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Women Cinemakers meets

Eva Millauer Lives and works in Bristol, United Kingdom

Since childhood I have explored self-identity through creative means. Poetry and painting were my main creative tools when I was very young. And I always danced and created little performance pieces for myself and my family or for school or church plays. I had blissfull experiences at any age I can remember. Seperation and Union were always a creative topic as well as a yearning for global harmony. I did a lot of drawings in school when I was bored in lessons, and in retrospect I love these drawings…and paintings they were not refined by going to an art school, and they just communicate a lot of was present in me, that I wasn’t conscious of yet.

An interview by Francis L. Quettier and Dora S. Tennant womencinemaker@berlin.com Hello Eva and welcome to WomenCinemakers: we would like to invite our readers to visit https://evamillauer.com in order to get a wide idea about your multifaceted artistic production we would introduce you to our readers with a couple of questions about your background: you have a solid background and you hold a BA (hons) in Visual and Performance Art, that you received from the University of Brighton. How did these experiences influence the evolution of your dance practice? Moreover, how does

your cultural substratum direct the trajectory of your artistic research? As a child growing up in Germany I was always the multidisciplinary creative type… I loved dance, had ballet and contemporary dance classes and acted in a drama group, I loved writing imaginative stories and poetry and already then oneness, harmony and even world peace were an important theme. My mother remembers that I told her about various blissful and mystical experiences when I was very young. I loved sewing and making my own rather wild clothes. I enjoyed a lot of different types of crafts, painting, drawing and photography. I doodled all sorts of drawings in school when I was bored in lessons, and quite a few of them showed dance in somewhat of an energetic ecstatic rather

Profile for WomenCinemakers

WomenCinemakers // Special Edition  

WomenCinemakers // Special Edition  

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