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Wethersfield

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SE RV I N G RO C KY H I L L Friday, March 30, 2012

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Form and function

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Engineering students win 2nd place and peer design award at national competition By ERICA SCHMITT STAFF WRITER

Erica Schmitt | Staff

Paul Czarnecki, a former senior field technician for CL&P, and current host of the company’s electrical safety program, talks to fourth graders at Hillcrest Elementary School. See story and photos on Page 5.

INSIDE:

science teacher at the school, Sue Fennelly, who accompanied the 15 students to the competition. “They just want excellence and don’t rest until things are perfect,” she added. Research began in September for the innovative device they presented at nationals. “We met every Tuesday for an hour-and-a-half then started meeting more often to perfect our project,” explained Ben Grant,

A group of Wethersfield High School students are breaking ground in the field of assistive technology and are well on their way to being the industry’s top engineers. The school’s JETS Engineering Team just returned from the national Engineering Design Challenge finals in Washington D.C. with a second-place title See HANDICAPPED, Page 2 for Best Engineering, in addition to the PEER Award and Best Volume 53, No. 8 50 Cents Universal Design. Some of the students have also started their own company and have a patent pending. “It’s so inspiring to see a group of kids who value learning and hard work as much as they do,” said the group’s advisor and a

Town seeking live-in caretaker for Solomon Welles House, Page 3 Antique collectors set for annual sale, Page 4

District-wide spelling bee a hit, Page 6


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WETHERSFIELD POST

Handicapped-friendly filing cabinet nets student two awards Continued from Page 1

one of two team captains. The “File-Up” is a filing cabinet with drawers that are easily-accessible to people with disabilities — inspired by a quadriplegic Marine veteran whose confinement to a wheelchair kept him from accessing materials in his office independently. Tim Fournier met with the group and explained how his disability affects his work performance and while also meeting with the Wethersfield Advisory Committee for People with Disabilities as well as the Easter Seals, the Eagles Team was able to design and construct a solution to a problem Fournier shares with many others — including some of the 3.4 million U.S. veterans with servicerelated disabilities. The two drawers on the File-Up cabinet slide out and hinge vertically so they can be accessed from any height, making items inside accessible to people who are unable to bend forward or crouch down to open drawers normally. “The great thing about it is that it’s universal, it helps just about everyone — not just people in wheelchairs,” said the team’s Co-Captain Griffin Latulippe, who knows firsthand the daily challenges the disabled face because he is in a wheelchair

himself. “This was not designed for me but I had fun using it,” added Latulippe. “Because I can’t bend over, it would be perfect.” And it was this versatility that won the Eagles the Universal Design Award, while it was the 300 other

The two drawers on the File-Up cabinet slide out and hinge vertically so they can be accessed from any height, making items inside accessible to people who are unable to bend forward or crouch down... teams in Washington who elected them the recipients of the PEER Award. Fournier was also impressed with the students’ efforts. “I don’t have to ask anybody or

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wait for anybody; I can complete my work in a timely fashion,” he said, adding, “It’s an incredible piece. I hope other people can enjoy it as much as I do.” And they just might, since seven team members and three alumni began InvenTech Enterprises, LLC in 2010, with the intent of creating new devices that improve lives — like the File-Up. With the help of the University of Connecticut’s Intellectual Property Group, one of their products now has a patent pending. “The Walken” is a walker with retractable and extending legs that make it simple for people to climb and descend staircases and ramps, which can be difficult navigating with a traditional walker. The kids will tell you that the national competition and InvenTech are unaffiliated ventures. However, projects originally created for their participation in the finals are the seeds of their company’s real product line. “Right now we’re meeting with manufacturers,”saidAndrewYanaros, a senior who plans on studying mechanical engineering at UConn next fall. His footsteps are following pretty close to Former JETS member John Wysmuller,who studied at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and is now a practicing engineer and like Fennelly, one of the Eagles’ four mentors. “We hope to prove that young people don’t have to wait until they “grow up” before they can change the world,”reads InvenTech’s mission statement, which can be found on their website. “Youth run, youth led, we are InvenTech, and we’re creating a better tomorrow, today.” To learn more about the students and InvenTech Enterprises, LLC, visit InvenTechEnterprises.com.

SE RV I N G RO C KY H I L L 188 Main St. Bristol, CT 06010 (860) 225-4601 • Fax: (860) 223-8171 wethersfieldpost@centralctcommunications.com A Central Connecticut Communications LLC publication Michael E. Schroeder — Publisher

Bill Ross — General Manager Gary Curran — Advertising Manager James Casciato — Editor

At Your Service — We welcome your phone calls — and your visits. News Coverage — If you have a story idea or questions call (860) 2254601 ext. 234. or email wethersfieldpost@centralctcommunications.com Sports Coverage — If you have a story idea or question, call Executive Sports Editor Brad Carroll (860) 225-4601 ext. 212 or bcarroll@centralctcommunications.com To Subscribe — To subscribe or for questions, call (860) 225-4608. Advertising CLASSIFIED & LEGAL: To place a classified ad, call (860) 231-2444. For legal advertisements, call (860) 231-2444. DISPLAY: If you have questions about placing a display advertisement, call Tim Matthews (860) 225-4601 ext. 245. Copyright 2011, Central Connecticut Communications LLC. No reproduction or reuse of material without the express written consent of the Wethersfield Post. All rights reserved. To request permission to reprint any material from this publication, write to: 188 Main St. Bristol, CT 06010 Wethersfield Post (USPS 703-860) is published weekly on Friday for $31 per year and $52 for out-of-state deliveries, by Central Connecticut Communications LLC, 188 Main St. Bristol, CT 06010. Periodical postage paid at New Britain, CT and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to the Wethersfield Post, 188 Main St. Bristol, CT 06010. Publisher’s liability for errors or omissions in advertising copy shall not exceed the cost of the space in which the error/omission occurs on the first insertion. Errors/omissions will be rectified by republication or by a credit applied to advertiser’s account; only one incorrect insertion of the same ad will be subject to republication or credit. No allowance shall be made in cases where the advertiser is at fault. Errors, typographic or otherwise, which do not materially affect the advertisement will not be adjusted. In no event shall Central Connecticut Communications LLC be liable for consequential damages of any kind.

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Friday, March 30, 2012 | 3

Town seeking caretaker for the Solomon Welles House By ERICA SCHMITT STAFF WRITER

A majestic old property set in a stunningly-scenic area is in need of a new caretaker: someone to provide year-round care, cleaning and maintenance of the home, which was built in 1774, is adjacent to Cove Park and just happens to be a local venue for community meetings and private parties. While this job description may stir up imagery of Stephen Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s classic horror novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Shining,â&#x20AC;? itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually the position available at the Solomon Welles House, located at 220 Hartford Ave. in Old Wethersfield. The Wethersfield Parks and Recreation Department is now accepting applications for the live-in position, as the current caretaker â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who has spent the last decade in the home â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is leaving this April and â&#x20AC;&#x153;moving onto something else.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for someone who can work well with people and doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind doing a lot of household cleaning,â&#x20AC;? said Parks and Rec Director Kathy Bagley. This individual (or couple) also needs to have the physical ability and willingness to set up and breakdown tables and chairs, as they will have the responsibility of setting and cleaning up any functions. They must maintain lodging within the designated living quarters and be available to assist users of the

house during the scheduled rental hours of 9 a.m. to 11 p.m., Monday through Friday. For handling the house responsibilities, the living quarters will be made available to the caretaker rent free, including all utilities, except telephone. The apartment for the caretaker includes a living room/ dining room combination, kitchen, bathroom and two bedrooms. According to Bagley, the site is rented on average two or three times during the daytime on weekdays, sometimes three times per week on weeknights and about three times a month on weekends. The caretaker is paid only for weeknight bookings, however, and another town employee takes over weekend party set-up and clean-up. A large room most often used for gatherings seats up to 44 people and is adjacent to a kitchen area. The house also has a wrap-around porch for use in nice weather, and there are no bookings through the month of August as there is no air conditioning system. In other words, that would be the best time for the Erica Schmitt | Staff caretaker to take a vacation. The Parks and Recreation Department is currently seeking a live-in caretaker for the Solomon Welles House. The The town hopes to have someone historic house was built in 1774 for the descendants of the colonial governor Thomas Welles. in place by this June, after interviews and background checks are completed. Employment applications are available at Wethersfieldct.com. For additional information, contact Parks and Rec at (860) 721-2890. The deadline for submissions is April 20. 10 East Cedar Street, Newington, CT 06111

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WETHERSFIELD POST

Vintage collectibles for sale at Webb-Deane Museum By ERICA SCHMITT STAFF WRITER

Above, eager antique hunters search through the items for sale at the Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum’s 2011 Tags & Treasures Sale. The 2012 sale will take place Saturday, March 31 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, April 1 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Charles Lyle of the group, adding, of position in colonial society.” bucks and as high as a few hundred. “To qualify you have to be a descenItems are marked at fairly rea- Prices don’t stretch into the thoudent of a family that had some kind sonable prices — as low as a few sands, however. About 500 people are expected to peruse through this weekend and there will be more than enough to

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satisfy their antique mania. “The whole barn is chock full right now, it’s like a big flea market,” said Lyle. The sale opens to the public from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 31, and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, April 1, for a $5 admission charge. A bag sale begins at 2 p.m. Sunday, when shoppers fill shopping bags provided by the museum with sale items for only $3 per bag. The money raised from the Tags & Treasures Sale, the museum’s largest fundraiser, supports the operations and educational programs of the Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum. For more information, contact Charles Lyle at (860) 5290612 ext. 14. The sale will be held inside the Webb Barn at 211 Main St., Old Wethersfield.

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A much-anticipated biennial event has crept up on collectors of vintage oddities, artifacts and antiques, to be held this weekend at the Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum in Old Wethersfield. The Tags & Treasures Sale comes to town every two years for the last 40 and features hundreds of historic estate items from some of Connecticut’s oldest families. Among the treasures of the upcoming 2012 sale — many of which lived gloriously in sprawling estate homes long ago — are antique comb-back and sack-back chairs, an oak Chippendale-style chest, glass, sterling silver, china, linens, fine jewelry, carpets, pictures, toys, games and books. These items have been donated by the Connecticut Chapter of the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America, who happen to own and maintain the WebbDeane-Stevens Museum. “It is a patriotic group for women with a long history,” explained Museum Executive Director

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WETHERSFIELD POST

Friday, March 30, 2012 | 5

CL&P program teaches Highcrest kids about electrical safety By ERICA SCHMITT STAFF WRITER

Kids at Highcrest Elementary in Wethersfield were eager to be ‘Safe Not Sorry’ Wednesday when a CL&P representative came to educate them in the company’s Electrical Safety Program. The school’s 61 fourth-graders began by watching an informative and entertaining video the power company put together for over 31,000 students at 500 Connecticut schools, to teach basic principles of electrical safety. “We just try to keep the kids out of trouble,” said Paul Czarnecki, former senior field technician of 31 years, who has been retired for eight years but has still volunteered to host the program for the last seven. “We used to offer it to fifth grade but now we’ve moved down to fourth grade because kids are getting more inquisitive these days,” he added, before showing the class the different size wires, insulators and tools used and letting them try on a pair of linesman’s gloves, a jacket and helmet. A long orange-colored “hot-stick” was of particular interest to the group, who learned how the device keeps linemen from being electrocuted while they’re up in the bucket fixing telephone pole wires. “This is so you come home every day with all your body parts,” Czarnecki told the kids. When it came time for questions, every hand was wiggling in the air and some students were even standing up, eager to satisfy their curiosity. Besides unplugging the hairdryer while it’s not in use, staying out of

Erica Schmitt | Staff

At left, students eagerly raise their hands to ask questions following an electrical safety presentation. At right, Paul Czarnecki, host of CL&P’s electrical safety program, with fourth-graders at Highcrest Elmentary students following a presentation.

trees that are close to wires, keeping kites away from power lines and knives out of the toaster, they learned that you don’t have to touch a power line to get shocked, you just have to get too close to it. Then they sat quietly through a scary story about a little girl who

decided a random outdoor cabinet would be the perfect hiding spot during a game of hide-and-seek. Not knowing the “cabinet” was actually a transformer death-trap, she was electrocuted. “There’s no second chance with electricity,”Czarnecki warned.

While chatting with the teachers afterwards, he noted, “This whole program is worth what the company spends if we save even one life.” And it came at the perfect time. “It ties in with our electricity unit,” said teacher Carrie Hill, adding, “The kids are right now making

connections with circuits and we’re learning about magnets.” At the end of the afternoon, students received copies of the Electrical Safety World Booklet and were encouraged to visit CL-P.com to share what they learned with their families.

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Pet care tips: Spring is hereâ&#x20AC;Ś and so are the ticks!

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Spring brings lots of sunshine, rain, flowers and of course little eight-legged critters we love to hate â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ticks! There have already been tick sightings which have resulted in media coverage throughout the United States. Whether it is the warm winter, the acorn population, and/or the mouse or deer population being blamed all the articles point to this year being a bad tick year. Not only are ticks gross but they can carry a number of diseases transmittable to humans and dogs. The most common seen here in Connecticut are Lyme disease, anaplasmosis and ehrlichiosis. Signs can be very vague ranging fromâ&#x20AC;? just not doing rightâ&#x20AC;? to fever and overt lameness to bleeding disorders. Of these only Lyme disease has a vaccine available for dogs. Prevention of disease is much easier, safer, and less expensive than treatment. Vaccinating your dog with the Lyme vaccine as well as monthly tick prevention with a good topical product such as Frontline Plus or Advantix II can be over 95 eprcent efficacious in preventing tick borne disease transmission. Although cats are naturally resistant to Lyme disease as well as the other tick borne diseases a good topical preventative should be used on them also to prevent other parasitic infections and to prevent them from bringing ticks into the home. Beware though not all topicals work the same! Be sure to talk to your veterinarian about what brands he or she recommends and why. So get a head start on tick season this year. If not already on flea and tick prevention, start it and continue it monthly all year round. Make an appointment with your veterinarian to see if the Lyme vaccination is appropriate for your dog.Talk to your veterinarian about yearly screening blood tests to see if your dog has already been exposed. And most importantly enjoy your spring and summer knowing your pet is as protected as can be. To learn more spring and summer pet tips visit the Wethersfield Library website at http://www.wethersfieldlibrary.org/news/upcoming.html for information about the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pet Awarenessâ&#x20AC;?lecture April 19. Dr. Monica Dijanic Medical Director, Beaver Brook Animal Hospital

Months of training culminate in district-wide spelling bee By ERICA SCHMITT STAFF WRITER

What began as a venture to improve studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CMT scores throughout the district culminated with a much-anticipated night of bumblebee mania,friendly competition and spelling delight. Wethersfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 District PTOs Spelling Bee had a turnout of more than 165 spellers and a packed auditorium of parents, friends and school officials eager to watch their kids get up on stage and spend last Friday evening vying for the title of Top Speller. Highcrest third-grade speller Rian Trinity Jackson opened up the evening with her performance of the National Anthem. Although there were some no-shows as well as a few new contestants the night of, Highcrest Elementary took the lead with the highest number of registered spellers, with 55 students. Webb had 39, Emerson Williams-30, Hanmer-37, and Charles Wright-21.

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They were divided into three groups by grade level. Grade 1 to 2 winners were Webb first-grader, Pryia Ray and runner-up, Victoria Harris, a first-grader at Webb. Hanmer fourth-grader, Morghan Kielb took first place for grades 3 to 4, with Harim Hahn, Highcrest fourth-grader as runner-up. In the Grade 5 to 6 category, Charles Wright fifth-grader, Kevin Rascius won and Highcrest sixth-grader, Alex Kanya was runner-up. The panel of four â&#x20AC;&#x153;judgesâ&#x20AC;? was comprised of Board of Education memberElaineSteinmiller-Paradise, Mrs. Regina Aleksandravicius, manager of Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Services at Wethersfield Library,Highcrest parent Jessica Aguiar and her husband, Joe Aguiar, a morning show host at The River 105.9 FM. Event chairwoman Leslie Esoian, a Highcrest parent, put in months of planning to organize the evening, which was much more than a oneday competition â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it was a season of kids reading, writing and spelling to prepare. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parents sat with them at night going over words â&#x20AC;Śevery little thing helps when it comes to literacy,â&#x20AC;?said Esoian. The hope is to have a Wethersfield student eventually ready for Scripps NationalSpellingBeeinWashington, D.C., where there has never been a winner from Connecticut.

The schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; PTOs created an interactive website months ahead of time to not only get everyone excited about the bee,but prepare them with study sheets and practice tests.Their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great American Spell Checkâ&#x20AC;?was a way for kids to practice and a fundraiser for the bee, as students took the tests and then collected pledge money for words they spelled correctly. A total of $457.80 was raised by the pledging. A number of community businesses also sponsored the event. Esoian enjoyed being on stage with the spellers, whom she encouraged, comforted and congratulated as the night progressed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can tell you firsthand how nervous and excited they were at the same time,â&#x20AC;? she remembered. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While the spellers waited in line, some shared with me their fears about getting a word wrong, or were thankful they werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t asked a word they did not know, which was asked of another speller.â&#x20AC;? Esoian and other parents hope that next year more students will sign up to participate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the first time weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done this so I think it just has to catch on,â&#x20AC;? she said. Annâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Video Connection videotaped the spelling bee and is selling DVDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for $10 each. To order one, visit http://www.wethersfieldbee. com/videographer.html.

Panera Bread to open new location April 9

Anticipation is â&#x20AC;&#x153;risingâ&#x20AC;? as the new Panera Bread in Wethersfield prepares to celebrate its opening Monday, April 9. Located in the Wethersfield Shopping Center, 1059 Silas Deane Hwy. Panera Bread is the 13th bakery-cafe in Connecticut owned by Panera franchisee, the Howley Bread Group of Cumberland, R.I. The opening represents 60 new jobs for the area. The 4,080 square-foot cafe with 92 interior seats and 18 seats on the outdoor patio will be open Monday through Thursday from 6:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 6:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.; and Sunday 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. for breakfast, lunch and dinner.The cafe will also be home to a drive thru, the first for the Howley Bread Groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 24 bakery-cafes in the area.Panera Wethersfield is also the latest CL&P customer to provide an electric car charging station as part of CL&Pâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s EV Research Project, the most comprehensive study of plug-in charging in New England. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re so happy to be part of this town, giving back to local charities and having a great group of Wethersfield High School students as part of our team,â&#x20AC;? said Paula Floryan, general manager of Panera Bread.


Friday, March 30, 2012 | 7

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WETHERSFIELD POST

CCSU students get a taste of financial reality Credit unions sponsor event to teach responsible money management By CIARA HOOKS CORRESPONDENT

NEW BRITAIN — CCSU’s Alumni Hall was the home Monday for one of the Financial Reality Fairs thrown for the high school students of Connecticut. The Credit Union League of Connecticut along with credit unions from all over the state put on the first fair of 2012 for about 12 schools totaling approximately 450 students. The schools included New Britain High School, Bristol Central High School,Maloney High School, Berlin High School, Wethersfield High School and Plainville High School. This is the fourth year Berlin High School has come and “it gets bigger and better every year,” said Lorraine Wicklund, an accounting teacher at the school. “We’ve planned it for the Personal Finance class and the Accounting 2 class, but other students also came,” Wicklund said. “I prefer seniors to come because they’re the ones who

are leaving and it’s the most realistic to them because they realize their life is going to move from high school.” Students participating at the fair got an eye-opening experience in financial budgeting. “The kids have a budget worksheet. In it they pick a career and a salary. They have to try and live within that salary,” said Brandi Byrne, marketing coordinator for First Bristol Federal Credit Union. They traveled around to these different tables occupied by volunteers to obtain things like food, housing, financial counseling, transportation, clothing, furniture, pets, credit unions, insurance, travel and entertainment and night life all within their budget.There was also, a wheel of reality, in which, the students spun a wheel like the Wheel of Fortune and it landed on a real life situation where they either gained or lost money. Nick Aguilar, from Wethersfield High School, whose career was a financial advisor, spun the wheel

of reality and got overtime pay, so they added $325 into his checking account. “Some people were losing money mattering on what you got, but I got an increase in my money,” he said Aguilar is an excited senior who was accepted into the accounting programs at UConn and Quinnipiac and treasured this experience. “It’s a unique experience; I mean there’s nothing much like it. You get to experience what it’s like coming out of college,” he said. “I got a broken leg,” said Mike Tirinzoni, 17, from Berlin High School whose career was a physician’s assistant. “I was kind of thinking about getting a second job to help pay for all my expenses including that, and it wasn’t really that great.” They were able to go back and change things to fit their budgets except the wheel of reality. “I started off with a Honda Accord for $15,000 and then went back, changed it and now I have a Volkswagen Passat for $7,000,” said Kobe MacDonald, 14, from

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Nick Aguilar of Wethersfield takes part in a budget exercise at the Financial Reality Fair at CCSU Monday. Below, Jakub Cwieka, left, and Alex Taddeo, right, of Berlin High School discover the cost of an apartment.

Bristol Central. I changed it because it didn’t really work out with the rest of my things; I was not balanced at all. I was off by a lot.” Kobe’s career was an electrical engineer. Most of the kids traveled in groups of two or three and became roommates when it came time for them to choose housing. At the end there was a post fair survey each student filled out giving them and overview of their experience. Besides the 80-100 volunteers the students also, had their teachers to help them if they had any questions. Most of the volunteers were from Connecticut credit unions, but there were some vendor volunteers from companies that the credit unions use or who the credit unions serve. “For example Hartford Hospital employees because Hartford Healthcare Credit Union serves them as their Credit Union and they had some people interested in volunteering,” said Byrne. Anna Lewandowski and Marinella Russell work at the Hartford Hospital and were recruited. This was their first time and Lewandowski was placed at the wheel of reality and Russell was at the clothing table. “They have to come in and they have to make a good decision on what kind of clothes to buy and

how to be thrifty or some of them aren’t as thrifty as they should be,” joked Russell. “They have different options; they break it down in monthly payments. Top of the line is $266 a month or they can opt to shop at thrift shops or consignment shops for $100 a month depending on their profession.” TheUnionLeagueofConnecticut presented this idea four years ago and “it just took off,” said Byrne. Every credit union in the state wanted to help as well.


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WETHERSFIELD POST

Friday, March 30, 2012 | 9

Food safety implications in the vegetable garden By DIANE WRIGHT HIRSCH MPH, RD, EXTENSION EDUCATOR

It has certainly been a strange “winter.” And who knows what March will bring.Some are speculating that we might have at least one big snow storm this month. It has been known to happen.Nonetheless, the serious home gardener is getting itchy and making plans. It is almost time to prepare the garden for planting. As you consider the soil amendments you will use this year, keep food safety in mind… In an effort to improve soil and production of fruits and vegetables, home gardeners will use compost, compost teas, and manure that is either fresh or composted. Compost is the natural breakdown product of leaves, stems, manures and other organic materials. And, a source of the pathogens that cause foodborne illness. Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7, and other bacteria, viruses and parasites can live happily in a pile of unmanaged compost. You certainly do not want to add these guys to the soil that is growing your salad! However, proper composting will kill pathogens and weed seeds, and improve the quality and safety of your compost. Using manure

Using plant based compost Foodborne illness causing bugs love decaying organic matter. But, a well managed compost pile (of at least 27 cubic feet) can generate enough heat to destroy these pathogens. To be effective, your compost must reach a temperature of at least 130 degrees F. If your compost pile is smaller than this, or, if you do not manage it properly, pathogens can survive. You need to turn the pile regularly and include ingredients that will break down.Coffee grounds and grass clippings (do not use if treated with pesticides or herbicides) can help to produce more heat. The best way to know if your compost is getting hot enough to kill pathogens is to check the temperature with a compost thermometer. You can buy one at a garden supply store. If you cannot measure the temperature of your pile or if you are unable to turn and manage it regularly, then treat your compost like uncomposted manure and spread it in the garden late in the fall. Even though commercial composters use horse and dairy manures

commonly added to compost tea may promote growth of bacteria that can cause illness in humans, including Salmonella and E. coli. So, if you are considering using compost tea, unless you know that you are using methods that minimize the presence of human pathogens, it would be wise to save them, again, for nonedible plants. Little is known for sure about the uptake by plants of human pathogens from the soil.The science is still very new and much of it has taken place in a laboratory. But, it makes sense at the very least to manage the processing and use of these amendments in a way that reduces the risk of contamination of these plants and to minimize the contact of manure, compost or compost teas that have Proper composting can not only help a gardener grow delicious fruits and not been managed in a way to kill vegetables, but can also help them prevent foodborne illness. or prevent the growth of human pathogens with edible plants — parin their “recipes”, home gardeners to teas as a source of nutrients for ticularly close to harvest. should not use any animal waste, these beneficial microbes. However, including pet waste. Animal waste United States Department of For more information about safe may contain pathogens that might Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural management of manure, compost not be destroyed during the com- Research Service (ARS) microbi- and compost teas, call the University post process. It is also best not to ologists David Ingram and Patricia of Connecticut Home and Garden put meat scraps or dairy product Millner have found that ingredients Education Center at (877) 486-6271 waste into your compost bin. These too can carry pathogens and attract animals to your pile.

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Using compost teas Compost teas are made by adding mature compost to unheated water and allowing the mixture to steep or brew.The goal is to enhance populations of beneficial microbes that can be useful for the suppression of foliar and soil borne pathogens.Sometimes additives such as kelp, fish extracts or sugars such as molasses, are added

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Manure is an excellent fertilizer and soil conditioner. But, applying fresh manure to your fruit or vegetable garden does not really make food safety sense. Even aged manure can have E. coli present. It is least risky, if manure is your soil amendment of choice, to use commercially composted manure. Purchase from a reputable company that follows practices that can insure that pathogens are destroyed in the process. Home composting of manure is more risky. It may be difficult, partly because of smaller compost piles, to achieve bug-killing temperatures. The process requires careful management, including: regular and adequate mixing and temperature monitoring with a long stemmed (very long stemmed) compost thermometer. The temperature must reach 130 to 140 degrees F for at least two five-day heating cycles. After composting, the compost must “cure” for two to four months before applying it to your garden soil to complete destruction of pathogens. We tell fruit and vegetable farmers that use uncomposted manure to

reduce food safety risks by applying manure in the fall after harvest, and mixing it in — not leaving it on the surface of the soil. Once manure is applied, at minimum, you must wait 120 days from manure application to crop harvest. But, even then, it is best not to use uncomposted manure on most food crops (corn is an exception to that “rule”). It is just not worth the risk. It really is best to use plant compost instead. Save the manure for non-edible crops.

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ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS

  POLICE BLOTTER

Jordan Ginsberg of Rocky Hill, a member of the Class of 2013, was recently named to the honor roll for the fall term at Pomfret School. Westminster School in Simsbury announced the following academic honor awards for the winter 2012 term. David Hallisey of Wethersfield, a junior, earned high honors. Franco Serrao of Wethersfield, a senior, earned honors.

Accreditation assessment team invites public comment A team of assessors from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA) will arrive April to examine all aspects of the Wethersfield Police Department’s policy and procedures, management, operations, and support services. The department was first internationally accredited in 1992 by CALEA, which requires police agencies to comply with 480 standards and undergo re-accreditation every three years to maintain the status. The re-accreditation team consists of police officials from similar agencies across the nation. The team will review operational files and training guidelines as well as interview officers, other staff and the public to ensure that the department is complying with the CALEA standards. Members of the public are invited to meet with the team to offer comments about the police department at a public information session from 5 to 7 p.m. April 10 at the Wethersfield Police Department, 250 Silas Deane Hwy. Individuals can also comment by calling (860) 721-2718 between 3 to 5 p.m. April 10. Comments are limited to 10 minutes and should pertain to the standards upon which CALEA judges the police department. A copy of the CALEA standards is available at Wethersfield Police Department and can be reviewed by contacting Sergeant Thomas Mitney at (860) 721-2919. Individuals may also submit written comments by writing to CALEA at 13575 Heathcote Boulevard, Suite 320 Gainesville, VA 20155. When the assessment team concludes its investigation it will report its findings to the full CALEA Commission, which will decide whether to reaccredit the department.

Brian Araujo, 31, of 22 Sandy Drive, Rocky Hill, was charged March 14 with possession of narcotics with intent to sell, possession of narcotics, and possession of more than ½ ounce of marijuana. Anthony Torres, 19, of 28 Bushnell St., Hartford, was charged March 14 with interfering with an officer, and second-degree breach of peace. Claire Khannah Williamson, 23, of 193 Evergreen Circle, Middletown, was charged March 16 with second-degree larceny. Lea Fuller,20,of 251 Court Ct.,Middletown, was charged March 15 with criminal impersonation, interfering with an officer, possession of drug paraphernalia and failure to appear. Damaris Vasquez, 17, of 65 Treat Road was charged March 15 with second-degree failure to appear. Allison Limberger, 22, of 8 Pioneer Drive, Ellington, was charged March 16 with operating under the influence and failure to renew motor vehicle license. Daisy Cruz, 49, of 936 Wethersfield Ave., Hartford, was charged March 16 with seconddegree failure to appear. Jahad Belcher,20,of 27 Eastford St.,Hartford, was charged March 17 with possession of narcotics, failure to drive in the proper lane and operating a motor vehicle without a license. Gabriel Espinoza, 54, of 115 Standish St., Hartford, was charged March 18 with operating under the influence of drugs/alcohol, and driving the wrong way on a divided highway Alberto Martinez, 37, of 596 Nott St. was charged March 19 with disorderly conduct. William Harris, 47, of 18 Denison St., Hartford, was charged March 20 with fourthdegree larceny. Ejoel Molina-Prado, 35, of 127 Babcock St., Hartford, was charged March 20 with second-

WETHERSFIELD POST

degree failure to appear. Kenneth Salisbury, 48, of 130 Goff Road was charged March 20 with disorderly conduct, second-degree unlawful restraint and seconddegree reckless endangerment. Matthew Torpey, 30, of 132 Prospect St., Vernon, was charged March 21 with weapon in vehicle, drinking while driving unreasonably fast, operating a motor vehicle under the influence. Constance Grabowski, 43, of 283 Prospect St. was charged March 21 with violation of probation/conditional discharge. Nestor Santiago, 36, of 462 Liberty St., Springfield, Mass., was charged March 21 with second-degree failure to appear. Christopher Patnode, 26, of 64 Punch Brook Road, Burlington, was charged March 21 with second-degree forgery, second-degree conspiracy to commit forgery and fourth-degree larceny. Sheryl Rutledge,49,of 11 Geer St.,Cromwell, was charged March 22 with third-degree assault and disorderly conduct. Jason Carillo, 26, of 200 Longvue St. was charged March 22 with second-degree failure to appear. Dana Feliciano, 47, of 116 Thorniley St., New Britain, was charged March 23 with operating under the influence, failure to have lights illuminated. Michael O’Connor, 35, of 843 Wells Road was charged March 24 with operating under the influence of drugs/alcohol, and failure to drive in the proper lane. Melanie Viera, 39, of 12 Frew Terrace, Enfield, was charged March 25 with seconddegree failure to appear. Edwin Netupski, 34, of 51 Sunset Road was charged March 26 with first and second-degree failure to appear.

ROCKY HILL EVENTS CALENDAR EXHIBIT OF STUDENT ARTWORK: In celebration of Youth Art Month, Rocky Hill High School and Griswold Middle School will present an exhibit of student artwork at Cora J. Belden Library through April 5. This exceptional showcase of artwork will include a wide range of media including drawing, watercolor, ceramics, photography, digitally created artworks and more. DINOSAUR STATE PARK SPONSORS DINOSAUR EGG HUNT: The Friends of Dinosaur State Park and the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) will sponsor a dinosaur egg hunt at 2 p.m. Easter Sunday, April 8 for children ages 2-12. Participants will be separated into two groups ages 6 and under and ages 7 to 12. The event will be held rain or shine and will take place on the lawn in front of the museum. There is no fee to participate in the hunt and reservations are not necessary. Note that the

hunt will start promptly at 2 p.m. Six of the hidden eggs will contain a gift certificate for a stuffed “Dilly” the Dilophosaurus. Participants must bring their own basket. Dinosaur State Park is located on 400 West Street in Rocky Hill. Visitors can view 600 early Jurassic dinosaur footprints under the dome along with museum exhibits. The park has a Discovery Room that features a small live animal collection, coloring and book-mark making stations, puzzles, puppets and fossil and mineral collections that visitors can touch and examine. There are 2½ miles of outdoor hiking trails and an outdoor picnic area. The park also has a bookshop that has a wide variety of unique items for sale. There is an admission fee to enter the museum. Adults (13 and up) are $6, Youth (6 to 12) are $2 and children under 6 are free. The park accepts MasterCard, Visa and Discover. Charter Oak Passes are available for seniors (65 and over) who are Connecticut residents. Picture ID

must be presented to acquire a pass. For more information or if you have any questions, contact Meg Enkler at (860) 529-5816 or visit the website at www.ct.gov/deep/dinosaurstatepark. FREE NUTRITION EDUCATION PROGRAM: The Central Connecticut Health District is offering a free educational course designed to assist individuals in managing healthy and affordable eating habits. The program will consist of four educational sessions, each covering a different aspect of nutrition management including how to shop on a budget, properly reading food labels as well as incorporating more fruits and vegetables in their diets. Classes will be held at the William J. Pitkin Community Center, Room S-2, 30 Greenfield St., from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on four consecutive Thursday evenings: April 12, 19 and 26 with a tour of Stop & Shop Supermarket in Rocky Hill May 3. In the event of a cancellation, all classes will be pushed to the following week.

The Health District received funding from the Connecticut Department of Public Health to present this program. The class is open to residents of Berlin, Newington, Rocky Hill, and Wethersfield who have an interest in changing their eating habits, incorporating more fruit and vegetables in their diet or need to grocery shop for healthy, family-friendly foods on a budget. Debbie Brinckman, RD, CDN will discuss healthy eating and nutrition management through the use of the USDA recommendations from their new program ChooseMyPlate. Participants will receive free materials, recipes and sample menus. At the last class, Debbie Brinckman, RD, CDN, will host a tour of Stop & Shop Supermarket in Rocky Hill, Thursday, May 3, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m, to provide information on how to read food labels and what to avoid when shopping. Arrive in the store by 6:15 p.m. Pre-registration is required — RSVP by April 9, to be part of this class. All participants must commit

to all four classes. To register for the program, residents should call the Central Connecticut Health District at (860) 721-2818. SPRING WINE TASTING: Holy Cross Church, 31 Biruta St., New Britain, invites the public to its “Spring Wine Tasting” from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, April 21. Cost per person is $20 for tickets purchased ahead of time or $25 per person for tickets purchased at the door. You must be 21 years of age or older for admission. The ticket price includes a selection of fancy hot and cold hors d’oeuvres and homemade desserts. To purchase tickets, contact Olivia at (860) 678-0597, the church office at (860) 229-2011, or stop by these Broad Street business: Teresa’s Herbs and Flowers, Discount Package Store, Royal Oak Package Store, Pulaski Delicatessen, Max Mart, Quo Vadis, Polmart, or the dental office of Dr. Barbara Malz. Proceeds will be used for the church restoration project.


WETHERSFIELD POST

LIBRARY CALENDAR LEARNING EXPRESS NOW AVAILABLE TO WETHERSFIELD RESIDENTS THROUGH WETHERSFIELD LIBRARY: Available free 24/7 through Wethersfield Library, LearningExpress Library is a comprehensive online resource that provides access to more than 300 online practice tests for students and adults of all ages. LearningExpress Library also offers comprehensive courses in math, reading, and writing, as well as workplace skills enrichment courses such as computer tutorials. LearningExpress Library courses are designed to help students and adult learners achieve their educational and career goals. All practice tests include score reports that help you focus on those skill areas that need the most attention. You can have unlimited access to interactive skill-building courses and a broad range of practice tests based on such exams as the GED, ASVAB, Firefighter, Police Officer, Paramedic, EMT Basic, U.S. Citizenship, Postal Worker, Cosmetology, and others. If you are preparing for the ACT, GED or SAT, LearningExpress Library offers a complete course series. Using LearningExpress Library is easy. Go to www. wethersfieldlibrary.org and click on the Learning Express logo. Use your Wethersfield Library card number to create a user name (choose your own password). LearningExpress Library is made possible through the generous support of the Friends of the Wethersfield Library. For assistance or further information, contact Wethersfield Library at (860) 257-2811. DROP-IN STORY/PLAY TIME: The Wethersfield Library invites children of all ages and their caregivers to come to Wednesday morning and Friday morning Drop-in Playtime/ Storytime from 10 a.m. to noon. The program is an opportunity for families to visit the library with their children in a friendly and relaxed environment and meets year round. A librarian will be on hand at each session to share a short story and a song at 11 a.m. No registration is required. Children’s programs are cancelled on any day when the Wethersfield Public Schools are closed due to weather. For more information, visit the library, www. wethersfieldlibrary.org/kids.htm or call the Children’s Department at (860) 257-2801. RECESS ROCKS: The spring session of the Wethersfield Library Children’s Department Literacy Classes has begun. The Children’s Department has offered a new class, Recess Rocks, for children ages 5 years and up on Tuesday afternoons at 3:45 p.m. This is a music and movement program designed to get kids fit, encourage natural “feel-good” energy, build self-esteem and to nurture fitness and lifelong healthy habits. Registration is required for Recess Rocks. For registration information or for more information on this and other children’s programs, visit the library, www.wethersfieldlibrary.org/kids.htm or call the children’s department at

(860) 257-2801. KEEP-THE-CHANGE PAYING OFF: Friends of the Wethersfield Library are pleased to say Keep-the-Change is paying off. Those who paid library fines then chipped in their change to the Keep-the-Change Program that started last summer should know the first purchase with their donations has been made. The Friends paid for steps so young patrons can take advantage of the new RFID Express Check-out option in the Children’s Department. While nickel and dime donations may seem small, it all adds up to help the library. JOB OUTLOOK PROGRAM: The Wethersfield Library will host a program for job seekers Tuesday, April 3, at 2 p.m. Patrick J. Flaherty, economist with more than 20 years professional experience analyzing the economy for the Connecticut Department of Labor will present a program titled “Connecticut Employment Trends: Finally Turning the Corner?” Job declines stopped in early 2010. Unfortunately, job growth was disappointing through most of 2011 but the year ended on a high note suggesting some positive momentum for 2012. Not all industries suffered equally in the recession, and recent job growth has been stronger in some sectors than others. Join us for an update on Connecticut employment trends, national industry and occupational projections, and the highlights about the fastest growing occupations. Additional topics will include the many services and online tools available to jobseekers from the CTDOL. The program is free and open to all. Light refreshments will be provided. Registration is recommended. To register of for information call the library at (860) 257-2811 or email registrations to library@wethersfieldlibrary.org. WETHERSFIELD LIBRARY’S MUNCHA BUNCHA BOOKS: Muncha Buncha Books, a program of stories, riddles, games, crafts, and lots of fun for children in grades K through 3 will be held Thursday, April 5, at 3:45 p.m. in the Children’s Program Room at Wethersfield Library. Join us and “Take Flight.” This storytime will take you soaring. Registration is required for Muncha Buncha Books. For more information, visit the library, or www. wethersfieldlibrary.org/kids.htm, or call the children’s department at (860) 257-2801. WETHERSFIELD LIBRARY CLOSED EASTER WEEKEND: The Wethersfield Library will be closed Friday, April 6, Saturday, April 7 and Sunday, April 8 for the Easter Holiday. The library resumes regular hours Monday, April 9. The library’s regular hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, and 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays. At any time, the library may be reached on the internet at www.wethersfieldlibrary.org where you may search the catalog, use the online databases, download an audiobook, ask a reference question, or renew, reserve or request a book.

  APRIL COMPUTER CLASSES: The Wethersfield Library is offering two computer classes Monday, April 9 and two classes Wednesday, April 11. Introduction to Computers will meet at 2:30 p.m. Monday, April 9. Learn everything you need to know about the hardware, software and operating system (Windows 7). This class will be helpful for those brand new to computers and for anyone interested in how a computer works. All You Need to Know about Email meets at 7 p.m. Monday. Find out the fundamentals of how to send and receive email. Learn about attachments and the wonders of the address book. You do not need to own a computer to have an email account. Wednesday, April 11, at 1:30 p.m. Introduction to the Internet will meet. Learn the basics of surfing the internet. Discover what a browser is and how it works. No computer skills are required for this class. Then at 3 p.m. Facebook amd more meets. Learn the dos and don’ts when signing up for Facebook. Get a thorough tour of Facebook and a brief look at some other social networking websites. These classes are conducted in a lecture format. Registration is suggested. You may register in person at the Wethersfield Library or by calling the Adult Services Information Desk at (860) 257-2811, or email registrations to library@ wethersfieldlibrary.org. FRIENDS OF THE WETHERSFIELD LIBRARY MEETING: The Friends of the Wethersfield Library will hold their April meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 10 at the Library. All meetings are open to the public. “LET’S TALK MURDER” MYSTERY DISCUSSION GROUP: The Wethersfield Library will host “Let’s Talk Murder,” a three-part book discussion group for mystery lovers. Discussions will be once a month on Thursday evenings at 7 p.m. The first book to be discussed on April 12 is “Rogue Island” by Bruce DeSilva. When tenement buildings in Providence, R.I. go up in smoke and some residents die, a newspaper reporter starts to investigate. “Rogue Island” was the 2010 winner

Friday, March 30, 2012 | 11

of the Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for the best first mystery novel. On May 24 “Still Life” by Louise Penny will be featured. Canada’s Chief Inspector Armand Gamache is called to a tiny hamlet south of Montreal, to investigate the suspicious “accident” that killed a retired schoolteacher. “Still Life” won the 2005 New Blood Dagger in Britain and the Arthur Ellis Award in Canada for best first crime novel. The June 14 selection is the 2009 Edgar Award winner “Blue Heaven” by C.J. Box. Two children witness a gruesome murder in rural Idaho and must depend on a rancher to help them survive. Marge Ruschau will guide the discussion. She is a librarian and former newspaper journalist who loves mysteries and is the facilitator of several mystery discussion groups in Connecticut. Copies of the books will be available at the library. SECOND SATURDAY CINEMA AT WETHERSFIELD LIBRARY PRESENTS “SUNSET BOULEVARD”: Second Saturday Cinema at Wethersfield Library meets April 14 for a 1:30 p.m. viewing of the 1950 film “Sunset Boulevard.” The film stars William Holden as Joe Gillis a struggling writer, and Gloria Swanson as the aging silent film star Norma Desmond who lures him into her fantasy world. Together they create two of the screen’s most memorable characters. Directed in 1950 by Billy Wilder “Sunset Boulevard” is now considered a classic and was included in the first group of films selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. This program is free and open to the public. Registration is not required. Light refreshments are provided by the Friends of the Wethersfield Library. For information call the Library at (860) 257-2811, or visit the library. PET AWARENESS PROGRAM: The Wethersfield Library will host a “Pet Awareness” program for animal lovers at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 19. The program will be presented by Howard Asher, DVM of Beaver Brook Animal Hospital

and will focus on what pet owners should do to get their pets ready for the spring and summer. You will learn about preventative medicines such as flea and tick medication along with heartworm prevention, the dangers of heat and other elements of summer weather and pet disaster preparedness. Asher is a member of the Connecticut and Hartford County, New York and Massachusetts Veterinary Medical Associations. He recently became a member of the Connecticut State Animal Response Team, and is currently a team leader for his assigned region. The program is free and open to all. Registration is suggested. For more information or to register call the Adult Services Information Desk at (860) 257-2811, or email registrations to library@wethersfieldlibrary.org. NAVIGATING THE EVER-CHANGING TECHNOLOGY LANDSCAPE: The Wethersfield Library will host “How to Navigate the Ever-Changing Landscape of Technology for Job Seekers and Late Bloomers” Saturday, April 21, at 1 p.m. Author and computer teacher Abby Stokes will present this program. The digital divide widens with the rapid pace of new innovations and gadgets. What is out there and how it might benefit you can be lost in all the tech talk. Stoke will help you understand what everyone is talking about and how to conquer the new technologies. Stokes is the author of “Is this Thing On? A Computer Handbook for Late Bloomers, Technophobes and the Kicking & Screaming.” She has taught basic computing at Cooper Union and New York University, has presented to libraries and works with individuals and corporations. Funding for this program has been provided by the Friends of the Wethersfield Library. The program is free and open to all. Light refreshments will be provided. Registration is recommended. To register of for information call the Library at (860) 257-2811, or email registrations to library@wethersfieldlibrary.org.

Drive Safer, Longer Are you a driver who is 65 years of age or older? Call for a FREE Assessment & Screening Appointment This one-hour research study is a program designed to help seniors drive safer and longer. Participants will receive: Tips to make driving safer. A $5 Dunkin’ Donuts gift card.

Mature Driver Safety Screening Program Call Lea Ann at (860) 249-1245 for info and to make an appointment.


12 | Friday, March 30, 2012

 

WETHERSFIELD POST

WETHERSFIELD EVENTS CALENDAR GOOD FRIDAY MEMORIAL CONCERT: On Friday, April 6, at 7 p.m., the choirs of First Church of Christ in Wethersfield, 250 Main St., will present Requiem, Opus 9 by Maurice Duruflé. Also great a cappella choruses will round out the evening including, “God So Loved the World” from The Crucifixion by John Stainer, and “Alleluia” by Randall Thompson. In addition, Christopher Dukes and Nancy Andersen will sing the beloved “Sanctus” from the St. Cecilia Mass by Charles Gounod. The concert will feature organist David Enlow. Enlow was a first-place winner in the Albert Schweitzer Organ Festival in 2003, and was a recent adjudicator. Enlow teaches Church Music at the Juilliard School. The concert will be under the direction of David Spicer, Minister of Music. The church’s concerts are open to the public, and no tickets are required. A free-will offering will be received. Childcare will be available for those 8 years old and under. MANAGING CONCERNS ABOUT FALLS: Have you turned down a chance to go out with family or friends because you were concerned about falling? Have you cut down on a favorite activity because you might fall? If so, “A Matter of Balance: Managing Concerns About Falls” is a program for you. Fear of falling can be just as dangerous as falling itself. People who develop this fear often limit their activities, which can result in severe physical weakness, making the risk of falling even greater. Many older adults also experience increased isolation and depression when they limit their interactions with family and friends. A Matter of Balance can help people improve their quality of life and remain independent. A Matter of Balance is designed to reduce the fear of falling and increase activity levels among older adults. Participants learn to set realistic goals to increase activity, change their environment to reduce fall risk factors, and learn simple exercises to increase strength and balance. The Injury Prevention Center of Hartford Hospital is offering “A Matter of Balance: Managing Concerns About Falls,” which meets for eight weeks, Mondays, April 2 through May 21 at the Wethersfield Senior Center/Pitkin Community Center, 30 Greenfield St. The program costs have been underwritten by a grant from the Jefferson House, so there is no charge to participate. A workbook is provided and refreshments are served. Call Lea Ann at (860) 249-1245 to register or for more information. “CROSSWALK” AT CENTERPOINT COMMUNITY CHURCH: The public is invited to join us for a guided time of quiet reflection through readings, images, videos and music designed to help us reflect on the depth of God’s love for us shown by the cross. All are invited and welcome; Thursday, April 5 at 7 p.m., 840 Silas Deane Hwy. For more information, call (860) 5718415 or visit www.centerpointct.org.

“Celebrate Easter with CenterPoint Community Church” — Sometimes we get so caught up in the day-today stresses of work, relationships and to-do lists that it’s easy to get discouraged and lose sight of the big picture of life. This Easter, we invite you to come alive and renew the spiritual side of your life at CenterPoint Community Church. We think that a little faith can fill you with hope and bring the big picture of life back into focus. It doesn’t matter what your previous church background is, you’re always welcome to restart your journey of faith with us! Join us Easter Sunday, April 8, at 10 a.m., 840 Silas Deane Hwy. for service and a time of fellowship. All are welcome. For more information, call (860) 571-8415 or visit www. centerpointct.org. APRIL ART LECTURES AT WETHERSFIELD ACADEMY FOR THE ARTS: Wethersfield Academy for the Arts, 431 Hartford Ave., will offer two classes at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 4 and Wednesday, April 18. On April 4; 6:30 p.m. Robert Norieka — Painting Fluidly through the Mediums — Prominent national award winning artist Bob Norieka, will share his passion and insights in painting a wide variety of subjects, always keeping his work fresh and exciting. “I always need to keep pushing the envelope. Sometimes I will do an oil painting on location and go back to the studio and try painting it as a watercolor.” Noreika has illustrated children’s books and magazine editorials. This “local artist” exhibits in galleries throughout New England and truly has a unique handle on various mediums to master a unique vision. On April 18, 6:30 p.m. Koo Schadler — Egg Tempra Painting: From Ancient Egypt to the Present Day Artist Koo Schadler will discuss the history of this renowned but little understood medium and demonstrate how to make egg tempera paint starting from scratch. Egg tempera is one of the oldest types of paint. The ancient Egyptians workedin tempera, as did Leonardo da Vinci and Jan Van Eyck. The Renaissance masterpiece “Birth of Venus” by Botticelli was painted in egg tempera. Modern masters of the medium include Andrew Wyeth, George Tooker, and Paul Cadmus. This nationally known egg tempra artist will explain the common yet remarkable ingredients that go into egg tempera paint — powdered pigments and egg yolk — as well as the traditional, true gesso ground and panel used by tempera artists. Schadler will bring examples of her own paintings to share and discuss. Audience members are welcome to delve further into egg tempera in the Question and Answer session that follows the presentation. For more information, call 860-436-9857 or info@wethersfieldarts.org DINOSAUR STATE PARK SPONSORS DINOSAUR EGG HUNT: The Friends of Dinosaur State Park and the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) will sponsor a dinosaur

egg hunt at 2 p.m. Easter Sunday, April 8 for children ages 2 to 12. Participants will be separated into two groups ages 6 and under and ages 7 to 12. The event will be rain or shine and will take place on the lawn in front of the museum. There is no fee to participate in the hunt and reservations are not necessary. Note that the hunt will start promptly at 2 p.m. Six of the hidden eggs will contain a gift certificate for a stuffed “Dilly” the Dilophosaurus. Participants must bring their own basket. Dinosaur State Park is located on 400 West Street in Rocky Hill. Visitors can view 600 early Jurassic dinosaur footprints under the dome along with museum exhibits. The park has a Discovery room that features a small live animal collection, coloring and book-mark making stations, puzzles, puppets and fossil and mineral collections that visitors can touch and examine. There are 2½ miles of outdoor hiking trails and an outdoor picnic area. The park also has a bookshop that has a wide variety of unique items for sale. There is an admission fee to enter the museum. Adults (13 and up) are $6, Youth (6 to 12) are $2 and children under 6 are free. The park accepts MasterCard, Visa and Discover. Charter Oak Passes are available for seniors (65 and over) who are Connecticut residents. Picture ID must be presented to acquire a pass. For more information or if you have any questions, contact Meg Enkler at (860) 529-5816 or visit the website at www.ct.gov/ deep/dinosaurstatepark. SPRING WINE TASTING: Holy Cross Church, 31 Biruta St., New Britain, invites the public to its “Spring Wine Tasting” from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, April 21. Cost per person is $20 for tickets purchased ahead of time or $25 per person for tickets purchased at the door. You must be 21 years of age or older for admission. The ticket price includes a selection of fancy hot and cold hors d’oeuvres and homemade desserts. To purchase tickets, contact Olivia at (860) 678-0597, the church office at (860) 229-2011, or stop by these Broad Street business: Teresa’s Herbs and Flowers, Discount Package Store, Royal Oak Package Store, Pulaski Delicatessen, Max Mart, Quo Vadis, Polmart or the dental office of Dr. Barbara Malz. Proceeds will be used for the church restoration project. HEALTH DISTRICT OFFERS FREE NUTRITION EDUCATION PROGRAM: The Central Connecticut Health District is offering a free educational course designed to assist individuals in managing healthy and affordable eating habits. The program will consist of four educational sessions, each covering a different aspect of nutrition management including how to shop on a budget, properly reading food labels as well as incorporating more fruits and vegetables in their diets. Classes will be held at the William J. Pitkin Community Center, Room S-2, 30 Greenfield St. from 6:30 to 8:30

p.m. on four consecutive Thursday evenings: April 12, 19 and 26 with a tour of Stop & Shop Supermarket in Rocky Hill May 3. In the event of a cancellation, all classes will be pushed to the following week. The Health District received funding from the Connecticut Department of Public Health to present this program. The class is open to residents of Berlin, Newington, Rocky Hill, and Wethersfield who have an interest in changing their eating habits, incorporating more fruit and vegetables in their diet or need to grocery shop for healthy, family-friendly foods on a budget. Debbie Brinckman, RD, CDN will discuss healthy eating and nutrition management through the use of the USDA recommendations from their new program ChooseMyPlate. Participants will receive free materials, recipes and sample menus. At the last class, Debbie Brinckman, RD, CDN, will host a tour of Stop & Shop Supermarket in Rocky Hill, Thursday, May 3, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m, to provide information on how to read food labels and what to avoid when shopping. Arrive in the store by 6:15 p.m. Preregistration is required — RSVP by April 9, to be part of this class. All participants must commit to all four classes. To register for the program, residents should call the Central Connecticut Health District at (860) 721-2818. WETHERSFIELD HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 150 MAIN ST. CALENDAR LISTINGS: Lecture, 7 p.m. April 9 — “Connecticut Arms and Equips the Union” with Dean Nelson of the Museum of Connecticut History, at Keeney Memorial Cultural Center, 200 Main St., Wethersfield. No reservations needed. Admission: $5, free tohistorical society members. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. For information, call (860) 5297656. Concert, 2 p.m. April 22, Phil Rosenthal presents “American Melody,” at Keeney Memorial Cultural Center, 200 Main St. This is the last in the 2012 Keeney Cultural Series. Rosenthal combines his rich baritone, banjo, guitar and mandolin picking with his bluegrass, folk and country roots to be “one of the most expressive singers of traditional country music.” Admission is $15 adults, $10 for historical society members. Reservations are not necessary. For more information, call (860) 529-7656. 7TH ANNUAL TASTE OF WETHERSFIELD APRIL 14: Do not miss the tastiest time in town! Wethersfield Historical Society will celebrate its 7th annual Taste of Wethersfield Benefit, Saturday, April 14, from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at the Keeney Memorial Cultural Center, 200 Main St., Wethersfield. Enjoy lively musical entertainment with the Hot Cat Jazz Band while you immerse yourself in the inspired dishes from some of our best restaurants and caterers in the Greater Hartford community and savor a variety of great wines and beers that pair well with the food tastings. Among the 22 vendors participating this year

will be Carbone’s Ristorante, Wood ‘n Tap, Saybrook Fish House, Lucky Lou’s Bar and Grill, Aroma Bistro, Ascot Catering, Comerio, Ginza Japanese Cuisine, Starbuck’s, Vito’s Pizzaria and Restaurant, Olde Burnside Brewery, Cork & Brew and 10 wine vendors provided by Buy Rite Liquors. In addition, there will be a silent auction of great packages of food related gifts as well as some unique offerings. General admission ticket price is $30 in advance, $35 at the door, but buy early as this event fills up fast. Patrons of the event, at $50 a ticket, will receive early admission at 6 p.m. with full access to the food, drink and entertainment, as well as a special prize drawing just for them. Tickets may be purchased at the Keeney Center, 200 Main St., Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, 1 to 4 p.m., the Old Academy, 150 Main St., Tuesday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Vito’s Restaurant, 673 Silas Deane Hwy., and online at www. wethhist.org. Partnering with the society to sell tickets will be several Wethersfield school PTOs, with a portion of the ticket price helping to support the schools. “APRIL IN PARIS” SPRING BENEFIT DANCE FOR NATURE CENTER: The Friends of the Eleanor Buck Wolf Nature Center’s 10th annual spring dance fundraiser will be held from 7 to 11:30 p.m. Friday, April 13 at the William J. Pitkin Community Center Banquet Room, 30 Greenfield St., Wethersfield. This year’s dance, “April in Paris,” will feature live music performed by the popular Connecticut-based band, The Dramatix. They will play all the best pop and rock hits with a dramatic flair. See their website at www.thedramatix.com for more information. The Friends will provide light refreshments, non-alcoholic beverages, and drink set-ups for those who bring alcoholic beverages. Back this year is our popular tea cup auction. Tickets for the event can be purchased in advance for $25 per person or at the door for $30. Proceeds from the dance will benefit the Friends’ Cornwall Scholarship Fund and the Eleanor Buck Wolf Nature Center. For advance sales, to reserve a table for your group, to volunteer for the event, or for more information, contact the Nature Center at (860) 529-3075 or naturecenter@wethersfieldct.com. The Friends is a nonprofit group that helps to provide supplies, equipment, veterinary care, and program support to the Nature Center. The Friends also provides financial assistance for children attending the Nature Center’s summer camp and scholarships for graduating high school seniors pursuing studies in the natural, environmental, or ecological sciences. The Eleanor Buck Wolf Nature Center in Wethersfield’s Mill Woods Park is an ecology education and community center devoted to helping central Connecticut residents explore and understand the natural world. Contact (860) 529-3075 or naturecenter@wethersfieldct.com for more information.


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WETHERSFIELD POST

Friday, March 30, 2012 | 13

State senate passes measure to freeze gas taxes for 15 months By KEITH M. PHANEUF ŠCONNECTICUTMIRROR

The Senate voted unanimously Wednesday afternoon to adopt a circuit-breaker measure that would freeze state fuel taxes for the next 15 months.

Announcements

But the Democrat-controlled chamber also rejected a Republican amendment to cancel a gas tax hike slated to take effect in July 2013. While the circuit-breaker will shave about 1.4 cents off the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fuel tax burden, the next tax hike would add nearly 4 cents per gallon.

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The House of Representatives, where Democrats also hold the majority was expected to adopt the circuit-breaker measure later Wednesday. Despite the bipartisan support, election-year politics was top of mind. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Today we have taken a baby step

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when we had the opportunity to take a giant step,â&#x20AC;? said Sen. Andrew W. Roraback, R-Goshen, a candidate for Congress. But Sen. Eileen M. Daily, D-Westbrook, said approving any relief beyond what was adopted Wednesday â&#x20AC;&#x153;is just not a prudent or

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WETHERSFIELD POST

HOME IMPROVEMENT DIRECTORY AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING MULL BROS., INC. - We are a family business that’s been catering to your cooling & heating needs since 1945. We proudly install Lennox, American Standard, Weil McLain & other quality equipment (oil, gas & electric). We also service most makes & models. We are located next to the Wethersfield Post Office (behind the penguins and polar bears) at 61 Beaver Rd. 860- 529-8255 BASEMENT WATERPROOFING JP BACHHAND BASEMENT WATERPROOFING Reliable local contractor. Hatchway leaks, foundation cracks, sub-floor drainage systems, sump pumps & yard drainage. Fully insured, free estimates, written guarantee. Our 27th year registered with CT Dept of Consumer Protection (Reg #511842). Call 860-666-9737 CERAMIC TILE LEN & JEFF SHALLER - Fix leaky showers. Regrouting in tubs. Bath, kitchen tile installed. 37 years experience. Neat, expert workmanship. Repairs a specialty. Call 242-5805 CLEANING SERVICES Polish/English speaking woman can clean your house with care. 3rd cleaning 50% off for new clients only. Satisfaction guaranteed. Insurance Bonded. Call Kasia 860-538-4885

PAINTING Painting, interior & exterior, power wash, installation of gutter screen covers, new & repairing stucco, 1 day service. Fully insured. Also house cleaning. Call 860-832-9970 PLUMBING POSITANO PLUMBING, INC. 31 years of serving Bristol and the surrounding areas. Specializing in all repairs. Plumbing & heating. Water heater replacement, boiler replacement. CT Lic #202691, 308931. For the best repair work in the area, please call 860-584-0012, 186 West St., Bristol. HOUSE, CONDO, OFFICE CLEANING - Polish/English speaking lady with many years of experience. References upon request. Please call Ela at 860-348-0234 ELECTRICAL SERVICES NDC ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING All aspects of electrical work, additions, new homes, renovations, pools, hot-tubs, etc. Main service up-grades from fuses to circuit breakers. Fast, quality workmanship. Nick 860-665-7202. CT Lic #E1-180139 GUTTER CLEANING #1 First In Reliability - We Show Up!!! One day service. Our 10th year. Reasonable rates. Senior discounts. Reliable service. Call Rob (860) 982-3300 “A West Hartford Resident” Visit our web site: robpolo.com

REMODELING FULL SERVICE REMODELING Windows, bathrooms and kitchens. All interior and exterior home or business remodeling and handyman service. You name it - I’ve done it! Excellent references and competitive rates with over 10 years experience. BBB Accredited. Call Mike 860-6906505 or Kris 860-348-076 today for your free estimate. Fully insured and licensed. Lic #565969.

ROOFING LA RICH, LLC - Master Elite Roofing Contractor with over 500 satisfied customers. Our workmanship is warranteed for 20 years by shingle manufacturer. Best warranty in writing. “Quality you can count on for years.” We do roof repairs, vinyl siding, windows, seamless gutters. Honest, competitive pricing. No hidden costs. Free estimates. Fully insured. Written warranties. Clean and courteous installers. CT Lic #565709. GAFELK ME #11852. 860-622-9800 or 860-747-4427. www.larichroofing.com TREE SERVICE TOTAL TREE SERVICE & LANDSCAPING, LLC - Fall Cleanup & Lawn Maintenenace. Commerical & Residential. 75 ft. bucket truck. Chipper, firewood, land clearing, stump grinding, tree removal. Registration #608808. Fully insured.860-529-8389 or 860-538-0980.

to advertise call 860-231-2444


16 | Friday, March 30, 2012

WETHERSFIELD POST

Newington Town Crier 03-30-2012  

Local news from Newington, CT

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