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Woodstock

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

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Serving Woodstock, Wonder Lake and Bull Valley, Ill.

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NEWS

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

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Water Works slides reopen for the remainder of the summer

‘Little Mermaid Jr.’ to run July 19 to 21 at the Opera House

Bull Valley resident heads satellite broadcasting company

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Hi-ho Phoebe! Local woman’s horse makes the silver screen By SANDY KUCHARSKI The Independent e 6:40 p.m. showing of “e Lone Ranger” at Classic Cinemas July 3 was filled with a crowd of more than 75 fans, dressed to the nines,

intently studying every scene that featured the horse Silver. e majority of the patrons in the theater at that time were family and friends of Amber Bauman of Woodstock, who raised and trained Phoebe, the pure white thoroughbred who

was one of the equine stars in the film. e local horse stars in several scenes including running on the train and jumping off a flaming barn. Her former owner could identify her based on her signature move,

swishing her tail between her legs when she jumps. Bauman also could tell a difference upon close inspection because some of the equine actors were males. Bauman said, “We all need to go see the movie again because

we were so focused on trying to determine which one was her and which one wasn’t her.” e movie premiere was the culmination of a chain of events that started more than Please see Horse, Page 3

Bull Valley joins with townships, Woodstock for roadwork

New wildlife refuge is a passion for one Woodstock woman

By KATELYN STANEK The Independent

The Hackmatack Wildlife Refuge is comprised of 11,200 acres of land and includes conservation easements, parks and privately held land across northeastern Illinois and southeastern Wisconsin. Above, open land within its borders in McHenry County is pictured. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KATELYN STANEK

Hackmatack making progress By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent

INDEX

Woodstock resident Lenore BeyerClow, a dedicated environmentalist and policy director for the regional conservation organization Openlands, has had a hand in creating an 11,200acre wildlife refuge encompassing properties in northeastern Illinois and southeastern Wisconsin. On Aug. 15, 2012, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced the Hackmatack Wildlife Refuge as the 557th refuge in the nation. However, it wasn’t officially established until Nov. 6, 2012, when Openlands purchased a 72acre parcel of land north of Woodstock

OBITUARIES OPINION EDUCATION A&E MARKETPLACE

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and sold 12 acres to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, making Hackmatack the 561st refuge. Funding for the 12-acre conservation easement came from donations from the Friends of Hackmatack and the McHenry County Conservation Fund, giving the USFWS the ownership interest it needed to establish Hackmatack as a National Wildlife Refuge. e remaining 60 acres was purchased from Openlands by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. Openlands is a nonprofit land trust that helps acquire land for public agencies. For Hackmatack, Openlands worked with Friends of Hackmatack,

Sierra Club — Illinois Chapter and the Trust for Public Land. As a result, the area became an NWR, protecting diverse habitats, providing recreation and promoting education. According to Openlands’ project overview, “Hackmatack is part of President Obama’s America’s Great Outdoors initiative to develop a 21st century conservation and recreation agenda.” “We have a vision of land protection that is established by having this refuge and now lots of organizations can come together to help make the vision a reality,” said Beyer-Clow. Instead of being a large piece of land Please see Hackmatack, Page 2

OBITUARIES Dan E. Andrew, Winston-Salem, N.C. Brian E. Messman, Woodstock Pearl Irene Bartel Rud, Sarasota, Fla. Gerald ‘Jerry’ A. Draffkorn, Wonder Lake

Miriam Lydia Eggum, Monroe, Wis. Robert J. Zimmerman, Woodstock Albert Ronne Baumann, Mission, Texas

END QUOTE “I’ve gotten this warm, fuzzy feeling being in Woodstock. “ —Jan Himmelfarb, Page 12

e village of Bull Valley and the city of Woodstock are partnering with the Dorr Township Road District and the Nunda Township Highway Department for a construction project that will resurface portions of Country Club and Bull Valley roads. More than 80 percent of the planned roadwork, slated to begin in May 2014, falls within Bull Valley village limits. e remaining stretches of road are within the jurisdictions of the other participating municipalities. e four bodies were co-applicants for federal Surface Transportation Program funds, which were granted for the project. e funding totals $1,160,000, amounting to 80 percent of estimated construction costs. e remaining 20 percent, or $290,000, will be paid by the participating municipalities at a rate proportional to the amount of construction in each jurisdiction. Rich Vance, Bull Valley village administrator, said partnering with surrounding municipalities to complete roadwork will reduce overall construction costs by combining what could be several smaller projects into one. “We’re taking advantage of the economy of scale,” Vance said. “We wanted the whole road to go together.” Vance added he believes partnering with other municipalities — something he said the village has rarely pursued — is vital for Bull Valley. Please see Roadwork, Page 4

The Woodstock Independent 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098 Phone: 815-338-8040 Fax: 815-338-8177 www.thewoodstockindependent.com


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July 10-16, 2013

NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Annual Barndance wins recognition By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent In its search to find the “unsung heroes and communities that collectively define the spirit of America,” Johnsonville Sausage named the Gavers Community Cancer Foundation’s annual Barndance event as one of the top 10 community celebrations in its nationwide “Best of US” contest June 24. As a finalist, the foundation received $1,000 from Johnsonville. Vice President Denise Graff Ponstein said the foundation was excited for the recognition, especially since a representative from Johnsonville contacted Steve Gavers about entering the contest. e award will contribute to proceeds collected at this year’s Barndance starting at 5 p.m. Saturday, July 20, at Emricson Park. is July marks the 14th year of the annual Barndance, a “FUNdraiser” and casual party in the park for anyone 21 or older. Barndance is dedicated to promoting awareness and funding education and research for cancer. e outdoor party will be held in a 120-by-120 tent, accompanied by a beer-garden tent. It will feature three bands - Rick Monroe, DOT DOT DOT and Hans & the Hormones. Graff Ponstein said there will be

Hackmatack

several other unique auction and raffle opportunities, including prizes like a Nashville getaway and Brewers vs. Cardinals tickets. e foundation also will honor three people with the annual “Never Be Defeated” award and announce a new project with Centegra Health System. Steve Gavers was diagnosed with testicular cancer in 1994. When six other people he knew lost their battle with cancer, Gavers was determined to fight and remain positive. He aggressively fought his cancer and is now a survivor. Gavers had the idea to throw a party to celebrate his remission, which turned into a successful, annual fundraising event, raising almost $5 million since its inception. “I felt I needed to do something, do more,” Gavers said. “I needed to share some of my experience with everyone who is dealing with what I did to make their ordeal a lot easier. I chose a harder path with more therapy, and I’m here.” e Barndance garners around $300,000 each year and lately has hosted more than 2,400 attendees. Graff Ponstein said every dollar raised is donated because the foundation does not have any paid staff. Five organizations have received donations from the Foundation including Centegra Health System, Family Health Partnership Clinic,

St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, e Wellness Place and the Brian Piccolo Cancer Research Fund at Rush University Medical Center. “Our goal is to create awareness and get people to get checked,” Graff Ponstein said. “ere are a bunch of communityminded people on the board who really believed in the cause, but we couldn’t do without the hundreds of volunteers each year.” e foundation has donated about $1.3 million for research to the Brian Piccolo Cancer Research Fund, which memorializes Chicago Bear Brian Piccolo, who died from embryonal cell carcinoma in 1970. e foundation gives to this fund because Piccolo’s wife, Joy Piccolo O’Connell, helped Gavers through his treatment. Sarah Finnegan, associate vice president of philanthropy at Rush University, said the Brian Piccolo Fund has raised nearly $8 million for cancer research, changing the once 100 percent fatal cancer to a 95 percent curable disease. “At Rush, because we have such a strong clinical, we excel at translational research,” Finnegan said. “We’re now looking at an individual’s biochemical makeup in delivering a treatment program for them.” Graff Ponstein said she gives her time

BARNDANCE When: 5 p.m. Saturday, July 20 Where: Emricson Park Tickets: $50 each

to the foundation because two of her brothers are cancer survivors. “I think that motivates me to work hard,” Graff Ponstein said. “When you’re working for any type of nonprofit organization you usually have a passion that drives you to do it. Knowing that working on this foundation has helped me indirectly help my brothers with their cancer treatments and survival fuels my passion.” Gavers said Woodstock’s community support has made this event successful. “If you want to make things happen, go to a small town,” Gavers said. “We’re blessed here. I have traveled all over the country, and as vast as it is, I have not seen one area that could start an event like we have. We have the largest party of “selflessness” people who attend one location for an evening of great times.” For more information on Gavers Community Cancer Foundation or to purchase tickets, visit www.gavers.org or call Steve Gavers at (815) 482-8350.

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bought at once and designated as a refuge, Hackmatack is a boundary. Acquired over a period of years, it is composed of 11,200 acres of land owned by different owners, both private and public. Acreage within the designated boundary has the potential to

be acquired over time, which Beyer-Clow said may be as long as 30 years. “What we call it is a mosaic of land protection,” Beyer-Clow said. “It is not necessarily the goal to own all of it, just to protect everything within it.”

While areas like Glacial Park, Ringwood, and Winding Creek, Hebron, are located within the Hackmatack boundaries, they are locally owned by the McHenry County Conservation District and not considered part of the refuge. Beyer-Clow said ownership determines “refuge” status. e private and locally owned lands within the boundary are protected, but they are not a refuge because they are not federally owned. Beyer-Clow said Openlands is working with other private entities to acquire more land for the refuge. In April, Ducks Unlimited, a non-profit organization that acquires land for habitat for waterfowl, acquired an 86acre parcel of land within Hackmatack in Walworth County, Wis. Beyer-Clow said Ducks Unlimited plans to restore it and transfer it to USFWS to become part of the refuge. Beyer-Clow said USFWS can acquire land from willing, private sellers. e Land Conservancy of McHenry

County, however, can work with private landowners to protect their land instead of outright land acquisition with public dollars. Beyer-Clow said if landowners put a conservation easement on their property, which gives away their rights to further develop their property, they can receive tax benefits through an individualized legal document. “Fish and Wildlife doesn’t acquire land from anyone who doesn’t want to sell it, they only acquire from willing sellers,” Beyer Clow said. “It doesn’t change underlying zoning by a municipality or county. It doesn’t affect or restrict any private landowner and what they want to do on their land. Once Fish and Wildlife acquire land, they restrict activities, but they own it.” Presently, Beyer-Clow said there is no area of the designated Hackmatack refuge for the public to visit. e 72 acres that made Hackmatack an official NWR is not yet open to the public because it is being restored. Once restored, these areas will be open for public recreation.

COURTESY GRAPHIC


NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 10-16, 2013

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Car show to flex some muscle for Thunder football By RHONDA MIX The Independent When Michelle Krenger, a parent of students at Woodstock North High School, approached staff at the school about starting an annual car show to benefit under football, she didn’t know what to expect. “I went to [coach Jeff Schroeder and principal Brian McAdow] and asked their thoughts about doing a car show with classic cars, not knowing that Brian was a ‘gearhead,’” Krenger said. “ey were both all over it.” Now in its third year, the Muscles for Muscles car show is set to return to WNHS Saturday, July 13. All of the proceeds from the event benefit under football and

will be used to purchase speed helmets, uniforms and an endzone camera, among other things. e fundraiser originated as a team effort between Krenger — whose son Jimmy plays football for the school and whose son Ricky is a former under player — Schroeder and McAdow. Krenger said she came up with the idea for a car show after realizing fundraising efforts for the school were becoming more difficult due to a rocky economy as well as new state guidelines regarding school fundraising. “My thoughts were to create a new tradition for the new high school,” Krenger said, “that kids can say they were [partly responsible for starting] when they come back for their 10- and 20-year reunions.”

is year, participants will have the opportunity to enter cars in contests for 42 different trophies, including Best of Show, as well as three Team Choice awards, in which football players will pick their favorite cars and present trophies to the owners. Additional trophies will be awarded based on votes by judges who have had previous experience dealing with classic cars. “e [judges] understand that this is a fundraiser for the kids,” Krenger said. “It’s fun, but they also know the amount of time and money someone can put into a car.” Krenger said she and fellow “football moms” Sharon Fabian and Rose Iverson have asked businesses in Woodstock and surrounding areas to donate

items for raffles, while also encouraging families to come out and show support for the high school football team. In addition to the car show and raffles, the event will feature food sales, music, games for children and a live broadcast by 103.9 e Fox. Krenger said in the planning stages of the first event, some people had doubts a new car show run by women would garner much support. “We had fun planning, and we laughed when ‘car guys’ said we would get about 30 cars,” she said. “[But] we had 92 cars, and we raised just under $5,000. Our goal this year is $8,000. It’s a big number, but with support and no rain, we can get there.” e entry fee is $20 per car, with donations accepted.

Slides reopen at Water Works By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent

Amber Bauman raised and trained Phoebe, one of the horses in the feature film “The Lone Ranger.” She is pictured with Phoebe’s sister, Shikago. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY SANDY KUCHARSKI

Horse

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three years ago. Bauman is the owner and trainer at Valley View Acres on Mt. abor Road. She currently offers lessons and also has raised many foals over the years. One of the pairings produced several pure white offspring. A good friend of Bauman had been perusing a Disney website when she noticed a casting call for pure white horses to star in an upcoming movie. e friend responded to Disney with Bauman’s contact information. Six months later, Bauman received a phone call from Disney’s head horse wrangler, Rex Peterson, asking questions such as is your horse as white as she looks in the photos, how well can she jump, and how long is her mane? “I hung up the phone and said this is hogwash!” Bauman recalled. Feeling skeptical, she called her husband, Tyson, who is a detective in Harvard, and asked him to check the guy out. He confirmed that Peterson was the real deal, and two days later Peterson flew in for a visit. Bauman was instructed to close the barn to the public and agree to keep the meeting totally confidential. While she was waiting for his arrival, Bauman said she whispered to Phoebe, “is is the opportunity of a lifetime, don’t blow it.” Bauman rode the horse in English tack and demonstrated her level of training and jumping ability, and Peterson also tried her out, using a Western saddle. e meeting went well, and he offered to buy the horse

for the movie project. e decision to let Phoebe go was tough for Bauman. She had raised Phoebe from a foal and had a very strong bond with the horse, describing the mare as an extension of her own personality. She did not have Phoebe up for sale before she was contacted by Disney, but she recognized the opportunity for this exceptional animal. “I cried a lot, but I run a horse business, and you have to think with your head and not your heart,” Bauman said. Leasing was not an option with the studio, and no offers have been made to Bauman to buy her back. inking realistically, she said, “Would I really want a horse back that’s been taught to rear on command?” Following production of “e Lone Ranger,” Phoebe was sent to a rest farm in New York, awaiting a possible opportunity to star in a sequel. A reflection of Hollywood, however, still remains at Valley View Farm. Bauman owns a full sister to her famous mare, another pure white thoroughbred named Shikago, who has stepped graciously into the spotlight and already made a celebrity stand-in appearance, visiting Star 105.5 radio studios July 3. Bauman was proud of Shikago’s calm demeanor, especially when the radio personalities asked her to bring the horse – with a 6-week foal at her side – inside the studio for a photo. The stunt went off without a hitch.

e water slides at Woodstock Water Works are back in operation as of July and for the remainder of the 2013 season after being closed June 13 due to a citation by the Illinois Department of Public Health. A spring inspection by the IDPH had deemed a grate cover for the drain pipes that served the slides and water features to be “non-compliant,” citing a violation of the Virginia Graeme Baker Anti-Entrapment Act, a pool and spa safety act passed when a young girl drowned after becoming trapped underwater by the powerful suction of a hot tub drain. e city of Woodstock has hired a specialized contractor to design an intake grate with an intent toward modification and compliance. In the meantime, city officials determined the grate poses no danger to swimmers and decided to reopen the popular pool attraction. “e company we are working with is one of only a few companies in the United States that has this type of specialized knowledge and capacity,” Mayor Brian Sager said of the company contracted to build the grate. “ey are indicating to us that the state of Illinois is the only state that has advanced the code requirements to this extent.” Because Water Works had been in compliance throughout multiple previous inspections, Sager said reopening the slides was a rational decision. “Our protocols have been, routinely, very protective,” Sager said. “We do not allow any degree of ‘recreational’ playing, swimming activity, in the slide

MUSCLES FOR MUSCLES CAR SHOW When: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 13 Where: Woodstock North High School, 3000 Raffel Road Entry fee: $20 per car Information: 815-482-2154 e Muscles for Muscles car show will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 13, at WNHS, 3000 Raffel Road. e event is free to the public. Vendors are still being accepted. For information, call 815-482-2154 or email MusclesforMuscles@ att.net. To register a car, visit w w w. a t h l e t i c s 2 0 0 0 . c o m / woodstocknorth or register on the day of the event from 8 to 11 a.m.

well. ey come down, they go out. Swimmers are not allowed in close proximity to the grates.” A lifeguard system also means a guard is stationed at the bottom of the slide at all times. As a further precaution, the area with the grates is roped off. “ere is absolutely “Our protocols no possible have been way that an individual routinely very who has come protective.” down the — Mayor Brian Sager slide could be moved toward the intake grates prior to a guard making sure they were moving out and toward the stairs or, should something happen, that they would not be immediately there to remove that person,” Sager said. Sager said the city has been working on communications with the actions to take with the IDPH. He said the IDPH may be concerned with Woodstock’s decision, but he said city employees are prepared to handle issues. Sager said the city intends to keep the slides open for the remainder of the season while working toward making the pool compliant with IDPH standards As a result of opening the slides, Sager said the response from the users of the pool was “unbelievably enthusiastic. “We believe it was in the best interest of our residents, our taxpayers — who support that aquatic center — and the users to open the slides through the remainder of the season, and then work with the IDPH to ensure that remediation comes into compliance with the state of Illinois’ stringent codes and happens after the pool season is completed,” Sager said. Recreation director Dave Zinnen said season pass holders have been credited with a 10 percent refund on their account because of the inconvenience.


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July 10-16, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Run for Hope exceeds fundraising goal By JAY SCHULZ The Independent e idiom “the third time’s the charm� was proven July 6 on a beautiful summer day at Emricson Park for the 2013 Run for Hope 5K. Four hundred ninety runners participated in the race, which far exceeded the goal of 420 set by organizers; and about $23,000

The Independent has a garage sale package! $FODVVLĂ€HGDG FRGHDSSURYHG VLJQV ODEHOVIRU PHUFKDQGLVH VDOHVLQYHQWRU\

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was raised, which exceeded the goal of $20,000. Event co-organizers Lynn Fuller and Josh Einspahr said they were extremely pleased with the event. “is year’s event was absolutely amazing,� Fuller said. “We’ve learned a lot in the past two years. We’ve become more organized. We are becoming better known. We had 490 runners, which was amazing.�

Roadwork

“Everything seemed to go smoothly,â€? Einspahr said. “We had 135 people sign up the day of [the race], which was great. ‌ It was a beautiful day. It was a little warm but not as bad as last year.â€? e race is held to raise awareness of and support research for childhood cancer in memory of Hope Fuller, a Woodstock resident who died in 2010 as a result of a brain tumor at the age of

NEWS 12. In three years, the event has raised about $47,000. Fuller, Hope’s aunt, said organizers will meet in the next few weeks to discuss what they can improve on for next year’s race. WHS graduate JD Fuller, Hope’s brother, ďŹ nished ďŹ rst with a time of 17 minutes, 11.4 seconds, followed closely by fellow graduate Phil Meyer with a time of 17.11.6. Twenty-eight children participated in the kids half-mile held immediately after the 5K.

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“e village really did not have working relationships with many of the municipalities in McHenry County,â€? he said. “It caused Bull Valley to be sort of remote — it was almost like an island. Bull Valley was suffering ďŹ nancially, but now that everyone is also suffering ďŹ nancially, if you take advantage of [intergovernmental partnerships], everybody wins.â€? Preliminary engineering work is not eligible to be covered by STP funding. All costs associated with construction engineering — which follows preliminary engineering — will be paid in full by the municipalities before being reimbursed at a rate of 80 percent by the Illinois Department of Transportation. e village of Bull Valley will operate as the lead agency for the project, collecting money from the participating municipalities and reimbursing them after funding from IDOT is received. Jeff Van Landuyt, Woodstock interim public works director, said the city of Woodstock initially turned down Bull Valley’s offer to partner on the project, changing course when STP funding

“The village really did not have working relationships with many of the municipalities in McHenry County. It caused Bull Valley to be sort of remote.� — Rich Vance, Village Administrator became available. “We were approached by Bull Valley quite some time ago and we told them we weren’t interested,� Van Landuyt said. “But now we’re paying 20 cents on the dollar to repave. at’s a lot more attractive.� Van Landuyt said completing the repaving project in conjunction with other municipalities improves road quality. “If they [repave] and we don’t do ours, there’s a crack there,� Van Landuyt said. “You can tell exactly when you’re in a different jurisdiction.� Total cost estimates for construction and construction engineering after reimbursements show Bull Valley

Road resurfacing project Project locations Bull Valley Road: From Valley Hill Road to east of Draper Road Country Club Road: From west of Deerpath Road to Fleming Road Length of road resurfacing, by municipality Bull Valley: 13,370 feet Woodstock: 945 feet Dorr: 700 feet Nunda: 1,623 feet

paying $256,206.21, Woodstock paying $17,112.20, Dorr paying $5,909.84 and Nunda paying $10,771.74. Costs for preliminary engineering, which began in February 2013, are estimated at $63,000 for Bull Valley, $3,000 for Woodstock, $2,000 for Dorr and $6,000 for Nunda. Bid letting is expected to take place Friday, Nov. 8.


NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 10-16, 2013

5

OBITUARIES

Dan E. Andrew

Dan E. Andrew, 93, Winston-Salem, N.C., formerly of Park Ridge and Woodstock, died Sunday, March 31, 2013. He was born in 1919 in Nebraska, to R.O. and Lotta Andrew. He moved with his parents to Woodstock in 1925. He received an accounting degree from the University of Illinois at the age of 20, as a member of the Reserve Officer Training Corps Army Horse Calvary. He served during World War II and supervised the making of munitions. He also served during the Korean War and remained in the Army Reserve until 1979, retiring as a colonel. He earned an MBA from the University of Chicago and held a variety of executive positions, including working at his family’s buisness, R.O. Andrew Company, Woodstock. He and his wife, Lorena, moved to Winston-Salem in 2000 and became residents of Brighton Gardens, where he remained until his death. He received numerous awards and honors throughout his life, including being named Man of the Year in Woodstock three times. He was a champion of the Woodstock Country Club and helped build the Woodstock swimming pool. He was proud to be chairman of the All-America City committee. He and his wife enjoyed traveling and took several trips to China. He was grateful for the help of his longtime personal assistant, Maggie Werkman, and her family. He was proud of his children and lived with an uncommon zest for life; he held true to his ideals of integrity, honesty, love of his family and love of his country. Survivors include two sons, Ray (Susan), Winston-Salem, and John (Lori) Leesburg, Va.; a daughter, Lynne (Francis), Los Gatos, Calif.; six grandchildren, Justin, Brian, Kate, Sarah, Joe and Lindsay; and his cousin, Lloyd B. Andrew Jr., who was like a brother to him. He was preceded in death by his wife in 2000. A memorial service for family and friends was June 22 at Pfafftown Christian Church Cemetery, Pfafftown, N.C. Military honors were given. Memorials can be sent to Forsyth County Mental Health Association, 1509 S. Hawthorne Road, Winston-Salem, NC 27103 or the Kate B. Reynolds Hospice Home, 101 Hospice Lane, Winston-Salem, NC 27101.

Brian E. Messman

Brian E. Messman, 53, Woodstock, died Monday, June 17, 2013, at Centegra Hospital-McHenry. He was born Oct. 26, 1959, in Woodstock to Marion and Grace (Thompson) Messman. He married Pam Francke. He worked for many years as a carpenter. He loved riding his motorcycle, camping and being in the outdoors. Most of all, he loved spending time with his family. Survivors include his wife; his parents; three sons, Tony (Kayla), Tom and Christopher; two daughters, Briana (Grant) Kolehase and Autumn; four brothers, Jerry, Ed, Steve (Diane) and Peter; a sister, Beth (Bill Olson) Messman;

a grandchild, Lillian Francke; and nieces and nephews, Salina and Hannah Messman and Gary and Katie Fike. A memorial gathering was held June 21 at Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, Woodstock. Burial was private. Memorials can be sent to the family.

Pearl Irene Bartel Rud

Peral Irene Bartel Rud, 91, Sarasota, Fla., died Monday June 17, 2013, at The Springs in Sarasota. She was born Nov. 2, 1921, in Franksville, Wis., to William Emil and Margaret Lillian Bartel. On Jan. 31, 1942, she married Harold Ragnar Rud in Chicago. She attended Steinmetz High School in Chicago and raised her family in Oriole Park. She enjoyed hosting family gatherings. She especially enjoyed children and encouraged her children and grandchildren to stand up for themselves and do well in school. She also enjoyed skiing, taking her children on excursions and visiting friends and family in Illinois and Wisconsin. She worked as a school secretary for many years before retiring with her husband – a veteran and former construction superintendent – to Cape Coral, Fla., where they enjoyed the year-round warmth and made many lasting friendships. Survivors include two daughters, Dlorah Audrey (Bud) Hayden, Sarasota, and Kristin Margaret (John) Winn, Grand Junction, Colo.; three grandchildren, Matt (Kim) Stone, Woodstock; Mark Stone, North Charleston, S.C., and Scott (Erin Young) Winn, Silverthorne, Colo.; five great-grandchildren, Zack and Zoe Stone, Paiton and Autumn Stone and Oliver Winn; a sister, Audrey (Ralph) Rasmussen, Cape Coral; and a brother, William (Mollie) Bartel, Elmhurst. She was preceded in death by her husband in 1992; two sisters, Verna Bartel and Gladys Suerth; and a brother, Robert Bartel. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, July 26, at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 545 S. Ardmore, Villa Park. Interment will be at Chapel Hill Gardens, Oakbrook Terrace. A reception for family and friends will follow at the Ivy Restaurant at 120 N. Hale, Wheaton. Donations in her name can be sent to Messiah Lutheran Church, 2691 NE Pine Island Road, Cape Coral, FL 33909.

Gerald ‘Jerry’ A. Draffkorn

Gerald “Jerry” A. Draffkorn Sr., 74, Wonder Lake, died Tuesday, July 2, 2013, at The Springs in Crystal Lake, surrounded by his loving family. He was born Jan. 2, 1939, in Chicago to Frank and Marian Quall Draffkorn. On Aug. 8, 1982, he married Susan Sullivan in Wonder Lake. He served in the U.S. Army. He was a well driller and retired three years ago from Joseph H. Huemann & Sons, Ringwood. He was a member of The Church of Holy Apostles, McHenry. Survivors include his wife; Wonder Lake, two daughters, Jennifer (Patrick) Etherington,

Round Lake Park, and Jill Draffkorn, Woodstock; three sons, Jerry (Natalie) Draffkorn Jr., Woodstock, Jeff (Mary) Draffkorn, Mount Prospect, and Jim Draffkorn, Wheeling; two brothers, Frank (Ellen) Draffkorn, Dallas, Ga., and twin brother Tom (Janice) Draffkorn, Woodstock; and eight grandchildren, Trey, Jonelle, Katie, Matthew and Jonathon Draffkorn and Nathan, Emily and Logan Etherington. He was preceded in death by a sister, Marianne Cristy, and a brother, Donald Draffkorn. Visitation was July 5 at The Church of Holy Apostles, McHenry. The funeral was July 6 at the church. The Rev. Paul White officiated. Burial was at Christ the King Cemetery, Wonder Lake. Arrangements were made by Schilling Funeral Home, Sterling. Memorials can be sent to www.schillingfuneralhome.com.

Miriam Lydia Eggum

Miriam Lydia Eggum, 95, died Tuesday, July 2, 2013, in Monroe, Wisconsin. She was born Aug. 23, 1917, in Chicago to Herbert and Amelia (Schmidt) Schrecke. On July 24, 1937, she married John Eggum. She moved with her family to Woodstock in 1956. She enjoyed playing bridge and volunteering for the hospital auxiliary gift shop. She was a member of Grace Lutheran Church for more than 50 years, the Woodstock Garden Club and McHenry County Homemakers Extension. She lived for her children and grandchildren and all the wonderful holidays they celebrated together. Survivors include two sons, John N. (Pamela) Eggum, Oak Park, and William A. Eggum, Monroe, Wisconsin; a daughter, Karen A. (Jerry) Wells, Woodstock; four grandchildren, Donald P. (Melinda) Wells, Woodstock, Karel L. (Chris) Wells, Caledonia, Wis., John P. (Meghan) Eggum, Chicago and Michael A. Eggum, Oak Park; five great-grandchildren, Drake M. Friedman, Samantha Lydia Friedman, Fiona A. Wells, Abigail Rose Litton, and John “Jack” Alexander Eggum. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband in 2008; two nephews, Paul and “Pete” Eggum; a son-in-law, Robert Wells; two brothers, Herbert and Richard Schrecke; and a sister, Dorette Taylor. Visitation and the funeral were July 9 at Grace Lutheran Church, Woodstock. Interment followed at McHenry County Memorial Park, Woodstock. Arrangements were made by Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, Woodstock. Memorials can be sent to a charity of one’s choosing.

Robert J. Zimmermann

Robert J. Zimmermann, 83, Woodstock, died Friday, July 5, at home. He was born Aug. 17, 1929, in Chicago to Fred and Theresa (Gart) Zimmermann. On April 7, 1951, he married Barbara Haack at St. Mary Church, Woodstock. He moved to Woodstock at the age of 9 and was a member of St. Mary Catholic Church ever since. He was employed with Woodstock Die

Albert Ronne Baumann

Albert Ronne Baumann 74, Mission, Texas, formerly of Woodstock, died Thursday, July 4, 2013, at Centegra Hospital – Woodstock . He was born June 6, 1939, in Fargo, N.D., to Albert and Isabel (Anderson ) Baumann. He married Marguerite Fitzgerald. He graduated from Worsham College in 1987 with a degree in mortuary science. He was a former partner at SchneiderLeucht,-Merwin, & Cooney Funeral Home, Woodstock, and was formerly employed at Union Special, Huntley. He was a member and past exalted ruler of the Woodstock Elks. He was a resident of Tropical Valley Acres, Mission Texas, and served as president and member of the board. He also was a member of St. Paul’s Catholic Church in Mission. He enjoyed golf and fishing and was an avid White Sox fan. He also enjoyed playing cards with family and friends and solving soduko puzzles. He will be remembered as a great husband, father and grandfather. Survivors include his wife; a son, Kenneth Baumann; a daughter, Kimberly (Jason) Sheckells; a son-in-law, Kevin Simes; six grandchildren, Parker Simes and Jacqueline Simes, Bryan and Stephanie Huffar and Jessica and Alexander Baumann; and a sister, Maryann Baumann. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Kathryn A. Simes, July 28, 2004, and his parents. Visitation was July 7 and 8 at SchneiderLeucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, Woodstock. The funeral was July 8 at the funeral home. Inurnment was at Linn-Hebron Cemetery, Hebron. Memorials can be sent to a charity of one’s choosing.

STREET SMARTS

POLICE BLOTTER Q Patrick James Haderly, 50, 107.5 E. Van Buren St., Woodstock, was arrested June 18 at 107.5 E. Van Buren St. on a warrant with the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office for failure to appear in court on a charge of battery. Haderly was turned over to the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office. Bond was set for $5,000. Court date was to be set. Q Thomas G. Bonick, 50, 302 South Drive, Lakemoor, was charged June 22 with possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia at North Jefferson and East Judd streets, Woodstock. Bonick was turned over to the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office. Bond and court date were to be set.

Casting Company and, after retirement, ventured into several different jobs ranging from selling fertilizer to working at a car wash. He was a dedicated family man and received enjoyment from his children and grandchildren. Survivors include his wife; three sons, Steven (Kathleen) Zimmermann, Palatine, John W. (Diane) Zimmermann, Fresno, Calif., and Jerome “Jerry” Zimmermann, Woodstock; five grandchildren, Eric (Pam) Zimmermann, Janna Zimmermann, Kristine (Timothy) Murphy, Richard (Dana) Zimmermann and Alexia Zimmermann; five great-grandchildren; two brothers, Charles (Marian) Zimmermann and Paul Zimmermann; two sisters, Terese Thompson and Ann (Steven) Janienke; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; a daughter, Patricia J. Zimmermann; and a brother and sister-in-law, Fred and Florence Zimmermann. Visitation and the funeral Mass were July 9 at St. Mary Catholic Church, Woodstock. Interment followed at Calvary Cemetery, Woodstock. Memorials can be sent to Journey Care,405 Lake Zurich Road Barrington, IL 60010, or St. Mary Catholic Church, 312 Lincoln Ave., Woodstock, IL 60098. Arrangements were made by SchneiderLeucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, Woodstock.

Q Jacob C. Adams, 27, 104 N. Rose Farm Road, Woodstock, was charged June 22 with possession of drug equipment at North Jefferson and East Judd streets. Adams posted $150 bond. Court date was set for July 18. Q Christopher Robert Catania, 20, 110 Villa Road, Streamwood, was charged June 26 with driving while license was suspended, unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia and speeding at Highway 14, Woodstock. Catania was turned over to the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office. Bond was set at $1,500. Court date was set for June 27. Q Eduardo R. Arango, 41, 302 W.

Diggins, Harvard, was charged June 28 with no driver’s license and speeding at Highway 14 and Kishwaukee Valley Road, Woodstock. Arango posted $150 bond. Court date was set for Aug. 1. Q Paul Brian Smith, 43, 1475 Commons Drive, Woodstock, was charged June 30 with battery at 3701 Doty Road. Smith was turned over to the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office. Bond was set at $1,500. Court date was set for July 25. Any charges are merely accusations, and defendants or suspects are presumed innocent unless proven guilty.

Franklinville Road between South Street and Perkins Road will close this week for resurfacing. Detours will use Kishwaukee Valley, Vermont, Garden Valley and Millstream roads as well as Route 176. The roadwork is expected to be completed by July 31.

Average gas price

$3.78

/GAL.

0.11

Reflects average price of regular unleaded gasoline at Woodstock gas stations the morning of July 8.


6

July 10-16, 2013

Opinion THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT Woodstock, IL Š 1987

CHERYL WORMLEY

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Publisher, Co-Owner

Cheryl Wormley John C. Trione Katelyn Stanek Jay Schulz Rhonda Mix Lisa Kucharski

PAUL WORMLEY Co-Owner

JOHN C. TRIONE General Manager

KATELYN STANEK Managing Editor

» OUR VIEW

Reason should prevail when it comes to wage ordinances Another summer, another contentious prevailing wage ordinance. As it has every year since the state of Illinois began requiring municipalities to pay contracted workers at a rate set by the Illinois Department of Labor, the Woodstock City Council passed a prevailing wage ordinance at a June meeting. And as they have for years, several councilmembers expressed dismay at the costly state statute. Prevailing wage ordinances require that workers contracted to complete a wide variety of city public works projects, from masonry work to paving to plumbing, be paid a uniform hourly rate typically based at least partly on union wages. e rates, which vary by county, are determined by officials at the Department of Labor. ere’s a problem with that: time and time again, it seems that the Department of Labor’s wage findings are well out of sync with the real world’s wages. As Councilwoman Maureen Larson noted, a quick perusal of the U.S Department of Labor Statistics’ website shows the amount of money the city of Woodstock will have to pay electricians actually exceeds the median wage for the same work in New York City and San Francisco. And there’s almost no way Woodstock — or any other taxing body — can avoid it. e state of Illinois makes it incredibly difficult for municipalities to work around what it determines to be the prevailing wage, meaning most simply go along with the Department of Labor’s findings. e result? An ordinance that amounts to an unfunded mandate from the state, pushing up costs for taxpayers and hammering public budgets across Illinois at a time when many cities are cutting back on staff and services in an attempt to make up for dwindling tax revenue. ere is one thing the city can try, though: it can work together with other area municipalities to conduct its own survey of county wages — no small task, it should be noted — to determine actual, reasonable prevailing wages. Such a solution was floated by Mayor Brian Sager during the council’s discussion, and it’s something the city should pursue. Forming a partnership with other area taxing bodies and commissioning a study may mean an investment of time and money, but it will be time and money well-spent if it means school districts, townships and cities aren’t paying New York City prices in northern Illinois.

weigh in Email letters to the editor to letters@thewoodstockindependent.com or mail them to 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098.

» YOUR VIEW

Quiet, please My wife and I have lived in Woodstock for two years, and we love it here. Every morning we sit on our porch and have our coffee, and, in the evenings, our drinks. But we do have a huge complaint. In the evening, the intersection in front of our house sounds like a NASCAR race, tractor pull or a commercial jet landing all in one. Cars, pick-up trucks and motorcycles go by with muffler systems that I know are against the law. I have contacted the Woodstock Police Department and was told they don’t write tickets for this, because in their words, “We would consider this a cheap ticket.” Meaning, I guess, not worthy. So I called the police in Lake Geneva, and talked to a sergeant as to how their ordinance was working out. She said great. ey give a warning, then a ticket, and she contends it has been very successful. When she heard what I was told by the WPD she was a little surprised. She said that you have to respect the entire community. ey also are enforcing a car radio noise abatement ordinance. When we can hear a pick-up truck that has turned off South, heading up Dean Street, and still hear it when it passes Dean Street Elementary School, it’s time to do something.

INDE THOUGHT

What I would really like to know is what is going on in their heads, that they think everyone enjoys their noise. People with loud radios always seem to have their windows down. I guess so we can enjoy. Mike Stenhoff, Woodstock

Thank you, Rec Dept. I just want to publicly thank the Woodstock Recreation Department for coming up with a plan for their season pass holders! Happy Fourth of July! Lisa Jesse, Woodstock

Score one for cooperation As a preschool teacher, I stress cooperation in my class and am glad to see that trait in the businesses, organizations and people of Woodstock. ere was a need for Woodstock Little League to have a scoreboard out at the Merryman Fields in order to host the Intermediate State Championship games. Woodstock Little League, Woodstock Lightning Baseball, Golden Eagle Community Bank and Mark Mitchell-State Farm all came together with monetary donations to put a scoreboard up at the Mer-

Woodstock residents worked together to raise money for a couple of great causes over the past week. Attendees at the annual fireworks show at Emricson Park donated thousands of dollars to help cover the expenses for this privately funded event. Several days later, the third annual Run for Hope 5K

ryman 6 Field. Because of these organizations’ generosity, WLL will now host the state championship games from July 6 to 14, and many other baseball teams will benefit from this addition. Score one for cooperation! Tammy Baier, Woodstock

Food co-op needs your help Close to 100 people are involved in building a local food cooperative in McHenry County, and they’re looking for more like-minded individuals to help in its formation, with a target opening date of the store-front co-op in May 2015. Our mission statement: “Build a local food cooperative promoting a healthy, ethical and resilient community,” would occur by supporting local farmers and other local artisans where possible, with products free of pesticides and chemicals. Interested individuals can sign up for more information, volunteer at various levels, help spread the word and participate in an upcoming meeting. Visit www.mchenrycountyfoodcoop.com, like us on Facebook under “McHenry County Food Cooperative or email us at mcfoodcoop@gmail.com. Sue Resnik, Crystal Lake

raised more than its ambitious goal of $20,000, pulling in $23,000 to benefit cancer awareness and research. The Woodstock Independent applauds the volunteers who help make these events a reality, as well as the attendees who donate the money that makes all of that effort a success.


OPINION

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 10-16, 2013

7

Âť COLUMN

It works for our fireworks, and it will My husband, Jim, and I greeted nearly everyone who came in the Jackson Street entrance to Emricson Park July 4 for Woodstock’s ďŹ reworks. We also gave each and every man, woman and child an opportunity to donate to our town’s Independence Day 2013 ďŹ reworks display. People were in an especially good mood this year, and the crowd was the largest in almost 20 years. We surmised the mood and size of the crowd might have been because the evening was comfortably cool, there were few if any mosquitoes and people had stayed in town and enjoyed the day. People in a good mood are generous. At the Jackson Street entrance, their pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters and their $1-, $5-, $10- and $20-bills totaled more than $1,150, which was $400 more than last year. I won’t have a total of all of the donations and the parking receipts until the Fourth of July Fireworks Committee meets in mid-July. I’m hopeful there’s enough to cover the $14,000 show that lighted the skies and delighted the community. As for the size of the crowd, people

ďŹ lled the sledding hill, the hill below Sullivan Field and the grassy areas near the South Street entrance to the park. Friends told us there were gatherings of people in the OakCheryl land and Calvary cemeteries and in Wormley yards, on porches Declarations and rooftops and in parking lots and cul-de-sacs around town. We were a community gathering to celebrate our nation’s independence. It is important to note the cooperation between the city, the ďŹ re/rescue district, the Fourth of July committee and the people. e committee contracts with the ďŹ reworks provider and organizes the fundraising. Business owners and people from all walks of life donate all of the money for the actual ďŹ reworks. e city’s Public Works Department sees that the park is all set up and then cleaned up. Woodstock Police Department ofďŹ cers help

park cars and provide security. And, the Woodstock Fire/Rescue District provides emergency vehicles, completes ďŹ reworks safety inspections and stands ready. Woodstock’s Fourth of July celebration is a wonderful example of a successful public-private partnership – government and the private sector working together. A PPP is, most often, a venture funded and operated through a partnership between government and one or more privatesector businesses. Our Fourth of July ďŹ reworks include at least three additional entities – a volunteer committee, service clubs and the people. e ďŹ reworks PPP has worked since 1995. It’s a model that can be tweaked and used to accomplish other worthwhile community projects. ere’s a tendency for people to think paying taxes satisďŹ es their part of the partnership. Paying taxes may take care of necessary services. Partnering expands the pool of ideas, energy and resources resulting in greater opportunities and improved quality of life for all. As residents of Woodstock

and citizens in this great land, we must continue to think about we can do for our community and our country. In this time of tight budgets at all levels of government – local, state and nation – we’d do well to remember the famous statement by President John F. Kennedy, made in his inaugural address Jan. 20, 1961, “My fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.â€? ere’s a ip side to the premise of the people asking what they can do. Governments must be open to including the people in addressing issues from economic development and safe communities to enhancing educational opportunities and celebrating the Fourth. To be successful, all affected and involved must be forward-thinking and proactive and willing to invest time, talent and ingenuity as well as ďŹ nances. Our Fourth of July ďŹ reworks proves the success of the PPP concept in Woodstock. Imagine how much more we could accomplish using the PPP model.

Cheryl Wormley is publisher of The Woodstock Independent.

QUOTABLE

Âť COLUMN

Lawmakers and voting buttons For the life of me, I’ll never understand why lawmakers are too lazy to push their own voting buttons. After all, that’s what we pay them to do: vote on our behalf. Back in 1988 when I ďŹ rst covered the Illinois General Assembly, a lawmaker proudly pulled a 7-foot-long piece of No. 9 wire from under his desk and showed me he could not only vote for himself but also use his wire stick to press the voting buttons on all the empty desks around him – without even getting up from his chair. e practice of lawmakers having others operate their voting button is not only commonplace — in Illinois, it’s expected. e Statehouse press corps has pretty much stopped reporting on the practice. After all, it has been going on for generations. If you are surprised by this, it’s because you haven’t watched more than ďŹ ve minutes of the Illinois House of Representatives in action.

If you have, you’ve witnessed chaos. Lawmakers are milling about, folks are gabbing, pages scurrying, secretaries are lugging ďŹ les and no one seems to be paying attention to whoever is Scott speaking about a Reeder particular bill. When Reeder Report it’s time to vote, often “lawmakersâ€? don’t bother to walk back to their desks. ey expect their buddies sitting nearby to press their voting button. If not another lawmaker, a staffer or whoever else is handy will end up pushing the button. It’s a routine practice by members of both political parties. And it shows a cavalier disregard for the solemnity of the process. When I covered the Nevada Legislature for one of the Las Vegas newspapers, I’d share stories of the voting antics of their counterparts in Illinois. Legislators there would give me perplexed looks, because they viewed pushing their own voting button as their civic duty. Every few years there will be a State-

Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

house tempest that the outcome of a particular vote would have been different if only all the lawmakers were pushing their own buttons. Such was the case back in 2011 when about 20 Democratic lawmakers were off the Illinois House oor attending one of the day’s three scheduled budget brieďŹ ngs when the ComEd “Smart Grid trailer bill,â€? a bill that would raise electric rates, was called up for a vote. Even though the lawmakers weren’t in the chamber, someone pushed their voting buttons and votes were cast on their behalf — and the bill passed. According to media reports at the time, this is what Gov. Pat Quinn, who opposed the bill, had to say: “e people of Illinois, I think, back home, if they hear that their legislator was letting some staff member vote their switch, or somebody next door to them who wasn’t elected by the people back home, this is not right,â€? Quinn said. “And the legislators know this.â€? Quinn is right. And yet this type of monkey business continues. Is it asking too much for legislators to cast their own votes?

Scott Reeder is the journalist in residence at the Illinois Policy Institute. He can be reached at sreeder@illinoispolicy.org.

“You can never really live anyone else’s life, not even your child’s. The influence you exert is through your own life, and what you’ve become yourself.�

st a f f

&$BMIPVO4Ut8PPETUPDL *- 1IPOF 'BY XXXUIFXPPETUPDLJOEFQFOEFOUDPN

Cheryl Wormley PUBLISHER c.wormley@thewoodstockindependent.com

The Woodstock Independent (USPS #001287) is published weekly at 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098-3213. Periodicals postage paid at Woodstock, Illinois. POSTMASTERS: Forward address changes to The Woodstock Independent, 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098-3213. Subscription rates/year: $35 in Woodstock and Wonder Lake, $37 in McHenry County, $42 for snowbirds and $50 outside McHenry County. Letters to the editor: We welcome letters of general interest to the community and reserve the right to edit for clarity or length. Letters should be fewer than 400 words, and writers are limited to one letter per month. Letters are due at noon Wednesday and must be signed and include the writer’s address and a telephone number for veriďŹ cation purposes only. Corrections: The Woodstock Independent strives for accuracy. To suggest corrections or clariďŹ cations, email news@ thewoodstockindependent.com.

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8

July 10-16, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Education

» DISTRICT 200

Renovation projects underway at D-200 schools Work is ongoing on health clinic at Woodstock North set to open next year By KATELYN STANEK The Independent Renovation and construction is underway at Woodstock School District 200 facilities, including work on a grant-funded project to create a planned health clinic at Woodstock North High School. A federal grant of $86,654 from the School-Based Health Center Capital Program is being used to cover the cost of outfit-

ting a health clinic at WNHS. e clinic, expected to open in the fall of 2014, will serve District 200 students and their families whether or not they have health insurance, offering immunizations and other basic health care. It will be located within what is currently unused office space at the high school. e conversion began in midJune and is expected to be finished by early August. Workers are outfitting the space with

water pipes and a new electrical system, among other things. “We’re doing plumbing and electrical work to make it compatible with a medical office versus a regular school office,” said Associate Superintendent Mark Heckmon. Also included in the district’s summer renovation projects are work on playgrounds at Dean Street Elementary School and Verda Dierzen Early Learning Center, paving at the joint campus of Prairiewood Elementary and Creekside Middle schools and sealcoating of parking lots at multiple district

facilities. Heckmon said sealcoating will be completed using internal staff this summer, a departure from recent years when the projects were outsourced to contractors. “We found it would be more cost-effective to hire our own staff on a short-term basis and purchase our own equipment,” Heckmon said. When district parking lots were last sealcoated in 2011, the bill was about $78,000. is year, Heckmon said the district anticipates paying about $54,000, plus about $11,000 in startup equipment costs. Heckmon said

HIGHLIGHT

COLLEGE CURRENTS

Miller earns bachelor’s

Ryan Miller, Woodstock, recently graduated with honors from Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa, with a Bachelor of Science degree in education.

UIC announces recent graduates

The following students from Woodstock

the district will continue to use internal staff for future sealcoating projects. Carol Smith, District 200 director of community services, said schools are facing fewer upkeep and renovation projects this summer than in past years. Last summer, workers completed construction projects at Dean Street Elementary and Northwood Middle schools using life-safety bonds. “is has been kind of a quiet summer, which is nice,” said Smith. “e last five years, we’d been doing a lot of work on the schools.”

recently graduated from University of Illinois, Chicago: Gregorio Guzman, pharmacy degree; Holly Perkins, nursing degree; Rachel Bush, Bachelor of Science in biological sciences; Jessica Dillon, Bachelor of Arts in English; Lauren Van Diggelen, Bachelor of Arts in political science; Carly Farrenkopf, Bachelor of Science in marketing; Nabeel Taqi, Bachelor of Science in accounting; Roy Mwale, Bachelor of Science in architecture; and Whitney Behm, Bachelor of Sci-

ence in kinesiology.

Winona State lists grads

The following students recently graduated from Winona State University, Winona, Minn.: Michelle Ferguson, Wonder Lake, Bachelor of Science in exercise and rehabilitative science; and Ellyn Krieg, Woodstock, Bachelor of Science in clinical laboratory science.

Marian awards scholarships By JAN DOVIDIO The Independent Seven Marian Central Catholic High School seniors received memorial awards and scholarships at its annual Honors Day celebration. e Sister Mardelle Scholarship went to Lauren Adams. e scholarship is named in honor of Sister Mardelle, a guidance counselor at the school for more than 30 years. She was nearly 80 years old when she retired in 2003, having held the position of director of guidance for many years. She passed away in 2011. Marian’s guidance center also is named in her honor. Michael Koscielniak and Daniel McConville won the Donald F. Penza Award. Penza was a former football coach for the Hurricanes. e school’s weight room is named in his honor. Neil Bingham received the Kay Hansen Memorial Scholarship. Hansen, a theology and English teacher, passed away in May, the day before Marian’s prom. During her final months of battling cancer, she bravely wore bandannas to school. Students honored her passing by hanging floor-to-ceiling bandanna decorations in the school hallways. e final three memorial scholarships were named for Marian students who tragically died in car accidents. eir families honor their memories by awarding the scholarships. Liam Kirwin won the Jeremy Scholnick Spirit Scholarship. Kristen Kummen received the Jonathan Scholnick Spirit Scholarship. Shannon Wuensch was awarded the Danielle and Kevin Trueblood Scholarship Award. “e members of the Class of 2013 have been an outstanding group of students,” Marian Superintendent Tom Landers said. “In addition to being very high achievers academically, they have been very highly involved and have been excellent leaders in extracurricular activities. But especially, they have been positive role models for their younger schoolmates.” News of recognitions and milestones can be sent to Janet Dovidio at fetjetjd@aol.com.


THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 10-16, 2013

9

A&E Children’s theater to make waves with ‘Little Mermaid’ By RHONDA MIX The Independent Kids are set to make a splash at the Woodstock Opera House this July with the Woodstock Children’s Summer eatre production of “e Little Mermaid Jr.” Sue Kazlusky, artistic director, said this summer’s production is especially exciting for two reasons. First, it will mark the 25th anniversary of WCST, which was originally founded by Pam Camp, Katie Amundsen and Tony Castalino. Second, it’s the first time WCST has been able to put on the production of “e Little Mermaid Jr.,” as licensing wasn’t available for public use until last July. Former WCST productions include “Cinderella,” “Beauty and the Beast,” and “Seussical Jr.” “Every year, we ask the kids what they would like to do,” said Kazlusky. “ey would always say, ‘e Little Mermaid.’” e musical will closely follow the Disney film storyline about a mermaid who falls in love with a human prince, though Kazlusky said some songs, including the much-loved “Under the Sea,” have been shortened. Dialogue also has been cut or changed slightly. Cast members, who live within the Woodstock School District 200 boundaries, are in fourth through eighth grades, though Kazlusky said many former participants of the summer theatre group return to help with productions even after they move on to high school. “Our whole crew is [basically] made up of teenagers,” she said. “Teenagers who’ve been in the program previously. It’s an honor to us they want to come.” “e Little Mermaid Jr.” will feature a large cast. One hundred students auditioned and 55 students were given roles in the production. “We are so blessed with our staff, the kids, the parents, the venue and the rehearsal space [at Unity Church],” Kazlusky said. One of the biggest challenges she said she has experienced directing the production thus far has been trying to figure out and balance the technological aspects of the musical — such as creating the illusion of sea witch Ursula’s magical growth spurt. Kazlusky described the group as a “well-oiled

‘THE LITTLE MERMAID JR.’ When: 2 and 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, July 19 and 20; 3 p.m. Sunday, July 2 Where: Woodstock Opera House, 121 E. Van Buren St. Tickets: $8 Phone: 815-338-5300 machine.” It is led by Ryan Baier (Sebastian the crab), Caroline Arana (Ursula the Sea Witch) and Patience McKenzie (Ariel the mermaid), eighth-graders at Creekside Middle School. ey said they have been working with WCST for five years and collectively wanted to try out for this production as it would be their last year participating as actors and actresses in the program. “I love doing musicals,” said Baier. “And I get to be with all my friends.” All three students said they are pleased with their roles in “e Little Mermaid Jr.” Baier said he loves his character’s Jamaican accent, his commanding presence and how he looks after Ariel the mermaid. “I love that my character is adventurous,” said McKenzie. “She likes to do things her own way. [She also] has a lot of siblings, like I do. I have five siblings.” Arana said she is not much like her character Ursula — who she described as her ‘alter ego’ in real life — though she appreciates some of the sea witch’s qualities. “You can have a lot of fun with her character,” Arana said. “She’s boisterous, gaudy and larger than life.” All three students said people should come to see the production that tells the classic tale in a different way. “Everyone sounds so great together,” said McKenzie. “We have a childhood passion you won’t find anywhere else,” said Arana. “And everyone wants to be onstage. [All of us] want to be here.” e dedication the young actors and actresses show is one aspect Kazlusky said differentiates the productions WCST puts on from typical children’s plays and musicals. “We tell the kids from day one, ‘You’re professionals,’” she said. “We

HIGHLIGHT

Woodstock’s Meyer continues music tradition By JAN DOVIDIO The Independent Woodstock resident Phil Meyer is a perfect example of giving back to his community. e 20-year old is currently an instrumental music major at St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minn. He is the son of Paul

and Cindy Meyer and is a 2011 graduate of Woodstock High School. Meyer enjoys playing with the Woodstock City Band, something the longtime musician has done for four years. He learned to play the trombone under Greg Eriksen at Olson Middle School. Eriksen is the principal trumpet in the city band. At Woodstock High School, Meyer was in varsity band and jazz ensemble, under the direction of Cody Halberstadt. “I’m grateful for the opportunity to play in an ensemble over the summer, since it’s more fun than practicing by myself,” Meyer said. “I’m glad I can contribute to a long-standing musical tradition.” News of recognitions and milestones can be sent to Janet Dovidio at fetjetjd@aol.com.

Micah Muhlenfeld, left, and Caroline Arana, who play King Triton and Ursula, respectively, rehearse for “The Little Mermaid Jr.” INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY RHONDA MIX

[put on] a professional show, not a children’s show …. It’s great to see all these kids doing a professional show in a professional way.” “e Little Mermaid Jr.” will take place at 2 and 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, July 19 and 20, and at 3 p.m. Sunday, July 21, at the Woodstock Opera House, 121 E.

Van Buren St. Tickets are $8. A special dinner will take place at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, July 19, followed by the show at 7 p.m. Tickets for the dinner and show will be $20 for adults and $15 for students. Proceeds from all shows will benefit WCST. For information, call 815-338-5300.


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THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

» DANCE

The Entertainer

WOODSTOCK’S ENTERTAINMENT HIGHLIGHTS

» MUSIC WOODSTOCK SUMMER CITY BAND CONCERT July 10, 17, 24, 31, 7:30 p.m. Woodstock Square Bring lawn chairs and gather around the bandstand. An ice cream social will run concurrent to the concert. Themes are: July 10: “Fun and Games” July 17: “Wizards” - The magic of music. STAGE LEFTOVERS July 10, 24, 7: 30 p.m. Stage Left Cafe’ 125 Van Buren St. 815-334-3555 The band will include Rich Prezioso, Joe Pesz, Brian Murphy, Laurel Palma, Pete Jonsson and Les Urban. LIVE MUSIC AT EXPRESSLY LESLIE’S July 12, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Expressly Leslie Vegetarian Specialties Woodstock Square Mall 110 S. Johnson St. Free expresslyleslie.com Small Potatoes will perform. OPEN MIC NIGHT July 12, 26, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $3 donation offsquaremusic.org Open Mic is sponsored by Off Square Music. Various artists will perform in 15-minute slots. WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET MUSIC Woodstock Square Free woodstockfarmersmarket.org July 13: 9 a.m. J.W. Rice; 10 a.m. Mary Lai; 11 a.m. Sue Fink. July 16: 9.a.m Cheryl Niemo; 10 a.m. Pete Jonsson; 11 a.m. Mark Hobbs. 28TH ANNUAL WOODSTOCK FOLK FESTIVAL

July 21, 12:30 to 6 p.m. Woodstock Square $15 - $25 suggested donation 815-338-2080 woodstockfolkfestival.org The main stage will feature Brother Sun, Emily Ebert, Donna Herula, Sultans of String, Judith Avers and Red Tail Ring. WOODSTOCK MOZART FESTIVAL PROGRAM I July 27, 8 p.m. July 28, 3 p.m. PROGRAM II Aug. 3, 8 p.m. Aug. 4, 3 p.m. PROGRAM III Aug. 10, 8 p.m. Aug. 11, 3 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $55 Conductor’s Circle, $43 A-seating, $33 B-seating 815-338-5300 Program I will feature Donato Cabrera, conductor, and Vassily Primakov on the piano. Program II will feature Igor Gruppman, conductor, Nazar Dzhuryn on the cello and Daniel Gauthier on the saxophone. Program III will feature Igor Gruppman as the conductor and violinist and Vesna Gruppman on the viola. FIRST SATURDAY MUSIC Aug. 3, 7 p.m. Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun St. $3 donation 815-337-3534 Visitors can participate in the open mic night or enjoy the show. Doors will open at 6:30. JAZZ JAM Aug. 9. 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $5 donation 815-338-4212 jazzonthesquare.com John Nellson and Billy Denk will host jazz on the Square.

HIGH PERFORMANCE DANCE THEATRE July 13, 7 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $23 815-338-5300 High Performance Dance Theatre will present a night at the cabaret with live music by The Key of Joy, with the mission of combining dance and modern technology.

» THEATER ‘THE LITTLE MERMAID JR.’ July 19, 20, 2 and 7 p.m. July 21, 3 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $8, July 19, 2 p.m. $6, July 19 5:30 reception and 7 p.m. show $20 adults, $15 students 815-338-5300 Woodstock Summer Theatre will feature cast members from fourth through eighth grades, presenting the familiar animated tale based on the Broadway musical.

» MOVIES Previews by Jay Schulz of films currently playing at the Woodstock Theatre unless otherwise noted ‘WORLD WAR Z’ United Nations employee Gerry Lane traverses the world in a race against time to stop the Zombie pandemic that is toppling armies and governments and threatening to destroy humanity itself. “World War Z” is directed by Marc Forster (“Finding Neverland”) and stars Brad Pitt (“Legends of the Fall”) and Mireille Enos (“Gangster Squad”). RATED PG-13, 116 MINUTES ‘THE LONE RANGER’ Lawman John Reid, played by Armie Hammer (“The Social Network”), becomes the Lone Ranger after being saved by his faithful Indian companion Tonto, played by Johnny Depp (“Benny & Joon”). “The Lone Ranger” is directed by Gore Verbinski (“Rango”) and also stars Helena Bonham Carter (“Big Fish”), Barry Pepper (“61*”) and William Fichtner (“Black Hawk Down”). RATED PG-13, 149 MINUTES

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ‘GROWN UPS 2’ Adam Sandler (“Happy Gilmore”), Kevin James (“Paul Blart: Mall Cop”), Chris Rock (“Nurse Betty”) and David Spade (“Tommy Boy”) return in the sequel to 2010’s “Grown Ups.” “Grown Ups 2” is directed by Dennis Dugan (“Problem Child”) and also stars Salma Hayek (“Desperado”) and Maya Rudolph (“Bridesmaids”). RATED PG-13, 101 MINUTES

‘DESPICABLE ME 2’ Gru, the voice of Steve Carell (“Crazy, Stupid Love”), is back with his minions and this time he is working for the AntiVillain League to fight a new supervillain. “Despicable Me 2” also stars the voices of Kristin Wiig (“Whip It”), Ken Jeong (“Community”) and Russell Brand (“Get Him to the Greek”). RATED PG, 98 MINUTES ‘MONSTERS UNIVERSITY’ The sequel to “Monsters Inc.” goes back in time to college where Mike Wazowski (Billy Crystal) and James P. Sullivan (John Goodman) meet and are instant rivals before becoming best of friends. “Monsters University” also stars the voices of Steve Buscemi (“Reservoir Dogs”), Helen Mirren (“The Queen”), Alfred Molina (“Chocolat”) and Bonnie Hunt (“Only You”). RATED G, 110 MINUTES ‘PACIFIC RIM’ Humans build giant robots to defend the earth from an alien attack. “Pacific Rim” is directed by Guillermo del Toro (“Hellboy”) and stars Idris Elba (“Thor”), Charlie Hunnam (“Children of Men”), Rinko Kikuchi (“The Brothers Bloom”) and Ron Perlman (“Drive”). RATED PG-13, 131 MINUTES ‘THE HEAT’ Sandra Bullock (“Speed”) and Melissa McCarthy (“Bridesmaids”) team up to take down a drug lord. Hilarity ensues. “The Heat” is directed by Paul Feig (“Freaks and Geeks”) and also stars Marlon Wayans (“In Living Color”) and Jane Curtin (“Saturday Night Live”). RATED R, 117 MINUTES ‘HOTEL FOR DOGS’ Wednesday Morning Movie Series 10 a.m. Two teenagers secretly set up a hotel for stray dogs. “Hotel for Dogs” is directed by Thor Freudenthal (“Diary of a Wimpy Kid”) and stars Emma Roberts (“Aquamarine”), Jake T. Austin (“Rio”) and Don Cheadle (“Iron Man 3”). RATED PG, 100 MINUTES


Marketplace THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

» COLUMN

July 10-16, 2013

Lots to see and do in McHenry County Doesn’t it seem as though your social dance card is full and that summer feels like it never came but is actually almost gone? I’m guessing you have been enjoying, as my family has, all of the wonderful local venues and events bringing an array of entertainment right to your backyard. Perhaps you’ve had the pleasure of spending time with your family, hosting a picnic and sharing a friendly smile on the Square, enLaura joying Woodstock’s own City Band Witlox concerts. Socialize Middaugh every Wednesday night beginning at Minding Your 7:30 p.m. from now Business until Wednesday, July 31, in the Park on the Square, and, yes, it’s free! Maybe your next adventure will be to head to the Tour de Crystal Lake from 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Sunday, July 14, brought to you by the McHenry County Convention and Visitors Bureau. is high-energy competition will feature international professional male and female cyclists racing at speeds exceeding 35 mph! Visitors will enjoy the free, fun family-event featuring racing action, complemented by a family fun-race, bike rodeo, musical entertainment, summertime beverages, merchant sales and more! Enjoy the sounds of Woodstock’s very own Cassandra Vohs Demann, Woodstock’s favorite band Hans and the Hormones, and more! If trains are your passion, vintage Diesel Days Saturday and Sunday, July 20 and 21, will surely please at McHenry County’s very own Illinois Railway Museum in Union. Take a ride on a coach train and a caboose pulled by one of the powerful giants. Great photo opportunities will abound for the diesel fan! You’ve heard about how much fun it is, but you must experience it for yourself and this is the year to do it – Gavers Barndance, that is! Come out Saturday, July 20, and join your friends to enjoy music, food and fun while benefiting the Gavers Community Cancer Foundation. is fun-filled evening will take place in Emricson Park. Save the date! What’s more fun than a county fair? e McHenry County Fair will be held Wednesday to Sunday, July 31 to Aug. 4, at the fairgrounds at the intersection of Route 47 and Country Club Road and will feature carnival rides, food booths, entertainment, animal and antique competitions, talent and queen contests, demolition derby, livestock judging, exhibits and more. Looking for a diverse selection of events from sports to music, hiking to antiques and more? You can always find something to pique your interest at www.visitmchenrycounty.com. Continue your summer adventure right here in Woodstock or within McHenry County!

To learn more about the marketing and promotional efforts of the McHenry County CVB contact Laura Witlox Middaugh, Manager of Group Sales at laura@ mchenrycountycvb.com.

IsoTropic Networks, Lake Geneva, Wis., operates six satellite dishes that serve clients around the world. Founder Hank Zbierski is standing to the left of one in the foreground. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

A link to the sky A Bull Valley man’s satellite company is one of just a few of its kind in the world By RHONDA MIX The Independent Bull Valley’s Hank Zbierski didn’t plan on owning and operating a prestigious satellite broadcasting company, but the IsoTropic Networks owner seems to be content with the course his life has taken. “Broadcasting has always been my love,” he said. Located on 21 acres in rural Lake Geneva, Wis., the facility appears at first glance to be something out of a science-fiction movie — complete with warning signs about trespassing and a series of six giant satellite dishes pointing skyward. e satellite dishes all serve a united purpose — to provide satellite Internet and broadcasting services to people, businesses and government agencies from South America to Nova Scotia, from the Baja Peninsula to Sub-Saharan Africa and beyond. IsoTropics Networks has clients all around the world, serving 1,400 sites globally. e company helps its clients — which include oil and gas companies, maritime businesses, celebrities, the FBI, retail corporations and the Environmental Protection Agency — obtain Internet and radio-broadcasting information as well as emergency and weather data. IsoTropics Networks also enables countries such as Colombia to engage in distance-learning programs with the services it offers. Additionally, the company owns its own airplane hangar and will personally deliver parts — which are manufactured globally — to clients. “We’re very proactive about what people need, “ Zbierski said. “Our system does an ‘ET phone

Hank Zbierski, Bull Valley, is owner of IsoTropic Networks, a satellite broadcasting company. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

home’ [to satellites up in space] every 250 milliseconds,” Zbierski said. e antennas can track satellites up to 22,500 miles in space. Currently, 21 employees work at the main facility, which is open 24 hours a day. Zbierski said his company is one of only 11 spots in the world for conducting satellite uplinks. But how did the company begin? Zbierski, who has been a resident of Bull Valley for 21 years, said while attending the University of Iowa on a football scholarship, he ran a radio station and built his own FM radio from scratch. He graduated in 1975, and in the 1980s, he began to dabble with satellite construction while working in a commodities trading business. In 1990, he offered to build an audio satellite for Linnco Futures, a process which took him a mere 45 days. Zbierski said

“It’s a fascinating business. It shrinks the world to nothing.” — Hank Zbierski, IsoTropic owner the project would ultimately save Linnco close to a million dollars. He partnered with the company for a time and then opened up his own business in 1992. “[e company] is growing by 20 to 25 percent per year,” Zbierski said. His wife, son and daughter are all active in the business. “It’s a fun business. We are doing things nobody else is doing,” Zbierski said. “Technology is changing the entire world. It’s a fascinating business. It shrinks the world to nothing.”

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Woodstock Culver’s under new ownership By KATELYN STANEK The Independent Culver’s owners and spouses Jan and Barry Himmelfarb never imagined working together. But then, as a former art director and electrician, respectively, they didn’t think they would find themselves behind the counter of their own restau-

MARKETPLACE

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

rant, either. “I never thought about working in the food industry, and I never thought about working with my husband,” Jan Himmelfarb said. “But now that we took on a second restaurant and we’re not always together, I find that I miss him being around.” e Himmelfarbs took over ownership of Culver’s, 1620 W. Lake Shore Drive, in May, making it the second hamburger and frozen custard restaurant they run. ey’ve also owned a Culver’s franchise in Schaumburg at the intersection of Meacham and Algonquin roads for more than five years. Working in the food industry represents a change in paths for

both of them. “We wanted a change of pace, a different lifestyle,” Barry Himmelfarb said. “And once you’re in the restaurant business, you kind of always want to go back to the restaurant business.” Jan Himmelfarb said their decision to own a Culver’s franchise was based partly on what she said makes the Sauk City, Wis.-based company unique. “ey’re very family-oriented, which is a huge thing,” Jan Himmelfarb said. “I think that made me want to work with Barry even more, because I never in my life thought that we would end up working together.” Although it’s the second Culver’s fran-

chise they own, the couple, who live in Buffalo Grove, said they’ve found their Woodstock location to be a change of pace from their restaurant in Schaumburg. “I’ve gotten this warm, fuzzy feeling being in Woodstock,” Jan Himmelfarb said. “Everyone’s so friendly, and they’re very welcoming and inviting. In Schaumburg, it’s so spread out, and there’s so many restaurants. ere’s a lot more competition.” Barry Himmelfarb agreed. “We like to get involved in the community with charities and so on,” he said, “and in a smaller town like this, there’s more opportunity to do that and to get to know our customers and our neighbors better.”

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Filed in the McHenry County Recorder’s Office June 24 to 27: Q Residence at 3515 White Tail Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by Patricia A.

Schnur, Wonder Lake, to Kevin Crook and Kristin Useltor, Woodstock, for $215,000. Q Land at 1003 Trakk Lane, Woodstock, 1.1 acres, was sold by Talmer Bank

and Trust, Troy, Mich., to Multitech Metal Forming LLC, Woodstock, for $25,000. Q Residence at 280 Verbena Lane, Woodstock, was sold by Federal National Mortgage Association, Dallas, to Elm Street Homes LLC, El Segundo, Calif., for $146,000. Q Residence at 7304 Mason Hill Road, Bull Valley, was sold by David and Connie Steffen, McHenry, to Brian and Christine Bradley, Bull Valley, for $235,000. Q Vacant land at Balsam Drive, Wonder Lake, 0.5 acres, was sold by Dawn Romano and Kim Halschild, Wonder Lake, to William and Linda Mueleer, Wonder Lake, for $7,500. Q Residence at 622 Silver Creek Road, Woodstock, was sold by William and Lisa Os, Woodstock, to Daniel

and Nuala Gorski, Wonder Lake, for $65,000. Q Residence at 2039 Aspen Drive, Woodstock, was sold by St. Cloud Ventures LLC, Kenosha, Wis., to Elm Street Homes LLC, El Segundo, Calif., for $150,000. Q Residence at 1118 N. Clay St., Woodstock, was sold by Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation, Chicago, to the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Chicago, for $65,600. Q Residence at 114 Schryver Ave., Woodstock, was sold by Federal National Mortgage Association, Dallas, to Edwin Sass, Woodstock, for $55,000. Q Residence at 1732 Roger Road, Woodstock, was sold by Centex Homes, Schaumburg, to Tony and Debbie Szybkowski, Woodstock, for $191,440.

Are you... A Subscriber Looking to sell something? The first 15 words are FREE and after it's 20¢ per word Only in The Woodstock Independent Classifieds

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THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 10-16, 2013

13

Community

Marine pilot sees where it all begins Capt. Matt Phillips gets up close to the production of one of the most important parts of his aircraft — the control grip By KATLEYN STANEK The Independent He may be stationed in Iwakuni, Yamaguchi, Japan, but when Woodstock native Matt Phillips flies his F-18, he’s holding a piece of home in his hands. e 28-year-old Marine captain, who flies with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 242, was on a short leave to visit family in Woodstock July 1 when he stopped at Guardian Electric, 1425 Lake Ave., to visit the manufacturer that makes one of the most important parts of his aircraft — the control grip. Guardian designs and produces a number of electromagnetic and electromechanical components, but perhaps its most famous product is the grip for the imposing F-18 aircraft flown by members of the U.S. military. “It has about eight different buttons,” Phillips said. “Between the stick grip and the throttle, you can run 80 percent of the aircraft, so it’s important to have

high-quality components that run efficiently.” After graduating from Woodstock High School in 2003, Phillips went on to Carlton College in Northfield, Minn., before beginning his career in the Marines. He’s been flying since 2007, having attended flight school in Florida and Texas before being stationed in San Diego for two years. Today, he flies jets outside of Hiroshima, Japan. “I was excited that a Woodstock company was involved in the production of the F-18,” Phillips said. Kevin Kelly, president of Guardian Electric, said the factory’s employees were happy to give the Woodstock man a tour. “We have a lot of local people here that live in the area, and they’re very proud,” Kelly said. “ey get really engaged with the customers and how the parts are being used, so when we meet someone who uses them, it’s gratifying.” While touring the factory, Phil-

“Having a local company with local workers making something on a $55 million jet is pretty cool.” — Matt Phillips, Marine captain lips met with employees and was given a close look at how a key component of his aircraft was created. “e amount of man-hours it takes to produce one of these things — you know it takes a long time — but it was really cool to see how it goes from raw materials to a finished product,” Phillips said. e Marine was set to head back to Japan July 5. “Having a local company with local workers making something on a $55 million jet is pretty cool,” Phillips said, “and to think that Woodstock, Ill., has a part in that is gratifying.”

Matt Phillips, left, is shown an F-18 control grip by Guardian Electric employee Roger Emery. Guardian manufactures the grip used in the airplane Phillips flies as a Marine. COURTESY PHOTO


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THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

COMMUNITY


COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 10-16, 2013

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» COLUMN

Public libraries have economic value, too Many people love their local library. We love the books. We love the smell. We love the movies and the programs and the computer access and the magazines. We love studying there, researching there and going to storytimes and other programs there. For us, the library is a wondrous place, full of fun, full of adventure, full of opportunity. But what about those folks in the community who don’t love, or even use, the library? It’s important too, for them to know just how valuable

a good local library really is — not just in societal or cultural terms, but in cold, hard economic terms. Last year, people made nearly a quarter of a million visits to the Woodstock Public Library, the vast majority of whom do other shopping and busi-

Nick Weber Check It Out

IN BRIEF

Fair accepting entries for talent contest

Entries for the 49th annual McHenry County Fair talent contest will be accepted until Friday, July 26. The contest is open to McHenry County residents age 21 and younger. Prizes totaling $1,100 will be awarded in the final competition Friday, Aug. 2. For an official entry form and information, call Kathy at 815-338-6319 or stop by the fair office at 11900 Country Club Road, Woodstock.

Unity to host pet blessing

Unity Spiritual Center will host its annual pet blessing service at 10 a.m. Sunday, July 28, at 225 W. Calhoun St., Woodstock. All pets are welcome. The Rev. Tom Wendt will preside over the service which will honor animal com-

ness within the city during their trips to the library. at’s a lot of business coming into the city. Additionally, recent surveys have indicated that roughly a third of prospective homeowners list access to a good library as a strong factor in deciding where to live. Another third list it as a contributing factor — nearly two-thirds of those surveyed consider the local library in deciding where to live. Finally, it should be noted that the

Woodstock Public Library is not only an economic asset for the community, it also is a very efficient municipal entity. We have one of the lowest costs per circulation in the county and the state. For every tax dollar that goes to the library, over five dollars worth of materials and services are made available to our patrons. So tell everyone you know how economically valuable the library is!

Nick Weber is director of the Woodstock Public Library.

CELEBRATION panions. Pet owners are encouraged to bring cages and leashes. For information, 815-337-3534.

MCCD to hold open house at Powers-Waker Homestead

The McHenry County Conservation District will hold an open house from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, July 14, at Glacial Park’s Powers-Walker House, 6201 Harts Road, Ringwood. Visitors will have the opportunity to tour the house and learn more about the Powers and Walker families. Volunteers dressed in historical attire will be available to answer questions, offer tours and provide demonstrations. Several presentations relating to the history of the area will be provided. The open house will be free and registration will not be required. For information, call 815-479-5779 or visit www.MCCDistrict.org.

FIREWORKS

Madison and Robert Decker and their mother, Jamie, wait for the fireworks July 4 at Emricson Park. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY JAY SCHULZ

Emily Ann Graf A baby girl, Emily Ann Graf, 8 pounds, 14 ounces and 21 inches, was born Tuesday, June 11, 2013, at Centegra Hospital – Woodstock.

Welcoming her are her parents, Paul and Cynthia Graf, Woodstock; a brother, Colin Graf, age 2; paternal grandparents Dennis and Christine Graf, Woodstock; and maternal grandparents, Roger and Anna Chorney, Woodstock.


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FLASHBACKS 25 years ago Q The Wonder Lake Board of Trustees opened bids for a planned 3,000-squarefoot village hall that would be located on Thompson Road. Q Woodstock resident John Sorensen became the commander of Woodstock VFW Post 5040. Q Dave Bruchsaler, a member of Wonder Lake Boy Scout Troup 456, achieved the rank of Eagle Scout. 20 years ago Q All 64 delegates of the Wonder Lake Master Property Owners Association met at a special convention to discuss lake renewal. Q Cynthia Skrukrud was named the director of McHenry County Defenders. Q Woodstock resident Isaac Bitton was named ‘Citizen of the Year’ by the Woodstock Lions Club. Q The Woodstock Girls Softball League celebrated its 25th anniversary. 15 years ago Q Fourteen-year-old Dustin Moore and several other Woodstock teenagers were

COMMUNITY RELIGION NOTES

circulating a petition to build a skate park. Q Thirteen-year-old Woodstock resident Kate Dreyer designed the winning patch for the Girls Scout Pokonokah Hills Resident Camp. Q Woodstock resident Katie Hartmann set the state record in the 3,000-meter run with a time of 10 minutes, 15 seconds in the U.S.A.T.F. Junior Olympics State Meet. 10 years ago Q The city of Woodstock received the Government Finance OfďŹ cers Association’s Distinguished Budget Presentation Award. Q Eleven-year-old Woodstock resident Rachel Savino attended space camp at U.S. Space & Rocket Center, Huntsville, Ala. Q The Independent chronicled Woodstock resident Paul Swetland who created a better breadboard, the panel used by electrical engineers to develop electronic circuits. Q The U-11 CrossďŹ re boys soccer team ďŹ nished the season with a record of 10-0.

Q

5 years ago Creekside Middle School graduates

Sebastian Agignoae and Taylor Webster were the recipients of the 2008 Jeff Firak Memorial Scholarships. Q Woodstock resident Kyle Otten, a member of Woodstock Boy Scout Troop 153, received the rank of Eagle Scout. Q Plans were in place for the ninth annual Gavers Barndance at Emricson Park. Q A partnership of Woodstock businesses presented a check for $10,500 to the Woodstock City Council to purchase a scoreboard for the Dream Field at Emricson Park. 1 year ago Q The city of Woodstock prepared to release a report of the condition of the Old Courthouse Building which it recently acquired. Q The Rev. Kurt Gamlin became pastor of the First United Methodist Church of Woodstock. Q Marian Central Catholic High School girls volleyball players Meredith Patterson, Caitlin Brocker, Tara Blake, Frankie Taylor and Bethany Bucci competed in the Amateur Athletic Union Girls Junior National Volleyball Championships.

CHRIST LIFE ÂŁĂŽĂˆÂŁ{ĂŠ7°Ê>VÂŽĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡{™Î{ĂŠ Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Programs/education/events: UĂŠ-iÂ˜ÂˆÂœĂ€ĂŠ9ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠĂ€ÂœĂ•ÂŤ]ĂŠĂˆ\Îäʍ°“°Ê/Â…Ă•Ă€Ăƒ`>Ăž EDEN BAPTIST £™äÎÊ °Ê-i“ˆ˜>ÀÞÊĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡nÂŁ{‡Çn{Ç Worship: 3 p.m. Sunday (Spanish) FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST ÂŁÂŁÂŁĂŠ7°Ê-ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÓÇΣ Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Programs/education/events: UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]棊\ÎäÊ>°“° FIRST PRESBYTERIAN nĂŠ °Ê,ÂœĂ•ĂŒiĂŠ{ÇÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡Ă“ĂˆĂ“Ă‡ĂŠĂŠ 7ÂœĂ€ĂƒÂ…ÂˆÂŤ\ʙÊ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž FIRST UNITED METHODIST Óä£Ê7°Ê-ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎΣäÊ 7ÂœĂ€ĂƒÂ…ÂˆÂŤ\ʙÊ>˜`棊\ÎäÊ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž Programs/education/events: UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]ʙ\{äÊ>°“°Ê FREE METHODIST ™Î{ĂŠ °Ê-i“ˆ˜>ÀÞÊĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡Î£näÊ Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Programs/education/events: UĂŠ Â…Ă€ÂˆĂƒĂŒÂˆ>Â˜ĂŠi`Ă•V>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜]ʙ\ÂŁxĂŠ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž GRACE LUTHERAN 1300 Kishwaukee Valley Road 815-338-0554 Worship: 5 p.m. Saturday; 8:30 a.m. (traditional), 10 a.m. (contemporary) Sunday HERITAGE BAPTIST CHURCH {ĂˆĂ¤Â™ĂŠĂ€iiÂ˜ĂœÂœÂœ`ĂŠ,Âœ>` *°"°Ê "8ĂŠ{ĂˆÂŁĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡xÇx‡££™ä Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday MCHENRY COUNTY JEWISH CONGREGATION nĂˆÂŁĂ‡ĂŠ,ˆ`}iwiÂ?`ĂŠ,Âœ>`]ĂŠ Ă€ĂžĂƒĂŒ>Â?ĂŠ>ÂŽi 815-455-1810 7ÂœĂ€ĂƒÂ…ÂˆÂŤ\ĂŠ ĂŠ Ăˆ\ÎäÊ °“°Ê Ă€Âˆ`>Ăž]ĂŠ ™\ÎäÊ >°“°Ê Saturday REDEEMER LUTHERAN £ÎÓäÊ i>Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡™ÎÇä Worship: 8 and 10 a.m. Sunday Programs/education/events: UĂŠ Â…Ă€ÂˆĂƒĂŒÂˆ>Â˜ĂŠi`Ă•V>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜]ʙ\ÂŁxĂŠĂŠ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž UĂŠ"ÂŤiÂ˜ĂŠ}Ă€ÂˆÂ?Â?ĂŠÂ˜Âˆ}Â…ĂŒ]ĂŠĂˆĂŠÂŤÂ°Â“Â°ĂŠĂ€Âˆ`>Ăž RESURRECTION CATHOLIC ә£nĂŠ -°Ê ÂœĂ•Â˜ĂŒĂ€ĂžĂŠ Â?Ă•LĂŠ ,Âœ>`ĂŠ UĂŠ nÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ ÇÎÎä Worship: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; 5 p.m. Saturday; 8 a.m. weekdays ST. ANN’S EPISCOPAL xäÎÊ7°Ê>VÂŽĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ä™xäÊ Worship: 8:30 and 10 a.m. Sunday ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN {ä£Ê-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠÂœÂ…Â˜Â˝ĂƒĂŠ,Âœ>`ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡xÂŁx™Ê 7ÂœĂ€ĂƒÂ…ÂˆÂŤ\ĂŠĂˆĂŠÂŤÂ°Â“Â°ĂŠ->ĂŒĂ•Ă€`>Ăž]ʙÊ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž Programs/education/events: UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]棊\ÎäÊ>°“° ST. MARY CATHOLIC ĂŽÂŁĂŽĂŠ °Ê/Ă€ĂžÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎÎÇÇÊ 7ÂœĂ€ĂƒÂ…ÂˆÂŤ\ĂŠ Ç\ÎäÊ >°“°Ê œ˜`>ÞÊ ĂŒÂ…Ă€ÂœĂ•}Â…ĂŠ Saturday; 5 and 6:30 p.m. (Spanish) ->ĂŒĂ•Ă€`>ÞÆÊ Ç\Îä]ĂŠ ™Ê >˜`ĂŠ £ä\ÎäÊ >°“°]ĂŠ Â˜ÂœÂœÂ˜ĂŠ (Spanish), 5 p.m. Sunday THE BRIDGE CHRISTIAN Ă“ĂˆĂ“Ă¤ĂŠ Ă€Âˆ`}iĂŠ>˜iĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡{Â™ĂˆÂ‡Ă¤x{n Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS Ă“Ă¤ÂŁĂˆĂŠ>Ă€ĂŒÂ?>˜`ĂŠ,Âœ>`ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎ{‡£ÇäÎ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday THE VINE ÂŁÂŁĂŽĂ“ĂŠ °Ê>`ÂˆĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎÎnä Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday UNITY SPIRITUAL CENTER Ă“Ă“xĂŠ7°Ê >Â?Â…ÂœĂ•Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎLJÎxĂŽ{ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Programs/events: UĂŠˆ˜`ĂƒÂ…ÂˆvĂŒiĂ€Ăƒ]ĂŠĂˆ\Îäʍ°“°]ĂŠ/Ă•iĂƒ`>Ăž WOODSTOCK ASSEMBLY OF GOD £Óä£Ê i>Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°UĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡ÂŁĂŽÂŁĂˆ 7ÂœĂ€ĂƒÂ…ÂˆÂŤ\ʙÊ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>ÞʍÀ>ĂžiĂ€ĂŠĂƒiĂ€Ă›ÂˆVi]Ê£äÊ a.m. worship service WOODSTOCK BIBLE ÇÇäÊ °Êˆ“L>Â?Â?ĂŠĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡ĂŽĂ¤Ă¤ĂˆĂŠ 7ÂœĂ€ĂƒÂ…ÂˆÂŤ\ʙ\ÎäÊ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž Programs/education/events: UĂŠ °,° °° ĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂ˜ÂˆĂƒĂŒĂ€Ăž]ĂŠÂŁÂŁ\ÂŁxĂŠ>Â°Â“Â°ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠÂŁ\ÂŁxĂŠ p.m. Sunday


COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 10-16, 2013

CALENDAR Upcoming events in the Woodstock area U Events are free unless otherwise noted

PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER SCHMID

10 | WEDNESDAY

15 | MONDAY

DAYTIME BOOK CLUB Read Between The Lynes 129 Van Buren St. 12:30 p.m. 815-206-5967 The group will discuss “Life After Life” by Jill McCorkle.

EVENING BOOK CLUB Read Between the Lynes 129 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. 815-206-5967 The group will discuss “The Light Between the Oceans” by M.L. Steadman.

STAGE LEFTOVERS Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 7:30 p.m. 815-334-3555 See The Entertainer, page 10.

VILLAGE OF BULL VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION The Stickney House 1904 Cherry Valley Road 7 p.m.

12 | FRIDAY

16 | TUESDAY

WOODSTOCK STADIUM MOTOCROSS SERIES McHenry County Fairgrounds 11900 Country Club Road Gates open at 3 p.m., races start at 6 p.m. $10 spectator admission 815-337-3511 Various classes and levels of racers will compete on a full motocross course at the fairgrounds.The race is the second in a series of six held in Woodstock.

HELPING PAWS NEW VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION Helping Paws Shelter 2500 Harding Lane 7 p.m. 815-338-4400 helpingpaws.net Helping Paws will welcome new volunteers and offers a monthly orientation.

OPEN MIC NIGHT Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $3 donation 815-338-5164 offsquaremusic.org See The Entertainer, page 10.

13 | SATURDAY HABITAT RESTORATION Dufield Pond Country Club Road 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 815-337-9315 schumacher.jeff1@gmail.com Individuals, students, small groups and families with children older than age 6 can participate in restoring native habitat at the conservation area. MEET P.C. MAROTTA Read Between The Lynes 129 Van Buren St. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 815-206-5967 The author of “In My Mother’s Kitchen” and “Brooklyn Italian: A Memoir of Recipes of Days Gone By,” will be at the book store to talk about memories of the life lessons she learned. MEET M.E. MAY Read Between The Lynes 129 Van Buren St. 2 to 4 p.m. 815-206-5967 The author of “Inconspicuous,” will be at the book store to launch her latest novel. SUMMER’S FIREWORKS Pleasant Valley, Shelter #2 13315 Pleasant Valley Road 4 to 5:30 p.m. Mccdistrict.org Take a guided hike through nature’s display of floral fireworks. HIGH PERFORMANCE DANCE THEATRE Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $23 815-338-5300 See The Entertainer, page 10.

CITY COUNCIL MEETING Woodstock City Hall 121 W. Calhoun St. 7 p.m. DISTRICT 200 BOARD OF EDUCATION Clay Professional Development Center 112 Grove St. 7 p.m. woodstockschools.org The meeting will be on the second floor. Use the parking lot behind Clay Academy and enter via Door 5.

18 | THURSDAY WOODSTOCK SENIOR CLUBS Dorr Township 1039 Lake Ave. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. A fee will be charged for lunch, $2 donation for bingo 815-344-3555 The activities will include a coffee klatch, trivia and bingo. Registration is required.

19 | FRIDAY ‘THE LITTLE MERMAID JR.’ Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 2 and 7 p.m. 2 p.m., $6 7 p.m., $8 5:30 reception and 7 p.m. show combination, $20 adults, $15 students 815-338-5300 See The Entertainer, page 10.

20 | SATURDAY ‘THE LITTLE MERMAID JR.’ Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 2 and 7 p.m. $8 815-338-5300 See The Entertainer, page 10. GAVERS BARNDANCE Emricson Park 5:30 p.m. Tickets: $50 gavers.org This annual fundraiser for the Gavers

Community Cancer Foundation will feature a buffet dinner and three live bands.

21 | SATURDAY CONTEMPORARY BLUES MUSIC SERVICE Unity Spiritual Center 225 W. Calhoun St. 10 a.m. 815-337-3534 unitywoodstock.org The one-hour contemporary music service will share the history of the blues. 28TH ANNUAL WOODSTOCK FOLK FESTIVAL Stage Left Café Woodstock Square 12:30 to 6 p.m. $15 - $25 suggested donation 815-338-2080 woodstockfolkfestival.org See The Entertainer, page 10. ‘LITTLE MERMAID JR.’ Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 3 p.m. $8 815-338-5300 See The Entertainer, page 10.

24 | WEDNESDAY SOCIAL SKILLS AND SELFESTEEM SUPPORT GROUP Recovery Outreach Center 101 Jefferson St. 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. 815-338-3590 The monthly free group meetings will be ongoing and no reservations are needed. STAGE LEFTOVERS Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 7:30 p.m. 815-334-3555 See The Entertainer, page 10. VILLAGE OF BULL VALLEY BOARD OF TRUSTEES The Stickney House 1904 Cherry Valley Road 7.p.m.

25 | THURSDAY SUMMER BIKE NIGHT Woodstock Harley-Davidson 2050 S. Eastwood Drive 5 to 9 p.m. Woodstockharley-dav.com Bike Nights will feature live music, food and drinks, and a chance to socialize and swap stories from the road.

26 | FRIDAY WOODSTOCK STADIUM MOTOCROSS SERIES McHenry County Fairgrounds 11900 Country Club Road Gates open at 3 p.m., races start at 6 p.m. $10 spectator admission 815-337-3511 Various classes and levels of racers will compete on a full motocross course at the fairgrounds.This race is the third in a series of six held in Woodstock. OPEN MIC NIGHT Stage Left Café

125 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $3 donation 815-338-5164 offsquaremusic.org See The Entertainer, page 10. MOVIES IN THE PARK Woodstock Water Works k Emricson Park, near WaterWorks Free 8:30 p.m., darkness permitting The Disney movie “Brave” will be featured.

27 | SATURDAY SCHOOL GARDEN VOLUNTEER DAY Woodstock North High School 3000 Raffel Road 9 a.m. to noon 815-334-5700 Volunteers will meet at the back of the school where gardening tools will be provided. Helpers are asked to bring a drink and snack and donations are appreciated. BASKETBALL IN THE PARK Emricson Park 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. (morning session) 1 to 4 p.m. (afternoon session) 815-814-0020 basketballinthepark.com The event includes 3-on-3 and 5-on-5 tournaments, free throw and knock out contests and more. All proceeds go to Give Kids the World Village. Rain date is July 28. HABITAT RESTORATION Boger Bog 2399 S. Cherry Valley Road 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 815-455-1537 Individuals, students, small groups and families with children older than age 6 can participate in restoring native habitat at the conservation area. DUCK RACE & POOL PARTY Woodstock WaterWorks Emricson Park 4 to 7 p.m. 224-770-2417 journeycare.org/duckrace The 20th annual event benefits JourneyCare (formerly Hospice & Palliative Care of Northeast Illinois) and includes free swimming, children’s activities and a DJ. Purchase chances on ducks and watch them race down the slide to win prizes. WOODSTOCK MOZART FESTIVAL PROGRAM 1 Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 8 p.m. $55 Conductor’s Circle, $43 A-seating, $33 B-Seating 815-338-5300 See The Entertainer, page 10.

ONGOING WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET Tuesdays and Saturdays Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Woodstockfarmersmarket.org Voted No. 1 in Illinois for midsize markets in 2012. See the Entertainer, page 10. COFFEE AT THE CAFÉ FOR

17

July 10 to 27 SENIORS Tuesdays Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 1 to 3 p.m. Senior citizens are invited to drop in for coffee. DIVORCECARE Tuesdays Woodstock Assembly of God 1201 Dean St. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. 815-338-1316 divorcecare.org The weekly support group and seminar will be conducted by people who understand the pain of separation or divorce. WEDNESDAYS AT HEARTHSTONE Hearthstone Communities 840 N. Seminary Ave. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. $5 for lunch 815-338-2110 hearthstonewoodstock.org Senior citizens are invited to drop in for activities beginning at 9 a.m. with coffee or an exercise class. WOODSTOCK SUMMER CITY BAND CONCERT Woodstock Square Wednesdays 7:30 p.m. See the Entertainer, page 10. ICE CREAM SOCIAL During the band concert July 10 Friends of the Woodstock Public Library. BINGO Wednesdays Woodstock Moose Lodge 406 Clay St. 7 to 9:30 pm. 815-338-0126 Games will include crossfire. Food will be available. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. SOBER MOMS AA MEETING Thursdays Blue Lotus Temple 221 Dean St. 10 a.m. 847-809-1104 Moms with a desire to stop drinking are invited to meet with the group. LIVE MUSIC AT EXPRESSLY LESLIE’S Fridays Woodstock Square Mall 110 S. Johnson St. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. See The Entertainer, page 10. OPEN GRILL NIGHT Fridays Redeemer Lutheran Church 1320 Dean St. 6 p.m. 815-338-9370 rlcw.org The church provides the grill, and the community is invited to bring whatever you want to eat and drink and maybe something to share.

BEST BET SELECTION To submit calendar items, e-mail pr@thewoodstockindependent.com or visit thewoodstockindependent.com


18

July 10-16, 2013

SERVICE DIRECTORY/CLASSIFIEDS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Service Directory

ATTORNEY

CARPENTRY

AC/HEATING

Need a Second Opinion?

Heating, Cooling, Plumbing and Water Heaters

Woodstock 815-337-4200

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Small blocks are $40 for 4 weeks. Call 815-701-9275 and ask for Jen for details.

Boiler & h heating ot water speciali sts!

24-Hour Service BUY GOLD

ASPHALT SERVICES

CONSTRUCTION

WE BUY GOLD and Pay Top Price! W Get the most cash for your Gold and Jewelry!

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Woodstock Jewelry and Pawn

Near the Square 121 E. Calhoun Street

COLLISION REPAIR

ELCTRC. CONTRACTOR

DESIGN

MENTION THIS AD FOR 10% OFF SERVICE CALL - Service upgrades Since - Repairs 1986 - Maintenance Residential - Commercial

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B&J SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Authorized and stocked service center for Briggs & Stratton, Tecumseh & Kohler Engine Co., Honda, Subaru-Robin, Engs., Murray & M.T.D. products.

GUTTER CLEANING

Cleaning

yrs. r 35 Ove rience e exp

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Chain saws serviced & sharpened.

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HEALTH INSURANCE

INSURANCE

Mark Mitchell Insurance Agency 5RXWH‡:RRGVWRFN

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PAINTING

TECHNOLOGY

and condos es townhom

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WINDOW CLEANING

Professional interior and exterior painting. Fully insured. 35+ yrs exp. Free estimates. Local references. Senior discounts.Winter Rates

J.B. Decorating 847-658-8512

A 1 Block Service Directory

$40

for Ad is 4 weeks


SERVICE DIRECTORY/CLASSIFIEDS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 10-16, 2013

19

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ClassiďŹ ed Ads FOR SALE/RENT

HELP WANTED

Apartment for rent. Large 1 bedroom apartment near the square. 815-861-1604

Association at www.IllinoisLawyerFinder.com

Bob Revolution Duallie - Double jogging stroller with accessories Infant seat, snack tray and handlebar console. 815-5193512 $375

HELP WANTED Retail sales Assoc., PT, experienced. Must like helping people, have interest in design, & assist w/beverages & ice cream. Some eves & weekends req. Pick up app at 111 E. Van Buren St., Woodstock. NEED CLASS-A CDL TRAINING? Start a CAREER in trucking today! Swift Academies RIIHU37',FHUWLÂżHGFRXUVHV and offer â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best-In-Classâ&#x20AC;? training. *New Academy Classes Weekly *No Money Down or &UHGLW&KHFN &HUWLÂżHG0HQWRUV Ready and Available *Paid (While Training With Mentor) *Regional and Dedicated Opportunities *Great Career Path ([FHOOHQW%HQHÂżWV3DFNDJH Please Call: (602) 648-5307 Drivers-CDL-A $5,000 SIGNON BONUS For expâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d solo OTR drivers & O/Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tuition reimbursement also available! New Student Pay & Lease Program USA TRUCK 877-521-5775 www.GoUSATruck.com Regional Class A Drivers needed. 48 hrs weekly hometime. Min 23 yrs old. 1 yr TT exp. Email Recruiting@veriha.com or call 800-333-9291 Drivers Driver Trainers Needed. Various runs available. Excellent Bonus and Pay. Join the deBoer team now! deBoer Transportation 800-825-8511 Apply Online: www.deboertrans.com â&#x20AC;&#x153;Partners In Excellenceâ&#x20AC;? OTR Drivers APU Equipped Pre-Pass EZ-pass passenger policy. 2012 & Newer equipment. 100% NO touch. Butler Transport 1-800528-7825 EARNING BETTER PAY IS ONE STEP AWAY! Averitt offers Experienced CDL-A Drivers ([FHOOHQW%HQHÂżWVDQG:HHNO\ Hometime. 888-362-8608. Recent Grads w/a CDL-A 1-5/ wks Paid Training. Apply online at AverittCareers.com. Equal Opportunity Employer Need Legal Help? FREE REFERRAL Call 877-270-3855 Courtesyy of the Illinois State Bar

MISC. SERVE TO LEARN. Earn money for college, train for a career, receive excellent pay and EHQHÂżWV6HUYHLQWKH1DWLRQDO Guard. Call 1-800-GO-GUARD or visit nationalguard.com Need to place your ad in more than 300 newspapers throughout Illinois? Call Illinois Press Advertising Service 217-2411700 or visit www.illinoispress. org

MOTORS THE BOAT DOCK We Buy & Consign Used Boats! 217-7937300 theboatdock.com Colmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s RV We buy/consign used Campers & RVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s! 217-7878653 www.colmansrv.com

Celebration ads share your joy with everyone! 4â&#x20AC;? block with picture only

$25.00

Call 815-338-8040

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FOSTERS WANTED K9 Lifeline Rescue, Inc and Dalmatian Rescue of Wisconsin is a licensed, non SURÂżWF5HVFXHJURXS:H have several dogs and puppies available for adoption, however our biggest need right now is obtaining more foster homes. Please visit our website for more information www.K9Lifeline.com

HELP WANTED Diesel Mechanic: Great Pay %HQHÂżWV$33/<ZZZ durhamschoolservices.com, or stop by 210 Park Ave, Lake Villa, IL 60046

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED: Drivers-OTR on call Class B CDL & Non CDL Retirees Welcome 815-337-3991

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WANT TO BUY

WANTED TO BUY Old or new working or not outboard motors, chainsaws, motorcycles, mopeds, bicycles, ďŹ shing tackle, all sorts of stuff. CASH ON THE SPOT 815-322-6383 HELP WANTED MEN & WOMEN 18 YEARS AND OLDER FOR DETASSELING CREW CHIEFS Up to $12.50 per hour HUGHES SEED FARM Woodstock, IL Apply at hughesseedfarms.com or call 1 pm to 4pm only Mon. - Fri. 815-338-2480

HELP WANTED



BOYS & GIRLS 14 YEARS AND OLDER FOR DETASSELING CORN Up to $8 per hour HUGHES SEED FARM Woodstock, IL Apply at hughesseedfarms.com or call 1 pm to 4pm only Mon. - Fri. 815-338-2480

HELP WANTED Experienced Retail and In Home furniture builders needed for work in McHenry, IL. Must have own tools, be able to lift 50 lbs., and pass a background check. This position is as an Independent Contractor. Contact NASRecruiting@sparinc.com

GARAGE SALE GARAGE SALE 129 Hutchins Street Friday, July 12 & Saturday, July 13 7:30 am- 3:30 pm Enter alley between Madison and Clay Furniture, Bikes, Toys, Games and More!

HELP WANTED

OWNER OPERATOR MUST HAVE OWN TRACTOR AND 5 YEARS OTR PLUS SKID LOADER EXPERIENCE. DEDICATED NORTHERN ILLINOIS AREA HAULING CARDBOARD BALES TO RECYCLING FACILITIES. MUST ALSO HAVE OWN AUTHORITY, 53â&#x20AC;&#x2122; TRAILER AND SKID LOADER. ESTABLISHED COMPANY. EXCELLENT PAY. GENEROUS FUEL REBATE. CALL 219-663-5678 EXT. 17 M-F 8AM-4PM CST


20

July 10-16, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on JUNE 19, 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post-office addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as THOMA CO. located at 4517 Clearview Dr., McHenry, IL 60050. Dated JUNE 19, 2013. /s/ Katherine C. Schultz (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 26, 2013, July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8674

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. JUAN F. MARTINEZ-AYALA; ACOSTA RODRIGUEZ A/K/A ARALI ACOSTA RODRIGUEZ; THE PONDS OF BULL 9$//(<+20(2:1(5¡6$662&,$7,21 INC.; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 09 CH 454 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on , Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, August 1, 2013, at the hour of 10:30 a.m. in the offices of Botto Gilbert Gehris Lancaster, 970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: LOT 148 IN THE PONDS OF BULL VALLEY PHASE 3A; BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHEAST OF QUARTER OF SECTION 15 AND PART OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 44 NORTH, RANGE 7, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 31, 2004 AS DOCUMENT 2004R0078701 AND AMENDED BY CERTIFICATE OF AMENDMENT RECORDED JUNE 15, 2005 AS DOCUMENT 2005R0047040, IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. P.I.N. 13-10-454-024. Commonly known as 2137 Greenview Drive, Woodstock, IL 60098. The improvement on the property consists of a condominium residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For Information: Visit our website at http:// service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, 3ODLQWLII¡V $WWRUQH\V  1RUWK 'HDUERUQ Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 0902744. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I543723 (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 26, 2013, July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8676

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS PNC BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY S. REUTER; JANET A. REUTER; CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA) NA; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 10 CH 02624 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on April 26, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, August 1, 2013, at the hour of 10:30 a.m. in the offices of Botto Gilbert Gehris Lancaster, 970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: THE WEST 330.0 FEET OF THE EAST 990.00 FEET OF THE SOUTH 660.0 FEET OF THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 44 NORTH, RANGE 6, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN MCHENRY COUNTY,

PUBLIC NOTICES

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT ILLINOIS; SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF MCHENRY AND STATE OF ILLINOIS. P.I.N. 12-25-300-008. Commonly known as 15000 ROUTE 176, WOODSTOCK, IL 60098. The improvement on the property consists of a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For Information: Visit our website at http:// service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, 3ODLQWLII¡V $WWRUQH\V  1RUWK 'HDUERUQ Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1026971. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I543729 (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 26, 2013, July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8677

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. DONNA J. PATNAUDE; THE TREES CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF DONNA J PATNAUDE, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 11 CH 490 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on May 18, 2012, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, August 1, 2013, at the hour of 10:30 a.m. in the offices of Botto Gilbert Gehris Lancaster, 970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: UNIT 8-B IN THE TREES CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS, AS DELINEATED ON A PLAT OF SURVEY OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED REAL ESTATE: LOTS 1 THROUGH 24 OF THE TREES, BEING A RE-SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOTS 16 AND 17 OF HUNTINGTON POINT UNIT 1, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 45 NORTH, RANGE 7 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, RECORDED OCTOBER 4, 1995 AS DOCUMENT NO. 95R042619, WHICH SURVEY IS ATTACHED AS EXHIBIT â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bâ&#x20AC;? TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM OWNERSHIP RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE RECORDER OF DEEDS FOR MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS ON MAY 20, 1996 AS DOCUMENT 96R025772, TOGETHER WITH A PERCENTAGE OF THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT TO SAID UNIT AS SET FORTH IN SAID DECLARATION AS AMENDED FROM TIME TO TIME, WHICH PERCENTAGE SHALL AUTOMATICALLY CHANGE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMENDED DECLARATION AS SAME ARE FILED OF RECORD. SITUATED IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. P.I.N. 08-32-406-069. Commonly known as 583 SILVER CREEK ROAD, WOODSTOCK, IL 60098. The improvement on the property consists of a condominium residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For Information: Visit our website at http:// service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, 3ODLQWLII¡V $WWRUQH\V  1RUWK 'HDUERUQ Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1103263. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I543733 (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 26, 2013, July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8678

PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MCHENRY COUNTY - WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Plaintiff, Vs. Jennifer L. Rink; et. al. Defendants, 12 CH 3095 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on MARCH 26, 2013 LENDER SALES OF ILLINOIS LLC will on AUGUST 5, 2013, at the hour of 10:30 A.M., or soon thereafter, at the front doors of the McHenry County Courthouse located at 2200 N. Seminary, Woodstock, IL 60098, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: LOT 147 IN PLAT OF SUBDIVISION OF FOX TRAILS, PHASE 1, BEING A PART OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTH HALF OF SECTION 14, AND THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 43 NORTH, RANGE 8 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 27, 1980 AS DOCUMENT NO. 800652, AS AMENDED AND RESTATED BY PLAT RECORDED FEBRUARY 26, 1982 AS DOCUMENT NO. 831493, IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. The common address of said real estate is: 706 Royal Glen Drive, Cary, IL 60013 PIN:19-14-452-025 Description of premises: RESIDENTIAL Sale Terms: 25% down by certified funds at the close of the auction: The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in â&#x20AC;&#x153;as isâ&#x20AC;? condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or WKH0RUWJDJHH¡VDWWRUQH\Âľ If the property is a condominium, the purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessments and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information: Sales Clerk, Codilis and $VVRFLDWHV3&3ODLQWLII¡$WWRUQH\ 15 W. 030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527 Attorney Number 0468002, (630) 794 5300, File No: 14-12-37001 I542379 (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 26, 2013, July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8679

AS AMENDED BY CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED OCTOBER 28, 1996, AS DOCUMENT NO. 96R55104, IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. P.I.N. 13-07-152-004-0000. Commonly known as 794 DUVALL DRIVE, WOODSTOCK, IL 60098-7011. The improvement on the property consists of a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For Information: Visit our website at http:// service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, 3ODLQWLII¡V $WWRUQH\V  1RUWK 'HDUERUQ Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1127399. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I543746 (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 26, 2013, July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8680

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on JUNE 10, 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post-office addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as 1 UP SEALCOAT located at 401 First St Apt 1N4, Cary, IL 60013. Dated JUNE 10, 2013. /s/ Katherine C. Schultz (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 26, 2013, July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8681

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on JUNE 21, 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post-office addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as AACE TRANSMISSION AND AUTOMOTIVE located at 1302 Borden St, McHenry, IL 60050. Dated JUNE 21, 2013. /s/ Katherine C. Schultz (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 26, 2013, July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8682

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on June 24, 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post-office addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as J AND J CONSTRUCTION located at 3012 W Route 120 â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNIT Dâ&#x20AC;?, McHenry, IL 60050. Dated June 24, 2013 /s/ Katherine C. Schultz (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 26, 2013, July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8683

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Plaintiff, vs. BERNADETTE FRANTZ; BERNARD R. DOBRZYNSKI; ELIZABETH A. DOBRZYNSKI; THE HIGHLANDS ON THE PARK TOWNHOME ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 12 CH 0037 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on January 11, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, August 1, 2013, at the hour of 10:30 a.m. in the offices of Botto Gilbert Gehris Lancaster, 970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: LOT 17 IN HIGHLANDS ON THE PARK, UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE WEST HALF OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 44 NORTH, RANGE 7, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED SEPTEMBER 18, 1996 AS DOCUMENT NO. 96R48018, AND

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY- SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.PATRICIA BROSKY, APPLEWOOD NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION Defendant 12 CH 2066 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 13, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on August 12, 2013, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Parcel I: The East 49.94 feet of Lot 145 in Applewood Unit 2 Resubdivision, Planned Unit Development, being a Resubdivision RI 2XW/RW œ¡.¡¡ LQ $SSOHZRRG 8QLW  Resubdivision, a Resubdivision of part of the East half of the Northwest Quarter and part of the Southwest Quarter of Section 15, Township 44 North, Range 7, East of the Third Principal Meridian, according to the Plat thereof recorded July 10, 1992 as Document Number 92K037966, in McHenry County, Illinois. Parcel II: Easement for ingress and

PUBLIC NOTICE

egress to and for the benefit of Parcel I as set forth in the Declaration of Covenants, conditions, restrictions and easements for the Applewood Neighborhood Association recorded December 20, 1991 as Document Number 91R049380, and as may be amended from time to time, in McHenry County, Illinois. Commonly known as 2410 ASPEN DR., Woodstock, IL 60098 Property Index No. 13-15-176-134. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $126,381.87. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not WR H[FHHG   VKDOO EH SDLG LQ FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in â&#x20AC;&#x153;AS ISâ&#x20AC;? condition. The sale is IXUWKHUVXEMHFWWRFRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQE\WKHFRXUW Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale.The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. )RU LQIRUPDWLRQ FRQWDFW 3ODLQWLII¡V attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or WKH0RUWJDJHH¡VDWWRUQH\ THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Case Number: 12 CH 2066 TJSC#: 33-10410 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised WKDW3ODLQWLII¡VDWWRUQH\LVGHHPHGWREHD debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I540332 (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8684

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on June 28 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois, setting forth the names and postoffice addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as FOUR LEAF CLOVER CLEANING CO located at 715 Carlisle Dr, Woodstock, IL 60098. Dated JUNE 28, 2013. /s/ Katherine C. Schultz (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8687

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on June 28, 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post-office addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as WALTER HOROWICZ CARPET located at 4512 Hickory Nut Dr, McHenry, IL 60051 Dated June 28, 2013 (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8688


PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on May 24, 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois, concerning the business known as CRYSTAL LAKE ENGRAVING located at 9112 Butternut Dr, Crystal Lake IL 60014 which certificate sets forth the following changes in the operation thereof: WITHDRAWAL OF NAME AND ADDITION OF NAME Dated May 24, 2013 /s/ Katherine C. Schultz (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8689

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on July 2, 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois, setting forth the names and postoffice addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as JTD GENERAL CONTRACTOR located at 3809 Grove Ave, McHenry, IL 60050. Dated July 2, 2013. /s/ Katherine C. Schultz (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 10, 2013) L8690

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on July 2, 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois, setting forth the names and postoffice addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as KANDLER ELECTRIC located at 2911 Knollwood Dr, McCullom Lake, IL 60050. Dated July 2, 2013 /s/ Katherine C. Schultz (County Clerk)

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 10, 2013) L8691

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MCHENRY COUNTY - WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS Bank of America, N.A. Plaintiff, Vs.Mark S. Rehorst et.al.Defendants,12 CH 1335 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on SEPTEMBER 17, 2012 LENDER SALES OF ILLINOIS LLC will on AUGUST 5, 2013, at the hour of 10:30 A.M., or soon thereafter, at the front doors of the McHenry County Courthouse located at 2200 N. Seminary, Woodstock, IL 60098, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: LOT 3 IN BLOCK 9 IN TODD WOODS SUBDIVISION, UNIT NO. 2, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 45 NORTH, RANGE 7 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JUNE 10,1958 AS DOCUMENT NO. 339334 IN BOOK 13 OF PLATS, PAGE 62, IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. The common address of said real estate is: 506 Hickory Road, Woodstock, IL 60098 PIN: 08-32-427-001 Description of premises: RESIDENTIAL Sale Terms: 25% down by certified funds at the close of the auction: The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments

or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in â&#x20AC;&#x153;as isâ&#x20AC;? condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the SXUFKDVHUVKDOOUHFHLYHD&HUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWHRI6DOH which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to WKHUHDOHVWDWHDIWHUFRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQRIWKHVDOH If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or WKH0RUWJDJHH¡VDWWRUQH\Âľ If the property is a condominium, the purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessments and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information: Sales Clerk, Codilis and $VVRFLDWHV3&3ODLQWLII¡$WWRUQH\ 15 W. 030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527 Attorney Number 0468002, (630) 794 5300, File No: 14-12-13989 I547550 (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 10, 2013) L8692

PUBLIC NOTICE RESOLUTION 2013-03 WHEREAS, the Board of Trustees of the Woodstock Fire/Rescue District has been made aware that the prevailing rate of wages as defined in the Prevailing Wage Act (820 ILCS 130) states that each public body shall, during the month of June of each calendar year, investigate and

July 10-16, 2013 ascertain the prevailing rate of wages as defined in this Act and publicly post or keep available for inspection by any interested party in the main office of such public body its determination of such prevailing rate of wage and shall promptly file a certified copy thereof in the office of the Secretary of State at Springfield. WHEREAS, the aforesaid Act requires that the Woodstock Fire/Rescue District investigate and ascertain the prevailing rate of wages as defined in said Act for laborers, mechanics and other workers in the locality of said Woodstock Fire/ Rescue District employed in performing construction of public works, for said Woodstock Fire/Rescue District. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE WOODSTOCK FIRE/RESCUE DISTRICT THROUGH ITS BOARD OF TRUSTEES AS FOLLOWS: SECTION I: To the extent and as required by â&#x20AC;&#x153;An Act regulating wages of laborers, mechanics and other workers employed in any public works by State, county, city or any public body or any political subdivision or by anyone under contract for public works,â&#x20AC;? approved June 26, 1941, as amended, the general prevailing rate of wages in this locality for laborers, mechanics and other workers engaged in construction of public works coming under the jurisdiction of the Woodstock Fire/ Rescue District is hereby ascertained to be the same as the prevailing rate of wages for construction work in the McHenry County area as determined by the Department of Labor of the State of Illinois as of June 1, 2013. As required by said Act, any and all revisions of the prevailing rate of wages by the Department of Labor of the State of ,OOLQRLV VKDOO VXSHUVHGH WKH 'HSDUWPHQW¡V June determination and apply to any and all public works construction undertaken by the Woodstock Fire/Rescue District. 7KH GHĂ&#x20AC;QLWLRQ RI DQ\ WHUPV DSSHDULQJ LQ this Resolution, which are also used in aforesaid Act, shall be the same as in said Act. SECTION 2: Nothing herein contained

21

shall be construed to apply said general prevailing rate of wages as herein ascertained to any work or employment except public works construction of the Woodstock Fire/Rescue District to the extent required by the aforesaid Act. SECTION 3: The Administrator of the Woodstock Fire/Rescue District shall publicly post or keep available for inspection by any interested party at Station 1 of the Woodstock Fire/Rescue District, 435 East Judd Street, Woodstock, Illinois, a copy of the determination made by the Department of Labor of the State of Illinois as of June 1, 2013. A copy of this determination or of the current revised determination of prevailing rate of wages then in effect shall be attached to all contract specifications. SECTION 4: The Secretary of the Woodstock Fire/Rescue District shall promptly file a certified copy of this Resolution with both the Secretary of State Index Division and the Department of Labor of the State of Illinois. SECTION 5: The Secretary of the Woodstook Fire/Rescue District shall cause a copy of this resolution to be published in a newspaper of general circulation as required by law. PASSED THIS 27th day of June, 2013 APPROVED:/s/ Robert A. Kristensen (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 10, 2013) L8693

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on July 5, 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois, setting forth the names and postoffice addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as MCD SERVICES located at 800 Royal Glen Dr., Cary, IL 60013. Dated July 5, 2013 /s/ Katherine C. Schultz (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 10, 2013) L8694

REAL ESTATE NOTICES IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. JUAN F. MARTINEZ-AYALA; ACOSTA RODRIGUEZ A/K/A ARALI ACOSTA RODRIGUEZ; THE PONDS OF BULL 9$//(<+20(2:1(5¡6$662&,$7,21 INC.; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 09 CH 454 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on , Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, August 1, 2013, at the hour of 10:30 a.m. in the offices of Botto Gilbert Gehris Lancaster, 970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 13-10-454-024. Commonly known as 2137 Greenview Drive, Woodstock, IL 60098. The improvement on the property consists of a condominium residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For Information: Visit our website at http:// service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, 3ODLQWLII¡V $WWRUQH\V  1RUWK 'HDUERUQ Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 0902744. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I543723 (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 26, 2013, July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8676

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS PNC BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY S. REUTER; JANET A. REUTER; CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA) NA; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 10 CH 02624

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on April 26, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, August 1, 2013, at the hour of 10:30 a.m. in the offices of Botto Gilbert Gehris Lancaster, 970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 12-25-300-008. Commonly known as 15000 ROUTE 176, WOODSTOCK, IL 60098. The improvement on the property consists of a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For Information: Visit our website at http:// service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, 3ODLQWLII¡V $WWRUQH\V  1RUWK 'HDUERUQ Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1026971. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I543729 (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 26, 2013, July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8677

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. DONNA J. PATNAUDE; THE TREES CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF DONNA J PATNAUDE, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 11 CH 490 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on May 18, 2012, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, August 1, 2013, at the hour of 10:30 a.m. in the offices of Botto Gilbert Gehris Lancaster, 970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake,

Illinois 60014, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 08-32-406-069. Commonly known as 583 SILVER CREEK ROAD, WOODSTOCK, IL 60098. The improvement on the property consists of a condominium residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For Information: Visit our website at http:// service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, 3ODLQWLII¡V $WWRUQH\V  1RUWK 'HDUERUQ Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1103263. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I543733 (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 26, 2013, July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8678 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MCHENRY COUNTY - WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Plaintiff, Vs. Jennifer L. Rink; et. al. Defendants, 12 CH 3095 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on MARCH 26, 2013 LENDER SALES OF ILLINOIS LLC will on AUGUST 5, 2013, at the hour of 10:30 A.M., or soon thereafter, at the front doors of the McHenry County Courthouse located at 2200 N. Seminary, Woodstock, IL 60098, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: The common address of said real estate is: 706 Royal Glen Drive, Cary, IL 60013 PIN:19-14-452-025 Description of premises: RESIDENTIAL Sale Terms: 25% down by certified funds at the close of the auction: The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and

in â&#x20AC;&#x153;as isâ&#x20AC;? condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or WKH0RUWJDJHH¡VDWWRUQH\Âľ If the property is a condominium, the purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessments and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information: Sales Clerk, Codilis and $VVRFLDWHV3&3ODLQWLII¡$WWRUQH\ 15 W. 030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527 Attorney Number 0468002, (630) 794 5300, File No: 14-12-37001 I542379 (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 26, 2013, July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8679 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Plaintiff, vs. BERNADETTE FRANTZ; BERNARD R. DOBRZYNSKI; ELIZABETH A. DOBRZYNSKI; THE HIGHLANDS ON THE PARK TOWNHOME ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 12 CH 0037 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on January 11, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, August 1, 2013, at the hour of 10:30 a.m. in the offices of Botto Gilbert Gehris Lancaster, 970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: P.I.N. 13-07-152-004-0000. Commonly known as 794 DUVALL DRIVE, WOODSTOCK, IL 60098-7011. The improvement on the property consists of a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the

assessments required by subsection (g1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 25% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the premises after confirmation of the sale. For Information: Visit our website at http:// service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only. Pierce & Associates, 3ODLQWLII¡V $WWRUQH\V  1RUWK 'HDUERUQ Street, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel.No. (312) 476-5500. Refer to File Number 1127399. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I543746 (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 26, 2013, July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8680 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY- SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.PATRICIA BROSKY, APPLEWOOD NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION Defendant 12 CH 2066 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 13, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on August 12, 2013, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 2410 ASPEN DR., Woodstock, IL 60098 Property Index No. 13-15-176-134. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $126,381.87. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in â&#x20AC;&#x153;AS ISâ&#x20AC;?


22

July 10-16, 2013

condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30

PUBLIC NOTICES

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW.  )RU LQIRUPDWLRQ FRQWDFW 3ODLQWLII¡V attorney: HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or WKH0RUWJDJHH¡VDWWRUQH\ THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Case Number: 12 CH 2066 TJSC#: 33-10410 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised

WKDW3ODLQWLII¡VDWWRUQH\LVGHHPHGWREHD debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I540332 (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 3, 2013, July 10, 2013) L8684

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MCHENRY COUNTY - WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS Bank of America, N.A. Plaintiff, Vs. Mark S. Rehorst; et. al. Defendants, 12 CH 1335 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on SEPTEMBER 17, 2012 LENDER SALES OF ILLINOIS LLC will on AUGUST 5, 2013, at the hour of 10:30 A.M., or soon thereafter, at the front doors of the McHenry County Courthouse located at 2200 N. Seminary, Woodstock, IL 60098,

sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described property: The common address of said real estate is: 506 Hickory Road, Woodstock, IL 60098 PIN: 08-32-427-001 Description of premises: RESIDENTIAL Sale Terms: 25% down by certified funds at the close of the auction: The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in â&#x20AC;&#x153;as isâ&#x20AC;? condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale.

If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or WKH0RUWJDJHH¡VDWWRUQH\¾ If the property is a condominium, the purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessments and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information: Sales Clerk, Codilis and $VVRFLDWHV3&3ODLQWLII¡$WWRUQH\ 15 W. 030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527 Attorney Number 0468002, (630) 794 5300, File No: 14-12-13989 I547550 (Published in The Woodstock Independent July 10, 2013) L8692

SPORTS

Tournament what other teams are out there besides the teams we normally see everywhere,â&#x20AC;? Brand said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We bonded really well. We got to spend more time together as a team. It was really fun.â&#x20AC;? Pautrat said she hopes next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Run for Hope Continued from Page 24

team has the same opportunity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope they do it next year even though I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be there,â&#x20AC;? Pautrat said. Hammond said, if given the choice, the team will most deďŹ nitely compete in the tournament next year.

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Runners race in the Run for Hope 5K, which began at Grace Lutheran Church and wound through Emricson Park July 6. Nearly 500 runners participated in the 5K and 28 took part in the half-mile for kids. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

IN BRIEF

Woodstock Little league hosting tournament

Woodstock Little League and District 13 are hosting the inaugural Intermediate State Tournament from July 6 to 15. This is the ďŹ rst year Little League International has offered the Intermediate Division as a full time option to its 11- to 13-year-old players. The division plays with full baseball rules - drop third strike, lead-offs, steals, etc. LLI offered this as a pilot program beginning in 2010. The city of Woodstock is assisting by providing ďŹ eld and facility maintenance and other behind-the-scenes support. Scoops Dairy & Dogs will run the concessions. The tournament is expected to bring around 500 people and many of the teams are staying at local Woodstock hotels. The full tournament schedule can be seen at www. eteamz.com/illinoisdistrict13/news/in-

dex.cfm?cat=458329. Pool-play games continue being played at 5:45 p.m. Monday to Thursday, July 8 to 11, at Merryman Fields and Emricson Park. Bracketplay will start Saturday, July 13, with the championship game played at Merryman No. 6 at 1 p.m. Sunday, July 14.

Ortmannâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to host bags tourney

Ortmannâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Red Iron Tavern, 101 E. Church St., will hold a bags tournament at 1 p.m. Saturday, July 27, in its beer garden. The entry fee is $15 a person. Registration is at the bar through Friday, July 26. Participants are guaranteed to receive a T-shirt if they sign up by Saturday, July 20. Cash prizes will be awarded. Burgers, brats and hotdogs will be served on the outside grill during the competition. For information, call 815-338-7334.


SPORTS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

July 10-16, 2013

23

SCOREBOARD ILLINOIS DISTRICT 13 AREA 1 JUNIOR LEAGUE POOL PLAY BASEBALL Q July 6: Woodstock 8, Streamwood 7 For Woodstock, Jake Glaves had a strong pitching performance, and Justin Carlton had a clutch hit in the bottom of the seventh inning. Q July 7: Woodstock 7, Libertyville 4

The Woodstock Little League 10-year-old all-star team claimed the championship of the Hampshire Area All Star Tournament July 5 to 7. Pictured front row, from left, are: Trey Shallenbarger, Clayton Grisolia, Trevor Nieman and Calvin Wormley. Middle row: Lou Gaddy, Alex Dodge, Austin Arndt, Danny McCoy, James Overly, Ryan Zinnen and JT Wormley. Back row: coach Dave Zinnen, manager Ryan Wormley and coach Shane Overly. Not pictured: Hunter Haak. COURTESY PHOTO

Little League all-stars take tournament By JAY SCHULZ The Independent Behind strong pitching, the Woodstock Little League 10-year-old all-star team won the four-team round-robin Hampshire Area All-Star Tournament held July 5 to 7 in Pingree Grove. Woodstock defeated Marengo 166 July 5, Crystal Lake 17-0 July 6 and Hampshire 4-3 in the championship game July 7. Highlighting the team’s performance was Danny McCoy, who pitched a perfect game in the win over Crystal Lake, throwing just 48 pitches and striking out seven; and Ryan Zinnen, who won the first and third games of the tournament.

Run

“e boys played fundamentally sound baseball all three days,” said manager Ryan Wormley. “All of the boys played well during the tournament and that’s a testament to how hard they practiced. ey were ready to play.” e team, nicknamed “Blue Ice,” was announced June 15, with practices starting June 18. e team was able to get in six to seven practices, according to Wormley. e win advanced the team to the Little League district tournament that will start ursday, July 11, in Hanover Park. ere will be six teams competing in the tournament, and each team will play three games in pool-play. e top two teams will advance to the championship.

Continued from Page 24

essary training over the summer, your whole 24-week cycle that we give them body will be ready to take that next to be prepared to race in October and step,” said KremNovember,” said ske. “You will be “The team is buying McCulley. “ere is able to push yournot a whole lot of self to run at the into the importance of immediate reward optimal level.” for the summer putting in a strong e ultimate goal miles, but the refor the high school effort each day.” ward pays off in late — Matt McCulley, WHS head coach October when we’re runners is performing well in the ready to race in the postseason. postseason.”Until “Although the season starts Aug. then, the more they get together, the 12, it’s important to train through the happier they’ll be.

Ferguson

Continued from Page 24

Ferguson said. “On the back, I settled [down]. I was hitting my drives straight and got on a birdie run at the end. My putting really saved me the last nine of the round.” is was Ferguson’s first win in a MCJGA tournament. He participated in five last year and is currently ranked 6th in the MCJGA boys senior division. “It feels pretty good,” Ferguson said. “I haven’t been able to get out much this

season but everything just kind of came together that round, especially at the end. It feels good to get a win.” e Woodstock co-op golf season will start in mid-August and Ferguson can’t wait to get on the links with his teammates. “I’m really excited,” Ferguson said. “We have some young talent returning. It should be fun with coach [J.C.] Wise and coach [Brent] Filetti.”

For Woodstock, Caleb Reuter pitched six strong innings, and Ryan Baier had a key two-run double. U11 AVALANCHE BASEBALL Q June 29: Avalanche 11, Lake Zurich 5 The Avalanche won the inaugural Northern Illinois All-Star League season championship with a 10-3 record and qualified as the No. 1 seed in the NIASL championship tournament.


24

Sports

July 10-16, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Streaks girls hoops heads north for tournament Ten teammates travel to Wisconsin Dells to face Midwestern competition By JAY SCHULZ The Independent

Golf Club, Huntley, June 26. “at was not a good day,” Ferguson said of his Pinecrest round. Just one week later, however, he was able to reverse his fortune with a round of 73 at Marengo Ridge. e round started rocky for Ferguson, who shot 40 on the front nine. On the back nine, he heated up and birdied four holes in a row – 13 to 16 – to post a 33. “e front was not what I envisioned,”

Woodstock High School head girls basketball coach Marty Hammond was looking for something different for his team, and a call he received this spring set the ball in motion for the Blue Streaks to spend a few days in the Wisconsin Dells playing basketball. “I wanted to try something new in our program and its all about timing,” Hammond said. “is gentleman came to me about the Dells tournament and it was a perfect match. Going up against other schools from other states was something I really thought would be good for our program instead of playing the same schools week after week during the summer when we play them already during the regular season.” Ten members of the team, along with five chaperones, traveled to the popular Midwest summer vacation destination to participate in the Shoot Out at the Dells, June 24 and 25, against teams from Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin. e team stayed at Kalahari Resorts & Conventions. e Blue Streaks played five games and finished the tournament 3-2. On June 24, the Streaks defeated Northwoods, Minn. and St. Charles, Minn., and lost to Hutchinson, Minn. On June 25, the Streaks defeated Bureau Valley and lost to Benton Shulls, Wis. “e girls really have a good time,” Hammond said. “ey enjoyed it. [ere was] good competition; different competition. e schools from different states have different philosophies on offense and defense. I think the girls learned a lot.” e players that participated are seniors Amber Roberts, Morgan Kunzie, Cody Brand and Megan Pautrat; juniors Colleen Brown, Courtney Drach, Hope Brainard and Selena Juarez; and sophomores Brecken Overly and Grace Beattie. Hammond said he was impressed with the play of his sophomores who earned valuable experience. “We brought a couple of sophomore girls up to see if they could play at the varsity level and they held their own,” Hammond said. Pautrat and Brand agreed with their coach and said they are hopeful Overly and Beattie can join the varsity team this year. “I thought they helped out the team a lot,” Pautrat said. “ey were key players in our games in the Dells … I’m looking forward to hopefully moving them to the varsity level.” “e sophomores did really well,” Brand said. “I’m hoping they will be able to [help the team this year]. We’re not quite sure if there will be enough girls [for them to be on varsity].” Brand, who is a member of the Iowa Magic travel team, said the experience was good for the Streaks. “It was really good getting to know

Please see Ferguson, Page 23

Please see Tournament, Page 22

From left, Liam DeWane, Luke Beattie and Zach Bellavia lead the Woodstock High School cross-country team through Emricson Park. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

The summer of run Summer is no vacation for Blue Streaks runners By MEGAN IVERS The Independent e traditional British folk song “e More We Get Together” holds true for cross-country runners in Woodstock. e starting line for their first fall race is miles of hard work away, yet the runners encouragingly get together day after day to build their fitness and have fun. “e team is buying into the importance of putting in a strong effort each day,” said Woodstock High School head cross-country coach Matt McCulley. “As a team, they realize what they need to do.” Twenty-eight runners on the Blue Streaks boys and girls teams have met for a variety of workouts, including repeats around Emricson Park, tempo runs at faster paces around town and injury-preventing core and

strength workouts in the gym. After all is said and done, the bonding and fun that’s a byproduct of group training has kept attendance steady. “We find ways to laugh at practice about the funny things that someone does,” said Woodstock senior captain Maura Beattie. “Our biggest strength will be that we’ve had strong numbers throughout the summer.” And as Beattie’s teammate, sophomore Megan Hansen, pointed out, there’s no time for sleepovers: “We’re up early every day.” e trend has caught on with local middle school students as well. According to first-year, Creekside Middle School head coach Jay Fuller, the ranks of Creekside’s cross-country team have swelled from 14 runners to more than 80 in less than 10

years. “We don’t want to burn them out,” said Fuller. “We want to make it fun and get mileage in and not worry about time.” Several of the Creekside runners will end their summer running camp this week with a 2-mile run with the high school runners. e run will end with a pancake breakfast ... for the middle school runners. e Blue Streaks will keep running the rest of their workout, which can range from 6 to 9 miles each day. Likewise, the Woodstock North High School under have been logging similar miles. New head coach Dan Kremske is encouraging his 12 to 14 athletes to get out daily. “Over the course of a season, your body can have a lot of aches and pains, but if you prepare yourself early on and do the necPlease see Run, Page 23

WHS student Ferguson wins junior golf tournament Woodstock senior wins Marengo Ridge Open By JAY SCHULZ The Independent When last seen during the school year, Woodstock High School incoming senior Alex Ferguson was pitching a shutout against crosstown rival Marian Central Catholic High School in the semifinals of the IHSA regional base-

ball tournament at the Dream Field at Emricson Park. Just over a month later, Ferguson had put down his baseball glove and picked up his golf clubs and won the McHenry County Junior Golf Association Marengo Ridge Open July 2. “I haven’t been able to get out much because of baseball,” Ferguson said. Ferguson has played in four MCGGA tournaments this summer. He shot a 79 at the Golf Club of Illinois, Algonquin, June 12; 79 at Turnberry Country Club, Lakewood, June 17; and 95 at Pinecrest

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