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Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

Dec. 5-11, 2018

Published every Wednesday | Est. 1987 | Serving Woodstock, Wonder Lake and Bull Valley, Ill. | www.thewoodstockindependent.com | $1.00

Incumbents to sit out city election

Five candidates file for three council seats to be elected April 2 By Larry Lough LARRY@THEINDEPENDENT.COM

COMMUNITY Corn shows its versatility as fence that keeps road clear PAGE 18

MARKETPLACE Woodstock-based company working on global water issue PAGE 15

ree new members will take their seats next spring on the Woodstock City Council. e incumbents who hold those seats – Dan Hart, Maureen Larson, and Mark Saladin – did not file petitions for re-election in the April 2 election. e five who did file are Darrin Flynn, omas Grell, Lisa Lohmeyer, Wendy Piersall, and Michael Stanard.

Because Grell, Lohmeyer, and Piersall submitted their petitions the moment the filing period opened, a lottery is planned to determine their order on the ballot. Flynn and Stanard were the fourth and fifth to file and will appear in that order. Saladin led the vote in an eight-candidate race in 2015, followed by Larson and Hart. With only five candidates on the ballot, no primary election will be held Feb. 26 as would have been required

Woodstock theater groups to disband, form new company PAGE 13

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SCHOOLS

10

A&E

13

MARKETPLACE

15

COMMUNITY

18

CALENDAR

24

CLASSIFIED

27

PUBLIC NOTICES

28

PUZZLES

29

SPORTS

30

Please see INCUMBENTS, Page 2

By Larry Lough LARRY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

The Woodstock Independent

671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098 Phone: 815-338-8040 Fax: 815-338-8177 Thewoodstock independent.com

Hart will leave the council after serving one four-year term, saying personal and professional demands wouldn’t leave him the time he needs to do the job. ”My life has changed a lot,” Hart said the day after filing ended Nov. 26. “I’m engaged, I’ve been traveling a

April 2 referendum, levy increase OK’d

INDEX OBITUARIES

‘Life has changed’

Fire District seeks more tax funding

LINCOLN LORE

A&E

OPINION

had more than 12 people filed for the council seats.

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Abraham Lincoln impersonator Gary Cooney of the McHenry County Historical Society talks about the 16th president after a photograph of the former Illinois lawyer was unveiled last week in the McHenry County Courthouse. See story on Page 2.

While many local taxing units plan 2018 tax levies that are lower than allowed under state law, the financially troubled Woodstock Fire/Rescue District will ask for everything it can get. e district Board of Trustees last week approved a $6.457 million levy for 2018, which is 4.99 percent higher than the 2017 levy. But because of the property tax extension limitation law, which caps increases at the lesser of 5 percent or the rate of inflation, the actual levy increase will be less than that. Fire Chief Mike Hill said the actual increase likely would be about 2.84 percent after the county cuts the levy to the maximum allowable. He figured that would increase the district’s property tax Please see FIRE DISTRICT Page 5


NEWS

Dec. 5-11, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

2

INCUMBENTS

CLAUS CLAN ARRIVES

Continued from Page 1

lot, doing more on the consulting side of stuff.” Hart, who owns D.C. Cobb’s restaurants in Woodstock and McHenry, said he had been doing restaurant con- Dan sulting nation- Hart wide which required him to be out of town. He also expressed some frustration that conflict-of-interest laws required that he not only recuse himself from voting on issues involving liquor licenses, Maureen but that he leave Larson the council chambers during discussions – even though his experience could have been useful. He figures he can contribute his experience better by not being a council member. “I can still attend meetings,” Mark he said, “and Saladin speak for or against [issues].” On the whole, though, he enjoyed his one term. “It was a good experience,” he said. “I’m happy I did it.”

Four seats in 2021 Saladin was elected to two full terms after being appointed to serve the final few months of an unexpired term when Ralph Webster resigned. “I’ve always looked at it as, 8 years is pretty substantial,” he said. “For me, I can just say I served my time.” And he’s pleased with what the council has achieved the past 8 years. “I feel the city’s in a real good position,” he said. “We’ve done some good things and set the city up to succeed.” Like Hart, Saladin looks forward to contributing “on the other side” of the council table. “It was time,” the attorney said of his decision not to seek re-election. “It’s been a good run.” Larson, who is finishing her third term, could not be reached for comment. Four other seats on the council will be on the 2021 ballot.

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Although the Woodstock Christmas Parade was postponed a week by snow, Santa and Mrs. Claus arrived this past Sunday for the annual event around the Square – a week late but just as festive.

(ILÄUHSS`]PZP[Z4J/LUY`*V\U[` We get next-to-last installation of famous Lincoln photograph By Larry Lough LARRY@THEINDEPENDENT.COM

McHenry County finally got its photograph of Abraham Lincoln last week, the 101st county in Illinois to unveil a copy of a famous photograph taken before he became president. e reproduction was introduced during a 20-minute ceremony last ursday in the county courthouse, where the art sat on an easel. But Chief Judge Michael Sullivan, who presided at the event on the day before his retirement, assured the group that the artwork would be given a more permanent home. “We’ll make sure it’s in a very prominent place in our courthouse,” Sullivan told leaders of the Illinois Judges Association and State Bar Association who attended the unveiling. e original photograph was taken in Springfield by Alexander Hesler on June 3, 1860, for Lincoln’s presidential campaign that year. Historians consider the portrait one of the best taken of Lincoln during his pre-presidential years. e image of the beardless Lincoln, printed on canvas and sitting in a stained-wood frame, is 30 inches wide and 40 inches tall. Installation in all 102 county courthouses in Illinois was funded by donations from the Judges

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Chief Judge Michael Sullivan (right) and Steve Greeley, president of the McHenry County Bar Association, unveil a photograph of Abraham Lincoln, the lawyer, during a ceremony Nov. 28 in the McHenry County Courthouse. Sullivan, who retired the day after the ceremony, has been chief judge of the 22nd Judicial Circuit since the county became its own circuit in 2006. Association, State Bar Association, and their respective foundations during the state’s bicentennial year. e Illinois State Historical Society owns the glass-plate positives of the Hesler-Lincoln portrait. Diann Marsalck, president of the Judges Association Foundation, explained McHenry County was next to last to get the portrait because the

project started earlier this year in southern Illinois. She said the unveiling in Cook County occurred just two days earlier. e 102nd unveiling, in Shelby County, was scheduled later ursday to complete the statewide project ahead of the state bicentennial celebration Monday at the United Center in Chicago.


IN BRIEF

GOP tabs Hammerand for vacant County Board seat

Dec. 5-11, 2018

Applications are invited for a position on the three-member Board of Fire Commissioners of the Woodstock Fire/Rescue District. The board sets policies and procedures for recruiting, hiring, promotion, and discipline of district employees. Commissioners earn a $500 stipend for attending quarterly meetings and are paid about $33 an hour if more meetings are required. Applications may be made through the district VMÄJL  , 1\KK :[ >VVKZ[VJR -VY TVYL information, call 815-338-2621 or send email info@wfrd.org

sworn in as Illinois senator for the 32nd District. The appointment will be made formally by *V\U[` )VHYK *OHPYTHU 1HJR -YHURZ ^P[O advice from the County Board. Because a Republican vacated the position, a Republican will complete the term, which will expire in December 2020. Hammerand is a retired small business owner of 35 years with previous sales rep. experience for Major Capital Equipment Manufacturing Co. /LOHZILLUTHYYPLKMVYTVYL[OHU`LHYZHUK has two grown children.

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Woodstock Fire/Rescue seeks new member on commission

3

CHURRO-FUELED FUN

Narcotics task force honored at Crime Commission event

2018

NEWS

;OL4J/LUY`*V\U[`:OLYPMM»Z5HYJV[PJZ;HZR force was honored last week during the Chicago *YPTL *VTTPZZPVU»Z :[HYZ VM +PZ[PUJ[PVU  >VUKLY3HRLYLZPKLU[1VOU/HTTLYHUKOHZ Awards Dinner, which recognized outstanding ILLUUVTPUH[LK[VÄSS[OL+PZ[YPJ[]HJHUJ`VU individual and organizational contributions in ÄNO[PUNJYPTL the McHenry County Among the 11 awards presented at the ChiBoard. cago event was the Law Enforcement ExcelThe McHenry County lence by a Task Force Award, which went to the Republican Executive narcotics task force. Committee endorsed 4LTILYZ SPZ[LK ^LYL :N[ 4PJOHLS 4\YHZRP Hammerand, 67, who KL[LJ[P]LZ  1LMM -PLSKZ HUK *HP[S`UU 2LSS`" HUK currently represents Disadministrative specialist Deann Finke, all of the [YPJ[  I\[ ^OVZL [LYT 4J/LUY`*V\U[`:OLYPMM»Z6MÄJL"+L[LJ[P]L9`HU will end next month. He ,OHYK[VM[OL4J/LUY`*P[`7VSPJL+LWHY[TLU[" would succeed Craig HUK +L[LJ[P]L 1HZVU +YHM[a VM [OL 3HRL PU [OL Wilcox, who vacated John Hills Police Department. his seat when he was Hammerand

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Children’s activities were part of the Churros With Santa festival Sunday sponsored by Hispanic Connections at the VFW in >VVKZ[VJR-VVKT\ZPJHUKM\UÄSSLK[OL[OYLLOV\YL]LU[

Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

YearbookDec. 21 Edition Ed

Take advantage of our print and online advertising opportunities to reach more than 17,000 local households! Deadline for advertising: Thursday, Dec. 13

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NEWS

Dec. 5-11, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

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Holiday patrols ticket 72 for car-restraint violations Staff Report NEWS@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

Ten days of holiday traffic enforcement led to 31 seat-belt citations being written by the Woodstock Police Department. ose were among 46 citations the department reported it issued from Nov. 16 to 26 as part of the nationwide Click It or Ticket/Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over enforcement effort. e McHenry County Sheriff’s Office reported more than 100 arrests countywide during the campaign, which included 41 seat-belt/childrestraint violations. City and county police joined other

state and local law enforcement agencies across Illinois to crack down on unbuckled motorists and impaired drivers during the anksgiving holiday. Other citations issued by WPD were: 7 – distracted driving 4 – stop sign citations 2 – speeding

1 – expired driver’s license citation 1 – uninsured motorists Sheriff’s deputies reported these other arrests and citations: 34 – speeding 12 – no insurance 11 – electronic communication device 3 – driving while license suspended or revoked 2 – driving under the influence 1 – drugs is law enforcement mobilization was funded by federal traffic safety funds through the Illinois Department of Transportation and was part of the nationwide Click It or Ticket/Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaigns.

PUBLIC SAFETY LOG Woodstock Police Department

Q Jeremy G. Stokes, 28, Johnsburg, Q Marlene D. Selep-Woehlke, 55, Hunt- was arrested Nov. 28 in the 600 block of ley, was arrested Nov. 21 in the 900 block Lake Avenue on a charge of disorderly of Dieckman St. on two McHenry County conduct. Released after posting $120 warrants. Held on $33,000 bond. Court bond. Court date Dec. 20. date to be set. Q Jessica L. Martinez-Maldonado, 32, Q Gregory D. White, 40, Chicago, was Woodstock, was arrested Nov. 27 at arrested Nov. 21 in the 2100 block of South and Madison streets on a charge West Lake Shore Drive on charges of of no valid driver’s license. Released KYP]PUN \UKLY [OL PUÅ\LUJL HUK KYP]PUN after posting 10 percent of $1,500 bond. \UKLY [OL PUÅ\LUJL V]LY  WLYJLU[ Court date Dec. 20.. blood-alcohol. Released after posting 10 percent of $1,000 bond and surren- 4J/LUY`*V\U[`:OLYPMM»Z6MÄJL dering driver’s license. Court date Dec. Q Austin C. McGee, 19, Wonder Lake, 20. Q Daniel W. Bane, 27, transient, was was arrested Nov. 20 on charges of arrested Nov. 22 at Lake Avenue and leaving the scene of an accident/vehicle Eastwood Drive on charges of driving damage, failure to give info/render aid, with license suspended and operating disregarding a stop sign, no valid regan uninsured motor vehicle. Held on istration, operating an uninsured motor vehicle, improper use of registration or $1,500 bond. Court date Dec. 6. Q Cynthia A. James, 49, Woodstock, title, and failure to reduce speed. was arrested Nov. 25 at Lake Avenue Q Meghan A. Prey, 23, Wonder Lake, and Eastwood Drive on charges of no was arrested Nov. 21 on a charge of valid driver’s license and seat-belt viola- domestic battery/bodily harm. tion. Released after posting 10 percent Q Troy R. Chambers, 32, Woodstock, was arrested Nov. 23 on a charge of of $1,500 bond. Court date Dec. 27. Q Juan Villagomez-Nava, 32, Wood- domestic battery/physical contact. stock, was arrested Nov. 25 at Lake Q Jason A. Kupsik, 20, Woodstock, was Avenue and Eastwood Drive on a war- arrested Nov. 25 on charges of drivrant from Elgin charging failure to PUN\UKLY[OLPUÅ\LUJLVMHSJVOVSKYP]appear. Released after posting 10 per- PUN\UKLY[OLPUÅ\LUJL^P[OISVVKHSJVcent of $10,000 bond plus $75. Court hol 0.08 percent, and failure to reduce speed. date Dec. 27. Q Julio C. Enriquez, 31, Woodstock, Q Ismael Ayala, 18, Woodstock, was was arrested Nov. 25 in the 600 block arrested Nov. 25 on charges of possesof Quinlan Lane on two counts of aggra- sion of controlled substance, display ]H[LK IH[[LY` [V H WLHJL VMÄJLY HUK H WSH[LH[[HJOTLU[HUKKLMLJ[P]LT\MÅLY JOHYNLVMYLZPZ[PUNHWVSPJLVMÄJLY)VUK Q Matthew Thomas, 30, Woodstock, was arrested Nov. 25 on a charge of to be set. Court date to be set. Q Alfredo D. Jordan, 19, Woodstock, possession of controlled substance. was arrested Nov. 26 in the 700 block of Dean Street on a McHenry County war- Charges are only accusations of crimes, rant charging failure to appear. Held on and defendants are presumed innocent unless proved guilty $3,000 bond. Court date to be set.

Woodstock Fire/Rescue District Fire Runs indicates units dispatched and what was found at the scene. Ambulance calls of Woodstock Fire/Rescue District are reported here in number only. EMS calls for Nov. 22-28: 91 Fire Runs Nov. 24

12:15 a.m. – 2200 block of Lake Avenue, malfunctioning alarm system sounded; engine 12:04 p.m. – 300 block of North MadiZVU :[YLL[ NHZVSPUL VY V[OLY ÅHTTHISL liquid spill; truck, shift commandeer Nov. 25

1:38 p.m. – McConnell Road and :HUJ[\HY`+YP]L[YHMÄJHJJPKLU[^P[OUV injuries; engine, ambulance 9:09 p.m. – 10000 block of Country Club Road, arcing, shorted electrical equipment; truck 10:33 p.m. – 10200 block of Lucas Road, arcing, shorted electrical equipment; engine 11:02 p.m. – 700 block of Brown Street, arcing, shorted electrical equipment; engine, bureau 11:05 p.m. – 1600 block of Tappan Street, arcing, shorted electrical equipment; engine Nov. 26

8:16 a.m. – 1200 block of South East^VVK+YP]L[YHMÄJHJJPKLU[^P[OPUQ\YPLZ" truck, shift commander, two ambulances 8:49 a.m. – McCauley Road and Comp[VU SHUL [YHMÄJ HJJPKLU[ ^P[O PUQ\YPLZ" engine, ambulance, shift commander 9:26 a.m. – 00 block of Church Street, electrical wiring/equipment problem; truck, brush truck Nov. 27

8:55 p.m. – 100 block of South Eastwood Drive, smoke scare, odor of smoke; truck, two engines, two ambulances, shift commander, chief

Woodstock Police Chief John Lieb reminded motorists that not wearing a seat belt is a primary offense, meaning police can stop drivers and issue a citation for that alone. State law requires all vehicle occupants, regardless of seating position, to wear a properly adjusted seat belt. “Our officers are out year-round,” Lieb said. “If you or your passengers are caught not wearing a seat belt, you will be cited for the violation. If you drive under the influence of alcohol or drugs, you will be arrested.” e extra enforcement effort around holidays is funded with federal highway safety funds administered by the Illinois Department of Transportation.

New vote on TIF2 this week By Larry Lough LARRY@THEINDEPENDENT.COM

Concern over public notice of the Nov. 19 meeting of the Joint Review Board will require a second vote on the proposed tax increment financing district this week. Amid some confusion at the earlier meeting, the board voted 5-2 in support of establishing TIF2, which would replace the original Woodstock TIF that will expire in 2020. e second vote will occur in a meeting at noon Wednesday in City Council Chambers at City Hall, where public comments also will be allowed before board discussion and a “vote on recommendation.” A Friday morning email announcing the meeting told board members it is expected to last 15 to 20 minutes. City Manager Roscoe Stelford said that while the meeting notice was posted in City Hall, it was not on the city’s website. e law requires both if the website is maintained by fulltime staff. Without a favorable vote from the Review Board, City Council would need five votes – rather than four – to approve TIF2. A final council vote is scheduled for Jan. 15. A final public hearing on the TIF2 proposal was conducted Tuesday at the council’s regular meeting.


Continued from Page 1

e districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ nancial troubles came to light this past summer during negotiations on a new contract with Woodstock Career FireďŹ ghters Local 4813. After rejecting a tentative offer, the ďŹ reďŹ ghters agreed to concessions that reduced the stafďŹ ng requirements of the three-year contract and waived a pay increase for two years. e district had been

- Accountant Brian Zabel on his audit of Fire/Rescue District ďŹ nancial records under 50 percent of being fully funded â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and repeated an earlier concern about covering ongoing expenses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Again, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m concerned about the cash ďŹ&#x201A;ow of the district,â&#x20AC;? Zabel said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;... Yes, that referendum needs to pass.â&#x20AC;? In an unrelated but telling action at the meeting, the board approved a $1,000 transfer to the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s depleted petty cash fund, the second

*HSSU\TILYZJSPTI Chief Hill has blamed the money problems on â&#x20AC;&#x153;unsustainable pension burdens and countless unfunded mandatesâ&#x20AC;? imposed by the state. But after last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meeting, Hill said the call volume is â&#x20AC;&#x153;going through the roofâ&#x20AC;? for ďŹ re and ambulance calls, putting a strain on department resources. Capt. Karen Bush reported the district is likely to exceed 5,000 calls in 2018 for the ďŹ rst time. She told trustees that October was the seventh consecutive month of more than 400 calls. By comparison, she said, only four months of 2017 saw as many as 400 runs. e 4,207 calls through October of this year is 266 more than this

time last year, she said, which is an increase of 6.75 percent.

(IPNWLYJLU[HNL Before it was withdrawn, the original referendum question proposed to raise the levy maximum to $7.32 million, which would be an increase of about $1.17 million. But Hill said uncertainty about the exact levy for 2018 led to a different approach. It will now ask voters to approve a levy increase of 20 percent in 2019, a signiďŹ cant increase over the 5 percent limit imposed in most years. While that sounds high, the chief explained, the district levy represents only about 7 percent of the property tax bill for most citizens â&#x20AC;&#x201C; so 20 percent of that would equal an increase of only about 1.4 percent of the total bill. Board members were concerned that voters might not understand the impact, but district attorney Tom Zanck said the ballot would include an explanation that the increase would be $56.86 a year for a single-family home with a fair-market value of $100,000. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we do our [public relations] campaign,â&#x20AC;? Hill said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the ďŹ rst thing weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll say.â&#x20AC;?

COL OR OF T H E Y E A R 2 019

METROPOLITA N A F- 69 0

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NEWS

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such transfer this year. After ďŹ reďŹ ghters agreed in August to forgo two years of pay increases in the new contract, board President Robert Kristensen expressed concern about the district having the money to cover expenses in the third year if the referendum did not pass. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to have money to make things happen,â&#x20AC;? he said in August. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see it happening without additional revenue.â&#x20AC;?

Dec. 5-11, 2018

income by about $172,000. e board also approved a referendum for the April 2 ballot to let voters decide whether the ďŹ re district can exceed the state levy limit. e wording of the ballot question will be slightly different from the referendum the board had approved for the Nov. 6 election before it was withdrawn to give district ofďŹ cials more time to convince voters of the need. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are ready to move forward,â&#x20AC;? Hill told the board at its Nov. 27 meeting. e chief reported that promotion of the appeal to voters would begin almost immediately.

paying $5,000 a day in overtime to meet the required stafďŹ ng levels with a shortage of personnel. e union asked for a list of the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spending priorities, which Hill had proposed to the board. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re living day to day without a plan,â&#x20AC;? he told the board in August. Brian Zabel, an accountant from Morris who audited the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s books, warned the board last week about the â&#x20AC;&#x153;pension underfunding liabilityâ&#x20AC;? of the district â&#x20AC;&#x201C; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s well

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

FIRE DISTRICT


“Absolutely

THE NO. 1 SHOW in the world!” —Kenn Wells, legendary lead dancer of the English National Ballet

NEWS

Dec. 5-11, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

6

All-new 2019 show with live orchestra ShenYun.com

5,000 Years of Civilization Reborn SHEN YUN’S unique artistic vision expands theatrical experience into a multi-dimensional, inspiring journey through one of humanity’s greatest treasures—the five millennia of traditional Chinese culture. Featuring one of the world’s oldest art forms—classical Chinese dance—along with patented scenographical effects and alloriginal orchestral works, Shen Yun opens a portal to a civilization of profound wisdom and divine beauty. Prepare for an experience that will take your breath away.

“Awe–inspiring sensation!” —

The first performances of the 2019 Shen Yun season!

“5,000 years of Chinese music and dance in one night.” —

“Incredible! Groundbreaking!” —

“Beautiful…A nimble mastery.” —Chicago Tribune

“This is the highest and the best of what humans can produce.”

Dec 22–23, 2018

The Gift for a Lifetime!

Coronado Performing Arts Center 314 N Main St, Rockford, IL 61101

—Olevia Brown-Klahn, singer and musician

Holiday Special (expires on Dec 23) Use Code “SY19” to waive processing fees at theater box office & through 855-799-7469

“Epic! One of the greatest performances ever existing on the planet! Something I will remember for the rest of my life.” —Arion Jay Goodwin, veteran music producer

“My heart was open and I started to cry. The spirit of hope, beauty and blessing…is a fabulous gift to us.” —Sine McKenna, Award-Winning Celtic Singer

The traditional Chinese culture Shen Yun presents cannot be seen anywhere else in the world—not even in China.

ORDER YOUR TICKETS NOW!

ORDERING Online: Tickets.ShenYun.com/Rockford Hotline: 855-799-SHOW (7469) Theater: 815-968-5222 Box Office: Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm; Sat, 10am-2pm Ticket Prices: $80 - $150


IN BRIEF

Robert Schnulle, 77

Summer 2019 internships ^PSSL_WSVYLUVUWYVÄ[^VYR

You may email obituaries to e Woodstock Independent at pr@thewoodstockindependent.com or bring them to the newspaper office at 671 E. Calhoun St. in Woodstock. A fee will be charged for standard obituaries. For more information about the newspaper’s policy, call 815-338-8040. During the week, obituaries are updated regularly on our website, thewoodstockindependent.com

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Local legislators will hold public hours in Harvard Recently elected state Sen. Craig Wilcox, R-McHenry, will partner with Rep. Steve 9LPJR9>VVKZ[VJRMVYQVPU[TVIPSLVMÄJL hours this week. The legislators will meet with the public from 10 a.m. to noon Wednesday at Harvard-Diggins Library, 900 E. McKinley St., Harvard. Theywill have a table set up at the library where visitors will be able to talk one-onVUL ^P[O [OL LSLJ[LK VMÄJPHSZ HUK ^PSS IL able to receive assistance with their dealings with state agencies. Wilcox’s district, like Reick’s, includes the Woodstock area. According to a news release, no appointTLU[ PZ ULLKLK MVY TVIPSL VMÄJL OV\YZ events. Future dates and locations for

Thayer Road bridge open, but load limit not changed

Recently The Thayer Road bridge north VM>VVKZ[VJROHZVWLULK[V[YHMÄJKH`Z ahead of schedule. The posted detour on the 43-year-old bridge came down Monday, McHenry County announced. The bridge will remain load-posted at 20 tons for single vehicles and 30 tons for vehicles with three or more axles until IDOT gives permission to remove the limits. After that, legal loads of up to 40 tons will again be allowed to cross. The $151,000 project, done by Sjostrom Contractors, of Rockford, included minor rehabilitation of the Hebron Township bridge and replacement of the driving surface and six channel beams. The bridge is scheduled to be replaced in 2022.

NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS

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815.337.1932 232 Main St. Woodstock

Whitney Behm, DMD

Elli Emmons, DDS

NEWS

Where to send obituaries

Applications are due by Jan. 31 for six summer internships with Leadership Greater McHenry County. The program allows college students to explore the career potential ^P[OPU[OLUVUWYVÄ[ZLJ[VY^OPSLKL]LSVWPUN management and leadership skills. According to a news release, the interns will be selected through a competitive application and interview process. Interns will be matched with participating 4J/LUY` *V\U[` UVUWYVÄ[ VYNHUPaH[PVUZ based on interests, skills, and the host’s ZWLJPÄJULLKZ During the eight-week paid internship, Z[\KLU[Z ^PSS NHPU ÄYZ[OHUK RUV^SLKNL VM [OL SVJHS UVUWYVÄ[ JVTT\UP[` P[Z SLHKLYship, and many organizations. For more information about the program, visit leadershipgmc.org/programs/ intern-program/. Leadership Greater McHenry County is a countywide organization to recognize and

KL]LSVW [OL ZRPSSZL[ VM PKLU[PÄLK SLHKLYZ TVIPSL VMÄJL OV\YZ ^PSS IL WVZ[LK VU [OL foster communication, and build connec- web sites of the legislators. tions among leaders and the community.

Dec. 5-11, 2018

Robert Schnulle, 77, of Woodstock, passed away on Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018, at his home. He was born Oct. 8, 1941, in Woodstock to Lester and Vera (Hildebrandt) Schnulle. He married Gail Selzer. Bob had worked for Althoff Industries for 31 years. He went to work for Associated Electrical in 1990, where he stayed until his retirement in 2001. He was an avid sports fan, and loved the Chicago Cubs and the Indianapolis Colts. He loved spending time with his family, and watching his grandkids grow up. Bob was a member of the Electrical Union Local 117, the Woodstock Knights of Columbus, the Woodstock Moose Lodge, and the Chain Gang for Woodstock High School. He was a past member of the Woodstock High School Backers Club, and he had been a coach with the Woodstock Little League. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Gail Schnulle; his children, Gary Schnulle, Donald (Terry) Schnulle, Jeff (Carol) Schnulle, Ann Schnulle; his grandchildren, Jason, Mitchell, Jacob, Madison, Paige, and Hannah; his siblings, Vernon (Dawn) Schnulle, Fred (Brenda) Schnulle, Carl (Rose) Schnulle, Harry (Bonnie) Schnulle, Susan (Roger) Stoerp, Sharon (Roger) Christiansen, Paula (Larry) Wiedner; and numerous nephews and nieces. He was preceded in death by his parents; and siblings, Ronald, Larry, Richard, William, James, Edwin Schnulle, Sally Schnulle, and Sandy Johnson. Visitation was held on Friday, Nov. 30, 2018, from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Schneider, Leucht, Merwin Cooney Funeral Home, 1211 N. Seminary Ave., Woodstock. The Funeral Mass was held on Saturday, Dec. 1, 2018, at 10:30 a.m. at St. Mary Catholic Church, 312 Lincoln Ave., Woodstock. Interment was in McHenry County Memorial Park cemetery in Woodstock. Memorials may be made to either the Woodstock High School Backers Club, the Woodstock North Boosters Club, or a charity of the donor’s choosing. Contact the funeral home at 815-3381710 or visit www.slmcfh.com to leave a condolence for the family.

7 THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

OBITUARIES


OPINION

Dec. 5-11, 2018

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Opinion

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Cheryl Wormley PUBLISHER, CO-OWNER

Paul Wormley CO-OWNER

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THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Cheryl Wormley Larry Lough Sandy Kucharski Ken Farver

Citizens give democracy good workout People who have concerns about the future of our democracy need to take a close look at how it is being practiced at the local level. First, the objective evidence. McHenry County voters last month showed up in record numbers for a nonpresidential election. Turnout for the Nov. 6 election was still less than half of the eligible voters, at 49.32 percent, but that’s the highest of the 21st century. Since 2002, turnout of midterm elections has ranged from 44.4 percent to 47.19 percent. But don’t let that modest percentage increase this year fool you. is year, 117,515 people voted. at’s 22,906 more than in 2014 – an increase of 24.2 percent in the number of citizens casting their ballots in the midterm. You can argue about what caused a surge in registrations (15.6 percent) this year and in voting, but no one can deny that our citizens were much more engaged in this election than normal. Let us hope this is the new normal, to increasing voter participation every election. As for the anecdotal evidence, you would just have to attend a meeting of the Woodstock City Council when the issue is a new tax increment financing district, or a local government meeting in Bull Valley when the agenda includes discussion of a proposed solar development in the community. Both issues were on agendas this week: an ordinance to regulate solar installations Monday night with the Bull Valley Planning and Zoning Commission, and a final public hearing on TIF2 Tuesday at the City Council meeting. Discussion in Bull Valley has had a hard time separating the proposal of developer SolAmerica from the proposed ordinance, which had been the focus of four planning commission meetings before this week. And at every one of those meetings, dozens of Bull Valley residents – nearly all opponents of the development – have showed up to make their voices heard on the two matters. While opponents of TIF2 are fewer, the debate has been no less intense. at’s how democracy works – citizens getting involved to let their elected leaders know something about the mood of the community. And if enough people are unhappy with the outcome of the governmental process, their voices can be heard on Election Day. at, too, is how democracy works.

What is our ‘word of the year’? Words are so important in our lives that we language lovers celebrate them each year with special recognition. But like anything in this age of conflict, not everyone agrees on what the “word of the year” for 2018 Larry should be. Lough Cambridge Editorializing Dictionary, a traditional reference, has an opinion. But it differs from the choice of online upstart dictionary.com. Or Oxford English Dictionary. Merriam Webster and the American Dialect Society have yet to weigh in with their picks. But you might decide to choose your own word. We even have some candidates

of our own in Woodstock. WORDS HAVE NO ACTUAL power, I argue, which might sound funny coming from a guy who has made a career with words. Sure, athletes can be motivated by an emotional speech from the coach at halftime. You might even be moved to vote for a candidate, join a protest movement, or buy a product based on the words you hear from an impassioned advocate. But words themselves are inert, agnostic, lacking in the ability to inspire. at’s why a particular word does not elicit the same reaction from everyone. By itself, a word is powerless, like the sound nobody hears when a tree falls in a deserted forest. We can, however, give power to words by how we respond to hearing or reading them. We can be inspired or upset in

how we choose – even involuntarily – to react to words. And effective advocates – be they politicians or salesmen – know how to use written or spoken words to get people to respond. It’s called manipulation. You might disagree. SOME WORDS OF THE YEAR win recognition based on their frequency of use, an objective measurement based on the number of times that people go to a dictionary to look up a definition. at is the criteria for MerriamWebster, which chose “feminism” as its word of 2017 based on the number of look-ups in that year. Other language references do it differently. Dictionary.com has a political bent in its choices. Its 2018 word is “misinformation.” Last year it was Continued on next page


One of the points of light in the community for me is the choir at my church, First Presbyterian. e choir will present its annual Christmas service this Sunday, Dec. 9, from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the white church on Route 47 north of town, just south of Charles Road. All are invited. Come.

Believe it or not, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Toy Hall of Fame. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of e Strong National Museum of Play in Rochester, N.Y. More than 60 Cheryl toys have been Wormley inducted in the +LJSHYH[PVUZ hall of fame since it was established in 1998. e ďŹ rst class included 17 iconic toys, including among others Etch A Sketch, Monopoly, Lincoln Logs, Tinker Toys and Play-Doh. Every year the public is invited to nominate toys for the incoming class. A committee of educators and historians selects the inductees. Criteria for selection include being widely recognized, respected and remembered; longevity; discovery â&#x20AC;&#x201C; fostering learning and creativity; and innovation â&#x20AC;&#x201C; having changed play or toy design. e 2018 inductees are Uno, pinball and Magic 8 Ball. Uno and Magic 8 Ball were ďŹ nalists in 2017, but were beat out by paper airplanes, Clue, and WifďŹ&#x201A;e Ball. e nine other ďŹ nalists this year were American Girl Dolls, chalk, Chutes and Ladders, Fisher-Price Corn Popper, Masters of the Universe, sled, tic-tac-toe, Tickle Me Elmo, and Tudor Electric Football. I know ďŹ rst-hand that Magic 8 Ball, which ďŹ rst appeared on store shelves in 1946, lives on. My 9-year-old granddaughter, Anna,

received one as a birthday gift from a friend last month. As for Uno, there are two decks in my house as well as decks in the homes of my grandchildren. An Ohio barbershop owner is credited with dreaming up the game that is simple enough for children and varied enough for adults to enjoy.

GREEN BEAN CASSEROLE More than a month ago, I read of the death of Dorcas Reilly. Unlike President Bush, Mrs. Reillyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t known in every household in the U.S. However, what she created is very well known. In a Campbellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s test kitchen in 1955, Mrs. Reilly created an American anksgiving staple â&#x20AC;&#x201C; green bean casserole. Campbellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cream soups were and still are a popular ingredient in casseroles. In the middle of the last century, homemakers welcomed simple recipes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a short list of ingredients prepared in minutes. Mrs. Reillyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s green bean casserole was perfect â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just ďŹ ve ingredients prepared in only 10 minutes. Asked what prompted her to combine mushroom soup and canned green beans, she humbly said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remember.â&#x20AC;? We may not be able to sing, create new toys or develop recipes that live on for more than 60 years, but we can all be points of light.

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Cheryl Wormley is publisher of e Woodstock Independent. Her email is c.wormley@thewoodstockindependent.com

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+VU/\TILY[ZVU Continued from previous page

â&#x20AC;&#x153;complicit,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;xenophobiaâ&#x20AC;? was the word for 2016. Because language follows culture, words of the year are often inďŹ&#x201A;uenced by politics and technology. Cambridge Dictionary determined 2018 was the year of â&#x20AC;&#x153;nomophobia,â&#x20AC;? the fear of not having â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or not being able to use â&#x20AC;&#x201C; your cellphone. But words donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be new. Oxford Dictionary determined â&#x20AC;&#x153;toxicâ&#x20AC;? to be the word of this year, but in the ďŹ gurative â&#x20AC;&#x201C; not literal â&#x20AC;&#x201C; sense of â&#x20AC;&#x153;poisonous.â&#x20AC;? Used as an adjective to describe â&#x20AC;&#x153;cultureâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;relationship,â&#x20AC;? it takes on a different nuance. But, perhaps, equally lethal. WE WILL NEED TO WAIT TO FIND out the 29th annual word of the year from the American Dialect Society. Last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s word was â&#x20AC;&#x153;fake news.â&#x20AC;? e year before it was â&#x20AC;&#x153;dumpster ďŹ re,â&#x20AC;?

deďŹ ned as â&#x20AC;&#x153;an exceedingly disastrous or chaotic situationâ&#x20AC;? that is out of control or poorly handled. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the rough equivalent of â&#x20AC;&#x153;train wreck,â&#x20AC;? metaphorically speaking. e Society suggested its terms were chosen as best representing public discourse and preoccupations of society â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in large part, it seems, because of presidential politics the past two years. e Society interprets word of the year as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;vocabulary itemâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including not just words but phrases, which do not have to be new but must be newly prominent or notable during the year. e 128-year-old Society includes linguists, lexicographers, etymologists, grammarians, historians, researchers, writers, editors, students, and independent scholars, according to its website. You going to argue with them? WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S THE WORD OF THE YEAR for the Woodstock area for 2018?

Maybe itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;TIF,â&#x20AC;? an acronym for tax increment taxing district, which has taxed the patience of people on both sides of the debate. You might consider â&#x20AC;&#x153;solar farm,â&#x20AC;? which often has attracted more heat than light. en there is â&#x20AC;&#x153;opioids,â&#x20AC;? abuse of which is a problem even in our suburban community, as revealed in e Independentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s four-part series this fall. Consider also â&#x20AC;&#x153;resource ofďŹ cer,â&#x20AC;? a school security term that took on extra meaning this year. Or maybe itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another acronym, OFAC, which has been the center of the discussion on homelessness in our community. atâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my list. Do you have others we should consider? Larry Lough is editor of e Woodstock Independent. His email is larry@ thewoodstockindependent.com

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Dec. 5-11, 2018

I have several things to share with you this week. Our country is mourning the death of a president. George Herbert Walker Bush, the 41st president of the United States, died Nov. 31 at his home in Houston. He was 94. He is often referred to as our most successful one-term president. Many of us remember his call to the citizens of this country to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;a thousand points of light.â&#x20AC;? We ďŹ rst heard it during his 1988 presidential campaign as he upheld the roles of community and voluntarism. And, we heard it again and again â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in his inaugural address and State of the Union addresses. e Points of Light Foundation he founded encourages people to honor his legacy â&#x20AC;&#x153;by pledging your time to volunteer, becoming a point of light in your communityâ&#x20AC;? to carry out his vision of ordinary citizens unleashing their power to create positive change. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen this happen in Woodstock in dozens if not hundreds of ways. Individuals, groups and nonproďŹ t organizations have worked to improve lives and our community.

The

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SCHOOLS

Dec. 5-11, 2018

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Schools

IN BRIEF

Grant would help to fund school sidewalk project

BEARING DOWN

More than 3,000 feet of new sidewalks to Dean and Olson elementary schools would be built with help from a $200,000 grant the city of Woodstock has applied for through the 2019 Safe Routes to Schools program. The grant is administered through the Illinois Department of Transportation. An application was submitted by the Nov. 19 deadline ahead of a resolution that was expected to be adopted Tuesday by the City Council. The project is estimated to cost $273,000, according to the city, with grant funds used to reimburse the expense once the sidewalk work is completed. The city worked with Woodstock School District 200 to determine best use of grant funds to ensure the safety and security of students who walk and bike to school.

Northwood will be host for Lego Robotics meet A LEGO League robotic qualifying competition will be held from 9:15 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 8, at Northwood Middle School . Team from Northwood and Creekside middle schools will be among 16 teams to compete. Other teams from Crystal Lake, Harvard and the surrounding area also are involved.

MCC Chorus will perform in singalong on Sunday The McHenry County College Chorus will join the community and Voices in Harmony choir to perform in the SingAlong of Handel’s “Messiah.” The performance will begin at 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 9, at the Raue Center for the Arts, 26 N. Williams St., in Crystal 3HRL° The singalong also features talented soloists, a 25-piece orchestra, and calligraphy by Timothy Botts. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for students and seniors. Children 12 and younger are free with a paying adult. For tickets and information, contact [OL9H\L*LU[LY)V_6MÄJLH[ 9212 orwww.rauecenter.org.

DISTRICT 200

Staley Da Bear gets down with students at Westwood Elementary School, where the Chicago Bears mascot visited last week because of the school’s outstanding participation in the Fuel Up to Play 60 program, ^OPJO[LHJOLZZ[\KLU[Z[OLILULÄ[ZVMOLHS[O`U\[YP[PVUHUKL_LYJPZL:[\KLU[Z^LYLX\PaaLKVU)LHYZ[YP]PH HUZ^LYLKX\LZ[PVUZHIV\[OLHS[O`LH[PUNHUKWO`ZPJHSHJ[P]P[`HUKKHUJLK^P[O:[HSL`

MADRIGALS ON THE MOVE

DISTRICT 200 PHOTOS

Woodstock High School Madrigal singers perform at Olson EleTLU[HY`:JOVVSVULVMZL]LYHSZJOVVSZ[OL`]PZP[LK-YPKH`TVYUPUN ;OLHUU\HS4HKNYPNHS+PUULYWLYMVYTHUJLZ^PSSIL+LJHUKH[ )\SS=HSSL`.VSM*S\I9LZLY]H[PVUMVYTZMVY[PJRL[ZHYLH]HPSHISLVU [OL>/:^LIZP[L^VVKZ[VJRZJOVVSZVYN7HNL


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PICTURE THIS Woodstock Square looking towards South Benton Street is decorated for the holidays in 1968 photograph.

Don Peasley Photo Collection, McHenry County Historical Society

The McHenry County Historical Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s holiday display, Rock Around the Quilted Tree Show & Contest, is now open from 1-4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday until Jan. 4. Closed Dec. 24, 25, and 31, and Jan. 1. Veteran Christmas memorabilia collectors Dave Harms and Lynne Eltrevoog are once again collaborating to deck the halls of the museum with a replica of a 1969 Sears Catalog holiday ad and other vintage holiday decorations for your viewing enjoyment. Admission required to the museum. For more information, call 815-923-2267.

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Kayla Lambert is a senior at Marian Central Catholic High School. She is the daughter of Tom and Julie Lambert, Algonquin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kayla is a committed young woman. She is goal-oriented and has been laser-focused on academic excellence throughout her time here at Marian. Her future is certainly bright,â&#x20AC;? said one of her teachers. Kayla was on the honor roll, Tri-M Music Honor Society, National Honor Society and a member of Academic Excellence in Theology and the Thespian Society. She is an Illinois State Scholar and also in theatre, choir and is a member of the math team. Outside of school, Kayla is a member of the Peer Ministry Team, Altar Serving Team and involved in the church youth choir. When asked who inspires her, Kayla responded, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mr. Liggett, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been my math teacher for the past three years. He cares so much about each student and is always Ă&#x20AC;OOHGZLWKSRVLWLYHHQHUJ\0UV&UHPHQWP\WKJUDGHWHDFKHUKHOSHGPHWRJDLQ FRQĂ&#x20AC;GHQFHLQP\VHOIDQGKHOSHGVKDSHPHLQWRWKHSHUVRQ,DPWRGD\ERWKDFDGHPLcally and personally.â&#x20AC;? When asked what makes her feel successful, Kayla said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m successIXOEHFDXVHRIWKHFRQĂ&#x20AC;GHQFH,KDYHJDLQHGLQP\VHOI7KLVLQFOXGHVWKHDELOLW\WRWDNH risks without worrying about being wrong and the endurance to try again even after a failed attempt.â&#x20AC;?

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Meet Suzanne Slade for a signing of her book “Astronaut Annie” Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018 at 10:30 a.m. “Astronaut Annie” will be taking off for an in-space reading in February. Woodstock

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Susan W. Murray THE INDEPENDENT

History in Woodstock TownSquare Players was established in 1967. WMTC followed in 1974 when a TSP member believed that a separate company, devoted entirely to musicals, was warranted, according to Sue Falbo, current TSP president. When Comella ran the idea for a single company past Mayor Brian Sager, who preceded Comella as WMTC president, he told her that the move was “a good business decision.”

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY SUSAN W. MURRAY

Woodstock resident Sydney Adkins styles the hair of Kenzie Parry, also of Woodstock, while Grace Schulz, of Harvard applies lipstick before TownSquare Players’ Saturday matinée of “A Christmas Carol.” Adkins played Belle, Parry played Mrs. Cratchit, and Schulz played Grace Fezziwig and Mrs. Dilber. After this year, Theatre 121 will be mounting productions of holiday shows such as “A Christmas Carol.” Because the two companies have operated with different structures and each has nonprofit status, disbanding and creating a new company was a complicated effort led by an interim board, with members drawn from both companies. Falbo, Comella, Elaine Riner, Janie Czarny, Beth Davis, Billy Seger, Shannon Day, Spencer White, and Roger Zawacki have been meeting monthly for a year to hammer out the details. A subcommittee was formed to write eatre 121’s bylaws, and the group had to obtain its nonprofit status by compliance with 501(c)(3) guidelines. e next-to-last official step in the process will come at TSP’s annual meeting in June when the membership must vote to disband TownSquare Players. Afterward, eatre 121 will have a its own board of nine members with a president, vice president, treasurer, secretary, and five at-large members who will head up committees. e other aspect of creating a new company, choosing a slate of shows for the 2019-20 season, is perhaps more pleasurable. eatre 121 has obtained the rights for its first production in October – a show with lots of singing and dancing that might have

come from Sweden, Falbo said. A Play Reading Committee will meet in early December to choose the four other shows for the inaugural season.

Many people involved Woodstock resident Paul Lockwood tried out for his first Woodstock show in January 2001 and was president of TSP from 2007 to 2013. He pointed out that while TSP and WMTC were two entities, “there’s never been a separation” between the two groups. “You could be part of both,” said Lockwood, who performed for TSP and WMTC. And, he added, the two groups shared rehearsal and storage space in a warehouse facility on the south end of Woodstock. Further, Campbell noted, the two companies sometimes combined their season offerings into one package for patrons. From a practical standpoint, having one company “allows some of the coordination of shows from one to the next to be seamless,” Lockwood said. “Putting on a production takes so many people,” Falbo said. With two companies relying on volunteers for tasks such as the load-in/

‘Collaborative community’ Falbo noted the rich vein of talent in the area that includes directors, singers, and actors. “It’s a very collaborative community,” she said. Campbell said that audiences can look forward to new programming building on the “wide variety of shows,” that Lockwood noted had been true of past productions, including those geared to families and others that were more adult-oriented. Woodstock’s Dramatic Publishing publishes and sells the rights to musicals, as well as full-length and one-act plays. President Christopher Sergel III greeted the eatre 121 news with enthusiasm. “is is an exciting time for Woodstock and surrounding communities,” Sergel said via email. “While each of these storied companies will take a final curtain call, a new day will rise from the collaboration – one that will provide a bold future under the right artistic direction and fiscal leadership. e opportunities are boundless. We wish eatre 121 the very best.” So, will eatre 121 bestow a “Heart and Soul” award to someone in each of its productions? at remains to be seen, but audiences can be assured that the heart and soul of community theater is alive at the Woodstock Opera House.

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If, while at a crowded event at Stage Left Café, you’ve ever found yourself pinned against the wall back near the serving counter, you will have noticed the plaques that list the names of the winners of the Heart Awards and Soul Awards. TownSquare Players gives a Soul Award to the person who brings outstanding dedication and enthusiasm to his or her role in a production. e Heart Award honors an individual who, by extraordinary effort, contributes unselfishly to the success of a show by Woodstock Musical eatre Company. For more than four decades, the two companies have provided Woodstock theater audiences with high-quality plays and musicals that are “affordable and accessible” and account for 40 percent to 45 percent of Woodstock Opera House programming, said Daniel Campbell, managing director of the venue. After a two-year effort, the two groups are slated to disband and form a new company, eatre 121, that will be the sole resident company of the Woodstock Opera House. e name is the result of suggestions solicited on the companies’ Facebook pages. e “121” refers to the number in the Woodstock Opera House’s street address at 121 W. Van Buren St. “I’ve been around to start three theater companies,” observed Kathie Comella, a performer, recipient of multiple Heart Awards, and the most recent president of WMTC.

load-out of shows, Falbo said, members of TSP and WMTC worried that they were “burning [the volunteers] out.” “It’s always challenging to put on great shows with a limited budget,” Falbo said of another advantage to forming one company. With branding distilled into eatre 121 and requests for donations coming from and going to one company, Falbo said, “we can move forward and make [community theater] better.” at spirit is reflected in eatre 121’s motto: “Honoring the past, acting for the future.” “We’ve got a great performance venue with a very long history,” Lockwood said. While acting in plays and musicals over the past 18 years, Lockwood said “it was never far from my mind that I was on the same stage where Paul Newman and Orson Welles performed.”

Dec.5-11, 2018

After four decades, groups plan merger

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A REASON FOR CELEBRATION!” –NEW YORK MAGAZINE

Woodstock

INDE AROUND THE WORLD

I NDEPENDENT The

Take a photo of you and your Independent at work, on vacation, on a date, at a ballgame, when you propose etc... and be the next featured reader!

PHOTO BY B JEREMY EMY MYY DA D NIEL. IEL. L. 20 201 8.

N OW ON ! SA L E

Woodstock resident Tricia Rachford and her sister Pegg Stoddard enjoy reading The Independent on Rapa Nui (Easter Island).

Email pics to jen@thewoodstockindependent.com or bring it to 671 E. Calhoun St.


15

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Transactions ďŹ led in the McHenry County Recorderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OfďŹ ce Oct. 1

OWC supports global water programs Donations, matching funds being offered in December campaign Staff Report NEWS@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

OWC, a Woodstock-based zeroemissions Mac and PC technology company, announced it would partner with the nonproďŹ t organization charity: water this holiday season in helping to provide drinking water to people in developing nations. In a news release, OWC â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Other World Computing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; said it would donate $25,000 to the nonproďŹ t agency and match, dollar for dollar, funds raised by the public up to $125,000 in the campaign to raise $250,000. In addition, OWC will donate $1 for every newsletter sign-up between now and Dec. 21.

According to charity: water, more than 663 million people are living without access to clean water â&#x20AC;&#x201C; nearly 1 in 10 people globally, and twice the population of the U.S. Clean and accessible water can improve education, income, and health â&#x20AC;&#x201C; especially for women and children. Donations may be made through my.charitywater.org â&#x20AC;&#x153;OWC is all about solutions and charity: water is an exceptional solution for a great need,â&#x20AC;? Larry Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor, founder and CEO of OWC, said in a news release. â&#x20AC;&#x153;By helping bring clean and accessible water to communities in need, we are not only providing better health conditions, but we are freeing up time in the day for a renewed focus on education, building and bettering these communities.â&#x20AC;? is latest partnership is part of OWCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s continuing effort to bring awareness and funds for clean

and accessible drinking water, the release said. OWC has previously funded 17 wells in Ethiopia and sponsored Florian Wagner and his African Waters project. In addition, OWC planned to make an additional $25,000 donation to Splash.org if the ďŹ rst $25,000 was raised by the public by Dec. 1. OWC will provide matching funds through charity: water now through Friday, Dec. 21. For more information on charity: water, visit charitywater.org. Other World Computing was founded by Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor in 1988 when he was 14. e company helps tech enthusiasts and industry professionals through storage, connectivity, software and expansion solutions to get the most out of their technology investments, protect digital assets, and expand their hardwareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capabilities to keep up with the demands and evolution of their work.

DO

YO U?

Presented by: Kim

Keefe

REALTORÂŽ

Â&#x2021;815.790.4852 (call or text) Kim@TeamOpenDoors.com

MARKETPLACE

Woodstock-based OWC is taking on a global mission to help provide clean drinking water to people in develVWPUNUH[PVUZHYV\UK[OL^VYSK)LZPKLZTHRPUNHJVU[YPI\[PVU[VUVUWYVĂ&#x201E;[JOHYP[`!^H[LY6>*PZTH[JOPUN donations through Dec. 21.

Dec.5-11, 2018

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY LARRY LOUGH

Q Residence at 232 Wildmeadow Lane, Woodstock, was sold by CalAtlantic Group, Inc., East Dundee, to Kelly Carlson, Woodstock, for $162,430. Q Residence at 243 Wildmeadow Lane, Woodstock, was sold by CalAtlantic Group, Inc., East Dundee, to Dan and Carole A. Wintersteen, Woodstock, for $191,545. Q Residence at 327 Wildmeadow Lane, Woodstock, was sold by CalAtlantic Group, Inc., East Dundee, to Nick P. Catsadimas, Woodstock, for $252,910. Q Residence at 385 Fieldstone Drive, Woodstock, was sold by CalAtlantic Group, Inc. East Dundee, to Eric M. and Heather D. Norwood, Woodstock, for $245,000. Q Residence at 356 Fieldstone Drive, Woodstock, was sold by CalAtlantic Group, Inc., East Dundee, to Ian Weber, Woodstock, for $304,050. Q Residence at 2870 Braeburn Way, Woodstock, was sold by CalAtlantic Group, Inc., East Dundee, Kari E. Jenkins and Carley L. Crawford, Woodstock, for 23,460. Q Residence at 237 Fieldstone Drive, Woodstock, was sold by CalAtlantic Group, Inc., East Dundee, to David and Jessica Degrassi, Woodstock, for $223,530. Q Residence at 209 Springwood Drive, Woodstock, was sold by CalAtlantic Group, Inc., East Dundee, to Daniel and Victoria Adams, Woodstock, for $227,905. Q Residence at 245 Wildmeadow Lane, Woodstock, was sold by CalAtlantoic Group, Inc., East Dundee, to Joseph T. Domka and Kristin M. Conrad, Woodstock, for $153,720. Q Residence at 247 Wildmeadow Lane, Woodstock, was sold by CalAtlantic Group, Inc., East Dundee, to Erik K. and Jessica M. Sallis, Woodstock, for $169,495.

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Marketplace


MARKETPLACE

Dec. 5-11, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

16

Keefe Real Estate begins operations in Illinois Woodstock office first outside Wisconsin base Staff Report NEWS@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

Keefe Real Estate opened its eighth office Monday at 11705 Catalpa Lane in Woodstock, the Wisconsin-based firm’s first office in Illinois. A grand opening celebration is planned for 3 to 6 p.m. ursday, Jan. 10, to coincide with the release of Keefe’s Lake & Country magazine’s spring issue, which will focus on McHenry County. A ribbon-cutting, refreshments, and tours of the new office will be part of the festivities. e public is welcome to the event. RSVPs are being accepted via email to katrinal@keeferealestate.com or by calling Katrina at 262-348-3215. Keefe sells and buys residential homes, commercial real estate, and vacation properties, as well as farms and land. Its team includes agents who have served McHenry County for years. Agents recently brought into the firm include Natalie Torres as managing

broker; Clancy Green, who will focus on commercial, residential real estate and vacant land; and Randy Erwin, who specializes in farms, vacant land, and rural estate properties. Suzanne Kaminski will be office administrator. ey join the three existing Keefe agents who serve customers along both sides of the state line. Work was still being done late last week to finish extensive renovations to the interior space of the office, which is just west of Studio 2015 jewelry store. e office has been given modern décor and new work spaces to accommodate up to 10 sales agents. Keefe Real Estate is an independent and family-owned real estate brokerage which originally opened in Lake Geneva in 1943 as Farm Auction Service Inc. to provide auction and shortterm lending services to area farmers. Keefe, with more than 80 sales agents, is No. 1 in sales volume in Walworth, Racine and Kenosha counties in Wisconsin, the news release said. e Woodstock office will serve McHenry and adjacent counties. For more information, visit www. keeferealestate.com or contact Ariel Altergott, 262-348-3239, aaltergott@ keeferealestate.com

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY LARRY LOUGH

The future’s so bright that Natalie Torres had to wear shades in front of [OLUL^2LLML9LHS,Z[H[LVMÄJLPU>VVKZ[VJR^OLYLZOLPZTHUHNPUN IYVRLY;OLVMÄJLVWLULK4VUKH`^PSSOH]LHNYHUKVWLUPUN1HU

Voices of Faith Chancel Choir presents:

Christmas Choral Celebration of Hope, Peace, Joy and Love Sunday, Dec. 9, at 9:30 a.m. Christmas Eve Candlelight Services 4:30 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. The services will include the music of JIM-JAM Children's Choir, Children's Hand Chime Choir, Voices of Faith Chancel Choir and Special Solos and Ensembles.

First Presbyterian Church, Woodstock, IL 2018 North Route 47, Woodstock


17

Dec.5-11, 2018

Mercyhealth Hospital

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Care with a passion that never rests

and Medical Center-Harvard is

Commission. Our stroke specialists

Just a short drive for exceptional hospital care When it comes to your health care, you deserve a hospital that puts you first. That’s what you’ll get at Mercyhealth Hospital and Medical Center–Harvard. Our primary and specialty care doctors strive to provide a compassionate patient experience.

are here 24/7 to rapidly diagnose and treat stroke patients who are brought to our emergency department.

From a comprehensive emergency department to private inpatient care, your needs are put first. We’ve added doctors, specialties and services to give you high-quality hospital care, just a short drive from Woodstock. It’s our honor to care for the needs of McHenry County residents. We promise to continue to grow to meet your health care needs, now and for decades to come. At Mercyhealth Hospital-Harvard, you will receive: • Minimal wait time at our emergency department • Emergency medicine physicians • Trauma-trained nurses • 24/7 care for pediatrics • ICU and inpatient care • Full-service surgical suites offering: • Eye surgery • Foot surgery • Gastroenterology procedures • General surgery • Orthopedic surgery • Pediatric surgery • Vascular procedures • Full-service radiology and laboratory

Mercyhealth Hospital and Medical Center–Harvard 901 Grant St., Harvard, IL 60033 (815) 943-5431 MercyHealthSystem.org

• Complete rehabilitation services • Inpatient rehabilitation • Occupational therapy • Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation • Physical therapy • Speech therapy • Private hospital rooms with large, private baths • Ambulatory outpatient care • Heart and vascular care • Interventional and non-interventional pain care • Accredited sleep disorders center • Mercyhealth Care Center • A home-like atmosphere for long-term care and short-term rrehabilitation

COMMUNITY

Illinois’ first hospital to be certified as an Acute Stroke Ready Hospital by The Joint


COMMUNITY

Dec. 5-11, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

18

Community

,HYS`ZUV^[LZ[ZJV\U[`»ZÄYZ[SP]PUNZUV^MLUJL Corn stalks keep snow drifts off county road By Sandy Kucharski SANDY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

It’s likely that most motorists who travel along an open stretch of Kishwaukee Valley Road west of Woodstock never noticed a lonely stand of corn on the north side of the road just east of Dimmel Road. But on the morning of Nov. 27 – after the first significant snow storm of the season – they benefited from its presence. e 800-foot strip of corn stalks effectively stopped blowing snow from drifting across the road, creating safer travel for drivers on the protected section of rural Woodstock highway that is maintained by the McHenry County Division of Transportation. McHenry County’s first intentional living snow fence isn’t much to look at, but it represents several years of efforts and collaboration between the McHenry County Division of Transportation, McHenry County Farm Bureau and the McHenry-Lake County Soil and Water Conservation District. Concerns and benefits were addressed, legislation was changed, and this winter marks the first season of “fences” in the county. e living snow fence program, implemented by MCDOT, is a voluntary agreement by grain farmers with fields adjacent to county roads in driftprone areas who leave several rows of crop standing throughout the winter. e crop, specifically corn, effectively serves as a snow fence, slowing and collecting drifting snow. e farmers are compensated by MCDOT for the lost revenue that could have been generated by harvesting the crop and the additional inconvenience of having to remove the crop to prep the field for planting the next spring.

INDEPENDENT PHOTOS BY SANDY KUCHARSKI

Standing corn on the north side of Kishwaukee Valley Road, west of Woodstock, is among McHenry Coun[`»ZÄYZ[PUZ[HSSTLU[ZVMSP]PUNZUV^MLUJLHWYVNYHT[OL`OVWL[VL_WHUKPU[OLM\[\YL Bureau leaders and members] for a couple of years to see if this could become a reality,” he said. e meetings also brought several other agricultural challenges to light. Not every farm field qualifies for the program. Only MCDOT-maintained roads in areas where drifting is a significant concern qualify. Because of crop rotation, even roads that do qualify will not always be able to participate. Standing corn is preferred. Lower, weaker crops like soybeans will not have the same impact on drifting snow. Combines are routinely cleaned and stored away after the fall harvest, but they would have to be brought out again in the spring to cut down the snow fence corn. e tillage program, field design, volunteer corn control, and usefulness of corn left exposed to the elements and wildlife are among the other concerns farmers voiced.

3LNPZSH[PVUILULÄ[ZMHYTLYZ Fair compensation addressed many of those concerns. Ed Weskerna, district manager of McHenry-Lake County Soil and Water Conservation District, reached out to state Rep. Barbara Wheeler about increasing the incentive. at communication, along with an email from a McHenry County farmer, set a chain of events in motion that resulted in a change in state law to increase compensation and make the living snow fence program more attractive. e farmer who contacted Wheeler explained why fair market value would be more fitting compensation for the program. She presented legislation that changed the wording of the statute to provide, at least 10 percent of fair market value, giving MCDOT more flexibility to suitably incentivize the offer to farmers. e legislation passed

Ag concerns addressed e concept isn’t new. Dan Volkers, manager of the McHenry County Farm Bureau, said living snow fence programs have existed in other states for years but the program had no steam in McHenry County. With compensation limited to 10 percent of the value of the crop, it was not worth the time or effort of delaying harvest and tilling. “We’ve been meeting [with Farm

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in the first session, was signed and became law. “at’s the way legislation should work,” she said. “It started with a citizen who the statute affected. … I was the vehicle. … It doesn’t have to be political. … It’s a classic win-win.”

Dollars and sense County DOT maintenance Superintendent Ed Markison has represented the county’s interests in implementing the program since 2009. “It’s been very hard to get any farmers on board,” he said – until the compensation changed to a flat price per acre, making it fair for all farmers, regardless of varying yields. Markison said MCDOT pays participating farmers about $1 per linear foot for the ground they devote to the living snow fence. In contrast, he estimates it costs from $1.34 to $1.54 per foot for county crews to install static snow fences in areas prone to drifting Adverse conditions such as unusually wet falls, late harvests, and early freezing can affect whether crews are even able to access fields in time to set up fences for the season. Manmade snow fences are more susceptible to wind damage than the living fences. Another representative of MCDOT, Ernest Varga, a design engineer and longtime proponent of the program, was pleased with how well the living snow fence section on Kishwaukee Valley Road worked. Continued on 5L_[page


19 THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Continued from Previous page

From an environmental standpoint, SWCDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Weskerna said, the program has a lot of pluses. e living snow fence provides increased wildlife habitat for the winter, reduces wind erosion, and reduces the amount of salt applied to snow-covered roads, thus reducing the amount of salt seeping into groundwater.

Ideal locations McHenry County is predominantly subject to northern and western winds, so the ideal candidates for living snow fences are north/south and east/west roads where a ďŹ eld â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with no natural cover â&#x20AC;&#x201C; comes directly up to the highway right of way.

Markison said MCDOT snowplow drivers provide suggestions for areas that would beneďŹ t from snow fencing, and the department has identiďŹ ed and budgeted for about 40 miles of MCDOT-maintained roads that would qualify for the program. e program is currently only available to county highways. Weskerna said the next step would be to expand this to state, township, and possibly even municipalities that have highways adjacent to farm ďŹ elds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We all have a passion for the county drivers and keeping aquifers clean,â&#x20AC;? Markison said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big step for us, and we want to see it take off.â&#x20AC;?

COMMUNITY

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hoping it really comes online,â&#x20AC;? Varga said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more cost effective, â&#x20AC;Ś and we have to be good stewards of the taxpayer dollars.â&#x20AC;? As an added incentive to participants and positive publicity for the program, Varga said the department had created signage to be installed at each living snow fence location. e signs mention the three collaborating sponsors â&#x20AC;&#x201C; McHenry County Division of Transportation, McHenry County Farm Bureau, and McHenry County Soil and Water Conservation District â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and include a separate plate bearing the name of the participating farm.

A prototype of the signage that will identify program participants along McHenry County roadways.

Pet Week of the

Saving just one pet wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change the world but, surely, the world will change for that one pet.

i/JDPw 4-year-old male terrier mix "UGPVSZFBSTPME UFSSJFSNJY/JDPIBTHSBEVBUFEGSPNUIFTJMMJOFTTPGQVQQZIPPEUPUIF DBMNFS NPSFTFMGDPOUBJOFETUBHFTPGFBSMZ BEVMUIPPE"OE XJUIIJTGSFFXIFFMJOHEBZT CFIJOEIJN /JDPLOPXTXIBUIFXBOUT BOE XIBU/JDPXBOUTBSF1&01-&Ä&#x2021;JTMJUUMFHVZ XJMMCFBHSFBUEPHGPSKVTUBCPVUBOZLJOEPG GBNJMZ CFDBVTFQFPQMFPGBMMBHFT TJ[FTBOE HFOEFSTBSF"0,XJUIIJN$PNFUP)FMQJOH 1BXTBOEDIFDLPVUUIJTBXFTPNFMJUUMFHVZ

St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lutheran Church 401 St. Johns Rd. Woodstock

To see this pet or others or to volunteer to help walk dogs, call the shelter at

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Dec.5-11, 2018

Standing corn prevents drifting snow, leaving the pavement on Kishwaukee Valley Road dry and clear. The section of unprotected roadway just to the west (at right) shows drifting across both lanes.

112 N. Benton St., Woodstock, IL 60098 815-578-4601 www.listandbuywithlisa.com www.facebook.com/listandbuywithlisa


OUT ON THE TOWN

COMMUNITY

Dec. 5-11, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

20

INDEPENDENT PHOTOS BY KEN FARVER

Ladies Night Out in downtown Woodstock attracted all sorts of mysterious wanderers who roamed the Square and sampled offerings from businesses that participated in the Chamber of Commercesponsored event. If you were wondering about that spotlight in the Woodstock sky Thursday evening, this was it.

IN BRIEF Quilting art exhibit in display at Ringwood “Walks in the Woods,” a quilt art exhibit by Frieda Anderson, will be on display from Dec. 8 to Feb. 3 at Lost Valley Visitor Center in Glacial Park, Ringwood. McHenry County Conservation District

invites the public to the free display, which is open to the public daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Anderson’s original quilts are inspired by the everyday scenery that surrounds her and the colors of the midwest landscape she lives in. She works with her own hand-dyed cotton and silk fabrics.

An artist reception will be hosted from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 9, at Lost Valley Visitor Center. Additional, smaller pieces will be for sale, and light refreshments will be served. For more information, call 815-4795779 or visit MCCDistrict.org.

Voices of Faith planning ‘Christmas Celebration’ The 20-voice choir of First Presbyterian Church, Woodstock, will present “A Christmas Celebration of Hope, Peace, Joy and Love” at 9:30 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 9. Director Melinda Davis has chosen a

variety of uplifting music, including several new pieces as well as some selections from the “Oratorio de Noel” by Camille Saint-Saens and “Candlelight Carol” by John Rutter. The worship service will feature the woodwind quintet Winds Off the Lake, bassist Louis Dolman, and accompanist Robert Diss. First Presbyterian will have two candlelight Christmas Eve services at 4:30 and 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 24. The Voice of Faith Chancel Choir, JIM-JAM Children’s Choir, and Children’s Hand Chime Choir will participate in the services. The public is invited to attend the service. For information, call the church at 815-338-2627.


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Dec.5-11, 2018

COMMUNITY

Looking for a little extra Christmas spending money? How about a lot? Tickets will be sold through Dec. 16 in a ďŹ rst-of-a-kind 50-50 rafďŹ&#x201A;e to support free carriage rides offered in downtown Woodstock during the Christmas season. According to a news release from the Woodstock Chamber of Commerce and Industry, funds are needed this year to keep the local tradition going. Terry Leonard, a Chamber member, has been giving carriage rides for generations at no cost to the public. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most places charge for it,â&#x20AC;? said Danielle Gulli, executive director of the Chamber. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying not to resort to that.â&#x20AC;? To continue the service, the Chamber is selling 1,000 50-50 holiday rafďŹ&#x201A;e tickets for $10 each, with a goal of raising $10,000 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; half of which would go to a lucky winner. Books of 25 tickets will be available. e winner of up to $5,000 will be drawn Dec. 17 at the Chamber ofďŹ ce.

Gulli said the carriage rides had been with â&#x20AC;&#x153;all sorts of different options.â&#x20AC;? Downtown retailers used to fund them, the city did it, and last year the Chamber covered the estimated $6,000 cost. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to try it out,â&#x20AC;? Gulli said of the 50-50 rafďŹ&#x201A;e. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At least somebody is getting something back.â&#x20AC;? Several local businesses are selling tickets, though Gulli said Friday that some stores had already sold out. Among those who started with tickets to sell were Read Between the Lynes, Home State Bank, D&A Apothecary, Mike Reinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Back on Track Chiropractic, Copy Express, Public House, Kim Keefe Team, e Bike Haven, Apple Creek Florist, Flooring America, Sugar Circle, Down to Earth, Frisbie & Lohmeyer Insurance, Fraser Wealth Management, ESC Technologies, Silver Prairie Soap, Hispanic Connection, Material ings, oughtfulness Shop, Double Yolk, Berkshire Hathaway, Swiss Maid Bakery, Berry Global, and the law ofďŹ ce of Campion, Curran, Lamb & Cunabaugh, along with City Hall and the Chamber ofďŹ ce.

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

By Larry Lough LARRY@THEINDEPENDENT.COM

21

INDEPENDENT FILE PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Carriage rides around the Woodstock Square are a tradition, but covering the cost has led the Chamber of Commerce and Industry to offer WLVWSLHJOHUJLH[HSP[[SLL_[YHZWLUKPUNTVUL`[OYV\NOHYHMĂ&#x2026;L

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TREE TRIMMERS

COMMUNITY

Dec. 5-11, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

22

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Volunteers decorate some of the 30 trees on display for the annual Christmas Tree Walk at the Woodstock Opera House. Several local organizations prepared the trees for display through Dec. 30 during regular Opera House hours.

Get the best ï¬&#x201A;oors under one roof for the holidays! Hours: Mon-Thurs 10-6, Fri. 10-5, Sat 10-4 Sundays by appointment only Contractors Welcome!

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RELIGION

59V\[L-PYZ[7YLZI`[LYPHU*O\YJO I\PSKPUN Worship: 1 p.m. Sunday JIOIĂ&#x201E;SJVT

1993 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 25 years ago Q e Woodstock Jaycees marked its 25th year of selling Christmas trees to raise funds for community projects. Q Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shop, on the Woodstock Square, owned by Jo Smith, celebrated its 30th anniversary in retail. Q e Woodstock High School varsity basketball team won its ďŹ rst championship in the three-year history of its own Toney Roskie Invitational Tournament.

1998 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 20 years ago Q WHS National Honor Society members teamed up with eighth-graders at Northwood Middle School as part of a new mentoring program. Q e Woodstock Kiwanis Club honored local ďŹ re/rescue personnel and their leaders, Ralph Webster and Phil Parker. Q WHS senior Jenny Koeser was named Athlete of the Week after scoring 17 and 13 points, respectively, in games against Richmond-Burton and Jacobs. She helped lead the Streaks to the 1998 regional volleyball championship and had been named All-Fox-Valley Conference in softball.

2003 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 15 years ago Q Participants and viewers of Woodstockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual Christmas Parade enjoyed balmy 47-degree temperatures. Q WHS seniors earned National Merit honors. Sarah Messmer was named a SemiďŹ nalist, and Andrew Greenleaf, Leland Humbertson, Caryn Leppert, and Ewa Litera were Commended Students. Q ree sets of brothers suited up for Marianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ nal football game of the season â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Andy and Luke Papke, Mike and Matt Ammirati, and Ross and Tyler Foley.

2008 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10 years ago Q e McHenry County Latino Coalition honored WHS Assistant Principal Ron Bendis with its Community Service Award. e award was given annually to a community member who demonstrated commitment and service to the

2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5 years ago Q With roof repairs underway, the city of Woodstock was prepping the 156-yearold Old Courthouse on the Square for sale. e City Council approved a Request for Proposals marketing plan for the Old Courthouse and the Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House. Q A new business group was aiming to bring its â&#x20AC;&#x153;shop localâ&#x20AC;? mantra to a regional audience. e Downtown Woodstock Collaboration was comprised of 22 small business and organizations in Woodstock that were pooling resources for advertising, sharing tips, and referring customers. Connie Citarelli, owner of Green Box Boutique, had been chosen to head the group. Q Boy Scout Troop 329 and M.A.C.V. AMVETS Post 269 had teamed up again to sell fresh-cut Christmas trees on Davis Road. e two groups had partnered for more than 10 years. e goal for 2013 was to sell 600 trees.

2017 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1 year ago Q â&#x20AC;&#x153;rill Ride,â&#x20AC;? a homegrown, Woodstock-based family movie, was premiering in theaters, including Classic Cinemaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Woodstock eater. e movie, written and directed by Chris Parrish, of Woodstock, was inspired by his 10-year-old son, Mason, who lost his battle to DIPG in 2011. Q e city of Woodstock recognized the anniversaries of employees. Opera House Director John Scharres had the longest tenure â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 40 years. Four Public Works Department employees celebrated 25 years with the city: Christopher Birdsell, Steve Major, Henry Vidales, and Alan Wilson. Q Centegra Health System announced it would outsource a number of positions, including 30 emergency room doctors. Medical directors, emergency department physicians, hospitalists, and nurse practitioners also were among the 87 employees listed in a Worker Adjustment and Retraining NotiďŹ cation.

Your ad could sponsor this Flashbacks section! Y Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

Call 815-338-8040 today. thewoodstockindependent.com

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Please send holiday schedules to sandy@ thewoodstockindependent.com

Q Woodstock was one of ďŹ ve municipalities studying the advantages of adopting a countywide 911 service. Q e American National Can facility in Woodstock was bought by Pechiney S.A., a French company. Q Mary Peterson was named a vice president of e State Bank of Woodstock.

Latino community. Q SportsCity Academy had begun offering indoor sports training space and individual and team training. Partners in the business were Pete Waterson, Todd Krennrich, Mike Turner, Bob Salzman, and Jack Porter. Q Mallory Bellairs, 13, recorded commercials interviewing Chicago Bears Coach Lovie Smith and running back Garrett Wolfe. e commercials were broadcast on Comcast SportsNet and WBBM radio.

Dec.5-11, 2018

Q MCHENRY COUNTY JEWISH CONGREGATION 9PKNLĂ&#x201E;LSK9VHK*Y`Z[HS3HRL 815-455-1810 >VYZOPW!WT-YPKH`Í&#x201E; !Í&#x201E;HT:H[\YKH` Q NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN CENTER +LHU:[ŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q REDEEMER LUTHERAN +LHU:[ŕ Ž  >VYZOPW!WT:H[\YKH` HT:\UKH` Q RESURRECTION CATHOLIC  :*V\U[Y`*S\I9VHK 815-338-7330 Worship: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; 5 p.m. Saturday; 8 a.m. weekdays Q ST. ANNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S EPISCOPAL >1HJRZVU:[ŕ Ž  Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q ST. JOHNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LUTHERAN :[1VOUÂťZ9VHKŕ Ž  >VYZOPW!WT:H[\YKH`" HT:\UKH` Q ST. MARY CATHOLIC 5;Y`VU:[ŕ Ž Worship: 7:30 a.m. Monday - Saturday; 5 and !WT:WHUPZO:H[\YKH`"! HUK !HTUVVU:WHUPZOWT:\UKH` Q THE BRIDGE CHRISTIAN )YPKNL3HULŕ Ž  Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS /HY[SHUK9VHKŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q THE VINE 54HKPZVU:[ŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q UNITY SPIRITUAL CENTER >*HSOV\U:[ŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q UPPER FOX VALLEY QUAKER MEETING 7PVULLY9VHK4J/LUY`ŕ Ž 815-385-8512 +PZJ\ZZPVUHUKZPUNPUN HT:\UKH` Worship, 10 a.m., fellowship, 11 a.m. Sunday Q WOODSTOCK ASSEMBLY OF GOD +LHU:[ŕ Ž >VYZOPW! HT:\UKH`WYH`LYZLY]PJL HT^VYZOPWZLY]PJL Q WOODSTOCK BIBLE CHURCH 118 Benton St. Worship: 10:30 a..m. Sunday

1988 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 30 years ago

23 THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Q BAHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;I COMMUNITY OF WOODSTOCK Gatherings are open to the public the second Saturday of each month. For information: 815-337-0126 woodstock.bahais@gmail.com Q BLUE LOTUS TEMPLE & MEDITATION CENTER +LHU:[ŕ Ž Meditation: 10 a.m. Tuesday, Saturday; 7 p.m. Monday, Wednesday Q CASA DE BENDICION 9PKNLĂ&#x201E;LSK9VHK*Y`Z[HS3HRL *Y`Z[HS3HRL*OYPZ[PHU*O\YJO Worship: 1 p.m. Sunday, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Q CHRIST LIFE >1HJRZVU:[ŕ Ž  Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Q COVENANT REFORMED BAPTIST CHURCH  .YLLU^VVK9VHK 76)V_ŕ Ž  Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q DOXA FELLOWSHIP  5:LTPUHY`(]Lŕ Ž   Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Q EDEN BAPTIST  5:LTPUHY`(]Lŕ Ž >VYZOPW!WT:\UKH`:WHUPZO Q FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST >:V\[O:[ŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 59V\[Lŕ Ž >VYZOPW! !HT:\UKH`+LJ  !HT *OYPZ[THZT\ZPJZLY]PJL"+LJ !HT *OPSKYLUÂťZ*OYPZ[THZWYVNYHT"+LJ! WTHUKWT*HUKLSPNO[*OYPZ[THZ,]L ZLY]PJLZ Q FIRST UNITED METHODIST >:V\[O:[ŕ Ž >VYZOPW! !HT:\UKH` Q FREE METHODIST 5:LTPUHY`(]Lŕ Ž Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Q GOOD NEWS CHURCH 4LL[PUNH[+VYY;V^UZOPW*VTT\UP[` 9VVT 3HRL(]L goodnewswoodstock.org Worship: 5 p.m. Sunday Q GRACE FELLOWSHIP *HPYUZ*V\Y[ŕ Ž Worship: 10:15 a.m. Sunday Q GRACE LUTHERAN 1300 Kishwaukee Valley Road 815-338-0554 >VYZOPW!WT:H[\YKH`JHZ\HS"!HT [YHKP[PVUHS!HTJVU[LTWVYHY`:\UKH` Q HOUSE OF BLESSING

FLASHBACKS


COMMUNITY

Dec. 5-11, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

24

Happenings SANTA’S HUT

Park in the Square Dec. 7 to 23 Weekdays 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays 1 to 4 p.m.

To submit calendar items, email pr@thewoodstockindependent.com 4 to 7 p.m. 815-338-2436

15 SATURDAY WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET

calendar

McHenry County Fairgrounds Bldg. D 12015 Country Club Road 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

5 WEDNESDAY WOLF OAK WOODS WORKDAY

YONDER PRAIRIE WORK DAY

8930 Rt. 120 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. conservmc.org

Yonder Prairie 1150 S. Rose Farm Road 9 a.m. to noon conserveMC.org

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

6 THURSDAY WOODSTOCK JAYCEES GENERAL MEETING Mixin Mingle 124 Cass St. 7:30 p.m. 815-575-8065

7 FRIDAY CARRIAGE RIDES On the Square 4 to 7 p.m. 815-338-2436

8 SATURDAY HOLIDAY FAIRE “HOMEMADE FOR THE HOLIDAYS” McHenry County Fairgrounds 11900 Country Club Road 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. $3 per person, $1 off with a nonperishable food item mchenrycountyfair.com/index. php/holiday-fair/

Candy is an important part of any parade, and a special crew of candy carriers worked the Woodstock Christmas Parade to help make sure children of all ages got their quota of sweets. The parade Sunday had been postponed the previous week by snow.

9 SUNDAY HOLIDAY FAIRE “HOMEMADE FOR THE HOLIDAYS” McHenry County Fairgrounds 11900 Country Club Road 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. $3 per person, $1 off with a nonperishable food item mchenrycountyfair.com/index. php/holiday-fair/

CARRIAGE RIDES On the Square 2 to 5 p.m. 815-338-2436

10 MONDAY COFFEE WITH THE CHIEF Woodstock Police Department 656 Lake Ave. 7 p.m. 815-338-2131

CARRIAGE RIDES

11 TUESDAY

On the Square 4 to 7 p.m. 815-338-2436

DISTRICT 200 BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING

Woodstock High School Library 501 W. South St. 7 p.m. woodstockschools.org

CARRIAGE RIDES On the Square 4 to 7 p.m. 815-338-2436

16 SUNDAY

CIVIL WAR ROUNDTABLE

YONDER PRAIRIE WORK DAY

Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 7 p.m. woodstockpubliclibrary.org

Yonder Prairie 1150 S. Rose Farm Road 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. conserveMC.org

STUDENT LOAN REPAYMENT CHALLENGES

CARRIAGE RIDES

Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 7 p.m. 815-338-0542

12 WEDNESDAY WOLF OAK WOODS WORKDAY 8930 Rt. 120 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. conservmc.org

14 FRIDAY

On the Square 2 to 5 p.m. 815-338-2436

18 TUESDAY AS SEEN ON PINTEREST: PAPER QUILLING ORNAMENTS Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 6 p.m. Register at 815-338-0542 or visit woodstockpulbiclibrary.org

CARRIAGE RIDES

WOODSTOCK CITY COUNCIL MEETING

On the Square

City Hall

121 W. Calhoun St. 7 p.m. 815-338-4300

19 WEDNESDAY MEMORY MAKERS STORYTELLING GROUP Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 9:30 a.m. 815-338-0542 woodstockpubliclibrary.org Led by Joy Aavang

WOLF OAK WOODS WORKDAY 8930 Rt. 120 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. conservmc.org

WORLD FILM NIGHT Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 6 p.m. 815-338-0542 “Bye Bye Germany”

CHRISTMAS CLEARING HOUSE TOY PACKING 950 Dieckman St. 6 to 9 p.m.

20 THURSDAY KIWANIS WOODSTOCK MEETING Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. Noon to 1 p.m. woodstockkiwanis@gmail.com

CHRISTMAS CLEARING HOUSE FOOD PACKING 950 Dieckman St. 6 to 9 p.m.

21 FRIDAY CARRIAGE RIDES Continued on Next Page

Resurrection Catholic Church

2918 South Country Club Road, Woodstock, IL 60098

We welcome all to join us at our Mass times: Sat. 5pm & Sun. 8am & 10:30am

We, the members of the Resurrection Catholic Church, are a prayerful, loving community formed by the Holy Spirit, striving to be a sign of the Gospel values of Jesus Christ: justice, truth and love.


entertainment WHS JAZZ CONCERT Dec. 5, 7:30 p.m. Woodstock High School commons 501 W. South St.

WHS MADRIGAL DINNER

Dec. 7, 21, 8 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. jazzonthesquare.com $5 donation

NORTH STREET Dec. 8, 7:30 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $5 suggested donation offsquaremusic.org

WNHS MADRIGAL DESSERT CONCERT

SECOND SUNDAY CONCERT Potts & Pans Steelband Dec. 9, 3 p.m. Culture, Arts and Music 1039 Wanda Lane $10, free for children younger than 6 pottsandpans.com

WNHS ORCHESTRA CONCERT Dec. 11, 7:30 p.m. Woodstock North High School 3000 Raffel Road

WHS CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA HOLIDAY CONCERT Dec. 11, 7:30 p.m. Woodstock High School Auditorium 501 W. South St.

Dec. 8, 3:30 and 7 p.m. Woodstock North High School 3000 Raffel Road $15 adults, $10 students and senior citizens 815-334-2132

ROBIN SPIELBERG SPIRIT OF THE HOLIDAYS SINGALONG

calendar

4 to 7 p.m. 815-338-2436

Continued from Previous Page On the Square 4 to 7 p.m. 815-338-2436

22 SATURDAY CHRISTMAS CLEARING HOUSE DELIVERY DAY 950 Dieckman St. 8:30 a.m. to noon

WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET McHenry County Fairgrounds Bldg. D 12015 Country Club Road 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

CARRIAGE RIDES On the Square

Dec. 12, 7:30 p.m.

23 SUNDAY CARRIAGE RIDES On the Square 2 to 5 p.m. 815-338-2436

25 TUESDAY CHRISTMAS DAY

29 SATURDAY HABITAT RESTORATION Boger Bog 2399 S. Cherry Valley Road 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. mccdistrict.org 815-455-1537

JANUARY

OPEN MIC NIGHT Dec. 14, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. offsquare@gmail.com

WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET McHenry County Fairgrounds Bldg. D 12015 Country Club Rd. 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Performers will be: Dec. 15: 9 a.m. Kishwaukee Ramblers, 11 a.m. Courtney Sullivan Reinhard

HOLIDAY WISHES Dec. 15, 8 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $10 suggested donation offsquaremusic.org

ORIGINAL OPEN MIC Dec. 20, 7:30 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $5 donation aplacetoshinemusic@gmail.com

CHRIS COLLINS &

1 TUESDAY NEW YEAR’S DAY

5 SATURDAY HABITAT RESTORATION +\ÄLSK7VUK 11418 McConnell Road 9 a.m. to noon mccdistrict.org 815-337-9315

DAR GENEALOGY WORKSHOP Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 10 a.m. woodstockpubliclibrary.org

7 MONDAY SPOUSAL CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP

Dec. 21, 8 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $40 815-338-5300 operahouse@woodstockil.gov

WOODSTOCK HOLIDAY BRASS CONCERT Dec. 22, 8 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $20 adults, $10 students 815-338-5300 operahouse@woodstockil.gov

ED HALL’S WOODSTOCK CHRISTMAS GUITAR NIGHT Dec. 23, 8 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $32 all seats 815-338-5300 operahouse@woodstockil.gov

NEW YEAR’S EVE OPEN MIC Dec. 31, 8 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $10 donation offsquaremusic.org

Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun St. $3 donation offsquaremusic.org

MOVIE ‘THE MUPPET CHRISTMAS CAROL’ – THE MOVIE Dec. 18, 7 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $5 per seat 815-338-5300 operahouse@woodstockil.gov

DANCE ‘THE NUTCRACKER BALLET’ Dec. 7, 7 p.m. (dress rehearsall performance) Dec. 8, 9, 15, 16, 2 p.m. Dec. 9, 16, 6 p.m. Dec. 8, 14, 15, 7 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. Presented by Judith Svalander Dance Theatre Adults $26, student $19, dress rehearsal $16 815-338-5300 woodstockoperahouse.com

Family Alliance 2028 N. Seminary Ave. 10:30 a.m. to noon 815-338-3590

foxvalleyrocketeers.org

ATROCIOUS POETS

COFFEE AT THE CAFÉ

Ethereal Confections 113 S. Benton St. 7 p.m. Atrociouspoets.com

8 TUESDAY Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 1 p.m. For senior citizens

MCHENRY COUNTY HORSE ALZHEIMER’S DEMENTIA SUPPORT GROUP CLUB MEETING +VYY;V^UZOPW6MÄJL 1039 Lake Ave. 7 p.m. mchenrycountyhorseclub.com

Valley Hi Nursing Home 2406 Hartland Road 6 p.m. 815-334-2817

FOX VALLEY ROCKETEERS MEETING

WOODSTOCK CITY COUNCIL MEETING

Woodstock North High School 3000 Raffel Road, Room D187 7:30 p.m. 815-337-9068

City Hall 121 W. Calhoun St. 7 p.m. 815-338-4300

COMMUNITY

JAZZ NIGHT

Dec. 9, 2 p.m. Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. woodstockpubliclibrary.org

BOULDER CANYON PRES- FIRST SATURDAY MUSIC Jan. 5, 7 p.m. ENT: A JOHN DENVER Unity Spiritual Center of CHRISTMAS

Dec.5-11, 2018

Dec. 7, 8, 7 p.m. Bull Valley Golf Club 1311 Club Road Adults $30, seniors $27, students $24 For tickets, call Brian Jozwiak 815-338-4370.

FREE GUITARS FOR FUTURE STARS CONCERT

Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $25 A seating, $21 B seating 815-338-5300 operahouse@woodstockil.gov

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

MUSIC

25


Service Directory

CLASSIFIED

Deadline: NOON Thurs. to get into next weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issue

Small Blocks are $40 and Large Blocks are $80 for 4 weeks

Call 815.338.8040 for details. AC/HEATING

CARPENTRY

Dec. 5-11, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

26

Your ad could be here! Call 815-338-8040

$80 for four weeks CONSTRUCTION

ELECTRIC CONTRACTOR

INSURANCE

MENTION THIS AD FOR 10% OFF SERVICE CALL - Service upgrades Since - Repairs 1986 - Maintenance Residential - Commercial

Delaware Electric Co. Fully Licensed

815-338-3139 HANDYMAN

PRINTING

Print  Copy  Design  Promote    815.338.7161

www.copyexpressyes.com

                 

HEALTH INSURANCE

PAINTING

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Medicare Supplements! TURNING 65? OVER 65? FIND THE PLAN THAT MEETS YOUR NEEDS Trudy L. Hayna Serving McHenry County for 30 Years We Offer All the Major Companies

>Ă&#x17E;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x160;-iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2021;ä䣣

YOUR AD HERE $80 for four weeks

Expert Painting Interior/Exterior Cabinets/Vanities Call Anthony 815-790-9350 TECHNOLOGY

Your ad could be here! Call 815-338-8040

$80 for four weeks


EMPLOYMENT DRIVERS

WANTED TO BUY

If you or a loved one were diagnosed with ovarian cancer after use of TALC products such as Baby Powder or Shower to Shower, you may be entitled to compensation. Contact Charles H. Johnson 1-800-535-5727

AIRLINE CAREERS FOR NEW YEAR - BECOME AN AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECH. FAA APPROVED TRAINING. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED - JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL AIM 800-481-8312.

TOP CASH PAID! FOR OLD MOTORCYCLES! 1900-1979 Dead or Alive 888-800-1932

LEGAL SERVICES

WANTED TO BUY

NEED LEGAL HELP? Get a FREE referral to an attorney! Call the Illinois State Bar Association Illinois Lawyer Finder The advice you need 877-270-3855 or https://www.isba.org/public/ illinoislawyerfinder

FREON R12 WANTED: CERTIFIED BUYER will PAY CA$H for R12 cylinders or cases of cans. (312) 291-9169; www.refrigerantfinders.com

SAINT JUDE: May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, JORULÃ&#x20AC;HGORYHGDQG SUHVHUYHGWKURXJKRXW WKHZKROHZRUOGQRZ DQGIRUHYHU6DFUHG Heart of Jesus, pray IRUXV6W-XGHZRUNHU of miracles, pray for XV6D\WKLV SUD\HUQLQHWLPHVSHU GD\IRUQLQHGD\V%\ the eighth day your SUD\HUVZLOOEHDQVZHUHG,WKDVQHYHU EHHQNQRZQWRIDLODQG SXEOLVKLQJPXVWEH SURPLVHG 0/

CLASSIFIED

TRAINING/EDUCATION

Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

LAST WEEKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ANSWER

<285$' COULD BE HERE!

Bohnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ace Hardware 150 S. Eastwood Drive -permanently closed-

Dec. 5-11, 2018

Rewarding Our Drivers from Day ONE! $1600 sign-on Bonus! EXPERIENCED DRIVERS *Flatbed *Step Deck *Van *LTL Reefer. Pay is 26% Gross Flatbed/Step Deck & up to .53/mile Van/Reefer. Full benefits w/FREE Health & Life Insurance, 6 paid Holidays + Industry leading Driver Bonus Program! Must have Class A CDL. Call Ruth or Mike at TTI Inc. 1-800-222-5732 Apply online ttitrucking.com

HEALTH

27 THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

&ODVVLÃ&#x20AC;HG$GV

Deadline: NOON Thursday to get into next weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issue

Congratulations to Jeri Spear. Stop by The Independent to pick up your $5 prize. Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

Sponsored By:

Your sponsorship ad could be here! Call 815-338-8040


Dec. 5-11, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

28

PUBLIC NOTICE

STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MCHENRY COUNTY PUBLICATION NOTICE OF COURT DATE FOR REQUEST FOR NAME CHANGE (ADULT) Request of Sarah Elizabeth Kerbyson Case No. 18MR000851 There will be a court date on my Request to change my name from: Sarah Elizabeth Kerbyson to the new name of: Lukas Ryan Kerbyson The court date will be held on January 17, 2019 at 9:00 a.m. at 2200 N. Seminary Ave. Woodstock, McHenry County in Courtroom # TBD, Dated at Woodstock, IL, November 12, 2018 /s/Sarah Elizabeth Kerbyson (Published in The Woodstock Independent November 21, 2018, November 28, 2018, December 5, 2018) L10655

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on November 13, 2018 An Assumed 5HTL )\ZPULZZ *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK PU [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM [OL *V\U[` *SLYR in McHenry County, IL under the following business name and address, and setting forth the names and addresses of all persons owning, conducting and transacting business known as: AMIGOS LEARNING

ACADEMY located at 1904 LAMB RD., WOODSTOCK IL 60098. Owner Name & Address: JANET MORITZ 1904 LAMB RD., WOODSTOCK IL 60098. Dated: NOVEMBER 13, 2018 /s/ MARY E MCCLELLAN (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent November 21, 2018, November 28, 2018, December 5, 2018) L10656

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on November 14, 2018 An Assumed 5HTL )\ZPULZZ *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK PU [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM [OL *V\U[` *SLYR in McHenry County, IL under the following business name and address, and setting forth the names and addresses of all persons owning, conducting and transacting business known as: Tommyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Premier Rides located at 908 Woodbridge Drive Cary IL 60013. Owner Name & Address: Thomas F. Nastali Jr and Dawn M Nastali 908 Woodbridge Drive Cary IL 60013. Dated: NOVEMBER 14, 2018 /s/ MARY E MCCLELLAN (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent November 21, 2018, November 28, 2018, December 5, 2018) L10657

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME

Public Notice is hereby given that on November 16, 2018 An Assumed 5HTL )\ZPULZZ *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK PU [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM [OL *V\U[` Clerk in McHenry County, IL under the following business name and address, and setting forth the names and addresses of all persons owning, conducting and transacting I\ZPULZZ RUV^U HZ! 9LÃ&#x201E;UPZO ;LR located at 1218 TAMARACK COURT, MCHENRY IL 60050. Owner Name & Address: ROBERT M ROEWER 1218 TAMARACK COURT, MCHENRY IL 60050. Dated: NOVEMBER 16, 2018 /s/ MARY E MCCLELLAN (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent November 21, 2018, November 28, 2018, December 5, 2018) L10658

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF CHANGE TO DBA Public Notice is hereby given that on SEPTEMBER 23, A.D. 2015, a *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK PU [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM the County Clerk of McHenry County IL concerning the business known as The LodeStone Center for Behavioral Health, P.C. #19583 located at 3923 MERCY DRIVE, MCHENRY IL  ^OPJO JLY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ZL[Z MVY[O the following changes in the DBA thereof: OWNERS: THERESA M. SCHULTZ 533 S EAST AVE., OAK PARK IL 60304, JEREMY BIDWELL 1004 DAKOTA DRIVE, WOODSTOCK IL 60098. CLOSING BUSINESS.

THIS WEEKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PHOTO

Each week, The Independent prints a picture of something somewhere in Woodstock. If you can FRUUHFWO\LGHQWLI\WKHORFDWLRQDQGVXEMHFWRIWKHSKRWR\RX·OOEHHQWHUHGLQWRDGUDZLQJIRUDSUL]H Entries may be dropped off at The Independent RIÃ&#x20AC;FH(&DOKRXQ6W:RRGVWRFNRUHPDLOHG WRQLFROH#WKHZRRGVWRFNLQGHSHQGHQWFRPQRODWHUWKDQSP)ULGD\2QO\RQHSUL]HZLOOEH DZDUGHGSHUZHHN7KHZLQQHUZLOOEHDQQRXQFHGLQQH[WZHHN·VLVVXH*RRGOXFN First & Last Name: Phone: What is it? Where is it?

Sponsored By:

Your sponsorship ad could be here! Call 815-338-8040

Dated this 5th day of OCTOBER, A.D., 2018. /s/ MARY E MCCLELLAN (County Clerk) Published in The Woodstock Independent November 21, 2018, November 28, 2018, December 5, 2018) L10659

PUBLIC NOTICE

Notice of Self Storage Sale Please take notice Red Dot Storage 78 - Woodstock located at 740 Washington Rd., Woodstock, IL 60098 intends to hold an auction of the goods stored in the following unit in default for non-payment of rent. The sale will occur as an online auction via www.storageauctions. com on 12/18/2018 at 9:00AM. Unless stated otherwise the description of the contents are household goods and furnishings. Linda Wolfman Unit #113. All property is being stored at the above self-storage facility. This sale may be withdrawn at any time without notice. Certain terms and conditions apply. See manager for KL[HPSZ° 7\ISPZOLK PU ;OL >VVKZ[VJR Independent November 28, 2018, December 5, 2018) L10660

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on November 28, 2018 An Assumed 5HTL )\ZPULZZ *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK PU [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM [OL *V\U[` *SLYR

in McHenry County, IL under the following business name and address, and setting forth the names and addresses of all persons owning, conducting and transacting business known as: OLSEN WOODWORK CO. located at 4709 SOUTHHAMPTON DR ISLAND LAKE IL 60042. Owner Name & Address: MYLES OLSEN JR 4709 SOUTHHAMPTION DR ISLAND LAKE IL 60042. Dated: NOVEMBER 28, 2018 /s/ MARY E MCCLELLAN (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent December 5, 2018) L10661

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on November 29, 2018 An Assumed 5HTL )\ZPULZZ *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK PU [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM [OL *V\U[` *SLYR in McHenry County, IL under the following business name and address, and setting forth the names and addresses of all persons owning, conducting and transacting business known as: WOODS TREE SERVICE located at 306 W RIVERSIDE DR LAKEMOOR IL 60051 Owner Name & Address: KYLE D WOODS 306 W RIVERSIDE DR LAKEMOOR IL 60051. Dated: NOVEMBER 29, 2018 /s/ MARY E MCCLELLAN (County Clerk). (Published in The Woodstock Independent December 5, 2018) L10662


RUBES

By Leigh Rubin

HEATHCLIFF By Peter Gallagher CROSSWORD

29 THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT Dec. 5-11, 2018

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Dec. 5-11, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

30

Sports 11SCOREBOARD 11 GIRLS BASKETBALL Woodstock Q Nov. 27 Woodstock beat Harvard 44-30. Emma Brand led the Streaks with 17 points and six rebounds. Kamryn Bogott had eight points including two 3s.

Wrestlers hit the mats for new season Staff Report THE INDEPENDENT

Wrestlers from Marian Central Catholic High School, Woodstock High

School, and Woodstock North High School dig in for a new season. Young talent, new coaches, and updated uniforms are among the changes this year.

e coaches have provided a brief preview of their teams by responding to email questions. eir comments follow.

WOODSTOCK HIGH SCHOOL

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY VICKY LONG

Junior forward Emma Brand rips down a rebound against Harvard. Q Nov. 30 Woodstock fell to RichmondBurton 41-27.

Woodstock North

Q Nov. 28 Woodstock North defeated Genoa-Kingston 68-46. Q Nov. 30 Woodstock North lost to Marengo 49-33. Q Dec. 1 Woodstock North beat North Boone 53-35.

Marian Central

Q Nov. 30 Marian Central defeated Joliet Catholic 48-39.

Head Coach: Ches Dougherty Assistant Coaches: Pat Grisolia, Kevin Zange No. on varsity roster: 15 Top returning athletes: Clayton Grisolia (JR) 113-lb., Will Conlon (JR) 138-lb., Cooper Adams(SO) 145-lb., Jerred Grell(JR) 182-lb. Promising varsity new-comers: Caleb Sciame(FR) 106-lb., Max Hodory(FR) 120-lb., Harrison Saville(JR) 126-lb., Alex Zange (SO)152-lb., Israel Arellano (SR) 170lb., Gavin Loiselle 220-lb. Goals this year: “ To fill out the 14 weight classes by Christmas and qualify three athletes for Individual state in Champaign,” Dougherty said. Challenges: “We have a strong freshman class that overlap talent in many weight classes and a small senior class of experienced wrestlers,” Douherty said. “Filling in a couple of our middle weights will be tough, and constant adjustments will be made each week.” New this year: “Coaches Pat Grisolia and Kevin Zange join the team with vast coaching and wrestling expertise,” Dougherty said. “anks to the Woodstock Blue Streaks Backers Club, we received all new custom singlets this year. To better keep accurate stats and give

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Noe Arellano faces an opponent Dec. 1 in the Richmond-Burton Dubois Tournament. the coaching staff and athletes an advantage, we purchased the cutting edge wrestling software Matboss to aid in training through in-depth reviews of each match. “We start a great year with several returning experienced middle- and lower-class wrestlers and an influx of raw freshman talent. It’s far from a rebuilding year, but the team is poised for huge growth as we will graduate only two of the starting varsity squad this year. “Look for a solid uphill climb from some talented and hard-working young men.”

MARIAN CENTRAL CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL ° °

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY MARGIE PAFFRATH

Senior Amber Reynolds drives against Joliet Catholic Nov. 30.

SCOREBOARD PRESENTED BY

815.338.7830

(6RXWK6W‡:RRGVWRFN

Head Coach: Dave Silva Assistant Coaches: Tony Randazzo, Andy Randazzo, Jim Herff, Will Gaddy and Lance Shelton No. on varsity roster: 14 Josh Glover (FR) 106-lb.; Elon Rodriguez (SO) 113lb.; Jack Harman (JR) 120lb.; Scott Burke (SO) 126-lb.; Daniel Valeria (JR) 132-lb.; Bryce Shelton (SO) 138-lb.; Hugh Holian (SO) 145-lb.;

Kaden Randazzo (SO) 152-lb.; Dylan Connell (SO) 160-lb.; Joey Fitzgerald (SR) 170-lb.; Cade Bokowy/Lou Gaddy 182lb.; Joey Pawlak (JR) 195-lb.; Mason Schwalbach (SO) 220lb.; or Paglialong (SR) HWT Top returning athletes: Harman, Shelton and Valeria are returning state qualifiers, and Connell is a returning state champion. Rodriguez,Randazzo and Paglialong are returning sectional qualifiers Goals: “We as a team expect to compete strongly for a state title this season,” Tony Randazzo said.

WOODSTOCK NORTH HIGH SCHOOL .

Head Coach: Tim Creighton Assistant Coaches: Buck Reidinger, Eric Hunt No. on varsity roster: 14 Top returning athletes: Carter Miller, Isaiah Vela and Eddie Flores Promising varsity newcomers: Henry Goetz, Sean Jaco Goals this year: “Our goal is to compete for [the Kishwaukee River Conference] title and qualify multiple wrestlers to IHSA state finals,” Creighton said. Challenges: A very young team.


STREAKS PAY TRIBUTE TO DREW

BOYS BASKETBALL Woodstock Q Nov. 28 WHS lost to Wauconda 58-57.

Woodstock North

Q Nov. 30 WNHS beat Marengo 63-52.

Marian Central

Q Nov. 28 Marian beat McHenry 41-32. Q Dec. 1 Marian lost to Sandwich 54-43.

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK SCOTT BURKE WRESTLING

Q Dec. 1 Woodstock varsity dance placed third at the Batavia Dance Invite.

Dan Chamness writes e College Report for e Independent.

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY MARGIE PAFFRATH

Junior Benjamin Moscinski drives against a Sandwich player Dec. 1. BOYS BOWLING Q Nov. 27 Woodstock co-op lost to Huntley 3,065-2,824. Q Nov. 28 Woodstock co-op lost to Johnsburg 3,162-2,743. Brendan Matthes posted the best score with a 234.

GIRLS BOWLING

Q Nov. 29 Woodstock co-op beat McHenry 2,049-1,744 in the season opener.

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY VICKY LONG

Senior October Heffner bowled a 397 series Nov. 29

Marian Central sophomore Scott Burke, wrestling in the 115-pound weight class, had WKUHHĂ&#x20AC;UVWSHULRGSLQVWRLPprove his record to 11-1 on the season. He helped Marian Central beat state-ranked 3A Glenbard East 53-22 Dec. 1.

Congratulations! Call to register 815-334-1900 815-355-0661 815-355-0661 More Info at SportsCityAcademy.com

WRESTLING Woodstock Q Nov. 29 Woodstock lost to Burlington *LU[YHS HM[LYHĂ&#x201E;UHSTH[JOMVYMLP[W\[ Burlington in the lead. Q Dec. 1 Woodstock took third place at [OL;VT+\IVPZ*SHZZPJH[9PJOTVUK)\Y[VU>VVKZ[VJRÂťZ*HSLI:JPHTLHUK *SH`[VU.YPZVSPH[VVRĂ&#x201E;YZ[WSHJL.H]PU 3VPZLSSL[VVRZLJVUKHUK*VVWLY (KHTZHUK1HYYLK.YLSSWSHJLK third.

Woodstock North DANCE

31

Dec. 5-11, 2018

Q Nov. 28 Woodstock North lost to Prairie Ridge 40-39.

Before the Murray State University Racer volleyball season ended Friday with a 3-0 loss to University of Kentucky in Lexington, Ky., the Racers, not to mention Rachel Giustino, a Marian Central Catholic graduate and Murray State junior, achieved several things. e loss occurred in the NCAA Division I Playoffs. Giustino was the Most Valuable Player of the Ohio Valley Conference Tournament and led the Racers to the tournament title and a berth in the Division I postDan season. In the Chamness loss to the Wildcats, she ďŹ nished The College with a doubleReport double as she had 12 digs and 11 kills. Before losing to Kentucky, the 10th-ranked team in the country, Murray State had won 16 consecutive matches. e Racers ďŹ nished 22-10 overall and 13-3 in the OVC. It was their second appearance in three years in the NCAA Tournament. Murray State was also in the tournament in 2016, Giustinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s freshman season. Georgia Wicker (Woodstock) had 314 digs for the Daemen College Wildcats volleyball team this year. e 5-foot-3 sophomore, who played in 32 matches and made 19 starts, also had 162 assists, 29 service aces, and three kills. Daemen ďŹ nished 21-11 overall and 13-1 in the East Coast Conference. Football Mason Sutter (Woodstock) caught three passes for 24 yards for Valparaiso University in the ďŹ nal game of the season. With the 45-31 loss to Stetson University, Valparaiso ďŹ nished the year 2-9 overall and 2-6 in the Pioneer Football League. Basketball Adam Pischke (Marian Central Catholic) scored eight points and doled out four assists for Lewis University as the Flyers defeated Ferris State University 87-79. Pischke started and played 34 minutes for the Lewis Flyers. Lewis is 4-1.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ALL GOOD MEMORIES PHOTOGRAPHY

Drew Lozowski was an incoming sophomore at Woodstock High School who died suddenly in August. He was a basketball player and had just joined the football team. His memory was honored at the Nov. 28 home game. The sophomore team is wearing orange shoelaces this season, and they have Drewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s freshman number 44 sewed onto their uniforms. Fans, coaches, and players wore their favorite jerseys to school and the game as a tribute because Drew was an avid sports fan. His parents, Julie and Eric, spoke to the varsity players before the game about Drewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love of sports and his â&#x20AC;&#x153;never give upâ&#x20AC;? attitude. They were presented with Drewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s freshman jersey, and a moment of silence was observed between the sophomore and varsity games. Pictured (from left) are WHS principal Art Valecelli, athletic director Chris Kirkpatrick, Eric and Julie Lozowski, and head basketball coach Al Baker.

All good things must come to an end ...

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

11SCOREBOARD 11


Dec. 5-11, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

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