Page 1

THE LAND

BETWEEN US


on the edge of a wood a moment’s hesitation how will you conduct yourself in the company of trees

Thomas A Clark Selected in response to works by Vija Celmins, William Henry Hunt and Li Yuan-chia. First published in Of Woods and Water 2008


Thomas A Clark Mary Griffiths Jerome de Groot John McAuliffe Vanley Burke Dorothy Richardson Søren Lind Zoe Lambert Stella Halkyard Opiyo Mumma List of works

3

1 5 7 9 10 12 14 17 19 23 24–29


The Land Between Us

The Whitworth has thousands of pictures in its collection that are classed as ‘landscapes’. Most of these drawings, watercolours, prints and paintings were made in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries by British artists. This preoccupation with place shows how, at the height of its power, the British Empire turned its gaze upon its homeland with wonderment and awe, looking inwards towards its imperial centre and picturing the mountains, rivers and fields that it found there. But art isn’t the same as history, it’s about the making of ‘things’ whose only purpose is to be looked at, experienced and thought about. Art is good at waiting. As marks and stains on paper or flickerings on a screen its symbolic energies cross time to be made ‘new’ by readings which are individual and cultural, as well as historical. Here, in the time frame of this exhibition, the art of the past and that of the present live side by side and address us in a new way. Through their confrontations and collaborations, they offer us a space within which we can create new meanings. By offering circuitous or even capricious routes through its works of art, this exhibition invites us to explore versions of landscape which resist the expectations of progression or completeness. Imagining a network of paths across the terrain we call landscape, this exhibition presents art that is concerned with place and identity, and the meanings that are made between this work and you the viewer, who recreates it at each viewing. In turn, the writers and artists contained in this small book take us off on their own imaginative tangents, inspired by the works in the exhibition, and present their own vistas and visions of The Land Between Us. The Whitworth is grateful to the exhibiting artists and contributors to this booklet, who have entered so openly into the spirit of the exhibition. Mary Griffiths Curator of Modern Art Whitworth Art Gallery

The Bay 1922 Paul Nash

5


The Forest Jerome de Groot

What is the forest? Forests are primal, Jungian, beautiful, ancient wildernesses; they can scare you or draw you in. They are the location of fairy stories, hunts, temptation, solitude, melancholy; hermits live in them, or outlaws. Nowadays forests are more resonant due to their lack, or their destruction – from the summer’s fires in California and Spain to the shrinking Amazon. The forest is a place of horror in our contemporary imaginations. The forest is where the dark things are, the man-eating trees in Evil Dead or the hanging horrors of von Trier’s Antichrist, where the wolves and the killers are. We learn this from the pagan forests of medieval images, from the gothic woodlands of Ann Radcliffe, from the darknesses of Red Riding Hood, from the loss of Hansel and Gretel. Angela Carter plays with our fears in her versions of familiar tales, mocking our fear of the dark.

Where is the forest? Forests are European – where darkness dwells – but they are also places of magic and love, of possibility and escape. They are American, where lumberjacks work and Native Americans hunt. They are part of the steppe, the outlands of Siberia, rainforests, Japanese bamboo reaches, burning Vietnamese nightmares; they are the lungs of the globe, places of mystery and desire. Throughout the post-Renaissance period forests have been increasingly controlled, owned by the gentry, the state, or the middle-class tourist. Forests are no longer wild, but part of garden estates; mountains and lakes replace them as the focuses of the imagination. They are felled for fuel, destroyed and burnt, circumvented, burrowed through.

Le Grand Cavalier sous Bois c.1854 Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot

7

>


When is the forest? Forests are resonant places in the medieval and early modern periods – one might think of the dark place of confusion Dante finds himself in at the beginning of the Divine Comedy, or the wood where Milton’s lord of misrule Comus dwells. In Shakespeare forests are dark and dangerous, places of possibility but also of witchcraft. They often seem to represent freedom – from tyranny in Arden, towards love outside of Athens – but invariably they prove to be sites of mischief and trauma; forests are where the witches are, where the violence is, are places outside of the rational which are dangerous and uncontrolled. Yet wooded areas are also indubitably places of escape and freedom – where Robin Hood eluded capture, or Thoreau camped out after leaving Walden. The forest is timeless and limited in age, ancient and newly planted.

A Deaf Ear John McAuliffe

Forests combine grace, mystery, horror, possibility, enigma and simple beauty. They challenge us, and concern us. Are we explorers, travellers, intruders, those seeking solitude or sanctuary? Might we reclaim the darkness, cower before it, enjoy the sunshine or decline to enter? Should we be scared or confident; admit our fears or hide them?

in a back corner girls drinking bubbly and, when I look up,

The sun’s a no-show, the scrub winter-green, dense and hard to shake as a night, years past, something in full swing, smoke filling a room,

one’s in the kitchen throwing shapes, lovely, the latch unlifted yet on traffic sounds, the sparrow’s chirrup, the day I’ll wake to this bald block under its blank sky, not exactly a visitor, more a latecomer, and, not miles away, an absence it turns on.

Written in response to works by Nikhil Chopra, Albrecht Dürer and Olafur Eliasson.

9

Written in response to works by Willie Doherty and Samuel Palmer.


11

Vanley Burke Young people from Handsworth on a day trip to Skegness, early 1980s. Selected in response to works by Black Audio Film Collective and JMW Turner.


Dorothy Richardson

From Lancaster to Heysham we passed over a flat disagreeable country and through the villages Torrisholme and Poulton beyond the latter, from the summit of a hill I first saw the sea: of the awful grandeur of which I was immediately convinced. I had till that moment no idea. The day was uncommonly fine, the sunbeams shone on the green liquid mirror which was broken here and there by foaming billows, ships were passing and repassing and the opposite side of the bay (called by Ptolemy Morecambe) is bounded by the Cartmel and Furness Shores from whence rise a chain of the most picturesque mountains that can be imagined. We passed along the sands to the small village of Heysham which is situate on the northern side of a hill extending downwards to the sands and guarded from the western winds by a high rocky cliff intermixed with brushwood. The church is very old and the north side stands upon a small eminence close to the sands‌ West of the church the rock rises very quick covered in places with herbage. Upon its summit stands the remains of an old chapel dedicated to St Patrick and near it in two places are stone coffins cut out of the rock.

Dorothy Richardson wrote a journal describing her travels round Britain and the ancient sites she visited. This eighteenth century travelogue is one of the earliest known texts of its type by a woman in English. Selected in response to work by John Robert Cozens and Nikhil Chopra.

13


Søren Lind Photograph of William Holman Hunt’s view of the Plain of Rephaim, Jerusalem. Commissioned to accompany Larissa Sansour’s Soup Over Bethlehem. As a Palestinian, Sansour is unable to enter Jerusalem, so Lind (a Danish national) made the journey on her behalf.

15


My Sangar Zoe Lambert

It was a while ago now, when it was anchored on the hilltop; that green-plated scaffold. I tell you, it hurts my eyes. In the evenings, the red light slipped through the curtains and into my kitchen. They say if you don’t have anything to hide? And I didn’t, but I could always see the tower up on Glassdrummond. I could hear them listening on the phone, watching while I cleared the table and washed the dishes. One evening, I was making myself a sandwich, and the light still shone across my table, so I picked up my breadbin and took it to the window and slid open its cover. There: just some soda farls, a brown loaf. But that wouldn’t satisfy them, so I opened my press doors: look, just some sugar and Barry’s tea. I showed them the bone china: the Royal Doulton cups and saucers. I’m sure they liked those. They’re English, aren’t they? In my bedroom I gave them a look in the bedding box – it’s been in the family longer than the border’s been there. See, I pointed with my hand. Cream cotton sheets; they were a wedding gift. Beautifully ironed and smelling of the lavender soaps I’d hidden between the folds. I held a soap to the window, as if in offering. I displayed the contents of my wardrobe: the bakery uniform: blue pinny and blouse, my husband’s old Post Office shirt. And then I had an idea. I waved my white nightie on the end of a mop, like a white flag. Surely this was a signal they’d understand. And my rosary beads, I wasn’t hiding those. They were hung in the window. They sent two of them round to complain, in their camouflage outfits, with berets instead of helmets. I said good morning, and asked them if they were having a nice stay. Wasn’t the weather glorious? One coughed and told me to stop exhibiting myself, and I said wasn’t that what they wanted? They clearly hadn’t understood my message. That night I could see them from the garden, up there, like gods, crouched on the hilltop. So I placed a few things on the lawn. I tell you, it was a beautiful job to do in moonlight and infra-red. I brought a photo of an aborted calf, and one of the car that had crashed into the bollards, and a branch burnt by the emissions. I laid them out on the grass, and in the middle I placed a photo of my husband with the tributes laid where he’d been shot: the cards and flowers, and his name in carnations. I placed them all on the lawn, and the red light flashed over and around them, prodding them, and still they would not see.

17

Written in response to work by Donovan Wylie.


Exhuming Hulme Stella Halkyard

It’s Friday, it’s ‘Factory Night’ at the Russell Club. Hypnotizing in lurex and terylene, Faye Fife and ‘Careful with that Axe’ Eugene Reynolds spangle and revillo on a low shallow stage the size of a shoebox. They love their baby ‘coz she does good sculptures yeah! Beyond this squat, brick, bijou boîte de nuit looms John Nash Crescent, whose six storey exo-skeleton sustains an anarcho-syndicalist ecosystem, the rarest of species, within the flamboyant grandeur of the curve of its back. The world, after all, moves on a woman’s hips. Speaking Swahili, a black girl called Blue irradiates the frosted austerity of the dental clinic with the Light of Kenya. Jomo Kenyatta conjoins Kwame Nkrumah in Pan African Congress at the Grand Junction Hotel. A tiger tinged with Tamil is chained to a radiator in the Church of the Ascension, safe from the (808) State but the ‘po-lice in the ar-e-a’ storm his sanctuary. Shamefully, they wrench him into the street in his pyjamas provoking an eruption of revolutionary fervour and mass disobedience, civil or otherwise. In the new liturgy, throwing shapes in the church of sound, Sonja’s on the shouts confirming that ‘an injury to one is an injury to all’. Meanwhile, date stamps are mobilized, the ‘Browne issue’ is ‘moved up’ and a fleet of mobile libraries hovers in suspension. A high pitched keening attracts a pack of feral dogs. They spool past the fiesta of formica in the Aaben Cinema, only to retreat, haunted by the uncanny silken sleeves of the heroine from a Chinese Ghost Story. Deposited in layers of variable thickness, like sheets of mica, these memories oscillate wildly, never ending in play.

Geoff Charles Protest in Liverpool attempting to stop the flooding of the Tryweryn Valley (1956). Selected in response to work by Chen Qiulin’s work about the flooding of the Three Gorges, China.

19

Written in response to work by Chen Qiulin and Cyprien Gaillard.


Slopes of Glyder Fawr, Llyn Idwal, Caernarvonshire, Wales 1947 John Piper

21


The Lakes People Opiyo Mumma Reports reaching the City from Sango say: that a hurricane cut a fishman’s boat killing the boatman and six handman; but nine survived the tragedy. The survivors, the reports say have been detained in the open at Sango without food, without water, without medicine, without sleep, without cover, in what the lake people name keeping wake till the last of the drowned – missing be retrieved. The survivors, it is reportedly feared, are in danger of death by chill from the cold night wind blowing the Basin after a narrow escape of death by water. It is the lake people’s culture, they say, to keep wake as long as the last of the dead by drowning is yet to be retrieved. They call, the searching party calls spiritedly for the drowned – missing to re-surface.

The late Opiyo Mumma was a Kenyan activist, deeply involved in the theatre of his country and committed to the power of words. He studied Drama at Manchester University in the 1990s. This poem was selected in response to works by Thomas Hearne and Romuald Hazoumè.

23


List of Works

Black Audio Film Collective 1982-98 (John Akomfrah b. 1958; Reece Auguis b. 1958; Edward George b. 1963; Lina Gopaul b. 1959; Avril Johnson b. 1958; David Lawson b. 1962; Trevor Mathison b. 1960) Handsworth Songs 1986 Single screen projection, 16mm colour film transferred to DVD, audio track Dimensions variable Tate. Presented by Tate Members 2008 Vija Celmins b.1938 Ocean Surface Woodcut 1992 1992 Woodcut 22.4 x 30.4cm Tate and National Galleries of Scotland. Acquired jointly through The d’Offay Donation with assistance from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and The Art Fund 2008 Nikhil Chopra b.1974 Yog Raj Chitrakar: Memory Drawing X 2010 Installation; charcoal drawing on canvas, photographs, costume, props Dimensions variable Courtesy of the artist and Chatterjee and Lal, Mumbai

Willie Doherty b.1959 The Visitor 2008 Video Dimensions variable Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased with assistance from the Friends of the Whitworth in 2008

William Henry Hunt 1790-1864 Bird’s Nest and Apple Blossom c. 1855 Watercolour, heightened with white bodycolour 22.4 x 29.6cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by Sir William Agnew in 1902

Albrecht Dürer 1471-1528 The Knight, Death and The Devil 1513 Engraving 19 x 25cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by George Thomas Clough in 1921

William Holman Hunt 1827-1910 The Plain of Rephaim from Zion, Jerusalem 1855, 1860-61 Watercolour, heightened with white bodycolour 35.5 x 50.8cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by the family of JG Howarth in 1961

Olafur Eliasson b.1967 The Forked Forest Path 1998 Site specific installation Dimensions variable Towner Art Gallery Eastbourne. Purchased by the Contemporary Art Society Special Collection Scheme on behalf of the Towner Art Gallery, with funds from the Arts Council Lottery Fund in 2004 Cyprien Gaillard b. 1980 Belief in the Age of Disbelief (Harlem) 2005 Photo-etching 36 x 47cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 2010

Nikhil Chopra b.1974 What Will I Do With All This Land (Forest) 2005 Silver gelatin print 50.8 x 50.8cm Courtesy of the artist and Chatterjee and Lal, Mumbai

Romuald Hazoumè b. 1962 And From There They Leave (Bouche du Roi) 2006 Panoramic photograph 109 x 545cm Courtesy of the artist and October Gallery, London

John Robert Cozens 1752-1797 Seven Grand Tour Sketchbooks 1782 Each 17.9 x 24.1cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased with grant aid from the V&A Purchase Grant Fund, The Art Fund, the Greater Manchester Council, the Friends of the Whitworth in 1975

Thomas Hearne 1744-1817 The Island of Montserrat from the Road before the Town 1775-76 Pen and ink, watercolour and bodycolour on paper 52.7 x 151.2cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 1994

Jacqueline Donachie b.1969 Green Place 2004 Installation; galvanised steel, wood and photographs Dimensions variable Whitworth Art Gallery. Commissioned by the Contemporary Art Society Special Collection Scheme and the Whitworth Art Gallery with lottery funding from the Arts Council England in 2004

Thomas Hearne 1744-1817 St. Christopher’s: The Salt Pond, Part of St. Christopher’s and Nevis from the Shore at Basseterre 1775-76 Pen and ink, watercolour and bodycolour on paper 52.7 x 150.5cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 1994

Li Yuan-chia 1929-1994 Five unique photographs (95/93; 97/93; 227,93; 268/93; 296/93) 1993 Hand coloured silver gelatin prints 25 x 36cm; 25.2 x 35.6cm; 24.2 x 19.9cm; x 19.4 x 24.2cm; 24 x 19.8cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased with assistance from the Friends of the Whitworth and an anonymous donor.

Larissa Sansour b.1973 Soup over Bethlehem 2006 Video Dimensions variable Courtesy of the artist and Galerie La BANK Turner numbers refer to the works’ locations within the exhibition: 1. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 North East View of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire 1792 Pencil and watercolour 18.6 x 25.7cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by Charles E Lees in 1894 2. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 A Shipwreck on a Rocky Coastline with a Ruined Castle 1792-93 Pencil and watercolour 16.9 x 23.6cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by Hector J Towlson in 1969

Erkan Özgen b.1971 Breath 2008 Video Dimensions variable Courtesy of the artist

3. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Magdalen Tower and Bridge, Oxford 1794 Pencil and watercolour 28.6 x 22.2cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 1891

Samuel Palmer 1805-81 The Cottager’s Return c.1833 Pencil and watercolour 16.1 x 20.9cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by Theodora Winter in memory of her father, Sir Thomas Barlow in 1984

4. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 The Old Water Mill 1794 Pencil and watercolour 25.2 x 18.9cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892

Chen Qiulin b.1975 Garden 2007 Video Dimensions variable Courtesy of the artist and Max Protetch Gallery, New York Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn 1606-1669 Landscape with a cottage and haybarn 1641 Etching and drypoint 12.9 x 32.1cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 1983

25

5. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Old Welsh Bridge, Shrewsbury, Shropshire 1794 Pencil and watercolour 22.4 x 27.4cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892 6. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Llangollen, Denbighshire, Wales 1794 Pencil and watercolour 20.2 x 26.3cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892


List of Works

7. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 St Anselm’s Chapel, Canterbury Cathedral, with Part of Thomas-a-Becket’s Crown 1794 Pencil and watercolour 51.7 x 37.4cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892 8. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 The Porch of Great Malvern Priory, Worcestershire 1794 Pencil and watercolour 23.1 x 42.9cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by Mary Worthington in 1904 9. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Great Malvern Abbey and Gatehouse, Worcestershire, from the North West 1794 Pencil and watercolour 30.5 x 41.4cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by Theodora Winter in memory of her father Sir Thomas Barlow in 1984 10. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 The Temple of Apollo, Lake Avernus 1794-97 Pencil and blue and grey watercolour 38.2 x 49.2cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892 11. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 and Thomas Girtin 1775-1802 Convents, near Capo di Monte, Naples 1794-97 Pencil and blue and grey watercolour 17.7 x 41.7cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by Miss FM Langton through The Art Fund in 1963 12. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 and Thomas Girtin 1775-1802 Villa Negroni, Rome 1794-97 Pencil and blue and grey watercolour 27.1 x 38.4cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by Miss FM Langton through The Art Fund in 1963 13. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Old Blackfriars Bridge, London 1795 Pencil and watercolour 26.2 x 17.1cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892

14. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Oak Tree, Hampton Court, Herefordshire 1795 Watercolour 30.9 x 41.9cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by Mary Worthington in 1904 15. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 A View in Kent 1795-6 Pencil and watercolour 22.2 x 35.9cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892 16. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 View of Hampton Court, Herefordshire, from the North West 1795-6 Pencil and watercolour 32 x 42.5cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892 17. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 The Chapel, Hampton Court, Herefordshire 1795-96 Pencil and watercolour 31.8 x 42.4cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by Mary Worthington in 1904 18. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire 1797 Pencil and watercolour 48.1 x 32.8cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 1891 19. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Llyn Cwellyn, Caernarvonshire, Wales 1798 Pencil and watercolour 25.5 x 36.2cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892 20. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 View of Hampton Court, Herefordshire, from the North East 1798-99 Pencil and watercolour 35.6 x 47cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by Mary Worthington in 1904

21. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 St Agatha’s Abbey, Easby, Yorkshire, from the River Swale 1798-99 Pencil and watercolour 63 x 89cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by Mary Worthington in 1904 22. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 A River Landscape with a Castle on a Hill 1798-99 Pencil and watercolour 43.2 x 61cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by Mary Worthington in 1904 23. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 The Chapter House, Salisbury Cathedral, Hampshire 1799 Pencil, pen and brown ink, and watercolour 64.5 x 51.2cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by Sir William Agnew in 1889 24. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Autumn Morning near Fonthill, Wiltshire 1799 Pencil and watercolour 32.1 x 46.2cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892 25. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 North East View of Fonthill Abbey, Wiltshire: Sunset 1800 Pencil and watercolour 69.6 x 103.5cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by Mary Worthington in 1904 26. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 The Abbey Pool 1800-1 Pencil and watercolour 51.4 x 76.2cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 1891 27. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Coniston Fells, Lancashire 1801 Pencil and watercolour 25.1 x 41.2cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892

27

28. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Conway Castle, Caernarvonshire, Wales 1801-2 Pencil and watercolour 42.7 x 62.9cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by the daughters of Mrs PW Kessler in 1948 29. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 The Aiguillette, Valley of Cluses, France 1802 Pencil, black chalk and watercolour 47.7 x 32.2cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 1925 30. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Lake of Thun from the Landing-place at Neuhaus, Switzerland 1802 Pencil, black chalk and watercolour 32.5 x 47.8cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 1925 31. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Kew Palace from the Thames 1804-5 Pencil and watercolour 25.2 x 35cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by Mary Worthington in 1904 32. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Valley of Chamonix, France, Mont Blanc in the Distance 1809 Watercolour and bodycolour 27.9 x 39.5cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by the executors of Ernest Edward Cook through The Art Fund in 1955 33. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Ullswater Lake from Gowbarrow Park, Cumberland 1815 Watercolour 28 x 41.3cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 1891 34. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Dead Pheasant 1815-18 Pencil and watercolour 28.2 x 37.7cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892


List of Works

35. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Eridge Castle, Sussex 1816 Pencil, watercolour and bodycolour 36.9 x 54.3cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 1891 36. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 The Lorelei, Germany 1817 Watercolour and bodycolour 19.7 x 30.5cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 1925 37. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Florence from the Ponte alla Carraia 1818 Pencil, watercolour and bodycolour 21.6 x 40cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 1891 38. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 The Roman Forum from the Tower of the Capitol 1818 Watercolour, bodycolour and scratching out 13.9 x 21.6cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by H M Treasury, Acceptance in Lieu Scheme in 2005 39. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Deer in Petworth Park, Sussex 1827 Watercolour and bodycolour 14 x 19.4cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892 40. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 ‘Tivoli’ : A Colour Beginning 1827-29 Watercolour 30.3 x 43.6cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 1922 41. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 ‘Loch Katrine’: A Colour Beginning 1827-29 Pencil and watercolour 30.3 x 45.7cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by AE Anderson through The Art Fund in 1922 42. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Study of Boats 1828-30 Pen and brown ink, brown watercolour, heightened with white bodycolour 13 x 18.2cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892

43. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Warwick Castle, Warwickshire 1830-31 Watercolour and bodycolour 29.7 x 45.1cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by Jesse Haworth in 1937 44. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Vignette Study of a Lighthouse 1833-35 Pencil and watercolour 19.8 x 15.5cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892 45. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Chillon Castle, Lac Leman, Switzerland, from Villeneuve 1836 Pencil and watercolour 23.6 x 32.5cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 1891 46. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Fire at Fennings Wharf, on the Thames at Bermondsey 1836 Pencil and watercolour 29.4 x 44.1cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892 47. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Sisteron, France 1836 Pen and brown ink, watercolour, heightened with bodycolour 13.8 x 18.5cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892 48. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Storm in the Pass of St Gotthard, Switzerland 1845 Watercolour 29 x 47cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by Jesse Haworth in 1937 49. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 View of London from behind Greenwich Hospital after 1801 Pencil, pen and brown ink and brown watercolour Whitworth Art Gallery. 18.1 x 26.3cm Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892

50. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Venice: San Giorgio Maggiore from the Entrance to the Grand Canal undated Watercolour 19.5 x 27.6cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by John Edward Taylor in 1892

Thomas Whittle II fl. 1865-85 Gypsies on Dartford Heath, Kent c. 1875 Pencil and watercolour, heightened with white bodycolour 27.7 x 38.3cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by William Ogden Sharp in 1926

51. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 A Conflagration, Lausanne undated Watercolour and bodycolour 24 x 30.5cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by Arthur A Allen in memory of John Edward Taylor in 1912

Donovan Wylie b.1971 Northern Ireland, South Armagh, Golf 40, West View 2007 Photograph 79 x 94cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Purchased in 2010

52. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 Sunset at Sea with Gurnets undated Black chalk, watercolour and bodycolour 21.8 x 28.4cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by Arthur A Allen, CP Allen, JE Taylor, ET Russell in memory of John Edward Taylor in 1912 Vincent Van Gogh 1853-1890 The Fortifications of Paris with Houses 1887 Pencil, black chalk, watercolour and gouache 38.7 x 53.4cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by Sir Thomas Barlow in 1927 Francis Wheatley 1747-1801 Gypsy Encampment undated Pencil, pen and brown ink and watercolour 19.8 x 25.1cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Bequeathed by Hector J Towlson in 1969 James Abbott McNeill Whistler 1834-1903 The Unsafe Tenement 1858 Etching 15.7 x 22.4cm Whitworth Art Gallery. Presented by Denis F Pilkington in 1966 Rachel Whiteread b.1963 Demolished. B: Clapton Park Estate, Mandeville Street, London E5; Bakewell Court, Repton Court; March 1995 1996 Screenprints Each 49 x 74.3cm Tate. Purchased in 1996

29


Thanks Black Audio Film Collective, Vija Celmins, Nikhil Chopra, Willie Doherty, Jacqueline Donachie, Olafur Eliasson, Cyprien Gaillard, Romuald Hazoumè, Erkan Özgen, Chen Qiulin, Larissa Sansour, Rachel Whiteread, Donovan Wylie. Vanley Burke, Thomas A Clark, Jerome de Groot, Stella Halkyard, Zoe Lambert, Søren Lind, John McAuliffe, the Estate of Opiyo Mumma. Laura Bartlett Gallery; Pavel Büchler; Chatterjee and Lal, Mumbai; Chinese Arts Centre, Sally Lai, Ying Kwok; Comma Press, Ra Page; Alistair Cox; Matthew Denniss and all of those who worked on the Olafur Eliasson installation – Stephen Ashdown, Sarah Bevin, Maire Byrne, Zia Chan, Antony Clarkson, Robert Foster, Ellie Geary, Evi Grigorpoulou, Charlotte Horrillo, Naomi Lethbridge, Jonathan Maj, James McNeff, Liam Pickering, Clark Piggott, Sarah Redfern, Sam Robinson, Helen Smith, Kathryn Stamper, Sarah Stockdale, Nicole Ward, James Wise, William Whittle, Jacqueline Wylie; Studio Eliasson, Felix Holwich; Steve James; John Rylands University Library, University of Manchester; The Li Yuan-chia Foundation, Guy Brett, Nick Sawyer, Bruce Haines; Magnum Photos, Fiona Rogers, Rhiannon Davies; Sue MacDiarmid; Manchester Museum; Manchester City Council, Sue Ahmadi, Ria Page, Kirsten Warren; Mary Murphy; Matt’s Gallery; Steve Millington; National Trust, Jon Twigg and all of his volunteers; Simon Norfolk; October Gallery, Elisabeth Lalouschek and Margaree Cotton; Max Protetch Gallery, New York, Josie Browne; Smoking Dog Films, John Akomfrah and David Lawson; Tate; Towner Art Gallery, Eastbourne, Matthew Rowe and Sara Cooper. The staff of the Whitworth Art Gallery.

Image credits p4 © Paul Nash/Tate, Whitworth Art Gallery; p6 Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Whitworth Art Gallery; p10-11 © Vanley Burke; p13 Reproduced by courtesy of the University Librarian and Director, The John Rylands Library, The University of Manchester; p14-15 © Søren Lind; p18 By permission of Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru / The National Library of Wales; p20 John Piper, © Estate of the Artist, Whitworth Art Gallery.

31


The Land Between Us place, power and dislocation Whitworth Art Gallery, University of Manchester 25 September 2010 – 23 January 2011 Curated by Mary Griffiths

Whitworth Art Gallery The University of Manchester Oxford Road Manchester M15 6ER t 0161 275 7450 w manchester.ac.uk/whitworth w thelandbetweenus.com

Š Authors, artists and Whitworth Art Gallery, University of Manchester Designed by Creative Concern


ISBN 978 0 903261 66 1

The Land Between Us  

Booklet accompanying The Land Between Us at Whitworth Art Gallery. "The idea of the show is to take a new look at landscape art – thinking...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you