WILMA May 2021

Page 1

WILMA

MAY 2021

WILMINGTON’S SUCCESSFUL WOMAN

T H E

HEALTH I S S U E

Full Workup

Tips for mind, body, and soul

Social Connections

The women building 3LW

The Great Outdoors Style in full bloom


WOMEN’S HEALTH STARTS WITH

INTRODUCING OUR NEW WOMEN’S CENTER OF EXCELLENCE

WOMEN'S CENTER OF

EXCELLENCE

For the last 50 years, Wilmington Health has been committed to providing the best care at the best value to the Wilmington area. We’re expanding that care with the new Women’s Center of Excellence. Our team of OB/GYN, Urology, Cardiology, Family Medicine, and Internal Medicine providers are focused on the total health of our patients, offering services to help women achieve optimal health at every stage of life. We are dedicated to excellence in women’s health. Dedicated to TRUE Care. Featuring our region’s only Pelvic Floor and Continence Center, led by the only female fellowship-trained urogynecologist within a 100-mile radius.

WILMINGTON - MIDTOWN 1124 Gallery Park Boulevard Wilmington, NC 28412

MAYFAIRE V 6727 Parker Farm Drive Wilmington, NC 28405

LEARN MORE OR SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT WILMINGTONHEALTH.COM/WOMENS-HEALTH


ISOMETRIC AND HIIT WORKOUTS

910 832 9679 • hotworx.net/wilmington 6756 Gordon Road Suite 150 Wilmington, NC 28411

1

WILMA

MAY 2021


may 2021

27

22

20

8 SPOTLIGHT

46 SCENE: From the fairway

10 TASTE: Coffee charters

47 TAKE 5: Health studies with Amanda Boomershine

12 STYLE: Among the flowers

48 MEN'S ROOM: Self-image reimagined

Check out WILMA magazine here:

2

WILMA

MAY 2021

/WILMAMAG


12 20 W OMEN'S CARE: Bringing together medical services 22 N ETWORK PATHS: Three Ladies in Wilmington up their numbers 27 A LL SIDES: Feed your mind, body, and soul 35 L IFE LEGACY: Paying forward a physician’s reach 38 F IT CAREER: Health and fitness science-related professional options for students WILMAmag.com

How are you staying healthy? Are you on top of it, crushing your goals and crossing the finish lines? Or, are you struggling to fit in all the things you know you should be doing such as moving daily and eating more of the good stuff? Either way, it can be hard. That’s why this month – as many of us lace back up for marathons that have restarted, tackle the quarantine fifteen, head out for a warm-weather walk, or struggle to keep on top of major health issues – we focus on the basics. Keep it simple and start with one step. Routine medical care might have taken a backseat during the pandemic, but providers for women’s services are now under an umbrella for one practice to streamline coordination (page 20). Social connections, whether you’re an introvert or extrovert or in between, are key and can use some dusting off now. Find out what 3LW is doing on that end (page 22). Area experts share their tips to reboot your skills for dealing with work stress, strengthening your muscles, and fueling your body (page 27). Whether your goals are big or small, good luck and cheers to your health. W MAY 2021

WILMA

3


Publisher Rob Kaiser rkaiser@wilmingtonbiz.com

BRIDGET CALLAHAN is a writer from

Cleveland, Ohio. She has been covering the Wilmington scene for over five years, through various publications. While her nationally published work ranges from the joys of hiking to the municipal intricacies of medical marijuana, she particularly appreciates all the amazing women she meets through her WILMA assignments. Callahan talks with the organizers of Three Ladies in Wilmington on page 22.

ARIS HARDING is a Wilmington-based

freelance photographer originally from southern Maryland. With a camera always in hand, she moved to New York City after graduating from UNCW. arisharding.com and @air_harding on Instagram. She photographed dietitian Sonia Kennedy for a feature on taking care of mind and body on page 27 and Shital Patel, wife of the late Dr. Henry Patel on page 35.

MELISSA HEBERT is a Wilmington-based

photographer who has had her work featured in national campaigns and magazines, including WILMA. Hebert studied photography at the Cleveland Institute of Art and specializes in editorial, portrait, and wedding photography. Hebert photographed this month’s cover shoot and garden-inspired style spread on page 12. melissahebertphoto.com

President Robert Preville rpreville@wilmingtonbiz.com Editor Vicky Janowski vjanowski@wilmingtonbiz.com Vice President of Sales Maggi Apel mapel@wilmingtonbiz.com Senior Account Executive Craig Snow csnow@wilmingtonbiz.com Account Executives Courtney Barden cbarden@wilmingtonbiz.com Marian Welsh mwelsh@wilmingtonbiz.com Office & Audience Development Manager Sandy Johnson sjohnson@wilmingtonbiz.com Events/Digital Coordinator Elizabeth Stelzenmuller events@wilmingtonbiz.com Design/Media Coordinator Molly Jacques production@wilmingtonbiz.com Content Marketing Coordinator Morgan Mattox mmattox@wilmingtonbiz.com Contributing Designer Suzi Drake art@wilmingtonbiz.com Digital Editor Johanna Cano jcano@wilmingtonbiz.com

CHERYL L. SERRA is a freelance strategic

communications specialist and writer who lives in Brunswick County. Serra talks with Allison Nye, program director for CFCC’s health and fitness science program, on page 38.

LYNDA VAN KUREN, a transplant from the

D.C. metro area, is a freelance writer and content marketer whose work has appeared in national as well as regional publications. She loves connecting with others, whether through writing, ballet, or training her dogs for agility competitions. She talks to the family of the Henry Patel, a physician who died last year, about their efforts to keep a fund in his name going to extend his good works, on page 35.

4

WILMA

MAY 2021

Fashion Stylists Ashley Duch Grocki & Drewe Smith Contributors Bridget Callahan, Jenny Callison, Nina Bays Cournoyer, Beth A. Klahre, Dylan Patterson, Michelle Saxton, Cheryl L. Serra, Lynda Van Kuren Contributing Photographers Logan Burke, Megan Deitz, Aris Harding, Melissa Hebert, Stephanie Savas Photography, Terah Wilson Founder Joy Allen Subscribe For a one-year subscription, please send $26.00 (check or money order) to: WILMA, 219 Station Rd., Ste. 202, Wilmington, NC 28405, or call 343-8600 x201 www.WILMAmag.com


WILMA’S

LEADERSHIP INITIATIVE FOUNDING SPONSORS

CORPORATE SPONSORS

SUPPORTER SPONSORS Cape Fear Community College

LIV CBD

Cape Fear Habitat for Humanity

Matthews Motors

Cavik Insurance

MegaCorp Logistics

Excite Credit Union

Meadowlark

Fleet Feet Sports Wilmington

Murchison Taylor & Gibson

Frank Institute

Nothing Bundt Cakes

Hedrick, Gardner, Kincheloe & Garofalo LLP

O'Brien Service, Co. Inc

Hope Abounds

Pathfinder Wealth Consulting

Jennifer M. Pan DMD

Patriot Roofing Company

Leggett, PLLC

Premier Staffing Solutions

WILMAmag.com

RSM US LLC Russell Family Law & Litigation Salt Air Heating & Cooling Teaching Horse UNCW CIE The Village at River Landing Waylett Wealth Management Wells Fargo White & Johnson Pediatric Dentistry Wilmington Area Rebuilding Ministry (WARM) MAY 2021

WILMA

5


TUESDAY, MAY 11 • 9-10:30 a.m. VIRTUALLY, via ZOOM

W2W UPDATES WILMA’s Women to Watch Leadership Initiative has updates to share as we continue to work on the effort’s core mission of helping develop more women leaders in our area. Here’s what we’ve been up to with various W2W Leadership Initiative programs and what’s coming up next: GET ON BOARD: In partnership with UNCW’s QENO, we’ll hold the next Get on Board training session 9-10:30 a.m. May 11. The training gives area women information about the roles and responsibilities for serving on boards of directors as well as a chance to answer questions about how to get connected to local boards. The registration deadline is May 7 for the online training from QENO, with a cost of $20. For more info and to register, go to wilmamag.com/women-to-watch/get-on-board. LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE: Orientation kicked off in April for this year’s class at Double Run Farm in Brunswick County. May’s meeting, which focuses on leading through challenging times, takes place outdoors at Cameron Art Museum. Info and announcement of this year’s class: WILMAmag.com/women-to-watch WILMA NETWORK: Members of the WILMA Network, made up of sponsors of the Women to Watch Leadership Initiative, meet on the second Tuesday of each month to welcome new members, catch up, and share goals for the year. GETTING SOCIAL: WILMA’s Women to Watch Leadership Initiative social media pages, where you can find the latest info about leadership program announcements, applications, and updates on women who have been involved with W2W. Follow us at facebook.com/WILMAsWomenToWatch and on Instagram @WILMAsWomentoWatch. IN THE LOOP: Keep up to date with these and other Leadership Initiative programs as well as applications announcement by going to WILMAmag.com or signing up for the WILMA Leadership email at WILMAmag.com/email-newsletter.

- Vicky Janowski, WILMA editor, and Maggi Apel, vice president of sales, Co-directors of the Women to Watch Leadership Initiative W2W@WILMAmag.com

6

WILMA

MAY 2021


The Women to Watch logo: When you see this throughout WILMA’s pages, it means this is a woman on the rise to know, an experienced leader to learn from, or a local program worth checking out. W

20 CENTERING WOMEN’S CARE: Wilmington Health opens center 22 SOCIAL NETWORKS: 3LW bridges connections for local Black professionals

47 TAKE 5: Amanda Boomershine heads up a community needs health survey

MAY

women’s professional groups Besides WILMA’s Women to Watch Leadership Initiative, there are a number of local groups to help women grow professionally. Here is just a sampling of some of them.

Cape Fear CREW Year Founded: 2010 Description: “Cape Fear CREW is the leading organization for commercial real estate in the Cape Fear region in North Carolina … Members represent every aspect of the commercial real estate industry, including, but not limited to, law, leasing, brokerage, property management, finance, acquisitions, and engineering.” Info: capefearcrew.org or info@capefearcrew.org

Cape Fear Women in Tech Year Founded: 2014 Description: “Our vision is to make the Cape Fear Region the No. 1 employer of women in technology careers per capita in the country. We do this by championing opportunities for women in technology, empowering women to strive for these competitive positions, and inspiring women to lead in those roles.” Info: cfwit.com or capefearwomenintech@ gmail.com

WILMAmag.com

Coastal Women Attorneys

The Junior League of Wilmington

(N.C. Association of Women Attorneys) Year Founded: 2013 Description: “CWA was formed to serve women attorneys in Southeastern North Carolina in the Fourth, Fifth and 13th judicial districts, which includes New Hanover, Pender, Brunswick, Columbus, Bladen, Duplin, Onslow, Sampson, and Jones counties. CWA is committed to increasing the participation of women attorneys in the legal profession, protecting the rights of women under the law and promoting, and improving the administration of justice.” Info: ncawa.org/cwa or cwa@ncawa.org

Year Founded: 1952 Description: “The Junior League of Wilmington is a women’s organization designed to empower women and to improve the community through the leadership of women as trained volunteers.” Info: jlwnc.org or info@jlwnc.org

The Inspiration Lab Year Founded: 2015 Description: “The Inspiration Lab was built for working women passionate about personal and professional development. We offer teachings and tools to improve your skills, productivity, creativity, emotional intelligence, and well-being. We also provide opportunities for networking and connection. We represent a variety of backgrounds and careers, but we’re all like-minded in being serious about success, maintaining a manageable work-life balance, and supporting one another’s growth.” Info: theinspirationlab.co

Women’s Impact Network of New Hanover County Year Founded: 2011 Description: “WIN is a collective philanthropy nonprofit that makes yearly grants to nonprofits within the county. The focus of these grants rotates annually among four areas: education, health and wellness, the environment, and arts and culture.” Info: winofnhc.org

YWCA Lower Cape Fear Founded: 1914 Description: “The YWCA Lower Cape Fear is dedicated to eliminating racism, empowering women, and promoting peace, justice, freedom, and dignity for all.” Economic advancement programs focus on educational assistance, job training, and short-term and long-term planning skills. Info: ywca-lowercapefear.org

MAY 2021

WILMA

7


photo of 2017 race c/o Girls on the Run of Coastal Carolina

RUNNING FOR EMPOWERMENT

G

Girls on the Run hosts the EmergeOrtho 5K on May 22. The race is a celebration of the end of the season for Girls on the Run, Heart & Sole, and STRIDE participants. Race proceeds provide financial assistance through scholarships for future Girls on the Run and STRIDE participants. The 5K, at Mayfaire Town Center starting at 7:45 a.m., also has a virtual option that goes from May 21 through May 29. “We never want a girl to not participate in Girls on the Run because of a financial constraint. Girls on the Run is for every girl,” says program director LINDSAY PEIFFER. “It’s so important to teach kids how to lead a healthy lifestyle at a young age but also those important life skills like teamwork, goal setting, hard work, and determination.” - Johanna Cano

8

WILMA

MAY 2021


CHAMBER HIRES BROGDON-PRIMAVERA

The Wilmington Chamber of Commerce will soon welcome LAURA BROGDONPRIMAVERA to its team. Brogdon-Primavera joins the chamber as its new director of programs and initiatives on May 3. She will report directly to chamber president and CEO Natalie English. “As we transition back to hosting inperson events, we believe the chamber’s membership experiences are going to be more valuable than ever before. We’re optimistic that Laura will bring in amazing speakers and develop unique programs that will keep our members talking about our events long after they’re over,” says chamber President and CEO NATALIE ENGLISH. “Laura also shares a passion for small businesses, entrepreneurs, and investing in minority-owned businesses in our community,” Brogdon-Primavera’s job responsibilities include managing all of the chamber’s events and councils and the Leadership Wilmington program, which currently has applications open through June 30. She was most recently manager of programs and operations at the University of North Carolina Wilmington’s Center of Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

W

CCNC APPOINTS NEWMAN TO LEADERSHIP ROLE

Community Care of North Carolina Inc. named LYDIA NEWMAN as executive vice president and chief administrative officer. In the role, Newman provides leadership in government affairs and works closely with the Community Care of North Carolina Inc. (CCNC) and NCCCN boards as the chief administrator and board liaison for the organization. She also advises CCNC President CEO TOM WROTH on strategies to “carry out value-based contracts between the provider network and payers and work collaboratively with CCNC’s internal departments and external stakeholders to assess, define, coordinate, and implement CCNC’s payer strategy,” officials say. Newman already had experience with CCNC. She helped start and led the operations of CCNC’s local network Community Care of Lower Cape Fear for more than twelve years, while also serving on CCNC’s statewide board.

ant more WILMA? Check out our daily emails, which include even more profiles and stories for Wilmington’s successful women. To sign up for the free emails, go to WILMAmag.com

NONPROFIT EARNS NC CHILD'S 2021 AWARD

Soaring As Eagles, a nonprofit focused on closing the achievement gap in Title 1 schools, recently received the NC Child’s 2021 Community Voices Award. The Community Voices Award recognizes advocates in the community who have brought change for children and youth because of their voices and their efforts. “I am thrilled to have the work of Soaring As Eagles acknowledged by NC Child, especially in this year that COVID-19 has expanded the learning gap and shined a light on inequity in our schools,” says KIM CEASER, the group’s founder and executive director. When COVID-19 prompted the shutdown of schools last spring, Soaring As Eagles partnered with LINC (Leading Into New Communities) to start a remote learning lab, providing a safe environment, hot meals, mentors, tutors, and more to help families, officials say. Nominations for the award came from the North Carolina Child Advocacy Network. Soaring As Eagles, which is based at The Harrelson Center in downtown Wilmington, was nominated by another member of the campus – MEBANE BOYD, director of New Hanover County’s Resiliency Task Force. “(This) community-based organization … doesn’t mind getting into the trenches,” Boyd wrote in her nomination. “They aren’t hesitant to go into gang- and drug-infested neighborhoods in service to families and children who need their services. They do all they can to understand each of the children’s unique needs, so they can meet the children where they are.”

Have a suggestion for a local woman or group to spotlight? Email us: wilma@WILMAmag.com WILMAmag.com

MAY 2021

WILMA

9


J

ust a week after celebrating Bitty & Beau’s fifth anniversary earlier this year, MATT DEAN was already thinking ahead to the next five years.

Barista Trevor Jefferson with Bitty & Beau’s co-founders Amy and Ben Wright

COFFEE

TALK

BITTY & BEAU’S SPREADS OUT

by JESSICA MAURER | photo by STEPHANIE SAVAS PHOTOGRAPHY

10

WILMA

MAY 2021

He envisions Bitty & Beau’s having locations in Japan and Hawaii, two locations he’d gladly help establish. Dean, who was among the first employees hired, serves as the company’s director of first impressions and is tasked with setting the bar for customer service among his fellow employees. But, Dean does not think of his co-workers as such; he thinks of them as family. “Bitty & Beau’s feels like a second family to me,” Dean says. “This job has changed my life.” Dean is one of 120 employees with intellectual and developmental disabilities who work for Bitty & Beau’s Coffee’s four corporate locations. Founders AMY and BEN WRIGHT set out not only to provide job opportunities for a community that’s severely underrepresented in the workforce but to change perceptions about their potential. In just five years, they have grown from a 500-square-foot building on Wrightsville Avenue to a 5,000 square-foot headquarters on New Centre Drive, with additional locations in Charleston, Savannah, and Annapolis. With franchise agreements for numerous new locations set to open this year in cities such as Charlotte, Washington, D.C., and Boston, the company expects to double its number of employees by year’s end. “By the time we were six months old, we had gotten so much interest from people wanting to be a part of bringing us to their city that we decided to franchise,” Amy Wright says. “We started to take hundreds of applications, not knowing that we didn’t yet have our systems in place to do so.” She says it wasn’t until the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, when all their stores were closed, that she and Ben had the time to put together a solid franchise plan. Having opened four stores by the start of 2020, and with hundreds of inquiries still pouring in, the Wrights felt confident that


despite the pandemic, they were ready to move forward with this next phase. “There’s this vision, and there’s momentum behind it,” Amy Wright says. “And, we wanted to create more jobs and more places where people can have this transformative experience. Now that our systems are in place, we feel confident that we can teach other people how to do this. We feel very fortunate that during what was a very dark 2020, we were able to use that time to think and to prepare for what we wanted to happen in 2021.” While the Wrights say their model will work anywhere, they’re looking for markets that are destinations – where the shop itself becomes a part of the experience of visiting that city. “This is such a dire epidemic in our country, that these individuals are so underutilized and don’t have the same opportunities as everyone else,” Amy Wright says. “We have a vehicle here for changing that, so our focus is on how we can continue to use the momentum that’s already built up over the past five years to reach more people.” The Wrights handle the vetting process for potential franchisees from start

to finish, having made the decision not to utilize a franchise broker. It’s important to them that they make a personal connection with potential franchisees, even if it must initially be done virtually in light of the pandemic. Amy Wright says people have different reasons for wanting to open their own Bitty & Beau’s. Some have family members with a disability, while others simply want to be a part of the company’s mission. A background in coffee or retail is not essential, as Amy Wright admits, she learned along the way. If the passion and dedication are there, the rest can be learned. AMIE and VIC CENNAMO, of Charlotte, are the parents of an eighteen-year-old son with autism, as well as a fourteen-year-old daughter. They first learned of Bitty & Beau’s through social media and friends within the special needs community. They visited three locations last year, and when Bitty & Beau’s announced in August they would begin franchising, they felt it was perfect timing to open one in their hometown. “As our son approached high-school

age, we worried about his future, especially given the grim facts about employment and those with disabilities,” Amie Cennamo says. “He’s now in his senior year, and we couldn’t think of anything we would be more passionate about because it’s something that our son can be a part of, too.” The Cennamos say they’re excited to be among the first franchisees selected by the Wrights to represent and help grow the brand. “The response we have received from the community has been overwhelming and extremely exciting,” Amie Cennamo says. “We have heard from so many people that had hoped for Bitty & Beau’s to come to Charlotte and want to know how they can be involved or how they can support us. This is how we ultimately help the world see the value of people with disabilities, in the workplace and beyond.”W Editor’s note: This is an updated reprint from WILMA sister publication WilmingtonBiz Magazine’s new issue. To read more and the rest of the issue, go to WilmingtonBizMagazine.com.

Dr. Bodah & Team Love Serving Wilmington Comprehensive Dental Services Flexible Finance Options Modern & High-Tech Facility Extended Hours

Schedule an Appointment for Today or Tomorrow. 910.460.6433 • 2029 Stonecrop Dr. CarolinasDentist.com

WILMAmag.com

MAY 2021

WILMA

11


ST YLED BY DREWE SMITH PHOTOS BY MELISSA HEBERT I N T R O B Y N I N A B AY S C O U R N O Y E R

12

WILMA

MAY 2021

Poplin ruffle BLOUSE and Emilee Anglaise SHORTS, both available from ZIA Boutique; SUNGLASSES (stylist’s own)


Picnic courtesy of Spoonfed Kitchen and Bakeshop

LIFE'S a A

PICNIC

h, the picnic. A triumphant convergence of the great outdoors, tasty nibbles, and good company. Originating in France, these lavish celebrations were mostly reserved for the aristocracy until a little thing called the French Revolution came along, opening royal parks to nonroyal people and making the picnic the most fashionable alfresco way to dine. This newly accessible feast for all senses served as inspiration for many modernist painters of the era, portraying white cloths set upon lush green grass, robust spreads of food and wine, and ladies scattered in various states of repose. Modern-day picnics haven’t changed much in essence. We still welcome a big basket filled with snacks on a sunny day, and no one ever turns down an opportunity to lounge. And, while we may have traded corsets and petticoats for more comfortable attire, we still embrace the flowing fabrics and rich swatches of color that influenced artists like Tissot, Monet, and Manet to create the masterpieces they did. So, get going and plan your own Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe. Though maybe not Manet’s au naturel version, unless that’s more your style. W

WILMAmag.com

MAY 2021

WILMA

13


Mixed-eyelet MAXI DRESS, available from ZIA Boutique

14

WILMA

MAY 2021


Sullivan DRESS, available from ZIA Boutique

WILMAmag.com

MAY 2021

WILMA

15


MODEL: Kenzie Hansley HAIR & MAKEUP: Meraki Beauty FOOD: Spoonfed Kitchen and Bakeshop WARDROBE: ZIA Boutique, 1113 Military Cutoff Road in The Forum

Naney watercolor DRESS, available from ZIA Boutique

LOCATION: Airlie Gardens, 300 Airlie Road

16

WILMA

MAY 2021


Services Brand Photography Logo Creation Social Media Management Website Design

REEDS Jewelers

hello@dreweandkate.com |

@dreweandkate

Drewe and Kate Branding Co. WILMAmag.com

MAY 2021

WILMA

17


SPONSORS’ CONTENT BROUGHT TO YOU BY ASHLEY HOMESTORE

5 1

4

2

6

GET THE LOOK 1 Grasson Lane Outdoor Sofa with Cushion 2 Grasson Lane Outdoor Coffee Table 3 Safavieh Outdoor Lima Chiminea 4 Grasson Lane Outdoor Chaise Lounge with Cushion 5 Outdoor Modern Ridgeway Stool 6 Paradise Trail Outdoor Fire Pit Table

3

18

WILMA

MAY MAY2021 2021


www

AshleyFurniture.com

(910) 769-0258 | 6832 Market Street, Wilmington, NC 28405 (910) 397-0368 | 5309 Carolina Beach Road, Wilmington, NC 28412 WILMAmag.com

MAY 2021

WILMA

19


CENTERING

Women’s Care

by BETH A. KLAHRE photo by TERAH WILSON

20

WILMA

MAY 2021


O

ver 200 physicians will ultimately serve at the new WH Women’s Center of Excellence, providing women’s health services across a variety of disciplines. Wilmington Health opened the center on March 22 at two locations – in Mayfaire and Midtown, with a collaborative approach to women’s health. Packaged under an umbrella are services dedicated to women’s health and catering to adult women at all stages of their lives. These services include primary care, obstetrics, gynecology, radiology, pelvic floor and incontinence care, urogynecology, and cardiology. “We recognized that patients were seeking a women’s health practice that truly packaged all of their health care needs conveniently without having to seek out care at multiple practices across the region,” Wilmington Health spokeswoman DESIRAE HRYNKO says. The major driving forces to the realization of the WH Women’s Center of Excellence were physicians SANDRA HALL and DEBORAH HESS, who were influential leaders in the planning, and Wilmington Health CEO JEFF JAMES, who kickstarted the initiative. Hess (above) is the only female fellowship-trained urogynecologist within a 100-mile radius of Wilmington, according to the practice. Hess, originally from a Boston suburb, and her husband wanted to raise their family in a coastal community and loved Wilmington when they came to interview. “My father was a gynecologist who loved his career caring for women,” she says. “He influenced my career path, and I am grateful to him for doing so.” Hess holds degrees in biochemical engineering from Dartmouth College as well as medical and public health with clinical research degrees from the University of Michigan. She did her urology residency at the Harvard Program and then went on to the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center for additional sub-specialty training in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery. WILMAmag.com

Joining Wilmington Health in 2019, Hess saw larger centers across the country forming multispecialty centers. “Given that one-third of women have some form of pelvic floor dysfunction including prolapse or incontinence, we felt this was an important component of a women’s center,” Hess says. “It is ideal to offer many closely-related services under one roof.” The WH Women’s Center of Excellence is also dedicated to clinical research and will conduct ongoing clinical trials related to women’s health. “Our women’s health division knows how critical it is to consider sex difference in clinical studies,” says Hall, who specializes in obstetrics/gynecology. “We are currently enrolling patients in studies researching new treatments for urinary tract infections, menopausal symptoms, and endometriosis with more in the pipeline.” The advantages of combining all of these medical services under one center are numerous, the physicians say. Easier communication and collaboration

among the health care providers within the practice leads to more efficient results, reporting and diagnoses, and comprehensive treatment plans. But, these benefits inspire a higher purpose. “We value the importance of caring for families. The center provides a place where women patients can truly add comfort and convenience in their daily lives,” Hrynko says. “We offer providers that our patients trust with the highest level of care and compassion.” James says he is already looking toward the future. “Our valued patients will drive our growth,” he says. “Over the next couple of years, we envision an expansion of radiology services and onboarding more expert providers for women’s health services. “We understand that our patients desire the most comprehensive approach to health care,” James adds. “Expansion of services combined with expert providers under this umbrella will support that endeavor.” W

MAY 2021

WILMA

21


22

WILMA

MAY 2021


SOCIAL

by Bridget Callahan photo by Megan Deitz

NETWORKS 3LW bridges connections for local Black professionals

F

or young professionals pursuing career opportunities, moving to a new city where they may know absolutely no one is always difficult. That lack of community can be even harder for Black professionals moving to a city like Wilmington, where opportunities to network and socialize with other professionals haven’t necessarily been targeting their demographic. The founders of 3LW (which stands for Three Ladies in Wilmington) are hoping to fix that by creating casual but meaningful opportunities for Black professionals to find each other and connect, a mission that seems more important than ever as people emerge from the pandemic’s social lockdown. The three ladies of 3LW are founders SHERI SHAW, assistant dean for student success at UNCW; CONSTANCE FOREMAN, a family medicine doctor with NHRMC Physician Group; and CRYSTAL PELLOM, director of diversity and inclusion for Coastal Horizons and founder of MMHP (Minority Mental Health Professionals). As transplants, career professionals, and friends, they’re well aware of how isolating it can be to move for a new job.

WILMAmag.com

The temptation to throw yourself into your work because you simply don’t know anyone else is a slippery slope. “Having 3LW gives people that work-life balance that we all need and desire,” Shaw says. “Now, I’m an extrovert. But, there are lots of introverts, and when they don’t see a community for them, they travel out. They go to their family every weekend, they go to Raleigh, they go to Charlotte, they go down to Charleston and Myrtle Beach. Every weekend they’re going somewhere else. What we wanted from 3LW is we want you to spend your off-time here. You don’t have to outsource your fun.” The group, however, aims to be more than just social events. They want to be a resource for Black professionals moving to the area. Shaw likens it to an extension of the Green Book idea: How do you find a Black church? How do you find a Black doctor? Where are the best places to live? These are all the types of tips a strong social network can help with. “There is a lot of research out there showing congruency in the patient and the provider provides better outcomes and a sense of fulfillment for both patients and provider,” Foreman says. “So, from my perspective, I know that a female patient who goes to a female provider has a better outcome. A Black patient with a Black provider? Better outcome. If you don’t see organizations that are congruent with who you are, it will be challenging to let your guard down and feel a sense of belonging.”

MAY 2021

WILMA

23


Specializing in dentistry for infants, children, adolescents and children with special needs.

109 Mendenhall Drive, Suite A Wilmington, NC 910.686.1869

GrowingGrins.com

MA O

N OW ED N

B

SI N ES

S

W

Now offering a loyalty membership plan

U

306 Dolphin Drive, Suite 2 Jacksonville, NC 910.333.0343

PATRIOTROOFER.COM 910-218-0600 INFO@PATRIOTROOFER.COM 5041 New Centre Drive, Suite 115 Wilmington, NC 28403

“Constance, Sheri, and I recognized the question is how do we retain people of color in this area, and what generally retains people is a sense of community, a sense of connectedness. We were lacking that,” Pellom says. “We know people succeed and excel in their respective roles and their families when they feel connected to their community. We see it as a multi-pronged approach to building stronger professionals but also building strong communities, so we’re not just here and present but here and thriving. “And listen, we just came out from a pandemic and a lot of social and racial unrest in this nation, and we know the best buffer of stress is your natural supports,” Pellom adds. “Right now, people just need to be well. They need an opportunity to not think about the financial ruin or the health issues from the pandemic or just the pandemic in general. We’ve been huddled up in our homes for more than thirteen months, and social distancing created a safe space for the pandemic, but it created a big gap when it comes to connecting to the next person. Some of us need to take our training wheels off, because we haven’t done it in a while, and 3LW is a chance to get back out there and remember why staying connected to other people is important for mental and physical health.” The group had its inaugural events – a speed dating event and a games night – last year right before the pandemic hit and decided to hit the pause button. But now, they’re ready to get back into it. “People are asking for it again,” Shaw says, “And, we know people who have transplanted here during the pandemic who are seeking out and need a community of color. Especially in this time of uncertainty of social unrest, race issues, and health inequities, they are looking for that space.” W

3LW’S “BACK OUTSIDE” DAY PARTY SATURDAY, MAY 22 • 1-3 P.M. END OF DAYS DISTILLERY, 1815 CASTLE STREET • Food and beverages available for purchase • No entry fee, but must be 21 years or older • Registration & info about future events: @three_ladies_in_wilmington on Instagram or linktr.ee/three_ladies_in_wilmington

24

WILMA

MAY 2021


keep it local WILMA’S

SPONSORS’ CONTENT

CBD SKIN CARE

Liv CBD Body Oil controls sebum production (acne), promotes collagen and helps speed up wound healing. Improves complexion, skin tone, and acne. Helps reverse sun damage and reduces appearance of scars. Hydrates skin and helps fight acne. Visit Liv CBD in downtown Wilmington at 320 Castle Street, Wilmington, NC 28401 and consult with a certified CBD specialist, or visit their website at LivCBDnc.com.

DESIGN + CRAFTSMANSHIP

Philip Robertson can find the perfect balance between design and craftsmanship. Robert creates layered wooden artwork requiring mechanical aptitude, a profound design sense, and hours of hand-on work in the woodshop. He continually challenges the relationship between the layers using modern day technology to bring his designs to life. Find works like Robertson’s at The Gallery of Fine Art in Mayfaire Town Center. Schedule an appointment online at GalleryofFineArtNC.com to visit the gallery at 970 Inspiration Dr., Wilmington, NC 28405 in Mayfaire Town Center.

WILMAmag.com SPONSORS’ CONTENT

MIRROR, MIRROR

Featured vendor, Tin & Oak, has a whole wall dedicated to unique mirrors, at Port City Peddler. Their multi-vendor store at 6213 Market Street 7 days a week. They have a large selection of new arrivals, from candles to vintage furniture, decor and more. Visit their website at PortCityPeddler.com or check out their Facebook @PcPeddlers

MAY MAY2021 2021

WILMA WILMA

25


T I M E TO

RESTART

LEADERSHIP

ACCELERATOR

MONDAY MAY 24

REINVEST IN YOURSELF AND YOUR CAREER WITH THE 2021 LEADERSHIP ACCELERATOR, A FULL-DAY ONLINE WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE. Hear from other leaders, get advice for moving ahead, and meet other women in the area with the same goals. The Accelerator is part of WILMA’s overall Women to Watch Leadership Initiative.

SPEAKERS

Stay tuned for announcements on additional speakers

KOBE CAMPBELL LEAD THERAPIST & CEO OF THE HEALING CIRCLE WANDA COLEY VICE PRESIDENT OF STRATEGY FOR UNITEDHEALTHCARE LISA LEATH PRESIDENT OF LEATH HR GROUP & CO-FOUNDER OF WORKTOK PARKER WILSON CEO OF SPARKED CONSULTING

SESSION 1

SESSION 2

KEYNOTE CONVERSATION

SEPI SAIDI | FOUNDER & CEO OF SEPI THE ENGINEER AND BUSINESSWOMAN TALKS ABOUT BUILDING A COMPANY AND STATEWIDE CONNECTIONS FROM THE GROUND UP.

REGISTER @ WILMALEADERSHIP.COM

BY MAY 17 SESSION 3

JUMPING LOOKING POWERING

BACK IN INWARD RE-ENGAGE YOUR GOALS AND MOTIVATE YOUR TEAMS

multiple breakout room sessions

26

WILMA

MAY 2021

FOCUS ON YOUR STATE OF MIND AND NAVIGATE THE PRESSURES OF WORK AND FAMILY

multiple breakout room sessions

UP

HEAR FROM TOP LOCAL LEADERS AND IMPROVE YOUR SKILLS

multiple breakout room sessions


mInD bOdY by

sOuL

Vicky Janowski

T

aking care of yourself isn’t limited to just one area of life. Run a marathon every weekend but sustain yourself solely on junk food, and you’ll quickly peter out – at least for most people. Get the workouts and healthy food in, while ignoring piled-up stress and poor sleep, and you’re out of whack again. Full-body health doesn’t rely on just one approach. Feeding your mind, body, and soul is a constant goal. Few of us get it right every day. That’s why we asked several area experts for tips on how to make it a little bit easier to try.

WILMAmag.com

MAY 2021

WILMA

27


mInD photo by

Megan Deitz

T

INA ABRAHAM, owner and founder of PURMINDFUL (purmindful.com), is a qualified mindfulness teacher, having taken a three-year MBSR Teacher Training Program at the University of Massachusetts Medical School as well as the Mindfulness in Schools Project course at Mindful Schools. She opened PURMINDFUL in 2016, offering mindfulness classes to businesses and schools and coaching to individuals. “We all experience some degree of tension in life, but excessive stress can take a toll on your body and mind,” Abraham says. “Mindfulness is a powerful tool that can help you manage the harmful effects of stress, anxiety, depression, and help you live a more joyful, aware life.”

In working with companies and employees about mindfulness in the workplace, what are some of the top stressors people seem to be dealing with? Abraham: “Top stressors I see often are long hours, lack of control, heavy workload, and tight deadlines. Another that speaks out loud and clear is career ambiguity as it creates uncertainty in their jobs, which creates anxiety and a sense of helplessness. Some of this shows up because we create storylines in our

28

WILMA

MAY 2021

minds about how we are doing or what someone is thinking. Solving this can be done in a couple of ways: First, it is important for the employee to ask themselves if the stories they are telling themselves are true, is it a fact? Ninety percent of the time it’s not a fact, it is our mind creating these narratives. Another way is to have a discussion with your manager or supervisor asking for what you need – which, could be a weekly or monthly conversation letting them know how they are doing, which will help to confirm that their job is secure and what is expected of them. Communication is key in any situation and tends to alleviate fears that are involved in the workplace.”

How have some of those changed or not during the past year of pandemic and remote working for many? Abraham: “Stress is still prevalent during the pandemic, if anything it has increased and taken on a new flavor. Many people are experiencing burnout working from home. This is because their home is not just a place to ‘unwind’ any longer; it also is where they work, … and just to add to it, the experience of depression on top of the fear and anxiety that is typically present when facing stress at work. So, in essence, the mind is trying to take it all in and still be able to complete the workload, which leaves many exhausted mentally and physically.”

What’s the connection between stress reduction and a healthier, happy work environment?


Abraham: “It’s really important for companies to create a healthy workplace culture that’s conducive to creativity and productivity, and this equates to less absenteeism in the workplace and a healthier happier workforce.”

What tips can you share for reducing work stress? Abraham: “For an acute situation, the first thing you should do is recognize that you are experiencing stress and observe yourself without judging, simply noticing what your experience is and what feelings are present – not what you are thinking. (For example,) my mind is racing, my chest feels contracted, my breath is shallow, I am feeling anxious. Focus in on the breath and accept that this is what you are experiencing in this moment and know that it will shift, whether it is in five minutes, thirty minutes, or a couple of days. We get hung up on thinking that when we experience difficult emotions that they will always be here, and this is not the case. So, if you can say to yourself ‘This too shall pass,’ it helps to alleviate some of the anxiety that can be wrapped around stress. If you are living stress day in and day out, it’s important to do some self-care and self-compassion towards yourself, which can look like many things. Here are a few examples: exercise, eating healthy, quiet time, journaling, and meditation. It is incredible how many people do not take time to just to do nothing, just to allow their mind to settle and watch all the thoughts that show up. We need this time to let the pressure valve off. Instead, we pack in all our stressors, what we have to do, what we haven’t done, thinking of the past, the future, and then what will people think of me.

That is a heavy load to carry around every day. So, the idea is, can we just touch into all of those thoughts and allow them and recognize that the majority of them are just causing us more stress? Can we label them as what they are? Just thoughts!” W

Image by PBSNC

A New Work by Artist Stephen Hayes Commemorating the United States Colored Troops November 13, 2021 The South was fighting for the Confederacy. The North was fighting for the Union. The USCT were fighting for their freedom. To learn more and find out how you can be a part of history, visit

USCTPublicSculpture.org

3201 South 17th Street Wilmington, NC 28412 (910) 395-5999

wants you!

BUSINESS CONTACTS COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT WEEKLY SPEAKERS AND SOCIALS Contact Louise McColl at louisemccoll18@gmail.com for more information.

Tina Abraham, who works with people on life coaching and with schools to help introduce mindfulness to kids, also shares tips about managing stress at home and for children and teens. To read those tips, visit this story at wilmamag. com/features/health. WILMAmag.com

MAY 2021

WILMA

29


bOdY AMY STEWART, owner of Back to Basics Personal Training (backtobasics-nc. com), offers up a routine to get cardio and resistance training in one workout. The moves are simple but can be intense if done right. She suggests performing the exercises three times a week, preferably every other day, keeping your heart rate at 6070% of your max heart rate. “Performing these exercises consistently for two to three

CURLS Stand with feet in and shoulder-width position; arms out to the sides, curling from a fully extended arm to your shoulder. Focus = biceps muscles

photos by Terah

Wilson

months will guarantee you a stronger heart and more conditioned muscles that will, in turn, keep your body in a constant burning metabolic state and a lower risk of heart disease and injuries,” Stewart says. “I recommend changing your routine after three months – different exercises – and adding in some long walks for beginners and running 20 miles a week for the advanced,” she adds. “Being consistent will give you the results desired!”

THE MOVES

Do each for 30 seconds for beginners and 1 minute for those who are more advanced. 3 sets of each exercise.

DIPS Beginners: Bend the knees when dipping your rear toward the floor while the hands are placed opposite direction with elbows behind you close to your body. Advanced: Keep legs straight while dipping. Focus= triceps muscles

PUSH-UPS 1. 2.

The classic works your chest muscles to build strength. Beginners: Keep knees on the ground with hands a little bit wider than shoulders; bring your chest toward the ground along with the thighs. Advanced: Keep straight legs shoulder-width apart with the same hand/chest placement.

30

WILMA

MAY 2021

1.

2.


SUMO SQUATS Holding a weight in between a wide, turned-out toes stance, squat as low as your thighs allow you to go to a parallel position to the ground. Focus = thigh muscles – hamstrings, glutes, and quadriceps

2.

1.

WALL SIT Stand with your back against a wall in a low squat with legs parallel to the ground; hands against the wall and shoulders back. Focus= hamstrings & quadriceps

BURPEES 1.

Burpees are performed with a little jump with hands overhead then a low squat with legs extended back into a very low push-up (chest touching the ground) and then back to squat jump position.

2.

3.

WILMAmag.com

WILMA

MAG .COM Need more WILMA? Check out the new WILMAmag.com, sign up for WILMA emails and follow us on social media.

@wilmamag

@wilmamagazine

MAY 2021

@wilmamag

WILMA

31


sOuL

photo by

Aris Harding

endurance for fitness training, Kennedy says. “By achieving an optimal balance of carb, protein, and fat when eating, this will allow for longer digestive time,” she says. “That leads to better energy and less insulin production, which decreases fat storage in the body. Eating the proper combination of foods also helps to achieve better workouts for both endurance and fitness training. “Improved immunity from food selections can mostly be attributed to eating more fruits and vegetables,” Kennedy adds. “The more variety of color, the more antioxidants and disease-fighting vitamins and minerals will be on board to help prevent someone from getting sick.”

TURKEY SAUSAGE PATTIES INGREDIENTS • cooking spray • 1 teaspoon olive oil • 1 small onion, diced • 1 large garlic clove, chopped • black pepper to taste • 1 teaspoon fennel seed • 1 pound 93% lean ground turkey

G

ood food is good for the soul, and the key is balance, says SONIA KENNEDY, who founded Nutrition in Motion in 2010 (nutritioninmotion.com).

“I teach people to balance food choices so they get a healthy and satisfying mix of protein, carbohydrates, and fats,” she says. “I try and teach people to eat until they are comfortably satisfied and not mindlessly stuffed. It is important to help people choose foods that taste good and feel good in their body after they eat them.” Kennedy says that making small changes can turn into habits that will last a lifetime. “Making a major overhaul is too much at once and is generally unrealistic and unsustainable. I stress that it is about progress, not perfection, and the journey to better health is never a straight line,” she says.

BALANCE BENEFITS Learning to balance macronutrients at every meal and snack can help boost energy, improve immunity, burn fat, and build

32

WILMA

MAY 2021

• • • • •

1 tablespoon red wine vinegar 1 tablespoon chopped chives 3/4 teaspoon paprika pinch raw sugar pinch nutmeg

DIRECTIONS Heat a medium, nonstick skillet over medium-low heat and add the oil, onions, and garlic and stir frequently, about 4-5 minutes, until onion is translucent. Lower heat, if needed, to avoid browning too quickly. Once onion is softened, add fennel seed and toss quickly until fragrant and toasted, about 1 minute. Remove mixture to a medium bowl to cool slightly. Add ground turkey, red wine vinegar, chives, paprika, sugar, and nutmeg to bowl with onions, garlic, and fennel seeds and mix with a fork until all ingredients are well distributed. Form mixture into six, even patties and lay on parchment or wax paper while working. If you want to make these for another day, they can be refrigerated or frozen. Spray a nonstick skillet and set over medium-low heat. Once hot, brown turkey patties, in two batches, 3 minutes on each side. Once you have achieved a nice, browned crust on each side, reduce heat to low and cover. Continue cooking until internal temperature reaches 165 degrees. Remove from heat and repeat with second batch.


EATING BETTER WITH BUSY LIFESTYLES All tips from Sonia Kennedy • Slow down. How fast you eat influences how likely you are to gain weight. Studies show faster eaters are 115% more likely to be obese than slow eaters. • Do not shop without a list. Plan ahead and stick to it to cut out impulse buying to keep the junk out of the house to begin with. • Increase your protein intake. Due to its ability to help you feel full longer, it’s the most filling of the macronutrients. Protein also helps retain muscle mass, which helps increase the calories you burn daily. • Replace your favorite “fast-food” restaurant. There are now many healthy fast-food restaurants and fusion kitchens offering delicious and healthy meals. There is likely a great replacement for your favorite pizza or burger joint. • Eat from smaller plates. Eating from smaller dinnerware, you can trick your brain into thinking you are eating more, making yourself less likely to overeat.

GETTING PICKY KIDS TO EAT BETTER • Eat family style. Share a meal together as a family as often as you can. No media distractions like TV or cellphones at mealtime. Use this to model healthy eating. Serve one meal for the whole family and resist the urge to make another meal if your child refuses what you’ve served. This only encourages picky eating. Try and include at least one food your child likes with each meal and continue to provide a balanced meal, whether she eats it or not. • Just because a child refuses a food once, don’t give up. Keep offering new foods and those your child didn’t like before. It can take up to as many as ten or more times tasting a food before a kid’s taste buds accept it.

POINT.

CLICK.

BUY.

In today’s busy world, time is of the essence. Let us save you time at Matthews Motors with our point.click.buy program. If you are going to buy online, buy from people you trust.

matthewsmotorswilmington.com

BEST THINGS TO TRY TO CUT OUT • Foods high in sugar. Avoid most cereals, flavored oatmeal, Pop-Tarts, and other high-sugar breakfast items. Starting the day off with a sugar spike will lead to poor energy and focus and likely cravings for more sugar and processed carbohydrates throughout the day. • Avoid all sugar-sweetened beverages. They contribute a large number of empty calories and can lead to many other diseases. W WILMAmag.com

(910) 294-5885 5723 Market Street Wilmington, NC 28405 DRIVE TODAY, PAY LATER. ASK US ABOUT TAX MAX!

MAY 2021

WILMA

33


Wilmington, NC Wilmington, NC 1437Military Military Cutoff Cutoff Rd, 1437 Rd,Suite Suite104 104 Wilmington, NC 28403 Wilmington, NC 28403 (910) 679-8797

(910) 679-8797 Mon-Fri: 9:00am - 6:00pm Mon-Fri: 9:00am - 6:00pm Sat: 10:00am - 5:00pm Sun: Closed Sat: 10:00am - 5:00pm

Sun: Closed ORDER ONLINE! WE DELIVER! NothingBundtCakes.com ORDER ONLINE! WE DELIVER! 34

WILMA

MAY 2021

NothingBundtCakes.com


Stealth Giving Henry Patel’s family says a fund pays forward the late physician’s generous spirit

T

by Lynda Van Kuren | photo by Aris Harding

his past August, Wilmington lost one of its most beloved physicians, HEMANT “HENRY” PATEL, but his legacy lives

on. To continue Patel’s dedication to education and compassionate patient care, his family established the Dr. Henry Patel Ninja Fund through the New Hanover Regional

WILMAmag.com

Medical Center Foundation. “I know how much love the community had for my husband, and we believe in giving back,” says his wife, SHITAL. “Our family wanted to do something good with his legacy.” Henry Patel was a leading cardiac electrophysiologist (a cardiologist who treats heart rhythm disorders) in the area – so much so that he was known as “the Ninja” for his ability to achieve the impossible in the lab. He held several prominent positions in Wilmington in his career, including

MAY 2021

WILMA

35


clinical cardiac electrophysiologist for Cape Fear Heart Associates; medical director of NHRMC’s Electrophysiology Lab; medical director of NHRMC’s Heart Center; chief of staff at NHRMC; NHRMC Board of Trustees member; and associate professor for the University of North Carolina. He also advanced the profession by serving as a co-investigator in electrophysiology clinical trials, and he authored dozens of scientific journal articles. If Henry Patel was a ninja in the lab, he was a super-ninja to his patients. His desire to know patients on a personal level started when they walked into his office. First, he dispensed with the doctor/patient boundary by asking them to call him Henry. Then, before getting to medical issues, he asked about his patients’ family, their work, and what they liked to do. He believed this information helped him solve his patients’ medical problems, but, equally importantly,

he asked because he genuinely cared, according to Shital Patel. In these discussions, he took all the time that was needed to explain the patient’s condition, what he was going to do, what the patient was going to do, and answer questions. His uplifting words,

“We will get through this, and you will be fine,” relieved fears and bred hope. For so many of his patients, Henry Patel became their friend as well as their trusted doctor. As one former patient said, “Dr. Patel was not only a doctor to me, but a counselor and a comforter.” Henry Patel’s support for his patients often continued long past their surgery and recovery. After his death, patient after patient shared with Shital Patel a time her husband had gone far beyond the call of duty to help them. Along with many other acts of caring and generosity, Henry Patel paid a patient’s mortgage for four months when the patient lost his job after surgery, and he wrote letters for fifteen years to help a patient win a suit for workers compensation. When Henry Patel wasn’t in the lab or with patients, he was teaching, says Shital Patel. In addition to his work with NHRMC’s residents, Henry Patel gave friends and strangers hands-on insights

Meet Dr. Lundgren & Dr. Manisero #PositivelyDifferentDentistry

Comprehensive Dental Services Flexible Finance Options Modern & High-Tech Facility Extended Hours M-F 7am-7pm

Schedule an Appointment for Today or Tomorrow. 910.460.6611 • 208 Porters Neck Rd. CarolinasDentist.com

36

WILMA

MAY 2021


into the medical profession. He regularly sent people who showed the slightest interest in a medical career, including those he met in restaurants or on planes, to his office manager to arrange informational interviews, job shadowing opportunities, mentorship possibilities, or other introductions to the field, according to Shital Patel. “He often told our children that someone believed in him when he was a kid and didn’t have much, so he helps the next person,” she adds. Henry Patel’s colleagues were equally important to him. He often treated the technicians, nurses, and other staff to lunch, anonymously, if possible. And he made everyone, from custodians to surgeons, his friend. Shital Patel and her two children,

WILMAmag.com

DREWV MAGAN and MACY MAGAN, set up the Dr. Henry Patel Ninja Fund in honor of Henry Patel’s unlimited zest and love for life, his family and friends, patients, and

community. They hope that the fund will remind people every day to do more, be more, give more, and live like Henry Patel. The family set an initial goal of $250,000 and a dream goal of $500,000 for the fund, which will be used to: • provide educational assistance to the medical staff at NHRMC’s Heart Center; • provide financial support for those in need; • and establish a waiting room for cardiac electrophysiology patients and their families. Henry Patel’s commitment to cardiology and his patients was legendary. He often said about cardiology, “I live it. It’s my life. It’s my family’s life.” With the Dr. Henry Patel Ninja Fund, his life’s work will continue, and medical professionals, patients, and their families will benefit far into the future. W Info: nhrmc.org/nhrmc-foundation/ hpatel

MAY 2021

WILMA

37


FIT

CAREERS by Cheryl L. Serra photo by Terah Wilson

T

hey asked, and Cape Fear Community College responded. Wilmington-area high school coaches and athletic department staff asked the college if it was interested in developing a health and fitness science program. “That’s what kind of started the conversation, and that’s when we looked into starting a program and considering if it would be a good fit for us,” says program director ALLISON NYE (above). The Health and Fitness Science

38

WILMA

MAY 2021

program offers students a choice of three curriculum tracks – one in which the student received an associate’s degree from CFCC; the other two that offer bachelor’s degrees from the University of North Carolina Wilmington through an articulation agreement that paves the way to transfer CFCC credits to the university portion of the program. Nye, who’s been a physical education instructor at CFCC since 1996, says those completing the program with a group fitness instructor or personal training certification can go right to work. Those who continue their education at UNCW may major in exercise science or healthful living/fitness educations. The program combines lecture and hands-on, application-style curriculum. Classes are currently held at the downtown campus. Starting in the fall, some will also be offered

at Southeast Area Technical High School. The program has two full-time and one part-time faculty but plans are to hire more as the program grows. Nye says opportunities in exercise science-related fields – including personal trainers, fitness directors, exercise and sports nutritionists, exercise psychologists or physiologists – are growing, and the demand might rise as people realize the importance of exercise for preventative care, take a more general interest in their health, or recover from medical conditions. Many of the students have played high school sports, while others enrolled to prepare themselves for career changes. They range in age from seventeen to thirty-seven. The majority, at least for now, are looking to be a personal trainer or earn


group exercise certification. But, some students have other aspirations, such as one current student who wants to be a doctor and another a physical therapist. “We’re a good foundation for both of them,” Nye says. Nye says program staff have learned the importance of advising students early on in the program and ensuring they understand what classes they need to take in which order for each of the three tracks. They also want to be sure highschool counselors have all the information they need to advise students about the program. Program members constantly evaluate what works and what needs improvement, including in the area of student recruitment and retention. Team members have frequent conversations about fitness and equipment trends. They work with local fitness professionals, partnering with valuable and reliable businesses that can provide work-based learning. The team stays up-to-date by monitoring valid and reliable organizations such as the National Academy of Sports Medicine, American College of Sports Medicine, American Council on Exercise, and other resources. They’re also tied closely to UNCW since many of their students will transfer there. The open enrollment program began last fall with its first cohort of students, who will cycle through five semesters. COVID-19 restrictions meant staff and students needed to wear masks and remain socially distant, and class sizes were reduced. There are about fifteen students in the program. “But overall, we still kept the integrity of the program by having the students show up in-person,” she says. “That was important to us … that we still kept contact with them face-toface. With it being the first time seeing these students and the first time we had started this program; it was really critical for us to still see them and still make sure we made that connection.”

Dental Implant Innovations That Will Make You Smile. Whether creating new dental implants or restoring older ones, COFSC is on the leading edge of this procedure. Our intraoral scanner and 3D printer replace traditional impressions, creating a much more accurate and completely customized result. Dental implants are a good replacement for natural teeth and more comfortable than dentures.

Many insurance plans are accepted, so visit carolina-surgery.com, or call 910.762.2618 to learn more. Mark E. Bufalini, DMD, MD Michael S. Booth, DDS

Wilmington, Jacksonville & Whiteville www.carolina-surgery.com

218152 cofsc implant ad-wilma.indd 1

6/5/18 3:39 PM

W WILMAmag.com

MAY 2021

WILMA

39


DIGNITY MEMORIAL

I

NEW CREMATION GARDEN NOW COMPLETE

t is a pleasure to announce the new cremation garden at Oleander Memorial Gardens is finally complete, as the finished product is the result of many long hours of effort, time, and planning. Located at the end of Greenville Sound Road, the new section of the gardens includes approximately 2,089 square feet and 96 new cremation spaces. With extensive, professional landscaping, the new section has a peaceful atmosphere. Cooling breezes and the familiar smell of the ocean waft in from Bradley Creek, located nearby. This creates the perfect environment for contemplating the life of a loved one; a setting in which favorite memories can easily flow into the consciousness. Tucked away in a quiet neighborhood behind the New Hanover County Arboretum, the gardens can sometimes feel as if they are located far outside of town. In actuality, however, the gardens are in

a convenient location that is easily accessible from almost every neighborhood in Wilmington. This will likely make it a popular choice for those who are focused on pre-planning their funeral arrangements. Of course, pre-planning funeral arrangements or a celebration of life might not be a favorite thing to do for anyone. The importance of pre-planning cannot be understated, however. Pre-planning funeral arrangements is an effective way to ensure your final wishes will be met, and there is no need for an immediate payment. Basically, it is just a means of ensuring your loved ones have a clear understanding of your wishes and preferences. This is not to downplay the fact that pre-funding a funeral is a good idea. Aside from ensuring that your family will not have to face the

simultaneous burden of grief and financial costs, funding arrangements now creates an opportunity to lock in current prices, which may rise in the future. Those who are unsure of whether they will stay in Wilmington have no need to worry about losing their prebudgeted funds, because with Dignity, the plan moves with you if you move over 75 miles away, to one of the more than 2,000 locations in our network. A discussion of pre-planning and the new cremation gardens is incomplete without a mention of the advantage of cremation. With a cremation, a funeral service could be planned weeks or even months after a loved one has passed away. Compared to a traditional burial, cremation offers a high degree of flexibility. In addition to avoiding the rush and stress of planning for a funeral in a short amount of time, this aspect of a cremation can allow for ample time for organization.

910.799.1686 | DIGNITYMEMORIAL.COM 40

WILMA

MAY MAY2021 2021

Our focus at Coble Funeral and Cremation Services at Greenlawn Memorial Park is to help you decide which service is the perfect fit for your individual preferences. One of the most important things is that, with advanced planning, everything can be completely up to you. To speak with someone about a cremation ceremony or celebration of life, call 910-799-1686 or visit www.dignitymemorial.com. Michael Higgins is Sales Manager for Dignity Memorial®, which cares for more than 300,000 families each year through its network of more than 2,000 providers throughout North America. Learn more at www. dignitymemorial.com or call Greenlawn Memorial Park, Oleander Memorial Gardens and Coble Funeral and Cremation Services at Greenlawn Memorial Park, 910.799.1686.


JAMES E. MOORE GAINING PEACE OF MIND IN TURBULENT TIMES

S

evere weather, political and social turmoil, unemployment, a global pandemic…this past year has been a challenge. One thing is for sure, all the time spent at home and out of our usual routines has helped us distinguish “wants” from “needs.” Understanding what’s really important in life — like good health and the welfare of loved ones — brings clarity and empowers us to set goals to achieve a satisfying life. Add to that the right insurance coverage and you will also have peace of mind while pursuing those goals. Are you downsizing to a smaller home, purchasing a new car or perhaps need new glasses? Do you need help paying medical bills or want to offset the cost of assisted living? Are you starting or expanding a business? Whatever your goals, James E. Moore Insurance Agency, Inc. can streamline the process of finding the right personal or business insurance to care for yourself, your family, and even your business.

Make an appointment to talk with us. Share your goals and concerns and we will identify what will meet your specific needs. We take time to answer your questions without all the jargon because we want to get it right for you. Working together, we’ll help you choose the best coverage within your budget. The last thing you need is to overpay to be underinsured! Our agency represents toprated national and regional carriers, including those that offer wind and hail coverage on their homeowner’s policy. In addition, we are one of the largest coastal agents for flood insurance. As this year unfolds, and we all create the “new normal” for our lives, think how relieved you’ll be to know you have the right insurance products in place. Think how good you’ll feel knowing you can deal with life’s stresses — and have the resilience to bounce back from adversity. We at James E. Moore Insurance Agency believe that is truly peace of mind. And you deserve to have it.

Adrienne Moore is CEO and 3rd generation owner of James E. Moore Insurance Agency, Inc. Established in 1954, it has become one of the most trusted independent insurance agencies in North Carolina. It is a family-owned business offering homeowners, automobile, life and health, employee benefits, and commercial insurance products. For more information, call 910.256.5333 or visit the agency’s website at www.JamesEMoore.com.

910.256.5333 | J AMES EM OORE .COM

WILMAmag.com

MAY 2021 2021 MAY

WILMA WILMA

41


MARKRAFT CABINETS

IMPROVING RESALE VALUE WITH THESE EASY RENOVATIONS

B

etween the busy real estate market and many of us still using our homes heavily for work, school, and everything in between, home renovation activity is steadily on the rise. But which improvements will increase your home’s value? Consider placing your focus on the kitchen and bathrooms when planning your next renovation. You’ll receive the most bang for your buck by focusing on a kitchen renovation. Chances are that if you haven’t recently renovated your kitchen, you’d like to. Whether it’s a minor or major kitchen remodel, creating a design plan depends on what should be upgraded in your kitchen to reflect today’s current style and the need for functionality. Also consider arranging your new kitchen cabinets to provide

more storage and floor space. Choosing a granite or quartz countertop is considered the supreme choice for a kitchen because the material is long lasting and stain resistant. Adding a complementary backsplash and hardware to your new cabinets are the finishing touches that will bring your entire renovation together. The next most important room to keep updated is the bathroom. When presented with an updated bathroom or an outdated one, potential home buyers will almost certainly choose the home with the renovated bathroom. Investing in bathroom cabinetry that is durable, updated, and offers ample storage space is a wise investment that will maximize your return. Because bathroom countertops don’t have the heavy usage that

kitchen countertops do, a marble countertop is a good choice. Incorporating the beauty of marble into your home is a timeless design choice and will give your bathroom the upgraded feeling that you’re seeking to achieve with a renovation. Most older homes were built with only one bathroom. If this is your situation, and your home has two bedrooms or more, adding an additional bathroom is something to consider. Potential homebuyers looking for homes with two or more bedrooms will expect more than one functional bathroom, which makes a bathroom remodel or addition an investment you will almost entirely recuperate if you decide to sell. A bathroom addition lends the flexibility to your design plan to create a

910.793.0202 | MARKRAFT.COM 42

WILMA

MAY MAY2021 2021

space entirely from scratch that fits your needs and flows with the rest of your home’s layout. Whether you are planning to sell or just want to renovate your existing space to fit your changing lifestyle, investing in your kitchen and bathrooms is the best place to start. The team at Markraft is excited to have the opportunity to work with you and start creating a design plan that best fits your needs. President and General Manager Cee Edwards and his team of talented designers invites you to visit Markraft’s Design Studio, 2705 Castle Creek Lane, just off Castle Hayne Road. Markraft’s professional kitchen and bath designers consult by appointment.


MINDPATH CARE CENTERS

6752 Parker Farm Drive, Ste 100, Wilmington, NC 28405

NOW SERVING WILMINGTON’S MENTAL HEALTH NEEDS

O

n top of everything in normal life, the past year has been hard on many people in a variety of ways. Folks have been experiencing a range of emotions including fear, confusion, anger, and anxiety. Not to mention that isolation due to the restrictions in place can and has led to distressing feelings of loneliness and depression for many adults and children. There is no longer such a stigma around seeking help in navigating life’s challenges when they arise. MindPath Care Centers treats thousands of people each year in North Carolina and is now centrally located in Wilmington –convenient to patients near Wrightsville Beach, UNCW, Mayfaire, Downtown Wilmington, and beyond. New patients may be

seen in-office, or via a HIPAAcompliant telehealth platform. At MindPath Care Centers, we understand that we all encounter challenges that can impact our mental health and well-being, especially in times like these. We have been committed to providing the most comprehensive mental and behavioral healthcare organization in the state for the past 25 years. Our aspiration is to reduce the stigma associated with, mental health and to provide quality access to mind care to all people in need – we believe that “Healthcare Begins with Mindcare™.” We accept several major of insurance plans and our offerings at this office include services like psychotherapy, counseling, addiction recovery, psychiatric evaluations,

medication management, and so much more. We also treat a wide range of conditions at our Wilmington office, including: •ADHD •Anxiety •Bipolar •Depression •Eating Disorders •Drug and Alcohol Use Disorders •And More We are proud to support the Wilmington community. If you or your loved one struggle with emotional, behavioral, relationship, or psychological difficulties, the specialist staff at MindPath Care Centers are here and ready to help. Find the answers to all of your questions and schedule your first appointment by visiting our website at mindpathcare. com or calling our Wilmington office at 910-444-3614.

Our Wilmington Providers: Stephen Katz, MD, psychiatrist, is most passionate about doing a good job for his patients and being respectful of them. He aggressively pursues positive outcomes. Tanya Bush, PMHNP, psychiatric nurse practitioner, is interested in the relationship between mind and body, and has experience working with patients of all ages. Laura Young, LCSW, psychotherapist, strives for a patient to learn to be their own therapist, through integrating meaningful skills and patterns into their lifestyle.

910.444.3614 | MINDPATHCARE.COM

WILMAmag.com

MAY 2021 2021 MAY

WILMA WILMA

43


MCKEE HOMES

MCKEE HOMES BRINGS NEW COMMUNITIES AND MORE TO THE COAST New 2020 Collection

The Espree Collection

New Coastal Communities

McKee Homes is excited to announce the release of the new 2020 Floorplan Collection. The collection includes the most popular home plans with improvements and updates today’s homebuyers want to see. During 2020, recommendations and feedback from buyers, Realtors, construction, and sales were examined to continuously improve upon McKee Homes floorplans, thus designating them the 2020 Floorplans. The leadership team at McKee Homes worked feverishly to incorporate feedback not only regarding look and flow of spaces, but also increased opportunities to offer upgraded lighting options and current new home trends that buyers are looking for. This process has allowed McKee Homes to give customers more of what they want without the extra cost of features and options they don’t need.

The McKee Homes Espree Collection brings affordability to Wilmington. This new series of homes offers intelligently designed floorplans with open concepts and versatile layouts that are perfect for entertaining. Starting in the mid $200’s, the Espree floorplans range from 1,512 to 2,186 square feet, offer 3-4 bedrooms with 2.5 baths and 1 or 2 car garages. Each Espree floorplan has different front elevations to choose from and a large selection of exterior color options. The personalization of each home continues in the McKee Homes Leland design studio where buyers can choose interior details and finishes. This brand-new collection of cost-effective single-family homes are currently available in the coastal community of New South Bridge, nestled just outside of Wilmington in Bolivia, NC.

McKee Homes continues to invest in the North Carolina coastal region. Current Wilmington area neighborhoods include Bellaport and two active adult communities: The Courtyards at Scotts Hill Village and Mallory Retreat. Additional new communities now open include Seaside Bay and New South Bridge. Seaside Bay, located in Supply, NC, is a beautiful wooded, gated new home community with direct access to the Lockwood Folly River from the community boat launch. This is a family-friendly community with outdoor living in mind including a community fire pit, gas grill, and gazebo. New South Bridge is a family-friendly new home community just off NC 211 on Old Lennon Rd SE in Bolivia, NC. This amenity-rich community includes a pool with a state-of-the-art clubhouse, boat storage area, scenic walking trails, and a 9-hole golf course!

910.475.7100 | MCKEEHOMESNC.COM 44

WILMA

MAY MAY2021 2021

Two more communities, Colbert Place & Woodlands at Echo Farms are scheduled to open later this year and are currently registering VIPs on the website. McKee Homes is proud to build communities in the NC coastal region and looks forward to building Life Changing Moments for coastal homebuyers. Jennifer Bynum is the Marketing Manager for McKee Homes. Jennifer has a passion for marketing and has been in real estate for more than a decade. After earning her business degree from ECU, Jennifer worked for two of the country's top national homebuilders as a Marketing Manager in Raleigh. Jennifer spent the last 5 years as a VP of Marketing for a land development company, working on master planned communities across the country.


TEACHINGHORSE

H

WE ARE IN THIS TOGETHER

i. My name is Beth Hyjek, I am one of the co-founders of TeachingHorse, LLC. TeachingHorse is a leadership development company that offers virtual and in-person experiences with horses. Our approach to leadership development is inspired by how horses lead their herds. The draw that often brings people to TeachingHorse is discovering how horses share leadership and collaborate to move through uncertainty. However, they are often surprised to learn that gender roles are a social construct that do not exist the same way outside of human culture. All the horses contribute to the health, harmony, and unity of the herd. Equality is not an issue. There is no preassigned narrative or expectation to what role a horse will play. What horses do so exquisitely is take on the role that is in the best interest

of the whole herd in the present moment. One of my fondest memories of watching horses share leadership is when we started the weaning process between our mare, Yani, and her foal, Grace. We had only two other herd members at that time, Harley, Yani's "main squeeze" and Rocky, the loveable but cantankerous "grandpa" of the herd. When you wean a foal from its mother, they must be in separate locations. We knew that Yani would be best served during this process to be with Harley. However, we didn't expect how beautifully Rocky would step into his role as the primary caregiver of Grace. Through our "human lens" including the biases of gender, we had doubts of how Rocky would respond to this new role. Rocky never balked at the request, no muttering under his breath that this is "women's work," no bruised ego...Rocky

stepped right in and took Grace under his "wing" and started teaching her how to be a part of a herd. Interestingly, what was equally fascinating was the "conversation" between Yani and Rocky when they all came back together as a herd. Yani charged into the pasture to reassert herself as Grace's mom, and Rocky placed himself in between Grace and Yani as if to say, "Now, hold up, this is my baby too.” Over a few days, Yani and Rocky worked out how they would individually and collectively contribute to Grace's nurturing and harmony was restored. Horses do not cling to "titles" or "expertise" or even the "plot of land" they are standing on; to do so would be a waste of the herd's energy and would comprise their well-being. The willingness to go to where you are needed makes a herd agile, adaptable,

and resilient. We, as a human species, are searching for ways to find agility, adaptability, and resilience in the new normal. The wisdom we need is here and horses are the perfect teachers. Beth Hyjek is the Co-Founder and COO of TeachingHorse, LLC. Beth’s background is in writing for the stage and screen. She holds an MFA from St. Mary’s College of California and a BFA from New York University, Tisch School of the Arts. Beth believes that stories are a powerful way to connect our past thinking and present reality in a way that can transform our future. So, whether it’s with horses, in a virtual environment, or 1-1, Beth creates a space for curiosity and learning to explore how stories influence the way we lead in every area of our lives.

919.333.9961 | TEACHINGHORSE.COM

WILMAmag.com

MAY MAY 2021 2021

WILMA WILMA

45


PAR FOR COURSE

LPGA AMATEURS CHAPTER REMAINS ACTIVE

by MICHELLE SAXTON photo by LOGAN BURKE

46

WILMA

MAY 2021

O

ther than putt-putt, JANE MCGANN first picked up a golf club at age forty-five. She took lessons, played at par-3 courses and driving ranges, and eventually competed in some national events. “I can’t tell you how proud I was of myself, that I kept my head down and I concentrated,” McGann says. “I didn’t win at nationals, but I didn’t embarrass myself either. “There’s nothing embarrassing about having a bad day on the golf course,” she adds, “But, it sure is thrilling when you have a good day on the golf course.” McGann, now sixty-nine, is communications chair for the LPGA Amateurs Cape Fear/Wilmington chapter. Formed in 2005

as part of the national LPGA Amateur Golf Association, the group promotes women playing golf. The local chapter includes nearly eighty women. The local chapter schedules a mix of fun and competitive golf events throughout the year, mainly from April through September. “Since we have such great weather in North Carolina and we have so many wonderful courses near us, we don’t really put our sticks up in the winter,” says MEGHAN KOBELT, the local chapter’s president. Competitive events may be flighted, or grouped by similar golf handicaps among players, Kobelt says. The local chapter recently held a Spring Kick Off event in April at Rivers Edge Golf Club in Shallotte. The group also sponsors the 2021 Women’s City Amateur Golf Tournament, scheduled for May 8 at the Wilmington Municipal Golf Course. “We want to see more women compete,” McGann says. Chapter league events include travel weekend play, competitive match play, Thursday night “Nine and Dine” gatherings, and Girls Weekend trips. The Cape Fear/Wilmington chapter also provides educational outreach through seminars on golf handicaps and rules, as well as pro instructor-led clinics on short game, full swing, putting, and when to use certain golf clubs. Networking is a benefit, McGann adds. “You might have a business that you want to attract sports-minded women to,” McGann says. “By getting out there with other women, it’s a great opportunity to meet them and get some business or learn something.” McGann credits the group with helping her during a battle with breast cancer about ten years ago and also with the loss of her husband, Jack, who died in November. “The group has meant a lot to me, both as far as golf and socially, but also for emotional support. They’ve been wonderful,” McGann says. “It’s almost like a sisterhood, rather than just a golf group.” Members must be at least eighteen. Annual dues are about $120 – with discounts for seniors, young professionals, and the military – and are prorated by quarter. More information can be found at chapters.lpgaamateurs.com/chapter/NCCF or by emailing lpgaamateurswilmingtonnc@yahoo.com. W


5

TAKE

by JENNY CALLISON photo by TERAH WILSON

AMANDA BOOMERSHINE, a professor of Spanish at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, is the primary investigator in a Community Health Needs Survey currently underway in the greater Wilmington area. The three major partners in this effort – the YWCA of the Lower Cape Fear, the UNCW Latino Alliance, and the New Hanover County NAACP – hope this anonymous, online survey will help identify community and medical system-related barriers that prevent people in the region from achieving their full health potential and will explore CDC-defined social determinants of health, which have to do with conditions where people live, work, and play. Survey info at tinyurl.com/HealthILM. HOW DID YOU BECOME INVOLVED? “I’m the co-leader of UNCW’s Latino Alliance and president of the local chapter of the United Nations Association. The community I most work with is the Latinx community. In the 2010 census, Hispanics represented 6% of the population; we’re estimating that has risen to 10% if not more. We’re seeing more Hispanic children in the schools. Health care needs are great, and they face barriers to receiving it, including those of language and culture. Work hours are also a challenge for them getting access to medical care.” WHOM IS THE SURVEY INTENDED FOR? “Our hope is that everyone living in Southeast North Carolina will have the opportunity to fill out the survey, and we are hoping to tap into populations that have been historically marginalized. We definitely want people to take the survey and want them to know that the results will matter. We genuinely want to know what their barriers are; what their challenges are, and what we need to do (to connect them with services). Some members of our team are employees of the hospital. Our hope is that anyone who provides care in the community would be willing to look at the data.” IF YOU HOPE THAT PEOPLE WHO HAVE POOR ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE WILL TAKE THE SURVEY, MIGHT THEY ALSO HAVE TROUBLE GETTING ACCESS TO A COMPUTER TO TAKE THE SURVEY? “Yes. We are trying to reach them through community networking, nonprofits that serve them, stores in their neighborhoods, community facilities, and health clinics. The survey will be distributed throughout the sixcounty area primarily served by New Hanover Regional Medical Center.” WHY CONDUCT THE SURVEY NOW? “The pandemic is really helping everyone to see the incredible impact that lack of access to affordable and culturally appropriate health care has on our community, especially our neighbors of color. Our hope is that this survey will allow everyone in the community to share what has been a challenge or barrier for their family when trying to access health care, be it preventive care or treatment for an illness.” WHAT IS THE SURVEY PERIOD? “The survey period started in January, and it will stay open through 2021. We have had some responses. Stephanie Smith (a registered nurse and faculty member in UNCW’s College of Health and Human Services) is handling the data.” W AMANDA BOOMERSHINE’s full profile will appear in an upcoming WILMA Roundup email. To sign up for daily WILMA emails, go to WILMAmag.com.

WILMAmag.com

MAY 2021

WILMA

47


BODY

EUPHORIA

SYNDROME by DYLAN PATTERSON illustration by MARK WEBER Dylan Patterson is a writer and filmmaker who teaches English at Cape Fear Community College.

I

It reflects poorly on our society that so many women suffer from body dysmorphia: The body they see in the mirror is less attractive than the body they actually inhabit. And, while some men suffer similarly, most of the men I know (myself included) exhibit symptoms of a condition I’ve dubbed “body euphoria syndrome.” For these men, the body they see in the mirror is vastly superior to the one they, in fact, possess. These days, we may be tempted to applaud such an attitude in the name of body positivity and all, but Google up “health risks of beer bellies on middle-aged men,” and the drawbacks of this kind of magical thinking start to become clear. Plus, for the women who live with these body euphoric men (“euphorons”), this condition can be downright annoying. Case in point: That guy in his late thirties who only dates women at least a decade his junior (always with rock-hard abs) is the same schmuck who, garbed only in faded boxer briefs with an overtaxed elastic waistband, parades his portly corpus through the living room with all the delusional self-satisfaction of a toddler scrawling crude figures on the wall and expecting praise from mommy. And, how about those otherwise skinny men with globular bellies who always pull up their shirts, smack their distended gut skin, and exclaim, “All muscle!” Then taunt you into poking it, so you can “see how hard it is.”

48

WILMA

MAY 2021

The “dad bod” trend a few years back didn’t help matters. Neither did middle-aged actors with dumpy physiques doing nude scenes. Don’t Will Ferrell and Jack Black seem just a little too eager to disrobe? There’s something that smacks of male privilege here. An obnoxious variety of not-so-passive aggression: “See how shameless I can be? How easily I’ve transcended caring? How enthusiastically unfazed I am as I flaunt my man boobs? Those aren’t love handles, they’re hip muscles!” Of course, men aren’t confronted with images of perfect male bodies at every turn. Perhaps if my fellow euphorons and I were confronted by ridiculously fit, half-nude young men on billboards every day of our lives, we’d be less selfsatisfied in our rotundity. I’m not saying my fellow euphorons and I (or anyone, for that matter) should be ashamed of our bodies. Not at all. But, I also don’t think our delusion deserves a round of applause. Do we celebrate the spendthrift who overestimates his checking account balance? Congratulate the slacker expecting a promotion? Applaud the guy who thinks he’s dad of the year because he changed one diaper? I’m also not making an argument that it’s vital for men (or anyone) to have perfect bodies. I guess my point is this: If you have a lens that skews hot and fit, be sure not to change lenses once you’re done looking in the mirror. Spread that magical thinking around.



NORTH SEPT. 23 WATERFRONT PARK DOWNTOWN WILMINGTON

REGISTER NOW @

WILMADash.com

13

th annual

WILMA HEALTH FEST

Health Fest booths & sponsorships are available for the WILMA Dash. Reach more than, 1,000 women during an outdoor health-focused event before and after the race at North Waterfront Park, in downtown Wilmington on September 23, 2021. For more information on Health Fest and sponsorships contact contact Maggi Apel at mapel@wilmingtonbiz.com or (910) 343-8600 x203.

PRESENTING SPONSORS

CORPORATE SPONSORS