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A Love That’s Labor COMMITMENT TO CRAFT CREATES THEATER MAJORS WHO PRODUCE


From the President. . . HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS are reviewed

periodically — generally every 10 years — by one of six regional accrediting bodies recognized by the U.S. Department of Education (professional schools and programs within a university are also subject to periodic accreditation review by their respective associations). For nearly four years, Drake University has been preparing for its 2008 reaccreditation by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) of the North Central Association of Schools and Colleges, which requires a rigorous self-study to demonstrate that the institution fulfills five criteria (if you’re interested, you can see the full set of accreditation requirements at www.ncahlc.org): • MISSION AND INTEGRITY: The organization operates with integrity to ensure the fulfillment of its mission through structures and processes that involve the board, administration, faculty, staff and students. • PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE: The organization’s allocation of resources and its processes for evaluation and planning demonstrate its capacity to fulfill its mission, improve the quality of its education and respond to future challenges and opportunities. • STUDENT LEARNING AND EFFECTIVE TEACHING: The organization provides evidence of student learning and teaching effectiveness that demonstrates it is fulfilling its educational mission.

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• ACQUISITION, DISCOVERY AND APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE:

The organization promotes a life of learning for its faculty, administration, staff and students by fostering and supporting inquiry, creativity, practice and social responsibility in ways consistent with its mission. • ENGAGEMENT AND SERVICE: As called for by its mission, the organization identifies its constituencies and serves them in ways both value.

personal lives, professional accomplishment, and responsible global citizenship” in Drake’s Mission Statement and to identify the specific ways in which Drake intentionally and systematically realizes the mandate of that mission. The Mission Explication project led to an extensive review of the Drake Curriculum and a significant reconfiguration of the sophomore year experience. We placed greater emphasis on ensuring that we had the objective data that we needed to manage the University effectively and to plan our future appropriately and created an Office of Institutional Research to meet that goal. We are in the process of developing and implementing a much more rigorous and systematic assessment of student learning outcomes — again, to ensure that we are keeping the promise of our mission and that we have useful ways of demonstrating that fact. There are many more examples of meaningful institutional change resulting from the self-study that are too numerous to mention here. The completed self-study will

As good as Drake University is today we know that no institution thrives by simply maintaining the status quo. From the very start, our approach in the self-study has been focused on the process itself as an opportunity for self-examination and reflection and as a catalyst for institutional change. As good as Drake University is today — and it is very good — we know that no institution thrives by simply maintaining the status quo. One of the most important things that we can do to maintain our edge and to fulfill our promise to our students is the rigorous self-examination made possible by the accreditation process. The fact that Drake will be reaccredited is hardly in doubt, but we asked ourselves what the process of preparing for reaccreditation could tell us that would be helpful in moving Drake forward, in pointing to areas in which we want to improve. As we answered that question, we identified and addressed some important issues. The development of the Drake University Mission Explication (available on Drake’s Web site) was a response to the need to explain — to ourselves and others — precisely what we mean by “meaningful

be available on the University’s Web site by the end of the year, and I hope that you will take the time to read it. It’s actually a very compelling story! And that has been one of the most important outcomes of this process — the chance to tell the story of Drake over the 10 years since the last accreditation review. It is the story of an institution that — through the efforts of hundreds of people and the support and encouragement of tens of thousands — is positioning itself as one of the country’s best, with even higher aspirations, a clear vision of our future and a plan to make that vision a reality. It has been exciting for us to create that narrative and even more exciting for all of us in the Drake family to be part of it.

Dr. David E. Maxwell, president

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The Magazine of Drake University


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contents

President

Features

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Dr. David E. Maxwell

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Director of Marketing & Communications Brooke A. Benschoter

CENTER STAGE

Drake steps into national spotlight as host of two presidential debates.

Director of Alumni & Parent Programs Barbara Dietrich Boose, JO’83, GR’90

EDITORIAL STAFF Editor Casey L. Gradischnig

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Art Director Courtney Hartman

BIG REWARDS IN SMALL PACKAGES

This kindergarten teacher approaches teaching and learning as a lifelong endeavor.

Graphic Designers Michael Her • Calee Himes

Writers/Copy Editors Abbie Hansen, JO’01 • Tim Schmitt

Contributors Lisa Lacher • Tory Thaemert Olson

Interns Amy Benes • Aaron Jaco, JO’07 Charley Magrew • Michelle Thilges

Publication Support

ANNUAL REPORT

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Achievements, events, and honors of 2006-2007.

Andrea McDonough • Jaquie Summers DRAKE’S MISSION is to provide an exceptional learning environment that prepares students for meaningful personal lives, professional accomplishments, and responsible global citizenship.

The Drake experience is distinguished by collaborative learning among students, faculty, and staff and by the integration of the liberal arts and sciences with professional preparation. To submit news or update your alumni file, contact Drake’s Office of Alumni and Parent Programs.

Departments CAMPUS

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Call: 1-800-44-DRAKE, x3152 E-mail: recordsinfo@drake.edu Surf: www.drake.edu/alumni Drake blue is published as a service to Drake alumni, parents and friends by the Drake University Office of Marketing and Communications. Views expressed in Drake blue do not necessarily reflect opinions of the editors or the University. We welcome articles by and story ideas from and about Drake alumni. Send correspondence to Editor Casey L. Gradischnig, Drake University, 2507 University Ave., Des Moines, IA 50311-4505. E-mail: casey.gradischnig@drake.edu.

FACULTY

Goldford Featured on “The Daily Show” DeAlba Presents Stalnaker Lecture Moberg Gallery Features Robert Craig’s Sculptres, Inside and Out Burney Appointed Associate Provost; Lenz as Interim Dean of College of Arts and Sciences

SPORTS

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Karnes Dies Winning Celebration Singing Golfer Bulldog Bests Sock it to Them Viva Vault Netting Honors Back to School

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Copyright Drake University 2007

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Drake Selected for National Phi Beta Kappa Program Two Drake Students Win Best Undergraduate Paper Scholars Visit Drake to Study Innovative Language Learning Historic Photos Get Digital Treatment Drake Thinks Green Drake Choirs Plan Regional Tour

ALUMNI

Nominate Accomplished Alumni Join a Reunion Committee Bulldog Finds Home in Knapp Center DU Celebrates Heroes

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campus buzz

DRAKE STUDENTS OFFER HEARTBURN SCREENING, RELIEF ON A STICK: Marie Marcelino and Sara Newton, both in their third year of Drake’s Doctor of Pharmacy program, conducted free heartburn screenings as part of Drake Day at the Iowa State Fair in August. Students also handed out free samples of Prilosec OTC for fair patrons who had already indulged in too many deep-fried treats.

DRAKE SELECTED FOR NATIONAL PHI BETA KAPPA PROGRAM The Phi Beta Kappa Society selected Drake University as one of 11 colleges and universities to participate in a series of events for teaching and learning deliberative skills through the discussion of major issues of meaning or value. The program, titled “Deliberation About Things That Matter,” emphasizes the first purpose of the society: To encourage the application of learning and scholarship in the examination of important topics. “I’m thrilled that Drake was chosen as one of a few universities across the nation to take part in this project because it shows confidence in Drake’s ability to connect groups across campus and thoughtfully explore the deliberation process,” said Lisa West, assistant professor of English and faculty adviser for Drake’s chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. Drake welcomed Morris P. Fiorina, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institute and the Wendt family professor of political science at Stanford University, to campus in September to present

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his views on the character of political conflict in contemporary America. Fiorina’s research focuses on legislative and electoral processes with particular emphasis on how political institutions and procedures facilitate or distort the representation of citizen preferences. “This is a fantastic opportunity for both teachers and students,” West said. “Drake has a strong interest in exploratory pedagogy in the liberal arts. We see liberal arts as linked to citizenship as well as learning. This program will help us to develop that connection.” TWO DRAKE STUDENTS WIN BEST UNDERGRADUATE PAPER Drake University students Skyler Nesheim and Luong “Louis” Hoang won an award for best undergraduate paper at the 40th annual Midwest Instruction and Computing Symposium, hosted by the University of North Dakota. Their paper, “Creating an Object-Oriented Network Simulator,” was honored for its innovation in creating a new software program to facilitate testing of ad hoc wireless network protocols.

the HOT list Nesheim, who recently graduated, and Hoang, a junior, collaborated as research assistants for Associate Professor of Computer Science Michael Rieck. Nesheim and Hoang developed the project by examining studies and dissertations from graduate students and gave a 30 minute presentation on their paper at the symposium. “The symposium conference was a big event,” said Hoang, an international student from Hanoi, Vietnam, who’s majoring in quantitative economics, mathematics and computer science. “It attracted many talented and professional persons in the field and it created a remarkable learning experience for sharing knowledge as well as the chance to network with our peers and leaders in the industry. Winning the best paper award acknowledged the effort we’ve put in and, of course, motivated us to maintain and improve our project in the future.”

The nation’s eyes were focused on Drake during ABC News’ two presidential debate broadcasts,

moderated by ABC’s George Stephanopoulos. Drake University fine arts faculty began the semester by showcasing musical and theatrical talents in “A Night of Stars,” a free concert sponsored by Friends of Drake Arts. The Anderson Gallery opened its fall season with “Selling the War: Posters of World War I,” an exhibition of 33 original propaganda posters on loan from the State Historical Society of Iowa. Nicholas Roth, assistant professor of piano at Drake University, performed “Robert Schumann: The Influence of Multiple Personality on the Prose Writings and Musical Compositions.” The fall series of Drake’s Let’s DU Lunch kicked

off with a speech by Keno Davis, head men’s basketball coach. Nicholas Kristof, a Pulitzer Prizewinning columnist for The New York Times, delivered the Martin Bucksbaum Distinguished Lecture. Drake University Theatre

SUMMER UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROGRAM SUCCESSFUL FOR STUDENTS AND MENTORS Though the 2007 Drake Undergraduate Science Collaborative Institute (DUSCI) Summer Undergraduate Research Program concluded in July when students presented their final projects, participating students have made it clear that their research will continue. “I am not surprised students are interested in continuing their research after the summer program ends, since their research project is not just another project — it becomes a part of them,” said Maria

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opened the fall season with Autobahn, a series of short plays by Neil LaBute. Martin Berger, associate professor of history of art and visual culture at the University of California, Santa Cruz, presented “Liberal Whites and the Politics of Black Civil Rights Photography” as part of the Drake University Writers and Critics Series. Lawrence Fish,

JO’66, chairman of the American unit of the Royal Bank of Scotland, spoke as part of the Executive in Residence series in Drake’s School of Management and Communication.

Bohorquez, associate professor and director of DUSCI. “The research project challenges them, and the reward is not a grade; it is the discovery of new knowledge.” continue to page 6

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Professional Progress STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION LEARN THAT PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IS MORE THAN JUST A CATCH PHRASE.

ADAM KADUCE, A JUNIOR business major, spent his summer coordinating promotions to celebrate the 80th anniversary of Fidelity Bank in West Des Moines, IA. He gained real-world experience in financial services and marketing while networking with professionals who he hopes will be his colleagues in just a couple of years. But this experience, Kaduce realized, would mean little if potential employers couldn’t understand how the internship helped him develop the professional skills they are seeking. During the first week of classes Kaduce stopped by the Career Services office on the second floor of Aliber Hall and enlisted the help of the center’s staff in updating his resume — just one of many services available to students in the newly opened office. A GENTLE NUDGE: Though these events provide plenty of opportunities

for students, the CBPA faculty and staff realize that students don’t always have the time to attend as often as they should. Recognizing this, the CBPA introduced a series of required courses that ensures students will participate in professional seminars, resume building, networking events, mock interviews and other activities that will help prepare them for the real world. “We recognize that students are busy,” says Annette Watson, career

The Magazine of Drake University

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Drake student Chris Collinsworth (right) meets with Northwestern Mutual representatives Dave Van Caster (left) and Nick Sales at a CBPA-sponsored career fair.

services center manager. “Requiring these things drives home the fact that they are important and have a purpose.” “I try to take advantage of as many of the opportunities as possible,” says Kaduce. “While I have many goals in college, the ultimate end game is to get that dream job. The CBPA has the same goal and that is one of the reasons I am so optimistic about my future.” THE PROFESSIONAL ADVANTAGE: From day one, CBPA students are

made aware that their future is in their own hands. In their first semester, students are given a personalized portfolio containing business tools to help them succeed. Filling the portfolio with professional accomplishments and experiences is the responsibility of each student, and it’s the goal of the Career Center to assist in those efforts. To this end, the CBPA launched Career Blueprint, a new database that allows students to access employment, internship and mentorship opportunities as well as links to potential employers and more than 4 million job listings. Additionally, the CBPA hosts two annual career fairs along with the University-wide career fair, mock interviews, and numerous professional lectures and networking events. — Tim Schmitt

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campus buzz continued from page 4 Participants in the program seek an adviser and submit an application and research proposal for the program that includes details on their topic and research project. The program is eight weeks long; every Friday students give an informal presentation on their research. “The student and mentor share the passion for the unknown, and they are thrilled when they find the answers to their problem. Trust and respect define the student-research mentor relationship,” Bohorquez said. “These students are being challenged to learn, produce and perform as graduate students.” SCHOLARS VISIT DRAKE TO STUDY INNOVATIVE LANGUAGE LEARNING Drake University hosted a five-day Network for Effective Language Learning conference for 32 educators from around the country who came to campus to

learn Russian as a means of understanding how the Drake University Language Acquisition Program (DULAP) is conducted. Jan Marston, director of DULAP and project director for NELL, said Russian was chosen as the language to learn because many participants had not studied it previously. “The teacher was encouraging and patient,” said Francis Rogers, a delegate from the Colleges of the Fenway in Boston. “He gave me tools to use that prior language classes [I’ve taken] didn’t have. I struggled, but I got through it. DULAP has encouraged me to read more history and literature.” NELL was established by the Council of Independent Colleges, with Drake as the “home base,” to assist small and midsize colleges and universities in transforming their language instruction to meet the needs of 21st-century students. The W.M. Keck Foundation has provided a grant of $360,000 to

admission update DRAKE RECOGNIZED FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE AND AFFORDABILITY: The Princeton Review recently named Drake University one of 161 Best Midwestern Colleges and featured Drake in the Best Colleges: Region by Region section of Princeton Review.com. In announcing the selections Princeton Review publisher and editorial director Robert Franek said, “We commend these institutions for their excellent academics and we believe our choices offer applicants and their parents in these regions a wide range of fine schools to consider applying to.” Additionally, the annual college rankings by U.S.News & World Report showed Drake advancing to fifth in the “Great Schools, Great Prices” categor y and improving its score for academic quality and overall score in the Midwest Master’s Universities categor y. Earlier this year, Drake was named a best value by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. “While validation of Drake is always appreciated, what is so wonderful about this Princeton Review ranking is that our students themselves have played a role in the listing,” said Tom Delahunt, vice president for admission and financial aid. “Without our student having a positive experience, this listing would not be possible.”

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STUDENT BAR ASSOCIATION NAMED BEST IN THE NATION: The Student Bar Association at Drake University Law School received the SBA of the Year Award from the American Bar Association/Law Student Division. SBA President Sean Bagniewski and ABA Law Student Division Representative Erin Lain, JO’06, accepted the top award at the ABA annual meeting in San Francisco. The trophy is on display in Opperman Hall.

the Council of Independent Colleges to implement NELL in cooperation with Drake. Using Internet-based resources and tools, DULAP students connect with real-life native speakers and writers while learning to use target-language materials that have been written by and for native speakers. “The conference was fabulous,” Marston said. “The week was so much richer than I had imagined. It brought together so many ideas.” HISTORIC PHOTOS GET DIGITAL TREATMENT More than 200 historic photographs of Des Moines held by the Special Collections Department of Drake University’s Cowles Library are now available online, offering Web surfers an in-depth, visual look at the history of Iowa’s capital city. “We started with images that didn’t have addresses or much information to accompany them and created a well-documented collection that isn’t just a series

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of pictures, it’s a working history of Des Moines,” said Bart Schmidt, digital projects librarian at Cowles Library. Photos in the collection were taken at various locations in Des Moines between 1904 and 1914. Each image is accompanied by a written history of its subject. In addition, viewers can use a map link to see where photographed buildings are, or were, located in Des Moines. If a building still exists, modern-day images of it are available. Accompanying the collection is an article by local historian and 1983 Drake graduate John Zeller titled “From the Real to the Ideal: Images of Des Moines in the Progressive Era.” Cowles Library also hosts digital collections that include images of the Drake Relays and legendary Drake football player Johnny Bright along with thousands of editorial cartoons by Ding Darling, the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Des Moines Register cartoonist. The collections are available at www.lib.drake.edu/heritage.

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The Magazine of Drake University


DRAKE THINKS GREEN With global warming taking center stage these days, Drake University is taking tangible steps to make protection of the environment a priority. President David Maxwell has joined approximately 300 college presidents and chancellors nationwide in pledging to take steps to make their campuses “climate neutral” to help combat global warming. “I am very pleased for Drake that we were invited to be a charter signatory to the Presidents’ Climate Commitment,” said Maxwell. “The University’s mission statement emphasizes responsible global citizenship, and our participation in this compact is an important way of collectively realizing that responsibility as an institution.” Additionally, the Drake Law School hosted a symposium in partnership with the Association of Patent Law Firms that convened internationally renowned scholars and experts on the topic of renewable energy and alternative fuels. The symposium, titled “Intellectual Property, Regulatory, Business, Academic and Government Perspectives of Alternative Energy Fuels,” was held at the Neal and Bea Smith Law Center in May. Drake also premiered its Buy Fresh Buy Local booth at the Downtown Farmers’ Market in Des Moines, where volunteers offered market patrons a free directory of farms and businesses selling local foods. Visitors also pledged to support local farmers and food businesses and purchased T-shirts and hats sporting the Buy Fresh Buy Local logo. In its first two weeks at the market the group received more than 400 pledges from citizens who agreed to purchase at least 5 percent of their weekly groceries

The Magazine of Drake University

from local producers throughout the summer. CBPA STUDENTS WIN KRAUSE CHALLENGE INVESTMENT CONTEST Kum & Go, one of the nation’s leading convenience store chains, has announced that Drake University is the winner of the 2007 Krause Challenge investment competition. Drake students earned a 25.53 percent return on investments, with their portfolio growing from $193,942.43 to $243,455.95. The increase was nearly 6 percent more than that achieved by students from the secondplace University of Iowa team. “It is inspiring to see the collegiate spirit and competition between our state schools transcending from the athletic fields to the finance classrooms,” said Kyle J. Krause, president and CEO of Kum & Go. “We are honored that the students take such pride in their investments. These students will become great assets to the Iowa workforce.” Drake’s growth represents a dramatic increase over last year’s performance, when Drake finished in third place with a 9.1 percent return.

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“The Krause Challenge has given our Finance 190 students the opportunity to invest real money and experience the competitive environment of the financial world,” said John Rozycki, associate professor of finance at Drake. “You just cannot get these kinds of experiences from a textbook.” CONSTRUCTION ON DRAKE WEST VILLAGE CONTINUES Construction on Drake West Village at 30th Street and Carpenter Avenue is continuing at an astonishing pace. As the structure and form of the buildings become obvious, the concept of the complex is becoming more apparent as well. The $37 million mixed-use housing and retail complex will provide a village atmosphere where students can live, work, study and socialize, while the campus community and its neighbors can patronize the new businesses in The Shops at Drake West Village. The development consists of three buildings totaling 226,000 square feet that will provide housing for up to 500 students, primarily juniors and seniors as well as graduate students in the

pharmacy program and Drake Law School. The students will live on the upper floors and new neighborhood businesses will occupy five street-level retail suites totaling 9,159 square feet. Hubbell Realty is seeking retail partners for the project that will appeal both to students and to residents of the surrounding neighborhoods. DRAKE CHOIRS PLAN REGIONAL TOUR The Drake Choir and Chamber Choir will perform evening concerts in Mason City, IA, tentatively on Wednesday, March 12, 2008, and in the Twin Cities on Friday, March 14. The performances will feature a variety of music and will be free and open to the public. The Drake Choir, a select ensemble of 54 students, tours regionally on an annual basis and internationally every four years. The Chamber Choir consists of 20 singers chosen from the Drake Choir and presents numerous on and off-campus events each year. The vocal ensembles will tour Austria and Italy in 2008, so those who hear them perform in the coming year will catch these outstanding performers at the top of their game.

DRAKE STUDENTS JUMP-START SCHOOL YEAR WITH COMMUNITY SERVICE: More than 100 first-year Drake University students spent the Saturday before their first week of classes working in the Drake neighborhood. The students kept busy picking up litter, weeding gardens, assembling back-to-school packages for inner-city children and compiling “literacy packets” for children that included pencils, notebooks and pens donated by local businesses. The students then joined community activists the following day for the third annual Back to School Bash at the John R. Grubb YMCA in Des Moines.

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Center Stage Drake students played an essential role in the staging of two presidential debates in Sheslow Auditorium that were viewed live by millions of voters across the country on ABC’s “This Week with George Stephanopoulos.” Approximately 60 students volunteered to help ABC News with the Republican debate on Aug. 5 and the Democratic debate on Aug. 19. They performed myriad tasks, assisting with production and public relations as well as standing in for candidates during long rehearsals and supporting candidates and press in the postdebate spin room.

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DRAKE STEPS INTO NATIONAL SPOTLIGHT AS HOST OF TWO PRESIDENTIAL DEBATES

“I was not just getting coffee and sitting around. I was actually a part of the production process and had very important jobs,” said Emily Brady, a sophomore radio and TV journalism major. Erin Lain, AS’06, a secondyear law student, found the experience to be a one-of-a-kind opportunity. “When I think back on my career at Drake, volunteering for ABC will most definitely be one of the highlights,” she said. “I learned so much about [the] political process and got a glimpse into the machinery of major American media.” ABC producers were equally as

pleased with the students’ contributions to making the debates run smoothly. “We were so impressed with the caliber of the Drake student volunteers who worked with us,” said Kathy O’Hearn, executive producer of “This Week with George Stephanopoulos” and executive producer of ABC News’ Iowa Debates. “Each one of these knowledgeable, courteous, students went the extra mile whenever and wherever they could. They helped make our debates a smashing success.” Drake President David Maxwell met with each of the

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candidates before the debates and personally welcomed them to the Drake campus. Both events, he said, were tremendous successes for the University. “The debates introduce our students to a public role in which they should take an interest,” he said. “Some students have actually told me that this is why they chose to come to Drake — so they could be part of this process during an election year. It’s a singular opportunity that most students and most universities never get to be a part of.”

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Sheslow Auditorium (above left and above right) served as the location of nationally televised debates among candidates from both the Democratic and Republican parties in August. President David Maxwell and Madeleine Maxwell met with reporters and candidates in the post-debate spin room located in the Harmon Fine Arts Center (above, center). Drake students worked as stand-ins for the candidates during the debates (above), front row: Eric Michel, Zac Brown, ABC’s George Stephanopoulos, Jamie Dorrell and Erin Lain. Back row: Brian Lundeen, Brian Harrington, Mark Stevens, Eric Gudmundson and Will Wemer. Supporters of candidates and causes gathered in force throughout the Drake neighborhood (left) during the debates.

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faculty focus GOLDFORD FEATURED ON “THE DAILY SHOW” Dennis Goldford, professor of politics at Drake University, was interviewed by CBS News before and after the Iowa Straw Poll in Ames in August, and then was featured on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.” The interview with Goldford shown on “The Daily Show” was used to explain the workings of the Straw Poll, which had reduced attendance this year and was bypassed by leading candidates Rudy Giuliani and John McCain. “I was pleased with how the interview went at the time but never expected to see it on Comedy Central,” Goldford said. “Jon Stewart wasn’t making fun of me, but seeing my picture frozen next to him while he was making a joke was a little unsettling. It was nice to get an e-mail from one of the students I advise, saying she thought it was ‘cool’ that her adviser was on “The Daily Show.” Goldford did dozens of interviews with national news media in August because of the presidential debates at Drake on Aug. 5 and Aug. 19. “It’s always fun,” he said. “After the debates, we’ll fall off the face of the earth until the news media return to Iowa to cover the presidential campaign this fall.” DEALBA PRESENTS STALNAKER LECTURE Luz Maria DeAlba, professor of mathematics and computer science, gave the annual Luther W. Stalnaker Lecture in September. Her lecture, titled “Combinatorial Matrix Theory: Origins and Applications,” explored how the concepts of determinant and matrix evolved from the 16th century to today. DeAlba also gave brief accounts of the background and work

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of prominent mathematicians whose work on these two concepts eventually led to Matrix Theory. DeAlba joined the Drake Mathematics and Computer Science Department in 1984 and served as department chair from 1997–99. While at Drake, she has taught a variety of mathematics and computer science courses, and contributes to her profession through articles, book chapters, technology manuals and solutions to problems. DeAlba was awarded a Windsor Professorship in 2001. Her principal research focuses on the mathematics subject area of Combinatorial Matrix Theory, from which she derived the topic for this lecture. MOBERG GALLERY FEATURES ROBERT CRAIG’S SCULPTURES, INSIDE AND OUT A recent exhibit at the Moberg Gallery in Des Moines featured several works by Robert Craig, associate professor of art and chair of the Department of Art and Design at Drake University. The exhibit, which showcased works by Craig and seven other prominent artists, included Craig’s “Daredevil,” a 7.5-foot tall painted steel sculpture on a concrete foundation just outside the front door of the gallery. Craig said “Daredevil” and “Manila,” a large-scale sculpture installed inside the gallery, are the “most recent pieces in a series of five sculptures that derive their form through the consideration of utilitarian objects. The scale of ‘Daredevil’ and ‘Manila’ was designed for both interior or exterior display.” The exhibit also includes two of his interior sculptures: “Prairie View” and “Untitled.” Craig has been creating sculpture for more than 20 years. He recently completed an

outdoor site-inspired work commissioned by the city of Cedar Falls, IA, for its Main Street Parkade Project. BURNEY APPOINTED ASSOCIATE PROVOST; LENZ AS INTERIM DEAN OF COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES John Burney, former dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, was recently appointed to the new position of associate provost for curriculum, faculty development and assessment. Burney began his new post in the summer. “John Burney has performed exceptionally the past four years as dean of the College of Arts and Sciences,” Provost Ron Troyer said. “He will now take

on an assignment that is critical for the University's future and I know that he will excel in his new position.” As a result, Joe Lenz, professor of English and chair of the English Department at Drake, has been named interim dean of Drake’s College of Arts and Sciences, effective Aug. 1. “Joe Lenz’s stellar work as chair of the English Department and in a variety of other assignments means that he has earned the strong respect of the College of Arts and Sciences faculty,” Troyer said. “I am confident that he will be an outstanding interim dean and look forward to working with him.”

FOUR MEMBERS OF THE DRAKE UNIVERSITY community were

honored recently during the Fall Faculty and Staff Convocation ceremony. Dee Wright (left), director of the University Counseling Center, was presented with the Madelyn M. Levitt Award for Distinguished Community Service. Hans Hanson (second from left), director of Campus Security Services, and Gloria Lawless (far right), a program assistant in the Student Life Center, were presented with Madelyn M. Levitt Awards for Employee Excellence. Additionally, Ericca Pollack (third from left), director of Residence Life, received a special award to recognize her exceptional planning and service as Drake prepared for its largest entering class since 1981.

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A Global Perspective NEW PROFESSOR BRINGS INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE AND BASKETBALL METAPHORS TO DRAKE LAW SCHOOL WHEN PETER YU’S PASSIONS COME TOGETHER,, it’s not always a good thing. For instance, when he plays basketball with his friends and colleagues — all lawyers — the result is not always positive. But as the founding director of the Drake Law School Intellectual Property Law Center, Yu is combining his passion for teaching with his interest in intellectual property law in a way that benefits not only himself, but also Drake University and the burgeoning field of IP law as a whole. The Intellectual Property Law Center was formed to promote a global, interdisciplinary understanding of intellectual property law and policy. It was established with a $1.5 million gift from Wayne, LW’72, and Donna Kern, which endowed the Kern family chair in Intellectual Property Law, and a $750,000 leadership commitment from Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., a subsidiary of DuPont. A WORLD VIEW: Yu comes to Drake from Michigan State University, where

he founded the university’s Intellectual Property & Communications Law Program. He earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Wisconsin and his JD from Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law at Yeshiva University in New York City. Born and raised in Hong Kong and having lectured in 15 countries and published books and articles in several languages, Yu truly brings international experience and perspective to the IP Law center — an important consideration given the global consequences of this area of law. A DIFFERENT SET OF RULES: Though his basketball playing has been curtailed

due to an ankle injury, Yu still manages to incorporate his love for the game into his professional life. He recently wrote an article explaining how basketball can help teach lessons on intellectual property and international trade. “That could be a career killer,” he jokes. But the comparison is valid. International basketball is different from the American version of the sport, and how the U.S. fares in competitions such as the Olympics depends upon how the teams interpret and adjust to those rules. When discussing global markets, Yu explains, the same is thing is true: Success depends on the ability to adjust and adapt to a different set of rules. That kind of thinking hasn’t killed his career but has made his addition to Drake a slam dunk. “I can’t wait to see what we do in the next few years,” he says. — Jane Burns, JO’83

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sports sideline KARNES DIES Former Drake athletic director Bob Karnes, GR’67, died of cancer in July at the age of 81. Karnes served as head track and field coach, athletic director and Drake Relays director. The Overbrook, KS, native served as Drake’s athletic director from 1968 until his retirement Aug. 31, 1986. He was president of both the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics and the NCAA Cross County Coaches Association. He was inducted into the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics Hall of Fame in 1987. Karnes also was a member of the U.S. Olympic Committee and the NCAA Track and Field Rules Committee. He was named to the Iowa Track Coaches Hall of Fame in 1985. Karnes was named head track and field coach, cross country coach and director of the Drake Relays on July 31, 1955, succeeding Tom Deckard. Karnes’ teams won 15 Missouri Valley Conference titles, more than any other Drake coach in any sport. Under Karnes, Drake won eight Missouri Valley Conference

mens’ cross country titles (1958, 1960, 1962–64, 1966–68), five MVC men’s outdoor track and field crowns (1963–65, 1968–69) and two MVC men’s indoor track and field crowns (1968–1969). During Karnes’ tenure, Drake hosted the NCAA Track and Field Championships (1970), the National High School AllAmerican Track and Field Championship meet (1972) and the NCAA Western Regional Wrestling tournament (1974). The Drake men’s basketball team played in three straight NCAA Tournaments, finishing third in the 1969 NCAA Final Four. Karnes initiated the Bulldog Club to provide financial assistance for Drake’s student-athletes, completed major renovations in both the Drake Fieldhouse and Drake Stadium and merged the Drake men’s and women’s athletic departments. Karnes was one of the top distance runners at the University of Kansas. He won more Big Eight Conference track titles (13) than any man in the school’s history and was captain of five teams. Karnes was a two-time NCAA All-American in track and field

THE 1957 SUN BOWL FOOTBALL TEAM was honored during Homecoming weekend. Under Coach Warren Gaer the team generated fervor with its 7-2 record, including a 20-0 victory over Iowa State University in Drake Stadium. The team won the Missouri Valley Conference title that year and went on to play in the Sun Bowl in El Paso, TX, on New Year’s Day 1958. Though the Bulldogs lost that game, they are still remembered for their tenacity and skill.

and his 13 league crowns topped the records of the legendary Glenn Cunnignham, Jim Ryun and Wes Santee. He also was a two-time winner of the Henry Schulte Trophy as the Big Eight Conference Outstanding Track and Field athlete. Karnes graduated from Kansas with a bachelor’s degree in 1950 and Drake with a master’s of science degree in 1967. After service in the U.S. Navy during World War II from 1943–46, he joined the naval reserve and retired as a Captain.

DU CELEBRATES HEROES During Homecoming weekend, Drake University honored Paul F. Morrison’s 90th birthday and paid tribute to the 1957 Sun Bowl Team (above). Morrison came to Drake as a student in 1935, worked for the campus newspaper The Times Delphic , as editor of the yearbook and later in the University’s news bureau until graduation. Soon after, he was drafted into the Army. In 1945 he came home to Drake, returning to the news bureau as fulltime director. He’s been at the University ever since. Though he retired in 1986, he continues to volunteer for the athletics department. (Left) Drake Athletic Director Sandy Hatfield Clubb awards Paul Morrision, JO’30, a blue Drake jacket in during the campus birthday celebration.

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Karnes is the second former Drake Relays director to die this year. His successor, Bob Ehrhart, passed away in January. WINNING CELEBRATION Members of the Drake men’s basketball team were rewarded for going undefeated on a fourgame tour of the Bahamas by spending a day on a catamaran and snorkeling in the crystal blue waters of the Atlantic Ocean. Talk among the 11 players centered around how their weeklong stay will pay dividends for the future. “This experience will definitely help us prepare for the upcoming season,” said guard Leonard Houston, who is one of three seniors on the team. “We’ve spent the past week together all the time, bonding. This trip will help improve team chemistry and the rapport of the team.” The catamaran, named Sea Horse, took the team five miles west of Paradise Island before docking, allowing players one hour to snorkel off the coral reef. The captain pointed out homes where celebrities live, including a private island owned by comedian-actor Eddie Murphy.

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champions “This was a nice way to cap off the trip,” said Josh Young. “It was interesting. You see a different world. It was a lot of fun. I was pretty anxious and am pleased at how things went.” The Bulldogs won all four games on the trip by a combined average of 34.3 points against the same teams that the University of New Mexico posted a 3-1 record against on a recent tour. SINGING GOLFER In September, pro golfer, Master’s champion and former Drake standout Zach Johnson, BN’98, took on his toughest challenge yet — singing “Take Me Out To The Ball Game” at Wrigley Field, home to the Chicago Cubs. Before the event he said, “I’m going to be swinging the microphone, I think. They’re not going to want to listen to my voice.” BULLDOG BESTS The Drake softball team swept its way to the championship in the Bulldog Classic in September as part of the team’s fall season. Freshman Erin Bly drove in three runs with a double and a two-run homer to lead Drake. SOCK IT TO THEM The surging Drake men’s soccer team earned regional props in mid-September, when the NSCAA/Adidas Midwest Region poll ranked the Bulldogs No. 6, ahead of Missouri Valley Conference rival Creighton, who clocked in at No. 7. The Bulldogs upset No. 20 Wisconsin 3-1 to win the Panther Invitational. VIVA VAULT Trevor Richards, a volunteer coach for the Drake men’s and women’s track and field program, won the pole vault at the World Masters Track and Field

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Championships. Richards soared 15 feet 1 inch to win the gold medal in the masters’ 40 age division. Fulvio Andreini of Italy was second at 14-9. NETTING HONORS Six former Drake standouts were named to the All-Time Missouri Valley Conference Men’s and Women’s Tennis Teams in July. In addition, Jeff Vaage (1986–99) was among nine coaches honored as MVC AllCentennial Coaches. Under Vaage, Drake won seven Missouri Valley Conference women’s tennis crowns (1989–93, 1996, 1999), including five consecutive titles from 1989 through 1993. Earning recognition for the Bulldogs were Robert Novotny (1993–97), Ross Nwachukwu (1990–94) and Sergi Vila (2003–07) on the men’s side, while Nikki Uelze (1992–95), Tisa Vial (1985–88) and Vera Vitels (1989–92) represented Drake women’s tennis. BACK TO SCHOOL Intense games of four square, basketball and monkey bar acrobatics highlighted the afternoon recess at Des Moines’ Moulton Elementary third grade in September. Six Drake women’s basketball players and 36 elementary school students had fun “hanging out” in the classroom and outside during recess. The event was a reward for Miss Hughes’ third grade class for good behavior during Drake senior Jill Martin’s eight-week student teaching experience. Martin was accompanied by teammates Brandy Dahir, Lindsay Whorton, Jordann Plummer, Ashleigh Brady and men’s basketball player Josh Young.

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Tackling Lessons EDUCATION MAJOR DEVELOPS CURRICULUM THAT INCORPORATES FOOTBALL AND WELLNESS INTO EVERYDAY LIVING.

When most football players take to the turf at Drake Stadium, they’re thinking of the matter at hand — putting a righteous pounding on the Bulldogs’ hapless opponent of the moment. But when senior Shea Moroni leads his team on the field he’s thinking about homework. Moroni, a star receiver from Glen Ellyn, IL, finished his athletic eligibility for the Bulldogs at the end of the 2006 season. No longer able to wear a jersey, but unable to tear himself away from the field, the education major decided to bring the classroom to the stadium. Moroni is spearheading a partnership among Drake Athletics, the Drake School of Education and Des Moines Public Schools that will provide enhanced, hands-on learning opportunities for elementary school students, education majors and student-athletes alike. The pilot program began this fall. Moroni, along with football players and students and faculty in the School of Education, developed a curriculum for elementary students that incorporates football and other wellness ideas into everyday learning. One of the first lessons was bringing classes to Drake Stadium for a visit. “We might look at the yard markers at the 10-yard line and say, ‘OK, how many feet is it to the goal line?’ It’s another way to apply the lessons they’re already learning in the classroom,” Moroni says. Drake Athletic Director Sandy Hatfield Clubb provided inspiration for Moroni’s project. When she arrived at Drake in 2006, she challenged coaches and student-athletes to come up with new ways to connect with and serve the Des Moines-area community. Drake’s men’s and women’s basketball programs have long had a reading tutor program for area schools. Moroni wanted to make sure the 120 or so men on the football squad were reaching out to the community as well. What came of Moroni’s effort is a project-based series of lessons that integrates the theme of football into regular coursework. “What we’ve been able to do is create something that really serves students,” says Laurel Prior-Sweet, GR’98, principal of Phillips Traditional School. “It’s an amazing amount of teamwork between a lot of different groups with a common goal.” Really, Moroni says, the only difference between football and this project is that “everybody wins: the kids, the Drake students, the football team, everybody.” — Daniel P. Finney, JO’97

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(From left) Directing major Wen Feng Jasmin Teo; journalism major Nicholas Toussaint; musical theater major Sierra White; theater design major Matthew Avery; and musical theater major Rebecca Gebhart.

A Love


That’s Labor BY DANIEL P. FINNEY, JO’97

COMMITMENT TO CRAFT CREATES THEATER MAJORS WHO PRODUCE


IT’S JUST PAST NINE O’CLOCK ON A MUGGY NIGHT IN MID-SEPTEMBER. THE STREETLIGHTS GLOW ORANGE ALONG THE WALKWAYS ON DRAKE UNIVERSITY’S CAMPUS. LIGHTNING FLASHES ON THE DISTANT HORIZON. A ROARING AUTUMN THUNDERSTORM BREWS IN THE SKIES. STUDENTS ATTENDING NIGHT COURSES POUR OUT OF HOWARD HALL AND HUSTLE TO NEARBY CARS. FOR MOST DRAKE STUDENTS, THE SCHOOL DAY IS DONE.

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UT INSIDE HARMON FINE ARTS CENTER, they’re just getting warmed up. In the basement studio theater, half a dozen students sit on an array of battered padded folding chairs scrawling intensely in notebooks. At the center of the room, a slight woman with curly hair sits on a park bench next to a stocky blond man in a maroon T-shirt frantically pantomiming a wild turn in a car. “This is a Howard Johnson’s, not the Taj Mahal!” the young man exclaims. “You’ve got to lock the door!” It’s a funny line from Neil LaBute’s vignette play called Autobahn. But nobody laughs. It wasn’t the actors’ delivery. It���s just that the audience isn’t there to be entertained. They’re there to perfect. The notes they feverishly write in notebooks, on the margins of scripts and on yellow sticky notes are designed to make every movement, facial expression and syllable uttered as perfect as humanly possible when the curtain opens in a few short weeks. Some of them are actors. Some of them are directors. Some are light, stage and sound majors. All are students seeking to be masters of their craft and putting the time and energy into the project so that they just might do it. They’ve been at this since 6 p.m. and they’ll be here for another hour. After that, there’s homework from their other classes — the ones they took during the day and often began at 8 a.m. There are lines to memorize and characters to understand. There are scenes to map, sets and costumes to design and lighting plots and sound effects to work out. And then there’s … well, there’s a lot more to do than there are hours in the day. This is the life of the Drake theater major. And they wouldn’t have it any other way.

••• THERE’S THIS STEREOTYPE OF THEATER MAJORS. People conjure this

image of star-crossed dreamers and drama junkies with delusions of seeing their name in lights or being hounded by the paparazzi on

1999–2000 SEASON Eleemosynary, Lee Blessing  Twilight of the Golds, Jonathan Tolins  The Way of the World, William Congreve  A Streetcar Named Desire, Tennessee Williams  The Dining Room, A.R. Gurney  Agnes of God, John Pielmeier  The Mineola Twins, Paula Vogel  Into the Woods, Stephen Sondheim  TenXTen, (ten short plays)  Vassa, Maxim Gorky 2001–2002 SEASON Equus, Peter Shaffer  Pterodactyls,

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the red carpet. Sure, there’s the occasional Drake theater major who comes to campus with the notion of being the Next Big Thing, but that’s not the typical Drake student, says Michael Rothmayer, Drake associate professor of theater arts and department chair. “Very few students come to our program looking to be stars,” Rothmayer says. “They come to be professionals. They come looking — and receive, I think — a very focused education that exposes them to every aspect of the stage. Our students come with a love of the theater.” Make no mistake, this love is a labor. Theater majors are often invisible on campus — even to their closest friends and roommates. They disappear into FAC for what seems like weeks on end, emerge occasionally for fresh air and then disappear again. “As a joke, we had these shirts made,” says Jasmin Teo, a senior directing major from Singapore. She gestures to the dark gray T-shirt that reads in tall, bold print, “I CAN’T. I HAVE REHEARSAL.” Rehearsal should always be with a capital “R” for theater majors. It dominates their evenings for every production, Monday through Friday, for entire semesters from their first year on campus until they toss their cap into the air on graduation day. For a school that’s most famous for its annual track meet, being a theater major is “a sprint-a-thon,” says Adam Sandroni, a junior acting major from Granger, IL. “It starts right when you get to campus with auditions and call backs,” he says. “Then there’s rehearsing. There’s getting the show ready. There’s set design and building. After that, the show opens. It closes. There’s strike day. Then it’s on to the next show. It’s a series of these short, intense races that make up the whole marathon.” In Drake theater, nobody runs just a single event, either. As part of the department’s curriculum, all students take a handful of courses outside their focus area. Set design majors take acting classes. Directors work with sound equipment and lighting. Everybody auditions for parts in shows. Theater majors may be artists, but Drake students are also

Nicky Silver  Romeo & Juliet, William Shakespeare  Fool for Love, Sam Shepard  All in the Timing, David Ives  Two Gentlemen of Verona, lyrics J. Guare, music G. MacDermot, book W. Shakespeare  Speed-the-Plow, David Mamet  The Cripple of Inishmaan, Martin McDonagh 2002–2003 SEASON How the Other Half Loves, Alan Ayckborn  The Crucible, Arthur Miller  The Shape of Things, Neil Labutte  The

Glass Menagerie, Tennessee Williams  Songs for a New World, Jason Robert Brown  Five Kinds of Silence, Shelagh Stephenson  Savage in Limbo, John Patrick Shanley 2003–2004 SEASON Veronica's Room, Ira Levin  Stepping Out, Richard Harris  The Miss Firecracker Contest, Beth Henley  Private Eyes, Steven Dietz  Quilters, Molly Newman & Barbara Damashek  Five Women Wearing the Same Dress, Alan Ball 

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Recent Drake theater productions (clockwise from left) Sarah Hoch, Jake Klinkhammer, Julia McKinney and Heather Herkleman in Company; Jake Klinkhammer and Doug Graham in Picnic; and Rebecca Gebhart and Jack Sharkey in Gaslight.

ruthlessly practical. They have no intention of becoming starving artists wasting away waiting tables hoping their big break comes along. “Drake makes you versatile,” says Daryl Vitali, a senior directing major from Alton, IL. “Everybody has to start somewhere. If I can’t get a directing job, I know I can work on a set in other ways and not make a fool out of myself. This is our art. It’s also our career. This is how we intend to make a living as professionals.” ••• SANDRONI PLAYS ALONGSIDE FIRST-YEAR STUDENT MONICA LANI, from

Flossmoor, IL. The pair’s scene in Autobahn involves a revelatory conversation between a couple as they drive home from a party. Lani’s character slowly reveals the details of her recent business trip and the strange occurrences between her and a group of strangers in her hotel room. She plays the part of a woman with a hidden secret deftly, without a hint of greenness that her age and academic status might suggest. She animates emotions by crossing her arms and contorting her long neck in a frantic and embarrassed display, matching her movements with the lines as she reads. Sandroni plays her baffled significant other who becomes more horrified as he drags each detail out of her during the scene.

Spike Heels, Theresa Rebeck 2004–2005 SEASON Proof, David Auburn  School for Scandal, Richard Brinsley Sheridan  A Girl's Guide to Chaos, Cynthia Heimel  Anton In Show Business, Jane Martin  No Exit, Jean Paul Sartre  Pippin, music & lyrics Stephen Schwartz, book Roger O. Hirson  Crimes of the Heart, Beth Henley 2005–2006 SEASON Arts & Leisure, Steve Tesich  Picnic, William Inge  Touch, Toni Press-

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His shoulders alternately slump and clench as Lani reveals her terrible carousing. The scene is equal parts amusing and voyeuristic character study. To the untrained eye, the young actors nailed it. Fortunately, there is a trained eye on hand in the form of Rothmayer. Throughout the scene, he sits in a director’s chair. His pupils train on the student actors through the razor thin slits of his eyelids looking over the top of his glasses. His expression is blank. He is stone. The funniest lines of the scene don’t incite even a twitch from the corners of his lips. The scene ends. The teaching begins. Rothmayer rattles off a series of improvements the pair could make. Vitali points out some dialogue flubs. Teo, the show’s student director, goes over botched scene details. “We’re getting there,” Rothmayer says. “We’re better than we were the first night, but we have a long way to go.” It’s 10:15 p.m. when students and professor finally exit FAC for the night. A hard rain falls. The students unfurl umbrellas or dash to their cars. Rehearsal is over, but there’s still the matter of their other homework and maybe catching up with the social lives of those mysterious other Drake students — the ones who aren’t in theater that they see from time to time, almost in passing. Their respite will be brief. Class for many begins at 8 a.m. Rehearsal, as always, caps the day beginning at 6 p.m. And the sprint-a-thon continues.

Coffman  The Duo, William Shakespeare  Wonderful Town, music Leonard Bernstein, lyrics Betty Comden & Adolph Green  The Importance of Being Earnest, Oscar Wilde  2006–2007 SEASON Nickel And Dimed, Joan Holden  The Boy Friend, Sandy Wilson  Sunday on the Rocks, Theresa Rebeck Avian  On the Verge, Eric Overmyer  Gaslight, Patrick Hamilton  Baby With the Bathwater, Christopher Durang

2007–2008 SEASON Autobahn, Neil LaBute  Company, music Stephen Sondheim, book George Furth  Art, Yasmina Reza  Three the Hard Way, Linda Eisenstein  Romantic Comedy, Bernard Slade  Macbeth, William Shakespeare  The Widow's Blind Date, Israel Horovitz.

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alumni update NOMINATE ACCOMPLISHED ALUMNI The Drake National Alumni Association Board is seeking nominations for the 2008 Drake Alumni Awards to be presented during the annual Alumni Awards Dinner on Friday, May 16. The alumni awards honor individuals for outstanding achievement in a career or profession and reflect the pride of Drake University in their achievements. The awards include the Distinguished Service Award, the top honor bestowed upon alumni of Drake University; the Young Alumni Achievement Award honoring alumni age 40 and younger for outstanding achievement in a career or profession; the Young Alumni Loyalty Award honoring alumni age 40 and younger for dedicated service to Drake; the Alumni Achievement Award; and the Alumni Loyalty Award. Nominations are due to the Office of Alumni and Parent Programs by December 21, 2007, and should include contact information for the nominee along with career information, service to the community and profession, service to Drake University and the specific award for which the person is being nominated. Contact information for the person making the nomination is required. Send nominations to Barb Dietrich Boose, director of alumni and parent programs, at barbara.boose@drake.edu, 515-271-3077. JOIN A REUNION COMMITTEE Class reunion committees are being formed for the 30-year cluster reunion for the Drake classes of 1977, 1978 and 1979 and for the milestone reunions for the classes of 1958,

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Drake University recognized and thanked donors for their generosity at the Francis Marion Drake Society Dinner in October. Picture 1: Kate Allen, AS’06; Boki Olden; Dennis Olden, LA’61; Sri Laxmana; and Lori Hansing Allen, ’70. Picture 2: Leslie Picchietti Byers, JO’87, performed with the Jazz Cats. Picture 3: Larry Stelter, one of the evening’s speakers, and Peggy Fisher, FA’70. Picture 4: Ann Clark Lienemann, ’56, Martie Sands Ullem, ED’66, and Drake President David Maxwell.

1948 and 1938. The 30-year cluster reunion will bring alumni back to campus during Drake Relays, April 25–26, while the milestone classes will reconnect during Commencement weekend, May 16–18. All Drake graduates are welcome to attend the reunions. To join a reunion committee, contact Barb Dietrich Boose, director of

alumni and parent programs, at barbara.boose@drake.edu, 515-271-3077. BULLDOG FINDS HOME IN THE KNAPP CENTER The University first paraded a new litter of its beloved mascot, the Bulldog, around campus for the 98th running of the Drake Relays. The seven 50-pound fiberglass bulldogs

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decorated in a variety of colorful styles have been standing guard at different locations around campus since their initial presentation on April 12. The Drake National Alumni Association Board purchased one of the pooches that now resides in the Knapp Center, on view for all who visit the location for various athletic and other University events.

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spotlight

Big Rewards in Small Packages THIS KINDERGARTEN TEACHER APPROACHES TEACHING AND LEARNING AS A LIFELONG ENDEAVOR THE SMALL CLASSROOM ON THE SOUTH SIDE of Des Moines is a study in carefully controlled chaos. Education grad Elaine Gilbert works the room, patiently guiding each of the 15 kindergartners who are busy pushing scissors through paper, cutting out Bingo cards and leaving behind piles of curled and discarded paper. “Just seeing the kids go through school and succeed and remain kind and caring is the most rewarding thing,” says Gilbert, who received an elementary education degree from Drake in 1999 and a master’s degree in 2002. “That social foundation in kindness is what I really try to foster in the classroom.” A KINDERGARTEN TEACHER SINCE 2000, Gilbert was recently

charged with helping facilitate the merger of Granger Mitchell Elementary School into South Union Elementary, and she also began teaching early childhood special education, the field of practice she finds most rewarding. “I’ve always had a passion for special needs students,” she says. “Younger kids are more accepting and they realize that everyone has differences. If you can encourage that early on they don’t pay much attention to it later.” Gilbert hails from Kansas City, but stayed in Des Moines upon graduating from Drake. That decision has allowed her to work in a diverse and changing school district, and her proximity to the University makes it easy for her to return frequently. “I keep going back to Drake,” she says.“I keep finding things I want to learn. It’s a constant quest to become a better teacher.” Gilbert recently returned to the School of Education to add a reading endorsement to her list of teaching credentials. A focus on reading is especially important, she says, because more students who speak English as a second language are coming into the schools. While this adds diversity to the classroom, it also poses a challenge to teachers. “That’s my greatest challenge — making sure I meet all their individual needs to the best of my ability,” she says. “At the end of the year it’s great to look at where they started and where they end up. It’s very rewarding.” — Tim Schmitt

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alumni update January

THURSDAY, MARCH 13 – SUNDAY, MARCH 16 Missouri Valley Conference Women’s Basketball Tournament St. Charles, MO

THURSDAY, JANUARY 10 Bulldog Bash Mad River Bar & Grille Chicago FRIDAY, JANUARY 18 Alumni event hosted by President and Mrs. Maxwell and the Drake Board of Trustees Phoenix

February DATE TO BE DETERMINED Naples Alumni Event Naples, FL HONORING A PASSING LEADER Business leaders, community members, family and friends recently filled Sheslow Auditorium to pay tribute and and celebrate the life of Maddie Levitt. A community leader, fundraiser and philanthropist, Levitt passed away Nov. 7. “There isn’t a soul within the Drake community who hasn’t been touched by Maddie Levitt’s devotion and dedication,” said Drake University President David Maxwell. “Drake has lost a dear friend, an icon and symbol of our University's enduring commitment to excellence and to enhancing the quality of life in Greater Des Moines and central Iowa. Levitt, who served on the University’s governing board since 1987, was the national chair of the Campaign for Drake, which raised $130 million for the University in 1994. She served as national chair of Campaign Drake, which raised $190 million for the University in 2002 and gained her the distinction of being the first person to chair two consecutive campaigns of $100 million or more in the same decade for a U.S. college or university. Through her 20-year relationship with the University, Levitt traveled 550,000 miles to meet

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with Drake alumni and friends across the country; established and funded annual awards for faculty and staff to recognize Drake’s most outstanding teachers, mentors and community activists; and contributed nearly $10 million herself to the University in support of students and faculty, as well as myriad projects such as the renovation of Sheslow Auditorium and the Drake Municipal Observatory. “She has changed Drake in countless ways through her extraordinary generosity, her tireless fundraising efforts and her indomitable spirit. We have surging enrollments. We have a student retention rate that places us in the top tier of master’s institutions. We are recognized among the very top master’s universities in the Midwest. There’s no question we’re a different institution and better institution because of Maddie Levitt,” said Maxwell. Drake presented Levitt with an honorary doctor of humane letters in 1990 and declared her an honorary alumna in 1994. The University has celebrated Maddie Levitt Day every May 31 since 2002 (the final day of Campaign Drake) and plans to continue to observe the special day in her memory.

April WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9 Let’s DU Lunch Stephen King, executive director, Downtown Events Group Des Moines FRIDAY, APRIL 25 – SATURDAY, APRIL 26 Drake Relays

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13 Let’s DU Lunch J. Scott Johnson, GR’90, president and COO, Wells Fargo Bank N.A. Des Moines

SATURDAY, APRIL 26 30-year cluster reunion Classes of 1977, 1978, 1979 Des Moines

May

March THURSDAY, MARCH 6 – SUNDAY, MARCH 9 Missouri Valley Conference Men’s Basketball Tournament St. Louis

FRIDAY, MAY 16 – SUNDAY, MAY 18 Reunion Classes of 1958, 1948, 1938 Des Moines FRIDAY, MAY 16 Annual Alumni Awards Dinner Des Moines

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12 Let’s DU Lunch Mike Tousley, president, Weitz Iowa Des Moines

SATURDAY, MAY 17 Law Commencement

WEDNESDAY MARCH 12 – FRIDAY, MARCH 14 Drake Choir Tour Northern Iowa, Southern Minnesota, Twin Cities

50-Year Club Dinner Des Moines SUNDAY, MAY 18 Undergraduate and Graduate Commencement

☛ For more information and a full listing of all Drake events — including athletics and fine arts events — visit: www.drake.edu/alumni/alumevents.php

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU Drake is currently seeking comments from the public about the University in preparation for evaluation by its regional accrediting agency. Drake will undergo a comprehensive evaluation visit Feb. 4–6, 2008 by a team representing the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, who will review the institution’s ongoing ability to meet the Commission’s criteria for accreditation. The University has been accredited by the

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Commission since it was established in 1913. If Drake has influenced your life, submit comments to: Public Comment on Drake University The Higher Learning Commission 30 N. LaSalle St., Suite 2400 Chicago, IL 60602

Comments must address substantive matters related to the quality of the institution or its academic programs and must be in writing and signed; comments cannot be treated as confidential and must be received by Jan. 6, 2008.

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spotlight

Dreaming Up Ideas EMMY-WINNING DRAKE GRAD CREATES ESPN TV SERIES CONCEPT

AS A HUSBAND, FATHER OF TWO and highlight producer for the most-watched sports network in the world, Gary Parker, JO’89, doesn’t have much down time. Yet even when Parker finds a few minutes for 40 winks or so, the creative drive doesn’t shut off. Early this year between late-night and early-morning shifts as ESPN’s highlight producer, Parker woke up with an idea for a show that would pit top athletes from across the sports spectrum against one another to determine the ultimate sports star. Within a couple months the show, titled “Who’s Now,” premiered on “SportsCenter” and ran to its Aug. 1 conclusion when Tiger Woods was named the ultimate sports star by ESPN viewers. ESPN.com users watched “Who’s Now” video segments more than 3.2 million times, left more than 53,000 comments and cast

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more than 4.2 million votes during the course of the show. “It was very successful,” says Parker. “I was surprised by the amount of dot-com hits the program got. That’s where it really thrived.”

And he’s been extremely successful in this regard, bringing home three sports Emmy awards in the category of live daily studio show for his work on SportsCenter. NONSTOP ACTION: The “Who’s Now” program

HISTORY OF SUCCESS: Parker joined ESPN

in 1994 as a production assistant and has been coordinating highlights for all live studio shows, including “SportsCenter,” “Baseball Tonight” and “NFL Prime Time,” for the past six years. “Working at ESPN is unlike any other environment that I’ve been affiliated with,” Parker says. “It’s a rock ’n’ roll environment. You put on your hard hat and you bring your lunch bucket and you’re all business when you walk in there. We’re here to make sure that people like you or me who watch the game will say, ‘Wow, that was a great highlight.’”

is over and it’s not yet known if ESPN will return to the idea next year, but Parker is pleased the show caught the public’s attention and that the format has been adopted by other programs. Still, there’s little time to bask in the success as Parker has more than enough happening to keep him busy, even without, literally, dreaming up new ideas. “It’s always a busy time of year, and it’s all-hands-on-deck time right now,” he says. “ESPN never stops.” –– Tim Schmitt

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alumni update

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LA’73, tee up at the Windy City golf outing. Picture 2: Los Angeles area alumni at the Hollywood

Bowl organized by Laurie Woken Manny, BN’82 (far right). (From left) Brian Manson, BN’93; Deborah Manson; Jennifer Fah, JO’95; Mary Willia, ED’69; Sean Gannon, FA’91; Rose Richard; Paul LeFort, JO’91; Christine Lind LeFort, ED’92; Bill Coy, PH’66; Pamela Eagan, PH’76; and John Mills. Picture 3: Raine Ettridge, BN’05; Carrie Blumenfeld, JO’00; Emily Sexton, JO’07; Amanda Gunther, JO’07; Jessica Laskey, JO’05 at the 2007 Des Moines young alumni event. Picture 4: Former head men’s basketball coach Tom Davis (left) and Rick Voss, BN’69, participate in the 2007 Windy City golf outing. Picture 5: Harry Gallaher, LW’89, and Anne Olsen, LW’02, reminisce at the 2007 Twin Cities alumni event. Picture 6: Amy Kneller, Ian Miller, BN’98, and Eric and Melissa Junge, GR’01, reunite at the 2007 young alumni gathering in Chicago.

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ACHIEVEMENTS, EVENTS AND HONORS OF 2006–2007

DRAKE ANNUAL REPORT


INTRODUCTORY MESSAGES

Drake University had an exciting year and I think you will be very pleased with what you read in this report. Whether you are interested in academic quality and reputation, athletic successes, financial stability, student achievements, campus appearance or community impact, Drake has a wonderful story to tell. I hope you enjoy that story. Drake’s current success has been built on effective strategic planning and the leadership of a great many people. Initiated in 2001, the current strategic plan has provided the University community with a clear sense of our mission, values and objectives as well as helping guide the University through a period of great change in higher education. We are now in the last year of that plan and the process of writing a new strategic plan has begun. This process will take a full year and will capture the attention, time and input of students, faculty, administrators, alumni, friends and trustees. The overarching goal is to make Drake a great university, a university that measures itself against its own achievements and challenges itself to be better. We watch, measure and learn from our fellow institutions, but our commitment and focus will continue to be on making Drake the best at “preparing students for meaningful personal lives, professional accomplishment, and responsible global citizenship.” Leadership at Drake is visible and tangible. The Drake community, whether students, faculty, administrators, alumni, trustees, volunteers or friends has been willing to give of its time, talents and resources to help Drake build the momentum we are enjoying today. Continuing that momentum and developing the additional resources we will need to meet tomorrow’s challenges is the task in front of us. As we move through the strategic planning process, our challenges and opportunities will present themselves and your continued leadership will be a central strength. It is the privilege of the board of trustees to serve this University. We are excited about Drake and its future. We thank you for everything you do for Drake. — James W. Hubbell, III, Chair, Drake Board of Trustees

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THE YEAR IN REVIEW: THE PRESIDENT’S PERSPECTIVE In the following pages, you’ll see — in somewhat staccato form — an overview of many of the impressive things that have taken place in the past year at Drake University. All of these accomplishments combine into a picture of a University that is healthy, vital, vibrant and increasingly recognized on a national scale for the quality of the learning that takes place. These accomplishments are not accidental or random; they are the consequence of the collective and deliberate efforts of our students, faculty and staff, alumni, supporters and friends, the Board of Trustees and Drake’s various volunteer councils. What the Drake family has accomplished — and continues to accomplish — is the result of an unwavering commitment to our mission to prepare students “for meaningful personal lives, professional accomplishment, and responsible global citizenship.” It is also the result of a constant striving to fulfill our clear vision of Drake University’s future, distinguished on the higher education landscape by our focus on the integration of liberal arts and sciences education with professional preparation and the integration of the classroom with student life, infused with a global perspective and carried out in an intensely interpersonal, collaborative learning environment. It is, in essence, the consequence of complementary forces. We are pushed by our tradition, core values and mission, and pulled by the vision of our future. Our ability to realize that vision, to ensure that it becomes a reality, is grounded in the Drake University Strategic Plan. Since 2001, the critical decisions that shape Drake University have been made in the context of a broad-based, datadriven, deliberative planning process. We are now engaged in developing Drake’s next strategic plan (the current plan is in force for another year), and in securing the resources that will support the realization of our vision for Drake’s future. As you look through the highlights of this past year, I hope that you will recognize that we are at a decisive point in our history — Drake has always provided a superb educational experience, but as an institution Drake in 2007 is stronger, more resilient, more responsive and more accountable than has been possible for a long time, thanks to the support, guidance and energy of many, many people. We are uniquely positioned to decide our own future, to make our collective vision for this wonderful University come true. It is a vision that is true to the best of what Drake always has been, and that challenges us to become what we can be — just as we have done for generations of students. — David Maxwell, President

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The Magazine of Drake University


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS View Drake’s complete list of contributors at www.drake.edu/alumni/donors.


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS View Drake’s complete list of contributors at www.drake.edu/alumni/donors.


YEAR IN REVIEW

DRAKE’S FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENTS spent the previous year building upon past achievements while eagerly moving forward and reaching toward new goals and accomplishments that will continue to fulfill and exceed the promise of a Drake education. The University continued to be recognized for academic excellence in national publications including high rankings in both U.S.News & World Report and Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. Drake was also one of the top producers of 2006–2007 Fulbright Fellows with three students earning Fulbright awards upon graduation. Drake witnessed strong progress in the Office of Alumni and Development with the largest total donated to The Drake Fund in years along with multiple generous gifts to the University. The University was a charter signatory to the Presidents’ Climate Commitment, a public affirmation of Drake’s determination to minimize its environmental footprint to the greatest extent possible. True to the University’s mission to prepare students for responsible global citizenship, Drake signed new exchange agreements with universities in Austria, Italy and Japan, and announced a collaborative effort with the Southwest University of Political Science and Law in Shongquing, China. Drake also expanded its international opportunities with the establishment of its first official study abroad program in the southern hemisphere with the University of KwaZulu-Natal in Durban, South Africa. The Donald V. Adams Leadership Institute (DVALI) continued in 2006–2007 to develop leadership training. Among the programs that the Institute helps to support is its signature Adams Academy, which enrolled 111 students who completed 10 sessions on leadership and 10 hours of community service. The Institute initiated the Emerging Leaders Model in which 42 first-year students participated in a six-week leadership program. A total of 323 students participated in fall and spring leadership workshops including student government leaders, resident assistants, and fraternity and sorority leaders. Longtime Drake University administrator Donald V. Adams received the Crystal Apple Award for his accomplishments and dedication to education. Linda Krypel, associate professor of pharmacy practice, was one of four individuals nationwide selected as a Fellow of the American Pharmacists Association. James L. Dodd, professor of

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accounting, was awarded a Fulbright Scholar grant to lecture at the University of Iceland. Chip Miller, professor of marketing, was also awarded a Fulbright Scholar grant to lecture at the University of San Carlos in Cebu, Philippines. Stuart Klugman, BN’70, the Principal Financial Group distinguished professor of actuarial science, received the University’s highest teaching award, the Madelyn M. Levitt Teacher of the Year Award. Lon Larson, PH’71, the Ellis and Nelle Levitt professor of pharmacy administration, became the first two-time recipient of Drake’s top mentorship award when he received the Madelyn M. Levitt Mentor of the Year Award. Drake welcomed numerous speakers to campus, including Ben Cohen and Jerr y Greenfield, the masterminds behind Ben & Jerr y’s Homemade Inc.; Bob Costas, an accomplished broadcaster and author; Brian Duffy, editorial cartoonist for The Des Moines Register; Jeff Johnson, host of BET Channel’s “The Jeff Johnson Chronicles”; and Neenah Ellis, JO’77, nationally renowned journalist and author. For the third year in a row, Drake finished the last fiscal year with a budget surplus. All funds were utilized for renovation of campus facilities. Ten classrooms, for a total of 30 in the past three summers, were renovated. At the start of the fall 2007 semester, all residence halls had wireless access to the campus network. In addition, technology upgrades were completed in seven classrooms for a total of 27 in the past three years. Following the $12 million renovation of Goodwin/Kirk residence hall and the $1.2 million renovation of Jewett Hall, construction began on a $22 million renovation project of the Quads along with renovation of Morehouse Residence Hall. Upon completion of the project, all residence halls will have been renovated in the past five years. Construction continues on the Drake West Village complex at 30th Street and Carpenter Avenue. The $37 million mixed-use housing and retail complex will offer a village atmosphere where students can live, work, study and socialize. The 98th running of the Drake Relays hosted 220 teams and a total of 8,700 individuals. With sell-out crowds and multiple records broken, it was one of the most successful Relays in the history of the University. The 2007 NCAA Midwest Regional Track and Field Championships were held in the Drake Stadium. Drake was also named host of the 2008 NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships to be held in June 2008.

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YEAR IN REVIEW CONTINUED | COLLEGE/SCHOOL SUMMARIES

Urska Juric was named the head women’s tennis coach in November. Keno Davis was named Drake’s 24th head men’s basketball coach in March. Steve Loney, who has 30 years of coaching experience at the professional and collegiate levels, was named interim head football coach at Drake. The men’s basketball team had its first winning season in 20 years and ended the season as champions of the state of Iowa. The women’s basketball team, despite illnesses and injuries, won the Missouri Valley Conference Tournament. The men’s tennis team had its highest national ranking in history, and both tennis teams finished as conference champions. Softball was ranked second in the nation in Division I for academics, and men’s track and field had the highest GPA for all NCAA Division I schools. Men’s cross country finished second for the fourth time in the last five years at the MVC Conference Championships. The women’s soccer team continued to dominate the MVC by earning its fourth straight regular season title. The program won its first-ever MVC Tournament and advanced to the NCAA Tournament for the first time in University history. The women’s golf team made its debut in the fall, writing a new chapter in Drake athletics. Drake reigned as the MVC Academic Champions with an all-student-athlete GPA of 3.14. Fifty-two studentathletes were named to Conference Academic Teams. Cowles Library experienced record levels of use with attendance counts exceeding 400,000 and hits to the library Web site numbering more than 1 million. Cowles Library upheld its reputation for innovation by adding a “federated search engine” to its Web site, which allows simultaneous searching of dozens of research databases. It premiered three new special projects in its digital collection and added several private collections presented as gifts from private donors.

exhibitions. Drake Jazz Ensemble I students played a 10date European tour, which included the Montreux Jazz Festival, one of Europe’s largest jazz celebrations. Arts and science faculty lead the planning for a new sophomore-level program called the Engaged Citizen Experience. The program, required of all Drake students, will combine new courses, student life programming and special speakers and events to facilitate a balanced discussion of the critical democratic and public policy issues that arise in various fields of study.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION Preparing students for the professional world by ensuring that they are able to network, write an excellent resume, experience several internship opportunities and plan their academic careers continues to be a top priority in the CBPA. The college offered career fairs for accounting and finance students, held mock interviews with students and launched a new database system that allows students and alumni to access employment, internship and mentorship opportunities. The MBA program was redesigned to better respond to the demands of the marketplace. Students can now extend their core knowledge into an area of specialization and also take three one-credit seminars that are designed to provide increased exposure to current issues impacting the workplace. The MPA program, long recognized as a unique graduate opportunity for metro area professionals, has added six cohorts at two off-site locations (since 2003) to provide opportunities for students outside the metro area. Additionally, the Graduate Studies Center and the Mary Greeley Medical Center hosted programs for regional area professionals.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES The Drake Undergraduate Science Collaborative Institute summer research program continued to gain momentum and exceed expectations during its first year, enabling nearly 30 Drake students and one high school student from Ames to conduct research projects alongside Drake faculty. Drake fine arts programs continued to offer myriad events to enhance the University and the Des Moines community. A trio of Drake faculty and alumni presented all 37 of William Shakespeare’s plays in less than two hours. Theater students presented Nickeled and Dimed among other productions. The Anderson Gallery hosted several

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SCHOOL OF EDUCATION The Drake University School of Education paid tribute to three dedicated educators at its annual alumni awards and senior recognition dinner. Tom Anderson, GR’73,’88, Justice Constance Cohen, ED’72, GR’77, LW’86, and Jim Heslop, ED’54, were honored. The State Board of Education granted full accreditation to the Drake Specialist Program, which prepares candidates for superintendent/AEA administrator licensure. The Teacher Quality Program, a collaborative effort among

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COLLEGE/SCHOOL SUMMARIES CONTINUED

Drake, DMACC and the Des Moines Public Schools to educate more than 40 area residents to become teachers in the Des Moines school system successfully completed its second year of certification coursework. The Adult Literacy Center continued to provide tutor sessions led by volunteers, with 70 currently in the program. Drake University Head Start celebrated its 30th anniversary and received recognition from Reading Is Fundamental Inc., the nation’s oldest and largest children’s and family literacy nonprofit group. Drake’s program was among only 25 of 4,600 programs nationwide to be so honored.

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM & MASS COMMUNICATION Students in the School of Journalism & Mass Communication launched “The Dog,” a campus radio station broadcasting a mix of college radio, information and live sports. KDRA broadcasts for 12 hours on weekdays and all day Saturday at 94.1. Fifteen young SJMC alumni formed the Junior National Advisory Council, the first Drake alumni organization devoted to those who have graduated in the past five years. Funded with a gift from Liz Newell, ’69, and Jack Kragie, AS’65, an interactive media lab was added in the west wing of Meredith Hall. Drake University journalism students earned two first-place honors and a total of six Region 7 Mark of Excellence awards from the Society of Professional Journalists. Collegiate journalists submitted more than 3,300 entries in 39 categories across SPJ’s 12 regions.

LAW SCHOOL Gifts totaling $5.25 million received in the past year will bolster Drake Law School efforts to build its regional and national profile. A gift of $1.5 million from Wayne, LW’72, and Donna Kern will sponsor an endowed chair that will oversee the new Intellectual Property Law Center, which was formed with a $750,000 leadership gift from Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., a subsidiary of DuPont. Peter Yu, who founded the IP program at Michigan State, was hired as the founding director of the Center. Dwight Opperman, LW’51, donated $3 million to further endow the Opperman Scholar program, which awards five or more renewable merit-based, full-tuition scholarships for outstanding first-year students and provides an annual grant of $10,000 to each Opperman Scholar to help pay for books and living expenses. The law school celebrated the founding, history and accomplishments of the National Bar Association and dedicated the transfer of the NBA archives from the Des Moines Public Library to the Opperman Law Library.

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COLLEGE OF PHARMACY & HEALTH SCIENCES The bachelor of science in health sciences program accepted its first 50 students in the 2007 fall semester. The minor program in entrepreneurial management for pharmacy majors became available in fall 2007. Also, a preceptor development program with ongoing continuing education opportunities was developed for implementation in summer 2007. For the 22nd consecutive year, PharmD graduates experienced a placement rate of 100 percent. Scholarly activities by CPHS faculty and students included 15 peer reviewed publications, 21 peer reviewed podium and poster presentations, 22 nonpeer reviewed presentations, 43 invited presentations and posters, nine book chapters, and nine undergraduate research projects. Suzanne Sietsema Blackburn, PH’73, and Mary Walbridge, PH’74, were honored with alumni achievement awards at the annual Pharmacy Day in February. DeeAnn Wedemeyer-Oleson, PH’99, was the recipient of the College’s first Young Alumni Achievement Award. The 2007 Weaver Medal of Honor, the College’s highest honor, was awarded posthumously to Wendell Talbot Hill Jr., PH’50. The first-ever Jerry L. Karbeling Memorial Leadership Award was given to Anthony Pudlo, PH’07. Nita Pandit, John Rovers and Sally Haack, PH’02, were selected by the student body as Pharmacy Mentor of the Year, Teacher of the Year and Pharmacy Preceptor of the Year, respectively. Ron Torry received the Hartig Distinguished Professor Award, while Haack was presented with the Hartig Faculty Development Award. Infrastructure improvements included pharmacy laboratories upgrades, renovation of the computer lab in Harvey Ingham Hall and construction began on the Mayhew Compounding Laboratory. John R. “Jack” Ellis, PH’57, and his wife, Audrey, presented a $1.5 million gift to the College to fund the John R. Ellis distinguished chair, a new endowed faculty chair position, which was filled by David Zgarrick. Selected alumni and graduating pharmacy students were invited to sponsor a white coat for an incoming P1 student. The $50 sponsorship helps pay for related expenses. The coats were distributed at the 2007 White Coat Ceremony.

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F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T

Y07 Drake’s ability to fulfill its mission is dependent on a sound financial picture. Keeping short-term demands in balance with long-term goals is a critical discipline.

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As of May 31, the close of Drake’s fiscal year, University assets totaled $410,975,784; liabilities totaled N e t T u it io n $147,031,424. Net assets increased by $34,735,750 G o v t G ra n t sduring the year to reach $263,944,360 at May 31, 2007. P riv a t e G if t sAbout 61 percent of the increase in net assets was attribE n d o w U s e dutable to unrealized market appreciation, 28 percent was A u x ilia rie s the result of nonoperating gifts, and another 8 percent was the result of operating surplus. O th er

62%

P riv G rn t s

es, FY07

A GOAL OF ACHIEVING AN OPERATING SURPLUS equal to 2 percent of operating revenues by fiscal year 2008 was adopted by Drake’s Board of Trustees. Drake ended the year with a $2.7 million operating surplus, which approximated 2.5 percent of total operating (both unrestricted and temporarily restricted) revenues. FY07 was the third straight year of operating surpluses and the 10th year of steadily improving bottom lines. The surplus was used to fund several important capital improvement projects, including the Morehouse renovation, modernization of 10 classrooms, relocation of the Olmsted parking lot entrance and various deferred maintenance projects.

REVENUES EXCEEDED budget by almost $7.6 million; while expenditures also exceeded budget by $5.4 million. The surplus was largely due to the $4.7 million positive variance in net tuition resulting from significantly improved full-time undergraduate student retention and increased I n s t r u c t io n part-time graduate student enrollment within the School A cad Supp of Education. Net tuition grew by 9.9 percent over the Instl Supp prior year. Significant positive variances were also generated A u x ilia r y P u b l S e r v from increased restricted operating gifts and from increased S t u S e r v room and board revenues.

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9%

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The expenditure budget is generally shown by function (as required by generally accepted accounting principles), with instruction, academic support and student services comprising more than 53 percent of the expenditure budget. However, the key budget drivers on the expenditure side are salaries and benefits, which make up more than 60 percent of the entire expenditure budget.

$ 153,336,000

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ENDOWMENT GROWTH is one important indicator of long-term institutional financial strength. At the close of the fiscal year, the market value of Drake’s endowment fund had risen to $153,336,248, compared to $128,768,203 at May 31, 2006. This growth was largely a result of market appreciation that totaled approximately

$18 million and gifts that totaled $7.98 million. The total investment return for the year was 18.7 percent, compared to 12.3 percent in FY06. Endowment earnings distributed to support the operating budget of the University totaled $5.9 million. This distribution represents a spending rate of 4.2 percent of the average market value for the year. The lower spending rate permits additional reinvestment into the endowment fund to support future students. Drake continues to focus on increasing its endowment over the next several years to ensure that it can provide the appropriate level of resources to fulfill its mission in the future.

Priv Grants $1,147,162 1% Other $2,135,403 2%

OPERATING REVENUES, FY07 ($107,563,254)

Auxiliaries $17,661,551 16% Net Tuition $65,095,375 62% Govt Grants $9,883,447 9%

Endow Used $5,900,000 5% Private Gifts $5,740,316 5%

OPERATING EXPENDITURES, FY07 ($104,834,618) Stu Serv $8,859,105 8% Publ Serv $10,078,144 10% Instruction $31,201,036 29% Auxiliary $24,779,845 24%

Acad Supp $15,669,493 15% Instl Supp $14,246,995 14%

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“I consider [donating to The Drake Fund] a small gesture of thanks, and a larger gesture of encouragement for future students.” — Nicole Bratt, AS’96

“Drake is a vibrant part of the cultural fabric in central Iowa. Iowa greatly benefits from the Drake Relays and the distinguished Bucksbaum Lecture.” — Frank Maher Friend of Drake University

The Drake Fund “It’s important to look at our future. We may not be in it now, but we can leave pieces for it. Supporting education is one of the ways to leave those pieces.”

“Drake is my home.” — Marc Kwame Dzradosi, PH’04

— Christine Day, ED’71, GR’88

TOGETHER WE TRANSFORM LIVES.

Make your gift online —

F OR MORE INFORMATION OR TO MAKE A CONTRIBUTION , contact Director of Annual Fund Programs Pam Pepper at 1-800-44-Drake, x4558, or go to www.drake.edu/alumni and click “Giving to Drake.”

www.drake.edu — and click on “Giving to Drake”


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With Pride and Purpose FRIENDS REUNITE AT THE AFRICAN AMERICAN ALUMNI REUNION ALUMNI, FAMILY AND FRIENDS returned to campus to reconnect and reunite at the University’s second African American Alumni Reunion Sept. 28–30. The event included informal events such as a reception at the Black Cultural Center, a performance by comedian Damon Williams and an alumni luncheon, along with the African American Alumni and Student Banquet on Sept. 29 and a celebration of Drake connections on Sept. 30. Co-chairs of the reunion were Kelly Redmond, JO’90, Valerie Wamsby, BN’91, and Joe Welcome, GR’84.

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DRAKE’S MISSION is to provide an exceptional learning environment that prepares students for meaningful personal lives, professional accomplishments, and responsible global citizenship. The Drake experience is distinguished by collaborative learning among students, faculty, and staff and by the integration of the liberal arts and sciences with professional preparation.


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