Whidbey Weekly, March 8, 2018

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March 8 through March 14, 2018

More Local Events inside

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SPRING CHINOOK SALMON (SPRINGERS)

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Springers. This is what most salmon anglers call the springtime migratory return of the mighty Chinook salmon. Springers are highly anticipated in the Columbia River Basin; droves of anglers on both the Washington and Oregon side of the “big C” love the size and fight of the Springer and are considered by many to be the best tasting fish of the season. Unlike fall runs of Chinook, which are very close to being spawn-ready when reaching their home rivers with large and semi loose eggs, the spring runs of fish will return in early March and stay as late as September before spawning. This pre-planned, long stay in the river is the main reason Springers are so tasty. They really pack on the fat and rich flesh for the long haul. We are lucky to get a chance at catching them in the Puget Sound, as the Springer’s transit through the local marine areas headed for some nearby rivers like the Cascade, Skagit, Stillaguamish, Skokomish, and the North Fork of the Nooksack. Many of these fish, once in the river, are protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), so opportunities to hook and land a Springer can be few and far between. March and April are great months to be out on the Puget Sound in search of Chinook salmon. Blackmouth are still present and a chance at a fat Springer will be there as well, but the biggest reason to be on the water now is for a short time - roughly 45 days - all of our nearby saltwater marine areas (Marine areas 6 through 10) are open to salmon fishing. Is there a reliable way to tell if you’ve caught a Springer versus a resident Blackmouth? First, I would say there is always an exception to the rule, but yes, there are a number of factors to help us decide: • Pigskin vs. snakeskin: The Springer will be fat and round, resembling a football, whereas the Blackmouth can be long and skinny, almost snake-like. • Scales and color. Once you’ve got your legal keeper on the deck of the boat, if the fish is shedding quite a few scales with each roll in the net, and its beautiful purplish-blue coloring along the fish's back is not standing out at you, it’s most likely a Blackmouth. Springers tend to be brighter in color and their scales are much tighter.

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• What’s that metallic smell? To me, all Chinook have a metallic smell to their skin and protective slime; even a 12-inch fish smells like a Blacksmith's anvil. This is especially true with resident Blackmouth; they have an unmistakable metallic smell compared to a faint, almost absent scent on the Springer. This unique smell does not affect the flesh at all, they still taste fantastic. • Rocky IV: If the cheeks (gill plates) of the fish you just landed look like Rocky in the 11th round, scraped and rough-looking, it’s most likely a Blackmouth. Resident fish will turn on their side and slide along the bottom, scooping up small crabs and shrimp, and any sand lance sticking their heads out of the loose sand. Springers are already bulked up for the river and tend not to spend the energy aggressively foraging the bottom.

enough to land a Springer in the salt. For me, I’m just happy to catch a keeper fish for the grill and will not release a keeper Blackmouth in search of a spring Chinook, but it is special if I can bring home one of these tasty fish. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife will be recording numbers of fish caught by recreational anglers at the boat ramps, and if quotas are met for a specific marine area, they will most likely close that area to harvest early. The closure will be posted on the WDFW web site under “emergency closures” even if, according to the regulations, it should be open to fishing. To view emergency closures, go to the WDFW website and click the “fishing” tab at the top of the page; next, click “regulations & seasons,” then in the “Step 2” section, click the “check emergency fishing rules for updates.” This will take you to all the selectable areas to check for closures. If you want to see how close we are to reaching quotas for a specific marine area, go to the website, select the “fishing” tab, then select “fishing reports, stocking reports & fish counts;” look on the right side of this page and you will find the “Winter Chinook Fishery Guidelines;” here you will find a report for each marine area with catch numbers and percentages of quotas. This information can be helpful for deciding to call in sick or sending up a memo to the wife about an upcoming fishing weekend with the boys. River fishermen would be wise to take a look at any historical data available on the river they are targeting, and filter out the timeframe when the greatest number of returning spring fish were documented; dams with fish-counting sites and daily hatchery returns are places to start. This gives you a greater chance to hook one simply because of the numbers of fish in the river at that time. Spring Kings are like Sockeye, they seem to travel closer to shore; the water temperature is slightly warmer and for some reason they like it. This is great news for plunking; use cured row, tuna balls, shrimp and proven artificial baits like “Brad's super bait” to hook one. FISHING REPORT: When the winds are favorable, salmon are being landed in all marine areas; spoons, hoochies and herring are producing fish. It all comes down to what you like and are comfortable fishing with. I’ve had reports of greenling for fish tacos being caught near shore rock piles, and March is prime time for pile perch. Here are a couple of nice Blackmouth caught by Mike Useman a few weeks ago in area 7. February was pretty nasty and made for rough fishing, so let’s hope for some calm seas in March, at least on the weekends. Think about renewing your boat sticker before the rush at the DMV. Feel free to e-mail me a picture or drop me a note about how your fishing has been. Keep your hooks sharp or changed often and GOOD LUCK OUT THERE! tlfishmonger@aol.com.

These tips can help you decide if it’s a resident or non-resident fish, and if you are lucky

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MARCH 8 - MARCH 14, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Happy Valentine's Day, a month late. The adjacent cute picture of an antique Valentine card is courtesy of Billie Bard, South Whidbey's only known, as far as I know, Valentine card collecting genealogical guru gardener.

Billie's heart warming colorful collection is now on display in the lobby of the Freeland Library. Some of her collection dates back to the 1880s. Last month, Daniel and I were lobby locked with curiosity as we saw Billie finishing up her circus vignette themed display. Several questions later, we knew a whole lot more about these incredible creations.

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Post Oscar Growing up in Ohio in the 50s, the Sunday night Academy Awards black and white TV telecasts started at 9pm, Columbus time. Mom usually made us go to bed at 7pm Sunday nights to be fresh for school the next day. Right. Pre-Oscar night naps for ninety minutes? Yep. Mom made us go to bed. Then right before Bob Hope's opening monologue, she would wake us up. Like we were really asleep? Now that I am considerably older, this year I did not need to take a nap before the Oscars. This year I was able to take a nap during. Just ask Autumn Should you ever stop at the Pay-Less customer service desk to cash in your lottery ticket, buy some smokes and Sudafed, or just to pick up the latest copy of Whidbey Weekly, you may meet Autumn.

Alley Cat Remember the 1963 Grammy Award winner for 1962's rock n' roll song of the year? What do you mean you weren't born yet?

When she is not helping a customer, Autumn may be answering trivia questions asked by loitering customers like me. Not only is her trivia knowledge the result of her life-long curiosities, much of Autumn's recent education comes from ID: Ideas & Discoveries, a magazine sold within a few feet of her control center.

It took a thorough reading of the small print on record 6, side 1, band 4 of the Reader's Digest Music Program Notes of the eight vinyl albumed All -Star Piano Magic (1980) to get the scoop. May I quote yet-to-be public domain liner notes without permission? Don't tell. Like Vegas, what happens on the page, stays on the page. “It may be simpler to remember the spelling of 'supercalifragilisticexpialidocious' than to find one's way through the maze Bent FabriciusBjerre created to establish credits for his individual talents. To begin with, he recorded 'Alley Cat' in 1962 in Copenhagen, Denmark, under the alias Bent Fabric. He wrote the tune under the name Frank Bjorn, the pseudonym he used as the composer-pianist star of a Saturday night Danish TV show called Around the Piano. Material for the show was also provided by Frank Barklay and Bert Graves, both of whom were actually Bent Fabricius-Bjerre. Some time later, Jack Harlen (a pseudonym for Britt Simonson) added lyrics to Bjorn's persistent and rhythmic tune. When released in the United States, the recording of 'Alley Cat' made the best-seller charts (a first for a Danish record), and won a Grammy for Best Rock and Roll Recording of 1962.”

For example, on page fifty-six of the May issue of ID, I learned there are 37,000 known species of spiders living on our planet. These species have a combined weight of about 27.5 million tons. To top it off, according to “zoologists at the University of Basel in Switzerland and Lund University in Sweden... the world's spiders eat a combined total of up to 800 million tons of meat and fish per year, while humans eat no more than 440 million tons of meat and fish annually.”

I never went back to that Skippers, or any other. Nor did I ever go to a Long John Silver's or an Arthur Treacher's Fish & Chips or any fish market that did not offer free Swedish fish.

I am just too darn excited to wait. Surely enthusiasm is a defense? How about deadlines?

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Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 10, Issue 10 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

What was I thinking? Me, a Midwest kid raised on a diet of meat and potatoes, speed-eating cod on a Saturday afternoon with a microphone at the ready. Lesson learned–don't talk with your face, fish full.

The other four nominees for the 1962 best rock recording award were Mary Wells (You Beat me to the Punch), Neil Sedaka (Breaking Up is Hard To Do), Sam Cooke (Twistin' the Night Away), The Drifters (Up on the Roof), and The Four Seasons (Big Girls Don't Cry).

Our thanks to AVI Records, Inc, for the courtesy of using their copyrighted information before getting permission.

PHONE: (360)682-2341

I'll have to ask Autumn if they still have Skippers anywhere. When I was a rookie DJ in Bend, Oregon in the 70s, Bonnie, our best sales rep, asked me to do a remote broadcast at the grand opening of a new Skippers. Not only would I be going live with cutaway broadcasts from the lobby, I would be able to participate in the all-you-can-eat fish contest. Like the egg-eating contest in Cool Hand Luke, or last weekend's mussel-eating contest in Coupeville, where food and speed can pin one's tolerance meter.

Since the statute of hallucinations has run, let me just say that after that remote, I became very remote.

The Danes could also be the world leaders in creative pseudonyms. Maybe there is an online class.

Think about that. Spiders from all over the world, eating all that prey, yet such determined arachnids do not even have a McDonald's or a Skippers to go to.

I just Binged to save my friends Brigit and Jim any possible interruption researching the competition that year for Mr. Bjorn's winner.

For me, that Alley Cat history line proves there is way more to the Danish culture than pastries, underwater Maritime museums, beautiful beaches, incredible cuisines, superb festivals, and wonderful people.

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Irish Fun in Coupeville Now in its 11th year, the Shifty Sailors' St. Paddy's Day Bash will be held once again at the Coupeville Rec Hall, March 17 from 6pm until 9pm. This annual celebration with family and friends is a feast of music and food that sells out quickly. Corned beef and community. Eclectic'ly Celtic. Saratoga Sirens. Brush off your blarney stone and get ready.

So will you if you stop by. Library parking is free, although challenging. I use the street by Dr. Bob's and Freeland Warehousing & Storage so I don't have to risk calling my insurance agent whom I have yet to meet.

No matter your birth year, you would recognize this song. However, you may not know the story behind the grooves of Bent Fabric, creator, composer, and recipient of that 1963 Grammy.

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In fact, the last time I saw a fish stick, I stepped on it. My interest in fish and fishing started and stopped on those mosquito infested rivers of southern Missouri, back when Grandpa would get me up at o-dark-thirty to drive his '53 Chevy along the hilly and windy roads in the Ozark dark, towing a fishing boat that had no bathroom or record player. Or was it all those games of Fish we played with Mom? How much more fishing did a kid have to do? Go fish, young man, go fish. To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

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MARCH 8 - MARCH 14, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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Bits & Pieces Participants may submit questions in advance by sending an email to Barbara.Bailey@leg. wa.gov, Norma.Smith@leg.wa.gov, and Dave. Hayes@leg.wa.gov. [Submitted by Nick Jacob, Public Information Officer, WA State Legislature]

Letters to the Editor Editor, This is in response to an article in the Feb. 15 thru Feb. 21 Whidbey Weekly submitted by the City of Oak Harbor regarding the Wastewater Treatment Plant. It’s appalling that the project is already a MINIMUM of $18 million over estimate. Why wasn’t the Mayor and City Council keeping on top of this…boy-someone sure dropped the ball and the homeowners on city water will be the ones that pay for their incompetence. The city staff assured the Mayor that the projected utility rates charged to Oak Harbor rate payers totaling approximately $102 per month for 2019 calendar year will not change. That amount is deceiving for the year of 2018. A single residence basic monthly charge is $129.83 NOT $102.00 as stated. This is the monthly amount a single residence is [currently] charged: Storm Drain: $14.22 Water Meter Charges - 5/8” Ready to Serve Charge: $26.25 Sewer-Residential Sewer: $89.36 Do they come up with the misleading figure of $102 by averaging in the organizations that are exempt or discounted? It sure isn’t a true representation of charges that a single residential home. Is the city staff saying the $129.83 a single residential home is paying in 2018 will remain the same in 2019? And if so, how high will it jump in 2020 to compensate? My rates have increased nine percent every year since I moved to town...before the new plant was built. I hope renters realize landlords recoup increases from bonds, levies and utilities by raising rents. Homeowners are not the only ones negatively affected when the mayor and his staff perform poorly. The whole community suffers.

Last year, 850 calendars were printed and sold at locations throughout Island County. The 2018 calendar cover photo was a Short-eared Owl in the snow taken by Camano Island’s Matt Ferguson.

“Glassical Gas” Art Show in Langley

Visit the Land Trust’s website (www.wclt.org) to learn more about how the contest works and to view photo requirements.

A collection of American pop culture in fused glass

Questions may be directed to landtrustphoto contest@gmail.com

The Hub Gallery in the Bayview Cash Store will be exhibiting the fused glass work of artist Gina Michel from March 10 – April 15, 2018. A newcomer to Whidbey Island, Gina will be introducing herself to the Northwest art scene, and has shown and sold her work in the Los Angeles area for the past several years.

The Whidbey Camano Land Trust is a nonprofit organization that actively involves the community in protecting, restoring, and appreciating the important natural habitats and resource lands that support the diversity of life on our islands and in the waters of Puget Sound. For more information, visit www.wclt.org, email info@wclt.org, or call (360) 222-3310.

The exhibition features several life-sized steampunk inspired electric guitars framed as wall art and a re-purposed 1923 piano covered with over 1500 hand made fused glass tiles. Several of the tiles are images of famous piano players like Billy Joel, Elton John, Ray Charles, Victor Borge, Stevie Wonder, Liberace, Beethoven and Mozart. The piano has built in cabinetry and is literally a functional wine bar. A reception for “Glassical Gas” will be held at the Hub Gallery Saturday, March 10 between 5:30pm and 7:00pm. The address is 5603 Bayview Road, Langley. The show can be viewed daily from 10:00am to 7:00pm through April 15. 25% of the proceeds from the show will be donated to Whidbey Animals’ Improvement Foundation (WAIF,) a non-profit organization for the care, shelter, and adoption of homeless pets on Whidbey Island. In addition, the artist will be offering “Steampunk Strat” to the highest bidder in a silent auction. This piece is valued at $1600, with the suggested starting bid at only $100. Visitors to the Los Angeles area can view “Super String Theory,” a re-purposed concert pedal harp covered in fused glass in the lobby of the prestigious Colburn School of Music, located across the street from the Walt Disney Concert Hall. The school purchased this piece in 2014. [Submitted by Gina Michel, Fused Glass Artist]

Enter Your Best Outdoor Photos in the Land Trust Photo Contest

Karen Golden Oak Harbor

Submitted by Ron Newberry, Communications Manager, WCLT]

Outcast Productions Presents “Annoyance” Outcast Productions begins its 8th season with Annoyance, a comedy by Sam Brobick, which opens March 16 and plays for three weekends at the Outcast Theater at the Island County Fairgrounds. The show is directed by Sandy K. O’Brien. Everyone experiences annoying people in their lives. This is the feeling you get when someone makes you feel angry or impatient (of course, you can also be annoying to someone else). In this comedy, a very annoying man goes to see two therapists with the hope of becoming less annoying; he ends up driving them both over the edge. First, he goes to see a woman therapist; and drives her crazy. Then, he goes to see her husband, who is also a therapist, and drives him batty. In the third scene, he goes to see both therapists who decide to take drastic measures to rid the world of this obnoxious (and very annoying) man. Of course it doesn’t go as planned. Show times are 7:30pm, March 16, 17, 23, 24, 29, 30 and 31; with a Sunday matinee March 25 at 4:00pm. Tickets are $18 for adults; $14 for students and seniors, and a special $12 performance on March 29. Order online from www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3346537, or email Outcast Productions at ocp@whidbey. com to reserve tickets and pay at the door by cash or check. [Submitted by Carolyn Tamler]

Editors Note: The City of Oak Harbor Utility’s current monthly wastewater base charge is $89.36. That rate will increase by 8.7-percent, to $102.76, in December, 2018. That figure does not include additional storm drain and water meter charges. The current charge of $89.36 took effect in December of 2016 and was an 8.7-percent increase over the previous rate of $77.70.

10th District Lawmakers to Hold Town Hall Meetings March 10 Tenth District lawmakers Sen. Barbara Bailey, R-Oak Harbor, Rep. Norma Smith, R-Clinton, and Rep. Dave Hayes, R–Camano Island, will hold town hall meetings in Freeland, Oak Harbor and Mount Vernon Saturday, March 10. The trio will offer insights on the 2018 legislative session and take questions from constituents relating to state legislative issues. Each town hall will last 90 minutes. Details are as follows: Freeland: 8:00am – 9:30am Whidbey Telecom Freeland Customer Experience Center 1651 Main St, Freeland, WA 98249

Navy to Hold Public Meeting for New Health Clinic

Paul Lischeid took this photo of a Great Blue Heron family at Deer Lagoon on South Whidbey. It appeared in the 2018 calendar.

It’s time to showcase the natural beauty of Whidbey and Camano islands with your best outdoor photographs. The Whidbey Camano Land Trust’s annual photo contest is underway and photo submissions are being accepted. Everyone is invited to participate in the contest, which is now in its fifth year. The contest opened March 1 and the final day to submit photos is Sunday, July 8, 2018. Each participant may submit up to five photos. All photos must be taken outdoors on Whidbey or Camano islands, however, they don’t have to be taken on a property protected by the Land Trust. Images that showcase island landscapes or wildlife are most desired.

Oak Harbor: 12:00pm – 1:30pm Oak Harbor High School 1 Wildcat Way, Oak Harbor, WA 98277

Winning photos will be featured in the 2019 Whidbey Camano Land Trust Calendar. At least 12 feature photos will be selected, one for each month. Twelve smaller photos also will appear in the calendar.

Mount Vernon: 3:00pm – 4:30pm Conway Middle School 19710 SR 534, Mount Vernon, WA 98274

Photographers whose images are selected will receive special recognition and at least one complimentary calendar.

The U.S. Navy is preparing an Environmental Assessment (EA) to evaluate the potential impacts associated with the proposed construction and operation of a new Naval Health Clinic on Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island. The Navy will hold a public meeting for this project March 22 in the ballroom in the Bakerview/Chief Petty Officer Club complex located at 1080 W. Ault Field Road in Oak Harbor from 5:00pm to 7:00pm. The proposed facility would continue to offer the same level of care currently available to military and retired beneficiaries, as well as their dependents, in the local area. The Navy will also be taking written comments from the public on this project which can be submitted at the meeting, by email or regular mail service. Submit written comments to: NAVFAC NW, EV21 Attn: NEPA Planner, Naval Health Clinic Oak Harbor, 1101 Tautog Circle Silverdale, WA 98315-1101

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What Should Investors Know About Recent Volatility?

As you may have heard, the stock market has been on a wild ride lately. What’s behind this volatility? And, as an investor, how concerned should you be? Let’s look at the first question first. What caused the steep drop in stock prices we experienced on a few separate days? Essentially, two main factors seem to be responsible. First, some good economic news may actually have played a significant role. A 17-year low in unemployment and solid job growth have begun to push wages upward. These developments have led to fears of rising inflation, which, in turn, led to speculation that the Federal Reserve will tighten the money supply at a faster-than-expected rate. Stocks reacted negatively to these expectations of higher interest rates. The second cause of the market volatility appears to be simply a reaction to the long bull market. While rising stock prices lead many people to continue buying more and more shares, some people actually need to sell their stocks – and this pent-up selling demand, combined with short-term profit-taking, helped contribute to the large sell-offs of recent days. Now, as for the question of how concerned you should be about this volatility, consider these points: Sell-offs are nothing unusual. We’ve often experienced big sell-offs, but they’ve generally been followed with strong recoveries. Of course, past performance is not a guarantee of future results, but history has shown that patient, persistent investors have often been rewarded. Fundamentals are strong. While short-term market movements can be caused by a variety of factors, economic conditions and corporate earnings typically drive performance in the long term. Right now, the U.S. economy is near full employment, consumer and business sentiment has risen strongly, manufacturing and service activity is at multi-year highs, and GDP growth in 2018 appears to be on track for the best performance since 2015. Furthermore, corporate earnings are expected to rise this year. So, given this background, what’s your next move? Here are some suggestions: Review your situation. You may want to work with a financial professional to evaluate your portfolio to determine if it is helping you make the progress you need to eventually achieve your long-term goals. Reassess your risk tolerance. If you were unusually upset over the loss in value of your investments during the market pullback, you may need to review your risk tolerance to determine if it’s still appropriate for your investment mix. If you feel you are taking on too much risk, you may need to rebalance your portfolio. Keep in mind, though, that by “playing it safe” and investing heavily in vehicles that offer greater protection of principal, but little in the way of return, you run the risk of not attaining the growth you need to reach your objectives. Look for opportunities. A market pullback such as the one we’ve experienced, which occurs during a period of economic expansion and rising corporate profits, can give long-term investors a chance to add new shares at attractive prices in an environment that may be conducive to a market rally. A sharp market pullback, such as we’ve seen recently, will always be big news. But if you look beyond the headlines, you can sometimes see a different picture – and one that may be brighter than you had realized. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Jeffery C. Pleet, CLU®, ChFC®

Financial Advisor 630 SE Midway Blvd. Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 679-2558 jeffery.pleet@edwardjones.com

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

Email: NWNEPA@navy.mil Comments must be postmarked or received by April 2, 2018, to be considered in the official record. [Submitted by Michael Welding, Public Affairs Officer, NAS Whidbey Island]

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MARCH 8 - MARCH 14, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED Skagit Valley College to Begin Bachelor’s Degree in Applied Management Skagit Valley College (SVC) received approval in February 2018 from the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU), the College’s regional accrediting body, to offer and begin an Applied Management baccalaureate program in September 2018. SVC received approval in October 2017 from the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC). The Bachelor of Applied Science in Applied Management (BASAM) is a two-year, careeroriented degree designed for Professional/ Technical students who have completed an associate’s degree (AAS-T, AAS or ATA). The 90-credit program combines upper level managerial and general education courses to furnish students with occupationally contextualized business skills and general knowledge typically necessary for advancement to manageriallevel positions or to operate an entrepreneurial venture. Sample courses include Foundations of Applied Management, Operations Management, Leadership and Organizational Behavior, Marketing for Managers, Principles of Finance, Social Capital and Career Advancement and an Applied Management Internship. “The Bachelor in Applied Management degree is flexible, affordable and is designed to accommodate motivated working adults who want to build their management skills and advance professionally,” said Sunaina Virendra, Business Instructor and Interim BAS-AM Director at SVC. “The program curriculum is centered around learning by doing and practical application within the workplace, with an unwavering focus on preparing students to address the opportunities, challenges, and nuances of operating in an increasingly diverse, interconnected, and complex global community.” With a focus on excellence, Skagit Valley College aligns its Workforce Education programs with regional and state economic development strategies. By maintaining strong

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connections with community leaders and key partnerships with business and industry, SVC provides training that responds to employer needs. “We are delighted to add the Applied Management program to the Bachelor degree offerings at Skagit Valley College” said Darren Greeno, Dean of Workforce. “Our other Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Conservation, launched in 2015, is performing above expectations in meeting program learning outcomes around the application of environmental conservation principles in ecological management and preparing students for careers in this field. The addition of a second Bachelor degree broadens the reach of our BAS platform and we believe it will play an important role in serving employer and student needs within the local community.” Applications for the first program cohort will open in March 2018. The priority application period is between April 2 – April 30, 2018. Students interested in the program must attend an information session before applying. The Fall 2018 incoming class is limited to 26 students, and classes will begin Fall Quarter. For program information, or to sign up for an information session, please visit www.skagit. edu/basam, or contact Sunaina Virendra, (360) 416-7635 or basam@skagit.edu. [Submitted by Arden Ainley, Chief Public Information Officer, SVC]

Gray Whale Watching Season is Here, Along with a New ID Guide for the “Sounders” The small population of Gray whales known as the North Puget “Sounders” return each year to feast on ghost shrimp in the tidal flats primarily around Whidbey, Camano, and Hat/ Gedney Islands, and along Everett and Tulalip. An unidentified Gray whale was sighted in Saratoga Passage and reported to Orca Network’s Whale Sighting Network on February 24. S/he may be the first of the returning Sounders or another stray gray who has been seen off Edmonds.

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This small group of Gray whales returns to Saratoga Passage and Possession Sound each spring for their annual three-month feeding foray in North Puget Sound, with the first whales typically arriving mid-February to earlyMarch. Cascadia Research of Olympia has been studying this population of Gray whales for decades. In greater Puget Sound, we see up to 12 of this population of Grays per year, some have been seen every year since 1991. The whales are identified by the markings on the underside of their flukes, as well as by the patterns of barnacles, scars, and markings on their backs. Patch, or #49, was among the first identified by Cascadia in our local waters in 1991 and is a favorite of many local whale watchers, as he is easily identifiable by the large white patch on his right side, as well as white patches on the underside of his flukes.

sightings are posted, along with news, events, and information about the whales of our region. Alert to boaters: All boaters in the North Puget Sound area should take extra caution and go slow during the spring Gray whale season (March – early May). Gray whales (and humpbacks) are often difficult to see or predict where they will surface next, so be alert for whales and give them lots of space. For more information and to view responsible whale watching guidelines visit: www.BeWhaleWise.org. Report A Sighting:

This year, Cascadia Research and Orca Network are happy to announce a collaborative effort to publish a laminated version of Cascadia’s ID guide of North Puget Sound Gray whales, to help whale watchers identify the whales they are watching, and to learn more about each individual whale in this unique, small group of Gray whales who are much beloved seasonal visitors. The guide is available for sale from the Langley Whale Center for $25, as well as from the Orca Network webshop: http://shop. orcanetwork.org/product_p/graywhaleguide. htm The annual spring visit of Gray whales provides an excellent opportunity to view whales from the shorelines of Island and Snohomish counties, or from the Mukilteo/Clinton ferries, much to the delight of residents and visitors alike. Orca Network provides a Whale Sighting Viewpoints Map to help watchers find the best locations for viewing whales from shore at the Langley Whale Center and on their website: www.orcanetwork.org/Main/index. php?categories_file=Viewpoints. To get the latest information on where the whales are, “Like” and “Follow” Orca Network’s Facebook page www.facebook. com/OrcaNetwork where current whale

Whale sightings from the public provide important information about the travels of the whales, and timely reports enable Orca Network to alert researchers who can then obtain photo/video identification and samples from the whales during their time in Puget Sound. Please include the following: Date/Time Species (If uncertain please note as such and describe) Whale (s) location Number of Whales Direction of Travel Observed behaviors (traveling, feeding, breaching, etc.) All sightings are in turn shared with researchers, agencies, and the public through Orca Network’s Whale Sightings email list, the Orca Network website and Facebook and Twitter pages, and at their Langley Whale Center. Where to report: Post directly to Orca Network’s Facebook page Call: (360) 331-3543 or (866) ORCANET Email: info@orcanetwork.org Web form on the website: www.orcanetwork. org/Main/index.php?categories_file=Contact Orca Network’s Whale Sighting Network has followed the travels of these whales, as well as other whales in our region for decades, and BITS & PIECES

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MARCH 8 - MARCH 14, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

AARP Tax Aid Thursdays, March 8, 15, 22, & 29, 1:00pm-7:00pm Island Senior Resources Center 14594 WA-525, Langley

Senior/Military. Students under 18 admitted free (under 14 must be accompanied by a paying adult). Tickets available at Blue Sound Music and Moonraker Books in Langley, bayleaf in Coupeville, and Click Music in Oak Harbor. Cash/check/CC accepted at the door. For information and on-line tickets, please visit sowhidbey.com or call (360) 929-3045.

Dine Out for Kids Fundraiser Monday, March 12, 11:00am-8:00pm Front Street Grill, Coupeville

Free tax return preparation and e-filing for taxpayers with low and moderate income. Supported by AARP Foundation. Call (360) 678-3000 to schedule an appointment. https:// senior-resources.org

A portion of proceeds benefit the Coupeville Schools Foundation.

Italian Four-Part Canzonas

Fun, talented, creative and outgoing Steve DeHaven will get you up and dancing the night away. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Thursday, March 8, 7:00pm St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods Episcopal Church, Freeland The Salish Sea Early Music Festival presents Italian Four-Part Canzonas with renaissance transverse flutist Jeffrey Cohan, dulcian (baroque bassoon) player Anna Marsh, violinist Courtney Kuroda, and violist Stephen Creswell. This quartet of flute, bassoon, violin and viola is representative of ensembles, made up of both stringed and wind instruments, which were common place throughout Europe between 1580 and 1628, when the Italian instrumental four-part canzona, inspired by vocal four-part songs, blossomed in print and performance. Among the composers to be represented are Giovanni Paulo and Andrea Cima, Giovanni Bassano, Girolamo Frescobaldi, and Fiorenzo Maschera. Please see www.salishseafestival. org/whidbey or call (360) 331-4887 for additional information. Admission is by suggested donation: $15, $20 or $25 (a free will offering), and those 18 & under are free.

Sons of the American Legion AllYou-Can-Eat Breakfast Saturday, March 10, 9:00am-12:00pm American Legion, Oak Harbor Hosted by the Sons of the American Legion. $9 all-you-can-eat breakfast supports veterans and their families.

Whidbey Audubon Field Trip Saturday, March 10, 9:00am Greenbank Farm, 765 Wonn Road Explore the Greenbank Farm wetland and the forests of South Whidbey State Park. Meet at the farm for this half-day trip. A variety of bird species are possible including great-blue herons, green-winged teal, Hutton’s vireo and several woodpeckers. Expect to do some walking. All vehicles proceeding to the park will need a state Discover Pass. Trip leader is Steve Ellis, (360) 678-2264.

Live Music: Alex Ashley Saturday, March 10, 6:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville A rare, triple-threat singer, songwriter and instrumentalist, Alex Ashley creates an electrifying amalgam of insightful lyrics, profound storytelling, sultry, smoky vocals and razorsharp guitar playing that brings his songs to life with nostalgic effervescence. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

American Classics & Jazz Saturday, March 10, 7:00pm South Whidbey High School, Langley Sunday, March 11, 2:30pm Oak Harbor High School Saratoga Orchestra of Whidbey Island presents American Classics & Jazz. Music Director, Anna Edwards, leads the orchestra in a program highlighting some of America’s favorite composers of the 20th century. General Admission tickets are $25 Adult and $20

Live Music: Steve DeHaven Friday, March 16, 6:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville

McIntyre Hall Presents: Dervish Friday, March 16, 7:30pm McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon Music from the West of Ireland with passionate vocals and dazzling instrumentals, Dervish have been bringing Irish traditional music to the world for more than 25 years. Described by the BBC as “an icon of Irish music”, the band has played at festivals from Rock in Rio to Glastonbury, toured with the Irish President and struck up tunes on the Great Wall of China. For tickets or more information, call (360) 416-7727 or visit mcintyrehall.org

Pancake Breakfast Fundraiser Saturday, March 17, 9:00am-11:00am Zorba’s Restaurant, 32955 SR 20, Oak Harbor Start your Saint Patrick’s Day celebration off with pancakes, eggs, bacon or sausage for just $10. Proceeds benefit Relay For Life Whidbey Island Leadership Team.

Kritter Fun Day! Saturday, March 17, 10:00am-2:00pm Commercial Building, Island County Fairgrounds, Langley A free, family fun event for all ages featuring prizes, crafts and games! Learn about rabbit, guinea pig and cat care. Pet the cute critters! Watch agility demonstrations. Learn how to fit and show. Meet the breeds! Make some fun and simple rabbit, cat and guinea pig crafts. Sponsored by Kool Kritters Island County 4-H Club and WSU Extension.

Oak Harbor St. Patrick’s Day Parade Saturday, March 17, 1:00pm Pioneer Way, Oak Harbor Featuring Grand Marshal Nora O’ConnellBalda. Organizations and individuals are welcome to enter. The parade is non-political and has no vendors. Please call Mike or Barb at (360) 679-8499 to receive an entry form. Immediately following the parade at the American Legion Hall Corned Beef & Cabbage dinners will be available for $9 a plate.

Whidbey Island Roller Girls vs Storm City Roller Girls Saturday, March 17, 5:30pm Roller Barn, 98 NE Barron Dr, Oak Harbor Admission: Adults $10, Children 12 and under $5 Come watch the Whidbey Island Roller Girls take on the Storm City Roller Girls of Clark County! Doors open at 5:30pm, bout begins at 6:00pm.

Live Music: Ike & the Old Man Saturday, March 17, 6:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville A father and son duo playing an amazing music from the 60’s to present. No cover. For

more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

2018 Local Artists Series Saturday, March 17, 7:30pm Whidbey Island Center For the Arts, Langley Weatherside Whiskey Band is a local alt-country and bluegrass ensemble featuring Tanner McInerney, Amy McInerney, Jakob Singer, and Jacob Yackshaw. Don’t miss this “whiskey-swilling roadhouse outfit” renowned for its down home sounds with three-part harmonies, acoustic guitar, mandolin, drums, and upright bass. Tickets available at (360) 221-8268 or online at www.tickets.wicaonline.org

Raise the Roof at Historic Greenbank Farm Sunday, March 18, 12:30pm-3:00pm Greenbank Farm, 765 Wonn Road A public fundraiser to repair the iconic “Whidbey 1904” barn roof. Featuring local live jazz, lovely decor, home design vignettes, Greenbank Farm Merchants’ fine wines, cheese, pies, and fabulous local art available for purchase. A percentage of proceeds of designated items go directly to the roof fund. Suggested minimum donation $15. Hosted by Seaside & Sylvan Home.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Lit for Fun Book Group: “Citizens of London” Thursday, March 8, 9:00am-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Lynne Olson’s “Citizens of London” the behind-the-scenes story of how the United States forged its wartime alliance with Britain. For adults. 2nd Friday Nonfiction Book Group Friday, March 9, 10:30am-12:00pm Coupeville Library Meeting Room Enjoy reading nonfiction? Bring a friend and join the discussion of “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in an American City” by Matthew Desmond. Adult Mental Health First Aid Monday, March 12, 8:00am-5:00pm Coupeville Library Meeting Room Sometimes first aid isn’t a bandage, CPR, or calling 911. Sometimes, first aid is YOU. A person you know could be experiencing a mental health or substance use problem. Learn an action plan to help. Please preregister. North Sound Writers Group Monday, March 12, 10:00am-1:00pm Freeland Library Join other writers to discuss problem solve share and receive feedback and work on the craft of writing. Everyone is welcome. For more information about this group visit northsoundwriters.com Discuss the Classics with Rita Drum Monday, March 12, 1:30pm Oak Harbor Library Join us as we discuss Jane Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility” in preparation for the Classic Novel that will be performed at the Island Shakespeare Festival! For more information, contact Rita Bartell Drum at ritadrum@gmail.com or (631) 707-5980. Growing Cut Flowers on Whidbey Tuesday, March 13, 1:00pm-3:00pm Coupeville Library Meeting Room This course will provide recommendations for the best flower varieties for growing on Whidbey along with tips and tricks for cultivating, maintaining and preserving your flowers.

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED AARP Tax Aide Wednesdays, March 14, 21 & 28, 10:00am-4:30pm Coupeville Library Meeting Room Free tax return preparation and e-filing for taxpayers with low and moderate income. Call (360) 678-3000 to schedule an appointment. Clinton Book Group: “The Dog Stars” Wednesday, March 14, 10:00am-11:00am Clinton Library Everyone is welcome to join our discussion “The Dog Stars” by Peter Heller. Books are available to check out a month prior to the discussion at the Clinton Library. Next month’s selection is this year’s Whidbey Reads title “Before the Wind” by Jim Lynch. Literature & Laughter Book Group Wednesday, March 14, 6:15pm-7:45pm Coupeville Library Meeting Room Join us for a discussion of “Britt-Marie Was Here” by Fredrik Backman. All are welcome! South Whidbey at Home Book Group: “All the Crooked Saints” Thursday, March 15, 2:00pm-3:15pm Freeland Library Join us for a great book discussion of Maggie Stiefvater’s “All the Crooked Saints.” You don’t need to be a member of South Whidbey at Home to attend - everyone is welcome! Shooting the Stars and the Northern Lights Thursday, March 15, 6:30pm-8:00pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S. Central Ave. Holly Davison, a local landscape photographer with a flair for capturing marvelous night sky scenes will share all she knows about chasing the Northern Lights on Whidbey Island. Bring your camera and your questions! Books2Movies: “The Zookeeper’s Wife” Friday, March 16, 2:00pm-4:30pm Freeland Library This group will focus on books that are also movies. Read/Listen to “The Zookeeper’s Wife” by Diane Ackerman and then join us for the movie and a lively talk.

Galleries & Art Shows Featured Artist: Jaclyn Miller Artist’s Reception: Saturday, March 10, 2:00pm-5:00pm Artworks Gallery, Greenbank Farm Artworks Gallery introduces new member Jaclyn Miller as featured artist for March. A native of Seattle, Jaclyn studied fine art at St. Lawrence University in New York. Jaclyn’s wood art explores themes such as travel and nature now reduced to the simplest elements of color and texture. Many of the reclaimed woods and hardwoods in her art are locally sourced on Whidbey Island. Other Artworks Gallery artists will be on hand to greet visitors during the reception, light snacks and beverages will be available.

Featured Artist: Bev McQuary Meet the Artist: Saturday, March 17, 10:00am-5:00pm Penn Cove Gallery, Coupeville Jewelry artist Bev McQuary will be “playing with fire”, or rather discussing her Italian bead-making process. Glass bead making involves melting colorful glass rods around a mandrel with a propane/oxygen torch and then embellishing them with more glass. The glass beads are then incorporated into unique, one-of-a-kind jewelry pieces with silver or copper wire.

Meetings & Organizations Republican Women of North Whidbey Thursday, March 8, 11:30am Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St. Cost: $10 per person Guest Speaker will be Rick Felici, Candidate for Island County Sheriff. Join us for a tasty lunch while Mr. Felici shares his vision for the Island County Sheriff’s Department. Contact: Rita Bartell Drum at (631) 707-5980 or Ritaddrum777@gmail.com WHAT'S GOING ON

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Summer Hill Open House p. 10 MARCH 8 - MARCH 14, 2018

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Whidbey’s Saratoga Orchestra jazzes it up this weekend By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Whidbey Island’s Saratoga Orchestra is offering two opportunities to hear classics from the Great American Songbook and popular jazz standards during performances this weekend. American Classics and Jazz takes center stage at 7 p.m. Saturday at South Whidbey High School in Langley and again at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at Oak Harbor High School. And, for this weekend only, the Saratoga Orchestra adds even more musicians, creating the Whidbey Jazz Orchestra. “It’s been a number of years since Saratoga Orchestra has been able to program a 'pops' concert featuring American music,” said Larry Heidel, the orchestra’s executive director. “When we found out we had the ability to form our 'Whidbey Jazz Orchestra' with current and former residents of the island, the pieces just fell into place.” Heidel said part of what makes this concert special are the students from all over the island who have a chance to play with the orchestra. “We created the 'High School All-Star Jazz Ensemble' for this concert to highlight the amazing students and school

Photo Courtesy of Saratoga Orchestra The Saratoga Orchestra of Whidbey Island will perform two concerts featuring American classics and jazz this weekend.

programs we have here on the island,” he explained. “Students from Oak Harbor, Coupeville and South Whidbey Jazz Ensembles will play alongside our members. They always bring a certain eagerness to learn and it’s fun to share music together.” Katyrose Jordan, a 2017 graduate of South Whidbey High School, who is currently attending the University of Washington, is back for this program and will be featured on sax and vocals. “It will be great to have Katyrose Jordan…return,” Heidel said. “Katyrose not only brings her 'old soul' vocals but is equally adept on the alto saxophone and will be playing a couple of transcriptions from the Charlie Parker with Strings albums from the 50s.” Another SWHS graduate, Angelique Poteat, is Saratoga Orchestra’s principal clarinet player, and said when she thinks of quintessential American music, she thinks of jazz. “It was truly the first type of American music that stirred up an international craze, and its influence is still prevalent in so much music created even today,” she said. “This program is chock full of great jazz standards, in addition to some patriotic warhorses.”

Photo Courtesy of Angelique Poteat Angelique Poteat will pay homage to Artie Shaw on clarinet at the American Classics and Jazz concerts being performed this weekend in Langley and Oak Harbor by the Saratoga Orchestra.

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RUN THE BRIDGE

The orchestra is conducted by Anna Edwards, but there will be guest conductors for John Philip Sousa’s “Stars and Stripes Forever.” Island County Commissioner Helen Price Johnson

See SARATOGA continued on page 10

Run the famed Deception Pass Bridge!

Photo Courtesy of Saratoga Orchestra Recent South Whidbey High School graduate Katyrose Jordan will join the Saratoga Orchestra to show off her skills on the saxophone as well as her vocals on arrangements from the Great American Songbook.

- Tech Shirts for All Participants - Customized Finisher Medals for All Events - Personalized Participant Bibs - Free Race Photos - Finish Line Celebration with Live Music

Sunday, April 22, 2018 Oak Harbor, WA Register Now at

www.runwhidbey.com Run for a day, play for a weekend!

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MARCH 8 - MARCH 14, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! WEDNESDAY, JAN. 3 12:34 am, SW Erie St. Reporting party advising disorderly female in men's restroom. 5:53 am, Walker Ave. Reporting vehicle in ditch, non-injury; reporting party stopped to try to pull it out, but driver didn't want cops because he doesn't have insurance. 1:51 pm, Silver Fir Dr. Reporting party is meter-reader and heard a muffled voice say “shut the f*** up, get down!” States voice came from inside location; male voice. 2:45 pm, Wingergreen Dr. Party requesting call in reference to harassment over the last few years; has moved from phone/personal contact to social media. 2:57 pm, NE 9th St. Reporting party on foot attempting to find cross street; states a “young” man is running down the path screaming “Sorry, sorry, help me I'm dying.” Male last seen heading in front of the treatment plant. 3:26 pm, Elger Bay Rd. Caller reporting earlier event; was parked in parking lot, pickup pulled up next to caller and a very large woman exited, smashing her car door into caller's door, leaving a very large dent. 5:51 pm, N East Camano Dr. Requesting call referencing filing charges against female who took her internet. 7:04 pm, W Troxell Rd. Advising female came to door and asked if she could come in; stated to caller's son that she needed to flee someone who was harassing her. Caller's son is 13 years old; son let female in. Female walked through home, looked around, then left. 7:12 pm, Summit Blvd. Party requesting contact at police department to report someone posting pictures without her permission. THURSDAY, JAN. 4 9:02 am, Howard Rd. Caller reporting subject outside store harassing and yelling at people, acting crazy; also has a stick in his hand, waving it around. 9:18 am, Britzman Loop Reporting two large dogs running loose and leaving feces all over neighborhood. 11:50 am, NE 9th Ave. Caller reporting issue with raccoons. 1:41 pm, SR 525 Reporting party advising his Harley was stolen two years ago, was not reported. Just got a call from friend saying they possibly saw motorcycle at location today, looked the same as stolen one. 2:48 pm, N Oak Harbor St. Party reporting a bunch of rabbits in a huge box. 4:12 pm, N East Camano Dr. Reporting female on business line upset she was transferred from Island County Sheriff's Office administration when trying to speak to a supervisor; saying she will file an “international complaint with the Department of Justice.”

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7:47 pm, Britzman Loop Advising house next door is vacant most of the year; reporting party heard a sneeze coming from yard. Party advising it is dark, no one seen, no vehicles. 10:08 pm, Pioneer Park Pl. Caller states can smell gas very strong in area near caller's residence; states a truck just drove down Book Woman Ln., believes truck was dumping some kind of chemical waste in area. FRIDAY, JAN. 5 6:36 am, SR 20 Advising tire fell off car at corner of Ault Field Rd. Caller is halfway in road, did not actually crash car, partially blocking. 11:07 am, Crawford Rd. Caller requesting to talk to law enforcement about neighbor accusing him of dumping junk car on his property. 1 pm, Shawn Ave. Requesting call referencing issue retrieving vehicle. Vehicle was given to subject by reporting party's deceased husband to do some repairs; subject is now asking for money before returning vehicle. 2:59 pm, Surface Rd. Party calling on behalf of employer who owns location; advising homeless person squatting on property, dumping laundry, couches and toilets. 5:14 pm, Twilight Ln. Reporting male subject who lives on Twilight Ln. has been outside past two hours; yelling, cursing and crazy. Caller says he does this all the time, but this time has gone on too long. 5:50 pm, NE Melrose Dr. Caller advising suspicious subject standing in driveway. 6:48 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising elderly woman took motorized cart from store. SATURDAY, JAN. 6 12:12 am, SR 525 Caller states tow truck flat bed was just helping caller out; states subjects were bragging about being high and transporting Meth in tow truck. 8:58 am, Cornet Bay Rd. Reporting party advising vehicle parked next to Cornet Bay marina; states dog feces was dumped all over hood. 9:45 am, NW 6th St. Requesting call referencing issues with upstairs neighbor; neighbor's daughter “flipped out” on caller earlier, has been saying things like “i don't like you” to caller when walking past. 2:47 pm, Humphrey Rd. Caller reporting problem with landlord; states landlord tried to have trailer towed last night but left it part way in the yard as they were caught. Landlord is not there now but lives in area. 8:46 pm, Lagoon Point Rd. Reporting loud barking dog; states male who was bothering her is now leaving. Reporting party states she is in the process of moving and male ripped up her nighty. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

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since March 2014 the Langley Whale Center has provided a great venue to learn more about the whales. The Whale Center is now located at 105 Anthes in Langley, one block up from “Whale Bell Park,” where the Whale Bell is rung whenever someone spots a whale in the area. The Langley Whale Center, open Thursdays thru Mondays, also features displays and videos about Gray whales, Orcas and the many other marine mammals of the Salish Sea. Cascadia Research has designed an exhibit for the Langley Whale Center describing the Gray whales in North Puget Sound. Also on display is a gray whale skull, Fin whale skull, and other marine mammal skeletal and specimen displays collected and prepared by Orca Network’s Central Puget Sound Marine Mammal Stranding Network. Visit the Langley Whale Center’s Facebook page for more information: www. facebook.com/LangleyWhaleCenter

Rehabilitation grants are awarded through a competitive application process: in five funding rounds, the Barn Advisory Committee has reviewed over three hundred eighty grant applications. Criteria for funding include, but are not limited to, the historical significance of the barn, urgency of needed repairs, and provision for long-term preservation. Priority is given to barns that remain in agricultural use. Historic agricultural structures listed in the Heritage Barn Register or the National Register of Historic Places, are eligible to receive grant funds. To be eligible for listing in the Heritage Barn Register, barns must be over 50 years old and retain a significant degree of historic integrity. If you have questions about your building’s eligibility or are unsure whether or not your building is listed on the Heritage Barn Register, please contact Michael Houser at (360) 586-3076 or michael.houser@dahp. wa.gov.

NAS Whidbey Island SAR Transports Injured Snowmobiler

All nomination/application materials related to the Heritage Barn Rehabilitation Grant Program can be downloaded from DAHP’s website at: http://dahp.wa.gov/heritagebarngrants

A Search and Rescue (SAR) team of five from Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island conducted a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) from the slopes of Mount Baker to the Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, Wash., Saturday, March 3, 2018.

Barn owners with questions about the grant program are encouraged to contact Jennifer Mortensen at (206) 624-9449 or via email at jmortensen@preservewa.org. Grant applications are due Thursday, May 17, 2018, with grant awards to be announced in late summer.

The SAR crew was notified of an injured snowmobiler on Mount Baker at an elevation of approximately 5,500 feet. The SAR aircraft took off at about 1:00pm and was on the deck near the site approximately 20 minutes later. The patient was then transferred onto the aircraft after a brief assessment by a SAR hospital corpsman. The crew took off at about 1:35pm and delivered the patient to the Harborview Medical Center half an hour later where the patient was turned over to a higher level of care.

[Submitted by Jennifer Mortensen, Washington Trust for Historic Preservation]

[Submitted by Susan Berta, Orca Network]

This was the first rescue of 2018 for NAS Whidbey Island SAR, which has also conducted two searches. The Navy SAR unit operates three MH-60S helicopters from NAS Whidbey Island as search and rescue/medical evacuation (SAR/MEDEVAC) platforms for the EA-18G aircraft as well as other squadrons and personnel assigned to the installation. Pursuant to the National SAR Plan of the United States, the unit may also be used for civil SAR/MEDEVAC needs to the fullest extent practicable on a non-interference basis with primary military duties according to applicable national directives, plans, guidelines and agreements; specifically, the unit may launch in response to tasking by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (based on a Washington State Memorandum of Understanding) for inland missions, and/or tasking by the United States Coast Guard for all other aeronautical and maritime regions, when other assets are unavailable. [Submitted by Thomas Mills, NAS Whidbey Island]

Grant Funding for Heritage Barns Now Available The Washington State Department of Archaeology & Historic Preservation (DAHP) announced this week that applications to request funding through the Heritage Barn Rehabilitation Grant Program are now available. Part of the state’s Heritage Barn Preservation Initiative established in 2007, the grant program assists with rehabilitation projects to stabilize and preserve designated Heritage Barns across the state. Since the program’s inception, Heritage Barn Grant funding has provided assistance to 83 Heritage Barns throughout Washington. “The Heritage Barn Preservation Initiative has achieved the objectives of saving historic barns while raising awareness and educating the public about the critical role of agriculture in our economy and heritage tourism,” noted Dr. Allyson Brooks, director of the State Department of Archaeology & Historic Preservation. “Washington State now boasts nearly 700 designated Heritage Barns spread across all 39 counties statewide, and our agency looks forward to building on the success of the program.”

Water Resources Advisory Committee The Board of Island County Commissioners is seeking applicants for consideration to fill two positions on the Water Resources Advisory Committee (WRAC). One representing Camano Island and an At-Large position. The WRAC consists of twelve voting citizen members, three from each County Commissioner District and three at-large positions. Applicants must reside within the District they wish to represent. These are volunteer positions with 4-year terms. The WRAC functions as the organization used to facilitate consensus decision-making concerning water resource management and planning issues in Island County. Members cooperatively review water resource plans, monitor plan implementation and make recommendations to the Board of Island County Commissioners as well as coordinate efforts with other relevant water resource management activities and encourage public awareness, education and involvement in water related issues. Applicants should be familiar/agreeable with consensus decision-making and have experience with or knowledge of watershed management, groundwater, stormwater, among other water resource interests. For more information, please visit the WRAC website at: https:// www.islandcountywa.gov/Health/DNR/WRAC/ Pages/Home.aspx WRAC meetings are held on the first Thursday of each month from 2:30pm to 4:30pm. Meetings are typically held at the City of Oak Harbor Public Works Facility (1400 NE 16th Avenue, Oak Harbor) or the Camano Island Senior Center (606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island). Subcommittee meetings may be held in addition to monthly meetings. Regular participation is expected. Interested individuals should provide a letter of interest, statement of qualifications and completed applicant questionnaire. The questionnaire is available online at: https://www. islandcountywa.gov/Health/DNR/WRAC/Documents/WRAC-Applicant-Questionnaire.pdf Please submit application materials by mail, email, or fax to one of the following: Mail: Island County Board of Commissioners, Attn: Pam Dill, Re: WRAC Vacancy Post Office Box 5000, Coupeville, WA 98239. Email: pamd@co.island.wa.us Fax: (360) 679-7381 Application materials should be received no later than 4:30pm on Tuesday, March 20, 2018. For additional application information, please phone (360) 679-7353 or e-mail Pam Dill at the above address. [Submitted by Pam Dill]

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Greenbank Progressive Club Monthly Potluck Dinner & Meeting Thursday, March 8, 6:00pm Bakken & Firehouse Roads Clubhouse, Greenbank Meet and greet will begin at 6:00pm with dinner at 6:30pm. Everyone is invited and asked to bring a dish to share and their own table service. The evening’s program will be presented by Tammi Moses of “Homes Are For Living”. Tammi coaches people on how to get to grips with hoarding. Her website Homes are for Living has more details. For us it will be more general along the lines of how to clear clutter from our homes; getting to grips with why we accumulate possessions. Even for those of us who aren’t hoarders we’re hoping she’ll have ideas on how to feel more comfortable with letting surplus stuff go. For rental of the Greenbank Hall, please call (360) 678-4813.

AAUW Women In History Program Saturday, March 10, 10:00am Coupeville United Methodist Church Members of the American Association of University Women (AAUW) Whidbey Island Branch will perform their annual Women in History program. Coffee and refreshments at 9:30am; program at 10:00am. Prospective members welcome. Contact Faye Lovvorn (flovvorn@comcast.net) or Elree Harris (elree64@gmail.com) for further information. The church is located at 608 N. Main St.

Genealogical Society of South Whidbey Island Monday, March 12, 12:45pm Trinity Lutheran Church Annex, Freeland We offer fellowship and support to anyone interested in genealogy. New members and guests are always welcome. Guest Speaker, Steven Morrison, will make two 30 minute presentations (1) Favorite Resources For Irish Genealogy (2) Irish Quakers Migration to Pennsylvania Steven Waltz Morrison has been a professional genealogist since 2006. He is a past president of the Olympia Genealogical Society, and has served multiple positions on the board of the Puget Sound chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists.

Wednesday, March 14, 9:00am Prima Bistro, Langley Members and non-members are welcome. Our speaker will be Sherrye Wyatt of Island County Tourism. She will speak about tourist marketing for Island Country and the WTA Tourism Bill, which just passed. Our other guest will be Brigid Reynolds, from the city of Langley, who will update us on the First Street project planning. The Chamber of Commerce holds Member meetings every month on the second Wednesday at 9:00am.

Relay for Life Wednesday, March 14, 5:30pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St. The Event Leadership Meeting will be held from 5:30pm-6:30pm. Team Relay Rally is from 7:00pm-8:00pm. For more information, email relaywhidbey@gmail.com Thursday, March 15, 9:30am-11:30am Fort Casey State Park Office, Coupeville Are you interested in history? Do you enjoy talking to people about history. Come for an informational meeting about the Fort Casey Volunteer Battalion tour guide program. For more information, call Janet Hall at (360) 678-1186. Thursday, March 15, 6:00pm Deer Lagoon Grange, 5242 Bayview Rd, Langley

How has cancer touched your life?

Pot Luck (bring food to share and your own dishes) followed by meeting and program of “Circumnavigating Whidbey by Kayak” presented by Sue Ellen White, John Goertzel, and Dale Christiansen. All are welcome!

South Whidbey Garden Club Friday, March 16, 9:00am-11:45am St. Peter’s Church, Clinton March’s program: “Low Maintenance Garden Designs.” Deby Kohlwes, an owner of The Grounds Professionals, a landscaping design and maintenance company in Mukilteo, will speak on planning a low-maintenance design including interest and appeal. Deby will also explain how to modify an existing garden to become more manageable. Refreshments provided. The public is welcome. For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Are you interested in becoming a volunteer at the Langley Whale Center or other Orca Network programs? Join current volunteers at our monthly volunteer no host coffee or email wendylsines@gmail.com for more information.

W.I.G.S. (Whidbey Island Genealogical Searchers) Tuesday, March 13, 1:00pm Heller Road, Fire Station #25, Oak Harbor “Finding your Ancestors and other Information on Censuses” will be presented by John Richter and Dave Flomerfelt, members of W.I.G.S. All are welcome to attend.

Even though I was diagnosed when I was two years old, I had never lost anyone to cancer until my grandmother died in 2003 and my grandfather in 2005. It hit me pretty hard Photo Courtesy of Ryan Neal Ryan Neal is a cancer survivor and a regular participant in Relay and it was those losses, combined with the for Life stories my parents have told me about what I went through, that really showed me just how devastating this disease is. How did you become involved in Relay for Life? I used to be involved with the relay on the east side of the mountains and when we moved over here, my parents heard about the Whidbey relay from the kind people at Upchurch Scientific. Why do you Relay? To contribute, in whatever way I can, to helping people who are fighting this disease, and to remember and honor those who have been taken by it. How has your participation in Relay for Life impacted you? It’s given me an understanding that I never had. Having had cancer at such a young age, I never truly understood how much of an impact cancer has on not only the person who has it, but those around them. That all changed after I lost my grandparents and realized that this is how those close to me felt when I was diagnosed.

Learn to Dance at Dan’s Classic Ballroom.Com!

Tuesday, March 13, 11:00am Whidbey Doughnuts, 5603 Bayview Rd, Langley

Ryan Neal Oak Harbor

Whidbey Island Sea Kayakers

Oak Harbor Garden Club

Langley Whale Center Volunteer Coffee

The Faces of Relay

Volunteer Tour Guides Needed

Classes, Seminars and Workshops

The program will begin about 11:00am and will be given by Robin Pokorski, National Garden Club Leadership Development Chairman. She will speak on how to help increase membership or stay motivated and to participate. You’ll learn a lot and have a good time learning it. She has presented this Forum to garden clubs all over the country as well as outside the garden club world to other non-profit organizations. All are welcome to attend. The church is located at 1050 SW Ireland St.

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Langley Chamber of Commerce Meeting

Open forum at 11:45am. Bring your genealogy questions and brick walls. Beginning Education class at 11:45am. “Filing What You Have” Tuesday, March 13, 9:00am First United Methodist Church, Oak Harbor

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What is your favorite part about being involved in Relay for Life?

Ballroom, Latin, Swing, Club Dances Groups, Privates, Wedding Prep (360) 720-2727 - dcb601@comcast.net

The people. The people whom I have had the honor of getting to know, hearing their stories and just being able to be a positive part of something that helps so many people.

Sacred Stories & Rites of Passage

Why should others participate?

Saturday, March 10, 10:00am-11:30am South Whidbey Commons, Langley Throughout history, sacred stories and rites of passage from world religions, cultures and traditions have served humanity, especially youth, in various and profound ways. Join Whidbey Island Waldorf School as they examine the role of sacred stories in the world; past, present and future, and how these can serve as rites of passage, leading and guiding children on their authentic path. In order to know how many chairs to set out please RSVP with Karina at enrollment@wiws.org. Dropins welcome! This special free morning Adult Education talk is facilitated by WIWS Grades 5 & 6 teacher Angela Lindstrom.

Seed Selection and Germination Class Sunday, March 11, 12:00pm-2:00pm South Whidbey Tilth, 2812 Thompson Rd, Langley Cost: $8 Tilth members, $15 non-members Farmer and educator Anza Muenchow presents tips for successfully starting seeds for your vegetable garden. Learn which varieties WHAT'S GOING ON

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I don’t know if I would use the word should. I don’t want anyone to think they should be obligated, but if they did, just once, participate in a relay, they would see just how much it means to those who have fought and are fighting this disease every day. If they did that, I think they would feel the way most of us do...how could you not want to help?

UNITED FOR A CURE

Relay For Life Of Whidbey Island June 1-2, 2018

Team Meeting: March 14, 7-8pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge

Come join us and see for yourself what Relay For Life is all about! Website: RelayForLife.org/whidbeyislandwa Email: relaywhidbey@gmail.com • Facebook: www.facebook.com/whidbeyrelay

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Summer Hill offers new view of assisted living By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

Summer Hill Assisted Living in Oak Harbor has a lot to celebrate. The senior living community is celebrating its newly remodeled dining room and lobby with a public open house from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, March 15. All are invited to check out the renovations, listen to music from Island Jazz Collective, enjoy Northwestthemed appetizers and desserts and take in jewelry and weaving displays by Whidbey Island artist Marcy Johnson. But those who live and work at Summer Hill have even more reasons to smile. The community, built in 1986, has recently earned stellar reviews from not only residents, but from industry professionals as well. Summer Hill was recently one of three facilities in the state to receive the Silver Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award for outstanding performance in the health care profession, presented by the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living. The award is based on the nationally recognized Malcolm Baldrige Performance Excellence Program, and challenges member providers to achieve excellence through three progressive levels — bronze,

silver, and gold. Summer Hill, which previously won the Bronze National Quality Award in 2013, is one of 27 assisted living facilities in the nation to be recognized. “We are all so proud of this recognition,” Leslie Burns, executive director of Summer Hill, said in a press release. “The key to our success is our committed team. Their hard work and dedication for improving the lives of the residents we care for every day is why we are in this position.”

In addition to the Silver Quality Award, the facility has also been rated the “Best of Assisted Living in Oak Harbor for 2018” by SeniorAdvisor.com, a designation handed out to the top one-percent of providers in the U.S. and Canada. This comes on the heels of an Excellence in Action award bestowed upon Summer Hill in 2016 by the National Research Corporation. “Wow, it’s overwhelming to know you are part of something that big,” Burns said. It is all big recognition for a relatively small facility such as Summer Hill, which boasts 59 apartments – three studio units, six two-bedroom units and 50 one-bedroom units. But there is more; the senior living community offers a salon, a fitness center, a game and

Photo Courtesy of Summer Hill Assisted Living Mikhaila Reed, a dietary team member, started as a volunteer at Summer Hill through Oak Harbor Public School’s Transition Program, and was hired full time once she completed the program.

activity room and the convenience of a newly remodeled dining room that serves residents from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. The facility offers its residents independent living in a community atmosphere. But even with all the accolades, there are still some misconceptions about what assisted living is really like. “When the people who are living in our building now were looking at care for their parents, for example, there were not a lot of options then,” said Heidi Kuzina, director of sales and marketing for Summer Hill. “Options then were limited to in-home care or nursing homes, many of which had bad reputations back then,” she said. “They didn’t have the choices we do now. The assisted living concept is really fairly new, so there is still a little bit of a fear factor when it comes to senior living.” Kuzina admits the adjustment from being on their own to being in an assisted living facility takes a little time. But residents are able to bring their own furnishings and belongings with them to make them feel at home from the start. The big added benefit is residents know there is assistance available to them 24 hours a day should they need it. “We tell our residents we can’t promise it will be easy, but we’ll walk the road with them,” Kuzina said. “We want them to maintain the quality of life they’re used to, we just help them pull it off.”

Photo Courtesy of Summer Hill Assisted Living Summer Hill Assisted Living in Oak Harbor is holding an open house from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, March 15 to celebrate the remodeling of its dining room as well as several recent awards.

Summer Hill’s commitment to its residents extends to the community as well. The facility has been recognized multiple times by Oak Harbor Public Schools for its participation in the Transitions Program, which provides onthe-job and life skills training to students with

Photo Courtesy of Summer Hill Assisted Living Senior living at Summer Hill in Oak Harbor means independent living with a community atmosphere. The facility offers fun-filled activities throughout the year, such as spooky Halloween punch served with style by sales and marketing director Heidi Kuzina.

special needs. That partnership has provided training for more than 20 youth. “I love being able to make a difference,” said Kuzina. “I love the diversity of our residents, hearing about their lives and getting to know them and their families. That’s the best.” More information is available online at SummerHillSenior.com. The facility is located at 165 SW 6th Ave. in Oak Harbor.

SARATOGA continued from page 7 will lead the piece at Saturday’s concert, and Oak Harbor Public Schools Superintendent, Lance Gibbon, will conduct the piece Sunday. Guest conductors aside, it is the caliber and talent of its musicians which make the magic that is the Saratoga Orchestra. “As a SWHS grad (i.e., native), I grew up in the midst of the rich and diverse music scene on Whidbey,” said Poteat. “I’m more surprised when I hear about places that don’t have the scope of talent we’re used to on the island. The fantastic environment and community of Whidbey draws in art appreciators and a broad spectrum of world-class artists, which in turn foster the next generation of musicians.” The pool of talented musicians in the Saratoga Orchestra runs deep, whether they hail from Whidbey Island or not. “We are also lucky to have John Wylie on tenor sax,” Heidel said. “John was formerly in the Navy’s 7th Fleet Band and taught at the Navy’s music school, teaching jazz improvisation. John is now stationed at NAS Whidbey until next month, so the timing worked out well for us to be able to showcase his talents.” Poteat and Wylie will be joined by jazz bassist Keegan Harsh-

man (another SWHS alum) and Julian Garvue, who is an award-winning jazz pianist based in New York City. Together they will celebrate some of America’s greatest composers and might even put a Whidbey Island spin on things. “Jazz and popular standards are much more open to our individual interpretation,” said Heidel. “For instance, George Gershwin’s popular song 'Summertime,' from his opera 'Porgy and Bess,' has been recorded over 33,000 times, each interpretation as unique as the next.” General admission tickets to either performance are $25 for adults and $20 for seniors/military. Students under 18 are admitted free (those under 14 must be accompanied by a paying adult). Tickets are available at Blue Sound Music and Moonraker Books in Langely, bayleaf in Coupeville and Click Music in Oak Harbor. Information and online tickets are available at sowhidbey.com. “I think the audience will enjoy the variety, the energy (I’d be wanting to dance in the aisles for much of this concert!), and the wonderful local talent we’re so fortunate to have,” said Poteat.

Photo Courtesy of Saratoga Orchestra John Wylie, of NAS Whidbey Island and former member of the Navy’s 7th Fleet Band, will play tenor sax at this weekend’s concerts by the Saratoga Orchestra of Whidbey Island.

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11 MARCH 8 - MARCH 14, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

By Carey Ross A Wrinkle in Time: Ava DuVernay, who expertly helmed "Selma" to great critical acclaim only to be ignored by the Oscars, is back with this adaptation of the beloved science fantasy novel, and this time she’s packing the most powerful secret weapon in the world: Oprah. ★★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 49 min.) Annihilation: Fresh off "Ex Machina" and with major studio backing, Alex Garland is back, this time with a sci-fi thriller about a mysterious and malevolent “Area X” and those who explore it, including Natalie Portman, Jennifer Jason Leigh, and my movie-star boyfriend, Oscar Isaac. ★★★★ (R • 2 hrs.) Black Panther: The Marvel Cinematic Universe pretty much kicks ass all over the place, never more so than with this long-time-coming installment starring Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, and Lupita Nyong’o and directed by "Creed" and "Fruitvale Station's" Ryan Coogler. Move over, Captain America. Black Panther has arrived. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 14 min.) Death Wish: The father of torture porn, Eli Roth, re-imagines the 1974 NYC mean streets classic, this time with Bruce Willis dealing out vigilante justice instead of Charles Bronson. I could say something about how the world might not need a movie that glorifies gun violence and taking matters into one’s own hands right now, but I’m pretty sure we stopped taking Willis too seriously right around the third time he died hard. ★ (R • 1 hr. 47 min.) Every Day: One of those YA movies about destiny and love against the odds that teaches teenagers to have impossible and potentially harmful ideas about what constitutes romance and relationships. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 35 min.) Game Night: A weekly couples game night goes awry when a murder mystery gets a little too real, and Jason Bateman, Rachel McAdams, and others must play sleuth to rescue a kidnapped Kyle Chandler. A comedy that should be terrible, but because of the gifts of Bateman and McAdams, it works. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 33 min.) The Greatest Showman: I can think of few people more equipped to portray P.T. Barnum, i.e. the “showman” in question, than Hugh Jackman, who is a bit like a charismatic human circus himself. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 45 min.)

packed YA film franchise that gave him his film career–and then almost took it away. An inspiring story. Shame the movie itself isn’t as good. ★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 22 min.) Peter Rabbit: A rabbit reboot in which Peter is hip now, if hip and being voiced by James Corden are things that can coexist. I’m confused. Critics are confused. Leave Peter alone, Hollywood. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 33 min.)

360-682-2341 • www.whidbeyweekly.com

The Strangers: Prey at Night: A family stops at a secluded mobile home park in the dark of night to stay with relatives. Despite the fact it is a deserted trailer park in the middle of nowhere, they elect to stay. They deserve whatever is coming to them. ★★ (R • 1 hr. 25 min.)

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Movie Hotline 360-279-2226 Book A Party or Special Showing 360-279-0526 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

www.farawayentertainment.com

Friday, March 9 & Saturday, March 10

A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) DOUBLE FEATURE! Sunday, March 11

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A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13)

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COMING SOON: 12 STRONG, GAME NIGHT, 3/16 TOMB RAIDER 3/23 PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3/29 READY PLAYER ONE

TRIPLE FEATURE!

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri: When Frances McDormand, glorious human, won her Best Actress Oscar, she invited all of the other women nominated across all categories to stand and then said, “We all have stories to tell and projects we need financed. Don’t talk to us about it at the parties tonight. Invite us into your office in a couple days, or you can come to ours, whatever suits you best, and we’ll tell you all about them.” Solidarity, sister. ★★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 55 min.)

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A WRINKLE IN TIME PG BLACK PANTHER PG-13 HURRICANE HEIST PG-13

The Shape of Water: If you’d told me this year’s Best Picture winner would be a love story between a mute woman and a merman, I might not have believed you. If you’d followed it up by telling me it was gorgeous and poignant and directed by Guillermo del Toro (who also won for Best Director), it would start to make perfect sense. ★★★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 3 min.)

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FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT YOUR LOCAL MOVIE THEATER

Red Sparrow: This is a movie that repeatedly uses sexual assault as a plot device intended to “toughen up” main character Jennifer Lawrence. Possibly related: This movie was made by a man. I’d like to meet him. I have some things to say. ★ (R • 2 hrs. 19 min.)

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Like us on:

The Post: When I watched Steven Spielberg’s star-studded (Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks, Alison Brie, Bob Odenkirk) recounting of the race to publish the Pentagon Papers by "The Washington Post" and the legal battle that ensued, the audience in the theater clapped and cheered at a couple of points along the way. See it, applaud if you are so inclined and be reminded of the power of the press in protecting America from itself. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 55 min.)

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360-679-4003 877-679-4003 www.seatacshuttle.com

Maze Runner: The Death Cure: This was the film that almost didn’t happen when its For Anacortes theater showings, please see star, Dylan O’Brien, was seriously injured in www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak an on-set accident. After a long, arduous Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this recovery, he returned to finish outPuzzle the1 (Hard, actionpage. difficulty rating 0.63)

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Box Office & Snack Bar Opens At 4pm • 1st Movie Begins At Dusk 11 & Over $6.50; Kids 5-10 $1.00; 4 & Under Free Go Karts Now Open Sat.11am - Dusk, Sun. 12:30pm-Dusk

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1403 N Monroe Landing Rd • Oak Harbor • 360-675-5667 www.bluefoxdrivein.com

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Wed Feb 21 21:11:20 2018 GMT. Enjoy!

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Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

THE TEMPTING TASTES OF SPRING Soon we will spring forward. We’ll turn the clocks ahead one hour and feel that hour immensely! But it isn’t so bad when you think of all the awesome things spring brings. It brings with it a little rain (but that’s kind of a given here in the Pacific Northwest) and a bunch of sunshine and all of it together allows the beauty of our region to flourish. Beauty can be found everywhere we choose to see it and one of the places I find beauty abounding is in a homemade, handcrafted garden of any sort. Whether edibles or merely ‘beautifuls,’ a garden is a fabulous thing. Of course, what makes any garden better is if you can obtain that which you have worked hard for, and turn it into fuel for your body. I like to eat ‘seasonally.’ By that, I don’t mean I just eat when eating is in season – if that were even a thing it would be dangerous and silly. Rather, I eat whatever produce is in season. I use it to the max in as many of my meals as possible. Spring means a host of fresh goodies for a vast and seemingly endless array of options as far as cooking is concerned. So what’s usually available during the season? Asparagus This garden delight is an excellent source of fiber, which acts as a ‘broom’ if you will, helping to ‘sweep’ the digestive tract clear of ‘backups.’ In addition, it’s a fabulous source of vitamins A, C, E and K as well as folate. It is also purported to be rich in antioxidants, touted for the ability to combat harmful free radicals. To top all of these wonderful attributes, asparagus is incredibly versatile. From oven-baked garlic spears to chicken-wrapped asparagus, this is one vegetable that can assume any role and become the star. Mint This is one of my favorite herbs. It can be used in so many ways and it's why I love it so much. Whether fresh or dried, in food

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and drinks alike, each time it’s used it lends something new to the dish or drink it is in – yet always maintains its distinctive flavor and aroma. Mint incorporates approximately 20 species under its familial umbrella. It contains menthol, a naturally derived aromatic decongestant which is great when we get a cold. In addition, it has the ability to soothe and cool inflamed passageways, such as a sore throat, so a little mint tea can really go a long way when we’re feeling under the weather. And these aren’t, by any stretch of the imagination, the only ways in which mint helps us from a ‘natural medicinal’ standpoint. This powerful little leaf holds other great benefits. Equally numerous are the ways in which we can cook with and enjoy it. From mint and ginger lemonade (which will be excellent as the days warm up), pesto, roasted carrots, desserts and even to fruit salads, mint is there – at the forefront and hanging out in the background, too. There’s no benching this mighty leaf in any way, shape or form! Peas An excellent source of vitamins B1 and K, these tiny green yummies pack a tasty punch in the health line. With the added benefit of being rich in copper, manganese, vitamin C, iron and potassium among others, you’re sure to get some goodness out of any meal that uses peas. Like so many other spring vegetables and pulses, these guys are so malleable. They can be transformed into anything. From creamed peas to ham and split pea soup, they can take center stage. If you want to give them a smaller part in your meal, that’s totally fine too, because they make a wonderful addition to pasta salads, tortellini dishes, stews, pot pies and more. Any way you can possibly think to use peas, there is likely a recipe for it out there! Strawberries I know, so predictable and cliché almost, but what’s better than walking into your local store’s produce section or visiting your local farmers market or co-op and smelling

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the sweet and inviting fragrance with which strawberries tantalize us? It’s not only delicious, but rich in antioxidants too. Strawberries contain polyphenols, which help support the regeneration of cells, maintain them and aid in the support of a healthy immune system. Oh, aren’t the ways in which to enjoy these delectable, red, luscious lovelies endless? Fresh and juicy just like that is by far the best way to eat them, but to be sure, so is drizzling a little dark chocolate over them. How about making a refreshing strawberry granita? With spring bringing warmer temperatures, the uses are countless, and getting creative in the kitchen is so much fun, particularly if you can pop a strawberry or two in your mouth while you turn the rest into something amazing! Dear readers, spring is about so many things. It’s when days get longer gradually, and winter releases its chilly grip on the land. The flowers and foliage radiate their magnificence and things grow with all their might. If you plan to grow a garden, now is the time to do it! If not, I encourage you to browse the produce section of the grocery stores, visit veggie patches, and get a sense of what’s in season. Not only can it be a little more cost effective, it’s fun working with what’s on hand. Just remember, any and all information I included about the health benefits these garden yummies hold must never be substituted for your doctor’s advice. I just like to add a little informational oomph to the tasty oomph certain foods naturally have. I am including a recipe for a simple strawberry syrup because it would make a scrumptious topping to pancakes and waffles alike! I hope you enjoy it as much as we do and if you have any comments, questions or recipes you would like to share, please send those to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail. com and we’ll do exactly that – Dish! Strawberry Syrup 1 cup water 1 cup sugar 2 cups quartered strawberries In a medium saucepan over medium to high heat, combine water and sugar. Stir until sugar is completely dissolved. Mix strawberries into the saucepan and bring to a boil. Boil for ten minutes and then reduce heat to medium/low and simmer until strawberries are extremely soft and mushy. The sauce should be thick. This should take about ten minutes on medium/low heat. Strain the liquid into a jar or bottle and refrigerate. Use on pancakes, waffles or even as an extra treat over a scoop of chocolate or vanilla ice cream and enjoy! www.medicalnewstoday.com www.allrecipes.com/recipe/223462/simplestrawberry-syrup/ To read past columns of Let's Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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work best in our region, when to start inside or sow outside, how to avoid damping-off and the process for hardening-off seedlings before transplanting outdoors. You can take seedlings home ($5 per tray). For information and to register, contact Tilth Education at education@ southwhidbeytilth.org.

NRA Personal Protection In The Home Friday, March 16, 6:00pm-9:00pm Saturday, March 17, 8:00am-6:00pm NWSA Range, Oak Harbor Cost: $35, includes a book This class builds on skills already gained in other shooting classes and shooting styles, which the student must be able to show documentation or competency. The class also gives a thorough legal brief on the provisions of law pertaining to the ownership and use of a firearm. Defensive shooting skills are emphasized in this class. This class includes shooting on the NWSA Pistol Range, located at 886 Gun Club Road, off Oak Harbor Road. For questions or to register, call NRA instructor John Hellmann at (360) 675-8397 or email NWSA.Training@gmail.com. Additional information can be found at www.northwhidbeysportsmen.org.

Never Alone: How Spiritual Ideas Work In Us Saturday, March 17, 11:00am First Church of Christ, Scientist, Oak Harbor Melanie Wahlberg, CS will discuss how to feel God’s presence in tangible ways. Co-sponsored by the South Whidbey Christian Science Society. Free admission and parking, childcare available. The church is located at 721 SW 20th Court. For more information, call (360) 969-1693 or email csrroh@comcast.net

Bond Investing Amidst Interest Rate Uncertainty Tuesday, March 20, 5:30pm-6-30pm Coupeville Library, 788 NW Alexander St. Free Bonds are a critical part of a fully diversified portfolio. Join us for this free educational seminar to help you better understand how your portfolio may be affected when interest rates rise or fall. By understanding the mechanics around how bond prices are affected by changes in interest rates, you can learn how to prepare your portfolio for an uncertain market environment. Dinner included! Please RSVP at (360) 678-6580.

Dining Guide Stop by after the St. Patrick’s Day Parade for our 1 Year Anniversary Celebration!

Zanini’s Catering & Events

We create the event... ...You create the memories Catering by Design • 360-320-3168 www.zaniniscateringandevents.com

Breakfast & Lunch on the Water - Daily Fresh Baked Treats Homemade Soups & Sandwiches 360.678.5431 • 4 Front Street • Coupeville

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1191 SE Dock St, #2 • Oak Harbor 360-675-6500 chrisbakeryonwhidbey.weebly.com

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Whidbey Weekly

MARCH www.whidbeyweekly.com 8 - MARCH 14, 2018 LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

common sense, and you’ll be fine. This is a good time, if you let it be so. Watch the 10th for signs you’re on the right path and move on quickly if you’re not.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Narrow your scope, and focus, focus, focus if you hope to achieve your goals this week. The options open to you are many, far more than you have time or energy to pursue. That means you must choose your battles carefully, or risk dissipating yourself in aimless pursuits that go nowhere and yield nothing. Work smarter, not harder. Obstacles on the 10th may be directional markers pointing out your path. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Look no farther than the people with whom you interact daily to find examples of crisis management this week. Before you follow their example, look to see how they fare. Examples of what not to do may be among your most valuable lessons. If you keep good company, you may see principles of success being acted out that you can apply in your own life. If so, you need not wait for a crisis to apply them. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Keep it light and keep moving this week if you hope to avoid getting mired helplessly in the quagmires of others. This is not to say you should not lend a hand if you can. But do try not to get pulled in. Two in the swamp of dismal doings helps no one, least of all you. Keep your feet under you and your platform firm, and you should have no difficulty staying out of trouble. The 10th is rife with positive opportunities. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Optimism is contagious, and this week you figure to be its most infectious carrier. Your good mood and positive spirit are much in demand everywhere you go. The effects of your presence linger behind you long after you go, so be aware of the fact and make a conscious effort to smile. The good that you do is more than you know. Watch the 10th for signs that there is something more tangible to do. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Charisma is your most potent asset this week. You may not feel that now is any different from other, more ordinary times, but be assured there is a certain air about you that appeals to others. New contacts are likely to see in you only what they want and need to see. Relationships formed now will shift their dynamic later as the effect wears off. The 10th is likely to deliver possibilities not available at other times. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Small steps methodically applied are your keys to progress this week. Companionship is the way beyond the down moods that are likely to be swirling. Bum company is to be avoided at all costs. Choose your associations well, using reasonable care and

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Your demeanor is the key to successfully delivering some potentially bitter pills this week. Sweetness is the coating that allows others to ingest your particular brand of doing and being. This makes you a potent force in the lives of others, since your delivery is kind, even when the message is not. You can sway others to your way of thinking on the 10th. Watch for opportunities you won’t get any other day. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Rigid attitudes are a fact of life this week, with the greatest rigidity likely to be your own. This can be a good thing if your beliefs are sound and your intentions good. You are a potent force in any case. Marshal your energies and pick your causes wisely, and you can achieve much in a short time. Be careful on the 10th that you don’t confuse motion with action. You’ll know the difference by the result. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) What you lack in finesse this week, you’ll easily make up in intensity. Your normally gung-ho approach to life is apt to be notched up even more, making you a force to be reckoned with. You are most effective in those areas of life that require you think outside of yourself, such as joint finance and psychology, but nothing is off limits to you. Pick the area of life you want to improve and then tackle it. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If it seems that you’re having to spend too much time working your way free of restrictive people and circumstances, you’re not wrong. It’s a time of facing up to whatever inadequacies and shortcomings limit you, so they can be eliminated. Later down the road your path will become smoother and easier, and the time spent in making it so will seem like time well spent. The 10th offers tools toward that end. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) When it comes to recognition and reward for your achievements in life, it’s within your reach now to take matters in hand and make it happen. In your drive to get your just desserts, be aware that it’s all too easy to overstep your authority. In so doing, you work against yourself, meaning that this is a good week to step lightly. Be aware on the 10th of this tendency to stray out of bounds. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Your normal tendency toward generosity is heighted at present, making it easy for you to over-give of yourself. The cosmic ledger has ways of balancing itself in that regard, meaning that it’s just as likely now that you’ll find yourself benefitting from unexpected gifts. These might come simply in the form of kindness from others when you least expect it. Whichever way the currents run on the 10th, flow with them. © 2018, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

CLUES ACROSS 1. Builder’s trough 4. Pouch 7. Adam’s partner 8. Zelda soldiers 10. Network of nerves 12. Heinrich __, poet 13. Algerian port 14. Reciprocal of one ohm

43. Doctor of Education

18. Home to the Celtics

44. Where the Knicks play

19. Title given to Italian monk

45. Basics

20. Drunkards

46. Tall tropical American trees

22. Cylindrical containers

48. Men wear them

23. South American plants

49. Widespread destruction

24. Frozen water

16. Title of respect

50. Midway between north and northeast

17. Form of expression

51. Vast body of water

28. Not in

19. Hoover’s office

52. Hair product

29. Journalist and suffragist Wells

CLUES DOWN

31. Consumed

20. Samoan monetary unit 21. Cooperation 25. Fiddler crabs 26. Portion of a play 27. Tropical American shrub 29. Frosts 30. Short-winged diving seabird 31. Chemical compound used as a hardener (abbr.)

27. Town in Galilee

32. Edible Mediterranean plant

1. Very brave 2. Go too far 3. Individual feature 4. Drug trials term (abbr.)

33. Poke fun of 34. “First in Flight” state

5. Has emerged

35. Fortifying ditch

6. Helped the Spanish conquer Mexico

36. Receding

8. Northern Vietnam ethnic group

32. Diversion

9. Dried-up

39. __ Turner, rock singer

11. Reactive structures (abbr.)

41. __-bo: exercise system

14. Licensed for Wall Street

42. Large, edible game fish

15. Japanese conglomerate

37. Christian liturgical creed 38. Used to decorate Xmas trees 39. High-__: complex 40. Thoughts 44. __ and cheese 47. Constrictor snake Answers on page 15

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock, as a professional astrologer, looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www.chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, March 8

Fri, March 9

Sat, March 10

Sun, March 11

Mon, March 12

Tues, March 13

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-52°/L-43°

H-50°/L-39°

H-53°/L-43°

H-58°/L-44°

H-54°/L-45°

H-55°/L-41°

H-51°/L-39°

Rain

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Sunny

Partly Sunny

Rain Possible

Cloudy

Wed, March 14

Rain

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-51°/L-41°

H-49°/L-37°

H-53°/L-42°

H-57°/L-44°

H-53°/L-44°

H-53°/L-41°

H-51°/L-39°

Rain

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Sunny

Partly Sunny

Rain Possible

Cloudy

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Rain


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MARCH 8 - MARCH 14, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Property Management You Can Count On!

Whidbey Residential Rentals, Inc. We Manage Your Home As If It Were Our Own. 360-675-9596 • www.whidbeyres.com 285 NE Midway Blvd • Suite #2 • Oak Harbor ANNOUNCEMENTS

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call (360) 221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child's life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. (425) 923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin' Alive team. Our team's mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSou ndDragonBoatClub?ref=hl Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help. If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has Advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line (888) 388-9221. Free Service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET

ful, growing organization and have a strong work ethic, we want to talk to you. Email your cover letter and resume to info@whidbeyweekly.com DRIVERS: Drivers wanted for Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle. CDL/ P2 Preferred, Training available for those without. Full Time, Part Time and weekend openings available. Details at www. seatacshuttle.com or call (360) 679-4003

PART TIME BAKER: Meals JEWELRY on Wheels/Senior Meals has Wide silver cuff bracelet with an immediate opening for a a 1-1/4" square blue green dipart time baker at the Langley chroic glass and wire wrapped Central Kitchen. Quantity beads, $49 OBO; Multi-stone Cooking Experience Preferred (moss agate, chalcedony etc.) & Team player. Able to lift 35 stretch bracelet, $20 OBO; lbs. Submit your resume at IsChrysoprase pendant with land Senior Resources: 14594 interesting silver chain, $75 SR 525, Langley, WA 98260. OBO; Beautiful sterling silver Closes March 21 or until filled. and sapphire earrings, $49 For details, call Debbie (360) OBO; Glass tube bead (blue/ 321-1621. ISR is an EOE (2) purple tones) bracelet, $25 FULL TIME AUTO TECHNIOBO; Interesting glass pin in CIAN: Martin’s Auto in Oak shades of blue, $5. Call (360) Harbor is seeking a full time 331-1063 (1) auto technician, Monday thru Oval amethyst ring set in Friday. Apply in person at 152 sterling silver, $45 OBO; White NE Midway Blvd (3) button pearl earrings 8mm, ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE: We No Cheating! are looking for a dynamic Account Executive. Applicant has to be able to work autonomously and be self-motivated; must possess exceptional customer service and organizational skills; marketing or advertising background desired. If you want to join a successPuzzle 1 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.63)

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$29 OBO; Pale blue Baroque pearl earrings 9-10mm, $39 OBO. Call (360) 331-1063 (1)

LAWN AND GARDEN 25 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new 8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. (360) 321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey (360) 321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS Marriage sale – joining two households. Trundle bed, stylish curved wooden frame with two mattresses, one slides under, great for the guest room or as twin beds for kids, $65; Blonde sofa set – sofa, matching chair and ottoman, comfortable, some minor cosmetic spots, $25; Hitachi Ultravision, 42-in tv on 20-in base, great picture and stereo sound, $45; 30’ x 40’ x 28” high sturdy utility table, steel legs, $15; Glider exercise unit, $10; Long-

LOCALLY OPERATED

Foster Homes Needed! Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

handled fishing net, 9’ - 6-½ foot handle, $15; electric drill, $5; Ears for running outboard out of water, $3 each; Shower aid grip handle, suction cup mounting, $3; Foot powered bicycle pump, $2; Post hole digger, $10; Weller welding gun, new, in box, $10; Folding chaise lounge, $5; Cloth 2 x 5 x 12 with 4 shelves & plastic cover – greenhouse for starting seeds, $15; Stinger 2½-gal wet/dry vac, $15; Old-fashioned woven picnic basket w/ hinged cover, $5; Delta bench band saw, model28-185, make offer; Free glider/walker exercise machine. Coupeville (360) 678-7591 (1) Over 50 LP (vinyl) albums for sale, various artists, pristine condition, $3 each. Call (360) 331-1063 (1) Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father's Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about

50-60 of these available. They are $16.00/ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH preferred. Dimensions are: 5-6"W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses, prefer German or Japanese. Oak Harbor, call (970) 823-0002 (1)

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

DID YOU KNOW MOST CLASSIFIED ADS ARE FREE? Contact us for more info! classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com

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Business Spotlight You’re In Luck!

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144 NE Ernst Street, Suite C Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 675-8239

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Lucas Jushinski, owner of Island Herb

Discover the Island’s YOU’RE Best Cannabis INVITED! Island Herb is a 21+ recreational cannabis retail shop and dispensary located on the south end of beautiful Whidbey Island, Washington in the town of Freeland. In many ways, Island Herb is unique among dispensaries. It strives to be Whidbey Island's destination pot shop. From the moment you walk in the door, you can tell there's something different here. Lucas Jushinski, Island Herb’s founder, envisioned a space that felt warm and inviting rather than cold and clinical. He brought this vision to life through creativity, color, and a great deal of art he's handpicked over the course of his travels. It's a space that's open, airy, and welcoming of people from all walks of life. "In many ways," says Lucas, "the store is a true representation of who I am and the journey I've been on."

It's not just the decor that's different though. Eric, Island Herb's manager, sums up the store’s ethos nicely, "We believe in people. We treat our own people well and love to give back to the community that’s supported our growth on the island.” This passion for people translates to the entire team. Each of whom goes through the medical cannabis program at Seattle Central Community College after they're hired. All of Island Herb's employees are approachable and, above all, able to answer any questions thrown their way. Island Herb has multiple daily and weekly specials, including: • Throwback Thursdays 20% Off Select Sitka Products

BIGGEST PAINT SALE OF THE YEAR

NEIGHBORHOOD PAINT PARTY! ACE

WHEN: SATURDAY, MARCH 24 11AM - 2PM

COLOR OF THE YEAR CONTEST CREATE AND NAME YOUR OWN COLOR AND WIN!

WHERE: 150 SE Pioneer Way Oak Harbor 360-679-3533

Women’s Care Oak Harbor is here for women of all ages.

• Happy Caturday (Every Saturday) $5 Off Happy Cat • Senior Sundays 10% Off for the 55+ Crowd on Sundays • Veteran Discount Veterans Receive a 10% Discount Every Day Island Herb’s doors are open Monday through Thursday, 11am - 7pm and Friday through Sunday, 10am - 7pm. You can find them at 5565 Vanbarr Pl or online at www.WhidbeyIslandHerb.com. Have a question? Give the team a call at 360-331-0140.

Dr. James Giem, Morghan Milagrosa, CNM, Dr. Melissa Chinn, Dr. James Bauer and Alicia Darr, CNM are in rotation and ready to care for you. Make an appointment today!

Call 360.240.4055 www.whidbeyhealth.org

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