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57th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia

VENICE 2017


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LETTER FROM

THE EDITOR It has been a total joy putting together this edition of Whitewaller Venice celebrating the 57th Venice Biennale, “VIVA ARTE VIVA.” We remember our first time encountering arguably the most important international art exhibition, an experience best described as mind-altering. We’re sure this year will reframe our vision of the world all over again.

Our esteemed guest editor, Francesca Bortolotto Possati, has been generous enough to share her side of Venice, alongside other Insiders offering not only their favorite spots, museums, and secrets, but their thoughts on the biennale’s role and impact on the city. In our Scoop section, you’ll find a special interview with the Venice Biennale’s curator this year, Christine Macel, conducted by the wonderful Judith Benhamou-Huet. We’ve also spoken with the artist Mark Bradford, who is representing the U.S. by creating a multiyear partnership with an admirable Venice rehabilitation organization. And Xavier Veilhan shares with us his plans to transform the French Pavilion into an active, working sound studio for musicians locally and abroad for the entire duration of the show. Outside of the Giardini and Arsenale are dozens of Collateral Exhibitions, and we’ve highlighted the fantastic—and fantastical— blockbuster Damien Hirst show at the Palazzo Grassi and Punta della Dogana, as well as Loris Cecchini’s immersive “Waterbones” show at T Fondaco dei Tedeschi. Plus, we try our best to tease those of you traveling to Athens and/or Kassel for documenta 14, learning that perhaps no preparation at all might be the best plan of action. With so much to see in Venice, it’s best to get straight into it, keeping the mantra “VIVA ARTE VIVA” in your mind.

—Katy Donoghue, Editor-in-Chief

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LA BIENNALE DI VENEZIA 2017

K ADER ATTIA

ROBE RTO CUOGHI

ERWIN WURM

VI VA ARTE VIVA

I TA L I A N PAV I L I ON

AU ST R IA N PAV IL IO N

NEW YORK HONG KONG

lehmannmaupin.com

Kader Attia, Arab Spring, 2014, Unlimited in Basel 2015. © Art Basel. Photo of Roberto Cuoghi © Fanis Vlastaras and Rebecca Constantopoulou. Courtesy the artist and DESTE Foundation, Athens and Hydra, Greece. Erwin Wurm, One Minute Sculpture, 2015. © MAK Center for Art and Architecture, Los Angeles.


LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER

Every two years, the entire art world comes together to celebrate the best our community has to offer. We are very excited to publish our first edition of Whitewaller Venice and take part in the unique event that is the Venice Biennale. We are extremely happy to welcome Francesca Bortolotto Possati, the owner of The Bauer Hotels and the ultimate Venice insider, to be our guest editor, opening her side of Venice to you. Alongside Francesca, several other Insiders will make this edition of Whitewaller truly your unique trusted companion for this incredible six-month-long event. Venice is the heart and pulse of the world when it comes to art, and whether you will be spending your time in the Giardini, at the Arsenale, or throughout the city, Whitewaller Venice will be there for you every step of the way. This will be an incredible time, and we are looking forward seeing you all in the various places and secret spots the Floating City.

—Michael Klug, Founder, CEO, Editor-at-Large

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LETTER FROM THE GUEST EDITOR

The Venice Biennale is one of the most important moments for Venice. The city opens up to the world not only as a place for incredible collections, hundreds of churches, and dozens of museums, but every two years with the biennale it becomes a vitrine through which the world can view contemporary art alongside history. The combination of old and young, yesterday and today, is very well matched in Venice. The city is so full of history and charisma that you cannot avoid it. Every two years the Venice Biennale is the event that brings together in the city a large cultural cross-section of people with a shared interest in the art world. This year’s exhibition will see the record attendance of 85 countries. Many of these will be hosted in extraordinary spaces that themselves have had an exceptional artistic relevance in previous years. The Bauer Hotel itself has been ambassador of the Venice Biennale, welcoming the exhibition before the Foundation occupied its official headquarters. Still today the Bauer Hotel receives artists that have exhibited installations in many spaces of the hotel and in its gardens and donated their works to the city. To me, the Venice Biennale represents an opportunity to encounter in our own home cultures and artistic expressions that are far from or totally unknown to us. It is about an enrichment that is unmatched, and one that only this city is able to offer. Even visitors just coming to see the art end up absorbing the culture and lifestyle of the city itself. You get so much more than what you came for. That’s why it’s so special. — Francesca Bortolotto Possati, Venetian Entrepreneur, Author, Interior Designer, Philanthropist, and Hotelier

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/EXHIBITION

ROBERT STADLER WEIGHT CLASS 27 APRIL - 24 JUNE 2017 693 FIFTH AVENUE - NEW YORK


TABLE of CONTENTS THE SCOOP/18 Christine Macel, Mark Bradford, Xavier Veilhan, Damien Hirst, Fondazione Prada, Mary Rozell, documenta 14, Loris Cecchini

INSIDER TIPS/34 Arrigo Cipriani, Alessandra Pagano, Natalie King, Cody Choi & Lee Wan, Philip Rylands, Erwin Wurm, Alessandro Possati, Toto Bergamo Rossi

BIENNALE & PAVILIONS/40 A survey of the 57th Venice Biennale “VIVA ARTE VIVA” exhibition and country pavilions

FOUNDATIONS, MUSEUMS & COLLATERAL EXHIBITIONS/76 The foundation and museum shows and Collateral Exhibitions not to be missed around Venice

RESTAURANTS & BARS/100 Reserve your spot at Venice’s best restaurants and bars, and be sure to look for Whitewaller’s recommendations

HOTELS/108 Venice’s top hotels offering the best in terms of amenities, spas, pools, restaurants, and nightlife

SHOPPING/114 We share our favorite spots for shopping in between art viewing and events

EVENTS/120 A guide to the VIP previews, dinners, book signings, and after-parties of the Venice Biennale’s opening week

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2O17 EDITION

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Venezia Giudecca 33


12 THINGS

YOU SHOULD BE SURE NOT TO MISS THIS WEEK

Padiglione Centrale Giardini, Venezia, 2010, photo by Giorgio Zucchiatti, courtesy of la Biennale di Venezia.

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OPENING OF THE 57TH INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITION, “VIVA ARTE VIVA” May 13–November 26 — Various locations

The 57th Venice Biennale, “VIVA ARTE VIVA,” is curated by Christine Macel and takes place over the Giardini and Arsenale, complemented by 23 collateral events and exhibitions throughout the city. The exhibition consists of nine chapters, with work by 120 artists from 51 countries.

Photo by Agata Gravante​, courtesy of the artist.​

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MARK BRADFORD'S “TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY” May 13–November 26 — US Pavilion at Giardini Representing the U.S. Mark Bradford’s “Tomorrow Is Another Day” marks the beginning of the artist’s sixyear collaboration with Rio Terà dei Pensieri. The artist is using the biennale to discuss the shortcomings of the prison system and the disadvantages former inmates face upon rehabilitation.

Studio Venezia Model (detail), © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2017.

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XAVIER VEILHAN'S STUDIO VENEZIA May 13–November 26 — French Pavilion at Giardini Xavier Veilhan has created a musical pavilion, building a working recording studio inspired by post-modern architecture. The artist invites musicians to create their own art throughout the seven months of the exhibition. Visitors will be able to witness firsthand music being made by some one hundred international and local musicians.

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Your Venice Biennale Must-Do List

Ali Arkady, The Land Beyond War, 2017, courtesy of the artist and Ruya Foundation, © Ali Arkady.

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“ARCHAIC” AT THE IRAQI PAVILION May 13–November 26 — Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti, 3rd floor The Ruya Foundation—the only organization working inside Iraq to preserve contemporary culture—loaned ancient and retrieved artifacts for the first time internationally for the exhibition “Archaic.” The show includes eight modern and contemporary Iraqi artists alongside 40 ancient works spanning six millennia.

Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler, Flora, courtesy the artists and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, Lora Reynolds Gallery, Austin, Vera Munro Gallery, Hamburg.

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“WOMEN OF VENICE” WITH CAROL BOVE, TERESA HUBBARD, AND ALEXANDER BIRCHLER May 13–November 26 — Swiss Pavilion at Giardini Curator Philipp Kaiser curated “Women of Venice” showcasing the work of artists Carol Bove and Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler. The exhibition looks into Alberto Giacometti’s absence from the Swiss Pavilion.

PAGE 50 Phyllida Barlow, untitled: stackedchairs, 2014, © Phyllida Barlow, courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth.

PHYLLIDA BARLOW AT THE BRITISH PAVILION May 13–November 26 — British Pavilion at Giardini Phyllida Barlow is known for her massive sculptures that employ low-cost material like plaster, cement, and plywood. Her solo exhibition this year in Venice will transform the neoclassical architecture of the British Pavilion.


Pierre Huyghe, A journey that wasn't, 2005, courtesy of Fondation Louis Vuitton, © ADAGP, Paris 2017.

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PIERRE HUYGHE AT ESPACE LOUIS VUITTON May 10–November 26 — Espace Louis Vuitton, Calle del Ridotto Three works will be presented—A Journey That Wasn’t (2005), Creature (2005–2011), and Silence Score (1997)—alongside a number of other pieces from the Fondation’s collection of Huyghe’s works, giving further depth to the show that explores the intersection of narrative, fiction, and fugitive memory.

“Tessa Blomstedt gibt nicht auf,” stage designer and costumes: Anna Viebrock, Volksbühne, Berlin, photo by Walter Mair.

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“THE BOAT IS LEAKING. THE CAPTAIN LIED.” May 13–November 26 — Fondazione Prada / CA’ CORNER DELLA REGINA The exhibition is the result of an ongoing conversation between the writer and filmmaker Alexander Kluge, the artist Thomas Demand, the stage and costume designer Anna Viebrock, and the curator Udo Kittelmann. The exhibition includes film, photography, installation, and theater.

Photo by Christoph Gerigk © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd.

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“TREASURE FROM THE WRECK OF THE UNBELIEVABLE” April 9–December 3 — Palazzo Grassi | Punta della Dogana The British artist has been working on this major exhibition at Palazzo Grassi and Punta Della Dogana for a decade. Curated by Elena Geuna (who has previously worked on shows of Rudolf Stingel and Sigmar Polke at the Palazzo Grassi), it is Hirst’s first significant show in Italy since 2004 at the Museo Archeologico Nazionale in Naples.

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Courtesy of Harry's.

HARRY’S BAR

Giudecca

In 1931, Giuseppe Cipriani opened this establishment at the end of an alleyway. His intention was not to have guests wander by, but for them to go out of their way to get there. Visited by kings, queens, and Hollywood legends, the bar was denoted a national landmark in 2001.

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® Simon Watson-Bauer, 2016.

BAUER PALAZZO

San Marco

The Bauer Palazzo, located on the Grand Canal and Campo San Moisé, is a five-star 19th-century property with 135 guest rooms and 56 suites. Part of Bauer Hotels, at the Bauer Palazzo, be sure to dine at the De Pisis gourmet restaurant.

Rebecca Belmore, Biinjiya'iing Onji (From inside), 2017, Filopappou Hill, Athens, documenta 14, photo by Fanis Vlastaras.

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DOCUMENTA 14 IN ATHENS AND KASSEL Athens, Greece: 8 April–16 July — Kassel, Germany: 10 June–17 September For this year’s iteration of documenta 14, the international exhibition that takes place every five years, artistic director Adam Szymczyk made the choice to split the show between Athens and Kassel. Szymczyk asks visitors to “unlearn what you know” before taking in the work, performances, and happenings.


the SCOOP Whitewaller speaks with Christine Macel, Mark Bradford, Xavier Veilhan, Mary Rozell, Loris Cecchini, and more about their projects in Venice

Alexander Kluge, Filmstill aus “Kommt ein Schiff gefahren – STUMMFILM,” 2016, © Alexander Kluge.

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632 North Park Street Columbus, OH 43215, USA

pizzuticollection.org

Rina Banerjee, She was able to slip in and out of air as the soil and climate where she nourished turned to dust, 2007 (detail)

MARCH 10 OCTOBER 28 2017


CHRISTINE MACEL

OPENS UP ABOUT “VIVA ARTE VIVA” By Judith Benhamou-Huet The press conference for the Venice Biennale, arguably the world’s most important contemporary art event, takes place three months earlier and is usually quite a confusing affair. That wasn’t the case for the 57th Venice Biennale, curated by Christine Macel, otherwise known as the chief curator of contemporary art at the Centre Pompidou. She’s opted for a title that borders on a song lyric: “VIVA ARTE VIVA.” “There’s no Biennale without courage,” underscored Paolo Baratta, president of the Venice Biennale. Macel outlined her plans for the exhibition, which she is directing without any collaboration from other curators. “That’s how I always work, on my own,” she said. There will be 120 artists, 103 shown for the first time at the Venice Biennale. She granted me an interview in private, as she is a reader of my blog (judithbenhamouhuet.com). JUDITH BENHAMOU-HUET: Tell me about the title. CHRISTINE MACEL: It’s sort of a mantra, a sort of art cry of passion for the art and the artists. There will be, at the center of the exhibition, their practices, their work, their worlds. It will be an exhibition in nine chapters, from the way the artists create in the studio through workshops, sources of inspiration, books, and the end of the show will be the pavilion of time and infinity—going out of oneself, opening oneself to the most unknown dimensions of our world. JB-H: You want people to understand what it really is to be an artist of the 21st century. CM: Exactly. It’s very important for me to show their practices and positions because they correspond to a freedom

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that has never been so wide and forces every artist to invent his life. Art doesn’t change the world. Art is the place where the world can be reinvented. JB-H: And we need it to be reinvented. CM: The world has become more complex, and so, too, has art. I would like the public to get closer to the artists’ practice, understand it. On the website and at the biennale, there will be artists talking about their practice in 30-second to 5-minute videos. We overconsume on artists, then forget about them too quickly. There will also be artists who are not young and deserve to be rediscovered. JB-H: How do you choose whom to include with the sheer volume of artists out there? CM: I have an inner filter. Something happens. It’s a proposition that stirs you, that excites you. I, too, want pleasure from art. I am physical, instinctive, and bodily in my relation to art. Of course I am cerebral, too. Evidently, for those who only view contemporary art at the fairs, there will be a lot of unknown artists. The biennale is the fruit of my research since 1995. JB-H: What are your thoughts on the current art market? CM: There is a positive consequence from the art market omnipresence, which is to make art more popular, and there’s a negative consequence: It transforms art into a luxury object. JB-H: What should the Venice Biennale be? CM: A connected wandering. As you move from one work to another, the progression, you will progressively understand the approach being taken.


Photo by Jacopo Salvi, courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia.

Arsenale, photo by Adrea AvezzĂš, courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia.


MARK BRADFORD’S “TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY” By Eliza Jordan The Los Angeles–based artist Mark Bradford will represent the U.S. at the 57th Venice Biennale. Known for his practice exposing conflict and adding to the conversation with aid and support, Bradford is a realistic and deliberate creator. He has been the recipient of awards like the Whitney Museum Bucksbaum Award and the prestigious MacArthur grant. His work has previously focused on an array of underground social issues—such as the appropriation of abandoned spaces, unprincipled leaders and economies, and vagrant communities. “We’re all grappling with that sense of vulnerability, and a sense that possibly our voices are no longer being heard, or that it’s becoming more difficult. But our voices are needed in the mainstream. I’m not saying I’m excited about this time, but it is familiar,” he told Whitewaller. This year, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) and the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University will present Bradford’s “Tomorrow Is Another Day” for the U.S. Pavilion. New work is on view alongside existing work, curated by BMA’s Dorothy Wagner Wallis, director Christopher Bedford, and senior programming and research curator Katy Siegel. In it, the artist is highlighting a relatively recent at-need discovery for him in Venice—the Rio Terà dei Pensieri. The social cooperative is full of incarcerated adults who want to provide for a healthy future beyond the correctional facility that they’re currently confined in. “When I was thinking about Venice, I started wandering about like I do. I usually go to a place and disappear from the art world. Eventually, I came upon something that I was very interested in,” said Bradford. “What I didn’t want is for it to be was an exotic ‘Let’s go see Mark Bradford’s intervention for the running of the biennial.’ No. It is human when I’m working with [these women]. Venice likes to cover up all of the ugly stuff . . . There’s nothing wrong at looking at something a little bit more urgent and difficult. I wanted to stand on both of my legs when going to Venice.

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I knew I wasn’t comfortable with just doing the pavilion. I just wasn’t.” Bradford is embarking on a six-year collaboration with the social cooperative that provides employment opportunities to incarcerated adults through the creation of artisanal goods and other products. He has committed himself to supporting Rio Terà and its programs, which aim to rehabilitate and reintegrate prisoners back into society. Men and women prisoners create handbags, tote bags, and cosmetics, among other handmade goods, which are sold to the community. The profits go directly back to Rio Terà to help expand and sustain the cooperative for years to come. A storefront for community engagement and sales opened its doors in April, and it is the initial manifestation of Bradford’s work with Rio Terà. “My hope is that after six years, they make so much money that they can just keep it—keep the store. Sell more, make more money, and allow people to be more aware of this as a model,” said Bradford. “As they integrate themselves back into society from the prison system, there will be a safe space for them.”

Courtesy of the artist.


Mark Bradford, Sexy Cash, 2013, Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, courtesy of the artist.

Mark Bradford, Father You Have Murdered Me, 2012, Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, courtesy of the artist.


XAVIER VEILHAN’S

STUDIO VENEZIA :

WITNESS MUSIC BEING MADE By Katy Donoghue

For the 57th Venice Biennale, Xavier Veilhan has transformed the French Pavilion into Studio Venezia, a music studio in a grotto-like setting, inspired by 1970s postmodern architecture, that will remain active for the six and a half months of the exhibition. With curators Lionel Bovier and Christian Marclay, Veilhan has invited professional musicians and audio engineers to perform, work, and record in the space, offering visitors a chance to witness and experience the creation of music. Whitewaller spoke with Veilhan about his interest in connecting the city of Venice to the project. WHITEWALLER: Does your approach to this project for the Venice Biennale compare to how you prepare for other exhibitions? XAVIER VEILHAN: Yes, and for different reasons. As an artist I love to escape. You don’t take notes on beautiful music—you just enjoy it. So I try to think more on this nonquantitative side. There is a very strong symbolic impact in this project. There is the idea that you represent a certain idea of culture. And with what is happening around the world, there is an idea that just doing what you do normally is a kind of statement. I want to, as an artist, promote the idea of being very concentrated but also being very laid-back at the same time. To answer your question more completely, I have been in Venice many times during the biennale and I was always surprised that the city’s spirit ended when entering a pavilion. It was like each artist imported something that was trying to do the very same thing he or she was doing elsewhere. That was not for me. I wanted to develop the project using the length of the biennial, which is over six months. I want to use that length to synchronize the pavilion to the city. An exhibition is, of course, a kind of metaphoric paradigm, but it’s also very interesting when it starts to be connected with the environment. WW: So how do you make that connection?

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XV: Through several means. The pavilion is reflecting and connecting not only the world of visual art but the world of music, which is much broader and much more accessible. Music, on a personal level, brings me a certain type of physical sensation that visual art does not. The idea is to transform the old pavilion into a kind of grotto that will be similar to postmodern architecture by 1970s architects like Frank Gehry. So it will look like an almost collapsed recording studio from the seventies with all these wood walls and the different kinds of fabric to affect the acoustics. This recording studio will work properly with all the technicians and devices needed. I propose that the viewer enter this kind of installation to get lost and forget about the outside when you are inside. The old pavilion will turn into the piece. Using the connection to the city, we are working with musicians from abroad, but also Venetian musicians. We have some historical musical instruments coming from Paris, but also from Venice. WW: How do you see the programming playing out over the duration of the exhibition? XV: Visitors can witness the process of a recording studio, just like watching a theater rehearsal on stage. I hope that people will adapt their senses to what is going on. I’m more concerned with what will happen after the opening, when it’s less populated. During that I want to have something that is more one person to another—this special encounter with the music. When you have somebody playing in front of you or singing without any mediation, when we are so used to streaming music or listening in your car, something completely different is happening. What I want to have is this moment where the music is propelling the visual aspect—this combination of vibrations through the air of the music and the frequencies of what you see.


Studio Venezia Model (detail), © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2017.

Portrait by Rob Lakow


TEN YEARS IN THE MAKING:

DAMIEN HIRST’S

“TREASURES FROM THE WRECK OF THE UNBELIEVABLE” By Katy Donoghue Imagine finding a shipwreck off the coast of East Africa. The vessel, once belonging to Cif Amotan II and full of over 100 treasures, objects, and artifacts, has remained submerged underwater for more than two thousand years. Legend has it that Amotan was a freed slave from Antioch who lived in the mid-first and early-second centuries CE. As a free man, he gathered a great fortune and built a collection of art from the ancient world. In the hopes of creating a museum, his ship the Apistos (meaning “Unbelievable” in Koine Greek) set sail filled with his collection, ultimately meeting its demise at the bottom of the Indian Ocean. It was found there in 2008, or so we’re told in Damien Hirst’s exhibition “Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable,” currently on view at both the Palazzo Grassi and the Punta della Dogana in Venice, curated by Elena Geuna. It is the artist’s first major solo show in Italy since 2004, but even outside of Europe we haven’t seen much of Hirst lately. Maybe it’s because he’s been financing the excavation of the Unbelievable—or dreaming up its contents—for the past 10 years. Whatever his truth for remaining under the radar, this exhibition requires of visitors a willingness to enter a moment

of suspended disbelief in order to take in all that Amotan’s collection has to offer. Viewers will fail to spot any mirrored shelves of pills, spirals of paint, framed butterflies, colorful polka dots, or animals in formaldehyde here. But Hirst’s hand (whether actually or metaphorically) is certainly present. There’s an Aztec calendar stone, a collection of gold nuggets, a large clam specimen, ancient ingots, antique torsos, Grecian nudes, masks, a peculiar Sphinx, the bust of an unknown pharaoh, a sacrificial bowl, helmets and swords, a variety of jugs and vessels—some appearing to be reproductions, others still covered in barnacles seemingly straight from the sea. There’s a bronze several stories high, Demon with Bowl (Exhibition Enlargement), in the atrium of the Palazzo Grassi. Another monumental sculpture, The Warrior and the Bear, refers to the Greek ritual arkteia, where Athenian girls imitated bears while dancing and performing sacrifices. Perhaps, with this show, Hirst is trying to own a swath of art history, and in turn question our very belief in art, history, and mythologies. And perhaps we should take a cue from the very name of Amotan’s ship. Either way, Hirst has truly created a show worth spending time with and getting submerged in.

Damien Hirst, Demon with Bowl (Exhibition Enlargement), photo by Prudence Cuming Associates, © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS/SIAE 2017.

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Damien Hirst, Aspect of Katie Ishtar ¥o-landi, photo by Prudence Cuming Associates, © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS/SIAE 2017.


FONDAZIONE PRADA’S “THE BOAT IS LEAKING. THE CAPTAIN LIED.” By Eliza Jordan On view at the Fondazione Prada’s Venetian venue, Ca’ Corner della Regina, from May 13 to November 26 is “The Boat is Leaking. The Captain Lied.” The exhibition is the result of an ongoing conversation between the writer and filmmaker Alexander Kluge, the artist Thomas Demand, the stage and costume designer Anna Viebrock, and the curator Udo Kittelmann. The threefloor show includes film, photography, and installations from private and public collections, as well as theater stages designed by Viebrock. Offering a critical look at today’s political and social environment, the exhibition aims to identify the worlds in which we live and our personal attitudes toward them. Kittelmann quotes a famous line in William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar— “Why, now blow wind, swell billow, and swim bark! The storm is up, and all is on the hazard”—and underlines how the show was generated out of a “shared awareness, both on an emotional and theoretical level, or the critical aspects of present times and the complexity of the world we live in.”

The light shone on all three German artists plays a critical part— each artist’s endeavors have extended beyond imagination and aesthetic, and were conceived with political and historic intentions. Here, the trio reveal themselves to be witnesses and chroniclers of the past and present. The meaning of today and yesterday is highlighted, too, with a close look at society’s dividing lines between a lust for life and a loss of trust, and extreme distress and never-ending hope. “It is a particularly lucky coincidence that Alexander Kluge’s filmic production, Thomas Demand’s photographic work, and Anna Viebrock’s stage settings are brought together in this collective exhibition concept, melding what are usually distinct artistic forms of expression. Until now, their different creative fields have prevented them from engaging in this kind of symbiotic collaboration, even though they know one another personally and have often exchanged ideas,” added Kittelmann.

Tessa Blomstedt, Gibt Nicht Auf, directed by Christoph Marthaler, stage designer and costumes by Anna Viebrock, Volksbühne, Berlin, photo by Walter Mair.

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Thomas Demand, Ampel / Stoplight, 2016, © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn / SIAE, Rome, courtesy of Sprueth Magers, Matthew Marks Gallery, Esther Schipper.

Thomas Demand, Patio, 2014, © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn / SIAE, Rome, courtesy of Sprueth Magers, Matthew Marks Gallery, Esther Schipper.

“Tessa Blomstedt gibt nicht auf,” stage Designer and Costumes: Anna Viebrock, Volksbühne, Berlin, photo by Walter Mair.


UNLEARN WHAT

YOU KNOW: DOCUMENTA 14 IN ATHENS AND KASSEL

By Katy Donoghue For this year’s iteration of documenta 14, the international exhibition that takes place every five years, artistic director Adam Szymczyk made the choice to split the show between Athens and Kassel (the latter typically being the host city). In the lead-up to the Greek opening in early April, both documenta and Szymczyk remained rather tightlipped about what to expect. Even after the Athens portion of the show debuted last month, an artist list had not been released for its German counterpart. Szymczyk asks visitors to “unlearn

what you know” before taking in the work, performances, and happenings of nearly 200 artists across 47 venues in Athens. Public programming, education, radio, TV, and publications complement the exhibition, organized with a team of curators and advisers. In anticipation of the Kassel leg of the exhibition this June, Szymczyk offered, “the great lesson is that there are no lessons.” While there’s no telling what to expect for the remainder of documenta 14, clearly it’s meant to be experienced without any expectations and an open attitude.

Annie Sprinkle and Beth Stephens, Cuddling Athens, 2017, EMST—National Museum of Contemporary Art, Athens, documenta 14, photo by Stathis Mamalakis.

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Kettly NoĂŤl, Zombification, 2017, Athens Conservatoire (Odeion), documenta 14, photo by Mathias VĂślzke.


WHITEWALL

Presents

LORIS CECCHINI AT DFS

LORIS CECCHINI’S IMMERSIVE INSTALLATION

“WATERBONES” By Katy Donoghue Covering the walls and ceilings of the top floor of T Fondaco dei Tedeschi is Italian artist Loris Cecchini’s “Waterbones.” Curated by Hervé Mikaeloff, the sitespecific project, on view during the Venice Biennale, is composed of thousands of moveable thin steel modules, a nod to algorithms found in nature and industrial design materials. Whitewaller spoke with Cecchini about the project and its ability to dance in space. WHITEWALLER: What was the starting point for “Waterbones”?

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LORIS CECCHINI: The title, “Waterbones,” underlines the morphological lightness and freeness and appears as a biological metaphor: The cells open and bloom, releasing molecular components in interaction with the space, developing autonomous and self-sufficient ways. The installation is composed of eight thousand identical elements in shiny steel linked together. The structure is continually varying thanks to the element’s hookup system. The particularity stands in the geometry of each element and in the fact that they are internally empty: This creates


a great lightness in the overall structure that gives me the possibility to expand and contract the form in an organic way, almost as if it were becoming a biological element. The final result is a great “dancing” form in the space that is offered in continuity with the architectural structure.

sculptural installation that would physically involve the spectator, wrapping the architecture in an immersive way. The sculpture presents itself from the floor to the ceiling, in different measures of density, which was totally crazy to realize due to the great number of elements involved.

WW: Your work often interacts with sitespecific architecture. How did you want to engage with T Fondaco dei Tedeschi?

WW: What interests you in translating science and nature into a poetic experience?

LC: The Fondaco’s Event Pavilion reminded me of the architecture of a greenhouse: I really like this kind of transparent construction, which is usually used for the containment of the plants. I have often tried to formulate a type of work that would show a direct relationship with natural forms and an idea of linguistic artifice as a cultural answer to this theme. In general, for me the architecture is a source material with which to interact, and I often try to integrate, in mimetic way, my mark to the one already present.

LC: This relationship is the knot around which the work is developed, a sort of personal translation in which the vegetal memory, the organic dimension, the structural morphology, and the idea of “open scheme” transform the image into an open reading, in virtue of the many possible visual analogies. All of this contributes to a type of “transfiguration” in which the sculptural element becomes a concrete metaphor and at the same time practicable abstraction in which what we imagine of the cellular engineering or of the fractal dimension overlaps with the dynamics of natural growth. In this sense, the overlap of several cultural practices— art and science, nature and technology— becomes the background landscape in which the work stirs.

WW: What kind of effect do you want this immersive experience to have on the viewer? LC: I tried to invade the space with a sculptural

Kettly Noël, Zombification, 2017, Athens Conservatoire (Odeion), documenta 14, photo by Mathias Völzke.


INSIDER TIPS Influencers in art, culture, and lifestyle share their side of Venice— with a few secrets, too!

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ARRIGO CIPRIANI Cipriani Family Patriarch Instagram: @cipriani @CateringVeniceByHarrysBar Courtesy of Cipriani.

WHERE TO SEE ART

Damien Hirst’s big exhibition at the Palazzo Grassi and Punta della Dogana organized by the Pinault Foundation. For places, I would suggest visiting the Arsenale and Giardini, the amazing Sestiere of Castello with its strong and preserved Venetian identity, and hidden places such as San Pietro di Castello, the church that was founded in the seventh century on Olivolo island and was the city cathedral before the Basilica of San Marco.

WHAT THE BIENNALE MEANS TO VENICE

It is the most important exhibition of contemporary art in the world, definitely an absolute value for a city that has such a special place in the world from an artistic point of view.

WHERE TO HAVE FUN AND RELAX

After stimulating your mind and senses seeing art all week, where do you like to relax in Venice after the biennale? Of course at Harry’s Bar or at Harry’s Dolci on the Giudecca island. There is always a fun, warm international atmosphere.

ALESSANDRA PAGANO Hotel Manager at The Westin Europa & Regina Instagram: @thewestineuroparegina Photo by Wladimiro Speranzoni.

WHERE TO EAT AND SIP

My favorite restaurant is the Rivacqua, for location, view, service, and for the best scartosso in the city. When I’m wanting something special to drink, I go to Giorgio Fadda at Bar Tiepolo. Giorgio’s Moscow Mule is the best in Venice. I also love to go to AMO, the newest offer in Venice inside the T Fondaco dei Tedeschi.

WHERE TO SEE ART

I recommend a visit to the Ca’ Rezzonico Museum, where you can find paintings by Giambattista Tiepolo and Pietro Longhi. Another place I enjoy is the Querini Stampalia Foundation, with precious furniture, paintings, porcelains, and frescos from important artists such as Giovanni Bellini. Contemporary art fans will enjoy a visit to Punta della Dogana or Palazzo Grassi, and the Peggy Guggenheim Collection.

WHERE TO HAVE FUN AND RELAX

Venice is full of hidden gardens, many of which belong to private Venetian families or public institutions. These gardens are often rich in art, fountains, and rare plants and have a magical atmosphere. And there is so much silence.


NATALIE KING Australian Pavilion Curator, and Chief Curator of Biennial Lab, City of Melbourne Instagram: @auscouncilarts

Photo by Kate Ballis.

WHERE TO EAT AND SIP

My favorite place to eat is Trattoria Antiche Carampane, which is a small family restaurant in an alley between the Rialto fish market and Campo San Polo. There are no printed menus and the delectable dishes are sourced from local produce and authentic Venetian seafood recipes.

WHERE TO SEE ART

Of course you can’t miss the Peggy Guggenheim Museum, resplendent with her collection in her former home. I adore the earrings on display that Yves Tanguy and Alexander Calder gave her. She wore one on each ear to show her impartiality between Surrealism and abstract art.

WHERE TO HAVE FUN AND RELAX

I like the Scuola Grande di San Rocco to view Tintoretto’s epic cycle of more than 60 paintings. This place was a Renaissance men’s fraternity, maybe even a cult. I also like the rows of ornate timber lanterns, steeped in history and mystery. Here I can pause and ponder before facing the crowds.

CODY CHOI & LEE WAN Photo by Youngsoo Chang, courtesy of Wolganmisool.

Artists representing the Republic of Korea

WHERE TO EAT AND SIP

Harry’s Bar, a Venetian landmark. I stop by Harry’s when I can for a dry martini and grappa. From drinks and food to atmosphere and company, Harry’s Bar is quite the charm. Rossopomodoro was the first restaurant I went to in Venice. Sit outside for pizza and prawn linguini.

WHERE TO SEE ART

Of course, the Arsenale and Giardini. Punta della Dogana’s exhibitions are great and the building itself is a piece of art. The view of the canal from Punta della Dogana’s second floor is breathtaking.

WHERE TO HAVE FUN AND RELAX

The square in front of Hotel Ala is nice to sit around for coffee or beer.

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PHILIP RYLANDS Director of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection Instagram: @guggenheim_venice Photo by David Heald.

WHERE TO EAT AND SIP

At Taverna La Fenice, adjacent to Venice’s opera house, one can relax in a deep armchair during the day and dine superbly in a traditional setting. Osteria Ai Assassini is a former wine cellar of the noble Marcello family. The food is fresh and local, and the menu changes every night.

WHERE TO SEE ART

Titian’s huge Assumption in the Frari church, seen from the full length of the nave, becomes even larger when the middle distance is obscured by the choir screen. One of the most astounding art secrets in Venice is the 12th-century roundel of a Byzantine emperor, stolen in 1204 from Constantinople, isolated and lonely on a wall in the little Campiello Cà Angaran near the church of San Pantalon.

WHERE TO HAVE FUN AND RELAX

Spend an evening on the terrace of the Gritti Palace sipping a prosecco and gazing out across the Grand Canal to the Baroque splendor of S. Maria della Salute. The sense of well-being and luxury is unique.

ERWIN WURM Artist co-representing Austria Instagram: @erwin.wurm Photo by Inge Prader, courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin.

WHERE TO EAT AND SIP

There are a lot of different places that are worth visiting in Venice. I can recommend Harry’s Bar, which is rich in history and legendary for its food and drinks.

WHERE TO SEE ART

Gallerie dell’Accademia, Palazzo Tiepolo Salvadori, the Pinault Collection in Palazzo Grassi, as well as the Venice Biennale are always worth a visit, when it comes to art.

WHERE TO HAVE FUN AND RELAX

I enjoy the outstanding restaurants, the street views and the architecture, as well as the good wines.


ALESSANDRO POSSATI Director of Zuecca Project Space Instagram: @alexpossati Courtesy of Zuecca Project Space.

WHERE TO EAT AND SIP

For the freshest seafood I head to Ostaria Boccadoro. You can taste the passion that Chef Luciano Orlandi puts into all his dishes, which never disappoint!

WHERE TO SEE ART

I am the director at Save Venice, which supported a major restoration of San Sebastiano, a project particularly close to my heart as the Venetian church is one of my favorite places to visit and reflect, while enjoying the incredibly skilled work of the artist Paolo Veronese. The best view in Venice can be enjoyed from the campanile of the San Giorgio Maggiore church, with views of the Doge’s Palace (Palazzo Ducale), the Campanile di San Marco, and Santa Maria della Salute.

WHERE TO HAVE FUN AND RELAX

Bike along the beach of the Lido island, home of the annual Venice Film Festival. A temple for contemporary spirituality can be found at the state-of-the-art Spa, located in the Bauer Palladio Hotel, on picturesque island of Giudecca.

TOTO BERGAMO ROSSI Director of Venetian Heritage Photo by Carlo ConTi.

Instagram: @venetianheritage

WHERE TO SEE ART

For Venetian Heritage this year there is a big anticipation for our contemporary art video by Douglas Gordon at the Doge’s Palace and a small exhibition at the Accademia of two old master pieces that we restored. The Philip Guston show on at the Gallerie dell’Accademia Museum is another one I am very excited about.

WHAT THE BIENNALE MEANS FOR VENICE

Well, it’s another kind of level of tourist—they behave better than the normal public, they come to see contemporary art, but they also come into old churches, etc. It’s a nice mix of people. And I think that’s the future of Venice; it’s all about culture.

WHERE TO HAVE FUN AND RELAX

To detox in Venice you just go to the Lido and have a walk on the beach! Or you can take a tour on the lagoon, just around Torcello Island. I personally will escape to my place on a little island called Lopud, near Dubrovnik, where I like to rest when I am tired.

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S. Marco 1459


BIENNALE

&

PAVILIONS A survey of the 57th Venice Biennale “VIVA ARTE VIVA” exhibition and country pavilions

Anne Imhof, Ropedancer, 2016, photo © Galerie Buchholz, courtesy of Galerie Buchholz.

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BIENNALE ARTE 2017 PREVIEW

May 10, 11, and 12

AWARDS CEREMONY AND INAUGURATION

May 13

DATES

May 13—November 26

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National Participants

Padiglione Centrale Giardini, Venezia, 2010, photo by Giorgio Zucchiatti, courtesy of la Biennale di Venezia.

The 57th Venice Biennale, “VIVA ARTE VIVA,” is curated by Christine Macel and takes place over the Giardini and Arsenale, complemented by 23 Collateral Events and Exhibitions throughout the city. The historic pavilions at the Giardini will host 86 national participants, including exhibition first-timers Antigua and Barbuda, Kiribati, and Nigeria. The exhibition “VIVA ARTE VIVA” consists of nine chapters, two of which open the show at the Central Pavilion, followed by the other seven hosted at the Arsenale through the Giardino delle Vergini. On view is work by 120 artists from 51 countries. As its title suggests, this edition of the biennale celebrates artists and the way their work expands our perspectives. Macel will take visitors inside the artist’s studio, unveiling the process of art’s inspiration and creation.

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“Today, in a world full of conflicts and shocks, art bears witness to the most precious part of what makes us human. Art is the ultimate ground for reflection, individual expression, freedom, and for fundamental questions. Art is the last bastion, a garden to cultivate above and beyond trends and personal interests. It stands as an unequivocal alternative to individualism and indifference,” Macel said in a statement. “VIVA ARTE VIVA” is inspired by humanism—focusing on the artists’ ability to make work in spite of their surroundings, be it an oppressive social or political environment. She proposes that the artistic act is an act of resistance, liberation, and generosity. “VIVA ARTE VIVA is an exclamation, a passionate outcry for art and the state of the artist. VIVA ARTE VIVA is a Biennale designed with artists, by artists and for artists,” said Macel.


“ VIVA ARTE VIVA​”

Sala Chini, Ciclo pittorico la Civiltà Nuova, 1909, Padiglione Centrale, Giardini, courtesy of la Biennale di Venezia.

Corderie Arsenale, photo by Giulio Squillacciotti, courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia.


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3. DUTCH Pavilion 4. ITALIAN Pavilion 5. SWISS Pavilion 6. VENEZUELAN Pavilion 7. RUSSIAN Pavilion

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8. JAPANESE Pavilion 9. KOREAN Pavilion 10. GERMAN Pavilion

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11. CANADIAN Pavilion 12. BRITISH Pavilion 13. FRENCH Pavilion

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14. CZECH & SLOVACH REP. Pavilion 15. AUSTRALIAN Pavilion

ardini

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16. URUGUAYAN Pavilion 17. ISRAELI Pavilion 18. UNITED STATES Pavilion 19. NORDIC Pavilion

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20. DANISH Pavilion 21. ICELANDIC Pavilion 22. HUNGARIAN Pavilion 23. BRAZILIAN Pavilion 24. AUSTRIAN Pavilion 25. EX YUGOSLAV Pavilion 26. EGYPTIAN Pavilion 27. VENETIAN Pavilion 28. POLISH Pavilion 29. ROMANIAN Pavilion 30. GREEK Pavilion


AUSTRALIAN PAVILION Commissioned by: Naomi Milgrom Curated by: Natalie King

Tracey Moffatt, Invocations # 5, 2000, edition of 60​, courtesy of the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.

TRACEY MOFFATT: My Horizon The Australian Pavilion will present Tracey Moffatt’s “My Horizon,” an installation of new work that includes film and photography which presents fictional narratives to explore journeys both legal and illegal, and confront some of today’s most salient global issues, including the migrant crisis. Moffatt explores the meaning of a horizon line—be it a reference the future, the out-ofreach, or the passage of time. Curated by Natalie King and commissioned by Naomi Milgrom AO, the exhibition will be accompanied by a publication from Thames & Hudson.

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AUSTRIAN PAVILION Commissioned and curated by: Christa Steinle

Brigitte Kowanz, N 46°38 ́47 ́ ́ E 14°53 ́31 ́ ́, 2007/2008, photo by Lisa Rastl, courtesy of Bildrecht, Vienna 2017.

ERWIN WURM AND BRIGITTE KOWANZ The Austrian pavilion will present the work of two artists this year: Brigitte Kowanz and Erwin Wurm. Both work within the medium of sculpture, playing with notions involving new material and architecture. Kowanz’s work explores themes of light, language, and mirrors in what has been describe as “conceptual poetry.” Wurm interacts more directly with the body—whether by asking it to pose with everyday objects or by stretching, plumping, or squeezing architectural frameworks.


BELGIAN PAVILION Commissioned by: Minister of Culture Curated by: Eva Wittocx

Dirk Braeckman, E.N.-C.K.-12, 2013, © Dirk Braeckman, courtesy of Zeno X Gallery, Antwerp.

DIRK BRAECKMAN A series of large-scale photographic prints by Dirk Braeckman will be presented at the Belgian Pavilion. The new work is a response to the speed of images. The artist aimed to make work that can’t be taken in at just a glance. Braeckman created powerful photos that engage directly with the viewer, establishing, as he describes, “stillness against today’s influx of images and information.”

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BRAZILIAN PAVILION Commissioned by: Fundação Bienal de São Paulo. President: João Carlos de Figueiredo Ferraz Curated by: Jochen Volz

Cinthia Marcelle, Portrait of Cinthia Marcelle, 2011, © Letícia Weidschaut.

CINTHIA MARCELLE Cinthia Marcelle started with the Brazilian Pavilion, designed by Henrique E. Mindlin and Giancarlo Palanti in the late 1950s. The artist’s installation responds to the building’s modernist architecture and reflects on its history of displaying art. Visitors will be introduced to a slight sense of instability with a large sculpture acting as an inclined floor. Also on view will be drawings, paintings, sculptures, and works in other media Marcelle made with collaborators, such as a video work created with Tiago Mata Machado.


BRITISH PAVILION Commissioned by: Emma Dexter Curated by: Harriet Cooper, Delphine Allier

Phyllida Barlow​, u​ ntitled: GIG (detail)​, 2014​, installation view, ‘GIG’, Hauser & Wirth Somerset, 2014​, © Phyllida Barlow​, courtesy​of​the artist and Hauser & Wirth​.​

PHYLLIDA BARLOW Phyllida Barlow is known for her massive sculptures that employ low-cost material like plaster, cement, and plywood. Her solo exhibition this year in Venice will transform the neoclassical architecture of the British Pavilion. Barlow, who has been making work since the 1960s, creates ambitious immersive installations that exude the feeling of the process of creating. Her palette mimics her choice of material, and she often uses scale to reach surprising parts of the gallery space, such as overlooked corners or high-up rafters. She generously does not hide the human touch and physicality required in her practice.

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CANADIAN PAVILION Commissioned by: National Gallery of Canada Curated by: Kitty Scott; Carol and Morton Rapp

Geoffrey Farmer, Planks, 2017, photo by Iacopo Seri, courtesy of the artist and Kunstgiesserei St Gallen.

GEOFFREY FARMER Geoffrey Farmer’s “A way out of the mirror” takes over the inside and even the outside of the Canadian Pavilion, which has been opened up to reveal the surrounding gardens. The project began with two unpublished press photos from 1955 showing a collision between a train and lumber truck at a railway crossing. Farmer’s grandfather was involved in the accident and tragically died soon after. This trauma was unspoken in Farmer’s family for many years and only resurfaced last year when the artist received the images from his sister. Exploring the multiple manifestations of collision, contemplation, and reflection, the exhibition reimagines the pavilion in the guise of a fountain, from which water flows.


DANISH PAVILION Commissioned by: The Danish Arts Foundation Committee for Visual Arts Project Funding

K​irstine Roepstorff, Y ​ ellow Dragon of the Center, courtesy of the artist.

KIRSTINE ROEPSTORFF INFLUENZA: Theatre of Glowing Darkness Kirstine Roepstorff will present “INFLUENZA: Theatre of Glowing Darkness.” The exhibition looks at what happens between the end of the known and the beginning of the new. The show will investigate questions of choice, risk, and memory. It will ask, “When everything was just floating energy in complete darkness . . . How much did you dare to risk in order to grow? How much darkness did you absorb?”

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FINNISH PAVILION Commissioned by: Raija Koli, Frame Contemporary Art Finland Curated by: Xander Karskens

Nathaniel Mellors and Erkka Nissinen, Work in Progress from The Aalto Natives, 2017, courtesy of the artists and Frame Contemporary Art Finland.

ERKKA NISSINEN AND NATHANIEL MELLORS: The Aalto Natives The artists Nathaniel Mellors and Erkka Nissinen have collaborated for the first time in “The Aalto Natives.” Both are known for the comedic narrative of their work, which deals with issues of morality and power. Nissinen has gained acclaim for his video and installation work. Mellors’s practice involves sculpture, performance, and video as well. Together, they have taken a “comiccosmic perspective” on nationalism, identity, and creation mythology via an absurdist satire.


FRENCH PAVILION Commissioned by: Institut français, with Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication Curated by: Lionel Bovier and Christian Marclay

Studio Venezia, Model (detail) © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2017.

XAVIER VEILHAN: Studio Venezia Xavier Veilhan has created a musical pavilion, building a working recording studio inspired by Kurt Schwitters’s Merzbau (1923–37). The artist invites musicians to create their own art throughout the seven months of the exhibition. Visitors will be able to witness firsthand music being made by some one hundred international and local musicians. Veilhan wants the studio project to be the beginning of an ongoing project, which he describes as a “musical reflector.”

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GERMAN PAVILION Commissioned by: ifa (Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen) on behalf of the Federal Foreign Office Curated by: Susanne Pfeffer

Anne Imhof, The Navel, 2016, © photo by Galerie Buchholz, courtesy of Galerie Buchholz.

ANNE IMHOF Anne Imhof’s work includes painting, sculpture, installation, and performance. For the biennale, the artist created a work that interacts spatially and temporally within the German Pavilion. Her performers are postgender and individualized. Each is image-ready, anticipating of the chance to become a digital commodity.


ICELANDIC PAVILION Commissioned by: Icelandic Art Center Curated by: Stefanie Böttcher

© Egill Sæbjörnsson, courtesy the artist and i8 Gallery.

EGILL SÆBJÖRNSSON: Out of Control in Venice Two trolls turned artists, Ugh and Bõögâr, were given full reign of the Icelandic Pavilion by artist Egill Sæbjörnsson. The transfer of power results in the fantasy-driven “Out of Control in Venice,” which asks the question, “Who is guiding our actions, thoughts, and even imagination?” As the story goes, in 2008 the artist first encountered Ugh and Bõögâr, who now follow him wherever he goes, sharing his studio and even creating works and exhibitions.

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IRAQI PAVILION Commissioned by: Ruya Foundation for Contemporary Culture in Iraq (RUYA) Curated by: Tamara Chalabi, Paolo Colombo

Ali Arkady, The Land Beyond War, 2017, courtesy of the artist and Ruya Foundation © Ali Arkady.

SHERKO ABBAS, ALI ARKADY, LUAY FADHIL, NADINE HATTOM, SADIK KWAISH ALFRAJI, SAKAR SLEMAN, JAWAD SALIM, SHAKER HASSAN AL SAID, AND FRANCIS ALŸS: Archaic The Ruya Foundation—the only organization working inside Iraq to preserve contemporary culture—loaned ancient and retrieved artifacts for the first time internationally for the exhibition “Archaic.” The show includes eight modern and contemporary Iraqi artists alongside 40 ancient works spanning six millennia, and accompanies a new commission by Francis Alÿs that deals with war and the role of the artist. Navigating Iraq’s fragile reality, “Archaic” highlights universal themes connecting today with the distant past.


IRISH PAVILION Commissioned and curated by: Tessa Giblin

© Egill Sæbjörnsson, courtesy of the artist and i8 Gallery.

JESSE JONES: Tremble Tremble “Tremble Tremble” includes a film and performance that, as artist Jesse Jones describes it, bewitch the judicial system. Jones will use the Irish Pavilion to create a site of alternative law, proposing the return of the witch as a feminist archetype who has the potential to transform reality. The artist found inspiration for the title of the exhibition in the Italian movement of the 1970s for housework wages, where women cried, “Tremble, tremble, the witches have returned!”

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ISRAELI PAVILION Commissioned by: Michael (Miki) Gov, Arad Turgeman Curated by: Tami Katz-Freiman

Gal Weinstein, Enlightenment, 2017 detail of work in progress), photo Ilan Potash, © courtesy of the artist.

GAL WEINSTEIN: Sun Stand Still The fruits of the past decade of Gal Weinstein’s practice are woven into this multi-site-specific installation. “Sun Stand Still” continues the artist’s interest in stopping time, destruction, and devastation. Tapping into romantic ideas and images of Zionism is Moon over Ayalon Valley, a monumental piece that depicts the tale of the conquest of Canaan by Joshua Bin-Nun, who called on the sun and moon to halt. Using unique materials, the installation will take up three levels and spill out into the pavilion’s courtyard.


ITALIAN PAVILION Commissioned by: Federica Galloni Curated by: Cecilia Alemani

Roberto Cuoghi, (SS(VIIZ)d), 2012, photo by Alessandra Sofia.

GIORGIO ANDREOTTA CALÒ, ROBERTO CUOGHI, AND ADELITA HUSNI-BEY Curator Cecilia Alemani chose the artists Giorgio Andreotta Calò, Roberto Cuoghi, and Adelita Husni-Bey to represent Italy. The artists’ work is tied to Italian culture, despite their coming of age in a global art scene, having been born between the mid-1970s and ’80s. The name of the exhibition, “Il Mondo Magico,” comes from the book by Ernesto de Martino, who studied the use of magic to deal with crises in various cultures. The work of Andreotta Calò, Cuoghi, and Husni-Bey reimagines reality in a variety of ways to better confront the world today.

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JAPANESE PAVILION Commissioned by: The Japan Foundation Curated by: Meruro Washida

Drawing for Out of Disorder, 2016, © Takahiro Iwasaki, courtesy of ARATANIURANO.

TAKAHIRO IWASAKI: Turned Upside Down, It’s a Forest Takahiro Iwasaki has created a multifaceted spatial experience of viewing the Itsukushima Shrine located in Hiroshima, where the artist was born, raised, and continues to work. Viewers can see the site from the perspective of a bird, insect, or fish, skewing the perception of time, material, and reality. The artist has explored Japan’s rural landscape in his previous work, and furthers that investigation with this project by imagining the site seen from land and by sea. The exhibition title, “Turned Upside Down, It’s a Forest,” comes from the idea that Venice would look like a forest if it were flipped, since it was built on stakes within a lagoon.


KOREAN PAVILION Commissioned by: Arts Council Korea Curated by: Daehyung Lee

Lee Wan, For a Better Tomorrow, 2015.

CODY CHOI AND LEE WAN Counterbalance: The Stone and the Mountain In “Counterbalance: The Stone and the Mountain,” Cody Choi and Lee Wan engage with the spawning disparity they encountered in their transnational journey to find their own identity. Current international political movements such as right-wing populism and restrictions on immigration influenced these two artists to delve into the borderless issues of glocalism. Choi came to prominence in New York art scene in the 1990s, a time of considerable turmoil in Korea. He created Venetian Rhapsody, a cluster of neon signs to critique “casino capitalism.” Lee Wan comes from a younger generation, and is debuting an installation of 600 clocks engraved with the personal details of people the artist met while traveling around the world, entitled Proper Time.

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LEBANESE PAVILION Commissioned by: Nouhad Younes Curated by: Emmanuel Daydé

ŠamaŠ, Lebanon Pavilion Venice, courtesy of Zad Moultaka Studio - Association Sacrum.

ZAD MOULTAKA: ŠamaŠ: Sun Dark Sun “ŠamaŠ: Sun Dark Sun” marks a return for Lebanon to the international exhibition in Venice. In it, the multidisciplinary artist Zad Moultaka is showing his monumental work ŠamaŠ—mixing sound and sight, invention and research, new technology with the archaic. ŠamaŠ is the Babylonian god of the sun and justice depicted on what is considered the first law table, the Code of Hammurabi, made two thousand years before the Common Era. Connecting the foretold Arab end of days with today’s wars in places like Syria, Moultaka considers, “Who is ŠamaŠ today?”


MALTA PAVILION Commissioned by: Arts Council Malta Curated by: Raphael Vella and Bettina Hutschek

​Darren Tanti, L’Annalisa​, courtesy of the artist​.

HOMO MELITENSIS “Homo Melitensis: An incomplete inventory in 19 chapters” is a conceptual exhibition curated by artists Raphael Vella and Bettina Hutscheck. Bringing together a collective of 13 artists, the project marks the return of the Malta Pavilion to Venice for the first time in 17 years. The exhibition is designed in collaboration with Tom Van Malderen’s Architecture Project.

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MEXICAN PAVILION Commissioned by: Gabriela Gil Verenzuela Curated by: Pablo Leon de la Barra

Carlos Amorales, Life in the Folds/ La Vida en los Pliegues, photo by Nicolas Mastracchio, courtesy Carlos Amorales, Kurimanzutto.

CARLOS AMORALES: The Life in the Folds The title of Carlos Amorales’s “Life in the folds” refers to the Henri Michaux’s 1949 novel. It is the product of the artist’s research into formal language, resulting in an installation that includes a set of encrypted poems that involve sound and symbol, a painting from the series entitled “The geometric splendor,” and the film The cursed village, which follows the tragic journey of a migrant family via a miniature puppet theater, which will be used for further performance during the exhibition.


NEW ZEALAND PAVILION Commissioned by: Alastair Carruthers Curated by: Rhana Devenport

Lisa Reihana, Captain James Cook and his John Shelton clock, in Pursuit of Venus [infected] (detail), 2015–17.

LISA REIHANA: Emissaries “Lisa Reihana: Emissaries” features the artist’s panoramic video in Pursuit of Venus [infected] (2015–17), including a reimagining of Les Sauvages de la Mer Pacifique from the early 19th century. Reihana has reanimated the French scenic wallpaper, also known as Captain Cook’s Voyages, creating a more complex story that dramatizes the fatal end for Cook in Hawaii. A score of the live performance, Cook’s original ticking travel clock, and rare recordings of Maori instruments further intensify the visual experience.

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NORDIC PAVILION Commissioned by: Ann-Sofi Noring, Moderna Museet Curated by: Mats Stjernstedt

The Nordic Pavilion, 2010​, p​hoto by Åke E:son Lindman.

SIRI AURDAL, NINA CANELL, CHARLOTTE JOHANNESSON, JUMANA MANNA, PASI “SLEEPING” MYLLYMÄKI, AND MIKA TAANILA: Mirrored Mats Stjernstedt has curated “Mirrored,” featuring the work of six multigenerational artists— Siri Aurdal, Nina Canell, Charlotte Johannesson, Jumana Manna, Pasi “Sleeping” Myllymäki, and Mika Taanila. Instead of one overarching theme, the exhibition challenges the self-image and stereotypes projected onto the Nordic countries of Finland, Norway, and Sweden. While some artists represent ahead-of-its-time urbanity, others explore politics and material. On view is a range of work—film, craft, sculpture, sound, and installation—that confronts both the architecture of the Nordic Pavilion and preconceived notions of Nordic expression.


POLISH PAVILION Commissioned by: Hanna Wroblewska Curated by: Barbara Piwowarska

Sharon Lockhart, Little Review, 2017, courtesy of the artist and Zachêta – National Gallery of Art.

SHARON LOCKHART: Little Review Sharon Lockhart’s project “Little Review” is created in collaboration with the young women of the Youth Center for Socio-Therapy of Rudzienko, with whom she has a longstanding relationship. The name “Little Review” is taken from a historical newspaper supplement, published from 1926 to 1939, that featured articles written exclusively by children and teenagers. The young women of Rudzienko engaged with this archive to select 29 issues, which will be translated to English and distributed weekly in the pavilion over the course of the biennale. The project also features a new film and series of photographs, as well as educational workshops for these young women.

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RUSSIAN PAVILION Commissioned and curated by: Semyon Mikhailovsky

Grisha Bruskin, Scene Change, 2016—2017, courtesy of the artist and the Russian Pavilion, Venice.

GRISHA BRUSKIN, RECYCLE GROUP, AND SASHA PIROGOVA: Theatrum Orbis Artists Grisha Bruskin, Recycle Group, Sasha Pirogova, and composer Dmitri Kourliandski are part of “Theatrum Orbis,” bringing together sculpture, sound, video, and installation in four parts. Bruskin’s figurative sculptures on entry lead to a labyrinth of rooms with works by Recycle Group and Pirogova. The name of the project translates to “Theater of the World,” which relates to the first modern atlas, made by Abraham Ortelius in 1570 during the Age of Discovery.


SOUTH AFRICAN PAVILION Commissioned by: Titi Nxumalo Curated by: Lucy MacGarry, Musha Neluheni

Mohau Modisakeng, Untitled Metamorphosis 3, 2015.

CANDICE BREITZ AND MOHAU MODISAKENG This two-person exhibition marks the first time the work of Candice Breitz and Mohau Modisakeng will be shown together within such a significant space. Modisakeng’s practice uses a personal language to explore ideas around nationhood, inequality, identity, migrant labor, and the body, grappling with black male identity, body, and place within a postapartheid context. Breitz, working in photography and video, creates installations that engage with issues of empathy, race, gender, and religion, as well as more recently investigating the impact of the global media in which celebrity-driven culture runs parallel to indifference toward real-world adversities.

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SPANISH PAVILION Commissioner: Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation, Government of Spain Curated by: Manuel Segade

Jordi Colomer, ¡Únete! Join Us!, 2017, courtesy of the Spanish Pavilion.

JORDI COLOMER: ¡Únete! Join Us! “¡Únete! Join Us!” by Jordi Colomer is a participatory exhibition curated by Manuel Segade, director of CA2M Centro de Arte Dos at the Comunidad de Madrid, and conceived as an installation of installations. Via a path suggested by several videos, visitors become actors within theater-like transitory spaces that mimic an abandoned racetrack, an emergency trailer park, or a tourist-ridden Mediterranean coast. Along the journey will be unexpected encounters, playful gestures, and potential exchanges. Colomer is playing with ideas around public and private space, as well as social, political, and physical movement.


SWISS PAVILION Commissioned by: Sandi Paucic and Marianne Burki, Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia Curated by: Philipp Kaiser

Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler, Flora, courtesy of the artists and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, Lora Reynolds Gallery, Austin, Vera Munro Gallery, Hamburg.

CAROL BOVE AND TERESA HUBBARD/ ALEXANDER BIRCHLER: Women of Venice Curator Philipp Kaiser curated “Women of Venice” showcasing the work of artists Carol Bove and Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler. The exhibition looks into Alberto Giacometti’s absence from the Swiss Pavilion. He declined all requests during his lifetime to represent Switzerland at the Venice Biennale—even though Albert’s own brother, Bruno Giacometti, built the Swiss Pavilion in 1952. Each artist has created new work for the project that addresses the legacy of Giacometti: Hubbard and Birchler’s film installation Flora and Bove’s sculptural constellations.

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PAVILION OF TURKEY Commissioned by: Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts

Cevdet Erek, "Jingle", 2012, photo by Coskun Asar, courtesy of the artist.

CEVDET EREK: ÇIN “ÇIN” is a site-specific sound-based work by the artist Cevdet Erek, who is known for his installations and performance, as well as his experience in architecture and the music band Nekropsi. “ÇIN” is open to participants, created in collaboration with Yelin Bilgin, Gürden Gür, Elif Tunçel, Ayşe Erek, and Yetkin Başarır. Following past works like Room of Rhythms, Rulers and Rythms Studies, and Sound Ornamentations, this project is steeped in memory and sound.


UNITED STATES PAVILION Commissioned by: Christopher Bedford Curated by: Christopher Bedford and Katy Seigel

Photo by Agata Gravante​, courtesy of the artist.​

MARK BRADFORD: Tomorrow Is Another Day “Mark Bradford’s “Tomorrow Is Another Day” brings together new and existing work by the Los Angeles–based artist. It also marks the beginning of the artist’s six-year collaboration with Rio Terà dei Pensieri, a Venice social cooperative nonprofit that provides employment for incarcerated men and women, aiding in their reintegration into society. A storefront in the city selling artisanal goods and other products from the program opened to the public in April; the entirety of its sales proceeds will help sustain Rio Terà for years to come. Bradford is using the world stage of the biennale to discuss the shortcomings of the prison system and the disadvantages former inmates face upon rehabilitation.

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ZIMBABWEAN PAVILION Commissioned by: Doreen Sibanda Curated by: Raphael Chikukwa

© Egill Sæbjörnsson, courtesy of the artist and i8 Gallery.

CHARLES BHEBE, ADMIRE KAMUDZENGERERE, SYLVESTER MUBAYI, AND DANA WHABIRA This is Zimbabwe’s fourth time showing at the Venice Biennale. The presentation offers a variety of mediums that explore a variety of perspectives on themes of patriotism, belonging, migration, and identity. It will showcase sculptures by Sylvester Mubayi, the oldest participant who is part of the country’s first generation of stone sculptors. In addition, the pavilion will present a collaborative performance work dealing with power, gender, and race by Admire Kamudzengerere and the Israeli artist Rachel Monosov, as well as a conceptual work from the architect, artist, and curator Dana Whabira.


FOUNDATIONS, MUSEUMS

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COLLATERAL EXHIBITIONS The foundation and museum shows and Collateral Exhibitions not to be missed around Venice

© Hanna Hedman.

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BIENNALE, FOUNDATIONS, MUSEUMS & COLLATERAL EXHIBITIONS

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Arsenale: La Biennale di Venezia, Campo della Tana, 2169 Giardini: La Biennale di Venezia, Sestiere Castello Punta della Dogana, Dorsoduro 2 Palazzo Grassi, Campo San Samuele, 3231 Collezione Peggy Guggenheim, Dorsoduro, 701-704 Fondazione Prada, Calle Corner della Regina, Santa Croce Palazzo Pisani Moretta, Sestiere San Polo, 2766 Palazzo Fortuni, Campo S.Beneto, 3780 Iraqi Pavilion at Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti, San Marco, 2847 Zimbabwe Pavilion at Santa Maria della PietĂ , Sestiere Castello, 3701 Museo Correr, Piazza San Marco 52 Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa, San Marco, 71C

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Fondazione Giorgio Cini, Isola di San Giorgio Maggiore Fondazione Querini Stampalia, Campo Santa Maria Formosa 5252 Gallerie dell’Accademia di Venezia, Campo della Carità , 1050 Museo del Vetro, Fondamenta Marco Giustinian 8 Museo di Palazzo Mocenigo, Santa Croce, 1992 Palazzo Cesari-Marchesi The Pool NYC, Calle Rombiaso, 2539 Palazzo Ducale, San Marco 1 Espace Louis Vuitton, Sestiere di San Marco, 1345 Campiello della Pescaria, 4 T Fondaco dei Tedeschi by DFS, Calle del Fontego Spazio Ridotto, Calle Ridotto 1388 Zuecca Project Space, Giudecca 33


FONDAZIONE BEVILACQUA LA MASA Dorsoduro

LUCY MCKENZIE LA KERMESSE HÉROÏQUE May 10 – September 10

Lucy McKenzie, Map with shells, 2017, © Lucy McKenzie, Fiorucci Art Trust.

Lucy McKenzie’s solo exhibition “La Kermesse Héroïque” is curated by Milovan Farronato and presented in collaboration with Fiorucci Art Trust. The show of new works incorporates applied arts like handcrafts, trompe l’oeil, ornamentation, public art motifs, stenciling, and more. The paintings in “La Kermesse Héroïque” range in size and scale—from mural-like unstretched canvases to fashion mannequins—exploring themes of public and private space, gender and class, and untold histories. For more information, visit whitewall.art

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FONDAZIONE QUERINI STAMPALIA Castello

GIOVANNI ANSELMO & ELISABETTA DI MAGGIO November 29 – March 26

Elisabetta Di Maggio, Untitled, 2015, photo by Francesco Allegretto, courtesy of the artist and Laura Bulian Gallery Milano.

The exhibitions of Giovanni Anselmo and Elisabetta di Maggio are both curated by Chiara Bertola. While the practice and material choice of each artist may not obviously connect, they both investigate the fluid and unabated passage of time that can result in a transformation (Di Maggio) or a constant (Anselmo). The latter, known for his role in the Arte Povera movement, is showing four pieces made from 1967 to today. The former has created a site-specific project, “Almost Transparent Nature,” which is spread throughout the museum. For more information, visit whitewall.art


FONDAZIONE GIORGIO CINI Isola di San Giorgio Maggiore

BRYAN MCCORMACK YESTERDAY/TODAY/TOMORROW: TRACEABILITY IS CREDIBILITY May 12–August 13

Today, refugee drawing by a 35 years old Afghan Woman, currently living in Skaramagas Refugee Camp, Athens, Greece.

Bryan McCormack’s “YESTERDAY/TODAY/TOMORROW: Traceability is credibility” addresses Europe’s migrant crisis. The Irish artist spent time in refugee camps asking those he encountered to draw representations of their past, present, and future life. The resulting sketches have been brought together as the anchor for the installation. Through this project, McCormack aims to collect, preserve, and interpret an archive of visual data. For more information, visit whitewall.art

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FONDAZIONE PRADA Santa Croce

THE BOAT IS LEAKING. THE CAPTAIN LIED. May 13– November 26

Anna Viebrock, “Tessa Blomstedt gibt nicht auf,” Volksbühne, Berlin, photo by Walter Mair, courtesy of Fondazione Prada.

“The Boat is Leaking. The Captain Lied.” is the result of an ongoing conversation between the writer and filmmaker Alexander Kluge, the artist Thomas Demand, the stage and costume designer Anna Viebrock, and the curator Udo Kittelmann. The exhibition includes film, photography, installation, and theater, connecting a shared emotional and theoretical awareness from the artists involved. Critical of today’s political and social environment, the three-floor show aims to create opportunity for visitor experience and exchange. For more information, visit whitewall.art


FONDAZIONE VENETIAN HERITAGE AT DOGE’S PALACE San Marco

DOUGLAS GORDON GENTE DI PALERMO!

May 13– November 24

Courtesy of Venetian Heritage.

Douglas Gordon’s GENTE DI PALERMO! (2016) is on view in the ancient prisons of la Serenissima, the Piombi. The Scottish artist, who won the Turner Prize in 1996, lives and works in Berlin and is known for his work in film, sound, photographic objects, texts, printed media, and site-specific installations. Curated by Mario Codognato, GENTE DI PALERMO! is a single-channel video by Gordon, presented in collaboration with the Fondazione Venetian Heritage, the British Council, and Canon. For more information, visit whitewall.art

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COLLEZIONE PEGGY GUGGENHEIM Dorsoduro

MARK TOBEY THREADING LIGHT

May 6 – September 10

Mark Tobey, Trembling Space, courtesy of the artist, © 2017 Estate of Mark Tobey/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

“Threading Light” is the first comprehensive survey of Mark Tobey’s work in over 20 years. The exhibition looks at the artist’s complex career, both in the U.S. and internationally. More than 70 paintings will be on view, dating from the late twenties to seventies, including some of Tobey’s last works. Presented with the Addison Gallery of American Art, the show is complemented by a catalogue in English and Italian editions. For more information, visit whitewall.art


MUSEO DI PALAZZO FORTUNY San Marco

INTUITION

AXEL & MAY VERVOORDT FOUNDATION May 13– November 24

Nusch and Paul Eluard and André Breton, Cadavre Exquis, 1931, David and Marcel Fleiss Collection, Galerie 1900—2000, Paris, © Galerie 1900-2000.

“Intuition” is the sixth exhibition by Axel Vervoordt and director of the Palazzo Fortuny Daniela Ferretti. The show, through modern and contemporary pieces, investigates how intuition is shaped by culture, geography, and time. Looking at dreams, the paranormal, fantasy, meditation, inspiration, and even hypnosis, “Intuition” examines the creative power that comes from the unconscious, the gut. On view is work by Vassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Joseph Beuys, Lucio Fontana, André Breton, Joan Miró, Anish Kapoor, Ann Veronica Janssens, and Marina Abramović. For more information, visit whitewall.art

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MUSEO DI PALAZZO GRIMANI Castello

BEVERLY BARKAT EVOCATIVE SURFACES May 13– November 26

Beverly Barkat, Evocative Surfaces, 2017, photo by Vartivar Jaklian.

“Evocative Surfaces,” a project supported by Outset, presents a site-specific installation of large-scale paintings on PVC sheets by Beverly Barkat, created especially for the palazzo. The artist was inspired by the Renaissance space and sought to create a contemporary dialogue with its architecture and history. The palazzo, designed by Palladio, Serlio, and Sansovino, is unique in Venice for its high Renaissance style inspired by the classical architecture of Rome and Tuscany and features elaborate fresco cycles. Barkat was particularly drawn to a fresco of a nude by Giorgione in the palazzo, saying, “I have been working from the nude for many years in my studio in order to better understand the movement of line.” Born in South Africa, the artist was raised in Israel and now lives and works in Jerusalem. For more information, visit whitewall.art


MUSEO CORRER San Marco

SHIRIN NESHAT

THE HOME OF MY EYES May 13– November 24

Shirin Neshat, Anna, from "The Home of My Eyes" series, 2015, courtesy Written Art Foundation, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

In “The Home of My Eyes,” Shirin Neshat presents 26 recent works, including the show’s title series and the video Roja (2016). The series is made up of 55 photographic portraits inscribed with ink. Portraying the diverse people of Azerbaijan, the artist conceived of the series as “a portrait of a country that for so long has been a crossroads of many different ethnicities, religions, and languages.” Images capture a range of ages and ethnicities shot close-up—in similar clothing and poses, against a dark background—with hand gestures that reference Christian religious portraiture. Roja is a surrealist piece that deals with nostalgia and the artist’s own memories and dreams. The exhibition is part of the MUVE CONTEMPORANEO program. For more information, visit whitewall.art

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GALLERIE DELL’ACCADEMIA DI VENEZIA Dorsoduro

PHILIP GUSTON AND THE POETS May 10 – September 3

Philip Guston, Mother and Child, 1930, © The Estate of Philip Guston, courtesy of Hauser & Wirth.

This is the first museum show in Venice centered on the American artist Philip Guston (1913– 1980). “Philip Guston and the Poets” connects the artist’s practice with poetry by D. H. Lawrence, W. B. Yeats, Wallace Stevens, Eugenio Montale, and T. S. Eliot. On view are 50 paintings and 25 drawings from 1930 to ’80. The exhibition, curated by Kosme de Barañano, also touches upon the artist’s relationship with Italy. Throughout his life, Guston was fascinated by the Italian Renaissance master painters, having begun his career as a muralist. For more information, visit whitewall.art


ZUECCA PROJECT SPACE Giudecca

SLATER B. BRADLEY SUNDOOR AT WORLD’S END May 11– November 26

Slater Bradley, In5Dcubation Lightbody Shield, 2015, private collection Berlin, courtesy of Slater Bradley Studio, Berlin and Sprüth Magers, © Slater B. Bradley.

“Sundoor at World’s End” by Slater B. Bradley follows the exhibition “The Secret Key” (November 2016–January 2017). Since 2015 Bradley has been working on the series “Shields,” comprised of abstract works that include paintings and photographic images. Seven shields made over the past two years will be installed in the exhibition, taking place at the Church of Maddalena. The American artist, currently living and working in Berlin, became the youngest male artist to have a solo show at the Guggenheim Museum in New York in 2005 at the age of 30. For more information, visit whitewall.art

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THE POOL NYC AT PALAZZO CESARI-MARCHESI San Marco

VITEL TONNÉ

AN ART RECIPE EXHIBITION IN VENICE

May 9 – June 25

Patrick Jacobs, Pink Forest, 2015, courtesy of Pierogi.

“Vitel Tonné” get its name from the traditional Italian meal of sliced veal and tuna-flavored mayonnaise. Serving up a well-rounded and inclusive “art recipe,” it is a group show taking over the 17th-century Palazzo Cesari-Marchesi. On view is a variety of highly digestible works including ceramics, paintings, photography, and more by artists like Federico Solmi, Sol LeWitt, Eteri Chkadua, Giulio Turcato, Patrick Jacobs, Bianca Sforni, Fratelli Toso, and more. For more information, visit whitewall.art


MUSEO DI PALAZZO MOCENIGO Santa Croce

TRANSFORMATION SIX SWEDISH ARTISTS May 13– October 1

© Hanna Hedman.

“Transformation” features the work of six Swedish artists who have reinterpreted the art of goldsmith work. On view is work by Hanna Hedman, Agnes Larsson, Sara Borg, Märta Matsson, and Tobias Alm. Their unconventional approach to jewelry incorporates nonprecious materials like aluminum powder, horsehair, and fish skin, reimagining traditional artisan practices. The artists create beautiful, challenging pieces, full of symbolism and surprising aesthetics. For more information, visit whitewall.art

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PALAZZO CA’ NOVA San Marco

CAROL RAMA

SPAZIO ANCHE PIÙ CHE TEMPO

May 8 – June 28

Carol Rama, Oplà marinaio, 1985, photo Roberto Goffi, Torino, © Archivio Carol Rama, Torino.

“Space even more than time” celebrates the late Italian artist Carol Rama (1918–2015). Thirty works are presented showcasing the artist’s evolving practice. Rama was a selftaught, spirited individual who paved her own way in the art world. Her work varied in style, color, and approach over the years, deftly moving between artistic languages. The exhibition coinciding with the 57th Venice Biennale is fitting, given that she participated in four past editions, and received the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement in 1993. For more information, visit whitewall.art


CAMPOLLIETO DELLA PESCHERIA Murano

LORIS GRÉAUD

THE UNPLAYED NOTES FACTORY May 13– November 26

Loris Gréaud, The Unplayed Notes Factory, 3D renderings (detail), 2017, photo credits Gréaudstudio, © Loris Gréaud, Gréaudstudio.

Loris Gréaud’s “The Unplayed Notes Factory” is a special project of Glasstress curated by Nicolas Bourriaud. In 1201, the glassblowers of Venice settled on Murano island. Gréaud aims to bring the historic Campiello della Pescheria glass furnace, which has been closed for the last 60 years, back to life. The artist has created a tableau vivant, offering an immersive installation full of sound, sights, and smells that invites visitors to explore, experience, and dream. The project has a darker edge, too, described by Bourriaud as “a sort of ghost ship.” For more information, visit whitewall.art

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MUSEO DEL VETRO Murano

GAETANO PESCE

FIVE GLASSMAKING TECHNIQUES

May 13– September 17

Gaetano Pesce, 62e, 1988—1992, Collezione CIRVA, photo by Ferrero Albero.

Curated by Gabriella Belli, Chiara Squarcina, and Françoise Guichon, this exhibition looks at Gaetano Pesce’s interest in glass. The architect, designer, and sculptor has long experimented with glassmaking techniques, even inventing one of his own. The show presents work created from skills like Pastis, Joliette, Vieux Port, Pâte de Verre, and Plage, which Pesce employed to a contemporary effect. His glass shapes are expressive, unexpected, and uniquely playful. For more information, visit whitewall.art


PUNTA DELLA DOGANA & PALAZZO GRASSI Dorsoduro / San Marco

DAMIEN HIRST

TREASURES FROM THE WRECK OF THE UNBELIEVABLE November 29 – December 15

Photo by Christoph Gerigk, © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd.

“Treasure from the Wreck of the Unbelievable” is a new project by Damien Hirst, taking over both the Palazzo Grassi and the Puntal della Dogana. The British artist has been working on the major project for a decade. Curated by Elena Geuna (who has previously worked on shows of Rudolf Stingel and Sigmar Polke at the Palazzo Grassi), it is Hirst’s first significant show in Italy since 2004 at the Museo Archeologico Nazionale in Naples. For more information, visit whitewall.art

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K11 FOUNDATION AT PALAZZO PISANI San Polo

LIANG YUANWEI

BEHIND THE CURTAIN May 12– June 18

Liang Yuanwei, 2017.11, 2017, courtesy of the Artist and Beijing Commune.

“Behind the Curtain” is curated by Loïc Le Gall, assistant curator at the Centre Pompidou. For the show, preeminent Chinese artist Liang Yuanwei is in part inspired by the Teatro La Fenice in Venice, and draws connections between European theater, Venetian masks, and Peking opera decor. On view are oil paintings that translate via delicate detail the texture of curtain fabrics. In these works, the Beijing-based artist alludes to issues of reproduction in contemporary art. For more information, visit whitewall.art


ESPACE LOUIS VUITTON San Marco

PIERRE HUYGHE May 10 – November 26

Pierre Huyghe, Silence Score, 1997, courtesy of Fondation Louis Vuitton, © ADAGP, Paris 2017.

The exhibition is part of Fondation Louis Vuitton’s “Hors-les-murs” program, showcasing previously unseen works from the collection. Three works will be presented—A Journey That Wasn’t (2005), Creature (2005–2011), and Silence Score (1997)—alongside a number of pieces from the Fondation’s collection of Huyghe’s works, giving further depth to the show that explores the intersection of narrative, fiction, and fugitive memory. The film A Journey That Wasn’t, which was born out of a trip to Antarctica on Jean-Louis Etienne’s ship Tara, remains the centerpiece. For more information, visit whitewall.art

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T FONDACO DEI TEDESCHI San Marco

LORIS CECCHINI WATERBONES April 7– November 27

Loris Cecchini, Waterbones, photo by Matteo De Fina, courtesy of the artist and Galleria Continua San Gimignano/Beijing/Les Moulins/Habana.

“Waterbones” is a site-specific, totally immersive installation by the Italian artist Loris Cecchini, curated by Hervé Mikaeloff. Visitors will be enveloped in an atmosphere framed by thousands of thin steel modules—on the walls and ceilings of the top floor of T Fondaco dei Tedeschi. Interacting directly with the space, and malleable in combination, “Waterbones” alludes to nature’s mathematical algorithms and industrial design. For more information, visit whitewall.art


RESTAURANTS & BARS Reserve your spot at Venice’s best restaurants and bars, and be sure to look for Whitewaller’s recommendations

Courtesy of Club del Doge Restaurant.

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HARRY’S BAR Whitewaller recommends: Fegato alla Veneziana.

In 1931, Giuseppe Cipriani opened this establishment at the end of an alleyway. His intention was not to have guests wander by, but go out of their way to get there. Visited by kings, queens, and Hollywood legends, the bar was denoted a national landmark in 2001 by the Italian Ministry for Cultural Affairs, and has all the while offered a delicious menu full of specials and classics, run by Giuseppe’s son Arrigo. The establishment is an intimate gathering spot for industry insiders and locals alike, and the ambiance embodies that of the relaxed and social Venetian heritage. Rather than just a bar or a restaurant, Harry’s Bar is a frame of mind, and a celebration of the atmosphere, conversations, and company within its space. Entrust in Harry’s Bar for off-site catering. Book a private event for an unforgettable experience. Make a reservation to ensure your visit. Try one of the restaurant’s classic dishes. Calle Vallaresso, 1323, 30124 San Marco, Venezia VE, Italy

+39 041 528 5777 harrysbarvenezia.com


RESTAURANTS, BARS, HOTELS & SHOPPING

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Bauer Hotel, San Marco, 1459, Hilton Molino, Giudecca, 810 Palazzina Grassi, Ramo Grassi, 3247 Hotel Danieli, Castello, 4196 The Gritti Palace, Campo Santa Maria del Giglio, 30124 The Westin Europa & Regina, San Marco, 2159 Bauer Palladio Hotel & Spa, Fondamenta Zitelle, 33 Villa F, Giudecca, 50 Sina Centurion Palace, Dorsoduro, 173 Belmond Hotel Cipriani, Giudecca, 10


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Restaurants, Bars & Shopping 11. 1. Harry's Restaurant & Bar, Calle Vallaresso, 1323 12. 2. Hostaria da Franz, Salizada Sant Antonin, 3499 13. 3. Club del Doges, Campo Santa Maria del Giglio, 2467 14. 4. AcquaPazza, Campo Sant'Angelo, 3808 15. 5. La Calcina, Fondamenta Zattere Ai Gesuati, 780 16. 6. T Fondaco dei Tedeschi by DFS, Calle del Fontego dei Tedeschi


AMO San Marco Whitewaller recommends: The Alajmo’s classic Bolognese ragù and potato “cappuccino.” AMO, the Alajmo family’s newest restaurant, is located inside of T Fondaco dei Tedeschi— Venice’s first luxury department store, operated by DFS. During the day, the coffee shop offers pastries and sweets, and for lunch and at night, guests are greeted with dim light and custom-made dark leather furniture in what seems to be the city’s most intimate hidden gem.

LA CALCINA Dorsoduro Whitewaller recommends: Enjoying your meal on the panoramic terrace on the Giudecca Canal. Inside The Hotel La Calcina is its restaurant, La Calcina, which offers traditional Venetian cuisine and Mediterranean dishes. The restaurant also features a full-service bar, welcoming for aperitifs, cocktails with seasonal fruits, tea, coffee, and snacks like homemade cakes and fruit salads.

RISTORANTE QUADRI San Marco Whitewaller recommends: The tasting menu. Ristorante Quadri is a quintessential seasonal restaurant, with a menu changing religiously to include the freshest ingredients available. Open separately for lunch and dinner, the restaurant serves Italian classics with modern twists in a lavish setting overlooking St. Mark’s Square.

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ACQUA PAZZA San Marco Whitewaller recommends: Schiaffoni di Gragnano alla granseola. Serving Amalfitan seafood cuisine in the pristine setting of Campo Sant’Angelo, Acqua Pazza is an enchanting eatery. Campania wines complement the famous Neapolitan pizza, and all mozzarella, tomatoes, oil, and pastas are imported from the Amalfi Coast. Men must wear trousers at dinner.

ANTICHE CARAMPANE San Polo Whitewaller recommends: Making a reservation—it’s essential. Antiche Carampane is a seafood-focused trattoria with a cozy atmosphere. Next to the Rialto fish market, the family-run establishment is decorated with photos, and guests typically spend a few hours dining and relaxing over cuisine and conversation.

CLUB DEL DOGE RESTAURANT San Marco Whitewaller recommends: The risotto carnaroli of the day. Located in The Gritti Palace, Club del Doge Restaurant is one of the most celebrated in Venice. Here flavors of fresh and seasonal ingredients from the local territory combine with innovative preparations and intriguing plays of consistency for a tasting experience with infinite facets, and Grand Canal views to match.


DANIELI BISTRO AT HOTEL DANIELI Castello Whitewaller recommends: Cicchetti in an intimate atmosphere overlooking Venice. An informal gathering place overlooking Venice the Danieli Bistro is a true celebration of Italian excellence. Sommelier select wines, handcrafted beers, and soft drinks are all made in Italy, matching a culinary experience that balances Italian tradition and international influences, fine Mediterranean and innovative ingredients.

RIVACQUA San Marco Whitewaller recommends: A holistic dining experience at its Floating Table. At The Westin Europa & Regina, guests will find RivAcqua, a restaurant set on the Grand Canal’s most beautiful stretch with an inebriating culinary concept. Nutrient-rich ingredients combine in creative preparations for an innovative rediscovery of the lagoon city’s culinary traditions.

VINO VERO Cannaregio Whitewaller recommends: Trying one of their many delicious chicchettis. A popular wine bar dedicated to natural and biodynamic wines, Vino Vero has over 600 bottles mainly from small producers in Italy, France, and Spain. Located on a backwater canal in Cannaregio, the standing-room-only bar offers extensive knowledge on wine and the many wonderful regions it comes from.

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HOSTARIA DA FRANZ Castello Whitewaller recommends: Asking owner Maurizio for his recommendation. Known for its fish dishes, Hostaria da Franz is an elegant restaurant for visitors and locals alike. With delicious homemade pastas and Mediterranean dishes, the establishment also offers gluten-free options—a true rarity in Venice.

COVINO Castello Whitewaller recommends: Venetian-style saor of seasonal vegetables, gold onion, white corn polenta, and marinated fresh Adriatic fish of the day. CoVino is a small, intimate establishment where reservations are necessary due to its livingroom-sized dining area. With gluten-free options in addition to its delicious meat dishes, the restaurant also offers vegetarian dishes alongside its scrumptious Italian classics.

DE PISIS San Marco Whitewaller recommends: The salt crust baked fish of the day. Located in Hotel Bauer Palazzo, near San Marco, is De Pisis—a beautiful restaurant on the canal, with a terrace to take in the breathtaking view of the Santa Maria Della Salute. The elegant atmosphere is complemented by the culinary culture of Venetian and Mediterranean essences.


HOTELS Venice’s top hotels offering the best in terms of amenities, spas, pools, restaurants, and nightlife

Courtesy of Bauer Palazzo.

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BAUER PALAZZO Whitewaller recommends: Enjoying all three outposts for different activities.

Known as the only privately owned deluxe hotel entity in Venice, The Bauer Hotels offer three distinctive and unique locations for guests in search of Venetian hospitality. The Bauer Palazzo, located on the Grand Canal and Campo San Moisé, is a five-star 19th-century property with 135 guest rooms and 56 suites. Across from St. Mark’s Square is Palladio Hotel & Spa—a private hotel with 21 suites and 58 bedrooms. A part of Palladio Hotel & Spa is the third outpost, Villa F, which encompasses 11 lavish residences with impeccable furnishings and fabrics, a butler, and a concierge service. At The Bauer Palazzo, be sure to dine at the De Pisis gourmet restaurant. Enjoy seasonal dishes and cocktails on the outdoor patio at L’Ulivo—Palladio Hotel & Spa’s restaurant. Treat yourself to a volcanic clay treatment applied in a Turkish bath. Relax in Villa F’s private three-acre garden. S. Marco, 1459, 30124 Venezia, Italy

+39 041 520 7022 bauervenezia.com


BELMOND HOTEL CIPRIANI Giudecca Whitewaller recommends: Enjoying the only Olympic-sized swimming pool in Central Venice. Belmond Hotel Cipriani welcomes guests to 96 rooms and suites, magnificent views, and an in-house Michelin-starred restaurant—Oro Restaurant. Located within a 15th-century building, the hotel also offers spa treatments at the Casanova Wellness Centre and an array of accommodations for various views of the garden, lagoon, and St. Marks Square.

HILTON MOLINO STUCKY HOTEL Giudecca Whitewaller recommends: Booking the Biennale package. Known previously as one of the most beautiful flour mills in Europe, the Hilton Molino Stucky Hotel, then Stucky Factory, opened in July 1884. Since then, many changes have been made, and guests from all over the world are able to enjoy its 379 rooms and suites, seven restaurants and bars, rooftop pool, fitness center, and spa.

PALAZZINA G San Marco Whitewaller recommends: Visiting the Palazzo Grassi museum next door. In the heart of the San Marco district, Palazzina G is a five-star Philippe Starck–designed hotel, and a member of Design Hotels. With 26 rooms and suites varying in size, the hotel also offers cuisine and spirits from PG’s, Krug Champagne Lounge, and Krug Terrace restaurant and bar.

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HOTEL DANIELI Castello Whitewaller recommends: Enjoying a cocktail at Bar Dandolo Overlooking the Venetian Lagoon and its islands on Riva degli Schiavoni, Hotel Danieli welcomes guests to legendary palaces and over six centuries of history, culture, and romance. The hotel’s exceptional heritage welcomes guests to explore 210 rooms and suites, and enjoy gorgeous views of Venice’s iconic panoramas.

THE GRITTI PALACE San Marco Whitewaller recommends: Indulging in the two-story Redentore Terrazza Suite. The Gritti Palace is a place of exceptional art and elegance. History and culture have joined renewed Venetian style, and its recent restoration has debuted a refined version of its iconic self. Discreetly tucked away on the Grand Canal for the most discerning of guests, the hotel boasts 61 guest rooms and 21 suites.

THE WESTIN EUROPA & REGINA San Marco Whitewaller recommends: Relaxing at Bar Tiepolo. The most terraced venue on Venice’s Grand Canal, The Westin Europa & Regina boasts a fresh atmosphere where guests may unwind in a setting of relaxed indulgence just off the fashionable Calle XXII Marzo. Many of the hotel’s 185 rooms and suites boast views over the Grand Canal and the Venetian landscape.


PALLADIO HOTEL & SPA Giudecca Whitewaller recommends: Exploring the spa’s eight treatment rooms. A part of The Bauer Hotel ring, Palladio Hotel & Spa is a renovated 16th-century convent designed by the great Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio. Inviting travelers to relax among immense detail and decoration, 21 suites and 58 bedrooms greet guests to the private hotel for an unforgettable stay.

VILLA F Giudecca Whitewaller recommends: Relaxing in the private garden and enjoying its meditation pool. Also a part of The Bauer Hotel, and together with Palladio Hotel & Spa, Villa F features 11 lavish residences within the 16th-century property. With impeccable service and luxurious living spaces, the exclusive accommodation is a sophisticated retreat full of exceptional detail.

SINA CENTURION PALACE Dorsoduro Whitewaller recommends: Having dinner at Antinoo’s Lounge & Restaurant. Sina Centurion Palace is an eccentric and extravagant hotel bursting with vibrant colors and 21st-century design. Behind its gothic facade, the hotel’s 50 rooms and suites boast character and an array of unique facets.

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A DELIGHTFUL RECIPE OF TASTE, ATMOSPHERE AND PANORAMA A true celebration of Made in Italy and of Italian excellence, the Danieli Bistro balances local tradition and international influences, fine Mediterranean and innovative ingredients. Drop by evenings from 6.30pm until midnight for an early or late supper, premium wines, and panoramic views. FOR RESERVATIONS, PLEASE CALL +39 041 782807 OR VISIT DANIELIBISTRO.COM

HOTEL DANIELI A LUXURY COLLECTION HOTEL, VENICE RIVA DEGLI SCHIAVONI, 4196 VENICE, 30122 ITALY


SHOPPING We share our favorite spots for shopping in between art viewing and events

Courtesy of OFFICINE904.

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AN ICONIC CULINARY EXPERIENCE ON THE GRAND CANAL Extending along the waterfront on one of the most beautiful stretches of the Grand Canal, the splendid Gritti Terrace continues to be the social hub of Venice. Drop in from noon until 6pm for an informal lunch or an afternoon snack immersed in a living canvas of the city’s legendary monuments. FOR RESERVATIONS, PLEASE CALL +39 041 794611 OR VISIT CLUBDELDOGE.COM

THE GRITTI PALACE A LUXURY COLLECTION HOTEL, VENICE CAMPO SANTA MARIA DEL GIGLIO, 2467 VENICE, 30124 ITALY


WHITEWALL

Presents

DFS

T F O NDAC O DEI T EDESCHI A CULTURAL DFS CREATION By Eliza Jordan Debuted by DFS Group in October 2016, T Fondaco dei Tedeschi delivers prestige shopping, culture, and entertainment for its visitors. On the Grand Canal in one of the most beautiful and historic cities in the world, the store shines from within a historic landmark building, offering an exceptional selection of luxury products. In its expansive space, shoppers can find accessories, jewelry, beauty products, fragrances, food, wines, spirits, and more. Seen as more than just a shopping destination, T Fondaco dei Tedeschi also hosts events and exhibitions, and is known as a city cultural hub.

Courtesy of T Fondaco dei Tedeschi.

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Courtesy of T Fondaco dei Tedeschi.

Courtesy of T Fondaco dei Tedeschi.


OFFICINE904 Whitewaller recommends: The AVB bag. OFFICINE904’s philosophy is “less is more,” but that doesn’t undermine the incredible craftsmanship behind the handbags they sell. Since 2010, this multidisciplinary studio has been bringing together the art, fashion, design, and architecture worlds to celebrate original handbag design with a unique boutique concept.

QUERINI STAMPALIA BOOKSHOP Whitewaller recommends: Being sure not to overlook the jewelry and silk scarves. Designed by Mario Botta, Querini Stampalia Bookshop—known as Qshop—is a bookshop and goods store offering publications on contemporary art, design, photography, and especially, the exhibitions and collections at Fondazione Querini Stampalia. The store also sells photography, silverware, glassware, and other unique home items.

SAN MARCO 801 Whitewaller recommends: The handcrafted figurines. San Marco 801 originated in 1972 and is located just a few steps from St. Mark’s Square. From Murano glass chandeliers to handmade papier-mâché commedia dell’arte masks, the store offers an array of special products that are perfect for gifts.

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CA’ MACANA Whitewaller recommends: Enrolling in the store’s decoration workshop. Founded in 1984 by Mario Belloni, this family-operated business is a mecca of handmade masks. With hundreds of different options for styles and molds, the store focuses on traditional Venetian, theater, and carnival masks for the traditional events.

LE FORCOLE DI SAVERIO PASTOR Whitewaller recommends: Stopping by the shop to see Pastor craft his famous fórcole in person. Known for his standout fórcole (the oar posts used on gondolas and other Venetian boats), Saverio Pastor creates objects that are both functional and beautiful. Found between the Guggenheim Collection and the church of La Madonna della Salute, his workshop presents centuries-old techniques met with contemporary design by way of elbow-shaped carved forms from single pieces of wood.

CAIGO DA MAR Whitewaller recommends: The selection of scented candles and perfume. Caigo da Mar is a specialty store in the San Samuele area that offers luxurious and decorative home items. Objects from artists and artisans like Piero Fornasetti and Cire Trudon stand out among other furniture, jewelry, and home accessories.


EVENTS A guide to the VIP previews, dinners, book signings, and after-parties of the Venice Biennale opening week

Photo by Giorgio Zucchiatti, courtesy of la Biennale di Venezia.

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TUESDAY, MAY 9

5 PM

OPENING OF THE EXHIBITION “PIERRE HUYGHE” Organized by Fondation Louis Vuitton, the opening of Pierre Huyghe’s exhibition will be hosted at the Espace Louis Vuitton Venezia. The exhibition is part of the 2017 Venice Biennale’s Collateral Events and will be followed by a cocktail reception. 5—9 PM Espace Louis Vuitton Access: By invitation only

6:30 PM

OPENING OF LUCY MCKENZIE’S “LA KERMESSE HÉROÏQUE” Lucy McKenzie’s “La Kermesse Héroïque” will debut at the Palazzetto Tito, one of Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa’s two venues. The exhibition is curated by Milovan Farronato, in collaboration with Fiorucci Art Trust, Galerie Buchholz, and Cabinet Gallery.. 6:30—8:30 PM Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa - Palazzetto Tito Free and open to the public

6:30 PM

VENETIAN HERITAGE RECEPTION FOR BRIGITTE KOWANZ AND ERWIN WURM Dorotheum and Venetian Heritage will host a reception in honor of the artists Brigitte Kowanz and Erwin Wurm. Kowanz and Wurm are representing Austria in the 2017 Venice Biennale, commissioned by Christa Steinle. 6:30—9 PM Ca’ Rezzonico Museum Access: By invitation only

Lucy McKenzie, Map with shells, 2017, © Lucy McKenzie, Fiorucci Art Trust.


WEDNESDAY, MAY 10

12 PM

PRESENTATION OF THE BARRY FRIEDMAN & VENETIAN HERITAGE COLLECTION In 2016 Barry Friedman donated his collection of two hundred Italian glass objects to Venetian Heritage, a selection of which will be on view during the Venice Biennale, highlighting Murano glass from early 19th century to the 1960s. 12 PM Murano Glass Museum Access: By invitation only

12 PM

PREVIEW OF GAETANO PESCE EXHIBITION Enjoy a preview of Gaetano Pesce’s exhibition curated by Gabriella Belli, Chiara Squarcina, and Françoise Guichon. The show highlights the artist’s interest in glass, including objects that showcase his use—and even invention of—glassmaking techniques. 12 PM Murano Glass Museum Access: By invitation only

Gaetano Pesce, Le debut, Collezione CIRVA 88-92.

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 10FRIDAY, MAY 12

10 AM

THE BREAKFAST PAVILION The Breakfast Pavilion is a curator project from Luca Lo Pinto and studio M-LXL (Marco Campardo & Lorenzo Manson), offering an information café for social and creative engagement. Artists Anna Sophie Berger, Olaf Nicolai, and Nicole Wermers will prepare and perform a unique breakfast each day. 10—12 PM Various locations Free and open to the public

Silo Studio, Textile Moulded Glass, 2013, photo by Nick Rochowski.


THURSDAY, MAY 11

5 PM

HADASSA GOLDVICHT OPENING Presented by the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, in collaboration with Meislin Projects, “The House of Life” by Hadassa Goldvicht is an immersive video installation that looks at Venice’s diminishing population through the story of Aldo Izzo, the keeper of the city’s two ancient Jewish cemeteries. 5—7 PM Fondazione Querini Stampalia By invitation only

6 PM

OPENING OF “LIANG YUANWEI: BEHIND THE CURTAIN” AT K11 FOUNDATION Get a first look at “Behind the Curtain” curated by the Centre Pompidou’s assistant curator Loïc Le Gall. The show features the work of the Chinese artist Liang Yuanwei, presented by K11 Foundation at Palazzo Pisani. 6—8 PM Palazzo Pisani Free and open to the public

6:30 PM

PREVIEW AND COCKTAIL FOR “PAINTINGS FROM MURANO” BY PAOLO VERONESE Paola Marini, director of the Gallerie dell’Accademia, hosts a preview of the exhibition “Paintings from Murano” by Paolo Veronese, featuring the paintings St. Jerome in the Desert and St. Agatha in Prison, restored by Venetian Heritage. The opening will be followed by cocktails hosted by exhibition supporter Bulgari. 6:30 PM Gallerie dell'Accademia Museum Access: By invitation only

Hadassa Goldvicht, The House of Life, 2013-2017, courtesy of Meislin Projects, © Hadassa Goldvicht.

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THURSDAY, MAY 11FRIDAY, MAY 19

6:30 PM

HANES ART GALLERY PRESENTS TIM YOUD “100 NOVELS” Hanes Art Gallery will present Tim Youd’s “100 Novels” project from May 11 to 19. During the special performance, Youd retypes the thriller Those Who Walk Away by Patricia Highsmith. The project is curated by Hanes Art Gallery’s Paul Bright in collaboration with Wake Forest University. Each day, the artist will type from the boat dock of the 19th-century Casa Artom, next to the Peggy Guggenheim Collection on the Grand Canal. This is part of the artist’s ongoing ten-year endeavor of retyping 100 novels while creating related paintings, drawings, and sculptures. Youd is careful to use the same typewriter as the original author in a location significant to the story. Venice as a city was important to Highsmith, who was also an acquaintance of Peggy Guggenheim (and some argue a character in Those Who Walk Away was based on her). This is Youd’s 49th book in the series. 10 AM—1 PM & 2—5 PM Gallerie dell'Accademia Museum From various points along the Grand Canal, or by appointment. Please rsvp to candace@cristintierney.com

Tim Youd retyping William Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, Faulkner's home "Rowan Oak,” Oxford, MS, June 2014, photo by Robert Jordan, University of Mississippi.


FRIDAY, MAY 12

10 AM

2017 ABSOLUT ART AWARD WINNERS ANNOUNCEMENT Absolut will announce the winners of the 2017 Absolut Art Award during the Vernissage of the 57th International Art Exhibition — La Biennale di Venezia. The finalists for Art Work are Simon Denny, Anne Imhof, Shahryar Nashat, Cameron Rowland, Anicka Yi, and Samson Young, and the finalists for Art Writing are Huey Copeland, Johanna Fateman, Orit Gat, Isabelle Graw, and Shanay Jhaveri. The winners will each receive a cash prize of €20,000 and budget to produce a new artwork and art publication. 10 AM

12 PM

PREVIEW OF DOUGLAS GORDON’S GENTE DI PALEMERO! Gabriella Belli, director of the Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia, hosts a preview of GENTE DI PALERMO! (2016). The work is a single-channel video by Douglas Gordon, curated by Mario Codognato in collaboration with the British Council, Canon, and Venetian Heritage. 12 PM Palazzo Ducale, Piombi Access: By invitation only

1 PM

PRIVATE VISIT AND LUNCH HOSTED BY DOLCE&GABBANA Dolce & Gabbana hosts a private visit and lunch in the Loggia Foscari—with some of the best views in Venice. Afterward, coffee and drinks will be served at the fashion house’s newly opened boutique on Via XXII Marzo. There, a percentage of the sales from its Venice Scarf will be donated to support Venetian Heritage. 1 PM Palazzo Ducale, Loggia Foscari Access: By invitation only

6:30 PM

VENETIAN CHIC BY FRANCESCA BORTOLOTTO POSATTI BOOK LAUNCH Celebrate the launch of Venetian Chic by Francesca Bortolotto Possati, CEO and president of Venice’s Bauer Hotel Group. The book is published by Assouline, and its launch will be followed by cocktails hosted by the Bauer Hotel. 6:30 PM Hotel Bauer, Assouline Boutique Free and open to the public

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SATURDAY, MAY 13

12 PM

PETER MARINO BOOK SIGNING The architect, designer, and avid art collector Peter Marino will be present for a signing of his books Art Architecture (published by Phaidon) and One Way (published by Skira Rizzoli), hosted by Toto Bergamo Rossi and the Board of Directors of Venetian Heritage. All proceeds will be donated to Venetian Heritage with drinks courtesy of Cantine Ferrari. 12—2 PM Garden of Palazzo Gradenigo in Rio Marin Free and open to the public

Portrait by Jesse Shadoan.


DISCOVER OUR NEW DIGITAL PLATFORM

Live May 12

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COVER CREDITS

57TH INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITION OF LA BIENNALE DI VENEZIA Photo by Andrea Avezzù, courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia.

BAUER PALAZZO

Courtesy of Bauer Palazzo.

ESPACE LOUIS VUITTON VENEZIA

Pierre Huyghe, A Journey That Wasn't, 2005, Super 16mm film and HD video transferred to HD video, color, sound, 21min 43s, courtesy of Fondation Louis Vuitton, © ADAGP, Paris 2017.

FONDAZIONE PRADA

Alexander Kluge, Filmstill aus “Kommt ein Schiff gefahren – STUMMFILM,” 2016, © Alexander Kluge.

FRENCH PAVILION

Studio Venezia, Model, © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2017.

PEGGY GUGGENHEIM COLLECTION

Mark Tobey, Advance of History, 1964, Gouache and watercolor on paper, 25 5/8 x 19 11/16 inches (65.2 x 50.1 cm), courtesy of The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, 1976, © 2017 Estate of Mark Tobey/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

PUNTA DELLA DOGANA & PALAZZO GRASSI

Damien Hirst, Demon with Bowl (Exhibition Enlargement), photo by Prudence Cuming Associates, © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS/SIAE 2017.

T FONDACO DEI TEDESCHI BY DFS Photo by Matteo De Fine, courtesy of DFS.


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Profile for Whitewaller

Whitewaller Venice 2017  

Venice Biennale 2017 May 9-November 22

Whitewaller Venice 2017  

Venice Biennale 2017 May 9-November 22

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