WILMA - August 2020

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WILMA

AUGUST 2020

WILMINGTON’S SUCCESSFUL WOMAN

BIG & BOLD

Bright colors and large prints for summer

AROUND TOWN Where to go, what to see

ASPIRING VIEW

Sandy Spiers on banking, giving back


A Wilmington community partner since 1966. Founded by Champion McDowell Davis in 1966, The Davis Community has enjoyed a long history of commitment to its residents and the Wilmington community at large for over 50 years. Our strong history, financial strength, local ownership, nonprofit status and long-held expertise as a local resource for seniors confirms our commitment to Wilmington-area residents of all ages, today and in the future. 1011 Porters Neck Road Wilmington, NC 28411 910-686-7195 TheDavisCommunity.org

Why wait? Learn more today. Discover how The Davis Community will help you live your best life. Only a limited number of independent living apartments and cottages will be available.

For more information call 910-686-7195.


Come grow with us.

Come Grow With Us! The Davis Community is expanding to offer a new independent lifestyle. Call us to learn more about this exciting new project and a new way of living at The Davis Community.

Introducing

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august 2020

12 24 32 8 SPOTLIGHT

44 CALENDAR

10 TASTE: Street food

46 THE SCENE: House Party

12 HEALTH: Virtual moves

47 TAKE 5: Full impact

14 STYLE: Summer brights

48 MEN’S ROOM: Space invaders

Check out WILMA magazine here:

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14 22 MONEY MATTERS: Sandy Spiers' bankable career 24 STAYCATION: Getaway picks 32 F RESH CROP: Planting life lessons 37 H IVE MIND: The buzz on beekeeping

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It’s August, and pandemic or no pandemic, that means back-to-school time. In most years, we’d include some nods to the schools in our August issue – ways to get kids ready; profiles on women making strides in the education field. This year, it was tough to know what school might look like in the time of COVID. Days before we sent this month’s issue to the printer, the state gave some guidance. For the new year, Kindergarten through twelfth-grade public school students in North Carolina would either be on rotating schedules in their classrooms or moving completely to online learning. While families had an early foray into remote learning in the spring, it’s clear this is still unprecedented territory. In the weeks and months ahead, keep an eye out on WILMA’s website, email newsletters, and social media channels. There, you’ll find resources, tips, and information to wade through the many questions – and a community to help with the challenges. For those without kids still in school, we also plan to talk about other ways to navigate these times from self-care to maintaining connections to career advice in a remote working world. If you have tips or suggestions, email editor@wilmingtonbiz.com. W

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Publisher Rob Kaiser rkaiser@wilmingtonbiz.com

JENNY CALLISON is a former Greater

Wilmington Business Journal reporter who continues as a freelancer with the Business Journal and WILMA. Before moving to Wilmington in 2011, she was a university communications director and a freelance reporter covering a variety of beats. This month, Callison talks with local banking exec Sandy Spiers on page 22.

President Robert Preville rpreville@wilmingtonbiz.com Associate Publisher Judy Budd jbudd@wilmingtonbiz.com

Editor Vicky Janowski vjanowski@wilmingtonbiz.com Senior Account Executive Craig Snow csnow@wilmingtonbiz.com

MELISSA HEBERT is a Wilmington-based

photographer who has had her work featured in national campaigns and magazines, including WILMA. Hebert studied photography at the Cleveland Institute of Art and specializes in editorial, portrait, and wedding photography. Hebert photographed this month’s cover and style spread on page 14. melissahebertphoto.com

Account Executive Ali Buckley abuckley@wilmingtonbiz.com Office & Audience Development Manager Sandy Johnson sjohnson@wilmingtonbiz.com Events Director Maggi Apel mapel@wilmingtonbiz.com Events/Digital Assistant Elizabeth Stelzenmuller events@wilmingtonbiz.com

LAURA MOORE is an English professor at Cape Fear Community College in one of the top threerated English departments in the state. In addition to education, she has a background in public relations and journalism. Moore details some new outdoor dining options for this month’s Taste feature on page 10.

DREWE SMITH is an editorial stylist and

creative director who specializes in photo direction and styling. Drewe is a Wilmington native and co-owns Drewe and Kate Branding Co., where she translates her love of design into branding photoshoots, logo design, and website building for a diverse collection of businesses. Smith styled this month’s summer-inspired shoot on page 14.

LYNDA VAN KUREN, a transplant from the

D.C. metro area, is a freelance writer and content marketer whose work has appeared in national as well as regional publications. She loves connecting with others, whether through writing, ballet, or training her dogs for agility competitions. She profiles Rise Up Community Farm’s executive director Mari Carl Fisher’s on page 2 and beekeeper Pam Latter on page 37.

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Design & Media Coordinator Molly Jacques production@wilmingtonbiz.com Content Marketing Coordinator Morgan Mattox mmattox@wilmingtonbiz.com Contributing Designer Suzi Drake art@wilmingtonbiz.com Digital Editor Johanna Cano jcano@wilmingtonbiz.com Fashion Stylists Ashley Duch Grocki & Drewe Smith Contributors Jenny Callison, Meghan Corbett, Nina Bays Cournoyer, Beth Klahre, Laura Moore, Dylan Patterson, Lynda Van Kuren, Elizabeth White Contributing Photographers Logan Burke, Megan Deitz, T.J. Drechsel, Melissa Hebert Photography, Kevin Kleitches, Michael Cline Spencer, Terah Wilson Founder Joy Allen Subscribe For a one-year subscription, please send $26.00 (check or money order) to: WILMA, 219 Station Rd., Ste. 202, Wilmington, NC 28405, or call 343-8600 x201 www.WILMAmag.com


WILMA’S

LEADERSHIP INITIATIVE FOUNDING SPONSORS

CORPORATE SPONSORS

“So far, this past year has been incredibly eventful for NHRMC, as it certainly

Kristy Hubbard Chief Strategy Officer New Hanover Regional Medical Center

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has for all of you. It has presented us with numerous opportunities to live into our vision of becoming an industry leader in a new era of healthcare delivery so that our community serves as a national model. As part of this, we are exploring how we can best fulfill that vision through a partnership with a stable, innovative system that will help us do all we want to do for our community, which, for us, starts with cultivating a diverse and extraordinary workforce. We remain immensely proud of this workforce, most of whom are women and all of whom are committed to leading our community to outstanding health and achieving excellence for all.”

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W2W UPDATES

WILMA’s Women to Watch Leadership Initiative has updates to share as we continue to work on the effort’s core mission of helping develop more women leaders in our area. Here’s what we’ve been up to with various W2W Leadership Initiative programs and what’s coming up next: WILMA NETWORK: Members of the WILMA Network, made up of sponsors of the Women to Watch Leadership Initiative, turned to the web to hold meetups this summer, including a lunch-and-learn session in July (above). Alexandra Lysik, agency owner for Cavik Insurance and part of the WILMA Network, talked to the members about creating a plan for marketing themselves to others and generating business leads. WOMEN TO WATCH AWARDS: Meeting virtually, our panel of outside judges deliberated over the nominations and applications that were turned in for the 2020 WILMA’s Women to Watch Awards. Keep an eye out at the beginning of this month for the announcement of this year’s thirty-five finalists on our website and email newsletter. LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE: In July, WILMA’s Leadership Institute, made up of thirty-two women who are part of this year’s cohort for the nine-month program, participated in a virtual skills workshop on negotiating tips with experts from GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy. WILMA LEADERSHIP EMAIL: If you haven’t checked it out yet, be sure to read WILMA’s Monday emails, which focus on leadership topics and profiles. IN THE LOOP: Keep up to date with these and other Leadership Initiative programs as well as applications announcement by going to WILMAmag.com or signing up for the WILMA Leadership email at WILMAmag.com/email-newsletter.

- Vicky Janowski, WILMA editor, and Maggi Apel, events director, Co-directors of the Women to Watch Leadership Initiative W2W@WILMAmag.com

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The Women to Watch logo: When you see this throughout WILMA’s pages, it means this is a woman on the rise to know, an experienced leader to learn from, or a local program worth checking out. W

12 BOOTY BUSTER: Booty Lab Rebecca McAbee's fitness app gets users moving 29 NUMBERS & SENSE: Sandy Spiers invests in Wilmington’s banking and nonprofit worlds

37 BEE-SY SEASON: Lotus Haven Hives’ Pam Latter on beekeeping

AUGUST

women’s professional groups Besides WILMA’s Women to Watch Leadership Initiative, there are a number of local groups to help women grow professionally. Here is just a sampling of some of them.

Cape Fear CREW Year Founded: 2010 Description: “Cape Fear CREW is the leading organization for commercial real estate in the Cape Fear region in North Carolina … Members represent every aspect of the commercial real estate industry, including, but not limited to, law, leasing, brokerage, property management, finance, acquisitions, and engineering.” Info: capefearcrew.org or info@capefearcrew.org

Cape Fear Women in Tech Year Founded: 2014 Description: “Our vision is to make the Cape Fear Region the No. 1 employer of women in technology careers per capita in the country. We do this by championing opportunities for women in technology, empowering women to strive for these competitive positions, and inspiring women to lead in those roles.” Info: cfwit.com or capefearwomenintech@ gmail.com

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Coastal Women Attorneys

The Junior League of Wilmington

(N.C. Association of Women Attorneys) Year Founded: 2013 Description: “CWA was formed to serve women attorneys in Southeastern North Carolina in the Fourth, Fifth and 13th judicial districts, which includes New Hanover, Pender, Brunswick, Columbus, Bladen, Duplin, Onslow, Sampson, and Jones counties. CWA is committed to increasing the participation of women attorneys in the legal profession, protecting the rights of women under the law and promoting, and improving the administration of justice.” Info: ncawa.org/cwa or cwa@ncawa.org

Year Founded: 1952 Description: “The Junior League of Wilmington is a women’s organization designed to empower women and to improve the community through the leadership of women as trained volunteers.” Info: jlwnc.org or info@jlwnc.org

The Inspiration Lab Year Founded: 2015 Description: “The Inspiration Lab was built for working women passionate about personal and professional development. We offer teachings and tools to improve your skills, productivity, creativity, emotional intelligence, and well-being. We also provide opportunities for networking and connection. We represent a variety of backgrounds and careers, but we’re all like-minded in being serious about success, maintaining a manageable work-life balance, and supporting one another’s growth.” Info: theinspirationlab.co

Women’s Impact Network of New Hanover County Year Founded: 2011 Description: “WIN is a collective philanthropy nonprofit that makes yearly grants to nonprofits within the county. The focus of these grants rotates annually among four areas: education, health and wellness, the environment, and arts and culture.” Info: winofnhc.org

YWCA Lower Cape Fear Founded: 1914 Description: “The YWCA Lower Cape Fear is dedicated to eliminating racism, empowering women, and promoting peace, justice, freedom, and dignity for all.” Economic advancement programs focus on educational assistance, job training, and short-term and long-term planning skills. Info: ywca-lowercapefear.org

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photo c/o UNCW

ROSEBORO FOCUSES UNCW DIVERSITY EFFORTS

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DONYELL ROSEBORO, a professor at UNCW’s Watson College of Education, now is serving as interim chief diversity officer for the school. She started in the position July 20 after Kent Guion stepped down from the role to join the University of North Carolina Wilmington’s College of Health and Human Services faculty. Roseboro, a professor in the department of instructional technology, foundations, and secondary education, came to UNCW in 2007. “UNCW is at a critical juncture in the growth of its programs and services to address diversity, inclusion, and equity,” says UNCW Chancellor Jose Sartarelli. “Under Dr. Roseboro’s leadership, I’m confident that OIDI will help the university take an even more in-depth and determined approach with the programs we are developing and will soon announce to address concerns about systemic racism expressed by students, faculty, staff, and alumni.”

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NHC STARTS COMMISSION FOR WOMEN

The newly formed New Hanover County Commission for Women met this summer for its first meeting and picked officers. The eleven-member commission serves as an advocate for women and as a resource of information on the status of women in New Hanover County for the New Hanover County Board of Commissioners and the Wilmington City Council. KATHRYN WANDLING (above), cofounder of the Coastal Community Mediation Center of North Carolina, is chair of the new group. Its vice chair is STEPHANIE JOHNSON, a licensed clinical mental health counselor and a licensed clinical addictions specialist. And the commission’s secretary is Sheila Evans, executive relationship manager for Human Capital Solutions’ CEO and the other cofounder of Coastal Community Mediation Center. “I and the other members of the Commission look forward to being of service to the Wilmington community,” Wandling says. “We’ve got a wonderful group of dynamic women, and in our first meeting were able to outline several areas of focus where we can do the most good for the women and girls of the community, including health care access and domestic violence.”

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CUCALORUS ADDS RAY-SMITH TO ROSTER

Cucalorus Film Foundation recently added ANNA RAY-SMITH to the organization’s seasonal staff as programming coordinator, focusing on relationships with filmmakers, artists, and other creatives who present work during the annual Cucalorus Festival in November and other Cucalorus events. Cucalorus hires more than a dozen professionals each year as the organization grows leading up to the annual festival in November. “We paused for a few months as the landscape changed for this year, and we’re super excited to be moving forward again,” managing director Rachel Taylor says. “Anna brings so much to the team as a filmmaker, a North Carolina native, and a recent UNCSA grad.” Ray-Smith is an independent filmmaker. While living and teaching in Spain, she produced two short films in Madrid. One of them, Chueca, had a successful international film festival run. She holds dual bachelor’s degrees in journalism and Hispanic studies from East Carolina University and a master’s degree in creative producing from the School of Filmmaking at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts.

ant more WILMA? Check out our daily emails, which include even more profiles and stories for Wilmington’s successful women. To sign up for the free emails, go to WILMAmag.com

WBD NAMES ITS FIRST FEMALE CHAIR

The first female chair was recently elected to the Wilmington Business Development Board of Directors. SABRINA SELLS, market president and senior vice president of North State Bank, was named chair for the 2020-21 fiscal year at the Wilmington Business Development (WBD) board meeting in late June. “I am fully aware of the responsibilities and the importance as the chair of this incredible organization,” says Sells (above). “My appreciation for what WBD does for our region is immeasurable, and I am elated to continue to serve with such a dedicated and professional team.” Other executive board members this fiscal year are Celanese thirdparty services manager Fred Samz as vice chair; Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage President and owner Tim Milam as treasurer; and WBD CEO Scott Satterfield as the board secretary. Mojotone CEO Michael McWhorter and CastleBranch CFO LAUREN HENDERSON will each serve a second, three-year term on the board. Jack Barto, former NHRMC president and CEO, and Bill Cherry, former owner of Air Wilmington, are rotating off the board. Filling the two vacant positions will be WILMA DANIELS, CEO of Daniels Development LLC, and Jeff Rooks, of Rooks Farm Service in Burgaw. The two will serve three-year terms on the board.

Have a suggestion for a local woman or group to spotlight? Email us: wilma@WILMAmag.com WILMAmag.com

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SOCIALLY

DISTANCED

SUPPERS WILMINGTON DINERS GO ALFRESCO

by LAURA MOORE photos by MICHAEL CLINE SPENCER

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ating outside has always been a fun, relaxing experience, but amid a pandemic, its openair qualities seem even more attractive. In accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, the city of Wilmington in collaboration with the Downtown Business Alliance and Wilmington Downtown Inc., launched Downtown Alive to open additional outdoor seating for area restaurants. Four blocks of downtown Wilmington close to traffic Thursdays through Sundays through September 7 to allow for a pedestrian thoroughfare. With restaurants only able to operate at 50% capacity, the Downtown Alive initiative expands seating space outdoors.

“People just feel more comfortable eating outside during this time,” Wilmington Mayor Bill Saffo says. “We are a tourist destination with a great climate, so until 100% capacity comes back into play, it’s the right thing to do.” The initiative has caught on beyond the parameters of the fourblock closure, inspiring businesses to be creative with spaces available to them. “Businesses, not just within the blocked-out areas are using adjacent buildings to expand their seating and even alleys beside them to add seating, like at the Copper Penny,” said TERRY ESPY, president of the Downtown Business Alliance who spearheaded the initiative. The alfresco dining adds to the “character and charm of Wilmington,” Espy says. Keeping patrons and staff safe is the focus, but keeping the character and flavor of downtown Wilm-


ington and its businesses is a bonus to the outdoor dining option. “It’s been great. It gives us the opportunity to safely expand seating,” says John Bradley, owner of Rebellion NC, a Front Street restaurant. “Adding more area for people to sit and eat outside is key, and it is obviously what phase two (of the state’s reopening plan) is all about.” Still, others are more comfortable staying at home. That does not mean they can’t enjoy the fun of having an easy meal and socially distanced get-together. “Take home, steam home,” is the mantra that is working well for Topsail Steamer of Surf City and Wrightsville Beach that allows customers to pick up all they need to have a seafood steam pot at home. The business offers a bucket of fresh, local seafood with corn and potatoes that only requires a bit of beer or water to be added to the bucket to be cooked at home on the stovetop. The kit even includes a paper tablecloth for easy cleanup. “It’s the nature of what we offer,” says Topsail Steamer owner DANIELLE MAHON, adding that their recent increase in business comes from her customers being “excited to have this as an option to do at home.” Because of the coronavirus, it’s just one way for those sticking closer to home to host an alfresco dinner party fwith family and close friends. Through an online company, Goldbelly, fresh, local seafood in a bay bucket from Topsail Steamer (topsailsteamer.com) also can be shipped nationwide to people’s front doors. “It’s all timing. We’ve already shipped to all fifty states,” Mahon says. “We were even featured in Forbes magazine for a Father’s Day meal kit idea.” As social beings, the pandemic has been frustrating to everyone, Saffo points out. But, making smart choices and following suggested guidelines doesn’t mean foodies can’t enjoy delicious meals and each other’s company. “We will get through this, and these measures will help us all a lot. Being able to practice social distancing while enjoying local businesses helps us all,” Saffo says. Downtown Alive runs Thursday and Friday evenings 6:30 p.m.-10 p.m., Saturdays 10 a.m.-10 p.m., and Sundays 10 a.m.5 p.m. through September 7. W WILMAmag.com

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BOOTY

BUSTER

GETTING GLUTES IN SHAPE, IN-PERSON OR ONLINE by ELIZABETH WHITE photo by TERAH WILSON

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or some, working out can be intimidating. It can be hard to find a place that feels comfortable and fits a variety of needs. At Booty Lab, workouts and training do not have to be such an unpleasant experience. Owner REBECCA MCABEE strives to make clients feel strong and empowered. With most gyms still closed and others working with restrictions, technology has been one way McAbee continues to help them keep those goals. McAbee’s family and love for the beach brought her to Wilmington. Originally, she was a personal train-

er at Wilmington Performance Lab, a business she ran with her husband. But, McAbee wasn’t completely happy. “I felt that my passion for coaching wasn't being fulfilled,” she says. This frustration led her to create her own business. McAbee wanted to educate women about weightlifting, which can be dangerous if performed incorrectly. She also likes glute-specific training. McAbee’s clients dubbed her the “glute queen,” since these muscles are a primary focus of her sessions. Booty Lab is more intimate than your average gym; McAbee strives to create a more private and comfortable environment, and her goal is to make her clients feel empowered both in and outside the gym. So, the studio provides a space for women to feel capable and confident, while also getting in a killer workout. “I consider my business to be a boutique-style studio,” she says. “We focus on giving the client a personal setting by training small groups of six.” At Booty Lab, McAbee says, “You can feel confident without having to fight for a (weight) rack, and you can do it all while rocking a sports bra.” She also had an app developed called Booty Lab by Becca. “The app was custom made through a company called Trainerize,” she says. The app can be downloaded through a link in her Instagram account, @bootylab. The account has more than 1,000 followers and offers tips regarding workouts and living a healthy lifestyle. The fitness app makes it easy to track workouts and measurements, as well as view photo progress through the training programs. McAbee also offers a monthly subscription. The subscription gives her clients self-guided workouts for at-home training or for gym settings. In addition, monthly programs provide specific guidance and videos tailored to the client’s personal needs. McAbee points out the app is more than just a way to track progress and workouts, adding that programs on it “come with a huge community of women” who help offer support. The constant motivation helps clients stay strong and be proud of themselves.


The best part, she says, is users do not even have to leave the house: “It’s all right at the fingertips of your phone.” The coronavirus pandemic forced many local businesses to close or go online, McAbee explains. “COVID was definitely a shock to everyone,” she says. Like many other businesses, she had to adjust. But, McAbee “takes obstacles as a challenge” and set in motion her plan. The personal setting of the Booty Lab studio transferred to virtual classes with ease. McAbee explains that nothing really changed with regard to personalized attention and programming with clients. Even though Booty Lab lost some clients along the way, many dedicated ones stayed. “We helped lift each other during these uncharted times,” she says. “I honestly think COVID brought myself and my clients closer together, as weird as it may sound.” She praises her clients for helping her keep a positive mental outlook through it all. Currently, McAbee uses ZOOM to continue her strength-training workouts. Even virtually, the small groups remain the same but are adjusted for different home environments. McAbee remains focused on ways to improve her fitness app, which she views as “her baby.” Soon, she plans on adding small group coaching to it. McAbee says despite the pandemic she is determined to continue helping women enjoy working out while also feeling confident about their bodies. W

TECH TOOLS VIRTUAL OPTIONS TO HELP STAY OR GET IN SHAPE BOOTY LAB BY BECCA: A fitness app developed by Booty Lab owner Rebecca McAbee (bootylabinc.com/fitness-app) SLOW BURN: The city of Wilmington’s Sherriedale Morgan Fitness Center has a six-week program including workouts sent by email. The program is free and open to the public. (wilmingtonnc.gov/departments/parks-recreation and click on Fitness Center) FULL BODY WORKOUT: Fit to You founder Kerri Davis shares a full-body workout on her fitness studio’s website that can be done at home. (fittoyounc.com/full-bodyworkout-at-home-or-anywhere) Find these and other local fitness resources on our WILMA Wellness email newsletter, out every Wednesday.

Keep Alcohol Out of the Hands of Kids. Talk It Up! Lock It Up!

Cape Fear Coalition for A Drug-Free Community

www.capefearcoalition.org Funded by the Office of National Drug Control Policy and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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UR COMMITMENT to the health and well-being of our community is part of the fabric that drives the decisions we make every day at Wilmington Health. The core values of our organization include the words Respect, Integrity, Leadership, and Accountability. • We use these ideals in the care we show our patients. • We use these ideals in supporting our community and moving it forward. • We use these ideals in the interactions we have with one another.

In these times of uncertainty and confusion, our dedication is not only important for the thousands of patients that we serve, but also for our outstanding team members and their families. Because just like you, we live here, we work here, and we always will be committed to Wilmington in all ways.

always wilmingtonhealth.com

12397 wh Always GWBJ Wilma Ad_4.792x4.52.indd 1

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summer

splash

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hile this summer kicked off like no other we've known, don't ditch all of your fun-in-the-sun plans just yet. Even if you're not jetting off to the tropics, you can still channel that colorful resort vibe right here in the ILM. Summer is the time to go bold and rule those quirky retro prints like bright flowers, stripes, and even gingham check. The usual classics of the season – wraps and oversized T-shirts – still take their rightful place poolside, doing double duty as both dresses and swim cover-ups. The bra top is also making a splash. Interchangeable with your bikini top, it is another perfect chameleon piece for going from daytime sun to evening fun in one stroke. And the No. 1 insider tip for summer? The answer lies at your feet ... Anything with a square toe means you’re in the fashion know. W STYLED BY DREWE SMITH | PHOTOS BY MELISSA HEBERT | INTRO BY NINA BAYS COURNOYER

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On Camilla: Adrianna Fiji striped DRESS; Sailors rope BELT; Kat Maconie Glitch Frida SHOES; Lux lemon EARRINGS; and Tom Ford SUNGLASSES, all available at Monkee's of Wilmington

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NUMBERS

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Sandy Spiers invests in Wilmington’s banking and nonprofit worlds


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ne merger. Approximately one zillion Paycheck Protection Program loan applications. One postponed wedding, and one nonprofit board chairmanship. When SANDY SPIERS looks back at her year so far, those experiences stand out. The merger the former SunTrust city president refers to is the joining of that bank and BB&T. That transaction closed in December, ushering in many months of integration to create a new bank, Truist. But soon into the new year, the novel coronavirus hit the economy, and SBA lenders like the newly yoked SunTrust and BB&T were inundated with PPP requests and worked around the clock with colleagues they hadn’t even met. That was April, which was supposed to bring the nuptials of Spiers’ son. Pandemic-related shutdowns put that event on hold. Spiers also chairs the board for the Girls Leadership Academy of Wilmington, which had just completed its new campus. This past spring, midway into GLOW’s first year in its new facilities, the school had to adapt to all-online learning because of the virus. Some people would wilt in the face of these challenges. But Spiers, who describes herself as an optimist who always finds silver linings, is working through the difficult times. Ask her how she has managed, and she will probably reply that she loves everything she does, professionally and personally. “I like the movement of money, which essentially is finance. It’s more the people part of banking I like solving problems. I am predominantly a middle-market banker,” she says. “In Eastern North Carolina, there is a little of both small- and middle-market, because there are not as many middle-market customers. But, I have loved the mom-and-popness of it.” Even though post-merger Spiers is no longer a city president, she says her job hasn’t changed much. “I’m basically doing the same thing as I did before as the city president and a middle-market banker. I am still a senior leader and part of a much bigger team with the BB&T presence in Eastern North Carolina,” Spiers says. “I’m staying very active in the community and building awareness of what Truist is as opposed to SunTrust.” She cites the combination of BB&T’s community banking model and SunTrust’s industry specialization through its investment bank.

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“We’re taking two strengths and making a better, stronger bank,” she says. “We’ll also be able to spend more on technology. We call it T3: We don’t want to lose the touch; we’re adding technology; we’re building trust.” Spiers points also to her strong family foundation. She and her husband, Don, both from Bogalusa, Louisiana, have been a couple since they were in eighth grade and he would ride his bike over to her house. They both attended Louisiana State University and got married a year after they graduated. That was thirty-six years ago. In 2000, their careers brought them to Wilmington. She remembers the trip: Their yellow lab couldn’t fly, so they packed up the car and drove across the country with two middle-schoolers, the dog, and a cat with two kittens. Spiers’ first job in the Wilmington market was with Centura Bank, which was later purchased by RBC. She served as city president for RBC before moving to SunTrust in 2011. Spiers is highly visible in the Wilmington nonprofit community and refers to “this volunteer problem I have” as the reason. In addition to her leadership role with GLOW, she’s also on the NHRMC Foundation board. Several other area organizations have benefited from Spiers’ volunteer involvement. “I do believe that we are supposed to give back,” she says. “Don and I are still together, our children are healthy and happy, as is our grandson. We are very blessed people. “I find (an issue) that pulls me. My dad died of cancer; I was drawn toward doing things for cancer and hospice. With GLOW, I really do believe women are very strong and make such a difference in the community and that helping them is such a good way of helping the community.” Recently, Spiers and Sheri Shaw, the assistant dean for student success at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, got to know each other and decided to form a group of fourteen white and Black professional women to share resources and explore issues of race. Their first (appropriately distanced) in-person lunch is scheduled to take place this month. Spiers has also been active as a mentor, both with UNCW’s Cameron Executive Network and WILMA’s Women to Watch Leadership Initiative. “I feel like I’ve been in the workforce for so long – a woman in a male-dominated industry of commercial banking – that I have some insights,” she says. “I have an analytical mind and love the math of banking. But, I’m also a people person and can read people and situations pretty well.” W

Sandy Spiers, along with YWCA Lower Cape Fear CEO Velva Jenkins and NHRMC Psychiatry Department Chair Lora Pacaldo, are the speakers for the Wilmington Chamber of Commerce’s virtual WOMEN’S PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT EVENT. The Zoom-based talk is 3:30-5 p.m. August 5. Info: wilmingtonchamber.org/events AUGUST 2020

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THREVE MERCANTILE Lisa Hauenstein (above) opened the home dÊcor store Threve Mercantile in 2017. Like most stores, the shop at 108 Market Street, had to close in the early shutdown stage because of the virus but is now open Wednesdays-Sundays. From furniture to accessories to art, the curated mix reflects Hauenstein’s eye for clean lines, natural materials, and global inspiration. There are also personal care items such as lavender-infused bath soaks, which seem oh-so-relaxing in these times.

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DREAMERS WELCOME A small boutique inn on South Fourth Street combines artistic elements, minimalist design, lush landscaping, and detailed amenities – all within a renovated Victorian house. Vegan/vegetarian breakfast – or even options for a happy hour with hors d’oeuvres or gourmet four-course meal – from a private chef are available. Yoga on the front porch can be arranged, as well. Owners are taking precautions from extra cleaning of high-touch areas and one-day delays between bookings.

EAT • STAY • PLAY • SHOP

DOWNTOWN ILM

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hings might look different this year, but it’s still summer vacation time. Whether you’re looking for staycation ideas, or you’re here to visit, check out these sample exploration plans. Downtown Wilmington’s mix of historical spaces and trendy upstarts makes it an easy place to start – or to escape to when you need a beach break. While some attractions are closed or on limited schedules, a stroll through downtown’s cobblestone streets still takes you past unique stores, outdoor dining, and a sweeping view of the Cape Fear River.

RUMCOW Rumcow is one of the many locally owned restaurants in downtown where the menu is as unique as the atmosphere. This one brings a global twist to Southern dishes such as the shrimp and grits tacos that add chimichurri to the classic dish. Similarly, the cocktails bring uniqueness and personality. Abigail Sena (left) and her husband, Joe, opened the restaurant at 121 Grace Street in 2018.

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RIVERWALK The 1.75 miles of downtown’s Riverwalk stretches from Nun Street to the Isabel Holmes Bridge. If the virus scuttled your summer trip to Italy, grab gelato at GelaRto in the J.W. Brooks Building, 18 South Water Street, and still have your la passeggiata evening stroll down the wooden boardwalk.

photos by TERAH WILSON

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BALD HEAD ISLAND A twentyminute ferry ride away from Southport is Bald Head Island, a carless enclave of multi-million homes, maritime forest trails, and miles of beaches. Bikes and golf carts rule the island, and you can take them to the southern tip where the Cape Fear River meets the Atlantic Ocean. Day passes are available for roundtrips on the ferry, but allow for extra time since capacities have been reduced for distancing.

EAT • STAY • PLAY • SHOP

SOUTHPORT

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hirty miles south of downtown Wilmington, the waterside city of Southport boasts old homes, historic sites, bed-and-breakfasts, and restaurants overlooking its yacht basin. It’s picturesque enough to have served as the setting for movies filmed there such as Safe Haven and I Know What You Did Last Summer (still a quaint backdrop for a scary flick). Along downtown’s Howe and Moore streets, quirky stores range from the kid-bonanza Bullfrog Corner toy store to the yearround, sprawling ornament depot The Christmas House. There are specialty shops and boutiques; restaurants and coffee shops. Meandering is the suggested mode of transportation.

photos by JOHN MUSS & T.J. DRECHSEL

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FRANKLIN SQUARE GALLERY Check out the works of local artists with a stop at the gallery, 130 East West Street, in Southport’s historic district. Associated Artists of Southport is a cooperative housed in Franklin Square Gallery, which exhibits pottery and paintings from over a hundred member artists who live throughout Southeastern North Carolina. Located in Southport’s former schoolhouse and town hall, the gallery operates as a nonprofit.

CANDY STORE HOUSE This pastel pink building with its Lego-like silhouette is actually a one-bedroom vacation rental, two blocks from the waterfront. It draws its name from being a candyselling general store in 1912. Rentals for the house at 315 East Nash Street are managed by Oak Island Accommodations.

PROVISION COMPANY, 130 Yacht Basin Drive, features a casual menu from conch fritters and fried oysters to burgers and potato salad – all with a view of the yacht basin. COVID-19 prompted some changes, says co-owner Maria Swenson. While the honor drink system is no longer in action – you used to be able to grab your own cold beer, wine, or soda and take it to your table – the popular menu remains the same for those dining in the restaurant’s outside deck.

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EAT • STAY • PLAY • SHOP

WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH

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photos by T.J. DRECHSEL

he sand. The surf. The salt air. Area beaches are a big draw for the summer travel season, and if you can brave the parking, the day’s oasis awaits once you sink into your spot facing the ocean. Or, skip the beach traffic altogether and hunker down for the weekend in a rental or hotel. Whether Wrightsville, Carolina, Kure, Topsail beaches, or beyond, there are days for any mood – beach chairs for lounging, boutiques for shopping, and instructors for surfing. Out here, the great outdoors are calling.

CRYSTAL SOUTH SURF CAMP Whether brand new to riding waves or honing your skills, surfing lessons are one way to get out of the beach chair. Jo Pickett, a former U.S. national shortboard champion, helps run Crystal South Surf Camp, providing private and group lessons as well as coaching. Pickett also has organized the Wrightsville Beach Wahine Classic, an all-girls and women surf competition, in recent years.

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HALLELU at 84 Waynick Boulevard is known for a casual but trendy beach vibe for the shop’s clothing, swimwear, accessories, and more. Owner Tara Huneycutt (below) also keeps up a strong web presence with the boutique’s online store and social media channels – @shophallelu on Instagram. Good to note when November hits, and you need a dose of summer.

OCEANIC RESTAURANT When Crystal Pier was first built in 1939, it was the longest pier on the Eastern Seaboard. Later rebuilt, today you can sit and enjoy drinks and bites on the pier that juts out from the Oceanic, 703 South Lumina Avenue. The restaurant offers up seafood dishes and coastal-inspired items, from crab-stuffed salmon to a grilled Jamaican jerk chicken sandwich, along with a postcard-worthy view.

BLOCKADE RUNNER Hit hard by Hurricane Florence in 2018, the Blockade Runner Beach Resort, 275 Waynick Boulevard, reopened after extensive renovations with a redesigned lobby and restaurant and updated rooms. The result is colorful spaces with a playful take on coastal design. The hotel, a Wrightsville Beach landmark for more than fifty-five years, overlooks the ocean across its grassy lawn.

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keep it local WILMA’S

SPONSORS’ CONTENT

UPCYCLED FURNITURE

Find furniture in beautiful condition and more at Port City Peddler. Their multi-vendor shop offers thousands of eclectic finds for every shopper including locally made items. Visit them at 6213 Market Street. Come inside, pickup curbside or order online at portcitypeddler.com

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FRESH FLOORS

Give your space an updated look with a new rug or carpet from Sutton’s Rugs & Carpets. Browse their top of the line brands for a customized look for every room. Shop now with some of the lowest prices of the season! Visit their website at suttonrugs.com or stop by their showroom at 3520 S. College Road in Wilmington, NC.

LIGHT & AIRY

Find light and airy summer style at Desert Rose Boutique. Shop their wide selection of clothes, hats, jewelry and other unique accessories. Visit their storefront open daily 11am5pm and Sundays 12pm-5pm! at 208 N Front Street, Wilmington, NC 28401 or shop online at bloomindesertrose.com


PETRIFIED WOOD

According to spiritual experts in gems and stones - petrified wood helps with patience on your spiritual transformation, helps to access past-life information, and see into the Akashic records and to contact your ancestors. Mystic Elements is here to help you find what suites your spiritual needs. Visit them at 4403 Park Ave. in Wilmington and be sure to wear a mask to keep everyone safe or visit their website at mysticelements.com.

HIGH-QUALITY CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES

Find well-made wallets, jewelry, clothing and more at Camillions Boutique! Shop online at CamillionsNC. com or pickup curbside at the downtown location at 112 Market Street in the heart of downtown Wilmington.

SAND AND SEA

Find art inspired by the sand and sea that we call home at theArtWorks™. Now open Fridays & Saturdays 11am6pm! Featured above is artist Terry Ganey. Call us at 910.352.1822, or email inquires to TheArtWorksWilmington@ gmail.com or visit theartworks.co

HANDI SANI

Stay safe and fight against germs with the new HANDI SANI by SQUEAK (80% alcohol/ WHO/ CDC recommended formulation). Visit their website at GetSqueakyWithUs.com and order online. Free shipping on all orders $75 or more.

SPONSORS’ CONTENT

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Harvesting Hope by Lynda Van Kuren photos by Logan Burke

This nonprofit farm produces more than food

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ou could say that farming is in MARI CARL FISHER’s blood. So is her passion for helping others. It’s a combination that impelled Fisher to found Rise Up Community Farm. Like any farm, Rise Up Community Farm grows produce, but it’s so much more than that. It also provides fresh vegetables to the needy in the area and supports local youth by helping them improve personal and job skills. “Through Rise Up Community Farm, I want to plant hope in the community as we cultivate the land, educate and nourish neighbors in need, and empower people to have meaningful lives,” says Fisher, who serves as the farm’s manager and executive director. Rise Up Community Farm is the culmination of Fisher’s background, work experience, and dreams. When she came to Wilmington in 2008 to study environmental science at University of North Carolina Wilmington, Fisher already knew a lot about working the soil – information she gained firsthand on her father’s farm in Virginia. Seeing the impact organic farming had on the community, Fisher decided to pursue it as a career. After graduation, she worked for a nonprofit organic farm in Florida for three years. Her second job was with

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a food bank for Central and Eastern North Carolina, where she collaborated with grocery stores and farmers to get fresh and healthy food donated to those in need. Fisher moved back to Wilmington in 2018 to marry her husband, who shared her vision. In 2019, Global River Church donated land for the enterprise, Fisher got nonprofit status for it, and Rise Up Community Farm was born. True to her beliefs, Fisher grows only organic produce. She concentrates on vegetables that people enjoy and that grow well in Wilmington’s hot, humid climate. Offerings include squash, tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, sweet potatoes, okra, collard greens, and butter beans. Half of the farm’s produce is earmarked for the community’s needy, which encompasses a larger population than you might suspect. About 33,600 individuals in New Hanover County – including 8,000 children, or one of every five children – are what Fisher calls food insecure. That is, they don’t know where their next meal will come from. “I’ve always felt passionate about seeing that everyone has access to fresh produce, no matter where they are financially,” says Fisher. Fisher donates produce to the food pantry at Global River Church as well as to food pantries throughout the area. Every week between eighty and 110 cars collect food from the church’s


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food pantry – up from sixty to seventy-five cars before COVID-19 shutdowns caused widespread unemployment. Fisher sells the other half of her produce, flowers, and herbs, which can be ordered online or bought at the farm on Saturday mornings. The proceeds go into the farm and support its youth program. The farm’s youth program consists of internships for students aged fourteen to seventeen. The interns, some of whom have experienced trauma or other hardships, get a chance to do something different and a safe place to be, Fisher says. The students work at the farm for eight weeks and receive a small stipend.

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They plant, weed, learn other agricultural skills, and sell the goods. Selling not only gives the interns valuable customer service skills, it also gives them ownership of their work, Fisher says. They see the continuum from planting seeds to providing people with food to eat. Fisher also holds workshops for the students, at which they learn personal and career skills. Recent workshop topics included personal finance, public speaking, resume writing, and interviewing skills. The interns are also introduced to career options by professionals who work in a variety of fields. “It’s such a joy to see someone you’ve

worked with be empowered, to see how much they’ve grown in just a year,” Fisher says. Rise Up Community Farm is supported by a number of volunteers. In addition to its ten to fifteen regular volunteers, a number of groups, including students from UNCW and members of churches and other organizations, have lent a hand with gardening. Other volunteers make presentations or hold workshops. Though it was established a mere year-and-a-half ago, Rise Up Community Farm has seen substantial growth. As the operation gets more efficient with its growing process, the farm is seeing


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Providing Protection On Land And Sea an increase in food production and an improvement in its soil. Also, as people learn about the farm, more are volunteering. For Fisher, seeing Rise Up Community Farm succeed on so many levels fills her soul. “I feel so much joy seeing people get and be excited about fresh vegetables,” she says. “I’m so thankful to be doing this work.” To make orders or to volunteer, go the Rise Up Community Farm website, riseupcommunityfarm.org. The farm is located at 4702 South College Road in Wilmington. W WILMAmag.com

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BEE-SY SEASON Lotus Haven Hives’ Pam Latter on beekeeping by Lynda Van Kuren photos by Terah Wilson

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hile most of us savor the sweet taste of honey as we spoon it on a biscuit or into our tea, we’d prefer to keep the bees that make it at a distance. That’s not the case for PAM LATTER, beekeeper and owner of Lotus Haven Hives.

Latter has thirty-seven bee colonies, from which she produces honey, creamed honey (which you can spread on bread like peanut butter), honey soap, and candles. “Beekeeping is very rewarding,” Latter says. “I grew up on a farm, and beekeeping lets me get back to my roots.” Latter’s interest in beekeeping started as mere curiosity. She did a Google search on honeybees and beekeeping, took a beginner beekeeping class with the Hampstead chapter of the North Carolina State Beekeepers Association, and started beekeep-

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ing with two hives. A year later, Latter decided to turn beekeeping into a business. She grew her hives and began making and selling products, including at the Wilmington Farmers Market. Latter also became a certified beekeeper, which verifies that she has the knowledge and skills to care for the bees, and a certified honey producer, which means she meets state standards and that her honey is pure. “Once I commit to doing something, I’m all in,” she says. About once a month, or more often when the bees are producing honey, Latter dons protective gear and visits the hives. She ensures the bees have enough to eat and that they are healthy. In the spring and summer, she also collects the honey. These visits aren’t without risk. Latter says getting stung goes with the territory. “I get stung all the time,” she says. “It doesn’t feel good and is usually because I’ve done something stupid.” The time and the stings are worth it to Latter, who values the role the honeybee plays in our world. Of course, there are the wonders of honey, a golden drop of sweetness that can, if produced and consumed in the same locale, help reduce allergies, Latter says. Honey, which is sterile, can also assist with wound healing. Honey soap, which has no lye, is an alternative to regular soap; and beeswax candles grace many a table or

lend a soft glow to a room. In addition, honeybees contribute to food production. They pollinate 20% of everything we eat, which translates to every five bites, Latter says. Almond, melon, cucumber, and other farmers hire beekeepers to bring their hives to their fields, so the bees can pollinate the plants. Despite their good work, honeybees face a dangerous world. Their natural habitat is being overtaken by people; and pesticide use, including the mosquito sprays we use on our lawns, can decimate entire colonies. Honeybees are also preyed upon by the Varroa mite, against which the honeybee has no defenses. Latter’s commitment to the honeybee and beekeeping shows no sign of waning. In addition to serving as a beekeeper, Latter is the president of the Hampstead NCSBA, and as such helps new beekeepers and those who simply have an interest in honeybees learn more about them. “My goal is to continue to keep my bees healthy but more importantly to educate new beekeepers so they can keep bees and keep them alive,” Latter says. W This profile ran in a recent WILMA Downtime email. To sign up for those and other WILMA daily newsletters, go to wilmamag.com/email-newsletter.


WILMA ONLINE

Keep up with WILMA all month long, through our website, daily emails, and social media.

Sign up for WILMA’s new daily emails at wilmamag.com/email-newsletter. Here’s the weekly lineup: MONDAY IS WILMA LEADERSHIP with profiles on the region’s leading women, their business, personal, and career advice, as well as highlights on women who are making moves. TUESDAY IS WILMA ROUNDUP, a focus on stories published on our monthly print issues and a look behindthe-scenes at the magazine. WEDNESDAY IS WILMA WELLNESS where you can read about the latest fitness and health trends, as well as profiles on women in the wellness industry and get recipes and workouts from chefs and trainers in the community. THURSDAY IS KEEP IT LOCAL, a collection of shopping finds from local retailers, sponsors’ content brought to you by the WILMA marketing team.

FRIDAY IS WILMA DOWNTIME, where we give you a backstage pass to upcoming shows and events in the community. You can also expect profiles and Q&As with local artists and highlights on the latest entertainment and leisure activities around town to get ready for the weekend.

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Read how local boutique SET FREE supports those at risk or rescued from human trafficking

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DIGNITY MEMORIAL

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PREPARING FOR THE LOSS OF A SPOUSE

lthough many risks can be avoided in life, the loss of a spouse is something that is inevitable. Many widows report that their spouse did not have a plan in place for what would happen if they should pass away. While experiencing the loss of a spouse is never easy, a few simple preparations can make that time a little less stressful. When planning ahead for a funeral service, there are several decisions to be made. The team at Dignity Memorial is available to help guide you through the process and help with any questions you have along the way. Whether you prefer a metal or wooden casket, cremation memorialization or traditional burial, your favorite hymn or an organist, all of these details can be selected ahead of time. Planning ahead and making these selections with the team at Dignity Memorial will guarantee that your final wishes are understood and that they

are carried out accordingly. Making cemetery arrangements and choosing a burial plot is another portion that needs to be planned and discussed. Have an open discussion with your spouse about how you both want to be memorialized. Each individual is unique and will want their resting place and selections to be customized. Many spouses, however, choose to have burial plots next to each other – which can accompany other family plots – or be memorialized together in a cremation niche in either an indoor or outdoor setting. Making these plans in advance ensure that future generations have a place to pay tribute to and honor their family. Creating a list of contacts to be used after the death has occurred is another discussion to have with your spouse. Identifying a cadre of close friends and family that should be contacted first is a top priority for this list. If

your spouse is employed, making plans to contact their employer should be next on the list. Some couples choose to assign one person on the list to contact the remainder of the listed individuals. This individual can also send funeral arrangement schedules through email and post on social media on the family’s behalf. Also, there are legal and estate considerations when preparing for a death. It is helpful to make sure these important documents are in order and up to date before the death occurs. A will outlines how you would like your assets divided after you are gone. You also have the ability to designate an executor that makes sure your will is implemented as planned. Making certain that these documents are carefully constructed and current can take the burden of making these difficult decisions during an emotional time off of your spouse.

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Most of us do not enjoy discussing death, and certainly don’t enjoy discussing the topic when it pertains to our spouse. But pre-panning together not only makes life easier for the surviving spouse, it ensures that final wishes are performed as desired. The compassionate experts at Dignity Memorial are available to discuss the process of pre-planning and walk you through each step.

Michael Higgins is Sales Manager for Dignity Memorial®, which cares for more than 300,000 families each year through its network of more than 2,000 providers throughout North America. Learn more at www. dignitymemorial.com or call Greenlawn Memorial Park, Oleander Memorial Gardens and Coble Funeral and Cremation Services at Greenlawn Memorial Park, (910) 799-1686.


MARKRAFT CABINETS

WHAT TO CONSIDER & EXPECT WHEN REMODELING

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emodeling any part of your home can be a daunting task. However, having a plan in place, and knowing what to expect, makes it a much more enjoyable experience. Home renovations are one of the best investments homeowners can make in their property and, with the help of the experienced professionals at Markraft, your renovation will run smoothly and provide you with the exciting results you hope for. Creating a plan for your remodel is essential and the team at Markraft is specially trained to help each of their clients create the best design plan for their space during an initial design meeting. The Markraft design studio offers countless resources to help with your selection process. Discovering your style and ideas for your space with a Markraft designer helps to shape your customized design plan. Not only will

the numerous swatches and samples help you choose the perfect finishes for your design plan, the vast array of product lines that Markraft carries give you every option of color, style, and texture you could imagine. Your Markraft designer will also help set a renovation budget and timeline to help the project stay organized and on task. Having these details in place also set clear expectations for the work that will take place and the amount of time each portion of work will take. This helps take the guesswork out of what work will happen and when. Your Markraft designer will conduct a job site inspection after an initial design plan has been created. While visiting your space, a Markraft designer will take measurements and further discuss design options. Taking the time to visually assess the space helps your Markraft designer to suggest the best possible layout.

This meeting will provide your designer with all the necessary information to create comprehensive layouts, to include CAD drawings that incorporate suggested designs. Now all you need to do is choose one of the beautiful designs – which might be the most excitingly difficult part of your renovation! When your layout selection has been made, your custom materials will be ordered and scheduled for installation. Upon Markraft’s receipt of your materials, the Markraft installation team will start installing your selections when it is convenient for you. Each member of Markraft’s installation team is trained with best practices in mind to ensure a precise and satisfactory install. The installation team works closely with the design team to help the installation process progress seamlessly. Watching the final stages of

your remodel come together will be just as exciting for the Markraft team as it will be for you. Each member of the team is passionate about the design process – from start to finish – and genuinely appreciates the opportunity to help others create space in their homes that best reflects their lifestyle. If improving the quality of your life through the style and functional aspects of your home is something you have been thinking about, make sure to call or visit the Markraft team today. President and General Manager Cee Edwards and his team of talented designers invites you to visit Markraft’s Design Studio, 2705 Castle Creek Lane, just off Castle Hayne Road. Markraft’s professional kitchen and bath designers consult by appointment.

910.793.0202 | MARKAFT.COM

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PLA NTATION V ILLAGE

HEROES WORK HERE

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see this sign every time I drive through the gates of Plantation Village. Immediately I think of the health care professionals who work in our Resident Care Center tirelessly caring for our residents. Lately, I’m starting to see heroes in other places. Everyday heroes just doing their jobs in tough conditions. We strive to be the Community of Choice in the Coastal Carolinas for independent seniors. Hospitality is our priority. It’s our North Star. Listen closely to our Associates. Every conversation the same. “What else can I do for you today?” Those aren’t just words. We believe it. We live it. It is said out of love and respect for the people that we serve. These people may not be related to us by blood, but we consider them family. Leading the charge is Johnna Glick, our Facilities Director. From ordering the correct PPE to ensuring that everyone

is following the established procedures, Johnna is taxed with keeping 300 residents and over 150 associates safe and healthy. Her concern for the wellbeing of our community can weigh heavily on her shoulders, but her team of Environmental Services providers, Security and Maintenance personnel keep meeting all the challenges with determination and patience. Safety isn’t enough. Isolation takes its toll and socialization is a key component to staying healthy. It takes a village to come up with ideas to keep all these individual people safe, but still engaged. Cara Arrans, Accounting Director, created a concierge service, aptly named, the Command Center – from vet visits to prescription pickups, if a resident has a request, we do our best to fulfill it. This includes weekly grocery delivery. Assisted by our local Harris Teeter, it’s not unusual for the team to deliver almost 2,000 grocery items to our resident’s front doors.

As restrictions eased, we opened the “Village Market” in the Commons Building. It’s the brainchild of Dining Room Manager, Cathleen Clemmons. Artfully arranged and stocked with everything from fresh produce to wines, residents can shop for necessities and pick up “grab and go” sandwiches, soups and pastry items. Gourmet meals are delivered daily to the resident’s homes. Food & Beverage Director, Kay McKinney and staff make sure to include special items to help keep everyone’s spirits up. It might be filet mignon, champagne, hand dipped strawberries or fresh cookies prepared by Chef Jessica. At last count we delivered 21,700 gourmet meals to the community. We are a vibrant community and while sheltering in place our Community Life Services Manager, Alycia Williams, is collaborating with the Marketing Team to create experiences

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that promote physical, mental and social wellbeing. Yoga, stretch, balance and Zumba classes are being streamed on our community television channel. Other experiences include virtual art tours, lecture series, games, scavenger hunts and employee parades. The Plantation Village associates are committed to creating happiness for our community. No matter what comes, we will continue to grow and adapt and work together to provide the best quality of life for our residents. The sign at the entrance is correct. Heroes do work here, and we’re proud to be among them. Becky Grogan, Marketing Coordinator at Plantation Village a non-profit Life Plan Community in Porters Neck offering independent living on a beautiful 56-acre campus.


PATHFINDER WEALTH CONSULTING

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SIMPLE IS SOPHISTICATED

hen the market is free-falling, taking dramatic action is tempting. Tax-loss harvesting, dollar-cost averaging, and rebalancing are tactical options to consider during a market drop, but the critical action is to stay invested. Folks swear by their NCAA bracket, only to have their predictions crushed by April. Some people addictively play the lottery, only to see their money disappear. Timing the market, like crafting a perfect bracket or winning the jackpot, is impossible to do consistently. Market movements are impossible to predict; therefore, tolerating volatility is part of being a sophisticated investor. Say you sold stocks today as the market plummeted over the next several weeks. Would you have sold at the bottom or at the top? Would you act swiftly if there was a rebound? How much of a runup would you be willing to miss out on to dodge a false positive before it fell

lower? Even if you sold at a good time, would you reenter when prices were lower than when you exited? Making guesses with your life savings involves a super-human kind of insight and emotional fortitude. Instead of trying to do the impossible, simply choose strategies that will grow your wealth substantially more than market timing: live within your means, invest for the long-term, manage your risks, and diversify your investments. Spending less than you earn is not complicated, but it is powerful. There’s nothing wrong with spending money, just ensure your assets and income outpace your expenses. Long-term investing can help minimize worrying about investment timing. Trying to time the market may lessen a portfolio’s long-term potential. In 2013, Fidelity conducted an internal study demonstrating that their best-performing accounts over the previous 10 years were those of deceased

investors! Investments left untouched for years yielded the best results. Risk management involves having cash available for emergencies, as well as being adequately insured should you become disabled or die prematurely. Managing your risks helps to ensure that a health issue, early death, or emergency won’t disrupt your long-term wealth-building plan. Diversification is spreading your assets among different asset classes and market sectors. Even if you’re concentrated in a bread-andbutter stock, will the discipline to sell overrule greed at the right moment? You don’t have to look far back in history to see the disastrous effects of Enron and the tech bubble. Wealth accumulation does not require a PhD, but it does require the wisdom to focus on things within your control and avoid predicting the future. This may sound simplistic, but it’s how we’ve helped people

grow their wealth for the last 15 years. Our clients are disciplined savers and we remain principled in our investment approach, focused on time-tested wealth building strategies. We believe we have been a part of our clients’ successes and would like the opportunity to be a part of yours too. We are here to guide you forward. This material is for informational/educational purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice. Diversification does not assure a profit or protect against loss in declining markets and cannot guarantee that any goal will be achieved. Past performance does not guarantee future results. Contact your financial professional for information specific to your situation. This Insights article is contributed by Kayla Willliford Johnson, Financial Planning Associate at Pathfinder Wealth Consulting.

NAVIGATING THE

PATH to RETIREMENT WILMAmag.com

910.793.0616 | PWCPATH.COM Advisory services offered through Commonwealth Financial Network, a Registered Investment Adviser. AUGUST 2020

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AUGUST

Editor’s note: Because of the coronavirus and changing restrictions in place from the state, the events below are current as of press time but might be postponed or canceled by August 1. It’s best to check event websites first before heading out.

1 SATURDAY

KID CLUB KITS Wrightsville Beach Museum of History The Wrightsville Beach Museum of History is

offering Kid Club Kits with activities to enjoy at home. Each themed kit has at least five activities and lessons. Kits to choose from are A Mermaid’s Tea Party, Ahoy There! with Pirate Pete, and Explore the Beach: Shells, Sand, and Grasses. Each box, targeted for kids ages four to nine, are $25 and can be picked up at the

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museum or sent with free local delivery.

Info: wrightsville-beach-museum.square. site

BATTLESHIP NORTH CAROLINA

Certain areas of the Battleship North Carolina attraction are open to visitors. Self-guided tours of the historic ship’s main deck and above, with a limited number of visitors, are available. Tickets are a reduced rate of $10 for adults, and visitors can come back with their receipts within a year after other parts of the ship are reopen. Info: battleshipnc.com

ACRYLIC POURED ART CLASS Going Local NC Throughout August Going Local NC in Mayfaire Town Center at 865 Inspiration Drive holds classes throughout August on poured art. No

5041 New Centre Drive, Suite 115 • Wilmington, NC 28403 910-218-0600 • INFO@PATRIOTROOFER.COM • PATRIOTROOFER.COM

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5

8/8 experience is necessary, and supplies are included. Participants can bring wine or other drinks. Classes are limited to four people per class because of group restrictions. Tickets are $35. Info: facebook.com/goinglocalnc

3

WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH FARMERS’ MARKET Wrightsville Beach Through September 28

MONDAY

The weekly Wrightsville Beach Farmers’ Market takes place 8 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Wrightsville Beach Municipal Grounds, next to the town hall. Social distancing guidelines are in place with masks and

8/3 gloves optional for vendors and shoppers but encouraged. Info: townofwrightsvillebeach. com

VIRTUAL POP UP Through August 26

Port City Young Professionals hosts several Virtual Pop Up networking events this month. Attendees can join in from home, with a cup of coffee or drink, and connect with other professionals in the area. This month’s schedule is August 3, 17, and 31 4:30-5:30 p.m. and August 12 and 26 5:30-6:30 p.m. Sign up for Port City Young Professionals’ email newsletter for reminders and Zoom links at bit.ly/pcypemail. Info: pcypapp.com/events

1 MILLION CUPS-CEA SERIES

1 Million Cups Wilmington holds a series featuring the winners of this year’s Coastal WEDNESDAY Entrepreneur Awards, a program put on by the UNCW Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship and the Greater Wilmington Business Journal, WILMA’s sister publication. The eleven category winners will present over the next two months of weekly virtual meetings 9-10 a.m. Info: 1millioncups. com/wilmington-nc

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THE PRINCESS AND THE PEA

Durham-based Rags to Riches Theatre for Young Children troupe presents The Princess and the Pea, hosted SATURDAY by the New Hanover County Public Library. The live video at 10-11 a.m. is available on the library’s Facebook page for twenty-four hours. The event, targeted for kids ages four to ten, is free and no registration is required. Info: facebook.com/NHCLibrary

Submit your event to the WILMA online calendar at WILMAmag.com

9/13/20 - 5k/1.5 Mile Run/Walk In Support of Survivors of Sexual Abuse www.journeytohealministries.org/hoperun WILMAmag.com

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HOUSE

PARTY

LAST CHANCE FOR WHITE PANTS GOES HOME by BETH A. KLAHRE photo by MEGAN DEITZ

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f putting away your white pants is a sad sign that summer is soon over, don’t fret! Lower Cape Fear LifeCare is holding its annual end of summer Last Chance for White Pants fundraiser – with a creative twist. Last year’s twelfth annual, sold-out event held at longtime sponsor Audi Cape Fear’s modern-design dealership drew hundreds of people and raised over $150,000 through ticket sales, sponsors, and live and silent auctions. This year, COVID-related restrictions on large gatherings inspired some creative thinking to reimagine the event as Last Chance for White Pants-House Party Edition. “We knew we would not be able to have the event in our usual way this year while protecting the health and safety of participants in light of COVID-19. Instead of having 500 people in one place on one night, why not spread the fun over the course of a

AUGUST 2020

weekend and over many different locations,” says TERRIE PRIEST, Lower Cape Fear LifeCare (LCFL) foundation manager (left). The 2020 House Party Edition of Last Chance for White Pants will include most of past attendees’ favorite pieces but in small gatherings of close friends and family. Party variations to suit every fancy include quiet dinner parties and midday brunches, bingo nights, backyard barbecues, and cul-de-sac cookouts. The house parties will take place on the weekend of August 27 through August 30, pending any new guidelines from the state or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ANA and MIKE BROWN are co-chairs of this year’s event. They have been recruiting hosts, who select their guest list and event setup. Parties are already planned in homes in New Hanover, Brunswick, and Columbus counties. Additionally, a virtual silent auction takes place the week of August 24. “Each party host receives a Party in A Box toolkit, which includes helpful items for hosting a memorable event including special guest prizes,” says AMANDA HUTCHESON, the group’s PR and communications specialist. Priest explains her passion and the critical need for fundraising for LCFL. “It is the mission of this organization that makes me proud to be an LCFL teammate. My family personally experienced the blessing of this organization through the care that my sister received during her illness and death,” Priest says. “I knew that it was an organization that I wanted to be a part of, raising money so that our communities have access to the highest quality of life-limiting illness care, regardless of ability to pay.” In the past five years, Last Chance for White Pants has raised nearly $800,000. Funds that are raised help support more than $1 million in charity care each year and programs for hospice care; grief care; palliative care for those undergoing serious illness treatment; dementia caregiver support; healing arts programs; and community education. “We hope that next year we will be back at Cape Fear Audi for the 2021 Edition of Last Chance for White Pants,” Priest says. “We are thankful for the continued support we receive from our community to ensure hospice and palliative care is available to everyone in our community.” W Info: WhitePants.org or 796-7985


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TAKE

by MEGHAN CORBETT photo by TERAH WILSON

In 2016, Ryan Fletcher co-founded the first ImpactClub in northern Virginia with hopes that it would one day be known as the “Home of Worldchangers.” One year later, CHRISTY and CHRIS SPIVEY launched the Wilmington group. In just a few years, the impacts of this endeavor are far-reaching in the local community. The group meets four times a year to listen to speeches from nonprofits in need before deciding who will be rewarded with a pool of donations collected from club members at the meeting. As hard as it is to believe, this financial sum is typically in the tens of thousands of dollars per meeting. We talk with Christy Spivey about the club’s reach in the Wilmington area. WHAT IS ONE DETAIL/EVENT FROM YOUR CHILDHOOD THAT YOU BELIEVE LED YOU TO WANT TO GIVE BACK? “We didn’t have a lot when I was growing up. But, no matter how much we didn’t have, I knew there was always someone else that had less. My grandmother taught me to be content and to help others.” WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE PEOPLE TO KNOW ABOUT YOUR HUSBAND AND CO-FOUNDER, CHRIS? “My husband, Chris Spivey, is the most compassionate and big-hearted man, especially when it comes to children. It took courage and an extreme amount of work to get ImpactClub started and to keep it going, but he does it for the love of our community. His business sense and experience has been an asset in organizing and growing ImpactClub. He also leads Mustaches for Kids and volunteers for Life Rolls On.” WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVORITE CHARITABLE CAUSES? “There are so many, but I’ll have to say those nonprofits that address basic safety, food, housing, and education – particularly for children – are so important. It’s hard for people to believe that there is need for such fundamental basic things right here in Wilmington, but it is true. If we can ensure that every child is safe, well-fed, has a home, and can get a quality education, we not only improve their chances for a better future, but we improve the long-term health of the community, as well.” WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE MOST IMPRESSIVE FEATURE OF IMPACTCLUB? “There’s no gala, no dressing up, no administrative overhead, no waste. All of the donations go straight from the members to the winning charity. You can show up in flip flops and shorts, hang out, learn about the many nonprofits serving our area, and know that your donation goes directly to the charity.” WHY DO YOU THINK THE WILMINGTON CHAPTER IS SO SUCCESSFUL? “Chris’ leadership has been key in making the local vision for ImpactClub come true, and, the great people of this community who have committed to making this difference for our area by becoming members. They are selfless and excited about what coming together with a common heart can do for others.”W CHRISTY SPIVEY’s full profile will appear in an upcoming WILMA Roundup email. To sign up for daily WILMA emails, go to WILMAmag.com.

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CLOSE ENCOUNTERS by DYLAN PATTERSON illustration by MARK WEBER Dylan Patterson is a writer and filmmaker who teaches English at Cape Fear Community College.

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Let’s face it. Social distancing isn’t fun, and it ain’t easy. You try your best to stay home and away from other people, but once you step out that front door, you just can’t guarantee that other people will stay away from you. So, for those times when you absolutely must go out, here are a few strategies to encourage the clueless to keep their distance: BEACH: Requiring the guy in your life to wear a Speedo will keep most fellow beachgoers at bay, especially when combined with faded tribal tattoos, excessive body hair, and/or gratuitous PDA. Loud music can also drive other sun worshippers away, but be sure to cater to the particular taste of your specific beach locale. While at one area beach, cranking “Free Bird” will act as human repellant, at another beach nearby, you may find that Lynyrd Skynyrd actually serves as social catalyst. When in doubt, blast opera, Creed, or songs featuring bagpipes or accordion. WALKING THE DOG: A heavy chain leash and black leather muzzle on even the most diminutive and passive pup will send most folks running. Particularly effective when paired with a disturbing pet name like “Scab,” “Damian,” or “Mange.” DINNER PARTIES: If you’re not ready for dinner parties, when invites arrive, politely decline saying, “We’re busy that night, but, you know what? Since the pandemic started, we’ve gotten really into these 10,000-piece monochromatic jigsaw puzzles. We’d love to have you guys over soon!” You will never hear from these people ever again.

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However, if you must attend a party, try this: As someone approaches, especially close talkers, announce that you’d love to tell them all about the line of amazing organic cleaning products you recently started repping. For a stubborn case, stage a fake fight or uncomfortable moment with your significant other. Suggested opening lines: “Well, if she’s just a work friend, why’s she texting you at 3 a.m.?!” Or, “I hear it happens to lots of men your age, honey. Try not to worry about it.” Or, “Well? What the hell did the dermatologists say?” WORK: Smelly food for lunch is guaranteed to keep colleagues out of your office. Of course, you can always go with the old standby stinkers like tuna salad, hard-boiled eggs, or foods heavy in garlic. But, why not branch out to other pungent edibles such as blue cheese, Brussels sprouts, or kimchi? Mix it up. Once your co-workers become inured to your lunch funk, you’ll know it’s time to switch up the menu. THE MALL: Strolling the stores with a large snake draped casually over your shoulders will part fellow shoppers like the Red Sea. (If mall security gives you any trouble, just claim it’s an emotional support pet). In a pinch, a lifelike rubber snake can suffice. Most effective when combined with a random accessory for maximum craziness like purple rollerblades or a Ross Perot for President T-shirt. Armed with these techniques, and others of your own devising, I hope, dear reader, that you will manage to stay socially distant and healthy in these challenging times.


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