Whidbey Weekly, August 1, 2019

Page 1

August 1 through August 7, 2019

August 21-25, 2019

August 23-Gala 6-9 pm Coupeville Rec Hall tickets $25, wine, appetizers award winning art!

pacificnorthwestartschool.org August 24-25, 10-4 coupevillechamber.com Weekend Exhibition & Sale #PleinAirWhidbey

Coupeville Rec Hall

The Coupeville Chamber and PNWAS are partnering to bring plein air to Whidbey this summer. Visit websites for full details Barbara Noonan

ART SCHOOL

Teresa Saia

MATT IVERSON

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AUGUST 1 - AUGUST 7, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

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2nd ANNIVERSARY SALES EVENT! Friday, August 2nd-Sunday, August 4 25% off memberships (must be paid at time of purchase). All in-store retail items will be 10% off (excluding firearms). From July 23rd to August 4th all customers will be entered to win a VRBP-100 Shogun each time they check in to use our range.

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! TUESDAY, JUNE 25 12:40 pm, Ault Field Rd. Reporting party advising husband’s “girlfriend” has been messaging her lewd photos of female and reporting party’s husband having sex; reporting party has no contact order with husband. 1 pm, NE Goldie St. Reporting party advising her female German Shepherd escaped from doggie daycare.

Pacific “Welcome Indoor to the P.I.T.” Tactical 951 NE 21st Court • Oak Harbor • 360-720-2619 • PacificIndoorTactical.com

SAVE THE DATE SATURDAY, AUGUST 3RD 8AM-4PM

We are cleaning out the back room!

Lots of great stuff priced below cost!

Freeland Ace’s

ANNUAL GARAGE

SALE Freeland

Cash or checks only. No credit/debit cards. All sales are final. 1609 E. Main Street • Freeland • 360-331-6799

Hardware

acehardware.com Monday-Saturday 8am-7pm • Sunday 9am-6pm

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26 8:55 pm, SR 20 Caller advising subject needs to be removed; is mentally “off;” not being physically violent but has been walking around with clumps of wood and saying violence is the answer. THURSDAY, JUNE 27 9:26 am, Mutiny Bay Rd Reporting party extremely upset due to construction; vehicles try to pass in no passing zones, exceeding 45 mph limit. 12:53 pm, Riepma Ave. Requesting to speak to law enforcement regarding living at boyfriend’s house; states just received eviction notice from boyfriend saying she has to move out in next three days; wants to know if it’s real. 6:59 pm, East Harbor Rd. Caller advising suspicious activity occurring across the street from location; advising male in black Honda Accord, wearing vinyl gloves, is making wife nervous; subject has been at location for about one hour. 7:28 pm, Cranberry Dr. Advising neighbor is burning tree limbs during burn ban. 8:38 pm, Bob Galbreath Rd. Reporting party advising neighbor is a nuisance to neighborhood; states neighbor runs chainsaw at all hours of the day, states subject is possibly on drugs. 9:06 pm, Crockett Lake Dr. Requesting call referencing what an actual approved fire pit is for the burn ban; wants to know if a homemade one out of cinder blocks is approved or not. 10:20 pm, Libbey Rd. Caller advising neighbor across the street is out mowing his lawn, states subject is a nuisance. Was also shooting guns off all day today. 11:54 pm, Koenig Ln. Advising male on reporting party’s porch is yelling for reporting party to take him to Oak Harbor. Male is incoherent, reporting party has not opened door. FRIDAY, JUNE 28 5:54 am, East Harbor Rd. Reporting party asked for Deputy Richardson or Sergeant from Island County Sheriff’s Office; clarified not familiar with deputy and asked if on duty deputy could help her, responded “that’s who I asked for.” 11:53 am, Storkson Dr. Caller states male passed out in grass area; is employee of location, will not go check to see if male is breathing. 4:15 pm, Crockett Lake Dr. Reporting party advising two crows

deceased on side of road in grass, unknown if they were shot or if there is a “bird disease” going around; requesting they be disposed of and wanting a phone call in case there is a bird disease. SATURDAY, JUNE 29 9:05 am, SR 20 Caller advising United States is under attack and “You guys need to be aware.” 11:42 am, Sun Vista Cir. Reporting party states “you know when you lose the fear,” asking how she can report the fear, states she doesn’t feel safe; called 9-1-1 multiple times before staying on line this time. 12:20 pm, Sun Vista Cir. Reporting party recalling; advising is also a cannibal, wants to add it to list so it’s on record. 7:14 pm, Sandy Point Rd. Reporting party advising saw male waving stick with a hook on end, a dead rabbit is on ground; advised rabbit is usually alive. SUNDAY, JUNE 30 8:13 am, NE Regatta Dr. Male subject crossing Crescent Harbor heading north on Regatta, dragging suitcase behind him and “harassing cars.” Male threw cigarette down and stomped his feet and stared at reporting party as he drove by. 8:43 am, SR 20 Reporting party advising male subject outside store is acting aggressive towards customers, making gestures with a fork. States he doesn’t seem completely lucid. 2:21 am, S Main St. Party advising she needs law enforcement to come and see her because subjects are flashing lights in her eyes. 9:18 am, Fort Nugent Rd. Caller advising raging bull is on the loose; bull is off road now and on gravel road. 3:36 pm, Basil Rd. Reporting party advising had new water meter installed and saw a law on meter advising if tampered with can lead to prosecution; reporting party just wanted to let law enforcement know he didn’t touch it. MONDAY, JULY 1 11:54 am, Beverly Beach Rd. Advising tree loggers are cutting reporting party’s trees; advising the neighbor sent them to reporting party’s property to cut a couple of trees; reporting party talked to tree loggers and stopped their operations. 7:34 pm, SR 20 Truck driving northbound towards the bridge, hit railing on side of the road and dragged it into the road. Vehicle kept heading north, no longer in area. 10:55 pm, Dugualla Rd. Reporting party advising subject is missing; was at location and just vanished; has not been able to find her for last few hours. Female has phone but is not activated yet. 11:54 pm, Walker Ave. Reporting party states yellow Corvette is driving around neighborhood; driver drove on reporting party’s lawn. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

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ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Excuse me. The radio is on. Presently, I am listening to Seattle Mariners’ broadcaster Rick Rizz talk about sloppy joes instead of baseball. Rick’s favorite school lunch was sloppy joes. Dodger legend Vin Scully used to say his favorite subject in

school was lunch.

Some folks think I am out to lunch. Maybe you too? At least we are in good company. Meat loaf Speaking of lunch, certain foods and libations have always excited me. Not really one to enjoy food since Mom did not enjoy the preparation thereof, my long standing standbys still work. Peanut butter and jelly. A fountain cherry Coke. Cheeseburgers. Mashed potatoes and gravy. This Saturday, I will be attending the Whidbey Island Car Show at the Whidbey Island Fairgrounds and Event Center.

Calendar check Readying to finish last year’s Christmas card mailing, I noticed this week’s issue of Whidbey Weekly is dated Aug. 1. Are you kidding me? How can we slow down life? Maybe I should stop taking naps. This will give me more time to figure out why I feel tired. Far From Normal Last weekend, while showing off Whidbey to Coloradans formerly Illinois ed and Missouri ed, our first stop in Coupeville, after enjoying the Lavender Wind Farm on Darst Road, was Far From Normal. Proprietor Cindy Van Dyk has a mind that fits her signage. The Far From Normal novelty inventory includes items not far from but very close to one’s heart. Memories, collectibles, and just plain fun stuff ooze from the shelves. For me, who has lettered in ADD, this store is a must for any attention deficit giftee. No matter the direction I look or go, I am ready to smile and buy. Last week’s haul of sentiment included the much loved Whitman Publishing’s Pat Boone Cut Out Dolls. With the new Seattle traffic fines, I shall not attempt using the HOV lane with Pat all dressed up in the passenger seat. Instead, I shall send Pat to my sister in Atlanta to see if she can do a diamond lane getaway with Pat down south.

AUGUST 1 - AUGUST 7, 2019 LOCALLY OPERATED

ESTATE SALE Everything Must Go Friday, August 2 Saturday, August 3 8am-5pm 829 NW Anchor Dr, Oak Harbor

COUPEVILLE FARMERS MARKET GROWING SINCE 1979 Come for the Ribbon and Cake Stay for the Market on The Green 10-2

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I will be in line at 8 a.m. even though the car show does not begin until 11 a.m.

Once, many, many years ago, I drove my sister through Beverly Hills while she navigated using one of those “Maps of the Stars.”

At 8 a.m., we can get biscuits and gravy, but not just any B. and G.

While we never found Tennessee Ernie Ford’s place, we found Pat Boone’s.

Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw

Boone’s gated estate was perfect in every way. One would expect that from Mr. Boone, son-in-law of Red Foley, country gospel singer extraordinaire.

Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

This is ScallyWagon Eatery’s homemade sausage gravy over freshly-baked biscuits. After I talk and walk that meal off, my blood pressure may need to be checked for excitement at 11 a.m. when the lunch menu kicks in. At 11 a.m., Capt’n Jac’s Meat Loaf sandwich will be available, all the way until the last award is given away at 3 p.m. My meat loaf support group companions tell me this “special recipe meatloaf is sliced thick, served on a toasted hoagie, topped with lettuce, tomato, and a very special Scallywagon sauce.” Maybe a flash mob of meat loaf fans will appear to sing highlights from Hamilton. Included with the sandwich are chips and a soda for only ten bucks. Hamilton is one of the two non-Presidents on our currency. Check out a ten dollar bill. Does Alexander Hamilton appear the least bit Ted Cruz-like in his needlepoint caricature? Maybe more Stewart Granger? I especially like the depiction of Hamilton’s hair style, his bow tie scarf, and his one-and-a-half eyebrows. Our family was not issued eyebrows either, so I always notice them, even on money. Instead of eyebrows, we Edmondsons were issued #2 pencils. Would it be considered corny to say a shopper looking for iPads, iTablets, or iPhones at an Apple store is iBrowsing? No wonder I have a corn allergy. Too much corn as a kid. Whidbey Island Car Show Should you be meat loaf-free in the vegetarian world, Scallywagon also has veggie fare, plus fresh strawberry shortcake and root beer floats. Throw in the car show, and we’re talking a family fun break for the day. Check it out at www.whidbeyislandcarshow.com. This free admission event benefits three of Whidbey’s finest: Friends of Friends Medical Support, the HUB Youth Center, and the Whidbey Veterans Resource Center. Any donations made for adjacent parking will also benefit these organizations. We locals love a good car show. Recent examples are Brian Grimm’s wonderful annual Cool Bayview Nights Car Show, and the sun drenched Jerry Lubinski Memorial Car Show, held last Saturday at Ryan’s House for Youth Campus in Coupeville.

Pat Boone’s copy of the Sunday Los Angeles Times was on his driveway, in front of the gate. Should we? We did. I stopped the car, a 1970 Volvo, engine running, told Linda to jump out of the car, and grab Pat’s paper.

Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala

Volume 11, Issue 31 | © MMXIX Whidbey Weekly

DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

WHY GO OVER THE BRIDGE FOR YOUR CUSTOM FRAMING & ART SUPPLIES?

What if Pat got my license plates and called the police to report my sister’s non-offensive touching of an inanimate object? No big deal. If Mr. Boone had called, or the police had shown up at my place, I would have explained that Linda and I were good friends of Speedy Gonzales. Harbor Lights Following our Coupeville tour, we headed to Langley, forever the Village by the Sea.

Following the sound with my Dr. Keating approved hearing aids, I saw the entrance to Ott and Hunter, possibly the finest feng shui’ed gathering space I have ever comforted.

Gene’s Has It All!

We Specialize In Custom Framing

Nervous at first, I realized my worry was senseless.

As we walked, I heard familiar voices singing melodically. The lyrics were so crisp and clear, sweet with harmonies and excellent instrumentation.

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross Kacie Jo Voeller

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published.

Placing the paper back where she found it, Linda jumped back in the Volvo as we sped away like Mr. T on an A-Team mission.

• • • • •

Honest Pricing No Fine Print Friendly Service No Traffic Delays 20% Military Discount

We walked in, sat down, and began to enjoy. Ninety minutes later, Jim Lightner, his bride Betty, Deb Lund and Karl Olsen, Martha and Vern Olsen, and pianist extraordinaire Kaj Lund Olsen stopped by our table to visit after the CD release party, the reason for the music. Talk about fun! Keegan Harshman, the backbone and creator of this weekend’s Little BIG Fest, plays acoustic bass on the Lightner’s Harbor Lights CD. Flute and violin enhancements are added by Katyrose Jordan. For more info, contact JimLightner@whidbey.com.

Hope to see you this Saturday at the fairgrounds in Langley.

As Jim and Betty sing on their first song, “It’s Good to be With You Again.”

I’ll be the guy with the mic who should be the only one around not knowing the nuances of an alternator, a generator, or a starter.

Talk to you next week, good Lord willin’ and the creek don’t rise.

However, I have decades of experience with cars and trucks that will not start.

Editor............................................................................... Kathy Reed

Like any little sister who does what she wants to do anyway, she grabbed the paper, beaming as I took her picture in front of the Boone compound-complex.

Pretending to not be a local, I wore a Seattle Seahawks sweatshirt despite the 80 degree heat.

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To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Whidbey’s Largest Selection of Fine Art Supplies

GENE’S ART & FRAME SINCE 1967

360-675-3854 • 250 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor genesartframing.com 9:30-6 Monday-Friday • 10-5:30 Saturday • Closed Sunday Custom Framing • Pens & Pencils • Papers • Canvas Brushes • Portfolios • Clay • Easels • Palettes • How-To- Books Calligraphy • Drafting • Airbrush • Artists & Craft Paint Supply Totes • Readymade Frames • Children's Art Kits

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Bits & Pieces past several years. The most important thing to remember as we move forward is that we are neighbors, and that we have much in common. Navy families, and civilians alike, we share the desire to live in a healthy and vibrant community.

Letters to the Editor Editor, As a citizen, business and property owner, as well as a new candidate for city council, I’m very disappointed in Attorney General Ferguson and Governor Inslee in targeting our military presence and operations when the state of Washington has many more pressing issues to deal with. I am appalled that most of our elected city and county officials that represent our community have not spoken up in outrage over this lawsuit and condemning not only A.G. Ferguson and Governor Inslee but COER as well. Our officials should be reassuring the people of North Whidbey that they will fight to keep this base in full operation. I believe that our community and our livelihood are coming under attack by these people. I am a strong supporter of Naval Air Station Whidbey Island and all the men and women serving here who contribute to the vitality, energy, identity and culture of this community. My father served in the Army Air Corp during World War II, my oldest son served in the Marines during Operation Desert Storm, and my youngest son currently serves in the Air Force. People come here and our citizens live here for many reasons. Anyone who has purchased property here in the last 20 years was made aware of, and required to sign a real estate waiver form stating that they are aware of the flight path, jet noise and the active military air station here. NAS Whidbey is valuable to our community on many levels. On a local level, NAS Whidbey is the number one employer on Whidbey Island, and the surrounding area. We rely on the federal payroll to keep our communities alive. On another level – and perhaps even more importantly - with ongoing threats against the United States from countries such as North Korea and Iran, our military presence is imperative to National Security. NAS Whidbey Island not only provides our country with the best trained military personnel and equipment for immediate readiness, but it stands ready to defend the State of Washington and our entire country against attack. When I become a city councilmember, I will do everything in my power - in conjunction with the City Council of Oak Harbor - to support NAS Whidbey Island in every way I can. Supporting our young men and women in the active armed forces and our veterans is the right thing to do. Jeff Mack Owner-Whidbey Jeweler Oak Harbor, Wash.

Editor, Recently, Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson filed a lawsuit against the Navy, alleging that the Environmental Impact Statement process used in determining the local impacts of the increased Growler jet activity from NAS Whidbey Island was inadequate. The lawsuit says that the methods used by the Navy in the EIS were not adequate to accurately predict the noise impacts generated by the expansion of Growler flights. We need accurate noise data in order to identify appropriate mitigation measures, as required by the EIS process, to protect our local communities. I have heard from hundreds of area residents on all sides of this topic, and unfortunately it has torn our community apart for the

NASWI is a major economic engine in our region, and is strategically positioned for international response. Its mission is vital to protecting our national security. The Navy’s social and economic contributions to our local communities – as well as the essential training of pilots and the value of NAS Whidbey facilities – are well understood, and not in question here. The AG focused his challenge on the process used in the EIS. He simply said the Navy must follow the same rules as any other entity in an EIS process, and identify the actual impacts of expanding their activities in our region. Helen Price Johnson Island County Commissioner, District 1 Clinton, Wash.

Rep. Norma Smith’s Statement on AG Ferguson’s Lawsuit Against U.S. Navy Tenth District Rep. Norma Smith, R-Clinton, has released the following statement in response to Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson’s lawsuit against the U.S. Navy over its expanded Growler jet operations on Whidbey Island: “I’m deeply disappointed in Attorney General Bob Ferguson’s misguided lawsuit and attack on our military community on Whidbey Island. His actions clearly do not reflect the strong support in our communities for Naval Air Station Whidbey Island and its vital national security mission. The vast majority of Whidbey Islanders cherish our service members, and honor their service and sacrifice. “While all Washingtonians should be respected for their perspectives on this issue and the many others that are before us as a state, I believe the attorney general’s lawsuit will have a chilling effect on constructive dialogue and solutions going forward. More troubling, however, is that it could also have very real consequences for the men and women who are trained here to protect and defend our country. “Tenth District residents – and all Washingtonians for that matter – would be better served by an attorney general focused less on ‘The Sound of Freedom’ and more on solving the many legal crises within state agencies that beg for increased oversight and accountability.” [Submitted by Nick Jacob, Public Information Officer, WA State House Republicans]

Bike Riders Get Triple Treat: Sunshine, Natural Beauty and Pie Chloe Perkins liked just about everything about participating in Sunday’s Sea, Trees & Pie Bike Ride. Surrounded by family and friends, she completed the 5-mile loop around Crockett Lake – quite a feat for the 7-year-old from Freeland. “I liked being with my friends and I liked being outdoors,” Chloe said. “And I saw three different butterflies. One was white. One was purple and black and one was orange and black.” Chloe was one of the youngest riders among the more than 90 who participated in the fourth annual event. The ride is organized by the Whidbey Camano Land Trust, a nonprofit nature conservation organization that protects natural areas and working farms and provides public access to beaches and trails. Sunshine and blue skies provided an idyllic setting for riders who embarked on routes of 5-, 10-, or 20-miles through scenic central Whidbey Island. The bike ride showcases more than 30 properties permanently protected by the Land Trust,

including Crockett Lake Preserve, the island’s largest wetland system. “We’re just glad there is a ride on the island that everybody can enjoy,” said Nancy Merickel, who rode with her husband Mike on a tandem bicycle. “It’s not too difficult. It’s just right.” The Merickels, from Oak Harbor, have participated in the ride all four years. This time they were accompanied by Daisy and Duke, two miniature dachshunds who took in the scenery from their pet trailer. “They go everywhere with us,” Nancy said. Participants enjoyed riding through some of the island’s most breathtaking landscapes, including farmlands, beaches, wetlands, and woods with incredible views of the Olympic Mountains and Puget Sound. “We’re just learning the island and we know a little bit about the land trust,” said Lynette Seebohm of Freeland. “We thought, ‘We’ll get a good ride in, burn a good 20-miler on a beautiful day and support the land trust.’” At the end of the ride, participants enjoyed a slice of pie donated by event sponsor Whidbey Pies. Other event sponsors included Skagit Cycle, Bayview Bicycles, Island Athletic Club, Mainspring Wealth Advisors, Penn Cove Taproom, and Prairie Center Red Apple Market. Most riders eat a slice of pie and mingle on the State Parks birding platform along the Keystone Spit after the ride. “We’re kind of new to biking and hadn’t ridden out here yet,” said Neva Patterson of Oak Harbor, who participated in the ride with friend Clint Perez. “Really, the selling point was that it was non-competitive, just like ‘Everyone bring your bikes out’ and we were like, ‘We can do that.’” The Whidbey Camano Land Trust is a nonprofit nature conservation organization that actively involves the community in protecting, restoring, and appreciating the important natural habitats and resource lands that support the diversity of life on our islands and in the waters of Puget Sound. For more information, visit www.wclt.org, email info@wclt.org, or call 360-222-3310. [Submitted by Ron Newberry, WCLT]

Coupeville Water Treatment Plant Results Successful The initial construction phase for the Navyfunded treatment plant to filter out per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from Coupeville’s water system was completed recently. Preliminary test results show the system is successful in filtering PFOS and PFOA to non-detect levels, the two compounds which have Lifetime Health Advisories (LHA) in accordance with EPA drinking water analytical requirements. Additionally, test results show the granulated activated carbon (GAC) filtration system is filtering all 18 PFAS compounds to non-detect levels in accordance with EPA’s most recent drinking water analytical method.

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED in our society and we will continue to develop long-term and appropriate responses for the various local issues we see here at Whidbey.” [Submitted by Michael Welding, NAS Whidbey Island]

Whidbey Community Foundation Opens Annual Grant Cycle in August Eligibility for funding in Animal Welfare, Environment, and Human Services Whidbey Community Foundation (WCF) will open its second annual grant cycle Aug. 5. Any organization that operates with a charitable status or for a charitable purpose on Whidbey Island is eligible to apply for a grant. The organization does not need to have a headquarters or physical presence on Whidbey, so long as services are provided here. Grant applications will be accepted under Animal Welfare, Environment, and Human Services categories. The online application will be open on WCF’s website between Aug. 5 – 31, and grants will be awarded before the end of the year. Visit WCF’s website www.whidbeyfoundation. org for more information. If you have questions about the grant process, contact the foundation at info@whidbeyfoundation.org or call 360-660-5041. [Submitted by Jessie Gunn, Whidbey Community Foundation]

SVC Whidbey Island Campus to Host Free Workshop: Solving the Mystery of Paying for College Whether your plan for college is to complete a degree, earn a certificate, or enhance your career and your earning potential, a college education is a big investment of your time, effort, and money. And right now, you may be concerned about the hardest part of that equation – money. Skagit Valley College can and wants to help you. Skagit Valley College Whidbey Island Campus will host a free workshop, Solving the Mystery of Paying for College, Tuesday, Aug. 6 from 4:00 to 7:00pm in Oak Hall, 1900 SE Pioneer Way, Oak Harbor. Presenters from SVC’s Financial Aid Office and Veterans Education Benefits Office will offer guidance about the variety of avenues available for funding your education. Special for our military neighbors, Roseann Cook, Navy College Program Pacific Northwest Region Advisor, will be in attendance to support Navy personnel with information about TA and MYCAA. Come find out the answers to the big question – how do I pay for college? You can’t get financial aid if you don’t apply for it! Skagit Valley College can show you how. [Submitted by Arden Ainley, Chief Public Information Officer, SVC]

Goosefoot Announces Results of Third Annual Community Grant Cycle and Funding To Date Goosefoot is pleased to have distributed a total of $247,000 to date this year to 26 local nonprofit organizations working on behalf of the South Whidbey community. Goosefoot works together with the South Whidbey community to create essential solutions. They address community needs, fund local nonprofits, help local businesses grow, preserve great places, and connect neighbors.

Even though the new plant is still under construction, the GAC filtration system will remain operational and continue to provide clean water to residents on Coupeville’s water system. The Navy expects the fully constructed water treatment plant to be finished in September 2019.

Last month, a total of $101,000 was distributed through Goosefoot’s annual Community Grant Program. Grant proposals were accepted and considered for projects focusing on economic development; building community or combatting community deterioration; addressing basic needs of people; or environmental or historic preservation.

Additionally, negotiations for the construction of the new water main/service lines to connect residents with drinking water wells above the EPA’s lifetime health advisory are ongoing. Officials anticipate construction to begin next month, and to have all these residents on the town’s system by the end of November 2019.

“We had 36 very worthy organizations apply for funding,” according to Sandy Whiting, Goosefoot’s executive director. “It wasn’t an easy task for our board members to choose among the valuable projects presented. We just wish we could fund everyone that applied.”

“This really is an extraordinary accomplishment for the project team to have designed and constructed this system in this amount of time,” said Capt. Matt Arny, NAS Whidbey Island’s commanding officer. “We still have more important work ahead to complete this project. However, this team remains at the leading edge of responding to the PFAS issues

Goosefoot awarded $101,000 to the following 21 organizations through its Community Grant Program: Citizens Against Domestic & Sexual Abuse (CADA) for funding staff and restorative therapy for youth and adults. BITS & PIECES

continued on page

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Bayview Corner Street dances 8/7 Nick Mardon Trio 8/21 PETE Free & Family FRIENDLY! Wednesdays from 6–8pm Bayview Cash Store 5603 Bayview Road, Langley Rain or shine. Dances move inside Bayview Hall if necessary. Free admission. Charge for food & beverages. Food tent by Farmer & the Vine.

Join us in celEbrating 1999-2019 twenty years

www.goosefoot.org • 360-321-4145 • info@goosefoot.org

Contractors & Do-it-yourselfers Save Time & MONEY!

Donations Are Tax Deductible

FREE pick up island wide, call for appointment. WANTED: CABINETS • WINDOWS • DOORS • PAINT • LUMBER FLOORING • ELECTRICAL • PLUMBING • HARDWARE TOOLS • APPLIANCES • LIGHTING • GARDENING ITEMS FREELAND • 1592 Main Street • 360.331.6272 southstore@islandcountyhabitat.com

of Island County

DONATIONS ACCEPTED 7 DAYS A WEEK! Volunteer Opportunities Available

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What’s Going On

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Galleries & Art Shows Featured Artist: Chris Cozine

All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Good Cheer Summer Happy Hour Thursday, August 1, 2:00-6:00pm Cozy’s Roadhouse - Clinton

be open. Discover Pass is required. For more information, contact Sharon Young-Hale at 360-678-1186.

Explore Summer: Make & Take Aliens Wednesday, August 7, 2:00pm Coupeville Library

Street Dance: The Nick Mardon Trio

Get ready for stories of extraterrestrials and then create your own alien to take home. For children ages 6 and up and their caregivers.

Wednesday, August 7, 6:00-8:00pm Bayview Cash Store, 5603 Bayview Rd, Langley

Good Cheer is kicking off a series of Thursday night Happy Hours. Hosted by some fabulous community partners, they’re hoping to reach a goal of $5,000 which will be matched by Whidbey Island Bank. Cozy’s is generously donating a portion of the proceeds to Good Cheer, so come for the cause, stay for the happy hour fish tacos and margaritas.

This talented trio from off-island blends the sound of electric blues with pop, jazz, funk, and rock and more styles. Nick Mardon fronts the band with melodic vocals and a distinguished guitar sound. The rhythm section features Greg Olson on the electric bass and Andy Emery on drums and percussion. Rain or shine! Dances move inside Bayview Hall if necessary. Free admission and family friendly. Food and beverages are available for purchase.

Guided Beach Walks

Whidbey Island Rendezvous

Friday, August 2, 11:00am-12:00pm Fort Casey State Park, Coupeville Come on a short walk to learn the basics about our ever-changing beaches at Fort Casey. Wear your walking shoes and a jacket. This will be an easy one hour, one mile walk with some uneven paths, stepping over driftwood, and a steep incline at the end. Discover Pass is required. For more information, email education@ soundwaterstewards.org.

3rd Annual Family Outdoor Discovery Day Saturday, August 3, 11:00am-3:00pm Fort Casey State Park, Coupeville Join Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission as local organizations host family friendly outdoor activities appreciating the Salish Sea and our community. Collect stamps at each station to earn a prize. Station topics will include orcas, watersheds, Garry Oaks, kites, mammals and more. Discover Pass is required. For more information, contact Jackie French at 360-544-2457 or Kelly Zupich at 360-720-4173.

American Roots Music Series Saturday, August 3, 7:00-8:00pm Deception Pass State Park, West Beach Amphitheater Randal Bays is well known in the worldwide Irish music community as a fiddler and guitarist. He has performed with many of the great Irish musicians of our time, touring North America and Europe. Joining Bays are wife Susan Waters on fiddle and vocals and sons Willie and Owen Bays on Irish flute and concertina. The concert is free to attend, though a Discover Pass or Day Pass is required for parking. Bench seating is available, but feel free to bring your own folding chair. Blankets and bug spray are highly recommended. Please contact DeceptionPass.Interpreter@parks. wa.gov or 360-675-3767 with any questions.

Live Music: Jess Saturday, August 3, 7:30-9:30pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Back by popular demand, singer songwriter Jessica “Jess” Drugge and her wife Marci Hastings, moved to Coupeville from West Seattle in December 2017. Jess’ performances are a mixture of originals and covers. Recently described as Coffeeshop Rock-Acoustic, Jess has carefully handcrafted her originals. No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com.

National Lighthouse Day Wednesday, August 7, 11:00-5:00pm Fort Casey State Park, Coupeville It was on this day Congress approved an act for the establishment and support of lighthouses. Celebrate National Lighthouse Day at our extraordinary and vintage Admiralty Head Lighthouse – one of the most photographed views on Whidbey Island. There will be activities, a children’s craft, tour the lighthouse tower and our gift shop will

Friday, August 9, 8:00am-9:00pm Saturday, August 10, 9:00am-9:00pm Sunday, August 11, 9:00am-5:00pm 4778 Monkey Hill Rd., Oak Harbor Experience American history at the Whidbey Island Rendezvous, which focuses on the fur trade era. Event includes traders, campers, muzzleloader shooting competitions, tomahawk and knife throwing, cooking competitions and more. Visit the on-site museum to learn more about this time in our nation’s history. No charge to attend but there are fees to enter the shooting competition or to camp. Call Greg at 360-679-4657.

All You Can Eat Breakfast Saturday, August 10, 8:00am-12:00pm Sunday, August 11, 8:00am-12:00pm Whidbey Masonic Lodge 15, 804 N. Main, Coupeville Breakfast includes eggs, bacon, sausage, pancakes, orange juice and tea or coffee. $8/Adults, $4/Children 4-12, under 4 free.

American Roots Music Series Saturday, August 10, 7:00-8:00pm Deception Pass State Park, West Beach Amphitheater WHOZYAMAMA is led by Claudette Boudreaux from Dulac, Louisiana. Members Claudette, Tami Allen and Claudia Anastasio played in the all-women Cajun dance band “Les Femmes d’Enfer” for over a decade. They joined Doug Warren, Todd Fischer and Rick Rice, members of Bayou Boogie, Cayenne and Delta Reys to form WHOZYAMAMA. The concert is free to attend, though a Discover Pass or Day Pass is required for parking. Bench seating is available, but feel free to bring your own folding chair. Blankets and bug spray are highly recommended. Please contact DeceptionPass. Interpreter@parks.wa.gov or 360-675-3767 with any questions.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free

Lit for Fun Book Group Thursday, August 8, 9:00-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Mark Sullivan’s “Beneath a Scarlet Sky,” the triumphant, epic tale of one young man’s incredible courage and resilience during one of history’s darkest hours. For adults. Summer Sensory Play Thursday, August 8, 9:30am Coupeville Library Celebrate summer with fun, interactive sensory stations. Wear clothing that can get messy. For toddlers, preschoolers and caregivers.

Religious Services Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at 360-222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com.

Concordia Lutheran Church Sunday service, 9:30am Bible Study & Sunday School, 10:45am 590 N. Oak Harbor Street For more information, visit www.concordiaoak harbor.org or call 360-675-2548.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00 & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit their website: unityofwhidbey.org.

Explore Summer: Rocks in Space Thursday, August 1, 10:00am & 1:00pm Freeland Library

Whidbey Quakers

Comet? Meteor? Asteroid? Why are there so many names for bits of rock in space? Join us and have fun exploring a universe of rocks. For ages 5-11 with a caretaker.

Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

Get to Know Your Chakras Thursday, August 1, 4:00-6:00pm Freeland Library Join Elizabeth Saenz, Reiki master/teacher, for a journey through the chakras. A fun, relaxing evening is planned for all who attend. For more information, visit wihha.com. Learn how your emotions affect these energy centers of the body. Elizabeth will explain what emotions, physical body parts, and symptoms are connected to each of them. You will practice a simple meditation technique to bring yourself into energetic balance and center.

Sundays, 4:00-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland

First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 2:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call 360-675-0621 or visit christianscience.com.

Artist Demonstrations: Friday, August 2, 11:00am-12:00pm and 4:00pm-5:30pm Saturday, August 17, 11:00am-12:00pm and 4:00pm-5:30pm Garry Oak Gallery, Oak Harbor Chris loved creating art as soon as she was able to use a crayon. It was her passion in school and in her pastime. She loves all kinds of art mediums, but eventually gravitated toward painting due to her love of nature. She later went to college, majoring in art which she eventually made her career. Chris’ art is characterized by vibrant colors and painterly texture.

Coupeville Arts and Crafts Juried Art Gallery Accepting submissions August 3-5, 11:00am-5:00pm Coupeville Recreation Hall, 901 NW Alexander St. Download prospectus at http://coupevillefestival.com/juried-art/

Kathleen Frugé Brown - Recent Paintings Artist’s Reception: Saturday, August 3, 5:00-7:00pm Show runs through September 3 Rob Schouten Gallery, Langley One of the most remarkable plein air painters in the Northwest is Kathleen Frugé Brown. Choosing her subject matter carefully, she stays away from the tried and expected and focuses instead on the surprising and unexpected. Finding beauty in the chaos of everyday woods and brambles, Kathleen makes every brushstroke an exuberant and reverent response to nature. Please join us for our opening reception in conjunction with Langley’s First Saturday Art Walk. Kathleen Frugé Brown and many of our gallery artists will be in attendance, and light refreshments will be served.

Meetings & Organizations Flying Fingers Deaf and Hearing Social Friday, August 2, 5:45-6:45pm Langley United Methodist Church, Fireside Room We celebrate birthdays, holidays and share food. Small group of individuals who enjoy seeing sign language used in conversations. Fun, easy going time. Donation for room usage. Come and meet us. Parking across street, off Third St. and Anthes Ave. Room is back side of church, follow the path and signs. For more information, contact Susan at 360-221-0383 or email sisoleil973@yahoo. com. For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Classes, Seminars and Workshops DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel Thursday, August 1, 7:00-9:00pm Oak Harbor Library meeting room No pre-registration required. Seating at 6:45pm. No late admittance allowed. Open to all and required by local driving schools for driver’s eduction students and parents. For more information, call 360-672-8219 or visit www.idipic.org

DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel Saturday, August 3, 1:00-3:00pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland No pre-registration required. Seating at 12:45pm. No late admittance allowed. Open to all and required by local driving schools for driver’s eduction students and parents. For more information, call 360-672-8219 or visit www.idipic.org.

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Whidbey Weekly

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PBY celebrates WWII veterans p. 10

AUGUST 1 - AUGUST 7, 2019

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Ready, set, paint! The Plein Air Paint Out is back The Paint Out is a familiar event to some, but it’s been seven years since it was last held on Whidbey.

“We did the Plein Air Paint Out from 2007 to 2012, but we’re a staff of two, so to pull it off became very difficult,” said Lisa Bernhardt, executive director of Pacific NorthWest Art School. “This year we’re hitting the reset button and bringing it back. We’ve partnered with the Coupeville Chamber and pooled our resources.” Participating artists can choose to paint anywhere on Whidbey, although Bernhardt said they are asking for several artists to make themselves visible in downtown Coupeville and at Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve. It’s a challenge she is hoping a lot of artists will want to take on. Photo Courtesy of Pacific Northwest Art School The Pacific NorthWest Art School and Coupeville Chamber of Commerce have joined forces to bring back the Whidbey Plein Air Paint Out in August.

By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly The Pacific NorthWest Art School and Coupeville Chamber of Commerce have teamed up to bring the Plein Air Paint Out back to Whidbey Island. The Paint Out, which features artists painting in the open air at locations all around the island and throughout Coupeville, will be held from Aug. 21 to 25. Artists can still register to participate in the competitive event and art lovers can take advantage of not only watching artists at work, but can actually purchase a piece of art they’ve watched be created. What’s more, all proceeds from the event benefit PNWAS and the Chamber. Here’s how it works: Artists from all over Western Washington and Canada will spend three days painting. People can watch the artists at work. Their creations will be stamped and verified at the art school each day. On Friday, Aug. 23, there will be a gala celebration for those 21 and over, where guests will have a chance to mingle with the artists and purchase the paintings. On Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 24 and 25, there will be a weekend exhibit and sale from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day, in conjunction with the Open Studio Art Tour.

“They can paint from sunrise to sunset and have their panel stamped,” she explained. “That way you can verify the work was produced during that time frame, so artists are running against the clock and against themselves.” Bernhardt said they plan on having over 60 participating artists. Several award-winning plein air artists are already registered, including Teresa Saia, Al Currier and Barbara Noonan. Pre-registration is available, but artists can also register the day of the event. The big push, Bernhardt said, is for the Friday night gala from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Coupeville Rec Hall, which is open to the public. Tickets are $25 per person. It’s a great way to see the work of established artists as well as emerging artists. It’s also an opportunity to see the skill involved in plein air painting. “A lot of painters in the studio work from a reference photo,” said Bernhardt. “They’re not painting standing on uneven terrain, dealing with wind or rain. They are truly in the moment, trying to capture the moment. It’s spontaneous. The light will change, the clouds will move and change. That takes some skill.” Oak Harbor artist Timothy Haslet is one of those who will be taking part in the Paint Out. He said he finds both plein air and studio painting useful.

“I use my studio for large paintings and evening work, and do small paintings on site,” he said. “Working in the landscape that one is painting is so very valuable, especially for color attribution. Photography just doesn’t seem to wholly capture it. I also enjoy the authenticity of sand or other elements that can fasten themselves to the paint! The bearer of the original work then has a small souvenir of the very scene painted.” Haslet said he also enjoys the whole process of painting outdoors. “I must paint quickly, to capture the moment of a scene, as weather and lighting can change so rapidly,” he said. “This is a good aide to my technique, as I don’t have time to be overly critical.” As for having people looking over his shoulder as he paints, he said it can make him nervous, but in a good way, because it pushes him to work even harder. “My work is only complete when others experience it,” said Haslet. “It drives me to do my best, and I have found that some of my best work happens when others are present. I am also a teacher at heart, and it’s easy to talk about and demonstrate things that I am passionate about.” Haslet said his favorite spots to paint include West Beach and Ebey’s Landing, although he’s not opposed to finding inspiration elsewhere. “I could spend a lifetime just painting in those places, but I also deeply enjoy the discovery of new beaches and views on the island from which to paint,” he said. “Sharing paintings from new places is my way of sharing these journeys.” For more information on the Plein Air Paint Out or to register or purchase tickets, visit pacificnorthwestartschool.org or coupevillechamber.com. The Whidbey Plein Air Paint Out is just one more event to illustrate the island’s unique place in the art world. “It’s like every type of artist is drawn here, so Whidbey speaks to artists in general,” Bernhardt said. “It provides a natural environment that’s close enough to Seattle for artists and it reaches collectors and patrons from on and off island.”

History comes alive at Rendezvous By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

If you pay close attention next Friday morning, Aug. 9, at about 8 a.m., there is a pretty good chance you might think your eyes are deceiving you, but they won’t be. A small band of “mountain men,” dressed in period clothes and carrying muzzleloader rifles will be making their way from Bowman Bay across Deception Pass Bridge to the annual Whidbey Island Rendezvous in Oak Harbor. It’s the first time this particular trek will take place and it helps kick off the weekend. Everyone is welcome to channel their “inner mountain man” and come learn all about it at the Rendezvous, which will be held at Greene’s Gun Shop at 4778 Monkey Hill Road Aug. 9 – 11. The event will include traders, campers, shooting competitions, tomahawk and knife throwing events, cooking competitions and more. It’s all part of an effort to help bring this era of American history to life. “In the 1820s the fur trade really opened up,” explained Greg Roberts, who owns Greene’s Gun Shop with his wife, Claudette Greene. “Merchants in St. Louis discovered if they took their goods to the mountains and had a rendezvous – a meeting - with these mountain men, they could exchange their goods for pelts. It ended up being a big celebration, so that’s what this event is based on.” According to Roberts there will be traders

at the Whidbey Island Rendezvous selling period goods as well as folks camping out in tents and teepees, all dressed in period garb. Everyone is welcome to take a stroll through history and try a hand at shooting a muzzleloader rifle or tossing a tomahawk or knife. The rendezvous focuses on the pre-1840 time period. “You’ll find people there who are interested in the history of the fur trade era who strive for authenticity,” he said. “They enjoy it because it’s history and it’s an escape, too, a chance to get away from it all for the weekend.”

While Greene’s Gun Shop hosts the Rendezvous, it is sponsored by The Hawken Shop, also owned by Roberts and Greene, which manufactures authentic Hawken rifles. The guns were originally made by brothers Jake and Samuel Hawken in the early 1800s through the 1850s in St. Louis, Mo. The Hawken rifle was top-of-the-line for its time, and while many may have duplicated the Hawken rifle’s style, the Hawken Shop in Oak Harbor is the only producer of the authentic Hawken rifle. “We bought the Hawken Shop in 1990 and this really became a fascination for me because of the history,” Roberts said. “There’s a lot of satisfaction in doing this and we’ve worked hard to continue the legacy. “People may think this gun is primitive by today’s standards, but this was state-of-theart in 1850,” he continued. “These guns fought our wars and fed our families.”

Because the muzzleloader was the cutting edge weapon during the fur trade era, the Rendezvous was a good fit for Roberts’ businesses. Stepping into the gun shop today is a little like stepping back in time, with an antique cash register on one counter and a laptop on another. Pieces of nostalgia are everywhere, the love and respect of history evident.

panies coming to Whidbey Island to see what was here,” said Roberts. “While there was a good Native American population here, there was not much in the way of furs or pelts so nothing ever developed here.”

“There is even a little history of the fur com-

See RENDEZVOUS continued on page 10

These gatherings, or rendezvous, offer people of all ages an opportunity to connect

DONATIONS NEEDED We could use your help with these items: NORTH pop-top cans WHIDBEY (Vienna sausages, spam, etc) HELP HOUSE peanut butter/cheese crackers, tuna pouches, small boxes of raisins 1091 SE Hathaway St • Oak Harbor • 360-675-3888

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AUGUST 1 - AUGUST 7, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

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HEALTH

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WH I

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Clinton Community Hall to support efforts to be a better functioning community hall with equipment purchases. Coupeville Farm to School Program to help move its program into the middle school. Friends of Friends Medical Support Fund for support of its dental care fund. Healthy Island Youth Initiative to fund scholarships for participation in sports and other physical activities. Hearts & Hammers to replace or repair the roofs of at least four homes on South Whidbey. Helping Hand for assistance with rent, utility bills, and other basic needs. The Hub Youth Central for its Summer Food and Fun program. Island Senior Resources for support of its Aging and Disability Program. Leadership Whidbey to develop a training program for local community leaders. Master Gardener Program for classes related to food productivity. Mother Mentors to assist with general operating support due to large state budget cut. Orca Network in support of the Whale Museum in Langley. Organic Farm School for strategic planning and developing new markets off-Island. Readiness to Learn for support to meet increasing demand for services. South Whidbey Commons to renovate its kitchen to increase training capacity. South Whidbey Historical Society to assist with its cataloguing of South Whidbey history. South Whidbey Tilth to build a seasonally year-round community farm stand. Whidbey Homeless Coalition to further develop its mentor program. Whidbey Island Center for the Arts for its efforts to get state certification for Langley as a Certified Creative District (CCD). Whidbey Veteran’s Resource Center to increase staff hours. In addition to its Community Grant Program, Goosefoot donated $146,000 to five other nonprofit organizations earlier this year. The South Whidbey School Farm received the last payment of a multi-year grant given before Goosefoot’s charitable giving program was formalized in early 2017. South Whidbey at Home, Whidbey Camano Land Trust, Whidbey Island Nourishes, and Whidbey Watershed Stewards all receive annual funding in their capacity as supported organizations of Goosefoot. As such, each group appoints two members to the Goosefoot board of directors to contribute valuable experience about how to best direct the organization’s philanthropy to fulfill its mission on South Whidbey. Currently, Goosefoot has a $25,000 community matching grant in play for Bayview Community Hall’s “Paint the Hall” campaign. The 90-year old Bayview Corner icon and treasured community resource is in serious need of exterior lead abatement, structural repairs, and painting. Goosefoot will match up to $15,000 in cash donations and up to $10,000 in donated supplies and labor. Goosefoot’s grant program is made possible with the profits generated by the grocery store it owns – the Goose Community Grocer. Whiting explains, “As the nonprofit owner of the store, our profits go towards supporting our mission of serving South Whidbey. Shoppers at the Goose should feel proud that their food dollars are going to help support all of the organizations listed above!” [Submitted by Marian A. Myszkowski, Goosefoot]

Local Business News “Pigs in Paradise” Campaign Emphasizes the Importance of Saving and Giving Back Cash-filled piggy banks and pay it forward stories can lead to a lucky winner’s personal paradise

MMCWS.com

7656 State Route 20, Unit B • Anacortes • 360-422-3623

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Peoples Bank announced its newest campaign, “Pigs in Paradise,” to underscore the importance of both saving and giving back to the community. Thursday, Aug. 1, 200 piggy banks will be hidden within one mile of each of Peoples Bank’s 23 branches located in Chelan/ Douglas, Island, King, Skagit, Snohomish

and Whatcom counties. Each contains $30 in cash; $15 for the finder to keep and $15 to be paid forward. Anyone who shares a story of how they paid forward an act of kindness – whether they find a piggy bank or not – will be entered in a drawing to win $2,500 for their own personal paradise, such as a kitchen remodel or a trip of a lifetime. Stories must be shared on the Peoples Bank Facebook or Instagram accounts (@peoplesbankwa) or in-person at any Peoples Bank branch. Further, anyone who enters the drawing at a branch office and completes an entry form will be entered to win a separate bonus prize of $400, half of which is earmarked for donation to a nonprofit of the winner’s choice. Winners will be announced Sept. 3. According to a recent CNBC poll, Americans’ top personal finance concern is being able to save enough for retirement. Backing this up, data from Northwestern Mutual’s 2019 Planning and Progress Study reveals nearly a third (30 percent) of U.S. adults aged 18 and over are within three paychecks of needing to either borrow money or skip paying one or more bills. The study also shows more than a fifth (22 percent) of Americans have less than $5,000 saved for retirement, and nearly half of working adults (46 percent) expect to work past the traditional retirement age of 65. “These piggy banks serve as a reminder of the importance of saving and planning for your financial future,” said Andy Pohlman, Chief Retail Banking Officer at Peoples Bank. “The ‘Pigs in Paradise’ campaign is a fun way for us to help people think about their financial goals, while also creating opportunities to give back to the communities where we live and work.” More information about “Pigs in Paradise” and full contest rules can be found at www. peoplesbank-wa.com/pigs. About Peoples Bank Peoples Bank is a locally owned and operated, independent full-service community bank with $1.8 billion in assets. Headquartered in Bellingham, Wash., the Bank was founded in 1921 and operates 23 branches located throughout Washington. In its most recent rating, BauerFinancial, a leading independent bank rating firm, awarded Peoples Bank its highest fivestar superior rating. This rating recognizes Peoples Bank’s strong financial management practices, dedicated employees and long-standing customer relationships. Learn more about Peoples Bank at www.peoples bank-wa.com/.

Planet Fitness Opens “Judgement Free” Gym in Oak Harbor Join for $10 a month with no commitment Planet Fitness has arrived in Oak Harbor. Its 20th club in the Seattle DMA is now open and staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week in Harbor Towne Center, 32165 State Route 20, Oak Harbor. Memberships are now being accepted for $10 a month with no commitment. Sign up online at www.planetfitness.com/gyms/oak-harborwa or in person. Also, as part of the Teen Summer Challenge initiative (www.planetfitness.com/TeenSummer Challenge), teens ages 15 to 18 are invited to work out for free through Sept. 1. In-person registration is required: teens under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or guardian at sign-up. As one of the nation’s largest and fastest-growing franchisors and operators of fitness centers, and home of the Judgement Free Zone®, Planet Fitness prides itself on providing a high-quality experience at an exceptional value and a hassle-free, non-intimidating environment. “Whether or not you’ve belonged to a gym, we invite you to check out the club, meet our friendly staff, get a tour and see what the Judgement Free Zone is all about,” said Victor Brick, Planet Fitness franchisee. “We’re confident that our encouraging and hassle-free environment will be a welcome addition to the community.” BITS & PIECES

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PBY hosts rare gathering of WWII veterans By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly It is a rare occurrence these days – the gathering of five World War II veterans, members of the “Greatest Generation,” as they are often called. The PBY Memorial Foundation brought this distinguished group of men together last week at the organization’s monthly luncheon to hear guest speaker Jack Holder, 97, share the story of his action-packed years as a Naval flight engineer in service to his country in the U.S. Navy. Holder is one of few remaining Pearl Harbor survivors. He also fought in the Battles of Midway and Guadalcanal. Other veterans in attendance included Win Stites, 93; Neil Stamey, 96; Harry Patton, 97; and George Behrend, 99. Holder, who chronicled his story in his book “Adrenaline Excitement and Fear, A WWII Naval Aviation Story,” shared how he grew up in a four-room house on a farm in rural Texas, with no telephone and not a lot of prospects, as he saw it. “I saw an opportunity in the Navy and I enlisted April 24, 1940,” he said. After basic training, his first duty station was Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. “It was a beautiful place – before Dec. 7, 1941,” Holder said. “For a Texas boy, it was exciting to be surrounded by all this beauty – beautiful scenery, beautiful beaches, beautiful girls.” Excitement changed to horror at the surprise attack by the Japanese. Holder described hearing the scream of the aircraft overhead. “The VP-21 hangar beside us (VP-23) was hit by the first bomb,” he said, recalling how he and the other sailors with him took refuge in a ditch for a sewer line under construction behind the building. “We could see all the aircraft circling above us with the rising sun on them,” Holder recounted. “One of the pilots saw us and opened fire, missing us by maybe 300 feet. I don’t remember how long we stayed in the ditch.”

RENDEZVOUS continued from page 7 not only with our nation’s history, but with each other. “It’s fun to be around a group of people who are happy to be together,” Roberts said. “I think the biggest thing about the Rendezvous is that it’s active, it’s fun. It’s not electronic. There’s camaraderie in the sharing of knowledge and skills and stories.” There is no charge to attend the Rendezvous or even to try shooting one of the muzzleloaders. Those interested can camp for the weekend and enter the shooting contest for $35 per person, or just participate in the shooting contest for $10 per person. There is no firm schedule; events get underway around 9 a.m. and are ongoing throughout the day into early evening. There will also be a small museum on site so people can learn more about the history of the fur trade era. More information is available by emailing Roberts at greg@thehawkenshop.com or by calling 360-679-4657. “We are losing our history so fast,” said Roberts. “If we can get people interested, that’s great.”

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Greg Roberts, co-owner of Greene’s Gun Shop and The Hawken Shop in Oak Harbor, holds an antique Hawken muzzleloader rifle, the only type available during the fur trade era in the first half of the 19th century. The weapons will be featured in shooting competitions to be held Aug. 9-11 during the Whidbey Island Rendezvous, along with many other period-specific activities.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Five World War II veterans gather for a rare get-together last week during the PBY Memorial Foundation’s monthly lunch in Oak Harbor. From left are Win Stites, Neil Stamey, Harry Patton, George Behrend and Jack Holder, the guest speaker for the event.

When they emerged, they could see the extent of the damage. “The [USS] Arizona, the West Virginia, the Tennessee, the California, the Pennsylvania, the Utah, the Nevada, the Oklahoma were all listing or sinking,” he said. “Seamen were jumping from the ships, swimming through water covered in burning oil; a lot of them died in the water, some died on shore. It was devastation like I had never seen before.” Six months later, Holder was part of the Battle of Midway in early June, 1942, and watched a Japanese ship sink from his circling aircraft, calling it “a good day,” even though they didn’t have enough fuel to make it back and landed in the water.

In April 1948, Holder received an honorable discharge from the Navy. He earned a total of 29 medals during his years of service. He went on to serve as a civilian flight engineer for Braniff International Airways for a number of years among other related professions, retiring completely in 1991. “Since then, I played a lot of golf,” he told the audience. “Jack’s story punctuates the value of hearing from an eyewitness to history, someone who was present in person,” said Wil Schellenberger, president of the PBYMF, which runs the PBY Naval History Museum in downtown Oak Harbor.

Holder went on to fight again in the Battle of Guadalcanal. Then, in early 1943, he got orders to train in the B-24.

“It’s amazing to hear the stories of sacrifice each of these men made during their military experience,” said Cmdr. James Rankin, Executive Officer of Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, who was present at last week’s luncheon. “You hear about the raids they embarked on and the small number of aircraft that actually returned from these missions, you can’t help compare that to the air dominance we have today.”

“Most people don’t realize the Navy had five squadrons of B-24s,” he said.

Those interested can find copies of Holder’s book online at Amazon.com.

“We set down at sea and I climbed onto the wing, tied myself to an antenna and spent the night,” he said. “We found out the next morning we were successful.”

Proud to be Pagan: Island welcomes first Pagan Pride Festival By Kacie Jo Voeller Whidbey Weekly Whether it is watching live Viking reenactments, perusing handmade fairy coats or learning more about aspects of paganism, experience a bit of magic as a medley of workshops and vendors set up shop in Coupeville’s Town Park from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 10 for Whidbey’s first Pagan Pride Festival. The event is hosted by Whidbey Witches, Heathens, Druids and Pagans, a social group for pagan and pagan-friendly people living in the Whidbey area. The group’s mission is to provide a welcoming environment for people from a variety of spiritual and cultural backgrounds. Tabitha Pierzchala, one of the group’s founders who is helping to organize the event, said Pagan Pride happens all over the nation, and she and co-founder Aaron Taggert wanted to bring the celebration to the island. The festival is an opportunity for those with beliefs ranging from polytheism to those based on ancient Celtic practices and more to come together, she said, and also serves as a place for those who are curious about paganism to learn more. “For me, it is an opportunity to meet other people who may consider themselves some variation of Pagan, Wiccan, Witch, Druid, Heathen, etc. and to meet other folks who prefer to do their practice however they are doing their normal practice,” she said. “They are not normally coming to the places where I am. It is just an outreach so that different folks on the island can realize that we are neighbors, so we can meet the other folks who are a little bit like us.” Pierzchala, who is a Wiccan priestess and a practicing Druid, said the event will include a number of workshops, with topics ranging from pentacle hair braiding, local medicinal plant identification, alternative burials, and

other topics concerning witches, heathens, druids, pagans and exploration of these areas. “For me, one of the highlights is having workshops,” she said. “We are organizing some short workshops throughout the day and I think that is going to be a lot of fun. A lot of people within our group have volunteered to lead things. Someone is going to teach the Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram, which is an important part of ceremonial magic, and it is just basically used to clean a space from a psychic or magical perspective.” Pierzchala, a military retiree who was a distinguished faith group leader while serving as an individual augmentee in Iraq, said the festival aims to increase awareness of the group locally and beyond. “It is something that I would like to do every year, so I am hoping that we get enough participation and engagement that it makes sense to do it again next year,” Pierzchala shared. “I would also like for folks in the larger Pacific Northwest Pagan community to notice that there is an active group on Whidbey Island.” Pierzchala also emphasized the group’s inclusiveness and willingness to answer questions from those who are interested. “We are an eclectic group and we are very willing to provide information to teach people who maybe do not know a lot about Paganism and have some pretty experienced people,” she said.

Photo Courtesy of Aaron Taggert Whidbey Witches, Heathens, Druids and Pagans typically meets for Sabbats, or sacred days, like May Day and also hosts weekly meetups. The group’s first Whidbey Island Pagan Pride Festival Saturday, Aug. 10 will serve as a place to explore pagan traditions and meet others with similar interests.

Pride, so we kind of learned how things worked over there, so finally this year we were able to put on our own.” In addition to workshops, there will be a number of vendors, including Sam Mobley of House of Mob, who will be selling handmade fairy coats, Taggert shared. Other vendors will include GooBee’s Honey Emporium, Sacred Grove Reiki, representatives from Scentsy and Color Street and more, Taggert said. He said the group hopes to draw enough participation this year to allow the festival to take place next year and beyond. “Pagan festivals are generally a lot of fun in and of themselves because you can meet people with similar interests, but basically it is bringing the people together so that way we can continue on in the future,” he said. Taggert hopes this festival will serve as the foundation for potential future events where newcomers to the island can find a group which aligns with their beliefs, he said.

Taggert, a founding member of Whidbey Witches, Heathens, Druids and Pagans, said the group is looking forward to having a local celebration.

“Especially with the military, people are always moving in and out,” he said. “This way the new people, at least once a year, will have a place to connect with their specific group, because paganism is diverse.”

“Tabitha and I had wanted to do a Pagan Pride Festival on the island for a while,” he said. “And then last year we went and volunteered in leadership for the Seattle Pagan

For more information, please visit the group’s Facebook page: www.facebook.com/whidbeywitches or visit www.meetup.com/WHiDPIsland/.

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Film Shorts

Crawl: First this movie hits you with a hurricane. Then it traps you in a slowly flooding attic. Then it attacks you with giant alligators. If someone in this movie doesn’t make one of the alligators swallow an alarm clock, that will be an opportunity missed. Five stars for giant alligators. ★★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 27 min.) Fast and Furious Presents: Hobbs and Shaw: It stars Dwayne Johnson, Jason Statham, Idris Elba, and an actual dame, Helen Mirren, so I could care less about its nonexistent plot, thinly drawn characters and reality-defying stunts. Give it all of the Oscars. Every last one. ★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 15 min.) The Lion King: I didn’t like this movie the first time around, so do your worst, Disney. Everything the light touches is your kingdom, after all. ★★★ (R • 1 hr. 48 min.) Once Upon a Time in Hollywood: Quentin Tarantino’s movies can be hit or miss, but when he fires on all cylinders, no one can craft a free-wheeling, dynamic film that crackles with energy quite like Hollywood’s resident enfant terrible. This time he turns his lens to Tinseltown of the late 1960s and does some of his best work yet with the likes of Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio, Margot Robbie, and Al Pacino firmly in tow. ★★★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 39 min.)

love to watch the same things over and over again. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 26 min.) Spider-Man: Far From Home: Spider-Man goes abroad to save the world and get the girl in this first post-Avengers movie in our new post-original-Avengers reality. If Tom Holland is the future of the franchise, I’m here for every web-slinging minute of it. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 9 min.) Stuber: This is the Lyft of Uber movies. Hollywood has seen a million sharks and it has jumped them all. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 45 min.) Toy Story 4: I don’t know how the fourth installment of a franchise can maintain this level of excellence, but such is the genius of Pixar. Credit should also go to Tom Hanks as the ever-reliable Woody, but this time the show belongs to Forky, aka Tony Hale. One or both of them will no doubt make you cry. It’s Pixar, after all. ★★★★★ (G • 1 hr. 30 min.

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The Secret Life of Pets 2: This sequel is pretty much a retooling of the first installment of this animated series, but since it’s a movie made for kids, who really cares? They

On a scale from 1 to 10...5.2

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Annabelle Comes Home: Wake me up when Chucky and Anna face off in the ultimate demonic doll duel to the death, preferably for both of them. Until then, I’m not interested. ★★ (R • 1 hr. 40 min.)

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Aladdin: I’m just going to go ahead and say there’s not a single animated Disney movie I would like to see remade into a live-action film. Nor do I find the idea of a giant blue Will Smith appealing, but your mileage may vary there. ★★ (PG • 2 hrs. 8 min.)

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Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

WHEN COOKING GOES AWRY! Today, I want to change things up a little at the urging of a reader who wrote in recently. She suggested I talk a bit about when cooking goes awry. I’ll just say this; there’s been a fair few times where trial and error resulted in errors when certain recipes didn’t quite pan out exactly as I’d planned. Sometimes it was because I added or omitted an ingredient or two and other times it was because the recipe was a dud. Maybe the measurements were wrong? Maybe it was ‘operator error?’ Either way, when cooking goes awry there are bound to be stories to tell and I have a couple of my own I’ll share with you here. I’ve always loved to bake. Cooking comes second. Being that baking is my very favorite thing to indulge in when I prepare food, I am always eager to try new recipes. When I was a teenager (quite some time ago, but I’m not telling you how long ago exactly), I found a recipe for shortbread in a new cookbook my mother bought. I knew this was going to be THE recipe that saw my family come to me, asking me to please bake some more shortbread and I could say “what’s in it for me?” Not really, but at least I thought it would turn out delicious, buttery shortbread cookies. I enlisted the help of my best friend, my trusty advisor on all things cookery and tasty, and I asked that she take the esteemed role of ‘recipe reader.’ She obliged with gusto, pledging allegiance to our baking and began reading the ingredients and their amounts. First, flour. She read a weight for the flour and even in my young and inexperienced baker’s mind I thought, ‘that sounds like a lot of flour,’ so I asked, “Are you sure it’s that much? Does it not say cups?” She assured me she was reading the recipe correctly and I trusted her, so I continued with the mixing of the butter, sugar, flour and baking powder. The batter was

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very crumbly, to say the least, but I decided it was just going to be mashed into the baking pan anyway, so it would be fine. It baked to a lovely light golden color and I gave my dad the honorary first piece of shortbread. He coughed, emitting a massive spray of crumb dust, wheezed, tried to choke it down without any liquid and eventually told me it was “really dry.” It was in fact, incredibly parched and undeniably a tall task to swallow without any milk or tea or whatever to chase it and force it down. As it turns out, my most trusted and esteemed recipe reader had in fact read the amounts incorrectly, resulting in the Sahara Desert being turned out in my baking pan. After we figured it all out, I offered my dog a piece and I said “well, at least the dog likes it.” No sooner had the words left my lips than the poor thing choked and hacked it up all over the kitchen floor. Let’s just say that for a while after, my family tended to ask me if they needed a chaser with their portion of whatever I had just baked. HAR HAR, family! Looking back, I still find this story so amusing and a verbal retelling is even better, just for the added value of the sound effects that go with it. It also prompted me to always read and reread recipes, even when someone else is reading it for me – which is hardly ever now! See, when cooking goes awry it can be really funny and make for hilarious memories which serve as get-together favorites time and time again. On occasion, when cooking goes awry, when a recipe seems to be all but lost in a botched job, we can end up with something totally new and delicious. I once made a rice pudding that turned out fabulous because I was reading two different recipes at the same time! Don’t ask me how it came to be that they should result in one of the best-tasting baked rice puddings I’ve ever made, but lo and behold, it did. It was only about 10 minutes after I put it in

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the oven I realized I’d been reading from two completely different recipes and I just thought, “Oh well, let’s see what it’s like in 30 minutes.” In that half hour, I thought back to the shortbread incident and how I was sure I had done my best to read the recipe properly. When I pulled the dish out of the oven the amazing aroma that filled the kitchen told me it was actually going to be a winner. It really was. Thick, gooey, decadent and creamy rice pudding with a very light golden-brown crust, served with a cup of hot, sweet, milky tea during winter; it went down a treat. I don’t have the recipe anymore, probably because it was a mashup of two and I don’t even know what the other one was! Nevertheless, it demonstrates that sometimes when things in the kitchen go awry, they can be salvageable or even wonderful new dishes in and of themselves. Dear readers, I would LOVE to hear from you all about your own ‘cooking gone awry’ stories. We all have one, I’m sure! A very big thank you again to the reader who suggested this and I hope they write to me again to tell me about a ‘cooking gone awry’ story of their own! I will include a simple recipe for a buttery shortbread cookie; I know I have already included a shortbread recipe before, but there are many different variations, so what’s one more to add to the collection? Please feel free to send any and all comments, questions, stories and definitely recipes you might like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we’ll do exactly that and Dish! Chocolate Shortbread ½ cup powdered or caster sugar (I use caster) 2 cups all-purpose flour 1/3 to ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1 cup plus 2 Tablespoons butter In a large bowl, combine the cocoa powder, sugar and flour until well blended. Cut in the butter until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Knead by hand until a dough forms and holds together. Shape into two flattened rounds, which you can then form into individual cookies or shapes. Space the cookies about an inch-and-a-half apart on an ungreased baking sheet and bake for about 25 minutes at 325°F or until cookies are set. Allow to cool before serving, eating and hopefully enjoying! To read past columns of Let’s Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

BITS ‘n’ PIECES

continued from page

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AUGUST 1 - AUGUST 7, 2019

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eventual success may well be a simple lack of experience. Your best chance of gaining the needed expertise on the 1st is through trial and error. Successive small steps are safer than a giant leap.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Pay attention to first impressions this week. Your instincts are enjoying a period of heightened sensitivity that will help you in your decision making. During this time, the acuity of what your gut is telling you makes your feelings a valuable adjunct to your rational mind. Where the two conflict, dig deeper. Chances are good of finding an overlooked detail you would otherwise miss. All is not as cut and dried as it seems on the 1st. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Any who question your courage or the strength of your beliefs has a surprise coming this week. It may appear temporarily that your defeat is inevitable, but hold on. Persistence pays, and determination wins in the end. Your struggles may be long and hard, and you may be forced to learn a new trick or two along the way, but you will arrive at your goal. A supportive partner is a major blessing on the 1st. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Your problems are not without solutions this week. The way may even be easy at times, but be wary of something for nothing quick fixes.The gift horse that turns out lame is but one classic example. If there is a secret to getting ahead in these times, it is to trust yourself. Allow yourself the latitude to make mistakes without self-censure and you will be free to search out the hidden answer on the 1st. Yours is the opinion that matters. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Your talents are on full display for all to see this week. Inevitably, you will be judged. More important than what others think, however, is what you think. Are you being true to yourself? Judged against the time-tested qualities of loyalty, honesty and dependability, how well are you doing? Can you exhibit those qualities in the course of being true to yourself? If so, you are ahead of the game on the 1st. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Your desire and enthusiasm for a fresh start juices all that you do this week. Even when you are not consciously thinking about it, this hunger for liberation from that which you see as troublesome puts wind in your sails. It powers the ambition that drives your actions and dictates your decisions. Used negatively, it can make you a grumbling discontent. Ambition in it’s positive form is the antidote to gloom and doom on the 1st. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Forward progress is possible this week, but so are frequent setbacks. In many cases, this means fighting for the same ground twice. Victory thus goes to the persistent and determined. The biggest obstacle between you and

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Actions and decisions that shape your destiny are very much in your own hands this week. This means you have the power to effect changes, if you deem change necessary, and to undertake things new and untried. None of it is likely to happen automatically. A great deal of thought and effort will be involved, with a high likelihood of returns commensurate to your effort. Decisive action is key on the 1st. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Now is the time to get with the key players in your life and look at what is working for you and what is not. The input of those others is important and may be the thing that stimulates you to new heights of optimism. To make the most of your time, you may need to let your guard down a bit and really open up to your partners. The feedback if you can do that will be so much more valuable. Candid is the word on the 1st. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) You are likely to feel the impact of change in a good way this week. Wanting to cling to old ways is natural, even in the face of evidence that the new way is better. The solution to this is built into your present circumstance, in the form of someone who argues in favor of taking the path as yet untried. Differences of opinion may have to be ironed out before progress can be made. The 1st may set the tone.

CLUES ACROSS 1. Bridge building degree 4. Catches 9. A heavy type of music 14. Original “Twilight Zone” host Serling

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) It’s a rapidly evolving picture this week, in which change in the lives of others filters down in ways that necessitate corresponding changes for you. Normal developments that you’ve been anticipating drive much of the scene now unfolding, but as always, it’s good to expect the unexpected. Watch carefully on the 1st. Desired goals may signal their imminent arrival in ways you might not have anticipated.

15. Rodent species

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) The day of reckoning is near when you’ll need to deal with certain of those pesky little matters you’ve put off and put off, again. No getting around it. Something that you could have done yesterday but didn’t is about to catch up with you. Having dealt with it, you’ll feel great about yourself, so why not make up your mind now to face the matter squarely and be done with it? The 1st gets the ball rolling.

24. Lessening of something

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You’ll do well this week to heed the self-help gurus who say, “don’t sweat the small stuff.” The unseen support behind much of what unfolds far outweighs any possible adversity. Overblown fears about the future have no place in your life. You’ll find new ways of making lemonade when life gives lemons. What better sweetener than the knowledge that it’s safe to relax and enjoy the journey? Knowledge is power on the 1st.

50. White vestment worn by clergy

12. Body part

51. Island people of the Mediterranean

19. A type of meal

55. Prices 58. On a line at right angles to a ship’s length

13. The top of a pot 21. Lake __, one of the Great 24. Capital of Jordan 25. A type of logic

16. Finnish lake

59. Where boats are parked

17. Street (abbr.)

60. One who values reason

18. Home of the US Naval Academy

64. It might be on your driveway

20. It held a convention once

65. Small Iranian village

32. Lemur

66. Used to emphasize

34. Small bodies of still water

22. Makes a loud, ringing sound 23. Cave 28. MJ’s nickname “__ Jordan” 29. One’s way of doing things 30. Wings

26. Khoikhoi peoples 27. A fixed time of prayer in Christian liturgies 31. Arrives

67. Mathematical term (abbr.)

35. __ route

68. Long necked birds

36. Breaks apart

69. Eyeglasses

40. A type of line

70. When you hope to get there

41. Caption that translates

CLUES DOWN

47. Criticize severely

45. Winged 48. Leg bones

1. Portuguese district

52. Monetary unit

31. Quotes as evidence for

2. An assembly of witches

33. Acts glumly

3. Having few teeth

37. A man’s title

4. The act of going across

38. It comes first

5. Nepalese dynasty

39. Edible mollusk 41. Resembles a pouch

6. “Bye Bye Birdie” actress __-Margaret

42. He/she checks your health

7. What the princess found beneath her mattress

43. Nobel Prize-winning biochemist

8. Pennsylvania transit organization

44. Stop momentarily

9. Winnie the Pooh creator

62. Some don’t want to be given any

46. Formerly (archaic)

10. Riddle

63. Wrath

49. Commercial

11. Grads wear one

53. 007’s creator 54. Accumulate 56. Establish by law or with authority 57. Breed of goat 59. Millisecond 60. Mock 61. Make older

Answers on page 15

© 2019, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, Aug. 1

Fri, Aug. 2

Sat, Aug. 3

Sun, Aug. 4

Mon, Aug. 5

Tues, Aug. 6

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-72°/L-59°

H-71°/L-57°

H-68°/L-54°

H-71°/L-54°

H-76°/L-58°

H-77°/L-59°

H-75°/L-58°

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Sunny and Pleasant

Partly Sunny

Mostly Sunny and Pleasant

Sunshine

Sunshine

Wed, Aug. 7

Mostly Sunny

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-74°/L-58°

H-72°/L-56°

H-72°/L-55°

H-74°/L-58°

H-81°/L-60°

H-81°/L-61°

H-83°/L-61°

Partly Sunny

AM Rain

Partly Sunny

Partly Sunny and Pleasant

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42

$

95

Full Synthetic

36

$

95

Includes 4X4 & SUV

4295

$

Most cars up to 5 qts. 5W20, 5W30, 10W30. Other grades extra. Some filters cost extra. Vehicles with Skid Plates may be extra. Plus $1 Environmental Disposal Fee.

WE CAN SAVE YOU UP TO $250 ON BRAKE SERVICE VERSUS OUR COMPETITORS. WARRANTIED AT 30K LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE.

TOYO TIRES - PASSENGER, LIGHT TRUCKS AND SUVS STARTERS ALTERNATORS TIMING BELTS SERPENTINE BELTS

BRAKES TIRES TUNE-UPS EXHAUST

UP TO

1

$ 00

Flat Rate Auto Repair only $7995 per hour

PER GAL LON D ISCOUNT T ODAY!

always

Ask for De

tails

FREE ESTIMATES!

At Hilltop Service Center we only repair and replace parts that are needed. We will not oversell or install unnecessary parts. We are highly trained brake technicians, not high pressure sales people.

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4 cyl

95

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8995*

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6 cyl

9995*

$

8 cyl

79

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11995

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GARAGE/ESTATE SALES Downsizing Sale: Friday, Aug. 2 and Saturday, Aug. 3, 9am-3pm, 2111 Madrona Way, Coupeville. Holiday decor, dishes, linens, music, books & lots more. No early birds Cash only. Garage Sale: Saturday, Aug. 10, 8am-2pm, 1931 NE 11th Ave., Oak Harbor. Nice loveseat w/recliners, 6-foot stainless steel table, bottle filler, antique buffet modified as TV stand, large food storage containers and much more. Garage Sale: Every Saturday and Sunday until site is cleared, 1010 Waterloo Rd, Oak Harbor (South of Oak Harbor, on Hwy 20, East on Waterloo Rd, large yellow shop building on south side). 40+ years: Tools, collectibles, furniture, household and kitchen appliances, dishes, pots and pans, oddities. Clothing, shoes, toys, games, yard furniture, books, large folding easels, briefcases, fabrics, quilting aids, mags, rulers, cutting guides and mats. Ironing and pressing aids. Over range microwave, never out of box, stainless.

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call 360-221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child’s life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. 425923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin’ Alive team. Our team’s mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/NorthPugetSoundDragonBoatClub?ref=hl Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help. If you or someone you know has been a victim of homicide, burglary, robbery, assault, identity theft, fraud, human

trafficking, home invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line 888-3889221. Free service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Imagine Oak Harbor’s first Food Forest, Saturdays 11am3pm, at 526 Bayshore Drive. Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com Mother Mentors needs volunteers! Oak Harbor families with young children need your help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@ gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for board members to join the dynamic board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET Automotive techs wanted: must have own tools, ASE certified helpful. Apply at Red Beard Automotive, 1707 Main St., Freeland (3) Full-time/Permanent Garden Center Manager: We are seeking a professional, experienced person to lead our outside Nursery Team. Looking for applicants with relevant experience, self motivation, and commitment. Northwest plant, tree and shrub knowledge is required, as well as previous buying experience. Supervisory and retail experience are a plus. Primary job will be to order weekly plant and hard goods order, assist customers with their selections and be involved in BBQ sales. Need to be willing to work outdoors How’d youdifficulty do? rating 0.52) Puzzle 1 (Medium, 4

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Foster Homes Needed! Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

in any type of weather. Will be supervising a team of 3-5. Qualified candidates please stop by with your resume (with references) and a cover letter, and fill out our application at: Freeland Ace Hardware, 1609 E. Main St, Freeland, WA 98249 (3) Fulltime Floor Sales Associate: If you have paint, tool, plumbing, or electrical product knowledge, love hardware, and crave the full-time retail career experience then we’d love to hear from you. Working Saturdays and Sundays are required. Must be able to lift 40-50lbs. Wages and benefits are based on qualifications and will be reviewed during the interview. 36+ hours a week qualifies for full time benefits: Medical/401k/ Discounts/Bonuses/Vacation, after passing the probationary period. Qualified candidates, stop by with your resume (with references) and a cover letter, and fill out our application at: Freeland Ace Hardware, 1609 E. Main St, Freeland, WA 98249 (3) Whidbey Institute is seeking an experienced land steward for a full time, permanent position. The Land Steward is a 35-hour per week position and will be responsible for care and management of the landscape, conservation forest, and public trails at the Whidbey Institute, a 501(c)(3) educational nonprofit with a 106-acre campus on South Whidbey. In addition, they will work with volunteers No Cheating!

and service learning groups to support land-based community engagement. Compensation for this position is $19/ hour, benefits include paid time off, paid holidays, and family leave. The application period closes Aug. 15. For more information, visit http:// tinyurl.com/wi-landsteward (1)

ELECTRONICS Visio 43” TV, 4K, model M43-C2, $150. 360-678-8449 (1)

TICKETS/GETAWAYS SEAHAWKS tickets vs. Oakland Raiders: Aug. 29 at 7 pm. Two tickets, 300-level, 40-yard line, $75 each. 360-914-0075 (1)

HOME FURNISHINGS Like new, cherry wood dining table with 6 chairs and 2 leaves, $200. 360-678-2111 (1)

LAWN AND GARDEN Japanese Maple trees. These are young trees, still small enough to plant easily. Take your pick from several different kinds, including Coral Bark Maples. $20 each. Coupeville 360-678-4848 (1) Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for flower beds, gardens, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard load, $225 delivered. South Whidbey, 360-321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS Love Casa Blanca? Two 8-1/2”x11” b&w framed

portraits from the movie, one of Bogart, and one with both Bogart and Bergman, plus five framed 8”x10” b&w scenes from the movie. Complete set for $40. 360-320-7232 (0) Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father’s Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about 50-60 of these available. They are $16 ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH preferred. Dimensions are: 5-6”W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

RECREATION Ultralight sleeping pad: Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xlite, weighs 1-lb., measures 77” x 25” x 2.5”. $199.99 at REI, asking $95. 360-678-2207 (1) Camping items: Brookstone waterproof floating lantern, for camping, patio, poolside, or emergencies, new, $5 or best offer; Old (but clean) Thermos 1-gallon jug, $5; Versatile backpack, the two parts can be used separately, or (for more serious backpacking) together, $15 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-3200525. Sports items: Bag Boy golf cart, $10 obo; Men’s wet suits, size L, $10 per item; Neoprene

gloves and hats, size L, $5 each. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Excellent grass hay, good for horses, $7 per bale. 20 bale minimum. 360-321-1624 Round bales of grass feeder hay, barn stored. 360-3211624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (465 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED Art, Antiques & Collectibles. Cash paid for quality items. Call or text 360-661-7298 Was your Dad or Gramps in Japan or Germany? I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses. Oak Harbor, call 970823-0002

PERSONALS Amanda – So good to see you, Sunshine. Love you so much. Sorry my brain took an extra minute to work. Love, Mom (1)

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


Business Spotlight Enjoy Your Summer, Let me Help! Clean Roof Clean Gutters Clean Windows

Give Me A Call Today!

CRYSTAL CLEAN

W NDOWS & MORE LLC

360-675-3005 - ANYWHERE ON WHIDBEY FREE ESTIMATES • LICENSED & INSURED www.crystalcleanwindowswhidbey.com

HARADA PHYSICAL THERAPY Your Hometown Therapists

• Sports Rehab • Post-Op Treatment • MVA/L&I Claims • Injury Screening • Pre/Postpartum Rehab • BikeFit • LSVT Certified • Neurological and Vestibular Rehabilitation

Theresa Knoll, PT, MPT Oak Harbor

Coupeville

31955 SR 20 360-679-8600

101 S Main Street

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Your Hometown Therapists

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Receive 20% OFF*

EVERYTHING THAT FITS IN THE BUCKET WHEN YOU MAKE A $5 DONATION TO OUR LOCAL CHILDRENS NETWORK FOR A $5 GALLON BUCKET. August 2-4

*Regular priced merchandise. Some restrictions apply.

150 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor • 360-679-3533

SEEKING ADVENTURE? WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED

Homes are for Living LLC Helps with Hoarding Issues By Kae Harris We could all, at some point in life, do with a little less clutter. But how, when clutter takes over our lives and becomes an overwhelming task with seemingly nowhere to start and definitely no end in sight? When clutter becomes a bigger problem, when hoarding becomes the operative word, Tammi Moses knows first-hand what it’s like. As a Clutter-Free Coach and Chief Encouragement Officer and founder of Homes are For Living LLC, she offers a unique perspective on the issue of hoarding, due to her experience growing up in a hoarder home. She knows it isn’t just as simple as telling someone with a hoarding problem “it’s just stuff” and “just clean everything up.” Hoarding issues run deeper and often go hand in hand with mental illness. Hoarding creates an environment of chaos in which conflict between loved ones is unfortunately born and cultivated. It can seem a tall task, to say the least, to escape from under the mass of things in a hoarder home, but it is not at all impossible to escape from it and take positive steps to move away from it and towards a clutter-free lifestyle – one the hoarder may ultimately desire, and certainly deserves. Homes are for Living offers services which utilize the Harm Reduction Approach in conjunction with the Uniform Inspection Checklist and a Collaborative Team Agreement to ensure a hoarding clean out goes as smoothly and successfully as possible. With onsite assessments, written action plans and onsite coaching from Tammi and a member of her team, you have a starting point and a map to help you navigate the sometimes-tricky landscape that hoarding is. Whether it’s facilitating a conversation about the hoarding issue with family members, or offering workshops and presentations, Homes are for Living brings you everything you need to help you or your loved one tackle the issue of hoarding and lets you know you are absolutely not alone! Coining the hashtags #YLITH (Youth Living in the Hoard) and #AKOPTH (Adult kids of parents that hoard) has enabled Tammi to get more information out there to people who may feel like they have nowhere else to turn. Her YouTube channel and informative blog posts offer guidance, information and support and a place where those who are most affected by another’s hoarding can share their stories and find a place and people to turn to who understand the problem and long-term impact it has on the lives of those it affects.

Support & Guidance in your time of sorrow We provide complete funerals, cremations and memorial services, helping you handle all the details of your loved one’s final arrangements with the utmost care and dignity.

Serving all Whidbey Island and beyond 746 NE Midway Blvd • Oak Harbor

360-675-5777 info@whidbeymemorial.com www.whidbeymemorial.com

Our top-notch surgeons are here for all your surgical care needs. John Hassapis, MD WhidbeyHealth Surgical Care 205 South Main Street, Bldg. A Coupeville • 360.678.6799

www.whidbeyhealth.org

Tammi Moses started Homes are for Living LLC in December 2013 to give a face and a voice to the people who struggle with issues stemming from hoarding. Above all, she wants those who are in the thick of it to know they aren’t alone and with an estimate of approximately 15 million people in the U.S. who deal with clutter problems, it really puts into perspective how widespread the issue is. Creating awareness is the first step in allowing people to talk about the problem which is part of the battle won. If you or a loved one are dealing with hoarding matters, reach out to Tammi at 360-720-8401 or homesareforliving@ gmail.com. You can find more information at www.homesareforliving.com or see Tammi personally at the Senior Resource Fair at the Senior Center Sept. 28.

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Connect with us today 360-720-8401 GET YOUR ISLAND HERB MERCHANDISE AT

Freeland Liquor Store

5565 Vanbarr Pl #2, Freeland, WA

Pickles Deli

11042 SR 525 Ste 122, Clinton, WA

Shelli Trumbull, CIC, ACSR Client Advisor/Agent

Insurance www.homesareforliving.com homesareforliving@gmail.com

Leavitt Group Northwest | 360-682-2162 31650 State Route 20, Suite 1 Oak Harbor, WA 98277 www.leavitt.com/northwest