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n a friendly, close-knit learning community our students are challenged to grow intellectually and integrate their faith in every program of study.

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Contents

 ,  /  ,  

FE AT UR E S

32 A god of our age: Who was Steve Jobs?

COVER STORY A revered technology pioneer and a relentless innovator, the Apple founder remained in many ways a mystery

36 Capitols and capital

Should politicians pick business winners and losers? The Solyndra debacle is a black eye for those who say yes, but the practice is bipartisan and widespread not only in Washington but in Mississippi, Texas, and other states

44 Palmetto peloton

With the primary calendar shifting forward, the leading  presidential candidates remain in a surprisingly close pack in the important South Carolina race. Perry leads Romney but not by much, and Cain is gaining ground

DISPATCHES 5 News 12 Human Race 14 Quotables 16 Quick Takes

50 Following the yellow brick road New Gov. Sam Brownback is turning Kansas into a bold laboratory for conservative reform

52 Sound & fury Disrupters of an Israeli ambassador’s speech say ruling against them violates free speech

5

54 Road to recovery

Both job seekers and job creators are facing difficult times, but many do not see that as a reason to lose hope

PAUL SAKUMA/AP

44

ON THE COVER: A person holds an iPad showing the Apple website; photo by Emmanuel Dunand/ AFP/Getty Images

REVIEWS 21 Movies & TV 24 Books 26 Q&A 28 Music

21

NOTEBOOK 61 Lifestyle 63 Technology 64 Science 65 Houses of God 66 Sports 67 Money 68 Religion

36

VOICES 3 Joel Belz 18 Janie B. Cheaney 30 Mindy Belz 71 Mailbag 75 Andrée Seu 76 Marvin Olasky

visit worldmag.com for breaking news, to sign up for weekly email updates, and more

 (ISSN -X) (USPS -) is published biweekly ( issues) for . per year by God’s World Publications, (no mail)  All Souls Crescent, Asheville, NC ; () -. Periodical postage paid at Asheville, , and additional mailing offi ces. Printed in the . Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. ©  God’s World Publications. All rights reserved. : Send address changes to , P.O. Box , Asheville,  -.

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10/6/11 4:59 PM


Fall in love again… with the King James version

In more than 400 selections interspersed throughout the scriptures, men and women from C.S. Lewis to Corrie ten Boom to George MacDonald share reflections and insights inspired by the KJV. It’s like going home again.

Introducing the KJV Devotional Bible

“The earth is the L’s and the fullness thereof; the world and those who dwell therein.” —   :

 Editor in Chief   Editor   Managing Editor   News Editor   Senior Writers  .  /     /  .  /     /    /   Reporters   /    Correspondents   /     /   /      /   /     /   /     /   /     /   /   Mailbag Editor   Executive Assistant  c Editorial Assistants   /  

 Art Director  .  Associate Art Director  .  Illustrator   Graphic Designer   Brand Design Director    

Featuring more than 400 selections from the most influential Christian writers from yesterday and today, including: Corrie ten Boom D. L. Moody Elisabeth Elliot Matthew Henry Charles Colson C. S. Lewis

George MacDonald Billy Graham Anne Graham Lotz Charles Spurgeon John Wesley and many more…

Devotions, reflections, notes, and quotes are interspersed throughout the full KJV text, allowing readers more freedom to move at their own pace and savor the depth of each meditation.

 Web Executive Editor  c Web Assistant Editor  

Special FeatureS • Profiles of contributors • Concise history of the King James Bible • Book introductions • Dictionary/concordance • Index of devotions by scripture passage

       

Invest Wisely.

Founder   Publisher  .  CEO   Associate Publisher   

Send Him.

  Customer Service Office .. Customer Service Manager  

 Advertising Office .. Director of Sales and Marketing   Account Execs   /   /   The World Market  

              

Thousands of native missionaries in poorer countries effectively take the gospel to unreached people groups

in areas that are extremely difficult God’s World Publications   () for American missionaries to reach.   /   /   4 They speak the local languages   /   /   4 They are part of the culture   /  .  /   4 They never need a visa, airline   /   tickets, or furloughs   /   /   4 They win souls and plant

             

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churches Native missionaries serve the Lord at a fraction of what it costs to send an American missionary overseas.


Joel Belz

The Smiths and the Browns Young Americans need to hear an old tale of sound stewardship

ERIC PETERSON/SIS

>>

H’    about personal finance—and maybe macroeconomics as well—that I first heard about  years ago. I wish I had heard it  years ago. I hope a few -somethings are listening to me now. It’s the simple story of two young couples— let’s call them the Smiths and the Browns—who were eager to buy their first homes. For the purposes of this account, we’ll assume that the Smiths and the Browns are virtually equal in almost everything they bring to this big purchase. Their incomes and savings are the same. Both have two young children. Their credit worthiness is the same. Their overall economic circumstances are very similar. We’ll also assume for this exercise, though it’s a stretch of our imaginations in today’s economy, that both the Smiths and the Browns can afford a down payment of ,. What’s also the same is both families’ desire to buy almost identical homes. They’re both attracted to recently constructed, three-bedroom, two-bath homes on spacious lots. They’d both prefer the comforts of air conditioning. They’d like to keep their quite-new cars in a garage. Naturally, they really prefer marble countertops in the kitchen (where they both have their eyes on a dishwasher) and in the bathrooms. In the neighborhood where they’d both like to live, the price tag on such houses is about ,. The Smiths have very much fallen in love with the house of their dreams. They’ve even made a list of all the things they’re willing to give up so that they can afford the regular mortgage payment— which will be about , monthly for the next  years. With a big gulp, they sign on the dotted line. The Browns, meanwhile, are gulping in a different way. Across town, they’ve found another house that, while by no means a nightmare, is neither what you’d call a dream. The neighborhood’s a little scruffy. Just two bedrooms, and another that might work for a third. Only one bath. Formica instead of marble, and there’s a big burnt circle right next to the kitchen sink where someone set an overly hot pan. No dishwasher.

Email: aseu@worldmag.com

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What’s got the Browns dreaming, though, is the prospect that in just eight years, with the same , monthly payment the Smiths are making, they can own this , house outright. No debt at all. And then, just eight years from now, other things being equal, they can take their , asset and make a  percent down payment on a , house like the one they’re saying “no” to now. At that point, they can repeat the eight-year process. Sixteen years from right now, the Browns will own the , house, with no debt and no further payments. Remarkably, they will have to wait only eight years longer than the Smiths to enjoy such comforts and such dreams. The Smiths, meanwhile, after  years, still owe about , on their , house, which by now they will think of as a little old and run down. They’d like to remodel, but can’t even think about it because of those , monthly payments they still face for another  years! The story of the Smiths, of whom there are many, and the Browns, of whom there are way too few, is one I first heard from my business professor friend Richard Chewning—but only after I was already committed to my first -year mortgage. I wish I had heard with more clarity a few years earlier. If I had heard it, and if I had listened, I would now be a wealthier man. If I had heard and taught that story more faithfully, my family would be more financially secure. My little part of God’s kingdom—my local church, the schools I support, and the outreach agencies I back—would all have more resources to work with. The story of the Smiths and the Browns is not just about housing. It’s about every dollar any of us ever spends. And it’s a story rooted in the deep biblical truth about the riches to be reaped when we faithfully defer our desires. A OCTOBER 22, 2011

WORLD

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everything Yo u

Your career. Your kids. Your home. Your hopes. You’ll find inspiration for everything you are at Christianbook.com. Books, e-books and Bibles. Music for every mood. And unique gifts that warm the heart and refresh the soul. In other words, you’ll find everything Christian.For less.

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You Brand WM 10.11.indd 1 21 D-OPENER.indd 4

8/3/11 2:51:29 PM 9/28/11 1:33 PM


Dispatches NEWS HUMAN RACE QUOTABLES QUICK TAKES

Furious reaction PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: KRIEG BARRIE

NEWS: As Justice Department gun scandal grows, the administration lashes out at a  reporter BY EDWARD LEE PITTS in Washington

>>

T -  over Operation Fast and Furious is now raising the ire of both political parties. Republicans are upset with Obama administration officials for stonewalling the investigation into a federal gun program that supplied firearms to Mexican drug cartels. Democrats in the White House are furious at one reporter for sticking with the story. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith, R-Texas, sent a letter to President Barack Obama on Oct.  requesting that he appoint a special counsel to examine whether Attorney General Eric Holder misled congressional lawmakers during testimony under oath on May . Smith’s committee had asked Holder to explain when he had first

mag.com: Your online source for today’s news, Christian views

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learned about Fast and Furious, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives program that distributed more than , guns to a Mexican trafficking network. Documents show that agents used taxpayer funds to purchase the semi-automatic weapons and then sold them to at least one cartel. The guns later turned up at numerous violent crime scenes in both Mexico and the United States, including one attack that killed a U.S. border agent. When a whistleblower revealed the operation, the Justice Department initially claimed it was a “botched” operation during which agents had “lost track” of the weapons. Holder, in his May testimony, said, “I’m not sure of the exact date, but I probably OCTOBER 22, 2011

WORLD

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Dispatches > News

Irene–imposed postponement in August, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., will be officially dedicated on Oct. . The new October date is set to coincide with the th anniversary of the Million Man March.

LOOKING AHEAD

EU leaders summit

Leaders of the -member European Union will begin two days of meetings on Oct.  that will likely be filled with discussions of the Eurozone’s debt crisis. As recently as Oct. , Greece admitted that it will miss deficit targets it agreed to in July, casting doubt that even a planned second bailout would solve Greece’s debt problems.

Weight change

By the time the th Convocation of the General Conference on Weights and Measures wraps up its meeting in Sèvres, France, on Oct. , the kilogram may have a new weight. Traditionally, the kilogram has had roughly the same mass as a liter of water. Scientists are hoping to recalculate the kilogram to equal exactly the mass of a liter of water. The conference could update other measurements, including the ampere, kelvin, and mole.

Vegas debate It’s hard to imagine

any serious contenders for the  presidential nomination not being in the race by midOctober. So the Oct.  Republican debate hosted by Western Republican Leadership Conference in Las Vegas could be  voters’ first chance to see the settled Republican field.

Bolshoi reopens After

a six-year,  million restoration, the famed Bolshoi Theater of Moscow will reopen on Oct. . Gone are the Soviet symbols that used to adorn the theater’s façade. The first performance is scheduled to be Glinka’s opera, “Ruslan and Ludmila.”

Gliding Wright The Wright Brothers’  flight may be

more impressive, but for a solid decade no one could break the gliding record set  years ago on Oct.  in North Carolina. Orville Wright lifted off in his Wright Glider and soared for  minutes and  seconds—a feat that enthusiasts will attempt to recreate in North Carolina.

KING: MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/GETTY IMAGES • KILOGRAM: iSTOCK • GREEK DEBT: PETROS GIANNAKOURIS/AP • THE VENETIAN® & THE PALAZZO®: HANDOUT • WRIGHT REENACTMENT: DREW C. WILSON/AP • TERRY: U.S. CUSTOMS & BORDER PROTECTION • ATTKISSON: CBS

heard about Fast and Furious for the first time over the last few weeks.” The question now is whether Holder perjured himself: Smith wrote in his letter that several recently released memos “raise significant questions about the truthfulness of the attorney general’s testimony.” For example, the director of the National Drug Intelligence Center told Holder in a July  memo that the operation was “responsible for the purchase of , firearms that were then supplied to the Mexican drug trafficking cartels.” In his letter to Obama, Smith wrote that documents suggest Holder began receiving weekly briefings about Fast and Furious no later than July , : “Senior Justice Department officials may have intentionally misled members of Congress.” Other lawmakers pressing for more information include Sen. John McCain and other members of the congressional delegation from Arizona, the state where border patrol agent Brian Terry was gunned down in December . Investigators found two guns from the program at the crime scene. As Congress tried to unravel the truth of what Holder knew and when he knew it, one reporter found herself in a White House hornet’s nest. CBS News investigative journalist Sharyl Attkisson told the Laura Ingraham Show on Oct.  that White House and Justice Department officials yelled and screamed at her for pursuing the story. Attkisson said a White House official cursed at her while arguing that investigating the scandal was unnecessary. She added that government officials argued she was not being reasonable since she was the only reporter pursuing the story: “They say The Washington Post is reasonable, the LA Times is reasonable, The New York Times is reasonable. I’m the only one who thinks this is a story, and they think I’m unfair and biased by pursuing it.” A

MLK dedication After a Hurricane

WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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10/6/11 3:34 PM


In the landmark sophistication of New York City’s famed Empire State Building stands The King’s College; an elite, selective college committed to equipping young men and women to lead the great institutions of the world. Through a unique, biblically-based curriculum focused on politics, philosophy, economics and business management, students prepare for careers in government, commerce, law, media, education, civil society, the arts and the church – an education of faith and consequence in the heart of New York City. www.tkc.edu • 1.888.969.7200

CREDIT

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9/28/11 10:01 PM


Dispatches > News

Hiring rights

DECISION STANDS The U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal of a case concerning World Vision’s policy to hire Christians only, so the  ruling of the th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in favor of World Vision stands. The high court’s decision means that World Vision can continue requiring its employees to agree to a statement of faith. World Vision fired three employees for not agreeing to the statement of faith: The three sued, arguing that the organization was humanitarian, not religious, but lower courts said World Vision qualifies as a religious organization. “Our Christian faith has been the foundation of our work since the organization was established in , and our hiring policy is vital to the integrity of our mission to serve the poor as followers of Jesus Christ,” said World Vision president Richard Stearns, in a statement after the Supreme Court’s decision.

It started out as little more than street theater, but throughout the first week of October the Occupy Wall Street movement grew into what The New Republic called “a younger, dreadlocked version of the Tea Party.” With declared complaints against corporations that ranged from the sound (“They have taken bailouts from taxpayers with impunity, and continue to give Executives exorbitant bonuses”) to the misdirected (“They have held students hostage with tens of thousands of dollars of debt on education”), nearly  protesters were arrested on Oct.  as they shut down a lane of traffic on the Brooklyn Bridge. As liberal journalists gave Occupy Wall Street favorable publicity, an Oct.  Rasmussen poll found that  percent of Americans have a favorable view of the protesters,  percent hold an unfavorable view, and  percent have no opinion.

WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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WORLD VISION: TED S. WARREN/AP • PROTESTERS: ANDREW BURTON/GETTY IMAGES CREDIT

Occupiers

Available in Apple’s App Store: Download ’s iPad app today

10/6/11 5:05 PM

WALLIS: WEF/PHOTOSHOT/NEWSCOM • PLAYBOY CLUB: MATT DINERSTEIN/NBC • SMITH: DAVE MARTIN/AP

President Barack Obama’s administration has sat on the fence regarding the liberty of religious institutions to hire and fire based on religious beliefs. One sign that it’s coming off the fence came in the Supreme Court building on Oct.  when Leondra Kruger of the Justice Department argued that religious institutions should be treated just like other institutions in matters of hiring. Kruger’s argument shocked the justices in what was already a blockbuster religious freedom case, Hosanna-Tabor v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (see “Firing lines,” Oct. ). “This is extraordinary— extraordinary,” Justice Antonin Scalia told Kruger during oral arguments. “There in black and white in the Constitution are special protections for religion.” One of the liberal justices jumped in on Scalia’s side: “I too find this amazing,” said Justice Elena Kagan. The facts of the case seemed to agitate Justice Anthony Kennedy, often a swing vote on the court. Cheryl Perich was a church-commissioned teacher at Hosanna-Tabor, a church and school in Redford, Mich., affiliated with the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod (). When a doctor diagnosed her with narcolepsy, a sleep disorder that may leave sufferers falling asleep on the job, she took a leave of absence. When she asked to return to work, school officials said she wasn’t ready. When she said she would sue, the church withdrew her commission and fired her for going to courts instead of the church’s established tribunals, as  teaching requires. The Supreme Court has never before ruled on who falls under the “ministerial exception,” a court-created law protecting religious institutions from federal oversight, and all of the justices seemed troubled that courts were deciding who counted as a minister and who didn’t. Several liberal and conservative justices treated the government’s position against the ministerial exception as radical, but Kennedy commented, “She was fired simply for asking for a hearing.” Douglas Laycock, the church’s attorney, responded, “She could have had a hearing in the synod.”


There he goes again

Jim wallis’ sojourners accepts $150,000 more from atheist George soros by Marvin Olasky Last year Jim Wallis encountered a barrage of criticism when WORLD reported that his religious left organization, Sojourners, took $325,000 from the world’s most notorious billionaire, pro-abortion atheist George Soros (July 17 and Sept. 11, 2010). Now he’s at it again: In an email note to me, Wallis confirmed that Soros’ Open Society Foundation has just given Sojourners $150,000 more. The donation is more evidence that Wallis and Sojourners are on the left, even though the organization appeals to young evangelicals by claiming to be apolitical—in Wallis’ summation, not left but “deep.” Sojourners has paid its bills through contributions from co-religionists but also with $250,000 from The Tides Foundation, $200,000 from the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations, and additional sums from Barbra Streisand and others. For some contributors, Sojourners is a useful tool in reducing evangelical support for conservatives. Others have grander

motives: Soros himself has stated, “The main obstacle to a stable and just world order is the United States.” Wallis defended his decision to solicit and accept Soros funds by pointing me to William Booth, founder of the Salvation Army, who accepted donations from disreputable sources. Booth, though, took contributions from liquor-sellers and gamblers who knew he would undercut their endeavors. Soros gives money to Wallis to promote the political views they share. Booth helped the poor without campaigning for governmental growth and materialistic panaceas: He explained, “To get a man soundly saved it is not enough to put on him a pair of new breeches, to give him regular work, or even to give him a University education. These things are all outside a man, and if the inside remains unchanged you have wasted your labor.”

world vision: Ted s. warren/ap • proTesTers: andrew BurTon/GeTTy imaGes CREDIT

wallis: weF/phoToshoT/newsCom • playboy club: maTT dinersTein/nBC • smiTh: dave marTin/ap

Show Scrubbed

The Playboy Club only survived until its third episode after NBC canceled the new show amid weak ratings and intense criticism of the prime-time series, which was based on the Playboy nightclubs Hugh Hefner started in the 1960s. It marks the first cancellation of the fall season and a victory for family groups like the Parents Television Council (PTC) that aggressively protested it. Prior to the show’s launch, PTC had called on the network to cancel the drama while urging advertisers to reconsider their support for it. “Bringing The Playboy Club to broadcast television was a poor programming decision from the start,” said PTC president Tim Winter. “We’re pleased that NBC will no longer be airing a program so inherently linked to a pornographic brand that denigrates and sexualizes women.”

Off the farm Hundreds of children avoided Alabama public schools and acres of crops went unpicked after an Alabama judge on Sept. 28 upheld most of the state’s new immigration law. The law—considered the strictest clampdown on illegal immigration in the nation—requires public schools to record the immigration status of new students, allows police to check immigration status during routine traffic stops, and requires employers to verify the legal status of their laborers. Many apparently illegal laborers fled, leaving many Alabama farmers shorthanded during the crucial harvest season. Chad Smith—a tomato farmer near Chandler Mountain—said he would normally use 12 trucks in harvesting his fields, but only had the workers for three. Smith (on the right) estimated his family farm could lose up to $150,000 this season because of a lack of laborers. Many others fear losing their crops or their farms. oCToBer 22, 2011

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WORLD

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10/6/11 5:04 PM


Dispatches > News

PRECISION POLICY Ahead of the th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan, the U.S. embassy in Kabul issued an alert to U.S. citizens working in the country, following the U.S. attack in Yemen that killed al-Qaeda leader Anwar alAwlaki. His death—plus the capture in Afghanistan of a commander of the al-Qaeda and Taliban-linked Haqqani clan—had U.S. forces braced for reprisal attacks on American targets.  forces announced that they had captured Haji Mali Khan in a joint raid with Afghan forces just a day after al-Awlaki’s death in Yemen at the hands of a -directed drone. On Oct. , days after Khan’s capture, U.S. forces killed a principal deputy to Khan known by one name, Dilawar, in a precision air strike near Afghanistan’s border with Pakistan. Targeted killings have been increasingly

COURAGEOUS FIGHTER Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, a Baptist pastor and civil rights leader who survived bombings and beatings in Birmingham, Ala., died Oct.  at the age of . Shuttlesworth helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and joined Martin Luther King Jr. in advocating nonviolence in the civil rights movement. His children were arrested, a bomb exploded under his bedroom, and he was hospitalized after falling under the fire hoses of the infamous Eugene “Bull” Connor. Connor said after the incident, “I wish they’d carried him away in a hearse.” King described Shuttlesworth as “the most courageous civil rights fighter in the South.”

used by the Obama administration, especially since the May raid that killed Osama bin Laden in Pakistan. U.S. officials blame the Haqqani network, based in Pakistan, for recent attacks in Afghanistan, including last month’s -hour siege at the U.S. embassy in Kabul. Last week the outgoing chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm. Mike Mullen, accused Pakistan’s spy agency, the , of supporting the Haqqani network in carrying out the attacks, the most serious allegation yet of Pakistani duplicity in the -year war. Commanders in Afghanistan called the capture “a significant milestone in the disruption of the Haqqani Network.” The death of Awlaki, who was born in New Mexico and



rely on homegrown U.S. terrorAwlaki the ists. Along with Awlaki, drone attack also killed terrorist Samir Khan—who was born in Saudi Arabia but grew up in New York and North Carolina and held U.S. citizenship. Having conspired over multiple acts of terrorism, Awlaki and Khan “gave up the benefits of American citizenship by taking up arms against their country,” points out analyst Max Boot.

WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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10/6/11 4:01 PM

CHAPLAIN: JULIE JACOBSON/AP • NADARKHANI: HANDOUT

Democrats are complaining about Republicans in the House of Representatives investigating the activities of abortion leader Planned Parenthood, which annually receives about  million in government grants—but when Democrats had a majority of House seats and could schedule investigations, they went after pro-life centers that live by volunteer labor rather than federal funding. Last month Rep. Cliff Stearns,, R-Fla., chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Investigations, sent Planned Parenthood Federation of America a six-page letter requesting more than a decade of documents. He is attempting to determine whether the group is illegally using federal funds to pay for abortions. Stearns’ committee will also investigate other alleged abuses, including failure to report cases of statutory rape and sex trafficking. Two senior Democrats, Reps. Henry Waxman of California and Diana DeGette of Colorado, responded to Stearns by arguing that the investigation singles out Planned Parenthood as “part of a Republican vendetta.” Waxman in  led an investigation of prolife pregnancy care centers and claimed the centers provide “false and misleading information.” Pro-life groups debunked Waxman’s report.

dealt a blow to al-Qaeda plans to SHUTTLESWORTH: DAVE MARTIN/AP • STEARNS: JACQUELYN MARTIN/AP • AWLAKI: DENNIS BRACK/LANDOV CREDIT

Following the money

had dual citizenship with the United States and Yemen,


Life on the Line

Disobeying DOMA new pentagon policy allows chaplains to perform same-sex weddings on military bases By EDwArD LEE PittS in washington

ShuttleSworth: Dave Martin/ap • StearnS: Jacquelyn Martin/ap • awlaki: DenniS Brack/lanDov CREDIT

chaplain: Julie JacoBSon/ap • naDarkhani: hanDout

>>

Navy Lt. Gary Ross and his partner of 11 years, Dan Swezy, exchanged wedding vows in Vermont at the stroke of midnight on Sept. 20— the first moment possible after the military formally repealed the longstanding “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy. Now, with a Sept. 30 ruling from the Pentagon, such ceremonies may be performed by chaplains and take place inside military bases. The ruling is already putting pressure on chaplains who worry that it brings the Armed Services one step closer to alienating conservative Christian denominations. The Pentagon’s decision allows Defense Department property to be used for same-sex ceremonies as long as such unions are not prohibited by state law. But Ron Crews, a retired military chaplain with the rank of colonel, said this latest Defense Department memo “flies in the face” of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DoMa). “I am just stunned by the brazenness of this apparent permission for chaplains to violate federal law,” said Crews. Crews said all military bases are federal property and should respect federal laws such as DoMa, which states that the federal government can only recognize marriage as the union of one

man and one woman. The Pentagon’s new policy does not force a chaplain to perform same-sex ceremonies, but Crews said this changed military landscape might force conservative chaplains into a defensive posture, as some groups are likely to test the limits of the ruling. Many former chaplains are encouraging new chaplains to continue to be a source of counsel for the nation’s soldiers while “serving according to the tenants of their faith,” said Doug Lee, a retired brigadier general chaplain. He added, “It is a red flag that the Pentagon is sort of dabbling into church affairs by talking about what a chaplain can and can’t do. Chaplains exist to serve their faith group, and those faith groups make decisions about a chaplain’s ministry.” Passed last December by a lame-duck Congress, the law repealed the longstanding “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy that had prohibited homosexuals from openly serving in the military. It did not address same-sex weddings on military bases or by military chaplains. Crews and Lee said this latest decision reinforces NEW PRESSURE: a chaplain leads the need for Congress soldiers of the to intervene and 82nd airborne clearly define the Division in prayer rights of a chaplain. in afghanistan.

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As Iranian pastor Youcef Nadarkhani waited to learn whether he would face execution for refusing to recant his Christian faith, his attorney reported a troubling new development: Iran’s state-run news agency began leveling new charges against Nadarkhani, accusing the pastor of being a Zionist and a threat to national security. Attorney Mohammed Ali Dadkhah said the post-trial claims were the first time he heard such accusations against his client. Religious freedom groups worried that the Iranian government created the new charges to justify a death sentence, even as international pressure mounted for the pastor’s release. Police arrested Nadarkhani in October 2009 on charges related to his work as a pastor. A court found Nadarkhani—a husband and father of two children—guilty of apostasy against Islam and sentenced him to death by hanging. Nadarkhani, 32, appealed to the Iranian Supreme Court, where justices demanded he recant his faith. The pastor refused, saying: “What should I return to? The blasphemy that I had before my faith in Christ?” When the judges said he should return to Islam, Nadarkhani’s reply was simple: “I cannot.”

octoBer 22, 2011

WORLD

11

10/6/11 4:03 PM


Dispatches > Human Race

Canadian-born researcher Ralph Steinman was one of three scientists to win the  Nobel Prize in medicine on Oct. . The cancer researcher had died on Sept.  after a fouryear battle with pancreatic cancer. The Nobel committee, which had not known of Steinman’s death, decided not to retract the award despite rules that it go to the living.

 After more than  years of curmudgeonly commentary, Andy Rooney, , has retired from ’  Minutes. The show had featured the regular segment “A Few Minutes

Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah overturned last month a court verdict that had sentenced Shaima Jastaina to  lashes for breaking the country’s rule against women driving. The ruling had sparked worldwide condemnation, coming just

 Megachurch pastor Rob Bell,, , has announced he is leaving the Michigan church he founded, Mars Hill Bible Church, to “take another leap into the unknown.” Bell (pictured with his wife, Kristen) says he and his family will relocate to Los Angeles where he reportedly plans to write more books, undertake speaking engagements, and work on a spiritual television drama loosely based on his life. His book Love Wins sparked controversy in the evangelical community earlier this year for questioning orthodox doctrines about hell (“Liberal love,” April ).

 An  investigation successfully foiled a lone wolf terrorist plot allegedly aimed at crashing explosive-filled drone aircraft into the Pentagon and U.S. Capitol. Officials arrested Rezwan Ferdaus, a Ferdaus -year-old American citizen, on Sept.  after conducting months-long surveillance and undercover work. Federal agents said Ferdaus also modified cell phones to act as switches for improvised explosive devices with the intent of passing them on to terrorists in the Middle East.

days after Abdullah had announced women would be allowed to vote and run in municipal elections in . Earlier this year, Saudi women protested the region’s sexist law by getting behind the wheel and driving their cars around town (“Taking the wheels,” July ).

  The trial of former Soviet military officer Viktor Bout, , the alleged international arms dealer whom U.S. officials accuse of attempting to sell weapons to a Colombian terrorist group, was due to begin Oct.  in U.S. federal court. Last November, the United States extradited the so-called “Merchant of Death” from Thailand—a move that angered the Kremlin.

STEINMAN: MIKE GROLL/AP • ROONEY: CBS/AP • BELLS: ANTHONY BEHAR/SIPA/AP • FERDAUS: COURTESY WBZ-TV, BOSTON/AP • SAUDI DRIVER: AMENA BAKR/ REUTERS/LANDOV • BOUT: NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/GETTY IMAGES CREDIT





with Andy Rooney” since . Rooney’s Oct.  signoff marked his ,th original essay, which over the decades ranged from rants about everyday annoyances to unabashed stances on politics and current events.

Download ’s iPad app today; details at worldmag.com/iPad

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10/6/11 9:24 AM


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al awIakI: TRaCy wooDwaRD/ThE washIngTon PosT vIa gETTy ImagEs • RoonEy: Cbs/aP • bElls: anThony bEhaR/sIPa/aP • fERDaus: CouRTEsy wbZ-Tv, bosTon/aP • sauDI DRIvER: amEna bakR/ REuTERs/lanDov • bouT: nIColas asfouRI/afP/gETTy ImagEs CREDIT

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10/4/11 10:42 AM


Border Patrol agent DAVID JIMAREZ on changes in illegal immigration over the past  years.

“If it is true, then we truly haven’t understood anything about anything.”

“It is as if a doctor advised an alcoholic to drink more beer in order to get better.” CLEMENT WERGIN, foreign editor of Die Welt, writing in the Daily Telegraph, on German politicians who advocate more economic integration in Europe in response to the financial crises in Greece and Italy.

“Thinking about it for another minute, if it’s not aliens, it’s got to be the United States.” German cybersecurity expert RALPH LANGNER, who last year discovered the Stuxnet worm, on the force he believes to be behind the cyber-superweapon.



ALVARO DE RUJULA, a theorist at , the European Center for Nuclear Research, on a report that physicists have detected subatomic particles moving faster than the speed of light (see p. ).

“New Jersey, whether you like it or not, you’re stuck with me.” New Jersey Gov. CHRIS CHRISTIE CHRISTIE, announcing on Oct.  that he will not run for the Republican presidential nomination in .

“I don’t think they’re better off than they were four years ago.” President BARACK OBAMA on Americans facing economic woes. The president pushed his jobs recovery bill as a way to reduce unemployment.

BORDER: JOHN MOORE/GETTY IMAGES • GREECE: THANASSIS STAVRAKIS/AP • DE RUJULA: HANDOUT • CHRISTIE: PAUL ZIMMERMAN/GETTY IMAGES • LANGER: ANN HERMES / THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR/GETTY IMAGES CREDIT

“There’s less traffic, but traffic that’s there is more threatening.”

WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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CREDIT

Dispatches > Quotables


CREDIT

border: John Moore/Getty IMaGes • Greece: thanassIs stavrakIs/ap • de rUJULa: handoUt • chrIstIe: paUL ZIMMerMan/Getty IMaGes • LanGer: ann herMes / the chrIstIan scIence MonItor/Getty IMaGes CREDIT

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Dispatches > Quick Takes   Unsatisfied with lazier candidates, the Society for New Bulgaria party in the Eastern European nation has put forth a donkey to stand for election in the mayoral race in the Black Sea city of Varna. Incumbent mayor Kiril Yordanov has refused to debate the beast of burden but the marginal political party is campaigning on its virtues. “Unlike the other mayor candidates and politicians, the Donkey has a strong character, doesn’t steal, doesn’t lie, and gets work done,” a party representative told a local radio station. Another party member added: “Let the residents of Varna draw the line and decide who has more positive qualities—the donkey or the incumbent mayor.”

  When officials in charge of the Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport in Tennessee struggled to find the right moniker to rename their airport, they eventually paid an advertising firm in Birmingham, Ala., for answers. Birmingham-based Big Communications solution for officials at the Chattanooga airport: Rename the facility Chattanooga Airport. The firm said the removal of “Metropolitan” from the name adds simplicity to the title.

Don’t expect this to show up on the campaign trail anytime soon. One eBay seller in Blanco, Texas, has offered for sale a six-foot terra cotta sculpture of Texas Governor Rick Perry for the first person to fork over ,. The sculpture comes with a special bonus: Much like a Chia Pet, the seller promises anyone can grow grass or ivy out of the terra cotta Governor Goodhair’s scalp. EBay user “momdogger” bragged about the offering: “[Perry] stated at a Tea Party debate that he would be offended if somebody thought he could be bought for ,. He obviously hasn’t evaluated his worth as a gigantic planter. You can secure this bad boy for only ,.”

DONKEY: ISTOCK • AIRPORT: HANDOUT • PATENT: U.S. PATENT AND TRADE OFFICE • PERRY: ALISON CREDIT NARRO

  As far as the U.S. Government is concerned, New Yorker Ignacio Marc Asperas holds the patent on making snowmen. In September, the Melville, N.Y., resident applied for and received a patent for his technique in rolling snow into the shape of a snowman. His patent application included detailed diagrams and instructions on how to create large snow people, with tips and tricks including using the “long end of a shovel as a lever to rotate the boulder when it is really big,” he wrote in the patent. “I do not pretend that the ultimate snowman will be as revolutionary to the advancement of mankind (as the wheel and the toaster oven),” Asperas wrote. “But I do contend that as far as I know no one has ever conceived and reduced to practice such an apparatus.”

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WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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mag.com: Your online source for today’s news, Christian views

10/5/11 9:46 AM

AHMADINEJAD: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/GETTY IMAGES • MAGAZINE: HANDOUT • CAT: STEVEN SENNE/AP • COLLINS: ALEX WONG/GETTY IMAGES • POTATO: ISTOCK CREDIT

  


 

 

In its most recent magazine issue, terror group and Sept.  perpetrator al-Qaeda delivered harsh words to Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad: Stop conspiratorially portraying the terror attacks on Washington, D.C., and New York City as an inside job. “Why would Iran ascribe to such a ridiculous belief that stands in the face of all logic and evidence?” the al-Qaeda writer said. The missive from the terrorism network improbably mirrored a satirical news video uploaded by The Onion to YouTube in April .

DONKEY: ISTOCK • AIRPORT: HANDOUT • PATENT: U.S. PATENT AND TRADE OFFICE • PERRY: ALISON CREDIT NARRO

AHMADINEJAD: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/GETTY IMAGES • MAGAZINE: HANDOUT • CAT: STEVEN SENNE/AP • COLLINS: ALEX WONG/GETTY IMAGES • POTATO: ISTOCK CREDIT

  Elsie Pawlow of Edmonton, Alberta, says she had a bout with depression. It lasted  minutes. It was caused by chewing gum. Regardless, Pawlow is suing Kraft Canada, makers of Stride Gum, for emotional pain and suffering rendered to her when a piece of the gum became lodged in her dentures. According to the lawsuit filed on Sept. , Pawlow said she chewed the Stride Gum for five minutes before it became stuck in her dentures. She then spent some time digging the gum remnants out of her false teeth and, according to her claim, slipped into an agonizing “depression for approximately  minutes.” Pawlow’s lawsuit requests , for her trouble.

If cats have nine lives, one named Frank and Louie in Worcester, Mass., may have . Frank/Louie turned  years old in September, a record age for a cat with the rare condition of having two faces. Few “Janus cats”—named for the Roman god of transitions, gates, and doorways—survive into adulthood. Frank/Louie has one brain, so its faces act in unison. It can only eat with its right face (Frank’s).

   A nightmarish scenario was real life for one Brazilian woman whose family says she was mistakenly ruled dead, placed in a body bag, and delivered to the refrigerated morgue, only to be discovered alive two hours later. The family of Rosa Celestrino de Assis says that an attending doctor pronounced the elderly pneumonia sufferer dead on Sept.  and sent her body to the Rio de Janeiro hospital’s morgue. After two hours, the woman’s daughter came to see the body for one last time only to discover her mother was breathing. “Not only did I have to go collect my mum from a cold storage drawer at the morgue, but when I got there, I find her still breathing,” Rosangela Celestrino told the Brazilian daily O Globo. ABC News reported that one nurse was fired and one doctor resigned over the incident.

    U.S. Sen. Susan Collins of Maine is on a mission to defend the honor of the humble potato. Guidelines recently introduced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture would dramatically reduce the use of potatoes in public-school lunch programs across the nation. The  says students should limit starchy vegetables like potatoes, lima beans, and corn to only two servings per week. That, says Sen. Collins, is nonsense. “I certainly agree that French fries is not the healthiest choice, but a baked potato can be a good source of potassium for our children,” said Collins, who represents one of the  largest potato-growing states. Collins said she and her starchy allies in Idaho and Colorado will attempt to strip funding for the anti-potato measure from the  budget sometime this autumn. OCTOBER 22, 2011

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WORLD

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10/5/11 9:47 AM


Janie B. Cheaney

Greeks bearing debts

Europe’s economic union of vastly different cultures was a recipe for failure

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WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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ORESTIS PANAGIOTOU/EPA/LANDOV

A     I’ve ever visited that features museum exhibits in the subways. It’s impossible to dig anywhere without turning up archaeological treasures, and something has to be done with them. So, while hurrying from one level to another underground, accompanied by the whoosh of tube trains, I kept encountering displays—early Attic weaving, or a complete human skeleton surrounded with burial artifacts. Antiquity beats with the rhythm of contemporary life, a constant reminder of past brilliance clashing with present instability. Greek pride in its ancient accomplishments is justified, but for most of its history Greece has been a backwater controlled by foreigners. The sovereign nation did not exist until the s and was never exactly stable. Its first governor, John Kapodistrias, was assassinated in St. Spiros church in the seaside town of Nafplio. Coups, revolts, and juntas followed— as if, having invented democracy for the rest of the world, the Greeks could never get a handle on it for themselves. There’s a story about how Kapodistrias, seeking to alleviate periodic famines, decided to introduce a cheap, versatile food to his countrymen: potatoes. He imported a boatload of them and piled them in the town square with an invitation to the public to take as many as they wanted. But the people were suspicious, and the pile remained untouched. So Kapodistrias posted a guard around the wagons and declared the potatoes off limits—and within a few nights, they were all gone. That’s how the potato was introduced to Greece, and why French fries are now on every menu. Cute story, and possibly even true. The point is not that Greeks are thieves but that they are individualistic and deeply distrustful. Though family and local bonds remain strong, cooperative effort for the

good of all is not a defining characteristic. National pride does not extend to sprucing up storefronts; except for a few beauty spots and the incomparable Parthenon, Athens is an ugly city. Journalist Michael Lewis, investigating Greece’s financial problems for Vanity Fair, discovered that tax evasion is common, even expected: “The only Greeks who paid their taxes were the ones who could not avoid doing so—the salaried employees of corporations, who had their taxes withheld from their paychecks.” Everybody else cheats. He also noted the universal suspicion of church, neighbors, business, and government, in spite of that government handing out wads of cash to pensioners, many of whom are allowed to retire at age  because of the unusual stress of their jobs. “Stress” is broadly defined to include hairdressing and nightclub singing. “It is the culture that creates economies, not the other way around,” wrote Roger Scruton about the blindness of the European Union. When hardworking, ambitious (to a fault) Germany shares a currency with shifty, casual Greece, what could be the result but a Germany saddled with Greek debt? The situation is already terrible; as I write, another nationwide strike has been called to protest the “austerity measures” the government must enforce in order to receive another -billion-euro infusion of the -billion loan promised by the . When this happened last year, a mob attacked and burned the Marfin Bank because they saw employees working inside. Pensioners and service-union workers shut down air traffic and the port of Pireus, temporarily kneecapping the tourism that pumps millions into the economy. Failing to take culture—and human nature—into account is the fatal flaw of all collective economic plans. The European Union might have done better to (figuratively) pile Greece’s share of its assets in the public square and dare individual entrepreneurs to take what they could; it would have suited the every-man-for-himself character of Greek pride. As it is, the anticipated Greek default may take the euro down with it and trigger bank panics around the world. When it comes to economic stability, nothing beats honest accounting, individual responsibility, and a sense of community, all of which are embedded in a culture. Those who try to enforce a collective may collectively perish. A Email: jcheaney@worldmag.com

9/29/11 8:10 PM


Follow our latest news @ blog.christianfocus.com

365 Great Bible Stories The Good News of Jesus from Genesis to Revelation Carine Mackenzie Here are enough Bible stories for the whole year or you can track a theme by looking out for the key pictures as you flick through. Discover key Bible truths and the special friend that you can make – Jesus Christ, the only Saviour. For ages 8-12 years old. ISBN 978-1-84550-540-0 | $19.99

Fighting Fear with Faith Weathering the Storms with God’s Promises Denise George Using stories of people from biblical, Christian history and contemporary experience, the reader is inspired by the courage and strength displayed to seek a life connected to the strong anchor of Jesus that can withstand the fiercest most frightening storms! ISBN 978-1-84550-716-9 | $12.99

Women of Faith and Courage Vance Christie Susanna Wesley, Fanny Crosby, Catherine Booth, Mary Slessor and Corrie ten Boom. “He has written each life story in such a vibrant way, truly making each of the five women come alive.” Helen Roseveare, author and public speaker ISBN 978-1-84550-686-5 | $14.99

I am my Sister’s Keeper Reaching out to Wounded Women Denise George Through biblical and contemporary stories of wounded women, George’s advice guides readers in how to pray, offer a listening ear, share from their own experiences and encourage hurting woman with God’s promises. ISBN 978-1-84550-717-6 | $12.99

Enough! Helen Roseveare In serving Jesus, we find that we have fullness in him and that indeed God is enough! Helen Roseveare provides clear Christian teaching with practical application intertwined from her own personal experience. ISBN 978-1-84550-751-0 | $4.99 ORESTIS PANAGIOTOU/EPA/LANdOv

Dealing with Depression Trusting God through the Dark Times Sarah Collins & Jayne Haynes “I encourage every church leader and member to read this book so that they will see how the gospel feeds the soul, enflames hope, and enables perseverance in the darkness of life, all through the grace of Christ.” Robert K. Cheong, Sojourn Community Church, Louisville, Kentucky ISBN 978-1-84550-633-9 | $7.99

Available from your local Christian bookstore or online www.christianfocus.com All Trade Orders to STL inc. 1-800-289-2772

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10/4/11 12:20 PM

Provident Films & sonY mUsiC entertAinment


Reviews MOVIES & TV BOOKS Q&A MUSIC

PROVIDENT FILMS & SONY MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT

Time to go pro MOVIE: Courageous shows that the Kendrick brothers are ready for the challenges of a Hollywood production BY MEGAN BASHAM

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T D T earned the highest receipts, the big box office story the weekend of Oct.  was the movie that came in fourth. With a miniscule budget (by Hollywood standards) of only  million, a Christian-themed story of five men struggling to live up to the high calling of fatherhood earned  million in its opening weekend. This feat is especially impressive given that it screened on less than half the number of theaters as its mainstream competitors. Looking solely at per-theater averages, Courageous was far and away the weekend’s winner. The latest production from Sherwood Baptist Church’s movie ministry (best known for Facing the Giants and Fireproof), Courageous (rated - for violence and drug content) packs an

Email: mbasham@worldmag.com

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undeniable emotional punch. In addressing arguably the greatest social ill America faces— absentee fathers—writer/director/actor/producer Alex Kendrick and screenwriter/producer Stephen Kendrick show that Christian movies have the potential to compete in the same arena as the big boys. Not only have they achieved the kind of laugh-out-loud humor usually foreign to the genre, their opening action sequence in which a father chases down his would-be carjacker is as tense and riveting as any from the likes of James Cameron or Michael Bay. Most of the characters are well-written and nuanced. Rather than stock bad guys and heroes, we have conflicted men with complicated backgrounds. The movie tackles issues of divorce, complacency, and abandonment with such a relatable tone, by the time it issues a clarion call to fathers to stand against a cultural tide that would make them irrelevant, it will be a rare hard-hearted man who doesn’t feel inspired to answer. OCTOBER 22, 2011

WORLD

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10/5/11 10:01 PM


Reviews > Movies & TV

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WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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MOVIE

/ BY MICHAEL LEASER

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C      , so devising a fresh take on the deadly disease is a challenge for any filmmaker. Few would be bold enough to attempt a comedic angle, but screenwriter Will Reiser has concocted an engaging, though often vulgar, dramedy that finds true-to-life humor in the experiences and relationships of a young man suffering from cancer. Adam (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) has lived his life playing it safe: no drinking, no smoking, and no driving—because it’s the fifth leading cause of death. He has a gregarious, foul-mouthed best friend (Seth Rogen), a beautiful but needy girlfriend (Bryce Dallas Howard), and a mother with smothering instincts (Anjelica Huston). When he discovers his back pain is a malignant tumor that needs a series of chemotherapy treatments followed by risky surgery, his well-meaning friends and family offer various, largely unwanted, coping techniques. His girlfriend buys him a dog, his mother offers to move in with him, and, after he breaks up with his girlfriend, his best friend suggests he use his condition to pick up women. Striving to maintain some sense of normalcy, Adam reluctantly sees a hospital-recommended therapist (Anna Kendrick), who turns out to be a young and untested doctoral student, learning as much about herself as about Adam while she tries to help him. He also finds some engaging and sometimes-helpful company in two older men going through cancer treatments themselves, played by Philip Baker Hall and Matt Frewer, who offer home-spun wisdom along with marijuana-laced macaroon cookies. Gordon-Levitt delivers a relatable performance, effectively showing how Adam tries to maintain his identity while dealing with the challenges his condition presents, both physically and in his relationships. Kendrick convincingly demonstrates the real difficulties a young therapist can have in balancing personal concern for her patient’s well-being while maintaining a professional distance. Rogen’s blowhard character ensures the film never descends into melodrama, but his too-frequent use of profanity (the primary reason the film earned an R rating) keeps / from reaching its full potential as a sincerely moving but grounded take on handling cancer.

KENDRICK BROTHERS: PROVIDENT FILMS & SONY MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT • 50/50: CHRIS HELCERMANAS-BENGE/SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT

Sherwood’s productions perform astonishingly well—for amateurs. But as last year’s winner of France’s Palm d’Or, Of Gods and Men, demonstrates, the capacity of experienced actors—to borrow a writer’s cliché—to show without telling is invaluable. They understand the art of subtlety and when a fleeting expression of pain will reveal more than all-out sobbing. They trust their audiences to respond without the promptings of enormous indicating gestures, something inexpe-

ALL IN THE FAMILY: Alex (left) and Stephen Kendrick.

rienced actors like those in Courageous rarely do. The film’s closing credits uncover a similar cause for its other weaknesses—the Kendricks are doing half the jobs themselves. It’s a shame given that the presence of editors and producers with years of practice in the Hollywood trenches might have elevated Courageous from “good if deeply flawed” to just plain good. For example, had the movie dropped at least one of the five fathers’ storylines to dig deeper into the remaining characters’ lives, the evangelizing scenes that come later would have felt less calculated and unearned. And a trained editing eye might have spotted that piling high point upon high point wasn’t lifting the story up, it was dragging it down. Courageous would have benefitted from leaving at least three of its emotional climaxes on the cutting-room floor. Christian audiences— starved for anything that speaks to them on a spiritual level—will continue to support Sherwood Baptist films for those elements that work while charitably overlooking those that don’t. But what a gift it would be to those same audiences, as well as to viewers who aren’t as likely to forgive shortcomings for the sake of message, for the Kendricks to build on their God-given talents and make a movie of such quality it requires no caveats. It won’t come as cheap or as easy, but it will be worth it. A

See all our movie reviews at mag.com/movies

10/5/11 10:03 PM

MACHINE GUN PREACHER: PHIL BRAY/MGP PRODUCTIONS • THE WAY: ELIXIR FILMS/FILMAX ENTERTAINMENT/SHAY PRODUCTIONS

Now, with so much positive to note about the film, I would like to go out on a limb and offer a suggestion to the Kendrick brothers. Perhaps it’s time to go corporate and dive into the high-dollar end of the pool. Not that they should go bigger just for bigger’s sake—but go bigger for excellence’s sake. They have grown with each movie, and Courageous proves they are ready for the challenges that come with pricier productions. Volunteer actors are a wonderful thing and those who have served in


MOVIE

Machine Gun Preacher BY REBECCA CUSEY

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P  S C do not pop up often on the Hollywood publicity circuit. The subject of the unlikely action movie Machine Gun Preacher sported a leather biker jacket and chewed on a toothpick during our interview in Washington, D.C., looking like a patron of the rougher sort of bar. However, his speech was peppered with words like “born again” and “spirit-filled” and Bible passages. Hollywood script writer Jason Keller, also in the interview, admitted he did not originally know what to make of his subject, but grew to respect him. “What I started to see in Sam [was] a man who’s a preacher, who’s a good Christian, who was flawed, but trying to be the best man and Christian he can be.” Gerard Butler stars as Childers, a drug abuser and

MACHINE GUN PREACHER: PHIL BRAY/MGP PRODUCTIONS • THE WAY: ELIXIR FILMS/FILMAX ENTERTAINMENT/SHAY PRODUCTIONS

KENDRICK BROTHERS: PROVIDENT FILMS & SONY MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT • 50/50: CHRIS HELCERMANAS-BENGE/SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT

MOVIE

The Way BY REBECCA CUSEY

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T W, a passion project from the father-and-son team of Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez, presents the intensely faith-filled practice of pilgrimage in a way that is not heavy-handed or saccharine. Sheen is a famously devout Catholic while his son describes his faith as “a work in progress,” but they both found transcendence in the story of Tom (Sheen), a doctor who decides to complete the journey of his son (Estevez, who also wrote the script) after he was killed in an accident. The lapsed Catholic father walks an ancient pilgrimage route from the Pyrenees Mountains to the cathedral in Spain where the remains of Saint James are said to be buried. The grieving father meets other pilgrims on the “Camino,” all with their own needs that drive them to a trip that feels foreign to their modern sensibilities.

criminal whose Christian conversion is unapologetically portrayed in the movie. On a church trip to Africa, he feels a call from God to shelter and protect children in Sudan, children who were routinely kidnapped and forced into prostitution or into the militia. Childers not only built an orphanage but picked up a gun and ambushed militia in Sudan’s brutal civil war to rescue the children. Because of its somber subject matter, the film is rated R. Nor does it shy away from Childers’ rough past. To portray its subject honestly, the movie includes high levels of violence, lots of swearing, and a married sex scene. Because Childers feels God’s call to rescue orphans so deeply, he nearly despairs when he fails. His crisis of faith becomes the strongest part of the film. The film always respects the faith that drives the story, but it raises more questions than it answers. Don’t look to Childers for answers. He doesn’t have time to debate the theological implications of toting a gun or his heavily works-based preaching. “I never try to claim that what I do is right,” he said. “But I will claim the defense that over a thousand children will say that what I do is right.”

“You don’t have to go to Jerusalem or Mecca or Santiago to go on pilgrimage, you go in your own heart,” Sheen said when I talked to him, Estevez, and producer David Alexanian in Washington, D.C. “But it is more conducive to get you out of your normal, everyday life. … You begin to let go of judgments and envies, anger and resentment, and all the negativity that keeps us from being human, keeps us from being free and knowing ourselves, that’s the real pilgrimage. That’s what lasts.” An unusual topic and profound faith combine to make a beautiful but quiet movie about a group of strangers, each with metaphorical baggage, who form a miniature Christian community as they travel together. The only thing they have in common is deep need that can only be filled with something greater than themselves. Like other films about

BOX OFFICE TOP 10     . -.  according to Box Office Mojo

CAUTIONS: Quantity of sexual (S), violent (V), and foul-language (L) content on a - scale, with  high, from kids-in-mind.com

S V L 1 ` 2 ` 3 ` 4 ` 5 ` 6 ` 7 ` 8 ` 9 ` 1 `0

Dolphin Tale* PG ....................    Moneyball* PG-13....................    The Lion King (in D) G ......    Courageous* PG-13 ........... not rated /* R.......................................   Dream House PG-13 ...............   Abduction PG-13 ......................   What’s Your Number R ......   Killer Elite R ..............................    Contagion* PG-13 ....................   

*Reviewed by 

faith that have been released this fall, the movie feels unfamiliar but ends up being a true, moving, and profound experience. The same could be said of actual pilgrimage as well. The Way is rated - for thematic elements, drug use, and smoking. OCTOBER 22, 2011

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WORLD

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10/5/11 10:04 PM


Reviews > Books

Compare & contrast

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WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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major schools of thought in appendices dealing with modern sociology, “scientific” sociology, and other models. In that way Redeeming Sociology is the opposite of a book that explores another field needing redemption: The Death and Life of American Journalism, by Robert McChesney and John Nichols (Nation, ). The title made me think that the book might show an awareness of resurrection, but it instead proposes a Night of the Living Dead: government subsidies of the press so that dinosaur newspapers, and journalists’ jobs, would be saved.

[Poythress] emphasizes godly ways to exercise love and generosity, contrasting them with bureaucratic egalitarianism. McChesney and Nichols … profess to believe that a government takeover of journalism would not lead to government control. McChesney and Nichols properly scorn the th-century idea that journalists would be “neutral professionals,” but they profess to believe that a government takeover of journalism would not lead to government control. They want Washington to “establish an office to oversee and coordinate the rapid transition of failing corporate newspapers ... into post-corporate newspapers ... with strict control on the official role to guard against censorship and abuses of the public trust.” Power without abuse?

Want to buy the Brooklyn Bridge or Florida swampland? The authors are either naïve or dissembling: “We would never advocate ‘reforms’ that provided the slightest opening for censorious practices.” Yet they suggest that government “might create incentives to get bad players off the field—by selling newspapers at fair (rather than inflated) prices to more responsible owners, unions, or community groups.” (Who determines the “fair” price? Who defines “responsible”?) McChesney and Nichols also propose “establishment of a ‘journalism’ division of AmeriCorps, the federal program that places young people with nonprofits to get training and do public-service work.” That last could have as many as , young journalists in training to be paid , per year. Given the way government works, they’d probably be in training to become propagandists. There’s more: McChesney and Nichols propose that “the government pay half the salary of every reporter and editor up to , each,” and give more money to television and radio stations so that they would hire experienced reporters laid off from newspapers. One other idea of theirs, for a “Citizenship News Voucher”—every American adult gets a  voucher to use for donating to a nonprofit news medium—would be sweet for , but every other industry could then come up with reasons for having its own vouchers, and government control problems also loom. Besides, the authors propose raising money for their schemes through new and higher taxes on consumer electronics, cellphones, broadcasting, and advertising. A

POYTHRESS: CHAE D. CHONG/LUXDEI PHOTOGRAPHY • NICHOLS & McCHESNEY: JEFF CHIU/AP

S    are such key fields, I keep looking for Christian books in those areas that thoughtfully challenge established orthodoxies. In the decade since /, though, we’ve often seen more books by Christians that seem prepared with the goal of gaining secular acceptance. This leaves them like seed tossed on rocky ground, springing up with charm in chapter  but withering by the end. The better way is to start with the Bible and then see what in secular studies corroborates scriptural perspective. By beginning in good soil, a few Christian academic books produce a crop of flavorful ideas—and one example of such is Redeeming Sociology by Vern Poythress (Crossway, ), a book that stays true to its subtitle: A GodCentered Approach. That’s the right approach, especially because current sociology is so left-wing. With any book that wins approving nods from sociologists likely to be worthless, a wise Christian writer starts typing with the understanding that faithfulness will bring him no academic glory. Westminster Theological Seminary professor Poythress glorifies God from the start by showing how any good societal relationships we have reflect that of the Trinity. Then, instead of tracing secular theories and seeing how he can add some God-flavoring, Poythress step by step takes us through God’s covenant, God’s government, and God’s definition of good diversity. He emphasizes godly ways to exercise love and generosity, contrasting them with bureaucratic egalitarianism. Instead of making contemporary sociological theory the core of his book, he dispatches the

Email: molasky@worldmag.com

9/29/11 9:27 PM

WHITE HOUSE: JOEL SARTORE/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC/GETTY IMAGES

God-centered versus government-centered approaches to academia and media BY MARVIN OLASKY


NOTABLE BOOKS

Four books about God’s work in the world > reviewed by  

God Is Red Liao Yiwu Chinese writer and activist Liao Yiwu has served jail time for his work documenting life on the fringe of Chinese society. In Red he describes his travels deep inside China to God is Red, interview Christian survivors of the Cultural Revolution. Although he is not a believer, he says these trips “have exhilarated me, lifting me out of my drunken depression. The stories of heroic Christians ... have inspired me.” He lets his subjects tell their own stories in heartbreaking detail. Many of them speak of the foreign missionaries who introduced the gospel to their villages. Introductory essays provide evocative descriptions of remote towns and villages. Liao Yiwu provides important insights into China’s recent past and shows the connections between that past and the remarkable growth of the church today. From the Garden to the City John Dyer This excellent short book is an introduction to media ecology, an area of study that looks at how technology works in cultures and changes cultures as it changes us. Since all of us use technology and live in a world shaped by it, it is important that we become more discerning about it. Dyer brings a solidly Christian perspective to the topic, arguing that technology is neither neutral nor evil, and that Christians need to ground their analysis of it in the Bible and its story of redemption. The book is lively and accessible to techies and non-techies alike. It offers help in answering a crucial question: “How then should the Christian live in a technological age?”

POYTHRESS: CHAE D. CHONG/LUXDEI PHOTOGRAPHY • NICHOLS & McCHESNEY: JEFF CHIU/AP

WHITE HOUSE: JOEL SARTORE/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC/GETTY IMAGES

A Heart for Freedom

Chai Ling Chai Ling was one of the student leaders at Tiananmen Square. After the government’s brutal crackdown, she went into hiding and eventually made her way to the United States. In this memoir, she explains how the daughter of two military doctors from a rural village in China came to be a student in Beijing and involved in the democracy movement. It also explains how she went to Princeton, earned an  from Harvard, and built a successful company. Happily married with three children, she seemed to put her Chinese life behind her. But God had other plans. The memoir explains how she became a Christian and concerned with fighting for the victims of China’s one-child policy.

Out of the Far Corners Peter Iliyn Peter Iliyn grew up hearing his father, Vanya, tell stories of escape at the age of  from Soviet Kazakhstan, and of his life as an orphan in China. Those stories shaped Iliyn’s life. He writes in the afterword that he grew up thinking, “l like God because he took care of my daddy.” In this book he tells those stories using Vanya’s words, which convey the certainty that miracles happen, and the bewilderment experienced by a rejected child—why his foster mother hates him and beats him when he can’t find the eggs, for instance. The book shows scenes of great injustice, but also shows God’s presence and grace in the midst of it. Email: solasky@worldmag.com; see all our reviews at mag.com/books

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SPOTLIGHT In The Executive Unbound (Oxford University Press, ), law professors Eric A. Posner and Adrian Vermeule show how executive branch power ballooned in the last century as congressional and judicial oversight waned. The Madisonian separation of powers is now a “historical curiosity,” they write. But no need for the public to be afraid: Politics and public opinion still constrain presidents. Like doctors who prescribe aspirin for cancer, the authors are right about the unnerving growth of the administrative state but fail to grasp the need for strong medicine. Sinful men unrestrained tend to abuse power. President Obama campaigned against Bush-era anti-terror strategies, but essays in Confronting Terror (Encounter Books, ) show that he has embraced the same policies. His morning security briefing must be terrifying. This collection of essays, edited by Dean Reuter and John Yoo, provides a helpful overview of the issues, written by contributors such as John Ashcroft on the right, and ex- president Nadine Strossen on the left. —Les Sillars

OCTOBER 22, 2011

WORLD

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9/29/11 9:31 PM


Reviews > Q&A

Candidate

Caın

From running businesses to fighting cancer, HERMAN CAIN brings a wealth of experience to his run for the Republican presidential nomination   By Marvin OlaSKy

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precious life is, and we know not the day that it could be gone. I had been blessed to achieve my American dreams and then some. I just wanted to be comfortable. I know the reason I am now totally cancer free—the chance of survival was only 30 percent—is because God wanted me to do something different than stay in cruise control the rest of my life. I never grew up wanting to be president of the United States. I didn’t seriously think about running until Barack Obama became president and I watched him beginning to destroy this nation and weaken America. President Obama talks about job creation from politicians, but he has no business experience. What has your substantial experience taught you about job creation? I’ve learned that (1) if you remove barriers to entrepreneurial creativity, jobs will be created and (2) the best job creators will always be the business owners who connect the best with their people. How did you improve performance at Burger King? Only 100 of the 450 were company-owned, which meant that my ideas had to be compelling and the owners needed to clearly see how it was going to

benefit their business. I couldn’t change the Whopper. I couldn’t dictate the national advertiser. The one thing that a leader can always do in any situation is change the attitude of the organization. So how did you change the attitude? Often leaders assume that people in their organization know what the keys to success are. No they don’t. Gallup research has shown for decades that only 42 percent of workers worldwide know exactly what is expected of them. We needed a list of guiding principles. President Reagan was famous for saying peace through strength. My guiding principle is, peace through strength and clarity. Employees need to understand that. Another thing that helps people to be self-motivated is spontaneous unexpected praise—that-a-boy, that-a-

ChaRliE NEiBERgall/aP

Herman Cain won a surprise victory in the Sept. 24 Florida straw poll, winning 37 percent of the 2,600 votes cast. Since then he has risen rapidly in public opinion polls and on Oct. 6 was in the top three, alongside Mitt Romney and Rick Perry. Cain, 65, has a master’s degree from Purdue in computer science but learned— from supervising 450 Philadelphia-area Burger Kings and becoming Ceo of Godfathers Pizza—that business management is more art than science. So is marriage: Cain’s has lasted 43 years so far. Here are edited excerpts from an interview that occurred last month at a worLD Donors Weekend in Asheville. Five years ago you learned that you had Stage 4 cancer in your colon and liver. Thankfully, it’s gone now, but how did you take the news? I didn’t even know what it was, so I asked the surgeon, “What is Stage 4?” His exact words were: “That’s as bad as it can get.” He was perfectly blunt with me. He challenged my faith, and one of the things that strengthened my faith was when I looked at my wife when we were getting in the car leaving the surgeon’s office, and I said, “I can get through this.” She said, “We can get through this.” Did that lead to your current campaign? It made me painfully aware of how WORLD  OCTOBER 22, 2011

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10/6/11 3:24 PM


Charlie Neibergall/aP

girl—every seven days. Every seven days compliment your people spontaneously. If you can’t catch them doing something right in seven days, you’ve got another problem. How would that apply to being president of the United States? I talk about commonsense solutions. I intentionally make them easy to be understood by the general public. If the people understand it, they will support it and they will demand it. That’s my 9-9-9 economic growth and jobs plan. Throw out the current tax code. Replace it with a 9 percent corporate tax, a 9 percent tax on personal income, and a 9 percent national sales tax. The payroll tax, the capital gains tax, and the death tax all go away. The income tax started out very small. If we made such a switch, adding a 9 percent national sales tax, what’s to Email: molasky@worldmag.com

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keep it at 9-9-9 rather than 20-20-20? As part of the legislation, we’d require a twothirds vote of the Senate to raise the 9-9-9. The other thing is, the 9-9-9 plan is phase one of my economic vision. Phase 2 would be to totally replace that with a straight national sales tax called the fair tax. It would also require a two-thirds vote of the Senate to touch that. You speak of gaining popular support for that proposal and others, but the experience of recent presidents has been that the people are very fickle. I interpret the old military saying “KISS,” to mean Keep it Sweet and Simple. The previous presidents, including our current one, have complicated matters. People are trying to take care of their families and run their businesses. They don’t have time to

read a 2,700-page piece of legislation. I will introduce legislation that is easier to understand. I will appoint cabinet members with leadership experience, problem solving experience, business experience. In the current administration, 7 to 8 percent of the appointees have business, real-world experience. In the Cain administration over 90 percent of the people will have had a real job in the private sector. You’ve been debating other presidential candidates. Would you put any of them in your cabinet? Yes. I would respectfully request Speaker Gingrich to be secretary of State. … I would ask Mitt Romney to consider two jobs: chairman of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors or Treasury secretary. I would give Paul Ryan those same two options also. Representative Michele Bachmann—yes, I could see her being in a Herman Cain cabinet, but I haven’t figured out what position yet. I have a lot of respect for her. You’ve talked about S.I.N. among liberals—shift the subject, ignore the facts, name-calling. Do you ever see S.I.N. among conservatives? That’s deep, doc. Not all conservatives are created equal so there are some that will try shift the subject and ignore the facts—but you don’t have a lot of name-calling coming from conservatives like we have coming from liberals. I’ll go deeper. What difference does it make whether a person believes in evolution or a person believes that God created the world? None. I happen to be a believer, and I believe that God created the world.… My faith I put right front and center. And I won’t apologize for it. I realize there are some people who do not share my faith; that’s why this country was created. So to try to make an issue out of “Do you believe what’s in the Bible about God creating the earth and universe vs. the evolutionary theory?”—I don’t think that’s relevant to turning this economy around and protecting this nation. A OCTOber 22, 2011

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10/6/11 3:25 PM


Reviews > Music

Lowe maintenance

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WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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trying to forget the wages of those sins), “House for Sale” (about trying to flee those wages), “Sensitive Man” and “You Don’t Know Me at All” (about trying to shift the blame)— each dramatizes the moment when one comes to his senses only to realize that he’s come to his senses too late. T   the young Nick Lowe magic, however, will prefer Rockpile’s Live at Montreux  (Eagle Rock), a -tracks-in--minutes document of just how rockin’ the band that he co-led with Dave Edmunds could be on a good night. The group was ostensibly promoting its first (and only) studio album, Seconds of Pleasure. But only Tracks One and Two from that album—both of them obscure covers—were in the setlist, as if the band’s real concerns lay elsewhere. In fact, they did. For some time, Lowe’s and YOUNG MAGIC: Rockpile members (from left) Terry Williams, Lowe, Edmunds, and Bremner in .

Edmunds’ “solo” efforts had been Rockpile recordings in disguise, and it’s material from these records (three from Lowe’s first two solo albums,  from Edmunds’ first six) to which the band devoted its considerable onstage energy on the July  night that this show was taped. And lest anyone accuse the band of enhancing that energy by following the (still) standard industry practice of rerecording parts of the show after the fact, the producers at Eagle Rock have left intact every aural glitch— most notably the insufficient levels of Lowe’s mic. In the many places where he’s supposed to be harmonizing with Edmunds and Billy Bremner, he all but disappears. The good news is that he’s audible enough when he sings lead. He thereby ensured that “So It Goes”—the first lines of which are “I remember the kid cut off his right arm / in a bid to save a bit of power” and seem prophetic at a time during which developed nations are cutting off their technological noses for the same reason— lives on in yet another incarnation. A

LOWE: REX FEATURES VIA AP IMAGES • ROCKPILE: HANDOUT

“I’    ,” sings Nick Lowe on the second cut of his latest album, The Old Magic (Yep Roc). “Lord, I never thought I’d see .” Since recording that line, he’s turned , but as “” isn’t a rhyme, he can easily bring the song up to date should he ever perform it live. And no doubt his astonishment at having reached whatever ripe old age he’ll be when he does perform it will only grow. He did, after all, cover the Faron Young hit “Live Fast, Love Hard, Die Young” in  when, as an alcoholic and the soon-to-be ex-husband of Carlene Carter, he was still adhering to the first two parts of that song’s advice. In short, he’s been living on what he apparently considers borrowed time for several decades now. During that period, he has become rich (thanks to Curtis Stigers’ windfallgenerating cover of his “[What’s So Funny ’Bout] Peace, Love, and Understanding” on the multi-platinum soundtrack to The Bodyguard), mellow, and wise. He’s perfected on a series of albums an elegantly reflective and primarily acoustic style that draws upon and blends mid-th-century country and jazz to quietly stunning effect. Indeed, the strongest songs on The Old Magic seem to have been written with the Frank Sinatra of In the Wee Small Hours, September of My Years, and She Shot Me Down in mind, melancholy masterpieces that span a quarter of a century and whose timelessness Lowe has tapped into. “Stoplight Roses” (about crossing the line between venial and mortal sins against romance), “I Read a Lot” (about

Email: aorteza@worldmag.com

9/30/11 11:56 AM

FRANK MICELOTTA/FOX/PICTUREGROUP/AP

The Old Magic shows a once fast-living rocker at his mellow and wise best BY ARSENIO ORTEZA


NOTABLE CDs

Five noteworthy new releases > reviewed by  

Songs and Stories Guy Clark Like Billy Joe Shaver only less so, Guy Clark is what many non-Texans think of when they think of Texas songwriter’s songwriters: a sentimental sweetheart beneath a gruff, salty exterior who’s capable of condensing the universals to their pith and setting them to simple melodies that make them impossible to forget. On a good night, he might even spin a few yarns that tie everything together. This album captures just such a night, hence its title. Prairie Home Companion wouldn’t have been wide of the mark either. Artificial Heart Jonathan Coulton Coulton is currently on tour with They Might Be Giants, and it’s easy to see how he got the gig. Like  he specializes in setting witty, nerd’s-eyeview observations of life’s nooks and crannies to melodies bouncy enough for kids. His vocabulary, however, presumes adulthood, from his vulgarities (two) to songs called “Nemeses” and “Je Suis Rick Springfield.” And while kids might giggle at “Glasses,” you definitely have to be old enough to know better to get “Today with Your Wife” and “Alone at Home.” SuperHeavy SuperHeavy The “Super” comes from “supergroup,” rock slang for “all-star team.” The “Heavy” comes from the ’s term for “Wow, man, that’s deep.” Unfortunately, this music only feels heavy as in “overweight,” with reggae-isms courtesy of Damian Marley, Bollywood-isms courtesy of A.R. Rahman, guitars courtesy of Dave Stewart, over-singing courtesy of Joss Stone and Mick Jagger, and kitchen sink courtesy of the other dozen-plus credited musicians crammed into nearly every song. The standard edition has  songs, the deluxe . Both prove more is less.

FRANK MICELOTTA/FOX/PICTUREGROUP/AP

LOWE: REX FEATURES VIA AP IMAGES • ROCKPILE: HANDOUT

An Appointment with Mr. Yeats The Waterboys If Iron Maiden’s “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” could make Coleridge fans of lumpen proles, who’s to say Mike Scott’s transformation of these  poems into cabaret-folk won’t bear similar fruit where Yeats is considered? Scott forgoes most of the more-anthologized poems, but he does do “The Lake Isle of Innisfree” (as a blues) and “The Song of Wandering Aengus” (as the intense meditation upon mystery that it is). And if you think his singing overdramatizes the material, wait till you hear Yeats reading it. See all our reviews at mag.com/music

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SPOTLIGHT Those who recoil upon encountering the computerized, Auto-Tuned sheen of [Re]Production (Gigatone), the newest album by Todd Rundgren, Rundgren should consider that Neil Young tried something similar in  with Trans, an album almost universally reviled at the time but whose charms have gradually come to the fore. And Rundgren’s album has an edge: Whereas Trans contained only one vintage Young remake, [Re]Production finds Rundgren revisiting hits and “deep album cuts” that he produced for other performers. Whether anyone will ever prefer his technocratic “Two Out of Three Ain’t Bad,” “Personality Crisis,” or “Love My Way” to the originals by Meat Loaf, New York Dolls, or Psychedelic Furs, respectively, is doubtful. And the atheism anthem “Dear God” sounds even more petulant coming from him than it did coming from . But, because the material is strong andor catchy, these versions, like his electric versions of Robert Johnson songs from earlier this year, at least have the capacity to surprise.

OCTOBER 22, 2011

WORLD

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9/30/11 11:59 AM


Mindy Belz

Into the upheaval A plea for eyes to see and feet to go

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WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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aren’t wearing burqas in their profile photos. Several of them asked me, an infidel, to friend them. A young Afghan who has become a Christian told me, “I know the people. Like myself they are born in war and have spent their lives in war. It is the same everywhere and then we die in war … with no specific activity and no vision. What was all of it for?” Decade upon decade of war, he said, has made Afghans “dull in their thinking,” and they need help to find purpose and meaning in their lives. His words, to me, suggest plowed ground, a field ready for planting. Yet for me and my fellow Christians in the West, too often we put more faith in the headlines from this place���boasting of insurgency, casualty figures, and the futility of the U.S. mission—than we do in the words of Jesus Christ, whose Great Commission begins with the call, “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations.” When horses and chariots sent by the King of Syria surrounded Elisha at Dothan, the prophet’s servant despaired. And Elisha prayed for God to “open his eyes that he may see.” And the servant saw horses and chariots of fire protecting Elisha. Then the prophet prayed for the Syrian army to be struck blind, and it failed to see Elisha as he led the unseeing troops into the midst of Samaria. So, surrounded by Israel’s army, the king of Israel ordered the army not to strike the Syrians but to feed them a great feast and send them away. Thus were they so thoroughly confounded that Scripture says the Syrian army “did not come again on raids into the land of Israel” ( Kings :). There was no pitched battle, no bribes, no vexing diplomacy. All that happened to turn war into peace in Elisha’s day was this: God opened the eyes of His people to see and struck blind His enemies. A

TAUSEEF MUSTAFA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

K, A— What if things aren’t as they appear? What if headlines blare a surface realism but ignore a truer reality? On the surface it looks like  will grow only more chaotic, nonsensical. Greece teeters toward government default, but its parliament just voted, -, to put  million in government funds toward a new mega-mosque. Muslims in Tunisia, where Arab street revolts began, are attempting to take over ancient churches and turn them into mosques. Iranians want to hang pastor Youcef Nakarkhani for the crime of protesting the teaching of Islam to Christian schoolchildren. The West looks loony, too. We just enacted major social change in the U.S. military—allowing gays to serve openly as homosexuals—in the midst of two of the longest-running wars in our history. In England the vaunted  is ditching the terms  and  that might “offend or alienate non-Christians” in favor of  and  (“Before the Common Era” and “Common Era”). These, it said, are “religiously neutral” alternatives. (It took the former Anglican bishop of Rochester, Michael Nazir-Ali, to point out the obvious: “Whether you use Common Era or Anno Domini, the date is actually still the same and the reference point is still the birth of Christ.”) But what if in the midst of all that it turns out all is not being lost in Christendom but much may be gained? What if the ground around us is being plowed to make way for important works of service and evangelism, to carry out more of the Great Commission and advance the kingdom of God? Take Afghanistan, where I have been traveling now for some days. In many quarters, especially among young people, the disillusionment with Islamic movements of all shades is palpable. The Afghans speak more openly than I have heard before. They deride whole communities as “fundamentalists” and have no time for the Taliban. Young men in their s showed me their Facebook pages, where they have both male and female friends—and the women

Email: mbelz@worldmag.com

10/4/11 8:46 PM


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10/3/11 2:38 PM


A god of our age

CREDIT

Who was Steve Jobs?

A revered technology pioneer and a relentless innovator, the Apple founder remained in many ways a mystery   by M a rv i n O l a s ky Rosebud. Seventy years ago Orson Welles directed Citizen Kane, which critics still praise as the most innovative film ever. Welles modeled the main character, Kane, on a famous northern California magnate who revolutionized the media of his day, William Randolph Hearst. “Rosebud” was Kane’s dying declaration, and the narrative structure of the film emphasized the work of a reporter trying to figure out the meaning of that word and the meaning of Kane’s life. Everyone he interviewed saw Kane through the prism of his own preoccupations. The reporter ended up much like the blind man feeling different parts of the elephant and thinking he’s in the presence of a tree trunk, a snake—or something else. When Steve Jobs died on Oct. 5, newspapers and airwaves (along with iPhones and iPads) were flush with accounts of the Apple founder’s life and legacy—but each biographer seemed to recreate Jobs in the beholder’s own image: Those wanting a classic American success story described Jobs as the college dropout who co-created the first user-friendly computer and became a multimillionaire at age 25. 32 

WORLD  OCTOBER 22, 2011

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SLUG: Caption

10/6/11 4:35 PM


CREDIT

Jobs holds up the new MacBook Air after giving the keynote address at Apple MacWorld Conference in San Francisco on Jan. , . PHOTO BY JEFF CHIU/AP

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10/6/11 4:36 PM


Steve JobS timeline

1972 Graduates from Homestead High School in Cupertino and enrolls at Reed College in Portland, Ore., but drops out after one semester

1974 Takes a job at Atari in Sunnyvale, Calif.; leaves to travel through India and joins a farm commune

1975 Joins Homebrew Computer Club, headed by Steve Wozniak, and persuades Wozniak to go into a business based on Wozniak’s design for a new computer logic board dubbed Apple 1

1976 Founds Apple Computer

1977 Introduces Apple II

1980 Takes Apple public—

1998 Releases the iMac, which

at the end of its first day’s trading Apple has a market value of $1.2 billion, so his stock is worth $239 million

becomes the fastest-selling personal computer in history

1981 Becomes Apple chairman

1983 Recruits John Sculley from Pepsi to be the CEO of Apple

1984 Introduces the Macintosh, an all-in-one desktop computer with a graphical interface and a mouse

1985 Clashes with the Apple board, which backs Sculley and ousts him

1986 Works on developing NeXT, a high-end computer, and buys Pixar Animation Studios for $10 million from filmmaker George Lucas

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1991 Marries Laurene Powell 1995 Releases the hit film Toy Story, the first Pixar movie with Disney, and becomes a billionaire when Pixar goes public 1996 Sells NeXT to Apple for $400 million and rejoins Apple as an advisor 1997 Becomes interim CEO after the Apple board ousts CEO Gil Amelio

CEO of Apple and introduces Mac OS X, its current operating system, based on the NeXT operating system

2001 Launches the Apple Store to bolster retail sales and introduces the iPod, a music player that revolutionizes the digital music industry

2003 Launches the iTunes Music Store

2004 Undergoes surgery for pancreatic cancer

his birth in 1955. “My parents, who were on a waiting list, got a call in the middle of the night asking: ‘We have an unexpected baby boy; do you want him?’ They said: ‘Of course.’” For parents with hyperactive children he was the child rushed to the emergency room after ingesting a bottle of ant poison, and the one who received a bad shock by sticking a bobby pin into a wall socket. For those with children born out of wedlock he was a man who initially denied paternity and refused to pay child support for his first daughter Lisa, but eventually accepted her and helped her to become a New York writer. Still other observers emphasized his style and beliefs: To romantics he was the romantic who gave a lecture to a class of Stanford business students, noticed a good-looking woman in the front row, chatted her up, headed to his car, and … “I was in the parking lot with the key in the car, and I thought to myself, ‘If this is my last night on earth, would I rather spend it at a business meeting or with this woman?’ I ran across the parking lot, asked her if she’d have dinner with me. She said yes, we walked into town, and we’ve been together ever since.” To marriage advocates he was the man who married that woman in a small ceremony at Yosemite National Park 20 years ago, and stayed married as they bore and raised three children.

jOBs wiTh maC: BERnaRd GOTfRyd/GETTy imaGEs • applE imaGEs: nEwsCOm

Those crafting a moral tale about never giving up wrote of how Jobs, booted from Apple at age 30, gained even greater financial and artistic success by propelling Pixar (Toy Story), regaining control of Apple, and making it not only one of the most valuable U.S. companies but perhaps the most loved. Workaholics called him a workaholic who loved his work and said so: “Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. … Like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on.” The Harvard Business Review called Jobs the “world’s greatest philanthropist” even though he wasn’t much of a donor: “What a loss to humanity it would have been if Jobs had dedicated the last 25 years of his life to figuring out how to give his billions away, instead of doing what he does best. We’d still be waiting for a cell phone on which we could actually read e-mail and surf the web. … We’d be a decade or more away from the iPad, which has ushered in an era of reading electronically that promises to save a Sherwood Forest worth of trees and all of the energy associated with trucking them around.” Other writers focused on Jobs’ personal life: For adoption advocates he was an adoptee who made it big. His biological mom and dad placed him for adoption soon after

2000 Becomes permanent

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jOBs wiTh ipad: Ryan ansOn/afp/GETTy imaGEs

1955 Born Feb. 24 and adopted by machinist Paul Jobs and accountant Clara Jobs of Mountain View, Calif.


 Sells Pixar to Disney in a . billion stock deal and becomes Disney’s largest shareholder

 Introduces the iPhone, a smartphone with a touch screen keypad that revolutionizes the cell phone industry  Takes a six-month medical leave during which he undergoes a liver transplant

 Releases the iPad touchscreen tablet

 Takes another medical leave, resigns as ,, and dies at age  Source: Current Biography, Atari, Apple, Reuters, AP, San Jose Mercury News, MCT

JOBS WITH IPAD: RYAN ANSON/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

JOBS WITH MAC: BERNARD GOTFRYD/GETTY IMAGES • APPLE IMAGES: NEWSCOM

To a neighbor writing in a Palo Alto paper, he was “a regular guy, a good dad having fun with his kids. The next time I met him was when our children attended school together. He sat in on back-to-school night listening to the teacher drone on about the value of education. … I saw him at his son’s high school graduation. There Steve stood, tears streaming down his cheeks, his smile wide and proud, as his son received his diploma.” To Buddhists and vegetarians he was a fellow-follower of the principles of minimalism, almost always appearing in public in a black turtleneck and worn jeans.

D

       of Jobs’ life, some conservatives were not immune to the tendency to see him largely in connection with their own campaigns: Jobs was a hero in June  when he banned most pornography from his devices: One blogger called that decision antagonistic to freedom, but Jobs replied that he wanted “freedom from porn.” Tony Perkins of the Family Research Council punned, “We’re grateful that Jobs is trying to keep the iPad from becoming an eyesore.” He was a villain six months later, in December , when Apple banned an app for the Manhattan Declaration that urged opposition to abortion and same-sex marriage. The National Organization for Marriage produced a -second video that

depicted Jobs as the censorious “Big Brother” featured in Apple’s famous  ad. So who was Steve Jobs? Reportedly, young Jobs was confirmed in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, but he spoke later of his desire to “make a dent in the universe”—and did not want God to make a dent in him. At the first Apple Halloween costume party, Jobs reportedly dressed up as Jesus. Was he attempting to be commercially omniscient—he said he knew what consumers wanted before they knew it—and omnipotent, making any product he produced a hit? I see him also as wanting to be the outsider who would enter a town and tame it, like the classic Western hero. His Buddhist twist would have fit him well for the odd western  series that hit the airwaves when Jobs was a teenager, Kung Fu, Fu the story of a monk who travels through th-century western America and survives through spiritual training and martial arts skill. But I may be as wrong as everyone else attempting to characterize an individual who cherished his privacy. Maybe the best approach is to get the words closest to “Rosebud” that Jobs ever uttered in public—his Stanford commencement speech in , one year after his first encounter with cancer. On that day, whistling past the graveyard, he described death as “very likely the best invention of life. All pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure, these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important.” One problem, though, is that he never clarified to listeners what is truly important. He did tell the Stanford graduates, “Follow your heart. ... Don’t be trapped by dogma—which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. … Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition.” Did Jobs remain a rebel against his youthful Lutheranism and the belief that our hearts are fallen? Did he ever realize that the thinking of some wise people, and especially that of a wise God, would help? Did Jobs ever come to grips with even three of the questions God hurls at the biblical Job: “Where were you when I laid the foundation of the earth? Have the gates of death been revealed to you? Where is the way to the dwelling of light?” If Jobs’ devotees were waiting for a final revelation from him as he approached death, it doesn’t seem that one came. Jobs was one of the gods of our age, conquering the computer world and fostering vehicles for new media in a way even grander than that of Citizen Kane/William Randolph Hearst. Through God’s common grace Jobs’ creations improved life. But he could not conquer death. Left unfulfilled were not only those curious about what Jobs’ Rosebud might be, but his biological father, Abdulfattah John Jandali, an -year-old Syrian immigrant who is now a casino vice-president in Reno, Nev. Several weeks before Jobs’ death, newspapers quoted Jandali saying he didn’t know until just a few years ago that the baby he and his girlfriend placed for adoption a half-century before had become a famous billionaire. Jandali said he had not called his son for fear Jobs would think Jandali was after his fortune, but he hoped Jobs would call him someday: “I just live in hope that, before it is too late, he will reach out to me, because even to have just one coffee with him just once would make me a very happy man.” Apparently, that meeting never happened. A OCTOBER 22, 2011

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10/6/11 4:43 PM


GOOD BET? Obama tours the Solyndra plant in Fremont, Calif., in May 2010 with Executive VP Ben Bierman (right) and CEO Chris Gronet. photo by Mandel ngan/ aFp/getty IMages

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Capitols and Capital by Emily Belz, Amy McCullough, and Marvin Olasky

[

Should politicians pick business winners and losers? The Solyndra debacle is a black eye for those who say yes, but the practice is bipartisan and widespread not only in Washington but in Mississippi, Texas, and other states

sat question:

How do you explain the Obama administration’s $528 million loan to solar panel manufacturer Solyndra, now bankrupt? A Corruption. Major Obama donor/Solyndra investor George Kaiser—through his George `

Kaiser Family Foundation—made four visits to the White House on March 12 and 13, 2009. He says he did not discuss the Solyndra loan there. B Patriotic wisdom. President Barack Obama said on Oct. 3, “Not every single business is ` going to succeed in clean energy, but if we want to compete with China … we’ve got to make sure our guys here in the United States of America at least have a shot.” C “Mistakes were made.” Some people goofed—but avoid personal responsibility by ` phrasing this in the passive voice. D Governmental arrogance. Bureaucrats are bad at picking winners and losers, ` particularly when it comes to start-up companies.

OCTOBER 22, 2011

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Answer key: A May be correct, since the Department of ` Energy reportedly fast-tracked the Solyndra loan, over objections that the company was too risky, and announced it two weeks after Kaiser’s visits. B The Obama administration is sticking to this ` free-spending position. The U.S. Department of Energy just rushed through $4.7 billion more in loans for solar energy companies to beat a midnight deadline Sept. 30, when the fiscal year ended. C Plenty of evidence for this. Regarding Solyndra, ` it’s not only that “hindsight is always 20-20,” as President Obama said: “People felt like this was a good bet.” Staffers at the Office of Management and Budget had early concerns. Forbes on Sept. 17 headlined one story, “Yes, It Was Possible to See This Failure Coming,” and explained how Solyndra right from the beginning was non-competitive in pricing against not only other kinds of energy providers, but even against other solar panel manufacturers. D Probably the best answer, as even Obama ` administration members and associates sometimes admit privately. In December 2009, Solyndra investor Brad Jones sent a worried email to President Obama’s top economic adviser at the time, Larry Summers. Jones wrote about the Obama administration’s first year of dispensing largesse: “The allocation of spending to clean energy is haphazard; the government is just not well equipped to decide which companies should get the money and how much.” Summers responded, “I relate well to your concern that gov is a crappy vc [venture capitalist] and if u were closer to it you’d feel more strongly.”

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BaRBOuR: ROgEliO v. sOlis/ap • Twin CREEks: amy mcCullOugh

One problem facing the United States, though, is that “crony capitalism” and governmental picking of winners and losers are roiling not only the White House: Many state governors and their associates are trying to do on a smaller scale what Team Obama has done big-time. They generally fare as poorly. U.S. solar manufacturers SpectraWatt (which received New York taxpayer funds) and Evergreen Solar (Massachusetts taxpayer funds) declared bankruptcy weeks prior to Solyndra’s collapse. Since it’s easy for Republicans to blast Obama and for newspapers to cover Washington misdeeds, WORLD decided to look beyond the Beltway at two governors who have tried to pick winners and losers. We examined the record of one Republican governor with stellar corporate connections, Mississippi’s Haley Barbour, who has not been dogged by a full-court press. We then reviewed the pickings of Texas governor Rick Perry that are now being examined in the light of his presidential candidacy.

aRbOuR, fORmeR chaiRman of the Republican National Committee, is well-connected: For years before becoming governor in 2004 he was a Washington lobbyist for major corporations ranging from Philip Morris to Microsoft. During the past year and a half he has brought six green energy manufacturers to Mississippi with taxpayer-backed loans totaling $400 million. The loans will be funded with bonds in a state where the total fiscal year 2011 budget is $4.5 billion. The six companies receiving loans—Twin Creeks Technologies, Soladigm, Stion, KiOR, Calisolar, and HCL Cleantech—do not appear to have direct ties to the Barbour administration, though Calisolar’s chairman, John Correnti, is a friend of Barbour’s. The loans seem strange in that The Wall Street Journal in March quoted Barbour’s disapproval of the Obama’s administration’s green energy funding: “The federal government too often is picking winners and losers. I don’t think we should be saying we are willing to fund this kind of energy but not that kind of energy.” Despite that rhetoric, Barbour has placed his own bets on manufacturers of monocrystalline and thin-film solar panels,

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“ThE FEdERAl gOvERnMEnT TOO OFTEn iS piCKing winnERS And lOSERS. i dOn’T ThinK wE ShOuld BE SAying wE ARE willing TO Fund ThiS Kind OF EnERgy BuT nOT ThAT Kind OF EnERgy.” —Haley Barbour

BARBOuR: ROgEliO v. SOliS/Ap • Twin CREEKS: AMy McCullOugh

renewable crude, energy-efficient glass, solar silicon, and bio-fuels and bio-products. State legislators, thinking of the 4,550 green jobs these companies collectively promise, have supported him. Although all six companies are venture capital–backed, and most had no previous commercial-scale manufacturing experience, legislators asked few questions. Solar panel manufacturer Twin Creeks Technologies was the first green energy company to receive a Mississippi stimulus. FEW QUESTIONS ASKED: Barbour (top, left) listens in August 2010 as KiOR CEO Fred Cannon discusses the company’s decision to locate the first of it’s biofuel production facilities in Mississippi; the Twin Creeks factory in Senatobia.

In April 2010, the California-based company announced its intent to set up its first commercial-scale plant in the state and received a $50 million loan award. Twin Creeks held its grand opening in May of this year, but it still isn’t manufacturing a commercial product. The company has promised to create 500 jobs over the next five years, and 180 by the end of 2011, but in June it reported having 15 employees. On Oct. 3 it listed two job openings on its website. Twin Creeks’ new 88,000-square-foot factory, funded with $22 million in state dollars, sits in Senatobia. No sign or logo identifies the plant. Twin Creeks spokesperson Tarpan Dixit says the plant is not in commercial production but in “validation mode” and waiting for certification—but that’s not the message conveyed by state officials. At Twin Creeks’ grand opening in May, Barbour said he was “delighted to celebrate the start of production” at the factory. In September Kathy Gelston, chief financial officer of the Mississippi Development Authority— the state’s economic development agency—said the factory was producing “sellable panels.” Tate County Economic Development Foundation director J.E. Mortimer recently toured the factory and saw the equipment: “We are still looking for really good things from this company. … Solyndra is nothing at all like Twin Creeks.” Gelston has said the green energy companies can only use the loans for building and equipment, so taxpayers have collateral if any of the companies collapse. But she admits that the Authority hasn’t assessed the forced liquidation value of the assets, should a fire sale become necessary. Some involved in the Twin Creeks deal have political connections. W.G. Yates & Sons Construction of Philadelphia, Miss., built part of the Twin Creeks plant. Executives and family members from W.G. Yates’ parent, The Yates Companies, gave $25,000 to Barbour’s federal PAC in August 2010. The Yates Companies also donated this year $10,000 of in-kind air travel to Haley’s PAC, a Barbour fundraising arm in Georgia. Several partners at one Twin Creeks backer, DAG Ventures, are Republican donors. Firm co-founder John Duff Jr. gave more

OCTOBER 22, 2011

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HOME RUN?  years and new supplies of cheap shale Barbour (third from  gas have flooded the market: The right) attends the  Department of Energy now says natural groundbreaking for  gas costs will be low and stable for years the clean coal plant  in Dekalb, Miss., on  to come, making this coal plant economDec. 16, 2010; Perry  ically questionable. If this holds true, the on Election Night  plant will have imposed significant costs last November. on customers instead of saving them money as promised. Plant critics point out that Mississippi’s Baseload Act makes it possible for customers to be charged for a power plant’s construction even if it is never completed or never works properly. Barbour spokeswoman Laura Hipp told WORLD that alternative energy companies must “meet benchmarks before receiving state funds” and must return the money if they violate their contracts. She said Twin Creeks now employs only 16 people but stated the company is only contractually “committed to employ 500 employees within five years.” She said, “Mississippi Power’s facility fits in perfectly with our plan to provide an affordable, stable fuel source produced in Mississippi for generations—not simply five or 10 years down the road.”

GROUNDBREAKING: PAULA MERRITT/THE MERIDIAN STAR/AP • PERRY: LM OTERO/AP

than $100,000 to the Republican National Committee, and then started giving to the Democratic National Committee. Yates spokesman Kenny Smith said, “The Yates family did give money to the governor’s Georgia PAC because they were optimistic that he was going to run for president and they were supporting him in that effort. It had absolutely nothing to do with the work at Twin Creeks.” It’s hard to know about funding of the five other companies: Secretive hedge funds back some of the companies, hampering transparency. One venture capital firm, Khosla Ventures, funds four of the six green companies that received loans from the state. Artis Capital Management, a hedge fund with ties to Khosla, backs two of the companies. Artis (also a backer of Solyndra) is an intensely secretive $1 billion hedge fund. Its website is password-protected, and its investors are unlisted. Public filings with the SEC only reveal the company’s president and counsel, and neither appears to have ties to the Barbour administration. Last year Artis partner David Lamond gave a paltry $500 to Haley’s PAC in Georgia. Barbour has also promoted an experimental $2.4 billion clean coal plant owned by Mississippi Power Company (MPCo.), which is part of Southern Company. When the plant comes on line, rates for poultry farmers will increase by more than 30 percent, and other customers also anticipate increases. (In the public electric utility model prevalent in southeastern states, power companies are regulated monopolies required to provide customers with the cheapest electricity available, but they are also private companies: Captive customers must pay for any improvements approved by state regulators.) The new plant idea has much to commend it: The plan is for the plant to mine on-site, low-grade lignite coal, insulating customers from market volatility in fuel costs. It is likely to be the first commercial-scale power plant in the nation to capture its carbon dioxide emissions. MPCo. argued for the plant’s economic benefit by comparing it to the alternative: a plant with much lower construction costs that would run on natural gas, a fuel that has historically been subject to significant market cost spikes. Barbour said the new plant would be a “home run for Mississippi,” but his backing for the project raised some eyebrows: Southern Company since 1999 has spent more than $2 million with BGR Group (formerly Barbour, Griffith & Rogers), according to federal lobbying disclosure documents. Barbour helped found BGR and, according to a blind trust document filed with the Mississippi Ethics Commission, owns shares and has a profit-sharing plan with the firm. (Barbour’s blind trust is supposed to insulate him from conflicts of interest: Assets are placed into a trust at the time of inauguration and kept by a trustee away from the official’s eye.) The new plant is being built with the help of $270 million in U.S. Department of Energy funds that BGR helped Southern Company to get and then hold onto, after Florida officials said no to the building of a coal plant there. Critics of the new coal plant note that drilling technology has advanced in recent

WORLD  OCTOBER 22, 2011

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GROUNDBREAKING: PAULA MERRITT/THE MERIDIAN STAR/AP • PERRY: LM OTERO/AP

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residential candidate Rick Perry has interwoven politics and economics throughout his 11 years as governor of Texas. WOrld noted on Sept. 10, “Big donors to Perry’s campaign have received support for their interests in low-level radioactive waste disposal, horseracing, poultry, new technology, and other endeavors. As one former aide said, ‘Some fleas have attached themselves to the dog.’” Many Perry donors have given hundreds of thousands of dollars and, according to studies by the Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, The Dallas Morning News, and other newspapers, received subsidies and contracts for their businesses. These hostile observers have been unable to prove “pay to play” connections, though, because Texas government under Perry’s watch has been so pro-business that many noncontributors have prospered just as much.

The Washington Post found the most frequent payoff, if there was one, was appointment to a prestigious board like the University of Texas regents. That’s a tradition in Texas and other states, which is why conservative regents often enjoy their positions and do nothing to check liberal academic dominance. The Los Angeles Times analysis found that half of the 150 large givers to Perry over the last decade—he raised $37 million from them—received business contracts, tax breaks, or appointments. For example, Joe Sanderson gave $165,000 to Perry, and his Mississippi-based company received a $500,000 grant to open a Waco chicken hatchery and processing plant. Unrelated, since Perry has made it clear, as one of his campaign commercials notes, that “Texas is open for business”? Related? Observers differed. The biggest Perry donor, clocking in at $1.1 million, is leveraged buyout master Harold Simmons. One company he

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UNDUE INFLUENCE? wsC site in  andrews, Texas (above); soward (right)  dissented and was not reappointed.

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wsC: handOuT/REuTERs/landOv • sOwaRd: haRRy CaBluCk/ap

owns, Waste Control Specialists (WCS), received a license to construct the first new low-level radioactive waste disposal site in the United States in three decades. Simmons, listed by Forbes last month as the 33rd richest American ($9.3 billion), told the Dallas Business Journal in 2006 that WCS was losing several million dollars a year, but approval of a license would give the company “a fantastic future.” Simmons said, “We first had to change the law to where a private company can own a license, and we did that. Then we got another law passed that said they can only issue one license. Of course, we were the only ones that applied.” Simmons said his company had found in west Texas “a perfect site … with perfect geology, and the people out there are all for it. The problem is with the bureaucracy. … But we think the odds are highly in our favor that we will be able to work through the bureaucracy.” His forecast was accurate: As the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality in 2007 and 2008 considered whether to give licenses to WCS, Simmons met twice with Perry. The Commission voted 2-1 to give WCS a go-ahead. The dissenting member, Larry Soward, told the Los Angeles Times that “the other two commissioners knew full well it was a very important matter to the governor’s office.” Perry

did not reappoint Soward when his term ended in 2009. WCS is now poised to aggregate not only radioactive waste from 35 states but hundreds of millions of dollars. The ugliness or beauty of this decision is in the eye of the beholder: The Times saw undue influence, but Perry defenders say he cut through the bureaucracy. During September The Wall Street Journal joined with Texas reporters in questioning Perry’s connections. Unimpressed with government’s record in picking winners and losers, both conservatives and liberals examined the Texas Emerging Technology Fund created at Perry’s request in 2005: It has committed $200 million from taxpayers to fund 133 start-ups. The Journal noted that Perry, along with his allied lieutenant governor and the speaker of the Texas House of Representatives, has final decision-making authority concerning the grants. The Dallas Morning News found that some $16 million from the tech fund has gone to firms invested in or run by major Perry contributors. This past spring state auditors pushed for greater transparency in fund management but found no evidence of fraud or illegal activity. While Texas-sized grants have not led to enormous losses like Solyndra’s, one medical imaging company that received a $1.5 million award in 2007, ThromboVision, went bankrupt last year. Texas state Rep. David Simpson, elected in 2010 with Tea Party support, said the fund is “fundamentally immoral and arrogant [with] the appearance of impropriety, if not actual impropriety.” Another Republican, state Sen. Mike Jackson, noted “criticism about the lack of transparency and insinuations of cronyism.” The Texas House of Representatives in May voted 89-37 to close the fund—only to have the legislature’s conference committee keep it in business, with $140 million more to spend. That’s not a good conclusion, according to Michael Sullivan, who heads Texans for Fiscal Responsibility. Sullivan points out: “Government should not be playing the role of venture-fund capitalist. … It’s always easy to spend other people’s money, and especially easy to spend other people’s money to the benefit of one’s own friends.” Taxing one business to fund another, and forcing taxpayers to invest in companies, is inherently unfair. A

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WSC: HANDOUT/REUTERS/LANDOV • SOWARD: HARRY CABLUCK/AP

Take a fresh look

Every word matters.

Every word of Scripture matters because every word is from God and for people. Because every word is from God, the HCSB uses words like Yahweh (Is. 42:8), Messiah (Luke 3:15), and slave (Rev. 1:1). And because every word of Scripture is for 21st century people, the HCSB replaces words like “Behold” with modern terms like “Look.” For these reasons and others, Christians across the globe are taking a fresh look at the HCSB.

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Every Word Matters HCSB.org

10/5/11 9:40 PM


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Palmetto r r r CAMPAIGN

2012 r r r

With the primary calendar shifting forward, the leading  presidential candidates remain in a surprisingly close pack in the important South Carolina race. Perry leads national leader Romney but not by much, and Cain is gaining ground

by JAMIE DEAN in Columbia, S.C.

photo illustration by KRIEG BARRIE

PELOTON I

 U.S. R. J W, -..,      as the congressman who yelled, “You lie,” when President Barack Obama told Congress that his healthcare plan wouldn’t cover illegal immigrants, some of Wilson’s constituents aren’t ready to oblige. During a packed town hall meeting with voters in Lexington, S.C., in late September, Wilson opened with grave remarks about record unemployment and soaring national debt. But the first written question from an audience member began with a tribute to the  incident: “Congressman Wilson, thank you for your correct response to the president of ‘You lie.’” The congressman—who had apologized for the timing of his outburst two years ago—shifted uncomfortably as the Lexington crowd cheered in agreement. But he grew more confident with the second half of the feisty question: “Can we count on Republicans to stand up to the massive spending of the last four years, the liberal mainstream media, and a radical president?” Wilson had a ready answer: “We have to shift the numbers in Congress.” But this crowd had its sights on a bigger prize, as another audience member asked: “In your opinion, what will our country look like if the  loses Congress and the White House next year?” It’s a question that pinpoints the angst of many Republicans across South Carolina and the rest of the country as the  presidential primaries loom less than three months away. For South Carolina, the question is especially urgent: The Republican who has won the state’s early primary contest has won the  nomination for the last three decades. This season, the state plans to hold its contest earlier than ever. Florida officials upended the primary calendar in September by announcing they would buck Republican National Committee rules that require most states to wait until March  to conduct primaries. When a Florida election committee announced a Jan.  contest, South Carolina officials preserved their first-in-the-South primary by bumping their contest from early February to Jan. . That means the three other early voting states—Iowa, New Hampshire, and Nevada—will likely move their  contests to early January, or even late December. Since time is growing short, and what happens in South Carolina is a crucial opening salvo in the battle for the White House, examining the race here offers an early glimpse into Republican politics nationwide. So far, the Palmetto State is proving this much: Economic issues are king, social issues won’t be forgotten, and the race for conservative votes is more fluid than many expected. OCTOBER 22, 2011

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B

y many estimates, South Carolina should be Rick Perry country: The professing Christian and pro-life governor of Texas embraces the Bible, babies, and barbeque. Perry’s wife, Anita, told a packed gathering of South Carolina voters at the grand opening of her husband’s campaign headquarters in the state capital of Columbia: “We have the same values, we like the same food, we kinda talk the same talk.” But in a Southern state where Perry seems like a natural fit, the candidate finds himself in a tight contest with former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, a Mormon candidate polling well in a state full of conservative evangelicals: A Winthrop University poll released on Sept. 20 showed Perry leading Romney in South Carolina by only 3 percentage points. Just three weeks earlier, another poll showed Perry leading Romney by 17 points. That’s a significant boost for Romney: Despite heavily investing cash and campaign time in South Carolina in the 2008 primary cycle, the presidential candidate finished fourth here. (Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., edged out former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee for the win.) The narrowing gap comes after Perry’s early surge when he entered the race in late August. The candidate’s searing poll numbers cooled after a few weeks on the campaign trail and a few less-than-stellar debate performances. And the Winthrop poll deserves some historical context: During the same period last election cycle, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and former Sen. Fred Thompson led the race in South Carolina. Both candidates fizzled before mid-primary season. But despite those realities, the recent numbers at least show that Romney is faring better in South Carolina than last primary season, and that he’s competitive in a state where he’s spent less time and money so far. South Carolina State Treasurer Curtis Loftis—a conservative Republican and a Southern Baptist—endorsed Romney in late August. After a recent campaign breakfast in Columbia headlined by Romney’s wife, Ann, Loftis explained why he thought the candidate had gained more traction this time around: “It’s a different world.” For Loftis, that difference is concentrated in an economy that soured nationwide a few months after the GOP primary season in 2008. The economic woes are particularly acute in South Carolina: The state has an unemployment rate of 11.1 percent—the fourth-highest in the nation. In rural South Carolina counties like Marion and Allendale, the unemployment rate reaches nearly 20 percent. That crisis could help boost Romney, a candidate touting his corporate background and business savvy. But Romney’s not alone: Perry boasts of creating jobs as governor of Texas, and candidates like former Godfather’s Pizza CEO Herman Cain are hammering their own job-centered credentials. While the winning candidate is still undetermined, and other dark horse candidates could burst on the scene, for most South Carolina voters the prevailing question is set: How do we dig out of the economic mire?

B

ack at the town hall meeting in Lexington, that’s the question on Darrell Harbour’s mind. Harbour owns a small company here that relocates machinery for industrial plants and provides heavy rigging and crane work. He decries Obama’s argument that regulating and taxing large

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corporations more aggressively will help a struggling economy, and he hopes for a GOP candidate who can reverse that trend. Harbour offers a painful example: He says he lost a quarter million dollars in purchase orders last year when some of the large companies he services grew skittish about the economic uncertainty. “Don’t tell me that beating up that big corporation doesn’t affect me,” he says. “It does—and it affects my guys.” The small business owner says that kind of uncertainty undercuts his ability to make plans and hire more workers. And he says increasing regulations makes business more expensive. For example, Harbour says some of the new machinery he bought this year came with designs imposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): new (and more expensive) fuel tanks that require using diesel exhaust fuel (DEF) along with regular diesel fuel to reduce smog. “So I just paid $128,000 for a tractor that I have to buy DEF fluid for and put it in with the diesel fuel to make EPA regulations,” he says. “And it costs $4 a gallon, plus the diesel fuel price.” But like other voters here, Harbour says he isn’t sure which GOP candidate could best tackle the kind of economic problems that hound South Carolina and the rest of the country. “The only one that’s made any comments that make a lot of sense was Herman Cain, and unfortunately I don’t think he’s going to be up CAROLINA ON THEIR MINDS: there in the running,” he says. But a week later Cain began a quick rise in Romney speaks to a group of polls nationally. small business owners at meetze plumbing in irmo, s.C. (ab0ve); During the town hall meeting, perry greets locals during a the crowd burst into applause when campaign stop at Bazen’s Family Rep. Wilson mentioned Cain’s tax Restaurant in Florence, s.C. reform plan. Afterwards, local resident Barbara Burchfield said she’s intrigued by Cain, but hasn’t settled on a candidate. But she does know that she’s most concerned about the economy: “We’d like to see the government run more like a household— if you don’t have the money, you don’t spend it.” And she believes something else: “The silent majority isn’t going to be silent anymore.”

W

hether Republican voters will prevail as the majority next November isn’t clear, though a recent ABC/Washington Post poll showed that the majority of voters expect Obama to lose the 2012 election. That dynamic has added fresh enthusiasm for GOP voters eager to nominate a candidate who’s not only electable in a general election, but desirable on a wide range of conservative issues. In South Carolina, those voters include a broad swath of evangelicals and social conservatives who say that while the economy dominates the election cycle, social issues like abortion and gay marriage remain a deep concern. For Romney—a self-proclaimed pro-life candidate who has struggled to overcome his pro-abortion past—that may mean significant hurdles with some voters here: The Winthrop poll showed Perry with a double-digit lead over Romney among evangelical voters in the state. Ray Moore—a longtime conservative Christian activist in South Carolina—says he thinks Romney will face a steep challenge with social conservatives. Moore points to Romney’s Massachusetts healthcare plan that eventually included a $50 co-pay for abortions. And Moore says many conservative

ROmnEy: maRy ann ChasTain/ap • pERRy: TRavis DOvE/ThE nEw yORk TimEs/REDux

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ChRis FiTzgERald/CandidaTE PhOTOs/nEwsCOm

for young girls in Texas. (The governor has since said he should activists still hold Romney accountable for the legalization of have proposed allowing families to opt into the vaccine for the same-sex marriage in Massachusetts while he was governor. sexually transmitted disease.) If both Romney and Perry—whose poll numbers dipped Still, Smith thinks those concerns won’t fell the candidate, after a Florida straw poll defeat—faltered in South Carolina, and that Perry likely has the best chance to win South Moore thinks a door could open for other candidates like Cain Carolina, barring a major gaffe, a dark horse candidate, or a sea or Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn. Either way, Moore says the change endorsement for Romney by someone like influential worsening climate for Democrats means that “Christians can Sen. Jim DeMint, R-S.C. For Perry, a win here is critical, since a vote for the best person. We can vote our conscience.” loss in South Carolina Randy Page—an would likely be far more evangelical, social condamaging than a loss for servative, and president Romney, says Smith: “I of South Carolinians for think if Perry has Responsible problems here, Perry has Government—is still problems.” mulling the GOP slate. Romney’s Page—also a board Mormonism seems member of South unlikely to create Carolina Citizens for substantial political Life—met Romney problems for him in this during the last primary cycle. The candidate’s cycle, and says that he’s religion drew more comfortable with his attention last time, but pro-life position: “I do evangelicals like Page, believe people can Smith, and others don’t change.” think it’s a major issue Page also says he with voters during this thinks social conservacycle. tives are interested in the David Woodard, a whole picture for GOP political scientist at candidates: “You can’t Clemson University, break the litmus test— agrees with that assessyou have to be pro-life— ment but says Romney’s but we’re also concerned attempt to woo South about where you stand Carolina voters still faces on the budget and welresistance: “I just cannot fare reform and taxes.” see South Carolina Oran Smith—an Republican voters voting evangelical and presifor a Mormon governor dent of the conservative from Massachusetts.” Palmetto Family Council That’s especially true, (PFC)—says he thinks says Woodard, when Romney’s stated they have the choice of a positions on social issues Texas governor with a are relatively strong, but Christian background: “I that he still faces an think Perry’s Christian uphill battle to win the associations, his football, South Carolina contest. his boots, his talkin’, his Smith says Romney’s ya’ll—I think all of it will halting answers to a connect eventually.” question at a South RAISING CAIN: Chad Connelly— Carolina debate regarding doors may be  chairman of the South Carolina Republican Party whether his vice president and cabinet appointees opening for the  and a board member at PFC—says connecting with would hold pro-life convictions left some voters Cain campaign. conservatives will hinge on an understanding that cold: “I think there was enough of a hiccup there fiscal issues and social issues work together: “I’m that did not make him the first choice of some one of those people who thinks you can’t separate the two.” cultural and social conservatives.” Policies that encourage hard work, marriage, and personal Perry’s campaign has unquestionably hit bumps: He still responsibility are key to encouraging conservative support, he faces conservative challenges over his immigration policy that says: “I think anyone who wins here is going to have to allows in-state college tuition for illegal immigrants, and understand that.” A questions over his attempt to make the HPV vaccine mandatory WORLD  OCTOBER 22, 2011

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Knowledge is the beginning of wisdom‌ The majority of adults pray daily. Just under three in ďŹ ve adults say they pray daily and one in ďŹ ve prays weekly. About one in 10 say they Chris Fitzgerald/Candidate Photos/newsCom

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heritage.org

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10/5/11 9:43 PM


Following  the yellow  brick road

New Gov. Sam Brownback is turning Kansas into a bold laboratory for conservative reform

by Angela Lu photo by John Hanna/AP

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A

fter 16 years of D.C.’s emerald haze, former Sen. Sam Brownback is finding there’s no place like home. This year he returned to Kansas as governor and has moved to remake the state’s politics and provide a possible blueprint for the rest of the country. Brownback had to deal with a whirlwind of problems including a $550 million deficit and a long-term trend of rural counties losing jobs and population. Most states faced much larger deficits: California, $28 billion; Illinois, $15 billion; New Jersey, $10.5 billion. Those states tried jury-rigged combinations of spending cuts, tax increases, and structural reforms, but Brownback, aided by a strongly Republican legislature, has tried to develop a consistent conservative program. The new governor aims to grow the state’s economy by keeping taxes low and cutting spending. In May he signed into law a budget that he said would eliminate the shortfall without raising taxes and would end the 2012 fiscal year with a surplus. One of Brownback’s most innovative efforts is his Rural Opportunity Zone program, which intends to reverse population decline in 50 of the 105 Kansas counties. The problem: Children of rural families go off to college and don’t return, often leaving the state or settling in the bigger cities of suburban Kansas City and Wichita where industries are located. Brownback hopes to reverse the trend by offering grants to repay student loans (up to $15,000) and providing a five-year income tax exemption for out-of-state taxpayers who move to rural areas. Many across the aisle are upset with his plans. Democratic Sen. Ed Trimmer said that getting people to move back into rural counties is only part of the problem: “If there are no jobs available in rural areas now, what will these people do to earn a Kansas income? Simply moving into an area does not create a job.” But Brownback spokeswoman Sherriene Jones-Sontag says the plan will provide not only an incentive for people to move back to rural areas, but also for businesses to move in. She said she has received queries from companies interested in moving to these areas because it would improve the quality of life for their employees. Another Trimmer objection: If Brownback is successful in eliminating the income tax for all Kansans as he promises, the incentives to move to rural areas will be short-lived. Republican Rep. Lance Kinzer also voted against Brownback’s plan because he said a Senate amendment added too many counties to the list, and the definition of rural counties was unclear: “We might as well make the whole state a Rural Opportunity Zone.” But the program passed the legislature and went into effect in July. Neighboring Nebraska and other states may enact similar plans if the Kansas program is effective.

Brownback’s budget also aggressively cuts spending to close the deficit. In one of the most controversial cuts, Kansas became the first and only state to defund the arts following Brownback’s line-item veto. He proposed instead to give a subsidy of $200,000 to the private nonprofit Kansas Art Foundation (Kaf), which he wants to replace the state-sponsored arts commission. He also donated $30,000 of his leftover inauguration funds to the organization. Linda Browning Weis, the chairwoman of the Kansas Arts Commission and the president of Kaf, is confident she and other arts advocates can raise enough private dollars for the programs: “Because government funding goes away, is art going to die? No. Art will live on.” By ending funding for the arts, Kansas also forfeited a matching grant of nearly $1.3 million in federal aid. Americans for the Arts, a Washington arts lobby, said nonprofit arts and culture organizations in Kansas support more than 4,500 full-time jobs and deliver $15.6 million in local and state government revenue. Brownback’s other major push is to tighten abortion regulations. When he came into office, the governor promised to create a “culture of life” that would protect humans in all stages of life. Kansans for Life legislative director Kathy Ostrowski says he’s made substantial improvements. The governor signed abortion laws that restrict private insurance coverage of abortions, except when a woman’s life is at risk. Kansas also banned abortion after 22 weeks’ gestation, required annual inspections of abortion centers, and diverted about $330,000 in federal family planning funds from Planned Parenthood to public hospitals and health departments. Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union are fighting the laws in court. Brownback’s budget also includes income tax deductions for new business equipment and software. It cut spending on education and government agencies, along with government worker pensions. Brownback plans to work more on those issues plus Medicaid and the state’s judicial system. Kansas is the only state where a commission headed by the bar association selects justices for the governor to nominate. The current Kansas Supreme Court votes liberal and is likely to rule against Brownback’s policies. Although these issues have not yet been resolved, Rep. Kinzer is excited about the new atmosphere in the government: “More than anything it’s a willingness to identify the issues and recognize the need for reform.” One of the new laws prohibits employee payroll deductions for union dues and PaCs. Former Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis once said, “It is one of the happy incidents of the federal system that a single courageous State may, if its citizens choose, serve as a laboratory; and try novel social and economic experiments without risk to the rest of the country.” If Brownback’s experiments work in Kansas, other states will follow him down the yellow brick road—yet this road leads not to the Emerald City but away from its fantasies. A OCTOBER 22, 2011

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

the speech, students took turns standing and shouting out scripted slogans that included, “You are a war criminal” and “Propagating murder is not an expression of free speech.” After a warning by campus officials,  students were arrested one by one before the entire group walked out chanting in unison. The ambassador’s speech was cut short by  minutes, disappointing a crowd of  people. The group became known as the “Irvine ,” although charges were dropped against one of the students pending  hours of community service. During the trial, which began on Sept. , attorneys for the students argued the importance of campus activism and claimed the defendants did not conspire to break the law, likening the disruptions to the activism of Martin Luther King Jr. and other social activists. Moutaz Herzallah, whose son is one of the defendants, moved to the United States from Bahrain several decades ago. BIG MESS ON CAMPUS: Protesters march outside the Orange County District Attorney’s office (left);  of the   and UC Riverside Muslim students on trial (right).

ZUMA PRESS/NEWSCOM

     of deliberation, an Orange County jury announced its verdict in a case that sparked national debate over free speech rights: On Sept. , all  Muslim students were found guilty of criminal charges for disrupting a speech by Israeli Ambassador Michael Oren at the University of California in Irvine () last year. The defendants continue to proclaim their innocence and accuse the Orange County District Attorney’s Office of racism and religious bias. A gag order prevented the D.A.’s office from answering these allegations during the trial, but on Sept. , District Attorney Tony Rackauckas released emails, documents, and videos that were used in the trial— an effort to prove to the public that criminal charges were justified. “The defendants have shown no remorse. They continue to claim they were wrongfully convicted,” District Attorney Chief of Staff Susan Kang Schroeder told me. “And many newspapers, without knowing all the facts,

have joined in their ridiculous sentiment even though they actually made motions in court saying this is a biased prosecution and they lost. They lost all those motions.” Schroeder described an astonished crowd when the verdict was read. Several people gasped while more than two dozen of the approximately  spectators stormed out of the room. She said one of the supporters pointed at a uniformed deputy sheriff guarding the court and shouted, “You are a tool of Israel.” Other supporters tried to intimidate the jurors by illegally taking video and pictures of them leaving the courthouse. Investigators were unable to catch those supporters. The students—eight from UC-Irvine and three from UC-Riverside—were charged with one misdemeanor count of conspiring to disrupt the ambassador’s Feb. , , speech and a second count for the disruption. The university’s Muslim Student Union () originally denied any involvement in the disruptions, but an investigation uncovered email proof of a meticulously planned scheme (see “‘We will fight you,’” Nov. , ). During

WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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SAM GANGWER/ZUMA PRESS/NEWSCOM

raeli Disrupters of an Is eech ambassador’s sp t them say ruling agains ch violates free spee co un ty, ca li f. by ji ll ne ls on in or an ge


SAM GANGWER/ZUMA PRESS/NEWSCOM

ZUMA PRESS/NEWSCOM

“I decided to immigrate with my family to this country so we could have peace, freedom of speech, dignity and honor,” Herzallah said. “Apparently the district attorney of Orange County threw the American Constitution in the trash.” Schroeder disagrees, saying others protested the ambassador’s speech but did so legally and were not prosecuted. “When you look at the emails, they’re very clear not only that they decided who gets to speak and who doesn’t get to speak, they also decided that Ambassador Oren should not get to speak because he’s an Israeli,” Schroeder explained. “That’s pretty anti-Semitic. And not only were they going to do this at , they were going to do it all over the country.” The students were sentenced to three years of informal probation and  hours of community service to be completed by Jan. . Attorneys for the students plan to appeal, and Schroeder said the defendants’ supporters are creating an anti–district attorney website and Facebook page. “If you dare to disagree with them then you’re antiMuslim when in fact it has nothing to do with their religion. It has to do with the fact that they committed a crime.” A

SIDEWALKS VS. SHOUT DOWNS

On the day the “Irvine ” verdict was announced, the th annual Arab American Festival was just beginning in Garden Grove, Calif., five miles from the Orange County Courthouse in Santa Ana. On a public street corner near the entrance to the festival, dozens of protesters were blowing horns and hollering at a group from Concerned Citizens for the First Amendment who were holding a sign the protesters found offensive. “Muhammad is a child molester,” the sign proclaimed, alluding to Muhammad’s marriage to -year-old Aisha (some traditions claim she was ). Many were angered and some suggested the group should not be allowed at the festival. One protester told me over the noise of the crowd, “What do you mean a public sidewalk? You cannot say Muhammad is like this. Muhammad is like that. You can say Jesus is the Son of God—that is your opinion. But you cannot say a bad thing about another prophet! That’s the bottom line.” Across the street, Pastor George Saieg from Arabic Christian Perspectives and his team were handing out drinks and Christian pamphlets to festival-goers. He disagrees with Concerned Citizen’s tactics but affirms their right to be there: “Some Muslims try to compare this to the situation with Irvine, saying, ‘Why are police just watching here and allowing this guy to hold a sign on a public sidewalk saying Muhammad is a child molester while they stopped us in Irvine to say our opinion inside when the ambassador of Israel was there?’ My response to them is this is a public sidewalk. But [at ] it was a lawful assembly,” Saieg said. “You cannot just come in and shout down a private event.” Saieg is well versed in First Amendment rights. He recently won an appellate court decision affirming his right to hand out Christian literature at a similar event in Dearborn, Mich., last year. The city had banned Saieg and other Christian groups from public sidewalks near the festival, arresting those who violated the ban (see “Smelting pot,” July , ). Saieg sued Dearborn and lost in Federal Court, but the th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in May that his First Amendment rights were violated. Saieg, who was born and raised in Sudan and now calls California home, says this is a victory for religious freedom: “If they stop us from preaching the gospel, Muslims also will be stopped from preaching their message and I think they should recommend that we continue our freedom of speech in this way.” —J.N.

OCTOBER 22, 2011

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10/5/11 9:47 PM


Road to r

both job seekers and job creators are facing difficult times, but many do not see that as a reason to lose hope by JOEL HANNAHS in Des Moines, Iowa

G  

 R  layoffs were possible, but the -year Wells Fargo employee didn’t expect to be in the first wave. He looked around the meeting room with some  others, and before anyone said a word, knew that even his position as vice president of continuous improvement was gone. Even as he thought to himself, “I didn’t see this coming,” he had a more important realization: God did. “So right away I had that reminder that the Lord is in control,” he said. A stubbornly sluggish economy is producing a large number of Americans in Rawls’ position. And the job creators who normally bring an economy out of recession, small businesses, are finding it frustratingly difficult to do so now, leaving many of the unemployed with few options. Iowa, despite a relatively low unemployment rate of . percent, is a microcosm of the nation in this regard. For Rawls, losing his job proved to be a chance to help others. Through a consulting opportunity, then a recurring two-month contract with Aviva Insurance, he has comparable pay and helps companies improve methods and measure performance. Along the way, he began to have opportunities to speak to others who were facing tough times, first former co-workers, then their friends. Over two years, he’s spoken with  to  people about facing joblessness. Sometimes it’s just a conversation, sometimes more. He shares practical knowledge of job-seeking tools, but he is also able to talk about the role of faith. “People are good at looking back on a trial and seeing God’s hand,” he said. “We need to learn to look ahead and see it.” John Ottley recommends job-seekers hold fast to Psalm :. Until recently a Des Moines



area pastor, Ottley was one of the people who picked up the phone and called Rawls and other friends for practical and biblical advice. Tom Evans, a former family physician, joined Ottley for long bike rides to hash out the practical realities of Ottley’s strengths and opportunities for a “late life transition” at age . Another sat down at Panera with his Bible open to share some counsel: “And I was the pastor!” jokes Ottley. After several months of looking into positions he thought might make sense, an unexpected door opened wide. Within weeks of hearing about a position at Grace Evangelical Church in Germantown, Tenn., he was serving again. “I certainly can appreciate the test of faith it is,” he said. “Faith is easy to talk about, harder to practice.”

T

    traditionally lies with the small businesses that are the nation’s top job creators. According to the Small Business Administration, small businesses created  percent of new jobs over the past  years. But with consumer confidence low and budgets tight, hiring hasn’t bounced back. In , Gene and Susan Lutz opened the Lutz Pharmacy in Altoona, Iowa. “I was able to start on a shoestring then,” he said. “That’s just about impossible today. You’ve got to be a certain size to make it even practical.” Pharmacists must sell twice the volume that would have supported his business in the early days, as audits and other government-caused costs are increasing. For example, required waste, fraud, and abuse training is not reimbursed. “Regulations are stifling,” said Lutz, past president of the American Pharmacy Association. “I don’t think it’s going to get better.”

WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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o recovery

LEARNING FROM THE LOSS: Rawls in downtown Des Moines. JOHN GAPS III/GENESIS FOR WORLD

OCTOBER 22, 2011

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Moines, has been in the home-remodeling field for more than  years, starting out by working his way through college. One change in the industry is the focus on ���green” or environmental methods. That increases costs, such as certification to handle lead-based paint properly. The layers of government involvement go all the way to the local level, with each community determining sprinkler requirements. Even so, he’s optimistic: “The last three years haven’t been good for housing, whether building or remodeling,” he said. “But your house is still a good place to put your money.” Bryan Regier, one of the pastors at STILL LOOKING: JobFaith Bible Church in Cedar Rapids, seekers check job said that the church had nine or  postings at St. Mark families out of work in , when the Presbyterian Church city battled a flood, and the jobless are in Ballwin, Mo.

[employees] before the recession hit. Everybody quit buying. We had to retrench and reorganize, but we’re surviving,” he said. “We’ll be here, but it’s been a tough three years.” He started a heavy truck alignment business in . He and an engineer then teamed up to manufacture the equipment to align trucks, and he pivoted to selling the product in . The general lack of confidence in the economy is now costing him sales. Most of his buyers plan to finance their purchases, yet many have trouble getting the necessary financing. For about  months, he did not have any financed sales because purchasers could not get loans. A secondary complication is not new: Each state has different tax laws, increasing paperwork for each out-of-state sale. Rollie Clarkson, owner of Remodeling Contractors in Des

always a part of their ministry. “People found employment again, but they’re underemployed,” he said. The church has a benevolence fund and an ad hoc committee process in place for when members end up in financial turmoil. They start by working up a new, lean budget. “We don’t just bail them out,” he said. “We get the numbers down, and we address hard issues.” Jobs are a constant topic of presidential hopefuls in Iowa, and Gov. Terry Branstad is touring the state talking jobs in town halls. With the federal government already borrowing  cents on the dollar, Branstad expects to continue looking for solutions at the state level. “This is a very slow recovery,” he said. “That’s why we’ve got to control costs.” A



ROBERT COHEN/POST-DISPATCH

The Lutz Pharmacy employs  people, a mix of full and part-time. Pharmacies have some built-in immunity to downturns, buoyed by customers using government and third-party payers. But the economy is a concern to them because they’re now in view of that point in their lives when they will expect to find a buyer and retire. Still closed on Sundays, the store’s front doubles as Healing Touch Book and Bible. The little Christian bookstore is partly just something they wanted to do, partly another way to differentiate from the national chains. “One of the benefits of being an independent business is that you can make decisions quickly and change gears,” Lutz said. Across town, the downturn had a bigger hit on Mike Beckett’s small business, manufacturing equipment for heavy-truck alignment, which now employs just six. “We were up to 

WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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Notebook

LIFESTYLE TECHNOLOGY SCIENCE HOUSES OF GOD SPORTS MONEY RELIGION

LONGACRE: PHOTO COURTESY OF HERALD PRESS • WHEAT GERM: POPOVAPHOTO/ISTOCK

SLUG: Caption

Eating simply >>

LIFESTYLE: A Mennonite cookbook may show a way out of the class struggle over food BY SUSAN OLASKY

T-   Mennonite publisher Herald Press published the More-With-Less Cookbook, which has now sold more than , copies. This year Herald Press released the third edition with updated statistics and nutritional information. Doris Jantzen Longacre’s cookbook brought together nutritious recipes from Mennonites living in North America and around the world. Its recipes stress cooking from scratch with whole grains, beans, fruits, and vegetables. Many of the

Email: solasky@worldmag.com

21 LIFESTYLE and TECH.indd 61

recipes use less meat than Americans are accustomed to eating. A recent flare-up in the food wars shows the continued need for the cookbook. In an August TV Guide interview, celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain slammed Food Channel personality Paula Deen: “The worst, most dangerous person to America is clearly Paula Deen … she’s proud of the fact that her food is [expletive] bad for you. … I would think twice before telling an already obese nation that it’s  to eat food that is killing us.” Deen OCTOBER 22, 2011

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Notebook > Lifestyle its artery-clogging, self-destructive glory.” Bruni argued that Americans are too fat but “getting Deen to unplug the waffle iron” would not get at the “core of the problem any more than posting fast-food calorie counts or taxing soft drinks do.” He called for more “healthy food that’s affordable and convenient.” That brings us back to More-WithLess. In addition to its  recipes, the cookbook conveys a Mennonite sensibility about eating simply. The book is out of step with both Bourdain and Dean. It shows that cooking on a budget doesn’t have to be deep fried.

S  TICKER  SHOCK

Bedbug bite

Bedbugs are on the rise, and so are illnesses tied to the pesticides used to fight them. Increased international travel and pesticide-resistant bedbugs have combined to bring the bloodsucking critters even into the fanciest Manhattan hotels. Anxious Americans are fighting back—and sometimes getting sick in the process. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports  people in seven states becoming ill after using pesticides to control bedbugs. Most illnesses were not serious—but one woman died. About  percent of the cases involved pyre-



Maybe your mother told you not to play with your food. If so, she was missing a chance to foster creativity, and Jill White Mills has something to teach you. Her website, Kitchen Fun with My Three Sons (kitchenfunwithmysons.blogspot. com), dishes up one clever plateful after another: a Charlie Brown devised from pancakes and scrambled eggs, flower pot on a stick S’more treats, or an Angry Bird peanut butter sandwich. When your children are not making fun food, they can enjoy drawing a stickman on the computer and then watching it move. Add a key and the stickman opens a box. Add a sword and the stickman chases away a dragon. All this fun is available on the easy-to-use website, Draw a Stickman (drawastickman. com). It features rudimentary story, drawing, and animation, but it’s still intriguing. —S.O.

throids and pyrethins, common insecticides available in over-the-counter pest control products and head lice shampoos. The government report acknowledges that pesticide-related illnesses are infrequent, but that could change as pesticide-resistant bedbugs proliferate. People, frustrated that drugstore pesticides don’t seem to work, may use more and more. The one person who died, a North Carolina woman with a history of diabetes along with heart and kidney disease, used insecticides all over the bedroom,  cans of foggers, and bedbug killer on arms, chest, and hair. —S.O.

BABY: ANDYL/ISTOCK • KITCHEN FUN: HANDOUT • BEDBUGS: ANIMATEDFUNK/ISTOCK

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is scaring young couples with its estimate that the average cost of raising children from birth to age  is now ,—that’s  percent greater than a decade ago. The  provides a calculator (.../default.aspx) so that parents can see the amounts for different-sized families living in different regions. Breaking down the numbers suggests a different story. Nearly half the total comes from housing and daycare/education expenses. The cost calculation assumes two parents working outside the home and assumes every child costs the same. But families with many children know that the incremental cost of subsequent children is low—if one parent is at home, at least during their preschool years. The  calculates  percent of the total for food and transportation and the remaining  percent for clothing, healthcare, and miscellaneous items. The numbers are scary because they forget the old adage: Children are cheaper by the dozen. Each child does not necessarily need a separate room. Meals are stretchable. On the other hand, that , does not include any money for private or Christian schools, so for some families the cost can be worrisome, especially when they have to pay twice for schooling: once in taxes, once in tuition. —S.O.

CHILD’S PLAY

WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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ILLUSTRATION: KRIEG BARRIE • BILLBOARD: TRAVELPIX LTD./PHOTOGRAPHERS CHOICE/GETTY IMAGES

responded in the New York Post: “You know, not everybody can afford to pay  for prime rib or  for a bottle of wine. My friends and I cook for regular families who worry about feeding their kids and paying the bills.” New York Times food critic Frank Bruni stepped into the fray, noting that the exchange “exposes class tensions in the food world that sadly mirror those in society at large. You can almost imagine Bourdain and Deen as political candidates, a blue-state paternalist squaring off against a red-state populist over correct living versus liberty in all


Notebook > Technology

Patent attacks

The makers of smartphones and tablet computers are engulfed in a global legal battle

BY DANIEL JAMES DEVINE

BABY: ANDYL/ISTOCK • KITCHEN FUN: HANDOUT • BEDBUGS: ANIMATEDFUNK/ISTOCK

ILLUSTRATION: KRIEG BARRIE • BILLBOARD: TRAVELPIX LTD./PHOTOGRAPHERS CHOICE/GETTY IMAGES

>>

I  C, America’s Founders promoted a culture of innovation by granting inventors, for a limited time, “the exclusive right” to their discoveries. Patents today last  to  years, enough time for companies to market unique products and recoup the costs of research and development. The number of patent lawsuits in the United States has risen around  percent in the past decade. In the fiercely competitive world of smartphones and tablet computers, suits have reached warlike proportions. A single smartphone might involve tens of thousands of patent claims, and the makers of these gadgets and their software—including Google, Apple, Samsung, HTC, Microsoft, and others— are busy suing and countersuing one another in multiple countries. The losers of patent cases may have to pay up or halt sales of a product altogether. Apple succeeded in blocking sales of Samsung’s Galaxy Tab . tablet in Germany in August because it looked too much like an iPad. (Apple is seeking to block Samsung devices in the United States as well.) VIA

Technologies, a chipset maker, has filed suit to ban iPad and iPhone sales in the United States. Some companies seem to be using patent suits not just to defend their products but to go on the offense against competitors, aiming to handicap rivals in a race to sell the hottest gadgets. Some disputes involve seemingly trivial infringements: Apple recently nailed HTC over a system that automatically recognizes phone numbers in emails. That and a data transmission patent infringement could translate into a ban on all HTC Android phone sales in the United States, depending on the outcome of a trade agency review. “The whole idea in the smartphone business now is to puff yourself up in a way that wards off lawsuits,” Dennis Crouch, a patent law professor from the

University of Missouri, told a Fortune reporter. Technology companies have taken to buying up their competitors just to get the patents they own: In July a group of companies bought over , patents and applications from the bankrupt Nortel for . billion, the biggest patent auction in history. Google, claiming its competitors were cooperating to “strangle” its Android mobile software, responded in August by purchasing Motorola Mobility for . billion, gaining , patents. The new patent law signed by President Obama in September could reduce the number of infringement disputes, but some think it will harm small-scale inventors. Companies could avoid the risk of suing one another into oblivion by simple cooperation, as Crouch suggests: They could license their technology to one another.

Tracking trick

Tracking technology is testing interpretations of the Fourth Amendment’s protection against “unreasonable searches.” The Wall Street Journal reported the  and other federal and local authorities are using secretive devices known generically as “stingrays” to track suspects. The devices mimic a cell phone tower, tricking a phone or mobile broadband card to connect and send information about its location. Legal experts say it’s unclear whether locating a suspect in his home with such technology should require a search warrant. –D.J.D.

Email: ddevine@worldmag.com

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OCTOBER 22, 2011

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Notebook > Science organ donations in the United States take place after brain death, but DCD is regaining its popularity, accounting for 6 percent or more of all donations today. Because a stopped heart can resume beating spontaneously in very rare cases, doctors normally wait two to five minutes before declaring cardiac death and allowing organs to be removed from the body. The unos transplant guidelines since 2007 have referenced that two-minute wait time. Organ sharing network seeks to speed Now, unos says the two-minute wait was never mandatory and isn’t its business up the clock on declarations of death to impose: “What we’ve come to realize is By daniel jaMes devine the hospital and the care team in charge of that patient is really the most qualified to make the determination of death,” said Charles Alexander, the former president of unos. That has A group responsible for arranging organ transplants critics worried: How soon might some doctors choose to is revising its donation guidelines, and has touched a declare death? Will they begin viewing patients as donors nerve in the process. The United Network for Organ before they’ve taken their final breath? Sharing (unos), which has a contract with the U.S. Another change unos plans to make is to redefine DCD as government to match donated organs to transplant candidates, “donation after circulatory death,” implying that death should is changing its policy regarding “donation after cardiac be determined not by heart inactivity but by a lack of adequate death,” or DCD. blood circulation. A Georgetown University bioethicist said Cardiac death, popularly characterized by a flat line on a the name change was a “potentially intentionally deceptive” video monitor, was once the standard prerequisite for organ way of avoiding debate about the definition of death. donation, but was replaced by brain death in the 1970s. Most

Mostly dead

DisowneD Pro-life activists celebrated the passage of an embryo patent ban on sept. 16, part of the america invents act, a law reforming the U.s. patent system. The act made permanent a ban that formerly had to be renewed year-by-year, preventing biotechnology companies from trying to claim rights on an embryo that, for instance, is cloned or has particular genetic traits. —D.J.D.

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Particle physicists have carried out an experiment that shouldn’t be possible. Albert Einstein’s special theory of relativity dictates nothing can travel faster than the speed of light—but if measurements made by researchers at the OPERA (Oscillation Project with Emulsion-tRacking Apparatus) project in Italy are accurate, neutrinos have bested light speed by 60 nanoseconds. The researchers made their discovery by shooting neutrinos— particles with almost no mass that can pass through matter easily—underground 454 miles through rock from the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) particle accelerator near Geneva, Switzerland, to a detector near L’Aquila, Italy, and timing the journey with GPS and two ultra-accurate cesium clocks. The notion that a central law of physics could be broken isn’t sitting well with the scientific public, and most think some measurement error is to blame. The OPERA scientists tend to agree, but after six months of checking and rechecking their data, they’re asking researchers at other particle labs to replicate the experiment and help them solve the puzzle. “The potential impact on science is too large to draw immediate conclusions or attempt physics interpretations,” said OPERA spokesman Antonio Ereditato. —D.J.D.

EKG: Max DElson Martins santos/istoCK • EMBrYo: hEro30/istoCK • ErEDitato: Martial trEzzini/KEYstonE/aP

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Notebook > Houses of God

Restoration Anglican Church, part of the theologically orthodox Anglican Church in North America, is a new congregation that meets in a decades-old church building in Arlington, Va. Restoration bought the building from Trinity Baptist Church, which disbanded last year. OCTOBER 22, 2011

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Notebook > Sports

Facing the music

>>

Decision to pull HANK WILLIAMS JR.’s MNF opener shows hyper-politicalcorrectness is still with us BY MARK BERGIN

Diamond gems



In the  World Series, Pittsburgh second baseman and defensive specialist Bill Mazeroski delivered a bottom-of-theninth-inning home run to win Game  and the title. To this day, Mazeroski maintains that the feeling of calm he felt as the fateful pitch was delivered “is something I’ve never been able to explain.”



WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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

Such excitement offers a reminder of the game’s human element. For all the wizardry of Billy Beane’s statistical analysis, now immortalized in the Brad Pitt film Moneyball, baseball remains a fantastically

In the  World Series, Boston first baseman Bill Buckner let a slow-dribbling ball trickle through his legs, allowing the Mets to score the gamewinning run and avoid elimination. New York would win Game  and the series two days later. The baseball from that infamous play went up for sale on eBay this month with a price tag of  million.

unpredictable enterprise, often turning on the intangible grit of a player’s guts. Playoff history proves as much. Here are three surprising, gripping, and deeply human moments from the game’s postseason archives.



In the  , Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter raced across the infield to track down an errant throw and flip the ball backhand to catcher Jorge Posada, (right) who promptly tagged out Oakland runner Jeremy Giambi (center) trying to score from first base. The play preserved a New York lead in Game  and provided the pivot for the Yankees to surge back from a - deficit to win the series in five games. Had Giambi only slid, Oakland might well have eliminated the Yankees that very day.

WILLIAMS: PAUL SPINELLI/AP • MAZEROSKI: AP • BUCKNER: RUSTY KENNEDY/AP • GIAMBI: ERIC RISBERG/AP

Major League Baseball’s pennant races provided historic drama this year—the September collapses of Boston and Atlanta; the -

seasonending surge from St. Louis; the stunning come-frombehind victory of Tampa Bay over New York on the final day of the season to nab a playoff spot.

Email: mbergin@worldmag.com

10/6/11 5:07 PM

OBAMA: MANDEL NGAN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES • TRADER: M. SPENCER GREEN/AP

F    , Hank Williams Jr. has provided the opening soundtrack for Monday Night Football. The country music singer earned four Emmy awards in the early s for his lyrical odes to the gridiron. And when the staple of American sports culture made the transition from  to  in , Williams traveled with it. But such staying power was little match for an ill-conceived political quip earlier this month. As a guest on the Fox News program Fox and Friends, Williams suggested that the recent golf outing of President Barack Obama with House Speaker John Boehner was akin to “Hitler playing golf with [Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin] Netanyahu.” The remark drew scorn from the Anti-Defamation League, which contends that such comparisons to Hitler cheapen the German dictator’s singularly heinous crimes against European Jews. But before Williams could muster a public apology,  pulled his musical opener from its broadcast, citing extreme disappointment with his comments. Who knew that the nation’s premier sports network is averse to using music from entertainers who make mildly stupid political statements? Too bad. That’s just about all of them. Such a policy smacks of last decade, when hyper-political-correctness cost numerous radio and television personalities their jobs. But hasn’t that era of tiptoes and eggshells begun to fade, and maybe especially in sports? Isn’t the affably controversial Hulk Hogan’s new reality show on midget wrestling evidence enough of that?


Notebook > Money

No Jobs, No Sale

Efforts to sell the president’s job plan don’t seem to be helping his popularity BY WARREN COLE SMITH

>>

O M, S. , President Barack Obama made a Rose Garden speech to unveil his  trillion plan to shrink the deficit and create jobs, with about half of the savings coming from spending cuts. Most of the rest will come from taxes. Despite an aggressive sales tour by the president—mostly to states that will be battlegrounds in the  election—he’s finding few buyers. The reasons for the lack of support are many. Conservative columnist David Brooks said the president’s plan isn’t big enough: “This plan will not solve our problem.” For Tea Party conservatives, tax increases are simply non-starters. Moderates and liberals hate the president’s proposed cuts. Still, Obama soldiers on. In addition to his speaking tour, the Democratic National Committee launched a multimillion-dollar ad campaign to promote the plan. The title of the campaign, “ months,” denotes the number of months until the  election. It’s a title that is either direct, ironic, or cynical, depending on your point of view. The ’s point of view is to bet heavily on the campaign and the plan, perhaps guessing it’s their last shot to move the economy and change perceptions of Obama’s performance before vague uneasiness becomes stubborn resistance. So the ads are running in the swing states of Florida, Colorado, Nevada, Ohio, North Carolina, and Virginia, as well as in Washington, D.C. The  hasn’t released dollar figures, but media experts estimate the buy to be in the tens of millions of dollars. They don’t seem to be moving the needle much. A Rasmussen poll conducted a week after the ads started running put the president’s approval rating at  percent, the lowest of his presidency.

F  ED OUT

Those who think the Federal Reserve does too much meddling may be able to take consolation in its latest move. On Sept. , the Fed announced a portfolio rebalancing designed to drive down interest rates on longterm government debt. The move was largely expected, but the stock markets hated it, both here and abroad, and moved sharply downward. Analysts say the news troubled investors for two reasons: First, the Fed’s statement offered a bleak assessment of the future of the U.S. economy. Second, the Fed purchased bonds that mature after  years. That is as far out as you can go. It means that the Fed is out when it comes to affecting interest rates in the future. For some analysts who think that market forces should be allowed to work more directly, that’s actually good news. —W.C.S.

Better banks

OBAMA: MANDEL NGAN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES • TRADER: M. SPENCER GREEN/AP

CREDIT

When is bad news good news? When it’s not as bad as it could have been. In late September, regulators closed banks in Virginia and California, lifting to  the number of U.S. bank failures this year. If that sounds like bad news, consider this: The number of closures has dropped significantly this year as banks have worked their way through the bad debt accumulated in the recession. By this time last year, regulators had shuttered  banks. In all of , regulators seized  banks, the most in any year since the savings-and-loan crisis two decades ago. Those failures cost the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which insures bank deposits, around  billion. The  has said  likely was the high-water mark for bank failures from the Great Recession. Florida, Georgia, and Illinois also have seen large numbers of bank failures. —W.C.S. Stay connected: Sign up to receive email updates at mag.com/email

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OCTOBER 22, 2011

WORLD

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Notebook > Religion

Pastors and politics A growing number   of congregations are   riding a wave of  political activism By tim dalrymPle

>>

68 

WORLD  OCTOBER 22, 2011

21 RELIGION.indd 68

Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, describes the nascent national movement of pastors engaging the political sphere as a reawakening of the Religious Right in a more localized, grassroots form—“a congregational version of the tea party.” Pastors who once avoided his calls are now calling him and asking to get involved. Whether this constitutes a healthy development in the life of the American church, or a distraction from its eternal purpose, is a matter of dispute even amongst Christian conservatives. Controversial new books on the essential mission of the church and starkly different responses among evangelicals to religious-political events like Glenn Beck’s “Restoring Honor” rally and Rick Perry’s “Response” suggest that pastors and religious leaders are finding it difficult to separate the right and wrong ways of bringing faith and politics together. Seven out of 10 pastors, according to a 2010 LifeWay Research study, draw the line at endorsing candidates from

the pulpit. It’s one thing to educate and mobilize a congregation around biblical principles of life, family, and fiscal stewardship, but quite another to make the church an instrument of political operators. Yet an even larger number, eight out of 10 pastors, according to a new LifeWay study, believe the taxexempt status of churches should not be imperiled by their political activities. Pastors want the freedom to choose whether to engage the political sphere without the threat of government intervention. What is clear is that pastors, as Johnson says, “see this as more than just another presidential election.” What is not yet clear is how congregations and their broader communities will respond. When churches enter the political fray, do they compromise their witness and make the proper party affiliation a prerequisite for entering the kingdom? On the other hand, in the midst of social disintegration and the erosion of JudeoChristian values, can churches and their pastors afford to stand apart from the fray, or do their moral and theological commitments compel action? The road to November 2012 is long, not only for the candidates and their supporters but for pastors and thoughtful believers who would understand, model, and teach the right relationship between faith and politics, church and state. A

Lisa Haney/sis

Call it the Holy Water Party. The federal government’s reckless mismanagement of the economy, and the continued deterioration of our collective moral culture, has inspired a new wave of conservative Christian political activism. According to pastor Jamie Johnson of Story City, Iowa, Iowan pastors were roused from their apolitical slumbers by hate-speech legislation in 2009 that might have constrained what pastors could say from the pulpit and a state Supreme Court decision in the same year opening the door to same-sex marriage. Three Iowa Supreme Court justices who ruled with the majority were voted off the bench, and now pastors are “much more enthused than they were four years ago” to shape the election’s outcome. Since some congregants prefer their pulpits without politics, says Kerry Jech of Marshalltown, Iowa, pastors like himself “take the fire” for their political activities. Yet he’s confident he’s making the right decision, and wishes more would join the cause. Many pastors believe that the issues at stake in the 2012 election are so important that failing to engage the political sphere is failing to defend the flock. The phenomenon is not limited to highly politicized states like Iowa. In a Los Angeles Times report on pastors “increasingly heeding a call to speak out on politics,” Richard Land, president of the Southern Baptist Convention’s

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Mailbag

“Remembering /”

(Sept. ) Many thanks for your special tribute to the / victims and their families. It was sad to read about those who could not recover physical remains of their loved ones. But it is a comfort to know that in our final homecoming the sea will give up her dead and out of the rubble of this tragic event the dead in Christ will receive new and glorified bodies.  , Pella, Iowa

“A long unremitting campaign”

“Where is our treasure?”

(Sept. ) You are right. The United States did not receive its wake-up call about radical Islam until /. These evil-doers began their work much before then. The first World Trade Center bombing in  and the two U.S. Embassy bombings in  had their origins with Islamic radicals in southeast Asia. It isn’t just a war against the Middle East and the United States. It truly encompassed much of the world and still is continuing.  

Grand Prairie, Texas

“September morn”

(Sept. ) Three cheers for Marvin Olasky’s column on Social Security. The American dream of retirement is the exact opposite of God’s plan for our lives. Idling away one’s time with golf, cruises, and cocktail parties does not square with a God who wants us to stay in the race, regardless of age or occupation.  

Huntington, W.Va.

Medical advances can enable us to live longer lives, but everyone still wants to retire at . My husband and I are in our s and fully expect to work until at least . But in today’s economy many

(Sept. ) It is very difficult, looking at the wreckage of the towers and reading about people jumping to their deaths, to remember that the Lord’s Prayer says “forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us.” I can’t seem around the world to be able to forgive those responsible, and reading Paul Glader’s account of Melanie Kirkpatrick’s experience causes a feeling of rage to well up in me, even  years later. God help us not to hate.

employers get rid of older employees to replace them with younger, less expensive workers. This leaves older Americans trying to compete for lower-paying jobs just to stay employed.   Phoenix, Ariz.

I have encountered many Christians who delay retirement because they can’t yet afford the comforts they desire in their golden years, or perhaps they distrust God’s providence. On the other hand, many Christian men and women step into retirement with their sleeves rolled up and the armor of God in place for the next phase of God’s call—volunteering, short-term

WUASA, CENTRAL SULAWESI, INDONESIA / submitted by Christy Hanna

 .  Holly Hill, S.C.

All the remembrances and photos of a very dark time were particularly poignant as we try to understand the meaning of / in light of God’s redeeming grace. When asked about the Galileans sacrificed by Pilate, Jesus’ response was a call to repentance. I wish you had mentioned that this is what the living are to do after monumental tragedies.   Springfield, Va.

Send photos and letters to: mailbag@worldmag.com

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OCTOBER 22, 2011

WORLD

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9/30/11 11:04 AM


Mailbag missions, and even attempting to turn their avocations into financially viable vocations. God bless them!  

Byron, Ga.

I do not dispute that Social Security is untenable in its current form, but for my Social Security check the government gets a volunteer in a school reading program, a board member for the senior center in a poor rural area, and a deacon in the church working in the government-sponsored food closet. There is a talented workforce among seniors. Instead of beating seniors with rhetoric about entitlements, let’s talk about the opportunities that freedom from the daily grind gives people to be productive in new ways.  

Groveland, Calif.

“The new greatest generation” (Sept. ) I don’t think there will ever be a generation like the one that lived through

World War II. I’m in the Air Force, and some give us that title because when / happened so many people signed up for the military. But our grandparents received that title because the entire country came together and sacrificed in many ways to support those fighting overseas. They knew what it meant to go without, but if you take luxuries away from people today or ask them to sacrifice for the nation, watch out. It always turns into something political.  .  Altus, Okla.

who sacrificed life and limb for a cause greater than themselves.  

Foothill Ranch, Calif.

“Islam vs. liberty” (Sept. ) This is the most lucid clarification I’ve read of the differences between Christianity and Islam regarding salvation and works, and it explains why freedom is troubling to Muslims. The choice is life eternal with God by works or by grace. I am in the grace camp.  

Boca Raton, Fla.

Our son Justin was one of that young, idealistic “generation of redeemers” who also saw something other than the horror in the smoking towers—and got up from his college classroom on Sept. , , and enlisted in the U.S. Army the next day. On Dec. , , Justin lost his life in Iraq. God has given us peace and comfort with respect to his passing. His story is one of thousands of brave young men and women

Like many other critics of Islam, Marvin Olasky does not account for the fact that millions of Muslims live peacefully in the United States today. I understand the concern about “radical Islam,” but too many allow the terrorists to define their view of a religion with over . billion adherents, all but a few of whom are innocent of bloodshed.  

Fairfax, Va.

“Closing in September” (Sept. ) Joel Belz asked for an example of something that works better now than when we were younger. Would anyone want to go back to the decades of Hitler, or “separate but unequal,” or runaway inflation? In my own lifetime I have seen many changes for the better. Polio is a rarity. Average life span is extended. Lakes and rivers are less polluted. Grocery stores carry far more choices. I can look at the glass as half-full or half-empty, or I can choose not to focus on the empty glass of the world and instead look to the full glass that is Jesus.   Silverdale, Wash.

“Thousands left behind” (Aug. ) I read your article on No Child Left Behind with great interest. The same process is projected into adulthood. My required class for a real estate license taught me nothing about real estate activities, like negotiating, but only how to pass the exam. In this respect European systems, which often offer vocational training, have us beaten hands down. Why are programs of this nature not nationally available here? At

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9/30/11 11:08 AM


mag.com Your online source for today’s news, Christian views least they allow the non-academically inclined to be self-sufficient.  

Longs, S.C.

“Not just kids’ stuff” (Aug. ) May Joel Belz have the strength and sense of humor to get through his adventure. I speak as one who, two years ago, took my mother into our home to care for her. She has Alzheimer’s disease and arthritis. Caring for mom has become a family ministry for us and involves some sacrifice, lots of work, and much wondering about how long we can do it. But God has given us what we need for each day.

mag.com mag.com is one of the most popular online sources for news and views from a Christian worldview perspective. Our website offers the latest news, intriguing stories, commentaries, reviews, political cartoons, and much more. Visit mag.com mag.com today and bookmark it, or make it your home page and daily source for hard-hitting, truth-telling reporting. And stay connected by signing up to receive email updates at mag.com/email

 

Lima, Ohio

“Sharpe words” (Aug. ) Shannon Sharpe missed a chance to follow in his grandmother’s footsteps. Our children do not care about our careers, achievements, or what we can buy them; they simply want our time, attention, and genuine affection. His  achievements will soon be forgotten but his lack of attention to his family could impact many generations to come.  

Eastvale, Calif.

Corrections William Bradford, who is buried in the cemetery at Trinity Church in New York (Houses of God, Sept. , p. ), was a printer born in  who arrived in America in . The capital of Nigeria is Abuja (“What is Boko Haram?,” Sept. , p. ). Lane Hardie set up a job-help program at Central Presbyterian Church in St. Louis (“Spirit of St. Louis,” Sept. , p. ).

And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, He explained to them what was said in all the Scriptures concerning Himself. -Luke 24:27

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Ask for your free copy at

www.Isaiah53.com, or call 212-223-2252.

LETTERS AND PHOTOS Email: mailbag@worldmag.com Write:  Mailbag, P.O. Box , Asheville,  - Please include full name and address. Letters may be edited to yield brevity and clarity.

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No turning back In the face of tragedy, a family’s choice to praise God challenges us to do the same

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KRIEG BARRIE

..

S  J W lost six children in a single day when a piece of metal fell off a truck and punctured the gas tank of their minivan. That’s the part of the story that is public, so I am not telling tales out of school. The accident unraveled a corruption scandal of bribes for driver’s licenses funneled into campaign chests, and ultimately sent a governor of Illinois to prison. But this is an essay about meeting the Willises  years later at a Christian conference, and about Psalm , and the triumph of Christendom by that simplest and most elusive of acts—believing God. And it is about the responsibility placed on me by knowing this now. And on you too, if you continue to read. By the ball of fire that consumed their minivan on Interstate , Scott (his face badly burned) said to his wife (her hands badly burned) what she told me are the best words he could have said: “It was very quick. And they’re with the Lord now.” Then, as he was helped to one ambulance and she to another, he called back to her: “Psalm .” Surrounded by emergency responders, Janet kept praying out, “I will bless the Lord at all times; His praise shall continually be in my mouth,” with the accent on “will.” I believe it is the same way Jesus must have cried to His Father, “I will put My trust in Him” (Hebrews :), not from a lotus position, but in torment. Because of the Willises, there is no turning back for me. I can never again countenance childhood trauma as an excuse for present sins. Gone is my ability ever to say that the Lord does not expect us to praise Him at all times. The oft-heard caveat that in certain sufferings it is impossible to praise the Lord—and uncharitable to expect another to do so—is totally and irreversibly undercut by this testimony. Gone forever is my ability to engage in ivory tower discussions on the applicability of certain Scriptures to my life. All speculations over whether the Psalms are merely liturgy or are meant to be obeyed are forthwith canceled. The Willises read the words “I will bless the Lord at all times” and came to the astonishing conclusion that it meant they should bless the Lord at all times. Gone, therefore, is my ability to take Scripture at anything but face value. No turning back. Thanks to the Willises, I can never again entertain as a theoretical possibility the notion that a person

Email: aseu@worldmag.com

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is unable to keep God’s commandments. Janet Willis chose, in an act of volition stripped bare of any warmth of feeling, to trust in her God. Blown out of the water is any attempt to come up with a scenario in which I might be excused for abandoning my faith. The Willises robbed me of that luxury when they underwent a testing at the extremities of human experience, and overcame—as the Son of Man with eyes of flame among the lampstands bids us overcome. Banished are my quid pro quos, the restrictions I put on God’s discipline unawares; the time limits I set Him for pulling rescue out of affliction; the lines I would not let Him cross; the right I reserved to judge His justice. The Willises have placed their stake here: “Though He slay me, yet will I trust Him” (Job :). “Sing, O barren one, who did not bear” (Isaiah :). A command to sing at such a time would be cruel counsel if it were not true that in worship we find deliverance. Praise meets trauma where nothing else can reach. Praise in the face of devastation releases blessings obtainable in no other way. The presence of God is directly related to worship. Because the Willises chose to praise, I can choose. And because the Willises chose to praise, I must choose. They have upped the ante of my life. Meeting them has increased my obligation, as every testimony of God’s deeds increases obligation. I cannot pretend we never made acquaintance. What a privilege to meet someone to whom the Lord has entrusted so much suffering. A OCTOBER 22, 2011

WORLD

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9/28/11 9:42 PM


Marvin Olasky

Battling class envy A long struggle for me, and for America

>>

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WORLD OCTOBER 22, 2011

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shepherd. I shall not want.” In junior high and high school I wanted everything and had no trust that God would provide anything. Since I had always lived in an apartment on one floor, I coveted houses with both an upstairs and a downstairs. We had a black-and-white television. I coveted a color one. In September , I put my two polyester sweaters in a suitcase and headed off to college. My roommate was a New Yorker who had brought his own dresser just to hold all his luxurious woolens. I was mad at him from day one. Later, I learned that Yale gave a prize to the undergraduate who had the best book collection. I spent three years putting together a collection of inexpensive paperbacks that in my view reflected excellent taste. The contest judges came to inspect. They trooped to my room, took a -second look at the paperbacks, and walked out chuckling. The prize committee chairman told me I’d be better off trading the thousand paperbacks for several prime (and expensive) first editions. Yes, I know class hatred. A year after graduation, hatred led me into the Communist Party USA. Envy led me to advocate murderous revolution of the kind that ravaged Russia, China, Cuba, Cambodia, and other countries. Envy leads to class warfare. Class warfare kills. It might kill this country. I’ve written in  (worldmag.com/store) about how God graciously pulled me out of communism. When I became a Christian in , many of my sinful tendencies remained. It’s been a -year struggle to corral them. But one instantly disappeared: class envy. Strange but true. My pre-Christian life did not include a day without envy of the rich. My Christian life has not included a day with it. Would that I could say that about my other sins! But my life has been better without class envy. I’m not saying we should ignore the way our concentration of power in Washington allows some to combine political and economic clout. Nor should we ignore how failing public schools leave many children uneducated: That’s our nation’s prime structural problem. I am saying that the life of this country would improve if we paid less attention to what the rich have, more to the sin in our own lives, and more to the productive ways of helping the poor that  has covered over the past  years. America, America, God shed His grace on thee. A

KRIEG BARRIE

L  I   creating more jobs by not worrying about inequality and putting aside class envy. One reader responded by asking whether I truly understood the debilitating effects of inequality and the anger it can cause. Oh yes, I know. My earliest memories are of my mother’s envy. She had five siblings, all of them married, all living close to each other in Massachusetts, so every other Sunday evening they assembled for bridge games that rotated among the various homes. When it was our turn I got to set out the candy dishes, sneaking more than my share of Brach’s sugared fruit slices, chocolate gold coins, M&M king-size peanuts, and Tootsie rolls. Dressed in my plaid knee-length shorts, my belly pushing against the fabric of a button-up shirt, with dark socks and dark leather shoes finishing the look, I listened to my mother interrogating her sisters about any new clothes they were wearing: “What’s something like that cost?” or “Where did you buy it?” My mother had married a smart man who was poor. Her sisters had married uneducated entrepreneurs who became rich. They lived in “split-level homes”—I wasn’t sure what they were, but they were bigger and better than our snug apartment. They had wall-to-wall carpeting. We had peeling linoleum. My mother’s sisters played mahjong, but at age , once I hit the fourth grade, she went back to work as a secretary, this time in a tannery. The smell was bad but the sense of defeat was worse. Her sisters had the good life. She had dictation. I had a bicycle put together out of scrap metal. I wouldn’t ride it in front of other kids with their Schwinns. I coveted. The rd Psalm famously begins, “The Lord is my

Email: molasky@worldmag.com

9/28/11 3:53 PM


California Baptist University

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krieg barrie

live your purpose | www.calbaptist.edu

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10/4/11 10:29 PM


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9/30/11 11:16 AM


WORLD Magazine October 22, 2010 Vol. 26 No. 21