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July 31-Aug. 6, 2013 July 31-Aug. 6, 20131

Woodstock

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

I NDEPENDENT The

Published every Wednesday

Est. 1987

Serving Woodstock, Wonder Lake and Bull Valley, Ill.

www.thewoodstockindependent.com

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NEWS

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

MARKETPLACE

Angelo Paloumbis speaks out about ‘Impossible’ makeover

Michael Peter Smith to perform Aug. 10 in Woodstock

Material Things Artisan Market opens on the Square

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AN 8,000-MILE MOVE An area family will need more than a rental truck when they take up residence in southern Africa

» CITY OF WOODSTOCK

Woodstock hires new public works director By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent

The Choitz family looks back through photos of their trip to Zambia, Africa, the site of their future home. From left to right are Kate, Kristin, Ben, Carter and Bri Choitz. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Woodstock family plans to relocate to Zambia By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent After her sixth trip since 2008, Kristin Choitz knew she could give up material

needs and amenities, and even her home in Woodstock, to take up residence in the country where she extends a hand to lift up the women of Zambia. Her family plans

to permanently reside in Chongwe, Zambia, a town and bush village, by January 2015. Kristin Choitz and husband, Ben, said they are looking forward to their future life because of the work they will continue to do through Extending Hands, a ministry-based organization started by Kristin Choitz after her

first visit. e organization was designed to “give the opportunity of a sustainable living to the widows and vulnerable women of Zambia who are affected by or infected with HIV/AIDS.” “We decided through lots of visiting and prayer, on Chongwe,” Kristin

By mid-August, Paul Ruscko will take over responsibilities as the new public works director for the city of Woodstock. Ruscko, the former public works director for the village of Lakewood, will be assuming the role left by former public works director John Isbell, who retired in November 2012, and by interim public works director Jeff Van Landuyt. e search for a new director began in September, but was postponed in April when former City Manager Tim Clifton retired. Ruscko was chosen from a pool of more than 40 candidates. “I want to provide the leadership to continue to provide that customer service to the community, and I hope to bring about the necessary change,” Ruscko said. Among the new director’s immediate goals are to analyze Woodstock public works operations and to start providing fresh perspectives on projects. “I’ve got some big shoes to fill, but I think I have what it takes to help out the department,” Ruscko said. Van Landuyt, who had been serving as both director and assistant director for the department, said the new hire will

Please see Move, Page 2 Please see Public works, Page 5

Fire district endorses proposed sprinkler mandate Trustees vote to support state fire marshal’s push to require sprinklers in new homes By KATELYN STANEK The Independent

INDEX

A proposal by the Illinois State Fire Marshal that would mandate sprinkler systems be installed in newly constructed homes recently received support from the Woodstock Fire/Rescue District, but some observers are skeptical of the proposed

OBITUARIES OPINION EDUCATION A&E MARKETPLACE

5 6 10 11 14

COMMUNITY CALENDAR CLASSIFIEDS PUBLIC NOTICES SPORTS

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regulation. e WFRD Board of Trustees passed a nonbinding resolution endorsing state fire marshal Larry Matkaitis’ efforts to update the Illinois fire code to require new one- and two-family residences be built with automatic fire sprinkler systems. Woodstock Fire Chief Ralph Webster said he has long supported such a requirement

but believed any effort to pass a sprinkler regulation at the local level would end in failure. “My board has had an interest in residential sprinklers for several years,” Webster said. “I asked them, instead of moving forward as a community, to wait until there was a statewide effort, because in my opinion, there would be strength in

OBITUARIES

END QUOTE

Harriet K. Schultz, Woodstock Nancy D. Sabaj, Woodstock

“People are leaving the state in droves, and we’re losing jobs as well.”

— Steven Reick, Page 5

numbers. What I’ve seen in the fire service is if individual communities support an effort, it’s easier to gain opposition as a single target. Statewide, it becomes a statewide fight that involves all local communities.” Webster said the proposed requirement will greatly increase public safety. “e highest number of fire deaths occur in residential buildings,” Webster said. “Currently, many of them are unsprinkled, and this would address that. e other issue is firefighter safety. When Please see Sprinklers, Page 5

The Woodstock Independent 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098 Phone: 815-338-8040 Fax: 815-338-8177 www.thewoodstockindependent.com


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July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

IN BRIEF

Police to host National Night Out event The Woodstock Police Department will take part in the 30th annual National Night Out crime and drug prevention event from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 6. National Night Out, sponsored by the National Association of Town Watch, encourages people to turn on outside lights and spend the evening outside with friends, neighbors and police as a way to prevent crime, generate awareness and strengthen community and police partnerships. The Woodstock Police Department will feature a special information area from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the Woodstock Police Department, 656 Lake Ave. For information, call 815-338-2131.

STREET SMARTS Construction on Fleming Road from Route 120 to Country Club Road is complete and open to the public. According to the McHenry County Division of Transportation, drivers can expect some follow-up work, but the road is officially open.

Average gas price

$4.05

/GAL.

0.01

Reflects average price of regular unleaded gasoline at Woodstock gas stations the morning of July 29.

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NEWS

Continued from Page 1

Choitz said. e first two weeks of their 28-day trip this past June and July were spent house hunting. e family plans to start out renting for about $600 per month. Eventually, they said they would like to have permission from the region’s chief to buy a larger piece of land for agricultural purposes and with space to house members of the Extending Hands team. e houses in the area are brick or clay block homes with tin roofs. While they may not have heat and air conditioning, they will have electricity, indoor plumbing and, most importantly for the kids, internet access. irteen-year-old Kate and 11-year-old Carter will continue schooling through online classes, using a wireless signal from a new phone feature that allows the device to be used as a hotspot and is a more economical solution than satellite connections. e oldest sibling, Bri, 17, came along for the experience but will not move to Chongwe with her family because she will be staying in the U.S. to attend either Hope College, Holland, Mich., or Cornerstone University, Grand Rapids, Mich. e Choitz family plans to move once they have raised sufficient funds for personal support and worked out their service arrangements through an organization called International Teams. IT sends workers, on payrolls supported by donations, all over the world. Kristin and Ben Choitz said being in Zambia with Extending Hands will be their full-time jobs. Kristin Choitz said her goal is to teach safety to Zambian women. She said her 10-member team focused on bringing local prostitutes to conferences this year to help them find ways to better their situations. is year, her husband also

Members of the Choitz family gather with children in Zambia. The Woodstock family will move to the southern African nation within the next few years. COURTESY PHOTO

decided to address what he sees as a societal problem that begins with how men value women. He hosted a firstever men’s conference, which drew attention from more than 100 people in the area. “I’m kind of a root-cause kind of guy,” he said. “When you look at what’s going on and why the women have been abused, you realize that the solution comes from working with the men.” Ben Choitz said he thinks the biggest problem with Western charity is it gives a significant amount of money to Africa, but there are no changes to show for it. “As soon as the money leaves, they are right back to where they were,” he said. “We’re not an organization that offers handouts. We offer a hand up. We want to help people improve their situation rather than say, ‘Here’s a bunch of money.’” e Choitz kids said they learned a lot from the experience and the culture in Zambia. “ere are 6-year-old girls carrying their newborn sisters or brothers on their backs,” Bri said. “ese kids are

growing up too fast, going to get water and riding bikes, like halfway across the world to get food for their family.” Carter said he was amazed at how joyful many of the young children could be, despite living in poor housing, enduring drastically muddy compounds brought on by the rainy season and lacking proper nutrition and parental support. “I loved it, he said. “I played a lot of soccer games with kids my age, and I made a lot of friends.” Younger sister, Kate, and her blonde hair were frequent attractions during the visit, and she had to adjust to the close proximity of people to one another. “ese girls called me over, and they’re like, ‘Can we play with your hair?’ I said, ‘Sure.’ en all of a sudden all these kids run up, and they see one person touch my hair, and then I had a mob, because it was blonde.” Once settled in Chongwe, the Choitz family will be busy at work with Extending Hands, but Kate said she looks forward to having chickens and goats and visits from Bri.


NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

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» CITY COUNCIL

City rejects bid for Opera House lighting work By KATELYN STANEK The Independent

Restaurant owner Angelo serves up orders for customers at Angelo’s Family Restaurant, 117 E. Van Buren St. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Angelo’s owner speaks out After an “Impossible” makeover, how do people at the Square staple feel about change? By RHONDA MIX The Independent For 40 years, Angelo’s Family Restaurant has been a popular breakfast haunt for many a Woodstock resident. e restaurant, owned by Angelo Paloumbis and his cousin, Angelo Mourelatos, recently brought fame to the Woodstock Square when the eatery starred on “Restaurant Impossible,” a restaurant rejuvenation show on the Food Network. e show features feisty Chef Robert Irvine and revolves around Irvine and his crew’s attempts to overhaul failing restaurants in two days, on a $10,000 budget. Paloumbis said his family was initially excited about the opportunity, and he and his wife were pleased with the outcome of the renovation, though he understands some people may not be happy with the results. “We needed to modernize it,” Paloumbis said, when asked what sparked his interest in renovation. “We wanted to remodel the restaurant. We wanted an adrenaline shot.” ough he would not disclose details, Paloumbis said prior to the show, the restaurant had been “in a pickle.” Paloumbis’s wife, Marianna, wrote a letter to “Restaurant Impossible,” asking producers for help, as a gift to him. “We were very excited they chose us,” Paloumbis said. “It was a great way to better the business, to bring our family closer and to help bring some action to Woodstock.” For two days, the show took over the restaurant, closing it down to the public. “We had no say in anything,” Paloumbis said, when asked about the renovation process. A designer was sent in to determine the best look for the new restaurant and work began. e designer’s intent was to create a European ambiance and bring the charm of the Square into the restaurant

with a modern twist. e diner was turned upside-down as the interior was remodeled, staff and Angelo were given “attitude overhauls” by Irvine; and kitchen layout and meal preparation techniques were altered. “I love the new look. It’s a fresh, new look,” Paloumbis said. “We haven’t seen anything like it in the rest of McHenry County. It still has a diner feel, too.”

“We wanted to remodel the restaurant. We wanted an adrenaline shot.” — Angelo Paloumbis, Angelo’s owner e menu, which once featured 300 items, shrank significantly to help cut business costs and maintain a sense of focus. Paloumbis said the new menu features a variety of more healthful food options with fresh ingredients, yet it still retains some old favorites. ough Paloumbis said he is pleased with the new Angelo’s, he also is aware some people in the community are not so happy. e restaurant once housed an abundance of booths, many of which have been replaced with metal chairs. People have complained about the uncomfortable chairs, the new menu and the removal of the everfamous “Groundhog Day” photos from the walls. Paloumbis said he plans to bring some of the old décor back as well as some booths, but much of the new look will stay. Ken Schumacher, a Woodstock resident, has been a regular patron at Angelo’s for 25 years. He said he enjoys breakfast at the diner every morning except Sunday. “What’s kept me at the restaurant all these years is [the family]. ey are wonderful people,” Schumacher said. “e food is great, I’ve always loved

the food .... When they have market day on the Square, it’s a good and close place for people to get a coffee.” Schumacher said he doesn’t have many complaints about the new look of Angelo’s, although he thinks additional booths need to be brought back to replace the uncomfortable metal chairs. “I think that would make a lot of people happy,” he said. Customer Michael Stanard, Woodstock, also shared his sentiments about the restaurant. “[Angelo], his family and the restaurant are important to Woodstock. ey are important to the Square,” he said. “People don’t like change .... My only complaint is Irvine maybe came in and took advantage and foisted a change upon the restaurant that wouldn’t fit in with the community,” Stanard continued. “[But] I commend [Angelo] for what he’s done. It is what it should be, the food is better now for sure. And prices are what they’ve always been.” Paloumbis said being on the show helped him realize his weak and strong points as a restaurant owner. “I’d do it all again,” he said. He said he also wants to establish better communication with customers and does not want to hear or see complaints about the restaurant via the internet. He encourages customers to come to him or staff members with concerns or questions they may have. “My customers that come in are on a first-name basis. I can joke around with them, and they are good people. A lot of them have known me since I was little. Please come in and tell me yourself, if you have problems,” Paloumbis said. “We are all ears. Tell me what is wrong. Tell me the specifics....We have strong ties to the community and want to maintain those ties,” he continued. “My dream is that when I retire, I still have that sign on the building – to hand it down again, to my kids or nephews. To keep it going.”

A bid for stage lighting upgrades at the Woodstock Opera House was rejected at a recent meeting of the City Council after a lone bid came in at more than $61,000 over what had been budgeted for the project. e city of Woodstock had anticipated spending $114,000 for lighting upgrades at the Opera House, a project that would have included the installation of 96 dimmers, new plugging strips and upgraded house lights. Oak Brook-based Continental Electrical Construction Company LLC was the only contractor to bid on the project, submitting a price of $175,573. A memo from Opera House Production Manger David Reeve advised the City Council to reject the bid. is was to be the second stage of upgrades to the Opera House’s lighting system. Last year, a new lighting control console, lighting fixtures, wiring and other equipment was purchased as part of the first phase of the Opera House Capital Improvement Plan Stage Lighting Project. e first phase of the project was budgeted at $100,000. Together, the two phases of the lighting project are intended to update an aging system. “My boss put it in 35 years ago, and it was used then,” Reeve said. e memo to city officials estimated the lighting renovations would allow the system to function for the next 40 to 50 years. “If you’re doing your job, you try to keep up with what’s going on and you try to strive to make the facility as modern as you feel is possible or appropriate,” said Opera House Building Manager Mark Greenleaf. “We always have a number of capital improvement projects we’d like the city to fund, and we try to make a good estimate of the cost of something were it to be approved, but that doesn’t mean the city always ultimately appropriates those funds.” Opera House employees will redefine the scope of the project, which is expected to be rebid in November. e bid was rejected as part of the City Council’s consent agenda July 16, with Mark Saladin, Maureen Larson, Mike Turner, Julie Dillon, RB ompson and Mayor Brian Sager voting to turn down Continental’s offer. Councilman Joe Starzynski was absent from the meeting. HOW THEY VOTED To reject a bid for lighting upgrades at the Woodstock Opera House: Yes Julie Dillon Maureen Larson Brian Sager Mark Saladin RB Thompson Mike Turner Absent Joe Starzynski


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THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

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Republican wants to take on Franks for seat By KATELYN STANEK The Independent

A Republican precinct committeeman has announced his intention to run against Democrat Jack Franks in the upcoming election for state representative. Attorney Steven Reick of rural Harvard said he is planning to take on Franks for his seat as representative of the 63rd House District, which includes much of McHenry County. Franks, of Marengo, has served as the district’s representative since 1999.

Sprinklers

Reick said he has decided to run for the seat out of concern for a state government he views as a “dysfunctional.� “e biggest overall issue is the loss of jobs through the fact that the state government is just so totally dysfunctional,� he said. “Businesses are not encouraged to start up or stay in Illinois because they see regulations getting out of control, taxes going up. People are leaving the state in droves, and we’re losing jobs as well.� Reick said his platform will focus on four issues: pension reform, education, taxes and Medicaid. He said

he is particularly concerned about Illinois’ adoption of the Common Core State Standards Initiative, a new set of educational standards that will apply to public school students in states that have approved the measure. “ere are certain issues I’m going to stand on,â€? he said. “One of them is the repeal of the Common Core standards in our schools. ‌ Schools and teachers are losing their ability to teach independent of what these standards are telling them they have to teach.â€? On social issues, Reick has voiced his opposition to same-

sex marriage and abortion and his support for laws allowing concealed carry. Franks’ popularity as a Democrat in reliably Republican McHenry County has been buoyed by his criticism of some highranking SpringďŹ eld ofďŹ cials, including former governor Rod Blagojevich, and by his endorsement of ďŹ scally conservative policies that call for an overhaul of the state’s budget. But Reick said he believes Franks’ opposition to some of his colleagues in the capitol building doesn’t stand up to scrutiny, given the

current representative’s history of voting for Democrat Michael Madigan as the long-serving Speaker of the Illinois House. “For eight terms, the ďŹ rst vote [Franks has] cast is for Mike Madigan as speaker,â€? Reick said. “I believe if you’re not willing to be part of the solution, you’re part of the problem. His support of Mike Madigan as speaker has undercut anything he says he stands for.â€? Reick serves as precinct committeeman for Greenwood 4. He lives with his wife, Deb, and has three adult children and four grandchildren.

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you enter a building that’s sprinkled, it’s very likely that the residents will be out, which reduces the stress on us to try to get in and take greater chances to get them out.â€? Andrew Mason, a press advisor for the OfďŹ ce of the Illinois State Fire Marshal, said sprinkler systems could have saved many lives last year, citing ďŹ gures from 2012 that showed ďŹ res killed 120 people in Illinois. “e risk of dying in a ďŹ re goes down about 80 percent if the structure you’re in has a sprinkler system,â€? Mason said. “at’s about 100 people that could have been saved by ďŹ re sprinklers.â€? Franks, homebuilders are among opponents Opponents of the measure have been vocal in their resistance to the proposed mandate, saying the impact of installing sprinklers in new homes could further depress an already struggling market. “e state ďŹ re marshal may not realize this, but our land prices are pretty depressed in McHenry County and our property taxes are pretty high,â€? said State Rep. Jack Franks (D-Marengo). “is would add another burden to homeowners.â€? Franks said he “respected the opinionâ€? of the WFRD board and other ďŹ re protection agencies but said the issue comes down to the rights of property owners. “I think it’s a good goal, but I don’t think we should mandate what people do or don’t do in their own homes,â€? he said. e proposal also has met with ďŹ erce opposition from construction industry groups, including the Home Builders Association of Illinois, which disputes

Public works allow the department to redistribute its workload. He said managing challenges such as June’s ooding was difďŹ cult without the extra help, and he said it will be one of the ďŹ rst priorities of business for Ruscko to adapt to. “When John [Isbell] left, he left a void here, and we had to divvy up his responsibilities,â€? Van Landuyt said. “It will be good to have someone to share the workload with and the responsibilities with.â€? City Manager Roscoe Stelford said Ruscko stood out among the candidates. “It’s a very dynamic department,â€? Stelford said. “It impacts so many parts of our community ‌ they play such a pivotal role that it’s important to have a good leader in public works.â€?

´7KHKLJKHVWQXPEHURI Ă€UHGHDWKVRFFXULQ UHVLGHQWLDOEXLOGLQJV &XUUHQWO\PDQ\RIWKHP DUHXQVSULQNOHGDQGWKLV ZRXOGDGGUHVVWKDWÂľ — Ralph Webster, Fire chief the state ďŹ re marshal’s ďŹ ndings that the regulation will add $1.61 per square foot to the cost of a new home. e association has released ďŹ gures that show sprinklers could cost between $7,000 and $18,000 per home, or more than $8.50 per square foot in some cases. “It’s an incredible expense that the homeowners will have to bear,â€? said Bill Ward, HBAI’s executive vice president and director of governmental affairs. “It will decide if someone buys a home or not.â€? But Ken Wood, a ďŹ re protection engineer for the state ďŹ re marshal’s ofďŹ ce, said home builders and lobbyists are exaggerating the cost of sprinkler installation. “We’ve seen greatly inated estimates from home builders ... without anything to back it up,â€? Wood said. Webster agreed the additional cost brought on by the proposed mandate would not have the impact predicted by the builders association. “At any point in time, if this issue is promoted, there’s going to be the argument that it’s going to hurt a struggling housing market or thwart the growth of one that’s growing,â€? Webster said. “In my opinion, the cost of the sprinkler system placed on the home is not going to be the deciding factor of

Continued from Page 1 Stelford said he expects Ruscko will adapt well to the department and start looking at the challenges involved in making Route 47 and other transportation improvements a priority. Stelford said Ruscko will play a crucial role in planning for the department’s future, but he will not be alone in his decisions because he has a strong team of experts, supervisors and seasoned crews. “He has a lot of people to help him,� Stelford said. “He’s not on an island.� Ruscko, along with his wife, Lisa, and 3-year-old son, Grady, are temporarily residing in Woodstock, until remodeling of their house in McHenry is complete. As public works director, Ruscko will receive a salary of $110,000.

whether or not someone builds a new home or buys an existing one, because you’re looking at a relatively small percentage of the cost of that home.â€? e existing state ďŹ re code was last updated in 2001. So far, 40 states have rejected new sprinkler mandates, which were initially put forth by the National Fire Protection Association. Ward said he believes Illinois should follow that example. “I think there’s a cliche that says, ‘If it just saves one life, isn’t it worth it?’â€? Ward said. “I’m not going to get into that argument. I don’t know what the price of one life is. But I do know that homeowners and communities can decide for themselves if they want this or not.â€? e OfďŹ ce of the Illinois State Fire Marshal will host a public hearing on the proposal at

´7KHVWDWHĂ€UHPDUVKDOPD\ QRWUHDOL]HWKLVEXWRXUODQG SULFHVDUHSUHWW\GHSUHVVHG LQ0F+HQU\&RXQW\DQGRXU SURSHUW\WD[HVDUHSUHWW\ KLJKÂľ — Rep. Jack Franks, D-Marengo 9 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 6, at 1035 Stevenson Drive, SpringďŹ eld. e WFRD Board of Trustees unanimously approved the resolution supporting the sprinkler regulation, with Robert Kristensen, Kenneth Marunde, John Kunzie, Richard Menzel and Scott Sankey voting yes.


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July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

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OBITUARIES

Harriet K. Schultz

Harriet K. Schultz, 93, Woodstock, died Monday, July 22, 2013, at her home in Woodstock. She was born Sept. 17, 1919 in Harvard to Edward and Emma (Schuldt) Knull. On Jan. 19, 1938, she married Charles B. Schultz at Emmanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church in Walworth, Wis. She lived in Woodstock for the past 60 years and spent more than 85 years of her life in McHenry County. She was a factory inspector for the Woodstock Typewriter Company and the Woodstock Die Cast Company. She was a member of Grace Lutheran Church in Woodstock since 1954. She enjoyed fishing, gardening, crocheting and traveling on bus tours with her sister, Janette. She also was an avid Chicago White Sox fan. She was a loving wife and a devoted mother. She moved her family to four different states while her husband served in the Air Force. Her quiet ways concealed a feisty, sometimes even stubborn streak, but she was always a loving, forgiving soul. Her family always came first in her life. Survivors include a daughter, Roxann (Paul) Giblin; a daughter-in-law, Katherine Schultz; four grandchildren, Shannon (Steve) Martin, Kimberly (Douglas) Vandewalker, Kassondra (Neil) Schroeder and Timothy (Tammy) Schultz; five stepgrandchildren, Paula (Brian) Olson, Michael Giblin, P. Shawn (Laurie) Giblin, P. Kelly (Kimberly) Giblin and Shannon Giblin; 13 great-grandchildren, and five great-greatgrandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband; two sons, Donald Schultz and James Schultz; a granddaughter, Cynthia Swan; five siblings, Harold (Connie) Knull, Elwood (Lucky) Knull, Foster Knull, Janette Bolton and Arnie Knull; and four foster siblings, Alvin (Marie) Klaman, Carl (Dorothy) Klaman, Evelyn (Carl) Johnson and Helen (Clarence) Mulenbrink.

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BIKE BENEFIT Visitation was July 26 at SchneiderLeucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, Woodstock. Visitation continued July 27 at Grace Lutheran Church, Woodstock. The funeral followed. Burial was at McHenry County Memorial Park, Woodstock. Memorials can be sent to the American Cancer Society Breast Cancer Research Foundation, P.O. Box 22718, Oklahoma City, OK 73123.

Nancy Diane Sabaj

Nancy Diane Sabaj, 70, Woodstock, died Thursday, July 25, 2013, at JourneyCare Hospice, Woodstock. She was born Sept. 4, 1942, in Chicago to Randall and Elenora (Salo) Bradley. On Sept. 10, 1960, she married Dennis F. Sabaj in Chicago. She enjoyed traveling and going on vacations with her family. She was a fun-loving and caring person with a kind heart and generous soul. Happiness was her first priority, and she made sure everyone else was having a good time, too. She always enjoyed spending time with her loving family and very dear friends. Survivors include her husband; two daughters, Denise Cardona and April (Frederick) Libert; a son, Jeffrey (Carissa) Sabaj; five grandchildren, Natalie Cardona, Keehan Sabaj, McKailey Sabaj, Thomas Libert and Bradley Libert; four sisters, Dolores, Helen, Sandy and Mavis; and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents and two sisters, Sheila and Ranora. Visitation and the funeral were July 28 at Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, Woodstock. All other services were private. Memorials can be sent to JourneyCare Foundation, 405 Lake Zurich Road, Barrington, IL., 60010 or online at http://give. journeycare.org.

POLICE BLOTTER Q Leo Alvarez, 21, 11411 Kishwaukee Valley Road, Woodstock, was arrested July 16 at 205 Dean St. on a warrant with the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office for failure to appear on a charge of trespassing. Alvarez was turned over to the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office. Bond was set at $3,000. Court date was to be set. Q Juan D. Lebron, 28, 2420 Bridgewater, Woodstock, was charged July 12 with aggravated criminal sexual assault in the Woodstock area. Lebron was turned over to the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office. Bond and court date were to be set. Q A juvenile, Crystal Lake, was charged July 13 with aggravated battery and purchase and acceptance of alcohol by a minor at 556 Birch Road, Woodstock. The juvenile was issued a notice to appear and was released to a parent. Court date was set for Aug. 23. Q Laura E. L’Heureux, 31, 1514 Rhett Place, Woodstock, was charged July 18 with retail theft at 1275 Lake Ave. L’Heureux posted $150 bond. Court date was set for Aug. 22. Q Jerome President, 46, 930 Lake Ave., Woodstock, was charged July 22 with criminal trespass to property at 145 S. Eastwood Drive. President was turned over to the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office. Bond was set at $1,500. Court date was set for Aug. 22. Q Adam S. Milbratz, 28, 3012 N. Chestnut Drive, Wonder Lake, was charged July 19 with driving while license was suspended at North Madison and Church streets, Woodstock. Milbratz posted $150 bond. Court date

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

was set for Aug. 22. Q Wendy J. Lani, 29, 25803 Graf Road, Harvard, was arrested July 19 at 656 Lake Ave. on a warrant with the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office for failure to appear on a charge of contempt. Lani posted $189 bond. Court date was set for Aug. 6. Q Samantha A. Sygulla, 20, 425 Damen St., Marengo, was charged July 20 with retail theft at 2200 Lake Ave., Woodstock. Sygulla posted $150 bond. Court date was set for Aug. 1. Q Jamie N. Mueller, 825 Washington St., Woodstock, was charged July 20 with retail theft at 2200 Lake Ave. Mueller posted $150 bond. Court date was set for Aug. 1. Q Arthur W. Anderson, 60, transient, was charged July 21 with criminal trespass to railroad property at 90 Church St., Woodstock. Anderson was turned over to the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office. Bond was set at $1,500. Court date was set for Aug. 15. Q Patrick L. Noonan, 24, 227 Burning Bush, Crystal Lake, was charged July 21 with criminal trespass to residence at 635 N. Madison St., Woodstock. Noonan posted $150 bond. Court date was set for Aug. 15. Q Faith L. Haanpaa, 23, 315 Hoy St., Woodstock, was arrested July 21 at 315 Hoy St. on a warrant with the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office for failure to appear in court. Bond was set at $5,000. Court date was to be set. Any charges are merely accusations, and defendants or suspects are presumed innocent unless proven guilty.

Bruce Bailey sits on a rare Fat Tire Ale bicycle at the Mooseheart Bash, raffled off July 27 at the Woodstock Moose Lodge Family Center to benefit Mooseheart in Batavia. Bailey founded the Mooseheart Challenge, a 45-mile bike ride to raise funds to sponsor a classroom at Mooseheart. The bike was donated by Rich and Karen Penza, Woodstock, and won by Brian Slusser, McHenry. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY LISA KUCHARSKI


8

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

Opinion THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT Woodstock, IL Š 1987

CHERYL WORMLEY

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Publisher, Co-Owner

Cheryl Wormley John C. Trione Katelyn Stanek Jay Schulz Rhonda Mix Lisa Kucharski

PAUL WORMLEY Co-Owner

JOHN C. TRIONE General Manager

KATELYN STANEK Managing Editor

» OUR VIEW

What’s at the core of Common Core? Like all public schools in Illinois and most in the country, Woodstock School District 200 schools will undertake the newest adventure in educational standards, the Common Core State Standard Initiative. As with No Child Left Behind, which was enacted in 2001, adoption of Common Core — which sets strict standards of achievement in math, reading and writing — include financial incentives for states that jump on board with the initiatives established by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers. And as with No Child Left Behind, many educators, parents, politicians and experts are wary of what these standards will bring to the classroom. ere are the usual concerns — not unfounded — about a top-down takeover of state educational methods by the federal government that have rankled many conservatives, and questions from people on both sides of the aisle about the wisdom of imposing yet another set of standards on our students and teachers. But even more questions and concerns remain. For District 200, some of the highest hurdles brought forth by implementing the Common Core won’t impact our schools’ bottom lines or infrastructures, according to administrators. ose hurdles include a “one-to-one” requirement that forces participating states to ensure every single student has access to a computer in order to take the new tests that measure student achievement in Common Core standards. District 200 is fortunate to have budgeted for similar expenses, but for many school districts, the cost of upgrading could be devastating. en there are the more abstract worries that accompany these sorts of schemes. Once again, our students and teachers will be subjected to a set of educational ideals put forth by people who don’t actually teach — Common Core standards began as an initiative from the business world. Once again, our schools will have to rearrange and reassess everything for the benefit of a few days of testing. Once again, an attempt is being made to quantify and commodify the inexact art of teaching and learning. Whether or not Common Core standards will benefit students, teachers and schools remains to be seen. To be sure, the financial incentives brought forth by the initiative could prove to be a boon for some, and we all have a right to hold our public schools to a high standard. But the vast array of questions and worries surrounding Common Core leave us and many others concerned about its eventual legacy.

weigh in Email letters to the editor to letters@thewoodstockindependent.com or mail them to 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098.

» YOUR VIEW

Help protect one of the state’s best streams Nippersink Creek is considered among the finest of Illinois streams. Past surveys for the presence of pollution-sensitive fish and other aquatic organisms have established that the main channel of the Creek rates as a “B” quality stream, while the North Branch Nippersink received a “Class A” ranking. To help protect and enhance this significant environmental quality, in 2008 the Nippersink Creek Watershed Plan (NCWP) was adopted to provide a sustainable framework of how to best identify water quality protection needs and opportunities. e NCWP, prepared under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Section 319 program funding, can be viewed online at the Nippersink Watershed Association website, www.nippersink.org. A critical part of continuing to protect and enhance the quality of Nippersink Creek is determining how watershed landowners view the importance of protecting the quality of our surface and groundwater resources; how they perceive potential threats to water quality; and understanding the degree to which they understand how human activities can potentially impact water quality. To help identify these issues, the Nippersink Watershed Association, in coordination with Illinois State University and local watershed partners, will be sending out a mail survey to a random sampling of

QUOTABLE

Nippersink Creek watershed residents. e survey will be arriving in the mail during the week of July 29. Having survey recipients complete this survey will help local watershed partners generate a social assessment of the issues that are important to watershed stakeholders and identify areas where additional educational /informational outreach may be needed. If you do not receive a survey in the mail, you also can go to the Nippersink Creek Watershed website, www.nippersink.org, and complete the survey online. We encourage everyone’s participation and perspectives and appreciate your time. is project is funded by Section 319 of the Clean Water Act through the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency. Randy Stowe, Watershed Manager, Wonder Lake

Township jobs: nice work if you can get it Townships in Illinois spend thousands upon thousands of tax dollars promoting townships as cheap lowcost government with underpaid employees. is is far from the truth and a perpetuated myth. It pays well to be a township road commissioner. Generally, township commissioners receive a salary, health insurance, lavish retirement benefits, sick days, personal days, holiday pay and other benefits that

those in the private sectors can only dream of. A few examples of township excess: (Source from Freedom of Information.) Nunda Township Road Commissioner - Salary $94,740, health $15,108, retirement $8,707 for a total taxpayer cost of $118,555! Algonquin Township Road Commissioner - Salary $93,318, health $10,608, retirement $10,451 for a total taxpayer cost of $114,377! McHenry Township Road Commissioner - Salary $80,635, health $4,950, retirement $8,983 for a total taxpayer cost of $94,567! Greenwood Township Road Commissioner — Salary $78,386, health $7,241, retirement $10,316 for a total taxpayer cost of $95,943! e public trough trumps being self-employed. Many road commissioners leave private businesses to land plum township jobs. And township jobs last a lifetime. Less work, more money. Even though road commissioners have less work, they continue to receive yearly raises. Note: When municipal governments annex land into their boundaries, the township roads within those boundaries become city roads. Also, many townships have more lightly traveled secondary subdivision roads than main roads. Townships can be abolished. is could be accomplished by referendum where voters would vote yes or no to either keep or abolish their township. Bob Anderson, Wonder Lake

“Age is a case of mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it don’t matter.” — Satchel Paige


OPINION

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

9

Âť COLUMN

Corn feeds, fuels, sweetens the world Corn on the right ‌ Corn on the left ‌ Corn ahead ‌ Corn behind ‌ Green, growing corn plants dominate a traveler’s view this time of year around Woodstock. e corn is now ‌ “as high as an elephant’s eye,â€? to borrow a line from Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Oklahoma!.â€? For the last couple of weeks, farmers and those of us who grew up on farms have been delighting in the sight and smell of corn tassels. Tassels are the ower of a corn stalk. ey are yellowish in color and grow out of the top of the corn stalk. Since corn is grown in all 50 of the U.S. states, some people several decades ago thought the corn tassel should be the national ower. But the rose won out and has been our national ower since 1986. is is the time of year when I like to drive with the windows open, taking in the full fragrance of the tassels. A bit of botany seems important at this point. Corn is one of the few plants to have separate male and female owering parts. e tassels are the male part

from which pollen sheds. e female part of the corn plant is the silk. e silks emerge from the ear shoot, which grows out of the stalk about halfway between the ground and the Cheryl tassel. e ear shoot eventually becomes Wormley the ear of corn. Declarations With the tassels emerging, this is corn pollination time. e tassels release pollen early in the day. e pollen drifts about until it is caught by one of the sticky silks, fertilization occurs and a corn kernel is created. Given that a typical ear of corn has 800 kernels, what was just described happens 800 times in the production of one ear of corn. One more thought on tassels and pollen. Most pollen drifts 20 to 50 feet, so corn plants seldom pollinate themselves. ey are dependent upon one another tasseling and producing silks at the same time. So why should you care about corn

tassels and pollination? Whether you realize it or not, you depend on corn and so do people around the world. ere are three major types of corn – ďŹ eld corn, sweet corn and popcorn. What you see growing around Woodstock is ďŹ eld or yellow dent corn. Nearly one-third of the ďŹ eld corn produced each year feeds livestock, providing nutritious food – dairy, eggs and meat. Another third is made into ethanol to power automobiles and trucks. On average about 20 percent of the ďŹ eld corn crop is exported. According to the National Corn Growers Association, between 4 and 5 percent of the 2012 corn crop was made into high fructose corn syrup for sweetening just about everything, especially pastries and beverages. About 2 percent of last year’s crop was made into cereals and other foods. Another 2 percent was processed as starch, which has a whole host of uses including a thickening agent in food as well as a component in cosmetics, paints, candles, ďŹ reworks, adhesives, antibiotics, textiles, soaps, plastics and carpeting.

A little more than 1 percent was used in making alcoholic beverages. Last, but very important, some corn – about one quarter of 1 percent – was grown to be used for seed for future crops. Illinois is second only to Iowa in total acres of ďŹ eld corn planted, and nearly a third of the world’s corn is produced in the U.S. With an ever-increasing world population, the need for ďŹ eld corn is increasing. Farmers have responded with better farming practices which have increased their yields per acre. In 1912, the average yield of an acre of corn in the U.S. was 20 bushels. Last year, even with the drought, it was 123.4 bushels per acre. With the world population expected to increase from today’s 7.1 billion to more than 10 billion by 2050, the amount of ďŹ eld corn needed by the world’s people will increase many fold. Corn grown by Illinois farmers is playing and will continue to play an important role in feeding, fueling and sweetening the people of the world.

Cheryl Wormley is publisher of The Woodstock Independent.

Âť COLUMN

Do you know where your food comes from? When I told a friend I was working on a column about the local food movement, he asked: “What does that have to do with nature?â€? Right then, I knew I had to write the column. Do you know where your food comes from? When eating at a restaurant, picking up a quick fast-food snack or sitting down to eat at home, do you know where each of the ingredients in your meal comes from? In many cases, the answer would be a surprise: apple juice from China; lettuce from California; grapes from Chile; and lamb from Australia. Transportation of food across such vast distances – by boat, plane, truck and train – has economic as well as environmental costs. Simply put, it costs more to transport a product to Woodstock from China than it does to bring it in from Iowa. With gas prices around $4 a gallon in the U.S. (and much more elsewhere in the world), transportation costs will continue to be a signiďŹ cant share of the cost of food. On the environmental side of the

equation, all those vehicles use fuel that emits carbon dioxide which contributes to warming the planet, which in turn leads to changes in the climate. Climate change is causing some areas Lisa to receive more rain and others to receive Haderlein less, and water availThe Nature ability is a critical of Things element of growing food. Long distance transportation of food has a social cost as it disconnects people from the sources of their food. When people start to see farmland as “scenery� and not as the source of food, there is a greater risk that the full value of that open land will not be recognized or valued by society. Ask the average person where his food comes from and he is likely to say “from the grocery store.� For those who visit the local farmers

Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

market, the answer might be “well, my beef comes from a farm in Greenwood, and my vegetables come from a farm near Harvard.â€? People have been embracing the beneďŹ ts of buying local food for several years now. So much so, that there is a word to describe them: locavore, a noun meaning one who eats foods locally grown whenever possible. Locally grown food products are fresher than food that has been shipped in from far away. I also ďŹ nd local produce to taste better than store-bought items. And buying directly from a local farmer is good for the local economy. Restaurants are now promoting the use of locally raised meats and produce on menus. 1776 and Duke’s Alehouse in Crystal Lake both describe the source of many ingredients right on their menus. Expressly Leslie’s in Woodstock obtains many of the ingredients for its vegetarian meals from vendors at the Woodstock Farmers Market. Buying more of one’s food locally at a farmers market, farm stand or through a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture)

operation builds community, strengthens the local economy and is better for the environment. It is just that simple. Resources Q Woodstock’s Farmers Market is from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays on the Square. e website www.localharvest.org provides information to help consumers ďŹ nd farmers markets, CSA operations, speciďŹ c products and even restaurants that use local farm products. Q A group is working to create a McHenry County Food Cooperative which would be member-owned and operated. e food would be organic and sourced locally, and the money spent at the co-op would stay in the community to boost the local economy. e group has a website at www.mchenrycountyfoodcoop.com and also a Facebook page. Volunteers are needed to help implement the project.

Lisa Haderlein is executive director of The Land Conservancy.

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Cheryl Wormley PUBLISHER c.wormley@thewoodstockindependent.com

The Woodstock Independent (USPS #001287) is published weekly at 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098-3213. Periodicals postage paid at Woodstock, Illinois. POSTMASTERS: Forward address changes to The Woodstock Independent, 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098-3213. Subscription rates/year: $35 in Woodstock and Wonder Lake, $37 in McHenry County, $42 for snowbirds and $50 outside McHenry County. Letters to the editor: We welcome letters of general interest to the community and reserve the right to edit for clarity or length. Letters should be fewer than 400 words, and writers are limited to one letter per month. Letters are due at noon Wednesday and must be signed and include the writer’s address and a telephone number for veriďŹ cation purposes only. Corrections: The Woodstock Independent strives for accuracy. To suggest corrections or clariďŹ cations, email news@ thewoodstockindependent.com.

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10

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Education » BOARD OF EDUCATION

Funding for low-income students could be used schoolwide With more than 40 percent of students coming from low-income households, five schools in Woodstock could use Title I money for all students By ELIZABETH HARMON The Independent e Woodstock School District 200 Board of Education has approved a plan that, if approved by the Illinois State Board of Education, would allow federal Title I grant money to be used for schoolwide programs in five of its six elementary schools. “Because our free and reduced lunch enrollment is over 40 percent, there’s recognition that it impacts the entire school,” said George Oslovich, assistant superintendent for middle and high school education. “Now we can help all students who are academically challenged.” Title I, a federal program designed to help low-income and academically at-risk students, provided District 200

with $734,858 in grants last year. e funds were spent on programs that targeted low-income first- and secondgraders. During the 2012-2013 school year, 2,544 District 200 students, or about 42 percent of the district’s total enrollment, qualified for free or reduced-cost lunch. “If we had a low-achieving first- or second-grader who wasn’t low income, we couldn’t do anything through Title I. Now we can,” Oslovich said. With schoolwide funding, any student in a Title I school can participate in grant-funded programs. Schools also have more flexibility to implement programs that address broader needs, ranging from academic support for math or reading to character education, improving parent involvement and more. “It’s not giving us more money, but

COLLEGE CURRENTS

HIGHLIGHT

District hosts business breakfast By JAN DOVIDIO The Independent Woodstock School District 200 recently invited business leaders to a breakfast to discuss career and technical opportunities for students. e gathering was chaired by George Oslovich, assistant superintendent. e group discussed opportunities local businesses are offering students during their high school years. “e discussion focused on careers and the fact that college is not for everyone,” said Oslovich. ere are already several ongoing

more flexibility in how we spend it,” said Superintendent Ellyn Wrzeski. Title I requires districts to have board-approved implementation plans in place, and this year’s plans have a larger focus. Teachers at Mary Endres Elementary School and Westwood Elementary School plan to focus on character education. Dean Street Elementary School teachers will work on implementing student-led conflict resolution. Olson Elementary School teachers will focus on a maintaining positive school climate and identifying factors that impact student achievement. Teachers at Prairiewood Elementary School will participate in a schoolwide study on differentiated instruction, while staff at Verda Dierzen Early Learning Center will work to establish a peer

observation and coaching program for teachers. “We have a lot of work ahead, and a lot of innovative programs,” said Nancy Reczek, assistant superintendent for early childhood and elementary education. Not all District 200 schools are part of Title I. Because of an emphasis on early intervention programs, the money traditionally has been allocated for elementary schools, so middle and high schools, as well, as Clay Academy, will not receive Title 1 funding. In addition, Greenwood Elementary School does not have low-income enrollment above 40 percent. However, under schoolwide funding, teachers from non-Title I schools still are able to participate in professional development programs funded by the grant. “It’s a nice benefit,” Oslovich said. e district will learn in August or September if the Illinois State Board of Education has approved its application for schoolwide funding.

partnerships with local businesses. Centegra collaborates on a beginning nursing program, while McHenry County College conducts a large auto program. A partnership with Scot Forge, Spring Grove, demonstrates how a company can provide education in manufacturing skills in the digital age. It trains students in computerized numeric control, a manufacturing software program that replaces old tool and die training. e 35 career and business partners who attended the breakfast will now serve as an advisory group to the district and will meet annually to assess their efforts. “e meeting was a great success and helped strengthen our valued relationship with the business community,” Oslovich said. News of recognitions and milestones can be sent to Janet Dovidio at fetjetjd@aol.com.

Wisconsin-Madison posts spring 2013 dean’s list

The following students were named to the University of Wisconsin-Madison spring 2013 dean’s list: Jennifer Dillon and Amanda Hafer, both of Woodstock.

Columbia announces spring 2013 dean’s list

The following students were named to the Columbia College, Columbia, Mo., spring 2013 dean’s list: Michael Gurdak, Brandy Lester, Mandi Manning and Melissa Sarelas, Wonder Lake; and Milissa Dooley, Jason Learman, Sarah Oliver, Patricia Peterson, Zane Seipler and Cassandra Stajdohar, Woodstock.

Aurora University announces spring 2013 dean’s list

The following students were named to the Aurora University, Aurora, spring 2013 dean’s list: Jeremy Lennon, Wonder Lake; and Ana Estrada, Kameron Gullett and Angela Ozanic, Woodstock.

Wisconsin-Whitewater lists recent graduates

The following students recently graduated from the University of WisconsinWhitewater: Jacob Huffman, Woodstock, with a Bachelor of Business Administration in finance; and Elizabeth Thompson, Woodstock, with a Bachelor of Science in elementary education with honors.

Shinabarger graduates with honors

David Shinabarger, Woodstock, recently graduated with honors from Spring Ar-

bor University, Spring Arbor, Mich., with a Bachelor of Arts in global studies.

Goodman makes dean’s list

Berrit Goodman, Woodstock, was recently named to the Lawrence University, Appleton, Wis., spring 2013 dean’s list.

Miller earns bachelor’s degree

Ryan Miller, Woodstock, recently graduated from Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa, with a Bachelor of Science in education.

Frame named to dean’s list

Caroline Frame, Woodstock, was recently named to the Saint Louis University spring 2013 dean’s list.

Creath earns farming certificate

Tyler Mackay Creath, Woodstock, recently graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a certificate in farm and industry.

Hagen wins character award at Clark University

Jamie Hagen, Woodstock, was recently named as a recipient of the 2012-2013 Midwest Collegiate Conference Champion of Character Award at Clark University, Dubuque, Iowa.

Latimer earns BA from Lake Forest

Amanda Latimer, Woodstock, recently graduated from Lake Forest College, Lake Forest, with a Bachelor of Arts in psychology.


THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

11

A&E Songwriting legend to perform in Woodstock By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent Elvis Presley captivated the world with his rock and roll, his good looks and his cutting-edge dance moves, but it was his guitar playing that inspired then 15-year-old Michael Peter Smith to learn to play guitar. Now an accomplished songwriter residing in Chicago, Smith will be performing in concert at 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 10, at Unity Spiritual Center, 225 Calhoun St. Smith’s performance is presented by Woodstock’s Off Square Music, a not-for-profit organization. Doors open at 7:30, and admission is $12. Smith will be hosting a songwriting workshop prior to the event from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. for $40, but admission to the concert is free for workshop attendees. Entranced by Presley’s first album, “Heartbreak Hotel,” Smith became an instant student of music. “When I heard it, I thought, ‘Boy, I would just love to be able to play the guitar,’ Smith said. “at was the first time I had ever seen someone play the guitar in public other than Roy Rogers, but Elvis was a lot more glamorous to a teenager.” Smith bought an guitar for five dollars from a friend in an a cappella doowop group and learned to play. He decided it would be difficult to be like the iconic Elvis, but he soon took a liking to folk music once it was popularized by the Kingston Trio. Along with a resurgence in the idea of coffeehouse entertainment at the time, Smith pursued folk music, thinking of it as an “exotic and romantic” way to perform. When well-known singer Steve Goodman introduced some of Smith’s songs to his Chicago audiences, Smith and his wife, Barbara, decided Chicago was a good place to take up residence and continue writing. Smith composed musical scores for a theatrical production of “e Snow Queen,” by Hans Christian Andersen, and also wrote music for the Steppenwolf eatre Company production of John Steinbeck’s “Grapes of Wrath,” starring John Malkovich in England in the 1980s. But he is best known for his songwriting talents. One of Smith’s best-known songs is “e Dutchman,” which has been performed and recorded by artists including Steve Goodman, Liam Clancy with the Clancy Brothers, and Celtic under. “Spoon River” is another of his most-performed pieces. He toured

MICHAEL PETER SMITH When: Saturday, Aug. 10 Where: Unity Spiritual Center, 225 Calhoun St. Songwriting workshop: 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., $40. Must be prepaid. Includes concert ticket. Concert: 8 p.m. $12. For reservations, call 815-338-5164 or email offsquare@gmail.com in Vietnam, performing for the troops in 1969. Regarding songwriting, Smith said it was a very natural process which he began by teaching himself the construction of folk songs. At age 15, Smith wrote his first song, followed by several more in high school. While he admitted the songs were not very good, he said the point is that songwriting is not as hard as it seems. “My theory, the reason I do workshops, is because I think it’s actually easy for anybody to do it,” Smith said. “People think you have to have what they call ‘talent,’ but most people can write pretty decent songs if they think about it.” In working with folk music, a traditional

Michael Peter Smith will present a songwriting workshop and concert Saturday, Aug. 10 at Unity Spiritual Center. COURTESY PHOTO

style built of similar elements and simple chords that became standardized over time, he said once people find the chords they like, they’ve got the building blocks for constructing the sounds they like.

“Most people just don’t make the attempt because they are daunted by the fact that they see people like [Paul] McCartney or [Bob] Dylan, and think they can’t do that.”


12

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Grammy-winner to teach master class at fest Teenage music students will participate in class led by Daniel Gauthier By RHONDA MIX The Independent Four music students from the community will have the privilege of participating in a master class led by European Grammy award-winning saxophonist Daniel Gauthier Sunday, Aug. 4, at the Woodstock Opera House. e 5 p.m. class is part of Woodstock’s annual Mozart Festival and will follow a 3 p.m. concert featuring Gauthier, conductor Igor Gruppman and cellist Nazar Dzhuryn. Michael Fitzpatrick, 19, Lakewood, Jonathan Zoia, 16, Woodstock, Grant Stec, 18, Woodstock, and Luke Hess, 16, Woodstock, are the four young men selected to participate in the class. Mozart Festival Director Anita Whalen said three of the students were chosen for the program based on their teachers’ recommendations. She contacted Fitzpatrick personally and invited him to the class after he received the Helen Wright music scholarship from the Woodstock Fine Arts Association following a 2012 scholarship audition. “Each young man will bring a piece of music to play, and they will prepare as best as they can. When the master teacher gives the class, he will coach them on how to be much more expressive,” said Whalen. “Usually the piece comes out sounding completely different, but it helps to infuse the students with a higher level of artistry.” ree of the students spoke about being chosen for this year’s master class. Fitzpatrick graduated from Marian Central Catholic High School in 2012 and currently plays in the Grinnell Symphonic Band at Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa. He also occasionally plays in the

Jonathan Zoia

Grant Stec

Michael Fitzpatrick

Crystal Lake Community Band. He has received the John Philip Sousa Band Award and a U.S. Marine Corps “Semper Fidelis” award for musical excellence. “I am very excited to meet Daniel Gauthier and learn from a saxophonist of such high caliber,” Fitzpatrick said when asked how he felt about the upcoming master class. “I hope that Mr. Gauthier will be able to provide me with helpful criticism on my playing technique, as well as hints on how I can improve myself as a musician .... My life wouldn’t be quite complete without music, so I certainly plan to keep playing my saxophone for the rest of my life.” Fitzpatrick will play “Improvisation” from “Improvization et Caprice,” composed by Eugène Bozza. Zoia, a Woodstock High School student, also said he is excited about the opportunity to work with Gauthier. He said he loves playing the saxophone due to the many genres of music available featuring the instrument. An avid player in the WHS varsity band, Zoia said he also has filled

in at Woodstock Band concerts. For his piece during the master class, he will play “Concerto in C Minor for Oboe,” by composer Alessandro Marcello. Anita Tebo will accompany him. “I’m really looking forward to playing this for the master class because I’ve played the piece before, and it’s nice, everyone has a different view of style,” he said. “I chose this piece because it shows two different types of personalities throughout the music …. I hope to gain more experience and technique.” Stec, a recent Woodstock High School graduate and future Rice University, Texas, student, also looks forward to learning from Gauthier.. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to have such an amazing saxophonist here,” he said. “I look forward to hearing all that he has to say and how he thinks about music.” ough Stec said he will not pursue music as a major while in college, he will definitely keep it as a hobby in the future. He said music has been a great outlet in

his life. “It’s been nice to take a class without the rigor of academics,” he said. “It has a therapeutic benefit, and I’ve made a lot of friends through participating in music activities.” Stec will perform “Concerto in E-flat for Alto Saxophone,” by composer Alexander Glauzunov. Tebo also will accompany him. Tickets to the class are $10. Whalen said she also encourages people to attend the class as well as Gauthier’s concert prior to the event. “I highly recommend the class,” she said. “A master teacher is going to give his advice. But it also would be great to first come hear the level of talent of the master himself at the concert. And then hear what he does with the students.” Tickets for the 3 p.m. Gauthier concert will be $25 for students and $33 to $55 for adults. For information, call 815-338-5300 or visit woodstockoperahouse.com.

only available at R&S Screen Printing, Woodstock When you buy a shirt at a concert you’re not paying for the 100 percent cotton thread or the stylish V-neck, you’re paying to say, “You Brandon shoulda been there. I Pacyna was. It was awesome, and it will never hap- INDIE Inn pen again.” Q Water bottle – only available at Lucky Brake, Crystal Lake Prevent dancing cramps on Saturday and reduce your headache on Sunday by simply drinking some water throughout the day. Friends of the Fox River will be doling out free, highquality H2O all day if you’re drinking out of a Lucky Brake Water Bottle.

ey’re $3.99, and they help keep plastic out of landfills. Q Notepad and pen – only available at Material ings, Woodstock You’re going to be overwhelmed with “new” at Wasted Plains – new bands, new friends, new artists and new ideas. Make a quick note. en get back to dancing. e notebooks fit flat in your pockets and will not inhibit you from executing any currently known dance moves. Guaranteed. Q Brittanie’s yme Organic Bug Spray, only available at Green Box Boutique, Woodstock Don’t let bugs bug you and don’t let chemicals kill your buzz. Brittanie’s yme Bug Spray is a safe organic insect spray for the whole family. Clove, geranium and eucalyptus provide a pleasing scent without any oily residue or harmful chemicals. AND, it won’t stain your Wasted Plains T-shirt! Q Mustache Bag – only available out

Out of the Box, Crystal Lake Put a bird on it? No. Put a ‘stache on it then stash all your Wasted Plains merch in it. When a mustache is applied to anything (human faces included), it clearly and immediately says, “I seriously know how to have fun.” I’ve hit the streets, found what’s neat and told you what you need. Now, it’s up to you to stop att these shops, meet the people running them and properly prepare yourself for a great day together. Pictures and links to each store’s website can be found at www. indieinn.com/innprint. Have another item to suggest? We just may do a follow up piece so drop us a line at info@ indieinn.com.

» COLUMN

Go indie for an indie fest e old saying goes, “Anything worth doing is worth doing right.” And “anything” means anything — including going to your favorite local indie music festival. at’s why I’ve scoured the best shops in McHenry County and made a list of essentials you should buy before rocking out Aug. 17 in downtown Woodstock for the 3rd Annual Wasted Plains Rock & Roll Revival. 5 Must-Haves to have a great time @ Wasted Plains Q Wasted Plains hats and shirts,

YOUR AD COULD BE HERE!

Brandon Pacyna is founder and operator of INDIE INN, which organizes creative talent including artists, bands, designers and photographers. Visit www.indieinn.com for more information.

Call 815-338-8040 today! thewoodstockindependent.com


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

The Entertainer WOODSTOCK’S ENTERTAINMENT HIGHLIGHTS

» MUSIC WOODSTOCK SUMMER CITY BAND CONCERT July 31, 7:30 p.m. Woodstock Square Bring lawn chairs and gather around the bandstand. An ice cream social will run concurrent to the concert. July 31 Theme: “Musical Potpourri” -129th finale concert OPEN MIC NIGHT Aug. 2, 16, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $3 donation offsquaremusic.org Open Mic is sponsored by Off Square Music. Various artists will perform in 15-minute slots. LIVE MUSIC AT EXPRESSLY LESLIE’S Aug. 2, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Expressly Leslie Vegetarian Specialties Woodstock Square Mall 110 S. Johnson St. Free expresslyleslie.com J.W. Rice will perform. WOODSTOCK MOZART FESTIVAL PROGRAM II Aug. 3, 8 p.m. Aug. 4, 3 p.m. PROGRAM III Aug. 10, 8 p.m. Aug. 11, 3 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $55 Conductor’s Circle, $43 A-seating, $33 B-seating 815-338-5300 WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET MUSIC Woodstock Square Free woodstockfarmersmarket.org Aug. 3: Talia Pavia String Academy students 9 a.m., Courtney Sullivan 10 a.m., Andrew Sedlak 11 a.m. Aug. 6: Paul Hanrahan 9 a.m., Pete Jonsson and Rich Prezioso 10 a.m. to noon. FIRST SATURDAY MUSIC Aug. 3, 7 p.m. Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun St. $3 donation 815-337-3534 Visitors can participate in the open mic night or enjoy the show. Doors will open at 6:30. JAZZ JAM Aug. 9, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 815-338-4212 $5 donation jazzonthesquare.com John Nellson and Billy Denk will host jazz on the Square. MICHAEL SMITH CONCERT Aug. 10, 8 p.m. Unity Spiritual Center 225 Calhoun St. 8 p.m. $12 donation 815-338-5164 offsquare@gmail.com Legendary singer-songwriter Michael Smith, composer of “The Dutchman” and “Spoon River,” will perform.

STAGE LEFTOVERS Aug. 21, 7: 30 p.m. Stage Left Cafe’ 125 Van Buren St. 815-334-3555 The band will include Rich Prezioso, Joe Pesz, Brian Murphy, Laurel Palma, Pete Jonsson and Les Urban. JAZZ FESTIVAL Aug. 22, 7 p.m. Aug. 23, 8 p.m. Aug. 24, 6 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 815-338-4212 $20 jazzonthesquare.com A variety of featured performers from the Chicago jazz scene. JAZZ FESTIVAL ON THE SQUARE Aug. 24, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Woodstock Square 815-338-4212 jazzonthesquare.com 9 a.m. Billy Denk Trio featuring Phil Ciancio & Jim Seidel 10:30 a.m. McHenry County College Jazz Combo 12 p.m. Outcast Jazz Band

» DANCE HOPE THROUGH DANCE Aug. 31, 8 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $28 adult, $18 student 815-338-5300 A festival bringing together performance companies and dancers in honor of Laura Maceika. The event is a fundraiser for the Laura Twirls Suicide Awareness Foundation.

» MOVIES Previews by Jay Schulz of films currently playing at the Woodstock Theatre unless otherwise noted.

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

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‘TURBO’ A snail who dreams of racing acquires amazing speed through a freak accident. “Turbo” is the directorial debut of David Soren and stars the voices of Ryan Reynolds (“Just Friends”), Paul Giamatti (“Sideways”), Ken Jeong (“The Hangover”), Bill Hader (“Adventureland”), Maya Rudolph (“Idiocracy”) and Michelle Rodriguez (“Avatar”). RATED PG, 96 MINUTES

RATED R, 117 MINUTES

‘THE CONJURING’ Paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren help a family who are being terrorized by mysterious forces. “The Conjuring” is directed by James Wan (“Saw”) and stars Patrick Wilson (“Watchmen”), Vera Farmiga (“Up in the Air”), Lili Taylor (“Dogfight”) and Ron Livingston (“Office Space”). RATED R, 112 MINUTES

‘THE SMURFS 2’ The Smurfs must rescue Smurfette, who has ben kidnapped by Gargamel. “The Smurfs 2” is directed by Raja Gosnell (“Never Been Kissed”) and stars Neil Patrick Harris (“Star-Kissed”) and stars Neil Patrick Harris (“Starship Troopers”) and Hank Azaria (“Mystery Men”), and the voices of Katy Perry (“The Ugly Truth”), Christina Ricci (“The Addams Family”) and Jonathon Winters “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World”). RATED PG, 105 MINUTES

‘GROWN UPS 2’ Adam Sandler (“Happy Gilmore”), Kevin James (“Paul Blart: Mall Cop”), Chris Rock (“Nurse Betty”) and David Spade (“Tommy Boy”) return in the sequel to 2010’s “Grown Ups.” “Grown Ups 2” is directed by Dennis Dugan (“Problem Child”). RATED PG-13, 101 MINUTES ‘DESPICABLE ME 2’ Gru, the voice of Steve Carell (“Crazy, Stupid Love”), is back with his minions and this time he is working for the Anti-Villain League to fight a new supervillain. “Despicable Me 2” also stars the voice of Kristin Wiig (“Whip It”). RATED PG, 98 MINUTES ‘THE HEAT’ Sandra Bullock (“Speed”) and Melissa McCarthy (“Bridesmaids”) team up to take down a drug lord. Hilarity ensues. “The Heat” is directed by Paul Feig (“Freaks and Geeks”).

‘THE WOLVERINE’ Wolverine travesl to Japan to visit an old acquaintance and is confronted with his own demons when a conflict ensues. “The Wolverine” is directed by James Mangold (“Walk the Line”) and stars Hugh Jackman (“The Prestige”) and Famke Janssen (“GoldenEye”). RATED PG-13, 126 MINUTES

‘2 GUNS’ Two undercover agents find themselves on the run after a failed attempt to infiltrate a drug cartel. ‘2 Guns’ is directed by Baltasar Kormakur (“Contraband”) and stars Denzel Washington (“Flight”), Mark Wahlberg (“Boogie Nights”), Paula Patton (“Precious”) and Bill Paxton (“Aliens”). RATED R, 109 MINUTES ‘THE CROODS’ Wednesday Morning Movie Series, 10 a.m., Aug. 7 A caveman and his family seek safety after their cave is destroyed. “The Croods” stars the voices of Nicholas Cage (“Adaptation”), Emma Stone (“Zombieland”), Ryan Reynolds (“The Proposal”), Catherine Keener (“The 40-Year-Old Virgin”) and Cloris Leachman (“Young Frankenstein”). RATED PG, 98 MINUTES


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» COLUMN

Marketplace THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Woodstock businesses unite If we can convince every household in Woodstock to spend just $50 of their holiday shopping budget in Woodstock on Small Business Saturday, $459,000 would be pumped into the local economy in just one day. Saturday Nov. 30, will mark the fourth anniversary of Small Business Saturday. Created and supported by American Express, Small Business Saturday falls on the Saturday, after anksgiving. It is the shop-local equivalent to Black Friday and Cyber Monday, which feature big-box retail and e-commerce stores, respectively. According to John Entrepreneur Trione Magazine, last year Minding Your U.S. consumers Business spent $5.5 billion at small business on Small Business Saturday. is was the first year sales were tracked for the day, but preholiday estimates predicted $5.3 billion. In fact, consumer awareness for the day grew from 34 percent in 2011 to 67 percent in 2012. at trend is an important one to note because it means the message of Small Business Saturday – that there is an economic benefit to communities that have a strong base of independent businesses – seems to be taking hold with consumers. at is great news for those of us in Woodstock who own or manage a small independent business. Last year, I spearheaded an effort to organize local efforts to support a Woodstock Small Business Saturday. We held two poorly attended meetings and created a Facebook page called Woodstock First to help spread the word. While I was disappointed by the turnout at our meetings, I continue to be very enthusiastic about creating a Woodstock Small Business Saturday. But we will need more than a handful of businesses participating to make it a truly successful endeavor. So this year, we are starting early. I would like to gather together in late August a group of business leaders who are enthusiastic about this opportunity. We need a committee of six to eight business leaders to start planning our campaign to educate the public about Woodstock First and the positive benefits associated with supporting Woodstock-based small businesses. One of the points I want to get across is that participation in Small Business Saturday is not just for retail stores. Service and professional sector businesses can benefit from being associated with this promotion, which is mostly about educating the public about the benefits of shopping Woodstock first. If you’re on Facebook join Woodstock First. en, send me an email if you are interested in helping to organize our local effort. I can be reached at gm@thewoodstockindependent. com. John C. Trione is the general manager of the Woodstock Independent

Material Things Artisan Market owner Ken West makes sure every second counts at his new shop, which features works of more than 40 artists. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

» NEW BUSINESS

At new shop, a place for artisans to shine By RHONDA MIX The Independent One man’s dream to support local artists has come to fruition in the form of one of the Woodstock Square’s newest shops. Material ings Artisan Market, 103 E. Van Buren St., opened its doors July 20. Woodstock resident Ken West is the owner of the new shop, which features works from more than 40 artists, including six from the area. “My goal is to support artisans and give them a place to show off their work,” said West, who also said he will showcase some of his own glass work and set up a studio in the back of the shop. Puppets, children’s toys, wall art, dishes, jewelry, journals, bags, glassware, purses, scarves and whimsical and repurposed pieces are available for purchase at the new shop. “We will offer a range of work,” West said. “We also [tie in art] to the way things are displayed, using structures such as doors and springs.” From 1979 to 1995, West owned and operated a glass store called Artful Glazier. After it closed, he worked in the car business for many years, and

said he figured he’d pursue his dream of once again owning an art shop during his retirement. However, after becoming disenchanted with the car business, West said he didn’t want to put his dream on hold any longer. “I had that fear that if I waited too long, I would never do it,” he said. “I wanted to have a shop in my own town like I did years ago.” West said he believes now more than ever that there are many entities in the community trying to become more coalesced, sharing a common goal of working together for the health of the Square. is is one reason he said he felt it was a great time to try his new venture. With his wife, Patti, as an assistant, West began to research artists he and his wife both enjoyed. ey sought out new artists at shows and on websites and reached out to see if they would be interested in selling products at Material ings. Items in the shop will range in price from $5 to $400. West said he wants Material ings Artisan Market to be a place where people can find gifts for anyone, from their grandmothers, nieces and neph-

MATERIAL THINGS ARTISAN MARKET Address: 103 E. Van Buren St. Phone: 815-575-9170

ews to significant others. Additionally, he said he plans to offer art classes in the lower level of the building beginning in the fall, in the form of a “make it and take it” program, where people will be able to make their crafts in class and take the finished product home the same day. West will teach most of the classes, though he said he is open to having other art teachers come in and teach classes, too. “I’m having more fun than I’ve had in a long time,” West said. “I’m not trying [to make set plans] for the future, but I hope that the community embraces it. … I hope it will be a popular, good store on the Square for a long time to come.” Material ings Artisan Market is open from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Filed in the McHenry County Recorder’s Office July 11 to 18: Q Residence at 9208 Evergreen Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by HUD, Wonder Lake, to Joseph Polito, Wonder Lake, for $37,100. Q Residence at 4521 E. Lake Shore Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by Dorma Crowder, Kingston, to Michael Craig and Lora Lauer, Wonder Lake, for $150,000. Q Residence at 7512 Birch Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by John Kilbane, Houston, to Joy Martin, Antioch, for $35,000. Q Residence at 3410 E. Lake Shore Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by Alfred Hain, Chicago, to Harvard State Bank, Harvard, for $75,000. Q Residence at 1849 Powers Road, Woodstock, was sold by Centex Homes, Schaumburg, to Megan Bennett, Woodstock, for $165,081. Q Residence at 7614 Beaver St., Wonder Lake, was sold by David Russell, McHenry, to Gerald Benzschawel, Won-

der Lake, for $33,000. Q Residence at 1973 Belaire Lane, Woodstock, was sold by Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation, Chicago, to the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Chicago, for $260, 451. Q Residence at 1980 Julie St., Woodstock, was sold by Maira Cortes, Wonder Lake, to Michael and Christine Andrews, Woodstock, for $110,000. Q Residence at 5806 Wonder Woods Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by Kaylie Carroll, Richmond, to Robert Carroll, Wonder Lake, for $55,000. Q Residence at 424 Pleasant St., Woodstock, was sold by Harvard State Bank, Harvard, to Maira Cortes, Woodstock, for $82,000. Q Residence at 1010 Dakota Drive, Woodstock, was sold by the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Atlanta, to James and Katherine Hogue, Woodstock, for $175,000. Q Residence at 639 Schumann St.,

Woodstock, was sold by Federal National Mortgage Association, Dallas, to William Tengler, Woodstock, for $150,000. Q Residence at 585 Washington St., Woodstock, was sold by Shepherd Enterprises, Richmond, to Carlos Rivas, Woodstock, for $75,500. Q Residence at 1430 Cord Grass Trail, Woodstock, was sold by HSBC Mortgage Services, Brandon, Fla., to Rabbani Gulam, Woodstock, for $122,000. Q Residence at 7703 Oakwood Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by Esche Properties LLC, Arlington Heights, to Matthew Beggs and Taylor Rowe, Wonder Lake, for $130,000. Q Residence at 3039 Courtland St., Woodstock, was sold by Milena DeDobbelaere, Liberty, to Rainy Investments, Elgin, for $84,500. Q Residence at 14709 Honeysuckle Lane, Woodstock, was sold by Daniel Slavin, Westminster, Colo., to Robert and Pearl Burnett, Woodstock, for $258,000.


THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

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Community » REGIONAL TRAVEL

Windmills survive winds of change in Fulton While perusing an Illinois travel website and travel magazine, I came across Fulton, a seemingly mysterious place I’d never heard of and many people I’ve talked to have never heard of as well. Rhonda Located along Mix the banks of the Roaming With Mississippi River, Rhonda Fulton is about a two-hour drive from Woodstock. Fulton’s tourism website describes the town as a “quaint community, rich in heritage and charm.” at claim, combined with the fact that Fulton boasts a Dutch windmill dubbed De Immigrant – manufactured and preassembled in the Netherlands – piqued my interest. ough I’d initially planned to write about Wisconsin for this month’s travel piece, I decided to head off to Fulton instead and see how authentic its windmill really is (not that I know much about windmills). I will not sugarcoat things. e drive to Fulton from Woodstock seemed long and arduous, due to a never-ending stretch of highway and nothingness. When I arrived in Fulton, my GPS malfunctioned. I then relied on my own sense of direction and hoped it would lead me to the river. When I saw windmill sails in the distance, I knew I was on the right track. I headed down the road until I came to the street where the windmill sat on a ledge above the river. It is the main focal point of the area. A kitschy Dutch cottage (complete with a steel structure of a Dutchman fishing) and a windmill museum sit on the road leading up to the windmill. I headed to the museum first. Fulton resident and volunteer miller Neal Luker greeted me at the door. He provided background information on the windmill, which he said arrived in Fulton in 2000 from the Netherlands and was assembled and installed by Dutch craftsmen. De Immigrant stands at 100 feet tall, and its timbers are assembled with wooden pegs. Luker said more than 75 volunteers work at the mill and museum, with 25 of them acting as either millers or millers-in-training. “[Working at the mill] gives people in the community an opportunity to work

WORKING ILLINOIS WINDMILLS The Fabyan Windmill, Geneva www.illinoiswindmills.org/index_ files/Fabyan.htm An authentic Dutch windmill dating from the 1850s listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979, it originally operated as a custom grinding mill. e windmill was originally constructed by German craftsmen before being renovated by a man named George Fabyan in the early 20th century. Fulton’s De Immigrant windmill is a popular tourist attraction. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY RHONDA MIX

together,” he said. “It’s a chance to get to know people. e dike was really ugly before we brought in the windmill and now we receive more than 10,000 tourists a year.” After touring the museum and viewing its model international windmills, I thanked Luker and headed across the street to De Immigrant, where I was promptly greeted by Ernie Eads, a longtime miller. Eads explained how the windmill was important to Fulton because many of its residents were of Dutch heritage. He also said the mill runs 30 times per year and uses basalt millstones that produce a variety of flours, including buckwheat, rye, corn and wheat. Millers grind one bushel of grain every 10 minutes. As we toured, I noticed a variety of fun-looking wooden shoes lying near the staircase. Eads told me to try on a pair, but, unfortunately, my feet wouldn’t fit. Of course, I was disappointed. We headed up a winding wooden stairway, and I listened as Eads talked about the inner workings of the windmill and its history. We completed the tour with a stop outside where numerous flags surround the mill, paying homage to different provinces in the Netherlands. I thanked Eads and left, snapping a few photos on the way back to my car. So was it worth a visit? I’m always one to suggest exploring

new places. However, unless people are passing through the area or are extreme windmill enthusiasts, I don’t think the visit to Fulton was worth the drive. With that being said, entry to the mill was free and Fulton did provide some insight into Dutch culture. e mill also makes for some nice photo opportunities. Interested in learning more about windmills in Illinois? I’ve always thought windmills were somewhat interesting and my parents took my brothers and me to a couple when we were children. ough windmills were once widely used in food production, many windmills around the world were cast aside with the onset of the industrial revolution. However, some of the structures have been preserved for their historic value. Once upon a time, more than 50 windmills existed in Illinois. Many of them were destroyed either from natural causes or due to nefarious reasons. Four working windmills still stand and three are open for public viewing.

Staff writer Rhonda Mix writes about regional travel destinations for The Independent and also maintains a travel blog at www. midwesternadventures.com. To suggest your favorite travel destinations in Illinois or Wisconsin, email rhonda@thewoodstockindependent.com.

Fischer Windmill, Elmhurst www.illinoiswindmills.org/index_ files/Fischer.htm e windmill sits in Mount Emblem Cemetery and was constructed in 1865 by Henry Frederick Fischer, who built the mill with parts from a prefabricated kit imported from Holland. Two Dutch millwrights assisted with the construction. e mill is currently closed to the public and pending renovation. Peotone Windmill, Peotone www.peotone.com/rathjemill Frederick Rathje, his son, Henry, and Christoph Elling began construction of the “wind grist” mill in 1872. e mill produced grain products such as fine wheat flour and rye and was a primary source of feed for the local livestock industry. Prairie Mills, Golden www.goldenwindmill.org e construction of this windmill began in 1872 by German immigrant Henrich Emminga. e mill was primarily used to grind buckwheat flour, rye, graham flour, cornmeal and mill feeds.


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COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

» COLUMN

After a lifetime of waiting ... I’m still waiting I admit to a lifelong obsession of following the misadventures of those lovable-losing, cellar-dwelling doormats of the National League, the Chicago Cubs. Born in 1946, a year after their last pennant, I have yet to taste the sweet nectar of victory that would culminate in an appearance in the World Series. But I have hope. I come from a family of baseball fans, a family that was split back in 1919 by the Black Sox scandal that saw the Chicago White Sox throw the World Series as a result of dirty money getting in the way of player performance. So I have suffered for 67 years, waiting for the red, white and blue bunting to fly from the upper deck of Wrigley Field. But what I now see is causing me concern.

New ownership of the Cubs by the Ricketts family and the hiring of proven baseball executives has given me a glimmer of hope that I will witness the Cubs as Dick world champions Hattan yet in my lifetime. I’m happy for the Talk to Me makeover of the ballpark, but I’m mystified by the process of rebuilding the team on the field. Last year, the team started to coalesce around the proven pitching of Ryan Dempster and Paul Maholm.

e steady bats of Geovany Soto and Reed Johnson ignited the offense and brought stability to the clubhouse as seasoned veterans do when they hang around rookies. en without warning, they were shipped off to other teams in trades for younger minor league prospects and the hope of future success. e team’s performance tanked and my blood pressure rose. Now a year later, they’re at it again. Messrs. Epstein and Hoyer have shipped off Matt Garza and Scott Feldman to contending teams for a flood of unproven talent. I have to admit I’m tired of the rebuilding process. What kind of a business develops top talent, sends them to a competitor and brings in inexperienced, raw recruits to rebuild the business without the benefit of ever working together in the past? What happened to the value

of mentors, veterans and people who have a sense of organizational history? ere. Now I feel better that I’ve ranted about something that has been stewing in my gut all summer. I refuse to go to the northside of Chicago to see minor league baseball. I can do that in Kane County, where the ticket prices are a fraction of the cost of going to the “Friendly Confines.” I refuse to darken the gates of that mecca of baseball folklore, where my heroes Ernie Banks, Hank Sauer and Ron Santo hit balls out onto Waveland Avenue. I’ll wait it out until the Cubs become a true contender once again. On second thought, if they start winning ....

Dick Hattan is director of development at Hearthstone Communities. He can be reached at hattand@wclsil.org.

BOWLING ALLEY MARKS GRAND OPENING

A bowler rolls a frame at the July 27 grand opening of Kingston Lanes, 1330 S. Eastwood Drive. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER


COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

17

HIGHLIGHT

For Woodstock man, an active retirement By JAN DOVIDIO The Independent Whit Sears, an 80-year-old Woodstock resident, is more active in volunteer efforts than ever before.

After earning his MBA from Harvard, he had a variety of jobs that took him to Tehran, Brussels and Hong Kong. at set the stage for wanting to help others on a global level. While living in Johnsburg from 1978 to 2002, he and his wife, DD, hosted three foreign exchange students and fostered more than 100 children. eir retirement years did not slow them down. Whit and DD sold their home and served more than two years with the Peace Corps in ailand. A year with AmeriCorps Vista in Montana fol-

lowed. en they headed overseas once again, this time to India. However, their service was shortened due to DD’s illness, which ultimately led to her passing. Becoming a widower did not deter Whit’s efforts. He currently provides senior transportation, helps Meals on Wheels, tutors English as a Second Language students at McHenry County College, serves as treasurer of his church and contributes many hours from January through April at the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance clinic at MCC. e free tax assistance clinic for low-income

people is coordinated by MCC accounting instructor Ann Esarco. When asked about his favorite volunteer effort during his retirement years, Whit replied, “Certainly the two years spent in ailand tops the list, although I wish I were certain that I contributed as much as I received.” Whit still carves out plenty of time to spend with his four children and 12 grandchildren.

visit www.gothistory.org.

Motorcycle ride to benefit Pioneer Center

For information, call 815-759-7112 or visit www.pioneercenter.org.

News of recognitions and milestones can be sent to Janet Dovidio at fetjetjd@aol.com.

IN BRIEF

Historical society to host historic tour

The McHenry County Historical Society and members of the Wilson/Weyland family of Marengo will host a free open house from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 4, relating to the 1867 limestone Pringle oneroom schoolhouse, a pre-Civil War Scottish Cemetery and First Presbyterian Church of Marengo, at 203 W. Washington St. Directions to the schoolhouse and cemetery will be available at the church. For information, call 815-923-2267 or

Hearthstone to host senior fair

Hearthstone-Centegra will host its annual McHenry County senior citizens fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 13, at McHenry County College, 8900 Highway 14, Crystal Lake. The fair will feature wellness information, music by The Del Bergeson Orchestra, an expo of products, a free lunch, bingo and more. Admission to the fair is $2 per person. For information, call 815-321-4028.

The seventh annual Pioneer Motorcycle Ride will take place at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, at the Moose Lodge, 3535 Richmond Road, Johnsburg. The ride will feature multiple stops to Wisconsin as well as door prizes and a 50/50 raffle. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. There is a fee of $25 per rider. Proceeds will benefit Pioneer Center for Human Services, McHenry.

VBS at Woodstock Free Methodist Church

Woodstock Free Methodist Church will host vacation Bible school for children age 4 through fourth grade from 9:15 to 11:45 a.m. Friday and Saturday, Aug. 9 and 10, and from 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 11. For information, call 815-790-2019 or visit www.woodstockfmc.net.


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THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

COMMUNITY


COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

19

INDE FOCUS

Golf committee meets at Boone Creek

WGC tours Loyola gardens

Members of the Wonder Lake Golf Committee participate in a golf outing at Boone Creek Golf Club, Bull Valley. Pictured, from left, are: Doug Adams, Steve Hall, Jim Jensen, Donna Sullivan, Vicki Koeune, Tom Henley, Jim King and Frank Hosticka. COURTESY PHOTO

Woodstock Garden Club members recently toured the gardens of Loyola University Retreat and Campus. Executive Chef Scott Commings gave a cooking demonstration and prepared lunch using fresh garden produce. Pictured, from left: Commings, Alex Thurman and WGC member and tour organizer Vicky Harrington. COURTESY PHOTO

Fire district receives special donation

The Woodstock Fire/Rescue District recently accepted a donation of stuffed animals from the Catalent Women’s Network. The stuffed animals will be handed out to distraught children when firefighters and paramedics interact with them while on duty. Pictured, from left, front row, are: Sallie Carter, Ilona Preiss, Monica Smith, Erin Volenta and Romana Bozovic. Back row: Brian Morris, Tyler Webster, Eric Lozowski, Bob Kordecki, Ryan Mains, Aaron Krejci, Aaron Pihl, AJ Huemann and Captain Scott Nieman. COURTESY PHOTO

WHS earns national recognition

Woodstock High School was recently selected as an outstanding High Schools That Work school. Dave Spence, president of the Southern Regional Education Board that sponsors the initiative, presented the award to WHS teacher Mariah Kolena July 17 at the 27th Annual HSTW Staff Development Conference in Charlotte, N.C. COURTESY PHOTO


20

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

FLASHBACKS 25 years ago Q Woodstock resident John Lillie was named volunteer general campaign chairman of the 1988 fundraising campaign for the United Way of McHenry County. Q The Woodstock Jaycees and Boy Scout Troop I53 raised more than $1,000 for the Gary Spice family. The Spices lost their home and all of their personal possessions in a ďŹ re. Q WHS student Ray Phillips took second place in the 165-pound Greco-Roman wrestling tournament at the Prairie State Games, Urbana. 20 years ago Q The Woodstock Independent chronicled former naval serviceman Paul Murdock, who was on the submarine USS Hawkbill during World War II. Q St. Mary’s High School Class of 1943 held its 50th anniversary. Q Luster Leaf Products Inc. moved to Woodstock. 15 years ago Q A new soccer ďŹ eld was planned for Emricson Park and 3,000 cubic yards of ďŹ ll was to be obtained for the ďŹ eld from

COMMUNITY RELIGION NOTES

the WHS gymnasium and classrooms construction site. Q WHS students Craig Kastning, Jennifer Schwinchow and Matt Huebner were named recipients of Todd Patton Memorial Scholarships. Q McHenry County Fair Association Board President Dick Menzel said the fair would stay in its existing location on Country Club Road. 10 years ago Q Alexandria House Bed & Breakfast, located on Dean Street two blocks from the Woodstock Square, opened for business. Q The 2003 Gavers Community Cancer Foundation Barndance raised more than $363,000, bringing its four-year total to about $1 million. Q WHS counselor Betty Andrysiak retired after 40 years in education. Q WHS graduate R.J. Albright won the McHenry County Men’s Amateur Golf Tournament, played at Whisper Creek Golf Club, Huntley.

Q

5 years ago Woodstock-based Delta Company

National Guard unit prepared to be deployed to Afghanistan. Q The Woodstock Fire/Rescue District broke ground on its new ďŹ re station on Raffel Road south of Woodstock North High School. Q The Woodstock Independent featured Creekside Middle School English as a Second Language teacher Linda Wheeler, who was preparing to spend a year in Varnesdorf, Czech Republic, as part of the Fullbright Teacher Exchange Program. 1 year ago Q Woodstock Little League brought a proposal to the Woodstock City Council to bid for the 50/70 Little League World Series. Q BBQ King Smokehouse, 125 E. Calhoun St., opened two years after owner Jason Szmurlo purchased the building. Q Woodstock School District 200 ended the 2011-2012 ďŹ scal year with a positive balance. Q The Wonder Lake Water Ski Show Team theme for its 53rd season was Las Vegas.

CHRIST LIFE ÂŁĂŽĂˆÂŁ{ĂŠ7°Ê>VÂŽĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡{™Î{ĂŠ Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Programs/education/events: UĂŠ-iÂ˜ÂˆÂœĂ€ĂŠ9ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠĂ€ÂœĂ•ÂŤ]ĂŠĂˆ\Îäʍ°“°Ê/Â…Ă•Ă€Ăƒ`>Ăž EDEN BAPTIST £™äÎÊ °Ê-i“ˆ˜>ÀÞÊĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡nÂŁ{‡Çn{Ç Worship: 3 p.m. Sunday (Spanish) FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST ÂŁÂŁÂŁĂŠ7°Ê-ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÓÇΣ Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Programs/education/events: UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]棊\ÎäÊ>°“° FIRST PRESBYTERIAN nĂŠ °Ê,ÂœĂ•ĂŒiĂŠ{ÇÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡Ă“ĂˆĂ“Ă‡ĂŠĂŠ Worship: 9 a.m. Sunday Programs/education/events: FIRST UNITED METHODIST Óä£Ê7°Ê-ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎΣäÊ Worship: 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday Programs/education/events: UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]ʙ\{äÊ>°“°Ê FREE METHODIST ™Î{ĂŠ °Ê-i“ˆ˜>ÀÞÊĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡Î£näÊ Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Programs/education/events: UĂŠ Â…Ă€ÂˆĂƒĂŒÂˆ>Â˜ĂŠi`Ă•V>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜]ʙ\ÂŁxĂŠ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž GRACE LUTHERAN 1300 Kishwaukee Valley Road 815-338-0554 Worship: 5 p.m. Saturday; 8:30 a.m. (traditional), 10 a.m. (contemporary) Sunday HERITAGE BAPTIST CHURCH 4609 Greenwood Road *°"°Ê "8ĂŠ{ĂˆÂŁĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡xÇx‡££™ä Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday MCHENRY COUNTY JEWISH CONGREGATION 8617 RidgeďŹ eld Road, Crystal Lake 815-455-1810 Worship: 6:30 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m. Saturday REDEEMER LUTHERAN £ÎÓäÊ i>Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡™ÎÇä Worship: 8 and 10 a.m. Sunday Programs/education/events: UĂŠ Â…Ă€ÂˆĂƒĂŒÂˆ>Â˜ĂŠi`Ă•V>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜]ʙ\ÂŁxĂŠĂŠ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž UĂŠ"ÂŤiÂ˜ĂŠ}Ă€ÂˆÂ?Â?ĂŠÂ˜Âˆ}Â…ĂŒ]ĂŠĂˆĂŠÂŤÂ°Â“Â°ĂŠĂ€Âˆ`>Ăž RESURRECTION CATHOLIC 2918 S. Country Club Road 815-338-7330 Worship: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; 5 p.m. Saturday; 8 a.m. weekdays ST. ANN’S EPISCOPAL xäÎÊ7°Ê>VÂŽĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ä™xäÊ Worship: 8:30 and 10 a.m. Sunday ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN {ä£Ê-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠÂœÂ…Â˜Â˝ĂƒĂŠ,Âœ>`ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡xÂŁx™Ê Worship: 6 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. Sunday Programs/education/events: UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]棊\ÎäÊ>°“° ST. MARY CATHOLIC ĂŽÂŁĂŽĂŠ °Ê/Ă€ĂžÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎÎÇÇÊ Worship: 7:30 a.m. Monday through Saturday; 5 and 6:30 p.m. (Spanish) Saturday; 7:30, 9 and 10:30 a.m., noon (Spanish), 5 p.m. Sunday THE BRIDGE CHRISTIAN Ă“ĂˆĂ“Ă¤ĂŠ Ă€Âˆ`}iĂŠ>˜iĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡{Â™ĂˆÂ‡Ă¤x{n Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS Ă“Ă¤ÂŁĂˆĂŠ>Ă€ĂŒÂ?>˜`ĂŠ,Âœ>`ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎ{‡£ÇäÎ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday THE VINE ÂŁÂŁĂŽĂ“ĂŠ °Ê>`ÂˆĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎÎnä Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday UNITY SPIRITUAL CENTER Ă“Ă“xĂŠ7°Ê >Â?Â…ÂœĂ•Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎLJÎxĂŽ{ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Programs/events: UĂŠˆ˜`ĂƒÂ…ÂˆvĂŒiĂ€Ăƒ]ĂŠĂˆ\Îäʍ°“°]ĂŠ/Ă•iĂƒ`>Ăž WOODSTOCK ASSEMBLY OF GOD £Óä£Ê i>Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°UĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡ÂŁĂŽÂŁĂˆ Worship: 9 a.m. Sunday prayer service, 10 a.m. worship service WOODSTOCK BIBLE ÇÇäÊ °Êˆ“L>Â?Â?ĂŠĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡ĂŽĂ¤Ă¤ĂˆĂŠ Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday Programs/education/events: UĂŠ °,° °° ĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂ˜ÂˆĂƒĂŒĂ€Ăž]ĂŠÂŁÂŁ\ÂŁxĂŠ>Â°Â“Â°ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠÂŁ\ÂŁxĂŠ p.m. Sunday


COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

CALENDAR Upcoming events in the Woodstock area U Events are free unless otherwise noted

PHOTO: FOXYPAR4

31 | WEDNESDAY MCHENRY COUNTY FAIR McHenry County Fairgrounds 11900 Country Club Road 8 a.m. $7 adults, $3 senior citizens, children age 8-12 815-338-5315 NORTHWEST HEALTHCARE GOLF CLINIC Northwest Healthcare Center 800 E. South St. 7 p.m. 815-337-7109 info@nwhealthcarecenter.com The clinic will review proper stretching to avoid injury, swing analysis and a demonstration of Kinesio® Textaping. Call for reservations.

1 | THURSDAY MCHENRY COUNTY FAIR McHenry County Fairgrounds 11900 Country Club Road 8 a.m. $7 adults, $3 senior citizens, children age 8-12 815-338-5315 WOODSTOCK SENIOR CLUBS Hearthstone Communities 840 N. Seminary Ave. 815-344-3555 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. $2.50 for lunch The activities will include tai chi, coffee klatch, cooking demonstration, trivia, bingo and card games. Registration required. JAIL BRAKERS Unity Spiritual Center 225 W. Calhoun St. 6:30 p.m. 224-422-7431 jailbrakers@gmail.com Jail Brakers is a support group that provides a safe place for children and families to express their emotional reaction to separation from a family member who has been incarcerated. YOUR MONEY AFTER DIVORCE Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 7 to 8:45 p.m. 815-338-0542 The free seminar will cover topics important for divorcing and divorced people including child support, maintenance and property taxes.

2 | FRIDAY MCHENRY COUNTY FAIR McHenry County Fairgrounds 11900 Country Club Road 8 a.m. $7 adults, $3 senior citizens, children age 8-12 815-338-5315 WOODSTOCK STADIUM MOTOCROSS SERIES McHenry County Fairgrounds 11900 Country Club Road Gates open at 3 p.m., races start at 6 p.m. 815-337-3511 $10 spectator admission Various classes and levels of racers will compete on a full motocross course at the fairgrounds.This race is the third in a series of six races held in Woodstock. OPEN MIC NIGHT Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St.

7 p.m. $3 donation 815-338-5164 offsquaremusic.org See The Entertainer, page 13.

3 | SATURDAY MCHENRY COUNTY FAIR McHenry County Fairgrounds 11900 Country Club Road 8 a.m. $7 adults, $3 senior citizens, children age 8-12 815-338-5315 HABITAT RESTORATION Harrison Benwell 7055 McCullom Lake Road 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 815-575-1684 Individuals, students, small groups and families with children older than 6 can participate in restoring native habitat at the conservation area. FIRST SATURDAY MUSIC Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun St. 7 p.m. $3 donation 815-337-3534 unitywoodstock.org See The Entertainer, page 13. WOODSTOCK MOZART FESTIVAL — PROGRAM II Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 8 p.m. $55 Conductor’s Circle, $43 A-seating, $33 B-seating 815-338-5300 See The Entertainer, page 13. RUN FOR JODI Woodstock North High School 3000 Raffel Road 8:15p.m. Preregistration: adults -$25, 11-17 -$15, 10 and younger-$5 Race day registration: adults -$30, 11-17 -$20, 10 and younger-$5 runsignup.com The race will benefit the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and locally support Jodi Farris, who continues a 15-year struggle with the disease. Jodi is the wife of Bruce Farris, local dentist, coach and running enthusiast.

4 | SUNDAY MCHENRY COUNTY FAIR McHenry County Fairgrounds 11900 Country Club Road 8 a.m. $7 adults, $3 senior citizens, children age 8-12 815-338-5315 HELPING PAWS NEW VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION Helping Paws Shelter 2500 Harding Lane 1 p.m. 815-338-4400 helpingpaws.net Helping Paws will welcome new volunteers and offers a monthly orientation. WOODSTOCK MOZART FESTIVAL — PROGRAM II Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 3 p.m. $55 Conductor’s Circle, $43 A-seating, $33 B-seating 815-338-5300 See The Entertainer, page 13.

5 | MONDAY FOX VALLEY ROCKETEERS MEETING Challenger Learning Center 222 E. Church St. 7:30 p.m. 815-337-9068 foxvalleyrocketeers.org Local rocketry enthusiasts are invited to the open meeting.

6 | TUESDAY CITY COUNCIL MEETING Woodstock City Hall 121 W. Calhoun St. 7 p.m.

9 | FRIDAY JAZZ JAM Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $5 donation 815-338-4212 jazzonthesquare.com See The Entertainer, page 13. MOVIES IN THE PARK Woodstock Water Works Emricson Park, near WaterWorks Free 8:30 p.m., darkness permitting The Disney movie “How to Train Your Dragon” will be featured.

10 | SATURDAY FOX VALLEY ROCKETEERS LAUNCH Kishwaukee Park Field Davis Road 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 815-337-9068 foxvalleyrocketeers.org The public is invited to the club’s rocket launch. MICHAEL SMITH SONGWRITER WORKSHOP Unity Spiritual Center 225 Calhoun St. 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. $40 815-338-6164 offsquare@gmail.com The workshop will be followed by Michael Smith’s concert. MICHAEL SMITH CONCERT Unity Spiritual Center 225 Calhoun St. 8 p.m. $12 donation 815-338-6164 offsquare@gmail.com See The Entertainer, page 13. WOODSTOCK MOZART FESTIVAL — PROGRAM III Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 8 p.m. $55 Conductor’s Circle, $43 A-seating, $33 B-seating 815-338-5300 See The Entertainer, page 13. HABITAT RESTORATION Dufield Pond Country Club Road 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 815-337-9315 schumacher.jeff1@gmail.com Individuals, students, small groups and families with children older than age 6 can participate in restoring native habitat at the conservation area.

11 | SUNDAY

WOODSTOCK MOZART FESTIVAL — PROGRAM III Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 3 p.m. $55 Conductor’s Circle, $43 A-seating, $33 B-seating 815-338-5300 See The Entertainer, page 13.

12 | MONDAY COFFEE WITH THE CHIEF Woodstock Police Department 656 Lake Ave. 7 to 8:30 p.m. 815-338-6787 Rick Atwater, director of Behavioral Health Services at Employee Health Consultants, will present a program on the heroin issue in McHenry County.

13 | TUESDAY ALZHEIMER’S & DEMENTIA FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP Valley Hi Nursing & Rehabilitation 2406 Hartland Road 6 p.m. 815-334-2817 Caregiving tips and strategies will be discussed.

15 | THURSDAY FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL Woodstock School District 200 WOODSTOCK SENIOR CLUBS Dorr Township office 1039 Lake Ave. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. A fee will be charged for lunch, $2 donation for bingo 815-344-3555 The activities will include a coffee klatch, trivia and bingo. Registration is required.

16 | FRIDAY OPEN MIC NIGHT Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $3 donation 815-338-5164 offsquaremusic.org See The Entertainer, page 13.

17 | SATURDAY UNDER ONE SKY BENEFIT Suncreek Farm 5119 N. Route 47 5 to 10 p.m. $20 per person in advance, $25 per person at the event extendinghands.org The event will include a pig roast and various live musical performances including Grammy award-winner Ashley Cleveland. Proceeds will benefit Extending Hands, an organization devoted to bringing healing and love to the people of Zambia.

19 | MONDAY VILLAGE OF BULL VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION The Stickney House 1904 Cherry Valley Road 7 p.m.

ONGOING

WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET Tuesdays and Saturdays Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. woodstockfarmersmarket.org

21

July 31to Aug. 19 Voted No. 1 in Illinois for midsize markets in 2012. See The Entertainer, page 13. COFFEE AT THE CAFÉ FOR SENIORS Tuesdays Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 1 to 3 p.m. Senior citizens are invited to drop in for coffee. DIVORCECARE Tuesdays Woodstock Assembly of God 1201 Dean St. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. 815-338-1316 divorcecare.org The weekly support group and seminar will be conducted by people who understand the pain of separation or divorce. WEDNESDAYS AT HEARTHSTONE Hearthstone Communities 840 N. Seminary Ave. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. $5 for lunch 815-338-2110 hearthstonewoodstock.org Senior citizens are invited to drop in for activities beginning at 9 a.m. with coffee or an exercise class. WOODSTOCK SUMMER CITY BAND CONCERT Wednesdays Woodstock Square 7:30 p.m. See The Entertainer, page 13. ICE CREAM SOCIAL During the City Band concert. See above. BINGO Wednesdays Woodstock Moose Lodge 406 Clay St. 7 to 9:30 pm. 815-338-0126 Games will include crossfire. Food will be available. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. SOBER MOMS AA MEETING Thursdays Blue Lotus Temple 221 Dean St. 10 a.m. 847-809-1104 Moms with a desire to stop drinking are invited to meet with the group. LIVE MUSIC AT EXPRESSLY LESLIE’S Fridays Woodstock Square Mall 110 S. Johnson St. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. See The Entertainer, page 13. OPEN GRILL NIGHT Fridays Redeemer Lutheran Church 1320 Dean St. 6 p.m. 815-338-9370 rlcw.org The church will provide the grill, and the community is invited to bring whatever you want to eat and drink and maybe something to share.

BEST BET SELECTION To submit calendar items, e-mail pr@thewoodstockindependent.com or visit thewoodstockindependent.com


22

July 31- Aug. 6, 2013

SERVICE DIRECTORY/CLASSIFIEDS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Service Directory

ATTORNEY

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AC/HEATING

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A 1 Block Service Directory

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for Ad is 4 weeks


SERVICE DIRECTORY/CLASSIFIEDS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 31- Aug. 6, 2013

23

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Masterson StafďŹ ng will host a Job Recruitment Fair for Bag Makers Inc. and Brown Printing Co. every Wednesday 9 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3 pm through August 28th at our Woodstock OfďŹ ce, 114 W. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL Bring proof of employment eligibility in U.S. and High School Diploma or GED.

HELP WANTED

OWNER OPERATOR MUST HAVE OWN TRACTOR AND 5 YEARS OTR PLUS SKID LOADER EXPERIENCE. DEDICATED NORTHERN ILLINOIS AREA HAULING CARDBOARD BALES TO RECYCLING FACILITIES. MUST ALSO HAVE OWN AUTHORITY, 53â&#x20AC;&#x2122; TRAILER AND SKID LOADER. ESTABLISHED COMPANY. EXCELLENT PAY. GENEROUS FUEL REBATE. CALL 219-663-5678 EXT. 17 M-F 8AM-4PM CST


24

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

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July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

Secretary (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 31, 2013) L8724

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PUBLIC NOTICES

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and  SP RQO\ 3LHUFH  $VVRFLDWHV 3ODLQWLII¡V Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1106389. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION 6HOOLQJ2IĂ&#x20AC;FHU   I551084 (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 31, 2013) L8722 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY- SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Plaintiff, -v.LISA JAMESON, et al Defendants 12 CH 02543 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on June 7, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on September 9, 2013, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 1111 POND POINT ROAD, WOODSTOCK, IL 60098 Property Index No. 13-16-303-012. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25%

GRZQ RI WKH KLJKHVW ELG E\ FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG IXQGV DW the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG IXQGVRU ZLUH WUDQVIHU LV GXH ZLWKLQ twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in â&#x20AC;&#x153;AS ISâ&#x20AC;? condition. The sale is further subject to FRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQE\WKHFRXUW8SRQSD\PHQWLQIXOO of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a &HUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWHRI6DOHWKDWZLOOHQWLWOHWKHSXUFKDVHU WR D GHHG WR WKH UHDO HVWDWH DIWHU FRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQ of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court Ă&#x20AC;OHWRYHULI\DOOLQIRUPDWLRQ,IWKLVSURSHUW\LVD condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at

the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property $FW  ,/&6  J   DQG J   ,I WKLV property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act,  ,/&6  J  ,) <28 $5( 7+( MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For LQIRUPDWLRQ H[DPLQH WKH FRXUW Ă&#x20AC;OH RU FRQWDFW 3ODLQWLII¡V DWWRUQH\ &2',/,6  $662&,$7(6 P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 7943OHDVHUHIHUWRĂ&#x20AC;OHQXPEHU THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-28219 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Case Number: 12 CH 02543 TJSC#: 33-14472 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection 3UDFWLFHV $FW \RX DUH DGYLVHG WKDW 3ODLQWLII¡V

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013 attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I547682 (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 31, 2013) L8723 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF THE RESIDENTIAL ASSET SECURITIZATION TRUST 2005-A8CB, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-H UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED JUNE 1, 2005, Plaintiff, vs. LAURETTE DELLINGER, INDIVIDUALLY AND AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE LAURETTE M. DELLINGER DECLARATION OF TRUST DATED DECEMBER 4, 1995 AND KNOWN AS TRUST AGREEMENT NO. 250, NATIONAL CITY BANK, Defendants, 11CH 1739 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on

27

January 9, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, September 5, DWWKHKRXURIDPLQWKHRIĂ&#x20AC;FHVRI Botto Gilbert Gehris Lancaster, 970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 13-07-177-057. Commonly known as 780 Tara Drive, Woodstock, IL 60098. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property $FW   6DOH WHUPV  GRZQ E\ FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG IXQGV EDODQFH E\ FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG IXQGV ZLWKLQ  hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are DGPRQLVKHGWRFKHFNWKHFRXUWĂ&#x20AC;OHWRYHULI\DOO information. )RULQIRUPDWLRQFDOO6DOHV&OHUNDW/DZ2IĂ&#x20AC;FHV of Ira T. Nevel, 175 North Franklin Street, Chicago, Illinois 60606. (312) 357-1125. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION 6HOOLQJ2IĂ&#x20AC;FHU   I551085 (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 31, 2013) L8727

SPORTS

Transplant from another participant in the swap. e young couple knew their only move was to continue with the procedures despite the pain of their loss. While they continued forward, they took heart in her father being able to donate some of his tissue, including his eyes, through Gift of Hope. Gift of Hope is a nonproďŹ t procurement organization that coordinates organ and tissue donation and provides education across Illinois and northwest Indiana. When Gift of Hope called about her father, Nichols said they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to think twice. ey already had been communicating with the organization as a possible launchpad for their future, active role in advocating for organ donation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Before my dad passed away, he had always talked to Andrew about how if he had good kidneys, he would deďŹ nitely try to donate,â&#x20AC;? said Nichols. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really proud to know he was able to help somebody else in need.â&#x20AC;?

Coaches

Continued from Page 28 Hogle and Nichols knew her father would now be closer to them than ever. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It made us comfortable and aware that we were being looked down upon,â&#x20AC;? said Nichols. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It helped me get through it, knowing that there was somebody looking down on us making sure we were safe.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a whirlwind of emotions,â&#x20AC;? added Hogle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Knowing her dad was right there, so fresh and so knowledgeable about our situation and what was about to happen for us, made it easy.â&#x20AC;? At 7 a.m. July 11, the ďŹ rst kidney was removed and transplanted. At 1 p.m., one of Nicholâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kidneys was removed for another patient. By 3 p.m., Hogle had received his kidney from another swap participant. Almost three weeks out from the procedure, both are relieved each time Hogle gets back test results indicating his new kidney is functioning normally and leading him on the road to better health. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty cool to know that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotten support and help from everywhere, in

Continued from Page 28

Even though he is an assistant, Bradshaw said he will speak up when he needs to. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I told Steve to begin with that when I see something, I am going to say it,â&#x20AC;? Bradshaw said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you are a head coach all of your life, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard not to.â&#x20AC;? Anderson, who earned his degree from Illinois State University in 2000, moved to Arizona in 2001 and spent 10 years coaching and running athletic programs. He moved back to Illinois as his wifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s job transferred back to the state. Last year, he was offensive coordinator and quarterback coach at Bartlett High School. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It feels good [to be back],â&#x20AC;? said Anderson who is coaching wide receivers and

all facets of life,â&#x20AC;? said Hogle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We look forward to being able to help everybody else when the time comes.â&#x20AC;? For now, Hogle and Nichols will continue their recovery, which for Hogle will extend another ďŹ ve to six weeks. While he must take precautions against getting infections and putting any extra stress on his new kidney, he can start getting back into the simple things normally taken for granted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spaghetti sauce, ketchup or BBQ were a big no-no ever since I started with the nephrologist,â&#x20AC;? said Hogle, who is Greek and had to suffer through a traditional Greek Easter without the pleasure of cheesy, Greek foods. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And traveling â&#x20AC;&#x201D; when we travel, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not going to have to look for a dialysis center.â&#x20AC;? Coaching basketball â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one of his favorite pastimes that often brought the couple together â&#x20AC;&#x201D; might be delayed just a bit longer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be a little while, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OK,â&#x20AC;? said Hogle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have this fresh outlook on

KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS According to Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Northwestern physicians have averaged 30 to 40 kidney paired-donation transplants â&#x20AC;&#x201D; also known as kidney swaps â&#x20AC;&#x201D; per year since the inception of the new program in 2010. The hospital averages 140 to 160 living donor-kidney transplants each year. life. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m ready to slow down and take my time and make sure Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m ready to give my all.â&#x20AC;? Instead, Hogle will focus on getting his son, Joe, ready for his freshman year at Jacobs High School. e family cannot wait to resume their routine of heading to the gym to play basketball together. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Joe] always understood and knew how to get the most out of our situation,â&#x20AC;? said Hogle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even though he adjusted well and understood, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ready for normalcy again.â&#x20AC;?

ST. MARY PLAYERS LEARN FROM A PRO

defensive backs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Looking around, the campus has changed a lot since I was here. e program is a lot smaller than when I was here, but it was only the one high school.â&#x20AC;? Anderson said his goal for the Blue Streaks is to return to the playoffs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been in a program since I started coaching football that hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t made the playoffs, so hopefully my personal streak continues,â&#x20AC;? Anderson said. WHS senior Jordan Sumner said Bradshaw and Anderson are a welcome additions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really like the new coaches,â&#x20AC;? Sumner said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;eyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a good addition. ey have helped out a lot even though they only have been here in the summer.â&#x20AC;? Desmond Clark, former tight end for the Chicago Bears, addresses members of the St. Mary Fighting Irish youth football team July 25. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Offseason

Continued from Page 28

off until practice resumes Aug. 14. Team meetings will start Aug. 12. WHS senior Mike Santucci said he learned how to be a better leader this summer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I learned how to be a role model to the younger guys, the juniors coming up,â&#x20AC;? Santucci said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ey have someone to look up and they can base their attitudes off the senior leaders.â&#x20AC;?

Santucci, who plays running back and wide receiver, said he said he wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have much time off because he has been training all year with WHS graduate and standout football player Craig Kastning working on speed and agility. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great,â&#x20AC;? Santucci said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned so much from him. He played at Woodstock. He won a state title and he was a captain on that team.â&#x20AC;?


28

July 31-Aug. 6, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Sports For transplant patients, tragedy and a gift of hope By MEGAN IVERS The Independent Less than one week before spouses Andrew Hogle and Jen Nichols were scheduled to participate in an eight-person kid-

ney paired donation or swap program at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Nichols received a phone call bearing news no one should have to hear. It was about her father, George Jackson, a 56-year-old Lake in

the Hills resident. Jackson suffered a heart attack while driving on Highway 14, causing him to lose control of his vehicle and have a fatal accident. Like all tragedies, the unfortunate incident came completely without

warning at a time when Hogle and Nichols already had a lot on their minds. “It all kind of happened at once,” said Nichols, whose presurgery appointments were scheduled five days later.

Months of dialysis and uncertainty for Hogle pointed to one day when Nichols, a former Woodstock High School athlete and current Hebron High School girls basketball coach, would donate her kidney to one of four patients receiving kidneys. Hogle would receive a donor kidney Please see Transplant, Page 27

Past meets present

Former head coach, graduate join WHS football staff By JAY SCHULZ The Independent

eral seven-on-seven practices this summer with other high schools including Harvard, Richmond-Burton and Marian Central. Beard said they tried to play at least one school a week. June was spent working on fundamentals, technique and conditioning. Helmets were the only equipment worn. In July, the team worked on technique and scheme and wore helmets and pads. Practice days were alternated between offense and defense. “By August, we should have 80 percent of our offense and defense systems in place and most of our special teams,” Beard said. e team had 48 participants in the summer program, and Beard said he was very pleased with how it went. “I think the commitment level from the 2013 team has been great,” said Beard. “e attendance, commitment and enthusiasm have been great this summer.” July 25 was the last day of practice for the summer, giving the players 17 days

e Woodstock High School football team went old school this summer with the return of two familiar faces. Former WHS head coach Bob Bradshaw and 1994 WHS graduate Todd Anderson joined the Blue Streaks coaching staff, bringing together four members from the early ’90s teams. “I am very excited for our coaching staff, and maybe I’m just the lucky man today to have these guys coaching with me,” said WHS head football coach Steve Beard. “Your program is only going to be as good as your players, your coaches, your parents and your administration, and I really think our coaching staff is great right now.” Beard and Anderson played for Bradshaw, who was the Blue Streaks head coach from 1969 to 1994. Also on the coaching staff is Tom Mitchell, who was an assistant under Bradshaw. “I couldn’t be happier with the three assistants we have hired this summer,” Beard said, noting assistant Jason Hy, who had coached as a volunteer the previous five years, became a paid member of the staff this year. “You don’t want to have a revolving door of assistant coaches. You never know who you are going to get.” Bradshaw led the Blue Streaks to the team’s first state championship in 1983. After leaving WHS, Bradshaw coached at several schools including Johnsburg, Prairie Ridge and Grayslake. He has not coached the past three years. “I didn’t have a job this year, and I don’t like to sit around,” Bradshaw said. “I knew Steve had some openings, so I talked to him about it. And, here I am.” “I feel great. I love WHS. I had a lot of success here. I’ve had great players and great assistants. … It was a lot of fun, and it is a lot of fun still.” Bradshaw, who is the offensive and defensive lines coach, said he is going to enjoy being an assistant for his former player. “I like being here as an assistant, because I don’t have all of the paperwork and the meetings and the worry,” Bradshaw said. “It’s fun. I’m doing this for fun. “Steve’s a great coach, and I’m learning his system. He played for me, and his system is a lot like what I am used to. But there are changes I’m going to have to learn. You’re never too old to learn.”

Please see Offseason, Page 27

Please see Coaches, Page 27

Woodstock High School head football coach Steve Beard, right, reviews plays with Jace Tohlman, left, and Alan Hafer July 23. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY JAY SCHULZ

» FOOTBALL WOODSTOCK HIGH SCHOOL

No time for an offseason Summer break is short for football players looking to get a leg up on the competition By JAY SCHULZ The Independent Members of the Woodstock High School football team didn’t have much time to enjoy the summer before they were out on the practice field preparing for the fall season. With just 10 days off after school ended, the team practiced from 8 to 11 a.m. Monday to ursday starting June 12. e Illinois High School Association allows teams 25 days of practice in the summer. Practices are voluntary, but if players want to be competitive, they don’t want to miss many practices, according to WHS head football coach Steve Beard. “It’s become just like other sports in the summer,” Beard said. “If you want to improve your skill, you have got to do some work in the summer. Whatever the sport, your skills have to improve. … If you are going to miss 25 practices in the summer and you expect to show up Aug. 14, you’re going to be 100 some-odd hours behind.” Summers weren’t always this way. Former WHS head coach and current line

coach Bob Bradshaw said when he first started as head coach in 1969, he was not allowed contact with the players during the summer. e team captains would take players out to what was then City Park (now Emricson Park), and Bradshaw would watch from his car on top of the hill. Not until the ’80s did he start to have practice in the summer — usually seven to 10 days — and the players also would compete in passing leagues. Bradshaw said he doesn’t think the current IHSA rules are necessarily a good thing. “I think it’s overdone,” Bradshaw said. “I don’t think it’s necessary or good for the kids. ey are forcing kids to specialize.” Bradshaw said he would rather have a shorter, concentrated practice time with required participation. WHS seniors Alan Hafer and Jordan Sumner agreed the practice time is needed, and in fact, the team could use a little more. “I think the summer is good for us,” Hafer said. “I feel we should get a little more because we start [school Aug. 15], which is very soon, and we lose on the two-a-days that most schools get.” “I think the amount [of training] we have in the summer is perfect,” Sumner said. “We might even need more so we can just roll into the season.” e Blue Streaks participated in sev-

“I think it’s overdone. I don’t think it’s necessary or good for the kids.” — Bob Bradshaw, WHS coach

Woodstockindependent 7 31 13  
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