Page 1

The local paper for the Upper per West Side p Sid

WEEK OF JUNE

2018 Summer

7-13 2018

GuideP.11

MAYOR’S PLAN FOR SCHOOL DESEGREGATION CONTINUES EDUCATION Proposal would set aside additional seats at elite institutions for students from high-poverty schools BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Legislation before the City Council would require sidewalk sheds to be dismantled within six months of being erected — or in seven days if no work is performed in that time. Photo: Steven Pisano, via flickr

STUBBORN SIDEWALK SHEDS OF THE UWS STREETSCAPE DOB data reveals buildings with the longest-standing scaffolding BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

On the 13-mile-long island of Manhattan, roughly 123 miles of sidewalk are covered in scaffolding. Nearly 3,900 sheds line the borough’s sidewalks, making

Scaffolding goes up but doesn’t go down — for months, years, even decades — while no work is happening.” Council Member Ben Kallos

the obtrusive structures a more ubiquitous feature of the Manhattan streetscape than the bus shelter, the Citi Bike station or even the blue mailbox. Community Board 7 is home to 453 of those active sheds, which shadow over 15 miles of Upper West Side sidewalks. It’s not just the quantity of sidewalk sheds that has prompted efforts at reform — it’s how long they stay up. Side-

In a bid to increase diversity at the city’s top public high schools, Mayor Bill de Blasio wants to jettison a highstakes single-exam entrance system that some have suggested works to exclude black and Latino students. Eight of the city’s nine elite specialized high schools — among the most competitive and prestigious public schools in the country — determine which students receive coveted offers of admission based on a single factor: scores on the Specialized High School Admissions Test, a three-hour standardized exam that all applicants must take. The single-test system, mandated since 1971 under state law, has produced a student body at specialized high schools that bears little resemblance to the demographics of the public school system as a whole. Black or Latino students make up 70 percent of New York City’s public school population, but comprise just 10 percent of the student body at specialized high schools. At Stuyvesant High School, the incoming freshman class of more than 900 includes just 10 black students.

Mayor Bill de Blasio detailed a major overhaul of the admissions process for New York City’s specialized high schools at J.H.S. 292 in Brooklyn June 3. Photo: Benjamin Kanter/Mayoral Photo Office “Basically for thousands and thousands of students and neighborhoods all over New York City, the message has been these specialized schools aren’t for you,” de Blasio said at a June 3 press conference in Brooklyn announcing the proposal. The city aims to begin addressing the disparity immediately by expanding an initiative known as the Discovery program that provides a path to admission at specialized high schools for low-in-

come students who score just below the cutoff score on the admissions test. According to Department of Education projections, the expansion would boost the proportion of specialized high school admissions offers to black and Latino students from nine to 16 percent. The second, and potentially more impactful aspect of de Blasio’s two-part proposal calls for the wholesale elimi-

CONTINUED ON PAGE 9

CONTINUED ON PAGE 26 Westsider WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW

WestSideSpirit

WESTSIDE SPIRIT.COM @WestSideSpirit

Crime Watch NYC Now Voices City Arts

3 6 8 10

Restaurant Ratings 23 Business 24 Real Estate 25 15 Minutes 27

< CITYARTS, P.12

NEWS residents A vocal group of U.W.S. Transportation isn’t convinced the doing enough is Committee of CB7 BY LISA BROWN

CONTINUED ON PAGE

MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.20

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

PROTESTING THE COMMUNITY BOARD OVER TRAFFIC DEATHS

Zero, Mayor Bill One year into Visionreducing trafficfor de Blasio’s plan traffic the number of has related deaths, Upper West Side fatalities on the compared to last actually increased, year’s figures. Upper West Siders -That has some needs to be done convinced more of the Transstarting with members of the local comportation Committee munity board. West mother, Upper Lisa Sladkus, a member of TransSide resident and said she’s fed at portation Alternatives a silent protest up, and organized 7’s February board Community Board residents dozens of meeting, where Committee called for Transportation leaders to step down. against incredible “We have run up imto get safe street trying just problems said. “This was provements,” she our point across get another way to dissatisfied.” that we are very involved with Sladkus has been Alternatives since Transportation served as director 2002 and formerly Streets’ RenaisSide of Upper West She says becoming sance Campaign. really got her into a mother is what activism. streets around me “Just noticing the as a pedestrian I felt and how unsafe she said. “I wanted and as a cyclist,”

9-15

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up told us she’d like to would and running this year, for serve as an ombudsman city small businesses within them clear government, helping to get bureaucracy the through things done. Perhaps even more also importantly, the ombudsman and number will tally the type small business of complaints by taken in owners, the actions policy response, and somefor ways to recommendations If done well, begin to fix things. report would the ombudsman’s give us the first quantitative with taste of what’s wrong the city, an small businesses in towards step rst fi important fixing the problem. of To really make a difference, for developers will have to is a mere formality their projects course, the advocaterising rents, are the work complete precinct, but chances-- thanks to a looking to find a way to tackle business’ legally quickly. is being done which remain many While Chin their own hours,” of after-hours “They pick out boom in the number throughout who lives on most vexing problem. gauge what said Mildred Angelo,of the Ruppert construction permits said it’s too early tocould have Buildings one the 19th floor in The Department of the city. role the advocate number three years, the Houses on 92nd Street between on the She Over the past is handing out a record there, more information work perThird avenues. permits, bad thing. of Second and an ongoing all-hours number of after-hours of after-hours work problem can’t be a the city’s Dept. with the said there’s where mits granted by This step, combinedBorough according to new data project nearby jumped 30 percent, noise in construction Buildings has efforts by Manhattan to mediate data provided constantly make BY DANIEL FITZSIMMONS according to DOB from trucks. President Gale Brewer of Informa- workers offer transferring cement response to a Freedom the rent renewal process, they want. They city classifies knows the signs Act request. The between 6 “They do whateverthey please. They Every New Yorker some early, tangible small clang, the tion work come and go as of progress. For many sound: the metal-on-metal beeps of a any construction weekend, can can’t come piercing a.m., or on the have no respect.” at p.m. and 7 business owners, that hollow boom, the issuance of these reverse. A glance The increased a correspond after-hours. soon enough. truck moving in has generated can hardly as has led to

SLEEPS, THANKS TO THE CITY THAT NEVER UCTION A BOOM IN LATE-NIGHT CONSTR

29

WestSideSpirit

WESTSIDE SPIRIT COM

NEWS

and you the alarm clock middle of the night, believe it: it’s the carries on fulland yet construction tilt. or your local police You can call 311

Newscheck Crime Watch Voices Out & About

The surge in permitsfees for the city in millions of dollars consome residents agency, and left application process vinced that the

2 City Arts 3 Top 5 8 Real Estate 10 15 Minutes

12 13 14 18

variances

CONTINUED ON PAGE

29

We deliver! Get The Spirit Westsider sent directly to your mailbox for $ $49 per year. Go to WestSideSpirit.com or call 212-868-0190


2

JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

A BROADWAY LOVERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ESSENTIAL BOOKSHELF THEATER Four books put the spotlight on the Great White Way BY LEIDA SNOW

Winners get to pick up their Tony Awards June 10. If we could award a Tony for theater books, here are four nominees from the recently published pile. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Wanna Be a Producerâ&#x20AC;? is by Broadway veteran John Breglio, who lent his legal expertise over a 40-year period to luminaries like Stephen Sondheim, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Marvin Hamlisch and Joseph Papp. As an independent, he shepherded the revival of â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Chorus Lineâ&#x20AC;? to success. With this memoir-handbook, Breglio meticulously maps out the essentials of turning an idea into a viable stage production. He examines how rights are secured and explores the mystery of royalty pools. He explains the uneasy alliance between not-for-profit theaters and commercial ones. His memories of playwright August Wilson differentiate critical acclaim (as

with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ma Raineyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Black Bottomâ&#x20AC;?) from commercial success (as with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fencesâ&#x20AC;?), and include the factoid that 90 percent of all plays on Broadway lose either all or most of their investments. Filled with real-life stories, the text also covers ďŹ nding the money, dealing with the creative team, auditions, casting, marketing and the press. Breglio takes an entire chapter to spotlight an unsung hero, the general manager. Among other duties, the GM is the person who works with the lawyer to negotiate contracts and maintain the ďŹ nancial records. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Broadway General Managerâ&#x20AC;? sets out to demystify what the cover describes as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the most important and least understood role in show business.â&#x20AC;? Seasoned pro Peter Bogyo begins by taking the reader through the steps necessary to becoming a GM, from how to get an entry level position, to achieving sponsorship in the apprentice manager program of ATPAM, the Association of Theatrical Press Agents and Managers. Other chapters sample actual contracts and discuss negotiating tactics. This is spinach-y stuff, but arts administration students or anyone inter-

ested in the fundamentals and inner workings of the usually closed world of theater production will ďŹ nd Bogyoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book essential reading. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fraver By Designâ&#x20AC;? is Frank â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fraverâ&#x20AC;? Verlizzoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s record of ďŹ ve decades of theater poster art, with reproductions of more than 250 of his designs, including â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Lion King,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The King and Iâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunday In the Park With George.â&#x20AC;? This is a cocktail-table book, and the graphics are superb. The visuals of shows seen bring rivers of memories. Also included are the different versions Verlizzo created to present to a production team, which might include producers, general manager, press agent, ad agency account executive and others. There were 21 different posters for his Follies art presentation, and we get to see a sampling of the range of concepts. Verlizzo distinguishes between Broadway and Off-Broadway, mostly because his choices rely on any productionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget. But he also notes the â&#x20AC;&#x153;aesthetic vibeâ&#x20AC;? of where heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s working, tending to edgier concepts Off-Broadway. There are subtle revelations about how Verlizzo approaches even the

41st

ORCHID SALE 10

3

Fine Crafts

11AM-6PM

Clothes

International Food

smallest details, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commentary by theater pros like producer and general manager Manny Azenberg, Tony Award winner Bernadette Peters and Ted Chapin of the Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Something Wonderfulâ&#x20AC;? is Todd Purdumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love letter to the Broadway revolution triggered by the transformative collaboration of composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist Oscar Hammerstein. Their names conjure Broadway musicals with enduring emotional power, and with songs that continue to resonate. Beginning with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oklahoma!â&#x20AC;? in 1943, and continuing with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Carousel,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;South PaciďŹ c,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The King and Iâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sound of Music,â&#x20AC;? Rodgers and Hammerstein inaugurated something new on Broadway: the serious musical play. Readers will learn about the ďŹ&#x201A;ops as well as the hits, and enjoy anecdotes about stars including Ethel Merman, Yul Brynner, Mary Martin and Julie Andrews. Purdum, a former longtime White House correspondent for The New York Times, has turned his obsession with Broadway into a lively explora-

tion of an unusually productive partnership that saw success on stage, screen, television and radio. As expected given his pedigree, Purdum has done his homework, and his appreciative book is balanced, providing, indeed, something wonderful.

Come meet me and my friends! MUDDY PAWS RESCUE & NORTH SHORE ANIMAL LEAGUE AMERICA

Boris & Horton

195 Avenue A btwn E. 12th & E 13th St. New York, NY SAT JUNE 9 (12 PM - 5 PM

len Dunn

Photo By El

               (( (  RR006

ENTERTAINMENT

Todd Purdumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Something Wonderfulâ&#x20AC;? is a love letter to the transformative collaboration of composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist Oscar Hammerstein.

25 Davis Ave., Port Washington, NY 11050 animalleague.org(  

 FOLLOW US ON:

I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS

Performances Main Stage 73-74 Sts. 1 PM to 6 PM

Linda Miller CHILDRENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BLOCK 84th - 85th Streets

Info: Mort & Ray Productions 212-764-6330 www. mortandray. com

West Side Federation of Neighborhood & Block Associations Booth @ 73rd-74th Streets Sponsored by

Green Mountain Energy & West Side Spirit

NY collector looking to purchase 78rpm record collections. Looking for Blues, Jazz, Country, Gospel on such labels as Paramount, Okeh, Vocalion, Library of Congress, Asch, Chess, Columbia, or Brunswick. Also looking for Rock and Jazz LPs and 45s from the 1950s and 1960s

CALL 917-676-6615 OR EMAIL NY78RPM@GMAIL.COM


JUNE 7-13,2018

3

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

CRIME WATCH BY JERRY DANZIG STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 24th district for the week ending May 27 Week to Date

Year to Date

2018 2017

% Change

2018

2017

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

0

1

-100.0

Rape

0

1

-100.0

6

6

0.0

Robbery

3

2

50.0

54

43

25.6

Felony Assault

1

2

-50.0

57

55

3.6

Burglary

1

4

-75.0

54

57

-5.3

Grand Larceny

13

17

-23.5

255 270 -5.6

Grand Larceny Auto

1

0

n/a

14

10

40.0

Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr

ATHLETA SHOPLIFTA

GAME STOP ROBBER STRIKES AGAIN

At 8 p.m. on Monday, May 28, a man in his mid-30s entered the popular fitness apparel store Athleta at 216 Columbus Ave. and made off with clothing valued at $1,700.

A Game Stop bandit who has been terrorizing the chain’s stores throughout Manhattan struck the company’s location at 2322 Broadway recently, police said. At 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 22, the man stole $1,300 in cash from the register before fleeing.

CREAMED

STOLEN WALLET

VENETA VENDETTA

Yes, it’s another Upper West Side Duane Reade robbery. At 8 p.m. on Wednesday, May 23, a 30-year-old man went into the chain’s store at 380 Amsterdam Ave. and stole $1,800 worth of facial cream, police said.

Police remind restaurant patrons to keep your bags on your laps or between your legs to protect your valuables when dining out. At noon on Wednesday, May 9, a 51-year-old woman left her bag on a chair in a restaurant at 1900 Broadway. When she next looked for her wallet, she found that an unknown individual had removed it from her bag. The stolen wallet contained credit cards and $100.

A shoplifter got away with a pricey handbag. At 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 17, a man entered the Century 21 store at 1972 Broadway and stole a Bottega Veneta bag valued at $1,600, police said.

The local paper for the Upper West Side

ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

thoughtgallery.org NEW YORK CITY

Advertise with The West Side Spirit today! Call Vincent Gardino at 212-868-0190

World Oceans Day: Oceanographer Dr. Sylvia Earle

FRIDAY, JUNE 8TH, 5:30PM National Geographic Encounter: Ocean Odyssey | 226 W. 44th St. | 646-308-1337 | natgeoencounter.com Named by Time Magazine as its first Hero for the Planet, Dr. Sylvia Earle is one of the world’s foremost marine biologists; she’ll share stories from beneath the waterline Friday night (free).

Secret Science Club North: Astrophysicist David Spergel

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13TH, 7:30PM Symphony Space | 2537 Broadway 212-864-1414 | symphonyspace.org Professor of astronomy at Princeton University David Spergel talks about the edges of time and space as he joins the Secret Science Club for a night of big questions like: what is dark energy, and what happened just after the Big Bang ($25)?

Just Announced | An Evening of Artistic Responses: The Let Go

TUESDAY, JUNE 26TH, 7:30PM The Park Avenue Armory | 643 Park Ave. | 212-616-3930 | armoryonpark.org Musician Nona Hendryx, vocalist/artist Helga Davis, dancer/choreographer Francesca Harper, and FLEXN dance pioneer Reggie (Regg Roc) Gray and his company the D.R.E.A.M. Ring present performative responses to Nick Cave’s “dance-based town hall” ($45).

For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

sign up for the weekly Thought Gallery newsletter at thoughtgallery.org.

WestSideSpirit.com


4

JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Useful Contacts

Drawing Board

BY MARC BILGREY

POLICE NYPD 20th Precinct

120 W. 82nd St.

NYPD 24th Precinct

151 W. 100th St.

212-580-6411 212-678-1811

NYPD Midtown North Precinct

306 W. 54th St.

212-760-8300

FDNY Engine 76/Ladder 22

145 W. 100th St.

311

FDNY Engine 40/Ladder 35

W. 66th St. & Amsterdam Ave.

311

FDNY Engine 74

120 W. 83rd St.

311

Ladder 25 Fire House

205 W. 77th St.

311

FIRE

CITY COUNCIL Councilmember Helen Rosenthal

563 Columbus Ave.

212-873-0282

Councilmember Inez Dickens

163 W. 125th St.

212-678-4505

State Senator Brad Hoylman

322 Eighth Ave. #1700

212-633-8052

State Sen. Jose M. Serrano

1916 Park Ave. #202

212-828-5829

STATE LEGISLATORS

Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal 230 W. 72nd St. #2F

212-873-6368

Assemblymember Daniel O’Donnell 245 W. 104th St.

212-866-3970

COMMUNITY BOARD 7 LIBRARIES

250 W. 87th St. #2

212-362-4008

St. Agnes

444 Amsterdam Ave.

212-621-0619

Bloomingdale

150 W. 100th St.

212-222-8030

Performing Arts

40 Lincoln Center

917-275-6975

HOSPITALS Mt. Sinai – Roosevelt

1000 10th Ave.

Mt. Sinai - St. Luke’s

1090 Amsterdam Ave.

212-523-4000 212-523-5898

CON ED TIME WARNER CABLE POST OFFICES

4 Irving Place

212-460-4600

2554 Broadway

212-358-0900

US Post Office

215 W. 104th St.

212-662-0355

US Post Office

700 Columbus Ave.

212-866-1981

US Post Office

127 W. 83rd St.

212-873-3991

Ansonia Post Office

178 Columbus Ave.

212-362-1697

HOW TO REACH US:

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:

212-868-0190 nyoffice@strausnews.com westsidespirit.com

Include your full name, address and day and evening telephone numbers for verification. Letters that cannot be verified will not be published. We reserve the right to edit or condense letters for libel, good taste, grammar and punctuation. Submit your letter at westsidespirit.com and click submit at the bottom of the page or email it to nyoffice@strausnews.com.

TO SUBSCRIBE: The West Side Spirit is available for free on the west side in select buildings, retail locations and news boxes. To get a copy of west side neighborhood news mailed to you weekly, you may subscribe to The Westsider for just $49 per year. Call 212-868-0190 or go online to StrausNews.com and click on the photo of the paper or mail a check to Straus Media, 20 West Ave., Chester, NY 10918

BLOG COMMENTS: We invite your comments on stories and issues at westsidespirit.com. We do not edit those comments. We urge people to keep the discussion civil and the tone reflective of the best we each have to offer.

PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: NEWS ITEMS: To report a news story, call 212-8680190. News releases of general interest must be emailed to our offices by noon the Thursday prior to publication to be considered for the following week. Send releases to news@strausnews.com.

Call 212-868-0190. Classified ads must be in our office by 12pm the Friday before publication, except on holidays. All classified ads are payable in advance.

PREVIOUS OWNERS: Tom Allon, Isis Ventures, Ed Kayatt, Russ Smith, Bob Trentlyon, Jerry Finkelstein

CALENDAR ITEMS:

ABOUT US

Information for inclusion in the Out and About section should be emailed to hoodhappenings@strausnews.com no later than two weeks before the event.

The West Side Spirit is published weekly by Straus Media-Manhattan, LLC. Please send inquiries to 20 West Ave., Chester, NY 10918.

SHELTER PET & GLOBALLY RECOGNIZED PIANIST Amazing stories start in shelters and KEYBOARD CAT 8M+ YouTube Views rescues. Adopt today to start yours.


JUNE 7-13,2018

5

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

NEIGHBORHOODâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BEST To place an ad in this directory, Call Douglas at 212-868-0190 ext. 352.

ART

CATERING

DENTAL

ShaniTheChef.com

NYCSmileSpa.com

MON-SAT 10:30AM-6PM | SUN 12PM-6PM

www.the-maac.com Come visit the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest art & antiques center featuring 100 galleries and over 40 categories. Enjoy time on our 3 ďŹ&#x201A;oors of antiques, ďŹ ne art, and every category in-between Buy or sell, we welcome your visit 7 days a week.

Preservation advocates opposed a set of proposed changes to Landmarks Preservation Commission rules on that grounds that the revisions would have reduced opportunities for public input on applications to perform work on landmarked buildings, such as these on West End Avenue. Photo: Steven Strasser

$459

$859

Individual

Couple

"--&YBNTt"--93BZT %FOUBM$MFBOJOHT ZS

$PVSUFTZTBWJOHTPGGNPTUQSPDFEVSFT

NO INSURANCE? NO PROBLEM!

212.355.4400

Personalized Meal Preparation Entire Shabbat Experience Healthy. Convenient. Affordable. Experienced and Highly Rated. 917 283-0819 Shani@ShaniTheChef.com

DINING

HEALTH

HEARING

Prevent heart disease and frustration.

Better Hearing is a Priceless Conversation!

1050 2nd Ave. bt. 55th & 56th Sts.

CITY DIALS BACK CONTENTIOUS CHANGES TO LANDMARK RULES

Columbus Circle 1841 Broadway, Suite 903 at 60th Street

NO deductible, NO annual limits NO pre-existing conditions, Renewable or cancellable anytime.

 PS PGmDF!OZDTNJMFTQBDPN

Schedule Your Complimentary Hearing Screening and get a $10 Gift Card* Risk Free Trial on Invisible Hearing Aids!

802-787-1841

Book Now

hiheartbeat.com

(888) 471-0544

www.MyHearingExpert.com PARK AVENUE

COLUMBUS CIRCLE

CHELSEA MARKET

1036 Park Ave. 426 W. 58th St. 314 W. 14th St.

DEVELOPMENT Revisions to earlier LPC plan address many of preservationistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; chief concerns BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Landmarks Preservation Commission has backed away from a controversial set of proposed rule changes in the face of forceful opposition from preservationists, who claim that the revisions would have cut the public out of the review process for certain types of changes to landmarked buildings. The changes, initially proposed in February, would have shifted responsibility for approving certain applications currently reviewed in public hearings by the full 11-member commission to LPC staff members, including some types of additions to rooftops and rear yards visible from the street. The LPC said the changes would codify existing agency practices, streamline the approvals process for certain types of applications, and in-

crease transparency and efficiency. But preservation advocates, as well as a number of community boards and elected officials, were quick to voice opposition to the suggested changes In response to the concerns, the LPC on May 29 outlined signiďŹ cant changes to the initial proposal, with many of the most controversial aspects of the proposed rules removed or revised, including most changes to the regulations on rooftop and rear yard additions. Other proposed changes were entirely scrapped, including a provision regarding the removal of cast iron vault lights (the metal panels inset with glass lenses commonly found on SoHo and Tribeca sidewalks to let daylight into basements) and another regarding windows on secondary facades of landmarked buildings. P reser vation advocates were largely pleased with the amended proposal, but reserved final judgement pending the release of the revised text of the proposed rule changes, which LPC staff will draft in the coming weeks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The devil is in the details,

and just a few words can have a huge impact,â&#x20AC;? said Sean Khorsandi, executive director of Landmark West!. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once they issue the rules, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be going through with a fine-toothed comb.â&#x20AC;? Tara Kelly, vice president of policy and programs at the Municipal Art Society, said she was â&#x20AC;&#x153;very encouragedâ&#x20AC;? by the LPCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presentation, which â&#x20AC;&#x153;seemed to address many of the most signiďŹ cant concerns.â&#x20AC;? She continued with a caveat: â&#x20AC;&#x153;However, we really need to see the text to see how theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re addressing the concerns.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;For example, they say theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re removing â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;mostâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of the new rules around additions, but we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know which â&#x20AC;&#x201D; so the most problematic could remain, or they might not,â&#x20AC;? Kelly said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know.â&#x20AC;? The May 29 LPC meeting marked the last public hearing headed by the commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s departing chair, Meenakshi Srinivasan, who announced her resignation in April, shortly after nine of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most prominent preservation groups penned a joint letter urging her

CONTINUED ON PAGE 23

LIGHTING

Restoration & Repairs Lampshades Â&#x2018;Custom Lighting For The Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Finest Homes

LOCKSMITH

212-288-7773 / www.locks.nyc

Â&#x2018;Lighting

Â&#x2018;Bespoke

Mention This ad and Receive A FREE In Home Consult in NYC!

BhonBhon Lighting BHONBHON.COM | (212) 397-3710 Visit Our Lighting Showroom 43-01 21st. Long Island City

PERSONAL TRAINING soZo concept *O)PNFt*O0GmDF Personal Training Bringing Fitness to the home & ofďŹ ce for over 20 years! No Weights Free Needed! Consult TRX Kerry Aissa Founder

212-203-5634 KTA1@me.com

Residential / Commercial Locksmith Service

Baldwin, Mul-T-Lock, Medeco, Schlage, Marks USA, Master Lock & More

& Full Service Hardware Store

Plumbing, Electrical, Paint Sundries, Cleaning Supplies & more! top One S ! Shop

SAVE MONEY & ENERGY BY USING LED BULBS Bring in or mention this ad and save 10% OFF any LED Purchase (While supplies last)

82nd St & 1st Ave 1574 1st Ave

73rd St & 3rd Ave 182 E 73rd St

RELIGIOUS Upper West Manhattan Church of Christ

Meeting at 891 Amsterdam Ave. @ 103rd St. In Hosteling International For more information: Call 212-729-8356 www.uwmchurchofchrist.com

All CCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Accep ted!

79th St & Broadway 2212 Broadway

SENIOR CARE KARPOFF AFFILIATES KARPOFF AFFILIATES

is your single stop for senior life transitions and real estate brokerage needs. We provide peace of mind and ensure that each project is handled with respect and integrity.

www.KarpoffAfďŹ liates.com

mkarpoff@karpoffafďŹ liates.com 212.358.8044 290 Third Avenue, Ste 26C, NYC 10010


6

JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Tour Breweries

Hudson Valley Region e 9 2018 un

J

of the

dirt

Bre w H p di

Saturday, June 9 12n - 5pm

r t- m a g.c o m

Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

EDITOR’S PICK

Wed 13 ALVIN AILEY RETURNS TO LINCOLN CENTER David H. Koch Theater, 20 Lincoln Center 7:30 p.m. $29+ 212-405-9000. alvinailey.org Led by Artistic Director Robert Battle, 60 years after the company’s founding, Ailey’s dancers of the highest caliber will perform a diverse repertory by eight choreographers across three programs.

Hop on our beer bus and embark on a tour of the best breweries in the Hudson Valley. Enjoy flights harvested from the historic black dirt region— known for its exceptionally lush soil and tasty brews. See the breweries in action. Tour the malt farm. Sip local beers. Get dirty.

95

$

tickets:

dirtbrewhop.com or call Molly at

845-469-9000

Hop On

Limite d time only: SAVE 20% with code BREW

Phoot: Carstor, via WikiMedia Commons

Thu 7

Fri 8

Sat 9

▲ ATRIUM 360: NOURA MINT SEYMALI

ROPPONGI MALE CHORUS ZIG-ZAG: ‘THE LAST MESSAGE’

THE IDEAL SCHOOL OF MANHATTAN BLOCK PARTY

Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall, 57th Street and Seventh Avenue 8 p.m. $20-$50 “The Last Message,” written by Japanese composer Shigeaki Saegusa, draws inspiration from “The Voice of Mankind,” a collection of letters written by soldiers of various nations who died during World War II. Come see the U.S. premiere of this powerful piece, performed by the Roppongi Male Chorus ZIG-ZAG and the Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra. 212-247-7800 carnegiehall.org

The IDEAL School 314 West 91st St. Noon. $20 This annual summer block party features performances by IDEAL students, games, rides, food, dancing, and arts and crafts and fun for all ages. theidealschool.org

David Rubenstein Atrium 61 West 62nd St. 7:30 p.m. Free Mauritania’s defining artist on the international stage, Noura Mint Seymali draws from her West African and Maghreb roots to carry her family’s Moorish griot (West African praise singers, poets and musicians) tradition into the 21st century. Her band conjures hypnotic grooves, melding traditional Mauritanian instruments with psychedelic rock. 212-875-5000 atrium.lincolncenter.org


JUNE 7-13,2018

7

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

MARBLE COLLEGIATE CHURCH

Sun 10 Mon 11 Tue 12 ▼ KIDS BAZAAR POP-UP Grand Bazaar 100 West 77th St. 10 a.m. Free This family-friendly pop-up market will feature unique and fun handmade baby and kids clothing, toys and accessories form talented local artisans. Stick around for the sweets and ice cream treats. grandbazaarnyc.org

BIG SING — GLORIA! St. John of the Divine 1047 Amsterdam Ave. 7 p.m. Free Several conductors will lead a mass choir for the New York Choral Consortium’s energizing Big Sing — Gloria! event. Various versions of “Gloria” from the masters Haydn, Mozart, Schubert and others will be sung by the audience. All are welcome, whether to sing or just listen. 212-316-7540 newyorkchoralconsortium.org

Upcoming Events

THE UNSEEN ROBERT F. KENNEDY Paley Center for Media 25 West 52nd St. 7 p.m. $32 Recently found, revealing outtake footage from the 1963 documentary “Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment” yields an intimate portrait of two Kennedy brothers — John and Robert — reviewing their options to further the civil rights movement. After the screening, a panel of family members and experts will discuss RFK’s legacy. 212-621-6600 paleycenter.org

Wed 13 YIDDISH UNDER THE STARS SummerStage Central Park near East 72nd St. and Fifth Ave. 7 p.m. Free Celebrate New York’s Yiddish heritage at this concert filled with Klezmer artistry, Yiddish theatre gems, and performances by Frank London & His Klezmer All Stars, Andy Statman, Cantor Magda Fishman, Pharaoh’s Daughter with Cantor Basya Schechter and others. nytf.org

Vist MarbleChurch.org for a full schedule of our PRIDE 2018 events.

2018 Marble SUMMER ARTS FESTIVAL

Monday, June 25 to Friday, June 29 Join us for a week of various programs, 6:00-8:30pm, featuring music from classical to jazz, dance, film, poetry, plays and fine art including paintings and photography. Artwork will also will be on display each day 4:00-6:00pm. Sponsored by the Arts Ministry. FREE ADMISSION.

Our Labyrinth Walks Labyrinth walks at Marble Collegiate Church are open to all: • First Sunday of each month: 1:00-3:00pm • Wednesdays before WeWo: 5:00-6:00pm

STREET FESTIVALS

Sun 10 41ST ANNUAL PLANTATHON & CRAFTS FAIR Broadway, 73-86 Streets 11 a.m. Free Come out and enjoy the, crafts, plants, antiques, entertainment, games and much more. Sponsored by West Side Federation of Neighborhood & Block Associations & The Broadway Mall Association.

(Please call the church to confirm schedule) Our Labyrinth Facilitators will be available to help guide you and answer any questions you may have, while allowing you the space to walk in your own way, at your own pace. Event listings brought to you by Marble Collegiate Church. 1 West 29th Street / New York, New York 10001 212 686 2770 / MarbleChurch.org Download the Marble Church App on iPhone or Android


8

JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

NEXTDOOR NEIGHBOR BY LORRAINE DUFFY MERKL

I’m usually not a “joiner,” but when the postcard showed up inviting me to become a member of Nextdoor Yorkville, I felt obliged to at least sign up to be more plugged into the ‘hood. The postcard, directed to UES residents, read: “On this website, we share service provider recommendations, items for sale/free, lost pet notifications, local events and much more ... including posts about Crime & Safety issues.” The mission of Nextdoor, located in San Francisco, is based upon the idea that the neighborhood is one of the most important and useful communities in a person’s life, and this platform will build stronger and safer neighborhoods around the world. Am I skeptical? Would I be a born and bred New Yorker if I weren’t?

Right now, the site is new and everyone is still minding their manners, introducing themselves in polite, helpful ways — the equivalent of the digital muffin basket. Most of the posts are quite benign: “Did you lose your keys?” a good neighbor wants to know, adding a picture of the errant belongings. Others are offering items for sale (pre-owned futon anyone?) and some want you to take their goods off their hands for free. Yes, everything from couches to cats, car seats to kids’ furniture. All you have to do is swing by and pick the item up, which is a lot more dignified than dumpster diving. Some neighbors need advice about finding a specific type of lawyer, a knife-sharpening service, or a babysitter. Quite a few are going on vacay and have apartments to let for July and August.

Of course, what really gives the site an “over the backyard fence” feel, is the group mourning of the upcoming closing of Glaser’s Bake Shop and the recent demise of Capitol Chemists, both on First Avenue; some have questions about what will replace the now reduced-torubble Mega Gristedes on East 86th. New businesses and entrepreneurs are making their presence known as well. So, what’s not to like? Well, although I can see the positives of this localized online network, I wonder how wise it is to announce that one is not going to be home for a couple of months or to get a caregiver from there either. After nanny Yoselyn Ortega was convicted of murdering Leo and Lulu Krim, I would think that, going forward, childcare would be procured from agencies that heavily vet their applicants. Also, I’m always wary that these types of internet venues will go the way of the infamous Park Slope Parents site, whose notoriety in

Voices

2006 was kicked off by what is now remembered as “The Blue Hat” incident. A mom had posted that she’d found a boy’s blue hat, which was countered by a snarky charge of sexism. (What, girls don’t wear blue?) That remark was then called out as too PC. The comments that followed (and there were many) went from sanctimonious to mocking. Even after the thread had run its course on the site, it remained alive thanks to mass media coverage referring to the Brooklyn parents as privileged and indulgent, with the word “awful” bandied about. Although I have yet to see such a discourse on Nextdoor Yorkville, there are potential signs. A co-op shareholder of Puerto Rican decent expressed his frustration at often being mistaken for the janitor, superintendent, dog walker, and most notably, an intruder. Of this writing there are 31 replies, mostly in solidarity. Apparently, he is not the only UES resident of color often confused with hired help. Another person got the ball roll-

ing with a post about noise — carhorn honking to be specific. Others jumped on the bandwagon about what can be done to combat this issue. Currently no one has suggested: “Buy a quiet place in the country.” A “lady driver” was called out for exiting the circular driveway of a high-rise without slowing down or stopping. I’m shocked her license plate wasn’t posted. But, still, even these listings are rather tame and the comments are neither critical nor snide. I am going to give Nextdoor Yorkville — and my neighbors — the benefit of the doubt that this online group interaction will be a good thing and will not turn into an UES “Blue Hat” situation. Perhaps, eventually, I’ll even want to contribute my own helpful hints and comments; or perhaps I’ll realize I don’t want to be part of an organization that would have me as a member. Lorraine Duffy Merkl is the author of the novels “Back to Work She Goes” and “Fat Chick.”

THE YOUNG ROYALS AND DADDY’S DAY BY BETTE DEWING

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle in Belfast a few weeks before their wedding. Photo: Northern Ireland Office

A lotta June holidays — above all, there is Father’s Day on June 17, which too often gets down-shifted. And as we always remind ourselves on Mother’s Day, or any significant holiday, really, “Let it not be one day of remembering in a year of forgetting.” And my greatest regret is not having enough time for my widowed dad, 44 years older than his only child. And he could not have been kinder, gentler — too much so really. But men often don’t share personal problems or sadness — not nearly enough. Yes, it is nature, but also nurture — societal in nature — and in need of a-changing. And I needed an intervention by kindred and friends to spend more — no, enough — time with my dad, whom I truly loved deeply. But even therapists rarely do that type of intervention

— that too needs changing. But above all, raise the value of fathers, fathering, paternal nurturing — and for society’s sake. And not least, in the White House — and not least with the young royals we’re discussing this column — to keep the peace, and yes, the world kind — the world kind. June is, of course, for weddings. And the world sure did have a big one in May. And related to Father’ Day, the 74-year-old daddy of the bride wasn’t there due to a heart woe presumably brought on by a paparazzi chase, This safe traffic activist can’t help wishing the minister’s wedding speech about racial injustice might have also denounced the paparazzi’s reckless and lawless endangerment which killed the groom’s beloved mother. You recall how the whole world mourned — with even a service of remembrance in Central Park. But it

did not challenge the cause. Incidentally, most people become more concerned about safe traffic — safe everything when there are offspring to worry about. I said most and more. I don’t think Ralph Nader has children. To stay with the royals. The newlyweds plan a Big Apple honeymoon trip, but here’s hoping time is soon spent with the bride’s father, who reportedly lives alone in Mexico. And until then, may they spend enough time on Skype until in an inperson visit. And we have a dream he’ll move to the UK. And so will the bride’s mother, and they’ll reconcile and live happily ever after in that multigenerational extended family. Indeed such arrangements in general should be encouraged — it takes a village, so nobody is left out. But for now, how great, how connecting if the new royals revived the reach-out-and-touch-someone vis-

its. And the groom’s grandparents, Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip (he needs more inclusion) will really love those calls and remember when long distance was only affordable for special occasions and emergency use. Ah, these beneficent phone calls can really bridge these family and friend divides when they’re frequent and lengthy enough and talk that matters is the main course. Forget the weather, and we don’t say “we’re fine,” when we’re not. And clergy should be teaching those caring communication skills — intergenerational ones — so no one is left out – and Father’s Day will not be a day of remembering in a year of forgetting. In loving tribute to your father and mine. dewingbetter@aol.com

President & Publisher, Jeanne Straus nyoffice@strausnews.com

STRAUS MEDIA your neighborhood news source nyoffice@strausnews.com 212-868-0190

Vice President/CFO Otilia Bertolotti Vice President/CRO Vincent A. Gardino advertising@strausnews.com

Associate Publishers Seth L. Miller, Ceil Ainsworth Regional Sales Manager Tania Cade

Account Executives Fred Almonte, David Dallon Director of Partnership Development Barry Lewis

Editor-In-Chief, Alexis Gelber Deputy Editor Richard Khavkine

Senior Reporter Doug Feiden

Director of Digital Pete Pinto

Staff Reporter Michael Garofalo

Director, Arts & Entertainment/ NYCNow Alizah Salario


JUNE 7-13,2018

SCHOOL CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 nation of the Specialized High School Admissions Test, a step that would require action from the state Legislature. Under the plan, the single-test criterion would be phased out over three years and replaced with a new admissions metric evaluating students based on course grades and state standardized test scores. Currently, students from a handful of top middle schools account for an inordinate number of offers to specialized high schools. The mayor’s plan would extend offers to the top 7 percent of students from each middle school in the city. Ultimately, full implementation of the plan would result in 45 percent of offers going to black and Latino students, the city projects, as compared to 9 percent currently. The mayor invoked the example of admissions to elite universities in making his case for the unfairness of single test admissions, a system in which some students have the resources to afford expensive test preparation books and classes and others do not, saying, “there is no great college in America that chooses its students based on a single standardized test” “It doesn’t matter if you’re having a good day, a bad day, if you’re sick, if you’re not sick,” de Blasio said. “You get one shot only for three hours that

9

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com determines your future. Nothing could be more insane than that.” Legislation to end the test has been introduced in Albany, but its prospects in the current legislative session, which ends this month, are unclear. Though some legal experts believe that under state law the city could immediately eliminate the Specialized High School Admissions Test in five of the eight specialized high schools that use it, de Blasio explained that his administration is of the opinion that “the law right now isn’t clear on this issue and the best way to win is to go change the law.” Two of the schools that would be impacted by the plan are in Manhattan: Stuyvesant High School in Battery Park City and High School for Math, Science and Engineering in Hamilton Heights. (The borough’s third specialized high school, LaGuardia High School on the Upper West Side, does not use the test and would not be impacted by the changes.) The plan to bolster diversity in the city’s highest-profile public schools is the latest effort in a broader push to end segregation in the New York City school system, which is among the most segregated in the nation. Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza, who took office in April, has criticized admissions screening in public schools and took an early and visible role in championing a plan to increase diversity in Up-

per West Side middle schools. Carranza drew on his experience as a teacher in critiquing the current single-test admissions model at the June 3 press conference, saying, “very often the students with the grit, the students with the tenacity, the students with leadership skills weren’t always my best test-takers, yet when given the opportunity to demonstrate those skills, when given the opportunity to actually act and be the leaders that they could be, they blossomed.” The announcement was met with opposition from several specialized high school alumni groups as well as some Asian students (who along with whites receive an outsized proportion of admissions offers to specialized high school), but a number of education groups and local elected leaders voiced support for the mayor’s initiative. Helen Rosenthal, who has been a vocal proponent of ending public school segregation in the Upper West Side district she represents in the City Council, praised the mayor’s effort in an emailed statement, saying, “There will never be equality of opportunity for every New York City child as long as admissions criteria are based on one test alone, when privately paid test prep is pervasive among families who can afford it. The current system only reinforces the deep socioeconomic disparities that exist in our society.”

BE THE SOMEONE

WHO HELPS A KID BE THE FIRST IN HER FAMILY TO GO TO COLLEGE.

Tired of Hunting for The West Side Spirit? Subscribe today to Westsider News of Your Neighborhood that you can’t get anywhere else

Dining Information, plus

crime news, real estate prices - all about your part of town

Cultural Events

in and around where you live (not Brooklyn, not Westchester)

Now get your personal copy delivered by US Mail for just

$

49/Year for 52 issues

To Subscribe : newyorkcares.org

Call 212-868-0190 or go online to westsidespirit.com and click on subscribe


10

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

JUNE 7-13,2018

WHIMSY UNDER THE STARS At MoMA, Bodys Isek Kingelez’ 3-D fables enchant BY VIRGINIA RANDALL

It is impossible to stay in a bad mood at MoMA’s new exhibit, ”Bodys Isek Kingelez: City Dreams.” This U.S. first retrospective of Bodys Isek Kingelez (1948-2015), a Congolese artist who created miniature models of fabulously whimsical future cities, is a tonic for modern angst. Visitors will recognize ordinary materials — thread spools, soda cans, corrugated cardboard, bottle caps, ballpoint pen shafts, cardboard tubes and more — transformed into construction materials for fanciful structures: hotels that fan out like peacocks’ tails, a United Nations building with what looks like a Ferris wheel, and entire cities reimagined in bright colors with scalloped edges, festooned with stars. Kingelez’ 30-year career was as improbable as his art. This self-described “designer, architect, sculptor, engineer and artist” was born in Kimbembele-Ihunga, a rural village in the Belgian Congo, and educated in missionary schools. About 10 years after the country gained independence from Belgium, Kingelez, then in his early 20s, moved to the capital, Kinshasa, to study industrial design amid an environment charged with post-freedom energy and enthusiasm about the future. He must have picked up on the excitement. One day, compelled by a vision, he picked up an exacto knife, some glue and cardboard, and created his first model building. He took his second work, “Musée National,” to the Institut des Musées Nationaux du Zaire, and produced another work, the “Commissariat Atomique,” as disbelieving staffers watched. They offered him a job as an art restorer, which fueled his growing obsession with what he called “extreme maquettes.” A blurb about him in a feature about art in African capitals led to an invitation to display at the Pompidou Center in Paris in 1989 and sparked his career. From then on, he focused on crafting wildly inventive buildings and, even-

Bodys Isek Kingelez (Congolese, 1948-2015). “Africanisch.” 1994. Paper, paperboard, plastic and other various materials, 19 11/16” × 22 7/16” × 24”. Private collection, Paris. Photo: Kleinefenn.

Bodys Isek Kingelex with “Étoile Rouge Congolaise” in Nantes, 1993. Photo: André Bodys Magnin, Mag gnin, courtesy André Magnin, Paris

tually, entire cities within “a better, more peaceful world.” “To create a future, you need a model. Without a model you can’t have a vision” he explained in “Kingelez: Kinshasa, A City Rethought,” a 30-minute documentary by Dirk Dumon being shown in conjunction with the exhibit. His works ranged from single models small enough to fit in one hand to large-scale cities (three of them are shown here) with dozens of fanciful buildings amid colorful boulevards, near-blue canals and verdant parks.

on to take in at once: skyscrapers wrapped in metallic paper, soda-can towers, curves, slides, stepped facades and even stars. One round skyscraper, sheathed in silver paper, resembles the office tower at Lexington Avenue and 57th Street, while another, topped by three bright red stars, would not be out of place in Las Vegas. Several buildings, with their undulating façades, are reminiscent of Miami Beach’s Fontainebleau Hotel (there are even miniature palm trees). If it’s all too much to survey, the exhibit includes a virtual reality experience that allows visitors to “walk” the streets of Villa Fantome. Somewhat ironically, Kingelez in the documentary comments that “people can’t work with their hands any-

THE WORKS Everything on display combines uplifting optimism and hope about a literally bright future — bursts of yellows and reds, sky blues, deep greens and oranges color his craft — and richly patterned designs. Stars, diamonds, scalloped edges, slides, circles, semicircles, fantastically shaped towers, (he loved skyscrapers) and improbably fan-shaped buildings rise from inventive bases. His “Stars Palme Bouygues” looks ready to take flight. (This work, created during six months in Paris, is his response to the Grande Arche de la Défense, just west of Paris, and Bouygues, the multinational conglomerate that built it.) There’s a spin on traditional African architecture in his homage to Kinshasa, where he went to university. “Kinshasa La Belle,” is a fanciful, round building with a twist on the brise-soleil, an architectural feature used by post-independence African

architects. He reimagined these window overhangs, which reduce heat by deflecting light, as gracefully scalloped pediments in bright blue over each window. He said in an interview he wanted to create a swarm of butterflies, “sky blue butterflies, flying around and around the building.” His first attempt, in 1994, to create a city transformed his birthplace, Kimbembele-Ihunga, into a cosmopolitan city with architecture straight out of the Jetsons. “This town” he wrote, “represents the shape of my imagination; it is the very image of my ability to create a new world.” It took him a year to fashion this glittering metropolis with skyscrapers, broad boulevards, a soccer stadium and restaurants where, he wrote, “everyone can feel at home.” Nestled amid the towers shaped like rockets or minarets, curved roofs and star-spangled apartment buildings, are the names of local families. Atop one shining edifice is a single meticulously cut out and painted human figure: his father. The showstopper is his largest cityscape, “Villa Fantome,” a fantasy city with shops, hotels, a sports stadium, a power plant, a post office, apartment and plenty of parking, but no police station or hospital. Kingelez described it as “a peaceful city where everybody is free. It’s a city that breathes nothing but joy, the beauty of life. It’s a melting pot of all races in the world. Here you live in a paradise, like heaven.” There is almost too much going

more, they do it all on computers.” Of all the motifs in this show, the most frequent is the star, sprinkled on pavements and buildings. Religion was an integral force in his life. Kingelez’ career was sparked by a divine vision, and it continued to inspire him throughout his life (he never made preparatory drawings). “God is the first artist, He created the mountains and forests,” he said, “It is our duty to follow His example.” The star, he said, is“a magisterial symbol for which all powerful God the Creator communicated to His people on earth.” Regrettably, none of the buildings envisioned by this inventive soul exists, but we can always hope. After all, we have the models.

Bodys Isek Kingelez (Congolese, 1948-2015). “Sports Internationaux.” 1997. Paper, plastic and other various materials, 35 7/16” × 33 7/16” × 9 13/16”, irreg. Purchased 2013 with funds from Tim Fairfax, AM, through the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art Foundation. Collection Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane. © QAGOMA, Natasha Harth


JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

2018 Summer Guide BY CHRISTOPHER MOORE

When the neighbors hit the road, you can double-down on the city streets. And you can be a summertime tourist without ever leaving home. Lovely little victories await. Dinner reservations you can’t get at other times of the year, and a feeling that there’s a little more space when the neighbors are away. And there’s more, in our summer guide and in your summer. There’s lounging before Shakespeare in the Park, laughing with the family at the Father’s Day festivities, confiding in a pal at a wine bar and taking in a movie at the pier. They’re all memories in the making. So enjoy your town. Watch it calm down and open up, and remember why you wanted to be here in the first place.

11


12

JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

FAIRS AND EVENTS The city streets come alive

The annual one-night-only Museum Mile Festival brings access to Fifth Avenue museums. Photo: f minus, via ďŹ&#x201A;ickr

Expected back at the Rubin Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s block party this year: Ajna Dance. Photo: Michael Seto/Rubin Museum

for

German Lessons Children

at German-American School

After-School Program NY State Accredited Language Program t-PXUVJUJPO /PQSFWJPVT(FSNBOOFDFTTBSZ .JOJNVNBHFZFBST t.BOIBUUBOMPDBUJPO6QQFS&BTU4JEF t-PDBUJPOTBMTPJO'SBOLMJO4RVBSF BOE(BSEFO$JUZ -POH*TMBOE

Classes start second week in September 'PSNPSFJOGPSNBUJPOTFF XXX(FSNBO"NFSJDBO4DIPPMPSH (FSNBO-FTTPOT4JODFPSDBMM Three convenient locations in the Greater New York Area: 2VFFOT .BOIBUUBO /: 6QQFS&BTU4JEF 'SBOLMJO4RVBSF (BSEFO$JUZ

MAKE MUSEUM MEMORIES

STILL PROUD

Museum Mile Festival Free June 12, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Fifth Avenue, 82nd to 105th Streets museummilefestival.org Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the night of a million museums. No, it only feels that way, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now a great New York night, one with open museums and openly enthusiastic visitors embracing them. Free access to famed institutions along Fifth Avenue, complete with art activities for kids and live musical entertainment. Also, an additional beneďŹ t for walkers: no cars.

The March Free June 24, stepping off at noon nycpride.org The ďŹ rst march was in 1970. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been progress â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from the Supreme Court on down â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but challenges remain. Expect both a political message and also enthusiasm when the march kicks off on June 24, with more than 450 continents and over 100 ďŹ&#x201A;oats.


JUNE 7-13,2018

THE BIG PICTURE Manhattanhenge at American Museum of Natural History Tickets: $15, $12 members, $13.50 for students & seniors) July 12, 7 p.m. Hayden Planetarium, enter at 81st Street amnh.org Manhattanhenge is our local take on Stonehenge, when the sun sets in a special way in our big city. Yes, you can see it for free on the crosstown streets, or you can head to the American Museum of Natural History, where astrophysicist Jackie Faherty will explain the history and astronomy behind it all.

GREET THE FUTURE Rubin Museum Block Party Free June 17, 1 to 4 p.m. West 17th Street, between Sixth and Seventh avenues rubinmuseum.org/blockparty The Rubin Museum’s annual bash mixes family art-making with live musical performances. And don’t forget the free museum admission. With

13

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

an emphasis this year on the museum’s yearlong theme of “The Future,” expect multigenerational activities, futuristic art-creating stations, drone demos and activities led by community partners. Jane Hsu, the head of interpretation and engagement at the Rubin, promises: “At the Block Party, families and kids of all ages will be able to make the future with art-making activities, performances, and intergenerational learning.”

MOVIES

On big screens, a wide selection

DOWNTOWN’S DELIGHT River to River Festival Free Various downtown venues lmcc.net/public-programs/river-to-riverfestival/ June 15 through June 24 It’s time to expect the unexpected again. At the 17th annual River to River Festival, all events are free and open to the public — and there are plenty of events, and musical styles, to choose from. Expect to be on the move, since this festival utilizes more than 40 different venues. Genres blend here, with dance, music, theater and the visual arts mixed together. Check the website to make a plan.

The staff of Film Forum eagerly awaits its renovation, currently underway. Photo: Jorge Torres

OUTSIDE FLICKS Movie nights at Bryant Park Free June 18 through August 20, 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. bryantpark.org/programs/movie-nights How many of us have enjoyed food, friends and films in this midtown setting over the years? Snacks, dinner and drinks are also part of the scene, which begins when the lawn opens on Monday nights at 5 p.m. Check the website for the movie lineup, expected soon, and the rules (no dogs on the lawn, for instance).

FILM FORUM: COME BACK SOON “Rendez-vous in July” Tickets: $15 ($9 for members) This summer, after theater reopens Film Forum 209 West Houston Street filmforum.org The theater’s under construction, and the official word on the anticipated return — “reopening this summer” — is a tiny bit vague. But

those who love heading to Houston Street for their film fix have no choice but to be patient. The renovations will bring about a fourth screen, new seating and an anticipated $6 million worth of improvements. Not bad for a singular film institution, which began with 50 folding chairs almost 50 years ago. Up first after the reopening: Jacques Becker’s “Rendez-vous in July,” part of a 15-film festival dedicated to Becker’s work.

MOMA MOVIE MAGIC “Modern Matinees: Hitchcock/Truffaut” Through June 29 Tickets: $12 for adults, $10 for seniors, $8 with student ID 11 West 53rd Street moma.org/calendar/film You could spend Independence Day with “Psycho,” thanks to the Museum of Modern Art’s latest celebration of the works from filmmakers Alfred Hitchcock and Francois Truffaut. Others in the series, which runs throughout June: “Rear Window,” “To Catch a Thief” and “Jules and Jim.”

:HDUHDSURXGPHPEHURI WKH$VVRFLDWHG3UHVV DQGWKH1DWLRQDO 1HZVSDSHU $VVRFLDWLRQ This annual Pride March mixes celebration with political activism. Photo: Elvert Barnes, via flickr


14

JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

NYCHORAL Sings â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Join us Wednesday evenings in August to sing and toast to Summer Sings!

EATS AND DRINKS Indulging in the tastes of summer

David Hayes, Music Director

The New York Choral Society Hear us now.

t8FQSPWJEFUIFDPOEVDUPS QJBOJTU TPMPJTUT BOETDPSFT:06BSFUIFDIPSVT t%VTUPGGZPVSTJHIUSFBEJOHTLJMMT PSKVTUTJOHBMPOHGPSUIFTIFFSGVOPGJU t.FFU.VTJD%JSFDUPS%BWJE)BZFTBOE"TTPDJBUF$POEVDUPS.JDIBFM$JBWBHMJB

The patio at Ardesia Wine Bar awaits visitors to Hellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen this summer. Photo: Daniel Krieger

ARDESIA WINE BAR TICKETS: $15 per person at the door or through Brown Paper Tickets at: www.nychoral.org/pages/summer-sings Visit NYCHORAL.org for additional information.

510 West 52nd Street ardesia-ny.com Wine, beer, cocktails and small plates mix ably at Ardesia Wine Bar, between 10th and 11th Avenues. During the summer months the backyard patio makes a big impression on visitors, who seem to be streaming to Hellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen as the far West Side becomes a key hot spot in our city. The wine list here has more than 10 options by the glass and more than 100 by the bottle. The special summer menu will be heavy on the rosĂŠ.

HUNGRY FOR DIVERSITY

BE THE SOMEONE

WHO HELPS A KID BE THE FIRST IN HER FAMILY TO GO TO COLLEGE.

Taste of Jewish Culture Street Festival Free June 17, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sixth Avenue, between 48th and 49th streets circle.org/event/taste-jewish-culture-streetfestival/ Benâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kosher Deli, a premiere New York dining

experience, is the headliner at this annual event. The theme this year is from the Workmenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Circle, which presents the event: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Diversity is Delicious.â&#x20AC;? Expect proof at this mashup, which includes nonJewish establishments putting their best Jewish spin on traditional dishes. Since itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, the plan is for dads to get a free egg cream. Family-friendly activities, dancing and musical performances round out the day.

OLD MARKET, NEW FESTIVAL Fairway Food Festival $5 The Armory, 216 Fort Washington Ave. fairwaymarket.com/foodfestival/ The Upper West Side mainstay made news by going to the East Side â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and beyond the city. Now the marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hosting a big event uptown. Signature sandwiches, pastries, cheeses, chips and snacks are all on the menu, as Fairway joins the parade of food festivals for the ďŹ rst time.

newyorkcares.org Fairway, embodied by its Upper West Side store, will make an impression uptown â&#x20AC;&#x201D; way uptown â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at its ďŹ rst-ever summer food festival. Photo: Teri Tynes, via ďŹ&#x201A;ickr


JUNE 7-13,2018

15

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

BLOOMINGDALE FAMILY DAYS

Heather Lind and Chukwudi Iwuji in “Othello.” Photo: Joan Marcus for Public Theater

THEATER AND DANCE Some city stages never go dark ‘OTHELLO’ RETURNS

MOVING MOVEMENTS

Shakespeare in the Park Free Through June 24 Delacorte Theatre, Central Park publictheater.org/Free-Shakespeare-in-the-Park For the first time since 1991, “Othello” is back this summer in Central Park. Tony winner Ruben Santiago-Hudson is directing the classic Shakespearean drama. Expect a lush, romantic and violent evening the park — and that’s just the beginning, because a second show, “Twelfth Night,” opens on July 17 and runs through Aug. 19.

Battery Dance Festival Free Aug. 12 to 17, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Robert F. Wagner Park in Battery Park City. Closing, ticketed event: Aug. 18, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Schimmel Center at Pace University. Tickets for this night are available beginning Aug. 1. batterydance.org/battery-dance-festival Established back in 1982, the Battery Dance Festival is the city’s longest-running free public dance festival. An expected audience of more than 12,000 people this year will greet dancers from New York City, along with talents from Botswana, Canada, Gabon, Kazakhstan, Macedonia, Spain, Turkey and a collection of India’s greatest Kathak dancers. Jonathan Hollander, artistic director of Battery Dance, says, “Having the opportunity to perform and teach around the world, it is only natural that we would bring back to our home in lower Manhattan the amazing treasures we discover overseas.”

‘PRETTY’ KARL ON STAGE ‘Pretty Woman’ on Broadway Tickets: from $99 Nederlander Theatre 208 West 41st Street telecharge.com You’re wary of Broadway versions of old movies? Of course you are. It’s a sign you’re a New Yorker. But your out-of-town relatives and pals might want to know the Broadway summer news: “Pretty Woman” begins previews July 20. At least the heralded Andy Karl, who overcame injury to become a Tony-nominated phenom in last season’s “Groundhog Day,” has recently been added to the cast. Samantha Barks has the Julia Roberts part.

FABULOUS FIDDER “Fiddler on the Roof” at The National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene $52 and up July 4 though Aug. 26 Museum of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Place, Manhattan nytf.org Oscar- and Tony-winner Joel Grey gets the directing credit for a highly-anticipated new production of “Fiddler on the Roof.” The show’s in Yiddish, with English and Russian supertitles. The emotions will be universal, if “Fiddler” stays true to form.

Saturday, June 9th 11am to 5 pm Columbus Avenue from 106th-110th st Plus, continue down Columbus for Valley Restoration street fair from 97th-106th st!

LEARN TO RIDE A BICYCLE With Bike NY 11am to 5pm

MUSIC BY CASA MANTEQUILLA 1pm to 5pm

SHREDDING TRUCK For Personal Documents 12pm to 4pm

CHILDREN'S ACTIVITIES AND MORE!

info@columbusamsterdambid.org 212-666-9774


16

JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

KIDS

HISTORY COMES ALIVE

A city full of adventure, for children and their caretakers COOLING OFF Sprinkler Day at Asphalt Green Free July 21 and August 10, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Athletic field at 555 East 90th St., New York, NY 10128 asphaltgreen.org If hot weather’s back, then the kids will need another Sprinkler Day at Asphalt Green. Luckily, there are two slated for this summer — opportunities for youngsters to enjoy free outdoor play in high-powered sprinklers. And there’s even another treat: a free frozen dessert on the way out.

WHERE CREATIVITY COUNTS The New-York Historical Society DiMenna Children’s History Museum awaits summertime visitors. Photo: New-York Historical Society /Jon Wallen

Stay cool this summer with

10

Delicious Flavors

l

Made with Real Fruit and Cane Sugar

Try them all!

“Art, Artists & You” exhibit Children and adults: $14. Seniors: $11. June 2 through Dec. 31, 2018 Children’s Museum of Manhattan, 212 West 83rd Street cmom.org The art exhibit goes interactive in “Art, Artists & You,” a new experience that might just liven up the family summer. Running through the end of the year, the part-exhibit, part-art-studio event draws on the talent of four artists who will be in residence during the show. On hand this year: Sara Jimenez (assemblage/collage), Deborah Morris (fiber arts), Ezra Wube (technology/new media), and Yeon Ji Yoo (paper).

“Independence Day: Freedoms and Food in WWII” Free museum admission for visitors under 17 Wednesday, July 4, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. DiMenna Children’s History Museum, NewYork Historical Society 170 Central Park West nyhistory.org/childrens-museum To mark its exhibit “Rockwell, Roosevelt and the Four Freedoms,” the society celebrates July 4 with an immersive family event. Activities will emphasize the freedoms cherished, the daily lives of soldiers and food — for soldiers and on the home front. All that history and a treat too: all visitors will get M&Ms!

HIGH LINE HAPPENINGS Family Festival Free June 30, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. On the High Line between 15th and 16th Streets thehighline.org/activities/go-it-s-a-familyfestival A chance to RSVP and a list of events for the family-oriented fun are listed on the High Line’s website. Expect art, storytelling and hands-on experiences during the event, which will be held rain or shine. And you should expect a little New York sparkle too, since Drag Queen Story Hour is on the agenda.

TENNIS, ANYONE? Tennis, golf and varietal day camps for ages 4 through 17 Tennis Club of Riverdale Cost: As low as $725 a week. 2600 Netherland Avenue, Bronx, N.Y. tcr-nyc.com Door-to-door transport is a convenience that Manhattan parents appreciate when they sign their kids up for day camps at the Tennis Club of Riverdale (TCR). Tennis camp includes airconditioned tennis instruction. There are other options available at TCR, where there’s a multisport approach and costs get less expensive the more weeks you sign up for.

Playground Pups 2II$OO6HUYLFHV8QWLO-XO\VW A Neighborhood Hangout For Your Dog 'D\FDUH‡*URRPLQJ‡%RDUGLQJ 7UDLQLQJ‡%RXWLTXH

Call For An Appointment SOD\JURXQGSXSVFRP‡ info@playgroundpups.com 664 Amsterdam Avenue (btwn 92nd & 93rd)


JUNE 7-13,2018

17

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

ESTABLISHED 1789 A NURTURING, SMALL, JUNIOR-K THROUGH 5th GRADE CO-ED SCHOOL Where Empowerment and Education go hand-in-hand.

Join Our Junior Kindergarten For children 4 years old by September 1st, 2018 LIMITED SPACE AVAILABLE

On 95th Street at Central Park West 212-663-2844 alexanderrobertson.org

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yiddish Under the Stars,â&#x20AC;? a free concert, will take place on June 13 at SummerStage in Central Park. Photo courtesy of NYTF

MUSIC

The sweet sounds of summer

June 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yiddish Under the Starsâ&#x20AC;? on June 13, Oh Wonder on July 9, Alonzo King Lines Ballet on July 25. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a taste of what plays out â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and plays to eager crowds â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in Central Park, and keep in mind that SummerStage is not a Manhattan-only affair. Parks throughout the ďŹ ve boroughs play host to other SummerStage events.

SWINGING AT THE CENTER SUMMER GROOVES Jazz in July Tickets: $35-$85 92nd Street Y 1395 Lexington Avenue 92y.org/events The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crazy Rhythm/Prohibitionâ&#x20AC;? concert, featuring the stylings of vocalist Mary Stallings, kicks off â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jazz in July,â&#x20AC;? a six-part series at the 92nd Street Y. The Y recently unveiled a $180 million, top-to-bottom renovation plan. Investing in the facilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future is good news for jazz fans, who look to Kaufmann Concert Hall as a key spot to visit during the summertime.

ECLECTIC LINEUP SummerStage Free June 2 through Sept. 27 East 71st and Fifth Avenue in Central Park cityparksfoundation.org/summerstage/ SummerStage, a mainstage and a mainstay of a New Yorkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer, isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just a good idea for a night out. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also eclectic. Look at the styles reďŹ&#x201A;ected in this summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lineup: The Metropolitan Opera summer recital series on

Midsummer Night Swing Free June 26 through July 15 Advance tickets start at $17. Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts lincolncenter.org/midsummer-night-swing That iconic social dance party is back, for 15 nights this summer. The swing event features outdoor dance lessons, live performances and tributes to the histories of swing, mambo, salsa, blues and much more. This is an event for both newcomers and dance pros.

RAINBOW MUSIC Pride at the Whitney Free with advance registration June 15, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. whitney.org The Whitney marks Pride with a special performance by artist NIC Kay. The topic is love, and the work considers RuPaulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s well-known question about how people can love others if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t love themselves. Hosted in collaboration with Discwoman, the evening also will feature a DJ set thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inspired by the Meatpacking Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rich queer history â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and current exhibitions that are on display at the Whitney.

KARPOFF AFFILIATES 4FOJPS.PWF.BOBHFSt3FBM&TUBUF#SPLFS

KARPOFF AFFILIATES is your single stop for senior life transitions and real estate brokerage needs. tIf you or your family member needs to renovate their existing home to allow them to BHFJOQMBDFPSJTMPPLJOHUPEPXOTJ[F XFDBOIFMQ t*GZPVXBOUUPNPWF XFDBOTFMMZPVSIPNF BTTJTUXJUIQBDLJOH PWFSTFFQSPGFTTJPOBM NPWFSTBOEQSPWJEFTVQQPSUUPSFEVDFTUSFTT8FXJMMNPWFZPVPVUPGTUBUFPSCBDLUP /FX:PSL*GZPVBSFMPPLJOHGPSBOBTTJTUFEMJWJOHSFTJEFODF XFDBOIFMQ t*GZPVIBWFMPTUTPNFPOF XFXJMMPSHBOJ[FBOEBTTFTTJUFNTMFGUJOUIFIPNFBOEmOEB buyer for the residence in order to lessen the hardship during this difďŹ cult time. t Karpoff AfďŹ liates created the signature service Moving On NYC to address these needs. 8FIFMQNBOBHFFWFSZEFUBJM DPOOFDUJOHXJUIBUUPSOFZT FTUBUFHVBSEJBOT TPDJBMXPSLers and caregivers. You will deal with one person from start to ďŹ nish. t8FSVOUBHBOEFTUBUFTBMFTBOEQSPWJEFBQQSBJTBMTGPSKFXFMSZ FTUBUFTBOEmOFBOtiques. We also offer total auction services.

We provide peace of mind and ensure that each project is handled with respect and integrity.

Marilyn Karpoff Founder & CEO

212-358-8044

www.KarpoffAfďŹ liates.com NLBSQPGG!LBSQPGGBGmMJBUFTDPN Compassionate Senior Move Manager and Expert Real Estate Broker

290 Third Avenue, Suite 26C | NYC 10010


18

JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

SENIORS

FFor llongtime ti NNew YYorkers, k a season to get out and get going

Yoga classes continue at Carl Schurz Park and other spots around the city, thanks to the City Parks Foundation. Photo courtesy of City Parks Foundation

CELEBRATING CULTURE

PARKS ARE THE PLACE

Intercultural Festival Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, 343 East 70th Street July 23 through 27 lenoxhill.org At the Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, they’re still finalizing plans for their fourth center-wide intercultural festival. Highlighting and celebrating the mix of cultures on display at the center, this year’s showcase will include performances by members, volunteers and guest presenters. On tap: a Balinese dance demonstration, expo-style information tables and a panel discussion on cultural traditions. Attendance is free, although visitors must register as members (that’s free and open to New York City residents) to participate.

Tennis, yoga and walking Free; online registration Weekdays throughout city CityParksFoundation.org The spring season of free yoga, tennis and fitness walking instruction continues in city parks through June 15. The City Parks Foundation welcomes New Yorkers 60 and older to the CityParks Senior Fitness program, an initiative playing out in Carl Schurz Park (walking on Mondays and Fridays, yoga on Tuesdays and Thursday) and in Central Park (tennis on Friday afternoons). Check online for details on the program, which began in 2006 and has served more than 10,000 participants.

A fashion show during an intercultural festival shows how the Lenox Hill Neighborhood House celebrates diversity.

©2018 VNSNY


JUNE 7-13,2018

19

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Your Neighborhood News Source

BEYOND BROADWAY - WEST SIDE The #1 online community for NYC theater:

www.show-score.com

NOW PLAYING IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD FROM $30

FROM $52

FROM $29

DESPERATE MEASURES

PUFFS

725 REVIEWS IN PREVIEWS

473 REVIEWS OPEN RUN

ž

AFTERGLOW 261 REVIEWS ENDS JUL 01

ž

91

ž

84

74

A foot-stompin’, knee-slappin’ new musical set in the Old West based on ‘Measure for Measure’.

A Harry Potter-inspired comedy for anyone who has ever felt like a character in someone else’s story.

A drama exploring the complexity of gay polyamory and open relationships.

NEW WORLD STAGES - 340 W 50TH ST

NEW WORLD STAGES - 340 W 50TH ST

THE DAVENPORT THEATRE - 354 W 45TH ST

WHAT’S TRENDING ACROSS NYC

COMING SOON

FROM $30

FROM $50

OUR LADY OF 121ST STREET 129 REVIEWS ENDS JUN 17

CARMEN JONES PREVIEWS START JUN 08

ž

First major NYC revival of Oscar Hammerstein II’s adaptation of Bizet’s ‘Carmen,’ reset with an African-American cast.

83

CLASSIC STAGE COMPANY - 136 E 13TH ST

A group of former students return to Harlem after the death of a beloved teacher in this brash and dark comedy.

FROM $50

SIGNATURE CENTER - 480 W 42ND ST

TEENAGE DICK PREVIEWS START JUN 12

FROM $30

A new comic take on ‘Richard III,’ which reimagines the famous king as a 16-year-old outsider in the deepest winter of his discontent.

PARADISE BLUE 102 REVIEWS ENDS JUN 17 ž

PUBLIC THEATER / SHIVA THEATER - 425 LAFAYETTE ST

83

FROM $25

THE MAID’S TRAGEDY OPENS JUN 13

A timely look at the changes a community endures through the story of a trumpeter and club owner. SIGNATURE CENTER - 480 W 42ND ST

The Pocket Universe presents a new staging of the Jacobean revenge drama, set in present-day Hollywood.

FROM $30

ACCESS THEATER - 380 BROADWAY

SYMPHONIE FANTASTIQUE 37 REVIEWS ENDS JUN 15

FROM $82

ž

THIS AIN’T NO DISCO PREVIEWS START JUN 29

82

Content provided by

A revival of Basil Twist’s boundary-breaking surreal show set in a 1,000-gallon water tank.

Stephen Trask (‘Hedwig and the Angry Inch’) and Peter Yanowitz tell the story of drifters and dreamers searching for their place in the world of Studio 54.

HERE ARTS CENTER - 145 6TH AVE

ATLANTIC THEATER - 336 W 20TH ST KEY:


20

JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

DAY TRIPS

Out of the city, and into a new adventure CLASSICAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; AND MORE Caramoor summer season opening night Tickets: $45 to $110 June 16 149 Girdle Ridge Road, Katonah, N.Y. caramoor.org Tony-winner Audra McDonald kicks the summer off at Caramoorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening night concert. And it should be an interesting summer, one that runs through July 27 and is the ďŹ rst since the departure of longtime bel canto expert Will CrutchďŹ eld. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taking his expertise to Purchase College, while at Caramoor the schedule in a bucolic session includes appearances by Kronos Quartet, the Jasper Spring Quartet and a jazz festival on July 21. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a dizzying mix, and even a short drive here takes you into a new world.

STATEN ISLANDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GIFTS Snug Harbor Cultural Center and Botanical Garden snug-harbor.org Instead of making fun of Staten Island, try visiting. The Snug Harbor Cultural Center and Botanical Garden would be a treasure for any borough â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s well worth a day trip from

Manhattan. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than one place, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than one way to visit. History, art, architecture and horticulture all get attention at Snug Harbor. Only two attractions, the Newhouse Center for Contemporary Art and the lovely New York Chinese Scholarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden, have admission fees. Every Saturday from June through September, you can take a 90-minute tour that gives you a sense of all there is to offer in this multifaceted part of your city.

HILL OF A PLACE Sagamore Hill National Historic Site Oyster Bay, Long Island nps.gov/sahi/index.htm Anyone who thinks history is dull hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been to Sagamore Hill â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or heard of the 26th President of the U.S. either. Visit Theodore Rooseveltâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer White House,â&#x20AC;? where individual tour tickets are required, cost $10 (children 15 and under are free) and are well worth the investment. Almost all of the home furnishings are original, making this seem like a step back to another era, one where a Republican president pushed a progressive agenda. You can see why foreign dignitaries were happy to visit here.

Sagamore Hill is worth a visit to Oyster Bay, Long Island. Photo: Sue Manus, via ďŹ&#x201A;ickr

Serving the Community for 17 Years 630 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10024     0    ---'#/!- )&(0---'#/'('#%&( Pre-need services are available Understanding the needs and providing a Jewish funeral from the only community-owned chapel in New York

Serving the metropolitan New York area, Florida, and Israel 24 hours a day


JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

21

The riverfront in Wilmington, Delaware awaits visitors. Photo: likeaduck, via flickr

ROAD TRIPS Overnight jaunts worth taking

OCEAN RESORT CASINO

BANK ON IT

Opens June 28 500 Boardwalk, Atlantic City, N.J. theoceanac.com Atlantic City keeps reinventing itself, and now there’s a brand-new perch from which to explore. The old Revel hotel, a high-profile effort to create buzz in Atlantic City, declared bankruptcy and went into history. Now the site has a new spot, Ocean Resort Casino, which already netted gossip-page headlines because Mark Wahlberg invested in HQ, the hotel’s nightclub. Expect more attention at the new resort — opening later this month. At Ocean Resort Casino, they’re advertising suite accommodations, deep soaking tubs and stunning views.

Red Bank, New Jersey visitredbank.com Charming without being claustrophobic, Red Bank, N.J. offers a visiting New Yorker a compelling mix of culture and relaxation. The downtown is a vibrant mix of shops and restaurants, and there’s an array of events throughout the year, from jazz and movies in the park to a sidewalk sale and an oyster festival. You might use the Federal-style Molly Pitcher Inn on the waterfront as your headquarters for a night or two. Nearby, the Count Basie Center for the Arts draws diverse acts even in the summertime, as when Leslie Odom Jr. appears later this month.

HYDE PARK HISTORY ‘Family Fun Festival’ Free June 30, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum Hyde Park, N.Y. fdrlibrary.org There’s as fresh reason to visit the richly historic and relaxing hamlet of Hyde Park, N.Y, where the Democratic Roosevelt is remembered. Later this month, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum and the Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site will join for their third annual “Family Fun Festival.” It’s on the library’s lawn and the grounds of the home. Activities will include a bird walk, circus acts, a live radio broadcast and radio activities. The festival’s free — and so is your visit that day to the library and the home.

A DIFFERENT DOWNTOWN Wilmington, Delaware visitwilmingtonde.com delart.org Amtrak isn’t just for getting from Penn Station north to Boston or south to D.C. Try getting off at one of those other stops — and you might be surprised what you’ll find. In Wilmington, Delaware, for instance, there’s old-school elegance at the Hotel du Pont, a walkable and historic downtown, food galore, and a renovated waterfront. Coming June 30 at the Delaware Art Museum, visitors can gain new understanding with a new exhibit, “Danny Lyon: Memories of the Southern Civil Rights Movement.” Sometimes city dwellers need a vacation not at the beach, but in a different downtown — and this small city has a pace and personality all its own.

On June 30, circus acts are among the fun slated for the annual “Family Fun Festival” at the FDR Library in Hyde Park. Photo: FDR Presidential Library

The pool at the Molly Pitcher Inn awaits summertime visitors. Photo courtesy of the Molly Pitcher Inn


22

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Healthcare in Your Neighborhood Lighthouse Guild Health Center provides coordinated vision and healthcare. We have specialized programs to maximize your functional vision and we address underlying medical issues. We provide: ï Diabetes care and selfmanagement education ï Primary care and specialty physicians ï Vision rehabilitation services ï Occupational therapy ï Physical therapy

ï

ï

Behavioral health services including individual and group therapy, day treatment and medication management Community-based coordinated care management*

* Offered in collaboration with our managed long-term care program, GuildNet. We are a Medicare and Medicaid provider and accept many insurance plans.

Located: 250 West 64th Street (bet. Amsterdam & West End Ave.)

Call us for an appointment 212-769-6313

lighthouseguild.org

@LighthouseGuild @LighthouseGld @LighthouseGuild

JUNE 7-13,2018

HEALTH AND WELLNESS Exercising your right to finding better health — and inspiration Summer Streets Aug. 4, 11 and 18, 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Free nyc.gov/summerstreets The city seeks artists, performers and fitness experts as part of its Summer Streets event, where participants enjoy a car-free environment. On three special Saturday mornings, from the Brooklyn Bridge to Central Park, the streets feel especially welcoming. There’s walking, biking, running and, well, just enjoying. The event extends along Park Avenue and connecting streets, with easy access from all points in New York City.

6 p.m. to 7 p.m. South Public Plaza, Flatiron District flatirondistrict.nyc/summer2018 The Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District doesn’t seem to take the summer off. There are free tech classes, performances — and enough free fitness classes to keep you in shape for summer. The classes will be taught by instructors from local studios, including Exhale Flatiron, Uplift Studios, Bode NYC, New York Health & Racquet Club, and Tiger Schulmann. Check online for the details about which class is on which date. No July 4 class is slated.

THEY TEACH, YOU DANCE

VACATION VOLUNTEERS

WHEN WALKERS RULE

Alvin Ailey Extension classes The Joan Weill Center for Dance, 405 West 55th Street One free class for newcomers; intro offer — two classes for $38. June 14-23 aileyextension.com/ncdanceweek Alvin Ailey is inviting you to dance. The dance organization, heading into its 60th year, has an ongoing initiative emphasizing “real classes for real people.” It’s called Alvin Ailey Extension, and it’s been around since 2005. This month more than 30 classes will be offered at the Ailey Studios to celebrate NYC Dance Week, which begins June 14. New students can take a free class; subsequent classes require payment. Check out the online calendar for details, and get ready to put some movement in your summer. If you’re more interested in watching others dance, see alvinailey.org for details about the dance theater’s summer season at Lincoln Center.

FLATIRON-STYLE FITNESS Wellness Wednesdays Free Summer Wednesdays, June 20 through Aug.8

When summertime is a time to give back and do good Woodstock Farm Sanctuary 2 Rescue Road, High Falls, N.Y. woodstocksanctuary.org On Saturdays and Sundays, you can tour this animal sanctuary (suggested donation is $10 for adults and $5 for children and seniors). It’s 60 to 75 minutes and gives you an inside look at a place that’s saving more than 400 animals. Or you can go one better — volunteer to help those animals yourself. There’s a three-hour minimum, and plenty of opportunity given the daily six-hour opportunity to assist. “The animals poop 365 days a year,” reports Todd Friedman, an animal caretaker and volunteer coordinator at the sanctuary. He started as a volunteer himself. Now he coordinates groups of helpings, who come from many different walks of life. Educational institutions, businesses, offices — all come up with teams who stack hay and clean pig stalls and clear fields and coops. “It’s a team-building thing,” he says. “We have a ton of schools that come.” There’s a contact form on the sanctuary’s website, where you can find out more about how to assist at the successful sanctuary. The 160-acre operation is in High Falls, 25 miles from Woodstock.

She depends on you. You can depend on us. Caring for an older relative or friend is not easy. You can get support and guidance that includes in-home or overnight care, supplies and a lot more. Call 311 and ask for “caregiving support.”

Bill de Blasio Mayor Department for the Aging

Donna Corrado, PhD Commissioner

Animal caretaker Todd Friedman helps out a beneficiary of the Woodstock Farm Sanctuary. Photo: Melissa Cacioppo


JUNE 7-13,2018

Jerusalem Restaurant

2715 Broadway

Grade Pending (23) Food from unapproved or unknown source or home canned. Reduced oxygen packaged (ROP) fish not frozen before processing; or ROP foods prepared on premises transported to another site. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Texas Rotisserie & Grill

2581 Broadway

A

Birch

750 Columbus Ave

A

Xian Famous Foods

2675 Broadway

A

Naruto Ramen

2634 Broadway

Grade Pending (41) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Food not cooled by an approved method whereby the internal product temperature is reduced from 140º F to 70º F or less within 2 hours, and from 70º F to 41º F or less within 4 additional hours. Appropriately scaled metal stem-type thermometer or thermocouple not provided or used to evaluate temperatures of potentially hazardous foods during cooking, cooling, reheating and holding. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

NY Brat Factory

933 Amsterdam Ave

A

Shaking Crab

2869 Broadway

Grade Pending (62) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food Protection Certificate not held by supervisor of food operations. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/ refuse/sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

Screme Gelato Bar

176 West 94 Street

A

Spoonbread Too

364 West 110 Street

Grade Pending (9) Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, cross-contaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan.

Westend Lounge

955 West End Avenue Grade Pending (5)

Regional

2607 Broadway

A

Tum & Yum

917 Columbus Ave

CLOSED (78) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Live roaches present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Hand washing facility not provided in or near food preparation area and toilet room. Hot and cold running water at adequate pressure to enable cleanliness of employees not provided at facility. Soap and an acceptable hand-drying device not provided. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Ballfields Cafe

0 South Of 65 Street

A

Sido Falafel & More

267 Columbus Ave

A

Birdbath Neighborhood Green Bakery

274 Columbus Ave

Grade Pending (36) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food Protection Certificate not held by supervisor of food operations. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/ or non-food areas.

Pokebab

2047A Broadway

Not Yet Graded (56) Food Protection Certificate not held by supervisor of food operations. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. No facilities available to wash, rinse and sanitize utensils and/or equipment. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

127 W 72 St

A

to withdraw the original rule change proposal, writing that the proposed rules would “create more uncertainty for the public and bargain away the future of our landmark buildings to save time during the application process.” At the meeting, Srinivasan characterized the proposed revisions as “rational and responsive” to public comments, and said that the rulemaking process is “about making sure that people know what agencies do and that it’s transparent.” “There’s this general comment that we heard that this will create more closed-door activity,” she said. “But in fact that’s not the case, because by putting our rules on paper where everybody can see them it actually shows how decisions are made by the commission or the commission staff.” “I think it’s kind of ironic that they tried to frame this as a transparency proposal,” said Andrew Berman. executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation. “It was very much an antitransparency proposal. Ultimately, it really just couldn’t bear the weight of scrutiny.” Srinivasan, who was appointed by Mayor Bill de Blasio in 2014, was a frequent target of criticism from some preservation advocates. Berman characterized Srinivasan’s tenure as “stormy” and “challenging” for preservationists, adding that she placed a “greater emphasis on greasing the skids for developers and allowing for greater changes and development in historic districts that in the not-too-recent past would have been considered unimaginable.” Commissioner Frederick Bland will preside over LPC hearings until the mayor appoints a new chair, who must

Do

Meenakshi Srinivasan, who resigned as chair of the Landmarks Preservation Commission June 1, said revisions announced May 29 to a controversial earlier rule change proposal reflected “rational and responsive” receptivity to public comments. Photo: NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission be approved by the City Council. GVSHP has launched a letter writing campaign calling on de Blasio to nominate, and the City Council to approve, a “true preservationist” as Srinivasan’s successor. Khorsandi articulated a concern frequently voiced by preservationists regarding what they view as de Blasio’s priorities: “I’m concerned he’s going to pick someone who’s not necessarily preservationminded, but more aligned with his agenda, which is very prodevelopment.” The next LPC chair will have

something

you You’d Email us at news@strausnews.com

significant sway over the direction of the commission, including the fate of the revised rule changes, which, once released, will be voted on by the commission at a later date. The LPC will hold meetings to discuss the revisions with preservation groups, community boards and other stakeholders in the weeks to come. Preservation groups have called on the LPC to open a new round of public comments on the revised text before a vote takes place. Michael Garofalo: reporter@ strausnews.com

us to

look

into

The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml.

LANDMARK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5

like

MAY 23 - 29, 2018

have

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS

Legend

23

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

?


24

JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

COVER TO COVER AT BOOK EXPO From Potterheads to literary professionals, 6 rules for mastering NYC’s biggest publishing event BY ALIZAH SALARIO

The first rule of Book Expo America is to bring a suitcase. Preferably one on wheels that’s suited to stacking advanced reader copies (ARCs) and bookish swag. Otherwise, prepare to spend hours walking around the Javits Center with bulging canvas totes weighing down each shoulder like saddle bags. It’s a real amateur look. Book Expo America (BEA), and its slightly wilder sister event BookCon, are the biggest publishing events in North America. Every year in late May and early June, publishers, authors, booksellers, literary agents, librarians and book bloggers descend upon the Javits Center to talk shop, get a sneak peek at upcoming titles and glean wisdom from their favorite authors. Like any other industry-specific conference, BEA is about making pro-

fessional connections, and of course it’s hard work for the many exhibitors and panelists. For the canvas tote set, it also serves as a literary amusement park, where book lovers can nerd out without judgment. Which brings us to the second rule of BEA: beware the superfans. Potterheads clamored to snap photos of the new 20th anniversary editions of all seven Harry Potter books, featuring stunning cover art by Caldecott Medal-winning children’s book illustrator Brian Selznick. When placed side by side, the covers form a panoramic view that depicts Harry’s journey throughout the series. A line running the entire length of a Javits Center aisle buzzed with excitement; many in line sported pastel hair and glittery nail polish. “The Wicked King” by bestselling YA author Holly Black was dropping right then and there; distributors handed out the new title like hotcakes. Take note, superfans: really big names can’t be found on the conference floor. Their events gener-

A section of the “Share the book that changed your life” wall. Photo: Alizah Salario

Business

Book Expo attendees waiting in line for a signature from “Potato Pants” author Laurie Keller. Photo: Alizah Salario ally require tickets, like the discussion between former President Bill Clinton and author James Patterson about collaborating on their forthcoming novel “The President is Missing.” Fans may have the inside scoop on book signings and releases, but one need only wander the aisles to catch the buzz. Another line snaking around the corner led this reporter to discover “Potato Pants,” a heartwarming tale about a potato and his eggplant nemesis by Geisel-Award winning creator Laurie Keller, and “Rebound” by poet and children’s fiction author Kwame Alexander, who looked unperturbed by the long line awaiting his autograph. “For a first time author, it’s terrifying and delightful,” says Heather Kim, who was signing copies of her quirky cookbook “Sweet Revenge: PassiveAggressive Desserts for Your Exes & Enemies.” Kim, who had sleeves of tattoos that crept up to her neck, said that as a heavily tattooed cookbook author, she had received both kind and questionable remarks. That’s case-in-point for BEA rule number three: Don’t be a genre snob. Part of the joy of BEA is the exposure to different genres and authors. Seeing what small presses outside of New York are churning out is refreshing,

particularly for those saturated in the hierarchical and exclusive New York publishing scene. That being said, don’t forget that BEA is in Manhattan for a reason, so stay loyal to your city. (Rule four). Local booksellers like Housing Works made their presence known with their version of “blind date” books. The mystery titles were wrapped in brown paper with cryptic faux titles like “Sometimes the path to success is incredibly convoluted” written in marker. Publishers were promoting New York-centric titles for fall, including two books about growing up in the 1970s and ‘80s Manhattan. Readers, keep an eye out for Amanda Stern’s memoir “Little Panic: Dispatches from an Anxious Life,” and John Fried’s collection of intertwining short stories about coming-of-age, “The Martin Chronicles.” Rule five may come as a bit of a surprise, but it dovetails with 2018’s “The Reimagined Book Expo” theme. Barnes & Noble chairman Len Riggio delivered the keynote address and was introduced Oren Teicher, CEO of the American Booksellers Association. On the face of it, an alliance between the independent bookstore community and the nation’s corporate bookstore behemoth might seem unholy, but

the message was clear: there’s room for both in our current bookselling ecosystem. “There could never be too many bookstores of any type in America,” said Riggio, as previously reported by Publisher’s Weekly. He reminded booksellers to be nimble in the face of change (change being driven by Amazon). Did we learn nothing from “You’ve Got Mail?” Indies and Barnes & Noble can peacefully coexist. Yes, publishing is big business, and BEA helps many a publishing professional turn a dollar, but reading books? That’s still — yes, still — about hope and wonder. That’s rule six, and the message of the Children’s Books and Authors breakfast led by Jaqueline Woodson, the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature. The panel included Academy Award-winning actress Viola Davis, whose upcoming picture book “Cordury Takes a Bow,” came from a desire to put her daughter into the stories she read, so that she and other African-American girls could see themselves on the page. Davis spoke about the important work of artists and writers. “We are the truth tellers,” said Davis. “We cannot afford to let 75 manuscripts go unfinished. We are the warriors.”


JUNE 7-13,2018

25

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

   



  

  

!

 

 



  

!

"#$% &'

&

()

&*&+,- #+ -



.&   



'/!

"%#%

.

(

'( 0 1 2 3

$(

!

"$4%

&#

()

'.67 667

8

!

" %

'.

(

*+,-

'  ' 



.!

"4%



(

.*$+ -

.' . 

$7

6

"'4%

$

(

*'+ -

.' 4  

'

!

"'%

'

(

*4+ - '

' .() 1 2 

&

!

"%.%

.#

()

&*4+ -

.# 4$ 

$(

!

" ##%

'

()

&*+ -

. 4$ 

$(

.!

"%&#%

4$

(

# 4. 

$!

.!

"%'%

&#

(

& ) 7)

!

'/!

".%'4%

.$

(

& ) 7)

.!

.!

"%&'%

'

(

*&+ -

..  . 

4

'/!

".%$%

4

()

$*'+ - $

.#  . 

.!

!

"$4%

#

(

*'+ -

..'   

'

.!

".%%

&

()

*#+ -

.. ## 

0

'/!

".% %

''

()

#*'+ -

. #& 

9

!

"%&%

&$

()

*&+,-

'&& #. 

&

6

"&%

..

(

.*4+ - 4

..67 6!17

.7

!

"4#%

'&

()

.*&+ -

& # 

.

!

"# %

&$

()

* + -

.67 6!17

&(

.!

"%4#%

.#

()

*+ - 

 $# 

.

'/!

" %&4%

.

()

 5

$ ) 7)

.:

6

" %

'

(

&

'/!

"&%.%

4$

()

67 6!17



.

 5 .

' &

'*.+ - & 4*$+ -  5  

$

#

#

4  

'*4+ - '*&+ -  .

 ; 



 



 

 



  

&  # 

#

!

"#'%#

..

(

*'+ - .

'.. # 

.:

!

"%'#%

##

()

.*+ -

 $ 

&4$

.!

".%$%

#

()

'*.+ -

' ' 



.!

"%4#%

. 

()

4 ' 

.

!

"#.%

#

()

' &

 $

$*.+ - ' * + -

&$ . 

''

.!

"%&.%$&

&4

()

*.+,-

' . 

..!

.!

".%.$%

'4$

()

$*+ -

&.  

.

!

"%#.%

..

()

*&+ - &

&.  

8

.!

"'%##%

&

()

*$+ -

$!  3

$!

!

"%'%

$#

()

*&+ -

.&# &$ 

&.

.!

".% %

. 

()

*&+ - 

.&# &$ 

.&&

!

"%&%

.'

()

*$+ -

&$ && 

(

6

"''%

'

(

*&+ -

 &' 

#:

6

" #%

&

()

$' &. 

&0

!

"% %

#4

()

 <5=  >*?*=  >@  < @ >

.+ - $

5   ? *8?<  ?   >%=  >55   A >      *

*4+ -




26

JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

W. 9 0t

1

h St.

Broa dwa y

2

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

4

3

W. 7 7t

5

something

have

Do

COMMUNITY BOARD 7 UPPER WEST SIDE Active shed permits: 453 Average duration since ďŹ rst permit: 282.07 days Sheds ďŹ rst permitted more than ďŹ ve years ago: 14

us to

?

into

Cen tral Park Wes t

h St.

like

Colu

mbu

s Av e.

h St.

W. 6 6t

LONGEST STANDING SHEDS (FIRST PERMIT DATE):

SIDEWALK

you Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d look

walk scaffolding, long required under New York City law as a safety measure to protect pedestrians walking near buildings undergoing construction or with facades deemed unsafe, is often temporary in name only. The shed at 360 Central Park West, a historic Rosario Candela-designed apartment building at the corner of West 96th Street, dates to the George W. Bush administration. Fourteen sheds in Community Board 7 were originally permitted more than ďŹ ve years ago. The average shed in the district has stood for 282 days, roughly in line with the Manhattan average of 270 days. While city law dictates when scaffolding must be erected, there are currently no regulations requiring sheds to be dismantled if no work is being done on the building. Legislation sponsored by Upper East Side Council Member Ben Kallos would change that. The bill, first introduced by Kallos in 2016, would require all sheds erected due to dangerous building conditions to come down within six months â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or sooner, if work is inter-

1 360 Central Park West (10/17/2008) 2 201 West 85th Street (2/9/2010) 3 114 West 86th Street (7/9/2010) 4 51 West 86th Street (5/26/2011) 5 17 West 60th Street (1/20/2012) Data: NYC DOT; Graphic: Christina Scotti

rupted for more than seven consecutive days. If a building owner fails to complete the necessary repairs and remove scaffolding within that time frame, the legislation calls for the city to step in to complete the work, take down the scaffolding, and bill the landlord for all costs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scaffolding goes up but doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go down â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for months, years, even decades â&#x20AC;&#x201D; while no work is happening,â&#x20AC;? Kallos said in January when he reintroduced the bill for the current session. Real estate groups oppose the proposed reform on the grounds that it would unfairly burden building owners.

Read this story online at WESTSIDESPIRIT.COM to view the interactive map

Email us at news@strausnews.com

Photo: Douglas Feiden NOTICE OF A JOINT PUBLIC HEARING of the Franchise and Concession Review Committee and the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation to th be held on Monday, May 7, 2018 at 2 Lafayette Street, 14 Floor Auditorium, Borough of Manhattan, commencing at 2:30 p.m. relative to: INTENT TO AWARD as a concession the operation and maintenance of Bryant Park in Manhattan, including the operation of food concessions, special events, a carousel, newsstands, seasonal markets, an ice-skating rink and other visitor services and events authorized by Parks, for one (1) ten (10)-year term with up to two (2) five (5)-year renewal options, by mutual agreement, to the Bryant Park Corporation. (â&#x20AC;&#x153;BPCâ&#x20AC;?). BPC shall operate and maintain Bryant Park for the use and enjoyment of the general public in accordance with the terms of the Agreement and to the reasonable satisfaction of the Commissioner. All gross receipts received by BPC will be used exclusively to pay all costs incurred by BPC in operating, repairing, maintaining and managing Bryant Park and in performing BPC's obligations and providing services required or permitted by the Agreement ("Expenses"). If the gross receipts received by BPC for any Fiscal Year exceed such costs ("Excess Revenues"), any Excess Revenues shall be used exclusively to pay: i) accumulated Expenses incurred in the prior Fiscal Year that exceed gross receipts for that Fiscal Year, or ii) Expenses incurred in any subsequent Fiscal Year, subject to submission to Parks of an annual income and expense statement with a certification that all of BPC's gross receipts, including Excess Revenues, to the extent expended, were applied solely to pay Expenses, or remain available to pay for future Expenses . Any Excess Revenues not applied to Expenses at the end of the term, shall be remitted to the City in accordance with the Agreement. LOCATION: A draft copy of the license agreement may be reviewed or obtained at no cost, commencing on Monday, April 30, 2018 through Monday, May 7, 2018, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., excluding weekends and holidays at the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation, located at 830 Fifth Avenue, Room 313, New York, NY 10065. Individuals requesting Sign Language Interpreters should contact the Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ofth fice of Contract Services, Public Hearings Unit, 253 Broadway, 9 Floor, New York, NY 10007, (212) 788-0010, no later than SEVEN (7) BUSINESS DAYS PRIOR TO THE PUBLIC HEARING. TELECOMMUNICATION DEVICE FOR THE DEAF (TDD) 212-504-4115

Diagnosed with COPD? Seeking Individuals for a Research Study

WCMC IRB

04/26/2018 Expiration Date: 02/12/2019

Approval Date:

Visits and Compensation: - Complete screening visit: - Complete bronchoscopy:

$50 $200

For More Information Contact the Department of Genetic Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Friday | 9amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm 646.962.2672 | cora@med.cornell.edu IRB Approved Protocol #1204012331

7KH1HZ<RUN&LW\'HSDUWPHQWRI3DUNVDQG5HFUHDWLRQ Âł3DUNV´ LVLVVXLQJDVLJQLÂżFDQW5HTXHVWIRU Proposals (â&#x20AC;&#x153;RFPâ&#x20AC;?) for the renovation, operation and maintenance of a snack bar at the Heckscher %DOOÂżHOGVLQ&HQWUDO3DUN0DQKDWWDQ $OOSURSRVDOVVXEPLWWHGLQUHVSRQVHWRWKLV5)3PXVWEHVXEPLWWHGQRODWHUWKDQ0RQGD\-XO\ DW307KHUHZLOOEHDUHFRPPHQGHGVLWHYLVLWRQ:HGQHVGD\-XQHDW$0:H ZLOOEHPHHWLQJDWWKHSURSRVHGFRQFHVVLRQVLWH %ORFN /RW ZKLFKLVORFDWHGQRUWKRIWKH +HFNVFKHU%DOOÂżHOGVDQGVRXWKRIWKH:HVW7UDQVYHUVH:HZLOOEHPHHWLQJLQIURQWRIWKH6QDFN%DU ,I\RXDUHFRQVLGHULQJUHVSRQGLQJWRWKLV5)3SOHDVHPDNHHYHU\Há&#x201A;&#x2021;RUWWRDWWHQGWKLVUHFRPPHQGHG PHHWLQJ +DUGFRSLHVRIWKH5)3FDQEHREWDLQHGDWQRFRVWFRPPHQFLQJRQ-XQHWKURXJK-XO\ EHWZHHQWKHKRXUVRIDPDQGSPH[FOXGLQJZHHNHQGVDQGKROLGD\VDWWKH5HYHQXH 'LYLVLRQRIWKH1HZ<RUN&LW\'HSDUWPHQWRI3DUNVDQG5HFUHDWLRQZKLFKLVORFDWHGDW)LIWK$YHQXH 5RRP1HZ<RUN1< 7KH5)3LVDOVRDYDLODEOHIRUGRZQORDGRQ-XQHWKURXJK-XO\RQ3DUNVÂśZHEVLWH7R GRZQORDGWKH5)3YLVLWKWWSZZZQ\FJRYSDUNVEXVLQHVVRSSRUWXQLWLHVDQGFOLFNRQWKHÂł&RQFHVVLRQV 2SSRUWXQLWLHVDW3DUNV´OLQN2QFH\RXKDYHORJJHGLQFOLFNRQWKHÂłGRZQORDG´OLQNWKDWDSSHDUVDGMDFHQW WRWKH5)3ÂśVGHVFULSWLRQ )RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQRUWRUHTXHVWWRUHFHLYHDFRS\RIWKH5)3E\PDLOSURVSHFWLYHSURSRVHUVPD\ FRQWDFW-RFHO\Q/HH3URMHFW0DQDJHUDW  RUDWMRFHO\QOHH#SDUNVQ\FJRY 7(/(&20081,&$7,21'(9,&()257+('($) 7'' 


JUNE 7-13,2018

27

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to westsidespirit.com/15 minutes

A DANCER COMES FULL CIRCLE An Alvin Ailey alum lends her talents to SummerStage BY ANGELA BARBUTI

When performed at SummerStage over two decades ago, Danni Gee never imagined that she would one day be at its helm. A former dancer with Alvin Ailey, she has been the curator of dance for the series, the biggest free outdoor performing arts festival in New York, since 2006. The southwest Philadelphia native came to New York in 1991 to dance with Ailey, but her life an injury curtailed her own dancing career. Also a talented vocalist, she went on to sing with Sister Sledge, Gloria Gaynor and Cher, and later led her own band. She returned to the dance world when a longtime friend and SummerStage’s former director of theater asked her to interview for the curator role. Since her involvement, SummerStage’s dance program has grown, which she credits to her experience at Ailey and relationships with former dancers. “All of the dance shows always look like a big family reunion,” Gee explained. “The park is filled with dancers coming out to see their colleagues. It’s been a really rewarding experience to be on this side of it ... and gives me great pleasure to now give dance back to the people and artists.”

What was it like when you first got to the city? It was definitely a different pace. Just even walking down the street and the speed at which people walk and bump into you. I spent a lot of time saying, “Excuse me” to people, which didn’t seem to matter. But it was very exciting; it was very busy and fast-paced. The subways were a little intimidating, but once I got the hang of that, it was fine. It just seemed like there was always something going on. It was a very late-night city, which I appreciate because I am a night owl.

What can you tell us about dancing at Alvin Ailey? It was a dream come true. It was very top notch ... just being in a company filled with such amazing performers and people who I had admired for so long luckily were still in the company when I joined. People like Desmond Richardson, Sarita Allen, Renee Robinson, Marilyn Banks.... I really felt like I made it to the big time and there were different rules. Alvin Ailey is a union company so all the rules are in place to protect us in terms of 10-minute breaks every hour during rehearsals. It was a different ballgame, a step up. And of course, the travel. At the time, when I was dancing with Philadanco, previously, at that point, we weren’t doing any international travel. And so, my first experience traveling overseas

was with Ailey. My first actual show was in Athens. So after I was told that I got the job, the company manager called me and his first question was, “Do you have a passport?” And at that time I didn’t, so that was the first thing I needed to get done besides sign my contract.

You sustained an injury that led you to stop your dance career, but then you pursued singing. Yeah, it was crazy. I mean, I had always done some singing as a child in church and throughout high school and even during the time I was in Ailey. There were several of us in the company who loved to sing and when we were on tour, we’d find these open mics to go to. After I left dancing, I wasn’t sure quite what I was going to do. I sort of dibbled and dabbled a little bit in music, moved back to Philadelphia, and ended up meeting this producer through a mutual friend there. He was looking for a vocalist to record vocals on a demo he was creating and I agreed to do it. And he said to me, “You have a really great voice; you should pursue this.”

Tell us about collaborating with Kathy Sledge. I reconnected with a member of Sister Sledge, Kathy Sledge, who was the youngest sister of the famous group. And prior to me joining Ailey, I had

Danni Gee, curator of dance for SummerStage. Photo: Sylvain Guenot worked with her just as a background dancer. So I moved back to Philly. She found out that I was back in town and I started working with her again just as a dancer, doing some simple dance moves. And one day she heard me singing backstage, working out some songs for myself. She didn’t realize I could sing as well. And so she then took me on the road with her and her sisters to fill in when all the sisters couldn’t be there together. So I started singing as quote unquote Baby Sledge for about six or seven years. I got my confidence up; I started my own band, Suga Bush, in New York.

What was it like to sing with Gloria Gaynor and Cher?

Since Danni Gee joined SummerStage as curator of dance in 2006, the series’ dance program has grown. Pictured: Brazilain soul band Liniker e os Caramelows perform at Brasil Summerfest at Central Park SummerStage August 5, 2017. Photo: Jack Vartoogian/ FrontRowPhotos

These are disco music icons and top notch professionals, really. From working with Kathy Sledge, we were on this throwback tour that included Gloria Gaynor. So I met her, she liked my energy and later on, asked if I could work with her and it was wonderful. I toured with her for four years. And Cher came out of, honestly, meeting someone on Facebook, another backing vocalist, and sharing conversations and experiences. She was already working with Cher and gave my information to Cher’s management. When Cher was out in Las Vegas doing her residency, this woman I met through Facebook had to go on another tour, so they called me. So I got to go to Las Vegas and work with Cher for six weeks. And she was amazing; she was super humble and professional. The show was amazing, sold out ev-

ery night, crazy fans. To go from Ailey, which was top of the food chain for me, then to work with somebody as incredible, famous and iconic as Cher, I can’t even understand it. It’s just the way the universe works.

Your job came about at SummerStage through a recommendation from a friend. Yeah, from our former director of theater, Freedome Bradley. We knew each other through the music and poetry scene when I moved back to New York. I had just gotten off of a tour with Kathy and he called me and said, “What are you up to these days?” And I said, “I’m looking for work.” And he mentioned that SummerStage was looking for a dance curator and that I should come and interview. I took a chance and luckily, our then-director took a chance on me. And she offered me the position. And I came in and was very honest with her that dance was my life for a very long time and I was passionate about it. And she called me the next day and I’ve been here ever since and love it. cityparksfoundation.org/summerstage

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to westsidespirit.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


D F P T X T M O U N T A I N N

S V Y R V E E T D X X Y H Y H

C T V E X R R S C Q C Y S J F

D A R E Y A Q D S V S G W C F

P A A S I X W T X A Z C M L P

H N M L T N O Y M L Y R O I T

W I S B I R D E R L L J R M W

Q G S F M P A T H E Q W R B Q

I J K T R E K R T Y G W I K F

The puzzle contains the following words. They may be diagonal, across, or up and down in the grid in any direction.

J H Z K S O X X T H I K I N G

Birder Climb Hiking Mountain Pass Path Rocks Route Shelter Storm Trails Trees Trek Valley Wetlands

ANSWERS U M

C

48 41

H

42

49

E

43

H

S

C O

E

36 33

34

E

T

G O

A

P

O

T

R

O

S

H

T

R O

I

29 26 20

21

L

A

I

E

12 1

2

R D

40

P T

R

E

I

M T

R

U 4

N

H O 45

L

R

H

E

28

E

H O

D

A

B

16

L

B

5

E

A

13

E

A

6

T

R 7

C

I U

G N

31

R

E I

23

C

R

35

M O

S

N

46

E

47

E

37

Y

A W A 27

P A

30

G

22 3

N

39

N O M

18 15

A

44

D W

38

50

L

I R

24

E R P

32

N E

25

L

19

L

A W N

17

O

B O

14 8

C

9

E

A M P 10

11

S V Y R V E E T D X X Y H Y H

C T V E X R R S C Q C Y S J F

D A R E Y A Q D S V S G W C F

P A A S I X W T X A Z C M L P

H N M L T N O Y M L Y R O I T

W I S B I R D E R L L J R M W

Q G S F M P A T H E Q W R B Q

I J K T R E K R T Y G W I K F

J H Z K S O X X T H I K I N G

8 1

5 9 4

7

2 1

5 3

6

4

3 7

2 9 6

8

6 2 3 7 9 8 4 1 5

9 6 2 4 7 5 8 3 1

7 3 8 1 6 2 5 4 9

4 5 1 9 8 3 6 2 7

3 8 9 6 4 1 7 5 2

2 7 6 3 5 9 1 8 4

1 4 5 8 2 7 9 6 3

24 Stiffness 25 Listlessness 27 Like some suits (2 words) 28 Comedian 30 From the beginning 32 Canada’s Grand ___ National Historic Park 34 Father (sl.) (2 words) 35 Donkey sound 37 Matterhorn, e.g. 39 CA valley 40 “Nuts!” 41 Computer tube 42 Cultivate 43 Purpose 45 Caviar 46 Agree, in a way 47 Madam sheep

C N V T U L P H S E A Q N V R

D F P T X T M O U N T A I N N

48 Swiss mountain 49 Bean counter, for short 50 Confess 51 New driver, typically 52 Pay for 53 1973 Supreme Court decision name Down 1 ___ in his kiss 2 Sorority letter 3 Canadian hockey player Bobby __ 4 Spice 5 Goes back out 6 After-bath powder 7 Place making dairy products 8 Lassie, e.g. 9 Court group 10 Level grass 11 Corral 16 Space 19 Feudal proprietor 20 Body mark 21 S-shaped curves 22 Take game without permission

A Z P O D E S D K K E L M N U

C N V T U L P H S E A Q N V R

Across 1 The __ Curtain 5 And so on 8 Temporary stay 12 Drive-___, abbr. 13 Prevent 14 Cousin of a bassoon 15 Capable of being categorized 17 Croquet area 18 Make a mistake as a ref 20 Bacchus follower 23 Lustrous fabric 26 Eager 27 In that manner 29 Earl Gray 30 Trophy 31 National production statistic, abbr. 33 Airline’s coach class 35 60 minutes 36 Carry around 37 Falcon’s home 38 Die out 41 Bud 44 Headset

V A R G V H J L C K K B T K X

A Z P O D E S D K K E L M N U

53

Q Q U I F S C A O X N K B E M

V A R G V H J L C K K B T K X

52

U B K K Z T Y Y R F P A S S W

Q Q U I F S C A O X N K B E M

51

4

WORD SEARCH by Myles Mellor

U B K K Z T Y Y R F P A S S W

50

5

E

49

47

2

D

48

46

2

9

O W

45

1

5 9

40

44

2

5

V

43

39

9 8

A

42

3 Level: Medium

5 7

3 8

9

5

32

37 38

6

2

4

35

36

41

4

3

W A

34

1

53

31

1

T

30

3

A

28

4

P

27

25

1

A

26

24

6

E

23

Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9X9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3X3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult.

C

19

22

33

11

17

18

29

10

14

16

21

9

52

13

15

20

8

N

7

A

12

6

E

5

S

4

E

3

SUDOKU by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

by Myles Mellor

T

2

CROSSWORD

R O

Westsider 1

JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

51

28


JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

29


30

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

JUNE 7-13,2018


JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

CLASSIFIEDS HELP WANTED

Telephone: 212-868-0190 Email: classified2@strausnews.com

POLICY NOTICE: We make every effort to avoid mistakes in your classified ads. Check your ad the first week it runs. The publication will only accept responsibility for the first incorrect insertion. The publication assumes no financial responsibility for errors or omissions. We reserve the right to edit, reject, or re-classify any ad. Contact your sales rep directly for any copy changes. All classified ads are pre-paid.

NEED TO RUN A LEGAL NOTICE? Quick | Easy | Economical

Call Barry Lewis today at:

212-868-0190

MASSAGE

SITUATION WANTED

:HDUHDSURXGPHPEHURIWKH $VVRFLDWHG3UHVVDQGWKH 1DWLRQDO1HZVSDSHU$VVRFLDWLRQ

“IF ONLY SOMEONE WOULD CLEAN UP THIS PARK.”

BE THE SOMEONE. Every day, we think to ourselves that someone should really help make this city a better place. Visit newyorkcares.org to learn about the countless ways you can volunteer and make a difference in your community.

Cat New York Cares Volunteer

31


32

JUNE 7-13,2018

The Spirit|Westsider westsidespirit.com

Got an EVENT? FESTIVAL CONCERT GALLERY OPENING PLAY

Get The Word Out! Add Your Event for FREE Just $10 per day to be featured

nycnow.com

West Side Spirit - June 7, 2018  
West Side Spirit - June 7, 2018  
Advertisement