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AHL

Active Healthy Lifestyle

Understanding the Active Healthy Lifestyle Mentality and Its Implications for Marketing williams-helde marketing communications | 2011


711 Sixth Ave North | Seattle, WA 98109 206.285.1940 | williams-helde.com


contents Introduction: Targeting people who are on the run Methodology

4 4

Part 1 Summary: Who are AHLs and what fuels them? 1.1 Who are AHLs?

7 8

1.2 AHLs across their lives

11

1.3 Super Influencers

12

1.4 Buying styles

14

Part 2 Summary: Connecting with AHLs 2.1 Media consumption

17 18

2.2 Motivation for consuming media

19

2.3 AHL attitudes towards advertising & brands

20

Part 3 Summary: AHL Audience Profiles 3.1 Young Movers

23 24

3.2 Active Parents

26

3.3 Booming Boomers

28

3.4 Senior Jocks

30

Conclusions

32

About Williams-Helde Marketing Communications

34

Sources

34

Fast Facts

35


introduction targeting people Who are alWays on the rUn With an increasing number of reports on American obesity and laziness1, there remains a hidden group of Americans who challenge this stereotype. They’re the “up at 5:30 a.m., run five miles and cook breakfast before you’ve even hit your first snooze” Americans. The “can’t stop me on the court,” “eat this-not-that,” “no amount of snow, sleet, or hail will stop me from getting to the top of this mountain” Americans. They’re fit, educated, super influential, and make up over 77 million power consumers in the United States.2,3 They are Active Healthy Lifestyles (AHLs).

the challenge

over

77

Million

The size, influence, and buying power of AHLs have made them an increasingly desirable audience for many

the numBer of active healthy lifestyles in the united states

brands. However, their unique behaviors and attitudes create particular challenges for advertisers. How do you target a user who is always on the run…literally? The following study was conducted by Williams-Helde Marketing Communications to gain a deeper understanding of AHLs; from how they make purchase

decisions, to why they consume certain types of media, to how marketers can most effectively and efficiently communicate with them.

Methodology This study was constructed with data primarily from Mediamark’s 2010 MRI Doublebase to address three main items: 1) The attitudes and behaviors of individuals who live active, healthy lifestyles, 2) the media consumption behaviors of individuals who live active, healthy lifestyles, and 3) the attitudes, behaviors, and media consumption of particular AHL audience segments. AHLs are defined by two criteria: being active and being healthy. For the purposes of this study, “active” was defined as participating in physical exercise 2 or more times a week OR participating in a sport in the past 12 months. “Healthy” was defined as trying to eat healthy and paying attention to nutrition. All data is significant at an alpha=0.05.

4


summary

Part 1

Who are AHLs AND WHAT FUELS THEM? As we sought to better understand AHLs, we looked at the characteristics that define them, as well as their attitudes and behaviors. What surfaced was a profile of individuals who take responsibility for their decisions and actions. This mentality encompasses all areas of their lives, from how they manage their health, to how they make decisions, to their attitudes about brands. While people at all life stages can be AHLs, middle aged people make up the largest group. We also discovered that motivations for being an AHL change with life stage. There are key mentalities that are universal to all AHL demographics. There are also certain agespecific criteria that increase the probability that an individual will be an AHL. While young people are more active, they are less likely to eat healthy, a trend that reverses with age. We also see that increased education and income brings an increase in active, healthy living. As AHLs age, we see changes in motivations to be active and healthy. Typically, younger AHLs diet for fitness and weight loss reasons, while older AHLs do it because of health conditions. Lastly, we see that, while they may meet other Active Healthy Lifestyle criteria, those who diet and exercise solely due to health conditions do not match the AHL mentality. AHLs don’t just exercise. They are active in all aspects of their lives, from how they gather information about products to their social lives. AHLs show high participation in social events in every consumer category. This is in stark contrast to their inactive counterparts who under-indexed in all of these categories. AHLs showed the highest participation in artistic events like live music and art shows. AHLs are highly informed and extremely influential; however, they’re not easily influenced as they like to gather their own information. AHLs are more knowledgeable and more influential than the average consumer. They show high influence scores in every category examined, but scored particularly high in categories related to active, healthy living such as sports and food. AHLs are well informed, conscientious consumers who understand the value of quality products. AHLs are very informed consumers who do a lot of research before they make buying decisions. Because of this, their decisions are not easily influenced by advertising. They understand the value of quality and are willing to pay for the best, after they’ve identified what “the best” really is.

7


1.1 Who are ahls? Active Healthy Lifestyles come in all shapes, sizes, ages, genders, and life stages. An 18-year-old single female with no children and a 75-year-old married grandfather can both be AHLs. However, we see key differences in motivations for being active and healthy among different groups of individuals.

64%

The first and largest predictor of both activity level and healthy eating is age. Looking at an index of AHLs by age (Chart 1.1.1), we see a bell curve showing the

of adults 45 to 54 are ahls ahl

likelihood of being an AHL peaking around ages 45–54 (64% of adults 45–54 are AHLs). This is driven largely by the balance of physical activity and healthy eating. If we look at active and healthy criteria independently, we see opposing trends. With active, we see a downward sloping trend, with ages 25–34 being the most active (78%) and ages 65+ being the least active (58%). Around ages 55–64, individuals

become more likely to be inactive than active. Conversely, healthy eating trends the opposite way, with ages 65+ eating the healthiest (89%) and ages 18–24 eating least healthy (70%). Around ages 45–54, adults become more likely to eat healthy.

the first and largest predictor of Both activity level and healthy eating is age In addition to age, we see that gender plays a role in physical activity and healthy eating. Chart 1.1.2 shows that men are more likely to be both active and healthy until around ages 45-54, where the trend flips and women become more active and healthy. This is likely due to the presence and age of children in the household, which tends to have a much greater impact on women than men. Men show minimal variance in AHL criteria whether or not they have children, while women with young

AHL, Activity, and Healthy Index by Age (Chart 1.1.1) chart 1.1.1

ahl, activity, and health

By age

115

Index

110 105 100 95

8

Active

Healthy

+ 65

4 55

Age AHL

-6

4

35

45

-4

-5

4

4 -3 25

18

-2

4

90 85 80 75


children are a lot less active and healthy than those with older children. As children move out of the house, there can be a drastic change in the amount of leisure time a mom has, and she appears to be spending more time on herself and her health.

Activity vs Health Index by Age and Gender (Chart 1.1.2) chart 1.1.2 activity vs health indeX By age and gender 120 115 110 Index

105 100 95 90 85 80

+

4

65 ge A

A

ge

55

-6

4 A

ge

45

-5

4 A

ge

35

-4

4 -3 25 ge A

A

ge

18

-2

4

75

Age Active Men

Education and income, which are often correlated, are also key indicators of AHLs. 76% of people with college degrees are AHLs, as opposed to 53% who only graduated high school and 39% who did not graduate high school. Furthermore, 77% of individuals who make more than $200,000 a year are AHLs,

Healthy Men

Active Women

Healthy Women

ahls are Willing to

pAy more

to BUy the Best,

But they won’t take your word that your product is the Best, they want you to prove it.

which is 11% greater than the number who make between $75,000 and $100,000. Further, people who make between $75,000 and $100,000 are 22% more likely to be AHLs than those who make between $40,000 and $50,000.

9


Digging deeper, we see that the motivations for becoming an AHL change through different life stages. Chart 1.1.3 looks at the three key motivators for people living healthy. We see a relatively even split between fitness and weight loss. However, we see that health conditions become a larger motivator for healthy living as people get older. This is somewhat intuitive, as older people are more likely to have various health conditions and concerns. We see slight variances between women and men. Where men’s motivations skew more toward fitness, women’s skew more toward weight loss, particularly at a young age. Lastly, while they may meet the AHL criteria, individuals who diet and exercise solely due to health conditions do not match the AHL mentality. This is likely because the AHL behaviors they exhibit are not by choice.

chart 1.1.3

ahl women and men reasons for healthy diet

Women Age 65+ Women Age 55-64 Women Age 45-54

AHLs

Women Age 35-44 Women Age 25-34 Women Age 18-24 Men Age 65+ Men Age 55-64 Men Age 45-54 Men Age 35-44 Men Age 25-34 Men Age 18-24 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Percent of AHLs Fitness

Health Condition

Weight Loss

implications for marketers As people age, their motivations for active and healthy living change from fitness and weight loss to health conditions. This may affect the audience that a marketer targets, as well as the messaging used for a product. A product targeted to young men should show fitness benefits. The same product targeted to young women should show weight loss benefits. That same product targeted to seniors should show the benefits to health conditions.

10


1.2 ahls across their lives Being active and healthy are not just things that AHLs do, they’re things that AHLs are. A deeper look into the activities of AHLs shows that these behaviors transcend health and fitness and expand across all areas of AHLs’ lives. AHLs are significantly more likely to participate in social activities than their non-AHL counterparts. AHLs are 261% more likely to attend a music performance, 201% more likely to go out to bars or go dancing, 195% more likely to entertain friends or relatives at home, and 153% more likely to participate in a club or organization. AHLs are significantly more likely to consume active media, like the internet, compared to passive media like TV. They are more socially active online as well. When compared to non-AHLs, AHLs are 15% more likely to participate in some form of social media; and specifically 41% more likely to use Facebook. Media behaviors and attitudes will be discussed in greater detail in Part 2.

chart 1.2.1

ahl vs non-ahl indeX for social event participation

AHL vs Non-AHL Index for Social Event Participation (Chart 1.2.1)

150

Index

130 110 90 70 50 30

Art Gallery

Country Music Perform.

Rock Music Perform.

Classical Music Perform.

Other Music Perform.

AHL

137

124

123

139

131

133

Non-AHL

43

63

64

40

52

49

Beach

Dancing

Dining Out

Entertain Friends or Relatives at Home

Karaoke

Live Theater

Museum

Movie

Club/ Organization

Sporting Event

121

129

127

122

124

122

133

138

112

119

122

67

55

59

67

64

67

49

42

82

71

67

Dance Bar/ Perform. Night Club

implications for marketers Whether considering brand positioning, messaging, or media, marketers should think beyond active and healthy and consider aligning with the social lifestyle and mentality of AHLs as well.

11


1.3 sUper inflUencers Active Healthy Lifestyles are highly influential consumers. AHLs over-index for influence on virtually every category from electronics, to news, to fashion, to food. Not surprisingly, AHLs are most influential on product categories related to being active or healthy. Topping the list is Healthy Lifestyle, with 89% of AHLs considered super influencers, Physical Fitness (88%), Dieting (86%) and Environmentally-Friendly Products (85%). Also near the top of the list we see business categories (Business Travel, Finance/Investments), Fashion (Shoes, Clothes, Other), and other leisure and lifestyle categories such as Wine, Vacation Travel, and Cooking. AHLs are influential for two reasons. First, AHLs are

ahls indeX highly for influence on virtually every category from electronics, to news, to fashion, to food

highly informed consumers. Other consumers recognize this and look to AHLs for information on the products they’re interested in. Secondly, AHLs are healthy, fit, socially active, and influential. Who wouldn’t want to be these things? Many non-AHLs aspire to the lifestyles of AHLs, and thus are influenced, through aspiration, by the decisions that AHLs make.

12


Categories

chart 1.3.1

super influencial ahls

Healthy Lifestyle Physical Fitness Dieting Environmentally-Friendly Products Business Travel Insurance Finance/Investment Wine Business Real Estate Vacation Travel Healthcare Politics Interior Decorating News Books Beauty Gardening Education Fashion: Shoes Photography Fashion: Clothes Household Furnishings Prescription Drugs Magazines Coffee Parenting Home Remodeling Restaurants Cooking Sporting Equipment Fashion: Other Products For Babies or Children Shopping Grocery Shopping Pets Sports New Technology Beer Radio New Food Items Computers Cleaning Products Home Electronics Music Mobile/Cell Phones Internet TV Shows Automobiles Snacks Fishing Other Alcoholic Beverages Other Entertainment Movies Newspapers Hunting Automotive Products Other Vehicles Video Games Soft Drinks

50

55

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

Percent

implications for marketers AHLs are super influential consumers. Marketers not in active or healthy categories should consider targeting AHLs to leverage their category influence, particularly if their product can be aligned with an AHL vertical. Marketers can also leverage the active healthy lifestyle aspirations of individuals who are not AHLs.

13


1.4 BUying styles When looking at Buying Style Segments, there are two categories that AHLs fall into: Buyers of the Best, and

Buyers of the Best

Conscientious Consumers. Over 77% of AHLs say they’re Buyers of the Best and 66% say they’re Conscientious Consumers. On the flip side, AHLs are neither PennyPinchers, Habitualized Havers, or Swayable Shopaholics

23% NO

34%

(although further segmentation does show some AHLs in

NO

these categories at certain life stages). These behaviors are consistent with the AHL mentality, which would

77%

suggest that they make decisions based on information

66%

YES

they’ve gathered and not on a gut reaction or a whim.

YES

Further exploration shows more insights into AHLs’ attitudes towards purchases and brands. Consistent with their buying styles, AHLs like to gather information before

conscientious consumers

buying and buy high quality goods, stating that they buy

23%

based on quality, not price. They reiterate that they aren’t swayed by what is ‘hot,’ in style, or convenient. While NO brand may not be the sole decider of which product they

34% NO

buy, it is an important piece of the information gathering

77%

process for AHLs. If they’ve researched or used a brand’s

66%

product before and perceive it as high quality, they

YES

YES

extrapolate that sentiment to other products of that brand. In fact, 63% of AHLs say they’re willing to pay slightly more for a product made by a brand they trust.

AHL Buying Style Index (Chart 1.4.1) chart 1.4.1

ahl Buying style indeX

130

110 100 90

Buying Style

14

Sh Sw op ay ah ab ol le ic s

tu a Ha lize ve d rs

bi Ha

Bu y th ers e Be of st

Co

ns Co cie ns nt um iou er s s

80

Pe nn yPi nc he rs

Index

120


implications for marketers AHLs are information seekers and informed consumers. Brands marketing to AHLs should seek to provide them with information that allows them to make their own informed decisions about products. Marketers should also focus on building a strong brand, as it can lead to strong brand loyalty. AHLs are willing to pay more to buy the best, but they won’t take your word that your product is the best, they want you to prove it.

chart 1.4.2

Buying attitudes

Index 80

85

90

95

100 105 110 115

80

85

90

95

100 105 110 115

I think shopping is a great way to relax I like to shop around before making a purchase I buy based on quality, not price Price is more important to me than brand names I am influenced by what’s hot and what’s not

Buying Attitudes

A celebrity endorsement may influence me to consider or buy a product I am willing to give up convenience in return for a product that is environmentally safe I buy brands that reflect my style

I tend to make impulse purchases I always check the ingredients and nutritional content of food products before I buy them My children have a significant impact on the brands I choose I would pay extra for a product that is consistent with the image I want to convey If a product is made by a company I trust, I'll buy it even if it is slightly more expensive I am willing to pay more for a product that is environmentally safe Brand name is the best indication of quality

15


summary

Part 2

connecting with AHLs “Active” is truly a lifestyle for AHLs. Beyond their personal behaviors and attitudes, this principle applies to their media consumption. AHLs consume more active types of media, such as the internet, and less passive media, like TV. Interestingly, this trend is the opposite of their non-active counterparts. We see other stark differences in motivations to consume media and attitudes towards advertising between AHLs and non-AHLs. AHLs’ media consumption is almost the polar opposite of non-AHLs, with AHLs consuming more active media like the internet and less passive media like TV. Topping the media list for AHLs is the internet, followed by other active media like magazines and outdoor, not surprising for people always on the go. TV falls to the bottom of the media consumption index for AHLs. If we compare non-AHLs to AHLs, we see the exact opposite: TV tops the list while the internet, magazines, and outdoor are at the bottom. Not only does their media consumption differ, but AHLs motivation for consuming various types of media differs from that of non-AHLs. Beyond the differences in consumption of media, the motivation for consuming different types of media is reflective of an AHL’s lifestyle as well. AHLs like to seek out their own information via magazines and the internet. On the flip side, non-AHLs gather their information passively through mediums like TV and radio. AHLs view these passive mediums as relaxation tools, not as sources of information. AHLs want to do their own research before investing in a product, and they have mixed attitudes towards advertising. The desire to learn and seek out information affects AHLs’ attitudes towards advertising. At the end of the day, they have a relatively positive attitude towards advertising as a whole, likely due to the fact that they don’t view advertising as an informational authority. For this, they rely on themselves to seek out information on products and brands. The end result is that if they have a bad brand experience, it’s due to poor research or use on their part, not because an ad was inappropriate or misleading.

17


2.1 Media consUMption When looking at media consumption, there are some stark differences between AHLs and non-AHLs. AHLs tend to view much more active types of media, with 67% of AHLs indexing as heavy internet users and 65% as heavy magazine consumers. 65% of AHLs also indexed high for outdoor media consumption, not surprising for an audience that’s always on the go. Conversely, they view a lot less passive media like TV. Non-AHLs are exactly opposite, indexing well for TV but poorly for more active media.

ahls are

104%

to Be heavy internet users than non-ahls non-ahl

More likely

Because we typically see younger generations having higher adoption of digital media, it might not be a stretch to assume that, because there are more young AHLs than older AHLs, we’d see this kind of division. Further exploration shows that media consumption does shift towards more passive media with age, but this media consumption pattern is present for AHLs of all ages. Even at 65+, AHLs are 102% more likely to consume

internet media and 8% less likely to watch TV than non-AHLs. As we see that active behaviors penetrate all facets of AHLs’ lives, it is no surprise to see the same with their media consumption.

AHL vs. Non-AHL Media Usage Index (Chart 2.1) chart 2.1.1 ahl vs non-ahl

media usage indeX

115

Magazine

110

Newspaper

Index

105

Radio

100

TV

95

Outdoor

90 85

Primetime TV

80

Internet AHL

Non-AHL

implications for marketers This information suggests that marketers trying to target AHLs should look to the internet, magazines, outdoor media, and emerging platforms such as mobile and tablets that are used by individuals who are actively consuming media. While TV under-indexes, there is still a healthy percent of AHLs who consume TV. However, their motivations are different, thus messaging should be too.

18


2.2 Motivation for consUMing Media Although we see that active media greatly out-indexes passive media for AHLs, it is important to note that 47% of AHLs still index as heavy TV consumers. The implication is not that marketers should ignore TV when trying to connect with AHLs, but that we must assess AHLs motivations in consuming various types of media to better understand how to speak to

We see that

them on these different channels.

ActiVe mediA,

We see that active media, like the internet, are used much more for information gathering and inspiration than passive media, like TV and radio, which are used primarily for relaxation. The internet is considered an information tool 67% more of the time than TV, while TV is used for relaxation

are used much more for information gathering and inspiration than passive media, like tv and radio, which are used primarily for relaXation

like the internet

243% more than the internet. The internet was used 40% more than TV for inspiration, yet 34% less than magazines, which are used for information, inspiration, and relaxation. Newspapers were used primarily to gather information and

AHL vs. Non-AHL Media Consumption Motivation (Chart 2.2)

the radio was used primarily to relax.

chart 2.2.1 ahl

125

media usage indeX

120 115

Index

110

Relaxation Only

105

Inspiration Only

100

Information Onl

95

Relaxation & Ins

90

Relaxation & Inf

ivation (Chart 2.2)

Three-in-one

80

et rn In

te

ap Ne w

sp

in az ag M

Relaxation Only

er

es

io Ra d

TV

75

Inspiration Only Information Only

Media

Relaxation & Inspiration Relaxation & Information Information & Inspiration

et rn te In

er

Three-in-one

ap

sp

Information & In

85

19


implications for marketers Marketers should use media consumption motivations when crafting brand messaging for each channel. Because the internet is used primarily for gathering information, it is a great place to put product information and details about the brand. TV, used primarily for relaxation, would be a great place to push non-product and non-technical brand messaging. TV, along with the internet and magazines, are great places for inspirational brand campaigns. While magazines index well for information, inspiration, and relaxation, marketers shouldn’t read this as a free-for-all to put whatever messages they want into magazines. Magazines are thick with editorial content and professional reviews—the kind of content that AHLs use for information gathering. If marketers are looking to place ads, they should look more to branding content. If they’re looking to seed information, they should look into content integration.

2.3 ahl attitUdes toWards advertising & Brands Active Healthy Lifestyles’ attitudes towards advertising and brands are consistent with the notion that they like to do their own product research as opposed to being influenced by third parties. They do not believe that brands that are advertised are better than those that are not, and often find advertising annoying and manipulative. They are looking for

ahls are looking for

inFormAtion

not for someone to tell them what to think.

information, not for someone to tell them what to think. Their attitudes towards advertising have interesting implications for their feelings about

brands. In a sense, they are blind to advertising messaging because they rely so heavily on their own information to make product decisions. They take advertising “for what it is.” The fact that they don’t “take the brand’s word for it” when choosing a product impacts their brand experiences. If an AHL has a bad brand experience, they are much less likely to blame it on the brand and more likely to blame it on themselves. For example, if a running shoe doesn’t work well, it’s because “I have high arches,” or because “I have a wide stance,” not because it is a bad product. If the AHL made an educated, informed decision that the product was good before they bought it, than the poor experience must not be blamed on the product. That does not mean, however, that they won’t remember the problem the next time they see that brand in a product consideration set.

20


chart 2.3 ahlTowards attitudes Advertising towards advertising AHL Attitudes (Chart 2.3)

70.00

65.00

Percent of AHLs

Advertising helps services that I ne 60.00

Too many produc

Advertising is mo 55.00

Much of advertis

I like to look at ad 50.00

On average, bran than brands that 45.00 Completely disagree

Completely agree Attitude

Advertising helps keep me up-to-date about products and services that I need or would like to have

A lot of advertising is way too annoying

Too many products do not perform as well as the ads claim

I like to look at advertising

Advertising is more manipulative than it is informative

On average, brands that are advertised are better in quality than brands that are not advertised

implications for marketers AHLs are looking for information, not to be told what to think. When determining messaging, marketers should make sure they’re providing what AHLs are looking for. Also, a bad product experience can be turned into a good brand experience if the brand can help alleviate the AHLs’ mistake, even though “it wasn’t the brand’s fault.”

21


summary

Part 3

AHL audience profiles AHLs exist at every life stage. That’s not to say that “a rose is a rose is a rose.” There are some key differences between groups of AHLs. The final frontier in exploring the AHL audience is to understand these differences and the impact they have on marketing to these individuals. In breaking down AHLs, one of the biggest differentiators is life stage. The definition of life stage can vary greatly, so we have broken it down into four simple groups: Young Movers, Active Parents, Booming Boomers, and Senior Jocks. Young Movers Typically 18–35, Young Movers have low to moderate incomes, are either single or recently hitched, and are childless. This is a socially active group that enjoys all physical activities, although members of this demographic are much more likely to work out than to eat healthy. Active Parents Active Parents are typically 25–55, married or divorced, with a moderate income, and have at least one child in the household. The addition of a spouse and children means much less leisure time. This leads to an increase in multitasking, meaning more physical activities are focused around social and recreational activities with friends, spouses, and kids. Active Parents are also slightly more health conscious than their younger AHL counterparts. Booming Boomers Booming Boomers typically range from 45–65, are married or divorced, with a moderate to high income, and have children who are no longer at home or nearing an age when they’re likely to move out. Without the kids, the resurgence in independence means more “me time” for these young-at-heart actives. Their physical activity revolves around health and fun, either aerobic exercise or recreational sports. There is an increase in casual sporting like fishing and golf, as well as an increased attention to health and diet. Senior Jocks Senior Jocks are typically 65+, married, divorced, or widowed, have adult children, and maybe even grandchildren. Their physical activities revolve around health and leisure, mostly aerobic exercising and casual sports. While life stage proves to be a big indicator for attitudes and behaviors, AHLs of all life stages share some unique attributes, particularly the view that “active” isn’t an adjective, it’s a lifestyle.

23


young movers

who are they?

At the earliest stage in our spectrum, we have Young Movers. Young Movers are typically 18–35 years old with low to moderate incomes. They’re either single, engaged, or recently married and do not have children.

24

Age Range

18–35

Income

Low–Moderate

Marital Status

Single, Engaged, or Recently Married

Children

No

Key Activities

Competitive Sports (football, basketball, soccer), Extreme Sports (backpacking, rock climbing, snowboarding), Yoga


Women

Lifestyle Young Movers are highly active individuals. They tend to be drawn to physical activities of all types, but were 44.77% more likely especially to competitive and extreme to eat healthy than men sports. Their lack of children allows them a lot of free time for activities. As a result, they exhibit highly social behaviors. They are less concerned about diet than older AHLs. They are also more likely to be influenced by friends and advertising than older AHLs. Their motivations for dieting are primarily fitness and weight loss. Men vs Women Young women are 6.39% more likely to be AHLs than young men. This was largely driven by the healthy eating habits of this group of women and the poor eating habits of the men. Men were 71.37% more active than women when looking at active were 71.37% more criteria alone. Conversely, women were 44.77% active than women more likely to eat healthy when looking exclusively at healthy criteria. While both men and women Young Movers indexed well for most AHL activities, we see men indexing highest for competitive physical activities where women were more likely to participate in aerobic physical activities.

men

Health Conscious Diet Socially Active Influenced by Advertising

TV

media consumption

Overall Activity

Radio Print Online Outdoor

Super Influencer

Penny Pinchers Buying styles

influence

activities

Media Behaviors Young Movers are super consumers when it comes to media. They are incredibly tech savvy and show exceptionally high use of the internet and new technology.

Conscientious Consumers Buyers of the Best Habitual Havers Swayable Shopaholics

implications for marketers Young Movers, like other younger audiences, are incredibly tech savvy and spend a lot of time online and engaging with emerging technologies. Marketers looking to reach Young Movers should seek to do so on digital platforms. They work out for fitness and weight loss reasons, so messaging should resonate with these motivations.

25


active parents

who are they?

Our second group of AHLs are Active Parents. Active Parents are typically 25–55 years old with moderate incomes. They’re typically married with children.

26

Age Range

25–55

Income

Moderate

Marital Status

Married or Divorced

Children

Yes

Key Activities

Social & Recreational (basketball, soccer, softball, bicycling, jogging)


Lifestyle Active Parents’ lives and activities are highly affected by their children. AHLs with children typically have significantly less leisure time, hence they are super multitaskers. They’re less social than their Young Mover peers. Active Parents��� physical activities become paired with social activities, whether it’s playing pick-up soccer with coworkers or working out with a friend. They are not easily influenced by peers or advertising and are considered highly influential. With more disposable income, they like to buy the best products for themselves and their children.

active parents’

pHysicAL

Men vs Women Men and women are equally likely to be AHLs during parenthood. The largest difference is how their behaviors shift with the age of their children. Men are typically less impacted by the age of their children than women. Women, commonly the primary caretakers, become more active and healthy as their children grow up, likely due to an increase in leisure time as their children become more independent.

activities

Become paired with social activities

Health Conscious Diet Socially Active Influenced by Advertising

TV

media consumption

Overall Activity

Radio Print Online Outdoor

Super Influencer

Penny Pinchers Buying styles

influence

activities

Media Behaviors Active Parents are heavy internet users. They also see a lot of outdoor advertising, more than any other group. Their TV usage is low compared to other media types.

Conscientious Consumers Buyers of the Best Habitual Havers Swayable Shopaholics

implications for marketers Active Parents’ behaviors are reflective of their roles as parents. They have less leisure time and are appreciative of things that help them multitask and save time, considerations when determining product messaging. Marketers should also consider the strong connection that Active Parents have between physical and social activities.

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Booming Boomers

who are they?

Booming Boomers are typically 45–65 years old with moderate to high incomes. They typically have kids who have moved out of the house.

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Age Range

45–65

Income

Moderate–High

Marital Status

Married or Divorced

Children

Yes; Out of the home

Key Activities

Aerobic & Recreational (bicycling, basketball, canoeing, skiing, golfing, hiking, target shooting)


Lifestyle After many years with kids in the household, Booming Boomers finally have some “me time.� They put some of their newfound leisure time into their own well-being, focusing on aerobic and recreational physical activities. Health becomes an increasing concern and motivation for both exercise and healthy eating. They have a moderate to high level of disposable income, yet are very conscientious shoppers. Men vs Women Around the Booming Boomer stage, there is a fundamental shift in activity and healthy eating between men and women. Before this stage, men are both more active and healthier than women. Around this stage, women become both healthier and more active. Again, this is likely due to the increase in leisure time that women have with children now out of the household.

me time.

with children out of the house, these ahls put some of their newfound leisure time into their own well-Being.

Health Conscious Diet Socially Active Influenced by Advertising

TV

media consumption

Overall Activity

Radio Print Online Outdoor

Super Influencer

Penny Pinchers Buying styles

influence

activities

Media Behaviors Booming Boomers show a significant level of TV consumption, with approximately 61% of the audience indexed as heavy TV viewers. They are also the first group to index well for print, with over 56% being heavy print users. That said, they still show strong internet usage, with 49% indexed as heavy users.

Conscientious Consumers Buyers of the Best Habitual Havers Swayable Shopaholics

implications for marketers Booming Boomers are a health-concerned group with newly found time to work out and eat healthy, and the income to invest in doing so. They are also the first group that shows heavy use of traditional media outlets, in addition to the use of digital media. Marketers should consider all media when trying to reach this audience.

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senior Jocks

who are they?

Senior Jocks are typically 65+ years old with a moderate income, as they are likely retired. They typically are (or have been) married, have kids who have moved out of the house, and perhaps even grandkids.

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Age Range

65+

Income

Moderate

Marital Status

Married, Divorced, or Widowed

Children

Yes; Out of the home; Grandchildren

Key Activities

Leisure (walking, bicycling, golfing, cross-country skiing)


Lifestyle Senior Jocks have reached an age where health conditions play a role in their everyday lives. Many of their activities and diet decisions revolve around their health. Their physical activities have slowed down to more leisurely activities like walking or golf.

Many of the

ActiVities

of senior Jocks revolve around their health.

and decisions

Men vs Women Both senior men and women show strong healthy behaviors as they get older, men at 86% and women at 90%. Their activity levels slip with age, women slightly more than men, with 66% of men and 52% of women being active.

Health Conscious Diet Socially Active Influenced by Advertising

TV

media consumption

Overall Activity

Radio Print Online Outdoor

Super Influencer

Penny Pinchers Buying styles

influence

activities

Media Behaviors Senior Jocks consume much more passive media than active media; however, they still show higher use of active media than their non-AHL counterparts. Their internet use shows only 26% indexing as heavy internet users. Their TV usage is strong, with 67% being heavy users; and they’re the first audience to index high for newspaper consumption, with 70% being regular newspaper readers.

Conscientious Consumers Buyers of the Best Habitual Havers Swayable Shopaholics

implications for marketers Senior Jocks show a large shift in media consumption, leaning much more towards TV and newspaper than any other type of media. Their motivations for working out also shift heavily towards health reasons.

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concLusions One of the most important aspects of marketing has always been the need to slip into the role of consumer psychologist: To understand the interplay between an individual’s environment, thoughts, moods, body, and behaviors. It’s these pillars, and

En v

the connection between them that have driven the research behind this paper.

e nm iro

Thoughts

The key to the AHL mindset is responsibility. These

nt

individuals are willing to take full responsibility for their decisions, their health, their actions and the outcomes of their experiences. Their belief in

Mood

Body

personal accountability is expressed through their behavior: Actively gathering information before making decisions; waking up early to prepare healthy meals and work out; and living active social lives to stay balanced and happy. And in turn, it’s these positive

Behavior

behaviors that lead to them being highly influential with other consumers. What marketers must understand is that AHLs don’t want to be told what to think. They want to seek out brand and product information and make their own decisions. As marketers, we must remember not to try to manipulate or persuade AHLs, but provide them with the right information to show them why our products are better, why they’re worth the extra money, or why they’re worth the drive to the store. Brands who reach their audiences in this way, like AHLs, will remain at the front of the pack for years to come. Key Findings Part 1: Who are AHLs and what fuels them? 1.1 Who are AHLs?

• There are AHLs at every age and life stage, but they peak at around 45–54.

• There is an inverse relationship between activity and healthy eating, with younger people being

• As people age, their motivations for dieting shift from fi tness and weight loss to health.

more active and less healthy, and older people being less active and more healthy. 1.2 AHLs across their lives

• AHLs are active and healthy in all areas of their life, especially in their social lives. 1.3 Super Influencers

• AHLs are extremely infl uential across virtually all consumer categories, but particularly in

• AHLs like to make decisions based on their own gathered information and aren’t typically

categories relative to physical activity or health, like sports and food. swayed by third parties, whether they be peers or advertisers.

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1.4 Buying styles

• AHLs like to gather information and make well-informed purchases.

• They aren’t tied exclusively to specific brands but they are loyal to brands that have proven themselves.

• Quality is more important than price to AHLs.

Part 2: Connect with AHLs

2.1 AHLs don’t consume media like their counterparts

• AHLs index high for consumption of active media like internet and magazines and low for passive media like TV and radio (in stark contrast to non-AHLs, whose media consumption behaviors are the opposite).

2.2 Motivations for consuming media are different from their counterparts

• AHLs use active media like the internet for information gathering and inspiration.

• AHLs use passive media like TV primarily for relaxation.

• Magazines were used for information, inspiration, and relaxation by AHLs.

2.3 Attitudes towards advertising & brands

• AHLs do not think of advertising as an information source, but use it to keep up on new products. • AHLs are not likely to be swayed by advertising and often find it misleading and annoying.

Influence

Activities

Young Movers

Active Parents

Booming Boomers

Senior Jocks

Overall Activity Health Conscious Diet Socially Active Influenced by Advertising Super Influencer

Media Consumption

TV Radio Print Online Outdoor Penny Pinchers Buying Styles

Conscientious Consumers Buyers of the Best Habitual Havers Swayable Shopaholics

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appendix About Williams-Helde marketing communications Williams-Helde is all about building harmonious relationships, with clients, brands, and consumers. We work well as a roster agency or AOR for clients with an active lifestyle message. We provide the inspiration and perspiration to build brands, create communities, and drive sales. You’ll love working with us. Contacts Marc Williams, President

Steven Clough, Media Director

711 Sixth Ave North

711 Sixth Ave North

Seattle, WA 98109

Seattle, WA 98109

p: (206) 285-1940

p: (206) 285-1940

e: slf@williams-helde.com

e: stevenc@williams-helde.com

w: williams-helde.com

w: williams-helde.com

Cite this paper Clough, S (2011). Active Healthy Lifestyles. Williams-Helde Marketing Communications.

Sources 1 Stone, E (2010). Fat and Fatter: The World’s 10 Fattest Countries 2010. GlobalPost. http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/health/101118/fat-and-fatter-worlds-10-fattest-countries 2 (2010) Major Economic Indicators 2010. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 3 Sondik, E, Medans, J, & Gentleman, J (2010). Summary Health Statistics for U.S. Adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2009. Center for Disease Control and U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. 4 (2010). World Health Statistics 2010. World Health Organization, Department of Health Statistics & Informatics of the Information, and Evidence & Research Cluster. 5V  an Dusen, A & Ferrey, P (2008). World’s Healthiest Countries. Forbes.com LLC. http://www.forbes.com/2008/04/07/health-world-countries-forbeslife-cx_avd_0408health.html 6 (2010). 2010 Doublebase GfK MRI. Gfk Mediamark Research & Intelligence, LLC. 7 Bodhaine, S (2009). U.S. Consumer Health & Wellness Segmentation. The Futures Company.

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fast facts • There are over 77 million AHLs in the United States. • AHLs peak around age 45-54; 64% of adults 45-54 are AHLs. • 75% of adults age 25-34 are active; 58% of adults 65+ are active. • 89% of adults age 65+ eat healthy; 70% of adults 18-24 eat healthy. • 66% of people with college degrees are AHLs; 53% of people with only high school degrees are AHLs; 39% of those who did not graduate high school are AHLs. • 77% of individuals making $200,000 a year are AHLs, 11% more than those who make between $75,000 and $100,000. • People who make between $75,000 and $100,000 a year are 22% more likely to be AHLs than those making between $40,000 and $50,000 and 47% more likely than those making between $20,000 and $30,000. • AHLs are 261% more likely to attend a live music performance, 201% more likely to go out to bars or go dancing, 195% more likely to entertain friends or relatives at home, and 153% more likely to participate in a club or organization than non-AHLs. • AHLs are 15% more likely to participate in some form of social media, and 41% more likely to use Facebook than non-AHLs. • 89% of AHLs are Super Influencers about Healthy Lifestyles, 88% about Physical Fitness, 86% about Dieting, and 85% about Environmentally-Friendly Products. • Over 77% of AHLs say they buy the best and 66% say they’re conscientious consumers. • 63% of AHLs say they’re willing to pay slightly more for a product that is made by a brand they trust. • 67% of AHLs index as heavy internet users, 65% index as heavy consumers of magazines and outdoor media. • At 65+, AHLs are 102% more likely to consume internet media and 8% less likely to watch TV than non-AHLs. • 47% of AHLs index as heavy TV consumers. • AHLs consider the internet an information tool 67% more than TV; TV is used for relaxation 243% more than the internet. • AHLs used the internet 40% more than TV and 34% less than magazines for inspiration. • Young women are 6.39% more likely to be AHLs than young men (18-35); men of this age are 71.37% more active than women and women were 44.77% more likely to eat healthy than men. • 61% of Booming Boomers index as heavy TV users, 56% as heavy print users, and 49% as heavy internet users. • 86% of senior men and 90% of senior women eat healthy; 66% of senior men and 52% of senior women are active. • 67% of Senior Jocks index as heavy TV users; 70% index as heavy newspaper consumers.

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Understanding the Active Healthy Lifestyle Mentality and Its Implications for Marketing