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FOREWORD EL-MOSTAFA BENLAMLIH UNITED NATIONS, RESIDENT REPRESENTATIVE, INDONESIA 1


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Here in Humanitarian Affairs, a formidable task has been taken on: to transform youths from being mere academic sponges to young leaders equipped with the abilities to make pragmatic and responsible decisions.

cclimatized conditions, revolutionary technology, world-class facilities and exemplary educators - it is little wonders that today’s youths are highly educated and academically qualified. Yet it is only a handful that has the caliber to become compassionate leaders and in the process ensure their own success and the sustainability of the world.

The ambition of transforming the vast majority of ignorant youths to leaders and responsible decision-makers requires a mammoth effort. This is simply because the young people in our society are rather myopic. Infatuated with the pursuits of distinctions and material comforts, they fall short in recognising the worth of personal development and values, such as leadership and compassion, necessary to thrive in the modern workplace and society. It is therefore remarkable that Humanitarian Affairs United Kingdom, a champion of youth causes, is continuing this uphill battle to motivate and nurture our youths to reach their full potential. Through their annual University Scholars Leadership Symposium, young people have proven to be compassionate and selfless in their relentless participation to improve the lives of the disadvantaged. But compassion and kindness alone will not be able to fulfil the task at hand - be it a humanitarian relief effort or touching the lives of the deprived communities. It is important that young people cultivate a sense of social responsibility and take upon themselves the drive, the discipline and the devotion for the cause that Humanitarian Affairs champion.

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INTRODUCTION

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he University Scholars Leadership Symposium is an international leadership and humanitarian conference for Outstanding Youth Leaders from all over the world. This annual event hosted by Humanitarian Affairs United Kingdom is both a training ground and a conference for young people to have exposure and experience and, most especially the skills to execute humanitarian work. It is also a venue for all of the youths to spend quality time getting to know new friends, gain knowledge about world affairs, and be motivated to do more good work for mankind. From August 1-7, 2012, Bali, Indonesia witnessed a culmination of more than 400 young individuals who shared the same passion for humanitarian work. The Symposium tackled key humanitarian issues relevant to the global community. Issues such as human trafficking, ur-

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ban poverty, child abuse, world hunger and poverty were some of the topics discussed. Four expert humanitarians were invited as guest speakers to provide motivation for the young delegates to be one with them in connecting with communities in need. The Bali Symposium 2012 was the third of Humanitarian Affairs’ conferences; succeeding the international gatherings in Melaka, Malaysia and Pattaya, Thailand for the first and second symposiums, respectively. The Province of Bali was chosen as the host of the Symposium for various reasons. Among them was that the province was known to be a gracious host to its guests who indulge in its cultures and world-class offerings. People came to Bali to witness spectacular things. Many foreign investors have flocked to this province to set up

businesses and share in the spectacles of Bali and have dominated the industries in Bali. The most important reason why Bali was chosen as the host of the Symposium delved deeper into a more humanitarian cause. Although distinctly known as a world-class resort, Bali was also the home of locals who did not have much share in the wealth gained by foreignrun establishments. By hosting the Symposium in Bali, Humanitarian Affairs wanted its delegates to know about the plight of the poor who struggle to keep up with the fast-changing developments in our world. The Symposium aimed to bring about the message of love, community and empathy to ensure that the developments and privileges that each person deserved left no one behind.

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THE ORGANISERS

community and sympathy for the Global Poor.

umanitarian Affairs, United Kingdom provides a venue for young people to be trained in doing social developmental work in order to nurture them into world-class citizens with a global mindset towards alleviating the problems of communities in need.

Humanitarian Affairs is a London-based non-profit, non-government organisation. As a social enterprise, it is incorporated under the Company Act of 1985 and registered with the Registrar of Companies in England and Wales. The registration number is 6582565. Humanitarian Affairs Asia is its Asia Secretariat based in Pattaya, Thailand. This Office administers the annual University Scholars Leadership Symposium and other programmes and projects held in the Asia and Pacific Region.

It runs programmes across different nations through the relief efforts they extend to countries and communities that are poverty- and disaster-stricken. Humanitarian Affairs believes that encountering different cultures and providing aid to those suffering abroad facilitates both intellectual and emotional development for the young people it mentors. Through its projects, Humanitarian Affairs aspires to transform momentary feelings of compassion into a long-lasting sense of responsibility,

Humanitarian Affairs is a member of the World Association of Non-Governmental Organizations and the World Alliance for Citizens Participation.

Vision

Purpose

We seek a world where every young person has: A sense of compassion for the less fortunate • A sense of social responsibility • Opportunity to serve others, and • Opportunity to initiate sustainable development programmes

Humanitarian Affairs aims to provide youths the opportunity • To engage in humanitarian service, • Strengthen their awareness of diverse cultures, and • Develop a lifelong commitment to helping others by participating in relief efforts to benefit impoverished communities in poverty-stricken countries.

Mission

Strategy

To nurture youths into responsible, competent and compassionate global citizens by equipping them with knowledge, skills and exposure.

To promote knowledge and support efforts that improves effectiveness, scale, and sustainability. To nurture youths through internship placement and mentorship programme. 5


SPEAKERS

ARTHUR GILLETTE GERALDINE COX RAOUL WIJFFELS ROBIN LIM


Arthur Gillette Retired Director – UNESCO

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olunteer work has always been a big part of Arthur’s life. Even as a student at Harvard College, he became involved in a weekend volunteer workcamp at the young age of 20. The work here allowed the students of the college to aid in cleaning and repainting slum houses in Roxbury, an African-American/Hispanic ghetto community in Boston. When he moved to Paris on his third university year, Arthur’s strong spirit for volunteerism led him to join the Service Civil International French branch to continue the kind of volunteer work he did in the U.S.A. As one thing led to another, he became Secretary General of the UNESCO-related and Paris-based Coordinating Committee for International Voluntary Service after he finished his undergraduate studies. His work there had moved him to start leader training for volunteer initiatives in Third World countries. Fruits of his work with this organisation manifested through the creation of projects such as a regional Latin American volunteer leader training

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workshop at Sucre, Bolivia that had volunteers from 12 countries build a medical centre. Arthur’s strong internationalist convictions have also led him to lend a hand in promoting East-West volunteer exchanges even while the Cold War was ongoing. His first action in doing so was through joining a large workcamp that sought to construct a secondary school in the rural areas of Central Ukraine. He eventually joined more East-West volunteer projects in Czechoslovakia, the USSR, and the German Democratic Republic. In 1963, Arthur became a staff member of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO). His career in UNESCO was dedicated to years of serving projects related to illiteracy, and cultural and built heritage. His hard work and dedication caused him to be awarded the position of Director of the Division of Youth and Sports Activities.

life’s works, one can say that Arthur Gillette is truly passionate about promoting active and intelligent youth participation in the solutions to the problems of the global community. His book, One Million Volunteers – The Story of Youth Volunteer Service, is a summary of his experiences as a volunteer and attempts to encourage volunteerism across the globe.

Looking over his career and

Geraldine Cox

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Country Head – Sunrise Children’s Village Cambodia

n 1970, Geraldine began her career with the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs where she had her first posting in Phnom Penh. This was at the time the Vietnam War spilled over into Cambodia. Her experiences in this country had left a lasting impact on Geraldine and she carried

this with her even after succeeding postings in the Philippines, Thailand, Iran, and America all throughout her work with the government before resigning in 1987. Upon returning to Australia, she worked with The Chase Manhattan Bank in Sydney for 8 years. 7

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During a return visit in 1993, Geraldine became involved in helping an orphaned Cambodian child. Coming from this experience, she cofounded the Sunrise Children’s Village. She eventually moved to Cambodia in 1996 and began work as an Executive Assistant for the Cabinet Director in the Cabinet of the First


Prime Minister of Cambodia, HRH Prince Norodom Ranariddh. She then managed the orphanage during her spare time. Geraldine has always been proud of being an Australian, but Cambodia has stolen her heart and the children of this country have charmed her so much. After being bestowed full Cambodian Citizenship in 1999 by King Norodom Sihanouk, she spends half the year caring for the children in the orphanage as “Big Mum” and the remaining time raising funds for the orphanage through her bought the rights to create a feature travels and by any means she comes film based on this book. The documentary, My Khmer Heart, was up with. also made to Geraldine as she went Gerladine’s story has been through various challenges to keep told in different ways through pub- her orphanage, along with the chillications and other forms of media. dren she was caring for, together. Her autobiography, Home Is Where This film won the Hollywood Film The Heart Is, was published by Pan Festival Documentary of the Year Macmillan in 2000. Hollywood also Award in 2000 and has since been

bought and screened by HBO and Discovery Cable Channels. Her story has also been featured in a variety of television programs in Australia such as the Australian Story, The Sunday Program, This Is Your Life, Four Corners, Today Tonight, The 7.30 Report, 60 Minutes and Talking Heads. Through the enormous amount of love and hard work she puts in, Geraldine has provided opportunities for the young Cambodians she cares for to achieve the brightest of futures through the orphanage’s sheltering and educational programs. Sunrise Children’s Village now prides itself of caring for hundreds of Cambodian children who would have otherwise been victims of poverty, prostitution, slave labour and child trafficking.

Raoul Wijffels

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Founder and Executive Director – One Dollar For Music Foundation3

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aoul Wijffels has always been a lover and teacher of music. In his quest to understand more of the art in developing countries, Raoul found himself in Indonesia in the middle of his research on the conditions of musical development. In 2006, this professor from the music conservatory within the University of Rotterdam discovered something truly unique during his travel in Indonesia—the Indonesian youths were brimming with raw musical potential! In his words, he described his experience of this discovery: “What I found touched me 8

deeply. All Indonesians seem to be born as an artist. Young people are physically very smart. And they dance, draw, play guitar, percussion and can all sing beautifully. So much talent! But so little recognition! And no serious guidance or facilities. Apart from the mainstream industry, there is not really a professional and independent artistic sector.”

Oftentimes, young Indonesians who venture into music group themselves into bands that play beats and tunes on makeshift drums, old guitars and raw vocals. Talented as they may be, these youths do not


receive much opportunity to polish their skills. As the Government’s Department of Education mainly focuses on the subjects of English and Mathematics, schools only provide the basic requirements and exposure to Music as a subject being taught in classes. Professional training then becomes a privilege for a few who can afford it. Coming from Holland, Raoul understands that the Dutch have always had access to learning more about music. This understanding has left him wondering about the conditions of and access to musical education in developing countries such as Indonesia. How is it possible for the Indonesians, especially the youth, to

Robin Lim

get access to formative training in music? In August 2007, Raoul, along with a group of local musicians and artists, finds himself providing the answer to this question after establishing the One Dollar For Music Foundation (ODFM).

opportunities to perform their art allows them to build their careers as they discover more about their own music and creativity.

ODFM continues to provide practical lessons and workshops to talented young Indonesians. Now The goal of ODFM is to pro- with a handful of trained students, vide young Indonesians with more these young musicians move on to support in music education, exposure share what they have learned about and experience. It is an attempt to music from their mentors. They conbridge the gap between raw poten- tinue to play their music and impart tial in music of the youth and seeing their knowledge during their visits to this unfold on a professional stage. schools as they in turn conduct workThrough its projects, the youth are shops to the next generation of musiable to receive skills training in voice, cians. instrumental, and technical sound education, to hone their talents. Improving their skills and giving them

CNN Hero of the Year 2011

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her grandmother was known as a legendary traditional midwife in the small-town communities of Baguio City in the Philippines. Her experiences in the lush mountainous city never left even as she moved to the USA. Robin still sought the use of traditional and natural treatments and wife in 1995. At the very young age Robin Lim began her work in of 10, she was exposed to the use of encouraged others to look into them promoting maternal health care and traditional cultural medicine by her especially when it came to prenatal traditional birthing techniques even maternal grandmother. Back then, care, childbirth and postpartum care. before she started training as a midShe was pushed into pursuing midvery baby’s first breath on Earth could be one of peace and love. Every mother should be healthy and strong. Every birth could be safe and loving. But our world is not there yet.” These were the word that left Ibu (Mother) Robin Lim’s lips after she was recognized as a CNN Heroes for the Year 2011.

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wifery after experiencing the loss of three important women in her life— her midwife, Sunny Supplee, her best friend, Brenda Swartz, and her younger sister, Christine Kim—within the same year. Her sister Christine died while carrying a baby in her womb. Contemplating on her loss, Robin looked deeply in herself and realized that she had not lived her life with enough care. Emerging from her suffering, she decided to live her life only for love and envelope those around her with this same love. These were the beginnings of her commitment to providing mothers and babies a safe and loving environment during a mother’s pregnancy, childbirth and thereafter. Robin encountered many blessings after deciding to “live only for love.” She got married to Wil Hemmerle and lived a happy life with their shared children. In their efforts to renew their lives, Robin and Wil brought their family to Bali, a place they found to be conducive to raising a family. Their first child together was thus born in the island of Bali. Robin encountered challenges during her pregnancy and in her hunt for safe midwifery in Bali. It was through this experience that she decided to put up Yayasan Bumi Sehat (Healthy Mother Earth Foundation) with the help of family members and good friends. The clinic’s humble beginnings started out in providing prenatal care from Robin’s house. Eventually, the demand for her expertise and care grew as more and more people sought her help in giving safe maternal care for disadvantaged mothers. She became known as “Ibu Robin” for her work in providing free prenatal care, birthing services

and other support for mothers in Bali who otherwise would not be able to available of such due to financial constraints. Winning the CNN Hero of the Year Award in 2011 provides further support for her work. She announces to many that the prize money of USD$250,000 is to be used to improve her clinic in Bali. With and for love, Ibu Robin continues to do her good deeds for the sake of mothers who are wanting of a more loving and caring entrance into the world for their children.

References: 1. Arthur Gillette Service Civil International. (n.d.). Archives of Service Civil International. Retrieved August 20, 2012, from Service Civil International Official Website: http://www. service-civil-international.org/main/sci/volunteers/gillette-arthur.html World Volunteer Web. (1999, December 26). A (Very) Short History of Volunteering. Retrieved August 20, 2012, from World Volunteer Web Official Website: http://www.worldvolunteerweb.org/news-views/volunteer-stories/doc/a-very-short-history/print.html 2 Geraldine Cox. Cox, G. (2011). About Geraldine. Retrieved August 20, 2012, from Geraldine Cox Official Website: http://www. geraldinecox.org/profile.html 3. Raoul Wijffels One Dollar For Music Foundation. (n.d.). Background. Retrieved August 20, 2012, from One Dollar For Music Official Website: http://onedollargb.massa.netivity.nl/ background/1201/ The Jakarta Post. (2011, January 8). One dollar for music. Retrieved August 20, 2012, from The Jakarta Post: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2011/01/08/onedollar-music.html 4. Robin Lim CNN. (2011, December 27). ‘Mother Robin’ wins CNN Hero of the Year. Retrieved August 20, 2012, from CNN.com: http://edition.cnn.com/2011/12/11/living/ cnn-heroes/index.html Robin Lim Support Organization. (n.d.). Bio: Robin Lim. Retrieved August 20, 2012, from http://robinlimsupport.info/: http://robinlimsupport.info/CurrentPages/ RobinsBio_materialsDev/Bio_of_Robin.htm

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OPENING CEREMONY

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hat is a Balinese welcome like? The 418 delegates of the University Scholars Leadership Symposium can give a comment or two about this. On August 2, 2012, they were able to witness the grandest of welcomes that Bali could offer during the Opening Ceremony of the Symposium. The Opening Ceremony was a feast for all the senses that began with the delegates themselves. This international delegation caught the eyes of many as they proudly walked down the halls of the Aston Denpasar Hotel and Convention Center in the national costumes of their respective home countries. The halls were eventually filled with lively conversations between new friends who shared stories of home and anticipation for the Symposium’s activities. A harmonious melody of different languages spoken together resounded off the convention center’s walls. It seemed unwilling to pause as it was caught up in all the excitement. As the doors of the Aston Grand Ballroom opened, the sweet smell of fresh flowers greeted the young delegates. Balinese hosts and hostesses were waiting for them at each side of the red carpet that cut through the middle of the ballroom and led straight to the stage where two of Balinese iconic towers stood. Garlands of flowers were placed around the necks of the delegates as they made their way through the entourage of Balinese entertainers and décor of traditional ornaments to their seats in front of the stage.

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When all of the audience was complete and settled, the lights in the ballroom slowly dimmed and the spotlights turned to the center of the stage. The distinct sounds of the Balinese Gamelan Angklung started to play. Dressed in traditional Balinese clothing embellished with glistening gold and colourful beads, dancers came on to the stage to entertain the audience with their 20 minutes of Balinese traditional welcome dance. After the performance, hosts Daniel Sheridan and Lauren Winterflood announced the arrival of the guest of honour. The audience stood to honour the arrival of Bapak I Wayan Suasta, the Assistant Governor of Bali, Indonesia as he made his way up the stage. Full attention was then given to him as he gave his well wishes and warm welcome to the youths and guests of the Bali Symposium. At the end of the opening remarks, the Regional Director for Humanitarian Affairs Asia, Ms. Janice Leong, and the Chief of Bali Police, Insp. Gen. Budi Gunawan were called on stage to join the Assistant Governor to declare opening of the Symposium. With all the performers crowded around the Balinese gong, symbolic of Balinese culture, the Assistant Governor was given the honour to strike the gong to symbolize the start the weeklong event. This was followed by loud round of applause and cheers from the audience and a shower of confetti to cap off the wonderful start of the Symposium.

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INSPIRING TALKS Arthur Gillette Making Dreams Happen

Youth volunteerism was a topic that was close to the heart of the Symposium. The best person to give a talk on this was someone with a wealth of experience in volunteering, and this person was none other than a retired director of UNESCO, Mr. Arthur Gillette. Arthur made dreams possible during his work as a volunteer. This was evident in the stories he shared about the volunteer work that he did in different countries. He provided valuable insights on the conditions of youth volunteerism around the world and how these can be of help in further shaping its development.

Geraldine Cox Overcoming Challenges

Geraldine was one lady who was undeniably hard to miss. With her cheerful and lively personality, people easily warmed up to her just as they did as she came up on stage to share about her work in Sunrise Village, an orphanage in Cambodia. It was the third time the founder and president of the orphanage came to the Symposium as a speaker. All the same, she never lost her touch in inspiring the delegates to overcome any challenges they faced when it came to doing good for others.

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Raoul Wijffels Music Matters

For Raoul Wijffels, music definitely mattered, especially in the creative and holistic development of young people. This was the reason why he chose music as his medium to boost the self-esteem of underprivileged youths of Bali and to improve their lives. His organization, the One Dollar Music Foundation, was established to help these young people discover themselves all the while they were discovering music. The time that Raoul spent with the delegates was both a concert and a sharing of his story with the youth of Bali. Music was the common thing that brought everyone together for the entire session. What made it stronger was its use to uplift the lives of the young people he worked with, such as the emerging band No Stress, and also the young participants of the Symposium.

Robin Lim

Baby Bonus What is the use of our hands? At the Symposium, Ibu Robin taught the audience about the importance of our hands and how they should be used. She explained that they were to work for love. As a living example of this, Ibu Robin made use of her hands to help mothers welcome their babies into the world in the most gentle and peaceful way possible. This very action of providing care for mothers was essential because birth would be the moment when people first experience love through the mothers’ labour. In sharing her experiences as a midwife, Ibu Robin reminded us of the unconditional love that mothers constantly shower their children with even as they grow older.

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“B world.�

PLENARY

e the change you want to see in this

MEETINGS

Following the wisdom of Mahatma Gandhi, our young delegates certainly put these words into action! The Plenary Sessions served as their playground as they experimented with different ideas on how to tackle some pressing concerns in the field of humanitarian work. In between the talks, the delegates were moved to their respective meeting rooms for the Plenary Sessions. They were split up into ten different groups that were assigned one topic each per session. Each delegate had plenty of opportunities to speak up about their ideas in the two Plenary Sessions that took place. Fresh ideas came up as the young minds brainstormed for solutions to their given assignments. The First Plenary Session was a discussion of ten pertinent humanitarian issues such as poverty, world

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PRESENTATIONS

SESSIONS

hunger and the lack of education. The next Plenary Session was a fun practice for everyone especially those who wanted to start their own humanitarian projects. The activity for the second Plenary Session was to come up with creative fundraisers that could possibly support their future projects. After each session, all ideas were presented before all back at the ballroom through interesting and lively presentations. Some groups gave their presentations in the form of skits and dance numbers. Others presented unique plans of creating an interactive smart phone application or large-scale fun runs to help raise funds for their chosen beneficiaries. Looking back, the Plenary Sessions were made fruitful and meaningful because of the many contributions from the delegates. They were great venues for them to exchange ideas rooted from an assortment of personalities, backgrounds and cultures. More importantly, they were moments that encouraged camaraderie among new friends.

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LEARNING JOURNEY T

an eco-friendly activity. The children who participated he Learning Journey was one of the unique in this came from a tranquil village of Ubud that hardly highlights of the Symposium. It entailed one full day that had any interactions with foreigners. During the Learning was dedicated to doing service-learning activities with Journey, they were immersed in a culturally diverse interthe children and communities of Bali. A day’s break away action with their new friends from different countries. from the serious talks and discussions, the Learning Journey was a venue for our young leaders to explore and immerse themselves in the culture of Bali. The program involved all the delegates and faculty observers in the activities. Ten groups were formed and each one of these groups was assigned to an activity for the day. Some delegates and faculty observers were assigned to work on a sustainable project by contributing to the construction of a house. For the most part, the Learning Journey was a day of fun and laughter with the Balinese children. The delegates became older brothers and sisters to the children that they met as they went through an eventful day in a small town village and in the best tourist attractions that Bali had to offer. The day was made even more meaningful as the delegates and faculty observers went about their respec Staying true to its thrust of reaching out to com- tive activities while wearing their Official Humanitarian munities in need, Humanitarian Affairs used the Learn- Affairs T-Shirts. More than just carrying the name of the ing Journey to benefit the local Balinese people. The or- organisation, the brightly coloured shirts carried with ganisers made sure that each activity supported a certain them a symbol of hope for a particular community in cause related to the Balinese communities. Activities such Bali—the widows of the Bali Bombings. In support of as Paintball, Bali Bike and the Marine Walk, which were the livelihood of these women, the organisers chose to businesses ran by the locals, provided sustainable income work with a group that continually worked diligently to to the local community. promote equality in treatment and dignity for all.

One of the sites for the Learning Journey was Ubud, a quiet countryside of Bali. The delegates and the children went cycling around this area as they promoted

Seeing everything together, one could tell that the Learning Journey was truly the heart of the University Scholars Leadership Symposium. Not only did our young humanitarians go through a day of fun and excitement, they also had a first-hand experience of doing humanitarian work by spending time with the children. The locals in turn further enriched the experience of the delegates when they welcomed them in their community to share a few good laughs, stories and newfound memories. Paths crossed and new friendships were formed. Even after the new friends have parted ways, this day will always be remembered as a heart-warming experience for all.

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Waterbom

Waterbom housed the fun water activities for both the Balinese children and the delegates. The 5-star water theme park entertained its guests with its water slide and lazy river attractions.

Canggu Club with Kids

Brenton Whittaker, founder of the Bali Kids Foundation, introduced the delegates to the children who would be their playmates for the day. Everyone had a great time playing games such as volleyball and basketball, and using the facilities at the Canggu Country Club.

Games with Children

Our young leaders were warmly welcomed by a local Balinese community to join them in their festivities for the day. Games and activities were prepared to entertain everyone. Delegates played games and football with the children as they listened and danced to live music from a traditional Balinese ensemble.

Cooking for 300

As lunchtime was nearing, busybodies chopped away at vegetables, fried noodles and cooked meat to provide a filling meal for more than 100 people. Delegates had their own share of work to provide lunch for their new little friends and their fellow delegates.

Building A House

Delegates worked hand-in-hand to carry wood, gravel and sand to build one house for the community. An afternoon’s worth of hard work produced a stronger foundation and flooring for the new home.

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Water Tubing

This group got to experience one of the latest attractions in Bali. Water tubing down the calm waters of the river was a memorable and bonding event for the delegates and the children as each ride had one delegate and one child share a floater.

Water Rafting

Their day started with a morning trip to the explore the arts and cultural centers in Bali, the Tegalalang Rice Terrace and the cocoa and spices garden. In the afternoon, everyone got to enjoy the adrenaline-filled white water rafting activity along the Ayung river.

Marine Walk

Armed with just their wetsuits and headgears, the delegates and their new Balinese friends ventured out into the depths of the ocean. Having more fun than they thought they imagined, this group got to walk on the ocean floor to get a glimpse of marine life.

Cycling in Ubud

This group joined Bali Bikes in their adventure along the countryside of Ubud. Delegates and children cycled alongside one another as they followed their tour guides to witness and experience the true Bali.

Paintball

Two teams battled it out in the playing field for an action-packed round of paintball. The delegates and the children paired up and joined one team who they fought bravely with to champion in the game. 19


More Snapshots of the Learning Journey 20


SHOW BUZZ L

ights. Camera. Action!

Every year at the University Scholars Leadership Symposium, the Show Buzz showcases presentations by the delegates that are jam-packed with film worthy action! The Show Buzz is an opportunity for them to use their creativity in producing public awareness campaigns for different causes. The Bali Symposium 2012 calls on to its international delegation to come up with presentations based on topics they are assigned to. The challenge for this year is to create a 7-minute spiel that would serve as their campaign video. With a camera crew on standby and a panel of judges ready to critique their works, the ten different groups then displayed their talents in acting, singing and dancing on stage to portray the messages of their topics. Some of these topics were meant as tributes to the the invited speakers of the Symposium. Awareness campaigns on youth volunteerism, the One Dollar For Music Foundation and the Healthy Mother Earth Foundation were created as tributes to Arthur Gillette, Raoul Wijffels and Ibu Robin Lim, respectively. Other presentations were closely linked with the plenary topics regarding relevant humanitarian issues such as the importance of having clean water, poverty, hunger and child trafficking. The Show Buzz also featured presentations on the delegates’ own take at creating skits for the Symposium in 2013, a mobile school project called Education on Wheels, and Humanitarian Affairs. As a highlight of the Symposium each year, the Show Buzz has become a favorite activity of the delegates. It brings about a message that advocating for humanitarian causes can come in different forms such as fun and creative presentations like the ones in Show Buzz. It also tells us of how youths can be resourceful as advocates and agents of change.

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CLOSING CEREMONY The guest-of-honour for the closing was an esteemed guest from the United Nations who stood as the UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Indonesia, Mr. El-Mostafa Benlamlih. Faced with a large international delegation of youths, he saw this as an opportunity to remind the youth of the greater purpose and meaning of the work they wished to entail; that humanitarian work was not about the humanitarians, but about the people in need who were to receive their aid. After these inspiring speeches, the Closing Ceremony then moved on to give recognition to the youths who performed outstanding work for the Symposium. Ms. Pawida Isarangkul Na Ayudhaya of Thailand was called on stage to receive her award and give her speech as Outstanding Intern for the Year 2012. Mohd Rizan bin Hassan of Malaysia was also recognized for his exceptional work as a youth leader who led a group of more than 60 Malaysian youths in the Symposium. All faculty observers from various universities and institutions received recognition for their participation in the event. The group facilitators hey say that “all good thing must come to an who led the 10 groups of delegates also went up the stage. end.� The same goes for the journey that the delegates They received due recognition and commendation from took on through the University Scholars Leadership Sym- the Association of Southeast Asian Nations for exercising good leadership skills in establishing camaraderie among posium. the delegates of the Symposium.

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In the afternoon of August the 6th, Humanitarian Affairs chose to commemorate its last day with its delegates by acknowledging the good work that has transpired over the past week. Ms. Janice Leong, regional head of Humanitarian Affairs Asia took the lead in this commemoration as she gave her closing remarks for all of the participants of the event. Her speech was one of encouragement and inspiration for the young people who dream to be Agents of Change in the world.

The Closing Ceremony offered the best time and atmosphere to reminisce about the events that happened. A video showcasing a montage of the different highlights of the Symposium were presented to the hundreds of young people who would be going home to share what they learned from their unique experience in Bali, Indonesia.

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C

OFFICIAL BANQUET

oats and ties were taken off and left in closets. High-heeled shoes were replaced with comfortable flats. Formal attires were changed to outfits suited for a fun evening out with friends. Once the formalities of the University Scholars Leadership Symposium were done, the delegates hurriedly went back to their rooms to change into more comfy outfits before heading out to the surprise venue for the Official Banquet to celebrate the end of the event in the most festive way. The Official Banquet aimed to celebrate the end of the Symposium in the most festive way. The festivities began even as the delegates left the Aston Denpasar Hotel and Convention Center. It thrilled everyone to see the vehicles that would take them to the surprise venue. The Bemo is a ubiquitous open-air colorful microbus that had imageries of tropical wonderlands painted on the entirety of their bodies. These vehicles carried the delegates to Taman Bhagawan, a 5-stars venue suitable for garden party. A team of 10 police outriders escorted the convoy of 25 Bemo vans each carried 17 persons through the bustling streets of Bali. The half-hour journey was worth the wait after everyone arrived at the venue of the Official Banquet

at Taman Bhagawan. The young delegates found themselves in a rainforest-type setting that highlighted Bali’s distinct culture and charm. Once everyone was settled in the many tables set up in the around the fountain pool that ran across the middle of the venue, the delegates helped themselves to the buffet dinner and dessert of Balinese treats. Hamanah, an Afro-Indonesian band, entertained its audience with its ethno-pop tunes. Its lively beats got many of the delegates to get up from their seats and move towards the stage. The celebration continued even after the band took a break. The stereos played popular dance songs to keep up with the partying crowd that danced as one. As the familiar tune of Katy Perry’s “Firework,” the delegates were greeted by a breathtaking surprise—a pyro-musical display of fireworks that lit up the night sky above them. Another surprise awaited the delegates evening. Under their tables, they found Djembe drums with the logo of Humanitarian Affairs United Kingdom printed on the top skin. Each delegate claimed one and joined the drummer from Hamanah in playing some ethnic beats. The assembly of drums echoed off into the night as the farewell celebration continued late into the night.

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A Good Farewell for the Symposium

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ANNEXES


Closing Remarks

by Ms. Janice Leong Regional Director for Humanitarian Affairs Asia

First of all, I would like to congratulate all of you here for your successful completion of the 3rd University Scholars Leadership Symposium.

friendly. Make it a point to care for those around you.

Remember to reflect on the invaluable experience that you had with your fellow delegates and the local communities here during the Learning Journey. How did we feel after I would also like the Learning Journey? What was to take this opportunity your experience with the children? to express my gratitude Isn’t it amazing that for those who to the team who has have so little and yet are the ones worked very hard to enthat give out the most happiness? sure the success of this Symposium. Shall we give a round Do you still recall the fun and laughter you have with the of applause to all the officials, group facilitators, advisers children? It might just be a day but it brought so much joy and all the hotel staff. to the children. And the same goes for those who built the house with love. My questions to all of you here are, “What are you going to do after this Symposium? What are the projects Love is the reason why we look forward to better that you are going to implement to reach out to impover- things in our lives. We look forward to a more compasished communities?” sionate world. We look forward to a world without strangers, without discrimination and violence. Let us all do our Reflect on the knowledge that you have gained part well for this day to come. Nothing will happen until during this weeklong Symposium. What have we learnt you take action. from Mr. Arthur Gillette’s talk on Making Dreams Happen? What does volunteerism mean to you? Is there a new I’ve read many of your application forms and 90% meaning attached to you as a volunteer? of you mentioned that you want to be an agent of change, to be part of the change and also to learn about your role in How about Ms. Geraldine Cox’ talk on Overcom- making a positive change. However, change only happens ing Challenges? Does her commitment to the children at if you and I take action. One simple example is that you the Sunrise Village in Cambodia inspire you to do more will not be here with the rest of the 400 delegates should for the underprivileged children? you not have taken any action to apply for the Symposium and make your travel arrangements here. MUSIC. What is music to you after listening to Mr. Raoul Wijffles talk on creative sustainable projects? Another good example is our Youth Leader, Mr. Can you think of any creative sustainable projects that can Rizan Hassan from Malaysia. He attended the previous uplift the lives of the marginalized youths? year Symposium and was so inspired that this year he leads a strong delegation of more than 60 like-minded I am sure many of you would agree that Ibu Robin youths like you to the University Scholars Leadership Lim has brought us back to reflect where we come from Symposium. He has worked tirelessly to Make His Dream and to express gratitude to our beloved mothers who we Happen; and that it is to inspire more young people to be take for granted. She has reminded all of us the most part of this Youth Movement in Social Change. beautiful word in the dictionary—love. Without love, one is without a soul. Without love, the world is cold and un- How about you? What would you like to change? 27


You can spread the word about this Youth Movement to your friends and inspire them to be part of the Change. You and your friends can initiate and lead a project that will benefit communities in need. Some of you who wish to be more involved in reaching out to international youths and learn more about event management, can join us as part of the Organising Committee for the next Symposium. Remember, you must be the change you want to see in this world. These are wise words from Mahatma Gandhi that have been my guiding principle in my life and I hope it can be yours, too. The best way to create a brighter future for all is too create one and it starts with you and me. With this I wish every one of you here all the very best in your endeavor to be part of this positive change. Enjoy the farewell dinner and treasure the friendship that you have made in this Symposium. Thank you and God bless.

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Speech by Outstanding Intern of the Year

A New Chapter of My Learning Life with Humanitarian Affairs by Pawida Isarangkul Na Ayudhaya (Asian University, Thailand) I believe that I was born to learn. The first few English words that I knew include “I don’t know” and I get to know what I didn’t know by learning. I realized that it was hard to start from zero especially when I was doing this internship. I planned to do internship in various fields, so I would have more working experience, to know what I’m good at and what needs to be improved. Last year, I was doing my internship at Hilton Hotel in Pattaya, Thailand. That was how I knew about the University Scholars Leadership Symposium. I was impressed by those 350 Student Leaders from all over the World who had the same dreams to make our world a better place. I wanted to be one of them, change makers. This year, I had an opportunity to become a part of the 3rd USL Symposium by doing an internship at Humanitarian Affairs Asia.

I decided to talk to Ms. Janice Leong, my supervisor. Instead of just letting me quit the job, she asked me, “how can I help you?” Ms. Leong also said something that made me decide not to quit. She said, “once you are a quitter, you will be a quitter for the rest of your life.” So, I decided to ask her for a week off to prepare my final exams and then I would come back to work. After exams, I went back to the office with a new positive attitude, to work harder and aim to spread out the word of the symposium. I created my own faith. The internship is meaningful to me. It makes me become a better and stronger person. It improves my working skills. For instance, communication skills and leadership skills. I learned about organization culture, supportive bosses and colleagues. Importantly, I had a chance to give a presentation to 1,500 people which not many organizations would allow interns to do so.

I also learn about life skills from my supervisor,Ms. Leong. She has been guiding me through my 3 months This internship was a new chapter of my learning internship. She builds up my good character and my posilife. It was tough in the beginning because I had to start tive attitude. She taught me a lot of things that I would from zero. I didn’t know how to start, how to work like like to share with you today: professionals. At the same time, I worried about my com- •“It doesn’t matter where or how we start but the ing final exams. I wanted to quit, I didn’t even give myself end that counts.” a chance to get familiar with the job, I thought this job was too difficult and I was not good at it. •“Always have a dream and make it come true;” I consulted my parents, teachers and friends but no one gave me the answer I wanted. Some told me to quit if I was not happy. My teacher told me not to quit and try harder until I reach Bali to be a part of the USL Symposium as I had always wanted to. My parents didn’t tell me what to do but they told me that whatever I decided, they want me to think carefully and don’t regret.

•“Do not give up on what we are doing, keep trying and have faith;” •“Always hope for the best and prepare for the worst;” and 29

•“Do not let fears stop us from doing good things.”


I can talk about what I’ve learned from this internship for days. Just to make it short, this internship is an experience that I would never find anywhere else. I’m glad that I didn’t quit the job on that day, I didn’t give up on trying and I didn’t give up on myself. I would like to thank Humanitarian Affairs and Ms. Janice Leong for giving me this opportunity to learn. I’m grateful that once in my lifetime I had a chance to be a part of Humanitarian Affairs, to empower myself and other young people like you all to reach out to communities in need. Thank you.

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Plenary Session Topics 1. Belly Busters (World Hunger) Proper living starts with proper nourishment. Taking in the right amounts of nutrition enables people to carry out their daily functions. It gives adults the stamina to work, and children the energy to study. However, these functions are disrupted when nourishment becomes scarce and unavailable to people. Nowadays, millions of people are faced with the problem of a great lack of food. Scarcity of food does not only occur in certain small communities that are far from our reach. It is spread out across different nations and affecting places in both developing and developed countries. We know this problem as World Hunger. Malnutrition is the common manifestation of hunger amongst people. Aggregated on the global level, other effects that stem out from widespread hunger are increased health risks and mortality rates. 2. Trash Hunter (Waste Management and Recycling) Waste management is one of the challenges faced by impoverished communities. Without a proper waste management system in these areas, trash piles up on streets and clogs sewage systems. Aside from harming the environment, people living in the surrounding communities are affected negatively as health problems occur. A clean slate in life might just be what these people need to help them rise above their livelihood and environmental problems. Finding means to make better use of the trash around them can be a source of livelihood for them. Through recycling and creative fabrication, useful and innovative products made of trash can be sold to generate profits. Armed with creativity and perseverance, almost anything can be made to benefit these people. As the saying goes, “one man’s trash can be someone else’s treasure.“ 3. Street Fighters (Street Children) Our childhood is marked by fond memories of playing in the streets with our good friends. After an eventful day, we say goodbye to our playmates and head home to the warmth of home-cooked meals and comfortable beds. These same memories cannot be shared by children who actually live on the streets. When poverty strikes, children become the most vulnerable victims to the growing demands of the quickly developing environment. These conditions in turn force many of them to live in impoverished states on the streets. Although playtime occurs in the same place, it also becomes the place where they set up their homes as they lay on cold concrete or dirt floors during chilly evenings. Such conditions expose them to different illnesses. A lack in resources also creates problems in providing them proper nourishment and education. Their growth and development are hindered by the absence of an environment conducive for their well-being. 31


4. Edu Master (Educating the Uneducated) Education is too often taken for granted. The phrase “school is cool” rubs off as something un-cool for those privileged enough to constantly attend classes. But, for people who are not able to attend classes regularly, or at all, the skills and education they get are tagged priceless. For both the young and the old, receiving education is one of the best things to have to prepare them for the world. Education allows people to explore their potentials and push their limits to become better persons as they encounter challenges throughout their learnings. A lack in resources should not deprive people of education. All of us can contribute our own skills and knowledge to those who have much to benefit from the opportunities that education presents to everyone.

5. Power Rangers (Child Trafficking) Respect is one thing each person should have for another. The value of a person should never be lost in place of anything. The problem we face today is that people’s respect for one another has reached levels so inhumane that many now turn to human trafficking. Considered as a crime against humanity, human trafficking is “the recruiting, transporting, transferring, harbouring or receiving a person through a use of force, coercion or other means, for the purpose of exploiting them.” (UNODC)

The most vulnerable victims of this crime are children. Their lives have been commodified by human traffickers as they are treated like goods that can be plainly sold and bought off store shelves. 6. Life Giver (Clean Water) Water is all around us. It is found in abundance in our seas, rivers and lakes. We find it also up in the skies as clouds and part of the moisture in our food. With so much water within our reach, it is hard to believe that there is a lack of safe drinking water for everybody. In truth, only 1% of the supply of water on Earth is usable by human beings. That 1% supply of water is essential to human beings. Our health is greatly affected by the quality and amount of water we take in. Health problems arise when a person is not able to drink safe drinking water in the right amounts. Contaminants in untreated water harm a person’s body when they are absorbed in their systems. Nowadays, billions of people are exposed to various health risks because they do not have the access to clean drinking water.

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7. Health Healer (Healthcare) “Health is wealth.� We often hear this saying but give very little importance to its meaning. The only time we give attention to it is when our health starts to take a beating. This is when most people would decide to spend some of their wealth to regain their health. The case is not the same for those who do not have the wealth or the resources to pay for medicine and health services. When proper healthcare is not provided, wounds and illnesses are left untreated. Prolonged health implications also take a toll on people’s health. Although prevention through hygiene education is a good solution to avoid these problems, many people from poor communities also still lack the basic knowledge on hygiene and education. 8. Skillful Warrior (Sustainable Livelihood) Poverty has its way of making people feel incapable of doing anything to break out of its cycle. Living in a poor environment makes it difficult for people to look for a job that can give enough compensation to sustain themselves. Good jobs are scarce and hard to find when you are competing with so many people. Oftentimes, landing one job is not enough. Others would need to look for more than one to provide for their needs. Improving the quality of work that people get into is a solution to ending the cycle of poverty. Introducing jobs that work around the model of sustainable livelihood can present better benefits to people. They can have security of tenure, better income and better working environments. 9. Urban Legend (Urban Poverty) A city is seen as a model of success for its citizens. With the boom in developments and economy in the urban areas, it is difficult not to be attracted to the success it has achieved and to aspire for the same. People flock to the city in the hopes of finding higher-paying jobs and living more comfortable lives. The great number of people coming into cities becomes too overwhelming at a certain point. When this happens, cities cannot keep up with the demands for work as job markets become oversaturated. Unemployment increases as the number of people also increases. Living conditions become poorer when overcrowding arises. This in turn results in a lack of resources for the people of urban poor communities.

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10. Spice Girls (Women Empowerment) Old traditions dictated what roles women were supposed to play. These roles included important tasks such as growing food, taking care of the household, hauling water and other laborious tasks. The amount of work that women did was not proportional to the compensation and recognition that they deserved. Many women were treated as voiceless citizens of their societies and were oppressed because of their gender. Until now, many women still encounter the same problems and are treated unjustly simply for the fact that they are women. Societies need to be more open-minded and see both men and women as equals. Contributions by: Chunlan Zhang Michele Cosi Pawida Isarangkul Na Ayudhaya Pim Preston Ruth Valorie Catabijan Sources: Cade, M. (2008, November 16). Street Children of the Philippines. Retrieved September 22, 2012, from Flickriver: http://www.flickriver.com/photos/ramdiboy/3299674549/ Cryptome. (2012, March 25). Wome Protest Worldwide 13. Retrieved September 22, 2012, from Cryptome Archives: http://cryptome.org/2012-info/women-protest13/ women-protest13.htm Furman University. (2010, December 3). River Pollution. Retrieved September 22, 2012, from Furman Wiki: https://confluence.furman.edu:8443/display/GGY230F10/ River+Pollution Green, D. (2010, January 20). From Poverty to Power. Retrieved September 22, 2012, from Oxfam Blogs: http://www.oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/?p=1753 Jarvis, L. (2004, October 26). Third World Hunger? Retrieved September 22, 2012, from Photo.net: http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=2828669 Life@30ish. (2009, December 2). Dirty Water! Retrieved September 22, 2012, from Life@30ish: http://lifeat30ish.com/?p=202 Medecins Sans Frontieres. (2011, August 2). International Activity Report 2010 - Central African Republic. Retrieved September 22, 2012, from Medicins Sans Frontieres: http://www.msf.org/msf/articles/2011/08/iar-2010----central-african-republic.cfm Reaching Out to Homeless. (n.d.). Retrieved September 22, 2012, from Jesus Is Savior: http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/Reaching_The_World/homeless.htm Samajik Shaikshanik Vikas Kendra. (n.d.). Bihar Drought. Retrieved September 22, 2012, from Samajik Shaikshanik Vikas Kendra Official Website: http://www.ssvk.org/ bihar_draught.htm What is it? (2008, March 16). Retrieved September 22, 2012, from Congestion Child: http://dilanz.wordpress.com/2008/03/16/what-is-it/

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Show Buzz Topics 1. Healthy Mother Earth Foundation Many mothers are anxious and scared of the thought of giving birth. Ibu Robin would like to assure them that giving birth can be peaceful and safe for mothers and their babies as long as they are given proper care during this special occassion. Help Ibu Robin to promote maternal health care and the use of traditional birthing techniques. An infomercial of your making can go a long way in easing the worries of these would-be mothers. 2. Poverty Poverty is a term that seems to be tossed about very lightly nowadays. People don’t seem to understand the gravity of the problem of poverty and how it gravely affects the lives of millions of people. We need your help in creating more attention for this problem so that the global community can be even more involved in finding solutions to poverty. 3. Hunger We are privileged to have healthy food at our disposal. This is not so for those who suffer from food shortages and widespread hunger. The problem of hunger does not only leave these people with empty stomachs. It leaves them weak from malnutrition and other illnesses they may incur for not having proper nutrition. Find a way to bring out the message of the pains of World Hunger. Your work is needed to generate awareness for communities who suffer from lack of food and resources. Through this, others may be able to send aid and relief to those who are in need of them. 4. Education on Wheels Education is the most powerful weapon that you can use to change the world. It is the best tool for people to change their situation for the better. People are deprived of the right to education for many different reasons—poverty, war conflicts and even natural disasters. The lack of education can further worsen the lives of the disadvantaged. To help those who are waiting for the opportunities that education presents to everyone, we need to raise awareness of the importance of Education for all. This year, we need a consulting team to create an awareness video on education for the most vulnerable and disadvantaged children. The team should also come with a catchy slogan as the title of the video. Check for political correctness 5. Clean Water We have seen countless photos of impoverished communities thriving in parched lands. We have also witnessed scenes on TV wherein the poor drink water that is brown from the mud it is mixed with. Now that you know about the problems linked with drinking dirty water, create a campaign video advocating for the sourcing and using of clean water for these concerned communities. Show your viewers the importance of clean water and sanitation.

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6. One Dollar Music Foundation After having spoken to the hundreds of youths at the Symposium, more of the world now knows about Raoul Wijffel’s One Dollar For Music movement. The interest sparked by this unique program should not be put out just because the Symposium has ended. The music needs to keep playing! Sharing the same love for music, help the One Dollar Form Music movement create a music video that will let others become aware of its advocacy and projects. Let people know how their one-dollar donations will be more than worth it through the creative music video you are tasked to do. 7. Child Trafficking Children all over the world are becoming victims of Human Traffickers for various illegal trades. Awareness needs to be raised for the issue of Child Trafficking to save these children and discourage traffickers from continuing their evil deeds. Come up with a TV campaign for Child Trafficking that will be presented on a global platform. Your work will be valuable in informing the public about this dreadful issue. 8. USL Symposium 2013 As a participant of this year’s Bali Symposium 2012, show the world what it is like to take part in this one of a kind gathering of youths. Share your experiences or give a sampler for the future delegates of what it is like to be a USLS delegate. With this, create a promotional video for next year’s University Scholars Leadership Symposium. 9. Youth Volunteering The term “youth volunteer” is used to describe a young person who offers to perform a service at one’s own free will. The world today depends on youths to take action and give back to communities who are in need of a helping hand. While some of us are living in a safe and clean environment, there are others who are not fortunate enough to have a fraction of that. Youths are the key to improving world poverty. The ideas that you come up with for sustainable projects today may prosper into real works in the future to benefit countless people. Volunteerism does not only give you new insights on how to help the world around us, but also brings you together with people who can help make this happen. Create a TV campaign to promote youth volunteerism and show how young people can make a difference in the world. 10. Humanitarian Affairs Humanitarian Affairs is an organisation dedicated to educating and nurturing young people who wish to take part in humanitarian efforts. This time, it is the organisation’s turn to call on to the youth to help advocate its projects. Make a creative video presentation that would encourage more youths like you to join the programmes of Humanitarian Affairs. In Highlight the values and programs of the organisation. Contributions by: Chunlan Zhang, Michele Cosi, Pawida Isarangkul Na Ayudhaya, Pim Preston, Ruth Valorie Catabijan

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Participants of the Symposium Faculty Observers

Group Facilitators & Volunteers

ASST PROF DR. KRONGTHONG KHAIRIREE DR. JAGMEET SINGH DR. JUANITO CABANIAS DR. PATRICIA SY-SANTOS DR. PRINYA THEWANARUMITKUL MR. MOHAMED DARMA RIZAL KHAIRIREE MR. CHEN SHUXING MR. HASNUL FAIRUZ BIN HUSHIN AMRI MR. MOHAMMAD RIZAN HASSAN MR. MOHD AZWAN BIN SHAHARIS MR. MOHD SUKOR BIN MD YUSOF MR. NAWAT NANTASEN MR. PHALAUNNAPHAT SIRIWONGS MR. SAIFUL BIN MOHD SAHAK MR. SEVERINO PADER MR. SHAHZOOL HAZIMIN AZIZAM MR. WISIT LOEDHAMMACAKRA MRS. FIRLY ISTIYANTI SAVITRI ZAKARIA MRS. NIRAMITA CHANTASUT MRS. VERONICA ALFONSO MS. BIBI ZALEHA BINTI ZURKIPLE MS. JANETTE DAVID MS. LIN XIUYA MS. MELFI CARANTO MS. WU YUMEI MS. ZHANG YUAN

ADAM DANIEL SHERIDAN ALDO TONG ARIANA GABAUDAN BEN DESSEN BLAKE MOONEY BRANDON LOUISE ANCHA MEDRANO CARMELLE CUNAN CAROLINE BOURBONNIERE CHUNLAN ZHANG CORAH CHIU EBONY CETINICH FELICIA ASTRID GABRIELLA CUTRI JESSICA LEE KATHERINE TYSON LAUREN WINTERFLOOD MADELEINE BUCHNER MIMI OORLOFF NINA MATSUMOTO PAWIDA ISARANGKUL NA AYUDHAYA REGINE STEPHANIE BORJA GUEVARA RUTH VALORIE CATATBIJAN SHAH HISHAM VICTORIA ANNELLS

Delegates AARON ALDRIN BORJA ABIGAIL AILEEN ALABA ABIGAIL CRYSTEL SY ABU BAKAR ALAMRI ADRIEL EARL TORIBIO AHMAD TERMIZI BIN MUHAMAD AINAMADIAH BINTI HARUN ALBERT JOSHUA PUTRA MALIOGHA ALIA CHAN ALIDIA LEE ALISSON RAY R LADAGA ALVIN FRANZ FAMINIAL ALYCE JEFFREY AMEER IZZUDIN BIN ABDUL RASHID AMEET BENEGAL

AMPORN RUENRENU AMRI BIN RAHAMAT ANAS BIN AZMI ANDIKA MEDALION SEBAYANG ANDREI MICHAEL ABASOLO FONACIER ANGGREKA MICHELLO BULAN ANISSA EKA MARINI PUJIANTARA APINYA JATURONG ARISA TAKAGI ARRON LOVELL ASHA KURUP AXEL YEN CLIMACOSA GARCIA AYUSH AGARWAL BERNARDINE GRIGSON BO ZHANG 37


BORDIN NGAMRUNGSIRI BRAEDAN BOLT CAI YUTING CAMERON STRAIN CAO XI CAROLINE TARA JAVIER CARYN TAN CASSANDRA WONG CEDRIC CHUA CHONG JIE CEN ZHIBIN CHANAKAN YATIKUL CHANTHA HOR CHAYISSARA SANGPRATEEP CHEN JUNJIE CHEN TIEGE CHEN ZHAN, ALBERT CHRISTINE JOYCE AGAPITO CHRISTINE RODRIGUEZ CHUTIMON THIPJINDACHAIKUL CLARE SLATTERY CLIFF KEVIN CENDAÑA CYNTHIA TAN CYRIL JOHNSON DAI SHUYUN DAMIRZHAN KALIKOV DARRYL ALTEA DAVID BRYAN LOZADA DENG WEIYUN DING XIAOYUE DIO WIKRANTA DR. KANTIMA CHARAPINYO DR.THAKRIT RUJIMORA DU BOWEN DU JIN EDGAR MORALES EDWARD JAMES POPA EILISH KATE BAILEY EMILY WOOD EMILY QUINN SMYTH FAKHIRA HAJI MUHD SAIFUL FANDI RIZKI ROSYARI FATHMA SONNAYA M. MINAGA FAZRIE BIN RAMALAN FENG HAO GAO HANYUE GAVIN SINGER GE XIAOCHEN GEOMEL CONCEPCION GEORGE BAKAR GERALD ORIN͂O SEMIFRANIA

GERALDINE ANNE MAJANGA GERMAINE DEANNE GUTIERREZ GIANINA JOY NATHANIA NAPO HABIBAH BINTI OMAR BUANG HAE JI HAJI AHMAD HAMIZ BIN HAJI JAMAN HAJI AN-MUAZ BIN HAJI JINAL ZAINAL HANNASI PURI HARDEEP SINGH DANG HE MENGYING HE YIXUAN HEMNAARTH A/L TANAKARAN HIDAYANTI HERDIANA HO MING WAI, MANDY HSIAO YA-FEI HSIAO JUI-TZU HSU SHIH HSUN HU XIANGYU HUANG YAOCEN HUANG WEN SHAO I GUSTI AYU OKA PASTINI IAN KO IQBAL FAHMI ITTIPON SUKSAWET IVAN JAYSON TAWIRAN IZZIATI MAS ADAVEENA BINTI ABDUL GHANI JACK FENBY JAMES BURKE O. ONG JAN ERIC AGUILAR RIVERA JARUWAN PERMSRI JEANSIL BRUYERE JENNIFER CONDON JIN JINGXIN JING GONG JINNAWAT SIRISUNGSUCHOL JIRAPAT NAMKAEW JOANNA WARD JOHN KALANTAR JOHN MARVIN ESPIRITU MORANTE JOHN MICHAEL LAVA JORDAN RAYMOND-MONRO JOSHUA EDWARD R. LAGASCA JOSHUA FRANCIS B. UY JOSHUA MANALO JUSTINE VERON REQUEJO JUTATIP KHUADKAEW KAKADA KONG KALEIGH ANN DeSOUZA KANITIPAN KITTIKHUN KARL REINER AGBULOS 38


KARTHIK A/L MUNIANDY KATA IVAN KATHLEEN JOY B. RIVERIA KENICHIRO AOKI KETSARA WATNUAM KIM NURI KITIYA SRISUK KRISSAH MARGA TAGANAS KU AMIRUL FAIZ BIN KU SEMAN KU LIN CHIEH KUNG YU-CHEN, MICAELA KUO CHI-LIANG KYOHEI SHINA LAI YA-CHUN LAU E-ZERN, DARREN LAWRENCE LAM LEE WON HEE LEE JAE HYEON LEE SHIH-TING LEE YEN HUI, WINNIE LEE YOO KYUNG LEO BOE LEUNG KAM FAI LI KERUI LI YIBAI LI YU ZHU LIANG XIAOJIE LIAO YUAN LIM CHUEN WAH LIM DWEI WEN LIM MUN YEE LIM YEE VONNE LIN CHAONAN LIN CHIEH-CHENG LIN CHIEH-TING LIN XIUYA LIOU GUANTING LIU XINYANG LO PIK YIN, SHERRY LOVELY ANNE ESTEPA LOW LI PIN M ASHRAF BIN A RAHMAN M ASHRAFIL AZHAN BIN AHMAD MAHD LUQMAN HAKIM BIN MAHAMAD SHUKRI MARIA LOUELLA GAMBOA MARINA BRIZAR MARK ROBERT COPUYOC MARWAN KAHAR BIN BAHARUDDIN MATTHEW JENTSCH MICAELA FE LLEXIA MOLAER

MICHAEL MIATARI MISHALINI KARTAGES MKHULULI DUNCAN STUBBS MOGANADEVI A/P RAJANDERAN MOHAMAD ADAM BIN ZAKRIA MOHAMMAD LUQMAN AIDIL BAHRIN MOHAMMED SYAFIQ BIN MOHD SHOKRI MOHD ASWAN BIN RAMLI MOHD FADHIL BIN BAHARUDIN MOHD HISYAM BIN JAHIMI MOHD JUHAR BIN HARUN MOHD LUTFI HAFIFI BIN JAPILI MOHD NUREDLEE BIN MOHD KAMAL GHAZALEE MOHD ROHIMAN BIN SUBRI MUHAMMAD ASARY MUHAMMAD FAKHRI BIN KHAZALI MUHAMMAD HAFEEZ BIN ZAKARIA MUHAMMAD HAZWAN OMAR MUHAMMAD NUR TAUFIQ BIN ABDUL WAHAB MUHAMMAD SUFYAN BIN ABDUL KADIR MUHAMMAD UBAYDULLAH KHAIRUDDIN MUHAMMAD ZHARIF BIN MOHD MOKHTAR MUHAMMED EIZAAZ REDZUAN MUHD. FARASUL WA’IE BIN WADI MUSTAFA AKMAL BIN KAMARUZAMAN NABILA KHAIRUNISAH NAIMAH BALQISH BINTI SHARI SHAWARUDIN NAMPHEUNG PIMPA NANDHINI RADHAKRISHNAN NARUEMOL TUEANSATI NATALIE JARRAH NATTASHA VALDEPENAS NAZATUL HANIM BINTI NIZAM NELSONPERUMAL A/L SINNASAMY NG BOON JOO NIK MUHD AFNAN BIN NIK MUHD AFANDI NOEL GUTIERREZ PEREZ NOOR AQILAH BINTI ABDUL LATIF JANATON NOOR FAIQAH BINTI ABDUL LATIF JANATON NOOR NAZATUL AZIRA BINTI SHAHIDAN NORASYIKIN BINTI IDRIS NORHAYATI AWANG HAJI IDRIS NUR AIN BINTI ARIFFIN NUR AMALINA BINTI AWANG NUR ASHIKIN BINTI MOHD SAID NUR FARAHAIN BINTI SHARIF NUR SHAREEN BINTI AHMAD NUR SYAMIRA BIN SAJALI NURHAZIQAH BINTI YUSOF 39


NUTNIDA PITIMOL NUTTAPOL JUNPUT ONCHIRA BUNYAPHALA ONG HWEE YANG ONG ZHU WEI, MELISSA PAINGRAWIN SUKBUNJONG PARK WOO JIN PARVINDER SINGH PATCHAREEWAN JANLURE PAVARIT MANCHANDA PHALAUNNAPHAT SIRIWONGS PHILIP MUNDIYAMKAI PIMPAJEE BUDSRI PISETPONG PANYA PITIWAT PAMAKATAE PLOYPAILIN DEEROD POKPONG JINTAPRASAT PORNPROM THAIWANNASRI PORNTIP PROMSUNGVONG PRARIT PHROMSAENWISET PRIYANKA PAN PUNPITRA PUNYARATABANDHU PUTRI BALKIS BINTI MOHAMAD NOR QIAO YU RACHEL McDONALD RAFAEL QUILALA RATTHAPON PAIKHAYAT REBECCA DUKE REZA BORZOU RHAYSSA CASTRECHINI RHIANNA COUZENS RIZQI YAKHUSNA YANAGIBORI ROCHELLE ALCASID ROHIN KUMAR RYAN JOHN MORATH SAJNI CHATLY SANDRA TRIASTUTI EFFENDY SANNY JOY EIZA OROPEL SARAH BOURKE SEBASTIAN ZANACCHI SHOTA ITO SHUTIMON SRISANGUANSAKUL SITI AISYAH REDUAN SITI RAHIMAH BINTI OSMAN SITI ZUBAIDAH BINTI SAMAT SONIA MARIE BACARES SOPHAL CHUM SOPHIA GEORGEFF SRIRATANALIM JIDAPA STACY TIE LING KIONG

STEVAN LLIC STEVEN FILBY SUDARAT CUMPANG SUKANYA LAMUN SUKSAKAO SAMRANWONG SUPITCHA KONGKIATWAREE SUTASINEE VORALIKIT SUTTIRAK SAN-NGAH SYAFIQAH BINTI ABDUL RAHIM TAE-SEON LEE TAHLIA BURCHILL TAKUMI SAITO TAN JIT MIN TANG TANG TARNRUETHAI BOONSIRI TAWAN JANSAWANG TAWANWONG SRITHONG TAWEWONG SOONTONPONG TAYLOR ALEXANDRA MACDONALD TEJI CHON THANA RAJ A/L LETCHUMANAN THANESHWARAN A/L RAMADAS THARATHIP JUNTARASAKA THOMAS PEARSON TIAN SIXIE TIDARAT SEEON TIEN PO-CHUN TOSCA ADRIANE VELASQUEZ TRI OCTAVIANI SIHOMBING TRUDY HARINGA TUN MOHD SAUFI BIN AHMAD ZAKARIA UNCHITTHA PRASATTSAP UTHIA ESTIANE VALAILAK WANNA VARACHAYA BOONMALERT VARISTHA NAKORNTHAP VOEURN NHAT WAN MOHD AMINUDDIN WAN RAHIM WAN NUR DAYANA BINTI WAN ANUUAR SAHIDDIN WAN NURHIDAYAT BIN WAN MUHAMAD WANG ANAN WANG HONGYU WANG PIN WANG RUOMEI WANPEN SANGHACHAI WARACHAI MAKJINDA WARINYA WAREE WASINEE SUAKLA WEI JINGDE 40


WINANG PRANANDANA WONG JIN JIE, EDWIN WORRAWOOT RAYASAGOOL WU YUMEI XAVIER ROEL ALVARAN XU FANGHAO XU YONGDAN XUE BING XUE CHEN YANG CHI LING, ANGELA YANG HU YANISA ONCHAIYA YEREMIA HARDIAWAN YING LIUYI YU TINGTING YU YING YU-AN CHIANG YUAN SU YUE GUAN YUENYONG KANOKPORN YUKI NISHIGUCHI YUSMUNIRAH BINTI MUHAMAD YUSAR ZHANG QIDI ZHANG MENGYUAN ZHANG MING ZHANG XIAO ZHANG XUYAN ZHANG YUAN ZHENG WANG ZHU HONGDOU ZHU JIANG ZURATUL NADHIRAH ZULKIFLI ZUWAIBATUL IKMAN BIN ZAUL KAFILAI

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Media Coverage on the Symposium Students learn to address global issues by DESY NURHAYATI ON 2012-08-03

Four hundred university students from 33 countries worldwide actively involved in sustainable development gathered in Bali to discuss global issues concerning their future during a five-day symposium.

 This third annual University Scholars Leadership Symposium organized by Humanitarian Affairs UK, a London-based social enterprise, brings college students from outstanding universities around the world together to learn about, explore and address global issues concerning the plight of those suffering from extreme poverty.

 Janice Leong, regional director of Humanitarian Affairs Asia, said in the opening on Thursday that the event would give these promising future leaders the opportunity to meet and build a network with youth from around the world, working toward the same goal of alleviating the plight of the poor in developing countries.

 “Our aim is to challenge them to play their roles in achieving the Millennium Development Goals and to motivate this next generation of leaders to be agents of change for the world they would like to see. ”

Discussions during this symposium are expected to provide the necessary skills and understanding for the students to learn how to plan, manage and implement a successful humanitarian service project in their own local community and around the world.

 “This training course is a knowledge-based program that will provide them with the proper planning skills needed in humanitarian service projects. These skills range from the screening of volunteers to the successful project management in the field,” Janice said. 

Pavarit Manchanda from Silpakorn University in Thailand, said he expected to learn a lot of things about humanitarian activities.

 The undergraduate student majoring in hotel management said he had done two humanitarian projects in his home country.

 “We went out to build a house for the poor, and it’s something I really enjoyed doing. One of every six persons on the planet is suffering from poverty, so it becomes the duty of the five others to help them, and it becomes my duty as a privileged one to help the rest,” he told Bali Daily.

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He put special concern on education issues, because illiteracy rates in Asian countries are still very high. “What we must focus on is education for all the underprivileged Asians, so they will be able to compete with others globally. ”

Veron Requejo, a fourth-year student of Ateneo de Manila University in the Philippines majoring in legal management, said that she was interested in fighting for the rights of laborers.
 
“That’s what I really want to do in the future. I came to this symposium hoping to broaden my perspectives to help out and change the world, not only in my country but also the other parts of the world,” she said.

 On the first day, keynote speaker Arthur Gillette, the former secretary-general of the Coordinating Committee for International Voluntary Service and retired director of UNESCO’s Youth and Sports Division in Paris, shared his volunteering experiences in many countries and talked about voluntary services around the world. He also talked about how to link volunteering with education.

 Geraldine Cox, the president and founder of the non-profit organization Sunrise Children’s Home shared the challenges she encountered while setting up a children’s home in Cambodia. 

On Friday, the symposium will start with a presentation by Raoul Wijffels, founder and executive director of the One Dollar For Music Foundation in Bali. He will share his creative concept of getting youths off the street to create music for their future. 

Robin Lim, founder of the Healthy Mother Earth Foundation and the CNN Hero of the Year 2011 will talk to the delegates about her inspiring story of helping the poor to deliver healthy babies. 

Also, each of the 400 delegates will write a postcard to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, expressing their thoughts on the future they would want to see. Source: Nurhayati, D. (2012, August 3). Students learn to address global issues. Retrieved September 22, 2012, from The Jakarta Post: http://www.thejakartapost.com/ bali-daily/2012-08-03/students-learn-address-global-issues.html

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Foreigners join social projects by DESY NURHAYATI ON 2012-08-08

Four hundreds university students from 33 countries participating in an international symposium in Bali took part in several projects to help poor families and orphans on the island.

 During the “Learning Journey” session on Sunday, the students were divided into seven different project groups.

 Two of the groups, consisting of 120 people, went to Mendoyo village in Jembrana regency, where they built a house for a poor family and distributed staple foods to the village residents, as well as playing with children in the village.

 Five other groups brought children from several orphanages to enjoy activities that they don’t usually have the opportunity to take part in.

 “Participants spent time playing with children in the village, and every delegate brought a present from different countries to be given to the children. They also cooked for the residents, 250 people, and ate lunch together. The night before we went to buy the food and everything and we also distributed a package of rice, cooking oil and noodles for every family,” Janice Leong, regional director of Humanitarian Affairs Asia, said Monday.

 Sixty of the participants built a house along local village residents, who had previously prepared the foundations. The students helped building the walls and the roof.

 The organizer worked together with Bali’s social welfare agency and arranged for the students to go to the village.

 “We also brought the children from the village and from orphanages to go to fun places and do fun things, like go to Waterbom, go paintballing, water tubing, marine walking and cycling in Ubud, activities that make the delegates attached to the children, so they have time to interact and spend quality time,” Leong said. 

The social projects were part of the 3rd annual University Scholars Leadership Symposium organized by Humanitarian Affairs UK, a London based social enterprise. The symposium brought college students from outstanding universities around the world together to learn about, explore and address global issues concerning the plight of those suffering from extreme poverty. 

Discussions during this symposium are expected to provide the necessary skills and understanding for the students to be able to plan, manage and implement a successful humanitarian service project in their own local community and around the world.

 Previously during the five-day symposium, the students had a chance to hear presentations and hold discussions with several inspiring speakers, including Geraldine Cox, the president and founder of the nonprofit organization Sunrise Children’s Home, who shared the challenges she encountered while setting up a children’s home in Cambodia.

 Other speakers were Raoul Wijffels, founder and executive director of the One Dollar For Music Foundation in Bali, 44


as well as Robin Lim, founder of the Healthy Mother Earth Foundation and the CNN Hero of the Year 2011, who captivated the students with her inspiring story of helping the poor to deliver healthy babies.
 
The students found the symposium sessions and the Learning Journey fun and inspiring.

 “The symposium has been very inspiring. I have had the chance to meet the great speakers. It touched me that some people can devote themselves so much to help others,” Varistha Nakomthap, a fourth-year student of the Faculty of Arts at Chulalongkorn University in Thailand, told Bali Daily on the sidelines of the symposium.

 “It is quite an experience for me. The children at the village speak a different language, but we can play and sing together. The smiles and the laughter are like a universal language for us,” she said.

 Blake Mooney from the Law and Arts Faculty of University of Melbourne, Australia, said he enjoyed spending time with the orphans, playing and chatting with them.

 “I was lucky enough to get into the group playing paintball with the orphans. I was a little bit worried that I was going to come across seven-year-old children, but they were 17-20-year-old boys and girls,” he said, laughing. 

“We spent a few hours having so much fun with them, talking, exchanging Facebook details. And how they want to continue their education and make a change and give back to their community,” said the fourth-year student majoring in criminology.

 He said the symposium had been great and full of social initiatives. 

“It’s amazing that these people can make a difference in many people’s lives. It’s also fun to meet people from around the world, to know that there is a lot of support to make change amongst young people from all different kinds of cultures and social settings. ”

The symposium also gave him the idea to open a chapter of Humanitarian Affairs in Australia. “I think this would be a great opportunity to harness the idea and start a chapter in Australia because there are many Australians who are very passionate about these matters,” said the student, who joined a sustainability project at his college. Source: Nurhayati, D. (2012, August 8). Foreigners join social project. Retrieved September 22, 2012, from The Jakarta Post: http://www.thejakartapost.com/balidaily/2012-08-08/foreigners-join-social-projects.html

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Misi Kemanusiaan

Oleh MOHD. SAIFUL MOHD. SAHAK 2012-08-13 SEMPENA mengambil keberkatan Ramadan, 400 mahasiswa dari 33 buah negara termasuk 70 mahasiswa dari institusi pengajian tinggi awam dan swasta negara ini telah menyertai Simposium Kepimpinan Pelajar-Pelajar Universiti di Bali, Indonesia baru-baru ini. Misi delegasi Malaysia yang diketuai Muhamad Rizan Hassan itu bertujuan meningkatkan kesedaran sukarelawan dan kemanusiaan dengan membantu golongan fakir miskin, anak-anak yatim dan membina rumah bagi golongan ibu tunggal. Tumpuan misi adalah di Wilayah Banjar Tengah, Kota Jembarana, Bali yang terletak kira-kira 130 kilometer dari Denpansar. Perjalanan dari kota Bali itu menggunakan kenderaan darat ke Desa Mendoyo Dauh Tekad mengambil masa kira-kira tiga jam menaiki bas. Wilayah Kota Jembarana adalah kawasan kampung yang paling ramai penduduk miskin. Terdapat 25 perkampungan daif yang penduduknya terdiri daripada golongan petani yang mengusahakan sawah padi sebagai sumber makanan rutin harian. Muhamad Rizan berkata, kesemua mahasiswa Malaysia mengalas tanggungjawab besar walaupun terpaksa menahan lapar dan dahaga. Namun ia tidak mematahkan semangat mereka menyertai misi kemanusiaan itu di sepanjang program simposium itu berlangsung. “Walaupun mereka berpuasa ia tidak menjadi penghalang kepada mahasiswa terlibat dengan program kemanusiaan dan kemasyarakatan. “Selain itu, mereka juga memikul tanggungjawab membentangkan isu-isu berkaitan hak asasi manusia dan kemiskinan melalui perbincangan dalam kumpulan. “Kita mahu melihat setiap anggota delegasi pelajar Malaysia menyumbang tenaga secara proaktif agar mereka dapat membina keyakinan tinggi selain melalui proses pertukaran idea bersama rakan-rakan dari negara lain,� katanya. Muhamad Rizan berkata, segala idea dan pandangan yang diutarakan pada program itu diharap dapat dipanjangkan ke peringkat yang lebih tinggi seperti Pertubuhan Bangsa-Bangsa Bersatu (PBB) dan seterusnya diguna pakai untuk memerangi isu-isu yang dibangkitkan. Program kemanusiaan itu di anjurkan Humanity Affair, London dengan kerjasama Majlis Photo courtesy of Ashraff Rahman Belia Malaysia (MBM) dan Persatuan Belia Asrama Malaysia (MYHA). Matlamatnya ialah menggarap penglibatan mahasiswa antarabangsa untuk terlibat dengan misi-misi keamanan dunia tanpa sempadan. Source: Sahak, M. S. (2012, August 13). Misi Kemanusian. Retrieved September 22, 2012, from Utusan Malaysia: http://www.utusan.com.my/utusan/Kampus/20120813/ka_01/Misi-Kemanusiaan

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Mahasiswa tonggak kemerdekaan Oleh MOHD. SAIFUL MOHD. SAHAK 2012-09-3

TAHUN ini genap 55 tahun Malaysia mencapai kemerdekaan . Dalam tempoh lebih lima dekad inilah, semua rakyat berbilang kaum sama-sama mencurahkan keringat dan bakti untuk membangunkan negara ini. Dalam fasa kemerdekaan ini, boleh dikatakan Malaysia berjaya mengharungi dugaan dan cabaran untuk menikmati kesejahteraan hidup di negara yang merdeka. Usaha mencapai kemerdekaan yang di capai ini juga hasil daripada peranan mahasiswa yang menjadi tonggak dan penyumbang dalam mengekalkan keamanan dan kestabilan negara. Mahasiswa adalah pencetus perubahan dalam sistem pendidikan tinggi yang menjadi kayu ukur kekayaan bangsa dan kestabilan di sesebuah negara. Justeru mahasiswa merupakan barisan hadapan dalam memartabat serta memperjuangkan kemerdekaan negara Malaysia. Yang Dipertua Majlis Perwakilan Pelajar Universiti Utara Malaysia (UUM) Amer Izzuddin Abdul Rashid berkata, sempena sambutan ulang tahun kemerdekaan negara mahasiswa perlu merenungi kembali jerih perih pejuang menuntut kemerdekaan yang terdiri daripada pelbagai kaum dalam semangat memakmurkan rakyat dan negara ini. “Mahasiswa hari ini harus mempertahan kedaulatan negara dengan prinsip dahulu dapat menghormati dan bertolak ansur dalam membina kehidupan di Malaysia, kenapa generasi sekarang tidak dapat bersikap sedemikian. “Mereka harus mempertahan negara bina bangsa daripada hancur berkecai dan musnah dalam sekelip mata. Oleh itu, kita perlu menghargai keamanan , keharmonian dan kestabilan yang ada,” katanya ketika di temui pada Simposium Kepimpinan Tinggi Pelajar-Pelajar Universiti Seluruh dunia di Bali, Indonesia baru-baru ini. Simposium itu di anjurkan Humanity Affair, London dengan kerjasama Majlis Belia Malaysia (MBM) dan Persatuan Belia Asrama Malaysia (MYHA) yang diketuai delegasi Malaysia, Muhamad Rizan Hassan. Amer Izzuddin berkata, formula kejayaan dan kestabilan negara kita sejak lebih lima dekad lalu ialah perpaduan kaum dan keamanan negara. Hanya dengan ‘resipi’ ini dijangka rakyat negara ini dan mahasiswa universiti dapat terus mencapai matlamat masa depan yang lebih baik. “Mahasiswa kena pertahankan perpaduan nasional yang menjadi tonggak keamanan dan kestabilan negara kita selama ini. Ingatlah, sesuatu perubahan yang ingin kita kecapi belum tentu membawa kebaikan, sebaliknya mungkin mendatangkan masalah lebih teruk. “Perhatikan negara-negara yang terlebih dahulu merdeka daripada kita, akibat perasaan prasangka mereka mundur dan miskin tanpa mendapat pelindungan dari kerajaan dan tahap kehidupan majoriti rakyatnya pun tidak begitu baik sehingga sukar menyambung pengajian tinggi. “Mahasiswa perlu menjaga, keunikan masyarakat majmuk yang mempunyai pelbagai kaum, bahasa dan agama tetapi hidup dalam aman menjadi model yang mahu dicontohi oleh masyarakat di negara- negara dunia lain “Oleh itu, mahasiswa perlu mempertahan asas-asas integrasi rakyat Malaysia yang bersandarkan ideologi kebangsaan yakni Rukun Negara dan Perlembagaan Persekutuan sebagai kontrak sosial negara mahu diganggu gugat dan diubah suai,” katanya. Source: Sahak, M. S. (2012, September 3). Mahasiswa tonggak kemerdekaan. Retrieved September 23, 2012, from Utusan Malaysia: http://www.utusan.com.my/ utusan/Kampus/20120903/ka_01/Mahasiswa-tonggak-kemerdekaan

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STATEMENT OF ACCOUNT INCOME(USD) 275,000

Registration Fee Less Operating Cost Allowances for Interns Accommodation for Interns Website Design Maintenance of Website Bank Charges Office Supplies / Maintenance of Equipment Office Cleaning Office Rental Printing - Posters / Brochures Postage / Courier Services Stationery Transportation Telecommunications / Skype Utilities Sub-Total

EXPENSES(USD)

1,050 2,850 4,000 1,100 2,640 1,200 180 3,500 2,700 1,150 106 700 2,200 1,250 24,626

Less Event Expenses Airfreight Accommodation at Aston Hotel Backdrop ( 12 units ) Banner – PVC ( 36 pieces ) Basic Necessities for 100 families Certificates ( 480 pieces ) Certificates Folders Drums Donations to Orphanages Delegate Tags / Lanyards Graphic Designing Entertainment ( Opening / Farewell ) Food and Beverages in Aston Food and Beverages in Taman Bhangwan Learning Journey ( 10 Activities ) Video Documentation Photo Documentation Printing Rental of Ballroom / 10 Meeting Rooms for 1 week Sound and Lighting Security Arrangement Speaker Expenses Event Management Transportation T-shirt Key-Chain Volunteer Training Miscellanous Expenses Sub-Total

1,670 47,080 2,500 600 1,700 480 220 5,400 7,000 830 1,800 3,500 39,820 25,200 35,790 7,000 2,500 280 16,600 3,000 2,500 6,000 2,000 16,000 2,400 400 1,600 1,000 234,870

Operating Cost + Event Expenses *Surplus Income

259,496 15,504

*The Surplus Income will be used for the Monthly Angel Kitchen Project to benefit the impoverished communities in Thailand.

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Final Bali Symposium 2012 Report  

Final Bali Symposium 2012 Report

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