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Woodstock School Parent and Student Handbook for Academics and Enrichment 2019-20 (Semester 2) Last updated: 23 Jan 2020


Academics and Enrichment Student Handbook 2019-20 (Semester 2)

1 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 2 3

Table of Contents Introduction from the Vice Principal Desired Learning Outcomes and Guiding Principles 3.1 3.2 3.3

4

Desired Learning Outcomes Guiding Principles IB Learner Profile

Academic Programme 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4

4.5 4.6 5

8 8 9 16

Late Work Absences Retakes/Retests Extra Credit Scheduling of Major Assessments

Academic Support Academic Resources

Academic Honesty

21

Music Student Guidelines 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5

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23 24 24 26

Course offering Application & Selection Process Tuition & instrument usage fees Use of school instruments, accessories supplies, storage & facilities Music Students Expectations and Requirements

6.5.1 6.5.2 6.5.3 6.5.4 6.5.5 6.5.6

16 16 17 17 17 18 19

5.1 Academic Honesty Frequently Asked Questions 5.2 Academic Honesty Agreement Form & Pledge 5.2 Academic Honesty Council (AHC) 6

5 6 7 8

Classroom Expectations Attendance Assessment and Grading Academic Practices:

4.4.1 4.4.2 4.4.3 4.4.4 4.4.5

2 4 5

Music Lessons and Practices Ensembles Recitals & Concerts Performance Dress Code Change of Instrument and Secondary Instruments External exams

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7

PASSAGE Enrichment Program 7.1

Eligibility to Participate in PASSAGE Activities

7.1.1 7.1.2 7.1.3 7.2

When are students allowed to miss school for PASSAGE? Notification of Absence Forms Conduct Requirement

35 35 36 36

Hiking & Biking

36

Guidelines for Athletes Student Leadership

38 39

7.4.1 7.4.2 7.4.3 7.4.4 7.4.5 7.4.6 8

34

Outdoor Learning

7.2.1 7.3 7.4

33

Student Council (STUCO) Class Governors and Representatives Dorm Councils Academic Honesty Council National Honor Society Curriculum Advisory

39 40 40 40 40 40

Appendices 8.1 8.2 8.3

Appendix: UY Student Council Constitution (Version 11.18.2019) Appendix: Curriculum Advisory Committee Constitution Appendix: Academic Honesty Policy

8.3.1 8.3.2 8.3.3 8.3.4 8.3.5 8.3.6

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41 41 50 52

Appendix A: Academic Honesty Frequently Asked Questions Appendix B: Case studies of academic honesty in a variety of MYP disciplines Appendix C: Case studies of academic honesty in a variety of DP courses Appendix D: Woodstock School Academic Honesty Agreement Appendix E: IB Declaration Form Appendix F: Academic Honesty Pledge

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2 INTRODUCTION FROM THE VICE PRINCIPAL Dear Parents and Students, The purpose of this handbook is to provide you with the guidelines and policies that define living and studying at Woodstock. Please read the handbook carefully as it will give you a sense of the academic expectations we have of our students and also will serve as a guide to the activities, sports, outdoor education programs and leadership opportunities that abound at the school. A Woodstock education should help our students to take responsibility for their relationship to others and the world in which we live - to discover ways of living together that are creative and harmonious. In order to do this, the school encourages students to consider and respect each other, making worthwhile use of time and energy and living together with compassion and international mindedness so that all feel secure and cared for. We all (students, teachers, staff and parents) need agreements and guidelines that support and maintain a school ethos which nurtures the growth both of individuals and community. Over the years, Woodstock has touched the lives of young people from all corners of the globe and from all walks of life who have come to this place to live and learn together. This hillside is a rich and vibrant environment and we challenge our students to make the most of what Woodstock offers. Students have a unique opportunity to grow into a truly global citizen during your years here. You will have many opportunities to develop your potential and pursue your interests. Through diligence, determination, organization, and hard work we can reach great heights! As the school motto puts it, Palma Non Sine Pulvere - there are no palms without striving.

Mr. Ethan VanDrunen Vice Principal

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3 DESIRED LEARNING OUTCOMES AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES 3.1 DESIRED LEARNING OUTCOMES Students increasingly take initiative in developing the following skills, attitudes, and values: In developing a profound sense of self, we: 1. Act with integrity. a. Persevere, with conviction and courage as sources of motivation. b. Acquire wisdom to make ethical decisions. 2. Possess creativity, curiosity, focus, passion, and a sense of vocation. 3. Remain open, teachable, humble, with an ability to follow when appropriate. 4. Pursue physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being through these practices: a. Celebrate achievement and remain resilient through failure. b. Maintain a reflective lifestyle that includes time for thought, reading or prayer. c. Manage complexity and practise self-discipline. 5. Gain an informed understanding of Christian beliefs and practices as we learn to think independently about our own and others’ faiths. In developing healthy interpersonal relationships, we: 1. Learn collaboratively, working with diverse people in effective teams. 2. Identify with the hopes, dreams, and struggles of people around us. 3. Give and receive effective feedback. 4. Remain flexible and adaptable, able to absorb others’ ideas and able to live with ambiguity. 5. Bring out the best in others by leading with our own positive example. In equipping ourselves to survive and thrive in the 21st century, we: 1. Create intellectual capital through lifelong exploratory learning in all areas of human endeavour. 2. Think critically, actively applying our knowledge and analysing patterns to find solutions. 3. Practice and master methods of scientific inquiry and research. 4. Communicate effectively to construct and support sophisticated arguments orally, in writing, and using creative forms of expression. 5. Utilize technological resources responsibly and with ease.

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In developing as citizens, we: 1. Maintain a sense of personal responsibility for our neighbours’ welfare. 2. Explore and appreciate regional and global cultures, languages, religions, and histories. 3. Remain comfortable in multiple environments because of our cross-cultural competency. 4. Possess and act on a strong sense of social justice and empathy with those less and more privileged than ourselves. 5. Understand and seek to preserve our natural environment as good stewards of the earth for future generations.

3.2 GUIDING PRINCIPLES Drawn from the foundational documents which articulate our school’s identity, ethos, and direction, these statements summarize the values that guide us, shaping the policies, practices and daily decisions for all members of our community. The Guiding Principles form the yardstick against which we measure the integrity of our personal and collectives lives. Above all else, in line with our defining identity, we seek a way of living and working together which is in congruence with the teachings of Jesus and other great teachers. • • • • •

We pursue wholeness We seek well-being We elicit greatness We value compassion We tread lightly on the earth

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3.3 IB LEARNER PROFILE Inquirers

We nurture our curiosity, developing skills for inquiry and research. We know how to learn independently and with others. We learn with enthusiasm and sustain our love of learning throughout life.

Knowledgeable

We develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring knowledge across a range of disciplines. We engage with issues and ideas that have local and global significance.

Thinkers

We use critical and creative thinking skills to analyse and take responsible action on complex problems. We exercise initiative in making reasoned, ethical decisions.

Communicators

We express ourselves confi-dently and creatively in more than one language and in many ways. We collaborate effectively, listening carefully to the perspectives of other individuals and groups.

Principled

We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of people everywhere. We take responsibility for our actions and their consequences.

Open-Minded

We critically appreciate our own cultures and personal histories, as well as the values and traditions of others. We seek and evaluate a range of points of view, and we are willing to grow from the experience.

Caring

We show empathy, compassion and respect. We have a commitment to service, and we act to make a positive difference in the lives of others and in the world around us.

Risk-Takers

Balanced

Reflective

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We approach uncertainty with forethought and determination; we work independently and cooperatively to explore new ideas and innovative strategies. We are resourceful and resilient in the face of challenges and change. We understand the importance of balancing different aspects of our lives—intellectual, physical, and emotional—to achieve well-being for ourselves and others. We recognize our interdependence with other people and with the world in which we live. We thoughtfully consider the world and our own ideas and experience. We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development.

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4 ACADEMIC PROGRAMME For Academic questions or concerns, contact the Vice Principal or the Academic Coordinator.

4.1 CLASSROOM EXPECTATIONS Being prepared for class means coming with relevant books, materials, writing utensils, charged devices and chargers. It includes bringing assigned work complete and ready to share. Teachers set classroom expectations for device use: when, where, and how. Principled and caring teachers and students show respect for their environment by • Cleaning up after themselves • Pushing in chairs • Switching off electronic equipment at end of class • Keeping food, gum and drink (except water in water bottles) out of classrooms Principled and caring teachers and students show respect for themselves and others by • Being prepared and on time • Showing active listening in class and group discussions • Using respectful language, tone and volume with each other • Following instructions and using laptops responsibly • Observing the dress code while at school

4.2 ATTENDANCE Principled and caring teachers and students arrive in enough time to be seated and ready to start a class, meeting or event on time according to standard internet time of the teacher/advisor. This demonstrates respect for others who have prepared the meeting and have come on time. When late entry is unavoidable, enter quietly and calmly with as little disruption as possible. For Facetime, advisors mark late entries. For classes, the Office adjusts attendance and late students must present themselves first to the Office, bringing a teacher’s or Health Center note if they have one. Arrival to a class, Facetime or special event after 5 minutes becomes an absence. The expectation for assemblies and homerooms is that students are seated in their row by the starting time to be considered present. Arrivals within the first 5 minutes are tardy. If a student thinks the tardy/absence is in error, it is the student’s responsibility to request attendance corrections from the teacher who took attendance originally. To be cleared, these

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must be received by the Office from the teacher by the end of the second available school day following the tardy/absence. Medical reasons may only be excused by the Health Center, and in the event of a summative, by the Resident Medical Officer. Students who need to visit the Health Center/School Clinic during class/Facetime must check in with the Office at school showing their slip before reporting to class/Facetime. Students who appear at the Health Center after 8:10am (8:40am Wednesdays) will be considered late/absent for school per time of arrival unless an emergency is verified by the Resident Medical Officer. Following a before-school Health Center visit, students have 20 minutes to check in with the Quad or UY Office and proceed directly to Facetime/class, after which tardies and absences will be recorded. Per semester, for attendance purposes, 1 unexcused absence or 3 tardies = 1 attendance offense. If an attendance offense remains unexcused by the end of the next 2 school days, notification will be sent to the student, parent, advisor, primary dorm parent and Dean of Students. After 3 attendance offenses are reached, another notification will be sent in warning. The 4th offense triggers a disciplinary panel hearing with conduct consequences and is considered a serious and concerning pattern of behavior.

4.3 ASSESSMENT AND GRADING Early Years: Students in the Early Years (Grades ECP through Grade 5) receive regular feedback and a standards-referenced progress report at the end of each term. Middle and Upper Years: Grades are to be entered in a reasonable timeframe to provide formative feedback to students and parents in advance of major assignment/summative task deadlines, and entered in gradebooks within two weeks for major (summative) assessments. Preliminary exams are purely for formative feedback and have no point or summative value. Formative Assessment excerpt from the Woodstock Policy on Assessment: This type of assessment is characterized by continuous and constant monitoring of a student’s readiness, skill, development and concept understanding by the teacher to inform his/her teaching and planning over a continual basis. Formative assessment is drawn from a range of assessment activities, including the use of assessment descriptors, self-evaluation, peer assessment and developmental portfolios. Homework procedures form part of the formative practices within Woodstock School. Homework is seen as a meaningful vehicle for developing

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wider approaches to learning (ATL) skills and as such should take the form of research, information finding and wider thinking problems.

Summative Assessment excerpt from the Woodstock Policy on Assessment: This type of assessment is the evidence of knowledge, concepts, skills and attitudes learnt during a particular unit of study. Summative tasks allow students to demonstrate their understandings and apply their knowledge in various ways. Summative assessments may be used to help student performance in a formative manner as well as to inform teachers in developing further teaching and learning opportunities. Summative assessments can also function as a culminating evaluation of student achievement, such as on an external exam. MYP Grades 6-10: There is no weighting, percentages or total points. Students in Grades 6 through 10 are graded according to the International Baccalaureate’s MYP Subject Assessment Criteria. MYP assessment at Woodstock School is criterion-related as it is based upon pre-determined achievement criteria that all students have access to. The criteria for each subject reflect the objectives of the subject group. The level of student success in reaching the objectives of each subject group is measured in terms of levels of achievement described in each assessment criterion. From this an achievement level is awarded ranging from 0-8 with 8 indicating the highest level of achievement. These criteria and achievement levels are the same for all students undertaking the MYP in schools around the world. To learn more about the specific criteria for each subject area, visit the school’s website and select the relevant grade or phase and click on the links to view the achievement level descriptors for each criterion. Formative assessments are held before each summative, scored per the teacher’s preference. The formative assessment scores are used to inform teachers of a ‘best fit’ approach when determining a level of achievement for a summative task. Summative assessment scores are based on IB MYP criterion-related rubrics. Semester grades: For each semester, each objective strand and each criterion will be assessed at least twice. (See Table 1.) The teacher then determines the overall criterion scores for A, B, C and D. The teacher totals the overall criteria scores and matches them to a grade boundary which determines a 1-7 semester achievement grade. (See Table 2.)

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Table 1: Semester Example of MYP Summative Tasks Summative Tasks

Criterion A

1st summative

5

2nd summative

Criterion B

6

4th summative Overall Criterion Scores:

6

Criterion D

7 5

3rd summative

Criterion C

7

5

8

6

8

5

7

8

Overall Semester Grade: 6 + 5 + 7 + 8 = 26 (With IB Boundary guidelines, 27 converts to a Final Semester IB MYP Grade of 6)

Table 2: Grades, Grade Boundaries and Descriptors Grades

1

2

3

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Boundary Guidelines

Descriptors

1-5

Produces work of very limited quality. Conveys many significant misunderstandings or lacks understanding of most concepts and contexts. Very rarely demonstrates critical or creative thinking. Very inflexible, rarely using knowledge or skills.

6-9

Produces work of limited quality. Expresses misunderstandings or significant gaps in understanding for many concepts and contexts. Infrequently demonstrates critical or creative thinking. Generally inflexible in the use of knowledge and skills, infrequently applying knowledge and skills.

10-14

Produces work of an acceptable quality. Communicates basic understanding of many concepts and contexts, with occasionally significant misunderstandings or gaps. Begins to demonstrate some basic critical and creative thinking. Is often inflexible in the use of knowledge and skills, requiring support even in familiar classroom situations.

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Grades

4

5

6

7

Boundary Guidelines

Descriptors

15-18

Produces good-quality work. Communicates basic understanding of most concepts and contexts with few misunderstandings and minor gaps. Often demonstrates basic critical and creative thinking. Uses knowledge and skills with some flexibility in familiar classroom situations, but requires support in unfamiliar situations.

19-23

Produces generally high-quality work. Communicates secure understanding of concepts and contexts. Demonstrates critical and creative thinking, sometimes with sophistication. Uses knowledge and skills in familiar classroom and real-world situations and, with support, some unfamiliar real-world situations.

24-27

Produces high-quality, occasionally innovative work. Communicates extensive understanding of concepts and contexts. Demonstrates critical and creative thinking, frequently with sophistication. Uses knowledge and skills in familiar and unfamiliar classroom and realworld situations, often with independence.

28-32

Produces high-quality, frequently innovative work. Communicates comprehensive, nuanced understanding of concepts and contexts. Consistently demonstrates sophisticated critical and creative thinking. Frequently transfers knowledge and skills with independence and expertise in a variety of complex classroom and real-world situations.

DP Grade 11: There is no weighting, percentages or total points. A minimum of two formative assessments are to be held and feedback returned before each summative task is due. Formatives are scored 1-7 according to task specific rubrics and may be criterion-related or points-based. The grade entered is for formative purposes and carries 0% weight toward the final semester grade. DP class summatives are designed to IB external exam objectives and assess both content and skills. There are a minimum of 3 summatives per semester, which address every assessment objective at least once per semester. Individual summatives may cover more than 1 objective. (See Table 3.)

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Summatives are scored according to subject rubrics using IBDP subject-specific grade descriptors. These are adjusted to the task to enable possible high achievement in early units. Table 3: Example of DP Summative Assessments Summative Assessments Objective 1 Objective 2 Objective 3 Objective 4 1st summative

X

2nd summative 3rd summative

X X

X

4th summative

X X

X

The final semester grade is determined by ‘best fit’ taking into account performance on objectives across three or more summative tasks per semester. Year-end Summatives (DP1) A year-end summative is to be given in each DP1 course in class time that covers the key concepts and big ideas of the course delivered over the span of DP1. This may take many forms, including a traditional test, project, portfolio, visual organizer, written or artistic work, presentation or a series of corrected tasks. Effort & Behaviour Grades: Effort grades are marked regularly for students in Grades 6-11 according to the following rubric: Descriptor

Outcomes for Effort

Excellent

The student demonstrates excellent effort by producing thoughtful and accurate work, insightfully participating in class, and meeting all deadlines over the brief marking period.

Good

Adequate

Limited

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The student demonstrates good effort by producing accurate work, meaningfully participating in class and meeting most deadlines over the brief marking period. The student demonstrates adequate effort by producing completed work, regularly participating in class, and meeting most deadlines over the brief marking period. The student demonstrates little effort by producing poor or incomplete work, rarely participating in class, and not meeting deadlines over a brief marking period.

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Behaviour grades are marked regularly in grades 6 - 10 according to the following rubric: Descriptor Outcomes The student demonstrates consistent respectful behavior towards other students, the teacher and/or things that belong to others Excellent over the brief marking period. The student demonstrates mostly respectful behavior towards Good other students, the teacher and/or things that belong to others over the brief marking period. The student demonstrates some respectful behavior towards Satisfactory other students, the teacher and/or things that belong to others over the brief marking period The student demonstrates limited respectful behavior towards other students, the teacher and/or things that belong to others Poor over the brief marking period. Grade 12 and Pass/Fail courses do not receive Effort or Behaviour grades. Pass/Fail (P/F) Courses: Examples: Activity Week, PSHE, Personal Project, IDP, TOK Pass/Fail courses may follow project-specific rubrics and/or a checklist of required tasks to achieve a grade of Pass. These must be shared at the start of the course. Pass with Distinction (PWD) when offered must be based on a rubric with predetermined criteria for earning PWD. Refer to the Pass/Fail Course Policy for when a student does not achieve Pass grade. Grade 12: For the Class of 2020, total points grading continues for assigned work. A variety of types of assessment are to be evident per semester: papers, projects, presentations, debates, tests, quizzes, posters, oral, etc. No one assessment may count for more than 20% of a semester grade. An assessment plan with anticipated points available showing breakdown by assessment type is to be shared on a syllabus for each course at the start of each semester. Students are graded according to Woodstock’s percentage scale as follows and awarded letter grades:

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Excellence

Proficiency

Competency

Partial Competence

Not Meeting Expectation

A+

87 – 100

A

82– 86

A-

80 – 81

B+

77 – 79

B

72 – 76

B-

70 – 71

C+

67 – 69

C

62 – 66

C-

60 – 61

D+

57 – 59

D

52 – 56

D-

50 – 51

F

0 – 49

Honor Roll: MY: Honor roll is based on the semester report IB Final Grade, Effort, and Behavior. 1. EMD – none (Principled) 2. Effort – Excellent or Good 3. Behaviour – Excellent or Good (Principled & Caring)

4. No Final Grade less than 5 for a semester in all subjects (Knowledgeable, Reflectors & Thinkers) Grade 9-11 students who have no semester grade lower than a 5 are eligible for Honor Roll. Grade 12 students who attain a trimester Grade Point Average (GPA) of 3.45 or above are recognised on the “A” Honor Roll. Students with a trimester GPA of 3.00 to 3.44 are recognized on the “B” Honor Roll.

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4.4 ACADEMIC PRACTICES: 4.4.1 LATE WORK MYP & DP Formative Assessments – Formative work is marked late with a note in the gradebook. If a student misses a formative deadline they will be assigned consequences such as demerits, notification to parents, lower Effort grades, or assigned supervised zero period, lunchtime, after school, and evening study halls, or other natural consequences which will support the student in their learning. These consequences are determined by the teacher. Repeated incidents of late formative work may result in further consequences such as dorm gating or loss of privileges (with approval from the Dean of Student Life). MYP & DP Summative Assessments - Summative tasks are due on hard deadline dates communicated with students in advance. Students must turn in whatever work they have completed on that date and will be scored on the work submitted then. If the work does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors in a rubric by the deadline date it will receive a 0. It is to students’ advantage to turn in partial work rather than no work on the day it is due. There are no extensions to summative deadlines. Externally Moderated Assessments - If students miss internal deadlines for externally moderated assessments/exams they jeopardize their qualification and will not receive feedback. Grade 12 Assignments - For late work, the grade reduces by 10% each day that it is late. Pass/Fail Courses - Late work may affect the ability to Pass the course and jeopardize an external qualification. 4.4.2 ABSENCES Excused Absences It is the student’s responsibility to find out missed work and to have teachers fill the Notification of Excused Absence form in advance. Requests for extensions must be made in advance of deadlines, otherwise the work remains due on the regular deadline. Only students with excused absences may retake missed in-class summatives/major assignments. It is the student’s responsibility to schedule a retake in advance of an absence (exception: medical emergencies verified by the school doctor) and complete it within the first two weeks back to school, or it will be entered as a 0 in the gradebook.

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Unexcused Absences Students who have an unexcused absence on the day of a summative, major test or assessment deadline receive a 0. There is no opportunity for makeup. 4.4.3 RETAKES/RETESTS Grades 6-11 - No summative retakes or retests of the same assessment are permitted for grade adjustment. Students who perform poorly or well below their expectations are invited to seek help from their teacher in revision sessions or during teachers’ available office hours. If a student later demonstrates mastery of a weak area, it may be reflected in the final semester grade. Grade 12s - Teachers follow department policies on retakes, revisions and corrections as listed on the course syllabus. These opportunities, when permitted by department policy, must be offered equally to all students in the class. 4.4.4 EXTRA CREDIT Grades 6-11 - The achievement grade is meant to be an accurate reflection of the student’s ability to perform on the summative task on the date the task is due. Students do not receive points for work so there is no extra credit available. Grade 12 - There are no extra credit/bonus points available. The assessment plan laid out in the syllabus at the start of term indicates the available opportunities for students to improve their grade through other types of work. Only new assignments required of all students (points not out of 0) may be added. 4.4.5 SCHEDULING OF MAJOR ASSESSMENTS Major assignments (summatives) must be scheduled and posted as a task in Managebac at least three weeks in advance to assist students’ time management. No more than two major assessments are to be scheduled per day for a single grade and no more than four in a week for students of the same grade. Once set, it is in appropriate for students to pressure teachers to move a summative date. A teacher may choose to move a scheduled assessment date according to professional judgment of the class preparedness, and subject to dates available. Students who notice a scheduled major assessment exceeding the limit of two per day must bring this to the attention of the DP/MYP Coordinator five school days in advance, at which time the last-scheduled summative will be required to shift.

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4.5 ACADEMIC SUPPORT The aim is for all students to be successful and thrive. In cases where that is not happening, a teacher or staff member may refer a student for identification of learning needs. The Academic Support Team consists of: the Vice Principal, Academic/DP/MYP Coordinators, Head of Special Educational Needs, the Head of EY/MY/UY, Dean of Student Life, PASSAGE Coordinator and the Personal Counsellors. It may also include the advisor, homeroom head and primary dorm parent. There are three levels of standard academic support for students: Level 1 – Monitoring, Level 2 – Intervention, Level 3 – Student of Academic Concern. Level 1 Academic Support. Monitoring For students whose needs may be met in the classroom through differentiation. Students who have successfully moved off Intervention are often at the Monitoring level. These students' names may be brought up during Academic Support meetings, but just as a check-In. The decision to place a student on or off Monitoring is made by the Academic Support Team and can be made at any time. An email will be sent to the parents/guardians informing them that the student has successfully moved off Monitoring. Level 2 Academic Support Intervention For students exhibiting signs of academic difficulty. Such signs may include low academic performance that is unusual, consistently low achievement or effort grades during a trimester, recommendations from two or more teachers, etc. The decision to place a student on Academic Support Intervention is made by the Academic Support Team and can be made at any time. Interventions may include: required evening study halls, weekly check-in by advisor, teacher team meetings, etc. The amount of time a student remains on Intervention is not fixed. The decision to move a student off Intervention and into Monitoring is made by the Academic Support Team and can be made at any time. Formal letters are used to communicate all significant stages of discussion. A student with persistent difficulties may be referred to the SEN and/or Counselling departments for assessment and support. This may include the involvement of external services. Parents’ permission will be sought for assessments. A formal Action Plan will be put in place by SEN following a team meeting, including staff, parents where possible and the student if applicable. All relevant parties will be informed of the Action Plan.

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Level 3 Academic Support. Student of Academic Concern Level 3 applies when it has been recognized that a student has persistent academic difficulties which have not been alleviated by the interventions at Level 1 and 2. Discussions with parents will include plans for continued, or new, interventions and changes in courses. In some cases, the appropriateness of keeping their child at Woodstock may be initiated. Limitations for school provision of services like courses, expertise and resources to meet student needs may also be considered and acknowledged to parents. Formal letters will be used to communicate all significant stages of discussion Timeline For a student who remains a Student of Concern for two grading periods or more, a timeline may be made in consultation with parents, teachers, advisors and/or administrators with specific goals and deadlines. The purpose of this timeline is to provide a clear structure for deciding whether a student is failing to thrive at Woodstock and that the best support for the student would be to find a place where they will thrive and be successful. If these goals and deadlines are not met, then the conclusion is that the student is best served by finding a better place and their place at Woodstock will not be held. A letter will be sent to parents/guardians containing all the details of the timeline. The decision to place a student on a timeline is made by the Academic Support Team and it can be made at any time. Free Periods When UY students do not have a class or music practice, they are assigned a free period. Rules for free period behaviour and routines are posted on the student website. Students on Academic Support are required to report to the library to study; other students have a list of approved locations they may be during free periods. Free periods may be used for independent study, visiting the library or CFI, meeting teachers and counsellors, personal time, internships, or fitness per the gym schedule. Attendance is required at school level during scheduled free periods, unless offered as a written senior privilege from the Dean of Student Life.

4.6 ACADEMIC RESOURCES Vera Marley Library and Quad Library • Library resources can be searched on the school website using the Destiny Library icon. • Woodstock libraries are open from Monday to Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. • Students are welcome to sign up in the UY Office by the end of lunch same day for Evening Study Hall on Tuesday and Thursday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

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• • •

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Resources including print/audio/video/periodicals may be borrowed for a period of 2 weeks with an exception of current periodicals for over-night. All resources are renewable. An automatic reminder goes to students’ email and late return attracts fine. Loss or damage of resources is chargeable as decided by the Library head depending on the availability and importance of the resource from parent account of the student. Students are given a chance and time to replace the same. “Course Reserve” resources may be accessed during school hours and may be borrowed after 4:00 p.m. for overnight. The library subscribes to research online databases which can be accessed from the Library web page. Students are welcome to undertake a usage tutorial from library staff on request. The library has a holding of 30 Chrome Books which may be borrowed by filling an online form with approval from ICT. Woodstock School Library facilitates learners to use and enjoy technology tools like laptops, printers and scanner. Students are welcome to bring their own devices but are expected to use them for academic purpose. Students are expected to respect the space and privacy of other learners around. Listening to music or watching movies must be done with earphones or headset. School bags must be left in the cubby holes provided at the entrance. Food/drinks/snacks are not to be brought to the library premises. Students are expected to maintain study environment by not talking loudly or disturbing other students and respecting the noise zones indicated in the library. Group study/discussion area may be used for academic purpose only. Any damage to library furniture/fixtures/facilities/resources/technology are chargeable.

Residence Library Collections • The residences also have small collections of reference materials for use during evening study halls, as well as limited libraries of entertainment videos.

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5 ACADEMIC HONESTY Academic honesty and integrity are integral to Woodstock School’s Guiding Principles of pursuing wholeness, seeking well-being, eliciting greatness and valuing compassion. Woodstock School’s Desired Learning Outcomes (DLO’s), along with the International Baccalaureate (IB) Learner Profile, demand careful attention to academic honesty by all members of the community. What is academic honesty at Woodstock School? Woodstock School students have the benefit of being in a safe learning environment. As students grow and make mistakes, every effort should be made to turn mistakes into learning opportunities. Each community member is responsible for a unique role in the process. Students, at Woodstock School are encouraged to inquire, take action and critically reflect on what they learn and how it affects their attitudes and behaviour. They should be able to make their thoughts and their learning explicit, show how they have developed their ideas and demonstrate the views they have followed or rejected, i.e. make their knowledge, understanding and thinking transparent. What is academic misconduct at Woodstock School? Academic misconduct is a behaviour that results in, or may result in, the student or any other student gaining an unfair advantage (or a behaviour that disadvantages other students) in one or more assessment components. Review the Academic Honesty Policy appendix for further information, procedures and consequences. Key Definitions under categories of “academic misconduct” in Woodstock School: ● Intellectual property: Products of the mind, including ideas, opinions, judgements, hypotheses, artistic creations, and more. They are owned by the creator. ● Plagiarism: The use of another person’s intellectual property without proper, clear and explicit acknowledgment. The use of translated materials, unless indicated and acknowledged, is also considered plagiarism. ● Collusion: Supporting academic malpractice by another student, for example allowing one’s work to be copied or submitted for assessment by another. ● Misconduct: Any behaviour that gains an unfair advantage for a candidate or that affects the results of another. For example, taking unauthorized materials into the room during an IB examination, disruptive behaviour and communicating with others during the examination.

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● Communication about the content of an examination 24 hours before or after the examination with others outside their school community is also considered a breach of IB regulations. ● Duplication: Presentation of the same work for different assessment components and/or Diploma Programme requirements. ● Unethical behaviour such as the inclusion of inappropriate material in any assessment materials or the breach of ethical guidelines when conducting research ● Any other behaviour that gains an unfair advantage for a candidate or that affects the results of another candidate (for example, falsifying a CAS record, disclosure of information to and receipt of information from candidates about the content of an examination paper within 24 hours after a written examination via any form of communication/media). Student It is the responsibility of the student to: ● Be aware of the School’s expectations for academic honesty; ● Complete and confirm their acceptance of the Academic Honesty Agreement ● Ensure that all work submitted for assessment is authentic, with the work or ideas of others fully and correctly acknowledged; ● Comply with all internal school/ academic calendar deadlines; ● Sign a cover sheet for each externally assessed component and all internally assessed components to confirm that his or her work is authentic and that the work being submitted for assessment, constitutes the final version of their work; Parent or Legal Guardians Parents can be of help as well in supporting academic honesty. They can: ● Complete and confirm their acceptance of the Academic Honesty Agreement. ● Encourage students to ask their teachers for advice if they are having difficulties with their work; encourage them to take responsibility in planning and completing their assignments. ● Establish communication with the school so that they understand the requirements of the Middle Years Programme and Diploma Programme and the expectations from the students. ● Support their child but make sure that he/she is the one responsible for the work done.

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Academic Honesty Policy The Academic Honesty Policy including types of academic misconduct, procedures and possible consequences is included as an appendix. All students and parents are advised to review the full Academic Honesty Policy.

5.1 ACADEMIC HONESTY FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS 1. What style guide does Woodstock School use? Woodstock School uses Modern Language Association (MLA) for citations and referencing. 2. Why cite? Proper citation is a key element in academic scholarship and intellectual exchange. When we cite we: ● show respect for the work of others ● help a reader to distinguish our work from the work of others who have contributed to our work ● give the reader the opportunity to check the validity of our use of other people’s work ● give the reader the opportunity to follow up our references ● show and receive proper credit for our research process ● demonstrate that we are able to use reliable sources and critically assess them to support our work ● establish the credibility and authority of our knowledge and ideas ● demonstrate that we are able to draw our own conclusions 3. What should we cite? As creators/authors, we are expected to acknowledge any materials or ideas that are not ours and that have been used in any way, such as quotation, paraphrase or summary. The term “materials” means written, oral or electronic products, and may include the following. ● Text ● Visuals ● Audio ● Graphics ● Artistic images ● Lectures ● Interviews ● Conversations ● Letters ● Broadcasts ● Maps

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4. What is the difference between collusion and collaboration? Defining the difference between collaboration (which is allowed) and collusion (which is not allowed) can sometimes be difficult: what is acceptable in some circumstances may not be acceptable in others. The definitions and examples below serve as guidelines. ● Collaboration is when two or more students work together in ways acceptable to the teacher setting the assignment. Much classwork is collaborative. Collaboration may sometimes be acceptable outside the classroom. ● Collusion is when two or more students work together in ways which are not acceptable to the teacher setting the assignment. Collusion is cheating and everyone involved may be liable to punishment. This includes cases where one student allows his work to be copied by another student: both students are colluding and both will be punished. ● One good rule of thumb: Is the student learning something? ▪ If someone else is doing the work, the answer is NO. This is collusion and is not acceptable. ▪ If the student, all students, are working together, then they may all be learning together. This may be seen as collaboration. Collaboration is allowed – except when the teacher has said that the work must be done by the student, working alone and without help.

5.2 ACADEMIC HONESTY AGREEMENT FORM & PLEDGE Students sign the Academic Honesty Agreement annually (see appendix). Additionally, students may be expected to write in full and sign the following Academic Honesty Pledge on academic assignments, examinations, research papers, and laboratory reports: On my honour, I pledge that I will neither give nor receive improper assistance in completing this task.

5.2 ACADEMIC HONESTY COUNCIL (AHC) Woodstock School provides students with support through its peer Academic Honesty Council, which operates in the presence of faculty advisors. The role of the Academic Honesty Council is to prevent academic honesty infractions through education and to provide restorative measures after an infraction takes place. The Acadmic Honesty Council will:

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• • • •

Mentor students in Woodstock School’s expectations for Academic Honesty; Hold councils to help students process their actions and determine, if necessary, appropriate, restorative consequences; Provide all new/continuing staff with regular reminders of their responsibility both to promote academic honesty and to prevent/detect malpractice; and Provide general support to staff/students with questions about academic honesty and mentorship to those who are struggling to meet the school’s expectations.

Refer to the Academic Honesty Policy appendix for more information.

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6 MUSIC STUDENT GUIDELINES 6.1 COURSE OFFERING The Woodstock School music programme includes instrumental instruction in choral, orchestral and band as well as Indian music, piano and classical guitar. The Indian music programme includes tabla, sitar, santoor, Indian classical guitar and Hindustani vocal instruction. Primary Years (Grades K – 5) Classroom Music – Grades K to 5 (mandatory) Indian Music – tabla for grades 4 to 5; santoor for Grade 5 Piano for Grades 3 – 5 Beginner Instruction in Keyboard Lab (Levels 1 & 2) Beginning Strings & Junior Strings for grades 2 – 5 – violin, viola & cello Middle & Upper Years (Grades 6 – 12) Classroom Music Courses Grades 6 – 8 required to participate in one ensemble: choir, orchestra, band or piano lab Grade 12 - AP Music Theory elective Choirs Intermediate Choir for Grades 6 – 8 Advanced Choir for Grades 9 – 12 – Voice for grades 8 – 12 Orchestra Programme Beginning Strings for Grades 6 – 10 (Levels 1 & 2) – violin, viola, cello and double bass Junior Strings for Grades 6 – 12 Intermediate Strings for Grades 6 – 12 Advanced Orchestra for Grades 9 – 12 Band Programme Beginning Band for grades 6 – 10: Woodwind, Brass & Percussion instruments Junior Band for grades 6 – 12: Woodwind, Brass & Percussion instruments Advanced Band for grades 9 – 12 Indian Music, Piano & Classical Guitar Studio Lessons Indian Music – sitar, tabla, santoor, voice & Indian classical guitar Piano for grades 6 – 12 beginner instruction in Keyboard Lab (Levels 1 & 2) Classical Guitar for grades 6 – 12

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6.2 APPLICATION & SELECTION PROCESS Students wishing to apply for instrumental instruction are required to fill an application/ audition form at the start of the academic year. An audition will be held for all students, both for beginners and for students who have had prior learning in any particular instrument. Students are selected depending on the following factors: • The audition outcome will determine appropriate placement of the student in ensemble level and recommended instrument • Space available in the student schedule to fulfil requirements • Space available in the respective teacher’s schedule • Priority may be given to students with prior learning in the particular instrument • Availability of the instrument of student choice • Balance of instrument distribution in the overall music programme Students who have not been selected due to particular reasons may be placed on the waiting list. This list will be considered at the beginning of each semester depending on the above factors.

6.3 TUITION & INSTRUMENT USAGE FEES There is an additional charge per semester for music tuition, according to the amount prescribed by the school. Charges may vary depending on whether it is an individual, duo or larger group instruction. Students using school instruments will also be charged for instrument usage. Students in ensembles only without music lessons will not be charged, though they will be charged for instrument usage in case of the use of a school instrument.

6.4 USE OF SCHOOL INSTRUMENTS, ACCESSORIES SUPPLIES, STORAGE & FACILITIES Students who do not possess their own instruments may be issued one from the department inventory and will be charged for instrument usage each semester. The student is required to fill a form for the issue of instruments and is responsible for the maintenance and upkeep of the instrument for the duration of the period during which it is used. All accessories supplied to the student will be charged to his/her account each semester. In case of damage to or loss of the instrument the student will have to bear the cost of either the repair or replacement. All orchestral and band instruments, school’s or private, must be stored in the instrument storage room with the exception of the larger percussion instruments. Guitars must be stored in the Diana Biswas Music Suite storeroom.

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Indian musical instruments are stored in the Indian Music Studio. Instruments are not to be left in the lobby, practice rooms or any other classrooms. Since it is impossible to monitor the storage rooms at all times and since these rooms are accessible to all music students, the school cannot take responsibility for the loss of instruments. Students are personally responsible for their instruments, whether school’s or owned. Students are not allowed to use instruments not assigned to them by the teacher. Breach of these guidelines could result in a academic honesty council reference. School instruments and facilities are reserved exclusively for the academic curricular programme. Instruments and facilities are not to be used for non-academic purposes. However, use of instruments and facilities may be considered for formal school events with stipulations allowing only authorized music students access to the required equipment. In these cases, prior permission must be obtained from the Head of the Music Department.

6.5 MUSIC STUDENTS EXPECTATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS 6.5.1 MUSIC LESSONS AND PRACTICES a) All music students are required to have the stipulated number of periods each cycle in order to earn credit for music courses. Ensembles are scheduled for three periods in a week. Students with lessons are required to have a minimum of three periods for music in a week to earn academic credit. There may be additional rehearsals in preparation for concert performances. Attendance at dress rehearsals before a formal performance is required of music students. b) Punctuality: Students are required to be on time for all classes and practices. Students are expected to be at the respective location ready to begin rehearsal at the start time of the class. This means, the student must have taken out his/her instrument from the case and have the music folder ready at the start time of the class. A student coming in after the second bell will be considered late for class and will be marked tardy. Repeated tardies will affect the Effort Grade and carry school attendance consequences. Students in ensembles are not allowed to miss a class or rehearsal for any reason except due to illness or school excused absences requiring the student to miss the class. Ensembles are group performance activities with a high-level of accountability required of members. Each student is accountable to the other members of the ensemble besides the Director. Unexcused absences will be dealt with seriously with consequences.

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Students may not ask to be excused from a rehearsal for reasons such as attending meetings, preparing for other events or for using the time to catch up on assignments or a make-up test. Unexcused absences are eligible for an EMD. A student having less than eighty percent attendance may not be allowed to participate in formal performances of the respective ensemble but will have an opportunity to demonstrate their level of achievement through an individual performance. c) Students are not allowed to use music periods for any other purposes such as taking a make-up test or catching up on assignments other than that in music. Students are assigned to practice rooms by the supervisor. If a student is found abusing the practice period time or facilities there may be conduct consequences. Repeated offences may result in removal from the music programme at the end of academic year. 6.5.2 ENSEMBLES a) Students receiving lessons in voice, orchestral and band instruments are required to participate in appropriate level ensembles. A student may be allowed to be in an ensemble only without lessons at the discretion of the ensemble director. Students will not be eligible to receive lessons if they cannot participate in an ensemble. b) Students may be placed in an appropriate level of ensemble depending on the technical and musical proficiency required for the ensemble level. Students may be auditioned by the respective ensemble Director in order to determine placement. c) Band students may be assigned to perform in the orchestras, depending on the instrumentation of the selected repertoire. A band student participating in orchestra throughout a semester by attending all classes is eligible to gain credit for the course. A band student who is involved only partially in the orchestra programme will not gain credit for the course though he/she will receive a participation comment in his/her transcript for the semester.

6.5.3 RECITALS & CONCERTS a) Students are provided many opportunities to perform at formal and informal recitals each school year. Performing students must rehearse with an accompanist where relevant and be present for all required rehearsals. Only excused absences will be accepted for missing rehearsals and performances.

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b) Auditions are scheduled on the school calendar for formal recitals such as the advanced student recital in the Fall and the senior recital in the Spring. Students wishing to audition for these performances are expected to note the dates at the start of the school year in order to prepare for and attend the auditions. Students who are not present in person for the auditions will be disqualified. c) All music students are required to attend two nights of music events in a semester that consists of the advanced student recital, the Indian music concert and ensemble performances. (Amended from the previous guidelines) d) The music department may schedule other concerts or recitals not on the school calendar either featuring internal soloist(s)/groups or visiting artistes/groups. Decisions about required attendance by specific groups will be made in conjunction with the Heads of School. e) Concert performances are treated as summative tasks. Ensemble members missing classes the week leading up to a concert performance will have their Effort Grades affected as well as attendance consequences. Students who miss a performance for unexcused absences may not make it up. Students who miss a performance due to an unavoidable excused absence will have an opportunity to demonstrate their level of achievement through an individual performance.

6.5.4 PERFORMANCE DRESS CODE Students are required to adhere to the stipulated dress code for all formal performances. Clothes must be comfortable and conducive for performing on respective instruments. Tight fitting clothing such as tight tops/jackets and short skirts or high heels are inappropriate performance attire. • Formal Concert Ensemble Dress Code: White top/shirt, black trousers/long skirts, ties, black formal shoes and black socks are regulation concert attire. • Advanced Student Recital and Senior Recital: Formal clothes are a requirement for these performances, whether it is the regulation concert clothing or any other acceptable formal attire conducive for performing. • Indian Music Concerts and Formal Performances: Students performing at these events are required to be dressed in formal Indian clothing. Students are required to remove footwear before performing.

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•

•

Other formal events: These events include performances at chapels, special assemblies, Indian Independence Day celebrations and Baccalaureate and Graduation ceremonies. Formal clothes are a requirement for these performances, whether it is the regulation concert clothing or any other formal attire conducive for performing as decided by the respective teacher/director. Informal Recitals and Performances: These include the after-school student recitals and performances at the regular assemblies. Students are expected to be neatly attired for these performances. They may not be attired in shorts, torn clothing or slippers.

6.5.5 CHANGE OF INSTRUMENT AND SECONDARY INSTRUMENTS Students are required to have the stipulated number of periods for each instrument of learning. Students are encouraged to adhere to one instrument through the school years at Woodstock in order to develop technical and musical proficiency. Early Years students are required to adhere to the primary choice of instruments for at least two years before considering a change. A student may apply for a change of instrument and consideration may be given depending on past record and teacher recommendation. In case of dropping lessons, students are expected to adhere to the school policy on drop/add period at the start of the term. A student may apply for a second instrument in addition to the primary instrument if there is space in his/her schedule. Preference is given to students on the waiting list. A choice of cross-ensemble instrument will be discouraged such as a band student wanting to take an orchestral instrument or vice-versa. In such a case, the student will have to make a choice of one or the other instrument. A student who is taking Indian music, piano or guitar may be considered for an orchestral or band instrument in addition to the primary instrument provided there is space in the schedule for the venture.

6.5.6 EXTERNAL EXAMS Music students are provided with an opportunity to take the external performance/theory examinations of the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music, London (ABRSM). The performance exam takes place once in a year in the Fall. Theory exams take place at the school twice in a year – one in the last weekend of February and the other during the last weekend of October. These exams are optional and are taken as desired by students with parent approval on teacher recommendation.

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The cost of the exam and the published exam material is borne by the student and will be charged to the respective student account. If for any reason the student is unable to take the examination after registering, the charge will be forfeited by the student, except in exceptional circumstances where it may be carried over to the next year. Students who are successful in these examinations receive an ABRSM certificate from London. Students taking the Music Theory course may choose to take a grade level ABRSM theory examination. Students taking the Advanced Placement music theory course in grade twelve may choose to take the external examination in the Spring. Students not taking the external AP exam will take an equivalent internal exam at the end of each semester.

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7 PASSAGE ENRICHMENT PROGRAM Woodstock’s enrichment programme enables students to enhance their personal and interpersonal development through experiential learning. At the same time, it provides an important counterbalance to the academic demands of the rest of the programme. The enrichment programme strives to be challenging and enjoyable - a personal journey of self discovery. It involves: • • • •

Purposeful activities with meaningful outcomes Challenges which extend the student Regular reviewing of progress Reflection on personal learning.

Full commitment to the enrichment programme is central to a student's successful completion of Woodstock’s education programme and their development within the ideals and vision of the school. This enrichment program is called PASSAGE. Just as the word “passage” means journey, our goal is for a student’s involvement in Enrichment at Woodstock to take them on a journey to discover their passions and gifting. Appropriately, the word PASSAGE is an acronym describing the programme:

Passion and Perseverance is found through pursuing one’s interests in: Arts and Sciences Service and Spirituality Athletics and Adventure Global Understanding and Leadership Expeditions of discovery PASSAGE offerings There are offerings for students from KG-12. Contact the Enrichment Coordinator (nazneennagarwalla@woodstock.ac.in) for a complete list of activity offerings. Students in Grades KG-10 and 12 are free to choose activities in any of the four categories. Students in Grade 11 are self-guided by their CAS goals for their IB Diploma and may approach the CAS Coordinator for assistance with their CAS requirements. All major activities in which the students participate fully will be tracked for their use on college applications.

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PASSAGE Participation PASSAGE commitments refer to an activity which may meet one or multiple days per week and includes both scheduled clubs, sports, and groups as well as unscheduled commitments such as NHS, internships and individual student initiatives once they have been approved for the start of a new semester. A student may satisfy their PASSAGE requirement with a mix of scheduled and unscheduled PASSAGE commitments.

7.1 ELIGIBILITY TO PARTICIPATE IN PASSAGE ACTIVITIES The following render a student ineligible for certain kinds of PASSAGE participation, until the grades/Effort are raised: Grades ECP-5 In Early Years participation in PASSAGE is voluntary. Please note that due to the long school day, options are limited for ECP 1 & 2. Grades 6-8 The student’s most recent summative assessment task(s) must have no more than one grade of 2 in any of all 8 subject areas. Additionally, the most recent Effort grade for all courses must be adequate or higher. For external events requiring individual student registration that do not allow swapping of participants, eligibility to participate is based on grades and Effort at time of registration. In Middle Years participation in one (minimum) to two (maximum) PASSAGE commitments per week are required. Students with 2 music ensembles may only take 1 PASSAGE. In Upper Years participation in two (minimum) to four (maximum) PASSAGE commitments per week are required. Students with a music ensemble may take 1 PASSAGE commitment. Grades 9-11 The most recent summative assessment must be no lower than a 3 for all courses, and students must have no more than two grades of 3. Additionally, the most recent Effort grade for all courses must be Adequate or higher. IB students deemed ineligible due to low summatives will regain eligibility when the next formative assessment score is four or higher in the low subject(s).

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For external events requiring individual student registration that do not allow swapping of participants, eligibility to participate is based on grades and Effort at time of registration. If a student is ineligible, the following takes effect until grades/Effort are raised: • The student is flagged for academic support with mandatory evening study hall attendance 2 days/week • The student is pulled back from any PASSAGE participation that takes place after dinner or involves participation off campus Grade 12 Any grade of F or 2 grades of D. (continuation of past practice) The Academic Coordinator and Enrichment Coordinator have discretion when implementing these guidelines for all grade levels, with a view towards the whole student. Further limitations on PASSAGE participation may occur for students whose IB Diploma is in jeopardy. Checks for eligibility will commence from 1 month after the first day of classes in first term. 7.1.1 WHEN ARE STUDENTS ALLOWED TO MISS SCHOOL FOR PASSAGE? Please see the Student Leave Policy for further information of what constitutes an excused absence for PASSAGE and how many days are permitted per semester. Students are only allowed to miss school for PASSAGE if there are no academic concerns or late work. However, if at any point a student’s overall well-being or academics are in jeopardy, his/her participation in PASSAGE activities may be on hold. 7.1.2 NOTIFICATION OF ABSENCE FORMS A notification of absence form is to be completed before a student is allowed to miss classes for any school or PASSAGE-related reason. It is designed to ensure that all the classes and PASSAGE activities that will be missed have a “catch-up” plan. The student is required to approach all relevant teachers, before the trip, to find out what work will be missed and turn in the completed form to the trip leader at least a day in advance. The trip leader brings the form on the trip to ensure students know what they are responsible to be working on. See the Retakes section of Academic Expectations for information on rescheduling major assessments.

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7.1.3 CONDUCT REQUIREMENT Students participating in leadership positions, Interschool sports teams and other field trip activities representing the school are expected to adhere to the Student Handbook and school policies. Disciplinary actions may result in leadership positions being revoked and students being removed from sports teams and PASSAGE.

7.2 OUTDOOR LEARNING Woodstock School offers hiking and camping as an important component of the Outdoor Education and PASSAGE programmes. The Hanifl Centre acts as a resource and information centre for the hiking programme, providing information to help in planning hikes, points and award criteria. Hiking and camping equipment is also available for loan to students and staff. This includes tents, backpacks, sleeping bags, Ensolite sleeping pads, rain ponchos, camping stoves, fuel bottles, and cooking utensils. Students are encouraged to purchase items of equipment for their long- term personal use, including hiking boots (preferably waterproof), light and compact three season sleeping bags, backpacks, day packs, water bottles, and clothing - in particular, appropriate polyester, quick dry T- shirts, underwear, thermal underwear tops and bottoms (base layers), fleece jacket, rain jacket and pants, thick wool socks, and a headlamp. 7.2.1 HIKING & BIKING • Day Hikes and Overnight Hikes: Hiking has a long tradition at Woodstock School. Our location within the Indian Himalayas is one of Woodstock’s distinctives. All students experience hiking and camping during their time at the school. Chaperone requirements are detailed within the school’s Field Trips Policy. •

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Hiking and Outdoor Skills Awards Programme: Early and Middle Years students receive points for hikes of varying length and difficulty, as well as for the demonstration of outdoor skills, in pursuit of Woodstock’s different awards levels. The school recognizes students who exemplify the qualities and characteristics that will allow them to be successful in the outdoors as well as actively participate in Outdoor Education programs offered by the school. Upper Years Education Awards recipients must actively participate in the voluntary programs offered by the school as judged by the Outdoor Chaperones and Leaders.

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Voluntary trips can include but are not limited to, weekend hikes and camping trips, climbing passage, bicycling, environmental clean-up hikes, and other opportunities both on campus and off campus that are offered on a voluntary basis. The student must also have actively participated in wilderness camping trips during Activity Week and Outdoor Learning weekend.

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Safety: In the event of an accident, the Student Life Coordinator should be informed, along with the Health Centre. If a village is nearby, the group may ask a village resident for help arranging for transport or other assistance. The Outdoor Education Coordinator is responsible for ensuring that all excursions are equipped with the appropriate health and safety items from the Health Centre. The Trip Leader is responsible for all guidelines to be communicated and followed. All trip participants are responsible for following the Trip Leader’s instructions and must stay between the Trip Leader and the “sweep”, who are in contact with one another via walkie-talkie or other communication device.

Equipment: Students are required to follow all equipment and safety guidelines as prescribed by the Outdoor Learning Department including demonstrating competence in using the equipment that they check out from the hiking room, checking that the equipment is in good condition, and returning equipment on time. Parent accounts are billed for the replacement of the equipment, if items are lost or damaged or not returned on time - as determined by the Outdoor Education Coordinator.

Cycling: Students interested in bicycling will notify the Outdoor Education Coordinator / Bicycling Coordinator of their interest. Students are able to use the school’s bicycles once they have attained parent permission to undergo training and pass a school evaluation test ride, a basic bike care and maintenance test, and a theoretical test. Students are not allowed to rent bicycles from the bazaar or keep their own bicycles. Students are only issued school cycles when undertaking an approved, authorized trip with a school chaperone.

Climbing: Woodstock has an indoor climbing gym and access to nearby outdoor climbing and bouldering locations. Participation in these activities are open to all Woodstock students and must take place under trained adult supervision.

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7.3 GUIDELINES FOR ATHLETES Coaches and leaders in Woodstock’s athletic programme strive to not only build skill and agility in our athletes but also to help team members grow in character and sportsmanship.

Teamwork: understanding that participation on athletic teams is a both a responsibility and a privilege at Woodstock. ● Students are expected to adhere to the eligibility guidelines, which are based on respect for and responsibility to other team members. ● Seasoned, older athletes are encouraged to help run sport camps and/or clubs for younger athletes throughout the year.

Integrity: striving to make wise choices and adhering to conduct expectations. ●

A student will therefore choose to remove themselves from the team for the duration of the season if placed on conduct probation. ● A student who begins the season on conduct probation will sit out the first two games (or reasonable equivalent). ● Athletes are expected to not participate in nor be in the presence of drinking or smoking; if an athlete is caught smoking or drinking, they have chosen to remove themselves from the team. ● Students are expected to abide by the school’s conduct guidelines while attending offcampus inter-school competitions.

Geared Up: using and taking care of uniforms and equipment appropriately and responsibly. ●

Any lost or damaged piece of equipment or uniform will be replaced at the student’s expense. ● Athletes must wear appropriate uniforms, including footwear, during all trials, practices, games, tournaments and competitions. ● Athletes are expected to adhere to the Woodstock dress code for athletic wear as outlined in the Student Life Handbook.

Effort: showing commitment to the sport through diligent practicing and keeping up with academic and attendance requirements. ● Academic requirements: o No PASS, No PLAY. ● Attendance requirements: o Once selected on a team, students should not leave of their own will; if a student leaves, they are ineligible to play any of the sports offered for an entire calendar year. o Students should have attended the final three periods of the day to be eligible for practice or a game that day.

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o o o o

Students must attend school the day following a major event or contest. Students are required to attend every practice, unless ill or approved by the coach with a 24-hour notice minimum for missing practice. If a student misses a practice without giving notice, they have chosen to remove themselves from the team for the duration of the season. Students must attend all off-season training sessions unless involved in another sport during that time.

Respect: treating teachers, peers, employees, outside athletes and coaches, referees and umpires with kindness and courtesy. ● No foul language or disrespectful behaviour will be tolerated at any time, on or off the court or field.

7.4 STUDENT LEADERSHIP 7.4.1 STUDENT COUNCIL (STUCO) The Student Council stimulates and coordinates student body activity in the following: ● Representing and channelling high school student opinion; ● Uniting the entire Woodstock community; ● Encouraging student involvement in discussions which affect the student body; ● Helping students arrange and hold special activities; ● Encouraging and becoming instruments of effective communication between the administration and the student body, the primary focus being the student interest. ● Approving and monitoring clubs One male and one female student are elected by the student body to serve as Co-Presidents of STUCO and speak for students to the Board of Directors through regular attendance at its semi-annual meetings. There are standing committees of STUCO as follows: ● Performance and Assembly Committee (PAC) Representatives PAC Reps are advised by and work with the Head of Upper Years to plan interesting, educational, and beneficial assembly programs that meet the goals of assemblies. ● Social Activities Committee (SAC) This group is responsible for student-organized events to encourage a greater sense of community in the school. This group works closely with other Student Council members to organise activities for the entire school. The group seeks advising for events from the Dean of Student Life, the Head of Upper Years, and the UY Office.

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� Menu Committee This group serves as a channel of communication between the Head of Food Services, Director of Student Services, and the students. 7.4.2 CLASS GOVERNORS AND REPRESENTATIVES Each class in Upper Years’ elects two class governors, one male and one female, who serve as representatives on STUCO. In addition, each class chooses two representatives, one of each gender, to represent their interests on each of the four standing committees of Student Council. 7.4.3 DORM COUNCILS In each residence, there is a Dorm Council presided over by one elected student president. Two student representatives from each grade, elected by their grade peers, sit on their Council. The Councils deal with residence-related issues, plan residence activities and provide leadership in the residences. The Dorm Presidents serve on STUCO. 7.4.4 ACADEMIC HONESTY COUNCIL The Academic Honesty Council is composed of four junior and five senior students, serving for two years. Interested students apply and are interviewed by the standing council. A male and a female faculty member serve as advisors. The Academic Honesty Council works to educate the Woodstock Community about the Honour Code. The Academic Honesty Council President serves on STUCO. (See Academic Programme section of the handbook for the Academic Honesty Council Constitution) 7.4.5 NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY Eligible students in Grades 10-12 may be nominated by teachers for induction into the internationally chartered organization, the National Honor Society. The criteria for selection include all of scholarship, leadership, character, and service. This organisation administers several programmes, including the Peer Tutoring Programme, Big Brother-Big Sister events, and serving as mentors at New Student Orientation. This group elects a president to serve as a member of STUCO. The Vice Principal advises this group. 7.4.6 CURRICULUM ADVISORY This group serves as a channel of communication between academic administrators and representatives of the student body regarding the academic curriculum of the school. A designated member of Curriculum Advisor serves as a member of STUCO.

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8 APPENDICES 8.1

APPENDIX: UY STUDENT COUNCIL CONSTITUTION (VERSION 11.18.2019)

Article 1: Purpose The purpose of the Student Council is to create a sense of responsibility and self-government among the student body. Members of the Student Council must: A. Represent and channel student opinion; B. Help students arrange and hold special activities; C. Facilitate effective communication between staff and the student body; D. Represent the student body in formal events and decision making processes; E. Exemplify the following Student Council values: (i.)

(ii.)

(iii.)

(iv.)

Treading Lightly on the Earth (a) Taking into account the environmental repercussions of our decisions and trying to make the most sustainable decisions; Community Engagement (b) Acknowledging the context of our surrounding communities and keeping them in mind with decisions; Servant Leadership (c) Seeing the leadership positions not as authoritative but as in service for the student body which elected the council and which we represent; Inclusivity (d) Making sure no facets of the diverse Woodstock community are wronged in our decision making (e) Ensuring a Student Council for all students -- including the Middle Years and the Early Years.

Article 2: Members A. School Presidents: The heads of the student council (one male and one female member) chair, direct and ensure the functioning of the student council, as well as represent the council on public occasions. Both presidents are voting members of the council and also non-voting members of the school board of directors, and represent the student body in the same. This is a year-long position. Candidate must be from grade 12.

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B. Class Governors: Represent and channel the opinions of their class in the student council, as well as serve as intermediaries between the student council and the rest of the student body. Class governors help build a sense of class identity. Governors also resolve any problems regarding bullying and time management. They also lead their respective grade’s StuCo. Their term is for one semester and they are voting members. Need to be one male and one female member. 1. Ninth grade: Help the grade transition into the Upper Years and organize Jazz Jam. 2. Tenth grade: Help students prepare for their examinations and organize the JuniorSenior Banquet. 3. Eleventh grade: Help students prepare for external exams, college applications, and organize talent show. 4. Twelfth grade: Help prepare the class to transition away from Woodstock, make arrangements for graduation, and work to make the final year memorable. C. Dorm Presidents (DP): Heads of the respective dormitories represent student opinions relating to residence life in order to make students feel safe and at home. They help with the maintenance of dorms to maintain a healthy and hygienic environment. They also encourage all grades in the respective dorms to interact with each other and help build a sense of community. Furthermore, Dorm Presidents also help organize social events at the dorm level best suited for students in their respective dorms. They organize open house and UY/ MY Coffee Bar. This is a year-long position. The candidate must be from the senior most batch of the respective dorm. D. Academic Honesty Council President (AHC): Chairs the committee and is responsible for promoting integrity and honesty in the school community. The president deals with issues regarding, lying, and cheating. He/ she administers hearings for those who violate the Honor Code and suggests personalized consequences to the staff advisor. The Academic Honesty Council elects the president. He/ She helps the School Presidents during the vetting of candidates for school-wide elections. This is a year-long position. E. The National Honor Society (NHS) Presidents: Responsible for promoting qualities of academic achievement, leadership in the school, and upholding sensitivity of the community. The Presidents should be willing to assist the school and StuCo in other miscellaneous activities including but not limited to HOD Surveys or Employees’ Day. The National Honour Society elects the presidents. They help the School Presidents during the vetting of candidates for school-wide elections. This is a year-long position.

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F. The Social Activities Committee Heads (SAC): The SAC heads chair the Social Activities Committee meetings and are responsible for student organized activities to encourage a greater sense of community in the school. They are in charge of inter-house events and providing feedback on the overall calendar for the term. This is a semester- long position. G. Performance and Assembly Committee Heads (PAC): The PAC heads and their committee is responsible for organizing any assemblies and performances in the school, including the audio-visual and stage management crews, printing the agenda, and ensuring healthy student participation. They are responsible for announcing any upcoming events to the community. This is a semester- long position. H. Menu Heads: The Menu Heads are elected by the students and are voting members of the committee. They are responsible for gathering students’ opinions about the menu and the food that is served in the school and cooperating with the Dean of Student Life and the Head of Food Services in order to convey those opinions. They are also responsible for helping the council with organizing special meals if needed for student planned events. There are no class representatives for this committee. This is a semester- long position. I. Head(s) of Media: The Head(s) of Media is/ are appointed by the ICT Department. They influence and represent technological changes in Woodstock by representing the student voice. They are aware of any foreseen technical difficulties related to the internet and are able to inform students about them or be a communication point to help resolve the issue. J. Staff Advisor: The Staff advisor is a non-voting member of the council. The Staff Advisor represents the administration and channels their opinion. They also advise the School Presidents on the feasibility of the council’s proposals. K. Secretary of the Student Council: Appointed by the School Presidents, he or she stays for the duration of a semester. Secretary is a non-voting member and is responsible for keeping accurate minutes of each Council meeting and informing members of the council’s activity. The Secretary serves as a point of contact for the community in regards to StuCo affairs. L. Treasurer of the Student Council: Appointed by the School Presidents, he or she stays for the duration of a semester. Treasurer is a non-voting member. He or she is in charge of various budgets associated with StuCo. He or she is accountable for all transactions and expenditures of StuCo.

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M. Academic Delegate: He or she is a representative of the Curriculum Advisory Committee to the Student Council, and focuses on the academic concerns of the student body, namely Woodstock’s capital “C” curriculum. The Academic Delegate is a voting member of the Student Council and is expected to hold the high standards and responsibilities of a StuCo member. The member’s goal is to work with and be a bridge between the Student Council and the Vice Principal's Curriculum Advisory Committee, in the interest of the betterment of the students' academic work. The Curriculum Advisory Committee elects the president. He/She helps the School Presidents during the vetting of candidates for school-wide elections.

Article 3: Operation The Student Council will function in accordance with the general policies of the institution and the Student Council constitution. It will be responsible to the student body and administration. A. The Student Council will conduct regular meetings at least once every two weeks. B. The Student Council will discuss, formulate and implement ideas and suggestions brought to the council. C. Each committee is required to report on their current and planned activities to the Council every meeting. They are also required to call attention to the issues brought up by the student body. D. The Student Council will evaluate proposals for activities, events, etc. and will support the student body in its endeavors by providing new opportunities. E. While having their own respective leadership positions, each member of the Student Council is expected to work on any specific Student Council goal or project regardless of the committee in-charge when needed along with generally working as a unit throughout their term.

Article 4: Procedure A. The Secretary, School Presidents, and Staff Advisor will create an agenda for the weekly meeting. The Secretary will send out the agenda at least one night before the meeting. B. Every meeting shall be opened with a progress report by every member of the council followed by a summary of the last meeting’s minutes. Any corrections and pending matters will be addressed.

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C. The members of the council will submit to the agenda any additional points they wish to discuss in the day’s meeting. D. All topics of the agenda will be discussed and a formal resolution will be drawn up for each topic to communicate and implement the council’s ideas and solutions. E. The meeting will be conducted in a formal and ordered manner. F. Matters will be decided by a simple majority vote, unless there is a motion to make the topic substantive, whereby it will be decided by a two- thirds majority. Abstentions will be allowed, except for substantive matters. 1. Before formal voting, the School Presidents will clearly and succinctly state the resolution being voted on. 2. All voting should be conducted on paper. 3. The Secretary will count the votes immediately and the Presidents will announce the result.

Article 5: Voting and Criteria Election of council representatives and committee members should be done before the end of each position term. A. Eligibility: 1. Any student on probation is not allowed to run for a position. 2. Any student who has had a third-level disciplinary offense in the previous two years is not permitted to run unless specifically authorized by the administration. 3. Any student who has broken the honor code in the two years preceding elections may not be allowed to run unless specifically authorized by the administration. 4. The candidate must have attended Woodstock for at least a term (Fall/Spring) prior to running. 5. The candidate from Class of 2020 must maintain a cumulative GPA of above 3.3 to be considered for Student Council positions. 6. Academic criteria for running for Spring 2020: MYP: Candidate must have mostly 5s (and above) with a maximum of two 4s; DP (Class of 2021 onwards): Candidate must have mostly 4s (and above) with a maximum of two 3s. This changes to mostly 5s with two fours and above (out of 7) for Presidential candidates.

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B. Specific criteria for each position 1. School Presidents: Any incoming senior who has been a part of Student Council for at least a term can run for the presidency. Exceptions can be made to this at the discretion of the current School Presidents, Senior Dorm Presidents, NHS Presidents, AHC Presidents and the Academic delegate (this would require a thorough check of the candidate with having to write an essay on why they are suitable for this position). Candidates will be interviewed by the above mentioned members and staff advisor before shortlisting a maximum of three male and three female candidates. Candidates will be given a week to campaign for their position. They may not run in pairs. 2. Class Co-Governors: Candidates will be interviewed by the School Presidents and certain other StuCo members mentioned previously. Once allowed to run, the class in question will elect candidates to the student council by majority vote. 3. Committee Class Representatives: Each class will elect two PAC and SAC representatives each. Their election process is identical to the process of electing class co-governors and their election is run by the current class governors respective of their grade. The representatives must act under the purview of the respective committee heads. 4. Committee heads (PAC, SAC, Menu, Dorm Presidents): Any student in the second term of tenth grade or higher who meets the eligibility criteria for the specific committee may run for committee head. Candidates will be interviewed by the School Presidents. One person from the pair of candidates running for SAC, PAC and Menu positions must have been a representative to the committee at least once before. A pair does NOT have to be of mixed gender. If any candidate does not meet the requirements, they must appeal to the Upper Years Coordinator to be eligible. C. Election Procedures 1. Candidates must apply for their respective positions through the application sent out by StuCo at the beginning of the election season. Candidates for School President must also submit a staff recommendation. 2. Candidates for School President, PAC, SAC, Menu Heads, and co-class governors will be interviewed by the previous School Presidents and certain StuCo members mentioned before. 3. The School Presidents and certain StuCo members mentioned reserve the right to qualify/dismiss applicants if they are not deemed suitable for the position after reviewing their application and conducting the interview. They will look for qualities in the candidates which are essential to the position they are applying for.

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4. No more than 3 candidates may run for a single position. If there are more than 3 “suitable” applicants for a presidential position, the executive committee may call for a runoff election and shortlist the candidates. 5. The School Presidents and the Heads of SAC, PAC and Menu will be elected by Upper Years. Co-class governors and class representatives will be elected by their respective grades. Dorm presidents will be elected by their respective dorms. 6. The Presidential candidates will be given a week to campaign for their positions during which time they will give their speeches to the student body. Candidates for Dorm President will give a speech to their respective dorms. Candidates for PAC, SAC, and Menu will have to organize events relevant to their committees instead of delivering speeches as a part of their campaign. 7. Presidential candidates will have to participate in an open panel discussion or a presidential debate in order to allow the student body to interact with the candidates and ask questions. 8. Candidates may only begin the campaign once they are told to do so. 9. No money should be used by candidates during their campaign. RESPECT OTHER CANDIDATES. DO NOT PUT THEM DOWN. Any misconduct during this period of election by a candidate will disqualify the candidate from the student council elections. 10. At the end of the campaign period, a ballot box will be set up for the student body to cast their votes. Only the votes that have been cast will be considered. All elections (excluding dorm council position) will take place on the school level. 11. The candidate or pair must attain a majority (51%) of the votes cast to attain their position. In case there is no clear majority, the student body will revote on the top two candidates. 12. In case of a tie in the runoff election, the StuCo Presidents and certain StuCo members mentioned before will make the final decision.

Article 6: Impeachment and Resignations A. A member of the committee may resign at any time subject to the discretion of the School Presidents if: (i.)

A member feels that they cannot fulfill the responsibilities that their position entails. (ii.) A member is facing personal problems and believes that this affects their ability to act as a committee head. B. Criteria for impeachment: Any voting member of the council has the right to call for a member’s impeachment if a member:

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(i.) Is absent for two Student Council meetings without an excuse. (ii.) Fails to fulfill the responsibilities of their office. (iii.) Grossly misrepresents student/staff opinion. (iv.) Is absent without an excuse from a compulsory council activity. C. Procedure for Impeachment: A motion for impeachment must be submitted by a member of Student Council, and must be seconded by at least two other members. The Staff Advisor may also move for impeachment, in which case the motion must be seconded by at least three other members. a. The motions for impeachment must have 51% votes or more to be carried forward. b. In such cases one of the following must be called in to act as a special observer in addition to the Staff Advisor: 1. Principal 2. One of the three deans (Enrichment, Student Services, Academic) most relevant to their position. D. An automatic impeachment will occur if a member enters probation of any kind, or commits an integrity infraction, which will be determined by the president of the Academic Honesty Council. E. In a case of impeachment, resignation, or vacation of office of any elected member of the Council, replacement candidates will have to follow the standard election procedures outlined in Article 5 C, but the student body can cast their votes in homeroom. In case both heads leave, the School Presidents will choose representatives from the concerned committee to run for the positions which will then follow standard election procedures as well. F. An impeached member may run for a Student Council position again after a gap of a term. However, if the impeachment occurred for an offence with a different time-gap specified, that specified time takes significance. G. The above criteria for impeachment applies to members of all the committees represented in Student Council. This will be left to the discretion of the committee heads.

Article 7. Amendments A. Any member of the Student Council may propose an amendment to the constitution, which must then be approved for discussion by the School Presidents.

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B. The amendment will then be debated upon in a formal manner, with the School Presidents chairing the debate. C. The amendment is then put to a vote. Passing the amendment requires a two-thirds majority Last -

Provisional amendment for Spring 2020 elections: A candidate may only run for one Student Council position at a time and may not run for anything if they already have a year-long position mentioned above.

Updated: November 13, 2019 under Priyansha Agarwal and Veer Arya (2019-2020 School Presidents)

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8.2 APPENDIX: CURRICULUM ADVISORY COMMITTEE CONSTITUTION Curriculum Advisory Committee Constitution 1.0 This committee was founded by the students of the class of 2016. This constitution was drafted by the committee of 2018-19. Article 1: Purpose The Curriculum Advisory Committee is a group of students that work with the Vice Principal and Head of Upper Years to give student representation and input on matters of the school’s capital “C” curriculum, including the delivery of the curriculum through teaching and assessment methods, study resources, study spaces etc. The committee must represent the student body in matters concerning the curriculum including, but not limited to, course offerings, study resources, and assessment methods. The committee may look to the school’s Desired Learning Outcomes for reference. Article 2: Members 1. Staff Advisor: The Vice Principal leads this committee along with the Head of Upper Years. The Vice Principal is the primary staff contact for this group, but in his/her absence the Head of Upper Years may take on their responsibilities for this group. 2. President (and Grade 12 representative): The head of the committee organizes and leads weekly meetings. The president is the grade 12 member who has been serving in the committee since grade 11. 3. Academic Delegate (and Grade 12 representative): The delegate’s primary responsibility is to serve as the bridge between the Student Council, the primary student government body, and the Curriculum Advisory to facilitate dialogue between the two student groups. This member may be the president or another senior member of the group. The decision is made between the president and the Vice Principal. 4. Grade 11 representative: A representative from grade 11 is chosen to serve on the committee for two following years. This representative will become the committee president in their second year. 5. Grade 10 representative: The grade 10 member is supposed to voice their grade’s opinion in curriculum matters. This member is elected for one year only and must apply again to maintain his/her position.

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Articles 3: Operation and Procedure 1. The committee will meet weekly with the Vice Principal and/or the Head of Upper Years to discuss matters that relate to student concern regarding the school curriculum and teaching. 2. The committee may also be called upon for student input by the administration/staff when necessary. 3. When matters pertaining to MY curriculum arise, the CAC may invite the grade 8 class governors for student representation. The MY matter will be dealt with in collaboration with the MYP coordinator. Article 4: Application and Criteria I. Eligibility 1. Student must have been in Woodstock for one academic year 2. Student must hold a current GPA of at least 3.45 or have no achievement grade lower than a 5 3. Any student with a level 2 disciplinary offence or has broken the honour code in the academic year prior to applying is not eligible for the position II. Applications and Selection 1. Students must apply through the form sent out by the committee president at the end of an academic year, which requires a teacher recommendation 2. The committee will read through each application and may decide which candidates to invite to interview 3. Suitable candidates will be called in for an interview 4. The committee, the Vice Principal, and the Head of Upper Years will choose one candidate from each grade to represent their grade based on the candidates’ interviews Article 5: Amendment 1. Any member can propose an amendment to this constitution 2. The proposed amendment must be discussed within the committee and unanimously agreed upon. Last Update: 21 May, 2019

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8.3 APPENDIX: ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY AIMS & OBJECTIVES Academic honesty and integrity speak to the core values of education and reflect Woodstock School’s Guiding Principles of pursuing wholeness, seeking well-being, eliciting greatness and valuing compassion. Woodstock School’s Desired Learning Outcomes (DLO’s), along with the International Baccalaureate (IB) Learner Profile, demand principled action by all members of the community. This policy will reflect the mission and vision of Woodstock School and that of the IB to ensure our commitment towards acting with integrity, honesty and respect towards ourselves and others in school. IB Learner Profile Inquirers

We nurture our curiosity, developing skills for inquiry and research. We know how to learn independently and with others. We learn with enthusiasm and sustain our love of learning throughout life.

Knowledgeable

We develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring knowledge across a range of disciplines. We engage with issues and ideas that have local and global significance.

Thinkers

We use critical and creative thinking skills to analyse and take responsible action on complex problems. We exercise initiative in making reasoned, ethical decisions.

Communicators

We express ourselves confi-dently and creatively in more than one language and in many ways. We collaborate effectively, listening carefully to the perspectives of other individuals and groups.

Principled

Open-Minded

Caring

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We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of people everywhere. We take responsibility for our actions and their consequences. We critically appreciate our own cultures and personal histories, as well as the values and traditions of others. We seek and evaluate a range of points of view, and we are willing to grow from the experience. We show empathy, compassion and respect. We have a commitment to service, and we act to make a positive difference in the lives of others and in the world around us.

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Risk-Takers

Balanced

Reflective

We approach uncertainty with forethought and determination; we work independently and cooperatively to explore new ideas and innovative strategies. We are resourceful and resilient in the face of challenges and change. We understand the importance of balancing different aspects of our lives—intellectual, physical, and emotional—to achieve wellbeing for ourselves and others. We recognize our interdependence with other people and with the world in which we live. We thoughtfully consider the world and our own ideas and experience. We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development.

This policy aims to: • Define academic honesty; • Give advice on and/or examples of what constitutes academic misconduct in its different categories, intellectual property, and authentic authorship; • Provide guidance on each person’s role in academic honesty; • Provide examples of conventions for citing and acknowledging original authorship; • Give guidance on the distinction between legitimate collaboration and unacceptable collusion; • Outline procedures and suggest consequences for academic honesty infractions. What is academic honesty at Woodstock School? Woodstock School students have the benefit of being in a safe learning environment. As candidates grow and make mistakes, every effort should be made to turn mistakes into learning opportunities. Each community member is responsible for a unique role in the process. Students, at Woodstock School are encouraged to inquire, take action and critically reflect on what they learn and how it affects their attitudes and behaviour. They should be able to make their thoughts and their learning explicit, show how they have developed their ideas and demonstrate the views they have followed or rejected, i.e. make their knowledge, understanding and thinking transparent.

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What is academic misconduct at Woodstock School? Academic misconduct is a behaviour that results in, or may result in, the student or any other student gaining an unfair advantage (or a behaviour that disadvantages other students) in one or more assessment components. Key Definitions under categories of “academic misconduct” in Woodstock School: • Intellectual property: Products of the mind, including ideas, opinions, judgements, hypotheses, artistic creations, and more. They are owned by the creator. • Plagiarism: The use of another person’s intellectual property without proper, clear and explicit acknowledgment. The use of translated materials, unless indicated and acknowledged, is also considered plagiarism. • Collusion: Supporting academic malpractice by another student, for example allowing one’s work to be copied or submitted for assessment by another. • Misconduct: Any behaviour that gains an unfair advantage for a candidate or that affects the results of another. For example, taking unauthorized materials into the room, during an external examination, disruptive behaviour and communicating with others, during the examination. • Communication about the content of an examination 24 hours before or after the examination with others outside their school community is also considered a breach to external exam regulations. • Duplication: Presentation of the same work for different assessment components and/or Diploma Programme requirements. • Unethical behaviour such as the inclusion of inappropriate material in any assessment materials or the breach of ethical guidelines when conducting research • Any other behaviour that gains an unfair advantage for a candidate or that affects the results of another candidate (for example, falsifying a CAS record, disclosure of information to and receipt of information from candidates about the content of an examination paper within 24 hours after a written examination via any form of communication/media).

POLICY & PROCEDURES Woodstock School’s Responsibility for Academic Honesty Woodstock School’s leadership team has the responsibility of creating procedures to enact the academic honesty policy fairly and consistently throughout the school. The school’s leadership team will be responsible for providing professional development for teachers concerning academic honesty and help to promote parent awareness of the school’s academic honesty policy.

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Principal and Vice Principal It is the responsibility of the Principal and Vice Principal both to establish school policies that promote good academic practice and to foster a school culture that actively encourages academic honesty. There will be shared responsibilities of different members of the School community, including that of the School Academic Honesty Council. The IB Coordinator and the Vice Principal’s office will handle parent communication related to academic honesty infractions. MYP and Diploma Program Coordinator The IB Coordinators must ensure that all staff and candidates: • Complete and confirm their acceptance of the Academic Honesty Agreement • Understand what constitutes academic honesty, an authentic piece of work, and intellectual property; • Receive guidance on study skills, academic writing, how to conduct research, and how to acknowledge sources; • Follow the procedure of the Reporting Policy, in conjunction with the college counsellors, with regard to the reporting of offenses to colleges and universities. • Communicate expectations you have for students work by clearly referring to the academic honesty guidelines • Understand what constitutes malpractice (particularly plagiarism, collusion, and misconduct during an examination); • Know the consequences of malpractice. In conjunction with the Academic Honesty Council, the IB Coordinators also: • Ensure that the Woodstock School Academic Honesty Pledge is prominently displayed in each classroom; • Supervise the school’s internal investigation into allegations of academic malpractice; • Keep a record of internal allegations of malpractice and their outcomes; • Ensure that all incidents of malpractice are recorded and archived; and • Regularly review/seek feedback on the Academic Honesty Policy. Teacher It is the responsibility of the teacher to: • Complete and confirm their acceptance of the Academic Honesty Agreement • Confirm that, to the best of his or her knowledge, all candidates’ work accepted or submitted for assessment is the authentic work of each candidate;

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• • • •

• • • • •

Ensure they themselves are fully aware of proper and current MLA citation and are using MLA conventions when providing students with materials; Ensure that students know what constitutes academic honesty and provide examples of correct acknowledgement of sources; Encourage honesty and create assignments with specific guidelines that encourage students to develop their own ideas; Draw students’ attention to suspected violations of academic honesty on draft assignments and report suspected academic honesty infringements of submitted work to the Academic Honesty Council; Follow the school’s guidelines for administering assessments in optimal conditions Follow prescribed protocol for invigilating internal and external exams; Report incidents of malpractice in accordance with the Academic Honesty Policy Make the Approaches to Learning (ATL) skills an explicit focus for teaching and learning, particularly information literacy skills. Require the Honor pledge to be written on the first page of all summatives for both MY and UY

Parent or Legal Guardians Parents should support academic honesty in the following ways: • Read and be informed of the Academic Honesty Agreement. • Encourage students to ask their teachers for advice if they are having difficulties with their work; encourage them to take responsibility in planning and completing their assignments • Establish a good level of communication with the school so that they understand the requirements of the Middle Years Programme and Diploma Programme and the expectations from the students. • Support their child but make sure that he/she is the one responsible for the work done. Student It is the responsibility of the student to: • Attend a session about Academic Honesty at the annual student retreat. • Complete and confirm their acceptance of the Academic Honesty Agreement • Ensure that all work submitted for assessment is authentic, with the work or ideas of others fully and correctly acknowledged; • Comply with all internal school/ academic calendar deadlines; • Sign a cover sheet for each externally assessed component and all internally assessed components to confirm that his or her work is authentic and that the work being submitted for assessment, constitutes the final version of their work;

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Academics and Enrichment Student Handbook 2019-20 (Semester 2)

Librarian The responsibility of the librarian is that of academic honesty expert. The librarian will: • Team teach with classroom teachers to integrate honest research and production practices in every assignment; • Provide as-needed help for all community members in the area of MLA format and citation; • Run scheduled workshops on topics related to academic honesty; • Hold short term one-on-one workshops with students found to be in violation of the Academic Honesty Policy; and • Provide and promote resources to learn about academic honesty and build academic honesty skills. The Academic Honesty Council (AHC) Woodstock School will provide students with support through its Academic Honesty Council which operates under a regularly reviewed constitution. The role of the Academic Honesty Council is to prevent academic honesty infractions through education and to provide restorative measures after an infraction takes place. The Academic Honesty Council will: • Help students learn Woodstock School’s expectations for Academic Honesty; • Hold councils to help students process their actions and, if necessary, determine appropriate, restorative consequences; • Provide all new/continuing staff with regular reminders of their responsibility both to promote academic honesty and to prevent/detect malpractice; and • Provide general support to staff/students with questions about academic honesty and mentorship to those who are struggling to meet the school’s expectations. Procedures for Reporting, Recording and Monitoring Academic Misconduct Most incidents of academic malpractice fall within the policies and procedures of the Academic Honesty Council (AHC). Accurate and timely reporting of all incidents is crucial to identifying patterns and being responsive. All members of the community must familiarize themselves with the Academic Honesty Council reporting procedures. If, at any time, a staff member is unsure whether or not a referral is appropriate, he or she will speak to one of the Academic Honesty Council advisors and/or the IB Coordinator as soon as possible.

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For cases involving more than one student, confidentiality will be maintained for all personally identifying information and details. Parents or guardians are allowed to know the details pertaining only to their own child. The college counsellors will follow the procedure of the Reporting Policy, with regard to the reporting of offenses to colleges and universities. Note: These procedures are primarily designed for Upper Years students; however, Middle Years students (Grades 6-8) may be referred to AHC for repeated or serious cases by the Head of Middle Years. All other AHC cases are dealt with by the Middle Years teachers themselves. Minor (Level 1) incidents: • Staff members consult with AHC staff advisors as necessary to determine next steps. For Level 1 infractions, the staff member deals with the infraction directly with the student within 24 hours according to the table below of possible consequences. • After discussion with the student, the staff member will record the incident in the Learning Management System (LMS) with parent notification and assign appropriate consequences. • A single L1 AHC incident will not affect a student’s eligibility for leadership positions or to represent the school. • NOTE: A pattern of minor infractions of similar type may be reported at a future date. For this reason, it is essential to record the incident in the LMS to establish patterns of behaviour. Level 2 and 3 Incidents: • Staff members will complete the Academic Honesty Council referral form within 24 hours. They will also notify the involved student, preferably in person. • Staff members will provide the Academic Honesty Council advisor(s) and/or the IB Coordinator, with the appropriate evidence to support their referral. • The involved student(s) will appear before the Academic Honesty Council and staff advisor(s), who will determine appropriate action steps, inform the student(s), parents, and staff member of these steps, and record the incident in the LMS. • The Academic Honesty Council staff advisor will be responsible for writing the parent letter, which the Vice Principal will approve and send. • In the event the Academic Honesty Council hearing determines an incident is a Level 1, the staff member will revert to the procedures for a minor infraction. • NOTE: Incidents will be reported per the Reporting Policy.

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Level 3 and 4 Incidents: The Academic Honesty Council may recommend that an incident be designated as a Level 3 or 4. Cases may also be automatically designated as such by the IB Coordinator/Academic Honesty Council advisor(s) based on the referral information. All Level 4 incidents will be heard by the Disciplinary Advisory Panel (DAP), and the Academic Honesty Council advisor(s) will join the DAP hearing. College counsellors will report in accordance with the Reporting Policy, and Level 4 incidents may also be required to be reported to the external board (IB). Examples of Academic Misconduct In the event a staff member is uncertain of the type of academic misconduct, he or she may consult with the Academic Coordinator or AHC staff advisors. Incidents may be escalated or de-escalated at that time or by review of a recorded history of past incidents. Lying in an AHC hearing to conceal or manipulate may automatically escalate the incident a level. A first incident may be deemed any level depending on the nature and setting. Note: Determination of whether plagiarism or improper citation has taken place is regardless of intentionality. Level 1 Minor

Level 2 Formative Assessments

Level 3 Summative/Major Assessments/Tests + Exam Condition Prelims

Level 4 External Exams + Externally Moderated Summative Assessments

• Improper or absent citation, e.g. quotations without the citation • Plagiarism of a small portion of text, e.g. a phrase, sentence or supporting image • Violation of formal or summative assessment behaviour expectations which appears innocuous

• Cheating, duplication, or plagiarism more than a L1 on a formative assignment • copying individuallyassigned homework from another student, or knowingly allowing a friend to cheat/copy

• Cheating, duplication, or plagiarism more than a L1 on a summative assignment • Copying individuallyassigned work from another student, or knowingly allowing a friend to cheat/copy • Gaining or sharing access to non-public assessments or answers prior to task assignment or return

• Cheating or plagiarism of any amount • Gaining or sharing access to non-public assessments or answers prior to task assignment or return

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• Lying to misrepresent in an academic context, such as to avoid an academic commitment • Pressuring another student to participate in cheating

• Repeated L1 infractions of a similar nature

• Misconduct in an examination condition – for eg. Writing during Reading time • Colluding with your friend for a major assignment that needs to be submitted as a summative

Process Flow and Recording of AHC Incidents Level 1 Minor

Process: Staff member who discovers an infraction informs the student and gives a logical consequence such as asking the student to redo the assignment. Recording: By staff member in LMS within 24 hours as an Academic Honesty Council L1.

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Level 2 Formative Assessments

Level 3 Summative Assessments/Tests + Exam Condition Prelims

Level 4 External Exams + Externally Moderated Summative Assessments

Process: Staff member who discovers an infraction informs the student(s) that it is being referred, completes the AHC referral form within 24 hours and hands over relevant documentation to AHC. AHC staff advisor checks for previous hearing level infractions and schedules a hearing within 1 week of reporting/escalates as necessary. At this time of scheduling, the Advisor, Dean of Student Life, and parent is notified of the upcoming hearing by the AHC staff advisor. The Academic Coordinator first attempts to contact the parent by phone, before the email goes out from the AHC advisor.

Process: Staff member informs the Academic Coordinator (AC) immediately. AC investigates and determines whether to hold DAP hearing as soon as possible, aiming for 24 hours. AC notifies Advisor, Dean of Student Life, and Parent that a DAP has been scheduled. The Academic Coordinator first attempts to contact the parent by phone, before the email goes out.

Recording: By AHC staff advisor at the culmination of the AHC process as an Academic Honesty Council L2/L3 Infraction in LMS. The AHC staff advisor writes a draft formal outcome letter. VP of Academics Office keeps formal outcome letters on file and communicates with the student, parent, Student Services, College Counsellors, the reporting staff member and the Advisor.

Recording: By AHC staff advisor at the culmination of the AHC /DAP process as an Academic Honesty Council L4 in LMS. VP of Academics Office keeps formal outcome letters on file.

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Academics and Enrichment Student Handbook 2019-20 (Semester 2)

Menu of Possible Consequences for Academic Misconduct Level 1 Minor

Resubmission of corrected or alternate work Follow up conversation reviewing academic honesty expectations with the reporting staff member Apology letter Reflection paper Notification to parents

Level 2 Formative Assessments

Level 3 Summative Assessments + Exam Condition Prelims

Students will be expected to make amends for their actions appropriate to the violation. Any consequence for a L1 Review of academic honesty expectations with an AHC member Confiscation of electronics (if involved in academic misconduct/collusion) Assign an AHC buddy to the student Loss of privileges as recommended by the AHC to the Dean of Student Life Reporting as required per Reporting Policy Other, as appropriate

Level 4 External Exams + Externally Moderated Summative Assessments Conduct probation Suspension or isolation Expulsion Loss of privileges Ineligibility to achieve IB qualifications (per IB policies) Reporting as required per exam boards and reporting policy Other, as appropriate

IB Requirements IB Middle Years Programme candidates suspected of academic misconduct at Woodstock School will be held accountable to Articles 20 and 21 found in the General regulations: Middle Years Programme document published September 2014. IB Diploma Programme candidates suspected of academic misconduct at Woodstock School will be held accountable to Articles 20 and 21 found in the General regulations: Diploma Programme document published September 2016. Upon enrolment into the IB program, each candidate and his/her parent/legal guardian receive a copy of the General Regulations: Diploma Programme. An information session will be run for parents/guardians and students, which will cover the details of the programme, with special attention given to coverage of the provisions, relating to academic malpractice. Every member of the Woodstock community will also receive a copy of the General Regulations: Diploma programme, and undergo an information/training session, as described above.

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Every faculty member teaching or associated with an IB course, will review the basic definitions cited in this policy and how they might come to play in their specific subject/course. Finally, each IB candidate will receive, review, sign and abide by a declaration Form. Please see attached Form in the Appendix. Rights of Woodstock School Students IB Middle Years Programme candidates convicted of academic misconduct at Woodstock School have a right to appeal the decision as stated in Articles 22 to 25 as found in the General regulations: Middle Years Programme document published September 2014. IB Diploma Programme candidates convicted of academic misconduct at Woodstock School have a right to appeal the decision as stated in Article 22 found in the General regulations: Diploma Programme document published September 2016.

APPENDICES & REFERENCES BIBLIOGRAPHY IB Publication: Academic honesty in the Diploma Programme IB Publication: Academic honesty in the IB educational context. November 2016 IB Publication: Academic honesty in the Middle Years Programme IB Publication: Diploma Programme. DP: From principles into practice. April 2015. IB Publication: Middle Years Programme. MYP: From principles into practice. May 2014. IB Publication: Programme standards and practices. March 2016. IB Publication: General Regulations – Diploma Programme APPENDICES Appendix A: Academic Honesty Frequently Asked Questions Appendix B: Case studies of academic honesty in a variety of MYP disciplines Appendix C: Case studies of academic honesty in a variety of DP courses Appendix D: Academic Honesty Agreement Form Appendix E: IB Student Declaration Form Appendix F: Academic Honesty Pledge

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REVIEW & REVISION Woodstock School’s academic honesty policy will be reviewed annually by a committee of different subject group teachers, the IB Coordinators and the school librarian to make sure the school meets the academic requirements of the IB. Any revisions or edits will be sent to the Education Team for approval Policy owner: Written by: Review by: Approval required:

Academic Coordinator, Mou Maiti Academic Coordinator, Mou Maiti Committee as prescribed above Education Team

POLICY UPDATES HISTORY: Date

Reviewed by & Date of review

Approved by & Date of approval

Next review

May 2018

Policy rewritten to align with IB requirements Academic Coordinator, Mou Maiti Date: May 2018

Ed Team Date: 11/May/2018

May 2019

May 2019

Policy rewritten to address clarity about levels and procedures, and to rename Honor Council as Academic Honesty Council

Ed Team Date: 22/May/2019

May 2020

Nov 2019

Policy revised with minor changes by AHC and the Academic Coordinator Date: 10 Oct 2019

Ed Team 4 Nov 2019

Nov 2022

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Academics and Enrichment Student Handbook 2019-20 (Semester 2)

8.3.1 APPENDIX A: ACADEMIC HONESTY FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS 1. What style guide does Woodstock School use? Woodstock School uses Modern Language Association (MLA) for citations and referencing. 2. Why cite? Proper citation is a key element in academic scholarship and intellectual exchange. When we cite we: ● show respect for the work of others ● help a reader to distinguish our work from the work of others who have contributed to our work ● give the reader the opportunity to check the validity of our use of other people’s work ● give the reader the opportunity to follow up our references ● show and receive proper credit for our research process ● demonstrate that we are able to use reliable sources and critically assess them to support our work ● establish the credibility and authority of our knowledge and ideas ● demonstrate that we are able to draw our own conclusions 3. What should we cite? As creators/authors, we are expected to acknowledge any materials or ideas that are not ours and that have been used in any way, such as quotation, paraphrase or summary. The term “materials” means written, oral or electronic products, and may include the following. ● Text ● Visuals ● Audio ● Graphics ● Artistic images ● Lectures ● Interviews ● Conversations ● Letters ● Broadcasts ● Maps ● 4. What is the difference between collusion and collaboration? Defining the difference between collaboration (which is allowed) and collusion (which is not allowed) can sometimes be difficult: what is acceptable in some circumstances may not be acceptable in others. The definitions and examples below serve as guidelines.

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● Collaboration is when two or more students work together in ways acceptable to the teacher setting the assignment. Much classwork is collaborative. Collaboration may sometimes be acceptable outside the classroom. ● Collusion is when two or more students work together in ways which are not acceptable to the teacher setting the assignment. Collusion is cheating and everyone involved may be liable to punishment. This includes cases where one student allows his work to be copied by another student: both students are colluding and both will be punished. ● One good rule of thumb: Is the student learning something? ▪ If someone else is doing the work, the answer is NO. This is collusion and is not acceptable. ▪ If the student, all students, are working together, then they may all be learning together. This may be seen as collaboration. Collaboration is allowed – except when the teacher has said that the work must be done by the student, working alone and without help.

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8.3.2 APPENDIX B: CASE STUDIES OF ACADEMIC HONESTY IN A VARIETY OF MYP DISCIPLINES Middle Years Programme Activity Culminating project: Personal Project Scenario An MYP year 5 student is completing her personal project on sustainable transport. However, she changed her idea for the project very late in the learning process. As advised on the academic honesty form for MYP projects, she met with her supervisor three times, and the teacher signed off her work to date. Now the student is concerned that the form does not include any of her current research and decision-making, and her supervisor is unaware of her new direction. The supervisor reminds the student about the importance of the process journal, and its purpose: to document progress throughout the project, including developments near the deadline for completion; to record selected, annotated and/ or edited research notes; and to maintain a current bibliography. The teacher explains the relevance of the academic honesty form as a form of communication. As long as the supervisor is aware of the student’s progression of ideas throughout the project, meaningfully recorded in the process journal, there is no need for concern. Activity Group work: Individuals and societies Scenario An MYP year 3 student has been part of a three-person group working on a I&S project. The student has found it challenging working in a group. One member of his group has copied and pasted material from an unattributed source in material that she was supposed to have created herself. The teacher works with the group and especially with the student who copied and pasted the material and is not yet academically proficient in the school’s teaching language. (In learning a new language, students are often able to recognize relevant content before they can generate their own.) The teacher provides the student with additional opportunities to practice paraphrasing skills and may use peer-coaching strategies to empower students to work collaboratively when documenting sources. Activity Oral presentation: Language and literature presentation Scenario An MYP student is organizing a presentation for language and literature, which will not be in her best language. The work will be filmed and uploaded to the school’s private video channel. Her presentation is on Astérix et Cléopâtre and she would like to use extracts of the film and book in her presentation. She wonders whether she needs to ask for copyright permission. Copyright law is complex and is often nationally-based. In most cases, copyright infringement occurs when intellectual property is used to make a profit by someone who is not its creator. The school’s video platform is not available to the public, and the project will not be used for commercial gain.

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If the student documents the film and book appropriately, it is unlikely that any permissions are needed. The teacher uses this example as a way to discuss piracy, responsible use and alternative royalty free print and multimedia resources (including creative commons licensing). Activity Creative work: Design Scenario An MYP student is designing a greenhouse as part of an assignment for MYP design. He is confused about how and whether to acknowledge sources for this project. Isn’t every technique a form of imitation? Is there such a thing as an original idea? The teacher reviews the MYP design cycle, explaining that inquiring and analysing involves research into a range of existing products that can inspire solutions to the design problem. The student realizes that by documenting his investigation with references, and developing an accurate bibliography, he is acting with academic honesty. Creativity often builds on the work of others, and new ideas often come from existing products and solutions. Activity Independent work: Sciences Scenario As part of a science project, an MYP student has been asked to conduct a series of lab tests but found his results to be inconsistent. He has decided to copy data from his friend, who conducted the same experiment, under the same conditions, and whose observations more clearly confirmed his hypothesis. Before the students submit their projects, the teacher discusses the importance of reporting data accurately. Achievement in the task depends on thoughtful analysis, not consistent results across trials or experiments. Copying, creating or manipulating data won’t help students attain a higher achievement level. Scientific thinking relies on the honesty of researchers who design and carry out experiments, and the data they generate. Table from: International Baccalaureate. Academic honesty in the IB educational context. November 2016

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8.3.3 APPENDIX C: CASE STUDIES OF ACADEMIC HONESTY IN A VARIETY OF DP COURSES Diploma Programme Culminating project: English A Extended Essay Activity Scenario A DP student is writing his English A extended essay. He has a scheduled meeting with

Activity Scenario

Activity Scenario

Activity Scenario

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his supervisor on Monday, where he is meant to submit a draft. Having missed his last meeting because he was off school ill, he is behind schedule and submits a draft consisting mainly of quotes hastily chosen from internet sites. The supervisor reminds the DP student of the importance of formulating his own ideas on the topic and a plan for the essay before consulting other sources. Without this preparation, the extended essay risks being simply a collection of other people’s ideas on the topic, which increases the temptation for the student to pass off others’ ideas as his own. Group work: Psychology Internal assessment A DP student has been working in a group on her psychology internal assessment. A domineering member of the group is putting pressure on the student to write the reports of the experimental study for everyone in the group. The student being pressurized understands this is inappropriate but wants to be popular with the group. The teacher notices the group is being dominated by one member and has a quiet talk with the student, reminding her that, although the data collection was done as a group, each member must write up an individual report. The teacher offers support in communicating this message back to the group. Oral presentation: TOK presentation A DP student is planning his TOK presentation. In researching the presentation, he uses a variety of sources, including books, websites and newspaper articles. He is not sure how to reference these sources in an oral presentation, or even if he needs to do so since it is not a written task. He asks his teacher for advice. The teacher advises the student that it is just as crucial to acknowledge sources in an oral presentation as it is in any other piece of work. The teacher suggests several ways in which the student may wish to do this, including verbal or written acknowledgments throughout the presentation, or with a bibliography on the last slide of the PowerPoint®. Creative work: Visual arts studio work A visual arts student is trying to work out if it is acceptable to do a variation on a famous painting as one of her pieces. She is not sure if that would be considered “copying”. She asks her visual arts teacher for advice. The teacher advises the student that this is acceptable, as it is common practice for artists to be inspired by, or to adapt, other artists’ ideas. However, the teacher emphasizes that she must explicitly acknowledge the original painting. The teacher suggests titling the piece, “After ... ”, so that it is very clearly attributed.

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Activity Scenario

Independent work: ITGS Internal assessment A DP student is completing her ITGS internal assessment. The task requires her to conduct an interview with a client and to submit a written record of it. When she begins writing her analysis, she realizes that she forgot to ask some questions that would have been helpful. She is tempted to fabricate some responses to these questions, as she feels it would make her analysis and solution stronger and help her achieve a better mark. As the deadline for submitting internal assessments approaches, the teacher initiates discussion with the class on the importance of reporting data accurately, and stresses that each student will be required to sign a coversheet confirming the authenticity of the work. The student realizes that fabricating her client’s responses could have far-reaching consequences as a case of academic misconduct.

Table from: International Baccalaureate. Academic honesty in the IB educational context. November 2016

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8.3.4 APPENDIX D: WOODSTOCK SCHOOL ACADEMIC HONESTY AGREEMENT As a member of the Woodstock School community, I am dedicated to the highest levels of academic integrity and honesty. During my time at Woodstock School, I will always: behave in a trustworthy manner report all suspicion of academic dishonesty complete my own work to the best of my ability cite my sources (including text, video, audio, visual art, etc.) During my time at Woodstock School, I will never: lie to manipulate or protect myself/others from consequences present another person’s work as my own fabricate or falsify data give/receive improper assistance with any task use an electronic device in an unauthorized way By signing this document, I acknowledge that I have read and understood the Academic Honesty Policy of Woodstock School and the Academic Honesty Policy of The International Baccalaureate Organization. If I breach any of the policies outlined in either document, I understand that I will be subject to the appropriate consequences. If I am elected to any StuCo position, I acknowledge that if I do break the Academic Honesty Code during my term, I will be required to resign.

_____________________________________ Signature of community member

_____________________________ Date

______________________________________ Name of community member

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8.3.5 APPENDIX E: IB DECLARATION FORM As an IB World School, it is our obligation and commitment to provide our students the best quality of education. To implement the IB Middle years(MYP) and Diploma Programme(DP), it is essential to be aware and informed about all the requirements and regulations of the MYP and DP. As legal guardians/parents and students of the IB programme, you are kindly requested to read the following documents: • General Regulations: Diploma Programme http://www.ibo.org/globalassets/publications/become-an-ib-school/rules-for-ibworldschools • Academic honesty in the IB educational context http://www.ibo.org/globalassets/digital-tookit/brochures/academic-honesty-iben.pdf • Woodstock Academic Honesty Policy By signing this document, I acknowledge that : • I have received, read and understood the documents listed above • I am aware of my role and responsibility as a member of the Woodstock community • I agree to all the conditions and consequences in the above-mentioned documents and their non-compliance _________________________________ Signature of community member

_____________________________ Date

______________________________________ Name of community member _______________________________________ IB Coordinator’s Signature

_________________________ Date

8.3.6 APPENDIX F: ACADEMIC HONESTY PLEDGE Students are expected to write in full and sign the following Academic Honesty Pledge on academic assignments, examinations, research papers, and laboratory reports: On my honour, I pledge that I will neither give nor receive improper assistance in completing this task.

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Profile for Woodstock School

Woodstock School Parent Student Academic Handbook 2018-2019  

Guidelines and policies that define living and studying at Woodstock.

Woodstock School Parent Student Academic Handbook 2018-2019  

Guidelines and policies that define living and studying at Woodstock.