Page 1

the

COMMUNICATIONS PROFESSOR SAYS GOODBYE

“Her generosity

and commitment to students and Whitworth's mission is the same now as when she first arriveD.”

09

OSAMA BIN LADEN KILLED IN FIREFIGHT 05


The most-read stories from the week of April 19 through May 1, 2011.

1

|

CONTENTS

UNCONVENTIONAL STUDENT BRINGS A LITTLE METAL TO WHITWORTH

2

UNDOCUMENTED, NOT UNAMERICAN

3

|

WWW.THEWHITWORTHIAN.COM

{ Trending Online}

CONTENTS

THE BUSIEST MAN ON CAMPUS

4

DOUBLE MAJORING CAN HINDER A WELL-ROUNDED EDUCATION

09

NEWS

|

COMMUNICATIONS PROFESSOR SAYS GOODBYE:

ARTS & CULTURE

|

WHITPICS

|

Students and faculty prepare to say goodbye to longtime professor Dr. Virginia “Ginny” Whitehouse, who accepted a new position at Eastern Kentucky University beginning fall 2011.

07

| OPINIONS

| SPORTS

| MAY 03, 2011

|

PEEPS FOR PEEPS IN UGANDA

13

LEARNING FROM OTHERS

NEWS

Above photo and cover photo by Chrissy Roach

DINING HALL EXPANSION IN THE WORKS: Board of Trustees approves 04 $6.5 million expansion for the dining hall.

OPINIONS

OSAMA BIN LADEN KILLED IN FIREFIGHT: After nearly 10 years of 05 Osama bin Laden being labeled as public enemy No. 1, White House

OBAMA’S BOTCHED RESPONSE TO THE LYBIA 12 CRISIS

sources have reported he has been killed.

PEEPS FOR PEEPS IN UGANDA: Program aims to raise money to

THE PEANUT GALLERY: Jerod Jarvis gives his 13 senior speech.

02

On the Cover

provide chickens for communities in Uganda.

CRUNCHING THE NUMBERS ASWU CHARTER TWO NEW CLUBS: As the year winds down, ASWU 06 charters new clubs with lofty goals for the coming year.

SPENDING TIME TO LEARN FROM OTHERS VIEWPOINTS

BUSINESS AS USUAL FOR WHITWORTH: Four Whitworth teams 07 place in business competition with innovative plans.

SPORTS

WHITILEAKS: Tracking ASWU’s spending.

ARTS & CULTURE COMMUNICATIONS PROFESSOR SAYS GOODBYE: Students and 09 faculty prepare to say goodbye to longtime professor Dr. Virginia “Ginny”

Whitehouse at the end of the school year.

OUTSTANDING AT INVITATIONAL: 14 WOMEN Whitworth track and field compete at the Pelleur

Invitational on Friday, April 28.

SCOREBOARD: Overall sport records from Whitworth’s 2010-2011 year.

THE JOCK STRIP: Inexplicable stupidity: Athletes battle it out for the ultimate crown.

ART SHOW PROVIDES REAL LIFE EXPERIENCE: Seniors gain real 10 life experience by putting together an art exhibition.

SENIOR PAVES HIS OWN PATH: Golfer Ryan Young 15 creates his own major and dreams big for the

STUDENT SELECTED FOR A PBS DOCUMENTARY: Junior Jaja 11 Quarless was selected as one of 40 individuals to take part in PBS

Freedom Rides to connect with his heritage and bring awareness to the Civil Rights Movement.

I SAW YOU

future.

SPORTS SHORTS: Featuring the NFL Draft, MLB Mariners and NBA Playoffs.


The Whitworthian has served as the main source of news and sports coverage for the Whitworth community since 1905. The Whitworthian is an organization composed entirely by students which produces The Whitworthian weekly newspaper and thewhitworthian.com.

the

News Editor Jessica Valencia jessica.valencia@whitworthian.com Assistant News Editor Evanne Montoya evanne.montoya@whitworthian.com Opinions Editor Andrew Gjefle andrea.gjefle@whitworthian.com Arts & Culture Editor Sophie Sestero sophie.sestero@whitworthian.com Radio Liason Chelsea Kwast chelsea.kwast@whitworthian.com Sports Editor Kara Heatherly kara.heatherly@whitworthian.com

Photo Editor Chrissy Roach chrissy.roach@whitworthian.com Advertising Manager Tobin Eyestone tobin.eyestone@whitworthian.com

Photo by David Hochstatter

Paging all Whitworth photographers! Have you taken a picture that you would like to see featured in our weekly publication or online?

Please include when and where it was taken, as well as your name.

|

E-mail entries to photo@whitworthian.com.

MAY 03, 2011

Fog hovers over the Hello Walk in the early morning on April 19.

Staff Members Nejela Almohanna, Brianna Anderson, Haley Atkinson, Sarah Berentson, Kyle Bohigian, Amy Carlson, Hannah Charlton, Maria Chumov, Dani Dubois, Rebecca Eng, Kara Fisher, Andrew Forhan, Audrey Gore, Jenna Hansen, Emily Hanson, Maddie Hayes, Andrea Heeter, Andrew Keyser, Kyle Kim, Lucas Kok, Deidre Low, Alli Marshall, Nick Martin, Hollie McCrea, Jo Miller, Max Nelsen, Charlene O’Connor, Josh Olsby, Remi Omodara, Lauren Otheim, Lindsay Pund, Caitlin Richmond, Melissa Ross, Anne Roth, Emily Roth, David Rurik, Tara Sackman, Rebecca Southwick , Caitlyn Starkey, Lindsie Wagner, Nathan Webber, Iris Wu and Taylor Zajicek.

|

In the issue published April 15, the Luau was incorrectly identified as Whitworth’s 33rd Annual Luau. It was the 41st Annual Luau.

SPORTS

Adviser Jim McPherson jmcpherson@whitworth.edu

|

}

OPINIONS

Graphics Editor Annette Farrell annette.farrell@whitworthian.com

|

Circulation Manager Morgan Feddes morgan.feddes@whitworthian.com

ARTS & CULTURE

Assistant Sports Editor Alex Blade alex.blade@whitworthian.com

Web Technician Ryan Gerhard ryan.gerhard@whitworthian.com

Corrections & Clarifications

The Whitworthian is committed to providing the Whitworth community with the most accurate information possible. The Whitworthian never knowingly publishes inaccuracies. If you have a comment or question about the fairness or accuracy of a story, send an e-mail to editor@whitworthian.com.

Assistant Copy Chief Cherise Hensley cherise.hensley@whitworthian.com

|

{

Copy Chief Tori Sullivan tori.sullivan@whitworthian.com

WHITPICS

ONLINE AT: www.thewhitworthian.com editor@whitworthian.com

PHOTO OF THE WEEK

Online Editor Andrew Schwartzmeyer andy.schwartzmeyer@whitworthian.com

|

CONTACT US: The Whitworthian c/o Whitworth University 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. Spokane, WA 99251 509.777.3248

Editorials in the “In the Loop” section reflect the majority opinion of the Editorial Board, which is made up of six editors.

Production Manager Andrea Glover andrea.glover@whitworthian.com

NEWS

PUBLIC FORUM: The Whitworthian is a public forum that believes in freedom of speech and expression as guaranteed in the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States.

Editor-in-Chief Jerod Jarvis jerod.jarvis@whitworthian.com

|

OPINIONS POLICY: Columns, editorial cartoons and reviews are the opinions of their individual creators and not necessarily the opinion of The Whitworthian, its editors or its staff.

embarrassing. Students who plan to live off campus often have to start looking for housing months before the end of the school year the process of finding roommates, visiting available houses, signing leases and other details simply takes time. More time than upperclassmen were given. This board realizes that the administration is between a bit of a rock and hard place with this issue - there simply isn’t enough space on campus to house every student wants to live there. And for a variety of reasons, from academic performance to retention to campus culture, it’s important that underclassmen live on campus. The reasons for this lack of space go back through a series of unfortunate events that largely began last year with errors made by the Admissions office. So at this stage there’s not much use in pointing out how campus culture will suffer without upperclassmen on campus or how the university should consider giving preference to those students who have already poured at least two years of their time and money into this institution. Such points have value, but it’s too late to do anything about it now. The bottom line is that this feels like a bit of a knife in the back to upperclassmen who do still wish to live on campus. Treating juniors and seniors with what feels like dispassionate dismissal came as a cold slap to many. Unforeseen problems will always arise students understand this. What is harder to understand is the lack of clear communication–a foreseeable problem that this board urges student housing, and Whitworth administration in general, to avoid.

{STAFF Spring 2011}

CONTENTS

GENERAL INFORMATION: The print edition of The Whitworthian is published weekly, except during January and student vacations. The content is generated entirely by students. The college administration does not review the newspaper’s content. Opinions and ideas expressed in The Whitworthian are those of the individual artists, writers and student editors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Associated Students of Whitworth University (ASWU), the university, its administration, faculty/staff or advertisers. The Whitworthian is paid for through advertising and subscription revenue and in part by student activity fees as budgeted by ASWU.

During the housing lottery last week, hopeful students of various ages crowded into the HUB to sign up for what they hoped would be the ideal on-campus living situation. Each year the lottery tends to be a stressful event, but this time around, students were greeted with some particularly upsetting news. Before things got started during the quad and triple signups, officials in charge of the housing lottery informed students that housing was capping the number of rooms to be allotted to juniors and seniors, leaving a good number of people flabbergasted and upset. To the credit of residence life and housing, they were quite accommodating and many people were able to find rooms, but the underlying lack of communication is appalling. It is simply unfair to students to have that kind of information dropped on their heads at the last minute. While the situation was hinted at in some emails leading up to the housing lottery, it was buried deep inside, and was not very noticeable. One email dedicated exclusively to this information would have been sufficient to prepare upperclassmen to explore alternatives in advance, should their plans not work out. This is not the first time that student housing has failed in communication. Earlier this semester, the plans to have a modern languages themed floor in Boppell Hall were put together and imposed on the dorm without consulting a single resident of that dorm. If Whitworth University and student housing have an agenda for the organization and allocation of dorm rooms, then the university needs to make it known to the students that it will affect. If there is a sort of agenda going on with what the university plans to do with the housing situation, the students simply need to know. The lack of communication is unfair and frankly

whitworthian

Serving the Whitworth community since 1905

|

OUR MISSION: The Whitworthian staff is dedicated to presenting accurate and relevant information in an innovative manner. Our goal is to be accountable while informing, entertaining and providing a forum for expressing the interests of the Whitworth community.

Editorial: IN THE LOOP Lack of communication in housing lottery unacceptable

WWW.THEWHITWORTHIAN.COM

VOLUME 101, ISSUE 15

|

{about us}

03


| WWW.THEWHITWORTHIAN.COM

NE WS Dining hall expansion in the works

|

Board of Trustees approves $6.5 million expansion for the dining hall. need to know Cost: $6.5 million Construction during the 2011-2012 school year

|

CONTENTS

Story by Evanne Montoya

|

MAY 03, 2011

|

SPORTS

|

OPINIONS

|

ARTS & CULTURE

|

WHITPICS

|

NEWS

Opening in fall

04

2012

220 more seats

Plans to build an addition on the Hixson Union Building are going forward after a unanimous decision by the Board of Trustees to approve the $6.5 million addition. Designs should be ready for review by prospective contractors in June or early July, and construction could start as soon as August, said Brian Benzel, vice president of finance and administration. Dr. Peter Barnes, a member of the executive committee of the Board and vice chair of the Student Services Committee, said student input and concerns had a hand in the decision. “Part of the reason the administration of the university and the Board are trying to do this is in response to concerns that were voiced to us by students,” Barnes said. Planning for the expansion had been done in the 2007-08 school year; however, it was put on hold due to the financial crisis in fall of 2008, Benzel said. The HUB plans came to the forefront again due in part to the unexpected enrollment spike last fall. “We essentially acquired about five years’ worth of enrollment growth in one year, which accelerated the challenge of the dining capacity,” Benzel said. This growth made it difficult for the available space to meet the needs of the student population. “There was general support by the Board for the HUB expansion,” Barnes said “We realize that there are limitations that the current space has with respect to students being able to get in and get out in a timely fashion, as well as in having the diversity of food options that they would like to have.” The addition would mean a significant increase in dining space.

The planning process When the trustees met in the fall, plans were already under way to restart the HUB project. The board gave permission for designs to be created and prepared. By March, the plans were more developed, Benzel said. Director of capital projects Steve Thompson and associate dean of students Dick Mandeville met with the cabinet and President Beck Taylor to present the plans and have them sign off on the look and functionality of the building, Benzel said. For the most part, the plans are similar to the original vision. “Probably the biggest decision we made in this phase was to make the addition a little bigger than we had planned in 2007-08,” Benzel said. This involved expanding about 20 feet on the east side toward Loop Road. While this change added about $1 million to the final cost, it’s relatively inexpensive for the amount of space it provides, Benzel said. The designs themselves still are not

entirely rigid, although the basics have been deposits and our entering freshman class, solidified. When prospective contractors making sure things are coming in at least as submit bids, the design has certain alterna- good as we had planned on,” Benzel said. tive elements. His main goal in the board meetings was “There’re some things that we have to do to make sure the board members knew that and some things we’d like to do, and the this project would create a $6.5 million ob‘like-to-dos’” often go on an alternates list,” ligation. Benzel said. “We look at how the prices come “I think the concern that we wanted the in and if we can afford to do the alternates Board to be very clear about is that moving we will.” forward now commits Construction will to a future financing “We essentially acquired about plan,” Benzel said. go on through the five years’ worth of enrollment 2011-2012 school Through discusgrowth in one year, which year, and the expansion during the board accelerated the challenge of the meeting, they were sion is set to open dining capacity.” fall of 2012. able to make that “There’ll be some - Brian Benzel point. access issues, and “The Board felt very Vice President of Finance there’ll be a little And Administration confident that it will more noise at varinot adversely impact ous times,” Benzel the overall budget said. “To say there and that there will be won’t be any [disruptions] would be over- funding available, especially as we continue promising, but functionally we won’t be tak- to grow enrollment and reach a cap of 2,300 ing the dining area down for any period of students,” Barnes said. time.” While the enrollment growth will help to The addition will be constructed sepa- cover the costs of the construction, it also rately, and an opening between the addition provides a need for this and future construcand the existing building will likely not be tion. created until after graduation in 2012, Ben“There are three projects in our radar zel said. screen right now, the HUB expansion, the “We know it’s crowded already so we don’t residence hall and then an Intramural stuwant to make it worse,” Benzel said. dent facility for Intramurals and student recThe addition will conform to Leadership reation,” Benzel said. in Energy and Environmental Design silver He named the HUB expansion and resistandards. dence hall as the most time-sensitive. At one point the plan was to work on and open the HUB and residence hall simultaneously; Finances and the Future however, there was not time or personnel reThe construction and other associated sources available to adequately plan the resicosts will be financed closer to when the dence hall in order to complete it by August 2012, Benzel said. building opens. “We had hoped in the fall that there might “We will self-finance out of university rebe a way to open the residence hall by fall of serve funds, and then we’ll pay ourselves back when the permanent financing is 2012 when the HUB opened, but that ended up not being feasible,” he said. done,” Benzel said. There was discussion from ASWU about Essentially, that means Whitworth will establishing an activities and facilities fee, loan itself the money until 2012 when bonds and other financing plans will be carried Benzel said. This would help pay for the recout. That will save the school from having to reation center and HUB improvements. “We haven’t set that yet; it will probably pay interest on an outside loan. Benzel said not be exceeding $300,” Benzel said. the money saved in interest would likely be The fee would not be implemented until more than would have been gained had the school invested the money in today’s market close to when the recreation center and HUB instead of using it to fund the building; how- are open to students. “I don’t want students to be paying a fee ever, like investing, it isn’t an entirely secure for a project that won’t be available for two option. “There is always risk; it’s a matter of pick- years,” Benzel said. The fee isn’t the only financial impact on ing what kind,” Benzel said. “What we’re students. risking is what the bond market will be like “Tuition is affected by this in some rea year from now; we have some exposure to gard as well, but more minimally,” Benzel that.” said. “Most of the support will be from room The school will be taking precautions to charges and the activities facilities fee.” ensure that it will be able to restore the reserve funds. Contact Evanne Montoya at “We’ll be looking really closely at our May evanne.montoya@whitworthian.com.

{


{ } numbers

$6.5

The cost of approved HUB expansion plan in millions of dollars.

52

Duration of the rice-fast for Peeps for Peeps in hours.

|

7.46

Story by Remi Omodara

107

Number of racers who finished every Bloomsday race from 19772010.

|

33:58

|

This year’s winning time, run by Simon Ndirangu of Kenya.

OPINIONS SPORTS MAY 03, 2011

$7,000

Cash award for the first place runner.

|

{

the fast. “My job as a connector is to bring the project to students at a more intimate level,” freshman connector Lillian Thomas said. “It isn’t just a fast, it is about getting into the mindset and the physical feeling of the women in Uganda who live like this every day.” Students who participate in the fast will have periodic discussions with their connectors over rice and water. The project is not just for the women in Uganda, but for the people of Whitworth as well. “We want a community transformation,” Hough said. “We want students to understand that there’s a bigger world out there.” The Whitworth community has the resources to help these people and transform global hunger, Hough said. The class understands the duty of human beings to reach out to the less fortunate and they want to share that knowledge with the rest of the community. Langeloh says their success on the project will be measured by how many people are still thinking about global hunger long after the fast. “We want to awaken souls to what’s going on beyond the pinecone curtain,” Hough said.

ARTS & CULTURE

Program aims to raise money to provide chickens for communities in Uganda

|

Length of Spokane’s Bloomsday Race in miles. Many Whitworth students participated.

WHITPICS

Uganda

|

Most of the world lives off of a mere $2 said it is a passion of hers. a day, Peeps for Peeps in Uganda coor“I am really keen on helping women,” dinator said. Hough said. The leadership studies 350 class is The class has been working through conducting a project on campus to raise Christian Veterinary Missions who money to buy chicks for 50 women in paired them with missionaries Jean and Karamoja, Uganda to sustain their liv- Tom Reed. ing. “The missionaries developed the pro“I think it’s really exciting because the gram where they train the women to impact we are having on the women is raise the 10 chicks, sell them and use really significant,” program coordinator them for food and income,” Langeloh Becky Langeloh said. said. The LS 350 class was split into three The class is trying to raise $5,775 groups; each presented a project pro- through a campus-wide fast that Sodexo posal and competed against the other has sponspered. groups in front of proStudents can fessor of global participate in commerce and “We want a community trans- the 52-hour, management formation. We want students to rice-only fast understand that there’s a bigger and Jack Burns and Sodexo world out there.” four judges. will donate The class 40 percent of chose the projthe profit from - Sophomore Molly Hough the meals they ect of the winning group, would have Langeloh said. eaten to the Then the class project, Hough chose people to fill leadership positions said. such as current program coordinator, To help with the fast, student in the LS Langeloh, and current chaplain, sopho- 350 class have chosen connectors. more Molly Hough. “Connectors are people in the com“I am class chaplain so at the begin- munity who are involved in the campus ning of each class I give devotion and and know a lot of people,” Hough said. prayer,” Hough said. “I am in charge of The role of the connectors is to get five the spiritual aspect of the project.” people to participate in the fast, and enHough, who wants to go into ministry, courage them and talk to them during

NEWS

Peeps for peeps in

|

Contact Jessica Valencia at jessica.valencia@whitworthian.com.

CONTENTS

$5,775

Fundraising goal for Peeps for Peeps, the leadership studies 350 project to raise money to buy chickens for women in Uganda in dollars.

|

During the press conference Obama said when he took office, he made it his “top priority” to take down the face and figure behind the World Trade Center attacks. Obama said he was briefed on a possible lead on bin Laden’s location. “It was far from certain, and it took many months to run this thread to ground,” Obama said. Yet the work of intelligence agencies paid off last week when the administration ascertained they had enough information go after bin Laden who was believed to be hiding within a Pakistani compound. President Obama reminded the world that the U.S. government was never out to attack Islam. “I’ve made clear, just as President Bush did shortly after 9/11, that our war is not against Islam,” he said. “Bin Laden was not a Muslim leader; he was a mass murderer of Muslims.” Obama called for the U.S. to stand in unity over this news of the death of bin Laden. “Let us remember we can do these things not just because of wealth or power, but because of who we are: one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

WWW.THEWHITWORTHIAN.COM

After nearly 10 years of Osama bin Laden being labeled as public enemy No. 1, White House sources have reported the national symbol of terrorism and fear was killed in a Pakistani compound on Sunday after nearly 40 minutes of firefights between al-Qaida and U.S. forces. “Today at my direction, the United States launched a targeted operation against that compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan,” President Barack Obama said during a press conference Sunday night. “After a firefight, [U.S. forces] killed Osama bin Laden and took custody of his body.” As news spread throughout the U.S. of bin Laden’s death, crowds gathered outside the White House singing and chanting; a sight that mirrored a similar gathering following 9/11 but with a clearly different tone for the evening. “His demise should be welcomed by all who believe in peace and dignity,” Obama said. In a statement released by former President George W. Bush following the Obama press conference, he reiterated the importance of this moment for the U.S. “This momentous achievement marks a victory for America, for people who seek peace around the world, and for all those who lost loved ones on September 11, 2001,” Bush said. “The fight against terror goes on, but tonight America has sent an unmistakable message: No matter how long it takes, justice will be done.”

crunching

|

Story by Jessica Valencia

THE

Osama bin Laden killed in firefight

Contact Remi Omodara at remi.omodara@whitworthian.com.

05


| WWW.THEWHITWORTHIAN.COM

| CONTENTS

|

NEWS |

As the year winds down, ASWU charters new clubs with lofty goals for the coming year. Story by Dani Dubois Adopt A Grandparent Adopt A Grandparent will serve to connect Whitworth students to the surrounding nursing and retirement community. The club will provide a way for students to spend time in fellowship with elderly citizens. “Whitworth University’s Adopt A Grandparent is a faith-based program seeking to connect students with residents living in nursing and retirement homes to ‘Adopt a grandparent,’” according to the club’s constitution. Adopt A Grandparent was officially chartered this spring, but will begin in fall 2011. “The goal of our club is to fill the need for Christcentered companionship with the elderly,” said sophomore Zach Autry, president of Adopt A Grandparent. Each student volunteer will be paired with an elderly person, and will be expected to meet with him or her at least once a week. Activities can include playing games, playing music and talking. According to the club’s constitution, “students will be paired up with one or more seniors in the hopes of fostering lifelong relationships.” Autry said Katie Apland, Adopt A Grandparent vice president and sophomore music major, was the inspiration for the club. “Last year I started playing piano for an hour per week at a retirement home,” Apland said. “While I was talking with them, I was struck with the loneliness and hopelessness of their last days.” Apland said she was surprised to find that Whitworth did not have a club that coupled students with retirement homes. Autry said the club will work with volunteers to place them in a retirement or nursing home, and

work to provide transportation needs between Whitworth and the residency. Adopt A Grandparent will serve to provide logistics as a go-between. Students may also volunteer to provide transportation. Autry said he hopes the club will be largely volunteer-initiated. The club members plan to host events in fall 2011 to raise awareness for their club and the need in Spokane’s community. Students who wish to become involved with Adopt A Grandparent should contact Apland at kapland13@my.whitworth.edu or Autry at zautry13@ my.whitworth.edu.

Students For Education Reform Students For Education Reform has opened a chapter at Whitworth to raise awareness and involvement in closing the achievement gap in Spokane. SFER Whitworth seeks to inform Whitworth students and motivate them to take action. “We want to mobilize Whitworth students to do something about inequity,” said sophomore Macy Olivas, president of SFER Whitworth. “We want to inform them about the achievement gap and about educational policy.” Olivas defined the achievement gap as the relationship between the quality of education a student receives and his or her socioeconomic status and race. “We believe it is a social injustice to limit a student’s quality of education based on the neighborhood they live in and their parents’ income,” Olivas said. “Everyone should have equal access to great education.” This view is held by the national SFER organization. Students For Education Reform was founded

by two undergraduate students at Princeton University. There are now 20 chapters nationwide, including SFER Brown, SFER Harvard and SFER Yale. SFER Whitworth’s constitution states their mission: “to close the achievement gap and ensure an excellent education for all children by mobilizing the next generation of leaders in education reform.” SFER Whitworth plans to be a presence in the Spokane community. Olivas said the club’s activities will include holding Saturday SAT prep classes for high school students, screening movies on education, bringing in guest speakers from organizations like Teach for America and visiting and serving local schools. “Another emphasis the club will have is on vocation, using the skills you have to mentor other students,” said sophomore Marissa Ranno, secretary of SFER Whitworth. Olivas said SFER Whitworth will also align with already established mentoring programs to help support their efforts. “Everyone has a role to play in this movement,” Olivas said. “We’re trying to involve all Whitworth students. No matter your academic major, we can use you to help ensure that one day all students can be on the path to attending the college of their dreams.” SFER Whitworth will hold an informational meeting Thursday, May 5, at 8 p.m. Students interested in joining the club should attend the meeting. The club’s executive members will be actively planning over the summer for fall semester events.

Contact Dani Dubois at dani.dubois@whitworthian.com.

Academy. Abbey. Apostolate.

|

MAY 03, 2011

|

SPORTS

|

OPINIONS

|

ARTS & CULTURE

|

WHITPICS

ASWU charters two new clubs for next year

06

M.Div. and M.A. in Theology Degrees AT S E AT T L E PA C I F I C S E M I N A R Y These three concepts academy, abbey, and apostolate define the vision of Seattle Pacific Seminary’s approach to theological education. The Seminary offers two graduate degree programs: M.A. in Theology and Master of Divinity (M.Div.). In each, you’ll experience rigorous scholarship (academy), spiritual depth in community (abbey), and compassionate service (apostolate)—all informed by our Wesleyan heritage that joins “knowledge and vital piety” as a means of changing the world. Scholarships and graduate assistantships are available. For more information, contact Raoul Perez, raoulp@spu.edu or visit our website. www.spu.edu/seminary


Four Whitworth teams placed in the regional business competition. Thirty-eight teams from Whitworth’s School of Global Commerce & Management, Gonzaga’s Hogan Entrepreneurial Leadership Program and Eastern Washington University’s Center for Entrepreneurial Activities competed in three categories: socialenterprise, community-based and student-generated.

ASWU Meeting April 27 The final assembly meeting was led by next year’s executive team, including Executive Vice President Melinda Leavitt, Financial Vice President Laura Cardle and President Eric Fullerton.

The assembly voted to charter two new clubs for next year. For more information, see the adjacent page.

SPORTS

|

Contact Caitlyn Starkey at caitlyn.starkey@whitworthian. com.

MAY 03, 2011

Updated daily with breaking news, updates, blogs, features, sports and commentary Scan this code for the minutes from the weekly ASWU meetings.

|

thewhitworthian.com

|

Outdoor Recreation New program equipment

OPINIONS

$4,747.18 - Capital

|

Cheerleading Mats for cheerleading stunts and safety

ARTS & CULTURE

$1,556 - Capital

|

Requisitions passed

WHITPICS

The assembly approved the ASWU budget for the next academic year.

|

Financial Standard Operating Procedures were also changed so the finance committee can approve requisitions up to $600 without approval from the general assembly. Upon passing the requisition the finance committee presents to the general assembly. The general assembly can then vote to repeal the requisition by two-thirds majority if it decides to do so.

NEWS

Whitworth seniors Sean Tennis and Michael Berger placed third in the student-generated category for their plan of Foothill Fresh Christmas Trees. The business plan is for local small table-top Christmas trees. Tennis credits the idea to his partner Berger. Berger put in around 200 hours of work and he put in around 100 hours, Tennis said. The competition was time intensive and a challenge. “I don’t think I have ever been better prepared,” he said. Tennis said he does not normally get nervous but he was for the competition. “It’s an honor to represent the business department,” Tennis said. Whitworth graduate student Terri Echegoyen received third place in the community-based category for a project titled Latah Creek Hardware & Home. Echegoyen was unable to be interviewed at the time of printing. According to the press release, business plans were judged based on 10 criteria categories including social return on investment and feasibility. “It was great, I learned a ton. Prize or no prize, it was a lot of fun. I would recommend it to anyone, no matter their major,” Williams said.

|

Foothill Fresh Christmas Trees

The assembly voted to approve changes to ASWU’s Financial Standard Operating Procedures. It changed the student representation for the finance committee from four to two.

CONTENTS

Whitworth graduate students Nicolle Gillie, Dennis Elrod and Kris Meng won first place in the community-based category for their cattle cooperative business plan. Essentially the plan allows local cattle ranchers to distribute their beef to the commercial market. “It’s basically a slaughterhouse, but that sounds bad,” Elrod said. The process certifies the meat with the USDA grass-fed seal and allows sale into the commercial markets, including restaurants, supermarkets and other venues. The business plan of Gillie, Elrod and Meng will be implemented starting in September. The local cattle cooperative was given a 20-year lowinterest loan from the federal government to finance the plan. Before the new process, cattle were shipped across the country for slaughtering and the ranchers were only given a portion of the profit. “By the time they’re done, there could be 16 different cows in your hamburger,” Elrod said. Gillie, Elrod and Meng’s plan reduces stress on the cattle and creates an incentive for better conditions. Before, the ranchers were paid the same amount of money for good or poor quality beef.

Senior Katie Williams placed first in the regional business competition in the student-generated categories for her business plan of Little Lamp Bites and Snacks. Little Lamp is a mobile food cart located near a college campus; the plan used the corner of Hawthorne Road and North Division Street as an example. The cart would be open late and stocked with healthy and sustainable options. In addition to the healthy choices, the cart would have a delivery via bicycle option. A student could order through text, online or a smart phone application. Being a student, Williams knows how hard it is to eat healthy while studying late at night. “It’s Jack in the Box or scrounging through your room for a granola bar,” she said. Williams will travel abroad for a year after graduation but when she returns, she would like to implement the plan. “My dream is to open a peanut butter and jelly restaurant,” Williams said. She explained that the shop would have multiple kinds of bread, various types of nut butter and many flavors of jam and jelly. Williams is not a business major like her fellow participants in the competition, she is majoring in Spanish and peace studies. She initially took the class to learn about personal finance. “Two months ago I had no idea what ROI was much less how to use it,” Williams said. “This is what I do for fun. I’m really passionate about it.”

}

leaks

|

Cattle Cooperative

Little Lamp Bites and Snacks

}

Story by Caitlyn Starkey

Whiti

WWW.THEWHITWORTHIAN.COM

Four Whitworth teams place in business competition with innovative plans.

|

Business as usual for Whitworth

07


TOP LEFT: Inside the Hixson Union Building at Springfest, people test their water pong skills to win a goldfish.

TOP RIGHT: A huge crowd of students are entertained by a hypnotist, The Trancelady, while volunteers participated in embarrassing shenanigans.

Photo by Becca Eng MIDDLE: Senior David Dennis rides the mechanical bull in a sumo suit at Springfest.

Photo by Becca Eng BOTTOM RIGHT: Two teams join in a massive group hug after playing each other in an epic game of Frisbee in the Loop.

Photo by Angeles Solis

THIS WEEK ONLINE Check out the multimedia section of The Whitworthian online. The slideshow Mind & Hearth features the local coffee shop from a different perspective.

| MAY 03, 2011

| 08

Springfest2011

Photo by Becca Eng

SPORTS

|

OPINIONS

|

ARTS & CULTURE

|

WHITPICS

|

NEWS

|

CONTENTS

|

WWW.THEWHITWORTHIAN.COM

|

WHITPICS

snap it! To explore more online.

Spirit of the Pirates explores the life behind the mask of Walker D. Plank.

www.thewhitworthian.com


| NEWS

|

A multidimensional job

|

Committed

Coming to Whitworth

Courageous

| MAY 03, 2011

|

continued on page 10

SPORTS

Inimitable

Whitehouse is an incomparable colleague Jackson described Whitehouse’s time here as “15 years of first-rate collegiality.” “Ginny has been a wonderful brightening force,” Jackson said. “She is lively, she is an enormous amount of fun and she is a colleague who sharpens the intellects of her colleagues by not letting us get away with sloppy thinking or low standards.” Esther Louie, assistant dean of intercultural student affairs, has worked with Whitehouse through the Act Six program and recognizes her ability to make things happen. “I love working with Ginny,” Louie said, “She’s really creative. She has a great can-do attitude.” Whitehouse knows not being around her colleagues everyday will be difficult and still hasn’t gotten her head around the fact she truly is

|

asked Quarless where the test was and he told her he had thrown it away. She made him go out in the rain and retrieve the test from the garbage. “She was a major part of everything I did at Whitworth,” Quarless said, “Whitworth won’t nearly be as strong without her.” One class Whitehouse was particularly pleased with was her article and feature writing class last Jan Term. Part of the class included sending students out to live with Hmong-American and Russian-American families and having them write stories about the experience. This is something

Whitehouse had wanted to happen for the 15 years she’s been at Whitworth. Holly Gregg, junior communications studies major, was in article and feature writing and said it was her favorite class in the communications studies department. It was structured so it felt just like working in a newsroom, getting up early to write a story and coming to class in the afternoon to edit it. Whitehouse sat down with each student and helped them edit so they could learn about writing style. Whitehouse did a really good job of seeing each student and figuring out what each one needed, Gregg said. “I love teaching students about the things I care about,” Whitehouse said, “I care about them writing well and telling other people’s stories well. I care about helping them make good ethical decisions. I care about them learning how to live and work with people who are different from them.”

OPINIONS

s u o i c o c e r P

Photo by Chrissy Roach

|

It has been 15 years since Whitehouse first joined the Whitworth faculty in 1996. Whitworth communications studies professor, Mike Ingram, has known Whitehouse since 1982 when they were friends and debate teammates at Carson-Newman College in Jefferson City, Tenn. “We laughed a lot that a pair of college friends were now academic professionals across the country,” Ingram said. Gordon Jackson, chair of the communications studies department, previously knew Whitehouse through professional associations. When the communications studies department was looking for a new journalism faculty member, Jackson suggested contacting Whitehouse. She applied and was the department’s top choice. “She brought new ideas and fresh eyes to our program,” Ingram said. Kathy Fechter, academic program assistant, said Whitehouse brought a lot of laughter, and was vivacious, energetic and very thoughtful.

Dr. Virginia Whitehouse announced she will be leaving after 15 years as a professor at Whitworth.

ARTS & CULTURE

Besides being a communications studies professor, Whitehouse has played a rather multifaceted role at Whitworth. She has been a student advisor, an internship supervisor, an Act Six mentor and she has added experiential and service learning components to several classes. Working with Act Six students is something Whitehouse particularly enjoyed. She helped with organizing the intercultural academic mentor program and paired incoming Act Six students with a faculty mentor. One student she mentored, Whitworth alumnus Dan Quarless, said Whitehouse greatly influenced his life. “She very much kept me in line while I was at Whitworth,” Quarless said, “She always made sure I was on top of my game.” Whitehouse definitely challenged him, Quarless said. There was an instance when he informed Whitehouse he had done poorly on a chemistry test. S h e

WHITPICS

d l o B

Communications studies professor Ron Pyle said Whitehouse has maintained consistency over the years since starting at Whitworth. “Her generosity and commitment to students and Whitworth’s mission is the same now as when she first arrived,” Pyle said.

CONTENTS

Exuber ant

There is soon to be an empty office in downstairs Lindaman as valued communications studies professor Ginny Whitehouse leaves Whitworth at the end of the semester. Whitehouse accepted a position at Eastern Kentucky University teaching journalism classes starting in the fall. Part of her job there will be to work with the school’s faculty to bring the curriculum into the social media and multimedia era. All of which are excellent opportunities, Whitehouse said. “But I will be very sad to leave Whitworth and everyone here and all my friends and wonderful students,” Whitehouse said. The decision to make the move centers on her desire to be closer to her family in the South. Whitehouse’s sister, mother and brothers are ecstatic about her coming. Whitehouse’s two adopted Chinese daughters, Kaili and Marie, ages 10 and 6, are nervous about leaving, but are excited for the new adventure. Whitehouse’s sister has two Chinese children of the same age living in Nashville, Tenn. The four children are very close, Whitehouse said.

|

Students and faculty were surprised when longtime professor Dr. Virginia “Ginny” Whitehouse announced she’d be leaving Whitworth. Her imprint has been left on the campus community. Those who will miss her most used many words to try and explain the professor’s essence. Story by Jo Miller

WWW.THEWHITWORTHIAN.COM

Communications professor says goodbye

|

ARTS & CULTURE

09


| WWW.THEWHITWORTHIAN.COM

| CONTENTS

| NEWS

| WHITPICS

ARTS & CULTURE | | OPINIONS

| SPORTS

| MAY 03, 2011

| 10

Art show provides real life experience Story by Caitlin Richmond Some majors require a thesis to graduate, others require some sort of major project. Art majors have to put together a gallery exhibit to graduate. This year’s exhibit, called Overtones/ Undercurrents, features 28 pieces by senior art majors. Every senior takes a class that ends with the show, but many seniors spend a lot of time outside of class preparing, in addition to doing homework for the classes they are in currently. “The hardest part was making everything work,” senior Damon Buck said. “These aren’t just class assignments. I want to have good intentions behind my work.” The senior art show is the culmination of everything art majors have done over their time at Whitworth University. This year there is a variety of art, from newspaper and yearbook page layouts to oil paintings. Art majors also put together a show during their junior year, to prepare for the senior art show. “What the junior art show does is get their feet wet,” said Stephen Rue, gallery director and a lecturer for the art department. “They start thinking about the process of the show and they can look ahead to their senior year.” Although the junior art show isn’t very different from the senior art show

Artwork by Grace Barnes (above) and other Whitworth seniors is displayed at the senior exhibition in the Bryan Oliver Gallery. Photo by Maria Chumov in terms of what the students do to get ready for it, there is an obvious difference in the art itself. “The attention to detail is a thousand times better than last year,” Buck said. “Some people didn’t really know their focus, but everyone has developed their own style and the quality has gone up in the past year.” One thing that is different about this show is that it will be showing at two locations. The first is in the Bryan Oliver Gallery on campus, and the second is at the Saranac Art Projects downtown.

There was good timing at the Saranac, which is why the senior art show was able to have another gallery, Rue said. Adjunct professor Garric Simonsen was the juror for the show, which meant he looked at all the work submitted and decided which pieces should be part of the show. “I looked at the students’ ability to be innovative and original,” Simonsen said. “It was a process of looking at the work and asking those questions.” For many students, this was the first time their work had been looked at by

someone who they weren’t very familiar with. “[Garric] was a little more critical, because there wasn’t a close relationship like there is with professors here,” Buck said. “They take our feelings to heart; they’re critical but we have a relationship with them.” Even though the jury process was more severe than people had originally thought it would be, most people were happy with how it turned out. “I’m pretty pleased with it,” Rue said. “Everyone found their own direction. The seniors have a good sense of who they are artistically.” Simonsen was happy about the work that ended up in the show. “A lot of the work was up to current contemporary standards,” Simonsen said. “The conceptual ideas were similar to the ideas of overarching institutional groups that are considered the art world. The work was pretty progressive and fairly cutting edge.” The show at the Bryan Oliver Gallery will be open until May 14. The show at the Saranac Art Projects opens May 6 and closes May 29. Contact Caitlin Richmond at caitlin.richmon@whitworthian. com.

WHITEHOUSE: Leaving Whitworth

continued from page 9

leaving. “I am deeply indebted to my colleagues and working in a wonderful department. We are genuinely friends and support each other,” Whitehouse said.

Students as friends Students of Whitehouse’s see the same good things in her as her colleagues do. Two communications studies majors, senior Stephanie Baker and Gregg, are excited for Whitehouse’s new opportunity, but sad about her departure. Baker said Whitehouse understands students and relates to them effortlessly while never being afraid to challenge them. “She does a good job of being supportive and challenging at the same time,” Baker said. Gregg has taken three classes with Whitehouse and remembers what she learns well because of Whitehouse’s extremely animated teaching style. “Whitehouse got into [her teaching] so much that she became what she was teaching,” Gregg said. Whitehouse brings energy to the classroom and is a role model for students. Students deeply value her encouragement and strong nudges when a student is delivering less than his or her best, Jackson said. “It’s very difficult to capture Ginny’s uniquely flamboyant, forceful style,” Jackson said. The students are Whitehouse’s favorite part of being at Whitworth; they are also her friends and she knows leaving them will be a big loss for her. “I feel like I am so fortunate to be part of our students’ lives,” White-

house said.

The void left behind There are two effects Whitehouse’s leaving will have on the department, Jackson said. The first is more easily dealt with than the second. The department has to find someone to cover the courses she teaches and will bring in a temporary lecturer for the writing for mass media class and will soon start the process of searching for a replacement faculty member. The second effect is a more intangible loss, Jackson said. It is much easier to cover courses and assign advisees to new people, but one aspect of her leaving is going to be impossible to assess and address. “Ginny’s leaving is a huge loss in a whole host of ways. Our biggest loss is her presence and she will not be easily replaced,” Pyle said. Ingram understands Whitehouse’s pull toward home and family, being a transplanted Southerner himself. At the same time he is sad and greatly aware of the void she will leave. “I think the whole campus will feel her void; they’ll know she’s gone,” Fechter said. Fechter is happy for Whitehouse, but will miss her and knows the department will miss her expertise. “Now it’s up to the department and the administration to do justice to Ginny’s legacy by finding someone who deserves to fill the space she’s leaving in her office, our department and campus as a whole,” Jackson said.

Energetic

Contact Jo Miller at jo.miller@whitworthian.com.

<eifccefnkfY\^`efli DXjk\i`eK\XZ_`e^gif^iXd`eAle\%

Fi`ek\im`\nX^X`ejk

jfd\fe\n_f_Xj% N_`knfik_ËjDXjk\i`eK\XZ_`e^D@K Gif^iXdc\kjpfl\XieYfk_ pflidXjk\iËj[\^i\\Xe[k\XZ_`e^Z\ik`ÔZXk`fe`ealjk(*dfek_j% @efliZf_fikdf[\c#pflËcc\ek\iXe[Zfdgc\k\k_\gif^iXdn`k_ fk_\ijkl[\ekj]fijlggfikXe[\eZfliX^\d\ekXcfe^k_\nXp%

Kfc\Xiedfi\1 nnn%n_`knfik_%\[l&d`k ,'0%...%*))) :fekXZkd`k7n_`knfik_%\[l 


FREEDOM RIDE

Scoundrel

Nashville Charlotte Memphis

Atlanta

Birmingham

Columbia

Montgomery

Jackson

{I SAW YOU}

New Orleans

I saw you kissing a blonde short haired girl in the back forty, then a day later you were with a blonde long haired girl in Duvall, that weekend I saw you holding hands with a blue eyed brunette on Sunday. You sir are a Don Juan and a Scoundrel!

Siren

|

ARTS & CULTURE

Lucky Friend

I saw you freshman year and thought you were probably a snotty girl; you and your friend. Now, I am so glad to know that we are friends and I didn’t act on my initial judgements. I’m so glad we’re friends and you are a part of my life.

WHITPICS

The Wide Window

OPINIONS

I saw you walking into the HUB for dinner. And you. And you. None of you saw me though! Ahahahaha! Try looking up next time. Then, wave back!

|

Contact Lindsie Wagner at lindsie.wagner@whitworthian.com.

Classy Dresser

I saw as you nearly left the room without your suit jacket. Classy. When you were complaining you hated wearing them, the collar popped in the back, and I couldn’t help but laugh. Once you fixed it though, I thought you pulled if off quite nicely. Hope your presentation went well.

|

50 years ago.” As an Act Six scholar, Quarless said he has gained a strong sense of the issues of social justice and inequality. The mainstream curriculum at Whitworth has also affected his identity. “I would say Whitworth has affected my identity because on one hand, Whitworth’s an open environment; I don’t feel an active press by the administration against learning about civil rights and my heritage,” Quarless said. “Whitworth has affected my identity, though, by not including the African American perspective in the dominant narrative.” It is troubling that students can get a four-year degree at Whitworth without ever coming into contact with the African American experience, he said. “That undermines my personal identity and my collective identity as an African American,” Quarless said. The Freedom Rides will give Whitworth students the opportunity to learn about history and civil rights in a new way, as the participants will be actively giving updates on Facebook and Twitter. A full-length film, which will appear on PBS, and 12 short films will also come out of the project.

NEWS

On the trip, both the students and some original Freedom Riders will take a bus through eight states, and will reach their final destination in New Orleans, the intended destination of the original Freedom Rides. The students and accompanying original Freedom Riders will be greeted by a public event and rally in New Orleans. “I feel like as an African American male, I’ve benefited a lot from them and other Civil Rights activists,” Quarless said. “I want to put myself in their shoes.” Quarless said he expects to find a different kind of education on this trip than that which he has found at Whitworth. “Whitworth is inclusive and tries to bring people in,” Quarless said. “But at the same time there are stories, especially the African American stories, that are omitted from the curriculum and from the dialogue.” Quarless said he hopes to find a learning experience connecting him further to his own heritage, and to be able to bring some of his lessons back to Whitworth. “I think the main way I’ll be able to bring this experience back to Whitworth is for one, to make people realize that it was only 50 years ago,” Quarless said. “In light of that, I’d want to stress to students and faculty and the greater Spokane community that the struggle didn’t end

|

In previous generations, young adults would actively fight for causes in which they believed. In this generation, students support causes by finding the correlating Facebook page and becoming a fan, junior JaJa Quarless said. In an attempt to bridge that generational gap, and also to bring awareness to the Civil Rights movement, PBS’s American Experience is sponsoring 40 college students in a journey similar to that of the Freedom Riders 50 years ago. The original Freedom Rides were organized by the Congress of Racial Equality, a group started by students at University of Chicago in 1942. The rides were meant to break down segregation in transport systems in the eastern and southern regions of the U.S., according to a 1962 Associated Press article. Quarless was selected as one of the students to make the trip, following the intended map of the original Freedom Rides. “I decided to apply firstly because I felt like when people hear about the Civil Rights movement, they hear about Dr. King, but the movement was driven by a lot of young people too,” Quarless said. Several original Freedom Riders, many of whom were college students when they made the journey, will join Quarless and the other college students as they follow in their footsteps.

Brave Letters

I saw your letter to the editor, and I want you to know that I, and probably others, really admire you for speaking up. That was a gutsy move. Good job. :)

CONTENTS

Junior Jaja Quarless was selected as one of 40 individuals to take part in PBS’ reinactment of the Freedom Rides to connect with his heritage and bring awareness to the Civil Rights movement. Story by Lindsie Wagner

|

Student selected for a PBS documentary

I saw you from my room walking to East singing beautiful music, and you have a gorgeous voice. Please keep up the singing!

WWW.THEWHITWORTHIAN.COM

1961

|

Washington, DC

| SPORTS

| Submissions published as received.

|

Seen someone? Submit your ‘I saw you’ (limited to 50 words) to isawyou@whitworthian.com.

MAY 03, 2011

Junior Jaja Quarless was selected as a student to follow along the original route of the Freedom Rides. Photo by Chrissy Roach

Scan QR code to submit your own I Saw You from your mobile device.

11


| WWW.THEWHITWORTHIAN.COM

| CONTENTS

| NEWS

| WHITPICS

| ARTS & CULTURE

|

OPINIONS | SPORTS

| MAY 03, 2011

| 12

Obama’s botched response to the Lybia crisis power had been used sooner, while Gadhafi was still reeling from the initial shock of the revolution, it is possible that Libya would not still be mired in MAX NELSEN a civil war. COLUMNIST Why the delay? Though he decided not to consult Congress, Obama had to get approval from the U.N. and the Arab League. When decisive action For weeks, I’ve hesitated to write about Libya. was needed, France and Britain stepped up to the Events were unfolding at such a rapid rate that I plate, while the Obama administration dragged its feared anything I wrote could be obsolete before feet. Weeks later, after filling out the requisite perit was published. Now that the revolution in Libya mission slips, Obama eventually assented to U.S. has been underway for more than two months, I participation. Well, kind of. feel I can begin to offer meaningful criticism of the Obama strongly insisted that the U.S. would let way in which the United States has played its role NATO take the lead in operations and that the goal in the conflict. was merely the protection of Libyan civilians and From the very beginning, the Obama admin- not the deposition of Gadhafi. By making stateistration has mishandled the crisis, regardless of ments about what we would not do (send in troops how you look at it. or depose Gadhafi), Obama made several serious First, of course, is the question of whether the strategic mistakes. Even if the U.S. never intended U.S. should have become involved in the conflict to send in ground troops, wouldn’t it be better to in the first place. For instance, America’s involve- keep Gadhafi guessing? Former U.S. ambassador ment does not come without significant monetary to the U.N. John Bolton noted, “By demanding cost. It is even questionable if President Barack Moammar Gadhafi’s ouster while restricting U.S. Obama had the authority to military force to the more authorize military action on limited objective of protectWhen decisive action was his own. ing civilians, Barack Obama needed, France and Britain According to Fred Lucas of stepped up to the plate, while has set himself up for masCNS News, while campaigning sive strategic failure.” the Obama administration for president in 2007, Obama Obama had no reason to dragged its feet. explicitly stated: “The presivery publicly limit the U.S. dent does not have power unrole except, of course, if he der the Constitution to unilaterwas trying to cover his political backside. ally authorize a military attack in a situation that While the U.S. took the lead in the initial operadoes not involve stopping an actual or imminent tions, Obama rushed to pull American forces out threat to the nation.” of the fight and let NATO handle things. Without The situation in Libya by no means constituted U.S. leadership, however, the situation quickly an “actual or imminent threat” to the U.S., yet soured. AP writers Don Melvin, Robert Burns and Obama chose to authorize U.S. military action Danica Kirka listed several of NATO’s early miswithout consulting Congress. Whether his action takes: “NATO holds its fire as Moammar Gadhafi’s was truly unconstitutional or not, Obama did not forces advance 100 miles into rebel territory. It even follow his own guidelines. then blasts a rebel tank, saying it didn’t know the Second, the exact nature of the Libyan rebels is rebels had any — even though footage of rebels not clearly known. Indeed, according to Sebastian with tanks had been on YouTube for weeks.” The Abbot of the Associated Press, “NATO’s top com- article later quotes Malcolm Chambers, a profesmander, U.S. Navy Adm. James Stavridis, told Con- sor of defense at London’s Kings College: “This is gress last month that officials had seen ‘flickers’ something new. We haven’t had a significant miliof possible al-Qaeda and Hezbollah involvement tary operation in which the Americans have taken with rebel forces.” a back seat for quite some time … It really is unIf this turns out to be true, the U.S. is spending clear whether the Europeans can rise to that chaltaxpayers’ dollars and risking American lives to lenge.” So much for NATO. aid some of the very people committed to AmerThis is just an abridged list of the foreign policy ica’s destruction. faux pas committed by the administration. Amid All this is relatively unimportant now since Obama’s indecisiveness and unwillingness to take Obama did eventually decide to get involved in strong action of any kind, the battle lines have Libya. However, U.S. involvement has been bun- stalemated. The U.S. and NATO are now realizing gled at nearly every opportunity. that they have to step up their efforts in order to Most apparent was the indecision of the Obama break the impasse. Thus, in trying to avoid comadministration. The revolution in Libya began on mitting to anything and seeking to cover his bases Feb. 15. By Feb. 28, the U.S. was positioning na- politically, Obama has actually put the U.S. in a val assets off Libya’s coast and calls were mount- more dangerous position where more commiting for the imposition of a no-fly zone to prevent ment is necessary. In the meantime, lives and forLibyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi from bombing tunes are being lost. Apparently, one doesn’t get his own people. However, coalition forces did not much experience as commander in chief while orbegin bombarding Gadhafi’s forces until March ganizing communities in Chicago. 19. By the time the airstrikes began, Gadhafi’s forces had reversed the significant initial progress of the rebels and were threatening the last rebel NELSEN is a sophomore majoring in political science. stronghold in Benghazi. If coalition air and naval Comments can be sent to max.nelsen@whitworthian.com.

{


| WWW.THEWHITWORTHIAN.COM

The

Peanut Gallery By: Jerod Jarvis

CONTENTS

| NEWS

| |

OPINIONS | SPORTS

{

ARTS & CULTURE

| MAY 03, 2011

|

telling me about the Republican Party mailer he received the other day, I engaged. Not only did I listen and comment, but I also brought up immiHALEY ATKINSON gration reform. From there we began talking about COLUMNIST environmentalism, education and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In listening to what he and my grandma had to say, I came to realize the fallacies Over Easter I was able to spend the weekend with in my opinions. He described watching a recent enmy grandparents. This interaction is not common- vironmental protest. place in my life, and thus seems worth noting. They “They were so dirty, dreaded hair, no showers, are both in their 80s, live in Wenatchee and are tru- ripped up clothes, just the worst. They were telling ly the most hospitable people you will ever meet. the people they need to stop driving; that we have Over the course of the weekend we shared our sto- to ride our bikes everywhere. But when they were ries, their lessons from the past and my hopes for asked how they got to Washington, D.C. from Calithe future. In hearing their experiences and beliefs, fornia they all drove.” I was forced to respectfully consider our differencMy grandma chimes in, “You have to live out es. Through this I gained an invaluable lesson. what you believe, all the time, not just when it’s I would encourage you, over the next couple convenient.” weeks or the course of the summer, to seek a relaI am nearly certain they saw this on Fox News, tionship with a person you don’t typically interact but I disregarded this information and listened to with. Spend time with someone what they were saying, and sitting on the other side of the they were right. If we are gofence and listen. The process of living well ing to seek radical change, We are often told to shy away we had better start making with one another requires from politics. This is especially those changes holistically in appreciation for the unique true when there is a known aspects the other has to offer. our own lives. disagreement, and you’re famSo students of Whitworth ily. Yet when we do, we gain I charge you, eat a meal with an essential aspect of political some folks who have a backthought, and a life principle - perspective. I am writ- ground significantly different from your own. Lising this now from my grandpa’s office looking at the ten to their story. Learn what has brought them to family portraits above his desk, the photographs their ideological framework. Do not disregard all of dams along the wall and an image of President or part of what they are saying; rather be receptive Barack Obama and the democratic party lead- gleaning from it what you can. You need not come ers signing a document with text reading, “these to agreement, but in putting a face to our perceived people are responsible for bankrupting the U.S.A. opposition we can all learn the line dividing us isn’t by passing the health care bill” in all caps. He is a that thick. World War II veteran and remains active politically. Since the fall of my freshman year I have been dreading the “Grandpa, I’m a peace studies major” conversation (which happened over dinner, while ATKINSON is a junior majoring in English and peace he was wearing his vest with an American flag and studies. Comments can be sent to “Go Army” pins). That day, however, as he started haley.atkinson@whitworthian.com.

|

Spending time to learn from other viewpoints

WHITPICS

JARVIS is a senior majoring in journalism. Comments can be sent to jerod.jarvis@whitworthian.com.

|

Hullo, Whitworth. It’s a fine day. One of the finest I’ve seen. Why is this day so fine? Simple: This day finds itself in this week. And this is a fine, fine week. And where dost this week find its greatness? Also simple: because this is the week before the week before graduation. I suspect, therefore, that as good as this week is, next week will be better. But while graduation looks about as tantalizing right now as a lame water buffalo to a starving lion with a compulsive eating disorder, it isn’t without its letdowns. Namely, I was not chosen as a speaker for our class. I didn’t even make the nominee list. I suspect the communists are behind this obvious oversight. But that is neither here nor there. Because I will not have the opportunity to speak to my fellow seniors at Commencement in a couple weeks, I wanted to print the speech I had prepared in this column, but the nit-pickers told me that 5,000 words running more than three pages wasn’t doable. Apparently we print news in this paper. Had no idea. So instead I’ve slaved away over the last two weeks distilling my magnum opus down into a few poignant points, which are printed below. If you are a senior, take notes, or cut this column out and have it inscribed on your contact lenses. If you are not a senior, consider yourself lucky to be receiving wisdom of this caliber so far ahead of the curve. 1. You no longer have a mother. Or a father, for that matter. Biological technicalities aside, you are now truly on your own. Or you should be. While people will tell you that there’s no shame in moving back home, you should be aware that there is. Shame, I mean. A lot of it. 2. You may have already learned to cook and clean for yourself, and that’s a good step. But now you no longer have a home - your bedroom is now a quilting room and your impressive collection of 500 energy drink cans mysteriously ended up in the recycle bin. 3. You don’t have insurance anymore either. That’s right. You have less than two weeks to schedule a final appointment with your dentist before you can kiss your oral health goodbye for the next several years. Or until you have your teeth beaten out by your Russian landlord due to your outstanding debt. 4. You will have to provide your own food. Fortunately, every major at Whitworth is designed to help with this. Biology majors can live off an exclusive diet of plant thorns and small rocks. Communication types have developed the ability to literally talk people’s ears off - a surprising source of both protein and fiber. Sociologists and political science students have learned to stomach anything. Art and theatre majors are both well prepared for a future of starvation. The only people who are going to have real problems after school are peace studies majors, but that was always going to be the case anyway. 5. Regrettably, most of the good paying jobs start before you get up in the morning. I originally had 27 points, each as pithy and timeless as the five you have just read. My apologies, but you have no one to blame but yourself for not selecting me as your speaker. So don’t come crying to me when you suddenly realize how cold the world is. Just hunker down and deal with it, senior. You’re a grown-up now.

13


| WWW.THEWHITWORTHIAN.COM

| CONTENTS

| NEWS

| WHITPICS

| ARTS & CULTURE

| OPINIONS

|

SPORTS |

sports talk with colin zalewski

Inexplicable Stupidity: Athletes battle it out for the ultimate crown If you’ve been following this column for any length of time, you’ve noticed a recurring theme: athletes are inexplicably stupid. Now, I try to mix things up every once in a while and give credit to those athletes representing their sport well, but this week it’s just too easy. Washington Redskins defensive lineman and African American (which will become relevant in a moment) Albert Haynesworth has been indicted on the charge of sexual harassment. Haynesworth, while enjoying a comfortable meal at a hotel restaurant in Washington D.C., decided he was done with his meal and asked to be charged. His waitress, an African American woman, had her hands full at the time, so Albert decided to slip his credit card into her bra and fondled her breast. If your jaw’s not already on the floor, get a load of this. When asked about the incident, Haynesworth said he would fight the case, citing that “she is just upset I have a white girlfriend … [I] don’t even like black girls.” Let me get this straight, Albert, your defense in a case that could cost you as much as six months in jail and $1,000 in fines is that some waitress is upset at your racial preferences in dating partners? I hope at every stadium the Redskins play in this season, there is at least one poster reading: “Albert the racist dragon.” In the spirit of Albert and his fondling, it’s time to set the record straight once and for all. It’s time for a show-down between the three major sports (MLB, NBA and NFL), for which has the absolute dumbest athletes. The match will be decided via a free-for-all of stupidity between one representative from each sport. The NFL will be repped by none other than Albert for reasons you now know. In the NBA corner we’ve got Latrell Sprewell. Sprewell is known for a plethora of off-court legal issues, constant technical fouls and the famous ending of his career when he declined a three-year, $21 million deal from the Timberwolves citing, “I’ve got a family to feed.” For the MLB we’ve got Barry Bonds. Big Barry wasn’t always big. He’s been insisting for years he is innocent of charges against him regarding steroid use. The story seems to change each time. Whether he didn’t do steroids at all, or he unknowingly did, he just can’t seem to get his story straight. Lastly, Barry Bonds is just pure stupid because he doesn’t think we can all see how steroid-licous he is, and yet he insists on continuing to ruin his life and the integrity of baseball. So which is the dumbest based on these representatives, MLB, NBA or NFL? Well it depends on whether you’re looking at legal stupidity or personal stupidity. Bonds may have lied to a grand jury, Sprewell is now bankrupt and has several children he can’t support and Haynesworth doesn’t like African American women. I’m literally scratching my head on this one, but I’m going to have to go with Albert. He covers all the bases of stupidity and so does the rest of the NFL.

|

MAY 03, 2011

The Jock Strip

14

Contact Colin Zalewski at editor@whitworthian.com.

Women outstanding at invitational

Story by Alex Blade

Several Whitworth Track and the 100m hurdles with a time of away from qualifying for the NCAA Field athletes competed in the Pel- 15.65. DIII Championships. The proviluer Invitational on Friday, April Turner’s victory came in the sional qualifying time for the 800m 29 at Eastern Washington 1500m run, in which she in DIII is 2:14.40. University. ran a time of The men were well repThe Pirates got victories 4:45.88, which resented by freshman Sam in two women’s events was more than Wright, who took second from seniors Elizabeth 20 seconds faster in the discus (155’-8”) Mattila and Tonya Turner. than the secondand third in the shot put Mattila beat a field of place finisher. (50’-6.75”). Sophomore runners from EWU, UniSenior Dana Carter Comito took fourth versity of Montana and Misterek turned in the shot put (50’-5.25”), Montana State University in a solid perand senior Alex Couette MATTILA TURNER in the 400m hurdles. She formance in the placed fourth in the hamran a time of 1:02.02, im800m run, taking mer throw (177’-6”). proving on her already NCAA Di- fourth place with a time of 2:14.41. vision III qualifying time for this Unfortunately, while the time was season. Misterek’s best of the season, it was Contact Alex Blade at Mattila also finished fourth in one one-hundredth of a second alex.blade@whitworthian.com.


Story by Jenna Hansen

by Alex Blade

NFL Draft

4 Quarterbacks drafted in first 12 picks.

ARTS & CULTURE

| OPINIONS

NBA Playoffs

No. 8 Grizzlies take down No. 1 Spurs in six games.

SPORTS | MAY 03, 2011

|

In what is the biggest NBA playoff upset of the year, the Memphis Grizzlies, who barely made the postseason as the No. 8 seed in the Western Conference, took only six games to beat the No. 1 seeded San Antonio Spurs. The series started off with the Grizzlies and Spurs each winning one of the first two games. Memphis then won two straight to go up 3-1, but San Antonio answered by winning in overtime in game five to force the series back to Memphis. But the Grizzlies prevailed in the sixth game to win the series. They were led by the 31 points and 11 rebounds of forward Zach Randolph. Memphis moves on to face the Oklahoma City Thunder in the Western Conference semi-finals.

|

Contact Jenna Hansen at jenna.hansen@whitworthian.com.

|

known as Q-school, which is a competitive series o0f qualifying tournaments for leading golf tours like the Professional Golf Association. “I’ve invested too much of my life to give up,” he said. “I want to try and see if it works out.” If he does not play professional golf, Young will go to graduate school to study landscape architecture with a focus on golf course architecture. Friedrichs said that golf course design is a good fit for Young. “He’s a smart kid, very focused and directed when he sets his mind to it,” Friedrichs said. “He has a fun passion like golf, and he wants to make it an artistic endeavor.” However, the industry is struggling because of the economy. Young said that it has dropped from approximately 400 new courses constructed each year to eight. Young said that because of this, he may work abroad, and his Spanish and business minors will be useful. The future is uncertain, Young said. “It’s seemed pretty easy so far, but now that I’m at the end, I’m scared. ,” he said. “I’ve been planning for years. Now it’s real.”

WHITPICS

College and University of Puget Sound, facing some difficult weather conditions during the spring. The team was ranked 24th in the nation and third in the West region in the NCAA Golf Coaches Association of America (GCAA) Division III men’s coaches’ poll on April 6, but Young said that weather conditions were frustrating and this spring was difficult for him. “I feel like as a senior, I should carry the team with my scores, but I haven’t been able to contribute as much,” he said. Warren Friedrichs, Whitworth athletic director and golf coach, said that Young is “a hard worker and a team leader” on and off the golf course. “He has a really good short game, and he always finds a way to piece together a good score,” Friedrichs said. “Ryan is tough mentally and has really matured as a player.” Young was focused on this season, but he is still weighing his options for the future. He said he has to decide if he wants to pursue professional golf after graduation. Next year, he might play in the National Professional Mini Tour, a new mini tour in the Pacific Northwest. This would give him feedback before trying to go to qualifying school, also

|

Photo by Angeles Solis

NEWS

Senior Ryan Young balances his major with his passion in life, as he prepares for a career designing golf courses.

The Mariners lost on Sunday to the Boston Red Sox in the last game of their roadtrip to Detroit and Boston. They were tied heading into the bottom of the ninth, but a sun-induced error by Ichiro led to a walkoff RBI single by Boston’s Carl Crawford. Despite the loss, the Mariners head back to Seattle one game shy of sweeping their six-game roadtrip. If they had won Sunday, it would have been the first time the Mariners would have gone undefeated on a roadtrip since going 10-0 during the 2002 season. Seattle was led by a strong pitching performance by Felix Hernandez, who went seven innings, striking out 10 and giving up two runs on six hits. At one point, he retired 12 straight Red Sox batters.

|

Major League Baseball

Mariners take five of six on roadtrip.

CONTENTS

This year was not the strongest quarterback class in the history of the NFL Draft. But, despite being a “down year” for QBs, four of them were drafted in the first 12 picks this year. Cam Newton was the first pick overall, going to the Carolina Panthers. While he is considered a high risk, high reward prospect, it did not come as a shock that he was the first player drafted. What was a suprise was Jake Locker going No. 8 overall to the Tennessee Titans. Locker was projected by most as a late first round to early second round pick, but had been slowly improving his draft stock over the last few months. Blaine Gabbert went next at No. 10 overall to the Jacksonville Jaguars. He was followed closely by perhaps the biggest suprise of the day, Christian Ponder. He went No. 12 overall to the Minnesota Vikings. The second round saw Andy Dalton and Colin Kaepernick go No. 35 and No. 36, respectively. Dalton went to the Bengals, and Kaepernick to the 49ers.

|

Unlike many college students who change their major or career plans several times during college, senior Ryan Young has wanted to design golf courses since he was in middle school — and he is still pursuing this dream. Young has played for Whitworth’s golf team since his freshman year and he hopes to incorporate his passions for golf and art into his future. He will graduate with a degree in art administration in May and hopes to make a career out of playing golf or designing golf courses. He began playing golf in sixth grade and immediately loved it because it fit with his personality. “It’s just the type of person I am. I’m self-motivated,” Young said. “Golf is an individual sport. It’s all on you. However much I put into working out, practicing, focusing, it shows when I get out there.” Young set the course for his future in eighth grade when he decided to pursue golf course design, which involves finding land, site development, designing the holes and layout of the course and building the community around it. “[My choice] decided my next eight years, and it helped me focus in high school,” he said. “It’s still happening, which is kind of weird. I’m still living my eighth grade dream.” “I want to make a career of playing golf or golf course architecture — travelling, being outdoors and doing what I love.” Because of his future plans, Young has worked at various golf courses and is helping construct the Gamble Golf Resort in Brewster this summer. However, he gained a different type of experience this past summer as the head golf coach at Camp All-Star in Chattanooga, Tenn. He was selected from more than 1,000 applicants and worked with campers and coaches from across the world. For Young, working at Camp All-Star was a learning experience, and it allowed him to be the teacher instead of the student. “It was definitely weird [to be the teacher], but I was excited to live in a different part of the country and meet different coaches,” he said. Young enjoyed sharing his love for golf with the campers. “I’m passionate about the game, and this was my chance to teach young kids and help them like the game.” Coaching also reinforced his career choice and helped him improve his own golf game. “The joy of teaching other people how to play golf really solidified that I want to be in this industry,” Young said. “I think that teaching helped me get better, and it really re-motivated me.” Young has had his share of success on Whitworth’s golf team. Last year, he was the Northwest Conference Player of the Year and helped the team qualify for the NCAA DIII championship tournament in Hershey, Pa. This season, Whitworth finished in third place in the NWC behind Linfield

{ }

WWW.THEWHITWORTHIAN.COM

Golfer Ryan Young creates his own major and dreams big for the future.

Sports Shorts

|

Senior paves his own path

15


Pamper Mom All May Long

Whitworth Faculty, Staff, and Students recieve

20% OFF any service when you show your Whitworth ID

VIDA salon&spa

1105 N. Lincoln St. Spokane, WA 99201 509.252.9890 www.vidasalon-spa.com

MAY MOTHERS

BEING ROOMMATES IS HARD ENOUGH.

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TIME FOR A LITTLE POSITIVE ENERGY. Go online to order your free Powermonger Awareness Kit at facebook.com/everylittlebit

SCAN THIS WITH YOUR SMART PHONE TO ORDER YOUR KIT!

The Whitworthian 5/3/11  

May 3, 2011 Issue of The Whitworthian

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you