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OSU-CASCADES

PPP 2012

4-year university price tag: $111M By Patrick Cliff and Lauren Dake The Bulletin

I

• See our special wrap around Sports for full coverage, including photos and results • See your submitted photos and more at www.bendbulletin.com/ppp Saturday’s elite winners: Stephanie Howe and Kris Freeman

Photos by Joe Kline The Bulletin

Also in Sports:

New York Times News Service

Sharine and Brian Kretchmar tried a number of medical treatments to conceive a second child. After a depressing series of failures, a doctor finally advised them to find a sperm donor. For more than a year, the Yukon, Okla., couple carefully researched sperm banks and donors. The donor they chose was a family man, a Christian like them, they were told. Most important, he had a clean bill of health. His sperm was stored

The Bulletin

To prove OSU-Cascades has local support for its planned transformation into a four-year university, the campus wants to line up $1 million in donations by the end of June. Without a large, active and wealthy alumni base that many universities have, OSU-Cascades must look primarily to the community. The campus set the $1 million goal and divided the amount into 40 equal parts — $25,000 apiece — both to make the task easier and to demonstrate broad community support for expansion. See Donations / A5

SUMMIT BOYS AND GIRLS TAKE HOME TENNIS TITLES

With sperm banks, a roll of the genetic dice By Jacqueline Mroz

By Patrick Cliff

at the New England Cryogenic Center in Boston, and according to the laboratory’s website, all donors there were tested for various genetic conditions. So the Kretchmars took a deep breath and jumped in. After artificial insemination, Sharine Kretchmar became pregnant, and in April 2010 she gave birth to a boy they named Jaxon. But the baby failed to have a bowel movement in the first day after birth, a sign to doctors that something was wrong. See Babies / A4

TOP NEWS CHINA: Blind activist lands in U.S., A3 TERRORISM: Arrests in Chicago, A3

China’s party elite send heirs to top U.S. schools CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — When scholars gathered at Harvard last month to discuss the political tumult convulsing China’s Communist Party, a demure female undergraduate with a direct stake in the outcome was listening intently from the top row of the lecture hall. She was the daughter of Xi Jinping, China’s vice president and heir apparent for the party’s top job. Xi’s daughter, Xi Mingze,

enrolled at Harvard in 2010 under what people who know her there say was a fake name, joining a long line of Chinese “princelings,” as the offspring of senior party officials are known, who have come to the U.S. to study. In some ways, the rush to U.S. campuses simply reflects China’s national infatuation with American education. China now has more students at U.S. colleges than in any other foreign country. See Chinese / A7

The Bulletin

We use recycled newsprint

By Andrew Higgins The Washington Post

Sarah Phipps / New York Times News Service

Sharine Kretchmar gives her son Jaxon, 2, treatment for cystic fibrosis, in Yukon, Okla. Children conceived with donated sperm are struggling with serious genetic conditions inherited from men they have never met.

INDEX

TODAY’S WEATHER Mostly cloudy High 72, Low 45 Page C8

Business Books Classified

G1-6 F4-6 E1-8

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Milestones Obituaries Opinion

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Vol. 109, No. 141, 54 pages, 7 sections

SUNDAY

FINISH

f Oregon State UniversityCascades is to become a four-year university serving 5,000 students over the next dozen years, it may need more than $111 million to build and buy buildings, according to a document from the state’s university system. The branch’s expansion plans coincide with a commitment by state leaders, including the governor, to carry out a so-called 40-40-20 initiative. By the year 2025, according to the plan, 40 percent of adult Oregonians should hold at least a bachelor’s degree. With the state’s largest university campuses nearing capacity, OSU-Cascades leaders hope the Bend campus can absorb some of the planned growth. The $111 million estimate is far from scientific. A 40,000square-foot building, for instance, is projected to cost $21 million a decade from

• To establish local support, campus seeks $1M in donations

now. Will that assumption hold true? Maybe, maybe not, said Becky Johnson, OSU-Cascades vice president, calling the document “very hypothetical.” Despite its limitations, the document provides a peek at the campus’ ambition. There are few specifics about where the buildings would be, other than an early purchase of about 5 acres from the Bend Park & Recreation District. That land, part of the former Mt. Bachelor park-and-ride lot next to Colorado Avenue in Bend, could eventually form the core of OSU-Cascades’ expanded campus. “It’s kind of a big number, but it’s serving more than five times the number of students we have right now,” Johnson said. The document describes a timeline that begins in 2013 and is tied to projected student growth. See OSU / A5

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

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TONIGHT

TODAY

Eyes to the skies for the solar eclipse

It’s Sunday, May 20, the 141st day of 2012. There are 225 days left in the year.

Bulletin staff report This evening, for the first time in eight years, Central Oregon viewers will be treated to a partial solar eclipse. The eclipse will begin over eastern Asia on Monday morning, local time. Late this evening, viewers in the Western United States, Canada and Mexico can catch a glimpse. Central Oregon is just north of the optimal locations to see the annular eclipse, which produces the “ring of fire” effect. Cities that will get those views include Medford; Chico, Calif.; Reno, Nev.; Albuquerque, N.M.; and Lubbock, Texas. Still, Central Oregonians will be able to see the rare solar spectacle tonight — assuming the evening clouds behave. “We will not get the ring,” said Bob Grossfeld, manager at the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory. “It’ll look more

HAPPENINGS

like a Pac-Man.” The eclipse will begin at 5:08 p.m. as the moon moves slowly across the face of the sun setting in the western sky. Peak viewing will occur at 6:24 p.m., when about 86 percent of the sun’s light will be blocked. The last partial solar eclipse in Central Oregon occurred in 2004, and the next — a total eclipse — will come in 2017. Grossfeld cautions viewers not to look directly at the sun without protective eyewear. The Sunriver Observatory, at 57245 River Road, offers solar telescopes and special eclipse glasses for a $5 donation. The observatory will be open from 4:30 to 7 p.m. tonight. If you miss the eclipse, don’t worry: another astronomical event will occur the afternoon of June 5, when Venus crosses a corner of the sun in what’s known as a transit.

In the shadows

• Leaders of the NATO nations begin a two-day summit in Chicago. Topping the agenda: the drawdown of allied forces in Afghanistan. A3 • Voters in the Dominican Republic will elect a new president.

Sun sets before eclipse begins

Tonight, a solar eclipse will block out most of the sun over parts of East Asia and the Western U.S.

Path of the solar eclipse At its peak, eclipse will block 94 percent of the sun’s light Annular Largest area of sun covered; “ring of fire” effect, similar to a total eclipse effect

IN HISTORY

Partial Moon covers about 33 percent of sun

Why eclipses occur Earth’s orbit

What you see

Earth

Moon

NOTE: Not to scale

Moon’s orbit

The moon moves directly between Earth and the sun

Sun

Annular eclipse

Partial eclipse

Source: NASA Graphic: Melina Yingling

© 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

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Oregon Lottery results As listed at www.oregonlottery.org

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Saturday night are:

8 13 35 46 51 30 The estimated jackpot is now $110 million.

MEGABUCKS The numbers drawn Saturday night are:

4 6 17 20 34 38 The estimated jackpot is now $1.8 million.

Still waiting for liftoff — what went wrong? Bulletin wire reports CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — All nine engines for the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket roared to life Saturday morning. But with a mere half-second remaining before liftoff, the onboard computers automatically shut everything down. Instead of blasting off on a delivery mission to the space station, the rocket stayed on its launch pad amid a plume of engine exhaust. And so it went, the new private supply ship for the International Space Station, stuck on the ground after engine trouble led to a last-second abort of the historic flight. Even NASA’s most seasoned launch commentator was taken off-guard. “Three, two, one, zero and liftoff,” announced commentator George Diller, his voice trailing as the rocket failed to budge. “We’ve had a cutoff. Liftoff did not occur.”

Engine trouble SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell said that high combustion chamber pressure in engine No. 5 was to blame. During an inspection later in the day, engineers discovered a faulty valve and worked into the evening to replace it. This was the first launch

NASA / The Associated Press

No stranger to glitches, the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket — headed for the International Space Station — experienced another just a half-second before liftoff Saturday at Cape Canaveral, Fla.

attempt by the several private U.S. companies hoping to take over the job of delivering cargo and eventually astronauts to the space station for NASA. Only governments have accomplished that to date: the United States, Russia, Europe and Japan. NASA is looking to the private sector, in this post-shuttle era, to get American astronauts launching again from U.S. soil. SpaceX officials said that could happen in as few as three years, possibly four. Several other companies are in the running.

An estimated 1,000 SpaceX and NASA guests poured into the launching area in the wee hours of Saturday, hoping to see firsthand the start of this new commercial era. They left disappointed. The abort was especially disheartening given the perfect weather and the absence of any earlier countdown problems. “This is not a failure,” Shotwell said. “We aborted with purpose. It would be a failure if we were to have lifted off.” Everyone around town, at least, is rooting for a successful flight. “Go SpaceX,” read

the sign outside Cape Canaveral City Hall. Until NASA’s space shuttles retired last summer, the sign had urged on the launches of Discovery, Endeavour and, finally, Atlantis. Those ships are now relegated to museums. Late last month, SpaceX conducted a test firing of the nine first-stage rocket engines at the pad. Each engine — including No. 5 — was “rock solid,” Shotwell said. The first flight of the Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral, in June 2010, encountered similar last-second engine trouble, but there was enough time to fix the problem and fly the same day. SpaceX has just a single second each day to launch this time around because of the space station rendezvous.

The next launch Tuesday is the earliest that SpaceX can try again to send its cargo-laden Dragon capsule to the space station. The California-based company — formally known as Space Exploration Technologies Corp. — is targeting every few days for a launch attempt to save fuel in case of rendezvous problems at the space station. Wednesday also could be a launch option.

Highlights: In 1927, Charles Lindbergh took off from Roosevelt Field in Long Island, N.Y., aboard the Spirit of St. Louis on his historic solo flight to France. In 1932, Amelia Earhart took off from Newfoundland to become the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic. In 1969, U.S. and South Vietnamese forces captured Ap Bia Mountain, referred to as “Hamburger Hill” by the Americans, following one of the bloodiest battles of the Vietnam War. Ten years ago: East Timor became the first new sovereign nation of the millennium. President George W. Bush said he wouldn’t budge toward easing restrictions on trade and travel with Cuba until Fidel Castro’s government took steps to hold free and fair elections and began to adopt meaningful economic reform. Five years ago: Gunman Jason Hamilton took his own life following a rampage in Moscow, Idaho, that killed three victims, including his wife. One year ago: Randy “Macho Man” Savage, 58, a largerthan-life personality from professional wrestling’s 1980s heyday, died in Pinellas County, Fla. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu rejected the idea of using his country’s 1967 boundaries as the basis for a neighboring Palestinian state.

BIRTHDAYS Actor Anthony Zerbe is 76. Actor David Proval is 70. Singer Joe Cocker is 68. Singer-actress Cher is 66. Actor-comedian Dave Thomas is 63. Rock musician Warren Cann is 60. Former New York Gov. David Paterson is 58. Actor Dean Butler is 56. TVradio personality Ron Reagan is 54. Actor Bronson Pinchot is 53. Actor Timothy Olyphant is 44. Rapper Busta Rhymes is 40. — From wire reports

NEWS Q&A I keep reading that the Q: Labor Department reports the number of people who have stopped looking for work. How in the world do the people there know this? — Sy Richards, Atlanta The U.S. Census Bureau asks a variety of questions in monthly interviews with 60,000 households, a spokesman with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics said. Some questions deal with the labor force, and those results are sent to the bureau. It uses those numbers to formulate monthly labor statistics. Here is a sample of the questions: • Do you currently want a job, either full or part time? • Last week, did you have a job either full or part time? Include any job from which you were temporarily absent. • What was the main reason you were absent from work last week? • Do you want to work a full-time workweek of 35 hours or more per week? • What is the main reason you do not want to work full time? • Last week, could you have worked full time if the hours had been offered?

A:

Do you have a question about nation or world news? Submit it to Cox News Service editors in Atlanta at q&a@ajc.com. Include name, phone and city.

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REALTOR


SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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Blind dissident lands in U.S. The Associated Press NEW YORK — A blind Chinese legal activist who was suddenly allowed to leave the country arrived in the United State on Saturday, ending a monthlong diplomatic tussle that strained U.S.-China relations. Chen Guangcheng had been hurriedly taken from a hospital hours earlier and put on a plane for the U.S. after Chinese authorities suddenly told him to pack and prepare to leave. He arrived Saturday

evening at Newark Liberty International Airport and was whisked to New York City, where he will be staying. “For the past seven years, I have never had a day’s rest,” Chen said through a translator, “so I have come here for a bit of recuperation for body and in spirit.” In a short statement, Chen urged Americans to fight against injustice, and thanked the U.S. and Chinese governments, along with the embas-

sies of Switzerland, Canada and France. “After much turbulence, I have come out of Shandong,” he said, referring to the Chinese province where he was under house arrest. The U.S. has granted him partial citizenship rights, he said. After seven years of prison and house arrest, Chen made a daring escape from his rural village in April and was given sanctuary inside the U.S. Embassy, triggering a diplomatic standoff over his fate.

G-8 leaders agree: Stimulus may work By David Nakamura The Washington Post.

CAMP DAVID, Md. — Leaders of the world’s wealthiest nations opened the door Saturday to more government spending in Europe as way to revive the continent’s struggling economy, shifting away from the idea that the only way to recovery was through strict fiscal austerity. Meeting at the Group of 8 summit at Camp David, President Barack Obama and his fellow leaders said they were committed foremost to creating jobs and growth, a shift, at least in emphasis, from previous gatherings dominated by German efforts to reduce high government debt through drastic fiscal reform. In a joint statement, the leaders of eight of the world’s richest countries said they would promote investment in education and infrastructure, as they also

sought to rein in government debt. Obama, who has pushed for additional fiscal stimulus in the United States, said the new agreement affirmed the course his administration pursued during the financial recession at home. He said the move toward economic stimulus bolstered Europe’s chances of surviving the crisis. “The direction the debate has taken recently should give us confidence that Europe has taken significant steps to manage the crisis,” Obama said in a brief statement to reporters. “There is now an emerging consensus that more must be done to promote growth and job creation right now in the context these fiscal and structural reforms.” Saturday, growth and jobs were cited as the “imperative” — a change from other summits where the same countries set strict timetables for cutting

deficits. National debt and deficit targets, moreover, were to be analyzed on a “structural basis,” an important distinction that lets countries accumulate more government debt during bad economic times. Saturday also saw turmoil in Greece, where parliament, elected just May 6, was dissolved and elections called. Obama is presiding over two international summits this weekend as he seeks to avert potential crises that could distract his focus on the U.S. economy in an election year. Obama is on his way to Chicago for a two-day NATO summit that will focus on Afghanistan. But the G-8 leaders also took on security challenges, presenting a unified front in ramping up pressure on Iran to abandon its nuclear weapons ambitions. Obama reiterated that Iran remained a “grave concern” for world leaders.

John Minchillo / The Associated Press

By the hundreds, NATO protesters march by Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s home Saturday. Three others are in court facing terrorism charges, suspected of planning to bomb the mayor’s residence, police stations and the Obama campaign headquarters during the NATO summit here.

NATO SUMMIT IN CHICAGO

Terror arrests and protests before countries debate Afghan pullout By Deb Riechmann The Associated Press

It was what President Barack Obama called a “war of necessity,” a conflict thrust upon America by the 9/11 attacks. As NATO’s Afghan mission winds down nearly 11 years later, the insurgents remain undefeated, corruption runs rife and the peace process is stuck in the sand. Such is the bleak reality of Afghanistan as Obama and leaders of about 60 countries and organizations meet today and Monday in Chicago — a tense city, after three were arrested on terrorism charges — to map their way out of an unpopular war. The goal is to develop a strategy that does not risk a repeat of the chaos that followed the Soviet exit two decades ago, which paved the way for the rise of al-Qaida. With none of the NATO countries having the stomach to pursue the war much longer, the only viable option is to leave behind an Afghan army and police force capable of defending the country against the Taliban and its allies after the NATO combat mission is declared over at the end of 2014 and most of the coalition

3 accused in plot to hit Obama campaign HQ CHICAGO — Three activists who traveled to Chicago for a NATO summit were accused Saturday of manufacturing Molotov cocktails in a plot to attack President Barack Obama’s campaign headquarters, Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s home and other targets. Defense lawyers shot back that Chicago police had trumped up the charges to frighten peaceful protesters away, telling a judge it was undercover officers who brought the firebombs to a South Side apartment where the men were arrested. Prosecutors, however, said the men were self-described anarchists. They are suspected of buying fuel at a gas station for the makeshift bombs, pouring it into beer bottles and cutting up bandanas to serve as fuses. The suspects, in their early 20s, were being held on $1.5 million bond each. —The Associated Press

troops leave. That would require no less than $4.1 billion a year from foreign coffers at a time when most of the countries are struggling with deficits and the specter of recession and bank failures. Without big handouts, Afghanistan simply cannot pay for its own defense. The challenge facing Obama and other world leaders will be to convince their own voters that Afghanistan is worth the investment. The war has already claimed the lives of at least 3,000 NATO service members — more than

1,840 of them American — and thousands of Afghans. Support for the war has eroded in Europe and hit a new low in America. Only 27 percent of Americans say they back the effort while 66 percent oppose the war, according to a recent AP-GfK poll. Jawed Ludin, Afghanistan’s deputy foreign minister, said the West should understand that terrorists in the region remain a global threat. “This is not a charity that we are receiving. Afghanistan is and will be on the front line of the world’s fight against terrorism.”

NAACP says gay marriage is a civil right Henny Ray Abrams / The Associated Press

Chen Guangcheng, the blind Chinese dissident, was greeted with cheers when he arrived at the apartment in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village where he will live with his family. The complex houses graduate students of New York University, where Chen is expected to attend law school.

U.S., allies turn attention to Syria’s chemical arms Bulletin wire reports The Obama administration is accelerating its planning with Middle Eastern allies for a series of potentially fast-moving crises in Syria in the coming months, including the possible loss of government control over some of the country’s scattered stocks of chemical weapons, U.S. and Mideast security officials say. The planning, involving intelligence and military officials from at least seven countries, includes detailed arrangements for securing chemical arms with special forces troops in the event that parts of Syria are seized by militants, the officials said. Western and regional intelligence officials are increasingly concerned that Islamic extremists could attempt to seize control of whole towns and districts if the country slides into full-scale civil war. The stepped-up preparations have coincided with increased military training in

the region, including an unusually large, multinational military exercise under way this month in Jordan, Syria’s southern neighbor. U.S. and Jordanian officials separately have been discussing possible permanent bases in the country for small units of Marines or special forces troops who could be deployed rapidly in a crisis anywhere in the region, from the Syria border to Iraq, according to current and former government officials familiar with the talks. Friday in the country’s biggest city, Aleppo, Syrian forces fired on protesters holding the largest opposition marches here yet, a sign of rising antiregime sentiment; Aleppo has largely remained supportive of President Bashar Assad throughout the 15month uprising. The U.N. estimated in March the violence in Syria has killed more than 9,000 people. Hundreds more have been killed since.

The Associated Press The board of the NAACP voted to endorse same-sex marriage Saturday, putting the weight of the country’s most prominent civil rights group behind a cause that has long divided some quarters of the black community. The largely symbolic move, made at the group’s quarterly board meeting in Miami, puts the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in line with President Barack Obama, who endorsed gay marriage a little more than a week ago. Given the timing, it is likely to be viewed as both a statement of principle as well as support for the president’s position in the middle of a presidential campaign. All but two on the organization’s board, which includes many religious leaders, backed a resolution supporting same-sex marriage. Borrowing a term used by gay rights’ advocates, the resolution stated: “We support marriage equality consistent with equal protection under the law provided under the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.” Gay marriage has divided the black community, with many religious leaders opposing it. In California, exit polls showed about 70 percent of blacks opposed same-sex marriage in 2008. Pew Research Center polls have found that they have become more supportive of gay marriage in recent years, but remain less supportive than other demographics. The practical implications of the NAACP’s decision are unclear. Several of its leaders have already expressed support for same-sex marriage.


A4

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

KENNEDYS MOURN ANOTHER DEATH

Dark horses add to Egypt’s election suspense By Liam Stack and David D. Kirkpatrick New York Times News Service

Michael Dwyer / The Associated Press

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. kneels with his children at the casket of his estranged wife, Mary Richardson Kennedy, the latest member of that charmed and cursed family to fall victim to tragedy and inner demons. The service in Bedford, N.Y., was private, but the list of celebrities attending, including Glenn Close, Dan Aykroyd and Chevy Chase, was a testament to both Kennedy star power and Mary’s knack for friendship. RFK Jr. delivered the eulogy. Mary Kennedy was buried at the cemetery in Centerville, Mass., several miles from the Kennedy seaside compound in Hyannisport.

Babies Continued from A1 Eventually Jaxon was rushed to surgery. Doctors returned with terrible news for the Kretchmars: Their baby appeared to have cystic fibrosis. “We were pretty much devastated,” said Sharine Kretchmar, 33, who works as a nurse. “At first, we weren’t convinced it was cystic fibrosis, because we knew the donor had been tested for the disease. We thought it had to be something different.” But genetic testing showed that Jaxon did carry the genes for cystic fibrosis. Sharine Kretchmar had no idea she was a carrier, but was shocked to discover that so, too, was the Kretchmars’ donor. His sperm, they would later discover, was decades old, originally donated at a laboratory halfway across the country and frozen ever since. Whether it was properly tested is a matter of dispute. Sadly, the Kretchmars’ experience is not unique. In households across the country, children conceived with donated sperm are struggling with serious genetic conditions inherited from men they have never met. The illnesses include heart defects, spinal muscular atrophy, neurofibromatosis type 1 and fragile-X syndrome, the most common form of mental retardation in boys, among many others. Hundreds of cases have been documented, but it is likely there are thousands more, according to Wendy Kramer, founder of the Donor Sibling Registry, a website she started to help connect families with children who are offspring of the same sperm donor. Donated eggs pose a risk as well, but the threat of genetic harm from sperm donation is arguably much greater. Sperm donors are no more likely to carry genetic diseases than anybody else, but they can father a far greater number of children: 50, 100 or even 150, each a potential inheritor of flawed genes, and each a vector for making those genes more pervasive in the general population. The scale of the problem is only now becoming apparent with the advent of online

CAIRO — Signs of a late surge in popularity by two dark-horse candidates in Egypt’s first competitive presidential race are adding new suspense about the outcome of the initial round of voting just days before it is set to begin. Polls conducted by the military-led interim government have shown growing support for Ahmed Shafik, who was the last prime minister appointed by President Hosni Mubarak before his ouster. The results have drawn warnings from members of Parliament that the military might be trying to tip the results in Shafik’s favor and

“You’ll never be able to catch everything. As the technical capabilities to do genetic testing and screenings improve, the banks will do that. But it will be incredibly expensive to test for everything.” — Sean Tipton, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

communities like Kramer’s. “There needs to be oversight, and some regulation of the industry,” she said.

Genetic testing optional It is not known how many children are born each year using sperm donors, because mothers of donor offspring are not required to report their births. By some estimates, there are more than 1 million children in this country conceived with donated sperm or eggs. The Food and Drug Administration requires that sperm donors be tested for communicable diseases, but there is no federal requirement that sperm banks screen for genetic diseases. Some of the better ones do anyway, in accordance with guidelines promulgated by organizations like the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, which encourages sperm banks to test donors for conditions like cystic fibrosis and mental retardation when there is a family history of the disease. Generally, the donor himself is tested, not his sperm. But compliance with those guidelines is not obligatory, and genetic testing practices vary widely across the United States. Critics of the industry are calling for mandatory and consistent medical and genetic testing of all donors. “In this day and age, when you have genetic testing available for about $200, there’s no reason sperm banks can’t provide this for clients,” Kramer said. The fertility industry, however, has long resisted the idea. “Human reproduction is an inherently risky proposition, and it always will be, so it’s impossible to remove all the risk and uncertainty of reproducing,” said Sean Tipton, director of public affairs for the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. “You’ll never be able to catch everything. As the technical capabilities to do

genetic testing and screenings improve, the banks will do that. But it will be incredibly expensive to test for everything.” A lack of regulatory recordkeeping also makes it difficult for sperm banks to warn related families, or even donors, when a genetic illness is discovered in one or more children. And donor families are not required to report births or illnesses to the sperm banks. Since the clinic has no way to know a donor’s sperm is flawed, it may continue to be sold long after problems have surfaced. Pamela Callum, a genetic counselor at California Cryobank, the largest sperm bank in the country, recently discovered that a donor to the bank had passed on the gene for neurofibromatosis type 1, or NF1, to five children. The case was reported in the February issue of the journal Human Reproduction. NF1 can cause benign tumors along nerves in the skin, brain and other areas, and it contributes to learning problems and an increased risk of brain tumors, leukemia and other cancers. “There were two other children who had been diagnosed with the disease, but the parents never told us,” Callum said. “If we had known earlier, we may have been able to take that donor off the catalog earlier.” “We’ll never be able to eliminate genetic diseases,” she added. “It’s just not possible. That’s why follow-up is so important.”

Forming national registry Several of the largest sperm banks in the country are attempting to create a national donor gamete registry, a centralized and permanent repository for the records of egg and sperm donors, said Scott Brown, communications director for California Cryobank, a leader in the effort. Such a registry might help prevent the spread of genetic

have set off a series of clashes at his campaign events between his supporters and opponents. But the signs of his new popularity have also given rise to speculation that his law-and-order message may resonate with voters. At the same time, Hamdeen Sabahi, a socialist and Arab nationalist in the tradition of Gamal Abdel Nasser, earned a surprising secondplace finish in the early returns of Egyptians voting abroad. Those results suggest that his secular brand of populism may be catching on among voters looking for an alternative to the previous front-runners, who are either Islamists or former Mubarak government officials. With voting set to begin Wednesday, the unexpected

diseases among donor children by providing a way for parents to report children’s illnesses to their sperm banks, thus allowing banks to weed out donors who may be carriers. Max Jackson, 18, of San Rafael, Calif., discovered that he had inherited a deadly heart defect known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, when the family of one of his donor siblings — a child conceived from the same sperm donor — reported the illness to the sperm bank. The donor was tested and found to be a carrier of the disease. At least eight other children conceived with the donor’s sperm have HCM, a thickening of the heart muscle that makes it harder to pump blood and can cause sudden cardiac death. Two of them have pacemakers now, and a 2-year-old donor child died of the disease, according to a case report in The Journal of the American Medical Association. Jackson, an aspiring rapper, must take medicine to control the illness, and he has to keep his heart rate below a certain level or risk cardiac arrest. (HCM is a leading cause of heart attacks in young athletes.) He recently met his sperm donor for the first time, and learned that the man and his wife also have a child with HCM. “He said he felt horrible for giving me the disease,” Jackson said. “I think I’ve been less scared of death since I found out I have HCM. It made me realize how easily we can die. I can die when I’m just running.” The lives of the Kretchmars have been irrevocably altered by their son’s illness. Cystic fibrosis is a progressive disor-

attention to their campaigns is raising new doubts about the dynamics of the race. Most analysts and polls have suggested that the clear front-runners are Amr Moussa, a former diplomat, and Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh, a self-described liberal Islamist who won the overseas voting with about 12,000 votes. But the few available polls here proved highly unreliable before the parliamentary voting a few months ago, so the outcome remains impossible to handicap. If no candidate wins a majority in the first round then the top two candidates will face each other in a runoff next month. A second-place finish by either Shafik or Sabahi could put them in reach of the presidency.

der that causes thick, sticky mucus to build up in the lungs, digestive tract and other areas of the body. The life expectancy of someone with the disease is about 37 years. Every day, Jaxon, now 2, must take more than 20 pills. (He learned how to swallow pills before he could walk, his mother said.) The boy needs several nebulizer treatments daily, and he must regularly don a special vest that shakes his torso to help loosen the congestion in his body. The Kretchmars have sued New England Cryogenic Center, the sperm bank that sold them the sperm used to conceive Jaxon. As it turns out, the sperm was purchased from Rocky Mountain Cryobank in Jackson, Wyo., which closed a few years ago. The sperm was donated more than

Shafik, 70, was forced out as prime minister after just five weeks when protesters demanded his ouster. In March, Parliament passed a law aimed, unsuccessfully, at barring him from running for president, a challenge he survived through an appeal to the Supreme Court. Sabahi is the candidate most hostile to Israel and the West. He often says he does not object to the text of Egypt’s Camp David treaty with Israel, but he wants to abolish “the spirit” of the accord and suggests Egypt should strive to be ready for a possible war with Israel. “I will support all forms of armed resistance,” he has said. “Egypt will no longer be a godfather for Israel in this region.”

20 years ago. A spokeswoman for the New England Cryogenic Center, Jacalyn Fallman, said her bank received documentation from Rocky Mountain Cryobank that the donor had been tested for cystic fibrosis, but added, “It would appear that testing done by Rocky Mountain was faulty.” “Someday I have to explain to Jaxon that the pain and difficulties that he endures every day are unnecessary and should have been prevented,” Sharine Kretchmar said. “It is a helpless feeling to know that I can’t take away my child’s pain.”

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

911 call could be crucial in Trayvon Martin case

OSU Continued from A1 To accommodate 5,000 students by 2025, the campus will need to average about 29,000 square feet of new class, office and research space per year for a decade. The list is a working document, said Jay Kenton, the vice chancellor for finance and administration with the Oregon University System. “It’s something that will guide actions but not predicate actions,” he said. “It gives people a sense that we thought through the issues and implications and it looks financially viable.” Some of the costs were figured by taking current construction costs and assuming they jump by 3 percent every year. Relying on unpredictable real estate prices, he said, is only one reason the document is likely to change over the years. Community partnerships between OSU-Cascades and others in Bend could shift needs, too. Those partnerships, in theory, could help cut costs. For example, the plan does not include a university library. Instead, OSU-Cascades will continue to share Central Oregon Community College’s library, according to Johnson. OSU-Cascades is also in discussions with the Bend Park & Recreation District and could share an activity center with the organization. Those types of partnerships often also inspire more community giving, Kenton said. Funding sources include state bonds and millions in donations and grants. “There is a lot of synergy when you build an urban university and you can get that by working with community partners, whether they are public, the city of Bend, or private individuals, developers or investors willing to team up,” he said. Put into context, Central Oregon has seen similar spending in the past six years. Redmond School District, for instance, passed a $110 million bond to pay for a new high school, elementary school and capital improvements in several other buildings. In Bend-La Pine, voters approved a $119 million bond that paid for new schools that include William E. Miller and Rosland elementary schools. But state law prevents universities, including OSU-Cascades, from asking voters to approve bonds to pay for capital projects, Johnson said. That leaves the campus looking largely to donors and lawmakers. Johnson said she is focused only on the first $24 million, which will pay for an initial 97,000-square-foot expansion. OSU-Cascades is already well on its way to raising $1 million for that project. Local lawmakers have vowed to work toward secur-

By Sari Horwitz The Washington Post

Conceptual artwork by Ambient Architecture LLC

A portion of the old Mt. Bachelor park-and-ride lot at Colorado and Simpson avenues in Bend could eventually form the core of Oregon State University’s expanded Cascades Campus. In this rendering, a campus building sits on the land, which was purchased from the Bend Park & Recreation District. (From this viewpoint of the Colorado-Simpson roundabout, Deschutes Brewery would be in the right forefront.)

ing the state’s share of funding, expected to be $16 million. Local donations and campus funds would cover the rest. Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, said she discussed the project last week with the governor. “The governor’s comments were, ‘I think $16 million is doable,’ ” Telfer said. But it will be up to the Legislature to approve the funding before it can hit the governor’s desk. “It’s one request out of many,” said Telfer, who sought re-election but was defeated by Tim Knopp in the Republican primary Tuesday. “But I can tell you, with the governor’s comments, with the new capacity needs from 40-40-20, with the affordable market and existing buildings, this is a shot in the arm to our economy. … All the stars are in alignment.” The proposal still needs approval by the state Board of Higher Education. By the end of August, the governor should be looking over the state’s capital construction projects. In December, Kitzhaber is slated to unveil his proposed budget. After that, assuming it hasn’t been cut from the higher education project list, the proposal will work its way through the legislative process. By May or June 2013, officials hope to know if the project has the necessary financial backing. Knopp, who is a former Oregon House majority leader, said he has always supported higher education. If he wins this November, he says, it will be no different. “I believe Central Oregon needs a four-year university,” he said. “Part of the original reason to bring OSU-Cascades … to Bend is to provide the opportunity to train your workforce locally. That creates a lot of interest and gets companies to the area; it’s a huge economic driver.” — Reporters: 541-633-2161, pcliff@bendbulletin.com, 541-554-1162, ldake@bendbulletin.com

N  B Status update — Joplin, Mo., twister Zuckerberg’s married is costliest since 1950 It has been a busy couple of days for Mark Zuckerberg. On Friday, the founder of Facebook took his 8-year-old company public at a $100 billion valuation. As if that weren’t enough, the 28year-old multibillionaire an- Zuckerberg nounced Saturday he had married his longtime girlfriend, Priscilla Chan, who graduated from medical school at the University of California, San Francisco, on Monday, the same day Zuckerberg turned 28. The announcement was made, of course, on Facebook. The couple met almost a decade ago while attending college at Harvard. The ceremony took place in Zuckerberg’s backyard before fewer than 100 guests; otherwise, details of the wedding were scarce.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — The cost of 30 manhole covers that got sucked away: $5,800. A new concession stand at the destroyed high school: $228,600. Shelter and care for more than 1,300 homeless pets: $372,000. The tornado that tore through Joplin a year ago already ranks as the deadliest twister in six decades. Now it carries another distinction — the costliest since at least 1950. Insurance policies are expected to cover most of the $2.8 billion in damage. But taxpayers could supply about $500 million in the form of federal and state disaster aid, low-interest loans and local bonds backed by higher taxes, according to records and Associated Press interviews with federal, state and local officials. The twister killed 161 people. — From wire reports

Transgender loses Miss Universe Canada bid TORONTO — The firstever transgender contestant to compete in the Miss Universe Canada pageant has lost her bid to win the title. Jenna Talackova, 23, competed with 61 contestants Saturday night. She was among the final 12 contestants. Talackova, who was born a male, underwent a sex change four years ago. The Vancouver, British Columbia, native was initially denied entry to

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Canada’s pageant because she was not a natural-born female. Donald Trump, who runs the Miss Universe Organization, subsequently overruled that decision. The 6-foot-1 blond beauty strutted the runway and competed in the bikini and formal wear contests. The winner advances to the international Miss Universe competition in December. — The Associated Press

Donations Continued from A1 Though missing the mark carries no immediate consequence, campus supporters believe failure would send a message to the state that the community will not support a four-year university in Bend. The effort is little more than a week old, yet it has drawn commitments from about 20 locals, according to Julie Hotchkiss, the Oregon State University Foundation development director who handles fundraising for the Cascades campus. “What we’re trying to do is answer a community appeal to have a four-year university. As such, we’re hoping the community will step up and help us realize that vision,” said Hotchkiss, who works with the foundation’s other staff on fundraising. That vision budgets $24 million to buy and renovate nearly 100,000 square feet of office, research and class space. OSU-Cascades is asking for $16 million from the state and will kick in $4 million in donations and another $4 million of campus funds. The state Board of Higher Education is set to vote in early June on a list of higher education projects that ranks OSU-Cascades’ immediate plan 10th. If donations total $1 million in the coming weeks, that’s only the beginning for the campus. Leaders would like pledges totaling another $3 million over the next few years, said Hotchkiss, who believes early success will build long-term momentum. Together, the two rounds of fundraising would total $4 million, money that would help pay for the campus’ nearterm expansion plans. Hotchkiss said the approach for the second, larger fundraising push is undetermined. What is certain is the campus will need to appeal to a range of

donors. “We’re trying to be clear that this is Central Oregon’s university,” Hotchkiss said. For now, the next few weeks are a significant chance for Central Oregonians to prove how serious they are about higher education, says Wes Price, a local CPA and Oregon State graduate who has pledged $25,000. Locals have pushed for a university presence in the region for years, Price said, and that effort has often been without much support or interest beyond the region. Central Oregon’s university aspirations were nearly killed altogether when the Legislature debated shuttering OSU-Cascades a few years ago. Now, though, the region has active backing from university administrators in Corvallis and state education leaders, Price said. The state also has set an ambitious goal that calls for 40 percent of adult Oregonians to hold at least a bachelor’s degree by 2025. Those factors, Price said, make the time ripe for locals to push hard for a four-year university. “I feel like it’s put-up-orshut-up time,” Price said. “Failing says everything (doubters) need to diminish what we’ve got going. That would be a big black eye.” Clark and others, though, are optimistic OSU-Cascades will receive enough promised donations soon. Bob Thomas, a retired automobile dealer, has been active with OSU-Cascades since the campus’ early days. A number of false starts have stymied fundraising efforts, but Thomas echoes the fundraising campaign’s language: “The time has come for OSU-Cascades.” “We have to show the world we’re committed to this. Foundations and governments like to help people that are helping themselves,” Thomas said.

In the last 45 seconds, there is a faint voice, a distant yell, and the urgent dialogue between a woman and a 911 operator. “There’s just someone screaming outside,” the caller begins on the recorded line. There is more distant yelling obscured by the operator — “Male or female?” — and the caller — “I think they’re yelling ‘help,’ but I don’t know.” There is a high-pitched scream, a kind of cry, and then the clearest sound of all. “There’s gunshots. … Just one,” the woman says on the only 911 call to record what was happening in the dark at the Retreat at Twin Lakes, a gated townhouse community in Sanford, Fla., on the night of Feb. 26. Those recorded 45 seconds turned out to be a recording of the end of Trayvon Martin’s life. And amid the conflicting, hazy and at times emotional reports from neighbors who heard and glimpsed only fragments of what was happening during those crucial seconds, the audio recording of them — from the start of the call at 7:16:11 p.m. until the gunshot at 7:16:56 p.m. — is perhaps the closest prosecutors and defense attorneys may come to an objective witness. It remains unclear exactly how the recording might be used in the court case, now under way, in which neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman, who said he shot the unarmed 17-year-old in selfdefense, is charged with second-degree murder. Zimmerman defense attorney Mark O’Mara said Friday the recording would require “a lot of forensic work-up.” Florida special prosecutor Angela Corey has released a trove of documents that included an FBI analysis stating that the recording is inconclusive. Two weeks before charging Zimmerman, who has

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pleaded not guilty, Corey hinted that the recording could be crucial. “The exact words and whose voice is whose will be the critical issues,” she told The Washington Post. Legal experts say the recording could be enormously important or disastrous for either side, depending on what a jury determines it can hear. But what happens when a potentially crucial piece of evidence — in one of the most explosive court cases in recent memory — is a poor-quality recording of overlapping voices and unintelligible yells, essentially a wilderness of sound? The answer may come down to which expert you ask. One of those experts is Alan Reich, a former University of Washington professor with a doctorate in speech science; he is certain he can hear a young man he concludes is Martin pleading for his life, from the start of the 45-second recording until the end. “I’m begging you,” he hears the younger of the two men yell as the recording begins. Another way to consider the 45-second recording is the way James Ryan considers it. Ryan is the retired head of the FBI forensic audio, video and image analysis unit. He said even the best audio forensic expert in the world using the most sophisticated equipment available would have a difficult time determining much at all from a recording of such degraded quality. “I think it’s hard to scientifically say anything definitive with audio like this,” Ryan said. You can read The Washington Post’s full story on the competing analyses online at http://tinyurl.com/c7wdu9f.

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

Cataloging wounds of war to help heal them By C.J. Chivers New York Times News Service

FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. — To those unfamiliar with a battlefield’s bleak routine, Col. Michael Wirt’s database could be read like a catalog of horrors. In it, more than 500 U.S. soldiers are subjected to characteristic forms of violence of the Afghan war. Faces are smacked with shrapnel, legs are blasted away near knees, bullets pass through young men’s abdomens. Vehicles roll over, crushing bones. Eardrums rupture. Digits are severed. Dozens of soldiers die. Hundreds more begin journeys home, sometimes to treatment that will last the rest of their lives. Each was listed in a small but meticulous computer entry by Wirt, a doctor intent on documenting how soldiers were wounded or sickened, how they were treated and how they fared. For those seeking to understand war and how best to survive it, the doctor on his own initiative created an evidence-based tool and a possible model. His database is one part of a vast store of information recorded about the experiences of U.S. combatants. But there are concerns that the potential lessons could be lost, because no one has yet brought the information together and made it fully cohere. Wirt was a brigade surgeon from the 101st Airborne Division during the U.S.-led effort in 2010 and 2011 to dislodge the Taliban from their rural stronghold along the Arghandab River. His database was one part official record and one part personal research project. His commander required him to keep tabs on ailing and wounded soldiers and to inform him of their prognosis and whereabouts in the medical system. To this, Wirt added layers of information. He documented which weapons caused which wounds. He tried to record increased or decreased risk factors — whether the victim was

Tyler Hicks / New York Times News Service file photo

Sgt. Ian Bugh, a medic with the U.S. Army, works on Marine Cpl. Brett Sayre, who was injured by an IED, in a flight over Helmand Province, Afghanistan, in 2010. A military doctor’s database of injuries in the Afghan war could help improve care, but the military has yet to follow his example.

wearing larger or smaller body armor, whether a bomb-sniffing dog was present, when a tourniquet was applied. He recorded which accidents and diseases took which soldiers off duty, and for how long. He mapped where on a human body bullets most often struck. A year after he returned to the states, Wirt and his database point to the promise and obstacles related to studying more than a decade of U.S. war. The amassed information on combatants over 10 years amounts to the most detailed data ever assembled on battlefield trauma and its care, U.S. military officers say. But the records are scattered. The Department of Defense’s trauma registry has information on roughly 66,000 patients who were admitted to modern military hospitals, including U.S. and coalition troops, Afghans and Iraqis, contractors and the odd journalist, diplomat or aid worker. It is a record, largely, of those who survived. The Armed Forces Medical Examiner’s Office maintains separate sets of records, including full-body CT scans, for service members killed in action. And each patient’s medical records, often with narrative details of wounds and a thorough

Cuba hints at loosening its own travel restrictions By Victoria Burnett New York Times News Service

HAVANA — From her small, tidy apartment here, Niurka dreams of visiting Miami one day to see her son’s home and the school where he is studying medicine. She also yearns to bid farewell to her late father at his graveside and to meet her brother’s children while they are still young. “Economic necessity has separated our family,” she said. “I want to put it back together.” But making the 30-minute hop to Florida will not be easy for Niurka, a 45-year-old doctor, whose brother left Cuba a decade ago, followed by her father and then, five years ago, her 24-year-old son. Like all Cubans, she needs permission to leave, but as a member of the country’s jealously guarded medical corps, she may be forced to wait years for an exit permit — if she gets one at all. So Niurka, who asked that her full name be withheld lest she spoil her chance of traveling, anxiously awaits a promised reform of Cuba’s migration rules that, for half a century, have controlled who can leave the island, who can return and how long they can be gone. Any loosening of controls would be a step toward eliminating one of the most deeply resented restrictions on Cubans’ liberty and a milestone on President Raul Castro’s gradual march toward economic and social reform. Cuban officials have hinted for years that a change might be coming, but the bureaucratic system limiting travel remains in place. If it does become easier for Cubans to legally leave the island, the reform could spur economic migration and deepen ties between the island and the 2 million members of the diaspora, whose money and business experience may be vital to the government’s plans to enlarge the private sector. “If you have a significant change to the migratory law, it will be a watershed,” said

Arturo Lopez-Levy, a Cubanborn academic who left the island 10 years ago and lectures at the University of Denver. “It could unleash the potential of the whole reform program and it could empower the actors who favor reconciliation between the Cubans on the island and the diaspora,” he said. “This is a critical juncture.” Hundreds of thousands of Cubans have gone into exile or migrated over the past five decades, and many of those who have come to the United States have done so partly because U.S. policy promises residency to Cubans who make it ashore. Thousands are believed to have died trying to cross the Straits of Florida in small boats. Though many Cubans now pay smugglers to take them to the U.S. via Mexico, the U.S. Coast Guard continues to find would-be migrants at sea. This month, Coast Guard members picked up more than 50 Cubans off the coast of Florida and returned them to Cuba. There was a swell of hope for new travel rules last August, when Castro told Parliament that the government was working on “updating” the law. Ricardo Alarcon, president of Parliament, has said the government was planning a “radical and profound” reform in the coming months. Deputy Foreign Minister Dagoberto Rodriguez said during a video conference with Cubans overseas in April that progress on the issue was “advanced.” Cubans and analysts said any kind of change would pique interest in travel but would be unlikely to provoke a mass exodus, because many countries restrict the number of Cubans allowed to visit by requiring them to seek a visa beforehand. The U.S. requires a visa for legal travel; however, Cubans who present themselves at a U.S. border checkpoint or who manage to reach the U.S. shoreline may stay and, after a year, seek permanent residency.

chronicle of treatments, are available in electronic form but only to those involved in each person’s care. Supporting documents for Purple Heart awards can also include medical and tactical data. In certain contexts, some of the material is merged, as at quarterly meetings of a special committee that has been seeking ways to improve prehospital care. So far these disparate storehouses of information have not been joined in a permanent place, much less made widely available for cross-disciplinary study. Col. Jeffrey Bailey, a trauma surgeon who directs the Joint Trauma System at the Institute of Surgical Research at Fort Sam Houston, confirmed what several military doctors noted: There as yet is no standardized medical database that researchers can use to look back comprehensively on the experiences of Afghanistan and Iraq. Bailey said his institute, a research arm to promote improvement in medical care, eventually hopes to combine what he called a “KIA module” from the medical examiner with the registry of patients treated in hospitals. He added, however, that dis-

cussion of merging the data is in its early phases and that while “I think we will get there, I can’t tell you when it will happen.” Against this background, Wirt, a neuroradiologist who volunteered for duty in an infantry brigade, set out in 2010 to make his own record of one brief but bloody chapter of the Afghan war. “This was a way to take something away,” he said, “so that all of the casualties mean something.” His commander wanted a high level of detail, he said. Curiosity drove him further. “If you don’t take data and analyze it and try to find ways to improve, then what are you doing?” Wirt said in an interview at Fort Campbell, where he is a deputy commander at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital. “In my humble opinion, a consolidated database with standardized input consisting of mechanism of injury and resulting wounds, classified by battle and nonbattle injuries, would be something you could actually use.” Other officers agreed. Maj. Kirk Webb, who was formerly responsible for compiling casualty data for the 101st Airborne Division, said each unit tracked its casualties, although not to the detail that Wirt pursued. Most of the information has probably vanished, he added. “It’s kind of sad, actually, because there is a lot information out there that gets lost,” Webb said. Dr. Dave Edmond Lounsbury is a retired colonel and medical doctor who was co-author of “War Surgery in Afghanistan and Iraq,” a textbook from the Office of the Army Surgeon General that, over considerable internal dissent, published case studies of combat wounds. He said that information like that compiled by Wirt would also be valuable for those who study workplace safety, for historians and for officers who hope to rise above collecting anecdotes to examine how insurgent and counterinsurgency forces fought each other and evolved.

But he and other officers noted a potential obstacle: Many people in the military have been opposed to sharing detailed medical data. The reasons, Lounsbury said, vary from concerns about patient privacy to a desire to present an airbrushed picture of war for public consumption. One military official also said restricting access to the data could prevent potential enemies from studying it. (The Office of the Surgeon General forbade Wirt to share with The New York Times his data on how U.S. soldiers were wounded, even though the newspaper asked for the data in the format in which the information is released and updated monthly by the Office of the Secretary of Defense for the entire Iraq and Afghan wars.) The data, by its very nature, can be politically charged. Records from the Arghandab offensive, for example, show that 530 Americans from Task Force Strike, Wirt’s former unit, were wounded in a roughly one-year period, compared with 150 Afghan soldiers and police officers. The contrast belies the official insistence that Afghan forces led the campaign or even participated equally in it. Lounsbury suggested that whatever the political content or concerns, compiling data and circulating it broadly was important both for the practice of wartime medicine and for the U.S. military and public to understand better a long period of war. “I can’t think of a higher lesson learned than to put all of that data together and find out what weapons were used and who got killed and who lived and with what therapy and treatment,” he said. Wirt, he added, “should be applauded for what he has done.” Change your mind. Change your life.

(541) 728-0505 www.neurofloat.com

After bomb, is Italy again on the verge of violence? New York Times News Service BRINDISI, Italy — A bomb exploded Saturday in front of a school in this southern city, killing a 16-year-old student and wounding at least five others, local officials said, raising fears of a return to the kind of violence that shook Italy decades ago. The explosion occurred near a vocational school named after Francesca Morvillo, a magistrate who was killed with her husband, Giovanni Falcone, an anti-Mafia prosecutor, by a Cosa Nostra bomb on May 23, 1992, an event Italy planned to commemorate on its 20th anniversary. Witnesses described the panic that followed the explosion as “an inferno,” while television stations broadcast knapsacks, textbooks and notebooks strewn across the asphalt in front of the school. There was no immediate claim of responsibility, and the Italian authorities said investigations would examine all possibilities. In recent months, Italy has experienced a level of economic turmoil that has unsettled people, with some linking the government’s austerity measures to a rash of suicides. There has also been a rise in violence against tax collection offices.


SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Chinese

“There is something about elitism that says if you are born in the right family you have to go to the right school to perpetuate the glory of the family. Going to an elite college is a natural extension of that,” said Hong, now a Beijing-based style guru and publisher. Noting that the Communist Party has drifted far from its early ideological moorings, Hong said she sees no contradiction between the desire for an Ivy League education and the current principles of the ruling party and its leaders: “What part of China is communist, and what part of Harvard is against elitist authoritarianism?” Hong’s stepfather, Qiao, was purged as foreign minister in 1976 and his ministerial post passed to Mao’s former interpreter, Huang Hua, whose son, Huang Bin, also went to Harvard. At the time, China’s own education system lay in ruins, wrecked by the 1966-76 Cultural Revolution and Mao’s vicious campaigns against intellectuals, who were reviled as the “stinking ninth category.”

Continued from A1 Chinese students numbered 157,558 in the 2010-11 academic year, according to data compiled by the Institute of International Education — up nearly fourfold in 15 years. But the kin of senior party officials are also a special case: They rarely attend state schools but congregate instead at top-tier — and very expensive — private colleges, a stark rejection of the egalitarian ideals that brought the Communist Party to power in 1949. Of the nine current members of the Politburo Standing Committee, the supreme decisionmaking body of a Communist Party steeped in anti-American rhetoric, at least five have children or grandchildren who have studied or are currently studying in the United States. And helping to foster growing perceptions that the party is corrupt is a big, unanswered question raised by the foreign studies of its leaders’ children: Who pays their bills? Harvard, which costs hundreds of thousands of dollars in tuition Competition in China Today, Chinese universities and living expenses over four years, refuses to discuss the have not only recovered but funding or admission of indi- become so fiercely competitive that getting into them is difvidual students. Grandchildren of two of ficult even for well-connected the party’s last three top lead- princelings. Even so, top Amerers — Zhao Yiyang, who was ican universities still carry purged and placed under more cachet among many in house arrest for opposing the China’s political and business military assault on Tianan- elite, in part because they are so men Square protesters in June expensive. A degree from Har1989, and his successor, Jiang vard or the equivalent ranks as “the ultimate Zemin — studied status symbol” for at Harvard. China’s elite, said The only promi- A degree from Orville Schell, a nent princeling Harvard or Harvard graduate to address the and director of the question of fund- the equivalent Center on U.S.ing publicly is Bo ranks as “the China Relations at Guagua, a gradu- ultimate status the Asia Society in ate student at HarNew York. vard’s Kennedy symbol” for “There is such School of Govern- China’s elite. a fascination with ment. His father is brand names” in the now-disgraced former Chongqing Party boss China that “just as they want Bo Xilai, who, like Xi Jinping, to wear Hermes or Ermeneis the son of an early revo- gildo Zegna, they also want to lutionary leader who fought go to Harvard. They think this puts them at the top of the food alongside Mao Zedong. Bo Guagua did not attend chain,” Schell said. The attraction of a topthe seminar at Harvard’s Fairbank Center for Chinese brand university is so strong Studies, which focused on that some princelings flaunt his family’s travails. But in even tenuous affiliations with a statement sent a few days a big-name American collater to Harvard’s student-run lege. Li Xiaolin, the daughter newspaper, the Crimson, he of former prime minister and responded to allegations of ill- ex-Politburo member Li Peng, gotten wealth. He said he had for example, has long boasted never used his family name that she attended the Massato make money and, contrary chusetts Institute of Technoloto media reports, had never gy as a “visiting scholar at the driven a Ferrari. Funding for Sloan Business School.” MIT his overseas studies, he said, says the only record it has of came entirely from unspeci- attendance by a student with fied “scholarships earned in- Li’s name was enrollment in dependently, and my mother’s a “non-degree short course” generosity from the savings open to executives who have she earned from her years as a “intellectual curiosity” and are ready to spend $7,500 for just successful lawyer and writer.” His mother, Gu Kailai, is 15 days of classes. The welfare of princelings now in detention somewhere in China on suspicion of involve- studying abroad can become ment in the alleged murder of a matter for the Chinese govNeil Heywood, a Briton who ernment. But most princelings served as a business adviser to have kept a low profile. Still, the stampede to Amerthe Bo family. After what Chinese authorities say was a fall- ican campuses has delivered ing-out over money, Heywood a propaganda gift to critics of was found dead, apparently the Communist Party, which poisoned, in a Chongqing ho- drapes itself in the Chinese flag and regularly denounces those tel room last November. Bo Guagua “is very worried who question its monopoly on about what might happen to power as traitorous American his mother,” said Ezra Vogel, a lackeys. A widespread percepHarvard professor who said he tion that members of the party had received a visit from a “very elite exploit their access and anxious” Bo last week. Bo’s im- clout to stash their own chilage as a wild playboy, added dren and also money overseas Vogel, is “greatly exaggerated.” “is a big Achilles heel for the party,” said MacFarquhar. ‘Dog-eat-dog’ politics Bitter foes of the ruling parIn China’s “dog-eat-dog” po- ty such as the banned spirilitical culture, Harvard scholar tual movement Falun Gong Roderick MacFarquhar told the have reveled in spreading Fairbank Center seminar, the sometimes unfounded rumors family is both “a wealth gener- about privileged party chilating unit” and a “form of gen- dren. New Tang Dynasty TV, eral protection.” As a result, he part of a media empire operadded, “you have a party that is ated by Falun Gong, reported, seen as deeply corrupt.” for example, that 74.5 percent Before his ouster, Bo Xilai of the children of current and had an official annual salary retired minister-level Chinese of less than $20,000. But his officials have acquired either son attended Harrow School, green cards or American an exclusive private academy citizenship. The rate for their in London with annual fees grandchildren is 91 percent, of about $16,000; then Oxford, said the TV station, citing which, for overseas students, an anonymous Chinese blog costs more than $25,000 a year posting that in turn cited supjust in tuition; and the Ken- posed official U.S. statistics. nedy School, which, according No government agency has isto its own estimates, requires sued any such statistics. about $70,000 a year to cover Though of dubious accutuition and living expenses. racy, the report stirred a storm “This is about haves and of outrage on the Internet, with have-nots,” said Hong Huang, Twitter-like microblogs dethe stepdaughter of Mao’s for- nouncing the hypocrisy of the eign minister Qiao Guanhua party elite. Most of the comand a member of an earlier gen- ments were quickly deleted by eration of American-educated China’s army of Internet cenprincelings. “China’s old-boy sors. But a few survived, with network … is no different from one complaining that officials America’s old-boy network,” “curse American imperialism said Hong, who went to Vassar and capitalism all the time but College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., their wives and children have and whose mother served as already emigrated to the U.S. Mao’s English teacher. to be (American) slaves.”

A7

Numb to carnage, Mexicans find diversions By Randal C. Archibold and Damien Cave

A growing toll

New York Times News Service

CADEREYTA JIMENEZ, Mexico — Couples were walking hand in hand. Children were frolicking. Just down the road in this northern Mexican town, 49 bodies, headless with their hands and feet severed off, had been found and cleared away. Francisco Umberta, alarmed by the latest in a string of unimaginably gory crimes linked to Mexico’s drug war, dealt with it by heading out on a date. A half-hour drive from where the torsos were discovered, he stood in line Monday near a crowded Chili’s restaurant to buy movie tickets for “The Avengers.” “Of course it is all scary,” he said of the massacre, which sadly set no record for carnage here, “but what are you going to do?” He had heard about the bodies on the radio shortly after they were discovered last Sunday but said the regional soccer playoffs drew more public attention. “It’s not like we’re all paralyzed,” said Umberta, 31, an office clerk. “We still need to live while they do what they do.” With mangled corpses turning up on street corners and inside restaurants, hung from bridges, and buried in mass graves, Mexicans seem to have grown inured. Outrage, fear, anxiety, sadness — it is tough to muster such emotions again and again, especially with 50,000 people dead in drug-related killings since President Felipe Calderon began his assault on traffickers six years ago. Other countries, of course, have gone through some version of this collective numbing: Israel in 2003, after a series of bus bombings; Iraq in 2006. But Mexico seems to have fallen to new depths of deliberate distraction this year, and many Mexicans are increasingly disturbed by their own attitude. They are equally depressed about its cause. After all, crime experts and psychologists say, the apathy — during a presidential campaign, no less — is really just a learned response to repeated trauma, and impotence in the face of horror. Mexicans in city after city have grown used to death tolls that climb continuously. Protests, marches and public art projects honoring the many victims have done little to alter reality. Every day, families and children walk by newsstands with tabloids showing graphic photographs of the latest corpses to be found. Most barely notice. “We know nothing is changing — it just goes on,” said Imelda Santos, 17, who was out enjoying a hamburger with friends. “We try not to worry too much because we are not involved.” That perception — it’s them, not us — appears to play a large role in people’s ability to remain disaffected despite the carnage. “For a lot of Mexicans, the big impulse is ‘Well, that’s just too bad, but at least we got rid of the bad guys,’” said Jorge Castaneda, a former presidential candidate. “That contributes to the jadedness.” In the case of the 49, perhaps some were on the wrong side of the law. The authorities have said several had tattoos of Santa Muerte, the unofficial saint of death often favored by cartel assassins. Mexico’s interior secretary, Alejandro Poire, said Monday that the Zetas, a drug gang known for its ruthlessness in a country known for it, too, appeared to be responsible for the killings. Security experts have surmised that the high-profile dumping was a response to mass killings by the Sinaloa cartel. The two groups are Mexico’s most powerful criminal competitors. They are also regional and cultural opposites. Sinaloa has been moving drugs north from the ranch country of western Mexico for generations; the Zetas are newer arrivals, founded by former spe-

The number of organizedcrime related killings in Mexico. 16K

12K

8K Alexandre Meneghini / The Associated Press

A woman, exhausted, protests against violence during the March of National Dignity campaign earlier this month in Mexico City. Given the day-to-day horror, psychologists say it is no wonder Mexicans are becoming numb to it.

cial forces soldiers who had been enforcers for the Gulf cartel on Mexico’s more urban eastern coast. They are battling each other, invading each other’s territory and leaving behind bodies to intimidate their rival. The latest wave of violence seems to have started, or intensified, in September when a group identifying itself as the Zetas Killers dumped 35 bodies on a highway at rush hour near a mall in the Gulf Coast city of Veracruz. Two months later, 26 bound and gagged bodies appeared in downtown Guadalajara, a Sinaloa stronghold. Then, on May 4, 23 people were found dead in the Zetas’ border state of Tamaulipas. Fourteen were decapitated. Nine were hanging from a bridge. “This is tit for tat,” said Alejandro Hope, a former senior intelligence officer. “For Sinaloa, it’s a way of bringing down these upstarts, and for the Zetas, it’s about protecting their reputation for extreme violence, which is their main asset.” Even though tit for tat makes sense in the latest massacre, experts say the explanation may turn out to be something else entirely. The victims, who included six women, might have been innocent migrants, like the 72 Central Americans the Zetas are believed to have killed and dumped in a grave discovered in 2010, or the 193

bodies found last year in another set of graves in Zetas territory near the Texas border. Given the violence, psychologists say it is no wonder people are checking out. “One strategy we use for protection, for survival, is to ignore it because there is nothing we can do,” said Maria Antonia Padilla Vargas, coordinator of a nonprofit psychological research group. “It’s a phenomenon we’ve observed when rats are exposed to uncontrollable electric shocks.” The official term is “learned helplessness,” and case studies are appearing all over Mexico. In January, two headless bodies showed up in a smoldering van outside a fancy mall in the Mexico City neighborhood of Santa Fe. As the police tape flapped in the wind, Carlos Alberto Govea, 24, kissed his girlfriend a short stroll away. Residents of another neighborhood in the capital, where a recent shootout killed six people, said they had already stopped discussing the crime. “It’s better to leave these things in oblivion,” said Andres Castillo, 68, eating a ta-

4K

’07 ’08 ’09 ’10 ’11 Sources: 2007-10 data from the Mexican government; 2011 estimate by the Trans- Border Institute’s Justice in Mexico Project New York Times News Service

male near a shoeshine stand. “We are coming to terms with the idea that we may leave our houses and not come back.” And the three main candidates running for president? They have kept their distance, too. With Calderon constitutionally barred from running again, all the campaigns have largely focused on other things. Many Mexicans doubt that whoever wins will create immediate change, and turnout for the July 1 election is expected to be light. “The politicians have not been able to resolve this,” said Jose Juan Cervantes, a crime and sociology researcher at the Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon. “So the people cope.”

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A8

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012


SPOR T S

Scoreboard, B2 NHL, B2 NBA, B3 MLB, B4

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

PREP TENNIS

CYCLING Gesink goes in front in California

A lot of state champions

MOUNT BALDY, Calif. — Dutchman Robert Gesink won the difficult seventh stage of the Tour of California on Saturday to take a 46-second lead in the overall standings into the largely ceremonial final leg. Gesink, the Rabobank rider who broke his right leg in a training accident last fall, pulled away from Colombia’s Jhon Atapuma in the final-half mile to win the 78.3mile leg from Ontario to Mount Baldy in 3 hours, 37 minutes, 8 seconds. Gesink was fifth in the 2010 Tour de France. “This is amazing,” Gesink said. “At the end of last season I crashed and broke my leg. In January, I still had to learn how to walk. Now I’m back.” Atapuma, riding for Colombia-Coldeportes, was second in the same time. Colombia teammate Fabio Duarte was third, 14 seconds back in the stage. Atapuma and defending race winner Chris Horner, the Radio-Shack Nissan rider from Bend, emerged from a lead pack of 17 riders after about 50 miles. The duo built about a 4-minute lead, putting Horner, who began the day trailing by 2:50, in the virtual race lead. But Horner, who won the race last year with his second-place finish in the same stage, faded in the waning miles, placed sixth and improved from 22nd to eighth overall. Dave Zabriskie, the Garmin-Barracuda rider from Salt Lake City, was second in the overall standings entering the final 46.2-mile stage from Beverly Hills to Los Angeles. A former Tour de France leader who assumed the race lead after a dominating fifth stage time trial, Zabriskie will likely finish second in the race for the fourth time.

Central Oregon crowned five different champions in tennis on Saturday. The Summit boys and girls teams won Class 5A state titles (see team pictures, B8), while the Storm’s Paxton Deuel (pictured below) won the 5A boys individual title. Also, Mountain View boys doubles and Crook County girls doubles teams won titles (pictured at right).

— The Associated Press

SOFTBALL Oregon defeats BYU to advance EUGENE — Kaylan Howard hit a two-run homer in the fifth inning and Oregon went on to defeat BYU 4-1 in the NCAA softball Eugene Regional final on Saturday. The 11th-seeded Ducks (42-15) advance to face the winner of the Austin Regional. Oregon won three straight in the first regional held in Eugene. Samantha Pappas added a two-run double in the four-run fifth for the Ducks. Jessica Moore allowed just one run on six hits with seven strikeouts. Tori Almond allowed four runs on five hits with eight strikeouts for the Cougars (45-15). J.C. Clayton hit a runscoring double in the bottom of the fifth. The Ducks advance to the Super Regional round for the third straight season. For information on Oregon State softball, see Briefs, B3.

John Klicker / For The Bulletin Matthew Aimonetti / For The Bulletin

Crook County’s Catie Brown, left, and Kayla Morgan won the 4A/3A/2A/1A girls doubles title (see story, B7).

At state, it’s a Storm stampede • Summit takes 5A boys and girls titles; Deuel wins in singles Bulletin staff report BEAVERTON — Paxton Deuel will not be missed by the rest of the state. The Summit senior capped a stellar four-year prep tennis career Saturday, winning his second consecutive Class 5A boys singles championship without dropping a set. Deuel, who will play for the University of Portland next year, also won the 5A doubles title as a freshman in 2009 with then partner Adam Krull. On Saturday, Deuel defeated Crescent Valley’s Jamie Fisher 6-4, 6-1 in the singles title match. “We’ve been really fortunate with reclassification in that Cleveland’s Alex Rovello (a four-time state champion) and Paxton have been the top singles players in the state and they’ve been playing in 5A,” said Storm coach Josh Cordell, whose team set a new 5A-state record for points this week. “A lot of people are going to be glad to see (Deuel) go. He’s just been really dominant.” Summit, which clinched its third title in four years on Friday, overwhelmed the competition at this year’s state tournament, scoring 27 points. (The old state record was 14 1⁄2 points.) Runner-up Crescent Valley finished the threeday event with 12 1⁄2 points and Mountain View, whose doubles team of Matt Larraneta and Matt Van Hemelryck knocked off the Storm’s Scott Parr and Lionel Hess 6-3, 4-6, 6-2 in the 5A championship final, scored eight points to place third overall. See Tennis / B8

Hot local golfers have one thing in common ZACK HALL

W

oodie Thomas’ chest puffs out just a little bit when one of his golfers — past or present — does well. “To me, the progress they make by getting the experience and the opportunity, I have a little pride in that, sure,” says Thomas, who is gearing up for his 13th season as tournament director for the Central Oregon Junior Golf Association. “I love to see how they’re doing.” Some of them have been doing quite well. By just about any measure, this has been a good month for Central Oregon amateur golfers. College players Andrew Vijarro, Alex Fitch and Jesse Heinly reached the highest level of their respective divisions. And Summit High School standouts Madison Odiorne and Dylan Cramer both made show-stopping performances in their respective district championship events, then Odiorne won the Class 5A individual title at state. See Golfers / B6

COJGA, at a glance The Central Oregon Junior Golf Association has divisions for players ages 6 through 18. Starting small in its first year in 1995, COJGA now has more than 300 members.

ON THE WEB For more information about COJGA, visit www.cojga.com

HORSE RACING

John Klicker / For The Bulletin

Summit’s Paxton Deuel hits a forehand on his way to defeating Crescent Valley’s Jamie Fisher in the Class 5A singles final at Tualatin Hills Tennis Center in Beaverton on Saturday.

Derby winner grabs victory at Preakness By Richard Rosenblatt The Associated Press

PREP TRACK & FIELD

Summit rolls to district titles

NBA

San Antonio uses 24-0 run to beat L.A., B3

COMMENTARY Mountain View’s Matt Van Hemelryck, foreground, and Matt Larraneta won the 5A boys doubles title.

— The Associated Press

Spurs take 3-0 lead over Clips

B

Motor sports, B5 Golf, B6 Prep sports, B7, B8

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Mountain View’s Krysta Kroeger, left, and Bend’s Amanda Pease, right, trail Summit’s Sarah Frazier on Saturday in the girls 100-meter final during the second day of the Class 5A Special District 1 track and field meet at Bend High School. Frazier won the event.

Bulletin staff report How high can Bradley Laubacher go? Summit’s senior high jumper set another personal best Saturday, clearing 6 feet, 10 inches to win the Class 5A Special District 1 state-qualifying meet at Bend High. The Storm rolled to victory in both the boys and girls team standings at the two-day meet. Inside The Summit boys scored 152 • More prep points to runner-up Bend’s 99. coverage and Mountain View’s boys team prep results, placed third (97 points) and B7 was followed by Eagle Point (76) and Ashland (36). The Storm girls, who are the five-time defending Class 5A state champions, doubled up second-place Mountain View, 220108. Bend High was third with 50 points, Ashland ended the day in fourth with 37 points, and Eagle Point scored 24 points to place fifth. “This sets us up well for a title run,” said Summit coach Dave Turnbull, whose program pulled off the boys and girls state track and field title sweep in 2011. The 5A state championships are at the University of Oregon’s Hayward Field in Eugene on Friday and Saturday. See Track / B7

BALTIMORE — I’ll Have Another had Bodemeister in his sights again, a shot at the Triple Crown hanging in the balance. Two weeks ago, he ran down his rival and won the Kentucky Derby. This time, the chestnut colt needed to be even more relentless to win the Preakness. Jockey Mario Gutierrez asked for more at the top of the stretch, and I’ll Have Another closed the gap with each stride, finally surging past Bodemeister a few yards from the wire. Next up: New York and the Belmont Stakes in three weeks and a chance to join the company of Secretariat, Seattle Slew and Affirmed, the last to win thoroughbred racing’s most coveted prize in 1978. See Preakness / B8 Jockey Mario Gutierrez reacts aboard I’ll Have Another. Patrick Semansky / The Associated Press


B2

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

O  A TELEVISION

SCOREBOARD

Today BASEBALL 12:30 a.m.: College, Kansas State at Texas Tech, (same-day tape), Root Sports. 10:30 a.m.: MLB, Boston Red Sox at Philadelphia Phillies, TBS. Noon: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Colorado Rockies, Root Sports. 5 p.m.: MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at Los Angeles Dodgers, ESPN. GOLF 3 a.m.: European Tour, Volvo World Match Play Championship, Golf Channel. 10 a.m.: LPGA Tour, Sybase Match Play Championship, Golf Channel (coverage also continues at 1 p.m.). 11 a.m.: Nationwide Tour, BMW Charity Pro-Am, final round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, Byron Nelson Championship, final round, CBS. MOTOR SPORTS 9 a.m.: IndyCar, Indianapolis 500, qualifying, NBC Sports Network. 11 a.m.: NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Pioneer Hi-Bred 250, ESPN. 4 p.m.: National Hot Rod Association, Dollar General Summer Nationals, (taped), ESPN2. BASKETBALL 9:30 a.m.: WNBA, Phoenix Mercury at Minnesota Lynx, ABC. 12:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, conference semifinals, Miami Heat at Indiana Pacers, ABC. 7:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, conference semifinals, San Antonio Spurs at Los Angeles Clippers, TNT. CYCLING 10 a.m.: Tour of California, Stage 8, NBC. SOFTBALL 10 a.m.: NCAA regionals, Michigan vs. Louisville, ESPN2. 12:30 p.m.: NCAA regionals, teams TBA, ESPN2. RODEO 11 a.m.: Bull riding, Professional Bull Riders, Pueblo Invitational (taped), CBS. HOCKEY Noon: NHL playoffs, conference finals, Phoenix Coyotes at Los Angeles Kings, NBC. 6 p.m.: International Ice Hockey Federation world championship, gold-medal game (same-day tape), NBC Sports Network. SOCCER 4 p.m.: Major League Soccer, Chicago Fire at Portland Timbers, Root Sports.

Monday BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, Atlanta Braves at Cincinnati Reds, ESPN. 7 p.m.: MLB, Texas Rangers at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. BASKETBALL 4 p.m.: NBA playoffs, conference semifinals, Philadelphia 76ers at Boston Celtics, TNT. 6:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, conference semifinals, Los Angeles Lakers at Oklahoma City Thunder, TNT. HOCKEY 5 p.m.: NHL playoffs, conference finals, New York Rangers at New Jersey Devils, NBC Sports Network.

RADIO Today BASEBALL Noon: College, Oregon State at Washington State, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

ON DECK Monday Baseball: Class 6A state playoffs, Lakeview at Redmond, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Class 6A state playoffs, McMinnville at Redmond, 4:30 p.m. Tuesday Boys lacrosse: OHLA second round state playoffs, Oregon Episcopal School at Summit, 6 p.m. Wednesday Baseball: Class 5A state playoffs, Wilsonville at Summit, TBA; Class 5A state playoffs, Sandy at Bend, TBA; Class 4A state playoffs, TBA at Sisters, TBA; Class 4A state playoffs, Madras at TBA Softball: Class 5A state playoffs, Mountain View at Sandy, TBA; Class 5A state playoffs, Summit at West Albany, TBA; Class 4A state playoffs, Madras at Phoenix, TBA

Indiana Atlanta New York Washington

1 0 1.000 0 1 .000 0 1 .000 0 1 .000 Western Conference W L Pct Los Angeles 1 0 1.000 San Antonio 1 0 1.000 Minnesota 0 0 .000 Phoenix 0 0 .000 Seattle 0 1 .000 Tulsa 0 1 .000 ——— Saturday’s Games Connecticut 78, New York 73 Indiana 92, Atlanta 84 Chicago 69, Washington 57 San Antonio 88, Tulsa 79 Today’s Games Phoenix at Minnesota, 9:30 a.m. New York at Connecticut, 2 p.m.

— 1 1 1 GB — — ½ ½ 1 1

Friday Track: Class 6A, 5A and 4A state championships at the University of Oregon in Eugene, 10 a.m.

HOCKEY

Saturday Track: Class 6A, 5A and 4A state championships at the University of Oregon in Eugene, 9:30 a.m.

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers 2, New Jersey 1 Monday, May 14: NY Rangers 3, New Jersey 0 Wednesday, May 16: New Jersey 3, NY Rangers 2 Saturday, May 19: NY Rangers 3, New Jersey 0 Monday, May 21: NY Rangers at New Jersey, 5 p.m. Wednesday, May 23: New Jersey at NY Rangers, 5 p.m. x-Friday, May 25: NY Rangers at New Jersey, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, May 27: New Jersey at NY Rangers, 5 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles 3, Phoenix 0 Sunday, May 13: Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 2 Tuesday, May 15: Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 0 Thursday, May 17: Los Angeles 2, Phoenix 1 Today, May 20: Phoenix at Los Angeles, noon x-Tuesday, May 22: Los Angeles at Phoenix, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, May 24: Phoenix at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. x-Saturday, May 26: Los Angeles at Phoenix, 5 p.m.

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION NBA Playoff Glance All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 2, Philadelphia 2 Saturday, May 12: Boston 92, Philadelphia 91 Monday, May 14: Philadelphia 82, Boston 81 Wednesday, May 16: Boston 107, Philadelphia 91 Friday, May 18: Philadelphia 92, Boston 83 Monday, May 21: Philadelphia at Boston, 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 23: Boston at Philadelphia, TBD x-Saturday, May 26: Philadelphia at Boston, TBD Indiana 2, Miami 1 Sunday, May 13: Miami 95, Indiana 86 Tuesday, May 15: Indiana 78, Miami 75 Thursday, May 17: Indiana 94, Miami 75 Today, May 20: Miami at Indiana, 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 22: Indiana at Miami, 4 or 5 p.m. x-Thursday, May 24: Miami at Indiana, TBD x-Saturday, May 26: Indiana at Miami, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE Oklahoma City 3, L.A. Lakers 1 Monday, May 14: Oklahoma City 119, L.A. Lakers 90 Wednesday, May 16: Oklahoma City 77, L.A. Lakers 75 Friday, May 18: L.A. Lakers 99, Oklahoma City 96 Saturday, May 19: Oklahoma City 103, L.A. Lakers 100 Monday, May 21: L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 23: Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, TBD x-Sunday, May 27: L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, TBD San Antonio 3, L.A. Clippers 0 Tuesday, May 15: San Antonio 108, L.A. Clippers 92 Thursday, May 17: San Antonio 105, L.A. Clippers 88 Saturday, May 19: San Antonio 96, L.A. Clippers 86 Today, May 20: San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 22: L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 6:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 25: San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, TBD x-Sunday, May 27: L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, TBD Saturday’s Summaries

Spurs 96, Clippers 86 SAN ANTONIO (96) Leonard 5-7 1-1 14, Duncan 8-16 3-5 19, Diaw 2-6 0-0 5, Parker 8-20 6-9 23, Green 3-6 0-0 7, Neal 2-5 2-3 7, Ginobili 4-9 4-5 13, Splitter 2-2 1-2 5, Bonner 1-4 0-0 3, Jackson 0-1 0-0 0, Mills 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-76 17-25 96. L.A. CLIPPERS (86) Butler 0-2 0-0 0, Griffin 13-24 2-2 28, Jordan 2-4 0-2 4, Paul 5-17 2-2 12, Foye 3-7 0-0 7, Martin 0-2 0-0 0, Williams 8-12 2-2 19, Bledsoe 1-1 0-0 2, Young 4-10 0-0 9, Evans 1-1 3-10 5, Simmons 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-80 9-18 86. San Antonio 11 32 26 27 — 96 L.A. Clippers 33 20 8 25 — 86 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 9-22 (Leonard 3-5, Diaw 1-2, Green 1-2, Ginobili 1-3, Parker 1-3, Bonner 1-3, Neal 1-4), L.A. Clippers 3-9 (Williams 1-1, Foye 1-1, Young 1-5, Paul 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—San Antonio 47 (Duncan 13), L.A. Clippers 54 (Griffin 16). Assists—San Antonio 27 (Parker 10), L.A. Clippers 22 (Paul 11). Total Fouls—San Antonio 19, L.A. Clippers 23. A—19,060 (19,060).

Thunder 103, Lakers 100 OKLAHOMA CITY (103) Durant 10-18 8-10 31, Ibaka 7-11 0-0 14, Perkins 1-3 0-0 2, Westbrook 15-26 6-7 37, Sefolosha 1-2 0-0 2, Collison 0-0 0-0 0, Harden 2-11 7-8 12, Fisher 2-4 0-0 5, Mohammed 0-1 0-0 0, Cook 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 38-77 21-25 103. L.A. LAKERS (100) World Peace 4-10 2-4 14, Gasol 4-10 2-2 10, Bynum 9-15 0-2 18, Sessions 4-9 2-2 10, Bryant 12-28 14-17 38, Blake 2-6 0-0 5, Hill 2-5 1-2 5, Barnes 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 37-86 21-29 100. Oklahoma City 24 22 25 32 — 103 L.A. Lakers 29 27 24 20 — 100 3-Point Goals—Oklahoma City 6-16 (Durant 3-4, Westbrook 1-2, Fisher 1-2, Harden 1-6, Sefolosha 0-1, Cook 0-1), L.A. Lakers 5-18 (World Peace 4-8, Blake 1-4, Barnes 0-1, Bryant 0-2, Sessions 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Oklahoma City 46 (Durant 13), L.A. Lakers 54 (Bynum 9). Assists—Oklahoma City 16 (Westbrook 5), L.A. Lakers 19 (Sessions, Bryant 5). Total Fouls—Oklahoma City 23, L.A. Lakers 19. Technicals—Perkins, Westbrook. A—18,997 (18,997).

WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct GB Chicago 1 0 1.000 — Connecticut 1 0 1.000 —

NHL

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF New York 8 3 1 25 25 D.C. 7 4 3 24 25 Sporting Kansas City 7 3 1 22 15 Chicago 4 2 3 15 11 New England 4 6 1 13 14 Houston 3 3 4 13 10 Columbus 3 4 3 12 9 Montreal 3 6 3 12 13 Philadelphia 2 6 2 8 8 Toronto FC 0 9 0 0 7 Western Conference W L T Pts GF Real Salt Lake 8 3 2 26 19 San Jose 7 2 3 24 23 Seattle 7 2 2 23 15 Vancouver 5 3 3 18 12 Colorado 5 6 1 16 17 Chivas USA 4 6 1 13 7 FC Dallas 3 6 4 13 12 Los Angeles 3 6 2 11 12 Portland 2 5 3 9 9 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Saturday’s Games Vancouver 2, Seattle FC 2, tie D.C. United 3, Toronto FC 1 New England 2, Houston 2, tie New York 2, Montreal 1 FC Dallas 1, Philadelphia 1, tie Colorado 2, Sporting Kansas City 2, tie Chivas USA 1, Los Angeles 0 San Jose 1, Columbus 1, tie Today’s Game Chicago at Portland, 4 p.m.

GA 17 17 9 10 15 11 12 18 13 21 GA 12 13 6 13 16 12 19 16 13

BASEBALL College Pacific-12 Conference All Times PDT ——— Conference W L Oregon 19 8 Arizona 17 9 UCLA 17 9 Stanford 16 10 Arizona St. 16 11 Oregon St. 14 12 Washington 11 15 Washington St. 10 15 California 9 17 USC 8 16 Utah 7 22 Saturday’s Games UCLA 8, Cal 5 USC 8, Arizona 5 x-Oregon 5, Seattle 4 Stanford 8, Utah 1 Washington State 9, Oregon State 5 Arizona State 8, Washington 4 Today’s Games Stanford at Utah, 11:30 a.m. x-Seattle at Oregon, noon Oregon State at Washington State, noon Washington at Arizona State, 12:30 p.m. UCLA at Cal, 1 p.m. Arizona at USC, 1 p.m. x-nonleague

All Games W L 40 14 35 16 38 13 35 14 34 19 34 18 26 23 25 25 26 24 23 24 14 37

TENNIS Professional Italian Open Saturday At Foro Italico Rome Purse: Men, $3.14 million, (WT1000); Women, $2.17 million (Premier) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles

Men Semifinals Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. David Ferrer (6), Spain, 7-6 (6), 6-0. Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, 6-2, 7-6 (4). Women Semifinals Li Na (8), China, def. Serena Williams (9), United States, walkover. Maria Sharapova (2), Russia, def. Angelique Kerber (12), Germany, 6-3, 6-4.

Sybase Match Play Pairings Today’s Semifinal Pairings Hamilton Farm Golf Club Gladstone, N.J. Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,553 yards; Par: 72 Candie Kung, Taiwan, vs. Vicky Hurst, United States Morgan Pressel, United States, vs. Azahara Munoz, Spain

GOLF

MOTOR SPORTS

PGA Tour

NASCAR

Byron Nelson Championship Saturday At TPC Four Seasons Resort Irving, Texas Purse: $6.5 million Yardage: 7,166; Par 70 Third Round Jason Dufner 67-66-69—202 J.J. Henry 68-68-67—203 Jason Day 68-68-67—203 Dicky Pride 66-68-69—203 Vijay Singh 68-70-66—204 Jonas Blixt 68-70-67—205 Marc Leishman 65-69-71—205 Rich Beem 68-70-68—206 Bob Estes 73-68-65—206 Joe Durant 70-71-65—206 Scott Piercy 66-70-70—206 Keegan Bradley 67-68-71—206 Matt Kuchar 66-68-72—206 Pat Perez 67-67-72—206 Ryan Palmer 64-70-72—206 Jason Bohn 70-70-67—207 Jimmy Walker 70-68-69—207 Andres Gonzales 66-72-69—207 Padraig Harrington 68-69-70—207 Chad Campbell 68-66-73—207 Phil Mickelson 70-69-69—208 Shane Bertsch 70-70-68—208 Graham DeLaet 71-68-69—208 James Driscoll 67-71-70—208 Greg Owen 67-71-70—208 Billy Mayfair 69-68-71—208 Ken Duke 69-67-72—208 Ernie Els 70-69-70—209 Nathan Green 68-71-70—209 John Mallinger 70-70-69—209 Andres Romero 72-67-70—209 David Mathis 68-71-70—209 Robert Garrigus 71-70-68—209 Roberto Castro 74-67-68—209 Charles Howell III 68-73-68—209 John Rollins 71-67-71—209 D.A. Points 68-69-72—209 Charley Hoffman 66-69-74—209 Tim Herron 70-72-67—209 Brandt Jobe 70-69-71—210 Derek Lamely 69-70-71—210 Bill Lunde 66-75-69—210 Boo Weekley 69-68-73—210 John Merrick 71-70-69—210 Danny Lee 71-71-68—210 D.J. Trahan 72-68-71—211 Todd Hamilton 70-70-71—211 Gavin Coles 71-69-71—211 Brian Davis 73-65-73—211 Greg Chalmers 70-71-70—211 Hunter Haas 69-73-69—211 Duffy Waldorf 72-70-69—211 Scott Brown 70-69-73—212 Ricky Barnes 67-71-74—212 Kevin Kisner 67-74-71—212 Gary Woodland 68-70-74—212 Nick O’Hern 70-71-71—212 Erik Compton 70-71-71—212 Blake Adams 66-71-75—212 Seung-Yul Noh 73-69-70—212 Mathew Goggin 69-71-73—213 Chris Couch 68-70-75—213 Brian Gay 71-71-71—213 Kyle Reifers 70-72-71—213 Richard H. Lee 68-72-74—214 Arjun Atwal 72-69-73—214 Chris Riley 67-74-73—214 Jhonattan Vegas 67-74-73—214 Alex Cejka 65-73-76—214 J.J. Killeen 70-72-72—214 Ryuji Imada 67-68-79—214 Made cut did not finish Harrison Frazar 68-70-77—215 Robert Gamez 74-68-73—215 Bobby Gates 71-70-75—216 Alexandre Rocha 69-72-75—216 Tim Petrovic 67-74-76—217 Rocco Mediate 70-71-76—217 Jerry Kelly 68-71-79—218 Stephen Gangluff 71-71-78—220

LPGA Tour Sybase Match Play Saturday At Hamilton Farm Golf Club Gladstone, N.J. Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,553 yards; Par: 72 Patty Berg Bracket Candie Kung, Taiwan, def. Yani Tseng, Taiwan, 3 and 2 Julieta Granada, Paraguay, def. Karine Icher, France, 1 up. Kathy Whitworth Bracket Ryu So Yeon, South Korea, def. Katherine Hull, Australia, 5 and 4. Vicky Hurst, United States, def. Angela Stanford, United States, 2 and 1. Mickey Wright Bracket Morgan Pressel, United States, def. Na Yeon Choi, South Korea, 5-4, 19 holes. Anna Nordqvist, Sweden, def. Amy Yang, South Korea, 3 and 1. Annika Sorenstam Bracket Azahara Munoz, Spain, def. Jodi Ewart, Britain, 2 and 1 Stacy Lewis, United States, def. Sun Young Yoo, South Korea, 1 up. Quarterfinals Patty Berg Bracket Candie Kung, Taiwan, def. Julieta Granada, Paraguay, 2 and 1. Kathy Whitworth Bracket Vicky Hurst, United States, def. Ryu So Yeon, South Korea, 2 up. Mickey Wright Bracket Morgan Pressel, United States, def. Anna Nordqvist, Sweden, 5 and 4. Annika Sorenstam Bracket Azahara Munoz, Spain, def. Stacy Lewis, United

States, 5 and 4.

Sprint Cup All-Star Race Results Saturday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (6) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 90 laps, 77.2 rating, 0 points. 2. (19) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 90, 93.4, 0. 3. (15) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 90, 71.1, 0. 4. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 90, 106.3, 0. 5. (21) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 90, 116.7, 0. 6. (5) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 90, 100.3, 0. 7. (18) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 90, 107.8, 0. 8. (17) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 90, 58.4, 0. 9. (20) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 90, 84.7, 0. 10. (2) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 90, 86, 0. 11. (22) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 90, 86.2, 0. 12. (10) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 90, 43.8, 0. 13. (8) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 90, 75.8, 0. 14. (12) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 90, 56, 0. 15. (11) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 90, 37.1, 0. 16. (7) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 90, 58.1, 0. 17. (9) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 90, 40.6, 0. 18. (14) David Ragan, Ford, 90, 28.6, 0. 19. (23) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 90, 31.9, 0. 20. (3) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 90, 77.8, 0. 21. (16) Mark Martin, Toyota, 90, 41.7, 0. 22. (4) Greg Biffle, Ford, engine, 67, 64.9, 0. 23. (13) Carl Edwards, Ford, engine, 25, 47.7, 0. ——— Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 92.045 mph. Time of Race: 1 hour, 28 minutes, 0 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.841 seconds. Caution Flags: 6 for 10 laps. Lead Changes: 7 among 7 drivers. Lap Leaders: Ky.Busch 1-14; J.Johnson 15-20; D.Hamlin 21-36; M.Kenseth 37-40; B.Keselowski 41-60; Ku.Busch 61-62; D.Earnhardt Jr. 63-81; J.Johnson 82-90. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): B.Keselowski, 1 time for 20 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr., 1 time for 19 laps; D.Hamlin, 1 time for 16 laps; J.Johnson, 2 times for 15 laps; Ky.Busch, 1 time for 14 laps; M.Kenseth, 1 time for 4 laps; Ku.Busch, 1 time for 2 laps. Top 12 in Points: 1. G.Biffle, 411; 2. M.Kenseth, 409; 3. D.Earnhardt Jr., 397; 4. D.Hamlin, 394; 5. J.Johnson, 372; 6. M.Truex Jr., 372; 7. T.Stewart, 369; 8. K.Harvick, 361; 9. Ky.Busch, 349; 10. C.Edwards, 337; 11. C.Bowyer, 335; 12. B.Keselowski, 328. Sprint Showdown Results Saturday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (3) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 40 laps, 150 rating, 0 points. 2. (1) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 40, 92.8, 0. 3. (19) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 40, 105.7, 0. 4. (2) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 40, 112.2, 0. 5. (7) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 40, 104.7, 0. 6. (13) Joey Logano, Toyota, 40, 84.5, 0. 7. (5) Aric Almirola, Ford, 40, 89, 0. 8. (4) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 40, 92.3, 0. 9. (6) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 40, 79.9, 0. 10. (9) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 40, 71.1, 0. 11. (11) Casey Mears, Ford, 40, 70.5, 0. 12. (8) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 40, 62.7, 0. 13. (21) Josh Wise, Ford, 40, 51, 0. 14. (15) Scott Speed, Ford, 40, 50.2, 0. 15. (16) David Gilliland, Ford, 40, 49.4, 0. 16. (17) Mike Bliss, Toyota, ignition, 28, 35.9, 0. 17. (20) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, vibration, 26, 35.8, 0. 18. (10) David Stremme, Toyota, overheating, 22, 39.6, 0. 19. (12) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, vibration, 20, 52.4, 0. 20. (22) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, electrical, 20, 26.9, 0. 21. (14) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, brakes, 7, 35.1, 0. 22. (18) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, accident, 3, 28.6, 0. ——— Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 125.581 mph. Time of Race: 0 hours, 28 minutes, 40 seconds. Margin of Victory: 2.384 seconds. Caution Flags: 1 for 0 laps. Lead Changes: 1 among 1 driver. Lap Leaders: D.Earnhardt Jr. 1-40. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): D.Earnhardt Jr., 1 time for 40 laps. Top 12 in Points: 1. G.Biffle, 411; 2. M.Kenseth, 409; 3. D.Earnhardt Jr., 397; 4. D.Hamlin, 394; 5. J.Johnson, 372; 6. M.Truex Jr., 372; 7. T.Stewart, 369; 8. K.Harvick, 361; 9. Ky.Busch, 349; 10. C.Edwards, 337; 11. C.Bowyer, 335; 12. B.Keselowski, 328.

7. (67) Josef Newgarden, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.6879 (224.037) 8. (11) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:40.1775 (224.751) 9. (5) EJ Viso, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:40.4119 (224.422) 10. (8) Rubens Barrichello, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:40.5253 ( 224.264) 11. (98) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.7144 (224.000) 12. (38) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.7437 (223.959) 13. (25) Ana Beatriz, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:40.7720 (223.920) 14. (83) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.8093 (223.868) 15. (9) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.9413 (223.684) 16. (50) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.0144 (223.582) 17. (19) James Jakes, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.0866 (223.482) 18. (4) JR Hildebrand, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:41.1299 ( 223.422) 19. (15) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.1517 (223.392) 20. (99) Townsend Bell, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.3377 (223.134) 21. (18) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.4865 (222.929) 22. (30) Michel Jourdain, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.5124 ( 222.893) 23. (77) Simon Pagenaud, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.5138 ( 222.891) 24. (17) Sebastian Saavedra, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:41.5720 ( 222.811)

NHRA Summer Nationals Pairings based on results In Saturday’s qualifying At Heartland Park Topeka Topeka, Kan. Top Fuel 1. Antron Brown, 3.797 seconds, 324.98 mph vs. 16. Cory McClenathan, 3.914, 309.98; 2. Steve Torrence, 3.801, 320.51 vs. 15. Hillary Will, 3.903, 305.01; 3. Brandon Bernstein, 3.804, 321.35 vs. 14. Terry McMillen, 3.891, 308.14; 4. Shawn Langdon, 3.805, 323.04 vs. 13. Spencer Massey, 3.888, 313.95; 5. Tony Schumacher, 3.818, 321.42 vs. 12. Clay Millican, 3.886, 311.77; 6. Morgan Lucas, 3.824, 320.66 vs. 11. Khalid alBalooshi, 3.869, 311.85; 7. David Grubnic, 3.841, 319.29 vs. 10. Bob Vandergriff, 3.866, 318.77; 8. J.R. Todd, 3.843, 318.69 vs. 9. Doug Kalitta, 3.844, 312.57. Did Not Qualify: 17. Mike Strasburg, 4.104, 282.13; 18. Scott Palmer, 4.125, 254.04; 19. Fred Farndon, 4.316, 181.67; 20. Luigi Novelli, 5.505, 240.72. Funny Car 1. Cruz Pedregon, Toyota Camry, 4.046, 315.56 vs. 16. Todd Lesenko, Chevy Impala, 4.362, 284.27; 2. Bob Tasca III, Ford Mustang, 4.062, 304.60 vs. 15. Bob Bode, Impala, 4.299, 291.45; 3. Mike Neff, Mustang, 4.063, 311.05 vs. 14. Tony Pedregon, Camry, 4.198, 301.20; 4. Ron Capps, Dodge Charger, 4.078, 307.09 vs. 13. Jeff Arend, Camry, 4.150, 300.60; 5. Johnny Gray, Charger, 4.105, 310.13 vs. 12. John Force, Mustang, 4.136, 306.60; 6. Jack Beckman, Charger, 4.105, 308.43 vs. 11. Alexis DeJoria, Toyota Camary, 4.135, 303.91; 7. Matt Hagan, Charger, 4.105, 303.91 vs. 10. Tim Wilkerson, Mustang, 4.130, 303.78; 8. Courtney Force, Mustang, 4.109, 310.13 vs. 9. Robert Hight, Mustang, 4.110, 306.88. Did Not Qualify: 17. Dale Creasy Jr., 4.399, 279.04; 18. Jack Wyatt, 4.437, 260.86; 19. Jim Head, 4.713, 295.85. Pro Stock 1. Allen Johnson, Dodge Avenger, 6.618, 207.85 vs. 16. Ronnie Humphrey, Pontiac GXP, 6.694, 206.26; 2. Greg Anderson, GXP, 6.624, 208.55 vs. 15. Richard Freeman, GXP, 6.682, 206.80; 3. Jason Line, GXP, 6.630, 207.50 vs. 14. Steve Kent, GXP, 6.680, 206.51; 4. Mike Edwards, GXP, 6.641, 207.37 vs. 13. Shane Gray, GXP, 6.673, 205.38; 5. Erica Enders, Chevy Cobalt, 6.643, 206.42 vs. 12. Chris McGaha, Avenger, 6.665, 206.23; 6. V. Gaines, Avenger, 6.645, 207.21 vs. 11. Jeg Coughlin, Avenger, 6.661, 206.70; 7. Vincent Nobile, Avenger, 6.646, 207.75 vs. 10. Kurt Johnson, GXP, 6.660, 206.20; 8. Rodger Brogdon, GXP, 6.650, 206.95 vs. 9. Ron Krisher, GXP, 6.655, 207.21. Did Not Qualify: 17. Mark Martino, 6.695, 205.91; 18. Larry Morgan, 6.698, 205.72; 19. Greg Stanfield, 6.711, 206.16; 20. Warren Johnson, 6.726, 205.91; 21. Jimmy Alund, 6.792, 204.32; 22. Mark Hogan, 6.986, 203.28; 23. Steve Kalkowski, broke.

DEALS Transactions

IndyCar

BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Placed LHP Everett Teaford on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Nate Adcock from Omaha (PCL). National League CHICAGO CUBS—Acquired C Koyie Hill from Cincinnati Reds for cash considerations. Placed C Geovany Soto on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 17. Recalled RHP Randy Wells from Iowa (PCL). LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Placed 2B Mark Ellis on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Ivan DeJesus from Albuquerque (PCL). MIAMI MARLINS—Optioned 1B Gaby Sanchez to New Orleans (PCL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Selected the contract of LHP Juan Perez from Nashville (PCL). Designated RHP Vinnie Chulk for assignment. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Placed OF Mark Kotsay on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 13. Recalled OF Blake Tekotte from Tucson (PCL).

Indianapolis 500 Qualifying Pole Day (Qualifying continues today; race May 27) At Indianapolis Motor Speedway Indianapolis With rank, car number in parentheses, driver, chassisengine, time and speed in parentheses: 1. (2) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:38.9514 (226.484 mph) 2. (27) James Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:38.9537 ( 226.481) 3. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:39.1233 ( 226.240) 4. (26) Marco Andretti, Dallara- Chevrolet, 2:40.6766 ( 225.456) 5. (12) Will Power, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:39.7004 (225.422) 6. (3) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:39.8780 (225.172)

Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Friday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 3,118 349 84 23 The Dalles 4,667 481 4 -1 John Day 4,986 499 11 5 McNary 6,199 256 6 0 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Friday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 143,551 137,852 5,699 3,477 The Dalles 90,598 4,764 1,699 919 John Day 77,832 3,805 1,801 1,204 McNary 63,177 2,050 4,676 2,201

FISH COUNT

NHL PLAYOFFS

Lundqvist, Rangers blank Devils, 3-0, lead 2-1 By Dan Gelston The Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. — In his latest playoff gem, Henrik Lundqvist had little time to do more than stop every breakaway or 2-on-1 attempt New Jersey shot his way. When he took a moment to breathe, Lundqvist had all the confidence his New York Rangers would bail him out with a goal or two. “You know sooner or later it’s going to turn,” he said. “It’s going to turn in our favor.” Unlike those dozens of Devils’ shots, his feeling was right on the mark. Lundqvist had 36 saves, and Dan Girardi, Chris Kreider and Ryan Callahan scored third-period goals to lead the New York Rangers to a 3-0 win

over the New Jersey Devils in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference Finals on Saturday. Girardi and Kreider scored goals only 1 minute, 57 seconds apart early in the third to seize the momentum in a packed building with fans of both teams at a fever pitch, and give New York a 2-1 series lead. Indeed it was a quick span the Devils may long regret, especially after they dominated long stretches of Game 3. “We played a real good hockey game,” Devils coach Peter DeBoer said. “We lost. We gotta find a way to score a goal.” The Rangers did, and they did so in a stretch that would compare to some of coach John Tortorella’s short and not-so-

sweet press conferences. But Tortorella abandoned his normally terse responses to praise his goalie after the win. “He a great competitor,” Tortorella said, “as far as his preparation and as far as what he does for this hockey club.” Lundqvist was busy from the opening faceoff en route to his second shutout of the series and third in the postseason. Callahan iced it with an empty-netter late in the third. Game 4 is Monday in New Jersey. Not even playing on home ice, where they had won four straight, was enough to help New Jersey. The Rangers have won every Game 1, lost each Game 2, and rebounded to win Game 3 in every round this postseason.

Julio Cortez / The Associated Press

New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist, left, makes a stop on a shot by New Jersey Devils’ Ilya Kovalchuk (17) during the second period of Game 3 of the Stanley Cup Eastern Conference final Saturday in Newark, N.J. The Rangers won 3-0.


SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

S  B

So ftball • Beavers stay alive in Norman Regional: With its backs up against the wall and needing a win to keep its reginal hopes alive, the Oregon State softball team delivered another thrilling performance on Saturday afternoon, eliminating Tulsa, 2-1, behind another lockdown effort in the circle by Marina Demore. The Beavers (36-22) dispatched Lehigh earlier in the day, 9-2, and now advance to face host Oklahoma (47-8), the national No. 4 seed, to determine the winner of the Norman Regional today beginning at 11 a.m. PDT. The Sooners, undefeated so far this postseason after beating both Lehigh and Tulsa in the past two days, only need one more win to advance. With a 2-1 record this weekend, Oregon State needs to defeat Oklahoma twice today if it wants to continue its season.

Baseball • Oregon takes series over Seattle: Aaron Jones’ walk-off single drove in Aaron Payne as sixth-ranked Oregon extended its win streak to seven games in a 5-4 victory over Seattle on Saturday at PK Park in Eugene. With the win, Oregon improves to 40-14 on the year, recording the club’s second 40-win season since the program was reinstated (2009). The Ducks also clinched their 11th weekend series win of the year. Jones led Oregon with a two-for-four effort, while Ryon Healy batted two-for-three and recorded his 33rd RBI of the year. Oregon and Seattle conclude the series today at noon. • Late grand slam lifts WSU over Oregon State: P.J. Jones hit a two-out grand slam in the bottom of the ninth inning to send Washington State to a 9-5 win over the 23rd-ranked Oregon State baseball team Saturday at Bailey-Brayton Field in Pullman, Wash. Washington State loaded the bases on an intentional walk to Taylor Ard and OSU reliever Matt Boyd got Derek Jones to foul out to third for the second out of the inning. Jones hit a 1-0 pitch from Boyd over the left center fence to win the game. Tyler Smith had tied the game for the Beavers in the ninth on a two-out double down the left field line. Danny Hayes led the Beavers offensively with three hits and extended his hit streak to eight games in the process. Oregon State and Washington State play the series finale today. First pitch is scheduled for noon.

Soccer • Chelsea takes Champions League: Didier Drogba scored the decisive penalty in the shootout as Chelsea beat Bayern Munich to win the Champions League final after a 1-1 draw on Saturday in Munich. The unlikely storyline of an English team beating a German team on penalties in a high-profile match provided a fitting end to a dramatic night, as Chelsea became Europe’s champion club for the first time.

Tennis • Djokovic, Nadal in final: The defending champion at the Italian Open, Novak Djokovic beat Roger Federer 6-2, 7-6 (4). Five-time winner Nadal eliminated fellow Spaniard David Ferrer 7-6 (6), 6-0 in the other semifinal. Djokovic beat Nadal in last year’s final, and defeated the Spaniard in an epic Australian Open final in January, which at 5 hours, 53 minutes was the longest Grand Slam championship match. Nadal easily won their last meeting in the Monte Carlo final last month when Djokovic was mourning the death of his grandfather. Maria Sharapova defeated rising German player Angelique Kerber 6-3, 6-4 and will defend her title against French Open champion Li Na. The Chinese player advanced after Serena Williams withdrew shortly before their semifinal with a lower back injury.

Cycling • Hesjedal takes back Giro lead: Andrey Amador won the 14th stage of the Giro d’Italia and Ryder Hesjedal took back the overall lead from Joaquin Rodriguez as the race took to the Alps on Saturday. On the first big summit finish of the race, Amador crossed in 5 hours, 33 minutes, 36 seconds, edging out Jan Barta and Alessandro De Marchi on the 128-mile trek from Cherasco to Cervinia. Hesjedal takes back the pink jersey from Rodriguez, who wore it for four successive days. The 15th stage today is similar to the 14th. The 105-mile leg from Busto Arsizio to Lecco and Pian dei Resinelli starts off relatively flat before four categorized climbs. Monday is a rest day. The Giro ends on May 27 in Milan.

Hockey

Mark J. Terrill / The Associated Press

Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin, right, goes up for a dunk as San Antonio Spurs center Tim Duncan defends during the first half in Game 3 of a Western Conference semifinal, Saturday in Los Angeles.

Spurs take 3-0 series lead, rally for win over Clippers The Associated Press LOS ANGELES — Nothing was going to rattle the calm, cool and collected Spurs. Not even a 24-point deficit. Tim Duncan scored 19 points, helping engineer a defining 24-0 run in the third quarter, and San Antonio defeated the Los Angeles Clippers 96-86 on Saturday to take a commanding 3-0 lead in their second-round playoff series. “We didn’t plan on being down that much,” said Duncan, who at 36 is hungry to win the team’s fifth NBA championship and first since 2006-07. “We stuck with it.” Led by Tony Parker’s 23 points and his defense on an ailing Chris Paul, the Spurs kept running their plays even as Blake Griffin’s early offensive assault buried them in a huge hole. Griffin missed three shots in the first half, when he scored 20 points and carried his team to a 24point lead despite a left hip injury and a sprained right knee. “They came out like we expected, very strong. Blake was making crazy shots,” Parker said. “We just took our time. It’s a long game, a very long game. At halftime, we were very calm.” Griffin had 28 points and 16 rebounds, and reserve Mo Williams added 19 points for the Clippers, who face some daunting NBA history heading into Game 4 today at Staples Center. No team has ever rallied from a 3-0 deficit to win a series. “If we don’t play with that sense of urgency, it’s not going to be pretty,” Griffin said. Rookie Kawhi Leonard added 14 points and Manu Ginobili 13 to help the top-seeded Spurs win their 17th in a row and improve to 7-0 in the playoffs. “We all struggled in the first quar-

Olympics • Torch relay begins: British sailing hero Ben Ainslie kicked off the torch relay for the 2012 London Olympics on Saturday in Land’s End, England, with a stroll through teary, flag-waving crowds who cheered the arrival of the flame to Britain. Hundreds held up mobile phones to snap photos as the gold medal winner jauntily walked past. They banged on plastic tambourines handed out by sponsors, creating a roar that shook the hillsides of this picturesque spot — the furthest point west in England.

Football • Air Force running back involved in drug investigation: Asher Clark, the second-leading rusher in Air Force football history, has been removed from the academy less than a week before he was scheduled to graduate, and sources indicated he was removed as part of the academy’s investigation into illegal drug use. Academy spokesman David Cannon said that Clark, a fouryear starter at tailback for the Falcons, was no longer enrolled at the academy. Cannon said he could not say why Clark was no longer at the academy, referring to the Privacy Act. — From wire reports

responding. “I missed some shots I hit in the first half, easy shots.” San Antonio led by 11 points early in the fourth before the Clippers got within seven on consecutive baskets by Williams. Gary Neal hit a three-pointer to launch a 13-9 spurt, capped by Parker’s three-pointer, that extended the Spurs’ lead to 8978. Paul, so dominant in the final period during the regular season, was limited to four points. Reggie Evans, a defensive spark for the Clippers off the bench, missed six of eight free throws in the final 3:42. “They play the same whether they’re up 20 or down 20,” Griffin said of the veteran Spurs. “Their communication and rotations are so good. Offensively, they know exactly what they’re going to do in every situation.” In another game on Saturday: Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Lakers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 LOS ANGELES — Russell Westbrook scored 10 of his 37 points during a stirring fourth-quarter comeback, Kevin Durant added 31 points and hit the tiebreaking three-pointer with 13.7 seconds left, and Oklahoma City seized control of the second-round series with a victory over the Los Angeles Lakers in Game 4. Serge Ibaka scored 14 points for the second-seeded Thunder, who took a 3-1 series lead and moved to the brink of their second straight trip to the Western Conference finals. Oklahoma City improved to 7-1 in the postseason with a tenacious rally on the second night of back-to-back games against the Lakers and Kobe Bryant, who scored 38 points in Los Angeles’ fifth loss in seven games overall. Game 5 is Monday night in Oklahoma City.

Wade, Heat move on after Game 3 By Tom Withers

• Russia faces Slovakia in worlds final: Russia and Slovakia will meet in the world hockey championship final today for the first time since the Slovaks won their only title a decade ago against the Russians. After Evgeni Malkin scored a hat trick to lead Russia to a 6-2 rout of host Finland, and Slovak forward Miroslav Satan scored twice to help beat the Czech Republic 3-1 in the second semifinal on Saturday.

ter. We didn’t feel right out there,” said Duncan, who like his teammates, looked to Parker to pick the team up. “We follow his lead. He stuck with it, made some big shots down the stretch and continued to attack,” Duncan said. “He was playing defense really hard and got up into Chris.” Besides Parker, the Spurs threw two other defenders at Paul. He finished with 12 points and 11 assists after two previous sub-par efforts in the series. “Tony really ran the show well,” Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said. “I’d say, ‘Let’s do this’ and he said, ‘No, let’s do this,’ and we’d do it.” After a quiet first half in which he scored eight points, Duncan helped the Spurs control the third quarter when they outscored Los Angeles 26-8. The Spurs took their first lead during the 24-0 run on a fadeaway jumper by Duncan, who scored nine points in the outburst that put them ahead for good. Danny Green added seven and Leonard five. “We kept telling Kawhi and Danny to stay calm,” Parker said. The Clippers’ defense completely faltered and they piled up miss after miss on the offensive end. “When they spread the floor and Tim Duncan runs a high pick-androll, it’s trouble for a lot of teams,” Griffin said. “That’s basically what killed us in the third. This is what they do best.” The Clippers scored the final four points of the third, which ended with a turnover by Williams, to trail 69-61 heading into the fourth. “You knew they were going to make a run. It was just a matter of trying to withstand it,” Griffin said. “In the second half, especially the third quarter, we did a poor job of

The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — Refreshed in body and spirit, the Miami Heat returned to practice reunited and refocused. There was no looking back. No heartfelt apologies given. No need for a detailed autopsy of Dwyane Wade’s ugly sideline exchange with coach Eric Spoelstra in Game 3. What’s done is done. All that’s for another day. Right now, it’s time to save the season. “We move on,” Wade said. Down 2-1 in the Eastern Conference semifinals to the ready-torumble Indiana Pacers, the Heat were back on the floor Saturday after staying away from Bankers Life Fieldhouse for a day to decompress following their stunning 94-75 loss, a defeat amplified by the clash between Wade and Spoelstra during a timeout in the third quarter. On Friday, Wade drove to Bloomington, Ind., and visited Indiana coach Tom Crean, his college coach for three years at Marquette. LeBron James went to the movies, catching “The Dictator.” Spoelstra joked that he locked away the keys to the team bus so players couldn’t get to the arena. “We wanted to get away,” Spoelstra said as his team prepared for today’s Game 4. Wade, who scored just five points on two-of-13 shooting and had five turnovers in Thursday’s blowout,

Next up NBA playoffs, Eastern conference semifinals, Miami Heat at Indiana Pacers • When: Today, 12:30 p.m. • TV: ABC

insists that any apparent problems with Spoelstra were overblown. He downplayed their fiery spat. “Things happen,” said Wade, who refused to acknowledge his quarrel with Spoelstra following the game. “In a perfect world a lot of things would go differently, but it’s not a perfect world. A lot of stuff in our game is in the heat of the battle, emotional-type things. When something happens, it happens and we move on as a team. “Me and coach have been together for nine years in some capacity. We’ve had many different conversations, some like that and some not. It wasn’t the first, it won’t the last. We know how to move on from things and we know each other wants the best for each other.” “There’s no harm done. We’re a family.” Spoelstra knows the dispute didn’t look good to the outside world, but it’s just part of professional sports. “Your communication sometimes is not for everybody’s living room, but it’s normal in our living room,” he said. “We’ve moved well beyond that. Dwyane and I have been to-

gether for a long time, nine or 10 years. That’s the least of our concerns the last two days.” With an aggressive approach on both ends of the floor, the Pacers have won the past two games to put the Heat in an unforeseen hole and place their title hopes in serious danger. A win today would put Indiana up 3-1 and send the panic meter to code red in south Florida. James, though, believes the Heat can even the series. “We’re a confident bunch,” the MVP said. “We’ve got a veteran ballclub. We didn’t play well in Game 3, so we have an opportunity to go out and make amends and try to bring it back to our house with the series tied 2-2.” The Pacers expect Wade to be back on his game today. Although he’s struggling with leg issues, Wade is still one of the game’s top players and has the ability to score in bunches. So his players wouldn’t forget how dangerous Wade can be, Indiana coach Frank Vogel gave them some video reminders before practice. “We showed clips of him torching us in previous games, making shots that he’s been missing in this series,” Vogel said. “Dwyane Wade has not been the normal Dwyane Wade we’re all used to seeing. We understand the threats that are there and I’ve made sure they leave here understanding that this team can beat us.”

www.smolichmotors.com

NBA PLAYOFFS ROUNDUP

B3


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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

MAJ O R LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

Boxscores Pirates 4, Tigers 3 Pittsburgh Tabata rf J.Harrison 2b A.McCutchen cf P.Alvarez 3b Walker dh Barajas c McGehee 1b Navarro lf McLouth lf Barmes ss Totals

AB 5 3 4 3 4 4 4 3 1 4 35

R 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H 1 1 2 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 9

BI 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

American League SO 0 1 0 3 1 3 1 2 0 1 12

Avg. .234 .261 .346 .205 .261 .216 .198 .175 .154 .153

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kelly cf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .196 Dirks lf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .351 Mi.Cabrera 3b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .309 Fielder 1b 5 1 2 2 0 1 .303 D.Young dh 4 0 2 0 0 0 .244 Avila c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .218 Boesch rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .244 Jh.Peralta ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .262 R.Santiago 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .183 Totals 36 3 10 2 4 6 Pittsburgh 200 020 000 — 4 9 0 Detroit 002 000 100 — 3 10 0 LOB—Pittsburgh 7, Detroit 10. 2B—Dirks (6), D.Young (9). HR—A.McCutchen 2 (7), off Smyly 2; Fielder (7), off A.J.Burnett. SB—Kelly (1). DP—Pittsburgh 1.

Baltimore Tampa Bay Toronto New York Boston

W 27 25 23 21 19

L 14 16 18 19 21

Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City Minnesota

W 23 20 19 16 14

L 17 21 21 23 26

Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 25 20 18 18

L 16 21 23 24

East Division Pct GB WCGB .659 — — .610 2 — .561 4 — .525 5½ 1½ .475 7½ 3½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .575 — — .488 3½ 3 .475 4 3½ .410 6½ 6 .350 9 8½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .610 — — .488 5 3 .439 7 5 .429 7½ 5½

Saturday’s Games Cincinnati 6, N.Y. Yankees 5 Toronto 2, N.Y. Mets 0 Cleveland 2, Miami 0 San Francisco 4, Oakland 0 Pittsburgh 4, Detroit 3 Tampa Bay 5, Atlanta 2 Minnesota 5, Milwaukee 4, 11 innings

Str Home Away W-5 12-9 15-5 W-1 15-5 10-11 W-4 12-9 11-9 L-1 12-9 9-10 W-1 9-11 10-10

L10 6-4 6-4 4-6 6-4 6-4

Str Home Away W-1 11-11 12-6 W-3 7-12 13-9 L-1 10-12 9-9 W-1 5-16 11-7 W-4 6-14 8-12

L10 5-5 4-6 5-5 4-6

Str Home Away L-1 11-9 14-7 L-2 9-10 11-11 L-1 11-10 7-13 W-2 7-8 11-16

Seattle 10, Colorado 3 Kansas City 7, Arizona 3 Baltimore 6, Washington 5 Boston 7, Philadelphia 5 Chicago White Sox 7, Chicago Cubs 4 Houston 6, Texas 5 San Diego 3, L.A. Angels 2 L.A. Dodgers 6, St. Louis 0

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2

H 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 6

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

SO 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 2 7

Avg. .328 .318 .268 .269 .260 .248 .226 .306 .275

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Zobrist rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .214 B.Upton cf 3 1 2 0 1 0 .275 Joyce lf 3 1 1 4 1 2 .294 C.Pena 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .218 Scott dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .238 S.Rodriguez 3b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .248 Rhymes 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .265 E.Johnson ss 2 1 1 0 1 0 .292 Gimenez c 2 1 1 0 1 0 .218 Totals 25 5 6 5 8 3 Atlanta 020 000 000 — 2 6 0 Tampa Bay 004 001 00x — 5 6 1 E—Rhymes (3). LOB—Atlanta 5, Tampa Bay 5. 2B—Uggla (9). HR—Joyce (8), off Delgado; S.Rodriguez (4), off C.Martinez. RBIs—J.Francisco (11), Hinske (8), Joyce 4 (23), S.Rodriguez (13). SB—Bourn (13), B.Upton 2 (9). CS—B.Upton (1), Rhymes (1). S—S.Rodriguez. SF—Hinske. DP—Atlanta 2; Tampa Bay 2. Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Delgado L, 2-4 4 3 4 4 5 2 84 4.26 C.Martinez 2 1-3 3 1 1 1 1 38 4.24 O’Flaherty 1 0 0 0 1 0 10 4.80 Durbin 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 11 6.75 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cobb W, 1-0 7 6 2 2 2 6 113 2.57 Jo.Peralta H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 5.09 Rodney S, 13-13 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.46 T—2:48. A—27,433 (34,078).

Giants 4, Athletics 0 Oakland J.Weeks 2b Pennington ss Reddick cf-rf J.Gomes lf Blackley p S.Smith rf-lf Donaldson 3b Barton 1b K.Suzuki c T.Ross p Balfour p Cowgill cf b-Ka’aihue ph Totals

AB 4 3 3 3 0 3 3 2 2 2 0 0 1 26

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 7

Avg. .200 .218 .270 .235 --.240 .125 .211 .224 .000 --.129 .264

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. G.Blanco rf 2 1 1 0 2 1 .282 B.Crawford ss 4 0 2 0 0 2 .233 Me.Cabrera lf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .337 Posey c 3 1 1 1 1 0 .302 Pagan cf 4 0 2 2 0 0 .304 Belt 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .253 Arias 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .238 Burriss 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .210 Vogelsong p 1 1 0 0 1 1 .000 Ja.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Pill ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Hensley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 29 4 10 4 5 6 Oakland 000 000 000 — 0 1 0 San Francisco 000 000 40x — 4 10 0 a-flied out for Ja.Lopez in the 8th. b-grounded into a double play for Cowgill in the 9th. LOB—Oakland 1, San Francisco 8. 2B—Posey (7). DP—Oakland 4; San Francisco 2. Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Ross L, 2-4 6 7 2 2 4 4 108 5.73 Balfour 2-3 2 2 2 1 1 17 4.50 Blackley 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 13 0.00 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Vogelsong W, 2-2 7 1 0 0 1 5 97 2.27 Ja.Lopez 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 1.04 Hensley 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 2.35 T.Ross pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. T—2:49. A—41,411 (41,915).

Mariners 10, Rockies 3 Seattle Ackley 2b C.Wells lf I.Suzuki rf J.Montero c Seager 3b Liddi 1b M.Saunders cf Ryan ss Vargas p Kelley p b-Figgins ph Delabar p Totals

AB 5 4 5 4 4 5 4 5 3 0 1 0 40

R 1 1 2 1 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 10

H 1 2 1 3 3 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 14

BI 2 2 0 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9

BB 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 5

SO 2 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 2 0 1 0 9

Avg. .252 .238 .281 .259 .292 .243 .235 .162 .333 --.180 ---

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Scutaro 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .253 Colvin rf-lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .299 C.Gonzalez lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .294 J.Herrera ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Tulowitzki ss 1 0 0 0 1 1 .268 Giambi 1b 1 1 1 0 1 0 .296 Cuddyer 1b-rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Pacheco 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .250 W.Rosario c 3 1 1 2 0 0 .215 Fowler cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Rogers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Ra.Hernandez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .230 Brothers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Outman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Friedrich p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 E.Young cf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .304 Totals 31 3 5 3 2 3 Seattle 022 104 010 — 10 14 0 Colorado 000 000 300 — 3 5 0 a-grounded out for Rogers in the 7th. b-struck out for Kelley in the 9th. LOB—Seattle 8, Colorado 3. 2B—Ackley (8), M.Saunders (11), Giambi (2). 3B—Ryan (1). HR— Seager (5), off Friedrich; W.Rosario (6), off Vargas. DP—Seattle 1; Colorado 1. Seattle Vargas W, 5-3 Kelley Delabar Colorado

IP 7 1 1 IP

H 5 0 0 H

L 16 17 19 19 20

St. Louis Cincinnati Pittsburgh Houston Milwaukee Chicago

W 22 20 19 18 16 15

L 18 19 21 22 24 25

Los Angeles San Francisco Arizona Colorado San Diego

W 27 21 18 15 15

L 13 19 23 24 26

East Division Pct GB WCGB .610 — — .575 1½ — .525 3½ — .525 3½ — .512 4 ½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .550 — — .513 1½ ½ .475 3 2 .450 4 3 .400 6 5 .375 7 6 West Division Pct GB WCGB .675 — — .525 6 — .439 9½ 3½ .385 11½ 5½ .366 12½ 6½

L10 6-4 5-5 6-4 4-6 7-3

Str L-1 L-3 L-1 L-2 L-1

Home Away 10-7 15-9 14-8 9-9 9-7 12-12 12-8 9-11 10-10 11-10

L10 3-7 5-5 5-5 4-6 3-7 3-7

Str Home Away L-3 9-8 13-10 W-1 9-8 11-11 W-1 10-8 9-13 W-1 13-9 5-13 L-4 9-11 7-13 L-5 9-14 6-11

L10 8-2 6-4 4-6 3-7 4-6

Str Home Away W-3 18-4 9-9 W-3 12-9 9-10 L-1 7-12 11-11 L-3 9-13 6-11 W-1 11-16 4-10

Arizona (Miley 4-1) at Kansas City (Adcock 0-1), 11:10 a.m. Minnesota (Marquis 2-3) at Milwaukee (Greinke 4-1), 11:10 a.m. Chicago White Sox (Peavy 4-1) at Chicago Cubs (Maholm 4-2), 11:20 a.m. Seattle (Beavan 1-4) at Colorado (Guthrie 2-1), 12:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 2-6) at San Diego (Bass 2-4), 1:05 p.m. Oakland (Colon 3-4) at San Francisco (Lincecum 2-3), 1:05 p.m. St. Louis (Lohse 5-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 2-3), 5:05 p.m.

MLB roundup

Rays 5, Braves 2 AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 1 3 31

Atlanta Washington Miami New York Philadelphia

W 25 23 21 21 21

Today’s Games Cincinnati (Cueto 4-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 5-1), 10:05 a.m. Miami (Jo.Johnson 1-3) at Cleveland (D.Lowe 6-1), 10:05 a.m. Pittsburgh (Correia 1-4) at Detroit (Scherzer 2-3), 10:05 a.m. N.Y. Mets (Gee 2-3) at Toronto (H.Alvarez 3-3), 10:07 a.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 4-0) at Washington (Strasburg 3-1), 10:35 a.m. Boston (Beckett 3-4) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 0-1), 10:35 a.m. Atlanta (T.Hudson 2-1) at Tampa Bay (Price 6-2), 10:40 a.m. Texas (Lewis 3-3) at Houston (Lyles 00), 11:05 a.m.

Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A.J.Burnett W, 2-2 6 7 2 2 3 2 106 4.78 Grilli H, 10 1 2 1 0 0 1 16 2.25 J.Cruz H, 7 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.56 Hanrahan S, 9-10 1 0 0 0 1 2 22 3.07 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Smyly L, 1-1 4 2-3 7 4 4 2 6 92 2.89 Villarreal 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 3 23 0.00 Coke 1 2 0 0 0 2 18 4.67 Benoit 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.70 T—3:06. A—42,953 (41,255).

Atlanta Bourn cf Prado lf Freeman 1b Uggla 2b McCann c Heyward rf J.Francisco 3b Hinske dh Pastornicky ss Totals

Astros 6, Rangers 5

National League

L10 7-3 5-5 6-4 5-5 7-3

R 3 0 0 R

ER BB SO NP 3 1 1 94 0 0 1 14 0 1 1 18 ER BB SO NP

ERA 3.34 4.26 5.12 ERA

• Reds 6, Yankees 5: NEW YORK — Joey Votto hit a three-run homer, Jose Arredondo worked out of a ninth-inning jam for his first major league save and Cincinnati held off the New York Yankees. • Blue Jays 2, Mets 0: TORONTO — Brandon Morrow pitched his second shutout in four starts, blanking the Mets on three hits and leading Toronto over New York. • Pirates 4, Tigers 3: DETROIT — Andrew McCutchen hit a pair of two-run homers and A.J. Burnett pitched six solid innings to lead Pittsburgh to a win over Detroit. • Indians 2, Marlins 0: CLEVELAND — Jeanmar Gomez pitched three-hit ball into the seventh inning and Asdrubal Cabrera homered to lead Cleveland past Miami. • Giants 4, Athletics 0: SAN FRANCISCO — Ryan Vogelsong allowed one hit in seven scoreless innings and played a key role in San Francisco’s go-ahead rally as the Giants beat Oakland for the 11th straight time at home. • Twins 5, Brewers 4: MILWAUKEE — Trevor Plouffe hit a solo home run in the top of the 11th inning to lift Minnesota over Milwaukee. • Rays 5, Braves 2: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Alex Cobb won his first start of the season, Matt Joyce hit a grand slam and Tampa Bay beat Atlanta. • Mariners 10, Rockies 3: DENVER — Jason Vargas threw seven strong innings, Kyle Seager homered and drove in three runs, and Seattle beat free-falling Colorado.

Friedrich L, 1-1 5 9 8 8 4 Rogers 2 3 1 1 0 Brothers 1 2 1 0 1 Outman 1 0 0 0 0 Friedrich pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. T—2:42. A—30,784 (50,398).

3 3 1 2

100 5.00 32 8.10 22 5.87 8 15.00

Indians 2, Marlins 0 Miami Reyes ss Infante 2b H.Ramirez 3b Dobbs rf Stanton dh Morrison lf G.Sanchez 1b Petersen cf J.Buck c Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 2 2 3 3 3 28

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 3

• Red Sox 7, Phillies 5: PHILADELPHIA — David Ortiz homered, singled and drove in two runs to lead Boston to a win over Philadelphia, snapping the Phillies’ six-game winning streak. • Astros 6, Rangers 5: HOUSTON — Justin Maxwell hit one of Houston’s season-high three homers to put his team on top in the fifth inning and the Astros held on for a win over Texas. • Orioles 6, Nationals 5: WASHINGTON — Adam Jones and Nick Markakis hit two-run homers and Baltimore matched a season high with its fifth straight win, beating Washington. • White Sox 7, Cubs 4: CHICAGO — John Danks pitched shutout ball into the seventh for his first win in nearly a month and Dayan Viciedo, A.J. Pierzynski and Adam Dunn homered as the Chicago White Sox beat the Chicago Cubs. • Royals 7, Diamondbacks 3: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Billy Butler and Mike Moustakas homered, Bruce Chen won his third straight start and Kansas City beat Arizona. • Padres 3, Angels 2: SAN DIEGO — Alexi Amarista scored San Diego’s first two runs against his former team and then doubled in the go-ahead run off Dan Haren in the seventh inning to lead the Padres to a victory against the Los Angeles Angels. • Dodgers 6, Cardinals 0: LOS ANGELES — Clayton Kershaw outdueled Jake Westbrook with a six-hitter for his fourth career shutout, leading the Los Angeles Dodgers over St. Louis.

New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova L, 4-2 6 7 5 5 2 12 103 5.69 Eppley 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 9 3.52 Rapada 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 3.75 Phelps 2 1 1 0 1 3 40 2.76 T—3:15. A—45,302 (50,291).

Blue Jays 2, Mets 0 BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2

SO 0 2 1 1 0 2 0 0 2 8

Avg. .242 .326 .233 .236 .277 .248 .197 .182 .186

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .266 Kipnis 2b 3 0 0 1 0 1 .263 A.Cabrera ss 3 1 1 1 1 0 .316 Hafner dh 2 0 0 0 1 0 .246 C.Santana c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .261 Brantley cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Jo.Lopez 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .233 Kotchman 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .211 Duncan lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .202 Cunningham lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .213 Totals 28 2 7 2 2 5 Miami 000 000 000 — 0 3 0 Cleveland 000 110 00x — 2 7 0 LOB—Miami 4, Cleveland 6. HR—A.Cabrera (5), off A.Sanchez. RBIs—Kipnis (24), A.Cabrera (18). SF—Kipnis. DP—Miami 2; Cleveland 2.

New York A.Torres cf Baxter dh Dan.Murphy 2b Duda rf I.Davis 1b Turner 3b Nieuwenhuis lf Cedeno ss Nickeas c a-Hairston ph Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 2 0 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

SO 1 0 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 0 8

Avg. .212 .351 .323 .273 .160 .204 .276 .211 .163 .257

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. K.Johnson 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .263 Y.Escobar ss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .259 Bautista rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .204 Encarnacion 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .271 Arencibia dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .250 Thames lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .258 R.Davis cf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .265 Y.Gomes 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .375 Vizquel 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .095 Mathis c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .207 Totals 30 2 6 2 2 8 New York 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 Toronto 000 020 00x — 2 6 0 a-walked for Nickeas in the 9th. E—A.Torres (2). LOB—New York 3, Toronto 6. 2B—Duda (5), K.Johnson (2), Y.Escobar (6), Encarnacion (10).

Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A.Sanchez L, 2-2 7 7 2 2 2 4 110 2.32 Mujica 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 3.86 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Gomez W, 3-2 6 1-3 3 0 0 2 4 105 3.19 J.Smith H, 6 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.95 Pestano H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.70 C.Perez S, 13-14 1 0 0 0 0 3 10 3.31 T—2:26. A—29,799 (43,429).

New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Batista 2 1 0 0 1 2 39 3.95 Hefner L, 0-1 5 4 2 2 0 5 65 2.25 Byrdak 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 3.18 Rauch 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 18 4.15 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morrow W, 5-2 9 3 0 0 1 8 107 2.63 T—2:12. A—34,962 (49,260).

Reds 6, Yankees 5

Twins 5, Brewers 4 (11 innings)

Cincinnati Heisey lf Stubbs cf Votto 1b B.Phillips 2b Bruce rf Frazier 3b Cozart ss Costanzo dh Mesoraco c Valdez ss-3b Totals

AB 5 3 3 4 3 4 0 3 3 4 32

R 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 6

H 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 8

BI 1 0 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 6

BB 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 2 2 1 1 3 2 0 2 0 2 15

Avg. .270 .235 .308 .260 .277 .275 .230 .143 .222 .195

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jeter ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .355 Granderson cf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .256 Cano dh 4 1 0 0 0 2 .302 Al.Rodriguez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Ibanez rf-lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .264 Swisher 1b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .260 Martin c 4 1 1 1 0 2 .170 Wise lf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .118 a-Er.Chavez ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .288 1-An.Jones pr-rf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .224 J.Nix 2b 4 1 3 2 0 0 .263 Totals 37 5 11 5 1 10 Cincinnati 110 030 010 — 6 8 0 New York 001 110 002 — 5 11 1 a-singled for Wise in the 7th. 1-ran for Er.Chavez in the 7th. E—Phelps (2). LOB—Cincinnati 5, New York 6. 2B—Heisey (6), Mesoraco (2), Ibanez 2 (7). HR— Votto (7), off Nova; Martin (4), off H.Bailey; J.Nix (2), off H.Bailey. SB—Stubbs (7), Jeter (3). DP—New York 1. Cincinnati H.Bailey W, 2-3 Ondrusek H, 4 Chapman H, 6 Marshall H, 2 Arredondo S, 1-1

IP 6 1-3 2-3 1 1-3 2-3

H 7 0 0 4 0

R 3 0 0 2 0

ER BB SO NP 3 1 7 97 0 0 0 10 0 0 2 17 2 0 1 20 0 0 0 7

ERA 4.34 2.65 0.00 5.02 2.29

Minnesota Span cf Revere rf Willingham lf Morneau 1b Dozier ss A.Casilla 2b Gray p Capps p Butera c J.Carroll 3b-2b Pavano p a-Doumit ph 1-Komatsu pr Duensing p d-Mauer ph Burton p Perkins p Plouffe 3b Totals

AB 5 4 4 3 3 5 0 0 5 4 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 37

R 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

H 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8

BI 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

BB 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .299 .321 .289 .244 .286 .230 ----.360 .231 .000 .264 .226 --.275 ----.147

Milwaukee Hart rf Morgan cf Braun lf Ar.Ramirez 3b Lucroy c R.Weeks 2b Green 1b b-Aoki ph Fr.Rodriguez p Axford p e-C.Izturis ph-ss Maysonet ss M.Parra p Gallardo p Loe p J.Perez p Veras p c-Conrad ph-1b f-Kottaras ph-1b Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 4 5 2 1 0 0 2 4 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 42

R 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H 2 3 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

BI 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 3 1 1 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 14

Avg. .257 .211 .319 .218 .330 .154 .227 .295 ----.212 .200 .000 .059 ------.000 .257

Minnesota 000 101 110 01 — 5 8 0 Milwaukee 000 101 020 00 — 4 9 2 a-was intentionally walked for Pavano in the 7th. bstruck out for Green in the 7th. c-popped out for Veras in the 7th. d-grounded into a double play for Duensing in the 8th. e-struck out for Axford in the 9th. f-struck out for Conrad in the 10th. 1-ran for Doumit in the 7th. E—Hart (2), R.Weeks (5). LOB—Minnesota 8, Milwaukee 6. 2B—Revere 2 (3), Butera (3), Hart (13). HR—Plouffe (4), off M.Parra; Ar.Ramirez (3), off Burton. SB—Revere (2), Morgan 2 (5), Lucroy (2). DP—Milwaukee 2. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pavano 6 5 2 2 1 6 86 4.91 Duensing H, 5 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 1.80 Burton BS, 1-1 1 2 2 2 0 2 25 4.60 Perkins 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 4.24 Gray W, 3-0 1 2 0 0 0 2 16 2.00 Capps S, 9-9 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 3.38 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo 6 3 2 1 3 3 108 4.62 Loe 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 9 2.65 J.Perez 0 0 0 0 1 0 9 Veras 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 14 6.27 Fr.Rodriguez 1 3 1 1 0 0 19 5.19 Axford 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.73 M.Parra L, 0-1 2 1 1 1 0 0 23 3.10 J.Perez pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. T—3:45. A—42,398 (41,900).

Orioles 6, Nationals 5 Baltimore Andino 2b Hardy ss Markakis rf Ad.Jones cf Wieters c Betemit 1b Tolleson 3b Flaherty 3b Avery lf Hammel p Ayala p Patton p Strop p e-N.Johnson ph Ji.Johnson p Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 0 3 2 0 0 0 1 0 34

R.Hill p Aceves p Totals

T—3:01. A—42,331 (41,487).

R 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

H 2 2 1 3 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 10

BI 2 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .269 .259 .258 .310 .243 .227 .308 .152 .286 .000 ------.179 ---

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lombardozzi 2b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .324 Harper rf-cf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .230 Zimmerman 3b 5 2 3 1 0 1 .250 LaRoche 1b 4 1 0 0 1 2 .313 Desmond ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .271 Ankiel cf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .242 c-Nady ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .145 Maldonado c 3 0 0 1 1 1 .000 Bernadina lf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .226 Detwiler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-T.Moore ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .200 Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Tracy ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .279 Perry p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Espinosa ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .207 H.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 36 5 10 5 3 8 Baltimore 022 020 000 — 6 10 0 Washington 000 013 001 — 5 10 0 a-singled for Detwiler in the 5th. b-flied out for Stammen in the 6th. c-grounded out for Ankiel in the 8th. d-lined out for Perry in the 8th. e-grounded out for Strop in the 9th. LOB—Baltimore 4, Washington 8. 2B—Andino (5), Avery (3), Zimmerman (6), Desmond (12), Ankiel (7). 3B—Hardy (1). HR—Ad.Jones (14), off Detwiler; Markakis (8), off Detwiler; Zimmerman (2), off Ji.Johnson. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hammel W, 5-1 5 1-3 6 4 4 2 5 94 3.12 Ayala H, 5 1 2-3 3 0 0 0 2 25 1.64 Patton H, 3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.34 Strop H, 7 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 11 1.14 Ji.Johnson S, 15-15 1 1 1 1 0 1 21 0.92 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Detwiler L, 3-3 5 9 6 6 1 3 79 3.65 Stammen 1 1 0 0 0 3 14 1.57 Perry 2 0 0 0 0 1 22 10.80 H.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.08 Ayala pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.

Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Hamilton cf-rf Beltre 3b M.Young 1b Dav.Murphy lf c-B.Snyder ph-lf N.Cruz rf M.Lowe p Napoli c D.Holland p a-Moreland ph Ogando p d-Gentry ph-cf Totals

AB 5 4 3 4 4 3 1 4 0 3 2 1 0 1 35

R 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

H 0 2 0 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 9

BI 0 0 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

SO 4 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 10

Avg. .278 .323 .384 .317 .276 .272 .333 .264 --.244 .000 .277 --.323

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schafer cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .254 Bogusevic rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .313 Maxwell rf-cf 2 2 1 2 2 0 .235 Ca.Lee 1b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .294 Lowrie ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .274 M.Downs 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .173 Myers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --J.D.Martinez lf 3 1 1 0 1 2 .221 C.Snyder c 3 1 1 1 1 1 .186 Harrell p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .188 Abad p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-T.Buck ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .259 W.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --W.Wright p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lyon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --M.Gonzalez 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .226 Totals 31 6 7 6 4 9 Texas 004 000 100 — 5 9 2 Houston 001 221 00x — 6 7 1 a-struck out for D.Holland in the 6th. b-doubled for Abad in the 6th. c-singled for Dav.Murphy in the 8th. d-flied out for Ogando in the 8th. E—Napoli (3), D.Holland (2), Lowrie (4). LOB— Texas 7, Houston 5. 2B—J.D.Martinez (5), T.Buck (5). 3B—Andrus (2). HR—Dav.Murphy (4), off Harrell; C.Snyder (2), off D.Holland; Ca.Lee (4), off D.Holland; Maxwell (2), off D.Holland. SB—Hamilton (4), Maxwell (1). DP—Houston 1. Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA D.Holland L, 3-3 5 5 5 5 2 6 100 4.27 Ogando 2 2 1 1 2 2 35 1.13 M.Lowe 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.57 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harrell W, 3-3 5 2-3 5 4 1 3 6 109 4.09 Abad H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 4.32 W.Lopez H, 4 1 2 1 1 0 2 19 1.85 W.Wright 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 2.70 Lyon H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 1.76 Myers S, 10-11 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 1.93 W.Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. W.Wright pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—2:58. A—42,673 (40,981).

Royals 7, Diamondbacks 3 Arizona Bloomquist ss A.Hill 2b J.Upton rf M.Montero c C.Young cf Kubel lf Goldschmidt 1b Ransom dh a-Overbay ph-dh R.Roberts 3b Totals

AB 5 5 3 2 4 3 4 3 1 4 34

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 3

H 2 1 1 0 1 2 3 0 0 1 11

BI 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 3

BB 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 5

Avg. .260 .233 .237 .260 .383 .303 .241 .269 .327 .233

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dyson cf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .277 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .176 Butler dh 3 1 1 3 0 2 .301 A.Gordon lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .237 Francoeur rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .235 Moustakas 3b 4 3 2 1 0 0 .298 B.Pena c 4 0 3 0 0 0 .265 Getz 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .272 A.Escobar ss 3 2 2 0 1 0 .304 Totals 32 7 11 7 2 6 Arizona 000 000 210 — 3 11 0 Kansas City 012 121 00x — 7 11 0 LOB—Arizona 8, Kansas City 5. 2B—Kubel (11), Goldschmidt (8), R.Roberts (5). HR—Butler (8), off I.Kennedy; Moustakas (6), off I.Kennedy. SB—J.Upton (7). DP—Kansas City 3. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA I.Kennedy L, 3-4 4 1-3 8 6 6 1 3 83 4.47 Zagurski 1 2-3 2 1 1 1 2 30 5.40 Collmenter 2 1 0 0 0 1 33 7.18 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA B.Chen W, 3-4 6 1-3 8 2 2 2 4 100 4.17 Crow 2-3 2 1 1 0 0 9 3.26 Mijares 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 12 2.60 G.Holland H, 2 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 8.31 Broxton 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.30 Crow pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—2:54. A—27,469 (37,903).

White Sox 7, Cubs 4 Chicago (A) De Aza cf H.Santiago p Z.Stewart p Beckham 2b A.Dunn 1b Viciedo lf Pierzynski c Rios rf Al.Ramirez ss E.Escobar 3b Danks p N.Jones p b-Lillibridge ph-cf Totals

AB 4 0 0 5 1 5 5 3 4 4 3 0 1 35

R 1 0 0 0 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 7

H 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 10

BI 1 0 0 0 1 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 7

BB 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

SO 1 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 8

Avg. .284 ----.206 .246 .248 .301 .267 .213 .146 .000 --.158

Chicago (N) AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Re.Johnson cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .211 Barney 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .277 S.Castro ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .315 LaHair 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .311 A.Soriano lf 4 1 3 2 0 0 .269 Je.Baker rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .212 Mather 3b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .250 K.Hill c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Dempster p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Campana ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .321 Camp p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Russell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --B.Parker p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bowden p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Cardenas ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .077 C.Coleman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 34 4 9 4 1 5 Chicago (A) 103 000 030 — 7 10 0 Chicago (N) 000 000 004 — 4 9 1 a-singled for Dempster in the 6th. b-struck out for N.Jones in the 8th. c-grounded out for Bowden in the 8th. E—Mather (1). LOB—Chicago (A) 7, Chicago (N) 4. 2B—Pierzynski (5), A.Soriano (8). HR—Viciedo (7), off Dempster; Pierzynski (6), off Dempster; A.Dunn (13), off Russell; A.Soriano (3), off Z.Stewart; Mather (3), off Z.Stewart. SB—De Aza (8). DP—Chicago (A) 2; Chicago (N) 2. Chicago (A) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Danks W, 3-4 6 1-3 3 0 0 1 4 83 5.70 N.Jones 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 3 1.33 H.Santiago 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 4.20 Z.Stewart 1 4 4 4 0 1 24 4.73 Chicago (N) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Dempster L, 0-2 6 7 4 4 3 3 90 2.28 Camp 1 0 0 0 0 2 21 3.27 Russell 1-3 3 3 2 1 0 17 2.08 B.Parker 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 8 0.00 Bowden 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 6.48 C.Coleman 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 3.86 Inherited runners-scored—B.Parker 3-0, Bowden 3-1. T—2:51. A—40,228 (41,009).

Red Sox 7, Phillies 5 Boston AB R Aviles ss 5 1 Pedroia 2b 5 1 Ortiz 1b 5 1 Byrd cf 0 0 Ad.Gonzalez rf-1b 4 0 Middlebrooks 3b 4 1 Saltalamacchia c 4 2 Sweeney cf-rf 3 1 Nava lf 4 0 Lester p 2 0 Padilla p 1 0

H 1 1 2 0 0 2 3 1 1 0 0

BI 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 1 0

Avg. .272 .302 .344 .280 .266 .277 .283 .311 .345 .000 .000

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 37 7 11 6 0 8

-----

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 5 0 1 1 0 1 .227 Mayberry lf 4 1 3 0 1 0 .257 Victorino cf 5 0 3 1 0 0 .251 Pence rf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .261 Ruiz c 4 1 0 0 0 1 .358 Wigginton 3b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .260 Luna 1b 5 1 3 1 0 1 .417 Galvis 2b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .242 Blanton p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .071 Valdes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Polanco ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .279 Savery p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Pierre ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .327 Contreras p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 40 5 15 5 2 5 Boston 120 220 000 — 7 11 1 Philadelphia 001 300 010 — 5 15 2 a-grounded into a double play for Valdes in the 6th. b-grounded out for Savery in the 8th. E—Lester (1), Blanton 2 (3). LOB—Boston 5, Philadelphia 11. 2B—Saltalamacchia (10), Sweeney (14), Victorino (6). HR—Aviles (7), off Blanton; Middlebrooks (5), off Blanton; Saltalamacchia (6), off Blanton; Ortiz (9), off Blanton; Galvis (3), off Lester. SB—Rollins (9). S—Sweeney, Lester. DP—Boston 3; Philadelphia 1. Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester W, 3-3 6 8 4 4 1 3 90 3.95 Padilla H, 7 1 1-3 4 1 1 0 1 31 5.71 R.Hill H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 1.08 Aceves S, 9-11 1 1-3 3 0 0 1 1 23 4.91 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blanton L, 4-4 4 1-3 9 7 6 0 4 102 3.74 Valdes 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 25 0.00 Savery 2 1 0 0 0 1 28 3.60 Contreras 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 7.20 T—3:11. A—45,656 (43,651).

Padres 3, Angels 2 Los Angeles AB R Trout lf-cf 4 0 Bourjos cf 1 0 b-M.Izturis ph-2b 1 0 Pujols 1b 4 0 Trumbo rf 4 0 H.Kendrick 2b 3 1 Walden p 0 0 Callaspo 3b 4 0 Aybar ss 4 1 Hester c 2 0 d-K.Morales ph 1 0 Haren p 1 0 Takahashi p 0 0 Langerhans lf 1 0 Totals 30 2

H 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 6

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 7

Avg. .333 .200 .263 .216 .352 .254 --.240 .221 .250 .294 .000 --.000

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Venable rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .258 Maybin cf 3 0 1 2 0 0 .210 Headley 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .248 Alonso 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .287 Guzman lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .260 Cashner p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Parrino ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .162 Thayer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hundley c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .170 E.Cabrera ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Amarista 2b 2 2 2 1 1 0 .375 Stults p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Denorfia ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .271 Totals 27 3 7 3 2 6 Los Angeles 010 010 000 — 2 6 1 San Diego 001 010 10x — 3 7 2 a-struck out for Gregerson in the 7th. b-struck out for Bourjos in the 8th. c-struck out for Cashner in the 8th. d-struck out for Hester in the 9th. E—Trumbo (5), Hundley (2), E.Cabrera (1). LOB—Los Angeles 7, San Diego 6. 2B—Aybar (6), Headley (10), Guzman (10), Amarista (1). 3B—Aybar (2). SB—Pujols (1), Aybar (3). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP Haren L, 1-5 6 2-3 6 3 3 1 5 85 Takahashi 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 Walden 1 1 0 0 1 1 21 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP Stults 6 2-3 4 2 2 3 2 97 Gregerson W, 1-0 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 Cashner H, 6 1 1 0 0 0 3 18 Thayer S, 5-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 20 T—2:47. A—43,427 (42,691).

ERA 4.37 6.30 3.27 ERA 2.70 2.95 2.89 0.00

Dodgers 6, Cardinals 0 St. Louis Furcal ss Beltran rf Holliday lf Berkman 1b M.Carpenter 1b Freese 3b Y.Molina c Dickson p Greene 2b Robinson cf Westbrook p E.Sanchez p a-T.Cruz ph-c Totals

AB 4 4 4 1 3 3 3 0 3 3 2 0 1 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 4

Avg. .351 .298 .269 .333 .283 .266 .301 --.227 .259 .125 --.133

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gwynn Jr. cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .291 E.Herrera 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .222 Abreu lf 2 2 0 0 2 1 .300 Van Slyke lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Ethier rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .304 A.Kennedy 3b 4 0 0 1 0 3 .235 Loney 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 A.Ellis c 4 0 2 0 0 0 .333 Sellers ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .171 Kershaw p 4 1 1 0 0 0 .176 Totals 34 6 9 4 2 6 St. Louis 000 000 000 — 0 6 2 Los Angeles 000 200 40x — 6 9 1 a-grounded into a double play for E.Sanchez in the 8th. E—Greene (3), M.Carpenter (4), Abreu (1). LOB— St. Louis 4, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Beltran (3), Ethier (12), Loney (11), A.Ellis 2 (7), Kershaw (1). HR—Sellers (1), off Westbrook. DP—Los Angeles 2. St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Westbrook L, 4-3 6 1-3 6 4 3 1 5 109 2.58 E.Sanchez 2-3 2 2 2 1 1 21 6.75 Dickson 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 0.00 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kershaw W, 4-1 9 6 0 0 0 4 117 1.90 T—2:35. A—39,383 (56,000).

LEADERS Through Saturday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Hamilton, Texas, .384; Konerko, Chicago, .367; Jeter, New York, .355; Ortiz, Boston, .344; AJackson, Detroit, .331; Andrus, Texas, .323; Beltre, Texas, .317. RUNS—Kinsler, Texas, 34; Hamilton, Texas, 33; AdJones, Baltimore, 32; De Aza, Chicago, 30; AJackson, Detroit, 29; Ortiz, Boston, 29; Pedroia, Boston, 28. RBI—Hamilton, Texas, 46; MiCabrera, Detroit, 34; Encarnacion, Toronto, 34; Butler, Kansas City, 31; ADunn, Chicago, 31; AdJones, Baltimore, 29; Ortiz, Boston, 29; Scott, Tampa Bay, 29. HITS—Jeter, New York, 59; Hamilton, Texas, 56; AdJones, Baltimore, 52; Ortiz, Boston, 52; Andrus, Texas, 51; Konerko, Chicago, 51; Pedroia, Boston, 51. HOME RUNS—Hamilton, Texas, 18; AdJones, Baltimore, 14; ADunn, Chicago, 13; Encarnacion, Toronto, 13; Granderson, New York, 13; Bautista, Toronto, 10; Reddick, Oakland, 10. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—DWright, New York, .409; Kemp, Los Angeles, .359; Ruiz, Philadelphia, .358; Furcal, St. Louis, .351; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, .346; MeCabrera, San Francisco, .337; AEllis, Los Angeles, .333. RUNS—Kemp, Los Angeles, 29; Uggla, Atlanta, 29; Beltran, St. Louis, 28; Bourn, Atlanta, 28; Freeman, Atlanta, 28; Furcal, St. Louis, 28; CGonzalez, Colorado, 28; JUpton, Arizona, 28; DWright, New York, 28. RBI—Ethier, Los Angeles, 36; Beltran, St. Louis, 32; Freeman, Atlanta, 32; CGonzalez, Colorado, 30; LaRoche, Washington, 30; Freese, St. Louis, 29; Holliday, St. Louis, 29; Ruiz, Philadelphia, 29. HITS—Bourn, Atlanta, 58; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 55; Furcal, St. Louis, 54; DWright, New York, 52; SCastro, Chicago, 51; DanMurphy, New York, 51; Desmond, Washington, 48; Pagan, San Francisco, 48; Prado, Atlanta, 48. HOME RUNS—Beltran, St. Louis, 13; Kemp, Los Angeles, 12; Braun, Milwaukee, 11; Bruce, Cincinnati, 10; LaHair, Chicago, 10; Pence, Philadelphia, 10; Holliday, St. Louis, 9.


MO T OR SP ORTS

SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

B5

NASCAR: SPRINT CUP

Johnson cruises to third victory at All-Star race By Jenna Fryer The Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. — Jimmie Johnson used a calculated strategy Saturday night to win NASCAR’s All-Star race and its $1 million prize for the third time in his career. The five-time champion won the first 20-lap segment of the Sprint All-Star race, then rode around at the back of the field for the next 60 laps around Charlotte Motor Speedway. His plan was to stay out of trouble, and make his play for the win in the fifth and final segment. The new format this year set it up so that the winners of the first four segments would be the first four drivers down pit road for a mandatory stop before the 10-lap sprint to the finish. Johnson’s win in the first segment meant he was guaranteed to be the first driver down pit road, and he had the first stall — the reward for his No. 48 Hendrick Motorsports team winning Thursday night’s Pit Crew Competition. The race was then just to beat everyone else off pit road, and Johnson did by edging Matt Kenseth across the line. He then had a great restart, and pulled away to become just the third driver — joining Dale Earnhardt and Jeff Gordon — to win three All-Star

races. Johnson’s other wins were in 2003 and 2006. This win comes a week after his Darlington Raceway victory gave Hendrick Motorsports its 200th Cup win, and he celebrated by picking up team owner Rick Hendrick, who climbed halfway through the window of the Chevrolet for Johnson’s celebratory lap. “He said come pick me up, and once I got to him, he didn’t want the ride,” Johnson said. “I’m like, ‘No, no, I came to get you, Get on the car.’ It was great to take him around.” Brad Keselowski, winner of the third segment, had no chance to catch Johnson over the closing 10 laps. “It’s all about the restart,” Keselowski said. “The high line on the restart just wouldn’t go. I don’t know if I would have been able to do anything, but I would have liked another shot. We got beat by a five-time champ and two-time All-Star winner, so I think we’re doing pretty good. We didn’t have enough to pull it off.” Kenseth, winner of the second segment, finished third and was followed by Kyle Busch and Dale Earnhardt Jr., who won the fourth segment and advanced into the All-Star race by winning the qualifying race earlier Saturday night.

Terry Renna / The Associated Press

Jimmie Johnson, right, celebrates with his crew after winning the NASCAR Sprint All-Star race in Concord, N.C., Saturday.

MOTOR SPORTS ROUNDUP

With inches to spare, Briscoe wins Indy pole The Associated Press “It’s a gust of wind, I N DI A NA POLIS it’s a shadow over — Roger Penske’s a part of the track,” strategy beat Michael Hinchcliffe said, before Andretti by inches Satholding up his name urday — 9.168 inches to Briscoe card and explaining be exact. that was the distance. In the closest pole “I’m going to lose a litduel in Indianapolis 500 his- tle bit of sleep at how small the tory, Team Penske sent points margin was to Ryan.” leader Will Power onto the Eventually, a series spokestrack with two minutes left man came in and blurted out in the Pole Day shootout — a the actual distance to the thoushrewd move that prevented sandth of an inch. three Andretti drivers from Nobody knows how to play taking one last shot at the pole this game better than Penand preserving it for his own ske, and he proved it again guy, Ryan Briscoe Saturday. It was a remarkable finish The iconic racing owner has to a wild afternoon. now won five of the past seven Briscoe was the surprise poles at Indy and extended his winner of his first Indy pole own Indy record to 17 poles. with a four-lap average of Briscoe is the 11th driver to 226.484 mph. He completed the win a pole for The Captain, 10-mile qualification run .0023 and it comes one week before seconds quicker than James Penske celebrates the 40th anHinchcliffe. The previous re- niversary of his first career cord was set in 1970 when Al Indy win in 1972. Unser defeated Johnny RuthAlso on Saturday: Brown leads Top Fuel field erford by .01 seconds over the TOPEKA, Kan. — Antron four-lap qualifying run. “My name will go down for- Brown earned his first No. 1 ever for something that I won qualifying position of the seahere at the Indy 500,” Briscoe son, leading the Top Fuel field in the NHRA Summernationsaid. It will go straight into the re- als at Heartland Park Topeka. Brown took the top spot with cord book. his Friday run of 3.797 second How close was the battle? Everybody seemed to have at a track-record 324.98 mph. Cruz Pedregon topped the an explanation. When Hinchcliffe left the Funny Car lineup, and Allen post-race news conference, Johnson took the No. 1 posiBriscoe held his fingers about tion in Pro Stock. Pedregon an inch apart and explained it won with his Friday run of 4.406 at 315.56, both track rewas that close. Hinchcliffe already knew cords. In Pro Stock, Johnson finished in 6.618 at 207.85. better.

Charlie Neibergall / The Associated Press

Darrell Wallace Jr. stands next to his car while waiting to qualify for today’s NASCAR Nationwide Series’ Pioneer Hi-Bred 250 auto race Saturday at Iowa Speedway in Newton, Iowa.

Driver’s seat elusive for black racers By Viv Bernstein New York Times News Service

HUNTERSVILLE, N.C. — Darrell Wallace Jr. was playing Amateur Athletic Union basketball at 8 and perhaps on a path to college ball when his father bought him a go-kart after a trip to a local track. “He was good right off the bat,” Darrell Wallace Sr. said. “But at 8 years old, do you think your son’s going to be the next Dale Earnhardt, or the next Joe Montana or Brett Favre?” How about the next Wendell Scott? Scott competed in 495 races in NASCAR’s premier series — now Sprint Cup — in the 1960s and ’70s and was the only black driver to win a race. Only five other African Americans have started a handful of races in the 64-year history of NASCAR and only one did so since 1986 — Bill Lester, who entered two Cup events in 2006. Nearly every major U.S. sport has black stars, including Tiger Woods, LeBron James and Serena Williams, but the top three NASCAR national series have none. It is a glaring absence in a sport desperate to attract new fans and diversify its audience. Wallace, 18, who is scheduled to make his debut in the lower-level Nationwide Series today at Iowa Speedway, just might be the one to finally break through. “We really feel that Darrell is a guy that has a gift behind the wheel,” said J.D. Gibbs, president of Joe Gibbs Racing, one of the top teams in NASCAR. Gibbs has been searching for NASCAR’s first black star for nearly a decade, beginning with a collaboration with Reggie White before he died in 2004, and signed Wallace in 2009, when he was 15. “I think it’s a real value to this sport if you can kind of have that piece fit in,” Gibbs said. “Other sports, it kind of happens naturally. This sport’s hard because of the barriers to entry because of the cost standpoint.” Darrell Wallace Sr., who owns an industrial cleaning business, has spent nearly $1 million to support his son’s racing. Now Gibbs has taken over. The plan is to have Wallace race in four Nation-

wide events this year, with the possibility of a full schedule in 2013. NASCAR officials will be among those watching closely today. “What he potentially could do for the sport, it is an extremely important debut,” said Steve Phelps, NASCAR’s senior vice president and chief marketing officer. According to Nielsen research, the median age of NASCAR fans is 51.6, older than fans of every other major sport in the United States. So NASCAR has created an “industry action plan” to attract a multicultural audience, youths under 18 and the 18-to-34 demographic. “Darrell can help us with all three,” Phelps said. A few years ago, Marc Davis was the great black hope. He won in the lower levels of the sport and was signed by Gibbs. But Davis raced in only 10 Nationwide Series events from 2008-11. The opportunities were few and the results less than needed to prove himself. Wallace says he knows Davis and makes no assumptions. “I don’t look ahead and think, man, I could be in a full-time Nationwide ride next year and hopefully Cup the next year,” Wallace said. “That could happen. This could be my first and only race. Who knows?” Much will depend on finding a company to sponsor Wallace. NASCAR has helped the Gibbs team make contact with potential sponsors in a tough economy that has made it difficult for even the best drivers to find backing. Fuel Sports Management Group, a company that matches sponsors with drivers, has also signed on to the Wallace effort. And Fuel has enlisted KWL Enterprises, run by Kevin Liles, the former Island/Def Jam Music Group president, to find black-focused companies to connect to Wallace. It is a monumental effort for a driver who has never run a national-level NASCAR race. But insiders have known about Wallace’s potential for years. Marcus Jadotte, NASCAR’s vice president for public affairs and multicultural development, met Wallace when he was 14. Jadotte encouraged him to apply for the Drive for Diversity program, NASCAR’s effort to develop minority and fe-

male drivers. In nine years, the program never delivered a driver to the top three national series until now. “He certainly has been on the radar in racing for it seems like half his life,” Jadotte said of Wallace. At 16, Wallace won his first race in the NASCAR K&N Pro East regional development series in 2010. He was the first black driver and the youngest to triumph in that series. Wallace has continued to win often enough to earn a shot. But if Wallace’s racing has set him apart, so has his race. He said he had been subjected to years of abuse from fans, even track officials, in the sport’s lower levels. It eased, his father said, when he stepped up to the K&N series. “I’ve experienced that since Day 1 of racing,” the younger Wallace said. “It doesn’t hurt me. It bothers my parents more than anything. For me, it’s just something I hear through one ear and it goes right through the other and just keep moving along and don’t even dwell on it. Because the more you dwell on it, the more it affects you.” Wallace’s parents have had to deal with racial issues as well. Darrell Wallace Sr. is white and his wife, Desiree, who ran track at the University of Tennessee in the 1980s, is African-American. “I went to school 80 percent black, so I don’t see color, I just see people and personalities,” Wallace Sr. said. “That’s probably where he gets it from. His mom’s the same way. Just brush it off and turn it on them.” In a sport with a long history of racism — Scott’s victory in 1963 was not acknowledged by NASCAR until after the event — and whose sponsors have not embraced minority drivers, Darrell Wallace Sr. says he believes his son will attract sponsorship precisely because he is black. “If he does do good and he makes it, the media coverage is going to be overwhelming,” he said, “and that’s what large corporations, they want to spend their money on advertising. If you’re the only African-American driver in the field, he’ll hopefully get a lot of exposure and a lot of media coverage. The branding will be there from corporate America.” NASCAR can only hope.


B6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

G O LF RO UN DUP

Pressel wins twice to reach Sybase semis The Associated Press GLADSTONE, N.J. — The Sybase Match Play Championship has been a tournament full of surprises since day one, and nothing changed this year. None of the top 14 seeds are still around. The final four consists of two so-called veterans seeking their first wins since 2008 and a couple highly regarded youngsters seeking their first taste of victory on the LPGA Tour. Of the four, Morgan Pressel is the most recognizable name. She won a major at 18 in 2007 and one other time the following year. Candie Kung is a 30-year-old fourtime winner who has not held a trophy since 2008. Azahara Munoz of Spain won an NCAA title for Arizona State, while Vicky Hurst is a 21year-old who represented the United States in the Solheim Cup last year. In the semifinals today, Pressel will face Munoz, and Kung will take on Hurst. Pressel, who has struggled all season, is the most interesting story. The soon-to-be 24-year-old rallied from 2-down with three holes to play to stun No. 2 ranked Na Yeon Choi in 19 holes in the morning and rolled over Anna Nordqvist of Sweden 5 and 4 in the afternoon quarterfinal in the surprised-filled event at the Hamilton Farm Golf Club. Pressel is the highest seed left at No. 15. Munoz, who had two top-five finishes recently, is the 19th-seed. Hurst is seeded 37th and Kung, who beat No. 1 ranked Yani Tseng in the morning round of 16, is the lowest seed left at No. 49. “I think that I definitely want to win again and I’ll have a chance tomorrow,” Pressel said. “No matter what happens, I think that I — this is the best I’ve played in a long time, and from Japan two weeks ago to this week, I finally feel comfortable with my game again to a point where I haven’t been in a while. I’m going to give it everything that I have tomorrow.” Pressel, whose best finish this year is a tie for 20th, has been steady this week. She made birdies on the 16th and 17th holes to tie Choi and won on the 19th when the South Korean missed a par-saving putt. In the afternoon, Pressel ran away from Nordqvist after the one-time U.S. Women’s Open champion fell behind after a couple of bogeys. “This afternoon, I had a little bit of a break and didn’t need to make quite as many birdies, but tomorrow I’m going to need to make the birdies again because I’m sure Aza going to come out and come out strong,” Pressel said.

Golfers Continued from B1 As a longtime volunteer for COJGA — an annual nonprofit summer series of competitive golf tournaments for junior golfers — the 70-yearold Thomas has seen the vast majority of this area’s best young golf talent over the past 12 years, including all five of the aforementioned golfers. He has also seen his share of less-talented players. “I don’t care if they’re shooting 130 or 75, each kid is as important as the other one in that program,” Thomas says. “Of course, you remember the top players a little better.” And many of those top players have given plenty for Thomas to root for of late. • Bend’s Vijarro — a University of Oregon senior who finished in a tie for 28th place Saturday at the NCAA Central Regional — will once again be playing in the 2012 NCAA Division I Men’s Golf Championship later this month. The former Bend High golfer, who won his only COJGA age-group championship in his final year, started for four seasons for the Ducks and plans to turn pro this summer. • Fitch, a Redmond High graduate and currently a senior at Linfield College in McMinnville, led NCAA Division III in scoring average during the regular season and made the cut this week at the Division III Men’s Golf Championship before placing in a tie for 22nd. The former COJGA age-group champion was also named to the DIII All-American team. • Heinly, a Summit High graduate and now a sophomore at Concordia University in Portland, will play in the NAIA National Championships. Heinly, who plans to transfer this fall to Division I Xavier University in Cincinna-

Morgan Pressel hits a tee shot on the second hole during a fourthround match against Anna Nordqvist in the LPGA Sybase Match Play Championship golf competition at Hamilton Farm Golf Club in Gladstone, N.J., Saturday. Mel Evans / The Associated Press

Golf course for 2016 in Rio in turmoil SAO PAULO — The ownership dispute over the land set to be used for the Olympic golf course for 2016 took another twist Friday when a court ordered the city of Rio de Janeiro to hand over the contracts with the owner of the land — and city officials said no such documents existed. A Brazilian court issued a search warrant for the contracts on behalf of a company claiming ownership of the property, saying it had the right to see the documents related to the land. The city said it hasn’t signed any contracts for the golf course because it will be a private undertaking. It had publicly announced earlier this year, however, that it made an agreement with the land owner to have the course built on it. It said it would alter some of the building requirements in the area and, in exchange, the land owner and a construction company would pay for the $30 million course. Local Olympic organizers said they expect the contracts for the course to be finalized by the end of June, and that the city wouldn’t be directly involved even though it was responsible for choosing the land and facilitating the agreement. — The Associated Press

Munoz routed No. 6 seeded Stacy Lewis 5 and 4 in a match in which the tour’s best American this year didn’t play well. In the round of 16, Lewis — who was the highest-seeded player remaining at that point — edged 2010 Sybase champion Sun Young Yoo 1up in the morning. “I played pretty horrible,” said Lewis, who won in Mobile, Ala., two weeks ago. “It was probably one of the worst rounds I played all year.

Vijarro finishes NCAA regionals with strong round Andrew Vijarro, a senior at the University of Oregon, posted his best round of the NCAA Central Regional Saturday to help lead the Ducks into the NCAA Men’s Golf Championship. Vijarro, a former Bend High School golfer, shot a 3-under-par 68 at the University of Michigan Golf Course in Ann Arbor, Mich., to finish the 54-hole regionals at 2 over and in a tie for 28th place. Vijarro helped propel the Ducks to 10 under as a team and into second place for the tournament at 10 under, one stroke behind USC. The top five teams advance to the national championship, which is scheduled for May 29-June 3 at famed Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles. — Bulletin staff report

ti, is one of just three at-large qualifiers (Concordia failed to qualify as a team for the tournament) invited to play in the NAIA event’s 156-player field. • Odiorne, a talented Summit freshman, shot a finalround 1-under-par 71 last week to win the Class 5A state championship (after Churchill’s Caroline Inglis was disqualified for signing an inaccurate scorecard). Odiorne, who has won three consecutive COJGA age-group championships while playing in an older age group, also led the Storm to the team championship. • Summit senior Cramer shot a sensational 6-underpar 66 at Bend’s Broken Top Club two weeks ago to win medalist honors at the Class

It probably didn’t matter who I was playing, I wasn’t going to win.” Munoz and Pressel are good friends. “We both want to win bad, so I think it’s going to be fun,” the 24year-old Munoz said. “I wish I wasn’t playing her to be honest.” Hurst and Kung both had to work harder to post their quarterfinals wins. The long-hitting Hurst, who upset

5A Special District 1 boys golf championships. A 66 is no joke at any level of golf. And Cramer, a COJGA champion, later led the Storm to a tie for second place at state by finishing the championship in eighth place. • And the rosters of the Summit girls team that won state, the Summit boys team that finished in a tie for second, the Bend High girls team that finished second and the Bend boys team that finished sixth all featured former and current COJGA players. The success they have all shared is no coincidence, says Fitch. “COJGA plays a huge part in all of this because of how well organized, affordable, and fun the tournaments were in the summer,” says Fitch. “I believe in my class alone there were six or seven of us who went on to play in college.” Odiorne agrees. “I think the (COJGA) program is great for Central Oregon juniors who want to be involved in golf and not have to travel to the (Willamette) Valley, and it can build friendships and introduce you to some really great people,” says Odiorne. “My first love will always be COJGA.” And the kinship among the players is strong. After all those summers, there is a kinship among the COJGA players, Fitch says. “I do find myself keeping tabs on them throughout their college careers as well,” he says. “It’s nice to see how they are doing and improving throughout the years.” Thomas watches from afar, proud of the part he played. Most of the standout golfers in this region have been in the COJGA program since standing no higher than a pitching wedge. Thomas notes that the older players — the likes of Vijarro, Fitch and Heinly — all

No. 5 ranked Cristie Kerr over 19 holes Friday, won the 15th and 16th holes to take the lead en route to a 2-up win over U.S. Women’s Open champion So Yeon Ryu of South Korea. Kung also won the 15th and 16th holes to go 2-up against Julieta Granada of Paraguay and closed out a 2-and-1 win with a par at the 17th. “We both played pretty solid the whole day,” Hurst said. “She kind of let it go at the end, but it was pretty close.” Kung said her putting carried her Saturday, but she had other concerns after the matches. She probably didn’t expect to be here today and checked out of her hotel. In the other morning matches, Ryu won seven of the first nine holes en route to a 5-and-4 win over Katherine Hull of Australia. Nordqvist won four of the final six holes in beating No. 10 seed Amy Yang 3 and 1. Hurst was a 2-and-1 winner over Angela Stanford in an all-American match. Munoz posted a 2-and-1 win over Jodi Ewart of England, who upset defending champion Suzann Pettersen in the first round. Granada was a 1-up winner over Karine Icher of France.

helped build COJGA from a fledgling program to one that now each summer provides competitive golf opportunities to more than 300 area boys and girls. He keeps tabs on all his players, present and past. And plenty of them help him do so. It’s enough to keep Thomas energized, even after 12 years with COJGA. After all, who knows which current COJGA player will turn out to be the next young Central Oregon golf star? “I love the kids so much that it’s pretty hard to not keep do-

Also on Saturday: Dufner maintains one-stroke lead IRVING, Texas — Jason Dufner shot a 1-under 69, enough to keep a one-stroke lead heading into the final round of the Byron Nelson Championship. On a day when nine players had or shared the lead, Dufner was the one on top alone for the second day in a row when play was done. He was at 8-under 202. Jason Day shot a 67, with his only bogey coming after missing a short putt on the 18th hole. He was a stroke back along with J.J. Henry and Dicky Pride. Henry also had a 67, and Pride shot a 69. McDowell among match play finalists CASARES, Spain — Northern Ireland’s Graeme McDowell advanced to the World Match Play Championship semifinals when Spanish favorite Sergio Garcia missed a short par putt on the first extra hole. McDowell will face Rafael Cabrera-Bello, a 3and-1 winner over Spanish compatriot Alvaro Quiros. Belgium’s Nicolas Colsaerts will play Scotland’s Paul Lawrie in the other semifinal at Finca Cortesin. Colsaerts beat American Brandt Snedeker 4 and 3, and Paul Lawrie routed South Africa’s Retief Goosen 6 and 5.

ing it,” Thomas says. But this story is not about him, COJGA, or the parents, Thomas insists. It’s about the golfers and all those accomplishments. And the people they have all become. “The key for me is that they are all REALLY good kids, regardless of the golf,” he says.

And COJGA, no doubt, played a role in that, too. — Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@bendbulletin.com

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend www.highdesertbank.com

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Cowgirl doubles team wins state title Bulletin staff report EUGENE — Crook County seniors Catie Brown and Kayla Morgan closed out two stellar varsity tennis careers Saturday, rolling past St. Mary’s seniors Anna Thorndike and Alden Caldewell 6-3, 6-2 in the Class 4A/3A/2A/1A girls tennis state doubles finals at the University of Oregon. Brown and Morgan, who also won state doubles in 2011, did not lose a set at this year’s state tournament and won 48 of the 59 games they played over two days. “They pretty much dominated,” Cowgirl coach Lloyd Rodgers said. “They’re just really experienced players. They’re both seniors, of course, and they’re as good as any 5A or 6A team.” Crook County placed second overall with 10 1⁄2 points to statechampion Oregon Episcopal School, which won the 4A/3A/2A/1A state tourney with 16 points. St. Mary’s of Medford and Beaverton’s Valley Catholic tied for third with six points apiece. “We were missing three players because of injury, so to come off that and place second, I’m pretty tickled,” Rodgers said. “All the kids worked really hard.” In other prep events Saturday: TRACK AND FIELD Hawk boys, Outlaw girls league champs SWEET HOME — The La Pine boys won the Sky-Em League championships to give the school its first district track title since 2000. Sisters claimed the league girls title. Complete team scores were not available. Hawk junior Jeremy Desrosiers led La Pine with four victories. The La Pine sprinter won the 100, 200 and long jump and ran a leg on the Hawks’ winning 400meter relay. La Pine’s Deion Mock and Dylan Seay went 1-2 in the boys pole vault. Seay added a win in the triple jump and another runner-up finish in the long jump. La Pine senior Travis Harrison won the shot and took second in the discus.

Crook County’s Catie Brown returns the ball as her doubles partner Kayla Morgan stands ready during the Class 4A/3A/ 2A/1A state championships on Saturday in Eugene. Brown and Morgan won the title. Matthew Aimonetti / For The Bulletin

PREP ROUNDUP “This was a big goal for us,” Hawk coach Gary Slater said. “The kids definitely wanted to win it.” Brandon Pollard (1,500) and Jake McAllister (high jump) recorded wins for Sisters. Zoe Falk and Alisha Haken led the Outlaw girls during the twoday meet, which started Thursday and resumed Saturday. Haken, the girls field athlete of the meet, took second in the 100 hurdles and high jump, won the triple jump, and placed fourth in the pole vault. Falk was named the girls track athlete of the meet after winning the 800 and 1,500, taking second in the long jump, and helping Sisters to a runner-up finish in the 1,600 relay. Senior Chelsea Reifschneider won both hurdles events for the Outlaws and Sara Small added a win in the pole vault. La Pine’s Ashley Agenbroad won the discus and Holli Glenn took second in the triple jump. The Class 4A state championships are in Eugene next week. Grizzly hurdler takes fifth MONMOUTH — Trinton Koch of Gilchrist placed fifth in the boys 300-meter hurdles in 44.72 seconds on the second day of the Class 1A state championships held at Western Oregon University. Dillon Link also competed in Saturday’s finals for the Grizzlies, finishing eighth in the discus (117 feet, 5 inches).

Gilchrist tied for 23rd as a team with nine points. Damascus Christian won the meet with 63 points. On the girls side, Brenna Gravitt placed eighth in the shot put (33-061⁄2) for the Grizzlies. Gilchrist placed 14th with 12 points. Condon/Wheeler won the 1A girls championship with 75 1/2 points. Bulldog sprinters go 2-4 in 400, girls 400-relay second MONMOUTH — Culver’s Jesus Retano and Kyle Belanger finished second and fourth in the boys 400meter final during the second day of the Class 2A state championships. Retano also placed eighth in the 200, while Belanger was sixth in the 800. The two Bulldog teammates, along with Josue Gonzalez and Gerson Gonzalez, also ran legs on Culver’s 1,600-meter relay team that placed fourth. Culver placed 12th overall in the boys team standings with 22 points. Central Linn claimed the 2A boys state title with 99 1⁄2 points. At the girls meet, the Bulldogs’ 400-meter relay team made up of Andrea Retano, Gabrielle Alley, Lori Sandy and Ana Badillo placed second overall in a time of 53.07 seconds. Sandy, who on Friday took seventh in the long jump, also added a fifth-place effort in the triple jump. The Bulldogs finished in 13th place in the overall girls standings with 18 points. Portland Christian scored 80 points to win the 2A girls title.

T rack Continued from B1 Laubacher, who entered this season with a PR of 6 feet in the high jump, shined the brightest for the Storm on a day when Summit secured 36 state berths. His mark Saturday tied him for the best height in the state this season, regardless of classification, and put him among elite company nationally. According to the track and field website Athletic. net, only 23 high school athletes in the entire United States have gone 6-10 or higher this spring, and none have gone over 7-0. “He’s putting it together at the right time,” said Turnbull, himself a former 7-foot high jumper. “He’ll be a 7-footer next week at state, and 7-2 is not out of the question.” While Laubacher turned heads with his exploits in the high jump alone, Mountain View’s Mitch Modin, Bend High’s J.C. Grim and Eagle Point’s Tyrone Holmes all showcased their versatility.Modin, a junior, advanced to state in four events, winning the 200 in 22.3 seconds and placing second in the high jump Saturday behind Laubacher with a mark of 606. Modin, who won the long jump on Friday, also led off the Cougars’ second-place 1,600-meter relay squad. Grim qualified for state in three events Saturday as he won the triple jump (44-01 3⁄4), took second in the javelin, finished fifth in the high jump but hit the automatic state-qualifying mark of 6-3, and helped the Bears’ 400-meter relay team to a runner-up finish. And Holmes, who has com-

B7

mitted to play defensive line for the University of Montana in the fall, on Friday won the shot put and took second in the discus before placing first in the 110-meter hurdles Saturday. The Summit boys won both the short and long relays Saturday. Bend placed second in the 400 relay, and Mountain View was the runner-up in the 1,600 relay. University of Oregon-bound Ashley Maton paced the Summit girls during the second and final day of state qualifying, successfully pulling off the 800 and 1,500 double by winning both events. The Storm went 12-3 in both races. In the 1,500, Maton (4:43.95), Megan Fristoe (4:46.64) and Kira Kelly (4:47.90) all qualified for state, as Kelly just barely hit the automatic-qualifying time of 4:47.96. While the Storm were deep — 12 different girls earned individual state berths for Summit — Special District 1 runner-up Mountain View rode the performances of a handful of key athletes. Cougar junior Krysta Kroeger is headed to Hayward in the 100 (second), in the 200 (first) and in both relays. Macaulay Wilson won the 400 and raced on both state-qualifying Mountain View relays. Shaina Zollman earned runner-up honors in both the long jump and the triple jump. Pole vaulter Tesla Wright and hurdler Alexa Evert were the only Bend High girls to earn state berths. Wright won the pole vault by clearing 11-2, a mark that tied her PR. Evert, a freshman, took second in the 100 hurdles behind Summit junior Josie Kinney. Summit’s Bradley Laubacher won the high jump at the Special District 1 track and field meet at Bend High School on Saturday. Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

PREP SCOREBOARD Track and Field Saturday’s results ——— Boys ——— Class 5A Special District 1 Championships At Bend High Second Day Team scores — Summit 152, Bend 99, Mountain View 97, Eagle Point 76, Ashland 36. (Winners and Central Oregon finishers in the top eight) 400-meter relay — 1, Summit (Lybarger, Thomas, Peay, Wilson) 43.17; 2, Bend 43.53; 4, Mountain View 44.35. 1,500 — 1, Eric Alldritt, S, 4:04.74; 2, Samuel Naffziger, S, 4:05.58; 3, Luke Hinz, S, 4:10.94; 6, Dakota Thornton, MV, 4:22.40; 7, Angel Hernandez, MV, 4:33.34; 8, Jacob Fillmore, B, 4:33.59. 100 — 1, Cole Thomas, S, 11.15; 2, T.J. Peay, S, 11.24; 4, Ben Ritchey, S, 11.60; 5, Trevor Roberts, MV, 11.74; 6, Cody Maguire B, 11.75; 8, Tyler Dunn, MV, 11.79. 400 — 1, Michael Wilson, S, 49.60; 2, Tom Steelhammer, B, 49.62; 3, Dan Maunder, S, 51.80; 4, Gabe Wyllie, MV, 52.54; 6, Blake Anderson, S, 53.80; 7, Curtis Jensen, B, 54.25. 110 hurdles — 1, Tyrone Holmes, EP, 14.56; 2, Danny Verdieck, B, 14.69; 4, William Butler, S, 15.89; 5, Garrett Hardie, S, 15.99; 6, Dantly Wilcox, MV, 16.27; 7, Jacob Potter, MV, 16.59; 8, Devan Welch, MV, 16.60. 800 — 1, Sam Jackson, A, 1:57.90; 3, Nathan Guyer, S, 1:59.08; 4, Chris McBride, MV, 2:00.93; 5, Daniel Ewing, B, 2:01.48; 6, Riley Anheluk, MV, 2:02.35; 7, Nico Spring, B, 2:04.17. 200 — 1, Mitch Modin, MV, 22.30; 2, Cole Thomas, S, 22.68; 4, Tom Steelhammer, B, 23.21; 5, Nathan Lybarger, S, 23.38; 6, Matt Murphy, MV, 23.79; 8, Cody Maguire, B, 24.17. 300 hurdles — 1, Michael Wilson, S, 39.64; 3, Danny Verdieck, B, 40.34; 4, Nathan Guyer, S, 41.54; 5, Jacob Potter, B, 42.34; 6, Dantly Wilcox, MV, 42.94; 7, Garrett Hardie, S, 43.44; 8, Tanner Combs, MV, 44.14. 1,600 relay — 1, Summit (Maunder, Wilson, Laubacher, Lybarger) 3:23.43; 2, Mountain View 3:23.87; 4, Bend 3:33.60. High jump — 1, Bradley Laubacher, S, 6-10.00; 2, Mitch Modin, MV, 6-06.00; 3, Blake Bosch, MV, 6-05.00; 4, Garrett Hardie, S, 6-05.00; 5, J.C. Grim, B, 6-03.00. Javelin — 1, Garrett Snow, EP, 187-00; 2, J.C. Grim, B, 173-02; 3, Calvin Aylward, S, 161-10; 4, Hayden Czmowski, MV, 160-02; 5, Uriahs Smith, MV, 144-05. Triple jump — 1, J.C. Grim, B, 44-01.75; 2, William Butler, S, 41-01.25; 3, Connor Scott, B, 40-07.00; 4, Jace Johns, MV, ——— Class 4A Sky-Em League Championships Sweet Home High School in Sweet Home, Day 2 Team scores — Not avaialbe 400-meter relay — La Pine (Neet, Desrosiers, Mock, Kimmel), 43.97; 6, Sisters 48.12 1,500 — 1, Brandon Pollard, S, 4:19.28; 4, Shea Krevi, S, 4:27.52; 7, Tyress TurnsPlenty, LP, 4:39.20; 8, Austin Smith, LP, 4:40.66 100 — 1, Garrett, Lewellen, E, 11.29; 6, Ethan Luloff, S, 11.55. 400 — 1, Jeremy Desrosiers, LP, 22.80; 5, Kole Kimmel, LP, 24.08. 110 hurdles — 1, Garrett Lewellen, E, 15.24; 2, Colton George, LP, 15.42; 4, Ian Baldessari, S, 17.59; 7, Chance Link, LP, 20.61. 800 — 1, Austin Place, CG, 2:01.55; 2, Easton Curtis, S, 2:01.6; 3, Landon Prescott, S, 2:05.57; 5, Taylor Ogle, LP, 2:09.52; 7, Nico Haddad, LP, 2:15.95 200 — 1, Jeremy Desrosiers, LP, 22.80; 5, Kole Kimmel, LP, 24.08. 300 hurdles — 1, Nick Hall, SH, 40.52; Colton George, LP, 40.67. 1,600 relay — 1, Cottage Grove (Richardson, Thaler, Place, Johnson) 3:31.58; 3, Sisters 3:33.90; 5, La Pine 3:40.49. High jump — 1, Jake McAllister, S, 6-00.00; 4, Joseph Swayze, LP, 5-09.00; 5, Joshua Stinson, LP, 5-09.00; 6, Brennan Miller, S, 5-06.00. Javelin — 1, Zach Borrelli, CG, 164-01; 3, Kyle Contreras, LP, 151-09; 5, Blake Knirk, S, 141-09. Triple jump — 1, Dylan Seay, LP, 41-06.00; 2, Jacob Richerson, S, 41-02.00; 8, Joseph Swayze, LP, 39-06.00. ——— Class 2A OSAA State Championships Western Oregon University in Monmouth, Day 2 Team scores — Central Linn 99.50, Enterprise 82.50, Portland Christian 67, Regis 48, Vernonia 45, Lost River 34, Scio 32, Irrigon 29, Yoncalla 26, Reedsport 26, Nestucca 24, Culver 22, East Linn Christian Academy 18, Faith Bible 16, Neah-Kah-Nie 15, Heppner 15, Glendale 13, Crow 10.50, Monroe 10, Union 7, Riverdale 7, Oakridge 7, Oakland 4, Kennedy 3, Canyonville Christian Academy 1, Weston-McEwen 1, Elgin 0.50. (Winners and Central Oregon finishers in the top eight)

400-meter relay — 1, Central Linn (Wyne, Barnes, LaCoste, Avilez) 44.21. 1,500 — 1, Joseph Ewers, Central Linn, 4:04.24. 100 — 1, Josue Avilez, Central Linn, 11.22. 400 — 1, Marcus Lynn, Enterprise, 50.07; 2, Jesus Retano, Culver, 51.36; 4, Kyle Belanger, Culver, 51.89. 110 hurdles — 1, Mark LaCoste, Central Linn, 14.97. 800 — 1, Nathan Fleck, Vernonia, 1:59.01; 6, Kyle Belanger, Culver, 2:00.91. 200 — 1, Nicolo Casale, Vernonia, 22.67; 8, Jesus Retano, Culver, 24.22. 300 hurdles — 1, Mark LaCoste, Central Linn, 39.69. 1,600 relay — 1, Vernonia, 3:26.8; 4, Culver (J. Gonzalez, Retano, G. Gonzalez, Belanger), 3:33.76 High jump — 1, Nick Ahn, Nestucca, 6-02.00. Discus — 1, Paul Benz, Regis, 152-06. Javelin — 1, Daniel Juneau, Glendale, 175-04. Triple jump — 1, Josh Reznick, Portland Christian, 42-08.25. ——— Class 1A OSAA State Championships At Western Oregon University in Monmouth, Day 2 Team scores — Damascus Christian 63, Pacific 44, Prairie City 41, Southwest Christian 39, Camas Valley 36, C.S. Lewis Academy 34, Joseph 33, Triad 30, Cove 28, Paisley 26, Willamette Christian 24, Dayville 23, Sherman 23, Jordan Valley 22, Lowell 22, Dufur 21, South Wasco County 17, Triangle Lake 16.50, Spray 15, Portland Lutheran 14, Condon/Wheeler 14, McKenzie 12, Gilchrist 9, New Hope Christian 9, Powers 8, Eddyville Charter 6.50, Powder Valley 6, Mohawk 5, Horizon Christian 5, Life Christian 4, North Clackamas Christian 3, Ione 3, Crane 1, Mitchell 1. (Winners and Central Oregon finishers in the top eight) 400-meter relay — 1, Camas Valley (Lindsey, Tilton, Wolfe, Andreas) 45.11. 1,500 — 1, Trevor Lane, Southwest Christian, 4:08.59. 100 — 1, Gabe Ovgard, Triad, 11.27. 400 — 1, John Koch, C.S. Lewis Academy, 50.46. 110 hurdles — 1, Austin McNichols, Lowell, 16.13. 800 — 1, Nick Martin, Southwest Christian, 1:57.83. 200 — 1, Gabe Ovgard, Triad, 22.78. 300 hurdles — 1, Trevor Lewis, Joseph, 42.33; 5, Trinton Koch, Gilchrist, 44.72. 1,600 relay — 1, Pacific (Wagner, Kreutzer, Wyatt, Finley) 3:30.93. High jump — 1, Cole Hoberg, Prairie City, 607.00. Discus — 1, Jeremiah Woods, Damascus Christian, 148-09; 8, Dillon Link, Gilchrist, 117-05. Javelin — 1, Justin Larson, Dayville, 201-08. Triple jump — 1, T.J. Kinnamon, Lowell, 4211.25. ——— Girls ——— Class 5A Special District 1 Championships At Bend High Second Day Team scores — Summit 220, Mountain View 108, Bend 50, Ashland 37, Eagle Point 24. 400-meter relay — 1, Mountain View (Kroeger, Anderson, Wilson, Bolster) 49.25; 2, Summit 49.38; 3, Bend 50.91. 1,500 — 1, Ashley Maton, S, 4:43.95; 2, Megan Fristoe, S, 4:46.64; 3, Kira Kelly, S, 4:47.90; 6, Jessica Wolfe, B, 5:15.89; 7, Melissa Hubler, B, 5:24.17; 8, McKenzie Bell, B, 5:31.08. 100 — 1, Sarah Frazier, S, 12.51; 2, Krysta Kroeger, MV, 12.61; 3, Amanda Pease, B, 12.85; 4, Alexa Thomas, S, 12.92; 5, Briana Bolster, MV, 12.94; 6, Kristen Place, MV, 12.95; 7, Megan Buzzas, S, 12.96. 400 — 1, Macaulay Wilson, MV, 59.71; 2, Miranda Brown, S, 1:00.48; 4, Cassidy Wheeler, B, 1:02.50; 6, Camille Stillwell, S, 1:05.28; 7, Alex Reininger, S, 1:05.48. 100 hurdles — 1, Josie Kinney, S, 15.90; 2, Alexa Evert, B, 16.28; 3, Christa Brandt, B, 17.36; 4, Molly Rygg, S, 17.46; 5, Chelsea Farnsworth, MV, 17.49; 6, Callan Brick, MV, 19.00. 800 — 1, Ashley Maton, S, 2:18.63; 2, Keelin Moehl, S, 2:20.38; 3, Kaely Gordon, S, 2:21.56; 4, Grace Curran, B, 2:24.61; 6, Tia Hatton, MV, 2:29.44; 8, Makeila Lundy, B, 2:39.74. 200 — 1, Krysta Kroeger, MV, 25.67; 2, Sarah Frazier, S, 25.90; 3, Macaulay Wilson, MV, 25.97; 4, Alexa Thomas, S, 26.35; 5, Briana Bolster, MV, 26.65; 6, Amanda Pease, B, 27.08; 7, Alyssa Pease, B, 27.90. 300 hurdles — 1, Josie Kinney, S, 46.40; 2, Sammy Hignell-Stark, S, 47.87; 3, Alexa Evert, B, 48.34; 4, Tash Anderson, MV, 48.47; 5, Christa Brandt, B, 50.88; 6, Whitney Woods, S, 51.04; 8, Chelsea Farnsworth, MV, 52.68. 1,600 relay — 1, Summit (Brown, Maton, Kinney, Moehl) 4:03.75; 2, Mountain View 4:06.94; 4, Bend 4:27.13. Discus — 1, Anna Roshak, MV, 113-09; 2, Sara Andre, MV, 97-08; 3, Mercedes Mingus, S, 96-06; 4, Emilee Sweider, MV, 91-09; 5, Molly Rygg, S, 91-09; 6, Emily Garrison, B, 88-11. Pole vault — 1, Tesla Wright, B, 11-02.00; 2, Annie Sidor, S, 11-02.00; 3, Emily Geddes, B, 10-06.00;

4, Samantha Mcgee, B, 10-00.00; 5, Anna Young, S, 10-00.00; 6, Ashley Needham, S, 10-00.00. Shot — 1, Anna Roshak, MV, 40-06.50; 3, Maddison Sumrall, B, 31-11.50; 4, Myah Harter, S, 3103.50; 5, Emilee Sweider, MV, 30-03.00. Triple jump — 1, Lucinda Howard, S, 36-08.75; 2, Shaina Zollman, MV, 35-06.75; 3, Torie Morris, MV, 34-06.75; 4, Sarah Frazier, S, 34-05.00; 6, Jade Danek, S, 29-11.50. ——— Class 4A Sky-Em League Championships Sweet Home High School in Sweet Home, Day 2 Team scores — Not available 400-meter relay — 1, Sweet Home (Makin, Stewart, Whitfield, Kent) 51.27; 4, Sisters 51.58. 1,500 — 1, Zoe Falk, S, 2:25.25; 2, Frances Payne, S, 5:04.32; 7, Katelyn Meeter, S, 5:41.07. 100 — 1, Ahsha Mootz, CG, 12.68; 4, Molly Boyle, S, 13.38. 400 — 1, Kristine Dunn, CG, 58.94; 5, Chloee Sazama, LP, 1:04.27; Lotte Hansen, S, 1:05.73. 100 hurdles — 1, Chelsea Reifschneider, S, 16.00; 2, Alisha Haken, S, 16.67; 6, Danielle Lovegren, S, 18.30. 800 — 1, Zoe Falk, S, 2:25.25; 2, Aria Blumm, S, 2:27.14; 5, Madison Boettner, S, 2:37.11. 200 — 1, Ahsha Mootz, CG, 26.18; 6, Molly Boyle, S, 27.91; 7, Chloee Sazama, LP, 27.93. 300 hurdles — 1, Chelsea Reifschneider, S, 47.21; 3, Holli Glenn, LP, 50.30; 5, Danielle Lovegren, S, 51.58. 1,600 relay — 1, Cottage Grove (Sisco, Abelin, Mootz, Dunn) 4:06.46; 2, Sisters 4:08.06; 6, La Pine 4:34.62. High jump — 1, Kelsey Shaw, E, 5-01.00; 2, Alisha Haken, S, 5-01.00; 4, Bailey Bremer, S, 4-11.00. Discus — 1, Ashley Agenbroad, LP, 108-03; 7, Alexis Tilman, LP, 90-06. Pole vault — 1, Sara Small, S, 11-00.00; 3, Olivia Chandler, S, 9-00.00; 4, Alisha Haken, S, 7-06.00; 4, Carly Audia, LP, 7-06.00. Shot — 1, Tricia Ingraham, CG, 37-03.50; 5, Alexis Tilman, LP, 32-04.00; 7, Ashley Agenbroad, LP, 29-07.50. Triple jump — 1, Alisha Haken, S, 34-02.00; 2, Holli Glenn, LP, 33-03.00; 3, Bailey Bremer, S, 3209.25; 4, Brittnie Haigler, LP, 30-11.00. ——— Class 2A OSAA State Championships Western Oregon University in Monmouth, Day 2 Team scores — Portland Christian 80, Reedsport 67, Kennedy 60, Union 53, East Linn Christian Academy 48.50, Scio 43, Neah-Kah-Nie 39, Lost River 36, Vernonia 19.50, Regis 19, Culver 18, Yoncalla 14, Gold Beach 13, Oakland 12, Weston-McEwen 11, Riverdale 10, Days Creek 9, Bonanza 8, Faith Bible 8, Enterprise 8, Elgin 7, Monroe 7, Nestucca 7, Heppner 4, Stanfield Secondary School 4, Irrigon 4, Pilot Rock 2, Santiam 2, Glendale 1, Riddle 1. (Winners and Central Oregon finishers in the top eight) 400-meter relay — 1, Portland Christian (Forney, White, Whalen, Cayetano) 51.82; 2, Culver (Retano, Alley, Sandy, Badillo) 53.07. 1,500 — 1, Katriel O’Reilly, Union, 4:55.97; 5, Angelica Metteer, Culver, 5:14.92. 100 — 1, Haley Guest, Scio, 12.75. 400 — 1, Haley Guest, Scio, 58.41. 100 hurdles — 1, Sierra Robertson, Portland Christian, 17.10. 800 — 1, Bridget Donohue, Kennedy, 2:25.49. 200 — 1, Haley Guest, Scio, 26.69. 300 hurdles — 1, Ashley Walters, Oakridge, 48.05. 1,600 relay — 1, Portland Christian (Cayetano, White, Jossi, Whalen) 4:09.54. Pole vault — 1, Shannelle Cayetano, Portland Christian, 10-09.00. Shot — 1, Lea Wilson, Vernonia, 39-03.00. Triple jump — 1, Alexis Anderson, Neah-KahNie, 37-08.00; 5, Lori Sandy, Culver, 32-10.25. ——— Class 1A OSAA State Championships At Western Oregon University in Monmouth, Day 2 Team scores — Condon/Wheeler 75.50, Damascus Christian 67, Paisley 62, Triad 53, Portland Lutheran 46, Southwest Christian 41, Triangle Lake 27, Imbler 27, St. Paul 24, Cove 22, Mitchell 20, Alsea 16, Hosanna Christian 13, Gilchrist 12, Eddyville Charter 11, Dufur 11, Prairie City 10.50, Perrydale 10, McKenzie 9, Sherman 9, Willamette Christian 8, Columbia Christian 8, Powder Valley 7.50, Adrian 7, New Hope Christian 7, Lowell 6, Life Christian 6, Monument 6, Mohawk 5, Arlington 5, Pacific 5, Harper 4, Camas Valley 4, Prospect Charter 4, Crane 3, Elkton 3, Spray 3, South Wasco County 2, Joseph 2, Siletz Valley 1.50. (Winners and Central Oregon finishers in the top eight) 400-meter relay — 1, St. Paul (C. Ruvalcaba, S. Brentano, S. Ruvalcaba, R. Brentano) 52.45. 1,500 — 1, Sarah Estabrook, Triad, 5:00.44. 100 — 1, Lindsay LeBrun, Portland Lutheran, 12.66. 400 — 1, Bridget Regan, Perrydale, 1:00.49. 100 hurdles — 1, Kristan Holding, Damascus Christian, 15.90.

800 — 1, Mikaela Martin, Imbler, 2:26.09. 200 — 1, Ellie Logan, Condon/Wheeler, 26.37. 300 hurdles — 1, Kristan Holding, Damascus Christian, 47.01. 1,600 relay — 1, Paisley (Norris, Hoppe, O’Connor, O’Leary) 4:18.56. Pole vault — 1, Lindi Burgeson, Damascus Christian, 9-00.00. Shot — 1, Megan White, Mitchell, 37-05.50; 8, Brenna Gravitt, Gilchrist, 33-06.50. Triple jump — 1, Ellie Logan, Condon/Wheeler, 34-09.75. Friday’s results ——— Boys ——— Class 6A Special District 6 Championships in Keizer, Day 2 McNary High School Team scores — Sprague 128, South Salem 116, McNary 113, Redmond 100, West Salem 99, North Salem 77, McKay 25. (Winners and Central Oregon finishers in the top eight) 400-meter relay — 1, Sprague (Howard, McDonnell, Marshall, VanLeeuwen) 42.93; 5, Redmond 46.73.

1,500 — 1, Jorge Rico, NS, 4:11.28; 2, Oliver Gunther, R, 4:11.53; 6, Alex Stevens, R, 4:17.03. 100 — 1, Jeff Howard, S, 10.90. 400 — 1, Jacob Kelly, NS, 50.69. 110 hurdles — 1, Daniel Brattain, MN, 14.69; 7, Keanu Tavita, R, 16.49; 8, Luke Davis, R, 16.82. 800 — 1, Dylan McHugh, MN, 1:57.25. 200 — 1, Jeff Howard, Sprague, 22.00. 300 hurdles — 1, Daniel Brattain, MN, 39.73; 3, Kellee Johnson, R, 40.55. 1,600 relay — 1, Sprague (Howard, Vettrus, Pederson, Marshall) 3:25.38; 7, Redmond (K. Johnson, Gunther, Q. Johnson, Leeland) 3:43.59. Shot — 1, Jacob Crivellone, R, 52-11.00; 6, Phelan Lund, R, 46-04.25. Javelin — 1, Junior Espitia, SS, 184-10; 2, Tanner Manselle, R, 183-03. Triple jump — 1, Tristin James, WS, 44-06.50; 5, Cody Simpson, R, 42-04.50. ——— Girls ——— Class 6A Special District 6 Championships in Keizer, Day 2 McNary High School Team scores — South Salem 126.5, Redmond 121, North Salem 120, McNary 99, West Salem 79.5, Sprague 66, McKay 44.

(Winners and Central Oregon finishers in the top eight) 400-meter relay — 1, Redmond (Koehler, Yeakey, Stroup, Ochsner) 49.87. 1,500 — 1, Emily Weber, SS, 4:53.31; 4, Tefna Mitchell-Hoegh, R, 5:14.39; 6, Elissa Brouillard, R, 5:16.82. 100 — 1, Kiersten Ochsner, R, 12.58; 6, Brianna Yeakey, R, 13.08. 400 — 1, Daysha Simms-Garcia, MN, 58.78; 7, Makenna Conley, R, 1:04.79. 100 hurdles — 1, Mary Savoy, WS, 15.63; 2, Monika Koehler, R, 15.75. 800 — 1, Bethany Johnson, SP, 2:25.16. 200 — 1, Kiersten Ochsner, R, 25.89. 300 hurdles — 1, Riley Knebes, NS, 45.75; 3, Monika Koehler, R, 46.93; 4, Dakota Steen, R, 47.40. 1,600 relay — 1, Redmond (Conley, Ochsner, Steen, Current) 4:03.91. Shot — 1, Carley Davis, WS, 38-07.00; 8, McKenzie Hidalgo, R, 30-11.50. Javelin — 1, Kelly Cruise, MK, 128-09; 3, Brianna Yeakey, R, 118-02; 5, McKenzie Hidalgo, R, 104-06. Triple jump — 1, Alyssa Neal, NS, 37-02.50.


B8

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

Summit’s Lindsey Brodeck returns a shot in the Class 5A singles final against West Albany’s Chelsea Clark at the Tualatin Hills Tennis Center in Beaverton on Saturday.

Tennis Continued from B1 “The rest of the state is glad to see Paxton go,” Cordell said, “but I’m glad to see the Matts leave. They had our number.” In addition to Deuel’s victory and Parr and Hess’ runner-up finish, Summit freshman Chandler Oliveira placed third in singles, brothers Bo and Liam Hall took fourth in doubles, and Alec Virk and Stewart Allen won the doubles consolation bracket. The Summit girls, who clinched their first state championship on Friday, ended the tournament with 12 1⁄2 points, besting second-place Ashland (10 1⁄2 points) and third-place West Albany (eight). Storm sophomore Lindsey Brodeck was the 5A girls singles runner-up, falling to West Albany sophomore Chelsea Clark 4-6, 6-2, 6-4 in the championship final. The Summit doubles team of Hannah Shephard and Morgan DeMeyer also placed,

Photos by John Klicker / For The Bulletin

The Summit boys tennis team, top, celebrates its Class 5A team title at the Tualatin Hills Tennis Center in Beaverton on Saturday, while the Summit girls tennis team, bottom, poses with its 5A team title trophy.

Preakness Continued from B1 That’s heady company for a colt who has yet to be favored in any of his seven races. That should change in the Belmont. “We’re thinking Triple Crown, baby,” elated winning trainer Doug O’Neill said. “He’s a special horse. We’ll see how he comes out of it, and if he comes out of it in good shape, we’re heading to New York, baby.” I’ll Have Another won by 1½ lengths in the Derby and by a neck in the Preakness — the same margins Affirmed posted in wins over rival Alydar in those two races 34 years ago. But there’s one big storyline difference this time: Bodemeister is skipping the Belmont. “He’s getting off the bus here,” trainer Bob Baffert said. The 13⁄16 -mile Preakness unfolded the same way as the 1¼-mile Derby, with the speedy Bodemeister moving to the lead under Mike Smith and I’ll Have Another hanging back in fourth in the 11-horse field. The early fractions were slower than the Derby, but when it came time for Bodemeister to dig in, it was I’ll Have Another who found another gear under Gutierrez and reeled in the tiring pacesetter in the shadow of the wire. Since Affirmed became the 11th Triple Crown winner, 11 horses have won the first two legs only to come up short in the 1½-mile Belmont, the longest of the races also known as the “Test of the Champion.” The most recent try came in 2008, when Big Brown was pulled up around the turn for home and did not finish. Before that, Smarty Jones was run down in the final 70 yards by Birdstone in the 2004 Belmont. With the colorful and controversial O’Neill squarely in the limelight, scrutiny is sure to intensify about his violations for allegedly giving his

Creative Cause is third, trainer with Central Oregon ties has ‘no regrets’ BALTIMORE — Creative Cause finished third in the Preakness, an afterthought in the duel to the wire between winner I’ll Have Another and Bodemeister. It was an improvement over Creative Cause’s fifth-place finish at the Kentucky Derby, but hardly a satisfying outcome for trainer Mike Harrington, who grew up in Redmond and Sisters. “He just got outrun,” Harrington said. “He always brings his best race. He just couldn’t outrun those horses today. What can you do?” Harrington had no complaints about the effort of jockey Joel Rosario, who had Creative Cause in second place at the threequarter pole but finished 8¾ lengths behind Bodemeister. “You got to try to win the race. Joel Rosario tried to win the race,” Harrington said. “I have no regrets.” Harrington figured Rosario’s hard charge took its toll on Bodemeister, who was overtaken by I’ll Have Another in the stretch. “He probably won it for I’ll Have Another,” Harrington said. —The Associated Press

horses improper drugs. He was fined $1,000 and suspended 15 days in one incident. He is contesting another. “We know we play by the rules,” O’Neill said. “It’s all about the horse, and we’re just going to focus on the horse.” O’Neill has been accused in California of “milkshaking,” the illegal practice of giving a horse a blend of bicarbonate of soda, sugar and electrolytes. The mixture is designed to reduce fatigue and enhance performance. The trainer’s most recent violation dates from an Aug. 25, 2010, race at Del Mar in California. A blood test on his horse, Argenta, showed elevated levels of TCO2 — the so-called milkshake — before it finished eighth. He faces penalties ranging from a minimum 90-day suspension and a $5,000 fine to a maximum 180-day suspension and a fine of $15,000. Any suspension almost certainly wouldn’t occur before the Belmont. I’ll Have Another seems to have made a habit of close calls lately. Before the Derby and Preakness, the chestnut colt won the Santa Anita Derby by a nose over Cre-

ative Cause. As usual, owner Paul Reddam wasn’t sure his colt would come through this time. “I didn’t feel confident we were going to get there until 10 yards from the wire,” Reddam said. “I wasn’t sure that we would get there, but I

knew that our horse had a lot of heart and a lot of fight.” With a record crowd of 121,309 watching, I’ll Have Another was sent off as the second choice at 3-1, with Bodemeister the 8-5 favorite. The winning time was 1:55.94. I’ll Have Another paid $8.40, $3.80 and $2.80. Bodemeister returned $3.20 and $2.80, and Creative Cause paid $3.60 to show. Zetterholm was fourth, followed by Teeth of the Dog, Optimizer, Cozzetti, Tiger Walk, Daddy Nose Best, Went the Day Well and Pretension. Baffert, a Hall of Famer and five-time Preakness winner, thought his colt — named for his 7-year-old son, Bode — would outlast I’ll Have Another. “I felt really good about where he was,” Baffert said. “I really thought he was going to do it. The winner is a good horse. He should get the respect now that he deserves.” The victory was worth $600,000, boosting his earning to $2,693,600. Not a bad return for Reddam, who

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taking fourth after dropping a heartbreaker 6-2, 2-6, 7-6 (6) in Saturday’s third-place match. “We were really hoping to see Hannah out with a win,” Storm coach Ryan Cruz said about Shephard, a senior, who won the 5A doubles state title as a sophomore with then partner Jessie Drakulich. “She’s had a great four-year career at Summit.” Both Storm teams look to reload as the girls program expect to return eight of its top 12 players, while the boys should have back two of its three singles players that advanced to state and three of its six doubles players that contributed to Summit’s state title this year. “Driving home (Saturday), we already talked a little bit about lineups for next year,” Cordell said. “We lose some really great guys, but we lose great guys every year. … We’ve got a really solid group of guys who like success and want to work hard and get better.”

Mountain View’s Matt Van Hemelryck, left, and Matt Larraneta bump chests as they celebrate their Class 5A state championship in boys doubles at Tualatin Hills Tennis Center in Beaverton on Saturday against a team from Summit.

bought the colt for $35,000 on the advice of O’Neill’s brother, Dennis. “He showed he’s the real deal. He’s a real race horse. He gutted it out,” Reddam said. “The other horse was not stopping. He ran a bang-up race, to come and catch him. How can you criticize that? For those who have followed the horse and bet on him, that’s been pretty rewarding. I don’t know if that will be the case next time, though.” I’ll Have Another could have plenty of company for the Belmont, including some familiar foes from the Derby: third-place finisher Dullahan; seventh-place finisher

Union Rags; eight-place finisher Rousing Sermon and 12th-place finisher Alpha. Other possibles include Paynter — trained by Baffert — and Peter Pan winner Mark Valeski. Gutierrez, who was riding at Hastings Park in Western Canada until showing up in California last winter, displayed the calm and cunning of a veteran. “It’s not me, it’s him. It’s all about the horse,” the 25-yearold jockey from Mexico said. “He just keeps proving people wrong. I’m so happy for him because he’s such a great horse. He has a tremendous kick in the end.”

MEMORIAL DAY 2012

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LOCALNEWS THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/local

LOCAL BRIEFING

HIGHWAY 97

Fire destroys home shop

Good signs for Redmond? $250K to draw motorists

A fire at a home shop in Crooked River Ranch on Friday afternoon caused an estimated $200,000 in damage. Crooked River Ranch Fire & Rescue units were called to the fire on Northwest Chinook Drive shortly before 4 p.m. Firefighters found the shop engulfed and the fire spreading to trees and outbuildings. The fire was quickly contained, and the home on the property suffered only minor heat damage. Twenty-four firefighters from six agencies helped fight the fire. The cause of the fire has yet to be determined.

C

Reader photo, C2 Obituaries, C6 Weather, C8

By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

REDMOND — Redmond plans to spend $250,000 on roadside signage intended to lure more motorists from Highway 97 into the city’s downtown. Drawing people downtown has been a priority since the highway bypass was completed in 2008. While many Redmond residents

were relieved when traffic that had been clogging Fifth and Sixth streets was routed past Redmond’s core, the change has not been entirely beneficial. Cars and trucks carry people who patronize local restaurants and businesses. Less traffic often means less business. And now, as the city works to revitalize its downtown, it wants to make sure drivers along Highway

Warm Springs tribes plan new school vote By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

If Warm Springs Reservation voters pass a referendum, a new K-8 school there likely would be ready in the fall of 2014. The Warm Springs Tribal Council hasn’t set a date for a second attempt to pass a $10.7 million referendum, which would provide half of the money needed to build the new school. The tribal measure failed to draw the required onethird of voters to the polls last Tuesday. “The tribal council needs to reconvene, and they haven’t done that yet,” said Urbana Ross, chief operations officer for the Confederated Tribes. See Warm Springs / C5

97 recognize Redmond. “The basis of all of this will be to get people off Highway 97 and into the city center,” said Heather Richards, the city’s community development director. “The reroute took people out of our downtown, and we have found that there has been trouble with people knowing where to turn off and into Redmond.” See Redmond / C2

JAPANESE FESTIVAL

— Bulletin staff report

WASHINGTON WEEK WASHINGTON — The House of Representatives voted Wednesday to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act, a 1994 law that provides extra funding for the investigation and prosecution of violent crimes in which women are the victims. However, the House version of the bill differs from the version passed last month by the Senate, which recognized and expanded coverage for domestic abuse victims who are Native Americans, illegal immigrants, as well as gay, lesbian or transgendered individuals. The House version passed by a 222-204 margin, with 216 Republicans and six Democrats in the majority and 23 Republicans and 182 Democrats voting no.

Photos by Scott Hammers / The Bulletin

Janessa Haugen, a Redmond High senior, dances with other members of the Hokule’a Polynesian Dancers. Organizer Ami Zepnewski said the cultural ties that Pacific Islanders share with the Japanese convinced her they’d be a good fit for Saturday’s Japanese Festival.

See Week / C2

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The Bulletin Call a reporter: Bend ................541-633-2160 Redmond ........ 541-617-7837 Sisters............. 541-617-7837 La Pine ........... 541-383-0348 Sunriver ......... 541-383-0348 Deschutes ...... 541-617-7829 Crook ............. 541-504-2336 Jefferson ....... 541-504-2336

Culture, cherished Dade Shank, 3, helps assemble a traditional Japanese floral arrangement Saturday at the Japanese Festival at Summit High School.

By Scott Hammers • The Bulletin While much of Bend’s attention was on the Pole Pedal Paddle on Saturday, the focus at Summit High School was more than 5,000 miles away. The school hosted its eighth annual Japanese Festival, and for the second consecutive year, the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan last year were top of mind. Between a silent auction and the sale of wristbands, organizers raised several hundred dollars to benefit orphans who lost their families. See Japanese / C7

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Submissions: • Letters and opinions: Mail: My Nickel’s Worth or In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Details on the Editorials page inside. Contact: 541-383-0358, bulletin@bendbulletin.com

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SUMMER IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER.

YESTERDAY

Fire destroys Wetle’s store in 1962 This feature is compiled by Don Hoiness from archived copies of The Bulletin at the Des Chutes Historical Museum.

100 YEARS AGO For the week ending May 19, 1912

Baseball bugs in Bend again Somewhere the sun is shining. Somewhere hearts are bright. For baseball’s in the air again And a good Bend team’s in sight. So dust your bleacher cushion And give the trout a rest. Come to the game next Sunday And root your gol durned best. Cheer up you Bend fans! After all, this isn’t going to be a baseball-less summer. Just couldn’t be, you know. Think of Bend as the only town in Central Oregon without gumption enough to dish the national game.

If you want to know who’s who and why in the local league, just drift around to Johnny Carmody or Immele, who’s come to Bend to stay, or First Baseman Steidl, or Nick Weider, Guy McReynolds or any one of the dozen others who are taking their last year’s gloves out of the safety deposit vault and limbering up to dust around the diamond. This Sunday afternoon the first practice game will be played with a team from the brick yard. Everyone who plays ball is wanted, and everyone who likes to see ball is also wanted. No admission and rain checks given, says the management. Last week a meeting was held by some of the players and the whole subject discussed. It was felt that the best first move was to place the proposed nine upon a financial basis that would be satisfactory to the people here from whom the team would expect support, especially as last year there were financial difficulties because, apparently, the players had too little responsible backing. See Yesterday / C2

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C2

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

Week

Well shot! R E ADE R PH OTOS

Continued from C1

U.S. HOUSE VOTE • Violence Against Women Act W ald en (R) ......................................... Y Blumenauer (D) .................................N Bonamici (D)......................................N DeFazio (D).........................................N Schrader (D) ......................................N

Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication.

On Friday, the House passed a $554 billion defense bill that goes against the White House’s plan to limit and slow certain weapons programs. The measure would also stall President Obama’s plan to reduce troop levels, and bars same-sex marriage or marriage-like ceremonies on military bases. It also allocated an additional $88.5 billion for the war in Afghanistan. The Pentagon had set 2013 defense spending at $550 billion, and the White House is threatening to veto the bill, which passed by a 299-120 margin, with 222 Republicans and 77 Democrats voting in favor.

Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

U.S. HOUSE VOTE • A $554 billion defense bill Walden (R) ......................................... Y Blumenauer (D) .................................N Bonamici (D)......................................N DeFazio (D).........................................N Schrader (D) ......................................N On Thursday, the Senate confirmed two nominees for the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. The confirmations mean that all the seats on the board are now filled, the first time it has had seven members since 2006. Needing 60 votes for confirmation, Jeremy Stein was approved by a vote of 70-24, while Jerome Powell received a 74-21 vote.

U.S. SENATE VOTE • Stein’s confirmation: Merkley (D) .......................Did not vote Wyden (D) .......................................... Y

GALAPAGOS GULLS

• Powell’s confirmation: Merkley (D) ........................................ Y Wyden (D) .......................................... Y

Lou Polaski of Bend took this photo in January on Española, one of Ecuador’s Galápagos Islands. He used a Canon S5-is, set at f/3.5 and 1/1600 sec.

Continued from C1 A committee was chosen which is to have a general financial supervision of the affairs of the team. Each month it will publish a statement showing just where the money matters stand. Art Seeley, H.W. Skuse and G.P. Putnam are acting on the committee. No bills will be accrued by the team without the O.K. of at least two of these men, who will handle the money. As soon as the players have tried out a little and a suitable man is picked, a manager will be chosen who will have active charge of the team’s business. After a couple of weeks the players will elect a captain. Every evening this week, from 6 to dark there will be practicing on the diamond. Every ball player is wanted. The committee, acting until the appointment of a manager, has sent letters to ascertain when other games can be scheduled here and elsewhere. A Fourth of July game will be arranged soon. About 15 players thus far have shown up.

7 5 YEARS AGO For the week ending May 19, 1937

Bend man plans trip to Ireland Maurice P. Cashman, resident of Bend for 26 years, tomorrow will leave for his first visit to his ancestral home since leaving Ireland in 1909. Cashman will go east from Portland tomorrow evening and will sail on the S.S. Washington from New York on June 2. He will return to the United States in August on the S.S. Manhattan. The Bend business man’s first stop will be in France, when the S.S. Washington docks at Havre, at the mouth of the river Seine. In France, Cashman will visit a sister and will spend some time in Paris before going to Ireland. In Ireland, Cashman will visit his old home in Youghal, a historic town that is now an outstanding tourist center. It was in Youghal that the first potato brought from the new world was planted and it was in this same town that the first pipe of tobacco brought from the Americas was smoked. In Ireland, the Bend man will visit brothers and sisters. After returning to the United States on the S.S. Manhattan, Cashman will go to Key West, Florida, to visit a sister, then will return to the Pacific coast over the southern route, to San Diego and Los Angeles. Cashman left Ireland in the spring of 1909 and landed in New York on Memorial weekend. He will be in New York

Continued from C1 The city expects to spend up to $150,000 for one large horizontal “Welcome to Redmond” sign at the intersection of Highway 97 and Southwest Glacier Avenue. The city has already paid $21,000 to design such a sign, but Richards has turned down much of the preliminary work. She liked one art-deco style concept but asked that the design be reworked to look “even more impressive.” “This is something where we want people to say ‘Wow, this city is somewhere special,’ ” Richards said. “It needs to tell people that this is a place where they want to go.” Also budgeted are “welcome to downtown” signs, parking lot identifiers and smaller directional signs that will point both drivers and pedestrians to amenities such as downtown, Dry Canyon park, Centennial Park, the library and City Hall. The city will follow an art-deco motif with the smaller signage as well. City officials are also discussing upgrades to street signs downtown. “Redmond has worked hard to establish a sense of place,” Richards said. “One way to continue to do that is to improve these types of above-ground amenities.” The city expects to have completed designs by the end of May. The Downtown Urban Renewal Advisory Committee will review the proposal at its June meeting. — Reporter: 541-617-7837 ehidle@bendbulletin.com

— Andrew Clevenger, The Bulletin

Yesterday

Redmond

again this Memorial weekend, on his way to Ireland. When Cashman came to the United States in 1909, he went to Minneapolis where he lived for two years before coming west to the new city of the upper Deschutes, just being opened to the outside world by railroads.

Bend’s jungle town spotless town now Bend’s “jungle town”, scene of a banquet yesterday enjoyed by some 70 transients, was spick and span today, entirely free of litter and green as many a city lawn, result of a cleanup party sponsored by Fire Chief Tom Carlon. The jungle banquet followed the cleanup and was enjoyed by men from many parts of the continent who rolled their own cigarettes when tobacco contributed by Mayor Fred S. Simpson was distributed. Early yesterday, Chief Carlon visited the jungles and found the place most unsightly. The heaviest concentration of debris was adjacent to the railroad tracks and in the vicinity of the stockyards. Chief Carlon decided that something should be done. Summoning the transients from the campfires, makeshift shelters and boxes, Chief Carlon asked them if they would like to have a banquet — mulligan and all the trimmings. The vote was unanimous. Carlon promised the group a banquet providing they cleaned up the grounds. Canceling their scheduled departures from Bend on out moving freights, the transients turned to and put the grounds in shape.

50 YEARS AGO For the week ending May 19, 1962

Wetle’s fire A loss estimated at $175,000 or $200,000 was suffered Tuesday night when fire destroyed the Wetle’s store in downtown Bend. It was one of the worst fires in the city’s history, approximating in loss the “Fourth of July fires” that destroyed Eddie’s Garage and Oregon Trail Box in post war years. Last night’s fire was confined to the Wetle building, but there was some smoke damage to nearby structures, However, only one of these, Western Auto, was closed today, as was Ellite Beauty Shop. The fire was discovered about 9:05 p.m. At the time it had made strong headway at the rear of the big store and was burning fiercely, with occasional bursts of flames shooting out from the Broadway alley. Not until shortly before 11 p.m. was

the fire contained. Firemen worked through the night. The amount of water in holding the fire to the building, contents of which were ruined in the first spread of the flames, was possibly the greatest poured on any blaze in the history of the town. Water ran gutter full down the west side of Wall, and through the Broadway alley. So great was the flow of gutter water that it spilled into the Duncan McKay yard near Drake Park. Some 50 Bend firemen, aided by several from Redmond, fought the fire, which for a time threatened to gut the business section of downtown Bend. Firemen, some on the roof, some pouring water in from the rear, dumped water on the flames for hours. Control was difficult because the roof of the Wetle store caved in, forming a shield against water. Only a sturdy firewall averted a downtown conflagration, it was agreed by many.

Store owners make plans to rebuild Wetle’s Department Store of Bend, destroyed last night by one of the most costly fires in this city’s history, will be rebuilt. This was the announcement made today by Jack Wetle, one of the owners, as he stood near the fire warped safe of the big store this morning and surveyed the loss. “Our insurance will not cover the loss, but it will get us back in business,” Wetle said.

25 YEARS AGO For the week ending May 19, 1987

Crook County students picked for Soviet peace trip While most of their friends plan summer vacations around waterskiing and baseball games, Ken Webb’s and Kristin Larson’s summer will include a trip to a country where it is illegal for them to sell their Levis. The two will depart June 24th for the Soviet Union along with 18 other teens from across the nation. Their mission? Peace. The two teens have been chosen to participate in Youth Quest for Peace. The program seeks to encourage an appreciation of cultural differences and to establish cross-cultural friendships. The philosophy is that young people are better able than older ones to overcome stereotypes and investigate possibilities for the world’s future. Curiosity about Soviet culture prompted Larson and Webb to apply to become members of the tour. They submitted applications and in March they were noti-

fied that they and a girl from Dundee were the only three students from Oregon to be accepted. Recently the two received their itinerary and learned they will visit Moscow as well as Soviet towns most Americans have never heard of. Although the sights will be different than those they’ve seen in Central Oregon, the two agree that sightseeing won’t be the first priority. “We’ll be meeting with a lot of peace groups,” Larson said, adding that she would like to let the Soviets know that Americans aren’t all “highpowered” people who want to blow them up. Learning about the culture is important to Webb who hopes to have a lot of input at the meetings the group has with diplomats and teen-agers. He also hopes to learn “what the Soviet kids think about America.” “I can see the language as a real barrier” to carry on conversations, Larson said with a smile. But the two — neither of whom has ever traveled off the North American continent — say they will have more access to Soviet citizens than most tourists. They’ll be allowed to explore and visit with students their own age.

About the only thing they won’t be allowed to do is sell their Levis, Webb said with a smile.

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

C3

O N

EUGENE — Three Eugene police officers were hospitalized when a man in a downtown office building overturned a container of mildew remover, releasing noxious fumes. The spill caused a brief street closure. The officers were treated and released. The incident in the building that used to house the Eugene Public Library on Friday caused a brief lockdown. The building is now home to an engineering firm, whose frightened employees locked the office door until police arrived. Police say the suspect, 21year-old Matthew Madden, was banging on windows and threatening employees. Madden faces charges of methamphetamine possession, disorderly conduct, criminal trespass and criminal mischief.

Man’s dismembered body found in home ALOHA — Washington County authorities say they found an Aloha man’s dismembered body in a garage freezer at a home he had been sharing with another man. The second man has been charged with murder. The Oregonian reports that sheriff’s investigators took 29-year-old Christian Delaurentiis into custody. He was charged Friday with one count of murder in a Washington County Circuit Court hearing. Sheriff’s spokesman Bob Ray says the body of 43-yearold Phillip Lindemuth was discovered when officers executed a search warrant at a home they believe Lindemuth owned.

Man gets 6 years in botched robbery EUGENE — A Coburg man has been sentenced to almost six years in prison for his role in a botched robbery that left his accomplice dead. Darin George Dubouch, 39, was sentenced Thursday following his conviction on robbery and burglary charges. Dubouch was arrested in February after he and Shawn Connelly forced their way into the home of a Eugene heroin dealer. The dealer surprised the intruders when he grabbed a handgun from underneath a pillow, fatally shooting Connelly and firing several more rounds toward Dubouch. Lane County Deputy District Attorney Chris Parosa says Dubouch escaped the home with the dealer’s wallet and 19 grams of heroin. — From wire reports

The Associated Press PORTLAND — Prosecutors have accused a Vancouver, Wash., man and three other people with leading an international conspiracy to manufacture and sell designer drugs online and to stores that earned them $5 million between 2009 and earlier this month. Ryan Scott, 31, had shipments of merchandise from Peru labeled as incense, “burial powder” or insecticide, all of which government agents seized in February 2011 and said were actually a synthetic drug that imitates the high of cocaine and Ecstasy. Less than two weeks after his shipment from Peru was seized, the Drug Enforcement Administration issued an emergency order to control five chemicals, all of them synthetic cannabinoids used to make what government agents call “fake pot.” Scott and a Bulgarian national living in Hawaii face charges of conspiracy to manufacture and distribute a controlled substance. A mother and daughter from Las Vegas were charged with money laundering. Scott was arrested Tuesday and brought to court Wednesday, where he pleaded not guilty. Scott’s attorney says he pays his taxes and has done nothing illegal. Scott’s previous shipments came to Oregon, Alaska

Edward Stratton / The Daily Astorian

Graduate student Sumyik Hur, left, and doctoral student Samanan Poowakanjana blend some surimi gel before injecting it into sausage-like sleeves Thursday at Oregon State University’s Seafood Lab in Astoria. They were showing visiting industry leaders how to properly cook the gelatinous substance, used in the United States primarily to make imitation crab meat.

a chat with Park. “Jae was my Ph.D. student in the late 1980s,” said Tyre Lanier, a professor from North Carolina State University who taught Park much of what he knows about surimi. He traveled to Astoria to speak at the school on the freezing of surimi, often immediately processed into formed and cured products such as crabsticks and other shellfish-flavored products. He started coming in 1991, slightly before the school existed. “That’s when Pacific whiting was being looked at for surimi,” he said. Surimi, which comes from pulverized fish flesh mixed with such additives as salt, vegetable oil, starch, egg white and sugar, is cooked in two ways in the OSU Seafood Lab: an ohmic (electric current) cooker and a hot-water bath. Samanan Poowakanjana, a doctoral student from OSU focusing on surimi chemistry,

said that making surimi of the proper consistency can depend on the salt content, species of fish, moisture content — his surimi is usually about 78 percent water — and the duration of the chopping process from frozen blocks of surimi paste to cooked sausageshaped packets. Poowakanjana showed attendees how the lab’s cooker could send an electric current through the surimi, cooking it to an internal temperature of 85 degrees Celsius in 30 seconds. With Pacific whiting, he said it’s best to turn the surimi paste into cooked gelatin within 20 to 30 minutes of taking it out of a freezer. Park started the first annual Surimi School at the Red Lion Inn in Astoria with six corporate sponsors. With the growth of the school, the venue changed to the Columbia River Maritime Museum, then the Holiday Inn Express, then The Loft at the Red Building.

and California, and made their way to 3,000-squarefoot warehouse in Vancouver from which he operated KTW Enterprises Ltd. Prosecutors say Scott also marketed a synthetic marijuana substance under the label “K2” — which drew a civil lawsuit from a Kansas company that also produces an incense called K2. The two companies reached a settlement. “Individuals who manufacture and distribute synthetic drugs in an attempt to get around the law are not fooling law enforcement,” said Kenneth Hines, the IRS special agent in charge of the Pacific Northwest. Manufacturers create synthetic marijuana by coating plant materials with chemicals that mimic the active ingredient in marijuana. The products promise users a legal high. Public health officials warn that the products can cause nausea, seizures, hallucinations, racing hearts, tremors and nonresponsiveness. Federal agents also seized hundreds of pounds of dried plant materials, packaging equipment, and chemicals from the Vancouver warehouse. Scott was released from jail after his plea but ordered to relinquish his passport, not travel overseas and undergo drug testing.

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Dutch Bros. Coffee Eagle Crest Resort Elegant Strands Hair StylingMichelle Young Elliott Hill Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum Fin and Fire Fireside Stove and Spa Five Pine Lodge Flat Bread Community Oven Fleet Feet of Bend Fr. James Radloff Good 2 Go…Food & Fun GoodLife Brewing Goody’s Groove Yoga Gymboree Healing Bridge Physical Therapy High Cascade Printing High Desert Museum Hilton Garden Inn Corvalis Hola! Home Heating and Cooling Hydro Flask Ida’s Cupcake Café In the Breeze Jason Quigley –The Athletic Club of Bend Jeremy Graham Jessica Motes- Chic Salon Jim Richards – Bend Elks Baseball Club Jim Smolich Motors Joe and Charlene Levesque K bar K Ranch Katie Anger- Fabric- Kate

Kelley Mingus Kercher Electric Kristi Ramage - Bella Salon Kumon Math and Reading Center of Bend Kym Anderson at Central Oregon Aeshetics Landysystems Nursery Laurene Boardman LaVelle Vineyards Leapin Lizards Toys Leigh Casler Les Schwab Tire Center Redmond Lifetime Vision Care- Dr. Ryan Linda Terell Lisa Wilber Little Pizza Paradise Longboard Louie’s Looney Bean Coffee Lufthansa Airlines McKay Cottage Restaurant McMenamin’s Metolious Mountain Products Michele Iams- Salon Estillo Michelle Capps- Salon Envy Mo’s Restaurant Moonfire and Sun Garden Center Mtn. High Coins and Collectibles Namaspa Natalie Gregory Newport Ave. Market Nosler Incorporated NuSkin OMSI Oregon Coast Aquarium Oregon Crossfit OrganicScapes Inc.

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South Valley Bank Spanish Learning Center Steel Bloom Sun Mountain Fun Center Sunriver Resort Susan Holmes Sylvan Learning Center Ted and Lauri Braich Tetherow The Beauty Lounge The BLVD The Crazy Bean The Electronics Shop The Frugal Boutique The Hen’s Tooth The Human Bean The LAX Shack The Moto Shop The Old Spaghetti Factory The Riverhouse The Vibe Thompson’s Import Specialties Timberline Lodge Tom Bochsler Trader Joe’s Trattoria Sbandati Tri County Paving, LLC Twist Cocktail Catering Two Old Hippies Vicki Shuck WebCyclery Widgi Creek Golf Club Wild Wind Ranch Wildlife Safari Willoughby’s Wilson’s Of Redmond Zule Housekeepers

We apologize if we have forgotten anyone. We greatly appreciate you all and you are in our hearts.

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Chemical spill fumes hospitalize 3 officers

ASTORIA — Ever wondered about the crab-flavored fish protein in your seafood sandwich, crab salad or California sushi roll? It’s surimi, a fish protein paste made into various shellfish-flavored products. Oregon State University’s Seafood Laboratory hosted the 20th annual Surimi School, a gathering of global industry representatives and researchers that made Astoria for one week the epicenter of expertise on the globally popular, gelatinous fish protein you’ve likely had in one form or another. About 40 students from surimi plants, surimi seafood (finished product) plants and others from accessory industries attended lectures and took part in surimi labs. Jae Park, an OSU professor seen as the pre-eminent expert on surimi, founded the OSU Surimi Technology School in 1993 in Astoria. He started similar institutes in Bangkok in 1996 and in Paris in 1999. “The academic and industry languages are different,” said Park. “With that mentality, I found there was a great need to build industry-academia partnerships.” His answer has been to bring in academic and industry experts from around the world to Astoria every May for the last 20 years, sharing knowledge between the two groups and enhancing everyone’s understanding of the everchanging surimi industry. “In the school, the curriculum stays 70 percent the same,” said Park, who started the annual Surimi Industry Forum in 2001. Representatives of seafood and environmental groups such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the West Coast Seafood Processors Association offered an update on surimi production, health and potential for improvement. A panel of industry representatives from at least four continents and 10 countries also discussed resource and supply on the global market. Growth in the United States’ surimi production occurred mostly in the 1980s, after which it relatively flattened out with a peak around 2003, said Park. Since 1990, the domination of U.S. and Japanese surimi producers (more than 75 percent of the market) has dwindled. Meanwhile, China and Vietnam accounted for more than 40 percent of all surimi produced, as of 2010, although, Park said, the fish catch in Southeast Asia has been decreasing. “We need to revisit our thermal processing without jeopardizing food safety,” said Park. “We talked about the sodium issue. Salt’s important, but we need to reduce the amounts used.” The largest fish source for surimi production is the Alaskan pollock, which Park estimated accounted for 1.365 million metric tons in 2011, followed closest by 393,000 metric tons of Pacific whiting-made surimi. The two species experienced dips in catches as recently as 2009, but have experienced a resurgence as of late. Taneko Suzuki, a guest professor from Kokusai Gakuin Saitama College in Japan, spoke on the health benefits of surimi. Park said the 86-year-old teacher, who travels the world imparting her wisdom to others, credits her health largely to eating surimi. After lectures on subjects ranging from cryoprotection (freezing) and hygiene to high-pressure processing and quality measurement of surimi, attendees of the school split off into labs on gel preparation, texture and color analysis, and microbiology/sanitation, along with

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PORTLAND — Former City Commissioner Charlie Hales has fired most of his campaign staff and told them they’re welcome to reapply for their positions. Hales has secured one of two slots in the runoff for Portland mayor. State Rep. Jefferson Smith grabbed the second. Hales has fired six members of his seven-member campaign staff, including campaign manager Jessica Moskovitz. Moskovitz says her release is a shock. She says Hales told her needed to “recast the play.” Hales received 37 percent of the vote in the Tuesday primary. He and Smith will face off in the November general election to replace Sam Adams, who is not seeking a second term.

The Daily Astorian

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Portland mayor candidate fires staff

By Edward Stratton

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KLAMATH FALLS — A Klamath County judge has sentenced a motorist to more than seven years in prison for causing the death of his passenger in a 2010 crash. The district attorney’s office says 29-year-old Marcus Valentine of La Pine was convicted of second-degree manslaughter. Valentine was driving south on Highway 97 when he veered off the road and into a ditch, rolling the vehicle. Passenger Richard Allino was ejected from the vehicle and died from his injuries.

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La Pine motorist gets 7 years for fatal crash

Astoria hosts summit on surimi, Police say man international the globally popular fish paste ran synthetic drug ring

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

SAN FRANCISCO

In a city where dogs outnumber kids, finding a way for coyotes to coexist By Norimitsu Onishi New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — Almost all creatures, great and small, are welcome in the city of St. Francis, patron saint of animals, whose spirit imbues this place with a love and regard for our nonhuman friends. Take just one example gleaned from census and city data: Dogs outnumber children here, making already assertive dog owners an even more formidable political force. But the emergence in recent years of coyotes in the city’s parks, and sometimes in its expensive backyards and picturesque streets, has raised doubts about whether that founding legacy can survive. Will the two animal worlds — the domesticated and the wild — be able to coexist? Might they even, as many in this liberal city hope, ultimately complement each other? Taking no chances, city officials recently cordoned off trails and barricaded a restroom in an area of Golden Gate Park where reports of coyotes following dog owners and approaching unleashed dogs have been rising. The coyotes are believed to be protecting their den and newborns during the pup-rearing season, which lasts from April through August. “Coyote alert” signboards and posters, as well as those warning dog owners to keep their pets on leash, have been put up in Golden Gate Park and other pockets where coyotes have been sighted. Reports of coyotes killing dogs have come in, though none have been substantiated this season. “Some of it, we don’t know how real it is and how much

Ramin Rahimian / New York Times News Service

A sign warns of coyotes at Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. The city recently cordoned off trails and barricaded off a restroom in an area of the park where reports of coyotes following dog owners and approaching unleashed dogs have been rising.

of it is people raising the hysteria level,” said Rebecca Katz, director of the city’s Animal Care and Control. The other day, Katz said, someone called in a coyote attack on a pet pig. “We went out there. There was no pig, no coyote. So yeah.” The barricades had also upset some people. “So it becomes more and more escalated that way,” she said. Last week, Animal Care and Control sent out a stern written statement warning that “San Franciscans do not seem to be getting the message about how to coexist peacefully with local wildlife” because many dog owners were ignoring the law and letting their pets run loose.

Animal Care posted a video on YouTube of an off-leash Rottweiler, filmed by his owner, harassing two coyotes apparently protecting a den. Some dog lovers were left unconvinced by the city’s plea for coexistence. “I’m not fond of wildlife. This is as wild as I want it to get,” said David Powers, who was walking Honda, a Rottweiler-German shepherd mix, near the barricaded restroom one recent afternoon. “This is a city. They belong in the country.” “I’ve never seen any — thank God,” he said, about half an hour before a lone coyote appeared at that spot and lingered more than long

Alaska mine could devastate rivers, EPA warns By Kim Murphy Los Angeles Times

SEATTLE — The Environmental Protection Agency is warning that plans for a massive mine in the hills above Bristol Bay in Alaska — home of the biggest sockeye salmon fishery in the world — could have devastating consequences for rivers and streams and wipe out habitat for fish. A study that represents the federal government’s first significant scientific assessment of the proposed Pebble Mine site concludes that extracting billions of pounds of gold, copper and molybdenum from the region could result in the direct loss of up to 87 miles of streams and nearly 7 square miles of wetlands. “We conclude that, at a minimum, mining at this scale would cause the loss of spawning and rearing habitat for multiple species of anadromous and resident fish,” according to the EPA watershed assessment released Friday. Anadromous fish are those that swim up rivers to spawn, such as salmon.

The EPA report, even before its release, touched off a political firestorm, with Alaska’s Republican administration warning that the agency had no authority to conduct the assessment. Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, questioned the EPA’s authority to regulate the proposed mine and issued a demand for the documents, sources and communications the agency used in preparing its findings. The query makes it clear there will be a tough political fight over the mine, not only within the Obama administration, but in Congress, where Republicans have long been gunning for the EPA. The main controversy centers on which federal agency has chief jurisdiction over granting a permit for the mine. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issues dredging and filling permits for mines, and generally is inclined to approve them. But EPA regulations under the Clean Water Act

give the agency the authority — hotly disputed — to veto discharges of dredged or fill material if it would adversely affect municipal water supplies, shellfish beds or fisheries. The regulations say the agency can issue the veto even in cases — such as the Pebble Mine site — where no permit has been applied for. Presumably, the watershed assessment could be a first step in determining such a veto, which is one reason the Alaska attorney general, U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, and others have questioned the EPA about preparing it. “I remain concerned that an attempt to pre-emptively veto the Pebble Mine would have the practical effect of halting any development in the Bristol Bay area that might generate dredge or fill material,” Murkowski wrote in a recent letter. “It remains unclear to me how dredge or fill material from a mining operation might be substantively different from dredge or fill material generated from any other form of development.”

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enough to satisfy joggers who stopped to take pictures with their iPhones. In San Francisco, a city of 805,000, there are 108,000 children, according to the 2010 census. And there are 180,000 dogs, and 10 coyotes, according to city estimates. The coyote population has grown nationwide, with an increasing number making forays into suburban and urban areas. Coyotes arrived relatively late here, with the first sightings in 2004. Around that time, a coyote was videotaped crossing the Golden Gate Bridge into the city at night. Genetic tests later confirmed that the city’s coyotes share ties to those found to the north, on the other side of the bridge. In 2007, the city had to call federal authorities to shoot two coyotes that had attacked a pair of dogs in Golden Gate Park. Since then, the city has emphasized coexistence. “Usually, the knee-jerk response is, “Problem: wildlife. Let’s trap and kill,” said Camilla Fox, executive director of Project Coyote, a private organization based in Marin County that has worked with several cities, including San Francisco, to educate people about coyotes. “San Francisco has been very proactive.” Though some dog owners accepted the coyotes’ presence grudgingly, others embraced it. In Glen Canyon Park, Matt Orrick said he walked his mutt, Lazlo, at least twice a day and regularly spotted coyotes at dusk. He had never experienced an encounter, though he kept Lazlo off leash. “They’re doing their own thing,” he said. “It’s pretty cool. This is a big city, and there are wild animals.” Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

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State denies Portland bid to delay covering open-air reservoirs McClatchy-Tribune News Service

State regulators this week denied a request for construction delays on projects to replace Portland’s open-air reservoirs. The Portland City Council in February asked to push back the projects 5½ to 8½ years. But the state, in a letter released Friday but dated Thursday, said the city’s latest request backtracked on years of previous pledges without a compelling rationale. That means Portland must shut down its uncovered reservoirs by Dec. 31, 2020. The Portland Water Bureau’s request “does not identify any specific circumstances not previously known” by city officials when they proposed the original schedule in 2009 or modifications in 2010, Dave Leland, the Oregon Health Authority’s drinking water manager, wrote to Portland. “Further,” Leland wrote, “the proposed timing appears to reflect a suspension of effort to comply with mandated regulation, rather than continuing, steady progress toward regulatory compliance.” Under federal requirements, Portland cannot continue storing drinking water in open-air reservoirs at Mt. Tabor and Washington Park. Portland is one of the only cities in the country that uses open-air reservoirs. Officials had planned to build a 25-million-gallon reservoir at Kelly Butte by the end of 2014 to replace an

existing 10-million-gallon tank. Mt. Tabor’s reservoirs had been slated to go offline in 2015, while a main and tank project at Washington Park was scheduled by the end of 2020. The city instead asked for completion dates in 2021, 2024 and 2026 — a request state officials have now declined. Portland Water Bureau Administrator David Shaff said he hoped state regulators would allow wiggle room, similar to a request in the state of New York. “We are very disappointed in this decision,” Shaff said in a statement. “We made a case to the state that was very similar to the one made by New York City in successfully extending its reservoir compliance schedule. Oregon is clearly choosing a very different approach for administering federal drinking water rules.” A Portland lobbyist who represents large water users criticized local and state politicians for the decision. “This is a sad day for Portland ratepayers. The Oregon Health Authority’s decision to deny Portland’s delay of unnecessary reservoir construction is not a failure on the merits, but a failure of leadership on the part of our City and State elected leaders,” Kent Craford, of the Portland Water Users Coalition, said in a statement. Earlier this year, state regulators did grant Portland’s request to avoid building an ultraviolet treatment plant at the Bull Run watershed.

CORRE CT I ON The licensed character comforter on pg. 16 of this week’s ad incorrectly states 8-pc. complete set. This is not sold as a set. We apologize for any inconvenience. ®


SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

For remote museum in Gorge, funding is blowing in the wind

Warm Springs Continued from C1 She said it could be about two weeks before a date is set.

A crucial step

By William Yardley New York Times News Service

GOLDENDALE, Wash. — The big winds that rake this nearly treeless channel of the Columbia River Gorge lightened somewhat last weekend. “It was calmer than usual,” said Colleen Schafroth, the executive director of the Maryhill Museum of Art, high on a bluff above the Columbia. “But the turbines were definitely turning.” And after last weekend, when Maryhill celebrated the opening of a $10 million addition, when benefactors strolled the new plaza that offers views of the river, Mount Hood and the wheat fields across the river in Oregon, and when guests dined outside the little cafe, everyone will know better than to complain when the wind picks up again. After all, in addition to a sculpture garden featuring artists of the Pacific Northwest, Maryhill’s grounds — all 5,300 acres of them — now include 15 wind turbines, part of a vast installation that sends 500 megawatts of electricity to Los Angeles and about $250,000 each year into the operating revenues of one of the most isolated art museums in the contiguous United States. Maryhill raised the money for the addition through public and private grants — no small feat given its size and location and the challenges facing arts institutions — but museum officials say revenue from leasing its land for wind energy provided the confidence and financial security to proceed with the capital campaign at a time when the number of visitors — about 45,000 a year — is well below its peak in the 1990s. “Essentially, it’s an endowment,” said Jim Foster, the past president of the Maryhill board. “It really gave us the freedom to go forward.” The terms of the lease will last for 20 years, with the potential for a 20-year extension. The revenues will make up nearly a fifth of Maryhill’s $1.3 million annual budget. Those who put together the arrangement say they know of no other like it. “We’ve never had a situation even close to this,” said Gary Hardke, the president of Cannon Power Group, the California company that leases the land from Maryhill and operates the wind farm, called Windy Flats. “It really put a floor under their annual revenues.” Maryhill has never been conventional. It opened in 1940 after its founder, Sam

The new facility at the Maryhill Museum of Art, in Goldendale, Wash. Inspired by the need to strengthen its position as a destination, Maryhill opened a $10 million addition that was partly financed by income from wind turbines on the museum’s rural acres. A visitor walks by a painting at an exhibit at the Maryhill Museum of Art on May 7. Photos by Matthew Ryan Williams New York Times News Service

The referendum is a crucial step for the district, which hopes to replace the outdated Warm Springs Elementary School. Jefferson County School District voters approved the other half of the project’s funding on Tuesday when they passed a $26.7 million school bond. That bond will pay for a variety of improvements throughout the district, including a new performing arts center, track and fire sprinklers. Of the $26.7 million, the district will issue $10.7 million in bonds toward the Warm Springs school. But that cannot happen unless the reservation’s referendum for an equivalent amount passes. Ross said the reservation will boost efforts to inform tribal members of the referendum. To that end, the tribes will put up more signs and contact the reservation’s various committees, she said. In order to pass, the referendum will need to receive a majority of “yes” votes, of course, but it will also have to meet a turnout threshhold. For the result to count, at least 1,022 voters must cast ballots. In the first vote this week, 77 percent supported the proposal, but

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turnout was insufficient by about 370 votes, Ross said. As a result, the referendum failed.

Bonds on hold Until the referendum passes, the district will hold off on issuing any bonds for its half of the Warm Springs school. As soon as the referendum passes, the district can start issuing the bonds, Superintendent Rick Molitor said. At that point, the bond money for the school will be available for about two years, a time frame set by state law, Molitor said. Jefferson County School District voters last weighed in on a bond to build new schools in 1993. That bond passed and paid for a new middle school. Molitor attributes the success of the latest bond request partly to the variety of projects it will fund. How the tribes will raise $10.7 million following the passage of a referendum is unclear. The tribal council is working with executive staff on answering that question, Ross said, adding that she’s not allowed to provide any details. — Reporter: 541-977-7185 bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

for appointments call 541-382-4900

bendbulletin.com

Hill, had given up on his original dream. Hill, a builder of roads and railroads (as well as the Peace Arch on the Canadian border in Blaine, Wash., and a replica of Stonehenge near Maryhill), had planned to establish a Quaker farming community there, but he could convince no Quakers to come. Soon he gave up on living in the area, choosing to remain at his home in Seattle. Yet his mansion, made from poured concrete, was not going anywhere. Artistic friends, led by the modern dancer Loie Fuller, persuaded Hill to turn it into a museum, one whose eclectic combination of exhibits — chess sets, Rodin sculptures, American Indian artifacts, a room with religious icons, a re-creation of Theatre de la Mode, British paintings — sometimes feels as unlikely as the museum itself. The addition increases the gallery space, but most of the new square footage is devoted to providing Maryhill with things larger museums take for granted: a dedicated collections room, space for educational and other programs, and a discrete cafe with views

of the gorge. (The old one flowed directly into the Rodin exhibits.) Some regulars have expressed disappointment. “I thought they’d get a lot more paintings out of the attic,” said Diane Born, who visited the addition with her husband, Fred, last week. Schafroth said she understood those complaints, but that Maryhill needed to strengthen its position as a destination for rural school groups and others who sometimes drive three or four hours to visit, and that it also needed to improve the experience in the existing galleries. “It was really awkward for people who loved art,” she said of the old cafe. “You’d hear the espresso machine.” Capturing the wind is not the only way Maryhill uses its land to benefit its bottom line. The museum brings in about $60,000 by leasing acreage for fruit orchards and vineyards. It earns about $20,000 each year by renting access to the Loops Road, a series of curving roads built by Hill that is now the site of the annual Maryhill Festival of Speed, a skateboarding contest.

The museum is in Klickitat County, which has just 20,000 people. Portland, the nearest big city, is two hours away. Even Goldendale, with fewer than 4,000 people, is more than 10 miles away. “To call Maryhill Museum a pretty remote place is a bit of an understatement,” said Foster, a lawyer in The Dalles, who grew up in the gorge and recalled playing on the museum grounds in the 1950s. Schafroth, who started at the museum in 1986 as its education director, noted that gas prices were going up, a challenge for a museum so far from population centers, and that the young people Maryhill wants to reach must be convinced that there is value in confronting real objects, not just images on screens. “Why do people want to come here?” she said. “Every day we have to be out there making that case.” Schafroth slapped a massive foundation wall that was left exposed as part of the renovation, marking the transition from the old building to the new one, then said of Hill, “He built this place to last forever.”

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Crystal Mountain still open with near-record snowfall By Mark Yuasa The Seattle Times

Crystal Mountain Resort remains just one of seven North American resorts still in operation, and if all the stars align, snow lovers could be carving turns there well into early summer. “Right now it’s kind of up in the air if we’ll get to July like last year, and it all depends on the weather,” said Tiana Enger, the Crystal Resort marketing director. The weather has been quite warm this week at the resort east of Mt. Rainier, but, surprisingly, 2 inches of new snow fell

Thursday night on the summit. Enger says they’ll know more on extending the season this week after looking at the long-range forecast. “There is an 80 percent chance that we’ll get into the first two weekends of June,” Enger said. Through Friday, there was 50 inches at the base and 115 inches on the summit. The season snowfall total is 580 inches; the record is the 612 inches that fell in 201011 when the resort stayed open until July 16. The previous record was 598 inches in 1998-99.

11 more Wash. liquor stores to close By John Gillie The (Tacoma, Wash.) News Tribune

The state will close 11 additional liquor sales outlets Tuesday as staffing shortages cut the workforce able to operate the state’s network of liquor stores. The closures include two in Seattle and one in Bremerton, and none in Tacoma or Olympia. The state’s liquor control board said it will reshuffle its available workforce to provide full staffing at the remaining

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stores until May 31, when the state will close all of its stores for good. Voters’ approval of Initiative 1183 last year ended the state’s monopoly in liquor sales. Under that initiative, the state’s liquor sales and distribution system will be fully privatized June 1. The board said that in selecting stores to close early, it picked outlets with other liquor stores in a reasonable proximity.

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SEND YOUR QUESTIONS FOR THESE LEGAL PROFESSIONALS TO:

PAT LYNCH c/o The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 or e-mail: plynch@bendbulletin.com

WILLS/PROBATE/ESTATE

ELDER LAW

Q

I have legal guardianship over my 81 yearold mother in the State of Washington. My husband and I are now retired and are planning on moving with my mother to Bend. Can I transfer the guardianship case to Oregon?

A

You will be able to transfer her case from Washington to Oregon by taking advantage Lisa Bertalan of the provisions of the new Uniform Attorney at Law Adult Guardianship and Protective Proceedings Hendrix, Brinch & Bertalan, L.L.P. Jurisdiction Act. This Act allows transfer of an adult guardianship from one State to another and ATTORNEYS AT LAW provides for a smooth transition without a lapse in 716 NW Harriman St. the guardianship.

My mother died about 15 years ago and in her will she left everything she owned to her three daughters. She owned a mobile home jointly with my sister. The deed said “with right of survivorship.” She wrote a note saying if the mobile home was sold, her half was to be divided among the three daughters. Is my sister obligated to divide the funds between the siblings when it sells? Probably not. The mobile home passed directly to your sister when your mother died because of the way the John D. Sorlie property was titled. When real estate is owned with right Attorney at Law of right of survivorship it will pass to the surviving joint owner BRYANT, LOVLIEN regardless of what the will says. You may be able to establish that & JARVIS, P.C. your mother’s note intended to establish a trust requiring your sister to split the proceeds of the home sale, but that will likely be a legal ATTORNEYS AT LAW 591 S.W. Mill View Way battle, the outcome of which would depend on the facts and cirBend, Oregon 97702 cumstances. This situation could easily have been avoided if your mother had formally established a trust to control how the mobile 541-382-4331 home was intended to be handled upon her death.

Q

A

Bend, OR 97701 541-382-4980

REAL ESTATE My husband has a judgment against him (not me). His creditor said it’s going to foreclose the judgment and sell our house to collect what my husband owes. Can his creditor do this?

Q

Maybe. If only your husband’s name is on the title, his creditor can force a sale. If both names are on the title as “husband Craig Edwards and wife, or “tenants by the entirety”, his creditor Attorney at Law will not be able to force a sale while you are both EDWARDS LAW alive. If you survive your husband, you will own OFFICES PC the house and his creditor will not be able to force 225 N.W. Franklin Ave. the sale. But if he survives you, his creditor may be able to force the sale if the judgment is less Suite 2 Bend, Oregon 97701 than ten years old. You should call your attorney 541-318-0061 for specific advice.

A

EMPLOYMENT

Q

A key employee could hurt our business if she left. We’d like her to sign a “noncompetition agreement,” but I heard you can’t enforce those in Oregon, correct?

Noncompete agreements—saying “I won’t compete after I leave”—can be enforced here, but there are many strict requirements. Since 2008, you must inform the employee in a written job offer, at least two weeks before their first day, that a noncompete is required—or enter into it upon “bona fide” (genuine) advancement for her. Noncompetes Kurt Barker Attorney at Law can only be used with certain exempt employees; and there are minimum salary and other requirements, too. Even if you can’t Karnopp Petersen LLP obtain an enforceable noncompete, there are other ways to 1201 N.W. Wall Street protect your business. For example, an agreement not to solicit or transact business with customers may be enforceable without Suite 200 Bend, Oregon 97701 the strict noncompete requirements. Bottom line: work with an 541-382-3011 experienced employment attorney to address this. www.karnopp.com

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

O D N  Beatrice Moen, of Bend April 28, 1925 - May 5, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592;

www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Mrs. Moen requested no services were to be held.

Blanche ‘Bee’ Margaret Foley, of Prineville April 1, 1922 - May 15, 2012 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: A Memorial Mass will be held at 10:00 a.m., Saturday, May 26, 2012, at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Prineville. Contributions may be made to:

Pioneer Memorial Hospice, 1201 NE Elm St., Prineville, OR 97754.

Dalton Garing, of Florence, Oregon Nov.19, 1928 - May 7, 2012 Arrangements: Dunes Memorial Chapel, Reedsport, Oregon (541-271-2822). Services: A private memorial service was held. Contributions may be made to: The charity of one's choice.

Norbert J. Volny, of Bend Oct. 15, 1946 - May 16, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds. com Services: Visitation will be Mon., May 21, from 3:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m., in the Niswonger-Reynolds Chapel, Bend. A funeral mass will be held Tues., May 22, at 10:00 a.m., in the St. Thomas Catholic Church, Redmond. Contributions may be made to:

Veteran’s group of one’s choice.

Rick (Richard) Corrigan, of Bend Sept. 25, 1948 - May 15, 2012 Services: will be held May 26, at 2:00 p.m., at Aspen Hall, 18920 Shevlin Park Road, Bend Oregon Contributions may be made to: The American Diabetes Association, or Phoenix Children's Hospital: Chid Life Department

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Twila (Peg) Wilson, of Bend Oct. 15, 1928 - May 16, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home is honored to serve the family. 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds. com Services: 1:00 p.m., May 26, 2012, at First Methodist Church, 680 NW Bond, Bend. Contributions may be made to: Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701 or in her name to First Methodist Church for her favorite charities.

Kenneth Allen Bond, of Lebanon Dec. 12, 1930 - May 16, 2012 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: A graveside service will be held at 10:30 a.m., Thursday, May 24, 2012, at the Burnt Ranch Cemetery in Mitchell, OR. Following the service will be a Celebration of Life at 12 noon, held at the Assembly of God Church. Contributions may be made to:

Pregnancy Alternative Center, 136 W. Vine St., Lebanon, OR 97355 or the Pregnancy Resource Center, 399 NW Deer St., Prineville, OR 97754.

Joan Dee Symons, of Redmond Jan. 27, 1932 - May 16, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Redmond. 541-504-9485 ww.autumnfunerals.net Services: 11:00 a.m., Tues., May 22, 12012, at Trinity Episcopal Church, 469 NW Wall St., Bend.

Elizabeth ‘Betty’ Jean Windham, of Bend Feb. 7, 1927 - April 13, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals Bend, 541-382-1811. Services: A Special Mass will be held for her Tuesday, May 22, at 12:15, at St. Francis of Assisi Historic Catholic Church, on the corner of Lava Rd.. and Franklin Ave., in Bend Contributions may be made to: a charity of your choice.

Catherine Mildred Paine Nov. 9, 1924 - May 13, 2012 Cathy passed away May 13, 2012, Mother's Day. She was born in Flint, Michigan, in 1924, to William and Catherine Summerfield, along with nine siblings. In her 20s, she moved to Southern California, where she met Catherine and marMildred Paine ried Clayton Paine. They had three children, Sheila Evans of Chicago, Daryl Paine of California and Sharon Morris-Reade of Oregon. She also has nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Cathy and Clayton were married for fifty seven years before Clayton passed away in 2007. Cathy was a beloved wife and mother, and was loved by all who met her. She will be greatly missed by her family and all her friends at Clare Bridge of Bend, she resided for the last five years. "You will always be in our hearts Mom" Please visit www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

to leave lences.

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Kelly Marie Harroun Feb. 18, 1973 – May 17, 2012 It is with the deepest regret we announce that our wife, mother, daughter, sister and friend Kelly Harroun has lost her more than five year battle with cancer. She leaves behind a husband, daughter Kelly Marie and Harroun lasting memories of smiles, laughter and a wonderfully generous and loving heart. For many years she explored the country as a traveling nurse with extensive stays on the Acoma Indian Reservation in New Mexico and in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Kelly most recently worked as an OR nurse at Doernbecher Children’s Hospital in Portland and Cascade Surgicenter in Bend, until the strains of her illness made it difficult for her to continue. She and Tim lived in Bend where Kelly was deeply involved in cancer survivor related issues. Kelly is survived by her husband, Tim; and daughter, Gracie; her mother, Joanne; and stepfather, Bob. She is also survived by her father, Len; sisters, Kasey and Heather; her brothers, Ken and Tom; and 13 nieces and nephews. Memorial Services will be held on Sunday, May 20, 2012, at 2:00 p.m., at Grace First Lutheran Church, located at 2265 NW Shevlin Park Road in Bend, Oregon. Memorial contributions in Kelly’s memory may be made to the Sara’s Project through the St. Charles Foundation, Partners In Care Hospice House, American Cancer Society, or Young Survivors Coalition. Baird Funeral Home of Bend is in charge of the arrangements, (541) 382-0903. www.bairdmortuaries.com I lift up mine eyes unto the hills from whence cometh my help.

Oct. 15, 1946 - May 16, 2012 Norbert John Volny passed away on May 16, 2012, happily pruning hydrangeas at his river home in Tidewater, Oregon. His life was blessed and he seized every opportunity to learn and use the gifts God gave him. He was a Special Forces officer from 1967 to 1971, honorably discharged at Norbert Volny the rank of Captain. From there he graduated from Cal Poly University with a bachelors in Structural Engineering. For 20 years he did structural engineering in Bend on many well known establishments such as the Summit Lift of Mt. Bachelor, The Deschutes Brewery, the otter pond at the High Desert Museum and the Prineville Courthouse. Finally retiring from engineering in the 1990s he worked with his family to complete Snowberry Village. After Snowberry, he took up painting with the local art group, Sagebrushers. Though he painted many things, his favorites were landscapes. A father with no match and a passionate and loving husband, he leaves behind Joan M. Volny, his wife; Norbert W. Volny, his son; and Natasha M. Woolledge, his daughter; five grandchildren; Sharon Volny and Vicky Burgess, his sisters. We know you are in God's kingdom. We will miss your laughter and great ideas. For those who wish, a visitation time will be held Monday, May 21 from 3:00 until 6:00 p.m. in the Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Chapel. A funeral mass will follow on Tuesday, May 22, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. at St. Thomas Catholic Church in Redmond. The family suggests memorial contributions be made to the Veterans organization of ones choice. Please visit the online registry for the family at www.niswonger-reynolds. com

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: Herbert Breslin, 87: The brash publicist and manager who helped fashion a supremely gifted tenor named Luciano Pavarotti into a superstar but who later wrote a biting memoir about their 36-year relationship. Breslin drove hard bargains, pestered opera impresarios and journalists, and worked mightily to build the career of Pavarotti. In his book “The King and I: The Uncensored Tale of Luciano Pavarotti’s Rise to Fame by His Manager, Friend and Sometime Adversary� (2004), written with Anne Midgette, Breslin paid tribute to Pavarotti’s sometime generosity and charisma and especially his ringing tenor voice, which he said gave him goose bumps every time. Died Thursday in Nice, France, of a heart attack while traveling. Peter Fuller, 89: The owner of Dancer’s Image, the horse that surged from 14 lengths back to win the 1968 Kentucky Derby — then lost the winner’s purse of $122,600 three days later when the painkiller Phenylbutazone was found in the horse’s urine. It was the first and only time that a winner has been disqualified from America’s premier horse race. Died Monday in Portsmouth, N.H., of cancer. Crawford Greenewalt Jr., 74: Archaeologist whose work over half a century helped illuminate the lives of king and commoner in the ancient city of

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Norbert J. Volny

Sardis, in what is now western Turkey. Died May 4 in Hockessin, Del., of a brain tumor. — From wire reports

Fischer-Dieskau honored as one of world’s top singers By Daniel Lewis New York Times News Service

Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, the German baritone whose beautiful voice and mastery of technique made him the FEATURED 20th century’s OBITUARY pre-eminent interpreter of art songs, died Friday at his home in Bavaria. He was 86. His wife, the soprano Julia Varady, confirmed his death to the German press agency DPA. Fischer-Dieskau was by virtual acclamation one of the world’s great singers from the 1940s to his official retirement in 1992, and an influential teacher and orchestra conductor for many years thereafter. He was also a formidable industry, making hundreds of recordings that pretty much set the modern standard for performances of lieder, the musical settings of poems first popular in the 18th and 19th centuries. His output included the many hundreds of Schubert songs appropriate for the male voice, the songs and song cycles of Schumann and Brahms, and those of later composers like Mahler, Shostakovich and Hugo Wolf. He won two Grammy Awards, in 1971 for Schubert lieder and in 1973 for Brahms’ “Schone Magelone.� Fischer-Dieskau (pronounced FEE-shur-DEES-cow) had sufficient power for the concert hall, and for substantial roles in his parallel career as a star of European opera houses. But he was essentially a lyrical, introspective singer whose effect on listeners was not to nail them to their seatbacks, but rather to draw them into the very heart of song. The pianist Gerald Moore, who accompanied many great artists of the postwar decades, said Fischer-Dieskau had a flawless sense of rhythm and “one of the most remarkable voices in history — honeyed and suavely expressive.� Onstage, he projected a masculine sensitivity informed by a cultivated upbringing and by dispiriting losses in World War II: the destruction of his family home, the death of his feeble brother in a Nazi institution, induction into the Wehrmacht when he had scarcely begun his voice studies at the Berlin Conservatory. His performances eluded

New York Times News Service

Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau at Carnegie Hall in 1988. Critics likened the German baritone’s recitals to magic shows.

easy description. Where reviewers could get the essence of a Pavarotti appearance in a phrase (the glories of a true Italian tenor!), a Fischer-Dieskau recital was akin to a magic show, with seamless shifts in dynamics and infinite shadings of coloration and character. He had the good luck to age well, too. In 1988, at 62, he sang an all-Schumann program at Carnegie Hall, where people overflowed onto the stage to hear him. Donal Henahan, then the chief music critic of The New York Times, noted that Fischer-Dieskau’s voice had begun to harden in some difficult passages — but also that he was tall and lean and handsomer than ever, and had lost none of his commanding presence. Fischer-Dieskau described in his memoir “Reverberations� (1989) how his affinity for lieder had been formed in childhood. “I was won over to poetry at an early age,� he wrote. “I have been in its thrall all my life because I was made to read it, because it gave me pleasure, and because I eventually came to understand what I was reading.� He discerned, he said, that “music and poetry have a common domain, from which they draw inspiration and in which they operate: the landscape of the soul.� Albert Dietrich Fischer was born in Berlin on May 28, 1925. He gave his first professional lieder recital in Leipzig in fall 1947 and made his opera debut in 1948. He retired from opera in 1978. He continued giving song recitals through the end of 1992 and then, on New Year’s Day 1993, announced that he would sing onstage no more.

Psalm 138: 7-8 Though I am surrounded by troubles, you will bring me safely through them‌ the Lord will work out His plans for my life—for your lovingkindness, Lord, continues forever. Don’t abandon me—for you made me. Our loving and kind Heavenly Father worked out His plans in Patti Pederson’s life. He made her and brought her safely through the troubles that we face here on Earth. He poured His abundant blessings upon her each and every day. He did not abandon her and on May 8, 2012, called her and her beloved four-legged grandson “Reeseâ€? home. Patti was born on November 11, 1955 in Anaheim, Calif. to Robert and Mildred Jury. Twenty-seven years later in 1982, she met her other half, Byron Pederson on a blind date. In 1983 they were married in Seattle, Wash. and together, with his daughter Angie, they started their family journey. Over the next three years, Patti and Byron welcomed into the world their two daughters, Briana and Caitlin. The family was not one to settle. They were pioneers. Moving from place to place over the span of 22 years, each new adventure fit another piece into the giant puzzle that they were creating. That journey took Patti and her family from Briar, Wash. to Sunriver, Ore. in 1989. Eventually it was on to Kalispell, Mont. in 2002 and finally Ennis, Mont. in 2005. Patti loved her little house on the golf course with its wonderful views and the peaceful serenity that comes from living in a small town. After graduating from Lake Stevens High School in 1974, Patti worked in various positions in the medical field and in 1995, while living in Sunriver, Ore. she began working in the medical transcription field which included running her own business for several years. In December of 2011, she put away her keyboard for the last time. Ask anyone what Patti’s most precious gift was and they will all say the same thing; servitude. It didn’t matter how she was feeling or what she was struggling with personally, she would never hesitate to bend over backwards to help others. Whether it was packing a lunch, making cookies for a friend, or doing your dishes and laundry when you were too sick to do them yourself, she always put everyone else’s needs before her own, never asking for anything in return. She had a comforting voice and a contagious laugh that could dance around a room and lift your spirit off the ground. Her daughters and her grandchildren were her pride and joy, and by far, her greatest accomplishments. She left an enduring impression on our lives that will never be forgotten. She was preceded in death by her father and mother, Robert and Mildred Jury and her brother, William Jury. She is survived by her husband, Byron and their three girls, along with their families: Angela and Charles Alexander with granddaughter, Ann-Marie and grandson, Charlie; Briana and Brandon Nelson, and Caitlin and Justin Danielson, with grandsons, Bryson and Wesson. She is also survived by her sister, Barbara Pettit and her husband, Charles, along with their children. Her brother, Robert Jury along with his wife, Cheryl and children not to mention numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins. And finally we cannot forget Mater and Naji, the cats who were Patti’s constant companions over the past several years while Byron was flying overseas. A celebration of Patti’s life will be held at a later date this summer yet to be determined. Remembrances in memory of Patti can be made to Mercy Xpress, a non-profit charity that she and Byron founded. She was hopeful that through Mercy Xpress, Byron could stay home and be able to fly helping others: Mercy Xpress, P.O. Box 454, Ennis, MT 59729. Our separation from Patti is only temporary. So let us rejoice in the knowledge that we will one day join her at our Father’s table, and will spend eternity by her side.


SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

C7

Blind student athletes get 462-acre blaze in Southern Oregon a chance to run without aid is believed to be human-caused WESTERN WILDFIRES

By Jacques Von Lunen The Columbian

By Thomas Peipert The Associated Press

In Southern Oregon, crews worked Saturday to extinguish a 462-acre wildfire near the California and Nevada border, one of several burning across the West. The fire eight miles east of Lakeview near Highway 140 was not immediately threatening people or property, but firefighters said they were concerned hot spots could ignite later in the fire season. The fire, believed to be human-caused, is burning on private land and in the FremontWinema National Forest.

Northern Colorado fire prompts evacuations Meanwhile, lower temperatures and higher humidity Saturday were helping crews assigned to a wildfire that has scorched 12 square miles in northern Colorado. The fire, which started Monday about 20 miles northwest of Fort Collins, had prompted officials to evacuate about 80 homes, but all residents were allowed to return by Friday night. No buildings have been damaged, and the blaze was about 45 percent contained Saturday afternoon. Reghan Cloudman with the U.S. Forest Service said the area received about 0.15 inches of rain Saturday morning, which “is better than nothing.” Scattered rain storms moved through the area in the afternoon, and temperatures were expected to remain in the 50s throughout the day — more than a 20-degree drop from highs during the previous three days. “The rain is definitely helping firefighters out there,” Cloudman said. “It’s good news, but we don’t want people to let their guard down.” The U.S. Attorney’s Office

Japanese Continued from C1 Visitors to the high school took in dance, drumming and martial arts performances, or learned traditional Japanese arts such as fish printing, origami, calligraphy, and the Japanese style of flower arranging called ikebana. The more competitive entered a ramen-eating contest, or a kendama tournament, a Japanese game played with a toy consisting of a small ball and a wooden cup with which to catch it. Organizer and Japanese teacher Ami Zepnewski said nearly all the work put into the event was done by her students at Summit and the students in the Japanese program at Mountain View High School. Many students become interested in Japanese things initially, said Mountain View freshman Mara Henderson, leading to an interest in learning the language. “I’m really interested in their culture, and I kind of wanted a different language other than Spanish or French,” Mara said. “I wanted to be unique — and, it’s actually pretty easy.”

Maya Sugarman / The Antelope Valley Press

Los Angeles County Fire helicopter crews work to contain a brush fire in Acton, Calif., on May 8. The wildfire in northern Los Angeles County burned 126 acres and destroyed several structures. Wildfires have ignited across the West, including one near Lakeview in Southern Oregon.

said 56-year-old James Weber of Fort Collins accidently started the fire with an outdoor stove while camping in the Roosevelt National Forest. U.S. Forest Service investigators said Weber, a mental health counselor at Colorado State University, tried to stamp out the fire Monday but fled as the blaze spread. He later reported starting the fire to the Larimer County Sheriff’s Office, officials said. There is no cellphone service in the area where the man was camping. The Forest Service issued Weber a citation for causing a fire without a permit, and he faces a $300 fine. Authorities also plan to pursue restitution for the blaze. The Colorado blaze has required the resources of more than 500 firefighters, two planes and five helicopters.

Across the West ... Wildfires also have charred terrain in Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon and Utah.

Katie Givens, a freshman at Mountain View, was also looking for something different when she signed up for Japanese classes. “I wanted to confuse my friends,” she said. “They were learning Spanish, so I said, ah ha, I’m going to learn Japanese.” While Katie failed to achieve the confusion she’d hoped for, she did develop a much deeper appreciation for Asian cultures. Sometime after high school, she’s hoping to spend a few years living in Japan to improve her language skills. Summit freshman Tanner Bailey developed his interest in Japanese though entirely different channels — primarily from eating in a variety of Asian restaurants when he lived in Utah. The presentation of the meals impressed him, and as he continued to learn more, he began teaching himself how to make sushi. Now, he’s set a goal of moving to Japan to train as a sushi chef. Saturday, Tanner and classmate Fernando Sanchez spent the day manning the ikebana table, teaching visitors how to build their own flower

• In Nevada, a fire grew to 27 square miles and threatened sage grouse and mule deer habitat. No homes were in danger, and no injuries were reported. The blaze was about 50 percent contained Saturday and remains under investigation. • In New Mexico, crews battled a lightning-caused fire that has scorched 545 acres in the Gila National Forest in the southwestern part of the state. No structures were at risk, and no injuries were reported. About seven trails remained closed in the forest and more than 110 firefighters around the state were helping battle the blaze Saturday. • In Utah, rain and cooler temperatures helped slow a wildfire that burned nearly 2 square miles in the western part of the state. Firefighters contained the blaze late Friday. No structures were threatened, and no injuries were reported. Authorities say the fire was sparked accidentally Thursday by a passing car.

Little sneakers slapped the ground, pigtails bounced and parents cheered — the sounds of any school track meet. Except for this announcement: “Clear the track, so the kids won’t run into you!” These athletes wouldn’t see someone blocking their way. The Washington State School for the Blind on Thursday staged its annual track and field meet, as it has since the late 1980s. About 130 students from all over Washington and Oregon came to compete against — and spend time with — their peers. For many, it was the first time running without the aid of a sighted helper. The Vancouver school has a railing that runs around the inside of the track. Students can run a hand along the rail while they dash around the 200-meter oval. Athletes also competed in shot put, long jump and high jump. Runners on the track take off in a staggered start. They compete against the clock, not against each other, so each can run on the inside lane next to the rail.

A sense of trust Some of the younger kids — or those whose disabilities slow their stride — round the track slowly, yet are clearly exhilarated by the sensation of running unaided. “There’s an aspect of confidence and trust in this,” said Dean Stenehjem, the school’s superintendent. “They’re running without knowing what’s in front of them.” Some runners fly by, the left hand barely touching the metal rail. Alfredo Castaneda Garcia runs with long strides during the 200-meter dash. His hand hovers above the rail, his fingers just making contact. He’s on his home school’s track team in Hillsboro. There, he runs the last leg of the 4x100m relay, holding a tether attached to a sighted athlete.

“There’s an aspect of confidence and trust in this. They’re running without knowing what’s in front of them.”

— Dean Stenehjem, superintendent of the Washington State School for the Blind

But running unaided is not unusual for him anymore — Alfredo has attended the Vancouver track meet for the last 12 years. “I like that I can always improve and collaborate with other team members,” Alfredo said. After graduating from his Hillsboro high school next month, Alfredo will come to the school for the blind for its transitioning program, he said. Others were still new to the experience. Alijah Murray, 7, bounced along the track with his father, Jacob, jogging along on the infield. The Murrays came from Tacoma for the event. Alijah has been excited about the meet for weeks, his father said. Alijah has circled the track at his school in Tacoma, with the aid of a few girls who “mother him,” his mother, Rachelle, said with a laugh. The young boy couldn’t comment on his experience of running alone for the first time. He was busy playing with new friends after the race. “Getting the kids together and networking with other parents — this is excellent,” Rachelle Murray said.

Sensory learning The day wasn’t just about running and competing. The youngsters learned about animals, too. The basement of the Vancouver school holds a Sensory Safari — taxidermied animals. If you’re unable to see a picture of a lion, a warthog or an antelope, how can

anyone’s description ever do the real thing justice? In the exhibit, students can learn what the exotic animals look like by touching. There are headsets for audio lessons and plaques in Braille. The permanent exhibit is a donation by the Safari Club International Northwest Chapter. And above ground, students experienced another animal up close. Two gentle giants from Mountain Peaks Therapy Llamas mingled with the athletes. “Holy smoke!” said Jesus Ortiz, a 17-year-old from Hillsboro. “This is a llama?” His hands ran over the sheared back, then wandered to the shaggy mane. His friend, Jesus Reyes, commented on the llama’s soft hair. But Ortiz took his hand and guided him to the soft tuft on the llama’s head. “No, you haven’t felt anything,” Ortiz said. “Go up here, man!”

No longer odd one out The Vancouver school is a state agency, and is the only school in Washington or Oregon devoted to serving those with severely impaired vision. It offers programs to students all over the state. But that doesn’t replace being among kids who know what it’s like to be blind. Arianna Jordan, an 11year-old from Spokane, grinned ear to ear after running the 200 meters. “That was cool,” she said. She’ll have regular access to the track soon. Arianna will be a student at the school for the blind next year. Her mother is moving the family to Vancouver, just for the school. There are only four or five other blind children the family meets at school events back home, said Georgia Tarrant, Arianna’s older sister. The young girl gets singled out. “Yeah, I’m tired of being called ‘that blind girl,’ ” Arianna said in a defiant tone. Starting in September, she won’t have to worry about that.

arrangements. Tanner said the three-tiered arrangements are not just designed to look nice. Larger flowers at the bottom represent man and earth, he said, while the towering spires of greenery at the top represent the heavens. In between snipping at scraps of flowers, Tanner said it hasn’t been easy getting high school students interested in assisting victims of the earthquake and tsunami. While most of his classmates remember it, he said the memory seems to be fading. Zepnewski said she’s had the same experience. Recalling discussions with her own family members who lost their homes last year, Zepnewski said Japanese people are often reluctant to discuss their problems, which has probably allowed the ongoing recovery efforts to slip from the public’s attention. “They’re just rebuilding, they’re moving on. That’s their goal,” she said. “But they don’t really talk about what might be going on inside.” — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

Offer expires 06/30/2012.

Sylvan of Bend 2150 NE Studio Rd., Suite 10, Bend, OR. 97701

541-389-9252 bendsylvan@qwest.net


THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

C8

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, MAY 20

MONDAY Tonight: Mostly cloudy, chance of rain late.

Today: Mostly cloudy.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

HIGH

LOW

72

45

Astoria 64/49

55/51

Cannon Beach 54/50

Hillsboro Portland 70/53 69/50

Tillamook 64/49

Salem

55/47

74/52

71/51

57/49

60s

69/54

71/48

Coos Bay

69/42

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Crescent

Roseburg

61/50

Chemult

78/51

Gold Beach

Silver Lake

68/39

60/50

Riley

WEST Partly to mostly cloudy with showers in the north this afternoon. CENTRAL Increasing clouds with isolated thunderstorms over the mountains.

Nyssa 81/52

80/49

70/43

74/43

Jordan Valley 74/48

Frenchglen 79/51

Yesterday’s state extremes

Rome

• 76°

84/50

Hermiston

82/50

78/47

Klamath Falls 80/47

82/50

Lakeview 79/49

• 27°

Fields

80s

McDermitt

82/54

Meacham

74/45

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes

-10s

0s

Vancouver 58/51 Seattle 63/51

10s

Calgary 63/46

20s

30s

40s

Saskatoon Winnipeg 68/50 64/44

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 68/40

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 77/60

Halifax 72/49 Portland Billings Bismarck To ronto Portland 72/50 77/51 71/49 St. Paul 81/58 70/53 Green Bay Boston • 103° 68/49 81/55 Boise 75/55 Buffalo Rapid City Thermal, Calif. Detroit 81/52 82/57 New York 69/53 84/62 80/59 • 21° Des Moines Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 76/50 Chicago Stanley, Idaho 69/45 85/61 81/59 89/61 Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. • 1.52” 73/50 65/51 City 80/60 Las Pompano Beach, Denver Louisville 80/62 Kansas City Vegas 77/49 88/60 Fla. 77/52 St. Louis 97/74 Charlotte 89/62 82/59 Albuquerque Los Angeles Little Rock Nashville 85/55 69/59 89/64 87/65 Phoenix Oklahoma City Atlanta 104/73 81/62 Honolulu 85/60 Birmingham 87/72 Tijuana 88/63 Dallas 73/57 85/66 New Orleans 88/70 Houston Chihuahua 87/68 Orlando 93/65 88/67 Miami 84/74 Monterrey La Paz 94/66 99/63 Mazatlan Anchorage 84/74 57/42 Juneau 58/43

(in the 48 contiguous states):

FRONTS

HIGH LOW

HIGH LOW

62 37

HIGH LOW

59 32

58 33

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .5:15 a.m. . . . . . 7:55 p.m. Venus . . . . . .6:37 a.m. . . . . 10:33 p.m. Mars. . . . . . .1:20 p.m. . . . . . 2:37 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . .5:21 a.m. . . . . . 7:55 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .5:00 p.m. . . . . . 4:16 a.m. Uranus . . . . .3:24 a.m. . . . . . 3:46 p.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66/36 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.01” Record high . . . . . . . . 91 in 1954 Average month to date. . . 0.50” Record low. . . . . . . . . 22 in 1941 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.63” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Average year to date. . . . . 4.63” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.02 Record 24 hours . . .1.07 in 1948 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:33 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:31 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:33 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:32 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 5:18 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 8:35 p.m.

Moon phases New

First

Full

Last

May 20 May 28 June 4 June 11

OREGON CITIES

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m. Astoria . . . . . . . .64/37/0.00 . . . .64/49/sh . . . . .62/49/sh Baker City . . . . . .71/29/0.00 . . . .76/46/pc . . . . . .69/41/t Brookings . . . . . .59/43/0.00 . . . . .60/49/c . . . . .58/49/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . .71/27/0.00 . . . .76/46/pc . . . . . .70/39/t Eugene . . . . . . . .66/34/0.00 . . . .73/49/pc . . . . .64/50/sh Klamath Falls . . .70/32/0.00 . . . .80/47/pc . . . . .67/43/sh Lakeview. . . . . . .70/30/0.00 . . . .79/49/pc . . . . .67/45/pc La Pine . . . . . . . .69/28/0.00 . . . .70/41/pc . . . . .59/37/sh Medford . . . . . . .75/41/0.00 . . . .86/53/pc . . . . .73/52/sh Newport . . . . . . .59/36/0.00 . . . .55/51/sh . . . . .55/50/sh North Bend . . . . .57/39/0.00 . . . . .60/51/c . . . . .59/51/sh Ontario . . . . . . . .73/40/0.00 . . . .82/54/pc . . . . .77/52/pc Pendleton . . . . . .74/39/0.00 . . . .72/50/pc . . . . .68/49/sh Portland . . . . . . .70/45/0.00 . . . .70/53/sh . . . . . .65/53/r Prineville . . . . . . .66/31/0.00 . . . .74/46/pc . . . . .64/39/sh Redmond. . . . . . . . not avail. . . . .67/46/pc . . . . .64/42/sh Roseburg. . . . . . .74/41/0.00 . . . . .78/51/c . . . . .68/49/sh Salem . . . . . . . . .72/39/0.00 . . . .72/50/sh . . . . .66/50/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . .72/31/0.00 . . . . .70/44/c . . . . .58/39/sh The Dalles . . . . . .76/42/0.00 . . . .71/51/pc . . . . .68/50/sh

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

5

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . .92-130 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 153 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .12-36 Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . Carry chains or T. Tires Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Squaw Valley, California . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . Closed for season Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report For links to the latest ski conditions visit: For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html www.tripcheck.com or call 511 Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .91/66/0.00 . .86/64/pc . 88/65/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . . . 85/56/s . . .80/59/t Albany. . . . . . . . . .82/47/0.00 . . . 88/56/s . . .78/55/t Albuquerque. . . . .82/51/0.00 . .85/55/pc . 89/58/pc Anchorage . . . . . .53/43/0.00 . . .57/42/c . 60/44/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . . .83/62/0.00 . .85/60/pc . . .86/62/t Atlantic City . . . . .75/45/0.00 . .73/61/pc . 67/60/sh Austin . . . . . . . . . .90/68/0.00 . .88/65/pc . 89/68/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .83/49/0.00 . .80/60/pc . 72/62/sh Billings . . . . . . . . .65/39/0.00 . .77/51/pc . 91/56/pc Birmingham . . . . .85/66/0.00 . .88/63/pc . . .86/63/t Bismarck. . . . . . . .64/51/0.44 . .71/49/pc . 78/55/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . . .75/43/0.00 . .81/52/pc . 78/48/pc Boston. . . . . . . . . .66/51/0.00 . . . 75/55/s . 66/56/sh Bridgeport, CT. . . .73/50/0.00 . . . 76/55/s . 70/55/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . . .82/52/0.00 . . . 82/57/s . 71/59/pc Burlington, VT. . . .83/46/0.00 . . . 89/59/s . 83/55/pc Caribou, ME . . . . .72/52/0.00 . .79/53/pc . . 82/49/s Charleston, SC . . .74/61/0.00 . .80/63/pc . 81/65/pc Charlotte. . . . . . . .76/54/0.00 . .82/59/pc . 80/60/pc Chattanooga. . . . .86/61/0.00 . . . 88/61/t . . .86/61/t Cheyenne . . . . . . .57/41/0.18 . .69/45/pc . 80/50/pc Chicago. . . . . . . . .92/59/0.00 . . . 89/61/t . 65/54/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .87/51/0.00 . .86/57/pc . . .82/58/t Cleveland . . . . . . .84/50/0.00 . .83/64/pc . . .78/61/t Colorado Springs .62/48/0.05 . . . 68/46/t . 78/50/pc Columbia, MO . . .87/64/0.00 . . . 82/54/t . . 74/55/s Columbia, SC . . . .80/61/0.00 . .81/60/pc . 83/61/pc Columbus, GA. . . .85/62/0.00 . . . 88/61/s . 85/63/pc Columbus, OH. . . .86/56/0.00 . .85/61/pc . 84/59/pc Concord, NH. . . . .82/41/0.00 . . . 85/51/s . . .74/50/t Corpus Christi. . . .88/69/0.00 . . . 85/72/s . . 85/71/s Dallas Ft Worth. . .89/69/0.00 . .85/66/pc . 87/66/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .85/54/0.00 . .84/61/pc . . .81/57/t Denver. . . . . . . . . .57/46/0.19 . . . 77/49/t . 86/52/pc Des Moines. . . . . .86/66/0.00 . .76/50/pc . . 74/53/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .83/51/0.00 . .84/62/pc . . .78/59/t Duluth. . . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . . 62/45/t . . 68/47/s El Paso. . . . . . . . . .91/72/0.00 . .93/73/pc . . 93/74/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .67/38/0.00 . .69/43/pc . 70/46/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .74/55/0.00 . .70/49/pc . . 75/55/s Flagstaff . . . . . . . .73/28/0.00 . . . 79/36/s . . 81/41/s

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .87/52/0.00 . .87/62/pc . . .73/57/t Green Bay. . . . . . .89/58/0.00 . . . 81/55/t . 66/49/sh Greensboro. . . . . .76/53/0.00 . .80/58/pc . . 77/59/c Harrisburg. . . . . . .84/49/0.00 . .83/59/pc . 72/59/sh Hartford, CT . . . . .83/45/0.00 . . . 82/58/s . 69/55/sh Helena. . . . . . . . . .66/33/0.00 . .73/49/pc . 81/50/pc Honolulu. . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . . . 87/72/s . . 86/72/s Houston . . . . . . . .88/62/0.00 . . . 87/68/s . 87/69/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .88/64/0.00 . .87/63/pc . . .85/61/t Indianapolis . . . . .86/61/0.00 . .87/64/pc . . .79/59/t Jackson, MS . . . . .89/65/0.00 . .89/61/pc . . .89/64/t Jacksonville. . . . . .82/64/0.00 . . . 83/63/s . . 88/65/s Juneau. . . . . . . . . .51/41/0.01 . .58/43/sh . . 60/45/c Kansas City. . . . . 85/64/trace . . . 77/52/t . 74/53/pc Lansing . . . . . . . . .85/54/0.00 . .87/61/pc . . .78/57/t Las Vegas . . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . . 97/74/s . 101/75/s Lexington . . . . . . .85/55/0.00 . .85/59/pc . . .83/62/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . .74/49/pc . 77/54/pc Little Rock. . . . . . .90/65/0.00 . .87/65/pc . . .84/60/t Los Angeles. . . . . .68/60/0.00 . .69/59/pc . 66/58/pc Louisville. . . . . . . .88/64/0.00 . .88/60/pc . . .81/61/t Madison, WI . . . . .90/56/0.00 . . . 82/52/t . . 68/51/s Memphis. . . . . . . .90/69/0.00 . .91/66/pc . . .83/63/t Miami . . . . . . . . . .84/74/0.06 . . . 84/74/t . 86/76/pc Milwaukee . . . . . .84/54/0.00 . . . 78/56/t . 63/51/pc Minneapolis . . . . .88/67/0.05 . . . 68/49/t . 72/51/pc Nashville. . . . . . . .87/62/0.00 . .89/64/pc . . .86/61/t New Orleans. . . . .90/68/0.00 . . . 88/70/s . 89/71/pc New York . . . . . . .80/53/0.00 . . . 80/59/s . 72/57/sh Newark, NJ . . . . . .80/50/0.00 . . . 82/57/s . 71/58/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . . .71/58/0.00 . . . 72/63/t . 73/63/sh Oklahoma City . . .87/68/0.00 . . . 81/62/t . . .81/59/t Omaha . . . . . . . . .87/71/0.00 . .73/50/pc . 76/54/pc Orlando. . . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . . . 88/67/s . . 89/69/s Palm Springs. . . .102/66/0.00 . .101/70/s . 104/70/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .90/62/0.00 . . . 88/57/t . 71/55/pc Philadelphia . . . . .81/53/0.00 . .81/59/pc . 71/60/sh Phoenix. . . . . . . . .98/70/0.00 . .104/73/s . 107/74/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .82/49/0.00 . . . 86/56/s . . .80/59/t Portland, ME. . . . .73/43/0.00 . . . 72/50/s . 65/49/sh Providence . . . . . .76/45/0.00 . . . 78/54/s . 67/53/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . . .77/54/0.00 . . . 79/61/t . . .80/59/t

The Associated Press GATES — Sheriff’s officers say a 22-year-old man died while trying to save the life of a 5-year-old boy who fell into the North Santiam River near Gates. The boy is missing in the river. Rescue crews recovered the man’s body Friday after-

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .63/50/0.20 . .69/53/pc . 81/59/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .82/46/0.00 . . . 85/51/s . 81/50/pc Richmond . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . . . 75/62/t . 73/60/sh Rochester, NY . . . .82/49/0.00 . . . 84/57/s . 81/59/pc Sacramento. . . . . .88/53/0.00 . . . 88/56/s . 85/57/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . . .90/66/0.00 . . . 89/62/t . 75/58/pc Salt Lake City . . . .71/45/0.00 . . . 80/62/s . . 89/59/s San Antonio . . . . .88/70/0.00 . .88/65/pc . 90/67/pc San Diego . . . . . . .69/61/0.00 . .69/59/pc . 68/59/pc San Francisco . . . .68/49/0.00 . .68/51/pc . 66/51/pc San Jose . . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . . . 79/54/s . 75/55/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . . .78/43/0.00 . .74/49/pc . 76/53/pc

Amanda Cowan / The Corvallis Gazette-Times

Linus Pauling Middle School students Nick Hentzel, center, and J.D. Pinion, right, join parent volunteer Tessa Hanover as they paddle on the Clemens Mill Pond while taking part in the 2012 Newton Creek Wetlands Stewardship Field Day Tuesday morning in Philomath.

Classes via canoe: Middle schoolers study aquatic habitats, watershed PHILOMATH — If you want to learn about beavers, you want to be able to take a close look at the semi-aquatic rodents and their habitat. So what better way to learn about the creatures than by canoe? So it was on Tuesday that sixth-grade students from Linus Pauling Middle School donned life jackets, grabbed paddles and made their way around Clemens Mill Pond in canoes. They weren’t disappointed. “We saw like six beaver lodges!” said sixth-grader Julia Harrington. “It was cool to see them up close instead of just hearing about them in a classroom.” Harrington is one of 400 middle-school students participating in the fifth annual Newton Creek Wetlands Stewardship Field Day event, held

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .80/58/0.00 . . . 81/62/s . 83/65/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . . .67/45/0.00 . .63/51/sh . . .60/47/r Sioux Falls. . . . . . .76/67/0.02 . .67/45/pc . . 75/53/s Spokane . . . . . . . .67/46/0.00 . .72/50/pc . 67/48/sh Springfield, MO . .86/64/0.00 . . . 82/56/t . 75/53/pc Tampa. . . . . . . . . .90/71/0.00 . .88/67/pc . . 88/70/s Tucson. . . . . . . . . .93/63/0.00 . .100/69/s . 103/70/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .89/70/0.00 . . . 82/61/t . . .82/61/t Washington, DC . .84/56/0.00 . .80/60/pc . 73/62/sh Wichita . . . . . . . . .88/71/0.00 . . . 78/55/t . 79/57/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .74/40/0.00 . . .70/49/c . 70/47/sh Yuma. . . . . . . . . . .99/68/0.00 . .104/72/s . 107/71/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .64/52/0.00 . . . 74/48/t . . .72/56/t Athens. . . . . . . . . .71/57/0.00 . .79/62/pc . . 75/63/c Auckland. . . . . . . .61/45/0.00 . .60/48/pc . 62/50/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .106/81/0.00 . .103/76/s 100/72/pc Bangkok . . . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . . . 94/82/t . 94/82/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . .88/65/pc . . 86/58/c Beirut . . . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . . . 80/65/s . . .77/64/t Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .75/46/0.00 . .75/56/pc . . .83/65/t Bogota . . . . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . .63/50/sh . 67/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .73/41/0.00 . . . 80/55/s . . 78/61/c Buenos Aires. . . . .61/54/0.00 . .73/62/sh . 65/54/sh Cabo San Lucas . .88/68/0.00 . . . 92/69/s . . 96/68/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . .85/64/pc . . 88/70/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .54/32/0.00 . .63/46/pc . 64/45/sh Cancun . . . . . . . . .82/75/0.00 . . . 84/77/t . . .85/75/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .52/43/0.00 . . .54/41/c . 62/52/pc Edinburgh. . . . . . .50/36/0.00 . . .52/41/c . 62/48/pc Geneva . . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . .76/55/sh . 59/47/sh Harare. . . . . . . . . .75/48/0.00 . . . 74/48/s . . 72/50/s Hong Kong . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . . 90/78/t . 87/78/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . .70/59/pc . 71/63/pc Jerusalem . . . . . . .74/57/0.00 . . . 77/55/s . . 73/54/s Johannesburg. . . .72/54/0.00 . . . 63/34/s . . 59/33/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .70/66/0.00 . .74/64/pc . 73/66/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . .63/50/sh . 64/52/sh London . . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . . . 70/52/r . . 65/48/c Madrid . . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . .64/45/sh . 65/43/pc Manila. . . . . . . . . .97/77/0.00 . . . 95/80/t . . .90/80/t

noon. A search for the boy was suspended at nightfall. Crews planned to resume looking for him Saturday. Linn County Sheriff Tim Mueller said that as of late Friday night, officers had not been able to reach the boy’s mother. No details were provided

Mecca . . . . . . . . .106/84/0.00 . .110/85/s . 109/82/s Mexico City. . . . . .79/52/0.00 . . . 76/46/s . . 74/48/s Montreal. . . . . . . .79/54/0.00 . . . 86/64/s . 86/60/sh Moscow . . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . . . 78/57/s . 78/58/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . . . 75/58/t . . .75/56/t Nassau . . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . .84/75/pc . 86/78/sh New Delhi. . . . . .106/84/0.00 111/86/pc 110/88/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . . .81/52/0.00 . . .76/58/c . . 75/60/c Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . . .62/51/c . . 64/49/s Ottawa . . . . . . . . .82/52/0.00 . . . 87/61/s . 83/59/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . .72/50/sh . 66/53/sh Rio de Janeiro. . . .79/64/0.00 . .76/60/pc . . 76/60/s Rome. . . . . . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . .70/59/sh . 66/54/sh Santiago . . . . . . . .70/39/0.00 . . . 61/50/s . 64/54/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . .71/54/pc . 72/54/pc Sapporo . . . . . . . .52/50/0.00 . .68/48/pc . 67/48/pc Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . .78/66/pc . . 81/62/s Shanghai. . . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . .70/61/sh . . 75/63/s Singapore . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . . 88/80/t . . .87/80/t Stockholm. . . . . . .64/41/0.00 . .71/47/pc . 69/54/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . .63/49/pc . 66/42/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . . . 80/71/t . 77/72/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . . . 76/62/s . 75/63/sh Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . . .72/55/c . . 75/56/c Toronto . . . . . . . . .81/50/0.00 . . . 81/58/s . 78/61/pc Vancouver. . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . .58/51/sh . 52/46/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . . .72/46/0.00 . . . 78/57/s . 71/58/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . . .68/43/0.00 . .79/58/pc . 80/63/pc

on the man or the boy. Initial reports indicated the boy was fishing with his father at Niagara County Park when the child fell into the river. The 22-year-old man reportedly jumped in to help him. The area is about 70 miles northwest of Sisters.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

Corvallis Gazette-Times

PRECIPITATION

Man dies trying to save boy in N. Santiam

PHILOMATH

By Raju Woodward

Mostly cloudy, chance of rain.

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

THURSDAY

Mostly cloudy, chance of rain.

Mostly cloudy, chance of rain.

66 41

EAST Ontario Partly cloudy with 82/54 a slight chance of thunderstorms.

Juntura

Burns

71/44

Chiloquin

Medford Ashland

60/49

Vale 82/54

Paisley 86/53

Brookings

73/46

71/51

78/45

Grants Pass 83/51

67/42

Unity

Christmas Valley

Port Orford 62/49

76/46

Hampton

Fort Rock 71/43

68/40

63/35

Bandon

Baker City John Day

70s

Brothers 69/41

La Pine 70/41

Crescent Lake

63/50

72/45

72/46

62/43

Spray 73/47

Prineville 74/46 Sisters Redmond Paulina 70/42 70/44 72/45 Sunriver Bend

73/49

61/51

71/44

Union

Granite

67/42

Eugene 70s

Florence

70/43

Joseph

Mitchell 75/47

73/50

Camp Sherman

72/50

Enterprise

Meacham 71/47

64/48

Madras

62/43

La Grande

Condon Willowdale

Wallowa

63/41

68/49

66/49

75/52

Corvallis Yachats

Maupin

Warm Springs

71/50

72/50

Ruggs

74/51

Albany

Newport

55/51

Pendleton

73/49

67/47

60s

72/50

Hermiston 73/51

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 58/43

70/50

73/51

The Biggs Dalles 70/52

72/52

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

WEDNESDAY

Mostly cloudy, chance of rain.

HIGH LOW

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

TUESDAY

at the former Clemens Mill site in Philomath. The event was organized by the Marys River Watershed Council in conjunction with 16 other groups and organizations including the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. “Our desire is to provide opportunities for students to learn about the watershed and the habitats around it,” said Kathleen Westly, the education coordinator for the Watershed Council. Franklin and other Linus Pauling students were on site Tuesday, followed by Philomath Middle School students later in the week. During the event, students spend about 45 minutes at 12 different stations. The stations range from wilderness survival to reptiles. One station, forestry and log scaling, drew upon the site’s history as a lumber mill.

For example, students used measuring tape to determine the length and diameter of various alder and Douglas fir logs to determine their potential value. But the most popular station appeared to be the beavers and canoeing station, especially with the sunny and warm weather. “This one was my favorite because it involved so much activity,” said Rosa Mendoza. “We were always moving and doing something.” The trip was the first time some of the students had been in a canoe. In addition to studying beaver habitats, students learned canoe safety procedures and how to use paddles to move canoes effectively. “The hardest part was sitting down inside the canoe,” said Zack Plawman. “It felt like we might tip over into the water. But after that it was fine.”

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com


COMMUNITYLIFE THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

— From staff reports

WASHINGTON

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For the Bulletin

Fourth Ave. N.

Mercer St.

By John Gottberg Anderson

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Portland OREGON 6

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Republican St. Fountain Lawn

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Seattle Sea ea attle tttle Center Ce C e Merrc rrcer c r St Mercer St.. Denn Den D nnnny Way Waay ay Denny

John St.

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Elliott Bay

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Denny Way

1. Teatro ZinZanni 2. Seattle Repertory Theatre 3. Playhouse Intiman 4. Pacific Northwest Ballet Phelps Center 5. Marion Oliver McCaw Hall 6. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation 7. Siff Film Center

St. on dis Ma

Downtown Seattle

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University versity e of Washing Washingto W shington Washington

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Fifth Ave. N.

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Harrison St.

Nic ker son

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SEATTLE — They are like something described in the rock opera “Hair” — curly, gleaming, streaming, twisted, flowered, bangled, tangled, spangled and spaghettied. As primped and coiled as Medusa’s serpentine hair, they NORTHWEST are sea forms and TRAVEL baskets, vases and chandeliers, towers and flowers. Their colors are more than you’ll see in the rainbow, and with nighttime illumination, they increase the wow factor at the Space Needle tenfold. Made entirely of handblown glass, these works are the magnum opus of Puget Sound native and internationally renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly. Today, at the foot of Seattle’s iconic Space Needle, the collection will be revealed to the general public. Known as the Chihuly Garden and Glass, this magnificent contribution to art lovers comes on the occasion of the 50th birthday of Seattle Center, on the site of the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair. In a city that abounds in cutting-edge architecture and design, it may be the boldest creation since the Space Needle itself was erected. Chihuly, who never met a color he didn’t like, broke ground on the project last August, a few weeks before he turned 70. It took him and his team just nine months (and $20 million) to develop a 1½-acre plot, repurposing an old exhibition hall and building a new glass house surrounded by a garden that blends fanciful glass foliage with the real thing. Meanwhile, the rest of the 74-acre Seattle Center is finding myriad ways to celebrate its first half century. From the Space Needle to the International Fountain Pavilion — from the Pacific

Seattle

Roy St.

8. International Fountain Pavillion 9. International Fountain 10. Memorial Stadium 11. Key Arena 12. Armory/Center House 13. Next 50 Pavillioin 14. Seattle Center Monorail

23rd r Ave. v

Want experience volunteering in a hospital? Prineville’s Pioneer Memorial Hospital is looking for volunteers to work on the clinic’s main floor. Volunteers should be able to commit to shifts that are at least two hours long, and should be friendly, responsible and neat. Shifts are available throughout the week. Volunteer applications are available at the hospital’s gift shop. Contact: 541-4162444.

The Seattle Center

Broadway r ay

Pioneer Memorial Hospital looking for volunteers

• New Chihuly Glass House and Garden highlights the 50-year party

. ve tA iot Ell

The Bethlehem Inn, a Bend homeless shelter, invites the community to an open house from 3 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. Participants can tour the inn and learn about how its programs serve homeless individuals and families. It is free to attend. The shelter is located at 3705 N. U.S. Highway 97. The Bethlehem Inn provided shelter and other support to 786 individuals in 2011, and served 60,000 meals to those in crisis. Another 200 nonresidents received food and support services. To learn more, call 541-322-8768 or visit www.bethleheminn .org. Donations can be mailed to P.O. Box 8540, Bend, OR, 97708.

The Bulletin

Photos courtesy Barb Gonzalez

Br

Bethlehem Inn plans open house

By David Jasper

The Space Needle towers above the grounds of Seattle Center, with the Olympic Mountains as a backdrop, in this photo taken from a suite at the Pan Pacific Hotel.

Second Ave. N.

Area gardeners are being asked to give back through several programs taking place this summer in Central Oregon. One is the Grow A Row Project, a program run by the regional nonprofit organization NeighborImpact. Participating gardeners grow a row of vegetables or extra produce that they donate. The goods go to area food banks so those who are less fortunate have access to fresh produce. The gardeners can bring the goods directly to food pantries listed at www.neighbor impact.org/growarow. NeighborImpact also is seeking volunteers to work at its demonstration garden in Redmond. Last year, the garden provided more than 1,000 pounds of fresh produce for donation to food banks. Also, NeighborImpact and Celebrate the Season are seeking gardeners and farmers to participate in the third annual Backyard Farm Tour on Aug. 2526. The tour features urban vegetable farms and gardens in the Bend area, although it’s expanding this year farther outside of Bend. People with livestock or chickens are invited to participate as well. Contact: Grow A Row Project at www .neighborimpact.org/ growarow; demonstration garden at sandyk@ neighborimpact.org or 541-548-2380, ext. 148; Backyard Farm Tour at wa@ bendbroadband.com or 541-244-2536.

Film looks at skating and art in Tunisia

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, SEATTLE CENTER!

Warren Ave. N.

Grow a row of vegetables for charity

www.bendbulletin.com/community

First Ave. N.

SPOTLIGHT

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TV & Movies, D2 Calendar, D3 Horoscope, D3 Milestones, D6 Puzzles, D7

90

15. EMP Museum 16. Seattle Children’s Theatre 17. Mural Amphitheatre 18. Chihuly Garden and Glass 19. Space Needle 20. Boeing IMAX 21. Pacific Science Center Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Science Center to the EMP Museum, the Seattle Center Monorail to the KeyArena and the theaters lining Mercer Street to the headquarters of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation — the city’s cultural hub is pulling out all the stops in recalling its roots.

Childhood memories

In November 2011, Bend filmmaker Nathan Gray spent 18 days in Tunisia shooting a documentary about art, skateboarding and young people in the birthplace of the Arab Spring. Gray is co-founder of the nonprofit theBedouins, whose mission involves “pushing skateboarding and street art as instruments of peace.” With him on the trip was Jesse Roberts, founder of arts nonprofit Rise Up International, which focuses on promoting the arts in Central Oregon and abroad. “PUSH Tunisia,” a 35minute documentary, is in the postproduction phase. Gray hopes to have it completed in time to enter it in this fall’s BendFilm Festival. Meanwhile, there’s a related art show of skateboarding photographs, graffiti art and mixedmedia works capturing the mood of their stay; it displays through May at Thump Coffee in downtown Bend (see “If you go”). Sales of prints and paintings in the art show will help fund future shows in San Francisco and Washington, D.C., according to Gray, who lives in D.C. part of the year. Gray has previously filmed and released the skateboarding documentaries “Sour,” about relations between Israeli and Jordanian skaters, and “Smile,” about teaching kids in a Bangalore, India, slum how to skateboard. His latest film is described as a “skate project to push the post-revolution skate and art scene. Follow a group of skaters, street artists and friends who explored Tunisia from a different perspective and recorded the whole experience on film,” according to the website www.pushtunisia.org. The project, which has been featured in The Guardian and Rolling Stone, began with a $30,000 grant from the U.S. Embassy in Tunisia, according to Gray. “We got a grant from the U.S. Embassy there to come over and do a project on street art, skateboarding and engaging the youth with these mediums and using them in a positive way, and as a diplomacy tool.” See Tunisia / D7

If you go What: “PUSH Tunisia,” skateboarding photos and mixed media When: Through May 31 Where: Thump Coffee, 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend Cost: Free; prices of works vary Contact: peace@ thebedouins.org or www.pushtunisia.org

Back in 1962, the Seattle World’s Fair was called the Century 21 Exposition. It spread along the base of Queen Anne Hill and was linked to downtown Seattle by a mile-long monorail — the country’s first commercial monorail and an engineering marvel of its time. See Seattle / D4

Correction

RIGHT: Fanciful blown-glass foliage streams through a natural planting in the Chihuly Garden. Artist Dale Chihuly and his team broke ground on the garden last August; it took nine months and $20 million to develop the 1½acre plot at the foot of the Space Needle.

In a story headlined “Museums of the Columbia Gorge,” which published Sunday, May 13, on Page C1, Queen Marie of Romania’s familial connections were incorrectly reported. Queen Marie of Romania was the granddaughter of England’s Queen Victoria. The Bulletin regrets the error.


D2

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

TV & M ‘American Idol’ caps its 11th season on Fox last medical mystery. A retrospective special precedes the finale. 8 p.m., Fox. Don’t miss TUESDAY: Graduation — “AMERICAN IDOL� — the day “Glee� fans have both Power ballads. Teen divas. anticipated and dreaded — is “Goosies.� Randy Jackson’s finally here. The Season 3 hideous jackets. ... We’ve finale has the crooning kids experienced it all in this, of McKinley High donning the 11th season, their red caps of prime time’s gowns and TV SPOTLIGHT and most popular talcontemplating ent competition. what the future But now, it’s finally time to holds for them. 9 p.m., Fox. crown a champion. After the WEDNESDAY: “Revenge,� final two contestants face off indeed, has been sweet all Tuesday, they’ll have to suf- season as it became the most fer through a horrendously buzzed-about network sebloated two-hour finale the ries. Now, comes a season following night before hear- finale that reportedly places ing the verdict. Our predic- several characters in peril tion? Confetti will fall and and a stunning revelation someone will cry. 8 p.m. that will provoke Victoria Wednesday, Fox. (Madeleine Stowe) to go on a revenge quest of her own. 10 Other bets p.m., ABC. SUNDAY: Chart-topping THURSDAY: It’s time to pop artists get their props at bust a move — or many “The 2012 Billboard Music moves — as “So You Think Awards.� Among the sched- You Can Dance� returns for uled performers are Justin another summer run. The Bieber, Carrie Underwood show debuts tonight, then and LMFAO. “Modern Fam- moves to its regular Wednesily� stars Julie Bowen and Ty day slot starting May 30. 8 Burrell are our hosts. 8 p.m., p.m., Fox. FRIDAY: In the documenABC. SUNDAY: The reality tary “Paul Simon’s Gracebloodbath that is “The Ce- land Journey: Under Afrilebrity Apprentice� comes can Skies,� the pop singer to an end tonight, and for the marks the 25th anniversary first time the two remaining of his “Graceland� album by contestants — Clay Aiken revisiting the making of the and Arsenio Hall — must record and the controversy work together on the final over his decision to work challenge. Yeah, like that with South African musishould go smoothly. 9 p.m., cians. 10 p.m., A&E. SATURDAY: The guys have NBC. MONDAY: OK, so his bed- their man caves. How about side manner left a lot to be “Mom Caves�? On tonight’s desired, but Hugh Laurie’s episode, a busy wife and cranky title character in mother gets a big surprise “House� kept us entertained when part of her home is for eight offbeat seasons. converted to replicate a HaThe acclaimed show comes waiian retreat. 8:30 p.m., to an end tonight with one HGTV.

L M T  FOR SUNDAY, MAY 20

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING (PG-13) 11 a.m., 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9

BEND

By Chuck Barney

2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

THE DEEP BLUE SEA (R) 1, 4, 7 FOOTNOTE (PG) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 THE KID WITH A BIKE (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) Noon, 3, 6 THINK LIKE A MAN (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 Warner Bros. Pictures / MCT

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX

Johnny Depp stars in “Dark Shadows.�

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 2, 4:45, 7:30 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 5:30, 8 THE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT (R) 2:45 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING (PG-13) 2:45, 5:15, 7:45

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX (PG) Noon, 3 WRATH OF THE TITANS (PG-13) 6 Part of McMenamin’s new “The Great Northwest Film Tour,� “Adventures in Plymptoons!� will screen at 9 tonight. Doors open at 8 p.m. After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

Tin Pan Theater

Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

PRINEVILLE Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 1:05, 4, 6:50 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) Noon, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20 THE DICTATOR (R) 1:40, 3:40, 5:40, 7:40 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 12:10, 3:20, 6:30

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

Every Friday

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 1, 4, 7 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (UPSTAIRS — PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:20 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

MADRAS

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 1, 2:45, 4:25, 6, 7:30, 9:05, 10:30 CHIMPANZEE (G) 1:10, 3:55, 6:20, 9 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 12:10, 1:15, 3:35, 4:35, 6:50, 7:45, 9:45, 10:35 DARK SHADOWS IMAX (PG-13) 4:10, 10:15 THE DICTATOR (R) 12:15, 1:25, 3:30, 4:40, 6:45, 7:55, 9:30, 10:20 THE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT (R) 6:05, 9:10 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 3:10, 6:25, 9:35 THE LUCKY ONE (PG-13) 12:25, 4, 7:40, 10:10 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 3, 3:45, 6:30, 7:15, 9:40, 10:25 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG-13) Noon, 3:20, 6:10, 6:35, 9:20, 10 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS IMAX (PG-13) 12:45, 7 MIRROR MIRROR (PG) 12:05, 2:50 THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS 3-D (PG) 1:30, 3:50 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 3:05, 7:05, 9:50

• Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

SISTERS

Regal Pilot Butte 6

Contra Costa Times (MCT)

EDITOR’S NOTES:

I HEART HUCKABEES (2004 — R) 4

REDMOND Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

Ollie Ollie is an extremely sweet almost 4 year old Havanese Mix that was brought to the shelter as a stray and sadly never reclaimed. Since he came to us as a stray, we do not know much about his past. Ollie does not seem to mind other dogs and loves to play. If you think this fantastically cute dog could be the one for you then come by the shelter and adopt him today! HUMANE SOCIETY OF CENTRAL OREGON/SPCA 61170 S.E. 27th St. BEND

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 9:15

(541) 382-3537 Sponsored by:

Deschutes Veterinary Clinic

L TV L   SUNDAY PRIME TIME 5/20/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00

5:30

KATU News World News Grey’s Anatomy Disarm ’ ‘14’ Paid Program Evening News Entertainment Tonight (N) ’ ‘PG’ NUMB3RS The Janus List ’ ‘PG’ Moyers & Company ’ ‘G’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 at 5PM (N) Ă… (4:00) ›› “Groundhog Dayâ€? Cook’s Country Test Kitchen

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… News Nightly News The Unit Into Hell ‘14’ Ă… KEZI 9 News World News Bones ’ ‘14’ Ă… Oregon Field Guide ‘G’ Ă… Nightly News Chris Matthews King of Queens King of Queens Doc Martin Dry Your Tears ‘PG’

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

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America’s Funniest Home Videos The 2012 Billboard Music Awards (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… KATU News (11:35) Cars.TV America’s Got Talent Hopefuls perform for the judges. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Celebrity Apprentice The winner is chosen. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… News Love-Raymond 60 Minutes (N) ’ Ă… 60 Minutes (N) ’ Ă… “Jesse Stone: Benefit of the Doubtâ€? (2012) Tom Selleck. ‘14’ Ă… News Cold Case ‘PG’ America’s Funniest Home Videos The 2012 Billboard Music Awards (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… KEZI 9 News The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons Cleveland Show The Simpsons Bob’s Burgers Family Guy (N) ’ (PA) ‘14’ Ă… News Two/Half Men Big Bang Big Bang Antiques Roadshow ‘G’ Ă… Finding Your Roots Masterpiece Mystery! (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Johnny Carson: American Masters ’ ‘PG’ Ă… America’s Got Talent Hopefuls perform for the judges. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Celebrity Apprentice The winner is chosen. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 Sports Sunday Heartland Full Circle ’ ‘PG’ ››› “The War of the Rosesâ€? (1989) Michael Douglas. Ă… Meet, Browns Meet, Browns Troubadour, TX (N) ’ Ă… The Klamath Basin: Restoration Undamming Oregon Exp Moyers & Company ’ ‘G’ Ă… The War A Deadly Calling Newsreels of troops killed. ’ ‘14’ BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

Criminal Minds Amplification ‘14’ Criminal Minds Normal ‘14’ Ă… Criminal Minds Masterpiece ‘14’ Criminal Minds Soul Mates ‘14’ Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Ă… (11:01) Criminal Minds ‘14’ Ă… *A&E 130 28 18 32 Criminal Minds 100 ’ ‘14’ Ă… ›› “U.S. Marshalsâ€? (1998, Crime Drama) Tommy Lee Jones, Wesley Snipes, Robert Downey Jr. Sam Gerard gets The Killing Stan takes matters into his The Killing Richmond helps the inves- Mad Men Christmas wishes; Harry (11:04) The Pitch The Frangelico *AMC 102 40 39 caught up in another fugitive case. Ă… own hands. ’ ‘14’ Ă… tigation. (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… helps a friend. (N) ‘14’ liqueur brand. (N) Ă… Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Tanked Polar Opposites ’ ‘PG’ Swamp Wars (N) ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters ’ ‘PG’ Ă… River Monsters (N) ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Don’t Be Tardy Don’t Be Tardy Don’t Be Tardy Don’t Be Tardy Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ What Happens Housewives/NJ BRAVO 137 44 ››› “Urban Cowboyâ€? (1980, Drama) John Travolta, Debra Winger, Scott Glenn. ’ (10:45) ››› “Rocky IIâ€? (1979) Sylvester Stallone. CMT 190 32 42 53 (4:45) ››› “Rocky IIâ€? (1979, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire. ’ Ă… Mark Zuckerberg: Inside Face. Target: Inside the Bullseye American Greed Biography on CNBC Sam Walton Greatest Pillow! Hollywood Bty CNBC 51 36 40 52 How I, Millions How I, Millions Biography on CNBC Sam Walton Piers Morgan Tonight CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents: Selling Miracles Piers Morgan Tonight CNN Newsroom CNN Presents: Selling Miracles CNN 52 38 35 48 CNN Presents: Selling Miracles (6:26) ›› “Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobbyâ€? (2006) Will Ferrell. Ă… Daniel Tosh: Happy Thoughts ‘14’ Aziz Ansari: Dangerously Hannibal Buress: Animal Furnace COM 135 53 135 47 (4:24) ››› “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Storyâ€? (4:30) City Club of Central Oregon Talk of the Town Local issues. Desert Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 British Road to the White House Q&A British Road to the White House Washington This Week CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Q & A A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Austin & Ally ’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Austin & Ally ’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie *DIS 87 43 14 39 Good-Charlie MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Ă… MythBusters Torpedo Tastic ‘PG’ MythBusters Bouncing Bullet ‘PG’ MythBusters Mailbag Special ‘PG’ MythBusters Bug Special ’ ‘PG’ MythBusters Mailbag Special ‘PG’ *DISC 156 21 16 37 Sons of Guns Zombie Gun! ‘14’ Keeping Up With the Kardashians Kardashian Take Miami Take Miami Keeping Up With the Kardashians Khloe & Lamar Keeping Up With the Kardashians Mrs. Eastwood & Company ‘PG’ Keeping Up With the Kardashians *E! 136 25 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter Ă… SportsCenter Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Los Angeles Dodgers From Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. (N) 2011 World Series of Poker 2011 World Series of Poker World, Poker NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series: Pioneer Hi-Bred 250 (N) MLB Baseball ESPN2 22 24 21 24 (4:00) NHRA Drag Racing Dollar General Summer Nationals (N) Ă… Magic Johnson The Announcement Ă… Magic Johnson Boxing Joe Louis Joe Louis’ Greatest Hits Ringside Ă… ESPNC 23 25 123 25 The Announcement Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ››› “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenixâ€? (2007, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint. ››› “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Princeâ€? (2009, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson. FAM 67 29 19 41 Harry Potter Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Huckabee Stossel Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Fox News Sunday FNC 54 61 36 50 Huckabee (N) Cupcake Champions (N) Food Network Star A food tour of New York. (N) ‘G’ Mystery Diners Chopped Reversal of Fortune *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Thing Ate Invention Hun. Food Network Star Fifteen finalists compete to host. ‘G’ Death-Funeral ›› “Step Brothersâ€? (2008, Comedy) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly, Richard Jenkins. ›› “Transformers: Revenge of the Fallenâ€? (2009, Science Fiction) Shia LaBeouf, Megan Fox. “Transformers: Revengeâ€? FX 131 For Rent ’ ‘G’ House Hunters Hunters Int’l Holmes on Homes Clean Slate ‘G’ Best of Holmes on Homes (N) ‘G’ Holmes Inspection ’ ‘G’ Ă… Holmes Inspection ’ ‘G’ Ă… Holmes on Homes ‘G’ Ă… HGTV 176 49 33 43 For Rent ’ ‘G’ Ax Men Family Rivalry ‘14’ Ă… Ax Men Swamp Gold ‘14’ Ă… Ax Men Up in Smoke ‘14’ Ă… Ax Men Betting It All (N) ‘14’ (10:01) Ax Men (N) ‘14’ Ă… (11:01) Ax Men Swamp Gold ‘14’ *HIST 155 42 41 36 Ax Men Up in Flames ‘14’ Ă… “Murder on the 13th Floorâ€? (2012) Sean Patrick Thomas. Ă… Army Wives (N) ‘PG’ Ă… The Client List Life of Riley ‘14’ “Murder on the 13th Floorâ€? Ă… LIFE 138 39 20 31 “The Wife He Met Onlineâ€? (2012) Cameron Mathison. ‘PG’ Ă… Caught on Camera Bad Behavior In Coldest Blood Inside a Crack House The Killing Game? Criminal Mindscape Joel Rifkin Meet the Press ‘G’ Ă… MSNBC 56 59 128 51 Caught on Camera ››› “Boyz N the Hoodâ€? (1991) Larry Fishburne, Ice Cube. ’ ›› “Notoriousâ€? (2009) Angela Bassett. Based on the life of slain rapper Christopher Wallace. ’ MTV 192 22 38 57 (4:18) ›› “ATLâ€? (2006) Tip Harris, Lauren London. ’ Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Victorious Tori Goes Platinum ‘G’ That ’70s Show That ’70s Show George Lopez George Lopez Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ NICK 82 46 24 40 Fred: The Show iCarly ‘G’ Ă… Oprah’s Next Chapter Oprah visits Steven Tyler at his home. ’ ‘PG’ Oprah’s Next Chapter ‘PG’ Ă… Oprah’s Next Chapter (N) ’ Oprah’s Next Chapter ‘PG’ Ă… Oprah’s Next Chapter ‘PG’ Ă… OWN 161 103 31 103 Disappeared Silent Night ’ ‘PG’ Volvo Ocean Race World Poker Tour: Season 10 World Poker Tour: Season 10 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Colorado Rockies From Coors Field in Denver. ROOT 20 45 28* 26 MLS Soccer: Fire at Timbers ››› “Star Wars: Episode III -- Revenge of the Sithâ€? (2005) Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman. ’ ›› “Crocodile Dundee IIâ€? ’ SPIKE 132 31 34 46 (4:30) ›› “Star Wars: Episode II -- Attack of the Clonesâ€? (2002) Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman. ’ ›› “Outlanderâ€? (2008, Action) James Caviezel, Ron Perlman, Sophia Myles. Ă… ›› “Resident Evil: Apocalypseâ€? (2004, Horror) Milla Jovovich. Ă… “30 Days of Night: Dark Daysâ€? SYFY 133 35 133 45 (4:00) ›› “Stealthâ€? (2005, Action) Josh Lucas. Joel Osteen Kerry Shook BelieverVoice Creflo Dollar ››› “David and Bathshebaâ€? (1951) Gregory Peck. The Evidence For Heaven Secrets “ThĂŠrèseâ€? (2004, Biography) TBN 205 60 130 ›› “Old Schoolâ€? (2003, Comedy) Luke Wilson, Will Ferrell. Ă… ››› “The Hangoverâ€? (2009, Comedy) Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms. Ă… (10:20) ››› “The Hangoverâ€? (2009) Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 (4:00) › “Road Trip: Beer Pongâ€? ››› “Captain From Castileâ€? (1947, Adventure) Tyrone Power, Jean Peters, Cesar Romero. Pre- ›› “A Gentleman at Heartâ€? (1942, Romance-Comedy) ››› “The Last of the Mohicansâ€? (1920, Adventure) Wallace Beery, Barbara ››› “Rules of the Gameâ€? (1939) TCM 101 44 101 29 miere. A Spanish noble escapes Inquisition by exploring with Cortez. Cesar Romero, Carole Landis. Premiere. Bedford. Silent. Cooper’s tale of the French and Indian War. Marcel Dalio, Nora Gregor. American Gypsy Wedding American Gypsy Wedding Sister Wives ’ ‘14’ Ă… Sister Wives Date night. (N) ‘14’ American Gypsy Wedding Sister Wives Date night. ’ ‘14’ *TLC 178 34 32 34 American Gypsy Wedding NBA Pregame NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Los Angeles Clippers (N) (Live) Ă… Inside the NBA (N) (Live) Ă… ››› “The Negotiatorâ€? (1998) *TNT 17 26 15 27 (4:45) ›› “2 Fast 2 Furiousâ€? (2003) Paul Walker, Tyrese. Ă… Wrld, Gumball Wrld, Gumball ›› “Open Seasonâ€? (2006, Comedy) Voices of Martin Lawrence. Adventure Time Adventure Time Venture Bros. King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Loiter Squad (N) *TOON 84 Extreme RV’s ‘G’ Ă… Sand Masters Sand Masters Hotel Impossible ‘G’ Ă… Bggage Battles Bggage Battles Sturgis: Wild Ride ‘PG’ Ă… Sturgis: Cops ‘G’ Ă… *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Extreme RV’s ‘G’ Ă… M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H: 30th Anniversary Reunion Special ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU USA 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU 100 Greatest Songs of the ’90s 100 Greatest Songs of the ’90s Mob Wives Reunion (N) ‘14’ Ă… Tough Love: New Orleans ’ ‘14’ Mob Wives Reunion ‘14’ Ă… Tough Love: New Orleans ’ ‘14’ VH1 191 48 37 54 100 Greatest Songs of the ’90s PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:20) ›› “Nowhere to Runâ€? 1993 ’ ‘R’ Ă… ››› “13 Going on 30â€? 2004 Jennifer Garner. ’ (9:40) ›› “Takersâ€? 2010, Action Matt Dillon. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… True Lies 1994 ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:35) › “Resident Evil: Afterlifeâ€? 2010 ‘R’ Ă… FXM Presents ›› “Alvin and the Chipmunksâ€? 2007 Jason Lee. ‘PG’ Ă… › “The Comebacksâ€? 2007, Comedy David Koechner. ‘PG-13’ Ă… FXM Presents › “The Comebacksâ€? 2007 David Koechner. Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 Horton Hears AMA Pro Racing The Ultimate Fighter Live ’ ‘14’ The Ultimate Fighter Live ’ UFC Fight Night UFC: Korean Zombie vs. Poirier From Patriot Center in Fairfax, Virginia. Ă… The Ultimate Fighter Live ’ ‘14’ FUEL 34 LPGA Tour Golf Sybase Match Play Championship, Final Day Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf Nationwide: BMW Charity Pro-Am, Final Round Big Break Atlantis GOLF 28 301 27 301 European PGA Tour Golf › “The Flower Girlâ€? (2009, Romance) Marla Sokoloff. ‘PG’ Ă… “Kiss at Pine Lakeâ€? (2012) Barry Watson, Mia Kirshner. ‘PG’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 (4:00) “Honeymoon for Oneâ€? ‘PG’ ››› “Despicable Meâ€? 2010, Comedy Voices of Steve (6:45) ››› “X-Men: First Classâ€? 2011, Action James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Rose Byrne. Game of Thrones Theon holds down Veep Nicknames Girls The Return Game of Thrones Theon holds down HBO 425 501 425 501 Carell, Jason Segel. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The early years of Charles Xavier and Erik Lehnsherr. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… the fort. (N) ’ ‘MA’ Ă… (N) ‘MA’ (N) ‘MA’ Ă… the fort. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ››› “The Perfect Stormâ€? 2000, Suspense George Clooney, Mark Wahlberg. ‘PG-13’ (7:45) ››› “The Perfect Stormâ€? 2000, Suspense George Clooney, Mark Wahlberg. ‘PG-13’ ››› “Diary of the Deadâ€? 2007 Michelle Morgan. IFC 105 105 (4:00) ››› “John Grisham’s The (6:15) ›› “The A-Teamâ€? 2010, Action Liam Neeson, Bradley Cooper, Jessica Biel. Former Special “The Pool Boysâ€? 2009, Comedy Matthew Lillard, Efren ›› “The Change-Upâ€? 2011, Comedy Ryan Reynolds. An overworked lawyer MAX 400 508 508 Rainmakerâ€? 1997 ’ ‘PG-13’ Forces soldiers form a rogue unit. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Ramirez, Tom Arnold. ’ ‘R’ Ă… and his carefree buddy switch bodies. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Empire (N) ‘PG’ G. Bush: The 9/11 Interview Wicked Tuna Grudge Match ‘14’ Empire ‘PG’ G. Bush: The 9/11 Interview Wicked Tuna Grudge Match ‘14’ Inside the Green Berets ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Power Rangers Planet Sheen Wild Grinders Odd Parents Odd Parents Legend-Korra Odd Parents SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Invader ZIM ’ Invader ZIM ’ NTOON 89 115 189 115 Legend-Korra Realtree Rdtrps Truth Hunting Friends of NRA Bone Collector Hunt Masters Your Weapon Hunt Adventure Realtree Rdtrps Wildgame Ntn Mathews Wardens Operation Warm Springs OUTD 37 307 43 307 Hunt Adventure Wildgame Ntn (4:45) ››› “The Ghost Writerâ€? 2010, Drama Pierce Brosnan. A ghostwriter’s The Borgias Day of Ashes Alexander The Big C Life Nurse Jackie ’ Nurse Jackie (N) The Big C How The Borgias The Siege at Forli Juan Nurse Jackie ’ The Big C How SHO 500 500 latest project lands him in jeopardy. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… begins a Lenten fast. ’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… Bazaar (N) ‘MA’ returns from Spain. (N) ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Ă… Bazaar ’ ‘MA’ Rights ’ ‘MA’ Inside-Headsets Hard Parts Octane Acad Car Crazy ‘G’ SPEED Center Inside-Headsets Hard Parts Wind Tunnel With Dave Despain Car Warriors Nova ’ Ă… SPEED 35 303 125 303 Wind Tunnel With Dave Despain ›› “Burlesqueâ€? 2010, Drama Cher, Eric Dane. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Magic City ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ›› “Cars 2â€? 2011, Comedy Voices of Owen Wilson. ’ ‘G’ Ă… (10:50) ›› “Tron: Legacyâ€? 2010 STARZ 300 408 300 408 (3:50) ›› “Tron: Legacyâ€? 2010 (4:45) ››› “Sistersâ€? 1973 Margot Kidder. Newswoman, (6:20) ›› “Skatelandâ€? 2010 Ashley Greene. A manager of ›› “Piranhaâ€? 2010, Horror Elisabeth Shue, Adam Scott, “Devil’s Playgroundâ€? 2010 Danny Dyer. Cole hunts the (11:15) “Johnny Wasâ€? 2006, Action TMC 525 525 private eye, Siamese twins, murder. ‘R’ a skating rink views his life differently. Jerry O’Connell. ’ ‘R’ Ă… person who can provide a cure for zombies. ’ Vinnie Jones. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Hockey IIHF World Championships, Gold Medal Game: Teams TBA NHL 36 ‘G’ Cycling Game On! Cycling Poker After Dark ‘PG’ Ă… NBCSN 27 58 30 209 Cycling Bridezillas Brittany & Kim ‘14’ Bridezillas Kim & Danielle ‘14’ Bridezillas Kim & Frankie ‘14’ Bridezillas Frankie & Marissa ‘14’ Bridezillas Frankie & Ruby ‘14’ Bridezillas Ruby & Kim ‘14’ Ă… *WE 143 41 174 118 Bridezillas Suzy & Brittany ‘14’


SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Fueling car as engine runs is taking a dangerous risk Dear Abby: My father absolutely refuses to turn off the ignition when fueling his car, despite the warning signs at the pump. How can I convince him to stop endangering himself and my mother? — Worried Down South Dear Worried: Motorists are instructed to “Stop Motor� while refueling for good reason. Gasoline is highly flammable. However, it is not actually the liquid that burns. Even at temperatures as low as 45 degrees, gasoline gives off vapor. It is the vapors that ignite. Gasoline vapor is heavier than air, so when it ignites, it does so at ground level. All it takes to create a violent explosion is fuel vapors, enough oxygen and a source of ignition. A spark from a cigarette, a hot exhaust pipe, faulty wiring, static electricity or the vapor reaching an open flame — all can cause gasoline vapors to explode. Please show this item to your father. Perhaps it will convince him to be more safetyconscious. If there is an attendant at the gas station your father frequents, frankly, I am shocked that the person hasn’t insisted your father turn off the engine. Dear Abby: My husband loves to cook and he’s very good at it. Every night when I get home from work, he greets me with a huge meal. Problem is, I feel obligated to eat it even when I’m not the least bit hungry. Every morning, he asks me what I want for dinner. I prefer my main meal at noon and a very light meal — or none at all — at the end of the day. How can I get him to stop cooking for me without hurting his feelings? I know he does it because he loves me, but I feel I am being forced to eat food I really don’t want. — Stuffed in San Antonio Dear Stuffed: I presume you’re a new bride because otherwise you would have already learned how to communicate openly with your husband

DEAR A B B Y while still being tactful. Try this: “Honey, you’re killing me with kindness. If I keep eating like this, I’ll have to invest in an entire new wardrobe. My metabolism works better if I have my main meal at noon and very little — if anything — in the evening, so please help me by not making these large dinners because they’re too tempting to resist.� P.S. If cooking is his creative outlet, why not suggest he go all out once a week and invite another couple? Dear Abby: My daughter recently became engaged to a wonderful young man. I have looked forward to planning her wedding for years. She always said she wanted to be married in our hometown, but now she says they want to get married near where he lives, which is four hours from where I live. I feel she has been persuaded to do this. I’m paying for the wedding and work full-time, and I’m really stressing about planning the dream wedding she wants from far away. Weddings are usually in the bride’s hometown for obvious reasons, but I’m concerned her mind was changed by his family for their convenience. What do I do? — Just the Bride’s Mom Dear Just: Have a frank talk with your daughter and ask why she changed her mind. Tell her that you have dreamed of planning her wedding for years, but the change of venue is causing stress for you. Then ask if she would prefer you just give her a check for the amount you can afford, and whether it would be more practical for her to do the planning herself. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Sunday, May 20, 2012 By JACQUE LINE BIGAR This year you will witness a major change in how you handle your finances. It also is possible that you will realize an artistic talent that helps you make money. Embrace this change. If you are single, you possess a lot of charisma. If you are attached, the two you look at your finances differently. Consider separate checkbooks. GEMINI always brings excitement. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You realize you have not caught up with certain neighbors or relatives in a while. Before you know it, trips are being planned. Do not allow yourself to believe that a problem is solved when it isn’t yet. Tonight: Catch up on a friend’s weekend. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Use the morning, when you feel vigorous and centered. Some confusion surrounding a special friendship takes over. You might feel like you have been deceived. Make sure you are coming from a grounded point of view before taking any action. Tonight: Rethink an expenditure. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You feel more upbeat as the day goes on. Decide not to make any major decisions or changes for now. Lying back for a while will not hurt. An older relative, boss or friend creates quite a haze when discussing a critical matter. Tonight: As you like. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Have that important conversation in the morning. If you wait any longer, you might not like what happens. Take your time organizing your thoughts before making any major decisions. Not everyone has to agree with you, nor will they. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You cannot go wrong if you just do your thing. You seem to have an typical routine that you follow. Be careful with a volatile friend, as you inadvertently could push that person to a place of no return. Know that you are not seeing a situation clearly. Tonight: Enjoy the moment. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Recognize certain responsibilities that you cannot

escape. Demands seem to increase, which hardly allows for fun or rest. You can shrug this situation off, but ultimately you will need more personal time. Tonight: Could go to the wee hours. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH A morning talk rejuvenates your attitude about certain people. If you want to take off and enjoy a day away from it all, do. You might enjoy the change of pace. It also might be a great idea to invite someone along. Tonight: Explore a new place. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You feel a tremendous need to connect with a key person in your life. Fulfill that desire, even if it means picking up the phone and not standing on ceremony. The air probably will be cleared, but you might not care. You are happy with this person. Tonight: Plan on a quiet dinner with loved ones. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You often are the centerpiece of any happening or event. Let others take the lead, especially if they indicate a desire to do so. Enjoy the lighter workload, and use the free time to do exactly what you want. A conversation cannot be postponed. Tonight: Join a loved one. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Take time today for yourself and perhaps a dear friend or loved one. You’ll both relax together while pursuing a mutual hobby. Let go of your concerns and enjoy the moment. Be aware that you might be getting a distorted version of a story. Tonight: Start organizing tomorrow. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Handle a serious conversation in the morning. You cannot hide that naughty twinkle in your eye. Allow your childlike nature to emerge. If you are single, you could be meeting someone very exciting soon. Tonight: Don’t hold back. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You need a lot of downtime. Many of you are involved in gardening or a similar pastime, or just giving a loved one some extra quality time. Maintain a sense of humor. Do not allow harsh words to escalate. Tonight: At home. Order in. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

D3

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351. open 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pinckney Center for the Arts, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7512.

TODAY KID’S MINI POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Teams of six participants, from first to sixth grade, compete in the relay of river rafting, biking, an obstacle course and a short run; free for spectators; 9 a.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3880002 or www.mbsef.org. PINGPONG TOURNAMENT: A round-robin pingpong tournament; $20 in advance, $25 at the door; 2-5 p.m., warmups at 1 p.m.; Earthwood Timber Frame Homes, 148 Sisters Park Drive, Sisters; 541-549-5648 or commonthreads@bendcable. com. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a Beethoven and Copland concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring Young Artist Competition winners; free but a ticket is required; 2 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-317-3941, info@ cosymphony.com or www. cosymphony.com. SOLAR ECLIPSE VIEWING: Watch a partial solar eclipse with solar telescopes; free, $5 or greater donation includes eclipse glasses; 4:30-7 p.m.; Oregon Observatory at Sunriver, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. THE UNDERGROUND IS BACK TOUR: Featuring performances by Sunspot Jonz, Aceyalone, JNatural and more; $12; 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www. j.mp/jonzalone. “ADVENTURES IN PLYMPTOONS!�: A screening of the film about the life and work of animator Bill Plympton, with a Q&A with the director; $9 in advance, $11 day of show; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com.

MONDAY REFLECTIONS ON THE PAGE: A discussion about the portrayals of gender in children’s books; free; 1-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700 or kroth1@ cocc.edu. “THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA�: A screening of a staged version of the opera; $12.50; 7:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a Beethoven and Copland concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring Young Artist Competition winners; free but a ticket is required; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-317-3941, info@ cosymphony.com or www. cosymphony.com.

TUESDAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Secrets of Eden� by Christopher Bohjalian; free; 2 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public

SATURDAY

Submitted photo

The sharply dressed multi-instrumentalists of Hey Marseilles will play their orchestral folk-pop Wednesday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541312-1080 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. CROSSOVERS BETWEEN VIDEO GAMES AND SOCIAL MEDIA: A discussion about Alternate Reality Game, which puts characteristics of video game players to use in social media; free; 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-633-3854 or awoodell@cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY PUBLIC WORKS COMMUNITY EVENT: Celebrate National Public Works Week with interactive displays, demonstrations, live music, giveaways and more; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; City of Bend Public Works Department, 575 NE 15th St.; 541-317-3000. “THE TWO ESCOBARS�: A screening of the documentary about Colombian soccer; free; 6 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-318-3726 or esandoval@cocc.edu. HEY MARSEILLES: The indie-pop band performs, with Lemolo; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. “LOVE NEVER DIES�: A screening of the sequel to “The Phantom of the Opera�; $12.50; 7:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347.

THURSDAY THE INDIAN WAR ERA IN EASTERN OREGON: Paul Patton talks about “Eagan and the Bannock-Paiute War of 1878�; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663 or ruthh@ uoregon.edu. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Julia Kennedy reads from her memoir “Ed Kennedy’s War: V-E Day, Censorship & the Associated Press�; free; 6-8 p.m.; The Nature of Words, 224 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233, info@thenatureofwords.org or www.thenatureofwords.org. ACCELERATE BEND KICKOFF: Learn about Bend 2030 Vision

P   P  Thanks to ‘angels’ on the ski slopes On April 28, while skiing alone on Cliffhanger Run at Mt. Bachelor, I had a pretty bad accident and suffered a serious leg injury. Almost immediately, two women stopped to check on me. One of them stayed with me and the other went to alert Ski Patrol. Shortly, two more women stopped to help. All these women offered priceless assistance on the hill; they helped me begin notifying family while we awaited patrol. Ski Patrol’s response was

very professional, and I appreciate their service tremendously. The women who came to my aid were angels. I feel blessed to live and play here, where kind and giving people such as these are among us. I am writing to share my experience with you — to witness this goodness and to pay tribute to our community members. And, if you are one of the women who helped me that morning, I would love the chance to talk to you and thank you again. Please give me a call at 541-385-5728. Don Cole, Bend

Person to Person policy We welcome letters expressing thanks and appreciation of extraordinary deeds done by area residents. Letters should be no longer than 250 words, be signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, taste and legal reasons; we reject those published elsewhere. Email: communitylife@bendbulletin.com. Fax: 541-385-5804. Mail: Person to Person, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

accomplishments and discuss your vision for Bend; registration requested; free; 7 p.m., doors open 6:15 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St.; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. ADLER & HEARNE: The Texas-based folk act performs; $6; 7 p.m.; The Sound Garden, 1279 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-633-6804 or www. bendticket.com. COMEDY NIGHT: Phil Perrier and Benjie Wright perform; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www. lastbandstanding.net.

FRIDAY THE SHINS: The indie rock band performs, with The Head and The Heart and Blind Pilot; $35 plus fees; 6 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3185457 or www.bendconcerts.com. “THE WELCOME�: A screening of the documentary about the experiences of veterans; free; 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-408-7703. COLLEGE CHOIR: The Central Oregon Community College choir performs, with Bellus Vocis and the Central Singers; $5; 7 p.m., doors

REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: A community breakfast benefiting Start Making A Reader Today; $6, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541-480-4495. ANTIQUE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Sisters Kiwanis Club; free; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sisters Fire Hall, 301 S. Elm St.; 541-480-1412. “KIDS CURATE� EXHIBIT OPENS: Explore artifacts chosen by students to reflect their cultural and family history, plus art from students; exhibit runs through July 29; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. CELEBRATE SPRING!: Help homesteaders prepare for spring on a 1904 ranch with planting, baking and furniture crafting; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. REDMOND SATURDAY MARKET: Vendors sell arts and crafts; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Ambiance Art Co-op, 435 Evergreen Ave.; 541-480-7197. SOLAR VIEWING: View the sun using safe techniques; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Sere Prince Halverson talks about her book “The Underside of Joy�; RSVP requested; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525 or sunriverbooks@sunriverbooks. com. TENACIOUS D: The mock-rock band performs, with The Sights; $39 plus fees; 6:30 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3185457 or www.bendconcerts.com. UNCOVER YOUR EARS: A night of family-friendly comedy; $10, $8 children and seniors; 8-10 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. SYNRGY: The California-based reggae band performs; $3; 10 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116.


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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

Photos courtesy Barb Gonzalez

A burst of bright yellow titled “Sun” directs attention to the Chihuly Garden at the foot of the Space Needle. To the left is the 40-foot-tall Glasshouse. The homage to famed artist Dale Chihuly will open to the public today, during the Seattle Center’s 50th birthday summer.

Seattle Continued from D1 As a child, attending with my family, I was fascinated not only by the monorail and the Space Needle, but also by the variety of international pavilions and by an exhibit mounted by NASA less than a year after the first Americans were launched into the stratosphere. Some of my memories were rekindled last week when I visited the “Celebrating Century 21” exhibit assembled by Seattle’s Museum of History and Industry. In particular, a display of artifacts and photographs — most of them kitschy and quirky, from Space Needle ashtrays to fashions of the times — brought a smile to my face. Here, for instance, I could hear part of the soundtrack from Elvis Presley’s movie, “It Happened at the World’s Fair.” A photo of the Bubbleator, a giant elevator designed like a seethrough beach ball that lifted visitors between the basement and the second floor of the Center House, reminded me that I had once been a passenger. At the exhibit I met Amy Nikaitani, who 50 years ago worked as an artist beside the International Fountain. Earning extra dollars for her family, she painted pastel portraits of fairgoers from morning till night. Still lively at 88, she sat beside the International Fountain and showed me a journal and sketchbook that she had kept during the fair. Some 2.3 million visitors attended the 1962 fair, which ran from April 21 to Oct. 21. When it ended, the Space Needle and U.S. Science Pavilion reopened to the public, the latter as the Pacific Science Center. Other buildings, including the Center House (formerly the Seattle Armory), the Coliseum (later to become KeyArena), the Century 21 Playhouse (renamed Seattle Repertory Theatre) and the Opera House (renamed Marion Oliver McCaw Hall) were retained, along with Memorial Stadium, home of everything from rock concerts to high school football. Many years later, the first major new addition to the Center grounds was the startlingly avant-garde Experience Music

Project (now the EMP Museum), architect Frank O. Gehry’s landmark structure, which opened in June 2000.

Built of 500 electric guitars and other instruments, a two-storytall sculpture called “If VI Was IX: Roots and Branches” stands at the heart of the EMP Museum. Nearby is the entrance to the museum’s guitar gallery, which displays two centuries of guitars, including an 1840 Martin. LEFT: An amateur guitarist and drummer jam together in sound booths at the EMP Museum.

The Space Needle When it was built in 1961, the Space Needle was the tallest building in North America west of the Mississippi River. Today, at 605 feet, it is merely the tallest building in its neighborhood of Lower Queen Anne. But its remarkable and creative design has made it a symbol of the modern Pacific Northwest like no other. Three men and a cocktail napkin are credited with giving the Needle its unique look. Legend maintains that a casual sketch (of a tower with a revolving restaurant) by hotel and airline executive Edward Carlson was its point of conception. Architect John Graham Jr. decided to make the restaurant look like a flying saucer, while architect Victor Steinbrueck devised the hourglass profile. Contractor Howard S. Wright II built the Needle to withstand 200-mph winds and a 9.1-magnitude earthquake. It was Wright’s descendants, who still own the structure and its footprint, who approached Dale Chihuly about building his garden of glass. Today, a valet parking circle fronts the Space Needle’s ground floor. Inside, a large gift shop surrounds a ticket desk. I paid for a ride to the observation deck and, along with about 15 others, boarded a glass-sided elevator that took me up 519 feet in just 43 seconds. From this vantage point, on a clear and sunny day, I could see from the Cascade Range to the Olympic Mountains, and seemingly each feature of every Seattle neighborhood. I watched as float planes landed on Lake Union, ferries crossed Elliott Bay to Bremerton, container ships unloaded their cargo at the mouth of the Duwamish River, and a solid stream of traffic crossed the Evergreen Point Bridge to Bellevue and Kirkland. On the level below the observation deck, the Sky City restaurant makes a full 360-degree revolution once every 47 minutes, affording diners the opportunity to perceive the entire cityscape without leaving

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their seats. The view of sights directly beneath the Needle, including the Chihuly garden and the EMP Museum, is better from this angle than it is from above.

The EMP Museum From the Space Needle, the EMP appears as a mangled mass of shiny, colorful metallic panels drawn together by a track of disjointed strings from the neck of a guitar. It looks like a musical instrument that has been smashed onstage, and that may be no accident. Software pioneer and philanthropist Paul Allen foresaw the museum as an homage to his childhood hero, rock musician Jimi Hendrix, a Seattle native who achieved international fame in the late 1960s. Hendrix, whose landmark “Are You Experienced?” album helped to name the museum, would be a bridge to the rich musical heritage of the Pacific Northwest, where bands like the Kingsmen, Paul Revere and the Raiders, Heart, Nirvana and Pearl Jam could also have their stories told. But Allen believed the Experience Music Project should offer a hands-on opportunity for visitors to involve themselves in the music. To that end, the EMP includes instructional studios and sound booths where guitarists, drummers and keyboard players can practice riffs and jam with one another. It also features videotaped oral histories where visitors can watch and listen to the music and memories of famous and not-so-famous performers and producers. The centerpiece exhibit is a two-story-tall, tornado-shaped sculpture built of 500 elec-

tric guitars and other instruments. Designed by the artist Trimpin, “If VI Was IX: Roots and Branches” is a computercontrolled structure that plays a remarkable range of music. The guitars are self-tuning, their pegs regulated to shift whenever the pitch registers as too sharp or too flat. “If VI Was IX” stands outside the entrance to the Hendrix exhibit and the Guitar Gallery, which displays a rich history of guitars beginning with an 1840 Martin. Headphones encourage visitors to interact with all of the exhibits, listening to music and personal histories of such bands as Seattle’s own Nirvana and Australia’s AC/DC, both of them featured through the summer. Four years after the EMP opened, Allen added a Science Fiction Museum in the south wing. It has since been melded with the museum as a whole, but continues to offer a unique set of exhibits. “The Lure of Horror Films” recommends the greatest scary films of all time; it features a soundproof “scream booth,” where visitors may practice bloodcurdling responses to fright-night moments. “Avatar” describes in detail the special effects employed in James Cameron’s Oscar-winning 2010 movie. Beginning June 9, “Icons of Science Fiction” will display a wide-ranging collection of memorabilia used in films from “Star Trek” to “Terminator.” Continued next page

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Expenses Gas, Bend to Seattle (round-trip), 650 miles @ $4.20/gallon: $109.20 Lunch, en route: $8 *Lodging, private home: $0 Dinner, The Hunt Club: $46 Lunch, John Howie’s Sport: $21 Admission, Space Needle + Chihuly Garden: $33 Dinner, Chandler’s: $68 Breakfast, Starbucks: $9 Admission, Pacific Science Center: $14 Lunch, Quincy’s, Center House: $5.95 Admission, EMP Museum: $18 Dinner, Seastar: $70 Lunch, en route: $8 Total: $410.15 *There are dozens of lodging options available. Two of my favorites are the 153-room Pan Pacific Hotel, whose new Space Needle Suites offer wonderful sunset views of the iconic tower rising above the Seattle Center grounds; and the intimate 73-room Sorrento Hotel, an Italian Renaissancestyle hotel that was already more than 50 years old when the world’s fair was staged in Seattle in 1962. Both include outstanding restaurants: Seastar at the Pan Pacific, the Hunt Club at the Sorrento.

Photos courtesy Barb Gonzalez

Children play around the edge of the International Fountain, for 50 years the heart of the Seattle Center’s 74-acre campus. Behind it rises KeyArena, site of many major concerts and home to the Seattle Storm women’s professional basketball team.

Botanical plumes surround a Medusa-like tower in the Mille Fiori (Thousand Flowers) exhibit of Chihuly Garden and Glass. Eight exhibition hall galleries showcase various periods in the creative life of Washington native Dale Chihuly.

If you go INFORMATION • Seattle Center. 305 Harrison St., Seattle; 206-684-7200, www. seattlecenter.com • Seattle Convention & Visitors Bureau. 701 Pike St., Suite 800, Seattle; 206461-5840, 888-732-2695, www.visitseattle.org.

LODGING • The Maxwell Hotel. 300 Roy St., Seattle; 206-2865208, 866-866-7977, www.themaxwellhotel. com. Rates from $127.20 • Mediterranean Inn. 425 Queen Anne Ave. N., Seattle; 206-428-4700, www.mediterranean-inn. com. Rates from $149 • Pan Pacific Hotel Seattle. 2125 Terry Ave., Seattle; 206-264-8111, 877-3244856, www.panpacific. com/seattle. Rates from $187 • Sorrento Hotel. 900 Madison St., Seattle; 206622-6400, 800-426-1265, www.hotelsorrento.com. Rates from $167 • Travelodge Seattle Center. 200 Sixth Ave. N., Seattle; 206-441-7878, www .travelodgeseattlecenter .com. Rates from $99.95.

DINING • Chandler’s Crabhouse. 901 Fairview Ave. N., Seattle; 206-223-2722, www.schwartzbros.com/ chandlers.cfm. Lunch and dinner. Expensive • The Hunt Club. 900 Madison St., Seattle; 206622-6400, www.hotel sorrento.com/fooddrink/hunt-club/. Three meals daily. Moderate to expensive. • Quincy’s Center House Restaurant. Center House, 305 Harrison St., Seattle; 206-728-2228. Lunch and dinner. Budget • Seastar Restaurant and Raw Bar. 2121 Terry Ave., Suite 108, Seattle; 206462-4364, www.seastar restaurant.com. Lunch and dinner. Moderate to expensive. • Sport Restaurant & Bar. 140 Fourth Ave. N., Seattle; 206-404-7767, www.sportrestaurant .com. Lunch and dinner. Moderate

ATTRACTIONS • Chihuly Garden and Glass. 305 Harrison St., Seattle; 206- 753-4940, www.chihulygardenand glass.com • EMP Museum. 325 Fifth Ave. N., Seattle; 206-7702700, www.empmuseum .org • Pacific Science Center. 200 Second Ave. N., Seattle; 206-443-3659, www.pacificsciencecenter .org • Space Needle. 400 Broad St., Seattle; 206-905-2100, www.spaceneedle.com

A huge interactive puzzle called Groovik’s Cube welcomes families to Puzzle Palooza, a new exhibit of brain teasers at the Pacific Science Center.

From previous page Linking the music and science-fiction sides of the museum is the cathedral-like Sky Church. By day, music videos are played on a giant screen; many evenings, popular bands perform here for after-hours events. Architect Gehry, renowned for such buildings as the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles and the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, did not initially hear the same degree of acclaim for his design of the EMP. Forbes magazine even called it one of the world’s 10 ugliest buildings. But with the passage of time, the strange structure has become more accepted.

The Science Center By contrast, the latticework towers at the entrance to the Pacific Science Center, designed by Minoru Yamasaki, have always been embraced as an integral part of Seattle Center. That’s ironic in a way, as Science Center officials staunchly defend their independence. “While we are close neighbors, Pacific Science Center is actually not affiliated with Seattle Center,” said media and public-relations manager Wendy Malloy. “That being said, we are also celebrating our 50th anniversary, independent of Seattle Center, in October.” Built as the United States Science Pavilion for the world’s fair, the Pacific Science Center was founded — when the fair ended — as the first private, not-for-profit American museum dedicated to science and technology. Its five exhibition halls, which horseshoe around a large central water court, include a variety of child-oriented educational exhibits. Among them are displays on dinosaurs, butterflies and other insects, marine life, health and wellness, computer technology and basic physics. There’s also an IMAX theater, a Laser Dome and a planetarium. A highlight of this birthday year is the return of the acclaimed King Tut exhibition. Beginning Thursday and continuing through the Jan. 6, 2013, “Tutankhamun: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs” will showcase more than 100 objects from Tut’s tomb and other sites representing 2,000 years of ancient Egyptian history. Promoters promise more than twice the number of artifacts seen when the original Tut exhibit passed through Seattle in 1978.

Summertime events Elsewhere around Seattle Center, there will be plenty going on all summer.

In KeyArena, the Seattle Storm women’s professional basketball team plays a Maythrough-September season. A busy concert schedule will be highlighted by back-to-back shows by Madonna on Oct. 2 and 3. The theatrical season will feature Seattle Opera and Pacific Northwest Ballet performances in McCaw Hall. Major festivals scheduled at Seattle Center include the Seattle International Film Festival (now through June 10), the Northwest Folklife Festival (May 25-28), Seattle Pridefest (June 24), Bite of Seattle (July 20-22) and the Bumbershoot music-and-arts festival (Sept. 13). On Oct. 21, the Seattle Symphony will headline a Closing Day Community Celebration. A renovation of the Center House, to be renamed The Armory to honor its original purpose, is already underway. New restaurants and a broader stage for weekend ethnic festivals are in the master plan, which retains the popular children’s museum on the building’s basement level. Immediately north, aging Memorial Stadium is scheduled to be relandscaped for integration into the Seattle Center grounds. On the east side of the Center House, next to the monorail terminal in an area that once offered carnival-style rides, Next 50 Plaza is projected as a playground for child artists. For summer 2012, however, it supports several temporary structures, including a pavilion with a series of two-month exhibits on sustainable futures, global health and world vision. Those tie directly into the vision of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, whose new head-

quarters opened three months ago on Fifth Avenue North on the northeast side of Seattle Center. A visitor center describes the foundation’s threepronged global goals in poverty relief, health and education.

The Chihuly Garden The arts are an integral part of any culture and any educational curriculum. From that perspective, the Chihuly Garden and Glass is being regarded as an essential element of the Seattle Center — even as it opens. Visitors enter past a gift shop into a redesigned exhibition space that was formerly the Seattle Center’s child-oriented Fun Forest. Although not organized chronologically, the

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displays (in eight galleries and three “drawing walls”) offer detailed studies of various periods in the artist’s creative life. In the Northwest Room, cylindrical baskets stand side-byside with the Native American crafts that influenced their creation, along with Pendleton blankets and historical photogravures by Edward S. Curtis. The Sea Life Room combines glass sculpture with original drawings of marine denizens. Ikebana and Float Boat places floral sculptures in traditional wooden boats from Finland, where the artist worked for an extended period. In Macchia Forest, Chihuly has speckled each cloudlike vase with all 300 colors available to him in a glass-blowing hot shop. The centerpiece of the Chihuly installation is the Glasshouse. Forty feet tall, its glass panels held by a steel frame, this conservatory was inspired by the Crystal Palace in London and the Sainte-Chapelle chapel in Paris. Suspended beneath the ceiling is a six-section, 100-foot-long sculpture in various shades of red, orange and yellow. The surrounding Chihuly Garden takes the artist’s “Mille Fiori” (thousand flowers) concept to its logical climax. “I want my work to appear as though it came from nature,” Chihuly told an interviewer. Here, the glass is mixed into the environment of an exhibition garden, where dogwoods and azaleas, grasses and trees juxtapose with fanciful glass botanicals. The winding garden path exits toward the Collections Cafe, which chef Ivan Szilak hopes to develop as a creative American restaurant in its own right. Casual visitors may be more impressed by the displays that gave the cafe its name: Dale Chihuly is a hoarder, and this is where he’s chosen to exhibit some of the items he’s amassed. Hanging from the ceiling are dozens of accordions. Behind glass at the main entrance are hundreds of bottle-cap openers. Built into the tables are displays of fishing lures, toy soldiers, porcelain dogs, jackknives, kitchen juicers, antique cameras — in all, 28 separate collections. I wouldn’t be surprised if Mr. Chihuly also has a hidden stash of colorful hippie-era hair clips — bangled, tangled, spangled and spaghettied. — Reporter: janderson@ bendbulletin.com

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D6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

M  A

  

• Online networks enable women to help each other learn, address tough challenges By Aimee Blanchette Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

Harold and Joyce (Reinke) Evans

Peggy Griffin and Jon Fickes

Griffin — Fickes Jon Fickes and Peggy Griffin celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary May 17. The couple were married May 17, 1987, in the mountains near Big Bear Lake, Calif. They have two children, Griffin, of Bend, and Weston, of Klamath Falls.

Mr. Fickes is an operating room tech at St. Charles Bend. Dr. Griffin is a veterinarian. She operates the independent veterinary clinic Critter Care-a-Van. They both enjoy long runs along the Deschutes River with their Irish setters. They have lived in Central Oregon for 20 years.

Flowers Brad and Nancy (Bolf) Flowers, of Prineville, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary May 12. The couple were married May 12, 1962, in Portland. They have three children, Duane (and Kim), of Troutdale, Suzanne (and Mike) Huffman, of Mesa, Ariz., and Kim (and Dave) MacKenzie, of Redmond; eight grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Mr. Flowers owned a business in Portland. Mrs. Flowers was a bookkeeper for their business and is a homemaker. They both enjoy home improvement projects and are active with their church. They have lived in Central Oregon more than nine years.

SOCIAL MEDIA

A new mom’s new best friend

Evans Harold and Joyce (Reinke) Evans, of Redmond, will celebrate their 69th wedding anniversary May 22. The couple were married May 22, 1943, in Norfolk, Va., while he was serving in the U.S. Navy. They have three children, Harold Jr. (and Donna), of Redmond, Mike (and Bonnie), of Pine Grove, Calif., and the late Jeff; six grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Mr. Evans was a fire captain in San Jose until his retirement in 1979. Mrs. Evans is a homemaker. They have enjoyed camping, fishing, dancing and spending time with family and friends. They have lived in Central Oregon for seven years.

Milestones guidelines and forms are available at The Bulletin, or send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to: Milestones, The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. To ensure timely publication, The Bulletin requests that notice forms and photos be submitted within one month of the celebration.

Brad and Nancy (Bolf) Flowers

B

MINNEAPOLIS — It’s the middle of the night and new mom Katie Champ rocks back and forth in the dark, struggling to nurse newborn Kaylee. Feeling isolated and worried that her baby might not be getting enough to eat, the Bloomington woman reaches for her new best friend — an iPhone — to check Facebook. She wonders: Who else in the world is awake and experiencing the same challenges? While a new mom’s need for support hasn’t changed much over the years, the places she’s finding it have. If it takes a village to raise a child, then Facebook, Twitter and thousands of “mommy blogs” proliferating the Web have become the virtual village. “Without this group, I’m not sure what type of mother I would be,” Champ said of the private Facebook community she belongs to called September Sweetpeas. The group comprises 300 women from all over the world who gave birth around the same month, including several from the Twin Cities. “I’ve learned more from these moms than I could from any book.” The virtual mommy network is growing at a staggering pace. Fourteen percent of American women with at least one child blog about parenting or turn to blogs for advice, according to a recent study by Scarborough Research. And about 3.9 million U.S. moms identify themselves as bloggers. Young mothers such as Champ, who checks in with her online mommy group daily, spend twice as much time online as women who are not moms, according to the 2012 American Media Mom report, a joint study between Nielsen and BabyCenter.com. The number of visits to the BabyCenter’s “community” page, where parents can find existing support groups or create their own, grew 259 percent from 2008 to 2011. But these moms aren’t just showing off their babies’ latest photos. From postpartum depression to mother-in-law and marriage issues, no topic is off limits. What starts as an online exchange of ideas is often just the beginning of real-life friendships. During those middle-

of-the-night feedings, what — aside from sleep — do new moms long for? Company. Someone who’s been there, who can feel their pain, maybe even offer a few tips they haven’t tried. “When I’m up at 3 a.m., all I can do is take out my phone and start looking for answers,” said Alison Cromie, a Farmington, Minn., mom who initially experienced nursing difficulties. “In-person support groups are time-dependent; social media is immediate.”

‘Digital natives’ New moms aren’t replacing the advice from their own mothers, existing friends and doctors, experts say, but are using social media to enhance their circles of support. They continue to forge relationships at day care dropoff or through Early Childhood Family Education classes, but also connect online — often creating Facebook groups — to deepen their friendships. “A lot of new moms today are digital natives,” said Susan Walker, an associate professor of family social science at the University of Minnesota who studies parents’ use of technology and social media. “They were brought up with these technologies, so it’s within their culture and their comfort to be socially engaged with other mothers through these media.” Generic baby blogs started over a decade ago but have since splintered into diverse niche groups devoted to every parenting style imaginable. Whatever your beliefs — “cry it out” vs. attachment parenting, breast vs. bottle, co-sleeping vs. crib, cloth vs. disposable diapers — there’s a blog, forum or support group at which other parents are likely to share your views. No matter their style, mothers by their biochemical nature are primed for bonding both with their babies and their communities, said Sara Pearce, owner and founder of Amma Parenting Center in Edina. New mothers have high levels of oxytocin, the “hormone of love” that aids in bonding with their babies, but also primes bonding with other mothers. “Even though so much has changed in the way we connect and communicate with each other, fundamentally, things have been the same for an eternity,” said Pearce, also a nurse, certified nurse/midwife and lactation consultant. “Moms need other moms.” Susan Biewen, a psychologist for Fairview Health Ser-

Renee Jones Schneider / Minneapolis Star Tribune

Katie Champ, of Bloomington, holds her daughter Kaylee as she looks online at a support group she joined for pregnant moms in early 2011. Through nursing difficulties, middle-of-thenight feedings and medical issues, the members of the group were able to support each other at all hours of the night using their smartphones.

vices, which specializes in postpartum issues, said online support has been very helpful in alleviating postpartum depression, particularly in the first isolating weeks after giving birth. But as children reach school age, wired moms are less likely to engage with other mothers in online communities. “A mother’s confidence grows as her kids get older,” Biewen said. “Her resources are more established within her lifestyle either through her children’s schools, activities or the neighborhood.”

Becoming offline friends Just because new moms connect online doesn’t mean they isolate themselves behind their computers and never leave the house to make real-life connections. Quite the opposite. A recent Pew Research Center study found that the average social networking site user had more close ties than the average American and was half as likely to be socially isolated. Missy Berggren, well known among mothers in the local social networking community, has formed many friendships with women she has never met face-to-face. Through Twitter, Facebook and her blog, the Marketing Mama, many of those connections evolved into real-life ones, too, over lunch meetings, “Tweetups” and local blogger events.

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“The support and friendship is tangible, it is meaningful, it is very, very real,” she said of her online friends. “Then when it transcends to face-to-face, it’s even more powerful.” Berggren, who co-founded the Minnesota Blogger Conference, said the stigma attached to meeting online friends in real life is fading away. “There used to be a time five years ago where social media was this thing that only existed online, but in the last few years that’s changed,” she said. “Now online is just the beginning of the relationship.” Berggren started connecting with local women via a message board on TheKnot .com in 2001 when she was planning her wedding. Over the next several years, many of the women kept communicating online and eventually met in person. They supported one another through pregnancy, motherhood and divorce. When one of the group’s members lost her battle with cancer, they came together at her funeral. “It was very profound,” Berggren said. “And that was a relationship that began with a bunch of women online talking about Vera Wang wedding

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pounds, 9 ounces, May 13. Jeffery Snow and Jennifer Wilson, a boy, Jadon Ray Snow, 7 pounds, May 11. Garett and Carly McFarland, a boy, Kellen Hoyt McFarland, 7 pounds, 14 ounces, May 7. Rigoberto and Maria Castellanos, a girl, Karime Montes Castellanos, 7 pounds, 15 ounces, May 8.

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SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

By Steven Kurutz New York Times News Service

Back in the 1980s, Kurt Andersen, the novelist and radio host, used to write freelance stories for architecture magazines, a job that took him into the homes of some very wealthy people. “I was always amazed: They were exactly propped with perfect art books,” Andersen said last week, recalling how obvious it was that the homes had been styled by someone other than their occupants. “Maybe all these people were interested in the same Botero coffee table book,” he added. “But I don’t think so.” Since then, the self-consciously styled home has become almost commonplace, particularly in cities like New York and Los Angeles where creative types congregate. “It’s not just rich people now,” he said. “It’s all of us.” As Andersen noted in a recent issue of Vanity Fair, in an essay on the larger topic of cultural stasis, millions of Americans are now “amateur stylists — scrupulously attending, as never before, to the details and meanings of the design and decor of their homes, their clothes, their appliances, their meals, their hobbies, and more.” For proof of this phenomenon, one need only consult one of the shelter magazines or a design blog like Apartment Therapy that features photos of homes designed down to the last detail. Studying these spaces, one can’t help noticing that the decor seems to bear little relationship to the way people actually live: deer antlers adorn the walls of people who almost certainly don’t hunt; vintage typewriters sit on school desks too small to be functional; books have been arranged on shelves by color

“Can everyone stop trying to be so awesome? Can we just chill out?” — Elaine Miller, design blogger

to reflect some perceived notion of good design. Elaine Miller, who writes Decorno, an occasionally sharp-tongued design blog, believes this sort of stagecraft is largely a result of living through social media. “People are insanely selfconscious,” Miller said. “People act like they’re always being watched. Even their house is a performance.” She cited as an example the way design bloggers and Pinterest users have lately become obsessed with entertaining. “It’s this throwback to the ’50s and ’60s, where women are going to throw these big parties,” she said. “They have a bar cart and they’re ready to entertain you.” Ah, the bar cart. If there’s one thing that typifies the selfconsciously styled home, it may be that. Evoking a mythical Hollywood Regency glamour, the bar cart telegraphs that the resident leads a life as rich as a socialite in a Slim Aarons photo and is constantly entertaining at home, though in reality it’s a prop that mostly collects dust. (This reporter should know: Of the three pieces of furniture in his living room, one is a bar cart that’s still waiting for its first party.) But with so many of us aspiring to be amateur Dorothy Drapers (and posting the evidence on design blogs), it’s inevitable that once-fresh decorating ideas like the bar cart

will become cliches. Design classics like Barcelona chairs and Arco floor lamps are now so overplayed that it’s impossible to own them without feeling like a design victim. At least one popular Tumblr has built its entire identity around ridiculing their presence in the homes featured on blogs. The site, which goes by a name that can’t be printed in this newspaper, calls out a range of familiar design cliches (from the Saarinen Womb Chair to a “terrarium that contains a tiny succulent array perched upon a stack of books”). But even seemingly uncommon decorative accessories like a library card catalog are pilloried, illustrating the been-there-seen-that feedback loop that will be familiar to any Pinterest user. One wonders if earlier generations were so self-conscious about decorating their homes. Didn’t they simply buy things they liked or could put to good use, and keep them for decades? Miller agreed with that theory — up to a point. “Even my grandparents went out and bought the same lamps as their neighbors,” she said. “The difference was, they weren’t trying to be awesome. They were just trying to get lights in their house.” In a mock plea, she added: “Can everyone stop trying to be so awesome? Can we just chill out?” Probably not. Twenty-five years ago, you saw the inside of the homes of your friends and neighbors, and of members of your extended family, and that was about it. Now there are countless images of picture-perfect interiors online to stoke your sense of envy and aspiration.

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Self-conscious home decorators living amid a proliferation of props

D7

LOS ANGELES TIMES SUNDAY CROSSWORD

Submitted photo

Surrounded by graffiti, a skateboarder grinds his axles in abandoned pool at a mansion that used to belong to a relative of former Tunisian ruler Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. This photo, among others from Bend filmmaker Nathan Gray’s recent visit there, is on display through May at Thump Coffee in Bend.

Tunisia Continued from D1 Gray and Roberts point out that what became known as the Arab Spring began in Tunisia in December 2010 with the self-immolation of an unemployed man named Mohamed Bouazizi. His “desperate act set off street clashes that ultimately toppled the country’s autocratic ruler,” the New York Times reported in January 2011. Inspired by the revolution in Tunisia, more protests and toppled rulers followed in Egypt, Libya and other countries. There was more calm than turmoil in Tunisia when they visited in November, 11 months after the revolution; however, at the same time, there was an excitement, and some cynicism, about the country’s election process. Roberts created shirts emblazoned with the Arabic word “inhad” — a translation of “rise up” — and when members of the film crew wore them, they were mistaken for a Tunisian political group. An abandoned mansion that had belonged to the family of toppled ruler Zine El Abidine Ben Ali became an epicenter of their activities. “Nathan and I were scouting (locations) because we wanted to find a place to do an art show. We couldn’t really find the right spot, and then

we heard about this house,” Roberts said. “The house had been looted after the revolution. There was already some graffiti. … This would be the perfect spot to do an art show.” Skateboarders thrive on empty pools, but the bluetiled pool lacked the rounded walls, or transitions, that enable skaters to ride in them. So Gray and others went to work removing a mattress, water heater and other trash that had been thrown in the pool, then forming transitions and pouring concrete to enable area boarders to skate it. “The house became a focal point for our energy. We spent three or four days there,” Gray said. “Part of it, initially, going into it, was this was going to be a skate movie,” Roberts added. “It’s not like there was this big huge storyboard as far as the documentary (went), but I think we were all so inspired by the Tunisian revolution, by the Arab Spring. … It was like, ‘How can we capture that as well?’ ” They interviewed skaters, musicians and artists, and visited significant places in Tunisia. “We ‘captured’ the energy of the revolution in various ways,” explains Euijin Gray, Nathan Gray’s wife, who was also part of the film crew during on the trip. “Aside from our

main focus of skating with the locals, hosting competitions, demos, skate sessions and giving away boxes of donated gear, we traveled to the birthplace of the revolution, Sidi Bouzid, and interviewed some locals,” she said. “We also met up with rapper El Général, who was instrumental in the revolution,” she added. Soon after they’d met and interviewed him, Time included the Tunisian rap star in its 2011 Time 100, a feature listing people the magazine considers to be among the world’s most influential. The doc more than doubled in length, from an intended 15-minute short film to a notso-short 35-minute film. “We had to take some time to explain what the revolution was about,” Nathan Gray said. “A lot of Americans (don’t) know … it’s a starting point for the Arab Spring.” Roberts returned to Tunisia in January to conduct art workshops, and just received a grant that will enable him to return in June for a street-art festival in which Rise Up International is involved. The two hope to have their internationally minded organizations collaborate on more projects together. “We’ve got the skate side (of things), and Rise Up’s got the street art,” Gray said. — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com

CROSSWORD SOLUTION IS ON D8


D8

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

THE SAN FRANCISCO OF THE EAST

Portland has grit, soul and salty docks By Josh Noel Chicago Tribune (MCT)

PORTLAND, Maine — I was in Portland all of 10 minutes when its soul rolled by on two wheels: a gentleman pedaling through downtown on one of those ridiculously tall bicycles with an oversize front wheel and tiny back wheel. The bike, called a penny-farthing, made the man look as if he had just ridden off the back of a deck of playing cards. Or straight out of the 1870s. He seemed barely to notice he was more than a century out of his time. But then, Portland is out of its time too. Maine’s largest city (not saying much in a state of 1.3 million) is long on modern comfort, but its most endearing feature is a cozy, Old World charm. The town seems almost entirely made of handsome, weathered brick that turns rosy warm at sunset, all the way down to the sidewalks that slope down to a still-working waterfront where gulls squawk and circle overhead. It’s not so difficult to have that old charm when your town’s engine is what it was when founded in 1786: the docks. Portland’s long, salty docks still teem with stacks of lobster traps, the hulking ships that catch the nation’s seafood, and businesses boasting, “Fishing Maine waters for over 100 years.” They’re open and free for your perusal and offer classic no-frills dining spots such as J’s Oyster, which serves fish straight out of the ocean and appears to have been redecorated approximately never during its 36-year existence. Head a block from the docks into downtown, and you see still more evidence of a town admiring its past while striving for the future, like the antique “E. Klaman Bottles” sign revealing what one brick storefront was — seriously, there’s a lot of brick — before it became

If you go Getting there: Portland International Jetport (portlandjetport.org) is served by several larger (United, Delta) and discount (JetBlue, AirTran) airlines. It is an easy and pleasant two-hour drive north of Boston. Eating: Food is one of the great pastimes in Portland, and there’s no shortage of quality. James Beard-winning Fore Street (288 Fore St., 207775-2717, www.forestreet.biz) has long brought class and a high-end touch to comfort food. Hugo’s (88 Middle St., 207-774-8538, www.hugos .net), another Beard winner, is

a Life is Good store. Yet Portland is decidedly modern, packed with more rewards than you’d expect from a town of 66,000. It is eclectic, creative, edgy and alive. The evidence is in the vibrant arts district of galleries, theaters and a sign promising “Ca$h for your Warhol.” It’s spread across Exchange Street, where you’ll find gourmet ice cream (Mexican chocolate, sea salt caramel), gourmet popcorn (Maine maple, dill pickle) and a “sexuality boutique” that is “women owned and operated since 2004.” About five miles outside of downtown, there’s world-class beer from Allagash Brewing. Even the buskers impress; on an unseasonably warm Wednesday afternoon a classical violinist in a long skirt and sandals played a block up from a tattooed guy in a porkpie hat blowing some jazz saxophone. Then there was the guy driving through downtown in a pickup truck, purple bandanna wrapped around his head, singing along to the Grateful Dead that spilled from his speakers. It’s also gentle, slow-mov-

higher end and more inventive, especially when it comes to seafood. Petit Jacqueline (190 State St., 207-553-7044, www.bistropj.com) is a newer, well-regarded bistro. For a slice of old-time Portland seafood, check out J’s Oyster (5 Portland Pier, 207-7724828, www.jsoyster.com). Staying: Portland’s downtown hotels are mostly chains, but for a more opulent stay, try the Portland Harbor Hotel (468 Fore St., 207-775-9090, www .portlandharborhotel.com). A cheaper, reasonable stay (with impressive views) can be had at the Holiday Inn By the Bay (88 Spring St., 207-775-2311, www.innbythebay.com).

Josh Noel / Chicago Tribune

Bricks are heavily featured in the buildings of downtown in Portland, Maine.

ing enough that if you let your mind drift, you could just as well be in Michigan or Oregon, at least until someone says “toddah sauce,” and then you’re jerked back to the realization that, yes, you’re in New England. The eclecticism — as well as the rolling streets ending at a waterfront — often leads people to call this San Francisco of the East. It’s a reasonable comparison, albeit on a smaller, calmer, colder level. “It’s a more innocent version of San Francisco,” said Mi-

chelle Gerster, 33, a Bay Area resident spending four months at Portland’s Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. In true Portland style, Gerster and a classmate were stopping strangers on the street, asking for permission to take their portraits. In the middle of downtown Portland, it made perfect sense. “Look at that family holding hands,” Gerster said, pointing across the street to a human chain of four breezing down the sidewalk. “That is so Maine!” “It is so Maine,” said her classmate, Ellen Sherwood, 24, an Augusta, Maine, native who has lived in Portland for about two years. She said she prefers Portland to her hometown. “You can do anything here,” she said. “You can go to school and get a job but still have things to do at night.”

SOLUTION TO TODAY’S SUDOKU

ANSWER TO TODAY’S JUMBLE

SUDOKU IS ON D7

JUMBLE IS ON D7

But Portland, thankfully, also has some grit beneath its nails that keeps it from being too utopian. There are plenty of hippie types, tattoos (lots and lots of tattoos), and I was asked several times for spare change, albeit with the utmost civility and East Coast brotherhood. “Spare any change?” one guy asked at the docks. “Sorry, I can’t,” I said. “Oh, don’t worry about it!” He said it so cheerfully that I didn’t worry about it. Being so small, much of the action — the shops, the James

Beard Foundation Awardwinning restaurants, the bars serving Maine craft beer — are downtown, just beyond the waterfront. Portland is small enough to soak up in about three days, though the east and west end neighborhoods bookending downtown also are worth exploring for their coffee shops and restaurants thick with locals who seem quite glad to be living in Portland. Unfortunately, at the end of my trip, I never got to do the thing I most wanted to: find that man and his bicycle again.

ANSWER TO TODAY’S LAT CROSSWORD

CROSSWORD IS ON D7


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Labrador Retrievers Born 4/12, English purebred yellow, 1 M, 1 F, ready 6/10, $250 ea. Call 541-516-8985

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Want to Buy or Rent WANTED: RAZORS, Double or singleedged, straight razors, shaving brushes, mugs & scuttles, strops, shaving accessories & memorabilia. Fair prices paid. Call 541-390-7029 between 10 am-3 pm. 208

Pets & Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Barn cats ready to work in your barn, shop or home in exchange for safe shelter, food & water. Altered, shots. We deliver! 389-8420

Boxer/ Bulldog (Valley Bulldog) new litter,CKC Reg., taking deposits. $700. 541-325-3376 Chihuahua pups, 1st shots & dewormed. Currently 9½ wks, BEAUTIFUL AppleHeads, loving temperaments. TOO CUTE!!! Must see. $500. 541.350.4810 Don’t miss the GUN DOG EXPO June 22-23-24, Portland, OR. See: www.GunDogExpo.com DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines, $12 or 2 weeks, $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

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F1b Labradoodles $800 Born 3-26-12. Call 541-977-2942

FREE Sweet Cat - great mouser - indoor or outdoor or both. Mattie is the easiest pet ever. We are moving to Florida & can't keep her. She is spayed & has a chip. Comes w/ nice cat post & supplies. Email kj@bje.bz or call 541-318-3501

German Shepherd puppy, white, AKC, $200 w/o papers $375 with. 541-536-6167 snowywhiteshepherds.com snowywhiteshepherds @gmail.com

German Shepherd puppies, purebred, parents on site, $350. 541-598-5105 German Shep. pups, all black / B&T, parents SWEET disp. M $400, F $450. 541-620-0946 German Short Hair puppies. AKC, all colors, $400. Call Mark 541-420-3580 GSP Pups 2 male 1 female Black/white, $750. 503-566-8105 Labradoodles - Mini & med size, several colors 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Labs, Purebred, 6 wks old, working parents, cert. hips, utd, $350 obo 541-603-8553 Lionhead baby bunnies, variety color, 5 @ $15 ea. 541-548-0747 Papillon beautiful puppies exceptionally wellcared for. Registered, vet checked. $350$450. 541-367-7766.

The Bulletin r ecommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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Antiques & Collectibles

Ruger P95 SS 9mm, $375. Ruger SR-9, $425. 541-647-8931 S & W AR-22LR rifle, w/mags. $550. 541-647-8931 S&W M&P compact 9 MM. NIB. Comes with two mags, a carry case and more. Very reliable, fun to shoot, and easy to carry. $465. Near Sunriver 503/559-3146, dealer. Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, or 503-351-2746 White River Conservationist fly rod, 8’6”, 5# line wt, $65. White River Dogwood Canyon disk drag fly reel, incl sock & tube, $50. 541-312-2785

Papillon mixed with tiny bit of toy poodle. Cute colors, $150 each 541 400 Hotwheels incl mo350-1684 torcycles & 36 T-hunts, 247 PEOPLE giving pets $150. 541-749-0204 Sporting Goods away are advised to Shirley Temple Collectible Dolls (15), be selective about the - Misc. never been out of box, new owners. For the 541-678-8249. protection of the ani14’ Army tent w/arctic mal, a personal visit to The Bulletin reserves pkg, all ropes incl, the animal's new great cond, all set up, the right to publish all home is recomready to view. $450. ads from The Bulletin mended. newspaper onto The 541-923-5920/550-9225 Bulletin Internet web255 site. Computers Pit Bull pups, Adorable, Black w/white THE BULLETIN rechests & feet, first US Stamp Collection quires computer adshots, 8 weeks, great vertisers with multiple Mint cond., 1926-2000, natured parents. $150, ad schedules or those white Ace albums + 541-382-3751. selling multiple sysmany Elvis stamps & tems/ software, to disrecord albums, $2000, close the name of the 541-447-4578 business or the term 241 "dealer" in their ads. Bicycles & Private party advertisers are defined as Accessories those who sell one Poodle pups, toy, for computer. SALE. Also Rescued Mtn Bike, 2011 Giant, Poodle Adults for brand new off road 257 adoption, to loving tires, must sell, great homes. 541-475-3889 cond., $300, Musical Instruments 541-480-2652. Queensland Heelers Upright Piano,good cond, standard & mini,$150 & 246 good sound, bench, up. 541-280-1537 http:// musics, $225, The Guns, Hunting rightwayranch.wordpress.com Dalles, 541-298-2159. & Fishing Rescued kittens/cats. People Look for Information 65480 78th St., Bend, CASH!! About Products and Sat/Sun 1-5; other For Guns, Ammo & Services Every Day through days by appt. 541Reloading Supplies. 647-2181. Altered, The Bulletin Classifieds 541-408-6900. shots, ID chip, more. 260 Info: 541-389-8420. Combat Pistol Course Ore. Precision FireMap, photos, more at Misc. Items arms Trng, June 2-3, www.craftcats.org $275. CHL or equal Buying Diamonds 210 req’d. Call Dusty, /Gold for Cash 541-420-0856 or Furniture & Appliances Saxon’s Fine Jewelers www.opfirearms.com 541-389-6655 Don’t miss the A1 Washers&Dryers BUYING GUN DOG EXPO $150 ea. Full warLionel/American Flyer June 22-23-24, ranty. Free Del. Also trains, accessories. Portland, OR. See: wanted, used W/D’s 541-408-2191. www.GunDogExpo.com 541-280-7355 BUYING & SELLING All gold jewelry, silver DO YOU HAVE China Hutch, gold oak, and gold coins, bars, SOMETHING TO made in Oregon, rounds, wedding sets, SELL Bentwood, $700, class rings, sterling silFOR $500 OR 541-536-6048 ver, coin collect, vinLESS? tage watches, dental Coffee Table, 2 end Non-commercial gold. Bill Fleming, tables, library table, advertisers may 541-382-9419. place an ad gold oak by BentGENERATE SOME with our wood, made in OrEXCITEMENT egon, $500, "QUICK CASH IN YOUR 541-536-6048. SPECIAL" NEIGBORHOOD. 1 week 3 lines $12 Couch, king size headPlan a garage sale and or board; Oak table, 6 don't forget to adver2 weeks $20! chairs, (2) 24” leaves; tise in classified! Ad must chest of drawers, 541-385-5809. include price of night stand & mirror. single item of $500 GET FREE OF CREDIT 541-923-9681 or less, or multiple CARD DEBT NOW! items whose total Folding Samsonite card Cut payments by up does not exceed table, 4 padded chairs, to half. Stop creditors $500. $100. 541-647-8484 from calling. 866-775-9621. Call Classifieds at (PNDC) 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com Greenwood Cemetery grave space (1), $650 cash. 541-636-4191 Visit our HUGE GUN SHOW home decor June 2nd & 3rd Male torso mannequins consignment store. Deschutes Fairgrounds. (2), $30 each. Call New items 541-647-8484 Buy! Sell! Trade! arrive daily! SAT. 9-5 • SUN. 10-3 MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. 930 SE Textron, $8 Admission, NEW! FastStart enBend 541-318-1501 12 & under free. www.redeuxbend.com gine. Ships FREE. OREGON TRAIL GUN One-Year SHOWS 541-347-2120 Money-Back GuarGENERATE SOME exantee when you buy HANDGUN SAFETY citement in your DIRECT. Call for the CLASS for concealed neighborhood! Plan a DVD and FREE Good license. NRA, Police garage sale and don't Soil book! Firearms Instructor, Lt. forget to advertise in 877-357-5647. Gary DeKorte. Thur. classified! (PNDC) May 24th, 6:30-10:30 541-385-5809. pm. Call Kevin CentThe Bulletin Offers wise, for reservations BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Free Private Party Ads $40. 541-548-4422 Search the area’s most • 3 lines - 3 days 22LR re- • Private Party Only comprehensive listing of Heritage volver, holster& ammo, • Total of items adverclassiied advertising... $200. 541-647-8931. real estate to automotive, tised must equal $200 merchandise to sporting or Less Learn rifle marksgoods. Bulletin Classiieds • Limit 1 ad per month manship & Ameri- • 3-ad limit for same appear every day in the can Heritage in a print or on line. item advertised within safe & enjoyable 3 months Call 541-385-5809 setting. Appleseed Call 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com Project will be at Fax 541-385-5802 Redmond Rod& Gun Wantedpaying cash Club, July 14-15, for Hi-fi audio & stuAug. 25-26. Visit Moving sale: bookcase, dio equip. McIntosh, www.appleseedinfo.org storage cabinet, JBL, Marantz, Dytreadmill, electric lift Mossberg 500 12ga naco, Heathkit, Sanchair, walnut desk and pump shotgun, 28” bbl, sui, Carver, NAD, etc. chair, end tables, $200. 541-647-8931 Call 541-261-1808 lamps, rug, microwave, stud tires. Remington 770 bolt 261 352-446-5235, Bend. 30-06 rifle $200. Medical Equipment 541-647-8931. NEED TO CANCEL Rem. M597 22LR rifle, ATTENTION DIABETYOUR AD? ICS with Medicare. with scope. $200. The Bulletin Get a FREE talking 541-647-8931. Classifieds has an meter and diabetic "After Hours" Line Ruger 10/22 rifle testing supplies at NO Call 541-383-2371 w/scope and ammo. COST, plus FREE 24 hrs. to cancel $200. 541-647-8931. home delivery! Best your ad! of all, this meter elimiRuger P94 .40 SW inWingback chair & ottonates painful finger cludes Uncle Mike's man, Flexsteel, plaid pricking! Call Sidekick Holster & 3 w/ducks, $75. 888-739-7199. boxes of ammo. $325 541-647-1333 (PNDC) 541-325-6928

REDMOND Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 1242 S. Hwy 97 541-548-1406 Open to the public. 266

Heating & Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves. 267

Fuel & Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Dry seasoned tamarack red fir, $165 rnd, $185 split 541-977-4500 or 541-416-3677 269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment Craftsman riding lawn mower, 42”, grass catcher, runs & looks great. $275. Call 541-508-0679. 970-260-2439, cell. For newspaper delivery, call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email

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Prompt Delivery Rock, Sand & Gravel Multiple Colors, Sizes Instant Landscaping Co.

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Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949. Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS 270

Lost & Found Found Diamond Ring, off Trail at Eagle Crest, in April, call to ID, 541-548-7814. Found Knife, on gas pipeline road, off China Hat Rd, bench made, fold out, 206-915-1412 FOUND roof off of child’s playhouse Tues. 5/15, on Hwy 97 N. before Deschutes Jct., light blue plastic. 541-389-6722. Lost glasses in green case near Home Depot. 541-815-8487 Lost near NW Crossing: leopard spotted shorthair cat-answers to "Tavi" Much loved, $100.00 reward. 541-390-4722 Lost orange & white shorthair male cat named Charlie, in Touchmark area. 541-389-6648 Lost: Set of keys, between Amethyst St. & S. Albertson’s. Sun. 5/13, 541-408-7724, 541-678-1835.

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420. 275

Auction Sales US 97: Murphy Rd Parrell Rd Sealed Bid Auction One 3/2 ranch style house w/dbl garage, 1460 sq.ft. No real estate, buildings only. Must be moved. Bids due by 5 pm, 6/15/12. For info & bid packet call 541-388-6400.

Farm Market

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Schools & Training AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 1-877-804-5293. (PNDC)

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Farm Equipment & Machinery John Deere Model 40 1955, nearly 100% Orig, runs good, exc. tin, 3 point hitch, hydraulics, light, $2000, 541-504-2891 or 541-977-3120

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.c om (PNDC)

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Clinical Director Rimrock Trails ATS has been dedicated to helping create lasting change in the lives of teens struggling with addiction since 1990. The Clinical Director provides leadership and day to day oversight of the clinical staff and treatment programs in compliance with standards of quality care and contract requirements. The person in this position must demonstrate competence in leadership, oversight and evaluation of services, staff development, individual service and support planning, case management and coordination, group, family, and individual therapy or counseling, documentation and rationale for services to promote intended outcomes and implementation of all provider policies. Qualifications: MA in Behavioral Health Field meeting QMHP requirements; must be certified or licensed to provide addiction treatment; 2 yrs of clinical management exp in a clinical. Competitive salary and great benefits. Send your cover letter and resume to: nancy.gm@bbsihq.com

or fax 541-388-1984.

General Central Oregon Community College has openings listed below. Go to https://jobs.cocc.edu to view details & apply online. Human Resources, Metolius Hall, 2600 NW College Way, Bend OR 97701; (541)383 7216. For hearing/ speech impaired, Oregon Relay Services number is 7-1-1. COCC is an AA/EO employer. Office Specialist, Campus Public Safety Act as department receptionist, dispatcher, and clerical assistant for the Campus Public Safety Office. Provide general office functions for the department. $1921 $2287/mo. Closes May 28. Campus Public Safety Supervisor Responsible for supervising the office of Campus Public Safety. Serve as the environmental/occupational safety resource for all employees. 3yrs exp req. $3781-$4502/mo. Closes June 13. _________________ Assistant Professor I of Emergency Medical Services Provide paramedic program courses instruction. See website for required qualifications. Start Fall 2012. $38,209-$46,309 for 9 months/yr. Closes May 28.

Cook Full menu cook, 1 year exp. min. FHC, ODL. Check out the Prep, cook, serve cafwith an ad in classiieds online eteria-style meals for The Bulletin’s groups. Seasonal www.bendbulletin.com “Call A Service (hours vary over seaUpdated daily son). DOE. Housing Professional” benefit neg. Meals Assistant Professor, 476 Culinary Arts Directory provided when kitchen Cascade Culinary Employment open. Unique highInstitute Wanted Used Farm Opportunities energy education faEquipment & Machincility, beautiful setting Provide instruction in the discipline of Culiery. Looking to buy, or south of Burns, OR. nary Arts and restauconsign of good used CAUTION READERS: Email resume to rant operations. Start quality equipment. mfs@highdesertair.com Fall 2012. Deschutes Valley Ads published in "Em$38,209-$46,309 for 9 Equipment ployment Opportuni- Courier / Warehouse months/yr. Closes 541-548-8385 ties" include emNutrition May 30. ployee and Receives food, loads & 325 independent posidelivers to sites; Adjunct Nurse Hay, Grain & Feed tions. Ads for posimaintenance of delivtions that require a fee ery van; operates ProvideEducator instruction for 1st quality grass hay for or upfront investment forklift. 5 hrs/day; students in an Assohorses. Barn stored, no must be stated. With Great benefits; Salary ciate of Applied Scirain, 2nd cutting, $220/ any independent job $13.02/hr. ence degree in a ton. Patterson Ranch, opportunity, please Nursing Program with Sisters, 541-549-3831 investigate thor- Please visit the District Practical Nurse and oughly. website at 1 ton Alfalfa hay, some Registered Nurse exit www.redmond.k12.or.us with dirt or mold, points. Start Fall Use extra caution when to review posting, job $155. 541-318-4829 2012. Closes May 28. applying for jobs ondescription & how to line and never proapply. Contact Carol 3A Livestock Supplies Adjunct Instructor of vide personal inforGustaveson at •Panels •Gates •Feeders Baking and Pastry, mation to any source carol.gustaveson@ Now galvanized! Cascade Culinary you may not have re•6-Rail 12’ panels, $101 redmond.k12.or.us Institute searched and deemed •6-Rail 16’ panels, $117 for additional Provide instruction in to be reputable. Use Custom sizes available information. the discipline of Bakextreme caution when 541-475-1255 ing and Pastry Arts. responding to ANY Customer Sales Start Fall 2012. Want to buy Alfalfa online employment Representative Closes June 5. standing, in Central ad from out-of-state. Rare opportunity with a Ore. 541-419-2713 progressive and Part-Time Instructors We suggest you call growing company in Wheat Straw: Certified & NEW! Outdoor the State of Oregon Bend. Bedding Straw & Garden Leadership, Consumer Hotline at To be considered for Veterinary Technician, Straw;Compost.546-6171 1-503-378-4320 this position, appliFine Arts & Music. cants must have COCC is always lookLooking for your For Equal Opportunity minimum 3-5 years of ing for talented indiLaws: Oregon Bunext employee? parts counter sales viduals to teach reau of Labor & InPlace a Bulletin experience, good part-time in a variety dustry, Civil Rights phone and computer help wanted ad of disciplines. Check Division, skills, energetic pertoday and our web site for in971-673-0764 sonality, and excelreach over structor needs. All polent customer service 60,000 readers sitions pay $500 per and multi-tasking If you have any queseach week. load unit (1 LU = 1 skills. Background in tions, concerns or Your classified ad class credit), with adsmall engine, outdoor comments, contact: will also ditional perks. power equipment, and Kevin O’Connell appear on agricultural equipClassified Department bendbulletin.com ment preferred. Valid Home Cleaning team Manager drivers license and which currently member for weekThe Bulletin clean MVR required. days only. Non smokreceives over 541-383-0398 We are a drug free ing cleaning busi1.5 million page company, offer a ness. 541-815-0015. views every comprehensive benmonth at no efit package, and a extra cost. AV Tech - Swank Augreat work environManufacturing/ Bulletin dio Visuals is seeking ment. EOE Production Classifieds a PT Audio Visual Email resume to: workers needed for Technician in Sunri- bend@floydaboyd.com Get Results! immediate ver. For more inforCall 541-385-5809 openings. mation or to apply or place your ad Please submit please visit Tick, Tock on-line at resume to: www.swankav.com lisa.mccawlegg@ bendbulletin.com Become a Tick, Tock... expresspros.com Team Member. EOE ...don’t let time get 341 Medical Biller 2 + Caregiver, full-time for away. Hire a Horses & Equipment years of adult foster home. Mulexperience. professional out tiple patient experiCOLT STARTING Please submit ence & work refs reof The Bulletin’s We build solid foundaresume to: quired. 541-350-9448 tions. Check us out. Jennifer.clemens@ “Call A Service 541-419-3405 expresspros.com Caregiver Professional” www.steelduststable.com Home Instead SeDirectory today! HR/Payroll nior Care is hiring 358 Administrator for part-time male/feFarmers Column Gilchrist area. male caregivers DO YOU NEED Please submit throughout Central A GREAT 10X20 STORAGE resume to: Oregon. You will BUILDINGS EMPLOYEE Jennifer.clemens@ provide seniors with for protecting hay, expresspros.com RIGHT NOW? one-on-one care to firewood, livestock Call The Bulletin allow them to etc. $1496 Installed. before 11 a.m. and maintain their inde541-617-1133. get an ad in to pubpendence. AlzheiCCB #173684. lish the next day! mer's and/or hoskfjbuilders@ykwc.net 541-385-5809. pice experience Where can you ind a VIEW the helpful, but not reHorse Pasture for rent, Classifieds at: quired. We have an helping hand? 2.5 acres, irrigated www.bendbulletin.com extensive screening w/cover, $369 for From contractors to & training process. season, Redmond. yard care, it’s all here 12-hour overnight & 541-610-4006. Call The Bulletin At 24-hour shifts. in The Bulletin’s 541-385-5809 Please call MondayWant to buy Alfalfa “Call A Service Place Your Ad Or E-Mail Friday, 9 am-1 pm standing, in Central At: www.bendbulletin.com Professional” Directory Ore. 541-419-2713 only, 541-330-6400.

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541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

Monday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday. . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . 11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat.

Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00 *Must state prices in ad

Garage Sale Special 4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . . . . $20.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $33.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $61.50

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

(call for commercial line ad rates)

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE; Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Call a Pro Whether you need a fence ixed, hedges trimmed or a house built, you’ll ind professional help in The Bulletin’s “Call a Service Professional” Directory

Good classiied ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not the seller’s. Convert the facts into beneits. Show the reader how the item will help them in some way.

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Mental Health Clinician: Adult Consumer Center

541-385-5809

280

Estate Sales

We are recruiting for a master’s level MH clinician, preferably licensed, to facilitate treatment with individuals who have severe and persistent mental illness. Position primarily involves facilitating individual and group treatment 286 and supervision at our Sales Northeast Bend adult mental health consumer center. Experience working with HH F R E E HH diverse populations a G a r a g e S a l e K it huge plus; we are an Place an ad in The EOE. This is a Bulletin for your gafull-time position with rage sale and rebenefits and a comceive a Garage Sale petitive salary based Kit FREE! upon experience and credentials. Submit KIT IN C L U D E S: resume and a cover • 4 Garage Sale Signs letter to: Program Di• $1.00 Off Coupon To rector, BestCare Use Toward Your Treatment Services, Next Ad 125 SW C Street, • 10 Tips For “Garage Madras, Oregon Sale Success!” 97741; or em-mail: • And Inventory Sheet heatherc@bestcaretreatment.org PICK UP YOUR

Estate Sale - Antiques, lots of great quality shoes, purses & petite women’s clothing, appliances, household items, garden, fabric/ craft, a little of everything. Sat-Sun, 5/19 & 20, 9-5. 2334 NE Wilcox Ave, Terrebonne. Cash only. Look What I Found! You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardGARAGE SALE KIT at Look at: ware, classified is 1777 SW Chandler Bendhomes.com always the first stop for Ave., Bend, OR 97702 cost-conscious for Complete Listings of consumers. And if Area Real Estate for Sale you're planning your own garage or yard Mental Health sale, look to the clas- Just bought a new boat? Clinician: Child & Sell your old one in the sifieds to bring in the Family Services buyers. You won't find classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! a better place 541-385-5809 for bargains! Call Classifieds: Yard/Living Estate Sale 541-385-5809 or Personal, commercial email & industrial items. Too classified@bendbulletin.com many to list! 1114 NE Revere Ave., Bend. We are recruiting for a 282 Fri-Sat, 8:00-4:00. master’s level child/ Sales Northwest Bend family MH clinician, 288 preferably licensed, to join our team in sunny Sales Southeast Bend Central Oregon. PosiAnnual School Yard tion primarily involves Downsizing from CounSale: Fri. & Sun. Only facilitating individual try to City! Sat. 9-3 & 8-4, - no Sat. sales. Sun. 10-2, Antiques, and family therapy in Take HWY 97 N. to horse tack,backpackan outpatient commuTumalo Rd. exit at ing gear, electronics, nity mental health overpass, turn west, furniture, misc. houseprogram, as well as school is at bottom of hold goods. 131 SE health assessments hill. 21155 Tumalo Rd. Airpark Dr. and crisis work. Expe541-389-2091. Lots of rience working with treasures for everyone! Local Organic Veggie diverse populations a MEGA SALE! Sat.-Sun., Start Sale: Fri., Sat., huge plus; we are an 8-3, 63985 Tyler Rd., Sun., 9-5, 37 SE EOE. This is a Tumalo, Hwy 20 West, Bridgeford Blvd., full-time position with W. on Bailey, S. on 458-206-9030. benefits and a comTyler, Furniture, petitive salary, based household items, anOUTDOOR SALE upon experience and tiques, crafts, Sharp Camping - fishing credentials. Submit 750 Motorcycle, kids hunting. Sun. only 9-3. resume and a cover clothes, toys, lots more! No early sales. letter to: Program Di20889 SE Westview Dr. 284 rector, BestCare Treatment Service, Sales Southwest Bend Tools, furn, antiques, 125 SW C Street, sports equip, toys & Madras, Oregon American Girl Dolls, mtn. games, china, art, quilt 97741; or e-mail: bike, gardening sup- fabric, Navajo rugs, heatherc@bestcareplies, Sat.-Sun., 9-4, Fri-Sat., 9-5; Sun 10-? 19634 SW Blue Sky Ln 20959 Greenmont Dr. treatment.org

Nurse Practitioners Nutrition Services IV Operations Manager One of C.O.’s top One of C.O.’s top Property Manager Part Time (24 hours painting companies is painting companies is On-site 2-person office/ Fast-growing, dynamic Position per week) position Prepares weekly menu looking for preppers, looking for painters. maintenance Team for investment firm in available at our Candidates should be Alpine Meadows Apts. & painter’s helpers. Bend is seeking an planners & monitors in Bend, experience On-Site Chronic DisCandidates should be honest, trustworthy, Operations Manager. inventory & orders required. Compensaease Management honest, trustworthy, responsible, dependPosition entails back product for satellite tion includes 2 bdrm. Clinic Located in responsible, dependable, well-kept apoffice, administrative, food program; Overhouse + salary. Please Bend, OR. able, well-kept appearance and have an and client servicing sees daily preparaemail resumes to: nor• Must by proficient in pearance and have an eye for detail. If you duties. Additionally, tion, loading & delivris.stevens.careers@g Phlebotomy eye for detail. Should work well with others, person will provide ery of food carts; mail.com and refer• Must be licensed as a know how to use prep are a professional and assistance in data Full-time; Salary ence “347 Team”. Nurse Practitioner and tools well. If you work want a great work encollection for the fi$13.70/hr; 172-days/ in the state of Oregon. well with others, are a vironment, send renancial planning deyr; Great benefits. • Must have Two - Five professional and want sume to kate@franpartment. Experiyears of professional Please visit the District Find It in a great work environcopainting.com. Min. ence in an investment clinical experience. ment, send resume to 3 yrs. professional The Bulletin Classifieds! firm environment website at Contact Genni Fairchild www.redmond.k12.or.us kate@francopainting. exp., tools & transpreferred, but not 541-385-5809 at 704-529-6161 for com. Minimum 1 year portation req. PT to necessary. Ideal to review posting, job more info. Please fax exp. preferred. May FT, $11/hr. to start. candidate: reliable, description & how to to 704-323-7931 or be willing to train the motivated, creative, apply. Contact Carol email to genni.fairright person. Reliable SOCIAL WORKER (MSW) team player, mature, Gustaveson at child@healthstatinc.c trans. required. PT to Established hospice, serving the community of goal-oriented, percarol.gustaveson@ om FT $10/hr. to start. sonable, well-orgaKlamath Falls for 29 years, is recruiting for a redmond.k12.or.us nized, and have for additional full-time MSW to join our interdisciplinary team. up-to-date computer information. Have an item to Position is responsible for delivery of varied skills across typical social work services to hospice patients and sell quick? Sell an Item Office Assistant platforms. Compenfamilies, including: initial psychosocial evaluaneeded for well-essation: $35K plus boIf it’s under tions, ongoing psychosocial counseling, direct tablished consulting nus and benefits. Incasework services, and bereavement services. $ 500 you can place it in company in Sisters, terested parties may Requirements: The Bulletin hourly wage. Duties send resume to: • Master's Degree of Social Work from school resume@valentineventures.com include answering accredited/approved by the Council on Social Classiieds for: No calls please. If it's under $500 phones, data entry, Work Education filing, shipping, sales • A demonstrated ability in casework, counselyou can place it in $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days and marketing. Need ing & group work, including clinical social work FIND IT! $ The Bulletin experience in Word, 16 - 3 lines, 14 days experience preferably in a healthcare or hosBUY IT! Excel & Access; abilpice setting Classiieds for: (Private Party ads only) SELL IT! ity to multi-task; and • Computer literacy w/Microsoft Office programs The Bulletin Classii eds have excellent com• Possess valid state driver's license and reli$10 - 3 lines, 7 days munication skills. able automobile, and be willing to operate perSend resume and refPREPRESS TECHNICIAN sonal car as necessitated by nature of job $16 - 3 lines, 14 days erences to Virginia The Bulletin is seeking a part time Prepress Excellent Benefits Package: Hickey at • Fully paid medical & dental (begins on the 1st Technician to work weekend evening shifts. (Private Party ads only) vahickey@comcast.net of month, following date of hire) Familiarity with CMYK prepress workflows • Fully paid short-long-term disability and life preferred, and a fundamental proficiency insurance using Macintosh and PC operating sysCITY OF REDMOND • 25 days of paid time off. tems is a must. This is a part time position Employment Opportunities For additional information, contact Trebor at with benefits. The Bulletin is a drug free 541-882-2902 or e-mail her at workplace and is an equal opportunity emAccounting Manager treborm@klamthhospice.org.

FAST!

$5515 - $6779 per month Exempt, Non-Represented Oversees all of the City’s professional accounting operations to maintain and ensure the integrity of the City’s financial reporting. Performs and supervises all technical accounting functions in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Minimum qualifications include a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting, Finance or Business Administration, and four (4) years of demonstrated experience in governmental accounting with knowledge of GAAP/GASB reporting requirements. Must demonstrate professionalism, strong organizational and communication skills and attention to detail. Extensive experience in word processing, spreadsheet and graphic tools. Desirable requirements include possession of a valid Oregon driver’s license, experience with CAFR preparation and a current Certified Public Accountant license. This position also requires candidate successfully passing a criminal history check, including fingerprinting, as mandated by Oregon Revised Statutes. HOW TO APPLY Request application packet from DeAnne Wakefield, City of Redmond Human Resources Department, via email only deanne.wakefield@ci.redmond.or.us. To be considered, ALL required documents must be received by DeAnne Wakefield, Human Resources Department, no later than 5:00pm, Friday, June 8, 2012.

ployer. Send a resume with qualifications, skills, experience and a past employment history to The Bulletin, attention: James Baisinger, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 by end of day 5/18/12.

Financial Controller Sunriver Owners Association is accepting applications for their Financial Controller position. Duties: manage accountingdepartment, maintain and review financial records, prepare monthly financial statements, assist General Manager with annual budget preparation, supervise accounting staff, oversee employee benefit plans, administer 401 (k) plan and coordinate workers’ compensation insurance and liability/ property insurance coverage and renewal. Education/Experience: Bachelors Degree in Accounting, five years experience as Controller/Chief Financial Officer of mid to large scale organization/ community association or equivalent financial experience. CPA preferred. Wage range: $62k-$93k with generous benefit package. Pre-employment drug screen and valid Oregon driver license required. EOE. Applications are required and can be downloaded from our website: www.sunriverowners.org. For inquiries, please call Sunriver Owners Association, Human Resources at 541-593-2411. Position closes: 5/31/12.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809 476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Business Opportunities

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin' s web site will be able to click through automatically to your site. Take care of your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Retail Sales Design Oriented Furniture Outlet, part-time, experience is helpful. Serious applicants with professional appearance apply in person at:

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans & Mortgages

1735 NE Hwy 20, Bend.

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Sales Marketing EXCITING OPPORTUNITY EXISTS Established internationally acclaimed artist/ photographer looking for an experienced sales and marketing person. Strong earning potential for the right individual who is willing to work on a commission basis only. Must be organized, have excellent sales, computer, and Ever Consider a Recommunication skills verse Mortgage? At along with a strong least 62 years old? interest in art. PosStay in your home & sible national travel increase cash flow! for exhibitions, sales Safe & Effective! Call presentations, etc. Now for your FREE Please send resume DVD! Call Now and cover letter 888-785-5938. via email to (PNDC) rm1545@earthlink.net with the subject indi- LOCAL MONEY:We buy secured trust deeds & cating “Sales & Marnote,some hard money keting”. loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13. Security See our website for our 573 available Security positions, along with the Business Opportunities 42 reasons to join our WARNING The Bulletin team! recommends that you www.securityprosbend.com investigate every phase of investment opportunities, especially those from out-of-state or offered The Bulletin by a person doing Recommends extra business out of a locaution when purcal motel or hotel. Inchasing products or vestment offerings services from out of must be registered the area. Sending with the Oregon Decash, checks, or partment of Finance. credit information We suggest you conmay be subjected to sult your attorney or FRAUD. call CONSUMER For more informaHOTLINE, tion about an adver1-503-378-4320, tiser, you may call 8:30-noon, Mon.-Fri. the Oregon State Attorney General’s A Classified ad is an Office Consumer EASY WAY TO Protection hotline at REACH over 3 million 1-877-877-9392. Pacific Northwesterners. $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call the PaNeed help ixing stuff? cific Northwest Daily Call A Service Professional Connection (916) ind the help you need. 288-6019 or email www.bendbulletin.com elizabeth@cnpa.com for more info (PNDC) Newspaper

Bulletin Advertising Department

Special Project Photographer/ Editorial Assistant The Bulletin is seeking a skilled photographer and editorial assistant to join the Special Projects team. Successful candidate will be responsible for on-site and studio photography for advertising products, including special magazines and niche products as well as retail advertising. Editorial assistant duties include some writing, organization, editing, data base management. Will also assist in some social media projects and participate in local events sponsored by The Bulletin. Qualified employee will possess basic photography skills, computer skills including Microsoft Office Suite and Adobe Creative Suite. Will require the use of a reliable personal automobile, proof of insurance, lifting up to 40 lbs. To apply, send a resume, cover letter and any appropriate work samples to: Martha Tiller at mtiller@bendbulletin.com. No phone call please.

Advertising Account Executive

The Bulletin is looking for a professional and driven sales and marketing person to help our customers grow their businesses with an expanding list of broad-reach and targeted products. This full time position requires a background in consultative sales, territory management and aggressive prospecting skills. Two years of media sales experience is preferable, but we will train the right candidate. The position offers a competitive compensation package including benefits, and rewards an aggressive, customer focused salesperson with unlimited earning potential. Please send your resume, cover letter and salary history to: Sean L. Tate Advertising Manager state@bendbulletin.com

Rentals

640

687

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Spacious 2 bdrm 1½ Advertise VACATION bath townhouse, w/d Warehouse - Industrial SPECIALS to 3 milhkup, fenced yd. NO lion Pacific Northunit for rent. 5600 PETS. Great loc! westerners! 30 daily sq.ft., $2250/month, $565 & up. 179 SW newspapers, six near Bend High. Hayes 541-382-0162; states. 25-word clas541-389-8794. 541-420-0133 sified $525 for a 3-day 630 ad. Call (916) 648 288-6019 or visit Rooms for Rent Real Estate Houses for www.pnna.com/advert ising_pndc.cfm for the Studios & Kitchenettes For Sale Rent General Pacific Northwest Furnished room, TV w/ Daily Connection. cable, micro & fridge. PUBLISHER'S (PNDC) Utils & linens. New NOTICE owners.$145-$165/wk All real estate adverExtreme Value Adver541-382-1885 tising in this newspatising! 30 Daily newsper is subject to the 634 papers $525/25-word Fair Housing Act 740 classified, 3-days. Apt./Multiplex NE Bend which makes it illegal Reach 3 million Pato advertise "any Condo/Townhomes cific Northwesterners. preference, limitation for Sale Alpine Meadows For more information or discrimination Townhomes call (916) 288-6019 or based on race, color, Widgi Creek, 17th 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. email: religion, sex, handiFairway, 2 bdrm, 2.5 Starting at $625. elizabeth@cnpa.com cap, familial status, bath, fully furnished, 2 541-330-0719 for the Pacific Northmarital status or nacar garage, exc. rental Professionally west Daily Connectional origin, or an inhistory, $270,000, managed by tion. (PNDC) tention to make any 503-799-1571. Norris & Stevens, Inc. such preference, Safely select, evaluate, 744 limitation or discrimifinance & succeed in a Close-in, charming 2 nation." Familial staOpen Houses bdrm, 1 bath. WSG & Franchise Business. tus includes children yard maint. incl. $725 www.frannet.com/msipe under the age of 18 per mo. + deposit. 541-610-5799 living with parents or Open 12-3 541-382-0088 legal custodians, 2541 NW Lemhi SOCIAL SECURITY Call for Specials! pregnant women, and Pass Dr. DISABILITY BEN- Limited numbers avail. people securing cusNorthWest EFITS. WIN or Pay 1, 2 & 3 bdrms tody of children under Crossing Nothing! Start Your w/d hookups, 18. This newspaper Home with ADU Application In Under patios or decks. will not knowingly acShelley Griffin, 60 Seconds. Call ToMountain Glen cept any advertising Broker day! Contact Disabil541-383-9313 for real estate which is 541-280-3804 ity Group, Inc. Li- Professionally managed by in violation of the law. censed Attorneys & Norris & Stevens, Inc. Our readers are BBB Accredited. Call hereby informed that Pilot Butte Village 55+ 888-782-4075. all dwellings adversenior retirement (PNDC) tised in this newspacommunity rentals. per are available on Call 541-388-1239 cascadiapropertymgmt.com an equal opportunity Say “goodbuy” basis. To complain of SPRING IN FOR A to that unused discrimination call GREAT DEAL!! HUD toll-free at item by placing it in $299 1st month’s rent! * 1-800-877-0246. The 2 bdrm, 1 bath The Bulletin Classiieds toll free telephone $530 & 540 number for the hearCarports & A/C incl! ing impaired is Just bought a new boat? Fox Hollow Apts. 541-385-5809 Sell your old one in the 1-800-927-9275. (541) 383-3152 classiieds! Ask about our Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co Super Seller rates! Rented your prop*Upstairs only with lease* Looking for your 541-385-5809 erty? The Bulletin next employee? 636 Classifieds Place a Bulletin help has an "After Hours" Apt./Multiplex NW Bend Open 12-3 wanted ad today and Line. Call 60639 reach over 60,000 541-383-2371 24 College Way TownThunderbird readers each week. hours to homes adjacent to Beautiful Setting Your classified ad cancel your ad! COCC starting $1050/ in Mountain High will also appear on month. 541-388-1239 Suzanne Iselin, bendbulletin.com 650 cascadiapropertymgmt.com Broker which currently reHouses for Rent Fully furnished loft Apt 541-350-8617 ceives over 1.5 milon Wall Street in NE Bend lion page views Bend, with parking. All every month at utilities paid. Call A quiet newer 3 bdrm, no extra cost. 541-389-2389 for appt 2.5 bath, 1692 sq.ft., Bulletin Classifieds mtn views. dbl. gaGet Results! Call 638 rage w/opener. $1195 385-5809 or place Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 541-480-3393,610-7803. your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com A Sharp Clean 2 bdrm, When buying a home, 83% of Central 1.5 bath apt., NEW Oregonians turn to CARPETS, neutral Want to impress the colors, great storage, relatives? Remodel private patio, no pets/ smoking, $530 incl. 745 your home with the Call 541-385-5809 to W/S/G, 541-633-0663 help of a professional Homes for Sale place your The Bulletin from The Bulletin’s Real Estate ad. 4270 sq ft, 6bd, 6ba, To Subscribe call “Call A Service 4-car, corner, .83 ac, 541-385-5800 or go to Professional” Directory Looking for your next mtn view, by owner. www.bendbulletin.com employee? $590,000 541-390-0886 Place a Bulletin help See: bloomkey.com/8779 wanted ad today and BANK OWNED HOMES! reach over 60,000 FREE List w/Pics! readers each week. DESCHUTES COUNTY www.BendRepos.com Your classified ad bend and beyond real estate will also appear on CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 20967 yeoman, bend or bendbulletin.com, currently receiving NOTICE: ASSESSMENT TECHNICIAN II (2012-00034) over 1.5 million page All real estate adverviews, every month – Assessor’s Office. Full-time position $2,582 tised here in is subat no extra cost. - $3,533 per month for a 172.67 hour work ject to the Federal Bulletin Classifieds Fair Housing Act, Get Results! month. Deadline: SUNDAY, 05/20/12. which makes it illegal Call 541-385-5809 or to advertise any prefplace your ad on-line BEHAVIORAL HEALTH DEPUTY DIRECTOR erence, limitation or at discrimination based (2012-00022) – Behavioral Health Division. bendbulletin.com on race, color, reliFull-time position $7,036 - $9,451 per month gion, sex, handicap, 652 for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE familial status or national origin, or intenHouses for Rent DATE EXTENDED, OPEN UNTIL FILLED, tion to make any such NW Bend WITH SECOND REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS preferences, limitations or discrimination. ON TUESDAY, 05/22/12. Clean small 2 bdrm. We will not knowingly Large yard. Wood accept any advertisheat. $700+ last + COURT SERVICES ASSISTANT (2012ing for real estate dep. Local ref. No 00033) – Justice Court in Redmond. Fullwhich is in violation of pets. 1015 NW Ogden. this law. All persons time position $2,582 - $3,533 per month are hereby informed 658 for a 172.67 hour work month. Deadline: that all dwellings adHouses for Rent vertised are available SUNDAY, 05/20/12. Redmond on an equal opportunity basis. The BulleDEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM Avail. Now - 4 bdrm, 2 tin Classified MANAGER (2012-00010) - Behavioral bath, family room, 3716 NW Arrowhead Ln pets Health Division. Full-time position $5,933 w/dep, no smoking, Need to get an ad $900, 541-526-0260 $7,970 per month for a 172.67 hour work in ASAP? month. DEADLINE DATE EXTENDED, OPEN Spacious Country home in NE Redmond near UNTIL FILLED, WITH SECOND REVIEW OF O’Neil Way. 2 master Fax it to 541-322-7253 APPLICATIONS ON MONDAY, 06/18/2012. bdrm/bath suites, large living rm, propane stove The Bulletin Classiieds ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST II $725, taking applications, 541-419-1917 (2012-00035) – Public Health Division.

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 E3 THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE ANSWER

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Full-time position $3942 - $5,397 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE: SUNDAY, 06/03/12. MENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST I, Assertive Community Treatment Team (2012-00011) - Behavioral Health Division. Full-time position $3,320 - $4,544 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE DATE EXTENDED: MONDAY, 05/21/12. MENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST I, Community Support Services Team (2012-00012) - Behavioral Health Division. Full-time position will work in Redmond & Bend offices, $3,320 - $4,544 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE DATE EXTENDED: MONDAY, 05/21/12. PSYCHIATRIC NURSE PRACTITIONER – Adult Treatment Program, Behavioral Health Division (2012-00024). Full-time position $6,125 - $8,382 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE DATE EXTENDED: THURSDAY, 05/31/12. TO APPLY ONLINE FOR THE ABOVE LISTED POSITIONS, PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT www.deschutes.org/jobs Deschutes County Personnel Dept., 1300 NW Wall Street, Suite 201, Bend, OR 97701 (541) 388-6553.

You may also drop off your resume in person or mail it to: 1777 SW Chandler, Bend, OR 97701. No phone inquiries please.

Deschutes County provides reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. This material will be furnished in alternative format if needed. For hearing impaired, please call TTY/TDD 711.

EOE / Drug Free Workplace

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

750

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver In River Meadows a 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 sq. ft., woodstove, brand new carpet/oak floors, W/S pd, $895. 541-480-3393 or 541-610-7803 VILLAGE PROPERTIES Sunriver, Three Rivers, La Pine. Great Selection. Prices range $425 - $2000/mo. View our full inventory online at Village-Properties.com 1-866-931-1061 682

Farms, Ranches & Acreage

Redmond Homes Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 762

Homes with Acreage

PUZZLE IS ON PAGE E2 771

775

Lots

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Custom Home Lots Available in NorthWest Crossing. The Garner Group 541-383-4360

10 year warranty! Start at 40 per Sq. Ft. More Sq. Feet for less. Call John at J & M Homes, 541-548-5511 2 bed, 1 bath $13,000. 2 bed, 1 bath $23,900. 3 bed, 2 bath $25,900. 3 bed, 2 bath $18,000. Call J & M Homes for details, 541-548-5511 780

Mfd./Mobile Homes with Land People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds

Bank owned Homes on land start at $69,950. Call John at 541-350-1782 for details.

Garage Sales Garage Sales Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809

personals An account has been set up at U.S. Bank by Jennifer Oliver, for Ed Shelton & Family Relief Fund. Thank you St. Anthony and St. Jude. Joan

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 8308.20144 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Fred L. Bradford Johnson and Elaine L. Bradford Johnson as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, to Western Title and Escrow, as trustee, in favor of Bank of the Cascades Mortgage Center, as beneficiary, dated 01/03/08, recorded 01/14/08, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2008-01746 and subsequently assigned to PennyMac Loan Services, LLC by Assignment recorded as 2010-24674, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: A parcel of land located in the Northwest One-Quarter (NW1/4) of the Northeast One-Quarter (NE1/4) of Section Nineteen (19), Township 17 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes county, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said Section 19 a 3 inch brass cap; thence along the North line of said Section 19, North 89 degrees 59' 15" West, 1644.17 feet to the true point of beginning; thence leaving said line, South 00 degrees 10' 01" East, 412.02 feet to a 5/8 inch iron rod; thence North 89 degrees 55' 33" West, 260.00 feet to a 5/8 inch iron rod; thence due South 120.00 feet to a 5/8 inch iron rod; thence North 89 degrees 55' 33" West, 285.45 feet to a 5/8 inch iron rod; thence North 06 degrees 26' 46" East, 534.79 feet to a point on the North line of said Section 19; thence along said North line, South 89 degrees 59' 15" East, 484.22 feet to the point of beginning and terminus thereof. Excepting therefrom: That portion which lies within the right of way of Butler Market Road PROPERTY ADDRESS: 22265 Butler Market Road Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,934.61 beginning 04/01/11; plus late charges of $75.74 each month beginning ; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $27.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $384,904.97 with interest thereon at the rate of 2 percent per annum beginning 03/01/11; plus late charges of $75.74 each month beginning until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $27.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 14, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com.

Tumalo 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2000 sw.ft. home with 1592 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2 bath, site-built, 2 car horse property. Large attached heated gaarena- barn houses rage, 24x36 heated, 72x180 indoor arena, finished shop w/10’ 25 stalls, 2 offices, 2 ceilings & 220V power, tack rooms, guest all on 1.22 treed acre quarters, exercise lot in CRR, too much to room, game room & list, $195,000 call viewing area w/ bar. 541-633-9613. Large outdoor arena Paddocks w/horse 764 safe fencing & shelFarms & Ranches ters, beautiful pond. $3000/mo. ESTATE PROPERTY, 541-327-8100 South Central Washington, Near Tri-Cit687 ies. 16,000 Acres, Commercial for For further information, please contact: South Slope RattleClaire Swazey Rent/Lease snake Mountain. For Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Sale June 1, 2012. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Once In A Lifetime Office/Warehouse loJohnson, Fred and Elaine Opportunity. cated in SE Bend. Up (TS# 8308.20144) 1002.205201-File No. www.McWhorterto 30,000 sq.ft., comRanch.com for inforpetitive rate, Publication Dates: May 13, 20, 27 and June 3, 2012. 1002.205201 mation. 541-382-3678.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E4 SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Boats & RV’s Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Computer/Cabling Install

Landscaping/Yard Care

Landscaping/Yard Care

More Than Service Peace of Mind

882

929

ATVs

Watercraft

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Automotive Wanted

We buy motorcycles, ATV’s, snowmobiles & watercrafts. Call Ken at 541-647-5151.

850

860

Motorcycles & Accessories Yamaha YFZ450 Sport Quad, 2005, new pipe & jet kit, too much to list, CRAMPED FOR fast, fun bike, $3200 CASH? obo. 541-647-8931 Use classified to sell those items you no 870 longer need. Boats & Accessories Call 541-385-5809

Spring Clean Up

•Leaves •Cones •Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration •Dethatching Compost Top Dressing Weed free Bark & flower beds

Harley Davidson SoftTail Deluxe 2007, white/cobalt, w/passenger kit, Vance & Hines muffler system & kit, 1045 mi., exc. cond, $19,999, 541-389-9188.

ORGANIC PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding Sprinkler Adjustments

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS Harley Heritage Softail, 2003 $5,000+ in extras, $2000 paint job, 30K mi. 1 owner, For more information please call 541-385-8090 or 209-605-5537

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

Home is Where the Dirt Is! 10 years Experience Clean Vacant Residences & Businesses. References Crecencia & Norma, 541-306-7426

881

Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, fuel inj, elec start, reverse, 2-up seat, cover, 4900 mi, $2500 obo. 541-280-0514

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Domestic Services

875

Snowmobiles

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Debris Removal

800

865

HD FAT BOY 1996

Same Day Response NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Landscape Construction which includes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-features, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be licensed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be included in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before contracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Completely rebuilt/ customized, low miles. Accepting offers. 541-548-4807

12’ alum. Sea King with NEW: seats, cover, 6hp Nissan 4-stroke; also trolling, fish finder, trlr. $1500. 541-312-4504 12' Smokercraft 2000 & trailer. 2007 9.9 HP Johnson w/less than 5 hrs use, Exc. shape. $3200, Call 360-903-7873 to view. In town. 13’ Smokercraft 1997, Alaskan Fish Boat w/ 9.9 Merc & elec. motor, swivel seat, fish finder, anchor, cover & top, trailer, $2450, 541-977-2644.

Honda 1500 Trike, 1994 with ‘08 Champion conversion, metallic red, always garaged, low miles, lots of op- 16’ Driftboat, like new cond., lots of upgrades, tions $21,500. Call 6 HP LS motor, $6500, 541-598-7718 call/text, 541-480-8075. HONDA CRF 250X 1988 373V 2006, senior citizen 19.5’ Ranger Bass Boat, bought new in 2007, Mercury 115 Motor, trail riding only in Ranger trailer, trolling Camp Sherman, low elec. motor, fish finder hours, not ridden last & sonor, 2 live wells & year, JD jetting kit, raall accessories, new diator & trans. guards, batteries & tires, great exc. cond., $3200 cond., $6500. OBO, 541-595-2559 541-923-6555.

Honda Elite 110 2010, Save tons on gas. $2499, Vin# B50394 Pro Caliber Motorsports 866-949-8607

19-ft Mastercraft ProStar 190 inboard, 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 hrs, great cond, lots of extras, $10,000 obo. 541-231-8709

Honda NT 700 2010, Tons of extras. $9999, Vin # B50416 19’ Glass Ply, Merc Pro Caliber Motorsports cruiser, depth finder, 866-949-8607 trolling motor, trailer, $3500, 541-389-1086 or 541-419-8034.

Electrical Services

Honda Shadow Arrow 2006, exlnt cond, low Painting/Wall Covering mi, always garaged, $3900. 541-420-4869

Honda ST 1300 - 2006. Less that 5,000 miles. Always garaged. Includes Givi tail bag, tank bag, Airhawk seat pad. Excellent condition. $7,500. 541-330-6123.

Excavating Levi’s Dirt Works: Residential/ Comercial General Contractor For all your dirt & excavation needs. • Small jobs for Homeowners by job or hour • Utilities • Concrete • Public Works • Subcontracting • Custom Pads • Driveway grading - Low cost get rid of pot holes & smooth out your drive! • Augering 541-639-5282 CCB#194077

Honda VT700 Shadow 1984, 23K, many new parts, battery charger, good condition, $3000 OBO. 541-382-1891

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

RV/Marine Suzuki GSXR 750 2001, Super Clean. $5999, Vin# BP50417. Pro Caliber Motorsports 866-949-8607

USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

541-385-5809 Yamaha Cruiser 2007, Very nice. $3999, Vin# B50420 Pro Caliber Motorsports 866-949-8607

Yamaha FJR 1300 Need to get an 2004, $7999, ad in ASAP? Vin# BP50423 Pro Caliber Motorsports You can place it 866-949-8607 online at: www.bendbulletin.com What are you

541-385-5809

looking for? You’ll ind it in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809

Yamaha FZ1 2006, Loads of EXTRAS. $6999, Vin# B50418 Reach thousands of readers! Pro Caliber Motorsports Call 541-385-5809 866-949-8607 The Bulletin Classifieds Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 877-213-9145. (PNDC)

SPRINGDALE 2005 27’, has eating area slide, A/C and heat, new tires, all contents included, bedding towels, cooking and eating utensils. Great for vacation, fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 541-408-3811

Regal Prowler AX6 Extreme Edition 38’ ‘05, 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all maple cabs, king bed/ bdrm separated w/slide glass dr,loaded,always 931 garaged,lived in only 3 Automotive Parts, mo,brand new $54,000, still like new, $28,500, Service & Accessories Springdale 2012 18’ will deliver,see rvt.com, used 3 times (diKayak, Eddyline ad#4957646 for pics. ‘92-96 Ford F150, tailvorce sale) $10,900 Sandpiper, 12’, like gate, maroon, exc cond, Cory, 541-580-7334 OBO. 503-778-0002 new, $975, $150. 541-382-8973 541-420-3277. Sundance 29’ 2009, We Buy Junk with 3 slides, super Cars & Trucks! 880 clean. $29,950; also Cash paid for junk 2008 Dodge 250 Motorhomes vehicles, batteries & diesel, hitch, brakes, catalytic converters. additional $31,500, Serving all of C.O.! exc. cond., Springdale 29’ 2007, Call 541-408-1090 541-610-5178 slide,Bunkhouse style, 932 sleeps 7-8, excellent 885 condition, $16,900, Antique & 541-390-2504 Canopies & Campers Classic Autos 2002 Country Coach Intrigue 40' Tag axle. For sale or trade to- Chevy 1951 pickup, 400hp Cummins Diewards 24’-26’ trailer sel. Two slide-outs. with slide. Lance restored. $13,500 obo; 541-504-3253 or 41,000 miles. Most Squire 9’10” cabover, 503-504-2764 options. $110,000 ‘96, elec. jacks, solar OBO 541-678-5712 panel, 2-dr refrig, The Bulletin’s Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 freezer, awning, out29’, weatherized, like “Call A Service door shower, exc. new, furnished & cond, $7000 obo. Professional” Directory ready to go, incl Wine541-549-1342 is all about meeting gard Satellite dish, your needs. $26,995. 541-420-9964 Lance 11.6 camper Mdl 1130, 1999. Ext’d cab, Beaver Patriot 2000, Call on one of the fully self-contained. Walnut cabinets, soprofessionals today! Incl catalytic heater, lar, Bose, Corian, tile, TV/VCR combo. Very 4 door fridge., 1 slide, well taken care of, W/D. $75,000 clean. Hauls easily, 541-215-5355 very comfortable. Viking Legend 2465ST $8995. 541-382-1344 Model 540 2002, exc. Coachman cond., slide dining, toi- Lance-Legend 990 Freelander 2011, let, shower, gen. incl., 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, Chevy Wagon 1957, 27’, queen bed, 1 $5500. 541-548-0137 4-dr., complete, exc. cond., generator, slide, HD TV, DVD $15,000 OBO, trades, solar-cell, large refrig, player, 450 Ford, please call AC, micro., magic fan, $49,000, please 541-420-5453. bathroom shower, call 541-923-5754. removable carpet, custom windows, out- Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, Georgetown 350, 2006, Weekend Warrior Toy door shower/awning auto. trans, ps, air, 11,000 mi, like new, set-up for winterizing, Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, frame on rebuild, regenerator, rear camelec. jacks, CD/stefuel station, exc cond. painted original blue, era, 2 slides, auto reo/4’ stinger. $9000. sleeps 8, black/gray original blue interior, leveling, awn. $50,000 Bend, 541.279.0458 interior, used 3X, original hub caps, exc. 541-549-4203 $24,999. chrome, asking $9000 Gulfstream Scenic 541-389-9188 or make offer. Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Autos & 541-385-9350. Cummins 330 hp dieLooking for your Transportation sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 next employee? in. kitchen slide out, Place a Bulletin help new tires,under cover, wanted ad today and hwy. miles only,4 door reach over 60,000 fridge/freezer icereaders each week. maker, W/D combo, Your classified ad FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd, Interbath tub & will also appear on 908 door panels w/flowers shower, 50 amp probendbulletin.com & hummingbirds, pane gen & more! Aircraft, Parts which currently rewhite soft top & hard $55,000. ceives over 1.5 mil& Service top, Reduced! $5,500. 541-948-2310 lion page views ev541-317-9319 or ery month at no 541-647-8483 extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get ReHunter’s Delight! Packsults! Call 385-5809 age deal! 1988 Winor place your ad nebago Super Chief, on-line at 38K miles, great bendbulletin.com 1/3 interest in Columshape; 1988 Bronco II bia 400, located at 4x4 to tow, 130K Sunriver. $138,500. Ford Galaxie 500 1963, 882 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, mostly towed miles, Call 541-647-3718 Fifth Wheels 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & nice rig! $15,000 both. 1/3 interest in wellradio (orig),541-419-4989 541-382-3964, leave equipped IFR Beech msg. Bonanza A36, lo- Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, cated KBDN. $55,000. CAN’T BEAT THIS! V8, automatic, great 541-419-9510 Look before you shape, $9000 OBO. buy, below market 530-515-8199 value ! Size & mile- Alpha “See Ya” 30’ age DOES matter, 1996, 2 slides, A/C, Class A 32’ Hurriheat pump, exc. cond. cane by Four Winds, for Snowbirds, solid 2007. 12,500 mi, all oak cabs day & night amenities, Ford V10, shades, Corian, tile, 1969 Cesena 182 0520lthr, cherry, slides, P-Ponk, 3BLD Stol, hardwood. $12,750. like new, can see nice panel, $70,000, GMC ½ ton 1971, Only 541-923-3417. anytime, $58,000. 541-884-6567 or $19,700! Original low mile, exceptional, 3rd 541-548-5216 541-881-1519 pm. owner. 951-699-7171

900

Executive Hangar

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C,

6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $49,900, 541-480-8648

Monaco Dynasty 2004, loaded, 3 slides, $159,000, 541-923- 8572 or 541-749-0037 (cell)

COACHMAN 1997

at Bend Airport (KBDN) 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office, bath- Lincoln Mark IV, 1972, room. Parking for 6 needs vinyl top, runs cars. Adjacent to good, $3500. Frontage Rd; great 541-771-4747 visibility for aviation bus. 1jetjock@q.com 541-948-2126

Escaper 29’ 1991,

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923 Catalina 5th wheel 23’, slide, new tires, extra clean, below book. $6,500. 928-345-4731

2 slides, A/C, elec/gas fridge, walk around queen bed, elec. front jacks, $4000 OBO, 541-382-8939 or 541-777-0999.

ONLY 3 OWNERSHIP SHARES LEFT! Economical flying in your own Cessna 172/180 HP for only $10,000! Based at BDN. Call Gabe at Professional Air! 541-388-0019 Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 916 hp, 360 V8, centerTrucks & lines, (Original 273 Heavy Equipment eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

National Sea Breeze 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, 2 power slides, upgraded queen mattress, hyd. leveling system, rear camera & monitor, only 6k mi. A steal at $43,000! 541-480-0617 933 RV CONSIGNMENTS Fleetwood Wilderness Pickups WANTED 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear We Do The Work, You bdrm, fireplace, AC, *** Keep The Cash, W/D hkup beautiful CHECK YOUR AD On-Site Credit unit! $30,500. 1982 INT. Dump w/ArPlease check your ad Approval Team, 541-815-2380 borhood, 6k on rebuilt on the first day it runs Web Site Presence, 392, truck refurbished, to make sure it is corWe Take Trade-Ins. has 330 gal. water rect. Sometimes inFree Advertising. tank w/pump & hose. structions over the BIG COUNTRY RV Everything works, phone are misBend 541-330-2495 Reduced now $5000 understood and an error Redmond: 541-548-5254 OBO. 541-977-8988 can occur in your ad. Komfort 24’ 1999, 6’ If this happens to your slide, fully loaded,never ad, please contact us used since buying, the first day your ad Boat loader, elec. for $8500, 541-923-0854. appears and we will pickup canopy, extras, be happy to fix it $450, 541-548-3711 Montana 34’ 2003, 2 as soon as we can. Southwind 35.5’ Triton, slides, exc. cond. GMC 9 Yard Dump Deadlines are: WeekGENERATE SOME ex2 slides, Duthroughout, arctic citement in your neig- 2008,V10, Truck 1985, 350, 2 days 12:00 noon for pont UV coat, 7500 mi. winter pkg, new 10borhood. Plan a ga- Avg NADA ret.114,343; bbl, steel box, $4500 next day, Sat. 11:00 ply tires, W/D ready, rage sale and don't OBO, 541-306-0813 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. asking $99,000. price reduced, Now forget to advertise in 12:00 for Monday. If Call 541-923-2774 $18,000, classified! 385-5809. we can assist you, 541-390-6531 Check out the please call us: classiieds online 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com The Bulletin Classified *** Updated daily Peterbilt 359 potable Used out-drive water truck, 1990, Chevy 2500 4X4 2001, parts - Mercury 3200 gal. tank, 5hp 6L V8, reg. cab, new OMC rebuilt mapump, 4-3" hoses, tires, needs nothing, rine motors: 151 camlocks, $25,000. $6595, 541-389-6372 MONTANA 3585 2008, $1595; 3.0 $1895; 541-820-3724 exc. cond., 3 slides, 4.3 (1993), $1995. king bed, lrg LR, Arc925 541-389-0435 Winnebago Outlook 32’ tic insulation, all op2008, Ford V10 eng, Utility Trailers Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, tions $37,500. Wineguard sat, TV, sur1995, extended cab, 875 541-420-3250 round sound stereo + long box, grill guard, Watercraft more. Reduced to running boards, bed $49,000. 541-526-1622 rails & canopy, 178K or 541-728-6793 Big Tex Landscapmiles, $4800 obo. 1998 SeaDoo XP ing/ ATV Trailer, 208-301-3321 (Bend) 881 Ltd with Trailer dual axle flatbed, Dodge 1500 2001 4x4 •One owner Travel Trailers 7’x16’, 7000 lb. sport, red, loaded, Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th •Low hours GVW, all steel, •Exc. cond. wheel, 1 slide, AC, rollbar, AND 2011 Jayco Eagle 2000 26’, $1400. •$3200 OBO TV,full awning, excelMoped Trike used 3 14’ slide, awning, air, 541-382-4115, or 541-948-6862 lent shape, $23,900. months, street legal. heat, gently used. 541-280-7024. 541-350-8629 call 541-433-2384 $12,000. 541-595-2003

25’ Catalina Sailboat 1983, w/trailer, swing keel, pop top, fully Piaggio LT50 Scooter loaded, $9500 call for 2003 , rarely driven in details, 541-480-8060 9 yrs, only 660 miles, mint condition; plus 2 Ads published in the helmets, a Mote Tote "Boats" classification tow bar and tie down include: Speed, fishaccessories, all for ing, drift, canoe, only $1750. house and sail boats. Call 541-389-3044 For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Handyman

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 E5

933

935

935

975

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Range Rover, 2006 Sport HSE,

Dodge 3500 2007 Quad Cab SLT 4x4, 6.7L Cummins 6-spd AT, after-market upgrades, superb truck, call for details, $28,000 OBO. 541-385-5682

nav, AWD, heated seats, moonroof, local owner, Harman Kardon, $23,995. 503-635-9494

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005, low miles., good tires, new brakes, moonroof Reduced to $15,750 541-389-5016.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin 940

Ford F-150 1995, 112K, Ford Bronco 1972, 4x4 4X4, long bed, auto, 302 V8 w/3 spd. on very clean, runs well, floor, lots of new new tires, $6000. parts, soft & hardtop, 541-548-4039. runs great, $4300. OBO 541-410-1685. Ford F-350 XLT 2003, 4X4, 6L diesel, 6-spd manual, Super Cab, short box, 12K Warn winch, custom bumper & canopy, running boards, 2 sets tires, wheels & chains, many extras, perfect, ONLY Jeep Cherokee 1990, 4WD, 3 sets rims & 29,800 miles, $27,500 tires, exlnt set snow OBO, 541-504-8316. tires, great 1st car! $1800. 541-633-5149 GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

Vans Ford Windstar 1995 7 pass., 140k, 3.8 V6, no junk. Drive it away for $1750; 1996 Nissan Quest 7 pass., 152k, 3.0 V6, new tires, ready for next 152k, $4500. Call 541-318-9999, ask for Bob.

Jeep Compass 2009 #137390 $17,995

975

Automobiles AUDI QUATTRO CABRIOLET 2004, extra nice, low mileage, heated seats, new Michelins, all wheel drive, $12,995 503-635-9494.

541-598-3750

aaaoregonautosource.com

BMW 525i 2004

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480. Mazda B4000 2004 Cab Plus 4x4. 4½ yrs or 95,000 miles left on ext’d warranty. V6, 5-spd, AC, studded tires, 2 extra rims, tow pkg, 132K mi, all records, exlnt cond, $9500. 541-408-8611 Wanted: Toyota or Nissan pickup, 19901995, $600. Funds limited. 541-923-7384 935

Sport Utility Vehicles Buick Rainier 2006 4x4, leather, $13,000. 541-383-4907 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Jeep Willys 1947 cstm, small block Chevy, PS, OD, mags + trlr. Swap for backhoe. No a.m. calls, pls. 541-389-6990

New body style, Steptronic auto., cold-weather package, premium package, heated seats, extra nice. $14,995. 503-635-9494.

*** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

541-385-5809

The Bulletin Classified

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2012 ELANTRA TOURING

2012 ACCENT GLS 1

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$

149/mo.FACT:

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169/mo.

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36 months Lease. MSRP $16,755. Max mileage 36,000. Cap Reduction $1,885. Down payment $2,181. Acquisition fee $595. Residual $13,904. Smolich Discount $756. Rebate $1,000. All financing by HMC and subject to credit approval*. Stk.#H11188 VIN: 134574. *Colors May Vary

Max mileage 36,000. Cap Reduction $1,050. Down payment $0. Acquisition fee $595. Residual $9,402. Smolich Discount $1,496. Rebate $1,000. All financing by HMC and subject to credit approval*. Stk.#H12034 VIN: 238173. *Colors May Vary

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%

% PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7021.11508 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7228.22343 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Dewayne C Parker and Sally A Parker, as grantor, to First American Title Richard H Keeble, as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance Co, as Company, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systrustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely tems, Inc. solely as nominee for Aegis Wholesale Corporation, as benefias nominee for Countrywide Bank, FSB, it's successors and assigns, as ciary, dated 02/26/07, recorded 03/02/07, in the mortgage records of Desbeneficiary, dated 12/06/07, recorded 12/19/07, in the mortgage records of chutes County, Oregon, as 2007-12787 and subsequently assigned to DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2007-64708 and subsequently asAurora Bank FSB by Assignment, covering the following described real signed to Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to BAC Home property situated in said county and state, to wit: Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP by Assignment, covering the following described real property situated in said Lot 54 in Block 12 of Fairway Crest Village III, county and state, to wit: Deschutes County, Oregon Lot 2 Twenty-two (22), Block D, Deschutes River Woods, PROPERTY ADDRESS: Deschutes County, Oregon. 57671 RED CEDAR LN, AKA 54 RED CEDAR LN SUNRIVER, OR 97707 PROPERTY ADDRESS: Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to 19411 Seminole Circle Bend, OR 97702 satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default due the following sums: monthly payments of $3,202.92 beginning has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the 08/01/11; plus late charges of $139.11 each month beginning 08/16/11; default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when plus prior accrued late charges of ($417.33); plus advances of $128.00; due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,026.62 beginning together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees in11/01/11; plus late charges of $42.98 each month beginning 11/16/11; curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $0.00; together beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. sums being the following, to wit: $419,960.84 with interest thereon at the By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the rate of 7.95 percent per annum beginning 07/01/11; plus late charges of obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said $139.11 each month beginning 08/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late sums being the following, to wit: $107,834.16 with interest thereon at the charges of ($417.33); plus advances of $128.00; together with title exrate of 5.875 percent per annum beginning 10/01/11; plus late charges of pense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason $42.98 each month beginning 11/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the procharges of $0.00; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, tection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepay- WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on July 30, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanment penalties/premiums, if applicable. dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in August 20, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanthe City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physipursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physithis notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestrecord legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive trustee.com. information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwest- Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have trustee.com. this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforand by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perfortrustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses ORS 86.753. actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be ORS 86.753. honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes reof the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inplural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpois secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northclude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. For further information, please contact: P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Winston Khan PARKER, DEWAYNE C. and SALLY A. Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. (TS# 7228.22343) 1002.211719-File No. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Keeble, Richard H. Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211719 (TS# 7021.11508) 1002.213311-File No. Publication Dates: May 20, 27, June 3 and 10, 2012. 1002.213311

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7314.01153 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Shane J. Parker, as grantor, to First American Title, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Homecomings Financial Network, Inc., as beneficiary, dated 07/19/05, recorded 07/27/05, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2005-48402 and subsequently assigned to GMAC Mortgage, LLC by Assignment, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot 17 of Brierwood, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2012 Southwest 23rd Street Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,033.54 beginning 04/01/11; plus late charges of $38.98 each month beginning 04/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $907.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $123,908.45 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.625 percent per annum beginning 03/01/11; plus late charges of $38.98 each month beginning 04/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $907.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 1, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Nanci Lambert Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Parker, Shane (TS# 7314.01153) 1002.211878-File No. Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211878


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E6 SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN 1000

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7345.25951 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7023.99250 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Richard L. Waible, Sr., as grantor, to Fidelity National Title, as trustee, in CALEB M. GASCHE, as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance Comfavor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee pany, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc., as benefifor Countrywide Bank, FSB, as beneficiary, dated 02/28/08, recorded ciary, dated 03/30/04, recorded 04/02/04, in the mortgage records of DE03/05/08, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as SCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2004-18130, covering the following 2008-09996 and subsequently assigned to Fannie Mae ("Federal Nadescribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: tional Mortgage Association"), covering the following described real propLOT THIRTY (30) HAYDEN VIEW PHASE ONE, erty situated in said county and state, to wit: DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Lot Thirty-three (33), Timber Creek II Phase 2, PROPERTY ADDRESS: Deschutes County, Oregon. 3125 SOUTHWEST NEWBERRY AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756-8953 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 320 South Timber Creek Drive Sisters, OR 97759 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the due the following sums: monthly payments of $735.75 beginning 12/01/11 default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when and $738.15 beginning 03/01/12; plus late charges of $28.06 each month due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,780.94 beginning beginning 12/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus ad07/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 07/16/11; plus vances of $93.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $1,390.15; together attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if for the protection of the above described real property and its interest applicable. therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $109,812.32 with interest thereon at the sums being the following, to wit: $417,584.36 with interest thereon at the rate of 3 percent per annum beginning 11/01/11; plus late charges of rate of 2.5 percent per annum beginning 06/01/11; plus late charges of $28.06 each month beginning 12/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late $0.00 each month beginning 07/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $93.00; together with title expense, charges of $0.00; plus advances of $1,390.15; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepaythe above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 2, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanAugust 1, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physi"Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. trustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perfortrust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes reRequests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inis secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Nanci Lambert Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 GASCHE, CALEB M. Waible, Richard L. (TS# 7023.99250) 1002.212098-File No. (TS# 7345.25951) 1002.211556-File No. Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.212098 Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211556 PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7777.17713 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Jeffery A. Adams and Amy Adams, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as File No. 7713.21916 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL OREGON, INC, as benEric Amend and Lisa Amend, husband and wife, as grantor, to Fidelity eficiary, dated 12/15/06, recorded 12/22/06, in the mortgage records of National Title Insurance Company, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage ElecDeschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-83442, covering the following detronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for U.S. Bank Nascribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: tional Association its successors and assigns, as beneficiary, dated 03/26/10, recorded 04/01/10, in the mortgage records of Deschutes Lot Sixty-nine (69), Hayden Ranch Estates, Phase 1, County, Oregon, as 2010-13212 and subsequently assigned to U.S. Bank National Association by Assignment recorded, covering the following deDeschutes County, Oregon. scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: PROPERTY ADDRESS: Lot 87 of Canyon Rim Village, Phase 4, City of Redmond, 1416 NE 4TH ST REDMOND, OR 97756 Deschutes County, Oregon. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to PROPERTY ADDRESS: satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default 1052 Northwest Rimrock Drive Redmond, OR 97756 has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,266.41 beginning Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default 04/20/10, $1,107.88 beginning 07/20/10, $1,013.08 beginning 01/20/11 has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the and $1,281.63 beginning 07/20/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when beginning 05/05/12; plus prior accrued late charges of $1,345.37; plus addue the following sums: monthly payments of $1,937.68 beginning vances of $13,688.64 that represent property preservation fee, taxes and 05/01/11; plus late charges of $74.73 each month beginning 05/16/11; balance of payment; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $4,011.25; toattorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums gether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees inadvanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its applicable. interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $254,205.72 with interest thereon at the sums being the following, to wit: $275,812.02 with interest thereon at the rate of 3.5 percent per annum beginning 02/20/10; plus late charges of rate of 4.95 percent per annum beginning 04/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 05/05/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late $74.73 each month beginning 05/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $1,345.37; plus advances of $13,688.64 that represent propcharges of $0.00; plus advances of $4,011.25; together with title expense, erty preservation fee, taxes and balance of payment; together with title costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by readefault; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of son of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayprotection of the above described real property and its interest therein; ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 6, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanAugust 16, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physi"Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. trustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perfortrust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes re- Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inis secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 ADAMS, JEFFERY A. and AMY (TS# 7777.17713) 1002.213088-File No. Publication Dates: May 13, 20, 27 and June 3, 2012. 1002.213088

For further information, please contact: Winston Khan Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 AMEND, ERIC and LISA (TS# 7713.21916) 1002.203690-File No. Publication Dates: May 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012. 1002.203690

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7777.17765 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by BRYAN W. GRUETTER AND MICHELLE A. GRUETTER, as grantor, to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Financial Oregon, Inc., as beneficiary, dated 09/14/06, recorded 09/21/06, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-64203, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWENTY-ONE (21), GOLDEN BUTTE PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 50 SOUTHWEST GLENEAGLES WAY BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,742.77 beginning 09/19/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 10/05/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $598.40; plus advances of $2,935.45 that represent property inspection fees and paid attorney's fees and costs; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $590,857.04 with interest thereon at the rate of 3.5 percent per annum beginning 08/19/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 10/05/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $598.40; plus advances of $2,935.45 that represent property inspection fees and paid attorney's fees and costs; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 9, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 GRUETTER, MICHELLE A. and BRYAN W. (TS# 7777.17765) 1002.212458-File No. Publication Dates: May 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012. 1002.212458

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7713.22075 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Stephen Forte and Cynthia Forte, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, to Premier Title and Escrow, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Dream House Mortgage Corporation, a Rhode Island Corporation, its successors and assigns, as beneficiary, dated 05/06/08, recorded 05/09/08, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2008-20509 and subsequently assigned to U.S. Bank National Association by Assignment, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot Thirty-Nine (39), Parkview Terrace Phases I and II, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 3005 Northeast Canoe Court Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,352.87 beginning 09/01/11; plus late charges of $56.15 each month beginning 09/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $185.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $172,712.15 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375 percent per annum beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of $56.15 each month beginning 09/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $185.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on July 27, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Winston Khan Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Forte, Stephen and Cynthia (TS# 7713.22075) 1002.211370-File No. Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211370


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 E7 1000

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7431.20277 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7827.20368 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by David B. Johnson and Myra Kay Johnson, as grantor, to First American Agnes J. Rubow, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of FITitle Company, as trustee, in favor of Columbia River Bank Mortgage NANCIAL FREEDOM SENIOR FUNDING CORPORATION, A SUBSID1000 1000 1000 Group, as beneficiary, dated 12/22/01, recorded 12/31/01, in the mortIARY OF INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., as beneficiary, dated 05/11/06, regage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2001-64541 and subsecorded 05/16/06, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices quently assigned to Freedom Mortgage Corporation by Assignment, covas 2006-33766 and subsequently assigned to OneWest Bank, FSB, covtrust in which the form and have proof LEGAL NOTICE ering the following described real property situated in said county and ering the following described real property situated in said county and Plaintiff requests that of service on the IN THE CIRCUIT state, to wit: state, to wit: the Plaintiff be alPlaintiff's attorney or, COURT FOR THE lowed to foreclose if the Plaintiff does not STATE OF OREGON Lot 16 in Block 2 of First Addition to Whispering Pines Estates, Lot three (3), block four (4), Rimrock Acres, City of Redmond, your interest in the have an attorney, IN AND FOR THE Deschutes County, Oregon. Deschutes County, Oregon. following described proof of service on the COUNTY OF real property: Plaintiff. DESCHUTES PROPERTY ADDRESS: PROPERTY ADDRESS: LOTS FOURTEEN If you have any quesWELLS FARGO BANK, 65066 Hunnell Road Bend, OR 97701 1049 NW Elm Avenue Redmond, OR 97756 (14) AND FIFTEEN tions, you should see N.A., its successors in (15), BLOCK TWO an attorney immedi- Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to interest and/or assigns, (2), BEND VIEW ADately. If you need Plaintiff, satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default DITION, DEShelp in finding an atv. has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); The CHUTES COUNTY, torney, you may conNICK P WILLIAMS; default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when event of default under the note and deed of trust, pursuant to Section OREGON. tact the Oregon State WENDY A.WILLIAMS; due the following sums: monthly payments of $807.73 beginning 11/01/11; 9(a)(i) of the Deed of Trust, which provides that, "Lender may require imBar's Lawyer Referral Commonly known as: STATE OF OREGON; plus late charges of $33.22 each month beginning 10/16/11; plus prior acmediate payment in full of all sums secured by this Security Instrument Service online at 580 Northwest Utica and OCCUPANTS OF crued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $12.00; together with title if…Borrower dies and the Property is not the principle residence of at least www.oregonstatebar. Ave., Bend, Oregon THE PREMISES, expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reaone surviving Borrower." . and pay, when due 9/1/2011 (Default Date), the org or by calling (503) 97701. Defendants. son of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the unpaid principle balance of $128,615.40, plus accrued, interest together 684-3763 (in the NOTICE TO Case No. 11CV0772 protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; with accruing interest, costs, advances, attorneys' and trustees' fees and Portland metropolitan DEFENDANTS: SUMMONS BY and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. costs accruing until the date of sale or full satisfaction of the obligation. area) or toll-free else- By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the READ THESE PUBLICATION where in Oregon at PAPERS CAREFULLY! obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said (800) 452-7636. A lawsuit has been TO THE DEFENsums being the following, to wit: $36,047.48 with interest thereon at the sums being the following, to wit: $128,615.40; together with title expense, This summons is isstarted against you in DANTS: WENDY rate of 5.75 percent per annum beginning 10/01/11; plus late charges of costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said sued pursuant to the above-entitled A.WILLIAMS AND $33.22 each month beginning 10/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of ORCP 7. court by Wells Fargo OCCUPANTS OF charges of $0.00; plus advances of $12.00; together with title expense, the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayBank, N.A., Plaintiff. THE PREMISES: costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Plaintiff's claims are ROUTH CRABTREE In the name of the default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on OLSEN, P.C. stated in the written State of Oregon, you July 27, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanthe above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayBy Sean C. Currie, complaint, a copy of are hereby required to dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. OSB # 08297 which was filed with appear and answer WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in Attorney for Plaintiff the above-entitled the complaint filed July 31, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanthe City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public Court. 621 SW Alder St., against you in the dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real You must "appear" in Suite 800 above-entitled Court the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the this case or the other Portland, OR 97205 and cause on or bethe City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the side will win automati(503) 459-0140; fore the expiration of auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of cally. To "appear" Fax (425) 974-8183 30 days from the date property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the you must file with the scurrie@rcolegal.com of the first publication execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. court a legal paper of this summons. The grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of Notice is further given that for payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS LEGAL NOTICE called a "motion" or date of first publica86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the PUBLIC AUCTION "answer." The "motion in this matter is complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Public auction to be tion" or "answer" must May 13, 2012. If you Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for held Saturday, June Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested be given to the court fail timely to appear address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, adpursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a 2, 2012 at 1:30 P.M., clerk or administrator and answer, Plaintiff dressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's at Jamison Street Self within 30 days of the will apply to the Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physiStorage, 63177 Jamidate of first publicaabove-entitled court or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt son St., Bend OR tion specified herein for the relief prayed concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in 97701. (Unit C-030, along with the refor in its complaint. also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no Lisa Williams). quired filing fee. It This is a judicial forerecord legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, must be in proper closure of a deed of at any time prior the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proinformation concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid ceeding dismissed by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwest1000 1000 1000 due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had trustee.com. no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required unthis foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by der the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all PUBLIC NOTICE portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. File No. 7023.98722 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforSUZANNE M. HANSEN, A SINGLE PERSON, as grantor, to FIDELITY includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other permance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, as trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO HOME son owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with MORTGAGE, INC, as beneficiary, dated 08/12/02, recorded 08/16/02, in deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said the mortgage records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2002-44574 successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be acORS 86.753. and modified by 2007-08578 on 02/09/2007, covering the following decessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this referscribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: A leasehold Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes reence. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be as created by that certain Residential Ground Lease Agreement, dated www.USA-Foreclosure.com. honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms July 17, 2002, recorded August 16, 2002 as Document No. 2002-44573, of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the Official Records, and amended by Amendment to Leases and Deeds of plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor For further information, please contact: Trust, recorded February 9, 2007, Document No. 2007-08578, between as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which Claire Swazey Golfside Investments, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, Lessor, is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inNorthwest Trustee Services, Inc. and Suzanne M. Hansen Lessee, for the term and upon and subject to all clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 terms and provisions thereof, of the following described property: auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoRubow, Agnes J rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.north(TS# 7827.20368) 1002.211965-File No. Lot 19, GOLFSIDE PARK PUD, City of Bend, westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. Deschutes County, Oregon Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211965 For further information, please contact: PROPERTY ADDRESS: Winston Khan 61055 PARRELL ROAD #20 BEND, OR 97702-2503 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to Johnson, David B. and Myra Kay satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default PUBLIC NOTICE (TS# 7431.20277) 1002.211673-File No. has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $518.24 beginning 11/01/11; Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211673 File No. 7023.99202 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by plus late charges of $20.02 each month beginning 11/16/11; plus prior acJay D. Jaeger, as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE crued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $118.00; together with title COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., as benPUBLIC NOTICE expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reaeficiary, dated 03/01/07, recorded 03/15/07, in the mortgage records of TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE son of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2007-15551, covering the following deprotection of the above described real property and its interest therein; scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: File No. 7021.11491 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Scott A Hill, A Married Man, as grantor, to Western Title & Escrow, as By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the UNIT 29, GREYHAWK CONDOMINIUMS, trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED IN AND SUBJECT as nominee for Countrywide Bank, FSB, it's successors and assigns, as sums being the following, to wit: $52,705.13 with interest thereon at the beneficiary, dated 06/05/07, recorded 06/08/07, in the mortgage records of TO THAT CERTAIN DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM OWNERSHIP rate of 7 percent per annum beginning 10/01/11; plus late charges of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2007-32521 and subsequently asFOR GREYHAWK CONDOMINIUMS RECORDED FEBRUARY 1, 2007 $20.02 each month beginning 11/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late signed to Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to BAC Home IN VOLUME 2007, PAGE 06945, DESCHUTES COUNTY charges of $0.00; plus advances of $118.00; together with title expense, Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP by AsOFFICIAL RECORDS, TOGETHER WITH THE LIMITED AND costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said signment, covering the following described real property situated in said GENERAL COMMON ELEMENTS SET FORTH THEREIN default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of county and state, to wit: APPERTAINING TO SAID UNIT. the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Lot 3, Six Peaks-Phase 4, PROPERTY ADDRESS: WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on Deschutes County, Oregon. 1531 NW JUNIPER ST 29 BEND, OR 97701-1501 August 17, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside PROPERTY ADDRESS: Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in 1430 Southwest 27th Street Redmond, OR 97756 satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default due the following sums: monthly payments of $515.70 beginning 03/01/09 execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the and $608.24 beginning 02/01/12; plus late charges of $25.78 each month grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when beginning 03/16/09; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus adthe trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,087.10 beginning vances of $2,134.00 that represent bankruptcy fees and costs, property costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. 10/01/11; plus late charges of $85.04 each month beginning 10/16/11; inspection fees and paid attorney's fees and costs; together with title exNotice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $0.00; together pense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the prowritten request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary tection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physifor the protection of the above described real property and its interest prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $76,958.40 with interest thereon at the record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive sums being the following, to wit: $264,003.37 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.875 percent per annum beginning 02/01/09; plus late charges of information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid rate of 6.125 percent per annum beginning 09/01/11; plus late charges of $25.78 each month beginning 03/16/09 until paid; plus prior accrued late information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwest$85.04 each month beginning 10/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $2,134.00 that represent bankruptcy trustee.com. charges of $0.00; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, fees and costs, property inspection fees and paid attorney's fees and Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said costs; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepaythe beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 20, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanAugust 1, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanbeing cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforthe main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the ORS 86.753. execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes regrantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" in"Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physi"Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physiclude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporequested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.norththis notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid For further information, please contact: information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestKathy Taggart trustee.com. trustee.com. Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have HANSEN, SUZANNE M. this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by (TS# 7023.98722) 1002.213295-File No. payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) Publication Dates: May 20, 27, June 3 and 10, 2012. 1002.213295 and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perfortrust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes re- Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inis secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com.

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For further information, please contact: Winston Khan Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Hill, Scott A. (TS# 7021.11491) 1002.213309-File No. Publication Dates: May 20, 27, June 3 and 10, 2012. 1002.213309

For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 JAEGER, ESTATE OF JAY D. (TS# 7023.99202) 1002.211862-File No. Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211862


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E8 SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN 1000

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7037.91470 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7023.99967 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Andrea L Lewis and Robert N Lewis, as grantor, to First American, as Michael D. Smith and Meryl A. Smith, as Tenants by the Entirety, as trustee, in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, as trustee, in favor 08/20/10, recorded 09/01/10, in the mortgage records of Deschutes of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 12/20/10, recorded County, Oregon, as 2010-34313, covering the following described real 01/05/11, in the mortgage records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as property situated in said county and state, to wit: 2011-00408, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot sixty-six(66), Ridge at Eagle Crest 21, Deschutes County, Oregon. Lot Twenty-Seven, Block Twenty-Four, Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1816 Turnstone Road Redmond, OR 97756 17274 SCAUP DRIVE BEND, OR 97707-2393 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,082.25 beginning due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,010.97 beginning 09/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 09/16/11; plus 01/01/12 and $982.19 beginning 03/01/12; plus late charges of $40.81 prior accrued late charges of $344.56; plus advances of $28.00; together each month beginning 01/16/12; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein plus advances of $78.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further for the protection of the above described real property and its interest sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above detherein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. scribed real property and its interest therein; and prepayment By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the penalties/premiums, if applicable. obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $307,976.05 with interest thereon at the By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said rate of 5.25 percent per annum beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of sums being the following, to wit: $149,987.08 with interest thereon at the $0.00 each month beginning 09/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late rate of 5 percent per annum beginning 12/01/11; plus late charges of charges of $344.56; plus advances of $28.00; together with title expense, $40.81 each month beginning 01/16/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said charges of $0.00; plus advances of $78.00; together with title expense, default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepaydefault; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayWHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. July 27, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 6, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanthe main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physiwritten request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physirequested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid trustee.com. information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestNotice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, trustee.com. at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforbeing cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforactually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with ORS 86.753. trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes reORS 86.753. ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inas well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoclude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpowesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Heather L. Smith For further information, please contact: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Kathy Taggart P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Lewis, Andrea L. and Robert P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 (TS# 7037.91470) 1002.211648-File No. SMITH, MICHAEL D. and MERYL A. (TS# 7023.99967) 1002.212463-File No. Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211648 1000

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7037.76595 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Daniel R Patterson, as grantor, to David A. Kubat, OSBA 84265 C/O T.D. Service Company, Washington, as trustee, in favor of Western Sunrise a/k/a Crossland Mortgage Corp., as beneficiary, dated 01/26/99, recorded 02/01/99, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as VOL: 1999 PAGE: 5040 and subsequently assigned to Chase Mortgage Company by Assignment recorded as 2001-1883, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot 2, Block 1, Singing Pines Subdivision, Deschutes County, Oregon.

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7713.22012 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Janet C. Stevens (unmarried), as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for U.S. Bank National Association, its successors and assigns, as beneficiary, dated 12/03/08, recorded 12/15/08, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2008-48938 and subsequently assigned to U.S. Bank National Association by Assignment, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lots 6 and 7, Block 1, Ellis Subdivision, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2130 Northeast 8th Street Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,486.73 beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of $124.34 each month beginning 08/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $326.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $403,365.85 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.95 percent per annum beginning 07/01/11; plus late charges of $124.34 each month beginning 08/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $326.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 7, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Winston Khan Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Stevens, Janet C. (TS# 7713.22012) 1002.212563-File No.

Publication Dates: May 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012. 1002.212463 Publication Dates: May 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012. 1002.212563 PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 8483.20044 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7713.22024 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Terry Reed an Lynda Reed, Husband and Wife, as grantor, to David A. Kelley Portwood, as grantor, to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Kubat, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Taylor, Bean & Inc. solely as nominee for U.S. Bank National Association, its successors Whitaker Mortgage Corp., and its successors and/or assigns, as benefiand assigns, as beneficiary, dated 09/07/05, recorded 09/12/05, in the ciary, dated 07/29/09, recorded 08/03/09, in the mortgage records of Desmortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2005-61150 and subchutes County, Oregon, as 2009-33154 and subsequently assigned to sequently assigned to U.S. Bank National Association by Assignment, Seaside National Bank & Trust by Assignment, covering the following decovering the following described real property situated in said county and scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: state, to wit: Lot Two (2), Block Six (6), Ponderosa Pines Second Addition, Lot Seven (7), Block Two (2), Pinewood Country Estates, recorded March 2, 1973, in Cabinet B, Page 17, Deschutes County, Oregon. Deschutes County, Oregon.

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 51381 Welch Rd La Pine, OR 97739

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 51948 BLACK PINE WAY LA PINE, OR 97739

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 17110 Shawnee Circle Bend, OR 97707

Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $542.72 beginning 01/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 01/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $59.13; plus advances of $1,553.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $49,072.52 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.875 percent per annum beginning 12/01/10; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 01/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $59.13; plus advances of $1,553.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 9, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com.

Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,109.73 beginning 06/01/11; plus late charges of $32.78 each month beginning 06/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $75.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $152,567.42 with interest thereon at the rate of 4.75 percent per annum beginning 05/01/11; plus late charges of $32.78 each month beginning 06/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $75.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 7, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com.

Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,091.08 beginning 09/01/11; plus late charges of $104.55 each month beginning 09/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $587.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $323,496.27 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.875 percent per annum beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of $104.55 each month beginning 09/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $587.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on July 30, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com.

For further information, please contact: Heather L. Smith Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Patterson, Daniel R (TS# 7037.76595) 1002.212454-File No.

For further information, please contact: Claire Swazey Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Portwood, Kelley (TS# 8483.20044) 1002.212330-File No.

For further information, please contact: Winston Khan Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Reed, Terry and Lynda (TS# 7713.22024) 1002.211639-File No.

Publication Dates: May 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012. 1002.212454

Publication Dates: May 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012. 1002.212330

Publication Dates: April 29, May 6, 13 and 20, 2012. 1002.211639


OPINION&BOOKS

Editorials, F2 Commentary, F3 Books, F4-5

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

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www.bendbulletin.com/opinion

DAVID BROOKS

The age of innocence

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he people who pioneered democracy in Europe and the United States had a low but pretty accurate view of human nature. They knew that if we get the chance, most of us will try to get something for nothing. They knew that people generally prize short-term goodies over long-term prosperity. So, in centuries past, the democratic pioneers built a series of checks to make sure their nations wouldn’t be ruined by their own frailties. The American founders did this by decentralizing power. They built checks and balances to frustrate and detain the popular will. They also dispersed power to encourage active citizenship, hoping that as people became more involved in local government, they would develop a sense of restraint and responsibility. In Europe, by contrast, authority was centralized. Power was held by small coteries of administrators and statesmen, many of whom had attended the same elite academies where they were supposed to learn the art and responsibilities of stewardship. Under the parliamentary system, voters didn’t even get to elect their leaders directly. They voted for parties, and party elders selected the ones who would actually form the government, often through secret means. Although the forms were different, the democracies in Europe and the United States were based on a similar carefully balanced view of human nature: People are naturally selfish and need watching. But democratic self-government is possible because we’re smart enough to design structures to police that selfishness. James Madison put it well: “As there is a degree of depravity in mankind, which requires a certain degree of circumspection and distrust: So there are other qualities in human nature, which justify a certain portion of esteem and confidence.” But, over the years, this balanced wisdom was lost. Leaders today do not believe their job is to restrain popular will. Their job is to flatter and satisfy it. A gigantic polling apparatus has developed to help leaders anticipate and respond to popular whims. Democratic politicians adopt the mindset of marketing executives. Give the customer what he wants. The customer is always right. Having lost a sense of their own frailty, many voters have come to regard their desires as entitlements. They become incensed when their leaders are not responsive to their needs. Like any normal set of human beings, they command their politicians to give them benefits without asking them to pay. The consequences of this shift are now obvious. In Europe and America, governments have made promises they can’t afford to fulfill. The Obama campaign issues its famous “Julia” ad, which perfectly embodies the vision of government as a national Sugar Daddy, delivering free money and goodies up and down the life cycle. In Europe, workers across the Continent want great lifestyles without long work hours. They want dynamic capitalism but also personal security. European welfare states go broke trying to deliver these impossibilities. Western democratic systems were based on a balance between self-doubt and self-confidence. They worked because there were structures that protected the voters from themselves and the rulers from themselves. Once people lost a sense of their own weakness, the self-doubt went away and the chastening structures were overwhelmed. It became madness to restrain your own desires because surely your rivals over yonder would not be restraining theirs. This is one of the reasons why Europe and the United States are facing debt crises and political dysfunction at the same time. People used to believe that human depravity was self-evident and democratic self-government was fragile. Now they think depravity is nonexistent and they take self-government for granted. Neither the U.S. nor the European model will work again until we rediscover and acknowledge our own natural weaknesses and learn to police rather than lionize our impulses. — David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times. John Costa’s column will return.

Thinkstock photo illustration

Can a child be a

psychopath? • There is no standard test for psychopathy in children and many professionals hesitate to apply the label By Jennifer Kahn • The New York Times Magazine

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nne and her husband, Miguel, took their 9-yearold son, Michael, to a

Florida elementary school for the first day of what the family chose to call “summer camp.” For years, Anne and Miguel have struggled to understand their eldest son, an elegant boy with high-planed cheeks, wide eyes and curly light brown hair, whose periodic rages alternate with moments of chilly detachment. Michael’s eight-week program was, in reality, a highly structured psychological study — less summer camp than camp of last resort.

Michael’s problems started, according to his mother, around age 3, shortly after his brother Allan was born. At the time, she said, Michael was mostly just acting “like a brat,” but his behavior soon escalated to throwing tantrums during which he would scream and shriek inconsolably. These weren’t ordinary toddler’s fits. “It wasn’t, ‘I’m tired’ or ‘I’m frustrated’ — the normal things kids do,” Anne remembered. “His behavior was really out there. And it would happen for hours and hours each day, no matter what we did.” For several years, Michael screamed every time his parents told him to put on his shoes or perform other ordinary tasks, like retrieving one of his toys from the living room. “Going somewhere, staying somewhere — anything would set him off,” Miguel said. These furies lasted well beyond toddlerhood. At 8, Michael would still fly into a rage when Anne or Miguel tried to get him ready for school, punching the

wall and kicking holes in the door. Left unwatched, he would cut up his trousers with scissors or methodically pull his hair out. He would also vent his anger by slamming the toilet seat down again and again until it broke. When Anne and Miguel first took Michael to see a therapist, he was given a diagnosis of “firstborn syndrome”: acting out because he resented his new sibling. While both parents acknowledged that Michael was deeply hostile to the new baby, sibling rivalry didn’t seem sufficient to explain his consistently extreme behavior. By the time he turned 5, Michael had developed an uncanny ability to switch from full-blown anger to moments of pure rationality or calculated charm — a facility that Anne describes as deeply unsettling. “You never know when you’re going to see a proper emotion,” she said. She recalled one argument, over a homework assignment, when Michael shrieked and wept as she tried to reason

with him. “I said: ‘Michael, remember the brainstorming we did yesterday? All you have to do is take your thoughts from that and turn them into sentences, and you’re done!’ He’s still screaming bloody murder, so I say, ‘Michael, I thought we brainstormed so we could avoid all this drama today.’ He stopped dead, in the middle of the screaming, turned to me and said in this flat, adult voice, ‘Well, you didn’t think that through very clearly then, did you?’” Anne and Miguel live in a small coastal town south of Miami, the kind of place where children ride their bikes on wellmaintained cul-de-sacs. (To protect the subjects’ privacy, only first or middle names have been used.) The morning I met them was overcast and hot. Seated on a sofa in the family’s spacious living room, Anne sipped a Coke Zero while her two younger sons — Allan, 6, and Jake, 2 — played on the carpet. See Psychopath / F6

BOOKS INSIDE BILLY BOB THORNTON: Actor tells stories of life, F4

HABITS: Book examines reasons for our routines, F4

SHEEN-ESTEVEZ: A look at father-son dynamics, F5

THE FAMILY: ‘Godfather’ prequel a good yarn, F5


F2

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

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The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

Bend moves in better direction on false alarms

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he Bend City Council is moving in a much-improved direction on its false alarm ordinance: It’s going to punish only the guilty.

There’s no doubt false alarms are a problem for Bend police.

The cost alone is bad enough. The department says it spends $111,000 a year responding to false alarms. There’s more. Capt. Cory Darling told the council 99 percent of the alarm calls the city gets are false — out of some 2,100 alarm calls a year. Responding wastes time. Tracking down somebody about the alarm can take hours. Because so many alarms are false, Darling is worried officers may not take alarm calls as seriously as they should. The ordinance initially brought to the council would have overhauled the system. To help the police quickly identify who was responsible for a building’s alarm system, the city would require a license. To recover costs, the license would cost money and the city was going to look at raising fines and possibly fine for the first offense. The initial proposal was not a completely unreasonable response to the problem. It was, though, a flawed response. It was punishing those who weren’t causing a problem with a new fee, instead of fo-

cusing on the troublemakers. The council told staff Wednesday it didn’t want a fee, for now. It wanted registration and fines. Registration would help the police resolve alarm calls more quickly, because they will at least have a contact number. The council wants staff to use fines to recover costs. That’s much better. Staff also made a good change. They attempted to clarify the types of alarm systems covered by the ordinance. Most of the problems with false alarms in Bend do not come from simple home alarms that just make a noise. The new ordinance writes those out of the definition: “An alarm in a singlefamily residential unit that is not electronically connected to another location is not an alarm system.� After all of those moves in a better direction, the council should still reject the plan if the fines are unreasonable.

Compromise shows promising maturity

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on’t expect a new 400-employee factory in Central Oregon in the very near future. Do hope, however, that a compromise reached among Central Oregon’s counties, the state Department of Land Conservation and Development and 1000 Friends of Oregon will make some version of that factory a possibility sometime down the road. The three counties and others had come up with a plan that would take a multicounty approach to filling the need for largelot industrial land in the region. Deschutes County adopted the regional economic opportunity analysis, as the plan is called, last year and the land-use watchdog group appealed. Among its concerns was the very idea that the plan would be regional, rather than the work of only one county. The group argued that the plan would open up too much land for development and would cost local communities too much in the process. State law is fuzzy on the matter, and the administrative rules that govern land-use planning in the state aren’t much help.

Now comes the hard work. DLCD will write new rules creating a pilot project in Central Oregon to test the regional approach. Assuming all sides agree the rules make sense, they will be adopted and Central Oregon can begin again to work on the plan to site large industrial parcels where they’ll best serve the entire area. Meanwhile, 1000 Friends need not worry that the idea would spread beyond the region, at least for now. There is no assurance all this will come to pass. Oregon’s landuse laws and rules haven’t been particularly clear on how and when counties may collaborate to meet land use goals, and it may prove difficult to write rules that all parties are willing to live with. Still, it’s clear that everyone involved in the current agreement recognizes that relying on the Land Use Board of Appeals may not be the best solution to the problem. In a state where appealing unpopular land-use decisions is extraordinarily easy, that is a sign of maturity that should be nurtured.

Trapping is thoughtless, inhumane By Bill Bodden rapping wildlife has been rightly criticized in The Bulletin lately for its cruelty, but its defenders, so far, have mainly proffered simplistic nonsense. We are, however, indebted to the correspondent who informed us that dogs would be incapable of understanding posted warning signs. Another comment about people in dire economic straits having to engage in illegal trapping for their survival will have elicited some sympathy, but that by no means justifies trapping as a “sport� or fun activity. Supporters injected a claim of tradition into the debate, but that is absurd. There are good traditions and others definitely not. When trapping was a way of life in the Northwest it nearly wiped out beavers. Persecution, including murder, of Native Americans in the Northwest was then something of a tradition that eventually extended to include African-Americans and Chinese. Mercifully, such extremes of racial bigotry have mostly been relegated to our national closet of shame, and animal trapping should be next. In his book, “The Man Who Listened to Horses,� Monty Roberts, aka the Horse Whisperer, tells of how he learned to train horses using intelligence and knowledge and succeeded in having horses accept a rider without recourse to brutality. When Roberts demonstrated this to his father who used cruel traditional methods to break horses

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IN MY VIEW and raise children, the father became so enraged at this rejection of his core beliefs that he beat his son mercilessly with a chain. Roberts also told of how his unarmed father disarmed a knife-wielding robber. He was obviously a man capable of remarkable physical courage but paradoxically also one who lacked the moral courage and integrity to admit his cruel ways were wrong and inferior. Unfortunately, the story of how Roberts’ father was locked into traditional authoritarian ways suggests a formidable challenge facing activists seeking a ban on much crueler trapping. Like Roberts’ father, many trappers may be in denial and incapable of admitting to being wrong about their inhumane practices. Recently, a photograph of a trapper in the Nez Perce National Forest was circulated on the Internet showing him posing and grinning near a trapped wolf restricted to a patch of snow saturated with his blood. Humane viewers of that repugnant scene could only imagine what fear and agony that wolf experienced before his hours of torture were brought to a merciless end. Admiring comments from other trappers accompanied the photograph on the trapping website, trapperman.com, but when it was exposed on an anti-trapping site, the exuberance ended abruptly. The trapping site removed its

spread, and some trappers expressed their outrage when their nefarious pastime was exposed to public scrutiny. Threats were leveled at the anti-trapping group, Footloose Montana, according to the website of the Earth Island Institute. Unwittingly, in their anger, some members of the trapping community revealed they did not want inherent sadistic realities of their traditional activities exposed outside their confederacy. Comments on related blogs suggested that many trapping devices were spread in the same and other areas of the national forest. Some were close to public access roads putting unwary visitors, their children and pets at risk of being caught in a bone-crushing trap. Unlike children conditioned in that locale to accept this despicable tradition, sensitive children could be traumatized by witnessing a tortured animal in a trap. With fear of traps prevailing, informed visitors will be confined to small areas of our supposedly public lands while trappers dominate hundreds of thousands of acres defiled by their barbaric equipment. Oregon should adopt enlightened bans on trapping. Let all visitors, including children, pets and horses, run carefree in open spaces without risk of crippling injury. So, which do you favor? Enlightened, humane conduct or thoughtless, inhumane behavior? — Bill Bodden lives in Redmond.

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Situation in Greece a living, breathing moral hazard By Michael Gerson WASHINGTON — urope’s economic struggles are a consistent drag on American growth. A eurozone breakup, in chaos and acrimony, could be a Lehman-like shock of incalculable damage. For years, the stronger European economies have managed to bump along from challenge to challenge — providing bailouts to the improvident in exchange for fiscal restraint and reform, while reassuring credit markets in an elaborate confidence game. But the fundamental problem has never been resolved. Europe is a monetary union without being a fiscal union. Germany has become the continent’s rich uncle, vouching for the credit and covering the debts of distant relations without authority over their spending habits.

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German patience with this arrangement is now being tested on Greece. It would be possible for Europe to maintain Greece — just 2 percent of the continent’s economy — as a permanent dependent. Greece could default within the eurozone and have much of its debt written off. But Greece is a living, breathing moral hazard. What message would it send to Italy, Spain, Ireland and Portugal — all undertaking difficult austerity programs — if the European Union provided special treatment to its least trustworthy member? Many Germans believe that Greece entered the EU on the basis of false economic figures in the first place. Should German taxpayers now assume permanent responsibility for a political system apparently incapable of responsibility? The birthplace of democracy seems to lack a working one.

So Europe seems to be preparing for the departure of Greece from the euro — kicking the dependent out of the house to live on his own. For many months, German and French banks have been quietly offloading Greek liabilities. European finance ministries are beginning to plan for an event with no legal precedent or procedure. The Greek return to a devalued drachma would probably not be disastrous (except for Greeks), so long as the damage is containable. Credit markets — having tested Greek political will and found it wanting — would press Portugal, Italy and Spain. Any sign of weakness would push their borrowing costs to astronomical, unsustainable levels. The trick will be for the EU to construct a firewall of long-term confidence — a reasonable conviction among investors that other economies are on a

responsible, sustainable path. This task is complicated. Portugal, Italy and Spain are making tough, painful fiscal reforms and reducing their structural deficits. They gain part of their national identity from responsible membership in the European project and don’t want to be relegated to the category of Greece. Austerity may be necessary — but is it politically sustainable? Probably not without help. As they engage in rigorous structural reforms, Italy, Spain and others are looking for greater transfers at Europe’s federal level to cushion their austerity. In exchange for surrendering a portion of their fiscal sovereignty, they want Germany to put up more money for expansionary investment. Germany already does some transfers through the European Financial Stability Facility and other outlets. But it has re-

sisted the issuing of eurobonds by the European Central Bank. There are a variety of proposals on the table to help diminish that opposition. Europe’s economic future does not only depend on objective economic conditions — the number of BMWs and Fiats produced and sold. It depends on the confidence of markets in the future political choices of politicians and voters. Europe has managed to muddle along from crisis to crisis. But the probability of managing all these sequential crises adequately is diminishing. For those inclined to pity the Europeans, it is worth recalling that the American fiscal reckoning is delayed, but not dissimilar. Economics is eventually politics — and our politics is hardly a model. — Michael Gerson is a columnist for The Washington Post.


SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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Lesson: Let sleeping Germans lie T

he newly elected French Socialist president, Francois Hollande, is warning Germany that Mediterranean ideas of “growth,” not Germanic “austerity,” should be the new European creed. No surprise there — reckless debtors often blame their own past imprudence on greedy creditors, especially if the latter are supposed to be guilt-ridden over causing two world wars. All over Europe, the gospel is that tight-fisted Germans are at the root of the European Union meltdown: They worked too hard, saved too much, bought too little and borrowed not at all. All that may be true, in theory. But, in fact, faulting thrift and industry is a prescription for incurring anger and guaranteeing backlash — especially in the case of the Germans, who are now asked to provide even more capital to help other European economies to recover. There is one general rule about the history of the modern state of Germany since its inception in 1871: Anytime Germany has been both unified and isolated, armed conflict has inevitably followed. We often scoff at such quaint historical laws — forgetting that World War I followed from the inability of the French to harness German nationalism after the Franco-Prussian War. World War II was a result of

VICTOR DAVIS HANSON the inability of the victorious allies either to dismantle the unified German state or incorporate a defeated Germany into some sort of continental alliance. After World War II, the allies swore that they had at last come up with a novel tripartite solution: Germany would be split apart. West Germany was to be a member of both NATO and, eventually, the new European Union. France, Great Britain and the United States would be nuclear powers, but not so Germany, where nuclear physics and rocketry were born. Seventy years of peace followed — an abnormality in two millennia of Western civilization in Europe. But now, insidiously, the WWII-era constraints are eroding. Germany is united and very rich. The rest of the European Union is quite poor and beginning to crack apart. A ragtag NATO is confused by the new “lead from behind” America. Yet the catalysts for the German wars were not just Europe’s inability to contain and surround a naturally powerful German state. German fears and emotions counted too.

There were lots of causes of the First World War. But one was German propaganda that France, Britain and Russia were thwarting a growing imperial Germany’s natural right to expand and colonize. Who knows all the sick reasons why desperate Germans turned to nutty ex-corporal Adolf Hitler in the 1930s? But among them was that ancient paranoia that the Allies once more had rigged the European system to keep Germany divided, weak, poor and on the defensive. In other words, serially hurt pride and a loss of deterrence seemed to have been keys to the outbreak of three German wars. And now? The very thought of an armed, powerful — and increasingly exasperated — Germany, furious at its neighbors for a fourth time, seems silly, especially given its success and security. But Germans certainly believe that they have played by all the postwar rules. They paid $2 trillion for their own reunification without asking for handouts. The European Union turned into a Ponzi racket in which poorer southern members cooked their books to get German cash — only when caught to blame their indebtedness on German mercantilism and callous, export-driven profit mongering. Perpetual war guilt decreed that Germans must be apologetic about their own success

and discreet about the reasons for others’ failures. Beneath the recent election of a socialist president in France and the rise of various extremists in southern Europe is a common theme. After four years of austerity, no poor European country still believes that it can — or should — sacrifice to pay back much of what it borrowed from a far wealthier Germany, which supposedly undermined the European Union by not spending and borrowing more. Of course, the EU always claims it will survive. Of course, all 21st-century Europeans know that nationalism and military preparedness are the fossilized notions of more primitive peoples. But let’s wait and see what happens when Europeans not only default on lots of German-backed loans, but also defiantly announce that they should not have been given them in the first place — and thus should not have to pay them back at all. Injury for Germany is one thing; insult on top of it might be quite another. History is quietly whispering to us in our age of amnesia: “I would not keep poking the Germans unless you are able to deal with them when they wake up.”

The Baltimore Sun

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he Supreme Court’s ruling on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, expected in June, will determine the future for countless Americans. Health care reform debates have elevated the plight of millions of uninsured Americans to the national consciousness. However, the physician workforce that would be needed to care for millions of newly insured people deserves equal attention. There is a growing shortage of primary care physicians in the United States, and it has been forecast for decades. The American Association of Medical Colleges projects a shortage of 124,000 physicians by 2020, 37 percent of them primary care doctors. This growing shortage predates the coming squeeze due to the Affordable Care Act, whereby 16 million to 32 million newly insured will enter our health care system and another 45 million will vie for consistent primary-care access in underserved areas. Some might ask how a shortage of this magnitude is possible in a country with such a wealth of medical schools, teaching hospitals, health systems and academic societies — along with so many faculty, medical students and resident physicians. The answer lies in understanding the root cause of the shortage: Although the Council on Graduate Medical Education has kept pace with projections to increase medical school enrollment by 15 percent over

the next ten years, there is a bottleneck in training doctors. Problem No. 1 is that for the last 15 years, the United States has capped the number of residency positions at 22,000 openings, with no funding for new residency slots. The private market has cried out in unison, “We need more residency slots,” and the federal government knew that this day would come. U.S. medical schools have enrolled thousands of international medical students and increased the number of women applicants by 3 percent; American Indian and Asian applicants are also up. However, the total cost of medical student debt is too high and is not sufficiently subsidized by current government programs — that’s problem No. 2. The Journal of the American Medical Association reported in 2008 that only 2 percent of fourthyear med students plan careers in general internal medicine, largely because of debt. The exorbitant cost and outrageous financing options deter many black and Hispanic students, in particular, from pursuing careers in general medicine. Ironically, minority primary-care physicians are most desperately needed in underserved areas. Many minority students are firstgeneration would-be doctors not competitively prepared in public high school premed curricula, and therefore they need two years of post-baccalaureate training (with even more debt) after incurring four years of college debt just to make the

cut to get into medical school. Yet, our current system sustains only 22,000 first-year residency slots for approximately 38,000 degreed physicians annually. True, the Affordable Care Act does offer a 10 percent Medicare pay boost to entice residents into primary care training — but let’s do the math. How could a new graduate pay off $400,000 in educational debt as a primary care physician with an annual salary of about $47,000 (the mean first-year residency stipend)? After loan repayment, this doctor has a possible $700 left per month. And frankly, 30-somethings with $400,000 of debt want to begin repayment just so they can aspire to the American dream of marriage, a family, buying a home and even affording decent clothes and meals.

That leaves $133 billion, much of which comes from tax-break bits and pieces, including corporate welfare like the biodiesel fuel credit ($1.1 billion). Good riddance to them if they lapse. What remains are $60 billion in spending cuts, resulting from “sequestration,” as the automatic cuts in last year’s debt-ceiling agreement are known. No doubt these cuts are controversial, and a blunt instrument. Republicans in the House are already fighting to save defense spending; Democrats are condemning them for doing so at the expense of social programs. It’s doubtful the Senate will act on any bill the House produces. But whatever happens, $60 billion is small change compared to the $15.4 trillion U.S. economy. The best solution would be a “grand bargain” that reforms the tax code and entitlements, and gradually sets the country on a sustainable long-term path. Alas, this is also the least likely solution. We’re in for some fiscal tightening and some spectacular political fireworks. In the end, though, the actual threat to economic growth may be more manageable than it now seems. — Charles Lane is a member of The Washington Post’s editorial board.

— Thomas Friedman is a columnist for The New York Times.

— Victor Davis Hanson is a classicist and historian at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.

In 2010, more than half of all graduating medical students in the U.S. had this type of debt. And if the Supreme Court upholds the Affordable Care Act, we will need these graduating medical students to buttress the influx of millions of newly insured into our national health care system. If federal regulators adopted any of the following solutions, we would be in a much better situation: • Encourage the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services to remove the current cap on residency slots nationwide, thereby funding more slots. • Require all private insurers to contribute to residency training funding. • Provide tuition remission for medical school students who attend one of the 78 public U.S. medical schools, with annual enrollment of 79,000 students. • Allow all medical schools to create a primary care physician education track funding students for four years of tuition in exchange for primary care practice post-graduation. During the Great Recession, our federal government spent more than $150 billion bailing out A.I.G. and $50 billion for General Motors. In recent years, our federal government spent $140 billion annually fighting wars overseas. The cost of not addressing this problem far exceeds the cost of solving it, and the medical education community understands this. — Monae Johnson is a doctoral candidate in public health at New York Medical College.

Warnings of ‘fiscal cliff’ real or a mirage? By Charles Lane The Washington Post

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hen Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, Pimco chief executive Mohamed el-Erian and the Economist all say we should worry about something, we usually should. Right now, they’re warning about the “fiscal cliff” — spending cuts and higher tax rates that will take effect on Jan. 1, unless Congress acts. In March, the Congressional Budget Office calculated that the fiscal cliff will suddenly subtract $388 billion from the economy in fiscal 2013 (from Oct. 1, 2012 to Sept. 30, 2013), an amount equal to roughly 2.5 percent of national output. That, in turn, would hurt growth, possibly boosting unemployment above what it would otherwise be. Economist David Greenlaw of Morgan Stanley thinks the fiscal cliff could cut one percentage point from economic growth. Still, I’m not freaking out. There are reasons to doubt Congress will let the full fiscal cliff materialize and that what does happen may not be all that devastating. In fact, here and there, the benefits of tightening might outweigh the costs. An example of the latter is the So-

cial Security payroll tax cut (which is not included in CBO’s estimate). In February, Congress extended the cut, along with unemployment benefits, through the end of this year. Yes, the cut’s expiration would hit working families right in the paycheck and curb consumer spending a bit, but extending the cut would rob Social Security of needed cash. The improving jobs picture also makes extended unemployment benefits less indispensable; at the margins, they may dull the incentive to seek a job. The CBO’s $388 billion estimate assumes the expiration of all temporary tax provisions in current law. But one such item is the $89 billion “patch” Congress applied to the alternative minimum tax. No matter how polarized Capitol Hill may be, it has always patched the AMT, and it’s a safe bet that’ll happen again. One of the largest spending cuts in current law is an across-theboard reduction in how much Medicare pays physicians. As with the AMT patch, Congress has always come up with “doc fixes” for Medicare in the past, and chances are it will again. These steps would reduce CBO’s estimated fiscal cliff to $280 billion,

according to Deutsche Bank economist Joseph Lavorgna. But even that number may overstate matters. The CBO counts the expiration of accelerated capital depreciation for businesses as a $45 billion tax increase. As Lavorgna explains, this is a bit of a misnomer since not every business can take advantage of this targeted break. Many economists think that, as an economic stimulus, accelerated depreciation delivers relatively little bang for the buck, which implies that eliminating it would not hurt growth as much as would other measures. Maybe it’s a good thing to let capital allocation follow market signals rather than tax advantages. Now we’re down to $235 billion. Of that, the biggest item is $102 billion from the end of the Bush tax cuts. What to do about them is likely to be hugely controversial — but only for upper-income taxpayers. President Obama supports the lower- and middle-income Bush rates, so expect those to remain if he’s reelected. Mitt Romney, of course, wants the Bush rates, or something like them, to be permanent. At most, we’re looking at some uncertainty until after November, when Congress and the president will iron things out.

The college revolution PALO ALTO, Calif. — ndrew Ng is an associate professor of computer science at Stanford, and he has a rather charming way of explaining how the new interactive online education company that he cofounded, Coursera, hopes to revolutionize higher education by allowing students from all over the world to not only hear his lectures, but to do homework assignments, be graded, receive a certificate for completing the course and use that to get a better job or gain admission to a better school. “I normally teach 400 students,” Ng explained, but last semester he taught 100,000 in an online course on machine learning. “To reach that many students before,” he said, “I would have had to teach my normal Stanford class for 250 years.” Welcome to the college education revolution. Big breakthroughs happen when what is suddenly possible meets what is desperately necessary. The costs of getting a college degree have been rising faster than those of health care, so the need to provide low-cost, quality higher education is more acute than ever. At the same time, in a knowledge economy, getting a higher-education degree is more vital than ever. And thanks to the spread of high-speed wireless technology, high-speed Internet, smartphones, Facebook, the cloud and tablet computers, the world has gone from connected to hyperconnected in just seven years. Finally, a generation that has grown up on these technologies is increasingly comfortable learning and interacting with professors through online platforms. The combination of all these factors gave birth to Coursera.org, which launched April 18, with the backing of Silicon Valley venture funds, as my colleague John Markoff first reported. Private companies, like Phoenix, have been offering online degrees for a fee for years. And schools like MIT and Stanford have been offering lectures for free online. Coursera is the next step: Building an interactive platform that will allow the best schools in the world to not only offer a wide range of free course lectures online, but also a system of testing, grading, student-to-student help and awarding certificates of completion of a course for under $100. (Sounds like a good deal. Tuition at the real-life Stanford is more than $40,000 a year.) Coursera is starting with 40 courses online — from computing to the humanities — offered by professors from Stanford, Princeton, Michigan and the University of Pennsylvania. “The universities produce and own the content, and we are the platform that hosts and streams it,” explained Daphne Koller, a Stanford computer science professor who founded Coursera with Ng after seeing tens of thousands of students following their free Stanford lectures online. MIT, Harvard and private companies, like Udacity, are creating similar platforms. In five years this will be a huge industry. While the lectures are in English, students have been forming study groups in their own countries to help one another. The biggest enrollments are from the United States, Britain, Russia, India and Brazil. “One Iranian student emailed to say he found a way to download the class videos and was burning them onto CDs and circulating them,” Ng said last Thursday. “We just broke a million enrollments.” In each course, students post questions in an online forum for all to see and then vote questions and answers up and down. “So the most helpful questions bubble to the top and the bad ones get voted down,” Ng said. “With 100,000 students, you can log every single question. It is a huge data mine.” These top-quality learning platforms could enable budget-strained community colleges in America to “flip” their classrooms. That is, download the world’s best lecturers on any subject and let their own professors concentrate on working face-to-face with students. When you consider how many problems around the world are attributable to the lack of education, that is very good news. Let the revolution begin.

Doctor shortage should be addressed By Monae Johnson

THOMAS FRIEDMAN

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BOOKS THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

B- Publishers Weekly ranks the bestsellers for the week ending May 12. Hardcover fiction 1. “11th Hour” by James Patterson & Maxine Paetro (Little, Brown) 2. “Bring Up the Bodies” by Hilary Mantel (Holt) 3. “Deadlocked” by Charlaine Harris (Ace) 4. “In One Person” by John Irving (Simon & Schuster) 5. “The Road to Grace” by Richard Paul Evans (Simon & Schuster) 6. “The Innocent” by David Baldacci (Grand Central) 7. “Calico Joe” by John Grisham (Doubleday) 8. “Home” by Toni Morrison (Knopf) 9. “The Wind Through the Keyhole” by Stephen King (Scribner) 10. “The Sins of the Father” by Jeffrey Archer (St. Martin’s) 11. “The Witness” by Nora Roberts (Putnam) 12. “Robert B. Parker’s Lullaby” by Ace Atkins (Putnam) 13. “A Dog’s Journey” by W. Bruce Cameron (Forge) 14. “The Lost Years” by Mary Higgins Clark (Simon & Schuster) Hardcover nonfiction 1. “The Passage of Power” by Robert Caro (Knopf) 2. “I Am a Pole (And So Can You!)” by Stephen Colbert (Grand Central) 3. “Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake” by Anna Quindlen (Random House) 4. “Most Talkative” by Andy Cohen (Holt) 5. “Screwed!” by Dick Morris & Eileen McGann (Broadside) 6. “Bombshell” by Suzanne Somers (Crown) 7. “The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Food from My Frontier” by Ree Drummond (Morrow) 8. “This Is How” by Augusten Burroughs (St. Martin’s) 9. “Prague Winter” by Madeleine Albright (Harper) 10. “Killing Lincoln” by Bill O’Reilly & Martin Dugard (Holt) 11. “Drift” by Rachel Maddow (Crown) 12. “The Loyalty Leap” by Bryan Pearson (Portfolio) 13. “Service” by Marcus Luttrell with James D. Hornfischer (Little, Brown) 14. “My Cross to Bear” by Gregg Allman (Morrow) Mass market paperback

By Steven Kurutz New York Times News Service

If Billy Bob Thornton’s new memoir, “The Billy Bob Tapes: A Cave Full of Ghosts” (William Morrow), reads as if he’s sitting in a roomful of friends telling stories, that’s because it was written that way. The actor and musician ran a microphone up from his home recording studio (he lives in the guitarist Slash’s former house in Beverly Hills), pulled up some chairs and, with Kinky Friedman, his co-author, and others as an audience, talked out his life story. Like many Southerners, Thornton, who grew up in Arkansas, is a gifted storyteller, with an eye for the telling detail and a moving way of blending comedy with tragedy. One story he tells about the burn-scarred transvestite he met while living at a shady motel during his early days in California is a heartbreaking gem. Thornton also covers his marriage to Angelina Jolie, his early struggles and later success in Hollywood, and his well-publicized “phobias,” which include a fear of antiques. Thornton recently spoke by phone from his home about the book.

Do you have a home in Q: No. Arkansas? My mom still lives A: in Little Rock, and I got a couple of aunts and uncles

You write that when Q: your dad was out of work, the family often went to live at your grandmother’s house in Alpine, Ark. What do you remember about it? It was a rambling old white wooden house like you would think of out in the country. Southerners have this thing where the extended family is around a lot. It would be my grandparents, then me, my brothers and my mom and dad, then some cousins and an aunt or uncle or two. So when I think of that house it was kind of command central. I felt safe there.

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It sounds as if you Q: have some interesting relatives. Let’s just say there are a A: lot of characters in my family. Like the FBI came to

and cousins there. My second home, if you could say I got one, is Austin, Texas. It’s my kind of town because it’s a hippie town and a cowboy town. For six years you lived Q: at the Sunset Marquis in Hollywood. What did you like about hotel living? I’ve always been 50/50 on things. I’m a hopeless romantic, and yet I like to live a bachelor’s lifestyle. I’m that way with hotel living and home living. I really want to have a home but, boy, living in hotels and having room service and having someone clean up. And I like small rooms. Even here in this big house, I kind of hole myself up in whatever room. Even if the room were 100 feet long, I would still have my chair four feet from the television. I like a couch and chairs where everything has you boxed in.

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‘Engines of Change’: How cars and culture fueled our dreams “Engines of Change” by Paul Ingrassia (Simon & Schuster, 416 pgs., $30) By Susan Carpenter Los Angeles Times

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

The cue: The “thwack” of the Sunday newspaper hitting the driveway. The routine: Reading the latest news, sports, editorials, and, of course, book reviews. The reward: Feeling more informed, enlightened and entertained. This is an example of a “habit loop,” which is explained early in New York Times reporter Charles Duhigg’s fascinating book “The Power of Habit.” The habit loop, whether or not we realize it’s there, is why our routines become so ingrained, so automatic — and so hard to change. “Habits, scientists say, emerge because the brain is constantly looking for ways to save effort,” Duhigg explains. “Left to its own devices, the brain will try to make almost any routine into a habit, because habits allow our minds to ramp down more often.” Duhigg pulls together both anecdotal and largescale studies in neurology and psychology and ties them in with consumer behaviors, the successes of a football team and global businesses, people who kick addictions, and largescale social movements. He details the research behind habit change and the results of people and entities that have tried to change habits. And he writes it all clearly and with flair — making complicated research accessible and interesting. Individual habits are particularly interesting to people in advertising: an early-20th-century ad man, Claude Hopkins, figured out how to sell Pepsodent toothpaste by cueing people to routinely get rid of the “film” on their teeth by brushing, with their reward being a lovely, film-free smile. Organizational habits are trickier since there are

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Writing in an amused tone, Ingrassia comes across as a curious onlooker who’s delighted by the details he’s dug up and the connections he makes between individual vehicles and the world that swirls around them. One of the book’s more thought-provoking premises connects the Chevrolet Corvair’s safety issues in the ’60s to the 2000 presidential election. Ingrassia argues that Ralph Nader’s fame for bringing the Corvair’s safety issues to light catapulted him into the spotlight as consumer rights crusader who was able to trade that fame into a presidential campaign bid that divided the vote and brought George W. Bush to power. With “Engines of Change,” Ingrassia has done a phenomenal amount of research, and an even more impressive job of balancing history, culture and cars.

By Lisa McLendon

numerous people with multiple, often competing, interests involved. Shaky truces between competing factions can provide superficial stability but mask dangers, as illustrated by the 1987 fire in the London Underground: too many departments had their own rules, and each department’s workers were not ever to do anything that was another department’s responsibility. So when the fire struck, workers did nothing that wasn’t their department. In the end, 31 people were killed in the fire, which spurred a massive reorganization of the whole transit system. Social habits are complicated too, but in a different way: Social ties are strong and influential, and can have a cumulative effect, which is how the arrest of a single person — Rosa Parks, who was not the first person to be arrested for refusing to give up her bus seat but was the most socially connected — sparked a fullblown movement. All this is not to say that we are slaves to our habits. Duhigg makes that clear as well: We can change habits, but it takes desire and effort, and the bad habits are simply “overwritten,” not eliminated. Let’s keep the good habits, though — like reading the Sunday paper.

son

It would be impossible to count the number of automotive makes and models that have come and gone since the car was first invented — or the number of books that have been written about them. The inescapable ubiquity of the automobile has made them, for better or worse, a sort of cultural fodder that Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Paul Ingrassia inventively exploits in “Engines of Change.” The question at the center of his treatise: Do cars shape the culture, or does culture shape the cars? It’s an intriguing idea explored with in-depth investigations of 15 passenger vehicles that, in Ingrassia’s opinion, “rose above merely defining the people who drove them … (They) helped shape their era and uniquely reflected the spirit of their age.” “Engines of Change” isn’t a traditional car book so much as a history of the last century viewed through a vehicular lens. It doesn’t begin with the very first car ever invented, which is a subject of dispute. Rather, it kicks off with the car that first made automotive transportation simple, affordable and practical — the Ford Model T, which cost $850, got almost 20 miles to the gallon and traveled 40 miles per hour when it was introduced in 1908. Ingrassia then moves on to General Motors’ idea to build “a car for every purse and purpose,” setting up the ongoing rivalry among Detroit manufacturers and a crucial psychological push and pull among consumers between the car as a pragmatic tool and status symbol. While American companies get the most attention, Volkswagen and its Beetle, BMW and its yuppie 3 series sedans,

Honda with its Civic and Toyota’s Prius also get individual chapters that mirror the culture, underscore the highstakes scenarios that brought so many iconic vehicles into being and highlight exactly how precarious the business of making cars can be. Ingrassia selects the Chevrolet Corvette as the poster child of postwar American ascendancy. First introduced in 1953, the Corvette, like all the cars he spotlights, demonstrates Ingrassia’s appreciation for the engineering and aesthetic derring-do of the vehicles themselves as well as the grandiose characters that brought them to life. Whether it was the Russian-Jewish immigrant Zora Arkus Duntov, who “took to flying his own airplane, and flew around Detroit-area freeways in his Corvette at speeds well above the ambient traffic”; John DeLorean, the anti-establishment playboy behind the Pontiac GTO and eponymous, stainless-steel sport car who was eventually brought down by a drug sting; or Bob Lutz, who, as president of Chrysler, introduced the Jeep Grand Cherokee by driving it up a flight of stairs and through a plate-glass window, Ingrassia distills each car’s story to its most compelling and surprising details. Two sets of glossy photo galleries are pictorial shorthand for the author’s talking points, including an image of tail-finned Dodge cruisers at the 1957 Detroit Auto Show. Ingrassia’s writing style is as accessible as it is friendly. It does not read as expert to the learner, which would be easy to do considering Ingrassia’s resume. He is currently the deputy editor in chief of Reuters and was, at one time, the Detroit bureau chief for the Wall Street Journal, where he won the Pulitzer in 1993 for his investigations into General Motors’ management problems.

“The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business” by Charles Duhigg (Random House, 286 pgs., $28)

liam

1. “Fifty Shades of Grey” by E.L. James (Vintage) 2. “Fifty Shades Darker” by E.L. James (Vintage) 3. “Fifty Shades Freed” by E.L. James (Vintage) 4. “The Last Boyfriend” by Nora Roberts (Berkley) 5. “In the Garden of Beasts” by Erik Larson (Broadway) 6. “State of Wonder” by Ann Patchett (Perennial) 7. “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot (Broadway) 8. “The Lucky One” by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central) 9. “The Art of Fielding” by Chad Harbach (Back Bay) 10. “Heaven Is for Real” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent (Thomas Nelson) 11. “Bossypants” by Tina Fey (Back Bay/Reagan Arthur) 12. “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” by Seth GrahameSmith (Grand Central) 13. “Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man” by Steve Harvey (Amistad) 14. “The New Jim Crow” by Michelle Alexander (New Press) — McClatchy-Tribune News Service

the house one time because my Uncle Don brought this friend home who was wanted all over the country. My grandfather is cutting up a turtle that he killed to make turtle soup, and the FBI comes through the back door, and it’s a raid on the house.

“The Billy Bob Tapes: A Cave Full of Ghosts” by Billy Bob Thornton and Kinky Friedman (William Morrow, 288 pgs., $26.99)

‘The Power of Habit’ explores our routines

Wil

Trade paperback

Billy Bob Thornton tells stories from life

NE

1. “The Lucky One” by Nicholas Sparks (Vision) 2. “The Fifth Witness” by Michael Connelly (Vision) 3. “A Game of Thrones” by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 4. “A Clash of Kings” by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 5. “A Storm of Swords” by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 6. “Buried Prey” by John Sandford (Berkley) 7. “Vision in White” by Nora Roberts (Jove) 8. “Mystery” by Jonathan Kellerman (Ballantine) 9. “The Affair” by Lee Child (Dell) 10. “Sunrise Point” by Robyn Carr (Mira) 11. “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” by Seth GrahameSmith (Grand Central) 12. “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest” by Stieg Larsson (Vintage) 13. “Chasing Fire” by Nora Roberts (Jove) 14. “The Lion” by Nelson DeMille (Grand Central)

www.bendbulletin.com/books


SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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Martin Sheen, Emilio Estevez explore father-son dynamics “Along the Way: The Journey of a Father and Son” by Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez with Hope Edelman (Free Press, 432 pgs., $27) By Jessica Gelt Los Angeles Times

Donna Ward / Abaca Press via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Martin Sheen, left, and Emilio Estevez examine the nature of their relationship in “Along the Way: The Journey of a Father and Son,” which was written with Hope Edelman.

Political satire takes aim at spin machine “They Eat Puppies, Don’t They?” by Christopher Buckley (Twelve, 352 pgs., $25.99)

LOS ANGELES — Martin Sheen was a struggling 21year-old stage actor when his first son, Emilio Estevez, was born. Sheen, seventh of 10 children in a family that knew him as Ramon Antonio Gerardo Estevez instead of his stage name, was more accustomed to having siblings than being a father. He felt more like a brother to Emilio, and that dynamic has defined their relationship to this day. In their new memoir, “Along

“The Family Corleone” by Ed Falco, based on a screenplay by Mario Puzo (Grand Central Publishing, 436 pgs., $27.99)

By Mike Fischer

Newsday

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Luca Brasi sleeps with the fishes, and the Corleones, while not resting in a watery grave, are gone as well — Sonny, the Don and his wife, even Michael and his daughter. But you can’t keep a good Godfather down, any more than you can kill off Sherlock Holmes or Dracula. The Corleones still haunt our imaginations, and the beleaguered publishing industry knows it’s easier selling a name brand than an unknown. So welcome back, Fredo and Tom, Clemenza and Barzini, and particularly you, Luca Brasi, with your 15 minutes of fame as one of the central characters in “The Family Corleone.” Billed as a prequel to Mario Puzo’s “The Godfather,” the novel takes place before most of the events of the original book. The writer is Ed Falco, here novelizing a Puzo screenplay that was originally conceived as half of “The Godfather Part III.” (The book prompted a nasty legal battle between Paramount and the Puzo estate over copyright and trademark concerns.) Sonny is 17, Michael 13 and Vito 41 as the book opens in 1933. Tom Hagen is a student at New York University who tempts fate by sleeping with Brasi’s

Some of it, including many of the scenes in Washington, are really funny — including the wise-guy exchanges between a swashbuckling deputy director from the CIA and the crusty New Englander running the National Security Council. Others, including those taking us inside China’s Ruling Politburo and those set on a Virginia horse farm with Bird’s trophy wife, are not. Buckley’s Chinese characters have the dry and chalky texture that suggests secondhand research. Most of the Virginia characters have no texture at all. But the scenes along the Potomac hum, as we watch Bird and Angel try to stay one step ahead of the storm they’ve unleashed. As long as there are gullible journalists ready to believe their fictions, a naive public willing to swallow them and world leaders for whom fiction and truth are interchangeable, Bird and Angel have a shot. In the process, and even as he is ostensibly writing about China, Buckley is taking a shot of his own at the run-up to the second Iraq War. It’s no accident that one of the tales that Bird feeds the media concerns an entirely fictional weapon of mass destruction — cribbed by Bird from something he had previously dreamed up for one of the spectacularly bad novels he writes in his spare time. “Assassination. Intrigue. Secret phone calls. Bird felt like a character in one of his novels,” the narrator tells us. “He rather liked the feeling.” Buckley is laying it on thick, here, but he has a point. In a world where obvious lies can pass for gospel truth, what’s to stop a scenario like the one spelled out in this book — in which the world’s two greatest powers risk war over something that never even happened — from becoming tragedy rather than farce? Funny as he is, Buckley makes clear that this isn’t a question we can laugh away.

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ity of a self-conscious teenager. “There are a lot of truths that are revealed, but they are really about us and our relationship,” Estevez says over lunch with Sheen at Shutters on the Beach in Santa Monica. “I always imagine that the people who have come and gone in my life are gonna go straight to the index to see how many times their names are mentioned. But this is not one of those books. We don’t trash anybody.” The book unfolded over a period of a year and half during which Edelman conducted extensive interviews with both men, had those interviews transcribed, wrote her interpretation of those transcripts and handed them off to Sheen and Estevez, who edited and

rewrote as necessary. “She’d send the transcripts back to us and we’d read them and say, ‘Oh my God, you can’t put this in the book,’” said Sheen. Sheen and Estevez have a natural back-and-forth that is at once playful and firm, warm and exasperated. Perhaps this is because Sheen has relied on Estevez. When the family relocated to Malibu, Estevez often took on the role of parent, watching out for his three younger siblings when his parents were busy with Sheen’s rising career. More often than not, Estevez enjoyed watching his father work, eventually becoming interested in a career in acting himself.

Strong debut novel depicts No need to refuse ‘Godfather’ prequel life in a Shaker community

By Ed Siegel

The recession is in full swing. Spending on defense is down. And that means Washington lobbyist Walter “Bird” McIntyre and his best client, aerospace giant Groepping-Sprunt, have a big problem. The magic bullet? A secret weapons system — to be developed by Groepping — that will scramble the Chinese communications grid. The problem? Getting it through a tightwad Congress. The solution? “Gin up a little anti-China mojo” among the American public so that Congress will do its job and foot the bill. Welcome to Christopher Buckley’s “They Eat Puppies, Don’t They?”, a rollicking satire with a cloak-and-dagger plot that spoofs Washington politics, while making some serious points about American foreign policy. Buckley’s first point — and here he really isn’t kidding — is that Americans are astoundingly ignorant and indifferent about China, a country to which we’re also increasingly indebted. Never mind China’s record on pollution, human rights and support for rogue states like North Korea. Bird knows that if he wants to get his countrymen excited about Beijing, his only legitimate option is the Dalai Lama. “We can’t get enough of him,” Bird enthuses to Angel Templeton, a leggy right-wing pundit who bears more than a passing resemblance to Ann Coulter. “If the American public were told that those rotten Commie swine in Beijing were putting … whatever, arsenic, radioactive pellets, in his yak butter, you don’t think that would cause a little firestorm?” Bird asks. “Who needs evidence when you’ve got the Internet?” he merrily adds. He and Angel plant a story, and the fur begins to fly. It doesn’t hurt that the Dalai Lama is suddenly diagnosed with terminal cancer, seemingly confirming Bird and Angel’s creative concoction. As the health of His Holiness declines, so do relations between Beijing and Washington, as both sides subsist on a starchy diet of rumor and intrigue, made from one part Cuban Missile Crisis, one part John Le Carre and a heaping helping of Marx Brothers.

the Way: The Journey of a Father and Son,” which was written with Hope Edelman, the two examine the nature of their relationship and the ways it formed and has informed both of their lives. Their family is discussed with deep respect — this isn’t the book you’d read to find out about son and brother Charlie Sheen’s “winning” meltdown last year. In fact, there is very little about Charlie. Instead, it’s a loving account that’s also very candid, staring unflinchingly at the painful moments, including Martin Sheen’s alcohol-fueled psychotic breakdown on the set of “Apocalypse Now,” seen through Emilio’s eyes and recalled with the humiliated clar-

mistress. And as the Italian families prepare to square off against one another, they face another threat — the Irish, who want control of their own mean streets. Most of this fits with Puzo’s original novel and director Francis Ford Coppola’s first two films. A couple of major incidents in the new book don’t quite square with Puzo’s screenplay, but that’s nothing to be concerned about. It’s an entertaining back story to the main event,. The author — uncle to actress Edie Falco — is a better writer than Mark Winegardner, who also wrote a couple of books based on the “Godfather” characters. Falco honors Puzo’s straightforward writing style without becoming as boring and unrhythmic as Winegardner. The difference between “The Godfather” and “The Family Corleone,” though, is the difference between art and commerce. Puzo and Coppola were channeling something poetic in the book and the two films. Falco has no such artistic ambitions, and how could he, given the perfection of the book and first two films, which make everything else superfluous, including “The Godfather Part III”? That said, Falco spins a good yarn, even if the violence is more grotesque than in Puzo. “The Family Corleone” is not a gourmet meal, but sometimes spaghetti and meatballs can be pretty tasty.

“A Simple Murder” by Eleanor Kuhns (Minotaur, 336 pgs., $24.99) By Oline H. Cogdill Sun Sentinel (Florida)

During the mid-19th century, the Shakers were the largest and most successful utopian group in existence, with tightknit communities scattered throughout the Northeast and in Kentucky. The religious sect, which began in England during the late 1700s, stressed equality of the sexes, pacifism and hard work. Sexual relations, even among married couples, were forbidden, making it a difficult religion for many to follow. Today, the Shakers are mainly remembered for their ladder-back furniture, crafts and recipes, each as simple as they are exquisite. One Shaker community still remains in Maine, as well as several heritage villages and museums. Eleanor Kuhns acutely captures the movement in her superb debut, which is resplendent with affecting details about daily life in a Shaker village in 1795. “A

Simple Murder” works as an intense historical but also a heartfelt story about families, especially the bonds between fathers and sons, and the grievances that can pull relatives apart. Widowed weaver Will Rees returns to his Maine farm that he left in the care of his sister and her husband with the proviso that they care for his son, David. But Will finds the farm in disarray, his cattle sold and, most important, that David has run away to join the Shaker community. Wanting to repair his relationship with his 13-year-old son, Will agrees to help the Shakers find out who killed one of their female members Kuhns skillfully weaves in historical details about the times and the Shaker movement in “A Simple Murder.” Kuhns, a career librarian, shows how the Shakers lived, their daily routines and their commitment to their religion, as well as how others were often suspicious of them. Kuhns also is careful to show the Shakers are devout, goodhearted people who, as we all are, also are flawed.

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

Psychopath Continued from F1 So far, she said, neither of the younger boys exhibited problems like Michael’s. “We have bookshelves full of these books — ‘The Defiant Child’, ‘The Explosive Child,’” she told me. “All these books with different strategies, and we try them, and sometimes they seem to work for a few days, but then it goes right back to how it was.” A former elementary-school teacher with a degree in child psychology, Anne admitted feeling frustrated despite her training. “We feel like we’ve been spinning our wheels,” she said. “Is it us? Is it him? Is it both? All these doctors and all this technology. But nobody has been able to tell us, ‘This is the problem, and this is what you need to do.’” At 37, Anne is voluble and frank. She had recently started managing a food truck, and the day we met, she was in Florida business mufti: a Bluetooth headset and iPhone, jean shorts and a fluorescent green tank top emblazoned with the name of her business. Miguel is more reserved. A former commercial pilot who now works as a real estate agent, he often acted as the family’s mediator, negotiating tense moments with the calm of a man who has landed planes in stormy conditions. “In the beginning, I thought it was us,” Miguel said, as his two younger sons played loudly with a toy car. “But Michael defies logic. You do things by the book, and he’s still off the wall. We became so tired of fighting with him in public that we really cut back on our social life.”

A possible diagnosis Over the last six years, Michael’s parents have taken him to eight different therapists and received a proliferating number of diagnoses. “We’ve had so many people tell us so many different things,” Anne said. “Oh, it’s ADD — oh, it’s not. It’s depression — or it’s not. You could open the DSM and point to a random thing, and chances are he has elements of it. He’s got characteristics of OCD. He’s got characteristics of sensory-integration disorder. Nobody knows what the predominant feature is, in terms of treating him. Which is the frustrating part.” Then last spring, the psychologist treating Michael referred his parents to Dan Waschbusch, a researcher at Florida International University. Following a battery of evaluations, Anne and Miguel were presented with another possible diagnosis: Their son Michael might be a psychopath. For the past 10 years, Waschbusch has been studying “callous-unemotional” children — those who exhibit a distinctive lack of affect, remorse or empathy — and who are considered at risk of becoming psychopaths as adults. To evaluate Michael, Waschbusch used a combination of psychological exams and teacher- and family-rating scales, including the Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits, the Child Psychopathy Scale and a modified version of the Antisocial Process Screening Device — all tools designed to measure the cold, predatory conduct most closely associated with adult psychopathy. (The terms “sociopath” and “psychopath” are essentially identical.) A research assistant interviewed Michael’s parents and teachers about his behavior at home and in school. When all the exams and reports were tabulated, Michael was almost two standard deviations outside the normal range for callousunemotional behavior, which placed him on the severe end of the spectrum. Currently, there is no standard test for psychopathy in children, but a growing number of psychologists believe that psychopathy, like autism, is a distinct neurological condition — one that can be identified in children as young as 5. Crucial to this diagnosis are callous-unemotional traits, which most researchers now believe distinguish “fledgling psychopaths” from children with ordinary conduct disorder, who are also impulsive and hard to control and exhibit hostile or violent behavior. According to some studies, roughly one-third of children with severe behavioral problems — like the aggressive disobedience that Michael displays — also test above normal on callous-unemotional traits.

(Narcissism and impulsivity, which are part of the adult diagnostic criteria, are difficult to apply to children, who are narcissistic and impulsive by nature.) In some children, CU traits manifest in obvious ways. Paul Frick, a psychologist at the University of New Orleans who has studied risk factors for psychopathy in children for two decades. In one famous case, a 9-year-old boy named Jeffrey Bailey pushed a toddler into the deep end of a motel swimming pool in Florida. As the boy struggled and sank to the bottom, Bailey pulled up a chair to watch. Questioned by the police afterward, Bailey explained that he was curious to see someone drown. When he was taken into custody, he seemed untroubled by the prospect of jail but was pleased to be the center of attention. In many children, though, the signs are subtler. Callousunemotional children tend to be highly manipulative, Frick notes. They also lie frequently — not just to avoid punishment, as all children will, but for any reason, or none. “Most kids, if you catch them stealing a cookie from the jar before dinner, they’ll look guilty,” Frick says. “They want the cookie, but they also feel bad. Even kids with severe ADHD: They may have poor impulse control, but they still feel bad when they realize that their mom is mad at them.” Callous-unemotional children are unrepentant. “They don’t care if someone is mad at them,” Frick says. “They don’t care if they hurt someone’s feelings.” Like adult psychopaths, they can seem to lack humanity. “If they can get what they want without being cruel, that’s often easier,” Frick observes. “But at the end of the day, they’ll do whatever works best.” The idea that a young child could have psychopathic tendencies remains controversial among psychologists. Laurence Steinberg, a psychologist at Temple University, has argued that psychopathy, like other personality disorders, is almost impossible to diagnose accurately in children, or even in teenagers — both because their brains are still developing and because normal behavior at these ages can be misinterpreted as psychopathic. Others fear that even if such a diagnosis can be made accurately, the social cost of branding a young child a psychopath is simply too high. (The disorder has historically been considered untreatable.) John Edens, a clinical psychologist at Texas A&M University, has cautioned against spending money on research to identify children at risk of psychopathy. “This isn’t like autism, where the child and parents will find support,” Edens observes. “Even if accurate, it’s a ruinous diagnosis. No one is sympathetic to the mother of a psychopath.”

Treatment One morning, I met up with Waschbusch at the site of his summer treatment program, a small elementary school tucked into the northwest corner of the Florida campus. Before becoming interested in psychopathy, Waschbusch specialized in attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder, and for the past eight summers has helped run a summer-campstyle treatment program for kids with severe ADHD. Last year was the first time he included a separate program for callous-unemotional, or CU, kids — a dozen children between 8 and 11. Michael was one of his earliest referrals. Waschbusch’s study is one of the first to look at treatments for CU children. Adult psychopaths are known to respond to reward far more than punishment; Waschbusch hoped to test whether this was true in children as well. But the process had been challenging. Where the ADHD kids were disruptive and hard to control, the CU kids showed a capacity for mayhem — screaming, tipping over desks, running laps around the classroom — that Waschbusch called “off the charts.” “We had kids who were trying to climb the fence and run into the next field during PE, kids who had to be physically restrained many times a day,” Waschbusch said, as we made our way to the school’s playground. “It really blew us away.” With short-cropped iron gray hair and an earnest, slightly distracted manner, Waschbusch came across as surprisingly

cheerful — though he was also blooded” conduct disorders vigilant. While leading me from more “coldblooded” probdown the school’s main hall- lems like psychopathy. way, he warily scanned each “Hotblooded kids tend to act classroom door we passed, as out very impulsively,” he added if to confirm that no child was as we followed the children inabout to burst out of it. The side. “One theory is that they’ve study had a ratio of one coun- got a hyperactive threat-detecselor for every two children. tion system. They’re very fast But the kids, Waschbusch said, to recognize anger and fear.” quickly figured out that it was Coldblooded, callous-unemopossible to subvert order with tional children, by contrast, episodes of mass misbehavior. are capable of being impulsive, One child came up with code but their misbehavior more words to be yelled out at key often seems calculated. “Inmoments: the stead of somesignal for all the one who can’t kids to run away sit still, you get “The thing that’s simultaneously. a person who “The thing jumped out at may be hostile that’s jumped when provoked out at me most me most is the but who also is the manipu- manipulativeness has this ability lativeness that that these kids to be very cold. these kids are The attitude is, showing,” he are showing.” ‘Let’s see how said, shaking — Dan Waschbusch, I can use this his head in wonFlorida International situation to my der. “They’re not University researcher advantage, no like ADHD kids matter who gets who just act imhurt from that.’” pulsively. And Researchers they’re not like conduct-disor- have linked coldblooded beder kids, who are like: ‘Screw haviors to low levels of cortisol you and your game! Whatever and below-normal function you tell me, I’m going to do in the amygdala, the portion the opposite.’ The CU kids are of the brain that processes capable of following the rules fear and other aversive social very carefully. They just use emotions, like shame. The dethem to their advantage.” sire to avoid those unpleasant As we talked, Waschbusch feelings, Waschbusch notes, is led me to the school’s out- part of what motivates young door basketball court, where children to behave. “Normally, a highly structured game of when a 2-year-old pushes his keep-away was in progress. baby sister, and his sister cries, Initially, the game appeared and his parents scold him, almost normal. Standing in those reactions make the kid a circle, kids tried to pass the feel uncomfortable,” Waschball to one another, over the busch continued. “And that head of the kid in the middle, discomfort keeps him from while the counselors gave doing it again. The difference constant feedback — prais- with the callous-unemotional ing focus and sportsmanship kids is that they don’t feel unand taking careful note of any comfortable. So they don’t misbehavior. When the ball develop the same aversion to flew wide on a pass, a burly punishment or to the experiboy with short-cropped hair ence of hurting someone.” gave his receiver a smolderWaschbusch cited one study ing look. “That anger — that that compared the criminal goes beyond what you see in records of 23-year-olds with ordinary kids,” Waschbusch their sensitivity to unpleasant said. “These kids, they take of- stimuli at age 3. In that study, fense easily and react dispro- the 3-year-olds were played a portionately. The same is true simple tone, then exposed to a for grudges. If one of the kids brief blast of unpleasant white scored a goal on him” — the noise. Though all the children smolderer — “he would be fu- developed the ability to anticirious. He would be angry at pate the burst of noise, most that kid for days.” of the toddlers who went on I had observed the same to become criminals as adults intense, focused anger in Mi- didn’t show the same signs of chael. One night, while Mi- aversion — tensing or sweatchael watched his Pokémon ing — when the advance tone video, Allan climbed up to sit was played. in the chair next to him with To test the idea that CU chilthe strap end of a Beyblade dren may be less responsive launcher dangling from his to reward and punishment mouth. Michael looked at than the average child, Washim with hatred, then calmly chbusch established a system turned back to the comput- in which kids were awarded er. Thirty seconds passed. points for behaving well and Suddenly, Michael pivoted, docked points for acting out, grabbed the strap with vicious and then he modified it to inforce and hurled the launcher clude weeks where either the across the room. reward (points earned) or the At the summer program, though, Michael seemed less violent than morose. Outfitted in red shorts and a blue baseball cap, he played well in keep-away, but appeared bored in the group evaluation circle that came afterward. While a counselor tallied points, Michael lay on the ground, flicking a thread he had pulled out of his shirt. The summer program was now in its seventh week, and most of the children had yet to show signs of improvement. Some, including Michael, were actually worse; one had begun biting the counselors. At the start of the program, Waschbusch noted, Michael’s behavior was comparatively good: He would sometimes jump up from his desk or run around the classroom but would only rarely have to be forcibly removed, as often happened with the wildest children. Since then, his behavior had spiraled badly — in part, Waschbusch thought, because Michael had been trying to impress another child in the program, a girl I’ll refer to as L. (Her name has been abbreviated to her first initial to protect her privacy.) Charming but volatile, L quickly found ways to play different boys off one another. “Some manipulation by girls is typical,” Waschbusch said as the kids trooped inside. “The amount she does it, and the precision with which she does it — that’s unprecedented.” She had, for example, smuggled a number of small toys into camp, Waschbusch told me, then doled them out as prizes to kids who misbehaved at her command. That strategy seemed particularly effective with Michael, who would often go to detention screaming her name. According to Waschbusch, calculated behavior like L’s distinguishes so-called “hot-

punishment (points lost) were augmented. At the end of each week, children chose prizes, based on the number of points they’d earned. Every day, Waschbusch and his counselors tracked each child’s behavior — the number and severity of outbursts, any instances of good behavior — and entered the results into a blinded data set. With just a dozen children in the program, Waschbusch admitted, the observations were more like a series of case studies than like a trial with robust statistics. Still, he hoped that the data would provide a starting point for researchers trying to treat CU children. “So little is known about how these kids operate,” Waschbusch said, following the ragged lineup indoors. Even now, he noted, the idea that CU kids might respond differently to treatment was largely untested. “This is uncharted territory,” he admitted. “People are worried about labeling, but if we can identify these kids, at least we have a chance to help them.” He paused. “And if we miss that chance, we might not get another one.”

Anatomical differences Waschbusch also hopes to gain a better sense of why some callous-unemotional children grow up to be deeply troubled adults while others do not. Magnetic resonance imaging on the brains of adult psychopaths has shown what appear to be significant anatomical differences: a smaller subgenual cortex and a 5 to 10 percent reduction in brain density in portions of the paralimbic system, regions of the brain associated with empathy and social values, and active in moral decision making. According to James Blair, a cognitive neuroscientist at the National Institute of Mental Health, two of these areas, the orbitofrontal cortex and the caudate, are critical for reinforcing positive outcomes and discouraging negative ones. In callous-unemotional children, Blair says, that connection may be defective, with negative feedback not registering the way it would in a normal brain. These differences, researchers say, are most likely genetic in origin. One study calculated the heritability of callous-unemotional traits at 80 percent. Donald Lynam, a psychologist at Purdue University who has spent two decades studying “fledgling psychopaths,” says that these differences may eventually solidify to produce the unusual mixture of intelligence and coldness that characterizes adult psychopaths. “The question’s not ‘Why do some people do bad things?’” Lynam told me by phone. “It’s ‘Why don’t more people do

bad things?’ And the answer is because most of us have things that inhibit us. Like, we worry about hurting others, because we feel empathy. Or we worry about other people not liking us. Or we worry about getting caught. When you start to take away those inhibitors, I think that’s when you end up with psychopathy.” While the chance of inheriting a predisposition to psychopathy is high, Lynam noted, it is no higher than the heritability for anxiety and depression, which also have large genetic risk factors, but which have still proved responsive to treatment. Waschbusch agreed. “In my view, these kids need intensive intervention to get them back to normal — to the place where other strategies can even have an effect. But to take the attitude that psychopathy is untreatable because it’s genetic” — he shook his head — “that’s not accurate. There’s a stigma that psychopaths are the hardest of the hardened criminals. My fear is that if we call these kids ‘prepsychopathic,’ people are going to draw that inference: that this is a quality that can’t be changed, that it’s immutable. I don’t believe that. Physiology isn’t destiny.” As of January, Waschbusch’s analysis of the reward-versuspunishment strategies showed little consistency — possibly because the study group was so small. This summer, he plans to expand the program from one group to four: Each group will be split between CU children and children with conduct disorder. Waschbusch hopes that by comparing the two, it will be possible to evaluate the differences in their responses to treatment. As for Michael, it was hard to tell whether the program had helped. Miguel said he had also been a difficult child — albeit not so problematic as Michael. “A lot of parents didn’t want me around their kids, because they thought I was crazy,” he said, closing his eyes at the memory. “I didn’t listen to adults. I was always in trouble. My grades were horrible. I would be walking down the street and I would hear them say, in Spanish: ‘Ay! Viene el loco!’ — ‘Here comes the crazy one.’” Miguel said he still had hope that Michael’s development would follow a similar path to his own. “I try to tell him: You’re here with a lot of other people, and they all have their own ideas of what they want to be doing. Whether you like it or not, you just have to get along.” — Jennifer Kahn teaches at the University of California Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism.


BUSINESS THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/business

Central Oregon resorts struggle Ponderosa Resort Location: Jefferson County, east of Camp Sherman Original proposal: About 2,500 homes and two golf courses on about 3,000 acres Status: Land for the proposed resort was purchased in 2003. The proposal was appealed to state Land

Location: Powell Butte Original proposal: 800 homes, 400 overnight lodging units, three golf courses and several restaurants on 2,000 acres. Status: Approved in 2006.

The Metolian

Resort lenders backed out of the project in 2007. Nine holes of one golf course were built. Developers filed for bankruptcy protection in January 2010. Assets liquidated in July 2011.

Crossing Trails Location: Powell Butte Original proposal: About 500 residential lots, a golf course and swimming complex on 580 acres. Status: Approved in late 2008. No properties built at the site. Land-use permit with Crook County still active.

Metolius Culver Camp Sherman 126

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Hidden Canyon Black 242 Butte Ranch

Location: Powell Butte Original proposal: 2,450 singlefamily homes and 1,225 overnight rental units on 3,200 acres. Status: Approved in 2006. No properties built at the site. Land-use permit with Crook County still active.

Prinev Sisters

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Powell Butte

Tumalo

Deschutes River Tumalo Falls

Brasada Ranch Thornburgh Location: West of Redmond Original proposal: Two residential villages with a total 950 homes, 475 overnight lodging units and three golf courses on 1,900 acres. Status: Approved in 2006. Construction of homes and golf courses never got off the ground. An investment firm that loaned more than $11 million to the resort initiated foreclosure proceedings on most of the property in October 2009. Filed for bankruptcy in March 2011. Sold at foreclosure auction in August 2011.

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Sunriver Resort Caldera Springs Reso

Deschutes River

97 Little Deschutes River MILES

La Pine

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Other resort-eligible land

Location: Powell Butte Original proposal: 900 housing units, golf course, welcome center, equestrian center, spa. Status: Approved in 2005, and developed by the real estate wing of Klamath Fallsbased manufacturer Jeld-Wen Inc. Sold to Northview Hotel Group in late 2010 amid debt restructuring at Jeld-Wen. $3.5 million in guest room, lodge and other facility upgrades since Northview purchase. Currently has 39 completed homes.

controlling interests, several of which defaulted on multimillion dollar loans as development was slow to come. Notices of default were filed on 191 residential lots in March, which developers indicated will go into foreclosure later this year.

Location: Bend Original proposal: Up to 420 single-family homes, 180 rental condominiums, luxury hotel, two golf courses, convention facility, swimming pools, tennis courts, spa, trail system on 640 acres. Status: Granted county approval in 2002. Sold 78 of 85 home lots in first phase of development.

Appealed to county multiple times to extend deadline for building overnight units. Currently has 72 completed homes. Acquired by Hawaiibased The Resort Group in February 2012. County issued notice of default in April, and reported $3.2 million in unpaid property taxes.

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

• Numerous planned destination resorts have stalled or failed in the housing bust Elon Glucklich The Bulletin

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etween 2000 and 2008, developers proposed or received approval to build nine new destination resorts in Central Oregon, more than double the number built in the previous 40 years. The plans were lavish: Thousands of homes, built around multiple golf courses designed by some of the biggest names in the industry. Plans for amenities from swimming complexes to helicopter landing pads were

By Kirk Johnson New York Times News Service

PORTLAND — John Gray, 92, got wind about three years ago, near the bottom of the Great Recession, that Habitat for Humanity was doing something pretty interesting here in Oregon’s largest city. In a depressed real estate market, Habitat, the nonprofit housing group, was betting big: trying to buy vacant land on the cheap, shopping from banks in repossession and foreclosure sales to squirrel Photos by Thomas Patterson away for New York Times News Service housing projJohn Gray, 92, has donated ects years in more than a $1 million to the future. Habitat for Humanity. G r a y knows a thing or two about business cycles and buying opportunities. He made his fortune after World War II selling chain-saw equipment for a once-burly timber industry in the Pacific Northwest, riding the crest of America’s first real housing boom. So he called a friend, who set up a meeting with Habitat’s local chief executive in east Portland. Would $1 million in cash help out in the effort? Gray asked. See Habitat / G3 Ryan Dunn sweeps the concrete foundation at a Habitat for Humanity construction site in Portland. By buying property in a down market, and with the help of a donor network, the nonprofit housing group is creating Habitat neighborhoods.

Pronghorn Golf Club & Resort

Tetherow Location: Bend Original proposal: 379 single-family homes, 210 townhomes, golf course, hotel with 50 adjacent rental cabins, spa, restaurant. Status: Granted county approval in 2004. Ownership was split among several

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Proposed and Existing resorts

A big-scale approach to housing • Habitat for Humanity plans construction ‘blitz’ in Portland

Remington Ranch

Use Board of Appeals and Oregon Supreme Court, over concerns on the resort’s environmental impact in the Metolius River Basin. State Legislature in 2009 authorized environmental protection for the Basin, severely limiting development potential there.

Madras

Location: Jefferson County, west of Camp Sherman Original proposal: About 450 residential lots, a 180unit lodge and a golf course on about 620 acres. Status: Planning began in 2005. Resort proposal was appealed to state Land Use Board of Appeals and Oregon Supreme Court, over concerns on the resort’s environmental impact in the Metolius River Basin. State Legislature in 2009 authorized environmental protection for the basin, severely limiting development potential there.

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News of Record, G2 Stocks/mutual funds, G4-5 Sunday Driver, G6

drawn up — all designed to lure visitors to Central Oregon, and turn them into investors in resort property. But the economic collapse that crippled the real estate market brought those dreams to a halt, as the outlook for destination resorts crumbled under the cutoff of credit, plummeting property values and rising foreclosures. Where the market for destination resorts stands today, or if there even is still one, is a matter for debate. The resort industry “was clearly devas-

tated by the downturn,” said Jon Peterson, president of Peterson Economics, a real estate analysis firm that has conducted feasibility studies for resorts including Powell Butte’s Brasada Ranch. Central Oregon’s more tenured, financially stable resorts date back to the late 1960s, when Sunriver Resort first sought to capitalize on the region’s outdoor amenities by drawing tourists to its lodges and vacation rental homes south of Bend. See Resorts / G3

Initial proposals for Tetherow destination resort called for more than 370 single-family homes and a luxury hotel at the resort west of Bend, but 15 homes have been completed, and no hotel. Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

DIGITAL MISSING POSTER

Pet ID chips are big business, but do they work? By Nancy M. Better New York Times News Service

“Bonnie is missing” blared the email subject line. A 2-year-old female pit bull weighing 55 pounds, with gray and white markings, she was last seen on the corner of Maple Avenue and Myrtle Street in my community, wearing a chain collar. “I am asking for your help in finding my lost dog,” her owner pleaded. I immediately felt a pang of anxiety. And then one of Screenshot c o n f u s io n . HomeAgain’s lost pet app. Exactly what Users receive regular elec- was I suptronic alerts about missing posed to do animals in their area. with this information? It appeared on my smartphone because I recently got a new puppy and, while Riley was under the ether being spayed, the veterinarian’s assistant recommended inserting a chip for identification purposes. See Chips / G5


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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

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If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

N  R Fannie Mae aka Federal National Mortgage Association to Garth R. Sundberg Jr. and Sonja A. Sundberg, Deschutes River Recreation Homesites Inc., Lot 2, Block 1, $183,750

DEEDS Deschutes County

Roxanne S. Taylor to Jeffrey E. Michelson, Tanglewood, Phase 3, Lot 14, $250,000

Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation to Dennis L. and Neva M. Mullins, Phoenix Park, Phase 2, Lot 60, $175,000

Bert E. and Betty J. Simmons to Alan A. and Michelle D. Skoglund, Caldera Springs, Phase 1, Lot 66, $630,000

R. F. Wilson trustee for R. F. Wilson Trust to Charlotte A. Kreefer, Breckenridge, Lot 3, $220,790

Federal National Mortgage Association to William S. and Peggy E. Rhoads, Sterling Pointe, Phase 2, Lot 55, $176,000

Craig and Cindy L. Brenton to Julie A. Lum and Peter C. Field, Deer Park 1, Lot 3, Block 1, $336,500

Jack M. and Nancy K. Smith trustees for Jack and Nancy Smith Trust to Scharpf Investments LLC, Second Addition to Bend Park, Lots 13 and 14, Block 162, $285,000 Nathan W. Doudney to Jeffrey L. and Connie L. Henry, Awbrey Butte Homesites, Phase 19, Lot 54, Block 6, $375,000 Charles D. and Frances D. Lumm to Bart S. Gernhart, Oregon Water Wonderland, Unit 1, Lots 8 and 10, Blocks 1 and 2, $170,000

Stephen G. and Laura C. Wilkes to Bradley B. and Maria C. Baird, Sundance East, Phase 3, Lot 4, Block 10, $175,000 Warren J. Seeds to Travis J. Nagle and Terrace R. Mucha, West Bend Village, Phases 3, 4 and 5, Lot 46, $300,000 Ilona M. Lewis trustee for Ilona M. Lewis Revocable Living Trust to Ronald H. Doke

and Linda A. Ratcliffe, Mountain High, Lot 8, Block 12, $329,000 Mitchel E. Rhoades and Amy J. Milne to Gregory S. and Darlene F. Swisher, Summershade, Lot 1, $289,000 Sierra Bend Property LLC to Craig A. Sather to Melinda J. Fahey, Yardley Estates, Phase 1, Lot 24, $249,900 Andrew P. and Mary A. Silva to Jerome J. and Mary D. Morse, Ridge at Eagle Crest 24, Lot 27, $217,866.46 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation to Southwest Property Group LLC, Painted Ridge at Broken Top, Lot 18, $233,400 Richard D. Porterfield trustee for Richard D. Porterfield Trust to Dustan and Dionne Campbell, Township 18, Range 11, Section 24, $156,500 Hayden Homes LLC to Amy J. Milne, Aspen Rim, Number 2, Lot 195, $209,990 Randy and Ronda G. Avery to David J. and Sandra K. Bishop, Township 16, Range 12,

Section 12, $225,000 David B. and Nancy K. Butler to Terrance J. and Jessica M. Kinnaman, Parks at Broken Top, Phase 4, Lot 156, $305,000 Fannie Mae aka Federal National Mortgage Association to Nicholas C. Wheeler and Valery P. Wyant-Wheeler, Ridge at Eagle Crest 50, Lot 210, $177,500 Shelly A. and R. Eric Duhn to Mark and Dianna Steinauer, Canal Crossings, Lot 9, $225,000 Janette M. Belanger trustee for Belanger Family Trust to Richard D. and Tina L. Steigleman, Champion Ridge, Phase 4, Lot 71, $266,500 Marion C. Poulton to Amos D. Ranck, Partition Plat 1996-50, Parcel 5, Township 14, Range 11, Sections 27 and 28, $224,000 Aaron and Charlotte Edmondson to Alberta I. McCrea, Cascade View Estates, Phase 7, Lot 64, $225,000 Nicholas M. and Rachael L. Schuetz to Alex

C. Gillon and Lynne Lafey, Westside Pines, Phase 3, Lot 23, $265,000 Jeffrey R. Colker to Emine C. Loxley, Township 16, Range 11, Section 28, $1,159,000 Timothy P. Jeffries who acquired title as Tim P. Jeffries to Randall A. Lefor, Edgewood South, Lot 10, Block 2, $157,800 Melvin McDougal to Catherine M. O’Grady, Brier Ridge, Lot 10, $222,500 Crook County

David J., Sandra K, James E. and Christine M. Bishop to Randy and Ronda G. Avery, Township 15, Range 15, Section 20, $425,000 Terry P. and Georgeanna M. Dugan to Gregory L. and Theresa K. Virnig, Partition Plat 2006-50, Parcel 2, $325,000 Carol H. Vavra to Stephen W. and Loralie Jessee, West Hills Subdivision, Lot 20, $170,000

How some companies expand even in a stalled economy By Anne Field New York Times News Service

In the middle of 2010, Tom Sesti decided he needed to do something about the cost pressures that had been plaguing his business, Bandals. Based in Rochester, Mich., the company had introduced a product, women’s sandals with interchangeable decorative tops, soon after the economic crisis hit in 2008. Almost immediately, the five-employee company was hit with cost increases of 15 to 30 percent for manufacturing and raw materials. Sesti decided Bandals needed to sell its way out of the problem. “We had to get to a level where our economies of scale cleared the hurdle of all our fixed costs,� he said. To that end, he considered two paths — offering a new product or expanding overseas. After running the numbers, he decided to do both. Lots of people advise staying aggressive during a difficult economy, but spending money when times are tough can be scary. This small-business guide looks at how Bandals and two other companies managed to do it.

Consider new markets When Sesti decided to focus on increasing revenue, his first thought was to find ways to balance the seasonality of Bandals, which sell best in warm months. He came up with two: making jewelry that could be used to decorate the ankles or tops of cold-weather boots, and expanding sales in countries with either year-round warm weather or with seasons that run counter to those in the United States. When he analyzed his expenses, Sesti started with the cost to manufacture the jewelry items in China. He added promotional expenses such as trade show attendance. Then he talked to retail customers and his sales force, and he came up with an estimate for how many he could sell. He figured he could break even in a year. When he looked at expanding the sale of Bandals to 15 countries overseas, he found he could do it for less than he expected. He determined that he could sell through local distributors and that his additional costs would primarily result from the time needed to identify partners, negotiate agreements and produce samples. As a result, he decided to pursue both strategies. “The reality was, there was a 50-50 chance one would work,� he said. “Given our costs, we realized we could try both.� As it turned out, both worked. In 2011, he said, revenue increased 250 percent and profits tripled.

Do not rush the decision In early 2009, as sales declined at an Ashburn, Va., technology company called Odin, Patrick Sweeney II, the chief executive officer, reduced overhead by 15 percent. Then demand for the company’s product — software for radio-frequency identification systems — started to pick up. But, banks, technology companies and other clients that

bought the sophisticated, multimillion-dollar tagging systems often took a year to sign a deal, and Sweeney could not wait that long. He decided Odin had to find other uses for its technology. He called a meeting of the top seven executives at his farm in Middleburg, Va. Over the course of a day, they brainstormed, analyzing various suggestions to see whether the sales cycle would be short enough and the marketing expenses modest enough. The group gathered around a white board and noted each suggestion. Maybe the radiofrequency ID systems could help companies keep track of their laptops? Maybe they could help customers in the oil-and-gas industry track the many nearly identical parts on drilling platforms? After about an hour and a half, Sweeney erased the weaker suggestions, leaving about 12 possibilities. Next, they considered whether there was an established competitor in the market. They analyzed the ideas to see if they involved something of critical value to a customer. They evaluated potential costs. Finally, they addressed how easy it would be to identify and reach the right decision-makers. They were down to five types of businesses that could use Odin’s technology. Three months of research narrowed the field to three. The first consisted of Defense Department and law enforcement agencies that keep track of weapons. The second was what is known as the cabinetry market in hospitals — cabinets installed and used by medical suppliers to store devices. Third, they considered companies that might use the tags to connect customers to social-media sites. Customers visiting a car dealership, for example, could swipe a tag at a kiosk, updating their whereabouts on their Facebook pages and also survey friends about, say, a car’s color. As a result, the car — and the dealer — could be exposed to hundreds of the customers’ friends. The technology could also be connected to the dealer’s customer database, pulling up records and making the checkout process easier and faster. In mid-2009, Odin started approaching government agencies. Most of the resulting contracts have been “sixfigure deals,� said Sweeney, who expects it to take two years for the company to attract larger commitments. Six months later, Odin entered the cabinetry market, which proved more lucrative. In fact, when it became clear that the area had potential, he doubled the company’s research and development budget to enable more sophisticated tweaking of the technology. And his social-media efforts have been so successful that he re-

cently created a new company, dwinQ, to sell those products. Last year, Sweeney said, revenue for the 40-employee company was up about 30 percent — with about half of all revenue coming from the new markets.

Focus on profits In 2008, Adrian Nazari watched as the market for his three-year-old business, Financial Crossing, fell apart. Based in Palo Alto, Calif., the company sold a technology that financial services firms used to help customers manage their debt. But as the market fell and fortunes declined, many clients pulled the plug on their contracts. Financial Crossing’s revenue fell 60 percent from 2008 to 2009. At first, Nazari decided to wait it out. But by mid-2009, he realized he had to change his strategy. He and his management team studied existing market research and conducted a survey of about 1,000 consumers. They found that respondents were considerably more concerned about their debt levels than they had been before the downturn. That lent credence to an idea Nazari had to build on the company’s existing technology to focus on consumers, rather than banks, and provide an online service to help them manage their financial obligations. It would be free to consumers; banks would pay for each transaction that resulted. Crucial to the decision was determining how long it would take to turn a profit. Costs, Nazari knew, would be substantial. It would take approximately $3 million, he figured, to retool the company’s technology. And the expenses for marketing, rebranding and public relations, as well as overhauling the sales system, could be another $6 million. But the potential market was much larger as well. “We were now looking at over 100 million U.S. consumers who potentially could use our products,� he said. He figured it would take two to three years to break even. Nazari, who changed the name of the company to Credit Sesame and based it in Sunnyvale, Calif., proceeded to develop the new technology and find money to finance the new enterprise. He raised about $1.2 million in venture capital in late 2010 (a year later, he would gather another $6.1 million), and by January 2011 he was ready to introduce the service. Now, he says, “We have hundreds of thousands of consumers using our product.� Credit Sesame did not start taking in revenue until the middle of 2011, but he expects the company, which has 24 employees, to approach $10 million this year. He anticipates breaking even by the first quarter of 2013.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

Fabrizio Costantini / New York Times News Service

Tom Sesti, whose company, Bandals, sells women’s sandals with interchangeable decorative tops, in Rochester, Mich. Sesti decided to expand overseas and offer a new product when confronted with cost increases for manufacturing and raw materials.


SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Habitat Continued from G1 His philanthropy in turn opened doors with other donors, including a lumber company heir who had never given to Habitat, but who was inspired by Gray’s example to chip in $250,000. Gray then upped the ante again, adding another $1 million to the statewide Habitat for Humanity office. This spring, the first 22 homes in the largest Habitat project in Oregon history — a 65-unit subdivision left partly built by a private developer who abandoned it when the market crashed — is rising on Portland’s east side. Habitat, meanwhile, has become the 10th-largest homebuilder in the Portland metropolitan area by housing volume, according to a local building trades association, and even more dominant on the lowerincome east side through the $10 million land-bank fund that Gray helped anchor. The 150 lots bought by the fund will keep the group busy for five years or more, even as it has increased its homebuilding output by 50 percent, to 30 homes a year from 20. “Recirculation,” Gray said in describing his money’s new path, from the old lumber and construction scene of the 1950s and 1960s — the GI Bill, suburbia on the rise, America in its lion phase on the world stage — to the new era of wounded, postcrash housing economics. “What they were doing seemed like a smart idea,” he said.

Beyond Portland Other Habitat branches have also pivoted in the recession, trying different angles in a dark time. In Nevada and Florida, for example, some Habitat groups stopped new construction entirely and shifted to renovation, buying abandoned properties in cities racked by high foreclosure

Resorts Continued from G1 Three others would follow during the next 15 years, with Seventh Mountain Resort, formerly Inn of the Seventh Mountain, Black Butte Ranch and Eagle Crest all operating by the late 1980s. But the landscape for destination resorts in Oregon was changing. Land-use laws put in place in the 1970s began to guide development in the following decades. It took a while for the new policies to bring in a development boom, said Paul Dewey, a Bend attorney and executive director of Central Oregon Landwatch, a nonprofit that has opposed some of the largescale resort development in the region. As the economy improved in the 1990s, and as Central Oregon’s population boomed, resort planners started eyeing opportunities in the Bend and Redmond areas, Crook County, even southern Jefferson County, Dewey said. A 640-acre piece of land northwest of Bend would become the opening salvo in Central Oregon’s resort boom. In 2000, developers went to work turning that land into Pronghorn Golf Club & Resort, a gated community with plans for about 400 homes, a luxury hotel, two golf courses, swimming pools, tennis courts and more. Deschutes County approved the project in 2002. Today, just 72 homes have been completed. The luxury hotel hasn’t materialized. Both the state and Deschutes County require destination resorts to provide overnight lodging units. Pronghorn’s lender sold $43 million in loans on the property to The Resort Group, a Hawaii development firm that has since taken over ownership at Pronghorn. It announced last week that a California resort management group, Auberge Resorts, would oversee Pronghorn’s future development. “There has been instability at the resort,” said Randy Koss, managing partner of Pronghorn. “But our gates are open.” Another resort that jumped into the market was Tetherow, offering a Central Oregon getaway just minutes west of Bend. It was approved by the county in 2004, with plans calling for nearly 380 singlefamily homes, 210 townhomes,

Workers at a Habitat for Humanity construction site in Portland. City officials hope to help struggling neighborhoods by anchoring them with Habitat’s owner-occupied homes. Photos by Thomas Patterson New York Times News Service

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Now, as the economy here and along much of the coastal strip north to Seattle is recovering, vacant land in Portland is being snatched up. A big national homebuilder based in Miami, the Lennar Corp., said in December it was expanding in the Portland and Seattle markets, and prices for vacant land have soared, said Dave Nielsen, the chief executive of the Homebuilders Association of Metro Portland. “Good for them,” he said, referring to Habitat. “If they were trying to do it now, they’d be in a bidding battle.”

A new chapter

rates. Across most of the nation, one-at-a-time houses, financed by church suppers and staffed by volunteer hammerswingers, are still the norm for Habitat, an ecumenical Christian group that was founded in 1976 in Georgia. But business leaders and housing experts said that Portland — partly through Habitat’s timing in betting big in a down market, partly through a donor network led by Gray that stepped up to help even as corporate support mostly collapsed — is creating something that will resonate long after the recession: Habitat neighborhoods. “That fact that John Gray had given us $1 million gave us legitimacy,” said Steve Messinetti, the president and chief executive of Habitat Portland/Metro East. “And then the market, and the depressed prices, allowed us to carry out our goals.” The scale and scope of the new Habitat projects, city officials say, will allow entire blocks on the city’s strug-

gling east side to be anchored by owner-occupied housing. Those owners, under Habitat’s model, would earn 30 percent to 60 percent of the median Portland area household income (around $20,000 to $40,000 a year for a family of four), living in homes they helped build themselves, and paying down their mortgages with zero-interest nonprofit loans. “As a housing commissioner we feel like we’re trying to plug a lot of leaks in the dike,” said Nick Fish, a Portland city commissioner in charge of the housing bureau and parks and recreation. And the city’s budget has still not recovered from the downturn. Habitat, especially in east Portland, he said, is filling the gap. “One of the ideas that they have floated is a plan, outside government, to take back blocks of the city, block by block, using their tool kit, with modest government contributions,” he said. “We can start building around their work.”

a hotel with adjacent cabins and a golf course. The golf course is there, as is a clubhouse and restaurant. Like Pronghorn, Tetherow has failed to build its hotel, appealing to the county multiple times for extensions. It has 15 completed homes, though another eight are under construction. Deadlines for building roads and infrastructure have been missed. Tetherow has been the victim of what resort development partner Dike Dame called “some difficult ownership issues that have precluded the development” of properties there. Ownership has been split among different development entities, several of which have suffered acute financial problems since the crash. Lenders have moved to foreclose on parts of the resort property twice in the last three years. Development partners brought a plan to the county last month that would transfer ownership of a piece of land adjacent to the golf course, in the hope of bringing a 198-room hotel there. Uncertainty still clouds the market. In many cases, said Peterson with Peterson Economics, that uncertainty has kept potential land buyers, in cities like Portland, Seattle and San Francisco, from purchasing vacation property. Residents from those cities are major members of Central Oregon’s resort client base, Peterson said. “Half of the problem today is just about psychology,” he said. “The question is, how long will it take until people feel comfortable enough to buy that second home?”

plex on almost 600 acres. Hidden Canyon and Crossing Trails never got off the ground. Remington’s developers filed for bankruptcy in 2010 after building half of one golf course and no homes. Only Brasada gained a solid foothold. Its original owner, Klamath Falls manufacturer Jeld-Wen, had the capital necessary to put key amenities in place, said Brent McLean, vice president of sales and marketing for Northview Oregon, the hotel management group that bought Brasada and Eagle Crest from Jeld-Wen in 2010. “Brasada, remember, was never really released to the market as a residential property resort,” McLean said. “Part of our success is that we’re hotel guys.” Few could have guessed in the mid-2000s what sort of devastation the end of the decade would bring to the housing market, not just in Central Oregon but around the world. The new landscape for destination resorts is uncertain. Crook County officials who oversaw some of the development proposals said they don’t see a comeback for the resort industry anytime soon. Bill Zelenka, Crook County’s planning director, said there’s still a chance for Crossing Trails and Hidden Canyon to get off the ground, once the market improves. But their developers don’t seem anxious to move forward. Zelenka said he hasn’t heard from Crossing Trails developers in six months. It’s been at least a year and a half since anyone with the Hidden Canyon development called the county. “You always wondered how these were going to turn out” during the rush to build in the mid-2000s. “But everybody seemed to be so positive at the time. All good things come to an end.” For many of the failed destination resorts, timing was the biggest factor, said Scott Cooper, Crook County judge, or administrator, from 2001 to 2008. “These had the potential to be great developments. But the bottom of the market fell out,” Cooper said. But in some cases, developers of the failed resorts were likely banking on the hope that the early and mid-2000s real-estate boom would last forever. Some did not have long-term funding plans in

The boom ends The resort crash hit Crook County hard. Large destination resorts weren’t even possible under county code until the early 2000s, when planners expanded their destination resort overlay map, opening additional land to development. A rush to enter the booming resort market quickly followed. Four resorts were proposed: Brasada Ranch, with 900 homes, an equestrian center, spa and more; Remington Ranch, a 2,000-acre development with three golf courses and several restaurants; Hidden Canyon, more than 3,000 acres and 2,400 home lots; and Crossing Trails, with a golf course and swimming com-

AmeriCorps volunteers Nick Welsh, left, Akina Martin, center, and Lindsey Roland painting the interior of a house built by Habitat.

There was a kind of bleakly fortuitous stroke of luck in the Habitat capital project, Fish and other housing experts said. The area that Messinetti’s Habitat branch was focused on, east Portland, was also the hardest hit by what Fish called the “predatory lending and

foreclosure mess.” The city expanded its boundary east into what had been an unincorporated area in 1988, he said, and the final, frothy wave of the easy-money era broke there in an area that never shared the hip West Coast prosperity of downtown.

place, Cooper said. “These things take deep pockets,” he said. “There’s a lot of cost before you see the first dollar. We always told de-

velopers who came to us with resort proposals, ‘If you’re not in this for the long run, if you don’t have deep pockets, if you think you’re going to be a de-

Gray said that for him part of the appeal of a big Habitat play was the idea that social stability of families and neighborhoods and economic stability in housing go together. It is a lesson, he said, from personal experience. He grew up in the 1920s and ’30s, the son of a rural schoolteacher who was widowed young and raised three boys in a fourroom house with no running water. On the dining room table of his downtown apartment, he pulled out a family album, stabbing a picture of the house with his finger, still amazed after more than 80 years that his mother’s landlord, a farm family, never raised the rent — $2.50 a month — even after rural electrification came through in the 1930s. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Oregon, who started his career at Habitat for Humanity, said he thought the housing bust, and Habitat’s new chapter here, had validated the idea that different economic models have value. Many of the families he worked with two decades ago in east Portland, for example, are still in their homes, he said, and the homes those families bought for $30,000 to $50,000 back then are now in some cases worth five times as much.

veloper that funds this thing as you go, then you’re probably on the path to failure.’” — Reporter: 541-617-7820, eglucklich@bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

G4

Mutual funds m

%

%

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

Name

AQR Funds:

Calamos Funds:

DivArb I n 11.06 -.04 +1.7 +13.4 MgdFutSt I n 9.73 +.16 -2.0 NS AcadEm n 16.05 -1.29 -20.0 +35.2

ConvA p GlbGr&IncI Gr&IncC t Grth&IncA p Grwth&IncoI GrowthA p GrowthC t Growth I MktNeutI r MktNeutA p

Alger Funds A: SpectraN

12.60 -.74 -2.8 +68.5

Alger Funds I: CapApprI SmCapGrI

20.87 -1.21 -3.1 +56.6 26.18 -1.74 -11.2 +60.8

AllianceBernstein : IntDurInstl

16.09 -.01 +5.6 +32.0

AllianceBern A: GloblBdA r 8.43 GroIncA p 3.56 HighIncoA p 8.84 LgCapGrA p 25.75

-.04 -.17 -.18 -1.37

+4.5 -0.9 +2.0 -3.4

+33.1 +46.5 +68.4 +51.0

AllianceBern Adv: HiIncm Adv

8.85 -.18 +2.3 +70.0

AllianceBern C: HighIncoC p

8.94 -.18 +1.3 +64.6

Allianz Admin MMS: NFJSmCpVl t 27.27 -1.44 -6.9 +56.1

Allianz Fds Instl: NFJDivVal SmCpVl n

11.30 -.48 -5.8 +42.6 28.69 -1.51 -6.7 +57.3

Allianz Funds A: NFJDivVal t SmCpV A

11.21 -.48 -6.2 +40.9 27.30 -1.44 -7.1 +55.4

Alpine Funds: TaxOptInco 10.05 ... +1.6 +5.4 AmanaGrth n 24.87 -1.09 -3.7 +43.3 AmanaInco n 31.87 -1.12 -4.1 +38.4

Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst SmCapInst

19.27 -1.01 -4.8 +45.1 19.05 -1.12 -9.7 +59.9

Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv

18.28 -.96 -5.1 +43.5

Ameri Century 1st: Growth

26.25 -1.38 -1.2 +56.6

Amer Century Adv: EqtyIncA p HeritageA p

7.32 -.22 -1.9 +37.4 20.30 -1.41 -7.7 +63.4

Amer Century Inst: EqInc

7.32 -.22 -1.5 +39.3

Amer Century Inv: AllCapGr CAIntTF DivBond n DivBond EqGroInv n EqInco GNMAI GovtBd GrowthI HeritageI IncGro InfAdjBond IntTF IntTF n IntlBnd IntlGroI MdCapVal NT DivrBd n SelectI Ultra n ValueInv Vista

28.52 11.89 11.13 11.13 22.10 7.32 11.25 11.59 26.02 20.93 25.08 13.24 11.64 11.64 14.46 9.57 11.93 11.03 40.36 24.01 5.74 16.22

-1.62 -.01 ... ... -1.08 -.22 ... +.04 -1.37 -1.45 -1.14 +.11 -.01 -.01 -.05 -.64 -.51 ... -2.19 -1.18 -.23 -1.17

-2.8 +9.4 +7.6 +7.4 -0.3 -1.6 +5.8 +7.0 -1.4 -7.5 -1.1 +12.8 +8.3 +8.5 +2.5 -16.3 -5.0 +7.5 -0.3 -1.1 -4.1 -8.9

+63.3 +21.2 +22.9 +22.2 +53.1 +38.4 +18.3 +16.8 +55.7 +64.7 +47.6 +31.7 +19.7 +20.4 +16.2 +28.0 +58.2 +22.7 +53.9 +57.5 +41.7 +45.1

-2.4 -0.3 +0.9 +6.5 -1.3 -11.3 +2.7 -16.5 -6.4 -3.8 +7.2 -5.6 +1.2 +14.6 -0.5 +3.4 -14.3 -3.9 +6.5 -5.4 -8.3 -14.0 +0.9 -11.5 +11.5 +13.6 +0.1

+49.9 +48.9 +41.9 +29.7 +36.4 +28.8 +24.9 +21.1 +42.3 NS +16.9 +37.7 +58.4 +36.5 +48.3 +14.3 +25.5 +38.2 +17.8 +45.8 +39.0 +33.3 +5.2 +53.0 +25.1 +30.4 +50.9

+0.2 -2.0 -11.9 -6.3 -1.2

+38.8 +33.3 +25.9 +34.7 +45.0

American Funds A: AmcapFA p AmMutlA p BalA p BondFdA p CapInBldA p CapWGrA p CapWldA p EupacA p FundInvA p GlblBalA GovtA p GwthFdA p HI TrstA p HiIncMuniA IncoFdA p IntBdA p IntlGrIncA p InvCoAA p LtdTEBdA p NwEconA p NewPerA p NewWorldA STBFA p SmCpWA p TaxExA p TxExCAA p WshMutA p

19.66 26.29 18.65 12.75 49.57 32.51 20.89 35.39 36.03 24.60 14.52 30.09 10.86 14.86 16.79 13.70 26.87 27.75 16.31 25.51 27.21 46.97 10.08 35.37 12.93 17.36 28.64

-.86 -.85 -.62 -.01 -1.41 -1.72 -.14 -2.18 -1.82 -.81 +.05 -1.55 -.21 ... -.48 -.02 -1.41 -1.23 -.01 -1.30 -1.41 -2.62 -.01 -2.11 -.01 ... -1.14

American Funds B: BalanB p CapInBldB p CapWGrB t GrowthB t IncomeB p

18.58 49.58 32.32 29.13 16.66

Ariel Investments: 39.57 -2.47 -13.2 +63.3 43.54 -2.57 -16.7 +63.6

Artio Global Funds: 9.96 9.52 22.78 22.24 9.58 13.69

-.18 -.17 -1.38 -1.35 -.58 -.05

-1.8 -1.5 -23.6 -23.8 -22.4 +6.7

+50.7 +51.9 +5.6 +4.8 +6.6 +28.4

Artisan Funds: Intl IntlInstl IntlValu r IntlValInstl MidCap MidCapInstl MidCapVal SmCapVal

20.88 21.01 25.32 25.37 35.68 36.99 19.58 14.77

-1.07 -1.07 -1.29 -1.29 -2.25 -2.33 -.99 -.82

-7.9 -7.6 -10.6 -10.4 -3.2 -2.9 -6.4 -11.2

+35.2 +36.0 +41.1 +42.0 +77.0 +78.3 +53.7 +46.2

Aston Funds: FairMidCpN M&CGroN

29.25 -1.95 -11.5 +66.1 23.70 -.86 +1.3 +40.8

BBH Funds: BdMktN CoreSelN

10.33 -.02 +1.0 +10.3 15.68 -.54 +2.1 +57.7

BNY Mellon Funds: BondFund EmgMkts IntmBdFd LrgCapStk MidCapStk NatlIntMuni NtlShTrmMu

13.53 8.84 13.16 8.37 10.91 13.92 13.00

-.03 -.62 -.03 -.41 -.79 -.02 ...

+5.7 -21.1 +4.4 -8.9 -15.2 +8.5 +1.8

+19.8 +25.9 +15.9 +45.3 +49.4 +21.0 +7.0

Baird Funds: AggBdInst CoreBdInst ShtTBdInst

10.86 +.01 +7.8 +31.8 11.04 ... +7.1 +37.2 9.69 -.02 +2.4 +14.7

Baron Fds Instl: Growth

52.49 -2.67 -4.6

NS

Baron Funds: Asset n Growth SmallCap

47.26 -2.84 -6.7 +50.4 52.08 -2.66 -4.8 +58.2 23.63 -1.45 -8.4 +59.0

Bernstein Fds: IntDur Ca Mu DivMun NYMun TxMgdIntl IntlPort EmgMkts

13.98 14.89 14.89 14.63 11.99 11.92 24.11

-.01 -.03 -.01 -.01 -.83 -.83 -2.02

+5.5 +6.3 +5.8 +5.7 -23.0 -23.1 -23.6

+31.0 +16.4 +15.5 +15.4 +3.9 +3.3 +23.9

Berwyn Funds: Income

13.01 -.13 +1.2 +38.6

BlackRock A: BasValA p CapAppr p EqtyDivid GlbAlA r HlthSciOpp HiYdInvA InflProBdA NatMuniA TotRetA

24.46 21.59 18.34 18.26 29.70 7.62 11.92 10.96 11.43

-1.34 -1.33 -.72 -.59 -1.02 -.16 +.08 -.01 -.02

-8.6 -9.6 -0.5 -6.7 -3.7 +2.5 +11.4 +13.8 +5.4

+39.4 +44.8 +48.4 +24.7 +48.4 +67.5 +29.8 +29.1 +31.1

BlackRock B&C: EquityDivC GlobAlC t

17.95 -.70 -1.3 +45.2 16.97 -.55 -7.4 +21.9

BlackRock Fds Blrk: CapAppr p

22.46 -1.38 -9.2 +46.5

BlackRock Instl: InflProtBd US Opps BasValI CoreBond EquityDiv GlbAlloc r CapAppr p HiYldBond NatlMuni S&P500 SCapGrI

12.05 33.77 24.63 9.57 18.38 18.35 22.42 7.62 10.95 15.93 22.74

+.08 -2.16 -1.35 -.01 -.72 -.60 -1.38 -.16 -.01 -.71 -1.58

+11.8 -14.3 -8.3 +5.8 -0.3 -6.4 -9.3 +2.8 +14.0 -1.6 -11.8

+31.1 +46.6 +40.7 +27.6 +49.7 +25.7 NS +69.2 +29.8 +50.5 +51.1

BlackRock R: GlblAlloc r

17.64 -.57 -7.0 +23.5

Brandywine Fds: BlueFd 23.73 -1.45 -10.4 +30.0 Brandywine 22.83 -1.59 -20.3 +20.4 BrownSmCoIns 45.50 -1.96 -7.9 +71.3

Buffalo Funds: SmallCap

26.73 -1.31 -4.4 +44.8

CGM Funds: FocusFd n Realty n

24.77 -2.68 -23.4 -2.9 27.80 -2.35 -4.7 +98.5

CRM Funds: MidCapValI

27.69 -1.27 -11.8 +42.1

Footnotes T M

S

Institutnl nr Clipper

10.96 -.63 -16.2 +29.7 62.99 -3.73 -5.7 +51.7

Cohen & Steers: InsltRlty n RltyShrs n

41.53 -3.13 +0.3 +107.6 63.97 -4.86 +0.3 +106.1

Columbia Class A: Acorn t AcornIntlA t BldModAgg p DivEqInc A DivrBd DiviIncoA DivOpptyA FocusEqA t HiYldBond LgCapGrA t LgCorQA p MidCpValA PBModA p SelLgCpGr t StrtIncA TxExA p SelComm A

27.67 35.71 10.25 9.60 5.13 13.87 8.06 23.00 2.79 24.12 5.89 12.98 10.60 12.47 6.15 14.12 42.67

-1.72 -2.03 -.40 -.43 -.01 -.49 -.31 -1.21 -.06 -1.29 -.26 -.87 -.30 -.64 -.07 ... -2.84

-7.5 -12.8 -4.4 -8.9 +6.3 +2.2 -2.1 +0.5 +3.6 -3.2 +1.0 -10.5 -2.0 -8.7 +4.8 +12.6 -6.2

Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z AcornIntl Z AcornUSA Bond DiviIncomeZ IntmBdZ n IntmTEBd n LgCapGr LgCapIdxZ MarsGrPrZ MidCapGr Z MidCpIdxZ MdCpVal p STIncoZ STMunZ SmlCapIdxZ n SmCapVal SCValuIIZ ValRestr n CRAQlInv np

28.66 35.92 28.22 9.61 13.88 9.39 10.95 12.60 25.20 21.62 25.34 11.03 12.99 9.92 10.55 16.74 40.60 13.61 44.97 11.21

-1.78 -2.04 -1.80 ... -.49 -.02 -.01 -.65 -1.11 -1.11 -1.54 -.72 -.88 -.02 -.01 -.86 -1.99 -.80 -2.31 +.04

-7.3 -12.5 -8.8 +7.1 +2.4 +6.2 +8.5 -8.5 -1.4 -0.4 -12.0 -7.6 -10.4 +1.4 +1.8 -4.1 -10.4 -9.2 -12.7 +6.6

m

B F

CoreFxInco LgGrw LgVal n ComdyRetA t

m

FF2000 n FF2010 n FF2010K FF2015 n FF2015A FF2015K FF2020 n FF2020A FF2020K FF2025 n FF2025A FF2025K FF2030 n FF2030K FF2035 n FF2035A FF2035K FF2040 n FF2040K FF2045 n FF2045K FF2050 n FF2050K FreeIncK IncomeFd n

12.08 13.40 12.27 11.18 11.35 12.31 13.44 11.74 12.62 11.08 11.19 12.63 13.16 12.72 10.80 10.93 12.69 7.53 12.72 8.89 12.82 8.74 12.82 11.44 11.42

+62.4 +44.3 +40.1 +41.5 +27.8 +48.7 +64.0 +49.4 +54.8 +54.1 +55.9 +51.5 Fidelity Invest: +38.4 AllSectEq 11.63 +55.8 AMgr50 n 15.43 +35.8 AMgr70 nr 15.94 +26.6 AMgr20 nr 12.98 +51.1 Balanc 18.66 BalancedK 18.66 +63.8 BlueChipGr 44.91 +45.9 BluChpGrF n 45.01 +65.8 BluChpGrK 44.96 12.79 +24.5 CA Mun n 48.35 +49.8 Canada n +35.2 CapApp n 26.84 +20.8 CapApprK 26.88 +57.0 CapDevelO 10.51 +51.0 CapInco nr 8.99 +54.2 ChinaReg r 25.46 +67.3 Contra n 71.63 +65.8 ContraK 71.62 +52.5 CnvSec 23.36 +12.1 DisEq n 21.73 +6.0 DiscEqF 21.71 +65.5 +46.3 +59.3 +42.1 +16.7

-3.28 -2.04 -.97 -1.07 -.15

-2.9 -0.6 0.0 -15.3 +3.5

+58.8 +73.9 +50.7 +36.5 +41.4

-.12 -.30 -.28 -.27 -.26 -.29 -.37 -.31 -.34 -.36 -.36 -.41 -.45 -.44 -.43 -.43 -.50 -.30 -.51 -.37 -.54 -.38 -.55 -.11 -.12

+1.1 -1.8 -1.8 -2.0 -2.2 -2.0 -3.2 -3.3 -3.0 -4.7 -4.9 -4.5 -5.3 -5.2 -7.1 -7.2 -6.9 -7.3 -7.1 -7.6 -7.5 -8.2 -8.0 +1.2 +1.2

+25.9 +35.2 NS +35.9 +36.5 NS +39.1 +40.2 NS +39.5 +40.6 NS +40.4 NS +39.3 +40.7 NS +40.0 NS +39.9 NS +39.9 NS NS +25.0

-.62 -.37 -.56 -.11 -.65 -.65 -2.60 -2.60 -2.61 -.01 -2.71 -1.44 -1.44 -.57 -.22 -1.27 -3.36 -3.35 -.92 -1.17 -1.17

-5.5 -1.8 -5.2 +2.3 -0.6 -0.4 -3.8 -3.6 -3.7 +11.9 -18.0 +0.3 +0.4 -8.4 -2.4 -20.8 +1.1 +1.2 -11.1 -8.8 -8.6

+48.4 +39.4 +42.3 +28.9 +43.1 +43.7 +62.9 NS +63.7 +24.7 +26.3 +57.5 +58.4 +51.2 +72.4 +22.0 +55.3 +55.9 +55.5 +30.0 NS

CommRet t

7.85 +.04 -16.9 +15.0

Cullen Funds: HiDivEqI nr

13.01 -.36 +3.5 +48.4

DFA Funds: Glb6040Ins IntlCoreEq n USCoreEq1 n USCoreEq2 n

12.42 9.06 11.04 10.82

-.45 -.59 -.57 -.59

-5.2 -20.5 -5.3 -6.9

+34.2 +22.1 +54.6 +53.5

-2.11 -1.62 -.08 -.03 ...

-13.2 -4.9 +3.3 +11.5 +4.5

+37.9 +34.6 +54.7 +25.0 +19.0

DWS Invest A: DSmCaVal EqtyDivdA HiIncA MgdMuni p StrGovSecA

32.66 32.32 4.74 9.41 8.94

147.31 -6.51 -1.4 +51.1

DWS Invest S: CoreEqtyS GNMA S HiYldTx n LgCapValS r MgdMuni S ShtDurPlusS

16.15 15.62 12.78 16.94 9.42 9.26

-.99 ... -.04 -.68 -.03 -.03

-8.1 +5.4 +14.0 -7.5 +11.7 +0.2

+46.5 +19.5 +35.0 +32.7 +25.5 +13.8

Davis Funds A: NYVen A

33.31 -1.77 -7.6 +36.0

Davis Funds C: NYVen C

32.07 -1.71 -8.3 +32.9

46.04 29.19 29.17 37.37 37.37 11.88

-2.03 -1.74 -1.74 -1.79 -1.79 +.01

-1.3 NS NS NS -17.9 +17.0 -2.5 NS -2.6 +53.9 +7.2 NS

Fidelity Spart Adv: ExtMktAdv r 500IdxAdv 500Index I IntlAdv r IntlIdx Inst TotlMktAdv r USBond I

36.28 46.04 46.04 29.18 29.19 37.37 11.88

-2.34 -2.03 -2.03 -1.74 -1.74 -1.79 +.01

-7.9 -1.3 -1.2 -17.8 NS -2.5 +7.1

+64.9 +51.5 NS +17.1 NS +54.0 NS

-1.58 -.76 -.55 -.52

-4.6 -8.7 -21.1 -0.7

+40.4 +34.5 +25.5 +40.5

First Eagle: GlobalA OverseasA SoGenGold p US ValuA t

45.06 20.23 24.48 16.77

First Investors A GroIncA p

15.05 -.75 -2.4 +50.9

Forum Funds: AbsolStratI r

11.22 +.06 +3.0 +20.5

Frank/Temp Frnk A: AdjUS p BalInv p CAHYBd p CalInsA p CalTFrA p EqIncA px FedInterm p FedTxFrA p FlexCapGrA FlRtDA p FL TFA p FoundFAl p GoldPrM A GrowthA p HY TFA p HiIncoA IncoSerA p InsTFA p MichTFA p MO TFA p NJTFA p NY TFA p NC TFA p OhioITFA p ORTFA p PA TFA p RisDivA p SMCpGrA StratInc p TotlRtnA p USGovA p

8.90 38.74 10.39 12.78 7.44 16.59 12.47 12.57 46.36 9.03 11.95 9.95 28.11 46.23 10.75 1.98 2.08 12.47 12.27 12.69 12.61 12.07 12.86 13.02 12.51 10.86 35.34 34.74 10.30 10.22 6.90

... -2.11 ... -.01 +.01 -.70 -.02 ... -2.63 -.05 -.01 -.44 -1.62 -2.08 -.01 -.04 -.06 -.01 -.01 ... -.01 ... -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -1.19 -2.33 -.16 -.06 +.01

+2.2 -10.2 +20.7 +13.4 +14.5 -3.4 +10.2 +12.5 -5.3 +2.5 +10.5 -8.5 -34.0 -2.0 +14.7 +3.7 -2.5 +11.4 +8.8 +11.9 +12.1 +9.9 +11.5 +10.6 +11.0 +12.0 +0.3 -9.7 +2.2 +4.9 +5.2

+6.4 +44.2 +46.3 +24.1 +28.9 +47.8 +23.0 +26.0 +47.2 +27.9 +22.6 +37.9 +22.4 +54.5 +37.1 +54.4 +50.6 +22.5 +18.6 +24.2 +23.4 +20.5 +23.1 +18.7 +23.4 +23.8 +54.9 +62.4 +35.1 +30.6 +16.7

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

GrEqGS4 IntlEqGS4 ValuEqGS4

20.04 -1.10 +1.1 +59.5 11.04 -.71 -19.4 +18.8 14.32 -.68 -5.7 +44.1

Harbor Funds: Bond CpAppInv p CapAppInst n HiYBdInst r IntlInv t IntlAdmin p IntlGr nr Intl nr

12.62 39.23 39.79 10.85 53.00 53.16 10.64 53.54

-.03 -2.03 -2.06 -.16 -3.20 -3.21 -.63 -3.23

+4.6 +0.7 +1.1 +3.8 -14.4 -14.3 -14.3 -14.1

+25.6 +53.2 +54.9 +44.2 +33.0 +33.5 +18.8 +34.5

Harding Loevner: EmgMkts r IntlEqty

43.53 -2.68 -12.9 +34.9 13.37 -.77 -13.6 +38.4

Hartford Fds A: CapAppA p Chks&Bal p DivGthA p EqtyInc t FltRateA px MidCapA p

29.32 9.21 19.12 13.64 8.78 18.67

-2.05 -.34 -.77 -.52 -.10 -1.12

-16.2 -4.6 -4.2 +0.8 +3.0 -10.1

+21.6 +30.5 +40.0 +52.8 +37.6 +47.9

25.95 -1.81 -16.8 +19.1 8.77 -.10 +2.2 +34.5

Hartford Fds I: DivGthI n

19.06 -.77 -4.0 +41.2

Hartford Fds Y: CapAppY n CapAppI n DivGrowthY n FltRateI x TotRetBdY nx

31.89 29.35 19.40 8.79 11.04

-2.22 -2.04 -.79 -.10 -.02

-15.8 -15.9 -3.8 +3.2 +6.5

+23.3 +22.6 +41.8 +38.8 +27.8

Hartford HLS IA : CapApp Div&Grwth GrwthOpp Advisers Stock IntlOpp MidCap SmallCo TotalRetBd

38.01 19.70 25.97 19.87 42.14 10.94 25.23 17.86 11.95

-2.43 -.81 -1.40 -.58 -1.31 -.62 -1.50 -1.08 -.01

-14.0 -3.9 -8.6 -0.4 -1.9 -14.3 -9.9 -11.4 +6.7

+35.1 +42.7 +50.0 +41.4 +53.0 +26.9 +50.2 +62.6 +29.6

Hartford HLS IB: CapApprec p 37.67 -2.41 -14.2 +34.0

Heartland Fds: ValueInv 38.18 -1.90 -12.4 +50.7 ValPlusInv p 27.48 -1.19 -9.7 +48.9

Henderson Glbl Fds: IntlOppA p

18.06 -1.17 -19.7 +7.3

Hotchkis & Wiley: MidCpVal

24.10 -1.62 -7.0 +78.5

Hussman Funds: StrTotRet r

8.95 28.94 29.84 20.20 20.32 29.12 3.08 55.92

-.15 -1.59 -3.17 -1.01 -.95 -1.69 -.01 -3.24

+2.9 -4.8 -34.1 -9.3 -8.7 -6.4 +1.6 -1.9

+55.4 +40.7 -2.8 +37.1 +44.3 +53.9 +12.2 +32.5

12.29 +.02 +3.1 +16.4

MdCpCGr t

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name 28.73 -1.80 -5.3 +62.7

TRIII n

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name 9.91

Munder Funds Y:

PIMCO Funds A:

MdCpCGrY n 29.41 -1.84 -5.1 +63.9

AllAstAuth t All Asset p CommodRR p HiYldA LowDurA RealRetA p ShortTrmA p TotRtA

Mutual Series:

QualGrowth I 27.25 -.97 -5.5 +46.3 QualityGrthJ 27.23 -.97 -5.8 +44.9

John Hancock A:

Nationwide Instl:

HiYldAd np

BondA p LgCpEqA StrIncA p

IntIdx I n 6.15 -.37 -18.4 +16.1 NwBdIdxI n 11.79 +.02 +7.1 +21.3 S&P500Instl n 10.86 -.48 -1.4 +50.9

PIMCO Funds C:

Jensen Funds:

15.85 -.08 +5.2 +47.3 24.24 -1.38 -10.0 +32.6 6.50 -.09 +1.0 +43.8

LSAggress LSBalance LS Conserv LSGrowth LS Moder

11.52 12.57 12.96 12.26 12.62

-.61 -.42 -.18 -.55 -.29

-.53 -.90 -1.17 -1.16 -1.18 -.71 -.87

+40.8 +41.1 +36.5 +40.6 +40.9

23.44 -1.52 -11.7 +45.9 13.20 -.73 -9.4 +40.0

IDModAgg EqIncInst Genesis n GenesInstl Guardn n HiIncBdInst LgCapV Inv n

8.86 -.37 -6.1 +35.4 10.96 32.97 46.31 14.53 9.05 24.38

-.35 -1.51 -2.12 -.68 -.22 -1.06

Neuberger&Berm Tr:

IntlMsterS r 16.70 -1.07 -15.6 +41.9 USLgCapGr r 13.42 -.72 +1.4 +64.0

Genesis n

Lazard Instl:

Nicholas n

17.16 -1.27 -14.5 +41.7

Lazard Open: EmgMktOp p 17.55 -1.30 -14.8 +40.3

Legg Mason A: CBEqBldrA 13.59 CBAggGr p 116.51 CBAppr p 14.35 CBFdAllCV A 12.67 WAIntTmMu 6.75 WAMgMuA p 16.95

-.45 -6.61 -.57 -.71 -.01 -.03

+3.1 -2.5 -0.3 -10.9 +11.2 +14.8

+45.7 +63.3 +42.5 +34.9 +22.4 +28.7

Legg Mason C: WAMgMuC CMValTr p

16.96 -.03 +14.2 +26.5 38.19 -1.88 -5.9 +33.9

Litman Gregory Fds: Intl I

12.32 -.75 -22.1 +16.9 26.83 -1.76 -11.2 +45.2 11.22 -.87 -26.2 +0.9 25.98 -1.34 -7.3 +68.2

Loomis Sayles: GlbBdR t LSBondI LSGlblBdI StrInc C LSBondR StrIncA

16.63 14.36 16.79 14.74 14.30 14.66

-.12 -.29 -.12 -.38 -.29 -.38

-1.3 -4.3 -4.2 -9.5 +1.4 -16.6

+58.7 +56.9 +57.8 +44.4 NS +34.4

48.03 -2.20 -4.4 +56.5

Nicholas Group: 44.19 -2.50 -2.9 +61.6

Northern Funds: BondIdx EmgMEqIdx FixIn n HiYFxInc n IntTaxEx n IntlEqIdx r MMEmMkt r MMGlbRE r MMIntlEq r MMMidCap ShIntTaxFr SmlCapVal n StockIdx n TxExpt n

11.00 10.15 10.57 7.20 10.87 8.75 16.27 16.22 8.18 11.16 10.68 15.01 16.10 11.12

+.01 -.74 -.03 -.13 -.01 -.53 -1.15 -1.01 -.50 -.72 -.01 -.73 -.71 -.01

+7.2 -19.9 +6.8 +2.8 +8.7 -18.3 -17.0 -7.3 NA -9.1 +2.3 -5.2 -1.4 +11.4

+20.9 +27.4 +22.6 +47.6 +17.9 +15.6 +39.0 +61.5 NA +60.3 +7.3 +56.1 +50.6 +22.0

Nuveen Cl A:

Longleaf Partners: Partners Intl n SmCap

+37.7 +19.4 +22.9 +20.4 +24.0 +26.6 +39.0

Neuberger&Berm Fds:

Laudus Funds:

EmgMktI

-6.2 -14.0 -8.5 -9.1 -8.2 -6.4 -6.8

Nationwide Serv: -9.7 -4.0 +2.5 -7.2 -0.1

Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p LSV ValEq n

11.96 18.77 27.14 26.88 27.50 16.45 20.29

+2.1 +1.8 +2.4 -0.8 +1.5 -0.1

+33.5 +54.1 +34.7 +50.0 +52.7 +53.3

HYldMuBd p 16.40 ... +20.5 +53.0 AAMuB p 11.48 ... +15.5 +37.3 LtdMBA p 11.22 -.01 +5.1 +14.2

AllAstAut t AllAssetC t LwDurC nt RealRetC p TotRtC t

13.52 -.63 -2.2 +50.6

IntmDurMuBd 9.31 ... +8.1 +20.7 HYMuniBd 16.39 -.01 +20.8 +53.8

-.23 -.25 -.01 +.10 -.01

+1.6 -0.5 +1.7 +11.5 +4.8

+28.4 +34.2 +16.2 +35.0 +24.5

+.06 -.01 +.10 -.01

-11.8 +2.1 +12.1 +5.7

+42.7 +17.7 +37.2 +27.9

-.26 -.23 +.06 -.25 +.10 -.01

+0.7 +2.8 -11.5 -1.6 +12.4 +5.9

+39.2 +33.1 +44.3 +41.8 +38.5 +28.6

PIMCO Funds P: AllAsset AstAllAuthP CommdtyRR EmgLocalP RealRtnP TotRtnP

11.81 10.36 6.48 10.28 12.31 11.24

Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n

26.84 -.98 -1.4 +45.5

Pax World: Balanced

22.05 -.87 -5.8 +30.3

Paydenfunds: GNMA HiInc

10.79 +.02 +7.1 +21.3 7.04 -.13 +3.6 +44.3

Perm Port Funds: Permanent

46.25 -1.01 -2.2 +40.9

Pioneer Funds A: CullenVal HighYldA p PionFdA p StratIncA p ValueA p

17.27 9.69 38.61 10.85 10.86

-.72 -.32 -1.86 -.10 -.49

-8.4 -4.3 -9.5 +3.1 -7.2

+29.7 +61.5 +38.1 +41.9 +28.5

Pioneer Funds C: Pioneer Fds Y:

Nuveen Cl R:

SAMBalA SAMGrA p

Prudential Fds A:

+31.4 +37.3 +42.8 +59.1 +17.4 +37.1 +7.4 +27.4

CullenVal Y GlbHiYld StratIncY p

38.76 -1.86 -9.2 +39.8 10.61 -.10 +2.3 +38.7 17.33 -.72 -8.1 +31.3 9.51 -.23 -3.1 +70.3 10.85 -.10 +3.4 +43.0

Price Funds Adv: BlChipGr n

41.60 -2.32 +2.7 +60.6

Upgrad e old jew your elry fo B IGG E R & BE r T Incred ible sav TER! in on Gol d Diam gs o nds & uniq u e Estate Jewelr y

33.69 -1.78 -7.3 +37.2

N Beautiful DIAMO

Dimensional Fds: EmMkCrEq n 17.22 EmgMktVal 25.57 GlbRESec n 8.32 IntSmVa n 13.54 LargeCo 10.24 STExtQual n 10.85 STMuniBd n 10.32 TAWexUSCr n 7.69 TAUSCorEq2 8.81 TM USSm 22.58 USVectrEq n 10.42 USLgVa n 19.37 USLgVa3 n 14.83 US Micro n 13.49 US TgdVal 15.41 US Small n 20.94 US SmVal 23.63 IntlSmCo n 13.87 GlbEqInst 12.35 EmgMktSCp n 18.39 EmgMkt n 23.53 Fixd n 10.33 ST Govt n 10.85 IntGvFxIn n 13.12 IntlREst 4.70 IntVa n 13.97 IntVa3 n 13.06 InflProSecs 12.75 Glb5FxInc 11.14 LrgCapInt n 16.46 TM USTgtV 20.34 TM IntlValue 11.47 TMMktwdeV 14.58 TMUSEq 13.92 2YGlFxd n 10.13 DFARlEst n 24.51

-1.28 -2.03 -.51 -.97 -.46 -.03 ... -.52 -.47 -1.14 -.61 -1.01 -.77 -.64 -.90 -1.13 -1.31 -.92 -.72 -1.38 -1.65 -.01 ... +.06 -.20 -.95 -.88 +.11 -.01 -.99 -1.18 -.79 -.74 -.64 ... -1.80

-20.7 +36.8 -26.1 +28.0 -1.3 +93.9 -21.4 +25.4 -1.4 +51.3 +2.7 +15.9 +1.5 +6.1 -20.9 +24.5 -7.0 +53.6 -7.2 +60.1 -9.5 +54.4 -10.1 +49.2 -10.1 +49.7 -6.4 +65.2 -11.0 +56.8 -7.8 +68.5 -10.2 +63.0 -18.4 +36.6 -11.8 +42.4 -20.3 +53.1 -18.7 +35.1 +0.6 +3.3 +3.0 +10.3 +9.4 +21.0 -8.1 +68.3 -24.6 +12.9 -24.4 +13.4 +14.1 +35.3 +4.5 +16.1 -18.3 +17.8 -9.8 +59.8 -24.5 +12.4 -9.1 +51.1 -2.6 +52.0 +0.9 +4.3 +3.6 +114.1

Dodge&Cox: Balanced n GblStock IncomeFd Intl Stk Stock

68.96 7.72 13.64 28.70 103.83

-2.79 -.45 -.06 -1.77 -5.44

-5.6 -16.1 +5.2 -20.7 -9.1

+38.5 +34.7 +29.0 +23.1 +40.5

DoubleLine Funds: CoreFxdInc I TRBd I TRBd N p

11.19 ... NA 11.24 +.01 NA 11.24 +.01 NA

NS NS NS

Dreyfus: Aprec BasicS&P BondMktInv p CalAMTMuZ Dreyfus DreyMid r Drey500In t IntmTIncA IntlStkI MunBd r NY Tax nr OppMCVal A SmlCpStk r DreihsAcInc

40.94 26.56 11.03 15.30 8.87 26.76 35.63 13.87 12.57 11.79 15.48 27.17 20.18 10.47

-1.55 -1.17 +.01 -.02 -.41 -1.75 -1.58 -.03 -.61 ... ... -1.84 -1.03 -.10

+0.9 -1.4 +6.8 +12.6 -6.8 -8.0 -1.7 +6.4 -10.6 +11.1 +10.1 -14.1 -4.2 -3.0

+53.5 +51.0 +20.0 +23.6 +48.1 +64.5 +49.6 +35.7 +28.2 +23.5 +22.3 +60.8 +65.2 +16.8

Dupree Mutual: KYTF EVPTxMEmI

8.03 -.01 +8.8 +18.5 42.21 -2.69 -16.9 +40.3

Eaton Vance A: GblMacAbR p 9.86 FloatRate 9.29 IncBosA 5.77 LgCpVal 17.45 NatlMunInc 9.95 Strat Income Cl A7.97

-.05 -.06 -.09 -.81 -.07 -.08

+0.1 +2.9 +3.8 -6.3 +15.7 +1.5

+12.7 +38.8 +62.3 +31.0 +31.4 +27.9

Eaton Vance C: NatlMunInc

9.95 -.07 +14.9 +28.6

Eaton Vance I: AtlCapSMID FltgRt GblMacAbR IncBost LgCapVal ParStEmMkt EdgwdGInst n

16.64 8.99 9.85 5.77 17.50 12.96 12.47

-.82 -.05 -.05 -.09 -.82 -.84 -.61

-0.3 +3.2 +0.4 +4.0 -6.0 -17.8 +3.9

+71.7 +39.9 +13.8 +63.5 +32.0 +35.5 +37.9

FMI Funds: CommonStk LargeCap p

24.25 -1.30 -2.8 +57.4 15.81 -.64 -2.8 +42.4

FPA Funds: Capit NewInc FPACres n Fairholme

40.58 10.65 27.02 26.50

-2.04 -.01 -.77 -2.37

-11.4 +1.6 -1.9 -17.2

+58.9 +8.0 +38.1 +22.7

Federated A: KaufmA p MuniUltshA StrValDiv p TtlRtBd p

4.93 -.32 -12.4 +34.4 10.05 ... +1.3 +4.6 4.77 -.09 +3.8 +55.9 11.43 -.04 +5.7 +24.1

Federated Funds: MidCapI Svc 20.68 -1.35 -8.0 +64.5 TtlRtnBdSvc 11.43 -.04 +5.9 +25.0

Federated Instl: 9.82 4.93 10.05 11.43 9.17 4.78

-.16 -.32 ... -.04 -.01 -.10

9.79 11.69 11.66 31.98 16.31 20.87 21.17 12.31

-.08 -.40 -.46 -2.08 -.99 -.99 -1.11 -.14

EqGrI n FltRateI n GroIncI LgCapI n MidCpII I n NewInsightI SmallCapI

60.38 9.77 17.95 18.96 16.56 21.15 22.35

-3.51 -.08 -.81 -.97 -1.00 -1.00 -1.16

1/5 CTTW 1/4 CTTW 1/3 CTTW 1/2 CTTW 2/3 CTTW

+6.0 -12.4 +0.9 +6.3 +1.4 +4.1

+59.2 +34.4 +3.2 +26.1 +11.1 +56.9

+2.2 -5.5 -7.3 -13.4 -13.3 +0.2 -15.1 +3.5

+24.7 +41.8 +41.7 Fidelity Selects: +57.6 Biotech n 94.03 -4.72 +44.6 ConStaple 74.04 -2.05 +51.7 Electr n 44.61 -3.60 +37.4 Energy n 44.84 -3.12 +41.4 EngSvc n 59.65 -4.32 Gold rn 33.98 -.81 +48.5 Health n 127.62 -4.46 +38.3 Materials 60.68 -4.35 MedDel n 57.56 -2.72 +61.3 MedEqSys n 26.58 -1.14 28.06 -2.00 +25.7 NatRes rn 79.25 -3.69 +47.8 Softwr n 92.86 -5.36 +56.1 Tech n +45.6 Fidelity Spartan: +52.9 ExtMktIndInv 36.28 -2.34 +38.6 500IdxInv n 46.03 -2.04

-2.4 +2.3 -0.8 -4.3 -13.1 +0.5 -14.9

-15.4 +18.9 -15.2 +19.6 -3.5 +58.8 -10.9 +51.0 -11.0 +50.2 -19.0 +28.6 -22.8 +28.3 -8.4 +40.0 -6.2 +40.0 -8.2 +40.7 -4.6 +42.2 -5.1 +41.3 +2.5 +25.8 -5.1 +39.1 +6.4 +21.0 +7.4 +16.7 -1.2 +68.7 -1.0 +48.0 -1.0 NS -1.1 +69.5 -14.6 +45.3 +3.2 +57.7 -12.7 +46.7 +12.6 +31.3 +5.4 +28.4 +5.1 +12.6 +7.7 +17.9 -16.8 +19.2 +7.5 +28.7 +7.5 +32.8 -4.3 +55.9 -10.9 +30.2 -16.8 +34.0 -13.4 +58.2 -5.4 +57.8 -5.3 +58.5 -11.4 +28.8 -11.3 +29.3 +10.7 +23.2 +0.7 +53.5 -6.8 +67.5 -6.7 +68.4 +11.2 +24.1 +8.9 +52.1 -2.0 +62.5 +9.5 +21.2 -9.1 +61.1 -8.9 +61.9 +1.6 +48.0 -15.6 +13.0 -0.5 +44.1 -0.3 +44.6 +5.7 +68.4 +3.9 +127.7 -5.4 NS -17.1 NS -16.9 NS -19.0 +33.0 -18.9 NS -10.3 NS -10.1 NS -9.8 NS -22.2 NS -22.0 NS +7.7 NS +3.7 +10.7 +1.6 NS +1.5 +12.2 -5.7 +80.1 -8.5 +64.8 -9.8 +77.2 -20.7 +48.3 -5.0 +58.5 -7.3 +45.3 -9.7 +65.7 +1.3 +66.8 +3.7 +42.1 +11.6 +24.0 +7.0 +34.1 -3.3 +65.6 +7.3 NS +7.1 +21.8 -10.8 +55.5 -10.0 +39.9 +14.7 +4.2 -16.5 -21.2 -25.3 -26.8 -1.1 -12.2 -6.5 -10.8 -24.0 +2.9 -7.9

+80.1 +58.0 +63.1 +27.0 +26.4 +13.6 +71.7 +58.3 +80.3 +46.1 +25.9 +84.4 +82.9

-7.9 +64.7 -1.3 +51.3

UtilitiesA p

13.39 -.26 +9.4 +60.4

Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: FdTF Adv GlbBdAdv nx GrAdv t HY TF Adv IncomeAdv RisingDiv r TGlbTRAdv x TtlRtAdv USGovAdv p

12.58 12.44 46.28 10.79 2.07 35.31 12.43 10.24 6.92

... -.40 -2.08 -.01 -.06 -1.19 -.42 -.06 +.01

+12.6 -3.5 -1.8 +14.9 -2.4 +0.6 -2.9 +5.2 +5.3

+26.3 +24.4 +55.6 +37.5 +51.6 +56.1 +34.9 +31.6 +17.4

Frank/Temp Frnk C: CalTFC t FdTxFC t FoundFAl p HY TFC t IncomeC t RisDvC t StratIncC p USGovC t

7.42 12.56 9.79 10.91 2.10 34.81 10.30 6.86

... ... -.43 -.01 -.06 -1.18 -.16 +.01

+13.8 +11.8 -9.2 +14.1 -3.0 -0.4 +1.8 +4.7

+26.6 +23.8 +34.8 +34.8 +47.8 +51.4 +33.5 +15.1

Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: BeaconA SharesA

11.87 -.53 -6.5 +36.5 20.12 -.86 -7.0 +37.7

Frank/Temp Mtl C: SharesC t

19.91 -.85 -7.6 +34.9

Frank/Temp Temp A: DevMktA p ForeignA p GlBondA px GrowthA p WorldA p

20.71 5.66 12.47 16.05 13.57

-1.18 -.39 -.41 -.96 -.84

-16.8 -23.1 -3.8 -15.5 -13.0

+37.1 +18.0 +23.4 +26.6 +27.9

Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: FlexCpGr FrgnAv GrthAv

47.27 -2.68 -5.1 +48.3 5.60 -.39 -22.9 +19.0 16.05 -.97 -15.4 +27.6

14.60 15.05 14.93 15.06

-.49 -.53 -.53 -.53

-.16 -.61 -.73 -1.25 -1.82 -.51 -.27 -.62 -.79 -.07 +.01 -1.36 -.90 -1.67 ... -1.75 -1.16 -.01

Invesco Funds P: SummitP p

QuestA

Invesco Funds Y: Ivy Funds:

13.74 -.41 -4.4 +30.3

GE Elfun S&S: S&S Income n TaxEx Trusts n US Eqty n

11.88 ... +7.6 +29.0 12.26 -.02 +11.1 +22.9 42.99 -2.19 -0.3 +48.2 40.34 -2.04 -3.9 +38.2

GE Instl Funds: IntlEq n SmCpEqI

9.38 -.61 -18.9 +8.4 15.32 -.82 -4.2 +67.6

GE Investments: TRFd1 TRFd3 p

16.03 -.57 -4.6 +26.2 15.98 -.57 -4.8 +25.4

GMO Trust: ShtDurColl r USTreas x

5.45 25.00

... ...

NE 0.0

NE +0.4

GMO Trust II: EmergMkt r

10.05 -.80 -21.6

NS

GMO Trust III: CHIE EmgMk r IntlIntrVal Quality

20.30 10.08 17.87 22.59

-.86 -.80 -1.00 -.65

-13.1 -21.6 -20.4 +6.4

+9.5 +30.5 +9.3 +49.4

GMO Trust IV: EmgCnDt EmerMkt IntlCoreEq IntlGrEq IntlIntrVal Quality QualityV

9.40 10.00 24.36 21.22 17.85 22.61 22.60

-.26 -.80 -1.37 -1.02 -1.01 -.65 -.66

+8.5 -21.6 -18.1 -11.7 -20.4 +6.5 +6.5

+91.2 +30.6 +16.2 +32.1 +9.5 +49.6 +49.7

GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r FlexEqVI IntlCoreEq Quality StrFixInco USCoreEq

10.01 16.65 24.33 22.60 16.75 12.69

-.79 -.69 -1.38 -.65 -.01 -.35

-21.5 -9.2 -18.0 +6.5 +12.8 +3.9

+31.0 -5.7 +16.3 +49.9 +46.7 +51.2

EqInc p SmCapG n Util A p

20.63 -.93 -4.6 +49.4 32.12 -1.84 -7.7 +51.6 5.64 -.16 -2.1 +47.6

AssetSC t AssetStrA p AssetStrY p AssetStrI r GlNatRsA p HighIncoA p HiIncI r LgCapGrA p LtdTrmA p

-7.2 -8.1 -8.8 -7.9

+11.5 -5.4 -6.3 -10.1 -9.5 -3.7 -4.0 -17.4 -6.0 +2.9 +16.4 -12.2 -11.9 -14.4 +12.7 +2.4 -11.1 +7.9

12.27 -.16 +11.8

12.02 7.80 12.26 11.29 12.77 13.31 22.82 24.52

+33.0 +31.3 +28.4 +32.3

NS +34.3 +46.9 +32.3 +54.9 +48.3 +38.7 +15.1 +42.3 +59.6 +42.2 +31.3 +31.4 +54.5 +30.9 +95.1 +55.6 +19.3

-.84 -.87 -.88 -.88 -1.20 -.09 -.09 -.75 -.03

NS

-8.9 -8.2 -8.2 -8.0 -32.9 +7.3 +7.6 -0.1 +2.8

+21.4 +24.1 +24.2 +25.0 +3.4 +59.6 +60.8 +43.9 +11.9

+.03 -.14 -.33 -.19 -.48 -.67 -1.30 -1.25

+7.4 +1.8 -1.5 +0.7 -3.1 -5.7 +3.1 -2.3

+24.3 +54.6 +32.3 +27.3 +37.8 +39.7 +73.7 +66.1

JPMorgan C Class: CoreBond pn 12.07 +.02 +6.6 +21.8

JP Morgan Instl: IntTxFrIn n 11.37 ... +6.7 +15.6 MidCapVal n 24.93 -1.27 -1.8 +68.6

JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond n 12.02 +.03 +7.8 +25.6 HighYld r 7.82 -.14 +2.1 +56.2 MtgBacked 11.56 +.02 +6.5 +29.5 ShtDurBond 10.98 -.02 +1.8 +9.2

JPMorgan Select: MdCpValu SmCap USEquity n USREstate n

24.71 37.58 10.27 17.03

13.64 14.26 10.81 10.80 18.45 20.11 12.65 10.41 12.22

-1.03 -.84 -.71 -.58 -1.07 -.82 -.60 -.77 -.78

-21.5 -16.8 -12.0 -10.8 -9.5 -2.3 -7.4 -18.8 -13.1

+46.5 +54.9 +72.7 +54.1 +56.8 +46.9 +51.3 +40.6 +39.7

EmerMkts GlobEq IntlDevMkt RESec StratBd USCoreEq USQuan

16.05 7.94 26.15 34.21 11.20 27.47 30.59

-18.4 -14.5 -19.1 -7.7 +6.0 -6.3 -2.1

+37.5 +32.6 +14.0 +68.9 +38.2 +41.8 +50.3

-1.27 -.47 -1.62 -2.18 +.01 -1.52 -1.58

Russell Instl I: StratBd

11.06

...

+6.0 +38.4

Russell LfePts A: BalStrat p

10.05 -.33 -5.5 +36.2

Russell LfePts C: BalStrat

9.95 -.33 -6.3 +33.0

Rydex Investor: MgdFutStr n

22.68 +.08 -12.0 -14.9

SEI Portfolios: CoreFxInA n EmMktDbt n HiYld n IntMuniA IntlEqA n LgCGroA n LgCValA n S&P500E n TaxMgdLC n

11.32 11.22 7.36 11.76 7.28 23.13 16.10 35.68 12.47

-.01 -.26 -.10 -.01 -.43 -1.17 -.79 -1.58 -.62

+7.2 +4.6 +4.0 +8.5 -19.3 -0.6 -6.3 -1.5 -3.2

+39.2 +52.6 +74.8 +21.0 +16.6 +54.6 +41.4 +51.2 +46.9

17.55 -1.44 -21.6 +28.5 21.39 -.94 -1.2 +51.1 17.20 13.40 9.60 14.34 36.67 20.32 19.27 9.66 23.47

-.86 -.56 -.45 -.85 -1.74 -.89 -1.10 +.01 -1.11

-4.7 -1.9 -5.7 -18.1 -2.3 -1.3 -8.4 +7.0 -2.3

+41.9 +47.5 +57.3 +16.5 +51.6 +51.2 +64.9 +20.8 +53.9

28.32 -1.62 -15.1 +29.4 12.76 -.84 -9.0 +74.0 29.47 -1.62 NA

NA

-1.26 -1.92 -.53 -1.28

40.49 -2.07 -6.8 +38.7 40.47 -2.07 -7.2 +37.3

11.37 -.01 +2.8 +14.3

54.83 -1.13 +0.1 +29.0 52.66 -1.93 -3.9 +37.3

GSShDurItl 10.21 -.02 +0.5 +6.3 IbbotsBalSv p 11.75 -.37 -5.1 +31.9 IbbotsModSv p11.69 -.24 -1.4 +28.7

541-385-7113

JPMorgan A Class: Core Bond A HighYld p Inv Bal p InvCon p InvGr&InA p InvGrwth p LgCpGrA p MdCpVal p

LowPrSkSvc r MicroCapI n OpptyI r PennMuI rn PremierI nr SpeclEqInv r TotRetI r ValuSvc t ValPlusSvc

Sun Capital Adv:

11.75 -.65 -6.7 +37.7

22.67 23.39 23.43 23.61 15.21 8.28 8.28 13.63 11.17

+6.5 +46.9 +17.6 +20.8 +44.5 +62.3 +58.6 +25.0

Royce Funds:

Balan n Gwth n

11.97 -.16 +10.7 NS 8.39 -.27 -4.8 +35.7 9.86 +.01 +15.5 +39.1

Franklin Mutual Ser: TgtModA p

+1.6 +0.9 +5.9 +9.2 -5.3 -11.9 -9.5 +9.2

St FarmAssoc:

12.28 -.52 -3.7 +48.5

GlBdC px

BalRiskY

... -.17 -.01 -.01 -.59 -.62 -.67 +.02

SoundShore n 30.69 -1.43 -8.2 +32.6

Invesco Funds C:

Franklin Templ:

10.16 9.57 10.55 12.68 12.61 10.09 12.49 10.93

Sound Shore:

25.61 -1.37 -11.8 +33.0

Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: 16.30 -.71 -6.7 +25.4

GScUltShBdI HighYldI IntmBondI InvGrTEBI n LgCpValEqI MdCValEqI SmCpValI TotRetBd I

US Gov n

15.61 -1.04 -7.0 +58.1

BalRiskC EqIncC HYMuC

12.50 -.40 -4.2 +22.0

32.71 -2.44 -8.0 +59.5 33.63 -2.50 -7.8 +60.7

RidgeWorth Funds:

Sit Funds:

12.00 +.29 -2.7 -5.9 26.69 -1.44 -7.4 +56.3

12.20 16.41 15.60 22.09 29.46 12.29 8.52 11.14 18.98 4.18 9.88 25.26 21.30 25.34 13.78 24.03 15.94 11.82

SmMCap SmMCpInst

ComStk A p 31.79 -1.43 -3.5 +46.0 SmCoA p 7.42 -.38 -6.4 +60.9 Sequoia n 150.70 -8.01 +4.6 +58.6

Invesco Funds A: BalRiskA Chart p CmstkA Constl p DevMkt p DivrsDiv p EqtyIncA GlbCoreEq p GrIncA p HiYld p HYMuA IntlGrow MidCpCEq p MidCGth p MuniInA RealEst p SmCpValA t TF IntA p

Rainier Inv Mgt:

Sentinel Group:

Invesco Fds Invest: DivrsDiv p

NA +29.8 +51.1 +42.0 +36.5 +37.9 NA +49.3 +49.6 +24.2 +27.2 NA NA

CoreEqVIP 34.91 -1.77 -11.5 +33.1 RSNatRes np 32.50 -1.98 -16.0 +38.3 RSPartners 30.03 -1.27 -10.0 +56.6

AmerShsD AmShsS p

Invesco Fds Instl: IntlGrow

NA +14.6 -3.9 -6.7 -0.7 -8.4 NA -3.6 -6.8 +10.9 +12.3 NA NA

Selected Funds:

IVA Funds: Intl I r WorldwideA t WorldwideC t Worldwide I r

-.56 -.01 -.16 -.81 -.32 -.69 -.11 -.66 -3.16 ... ... -.03 -1.61

RS Funds:

MidCapValA

ING Funds Cl A: GlbR E p

12.10 8.26 7.45 15.01 12.33 12.93 7.59 13.07 50.37 8.90 8.97 13.68 20.12

Security Funds:

$75 $125 $175 $275 $375

StrGrowth ICM SmlCo

AAGthA p CATxA p DvrInA px EqInA p GeoBalA GrInA p HiYdA p InvA p MultiCpGr NYTxA p TxExA p USGvA px VoyA p

CoreEqty DivEqtySel FunUSLInst r IntlSS r 1000Inv r S&P Sel n SmCapSel TotBond TSM Sel r

TARGET: SmCapVal n

-2.0 +67.4 -2.1 +66.1 -3.0 +48.0 +1.8 +110.2

JPMorgan Sel Cls:

ValueY n

18.33 -.89 -7.4 +35.6 12.24 12.14 12.24 13.90

-.14 -.15 -.15 -.26

+4.1 +3.2 +4.3 +2.7

+42.5 +39.3 +43.6 +52.3

-.08 -.02 ... -1.05 -.55 -.77 -.43 -.14 -1.24 -.05 -.02 -1.04 -2.04 -.05 -.46

+3.4 +9.7 +3.3 -11.8 -10.7 -10.4 -6.6 +2.3 -10.5 +12.8 +3.6 -11.9 -9.6 +15.2 -2.8

+30.1 +22.4 +10.2 +48.9 +28.8 +39.6 +35.4 +49.4 +75.4 +38.1 +21.6 +53.8 +54.2 +33.7 +42.5

Lord Abbett A: FloatRt p IntrTaxFr ShDurTxFr ValueOpps p AffiliatdA p FundlEq BalanStratA BondDebA p DevGthA p HYMunBd p ShDurIncoA p MidCapA p RsSmCpA TaxFrA p CapStruct p

9.22 10.89 15.94 14.80 10.68 12.05 10.00 7.79 19.71 11.63 4.58 15.73 30.32 11.26 11.72

Lord Abbett C: BdDbC p 7.81 -.14 +1.7 +46.6 ShDurIncoC t 4.61 -.02 +2.9 +18.8

Lord Abbett F: BondDeb ShtDurInco

7.78 -.14 +2.5 +50.6 4.57 -.03 +3.5 +21.7

Lord Abbett I: HiYld SmCapVal

7.65 -.15 +3.1 +60.9 32.19 -2.16 -9.3 +55.6

MFS Funds A: IntlDiverA MITA MIGA BondA EmGrA GvScA GrAllA IntNwDA IntlValA ModAllA MuHiA t ResBondA RschA ReschIntA TotRA UtilA ValueA

12.23 19.57 16.09 13.79 43.91 10.59 13.71 20.49 23.91 13.49 8.07 10.85 25.62 13.05 14.26 16.67 23.07

-.70 -.85 -.63 -.12 -2.19 +.03 -.55 -1.17 -1.12 -.40 ... -.02 -1.15 -.76 -.37 -.81 -1.01

NA -3.6 -0.8 +6.0 -0.4 +6.4 -4.7 -9.6 -6.6 NA +16.7 +6.0 -2.5 -17.3 -0.9 -4.5 -4.2

NA +41.7 +54.4 +45.3 +55.9 +15.9 +46.6 +53.1 +32.6 NA +40.8 +34.2 +49.7 +22.7 +32.2 +54.4 +37.1

-2.28 -1.20 -.02 -.78 -1.01

-0.1 -9.4 +6.1 -17.0 -4.0

+57.2 +54.2 +34.8 +23.6 +38.2

MFS Funds I: EmgGI IntNwDI n ResrchBdI n ReInT ValueI

45.70 21.04 10.85 13.47 23.18

MFS Funds Instl: IntlEqty n

16.14 -.97 -13.7 +32.7

MainStay Funds A: HiYldBdA LgCpGrA p

5.91 -.06 +5.3 +51.4 7.17 -.39 -3.5 +51.5

MainStay Funds I: EpochGlb r MnStMAP I ICAP SelEq S&P500Idx

14.99 31.42 34.36 30.09

-.58 -1.53 -1.54 -1.32

-4.2 -6.6 -6.0 -1.5

+46.8 +43.4 +44.1 +50.2

Mairs & Power: Growth n

11.16 -.01 +5.3 +15.0

Nuveen Cl Y:

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdA p InvGrBdC p InvGrBdY LSFxdInc

LtdTermR

75.67 -3.29 +0.5 +52.2

Managers Funds: PimcoBond n 10.82 -.01 +5.5 +28.3 TmSqMCpGI n 13.96 -.81 -5.5 +55.0 Bond n 26.73 -.21 +5.1 +48.9

Manning&Napier Fds: ProBConS n 13.06 -.17 +1.3 +24.2 WorldOppA n 6.70 -.41 -21.4 +19.8

Marsico Funds:

RealEst

20.05 -1.49 +3.1 +114.3

Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r GlobalI r Intl I r IntlSmCp r Oakmark Select

27.39 19.99 16.59 12.43 43.58 29.15

-1.10 -1.30 -1.03 -.89 -2.27 -1.86

-3.7 -14.3 -17.7 -14.6 -2.4 -4.6

+29.8 +33.3 +33.1 +54.4 +57.2 +61.0

-.18 -.85 -.44 -.01 -.17

-10.1 -12.3 -17.0 +5.4 -17.9

+30.1 +44.0 +19.0 +13.6 +11.3

... -.01 -.34 -.01 -2.28 -.13 -1.72 -3.60 -.44 -1.36 -2.76 -.43 -1.91 -.06 -1.03 -.10 -.55 -1.50 -.01 -1.69 -.69 -1.21 -.76 -.04 -1.93

+22.9 +19.6 -7.9 +21.3 -1.9 +2.5 -14.0 -5.8 -7.1 -10.8 -15.4 -10.0 -13.2 +0.2 -33.6 -1.2 -16.0 -12.0 +10.3 +0.5 +0.5 -7.8 -3.2 +3.0 -18.3

+52.1 +47.9 +34.9 +57.7 +42.7 +42.0 +45.1 +81.4 +38.5 +48.6 +36.4 +28.7 +44.9 +44.7 +32.4 +22.8 +32.4 +35.3 +25.6 +46.2 +42.5 +52.6 +40.9 +51.1 +35.9

Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp GlbSMdCap LgCapStrat MuniBond pn RealReturn

6.97 13.75 8.93 12.28 8.97

EqtyInc n Growth pn HiYld n MidCapGro n R2020A p R2030Adv np R2040A pn SmCpValA n TF Income pn

23.41 34.17 6.62 53.34 16.29 16.95 16.98 34.94 10.45

-1.11 -1.86 -.14 -3.33 -.64 -.80 -.86 -1.76 ...

EmMktInc SmlCapGr TotlRetBdI

PACE Funds P:

Primecap Odyssey :

AMTFrMuA AMTFrNY ActiveAllA CAMuniA p CapAppA p CapIncA p DevMktA p DiscFd p Equity A EqIncA p GlobalA p GblAllocA GlblOppA GblStrIncoA Gold p IntlBdA p IntlDivA IntGrow p LtdTrmMu MnStFdA MainStrOpA p MnStSCpA p RisingDivA SenFltRtA S&MdCpVlA

6.98 12.07 9.05 8.55 44.91 8.83 30.19 57.81 8.72 22.74 54.31 13.95 27.20 4.15 27.67 6.24 10.28 26.04 14.98 33.54 12.85 20.31 15.91 8.22 28.52

Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.38 -.70 -4.1 +37.0 S&MdCpVlB 24.18 -1.64 -19.0 +32.6

Oppenheimer C&M: DevMktC t 28.95 -1.66 -14.6 +42.1 GblStrIncoC 4.14 -.06 -0.6 +41.1 IntlBondC 6.22 -.10 -1.9 +20.3 LtdTmMuC t 14.92 -.01 +9.5 +22.7 RisingDivC p 14.33 -.69 -3.9 +37.7 SenFltRtC 8.22 -.05 +2.4 +48.8

Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p LtdNYC t RoNtMuC t RoMu A p RoMu C p RcNtlMuA

3.38 ... +9.5 +25.6 3.36 ... +8.4 +22.5 7.33 ... +17.2 +51.2 16.83 -.01 +18.2 +45.0 16.80 -.01 +17.3 +41.4 7.35 ... +18.2 +54.8

Oppenheimer Y: CapApprecY DevMktY IntlBdY IntlGrowY MainStSCY RisingDivY ValueY

46.99 29.87 6.24 25.91 21.35 16.27 20.99

-2.38 -1.70 -.10 -1.49 -1.27 -.78 -1.00

-1.5 -13.7 -1.0 -11.6 -7.4 -3.1 -12.2

+44.5 +46.5 +24.1 +37.3 +54.5 +42.0 +34.6

Optimum Fds Instl: Fixed Inc

9.91 +.01 +7.4 +42.6

Osterweis Funds:

LgGrEqtyP LgVEqtyP

18.83 -.94 -1.7 +51.9 16.34 -.86 -7.2 +41.9

+44.6 +59.2 +56.0 +65.5 +43.5 +45.9 +46.1 +59.6 +23.4

16.16 -.64 -4.0 +42.4 16.85 -.79 -5.7 +44.9

OsterweisFd n 26.16 -1.22 -8.7 +32.8 StratIncome 11.59 -.05 +4.1 +36.5

Oppenheimer A:

TotRtBdN p -4.8 +1.6 +2.0 -6.8 -3.8 -5.4 -6.3 -4.0 +11.4

Price Funds: Balance n BlueChipG n BdEnhIndx n CapApr n DivGro n EmMktB n EmMktS n EqInc n EqIdx n GNM n Growth n GwthIn n HlthSci n HiYld n InstlCpGr n InstHiYld n InstlFltRt n MCEqGr n IntlBd n IntlDis n IntlGr&Inc n IntStk n LatAm n MdTxFr n MediaTl n MidCap n MCapVal n NewAm n N Asia n NewEra n NwHrzn n NewInco n OverSea SF n PSBal n PSGrow n PSInco n RealAssets r RealEst n R2005 n R2010 n R2015 Retire2020 n R2025 R2030 n R2035 n R2040 n R2045 n Ret Income n SciTch n ST Bd n SmCapStk n SmCapVal n SpecGr SpecIn n SumMuInt n TxFree n TxFrHY n TxFrSI n R2050 n Value n

19.41 41.71 11.63 21.44 23.90 13.00 28.37 23.47 35.01 10.12 34.55 20.59 36.97 6.64 17.18 9.36 10.04 27.75 9.80 40.19 11.35 12.41 35.77 10.99 50.94 54.44 21.78 32.57 14.56 38.41 32.75 9.78 7.28 19.13 22.80 16.14 9.92 19.63 11.46 15.43 11.91 16.39 11.94 17.07 12.03 17.10 11.38 13.18 25.96 4.84 32.45 35.18 17.42 12.49 11.90 10.44 11.57 5.71 9.54 23.02

-.69 -2.33 +.01 -.63 -1.03 -.36 -1.74 -1.11 -1.54 ... -1.88 -.95 -1.66 -.13 -1.02 -.18 -.10 -1.79 -.07 -2.14 -.68 -.70 -3.22 ... -2.35 -3.39 -1.22 -1.43 -.77 -3.08 -1.89 -.01 -.43 -.74 -1.13 -.46 -.72 -1.51 -.29 -.45 -.41 -.65 -.52 -.80 -.60 -.87 -.58 -.30 -1.57 -.01 -1.88 -1.77 -.96 -.17 -.01 ... +.01 ... -.49 -1.16

8.59 -.22 +2.4 +63.0 25.45 -1.92 -20.7 +49.5 9.92 +.02 +6.3 +34.8

TCW Funds N:

Price Funds R Cl: Ret2020R p Ret2030R n

19.60 -1.10 -7.6 +54.9

TCW Funds:

South of the underpass 185 SE 3rd Street, Bend -1.44 -1.44 -.76 -1.70 -1.71 -1.61 -1.62 -1.56 -.69 -1.56 -.98 -1.64 -.08 -1.14 ... +.04 -4.88 -.85 -4.88 -4.88 -1.32 -.19 -1.70 +.11 -.02 ... -.01 -1.64 +.01 ... -.90 -.50 -3.38 -1.65 -2.00 -1.99 -3.43 -3.43 -.01 -.47 -1.64 -1.64 -.02 -.36 -1.32 -.01 -3.42 -3.44 -.36 -1.62 -.60 -.60 -.19 -2.25 -.63 +.07 +.07 -1.04 -1.05 -.57 -.58 -.63 -.42 -.43 +.02 ... -.01 -.01 -1.13 -.87 -.64 -.95 -.83 -1.33 -1.12 -.36 -.13 -.01 -.01 -3.79 +.01 +.01 -4.14 -1.02

20.36 -1.04 +1.3 +56.0 30.32 -1.65 -2.4 +65.0 20.95 -1.25 -9.4 +60.1

Putnam Funds A:

Intl MidCap r

ones Ava ab e… St er rg La ve a H e W

25.80 25.78 15.21 26.63 26.62 25.23 20.09 42.15 17.83 42.14 21.57 32.63 9.78 26.50 11.90 10.86 87.20 18.89 87.16 87.16 18.52 8.89 22.55 13.23 10.98 11.02 10.62 27.69 11.85 7.84 17.78 10.24 46.70 26.38 36.83 36.82 65.95 65.89 12.64 10.56 27.39 27.39 13.40 16.24 29.82 13.58 54.86 55.23 9.22 27.48 18.37 18.37 10.86 29.39 11.63 8.62 8.64 14.56 14.59 10.39 10.41 11.08 7.88 7.89 11.86 10.88 8.53 8.53 20.56 15.38 10.47 16.84 14.40 25.29 18.16 11.41 11.02 11.56 11.09 70.96 11.88 11.88 65.36 17.71

+42.5 +54.6 +57.2 +63.6 +20.7 +18.0 +58.8 +41.8 +60.7

Scout Funds:

ory Studs ds n New Fact on am D te ta Es

DiverIntl n DiversIntK r DivStkO n DivGrowK DivGth n Emerg Asia r EmrgMkt n EqutInc n EQII n EqIncK Export n FidelFd FltRateHi r FourInOne n GNMA n GovtInc n GroCo n GroInc GrowCoF GrowthCoK GrStrat nr HighInc rn Indepndnce n InProBnd IntBd n IntGov IntmMuni n IntlDisc n InvGrBd n InvGB n LargeCap n LgCapVal n LatAm n LevCoStock LowPr rn LowPriStkK r Magellan n MagellanK MA Muni n MegaCpStk n MidCap n MidCapK r MuniInc n NewMkt nr NewMill n NY Mun n OTC OTC K 100Index Ovrsea n Puritan PuritanK RealEInc r RealEst n SrAllSecEqF SCmdtyStrt n SCmdtyStrF n SrsEmrgMkt SrEmgMktF SrsIntGrw SerIntlGrF SrsIntSmCp SrsIntVal SerIntlValF SrsInvGrdF ShtIntMu n STBondF STBF n SmCapDisc n SmCpGrth r SmCapOpp SmallCapS nr SmCapValu r StkSlcACap n StkSelSmCap StratDivInc StratInc n TaxFreeB r TotalBond n Trend n USBdIdxF USBI n Value n Wrldwde n

-9.3 +1.0 +4.1 -2.7 -27.2 +2.8 -9.7 -8.8 +0.8

Schwab Funds:

ECIAL! MOTH ER’S DAY DS PEarrings!

Diamond Hill Fds:

GrowthZ MidCapGrZ SmallCoZ

EmgMkt SP500 n

Davis Funds Y: Diver Inc p 9.27 -.04 +5.7 +39.0 SMIDCapGr 23.38 -.99 -1.8 +98.7 LtdTrmDvrA 8.93 ... +3.3 +17.1

-.97 -1.00 -.10 -1.59 -3.35 -.06 -1.20 -.93 -.57

SSgA Funds:

WE’RE BUYING!

Delaware Invest A:

16.65 19.53 5.46 29.22 40.75 11.44 20.02 14.95 10.92

Russell Funds S:

Mtn High Coins Local and Family Owned for over 25 Years

BlendA GrowthA HiYldA p MidCpGrA NatResA STCorpBdA SmallCoA p 2020FocA UtilityA

12.81 -.43 -2.1 +40.1 13.54 -.59 -4.4 +42.3

Prudential Fds Z&I:

6.38 10.46 12.31 11.24

HYMunBd t DivValueI

+4.9 +28.8

PIMCO Funds D: CommodRR p LowDurat p RealRtn p TotlRtn p

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

+2.4 +0.3 -11.7 +2.9 +2.0 +12.1 +0.9 +5.6

9.17 -.17 +3.0 +59.6 10.18 11.56 10.46 12.31 11.24

PioneerFdY StratIncC t

Nuveen Cl I:

-.23 -.25 +.06 -.17 -.01 +.10 ... -.01

PIMCO Funds Admin:

Nuveen Cl C: 16.38 -.01 +19.8 +50.5

...

10.30 11.71 6.36 9.17 10.46 12.31 9.82 11.24

BeaconZ EuropZ GblDiscovA GlbDiscC GlbDiscZ QuestZ SharesZ

John Hancock Cl 1:

Hartford Fds C: CapAppC t FltRateC tx

HiYldT r Janus T OverseasT r PerkMCVal T PerkSCVal T ResearchT n ShTmBdT Twenty T

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

Need Cash?

DWS Invest Instl: Eqty500IL

500Idx I IntlIdx Inst IntlIndxInv TotMkIdxF r TotMktIndInv USBond I

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

GOLD AN IS AT IME ALL T !!! H IG H

7.77 +.03 -17.1 +14.0

Credit Suisse Comm:

Fidelity Advisor I: w

56.44 37.66 20.58 20.32 12.30

Fidelity Freedom:

Credit Suisse ABCD:

NwInsghts tn 19.74 -.93 -0.5 StratIncC nt 12.28 -.14 +2.7

NS F

EqGrT p GrOppT NwInsghts p SmlCapT p StrInT

8.73 +.02 +7.1 +31.1 15.17 -.79 -2.7 +53.8 8.67 -.39 -6.6 +43.2

Fidelity Advisor C:

NE D NN F

12.45 -.15 +3.7 +42.3

Fidelity Advisor T:

CG Cap Mkt Fds:

FltRateA r FF2030A p FF2040A p LevCoStA p MidCpIIA p NwInsghts p SmallCapA p StrInA

m

NA

Causeway Intl:

Fidelity Advisor A:

N

p F

R

+25.0 +32.4 +36.6 +39.7 +40.8 +48.5 +45.2 +49.6 +21.2 +20.3

Inco p 16.04 -.04 +2.1 +25.2 ShDurIncA t 16.08 -.05 +0.9 +13.8 SocEqA p 34.75 -1.68 -5.8 +46.6

HighYldBd r KaufmanR MunULA p TotRetBond UltShortBd StaValDivIS

F

E

f P n n

-9.9 -6.9 -6.4 -5.7 -5.5 -12.0 -12.6 -11.8 +1.9 +1.6

LongShortI n 17.06 -.51 -0.4 +19.9

Arbitrage I n 13.01 -.09 +2.9 +11.1 ArbitrageR p 12.77 -.09 +2.6 +10.2

GlbHiInco t GlbHiIncI r IntlEqI r IntlEqA IntlEqII I r TotRet I

StrInI -.50 -.32 -1.05 -1.05 -1.02 -2.62 -2.35 -2.88 -.15 -.15

Calvert Invest:

NYVenY

-.62 -1.42 -1.72 -1.50 -.48

Arbitrage Funds:

Apprec Ariel n

16.78 10.44 30.89 30.79 30.11 47.81 42.84 52.45 12.15 12.27

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

-1.6 +40.3 +2.9 +61.6 +7.1 +22.1 +0.6 +47.7 -1.7 +45.3 +4.0 +44.6 -18.3 +33.3 -4.5 +45.7 -1.5 +50.4 +5.4 +18.5 +1.9 +60.3 -3.7 +47.3 +4.8 +90.4 +2.4 +57.2 -1.1 +60.5 +2.1 +55.3 +2.3 +33.8 -6.9 +69.2 +0.1 +20.3 -10.9 +49.7 -17.6 +24.2 -14.3 +34.6 -25.7 +24.7 +11.2 +25.0 -0.4 +90.1 -6.6 +66.6 -9.9 +49.5 -4.8 +52.3 -9.7 +59.8 -23.9 +18.1 +0.5 +98.3 +6.1 +25.4 -15.8 +26.7 -2.4 +42.7 -4.8 +46.6 -0.7 +35.8 -17.9 NS +3.4 +115.1 -0.7 +36.2 -1.6 +39.4 -2.6 +42.1 -3.6 +44.5 -4.6 +45.7 -5.2 +46.9 -6.0 +47.3 -6.1 +47.2 -6.1 +47.2 -0.5 +31.7 -12.1 +56.7 +1.8 +10.9 -5.1 +79.0 -3.8 +60.8 -6.3 +49.0 +3.2 +33.9 +8.0 +19.7 +11.7 +24.4 +15.8 +41.1 +3.8 +11.8 -6.0 +47.2 -7.2 +47.5

10.25 +.02 +6.0 +33.6

TFS Funds: MktNeutral r

15.00 -.13 -1.3 +20.4

TIAA-CREF Funds: BdIdxInst BondInst EnLCGInst r EnLCVInst r EqIdxInst Gr&IncInst InfLkdBdInst IntlEqIInst IntlEqInst LgCGrInst LgCVl Inst LC2040Ret MdCVlRet RealSecInst S&P500IInst

10.91 10.66 9.07 7.75 9.85 9.52 12.45 13.81 7.68 10.81 12.64 10.48 16.92 17.00 14.59

+.02 -.03 -.48 -.40 -.47 -.49 +.12 -.82 -.51 -.57 -.66 -.54 -1.03 -1.04 -.64

+7.2 +6.7 +0.8 -5.3 -2.6 -0.9 +13.0 -17.9 -23.5 +0.2 -7.5 -6.9 -7.2 -7.0 -1.3

NS +23.0 +61.4 +42.0 +53.1 +49.0 +32.1 +16.7 +20.1 +51.2 +44.1 +40.4 +56.0 +57.1 +51.1

Templeton Class A: TGlbTRA x

12.42 -.42 -3.1 +33.9

Templeton Instit: ForEqS

16.48 -1.01 -19.1 +15.9

Third Avenue Fds: IntlValInst r REValInst r ValueInst

14.12 -.82 -19.6 +16.8 22.67 -1.12 -7.0 +52.6 41.57 -2.33 -18.7 +18.1

Thornburg Fds C: IntValuC t

22.55 -1.18 -18.3 +18.9

Thornburg Fds: IntlValA p IncBuildA t IncBuildC p IntlValue I LtdMunA p LtTMuniI ValueI

24.03 17.52 17.52 24.57 14.64 14.65 29.03

-1.25 -.66 -.66 -1.28 -.01 ... -2.26

-17.7 -5.7 -6.4 -17.3 +5.5 +6.0 -21.1

+21.7 +45.0 +42.2 +23.1 +16.2 +17.4 +17.9

Thrivent Fds A: LgCapStock MuniBd

21.51 -1.12 -7.3 +32.4 11.81 -.01 +11.0 +21.8

Gateway Funds: GatewayA

26.37 -.47 -0.2 +17.8

Goldman Sachs A: GrthOppsA 22.11 -1.14 -4.2 +60.7 MidCapVA p 34.12 -2.12 -10.9 +53.2 SmaCapA 39.59 -2.04 -4.6 +62.6

Goldman Sachs Inst: CoreFxc GrthOppt HiYield HYMuni n MidCapVal SD Gov ShrtDurTF n SmCapVal

10.50 23.67 7.05 9.10 34.40 10.25 10.65 41.61

+.01 -1.22 -.13 -.01 -2.13 -.02 -.01 -2.14

+7.4 -3.8 +2.4 +16.0 -10.5 +0.9 +3.4 -4.2

+34.3 +62.7 +56.4 +45.3 +55.1 +6.0 +10.0 +64.6

GuideStone Funds: BalAllo GS4

12.10 -.30 -0.7 +38.4

29.48 7.83 11.38 10.89 23.61 22.78 9.90 11.56 10.98 10.47 20.49

-1.30 -.14 ... -.69 -1.20 -1.30 -.62 +.02 -.02 -.01 -1.03

-1.4 +2.1 +6.6 -19.6 -4.4 +3.3 -7.4 +6.4 +1.6 +4.7 -4.6

+50.8 +55.9 +15.2 +16.4 +51.2 +74.8 +62.4 +29.0 +8.4 +17.0 +45.2

PacTigerInv MergerFd n

20.81 -1.03 -10.3 +50.5 15.64 -.17 -1.0 +10.7

Meridian Funds: Growth

42.95 -2.85 -2.8 +71.0

Metro West Fds: HiYldBdM p LowDurBd TotRetBd TotalRetBondI MontagGr I

9.96 8.60 10.65 10.65 23.81

-.17 -.01 ... +.01 -.87

James Adv Fds:

Morgan Stanley A:

BalGldnRbw

FocusGroA

20.47 -.51 +1.5 +30.4

MorganStanley Inst:

Forty Overseas t

EmMktI n IntlEqI n MCapGrI n MCapGrP p SmlCoGrI n

Janus T Shrs: BalancedT n 25.18 -.80 -0.8 +32.0 FlexBondT 10.80 ... +6.9 +29.8 Grw&IncT n 30.90 -1.64 -4.9 +34.7

+49.2 +32.1 +38.8 +39.8 +41.9

36.16 -1.64 -5.8 +71.9

Janus S Shrs: 33.74 -1.95 -1.9 +32.8 29.67 -3.15 -34.3 NS

-1.1 +2.4 +6.3 +6.5 +1.5

21.94 12.37 34.24 33.01 12.90

-1.47 -.73 -1.86 -1.79 -.66

Munder Funds A:

-16.5 -12.0 -13.0 -13.2 -12.1

+34.3 +20.6 +69.8 +68.6 +53.4

AllAssetAut r AllAsset CommodRR DiverInco EmgMktCur EmMktsBd FltgInc r FrgnBdUnd r FrgnBd n HiYld n InvGradeCp LowDur n ModDur n RERRStg r RealReturn RealRetInstl ShortT StksPlus TotRet n TR II n

10.37 11.81 6.49 11.68 10.09 11.50 8.49 10.97 10.83 9.17 10.76 10.46 10.84 5.14 12.19 12.31 9.82 8.02 11.24 10.85

-.23 -.26 +.06 -.10 -.20 -.24 -.15 -.05 -.03 -.17 -.04 -.01 -.02 -.29 +.24 +.10 ... -.37 -.01 +.01

+2.9 +33.6 +0.8 +39.5 -11.4 +44.7 +5.6 +50.7 -7.0 +19.9 +7.0 +45.7 -2.6 +29.1 +6.2 +47.7 +9.2 +37.0 +3.3 +60.8 +7.6 +46.6 +2.4 +18.7 +4.5 +26.6 +21.2 +220.6 +25.0 +62.3 +12.5 +38.9 +1.1 +8.4 -1.4 +69.3 +6.0 +29.0 +5.7 +26.1

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-1.10 -.01 -1.37 -.43 -.74 -.48 -3.45 -.77 -4.61 +.01 -.98 -1.22 -.09 -.56 -3.66 +.13 -.87 -1.02 -1.78 -.05 +.03 -.31 -.88 -.12 -.59 +.08 +.44 -1.26 -.01 -.97 -.01 -.01 -.01 ... ... -.01 -1.20 -.56 -2.68 -1.04 -.62 -.04 -.01 -.01 -1.34 -.14 -.47 -.34 -.71 -.46 -.87 -.57 -.98 -.97 -.62 -1.02 -.30 -.85 -.69 -1.25

-4.5 +9.8 -10.6 -9.2 -0.7 +2.5 -17.7 +2.5 -8.6 +6.0 -12.8 -1.2 +5.8 +3.3 -0.9 +12.9 -20.4 -16.2 -18.7 +7.7 +9.0 -0.2 -5.7 +2.6 -2.5 +17.8 +30.3 -3.4 +9.6 -3.5 +12.6 +8.9 +2.9 +11.4 +1.3 +10.3 -34.9 -7.5 -7.5 -7.5 -1.8 +2.1 +2.4 +1.6 -7.6 +3.8 +1.4 -0.8 -2.1 -3.4 -4.5 -5.7 -6.1 -6.1 -6.1 -2.2 +6.3 +0.9 -7.6 -2.4

DevMkInPl nr 86.06 EmMkInPl nr 79.32 ExtMkt I n 100.29 MidCpIstPl n 99.39 SmCapInPl n 98.45 TotIntAdm nr 21.47 TotIntlInst nr 85.87 TotIntlIP nr 85.89 TotIntSig nr 25.75 500 n 119.70 Balanced n 22.36 DevMkt n 8.32 EMkt n 23.85 Extend n 40.61 Growth n 33.52 ITBond n 11.95 LTBond n 14.26 MidCap 20.10 REIT r 20.29 SmCap n 34.07 SmlCpGrow 22.00 SmlCapVal 15.31 STBond n 10.63 TotBond n 11.09 TotlIntl n 12.83 TotStk n 32.33 Value n 20.79

-5.15 -5.88 -6.52 -6.77 -5.96 -1.37 -5.46 -5.47 -1.65 -5.28 -.60 -.50 -1.77 -2.64 -1.62 ... +.25 -1.36 -1.49 -2.07 -1.36 -.91 -.02 +.02 -.82 -1.55 -.92

BalInst n 22.37 DevMktInst n 8.26 EmMktInst n 23.85 ExtIn n 40.64 FTAllWldI r 76.33 GrowthInstl 33.52 InfProtInst n 11.69 InstIdx n 118.94 InsPl n 118.95 InstTStIdx n 29.27 InstTStPlus 29.27 LTBdInst n 14.26 MidCapInstl n 20.15 REITInst r 13.40 STIGrInst 10.73 SmCpIn n 34.10 SmlCapGrI n 22.05 TBIst n 11.09 TSInst n 32.35 ValueInstl n 20.79

-.60 -.49 -1.77 -2.64 -4.82 -1.62 +.10 -5.25 -5.25 -1.40 -1.40 +.25 -1.37 -.99 -.04 -2.07 -1.36 +.02 -1.54 -.92

BalancSgl n ExtMktSgl n 500Sgl n GroSig n ITBdSig n MidCapIdx n REITSig r STBdIdx n SmCapSig n TotalBdSgl n TotStkSgnl n ValueSig n

22.12 34.92 98.89 31.04 11.95 28.79 23.11 10.63 30.73 11.09 31.22 21.64

-.60 -2.27 -4.36 -1.50 ... -1.96 -1.70 -.02 -1.86 +.02 -1.49 -.95

AggrOpp n

M M

9.62 -.60 -13.4 +46.7

m

V V mM

A

M

WM B

M

W

&R

A

m

Transamerica C: AsAlModGr t 11.51 -.41 -6.7 +32.2

TA IDEX C: 11.55 -.30 -3.6 +32.0

Transamerica Ptrs: 8.69 -.38 -1.5 +50.6

W

Tweedy Browne: GblValue

22.43 -.77 -6.1 +44.1

USAA Group: AgsvGth n CornstStr n Grwth n Gr&Inc n HYldInco n IncStk n Income n IntTerBd n Intl n PrecMM S&P Idx n S&P Rewrd ShtTBnd n TxEIT n TxELT n TxESh n

33.77 21.44 14.90 14.69 8.28 12.57 13.31 10.62 21.85 24.83 19.44 19.45 9.18 13.60 13.71 10.84

VALIC :

HiYld In Intl I Inst LgCGr2In LgLGI In LgCV3 In LgCV1 In LgGrIn LgCpIndxI LgCValIn LT2010In LfTm2020In LT2030In LT2040In LfTm2050I MidCGIII In MidCV1 In PreSecs In RealEstSecI SGI In SmCV2 In

10.60 9.58 8.00 9.41 9.90 10.59 8.31 9.12 9.56 11.36 11.64 11.40 11.46 10.93 10.38 12.76 9.83 18.39 10.59 9.15

CAITAdm n 11.63 CALTAdm 11.82 CpOpAdl n 69.21 EM Adm nr 31.34 Energy n 100.61 EqIncAdml 46.52 EuropAdml 50.43 ExplAdml 68.20 ExntdAdm n 40.64 500Adml n 119.72 GNMA Adm n 11.06 GroIncAdm 45.04 GrwthAdml n 33.52 HlthCare n 55.90 HiYldCp n 5.80 InflProAd n 28.71 ITBondAdml 11.95 ITsryAdml n 11.74 IntlGrAdml 52.45 ITAdml n 14.28

MidCapIdx

-1.71 -.53 -.75 -.82 -.14 -.47 -.01 -.04 -1.38 -1.05 -.86 -.86 -.02 ... -.01 ...

-4.3 -7.5 -4.2 -7.7 +1.0 -2.8 +6.7 +5.3 -14.1 -28.2 -1.5 -1.4 +2.6 +10.0 +13.8 +3.7

+47.5 +42.0 +44.5 +43.7 +68.5 +46.1 +34.3 +52.3 +30.6 +25.6 +50.5 +51.2 +17.3 +25.5 +30.4 +12.5

19.30 -1.26 -7.8 +66.2

-.01 -.01 -3.16 -2.33 -6.48 -1.60 -3.24 -4.28 -2.64 -5.28 +.01 -2.00 -1.63 -1.54 -.09 +.26 ... +.03 -3.27 -.01

+9.9 +12.5 -10.5 -19.8 -17.6 +2.6 -20.5 -8.5 -8.2 -1.3 +6.1 -1.1 +1.0 -0.8 +5.9 +13.1 +10.7 +9.1 -16.2 +8.9

+21.7 +24.8 +38.0 +29.5 +21.3 +59.6 +17.1 +65.0 +64.3 +51.6 +19.8 +50.1 +60.5 +50.0 +53.0 +32.6 +33.1 +20.0 +29.8 +20.0

+1.9 +42.4 -8.2 +64.3 -1.3 +51.6 +1.0 +60.5 +10.7 +33.1 -8.6 +65.2 +3.6 +114.6 +2.6 +11.1 -8.2 +66.1 +7.3 +22.3 -2.5 +54.2 -4.7 +44.6

Vantagepoint Fds:

AsAlModGr p 11.56 -.40 -6.1 +34.7

InstStkIdx p

+1.9 +42.5 -18.0 NS -19.7 +29.8 -8.2 +64.4 -18.7 +20.6 +1.0 +60.7 +13.1 +32.6 -1.3 +51.6 -1.2 +51.7 -2.5 +54.3 -2.5 +54.4 +22.7 +53.3 -8.6 +65.4 +3.6 +114.8 +2.3 +18.0 -8.2 +66.2 -8.6 +74.0 +7.4 +22.5 -2.5 +54.3 -4.7 +44.8

Vanguard Signal:

Transamerica A:

AsAlMod t

-18.0 NS -19.7 NS -8.2 NS -8.6 NS -8.2 NS -18.8 NS -18.8 NS -18.7 NS -18.8 NS -1.4 +51.1 +1.8 +41.8 -18.1 +16.6 -19.9 +29.0 -8.3 +63.5 +0.9 +59.8 +10.6 +32.6 +22.5 +52.6 -8.8 +64.6 +3.4 +114.0 -8.4 +65.4 -8.8 +73.1 -8.0 +57.6 +2.5 +10.7 +7.2 +21.9 -18.8 +19.0 -2.7 +53.7 -4.9 +44.0

Vanguard Instl Fds:

WM B

SandsCpGY n 11.69 -.61 +9.4 +94.5 SandsCapGrI 16.23 -.85 +9.7 +97.0 SelGrowth 11.47 -.60 +9.1 +93.1

+51.3 +21.4 +37.7 +40.5 +48.3 +49.8 +21.1 +59.1 +64.2 +19.4 +36.7 +49.5 +52.5 +57.3 +49.8 +32.1 +31.3 +29.4 +13.1 +38.9 +19.6 +31.3 +39.7 +26.5 +36.1 +57.7 +42.6 +65.4 +20.0 +56.5 +28.9 +19.7 +9.5 +23.5 +4.7 +20.8 +27.2 +45.7 +43.5 +56.0 +38.4 +17.5 +8.2 +5.9 +63.3 +30.6 +36.3 +37.3 +38.5 +39.9 +41.1 +42.0 +41.6 +41.7 +41.6 +48.5 +45.1 +40.6 +42.2 +47.6

Vanguard Idx Fds:

Touchstone Family:

16.87 -.71 -5.8 +80.3 15.42 -.68 -8.3 +53.3 14.52 -.57 -4.0 +49.0

+2.2 +59.7 -18.7 +15.7 -0.2 +51.3 -1.6 +65.2 -8.1 +36.5 -5.3 +38.0 -1.7 +47.6 -1.4 +50.6 -4.5 +42.2 -0.9 +44.0 -3.5 +44.8 -5.1 +45.3 -6.5 +44.3 -7.3 +43.9 -12.0 +63.5 -8.7 +59.8 +1.9 +69.6 +3.0 +108.1 -7.1 +83.6 -9.9 +57.3

DivrEq n 20.78 CAIT n 11.63 CapOpp n 29.96 Convt n 12.10 DivAppInv n 22.03 DividendGro 15.70 Energy 53.59 EqInc n 22.19 Explorer n 73.26 GNMA n 11.06 GlobEq n 16.17 GroInc n 27.58 HYCorp n 5.80 HiDvdYld n 18.20 HlthCare n 132.47 InflaPro n 14.61 IntlExplr n 13.08 IntlGr 16.49 IntlVal n 26.04 ITI Grade 10.16 ITTsry n 11.74 LIFECon n 16.49 LIFEGro n 21.56 LIFEInc n 14.35 LIFEMod n 19.57 LTInGrade n 10.60 LTTsry n 13.51 MidCapGro 19.74 MATaxEx 10.83 Morgan n 18.54 MuHY n 11.09 MuInt n 14.28 MuLtd n 11.18 MuLong n 11.66 MuShrt n 15.94 OHLTTxE n 12.56 PrecMtlsMin r 15.14 PrmCpCore rn 13.58 Prmcp r 62.60 SelValu r 18.68 STAR n 19.23 STIGrade 10.73 STFed n 10.84 STTsry n 10.77 StratEq n 18.80 TgtRetInc 11.76 TgtRet2010 22.98 TgtRet2015 12.58 TgtRet2020 22.17 TgtRet2025 12.54 TgRet2030 21.38 TgtRet2035 12.78 TgtRe2040 20.93 TgtRet2050 n 20.84 TgtRe2045 n 13.14 USGro n 19.14 Wellsly n 23.33 Welltn n 32.00 Wndsr n 13.14 WndsII n 26.58

V

28.12 -1.84 -8.8 +65.8 59.16 -2.10 -26.8 +61.4

-.05 -.01 +.08 +.44 ... -6.21 -3.00 -.01 -.01 -.01 -2.78 -3.00 ... -6.37 -.01 -.02 ... -.01 -.04 -2.07 -3.09 -2.57 +.02 -1.55 -.91 -.73 -1.46 -2.35 -2.22 -.58 -1.44

Vanguard Fds:

Delafield Gold t

AggGrwth r Growth r Stock r

-.21 -.58 -.39 -.50 -.47 -.49 -.48 -.40 -.46 -.28 -.42 -.48 -.55 -.57 -.74 -.79 -.15 -1.37 -.69 -.52

ITCoAdmrl 10.16 LtdTrmAdm 11.18 LTGrAdml 10.60 LTsryAdml 13.51 LT Adml n 11.66 MCpAdml n 91.23 MorgAdm 57.51 MuHYAdml n 11.09 NJLTAd n 12.25 NYLTAd m 11.66 PrmCap r 64.96 PacifAdml 58.08 PALTAdm n 11.64 REITAdml r 86.57 STsryAdml 10.77 STBdAdml n 10.63 ShtTrmAdm 15.94 STFedAdm 10.84 STIGrAdm 10.73 SmlCapAdml n 34.10 TxMCap r 64.74 TxMGrInc r 58.22 TtlBdAdml n 11.09 TotStkAdm n 32.34 ValueAdml n 20.80 WellslAdm n 56.53 WelltnAdm n 55.27 WindsorAdm n 44.33 WdsrIIAdm 47.18 TaxMngdIntl rn 9.58 TaxMgdSC r 27.89

Tocqueville Fds:

StockIndex 24.20 -1.07 -1.6 +50.9 18.58 -.99 +0.7 +51.2 PIMCO Admin PIMS: CoreBond n 12.01 +.03 +7.6 +24.8 Focus p Van Eck Funds: RelRetAd p 12.31 +.10 +12.3 +37.8 Principal Inv: CorePlusBd n 8.40 -.01 +6.3 +33.4 Matthews Asian: GlHardA 39.00 -2.91 -25.4 +21.3 ShtTmAd p 9.82 ... +0.9 +7.6 BdMtgInstl 10.86 -.02 +6.0 +41.4 Gabelli Funds: EmMkEqSl 20.21 -1.32 -15.5 +29.8 AsiaDivInv r 12.92 -.59 -7.4 +52.3 TotRetAd n 11.24 -.01 +5.7 +28.0 DivIntlInst 8.74 -.56 -15.3 +25.0 Vanguard Admiral: Asset 48.15 -2.47 -6.3 +55.2 EqtyInc 9.53 -.43 +1.4 +61.5 AsianG&IInv 15.77 -.69 -8.2 +38.8 PIMCO Instl PIMS: BalAdml n 22.36 -.61 +1.9 +42.3 HighYldA p 7.55 -.14 +2.9 +50.7 China Inv 21.33 -1.27 -21.6 +28.6 EqIndx HighYld IntmdTFBd n IntlValSel IntrdAmer LgCapGr MkExpIdx n MtgBckdSl n ShtDurBdSel TxAwRRet n USLCCrPls n

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt

m

W m

W

A

A

W

A

A

W

A

C

W

A

mM

M M

W

A

M

W

A m

W M

W W

A

W

mB

W

Y

m

N


SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Hand-washing machine tied up in FDA red tape • Entrepreneur hopes to market it toward restaurant chains By Allison Sherry The Denver Post

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Jim Glenn is the kind of entrepreneur whom politicians on both sides of the ideological divide like to brag about. Glenn’s Golden, Colo.based company, Resurgent Health and Medical, makes a hand-washing machine beloved by well-known companies such as Chipotle and Whole Foods. For more than 20 years, Glenn, Resurgent’s chief executive, also has sold the machines to parts of the federal government, including the Bethesda Naval Hospital and Veterans Affairs facilities. But the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will not approve the machines — which work sort of like an electronic hand-dryer except that when a user plunges his or her hands into two holes, they are covered with warm water and antibacterial soap — for use in a “food handler setting.” Glenn did get a letter last year from the federal agency saying it “does not object to the use of the ... systems ... for the purpose of general skin cleansing by employees in a food establishment.” Seem confusing and bureaucratic? It is to a frustrated Glenn, who says he needs the FDA approval letter to expand his business by marketing to restaurant chains and getting state healthdepartment approval. Glenn had the FDA’s stamp of approval for the better part of the 1990s, but changing FDA leadership brought new regulations. If it weren’t for the lengthy back-and-forth with the FDA over the past three years, Glenn estimates that he’d have doubled the size of his 20-employee shop. “I don’t know what’s going on in Washington. Does anyone understand it? They think you can impose these expensive regulatory burdens and companies are going to flourish?” Glenn has some allies in Congress. A handful of House members and two senators — Michael Bennet, a Colorado Democrat, and Tom Coburn, an Oklahoma Republican — are pushing the FDA to let Glenn’s hand-washing machine pass muster so he can market it as an approved device. The FDA has said in a letter that it expects the company to pursue “appropriate

regulatory approval” for its products. The FDA wants Glenn’s company to develop a standard for hand-washing hygiene in food-handling establishments — something that doesn’t exist now. “The agency remains willing to work with Resurgent to develop a sensible regulatory approach that is consistent with the agency’s legal authorities and mission to protect the public health,” FDA spokeswoman Erica Jefferson said. Glenn says developing the standard for everyone would be cost-prohibitive for a company of Resurgent’s size. “We have done the studies; our clinical work is based on that standard, and we submit that to the people who buy the machines,” Glenn said. “Out of the blue, they have decided we have to be the company that develops a new standard for hand hygiene in the food industry.” Resurgent’s experience with the FDA isn’t unique, according to Bennet’s office, which is working on several bills to overhaul the federal agency. That overhaul has to happen by the end of the year, when the FDA is due for its everyfive-year reauthorization. With an increase in medical devices, the agency’s process has become bogged on the Washington side, members of Congress and business folks say. “I hope they come to their senses,” said Bennet, who hosted a roundtable with the FDA commissioner and CEOs of some Colorado companies last summer. “On a macro level, they’re moving things in the right direction. With respect to Resurgent, I think they’re just trapped betwixt and between bureaucratic agencies,” Bennet said. “There’s no reason for them not to be able to continue to develop their business.” Glenn contributed to Bennet’s 2010 race for the Senate, giving him $750, according to campaign-finance records. Glenn says he continues to push the FDA for some resolution. He can’t build a business on international sales, he says. “We have tens of thousands of machines in the U.S. being used right now,” he said. “The U.S. is our market. That’s where we’re helping.”

Chips

Beaux Bear is about to receive a microchip. The pet-chip industry has recently taken a commercial turn, spawning new ventures, including membership programs and social networking.

Continued from G1 My previous dog’s identification had consisted of a nylon collar and metal tag; the chip sounded Big Brother-ish, if not unnecessary. But the assistant assured me that “everyone” does it these days, so that lost or stolen pets can be readily identified if brought to a shelter or veterinarian’s office. A scanning wand would be waved over my golden retriever’s back, her ID number would pop up and we would be notified of her whereabouts. Gazing into Riley’s molten brown eyes, the assistant said, “Wouldn’t you want to be sure that she comes home?” I signed the paperwork immediately. Unbeknown to me, along with the chip came a year’s free “premium” membership from HomeAgain, the largest provider of pet chips in the United States. By registering Riley with HomeAgain, I had unwittingly become one of 850,000 PetRescuers who receive regular electronic alerts about missing animals in their area. While pet-chip technology has been around for nearly two decades, the industry has recently taken a commercial turn, spawning new ventures, including membership programs and social networking. What was once a simple process — inject a tiny transponder the size of a grain of rice between a pet’s shoulder blades and pay a onetime registration fee — has become a big business, with annual charges for benefits ranging from online distribution of customized lost-pet notices to discounted flights for missing pets found hundreds of miles away.

Suzanne DeChillo New York Times News Service file photo

“They wanted to increase their revenue through annual fees and add-ons, so we split up,” Sharp said. Today the kennel-club service charges a one-time fee of $19.95, which enrolls a pet in its database for life (HomeAgain charges $39 for enrollment). Kennel club customers can also pay a one-time fee of $15 for lifetime membership in its lost-pet recovery program, which includes a 24-hour hot line. HomeAgain charges $17.99 a year for its package of benefits; its newest feature is an iPhone and Android app that lets users upload photos of lost pets and delivers alerts with a bark or meow.

‘No quick cure’ Some pet owners find the alerts distressing and confess to not opening them or to unsubscribing from them. Others shrug them off. “I would rather get three emails a day about lost pets in my neighborhood than 20 emails from stores I rarely shop at,” said Sharp of the kennel club. MacPhee acknowledges that not every HomeAgain customer appreciates such services; after the free first year, about half decline to renew the membership (the registration information remains active in the company’s database). But he anticipates increasing the PetRescuer network to 3 million people by 2013 — partly by enrolling people who do not actually own pets. (They can submit their email and ZIP code and request to be notified about lost pets within 5, 10 or 25 miles of their home.) “Early triage is the No. 1 thing that gets pets found,” he said. “The distribution of information is really what helps find your animal.” Yet some pet experts think the chips provide a false sense of security.

Chip vs. tag Gary MacPhee, the general manager of HomeAgain, which is a subsidiary of Merck & Co., said, “We wanted pet owners to belong to our organization and we thought we could add value with our services.” Most recoveries are still done by collar tag, said Tom Sharp, an American Kennel Club official. “It’s more likely that your dog will wind up on your neighbor’s property than in the local animal shelter,” he said. “But a chip is still the only way to permanently identify your dog as belonging to you.” Since 1995, the kennel club has offered its own nonprofit chip service, Companion Animal Recovery. Until 2005, the service had a partnership with HomeAgain, which produced the chips; when that contract expired, the two organizations parted ways.

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Northwest stocks AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40f .88 1.10f ... .28 .53f .22 .90f .20f .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

14 16 ... 37 12 ... 9 17 24 14 15 7 ... 11 7 23 7 ... 20 18 11

YTD Last Chg %Chg 32.34 25.46 7.02 19.40 69.15 4.52 46.53 46.82 82.94 7.51 20.38 21.46 8.96 26.07 7.41 21.81 4.62 8.83 22.08 13.75 29.27

+.14 -.14 +.04 -.68 -.58 -.36 +.28 -.15 -.53 -.23 -.17 -.60 -.04 -.12 +.01 -.12 -.11 +.29 -.10 -.15 -.45

-13.9 -1.1 +26.3 -2.8 -5.7 +3.2 -1.4 +.6 -.5 +24.8 -18.7 -16.7 -13.8 +7.5 -3.6 -10.0 -22.2 +9.4 +2.9 +1.4 +12.8

Name

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 ... .80f ... 1.68 .12 .70f .75f 1.56 .89f .68 ... .28 .78f .32 .88 ... .60

YTD Last Chg %Chg

22 105.44 +1.10 +9.4 15 48.89 +.35 -1.6 19 45.61 ... -4.8 16 4.75 +.09 +4.6 12 37.59 -.31 +.3 ... 1.79 +.17 -6.3 32 36.39 -.26 -.5 20 167.48 +.94 +1.6 11 18.39 -.01 -12.6 8 26.26 -6.08 -37.9 26 116.07 +.50 +30.0 11 34.98 -.24 -4.8 30 51.53 -.14 +12.0 22 5.04 -.07 +3.5 16 12.51 -.13 +1.0 12 30.27 -.38 +11.9 14 16.96 -.18 +21.2 11 30.94 -.50 +12.3 12 19.29 +.04 +23.7 29 18.76 +.07 +.5

NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1592.00 $1591.60 $28.694

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more)

$1574.00 $1574.50 $27.996

Free Business Delivery and Printer Service Local since 1989 AUTHORIZED DEALER • copy • print • scan • fax

www.synergyoffice.com

541- 388 -1797

541-706-6900

MEMORIAL

In our effort to provide dental care to children in Deschutes County who can’t afford it, the Kemple Memorial Children’s Dental Clinic wishes to thank the following dentists for their volunteered services in April.

Doctors volunteering in their own offices in April 2012 Dr. Dean Nyquist Dr. Casey O”Neill Dr. Michael Olin Dr. Zack Porter Dr. Maurine Porter Dr. Catherine Quas Dr. Daniel Radatti Dr. Steven Rogers Dr. Brian Rosenzweig Dr. Mehdi Salari Dr. Todd Schock Dr. Ken Shirtcliff Dr. Marika Stone Dr. Andrew Timm Dr. Jeff Timm Dr. Ryan Timm Dr. Steve Timm

Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

S&P500ETF BkofAm SPDR Fncl Bar iPVix JPMorgCh

2808685 2156056 1190866 860907 816580

129.74 -1.12 7.02 +.04 13.77 -.16 22.36 +1.36 33.49 -.44

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

BrownShoe CSVS2xVxS PrUVxST rs CSVSVixMT iP SXR1K

10.99 10.80 24.08 69.47 30.90

Chg %Chg +2.23 +1.27 +2.76 +7.40 +2.95

+25.5 +13.3 +12.9 +11.9 +10.6

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Renren Mechel pf PSSPIntDv E-CDang GencoShip

4.93 -1.31 -21.0 2.42 -.54 -18.2 18.93 -4.09 -17.8 5.45 -.83 -13.2 3.04 -.46 -13.1

Amex

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Indexes Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Facebook n SiriusXM PwShs QQQ Oracle Cisco

5651058 938729 729038 675088 506698

38.23 ... 1.89 +.06 60.81 -.80 25.61 -.64 16.47 -.08

GoldStr g NwGold g CheniereEn NovaGld g Quepasa

Vol (00)

Last Chg

106029 1.13 -.19 56009 8.23 +.45 49927 13.82 -.21 40565 5.46 +.03 30548 3.06 -.85

Gainers ($2 or more)

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

GigOptics GoldenMin NwGold g GoldRsv g Compx

2.73 3.62 8.23 3.81 12.01

+.30 +12.3 +.23 +6.8 +.45 +5.8 +.18 +5.0 +.56 +4.9

Velti 6.76 +.85 FFinSvc 3.88 +.43 NewBrdgeB 4.54 +.43 Homeow wt 2.52 +.23 ShoeCarn s 21.72 +1.85

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg +14.4 +12.4 +10.5 +10.0 +9.3

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Quepasa Vringo SuprmInd AvalonHld PfdAptCm

3.06 3.02 3.60 3.57 7.17

-.85 -21.7 -.31 -9.3 -.34 -8.6 -.33 -8.5 -.65 -8.3

FsthdTech Schnitzer Kirklands DialGlobal Zynga n

19.27 26.26 10.66 2.39 7.16

-7.53 -6.08 -2.19 -.40 -1.11

Diary 758 2,307 84 3,149 12 157

Last

Name

Diary Pvs Day

Low-Cost, High Quality Compatible Print Cartridges

Bob Browning Owner

Market recap

Precious metals Metal

Self Referrals Welcome

mandated that all pet organizations acquire universal scanners,” said Sharp of the American Kennel Club. “So it’s still possible that a pet’s chip won’t be read properly if he turns up at a shelter.” As for me, I can’t bring myself to delete or ignore the lostpet alerts that pop up regularly on my smartphone. The latest one: “Farrah is missing,” described a 4-year-old female cat, weighing 12 pounds, with a black-and-white tuxedo coat. Her mug shot was adorable, and the online map showed a little green marker with a tiny paw print near my neighborhood. I’m rooting for her safe return.

At the Kemple Memorial Children’s Dental Clinic, our mission is to improve the health and well-being of children in Deschutes County by facilitating urgent dental services for children (K-12) whose families cannot access basic dental care.

541-647-8261

Div PE

Claudia Devita, a Fairfield County, Conn., breeder, urges clients to understand the system’s limitations. “There is no quick cure to finding a lost dog, even with a chip,” she said. “Your dog has to be lucky enough to be returned to a place that has a scanner to check the number on the chip and then a way of contacting you. The only foolproof way to keep your pet safe is with making sure the dog is either walked on a leash or kept inside a yard with a fence.” Indeed, unreliable or incompatible scanner technology remains a nagging issue for chip providers. A chip is essentially a tiny transponder that uses radio frequency waves to transmit data, including registration and vendor contact information. Each chip can be activated by a handheld scanner, but competing companies use different frequencies to send signals. Several chip vendors now produce universal scanners and give them to animal shelters at low cost or free, but there is no guarantee that a particular chip will be recognized. “The government has not

Dr. Scott Anderson Dr. Susan Armstrong Dr. Scot Burgess Dr. Bradley Burket Dr. David Cauble Dr. Karen Coe Dr. Blake Drew Dr. Greg Everson Dr. Matt Falkenstein Dr. Phillippe Freeman Dr. Rex Gibson Dr. David Gobeille Dr. Brad Hester Dr. Dennis Holly Dr. Jeff Johnson Dr. Mark Keener Dr. Emine Loxley Dr. Nicholas Misischia

Don’t Replace ... Reface

Name

G5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

-28.1 -18.8 -17.0 -14.3 -13.4

Diary 181 273 39 493 5 33

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

691 1,787 118 2,596 9 199

52-Week High Low 13,338.66 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 474.18 381.99 8,496.42 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 860.37 601.71

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,369.38 4,873.76 464.16 7,427.74 2,209.54 2,778.79 1,295.22 13,558.78 747.21

-73.11 -64.42 +.07 -52.69 -10.77 -34.90 -9.64 -118.89 -7.12

-.59 -1.30 +.02 -.70 -.48 -1.24 -.74 -.87 -.94

+1.24 -2.91 -.11 -.66 -3.02 +6.67 +2.99 +2.80 +.85

-1.14 -10.55 +5.53 -11.13 -7.35 -.88 -2.85 -4.08 -9.87

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed yesterday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Friday compared with late Thursday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

288.77 2,073.88 3,008.00 5,267.62 6,271.22 18,951.85 36,875.24 13,048.90 3,501.44 8,611.31 1,782.46 2,779.10 4,098.84 5,419.76

-.50 -.35 -.13 -1.33 -.60 -1.30 -1.04 -.31 -.57 -2.99 -3.40 -1.54 -2.61 -1.26

t t t t t t t t t t t t t t

.9816 1.5803 .9791 .001980 .1580 1.2737 .1287 .012646 .072189 .0320 .000853 .1396 1.0605 .0338

.9929 1.5816 .9829 .001980 .1581 1.2714 .1287 .012614 .072499 .0322 .000858 .1389 1.0586 .0339


G6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

S D 

Sorento easy to drive with lots of power By Emma Jayne Williams McClatchy-Tribune News Service

In 2003, Kia introduced the midsize Sorento SUV, which for a while replaced the Sportage, which had been the brand’s only sport utility since the South Korean automaker arrived in the United States in the mid-’90s. The Sportage two years later was reintroduced as a compact crossover, REVIEW and remains in the Kia lineup. But the Sorento has racked up much-better sales, and that continues this year. Kia had sold 26,011 of the Sorento through March, compared with 9,888 of the smaller Sportage. There was no 2010 model for the U.S. market, but a completely redesigned Sorento went on sale in early 2010 as a 2011 model, based on the architecture of the Hyundai Santa Fe. It was the first product to come out of the new Kia factory in West Point, Ga., which now also builds the Santa Fe on the same assembly line. With the remake, the Sorento switched from a truck-style body-on-frame configuration to a crossover unibody design that offers more interior space, with room for up to seven passengers or 72.5 cubic feet of cargo (with the second and third row seats folded). It also has a more comfortable ride. The exterior was all new, with Kia design cues such as wraparound headlights lined up to the sporty grille (in a nice, friendly grin). For 2012, prices range from $21,250 (plus $800 freight) for the base front-wheel-drive model with a 2.4-liter, 175horsepower engine and sixspeed manual transmission, to $34,850 for the fully loaded, V6 powered SX all-wheeldrive model, which I tested. But the LX is the first trim level to get an automatic transmission. The LX with the four-cylinder engine and six-speed automatic begins at $23,150 with front-wheel drive, and $25,350 with allwheel drive. With a V6 engine, the LX is either $24,950 (front drive) or $26,650 (allwheel drive). EX models, the midlevel trim, begin at $25,950 with a four-cylinder engine, automatic and front drive, and $27,650 with all-wheel drive.

Kia via McClatchy-Tribune Media Service

The Kia Sorento has outsold its smaller crossover sibling, the Kia Sportage.

2012 Kia Sorento Base price: $21,250 As tested: $37,200 Type: Front-wheel and allwheel drive crossover SUV Engine: Options range from a four-cylinder 2.4 liter, 175-horsepower engine to a fully loaded V6 Mileage: 18-22 mpg city, 24-32 mpg highway

With a V6, the EX starts at $27,950. The SX starts at $33,150 with front drive. Multiple options and options packages are available for each model. The Sorento SX comes in five elegant colors: Bright Silver (light gray), Titanium Silver (dark gray), Ebony Black, Snow White Pearl and Dark Cherry (nearly black). Leather seats are standard on the SX, in either black or Black Dove. My SX AWD came with chrome roof racks, grille trim and tailgate accent; 18-inch, 10-spoke mirror-finish alloy

wheels; dual chrome-tipped exhaust outlets; chrome door handles and lower window trim; stainless-steel trim on the rear bumper step pad and lower rear bumper, the lower front bumper and the illuminated sill plates; body-color power/folding outside mirrors with jewel-like turn-signal indicators on the rear of the housing; and a rear spoiler. Raptor-like fog lights were set in a honeycomb housing, echoing the grille and large wraparound taillights with faceted LEDs, which added a nice look to the rear. My Kia was fun and easy to drive, with lots of power (Kia calls it “The Power to Surprise”). Handling was responsive and secure, thanks to features like antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability control, and downhill brake/hill-start assist control. The 3.5-liter V6 engine delivered 276 horsepower and 248 foot-pounds of torque. The six-speed automatic transmission (with

It helps to know the essentials for changing transmission fluid By Brad Bergholdt McClatchy-Tribune News Service

I’m due for an automatic transmission fluid Q : change for an ’04 Accord V6 with 126,218 miles on it. The owner’s manual recommends draining and filling the ATF Z1 four times, driving and moving the car through all gears between each drain and fill. I’ve contacted three mechanics, including two Honda mechanics who told me they only do one drain and fill because that’s all that is necessary. One mechanic said you only need to drain and fill four times for the first change, so as to dilute out the incorrect fluid that was put in by the factory. Another said you only need to do one drain and fill if the fluid is warmed up, rather than cool. Which procedure is correct, and why? Wow, this is like asking three doctors why your elbow hurts! Opening the drain plug of your automatic transmission allows only about 40 percent (3.1 quart) of the fluid to escape. The remaining fluid is trapped in the torque converter and a multitude of internal places and passages. This makes a great case for draining/refilling several times (and running the transmission through its paces between) in order to turn the tide on the old fluid. The more times one repeats the process the smaller the percentage of

A :

old fluid remains. Draining an engine of oil when warm makes a lot of sense, but I don’t see how it makes a big difference with low viscosity automatic transmission fluid. Honda has come out with a new ATF DW1 fluid that offers improved cold transmission performance and improved fuel economy, compared to the original ATF-Z which has been discontinued. The new Honda specified fluid can be mixed with old in any ratio and isn’t too pricey at about $7.50 per quart. How can you tell when Q : your battery terminals need cleaning? I’ve had or seen a few cars that had horribly dirty looking terminals but there seemed to be no problems caused by it. And then there was the time my car wouldn’t start and the clean looking terminals turned out to be what caused it. With the computers in cars now it seems like it’s best not to disconnect the cables to clean them unless you really need to. This is a great question with an easy solution, if it’s a top terminal battery. A corroded battery terminal can lead to starting problems, odd computer glitches, and even radio static. A simple voltage drop test will tell you the real story about terminal performance. You’ll need a basic multimeter (Sears Craftsman

A :

.82139 is a favorite at about $30) and a helper. With the meter set to volts DC, press/hold the red lead tip against the battery positive post and the black lead to the cable clamp (only a half inch or so apart). Watch closely as your helper cranks the starter — keep hands and leads clear of moving parts! A reading of 0.2 volts or less indicates an acceptably small amount of voltage drop across the connection during the most severe service the terminal connection will ever see. If the engine starts too quickly to see the reading clearly, press the data hold button (prior) and the meter will record a snapshot. Next, check the negative terminal in the same way, this time black lead to post and red to clamp. This quick test unfortunately can’t be performed on side terminal batteries as the cable end obscures access to the battery terminal. A reading above 0.2 volts indicates terminal cleaning is needed. — Bergholdt teaches automotive technology. Email questions to under-the-hood@earthlink.net.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

manual-shift feature) shifted smoothly. Inside, the SX was very comfortable, with just-right thigh support; power heated/ cooled driver’s seat with lumbar support; tilt/telescopic, leather-wrapped, heated steering wheel with controls for the audio system, Bluetooth wireless devices, and cruise control; and dual-zone climate control with an ionized air filter. The driver’s seat and outside mirror also

had memory settings. The cruise control was easy to use, and the included navigation system (with Sirius Traffic and rearview-camera display) was exceptional — easy to program and to follow with precise directions and easy-to-read map. The excellent Infinity Surround Sound audio system shared the touch screen with the navigation system and was easy to program using either “old school” buttons and

knobs or the touch screen. A USB port, an auxiliary input jack and an iPod connection were located under the center of the dash, along with two 12-volt outlets. The trip computer features a trip meter, odometer, and information regarding fuel remaining (18.5 gallon tank), range (miles until empty) and current average mileage (22 mpg in my case, with multiple short stop-and-go trips near home). An ECO indicator alerts the driver when achieving optimum fuel economy, to help adjust driving habits to stretch the time between fillups. EPA ratings for the V6 with all-wheel drive are 18 mpg in the city and 24 on the highway. The 2.4 liter with manual transmission is rated at 20/27 and seats five; the 2.4-liter with six-speed automatic is 22/32. Five passengers can sit comfortably in the front and middle seats, and two additional can fit in the third seat, if necessary, but that seat is quite small and is probably good only for children or very short trips. The second row seatbacks fold and recline in a 60/40 configuration using a lever on the top of the seatback. I found the folding process a little awkward as the seatbacks (and the passenger seat) were heavy, and there was no power-assist. The front seats need to be pulled forward some to allow enough room for the second row to fold flat. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety gave the 2012 Sorento a “Good” overall rating for safety — the highest — making the vehicle a Top Safety Pick. Total price of the tester was $37,200, including freight and options.


Pole Pedal Paddle special section

Complete Pole Pedal Paddle results by category ELITE MEN 01-99 1 Freeman; Kris, Bend 2 Boone; Andrew, Bend 3 Violett; Zachary C, Bend 4 Condon; Michael J, Bend 5 Adams; Jason S, Bend 6 Ness; Ryan, Bend 7 Tedrow; Jason, Bend 8 Fox; Matt E, Bend 9 Burruss; Oliver, Bend 10 Vraniak; Peter, Bend 11 Jorgensen; Brian, Bend 12 Cavanagh; Jordon, Bend 13 Price; Howard, Bend

1:46:00 1:46:57 1:49:39 1:51:07 1:54:10 1:55:29 1:55:57 1:56:52 1:57:19 1:57:38 2:00:58 2:14:19 2:40:22

ELITE WOMEN 01-99 1 Howe; Stephanie M, Bend 2 Wellington; Mary, Bend 3 Blackwelder; Brooke, Bend 4 Daubeny; Carolyn, Bend 5 Smith; Isabel, Bend

2:01:05 2:06:28 2:11:51 2:14:02 2:18:05

MASTER ELITE MEN 01-99 1 Rogers; Bruce, Bend 2 Bowman; Dave, Bend 3 Carney; Chris A, Bend

1:53:10 2:12:37 2:26:55

MASTER ELITE WOMEN 01-99 1 Jakubowski; Lisa, Bend 2 Munck; Kirsten, Bend

2:28:03 2:32:34

MALE PAIRS 01-12 1 Beach N’ Bombers, Bend 2 Tnt, Bend

2:17:04 2:26:40

MALE PAIRS 13-17 1 Sba, Truckee 2 Axe Lax, Eugene 3 Big Foot Boys, Bend 4 This Is A Stupid Name!, Bend 5 Sons Of Old Guys, Bend

2:12:04 2:18:49 2:19:48 2:23:15 2:25:31

MALE PAIRS 18-24 1 Victorious Secret, Truckee 1:58:43 2 Off In The Shower, Bend 2:07:31 3 Moonlight Five Racing, Eugene 2:11:14 4 Jay-Schwarz, Bend 2:11:19 5 Harder; Better; Faster; Stronge, Portland 2:13:48 6 This Is Hard, Aloha 2:26:54 7 Live The Dream, Portland 2:35:53 8 Brotein, Bend 2:39:36 9 Dudezilla, Redmond 2:47:12 10 Maybe Mayhem, Portland 2:51:42 MALE PAIRS 25-34 1 Rogue Harder!, Hood River 1:52:54 2 Get Jacked!, Bend 1:57:02 3 Evan Williams Has Electrolytes? 2:03:45 4 Mullets And Muscle Milk Mustach 2:05:29 5 Margarita Men, Portland 2:08:31 6 Velvet Hammer, Klamath Falls 2:11:01 7 Team Visalus, Bend 2:11:18 8 Duck Hunt, Lake Oswego 2:11:29 9 Dumb & Dumber, Bend 2:12:31 10 Peter; Paul And Mary Too!, Portland 2:16:33 11 The Ewen Bandits, Bend 2:17:35 12 Johnny & Roy, Bend 2:19:55 13 Trail Boss, Bend 2:20:23 14 Boise Bruisers, Nampa 2:20:41 15 Duck Butter, Portland 2:22:07 16 Pass The Danish, Portland 2:27:35 17 Dasnet, Portland 2:30:00 18 Jeradam Schreding, Hillsboro 2:30:11 19 Round Mountain Runners, Sisters 2:30:39 20 Tacc Attack, Central Point 2:31:35 21 B-Dawgs, Bend 2:36:04 22 Murphy’s Law Firm, Portland 2:37:43 23 Cock And Balls, Bend 2:40:02 24 The Edge, Bend 2:43:03 25 Bill Braskey All Stars, Lake Oswego 2:57:01 26 Car Ramrod, Bend 3:02:47 27 Katadyn Kickers, Portland 3:03:09 28 Adult Supervision Required, Bend 3:19:09 29 Amazing, Atlanta 4:01:31 30 Those Shorts Are Too Small!, Pasadena 4:55:43 MALE PAIRS 35-44 1 Montana Beef, Bend 2 Tuscano/schloss, Truckee 3 Roguishly Yours, Portland 4 Rolf Prima 60x11 T Booyah!, Eugene 5 Transcanada, Arlington 6 Thursday Powder, Bend 7 Bangers & Mash Ride Again, Bend 8 Juniper Fever, Bend 9 Fat Men In A Little Boat, Bend 10 Us Adaptive Nordic, Rathdrum 11 Pancho And Lefty, Redmond 12 Mikes A Girl, Bend 13 Just Stop The Bleeding, Eagle Point 14 Berry Loco, Bend 15 Paddledry.Com, Camas 16 Upstate Cheeseheads, Bend 17 Liquid Force, Bend 18 Rusty Hammers, Bend 19 Timm / Sanders, Bend 20 Hurricane Hoser, Bend 21 Cruise Brothers, Gaston 22 Ion, Portland 23 Rum N Coke’s, Bend 24 Glovedads, Bend

1:55:09 1:55:47 1:58:12 2:00:35 2:08:34 2:10:22 2:11:36 2:13:06 2:14:03 2:21:32 2:22:02 2:24:07 2:24:47 2:25:30 2:28:14 2:29:33 2:36:04 2:36:21 2:38:19 2:44:02 2:44:41 2:51:10 2:55:20 3:17:25

MALE PAIRS 45-54 1 Team Guy, Bend 2 Waylon And Willie, Bend 3 Style Porieche, Bend 4 Center Folds, Bend 5 The Wychus Brothers, Sisters 6 Lucky N’ Wreck-Less, Bend 7 The Churnin’ Germans, Bend 8 Fonebone, Madras 9 Coby & Eric, Hood River 10 Oregon Paddle Sports, Eugene 11 Coop’s Troops Duo, La Pine 12 Loan Arrangers, Bend

1:49:02 1:54:35 1:55:23 2:03:46 2:06:46 2:16:45 2:21:25 2:27:50 2:36:56 2:43:29 2:46:27 3:12:55

MALE PAIRS 55-59 1 George And Sandy, Bend 2 Tome/stoltz, Redmond

2:11:34 3:30:03

45 Tay’s Team, Bend 2:51:52 46 Team Timony, Newberg 2:52:23 47 4squirrels2nuts, Bend 2:54:19 48 Bratton Family, Bend 2:55:30 49 The Dj Girls, Bend 2:56:56 50 Outlaws, Bend 2:57:59 51 Familie Harder Von Yamhill, Yamhill 2:58:13 52 Johnston 5 And 2 Rains, Salem 2:58:36 53 Gma’s Crew, Santa Clara 2:58:46 54 Australian_for_beer, Bend 3:00:09 55 Team Macht Schnell, Bend 3:01:21 56 Pole Dancers, Chicago 3:02:46 57 Indecision, Bend 3:04:25 58 Team Visser, Redmond 3:05:10 59 Femme Fatales, Eugene 3:05:19 60 Team Skelton, Terrebonne 3:07:26 61 The U Quad, Bend 3:07:46 62 Just Not Last Place 2012, Vancouver3:08:28 63 The Harris Hamlin Family, Bend 3:09:20 64 Maximumwill, Bend 3:10:36 65 We All Won, Jacksonville 3:19:30 66 Cuidado Piso Mojado, Bend 3:19:58 67 Black Butte Porter Makes Me Sparkle, 4:01:08

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Paddlers make their way upriver as onlookers fill the footbridge in Bend’s Old Mill District to watch the paddling portion of the Pole Pedal Paddle on the Deschutes River on Saturday. COED PAIRS 18-24 1 Gangstar Ninja, South Lake Tahoe 2 Piece Of Cake, Eugene

2:04:44 2:18:11

COED PAIRS 25-34 1 Ole And Lena, Eugene 2 Waste Not Thy Hour, Bellingham 3 Shrimp & Grits, Jacksonville 4 Cooperschenk, Klamath Falls 5 It Takes Two To Tango, Seattle 6 Broom Sweepers, Jacksonville 7 Reign In Snow, Portland 8 Panda-Monium, Bend 9 Slayer, Bend 10 Superman Banana, Boise 11 Jack And Lynn, Bend 12 Here For Beer, Portland 13 Leonard & Ralphie, Portland 14 Hot Granola, Bend 15 Dynamic Drake Duo, Bend 16 Double Aa, Bend 17 Wikispeedia, Portland 18 Team Radson, The Dalles 19 Team Taylor, Bend

2:18:55 2:22:43 2:22:44 2:22:53 2:24:10 2:24:40 2:25:49 2:31:21 2:33:31 2:34:39 2:36:20 2:39:55 2:41:43 2:42:43 2:43:28 3:11:20 3:16:59 3:21:36 4:23:30

COED PAIRS 35-44 1 Desert Orthopedics, Bend 2 Date Night, Hood River 3 At And Hg, Bend 4 Bacon And Leggs, Bend 5 Alihans, Bend 6 Yo Mama, West Linn 7 Mudshark, Coeur D Alene 8 Lute Clean Up Crew, Bend 9 Rams Stampede, Bend 10 Somali Pirates, Bend 11 Touche’, Redmond 12 Red Kadijos, Bend 13 Plant Powered Partners, Bend 14 North And South Unite!, Bend 15 Blistered Chickens, Bend 16 Team Newport, South Beach 17 Team Nueve, Bend 18 Elohim, Parma 19 Jammers, Bend 20 Amf, Bend 21 O-Schmittendorff, Bend 22 Umbrella, Washougal 23 Thunder Rose, Corvallis 24 Lobsters, Bend 25 Beat The Flemings!, Bend 26 Team Nafzger, Boise 27 Bend Like Bamboo, Portland 28 Talk Nerdy To Me, Portland 29 Teambo 3.0, Talent 30 Team Ravassipour, Medford 31 Cancan, Bend 32 1juiceduck, Portland 33 Team Howgner: We Just Want Beat 34 Think Lightning, Redmond

2:02:31 2:05:58 2:07:11 2:08:28 2:09:28 2:09:48 2:11:58 2:15:43 2:16:11 2:19:06 2:24:54 2:26:26 2:27:00 2:30:49 2:31:04 2:31:46 2:33:09 2:36:14 2:38:13 2:39:24 2:40:04 2:46:26 2:46:41 2:47:17 2:48:56 2:51:31 2:54:57 2:57:43 2:58:45 3:03:56 3:04:51 3:14:50 3:29:31 3:59:45

COED PAIRS 45-54 1 Just Us, Bend 2 Touchette/churchill, Bend 3 Rolf Primadonna’s, Eugene 4 Homestead, Anchorage 5 M & C Hammers, Bend 6 We <heart> Goalie Fights, Portland 7 Mtn Wren, Sisters 8 Happy 10th-Skaal!, Bend 9 Coasting Uphill, Bend 10 The Tortoise And The Hare, Bend 11 Trading Places, Bend 12 Team Trifecta Sbfers, Star

2:08:00 2:10:01 2:18:32 2:22:12 2:22:26 2:28:06 2:28:51 2:35:10 2:40:53 2:46:30 3:13:46 3:20:56 2:10:36 2:25:28 2:52:16 3:09:14

2:29:11

COED PAIRS 60-64 1 Say Two, Sunriver, 2 The Odd Couple, Portland 3 Gadski, Hood River

2:28:02 2:40:50 2:53:53

MALE PAIRS 70-98 1 Lew And Roger, Redmond

2:43:33

TANDEM PAIRS 01-17 1 Michael & Zeb, Bend

2:24:18

FEMALE PAIRS 13-17 1 Team Victorious Secret, Truckee 2 Tenacious Turtles, Bend 3 Honorary Hippos, Bend 4 Dud Duo, Bend 5 Motley Craw, Bend

2:31:55 2:38:13 2:48:35 3:05:35 3:46:55

TANDEM PAIRS 25-34 1 Ex-Bendites, Bellingham 2 Go E & J!, Corvallis 3 It’s A Vd Thing, Bend 4 Who’s Watching The Kids?, Bend 5 Waterloo, Bend 6 Schmoopy & Love Bug, Bend 7 Prestige Worldwide, Bend 8 Black Eyed Betties, Bend 9 Honey Badgers, Milwaukie 10 Fringe Division, Bend

2:25:59 2:26:55 2:28:51 2:29:58 2:30:24 2:35:11 2:42:43 2:50:12 2:57:15 3:31:59

TANDEM PAIRS 35-44 1 Lantz Alot, Eugene 2 Not Those Kochs, Bend 3 Hopefully Home By Happy Hour 4 Pressprich Duo, Bend 5 Terminal Mavity, Bend 6 Stopchip, Bend 7 Green Mountain Bros, Bend 8 Mighty Marsh-Rhodes Renegades 9 Eman Meat, Bend 10 Team Jamel, Sisters

2:27:45 2:27:47 2:39:03 2:40:13 2:41:27 2:48:37 2:52:23 2:57:14 3:05:57 3:13:27

TANDEM PAIRS 60-64 1 Like The Wind, Bend

3:02:52

2:16:00 2:26:35 2:32:04 2:34:34 2:36:36 2:46:36

MALE PAIRS 65-69 1 Peons, Corvallis

FEMALE PAIRS 18-24 1 Funke, Albany 2 Les Putains, Corvallis

2:43:56 2:45:52

FEMALE PAIRS 25-34 1 Sup, Bend 2 Sisters Take Three, Redmond 3 Viking Vixens, Portland 4 Klam Chowder Ii, Klamath Falls 5 Mutton Busters, Portland 6 Megan Katie, Portland 7 Meyros, Portland

2:14:39 2:27:15 2:54:18 2:58:34 3:13:58 3:22:16 3:39:51

FEMALE PAIRS 35-44 1 Fast Forty Furious Fems, Bend 2 Mavchin, Bend 3 2 Gals, Bend 4 Katz, Bend 5 Keta’s Girls, Bend 6 Run Little Piggies, Bend 7 Sheryl & Courtney, Boise 8 Livin’ The Good Life, Bend 9 20 Pounds, Bend 10 Gbc’s, Bend 11 Domination In Tandem, Portland 12 Feisty Soles, Boise 13 Betcha We, Bend 14 K Squared, Eugene 15 Huff And Puff, Vancouver

2:10:20 2:16:17 2:17:50 2:31:27 2:34:35 2:37:55 2:40:45 2:40:56 2:41:44 2:42:30 2:44:25 2:56:34 3:05:50 3:08:03 3:42:23

FEMALE PAIRS 45-54 1 Downing & Wose, Bend 2 Monalisa, Bend 3 Tina Pavelic, Susan Hopkins, Bend 4 Two Of A Kind, Redmond 5 Snow And Sun Girls, Sisters 6 Gay & Elizabeth, San Mateo

2:09:55 2:17:49 2:26:01 2:31:11 2:36:21 3:03:21

FEMALE PAIRS 60-64 1 Nordic Chicks-Sue And Dagmar, Bend 2:15:58 COED PAIRS 13-17 1 Team Pb, Truckee

2:08:32

PPP { Pole Pedal Paddle 2012 The 36th edition of Central Oregon’s signature multisport race From Mount Bachelor to Bend • Saturday, May 19

BUSINESS/SERVICE TEAM 01-98 1 Sunnyside Sports, Bend 2:03:24 2 Desert Orthopedics, Bend 2:04:32 3 Group Mack Attack, Portland 2:04:49 4 Gus, Portland 2:18:37 5 Pac Med, Bend 2:23:40 6 The Screaming Pomonella, Bend 2:27:54 7 Hasson Manly Men, Bend 2:29:17 8 The 3 Stooges, Boise 2:40:08 9 Umpqua Bank, Bend 2:41:54 10 Harmony House Of Bend, Bend 2:42:30 11 Grace Bible Church Of Bend, Bend 2:44:11 12 Ls Networks’ Bandwidth Busters 2:48:03 13 Team Topo, Bend 2:49:10 14 Whpacific - All Comers, Portland 2:50:05 15 Greasebus, Portland 2:50:41 16 Columbia Bank Couch Demons, Bend 2:53:46 17 Hasson-Hasson, Bend 2:53:56 18 Trader Joe’s Marching Lobster, Bend 2:54:44 19 News Channel 21, Bend 2:58:00 20 Hall Dental Team, Bend 2:59:46 21 Newport Ave Market, Bend 3:00:05 22 Gillespie Graphics, Wilsonville 3:01:19 23 Venturing Crew 679, Vancouver 3:15:29 24 Redhawk, Bend 3:25:30

COED PAIRS 55-59 1 Transit Time, Bend 2 Large And In Charge, Bend 3 Endless Summer, Bend 4 Eyesrus, Portland

MALE PAIRS 60-64 1 Slow Twitch Nap Dogs, Par. Valley 2 Always An Adventure, Bend 3 Vito Roti’s Grandkids, Bend 4 Corvallis Curmudgeons, Corvallis 5 Deux Chevres Vieux!, Bend 6 Canon’s Grandpa’s: R&b Classics

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

TANDEM PAIRS 70-98 1 Coppertop, Redmond

2:58:30

MALE INDIVIDUAL01-12 1 Cravens; Minam, Bend 2 Lukens; Joseph D, Bend 3 Ringo; Joe, Bend 4 Hassell; Forrest, Bend

2:14:07 2:36:50 2:59:56 3:23:00

MALE INDIVIDUAL13-15 1 Shannon; Casey, Bend 2 Moon; Jeremy, Bend 3 Roslund; Riley, Bend 4 Peters; Luke O, Bend 5 Rich; Carlos C, Bend

2:19:32 2:33:26 2:40:24 2:46:47 2:46:58

MALE INDIVIDUAL16-19 1 Schwarz; Peter, Bend 2 Giannioses; Niko, Bend 3 Stauffer; Reed, Eagle 4 Curtis; Samuel, Corvallis

2:18:54 2:27:30 2:28:02 2:39:16

MALE INDIVIDUAL20-24 1 Brown; Kevin R, Bend 2 Runberg; Damon M, Bend 3 Gamm; Michael L, Bend 4 Condon; James, Bend 5 Walsh; Tyler, Bend 6 Wunder; John B, Bend

2:04:19 2:14:59 2:16:18 2:22:05 2:24:11 2:37:04

MALE INDIVIDUAL25-29 1 Schwind; Adam, Portland 2 MacKenzie; Ryan J, Newberg 3 Erdman; Charles, Klamath Falls 4 Roth; Ian H, Corvallis 5 Jones; Jay, Bend 6 Woods; Chris M, Portland 7 Rodgers; Sean, Eugene 8 Shamrell; Nicholas A, Vancouver 9 Helmstead; Kris G, Bend 10 Wyeth; Nate C, Redmond 11 Stevenson; Ben J, Silverton

2:23:09 2:23:31 2:23:58 2:26:33 2:31:55 2:45:07 2:53:43 2:54:45 3:06:13 3:28:42 3:29:16

MALE INDIVIDUAL30-34 1 Johnston; Joshua M, Portland 2 Conklin; Kenneth A, Bend 3 Mast; Devin H, Bend 4 Baumann; Dan, Bend 5 Anderson; Ethan H, Portland 6 Lee; Kalin, Corvallis 7 Sandburg; Kyle A, Seattle 8 Usher; Andrew, Portland 9 Berg; Tommy, Bend 10 McMahon; Ryan P, Bend 11 Layman; Andy J, Bend 12 Taylor; Travis, Redmond 13 Jackson; Eric, Sunriver 14 McCoy; Dan, Bend 15 Westfall; Kyle, Oakland 16 Carnahan; Clay J, Portland 17 Timm; Ryan, Bend 18 Moore; Chris W, Portland 19 Achterman; Peter S, Portland 20 Grube; Anton D, Philomath 21 Troullier; Glenn, Bend 22 Meyrowitz; Jeffrey, Portland 23 Spahr; Geoff, Lake Oswego 24 Appel; Brian, Salem

2:04:10 2:13:43 2:18:59 2:19:51 2:24:21 2:26:33 2:28:14 2:28:36 2:31:44 2:32:35 2:34:23 2:34:57 2:36:51 2:42:33 2:44:53 2:53:03 2:53:04 2:54:36 2:55:29 2:59:27 3:02:04 3:09:50 3:09:52 3:24:50

MALE INDIVIDUAL35-39 1 Riley; Todd, Bend 2 Hammer; Erik K, Bend 3 Bliesner; Ben R, Rhododendron 4 Swanson; John, Bend 5 Bruce; Gary, Redmond 6 Williamson; John, Bend 7 Kapsa; Wesley, Bend 8 Hayner; Derek, Bend 9 Stilson; Rick, Bend 10 Mitchell; Bart, Bend 11 Chapman; Andy, Bend 12 Teuber; Jed, Bend 13 Monger; Brock, Redmond 14 Pier; Steven F, Bend 15 Sorenson; Eric L, Bend 16 Storey; Casey M, Nehalem 17 Bower; Travis R, Redmond 18 Smith; Andrew J, Eugene 19 Toms; Andrew, Bend 20 Freeman; Chad, Portland 21 Brooks; Derrick, Vancouver 22 Hautau; Alex J, San Francisco 23 Kinane; William P, Santa Rosa 24 Miller; Simon, Portland 25 Cheng; Anton, Portland 26 Scattergood; Sean, Rainier 27 Croft; Cooper, Pleasant Hill

1:58:24 2:05:28 2:14:51 2:19:16 2:21:36 2:24:04 2:24:04 2:25:27 2:29:45 2:30:52 2:38:26 2:38:30 2:38:49 2:39:19 2:41:45 2:44:05 2:46:09 2:58:02 3:04:01 3:04:50 3:06:20 3:19:48 3:23:49 3:24:15 3:26:05 3:31:03 4:24:26

MALE INDIVIDUAL40-44 1 Rankin; Brian, Bend 2 Moore; Jay, Bend 3 Bell; Jake, Bend 4 White; Roger, Bend 5 Cauble; Dave A, Bend 6 Rogan; Joe, Boise 7 Ranger; The Bone, Bend 8 Hoiness; Tim, Bend 9 Sieveking; David, Bend 10 Corey; Randy K, Tualatin 11 Sills; Mike, Portland 12 Morrow; Kirk, Bend 13 Wayland; David, Bend 14 Pilver; Dan, Bend 15 Pederson; Erik S, Bend 16 Stroud; Daniel, Bend 17 McPartland; John, Vancouver 18 Wells; Jason, Sherwood

2:07:39 2:15:10 2:17:06 2:17:15 2:23:10 2:27:01 2:28:34 2:35:12 2:38:38 2:42:26 2:42:50 2:43:26 2:44:24 2:44:41 2:45:04 2:53:37 3:19:47 3:24:41

MALE INDIVIDUAL45-49 1 St.Clair; Tom, Tumwater 2 Peters; Rick, Bend 3 Huegel; Jerry, Bend 4 Ford; Barrett D, Sisters 5 Coe; Michael, Bend 6 Thompson; Dan, Bend 7 Swisher; Dave, Bend 8 Cummins; Andrew, Portland 9 Fineran; Ben, Redmond 10 Schriber; David, Portland 11 Bibeau; William, Bend 12 Sutton; Owen, Bend 13 Kavanaugh; Bob, Hood River

2:05:00 2:14:24 2:22:03 2:24:10 2:26:07 2:37:04 2:42:17 2:43:34 3:01:24 3:03:48 3:25:10 3:26:39 3:26:39

MALE INDIVIDUAL50-54 1 Maurer; Mike, Bend 2 McLandress; Michael, Bend 3 Nicholson; Brad L, Sisters 4 Salmond; Steve, Bend 5 Cox; Chuck, Corvallis 6 Crozier; Stephen, Bend 7 Marthaller; Wayne A, Medford 8 Tompkins; Al, Bend 9 Peplin; Todd M, Redmond 10 Lenhart; David, Bend 11 Dommen; Frank, Burlingame 12 Fairgrieve; John P, Vancouver 13 Tomseth; Matt, Bend 14 Henkle; Douglas B, Gresham 15 Seglund; Paul, Bend 16 Kohlwes; Jeff, Mill Valley 17 Evans; Kevan M, Lebanon 18 Elder; Dale, Sisters

2:20:12 2:22:25 2:22:58 2:32:20 2:38:52 2:45:22 2:48:18 2:52:01 2:53:19 2:56:42 2:56:55 2:58:07 3:00:06 3:00:57 3:03:58 3:08:00 3:38:32 3:42:28

MALE INDIVIDUAL55-59 1 Mavis; Craig E, Bend 2 Davis; Mike, Hillsboro 3 Bronson; Kenneth R, Sweet Home 4 Krist; Vern M, Portland 5 Brewer; Marc, Portland 6 St.Clair; Brad, Philomath 7 Winsor; Keith C, Bend 8 Groner; David P, Lake Oswego

2:29:34 2:37:07 2:42:38 2:42:52 2:43:00 2:45:59 2:48:54 2:50:37

9 Izdepski; Brian A, Edmonds 10 Patrignani; Stewart M, Davis 11 Williams; Bruce W, Leavenworth 12 Fanning; Jack, Portland 13 Benson; Ron, Santa Cruz 14 Page; Nelson G, Anchorage

3:01:52 3:23:00 3:30:41 3:37:35 3:38:18 3:39:00

MALE INDIVIDUAL60-64 1 Buns; Dr., Bend 2 Cheney; Amory, Bend 3 Dirksen; Mike, Cottage Grove 4 Hinkley; Bert, Bend 5 Johnson; Eddie, Bend 6 Reynolds; Bob, Bend 7 Wells; Jim, Bend 8 Roadman; Ken, Bend 9 Chick; Dennis, Bend

2:14:38 2:16:13 2:24:11 2:27:03 2:32:22 2:36:46 2:42:52 2:47:47 3:24:16

MALE INDIVIDUAL65-69 1 Reynolds; Gary, Bend 2 Elliott; James P, Bend 3 Galloway; Bruce, Grants Pass 4 Burwell; Henry W, Bend

2:39:30 2:44:57 3:09:10 4:04:29

MALE INDIVIDUAL70-74 1 Martin; Bill, Bend 2 Peterson; Reider, Ashland 3 Arnold; Richard, Bend

2:53:10 3:02:27 4:04:34

MALE INDIVIDUAL75-98 1 Gilpin; Ernie, Bend

4:09:39

FEMALE INDIVIDUAL1-12 1 Gorman; Michaela, Bend

2:40:43

FEMALE INDIVIDUAL13-15 1 Brooks; Olivia, Bend 2 Hyde; Emily, Bend 3 Gorman; Sadie Ann, Bend

2:50:41 2:51:51 2:58:01

FEMALE INDIVIDUAL16-19 1 Lane; Kate, Kilchberg 2 Nock; Katie, Gresham 3 Houghton; Tatum J, Gresham

2:31:38 3:46:36 3:46:36

FEMALE INDIVIDUAL20-24 1 Scott; Lily M, Bend 2 Pressprich; Nicole E, Bend FEMALE INDIVIDUAL25-29 1 Shekell; Taylor, Portland 2 Hogan; Hillary, Bend 3 Adair; Camille R, Kirkland 4 Werner; Courtney J, Bend

2:29:47 2:38:34 2:25:26 3:38:40 3:45:55 3:50:03

FEMALE INDIVIDUAL30-34 1 Bradbury; Pam J, Bend 2 Brandt; Meredith L, Bend 3 Morris; Melissa, Bend 4 Buell; Melodie, Bend 5 Park; Anna, Bend 6 Smith; Jessica L, Bend 7 Bliesner; Kristen C, Rhododendron 8 Ford; Katie A, Bend 9 Nichols; Melinda, Bend

2:24:26 2:28:43 2:31:56 2:33:18 2:40:19 2:42:24 2:51:45 2:58:15 3:17:34

FEMALE INDIVIDUAL35-39 1 Piper; Tania, Bend 2 Toms; Karla, Bend 3 Kennedy; Bobbi, Portland 4 Rogan; Jennifer C, Boise 5 Redmond; Kathy L, Bend

2:22:18 3:00:13 3:05:27 3:11:40 3:16:04

FEMALE INDIVIDUAL40-44 1 Fitts; Shelly, Bend 2 Teuber; Noelle P, Bend 3 Halpern; Melinda, Bend

2:22:50 2:47:28 2:51:52

FEMALE INDIVIDUAL45-49 1 Welland; Kathleen M, Parkdale 2 Holcomb; Annette, Bend 3 Costello; Karen, Wilsonville

2:27:07 2:27:30 3:33:16

FEMALE INDIVIDUAL50-54 1 Stevenson; Pam, Bend 2 Demattei; Siena M, Portland 3 Opsal; Connie, Eugene 4 Wilson; Louise E, Bend 5 Corbari; Sandy, Bend 6 Standley; Maribeth, Meridian

2:22:36 2:30:48 2:49:04 3:11:46 3:14:40 3:16:54

FEMALE INDIVIDUAL55-59 1 Buer; Gro A, Leavenworth

3:40:41

FEMALE INDIVIDUAL60-64 1 Addison; Cat S, Bend

3:27:44

FEMALE TEAM 01-12 1 High Voltage, Bend 2 Triple Threat, Bend

2:34:26 2:44:40

FEMALE TEAM 13-15 1 Zac Efron Is Hot, Bend 2 3.14159 Addicts, Bend 3 Team Rainbow, Bend 4 Team Joffa, Bend

2:32:50 2:33:08 2:49:16 2:56:17

FEMALE TEAM 20-24 1 Rebound / U.S. Ski Team, Bend

2:00:28

FEMALE TEAM 25-29 1 Rebound / U.S. Ski Team, Bend 2 Party In Your Pantsuit, Portland 3 Drugs On Toast, Bend Or 4 One Kick A$$ Bride And Her Craz

2:02:32 2:53:37 3:09:53 3:11:50

FEMALE TEAM 30-34 1 Addicted To Winning, Bend 2 Flat, Portland 3 Revenge Of The Nerds, Bend 4 Dave’s Team, Bend 5 No Killer Bunnies, Eugene 6 Gangrene, Bend 7 The Better Halves, Saint Paul

2:07:36 2:29:32 2:33:50 2:37:51 2:58:58 3:11:20 3:22:32

FEMALE TEAM 35-39 1 Hdc / C&r Group, Bend 2 We Have No Name, Bend 3 Wonder Girls, Bend 4 Powered By Estrogen, Bend 5 Super Sonic, Bend 6 Cardio Junkies, Medford 7 Eggstrordinary, Bend 8 The Good Time Gals, Bend 9 Moms Who Rock, Bend 10 Better Halves, Bend 11 Tough Tushies, Portland 12 Soul Sisters, Bend 13 Team Propel, Ridgefield 14 Not That Kind Of Dr., Bend

2:20:53 2:22:12 2:26:16 2:32:20 2:37:29 2:42:45 2:47:23 2:49:02 2:49:16 2:49:39 2:57:39 3:16:28 3:22:41 3:24:39

15 Funky Ducks, Eugene 16 Intensity, Vancouver

3:44:39 3:51:00

FEMALE TEAM 40-44 1 The Tuffs, Crater Lake 2 Marajj, Bend 3 Power Of She, Sisters 4 Tara And The Pussycats, L. Oswego 5 Tweedle Beetle Pole Peddle Padd 6 Turbo Ninjas, Bend 7 The Grrrlllzzz!!, Redmond 8 Eat Our Cookies, Bend 9 Loco Ladies, Bend 10 High Lakes Health Care, Bend 11 Fine Whine, Eugene 12 Mountain Mommas, Lebanon

2:28:54 2:33:10 2:34:24 2:37:39 2:43:39 2:53:29 2:58:11 3:07:10 3:08:18 3:12:25 3:13:28 3:38:10

FEMALE TEAM 45-49 1 D And D, Bend 2 Superior Fit, Central Point 3 Sweaty Bettys, Bend 4 Appropos Of Nothing, Bend 5 Repurposed Runagades, Sunriver 6 Run Wild, Klamath Falls 7 Finish It!, Lake Oswego

2:07:12 2:21:36 2:30:20 2:34:08 3:04:11 3:07:16 3:18:35

FEMALE TEAM 50-54 1 Team Bring It On!, Portland 2 Bottle Blonds, Bend 3 Soggy Bottom Girls, Spokane 4 Ya Ya Sisters, Redmond 5 Next Year We Train!, Bend 6 Martini Mothers, Bend 7 Sisters With Blisters, Bend

2:43:11 2:45:45 2:45:51 2:46:00 2:48:30 3:02:49 3:18:39

FEMALE TEAM 55-59 1 Polka Dot Powered Princesses, Bend 2 Ipol Iped Ipad, Bend 3 Aged To Perfection, Boise 4 Show Your Work!, Portland

2:31:50 2:43:52 3:02:07 3:06:27

FEMALE TEAM 60-64 1 Gray Hares, Bend 2 Code 60, Bend 3 Mental Pausal, Bend 4 Bend’s Bodacious Babes, Bend 5 Hot Flashers, Davis

2:38:35 2:46:09 2:53:47 3:13:13 3:15:31

COED TEAM 13-15 1 The Shottonites, Bend

2:25:26

COED TEAM 16-19 1 Cthulhu, Bend 2 The Chillerz, Bend

2:19:23 2:43:18

COED TEAM 20-24 1 The European Racers, Corvallis 2 Just Let It Happen, Portland 3 Moving Bliss Happiness, Bend

2:31:31 2:41:29 3:04:15

COED TEAM 25-29 1 The Falcons, Portland 2:01:26 2 Teamluddskitweets, Portland 2:03:10 3 Five Pair And A Box, Bend 2:13:02 4 Shot In The Dark, Redmond 2:25:54 5 Reactive Power; Suckas, Portland 2:29:52 6 Porkbelly, Bend 2:36:44 7 Wolnick Warriors, Bend 2:40:44 8 Hertz Doughnut, Portland 2:41:37 9 MacH schnell, Portland 2:43:41 10 My Other Car, Woodburn 2:44:45 11 Easybar, Bend 2:45:51 12 Race Invaders, Seattle 2:46:17 13 Better Than The B Teams, Portland 2:47:05 14 The Eugene Machine, Eugene 2:48:40 15 Hustlin Owls, Portland 2:53:34 16 Prestige Worldwide...Wide...Wid, Bend 2:53:43 17 Wasted Potential, Bend 2:56:53 18 Team Scrimp, Klamath Falls 2:58:05 19 Stench Goose Posse, Bend 2:58:07 20 Stench Geese Honk!, Bend 2:58:27 21 Return Of The Rapture Babies, Estacada 3:00:39 22 Aflac, Bend 3:03:50 23 Calm As Hindu Cows, Tacoma 3:09:29 COED TEAM 30-34 1 Mazama Bar, Olympia 2:10:45 2 Symbiotics, Portland 2:21:05 3 Twenty’s Times Two, Tigard 2:21:41 4 Vlachness Monsters, Bend 2:22:51 5 Hamms Samich, Coos Bay 2:23:07 6 Walker Structural Engineering, Bend 2:24:30 7 The Three Amigos, Bend 2:30:41 8 Cornbread, Bend 2:31:42 9 Strench Goose Charge, Bend 2:31:43 10 McKadsimram, Bend 2:37:18 11 That’s What She Said, Sisters 2:37:19 12 Mismatch, Bend 2:38:12 13 Kai Boise Costume Party, Boise 2:42:45 14 G5 Alive, Bend 2:44:45 15 Super Troopers, St. Paul 2:46:28 16 Ale Stars, Central Point 2:47:54 17 More Than The Law Would Allow, Medford 2:54:35 18 Rjg Meta Athletes, Bend 2:57:21 19 Sock Rebels, Tigard 2:58:54 20 Unknown, 2:59:24 21 Stc, Portland 2:59:26 22 O’Izdepski, Edmonds 2:59:29 23 The Beer View Mirror, Bend 3:00:43 24 The Rapture Babies Return, Estacada3:01:01 25 The Viking And Vixens, Central Point 3:01:17 26 Sock Empire, Tigard 3:01:18 27 Knight Writers Of Sandy, Sandy 3:04:11 28 Simon Says Tina Binky & Butterb, Portland 3:09:36 29 Kami The Aces Stationary Biker, Bend 3:13:25 30 Barbra Streisand, McDonough 3:20:38 31 Mutiny, Portland 3:21:37 32 The Rural Jurors, Portland 3:26:03 33 Norfolk-In-Chance, Atlanta 3:43:58 COED TEAM 35-39 1 Therapeutic Associates Acb, Bend 2:09:44 2 Meatgoats, Eugene 2:10:40 3 Team Hang 11, Bend 2:12:08 4 4 Pales And A Stout, Bend 2:23:50 5 Recreational Hazards, Bend 2:25:42 6 Sour Punch, Bend 2:26:24 7 Oregon Orthopedic & Sports Medi, W. Linn 2:31:13 8 Brass-Ada Monkeys, Bend 2:32:32 9 Rouge Lemming, Ashland 2:34:25 10 Shredder, Bend 2:35:19 11 Smarty Pints, Beaverton 2:36:43 12 Dog Alley, Bend 2:37:40 13 Deschutes Multisport Club, Bend 2:38:48

14 Les Schwab X 5, Redmond 15 Red Vines, Bend 16 Real Women Have Muscles, Bend 17 Fab Five Plus 1, Portland 18 Five Fluffy Inches, Bend 19 Alcoholetes, Portland 20 Skin To Win, Bend 21 Totin’ Tots, Klamath Falls 22 Tycho Monolith, Bend 23 Ai Caramba!, Bend 24 Team Awesome!, Lake Oswego 25 Were Back!, Canby 26 Plow Plummet Plunge, Corvallis 27 Scenic, Central Point 28 Spooning Leads To Forking, Bend 29 Yes! We Have A Banana, Bend 30 Summit Self Storage, Medford 31 Blazing Arrows, Portland 32 Blue Toucan, Portland 33 Gado-Gado, Portland 34 Fraught With Peril, Bend 35 Cats Vs. Griz, Bend 36 Middle-Age Marvels, Bend 37 G5 Gangstars, Bend 38 The Honey Badgers, Lake Oswego 39 Push Prod Poke, Corvallis 40 Baker Charter Schools, Camas 41 Si SE Puede, Tigard 42 Funky Monkey, Portland

2:39:16 2:40:27 2:42:47 2:42:53 2:43:15 2:48:56 2:49:39 2:50:39 2:51:53 2:51:55 2:52:20 2:53:20 2:55:00 2:55:06 2:56:36 2:57:08 2:57:12 2:58:35 3:02:05 3:03:06 3:04:46 3:08:12 3:08:27 3:09:14 3:10:27 3:25:24 3:34:36 3:39:56 3:42:25

COED TEAM 40-44 1 Watch This, Bend 1:59:47 2 Bone Yard Cycling, Bend 2:11:05 3 Tbd, Bend 2:12:49 4 We Like Fast Girls, Portland 2:19:00 5 Peak Performance Punishers, Redmond 2:19:22 6 Winged Scapulas, Bend 2:21:01 7 Susan Kolb, Bend 2:23:46 8 Centurylink, Bend 2:25:47 9 Just For The Halibut, Lake Oswego 2:26:09 10 Pain Room, Bend 2:27:10 11 Cross Mountain Flyers, Portland 2:27:51 12 Beyond Adventurous, Bend 2:32:41 13 Weird Wilma And The Big Buckaro, Bend 2:32:51 14 Buono Beaters, Portland 2:33:59 15 Team Swift, Bend 2:36:08 16 Bef, Portland 2:36:23 17 Use It In A Sentence, Beaverton 2:36:28 18 Tutus & Handguns, Bend 2:39:24 19 Control-Alt-Delete, Bend 2:40:36 20 That Just Happened, Portland 2:40:44 21 Bill’s Fab 5, Banks 2:42:52 22 El Diablo & The Loopers, Bend 2:43:48 23 Otter Do It, Bend 2:45:14 24 B Adventurous, Bend 2:45:49 25 Idatrek, Bend 2:46:34 26 Hunkleys, Silverton 2:55:34 27 Skanska, Bend 2:59:55 28 District Twelve, Portland 3:03:55 29 The Vikings, La Pine 3:07:40 COED TEAM 45-49 1 Half Fast, Bend 2:01:53 2 Gonadal Shields, Bend 2:16:10 3 Spongebob Flash Mob, Redmond 2:24:59 4 Kami The Aces Stationary Biker, Bend 2:50:33 5 Squirrely Hollow, Bend 2:54:34 6 Suck My Tortoise Dust, Portland 2:57:16 7 Portland Tangoroos, West Linn 3:08:02 8 Creaky Creekers, Bend 3:28:49 COED TEAM 50-54 1 Fly Bye, Tigard 2 Tektronix 18, Lake Oswego 3 Out Of Kilter, Bend 4 Consolidatorsx2, Bend 5 Nanosonic Pajamas, Sandy 6 Arc Flash, Bend

2:16:27 2:17:32 2:22:19 2:39:40 2:58:52 3:02:38

COED TEAM 55-59 1 Porsche Club, Bend 2 She’ll Be Back, Yakima 3 Super Sunsetters 5.0, Bend 4 Abominable Slowmen, Bend 5 Better Late Than Never, Bend 6 Luckyguy, Bend

2:22:57 2:27:07 2:32:24 2:38:58 2:56:02 2:59:31

COED TEAM 60-64 1 Yeswecan, Bend 2:14:24 2 Kitty Boose Doggies, Bend 2:39:43 3 Loose Does From Sand Lilly Farm, Bend 3:09:48 COED TEAM 70-98 1 Steve; Mike; Chuck & Greg’s Gro, Bend 3:09:18 FAMILY TEAM 01-98 1 The Mcclain Clan, Bend 1:55:18 2 Un Dia En La Playa, Bend 1:57:38 3 Older, Bend 2:11:54 4 Team Smullin, Bend 2:14:48 5 Singleton Chicken Dinner, Sisters 2:17:06 6 Team Neville, Medford 2:18:28 7 Shakey Mess, Bend 2:22:38 8 Team Colon-Closing Parenthesis, Bend 2:24:20 9 Team Sjogren, Bend 2:25:39 10 Z Browns, Bend 2:26:39 11 Marapalooza, Bend 2:27:02 12 Equinabolix, Salem 2:27:06 13 Goodpeople Gone Bad, Tigard 2:27:34 14 Pine Ridge Inn Fam, Bend 2:28:17 15 Hodgerts 1981-2012, Bend 2:28:45 16 Hannons On, Portland 2:30:05 17 Swanee R Us, Bend 2:31:22 18 Hart Family, Portland 2:33:22 19 Three Vikings And A Roman, Bend 2:34:47 20 MacLean4, Tahoe City 2:36:04 21 Kung Fu Ninjas, Boise 2:36:25 22 Go Team Ryan, Bend 2:36:49 23 Rockbottom Racing, Juneau 2:37:15 24 Runbergrun, Bend 2:37:34 25 The Young & The Restless, Portland 2:40:33 26 Rolling Boulders, Klamath Falls 2:41:27 27 Harrer, Sisters 2:42:15 28 The Patzers, Corvallis 2:45:19 29 Pops Progeny & Partners, Bend 2:45:32 30 Lost In Bend, Tigard 2:45:43 31 Czech It Out ! 2, Bend 2:45:54 32 Bad A** Baileys, Bend 2:45:55 33 Team Tobiason, Bend 2:46:00 34 Eschelbach Boyz, Bend 2:46:19 35 The Funky Shmushkins, Menlo Park 2:47:19 36 Beam Team, Corvallis 2:47:27 37 Team Vostok, Corvallis 2:47:37 38 A Little Younger And More Restl, 2:48:01 39 Inlaws, Bend 2:48:23 40 Team Banjo, Bend 2:48:26 41 Optimystics, Bend 2:48:42 42 McGrath’s Mighty Minnow’s, Salem, 2:49:20 43 The Old; Young And Restless, 2:49:43 44 Grinnin Barretts, Bend 2:49:52

MUNICIPAL TEAM 01-98 1 Chased By Cops, Bend 1:58:50 2 Government Inaction, Bend 2:11:35 3 Terrebonne Terrors, Bend 2:14:18 4 Animal House, Oregon City 2:34:34 5 Cream Carney, Bend 2:36:06 6 Miss Diagnosed, Bend 3:18:00 7 Redmond Area Parks And Rec., Redmond 3:18:12 HIGH SCH TEAM 01-98 1 The Seven Peaks Geeks Of Bend, Bend 2:25:48 2 Oak Hill #1, Eugene 2:34:43 3 The Purple Potato Pirates, Bend 2:48:00 4 High Desert Wannabe’s, Bend 2:56:49 5 Oak Hill #2, Eugene 2:58:49 6 Oak Hill #3, Eugene 3:06:57 CHALLENGED 01-98 1 Team Onward!, Bend 2 No Boundaries!, Bend

2:48:45 3:51:05

OPEN TEAM 01-98 1 Tai Turbo, Bend 1:47:12 2 Tinh’s Vu Doo Magic, Bend 1:49:21 3 Timeless, Bend 2:03:30 4 Muckaroos, Portland 2:11:53 5 Team W.O.W., Bend 2:23:39 6 Oregon New Lawyers Division, Tigard 2:26:18 7 Can’t Grow Chest Hair, Portland 2:35:15 8 Travel-In Fitness, Bend 2:36:46 9 Gone To The Dogs, Bend 2:39:19 10 Wild Bill’s Posse, Eugene 2:41:11 11 Sole Sisters, Madras 2:43:11 12 Lt. Dan’s Platoon, Eugene 2:44:42 13 Curriculum Curators, Bend 2:45:10 14 Phatts Pheatures, Salem 2:46:56 15 Trifecta, Bend 2:52:56 16 Coop’s Troop, La Pine 2:57:25 17 The Doctor And Zero Patience, Bend 2:57:25 18 The Cardinal Force, Cupertino 3:00:26 19 Amazeing Sisters, Madras 3:03:59 20 Team Mcglathery-Hill, Troutdale 3:04:19 21 Misbehaviorists, Tualatin 3:07:24 22 Tobias5west, Yarmouth 3:13:35 23 Vt 2, Redmond 3:17:51 24 All Is Well That Ends.........., Bend 3:28:10 MALE TEAM 01-12 1 Ninja Richards, Bend

2:38:38

MALE TEAM 13-15 1 Mugs Are For Wussies, Bend

2:24:02

MALE TEAM 16-19 1 Band Of Brothers, Bend 2 Nazgul!, Bend 3 Team Moo-E, Bend 4 Euroswag3, Portland

2:00:19 2:10:52 2:19:31 2:50:17

MALE TEAM 20-24 1 Rebound / U.S. Ski Team, Bend 2 Osu Triathlon Club, Corvallis 3 College Excel, Bend 4 Sublimity Fire, Stayton 5 Demattei/sampson, Portland

1:43:51 2:41:28 2:56:31 3:13:57 3:14:13

MALE TEAM 25-29 1 Rob Schneider’s #1!, Salem 2 Uncut Ii, Portland 3 Gg, Bend 4 Team Muggin, Bend 5 Go Nuts!, Portland 6 Tripod, Bend 7 5 Hombres; 5 Pulgadas, Atlanta

2:26:46 2:31:12 2:37:55 2:42:06 2:43:34 2:51:47 3:16:00

MALE TEAM 30-34 1 Los Locos Catorce, Portland 2:10:24 2 Wiked Shenanigans, Portland 2:14:41 3 Oh Brother; Where Art Thou?, Bend 2:21:13 4 Malin Men + 1, Bend 2:23:02 5 Osp Swat, Bend 2:30:37 6 [disqualified - Unsportsmanlike], Bend 2:32:10 7 Rhinestone Cowboys, Portland 2:33:10 8 Smang. Smash & Bang, Onyx St. 2:41:15 9 Too Legit To Quit, Siletz 2:55:21 MALE TEAM 35-39 1 The Breakfast Club, Bend 2 Colonel Angus, Bend 3 O’O Yoyos, Bend 4 ‘mcfordne`champs’, Bend 5 Not One Good Ear Among Us, Canby 6 Tallman Brewing, Pdx 7 Has Beens, Bend 8 Three Amigos, Vancouver 9 Lenta Y Constante, Corvallis 10 Beer Run, Bend 11 Manzama, Bend 12 Kesandrew, St. Paul 13 Honeybadgers, Camas

2:05:34 2:09:27 2:15:33 2:22:59 2:29:12 2:36:46 2:38:47 2:43:55 2:46:31 2:47:09 2:49:06 2:53:41 3:08:49

MALE TEAM 40-44 1 Brothers From Sisters, Sisters 2 Bacon And Patrone, Bend 3 Old Fockers, Bend 4 Short Bus, West Linn 5 Shooting Blanks, Normandy Park 6 Procrastinators, Bend 7 St. Patrick’s Revenge, Portland 8 High Desert Visionaries, Bend

1:59:09 2:06:04 2:07:41 2:11:09 2:28:15 2:36:27 2:41:16 2:52:23

MALE TEAM 45-49 1 Just Doggin’ It, Bend 2 The Uncalled Four, Bend 3 3 Spider Monkeys & A Silverback 4 Slow Dawgs, Bend 5 Blrb Architects, Tacoma 6 Staggering Geniuses, Portland 7 Blood Sweat And Beers, Bend 8 Pdx Express, Milwaukie

2:00:08 2:24:03 2:24:06 2:31:12 2:44:16 2:46:35 2:56:12 3:01:58

MALE TEAM 50-54 1 Crash Test Dummies, La Conner 2 Spokanistan Slackers, Spokane 3 Black Tornado 79, Fall City 4 Gluttons For Punishment, Bend 5 Creaky Knees, Seattle 6 Buffalos On Nitro, Portland

2:07:25 2:13:09 2:17:51 2:19:22 3:04:14 3:07:01

MALE TEAM 55-59 1 There Goes The Neighborhood, Bend 2:29:35 2 Weakend Warriors, Hillsboro 2:35:02 3 Preforms Well Hungover, Portland 2:38:53

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Bend’s Stephanie Howe pedals toward the bike-to-run exchange after completing the 22-mile ride from Mount Bachelor to Bend during the Pole Pedal Paddle on Saturday. Howe won the elite women’s race.

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Kris Freeman starts to unstrap his cycling shoes as he nears the bike-to-run exchange on the Pole Pedal Paddle course on Century Drive in Bend on Saturday. Freeman won the men’s race.

Something old, something new PPP: ELITE WOMEN

PPP: ELITE MEN

• Bend’s Stephanie Howe claims her third straight win

• Olympian Kris Freeman edges Bend’s Andrew Boone

By Mark Morical

By Mark Morical

The Bulletin

The Bulletin

Power couples make the news in Hollywood. But here in Central Oregon, where fitness is a way of life, it is endurance couples that get the headlines. Stephanie Howe and Zach Violett are probably Bend’s most prominent endurance couple. Howe won her third straight women’s elite title in Saturday’s U.S. Bank Pole Pedal Paddle, finishing in 2 hours, 1 minute, 5 seconds, and Violett placed third in the men’s elite race. Avid cross-country skiers and ultra runners, Howe and Violett have been dating for three years and share a house together on Bend’s west side. See W om en / Opposite side

The race between a Bend cyclist and an Olympic cross-country skier Saturday turned into one of the most intriguing Pole Pedal Paddle elite men’s competitions in years. In the end, after three lead changes, U.S. Nordic Ski Team member Kris Freeman used strong run and paddle stages to win the 36th annual U.S. Bank PPP in 1 hour, 46 minutes. Defending champion Andrew Boone, of Bend, finished second, just 57 seconds behind Freeman. It was the closest margin of victory in the men’s race since 2004, when Bend’s Ben Husaby edged Andy Fecteau, also of Bend, by a mere 10 seconds. See M e n / Opposite side

The Pole Pedal Paddle, at a glance In all, 2,922 racers competed — as individuals or members of teams — in Saturday’s PPP. The Pole Pedal Paddle, sponsored by U.S. Bank, is a fundraiser for the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation. The multisport race is made up of six stages, for a total course distance of about 34 miles. 1. Alpine skiing A 200-foot uphill sprint through snow to skis and snowboards, and a race down a gated course on the Leeway Run at Mt. Bachelor ski area.

2. Nordic skiing An 8-kilometer loop along the Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center trails, first skirting the Bachelor parking lot and then finishing at the Nordic Center. Both skating and classic techniques are allowed.

3. Cycling A 22-mile mostly downhill ride along Century Drive from Mount Bachelor to Colorado Avenue in Bend.

4. Running A 5-mile run along Century Drive and the Deschutes River Trail to the boat exchange near Riverbend Park.

5. Paddling A 1½-mile paddle in a kayak or canoe (or other PPP-approved watercraft) on the Deschutes River, including upstream and downstream sections.

6. Sprinting A half-mile run from the paddle finish along a paved path and grass to the finish at the Les Schwab Amphitheater.

Inside • On the back page, find complete results for all individuals, teams and pairs competitors • On the inside page, find more coverage of PPP teams and some of the best stories from this year’s race

MALE TEAM 60-64 1 Right Here; Right Now, Poultney

2:51:25

On the web

MALE TEAM 65-69 1 Mac Sagecliff, Portland 2 Fast Enough, Bend 3 Pola Nuamba, Terrebonne 4 Wheezing Geezers, Bend 5 Old Cougs, Vancouver

2:22:01 2:26:08 2:40:08 2:40:29 3:30:01

• See more photos and sortable race results online at www.bendbulletin.com/ ppp

MALE TEAM 70-98 1 The Flame, Albany

2:43:30


THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012

Pole Pedal Paddle Special Section

Lots of competitors team up for the race THE BOATS AWAIT

By Mark Morical The Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Kris Freeman fights to keep his lead during the paddling stage of the Pole Pedal Paddle on Saturday on the Deschutes River in Bend.

Men Continued from D1 Bend’s Zach Violett finished third on Saturday, 3:39 behind Freeman. Bend athletes rounded out the top five as Michael Condon placed fourth (5:07 back), and Jason Adams was fifth (8:10 back). The PPP-savvy Boone, 31, made a fast transition after the alpine ski stage at Mt. Bachelor ski area to gain a sight lead, but it did not last long. Freeman, 31, passed him during the 8-kilometer nordic ski stage and built a lead of more than a minute. “He blew by me so fast on the nordic that I thought maybe I would never see him again,” Boone said of Freeman as he assessed the race after finishing at the Les Schwab Amphitheater. “It was just kind of cool to see how much power he could put out. “I raced the best race I possibly could have today. He’s just world-class, and he showed it. If I’m going to lose to somebody, a threetime Olympian isn’t a bad person to lose to.” Freeman caught Boone midway through the downhill section of the cross-country ski leg. “I took off, and I should be able to do that, since it’s what I do,” Freeman said. But the race was far from over. On the 22-mile bike ride down to Bend along Century Drive, Boone passed Freeman about two-thirds of the way through the stage and held a lead of nearly one minute at the bike-to-run transition on Colorado Avenue. But Boone said he felt sluggish on the first two miles of the 5-mile run, and Freeman

passed him three miles in, building a lead of about 10 seconds by the finish of the run at Riverbend Park. “I suspected I’d be a stronger boater, and I didn’t want him to be able to draft me, so I got a little bit of a lead going into the water,” Freeman said. By the time Boone was on the Deschutes River and paddling his surf ski, he was about 30 seconds behind Freeman. Freeman said he does not race kayaks, but he does spend about five hours a week in the springtime paddling his downriver boat along the Pemigewasset River, located just across the street from his condo in Thornton, N.H. “At that stage in the race, you’re not really going at a high pace,” Freeman said of the PPP’s paddle stage. “It’s just about keeping your muscles together.” Freeman did that, and he came away with the victory after the half-mile sprint to the finish under a high overcast at the amphitheater A Type 1 diabetic, Freeman uses a small pump called an OmniPod that attaches to his chest and can be programmed to automatically deliver small doses of insulin through a needle in his skin. He was changing the pump as he discussed the race Saturday in the festive amphitheater. “I think it’s a great event,” Freeman said of the PPP, which he was racing for the first time as an individual. “I can’t believe how many people come out for it. It’s like nothing else. It’s really, really cool.” — Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com

Behind the scenes at the PPP By Amanda Miles and Elise Gross • Photos by Joe Kline The Bulletin

Thousands of racers competed in Saturday’s U.S. Bank Pole Pedal Paddle, and each of them had a story. We take a look at a few of the stories from this year’s race:

Women Continued from D1 “We train together and we help each other out,” Howe said, shortly after finishing at Bend’s Les Schwab Amphitheater. “It’s a bonus when we both have a good day. I’m super psyched for him today to finish third, that’s awesome.” Bend’s Mary Wellington was runner-up in the women’s race for the second straight year, 5:23 behind Howe. Brooke Blackwelder, of Boise, Idaho, finished third (10:46 behind Howe). Violett said he had no doubt about his girlfriend’s ability to three-peat, even though she has been living in Corvallis for most of the past year working toward her doctorate at Oregon State University and has had limited time on snow. “She just did a 50-mile (running) race a month ago and just killed it,” Violett said. “I told her, ‘You might not have been biking as much, and skiing as much, but you’re in good shape, and that’s what matters.’” Howe led from start to finish on Saturday, but Wellington was just 50 seconds behind her on the bike-to-run transition on Colorado Avenue. Howe’s strength is running, and she added about four minutes to her lead during the 5-mile run to win easily. “I just didn’t look behind me and just focused on myself and kept going,” Howe said. “People were giving me splits, but I don’t think about that, I just go. The run is kind of my strong point, so I recovered there, and I was able to run hard.” Wellington, 41 and the mother of a 5year-old daughter, said she kept Howe in her sights until the running stage.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

A runner makes his way through the running course as spectators gather at the run-to-boat exchange of the Pole Pedal Paddle on Saturday in Bend.

The vast majority of Pole Pedal Paddle participants compete as part of a team, and the family team category was the race’s most popular this year, with a record 70 entries. The family team criteria for the Terry Bonynge Award (in years past presented to the fastest family team) changed this year to encourage more participation. The winning family was based on a formula that calculated the number of team members, plus age span, divided by the team’s race time. The team with the highest score received the award. That honor this year went to the McClain Clan, of Bend, which finished with the fastest time (1 hour, 55 minutes, 18 seconds) and the highest score after the formula was calculated. Bonynge, who died from an aneurysm in 2002, was an elementary school teacher and a volunteer for Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation in Bend. Her husband at the time of her death, David Smullin, helped develop the new formula in an effort to get more entries in the family team category. “The bigger the age span and the more people you have, the slower you can go,” Smullin said, explaining how the formula works. “It is also another

way to honor Terry 10 years after her death.” Smullin was hoping the formula would allow a different team to win this year, as the McClain Clan has won the family division several times in recent years. “They figured out how to get around it,” Smullin joked. “They brought in grandpa for the sprint.” U.S. Nordic Ski Team members dominated the other team divisions, as Rebound/U.S. Ski Team won the male team competition and posted the fastest overall time of the day, 1:43:51, more than two minutes faster than their U.S. squad teammate and individual winner Kris Freeman. Another Rebound/ U.S. Ski Team won the female team category with a time of 2:00:28. The open team division was won by Bend’s Tai Turbo, whose time (1:47:12) was the second fastest team time of the day, behind only the male U.S. Ski Team squad. The fastest team in the coed team category was Bend’s Watch This, which finished in 1:59:47. Bend’s Team Guy won the male pairs division (1:49:02), and Downing & Wose, also of Bend, won the female pairs (2:09:55). The top honor in coed pairs went to Bend’s Desert Orthopedics (2:02:31).

Third’s a charm for the D And D In its 20th year at the PPP, the D And D squad found itself in a new position among women’s teams: third. But this year’s lineup — downhill skier Marcy Monte, nordic skier Carrie Carney, runner Lisa Nye, paddler Meg Chun and cyclist Elayne Logan Currie, all of Bend — felt just fine with that finish. “Look at our competition,” Monte said after the team had finished. “We’re competing against Olympians. We’re competing against women that are younger.” Featured in a Bulletin article this past Tuesday as the D&D Down and Dirty Girls, the team has finished first among all women’s squads in 12 of the past 16 editions of the race and second in the other four. (The team took fifth in each of its first three years of existence.) But this year, the D And D ladies (ranging in age from

37 to 56) were up against two Rebound/U.S. Ski Team squads, each made up of members of the U.S. women’s cross-country skiing national team. The D And D completed this year’s PPP in 2:07:12, more than four minutes faster than its 2011 winning time. And the team kept its margin of defeat respectably close: The younger of the two Rebound/U.S. Ski Teams, competing in the female team 20-24 division, posted the fastest time among women’s teams in 2:00:28. The other squad, in the female team 25-29 division, finished in 2:02:32. The race for third was tight. Heading into the final leg of the race, the sprint, D And D team members estimated they were in a virtual dead heat with Addicted To Winning, a team led by 2008 and 2009 elite women’s champion Sarah Max. Addicted To Winning had started five minutes

Team D And D members pose after the Pole Pedal Paddle on Saturday at the Les Schwab Amphitheater in Bend. From left are Meg Chun, Elayne Logan Currie, Carrie Carney and Marcy Monte. Not pictured is team member Lisa Nye. earlier in a prior wave. “So I took off, and I’m thinking, ‘Oh my gosh,’” Carney said of her sprint. “I don’t know how fast Sarah ran, and Sarah’s a very fast runner, very good runner.”

But Carney, a former track star at Mountain View High School, still possessed enough foot speed to help the D And D finish ahead of Addicted To Winning — by a mere 24 seconds.

Carney remains uncreamed Carrie Carney was not the only Carney competing at the PPP on Saturday. Her husband, Chris, placed third in the master elite men’s division. Perhaps more important, he defeated a municipal team called Cream Carney, whose goal — as may be deduced from its name — was to finish in a faster time. Leading up to the race, Chris Carney, a Bend Police Department officer, had tried to persuade co-worker Amy Ward to also contest the PPP as an individual. Instead, Ward put a team together — most of them fellow officers — to take down Carney. At stake between Ward and Carney was a coffee beverage of choice. “She kind of put this ringer team together,” Carney said of Ward. Why the urgency for Cream Carney to defeat Carney? “Because he’s a prima donna,” teased Don Barber, the team’s paddler and sprinter, after the race. But on Saturday, the prima donna won out. Despite falling several times in icy conditions on the nordic leg, Carney completed the race in 2:26:55, while Cream Carney finished in 2:36:06. Carney already knows what kind of coffee he wants when Ward pays up: a white chocolate mocha. Ward is planning for a return with the same team next year and another bet: “Double or nothing.”

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Zach Violett hugs women’s winner Stephanie Howe after they finished the Pole Pedal Paddle on Saturday at the Les Schwab Amphitheater in Bend.

“I just knew if I was anywhere close she was going to take off on me (on the run),” Wellington said. “She’s such a great runner. But I felt solid on the run and hit the paddle strong. I was hoping to stay closer than last year.” While Violett’s time was more than 11 minutes faster than Howe’s on Saturday, the competition between the two elite endurance athletes could be closer in longer running races. Howe actually beat Violett in a 50-mile race last year. “I beat him one time, and I don’t think he’s very happy about that,” Howe said, smiling. “It was a long run and he just had a bad day. I don’t think we’re competitive with each other, we’re just happy for each other when it goes well.” “She got me in one last year,” Violett said, “so now I have to respect her.” — Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com

Some of the members of team Cream Carney — from left, Laura Jacobs, Don Barber and Amy Ward — bow to Chris Carney at the Les Schwab Amphitheater on Saturday after the Pole Pedal Paddle. Cream Carney set out to beat Chris Carney but lost to the individual masters racer.

From silver screen to Bend mountain Ten-year-old Forrest Hassell crosses the finish line of the Pole Pedal Paddle on Saturday in Bend. Hassell is the youngest competitor to complete the full course solo.

Not too young to compete Forrest Hassell is only 10 years old, but he already has a Pole Pedal Paddle under his belt. Not a single stage as part of a team. Not a Kids’ Mini PPP. A complete big-boy, Bachelor-to-Bend PPP. A fourth-grader at Bend’s Lava Ridge Elementary School, Forrest is believed to be the youngest solo competitor ever to finish the PPP. Prior to this year, Reitler Hodgert, also of Bend, was 11 when he completed the PPP in 2004. “It was all worth it,” Forrest said Saturday after finishing the PPP course in 3 hours, 26 minutes. While Forrest completed each leg of the race on his own, he did have some company most of the way. Melissa Hassell, Forrest’s mother, shadowed him on the downhill ski leg at Mt. Bachelor ski area, while his father, Darren, accompanied him on the nordic ski and cycling routes. And Dawnelle Roth, a teacher at Lava Ridge, completed the run and sprint portions with Forrest, who had the paddling section to himself. “Even though it’s one of the shortest legs, I think it’s one of the hardest because the thing about the kayak is you can’t stop and you just have to keep it going,” said Forrest, who was the beneficiary of some advice from members of the visiting U.S. and Canadian ski teams while he was training at Mt. Bachelor earlier in the week. Melissa Hassell said that her son was inspired by reading in The Bulletin’s coverage of last year’s PPP about Olivia Brooks and Sadie Ann Gorman, two Bend girls who were 12 years old when they competed as individuals in the 2011 PPP. “Mom, I’m 9 years old. Next year I’ll be 10,” Melissa recalled Forrest saying to her a year ago. “Do you think I could do it, and I’d be the youngest?” Perhaps the girls inspired some other participants, too. A total of 13 kids — nine boys and four girls — age 15 and younger finished this year’s race as individuals. Among them, both Sadie Ann and Olivia were back. And at age 11, Michaela Brooks, Olivia’s younger sister, became the youngest female individual finisher, breaking the benchmark set by big sis and Sadie Ann last year. As for Forrest, he is already ready for the 2013 PPP. “I think I’ll try it again next year,” Forrest said. “It was a really fun experience.”

Kay Whitson, left, and Curt Bondurant, with dog, Domino, stand by the boat launch area along the Deschutes River. The two have volunteered numerous times and are engaged.

Love and volunteering at the PPP For many who help put on the Pole Peddle Paddle, volunteering with the race is a tradition. Each year, the wildly popular multisport event draws more than 600 volunteers of all ages, according to PPP volunteer coordinator Patty Neumann. Some volunteers have been doing so for as long as they can remember, including Kay Whitson, 54, and Curt Bondurant, 58, both of Bend. The couple, who met while working at the PPP boat launch more than 25 years ago, plans to marry in July. Whitson, who said that before the two became a couple she would see Bondurant only once a year — at the PPP — credits the race for her upcoming marriage. “I call it ‘Same time next year,’” said Whitson of the previous extent of her relationship with Bondurant. Whitson said the pair remained friends over the years, raising their own families and eventually both becoming single and, about three years ago, falling in love. Bondurant has served as the boat launch captain for the past 25 years. Whitson joined Bondurant as co-captain four years ago, overseeing roughly 100 volunteers whose duties during the PPP include pulling more than 900 boats out of the water and transferring them to safety, according to Whitson and Neumann.

“Dumb” and “Dumber” relied on their moped to get them up to the start of the PPP at Mt. Bachelor ski area, but they traded off skiing, biking and running to reach the finish line in Bend. Kevney Dugan, 30, and Kyle Watt, 31, who competed in the men’s ages 25-34 pairs division, donned outrageous 1970s vintage tuxedos — bright orange and powder blue, respectively. The dopey but dazzling duds were replicated from the 1994 Jim Carrey comedy “Dumb and Dumber” and were

complete with top hats and a Samsonite briefcase. Dugan and Watt, both of Bend, said they were inspired by the film’s main characters, who ride a moped on a cross-country adventure. “We figured the (PPP) is kind of like going across country,” said Watt. While Dugan and Watt competed in style, their tuxedos were not exactly performancefriendly attire. “It was brutal,” said Dugan of competing in his outfit. “I was sweating profusely.” Kyle Watt, 31, in blue, and Kevney Dugan, 30, both of Bend, sport their “Dumb and Dumber” inspired costumes in the Pole Pedal Paddle.


SISTERS MAGAZINE RODEO EDITION Sisters Rodeo ... It’s “The BIGGEST Little Show In The World” with three full days of rodeo - June 8, 9, 10 in Sisters. Sisters Magazine will let you know where all the action is. Publishes: Friday, May 25

MAY 20, 2012

Serving Central O

www.bendb


S U N D AY, M AY 2 0 , 2 0 1 2

A LIFE LESSON FROM

COLIN POWELL

DOING IT

HIS WAY KEVIN COSTNER ON BEING LUCKY, RAISING KIDS IN HIS 50s, AND REMEMBERING WHITNEY

By Dotson Rader

PLUS: OUR SUMMER TV PREVIEW

Costner stars in the History channel’s Hatfields & McCoys, beginning May 28 ©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


Walter Scott,s

PARADE I DON’T THINK ANY WOMAN IN THE WORLD COULD GET TIRED OF BEING COMPARED TO MARILYN MONROE.”

Q: What happens to the costumes worn on Dancing With the Stars once the show is over? —Debbie Armiger, N.J.

A: “Some go into storage,

some are auctioned for charity, and others we reuse,” says costume designer Steven Lee. Celebs may also buy their costumes, though they can cost up to $5,000 apiece.

P Daniel Radcliffe and Allen Ginsberg

Q: Is Daniel Radcliffe finding it hard to transition to adult roles in movies? —Meredith, Boston

Sacramento

A: Although Sedaka, 73,

—Mad Men star Christina Hendricks on her famous figure

A: Not at all! Radcliffe, adcliffe,

22, adeptly played da concerned father in the recent supernatural aturaal thriller The Woman an in in Black (on DVD May 22), and he’ll nextt portray celebrated Beat at poet Allen Ginsberg in Kill Kill Your Darlings, due in 2013. Find out what h t he ha thinks about donning another pair of iconic glasses at Parade.com/radcliffe..

his career stalled in the ’60s because of Beatlemania. Does he hold a grudge? —Sheila G.,

See more Marilyn Ma look-alikes look-ali at Parade Parade.com /monroe /mo

says the Beatles “came to America Ame and took me off the t map,” all has b be been en forgiven. for He even to took ook his h 6-year-old gran grandson to a Paul McCartney M concer cert last year in Las Ve Vegas. egas “He told me he likes th the Beatles’ songs bett better ter e than mine!” S Sedaka edak says with a laugh. His twin ggranddaughters gr andd da sing backup on his new children’s book/CD combo, Dinosaur Pet, inspired by his 1961 hit “Calendar Girl.” Listen to the song at Parade.com/sedaka.

WALTER SCOTT ASKS …

Randy Jackson As he readies for the American Idol finale (Fox, May 23, 8 p.m. ET), Jackson, 55, is also shining a spotlight on type 2 diabetes with the Taking Diabetes to Heart campaign. What changes have you made in your life since you were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2003? I’ve made a

complete 180. I’m a much healthier eater and I’ve lost quite a bit of weight over the years. I’m very active now. I’m actually a pretty good tennis player! You have some memorable Idol catchphrases. Do you have a favorite? I try to switch it up. Ryan Seacrest loves “In it

to win it,” so I’m going to get him a shirt with that on it. You’ve played the bass guitar for several bands, but can you sing? I used to think I was a singer; I had

Who will be the next American Idol? Vote at Parade .com/idol

my own delusions about it. I’ve sung background for a couple of bands. I’m better than some on the radio now, I’ll tell you that much!

You’re the last original Idol judge, now in your 11th season. Have you ever thought about leaving the show? We have these things called contracts, so you

never know! But I’m still enjoying it 100 percent. Email your questions to Walter Scott at personality@parade.com. Letters can be sent to P.O. Box 5001, Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. 10163-5001.

P Henri Richard with the Stanley Cup in 1973

Q: Which NHL player has the most Stanley Cup wins? —Bob Flanagan, New York City

A: The puck stops

with former Montreal Canadiens center Henri Richard. Nicknamed “Pocket Rocket” for his 5-foot-7 frame, the Hall of Famer won 11 championships—more than any other player in NHL history—between 1955 and 1975. Now 76, Richard serves as an ambassador for the Canadiens’ organization.

PHOTOS, FROM LEFT: ADAM TAYLOR/ABC VIA GETTY IMAGES; GARDINER ANDERSON/BAUER-GRIFFIN; BETTMANN/CORBIS; GREGG DEGUIRE/ FILMMAGIC; HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES; DICK RAPHAEL/SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. ILLUSTRATION: JORGE AREVALO

P Maria Menounos and Derek Hough

Past contestants Ricki Lake, Nancy Grace, and Kristi Yamaguchi own all the sparkly garments they wore, and Maria Menounos has expressed interest in buying hers at the end of this season.

Q: Neil Sedaka has said

2 • May 20, 2012

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NO PURCHASE OR PAYMENT OF MONEY NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. A PURCHASE OR PAYMENT WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING. The Road to the Ram® Jam Sweepstakes and Instant Win Game started 2/1/12 at 12:00 PM ET, and ends 9/30/12 at 11:59 PM ET. Legal residents of contiguous 48 US/DC only; 18 years or older as of time of entry. Go to www.RamTrucks.com/RoadtoRamJam for Official Rules, entry instructions, odds of winning, prize details, restrictions, etc. Residents of AK, HI, and PR are ineligible. Void in AK, HI, PR and where prohibited. Sponsor: Chrysler Group LLC, 1000 Chrysler Drive, Auburn Hills, MI 48326-2766. This Promotion is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administrated by, or associated with, Facebook.® Ram is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC.

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NO ORDINARY TALENT

What W Wh at too re read, see, and do this week “EITHER YOU’RE NAIVE OR YOU HAVE SCRUPLES. I’M NOT SURE WHICH IS WORSE.” Season 7

For more, go to Parade.com/pick Parade.com/picks

LEAVING THE HOUSE

TV’s crankiest doc hangs up his stethoscope this week (May 21, Fox, 8 p.m. ET) after eight years of medical sleuthing. Fans of this mad-dog M.D. (Hugh Laurie) will miss his bitterly honest bedside manner. “He didn’t just attack for the sake of attacking,” says executive producer David Shore. “There was always an agenda, however petty.” Here, a few of our favorite House-isms.

BOOKS PAST & PREZ Presidential Campaign Posters offers iconic poster images, including this Reagan-Bush ’84 classic. The Presidents Club (by Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy) gives insight into the special bond shared by past Oval Office occupants.

FULL NELSON

“DO I GET BONUS POINTS IF I ACT LIKE I CARE?”

Willie’s actual guitar from 1969!

Season 2

“IF YOU CAN FAKE SINCERITY, YOU CAN FAKE PRETTY MUCH ANYTHING.” Season 1

Willie Nelson may be partial to his well-worn guitar Trigger (left), but he’s still finding ways to reinvent himself musically. On his new album, Heroes, he joins forces with Snoop Dogg and covers Coldplay. His lovely version of Pearl Jam’s “Just Breathe,” sung with his 23-year-old son, Lukas, is one of many highlights. Listen to “Just Breathe” by QR code Q scanning this in info nfo to go o tag with your he here ere teeka teekay ay smartphone code c tar

APP PO OF THE T E WEEK TH W TURN YOUR YO SMARTP SMARTPHONE INTO A MINI M HUBBLE HUBBLE: AIM ITS CAMERA AT THE NIGHT SK SKY AND SKYVIEW WILL CREATE AN A INTERACTIVE INTERAC MAP OF THE T PLANETS. PLA LANETS IPHONE) (FREE, IP

14 : 11 It too took ok Ste Steve Jobs only 14 minutes, 11 seconds to deliver a memorable memora a commencement speech to Stanford’s class of 2005—but his message is timeless. Watch other great grad talks and get gift ideas for your oth favorite seniors at Parade.com/grads. fa

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PA R A D E

From her small-town Texas childhood to her life today on a Virginia farm (with stops along the way to make classic films like Badlands, Carrie, Coal Miner’s Daughter, and The Help), Sissy Spacek tells the story she calls My Extraordinary Ordinary Life. Readers will revel in this charming memoir by a movie star who feels like just folks.

4 • May 20, 2012

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SUNDAY WITH ...

AFTER BEING MARRIED 31 YEARS, I’M NOT TRYING TO SHOW OFF. I CAN COME HOME REEKING OF TRANSMISSION FLUID.”

Jay Leno The Tonight Show host on comic highs and lows, his many cars, and the secrets of a successful marriage

he late-night landscape is dramatically different than it was when Jay Leno took over from Johnny Carson in 1992, but the Tonight Show host is sticking to his program’s tried-and-true format. “I love Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert, but they’re doing a very specific kind of comedy,” says Leno, 62. “I’m doing this broad thing of a smart joke, a silly joke, and then a joke unrelated to politics. That’s what The Tonight Show is—it’s big-tent comedy.” He discusses stand-up and career longevity with Mary Margaret.

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PARADE Did you always want to work in entertainment? When I was 7, I went to the movies and watched Elvis Presley in Loving You. The girls went crazy when he sang “Teddy Bear,” and I thought, “This is the way to make a living.” I even took guitar lessons, but when that didn’t work, I decided to tell jokes instead.

What was your first joke? In fourth grade, the teacher was talking about how cruel the Sheriff of Nottingham was and something about Friar Tuck, and I said, “Do you know why they boiled them in oil? Because he was a fryer.” It got a laugh. You had some lean years starting out. What was your low point, and what advice do you give to struggling comics? My low point was sleeping in an alley off of 44th Street and Ninth Avenue in New York, right near the Improv. It was awful. I always tell comics, do what you have to do and take every gig that’s out there, no matter how demeaning, because you learn something. Has the digital age affected how you approach comedy? You know, humor doesn’t change a whole lot. If you watch a comedy from the 1920s, the fat rich man stepping out of a Cadillac and into

PHOTO: SANDY HUFFAKER/CORBIS. ILLUSTRATION: GRAFILU

DRAMATIC RESULTS

6 • May 20, 2012

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the mud is just as funny now. You can use all these new elements, but that part of the process doesn’t really change. How do you like to spend your Sundays? Working at my garage. I have about 135 cars and 90 motorcycles. It’s a little silly, but my thing has always been one woman and 200 vehicles. It’s cheaper than one car and 200 girlfriends. What’s with your offduty uniform of denim work shirt and jeans? That comes from me telling the wardrobe guy, “Run down to Banana Republic and get me 20 pairs of jeans and 40 shirts.” Then I’m done for the year. Do you and your wife still have date nights? Yeah, she’ll find a restaurant, some fancy place in Beverly Hills. I’ll stop at In-N-Out Burger first since I’m not a big restaurant guy. But she likes it, and when you’re married, that’s what you do. What else keeps a marriage working? If you don’t fool around, it’s not that hard. I think the key to life is low selfesteem—believing you’re not the smartest or most handsome person in the room. All the people who have high self-esteem are criminals and actors.

that’s fine. My only rule is it has to be funny. Why do you still tour? When you live in show business, people will tell you something is good even when it’s

The comedian recalls two of his most memorable interviews and the one gig that made him really nervous at Parade.com/leno

terrible. But on the road, you find out what they really think. Are you always on the lookout for a joke? If you have to write 10 to 14 minutes [of mate-

rial] every day, you have to keep your eyes and ears open. It’s like how I was in school: I didn’t study a lot but I never missed a class, so I was taking it all in. I’m always listening.

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A tourist stops at a small hotel, puts a $100 bill on the counter, and goes to inspect a room. The owner takes the bill and rushes off to pay the butcher, to whom he owes $100. The butcher races to his wholesaler and pays off his own $100 debt. The wholesaler hurries to the farmer and gives him $100 for the pigs he bought. The farmer hands over $100 to the party planner who set up his bachelor bash. The party planner heads to the hotel to pay the $100 she owes for the party room and lays the bill on the counter. At that point, the tourist returns to the front desk, says that the room is unsatisfactory, picks up the $100, and departs. The tourist has his money back, and everyone else is $100 ahead by reducing his or her debt by that amount. Could this be the answer to the debt crisis? —Gary Dalessandro, Sharpsville, Pa.

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What lessons did you take from the late-night wars in 2010—when Conan O’Brien left NBC and you returned to The Tonight Show? Oh, probably never explain, never complain. I make my living making fun of people, and if people make fun of me,

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Can you determine what happened, readers? The answer follows: Actually, everyone stayed exactly the same. For example, the farmer was owed $100 by someone, but he also owed $100 to someone else. The payments canceled one another out. To ask a question, visit Parade.com /askmarilyn

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K

evin costner

has often been compared to Gary Cooper. Even Cooper’s widow, Rocky, once told me she saw the similarities: “They both act with their eyes.” Now 30plus years into his career, Costner still radiates the all-American appeal and casual glamour that helped make him a star. Dressed in a beige sweater over a white T-shirt, ivory chinos, and spotless canvas sneakers, he relaxes in an armchair in the living room of his oceanfront house outside Santa Barbara, Calif. It is a modest home by movie star standards: four bedrooms on a suburban lot close to the neighbors. But Costner is at ease here, talking about his family, his career, the people he has loved. At 57, he is deeply tanned, his hair now grayish-blond, his voice soft

“I have regrets. But that’s from a lifetime of taking chances” Kevin Costner opens up about family, his late friend Whitney Houston, and what he prays for • BY DOTSON RADER

needs a bigger house and is planning to build it on 10 waterfront acres nearby. His brood also includes three adult children with his first wife and college sweetheart, Cindy Silva, from whom he was

COSTNER RIDES AGAIN The actor (center) plays patriarch “Devil Anse” Hatfield in Hatfields & McCoys. For more about the real-life clans, go to Parade.com/costner.

and soothing. He is still sexy, and he knows it. He lives with his second wife, handbag designer Christine Baumgartner, 38, and their children, daughter Grace, almost 2, and sons Hayes, 3, and Cayden, 5. As we talk through the afternoon, we can hear the kids playing in other rooms. Costner says he

divorced in 1994, and a teenage son from a brief post-divorce affair with Pittsburgh football heiress Bridget Rooney. “You never stop raising kids,” he tells me. Costner grew up far from beachfront wealth, in a conservative, hardworking Baptist family in Southern California. He studied business at Cal State

Fullerton, married, and landed a job in marketing after graduation. But he quit after a month to become an actor. “The dialogue in my head was ‘You’ve got to live your life for yourself,’ ” recalls Costner. He went on to appear in over 40 films, including The Untouchables, Bull Durham, Field of Dreams, and Dances With Wolves, winning Oscars for the latter for directing and Best Picture. His latest project is the miniseries Hatfields & McCoys, about the post–Civil War clans who famously feuded; it airs May 28, 29, and 30 on the History channel. He’ll also play Clark Kent’s dad in the 2013 Superman reboot, Man of Steel. It was a different type of performance, however, that recently won him attention and praise: In February it fell to Kevin Costner, Whitney Houston’s costar in The Bodyguard, to deliver a eulogy for his friend at her funeral in her childhood church in Newark, N.J. PARADE Why did you want to speak at Whitney Houston’s service?

When [Whitney died], immediately people were on the airwaves talking about it. It’s unusual to

watch the world talking about someone that you have a fairly unique relationship with. It’s almost surreal. This little drumbeat began: “You need to say something.” Did you feel like you wanted to hear from me? Yes. I also thought—and I think it’s in the film—that lots of people

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


WATERWORLD Costner near Santa Barbara with his dogs, Daisy and Jewel.

have the idea that the two of you were lovers. That they were thinking, “This is the only guy who ever really loved her, and why doesn’t he say something?”

Well, I began to feel that. ... You know, I didn’t feel the need to tell people I knew her. A couple of times over the years I called radio

stations that were on her pretty hard, asking the deejay to look at it in a different light. And at a couple of critical moments in her life, I was asked by a close friend to write her a letter. And I did. I don’t know if she ever read them. Did Whitney’s Hollywood celebrity contribute to her substance abuse?

There’s an epidemic of drugs everywhere. Hollywood is a very small part of it. Did you sense her vulnerability?

Oh, yes. I tried to identify it in my eulogy. ... I think about Whitney a little bit the way I think about the Kennedys. I know there’s trouble, but I choose to think about a lot

of other stuff. The trouble is as real as the achievement, but it does not tarnish it. [Costner starred in two films about the Kennedys, JFK and Thirteen Days.] Who invited you to speak at her funeral?

Dionne Warwick. My wife and I flew into New York on a Friday

C OV E R AND OPE NI NG PHO TO GRAPHS BY AMANDA FRI E DM AN | May 20, 2012 • 9

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


JULY

Summer TV off erings Preview New this season MAY

• Dogs in the City(CBS, May 30, 8 p.m. ET) New York City “dog guru” Justin Silver resolves issues between owners and their canines—like a pooch that’s having problems adjusting to joint custody after a divorce— on this reality series. • Duets(ABC, May 24, 8 p.m. ET)

• Men at Work(TBS,

In the latest twist on music talent shows, chart-toppers Kelly Clarkson (above), Jennifer Nettles, Robin Thicke, and John Legend select contestants to be their duet partners. “I’m looking for somebody who sings with soul and passion,” says Thicke. “Someone like Prince, Marvin Gaye, and Michael Jackson.”

May 24, 10 p.m. ET) Four buddies who toil at a magazine (Danny Masterson, James Lesure, Michael Cassidy, and Adam Busch) serve as each others’ wingmen in life and love.

• Perception(TNT, July 9, 10 p.m. ET) Eric McCormack (right) plays a neuroscience professor— brilliant but schizophrenic—who helps an FBI friend and former student (Rachael Leigh Cook) solve crimes.

• Political Animals(USA, July 15, 10 p.m. ET) Sigourney Weaver stars as a former first lady turned secretary of state battling to keep a reporter (Carla Gugino) from exposing family problems in this six-episode miniseries. So is Weaver channeling Hillary Clinton? “Not at all,” she says. “My character, Elaine Barrish Hammond, is her own woman.” In fact, Weaver sees her as a composite—and a role model. “Women lead differently than men,” she says. “It’s more collegial. I hope women find the show empowering, because we’ve got a lot of work to do.” • 3(CBS, July 22, 9 p.m. ET) Could it be—a dating show that (sort of) resembles reality? Three women audition men, go on dates, and bond over their romantic road bumps. AUGUST

• Star Next Door(The CW, mid-August) Singers like Gloria Estefan and John Rich not only mentor budding talents—they move in with them! “We immerse ourselves in what they do day to day,” says Rich. “If it’s a single mom who needs help changing the diapers, I’ll be the diaper-changer. It’s a really nuts-and-bolts approach to fi nding a superstar.” Queen Latifah executive-produces.

• Major Crimes(TNT, Aug. 13, 10 p.m. ET) This spin-off from The Closer brings back Mary McDonnell (left) as LAPD captain Sharon Raydor, in a series that shows how police and prosecutors work together to get convictions.

JUNE

• Take Me Out(Fox, June 7, 8 p.m. ET)

Fonda). “It’s an idealistic look at the news,” Sorkin says. “They’re trying to channel the days of Edward R. Murrow and Walter Cronkite.”

George Lopez hosts this dating series featuring 30 women looking for love and bachelors who must make the ultimate first impression.

• Push Girls(Sundance Channel, • Bunheads(ABC Family, June 11, 9 p.m. ET) A Vegas showgirl (Sutton Foster) relocates to her husband’s town and takes a job at her mother-in-law’s dance school in this dramedy. And just what is a bunhead? “Someone who spends her life in tights and a leotard, with her hair in a bun,” Foster explains. “It’s a lifestyle!”

• Dallas(TNT, June 13, 9 p.m. ET) ss “There’s been a seamless s,” transition of deviousness,” says Linda Gray, who al returns from the original series (along with Larry Hagman, right, Patrick Duffy, and others) for this reboot about oil,

betrayal, and Ewing family values. Josh Henderson, Jesse Metcalfe, and Jordana Brewster are among the second-generation schemers.

• The Newsroom(HBO, June 24, 10 p.m. ET) The West Wing creator Aaron Sorkin brings his hallmarks—workplace romance and a rat-a-tat dialogue—to this series se about a cable TV news show. Jeff Daniels (above) is a moderate m Republican anwh chor whose attacks on the extre tremists in his party delight his old-fl ame producer (Emily Mortimer) but anger his CEO (Jane

June 4, 10 p.m. ET) This documentary series focuses on four young women who refuse to be limited by the fact that they’re in wheelchairs.

• Saving Hope(NBC, June 7, 10 p.m. ET) A hospital’s chief of surgery (Michael Shanks) lands in a coma (though his spirit seems to be roaming the halls) and his fi ancée and fellow surgeon (Erica Durance) must fi ght for his life. “They’re on a journey to fi nd each other again,” says Durance.

• Anger Management(FX, June 28, 9 p.m. ET) After his public meltdown and exit from Two and a Half Men, Charlie Sheen (below) returns to prime time as Charlie Goodson, a hot-headed ex-ballplayer who’s now a therapist. “He has definitely pulled himself together,” series creator Bruce Helford (The Drew Carey Show) says of his star. “He knows he has a lot to prove, and he’s working harder than I’ve ever seen an actor work.”

PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: DONALD KRAVITZ/ GETTY IMAGES; KAREN NEAL FOR TNT; TNT; GREG GAYNE/ FX NETWORKS; MELISSA MOSELEY/ HBO; ZADE ROSENTHAL/ TBS

WHAT TO WATCH

—Steve Daly, Kathy Heintzelman, Erin Hill, and Mary Margaret 10 • May 20, 2012

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COVER AND INSIDE PHOTOS: STYLING, MARYA TALBOT; GROOMING, STEPHANIE DANIEL. STILL FROM HATFIELDS & MCCOYS: CHRIS LARGE

Kevin Costner | from page 9

night, and the next day we went to the funeral. I was writing [my eulogy] on the plane, in the limo, in bed. It was important. When I first walked into that church, it was electric, man. The band was going, the people were moving. I started [speaking] with the idea that sometimes what you think life will be it won’t be at all, and about what was real between Whitney and me, what we talked about— being in church when we were little, both getting in trouble, about our not wanting to be preachers. “Don’t let me be a preacher!” I wanted to impart a bit of the Whitney that I knew, and maybe people could think about her in a different way. You held off filming The Bodyguard for a year to wait for her.

You don’t do that for everybody. And it was a pretty seminal moment for Whitney. I was told that the movie made a big impression on the black community because I took Whitney in my arms and kissed her, not as a black woman but as a beautiful woman. That’s how I saw her. You and Whitney were both raised Baptist. Do you still pray?

Yes, because I realize I have been very lucky. I feel that there has been a hand over my life. I haven’t lived a perfect life. I have regrets. But that’s from a lifetime of taking chances, making decisions, and trying not to be frozen. The only thing that I can do with my regrets is understand them. When I see my children, and when I see the people who value me, I know how lucky I am. I think, “Where did that luck come from?” And so I give thanks for the life I’ve lived. continued on page 14

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


Views

Has an act of kindness changed your life? Tell us at Parade.com /kindness

By Colin L. Powell

Kindness Works any years ago I was the warden—the senior lay person—of a small suburban Episcopal church in northern Virginia. During that time, the bishop assigned to our parish an elderly priest, in some kind of distress and in need of a parish, to serve as an assistant pastor. I never knew the nature of his problem. We just welcomed him into the church, treated him as one of us, and ministered to him, just as we ministered to one another. He was with us for a year. On his last Sunday, he was assigned the sermon. As he finished, he looked out over the congregation and with a smile on his face quietly concluded, “Always show more kindness than the employees were seems necessary, immigrants and ASK ANY because the person VETERAN THE minorities making receiving it needs it minimum wage. NAME OF more than you will The attendants HIS DRILL ever know.” That had never seen a SERGEANT sentence hit me AND HE WILL secretary wandering with a special force around the garage KNOW IT. that has remained before; they thought with me for four decades. His les- I was lost. They asked if I needed son was clear: Kindness is not just help getting back “home.” I told about being nice; it’s about recog- them no. I just wanted to chat. nizing another human being who After a while, I asked them a deserves care and respect. question about their jobs that had Much later, when I was secre- puzzled me. Because the garage tary of state, I slipped away one was too small for all the employees’ day from my beautiful office cars, the attendants had to stack and vigilant security agents and cars one behind the other. “When snuck down to the garage, where the cars come in every morning,

M

Colin Powell in Mumbai, India, in 1997, making kindness count.

how do you decide whose car is the first to get out, and whose ends up second or third?” They gave each other knowing looks and little smiles. “Mr. Secretary,” one of them said, “it goes like this: When you drive in, if you lower the window, look out, smile, or know our name, you’re number one to get out. But if you look straight ahead, don’t show you see us or that we are doing something for you, well, you are likely to be one of the last to get out.” At my next staff meeting, I shared this story with my senior leaders. “You can never err by treating everyone in the building with respect, thoughtfulness, and

a kind word,” I told them. It ain’t brain surgery. Every person in an organization has value and wants that value to be recognized. Everyone needs appreciation and reinforcement. Taking care of employees is perhaps the best form of kindness. Being kind doesn’t mean being soft. When young soldiers go to basic training, they meet a drill sergeant who seems to be their worst nightmare. They are terrified. But all that changes. The sergeant is with them every step of the way, teaching, cajoling, enforcing, bringing out the strength and confidence they didn’t know they had. When they graduate, they leave with an emotional bond they will never forget. Ask any veteran the name of his drill sergeant and he will know it. (My ROTC camp drill sergeant almost 55 years ago was Staff Sgt. Artis Westberry.) I believe that if you develop a reputation for kindness, even the most unpleasant decisions will go down easier. People will realize that your decision must be necessary and is not arbitrary or made without empathy. As the old saying goes, “To the world, you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world.” Adapted from Colin Powell’s new book, It Worked for Me (HarperCollins)

PHOTO: SHERWIN CRASTO/AP IMAGES

How someone down on his luck taught Colin Powell a lifelong lesson

12 • May 20, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


It scares other bacon to bits.

Introd oduccin ng neew Ossca ar Ma Maye y r Butch cher e Thi hick ck Cutt Bacon. Th Thes esee he hear arty ty,, thick cuts are han a d trimmed and smoked with na atural hardwood ds for up to 14 4 ho hours. Ladies and gentlemen en,, this is bacon.. © 2012 2012 K raft raf Food Fo oo ods

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I want to live forever, and I know I won’t. I’m not afraid of dying. I’m only afraid of one thing: not being able to raise my kids. When I pray, that’s what I pray for—that I be the one who raises Grace, Hayes, and Cayden. How are your older kids?

My son Joe just got his first job out of college—he’s a sound engineer at a music studio. I’m so proud of Joe, Lily, and Annie. Annie told me something that I found really moving. When she went away to college in Chile, we changed her last name because we thought it’d be better for her down there not to have any connection [to me]. Then Annie called and said, “I’ve spent my whole life not wanting to lean on my name. But the minute it was taken away from me, it really bothered me. I miss our name.” What she said was so beautiful. Your second wife, Christine, badly wanted children, and you didn’t want more, right?

Yes. She said, “I’m going to wait for you, but not long. When you come to your senses, come back to me.” [laughs] And I did. What makes your marriage work?

LOVE ON THE LINKS With his wife, Christine, and their younger son, Hayes, at a golf tournament in 2011.

released in 1987, did you know that you had become a big movie star?

I was aware that good things were happening to me. It was a big moment. But I never wanted to be the No. 1 person. That comes and goes. I just wanted to be in the room where the decision was made, so that when I wanted to make a film, I made it. Why did you want to make Hatfields & McCoys?

As we get further and further removed from history, people start to think these stories weren’t true—that the Hatfields and McCoys were a comic. But no— these were people who came out

Maybe it’s the ability to say you’re sorry. I know that sounds so simple. If you’re willing to tell somebody that you love them, are you also willing to say you’re sorry? You need to, even when you think you’re in the right. When The Untouchables was

To see Costner in his classic roles over the years, scan this tag with your smartphone.

of the Civil War, which was the root of so many problems. So to give authenticity and perspective to that story was interesting to me. You know, these are very easy people to make fun of. They have beards; they’re ultra-religious; they talk funny. But these people and their descendants were judges and senators. It’s like what started the feud—one of the reasons was a pig trial. It’s easy for us to laugh at that, right? But a pig could feed a family for 30 days. And today people will go to court if their view in Malibu is obstructed. Anybody who watches [the miniseries] will know that the Hatfields and the McCoys are part of the American fabric.

DR. OZ’S Transformation Nation: Million Dollar You

SMART MOVE OF THE WEEK

This Wednesday we will announce the winner of the Transformation Nation: Million Dollar You challenge. Here’s one surprising takeaway: Reducing stress had an enormous impact on overall success—including weight loss. Make relaxing a priority for your health—and your life. For more tips, go to Parade.com/oz.

Have you ever thought about running for office?

I would never do it. Ego has slipped so far into the political landscape that it’s usurped the idea of public service. A good idea for one party is a bad idea for another—it has to be defeated. Do I have the mentality to govern? I think I do, but not in the system that exists. I would be frustrated. What do you love about the career you’ve chosen?

I’ve always felt performanceoriented. If you compare acting to a sports moment, where you’re down to the last shot or pitch, a lot of people wouldn’t want to be in that situation. I’ve always liked it. I’ve never thought as much about the things that could go wrong as what can possibly go right.

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PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: PACIFIC COAST NEWS; SONY PICTURES TELEVISION; ORION/EVERETT COLLECTION

Kevin Costner | from page 11

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Bulletin Daily Paper 05/20/12  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Sunday May 20, 2012