WILMA - September 2020

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WILMA

SEPTEMBER 2020

WILMINGTON’S SUCCESSFUL WOMAN

T H E

STYLE I S S U E

Swing Into Fall

Looks to last past summer

Flashback Flare

Heathers-inspired attitude

Building a Brand Drewe and Kate’s excellent adventure


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JOIN US SEPTEMBER 2ND FOR A SOCIALLY DISTANCED 5K COURSE DOWNTOWN

USE OUR APP TO RUN ON YOUR OWN OR WITH FRIENDS, AND POST YOUR TIME

NO RUNNING REQUIRED TO ENTER PRIZE DRAWINGS AND SEE SPONSOR OFFERS

MORE INFO @ WILMADash.com


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Like most things this year, we’ve made some adjustments to the annual WILMA Dash. The 12th annual WILMA Dash offers runners and walkers several safe, socially distant options, including a September 2 course downtown with traditional timing, as well as other suggested local courses that can be completed individually or in small groups anytime over a one-week period in early September.

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Open through SEPTEMBER 15 SEPTEMBER 2 Pier 33, 10 Harnett St. Race start: 6:30 p.m. The September 2 race downtown will include two starting lines, staggered starting times and other precautions to safeguard participants’ health. • To view the course, visit

WILMADash.com

SEPTEMBER 2-9 Alternatively, participants can complete their race on several suggested courses or their own course from September 2-9 and use the IYR app to capture and share their time. •F or full virtual race instructions, and for suggested courses in our area, visit WILMADash.com

No running required to participate in the prize drawings! Support our sponsors by checking out their offers and prizes on the following pages. Your email address will be shared with the organizations whose prize drawings you enter. Winners will be selected individually by each company following the Dash.

Questions? Contact Maggi Apel, events director at mapel@wilmingtonbiz.com

Updated race guidelines @WILMA dash .com WILMAmag.com

SEPTEMBER 2020

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wilma dash

INFO, OFFERS

& PRIZES PRIZE: $100 in products & 1-hour personalized health coaching VALUE: $100

P RIZE: “Day at the Beach” goodie bag

• Mask-free shopping!

VALUE: $120

• Aging Well, inside and out

• Now offering MaxPerks Checking

AQUESTA.COM

• 20-40% off all products – plant-based & vegan certified

ARBONNE.COM/PWS/SUSIEWEILER

MEDAL SPONSOR

P RIZE: Free 2-month membership & 10-pack group training VALUE: $285 • We use science to prove the effectiveness of our workouts • Our approach is custom and geared towards your goals. • Join Downtown Wilmington’s first and ONLY full-service gym!

AXISFITNESSTR AINING.COM

PRIZE: Gift certificate toward a Vivive Treatment VALUE: $1,000 • All our locations are open • Seeing patients with enhanced CDC Recommended Guidelines • Free cosmetic consults

ATLANTICDERMNC.COM PRIZE: 1-hour physical therapy session VALUE: $120 • First-time patient special, $30 for 30-minute PT evaluation • Fitness/sports physical therapy focused on strength training

BEACHBARBELL.COM

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PRIZE: 10 units of Botox VALUE: $120 • Consults can be done in the office or virtually • Free initial consult to find out which service is right for you • Mention this offer to receive $25 off any service

BIOSYMME TRY.COM

PRIZE: Medspa At Cambridge Gift Certificate VALUE: $50 • Luxury retirement living • Medspa at Cambridge open for spa treatment

C VSLIVING.COM


wilma dash

INFO, OFFERS

& PRIZES

PRIZE: 1 continuing ed culinary class of choice + CFCC's Homebrewing Basics course at Waterline Brewing VALUE: $135 • CFCC alumni - Join your Sea Devil Nation at WeAreCapeFear.com • Follow CFCC on social media at CapeFearCC • The CFCC Foundation provided 1,053 scholarships in 148 programs last year!

CFCC.EDU

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P RIZE: Free chicken salad for a year VALUE: $143

• Mention this offer and receive $1 off a Chick Special meal • Delivery now available! • Follow on social media @ ChickenSaladChickWilmington

CHICKENSAL ADCHICK .COM

PRIZE: Half off Genetic Direction Testing for nutritional needs • Chrysalis Center is a private healthcare organization that offers a supportive, healing environment in order for change and growth to occur.

CHRYSALISCENTER-NC.COM

BIB SPONSOR PRIZE: A cataract screening for you or a family member VALUE: $100 • State of the Art Care • Expert advice and services for advanced surgical lens implants with cataract surgery • A COVID compliant, 1-on-1, custom care experience

CATARAC TCONSULTANTS.COM

• Designed for women and features a 30 min workout that is fun, fast and safe

PRIZE: Gift basket from Sweet Nectar’s Florist VALUE: $100

• Enjoy our total body workout at home

• Open for both live or virtual meetings

• One-on-one monthly coaching included with membership

• Now offering a 15% discount with 0% financing for 60 months • Offering a 10% discount for pre-need funeral arrangements

FACEBOOK.COM/CURVESBURGAWNC

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DIGNIT YMEMORIAL.COM

PRIZE: : Gift certificate to Meadowlark VALUE: $100 • Receive $25 when you open a Go Checking Account • Receive $25 when you open a new credit card with Excite • Receive money off closing costs with a mortgage purchase or refinance

EXCITECU.ORG SEPTEMBER 2020

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wilma dash

INFO, OFFERS

& PRIZES PRIZE: The Performance & Recovery IV w/ Glutathione Push VALUE: $125

PRIZE: Beauty Bundle Set VALUE: $116

• Wilmington’s only 100% clean beauty and wellness store • Free in-store samples for your perfect skin match • Use your bib number for 10 % off Sept. 2-9

FIGGYCO.COM

FR ANKINSTITUTE.COM

PACKET PICKUP SPONSOR

FLEETFEET.COM/S/WILMINGTON PRIZE: $100 gift certificate to the service dept VALUE: $100 • Currently following CDC safety guidelines • We can service your vehicle, sell you a car and arrange financing • Matthews Motors wants to buy your car MATTHEWSMOTORSWILMINGTON.COM

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• 24-hour infrared fitness studio • Burn more calories in less time using heat + infrared + exercise • First session is FREE!

• Here and ready to assist you with post-race recovery • IV’s are available to help with race recovery and hydration • Check out our symptom survey for more tailored services

HOT WOR X.NE T

PRIZE: Brooks running shoes VALUE: $130 • Open with enhanced cleaning and distancing • Scan your feet to get matched with the right shoes • Learn how to earn your $15 Fleet Feet store credit fleetfeet.com/s/wilmington/retail/ personal-rewards

P RIZE: 90-minute therapeutic massage, including salt therapy, in treatment cave

VALUE: $170 • Now offering ‘pandemic price cuts’ on all services! • Enjoy more space with only four per session • Learn more about massage memberships and more ways to save

NATIVESALTCAVEANDWELLNESS.COM

PRIZE: A Bundt party delivered! VALUE: $100 • We are open and spreading joy safely! • Let us help you make someone’s day! • Because cake makes everything better!

NOTHINGBUNDTC AKES.COM/ BAKERY/NC/WILMINGTON-NC


wilma dash

INFO, OFFERS

& PRIZES

PRIZE: Win a free year of Energy Savings Club VALUE: $188.75 • Buy a qualifying system • Receive 0% APR for 72 months • Learn about our financing and complimentary in-home evaluations

OBRIENSER VICE.COM

P RIZE: One month of 1-on-1 personal finance coaching VALUE: $150 • Earn 2% APY with our Simple+ Checking Account • Mortgage free with our 12-year Liberty Loan • Free financial education with our SmartU program

PACU.COM

PRIZE: Custom Orthotics with fitting VALUE: $100 • Clinic Specialties: Pelvic and lymphedema rehab, Cancer rehab and Orthopedics • Now treating Men and pediatric patient populations • All treatments are private one-hour appointments

PTFOR WOMEN.COM

PRIZE: Golf Getaway Package VALUE: $300

• Memberships starting at $200 per month, no initiation fee • Luxurious, affordable weddings, just up the I-40

RIVERL ANDING.COM

PRIZE: $100 gift card to Tropical Smoothie VALUE: $100 • Ketogenic, gluten free and sugar free bakery • Specializing in breads, cupcakes, cakes, desserts, special events and weddings

• Download the Tropical Smoothie app for rewards • Order online for curbside or delivery • Email proof of race finish to tscwilmmarketing@gmail.com for additional prize

SWEE TSANDSPIRITS.COM

TROPICALSMOOTHIECAFE.COM

WILMAmag.com

PRIZE: Private Group 1-hour Guided Meditation VALUE: $175 • Open! Salt is antiviral; sessions are private, come breathe better • Cleanse your respiratory system & boost immune system • First time? Intro offer $17.50 for 45min session

PR ANASALTC AVE.COM

P RIZE: Chiropractic spinal evaluation, x-rays, and a 60-minute massage VALUE: $375 • Learn more about how to get a free half hour massage • Learn more about how to get a free spinal evaluation • Open with enhanced cleaning protocols

SITOCHIROPR AC TIC.COM

PRIZE: Children's Sonicare Toothbrush & Whitening Kit VALUE: $130 • Compassionate Dentistry for infants, children, adolescents and children with special needs. • Seeing patients with enhanced Covid-19 Protocol • Call 910-686-1869 for an appointment

GROWINGGRINS.COM SEPTEMBER 2020

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38 18 12 SPOTLIGHT

46 THE SCENE: Designated survivor

14 TASTE: Potbelly craze

47 TAKE 5: Linda Thompson's new role

16 HEALTH: The Kids Are All Right?

48 MEN’S ROOM: Debris domination

Check out WILMA magazine here:

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30 18 H EATHERS REDUX: The original mean girls style 27 BRAND NEW: Drewe and Kate build a name 30 E ASY BREEZY: Relaxed fall looks 38 S OLE MATES: Fashion kicks

WILMAmag.com

On a work Zoom meeting, we recently played quarantine bingo. Did you watch Tiger King? Did you start an art project? Did you download TikTok (if you did, do you only have weeks left to binge?) Imagine the fashion version for 2020. Did you wear stretchy waistbands for entire week? Heck, for an entire month? Did you #NoMakeup – but not because you were making a statement? Well, by the power of Anna Wintour, it’s September. That means, it’s the annual Style Issue – both here at WILMA and at Vogue, though they might have a couple more celebrities gracing their pages this month than us. Our cover model, Merritt Hunt, however, is a WILMA celebrity in her own right, with this being her second Style Issue cover for us. She effortlessly shows off seasonal transitional looks that bring brightness and a laid-back attitude. Not laid back but packed with plenty of attitude is our Heathers-inspired spread. If you’ve never seen the movie, don’t worry. All you need to know is that you can rock anything you wear as long as you have the confidence of a Heather. So, suit up. Put on something that lifts your spirits. And, let’s runway walk into fall. W SEPTEMBER 2020

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NINA BAYS COURNOYER is design

director for the Los Angeles Business Journal and style intro writer for WILMA magazine. A graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, she was previously co-editor/art director of WILMA and art director for the Greater Wilmington Business Journal and is happy to still be part of the WILMA team, even while on the opposite coast. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband, Bryan, and their two cats, Oskar and Bucky. Bays Cournoyer is all over this issue, setting up our style spreads about Heathers looks (page 18), fall transition pieces (page 30), and sneaker kicks picks (page 38).

DREWE AND KATE – DREWE SMITH and KATE SUPA own a creative studio that helps companies elevate their brand and digital presence through photography, brand styling, logo design, and website creation. While their business partnership and company growth are profiled on page 27, they also pulled together the fall style spread on page 30 and photographed this month’s cover. Drewe Smith, one of WILMA’s stylists, also styled the Heathers spread on page 18.

CHERYL L. SERRA is a freelance strategic

communications specialist and writer who lives in Brunswick County. This month, Serra talks with local counselors about the stresses on children during COVID-19 restrictions, especially with the start of the new school year and the changes that have come about from it. Check out page 16 for their thoughts and advice.

TERAH WILSON is a Wilmington-based

freelance photojournalist with over sixteen years’ experience in photography and art. She is a mom of three, an artist, and an avid coffee drinker. Wilson photographed licensed clinical social worker Angela Smith for helping kids cope on page 16, a unique rucksack run on page 46, and our Take 5 subject Linda Thompson, the newly named chief diversity and equity officer for New Hanover County, on page 47. terahwilson.com

MELISSA HEBERT is a Wilmington-

based photographer who has had her work featured in national campaigns and magazines, including WILMA. Hebert studied photography at the Cleveland Institute of Art and specializes in editorial, portrait, and wedding photography. Hebert photographed the How Very style spread on page 18. melissahebertphoto.com

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Publisher Rob Kaiser rkaiser@wilmingtonbiz.com President Robert Preville rpreville@wilmingtonbiz.com Associate Publisher Judy Budd jbudd@wilmingtonbiz.com

Editor Vicky Janowski vjanowski@wilmingtonbiz.com Senior Account Executive Craig Snow csnow@wilmingtonbiz.com Account Executive Ali Buckley abuckley@wilmingtonbiz.com Office & Audience Development Manager Sandy Johnson sjohnson@wilmingtonbiz.com Events Director Maggi Apel mapel@wilmingtonbiz.com Events/Digital Assistant Elizabeth Stelzenmuller events@wilmingtonbiz.com Design & Media Coordinator Molly Jacques production@wilmingtonbiz.com Content Marketing Coordinator Morgan Mattox mmattox@wilmingtonbiz.com Contributing Designer Suzi Drake art@wilmingtonbiz.com Digital Editor Johanna Cano jcano@wilmingtonbiz.com Fashion Stylists Ashley Duch Grocki & Drewe Smith Contributors Tim Bass, Bridget Callahan, Shea Carver, Nina Bays Cournoyer, Beth Klahre, Justin Williams Pope, Cheryl L. Serra, Mark Weber Contributing Photographers Drewe and Kate, Melissa Hebert Photography, Michael Cline Spencer, Terah Wilson Founder Joy Allen Subscribe For a one-year subscription, please send $26.00 (check or money order) to: WILMA, 219 Station Rd., Ste. 202, Wilmington, NC 28405, or call 343-8600 x201 www.WILMAmag.com


WILMA’S

LEADERSHIP INITIATIVE FOUNDING SPONSORS

CORPORATE SPONSORS

SUPPORTER SPONSORS Cape Fear Community College Cape Fear Realtors Cavik Insurance Chrysalis Center for Counseling & Eating Disorder Treatment City Club of Wilmington Excite Credit Union Fleet Feet Sports Wilmington Frank Institute Greene Resources Hedrick, Gardner, Kincheloe & Garofalo LLP

WILMAmag.com

LeadersCare, Health & Leadership Consulting Matthews Motors Meadowlark Michele Simpson DDS Murchison Taylor & Gibson Pathfinder Wealth Consulting Patriot Roofing Company Quality Chemical Laboratories Restorative Tattoos Runway Skin Bar

Sleep Number Sweets and Spirits UNCW CIE UNCW College of Arts & Sciences USS North Carolina Battleship Village at River Landing (The) Waylett Wealth Management / Morgan Stanley Wells Fargo Bank White & Johnson Pediatric Dentistry

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W2W UPDATES

WILMA’s Women to Watch Leadership Initiative has updates to share as we continue to work on the effort’s core mission of helping develop more women leaders in our area. Here’s what we’ve been up to with various W2W Leadership Initiative programs and what’s coming up next: WOMEN TO WATCH AWARDS: So, it’s no surprise who this year’s finalists are. If you subscribe to our newsletter, you already know. (Or, you can flip to the back of this magazine.) But, we’re hard at work on our upcoming Women to Watch Awards Issue, featuring the thirty-five finalists in seven categories: Arts, Business, Education, Health, Public Service, Nonprofit, and Rising Star. Photoshoots have happened (see above); interviews are ongoing. In the meantime, keep an eye on our social media channels and Facebook page – Facebook.com/WILMAmag – to learn more about this year’s group. Category winners will be announced in October. LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE: In August, WILMA’s Leadership Institute, made up of thirty-two women who are part of this year’s cohort for the nine-month program, participated in a virtual skills workshop on productivity tips in the time of COVID and self-care, from mental to physical health. WILMA LEADERSHIP EMAIL: If you haven’t checked it out yet, be sure to read WILMA’s Monday emails, which focus on leadership topics and profiles. IN THE LOOP: Keep up to date with these and other Leadership Initiative programs as well as applications announcement by going to WILMAmag.com or signing up for the WILMA Leadership email at WILMAmag.com/email-newsletter WILMA NETWORK: Members of the WILMA Network, made up of sponsors of the Women to Watch Leadership Initiative, turned to the web to hold meetups this summer, including a lunch-and-learn session in July. Alexandra Lysik, agency owner for Cavik Insurance and a member of the WILMA Network, talked to the members about creating a plan for marketing themselves to others and creating business leads. - Vicky Janowski, WILMA editor, and Maggi Apel, events director, Co-directors of the Women to Watch Leadership Initiative W2W@WILMAmag.com

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The Women to Watch logo: When you see this throughout WILMA’s pages, it means this is a woman on the rise to know, an experienced leader to learn from, or a local program worth checking out. W

14 SERVING UP SAMMIES: Potbelly brings new taste to Port City 27 ON BRAND: Drewe and Kate adds Wilmington style 47 LINDA THOMPSON: Her next chapter with New Hanover County

SEPTEMBER

women’s professional groups Besides WILMA’s Women to Watch Leadership Initiative, there are a number of local groups to help women grow professionally. Here is just a sampling of some of them.

Cape Fear CREW Year Founded: 2010 Description: “Cape Fear CREW is the leading organization for commercial real estate in the Cape Fear region in North Carolina … Members represent every aspect of the commercial real estate industry, including, but not limited to, law, leasing, brokerage, property management, finance, acquisitions, and engineering.” Info: capefearcrew.org or info@capefearcrew.org

Cape Fear Women in Tech Year Founded: 2014 Description: “Our vision is to make the Cape Fear Region the No. 1 employer of women in technology careers per capita in the country. We do this by championing opportunities for women in technology, empowering women to strive for these competitive positions, and inspiring women to lead in those roles.” Info: cfwit.com or capefearwomenintech@ gmail.com

WILMAmag.com

Coastal Women Attorneys

The Junior League of Wilmington

(N.C. Association of Women Attorneys) Year Founded: 2013 Description: “CWA was formed to serve women attorneys in Southeastern North Carolina in the Fourth, Fifth and 13th judicial districts, which includes New Hanover, Pender, Brunswick, Columbus, Bladen, Duplin, Onslow, Sampson, and Jones counties. CWA is committed to increasing the participation of women attorneys in the legal profession, protecting the rights of women under the law and promoting, and improving the administration of justice.” Info: ncawa.org/cwa or cwa@ncawa.org

Year Founded: 1952 Description: “The Junior League of Wilmington is a women’s organization designed to empower women and to improve the community through the leadership of women as trained volunteers.” Info: jlwnc.org or info@jlwnc.org

The Inspiration Lab Year Founded: 2015 Description: “The Inspiration Lab was built for working women passionate about personal and professional development. We offer teachings and tools to improve your skills, productivity, creativity, emotional intelligence, and well-being. We also provide opportunities for networking and connection. We represent a variety of backgrounds and careers, but we’re all like-minded in being serious about success, maintaining a manageable work-life balance, and supporting one another’s growth.” Info: theinspirationlab.co

Women’s Impact Network of New Hanover County Year Founded: 2011 Description: “WIN is a collective philanthropy nonprofit that makes yearly grants to nonprofits within the county. The focus of these grants rotates annually among four areas: education, health and wellness, the environment, and arts and culture.” Info: winofnhc.org

YWCA Lower Cape Fear Founded: 1914 Description: “The YWCA Lower Cape Fear is dedicated to eliminating racism, empowering women, and promoting peace, justice, freedom, and dignity for all.” Economic advancement programs focus on educational assistance, job training, and short-term and long-term planning skills. Info: ywca-lowercapefear.org

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photo c/o Lighthouse Films

HWF ANNOUNCES PRESERVATION AWARD WINNERS

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The Historic Wilmington Foundation announced the recipients of its 2020 Preservation Awards, holding a virtual ceremony to highlight the fifteen winners this year. Among the winning projects were Arrive Hotel, The Bodega, and End of Days Distillery for revamping and reusing their building spaces. Rehabilitation nods went to both private homeowners and business owners such as ANDREA and BRAD WALKER (above), owners of Lighthouse Films who painstakingly fixed up the Richter Building on North Fourth Street. Inside the building, which was built in 1903, the couple spent countless hours salvaging wood from the ceilings and floors so that workers could use the materials to help bring the building back to life, Andrea Walker says in her award acceptance talk. “I love coming to work every day and walking up those stairs and being greeted by these beautiful (wood) ceilings,� she says. For a full list of winning projects, go to historicwilmington.org/2020-preservation-awards.

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CHIPPS NAMED HEAD OF UNCW SPARC

The University of North Carolina Wilmington named KATI CHIPPS as director of its Office of Sponsored Programs and Research Compliance. Chipps has experience in research administration, training and development, and nonprofit management. She most recently served as a research administration manager for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Gillings School of Global Public Health. The Office of Sponsored Programs and Research Compliance (SPARC) “provides assistance in identifying funding opportunities, preparing proposals and ensuring compliance with government regulations and specific requirements of sponsored research and programs,” officials say. The university also filled two newly created leadership positions in the office. DANA BELL took on the role of SPARC’s preaward coordinator, and Michael Carr began as assistant director for agreements. Bell came to UNCW in January as a proposal development specialist. Before her roles at UNCW, she worked in research administration at the Medical University of South Carolina.

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CF MUSEUM BOARD ELECTS OFFICERS

Cape Fear Museum Associates Inc. recently named its board officers and new members. EMILY BOGAN (above), vice president of product enablement and GTM at nCino, was named board president. KATE BAYNARD was elected vice president, and CHRYSTAL FRAY is board secretary. Daniel Owen was named treasurer. New board members are: DIANE DURANCE, director of the UNCW Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship; JEAN GUINUP, owner of GC Communications LLC, a tourism and hospitality consulting firm; SUSAN HANNA, who is retired from NHRMC after thirty years in a number of nursing roles; SARA IZAD, a software architect at nCino for retail product; and LISA LEATH, founder of WorkTok and president of Leath HR Group. John Coble, a partner in the Marshall, William & Gorham law firm, and Girard Newkirk, founder of KWH Coin Smart Grid, also joined the board. “We are delighted to welcome these dedicated community leaders to Cape Fear Museum’s Associates Board,” museum director Sheryl Kingery Mays says.

ant more WILMA? Check out our daily emails, which include even more profiles and stories for Wilmington’s successful women. To sign up for the free emails, go to WILMAmag.com

AREA WOMEN JOIN NEW STATE GROUPS

Local leaders now sit on new state task forces that Gov. Roy Cooper created in the summer. Cooper named MARGARET WELLER-STARGELL to the Andrea Harris Social, Economic, Environmental and, Health Equity Task Force. Weller-Stargell (above) is president and CEO of Coastal Horizons, as well as the president of the Willie Stargell Foundation, and chair of the North Carolina Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services Waiver Advisory Committee. The group was formed to “address the social, environmental, economic, and health disparities in communities of color that have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic,” state officials say. “Inequities in North Carolina are not new, but COVID-19 is shining a bright light on disparities that have gone unchecked in our health care and economic institutions for communities of color,” Cooper says. DEBORAH DICKS MAXWELL, president of the New Hanover County NAACP, was appointed to another new task force focused on equity. She is one of the members sitting on the Task Force for Racial Equity in Criminal Justice. The group is expected to help develop and help implement policy solutions to address systemic racial bias in criminal justice and submit recommendations by December 1.

Have a suggestion for a local woman or group to spotlight? Email us: wilma@WILMAmag.com WILMAmag.com

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SERVING UP

SAMMIES POTBELLY BRINGS NEW TASTE TO PORT CITY

by JUSTIN WILLIAMS POPE photos by MICHAEL CLINE SPENCER

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hether it’s the rich Pizza Sandwich or the clean Mediterranean Chicken, it’s a sure thing that the Potbelly Sandwich Shop delivers a taste of yumminess and brings something new to Wilmington when new is needed. The first of several area planned Potbellys, the soup and sandwich shop opened July 6. “We are very excited to be able to bring this to Wilmington,” says BRENT BROUSE, who owns and operates the restaurant along with his wife, MICHELE. Living in Chicago and moving to Wilmington in 2012, the couple has never forgotten the Potbelly shops that are in that part of the country. They are excited to have this unique eatery in the Port City.

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“The menu is diverse, so there is something that everyone can choose,” says Brent Brouse, adding that everyone must try “a wreck” just once. He says the sandwich made of salami, roast beef, turkey, and ham is his favorite item on the menu. Michele Brouse (above) says that other favorites are the Chicken Salad Salad and the Chicken Pot Pie Soup, and one can only finish up with an ice cream sandwich (that is made with in-house cookies). Other items include classic sandwiches, shakes, and smoothies, as well as cookies and dream bars. Brent Brouse says that while the restaurant has already proven it’s a lunchtime favorite for nearby New Hanover Regional Medical Center and other medical staffers, Potbelly can also provide a deliciously fast, hot dinner. He says the restaurant has just added breakfast fare to its menu as well. Nestled along 17th street, the Potbelly Sandwich Shop has opened during an uncertain time


for restaurants. Michele Brouse says that despite the coronavirus outbreak, they didn’t want to postpone opening. “We felt like it was a good thing to bring something new and comforting during this time,” she says. Restaurant staffers are following safety guidelines to protect patrons as well as fellow staff members. One added benefit to restaurant seating is that the Potbelly has a capacity for a large outdoor seating area for those who prefer to stay alfresco. The Potbelly Sandwich Shop first started as an antique shop in Chicago. By 1977, the owners began to serve sandwiches to hungry customers and soon became a lunchtime staple. While Potbelly is a franchise, it is locally built and locally employed, according to the Brouses, who are proud to be the first to open a Potbelly in this part of North Carolina. Other locations are already in Charlotte and Raleigh. The local version of Potbelly has a unique design with bright colors and photos of Chicago adorning the walls. Hanging in the center of the store is an airplane to fascinate kids of all ages. The Brouses took special steps to make Wilmington’s Potbelly feel like home. The restaurant tables have North Carolina designs on them, and one is dedicated to Wilmington’s heritage as a Coast Guard city. Local is a key word for the Brouses. Both emphasize that it is important for them to contribute to the local community and economy. “This is home for us, and we wanted to keep it local to Wilmington,” says Michele Brouse. Earlier this spring, she was instrumental in launching the Meals for Heroes program that assisted in rewarding health care workers across New Hanover County. Modeled after a similar program that started in Washington, D.C., Michele Brouse used her event planning background and developed Caring to Deliver, an online campaign that allowed local restaurants to join together to offer support to local businesses. The program was widely praised, but she doesn’t want to take any accolades for it. “This is our home and our community,” Michele Brouse says. “We have fallen in love with Wilmington, and our goal is to give back.” W WILMAmag.com

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I KIDS

HELPING

COPE

SCHOOL CHANGES CAN UP ANXIETY FOR STUDENTS by CHERYL L. SERRA photo by TERAH WILSON

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f COVID-19 has tested adults’ mettle, what has it meant for area students, many of whom will be starting their school year as they ended it – remotely? ANGELA SMITH, a licensed clinical social worker, says most of the children and adolescent patients she has been helping this year have shown increased anxiety due to COVID. “Children are struggling with loss of social activities such as sports, music, arts, and group work that is so important to many of them,” says Smith (above), who is with Anchor Psychological & Counseling Services, which has offices in Wilmington and Hampstead and specializes in trauma-based services. “They are struggling also with having to have parents play a different role in their lives. Some children have issues going on at home and would use school as an escape,” she adds. Smith says she worries about children who are in abusive homes who are not being seen by teachers or social workers in their schools.

ASHLEY TROTTER is a licensed clinical mental health counselor and owner of Reclaim Counseling & Wellness, a Wilmington group practice that specializes in treating a wide range of mental health, behavioral, and family issues. Like Smith, she’s seen a spike in referrals due to issues with the pandemic, but she also notes the practice has been seeing an increase in referrals for years for children and teens, particularly those who are school-aged, suffering from anxiety and depression. “We have also seen some of our clients who had made significant progress call back and report increased symptoms related to anxiety and depression over the last few months,” she says. “Parents are reporting concerns related to behavioral changes, somatic symptoms of anxiety, sleep changes, and generalized anxiety symptoms in children. Families are reporting stress in managing school assignments, child care, financial worries, and overall worries related to staying well. “We have also seen a spike in a request for marriage counseling. Families are feeling stress on many levels. This often


trickles down to children and the family system,” Trotter adds. In addition, she says, many children whose parents share custody were accustomed to spending more time during the summer with the other parent, and in some cases have not been able to. Kids are disappointed in the imposed social distancing that has waylaid sports and social activities, summer camps, and other opportunities that allow children and adolescents time with friends and family. Trotter says children experience and process stress in different ways. For instance, younger children may not be able to verbalize their feelings and worries, and some are more susceptible to stress related to their environment such as school. “COVID has definitely brought on changes on many levels, as well as potential feelings of being unsafe,” Trotter says. Symptoms to look out for can include changes in a child’s personality. They may become more clingy, angry, or withdrawn. They may experience developmental regression such as bedwetting, temper tantrums, separation anxiety, etc. Having trouble sleeping or being more fearful at bedtime may be indications of increased anxiety for children. While adults try to put together the jigsaw-like pieces of their lives with their work, family, and school needs, Trotter offers some advice to help children. “Parents can help by first being supportive,” she says. “Respond to your child in a positive way, listen to their concerns, give them extra love and attention. Spend time talking with your children and encouraging expression of feelings. Recognize that sometimes children may exhibit negative behaviors due to the fact they aren’t able to verbalize what they are feeling or understand it.” Parents should also strive to manage their own mental health and stress because children will watch their parents’ cues. Trotter encourages parents to present a positive attitude and help children see some good things that are coming out of this difficult time, such as more family togetherness. And, everyone, experts point out, should be encouraged to seek professional help when they need it. W WILMAmag.com

O

UR COMMITMENT to the health and well-being of our community is part of the fabric that drives the decisions we make every day at Wilmington Health. The core values of our organization include the words Respect, Integrity, Leadership, and Accountability. • We use these ideals in the care we show our patients. • We use these ideals in supporting our community and moving it forward. • We use these ideals in the interactions we have with one another.

In these times of uncertainty and confusion, our dedication is not only important for the thousands of patients that we serve, but also for our outstanding team members and their families. Because just like you, we live here, we work here, and we always will be committed to Wilmington in all ways.

always wilmingtonhealth.com

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HOW

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STYLED BY DREWE SMITH | PHOTOS BY MELISSA HEBERT | INTRO BY NINA BAYS COURNOYER

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L

unchtime poll …

If a global pandemic hit this summer, what would you be wearing? With so much indoor time on our hands, what better way to embrace the couch for a few hours than with your fav fashionable clique? Enter Heathers, the 1989 cult classic. These original mean girls may be hell to sit with in the cafeteria, but they sure have the passion for fashion. And, while you may not subscribe to their specific style choices, the inspiration is more in their devil-may-care attitude. We’ve been shut-ins for too long. Be loud! Be seen! Mix those patterns! Break out that over-the-top belt, those rose-colored therapy glasses, and whatever other impulse buys you’ve made over these past crazy months! (We’ve all done it.) Those items spoke to you for a reason. So, get out there and wear what makes you smile – and what makes you, you. Now, great pate … but I gotta motor if I’m gonna make that party. W

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Yellow cotton BLAZER (part of an upcycled suit), Gottex geometric full SWIMSUIT/BODYSUIT, high-waisted gingham PENCIL SKIRT, gold telephone PIN, black alligator BELT, and Loeffler Randall FLATS, all available at Jess James + Co. Vintage Boutique

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Silk turquoise geometric print BLAZER, purple cotton PENCIL SKIRT, gold box BAG, gold CHAIN BELT, and Delman Spectator MULES, all available at Jess James + Co. Vintage Boutique

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Black-and-white silk floral DOTTED TOP, Valentino red flared SKIRT, J. Crew Collection Spectator red/ tan HEELS, and oversized pearl gold EARRINGS, all available at Jess James + Co. Vintage Boutique

MODELS: Camry Dale, Maura Malloy, and Sariah Blanton (UC Models) HAIR: Claire Svensson for Delphine and James MAKEUP: Meraki Beauty WARDROBE: Jess James + Co. Vintage Boutique

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25 years experience Trained in PA & NY

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CALL (910) 538-5877

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SPONSORS’ CONTENT BROUGHT TO YOU BY ASHLEY HOMESTORE

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ON

BRAND

Drewe and Kate adds Wilmington style by Bridget Callahan

D

REWE SMITH and KATE SUPA’s relationship started the way so many other relationships in Wilmington start: through a wedding.

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Well, a wedding magazine. The two founders of Drewe and Kate Branding Co. connected while Smith was editor-in-chief of Focus on the Coast. The magazine was launching a wedding edition, and Supa, a well-known local wedding photographer, came in to meet with the sales team about buying an ad. “I had been following Kate’s work on Instagram for a while,” says Smith (above, right), “and I loved everything she was doing. I really wanted to meet her, so I actually stole her sales meeting from one of my people.” The next time the magazine needed a staff photographer, Smith hired Supa (above, left). It was an instant friendship. Later, when Supa had a client who needed help conceptualizing a photoshoot, she recommended Smith to style it.

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“Kate called me, and I said, ‘No one is ever gonna pay me to do that. That sounds ludicrous. I don’t even know how much you charge for something like that. That sounds like a made-up job,’” Smith says, laughing. The two found they had amazing work chemistry together, with equally exacting work ethics. Never one to sit on an opportunity, Supa threw out an idea. “The shoot went great, and when I got

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home that night I called Drewe and I said, ‘So what do you think about doing this as a business? I’ve already registered our Instagram handle, it’s DrewandKate,’” and I put her name first so hopefully she would just say yes,” Supa says. It worked. Now, almost four years later, Drewe and Kate Branding Co. is a full-service creative studio, dedicated to helping small businesses elevate their design aesthetic with cohesive brand packaging. Long gone are their days of being “just a photographer” or “just a stylist.” Their services are now packaged to help businesses build a complete look, offering logo design, branded photography, website design, and social media management all done by Supa and Smith (Smith also serves as one of WILMA’s stylists). And, in the era of COVID when foot traffic has become so unreliable, bringing people to you through a polished, effective aesthetic is more important than ever for small businesses. “You want to make sure that what you’re selling matches your aesthetic online,” Smith says. “You don’t want there to ever be a disconnect from someone looking at your social media to when they walk in your store or when they go to your website. So, that’s where we come in.” As Supa points out, people often underestimate what goes into a photoshoot. “What are you wearing? Does your

SEPTEMBER 2020

outfit match your brand? Did you get your hair and makeup professionally done, because that makes a huge difference,” Supa says. “We’re selling a feeling more than anything else. We want people to look at your clothes and see themselves in them; see themselves in that lifestyle. If you’re a local boutique, we’re gonna shoot a lot around town so people can see them in places they recognize.” “There have been so many times that we’ve spent hours discussing whether this location matches their brand pillars,” Smith adds, “It’s a lot of preplanning. For example, we’re shooting someone’s holiday campaign next month, and we’re bringing Christmas trees. We’re not just rolling into someone’s Christmas decorated house. We’re talking color palettes and brand colors, making sure the ornaments match the blue in their logo, making sure their outfit doesn’t clash with the brand color.” From helping clients pick a new business name to coaching social media management strategies, the duo quickly made a reputation for themselves in Wilmington as branding gurus. And, the two women are constantly challenging themselves to offer their clients even more. “Things are always moving and changing, and our business needs to move and change with the times, too. So, if we need to learn something, like website design, we’re going to do it; we’re going to figure it out. That’s just how media works,” Supa says. Approaching their fifth year, even in the uncertainty of 2020, both Smith and Supa are excited about the future. “I definitely think we want to expand – keep doing what we’re doing but find a way to do it on a larger scale,” Smith says. “Getting to watch people’s businesses not just survive but thrive, and how excited that makes me, is not something I anticipated in my life. Those little wins our clients have feel better than anything else.” “I don’t think we’re the kind of people who like to just maintain,” Supa adds. “We can’t wait to grow. We love supporting small businesses, so we wanna keep those kinds of clients, and if we can maybe provide jobs for people in the community in the next few years, that’s even better.” W


5041 New Centre Drive, Suite 115 • Wilmington, NC 28403

Sixth Annual Cape Fear Region

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910-218-0600 • INFO@PATRIOTROOFER.COM • PATRIOTROOFER.COM

October 5-10

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Presented by the UNCW Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship

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2020

MINORITY ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT WEEK

OP M EN

With over 20 programs, from attracting customers post COVID-19 to learning how to become an effective leader, this year’s MED Week offers something for everyone.

TW

Cape Fear Region Minority Enterprise Development (MED) Week recognizes the achievements of local minority entrepreneurs, provides opportunities for networking, and presents workshops to help Virtual grow and strengthen businesses. EVENT SPONSORS Cameron School of Business Daniels and Daniels Construction Co. Gustavo Rodea, Mattress and Furniture Liquidators New Hanover County SBTDC Social Haven UNCW Alumni Association UNCW Business Affairs UNCW Office of the Chancellor UNCW Swain Center

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options for most programs!

REGISTER TODAY! 100 lucky registrants will receive a conference swag package for registering and sharing this event! To learn more, visit WWW.UNCW.EDU/DIVERSITY/MEDWEEK

UNCW is an EEO/AA Institution. Accommodations for disabilities may be requested by calling 910.962.2691 at least three days prior to the event.

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Christy SHIRT in Harvest Moon, Monty SHORTS in Miss Julie, Josephine twist buckle woven BELT, and Lele Sadoughi HEADBAND, all available at Oliver Clothing

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SEASONAL

SWING STYLED & PHOTOGRAPHED BY DREWE AND KATE | INTRO BY NINA BAYS COURNOYER

T

he end of summer is usually punctuated with back-to-school sales, back-to-work sighs, and back-to-the grind routines. But lately, routines have gone out the window, and the most important “back to” on the horizon is getting back to being you. Sure we’ve embraced the daily donning of sweats and non-donning of bras – but, the time has come to put on your grown-up pants (or any pants, for that matter) and dive back into the world. If you’re having trouble visualizing your wardrobe beyond the pajama drawer, here are a few transitional tips. SAY NIGHTY NIGHT. Keeping that light, comfy

feel of your nightgown is easy with a simple sundress. We’re lucky that here, September is still fairly temperate, so all those summer dresses you bought before things turned topsyturvy are all wearable well into the fall season. DENIM REVIVAL. Okay, so it’s not exactly your

fav sweats, but jeans are a close second. Start slow with this season’s flared fits. If you’re feeling adventurous, check out the return of the wide-leg, high-waisted jean in a ’90s-inspired light wash. SHOE IN. Though nothing can beat bare feet,

fall’s footwear trends include some pretty nifty options. Low-heeled loafers are making their mark with fresh takes in slingback styles. Mary Janes and pointed toe flats are also hot to trot. Still not convinced? You’ve got a secret weapon: From silky to fuzzy, slippers have been a key inspiration for this season’s shoe designers. (Just keep the bunny ones at home.)

Lotta Davis MIDI DRESS, The Golden Nectar and The Kelli NECKLACES by Half United, and glassware, all available at Tusc

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Seersucker check TOP, seersucker check SHORTS, fine grommet BELT, Salvadore ST. AGNI SANDALS, all available at Oliver Clothing

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The Marta BLOUSE, original straight JEANS in Comfort Sky, and Cafe Society woven MULES, all available at Tusc

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Brodie MINI DRESS, woven drop hoop EARRINGS, The Mason Necklace by Half United, and Louise HEELS in Cloud, all available at Tusc

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Specializing in dentistry for infants, children, adolescents and children with special needs.

MODEL: Merritt Hunt HAIR: Set Blowout Bar MAKEUP: Danielle Forte

109 Mendenhall Drive, Suite A Wilmington, NC 910.686.1869

WARDROBE: Tusc, Oliver Clothing FLORALS: Mother of Wild LOCATION: Midtown Tudor

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keep it local WILMA’S

SPONSORS’ CONTENT

CASUAL & CUTE GRAPHIC TEES

The perfectly soft and flattering graphic tee is hard to find, but Camillions Boutique has got you covered! Pair your casual tee with a shimmery skirt for an effortlessly dressed up look. Shop in store, online at CamillionsNC.com or pickup curbside at the downtown location at 112 Market Street in the heart of downtown Wilmington.

GUILT FREE SWEETS

HANDI SANI

Stay safe and fight against germs with the new HANDI SANI by SQUEAK (80% alcohol/ WHO/ CDC recommended formulation). Visit their website at GetSqueakyWithUs.com and order online. Free shipping on all orders $75 or more.

SPECIALIZED CARPETING & RUG DESIGN

Unleash your inner desire with Sutton’s Rugs & Carpet’s perfect assortment of natural fibers and textures ranging from sisal, seagrass, jute and wool. They specialize in wall to wall carpeting, staircase installation, area rug fabrication, and more! Add personality and ultra chic sophistication to your home today by visiting Sutton Rugs & Carpets, 3520 South College Road in Wilmington or call (910) 794-8100.

Treat yourself while sticking to your dietary needs with Keto-Friendly and Gluten-Friendly sweets from Sweets and Spirits. They offer breads, cupcakes, cakes, desserts for any occassion, including weddings. Visit their website at sweetsandspirits.com, stop by their storefront at 234 E. Main St., Jefferson, NC or find their treats around town at Old North Coffee Shop, Grinders Cafe and Slainte Irish Pub.

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ECLECTIC HOME GOODS

Find original art, home goods and antiques at Port City Peddler. Their multi-vendor shop offers thousands of eclectic finds for every shopper including locally made items. Visit them at 6213 Market Street. Come inside, pickup curbside or order online at portcitypeddler.com.

SUMMER OASIS

Find light and airy summer style at Desert Rose Boutique. Shop their wide selection of clothes, hats, jewelry and other unique accessories. Visit their storefront open daily from 11-5pm and Sundays 12pm-5pm! at 208 N Front Street, Wilmington, NC 28401 or shop online at bloomindesertrose.com.

SUNFLOWER SEASON

Find art inspired by the season at theArtWorks™. Now open Thursdays through Saturdays 11am-6pm! Featured above is artist Sue Bark. Call us at 910.352.1822, or email inquires to TheArtWorksWilmington@gmail.com or visit theartworks.co.

ORANGE CALCITE

According to spiritual experts in gems and stones - Orange Calcite creates a warm, welcoming atmosphere in your home or office. It is used in gentle love magic; it helps alleviate fear and anger. Mystic Elements is here to help you find what suites your spiritual needs. Visit them at 4403 Park Ave. in Wilmington and be sure to wear a mask to keep everyone safe or visit their website at mysticelements.com.

SPONSORS’ CONTENT

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BY NINA BAYS COURNOYER

SNEAK PEEK

Sneakers, trainers, runners, joggers, kicks. Whatever you call them, they’re having a special moment right now. To some, sports and sneakers are synonymous, but you don’t have to be dribbling a basketball or swinging a racquet to get into this season’s styles. Designs run the gamut from old faithfuls like your hi-top Chucks to extreme overload, making any ’90s club kid swoon. Here are a few of the trends sure to get your feet fab for fall.

THROWBACKS: NOT JUST FOR THURSDAY Reebok Freestyle Hi

Converse Seasonal Color Chuck Taylor All Star in saffron

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Vans, Converse, Reeboks, Adidas, Nike. No matter what your vibe, let’s face it – these kicks never really go out of style. This season’s sneaks are bringing back some of the old-school detailing you’ve been pining for like rounded toes, cloudlike insoles, and even Velcro closures. The palette also appeals to a retro sensibility with hues trending towards burgundy, rust, and ochre. If you’re hardcore about the original dad sneaker, you can’t go wrong with the all-white classic.

MAXED OUT Puma RS-X Unexpected Mixes

Take all of the above, shake briskly, and you’ve got the maximalism-inspired sneaker. While in runner speak, “maximalist” refers to certain high-performance features, we’re talking art-speak: specifically, an aesthetic of excess. With mixed prints and materials, loud colors, and even louder styling, these trainers are definitely not for the timid.


KICKS FOR A CAUSE

If you’re looking to make more than just a fashion statement, there are plenty of brands that support the causes that resonate with you most. TOMS was one of the first shoe brands to promote ethical practices and give-back incentives and has inspired many more. From Cariuma’s eco-friendly shoes made from bamboo and recycled plastic; to vegan, cruelty-free footwear brand Keep; to Sseko Designs that helps Ugandan women get their college degrees, there’s a movement out there worthy of getting behind. There are also plenty of cool collabs to look out for: Adidas has been a front-runner, celebrating a five-year partnership with Parley for the Oceans and transforming plastic ocean waste into sustainable, high-performance footwear. In April, Adidas also teamed up with Girls Are Awesome – a brand platform that aims to create more visibility for women in the arts, sports, and music arenas – creating a capsule collection to promote female role models and featuring the popular Superstar shoe. Adi Are das S Aw upe eso rst me ar G she irls ll-to e

22 xi H2 n Ma a g o H

LÄST S Snake print Leat her Pink C hunky

THE HEIGHT OF FASHION

Lo Arc uis Vu hlig itto n ht

’90s sneakers ain’t got nothing on these babies. The chunky sole revival started a few years back thanks to Balenciaga’s Triple S shoe and has been growing (both in popularity and height) ever since. These tricky outsoles play with funky shapes and contrast colors and are guaranteed to elevate your sneaker game, literally. Need even more lift? The platform sneaker trend takes things One. Step. Beyond. Whatever your footwear preference, always remember the words of Marilyn Monroe: “Give a girl the right shoes, and she can conquer the world.” W

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Keep Alcohol Out of the Hands of Kids. Talk It Up! Lock It Up!

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DIGNITY MEMORIAL

N

GUIDANCE FOR A SURVIVING SPOUSE

avigating the process of executing an estate can be complex. If this task falls on you, it’s likely that you are still grieving from your recent loss and the task of administration seems overwhelming. Managing what needs to be done before, during, and after a death has occurred requires many details to be considered, but it’s a process that can be made easier if you know where to turn for help. One of the most significant sources of help will be a funeral planner. And while funeral planners can help you with an immediate need, pre-planning a funeral makes the process easier and is a better value than paying for services on an immediateneed basis. The professionals at Dignity Memorial are always available to help guide you through pre-planning options and explain the details.Your funeral director will take a burden off you by overseeing the logistics of the funeral

service and memorialization. The team at Dignity is also available to help you with any questions or concerns you might have in the days, weeks, and years following the service. Aside from the immediate needs associated with a funeral, ongoing legal support can be obtained from an estate attorney. While it’s not essential to have a family estate attorney on hand, doing so will make distributing assets simpler for you and will avoid complications associated with navigating unknown legal territory alone. Similarly, a comprehensive support team would also include a Certified Public Accountant (CPA).Your CPA will help file the final tax return for the decedent and, along with the estate attorney, provide guidance on handling any trusts, stocks, or bonds. A task that both the estate attorney and CPA may need your help with is managing recurring bills or subscriptions

maintained by you or your loved one. Make a list of expenses like a mortgage, utilities, insurance, and credit card payments, and be sure that the name of the decedent is removed from the accounts and that they remain current or are canceled. Think about any subscriptions that were in use, but that may not be needed anymore – smartphone applications, online streaming services, printed publications, and gym memberships, for example. These will all need to be considered for cancelation or transfer to a new name. Deleting or memorializing social media accounts should be completed by contacting the specific company directly. Finalizing these accounts, as well as any electronic mail accounts, will likely need to be performed by the Executor or Administrator of the estate, and may require documents such as a death certificate. Ensuring these details are not overlooked will help you avoid any hassle

910.799.1686 | DIGNITYMEMORIAL.COM 40

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associated with identify theft in the future. Dignity Memorial offers resources to help prepare and support families with end of life plans. To receive a free planning guide, call 910-791-4444. Even after attending a funeral service at Dignity Memorial, the care continues with The Compassion Helpline® which offers over the phone counseling services 24 hours a day. Michael Higgins is Sales Manager for Dignity Memorial®, which cares for more than 300,000 families each year through its network of more than 2,000 providers throughout North America. Learn more at www.dignitymemorial. com or call Greenlawn Memorial Park, Oleander Memorial Gardens and Coble Funeral and Cremation Services at Greenlawn Memorial Park, (910) 799-1686.


GIERIE ORTHODONTICS

C

AT-HOME ALIGNERS: SOMETHING TO SMILE ABOUT

lear aligners have been available for over 20 years and the technique has gotten progressively more sophisticated over time. Athome clear aligners like Smile Direct Club allow orthodontic patients more convenience than ever to perfect their smile. Dr. Gierie and his team use both Invisalign and GOCLEAR in-house aligners to customize these products for the specific need of each patient. This offers the best of both worlds: Orthodontist supervised with minimal visits to the office like at-home aligners provide. So, what are at-home clear aligners? Clear aligners have replaced traditional braces in many instances but haven’t taken over completely. Traditional metal braces can be the better option for some cases, but when a patient is a good match for a clear aligner, they are often preferred by patients. The aligners make small adjustments to a patient’s teeth over time to create the desired results. People find them to be easier and less invasive than metal braces and while they need to be worn

over the teeth for most of the day, they are virtually invisible. The process begins with a scan taken at the orthodontist’s office. There are companies that will mail an impression kit to the patient and then mail back aligners but making an appointment with an orthodontist ensures proper evaluation of dental health and the best results. Digital scanners help ensure that the aligners will have the most accuracy and offer the best fit and results. One of the limitations of at-home aligners is that they are used only for minor tooth movement. Patients with complex orthodontic problems will need a customized plan which could include a mix of traditional or clear braces and then a transition to aligners. At-home aligner systems typically don’t offer an inperson doctor examination with x-rays to determine if the patient's gums are healthy. It is critical to know if a patient has enough bone around their teeth before beginning aligner wear for the aligners to work properly without causing harm. Orthodontists screen for issues

like periodontal disease or gum problems which would need to be treated before the patient starts with aligner treatment. If these things aren’t evaluated, patients can suffer bone and tooth loss in some instances. How are the patients then monitored while their aligners? That’s where virtual consultation and virtual monitoring come in. Dr. Gierie uses a special application that allows him to have a remote appointment with his patients. This allows the orthodontist to visually assess the progress a patient is making through the course of their treatment plan. Teledentistry allows orthodontists and patients to work remotely, but still communicate about issues and next steps. The applications used are HIPPA compliant, making sure that privacy is still maintained even though the visit is a remote one. Patients who travel often or move but still want to maintain a relationship with their current orthodontist, go to school across the country, or just don’t have the time to travel to the orthodontist

office are all great candidates for teledentistry. This trend minimizes the number of inperson visits while still allowing for monitoring of a patient’s progress. No matter the type of treatment plan, the team at Gierie Orthdontics is here to give you the smile of your dreams in the most convenient way possible. Give them a call today to set up a remote appointment and discuss how to get started! Dr. William V. Gierie received his dental and orthodontic specialty training from UNC, Chapel Hill, where he is an associate adjunct faculty member and Invisalign instructor in the orthodontic department. Dr. Gierie is Southeastern NC’s first Invisalign Diamond provider and lectures extensively on Invisalign. He maintains a private orthodontic practice in Wilmington, N.C., at 700 Military Cutoff Road, Suite 100. For more information, visit gobraces.net or call 910.256.8590.

GIERIE ORTHODONTICS

910.256.8590 | GOBRACES.NET

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JAMES E. MOORE INSURANCE AGENCY

HURRICANE THOUGHTS:

A

s a Wilmington native, longtime resident of Wrightsville Beach - and an insurance agent - I have experienced and helped countless others contend with hurricanes. Now that the 2020 hurricane season is underway, here are some thoughts I hope you’ll take to heart. The next hurricane will never be exactly like any other. I’ve always said that, but now I also say the next storm will not only be different, but it could be worse than anything we have imagined. The possibility of our next hurricane being a Category 5 is higher than ever. Hurricanes reaching North Carolina lose most of their energy due to cooler waters at this latitude. With global warming, this cushion is disappearing. Experts believe there is enough energy in our ocean to easily support a Category 5 storm.

FROM A PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL PERSPECTIVE

Life before property. In the past, almost all our focus in preparing for hurricane season has been on protection of property. I’m now suggesting we spend as much or more time preparing for our physical safety. Plan to evacuate. Think about how far you might travel and where you will stay. If you have elderly family members or close friends who might need help, consider them too. Remember to plan for your pets, which may necessitate different hotels or friends with whom you’ll shelter.You might also pre-pack and take photos and valuable keepsakes. Arrange with someone in Wilmington to help with your property in your absence. It could be weeks before your return and it would be wise to leave your property key with someone to protect your property. At the least, they’ll be able to let you know the

condition of things. Update your insurance immediately. There could be as much as a 30-day wait before changes to your insurance become effective. Call your insurance agent today to ensure everything is in order. Create a checklist. Sit down now and make a list of everything you think you need to do in advance of a hurricane. Inspect your house. If some things could be patched up or repaired now, doing so could save you a lot of time and money. Create a video inventory. Walk around inside your home with a video camera and create a record of everything you have. Be sure to make audio notes as you’re taking the video. Remember that conditions can change rapidly. Have your plan in place and as you listen

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to the hurricane warnings keep in mind that conditions can change very rapidly. We all hope there won’t be any major storms this year. But in reality, the only thing we can ever control is our own ability to respond in an emergency. Preparedness is truly the key to keeping our loved ones and our property safe and being able to help others in the process. Jim Moore is the president of James E. Moore Insurance Agency. Established in 1954, it has become one of the most trusted independent insurance agencies in North Carolina. The James E. Moore Insurance Agency is a familyowned business and offers homeowners, automobile, life and health, employee benefits, and commercial insurance products.


MARKRAFT CABINETS

R

SPOTLIGHT ON TOP-SELLING BRANDS AND PRODUCTS

Whether you’re planning on staying in your current home for the long-term, just passing through, or are motivated to make improvements to sell, renovating a portion of your living space is inevitable. While dark wood wall paneling, floral wallpaper, shiny gold filigree fixtures, and shades of green and pink carpet might have been stylish in years past, there comes a time when we do away with the old and make room for the new and improved. The team at Markraft has made it their priority to master the process of remodeling and they are always on the cutting edge of new brands and products to introduce to their clients. Homecrest Cabinetry® is known for their stylish, durable, and well-priced products. Prized for their quality cabinets, Homecrest also places great importance on sustainability by using environmentally responsible materials during

their production process. The company offers several appealing cabinet door styles and has recently added two additional styles to meet today’s trends – the Wexford and the Bishop 5-Piece, which include narrow minimalistic lines and precise edges. The transitional style of their new millwork comes in a variety of finishes to compliment any architectural design. Ultracraft® custom cabinets is a full access cabinetry line that carries over 75 door styles, with wood not being the only material option – metal, melamine, and veneer materials are just a few alternatives that can be combined with any of their door styles. In total, the company offers more than 10,000 different door style and finish combinations, which include custom-color painted cabinets. While most companies offer framed cabinets, Ultracraft® cabinets are full access meaning their designs offer greater stability

and storage space. Ultracraft® outperforms the competition by providing 13 inches of depth instead of the standard 12 inches – resulting in 15 percent more storage space. If your design plan consists of easy ways to keep kitchen appliances and items organized, Ultracraft’s accessories are what you are looking for. Pull out spice racks, drawer inserts, and hidden waste basket cabinets are just a few solutions the company offers. Cabinets aren’t the only thing to think about when planning your design. Countertops bear the brunt of being the most heavily used part of the kitchen – and they’re expected to look good while doing it! As if their countertop selection wasn’t already vast, Cambria® has incorporated 14 new natural quartz designs into their repertoire. The designs range from crisp contrasting flecks on neutral backdrops to the subtle rich details of crisscrossed

veins found in natural stone. From Sanibel Shoreline™ to Kentucky Coal™, each quartz countertop design is named after special places found in our beautiful country. Cambria® countertops balance form and fashion within any design all while providing style and functionality to your space. These are only a few of Markraft’s top selling brands and recent product developments. The selection is endless when exploring style and color swatches with one of Markraft’s designers and they’re excited about the opportunity to help you create your own unique design plan. President and General Manager Cee Edwards and his team of talented designers invites you to visit Markraft’s Design Studio, 2705 Castle Creek Lane, just off Castle Hayne Road. Markraft’s professional kitchen and bath designers consult by appointment.

910.793.0202 | MARKAFT.COM

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PATRIOT ROOFING PROPER COMPONENTS OF AN ASPHALT ROOF

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Stephanie Bolton is the owner of Patriot Roofing Company, a female-owned and locally operated roofing company serving the Cape Fear area. With over 20 years of experience serving homeowners, Patriot Roofing Company specializes in residential roofing, siding, gutters, and windows. Visit them online at, PatriotRoofer.com or call 910-218-0600.

ach day, the roof over our home protects us from the elements and allows us to live in a comfortable climate-controlled environment. Our roof is a major component of our home and helps to keep our family safe– but thinking about roof maintenance, replacement, or repair isn’t something homeowners think about each day. The team at Patriot Roofing makes staying informed about roofing materials and advancements part of their daily routine. Because they are constantly keeping up with leading practices and products within the roofing industry, they are equipped to bring their knowledge directly to the clients they serve. While types of roofing materials vary, asphalt is most commonly used when constructing a residential home. Asphalt roofs are versatile, come in a variety of color and designs, and are easy to repair. However, understanding the proper components of an asphalt roof are important to understand before making your next roof selection. Patriot Roofing is an Owens Corning Preferred Contractor which means they offer the, Total Protection Roofing System® and that they follow strict standards and guidelines of reliability and professionalism. The Total Protection Roofing System® offers the gold standard of roofing material quality and construction. The first step in the system is to SEAL your roof. Sealing the roof means to create a water-proof barrier that will prevent any water from making its way through your roof. Wind driven rain

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and collection points where normal amounts of water can accumulate, like vents, chimneys, and skylights, are considered when creating a customized seal for your roof. Not only does a proper seal on your roof effectively block active water leaks, it prevents against rot and mold from accumulating. The second step in the system is to DEFEND your roof. Asphalt shingles make up this next step and are your roof ’s first line of defense when keeping nature and weather outside of your home. Your roof ’s shingles repel water and the strong adhesion that Owens Corning products offer help to avoid shingle loss during high winds. This sturdy layer of resilient shingles works hard to protect your home but can also be customized to coordinate with your existing home design – which means the durability can also look beautiful! The last step in the system is to BREATHE. Yes, you read that right – our homes also need to breathe in order to function properly. Heat and moisture buildup can lead to roof deterioration and mold. When air is allowed to flow through your home’s attic, these issues are greatly reduced. Installing things like, intake and exhaust ventilation let air move through the attic which naturally manages the temperature and moisture of the materials. When planning for a roof repair or replacement, contact the professionals at Patriot Roofing first. They’ll be happy to provide you with a free estimate and their experienced staff can help answer any questions you might have.


YMCA SOUTHEAST NC

YOUTH SPORTS, EXTENDED LEARNING PROGRAMS ACCESSIBLE FOR FAMILIES

T

he school year will be different this year and the YMCA wants to ensure that children and teens have access to opportunities they need to learn, grow, and thrive. Whether it’s a safe, enriching environment to go outside of school, or staying active through youth sports, the Y is committed to enhancing your child's school year. All programs have been adapted with safety at the forefront. We are taking precautions outlined by the CDC and consistently revising and updating our safety guidelines to this evolving situation, so please bear with us if anything should change. Explore and learn more about our programs below: Extended Learning – The YMCA’s Extended Learning Day Camp operates on weekdays from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., for students

participating in virtual learning. We have created a fun, socially distanced environment, where students can complete their virtual learning requirements, participate in sports, arts and crafts, exercise and socialize. Some other possible activities include swimming and visiting YMCA Camp Kirkwood. There are programs available for teacher workdays/holidays, and program sites include First Baptist Church of Leland, Midtown YMCA, Nir Family YMCA, and Ogden YMCA Activity Center. We anticipate these programs will fill up fast, so early registration is recommended. Youth Sports – There are a few modified youth sports options to ensure the safety of children. Our outdoor recreational soccer and flag football programs include a standard league or training session. Standard league

includes one weekly practice and eight games against another team in our league. The fall training session will consist of one weekly session in a small group and no games. The idea is that games present a higher risk than training only. There are a complex set of guidelines pertaining to limiting the spread of the Coronavirus posted on our website; one is that coaches, players, and staff will have their temperature checked at the start of each practice session, at all fields. Additionally, Halo Hoops is anticipating holding a modified winter league. To make all this happen, we are adapting our programs to current safety guidelines. This includes updating training procedures for coaches. One of the first deadlines is September 15, and the final one is November 17. Swim Lessons – Small

group and private swim lessons are available this fall. Swim lessons are available for children and adults 6 months and older. We have modified our swim lesson programs to adhere to state and local policies and guidelines to ensure the safety of our community. We require a parent in the water for all lessons for any child that cannot swim completely independently. The Y has been listening and responding to the needs of our community for 133 years. Though COVID-19 has proven to be a challenge for all of us, the Y remains committed to serving children and families in a safe and socially responsible manner. For information on back to school programs, safety guidelines and commonly asked questions, visit our website www.ymcasenc.org or call 910-251-9622.

336.409.7938 | YMCASENC.ORG

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STRANDED

SURVIVOR

DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES? by BETH A. KLAHRE photo by TERAH WILSON

photo c/o Kasey Meuneir

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tranded 6: Sole Survivor, possibly the ultimate in rucksack endurance events, is gearing up to be the best and toughest event yet. “This is our sixth extreme endurance experience,” says KASEY MEUNIER, event creator and FitMo Spartan certified coach. Different from a series of obstacle courses of varying distance and difficulty like a Spartan Race or a Tough Mudder, Stranded Survivor is a thirty-plus mile, twenty-plus hour challenge for body, mind, and spirit. “It will be grueling,” Meunier says. “Your mind will tell you it’s hard. You’ll want to quit. But, your heart will remind you why you signed up for something so crazy. In the end, it comes down to who’s got the spirit to keep their mind strong enough to keep their body moving.” Participants carry their own backpack with nutrition and hydration. But, that’s

SEPTEMBER 2020

not all. Everyone carries mandatory supplies such as weights, duct tape, trash bags, wooden skewers, blindfolds, and PVC pipe needed to complete physical challenges and mental puzzles based on a socially conscious theme. Past themes included the topics of addiction and homelessness. Participants carried one-pound metal blocks for the first twelve hours. “At first, it’s laughable; it fits in your hand. Soon, it becomes a bother and eventually causes pain,” Meunier says. And then, there was the challenge of lugging sacks of rice. Coach Kasey is teaching lessons. “The weight represents addiction. Carry it regardless of how uncomfortable it is. You can go back to normal life tomorrow. Some people aren’t so lucky.” The rice was delivered to Good Shepherd Center, a homeless shelter, along the route. Participants who make it through the first twelve hours receive a finisher patch. Back by popular demand, this year’s format will also recognize the last one standing. “The prize is a goofy gift like a fire starter or a swag compass. The sillier the prize, the harder people try to win,” Meunier says, adding that this year’s prize is a secret, just like the challenges. Meunier wasn’t always so dedicated. “Seven years ago I was not doing much good with my life. Then, I discovered fitness. I found I could make a business out of coaching and training,” Meunier says. After he participated in an obstacle race in the Vermont mountains, Meunier decided to bring his own endurance event to Wilmington under his logo Outside the Box Endurance. According to Meunier, this year is special. “Because of what’s going on in the world today, this event is really needed to help re-evaluate life and get away from the craziness while forming lifelong bonds with those alongside you,” he says. “There is nothing better than to watch people push beyond what they thought they couldn’t do. Those who doubt themselves the most, step up the most. That’s awesome.” Stranded Survivor is for all ages, physiques, and fitness levels. The event is planned for September 5-6 in and around Wilmington pending any new COVID-19 restrictions. W Info: facebook.com/FitMoOTB


5

TAKE

by SHEA CARVER photo by TERAH WILSON

As protests around Wilmington began to erupt in response to the George Floyd killing in May, New Hanover County commissioners decided to launch a new department and role to address issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion throughout the county. This summer, they announced that LINDA THOMPSON would step up as the county’s first-ever Chief Diversity and Equity Officer. Thompson has worked for the Wilmington Police Department in public relations for twenty-five years and received her bachelor’s in communications and broadcasting, plus her master’s in conflict management and resolution. She has witnessed firsthand numerous advances in social justice since moving to Wilmington thirty-seven years ago to attend UNCW and is ready to face a new challenging chapter in her career. WHAT WILL BE YOUR EARLY FOCUS AS CHIEF DIVERSITY AND EQUITY OFFICER FOR NEW HANOVER COUNTY? “One of my first tasks will be to become familiar with the vision of our county leaders in the area of diversity, inclusion, and equity. Once I have been briefed on that vision and have a clear understanding, I’ll get to work setting my work agenda and the department’s strategy for the remainder of the year.” WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE MAIN CHALLENGE OUR COUNTY GOVERNMENT FACES IN ENSURING IT SERVES ITS PEOPLE OF COLOR AND MARGINALIZED COMMUNITIES MORE EQUITABLY? “Even in this season of high-tech communications, providing adequate communications within minority communities remains a challenge for all government agencies. Finding creative avenues to share vital information for equal distribution of services will be key in our efforts to serve all of our residents.” HOW HAS YOUR JOB IN PUBLIC AFFAIRS FOR THE WILMINGTON POLICE DEPARTMENT, AS WELL AS ANY OTHER OUTREACH AND COMPLETED STUDIES YOU’VE DONE, PREPARED YOU FOR THIS ROLE? “I believe my twenty-five years of service in public affairs, police community relations, and ministry alone have certainly given me the opportunity to meet many people with diverse experiences. Those experiences have allowed me to understand that my view or perception of a situation is not the only one that matters. We must see individuals in their circumstance as human beings and employ compassion and empathy. Only then can we understand the necessity for diversity, inclusion, and equity in our community.” FAITH IS A BIG PART OF YOUR MAKEUP; HOW DOES IT GUIDE YOU THROUGH LIFE, PERSONALLY AND PROFESSIONALLY? “Born the middle daughter of a bishop and missionary, I have never known a time when I didn’t keep God in the forefront of my life’s journey. It is His guidance that keeps me rooted and grounded and able to serve our community.” WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT LIVING IN WILMINGTON? “Our landscape is certainly beautiful, but the people are what keeps me here.” W LINDA THOMPSON’s full profile will appear in an upcoming WILMA Roundup email. To sign up for daily WILMA emails, go to WILMAmag.com.

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THE

STUMP

MONKEY by TIM BASS illustration by MARK WEBER

G

Tim Bass is coordinator of UNCW’s bachelor of fine arts program in creative writing.

Get outdoors, they said. Get into the sunshine. Get fresh air. Who was I to argue with epidemiologists during a pandemic? So, I went outside, all the way to my backyard. The planet was sending a message: I had to do something about that mess. Years ago, I took up a mission to overhaul my entire yard – thinning it out, cutting it back, cleaning it up, giving it something more like planned purpose and less like jungle jumble. The previous owner of my house had a motto: “If it’s worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” He sure overdid it in the yard. A mass of pittosporum reached up the front windows, and a row of unkempt yews shielded one side of the house. The guy plugged all open spaces with haphazard hollies, frost-bitten ferns, and assorted strange plants I can’t find in the botany textbooks. He added a double row of boxwoods dense enough to stop an attack by the Knights Templar. I fought the overgrowth, but by the time I got to the last section of the backyard, I’d run out of energy and space to pile the clippings. I never dealt with a row of Leyland cypress the overdoit-guy had planted to screen out a side street. The trees grew like towers, blocking all signs of human existence. The man sure liked his privacy. Maybe he was a nudist. Hurricane Florence pushed those trees over, and when I finally got home after evacuating, I found that my neighborhood had been overrun by the creatures called Suburban Men With Chainsaws. Stuck at home with hot beer and no cable, they dusted off their Husqvarnas and Homelites, siphoned gas from their generators, and marched into the streets to, as they like to say, “clear brush.”

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Without asking, they cut my cypress trees to ground level. Turns out Suburban Men get their chainsaw thrills from buzzing trunks, not from removing stumps, so they left me with the dirty work. Very dirty. After a struggle, I managed to get rid of all the stumps but one. I left it there until a few weeks ago, when my lawnmower blade hit it. While I’m not one of the Suburban Men With Chainsaws, I am one of the Suburban Men With Lawnmowers (yes, more than one), and when something threatens our mowers, that something has to go. Dressed in work boots, ankle-high sweat socks, and discount gym shorts – the style is called Yard-Chore Chic – I went to battle armed with a shovel and a limb saw. When I stripped away my T-shirt to cool off, I heard curtains snapping closed across the neighborhood. Passing drivers covered their eyes. Dog walkers looked the other way. So did the dogs. “That’s a sight,” I heard someone say. I don’t think it was a compliment. After days of digging, pulling, digging again, pulling again, and digging, digging, digging, I found that the more I monkeyed with the stump, the deeper it seemed to go. Finally, I unearthed enough lateral roots to get the saw in there and cut them away, and I worked the stump free. It was like pulling a wisdom tooth from a Tyrannosaurus rex. I felt pretty proud of myself. I’d joined a new club: Suburban Men Who Triumph Over Stumps. I pulled off my filthy boots and headed back indoors, out of the sunshine, into the recirculated air.


WILMA’S

WOMEN WATCH AWARDS

2020 FINALISTS • WILMA’s annual awards celebrate the women making an impact in their fields. Read more about this year’s finalists in our October issue and keep an eye on our website next month to find out the category winners.

ARTS

EDUCATION

M AU R E E N F E RG U S O N LEWIS

JAI M E C HA DWIC K

Founder, A Brilliant Cause LLC / Founder, Carolina Beach Mural Project

JE NE AN L ACORT E

Para Medical Tattoo Artist, Restorative Tattoos

FID IAS R E Y E S

Director of Arts Engagement, UNCW’s Office of the Arts

JE SSIE RO B E RTS O N

SABR I N A HILL -B L AC K

Principal, D.C. Virgo Preparatory Academy

J E NNI F E R M C B RID E

Artist, Kirah Fine Art

BUSINESS

HEALTH

A L I S ON DUP RA BR I E N

G R AC E C A L DWE L L

LI SA L E AT H

President and Founder, Leath HR Group / WorkTok

DA N I ELLE MA HON Founder, Topsail Steamer

KEL LY S T UA RT

Broker / Realtor, Carolinas Commercial Real Estate Team with Intracoastal Realty Corporation

Director of El Cuerpo, Christ Community Church

KRYS T IN A F U G E

Philanthropist, Volunteer, Entrepreneur and Committee Lead, Pink Ribbon Project at the NHRMC Foundation

L ILY NICOL E

Group Organizer, lowercase leaders

RE B E C C A T RA MM EL Executive Director, Champions for Compassion

SA RA H A RT HU R

Coordinator of the Center for Workforce Development, UNCW CHHS

K I R AH VA N SIC KLE

Engineering Manager, Stability, and Radiological Analysis, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy

E LIZA B E T H CO OPER

TI F FANY E RIC HSE N

HEAT HE R W I L S O N

SH AWN L A MB

Board Chair, DREAMS Center for Arts Education / President, Kingdom Colors Home Education Community

PUBLIC SERVICE

Artist, Frogs and Friends / Student, UNCW

Technical Program Manager, Apiture

L ATOIA B ROWN

Baking and Pastry Arts Program Director, CFCC

Assistant Vice President of Instructional Operations, CFCC

Deputy Director, Cameron Art Museum

NONPROFIT / VOLUNTEER

Founder, The Joy Project

L I NDY F ORD

President, Lindy Ford Nutrition & Wellness

K E R RY L A M B

Administrator for Neurosciences, NHRMC

TR ACY SA IE E D

Coordinator of Volunteers/Gifts Shops/ Community Outreach, Pender Memorial Hospital / NHRMC

E L SI E SHIE LD S

Founder and President, Always Good Company Home Care Inc.

Community Engagement Manager, NHRMC

L ISA B ROWN

Public Health Preparedness Coordinator, New Hanover County

A M I D ’A M B RO S IO

Youth Violence Intervention Specialist, New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office

TA M IE KE E L

Facility Manager, Wilmington International Airport

M A RY RU DYK

Chief of Staff, Geriatrician, NHRMC

RISING STAR JE SSIC A AGU IL A R

Pender County Coordinator, Juntos 4-H

JU LIE A ND RE WS

Marketing Manager, Logan Homes

AU NIKA B ROWN E Executive Director, U.S. International Ballet

A S T RID KE U SS EYA N

Laboratory Manager of Pre-Analytical and Client Services,NHRMC

JORE Y S TA NL EY

Museum Educator, Cape Fear Museum


Family. Family. Friends. Friends. Community. Community. We're We'reall all this together. together. We're allinininthis this together.

hasaalong longtradition traditionofofbeing beingthere. there.That’s That’sone onereason reasonwhy whyI’m I’m State StateFarm Farm®®has ® has a long tradition of being there. That’s one reason why I’m State Farm XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX. proud proudtotosupport supportXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX. ® ® XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX. proud tohelp support Here Heretoto help life lifego go right. right.

Here to help life go right.®

Agent Agent Name, Name, Agent Agent Rob Rens, Agent Street StreetAddress Address Hayne Road 2528 Castle City, City, State, State, Zip ZipNC 28401 Wilmington, Agent Name, Agent Phone Phone MyCapeFearInsurance.com Street Address E-mail E-mail O: 910.599.9398 City, State, Zip C: 910.262.3355

Phone E-mail

1801075

1801075 1801075

State Farm, Bloomington, IL

State StateFarm, Farm,Bloomington, Bloomington,IL IL