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YOUNGEUN EMMA JUNG

P ORT F OL IO


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CV

I. WORKS T H E E C H O C R I T I C P H I L I P P A R K E R

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P R A T T G A U D

T H E F O R E S T

C R I T I C V I T O A C C O N C I P R A T T G A U D

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T H E F L O W C R I T I C S T E P H A N I E B A Y A R D T E A M J O S E A B R E U P AT R I C K G E H L I N G

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P R A T T G A U D

T H E F O L D C R I T I C M A R I A S I E I R A

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P R A T T G A U D

I N S I D E O U T

C R I T I C H E N T I E L O U W S C H O O L O F A P L

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I N W A R D H O U S E

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C R I T I C J A M E S S L A D E P R A T T G A U D

II.

PROFESSIONAL M A L I C A Z A A R C H I T E C T S , N E W Y O R K

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N E W Y O R K , U S A

I I I . E X P L O R AT I O N S T H E L I V A B L E C I T Y

C R I T I C A L E X A N D R A P R A T T G A U D

S U N K E N F O R E S T

BARKER

C R I T I C S I G N E N I E L S E N P R A T T G A U D

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176

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YOUNGEUN EMMA JUNG P H O N E E M A I L

917.932.5215 youngeun. jung31@gmail.com

E D U C AT I O N P R AT T I N S T I T U T E P R AT T G A U D

MASTERS IN ARCHITECTURE

05-2017 09-2014

NEW YORK, USA

ARCHIVED “ I N WA R D H O U S E ” CRITIC: JAMES SLADE “ T H E F L O W ” C R I T I C : S T E P H A N I E B AYA R D “ D E TA I L ” C R I T I C : S T E P H E N C H U P R AT T I N S T I T U T E G R A D U AT E A S S I S TA N T TO T H E D E A N G R A D U AT E T E A C H I N G A S S I S TA N T M AT E R I A L S A N D A S S E M B L Y

05-2017 09-2016

12-2016 09-2016

I N S T R U C TO R S : GABRIELLE BRAINARD, STEPHEN CHU FRANK LUPO, BEN MARTINSON

N A A B A C C R E D I TAT I O N A S S I S TA N T

05-2016 03-2015

P R O D U C T I O N FAC I L I T Y M A N AG E R

09-2015 10-2014

NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF APL

BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH HONORS ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES

10-2008 06-2011

NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE, UK

VOLUNTEER WORK L I G H T I N A F R I C A , TA N Z A N I A

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08-2009


EXPERIENCE CAZA ARCHITECTS

SKILLS 08-2016 05-2016

DESIGN INTERN

3 DS MA X A DOB E A FTEREFFECTS A DOB E IL L US TRATOR A DOB E INDES IG N A DOB E PH OTOS H O P A RC G IS AUTO CA D MA X WEL L RENDER MAYA MICRO S OFT WORD MICRO S OFT EX CEL MICRO S OFT POWERPO INT REVIT RH INOCERO S S KETCH UP Z PRINT

NEW YORK, USA

PROJECTS “MALI” DESIGN RESEARCH CONCEPTUAL DESIGN P R E S E N TAT I O N D R AW I N G S COLLAGE RENDERS

“ O Y S T E R TOW E R ” NEW YORK CITY CODE RESEARCH A N A L Y T I C A L D R AW I N G S

D AV I G N O N M A R T I N ARCHITECTURE + INTERIORS

D I G I TA L

06-2013 04-2012

JUNIOR A R C H I T E C T U R A L A S S I S TA N T

PRODUCTION 3 D PRINTING L A S ER CUTTING

C A L G A R Y, C A N A D A

ANALOG

PROJECTS

H A ND DRA FTING FREEH A ND S KETCH ING MODEL B UIL DING

“YU CLINIC” DESIGN RESEARCH CONCEPTUAL DESIGN CLIENT MEETINGS CONCEPT RENDERS FA B R I C AT I O N D R AW I N G S

AWA R D S A N D P U B L I C AT I O N S NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY

“RIVER HOUSE”

SCHOOL OF APL I N T E R N AT I O N A L STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP 2008

3D MODELING FA B R I C AT I O N D R AW I N G S

08-2010

SAMOO ARCHITECTS & ENGINEERS INTERN SEOUL, KOREA DESIGN RESEARCH CONCEPT DESIGN P R E S E N TAT I O N PA C K A G E

P R AT T I N S T I T U T E P R AT T G A U D INPROCESS 2017

P R AT T I N S T I T U T E P R AT T G A U D FIRST YEAR P O R T F O L I O AWA R D 2015

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I. WORKS


THE ECHO P R AT T G A U D

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SITE N 6TH STREET BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

PROGRAM FERRY TERMINAL

L OT S I Z E 16,000 SQFT

CRITIC P H I L I P PA R K E R

This ferry terminal is located on N 6th Street, Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The particularity of the site located near the water allowed the public and private spaces on the site to be defined by the relationship of the edge of land to the water. Various drawings were produced to understand the dynamic shifts occurring on the site. These drawings became an influential element in the design form, argued to capture the dynamic movement of the site.

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5TH S

TREET

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WAT E R - H A R D S U R FA C E The direction of the water current was encountered by the hard surface of a boat. As the boat generate opposite force from the water current, there is a disruption and the change in the direction of the water current.

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The opposing forces create a tug-of-war movement, where echo of movement occurs.

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PA U S E Moment of inception

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PUSH

INFLECTION PULL

A momentous incident was recognized when two opposing forces encounter. There is a momentary pause and the dynamic flow of water changes in direction.

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Network of surfaces were constructed from the line drawings. This is the embodiment of dynamic forces at the moment of inception.

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the Inception Line was introduced to suggest the ‘tug-of-war’ method. Spaces were excavated at points where the water line interferes with the surface.

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The sound frequency was used to define a spatial logic. There are intense and loose moments of sound which the former defined public space and the latter defined the private.

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The sound frequency sparks when water hits. The hollowness of the sound occurs when the water withdraws.

hit

withdraw

hit

withdraw

hit

withdraw

hit

withdraw

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FERRY P R I VAT E

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SEMI P R I VAT E


LAND SEMI PUBLIC

PUBLIC

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THE FOREST P R AT T G A U D

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SITE M OTO R G AT E G A R A G E , R O O S E V E LT I S L A N D , NEW YORK

PROGRAM INSTITUTIONAL BUILDING

L OT S I Z E 87,500 SQFT

CRITIC V I TO AC C O N C I

JURY JAMES WINES KRIS KIZAK M A R I A A I O L O VA MARIA SIEIRA

motorgate garage is located on the northern side of roosevelt island, and it is the first point of entry when coming to roosevelt island by a vehicle. The garage is directly adjacent to the roosevelt island bridge that connects roosevelt island from queens. the residence in roosevelt island uses the parking garage and albeit the run-down appearance from the outside, it is regularly used all year around by both residents and visitors to roosevelt island.

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THE LOVE SONG OF J. ALFRED PRUFROCK T. S . E L L I OT

Let us go then, you and I, When the evening is spread out against the sky Like a patient etherized upon a table; Let us go, through certain half-deserted streets, The muttering retreats Of restless nights in one-night cheap hotels And sawdust restaurants with oyster-shells: Streets that follow like a tedious argument Of insidious intent To lead you to an overwhelming question… Oh, do not ask, “What is it?” Let us go and make our visit. In the room the women come and go Talking of Michelangelo. The yellow fog that rubs its back upon the window-panes, The yellow smoke that rubs its muzzle on the window-panes Licked its tongue into the corners of the evening, Lingered upon the pools that stand in drains, Let fall upon its back the soot that falls from chimneys, Slipped by the terrace, made a sudden leap, And seeing that it was a soft October night, Curled once about the house, and fell asleep. And indeed there will be time For the yellow smoke that slides along the street, Rubbing its back upon the window-panes; There will be time, there will be time To prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet; There will be time to murder and create, And time for all the works and days of hands That lift and drop a question on your plate; Time for you and time for me, And time yet for a hundred indecisions, And for a hundred visions and revisions, Before the taking of a toast and tea. In the room the women come and go Talking of Michelangelo.

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THE LIBRARY OF BABEL JORGE LOUIS BORGES

The universe (which others call the Library) is composed of an indefinite and perhaps infinite number of hexagonal galleries, with vast air shafts between, surrounded by very low railings. From any of the hexagons one can see, interminably, the upper and lower floors. The distribution of the galleries is invariable. Twenty shelves, five long shelves per side, cover all the sides except two; their height, which is the distance from floor to ceiling, scarcely exceeds that of a normal bookcase. One of the free sides leads to a narrow hallway which opens onto another gallery, identical to the first and to all the rest. To the left and right of the hallway there are two very small closets. In the first, one may sleep standing up; in the other, satisfy one’s fecal necessities. Also through here passes a spiral stairway, which sinks abysmally and soars upwards to remote distances. In the hallway there is a mirror which faithfully duplicates all appearances. Men usually infer from this mirror that the Library is not infinite (if it were, why this illusory duplication?); I prefer to dream that its polished surfaces represent and promise the infinite ... Light is provided by some spherical fruit which bear the name of lamps. There are two, transversally placed, in each hexagon. The light they emit is insufficient, incessant. When it was proclaimed that the Library contained all books, the first impression was one of extravagant happiness. All men felt themselves to be the masters of an intact and secret treasure. There was no personal or world problem whose eloquent solution did not exist in some hexagon. The universe was justified, the universe suddenly usurped the unlimited dimensions of hope. At that time a great deal was said about the Vindications: books of apology and prophecy which vindicated for all time the acts of every man in the universe and retained prodigious arcana for his future. Thousands of the greedy abandoned their sweet native hexagons and rushed up the stairways, urged on by the vain intention of finding their Vindication. These pilgrims disputed in the narrow corridors, proferred dark curses, strangled each other on the divine stairways, flung the deceptive books into the air shafts, met their death cast down in a similar fashion by the inhabitants of remote regions. Others went mad ... The Vindications exist (I have seen two which refer to persons of the future, to persons who are perhaps not imaginary) but the searchers did not remember that the possibility of a man’s finding his Vindication, or some treacherous variation thereof, can be computed as zero. At that time it was also hoped that a clarification of humanity’s basic mysteries -- the origin of the Library and of time -- might be found. It is verisimilar that these grave mysteries could be explained in words: if the language of philosophers is not sufficient, the multiform Library will have produced the unprecedented language required, with its vocabularies and grammars. For four centuries now men have exhausted the hexagons ... There are official searchers, inquisitors. I have seen them in the performance of their function: they always arrive extremely tired from their journeys; they speak of a broken stairway which almost killed them; they talk with the librarian of galleries and stairs; sometimes they pick up the nearest volume and leaf through it, looking for infamous words. Obviously, no one expects to discover anything.

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Level 6 pick up the book & enter the park

enter on level 1

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read, write, think & contemplate

find the staircases and descend

vehicle parking flr 1 - 5

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THE FLOW P R AT T G A U D

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SITE VENICE

PROGRAM T H E AT R E

L OT S I Z E 30,000 SQFT

TEAM JOSE ABREU PAT R I C K G E H L I N G

CRITIC S T E P H A N I E B AYA R D AA 64

C O N S U LTA N T S SITE M E TA B R U N Z E M A M e t a B r u n z e m a A r c h i t e c t P. C . FAC A D E GABRIELLE BRAINARD Heintges MECHANICAL ROBERT KEARNS Buro Hpappold STRUCTURAL SARRAH KHAN Agency group

Comprehensive Architectural Practice in Design studio emphasizes the comprehensive nature of architectural design. Students as a team are required to design a building proposal from concept development through construction document phase. The design research was site specific with emphasis on climatic and u r b a n c o n d i t i o n s . F u r t h e r, a s p e c t s o f s u s t a i n a b i l i ty, s t r u c t u re , mechanical systems and building code regulations for specific project types were examined. The design of a performance theater situates in Venice, final vehicle access point in Venice. From the site, the visitors and commuters would travel via foot or water transportation. The design development strategy was to introduce the building as an entry platform to Venice with means of outdoor entertainment area including outdoor theatre and an outdoor market. By channeling the Northern wind to the design, the building took advantage of natural ventilation while maximizing solar gain from the expansive Southern-facing facade.

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possib le PAT H

CONCEPT 1: UP T h r o u g h G o o g l e m a p , t h e s t r e e t s o f Ve n i c e wa s ex p l o r e d i n t h e wo r m ’ s eye view. What was discovered was the friendly interaction between neighbors, the relationship between nature and architecture and the feeling of c o m p r e ss i o n a n d ex p a n s i o n a s t h e b a c k s t r e e t s o f Ve n i c e i n t r o d u c e d m o r e narrowing of the streets or the contrary.

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CONCEPT 2: TWISTED SECTIONS Ta k i n g s e r i e s o f s e c t i o n l i n e s t o c r e a t e a t h r e e - d i m e n s i o n a l m o d e l that demonstrates fluidity, transformity and duality of surfaces.

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PERFORM VENICE

A theatre space for local and international visitors; the site is l o c a t e d i n Ve n i c e , I t a ly, w h e r e i t i s a t t h e l a s t ve h i c l e a c c e ss p o i n t on the island. From our site, the visitors will walk or commute via means of water vehicles to the different parts of the city.

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A

B

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FLUID MOVEMENT

Inspired by the fluid movement the and energy observed by Richard Serra, the building invites the visitors and treats the space as a n e n t r y t o V e n i c e . I n a m e z o s c a l e , Pe r f o r m V e n i c e r e c a p t u r e s t h e ex p e r i e n c e o f Ve n i c e , t h e f l u i d f o r m o f t h e b u i l d i n g s u g g e s t s continuity and changing condition of the path discovered from the initial site research. The design of the building opens up the courtyard space for possibilities of engaging local residents and to use the space as an open market space during the summer months. This plaza creates a n o p p o r t u n i ty o f t h e a t r i c a l i n t e r a c t i o n s o f d a i ly l i f e i n Ve n i c e .

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AINABILITY STRATEGY

SICAL

G NATURAL VENTILATION IN THE MARKET AREA DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS TO REDUCE THE USE OF FOSSIL FUEL ABLE WINDOWS IN THE OFFICE SPACE TO ALLOW NATURAL VENTILATION TO OCCUR DURING THE SUMMER WATER IS PROPERLY COLLECTED TO BE USED FOR USE IN BATHROOMS AIMED BRICKS ARE USED ON THE GROUND FLOOR OF THE BUILDING TO PROMOTE THE REUSE OF EXCESS MATERIALS STRIAN WALK AND PAVEMENTS AROUND THE SITE USES LIGHT-COLOR RECLAIMED OPEN-JOINT BRICKS IN ORDER TO CT LIGHT DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS AND REDUCE URBAN HEAT EFFECT. TATION OF THE BUILDING IS ADJUSTED TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE NORTHERN WIND. THIS WILL ALLOW NATURAL O FLOW IN FROM THE OUTSIDE AND VENTILATE THE TALL LOBBY SPACE GHTING OF THE EXISTING CANAL ON SOUTH SIDE OF THE SITE TO CREATE BIODIVERSITY IN THE AREA AND FACILITATE BILITATION OF URBAN LAGOON ECOSYSTEM DESIGNED FOR STORM WATER TO FILTER THROUGH GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE IN ORDER TO STREAM CLEAN R BACK IN TO THE CANAL

• • • • • •

SOCIO-CULTURAL

USING LOCAL LABOR TO RECLAIM BRICKS AND PROMOTE LOCAL LABOR PART OF EXISTING CANAL WAS DAYLIGHTED ON THE SOUTH OF THE SITE FOR MODEL-BOATING AREA FOR CHILDREN DESIGNED A FOREST AREA FOR COOLER MICRO-CLIMATE AND TO ENGAGE WITH THE LOCAL NEIGHBORS VAST PORTION OF THE SITE WAS PAVED WITH RECLAIMED LIGHT-COLOR OPEN-JOINT BRICKS TO BE USED AS A OPEN THEATRE SPACE FOR THE VISITORS AND RESIDENTS PROJECTION SCREEN IS INSTALLED ON THE WEST FACADE OPEN MARKET AND SEATING AREA AS WELL AS STEPS ARE PROVIDED FOR EXTRA SEATING AROUND THE CANAL AND PROMOTE LOCAL LABOR AND CULTURE

GREEN SPACES

IN ORDER TO IMPROVE THE EXISTING CONDITION OF THE SITE, FOREST-LIKE SPACES WERE INTRODUCED WHERE DENSE GREENERY GENERATES MICROCLIMATE IN THE AREA

GREY WATER TREATMENT

LARGE PART OF THE SITE DESIGN WAS INTENDED TO MINIMIZE GREY WATER STREAMING FREELY TO THE CANAL. VARYING PLANTING STRATEGY WILL BE USED TO MINIMIZE THE RISK. THIS AREA WILL CONTAIN PLANT SPECIES SUCH AS CATTAILS, COMMON REED, WATER LILIES AND OTHER LAGOON PLANTS

DAYLIGHTING CANAL

THROUGH RESEARCH, RIO TERA WAS FOUND ON SITE (AN EXISITNG CANAL BELOW). THE CANAL WAS DETERMINED TO BE DAYLIGHTED TO INVITE LOCALS AND VISITORS FOR MODEL BOATING. DAYLIGHTING OF THE CANAL CREATES A MICRO-CLIMATE AND ENCOURAGES BIODIVERSITY

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SIDEWALK

RECLAIMED BRICKS AND RECYCLED LOCAL MATERIALS ARE USED IN DESIGN OF THE SIDEWALK ALONG THE CANAL IN ORDER TO IMPROVE THE EXISTING SITE CONDITION

OUTDOOR THEATER

OTHERWISE UNDERUSED PARKING LOT AT NIGHT TIME, THE VAST BUS TERMINAL CAN BE TRANSFORMED INTO A OUTDOOR THEATER AT NIGHT TIME FOR VISITORS AND LOCALS. THE SITE IS PAVED WITH RECLAIMED BRCKS AND GRASS

RECLAIMED BRICKS

LIGHT COLORED, RECLAIMED OPEN JOINT BRICK PAVER WAS DESIGNED TO REDUCE THE HEAT DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS AS WELL AS A WAY OF SOAKING THE WATER DOWN AND CHANNEL TO THE CANAL, FILTERING THE GREY WATER.

OUTDOOR MARKET

DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, THE BUILDING CAN BE OPENED TO THE COURTYARD FOR THE OUTDOOR MARKET. THIS WILL HELP TO PROMOTE LOCAL GOODS AND ENGAGE WITH THE LOCALS


S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y S T R AT E G Y PHYSICAL • • • • •

Using natural ventilation in the market area during the summer months to reduce the use of fossil-fuel Using the operable windows in the office space to allow natural ventilation to occur during the summer Grey water is properly collected to be used in bathrooms Reclaimed bricks are used on the ground floor of the building for the reuse of excess materials Pe d e s t r i a n w a l k a n d p a v e m e n t s a r o u n d t h e s i t e u s e s l i g h t - c o l o r , reclaimed open-joint bricks in order to reflect the light during the summer months and to reduce the urban heat effect Orientation of the building is adjusted to take advantage of the northern wind, this will allow natural air to flow in from the outside and ventilate the tall lobby space Daylighting of the exiting canal on the south side of the site to create a biodiversity in the area and to facilitate rehabilitation of the urban lagoon ecosystem Site designed for storm water to filter through green infrastructure in order to stream clean water back in to the canal

S O C I O - C U LT U R A L • • • •

• •

Using local labor to reclaim bricks and promote the local craftmenship Pa r t o f t h e e x i s t i n g c a n a l w a s d a y l i g h t e d o n t h e s o u t h o f t h e s i t e f o r model-boating area for the children Designed a forest area for cooler micro-climate and to engage with the neighbors Va s t p o r t i o n o f t h e s i t e wa s p a ve d w i t h r e c l a i m e d l i g h t - c o l o r e d , o p e n joint bricks that can be tranformed as an open theatre space for the visitors and residents Projection screen is installed on the west facade Open market and seating area as well as steps are provided for extra seating to serve the local labor and culture on the weekends

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SITE SECTIONS

S i t e S e c t i o n A - A1

Site Section B-B1 58


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E L E VAT I O N S

NORTH ELEVATION

North Elevation

ELEVATION 6 EAST 0


NORTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

South Elevation

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A2.1 1

A

B

1

A5

03 .1

01 A3.2

3'-0" A.F.F.

I

2

C

2 A2.1

3

J

4

5

K

6 D

L

S

E

A3

01 .1

M

N

F O

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 62

H

G P

Q

R

T


A

B

1 2 A5.1

A5

03 .1

01 A3.2

I

2

1 A5.2

C

3

J

4

5

K

6 D 2 A5.2

L 1 A1.01

S

E

A3

01 .1

M

N

F

H

G O

P

T

R

Q

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 63


A

B

1

01 A3.2

03 .1

I

A5

2

C

3

J SLOPE 12' PER FT.

4

5

K

6 D

L

North Elevation

E

A3

01 .1

M

N

F

THIRD FLOOR PLAN 64

H

G O

P

S

Q

R

T


A

B

1

01 A3.2

I A5

03 .1

2

C

3

J

4

5

K

6 D

L

S

E

A3

01 .1

M

N

F

H

G O

P

T

R

Q

FOURTH FLOOR PLAN 65


P R O G R A M / C I R C U L AT I O N

ELEVATOR CORE LOBBY BAR/CAFE OBSERVATION DECK

Emphasizing natural flow of visitors to the building as it was to be considered as a n e n t r a n c e t o Ve n i c e , t h e c i r c u l a t i o n i n the building was to connect the flow from entrances from either side of the building and proceeds to the floors above.

EGRESS STAIR OFFICES OUTDOOR PLAZA

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THEATRE EGRESS STAIR BACK OF HOUSE LOADING DOCK

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1

FACADE ELEVATION

3

Scale: 1/2" = 1'-0"

E

F

2

DETAIL PLAN

Scale: 1/2" = 1'-0"

S T R U C T U R E D E TA I L S

The building was constructed using concrete and steel construction method. Shear walls defining the theatre act as an anchor to the building was connected to steel members that allowed the lobby space and circulation space to seem more fluid and light.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

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Fiber glass insulation Steel stud framing Steel column beyond Glass Storefront window wall Concrete slab on deck Metal hangers GWB interior finish

9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

Steel beam with fire protection Tr a v e r t i n e p a n e l s Metal shelving Horizontal bracing Ve r t i c a l b r a c i n g Horizontal steel section Metal panels with insulation Wa t e r p r o f f m e m b r a n e

DETAIL SECTION Scale: 1/2" = 1'-0"


1 2

3 4

10 11 12 13 5 6

14 15 16 7 8 9

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FAÇ A D E

The design of the facade is to emphasize the fluid form. Therefore lean horizontal panels were installed to articulate the movement and bringing in translucency to the building that may seem deep and opaque. Through research the team has found that travertine can be cut to thin strips and each panel is set on a shelf and further held back to the main structure.

1. Cross Brace Member 2 . H o r i z o n t a l Tr u s s 3. Concrete floor on metal deck 4. Storefront window mullion 5. Sealant for thermal protection 6. Horizontal steel member 7. Stud wall with insulation 8 . Ve r t i c a l b r a c i n g m e m b e r 9. Horizontal bracing member 1 0 . Tr a v e r t i n e 11. Metal shelving

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1 2

3 4 5 6 7

10

8

11

9

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T H E AT E R : T H E A N C H O R

The theater is nested between the concrete shear walls on the west portion of the building. The massing of the theater is easily recognizable from the exterior of the building.

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NSVERSE SECTION

A. TRANSVERSE SECTION

6

74

5

4

3

2

1


T.O.D. 2ND FLOOR ELEV: + 19’ - 0”

STAGE

A 1

ELEV: + 3’ - 0”

GROUND

ELEV: + 0’ - 0” 2

2

1

N

TOP OF PARAPET ELEV: + 74 - 0” T.O.D. ROOF ELEV: + 64 - 0”

T.O.D. 4 TH FLOOR ELEV: + 48 - 0” T.O.D. 4 TH FLOOR ELEV: + 44’ - 0”

T.O.D. 3 RD FLOOR ELEV: + 32’ - 0”

T.O.D. 2 ND FLOOR ELEV: + 19’ - 0”

A2.1 1/8” = 1’

1

STAGE ELEV: + 3’ - 0” GROUND ELEV: + 0’ - 0” 2

2

1

N

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B. LONGITUDINAL SECTION

2 : LONGITUDINAL SECTION

I

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J

K

L

M

N


T.O.D. 2ND FLOOR ELEV: + 19’ - 0”

STAGE

1

ELEV: + 3’ - 0”

GROUND

ELEV: + 0’ - 0”

B

2

2

Q

R

TOP OF PARAPET ELEV: + 74 - 0” T.O.D. ROOF ELEV: + 64 - 0”

T.O.D. 4 TH FLOOR ELEV: + 48 - 0” T.O.D. 4 TH FLOOR ELEV: + 44’ - 0”

T.O.D. 3 RD FLOOR ELEV: + 32’ - 0”

A2.1

T.O.D. 2 ND FLOOR ELEV: + 19’ - 0”

1/8” = 1’

STAGE ELEV: + 3’ - 0” GROUND ELEV: + 0’ - 0” 1

P

2

1

N

2

1

O

1

N

S 5.2

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THE FOLD P R AT T G A U D

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SITE S W I L L I A M S T R E E T, NEW YORK

PROGRAM E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L

L OT S I Z E 60,000 SQFT

CRITIC MARIA SIEIRA

The elementary school is to be located in the financial district of the lower Manhattan. This area is busy during the day full of businessmen and tourists. The goal of the project was to construct a safe learning environment for the children that is welcoming and playful. the concept of Vertical playground was a way of finding the children’s realm in a dense metropolitan area. This project uses folding of surfaces to create multiple spatial conditions that in turn creates a cozy, intimate spaces for the children.

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The surfaces takes on a double identi ty; an adult’s city on one side, children’s city on the other.

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CHILDREN - FOOD - LIGHT

The first proposal came upon the study of food and light. This study lead to realization of child’s eating behavior; a child would not choose to eat in a sedentary position at a table by choice. The work of robert morris, ‘bodyspacemotionthings’ examines the interaction of a body in space and it was thought to be relevant to children’s behavior; squeezing one’s body in a niche and haphazardly walking down on a sloped surfaces.

84


85


86 BR O

AD

ST RE ET


WA I T I N G AREA

S T U D E N T GA L L E RY

SECURITY OFFICE

SOUTH

WILLIAM

STREET

87


FL 2 1 2 3 4

1

Children’s nook Classroom Office Conference

2

3

4

A

3

4

B

C

2 D

88

1


FL 3 1 Classrooms 2 Auditorium 3 Play area

1

2

3

4

A

1 B O P E N BE LO W

C

2 D

3

89


FL 4 1 Classrooms 2 Play area

1

A

2

3

4

2

1

B OPEN B ELOW

C

OPEN BELOW

1

D

2

90


FL 9 1 Outdoor play area 2 Nook / climbing wall

1

2

3

4

A

B

1

C OPE N BELO W

2

D

91


92


CROSS SECTION The folded tower

93


LONGITUDINAL SECTION The folded tower

94


95


T H E AT R E Children becomes playful in this area. There is a stage for the children’s theatre, where the audience can view the children play from the staircase and the seating area created as a result of the folded surfaces.

96


97


P L AY A R E A Fo l d e d s u r f a c e s c r e a t e s d y n a m i c s p a c e s , t h e r e a r e both intimate spaces and expansive play spaces for the children.

98


99


THE NOOK Children like to hide. Children like to hide from the adults. Children like to hide in the nook away from the eyes of the adults.

100


101


INSIDE OUT SCHOOL OF APL

102


SITE G AT E S H E A D , TYNE AND WEAR

PROGRAM MONTESSORI SCHOOL

L OT S I Z E

Located in Gateshead, North East of England, the area is highly saturated with poverty and the site was largely contaminated with industrial excess.

50,000 SQFT

CRITIC HENTIE LOUW

Montessori school was to be introduced to the site in order to raise the educational standards in the neighboring area and further to enhance the educational gap between the poorer district to more established district nearby.

103


104


105


106


A L D O VA N E Y C K Children’s home in Amsterdam

Inspired primarily by Aldo van Eyck’s writing, the Montessori primary school in Gateshead was thought to be a space that allowed a child to shift freely from one space to another. Further study of the traditional Korean architecture, Han-Oak enriched the materiality and hierarchy of spaces. ‘Since the interior street is an intermediary place, I wanted the child’s behavior and movement in it to remain as vigorous as they are outside. ... The child is inside here - the same outside child.’

107


A D U LT ’ S S P H E R E

G AT H E R E D U N I V E R S E

CHILD’S SPHERE

108


2 SPHERES

S PAC E D I V I S I O N S

A Child’s realm and adult’s realm.

G AT H E R I N G S PA C E M A I N C I R C U L AT I O N = C O U R T YA R D

Intimate outdoor gathering space for both adults and children.

HIERARCHY OF LEARNING

LOWER LEVEL

Group learning spaces UPPER LEVEL

Individual learning spaces.

109


Learning space overlooks onto the library and use of natural materials

110

Outdoor recreational area Inner-Outer quality


Courtyard space

Extension of nature Framing the view

111


A

B

112


Site section A

South Elevation B

113


AT M O S P H E R I C D R AW I N G S ‘endless pathway’

114


AT M O S P H E R I C D R AW I N G S ‘framing the view’

115


AT M O S P H E R I C D R AW I N G S ‘hierarchy of learning’

116


AT M O S P H E R I C D R AW I N G S ‘gathered universe’

117


CLASSROOM Children will exercises a floor-seating life style influenced by Maria Montessori’s teaching method.Children will play with Montessori materials and engage with the nature beyond the classroom.

118


8 9

7

1 6

2

5

4

FLOORPLAN

3

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Auditorium Classroom (3-6) Classroom (6-9) Classroom (9-11) Courtyard library Offices Bathrooms Upper library Upper deck

119


120


121


I N WA R D H O U S E P R AT T G A U D

122


SITE SHORE ROAD B AY R I D G E , NEW YORK

PROGRAM MIXED USE RESIDENTIAL

L OT S I Z E 130,000 SQFT

CRITIC JAMES SLADE

Inward house is a mixed use residential complex with the cancer research center and a community center. Studying the socio-political aspects of the site and the current life style trends, the research in housing involved c o - c o n s u m p t i o n , g i g - e c o n o my, f a r m - t o - t a b l e m ove m e n t a n d various amenity spaces. The proposed housing complex is part of the 10 year plan of Bayridge, Inward house aims to attract a single, working individuals to rejuvenate the current aging population of Bayridge. Inward house will implement co-comsumption to reduce energy use, The residents will share commodities vehicles to kitchen utensils. Further, Maggie center located in the building will help to engage the local population by promoting healthy lifestyle and grow awareness to undeniable percentage of cancer population in our lives.

123


124


125


126


127


mixed use high density housing program study

C O N N E C T I V I T Y - C O R E L AT I O N S H I P

Circulation/ C o n n e c t i o nhigh

density housing

Commercial Unit

High Density Housing

commercial unit circulation/ connection

alternating network connection

Alternating Network Connection

128

loop connection

Loop Connection

central connection

Central Connection


CONSUMPTION / CYCLE

PATH-WAY-FINDING

PATH-WAY-FINDING

Pa t h - W a y - F i n d i n g

PROGRAM / VISUAL PERMIABILITY

P r o g r a m - V i s u a l Pe r m e a b i l i t y

129


MAGGIE’S CENTER FOR CANCER RESEARCH

The main characteristics of Maggie’s center is the act of sharing stories about cancer around the kitchen table. In Maggie’s center, kitchen and dining room are shared areas where stories are shared between the patients as well as doctors and families of patients. This ‘dine-in’ support area helps to recognize cancer, promotes the frankness about cancer and allows patients to know that cancer matters to the society.

130


3rd ave

4th ave

101st street

sho

re

roa

d

131


Section

Cross

A - A’

Section

Unit B

Entry

Unit A

Unit

Unit A

Unit B

A - A’

Sleeping

Bathing

Unit A

Sleeping

Unit B

Wo r k i n g

Bathing

OFFICETEL Officetel is a housing type originated from Korea where the initial intent largely concerned the working individuals. These type of building typically consist of residential and commercial units, and it is designed to be partially self-contained buildings, such occupants can live and work in the same building to minimize the commute time. Officetel parcels are typically around 50 to 100 sqmt; basic furnishings are usually included with an officetel lease and often includes built-in furniture.

132


b

BATHE

t

i un

SL

it

un

a

BATHE

WO

EE

P

RK

P

EE

SL

RK

WO

WORK / SLEEP

In response to the growing concept of gig-economy, this project looks ahead to the future development of Bayridge area where spaces are dedicated for working individuals. The organization of the space within unit follows a notion that the i n h a b i t a n t s e i t h e r c h o o s e t o Wo r k o r S l e e p . Further, the corporate consumption is largely encouraged in recent years thus the kitchen area is omitted from the individual units.

133


Unit C

dn

dn

Level 3

Level 3

Wo r k i n g / B a t h i n g

Wo r k i n g / B a t h i n g

Unit A

Unit C

Level 2 Sleeping

Level 2 Sleeping

dn

dn

up

Unit B

Unit D

Level 2

Level 2

Sleeping

Sleeping

up

Unit A

Unit B

Level 1 Wo r k i n g / B a t h i n g

Level 1 Wo r k i n g / B a t h i n g up

134

Unit D

up


UNITS

Each unit There are Both type users can

is split into 2 different levels; a space for working or sleeping. 2 different units stacked and mirrored to make up a module. of modules are accessible on the unit’s lower level, where the choose to work or climb the stairs to the floor above to sleep.

135


Ty p i c a l

FL 2 3 4 Residential

UP

UP

136


Ty p i c a l

FL 5 6 7 Residential

UP

UP

137


138


VERTICAL LIVING

High percentage of single, working individuals maintain themselves by prepared meal or dining out. Thus incorporating shared kitchens will enhance the quality of life of working individuals where corporate consumption makes cooking more efficient and it also promotes a healthier lifestyle. Further the produce that will be used to prepare a meal can be obtained f r o m t h e Ve r t i c a l G a r d e n s . T h e ve r t i c a l g a r d e n s a l s o p r ov i d e a s o f t landscape within the building and the lushness of these green features will further promote positive and healthy lifestyle to the residents. In shared kitchens, residentss are able to communicate with their neighbors and exchange information in similar manner to Maggie’s Center for cancer research.

139


Residential Block Maggie’s Center A N ATO M Y O F T H E B U I L D I N G

The lower stack on the ground floor serves main circulation to the residential floors above. The ground floor houses Maggie’s Center where the visitors can come to dine and research about cancer.

140


Residential Block Maggie’s Center

VERTICAL GARDENS

The green blocks are used as a resting/meditation/living space for the residents. Highlighted below in green are the green walls where they grow produces for the residents.

141


WA L L S E C T I O N U P P E R F L O O R S

142

WA L L S E C T I O N L O W E R F L O O R S


I N T. M E D . F L O O R D E TA I L

O V E R H A N G D E TA I L

F O U N D AT I O N D E TA I L

143


a-a’

b-b’

S e c t i o n A - A’

144


a-a’

b-b’

Section B-B’

145


146


147


148


II. PROFESSIONAL

149


MALI CAZA ARCHITECTS

150


TYPE COMPETITION

PROGRAM CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY

TEAM CARLOS ARNAIZ LAURA DEL PINO VA L E N T I N A M E L O N I JUN DENG

The design for the new contemporary art wing in Lima exemplifies the expanding role of art institution in contemporary urban culture. MALI is today a museum, community center, educational platform and event space. The project embraces this programmatic diversity by imagining a form that establishes an explicit relationship with Lima’s architectural past. The design for the new MALI employs a playful twist on the modernist idea of repetition. Instead of the early industrial methods of molds and stamps, the entry offers an idea of formal iteration that aerates and folds MALI’s lace-like Palatial Italianate façade into a cluster of closely packed cylinders whose walls form a coiling arched structure. Like a spiraling Roman aqueduct, the walls tease out the potential of non-hierarchical space through radial symmetry. The design imagines the original Exposition palace with its 7-meter high peristyle hall of slender French castiron columns transformed into a flexible state-of-thea r t e x h i b i t i o n s p a c e . Pe r u ’ s 1 9 t h c e n t u r y E n l i g h t e n m e n t ambitions of progress as embodied in the structures of the 1872 Exposition are thereby venerated by a stripping down of architecture. We propose consolidating the exhibition spaces in the historic MALI building so that visitors can move from contemporary installation on the 1st floor to historic artifacts on the 2nd floor. The art experience is given a clear identity through its association with one seamless passage through the Exposition Palace.

151


Exposition palace

Pe e l i n g t h e o l d s k i n

Reappraise the face

Tu r n i n g i n t o a n e w

Marking a cluster

Creating the new MALI

2

152


3

4

6.00

5

6.00

6

6.00

7

6.00

8

6.00

9

6.00

10

6.00

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12

6.00

13

6.00

14

6.00

15

6.00

16

6.00

R0.5 0

0 R0.5

0 R0.5

2.50

2.50

R1.00

3.00

1.09

2.38

1.10

1.48

R0.50

R0.50

A

0

12.00

R1.0

15.00

6.00

6.00

0 R5.8

B

3.46

6.00 12.00

12.00

0 R1.0

6.00

R0.50

R0.50

R0.50

R1.00

12.00

12.00

4.37

R5.83

R1.00

R5.83

R5.83

R1.00

20

6.00

0

11.00

19

6.00

0

2.50

R0.50

3.00

6.00

1.50

144°

R1.0

12.00

6.00

R0.50

12.00

6.00 1.30

R5.8

R5.8

R5.8

6.00

1.73

18

6.00 12.00

0

0

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2.83

2.90

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6.00 R0.50

6.00

R2.8

0

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1.70

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3.31

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R5.8

6.00

21.78

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R15.0

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F

F 2.77 R0.50

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R5.61 R5.6 1

1

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R5.6

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R5.61

R5.61

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R5.6 R5.61

R5.8

90°

11.61

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9.00

2.56

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G 5.80

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8.78

0

R0.50

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R0.5 8.78

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H 24.00

18.00 R15.0

2

6.00

3

6.00

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6.00

5

6.00

6

6.00

7

6.00

8

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9

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6.00

13

6.00

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6.00

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6.00

16

6.00

17

6.00

18

6.00

19

20

Green roof slope

Module 1 Module 2

R o o f 3s t r u c t u r e Module

distribution

Module 4

Module 5 Module 6

Module 10

1

6.00

Module 7 Module 8 Module 9

Ty p i c a l Exposition bay

Module 10

Module 4

6.00

Module 11

Diameter 2.5m

Module 12

Ty p i c a l module

Module 5

6.00

0.39 8.78

8.78

Module 1

11.61

0.39

8.78

8.78

Module 2

90°

0.39

R0.5

0.45

11.61

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90°

5.60

8.78

11.80

H

Module 3

G

2.56

3.14

R1.00

0 R0.5

3.15 R1.00

R1.00

3.04

5.80

Module 11

1.47

2.80

1.53

1.54

6.27

R1.00

R14.

R0.50

R2.80

6.00

00

R2.80

1.47

6.00

R13.

6.00

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6.00

R12

R0.50

R0.50

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0

0

0

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6.00

R1.00

12.00

12.00 00

R2.8

R2.8

R2.8

R2.8

6.00

Module 7 Module 6

11.60 6.00

0

0 R0.5

0 R0.5

Module 8

3.00

2.33

6.38

R10.0

R11.

3.00

Module 9

R9.00

2.90

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R12.00

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12.00

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6.00

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C 2.86

4.36

R1.0

6.00

0.97

2.16

0

R1.0

2.30

4.79

3.00

0

C

Diameter 2.5m

Inspired by the arches from Exposition palace, the new building transforms the facade into a cluster of closely packed cylinders whose form a coiling arched structure

153


Green roof strategy to reduce heating during the summer Hot air entering

Refrigerant / water

Concrete core cooling

Light-well to enhance lighting in the basement

Adiabetic ventilation system and natural light strategy Perforated ventilation wells to allow natural ventilation

Cross ventilation through the ground floor space by passing the auditorium

154

Evaporation and cross ventilation strategy

Cool air exiting


9 AM: ART DELIVERY

9 AM: ART DELIVERY

Museum access 3

Back door service entry 3

Ticket/ Reception

Pa r k i n g a c c e ss

2

1 3

3

2

1

1 2

Subway access

Pa r k i n g a c c e ss

1 2

9 AM: ART DELIVERY

9 AM: ART DELIVERY 2

1

1

Ceremony Access

2

Pa r k i n g access 1

1 3

1

1

Access Northern classroom

3

Southern classroom

Spill-out space

155


Top of Canopy + 5. 50 m

Boom of Canopy + 4. 00 m

Ground level 0. 00 m

First Basement - 4. 00 m

Second Basement - 8. 00 m

Top of Canopy (Cafe) + 5. 50 m

Boom of Canopy (Cafe) + 4. 00 m

Top of Canopy + 5. 50 m Boom of Canopy + 4. 00 m

Ground level 0. 00 m

First Basement - 4. 00 m

Second Basement - 8. 00 m

156


157


158


159


160


161


162


163


164


I I I . E X P L O R AT I O N S

165


T H E L I VA B L E C I T Y P R AT T I N S T I T U T E

166


TO P I C CRITICAL GEOGRAPHY

TEAM JOSE ABREU T I A N Y U YA N G

CRITIC ALEXANDRA BARKER A L I H A N P O L AT

The premise of the study was to examine the current pattern of amenity distribution that would make Manhattan as the ideal place to live. Five features of the city were considered important to daily l i ve s o f N ew Yo r k e rs ; s u bway, s c h o o l , p a r k , g ro c e r y a n d hospital. These are places that are commonly used by people but some are accessed more frequently than others. Therefore the five features were given a score by answering the following questions: 1 . D o e s t h e f e a t u re s e r ve a l l p u b l i c ? [ Ye s / N o ] 2. How frequent is the feature served in a week? [1-7] 3 . D o e s t h e f e a t u re h ave t o b e c l o s e t o t h e u s e rs ? [ Ye s / N o ]

167


T H E L I VA B L E C I T Y

Ave r a g e s p e e d o f a p e r s o n wa l k i n g i s a b o u t 3 . 1 m l / h r. This means that (3.1mil/hr)x(1 hr/60s) = 0.05 mil/min. To m e a s u r e t h e i d e a l d i s t a n c e f o r t h e l i v a b l e c i t y p r o j e c t , we used 0.05 mil/hr as a guideline to draw the boundaries.

Guiding questions: 1 . D o e s t h e f e a t u re s e r ve a l l p u b l i c ? [ Ye s / N o ] 2. How frequent is the feature served in a week? [1-7] 3 . D o e s t h e f e a t u re h ave t o b e c l o s e t o t h e u s e rs ? [ Ye s / N o ]

Category

Total Score

1

2 12

S U B WAY

1

2

SCHOOL

3 9

1

2

PA R K

3

3

9

1

2

GROCERY

12

1

2

H O S P I TA L

3

3

8

B U I L D I N G F O OT P R I N T

1 min2 0.05 mil0

168

min .10 mil0

3 min4 .15 mil0

min .20 mil


S U B WAY S

SCHOOL

Subway map is the most dense along the middle of Manhattan and less on the edge towards the water. It is more dense on the southern part of the city than the northern part of Manhattan.

Lower Eastside and East Harlem is more populated with schools and it is less populated in Hells kitchen, Midtown, and East village. (Between 42th and 59th street)

169


T H E L I VA B L E C I T Y

The distance to hospital is 5 times greater as the frequency of the need is comparatively less. Therefore the average distance for hospital is determined as 0.25 mil/min.

PA R K

1 min2 0.25 mil0

1 70

min .50 mil0

3 min4 .75 mil1

min .0 mil

There are consistent parks that are large and small throughout Manhattan, however there are less park spaces available in Hells kitchen and Midtown.


GROCERY

H O S P I TA L

Grocery stores are easily found in Manhattan (size larger than 10,000sf) however it is most dense in lower Manhattan in Chinatown and Little Italy.

Hospitals are concentrated in Upper East Side, Medical city and Stuyvesant street.

171


T H E L I VA B L E C I T Y

Further study of the property taxation report showed that the property taxation have high price peaks near the water boundaries, even though there are less amenities available. A possible reason for this is the waterfront view, having a view towards the river might have a higher impact on the real estate value than having the amenities near by. Also the waterfront view would have more impact on the property value for residences than an office building. Ideally, there would be more features available along the water’s edge however waterfront may not be the most desirable place for retail owners as they would lose areas in their proximity radius when they are closer to the river.

172


The molding and vacuum form of the property taxation data

173


The 3d printed model of the amenities in Manhattan

1 74


Ultimately, the study of livable city is marginalized to middle-low income households, where the lifestyle generally requires access to amenities without personal vehicle access and the study was helpful in an overall understanding of housing price trends in Manhattan.

175


SUNKEN FOREST P R AT T I N S T I T U T E

1 76


TO P I C URBAN DESIGN AND PLANNING

CRITIC SIGNE NIELSEN

Hudson square is located on Sixth Avenue between Broome street and Spring street in Manhattan. The site was to be redesigned for its under-utilized state to be more welcoming and enjoyable for the residences and visitors. The premise of the site was to make this non-profit park to respond to manage the traffic, creating a pedestrian environment, an open spacd and green streets, and to create a neighborhood identity.

177


HUDSON SQUARE

SITE SOHO AREA

178


Due to the density of Soho are and its function as a shopping and entertainment quarter, there are very limited open space or green space within Soho boundary. Hudson square is at its very approximate boundary of Soho (marked by the satellite map) which could be utilized as a popular green space that could serve people from Soho for lunch time activities and resting space. The idea is to connect Hudson s q u a r e t o Tr u m p p l a z a a l l o w i n g f o r p e o p l e t o t r a v e l t o w a r d s H u d s o n s q u a r e f o r f o o d and entertainment, further expecting the surrounding retails to prosper.

179


SITE BACKGROUND

S TAT U E O F T H E L I B E R ATO R S J O S É G E R VA S I O A R T I G A S He is know as one of the major figure of Latine American countries. He is one of the six sculptures which overlook the Avenue of the Americas. Soho square, which the statue stands was one of several wedged shaped public plazas created when Sixth Avenue was extended South of Carmine Street in the 1920s. The street was renames Avenue of America in 1945 at the suggestion of Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia, to honor Pan-American ideals and principles.

180


C U R R E N T S TAT E

C u r re n t ly, t h e re a re b e n c h e s a m o n g t h e t re e s that does not seem to be in any particular order. This creates an uninviting space for lunch-time users during the week and weekends. There are no distinctive features to accommodate high school students nor workers from the Soho or Hudson square.

The idea behind the design of Hudson Square is an urban park. Since there are abundance of existing tress on site that are in a good condition, the design will maximize the use of existing greens and the concentrated lush of green will appeal the to the pedestrians entering the site on the Spring street entrance.

In accordance with the surrounding buildings and needs to provide a space for both high school students and near-by workers, The design proposal would include a raised platform on South end of the site, creating an infrastructure that would play the role of a mediator between the different user groups. This mediator wall will soften the atmosphere of the area and to also provide a shelter and a seating space.

181


PRECEDENT STUDY

VANKE CHONGQING XIJIU PLAZA ASPECT Studios Vanke, Xijiu Plaza is located at the centre of Shipingqiao retail hub. Vanke Group has the vision of developing Xijiu Plaza into a vibrant urban space for the younger generation to work, live and play. The plaza encourages engagement and activity between people within the community, those from different age groups with different interests, resulting in a dynamic, memorable and innovative urban space which is still distinctively Chongqing. I was interested in different type of seating where it is a continuous loop of seating area, allowing for people to sit along the steps, which reminded me of continuous loops of stoops in New York. This type of continous seating creates walkways or closed loop could define a center for an entertainment stage.

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PLACE LAZARE GOUJON In Situ Architectes Paysagistes The Lazare Goujon square redevelopment restores the unity of a generous pedestrian area. On either side, two planted rows set an intermediate scale between the two main buildings, thus creating a more intimate place. The idea of creating a central point of interest could be used to invite users to sit around while taking their lunch. This arrangement could be incorporated with large tree as a center point for Hudson Square.

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BIG IDEA 1 Connecting the Hudson Square to Soho: Using Spring street as the main entrance to the site, the main goal is to bring in the tourists and workers to the Hudson square. Since there are not many green spaces around the area, making an urban forest would attract people to Hudson square.

BIG IDEA 2 C o n n e c t i n g H u d s o n s q u a r e t o Tr u m p h o t e l p l a z a : Po t e n t i a l ly m a d e i n t o g re a t re s t a u ra n t s t r i p , t h i s a re a c o u l d a c t a s a c o n n e c t i n g w i n g t o Tr u m p h o t e l p l a z a , p r o v i d i n g r e s t a u r a n t s will spill-out spaces to the street and making the street more lively and safe to walk.

BIG IDEA 3 Creating division within the space: It is particularly difficult to mix the high school students with the businessmen who may be coming to Hudson square to have lunch. Instead of trying to assimilate the different groups of people, the design acknowledges the different user types and distinguishes two different spaces. Northern portion of the site is dedicated more towards the general working public and tourists while the Southern portion of the site is mainly dedicated to the high school students during weekdays.

BIG IDEA 4 Creating a node for Dominick Street: Jose Artigas monument will be moved to the newly paved little sixth street to interrupt the flow of the traffic, making a node to turn to Dominick street.

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SU RFAC E T REATM EN T TYPE 1

SU RFAC E T REATM EN T TYPE 2

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TREE NG S

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NICK DOMI EET STR

BROO

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SURFACE TREATM EN T TYPE 2

r ti g a s Jose A S ta tu e

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SU RFAC E T REATM EN T TYPE 2

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SPR

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NIC DOMI E STR

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Pe d e s t r i a n wa l k wa y re d e s i g n e d w i t h recycled brick to reduce surface heating and allow to act as a pervious pavement

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Using grassy softscape to integrate the pavement to the urban forest

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Row seating for users that are spontaneously surrounded by trees and lights

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‘Sunken forest’ seating area

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Raised platform using pervious pavement to reduce surface heating

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Citi-bike relocation

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Jose Artigas statue relocation

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Original pedestrian path kept as is

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Additional lighting added for night time activities`

Bike-friendly path is proposed as there seem to be disconnected bike path for Hudson square to the areas surrounding the site.

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Bike-friendly path

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There is an additional p e d e s t r i a n wa l k way, t h i s p a t h was created for residents to enjoy the site after hours and additional street lights were provided to promote safety. This pathway will be paved with reclaimed bricks for surface heating reduction during the summer months.

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Dominick street was decided to be closed off at the end of the street to allow for quieter path, potentially allowing restaurants that could spill out to the street.

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NICK DOMI EET STR

TREE NG S

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2016 Portfolio HR