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WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA

2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT

CONSERVE. ENHANCE. RESTORE.

2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA


WHC-funded project: Wetlands on Wheels 2017-2018: Advancing and Engaging Stewardship in BC. Photo credit: BC Wildlife Federation.

Wildlife Habitat Canada 2039 Robertson Road, Suite 247, Ottawa, ON K2H 8R2 Phone: 613-722-2090 Email: admin@whc.org

Toll Free: 1-800-669-7919 Website: www.whc.org

Cover Image: 2017 Canadian Wildlife Habitat Conservation Stamp Image, “Tranquil Waters—Canada Geese ” by Angela Lorenzen.

Charitable Registration Number: 11929 8131 RR0001 All donations to WHC are tax deductible.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

WHC-funded project: Saskatchewan Breeding Bird Atlas– A Public-Private Partnership for Conservation. Photo Credit: Bird Studies Canada.

4

About Wildlife Habitat Canada

5

Message from the Chair

6

Canadian Wildlife Habitat Conservation Stamps and Limited Edition Prints

8

Conservation Edition Prints

9

Fundraising

10

New Website

11

#WHCStampMeans

12

Conservation

13

Measuring Success

14

The Migratory Birds Convention Act

15

Highlight of Accomplishments: Grant Program

16

Canadian Habitat Joint Ventures

18

WHC Supported Conservation Projects

46

Grant Program Performance Indicators

48

Financial Summary 2017-2018

52

Our Supporters and Partners

53

Supporting a New Generation of Hunters

54

Staff

55

Board of Directors

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About Wildlife Habitat Canada We envision a future where Canadians share a conservation ethic that recognizes the fundamental importance of wildlife habitats that are abundant, rich and support biodiversity.

OBJECTIVES: 

Provide a funding mechanism for wildlife habitat conservation programs in Canada

Conserve, restore and enhance wildlife habitat in order to retain the diversity, distribution and abundance of wildlife.

Foster coordination and leadership in the conservation community.

Promote the conservation contributions of waterfowl hunters and encourage waterfowl hunting participation.

WHC-supported project: Wetland Habitat Conservation, Restoration and Enhancement on BC’s Sunshine Coast. Photo credit: Sunshine Coast Wildlife Project.

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2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA


Message from the Chair In 2017, WHC celebrated three remarkable moments in history: Canada’s 150th anniversary; the 100th anniversary of the Migratory Birds Convention Act, and the 33rd Canadian Wildlife Habitat Conservation Stamp and Print, featuring the painting “Tranquil WatersCanada Geese” by Canadian artist, Angela Lorenzen. Thanks to the thousands of waterfowl hunters and others in Canada who purchase the Stamp, WHC is able to conserve, enhance and restore wildlife habitat across the country. The money from Stamp sales enabled WHC to invest $1,280,136 in grants to 44 different projects. This allowed us to leverage more than $6.97 million in additional partner revenue to support conservation activities. The result? More than 11,735 hectares (29,000 acres) of valuable wildlife habitat being conserved, enhanced or restored through the efforts of more than 30,000 participants. In early 2018, Environment and Climate Change Canada introduced a proposal to raise the price of the Stamp, which saw its last increase in 1991. With continuing inflation and other rising costs, an increase in the Stamp price is critical to ensuring that WHC is able to continue directing funds to important on-the-ground conservation work.

Wm. Michael Phippen Chair Wildlife Habitat Canada Board of Directors Above: The WHC Board Chairman captaining the Delta Lifeboat, part of the Canadian Lifeboat Institution, on a WHC field tour of the Fraser River Delta in B.C.

Stamp funds have also helped us support new educational and mentorship programs that promote hunter safety and provide knowledge for new hunters (You can learn more about these projects under “Grant Program” and on page 53 of this report). This includes the “Sportswoman of The Year” Award, which is part of Manitoba Wildlife Federation’s program to get people involved in hunting and wildlife conservation. WHC has continued to provide leadership on various national and international committees, including the Green Budget Coalition, North American Wetlands Conservation Council (Canada), and the North American Waterfowl Management Plan. By being closely engaged in policy and wildlife management issues, we can continue to help safeguard important ecosystems, wildlife species and help all Canadians better understand the need for, and value of, conservation. We believe that the work we are doing now will help ensure wetland habitat thrives in the future. On the doorstep of our 35th anniversary, we have a lot of accomplishments of which to be proud, but also the keen desire to keep making important strides forward. I encourage you to learn more about what we do as a core member of Canada’s conservation community. Respectfully submitted,

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Canadian Wildlife Habitat Conservation Stamps & Limited Edition Prints Every year the winner of Wildlife Habitat Canada’s art competition has their painting re-created on the Canadian Wildlife Habitat Conservation Stamp and Print. The Stamp is affixed to the Migratory Game Bird Hunting Permit for waterfowl hunters and is also sold to collectors and art enthusiasts to generate funds for our grant program. We are pleased to welcome Québec artist Pierre Girard back to our program in 2018. Pierre’s painting, “Autumn Colours - Wood Duck,” is featured on the 2018 Stamp and Print. Pierre is a seasoned wildlife artist, whose art first appeared in the Canadian Wildlife Habitat Conservation Stamp and Print series in 2010 (Green-winged Teal). His work has also been featured on two Québec Wildlife Foundation Stamps.

Pierre Girard Winner of the 2018 Art Competition. www.pierregirard.com

“Autumn Colours - Wood Duck,” featured on the 2018 Stamp and Print.

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2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA


The 2017 Winning Painting The Branta canadensis, commonly referred to as the Canada Goose, has distinct Canadian roots. To celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary in 2017, the Canada Goose was selected as the species to appear on the 33rd Canadian Wildlife Habitat Conservation Stamp and Print.

2017 Print and Stamp Image

The winning painting for 2017, “Tranquil Waters Canada Geese,” was painted by Angela Lorenzen of London, ON. Angela began selling her works as a professional artist in 1993, and has painted full-time since 2009. She has a background in the biological sciences, and over the years she has taken many photos of Canadian geese.

Canadian artist, Angela Lorenzen www.angelalorenzen.ca

Angela decided on the photo that she used as the reference for her 2017 painting based on the quality of light and the windswept reeds. From there, she chose the most interesting poses for the geese and began painting. Her piece was selected out of 42 entries as the winning painting to be featured on the 2017 Stamp and Print.

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Conservation Edition Prints

WHC donates in the name of conservation Every year, we donate Conservation Edition Prints in support of hunter education and conservation

fundraising

events

across

Canada. We provide these timeless art pieces for events such as banquets, auctions, golf tournaments, youth education events and raffles.

WHC Conservation Edition Print Recipients Central Kootenay Invasive Species Society

Fondation pour la Sauvegarde de la Truite Mouchetée

Ducks Unlimited Canada, Hampton Chapter Nature Canada FédéCP Gaspésie-Iles de la Madeleine Regional Conference Fédération Quebecoise des chasseurs et pécheurs

Port Moody Ecological Society Wild for Hope Sportsman Dinner

WHC is grateful for the support of so many talented artists who make the conservation Stamps and Prints what they are.

Thank you to all of the artists who have submitted their work to WHC! A portion of waterfowler John Clements’ Permit/Stamp collection. Photo credit: John Clements.

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2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA


Fundraising Photo credit: Capital Waterfowling Inc.

Fundraising is a critical component for not only the organizations that we work with, but for WHC as well. We are always looking for new ways to generate additional funds to help us achieve our mandate, and to flow more funds into our competitive grant program. In 2017, WHC developed a partnership with

Capital Waterfowling Inc. (CW), a company that produces Canadian-made duck and goose calls. A special conservation edition Goose Call (to complement the 2017 Canada Goose Stamp and Print) was produced, and CW donated a portion of the proceeds from each sale to WHC. When all was said and done, CW donated $6,800 to WHC, to support habitat conservation and waterfowl hunter recruitment and education activities in Canada. We are excited to continue this partnership in 2018, with a special, new to market Wood Duck call! capitalwaterfowling.com

Sustainable Outdoors Co. In 2017, WHC also partnered up with outdoor clothing company, Sustainable Outdoors Co (SOC). SOC supports conservation initiatives through its sales. As the featured charity in December 2016 and January 2017, WHC received a portion of the proceeds from sales during

this

time

period

towards

its

conservation programs.

sustainableoutdoorsco.com

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New Website—a fresh new look!

In March 2017, WHC unveiled its NEW website! Now, it is easier than ever to learn more about what we do and the projects we are working on.

www.whc.org The imagery was given a much needed facelift, content and menus were fine tuned, and the layout and design were thoughtfully planned to be interactive and engaging. An Online Store component was added, to allow our customers to purchase their Canadian Wildlife Habitat Conservation Prints in just a few clicks. We re-vamped our online donation portal to make it even easier for our supporters to make a donation of any amount—funds that are critical to ensuring WHC continues to move forward in achieving its mandate. Stop by and browse around our new site. We are sure that you will like what you see! While you’re there, don’t forget to subscribe to our quarterly e-newsletter!

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2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA


#WHCstampmeans Campaign In 2017 WHC challenged hunters, conservationists, artists and its grantees alike to think about what the Stamp means to them. To take part in this campaign, participants took a selfie with their 2017 Stamp, uploaded

it

to

Twitter

and/or

Facebook, and captioned the photo with a description of why the Stamp was important to them and the hashtag #WHCstampmeans.

This campaign raised awareness about WHC and gave supporters the chance to reflect on the importance of the Stamp‌ and the chance to win a variety of great

prizes!

Prizes

were

awarded monthly through a draw. Some of the prizes up for grabs included a Limited Edition Print, a Capital Waterfowling conservation edition Goose Call and a Cabela’s gift card and prize pack.

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Conservation Partnerships are the cornerstone of conservation. WHC works with conservation organizations, NGO’s, government and industry to get critical funds on the ground for habitat conservation, stewardship efforts and education initiatives across Canada. But not all conservationists are necessarily part of an organization, business, or association. Waterfowl hunters are some of the most dedicated conservationists in the country. The proceeds from the Canadian Wildlife Habitat Conservation Stamp, affixed to the federal Migratory Game Bird Hunting Permit that waterfowl hunters are required to purchase, directly support conservation efforts. Waterfowl hunters’ support is not limited to financial means. Many hunters also donate their time to volunteering activities and fundraising events.

Photo credit: Delta Waterfowl Foundation.

In August 2017, WHC held an event in partnership with the new Cabela’s store in Ottawa during their Great Outdoor Days promotion. WHC’s goal was to generate awareness of what the Stamp funds are used for and promote the conservation contributions of waterfowl hunters. Customers were able to purchase Migratory Game Bird Hunting Permit (with Stamp) from Cabela’s, and Environment and Climate Change Canada attended to promote the electronic permitting system.

Portion of the Canadian Wildlife Habitat Conservation Stamp series on display at Cabela’s Canada (Ottawa, ON).

Did you know? The conference room at the Ottawa Cabela’s store is decked out with images from the Canadian Wildlife Habitat Conservation Stamp series. The display recognizes the important role that waterfowl hunters continue to play in habitat conservation across Canada.

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2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA


Measuring Success Performance Indicators “Performance indicators are measurable results that demonstrate how a project’s objectives are met.” Environment Canada, “Performance Indicators” (2013-07-02)

As required by Environment and Climate Change Canada, WHC has a comprehensive set of performance indicators in place for the competitive grant program under the Stamp Initiative. See pages 46-47 for our 2017-2018 program achievements.

WHC-supported project: Introduction to Waterfowl Hunting Activities - 2017. Photo credit: Sauvaginiers Grande Region Québec.

NEW! As part of the Contribution Agreement with Environment and Climate Change Canada, WHC will develop a performance measurement framework (PMF) for WHC’s Strategic Plan in 2018-2019. This will cover progress on WHC’s strategies to: 

increase funding available for Canadian wildlife habitat conservation;

provide and administer grants to fund wetland and waterfowl conservation and research, and conservation networking projects;

promote and advocate the importance of wildlife habitat conservation in Canada;

work with governments, NGO’s and other partners to support and enhance WHC’s conservation efforts;

communicate the role and contributions that the waterfowl hunting community are making to wildlife and habitat conservation; and,

promote and increase participation waterfowl hunting in Canada.

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in


The Migratory Birds Convention Act (MBCA) 100 years of Canadian Conservation!

On August 16, 1916, the Migratory Bird Convention, the first international treaty on wildlife conservation, was signed between Canada and the United States in order to regulate bird populations. To implement this convention, the Migratory Birds Convention Act (MBCA) was passed in Canada in 1917. At that time, Canadians began realizing how unstable bird populations had become and the dramatic effect people had on wildlife populations. In 2017, 100 years later, bird populations have become more sustainable. Waterfowl populations in particular have largely recovered due to decades of research, habitat restoration, and stewardship. (Source: http://www.hww.ca/en/issues-and-topics/ centennial-of-migratory-birds-convention.html)

Photo credit: Ryan Reynolds.

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Highlight of Accomplishments: Grant Program In 2017-2018, WHC provided:

34

44 grants

to

...totalling approximately

organizations

$1.28 million.

Photo credit: Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources—Wildlife Division.

Total funding leveraged more than $6.97 million in additional partner revenue to help conserve more than

29,367 acres (11,884 hectares) of wildlife habitat. * North American Waterfowl Management Plan

$1.25 million of WHC grant funds contributed to NAWMP* priorities and leveraged additional funds at a rate of 6:1 for the conservation and preservation of waterfowl.

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Canadian Habitat Joint Ventures Habitat Joint Ventures integrate planning, science, governance, partnerships and management to achieve NAWMP (North American Waterfowl Management Plan) goals in Canada through a programmatic approach. Joint Venture partners actively research, monitor and evaluate waterfowl populations and deliver habitat conservation programs at a regional level. Pacific Birds Habitat Joint Venture (PBHJV) Includes portions of British Columbia, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California and Hawaii. The British Columbia coastline is a complex of inlets, bays, islands, straits and fjords rising to a diversity of near-shore, inter-tidal and forested habitats. There are over 440 estuaries with tidal wetlands and adjacent floodplain habitats. Over 1 million waterfowl nest along British Columbia’s coastline and another 400,000 in its estuaries. Agricultural areas in the region also provide significant habitat and food supply for migrating and wintering waterfowl. www.pacificbirds.org Examples of projects supported by WHC:  Cover Crop Stewardship for Waterfowl on the Fraser River Delta. PBHJV priority area.  Wetland Habitat Conservation, Restoration and Enhancement on BC’s Sunshine Coast. PBHJV Implementation Plan-Sunshine Coast, priority area. The Canadian Intermountain Joint Venture (CIJV) An area of 123.5 million acres (50 million hectares) in the central/southern interior of British Columbia and the eastern Rocky Mountains in Alberta. The CIJV encompasses a diverse landscape of valleys and mountains with grasslands, dry and moist coniferous forests, riparian areas and wetlands, alpine tundra, and pocket desert. Twenty-four waterfowl species breed in the CIJV with an estimated population of 1.45 million birds. This represents 70% of B.C.’s and roughly 4% of Canada’s breeding waterfowl population. www.cijv.ca Examples of projects supported by WHC:  Improved Measurement and Mapping Tool for Wildlife Habitat Conservation. CIJV Implementation Plan Creston Valley is an important wetland area. Addresses CIJV Implementation Plan habitat loss challenges.  Chilcotin Lake Enhancement. Cariboo-Chilcotin Priority Area of the CIJV.  Building on the Success of the Columbia Wetlands Waterbird Survey – Year 3. The Columbia Wetlands are of significance for migration staging habitat.

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Canadian Habitat Joint Ventures

The Prairie Habitat Joint Venture (PHJV)

The Eastern Habitat Joint Venture (EHJV)

Encompasses 158.4 million acres (64.1 million hectares) in the prairie and aspen parklands of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and the Peace-Parkland Region of British Columbia. The Western Boreal Forest program also falls under the PHJV including parts of British Columbia, the Prairie Provinces, and the Yukon and Northwest Territories. The PHJV covers one of the most productive areas for waterfowl in the world. Over half of North America's mid-continent ducks breed within this region. www.phjv.ca

Contains 780 million acres (315 million hectares) in Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador. The EHJV supports 30% of Canada’s wetlands, including coastal bays and salt marshes, lakeshore marshes, floodplain wetlands, and boreal forest wetlands. The EHJV supports a significant portion of the continental populations of American Black Duck, Mallard, Ring-necked Duck, Common Goldeneye, Common Eider (3 races), Green-winged Teal, and Canada Goose (5 populations). www.ehjv.ca

Examples of projects supported by WHC:  Ducks Unlimited Canada South Reader Outlet Water Control Structure Rebuild. PHJV priority area.  The Prairie Pothole Production Project. PHJV Prairie Parkland Implementation Plan.  Waterfowl nest success in the Western Boreal Forest: Does industrial development alter predation? Western Boreal Forest, PHJV.

Examples of projects supported by WHC:  Nashwaak Watershed Wetland Habitat Conservation. EHJV conservation, restoration, and enhancement of habitat in priority areas, habitat conservation for important migratory activities.  Long Point Crown Marsh Restoration Project. EHJV Implementation Plan in key program area.

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British Columbia Cover Crop Stewardship for Waterfowl on the Fraser River Delta Farmland and Wildlife Trust $30,000 Grant The lower Fraser River Delta is an internationally significant site that annually supports over 1.4 million migratory birds located along the Pacific Flyway. It also supports the greatest abundance of winter birds in Canada. Through this program, wildlife habitats were enhanced through the planting of vegetative cover before winter. UPLAND RESTORATION    

Above: Extent of waterfowl grazing on same barley winter cover crop field as above. (March 2018) Below: Barley winter cover crop field. (Nov. 2017).

4 Stewardship Agreements were signed, which resulted in 732 acres of novel cover crops. 22 Stewardships Agreements were signed, which resulted in 2,807 acres of cover crops and engaged 33 farmers. Field verification, and field monitoring activities were completed. 1,570 people attended a Day at the Farm event. Photo credits: Delta Farmland and Wildlife Trust.

Improved Measurement and Mapping Tool for Wildlife Habitat Conservation Central Kootenay Invasive Species Society $8,122 Grant CONSERVATION PLANNING 

Two tests were conducted to see how similar ground-assessed coverage and UAV coverage were. The April test determined that there was little difference. The June test found a significant difference.

These results may demonstrate that the accuracy of each test may depend on if the flowers have bloomed yet and natural disasters which affects ground based coverage.

A Yellow Flag Iris colour signature was developed with SGRC statistics.

COMMUNICATION & EDUCATION  

Reached out to the public through Facebook, Twitter, public engagement events and two radio interviews. Educated 12 students at Prince Charles Secondary School.

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UAV flight on 28 April 2017, assessing Yellow Flag Iris shoots in early spring at the Creston Valley Wildlife Management Area (CVWMA). Photo credit: Central Kootenay Invasive Species Society.


British Columbia Monitoring Three Years of Yellow Flag Iris Research in Critical Wildlife Habitat Agrowest Consulting $10,300 Grant This research project studied 1) how the vegetation community changes over time (2 years) after benthic barrier and aggressive cutting treatments of yellow flag iris have been executed; and, 2) the survival and growth rates of sedges and cattail when transplanted into areas treated with benthic barriers.

Wildsight Golden $18,250 Grant The Columbia Wetlands Waterbird Survey (CWWS) is a five-year (2015-2019) coordinated bird count, where the primary goal is to collect baseline inventory bird data utilizing citizen-scientists. COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

5 presentations took place to promote the survey and to maintain a volunteer base. At these events there were 3 educational booths.

2 bird walks, 4 classroom training modules and 2 field ID trainings were conducted.

All data was put in e-Bird and the BC provincial government species database. Photo credit: Wildsight Golden.

SCIENCE  8 sites were tested for percent cover of Yellow Flag Irises, native species and bare ground.  3 sites assessed for survival of transplanted rushes and cacti.  More than 12,000 native transplants were planted at 3 locations across the province.  This project resulted in an understanding of suitable restoration species such as cacti, soft-stemmed and hard-stemmed bulrushes.

Building on the Success of the Columbia Wetlands Waterbird Survey Year 3

SCIENCE   Left: Yellow Flag Iris, invading a wetland in the study area. Right: Yellow Flag Iris seed pods. Photo credits: Agrowest Consulting.

621 Trumpeter/Tundra swans counted during an aerial swan survey. 7,156 waterbirds were counted during aerial surveys. The Nature Trust of British Columbia was approved for a grant for the Chilcotin Lake Enhancement project; however, the project was not able to proceed due to wildfires in the province and the lack of contractors available to complete the work. WHC funds were returned to the program for re-allocation.

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British Columbia Squamish Watershed Society Youth Outreach Event – Squamish.

Wetland Habitat Conservation, Restoration and Enhancement on BC's Sunshine Coast Sunshine Coast Wildlife Project $59,000 Grant HABITAT RESTORATION 

69 acres of wetland habitat and 49 acres of upland habitat were protected through the signing of 81 stewardship agreements with landowners.

WETLAND RESTORATION

Wetland on Wheels 2017-2018: Advancing and Engaging Stewardship in BC BC Wildlife Federation $50,000 Grant

30 nest boxes and 24 nesting platforms were built and installed.

Finalized plans and permissions to excavate 3 ponds.

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

4 wetland surveys delivered.

15 wetland sites improved.

1,498 participants were engaged in the project.

SCIENCE

SCIENCE

10 wetland sites were surveyed to find high priority sites for wetland restoration and retention and 30 sites were surveyed for wildlife.

3 Map Our Marshes workshops, 4 Wetland workshops, 1 Lentic Health Assessment workshop, and 2 Restoration Design workshops were delivered.

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION

WETLAND RESTORATION

2,000+ citizens were reached through presentations, workshops and children's programs.

Wetland restoration occurred at Turtle Lake, Gypoo Logging Basin, and the Hoodoo property.

Photo credit: Sunshine Coast Wildlife Project.

1,500 native species planted at KP park.

Photo credits: BC Wildlife Federation.

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Alberta AHEIA's Youth Camps and Outdoor Youth Seminar Alberta Hunter Education Instructors’ Association $37,000 Grant This program trains a new generation of waterfowl hunters to be safe, responsible, and respectful. Participants are taught safe zones of fire; limitations and distance; general safety; and how to conserve, protect, restore and enhance habitat for the benefit of various waterfowl species and wildlife. COMMUNICATION & EDUCATION 

192 youth participants attended the camps and 124 attended the youth seminar.

Participants were conservation.

About 50 of the attendees signed up for mentorship programs after receiving mentorship booklets that were created in partnership with WHC.

introduced

to

hunting,

fishing,

and

AHEIA's Outdoor Women’s Program Alberta Hunter Education Instructors’ Association $20,000 Grant This is the longest running outdoor women's camp in Canada specifically focused on educating women and recruiting them to the enjoyment of hunting and hunting-related outdoor activities. COMMUNICATION & EDUCATION 

178 participants increased their skills and knowledge of hunting, fishing and conservation.

Participants learned about the Alberta Conservation and Education Program, the Canadian Firearms Safety Course and the Canadian Boating Safety Course.

Many participants attended other AHEIA courses following the completion of this program.

Photo credits: Alberta Hunter Education Instructors’ Association.

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Alberta Outdoor Bound Mentored Hunt Program The Alberta Hunter Education Instructors’ Association $13,000 Grant This program provided youth and novice hunters with the chance to gain a better understanding of hunting, a respect of nature, and increased confidence while hunting, as well as in everyday life. It focused on interpersonal support and growth, guidance, material exchange, sharing of wisdom and experience, coaching and role modeling.

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

339 Mentors provided mentorship to 3,410 youth and novice hunters.

Partnerships were created with various NGOs and retailers.

Recruits learned new skills, gained knowledge about Alberta’s wilderness resources, and the importance of safety and cooperation in the outdoors.

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Alberta Parkland County Alternative Land Use Services Program (ALUS)

Reinvigorating the Important Bird and Biodiversity Programs in Alberta

Parkland County $22,500 Grant

The Federation of Alberta Naturalists (Nature Alberta) $8,000 Grant

This project worked with farmers and ranchers in Parkland County to conserve, enhance and restore wetland and upland habitats, and support voluntary actions to restore and conserve species and their habitats on private land. CONSERVATION PLANNING 

12 in-person meetings were held with landowners and 22 phone contacts were made regarding proposed projects.

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

Support for habitat conservation was gained through newsletters, brochures, workshops, and speeches.

Hosted 3rd annual ALUS Field Tour.

WETLAND AND UPLAND RESTORATION 

4 project agreements were signed.

Completed projects resulted in 25.02 acres of enhanced wetland habitat and 98.96 acres of enhanced upland and riparian habitat.

ALUS Parkland's Carla Rhyant and sheep. Photo credit: Parkland County

These programs have led to tangible and positive changes for the environment and increased protection for birds in Alberta and Canada. Giving the opportunity for many people to become stewards and for participants to have an overall greater understanding of the programs offered, enables the implementation of programs in future years.

Great Horned Owl as part of the Birds Family Nature Night at Big Lake IBA August 2, 2017. Photo credit: The Federation of Alberta Naturalists (Nature Alberta)

COMMUNICATION & EDUCATION  3 Important Bird and Biodiversity Area webinars were held, engaging 112 attendees.  3 Migratory Bird Events were held, with approximately 700 participants.  144 people participated in Birds Family Nature Night.  174 participants attended 6 wetland education workshops.

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Alberta Waterfowl Nest Success in the Boreal Forest: Does Industrial Development Alter Predation? University of Waterloo $69,225 Grant This study sought to determine the relationships between industrial development and duck predator communities and nest success in the Western Boreal Forest. It did so by monitoring changes in predator communities, estimating nest success and identifying nest predators, and developing computer simulations to predict changes in predator communities and nest success. The results suggested that predation plays a major role in waterfowl nest success in the Western Boreal Forest. SCIENCE  Mammal communities in the study area were monitored over the nesting period with camera traps.  11 Cameras were set up on real nests, and 70 cameras were set up on artificial nests. These cameras were monitored every 7-14 days.  2 female ducks were marked with radio transmitters. Fur samples were collected. 32 temperature probes were deployed.  Point count surveys were conducted throughout the field season.

Common raven

Moose with calf

Moriah Tanguay holding a banded drake mallard. Photo credits: University of Waterloo .

Sandhill cranes

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Saskatchewan Saskatchewan Breeding Bird Atlas - A Public-Private Partnership for Conservation Bird Studies Canada $25,000 Grant The Saskatchewan Breeding Bird Atlas is an eight-year public-private partnership for conservation that will provide an up-to-date assessment of the distribution and relative abundance of populations of breeding birds throughout the province. COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION

SCIENCE

Delivered 12 Breeding Bird Atlas training workshops to 219 participants.

2 Bird ID workshops were completed, with 65 attendees.

7 "How to participate in the Atlas" presentations were given to approximately 370 attendees.

The project was promoted to an estimated audience of 900 at 6 outreach events.

248 Participants were engaged by 677 atlas squares receiving sampling effort.

CONSERVATION PLANNING 

Steering Committee and Regional Coordinator meetings were held.

Mountain Bluebird carrying food. Photo credit: Bird Studies Canada.

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Manitoba Phase 2 GO HUNT - Hunting Recruitment Pathway Manitoba Wildlife Federation (MWF) $30,000 Grant Goals: 1) continue growth and collaboration with the GO HUNT website, partners, resources, training and hunting opportunities; 2) update the MWF database to track participation; 3) hunting recruitment pathway promotion and communication. These goals were met through a series of carefully outlined steps. COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

Hunter Ed and 11 hunting "How To" videos were added to the GO HUNT website.

New programs developed in collaboration with partners and clubs.

Established new corporate sponsors.

Purchased a database system to distribute hunting and shooting information, track program participants, accumulate information on hunting prospects, and various other tasks.

Phase 3 GO HUNT - Hunting Recruitment Pathway Manitoba Wildlife Federation (MWF) $10,000 Grant "1st Shot Training Days" allowed new hunters to gain hands-on firearms experience from an experienced hunter, and another program allowed for mentors to be trained on how to teach novice hunters. These programs were very well attended, and are crucial to reducing hunting related injuries and getting young people interested in hunting. COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

25 participants attended "1st Shot Training Days".

7 new mentor recruits were added to the "Train the Mentor" program and trained in using shotguns, cooking techniques, and about waterfowl.

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Carly Deacon, Top Outdoorswoman contest winner and past WHC Board Member. Photo credits: Manitoba Wildlife Federation (MWF).


Manitoba The Prairie Pothole Production Project Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation $85,000 Grant MHHC implements its WHC-funded conservation programs in direct alignment with the PHJV PrairieParklands Implementation Plan (2013 – 2020). The primary goal of this project was to retain and restore breeding habitat for waterfowl and wetland-associated species in the PHJV Delivery Area of Manitoba. HABITAT RETENTION

Lazaruk conservation easement. Photo credit: Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation.

10.5 acres of restored wetland habitats were protected for 10 years and 2 agreements with landowners were signed.

1,968.6 acres of wetland and upland habitat in PHJV target areas were protected and 10 conversation easements were completed.

WETLAND RESTORATION 

24.4 acres of wetland habitat was restored and 3 restoration agreements were completed.

South Reader Outlet Water Control Structure Rebuild Ducks Unlimited Canada $100,000 Grant Ducks Unlimited Canada is redeveloping the South Reader Outlet water control structure in order to continue to conserve and manage wetlands in the Reader-Root Complex. Continuance of a functioning control structure at this site is critical in order to maintain the historic water level regime that has been altered by upstream and downstream hydro developments on the Saskatchewan River. Above average precipitation and overland flooding from the Saskatchewan River caused a significant delay in the ability to access and complete work at the South Reader Outlet in 2017-2018. Initiation of work was delayed; however, all WHC grant funds were expended within the fiscal year towards the purchase of control structure materials. DUC will complete the control structure installation in 2018-2019 and provide a follow up report on project activities.

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Ontario Migratory Bird Rest Stop Rehabilitation Lower Thames Valley Conservation Authorities $40,000 Grant UPLAND RESTORATION 

More than 70 acres of upland habitat was restored and 42,000 trees were planted.

WETLAND RESTORATION 

20 landowners were engaged, resulting in the signing of 20 agreements and the creation of 35.5 acres of wetland habitat.

HABITAT RETENTION 

Habitat fragmentation was reduced with over 80 acres of land being put under stewardship.

COMMUNICATION 

In partnership with the OMAFRA, infrastructure was put in place to monitor 9 wetland sites for water quality and nutrient loading in the Great Lakes.

40 students and 50 industry professionals toured one or more of the sites.

Buchanana Marsh after restoration. Photo credit: Lower Thames Valley Conservation

Long Point Crown Marsh Restoration Project Long Point Waterfowlers’ Association $20,000 Grant This project restored and conserved wetland habitat by implementing activities to control invasive Phragmites australis. Long Point Crown Marsh is an important stopover and resting habitat for migrant waterfowl and migratory game birds, and the project activities will allow for the return of native vegetation and cover plants to the site. WETLAND RESTORATION

Photo credits: Long Point Waterfowlers’ Association.

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About 900 meters of marsh were influenced through the maintenance and improvement of hydrologic connections in sections of the marsh.

23 acres of wetland habitat was restored through the removal of dense Phragmites stands.

An additional 35 acres was restored through the treatment of dry areas around the natural and restored open water communities.

2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA


Ontario OFAH Youth Waterfowl Hunt Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters $2,775 Grant The OFAH is committed to recruiting and growing the number of youth and new hunters in Ontario. This recruitment is crucial to securing future generations of land and wildlife stewards. This project provincially promoted waterfowl hunting through two 1-day, hands-on waterfowl hunting and wetland education experiences.

A class exploring a wetland habitat. Photo credits: Credit Valley Conservation Foundation

Why Wetlands?: A Multimedia Approach Credit Valley Conservation Foundation $15,000 Grant Why Wetlands? is an investigative look into wetlands through multimedia and environmental inquiry. This project created a curriculum-based video, an in-class activity, and an associated field trip to a wetland for grade 4 students to increase student knowledge and hands-on experience in wetland conservation. COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION  A video and activity suite covering topics of

wetlands and wildlife, development, invasive species, and climate change was produced to inform students about wetlands prior to taking part in a structured field trip. Two mentors, one new hunter, and four birds harvested at the Darlington Youth Hunt. Photo credit: Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters.

 725 students and 30 teachers participated in the

program and attended an interactive wetland tour of Terra Cotta Conservation Area.

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

17 youth waterfowl hunters were trained in various courses, hunting, and conservation.

8 young hunters participated in their first waterfowl hunt.

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Photo credits: Bird Studies Canada

Ontario

Advancing OEHJV and NAWMP Marsh Bird Priorities Bird Studies Canada $25,000 Grant The purpose of the project was to implement the enhanced Great Lakes Marsh Monitoring Program (GLMMP) to: 1) provide means to meet diverse Ontario EHJV / NAWMP monitoring and evaluation needs; 2) strengthen Ontario EHJV’s / NAWMP’s ability to manage and conserve wetland-dependent species; and, 3) build OEHJV / NAWMP support for waterfowl and wetland conservation. COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION

SCIENCE

350 Volunteers conducted bird, frog and habitat surveys at 1,000 stations in 200 wetlands.

Completed in-person training workshop for 30 new participants, and two online training webinars for 60 participants.

Maintained and updated route maps.

120 members of the public completed engagement projects with the Canadian Freshwater Alliance/Lake Erie Alive. Presentations that described the benefits of the Great Lakes Marsh Monitoring Program and its importance for advancing Ontario EHJV and NAWMP priorities were delivered to 90 people.

Control and Outreach of Water Soldier (Stratiotes aloides) in the Trent Severn Waterway Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters $10,000 Grant SCIENCE

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION

28 volunteers surveyed an area covering 40km at the Water Soldier Watch Day event.

57 community members attended an information session and a webinar was held with 60 participants.

Monitoring and surveillance activities to sample the Trent River for Water Soldier were completed, with over 2,150 ha of prime habitat investigated.

WETLAND RESTORATION 

45 leaf bags of Water Soldier were removed manually in small isolated populations.

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Water Soldier Watch Day orientation. Photo credit: Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters.

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Québec Introduction to Waterfowl Hunting Activities - 2017 Héritage faune $20,000 Grant Héritage faune is the official foundation of Québec’s Federation of Anglers and Hunters (FédéCP). This project included initiatives to support the development and renewal of waterfowl hunters in Québec through the involvement of regional and local organizations. The goal of the project was to facilitate the development of hunting activities that promote youth, women or non hunters’ involvement and to enhance the practice of family activities. COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

146 participants were introduced to waterfowl hunting.

Recruits learned about the importance of wetland habitat, how to identify waterfowl species and participated in shooting safety training.

Photo credit: La

Tuque

Photo credit: Héritage Faune

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Québec Protecting the Biodiversity of Forest Wetlands on Private Land / Southern Quebec EHJV / 2017-2018 Fondation de la Faune du Québec $75,000 Grant The purpose of this project was to implement new conservation activities under the reformed Fondation de la faune program of Faune-Forêt (Wildlife-Forest). This program provides financial assistance for protection and enhancement initiatives of wildlife habitat in forests. It allows forest landowners to be better informed and supported technically regarding the management and conservation of wildlife resources on their properties. WETLAND RESTORATION 

15 regional projects were completed.

A 3 hectare wetland was created and a wetland was enlarged to provide an extra hectare of habitat.

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

80 landowner booklets were created with protection recommendations for landowner properties.

More than 100 landowners were contacted to present the project and offer a field visit.

HABITAT RETENTION

Photo credit: Fondation de la Faune du Québec.

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Québec Improvement of segment 5 of the Saint-Barthélemy wildlife management system Ducks Unlimited Canada $25,000 Grant This project was a response to the Lac Saint-Pierre Intervention Strategy, launched by the Government of Quebec in 2014 to address issues surrounding Lac Saint-Pierre. Beginning to restore Lac SaintPierre is an important task, as this site is an important, staging, feeding, breeding area for waterfowl. Through this project, Ducks Unlimited Canada planted a permanent vegetative cover that ensured the free movement of fish in their breeding habitat and optimized existing habitats.

Restoration of Lac Ste-Anne wildlife management Ducks Unlimited Canada $5,000 Grant Some project activities were postponed as a result of a more comprehensive engineering study being required than anticipated (WHC funding to the project was therefore reduced). The purpose of this project was to replace the existing water level control structure to ensure the sustainability of 640 hectares of habitat, maintaining this regionally important wetland.

WETLAND RESTORATION 

The design concept, field surveys, plans and specifications, and applications for permits/ authorization were developed.

Weed control and the establishment of permanent herbaceous cover was completed on 104 acres.

Right bank dyke (before).

Right bank dyke (after). Photo credits: Ducks Unlimited Canada.

WETLAND RESTORATION

Field surveying. Photo credit: Ducks Unlimited Canada.

Field visits were conducted by biology and engineering staff.

Biological concept completed.

Contract for the Safety Assessment Study (SAS) awarded.

and

dykes

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clearing

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New Brunswick Nashwaak Watershed Wetland Habitat Conservation Nashwaak Watershed Association Inc. $18,000 Grant The Nashwaak Watershed Association (NWAI) is committed to the management of the Nashwaak River Watershed as a healthy ecosystem that balances a variety of economic, recreational, social, and landowner interests. This project aimed to increase private landowner awareness about wetland ecosystems and carry out a restoration project to re-establish critical migratory bird habitat. CONSERVATION PLANNING 

10,022 landowners were engaged through mailings and phone contacts.

Communicated with all regional EHJV partners.

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

Outreach, negotiations and education of landowners of high priority EHJV habitat and neighbouring properties was conducted.

Students in the watershed were engaged through the “Upstream Downstream” program.

WETLAND AND UPLAND RESTORATION 

714 Silver Maple and Bur Oak trees were planted and 30m of highly eroded riverbank was restored.

11 volunteers were trained in restoring wetland habitat using bioengineering techniques, and 16 volunteers helped with willow staking activities.

Top: Poster for Bio-engineered Riverbank Restoration Tour conducted by the project. Middle: Volunteers assisting with wetland restoration using bioengineering techniques Bottom: Grade 3 & 4 students from Nashwaak Valley School planting a silver maple tree on a seasonally flooded property in Durham. Image and photo credits: Nashwaak Watershed Association Inc.

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Nova Scotia Nova Scotia Eastern Habitat Joint Venture (NS-EHJV) Wetland Stewardship Program Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources - Wildlife Division $50,000 Grant Traditional land use practices in Nova Scotia have historically resulted in the loss of wetland habitat. To address this issue, the NS-EHJV program works to facilitate partnerships with farmers, agricultural extension workers, community groups, educational institutions, governments and non-government organizations to improve the conservation, restoration and enhancement of wetland habitats in the agricultural landscape.

HABITAT RETENTION 

29 farms were visited, resulting in the completion of 15 new Agricultural Biodiversity Conservation (ABC) Plans.

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

Continued development of the BioLOG Website to encourage biodiversity conservation and wetland stewardship on farmlands, including: website re-design with improved navigation; more information and improved Best Management Practices for wood turtles; and, new information on several nuisance wildlife species that occur on farmland.

More than 1,500 people were engaged at 13 events promoting ABC Plans and the BioLOG.

The NSDNR participated in the formation of 2 new habitat conservation associations.

“Becoming an Outdoor Woman” event was held, with over 55 attendees.

Photo credits: Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources - Wildlife Division.

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Prince Edward Island Wetland Management/Enhancement at Glenfinnan Marsh, PEI Prince Edward Island Fish and Wildlife Division of the Department of Communities, Land and Environment $15,000 Grant In 1967, the Glenfinnan Marsh was constructed with a road for locals to access the marsh. Over the years, the road became impassable, causing the marsh to be inaccessible to hunters, trappers and wetland managers alike. This project addressed the degraded state of the marsh by reconstructing the access road, which allowed access for the maintenance of the water control structure and the management of the wetland. MANAGEMENT 

350m of road was grubbed and 163 loads of sandstone was added to build up the road and parking area.

3 culverts installed and a public boat launch was constructed.

Water levels were temporarily lowered in the marsh to better survey the vegetation, dry out the mud flats, re-oxygenate the soils and stress some of the fringe cattails as part of wetland enhancement activities.

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

Project communications were achieved through social media, the EHJV website, and an ArcGIS online story map.

Photo credit: Prince Edward Island Fish and Wildlife Division of the Department of Communities, Land and Environment.

Connecting Women to Wildlife Trout Unlimited Canada - Prince County Chapter $1,500 Grant This program offered a multi-step approach to women who were interested in pursuing hunting activities: 1) firearms familiarization, 2) firearms safety/hunter education training, 3) skeet shooting, and 4) mentored hunts. COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

3 Firearms Familiarization Days were held.

2 Canadian Firearms Safety and Hunter Education courses, and 3 Skeet shooting days were organized and completed.

7 Women's Mentored Hunts were held.

Photo credit: Trout Unlimited Canada - Prince Country Chapter.

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2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA


Newfoundland and Labrador Newfoundland and Labrador Wetlands Conservation and Stewardship NL Wildlife Division, Department of Environment and Climate Change $25,000 Grant The NL Wildlife Division, as its primary contribution to the Eastern Habitat Joint Venture, and the implementation of the NAWMP in the province, partners with governments, landowners, resource users and industry to conserve wetlands, wetland-associated uplands and coastal habitats in order to sustain their associated waterfowl, seabird and seaduck populations. This project sought to sign new stewardship agreements with NL municipalities and landowners and to work with existing agreement signatories to provide assistance, educate local people and work with signatories to implement habitat enhancement activities outlined in Habitat Conservation Plans. HABITAT RETENTION 

4 formal proposals were presented to municipal councils, and 5 new plans were drafted.

Field assessments were completed in four cities.

4 stewardship agreements were signed, securing 6,706 acres of land and water.

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION

Top: Lewisporte road sign at entrance to Bottom Brook Estuary conservation area. Middle: A beautiful day for an interpretive walk in Gambo, NL. Bottom: Bottom Brook Estuary, Conservation Area within the Lewisporte Municipal Stewardship Agreement.

Photo Credits: NL Wildlife Division, Department of Environment and Climate Change.

Participated in, organised and supported 6 events.

Attended a SAM annual general meeting and discussed SAM projects.

Produced signage for 4 municipalities.

COORDINATION 

Participated in 7 meetings and conferences.

Updated National Tracking System with project accomplishments.

Held training session for the Wetland Ecosystem Services Protocol.

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Newfoundland and Labrador Murre Conservation Fund Year-Round Energetics Models to Identify Critical Habitats for Murres During the Non-Breeding Season McGill University $11,500 Grant The purpose of the project was to measure energy intake and expenditure year-round in Thick-billed Murres while simultaneously recording position via solar geolocation. Results will identify key time(s) of year that are critical for murres (thereby improving population models), and critical habitats year-round for protection, including habitats that could be improved for murres via reduced shipping traffic, rapid response to oil spills and formal marine protected areas. Given that local Inuit communities have proposed creating a marine protected area in Hudson Bay and Canada will be protecting 10% of the Arctic Ocean by 2020, such information is needed quickly so that those activities can benefit murre conservation.

SCIENCE 

The team at Coats Island collected baseline murre data on survival, reproductive success, counts and tracking.

Depth-light-acceleration loggers were attached to 44 Thick-billed Murres.

Researchers were able to link energy budgets from 10 loggers retrieved in 2016 that had been downloaded, with timing of breeding/reproductive success.

Net Energy Intake map showing that net energy intake was lowest at moulting areas. Photo credit: McGill University.

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Newfoundland and Labrador Murre Conservation Fund Population Monitoring and Tracking Murres at the Gannet Islands, NL Acadia University $18,500 Grant

Censusing Murres.

Photo credits: Acadia University.

Common and Razorbill Murres.

The Gannet Islands are host to one of the key seabird colonies in coastal Labrador. The islands support the largest Razorbill colony in North America, the largest Common Murre colony in Labrador and a significant Thick-billed Murre colony. Studies have shown that Common Murres from the Gannet Islands are harvested at a rate 3-5 times higher than any other Canadian colony of Murres. This project continued the work that was initiated in 2015, conducting bird banding, monitoring chick growth population and reproductive success; and worked to assess the potential impacts of threats to Murres on the Gannet Islands. SCIENCE 

Completed burrow counts on 2 islands: 80 Murre plot counts, 3 Razorbill plot counts, and 55 island census counts.

Banded 65 Common Murre chicks.

Collected 65 tissue samples from different alcids for dietary and containment assessment.

Tracked 23 Thick-Billed Murres, deployed geolocators on Razorbills and recovered geolocators from Puffins.

Banding and plot count data submitted to federal database managers.

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Regional Ensuring the efficiency and productivity of existing nest structures throughout the Prairie Pothole Region Delta Waterfowl Foundation $63,828 Grant

Protecting and Managing Waterfowl Populations in southwestern Quebec Canadian Park and Wilderness Society – Ottawa Valley Chapter $10,000 Grant

The primary goal of this project was to improve waterfowl reproductive success and recruitment, and to conserve important breeding habitats. Hen Houses were installed, which provide a safer location for hens to nest, and also have higher reproductive success than traditional nesting habitat, producing more incremental ducks. MANAGEMENT 

Maintenance completed on 2,595 Hen Houses, resulting in the enhancement of 3,893 acres of wetland habitat. White-tailed deer at the edge of the hardwood road in Mansfield and Pontefract. Photo credit: Helena Kreuzberg.

HABITAT RETENTION 

Easement contract finalized, protecting 101 acres of wetland habitat and 102 acres of upland habitat.

CONSERVATION PLANNING 

A questionnaire was developed and distributed to stakeholders. The returned data was entered into a database to inform ongoing development of a protected area proposal.

A new map was created showing conservation opportunities in the region.

SCIENCE 

Volunteers monitored nests and were involved in brood evolution.

MANAGEMENT 

40 nest boxes and 8 bat boxes were built.

LAND AND WATER POLICY  Low wetland water levels are evident near Colonsay, SK, as this Hen House is at eye level with Delivery Specialist, Travis Quirk. Photo credit: Delta Waterfowl Foundation.

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A report on the conservation values of the Noire and Coulonge River watersheds was prepared and shared with decision-makers in the region.

2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA


National Connecting with Wetlands: How to Deliver Wetland Field Trips Ducks Unlimited Canada $40,000 Grant This project was designed to help individuals explore wetlands in a structured way by providing them with the skills, understanding and encouragement to lead their own wetland field trips. This project is expected to enhance Ducks Unlimited Canada’s (DUC) efforts to connect youth and adult audiences with wetland habitats and encourage them to support and undertake their own related conservation actions. The project also provides background to train the students who lead wetland field trips as part of DUC’s Wetland Centres of Excellence mentoring programs and to respond to the interest of volunteers who want to connect with young people in their own communities. COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

In-person and phone discussions were held with 30 educators/staff and 50 Wetlands Centres of Excellence students who completed 4 days of mentored programs.

Developed interactive learning tool: videotaping and photography completed with 6 teachers, 100 students and 5 interpreters.

6 videos and more than 20 PDFs were produced.

An ad was created to promote the program.

Photo/Image Credits: Ducks Unlimited Canada.

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National Understanding Bird Watchers' Preferences and Priorities for Wetlands Conservation, and Attitudes About Waterfowl Hunting University of Alberta $15,000 Grant Information gathered gave insight into bird watchers’ preferences for wetland conservation and their attitudes about hunting, which will allow for the creation of waterfowl and wetland conservation strategies that resonate with hunters and bird watchers alike. It will also give insight into waterfowl population size, amount of habitat, and what level of harvest is consistent with stakeholders’ preferences. SCIENCE 

13,730 Canadian eBird members were sent an invitation to complete the survey.

4,022 individuals returned the completed questionnaire.

Preliminary analysis of birdwatchers' responses has been completed and completion of non-response results is being incorporated.

National Assessment of Waterfowl Hunter Recruitment, Retention and Reactivation (R3) Programs in Canada University of Alberta $9,000 Grant This assessment evaluated where R3 programs are being offered, who is offering them, if there are any gaps or overlaps in programs, and the best way to deliver these programs. Through this evaluation, Canadians can benefit from shared learning and the coordination of activities.

Image credit: University of Alberta.

SCIENCE 

Worked with the Canadian Wildlife Directors Committee and Joint Venture and Flyaway representatives to identify R3 programs and program contacts.

An initial list of organizations involved was compiled, and 28 individuals were contacted and asked to participate in the survey and to share it amongst other organizations offering R3 programs.

Workshop locations. Image credit: University of Alberta.

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2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA


National National Conservation Summit Canadian Wildlife Federation $25,000 Grant The National Conservation Summit was created to be a unique meeting of conservation leaders and innovators. The objectives of the program were to: 1) identify practical solutions and opportunities as part of a ‘go forward’ strategy, including environmental, economic, and social dimensions; 2) build common ground for conservation efforts among a very broad cross-section of Canadian society; 3) establish broad coalitions of organizations to commit to develop and deliver specific solutions to key challenges to conservation in Canada; and, 4) support follow-up action on key initiatives for the conservation of the full diversity of wildlife and their habitats in the 21st Century.

Image credit: Canadian Wildlife Federation.

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

The National Conservation Summit took place November 28-30, 2018.

240 emails were sent to eligible leaders and decision-makers.

CONSERVATION PLANNING 

148 participants registered for the conference.

2 background research pieces were completed.

The results of a report about financing tools for conservation and a survey about the state of partnerships for wildlife conservation were presented at the summit and made public.

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National Recruiting Hunters and Promoting Hunters Across Canada Delta Waterfowl Foundation $114,636 Grant This project included a variety of efforts to recruit new waterfowl hunters. Utilizing its facilities, partners and local chapters, Delta Waterfowl hosted conservation camps/workshops during the summer months to educate groups of prospective hunters and to give them the tools needed to become a hunter.

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION

Image and photo credits: Delta Waterfowl Foundation.

Hosted 9 summer hunter education camps in AB, MB, ON, and PEI with 204 participants. These camps included hands-on experience and a variety of wildlife, safety, and conservation information.

Hosted 21 mentored hunts in 7 provinces with 205 new hunters who learned about gun safety, shooting, where to go, duck and goose hunting, calling, bird preparation and cooking.

A new mentor recognition program was created to complement the creation of Delta's First Duck Pin for new hunters.

Survey work of hunter recruitment efforts and a special report on the status of hunter numbers was collected.

Did you know? Hunters contribute $12 to conservation for every dollar from non-hunters. (Source: Delta Waterfowl Foundation)

Pontiac, Québec hunt.

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By increasing the number of new conservation-minded hunters, contributions to habitat conservation will increase in the future.

2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA


National Canadian Wetlands Roundtable (CWR) Canadian Federation of Agriculture $15,000 Grant The CWR is a partnership of environmental non-governmental organizations, industry and governments focused on implementing a National Wetlands Conservation Strategy for Canada through collaborative policy development and communication activities for effective wetland habitat conservation in Canada. COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

Continued executing and supporting CWR strategic plan and activities.

Development of a website and archive of all CWR materials produced to date.

A follow up workshop on wetland inventory occurred to set priorities based on previous workshops and to develop a path forward to achieve results.

Image credit: Canadian Federation of Agriculture.

Canada's MBCA Centennial: Celebrating Bird Conservation in 2017 Nature Canada $15,000 Grant This project celebrated the centenary of the Migratory Bird Convention Act (MBCA) and the 31th anniversary of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP) on Canada’s 150th Anniversary. COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION Coordinated International Migratory Bird Day in Canada.

Over 450 people attended bird banding and birds of prey demonstrations, children's activities and bird walks in Ottawa, activities which was held in conjunction with the Canadian Biodiversity Institute.

Worked with 32 clubs in Québec to host these events, which included invitations to waterfowl organizations and duck clubs.

The Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change.

2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA

Photo credits: Nature Canada.

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Grant Program Performance Indicators As required by Environment and Climate Change Canada (EC), Wildlife Habitat Canada (WHC) has developed a comprehensive set of performance indicators for its competitive grant program. What is a performance indicator? “Performance indicators are measurable results that demonstrate how a project’s objectives are met.” - Environment Canada, “Performance Indicators” (2013-07-02)

The Performance Measurement Framework (PMF) was implemented in late 2012. 2017-2018 grantees reported against WHC’s ten performance indicators in their Final Project Reports, with the following results: Habitat grants provided to eligible recipients (NAWMP, other important migratory game birds): 

Funding allocation, $798,225

Networking grants provided to eligible recipients (Wetland Education, Hunter Education/Recruitment): 

Funding allocation, $451,911

NL Murre Conservation grants provided to eligible recipients: 

Funding allocation, $30,000.

Increased number of NAWMP conservation activities: 

Proportion of funded projects addressing priority activities under NAWMP as identified by the Habitat Joint Ventures and Joint Venture Technical Committee: 98% (42/44 projects) WHC invested $1,250,136 in NAWMP projects, which leveraged an additional $6.8 million in additional partner funding (Government of Canada funding not counted in the calculation of leveraged funds).

Increased number and types of habitat protected, conserved and restored: 

Land area conserved, enhanced or restored through funded projects, 29,367.27 acres.

Increased participation in on-the-ground wetland education programs and hunter education programs: 

30,528 participants

Total participant person-days: 54,707.8

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Increased participation in murre conservation activities and management: 

Funding allocation, $30,000.

Number of participants (9) and total participant person-days (348).

Grantees are able to leverage WHC funding and secure total project funding: 

Total funds leveraged by WHC funded projects, $6,971,478 (Government of Canada funding not counted in the calculation of leveraged funds).

Increased use of voluntary preventative measures to protect, restore and enhance habitats: 

Voluntary preventative measures employed in funded projects (cumulative for past 2 fiscal years, 2016-2017 and 2017-2018): Total land area (acres) put under stewardship by funded projects— 64,546.6 acres. Number of private landowners involved in funded projects— 4,030. Total in-kind contributions to funded projects— $4,435,339.99.

Increased number of public and private partners involved in wildlife habitat conservation: 

Number of partners involved in wildlife habitat conservation (cumulative for past 2 fiscal years, 2016-2017 and 2017-2018): Average number of partners involved in funded projects— 5.845.

Increased application of innovative habitat conservation tools (cumulative for past 2 fiscal years, 20162017 and 2017-2018): 

Innovative habitat conservation tools in funded projects, 42.31% (33/78 projects).

Increased scientific understanding of habitat conservation and migratory game bird management: 

Funded projects showing ‘evidence of acquisition’ of expected knowledge and/or skills by the target group (cumulative for past 2 fiscal years, 2016-2017 and 2017-2018): Total approved funding for Research projects that are supported by a Joint Venture, $266,255.

Cumulative number of habitat acres conserved, enhanced and restored through WHC funded projects over the past 5 years:

1,283,051.27 acres.

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Financial Summary 2017-2018 Independent Auditor’s Report on Summary Financial Statements

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WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA Summarized Statement of Financial Position March 31, 2018, with comparative figures for 2017

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Financial Summary 2017-2018 WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA Summarized Statement of Operations and Changes in Net Assets Year ended March 31, 2018, with comparative figures for 2017

Left: WHC-funded project, Newfoundland and Labrador Wetlands Conservation and Stewardship. Photo credit: NL Wildlife Division, Department of Environment and Climate Change. Right: WHC-funded project, NS-EHJV Wetland Stewardship Program. Photo credit: Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources-Wildlife Division.

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WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA Notes to Summary Financial Statements Year ended March 31, 2018

WHC Executive Director, Cameron Mack, and Senator Diane Griffin, a previous WHC Board member.

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Our Supporters and Partners Through a legislative arrangement with Environment and Climate Change Canada, Wildlife Habitat Canada receives the revenues from the sale of the Canadian Wildlife Habitat Conservation Stamp, purchased primarily by waterfowl hunters to validate their Migratory Game Bird Hunting Permits. Each year, Wildlife Habitat Canada receives this financial support through a contribution agreement with Environment and Climate Change Canada. This endeavour supports Environment and Climate Change Canada's responsibility for the protection and conservation of habitat, particularly for the conservation of waterfowl pursuant to the Migratory Birds Convention Act. Wildlife Habitat Canada would like to thank the following organizations for their support of our partnership programs and activities in 2017-2018: Acadia University

McGill University

Agrowest Consulting

Nashwaak Watershed Association Inc.

BC Wildlife Federation

Nature Canada

Bird Studies Canada

NL Wildlife Division, Department of Environment and Climate Change

Canadian Federation of Agriculture Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society— Ottawa Valley Chapter Canadian Wildlife Federation Canadian Wild Turkey Federation

Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources— Wildlife Division Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters Parkland County

Central Invasive Species Society

Prince Edward Island Fish and Wildlife Division of the Department of Communities, Land and Environment

Credit Valley Conservation Foundation

QDMA Canada

Delta Farmland and Wildlife Trust

Sunshine Coast Wildlife Project

Delta Waterfowl Foundation

Sustainable Outdoors Co.

Ducks Unlimited Canada

The Alberta Hunter Education Instructors' Association (AHEIA)

Capital Waterfowling Inc.

Fondation de la faune du Québec Héritage Faune Long Point Waterfowlers’ Association Lower Thames Valley Conservation Authorities Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Wildlife Federation

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The Federation of Alberta Naturalists (Nature Alberta) Trout Unlimited Canada, Prince Country Chapter University of Alberta University of Waterloo

2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA


Supporting a New Generation of Hunters Wildlife Habitat Canada supports youth hunter education programs and mentored hunt activities to foster a new generation of waterfowl hunters. This contributes to one of the objectives under WHC’s Strategic Plan, to promote the conservation contributions of waterfowl hunters and encourage waterfowl hunting participation.

WHC-funded project, “Connecting Women to Wildlife,” run by Trout Unlimited Canada, Prince Edward County Chapter.

WHC Board of Directors, Annualhunters Meeting 2017—Halifax, NS WHC-funded project, “Recruiting and promoting hunting across Canada,” run by Delta Waterfowl Foundation .

2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA

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Staff Executive Director Cameron Mack Program Administrator (maternity leave coverage) Katherine McCran-Leach Program Manager Julia Thompson Director of Finance and Administration Pierre Vary Accountant Hao Wu

Contract Staff Communications & Outreach Coordinator Jennifer Feschuk Print Program Coordinator Tejal Mistry Mailings Assistant Shams Kaddoura

French Translation Services 

Nadine Cardinal

Johanne Lemieux

Anne-Marie Couture

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With special thanks to our volunteers: 

Antoine Ally

Karena Mistry

Chris Benson

Brittany Sullivan

2017-2018 ANNUAL REPORT | WILDLIFE HABITAT CANADA


Board of Directors Chair Wm. Michael Phippen Sr. Vice President and Managing Director, BMO Nesbitt Burns Inc. Vice-Chair David Harris Retired Regional Director, Eastern Region, Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources Past Chair Eric Boysen Retired Director, Biodiversity Branch/Renewable Energy Program, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources Directors Jim Fisher Chair, Finance and Audit Committee. Director of Conservation Policy, Delta Waterfowl Kelly Semple Chair, Nominating Committee. Owner/ operator, Southpaw Outfitters Susan F Gesner President, Gesner and Associates Environmental Learning Serge Larivière Director General, Cree Hunters and Trappers Income Security Board Brad Potter Manager, Fish and Wildlife, Forests, Fish and Wildlife Division, PEI Department of Communities, Land and Environment

Ryan Reynolds Co-owner, Capital Waterfowling Inc. and professional waterfowl guide

Travis Ripley Executive Director, Fish and Wildlife Policy Branch, Alberta Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Resource Development

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1987

WHC Conservation Stamp and Print Series 2039 Robertson Road, Suite 247, Ottawa ON K2H 8R2 Telephone: 613-722-2090 Toll-Free: 1-800-669-7919 Email: admin@whc.org

WWW.WHC.ORG

Putting our stamp on Canadian conservation since 1985. Š Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of the Environment.

Profile for WildlifeHCanada

2017-2018 Annual Report, Wildlife Habitat Canada  

2017-2018 Annual Report, Wildlife Habitat Canada  

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