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“MANY YEARS LATER as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice. At that time Macondo was a village of twenty adobe houses, built on the bank of a river of clear water that ran along a bed of polished stones, which were white and enormous, like prehistoric eggs. The world was so recent that many things lacked names, and in order to indicate them it was necessary to point. Every year during the month of March a family of ragged gypsies would set up their tents near the village, and with a great uproar of pipes and kettledrums they would display new inventions. First they brought the magnet. A heavy gypsy with an untamed beard and sparrow hands, who introduced himself as Melquíades, put on a bold public demonstration of what he himself called the eighth wonder of the learned alchemists of Macedonia. He went from house to house dragging two metal ingots and everybody was amazed to see pots, pans, tongs, and braziers tumble down from their places and beams creak from the desperation of nails and screws trying to emerge, and even objects that had been lost for a long time appeared from where they had been searched for most and went dragging along in turbulent confusion behind Melquíades’ magical irons. “Things have a life of their own,” the gypsy proclaimed with a harsh accent. “It’s simply a matter of waking up their souls.” José Arcadio Buendía, whose unbridled imagination always went beyond the genius of nature and even beyond miracles and magic, thought that it would be possible to make use of that useless invention to extract gold from the bowels of the earth. Melquíades, who was an honest man, warned him: “It won’t work for that.” But José Arcadio Buendía at that time did not believe in the honesty of gypsies, so he traded his mule and a pair of goats for the two magnetized ingots. Úrsula Iguarán, his wife, who relied on those animals to increase their poor domestic holdings, was unable to dissuade him. “Very soon well have gold enough and more to pave the floors of the house,” her husband replied. For several months he worked hard to demonstrate the truth of his idea. He explored every inch of the region, even the riverbed, dragging the two iron ingots along and reciting Melquíades’ incantation aloud. The only thing he succeeded in doing was to unearth a suit of fifteenth-century armor which had all of its pieces soldered together with rust and inside of which there was the hollow resonance of an enormous stone-filled gourd. When José Arcadio Buendía and the four men of his expedition managed to take the armor apart, they found inside a calcified skeleton with a copper locket containing a woman’s hair around its neck.In March the gypsies returned. This time they brought a telescope and a magnifying glass the size of a drum, which they exhibited as the latestdiscovery of the Jews of Amsterdam. They placed a gypsy woman at one end of the village and set up the telescope at the entrance to the tent. For the price of five reales, people could look into the telescope and see the gypsy woman an arm’s length away. “Science has eliminated distance,” Melquíades proclaimed. “In a short time, man will be able to see what is happening in any place in the world without leaving his own house.” A burning noonday sun brought out a startling demonstration with the gigantic magnifying glass: they put a pile of dry hay in the middle of the street and set it on fire by concentrating the sun’s rays. José Arcadio Buendía, who had still not been consoled for the failure of big magnets, conceived the idea of using that invention as a weapon of war. Again Melquíades tried to dissuade him, but he finally accepted the two magnetized ingots and three colonial coins in exchange for the magnifying glass. Úrsula wept in consternation. That money was from a chest of gold coins that her father had put together ova an entire life of privation and that she had buried underneath her bed in hopes of a proper occasion to make use of it. José Arcadio Buendía made no attempt to console her, completely absorbed in his tactical experiments with the abnegation of a scientist and even at the risk of his own life. In an attempt to show the effects of the glass on enemy troops, he exposed himself to the concentration of the sun’s rays and suffered burns which turned into sores that took a long time to heal. Over the protests of his wife, who was alarmed at such a dangerous invention, at one point he was ready to set the house on fire. He would spend hours on end in his room, calculating the strategic possibilities of his novel weapon until he succeeded in putting together a manual of startling instructional clarity and an irresistible power of conviction. He sent it to the government, accompanied by numerous descriptions of his experiments and several pages of explanatory sketches; by a messenger who crossed the mountains, got lost in measureless swamps, forded stormy rivers, and was on the point of perishing under the lash of despair, plague, and wild beasts until he found a route that joined the one used by the mules that carried the mail. In spite of the fact that a trip to the capital was little less than impossible at that time, José Arcadio Buendía promised to undertake it as soon as the government ordered him to so that he could put on some practical demonstrations of his invention for the military authorities and could train them himself in the complicated art of solar war. For several years he waited for an answer. Finally, tired of waiting, he bemoaned to Melquíades the failure of his project and the gypsy then gave him a convincing proof of his honesty: he gave him back the doubloons in exchange for the magnifying glass, and he left him in addition some Portuguese maps and several instruments of navigation. In his own handwriting he set down a concise synthesis of the studies by Monk Hermann. which he left José Arcadio so that he would be able to make use of the astrolabe, the compass, and the sextant. José Arcadio Buendía spent the long months of the rainy season shut up in a small room that he had built in the rear of the house so that no one would disturb his experiments. Having completely abandoned his domestic obligations, he spent entire nights in the courtyard watching the course of the stars and he almost contracted sunstroke from trying to establish an exact method to ascertain noon. When he became an expert in the use and manipulation of his instruments, he conceived a notion of space that allowed him to navigate across unknown seas, to visit uninhabited territories, and to establish relations with splendid beings without having to leave his study. That was the period in which he acquired the habit of talking to himself, of walking through the house without paying attention to anyone, as Úrsula and the children broke their backs in the garden, growing banana and caladium, cassava and yams, ahuyama roots and eggplants. Suddenly, with-out warning, his feverish activity was interrupted and was replaced by a kind of fascination. He spent several days as if he were bewitched, softly repeating to himself a string of fearful conjectures without giving credit to his own understanding. Finally, one Tuesday in December, at lunchtime, all at once he released the whole weight of his torment. The children would remember for the rest of their lives the august solemnity with which their father, devastated by his prolonged vigil and by the wrath of his imagination, revealed his discovery to thEM ‘The earth is round, like an orange.’”one hundred years of solitude, gabriel garcia marquez,


“MANY YEARS LATER as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice. At that time Macondo was a village of twenty adobe houses, built on the bank of a river of clear water that ran along a bed of polished stones, which were white and enormous, like prehistoric eggs. The world was so recent that many things lacked names, and in order to indicate them it was necessary to point. Every year during the month of March a family of ragged gypsies would set up their tents near the village, and with a great uproar of pipes and kettledrums they would display new inventions. First they brought the magnet. A heavy gypsy with an untamed beard and sparrow hands, who introduced himself as Melquíades, put on a bold public demonstration of what he himself called the eighth wonder of the learned alchemists of Macedonia. He went from house to house dragging two metal ingots and everybody was amazed to see pots, pans, tongs, and braziers tumble down from their places and beams creak from the desperation of nails and screws trying to emerge, and even objects that had been lost for a long time appeared from where they had been searched for most and went dragging along in turbulent confusion behind Melquíades’ magical irons. “Things have a life of their own,” the gypsy proclaimed with a harsh accent. “It’s simply a matter of waking up their souls.” José Arcadio Buendía, whose unbridled imagination always went beyond the genius of nature and even beyond miracles and magic, thought that it would be possible to make use of that useless invention to extract gold from the bowels of the earth. Melquíades, who was an honest man, warned him: “It won’t work for that.” But José Arcadio Buendía at that time did not believe in the honesty of gypsies, so he traded his mule and a pair of goats for the two magnetized ingots. Úrsula Iguarán, his wife, who relied on those animals to increase their poor domestic holdings, was unable to dissuade him. “Very soon well have gold enough and more to pave the floors of the house,” her husband replied. For several months he worked hard to demonstrate the truth of his idea. He explored every inch of the region, even the riverbed, dragging the two iron ingots along and reciting Melquíades’ incantation aloud. The only thing he succeeded in doing was to unearth a suit of fifteenth-century armor which had all of its pieces soldered together with rust and inside of which there was the hollow resonance of an enormous stone-filled gourd. When José Arcadio Buendía and the four men of his expedition managed to take the armor apart, they found inside a calcified skeleton with a copper locket containing a woman’s hair around its neck.In March the gypsies returned. This time they brought a telescope and a magnifying glass the size of a drum, which they exhibited as the latestdiscovery of the Jews of Amsterdam. They placed a gypsy woman at one end of the village and set up the telescope at the entrance to the tent. For the price of five reales, people could look into the telescope and see the gypsy woman an arm’s length away. “Science has eliminated distance,” Melquíades proclaimed. “In a short time, man will be able to see what is happening in any place in the world without leaving his own house.” A burning noonday sun brought out a startling demonstration with the gigantic magnifying glass: they put a pile of dry hay in the middle of the street and set it on fire by concentrating the sun’s rays. José Arcadio Buendía, who had still not been consoled for the failure of big magnets, conceived the idea of using that invention as a weapon of war. Again Melquíades tried to dissuade him, but he finally accepted the two magnetized ingots and three colonial coins in exchange for the magnifying glass. Úrsula wept in consternation. That money was from a chest of gold coins that her father had put together ova an entire life of privation and that she had buried underneath her bed in hopes of a proper occasion to make use of it. José Arcadio Buendía made no attempt to console her, completely absorbed in his tactical experiments with the abnegation of a scientist and even at the risk of his own life. In an attempt to show the effects of the glass on enemy troops, he exposed himself to the concentration of the sun’s rays and suffered burns which turned into sores that took a long time to heal. Over the protests of his wife, who was alarmed at such a dangerous invention, at one point he was ready to set the house on fire. He would spend hours on end in his room, calculating the strategic possibilities of his novel weapon until he succeeded in putting together a manual of startling instructional clarity and an irresistible power of conviction. He sent it to the government, accompanied by numerous descriptions of his experiments and several pages of explanatory sketches; by a messenger who crossed the mountains, got lost in measureless swamps, forded stormy rivers, and was on the point of perishing under the lash of despair, plague, and wild beasts until he found a route that joined the one used by the mules that carried the mail. In spite of the fact that a trip to the capital was little less than impossible at that time, José Arcadio Buendía promised to undertake it as soon as the government ordered him to so that he could put on some practical demonstrations of his invention for the military authorities and could train them himself in the complicated art of solar war. For several years he waited for an answer. Finally, tired of waiting, he bemoaned to Melquíades the failure of his project and the gypsy then gave him a convincing proof of his honesty: he gave him back the doubloons in exchange for the magnifying glass, and he left him in addition some Portuguese maps and several instruments of navigation. In his own handwriting he set down a concise synthesis of the studies by Monk Hermann. which he left José Arcadio so that he would be able to make use of the astrolabe, the compass, and the sextant. José Arcadio Buendía spent the long months of the rainy season shut up in a small room that he had built in the rear of the house so that no one would disturb his experiments. Having completely abandoned his domestic obligations, he spent entire nights in the courtyard watching the course of the stars and he almost contracted sunstroke from trying to establish an exact method to ascertain noon. When he became an expert in the use and manipulation of his instruments, he conceived a notion of space that allowed him to navigate across unknown seas, to visit uninhabited territories, and to establish relations with splendid beings without having to leave his study. That was the period in which he acquired the habit of talking to himself, of walking through the house without paying attention to anyone, as Úrsula and the children broke their backs in the garden, growing banana and caladium, cassava and yams, ahuyama roots and eggplants. Suddenly, with-out warning, his feverish activity was interrupted and was replaced by a kind of fascination. He spent several days as if he were bewitched, softly repeating to himself a string of fearful conjectures without giving credit to his own understanding. Finally, one Tuesday in December, at lunchtime, all at once he released the whole weight of his torment. The children would remember for the rest of their lives the august solemnity with which their father, devastated by his prolonged vigil and by the wrath of his imagination, revealed his discovery to thEM ‘The earth is round, like an orange.’”one hundred years of solitude, gabriel garcia marquez,


INDEX

PLACES I HAVE BEEN LIVING IN THE PAST 5 YEARS

8

WHO I BECAME

16

MY WORKS MONFALCONE CORPORATE IDENTITY AMAL EUROARAB FILM FESTIVAL VIAREGGIO CARNIVAL MEMORY CLA CLA CORTOCIRCUITO FILM FESTIVAL JAULA PARA ORIGAMI VODOU ARJOWIGGINS HET DOLHUYS / 1 HET DOLHUYS / 2 REGIOJOURNAAL JAREN 50 HEARTS LOGOS

20

21 25 29 33 37 40 42 45 49 53 57 63 67 71 74


WHE I’VE LIVIN THE


ERE BEEN NG IN PAST


I lived in Santiago de Compostela for one and a half year, watching the world from my green windows.

10


Espa単a


THE NETHERLA

I lived in The Netherlands (Amsterdam) from 2008 until 2010, loving their approach to graphic design, their style and their open minded way to manage everyday’s life.


ANDS

13


AUSTRA

I lived in Sydney from 2006 to 2008, surrounded by the ocean, playing in the waves.


ALIA


WHO BECA ME AFTE


OI A-

ER-


What I like/hate most from 0 to 10 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Graphic Designer BRITNEY SPEARS THE BEATLES

7 A.M. 12 P.M.

IPHONE IPOD

FLASH INDESIGN

SERIES MOVIES

How I would/n’t like to be from 0 to 10 Italian

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 IMMORTAL HEALTY

SPORTY BEAUTIFUL

EGOCENTRIC FUNNY

WIFE LOVED

FAMOUS LIKED

30 year old

My unofficial day Singing songs very loud - 2 h Getting the good vibe to start the day - 1h Deep Breath to ineriorize everyday’s little injustices - 30 mins Finding a good excuse not to work out - 1h Total time for my daily meals - 5 mins (I’m a fast eater) Thoughts in the rest room - 45 mins Listening to the news and therefore fantasize about fixing the world - 3hrs Complaining (talking shit) about the prime minister of my country - 6hrs Listening to awesome music - 8hrs Checking out cool things on the net to show off with my friends - 2hrs

18


Languages I speak

Italian French

Spanish

English

Thinker

Mother tongue Fluent Quite fluent Good Learner

What mostly I’ve been doing in the past 5 years 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2005

2006

Working

2007

Travelling

2008

2009

2010

Having fun

My official day Pretending to run - 30 mins Losing my sight staring at the computer’s screen - 12 h Watching movies on my laptop - 2 h Smoking cigarettes - 1 h Trying to learn a new language - 1 h Reading some book - 30 mins Showering - 30 mins Chatting with friends - 30 mins Talking to my boyfriend - 30 mins Sleeping - 6 h

19


MY WORKS. 20


WHOSVERO 2011

MONFALCONE MUSEUM / CORPORATE IDENTITY Logo and corporate identity proposal for the Shipyard Museum in Monfalcone (Italy).

POLO MUSEALE DELLA CANTIERISTICA NAVALE DI MONFALCONE

21


mappa ZONA RICREATIVA 1 Bar 2 Giardino 3 Store

TI TROVI QUI

1

ENTRATA 8

ZONA MUSEALE

2

3

TOILET

USCITA

TOILET

7 4

4 Mostra Permamnente 5 Esposizione Barche 6 Visita Virtuale

5

6

ZONA CANTIERE 7 Padiglione A 8 Padiglione B POLO MUSEALE DELLA CANTIERISTICA NAVALE DI MONFALCONE

Museum map

Flags

03/11 LA VITA DEL CANTIERE POLO MUSEALE DELLA CANTIERISTICA NAVALE DI MONFALCONE

22

POLO MUSEALE DELLA CANTIERISTICA NAVALE DI MONFALCONE

I protagonisti, Il territorio Riletti per grandi temi.


WHOSVERO 2011 / MONFALCONE MUSEUM

POLO MUSEALE DELLA CANTIERISTICA NAVALE DI MONFALCONE

Storia di un successo NIAMCONULLAN HENIAMC ONSENDIPIT WISI BLAOR IN VEROSTRUD TATE ELIT LUTAT. TATIO DUNT AUTATEM IPIT NONSE DO CONSED

ORPERIT WIS NUM IPIS NIT VEL IRILS UTEM QUISIT VELIT LOREET AUGUE CORE MA

Poster

Padiglione A ZONA CANTIERE

Mostra Permanente ZONA MUSEALE

Padiglione A ZONA CANTIERE

Mostra Permanente ZONA MUSEALE

Giardino ZONA RICREATIVA

Ufficio Informazioni ZONA MUSEALE

i

Padiglione A ZONA CANTIERE

Giardino ZONA RICREATIVA

Toilets ZONA RICREATIVA

Toilets ZONA RICREATIVA

Sign system

23


WHOSVERO 2011

AMAL EUROARAB FILMFESTIVAL / POSTER Proposal for the Santiago de Compostela 2011 contest.

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26


WHOSVERO 2011 / AMAL EUROARAB FILM FESTIVAL

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28


WHOSVERO 2011

VIAREGGIO 2012 CARNIVAL / POSTER Proposal for 2012 Viareggio Carnival contest. The city character “Burlamacco” had to go within the poster design.

29


WHOSVERO 2011 / VIAREGGIO 2012 CARNIVAL


e co memory 32


WHOSVERO 2011

MEMORY / CARD GAME PROJECT The eco memory project I introduce is a redesign of the famous Ravensburger © table game from an ecological point of view (including a logo exclusively thought for the project). The aim is to use some mnemonic stimulation, like the traditional game, developing knowledge of ecologically oriented issues. Therefore new concepts are learned through the game. The kit THE PLAYING CARDS As shown on table number 1 there are 20 cards. Each one has an icon which refers to ecological theme. For instance: windmill, atom, thermometer, sea, recycle symbol, factory symbol, etc etc. The reverse side of every card has a “memory” word design which uses an embossing technique (see the image on the left side of this page). The explanatory cards Every playing card comes with an explanatory card. Every symbol will be accompanied by a text which illustrates its meaning. This text would be written using a vocabulary appropriate for the age range the game is marketed towards. In this way every card becomes a stimulus for environmental awareness. Materials Being an ecologically oriented product it uses only environmentally friendly materials. For example recycled cardboard. You can see some example of packaging I designed. 33


e c o memory


WHOSVERO 2011 / MEMORY

windmill

The Windmill represents wind power, or rather the conversion of the wind’s kinetic energy into other forms whether electrical or mechanical. It was the first kind of renewable energy mankind discovered, and it currently represents one of the most interesting fields in sustainable development.

35


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WHOSVERO 2011

CLA CLA / CORPORATE IDENTITY Logo, flyers and brochures for an Educational centre.

CREATIVITÀ

37


38


WHOSVERO 2011 / CLA CLA

N

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O CLA CLA CENTRO PER UN’EDUCAZIONE ALLA SALUTE PRESENTA C M

A RI Nel cuore di Piacenza circondati da un PA verde e grande giardino, spazi luminosi e IM accoglienti dedicati alla prevenzione e al mantenimento della salute al fine di migliorare la qualità dello stile di vita.

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A

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Centro per un’ Educazione alla Salute è uno spazio aperto a partecipazioni di eventi culturali per adulti e bambini, a progettualità ed a collaborazioni nelle scuole e nelle aziende. O

R SP

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rla

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o bu

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IM

EN

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m

ria

pa

a

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ce

os

n co

im

a

tic

as

nn

gi

D

AN C

Il Centro per un Educazione alla Salute organizza momenti di informazione e corsi di formazione, avvalendosi di consulenti esterni, liberi professionisti che partecipano con progetti autonomi riguardanti l’Educazione alla Salute.

R PA

lax

re

n ce

n

uo

o

nd

a ar

b el

bo

ci

Progetto grafico: Veronica Colombi -- www.whosvero.com

d

ep

pr

ANCHE LA SALUTE È UN MODO DI ESSERE i

n

le

an

m

a

nz

da

o nd

co

AN

N

U

N SA

D

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U

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FI

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G

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AN C

D

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CENTRO PER UN’EDUCAZIONE ALLA SALUTE CLA Associazione Culturale

CENTRO PER UN’EDUCAZIONE ALLA SALUTE CLA ASSOCIAZIONE CULTURALE

STRADONE FARNESE 25 - 29121 PIACENZA T 0523 38 58 50 - WWW.CLA-CLA.IT - INFO@CLA-CLA.IT

39


WHOSVERO 2011

CORTOCIRCUITO FILM FESTIVAL / POSTER Proposal for the 2011 Santiago de Compostela short movie festival.

40


41


WHOSVERO 2011

JAULA PARA ORIGAMI / POSTER Poster for a party inspired to the 20s.

42


43


44


WHOSVERO 2011

VODOU’S EXHIBITION / LOGO Hand-made letters inspired to the Haitian Vodou tradition for the 2008 Vodou exhibition in Amsterdam.

45


46


WHOSVERO 2011 / VODOU

47


WHOSVERO 2011

ARJOWIGGINS / AGENDA Agenda created for 2008 Arjowiggins event as a gift for its customers.

49


Agenda 2009. I lection of crazy given by design sicians, printer trators etc...


It’s a coly recipes ners, murs, illus-


52


WHOSVERO 2011

HET DOLHUYS / CALENDAR 2009 Calendar for Het Dolhuys, psychiatric museum in Haarlem (NL).

53


54


WHOSVERO 2011 / HET DOLHUYS

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56


HET DOLHUYS / ANNUAL REPORT 2009 Psychiatric Museum (Haarlem, NL) Annual Report.

57


58


WHOSVERO 2011 / HET DOLHUYS

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60


WHOSVERO 2011 / HET DOLHUYS

61


62


WHOSVERO 2011

REGIOJOURNAAL / MAGAZINE LAYOUT Layout for Amsterdam monthly magazine.

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64


WHOSVERO 2011 / REGIOJOURNAAL

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66


WHOSVERO 2011

JAREN / SELF-PROJECT I have been asking people to sketch on an A5 paper sheet what their mental picture of a year was. Not a specific one, but more like the imagine they draw up on their mind when they think of how to organize calendar, days, weeks, months or seasons... It’s something I’ve always been curious of, since my idea about it is a real drawing on my mind. Here a few examples of what people made to explain theirs. It was quite weird to find out they knew exactly what i meant.

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68


WHOSVERO 2011 / JAREN

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70


WHOSVERO 2011

50 HEARTS / BOOK 50 hearts designed for a dutch paper company as a valentine’s day gift.

71


WHOSVERO 2011 / 50 HEARTS


WHOSVERO 2011

LOGOS / VARIOUS Serie of logos I designed.

74


POLO MUSEALE DELLA CANTIERISTICA NAVALE DI MONFALCONE

CREATIVITÀ

e c o memory

proxecto nise

thebrainstormweb.com 75


TO BEHRANG


78


my portfolio book