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the

the student voice of Whitney High November 1, 2010

roar

Volume 6 Issue 1

Which one are you? Do you pledge allegiance?


2 contents

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

Who are you?

6 8 9 10 13 14 19 22

This issue deals with the lifestyles and choices of students at this school. It doesn’t matter who you decide to be, just stand strong and be yourself.

Cell phone obsession can lead to addiction. Are you addicted? By ROBERT PARKER

Not everyone stands for the pledge. Are you one of them? By EMMA GETZ

There’s more to football than just the game. Are you aware of the traditions? By SHAI NIELSON

Marching band is more than a sport, it’s a bond. Are you part of the family? By EMMA RICHIE

Athletes have to eat right to perform at their best. Are you eating healthy? By EMMA RICHIE

New fashion is hitting the scene. Are you in style? By SYDNEY RODRIGUERA

People are sacrificing eating meat once a week. Are you able to stop? By JESSIE HOLBROOK

Aspartame may have health issues. Are you aware of the effects? By KAVYA PATHAK Cover photo illustration by Robert Parker

Are you ready?


what we say 3

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

STAFF EDITORIAL: stand up for yourself

THE ROAR 2010-2011

A

Assistant Editors Ilaf Esuf Emma Richie

dam Lambert, Ke$ha, Hillary Rodham Clinton and now, the Commander in Chief, President Barack Obama, among thousands of others, have all made a stand against bullying through the It Gets Better Project. This project, founded by Dan Savage, is gathering support videos from people worldwide to help LGBT youth realize that the future will, well, get better. In addition to this, people nationwide wore purple this October to recognize those who have committed suicide due to the bullying. In his video, President Obama said that bullying should not be regarded as a part of life, and that it needs to be stopped. And that’s what we, The Roar staff, believe as well. Whether you’re the softspoken bookworm who read To Kill A Mockingbird instead of Green Eggs and Ham or you’re still in the closet because you’re afraid of the consequences of coming out, you need to stand up for yourself.

Instead of just ignoring the attacks, whether they are verbal, emotional or physical, you need to make a stand against your attacker. And if you witness someone being bullied for their lifestyle or personality, give them a hand. Bullying can be stopped, but it takes action and determination from everyone to finally rid of it. “What I want to say is this: You are not alone. You didn’t do anything wrong…There are people out there who love you and care about you just the way you are,” Obama said in his video. That’s the point that Savage and The Roar staff is trying to get across. As long as you stand strong and make your point clear, the bullying will dissipate, and the future will be brighter. Are you going to do something about it?

15-1 AGREE

Editor-in-Chief Robert Parker

Feature Editor Sydney Rodriguera Adviser Sarah Nichols, MJE

Staff Brittaney Campbell Gabbi Forrest Emma Getz Jessie Holbrook Ellis Holdsworth Amy Lu Chloe McCrossen Alyssa Navas Shai Nielson Kavya Pathak Jessica Randhawa Emma Richie Jessica Sypolt Anika Terpstra Margaret Tinker

THE FIRST AMENDMENT: Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

The Roar is a student publication planned and produced by the advanced journalism class at Whitney High School. The newspaper is an open forum for student expression. Student editors make all content decisions. Columns represent the viewpoints of individual writers and are not representative of the opinions of the student body, faculty, staff or administration of Whitney High School or Rocklin Unified School District. The staff seeks truth, accuracy and objectivity. Staff members practice ethical student journalism by providing fair and balanced coverage as determined by community standards. Students working to publish each issue strive to achieve accuracy by checking sources, spelling and quotes as well as by obtaining information from a variety of credible sources. Students not enrolled in journalism who wish to serve as contributing writers, photographers or graphic artists should contact the editor at theroar@rocklin.k12.ca.us or stop by C-2. The Roar staff gladly accepts letters to the editor, either by e-mail at the address above or delivered to C-2. All letters must be signed by the writer and may be edited for length or content. Letters submitted via e-mail will be verified. Libelous or potentially harmful content will not be printed. Multiple letters about the same topic may not be printed due to space limitations. For information about advertising, including rates, sizes and discounts, contact The Roar at (916) 632-6500 or e-mail a request to theroar@rocklin.k12.ca.us.

Which side are you on?


4 feature

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

What to

Wear?

Administrators and chaperones are strictly enforcing the dress code this year JESSICA RANDHAWA staff writer

M

usic blasting, people dancing, amazing decorations, and everyone having a great time. Those are just a couple of things that you will hear and see at the school dance. There is one thing that students struggle with though and that’s usually dressing according to the dance dress codes. Administrators and chaperons are strictly enforcing the dress code this year. “I look for pants and shoes when it comes to the boys especially at the semi-formal type dances. For the girls I want to make sure that the dress tops don’t make me feel uncomfortable and that the length for the dress goes at least mid-thigh. I also hate it when guys think that the can wear Vans to a semi-formal dance,” Mr. Erich Means said. Some people don’t quite agree with the dance dress code. “For casual dances I think it is kinda fair but I wish that they didn’t make such a big deal about the shorts that girls wear,” Cynthia Parra said. On the other hand, “I think that the dance dress code is completely fair,” Alexis Martinez said. The dress code limits some people when it comes to what they are going to wear to a dance. “If I find a really cute outfit or dress I might not be able to wear it because it might not be in dress code,” Drew Cantrell said. Everyone has their own opinion on everything even when it comes to what they would change on the dress code. “If I could change anything I would like it to be more specific about the tops girls wear, but I don’t think that we could cover all the new trends each season,” Means said. Where as, “If I could change anything I would change the rules on the straps and the shorts, but I think that the dress code for the

Photo by Jessica Randhawa

semi formal dances are perfect,” Martinez said. Some of the dress code rules for girls are dresses should be respectful and appropriate. At a semi-formal dance boys are required to wear long pants, shirt and tie. For a regular dance the dress code is the same as the school dress code. All the rules and regulations for the dances can be found in the student planner on page 18-21 and on the school Web site under the school information tab listing school policies, information and regulations.

Areyou you addicted towhat yourtophone? Are sure you know wear?

41% of people said that the dress code is too strict.

82% of people said that their Homecoming dress is within dress code.

SOURCE: 165 students surveyed on http://surveymonkey.com


feature 5

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

Danielle Ross, 11

Skyler Riley, 10

Tim Costanzo, 11

Tom Ruiz, 12

Tyler Slagle, 9

Chris Lam, 10

Kayla Mingo, 9

Sofia Pierantoni, 11

ELLIS HOLDSWORTH & CHLOE MCCROSSEN photos & design

Andrew Heater, 11

Matt Pounds, 11

Kris Corpus, 9

Sav Nichols, 11

Kelsey McPeters, 10

Are you telling the truth?

Andrew McIntyre, 12


6 technology

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

Photo by Robert Parker

Now that cell phones are more prevalent than ever, the effects could get to your head ROBERT PARKER

“Cell phones are now used worldwide by an estimated 3-4 billion people and there is increasing heavy use by children. Questions about the current evidence can only ell phones have revolutionized the way people, be resolved by longer term epidemiologic follow-up and especially young adults, communicate with each by critical evaluation of experimental studies that report other and, now that several phones offer Internet biological effects from cell phones,” said Michael J. Thun, access, the world. However, some people use MD, American Cancer Society Vice President Emeritus of their phones so much that it may cause health issues, both Epidemiology and Surveillance Research. physically and psychologically. What that means is that more time is An article from Cancer.org, sponsored by WHEN I COME WITHIN 50 needed for the results of the tests to be the American Cancer Society, states, “Cell FEET OF MY PHONE, I FEEL conclusive. Cell phones are a relatively recent phones operate with radio frequencies (RF); GOOD. WHEN I GO AWAY 50 FEET, THE WITHDRAWAL development in the scientific aspect, and not they do not emit ionizing radiation, the type SYSTEMS KICK IN. enough time has lapsed for any conclusions to that damages DNA and is known to have the be concrete. ability to cause cancer. However, there is some However, despite the inconclusive cancer results, cell concern that cell phone use may indirectly affect tumor phones seem to have other physical effects on the addicted. growth.” Joe Mikesell, a self-proclaimed addict, remembers a day If true, this could potentially be a worldwide concern, as when he did not have his iPhone with him at school. according to articlesbase.com, 66 percent of American teens “I felt sick. I felt like I was dying and I was slowly withering and 80 percent of Japanese teens own a cell phone. editor-in-chief

C

Are you willing to admit it?


technology7

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010 away. My stomach became upset, and I felt like I was going to throw up everywhere,” Mikesell said. Mikesell uses his iPhone for everything, from Internet to games to dozens of different applications. “When I come within 50 feet of my phone, I feel good. When I go away 50 feet, the withdrawal systems kick in,” Mikesell said. In an article from The New York Times, Paul Atchley, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Kansas, said this type of behavior is not surprising, and that “It kind of takes my breath away, but younger people have the capacity and the expectation to be able to communicate all the time. When they are excluded from texting networks, their self-esteem declines. I don’t think it’s compulsion to multitask as much as it is a compulsion to belong.” Mikesell fits this description, saying he needs to stay connected. This seems to be the case for many students, including junior Angel del Castillo, who got her first cell phone in May of this year, relatively late compared to her peers. “It’s just better to communicate with. Before, I’d have to use other people’s phones or Facebook or something, and now it’s like people are a text away,” del Castillo said. However, she doesn’t admit to being addicted — psychologically or physically. “If anyone thinks that [I’m addicted], I’m making up for lost time. I don’t feel any different without it,” del Castillo said.

By the numbers

with Joe Mikesell Photo by Robert Parker Garrett Longacre and friends check their phones at the powder puff game.

166 500-600 1.2 $35

apps on his iPhone

texts per day

tweets per day

Are you addicted to your phone?

monthly phone bill

8

number of iPhones he’s owned


8technology

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

I PLEDGE

“ FLAG?

ALLEGIANCE to the

When we say it we acknowledge the beliefs and values of our country.

EMMA GETZ staff writer

E

Photo by EMMA GETZ

very day people file into second block, books in hand, and sit down at their slightly too small desks. The teacher tries desperately to squeeze in a few class notices before the announcements come on but are usually cut off by the sound of the screen blaring techno music and a boy stating “3...2...1...” Everyone, well, almost everyone stands. Some lazily flop their hands across their chest while others loudly finish off their extra-crunchy potato chips. They mumble about half of the words and then plop back down into their chairs, lazy and inconsiderate. Some people might say that teachers and administrators should enforce it more, but I don’t think they are to blame. It’s a personal choice, yes, but in this case there is a right and wrong option. Nobody is asking too much of anyone, so I don’t understand why is such a big deal. I it’s against your beliefs, you don’t have to say a word. It’s quite possible to stand, right? The Pledge of Allegiance has become a daily chore for most teens. It is becoming more and more apparent that middle school and high school students don’t take the pledge as seriously as they use to. However, there are some students that still take the pledge to heart. “I think the Pledge of Allegiance is important because when we say it we acknowledge the beliefs and values of our country and our support for the military that defends those values,” ROTC cadet captain Aaron Oborn said. He is part of a small group of people who still have and big amount of hope in the pledge, and hope to keep it alive. The pledge doesn’t only honor the country, but acting like it’s a joke can be insulting to some people. If it really has no significant meaning to you, all it takes is a little leg muscle to stand up.

Are your phone? Areyou you addicted a believer to in the pledge?


sports 9

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

varsity

Football is more than just playing the game.

Do you know the hidden secrets of the football players?

“(The lunchbox) basically symbolizes a man getting up everyday, going to work, packing his lunch and then coming home and doing the same thing everyday.” SHAI NIELSON

“As a team, the night before a game we have a team dinner to bond.” n Jake Rodrigues

n Jake Rodrigues

staff writer

JV Heta dom mé mu gato. Heta dolf mé mu gato. Kulia i ka nu’u.

“We do the Lord’s Prayer before each game to give honor to God and keep us safe.” n Cody Moffitt

“(The team’s chant) is Hawaiian and (Coach Fred Locsin) made it up a couple years ago and every JV team does it.” n Ryan Giacomini

Personal “Before a game, I always watch ‘Remember the Titans.’” n Jake Rodrigues

“(Coach Fred Locsin) gives the coconut to the player of practice or the stand out player of a game.” n Cody Moffitt

football

“I think it’s stupid that (JV) can’t give out our jerseys because I think ladies look good wearing my number on game days.” n Cody Moffitt

TRADITIONS

Are you in on the secrets?

Photos by Shai Nielson


10 feature

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

we are

FAMILY

Photo by SHAI NIELSON

Bickering. Stability. Love. This is family. This is Marching Band.

EMMA RICHIE staff writer

“Marching band means the world to (all of us band After inner struggles with their relationship, the two witches members) and we hang out all the time, 24/7,” first trumpet find where they belong, just like the band. Kayla Kellogg said. “This year’s show is about love and heartbreak so there is a A combination of brass, woodwinds and percussion make lot of going back and forth with interacting with the marching up any normal band, but a key feature of the marching band,” Jessica Salvato said. band is the underlying tone of family. The students are more Besides field shows at football games, marching band than musicians, they are the children, while Mr. Kris Harper and color guard, who act and toss flags, competed in exceeds the role as band director. competitions at Del Oro, where they placed first, and “I’m kind of like the dad, the father, the counselor, and the Oakmont, where they placed second, performing songs from coach. I hand out the Band-Aids and I steer (the band) the Wicked like “No One Mourns The Wicked,” “Defying Gravity,” way I want it to go,” Harper said. “No Good Deed” and “Dancing Through Life.” However, dependence does not solely lie To prepare for these performances, the band IT’S ALL ABOUT BREATH CONTROL, BECAUSE on Harper, for the band mates rely on each takes extra care to make each show perfect. YOU NEED TO BREATHE other, as well. Each member helps each other “We practice twice a week (Tuesday and BECAUSE YOU ARE MOVING with music, marching techniques, what they Wednesday) and sometimes on Saturdays. We BUT YOU ALSO NEED TO are supposed to be doing and keeping focus. BREATHE THROUGH YOUR run music on the field to see how loud we can INSTRUMENT TO MAKE A play, and then we run drills to see where we They hang out before school, at break, at lunch GOOD SOUND AND MAKE IT are on the field and then put it all together,” and after school, not only for band, but to be LOUD ENOUGH together as friends and have fun. Kellogg said. - FIRST ALTO SAX “When I’m having a bad day, (the Before practices commenced and the CLAIRE PHILLIPS band) cheers me up year began, each band member came from a and they are fun to be different school with different friends, yet are around,” second alto saxophone now together, like Elphaba and Glinda. Christine Tsao said. Their differences bring them together. Their differences Everyone has a special role in band, make them family. whether it be the advice giver, the listener, the joker or even the dad. “It’s really hit or miss with band: either you fit in, or you don’t,” first alto saxophone Claire Phillips said. The relationship of members in the band goes hand in hand with this year’s marching band theme “Wicked.” In the original Broadway musical, the wicked witch Elphaba is cast away from society due to her green skin, but then befriends the good witch Glinda.

Photo by EMMA RICHIE

Photo by SHAI NIELSON

Conner Morales stands at attention during practice

Marching band members help a fellow bandmate, Sandy Balunis, ask color guard member Donna Cruz to Homecoming.

Are you part of the family?


Feature 11

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

Show ME YOUR

Only about

24% of apprehended

shoplifters are teens, between 13 and 17 years old. Making the

76%

other desperate thieves, drug addicts and kleptomaniacs

RECEIPT

according to sacsherrif.com

EMMA GETZ & ANIKA TERPSTRA

“I was buying some candy at Target and as I was at the checkout, the guy behind the counter asked me if I had anything in my pockets and I said ‘no’ then the security guard asked me the same thing and again I said ‘no’. Afterwards I was thinking ‘what the heck.’” NOELLE GILLESPIE

staff writers

Photo by ANIKA TERPSTRA

“I was at 7-Eleven waiting for my friends and taking pictures for yearbook, and as I was waiting I asked the manager’s wife if it was OK that I was taking pictures and she said it was fine but then the manager yelled at me and told me to get out.” LAUREN ROUDEBUSH

“I was walking through a store and the whole time I felt like employees were watching me. I think it might be [because of my age] but you never know.” JOHNNY CARMAN

We are teenagers. Parents yell at us, young kids look up to us and elderly people tell us to get off their lawns. We carry out our days trying our hardest to stay out of trouble, only to be stopped by managers and security guards who accuse us of stealing their precious merchandise. What their one-sided minds don’t realize is that most of us don’t need that kind of weight on our shoulders when we already have to deal with the daily pressures of grades, high school flings and, for some of us, jobs. We understand this might be a hard concept to grasp, but not all of us are out to cause trouble. “I went with my little cousin to Home Depot and I bought him candy bar and a drink at the self-checkout with my ATM card. After I bought it, I was walking out and the lady at the door stopped me and harassed me until I showed her the receipt. I let her see it eventually but she thought I stole it because I’m young and she probably thinks all teenagers are thieves,” Kylie Borchelt said. The bar set for teens has been set pretty high that last couple of years. It seems like if you don’t have a 4.7 GPA and a scholarship to Stanford in the waiting, you will be automatically pegged as the self-destructive high school student who steals things for enjoyment. If adults opened their eyes just a little bit wider, they might see we’re not all bad.

AreAre youyou addicted to at your phone? mistreated stores?


12 health

the roar

Healthy Eating Alyssa Navas

NOV. 1, 2010

Balance. Variety. Moderation. Stay active, stay healthy -Dylan Santiago

TIPS:

BENEFITS:

staff writer

Eat variety of nutrients- rich foods. To have good health a person needs 40 or more different nutrients. Daily food selection should include: whole grains, fruits, veggies, dairy products, and meat (poultry/fish). >Maintain a healthy weight. Weight depends on many factors: sex, height, age, and heredity. Extra body fat increases chances for high blood pressure, heart disease, strokes, diabetes and types of cancers. Yet, if your too thin, this can be a risk for osteoporosis, a low immune system, anemia, and menstrual irregularities. So the key here is, exercise! >Eat regular meals. Skipping meals can lead to out-of-control hunger, resulting in overeating.

When you skip meals your metabolism slows down, so your not burning calories like you should. Even if you don’t feel hungry, never skip a meal. Eat every 3-4 hours with 5-6 small meals per day, these meals should consist of complex carbohydrates and lean proteins. >Eat slow. It takes about 20 minutes after eating for your brain to know it is full. When eating a meal, take time after a few bites and set your fork down. It is said to hinder the digestion system if you eat too fast, you also tend to eat more.

>Eating healthy food boosts the immune system and protects your chances of getting certain diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity. >Longer life >Sleep better and feel more rested in the morning. >Permanent weight loss, eating IT MAKES PEOPLE HAPPIER healthy also can cure cellulite. AND THEY FEEL GOOD >Cure PMS, unhealthy foods ABOUT THEMSELVES, ALSO contain a lot of salt and YOU LOOK BETTER unsaturated fats. Salt increases -INESSA SMITH water retention and fats cause more estrogen. >Better looking skin. Surprisingly, healthy foods clean toxins, making skin smoother and clear.

Photo by ALYSSA NAVAS

I do a lot of sports and its important to eat INTERESTING FACTS: healthy to have enough > Whenever a recipe for cake or muffins calls for oil, use applesauce energy instead -Spencer Deigert. >The average person eats almost 1500 pounds of food a year. >A Big Mac has 560 calories and its ‘special sauce’ is thousand island dressing. >Canned soups taste so good because of their high sugar content. >Iceberg lettuce is composed of 90 % water. >The more raw the fruit or vegetable is, the more nutritious it is.

I’ve always been concerned about my health, that’s why I got my degree in nutrition. Its important to me to be a good role model to my students and to my daughters. I’m hoping to set a healthy example for them to follow -Mrs. Jennifer Hernandez

Statistics show that everyday 1 in 4 Americans eat a fast food meal. That’s about 80-90 % of Americans that are unhealthy. Are you your phone? Areaddicted you eatingtohealthy?


health 13

the roar

food for thought

o Phot

IC MA R by EM

EMMA RICHIE

y EM MA

I’M ON A SEAFOOD DIET. I SEE FOOD AND I EAT IT. -FOOTBALL PLAYER, CODY JOHNSRUD

RICH IE

“It’s like if you put premium oil into a turbo charged 12 cylinder Mercedes, it’s going to run better,” varsity soccer player, Mary Mae Caldwell said. Like a well-fueled engine, athletes need the protein, carbohydrates and energy to perform at their top level. But are today’s young athletes getting the food they need to run longer, tackle harder and kick farther? According to Nutrition Guide for Young Athletes produced by Seneca Physical Therapy in Rockville, Md. an average 16-year-old girl should be eating 2910 calories, 520 grams of carbohydrates and 89 grams of protein per day, and an average 16-year-old boy should be eating 4171 calories, 800 grams of carbohydrates, and 136 grams of protein per day. “I actually like eating healthy and I don’t eat a lot of junk food. It makes me feel good,” varsity runner Ryan Hodgens said.

Phot ob

HIE

NOV. 1, 2010

EATING HEALTHIER GIVES ME MORE ENERGY THROUGHOUT THE DAY SO IT HELPS ME PLAY BETTER WHEN IT’S GAMETIME. -VOLLEYBALL PLAYER, LEXIE MAY

SH o by Phot

o by

Phot ICHIE

Are you getting the food you need to perform?

EMM AR

N ELSO AI NI

staff writer

Hodgens is ranked No.14 nationally for the 2k steeplechase and is very pro-health food when it comes running. His sport requires him to stay in tip-top shape by having a high carbohydrate intake and eating lots of protein as well as eating superfoods such as chia seeds. As his sport takes him to more competitive races, he finds himself changing his diet to adapt to his athletic needs. “I don’t drink as much soda, I pass on desserts most nights, and just all-around make sure that I’m eating the right foods,” Hodgens said. However, other athletes don’t see the benefit of changing their eating habits for sports. “If your body is asking for something, then that is what you need to give it. Food is fuel, and if you ration that you won’t function properly,” Caldwell said. Experts are concerned at the growing number of teen athletes who are not getting the recommended amount of nutrition to perform at their highest quality.


14 fashion

FALL:

Must have! Brass-colored jewelry wil rule over gold and silver. Be sure to stock up! Thin chain jewelry can be layered together nicely. Jewelry with fabric incorporated in it wil be popular as well.

SYDNEY RODRIGUERA feature editor

fashion 15 A structured jacket is going to be one of your best investments this season. Getting one in a dark brown, black, or charcoal grey is a fashionable and easy way to keep warm on those windy fall nights.

Flowy dresses are going to be big thjis seaon. It’s so easy to dress flowy dresses up or down. Wear it with a pair of pumps and a clutch, and it’s dressy. With a belt and some flats, and it’s casual.

Rings are going to be huge this season. Literally! Brass-colored rings with huge stones are really in. And rings in the shape of animals and objects are also going to be tres a la mode!

Loose-fitting capri pants are oh so flattering and go well with everything from baggy shirts to structured jackets!

IN LINE

In love

Printed or embroidered tanks and tees are going to be huge for mixing and matching with sweaters and jackets. Neutrals are the best option for colors. And the ones with lace go with everything!

Into place

Indie

Influenced from the new “hipster” craze, Indie gives a laid back yet stylish factor to a fall wardrobe. Filled with saturated colors and camel tones, it may not be the most bright and colorful trend, but it sweeps the nation with its elegant yet relaxed feel. Popular trends for the indie look are tights, Oxford shoes, long-hanging necklaces, highwaisted shorts, loose-fitting shirts, and messanger bags. Fedoras and other rimmed hats will be popular as well. The look is to be laxed with a vintage twist.

Get the look!

Vintage

The classic looks of vintage are still in style. From jewelry covered in cameos and bows, to floral skirts and classic flats, these trends are never going away. Cardigans and shrugs over lace tanks put together with fitted or long-flowing skirts will be a great combination to give an adorable without being literal nod to the 20s to 50s. But remember: this season, it’s less poof and more flow. Plus, tights will be a great buy for those days when you want to wear a skirt, but want to keep covered up. Patterns and designs will add pizazz to any outfit

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Clothing from Krush Boutique and the Nordstrom BP Department

Photos by SYDNEY RODRIGUERA

Nordstrom BP Department Urban Outfitters Anthropologie Vintage/Consignment stores Aldo Heritage Artifacts Nordstrom Rack Target Forever 21 Charlotte Russe

MILITARY With structured and metalbuttoned jackets, boots that hit you at the mid-thigh, and chic dark -washed denim, the new utilitarianinspired trend is taking off. Wearing wide-shouldered and broad jackets on top with skinny and fitted pants on the bottom, this is also a nod to menswear as womenswear, which is in as well. And adding girly touches such as girly necklaces or purses to the outfit gives it a nice touch of feminine, which is always a complimenting contrast to the menswear-inspired look.


16

technology

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

YOU are what you

APP

Facebook - Free I can connect with my friends without using my computer, it’s so much easier. -Jamie Innocenzi

Pandora Radio - free It plays music that you actually want to listen to, any genre and it keeps me entertained. -Emily Martinez

Twitter - Free I tweet all the time and I can do it whenever and wherever I want. -Erin Shay

Tap Fish- Free I get to watch my babies experience the wonders of life as they hatch from their eggs. -Justin Achanzar

Papi jump - Free It keeps me entertained when I should be doing homework. -Haley Martin Fat Booth - $0.99 I like to mess around with my friends, and make them look fat. -Alex Mowry Doodle Jump - $0.99 It gives me something better to do in my boring classes. -Lee Ertl Solitaire - $0.99 It’s so fun and it helps prepare me for the 2014 solitaire Olympics. -Emma Smith NFL SuperFan - Free It keeps me updates on all my favorite teams. -Lauren Zbieg

Photo by Lauren Roudebush JESSICA SYPOLT staff writer

39% music

7% lifestyle

18% other FML - free This app makes my life feel a lot better because stuff like this just doesn’t happen normally. -Maddie Dart

30% games 56% social networking

Are you an app lover?

7% news

what types of apps do people use?


lifestyle 17

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

The long road to learning

Photo by Kavya Pathak

Piziali, who lives in Grass Valley, 45 friend’s house,” Piziali said. minutes away, said. “I didn’t like the Parents and older siblings drive many people there, and wanted to have a commuters to school, though some aking up before the sun rises fresh start.” drive themselves. and driving more than 40 For others, the “My mom minutes just to get to school location of their parents’ used to drive “EVEN THOUGH I HAVE TO DRIVE is the everyday routine for sophomore workplaces convinced me when I 40 MINUTES TO GET TO SCHOOL, Katelyn Piziali, who, unlike most of the them to make the switch COMMUTING ACTUALLY ISN’T THAT was younger,” student body, does not live close to our to this school. Nichole BAD,” BROWNING SAID. school. Commuting from all over the “My mom works in Browning, Sacramento area and beyond, these the Rocklin Unified who lives in students like her choose to make the School District,” Sami Wheatland, drive here. Brown, who lives 40 minutes away in said, “But now that I have my license, I “I have to wake up at 5 a.m. to get to the outskirts of Lincoln, said, “It’s just drive myself to school.” school on time,” Katelyn Piziali said, easier for both of us if I go to school in Yet, some enjoy the drive they must “I’m used to Rocklin.” make each day. waking up After school events, “Even though I have to drive 40 minutes “I HAVE TO WAKE UP AT 5 A.M. TO early now, such as football games, to get to school, commuting actually GET TO SCHOOL ON TIME,” KATELYN but it’s still a also pose a challenge for isn’t that bad,” Browning said. PIZIALI SAID, “I’M USED TO WAKING hassle.” students who live far away. Having extra time before getting to UP EARLY NOW, BUT IT’S STILL A These “If there’s something school is helpful for some students. HASSLE.” students have going on at school later “I like to have that space between a variety of in the evening that I want leaving and getting to school. It gives reasons for choosing our school. to come back for, I can’t drive all the me time to catch up on homework, or “I didn’t want to go to the school in way back home. I have to go to my just sit and relax before the school day my district, Bear River [High School],” grandparents’ house in Granite Bay, or a starts,” Piziali said. KAVYA PATHAK staff writer

W

Are youAre addicted to your phone? you a commuter?


18 awareness

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

Dear

Jack

Andrew McMahon of Something Corporate and Jack’s Mannequin records his journey battling Leukemia and creates a organization to fight against the disease. Selling more than 700,000 albums, Andrew McMahon’s high school band, Something Corporate had tour around the world. By 21-years-old, McMahon written and recorded his first solo record for a new project. With the title of Jack’s Mannequin, the band was set to headline their first tour across the U.S. in spring of 2005. McMahon surmised great changes to occur with the first album ready to be released. Being diagnosed with Acute Lymphatic Leukemia wasn’t among one of them. “I’m Andrew McMahon. I’m 22 years old. I play in two bands. And uh... I am now officially a Leukemia patient.” Battling the one of the largest cause of death in his generation hadn’t stopped him from doing something big. In the duration of his treatment in 2005, McMahon had documented everything. Set with a video camera given to him from Maverick Records from the creation of his album, he continued recording after his diagnose in May of that year. The recordings from his treatment were created into a documentary named Dear Jack after his foundation to fight against the disease. “I plan on recording just so I don’t forget what it is to be this ready to fight.” The documentary, released November of 2009, gives a behindthe-scenes look into the life of McMahon. Narrated by Tommy Lee, the film opens with his childhood AMY LU

staff writer

and displays his journey from a contestant in his middle school’s talent show to the first show he performed with both Something Corporate and Jack’s Mannequin. It, as well, gives a immensely raw look into the life of a Leukemia patient. From being diagnosed to shaving his hair, preparing for the process disease. As the story develops, it displays him getting spinal taps, radiation treatment, and injecting stem cells into his blood. Additionally, it illustrates the personal and emotional strain the disease affects his relationships with loved ones especially his sister and long-time girlfriend. In July of 2006, McMahon had founded the Dear Jack Foundation. Named after one of his own song, he strive to make change for other people struggling with Leukemia. The foundation’s mission is to raise awareness, support other organizations and charities, and aid research in finding treatment as cancer is the number one cause of death in young adults. McMahon had began a solo tour in 2009 to raise awareness for the organization and support the release of the documentary. Dear Jack has been at 2010 Vans Warped Tour to help as well and is next hosting a fund raising event called Light the Night on Oct. 24 in Los Angeles. On Nov.18, both Something Corporate and Jack’s Mannequin will perform at the first annual benefit concert for Dear Jack in L. A.

I’ll write you as a friend Dear friend, I fear the END is coming soon To you it’s not so clear It’s clear to me, It’s clear as glass Dear Jack, Dear Jack, Dear Jack, Dear Jack Dear hope, hope, hope, hope, hope, hope Attach it to the end of your rope A rope that wove ambition in with sorrow Distancing tomorrow, tomorrow’s come and past. Dear Jack, Dear Jack, Dear Jack, Dear Jack You were the FIGHTER I was the kid against the world I heard there’s nothing gonna hold you down I’ll use a lighter so you can see what isn’t there We’ll swing at air Swinging off eventually you’re bound Bound to the ground Dear Jack, Dear Jack, Dear Jack, Dear Jack Wherever you are hold tight Wherever he is shine light right there Be STRONG I DARE I know it’s hard I will wait, I will wait You were the FIGHTER I was the kid against the world I heard there’s nothing gonna hold you down I’ll use a lighter so you can see what isn’t there We’ll swing at air Swinging off eventually you’re bound Bound to the ground I had songs FOR YOU I had all your music written out The words came when I heard you SCREAMING I had plans for you Until the plans fell through Now there is no turning back my dear Jack You were the FIGHTER I was the kid against the world I heard there’s nothing gonna hold you down I’ll use a lighter so you can see what isn’t there We’ll swing at air Swinging off eventually you’re bound You’re bound to the ground We’re bound to the ground Bound to the ground We’re bound to the ground

Are youAre addicted to your phone? you a fighter?


technology 19

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

meatless

DON’T CHEAT, CUT OUT MEAT, ONE DAY OF THE WEEK

MONDAY JESSIE HOLBROOK staff writer

It isn’t a war against animal cruelty, and it’s not trying to turn you into a vegetarian. The campaign to not eat steak, chicken, pork, veal or lamb actually started back during World War I in an effort to save food for troops. People supporting this idea have started this again as a way to reduce the world’s total meat consumption. This movement’s goal is to decrease meateating habits by 15 percent for better health and a less-stressed life for people. Hospitals, celebrities, schools and restaurants are all involved.

“I ate fish every Monday instead of meat. My favorite is salmon, so I mostly ate that on Mondays.” n

Nazar Znakovsky

“It’s really easy for me to not eat it because I don’t really like meat anyways. So to me, it doesn’t take a big poll on my day.” n Erin Shay

“This is funny ... my mom made chicken for dinner and I went to take a bite then remembered that I can’t eat meat! I made myself a salad after that. But I’ve got to say chicken was the hardest.” n Courtney Card How would you feel if the cafeteria eliminated meat from the school lunch menu every Monday?

15% I’m all for it!

WHS students answered: based on a poll of 160 students on http://surveymonkey.com

30% No, I wouldn’t like that!

55% I don’t care.

WHO’S PARTICIPATING IN MEATLESS MONDAY? Restaurants Bar Jamon, N. Y. C. Bloomingfoods, Indiana Bread & Brew, Washington D.C. Cafe Phipps, Pittsburgh CanoeHouse, Hawaii Carnevino Italian Steakhouse, Las Vegas Daffodil, San Francisco Tender Greens, California Hospitals Kishwaukee Community Hospital The Johns Hopkins Hospital Schools University of California, San Diego Yale University Columbia University Oakland Unified School District University of California, Santa Barbara

Are you going to remember every Monday?


20 technology

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

ON SCREEN

vsIN PRINT

Student preference of online textbooks over traditional in print books

ILAF ESUF staff writer

, it is tbook n,” x e t d oun catio eight p le in any lo b i s s t en aid, a acces ge stud oma s rra e d ll a o S c t a r Sie Elvi Hesitan their thinning t to ore at h its m o s e h ip r b g ug eir sop tightly . Altho seem like y try th e e n g h t e io l s l it a ay Co wallets money. In add ry ility m ld also be b a t a r e s s v o p ece cou preser set, it portability ing unn ing t s a a ic n d a a to er as buy tudents ll. The ok s such s a pitfa line textbo hin routine coffee, some o t s n b it o jo w n d g sed of a mornin d or even thir es of y be u wireless l n o p n o o n c h of ca add se e, all in et. inities ommonly pertoir g c he vic t e r o their re ing their bud can y, m tive t a i l v o e in a n d t i. This ose in fi F i r o f W main l s r th na prow , these know problem fo ernet On the money ge of t a e n v I e a s s ited cau ways to take advanta n ve lim need to e a e h b s t s t a a th . ut studen t idea that h line books rces, b n ien resou ess to their an anc ince the 70s: o at cc as ts gain a students th ble presen known ks. o ls , a g o , s s n o k Al ta i textboo Kindles, or No als to the such as d e s u , u n s ks are e-book technical ma oks ages xtboo bo l of te rough the p gh u e e o e f f h o lt y A rit g th l not e majo the flippin ighting wil nce were th ing the time, to l ie h ur ed or hig ame exper made d now expand e s g e e ll s h e o a t trend h ks as well as c entally get gh an onlin o u m o n o b r o y h ir r t v o en st y k ks. This “usuall book. xtboo textboo alternative is though text having a te much le k “Just cus so favorab han a textboo ook,” me fo mith said, t b s r e p e l h p t e a h S s on che k San ,” Mai depend extboo better ly attending ersity. it really yo said, the t t t ne rro urren e Univ Lupe A tor at the Hor ate c nsisco Stat margins t S o t a n in e Fra coord acrame ting g in th ore of S Writin nd highligh Bookst y. l ks a t is a sit nancia of boo s of the tex g, Univer ition to the fi , s t t r fi e a n d ear in l ben In ad key p ay of l cept menta the n w o c ir i v s clas s con and en also admire er, thi logical ts howev studen y and techno ks. oo ilit portab es of online b g an a t g n a in rry adv than ca r e h t a “R

Photos by ILAF ESUF

Areyou you addicted to your phone? Are tired of traditional textbooks?


the roar

NOV. 1, 2010 hard to accomplish on an online book, and thus it repels students. Another drawback of an online textbook is the weariness brought on by staring at a computer screen for hours on end. Also, in this technologically advanced period, having an online textbook could prove difficult due to the numerous distractions such as social networking or media based websites. Even students who have not yet been admitted to college have online textbooks on their minds, though it may not be in the positive light. “I have considered it, but I think that if I buy [traditional] textbooks, I can turn around and sell them back to other students. That way I’m not just wasting money,” Naureen Ali said, senior currently enrolled in four AP classes. Most students feel that the idea of an online textbook which saves paper, money, and is easier to access is a great idea, however, in reality, many do not want to give up their traditional texts.

Are you tired of textbooks?

technology 21 It may not be a fashion now, but the trend is coming.

“I THINK SOONER OR LATER THE TREND [FOR ONLINE TEXTBOOKS] WILL BE HIGH BECAUSE PRINTED BOOKS ARE MORE EXPENSIVE, SO I CAN SEE THE TREND FOR BOOKS ONLINE INCREASING BECAUSE IT IS CHEAPER AND CONVENIENT,” ARROYO SAID.

The Rocklin Unified School District agrees that the trend will be evident soon, and is always on the lookout for new innovations to educate students. “I think that we will eventually have e-readers for our students and it is not a matter of if, it is a matter of when.” Wendy Lang said, the board president. The battle of online textbooks versus printed textbooks still goes on today while students debate the pros and cons. As the future of technology grows, students find new and improved ways to maintain their budgets.

YES 30%

NO 55% UNSURE/ EITHER OR 15%


22health

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

Drink to your

H T A E

D

KAVYA PATHAK staff writer It’s in every “diet” product on the market. Sugar free gum, candy, and most of all, sodas all contain it. Hidden in the long list of unpronounceable ingredients on the back of packages and cans, the artificial sweetener aspartame has been controversial since its creation in the 1960s. Accidentally discovered when a scientist was trying to create an antiulcer drug, aspartame became the main ingredient behind artificial sweeteners like NutraSweet and Equal, and soon was being added into most fat-free and low- fat food items. “Aspartame has a place in the diet for diabetics only, since they cannot process regular sugar,” Prema Padmanabhan, a retired registered dietitian for the federal Women, Infant, and Children program in New York said, “For healthy people, it is an artificial substance with long term negative effects.” Aspartame is made up of multiple chemicals, including aspartic acid, a known neurotoxin, and methanol, or wood alcohol. When these

Are you

The controversy over diet soda and its effects

ingredients are ingested in large quantities, or, in the case of methanol, are heated up, they begin to cause severe problems in the body. “I have personally seen cases in which regular ingestion of aspartame has caused headaches and memory loss,” professor Sharon Fowler of the

in food, said. Aspartame, though it is in diet sodas, has been linked to long term weight gain. “[Aspartame in diet sodas] can actually help cause weight gain in the long run. “I HAVE PERSONALLY SEEN CASES It has been IN WHICH REGULAR INGESTION shown to make OF ASPARTAME HAS CAUSED a healthy person overweight, and HEADACHES AND MEMORY LOSS” an overweight person obese,” Fowler said. Teenagers, particularly University of Texas Health girls, tend to experience greater effects Science Center at from aspartame. San Antonio said, “and “Teens tend to drink more soda than experiments have been older people, so with a higher dose [of done which show that baby aspartame], there are more damaging rats whose mothers were fed effects,” Edelkind said, “Teenagers also aspartame have significant tend to feel the effects of unhealthy neuron damage and a higher risk eating later on in life. Phosphates in diet of cancer.” sodas remove calcium from bones, and This chemical can also cause when girls grow up and get osteoporosis seizures in children and adults. from drinking too much soda as teens, “Aspartame in large amounts they’ll be sorry.” actually lowers the seizure Despite research that exposes more threshold, creating a greater risk for negative effects of aspartame, the having seizures,” Shula Edelkind, product is still on the market, and no director of the research library plans have been made by the Food at the Feingold Association, and Drug Administration (FDA) to a nonprofit dedicated to change this. spreading awareness “The companies that make about synthetic aspartame are very powerful, and that additives makes it difficult to get aspartame banned by the FDA,” Edelkind said, “Ultimately, it’s up to the public to spread awareness, and if they do, the industry will change too.” However, some are not convinced

ad-you dicted to your Are aware of what’s in your soda?

phone?


health 23

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010 that aspartame is truly harmful. “Aspartame has been deemed safe for human consumption by regulatory agencies in many countries, including the UK, United States and Canada,” Camy Butler, a pediatric dietitian at Sutter Memorial, Sacramento, said. Some students still remain unconvinced

over diet soda’s potential risks. “I’ve been drinking diet Coke since I was little and I’m fine,“ sophomore Noor Bhangu said. No matter what, the controversy over aspartame rages on, as scientists debate whether this chemical is a harmless additive or a lethal poison.

Celebrate

60% of WHS students would choose regular soda over diet if told about the potential health risks of aspartame

all you’ve achieved. PRESTIGE PORTRAITS by LIFETOUCH

NATHAN HODGENS

www.prestigeseniors.com

75%

of WHS students did not know about potential health risks of aspartame

20%

of WHS students think that aspartame should be removed from sodas

CIERRA HARP

ELK GROVE 916. 393.9950 CITRUS HEIGHTS 916.535.7797 SABA RAHMAN

Are you aware of what’s in your soda?

Photos by KAVYA PATHAK


24 in review

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

powder puff hip-hop lunch games night rally Grammy style

rock’n’roll performances royalty country music spirit points leadership Homecoming

2

1

3

6

5

8

4

7

STAR-STUDDED STYLE 1. Graduate Robby Knapp, Taylor David and Nazar Znakovsky pose with senior powder puff players Ann Diep and Marrisa Morales. Photo by Hannah Heflin. 2. Dressed for pajama day, Ashley Ross, Karen Garcia and Cassidy Helton show spirit at lunch. Photo by Alexys Williams. 3. In the freshman section at the rally, Karina Gutierrez, Taylor Sienkiewicz, Hayley Matics, Caitlyn Parker, Macie Sveum and Allie Phil pose for a photo after the rally on Oct. 20. Photo by Ayanna Davis. 4. Mr. Kym Milisci at the powder puff game Oct. 18. Photo by Robert Parker. 5. Homecoming King and Queen Ronnie Eldabbagh and Brandi Carlson. Photo by Ayanna Davis. 6. Junior powder puff cheerleaders Halen Terrana and Evan Orrick perform at halftime. Photo by Margaret Tinker. 7. Kami Saylor helps Andrew Siwabessy get ready before the powder puff games. Photo by Alexys Williams. 8. Practicing the senior powder puff dance, Taylor Stout helps the boys prepare. Photo by Alexys Williams.

Are you willing to take a risk, show spirit, get involved?


on campus 25

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

Members ‘unite’ for fellowship, discussion KIMY CABRERA Journalism I

Curious students gather around a table displaying a bright homemade banner saying “United” at Club Rush on Oct. 6. Strewn on the table are colorful giveaway wristbands and a big sheet of paper with several names. Those signatures indicate new membership to the Christian club United. The group’s ongoing events include having speakers visit every other Friday. Some members also meet separately for Bible study on Wednesdays. The whole group meets Fridays for fellowship, a time during which members discuss the chosen topics or plans. “Fellowship basically makes the group stronger. It’s totally healthy for a Christian group,” Paulina Trujillo said. The club is in the process of planning events and organizing officer positions as more students join. Co-president Kayla Krogh said, “Everyone seems to be really excited to sign up. It’s pretty awesome.”

Hip-hop crew expands TISHA DEGAMO Journalism I

Pak4, the dance crew, recently welcomed new members into the group, pushing the total to 15. The crew revolves around hip-hop culture and dance. “Dancing is a passion,” Richie Phan said.

During Club Rush at lunch on Oct. 6, Paulina Trujillo and Kayla Krogh talk to potential members like xx at the United booth. PHOTO BY KIMY CABRERA

The crew got its unique name in 2006 due to the four founders: Chris Grajo, Richie Phan, Adam Muñoz and Adrian Bayardo, who created the group to share their enjoyment in dancing hip-hop. President Genelle Guevarra jokingly said the group has no activities planned for the neat future. However, Pak4 plans to perform at future rallies and will be dancing at hip-hop workshops. They also intend to just have fun during practices.

For Club Rush, their plan was to gather up people to sign up for the “Pakage,” which is like a fan club or support system. People crowded around their booth while hip-hop music blasted from the speakers. The members playfully danced along with the music and gave out cookies to students who stopped by. Pak4 meetings take place every Monday in the amphitheater or at a martial arts studio called West Coast.


26entertainment

Are you a

The ongoing battle between Bieber-Fever and Anti-Bieberism doesn’t seem to be stopping anytime soon, and the two sides have become far more distinct than before; you’re either with him, or against him. GABBI FORREST staff writer

J

ustin Bieber. There’s a name everyone has heard at least once or twice. Love him or hate him, he’ll still be making headlines and trending on Twitter. At least, for now. There’s the self-proclaimed “Beliebers” who wear their BieberFever ridden heart on their sleeve. And actually, they all aren’t crazed 13-yearold girls. “Justin Bieber fans can be any age, it doesn’t matter. Some of his fans are a little crazy, but I’m not,” Heidi Miller said. There’s the haters, who even at the slightest mention of Bieber’s name turn away in disgust. But why hate on Justin Bieber? The reasons range from “he hasn’t hit puberty yet” to “she’s a girl.” “Everyone is always saying he’s gay. I think even if he was gay, he’d still be hot and have an amazing voice. Being gay would not affect his voice, that’s such a stereotype,” Miller said. The Beliebers stand 5 million strong on Twitter, rebutting against trending topics such as #justinbiebersucks with hashtags like #weloveyoujustin. And sure, Bieber’s music video “Baby” is the most watched video on Youtube, but there’s always an opposing side. “I hate him. He sounds and looks like a girl. It sucks a good rapper like Ludacris would do a song with him,” Hunter Lemay said. And with recent news regarding the 16-year-old pop sensation, one regarding a water bottle to the head, the ridicule has gotten far more intense. “If I ever got a free ticket, I’d go and throw another water bottle at him. I love whoever threw the bottle in the first place,” Matt Magee said. Even with all the hate, Beliebers stay strong and stand up for their hero. “Arguing with haters isn’t a lost cause

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

Belieber?

at all. I try to make a valid point. Like when people say he sounds like a girl in “One Time” I’m like, ‘Come on, he recorded that song two years ago, try listening to him now,’” Miller said. And sometimes, amidst all this chaos, there’s some civil people inbetween. They don’t necessarily like his music, but don’t see any specific reason to hate him. “Yeah, I’m in-between. He’s a good singer, but he doesn’t deserve all the hype he’s getting,” Matt McConnell said. Some focus more on his musical talents more than his physical appearance, fans, or latest object being launched at him. They like his music, but are in a constant tug-of-war between liking his music, and making fun of him. “I don’t really care for him, I just like his music. Like, I know the ‘Baby’ rap. I think he’s smart; he knows how to market himself and get girls,” James Mendaros said. The Belieber vs. Anti-Bieber war has become more tense, since Justin’s “My World Tour” made a stop at Arco Arena Oct. 22. Some had been counting down since they bought their tickets in April, while the others laughed at the waste of $50. “I think it’s cool all the girls get to see him, cause if they truly like him, when is he ever going to be back in Sacramento? I almost got tickets. You go to a Justin Bieber show, you get all the girls,” Mendaros said. What’s next for Justin Bieber? And, what’s to come for the Beliebers and haters?

Are you addicted your phone? Are youtoashamed to like Justin Bieber?

Photo by Gabbi Forrest


feature 27

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

VAMPIRE NATION

With pale skin and good looks, vampires are winning the hearts of teenage girls everywhere.

Photos by Margaret Tinker

MARGARET TINKER staff writer

B

y definition a vampire is a corpse that rises nightly from its grave to drink the blood of the living. If you ask just about any teenage girl the definition of a vampire you’ll probably get “hot, passionate and misunderstood.” If you go back in history the idea of vampires has been around since 5000 B.C., but the way they are viewed is constantly changing. From “Dracula” to “Twilight”, “The Addams Family” to “True Blood”, vampires seem to take on completely different personas. Sure, they still drink blood and don’t do too well in sunlight, but they definitely are not the feared creatures of the night they used to be. “I love vampires. Like Damon on “The Vampire Diaries”. He’s so hot. Hotter than Stefan,” Corrine Stapenhorst said. Even though vampires have been around for centuries, the way they operate has taken many different forms. For instance, in “The Vampire Diaries” vampires have sharp teeth and can only walk in daylight if they have a “day walking ring” created by a witch. However in “Twilight” their teeth are perfectly normal, minus a deadly

venom that coats them, and they can walk in sunlight, as long as they feel like sparkling. With all of the hype surrounding vampires right now, there are still some that are unimpressed. “It’s stupid. I don’t understand what’s so great about other people sucking blood out of other people. I think it’s overrated,” Aaron Groux said.

n Damo R NOeT s. Like ies.’ r i HOTeO p vam Diar “I lov e Vampire than on ‘Th hot. Hotter He’s so.” Stefan

It’s no surprise that it’s mainly girls jumping on the blood-sucking band wagon, however some boys do find it all intriguing. “I like “Twilight” for the romance. It’s the idea of having someone perfect for you,” Justin Fischer said.

Are you vampire obsessed?

Whether you go for old-school vampires like in Anne Rice’s The Vampire Chronicles, or current younger vamps like Bill Compton and the beloved Cullens, one thing remains. The fascination with vampires hasn’t died since the 1800s, and doesn’t seem to be dying anytime soon. It’s almost immortal.

Are you a fanatic?

“I like vampires but “Twilight” made them a fad and I don’t think they’re that cool anymore.” n Mina Felix “I don’t like “Twilight” vampires, but I like Anne Rice’s vampires. It’s classic, romantic and genuinly scary. The immortality thing is cool too.” n Anna Larson “I like vampires. They have really nice teeth.” n Alex Reymont


28 just for fun

the roar

NOV. 1, 2010

From animals to vehicles to catchy phrases, Silly Bandz are all over the school. It’s almost as if there isn’t any color, object or even person that can’t be made into a band.

77%

of students like Silly Bandz “just for the fun of it”

SILLY BANDZ OFFER

Photo illustration by Brittaney Campbell

for everyone BRITTANEY CAMPBELL staff writer

“I think it’s such a simple idea, but it’s really effective. I don’t wear them, though, because they are way too overrated.” n Tori Chaffin

Interested in making your own customized bracelet?

53%

Try these sites: • www.superbands.com • www.logotags.com • pepbandz.com • www.gagabandz.com

animals

2%

“I don’t really wear them. I think the bracelets are stupid.” n Charles Cox

vehicles

12%

“I love Silly Bandz! They are so cute.” n Megan Scardina

words

“I wear them. They are really cool because they have every kind of animal.” n Sam Datta “My favorite one that I have is the hands making the peace sign.” n Kelsey Travis

what’s your favorite?

3% foods

11%

characters

19% other

‘BAND’ from schools And while WHS allows us to wear them as we please other schools have banned their students from wearing them. Many elementary schools are stating that they are a nuisance to have

Are you a fan of silly bands?

at school because students want to trade them and it causes them to be disruptive during class. Even Long Island is banning their schools of the silly band bracelets.


The Roar | Volume 6 | Issue 1 | November 2010