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OUR MISSION Watford New Hope Trust (WNHT) exists to serve homeless and vulnerably-housed individuals by providing accommodation and opportunities to rebuild damaged lives. Founded upon Christian values, which are at the core of our operation, we support people regardless of faith. We house up to 60 people every night and support more than 600 people each year through accommodation, support and development services.

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CONTENTS Chairman & CEO’s Welcome

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Overview 2012/13

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Our Services

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Outreach

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The Haven Day Centre

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The Sanctuary Transition Service

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24/7 Emergency Helpline

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The Sanctuary Night Shelter

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Community Home

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New Hope House

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Client Stories

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Central Support

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Mental Health Support

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Move-on

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Tenancy Sustainment

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Workshops

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Community Market Garden

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Finances

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Thank You!

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ACCOMMODATION

SUPPORT

DEVELOPMENT

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IMAGE MATTHEW & JOHN

CEO & CHAIRMAN’S WELCOME Welcome to this 23rd annual review of Watford New Hope Trust. We hope you will enjoy reading the following pages, which summarise our work in the financial year ending 31st March 2013. We begin this review by offering our deepest gratitude to Mike Smith and the Revd Mike Jones, who have been stalwart leaders of the Trust since 2007, serving as CEO and Chairman respectively. They have led the Trust through difficulties unseen since the 1980s – specifically the economic downturn, which has caused extraordinary pressure within the homelessness sector. We wish them both long and enjoyable retirements. Credit for the successes outlined in the following pages must be attributed to their leadership. A significant achievement this year has been the launch of our two services for people who are new to homelessness: a ‘Transition’ emergency accommodation service and a

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24/7 emergency helpline. Thanks to a three-year funding commitment from the government-sponsored Homelessness Transition Fund, these services have already prevented more than 100 people from falling victims of entrenched homelessness. Both of these services fall in line with the government’s No Second Night Out initiative. Sadly, due to on-going financial pressures, this year saw the closure of our Furniture Recycling Scheme, which had been a part of the Trust for twelve years. Similarly, the funding for our Day Centre workshop programme came to an end this year, resulting in a significant reduction of this service. However, the void that these services leave is to be filled by a new self-sufficient enterprise: an employment training scheme called HopeWorks, which seeks to support people in their return to the workplace. This service will launch in the next financial year. At the end of the year we opened a charity shop in Croxley Green. This is our third charity shop and our second outside Watford. Our growing number of retail outlets forms part of a plan to diversify our income streams, so that we may be more robust to face the increasing demand for homelessness provision and decreasing supply of statutory funding.

offer. Aside from periods of changeover and/or exceptional circumstances, our bed spaces continue to operate at capacity – which we increased by six bed spaces this year. We will be making even more bed spaces available in the year ahead, as we launch a safe house for vulnerable women. However, the lack of affordable accommodation and the inability to access the private rented sector remains a very real problem for our service users. We thank God that we have been able to facilitate the rebuilding of so many damaged lives this year, and we give thanks for our many supporters and partners, without whom we simply would not exist. We look forward to working with each of you as we continue to combat homelessness in the year ahead. Thank you for your donations, your prayers and your time.

John Ford (Chairman) & Matthew Heasman (CEO)

Overall, this year has been no less challenging than previous years and the demand for our services is stronger than ever. Sadly, the number of people in need of accommodation far outweighs the number of bed spaces that we are able to

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OVERVIEW

2012/13

This year, we have supported at least 634 individuals (617 in 2011/12).

In addition to this, we have supported many individuals whom we have been unable to identify, for instance, one-off callers to our 24/7 Emergency Helpline. Of those we have supported, the circumstances of 582 individuals were known to us, and of these, the following statistics apply:

This year, we have begun a lengthy process of improving the way we are collecting and analysing data from our service users. As a consequence, we are painting a more accurate picture regarding the complex situations which they face. There are a few marked differences between this year’s statistics and last: we have seen a greater number of under-30s in need of homelessness services than in previous years and an increasing number are female. Also, the number of service users suffering from mental health issues has increased. This particular issue is now being recorded with a much greater degree of accuracy than in previous years, which explains in part the dramatic increase from 44% (2012) to 65% (2013). Attention will be given to this issue for a report in 2014. Tragically, this year we lost an average of one service user per month to death and all-barone was under the age of 50. This statistic has been constant for the past three years and it highlights the stark reality of the situations that our ‘front-line’ staff face when working with people in desperate situations. During our 23rd anniversary service, we held a time of remembrance for those we had lost over the course of the year. We intend to hold these poignant times of reflection each year going forward.

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In an attempt to simplify a complex issue, homelessness can be described using two categories: visible and invisible. The traditional stereotype of a homeless person being a drunken, bearded man with his dog, begging on the street would fall into the former category. Yet it is important to recognise that those who are visibly homeless are merely the tip of the iceberg. This year, just 16% of the people we supported had been visibly (or ‘street’) homeless. The remaining 84% of those we supported would fall into the ‘invisible’ category – i.e. they are unseen by the public eye. This overwhelming majority underscores the fact that the traditional homeless stereotype is misleading. Of this 84%, almost half were ‘sofa surfers’ – a term given to someone who stays temporarily in the houses of friends or family, yet they are without a permanent or stable dwelling. The other half lived in squats, bed and breakfasts, hotels and hostels. This year, the main reason for homelessness given by our ‘visible’ service users was relationship breakdown (which includes domestic violence and other abuse, as well as the breakup of cohabiting couples). The main reason given by our ‘invisible’ service users was unemployment and, consequently, financial poverty. The distribution of the individuals that we were able to support this year is shown in the table below. Please note that these figures include crossover e.g. a Day Centre user may also be staying in one of our hostels.

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SERVICE USER USE BY SERVICE:

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OUR SERVICES Our services are outlined in alphabetical order in the three categories below. A more detailed overview of their performance in the year ending 31st March 2013 is found in the following pages.

ACCOMMODATION Alpha Court (six bed move-on accommodation) Community Home (five bed ‘damp’ house) Hosier House (three bed safe house) Opening 2013/14 Manse (four bed move-on accommodation) New Hope House (10 bed ‘dry’ hostel) Sanctuary Cluster Flats (11 bed move-on accommodation) Sanctuary Night Shelter (14 bed emergency accommodation) Sanctuary Transition Service (six bed emergency accommodation)

SUPPORT SERVICES 24/7 Homelessness Helpline Central Support Team Day Centre Mental Health Worker (floating support) Outreach (floating support) Tenancy Sustainment Team (floating support)

DEVELOPMENT SERVICES Furniture Recycling (closed August 2012) HopeWorks (employment training scheme) Opening 2013/14 Market Garden Workshops In the following pages, we summarise each of the above in the typical order through which people progress when accessing our services, beginning with Outreach – often the first point of contact – and ending with our move-on accommodation, tenancy sustainment and development services.

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OPEN MON-SAT, 9AM-12.30PM AVERAGE LENGTH OF SUPPORT: 6 DAYS COMMON NEEDS: ACCOMMODATION

OUTREACH Often the first point of contact that those who are homeless have with WNHT, Outreach enables people to access the support they need.

our emergency beds

This year, we’ve seen an increase in the number of under-30s needing our support. Also, ‘sofa-surfing’ remains on the rise, in part due to the changes to housing benefits, which came into effect in the previous financial year. We’ve also supported people from all sorts of professional backgrounds: builders, professional musicians, businessmen and women. Of the people we supported this year, 86% were men.

‘I am really thankful to Outreach, not just for the housing help, but also for listening to me and supporting me when I was in a very difficult place.’

Two changes during the year have enabled us to support more people through this service: Day Centre staff have been trained as outreach workers, so that they are able to cover this work if and when necessary; and the new Transition Service has enabled us to refer people with ‘no recourse to public funds’ to a bed, so much more rough sleeping has been prevented.

THIS YEAR 264 individuals supported on

408 occasions. 4 hours per week on street 96 rough sleepers referred into

We were particularly grateful to receive full funding towards this project for the first time, from Watford Borough Council, which will also continue next year. Funded by Watford Borough Council

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OPEN MON-SAT, 9AM-12.30PM AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE: 66 PEOPLE COMMON NEEDS: ADVICE AND FOOD

THE HAVEN DAY CENTRE Our Day Centre offers a drop-in service, giving access to food, clean clothes, washing facilities, guidance and a listening ear.

THIS YEAR 364 individuals supported 41,316 meals served 27 volunteers involved

‘The Day Centre got me into accommodation. I always thought that when you were homeless you just had to be on the street, I didn’t know there were places like this.’

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This year, the effects of the financial recession have been particularly noticeable. The Job Centre has been referring people to us for food, and service users have been finding it increasingly difficult to find landlords who accept housing benefit. We’ve also supported people who many wouldn’t expect to have become homeless: people with degrees; skilled craftsmen; and directors of companies. The belief in a loving and faithful God sustains us through these difficult times, which is endorsed by the daily generosity of Pret A Manger, Costco, Ocado and others, as well as the astonishing amount of Harvest donations. This means that none of our service users has left our services hungry and our food bill is at an alltime low, despite the need to feed even more mouths. However, hunger can often be the symptom of deeper problems, which the Day Centre also seeks to address. Through our advice and signposting services, we have been delighted to see people tackle addiction issues (e.g. through the Day Centre Alcoholics Anonymous group), learn budgeting skills and find employment. Partially-funded by Hertfordshire County Council.


6 BEDS 24/7 SUPPORT AVERAGE STAY: 5 DAYS

THIS YEAR 171 individuals supported 51% occupancy rate 74% Positive move-on rate

‘Staying in the Transition Service has given me safety and support to find the right accommodation for the future. Without it I would have been on the streets.’

TRANSITION SERVICE The Sanctuary Transition Service focuses on helping those who are facing homeless for the first time, by offering advice, guidance and a bed for the night.

Thanks to funding from the Homelessness Transition Fund, we launched this service on 31st May 2012. Before this, there was no dedicated service in Watford for people who faced homelessness for the first time. As a consequence, rough sleeping in Watford was increasing, highlighted by the fact that the Night Shelter occupancy rate was almost 100% last year. Evidenced by statutory research, the longer people are homeless, the more likely they are to get involved with illegal substance and alcohol misuse. Consequently, mental health issues are then more likely to arise. This Transition Service has been ‘catching’ people who are new to homelessness and we have seen a decrease in people requiring prolonged support and care as a result.

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THIS YEAR 277 people supported 150 referred into Transition

Service Helpline available 24/7

24/7 EMERGENCY HELPLINE Our 24/7 emergency homelessness helpline offers advice and support for those facing homelessness locally.

Along with the Transition Service, our 24/7 emergency homelessness helpline was also launched on 31st May 2012. Thanks to this service, local people who are at risk of homelessness or have been made homeless recently, can phone 0300 012 0168 at any time to talk to an advisor about their options. This line was called 441 times this year and we were able to support 277 of these callers through advice, signposting and/or accommodation.

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14 BEDS 24/7 SUPPORT AVERAGE STAY: 29 DAYS

THIS YEAR 147 individuals supported 93% occupancy rate 59% positive move-on rate

‘I didn’t know the Night Shelter existed. It has helped and benefitted me as a stopgap between two homes. I had nowhere else to go but the Night Shelter gave me time to evaluate what I have to do to get myself back on track. I have changed my way of thinking about homeless people since becoming homeless myself. Anyone can find themselves in this situation.’

THE SANCTUARY NIGHT SHELTER Our Night Shelter is the only emergency accommodation in Watford. It provides short-term accommodation for people who would otherwise have nowhere secure to stay, as well as an evening meal, laundry facilities and support in moving to somewhere more long-term.

This year has been challenging but rewarding in many ways. Due to the demanding nature of the work, we’ve suffered staff shortages. However, we’ve been able to support more people than last year, whilst maintaining a similar positive move-on rate. We’ve also had far fewer returning service users, as well as fewer from an entrenched streetdrinking culture. The layout of the Night Shelter changed from 12 beds (10 single rooms and one shared) to 14 single rooms this year. As a result, the atmosphere in the Night Shelter has been calmer because no-one has had to share and everyone has their own private space. Partially-funded by Hertfordshire County Council.

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5 BEDS 5 BEDS 24/7 SUPPORT 24/7 SUPPORT MAX STAY - UP TO 2 YEARS AVERAGE STAY: 332 DAYS

THIS YEAR 10 individuals supported 95% occupancy rate 60% Positive move-on rate

‘The Community Home has given me a home where I have regained my life again.’

COMMUNITY HOME Our Community Home offers long-term accommodation and a sense of community for those with alcohol addiction issues. Residents can drink a controlled amount of alcohol on the premises with the aim of stopping drinking altogether.

This year, our residents painted and decorated the lounge and dining room, which has helped reinforce the feeling that this house is their home. As usual, the residents and staff went on an annual holiday to Cornwall, where two of our more long-term residents dressed up as pirates! A separate access way and outdoor toilets were created this year, which has meant that the growing number of people using the Community Market Garden no longer disturb the residents of the Community Home. The residents now have more privacy and their own small garden.

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Partially-funded by Hertfordshire County Council.


10 BEDS 24/7 SUPPORT AVERAGE STAY: 150 DAYS

THIS YEAR 29 individuals supported 93% occupancy rate 84% Positive move-on rate

‘New Hope House has given me the support I need by means of proactive key workers who listen and help with whatever issues I may be having.’

NEW HOPE HOUSE New Hope House is a dry hostel that offers short-term accommodation and support in preparing to move on to more independent accommodation. We’ve had a challenging yet productive year. The challenges have largely arisen because we’ve supported people from more diverse backgrounds. In previous years it’s been more common for our residents to have had issues with addiction prior to coming to New Hope House. However, this year we’ve supported people with mental health issues, difficult relationships and people who’ve simply lost their job. The only real common factor is that they have lost their accommodation. This diversity of issues and the complexity of situations do present a challenge but they also give the opportunity for staff members to make the most of their skills and abilities.

Partially-funded by Hertfordshire County Council.

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TOM’S STORY I am 48 years old and I’m a baker by trade. In 2001, my daughter was born with serious health problems which, after three intense years of caring for her, contributed to the breakdown of my marriage. When my marriage broke down, I left my family home to my wife and daughter and moved into supported accommodation locally and was rehoused. My wife and I tried desperately to make things work between us and we even got back together for a year, but our relationship was badly fractured and we separated again. Throughout all of this, I was so affected by my personal difficulties that I could not face going to work and I lost my job due to poor attendance. Following my marriage break up I re-trained as a landscape gardener and found permanent work on a fixed-term five-year project. This job came with accommodation, but when the work ended, so did my housing. In 2010, I was homeless again and I moved back into supported accommodation. I remained in supported accommodation for the best part of two years. Throughout that time, I looked for work, but I also became increasingly frustrated and turned to alcohol as a means of mental

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escape. As a result, I ended up losing my accommodation and I became a rough sleeper for a few nights. Somewhere along my journey, I had heard about Watford New Hope Trust and I managed to get a referral through the Outreach Team into the Sanctuary Night Shelter. I then moved into New Hope House. I stopped drinking as soon as I moved in, which meant that the accompanying behaviour also stopped. Throughout my time at New Hope House, I was helped to find long-term accommodation. The house was a fantastic place to live – good food and good company! I stayed there for about nine months and I was encouraged to start baking again. I was able to give something back to WNHT by baking for events and for other residents. At the end of my time with WNHT, I was housed by Hertsmere Borough Council. New Hope House and the Tenancy Sustainment Team (TST) helped prepare and support me in this move. I continue to receive support from TST – they help make sure things are going OK. I look forward to returning to full-time work as a baker in the near future whilst continuing to give all I can to my family.


ANNIE’S STORY I grew up in the local area and did well at school, getting a good job in sales and marketing when I left. In 2011, aged 26, I was made redundant as a result of the economic downturn. Losing my job meant I could no longer afford to pay my rent and I had to move out of my own flat and back in with my family. This situation caused a lot of stress for me and my family and it contributed to a damaged relationship which meant I had to move out. So, I went to the local council for help and they advised me to visit the Haven Day Centre. When I was growing up I knew the Day Centre as the building with a grass roof! I thought it was a place just for alcoholics and I never imagined I’d end up there. This made me very anxious. I met with an outreach worker who referred me into the Sanctuary Night Shelter that day. It was so daunting going into the Night Shelter. I tried to act confident, but when someone asked if I was OK I burst into tears and said, “No, I’m not OK; I’m in a Night Shelter!”. Another resident told me that everyone cries on the first night, but it gets better.

took full advantage of the support at the Day Centre and all the workshops. I also volunteered in the Day Centre kitchen, helped with admin in the Central Support Team and at Harvest. Before I went to the Day Centre I thought of the classic stereotype when I pictured someone who was homeless — a tramp. I also thought it was a lifestyle choice but now I know that this is not a fair picture. Whilst I was in the Night Shelter I discovered WNHT was a Christian-based organisation, so I set out on mission to disprove God... but I failed! I challenged the staff at the Day Centre about their faith and they pointed me in the direction of an Alpha Course through a local church. On this course I experienced God’s love, I became a Christian and was baptised! WNHT helped me to find a place to call my own and I have now lived here for a year. I’m still part of a local church and my life feels stable again. My time with WNHT enabled me to reflect on my future career and, with encouragement and on-going support from staff, I am re-training as carer. After eight years in sales and marketing I feel the time is right to change direction and pursue a career where I can use my experience to help others.

I settled in quickly, made friends, and I went to the Day Centre each day. I

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OPEN MON-FRI, 9AM-5PM SUPPORTS MORE THAN 70 STAFF & 200 VOLUNTEERS

THIS YEAR 10,728 unique visits to our

website £509,802 raised through

fundraising £266,059 raised through retail

CENTRAL SUPPORT The Central Support Team is responsible for administration, facilities management and maintenance, finance, publicity, fundraising, retail, HR and IT.

The role of the Central Support Team (CST) is vital: it recruits, supports and empowers all of the Trust’s staff and volunteers in our many services and locations. This year, 88 members of staff were supported by the CST (76 in 2012/13). This figure includes full and part-time staff, as well as those who have joined us and left us during the year. In addition, more than 200 volunteers were supported, recruited and trained by the CST. This year, the changes to the CST were substantial. Aside from the previously-mentioned retirements of our CEO and Chairman, in May we said a fond farewell to our Services Director Pete Belfield. Pete – and his long-serving Day Centre-based wife, Sarah – left us for Ethiopia and, in his place, we welcomed James Wilson as Operations Director and Sara Crean-Muir as

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Strategy Director onto the Senior Leadership Team. This year saw an investment in our volunteers – a remarkable group of people who, thankfully, continue to outweigh our paid staff in number. Thanks to funding from the Sylvia Adams Charitable Trust, we were able to employ a Development Manager for the first time. She will oversee our volunteering programme, which will keep our staffing costs down, as well as engaging more members of the community with our work, particularly through volunteering days at our Community Market Garden. Our small Fundraising and Communications team has experienced a very challenging yet fruitful year, reaching the £0.5m mark for the first time. We thank God that the local community continues to rally around the Trust, financially supporting us through these difficult times. More than £27,000 was raised through local events, which included our second annual partnerships with Watford YMCA and Watford Grammar School for Boys through the winter and summer sleepouts respectively. Also, our annual Harvest appeal attracted more than £50,000 worth of food and toiletries. This appeal was supported by Watford’s very own super hero ‘Soup-er Tom’. In case you missed it, the video is well worth a watch! Please visit www.wnht.org/media. We were particularly grateful to St Margaret’s School for Girls, who supported us in many ways throughout the year, but their school sleepout towards the end of the year generated a staggering £4,800. Thank you to the many girls who braved snow and -1˚c temperatures to support us in this way. To honour our many amazing fundraisers, such as these, we have established our Fundraiser of the Month award, which showcases the amazing things that people in our community are doing to raise money in support of people who are homeless. Please see www.wnht.org/fotm for further information. Partially-funded by the Sylvia Adams Charitable Trust.

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‘Always friendly smiles, always friendly faces, always a warm welcome, a sanctuary from the commotion of everyday life, and a place to feel at home.’

CENTRAL SUPPORT RETAIL Our charity shops bring in essential unrestricted funding for the Trust and enable us to engage with the local community.

Croxley Green Our new shop in Croxley Green is located on New Road and opened just before the end of the year, on 16th March. The shop had a particularly successful first day, despite the rain, and was busy from opening until closing. Since its opening our new shop has been overwhelmed with donations. We would like to say a huge THANK YOU to all those who’ve supported this new shop, by donating or volunteering, or simply taking an interest and telling their friends and family.

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Chorleywood We had a good start to the year at the Chorleywood shop, but we have faced a few challenges since then. The economic climate has had a big impact in that lots of other businesses have shut down on The Parade, where our shop is located. This has caused the number of people visiting the shop to drop. Despite these difficulties, our volunteers have stayed with us and we’ve kept our ‘boutique’ feel! In the New Year we created a children’s corner which has been really successful in bringing parents with children into the shop.

Watford Our Watford shop continues to thrive. As ever we’ve been amazed by God’s faithfulness. We never worry about what’s in the tills because we know God will provide, which gives us the freedom to give items away to those who are in desperate financial situations. We’ve also continued to be overwhelmed and humbled by the abundance of donations, which enabled us to generate more than £200,000 again this year. We are incredibly grateful to the amazing troop of people who ensure that this shop remains entirely volunteer-run. Some of these have had hospital stays and personal difficulties, yet they continue to fight for the cause of homeless prevention. Sadly, some of our regular customers have passed away during the year – they are sorely missed and we were grateful to have been a part of their lives. Our wonderful shop manager, Polly, picked up another award this year, for long voluntary service and dedication to charitable work. She was recognised by the High Sheriff of Hertfordshire with a Personal Award.

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40 HOURS OF SUPPORT PER WEEK AVERAGE LENGTH OF SUPPORT: 111 DAYS

MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT Our mental health floating support worker offers specialist guidance and enables service users to access professional support where necessary.

THIS YEAR 47 individuals supported 74% prevented from

homelessness ‘This service has helped me deal with my journey of sobriety when times have been good and bad. I’m by no means the finished article but whilst working with this support I have come a long way. I’ve been put in touch with the right people at the right time and I’m grateful for this.’

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We’ve had a busy year with lots of changes and exciting developments. One of these is the addition of a Community Health Pod, donated by locallybased company Telehealth Solutions Ltd, which is used to measure people’s levels of depression and anxiety and enables us and service users to keep track of their mental health. The mental health support worker completed Cognitive Behavioural Therapy training which is enhancing the work she does with service users. This year, as in previous years, the most common illness that we’ve seen is depression and we’ve seen more people in need of longer-term support, rather than short-term work. We’ve also seen very educated, affluent people walk through the door, who you might expect to be in a job or working, yet they have found themselves homeless and in need of help.

Partially-funded by Hertfordshire County Council.


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21 BEDS STAFF ON CALL 24/7 AVERAGE STAY: 320 DAYS

THIS YEAR

MOVE ON

36 individuals supported

We offer three hostels for those who are preparing to move on to their own home. These give people the opportunity to live more independently, offering a vital stepping-stone between staying in a hostel for those who are homeless and living in their own home.

83% occupancy rate 74% Positive move-on rate

‘The Trust has provided me with freedom, responsibility, selfdetermination and most of all, normality. The whole process was smooth and problem free.’

In all of our move-on accommodation, we’ve found it increasingly difficult to move people on, mainly because most private landlords won’t accept housing benefit, and social housing is in greater demand, meaning people can be waiting for social housing for years. We spoke of this ‘bottleneck’ effect in last year’s annual review and this year is no different. Another struggle that we’ve faced is inadequate staff cover in Alpha Court and The Manse; however, this issue was resolved toward the end of the year.

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11 BEDS STAFF ON CALL 24/7 AVERAGE STAY: 320 DAYS

Cluster Flats

Located above the Sanctuary Night Shelter, our Cluster Flats provide space for residents to live more independently while having access to support when required.

This year we’ve seen an increase in the average length that people stay. This is partly because fewer people have been ready to move out and have had fewer opportunities to. However, it’s also because no-one has moved out under negative circumstances, for example, no-one has been evicted. In a sense this has been the most stable and positive year to date, because we haven’t had to ask anyone to leave. This is reflected in the higher length of stay and the fact that this service saw a 100% positive move-on rate!

6 BEDS STAFF ON CALL 24/7 AVERAGE STAY: 443 DAYS

4 BEDS STAFF ON CALL 24/7 AVERAGE STAY: 311 DAYS

Alpha Court

Alpha Court contains six one-bedroom self-contained flats with Assured Shorthold Tenancies. Tenants are supported in finding permanent employment and planning a successful move to independent living.

This year our residents have tended to stay longer, for reasons mentioned above, as well as personal circumstances. However, in both Alpha Court and the Manse our residents have tended to be people who’ve fallen on hard times because work has dried up.

The Manse

The Manse provides individual bedrooms for four people, with a shared kitchen and living area. Residents cook and clean for themselves and are offered support to move on.

Most of the residents we’ve supported in the Manse have either been working or are keen to return to employment. Many of the residents have been ready and willing to move into their own accommodation but are unable, because of the lack of accommodation available for them. Partially-funded by Hertfordshire County Council.

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OPEN MON-FRI, 9AM-5PM AVERAGE LENGTH OF SUPPORT: 844 DAYS COMMON NEEDS: SOCIAL SUPPORT

TENANCY SUSTAINMENT

Our Tenancy Sustainment Team offers practical and emotional support to enable service users who’ve moved into their own accommodation to keep their own home.

THIS YEAR 56 individuals supported 98% sustained tenancy 6 supported through a pre-

tenancy course ‘I find TST staff helpful to talk to when my motivation is low. They can present a more positive way of looking at things.’

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This year we’ve supported more people in applying for work. We’ve also developed effective bereavement support, having improved our understanding of counselling skills and techniques. This year saw significant staff shortages, which explains the drop in the number of people we were able to support. However, we were delighted to welcome a new manager who joins us from Watford Borough Council, where he worked in the housing team for 29 years. During Harvest season, we had the opportunity to give food to service users, many of whom survive on benefits. We’ve supported people who’ve had careers many would not associate with a risk of homelessness, including teachers and chauffeurs. This reminds us that, as the main cause of homelessness is relationship breakdown, it really can happen to anyone.

Funded by the J P Getty Jnr Charitable Trust and Hertfordshire County Council.


SUBJECTS INCLUDE READING, WRITING, KNITTING, ART, IT AND COOKERY.

THIS YEAR

WORKSHOPS

227 individuals supported

Our workshops enable service users to develop their skills and confidence. We offer a wide variety of activities, including help with IT, film club, and creative writing.

41 subjects taught 63% male; 37% female

‘They have shown me I’ve got some things I never knew I could do. I’ve learned things I’ve always wanted to do. Plus it keeps me out of trouble. If I wasn’t at workshops I’d just be dossing around town getting drunk and getting into trouble.’

Sadly, this is the last time that workshops will feature in an annual review in this way, as our funding ceased at the end of this year. However, during the year we took steps to separate the workshops from our Day Centre and trialled them in other locations, including New Hope House, the Community Home and the Community Market Garden. This was with a view to see if they could operate more successfully from other locations – the conclusion being that, in the year ahead, we will be tying a few of our workshops in with our work at the Community Market Garden. We’ve seen a range of skills and talents in our service users and the different forms of expression they use clearly shows that there is no one type of person who becomes homeless. Workshops offer a space where service users can explore and express their own individuality, so we have the opportunity to really see the rich diversity of the people we work with. Partially-funded by Watford Borough Council.

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OPEN MON-FRI, 10AM-3PM SPREAD ACROSS AN ACRE OF LAND

THIS YEAR 57 individuals supported 26 company and community

groups visited £2,603 generated in plant sales

‘This is like an oasis for homeless people.’

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COMMUNITY MARKET GARDEN

Our Community Market Garden is a serene, beautiful place where service users can volunteer, developing their skills and confidence while gaining the proven health benefits of ‘ecotherapy’. It also serves as a vital link between the Trust and the local community.

This year we’ve seen a lot of exciting developments at the garden. Firstly, you may notice that the name of this service has changed slightly. This is to reflect the fact that it now engages more with the community. Thanks to funding from the ASDA Foundation, we’ve been able to create a separate access to the garden, build outside toilets and a workshop. As well as preventing disturbances to the people staying at our Community Home, this means we’ve been able to invite local schools to visit, in addition to local companies. As part of our work with the community, we also held an open day, which gives everyone in the local and surrounding area the opportunity to visit the garden, buy produce and learn more about what we do.


You will also notice from the statistics that the number of service users the garden has supported has more than doubled this year. We are thrilled to have seen a 148% increase in the number of service users accessing this therapeutic resource – 68% of these users suffer with mental health issues and the garden has proven to be effective thus far in helping people to cope with their struggles. Also, in the year ahead we hope to see even more service users accessing the garden as we use it as a venue for creative workshops. Our new workshop is a particularly important addition in this regard, as it has provided an inside space, which means people can come to the garden in all weathers. Finally, we’ve cleared the extra land that Watford Borough Council added to our new lease, which is now an attractive woodland area populated by homemade bushcraft animals. On this land we plan to erect a yurt (also funded by the ASDA Foundation). A yurt is a semi-permanent nomadic dwelling, made from highly durable and weatherproof material. Ours will be used as another indoor space which will be especially useful for counselling work and company visits. Partially-funded by the Garfield Weston Foundation and the Cathedral and Abbey Church of St Alban Mission Allocation Fund.

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FINANCES

2012/13

This year, our services have expanded to meet the growing demand for homelessness provision. As a consequence, our expenditure has risen and this year we exceeded the £2m mark for the first time. Although our income has also increased, by comparison with last year, we have ended this financial year with a marginal deficit of £23,119. Whilst a deficit is never an ideal position, this follows three years of marginal surplus, which means this is not a major cause for concern. A more detailed breakdown of our income and expenditure for the year is as follows: STATUTORY CONTRACT INCOME (31%) HOUSING BENEFIT (27%) RETAIL (13%) LOCAL AUTHORITY (9%) INDIVIDUALS (6%) TRUSTS & FOUNDATIONS (4%) COMMUNITY GROUPS (3%) OTHER PROPERTY INCOME (2%) SCHOOLS (2%) RESIDENT CONTRIBUTIONS (2%) COMPANIES (0.7%) LEGACIES (0.1%)

SANCTUARY NIGHT SHELTER & CLUSTER FLATS (27%) NEW HOPE HOUSE (15%) COMMUNITY HOME (10%) HAVEN DAY CENTRE (9%) RETAIL (7%) FUNDRAISING & PUBLICITY (7%) TENANCY SUSTAINMENT TEAM (6%) TRANSITION SERVICE (4%) ALPHA COURT (2%) THE MANSE (2%) WORKSHOPS (2%) MARKET GARDEN (2%) OUTREACH (2%) FURNITURE RECYCLING PROJECT (2%) GOVERNANCE (1%) HOPEWORKS (1%)

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Please note that the figures above have been approved by the WNHT Board of Trustees. They are taken from our annual audited consolidated charity accounts (which comprise New Hope Retail and Watford New Hope Trust). A full copy of these accounts can be requested from our Head Office, or viewed on the Charity Commission website.


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THANK YOU This year, we have received 532 financial donations from 303 individuals (10 of these have given more than £1,000; one of whom has given more than £1,500), 103 churches and community groups, 79 schools, 24 companies, 21 charitable trusts and foundations, and two statutory bodies.

We simply would not exist without this support and we are so grateful to everyone who has supported us in this way. A few have given us an exceptional level of support (typically £1,000 or more) and, unless they have asked to remain anonymous, we would like to say a special thank you to the following:

CHARITABLE TRUSTS & FOUNDATIONS

Cathedral & Abbey Church of St Alban Christ Church & St John’s, Watford Christ Church Chorleywood,

29th May 1961 Charitable Trust

Cream Tea Brigade

Alfred Haines Charitable Trust

Derby Road Baptist Church

ASDA Foundation

Hillside Community Church

Cadbury Foundation

Kol Chai Hatch End Jewish Community

Coutts Charitable Trust

Northwood Lions Club

Eastcheap Charitable Trust

Rotary Club of Watford

Garfield Weston Foundation

St Andrew’s Church Chorleywood

Gladys Wightwick Trust

St Edmund the King Northwood Hills

J and S Ford Charitable Trust

St George’s Day Charity Club

J Paul Getty Jnr Charitable Trust

St Helen’s Church Garston

Kingsbury Charity

St James’ Church Bushey

St James’s Place Foundation

St James Road Baptist Church

Sylvia Adams Charitable Trust

St Lawrence’s Church Abbots Langley St Lawrence’s Church Eastcote

FAITH AND COMMUNITY GROUPS

St Luke’s Church Bricket Wood

Bushey Baptist Church

St Michael & All Angels Church Sunnyside

Bushey Hall Lodge 2323

St Paul’s Church Chipperfield

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St Luke’s Church Watford St Mary’s Parish Church Watford


St Peter’s Church Bushey Heath

Haberdashers’ Aske’s School for Boys

St Peter’s Church Watford

Haberdashers’ Aske’s School for Girls

Watford Community Church

Holy Trinity C of E Primary School

Watford Lodge

Laurance Haines School

West Watford Christian Fellowship

Merchant Taylors’ School Northwood College

COMPANIES DDD Ltd Costco Wholesale UK Ltd Elavon Merchant Services intu Watford (formerly the Harlequin Centre) Ocado Pret A Manger Telehealth Solutions Ltd

Northwood Preparatory School St Helen’s School, Northwood St Margaret’s School for Girls St Martin’s School, Northwood Tanners Wood School Watford Grammar School for Boys Watford Girls Grammar School Whitchurch First School

LOCAL AUTHORITIES

The Entertainer Toyshop Hertfordshire County Council

SCHOOLS

Watford Borough Council

Aldenham School Ashfield Junior School (winners of our annual Harvest Award for schools) Berrygrove Academy Eastbury Farm JMI & Nursery School

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Address Watford New Hope Trust 67 Queens Road Watford WD17 2QN

Phone 01923 210 680 Web

www.wnht.org

Email

info@wnht.org

t Search for @wnht

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watfordnewhopetrust

Watford New Hope Trust is a registered charity (1080784) and a company limited by guarantee (03969063) Registered office: Cansdales, Bourbon Court, Nightingales Corner, Little Chalfont, Bucks, HP7 9QS.


Annual Review 2013