WILMA - June 2020

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JUNE 2020

WILMINGTON’S SUCCESSFUL WOMAN

Boutique Unique

At-home style from Aqua Fedora’s Jenna McKnight

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Leadership Strides

W2W’s five-year anniversary


Family. Family. Friends. Friends. Community. Community. We're We'reall all this together. together. We're allinininthis this together.

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47 36 12 8 SPOTLIGHT

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46 THE SCENE: Cycle-centric

12 TASTE: Market value

47 TAKE 5: Horsing around

15 STYLE: Own it

48 MEN’S ROOM: Camp counseling

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25 B ANDS ON THE RUN: Mobile music 30 V INTAGE GOES SOCIAL: Getting creative at Second Skin 36 P AWS4PEOPLE: Every dog has its day

WILMAmag.com

For us, June marks a special anniversary. Five years ago, WILMA launched its Women to Watch Leadership Initiative. The initiative’s goal is to help develop more women leaders in the area. In the past five years, hundreds of women have participated in the initiative, which might be why when we put together this month’s issue featuring women at the forefront of the community’s response to the coronavirus or finding creative solutions during the economic downturn, some familiar names popped up. Carla Turner, with the New Hanover County Health Department who has been a key figure in the local COVID-19 response (page 10), was a Women to Watch Award winner for Health. Other WILMA award winners found throughout these pages: Modern Legend owner Catherine Hawksworth (page 15) and paws4people executive director Kyria Henry (page 36). Several other women involved in the leadership programs throughout the years, from mentors to Leadership Institute alum, are popping back in to help us with our Leadership Accelerator event this month in its online form. (Details on page 34). W

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Publisher Rob Kaiser rkaiser@wilmingtonbiz.com

MELISSA HEBERT is a Wilmington-based

photographer who has had her work featured in national campaigns and magazines, including WILMA. Hebert studied photography at the Cleveland Institute of Art and specializes in editorial, portrait, and wedding photography. Hebert photographed this month’s cover and home-based style spread on page 15. melissahebertphoto.com

President Robert Preville rpreville@wilmingtonbiz.com Associate Publisher Judy Budd jbudd@wilmingtonbiz.com

Editor Vicky Janowski vjanowski@wilmingtonbiz.com Senior Account Executive Craig Snow csnow@wilmingtonbiz.com

CHERYL L. SERRA is a freelance strategic

communications specialist and writer who lives in Brunswick County. Serra profiled Carla Turner, with the New Hanover County Health Department (page 10), and Kyria Henry, head of paws4people (page 36).

DREWE SMITH is an editorial stylist and

creative director who specializes in photo direction and styling. Drewe is a Wilmington native and co-owns Drewe and Kate Branding Co., where she translates her love of design into branding photo shoots, logo design, and website building for a diverse collection of businesses. Drewe directed this month’s out-of-the-box style shoot, which included featuring several local boutique owners showing off their shop inspirations at home (page 15).

LYNDA VAN KUREN, a transplant from the

D.C. metro area, is a freelance writer and content marketer whose work has appeared in national as well as regional publications. She loves connecting with others, whether through writing, ballet, or training her dogs for agility competitions. She tracked down several new music options that have sprung up while indoor venues are closed (page 25).

TERAH WILSON is a Wilmington-based

freelance photojournalist with over sixteen years’ experience in photography and art. She is a mom of three, an artist, and an avid coffee drinker. Her passion is to capture everyday moments in a way that reveals the extravagance of life! Wilson photographed the Riverfront Farmers’ Market (page 12), Kyria Henry (page 36), and Melanie Spencer, co-owner of Bike Cycles (page 47). terahwilson.com

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Account Executive Ali Buckley abuckley@wilmingtonbiz.com Office & Audience Development Manager Sandy Johnson sjohnson@wilmingtonbiz.com Events Director Maggi Apel mapel@wilmingtonbiz.com Events/Digital Assistant Elizabeth Stelzenmuller events@wilmingtonbiz.com Design & Media Coordinator Molly Jacques production@wilmingtonbiz.com Content Marketing Coordinator Morgan Mattox mmattox@wilmingtonbiz.com Contributing Designer Suzi Drake art@wilmingtonbiz.com Digital Editor Johanna Cano jcano@wilmingtonbiz.com Fashion Stylist Ashley Duch Grocki Contributors Bridget Callahan, Meghan Corbett, Nina Bays Cournoyer, Dylan Patterson Cheryl L. Serra, Lynda Van Kuren, Lori Wilson Contributing Photographers Megan Deitz, Melissa Hebert Photography, Kevin Kleitches, Michael Cline Spencer, Terah Wilson Founder Joy Allen Subscribe For a one-year subscription, please send $26.00 (check or money order) to: WILMA, 219 Station Rd., Ste. 202, Wilmington, NC 28405, or call 343-8600 x201 www.WILMAmag.com


WILMA’S

LEADERSHIP INITIATIVE FOUNDING SPONSORS

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“Women are the backbone of the Wilmington community, creating a

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strong foundation and binding thread across arts, technology, business, education, and nonprofit sectors. Women leaders built this foundation through years of hard work, grit, and perseverance. CastleBranch and tekMountain are proud to support our women leaders through training, mentoring, and networking opportunities. It is a privilege to partner with WILMA’s Women to Watch Leadership Initiative to inspire and sustain our community of influential women."

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Co-directors Maggi Apel and Vicky Janowski at the initiative’s launch party in June 2015.

5 YEARS OF W2W

In 2015, WILMA magazine launched the Women to Watch Leadership Initiative with the mission to help develop more women leaders in Wilmington-area businesses, nonprofits, government bodies, and boards of directors. We’ve tackled this through several different programs from leadership training to mentorship. The number of area women who have participated over these past five years reaches into the thousands. As we mark our five-year anniversary, here’s a little about how those programs have grown over the years. LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE: From an initial class of eight women in 2015, the Leadership Institute has grown to thirty-two members each year. The class meets for nine months for skill seminars, peer mentoring, and interaction with local executives and leaders. Including this year’s cohort, more than a hundred women have gone through this intensive training program. GET ON BOARD: The Get on Board program, held in partnership with UNCW’s QENO, prepares women for joining boards of directors. Besides group training sessions, we also help connect potential candidates to area boards through networking events and our website WILMAsGetOnBoard.com. More than 300 women have gone through the board training workshop. LEADERSHIP ACCELERATOR: The annual, half-day women’s conference has drawn national speakers from Vivian Howard to Sheri Lynch as well as local experts on a range of seminar topics. With large events not yet taking place because of the coronavirus, this year’s Leadership Accelerator features free talks that will be shown online this month. For more details on the topics and registration, go to page 34. MENTORING: Each year through an application process, we match up thirty women with mentors as part of our yearlong mentoring program. Starting in the spring and through monthly one-on-one meetings, the participants meet with their mentors to gain insight and advice about leadership goals. We also have held group mentoring events open to all WILMA readers. WILMA’s WOMEN TO AWARDS: Our annual awards program recognizes women throughout the community in the fields of Arts, Business, Education, Health, Nonprofit/Volunteer, Public Service, and Rising Star. Thirty-five finalists each year are featured in WILMA and recognized at our awards party in October, where the winners are named. (Nominations/applications for this year’s awards are being accepted through July 1 at W2WAward.com.) WILMA NETWORK: The WILMA Network, made up of representatives of initiative sponsors, helps women business owners, executives, and community leaders connect with each other and serve as a resource for up-and-coming women in the region. IN THE LOOP: Keep up to date with these and other Leadership Initiative programs as well as applications announcements by going to WILMAmag.com/women-to-watch or signing up for WILMA newsletters on our website.

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The Women to Watch logo: When you see this throughout WILMA’s pages, it means this is a woman on the rise to know, an experienced leader to learn from, or a local program worth checking out. W

10 HEALTH BOOSTER: Carla Turner helps New Hanover County stay healthy 15 HOMESTYLE CHIC: Local boutique owners share their style inspirations 30 SUCCESS ‘STORIES’: Second Skin Vintage's Karyn Oetting gets creative

JUNE

leadership opportunities ALL MONTH

UNCW’s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship continues its 1 MILLION CUPS meetings every Wednesday at 9 a.m. through Zoom as well as its DIAL-UP DISRUPT talks every Friday at noon. For more info on each: uncw.edu/cie/events WILMA’s Women to Watch Leadership Initiative holds a month-long online LEADERSHIP ACCELERATOR series. Every Monday morning in June, we spotlight a different discussion with area women on topics from mentoring connections to motivating teams to general leadership advice. Info: WILMALeadership.com

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PORT CITY YOUNG PROFESSIONALS holds a virtual networking event through Zoom 5:30-6:30 p.m. Info: pcypapp.com/events

The Inspiration Lab hosts a personal branding workshop 7:30-8:30 p.m. “THE 6 SECRETS OF PERSONAL BRANDING” is a free online workshop, but registration is required. The

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Inspiration Lab follows that up with Personal Branding 101, a paid course that will be a deep dive into all things personal branding, on June 12 and 19 from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Info: theinspirationlab.co/events

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UNCW’s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship and Cucalorus hold the June NC FILM FORUM on the topic of “Cast & Crew.” The talk, via Zoom, starts at 5:30 p.m. Info: cucalorus.org/nc-film-forum

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The Greater Wilmington Business Journal, WILMA’s sister publication, holds its quarterly POWER BREAKFAST on New Hanover Regional Medical Center and its potential sale or partnership with an outside health system. The event takes place online instead of in-person, and it will be free to watch the discussion, which is 8-9:30 a.m., with Barb Biehner and Spence Broadhurst, Partnership Advisory Group co-chairs; New Hanover County Manager Chris Coudriet; and NHRMC President and CEO John Gizdic. To register:

WilmingtonPowerBreakfast.com

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The YWCA Lower Cape Fear holds its first-ever WOMEN IN BUSINESS BAZAAR 4-8 p.m. at the YWCA, 2815 South College Road, featuring women-led businesses and their products and services. The event is a new initiative from the YWCA’s women’s empowerment group Sisters in the City. Info: ywca-lowercapefear.org

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The North Carolina Department of Revenue and Small Business Center Network host a COVID-19 WEBINAR, focusing on how COVID-19 might impact business owners’ tax obligations. Officials cover coronavirus-related tax relief and extension of the 2019 tax filing deadlines, options for taxpayers who cannot pay by July 15, available services and support, and more. The session, 10-11 a.m., is free, but registration is requested. Info: ncsbc.net

Sign up for the WILMA Weekly newsletter at WILMAmag.com. To include your group's event, email W2W@WILMAmag.com

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ENCORE’S ‘BEST OF’ MOVES ONLINE

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encore’s Bestival event, to announce the magazine’s Best Of readers choice awards in May, moved online this year. Hosted by comedy troupe Pineapple-Shaped Lamps, it also featured standup comedy, sketches, and live music performances. Through raffles and a Stay Away 5K, it raised money for local nonprofit NourishNC. Winners were announced during the livestream in categories ranging from best new restaurant to best gift shop to best law firm and a lengthy list of other picks. Artists such as Sarah Rushing Doss (best local artist-female), Honey Head Films (best local filmmaker-Erika Edwards and Kristi Ray, shown above), and Allie Pooley (best actress) were among the reader picks. To see a full list of winners and runners-up, go to encorepub.com.

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HOMEBUILDERS GROUP HIRES MEACHAM

The Wilmington-Cape Fear Home Builders Association added ELIZABETH MEACHAM as director of programs and events.
 Meacham has four years of experience in public relations, communication, nonprofit work, and event management through positions with organizations in Wilmington, Chapel Hill and New York City.
 Meacham oversees the association's major events such as the Parade of Homes and Coastal Holiday Home Tour.
 “In addition, she will recommend and deliver strategic solutions that will enhance the productivity of the association’s non-dues revenue streams through a combination of the association’s special programs, councils and events,” say officials with the group. Meacham is from the Wilmington area and holds a bachelor’s degree in media and journalism from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
 “She brings new insight into our organization, and she’s already hit the ground running,” says Cameron Moore, executive officer for the WCFHBA. “We’re looking forward to her leadership and the direction she will take us in the coming year.”

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RUDYK JOINS CCLCF’S BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Physician MARY KATHRYN RUDYK, joined Community Care of the Lower Cape Fear’s board of directors. A geriatric medicine specialist at Senior Health Associates, Rudyk has owned an internal and geriatric medicine practice in New Hanover County for twenty-five years. Her practice follows a continuumof-care model, emphasizing the value of providing or coordinating patient care through a comprehensive array of health services in the office, hospital, nursing home, assisted living, and hospice. Rudyk also serves as a member of the Partnership Advisory Group, made up of twenty-one people selected from New Hanover Regional Medical Center trustees, medical staff, and the community who developed an RFP for health systems interested in buying or partnering with NHRMC. “Dr. Rudyk brings extensive experience and expertise in the ACO model, specializing in developing care and discharge/transition plans to reduce readmissions, ensure safe discharges, and avoid silo effects,” officials said in the board appointment announcement.

ant more WILMA? Check out our daily emails, which include even more profiles and stories for Wilmington’s successful women. To sign up for the free emails, go to WILMAmag.com

KOMEN NAMES PARK BERRY AS REGIONAL ED

The board of directors of the Susan G. Komen North Carolina Triangle to the Coast named KRISTA PARK BERRY as executive director of the nonprofit organization. Park Berry has more than two decades of nonprofit sector experience. She previously served as communications and development director for the Komen NCTC affiliate. The Susan G. Komen North Carolina Triangle to the Coast is a nonprofit organization that helps fund breast cancer research and provides help to those facing the disease. It was founded in 1982 “by Nancy G. Brinker, who promised her sister, Susan G. Komen, that she would end the disease that claimed Suzy’s life,” according to nonprofit officials. “I am deeply honored to lead Komen NCTC in its commitment to fighting breast cancer through research, community outreach, public policy advocacy, and access to health care across central and eastern North Carolina,” Park Berry says. “I am passionate about the affiliate’s innovative breast health initiatives, and I look forward to being part of the work that carries the mission forward.” Susan G. Komen NCTC serves twenty-nine counties in North Carolina with grant funding to local organizations that provide mammograms, diagnostic screenings, financial support, and treatment services to uninsured and underinsured breast cancer patients.

Have a suggestion for a local woman or group to spotlight? Email us: wilma@WILMAmag.com WILMAmag.com

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HEALTH BOOSTER CARLA TURNER HELPS NEW HANOVER STAY HEALTHY by CHERYL L. SERRA photo by KEVIN KLEITCHES

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hen in nursing school years ago, CARLA TURNER did a community health rotation and thought, “This is something I’m never, ever going to want to do.” Today, however, she’s the personal health services manager at the New Hanover County Health Department and is reveling in the management and leadership aspects of her job and the opportunities for growth it pro-

vides her and her staff. Turner’s role calls for her to serve as the lead nurse and manage the division, including all nursing and social work programs (including school nurses), laboratory services, WIC/Nutrition Services, child dental health programs, and school mental health programs. She manages eight supervisors who oversee about thirty programs and services, such as family planning and sexually transmitted disease clinics, childhood and adult immunizations, and travel vaccinations. The department has about 130 staff members. In addition, Turner works closely with other division managers to coordinate department services and human resources, acts as a community liaison, represents the department, serves as an appointee of the health director, and steps in as acting health director as needed. The public health department offers its services to anyone, regardless of people’s ability to pay. Patients also are not required to live in New Hanover County to receive services. The department does not offer primary care. Before joining the public health department, Turner served as a staff nurse at New Hanover Regional Medical Center, in home health care, and as a staff development coordinator and director of staff development. She served as a school nurse at Noble Middle School and Winter Park Elementary School. It swayed her career path. “That (being a school nurse) has got to be one of the best jobs I ever had,” she says. “You had an impact on those kids every day. I would say, ‘We do more than just put Band-Aids on people.’ We did a lot of chronic health management in a school.” Turner received her undergraduate degree in nursing from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She was working on her graduate degree in health care administration from California College for Health Sciences when she was a school nurse, around 2000-2005. She’s been in her current position


for more than eight years and believes her skill set is a great match for the job. “I love to take care of people,” she says. “And now I get to take care of … employees who I get to help grow and empower and help them be successful.” These employees, in turn, do “an amazing job taking care of people in the community.” “Public health isn’t for everyone,” she says of her work. “You have to have a heart for people, in general, to do what we do well.” She cites helping her staff grow and get promoted among her leading accomplishments. She’s also proud of the growth in the number of department staff and services. Of course, the COVID-19 pandemic put her and her staff to the test. “I’m extremely proud of the county’s response,” she says. The county’s restrictions were more stringent than the state’s in some areas, and she believes that factor contributed to keeping down the number of those infected. Her department has reached out to long-term care facilities and other high-risk places, providing education and – when possible – answers to questions about the virus. Turner helped lead an effort to set up drive-thru diagnostic testing site for anyone experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. She credits her partners in the community, such as county management, county communications, emergency management, fire and law enforcement, property management, and the parks department. Turner says that rapidly evolving guidance has kept her and her staff on their toes. “That has been a challenge at times as we have had to completely change gears in the middle of a process and rethink the best way to proceed,” she says. “But, we keep moving forward with a servant heart. We know that what we are doing is going to make a difference.” And, what they’ve learned will help improve the practice moving forward. For instance, Turner wants to create a plan to communicate more effectively with staff to be sure everyone has important information when they need it. “This is public health at its finest,” Turner says. “COVID is teaching us a lot about our capacity and how much we can handle.” W WILMAmag.com

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A FRESH APPROACH FARMERS MARKET ADAPTS TO CHANGING CONDITIONS

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by MEGHAN CORBETT | photo by TERAH WILSON

s commerce slowly gets back to normal, many are finding creative ways to serve the community once again with a few added safety protocols in place. One example is the Riverfront Farmers’ Market, the original farmers market of Wilmington. Established in 2003, the market became a success in part because of support from the city as well as the community, which saw the need and demand for a quality farmers market in downtown Wilmington. “Considered the premier farmers market in Southeastern North Carolina, the RFM (Riverfront Farmers’ Market) has

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proven successful in fulfilling its mission of providing a place for local growers, producers, artisans, and crafters to sell their goods directly to consumers; educating consumers about local farming and seasonal eating; encouraging and promoting use of locally grown farm products; and enhancing the quality of life in Wilmington by providing a community activity that fosters social gathering and interaction,” says Riverfront Farmers’ Market organizer ANDRELLA CHRISTOPHER. The Riverfront Farmers’ Market opened its season in early May with a drive-thru-only setup. “We had talked about the idea for some time,” Christopher says. “As soon as we received permission, we jumped on it! At the time, it was the safest way to provide the farmers’ produce to the public.”

As local officials started loosening restrictions, the market was able to move to the familiar format. “As luck would have it, the following week we received the all-clear to hold a pedestrian market,” Christopher says. “But, the drive-thru market was very well attended although it was slow-moving … I think people were quite thrilled to be able to go someplace different as well as purchase fresh produce.” The somewhat return to normalcy was made possible through an offer from Waterline Brewing Company to let them set up the Saturday markets in the parking lot of the brewery, which is located at 721 Surrey Street, just under the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge. “We feel comfortable with the pedestrian market because there is so much room to move around that it’s easy to keep a 6-foot distance when walking from booth to booth,” Christopher says. “We are very grateful to Waterline brewery for allowing us to use the parking lot adjacent to their property. “It is fenced in, so we can control the


capacity if it feels like there are too many people at one time,” Christopher adds. “I’d say 95% of shoppers are being considerate of others by wearing a face covering. All of the vendors wear face coverings and only attend to one customer at a time to prevent crowding. The vendors constantly wipe everything down and sanitize their hands or gloves. We (also) have hand-washing stations throughout the market, (and) the market flows in one direction with a separate entrance and exit.” Those who choose to visit the farmers market can enjoy a wide selection including in-season fruit and vegetables, eggs, meat, bread, seafood, elderberry syrup, CBD products, soaps and lotions, dog treats, coffee, wine, plants, jewelry, pottery, and much more. RFM shoppers should adhere to guidelines put in place by the organizers of the market to make sure it can continue through these restrictive times. “Stay home if sick or if exposed to someone that is sick; face mask/face covering recommended; maintain 6 feet of space between yourself and others – especially when standing in line,” Christopher says. “We are asking only one customer or family unit in a tent at a time; avoid touching products you aren’t purchasing; be sure to wash all produce before consuming.” Until the restrictions on city event permits are lifted, the market will be located at Waterline Brewing. Once restrictions are lifted, the market will return to Dock Street between Front and Second streets. The Riverfront Farmer’s Market runs 9 a.m.-1 p.m. every Saturday through November 21. W

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THE BEST JUST GOT BETTER Fountain Financial Associates is excited to welcome CAPTRUST to the Wilmington community Our professional team, office location, and phone number will remain the same, and we will continue to offer the same high-quality service you have come to expect from us. 1209 Culbreth Drive, Suite 100 | Wilmington, NC 28405 | 910.256.8882 captrust.com/wilmington AD20_007

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DIRECTED BY DREWE SMITH | PHOTOS BY MELISSA HEBERT | INTRO BY NINA BAYS COURNOYER

home

I

style

n a world where sci-fi has become our daily reality, it is certainly not ‘business as usual’ for these boutique owners. The challenge of curating their shops with beautiful notions is compounded by the necessity of doing it from the safety of their homes. Modern Legend, Aqua Fedora, and ZIA Boutique, among others, have all had to do a quick-change on their regular marketing plans and in-store offerings, while keeping strongly connected to their customer base. But, creativity is no stranger to this group. With innovative thinking such as ZIA’s at-home try-ons, Modern Legend’s “date night” dinner and a record special, and Aqua Fedora’s curbside pickup and free delivery, they have all embraced the challenges of our current state of being with true style. (As well as given us the opportunity to wear something other than yoga pants.) W

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Rising tides SHIRT, Cancun EARRINGS, summer day HAT, fringe flared JEANS and BAG, all available at Aqua Fedora

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Floral-print TANK with fringe, black JEANS, and flower EARRINGS, all available at ZIA Boutique; gold “I CHOSE THIS OUTFIT NECKLACE, available at ilikeithereclub. com; wide-brimmed HAT, available at BECAUSE I AM DRAWN Blush Hause of Beauté

TO MORE OF THE BOHO STYLE OF EVERYTHING. IT JUST FEELS CASUAL TO ME BUT NEVER BORING OR PLAIN. HIGH-WAIST FLARES ARE GREAT BECAUSE I FEEL LIKE I CAN WEAR CROPPED TOPS WITHOUT SHOWING TOO MUCH MIDRIFF, AND I LOVE ANYTHING OFF THE SHOULDER. THE DRESS IS SOMETHING THAT I LOVE BECAUSE OF THE CROCHET TOP OF IT. THE TEXTURE MAKES THE DRESS INTERESTING!” – JENNA MCKNIGHT Aqua Fedora, owner

Cali DRESS, Beleaf EARRINGS, Arrow NECKLACE, all available at Aqua Fedora

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“I THOUGHT, ‘IT’S SUCH A WEIRD TIME, BUT REMEMBER WHEN WE DIDN’T HAVE PHONES OR LAPTOPS THE WAY WE DO NOW?’ AND, IT MADE ME THINK OF FIFTY-ODD YEARS AGO, AND SO I DECIDED TO ROLL WITH THAT. I SET UP THE RECORD PLAYER AND VINYL, DID MY MOST RETRO-FOCUSED OUTFIT, AND JUST HAD FUN WITH IT. I THOUGHT IT FIT THE VIBE OF MODERN LEGEND PERFECTLY. IT ALSO MADE SOMETHING FEEL LIGHTHEARTED IN A TIME WHERE THINGS FEEL SO HEAVY.” – CATHERINE HAWKSWORTH Modern Legend, owner

Dreamer TEE, black + white polka dot HEADBAND, pink heart SUNGLASSES, mint green suitcase RECORD PLAYER and RECORDS, all available at Modern Legend

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“I HAVE ALWAYS LOVED BRIGHT COLORS AND FUN PRINTS! I FEEL MY MOST PUT TOGETHER IN A PRETTY DRESS OR JUMPSUIT AND LOVE HOW A PIECE CAN COMPLETELY ELEVATE YOUR MOOD OR SET THE TONE FOR THE DAY.” – ZELLE BROWN ZIA Boutique, owner

Hutch Leona bustier DRESS, gold oval EARRINGS, and Noor wedge SHOES, all available at ZIA Boutique

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COVID 19 phased reopening will begin June 1 with a variety of health protocols in place. The safety of our visitors and staff is paramount but our mission is the same: to tell the story of Wrightsville Beach through engagement and exploration. Together we will do this in exciting new ways in 2020.

FOLLOW US

910-256-2569 wbmuseumofhistory.com 303 & 307 W. Salisbury St. Wrightsville Beach, NC

Julie Brown Luanna JUMPSUIT and gold brushed BANGLES, all available at ZIA Boutique

YOUR ORCHESTRA OUR COMMUNITY WILMINGTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (910) 791-9262 | wilmingtonsymphony.org 5032 Randall Pkwy, Wilmington, NC 28403

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BANDS ON THE

RUN

Innovative ways tunes are getting out By Lynda Van Kuren | photos by Michael Cline Spencer & Suzi Drake

WILMAmag.com

Wilmington is used to having a vibrant music scene, and nothing, including COVID-19, can stop it. Some of the Port City’s music lovers have found creative ways to allow musicians to entertain audiences and audiences to enjoy their talent while typical concert venues are closed.

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The Caroliners Duo play Wrightsville Beach Brewery’s Drive Up Concerts, providing the soundtrack for the brewery’s Saturday farmers market.

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While some spontaneous, one-night, pop-up concerts have occurred throughout the area, JOHN HINNANT, a commercial real estate broker and real estate appraiser, is taking the idea to a whole new level. His Under the Magnolias concert series is ongoing. Drive past his home on a Saturday evening, and you’ll see twenty-five or so of his neighbors sprawled across his yard or relaxing on their porches while jamming to a sixtyto ninety-minute concert. “This is an opportunity to do something to promote community pride,” Hinnant says. “I’m glad I can provide a little joy for my neighbors and the musicians.” For the concerts, Hinnant calls on area musicians he met while working for Wilmington Downtown Inc., in 2007. Many of the musicians haven’t performed since the stay-at-home orders were put in place and welcome the opportunity to play before a live audience. Hinnant is glad he can give them that chance. “Musicians have a God-given talent that’s meant to be shared,” he says. “You can watch concerts at home, but it’s not the same.” Hinnant pays the musicians a bit of seed money, he says, but the concerts are free to his neighbors. However, many give the musicians cash or tip them through their social media accounts. While Hinnant hopes musicians will soon be able to resume performing in their usual venues, he’s happy to provide the Under the Magnolia series in the meantime. JUD WATKINS, owner of Wrightsville Beach Brewery, is another Wilmingtonian who is hosting innovative musical concerts. For the past couple of months, he’s had musicians playing at a drive-thru farmers market held on Saturdays at the brewery’s parking lot. Once the state moved into its first phase of reopening businesses on May 8, Watkins started adding Drive Up Concerts to the mix. On Thursdays, families can order a pizza and pick it up at the restaurant’s drive-thru area, park in a socially distant space (only every other parking spot is open for use), and enjoy some music while they eat. As with the farmers market, part of the


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Eric Metts plays the neighborhood Under the Magnolias concert series.

money the brewery earns will be donated to a local nonprofit. Watkins is calling on musicians he had lined up to play at the Oleander Drive restaurant for the concerts. Most are thrilled to participate, and people attending the events have been happily surprised to have live music to listen to. They’ve also been generous with their tips, says Watkins. Watkins says he may get some criticism for the Drive Up Music series, but he consulted with medical personnel on how to implement the concerts and hopes people will see the value they give the musicians and community. “Some will say this is too soon, that we’re not respecting social distancing,” Watkins says. “Others will say it’s the wrong time for music. To both, I say we put a lot of time and thought into this. We put safety first. Hard times are always the right time for music. It lifts people’s spirits. We’re showing the community we are all still in this together and trying to help the local economy.” And, if you can’t go to the music, KEVIN BLAKE, lead technician and sales representative for Cryostop Pipe Services, brings it to you with his mobile music concerts. Soloists or bands play from the back of one of his trailers as it tours local

neighborhoods. Blake, an avid music lover, often helps area musicians. The mobile music concerts are another way to meet that goal while uplifting those with the stay-athome blues. “We’re doing this for the community and the musicians and to spread a little cheer,” Blake says. Neighborhoods are as eager to participate in the mobile concerts as the musicians. Folks come out to their yards to listen and dance as the trailer slowly traverses the streets; some people ride their bikes, keeping distance between them, behind the trailer. One reason the venture is so popular is that Blake tries to match the right band to each neighborhood by learning what residents want to hear beforehand. Blake donates 95 percent of the business sponsorships he receives to the musicians, and many people give the musicians cash or virtual tips. Blake plans to continue the mobile concerts as long as people want them. “Music brings joy to us at all times, and we’re trying to share this with the community and musicians,” Blake says. “We’re just trying to bring a little normalcy back but in a different way.” W


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images c/o SECOND SKIN VINTAGE

SUCCESS

‘STORIES’ by Lori Wilson photo by Megan Deitz

T

hrough social media sites, many users have found new ways to connect – like with old high school friends, former colleagues, and favorite businesses. Let’s be honest: Most of us barely go a day without tuning in. Every like, share, or comment means we’ve been seen and heard, and nowadays, in the middle of a pandemic, social media is one of the few ways we can visit WILMAmag.com

Vintage clothing shop invites customers to create and interact

each other. For many storefront business owners, venues such as Facebook and Instagram have provided a lifeline. KARYN OETTING, owner of Second Skin Vintage, describes how the clothing shopper’s experience has changed during the COVID-19 outbreak. Before the pandemic emerged, she and her staff would greet their customers upon entering their doors, perhaps followed by a fun conversation or even a story about vintage apparel. But, lately, they’re sharing more dialogue virtually through Instagram Stories, a feature of the social media platform that allows users to temporarily share moments – photos, videos, questions, music – via a reel or slideshow. “We are very literal with the Insta ‘story’ concept,” Oetting says. “We are telling little stories.” She and her staff began posting series with a theme, such as educational videos on vintage clothing history and photos of apparel with a common subject. “For the first day or two, it was just

about what people want to see right now, what do we think people want to see and how can we amuse and entertain followers and ourselves,” she explains. “We just pivoted 180 degrees.” Second Skin Vintage had already been using both Instagram and Facebook to share inventory and make online sales, but Oetting also depended on foot traffic from the store’s location in the Castle Street Arts and Antiques District. As the shop’s staff began counting days of the stay-at-home order, more creative ideas emerged. “One week Dorothy (Reynolds, one of two employees) came in and had an idea of doing an art challenge,” Oetting explains. “She was inspired by the fact that, over the years, we’ve had customers or people who follow our account who draw or paint pictures of our clothing. Sometimes, they send us renderings of what they’ve done.” So, she put together a vintage outfit from their inventory and challenged followers to create an interpretation of the ensemble in any artistic medium. As an JUNE 2020

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example, Reynolds created a collage. Participants were instructed, via Instagram and Facebook, to message the shop with their submissions. The first-place winner (whose collage interpretation included a dressed figure wearing a face mask) won a $20 gift certificate to the store. Oetting says she appreciated the artist’s homage to our current health culture. “When little-to-no commerce is going on, you have to find ways to stay relevant and interesting to your customers,” the shop owner explains. “I want to inspire other businesses; you can think outside the box.” And Second Skin Vintage is also inspiring its customers who are stuck at home. Early into quarantine life, Reynolds and shop employee Ella Richardson hosted athome fashion shows in some of their favorite looks, and soon others followed the trend. Oetting also asked customers to suggest songs to be added to the shop’s “Musings on COVID” playlist, which is now publicly available on Spotify. Many of Second Skin Vintage’s posts and stories feature its inventory but in new, sometimes quirky, ways. In one instance, the shop hosted a 1980s mystery blouse special offer: Followers could purchase a top in their size for only $16, but the print or color they received was a surprise. The tops quickly sold out. “Really, this is the golden age of Second Skin Vintage Instagram stories,” Oetting says with a laugh. Reynolds describes two of her favorite themed stories. One week, she gathered outfits inspired by cats, featuring looks imitating lions, jaguars, etc., and even her own pets at home. In another, she curated ensembles imitating cleaning supplies – again with a tip of the hat to COVID-19 conditions. “Dorothy and Ella are the lifeblood behind these stories,” Oetting explains. “When we started this, I freaked out about how to turn my physical store into something else, but I have two young people … and their enthusiasm.” Second Skin Vintage reopened for onsite shopping May 9 but with restrictions such as requiring a facemask, limiting capacity, and closing dressing rooms. Ultimately, Oetting says, the shop will continue to rely on online efforts for the foreseeable future. W


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Sign up for WILMA’s new daily emails at wilmamag.com/email-newsletter. Here’s the weekly lineup: MONDAY IS WILMA LEADERSHIP with profiles on the region’s leading women, their business, personal, and career advice, as well as highlights on women who are making moves. TUESDAY IS WILMA ROUNDUP, a focus on stories published on our monthly print issues and a look behindthe-scenes at the magazine. WEDNESDAY IS WILMA WELLNESS where you can read about the latest fitness and health trends, as well as profiles on women in the wellness industry and get recipes and workouts from chefs and trainers in the community. THURSDAY IS KEEP IT LOCAL, a collection of shopping finds from local retailers, sponsors’ content brought to you by the WILMA marketing team.

FRIDAY IS WILMA DOWNTIME, where we give you a backstage pass to upcoming shows and events in the community. You can also expect profiles and Q&As with local artists and highlights on the latest entertainment and leisure activities around town to get ready for the weekend.

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paws4people trains dogs to assist those in need by Cheryl L. Serra | photo by Terah Wilson


This profile ran in a recent WILMA Downtime email. To sign up for those and other WILMA daily newsletters, go to wilmamag.com/email-newsletter.

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What started as a passion for KYRIA HENRY has turned into a career and the creation of a one-of-a-kind program at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Henry is the founder and executive director of paws4people, the mission of which is “educating and empowering people to utilize assistance dogs to transform their lives.” paws4people provides highly trained assistance dogs to people with disabilities. The organization also provides trained facility dogs – dogs that work with a professional and are utilized in that person’s career – to specific individuals to use in a variety of ways, such as working with students with special needs and supporting individuals with medical-related disabilities. Henry’s father, Terry, wears a number of hats with the organization, including deputy executive director of operations and finance. He’s been training dogs for more than forty years. After his 1987 discharge from the military, Terry Henry has tried to mitigate his symptoms of complex/chronic post-traumatic stress. In 1999, he began training his own psychiatric medical alert assistance dog to help. Kyria Henry grew up in a house with dogs, but in her mind, they were pets, not working animals. From middle school through college, she worked with a certified therapeutic facility and educational facility dogs in nursing homes, hospitals, and special education classrooms. She wanted to explore moving from the pet culture she grew up with to use the dogs in a different way. “It started as a passion, and I wasn’t sure if it would evolve into more than that; if it would become a livelihood and a career path,” Kyria Henry says. She’s grateful it did. paws4people was started in northern Virginia when she and her dad wanted to explore therapeutic interventions with their dogs. They wanted to work with the geriatric population and students with special needs. When they began to look for resources that would allow them to formalize certification and complete other necessary tasks to offer these services professionally, they couldn’t find any. So, they decided to create them, “so we weren’t sneaking dogs into places.” A service dog is any dog that is individually trained to assist an individual with a disability. Service dogs, when accompanied by an individual with a disability of any kind, generally enjoy complete public access and may go with their disabled handler to most places nondisabled members of the public may go.

WILMAmag.com

Therapy dogs are typically well-trained, sweet-natured, friendly dogs who are, first and foremost, pets. Their family trains them and has them certified via a therapy organization, and therapy dog teams are most often volunteers. Therapy dogs don’t have public access, with or without their handler, and they may only enter buildings (that don’t allow all pets to enter) with a direct invitation to the dog and handler or to the therapy dog organization. Kyria Henry sees paws4people’s evolution as a series of milestones: Initially, it was a passion, using dogs therapeutically and working with people who owned their own dogs and wanted to use them to help other people; paws4people trained the dogs and owners so they could use the dogs in different therapeutic outlets. At college in West Virginia, she went to prisons three times a week to teach inmates how to train dogs. Thus, began phase two of the organization, the prison training programs, where inmates learned to train service dogs from birth to have a job and to be assigned to a single person. She saw what that population was gaining interpersonally by having the experience of working with dogs and caring for something and then giving it away. “And, I thought that another demographic that could really benefit from that was the undergraduate population, so they could gain some hands-on philanthropic experience before they went into a career path,” Kyria Henry recalls of the next organization iteration. In 2011, paws4people partnered with UNCW to offer the first university service dog training program. The four-course program was two years in development and provides students with experience training and using service and therapy dogs. The program is aimed at showing students how dogs can be used in clinical and educational practices to mitigate symptoms of a number of challenges, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and behavior disorders as well as in individuals with physical disabilities. Some of the people the dogs help are veterans and children. The partnership with UNCW, Kyria Henry says, “allowed us to grow even larger and establish roots here in Wilmington.” According to the UNCW website, more than 1,100 students have participated in the program coursework, and 145 students have completed the full program. Students have documented more than 68,000 volunteer hours as part of the program. Kyria Henry says eight paws4people staff members are program graduates. The next major organizational growth spurt occurred in 2018, when paws4people acquired its first 11-acre campus, called ADDIE’S Way (named after one of the four original dogs who started with the paws4people foundation), in Castle Hayne. “That’s changed the complexion of the organization a lot,” Kyria Henry says. “We have a home base, we have offices, we have a breeding facility, we have a place for clients to come train. So, we’re no longer just community-based. We have our own headquarters.”W JUNE 2020

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JEFF LESLEY – CENTURY 21

COVID-19 REAL ESTATE FAQ What is the current status of the Wilmington market?

Fortunately, I mastermind with top agents across the country weekly − Los Angeles, Dallas, Nashville and Miami. They shut down 3 to 4 weeks ahead of us, so I was able to observe and adapt practices to prepare. Weeks 1-4 things slowed as people began to adapt to the new safety protocol. Week 5 and forward real estate was just like traffic on the streets of Wilmington − it was back. According to the MLS in April 2020 in New Hanover County 405 homes went under contract, that is compared to 558 homes in April 2019, down 27% year over year. May 1st to May 15th, this year had 276 homes go under contract and 2019 had 283, a 2% decline (weeks 5+, buyers are back). Many multiple offer situations, so there is a lack of inventory that kept that

number negative.

How can I safely and effectively market my home today?

Before home showings hire an agent, like myself, that is spending money marketing your home appropriately to expose your home and not expose your health. Professional photography, detailed floor plan, 3D virtual tour, maximum marketing on major websites, you don’t want to hear they didn’t like it due to something they should have known from the right marketing. In home showings… be smart. If you are feeling any symptoms, please do not allow anyone into your home. If you are healthy, know that agents and buyers must acknowledge that they are as well before entering. Turn on lights, open blinds, open doors − you do the touching, so they don’t have to. You can limit showings and more to tailor to your needs.

I want to sell my home now − how do I?

We have sold real estate using virtual options for years in this second home market. Conference calls with the new twist of Zoom, DocuSign for remote digital signatures, sending data and texting pictures, all of these can be done remotely for an agent that does enough business to understand our market and home values. If you are comfortable with inhome meetings these are still happening with healthy parties as well.

I want the COVID deal of the century − where is it?

Rules are in place to look out for everyone’s best interests right now as they should be. Tenants cannot be evicted, and some financial institutions are relaxing restrictions on payments. Many safety measures are in place to

910.297.7071 | WilmingtonsTopAgent.com

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protect the economic victims of this pandemic. Know that in addition to the protection a foreclosure can take 6-12 months, so we are probably looking at mid-2021 before they appear. Need a deal? Someone who just found out that they are going to be a grandparent and wants to be there to spoil their new grandchild, now that is a motivated seller! This article was edited to fit the page, contact me for the full content or with COVID or post COVID real estate questions. -Jeff Lesley, 910-297-7071 or JLesley@ Century21Sweyer.com Jeff Lesley with Century 21 Sweyer & Associates is the #1 Individual Agent across all brands in the Cape Fear Region. He has personally sold 48 homes from January 1st to May 15th, 2020 and is ranked #8 for the Century 21 Brand in the United States.


MAR K R A F T C A B I NE TS CREATING THE PERFECT OUTDOOR ENTERTAINMENT SPACE

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utdoor living has been a trend which is steadily on the rise. More and more homeowners are looking to purchase homes with existing outdoor spaces, or they are ready to re-design or incorporate one in their current home. The feel of bringing the outdoors in is what makes these spaces popular – and with our area’s moderate climate, outdoor living spaces can be used almost year-round. In recent years, adding an outdoor garden and updating a patio table and chairs would have been the extent of outdoor design. Now, homeowners are adding outdoor kitchens, wet bars, audio systems, and lots of room for entertaining. Items that used to be strictly kept indoors are now being created specifically for outdoor use. Markraft offers selections of weatherproof cabinetry and countertops that provide the durability needed to sustain the elements. Some of the outdoor design trends include ceramic grills enclosed by granite countertops that provide ample space for meal prep. Propane barbeque grills can also be fitted with custom countertops and surrounding cabinets for easy access to kitchen supplies. Wet bars and sinks are also a popular choice for outdoor kitchen areas. Markraft’s designers incorporate custom sinks and faucets into their outdoor design plans that complement their outdoor product selection. Whether preparing a small family meal outdoors or entertaining a large party, an outdoor kitchen provides convenience and charm. Many times, we gather in our kitchen areas even if a separate dining space is

accessible. This is also true for outdoor kitchen areas. Large or small seating areas can be incorporated into an outdoor kitchen. One of Markraft’s offerings, Dekton® – an ultra-compact and weather resistant surface – can provide a durable outdoor island space that can accommodate plenty of barstool seating. Markraft also offers custom items like cabinet drawers with built in coolers for drink storage making serving cold beverages on hot days a breeze. These modern amenities make living outdoors not only convenient but comfortable too. When working with a Markraft designer, an outdoor kitchen may not be the only thing on your list. Their design team can help you integrate other items like a wine refrigerator, wood fire pizza oven, lighting, and even a place for your own beer tap. Markraft’s designers not only provide an extensive selection but offer creative ways to make the most out of your design vision. Considering details like where the sun will rise and set over your outdoor space and positioning the design for maximum comfort is part of their process. The experience and knowledge of the Markraft design team has prepared them to turn any backyard space into the oasis of your dreams. President and General Manager Cee Edwards and his team of talented designers invites you to visit Markraft’s Design Studio, 2705 Castle Creek Lane, just off Castle Hayne Road. Markraft’s professional kitchen and bath designers consult by appointment.

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DIGNITY MEMORIAL

UNIQUE WAYS TO ALWAYS REMEMBER LOVED ONES

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eciding upon a permanent place of remembrance for a loved one is not only an important part of honoring their memory but provides a place for family and friends to pay tribute for generations to come. While many people still make the choice to have a traditional ground or aboveground burial, cremation has been increasing in popularity over the years. Many find this option appealing for the convenience, lower cost versus a traditional burial, and flexibility to keep or scatter ashes during a memorial service. Unlike a traditional burial, cremation offers flexibility for the funeral service to be planned weeks or even months after a loved one has passed. This provides much needed time for organizing the service, selecting thoughtful passages, photos, and music. The rush and stress of planning a funeral in a short amount of time to accommodate a swift burial is removed when choosing

cremation. Friends and family who are under geographical or financial constraints may not be able to attend a quickly planned funeral. Cremation offers time for individuals facing these circumstances to have the necessary time to attend a service planned well in advance. Some individuals prefer cremation so that they can bring cremains home with them and display a custom urn on a mantel or other special place in their home. Many times, this option helps living friends and family members feel connected to the loved one who has passed and brings a daily sense of remembrance. Alternatively, and sometimes after many years, some people make the choice to transfer cremains to sacred spaces. Scattering ceremonies are popular with people who have a strong connection to specific places, like the ocean, a special lake, landmark, or even outer space! Dignity Memorial can help plan special scattering ceremonies that best pay tribute to each unique

individual – and that includes the option to have cremains launched into space. These special ceremonies offer a chance for loved ones to be together, share memories, and peacefully reflect. During these ceremonies all or some of the ashes can be scattered. Some also choose to complement a scattering ceremony by retaining some of the cremains. Dignity Memorial offers a wide variety of options for this, such as a small urn or keepsake jewelry that house a tiny amount of cremains. The selections are endless making each individual memorialization unique. For some, reflecting in a tranquil setting where the cremains of a loved one have their own space may be more fitting. While burying cremains is an option, a cremation niche is an above ground burial space. A cremation niche can be small, large, public, or private. The space consists of a wall of small cutouts that house the cremains in their custom urns. The front of the cremation

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niche can be enclosed bronze or granite, but individuals can also choose glass fronts which allow the urn to be viewed alongside small mementos, if desired. Planning how best to memorialize a loved one comes with many decisions. The team at Dignity Memorial is here to help guide you through the process and educate clients about the vast array of options available to them. Whether for an immediate need or preplanning, Dignity Memorial is ready to answer any questions you may have. Michael Higgins is Sales Manager for Dignity MemorialÂŽ, which cares for more than 300,000 families each year through its network of more than 2,000 providers throughout North America. Learn more at www.dignitymemorial. com or call Greenlawn Memorial Park, Oleander Memorial Gardens and Coble Funeral and Cremation Services at Greenlawn Memorial Park, (910) 799-1686.


PLA NTATION V ILLAGE

PLANTATION VILLAGE RESIDENTS DISCUSS WILMINGTON THEN AND NOW

T

he residents of Plantation Village are what make this such a wonderful place to live and very few communities have the life experiences that our residents have. With that in mind, I thought it would be enlightening to talk with a few of our residents and gather their thoughts. Some of them have lived here in the Wilmington area for over 50 years, so a common thread for them is that they have witnessed a period of expansion that has not only been unprecedented, but also mostly unexpected. Another subject of agreement is centered on the impact of Covid-19, as it is something they never expected to see in their lifetimes. “It’s been incredible to see the growth of our area, and it’s amazing how life changes,” says Betty Biggs, an octogenarian who moved to Wilmington when she was eight. Understanding that she was raised in Winter Park on Wrightsville Avenue, three blocks from what would

eventually become College Road. She and her husband built a house on Whiskey Creek, an area that was formerly a tiny backwater. Betty has seen a lot of changes. About the virus, Betty simply states that, “People who aren’t following the social distancing guidelines are putting their friends and family at risk.” Betty has watched our country go through some unprecedented challenges and has a unique insight into the current. Betty is an eternal optimist and believes it’s all about the lens we use to view the world. “Life is wonderful if we make it that way!” Cecelia Corbett’s family has been in Wilmington for three generations. Her grandfather ran steamboats on the Black River and the Cape Fear. She remembers when Independence Mall was just an airfield, and Oleander Drive was just a two-lane road and College Road did not even exist. Cecilia has been impressed by the Plantation Village response to the Shelter in

Place guidelines. She has been delighted with the concierge services provided by the associates. Meals are delivered and grocery service is available with the items brought straight to your door. The ‘Command Center” will run errands and set up transportation for doctor’s appointments and necessary travel. All these services are provided to keep the residents safe and protected during this pandemic. Betty Fulenwilder has been a Wilmington resident for over 50 years. With five children, nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren, she is accustomed to having lots of people around. The forced isolation brought on by the virus has not been easy, but the strength of her spirit is unquestionable. She points out that, “We must continue to quarantine.” Our community has always rallied together in times of need and this will be no different. The ladies are confident that the advancements in science and technology that

they have witnessed over their lifetimes will help to facilitate a safer 2020 and a brighter future for everyone. For more information about the people that make Plantation Village one of the most inviting, comfortable places to live in the Wilmington area, visit us on the web at www.PlantationVillageRC. com. Like us on Facebook by visiting www.facebook.com/ PlantationVillageRC. Becky Grogan is Marketing Coordinator at Plantation Village, a non-profit continuing care retirement community that offers independent living on a 56-acre campus in Porters Neck, minutes from downtown Wilmington and area beaches. Residents enjoy first-class services in a wide variety of home styles, from one- and two-bedroom apartments to cottage homes and two-bedroom villas. Plantation Village is managed by Life Care Services™, the nation’s second-largest elder care management company.

1.866.825.3806 | PLANTATIONVILLAGERC.COM

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BEST SEAT IN THE HOUSE

UNCW’s Office of the Arts started BEST SEAT IN THE HOUSE program as a hub for live and prerecorded

performances of local, regional, and national artists to

stream from home. UNCW’s Behind the Curtain Podcast talks about the ways artists are adapting as a result of

the COVID-19 pandemic. The website also includes a live concert series every Tuesday, featuring local artists. Info: uncw.edu/arts/bestseat.html

CONNECT WITH CAM

Cameron Art Museum’s CONNECT WITH CAM includes several online activities for art lovers as well as parents

of budding artists. Art Explorers sessions geared toward toddlers and preschoolers feature story time and an art project every Tuesday and Thursday at 10 a.m.

Kids@CAM family projects are online. Meditation sessions happen Mondays at 11 a.m. And, the art museum’s virtual exhibitions also are online. Museum executive director

Anne Brennan has hosted Live@CAM with a look into the museum’s vault. Info: cameronartmuseum.org

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PIPER THEATRE Lockdown Kids Series.

For thirty years, Thalian Hall has hosted New Hanover County first- and second-graders

to experience live musical theater. It now is

showing past performances every Thursday, Saturday, and Monday at 10 a.m. through

August 10 on NHC-TV (Spectrum channels

13 or 192 and Charter channels 5 and 192) as

well as every Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday at 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. on the city of Wilmington’s GTV (channel 8). Info: thalianhall.org

VIRTUAL YMCA STORYTIME WITH MR. SCOOTER

facebook.com/groups/NHCPLstorytime

for New Hanover County Library, holds

CINEMATIQUE SOFA SERIES

Wednesdays at 10 a.m. featuring a mix of

CINEMATIQUE SOFA SERIES, based on

the little ones. Find him by searching Mr.

movies series at Thalian. Viewers can click

Hayes and other librarians also are holding

for streaming the independent, foreign, and

public library system has started. Mondays

the Cinematique experience. Info: thalianhall.

Scooter Hayes, youth services librarian

STORYTIME WITH MR. SCOOTER, live on

Thalian Hall and WHQR are holding the

books, activities, and silly songs to entertain

the in-person, long-running Cinematique

Scooter aka Melvil Dewey on Facebook.

on the “Rent Now” button on Thalian’s site

live storytimes on a Facebook group that the

documentary films typically curated as part of

at 10 a.m. feature Hayes. Thursdays at 11:30

org

a.m. is family yoga storytime with Ms. Susan.

PIED PIPER THEATRE

a.m. is with Mr. Max. And, Fridays at 10:30

Go here to request to join the private group:

Carolina’s group instructors post VIRTUAL EXERCISE CLASSES from pilates to yoga

to PowerPump. The videos, on the YMCA’s

YouTube page, include a variety of sessions to help members (and nonmembers) continue to stay active at home. The local page has a link to Y360, an online community of other YMCA fitness videos. Members can access more

than 100 Les Mills workouts for free. And, the facility also is posting wellness challenges

to keep you motivated outside of the center. Info: ymcasenc.org/coronavirus/virtual-y

Thalian Hall also has organized the PIED

Submit your event to the WILMA online calendar at WILMAmag.com

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2101 Capital Dr., Wilmington, NC 28405 | (910) 799-5565 | info@setileconnection.com

JUNE 2020

WILMA

45


PEDAL

TO THE

METAL BIKING SEES A SURGE IN POPULARITY

by BRIDGET CALLAHAN photo by TERAH WILSON

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W

ith the shutdown lifting in North Carolina, a lot of local businesses are getting a late start to what is normally their busy season. But, one surprising type of business has actually seen a surge in business because of the coronavirus: bicycles. Owners MELANIE and SHAWN SPENCER have been bike advocates in Wilmington for a long time. Shawn grew up here, and met his wife, Melanie, when they both attended the University of North Carolina

Wilmington. The couple has long shared a passion for biking. “While we were dating, we actually wrote it on a piece of paper that our dream was to own and run our own bicycle store. It was always the dream,” Melanie Spencer says. Thirteen years ago, as the new shopping complex at Mayfaire Community Center was getting set to open, the couple went for it and opened up Bike Cycles, a bicycle shop with sales, rentals, and a full-service repair shop. When the state began closures this spring to help slow the spread of COVID-19, bicycle shops were deemed an essential business since many people use them to commute to work. “First and foremost, we wanted to make sure our staff felt safe,” Melanie Spencer says, “and that we were providing the appropriate disinfecting of the bicycles and the bicycle shop area.” The couple closed the storefront portion of the shop but continued to do curbside pickup and drop-off for bike sales and repairs with a full staff. “We’ve had a big resurgence of cycling,” Melanie Spencer says. “We’ve seen the business get a huge uptick. A lot of people are remembering why they live in Wilmington, and they’re reconnecting with the outside area. The kids are home from school, and everyone’s in their house, in their garage, looking at the bicycles that they haven’t had time to take out in the past. We’ve had a ton of repairs and sales. People can’t go to the gym … and now they’ve got free time to get outside.” More bikes were out also because Wilmington’s usual car traffic lightened up significantly during the stay-at-home orders. But, for people who may be a bit rusty, Melanie Spencer has a few basic safety reminders. “The first thing is you really still want to adhere to the social distancing rules. And, you don’t want to bike in groups. Stick with 6 feet of distance,” she says. “Always be wearing a helmet, and always follow basic traffic rules just like a car would. Remember to use caution, and assume cars don’t see you. Take a look around whenever you’re taking a turn or using your hand signals; take the time to make sure the people in cars make eye contact with you and do actually see you.” “We’ve advocated for so long to get people outside and ride bikes, and hopefully this is a cultural shift,” she adds. “This is just such a beautiful place to live, and riding a bike is fun here!”W


5

TAKE

photo by TERAH WILSON

The Corder family bought Azalea Coast Horse Farm in the spring of last year. “We started on the renovations immediately and are currently finishing the final touches,” says JENNIFER CORDER, owner and barn manager of the New Hanover County horse farm. The farm has offered boarding, lessons and training, and hosts a show team. Azalea was able to stay open during the recent COVID-19 shutdowns. “Since our farm is a smaller operation, we have been able to provide proper social distancing measures as well as keep the facility consistently wiped down and sanitized,” says Corder, who has been involved with horses since she was in elementary school. “For as long as I can remember, my life has always revolved around horses,” she says. WHAT DRAWS YOU TO HORSES? “It’s hard to explain what draws me to horses. It’s a feeling I’ve had since early childhood. It’s what I understand. They have such a huge heart and a willingness to please. Once you form that bond with a horse, they will show you such great loyalty. Plus, there really isn’t a better listening companion than a horse.” HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN RIDING? “Since childhood. I took a break during my early adult years but came back to it after my daughter, Airlie, was born.” WHAT HAS IT BEEN LIKE RENOVATING AND RUNNING THE HORSE FARM? “Renovating and running a property that has served as a landmark in the horse community has been an honor. When we purchased the property, we promised the previous owners we would create a positive environment for children to ride and spend time together. Seeing it come together has been a great experience. The day-to-day operation is hard work, but it pays off to see the kids smiling faces playing, laughing, and riding every day.” FOR THE KIDS WHO COME TO AZALEA, WHAT DO YOU SEE THEM LEARNING BEYOND JUST RIDING SKILLS? “For the kids at Azalea Coast, as well as children riding anywhere, horses teach them responsibility, hard work, and self-discipline. These kids have to take care of a large animal on a daily basis. There are also great emotional benefits to riding such as teaching children empathy and compassion. Riding and working with horses also helps children gain self-confidence and self-assurance.” WHAT’S A REALLY GOOD NAME FOR A HORSE? “It all depends on their personality. I do have two names that I’d choose between if I ever bought another gelding: Maverick – registered name would be Top Gun – or Ferdinand, after my favorite children’s book character.” W JENNIFER CORDER’s full profile will appear in an upcoming WILMA Roundup email. To sign up for daily WILMA emails, go to WILMAmag.com. WILMAmag.com

JUNE 2020

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CABIN FEVER by DYLAN PATTERSON illustration by MARK WEBER

J

Dylan Patterson is a writer and filmmaker who teaches English at Cape Fear Community College.

Just as you were suddenly forced to play teacher this spring, you may soon find the role of camp counselor thrust upon you. To keep your kids engaged, entertained, and educated this summer, check out the following do-it-yourself stay-at-home camps: Attic Clean Out Treasure Camp: To stoke maximum enthusiasm, first stress to your kids that ANYTHING could be up there: toys, treasure, a reclusive relative with a wad of two-dollar bills burning a hole in his pocket. Teen boys can be enticed with vague references to a (fictional) “box of old Playboys the former owners left behind.” Hones dexterity as campers balance on cross beams to avoid falling through the ceiling drywall below. Teaches computer skills as kids learn to post items for sale on Facebook Marketplace. Or, if your house lacks an attic, try Crawlspace Clean Out Adventure Camp: Many small bodies make quick work of this normally dirty and backbreaking chore. Boys will love the high probability of encountering the desiccated skeleton of a small mammal. Note: Teen girls will “literally hate” this camp and instead spend the week in their rooms making TikTok videos. Murder Mystery Camp: Solve the case of Who in the Family Finally Got Sick of Social Distancing and Completely Lost It? This camp’s a cross between Clue and The Shining ... but for kids! “Mommy with the hedge clippers in Daddy’s man cave!” Tip: If you “randomly” pick your most annoying child to play the victim, the little devil will have to lie still for hours as “the body.”

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“Yes, Mom and Dad Used to Play Sports!” Camp: Mom plumbs the depths of memory for the gymnastics routine she learned in the ’90s so she can impart it to her daughter who, before attempting each maneuver, groans and says, “That’s not how Jackie does it in class.” Alternative: Dad relives his high school glory days and teaches the kids hoops skills for the week (or, more likely, for 45 minutes until he blows out his knee, grabs an ice pack and an IPA, and retreats to the A/C and recliner). “Is That Even Music?” Camp: Dad dusts off his old guitar, Mom warms up those rusty pipes, and both take a walk down memory lane as they teach the kids to play the song that killed at open mic nights back in the day: “Fly” by Sugar Ray (“I just wanna fly, put your arms around me, baby…”) Warning for parents of teens: This camp could result in adolescent corneal strain from violent eye rolls. Backyard Camping Camp: Day 1: Campers search for all that camping gear you got for your wedding, never used, then stashed in the attic, shed, and garage. Day 2: Campers patch the holes in said gear. Day 3: Spent at Medac after camper burns off eyebrows in a lighter fluid incident. Day 4: Taco in a Tent night. Day 5: Build a fort in the living room cause it’s “too hot outside.” Feel free to experiment, folks. Get creative! Remember, anything that gets the kiddos out of your hair for an hour or two while you sneak off to the garage for a glass of wine or a hard cry is a win. Happy summer!


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YWCA IS ON A MISSION Thank you for taking a STAND with us! YWCA of the Lower Cape Fear offers affordable, licensed child care, after school program, summer camp, and an aquatics center. We are on a mission to serve women and families in our community. We provide a safe space for women and girls. We advocate for racial justice, civil rights, women's empowerment, economic advancement, youth enrichment, health and safety.

ywca-lowercapefear.org 910-799-6820