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MAY 11, 2012

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Killed in the line of duty in 1882, deputy gets his due By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

It was more than 130 years ago that Lake County Sheriff’s Deputy Samuel J. Lewis died in a shootout with more than a dozen masked men. But thanks to the work of a retired deputy in Texas, Lewis is finally getting his due. This week, Lewis was added to Oregon’s law enforcement memorial wall along with two officers killed in the line

of duty in 2011. Lewis’ path to his rightful station on the wall started with Terry Baker, who retired as a chief deputy of the Dallas County (Texas) Sheriff’s Office in 1994. In 1997, he started researching his department’s line-of-duty deaths. And he kept right on going. “My wife and I began not only researching my department, we went all over Texas,” he said. “From Texarkana to El Paso and from the

panhandle to south Texas, we’ve traveled it all.” Officers killed on the job is a subject close to Baker’s heart. In Dallas County, where Baker served for 39 years, 20 officers have been killed in the line of duty. Baker knew eight of them. One was his partner, another an officer who worked for him. “That gave me a strong attachment,” he said. Lewis is not the first out-of-state case Baker has worked on. He’s

helped with line-of-duty deaths in Oklahoma as well, and in his open files are another 50 cases in states other than Texas, “from New York all the way to Arizona.” Baker was reading microfilm back issues of the Galveston Daily News in pursuit of a different case when he stumbled upon a brief article discussing Lewis’ murder in Oregon. The article appeared on March 14, 1882. See Deputy / A4

Feedback is sought on park projects • Bend district narrows its list for possible $31 million bond

FOR THE POLE PEDAL PADDLE, PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

The Bend Park & Recreation District has refined a list of projects for a possible bond measure that would appear on the November ballot. But before the board of directors finalizes that list, which includes modifications to the Colorado Avenue dam, building an open-air ice rink and completing the Deschutes Inside River Trail, the board wants • How you can chime to hold meetings to allow the in, A4 public to weigh in and possibly reprioritize the projects. “We’ll be asking people to tell us what matters to them,” said Jan Taylor, the district’s community relations manager. She said the project list was put together using information collected from surveys and polls of residents over the past couple of years. See Parks / A4

JPMorgan Chase discloses $2 billion in trading losses By Jessica Silver-Greenberg and Peter Eavis New York Times News Service

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

P

articipants in a nordic skiing clinic practice their form for instructors Anna Schulz, bottom left, and Dan Simoneau, bottom right, at the Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center on Thursday morning. The Mt. Bachelor Ski Education Foundation is hosting clinics for the multisport Pole Pedal Paddle competition, which will take place May 19.

Clinics, which cost $20, will be held Saturday and Sunday at 10 a.m. For more information, call 541-388-0002.

End of the world? Now even Mayans say ‘no’ • Archaeologists find an ancient deep-time calendar, shattering the 2012 doomsday myth

“It’s like looking into Da Vinci’s workshop.” — William Saturno, archaeologist who led the expedition

By Brian Vastag The Washington Post

The ancient Mayans were masters of time, keepers of good calendars. And now we have one of their timekeepers’ workrooms to prove it. In a striking find, archaeologists in Guatemala report the discovery of a small building whose walls display not only a stunningly preserved mural of a brightly adorned Mayan king, but also calendars that destroy any notion that the Mayans predicted the end of the world in 2012. These deep-time calendars can be used to count thousands of years into the past and future, countering pop-culture and New Age ideas that Mayan calendars ended on Dec. 21, 2012, (or Dec. 23, depending on who’s counting), thereby

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JPMorgan Chase, which emerged from the financial crisis as the nation’s biggest bank, disclosed Thursday that it lost more than $2 billion in trading, a surprising stumble that promises to escalate the debate over whether regulations need to rein in trading by banks. Jamie Dimon, the chief executive of JPMorgan, blamed “errors, sloppiness and bad judgment” for the loss, which stemmed from a hedging strategy that backfired. The loss, which could go higher, is a rare blow to the reputation of Dimon, 56. After successfully steering his bank through the market turmoil of 2008 and the recession, he is perhaps the most influential bank executive in the country — and a vocal critic of the efforts to write rules under the Dodd-Frank regulatory overhaul. See Losses / A4

Tyrone Turner / National Geographic via The Associated Press

Conservator Angelyn Bass cleans and stabilizes the surface of a wall of a Maya house that dates to the ninth century A.D. in northeastern Guatemala. Archaeologists have found a small room where scribes apparently used walls to keep track of astronomical records and the society’s intricate calendar some 1,200 years ago.

predicting the end of the world. The newly found calendars, which track the motion of the moon, Venus and Mars, provide an un-

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precedented glimpse into how these storied sky-gazers — who dominated Central America for nearly 1,000 years — kept such accurate track of

months, seasons and years. “What they’re trying to do is understand the large cycles of cosmic time,” said William Saturno, the Boston University archaeologist who led the expedition. “This is the space they’re doing it in. It’s like looking into Da Vinci’s workshop.” Before the new find, the bestpreserved Mayan calendars were inscribed in bark-paged books called codices, the most famous being the Dresden Codex. But those pages hail from several hundred years later than the newly found calendars. Saturno said researchers have long assumed the Mayans had worked out the cycles of the moons and planets much earlier, but no evidence of such work had ever been found. See Mayans / A4

INDEX Business Classified Comics

E1-4 F1-6 B4-5

Crosswords B5, F2 Dear Abby B3 Editorials C4

Horoscope B3 Movies GO! 31 Obituaries C5

TODAY’S WEATHER Sports Stocks TV

D1-6 E2-3 B2

Clear and warmer High 67, Low 31 Page C6

Gamma-ray bending opens door for optics By Jon Cartwright ScienceNOW

Lenses are a part of everyday life — they help us focus words on a page, the light from stars, and the tiniest details of microorganisms. But making a lens for highly energetic light known as gamma rays had been thought impossible. Now, physicists have created such a lens, and they believe it will open up a new field of gamma-ray optics for medical imaging, detecting illicit nuclear material, and getting rid of nuclear waste. Glass is the material of choice for conventional lenses, and like other materials, it contains atoms which are orbited by electrons. In an opaque material, these electrons would absorb or reflect light. But in glass, the electrons respond to incoming light by shaking about, pushing away the light in a different direction. See Optics / A4

TOP NEWS HIV: Panel recommends drug, A3 SYRIA: Car bombs kill dozens, A3


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

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In human-powered helicopter contest, contestants try to make a lift of faith

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By Steve Chawkins Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Up, up and not quite away. That’s the frustrating story of human-powered helicopters and the prize coveted by virtually everyone who has designed the cumbersome beasts and tried to get them aloft. So far, nobody has come up with a muscle-driven machine capable of hovering for 1 minute and rising 3 meters — requirements for the Igor I. Sikorsky Prize, an honor the helicopter industry has dangled in front of aeronautics buffs for 32 years. The prize has been offered so long that the booty, initially $10,000, became embarrassingly small. Now it’s $250,000 and still unclaimed. Despite the skeptics, Neal Saiki, a 45-year-old Santa Cruz engineer, chases the Sikorsky dream, building unlikely craft that are part bicycle, part super-sized pinwheel. “We’re so interested in bigger and faster, we’re so used to going to the moon or looking at stars that are light years away that this goes against the grain,” he says. “But it’s one of the last aviation frontiers.” The Sikorsky has gnawed at him since 1989, when he led a team at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo that built the first muscle-driven chopper to get off the ground. But the 7.1second flight, which soared all of 8 inches off the floor of a Cal Poly gym, wasn’t nearly enough to take home the prize. Still, it was a heady day. Onlookers cheered as Greg McNeil, a fellow engineering student and bike racer, pedaled furiously. Saiki, grasping a safety rope at the end of a 100foot rotor, urged him on, twirling his hand over his head and yelling, “Up! Up! Up!” Clad in a white dinner jacket and black bow tie, Saiki looked as if he had sauntered in on his way to the prom. “If you’re setting a world’s record,” he explained in an interview decades later, “you might as well look good.” But Saiki still didn’t have the Sikorsky, and it bugged him. After graduating from Cal Poly with a master’s degree in aeronautical engineering, he worked for NASA but soon turned entrepreneurial. He invented a hanging cot for climbers and designed highend mountain bikes — but the

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Called the Igor I. Sikorsky Prize, the Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. has pledged $250,000 for the first successful flight of a human-powered helicopter. Regulations include length of flight (1 minute) and height of flight (3 meters). So far, the prize has gone unclaimed since its creation in 1980.

Sikorsky was always churning in his imagination, just out of reach. For a while, he tried his hand at creating another entry for the Sikorsky sweepstakes. In 1994, five years after the DaVinci III lifted off oh so briefly, his ongoing dream went up in smoke: A forest fire swept through his workshop near San Luis Obispo, destroying the Penguin, another humanpowered chopper he’d been building with high hopes. A trim man with a passion for rock climbing and samurai swords, Saiki sold his house in 2006 to start Zero Motorcycles, a pioneering manufacturer of electric cycles in Santa Cruz. In a management shake-up last year, he left Zero, saying he wanted to spend more time with his four children ages 1 to 11. He also announced — unsurprisingly, to those who knew him — that he intended to build a human-powered helicopter. “I’ve always wanted to go back and have another try at it,” Saiki said. “Now I’ve got the time, and I don’t have the dayto-day financial pressures.” So far, Saiki has spent more than $100,000 to create the craft he calls the Upturn. He works in his garage, has ultralightweight parts fabricated all over the country and runs tests at a friend’s private hangar, far from prying eyes. This summer, he hopes to make his bid in front of witnesses appointed by the American Helicopter Society International, the prize’s sponsor. “We want to make sure we can win it before we do that,” Saiki said. “It’s a very large, very fragile aircraft and a million things can go wrong.” A human-powered helicopter has no known use. Accord-

“We’re so interested in bigger and faster, we’re so used to going to the moon or looking at stars that are light years away that this goes against the grain. But it’s one of the last aviation frontiers.” — Neal Saiki, engineer and contestant for the Igor I. Sikorsky Prize

ing to conventional scientific wisdom, it would have to weigh less than a couple of checked bags but span a good-sized barn. Some experts doubt that such a craft can fly for a full minute, even with muscle power provided by an elite cyclist. The fundamental challenge is daunting. Airplanes accelerate gradually, essentially lifting skyward on a ramp of air. Helicopters, however, shoot straight up — a feat that requires a jolt of energy so big that it is beyond the capability of most in-shape pedalers. “Humans can only deliver so much,” said Matt Tarascio, a helicopter engineer who coordinates the contest and works for its chief funder, Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. “In industry, we’d just put in a bigger engine.” Then there’s the problem of weight. To get off the ground, a helicopter must churn an immense volume of air. To do that with the measly power provided by a human, the chopper’s rotors must make up for their lack of speed with huge dimensions. But those big rotors — sometimes longer than the Wright brothers’ first flight of 120 feet — can be exceedingly floppy, and stiffening them adds more weight. “Just getting off the ground is a significant achievement,” Tarascio said. As time draws closer for Saiki’s shot at the prize, he’s raising money to remake key parts and shave 15 pounds off his craft. Every few weeks, he trucks it to the hangar in 17 pieces and, with a small crew, takes as long as six hours to assemble it. They grapple with high-tech puzzles of vibration and instability but also contend with low-tech problems, like looping a rope for a safety harness over a girder six stories off the ground. After trying a bow and arrow, Saiki managed it with a fishing rod. Over the years, there have been about 20 attempts at the Sikorsky. The rules are strict:

no batteries, no lighter-than-air gases, no parts jettisoned from midair, no drugs to amp up the pilot, no wind. Ground-based crew members may touch the craft to help keep it stable at takeoff and landing, but not during flight. It must hover over a 10-meter-by-10 meter square, an area roughly the size of eight compact parking spaces. Besides Cal Poly’s DaVinci III, only two of the elaborate gizmos have lifted off. In 1994, students at Nihon University in Japan flew their Yuri I for 19.46 seconds, rising to 8 inches. Last May, the University of Maryland’s Gamera, named for the huge, fire-breathing turtle of Japanese monster films, cleared the floor for 11.4 seconds. In Santa Cruz, Saiki and his crew have run a few test flights at a local high school gym, barely large enough to accommodate the Upturn’s two delicate foam rotors. At one point, the 90-pound craft’s balsa wood seat flew off its titaniumand-carbon fiber frame like a piece of cheap scenery, dumping Greg McNeil, the bike racer who piloted the DaVinci III 23 years ago. “It looked like we’d come off the ground, and once that happens there are all these funky loads pulling on the cables,” said the 44-year-old McNeil, who could be Saiki’s pilot once again. “Any weak points in the craft get stressed.” McNeil said he’s just 3 or 4 pounds heavier than the 135 he weighed in college. He and some other Cal Poly pals, all engineers, are assisting Saiki, who is in touch with his former mentor, a now-retired Cal Poly engineering professor named William Patterson. Patterson, a Vietnam War helicopter pilot who was shot down in Laos, was the driving force behind Cal Poly’s entry in the Sikorsky contest. “My students figured it was something they could build in a couple of days,” he said.

HAPPENINGS • Former Sen. John Edwards’ lawyers will ask Judge Catherine Eagles to dismiss six charges of conspiracy and violating campaign laws, claiming the government has not presented a strong enough case against him to go to the jury, A3 • In today’s issue of the journal Science, scientists detail their findings that Vesta, the second-largest of the asteroids, exhibits planetlike features. Observations by NASA’s Dawn spacecraft show that Vesta formed within the first few million years of the solar system, that its surface is in places as bright as snow and in others as dark as coal, and that it contains an iron core that may have even briefly generated a magnetic field.

IN HISTORY Highlights: In 1927, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was founded during a banquet at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles. In 1950, President Harry S. Truman formally dedicated the Grand Coulee Dam in Washington state. In 1981, legendary reggae artist Bob Marley died in a Miami hospital at age 36. The Andrew Lloyd Webber musical “Cats” opened in London. Ten years ago: Israel pulled out of the West Bank town of Tulkarem, leaving Palestinianrun territories free of Israeli troops for the first time in six weeks. Five years ago: North and South Korea adopted a military agreement, enabling the first train crossing of their border in more than half a century. One year ago: Former hedge fund titan Raj Rajaratnam was convicted by a federal jury in New York in an insidertrading case of five counts of conspiracy and nine of securities fraud.

BIRTHDAYS Actress Frances Fisher is 60. Actor Boyd Gaines is 59. Actress Martha Quinn is 53. Actor Jeffrey Donovan is 44. Actor Nicky Katt is 42. Actor Coby Bell is 37. Actor Jonathan Jackson is 30. Actor Cory Monteith (TV: “Glee”) is 30. — From wire reports

MEDICAL MARIJUANA

Pot market takes a hit in California

REDMOND BUREAU Street address .......226 N.W. Sixth St. Redmond, OR 97756 Mailing address ....P.O. Box 788 Redmond, OR 97756 Phone.................................541-504-2336 Fax .....................................541-548-3203

32 years — and still no winner

It’s Friday, May 11, the 132nd day of 2012. There are 234 days left in the year.

By Peter Hecht McClatchy Newspapers

ARCATA, Calif. — The pot market is crashing in California’s Emerald Triangle. The closure of hundreds of marijuana dispensaries across California and a federal crackdown on licensing programs for medical pot cultivation are leaving growers in the North Coast redwoods with harvested stashes many can’t sell. Purportedly legal medical cultivators are fleeing to the black market. So much cheap weed is getting dumped in the college town of Arcata, some local dispensaries say business is down 75 percent. The region’s pot pilgrimage had accelerated in recent years as people were drawn by local cannabis traditions and dreams of cashing in on the medical marijuana market. They planted marijuana in the backwoods and in rewired houses with high-intensity grow lights. The saturation of pot growers set off a price tumble by 2010, as a pound of prime Emerald weed slipped from $5,000 to $3,000 for marijuana grown indoors and $2,000 for product grown outdoors. Lately, prices are in free fall.

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3 bedroom, 2 bath, custom home on 5 acres. Set up for horses and has shop, barn and wildlife. $415,000. CALL CANDY BOWERMAN AT 541-410-3193. MLS: 201107457

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Featuring mountain views and well-built 2788 sq. ft. manufactured home on 2.99 acres with irrigation. 4 bedroom, 3 baths, bonus room, Italian tile floors and maple cabinets. $299,900. CALL TAMMY SETTLEMIER AT 541-410-6009. MLS: 201203673

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REALTOR


FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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T S N   B Prosecutors rest case against Edwards GREENSBORO, N.C. — The government rested its case against John Edwards on Thursday by showing a videotape of the one-time Democratic presidential hopeful telling a now-infamous lie — that he was not the father of Rielle Hunter’s child. Judge Catherine Eagles is expected to hear defense motions today to dismiss the case. The jury will not be in the courtroom today as she listens to attorneys. Prosecutors wrapped up Thursday with some of the driest testimony of the past three weeks, as two FBI agents discussed pages of financial records and invoices. A former Edwards supporter also testified about Edwards’ dreams of higher office — possibly even an appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court. Then prosecutors put up their last piece of evidence — a videotape of Edwards’ 2008 TV interview in which he acknowledged to newscaster Bob Woodruff that he had an extramarital affair with Hunter, but denied he was the father of her newborn daughter, Quinn. Edwards later admitted he was the father of the now 4year-old, who lives with Hunter in Charlotte, N.C.

House’s $310B in cuts likely to die in Senate WASHINGTON — The House approved sweeping legislation on Thursday to cut $310 billion from the deficit over the next decade — much of it from programs for the poor — and to shift some of that savings to the Pentagon to stave off automatic military spending cuts scheduled for next year. The legislation has no chance of passing the Senate or of becoming law. The White House issued a stern veto threat, saying the bill would “fail the test of fairness and shared responsibility.” But the legislation’s prescriptions and priorities could define the 2012 congressional elections — and are likely to affect the race for the White House. Republicans framed the fight as a test of seriousness, saying their party was the only one willing to make the difficult choices necessary to tame the deficit. President Barack Obama’s polices are “not working,” said Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, the Budget Committee chairman.

Students make gains in testing on science U.S. eighth graders have made modest gains in national science testing, with Hispanic and black students narrowing the gap between them and their white and Asian peers, the federal government reported Thursday. Students tested last year scored an average of 152 out of a possible 300, up from 150 in 2009, a small but statistically significant improvement. The latest results are based on a representative sampling of 122,000 students in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, part of the Department of Education’s National Assessment of Educational Progress.

Lawsuit: Sheriff had bias against Latinos PHOENIX — A federal lawsuit asserting a “pattern of unlawful discrimination” by law enforcement officials here claims that Latinos at the county jail were often referred to as “stupid,” or with a coarse ethnic slur. On the streets, Latino drivers were five to nine times more likely than their white counterparts to be stopped or searched, the lawsuit asserts — for appearing disheveled or dirty, or if it seemed that too many people were crammed into the back seat. Some were detained because they were said to have looked nervous, or for avoiding eye contact. The accusations are part of a lawsuit filed Thursday by the Justice Department against Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County. — From wire reports

Obama campaign pushes In first, panel backs drug to prevent HIV infection issue of gay marriage By Brian Vastag New York Times News Service WASHINGTON — Vice President Joe Biden apologized to President Barack Obama for hastening him into an endorsement of same-sex marriage, several people briefed on the exchange said Thursday, even as the White House sought to capitalize on Obama’s long-awaited expression of support. As the president traveled to the West Coast on Thursday, where in Seattle he said Americans should have the chance to succeed “no matter who you love,” his presumptive challenger, Mitt Romney, and Republican leaders in Congress tried, with limited success, to steer the focus of the presidential campaign back to the nation’s sluggish economy. When Romney addressed hundreds of donors and other supporters at a pair of campaign stops in Nebraska, one of the na-

tion’s most reliable Republican states, he steered clear of the topic of same-sex marriage, underscoring Republican caution over the shifting politics of the gay marriage debate. On Capitol Hill, House Speaker John Boehner deflected questions about samesex marriage, declaring: “The president can talk about it all he wants. I’m going to stay focused on what the American people want us to focus on, and that’s jobs.” While Obama did not dwell on same-sex marriage in his initial appearances in Seattle, he had evidently struck a chord with some residents there. “Thank You! Mr. President for standing up for my Mommys!” read a hand-written sign held by a woman with an infant as Obama’s motorcade passed en route to a fundraiser. Still, the internal White House tension over Biden’s comments threatened to distract from the presidential endorsement that was seen as overdue

in some circles of the gay and Democratic communities. While the president bears Biden no ill will, several officials said, the episode enraged Obama’s senior political advisers and hampered the White House’s efforts to reap political dividends from the president’s declaration through a campaign email, a video and a three-state fundraising swing by Obama. Despite the White House friction, by Thursday there were signs that Obama’s comments had compelled a number of liberal donors, who had previously remained on the sidelines, to open their wallets. Juan Ahonen-Jover, a former technology executive, and his partner, Ken Ahonen-Jover, a doctor, donated a combined $10,000 to Obama’s campaign within minutes of learning that the president had changed course on gay marriage, pulling off the road on their way to Key West, Fla., to find an Internet cafe where they could make the contribution.

SYRIA

Massive suicide attack makes international action less likely By Karen DeYoung The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Agreement on additional international action in Syria appeared more remote than ever following a massive suicide bombing on Thursday in Damascus, as foreign leaders pointed fingers of responsibility for the violence in opposite directions. Obama administration officials said they could not confirm who carried out the attack, which killed 55 people and wounded more than 400. But they placed the blame squarely on Syrian President Bashar Assad for allowing the situation to escalate rather than complying with a United Nations resolution ordering a cease-fire supervised by U.N. monitors. Russia, whose approval is necessary at the Security Council for any further U.N.-authorized action, accused countries supporting the U.S.-backed Syrian opposition of intentionally instigating heightened violence to justify military intervention. “Some of our foreign partners are taking steps to ensure, both literally and figuratively, that the situation explodes,” Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said, making clear that he was “referring to the bombings.” Lavrov made his remarks at a news conference in Beijing, alongside his Chinese counterpart, Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi, who

The Washington Post.

WASHINGTON — For the first time in the 30-year battle against the HIV epidemic, a panel of experts has recommended that the Food and Drug Administration approve a drug to give to healthy people to protect against the infection. The panel recommended Thursday that the agency approve the drug Truvada for preventing HIV in men who have sex with men, HIV-negative partners of HIV-positive people and “other individuals at risk for acquiring HIV through sexual activity.” The FDA usually follows the advice of its advisory committees, which are made up of experts from outside the agency, although it does not have to. Its decision is expected by June 15. FDA approval would mark a watershed moment in the fight against an epidemic that still causes 50,000 new infections a year in the United States. Worldwide, according to the United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS, 2.7 million new infections occur annually. “I really think this provides for an amazing opportunity to turn the tide of the epidemic,” said Matthew Sharp, a patient advocate on the committee who voted for approval. “For somebody living with HIV for 23 years, I’m tired of seeing the ongoing infection rate.” The committee wrestled all day with safety concerns, including fears that men taking the drug would see it as an excuse to stop using condoms, and worries that healthy people would not take the drug daily. The series of three votes, one for each category of user, was not unanimous, with dissents and abstentions ranging from two of the 22 committee members on the first vote to 10 on the third.

“I have significant safety concerns,” said committee member Lauren Wood of the National Cancer Institute, who voted against approval each time. Wood said Truvada can cause kidney problems. She also objected to the lack of U.S. women in the pivotal studies, which were largely conducted in Africa. “I want to make the committee aware that there is not a single African American female in any one of the studies put forward for approval. I think that’s unacceptable,” she said. Truvada is already FDAapproved for the treatment of HIV. That means physicians are free to prescribe it “off label” for prevention; reports indicate that some already do. But a new FDA approval will free the company that makes the drug, Gilead Sciences, to market Truvada for prevention, too. One local HIV/AIDS researcher said the “need for prevention is incredibly, incredibly important.” Richard Elion of the Whitman-Walker clinic in the District of Columbia pointed to young men he counsels who continue having anal sex without condoms despite warnings to the contrary. “They need a new care plan, a new approach that works.” The votes mark an “important moment,” said Jennifer Kates, an HIV/AIDS policy expert at the Kaiser Family Foundation. Still, she said, “there’s no single thing that’s going to change the trajectory of the epidemic.”

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An aerial view shows the scene where two bombs exploded in Damascus, Syria, on Thursday. The explosions killed at least 55 people and wounded more than 400.

reiterated his government’s rejection of “outside military intervention in Syria.” The deadliest bombing in the Syrian capital since the uprising began 16 months ago came as the U.N. monitor-

ing mission was widely seen as failing. The United States and its allies, senior administration officials said, are discussing the criteria for declaring it dead and what to do afterward.

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Climbers near wreckage of Russian jet CIRCUIT The Associated Press MOUNT SALAK, Indonesia — Rescue teams used climbing gear to scale the nearly sheer slopes of a dormant Indonesian volcano, hoping Friday to reach the wreckage of a Russianmade jetliner that crashed with 45 people aboard during a demonstration flight for potential buyers. Local television showed what appeared to be the plane’s tail with the Sukhoi Superjet-100’s blue and white logo, part of a wing and bits of twisted metal scattered along Mount Salak’s slopes like confetti. Thick fog kept helicopters away from the crash site, officials said, delaying potential answers to what caused the crash. The jet slammed into the volcano Wednesday at 480

mph, raining debris down the slope. The Sukhoi Superjet-100 is Russia’s first new model of passenger jet since the fall of the Soviet Union two decades ago and was supposed to kickstart the nation’s efforts to modernize its fleet and resurrect its neglected aerospace industry. The ill-fated Superjet was

carrying representatives from local airlines and journalists on what was supposed to be a 50-minute demonstration flight. Just 21 minutes after takeoff from a Jakarta airfield, the Russian pilot and co-pilot asked for permission to drop from 10,000 feet to 6,000 feet. They gave no explanation, disappearing from the radar immediately afterward.

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COURT JUDGE Balyeat Wins Judicial Preference Poll Deschutes County attorneys overwhelmingly voted for Andy Balyeat in the Judicial Preference Poll conducted by the Oregon State Bar for the Circuit Court Judge position. Andy received double the votes of the second place finisher and nearly half of all votes cast for all four candidates.

- Oregon State Bar Judicial Preference Poll (April 2012)

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

Parks Continued from A1 The district anticipates the bond measure will be around $31 million, though that figure could change depending on what happens in the upcoming meetings. The amount of money allocated to certain projects could also vary. Most of the $31 million — about $14 million — would go toward completing the Deschutes River Trail, which officials say community members have consistently ranked as a high priority. That project includes buying more land on the north side of Bend near the district’s 122-acre Gopher Gulch Ranch property, which it acquired in 2010 for $2.75 million. It would also involve the district building two to three more bridges across the Deschutes River to connect the trail to Tumalo State Park and U.S. Forest Service land near Meadow Camp. Officials say if this were done, then people could travel along the trail from Tumalo State Park to Sunriver. The next two largest projects are a revamp of the Colorado Avenue dam and spillway that would allow people to pass through more safely and an open-air event center that would serve as an ice rink in the winter. For several years district officials and a local nonprofit, the Bend Paddle Trail Alliance, have discussed turning the spillway into a whitewater play area for kayakers. The project, which has been designed, would also include a passageway for floaters and some natural habitat areas. According to the district, this project is slated to cost about $5.3 million. The Bend Paddle Trail Alliance has raised about $900,000 to contribute to the effort. The ice rink is being packaged in the bond measure as part of a $5.7 million “recreation-education center” that would be located on a portion of the former Mt. Bachelor Park-N-Ride lot that the district bought in December for $2.5 million. The district has partnered with Oregon State University-Cascades to develop the parcel, and possibly

Public meetings on park projects The Bend Park & Recreation District will host a series of meetings to get public input on a possible $31 million bond measure. The district will also have information and staff available at its headquarters on May 25, 29, 30 and 31 to answer questions. • Wednesday, May 23, 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 800 N.E. Sixth St., Bend • Thursday, May 24, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Bend Park & Recreation District headquarters, 799 S.W. Columbia St., Bend • Thursday, May 31, 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Bend Park & Recreation District headquarters, 799 S.W. Columbia St., Bend

include a large-scale indoor recreational facility similar to Juniper Swim & Fitness Center. Under the proposed bond measure, the district would build a covered, open-air facility that in the winter could be used as an ice rink and in the summer could host activities such as farmers markets, basketball and indoor lacrosse. Other funds would be used to build a 25- to 30-acre community park in southeast Bend ($4 million), install infrastructure at Pine Nursery Park to prepare for expansion ($1.6 million), and pay for a study to figure out the best way to get rid of the sedimentation buildup in Mirror Pond ($425,000). The Park & Recreation District board of directors isn’t expected to make a decision to pursue a bond measure until next month. The public meetings to discuss the project list are scheduled between May 23 and May 31. The district will also have displays set up at its headquarters from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 25, 29, 30 and 31. Staff members will be available to explain the project and answer questions. — Reporter: 541-633-2160, ngrube@bendbulletin.com

Losses Continued from A1 The setback for JPMorgan may strengthen the hand of regulators in Washington who are now writing the rules for Dodd-Frank — in particular the Volcker Rule, which restricts banks from trading with their own money. JPMorgan’s setback “casts doubt on Jamie’s opposition and adds fuel to anyone who has been pushing for greater regulation,” said Mike Mayo, an analyst with Credit Agricole Securities. “Oh, how the mighty have fallen.” Questions over whether

Mayans Continued from A4 But in 2010, an undergraduate student working with Saturno, Max Chamberlain, stumbled onto the house as the team began a huge job — starting excavations at a Mayan city, Xultun, which, despite being known since 1915, had never been professionally excavated. Instead, over the decades, looters had dug deep trenches to access buildings. One day at lunch, Chamberlain announced his intention to find paintings by crawling through the trenches. Saturno scoffed. The buildings were too shallow — any paint on their walls would surely be long gone, erased by water, dirt, insects and encroaching tree roots. But sure enough, Chamberlain stumbled onto a wall, open to a trench, showing two red lines. A quick excavation revealed the back wall of the building — replete with a mural of a resplendent Mayan king, in bright blue, adorned with feathers and jewelry. Saturno’s team brushed off the wall and, “Ta-da!” he said. “A Technicolor, fantastically preserved mural. I don’t know how it survived.” Saturno immediately emailed contacts at

banks have been engaging in such trading for themselves while calling it “market making” or “hedging” came into focus last month, when reports emerged that a trading unit of JPMorgan in London was taking such large positions in the name of hedging that they were distorting the market. At the time, Dimon played down concerns about that trading in what the bank calls its Chief Investment Office, telling analysts on an April 13 conference call that it was “a complete tempest in a teapot.” In a hastily organized conference call with analysts Thursday, Dimon sounded more humble, saying that “egregious mistakes” were made.

Yet while conceding that the bank had “egg on its face,” Dimon refused to concede that the losses necessitated a stronger regulatory framework. The troubles are expected to weigh on the bank’s broader earnings. For example, the corporate group, which includes the Chief Investment Office, is now expected to lose $800 million in the second quarter, the company said in the filing. Previously, JPMorgan had estimated that the group would report net income of roughly $200 million. Shares of JPMorgan tumbled 6.7 percent in after-hours trading. Its Wall Street rivals were also down sharply.

the National Geographic Society, which agreed to fund a full excavation of the building. The mural is the first Mayan painting found in a small building instead of a large public space. And it’s also the oldest known preserved Mayan painting. Next to the king, a scribe — perhaps the worker who scribbled the calendars on the wall — holds a writing instrument. Three mysterious figures wearing black also march across the wall. One of them is named “older brother obsidian.” Mayan experts have no idea whom these mysterious figures might represent. Once the team uncovered several columns of red and black dots and dashes — the Mayans’ numbering system — the meaning of these figures was almost immediately evident to David Stuart, one of the world’s foremost experts in Mayan hieroglyphics. It was a lunar table, showing a 4,784day cycle of the moon’s phases. The table is broken into 27 columns, each representing six lunar months. Each column is topped by the face of one of three moon gods — a jaguar, a skull and a woman. These three repeat. So by consulting the table, a priest, say, could tell which moon god would preside over a particular date. Want to know whether the king’s birthday falls under a jaguar moon 10 years hence? A hundred? A thousand? Just

check the table. “It’s really cool because it shows us the tools the ancient astronomers and priests were using to do their calculations,” Stuart said. On another wall sits a smaller set of four columns of figures. These took a bit more puzzling. But eventually the all-star Mayan scholar team assembled by Saturno figured it out: This second table was filled with huge numbers relating to how long it takes Mars and Venus to cross the sky and come back again. This calendar spans some 7,000 years — heading much farther into the future than the supposed doomsday date. “Like a lot of ancient cultures, they were able with naked-eye astronomy to calculate the paths of the planets,” said Stuart. “We tend to forget that before telescopes, people were able to analyze the movement of planets in a lot of detail — and figure out exactly, to the day, the length of a Venus year and a Mars year.” Heather McKillop, a Mayan expert at Louisiana State University who was not involved in the research, called the Xultun murals “stunning new evidence of the ancient origins of Maya astronomical record keeping, best known from later documents.” The discovery is detailed in this week’s Science magazine and in the June issue of National Geographic.

Deputy Continued from A1 The story refers to Lewis as “Sheriff J.F. Lewis” and concludes by noting that “Intense excitement prevails” after the shooting. The shooting was a result of an 1880s feud that broke out between H.C. Laws and the Calavan family. Laws was the leader of the Bonanza Regulators, a band of settlers who tried to keep newcomers away from the Lake County area and prevent cattle grazing on public land. The feud apparently escalated until Frank Calavan, 15, was shot and killed near the Oregon-California border on Feb. 13, 1882. Laws was taken into custody, and at 10 p.m. on March 11, 1882, Lewis was guarding him in Greenman’s Hotel in Linkville, now Klamath Falls. Laws was due for a hearing two days later, and Lewis was accompanied at the hotel by Justice of the Peace William A. Wright. “From reading all the accounts from back then, they had to have information that someone was going to try to break him out because the deputy and the judge were there at 10 at night,” Lake County Sheriff Phillip McDonald said.

Shootout compared to Gunfight at O.K. Corral A group of masked men bent on revenge showed up at the hotel and demanded that Laws be handed over to be lynched. Lewis refused. He shot. The masked men shot back, and Lewis was hit in the leg. The bullet severed his femoral artery, killing him in five minutes. Judge Wright was shot in the arm, and the mob departed without Laws. “Movies were made like that,” McDonald said. A description of the events from The Daily Oregonian indicated Lewis shot one of the attackers in the head. “The lynchers then left, taking with them a wounded man, who is supposed to be shot in the head, as a hat was picked up riddled with shot and a piece of scalp with a tuft of hair attached,” the article

Optics Continued from A1 Refraction works well with visible light because the light waves have a frequency that chimes well with the oscillations of orbiting electrons. But for higher-energy electromagnetic radiation — ultraviolet and beyond — the frequencies are too high for the electrons to respond, and lenses become less and less effective. It was only toward the end of the 20th century that physicists found they could create lenses for X-rays, the part of the electromagnetic spectrum just beyond the ultraviolet, by stacking numerous layers of patterned material. Such lenses opened up the field of X-ray optics which, with X-rays’ short wavelengths, allowed imaging at a nanoscale resolution. There the story should have ended. Theory says that gamma rays, being even more energetic than X-rays, ought to bypass orbiting electrons altogether; materials should not bend them at all, and the refractive index for gamma rays should be almost equal to one. Yet this is not what a team of physicists led by Dietrich Habs at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich and Michael Jentschel at the Institut LaueLangevin in Grenoble, France, has discovered. ILL is a research reactor that produces intense beams of neutrons. Habs, Jentschel and colleagues used an intense beam of neutrons to bombard samples of radioactive chlorine and gadolinium to produce gamma rays. They directed these down a 20-meter tube to a device known as a crystal spectrometer, which funneled the gamma rays into a specific direction. They then passed half of the gamma rays through a silicon prism and into another spectrometer to measure their final direction, while they directed the other half straight to the spectrometer unimpeded. To the researchers’ surprise, as they report in a paper due to be published this month in Physical Review Letters, gamma rays with an energy above 700 kiloelectronvolts are slightly bent by the silicon prism. “Everything was wrongly predicted,” explains Habs. “But we said, [the refraction] looks so marvelous for X-rays, why don’t we have a look whether there is something? And suddenly we found there is a totally unexpected effect.” “It is great to see that the advances x-ray optics have made ... over the past 20 years might now even be moving into the [gamma ray] range,” says Gerhard Materlik, chief executive of the Diamond Light Source, in Didcot, England. “I hope that the predictions made by the authors about possible gamma ray optics can be realized to turn them into real optical components.”

itself for an anniversary. “That’s the reason the memorial exists, to honor all those state, federal, tribal officers who died in the line of duty,” he said.

Added to memorial wall

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Department of Correction Officers Sheri Harmon, left, and Steven Perrine take imprints from the Police Memorial during a ceremony Tuesday in Salem. Lake County Sheriff’s Deputy Samuel Lewis, killed in a shootout in the early 1880s, was one of three officers memorialized Tuesday.

reads. “The shot that struck him is supposed to have been fired by Lewis, as a gun was found behind him with one barrel discharged and he had no arms on him.” The Daily Oregonian article indicates there were no suspects in the shooting. “There is no clue to the perpetrators of this unlawful and bungling affair.” No one ever took the blame for Lewis’ murder. After confusion about which state had jurisdiction over Laws, his case was dismissed in California and he fled to Utah and then New Mexico. Baker said some articles compared the Linkville hotel incident to the historic Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. The original Galveston Daily News article caught Baker’s eye because his son lives in Medford, and the dateline of the piece was nearby Jacksonville. So Baker did some digging and determined that Lewis was not on the national memorial. Then he set it aside for a while to work on other projects. When Baker returned to his pile of research on Lewis, he turned to the Internet for more information. Eventually he tracked down the small story in The Daily Oregonian, as well as a pile of information from the Harney County Library about the feud that led to

the 15-year-old’s death. Information in hand, Baker contacted Lake County Deputy Charles Pore about his find. Pore started conducting research of his own, in county records. He hit pay dirt. Nestled in the bowels of the Lake County Courthouse were big bound books filled with county commissioners’ meeting minutes and records. “The commissioners had offered a reward of $1,000 for the apprehension and conviction of any or all of the murderers of (Samuel) Lewis,” McDonald said. Next, the office located Lewis’ probate documents. Lewis’ brother, Evan Lewis, was the executor of the estate, and his father, John Lewis, the beneficiary. His estate consisted of $205 and a horse and saddle. Jerald Steward, 70, remembers hearing his grandfather tell stories about the Lewis men. Steward’s great-grandfather was Evan Lewis, the deputy’s brother. Samuel Lewis was a single man who, according to Steward, had come over with his brother from Lane County, likely on foot. “I heard my grandfather talk about (the shooting) but he never really said all that much,” he said. The only part of the story he

remembers, in fact, was that Lewis had been killed while standing at the top of a flight of stairs, trying to protect someone. And he knew his great-grandfather, Evan Lewis, had named his son after his slain brother. Knowing the full story is important. “It really made me think that all this time didn’t diminish the act that he did,” Steward said, “and I’m thankful that there was somebody out there who was able to track it down.” Since Steward discovered the family connection, he’s discovered that Lewis is buried in the IOOF Cemetery in Lakeview, just across the road from Steward’s great-grandfather. Steward’s not the only one to benefit from Baker’s discovery. “It was actually very neat to go back and find the records from back then, and to know that this guy, Deputy Lewis, is not forgotten anymore,” McDonald said. “It’s just neat to see the history of the Sheriff’s Office. We still have some history there, and it’s been an honor to be able to bring this forward.” Eriks Gabliks, the director of the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, said old line-of-duty deaths are typically found when a police department or other agency is researching

On Tuesday, a ceremony was held to add Lewis and two other officers killed in the line of duty to the memorial wall. In addition to Lewis, the memorial wall now includes Eugene Police Officer Chris Kilcullen, who was shot and killed in April 2011 in Springfield during a traffic stop, and Oregon Department of Corrections Officer Buddy Ray Herron, who was fatally stabbed when he stopped to help a stranded motorist in November 2011. Lewis is the seventh officer from the 1800s to be added to the memorial wall. He joins fellow Lake County Deputy David Sanchez, who was shot and killed in 1979. Every year, the Lewis family gets together for a reunion on Father’s Day. This year, Steward hopes to bring Pore to the event to tell them more about their long-dead ancestor. “It’d make it personal,” he said. — Reporter: 541-617-7831, smiller@bendbulletin.com

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FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012


FAMILY

TV & Movies, B2 Calendar, B3

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/family

IN BRIEF

Sarah Larson’s youngest daughter, Nancy, made this Mother’s Day card as a child.

Meet local doulas at event Expectant mothers and families are invited to meet doulas based in Central Oregon from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday. The event is a free, informal gathering that will allow pregnant women to meet and ask questions of a variety of local doulas. A doula is an individual, usually a woman, who is trained to provide support during childbirth and may also offer postpartum assistance. The event will also feature information from Dr. Marie Herbert, who will talk about pediatric chiropractic care. Attendees can enter to win a free massage. The event will take place at Hawthorn Healing Arts Center, 39 N.W. Louisiana Ave., Bend. Reservations are encouraged. Contact: Sarah at 541-815-5165.

‘Challenged’ books named The American Library Association released information about the 10 books that were most frequently challenged for inclusion in school curricula or libraries. In 2011, the ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom received 326 reports of challenges to ban or restrict these titles. A challenge is a formal, written complaint registered with a school or library asking for a book or other material to be removed or restricted. The book receiving the most challenges was a series by Lauren Myracle, “ttyl,” “ttfn,” “l8r” and “g8r,” which received objections for religious viewpoints, sexually explicit content, offensive language and being unsuitable to the age group. The other books receiving the most challenges are (some of the objections are listed after the title): • “The Color of Earth” book series by Kim Dong Hwa (sex education, nudity) • “The Hunger Games” book series by Suzanne Collins (antiethnic, anti-family, occult/satanic, violence) • “My Mom’s Having a Baby! A Kid’s Month-by-Month Guide to Pregnancy” by Dori Hillestad Butler (nudity, sex education) • “The Absolutely True Diary of a PartTime Indian” by Sherman Alexie (racism, sexually explicit, religious viewpoint, offensive language) • “Alice” book series by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor (nudity, offensive language, religious viewpoint) • “Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley (racism, sexually explicit, religious viewpoint) • “What My Mother Doesn’t Know” by Sonya Sones (offensive language, sexually explicit) • “Gossip Girl” book series by Cecily Von Ziegesar (drugs, sexually explicit, offensive language) • “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee (racism, offensive language) — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

B

Dear Abby, B3 Horoscope, B3 Comics, B4-5

HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY

Andy Tullis The Bulletin

GOOD QUESTION

What if I can only save a little for my kid’s college? Editor’s Note: Good Question is a biweekly feature in which a local expert in a particular field answers a question related to family life. Have a question about your family? Send it to family@ bendbulletin.com. By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

What should I do if I Q: want to save money for my child’s college fund but I’m only able to save $100 a month? Julie Miller is vice president and Oregon regional manager of Bank of the Cascades. She has been with the bank for 16 years and has two children who have both Miller been through college. Miller says that while it may not seem like $100 is a lot to put away each month for a child’s college fund, it all adds up. With the rising cost of college, it may not be realistic for the fund to cover your child’s tuition completely. However, whatever you can put away will help in the long run, she says. There are many factors to consider when creating a college fund for your child, Miller says: the increasing cost of college, how old your child is when you start saving, and what kind of school your child may attend. Miller says parents interested in finding out how much they should be saving can consult with local investment advisers, who can provide them with calculations of how much money they should be contributing to the college fund each month, while taking into account tuition inflation. See Question / B6

A:

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Larson looks through old Mother’s Day cards from her children. She saved many of the cards and gifts made for her.

• Area moms share the long-treasured trinkets and cards their children made them for Mother’s Day

TO:

By Alandra Johnson The Bulletin

MOM

he cards and knickknacks sit in boxes stacked up in the basement or placed on the highest shelf in the closet. The boxes are likely covered with dust — probably haven’t been opened in years. But don’t let that fool you. What’s inside is treasure. Just ask any mom. Every year, children bring home dozens of crafts and cards to their parents, many of which don’t survive much longer than the school year. But many local moms held on to a select few and, now that their children are grown, those crayon-written cards and crafts have turned into treasure. Bend resident Carol Garcia, mother of two and grandmother of three, has many such boxes. Each one contains lovingly saved school papers, projects and artwork from her two sons. To find old Mother’s Day cards made by her sons, Garcia had to search an old hat box stuffed in the closet. Garcia isn’t sure why these specific cards touched her so much, but she knows how she feels when she looks at them: “Total completion, satisfaction.” “The only thing I ever wanted to be in the world was a mom.” In 1975, Garcia’s son Phillip, about age 5, scrawled in crayon: “Mother my dear/ mother my dear, I love you, I love you/ every day of the year.” He signed it “whit lots of love.” The misspelling adds to the charm. In 1988, when her son Matt was in about fifth grade, he wrote in a card: “some moms are smart, some moms are pretty, some moms are talented, but no moms are as great as you!” On the back he wrote a promotional bit about the card: “Give a Matt card on special occasions, they really get the message through.” See Moms / B6

T

ASK MR. DAD

Help your child survive separation anxiety By Armin Brott McClatchy-Tribune News Service

My 3-year-old son Q: has been going to the same day care for eight months, but he’s still anxious and nervous every time I drop him off. I know that young children can have anxiety problems about unfamiliar places and people, but hasn’t this gone on long enough? I remember dropping off my oldest daughter (now 22) on her first day at day care, and how hard it was to say goodbye and leave her in the care of people who couldn’t possibly love her as much as I did. And I still remember how she cried and didn’t want to let me go. She got over it within a few days (although it took me a lot longer), and most kids will do the same. But unfortunately, when it comes to separation anxiety, there’s no way to tell you what’s normal and what’s not. See Mr. Dad / B3

A:

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Carol Garcia, of Bend, saved cards and letters from her children from the early ’70s.

Nita Belles holds a wooden box and a set of drink coasters she received from her now-grown children as gifts for Mother’s Day.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

TV & M 

Find local movie times and film reviews inside today’s GO! Magazine.

Once controversial, gays now mainstream on TV By Brian Stelter New York Times News Service

On “Glee� this spring, a transgender character named Unique is competing in a singoff. On “Grey’s Anatomy,� Arizona and Callie are adjusting to married life, having been pronounced “wife and wife� last year. On “Modern Family,� the nation’s most popular television show, partners Cameron and Mitchell are trying to adopt a second child. What’s missing? The outrage. The cultural battlefield of television has changed markedly since the 1990s, when conservative groups and religious figures objected to Ellen DeGeneres coming out and “Will & Grace� coming on. Today, it’s rare to hear a complaint about shows ABC via New York Times News Service like “Modern Family� or the drama “Smash,� which has Eric Stonestreet, as Cameron, five openly gay characters, or and Jesse Tyler Ferguson, as the sitcom “Happy Endings,� Mitchell, with Aubrey Anderwhich, against stereotype, has son-Emmons, as Lily, their a husky and lazy gay male adopted daughter, during an episode of “Modern Family.� character. To the contrary. Mitt Romney is known to be a fan of “Modern Family,� and a more comfortable with their Catholic group gave it a media gay, lesbian and transgender neighbors. award this month. “TV and movie representaNext week in New York the major networks will announce tion matters,� said Edward a slate of new shows, includ- Schiappa, a professor of coming a sitcom on NBC that fea- munication studies at the University of Minnesota. tures a gay couple Biden apparently and their surrogate. TV agrees: He said SunThe title: “The New Normal.� SPOTLIGHT day that “Will & Grace,� which ran At a time when from 1998 to 2006, gay rights are reemerging as an election year “probably did more to educate issue — in part because of the U.S. public than almost Vice President Joe Biden’s and anything anybody’s ever done President Barack Obama’s so far.� When that sitcom began stated support for gay marriage — activists and academ- on NBC, it was seen as conics say that depictions of gay troversial. Several consercharacters on television play vative groups claimed that a big role in making viewers it and shows like it would

make homosexuality seem desirable. Some groups said the same about “Ellen,� the ABC sitcom starring DeGeneres, who came out as a lesbian on the show and in real life in 1997. DeGeneres threatened to quit a year later when ABC preceded an “Ellen� episode that showed her jokingly kissing a friend with a message that warned, “Due to adult content, parental discretion is advised.� That warning would not appear today, as complaints about gay characters on shows like “Modern Family� and “Glee� barely bubble to the surface. Steven Levitan, a cocreator of “Modern Family,� said he thought when the show started that the inclusion of Cameron and Mitchell would “limit our success a bit, because it will perhaps alienate a certain segment of the population.� “In fact,� he said, “it’s turned out to be quite the opposite,� a point he reiterated last fall when the series won its second Emmy Award for best comedy.

P’ G   M  This guide, compiled by Orlando (Fla.) Sentinel film critic Roger Moore, should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

‘DARK SHADOWS’ Rating: PG-13 for comic horror violence, sexual content, some drug use, language and smoking What it’s about: A long-dead vampire returns to life in the wild, woolly and promiscuous America of the 1970s. The kid attractor factor: Johnny Depp, vampires, ’70s camp. Good lessons/ bad lessons: “Family is the only real wealth.� Violence: Yes, some of it moderately graphic. Language: A generous scattering of profanity. Sex: Yes, but nothing explicit. Drugs: Some alcohol, drugs and cigarettes. Parents’ advisory: The low comedy and slapstick will appeal to all ages, but the violence and sexual content make this best suited for 12 and older.

‘THE AVENGERS’ Rating: PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi violence and action throughout, and a mild drug reference. What it’s about: Superheroes are summoned by a secret government agency to battle an

Warner Bros. Pictures via The Associated Press

Johnny Depp portrays Barnabas Collins in “Dark Shadows,� based on the campy 1960s soap opera of the same name. See the full review in today’s GO! Magazine. alien invasion. The kid attractor factor: It’s Iron Man and Thor and Hulk and Captain America, plus Black Widow and Hawkeye Good lessons/ bad lessons: There is no “I� in “team,� even when Iron Man’s on that team. Violence: Lots and lots.

Language: A scattering of profanity. Sex: Gwyneth Paltrow in Daisy Dukes, Chris Evans shirtless, Scarlett Johansson being Scarlett Johansson Drugs: Mentioned. Parents’ advisory: Not “Dark Knight� dark and bloody, but pretty violent. OK for 10 and older.

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*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Meet, Browns Ciao Italia ‘G’

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News Meet, Browns Jacques Pepin

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Ă… Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Travelscope ‘G’ Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens Midsomer Murders ’ ‘PG’ Ă…

7:00

7:30

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Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Shark Tank (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Who Do You Think You Are? ‘PG’ How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Undercover Boss MasTec ’ ‘PG’ Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Shark Tank (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Big Bang Big Bang The Finder (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Washington W’k BBC Newsnight Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Who Do You Think You Are? ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Nikita Crossbow (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Masterpiece Mystery! ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (DVS) Price-Antiques

9:00

9:30

Primetime: What Would You Do? Grimm Big Feet (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… CSI: NY Near Death (N) ‘14’ Ă… Primetime: What Would You Do? Fringe (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Midsomer Murders ‘PG’ Ă… Grimm Big Feet (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Supernatural (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… World News Tavis Smiley (N)

10:00

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20/20 ’ ‘PG’ Ă… KATU News (11:35) Nightline Dateline NBC (N) ’ Ă… News Jay Leno Blue Bloods Mother’s Day (N) ‘14’ News Letterman 20/20 ’ ‘PG’ Ă… KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Masterpiece Classic Aristocratic D’Urbervilles. ’ ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) Dateline NBC (N) ’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno Cops ‘PG’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘PG’ ’Til Death ‘PG’ That ’70s Show Charlie Rose (N) ’ Ă… PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

Parking Wars Parking Wars Parking Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars *A&E 130 28 18 32 Parking Wars (3:00) “Kindergar- ›› “Overboardâ€? (1987, Comedy) Goldie Hawn, Kurt Russell, Edward Herrmann. An amnesiac ›› “Caddyshackâ€? (1980, Comedy) Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield. A ››› “A League of Their Ownâ€? (1992) Tom Hanks, Geena Davis. A women’s *AMC 102 40 39 ten Copâ€? millionairess is duped by a cunning carpenter. Ă… vulgar newcomer clashes with the country club set. Ă… professional baseball league debuts in 1943. Ă… Snake Man of Appalachia ‘PG’ Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Whale Wars: Viking Shores ‘PG’ Whale Wars: Viking Shores ‘PG’ Frozen Planet ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Whale Wars: Viking Shores ‘PG’ *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Snake Man of Appalachia ‘PG’ (5:15) ›› “Ghostbusters IIâ€? (1989, Comedy) Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd. (7:45) ›››› “The Silence of the Lambsâ€? (1991, Suspense) Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins. (10:26) ›››› “The Silence of the Lambsâ€? BRAVO 137 44 (5:45) ›› “National Lampoon’s Vacationâ€? (1983, Comedy) Chevy Chase. ’ Ă… The Singing Bee (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Jennie Garth Melissa & Tye Jennie Garth Melissa & Tye The Singing Bee ’ ‘PG’ Ă… CMT 190 32 42 53 › Son-in-Law Around the World in 80 Plates Mad Money The Celebrity Apprentice Celebrities create a print ad campaign. ‘PG’ Insanity! NutrBullet CNBC 51 36 40 52 The Celebrity Apprentice Celebrities create a print ad campaign. ‘PG’ Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… South Park ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report Always Sunny Always Sunny (7:58) Tosh.0 (8:29) Tosh.0 Gabriel Iglesias: Hot and Fluffy Ralphie May: Too Big to Ignore The Half Hour The Half Hour COM 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Talk of the Town Local issues. Desert Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Politics & Public Policy Today CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Politics & Public Policy Today Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Jessie (N) ‘G’ Phineas, Ferb Fish Hooks (N) A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Austin & Ally ’ Good-Charlie A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ *DIS 87 43 14 39 Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Deadliest Catch Turf War ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Catch Weak Links ‘14’ Deadliest Catch The exhausted crews dig deep. ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Devil’s Ride ’ ‘14’ Ă… Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Ă… *DISC 156 21 16 37 Tuna Wranglers ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Kendra ‘14’ Kendra ‘14’ Mrs. Eastwood The Soup ‘14’ E! News (N) Fashion Star Buyer’s Choice ‘PG’ Bobby Brown Khloe & Lamar Fashion Police (N) ‘14’ Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 NBA Countdown NBA Basketball Memphis Grizzlies at Los Angeles Clippers (N) (Live) Ă… To Be Announced SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 TBA Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… Dan Le Batard NASCAR Racing ESPN2 22 24 21 24 NASCAR Racing Friday Night Lights ‘PG’ Ă… 30 for 30 ‘PG’ Ă… The Dotted Line Ă… 30 for 30 ‘PG’ Ă… The Dotted Line Ă… Year of the Quarterback Ă… ESPNC 23 25 123 25 Friday Night Lights ‘PG’ Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ›› “Stepmomâ€? (1998, Drama) Julia Roberts, Susan Sarandon, Ed Harris. ››› “Freaky Fridayâ€? (2003) Jamie Lee Curtis, Lindsay Lohan. The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 (4:00) ›› “The Deep End of the Oceanâ€? (1999) Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Food Network Star Reunion Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Avatarâ€? (2009, Science Fiction) Sam Worthington. A former Marine falls in love with a native of a lush alien world. The Ultimate Fighter Live (N) ‘14’ UFC Primetime Bounty Hunter FX 131 Property Bro Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l House Hunters House Hunters You Live in What? ‘G’ Ă… House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l HGTV 176 49 33 43 Property Bro Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… (11:01) American Pickers ‘PG’ *HIST 155 42 41 36 United Stats of America ‘PG’ America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted (N) ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ LIFE 138 39 20 31 America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup: Raw Consequences Lockup: Raw Nothing But Time Lockup: Santa Rosa Lockup: Raw Ain’t No Hotel Lockup: Raw Jailhouse Blues MSNBC 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) True Life ’ The Substitute Ridiculousness Money Strang. Money Strang. Pauly D Project Punk’d Ă… ›› “Get Rich or Die Tryin’â€? (2005) Curtis “50 Centâ€? Jackson. ’ MTV 192 22 38 57 True Life Two people lose weight. SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SquarePants ’ ‘Y7’ Legend-Korra Legend-Korra George Lopez George Lopez Friends ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob The Judds ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Judds ’ ‘PG’ Ă… My Mom is Obsessed ’ ‘PG’ My Mom is Obsessed ’ ‘14’ My Mom is Obsessed ’ ‘PG’ My Mom is Obsessed ’ ‘PG’ OWN 161 103 31 103 The Judds ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at New York Yankees From Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, N.Y. The Dan Patrick Show MLB Baseball ROOT 20 45 28* 26 (4:00) MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at New York Yankees (N) (Live) (6:24) Gangland Crip or Die ‘14’ (7:36) Gangland Stone to the Bone ’ ‘14’ Ă… (8:48) Gangland ’ ‘14’ Ă… Gangland Snitch Slaughter ‘14’ (11:12) Gangland ’ ‘14’ Ă… SPIKE 132 31 34 46 (5:12) Gangland Hunt and Kill Brown Pride. ’ ‘14’ › “The Wicker Manâ€? (2006) Nicolas Cage, Ellen Burstyn. Premiere. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ Ă… Dream Machines Ă… Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files SYFY 133 35 133 45 (3:30) ›› “The Villageâ€? (2004) Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey The Harvest Perry Stone Praise the Lord (Live). Ă… Frederick Price Life Focus ‘PG’ Secrets Creflo Dollar Israel: Journey of Light TBN 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ House of Payne House of Payne House of Payne House of Payne ›› “The Heartbreak Kidâ€? (2007, Comedy) Ben Stiller. Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ››› “Bedazzledâ€? (1967, Comedy) Peter Cook, Dudley Moore. A depressed ››› “The Wrong Boxâ€? (1966, Comedy) John Mills, Ralph Richardson. Victo- ›› “The Bed Sitting Roomâ€? (1969) Rita Tushingham, Ralph Richardson. ››› “Let’s Scare Jessica to Deathâ€? TCM 101 44 101 29 cook makes a diabolical deal with the devil. Ă… rian brothers must outlive each other to win cash hoard. After-effects plague the survivors of history’s shortest war. (1971) Zohra Lampert. Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride *TLC 178 34 32 34 Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride DC Cupcakes: Mommy Law & Order Fluency ’ ‘14’ Law & Order ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) ›› “Edge of Darknessâ€? (2010, Suspense) Mel Gibson, Ray Winstone. Premiere. Ă… ›› “Edge of Darknessâ€? (2010) Mel Gibson. Ă… *TNT 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Nowhere Man ‘14’ Johnny Test ’ Regular Show Regular Show Regular Show Adventure Time Adventure Time Cartoon Planet ‘G’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘PG’ *TOON 84 Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Ă… Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Ă… Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Ă… The Dead Files (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Ă… *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Ă… (6:13) M*A*S*H Smilin’ Jack ‘PG’ (6:52) M*A*S*H (7:24) M*A*S*H Home Improve. Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza The Blood Line ‘PG’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Fairly Legal Kiss Me, Kate ‘PG’ Common Law Pilot (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (11:18) Suits USA 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU Behind the Music Usher ’ ‘PG’ ›› “The Woodâ€? (1999, Drama) Omar Epps, Taye Diggs. ’ › “Honey 2â€? (2011, Drama) Katerina Graham, Randy Wayne. Premiere. ’ Behind/Music VH1 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Ă… PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:20) ›› “Oxford Bluesâ€? 1984 Rob Lowe. Ă… ›› “The Frightenersâ€? 1996, Suspense Michael J. Fox. ’ ‘R’ Ă… (9:50) ››› “Beetlejuiceâ€? 1988 Michael Keaton. Tango & Cash ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:35) ›› “Tango & Cashâ€? 1989 ’ ‘R’ Ă… ›› “Big Momma’s Houseâ€? 2000 Martin Lawrence. ‘PG-13’ Ă… › “Big Momma’s House 2â€? 2006 Martin Lawrence. ‘PG-13’ Ă… › “Wooâ€? 1998 Jada Pinkett Smith. ‘R’ Ă… FXM Presents FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:00) “Big Momma’s House 2â€? ›› “Iron Monkeyâ€? (1993, Action) Rongguang Yu, Donnie Yen. ›› “Legend of the Drunken Masterâ€? (1994, Action) Jackie Chan, Ti Lung, Anita Mui. ›› “Iron Monkeyâ€? (1993, Action) Rongguang Yu, Donnie Yen. Legend-Drunk FUEL 34 PGA Tour Golf The Players Championship, Second Round Live From THE PLAYERS Live From THE PLAYERS GOLF 28 301 27 301 (4:00) Live From THE PLAYERS The Waltons The Starlet ‘G’ Ă… The Waltons The Journal ‘G’ ›› “Mother’s Day on Walton’s Mountainâ€? (1982) Ralph Waite. ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Innocents ‘G’ (3:30) “Dinner for › “D.O.A.: Dead or Aliveâ€? 2006 Devon Aoki. Four martial ›› “One Dayâ€? 2011, Romance Anne Hathaway. For two decades, two friends The Ricky Ger- Life’s Too Short Real Time With Bill Maher (N) ’ Real Time With Bill Maher ’ ‘MA’ Ă… HBO 425 501 425 501 Schmucksâ€? artists unite against a sinister force. ‘PG-13’ reunite on July 15 each year. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… vais Show ‘MA’ Episode 4 ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Ă… ››› “Die Hardâ€? 1988, Action Bruce Willis, Alan Rickman. Premiere. ‘R’ (7:45) ››› “Die Hardâ€? 1988, Action Bruce Willis, Alan Rickman, Bonnie Bedelia. ‘R’ ›› “Teethâ€? 2007, Comedy Jess Weixler. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 “Hand That Rocks (5:35) › “Your Highnessâ€? 2011, Comedy Danny McBride. A slacker prince has (7:20) ›››› “Alienâ€? 1979, Science Fiction Tom Skerritt. A horrific spaceship (9:20) ››› “Men in Blackâ€? 1997, Action Tommy Lee The Girl’s Guide Lingerie Feature MAX 400 508 508 Cradleâ€? to join his brother on a noble quest. ’ ‘R’ Ă… stowaway attacks interstellar miners. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Jones, Will Smith. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… to Depravity (N) 1: Nighty Guerrilla Gold Rush ‘PG’ The 400 Million Dollar Emerald Goldfathers (N) ‘14’ Guerrilla Gold Rush ‘PG’ The 400 Million Dollar Emerald Goldfathers ‘14’ Wild Justice Night Patrol ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Wild Grinders Planet Sheen Power Rangers Power Rangers SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Power Rangers Power Rangers Odd Parents Spanish Fly Wanna Fish Pro Fishing Strike King Pro Bassmasters Hook-N-Look Big Water Major League Fishing Project West. Extremes Amer. Archer OUTD 37 307 43 307 Zona’s Show (4:30) “Lebanon, Pa.â€? 2010, Comedy-Drama Josh Hop- (6:25) › “Furry Vengeanceâ€? 2010 Brendan Fraser. Forest › “Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evilâ€? 2011 Voices of (9:25) ››› “Source Codeâ€? 2011, Suspense Jake Gyllen- Boxing Yudel Jhonson vs. Freddy SHO 500 500 kins, Rachel Kitson. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… animals go to war against a land developer. Hayden Panettiere. Premiere. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… haal, Michelle Monaghan. ‘PG-13’ Hernandez (N) ‘PG’ Car Warriors Le Mans ‘14’ Car Warriors Chevelle ‘14’ Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff Mobil The Grid Formula 1 Debrief (N) Formula One Racing Spanish Grand Prix, Practice SPEED 35 303 125 303 Car Warriors Camaro ‘14’ (6:10) ›› “Cars 2â€? 2011 Voices of Owen Wilson. ’ ‘G’ Ă… (8:02) ›› “Battle: Los Angelesâ€? 2011 Aaron Eckhart. ‘PG-13’ Ă… Magic City (N) ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Magic City ’ ‘MA’ Ă… STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:35) ›› “Mars Needs Momsâ€? (4:45) ››› “The Cry of the Owlâ€? 2009, Suspense Paddy ›› “Raw Dealâ€? 1986, Action Arnold Schwarzenegger, Kathryn Harrold. Ex-FBI (8:25) “Johnny Wasâ€? 2006 Vinnie Jones. Johnny Doyle ›› “Drive Angryâ€? 2011 Nicolas Cage. A brutal felon es- “Original Kings of TMC 525 525 Comedyâ€? Considine, Julia Stiles. ’ ‘R’ Ă… agent wipes out Chicago mob. ’ ‘R’ Ă… tries to leave his violent past. ’ ‘R’ Ă… capes from hell to save his grandchild. ‘R’ Cold War on Ice: Summit Series ’72 ‘PG’ Poker After Dark ‘PG’ Ă… Darts NHL 36 ‘G’ NHL 36 ‘G’ VS. 27 58 30 209 Hockey IIHF World Championships: USA vs. Kazakhstan CSI: Miami Killer Date ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami Vengeance ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami Whacked ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami 10-7 ’ ‘14’ Ă… Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Downsized A House Divided ‘PG’ *WE 143 41 174 118 CSI: Miami Sex & Taxes ’ ‘14’


FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A   & A 

Adult survivor of child abuse wants to break from her past Dear Abby: When I was in sixth grade, my 19-year-old brother, “Ray,� came into my room and fondled me late at night. I pretended to be asleep so I didn’t have to deal with the situation. I told my mom afterward. She told me not to tell my father and bought a lock for my door. Years later, when my sister found out what happened to me, she told me Ray had also done it to her. She told Dad and confronted Mom. Neither one ever said anything to Ray. They told us it was “in the past� and to leave it alone. Because my sister is openly confrontational about it, she isn’t invited to family events that he is attending. I am invited because I just ignore him, but it’s uncomfortable knowing my parents took his side over that of their two daughters. I won’t let my daughter be alone with him — or with him and my mom, because I don’t trust her anymore. Should I tell my parents I don’t want to hear about my brother and no longer want to be around him? — Wronged in Georgia Dear Wronged: Yes, if it will make you feel better, by all means do. That your parents would ignore your brother’s predatory behavior is appalling. By protecting him, your mother betrayed you and your sister. You are also wise to be vigilant if he is anywhere around your daughter and to restrict contact with him to a minimum. No child is safe around your brother. If you and your sister haven’t had counseling to come to terms with what happened to you, please consider contacting the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN). The website is www.rainn.org, and the toll-free number is 800-6564673. Nothing you say to the counselors will shock them, and they will be glad to refer you to someone qualified to help you. Dear Abby: I think my inlaws want my husband to divorce me because I have

DEAR ABBY Asperger’s syndrome and bipolar disorder. Sometimes I innocently say things that other family members take offense to. My mother-in-law then calls my husband, tells him what a “nut� I am and how upset “so-and-so� got. This results in huge fights between my husband and me, and it’s hurting our marriage. I have offered to educate my in-laws about bipolar and Asperger’s, but they say I’m just making excuses for my behavior. I would like to explain to them that my thought processes aren’t the same as everyone else’s, so I am going to make mistakes in what I say to people. I am hurt by their judgment and lack of tolerance. I don’t do “bad� things often — maybe once or twice a year. But instead of overlooking it, they make a big deal out of it because I’m different. They should focus on the good. I do a lot of charity work and would help anyone in need. Their lack of understanding is ruining my marriage. I’m 25 and we have been married for five years. I don’t want to throw that away. What do I do? — Am How I Am in Alabama Dear “How You Are�: That your marriage has lasted through your mother-in-law’s attempts to undercut it tells me the bond between you and your husband must be a strong one. Does he understand how Asperger’s and bipolar disorder affect the brain? If not, then the doctor who prescribes your medication should explain it to him so he can explain to his parents that what they are complaining about is not your fault. And if they don’t “get it,� a behavioral specialist should explain it to them. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

F C 

This year you sometimes feel as if you are jumping from one confusing situation to another. Learn to clarify information more often and remember to ask about, reiterate and confirm details. Your communication skills could grow by leaps and bounds as a result. An element of surprise often occurs, but in a most unusual manner. If you are single, you could meet several very exciting people, one after the other. You might wish for more stability in your relationships or budding love ties. Don’t fight change, nor judge it. If you are attached, as a couple you could often find yourselves doing the most unexpected things and loving it. Let it happen. AQUARIUS is a great friend and supporter. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Meetings determine much of your plans. Extra events might be a part of the continuum, as you try to figure out which way to go. Flush out a misunderstanding at its embryonic stage. Do not let a situation develop into more. Tonight: Start the weekend right. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Pressure builds today — more than it has most of the week. You suddenly have a panoramic view of how much you need to do, and exactly how to proceed. A meeting or a friend tosses a boomerang into your plans. Tonight: In the limelight. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Keep reaching out for someone who is close to you emotionally but perhaps physically distant. Expect the unexpected in your life, especially if the activity involves others. Tonight: Split as fast as you can. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Deal with others directly. Relate on an individual level, and get as much done as possible. You’ll gain a certain sense of completion that you have not experienced in a long time. Do not hesitate to ask questions in situations where you are left hanging or are confused. Tonight: With great company. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Others demand to have a greater say. You might enjoy what is going on, if you can relax and stay in a noncompetitive role. A close friend or loved one once

more demonstrates his or her unpredictability. Let this person know what needs to happen. Tonight: Go with the most appealing suggestion. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH As others start their weekends, it becomes apparent that you wind up holding the bag. Ask for some support or help before it is too late and you decide to pitch in and get extra work dumped on you. Tonight: All smiles. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH It could be difficult for you to alter your mood. Your jovial, humorous personality announces that this is a very good day. You are ready for the weekend. Do not allow a misunderstanding to interfere. Tonight: Only where the action is. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Many of you might consider calling it an early day at work. Others, who might be retired or not working, could find it difficult to leave their immediate environment. Let go of pre-existing ideas, and opt for a more experimental suggestion. Tonight: Enjoy the moment. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH You seem to choose the right words to patch up a misunderstanding. Others naturally gravitate toward you when you express your happiness. Unexpected surprises could be heading your way. Tonight: Time for fun. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You might want to rethink a decision that involves a key person in your life. This person has a way of spending your money. Practice saying “no� more often. Do not push your luck with a boss or higher-up. Tonight: Go off and paint the town red. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You sense what could come down the path. With your openness, you will attract much more of what you want. Let go of rigidity, even with a difficult family member who acts like a stick in the mud. Tonight: The world does revolve around you, at least for now. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Make it OK to cocoon and maybe even pout a bit. How you handle a personal issue could change radically because of you taking your time. Realize that sometimes you take on too much and cause yourself a problem. Tonight: Shh. Keep your plans secret.

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon.

Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Find a full community events calendar inside today’s GO! Magazine.

TODAY RV GOLD RUSH: Featuring an RV show and sale, with gold panning; free; 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-419-8680. HOME SWEET HOME: Meet Smokey Bear and Woodsy Owl and explore the importance of protecting forest ecosystems; daily through Sept. 16; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. RAKU POTTERY SALE: The Raku Artists of Central Oregon host a sale of handcrafted pottery; free admission; noon-7 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-350-2662. “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD�: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of children held in a concentration camp; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www .cascadestheatrical.org.

SATURDAY GEAR UP FOR SUMMER: A sale of donated or consigned summer sports gear, with music, a silent auction and a climbing wall; proceeds benefit Deschutes Search & Rescue Foundation; free admission; 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; GoodLife Brewing Co., 70 S.W. Century Drive, 100464, Bend; 541-508-2456. HIGH DESERT CRUISE-IN: The High Desert Mopars host a car show featuring classic cars, rods, trucks and bikes, a raffle, a DJ and more; free to the public,

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Friday, May 11, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar

B3

car entry $10; 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; Wagner Square, South U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Odem Medo Road, Redmond; 541-550-0206. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the Sisters High School Mandarin class trip to China; free admission; 8 a.m.5 p.m.; Sisters Community Church, 1300 W. McKenzie Highway; 541-549-4071. VFW BREAKFAST: Mother’s Day brunch; $8; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. RV GOLD RUSH: Featuring an RV show and sale, with gold panning; free; 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-419-8680. RAKU POTTERY SALE: The Raku Artists of Central Oregon host a sale of handcrafted pottery; free admission; 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-350-2662. SENSATIONAL SATURDAY: Visit a 1933 ranger station with Smokey the U.S. Forest Service mascot; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. MINING DAYS: Experience the life of a placer miner and pan for gold; $2 panning fee, plus museum admission; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. SALMON BAKE: Featuring a dinner of salmon, salad, beans and fry bread, with Native American dance performances and crafts; free; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-318-3782 or http:// nativeamerican.cocc.edu. SOLAR VIEWING: View the sun using safe techniques; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754 or www.highdesert museum.org. BARK FOR LIFE: A noncompetitive walk with dogs; with contests, activities and demonstrations; proceeds benefit the American

Cancer Society; $15 for one dog, $25 for two; 12:30 p.m.; La Pine Pet Bed N Bath Inc., 51590 Russell Road; 209-840-1450, barkforlifelapinesunriver@hotmail. com or www.relayforlife.org/ barklapineor. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Charles Finn talks about his book “Wild Delicate Seconds�; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. BEND GAME NIGHT: Play available board games or bring your own; free; 6 p.m.-midnight; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-318-8459. “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD�: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of children held in a concentration camp; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Ron Bell-Roemer and music by The Hat Band; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943.

SUNDAY RV GOLD RUSH: Featuring an RV show and sale, with gold panning; free; 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-419-8680. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3:30 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-447-7395. “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD�: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of children held in a concentration camp; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. SECOND SUNDAY: Chris Anderson and Cecelia Hagen read from a selection of their works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

MONDAY ONE MAKES MANY: A volunteer fair featuring local nonprofit organizations on site to answer questions and offer volunteer opportunities; free; 3-6 p.m.; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-385-8977. “THE HEALTHCARE MOVIE�: A screening of the documentary about health care systems in Canada and the United States; free; 6 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-318-8169.

TUESDAY STUDENTS SPEAK — A WATERSHED SUMMIT: Local students share their watershed projects in art, science, videography and hands-on restoration; free; 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m.; Mt. Bachelor Village Resort Conference Center, 19717 Mount Bachelor Drive, Bend; 541-389-5900 or kyake@ restorethedeschutes.org. “OREGON STATE ARCHIVES RECORDS COLLECTION�: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Lane Sawyer; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-9553 or www. orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs.

WEDNESDAY THE INDIAN WAR ERA IN EASTERN OREGON: Eric Iseman talks about “Captain Jack and the Modoc War of 1872-73�; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663 or ruthh@ uoregon.edu.

THURSDAY CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY CHILDREN’S CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a children’s concert under the direction of Michael Gesme; preceded by a hands-on instrument exploration; free; 7 p.m., interactive session 6 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-317-3941, info@cosymphony.com or www .cosymphony.com.

S  T  L   Y E  For the week of May 11-17 Story times are free unless otherwise noted. Barnes & Noble Booksellers 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242

ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday. Between the Covers 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766

STORY TIME: 2 p.m. Thursday. C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-388-1188

STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Thursday. Crook County Public Library 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. WEE READ: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Monday and Wednesday.

Mr. Dad Continued from B1 What’s going on from your child’s perspective is that he knows you’re about to leave and he’s worried that he’ll never see you again. Some kids take longer than others, but eventually they all learn that you’ll be back. In some extreme cases, separation anxiety can last through the toddler years and all the way up to kindergarten or elementary school. On average, kids 18 months to 2½ years are the most susceptible to separation anxiety, and your 3-year-old isn’t that far out of the range. So the fact

Downtown Bend Public Library 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7097

BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Monday and 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 11 a.m. Tuesday. PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 35; 10:30 a.m. Friday, 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. FAMILY STORIES: Ages 3-5; 12:15 p.m. Saturday. East Bend Public Library 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3760

FAMILY FUN: Ages 0-5; 9:30 a.m. Wednesday. SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 0-5; 10 a.m. Saturday. SPANISH STORIES AND SONGS: Ages 0-5; Stories and songs in Spanish; 11 a.m. Saturday.

and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger)

WILD WEDNESDAYS: Ages 7-12; treasure hunt; 12:30 p.m. to close Wednesday. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Ages 3-4; explore museum’s animal habitat, share stories and songs; 10 to 11 a.m. Thursday; $15 per child nonmembers, $10 per child members. TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; storytelling about animals and people of the High Desert; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday.

LAPTOP LAB: Grades 6-12; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Monday. TEEN TERRITORY DIY DAY: Grades 6-12; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. Redmond Public Library 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1054

BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Thursday. PRESCHOOL PARADE STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18 to 36 months; 10:15 a.m. Thursday.

Jefferson County Public Library 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 35; 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday.

Sisters Public Library 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070

FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 05; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. Sunriver Area Public Library 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080

High Desert Museum

La Pine Public Library

59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www. highdesertmuseum.org; 541-382-4754; unless noted, events included with admission ($15 adults, $12 ages 65

16425 First St.; 541-312-1090

FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 05; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday.

FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Thursday.

TEEN TERRITORY OPEN DAY: Ages 12-17; 1:30 to 3 p.m. Wednesday.

a big brother? Even changing day cares (which isn’t your situation) or leaving your child in day care for longer periods than he’s used to (which could be) can reignite separation anxiety. One of the biggest anxiety triggers is moving to a new home — even if it happened months ago. You may be over it, but your child may not have fully adjusted yet and could still be processing things. The same can apply to major remodeling projects. Keep in mind that moving can have serious effects on all aspects of a child’s development. For example, children who were already potty-trained or gave up a favorite stuffie can revert back to needing diapers and Teddy after a big move.

It’s also possible that your son knows exactly what effect his behavior has on you and he’s ramping up his anxiety because he gets extra attention from you. If you react to his crying or clinginess by staying longer, or by caving in some other way, he’ll keep using that tactic. Without realizing it, you may be teaching him that clingy behavior and tears get rewarded. See, I cry and scream and daddy or mommy stays with me! The most important thing you can do is remain calm. Don’t lose your temper or get too impatient, but don’t give in to his demands, either. And try to create a drop-off routine and stick to it. Kids love and crave routines and find them very reassuring.

that he’s still having trouble adjusting doesn’t necessarily mean that there’s a problem. Again, some children simply adjust more slowly than others. But in some cases, the separation itself isn’t the problem, and the anxiety may be a symptom of something deeper. Any kind of traumatic experience could have a profound effect on your child and his ability to adjust to day care (keep in mind that while these experiences may not seem terribly traumatic to you, they could be a really big deal to your child). For example, a major change at home could cause general feelings of anxiousness and worry about losing you. Are you and your spouse arguing a lot? Did your son just become


B4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

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FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

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ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

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MARY WORTH


FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

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DENNIS THE MENACE

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B6

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

Moms Continued from B1 Garcia also saved a small bunny figurine that she made for her mom when she was a little girl. “I just love children’s art.” While she doesn’t often get it out, “just knowing it’s there” is comforting. Garcia says her two sons aren’t interested in the items she has saved, but she wonders if that will change over time, or if someday her grandchildren will want to delve into their parents’ past. Tumalo resident Nita Belles says she saves everything. “Oh, I don’t throw stuff away,” said Belles. Two items that her children made her for Mother’s Day receive special attention. A wooden box her son made, which is covered with decorative pastel paint splatter and has rope handles, sits on her vanity. And coasters her daughter made from paper, which were then laminated and cut into circles, make their way onto the table every now and then. “Every time you pull them out, it makes your heart warm,” said Belles. Belles says her daughter, Georji Brown, now 36 with two children of her own, made the coasters when she was 9 or 10. Andy Belles, 24, made the box when he was about 7. She says both of her kids liked to give gifts. When she looks at these presents, Nita Belles is taken back to that time. “It’s just memories — and you realize how fast it goes,” said Belles. “I think of that little face and snuggles.” Belles says now that her daughter is a mother, she understands why Belles saved so many things. “Kids make something special like that, you wouldn’t throw it away,” said Belles. On the other hand, Bend resident Sarah Larson has never been much of a saver. Larson’s six children simply produced too many things to save it all. The Mother’s Day mementos Larson could find were at the bottom of a cedar chest and all were from her youngest, 23-year-old Nancy. “I’m surprised I didn’t have anything from the other kids,” said Larson. She wonders if her kids didn’t make as many Mother’s Day items because most of them were home-schooled — and a lot of Mother’s Day trinkets seem to be produced as class projects. Larson suspects Nancy’s cards got saved because she is five years younger than the

Sarah Larson holds a card made by her daughter, Nancy.

Jewel Payne, of Bend, holds a card with coupons made by one of her children.

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Payne’s daughter, Julia, made this card for her mother when she was a child. Payne plans to redeem the pancake offer soon.

next oldest sibling. In one particularly funny card, Nancy included a $5 “check” written on paper and a note saying, “I want you to enjoy this and you don’t have to give me any change.” Looking back, Larson says she wishes she would have saved more, saying the cards bring back precious memories. “The years just go by fast. It’s really important to keep that kind of stuff.” She treasures, for instance, a wooden grocery list hold-

er made by her oldest son, Matthew, who died. Larson’s mother, Grayce Goodrich, saved artistic cards created by a friend of the family, Susan Grant, who had kind of adopted Goodrich after her own mother died. “My mom knew where to find all the ones Susan did,” said Larson, though her mom wasn’t as sure about anything made by her own children. Jewel Payne, of Bend, knew right where to find the cards her kids had given her over

the years, as she keeps all of that stuff labeled in boxes. “I was kind of surprised I had so many,” said Payne. She has always saved items from her kids, in part, she thinks because her own mom was a saver and it’s a family tradition. “I really enjoy having some of that heritage,” said Payne. Seeing the cards after so many years made her laugh and grin. In the mix, she found a particular card from her daughter Julia, offering to make her pancakes. As

so many coupons from kids do, this one had gone unredeemed. Well, Payne has decided to collect on Julia’s long ago promise. She informed her now 39-year-old daughter that she intends to collect. “She grinned and thought it was great,” Payne said of her daughter’s reaction. Payne also loved looking at some of the funnier bits — like another card that said, “My mother gets mad once in a while, but by the end of the day she’s happy again.” Payne saved items from all

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Continued from B1 Miller says parents can use a basic savings account for a child’s college fund or get an Oregon 529 college plan account, which provides tax advantages. Miller also recommends parents approach the account with the mentality that every little bit counts. She says it’s helpful to put any forms of unexpected income, such as rebates or dividends, toward the savings account. “Don’t even look as that money as spendable income,” Miller said. “Put it directly into savings.” Miller also recommends that parents get their children involved. This will not only help them become familiar with banks, but will also teach them about financial discipline. “It helps children establish the thought process that when you earn something, you should put some of it aside for the future,” Miller said. “It’s very important for kids to learn that — it’s not something that’s always taught in school.” Another thing to consider when setting up a college savings account is how many children you will have in college at the same time. “It’s far beyond just saving money for college,” Miller said. “It’s coming up with an entire tax strategy and financial plan.” Parents interested in finding out specifics about college savings funds should consult their bank. Miller says in her experience, thinking ahead and saving money for your child’s future is definitely worth it. “It’s one of the best investments you can make,” Miller said.

four of her children, but the ones from her son, Timothy, hold particular meaning; he died when he was 19. “There are lots of awesome memories of him. Of course, it’s bittersweet.” But being able to look through cards he made and notes he wrote is precious for Payne. “I would encourage young moms especially to enjoy their kids. It’s such a treasure.”

y Wa

RV GOLD RUSH Deschutes Co. Fair Grounds

Deschutes County Fairgrounds


LOCALNEWS

Reader photo, C2 Editorials, C4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/local

DESCHUTES

LOCAL BRIEFING Ex-officer guilty of sex abuse A former Warm Springs police officer was found guilty of five counts of sex abuse Thursday, the Oregon Department of Justice said. Harry Hintsala, 62, was found guilty of sexually abusing five girls between 8 and 12 years old at his residence in Warm Springs between 2007 and 2011 — after Hintsala retired from being a police officer and supervisor at the Warm Springs Children’s Protective Service. Hintsala pleaded not guilty to the charges. Hintsala will live at a halfway house and wear a GPS monitoring bracelet until his sentencing hearing June 25. He faces a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison, and a lifetime of supervised release.

Search continues for Bend woman Police spent a third day searching for a missing Bend woman Thursday, concentrating their efforts on the Deschutes River near where her car had been found a day earlier. Carol Margaret Ray, 46, was reported missing by her husband Tuesday. By midday Wednesday, police had located Ray’s blue 1999 Acura sedan parked near the river upstream from the Seventh Mountain Resort. Bend Police Lt. Greg Owens said officers used a cadaver dog to search for signs of Ray near the river late Wednesday, and he believed they returned to the river with the dog Thursday. The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and Deschutes County Search and Rescue are assisting. Ray was last seen wearing a blue, zip-up hooded sweatshirt. She is Asian, approximately 5 feet 1 inch tall and weighs 90 pounds.

Keeping fuel from the fire • A prescribed burn west of Bend is part of a national effort to reduce wildfire risks

1

The Bulletin

By Hillary Borrud

U

.S. Forest Service firefighters sparked a 100-acre fire Thursday morning, putting smoke over the western Bend skyline most of the day. The sight will be more common in coming years as the agency continues a decadelong program with the state and Deschutes County — as well as environmental groups and timber interests — to improve the forest west of town, said Alex Enna, assistant fire management officer for the Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District of the Deschutes National Forest. “In the future there is going to be quite a bit of prescribed burning in the Bend area, this close to town,� said Enna, who oversaw Thursday’s fire. The burning will be part of the Deschutes Collaborative Forest, which Congress established in 2009 along with similar programs in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico and Washington. The Deschutes Collaborative Forest guides management decisions on nearly 150,000 acres of forest west of Bend, relying on $10 million in funding from the Department of Agriculture over the next decade. See Burn / C2

The Bulletin

Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

A section of the 107-acre Fry Fire, near the intersection of Skyliners Road and Forest Road 300 west of Bend, before firefighters sparked the fire on Thursday. The ignition stage of the burn was Thursday, with mop-up and patrols of the area to occur over the weekend, according to local fire officials.

2

More on the Web To see video of the U.S. Forest Service’s 107-acre prescribed Fry Fire, visit www.bendbulletin.com

A section of the Fry Fire burns Thursday. Bend Fort Rock Fire District firefighter Travis Moyer uses a drip torch to ignite debris on the ground. Below, a section of the Fry Fire after Thursday’s prescribed burn.

3

Correction The headline on a news brief that appeared Thursday, May 10, on Page C2 was incorrect because of an editing error. The Redmond School District hired Sisters Middle School teacher Justin Nicklous to head the Tumalo K-8 Community School. The Bulletin regrets the error.

Police ID pedestrian killed by car By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Redmond police have identified the pedestrian who was fatally injured when she was struck by a vehicle Wednesday night as Debra Liabraaten, 56, a Redmondarea resident. Police said Liabraaten was walking in or near the northbound lanes on Northwest Sixth Street near the intersection with Northwest Kingwood Avenue. Shortly after 10 p.m., she was struck by a northbound vehicle driven by Travis Osbon, 19, of Redmond, and later died of her injuries. Police said Liabraaten was wearing dark clothing and walking in a dimly lit area. Osbon was not cited, and police do not believe he was intoxicated or driving at excessive speed. Osbon has a clean driving record, according to court records. Toxicology tests for Liabraaten are pending, as is a crash reconstruction by Oregon State Police. — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

— Bulletin staff reports

The Bulletin will run listings of election events. Events must be free and open to the public. To submit a listing, email information to news@bendbulletin .com, with “Election calendar� in the subject line.

Clerks in five Oregon counties, including Deschutes, recently completed a software upgrade that is allowing them to better coordinate their voter information with the state’s voter database. The process delayed ballot counting in some of the counties, but all systems were working by Wednesday, according to the Secretary of State’s Office. “There were some problems with connectivity with having these two systems communicate,� said Andrea CantuSchomus, a spokeswoman for Secretary of State Kate Brown. “As far as long-range problems that would exist, we haven’t identified anything that would lead us to believe we can’t continue to use both the hardware and software involved.� See Ballots / C2

REDMOND

Bend has been awarded the title of best-tasting water in the Pacific Northwest by the American Water Works Association. Bend competed against seven other cities in the Pacific Northwest at the regional AWWA conference May 2 in Yakima, Wash. The city will advance to the Best of the Best taste test competition at the AWWA Annual Conference and Exposition in Dallas on June 12.

ELECTION CALENDAR

Software updates delayed ballot counting

By Dylan J. Darling

Bend awarded best water title

More briefing and News of Record, C2

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

Crook County charter deal awaits OK from district, school boards By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

Before the new virtual charter school planned for the Crook County School District can start enrolling students, it needs to have a contract approved with the school district. The board of Insight School of Oregon, which is starting the charter school, met Thursday night to talk about preliminary contract details — in an online conference call. The Crook County School District approved the initial proposal from Insight in April. The contract, which the district’s board and the Insight board both still need to approve, is the next step. Insight, which already provides alternative education services to Oregon districts that are separate from the charter option, hopes to start

offering classes this fall. As a virtual charter school, it will offer online courses to students throughout Oregon — not just Crook County. Charter schools are public schools that receive state funding and are required to provide a service to students that isn’t readily available in traditional public schools.

33-page initial draft The initial draft of the contract is a 33-page document that spells out the relationship between the charter school and the district, which is the school’s sponsor and has an oversight role. Board members pored over the document in the meeting, highlighting sections displayed online with questions about topics like how enrollment is counted and whether

the charter would have to pay for using school district space for in-person classes that offer coaching. Board member Anne Disney questioned the wording in one section requiring an active enrollment of at least 425 students, noting that the new school will have a shortened time frame for enrolling students once a contract is approved. Insight officials stressed the questions aren’t a sign of disagreeing with the district and are aimed at getting a contract that is clear to all, including future school leaders. J.D. McMahan, head of school for Insight, told the board he would like to have additional meetings before the end of this month. — Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

Burn LOC AL B RIEFING Continued from C1

Fire damages Jeld-Wen factory The Jeld-Wen window and door factory on Bend’s east side was damaged in a fire Thursday morning. Bend fire crews responded to the factory on Boyd Acres Road just after 8:30 a.m. to find an air filtration system outside one of the shops on fire. After extinguishing the fire, firefighters entered the building, where they discovered the fire had spread into the shop and activated the fire sprinkler system. The factory was evacuated. No injuries were reported.

3 Bend kids cited for lighting 3 fires Three Bend children are accused of starting a fire Wednesday in a wooded area near Southeast 15th Street and Southeast Lostine Circle. Police say the youths — two girls, both 11, and a boy, 12 — found a lighter and started three fires in the wooded area shortly after 5 p.m. One fire went out on its own, and another was extinguished by a witness, who then contacted the fire department. The children were cited for reckless burning and released to their parents.

Visit Bend opts out of morning meet Officials at Visit Bend confirmed this week they will not attend the morning portion of a June 5 tourism workshop organized by Deschutes County, despite County Commissioner Tammy Baney’s offer to change the format to alleviate concerns expressed by Visit Bend’s board. The county hired the Coraggio Group to facilitate the workshop, which was to include a morning session with only Visit Bend and the Central Oregon Visitors Association. The tourism groups clashed in recent months when they worked separately to bring competing triathlons to the area on the same weekend. Afterward, some officials called for the groups to improve communication and consider coordination. Last week, Bend City Councilor Jodie Barram said she did not feel comfortable attending the workshop if the morning portion was paid for by an unidentified private party. Baney had offered to find private funding for this portion of the event, after Visit Bend officials said it might not be appropriate to finance it with public money. Baney has said the facilitator will not cost more than $4,500. — Bulletin staff reports

Continued from C1 The burn Thursday, which the Forest Service named the Fry Fire, was about seven miles from downtown Bend, off of Skyliners Road. The fire was set to burn 92 acres of land managed by the Forest Service and 15 acres of private land. Bend Fire Department, the Oregon Department of Forestry and the Sunriver Fire Department also helped with the controlled fire. Using drip torches, which start fire by dripping burning drops of a gasoline and diesel mixture, firefighters started the fire at 11 a.m. As the fire grew in size and intensity, its smoke plume became visible from town.

Spokeswoman fields questions on Pilot Butte Atop Pilot Butte, Katie Lighthall, program director for Project Wildfire, took questions throughout the day from about 100 people curious about the smoke rising between town and the Cascades. Deschutes County created Project Wildfire to design wildfire prevention plans. The No. 1 question was whether it was a controlled

burn or something to worry about. Lighthall said she was glad to hear people expect to see prescribed fire near Bend. Winds from the northeast pushed the smoke away from town, she said, just as firefighters expected when they chose Thursday to burn. “Take it up and away — you can’t ask for a better prescribed burn day,” Lighthall said. Living a mile and a half from the fire on Skyliners Road, Jim Terhaar, 51, said he supported thinning and prescribed burns. “I’m all for it,” he said after interrupting his bike ride on Skyliners to check on the fire. Firefighters today will start mopping up the fire, or dousing hot spots with water and monitoring any parts that are still burning. Enna said firefighters will likely be at the fire for about a week. Their job is to make sure the fire burns what was planned and doesn’t spread out of control. “We will consistently have people out here every day until there is no more smoke or heat on the unit,” Enna said.

Well shot! R E ADE R PHOTOS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@ bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

— Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

“It just takes time as you’re upgrading to work out all the little issues that come along with doing an upgrade and making sure that everything is working properly.” — Nancy Blankenship, Deschutes County clerk

Ballots Continued from C1 Deschutes County was one of the counties in which installation and testing of the software updates delayed voter turnout information. Multnomah, Washington, Lane and Deschutes counties received the ballot sorters last year. They were paid for with federal money designated to improve the administration of elections. Deschutes County’s sorter, which cost about $175,000, streamlined vote counting by eliminating manual procedures such as hand-sorting ballots. Jackson County received a sorter earlier this year. Deschutes County Clerk Nancy Blankenship said that after the software was updated, counties began testing it May 1. The ballot sorter also had to be programmed to account for “redistricting, the Republicans putting out an offering for the nonaffiliated voters to vote on their party and a couple of other things that required programming,” Blankenship said. In Multnomah County, the elections division still reported estimated voter turnout on a daily basis by calculating the numbers of ballots delivered in mail trays. Eric Sample, a spokesman for the clerk’s office, said ballot processing is going smoothly. “It has worked very well, but there were some changes allowing for a more seamless process between the statewide

system and the vendor’s sorting system,” Sample said. “It’s working very well now.” Cantu-Schomus said the software upgrades were completed at no additional cost because Brown has personnel dedicated to working on the Oregon Centralized Voter Registration System and county elections issues. County clerks last year identified ways in which they wanted to improve the sorter software to meet their needs. For example, the upgrade eliminated the need to manually update voter information on the ballot sorter and the centralized voter registration system. The updates are now automated. But the upgrades had to wait because some counties had elections, such as the January special election to replace former Congressman David Wu, who resigned last year. “It’s a pretty large coordinated effort,” Blankenship said. “It just takes time as you’re upgrading to work out all the little issues that come along with doing an upgrade and making sure that everything is working properly. We were doing a lot of testing and so that just took some time.” The testing did not uncover problems with the ballot sorter, Blankenship said. “There wasn’t any problem, it was just a matter of getting those upgrades in place before we could provide those returns,” Blankenship said. — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com

SPRING CLUSTER Carson Aldred, of Redmond, snapped this photo of a flowering pear tree using an iPhone 4S. “The bug was unintentional,” wrote Aldred. “(I) only realized it was there after the shot was taken, but I think (it) adds to the whole spring theme.”

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 8:21 p.m. May 9, in the area of Northeast Knowledge Street.

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Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:07 p.m. May 9, in the area of Southeast Knowledge Street.

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FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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DNA links 3 more deaths to ‘I-5 Killer’

2 more envelopes of powder received

PORTLAND — Two more public buildings in Portland have received envelopes containing white powder, for a total of six in two weeks. The FBI says none of the powder has proven hazardous. The latest suspicious letters arrived Thursday at two downtown office buildings. FBI spokeswoman Beth Anne Steele says the agency is investigating and trying to determine whether the letters are related. After field tests by the Portland Fire Bureau, the FBI has sent the envelopes on to the Oregon State Public Health Laboratory for additional testing. The federal agency is releasing few details but notes that a person convicted of mailing threatening communications faces a maximum 10 years in prison. Someone convicted of using a hoax substance could face five years. The first envelope arrived April 26 at the federal courthouse. Another reached the Lloyd Center Mall on Tuesday. On Wednesday, envelopes were received at a downtown Hilton Hotel and at Port of Portland headquarters at Portland International Airport.

By Steven DuBois The Associated Press

PORTLAND — More than 30 years after her daughter’s death, Candee Wilson has confirmation of what she had always known. “I knew literally from the day she died that it was the I-5 Killer,” said the mother of Julie Reitz, who was raped and murdered in February 1981. “The night that

she left I warned her, I said: ‘Be careful, there’s a dangerous person out there.’ ” Portland po- Woodfield lice said Thursday that advances in DNA technology allowed them to link Randall Woodfield, known as the I-5 Killer, to the deaths of the 18-year-old Reitz and two people slain in a Portland home in November

1980 — Doug Altig, 24, and Darcey Fix, 22. Detective Jim Lawrence, with works for the bureau’s Cold Case Unit, said investigators can now “definitively prove” that Woodfield killed seven people during an early 1980s crime spree — five in Oregon and two near Redding, Calif. The I-5 Killer, who might be responsible for as many as two dozen more homicides, also committed at least 25 rob-

beries during the crime spree, many involving sexual assaults, the detective said. Woodfield, 61, was arrested in March 1981 and is serving a life sentence for the murder of an Oregon woman and the attempted murder of another. He won’t be prosecuted for the deaths of Altig, Fix and Reitz unless he becomes eligible for parole. Rod Underhill, the chief deputy district attorney in Multnomah County, said

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IPad-assisted voting goes statewide SALEM — Oregon is taking its experiment with iPad voting to the whole state. Secretary of State Kate Brown’s office said Thursday that all 36 counties will have at least one iPad and printer to help disabled voters mark a ballot in next week’s primary. Officials say nearly 200 voters used an iPad to mark ballots in a pilot project limited to a five-county special election. The tablets are supposed to make it easier for voters to mark their ballot privately if they can’t use the traditional pen and paper. The iPad’s accessibility features allow voters to use external accessories or other customizations to fit their needs. Voters with vision impairments, for example, can adjust the font size and color, or they can plug in headphones to hear the ballot read aloud.

Border county passes on wolf ban KLAMATH FALLS — Officials in Siskiyou County in Northern California have decided not to take up a measure banning wolves like the one from Oregon that has been wandering around looking for a mate. Super visor Jim Cook told Inside The Herald and • OR-7 spotted in News newspaper Northeast in Klamath Falls California, that the ordiC5 nance proposed by a local cattleman didn’t seem to have much community support and had not been vetted. He added that supervisors did not want to react to one wolf passing through. The wolf known as OR-7 left northeastern Oregon last year and has traveled more than 1,000 miles. Its quest has taken it into Northern California, back into Oregon, and back into Northern California. Wolves are federally protected as an endangered species in Western Oregon and all of California.

Logging protester arrested in Salem SALEM — A man protesting logging on Oregon state forests climbed up a flagpole Thursday at the Capitol in Salem, and climbed down 90 minutes later to go to jail. The group Cascadia Forest Defenders said it’s protesting against the logging as a way to fund public schools. The Statesman Journal in Salem said the climber held a banner reading, “School vs. trees? We want both.” Oregon State Police said 23-year-old Perry Thompson Graham of Eugene was booked on charges of disorderly conduct, trespassing and criminal mischief. — From wire reports

that is a very slim possibility. The death penalty is not an option because it was not allowed in Oregon at the time of the crimes, Underhill said. Woodfield, a wide receiver drafted by the Green Bay Packers in 1974, has not confessed to the murders, said Sgt. Paul Weatheroy, who interviewed Woodfield at length in 2005, when DNA linked him to the 1980 killing of Cherie Ayers of Portland.

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Portland Police Officer Pete Simpson holds up a photograph as Brian Tierney looks on during a news conference Thursday in Portland. Tierney, 29, an opera and choir singer, is recovering from life-threatening wounds suffered in a March 28 shooting. Police are asking the public for information regarding a black Cadillac Escalade in connection with the shooting.

Public’s help sought to find shooter of singer at the wheel By Steven DuBois The Associated Press

PORTLAND — A singer shot multiple times while driving on Interstate 205 in southeast Portland said Thursday he doesn’t think the gunman could be an acquaintance, and detectives working the case asked the public for information about a black Cadillac Escalade. Brian Tierney, who sings opera and choir, is recovering from life-threatening wounds suffered in the mysterious shooting six weeks ago. The 29-year-old Portland man flagged down motorists after the 10 p.m. shooting and police found him in his blue Chevy Cobalt, pulled over in a southbound lane. Tierney told

police he had been on his way home from choir practice. Tierney appeared at a news conference Thursday with his wife by his side, his right arm in a sling and a long scar next to his right eye. He thanked members of the community, particularly fellow musicians, for their outpouring of support and urged people to come forward with tips to “solidify the case and get this person off the road.” With a pair of detectives by his side, Tierney declined to provide specific details from the rainy night of the shooting, saying they were part of the ongoing investigation. That included whether he saw his assailant, or if he remembered anything that prompted the incident. Tierney said he did not think

Anti-whaling group joins fight to save dam sea lions The Associated Press SALEM — The Sea Shepherd Conservation Society — known for actively battling whalers — says it’s joining the fight to save sea lions on the Columbia River. The group said it would deliver letters to the Oregon governor’s office Thursday afternoon, calling for an end to the killing of sea lions that have been

eating salmon at the Bonneville Dam. The Friday Harbor, Wash.based society says officials should address other issues that threaten salmon, such as dams and overfishing. Two Bonneville sea lions were captured and killed by lethal injection last month. The Humane Society of the United States is suing to permanently end the sea lion killings.

State workers urged to prepare for zombies The Associated Press SALEM — Oregon state workers are being urged to prepare for a zombie apocalypse. The Oregon Housing and Community Services agency is using zombies to spice up its annual safety week messages to employees.

The messages are the work of administrative services manager Sandy McDonnell. She got the idea from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which held a zombie preparedness campaign last year. She said if you’re prepared for a zombie apocalypse, you’re ready for any disaster.

the shooter could be someone he knows. “Hopefully, I haven’t offended someone,” he joked. Police want to hear from anyone who saw a black Cadillac Escalade traveling erratically on I-205 the night of the shooting. The SUV had tinted windows, large chrome rims and low-profile tires. Detectives declined to say if Tierney or a different motorist provided information about the possible involvement of a Cadillac. As for his health, Tierney said he is dealing with “multiple therapies” but is getting better each day. He is back behind the wheel, at least for short trips, and hopes to resume performing soon: “I’m a little tired, but when I sing, the range is fine.”

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THE BULLETIN â&#x20AC;˘ FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

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Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

Post office fix a step toward bigger solution

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he message about the value of rural post offices apparently came through loud and clear to decisionmakers in the U.S. Postal Service.

This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement that rural offices will be preserved â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with reduced hours in some cases â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is a welcome sign of the effectiveness of citizen protest that garners legislative support. The Postal Service had proposed shuttering thousands of post offices as part of its effort to achieve fiscal balance, but the reaction was swift and strong. Critics said rural post offices are essential to their communities. In Central Oregon, hours will be reduced at numerous rural offices, ranging from Paisley to Dayville to Camp Sherman. At Post and Fort Rock, only two hours will remain, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way better than zero hours. Financial problems remain, however, and many more tough decisions are needed to solve the enormous issues that face the Postal Service. Because the U.S. House and Senate have not been able to agree on legislation, the Postal Service is expected to announce additional changes soon. Hundreds of mail

No one doubts major changes are needed in the postal service, which is now losing millions of dollars every day and projects yearly losses of $21 billion by 2016. processing centers, including the one in Bend, could face closure in an announcement scheduled for next week. Saturday mail delivery could be eliminated. No one doubts major changes are needed in the Postal Service, which is now losing millions of dollars every day and projects yearly losses of $21 billion by 2016. Congressional and Postal Service leaders will have to make critical choices to preserve the most valuable aspects of this long-standing traditional service. This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision, however, is a good one. The rural post offices provide a unique service to their communities, and their cost is a small factor in the larger problem.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Spamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; complaint is about GOP lawmakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s message

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abor group Our Oregon and Oregon House Democrats have dragged state Rep. Dennis Richardson, R-Central Point, to the woodshed for sending out unsolicited political emails. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people feel like heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s invaded their inbox, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very difficult to unsubscribe from his list,â&#x20AC;? Scott Moore, the spokesman for Our Oregon, told Salemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Statesman-Journal. Nobody wants a bunch of junk email, but we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe this kerfuffle is as much about inboxes as it is about Richardsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s message. His most recent newsletter tries to sort myth from fact in the union dispute in Eagle Point and ultimately comes down against the teachers. Richardson made public records requests from state agencies and gathered up email addresses. He compiled a list and has been using it to give oomph to his newsletters. For instance, he sent out 475,447 newsletters on Feb. 8. It was enough to crash the Legislatureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Web server. OK, that crash shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happen. The problem has apparently been fixed. It hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happened again. Some people have also had trouble unsubscribing from his email list. Richardson says when he gets a complaint he works to get

(Sen. Richardsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) most recent newsletter tries to sort myth from fact in the union dispute in Eagle Point and ultimately comes down against the teachers. people off his list. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a reasonable approach. The email that prompted the latest complaints was about the dispute between the school district in Eagle Point and the teachers unions. If you read the news stories, you can find out that teachers are on strike there and classes are canceled until Monday. The union doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want the district to subcontract transportation jobs and does want more teacher preparation time. The district counters that giving in to the union demands would mean cuts to staff and school days. What Richardson did is spell out the demands of the union and its previous contract, the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current offer and how the district has been spending down its reserves to keep operating. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more detail about whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on than what we found in any news article. The details certainly donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t flatter the teachers union. If you are not on Richardsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s email list, you are missing out.

My Nickelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Worth Listen to James Madison Health care is a right Listen to words attributed to James Madison, who was judged the most intelligent of the Founding Fathers, the man who wrote our Constitution and who became the fourth president: â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are free today substantially, but the day will come when our Republic will be an impossibility â&#x20AC;Ś because wealth will be concentrated in the hands of the few â&#x20AC;Ś and when that day comes, we must rely upon the wisdom of the best elements in the country to readjust the laws of the nation to the changed conditions.â&#x20AC;? That day has come. The wealth of this land is, indeed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;concentrated in the hands of a few.â&#x20AC;? Our elected officials â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who should be the â&#x20AC;&#x153;best elementâ&#x20AC;? to uphold the Constitution â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are not acting for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;general welfare,â&#x20AC;? as laid out in that same Constitution. It is time to stand in support of the Occupy movement and the 99 Percent Spring and force those in charge to follow the intent of the Constitution and act in the best interests of everyone. Individuals banding together make a powerful force, and each of us has a place in that force with our voices and votes. Incidentally, I am 95 years old, have lived through 17 presidents and voted for 14. Never before have I been so concerned about the future of my country. If it takes getting arrested and jailed â&#x20AC;&#x201D; without violence â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to gain attention, so be it. Let each of us do his/her share and get on with this vital task. Francis Juris Prineville

Paul deWittâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s April 29 letter laments criticism of Justice Antonin Scalia â&#x20AC;&#x153;trivializingâ&#x20AC;? Obamacare. Scaliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comparison of a mandate to buy health insurance to a government mandate to purchase broccoli revealed a sarcastic, petty mind. Justice John Roberts enhanced Scaliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sarcasm with an analogy of cellphone purchase. Justice Samuel Alito wondered if the government could force Americans to buy funeral cost insurance. Pondering those analogies, one sage reflected we should be thankful Justice Clarence Thomas kept his mouth shut. Court decision? Obamacare is unconstitutional. A relative, age 46, was recently diagnosed with cancer. She and her husband have health insurance. There is no guarantee her current insurance company wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drop her. The minute the diagnosis was made she became uninsurable. Today they have health insurance, tomorrow is uncertain. Obamacare would prevent that. Medicare is not free! Premiums are deducted from Social Security checks. Seniors pay premiums for supplemental and prescription insurance and provider copays. Medicaid is means tested. Both programs are threatened. DeWitt upholds the GOP position that health care is not a right and anyone lacking insurance or ability to pay receives no treatment. Rep. Paul Ryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget prioritizing greater tax breaks for the 1 percent, greater corporate subsidies, increased defense spending preparing for more wars, guarantees

a fiscal crisis compounded by a humanitarian crises. If obtaining preventable and treatable medical care is not a right, then there is no right to life. Belief that life is sacrosanct in the womb but 99 percent expendable after birth is sick, and nationally weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re terminal. Harriett Heisey Bend

Headline reflects bias The headline selected for The Bulletin article â&#x20AC;&#x153;Local Guardsman accused of raping 11-year-old girl,â&#x20AC;? which appeared in the Local News section April 30, manifests a bias on the part of the articleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s author and her editor. Florentino Valdezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s military status is only tangentially relevant to the crime of which he remains incarcerated while awaiting trial. Valdez could have also been described by referring to his occupation or ethnicity. Instead the reporter who wrote the article chose to draw attention to his connection with the armed forces. I doubt she would have described him as a Hispanic-surnamed widget maker. The author, perhaps unwittingly, is perpetuating a prejudice one finds not infrequently among individuals who have limited contact with the military and whose perceptions of the armed forces were not infrequently shaped by the indoctrination they received as undergraduates and from the establishment media. John C. Driscoll Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Telfer is the candidate with character and integrity T

By David L. Foote he April 22 column by John Costa identifying the differences between Sen. Chris Telfer and Tim Knopp â&#x20AC;&#x201D; both candidates for Senate District 27 in the Republican primary â&#x20AC;&#x201D; overlooked one of the most crucial differences between these two individuals. Character and integrity. You can tell a lot about a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s character and integrity by what they say and what they do campaigning. In this particular race, it raises some very real questions and concerns. What do you think of the candidate who lists their occupation in the votersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; pamphlet as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Executive Vice President, Non-Profit?â&#x20AC;? Is this a philanthropic non-profit? Ah, the candidate must be very generous. What the candidate didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say was this nonprofit is a large special interest organization in the region, the Central Oregon

Builders Association. The candidate also is actively involved in two political action committees associated with this nonprofit. Was the candidate fearful of telling the whole story? Character and integrity? What do you think of the candidate who proudly announces the ability to raise more than $100,000 for a primary campaign in less than a month? Perhaps this candidate has a lot of grass-roots support? Or was it tapping into a few large donors and special interest groups to buy an election? Is it not reminiscent of this same personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s political action committee trying to buy a Bend City Council seat in 2006 by pouring in $20,000 to try defeating an incumbent? Character and integrity? What do you think of the candidate who portrays oneself as a coalition builder reaching across party lines

IN MY VIEW

and then criticizing the opponent doing exactly that and for not being a true Republican and not being dogmatic enough? Character and integrity? What do you think of the candidate whose primary issue is that their opponent didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t protect an incumbent state legislator during the required redistricting for all state House and Senate seats? Well, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a person who stands up for principle, right? If this was such an egregious sin and unfair, why didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the candidate or the affected state legislator challenge the redistricting? Is running for office to settle a vendetta worthy of our trust? Character and integrity! What do you think of a candidate who promises never to raise taxes,

will vote to cut taxes and also pass legislation that will create 50,000 new jobs in Central Oregon? Wow, is that not wonderful? Sounds almost like a guarantee. This is the candidate who would have opposed the gas tax increase that brought significant jobs and much-needed infrastructure improvement to Central Oregon. This is a candidate who makes no connection between a strong infrastructure being an absolute necessity for creating jobs and diversifying our economy. Dogma and promises over practicality and reality. Character and integrity? What do you think of the candidate who tells you the opponent supports you losing your â&#x20AC;&#x153;kickerâ&#x20AC;? refund? If true, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to know. If false, then doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t it simply become a scare tactic to smear the opponent? Since it is a blatantly false charge, what does that say about the candidate? Charac-

ter and integrity! Character and integrity matter. In this race, the contrast is stark. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why I am voting for Telfer, who embodies and has demonstrated great personal and professional character and integrity. The senator has earned great respect both at home and in the state Capitol for what she has accomplished and who she is. She puts principle over dogma, truth over fear mongering, the best interests of our community and the state over party politics, and moral fiber over expediency. She has again demonstrated her character and integrity in dealing with the campaign tactics of this opponent, choosing to respond forcefully but truthfully to his allegations. Yes, character and integrity are very important considerations. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; David L. Foote lives in Redmond.


FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ THE BULLETIN

WEST NEWS

O

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Healthyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; OR-7 seen in Northern California

D N  Barbara Grimes, of Prineville Aug. 20, 1934 - May 4, 2012 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: A private graveside service will be held at Juniper Haven Cemetery.

By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

Contributions may be made to:

Pioneer Memorial Hospital at 1201 NE Elm St., or Crook Co. Fire and Rescue at 308 NE 2nd St., or Crook County Search & Rescue at 500 NE Belknap St., all of Prineville, OR 97754.

Billy Gene Hakala, of La Pine Jan. 23, 1936 - May 7, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Celebration of Life party will take place at a later date.

Christopher Wayne Snyder, of Oklahoma July 31, 1983 - April 21, 2012 Services: Redmond Church of Christ, in Redmond, OR, on May 12, 2012, at 2:00 p.m.

Gerald Michael Meyers, of Bend Feb. 27, 1943 - May 5, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Graveside Service, May 19, 2012 at 2:00 PM at Deschutes Memorial Gardens, 63875 N. Highway 97, Bend. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Norman Murray Cobb, of Redmond July 5, 1925 - May 8, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn FuneralsRedmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: 11:00am Graveside, Tues., May 15, 2012 at Willamette National Cemetery, Portland

Ron Dodson, of La Pine June 24, 1949 - May 9, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Celebration of Life will be held on Thursday, May 17, 2012, at 1:00 PM at the Gull Point boat ramp off Wickiup. (Potluck barbecue). Contributions may be made to:

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation; 1-800-225-5355.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

The Associated Press file photo

Hair stylist Vidal Sassoon gives New York model Holly McGuire a close-cropped hairdo at a preview of the New York Couture Group styles in New York in January 1966. Sassoon, whose 1960s wash-and-wear cuts freed women from endless teasing and hair spray, died Wednesday in Los Angeles. He was 84.

Sassoonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s styles revolutionized womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s haircuts crimper of his generation. At 14, he had dropped out LOS ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; With of school and, at his motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one high-profile haircut on the urging, took his first job in a Paramount Studios lot, Vidal hair salon. Sassoon vaulted to fame in â&#x20AC;&#x153;I kept thinking I would be Hollywood. spending my life up to my elFlown in from London, he bows in shampoo,â&#x20AC;? Sassoon trimmed the tresses of Mia wrote in his 1968 autobiograFarrow for her role in the film phy, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sorry I Kept You Waitâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Rosemaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Babyâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a $30 ing, Madam.â&#x20AC;? haircut that he calculated cost When he was about 20, he $5,000, including airfare. served as a volunteer soldier in The 1967 event was staged Israelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1948 War of Indepeninside a makeshift â&#x20AC;&#x153;salonâ&#x20AC;? in dence and found that it gave a boxing ring. The him â&#x20AC;&#x153;a sense of dignifilmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s director, Ro- FEATURED ty and the confidence man Polanski, looked helped structure OBITUARY that on as Sassoon gave my future,â&#x20AC;? he later the actress a pixie cut said. that would be copied by After a decade laborwomen the world over. ing as a stylist in LonAs a celebrity hairdon, Sassoon finally stylist, Sassoon helped captured fashionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main launch the age of the stage in 1963 when he signature hair salon, Sassoon crafted an architecturcomplete with deal haircut for fashion signer-label prices. He designer Mary Quant, also revolutionized womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s then one of Londonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bright hair styling with his signa- young talents who is credited ture sleek, geometric cuts. His with inventing the miniskirt. most enduring contribution She wanted a new look for was perhaps a simple one â&#x20AC;&#x201D; her, and her models, to wear in he popularized the hand-held a fashion show. In sharp conblow dryer. trast to the reigning pouf of Sassoon, who had leuke- the day, he cut a blunt-edged mia, died Wednesday at his bob that angled down toward home in Los Angeles, a family her chin. spokesman said. He was 84. Fashion editors took note When Sassoon opened a of the modelsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; haircuts, and hair salon in 1970 in Beverly Sassoonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name quickly beHills, the opening-night party came associated with top also took on a theatrical flair fashion models, notably Britwhen hundreds of celebri- ish cover girl Jean Shrimpties, fashion and otherwise, ton, and with young British â&#x20AC;&#x153;roamed up and down three pop musicians starting with levels in a merry melee,â&#x20AC;? the the Beatles, whose blunt-cut Los Angeles Times reported. bangs â&#x20AC;&#x201D; done at the Sassoon He moved his corporate salon â&#x20AC;&#x201D; launched a unisex headquarters to Los Ange- hair trend. les in 1974 and built a beauty He followed his â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mary business with global reach Quant bobâ&#x20AC;? with two other made up of hair-care products, looks that confirmed his taste signature salons and training and style. The first was a â&#x20AC;&#x153;five academies. pointâ&#x20AC;? cut that resembled a When Sassoon used a blow bowl with peaks at the nape dryer to create his innova- of the neck and in front of the tive hairstyles, what had been ears. The following year he a novelty item turned into a introduced an â&#x20AC;&#x153;asymmetric standard appliance in salons bob,â&#x20AC;? cut longer on one side and homes. Hair rollers and than the other. helmet-style dryers became To get the flat, shaped effect all but obsolete as a result. he wanted, he phased out the â&#x20AC;&#x153;His designs have shaped hair curlers and stationary the late 20th century,â&#x20AC;? Rich- dryers typical of the day. His ard Martin and Harold Korda, portable blow dryer and a stylthen curators at the Costume ing brush became his main Institute of the Metropolitan tools, along with his scissors. Museum of Art in New York â&#x20AC;&#x153;To me hair dressing means City, wrote in the introduction shape. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very important to the 1993 book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vidal Sas- that the foundations should soon, Fifty Years Ahead.â&#x20AC;? He be right,â&#x20AC;? he wrote in his brought â&#x20AC;&#x153;modernism to the autobiography. medium of hair,â&#x20AC;? they wrote. In interviews he said his Television viewers across low-maintenance hairstyle the country saw the man be- gave women greater freehind the name when he purred dom and independence, buzz the memorable and satirized words for the social revolution line in a 1976 commercial: â&#x20AC;&#x153;If breaking loose in Europe and you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look good, we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the U.S. look good,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s, everyone let The London native said he their hair down and I was never wanted to be a â&#x20AC;&#x153;crimp- there to cut it in very straight, er,â&#x20AC;? slang for a hairdresser. Yet geometric lines,â&#x20AC;? he later he became the most influential recalled. By Mary Rourke

Los Angeles Times

GRANTS PASS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A young male wolf from Oregon that has won worldwide fame while trekking across mountains, deserts and highways looking for a mate has had what appears to be his first close encounter with people â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and got his picture taken, to boot. A federal trapper, a state game warden and a state wildlife biologist were visiting ranchers in Northern California on Tuesday to notify them that GPS signals showed the gray wolf was in the area, when they stopped to look over a sagebrush hillside with binoculars, said Karen Kovacs, wildlife program manager for the California Department of Fish and Game in Redding, Calif. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There, all of a sudden, out pops a head, and there he is,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He appeared very healthy.â&#x20AC;? California wildlife biologist Richard Shinn snapped a photo, the first shot of the animal in color, and the department posted it on its website. The sighting happened on private land in Modoc County, in the extreme northeastern corner of California. The wolf, known as OR7, left the Imnaha pack in northeastern Oregon in September. His travels took him down the Cascade Range and across the border into California in December, making him the first wolf in California in more than 80 years, according to the department. Along the way he was photographed in black and white by an automated trailside camera in Oregon. He has since gone back to Oregon and returned to California, making his first visit to Modoc County. While his story has appeared in newspapers and websites around the world, OR-7 has yet to find a mate or even settle down since following his natural inclination to leave his home and head out on his own. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We joked that it only seems right that the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most famous wolf makes an appearance in California and the paparazzi come out,â&#x20AC;? said Rob Klavins of the conservation group Oregon Wild, which held a contest for children around the world to name the wolf and came up with Journey.

California Department of Fish and Game

OR-7, the Oregon wolf that has trekked across two states looking for a mate, is pictured on a sagebrush hillside in Modoc County, Calif., on Tuesday.

D E 

 Carl Beane, 59: Boston Red Sox public address announcer, also known as the voice of Fenway Park, whose booming baritone called ballplayers to the plate for two World Series champions. Died Wednesday after suffering a heart attack while driving near Harrington, Mass. Stacy Robinson, 50: Wide receiver who won two Super Bowls with the New York Giants before working with the players union. Death announced Tuesday. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; From wire reports

C5


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, MAY 11 Tonight: Mainly clear and not as cold.

Today: Mainly clear and significantly warmer.

HIGH Ben Burkel

SATURDAY

LOW

67

Bob Shaw

Astoria 65/41

57/46

Cannon Beach 60/42

Hillsboro Portland 74/45 72/38

Tillamook 66/42

Salem

57/43

75/44

73/40

Maupin

71/34

Corvallis Yachats

64/26

Prineville 66/30 Sisters Redmond Paulina 62/26 67/28 69/29 Sunriver Bend

62/47

Eugene

Florence

72/37

64/46

Crescent

Roseburg

61/44

Silver Lake

66/23

Port Orford 63/47

Gold Beach 63/47

Brookings

66/32

Unity 65/33

68/32

72/50

71/42

Riley

69/42

69/36

65/27

65/32

Jordan Valley 62/34

Frenchglen 68/37

Yesterday’s state extremes

Rome

• 74°

68/32

Paisley

Brookings

70/38

71/35

83/47

80s

EAST Sunny skies today. Ontario Clear skies will 71/41 persist tonight.

Juntura

Burns

67/28

70s

Chiloquin

Medford

Vale

60s

71/34

Grants Pass 84/45

64/26

CENTRAL Sunny skies today. Clear skies will continue tonight.

Baker City John Day

Christmas Valley

Chemult

79/46

61/26

WEST Sunny skies can be expected today. Skies will be clear tonight.

Klamath Falls 73/38

Ashland 79/43

• 19°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

69/40

68/41

Redmond

71/30

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes

-10s

0s

Vancouver 63/46

10s Calgary 58/35

20s

30s

Saskatoon 60/43

Seattle 67/45

40s

Winnipeg 61/45

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 69/39

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 57/41

Halifax 61/43 Portland Billings To ronto Portland 64/44 60/38 66/45 74/45 St. Paul Green Bay Boston • 101° 66/46 75/51 Boise 66/49 Buffalo Rapid City Blythe, Calif. Detroit 68/40 63/48 New York 59/40 69/52 • 19° 71/51 Des Moines Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus Chicago 78/53 Redmond, Ore. 52/36 73/51 72/52 74/56 Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake W ashington, D. C. • 2.53” 73/51 73/54 Denver City Kansas City 73/51 Las Bar Harbor, Maine 53/39 Louisville 71/44 80/55 Vegas St. Louis 76/53 78/58 94/72 Charlotte 76/49 Nashville Los Angeles 78/54 Little Rock 66/58 80/57 Phoenix Albuquerque Oklahoma City Birmingham Atlanta 72/58 100/71 Honolulu 80/59 80/53 81/59 85/69 Dallas Tijuana 75/60 73/56 New Orleans 84/69 Orlando Houston 88/65 Chihuahua 80/64 83/61 Miami 86/74 Monterrey La Paz 94/69 90/62 Mazatlan Anchorage 84/62 44/37 Juneau 44/40

(in the 48 contiguous states):

Bismarck 62/34

FRONTS

ROSEBURG

HIGH LOW

HIGH LOW

83 46

HIGH LOW

85 49

81 43

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .5:10 a.m. . . . . . 6:52 p.m. Venus . . . . . .7:09 a.m. . . . . 11:17 p.m. Mars. . . . . . .1:40 p.m. . . . . . 3:07 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . .5:50 a.m. . . . . . 8:19 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .5:38 p.m. . . . . . 4:53 a.m. Uranus . . . . .3:58 a.m. . . . . . 4:20 p.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55/23 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.01” Record high . . . . . . . . 87 in 1936 Average month to date. . . 0.25” Record low. . . . . . . . . 17 in 1953 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.63” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Average year to date. . . . . 4.38” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.20 Record 24 hours . . .0.78 in 1980 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:43 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:21 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:42 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:22 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 1:02 a.m. Moonset today . . . 11:24 a.m.

Moon phases Last

New

First

May 12 May 20 May 28 June 4

OREGON CITIES

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m. Astoria . . . . . . . 55/37/trace Baker City . . . . . .56/28/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .74/50/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .61/25/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . 61/34/trace Klamath Falls . . .64/27/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .61/28/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .59/19/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .73/35/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .52/34/0.00 North Bend . . . . .54/39/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .65/43/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .60/35/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .62/37/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .55/24/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .60/19/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .65/39/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .62/32/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .62/20/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .69/39/0.00

Full

. . . . .65/41/s . . . . . .68/46/s . . . . .66/32/s . . . . . .74/38/s . . . . .72/50/s . . . . . .66/50/s . . . . .67/33/s . . . . . .74/37/s . . . . .72/37/s . . . . . .79/45/s . . . . .73/38/s . . . . . .76/40/s . . . . .68/41/s . . . . . .73/43/s . . . . .69/25/s . . . . . .70/31/s . . . . .83/47/s . . . . . .89/51/s . . . . .61/43/s . . . . . .67/45/s . . . . .62/45/s . . . . . .62/48/s . . . . .71/41/s . . . . . .77/44/s . . . . .70/37/s . . . . . .75/39/s . . . . .74/45/s . . . . . .80/50/s . . . . .66/30/s . . . . . .77/38/s . . . . .69/32/s . . . . . .76/35/s . . . . .79/46/s . . . . . .84/50/s . . . . .75/39/s . . . . . .80/46/s . . . . .67/28/s . . . . . .74/34/s . . . . .73/40/s . . . . . .79/44/s

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

7

HIGH 6

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . .114-148 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 175 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report

V.HIGH 8

PRECIPITATION

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .24-60 Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . Carry chains or T. Tires Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Squaw Valley, California . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . Closed for season Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report For links to the latest ski conditions visit: For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html www.tripcheck.com or call 511 Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .71/57/0.75 . . . 73/57/t . . 78/57/c Akron . . . . . . . . . .62/42/0.00 . . . 68/46/s . . 73/50/s Albany. . . . . . . . . .57/50/0.03 . . . 65/43/s . . 76/51/s Albuquerque. . . . .79/46/0.00 . .80/53/pc . 80/53/pc Anchorage . . . . . .46/39/0.00 . . . 44/37/r . . .48/37/r Atlanta . . . . . . . . .74/53/0.00 . . . 81/59/s . 78/61/pc Atlantic City . . . . .67/54/0.12 . . . 70/47/s . . 73/54/s Austin . . . . . . . . . .75/64/0.42 . . . 79/63/t . . .79/62/t Baltimore . . . . . . .68/53/0.00 . . . 72/48/s . . 78/54/s Billings . . . . . . . . .71/37/0.04 . . . 60/38/s . . 68/42/s Birmingham . . . . .76/52/0.00 . . . 80/59/s . . .79/61/t Bismarck. . . . . . . .85/45/0.00 . . . 62/34/s . . 69/44/s Boise . . . . . . . . . . .62/43/0.00 . . . 68/40/s . . 75/45/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .67/54/0.85 . .66/49/pc . . 73/55/s Bridgeport, CT. . . .66/54/0.68 . . . 68/48/s . . 70/53/s Buffalo . . . . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . . . 63/48/s . 65/50/pc Burlington, VT. . . .56/48/0.20 . . . 61/41/s . 73/50/pc Caribou, ME . . . . .55/49/1.26 . .55/37/sh . 60/39/pc Charleston, SC . . .80/59/0.00 . . . 79/59/s . . 78/62/s Charlotte. . . . . . . .74/50/0.00 . . . 76/49/s . . 78/56/s Chattanooga. . . . .76/49/0.00 . . . 79/55/s . 78/57/pc Cheyenne . . . . . . .79/44/0.00 . . .52/36/c . . 51/37/c Chicago. . . . . . . . .67/46/0.00 . . . 74/56/s . . .61/52/t Cincinnati . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . . . 73/49/s . . 77/56/s Cleveland . . . . . . .62/43/0.00 . . . 65/51/s . 70/52/pc Colorado Springs .79/45/0.00 . . . 54/38/t . 49/42/sh Columbia, MO . . .74/49/0.00 . .78/57/pc . . .74/55/t Columbia, SC . . . .79/54/0.00 . . . 79/55/s . . 81/58/s Columbus, GA. . . .79/57/0.00 . . . 84/60/s . . .83/62/t Columbus, OH. . . .65/48/0.00 . . . 73/51/s . . 76/56/s Concord, NH. . . . .65/51/0.69 . .67/40/pc . . 78/50/s Corpus Christi. . . .86/68/0.51 . . . 86/71/t . . .80/69/t Dallas Ft Worth. . .82/60/0.00 . . . 75/60/t . . .77/59/t Dayton . . . . . . . . .66/44/0.00 . . . 72/51/s . . 75/56/s Denver. . . . . . . . . .85/53/0.00 . . . 53/39/t . 54/41/sh Des Moines. . . . . .76/50/0.00 . . . 78/53/t . . 67/50/c Detroit. . . . . . . . . .65/41/0.03 . . . 69/52/s . . .71/53/t Duluth. . . . . . . . . .72/40/0.00 . . . 59/39/t . . 63/46/s El Paso. . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.07 . .83/62/pc . 89/64/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . . .58/31/0.00 . .61/31/pc . . 57/38/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .83/50/0.00 . .64/40/pc . . 69/47/s Flagstaff . . . . . . . .75/37/0.00 . . . 74/38/s . . 74/37/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .67/40/0.00 . . . 72/52/s . . 70/48/c Green Bay. . . . . . .68/39/0.00 . .75/51/pc . 66/46/pc Greensboro. . . . . .71/51/0.00 . . . 74/46/s . . 78/55/s Harrisburg. . . . . . .65/52/0.01 . . . 70/45/s . . 76/52/s Hartford, CT . . . . .65/55/0.47 . . . 69/42/s . . 77/53/s Helena. . . . . . . . . .57/44/0.00 . . . 64/34/s . . 72/41/s Honolulu. . . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . . . 85/69/s . . 84/69/s Houston . . . . . . . .83/65/0.00 . . . 80/64/t . . .81/65/t Huntsville . . . . . . .80/49/0.00 . . . 78/57/s . . .79/57/t Indianapolis . . . . .69/42/0.00 . . . 74/51/s . 75/57/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .81/53/0.00 . .81/60/pc . . .79/64/t Jacksonville. . . . . .80/60/0.00 . . . 83/60/s . 82/62/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . . .43/38/0.05 . . . 44/40/r . . .46/39/r Kansas City. . . . . .77/46/0.00 . .80/55/pc . . .71/53/t Lansing . . . . . . . . .66/37/0.00 . . . 72/52/s . 71/49/sh Las Vegas . . . . . . .97/69/0.00 . . . 94/72/s . . 95/72/s Lexington . . . . . . .68/44/0.00 . . . 73/49/s . 75/58/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .86/47/0.00 . .72/51/pc . 60/48/sh Little Rock. . . . . . .82/55/0.00 . .80/57/pc . . .78/59/t Los Angeles. . . . . .71/61/0.96 . . . 66/58/s . . 70/60/s Louisville. . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . . . 76/53/s . 79/59/pc Madison, WI . . . . .69/38/0.00 . .75/52/pc . . 68/44/c Memphis. . . . . . . .78/55/0.00 . . . 80/60/s . . .78/60/t Miami . . . . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . .86/74/pc . 84/75/pc Milwaukee . . . . . .62/41/0.00 . . . 69/52/s . . 61/48/c Minneapolis . . . . .73/46/0.00 . . . 66/46/t . . 67/47/s Nashville. . . . . . . .75/49/0.00 . . . 78/54/s . 79/59/pc New Orleans. . . . .83/69/0.00 . . . 84/69/t . . .81/68/t New York . . . . . . .63/54/0.10 . . . 71/51/s . . 73/57/s Newark, NJ . . . . . .67/55/0.07 . . . 71/50/s . . 74/58/s Norfolk, VA . . . . . .72/57/0.01 . . . 72/50/s . . 77/56/s Oklahoma City . . .82/49/0.00 . . . 72/58/t . . .74/56/t Omaha . . . . . . . . .84/51/0.00 . .73/51/pc . . 61/48/c Orlando. . . . . . . . .88/70/0.00 . .88/65/pc . 86/66/pc Palm Springs. . . . .99/70/0.00 . .102/69/s . 102/70/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .72/43/0.00 . . . 78/56/s . . .70/52/t Philadelphia . . . . .68/55/0.07 . . . 72/52/s . . 79/57/s Phoenix. . . . . . . . .94/63/0.00 . .100/71/s . 100/71/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .62/46/0.00 . . . 68/43/s . . 74/51/s Portland, ME. . . . .65/51/1.01 . .64/44/sh . . 71/48/s Providence . . . . . .67/53/0.69 . .68/46/pc . . 76/53/s Raleigh . . . . . . . . .72/51/0.00 . . . 74/46/s . . 79/55/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .79/44/0.00 . .59/40/pc . 66/46/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .73/49/0.00 . . . 78/47/s . . 82/49/s Richmond . . . . . . .72/54/0.01 . . . 73/47/s . . 79/54/s Rochester, NY . . . .59/46/0.00 . . . 63/46/s . 75/49/pc Sacramento. . . . . .88/51/0.00 . . . 91/54/s . . 93/56/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .76/52/0.00 . .78/58/pc . . .76/58/t Salt Lake City . . . .71/55/0.00 . .71/44/pc . . 73/47/s San Antonio . . . . .77/68/0.46 . . . 82/62/t . . .80/63/t San Diego . . . . . . .64/59/0.00 . . . 67/60/s . . 68/60/s San Francisco . . . .77/49/0.00 . . . 75/55/s . . 74/53/s San Jose . . . . . . . .83/50/0.00 . . . 84/57/s . . 84/54/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .75/41/0.00 . .69/48/pc . 69/48/pc

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . 82/62/trace . . . 82/60/s . 81/62/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . . .58/39/0.00 . . . 67/45/s . . 74/48/s Sioux Falls. . . . . . .82/47/0.00 . .62/44/sh . 66/42/pc Spokane . . . . . . . .56/30/0.00 . . . 61/40/s . . 70/45/s Springfield, MO . .76/46/0.00 . .77/56/pc . 75/54/sh Tampa. . . . . . . . . .87/72/0.00 . .88/69/pc . 87/67/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . . .89/56/0.00 . . . 96/64/s . . 97/66/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .83/52/0.00 . .78/58/pc . . .75/56/t Washington, DC . .70/56/0.00 . . . 73/51/s . . 79/56/s Wichita . . . . . . . . .83/52/0.00 . .79/57/pc . . .71/54/t Yakima . . . . . . . . .65/31/0.00 . . . 68/40/s . . 77/39/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . . .99/70/0.00 . .102/69/s . 101/70/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .68/59/0.00 . . .58/45/c . 55/43/pc Athens. . . . . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . . . 80/64/t . . .75/64/t Auckland. . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . .64/51/pc . . 64/53/c Baghdad . . . . . . .108/79/0.00 . .103/76/s . 100/73/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .99/81/0.00 101/80/pc . 101/79/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . .78/59/sh . 75/57/sh Beirut . . . . . . . . . .75/68/0.00 . . . 79/65/s . . 79/67/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .77/32/0.00 . . . 76/55/t . 55/42/pc Bogota . . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . .64/51/sh . 62/50/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .81/46/0.00 . . . 81/56/s . 80/49/sh Buenos Aires. . . . .68/57/0.00 . .69/45/pc . 58/45/pc Cabo San Lucas . .86/64/0.00 . . . 88/67/s . . 91/69/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . . . 92/73/s . . 97/68/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .46/34/0.00 . . . 63/35/s . . 65/39/s Cancun . . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . .88/76/pc . 87/76/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . . .52/45/0.00 . .53/35/sh . 54/38/pc Edinburgh. . . . . . .45/41/0.00 . .53/37/sh . 52/42/pc Geneva . . . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . . . 83/59/s . 61/42/sh Harare. . . . . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . .70/54/pc . 70/47/pc Hong Kong . . . . . .93/84/0.00 . . . 87/79/t . . .87/80/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . .74/61/pc . . 71/59/c Jerusalem . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . . . 81/61/s . . 84/65/s Johannesburg. . . .73/52/0.00 . . . 72/48/s . . 69/48/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .72/66/0.00 . .73/63/pc . 73/63/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .88/61/0.00 . .79/69/pc . 83/65/pc London . . . . . . . . .63/57/0.00 . . .57/41/c . . 59/47/s Madrid . . . . . . . . .90/54/0.00 . . . 88/58/s . 87/60/pc Manila. . . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . . 93/81/t . . .92/81/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .111/82/0.00 . .107/82/s . 107/81/s Mexico City. . . . . .75/57/0.00 . .80/56/pc . . .78/55/t Montreal. . . . . . . .54/48/0.00 . . . 61/42/s . 67/52/pc Moscow . . . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . . . 71/55/s . 75/51/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . . . 75/60/t . . .75/61/t Nassau . . . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . .86/73/pc . 85/70/sh New Delhi. . . . . .108/88/0.00 109/83/pc 107/82/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . .66/50/pc . 67/51/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .52/43/0.00 . .56/42/sh . . 52/35/c Ottawa . . . . . . . . .48/43/0.00 . . . 62/42/s . . 68/46/c Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . .69/46/sh . 62/43/pc Rio de Janeiro. . . .86/70/0.00 . .84/67/pc . 83/70/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . . . 80/58/s . 82/62/pc Santiago . . . . . . . .64/39/0.00 . .71/46/pc . 72/49/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . .77/60/pc . . .72/64/t Sapporo . . . . . . not available . . .58/36/c . 53/38/pc Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .79/54/0.00 . .70/50/pc . 73/54/pc Shanghai. . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . . 78/63/s . 81/63/sh Singapore . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . . 87/81/t . . .87/80/t Stockholm. . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . .63/47/sh . 51/35/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . .71/51/pc . 67/50/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .77/70/0.00 . .88/73/pc . 86/73/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . . . 83/64/s . . 86/66/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . .66/54/sh . 65/51/pc Toronto . . . . . . . . .61/45/0.00 . . . 66/45/s . . 69/51/c Vancouver. . . . . . .55/46/0.00 . . . 63/46/s . . 69/50/s Vienna. . . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . . 82/64/s . 64/41/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . . .79/48/0.00 . .82/60/pc . 60/39/sh

DUSTER IN THE BERRIES

Dachshund dies after mauling by pit bull The Associated Press ROSEBURG — A 12-pound dachshund severely mauled by a pit bull in Roseburg has died. Veterinarian Alan Ross told the NewsReview he initially thought the 4-year-old dog — named Itty Bitty — had a reasonable chance of surviving bite wounds to the chest and front right leg but died late Wednesday. Brett Patton of Winston told TV station KPIC he was playing disc golf with friends Tuesday when a friend’s dachshund was

Mostly sunny and warm.

Mostly sunny and warm.

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

TUESDAY

Mainly clear and warm.

76 39

Nyssa

Hampton

Fort Rock 67/27

66/24

59/19

Bandon

67/36

Brothers 66/25

La Pine 69/25

Crescent Lake

70s

63/44

67/31

50s

66/28

72/42

Coos Bay

68/26

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

64/31

Union

Mitchell 68/31

69/32

Camp Sherman

79/39

63/30

Joseph

Granite Spray 71/34

Enterprise

Meacham 68/35

69/36

Madras

62/29

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

61/28

69/37

72/37

70/33

77/39

70/37

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

75/41

68/36

75/39

61/43

Hermiston 72/36

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 58/40

74/39

71/40

The Biggs Dalles 72/40

74/44

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

MONDAY

Mainly clear and significantly warmer.

HIGH LOW

31

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

SUNDAY

attacked by a pit bull that broke its leash. Six men tried to separate the animals, but when they realized the dachshund was being torn apart, Patton says he asked the pit bull’s owner if he could kill it. He says she said yes. Police took the dachshund to Companion Animal Clinic with serious injuries. The pit bull’s owners told KPIC they did not give Patton permission to stab their dog. The Douglas County sheriff’s office is investigating.

Kent Wooldridge and his wife, Renee, inspect his Grumman Ag Cat, a 1978 crop duster, after it crash-landed at their private airstrip along Interstate 5 west of Jefferson on Thursday. Wooldridge said one of his brakes failed on landing, causing the plane to roll off the runway and flip into blackberry briars. Mark Ylen Albany Democrat-Herald


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 College football, D2 NBA, D3 Golf, D3

MLB, D4 Horse racing, D4 Prep sports, D5 Adventure Sports, D6

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

D www.bendbulletin.com/sports

OLYMPICS

PREP TRACK & FIELD

Local schools tune up for districts • Summit boys, girls win Intermountain Conference meet; Mountain View girls, Bend boys take second Olympic torch bearer Alex Loukos from Great Britain carries the flame in Greece on Thursday.

London flame lit in Greece ANCIENT OLYMPIA, Greece — The flame that will burn during the London Games was lit at the birthplace of the ancient Olympics on Thursday, heralding the start of a torch relay that will culminate with the opening ceremony on July 27. After a choreographed ceremony, Greek swimmer and Olympic silver medalist Spyros Gianniotis became the first torchbearer. The 32-year-old Gianniotis was the first of 490 torchbearers who will carry the flame across 1,800 miles of Greek soil before the flame is handed to London organizers on May 17 in Athens. Gianniotis then handed over the torch to 19-year-old Alex Loukos, born of a Greek father and British mother and raised in the east London borough of Newham next to the Olympic Park.

Bulletin staff report Summit senior Lucinda Howard solidified her status as one of the top field event athletes in the area Thursday afternoon, winning the high jump, long jump and triple jump at the five-team Intermountain Conference track and field championships at Bend High. Full results for the meet were not available at press time. Howard, the Class 5A state runnerup in the high jump last season, cleared 5 feet, 6 inches in the high jump Thursday and went 36 feet even in the triple. Competing in the long jump for the first time in her high school career Howard recorded a mark of 17-02 1⁄2. “(Howard) is one of the most coachable kids I’ve ever had,” said Summit coach Dave Turnbull.

With Howard leading the way, the Storm won the girls meet with 149.5 points. Mountain View placed second with 81 points, and was followed by Bend, Redmond and Crook County. Turnbull also pointed out the long jump performances of Mountain View’s Shaina Zollman and Torie Morris and Summit’s Evan Davis, who all jumped over 16 feet Thursday. “It will be a great battle next week for who will go to state,” Turnbull said in reference to the Class 5A Special District 1 meet on May 18 and 19, which will also be at Bend High. The Cougars’ Krysta Kroeger won the 200, and Anna Roshak placed first in both the discus and shot put to pace Mountain View. See Track / D5

ADVENTURE SPORTS

Nadal loses, may boycott blue clay MADRID — Rafael Nadal lost to Fernando Verdasco 6-3, 3-6, 7-5 Thursday at the Madrid Open, then threatened not to return if the new blue clay-court wasn’t discarded. Defending champion Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer, meanwhile, eased into the quarterfinals with straight-set wins. Nadal blew a 5-2 lead in the third set en route to the loss, his first to Verdasco in 14 matches. The Spaniard blamed his first loss on clay in almost a year on the blue clay, calling it soft and slippery earlier in the week. “Being able to move is very important for me and if I can’t move well, I can’t hit the ball well either,” said Nadal, a two-time Madrid champion. “If things don’t change, this will be one less tournament on the calendar for me. “This surface destabilizes the game. It is a completely different game and I don’t want to take risks.” On the women’s side, Serena Williams overcame a sluggish start to beat former No. 1 Caroline Wozniacki 1-6, 6-3, 6-2 and reach the quarterfinals. Williams will play No. 2 Maria Sharapova.

LACROSSE

MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAIL GUIDE

Black Rock • Path provides a glimpse into one of Central Oregon’s most stunning landscapes MARK MORICAL

— The Associated Press

TENNIS

Joe Kline/The Bulletin

Summit’s Bradley Laubacher clears the bar in the high jump at 6 feet 8 inches during the Intermountain Conference championship meet on Thursday at Bend High School. Laubacher won the event as the Storm boys went on to take the team title.

Editor’s note: Mountain Bike Trail Guide, by Bulletin outdoors writer Mark Morical, features various trails in Central Oregon and beyond. The trail guide appears in Adventure Sports on alternating Fridays through the riding season.

O

ne of the oldest mountain biking trails in Central Oregon, the Black Rock Trail south of Bend is a relatively short (4½ miles) ribbon of dirt singletrack that skirts a truly dramatic landscape. The trail could serve as a field course in geology. It parallels the edge of a vast lava-rock field that covers more than 9 square miles from U.S. Highway 97 east to the Deschutes River. The field — for whose jagged black lava formations the trail is named — was formed by the eruption of the Lava Butte cinder cone some 7,000 years ago, according to the U.S. Forest Service.

The Black Rock Trail was rerouted from its original path about 10 years ago. But on a recent ride, I could see why some of Central Oregon’s mountain biking pioneers considered it one of their favorite trails in the early 1980s. “It was one of the first ones around,” said Kent Howes, who serves on the board of directors for the Central Oregon Trail Alliance. “It sort of got put away for a while, and didn’t really get worked on, and then came back about 10 years ago. It just didn’t get used much (before that).” I started the ride Monday from the Deschutes River Trail at Dillon Falls, planning an out-and-back ride of about 17 miles. About four miles into the trip, I arrived at Benham Falls, its whitewater shimmering in the sun on a bright spring day. Above the falls, the trail widens and comes to a wooden bridge. After crossing the bridge, bikers have a choice of heading west (right) to continue along the river trail to Sunriver, or going southeast (left) onto the Black Rock Trail. I turned left and began a gradual climb to the southeast, nothing too strenuous or technical. See Black Rock / D6

Breaking down the trail: Black Rock DIRECTIONS To access the trail from its east end, drive about 10 miles south of Bend to Lava Butte and the Lava Lands Visitor Center. A sign marks the Black Rock Trail from the parking lot. The trail can be accessed from its west end along the Deschutes River Trail near Benham Falls. (Map, D6)

LENGTH Nine miles out and back.

RATING Technically easy and aerobically intermediate.

TRAIL FEATURES Smooth, rolling singletrack that skirts a field of lava rock covering more than 9 square miles.

The Cascade mountains provide a breathtaking backdrop to the lava rock along the Black Rock Trail. Mark Morical / The Bulletin

Sisters to host tourney Bulletin staff report The 2012 Sisters Annual Lacrosse Invitational (SALI) is scheduled to take place in Sisters today and Saturday. The tournament, which started about eight years ago, is expected to draw about 60 teams — organizers say they expect nearly 1,400 players. Participating teams will be mostly from Oregon, but others are expected from Washington, Idaho and Nevada. Teams range in age from elementary school coed through boys high school varsity and also include middle school and junior varsity divisions. Most of SALI’s games are scheduled for Saturday, but several high school boys games are slated for today with start times of 4:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Saturday’s first round of games is expected to begin at 8 a.m., while the last game of the day, a masters game with coaches playing, will start at 7 p.m. Brackets are available at allprosoftware. net/SALI2012/default.htm. Games will be staged on the athletic fields at Sisters High School and Sisters Middle School, as well as at Reed Stadium. Admission is free for spectators, and dining will be available on-site.

Sisters Annual Lacrosse Invitational Who: Coed and boys teams from Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Nevada, ranging in age from early elementary school through high school varsity When: Today and Saturday Where: Sisters High School and Sisters Middle athletic fields and Reed Stadium Admission: Free, on-site dining will be available More info: outlawslax.org, click on the “SALI 2012” tab

—The Associated Press

NBA PLAYOFFS 76ers Bulls • 76ers win series, 4-2

79 78

Celtics Hawks • Celtics win series, 4-2

83 80

Nuggets Lakers • Series tied, 3-3

Roundup, D3

Quick is unlikely goalie star for Los Angeles in playoffs By Greg Beacham The Associated Press

113 96

EL SEGUNDO, Calif. — Jonathan Quick’s lateral movement is undeniably impressive. Just ask the reporters and team employees who approached his locker for an interview earlier this week, only to watch the Los Angeles Kings’ All-Star goalie quickly pivot and back out of the room with remarkable agility. Quick returned a moment later, of

NHL course. He’s neither shy nor unpleasant to anybody around the Kings, but the quiet Connecticut native is fully focused on extending a surprising playoff run by a team with an unlikely star in net. “It’s fun to still be playing hockey this time of year,” Quick said. “I think this is the deepest I’ve ever gone into

the spring, so it’s great. We want to keep going.” After keeping one of the NHL’s lowest-scoring teams in the playoff hunt almost by himself for long stretches of Los Angeles’ regular season, Quick has allowed only 14 goals in nine playoff games against the Western Conference’s top two teams, backstopping the eighth-seeded Kings into the conference finals against Phoenix. See Quick / D5

Darryl Dyck / The Canadian Press

Los Angeles Kings’ goalie Jonathan Quick.


D2

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION Today GOLF 10 a.m.: PGA Tour, The Players Championship, second round, Golf Channel. MOTOR SPORTS 12:30 p.m.: NASCAR, Nationwide Series, VFW Sport Clips Help a Hero 200, qualifying, ESPN2. 4 p.m.: NASCAR, Nationwide Series, VFW Sport Clips Help a Hero 200, ESPN2. RUGBY 12:30 p.m.: Albuquerque Aardvarks vs. Glendale Raptors (taped), Root Sports. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at New York Yankees, Root Sports. 5 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Texas Rangers or Atlanta Braves at St. Louis Cardinals, MLB Network. BASKETBALL 6 p.m.: NBA playoffs, first round, Memphis Grizzlies at Los Angeles Clippers, ESPN.

Saturday SOCCER 1:30 p.m.: Major League Soccer, D.C. United at Houston Dynamo, NBC Sports Network. 7 p.m.: Major League Soccer, Real Salt Lake at Seattle Sounders, Root Sports. GOLF 9 a.m.: PGA Tour, The Players Championship, third round, Golf Channel. 11 a.m.: PGA Tour, The Players Championship, third round, NBC. LACROSSE 9 a.m.: College men, NCAA tournament, first round, Duke vs. Syracuse, ESPN. BASEBALL 10 a.m.: MLB, regional coverage, Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee Brewers or New York Mets at Miami Marlins or Los Angeles Angels at Texas Rangers, Fox. 1 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at New York Yankees, Root Sports. 4 p.m.: MLB, Atlanta Braves at St. Louis Cardinals or Cleveland Indians at Boston Red Sox, MLB Network. 4:30 p.m.: College, Baylor at Oklahoma (same-day tape), Root Sports. SOFTBALL 1 p.m.: College, ACC tournament, final, teams TBD, ESPN. 3 p.m.: College, Big East tournament, final, teams TBD, ESPN2. 5 p.m.: College, SEC tournament, final, teams TBD, ESPN. MOTOR SPORTS 3:30 p.m.: NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Showtime Southern 500, Fox. HOCKEY 4:30 p.m.: NHL playoffs, conference semifinal, Washington Capitals at New York Rangers, NBC Sports Network BASKETBALL 5 p.m.: NBA playoffs, conference semifinal, Philadelphia 76ers at Boston Celtics, TNT.

7:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, first round, Denver Nuggets at Los Angeles Lakers, TNT.

Sunday SOCCER 12:30 a.m.: Beach soccer, Sao Paulo vs. Seattle Sounders (same-day tape), Root Sports. 6:30 a.m.: English Premier League, Manchester City vs. Queens Park Rangers, ESPN2. 7 a.m.: English Premier League, Aston Villa vs. Norwich City, FX. HOCKEY 6 a.m.: International Ice Hockey Federation World Championships, USA vs. Finland, NBC Sports Network. GOLF 9 a.m.: PGA Tour, The Players Championship, final round, Golf Channel. 11 a.m.: PGA Tour, The Players Championship, final round, NBC. BASKETBALL 10 a.m.: NBA playoffs, first round, Los Angeles Clippers at Memphis Grizzlies, ABC. 12:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, conference semifinal, Indiana Pacers at Miami Heat, ABC. LACROSSE 10 a.m.: College men, NCAA tournament, first round, Princeton vs. Virginia, ESPN. BASEBALL 10 a.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at New York Yankees, Root Sports. 11 a.m.: MLB, Atlanta Braves at St. Louis Cardinals, TBS. 2 p.m.: College, USC at Oregon, Comcast SportsNet Northwest. 5 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Texas Rangers, ESPN. VOLLEYBALL Noon: U.S. Olympic Trials (taped), NBC Sports Network. RODEO 1 p.m.: Professional Bull Riders, Boise Invitational (taped), CBS. MOTOR SPORTS 2 p.m.: American Le Mans Series, Monterey, ESPN2. CYCLING 2 p.m.: Tour of California, stage 1, NBC Sports Network.

RADIO Today BASEBALL 11 a.m.: Oregon State at Utah, KICE-AM 940.

Saturday BASEBALL 11 a.m.: Oregon State at Utah, KICE-AM 940.

Sunday BASEBALL 11 a.m.: Oregon State at Utah, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations

Leach rejuvenated as Washington State coach The Associated Press OMAHA, Neb. — Other than the legal wrangling that followed his departure from Texas Tech, Mike Leach enjoyed the two years he was without a coaching job. Leach said Wednesday that the time away gave him an opportunity to do things he wouldn’t have done otherwise. Now he’s glad to be back. The rejuvenated Leach recently finished his first spring practice at Washington State, a program that has lost 40 of 49 games the past four years. He is hoping to have the same success he had at Tech, where he led the Red Raiders to bowl games each of his 10 years there. His bitterness about the way his run at Tech ended was apparent during a news conference before his appearance as featured speaker at the Omaha Sports Banquet on Wednesday night. He said he figured it was a matter of time before he got another job. “I was in my coaching prime. I was having fun doing what I was doing,” Leach said. “But two years got tak-

COLLEGE FOOTBALL en away from me. We won 29 games in the last three years there at Tech, so two years got taken away from me through the actions of others, and I did plan to get back in.” Leach still has unfinished business in the Lone Star State. He was fired amid allegations he mistreated a player who had a concussion. Leach has denied wrongdoing. The player, Adam James, is the son of former ESPN college football analyst Craig James. Leach said Craig James coaxed Tech administrators into firing him. Leach sued ESPN Inc. and a Dallas public relations firm for libel and slander. No trial date has been set. Leach tried to make his case and uphold his reputation in his best-selling book, “Swing Your Sword,” which he coauthored after his firing. “I think the facts are pretty borne out, but never the less I expect to have a victory in court, yeah,” he said.

ON DECK

IN THE BLEACHERS

Today Baseball: Redmond at Sheldon (DH), 3 p.m.; La Pine at Elmira, 4:30 p.m.; North Marion at Madras, 5 p.m.; Cottage Grove at Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Redmond at Sheldon (DH), 3 p.m.; Elmira at La Pine, 4:30 p.m.; Madras at North Marion, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at Cottage Grove, 4:30 p.m. Track and field: Culver at Tri-River Conference championships in Junction City, TBA; Sisters at Wally Ciochetti Invite in Cottage Grove, 2 p.m.; La Pine, Madras at Central Invite in Independence, 4 p.m. Boys tennis: Crook County at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 5 tourney in Baker, TBA Girls tennis: Sisters hosts Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 tourney at Black Butte Ranch, TBA; Crook County at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 5 tourney in Baker, TBA Boys lacrosse: OHSLA High Desert League playoffs: Bend vs. Harney County at Sisters High, 4:30 p.m.; Summit vs. Sisters at Reed Stadium in Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Girls lacrosse: OGLA South League tiebreaker: Bend United vs. Marist at Sheldon High School in Eugene, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Baseball: Grant Union at Sisters (DH), noon Track and field: Culver at Tri-River Conference championships in Junction City, TBA; Gilchrist at Mt. Skyline Class 1A championships in Grants Pass, 10:45 a.m.

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION NBA Playoff Glance All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Philadelphia 4, Chicago 2 Saturday, April 28: Chicago 103, Philadelphia 91 Tuesday, May 1: Philadelphia 109, Chicago 92 Friday, May 4: Philadelphia 79, Chicago 74 Sunday, May 6: Philadelphia 89, Chicago 82 Tuesday, May 8: Chicago 77, Philadelphia 69 Thursday, May 10: Philadelphia 79, Chicago 78 Miami 4, New York 1 Saturday, April 28: Miami 100, New York 67 Monday, April 30: Miami 104, New York 94 Thursday, May 3: Miami 87, New York 70 Sunday, May 6: New York 89, Miami 87 Wednesday, May 9: Miami 106, New York 94 Indiana 4, Orlando 1 Saturday, April 28: Orlando 81, Indiana 77 Monday, April 30: Indiana 93, Orlando 78 Wednesday, May 2: Indiana 97, Orlando 74 Saturday, May 5: Indiana 101, Orlando 99, OT Tuesday, May 8: Indiana 105, Orlando 87 Boston 4, Atlanta 2 Sunday, April 29: Atlanta 83, Boston 74 Tuesday, May 1: Boston 87, Atlanta 80 Friday, May 4: Boston 90, Atlanta 84, OT Sunday, May 6: Boston 101, Atlanta 79 Tuesday, May 8: Atlanta 87, Boston 86 Thursday, May 10: Boston 83, Atlanta 80 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Utah 0 Sunday, April 29: San Antonio 106, Utah 91 Wednesday, May 2: San Antonio 114, Utah 83 Saturday, May 5: San Antonio 102, Utah 90 Monday, May 7: San Antonio 87, Utah 81 Oklahoma City 4, Dallas 0 Saturday, April 28: Oklahoma City 99, Dallas 98 Monday, April 30: Oklahoma City 102, Dallas 99 Thursday, May 3: Oklahoma City 95, Dallas 79 Saturday, May 5: Oklahoma City 103, Dallas 97 L.A. Lakers 3, Denver 3 Sunday, April 29: L.A. Lakers 103, Denver 88 Tuesday, May 1: L.A. Lakers 104, Denver 100 Friday, May 4: Denver 99, L.A. Lakers 84 Sunday, May 6: L.A. Lakers 92, Denver 88 Tuesday, May 8: Denver 102, L.A. Lakers 99 Thursday, May 10: Denver 113, L.A. Lakers 96 Saturday, May 12: Denver at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers 3, Memphis 2 Sunday, April 29: L.A. Clippers 99, Memphis 98 Wednesday, May 2: Memphis 105, L.A. Clippers 98 Saturday, May 5: L.A. Clippers 87, Memphis 86 Monday, May 7: L.A. Clippers 101, Memphis 97, OT Wednesday, May 9: Memphis 92, L.A. Clippers 80 Today, May 11: Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 6 p.m. x-Sunday, May 13: L.A. Clippers at Memphis, 10 a.m. ——— CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Philadelphia vs. Boston Saturday, May 12: Philadelphia at Boston, 5 p.m. Indiana vs. Miami Sunday, May 13: Indiana at Miami, 12:30 p.m. Thursday’s Summaries

Nuggets 113, Lakers 96 L.A. LAKERS (96) Ebanks 4-9 2-2 10, Gasol 1-10 1-2 3, Bynum 4-11 3-5 11, Sessions 4-9 6-8 14, Bryant 13-23 4-4 31, Barnes 2-8 1-2 6, Hill 3-6 2-2 8, Blake 1-3 0-0 3, Eyenga 1-2 0-1 2, Murphy 1-1 0-0 3, Morris 1-1 3-4 5, McRoberts 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-83 22-30 96. DENVER (113) Gallinari 5-13 0-0 12, Faried 6-11 3-3 15, Mozgov 3-5 2-4 8, Lawson 13-18 1-3 32, Afflalo 3-5 0-0 6, McGee 1-5 0-0 2, Harrington 1-8 2-6 4, Miller 5-10 1-1 12, Brewer 8-12 0-0 18, Hamilton 1-2 0-0 2, Stone 1-2 0-0 2, Koufos 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 47-91 9-17 113. L.A. Lakers 20 25 23 28 — 96 Denver 30 24 36 23 — 113 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 4-14 (Murphy 1-1, Blake 1-2, Barnes 1-4, Bryant 1-4, Sessions 0-1, Ebanks 0-2), Denver 10-20 (Lawson 5-6, Brewer 2-3, Gallinari 2-6, Miller 1-1, Afflalo 0-1, Harrington 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Lakers 51 (Bynum 16), Denver 57 (Faried 11). Assists—L.A. Lakers 23 (Bryant, Blake 4), Denver 26 (Afflalo, Gallinari 7). Total Fouls—L.A. Lakers 17, Denver 22. Technicals—L.A. Lakers defensive three second. Flagrant Fouls—Bryant. A—19,770 (19,155).

76ers 79, Bulls 78 CHICAGO (78) Deng 8-16 3-3 19, Boozer 1-11 1-1 3, Asik 3-6 4-7 10, Watson 2-11 1-2 6, Hamilton 9-20 1-1 19, Korver 0-0 0-0 0, Gibson 4-10 6-7 14, Brewer 0-1 0-0 0, Lucas 3-5 0-0 7, Butler 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 30-80 16-21 78. PHILADELPHIA (79) Iguodala 7-12 4-4 20, Brand 2-9 1-2 5, Hawes 410 0-0 8, Holiday 4-11 4-5 14, Turner 4-11 2-2 10, Williams 4-12 4-7 14, T.Young 4-8 0-0 8, Meeks 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 29-73 15-20 79. Chicago 22 18 23 15 — 78 Philadelphia 24 24 15 16 — 79 3-Point Goals—Chicago 2-13 (Lucas 1-2, Watson 1-4, Hamilton 0-2, Deng 0-5), Philadelphia 6-16 (Iguodala 2-3, Holiday 2-4, Williams 2-7, Turner 0-1, Hawes 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Chicago 66 (Deng 17), Philadelphia 38 (Hawes 10). Assists—Chicago 19 (Watson 10), Philadelphia 19 (Iguodala 7). Total Fouls—Chicago 19, Philadelphia 18. Technicals—Gibson, Philadelphia defensive three second. A—20,362 (20,318).

Celtics 83, Hawks 80 ATLANTA (80) M.Williams 6-13 0-0 16, Smith 7-18 4-4 18, Horford 6-9 3-4 15, Teague 2-9 0-0 5, Jo.Johnson 7-17 11 17, Hinrich 2-5 1-1 5, Dampier 0-1 0-0 0, McGrady 2-6 0-0 4, Pargo 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-78 9-10 80. BOSTON (83) Pierce 5-11 7-8 18, Bass 3-7 0-0 6, Garnett 10-19 8-10 28, Rondo 7-14 0-0 14, Bradley 3-9 0-0 6, Allen 1-7 4-6 7, Stiemsma 0-1 0-0 0, Hollins 1-3 0-0 2, Pietrus 1-1 0-0 2, Dooling 0-2 0-0 0, Daniels 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 31-74 19-24 83. Atlanta 23 18 22 17 — 80 Boston 20 27 20 16 — 83 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 7-15 (M.Williams 4-5, Jo.Johnson 2-6, Teague 1-2, McGrady 0-1, Hinrich 01), Boston 2-10 (Pierce 1-2, Allen 1-7, Dooling 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 44 (Smith, Horford 9), Boston 51 (Garnett 14). Assists—Atlanta 22 (Teague 6), Boston 19 (Rondo 8). Total Fouls—Atlanta 20, Boston 14. Technicals—Dampier, Smith, Teague, Boston defensive three second. A—18,624 (18,624). Team Playoff Statistics Through Thursday’s Games Team Offense G Pts San Antonio 4 409 Oklahoma City 4 399

Avg 102.3 99.8

Denver Miami L.A. Lakers Memphis Indiana Dallas L.A. Clippers Boston Utah Philadelphia Chicago Orlando New York Atlanta Boston Miami Indiana Philadelphia Chicago San Antonio Atlanta Memphis Oklahoma City Orlando L.A. Clippers Denver New York L.A. Lakers Dallas Utah

6 5 6 5 5 4 5 6 4 6 6 5 5 6 Team Defense G 6 5 5 6 6 4 6 5 4 5 5 6 5 6 4 4

590 484 578 478 473 373 465 521 345 516 506 419 414 493

98.3 96.8 96.3 95.6 94.6 93.3 93.0 86.8 86.3 86.0 84.3 83.8 82.8 82.2

Pts 493 414 419 506 516 345 521 465 373 473 478 578 484 590 399 409

Avg 82.2 82.8 83.8 84.3 86.0 86.3 86.8 93.0 93.3 94.6 95.6 96.3 96.8 98.3 99.8 102.3

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers 3, Washington 3 Saturday, April 28: NY Rangers 3, Washington 1 Monday, April 30: Washington 3, NY Rangers 2 Wednesday, May 2: NY Rangers 2, Washington 1, 3OT Saturday, May 5: Washington 3, NY Rangers 2 Monday, May 7: NY Rangers 3, Washington 2, OT Wednesday, May 9: Washington 2, NY Rangers 1 Saturday, May 12: Washington at NY Rangers, 4:30 p.m. New Jersey 4, Philadelphia 1 Sunday, April 29: Philadelphia 4, New Jersey 3, OT Tuesday, May 1: New Jersey 4, Philadelphia 1 Thursday, May 3: New Jersey 4, Philadelphia 3, OT Sunday, May 6: New Jersey 4, Philadelphia 2 Tuesday, May 8: New Jersey 3, Philadelphia 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Phoenix 4, Nashville 1 Friday, April 27: Phoenix 4, Nashville 3, OT Sunday, April 29: Phoenix 5, Nashville 3 Wednesday, May 2: Nashville 2, Phoenix 0 Friday, May 4: Phoenix 1, Nashville 0 Monday, May 7: Phoenix 2, Nashville 1 Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 0 Saturday, April 28: Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 1 Monday, April 30: Los Angeles 5, St. Louis 2 Thursday, May 3: Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 2 Sunday, May 6: Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 1

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF Sporting Kansas City 7 2 0 21 12 New York 6 3 1 19 20 D.C. 5 3 3 18 20 Chicago 3 2 3 12 9 Montreal 3 5 2 11 11 New England 3 6 0 9 8 Houston 2 3 2 8 7 Columbus 2 4 2 8 6 Philadelphia 2 5 1 7 5 Toronto FC 0 8 0 0 6 Western Conference W L T Pts GF Real Salt Lake 7 3 2 23 18 San Jose 7 2 1 22 21 Seattle 7 1 1 22 13 Vancouver 5 2 2 17 9 Colorado 5 5 0 15 15 FC Dallas 3 5 3 12 10 Los Angeles 3 5 1 10 11 Chivas USA 3 6 0 9 5 Portland 2 5 2 8 9 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Saturday’s Games Los Angeles at Montreal, 1 p.m. D.C. United at Houston, 1:30 p.m. FC Dallas at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Vancouver at New England, 4:30 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Seattle FC, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Games New York at Philadelphia, 9:30 a.m. Chivas USA at San Jose, 4 p.m.

GA 5 14 15 9 15 12 9 10 9 18 GA 12 11 3 7 12 16 14 11 13

BASEBALL College Pacific-12 Conference All Times PDT ——— Conference W L Oregon 16 8 Arizona 13 8 Arizona St. 14 10 UCLA 12 9 Stanford 11 10 Oregon St. 11 10 Washington 11 10 Washington St. 9 11 California 9 12 USC 7 13 Utah 6 18 Today’s Games Oregon State at Utah, 11 a.m. Arizona at California, 2:30 p.m. UCLA at Washington, 5 p.m. Arizona State at Gonzaga, 6 p.m. Washington State at Stanford, 6 p.m. Saturday’s Games Oregon State at Utah, 11 a.m.

All Games W L 35 14 30 15 29 17 32 13 29 14 30 16 26 18 24 20 25 19 22 21 12 33

Arizona at California, 1 p.m. UCLA at Washington, 2 p.m. USC at Oregon, 2 p.m. Washington State at Stanford, 2 p.m. x-Arizona State at Gonzaga, 3 p.m. Sunday’s Games Oregon State at Utah, 11 a.m. Arizona at California, 1 p.m. Arizona State at Gonzaga, 1 p.m. UCLA at Washington, 1 p.m. Washington State at Stanford, 1 p.m. USC at Oregon, 2 p.m. x-nonleague

TENNIS Professional Madrid Open Thursday At Caja Magica Madrid, Spain Purse: Men, $4 million, (WT1000); Women, $4 million (Premier) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men Third Round Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, def. Gael Monfils (12), France, 6-1, 6-1. Juan Martin Del Potro (10), Argentina, def. Marin Cilic, Croatia, 6-2, 6-4. Alexandr Dolgopolov (16), Ukraine, def. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (4), France, 7-5, 3-6, 7-6 (2). Fernando Verdasco (15), Spain, def. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, 6-3, 3-6, 7-5. David Ferrer (5), Spain, def. Nicolas Almagro (11), Spain, 7-6 (5), 3-6, 7-6 (8). Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. Richard Gasquet (14), France, 6-3, 6-2. Janko Tipsarevic (7), Serbia, def. Gilles Simon (9), France, 7-6 (3), 5-7, 6-1. Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Stanislas Wawrinka, Switzerland, 7-6 (5), 6-4. Women Third Round Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, def. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 6-2, 7-6 (5). Serena Williams (9), United States, def. Caroline Wozniacki (6), Denmark, 1-6, 6-3, 6-2. Agnieszka Radwanska (4), Poland, def. Roberta Vinci, Italy, 7-6 (1), 6-4. Varvara Lepchenko, United States, def. Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain, 6-1, 6-7 (3), 6-3. Maria Sharapova (2), Russia, def. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, walkover.

GOLF PGA Tour The Players Championship Thursday AtTPC Sawgrass, Players Stadium Course Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Purse: $9.5 million Yardage: 7,215; Par 72 (36-36) First Round Ian Poulter 34-31—65 Martin Laird 33-32—65 Blake Adams 31-35—66 Kevin Na 37-30—67 Ben Crane 33-34—67 Michael Thompson 35-33—68 Harrison Frazar 33-35—68 Matt Kuchar 34-34—68 Kevin Stadler 35-33—68 Jhonattan Vegas 34-34—68 Jonathan Byrd 33-35—68 Adam Scott 33-35—68 Bill Haas 35-33—68 Ben Curtis 33-35—68 Brian Davis 34-34—68 Sang-Moon Bae 34-34—68 Pat Perez 36-33—69 Kris Blanks 34-35—69 Arjun Atwal 34-35—69 Padraig Harrington 35-34—69 Sean O’Hair 36-33—69 David Toms 35-34—69 David Hearn 35-34—69 Brendon de Jonge 34-35—69 Johnson Wagner 32-37—69 Ryan Moore 34-35—69 J.J. Killeen 32-37—69 Tom Gillis 33-37—70 Geoff Ogilvy 33-37—70 George McNeill 34-36—70 Jeff Maggert 35-35—70 John Merrick 37-33—70 Tim Herron 35-35—70 Zach Johnson 34-36—70 Robert Karlsson 36-34—70 Harris English 35-35—70 Graham DeLaet 36-35—71 Brian Gay 38-33—71 Nick Watney 34-37—71 Tim Clark 34-37—71 Louis Oosthuizen 36-35—71 Carl Pettersson 37-34—71 Chris Kirk 35-36—71 Henrik Stenson 35-36—71 J.J. Henry 35-36—71 Rod Pampling 33-38—71 Josh Teater 38-33—71 Jimmy Walker 34-37—71 Bo Van Pelt 32-39—71 Charlie Wi 37-34—71 Fredrik Jacobson 36-35—71 Stewart Cink 36-35—71 Lee Westwood 35-36—71 Phil Mickelson 35-36—71 Chris Couch 35-37—72 Greg Chalmers 34-38—72 Kevin Streelman 36-36—72 Scott Verplank 35-37—72 Bryce Molder 36-36—72 Keegan Bradley 36-36—72 Rickie Fowler 37-35—72 David Mathis 36-36—72 Chad Campbell 34-38—72 Chez Reavie 36-36—72 John Rollins 36-36—72 Francesco Molinari 36-36—72 Retief Goosen 36-36—72 Scott Stallings 34-38—72 Jim Furyk 36-36—72 Davis Love III 34-38—72 Brendan Steele 35-37—72 Trevor Immelman 37-35—72 Robert Allenby 35-37—72 Luke Donald 36-36—72 Rory McIlroy 34-38—72 Joe Ogilvie 37-35—72 Alvaro Quiros 37-35—72

John Mallinger Cameron Tringale Chris DiMarco James Driscoll Brandt Jobe Vijay Singh Heath Slocum Scott Piercy Sergio Garcia Jason Day Webb Simpson Robert Garrigus Ryan Palmer Brian Harman Ken Duke Chris Stroud Martin Kaymer Jason Dufner Kyle Stanley Bob Estes Peter Hanson Marc Leishman Hunter Mahan Tiger Woods Michael Bradley Spencer Levin J.B. Holmes Nick O’Hern Kevin Chappell Ricky Barnes Lucas Glover Graeme McDowell Ernie Els Mark Wilson John Senden Tommy Gainey Matt Bettencourt Justin Leonard K.J. Choi Sung Kang Camilo Villegas John Huh Bud Cauley Ryuji Imada Andres Romero Briny Baird Brandt Snedeker Rory Sabbatini Charles Howell III Justin Rose Steve Stricker Gary Woodland Matt Every Jeff Overton Aaron Baddeley Charley Hoffman Troy Matteson Billy Mayfair Colt Knost D.J. Trahan Tom Pernice Jr. Y.E. Yang Jerry Kelly Hunter Haas Paul Casey

35-38—73 37-36—73 35-38—73 35-38—73 37-36—73 35-38—73 37-36—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 35-38—73 34-39—73 38-35—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 39-34—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 37-36—73 34-39—73 39-34—73 36-37—73 36-38—74 37-37—74 36-38—74 38-36—74 36-38—74 37-37—74 37-37—74 36-38—74 38-36—74 38-36—74 34-40—74 36-38—74 35-39—74 36-38—74 38-37—75 36-39—75 37-38—75 36-39—75 34-41—75 39-36—75 37-38—75 37-38—75 35-41—76 39-37—76 35-41—76 38-38—76 37-39—76 38-38—76 36-40—76 36-41—77 40-37—77 40-38—78 39-39—78 39-40—79 42-37—79 39-40—79 41-38—79 39-41—80 41-39—80 38-42—80 39-43—82 WD WD

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Recalled RHP Tommy Hunter from Norfolk (IL). Placed OF Endy Chavez on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 9. BOSTON RED SOX—Selected the contract of OF Daniel Nava from Pawtucket (IL). Optioned RHP Clayton Mortensen to Pawtucket. Designated LHP Justin Thomas for assignment. MINNESOTA TWINS—Recalled OF Darin Mastroianni from Rochester (IL). Selected the contract of RHP P.J. Walters from Rochester. TAMPA BAY RAYS—Activated INF Jeff Keppinger from the restricted list. Placed 1B-OF Brandon Allen on the 15-day DL. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Agreed to terms with OF Vladimir Guerrero on a minor league contract. National League PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Placed RHP Joel Hanrahan on the bereavement list. Recalled RHP Daniel McCutchen from Indianapolis (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association DENVER NUGGETS—Excused C Chris Andersen indefinitely from all team-related activities as he deals with a police investigation. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS—Agreed to terms 0with DE Calais Campbell on a five-year contract. BALTIMORE RAVENS—Signed DE Courtney Upshaw, RB Bernard Pierce and WR Tommy Streeter. BUFFALO BILLS—Agreed to terms with LB Nigel Bradham, CB Ron Brooks, T Zebrie Sanders, LB Tank Carder, OL Mark Asper and K John Potter. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Signed CB Shaun Prater and S George Iloka. DENVER BRONCOS—Agreed to terms with CB Drayton Florence. DETROIT LIONS—Signed WR Ryan Broyles, DE Ronnell Lewis, LB Tahir Whitehead, CB Chris Greenwood, CB Jonte Green, LB Travis Lewis, G Rodney Austin, T Quinn Barham, G Pat Boyle, WR Troy Burrell, DT Michael Cosgrove, K Derek Dimke, WR Patrick Edwards, TE Alex Gottlieb, RB Stephfon Green, WR Jared Karstetter, S Alonzo Lawrence, DE Edmon McClam, LB Carmen Messina, QB Kellen Moore, G J.C. Oram, LB Ronnie Sneed and TE Austin Wells. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Promoted Jim Nagy from regional scout to national scout and Ryne Nutt from scouting assistant to area scout. Named Kyle O’Brien regional scout. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Named Matt Patricia defensive coordinator, Josh Boyer cornerbacks coach, Brian Flores safeties coach, Patrick Graham defensive line coach, Pepper Johnson linebackers coach, George Godsey tight ends coach, Joe Judge special teams assistant and Steve Belichick coaching assistant. Signed RB Joseph Addai, RB Brandon Bolden, DL Marcus Forston, DL Justin Francis, TE Brad Herman, WR Matt Roark, OL Jeremiah Warren and OL Markus Zusevics. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Signed CB Conroy Black, LB Kaelin Burnett, WR Derek Carrier, WR Brandon Carswell, DT Dominique Hamilton, S Aaron Henry, P Marquette King, T Dan Knapp, LB Mario Kurn, WR Thomas Mayo, G Lucas Nix, S Chaz Powell and WR Rod Streater. PITTSBURGH STEELERS—Signed OL Kelvin Beachum. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Signed WR Tiquan Underwood to a two-year contract. Waived DT Myles Wade. Released QB Jordan Jefferson. United States Football League USFL—Named Fred Biletnikoff and James Bailey to the board of advisors. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS—Signed Bruce Boudreau coach, to a two-year contract extension. DALLAS STARS—Named Bob Gainey senior advisor. MINNESOTA WILD—Signed D Clayton Stoner to a two-year contract extension. OTTAWA SENATORS—Signed D Fredrik Claesson to a three-year, entry-level contract. SOFTBALL USA Softball AMATEUR SOFTBALL ASSOCIATION/USA SOFTBALL—Named Laura Berg assistant coach for the women’s national team. COLLEGE EASTERN ILLINOIS—Announced the resignation of Brady Sallee, women’s basketball coach. MICHIGAN STATE—Announced the NCAA granted WR DeAnthony Arnett a waiver to play this season. MISSOURI STATE—Dismissed QB Trevor Wooden from the football team for violating team rules. PROVIDENCE—Announced sophomore basketball C Carson Desrosiers is transferring from Wake Forest. VIRGINIA TECH—Named Kurt Kanaskie, Mark Byington and Ramon Williams, men’s assistant basketball coaches. WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE—Named Andy Geiger athletic director.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 18,436 599 23 5 The Dalles 4,300 192 4 2 John Day 4,937 171 8 4 McNary 1,048 35 13 6 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 81,863 1,747 4,501 1,410 The Dalles 26,283 903 1,618 908 John Day 17,366 707 1,727 1,179 McNary 9,002 219 4,623 2,183


FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

S  B

Horse racing • Derby-winning trainer could face suspension: Kentucky Derby-winning trainer Doug O’Neill could face a suspension in California after one of his horses was found to have an elevated level of total carbon dioxide, an infraction for which he previously has been punished. The California Horse Racing Board is considering the case, which involves “milkshaking,” the illegal practice of giving a horse a blend of bicarbonate of soda, sugar and electrolytes. The mixture is designed to reduce fatigue and enhance performance. O’Neill faces his third total carbon dioxide violation in California and fourth in a career that has spanned 25 years. Speaking at Pimlico Race Course on Thursday, where he is overseeing Derby winner I’ll Have Another in preparation for the May 19 Preakness, O’Neill adamantly denied the charge (see related story, D4).

Football • Vikings close to new stadium: The Minnesota Vikings are on the brink of getting a new stadium after the state Senate approved a plan that relies heavily on public financing. Gov. Mark Dayton has said he’ll sign the measure, which makes Thursday’s Senate approval the final hurdle for the nearly $1 billion stadium. The House passed it overnight. The team has been chasing a new stadium for nearly a decade. Dayton led the charge this year, fearing the team might leave the state if it didn’t get a replacement for the 30-year-old Metrodome. Under the bill, the team’s future in Minnesota would be guaranteed for three decades. The Vikings would pay 49 percent of construction costs. The public expense is high: $348 million for the state and $150 million for the city of Minneapolis. • FCS set to expand playoffs: The Football Championship Subdivision is moving swiftly toward expanding its current playoff system from 20 to 24 teams by 2013. The proposed system seeds the top eight teams and gives them first-round byes and home games in the following round. It would also extend an automatic bid to the Pioneer Football League. • NFL, refs can’t come to terms: The NFL is looking for potential replacement officials while it negotiates with the officials’ association on a new contract. The previous contract expired after last season and another negotiating session is expected later this month, NFL Referees Association executive director Tim Millis says. Millis says he is “surprised by the timing” of a league memo to its officiating scouting department to begin identifying possible replacements. NFL spokesman Greg Aiello says Thursday, “We expect to reach an agreement, but must have contingency plans in place.”

Softball • Eastern Oregon University sued over injury: An Eastern Oregon University student whose skull was fractured during a softball practice is suing the university for almost $1 million. In a complaint filed in January in Union County Circuit Court, Holly Martin claims she sustained lifechanging injuries as a result of being struck in the head by a ball in February 2010 at the university. She says she suffers from severe headaches, memory loss, and the inability to perform tasks requiring sustained attention. The La Grande Observer reports the university says any damages were caused by Martin’s own negligence. Eastern also says Martin waived her right to sue and assumed the risk of injury by agreeing to participate in a collegiate level sport.

Basketball • Atlanta to host three divisions of title games: All three divisions of NCAA men’s basketball will see their 2013 national champions crowned during Final Four weekend in Atlanta. The NCAA has announced that for the first time, the Division II and Division III titles will be awarded in the same city and over the same weekend as the culmination to the Division I tournament. The NCAA says the moves are being made in part to add to the 75th anniversary celebration of college basketball’s annual championship tournament. • CAA hoops on tenuous ground: Academic sanctions and potential defections could give the Colonial Athletic Association a drastically different look. Two CAA schools — UNC

Wilmington and Towson — are facing Academic Progress Rate sanctions that could keep them out of the men’s basketball tournament next season, and VCU, George Mason and Old Dominion are talking behind closed doors about leaving the conference. “It’s all a little surreal,” CAA Commissioner Tom Yeager said, particularly since it’s coming only a year after the CAA was at its high point. The league sent three teams to the NCAA tournament last year and Virginia Commonwealth made a stunning Final Four run. • U.S. men’s team gets extra time to set roster: The U.S. men’s basketball team has more time to solve the problems caused by its injuries. The Americans have been granted an extension from the U.S. Olympic Committee and won’t have to name their roster until July 8, pushed back from June 18. That will allow them to wait until after the NBA season has ended and after training camp has begun. USA Basketball chairman Jerry Colangelo says the Americans haven’t determined how many players will be invited to camp in Las Vegas. There are currently 18 healthy players in the roster pool. The Americans needed permission to add the final two players to it, Oklahoma City’s James Harden and Kentucky’s Anthony Davis, after the pool was depleted by injuries to Derrick Rose, Dwight Howard, Chauncey Billups and LaMarcus Aldridge. • Nuggets’ Andersen target of investigation: Denver Nuggets reserve center Chris “Birdman” Andersen has been excused indefinitely from all team-related activities after Douglas County sheriff’s deputies searched his home Thursday as part of an investigation by the department’s Internet Crimes Against Children unit. Andersen was not on the bench when the Nuggets faced the Los Angeles Lakers in Game 6 of their playoff series Thursday. The 10th-year pro hasn’t played in the postseason after averaging 5.3 points and 4.6 rebounds during the regular season.

Baseball • MLB poised to pick off 1st-and-3rd trick move: A pickoff move that’s been part of baseball strategy for years might get picked off next season. Major League Baseball is poised to eliminate the fake-to-third, throw-to-first trick that teams routinely use. The Playing Rules Committee has approved a proposal to make the move a balk, and MLB executives and umpires are in agreement. The players’ union vetoed the plan for this season to discuss it further. MLB is allowed to implement the change after a one-year wait. There’s no telling yet whether that would happen if players strongly object. Under the new wording, a pitcher could not fake to third unless he first stepped off the rubber. If he stayed on the rubber, as most all pitchers do now, it would be a balk. • Yankees GM says Clemens wanted McNamee in 1999: The general manager of the New York Yankees says Roger Clemens asked for Brian McNamee to be hired after a poor playoff performance in 1999. Brian Cashman testified Thursday in the fourth week of the trial. Clemens is charged with lying to Congress in 2008 when he denied using steroids or human growth hormone. Cashman recalled how he visited Clemens in the clubhouse after Clemens lasted only two innings against Boston in Game 3 of the American League playoffs. The Yankees hired McNamee the following season. McNamee has said he injected Clemens multiple times with steroids and HGH. He is expected to testify next week.

Cycling • Cavendish wins stage, Phinney crashes: World champion Mark Cavendish won the fifth stage of the Giro d’Italia on Thursday, while American Taylor Phinney crashed and Ramunas Navardauskas retained the overall lead. Cavendish edged Matthew Goss of Australia to finish the 123-mile leg from Modena to Fano in 4 hours, 43 minutes, 15 seconds. It is the Team Sky rider’s second victory in this year’s Giro, after his Stage 2 win. Navardauskas is five seconds ahead of Garmin-Barracuda teammate Robert Hunter. Phinney collided with Lucas Sebastian Haedo about 18 miles from the finish. Both were swiftly back on their bikes but struggled to join the front of the pack. Phinney had a swollen right ankle following a crash on Monday. — From wire reports

D3

NBA PLAYOFF ROUNDUP

Sixers top Bulls to advance The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA — Andre Iguodala hopped on the scorer’s table and played to the crowd as the catchy 76ers’ anthem blared in the arena. His teammates joined Iguodala and danced along as confetti fluttered around them. “Number one, Philadelphia. Here they come, team of the year.” Team of the first round, for sure. Eight years of going home empty in April is over. The Sixers at last had a reason to go wild. Iguodala made the goahead free throws with 2.2 seconds left and Philadelphia rallied for a 79-78 victory over the top-seeded Chicago Bulls in Game 6 on Thursday night, advancing to the second round of the Eastern Conference playoffs for the first time since 2003. The 76ers will face Boston, which beat Atlanta in six games, in the conference semifinals. “I don’t know how we won this game,” coach Doug Collins said. Collins and the Sixers hardly cared the series win comes with an asterisk. The Bulls lost reigning MVP Derrick Rose to a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee late in their Game 1 win. Center Joakim Noah missed the last three games with a sprained left ankle. “I thought we had more than enough to win with,” Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau said. “I’m disappointed in the loss but I’m not disappointed in our team.” Without their stars, the Bulls found it tough to gut one out against the Sixers. Omer Asik missed two free throws for the Bulls with 7 seconds left that would have given them a three-point lead. Iguodala grabbed the second miss, sprinted the length of the court, and was fouled by Asik on the driving layup. The Sixers put their season in the hands of one of the worst fourth-quarter freethrow shooters in the NBA. Collins was hunched over

NBA in brief

Matt Slocum / The Associated Press

Philadelphia 76ers’ Andre Iguodala, top, goes up for a dunk against Chicago Bulls’ C.J. Watson in the second half of Game 6 of a playoff series on Thursday in Philadelphia.

and his hands clasped with Iguodala at the line. He made both — and 20,362 fans went absolutely wild. Iguodala made nine of 10 free throws in the fourth quarter in this series after shooting 45 percent (23 of 51) from the line in the period this season. Iguodala changed his approach at the line this series. He started thinking what it would be like to teach his son how to shoot free throws. Dads don’t miss. “I was like, ‘Son, this is how you shoot free throws,’” Iguodala said. The Sixers are the fifth No. 8 seed to win a first-round series against a No. 1 seed. Memphis eliminated San Antonio last season, while Gold-

en State (2007), New York (1999) and Denver (1994) also pulled off the rare feat. Also on Thursday: Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Lakers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 DENVER — Ty Lawson scored 32 points, fellow spark plug Corey Brewer added 18 and Denver forced a Game 7 in its first-round playoff series with a dominating win over Los Angeles. Game 7 in the Western Conference series is Saturday night at the Staples Center. Kobe Bryant followed his 43-point outburst in Game 5 with 31 points in 3½ quarters despite a sour stomach that prevented him from attending the Lakers’ morning shootaround and forced him to take intravenous fluids all day.

• Blazers’ Aldridge has surgery on hip: The Portland Trail Blazers say forward LaMarcus Aldridge had surgery on his right hip. The arthroscopic procedure repaired a slight labral tear. Aldridge was bothered by the injury late in the season and missed the Blazers’ final eight games. The 6-foot-11 power forward announced earlier he would have the proactive procedure for the tear, which he described as minor. Aldridge had surgery to repair torn cartilage in his left hip when he was at Texas in 2005, but that injury was more severe. Aldridge averaged 21.7 points, 8.0 rebounds and 2.4 assists this season while shooting a careerhigh 51.2 percent. • Thunder’s Harden takes Sixth Man award: Oklahoma City’s James Harden is the NBA’s Sixth Man of the Year after leading all bench players in scoring this season. Harden averaged 16.8 points on career-best 49 percent shooting this season, and he recorded his first career 40-point game last month in a win at Phoenix. — From wire reports

Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Hawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 BOSTON — Kevin Garnett had 28 points, including the jumper to give Boston the lead with 31 seconds left, and 14 rebounds as the Celtics advanced to the Eastern Conference semifinals for the fifth straight year. Paul Pierce had 18 points despite playing with a sprained medial collateral ligament in his left knee. Josh Smith had 19 points and nine rebounds for Atlanta, which failed to advance in the playoffs for the first time in four years.

GOLF ROUNDUP

Poulter, Laird tied at Players Championship; Tiger struggles The Associated Press PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. — The TPC Sawgrass would seem to be the last golf course where a player can relax. That might explain why Ian Poulter and Martin Laird were atop the leaderboard Thursday in The Players Championship at 7-under 65, even if their mood was for entirely different reasons. Poulter finally moved in his new home at Lake Nona that took nearly three years to build and caused him enough grief that he said he could write a book. It took so long to unpack boxes last week that he barely had time to practice, but at least his head was clear. “All of the hassle and stress is over, and I can just go out and play golf,” Poulter said. Laird recently parted with his longtime caddie, and hired a new looper who also is a friend and closer to his age. “It was kind of nice to be out on the course and be able to chat away to someone that’s my age and is like a friend as opposed to a caddie,” he said. “That definitely helped keep me a little more relaxed on the golf course, and it feeds through all parts of your game, down to your putting.” It wasn’t like that for everyone. Four players withdrew with various injuries and high scores. Sunghoon Kang opened with a quadruple-bogey 9, followed with eagle-parbirdie and lost four shots over the last four holes. Jerry Kelly made four birdies and shot 82. Tiger Woods brought a small degree of normalcy, not necessarily a good thing for him at Sawgrass. He often has trouble breaking 70 at The Players Championship, and that trend continued with a sloppy 74. This might be costly, however, because it put him in a tie for 100th and put him in serious

danger of missing the cut for the second straight week. He has only missed eight cuts in his career. “Just one of those days,” Woods said, and there seems to be a lot of those lately. Poulter ran off four straight birdies around the turn and birdied all of the par 5s, key for this golf course. Laird was the only player without a bogey on his card. He made birdie on his final hole to catch Poulter, although his focus was more on his scorecard than the leaderboard. “I knew I hadn’t made a 5 all day, and that was kind of a little goal I had,” said Laird, who finished on the par-5 ninth. “Nothing to do with getting to 7 under. It was, ‘I don’t want to make a 5 all day.’” They were a shot ahead of Blake Adams, with Ben Crane and Kevin Na another shot behind. The 11 players at 68 included Adam Scott, Matt Kuchar, Ben Curtis and FedEx champion Bill Haas. There were 27 players who shot in the 60s, and more than half the field broke par. Woods was not among them. Not even close. “I just didn’t score,” Woods said. “It was frustrating in the sense that my good shots ended up in bad spots, and obviously, my bad shots ended up in worse spots.” The conditions were ideal for scoring for those hitting it where they were aiming, and making their share of putts. Adams ran off five straight birdies early in his round and kept the mistakes to a minimum. Na shot 30 on the back nine. Sawgrass, though, punishes even the slightest mistakes. Rory McIlroy, the world No. 1, was 2 under for his round until coming up just short of the island-green 17th and making double bogey. He wound up with a 72, while Phil

Mickelson had a 71 in his first round after being inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame. Lee Westwood had a 71, irritated only because of seven birdies on his card. Also on Thursday: Spaniard fires 64 SANTO DA SERRA, Madeira Islands — Spain’s Alvaro Velasco shot an 8-under 64 to take a two-stroke lead after the first round of the European Tour’s Madeira Islands Change your mind. Change your life.

(541) 728-0505 www.neurofloat.com

Open. Englishmen Oliver Wilson, Tommy Fleetwood and Ben Parker were tied for second along with Swedes Joakim Largergren and Magnus Carlsson and Denmark’s Morten Orum Madsen.


D4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

M AJ O R LEAGUE BASEBALL OOPS

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES American League Baltimore Tampa Bay Toronto New York Boston

W 20 20 18 17 12

L 12 12 14 14 19

Cleveland Detroit Chicago Kansas City Minnesota

W 18 16 15 11 8

L 13 15 17 19 23

Texas Oakland Seattle Los Angeles

W 21 16 15 14

L 11 16 18 18

East Division Pct GB WCGB .625 — — .625 — — .563 2 2 .548 2½ 2½ .387 7½ 7½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .581 — — .516 2 3½ .469 3½ 5 .367 6½ 8 .258 10 11½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .656 — — .500 5 4 .455 6½ 5½ .438 7 6

Thursday’s Games Baltimore 6, Texas 5, 1st game N.Y. Yankees 5, Tampa Bay 3 Cleveland 8, Boston 3 Texas 7, Baltimore 3, 2nd game Toronto 6, Minnesota 2 Detroit 10, Oakland 6

Patrick Semansky / The Associated Press

Detroit A.Jackson cf Dirks lf 1-Worth pr-2b Mi.Cabrera 3b Fielder 1b D.Young dh Avila c Raburn 2b-lf Boesch rf Kelly rf R.Santiago ss Totals

AB 5 4 0 5 5 5 5 5 4 1 5 44

R 2 2 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 10

H 2 4 0 4 0 2 2 1 1 0 1 17

BI 0 1 0 3 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 10

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .322 .383 .182 .285 .296 .236 .259 .134 .214 .242 .163

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Weeks 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .197 Pennington ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .212 a-Sogard ph-ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Reddick cf 5 1 2 0 0 3 .270 J.Gomes dh 4 1 1 0 0 2 .262 S.Smith lf 2 2 2 0 2 0 .224 Inge 3b 4 1 1 4 0 1 .179 Ka’aihue 1b 3 1 2 2 1 1 .284 K.Suzuki c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Recker c 1 0 0 0 1 0 .174 Taylor rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .188 Totals 35 6 9 6 4 12 Detroit 108 010 000 — 10 17 1 Oakland 020 000 040 — 6 9 2 a-grounded out for Pennington in the 8th. 1-ran for Dirks in the 7th. E—Mi.Cabrera (4), Ka’aihue (1), Reddick (2). LOB—Detroit 8, Oakland 6. 2B—Mi.Cabrera (5), Avila (4), Raburn (4), Boesch (3), R.Santiago (1), Ka’aihue (5). 3B—Reddick (1). HR—Dirks (3), off Colon; Ka’aihue (1), off Scherzer; Inge (4), off Balester. SB—J.Weeks (8). DP—Detroit 1. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer W, 2-3 6 1-3 5 2 2 2 9 106 5.73 Dotel 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 4.09 Coke 2-3 2 3 3 1 0 16 4.85 Balester 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 4.91 Benoit 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 18 3.29 Valverde 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.91 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Colon L, 3-3 2 1-3 9 8 7 0 0 44 3.96 Norberto 1 2-3 2 1 1 1 2 33 4.02 J.Miller 3 5 1 1 0 1 51 1.93 Blevins 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 1.80 Balfour 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 4.41 Balester pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—3:13. A—11,513 (35,067).

Blue Jays 6, Twins 2 Toronto K.Johnson 2b Y.Escobar ss Bautista rf Encarnacion dh Thames lf Lawrie 3b Rasmus cf Lind 1b Arencibia c Totals

AB 5 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 4 35

R 1 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 6

H 1 4 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 10

BI 0 0 0 2 1 2 1 0 0 6

BB 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 4

SO 2 0 1 1 2 1 0 1 1 9

Avg. .259 .265 .177 .268 .258 .282 .220 .190 .227

Minnesota Span cf Dozier ss Mauer 1b Willingham dh Doumit c Plouffe 3b Komatsu rf Mastroianni lf

AB 3 4 3 3 4 4 3 3

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

H 1 1 0 1 0 1 2 0

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 0

Avg. .298 .250 .270 .313 .239 .149 .211 .000

A.Casilla 2b 3 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Totals 30 2 7 1 3 6 Toronto 203 100 000 — 6 10 2 Minnesota 001 001 000 — 2 7 0 E—K.Johnson (6), H.Alvarez (1). LOB—Toronto 8, Minnesota 4. 2B—Rasmus (4). HR—Willingham (7), off H.Alvarez. SB—Encarnacion (5). DP—Toronto 3. Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA H.Alvarez W, 3-2 7 7 2 1 3 2 101 2.61 L.Perez 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.65 Frasor 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 3.46 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Marquis L, 2-2 4 7 6 5 3 2 86 6.26 Swarzak 3 2 0 0 0 3 34 5.13 Perkins 1 0 0 0 1 3 17 5.11 Gray 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 1.98 T—2:45. A—31,438 (39,500).

Orioles 6, Rangers 5 (First Game) Texas AB R H Kinsler 2b 5 0 1 Andrus ss 5 1 1 Hamilton lf 4 0 1 Beltre 3b 4 0 1 M.Young dh 4 1 1 N.Cruz rf 4 1 1 Torrealba c 4 1 3 B.Snyder 1b 3 0 0 a-Moreland ph 1 0 0 Gentry cf 2 0 0 b-Dav.Murphy ph 1 1 1 Totals 37 5 10

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 5

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

SO 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 7

Avg. .280 .314 .400 .316 .306 .250 .236 .364 .257 .273 .296

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Flaherty lf 4 1 1 1 0 3 .167 Hardy ss 4 1 1 1 0 0 .244 Markakis rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .246 Ad.Jones cf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .288 Wieters c 2 1 0 0 1 2 .294 Betemit 3b 3 1 1 2 0 2 .253 C.Davis dh 2 0 0 0 0 2 .283 Mar.Reynolds 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .186 Andino 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .305 Totals 29 6 5 6 1 13 Texas 000 100 013 — 5 10 1 Baltimore 300 000 30x — 6 5 0 a-flied out for B.Snyder in the 9th. b-homered for Gentry in the 9th. E—Andrus (3). LOB—Texas 6, Baltimore 1. 2B— M.Young (6), Torrealba 2 (4). HR—Dav.Murphy (3), off Ji.Johnson; Flaherty (1), off Lewis; Hardy (8), off Lewis; Markakis (5), off Lewis; Ad.Jones (9), off Lewis; Betemit (5), off Lewis. DP—Texas 1. Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lewis L, 3-2 7 5 6 6 1 12 114 3.69 M.Lowe 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 0.90 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA W.Chen W, 3-0 7 2-3 6 2 2 1 5 103 2.68 Ayala 1-3 3 2 2 0 1 15 1.13 Ji.Johnson S, 9-9 1 1 1 1 0 1 18 0.66 Ayala pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. T—2:23. A—0 (45,971).

Rangers 7, Orioles 3 (Second Game) Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Hamilton cf-lf Beltre dh M.Young 3b Dav.Murphy lf Gentry cf

AB 5 3 4 5 5 4 0

R 1 2 1 0 0 0 0

H 1 2 1 1 0 0 0

BI 0 2 2 1 1 0 0

BB 0 2 1 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 2 0 2 1 0

Avg. .277 .323 .395 .311 .295 .282 .273

N.Cruz rf Napoli c Moreland 1b Totals

4 4 4 38

1 1 0 0 2 1 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 7 9 7 3 9

.250 .247 .256

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Andino 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .291 Hardy ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .238 Markakis rf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .242 Ad.Jones cf 3 1 1 0 1 2 .289 Wieters dh 4 1 0 0 0 0 .283 Betemit lf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .244 Mar.Reynolds 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .191 Tolleson 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .333 a-Flaherty ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .194 Exposito c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .143 b-N.Johnson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .122 Totals 31 3 5 1 5 7 Texas 200 020 300 — 7 9 3 Baltimore 030 000 000 — 3 5 2 a-singled for Tolleson in the 9th. b-grounded into a double play for Exposito in the 9th. E—Hamilton (1), Kinsler (4), Andrus (4), Andino (4), Tolleson (1). LOB—Texas 7, Baltimore 7. 2B— N.Cruz (9). 3B—Napoli (1). HR—Hamilton (15), off Tom.Hunter. SB—Markakis (1). DP—Texas 1. Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP D.Holland W, 3-2 6 4 3 0 2 5 97 Ogando 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 Adams 1 0 0 0 2 0 23 Nathan 1 1 0 0 1 1 17 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP Tom.Hunter L, 2-2 6 5 4 4 1 7 91 Lindstrom 1 3 3 2 1 0 24 S.Pomeranz 1 1 0 0 0 1 8 Strop 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 T—2:44. A—19,250 (45,971).

ERA 3.86 0.54 2.13 2.84 ERA 5.14 1.29 0.00 1.50

Indians 8, Red Sox 3 Cleveland Damon lf Cunningham lf Kipnis 2b A.Cabrera ss Hafner dh C.Santana c Choo rf Brantley cf Kotchman 1b Hannahan 3b Totals

AB 5 0 5 4 4 4 3 5 2 4 36

R 0 0 2 1 1 0 2 1 0 1 8

H 1 0 2 2 0 0 1 4 0 2 12

BI 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 2 1 2 8

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 3

SO 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 5

Avg. .171 .227 .270 .343 .245 .255 .239 .256 .194 .300

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Sweeney rf-cf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .351 Pedroia 2b 5 1 1 1 0 0 .303 Ortiz dh 5 0 1 0 0 0 .352 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 5 2 2 0 0 1 .283 Middlebrooks 3b 5 0 1 0 0 2 .323 Nava lf 2 0 1 1 2 0 .500 Aviles ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .265 Byrd cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .281 a-Punto ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .138 D.McDonald rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Shoppach c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .250 b-Saltalamchia ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .236 Totals 36 3 10 3 4 6 Cleveland 034 000 001 — 8 12 0 Boston 010 010 100 — 3 10 0 a-walked for Byrd in the 8th. b-struck out for Shoppach in the 8th. LOB—Cleveland 8, Boston 11. 2B—A.Cabrera (11), Choo (6), Brantley 2 (10), Ad.Gonzalez (9), Nava (1). HR—Hannahan (3), off Beckett; Kipnis (6), off Beckett; Pedroia (5), off Sipp. SB—A.Cabrera (2). DP—Cleveland 1; Boston 1. Cleveland D.Lowe W, 5-1 Sipp

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 6 9 2 2 1 3 107 2.47 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 12 8.38

L10 6-4 6-4 6-4 5-5 2-8

Str Home Away L-1 9-7 11-5 L-1 13-3 7-9 W-2 8-7 10-7 W-1 9-7 8-7 L-3 4-11 8-8

L10 7-3 5-5 4-6 5-5 2-8

Str Home Away W-1 8-10 10-3 W-1 9-9 7-6 W-2 5-9 10-8 W-2 4-13 7-6 L-2 4-11 4-12

L10 5-5 5-5 4-6 7-3

Str Home Away W-1 8-5 13-6 L-2 7-9 9-7 W-1 7-8 8-10 W-1 9-8 5-10

Today’s Games Seattle (F.Hernandez 3-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 2-4), 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Hellickson 3-0) at Baltimore (Eveland 0-0), 4:05 p.m. Cleveland (Jimenez 3-2) at Boston (Buchholz 3-1), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 4-2) at Texas (Darvish 4-1), 5:05 p.m. Kansas City (F.Paulino 1-0) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 2-3), 5:10 p.m. Toronto (Drabek 2-3) at Minnesota (Blackburn 0-4), 5:10 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 3-2) at Oakland (Milone 4-2), 7:05 p.m.

Texas Rangers first baseman Brandon Snyder, left, and shortstop Elvis Andrus collide as they drop a pop fly by the Baltimore Orioles’ Robert Andino in the seventh inning of the first game of a doubleheader in Baltimore on Thursday. Baltimore won 6-5.

AL Boxscores Tigers 10, Athletics 6

National League Washington Atlanta New York Miami Philadelphia

W 19 19 18 16 14

L 12 13 13 15 18

St. Louis Cincinnati Houston Pittsburgh Chicago Milwaukee

W 20 16 14 14 13 13

L 11 14 17 17 18 18

Los Angeles San Francisco Arizona Colorado San Diego

W 20 15 14 13 11

L 11 16 18 17 21

Thursday’s Game Washington 4, Pittsburgh 2

East Division Pct GB WCGB .613 — — .594 ½ — .581 1 — .516 3 2 .438 5½ 4½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .645 — — .533 3½ 1½ .452 6 4 .452 6 4 .419 7 5 .419 7 5 West Division Pct GB WCGB .645 — — .484 5 3 .438 6½ 4½ .433 6½ 4½ .344 9½ 7½

L10 5-5 5-5 6-4 8-2 4-6

Str Home Away W-1 12-4 7-8 L-1 8-5 11-8 W-5 10-6 8-7 W-1 6-5 10-10 L-3 5-8 9-10

L10 6-4 7-3 6-4 5-5 6-4 4-6

Str Home Away W-4 8-4 12-7 W-1 8-6 8-8 L-1 10-8 4-9 L-1 8-7 6-10 W-1 9-10 4-8 L-1 7-8 6-10

L10 5-5 4-6 3-7 3-7 4-6

Str Home Away W-1 12-3 8-8 L-1 8-7 7-9 L-5 6-10 8-8 W-1 8-10 5-7 L-1 9-14 2-7

Today’s Games Houston (Norris 2-1) at Pittsburgh (Ja. McDonald 2-1), 4:05 p.m. San Diego (Richard 1-4) at Philadelphia (Worley 2-2), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 1-2) at Miami (Buehrle 2-4), 4:10 p.m. Washington (G.Gonzalez 3-1) at Cincinnati (Leake 0-4), 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Garza 2-1) at Milwaukee (Wolf 2-3), 5:10 p.m. Atlanta (Minor 2-2) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 2-2), 5:15 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 5-1) at Arizona (Corbin 1-1), 6:40 p.m. Colorado (Moyer 1-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 4-0), 7:10 p.m.

Roundup • Indians 8, Red Sox 3: BOSTON — Embattled starter Josh Beckett did nothing to help restore his reputation, getting booed off the field at Fenway Park in the third inning of Boston’s loss to Cleveland. Jack Hannahan hit a two-run homer and Jason Kipnis had a solo shot off Beckett, who was already in hot water with Red Sox fans for playing golf last week a day after he was scratched from his scheduled start with a sore lat muscle in his back. • Yankees 5, Rays 3: NEW YORK — CC Sabathia outpitched David Price for the first time in six career matchups between the All-Star lefties, Robinson Cano and Curtis Granderson homered and New York beat Tampa Bay. Sabathia (5-0) struck out 10, punctuating his outing by fanning B.J. Upton with two runners on base to end the seventh inning. • Blue Jays 6, Twins 2: MINNEAPOLIS — Henderson Alvarez pitched seven strong innings to win his third straight start in Toronto’s victory over Minnesota. Yunel Escobar scored three times and hit four singles for the Blue Jays.

J.Smith 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 Pestano 1 0 0 0 3 1 41 Hagadone 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP Beckett L, 2-4 2 1-3 7 7 7 2 2 56 A.Miller 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 16 R.Hill 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 Atchison 2 2 0 0 0 1 29 F.Morales 1 1 0 0 0 0 19 Aceves 1 1 1 1 1 0 19 T—3:11. A—37,348 (37,495).

2.87 1.93 0.87 ERA 5.97 0.00 1.59 1.23 4.50 6.39

Yankees 5, Rays 3 Tampa Bay Zobrist rf S.Rodriguez 3b B.Upton cf Keppinger dh Guyer lf C.Pena 1b E.Johnson ss Gimenez c a-Joyce ph Rhymes 2b Totals

AB 5 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 1 4 35

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3

H 0 2 0 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 8

BI 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 3 1 1 2 1 0 0 1 10

Avg. .208 .228 .288 .309 .000 .235 .209 .244 .286 .241

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jeter ss 4 0 0 0 1 1 .376 Swisher rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .276 Cano 2b 4 1 3 2 0 0 .286 Al.Rodriguez dh 4 1 2 0 0 1 .287 Teixeira 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .212 Granderson cf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .273 An.Jones lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .224 Wise lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .182 E.Nunez 3b 2 1 2 0 1 0 .294 J.Nix 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 C.Stewart c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .240 Totals 34 5 11 5 3 6 Tampa Bay 110 000 001 — 3 8 2 New York 020 030 00x — 5 11 2 a-grounded out for Gimenez in the 9th. E—S.Rodriguez (4), Price (1), E.Nunez 2 (4). LOB—Tampa Bay 7, New York 8. 2B—Al.Rodriguez

• Orioles 6-3, Rangers 5-7: BALTIMORE — Josh Hamilton hit his major league-leading 15th homer, Derek Holland pitched six innings of four-hit ball and Texas beat Baltimore for a doubleheader split. In the opener, the Orioles set an AL record by hitting home runs in their first three at-bats and launched five in all against Colby Lewis (3-2), who struck out a careerhigh 12. That made him the first pitcher since 1918 to give up five home runs and have at least 10 strikeouts in the same game. • Tigers 10, Athletics 6: OAKLAND, Calif. — Miguel Cabrera broke out of a slump with two RBI hits in Detroit’s eight-run third inning against Oakland. Max Scherzer (2-3) struck out nine in 6 1⁄3 innings to end a three-start winless streak. • Nationals 4, Pirates 2: Stephen Strasburg struck out a season-high 13 over six innings as Washington snapped a three-game losing streak with a win over Pittsburgh. Roger Bernadina and Adam LaRoche both homered in the sixth off Pittsburgh’s Kevin Correia (1-3) to erase a two-run deficit.

(3), An.Jones (1). HR—Granderson (11), off Price; Cano (3), off Price. SB—E.Johnson (4), E.Nunez 2 (6). DP—Tampa Bay 2; New York 1. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price L, 5-2 7 11 5 5 3 4 110 2.98 Badenhop 1 0 0 0 0 2 18 5.17 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia W, 5-0 8 7 2 0 1 10 119 3.51 R.Soriano S, 1-1 1 1 1 1 0 0 12 2.77 T—2:48. A—37,720 (50,291).

NL Boxscore Nationals 4, Pirates 2 Washington AB R Desmond ss 5 0 Bernadina lf 4 1 Zimmerman 3b 3 1 LaRoche 1b 3 1 Harper rf 4 0 Espinosa 2b 4 0 Ankiel cf 4 1 Flores c 4 0 Strasburg p 1 0 a-Lombardozzi ph 1 0 Mattheus p 0 0 Clippard p 0 0 c-Tracy ph 1 0 H.Rodriguez p 0 0 Totals 34 4

H 0 1 1 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 9

BI 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .254 .189 .229 .327 .263 .191 .275 .206 .308 .295 .000 --.256 ---

Pittsburgh Tabata rf Presley lf A.McCutchen cf P.Alvarez 3b Walker 2b G.Jones 1b Barmes ss d-McGehee ph McKenry c Correia p

H 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0

BI 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 2 1 2 2 3 2 0 1 2

Avg. .240 .241 .330 .216 .288 .264 .152 .243 .206 .200

AB 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 1 3 2

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

b-McLouth ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .205 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Resop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 2 5 2 3 15 Washington 000 003 001 — 4 9 2 Pittsburgh 000 200 000 — 2 5 0 a-grounded out for Strasburg in the 7th. b-flied out for Correia in the 7th. c-singled for Clippard in the 9th. d-grounded out for Barmes in the 9th. E—LaRoche (3), Harper (1). LOB—Washington 6, Pittsburgh 5. 2B—LaRoche (7), Strasburg (3), McKenry (2). HR—Bernadina (1), off Correia; LaRoche (6), off Correia; Ankiel (2), off Resop. DP—Washington 1 (Desmond, Espinosa, LaRoche); Pittsburgh 1 (Walker, Barmes, G.Jones). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Strasburg W, 3-0 6 5 2 1 3 13 103 1.64 Mattheus H, 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 2.40 Clippard H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.86 Rodriguez S, 7-9 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 2.63 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Correia L, 1-3 7 6 3 3 2 1 81 3.47 Watson 1 1 0 0 0 2 10 5.40 Resop 1 2 1 1 0 0 12 3.29 T—2:38. A—15,381 (38,362).

Leaders AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Hamilton, Texas, .395; Jeter, New York, .376; Ortiz, Boston, .352; Sweeney, Boston, .351; Konerko, Chicago, .345; ACabrera, Cleveland, .343; Andrus, Texas, .323. PITCHING—Weaver, Los Angeles, 5-0; Sabathia, New York, 5-0; DLowe, Cleveland, 5-1; Shields, Tampa Bay, 5-1; Price, Tampa Bay, 5-2; 11 tied at 4. STRIKEOUTS—Sabathia, New York, 53; FHernandez, Seattle, 51; Verlander, Detroit, 48; Weaver, Los Angeles, 47; Scherzer, Detroit, 45; Peavy, Chicago, 44; Darvish, Texas, 44. SAVES—CPerez, Cleveland, 11; JiJohnson, Baltimore, 9; Rodney, Tampa Bay, 9; League, Seattle, 8; Nathan, Texas, 7; Balfour, Oakland, 7; Broxton, Kansas City, 7.

HORSE RACING COMMENTARY

After a Kentucky Derby victory, the spotlight gets a lot brighter JIM LITKE

W

inning the Kentucky Derby isn’t always all it’s cracked up to

be. It might be the shortest championship celebration in all of sports. The winning trainer, jockey and horse can’t go to Disneyland, at least not right away. All three have to reunite in Baltimore two weeks later to validate the title, and if all goes well, in New York three weeks after that to validate it again. As if that schedule wasn’t daunting enough, they’re also supposed to be drumming up business for the sport when it matters most, during Triple Crown season. Doug O’Neill, who trained I’ll Have Another to one improbable win, just found out what a tough balancing act that can be. “I swear on my kids’ eyes I never milkshaked a horse,” O’Neill said Thursday at Pim-

lico Race Course, where he addressed reports about his possible suspension in California on charges he gave his horses performance-enhancing cocktails of bicarbonate of soda, sugar and electrolytes. Instead, O’Neill blamed the failed tests on “some people in charge of California racing I think didn’t like a few of us that were doing well. Anyway, it’s all being heard by the courts and I’m very confident everything will be fine.” Let’s assume so, since the he-said, they-said dispute won’t be resolved either way until after the Belmont closes out the Triple Crown season on the second Saturday in June. What matters at the moment, though, is how O’Neill responds to the spotlight — a place few people can appreciate more than Bob Baffert. Baffert has three Derby wins and five Preakness victories, but has failed in all three of his Triple Crown tries at the Belmont, most memorably in 1998, when Real Quiet was beaten by a nose. He lost the Derby again last Saturday when I’ll Have Another ran

Mark Humphrey / The Associated Press

Jockey Mario Gutierrez, left, owner J. Paul Reddam, middle, and trainer Doug O’Neill hold the trophy after I’ll Have Another won the 138th Kentucky Derby Saturday in Louisville, Ky.

down his colt, Bodemeister, in the stretch. Baffert hasn’t decided whether to renew that fight by bringing Bodemeister to Baltimore, but the news has been more encouraging every day. “After that duel, all I thought I’d have left was hair and lactic acid. But Bodemeister looked good when we got him and he’s looked better most every day since. So all credit to the winner. He’s a good horse,”

Baffert said. “And that kid, he rode an A-plus race.” That would be 25-year-old jockey Mario Gutierrez, who was riding in his first Derby barely a decade after racing quarterhorses in his native Mexico. But he’s handled the attention like a veteran, charming the racing public and press with stories about his modest beginnings, then looking very polished throwing out the first pitch Wednes-

day night at the Dodgers’ game. O’Neill’s week, on the other hand, was mostly uneventful until stories of his run-ins with racing officials on the milkshaking charges — his third in California and fourth in a career that has spanned 25 years — began making the rounds. O’Neill isn’t the first trainer in the Triple Crown chase to have to answer questions about possible performance-enhancing — both Rick Dutrow, who won the 2008 Derby and Preakness and Jeff Mullins, who trained the 2009 morning-line favorite, got asked plenty of those — and he won’t be the last. He understands scrutiny is part of the bargain. Asked whether winning the Derby was validation for his career, which began taking off in 2005 yet remained confined largely to the West Coast, O’Neill answered evenly: “I’ve never thought of it that way.” “All those guys — the Bafferts, the (Nick) Zitos and (D. Wayne) Lukas — they’ve all battled their negative press days. You win the big one and

people kind of want to go after you,” he said. “It has validated, to our team, that if we get a top 2-year-old we can turn him into a Derby winner. Hopefully it’s the first of a few.” Baffert didn’t doubt that. Then again, he knows how easy it is to get ahead of yourself in the sport, especially when you’re supposed to be leading the charge. “Doug knows what to do and he’s plenty capable,” Baffert said. “Besides, he’s already won the big one. So I’d just say relax and enjoy it, even if you really can’t. ... “And since I can’t change the Derby either, I can say this: I’m glad he’s the one dealing with it. Everybody wants a piece of you and plenty of your time. There’s so much going on around the barn, it’s easy to get sloppy,” Baffert added. “It’s like you’re running for office. You’ve got be ready,” he paused, “for just about anything.” — Jim Litke is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at jlitke@ap.org and follow him at Twitter.com/JimLitke.


FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D5

PREP ROUNDUP

OLYMPICS: EQUESTRIAN

Redmond doubles team takes third in CVC

Teen trying to qualify for U.S. team

Bulletin staff report SALEM — Having already clinched a berth in the state tournament, the Redmond High girls doubles team of Monica Johnson and Ashlee Lemos was defeated Thursday in the semifinal round but bounced back to claim third place on the final day of the Central Valley Conference district championships at Salem Tennis & Swim Club. In the semifinal match, the Redmond pair lost 6-1, 6-0 to West Salem’s Amy Lin and Kaitlyn Murray. In the contest for third place, Johnson and Lemos defeated sisters Torry and Leanne Moore of West Salem, 7-6 (4), 6-2. Johnson and Lemos on Tuesday won a quarterfinal match that secured a spot in the Class 6A state tournament next week at Tualatin Hills Tennis Center in Beaverton. On the strength of Johnson and Lemos, and a solid showing in consolation play that included a victory in the doubles finals by Hannah Ronhaar and Claire Wright, the Panthers finished second in the seven-team district field with 25 points. Sprague of Salem was first with 34 points, and West Salem was third with 24 points. In other prep events Thursday: GIRLS TENNIS Seven Cowgirls headed to state BAKER CITY — Reigning Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state champion Crook County advanced seven Cowgirls to the semifinal round of the Class 4A/3A/2A/ 1A Special District 5 tournament, which in turn earned all seven athletes a berth at next week’s state championships. Crook County’s Elsa Harris will compete in today’s singles semifinal after rolling through the quarterfinal round. The Cowgirls also moved on three doubles teams past the quarterfinals: Kayla Morgan and Catie Brown, Ali Apperson and Lisa Pham, and Annie Fraser and Leslie Teater. Morgan and Brown play their teammates Fraser and Teater for a spot in the tournament final. The tournament continues today at 10 a.m. Buffs place fifth at SD2 tourney PORTLAND — Madras’ Kaitlyn Carter and Veronica Yvette Ruiz won the girls doubles consolation championship at the Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 tournament at the Portland Tennis Center. Carter and Ruiz knocked off their teammates Maria Carranza and Sophie Gemelas 7-5, 6-3 to help the White Buffaloes finish fifth overall at the 11-team district tournament. BOYS TENNIS Cowboys’ doubles team reaches semis BAKER CITY — Crook County’s Jared Anderson and Brady Slater won their quarterfinal matchup to earn a spot in today’s semifinal round of the Class 4A/3A/ 2A/1A Special District 5 tournament. The Cowboy duo’s win also secures them a spot in next week’s state championships in Eugene. BASEBALL Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Central Linn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 The Bulldogs won by forfeit over Central Linn in 2A/1A Special District 2 play. Culver lost 4-2 to host Scio on Wednesday. The Bulldogs (10-9 overall, 6-6 Special District 2) will play at East Linn Christian Academy on Monday.

Quick Continued from D1 Except for Vancouver’s Cory Schneider, who only played three games, he leads all playoff goalies with a 1.55 goals-against average and a .949 save percentage. Although Quick’s funky, flexible, low-to-the-ice style is often thrilling to watch, his teammates cite his rigorous work ethic and determination as the reason he rose from a third-round draft pick playing in the ECHL to a starring role for a Stanley Cup contender, bypassing bigger prospects and outlasting veterans along the way. “What’s special about him is his desire, his never-giveup attitude,” Kings forward Justin Williams said. “Even in practice, when you feel like you have an empty net, he’s always striving to stop that puck. It’s just what he loves to do. I love it when you come out and score on a goalie in practice and he says something derogatory to you. It means he wants to stop everything. That’s a great attitude, and he certainly has that.” Quick is a finalist for the Vezina Trophy after finishing the regular season with 35 wins, a 1.95 goals-against

By Jillian Dunham New York Times News Service

Photos by Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Bend’s Jessica Wolfe leads a group of runners in the girls’ 1,500-meter run during the Intermountain Conference championship meet on Thursday at Bend High School. Wolfe won the event.

Track Continued from D1 Tesla Wright highlighted the Bend High girls’ efforts with a win in the pole vault. Crook County’s Marci Johnston was the runner-up in the shot put, and the Cowgirls’ Molly Viles took third in the discus. On the boys side, Summit recorded 110 points and narrowly edged out the host Lava Bears, who scored 101 points. Mountain View, Redmond and Crook County finished third, fourth and fifth, respectively. Storm sprinter Michael Wilson won the 300meter hurdles and the open 400 to energize the Summit boys. Mitch Modin turned in the performance of the day for Mountain View and arguably the entire meet, winning the boys 200 in 22.49 seconds and the long jump with a mark of 22-071⁄2. Both marks were personal bests for Modin in addition to being the second-best time and jump posted in 5A this year. Bend High’s J.C. Grim also had a stellar meet, winning the triple jump and javelin in addition to runner-up finishes in the long jump and high jump. Hunter Bourland was the standout performer for the Crook County boys, racing to second in the 100- and 200-meter sprints. Bourland also ran on the Cowboys’ 400-meter relay squad that placed second to Summit. While the IMC championships did not qualify athletes for the state meet, Central Oregon’s track coaches agreed on its significance.

average, a .929 save percentage and a franchise-record 10 shutouts. His profile will only grow next week when hockey fans get an in-depth look at his puck-stopping skills — a hybrid of aggression, anticipation and pure hustle that doesn’t conform to any particular school of goaltending. He rose gradually through the Los Angeles organization after two seasons at UMass, making stops in the ECHL and AHL. But ever since he took over the starting job midway through the 200809 season, Quick has been a welcome revelation for Kings fans. The franchise suffered through plenty of middling goaltending from a long line of netminders during Los Angeles’ eight-year absence from the playoffs between 2002 and 2010. He moved past Coyotes backup Jason LaBarbera, who was traded to clear the way for Quick, and current Kings backup Jonathan Bernier, general manager Dean Lombardi’s first-round pick in 2006 — just one year after the prior administration chose Quick. Quick doesn’t carry himself as a star or an oddball goalie, either. Other than his taste for hip-hop and hoodies away from the rink, the Kings

Mountain View’s Justin Warren releases a discus while competing in the event at the Intermountain Conference championship meet on Thursday at Bend High School. Warren placed second behind teammate Hayden Czmowski.

“If you don’t keep the IMC alive, you lose all that history,” Bend High coach Matt Craven said about the long-standing rivalries between the five Central Oregon schools who now participate in three different classifications. “We want to know who the league champions are.” Bend, Summit and Mountain View compete with Ashland and Eagle Point on May 18 and 19 at Bend High in the Class 5A Special District 1 meet. Crook County is in La Grande the same days for the Class 4A Greater Oregon League meet, and Redmond competes at the Class 6A Central Valley Conference championships in Keizer on Wednesday.

say not much distinguishes Quick from the rest of them. “He keeps a very low profile,” Los Angeles defenseman Rob Scuderi said. “I’ve played with a lot of good goalies that were like that, but he just does his job. Even if he lets in a bad goal, he doesn’t let it affect his play. I’m sure that’s a quality a lot of goalies would like to have. He just has that little extra something. He has great anticipation, and he never gives up on a play. Those two things keep him in every single play.” While many modern goalies are big men who prefer seeing over the defense and using the butterfly to cover the bottom of the net, Quick plays wider and lower, exploiting his impressive athleticism. When he’s on his game, he’s often crouched with his upper body nearly parallel to the ice, peering between the skaters’ legs for the puck. Everyone from Blues coach Ken Hitchcock to celebrated Canadian commentator Don Cherry have compared Quick in recent weeks to Terry Sawchuk, the Red Wings’ Hall of Famer who played for the Kings in their inaugural NHL season in 1967-68. Others see shades of Martin Brodeur and Tim Thomas,

two veteran scramblers who don’t stick to the popular butterfly template. “Awkward style, (but) unbelievable focus on finding the puck,” Hitchcock said. “The way Sawchuk played goal, that’s exactly how Jonathan Quick plays. He never quits on a puck. He’s like an old-school goalie.” Hitchcock went farther, comparing Quick’s relentlessness to Dominik Hasek and Ed Belfour after his 23-save performance in the Kings’ second-round clincher last Sunday. Quick mostly refrains from dissecting his own approach, simply describing it as “less style, more compete.” At 6foot-1, Quick isn’t as big as Phoenix’s 6-4 Mike Smith or Nashville’s 6-5 Pekka Rinne, but he admires Rinne and other goalies who exploit their size. Quick also praises Kings goaltending coach Bill Ranford, the Conn Smythe Trophy-winning goalie for Edmonton in 1990, for improving his technique without changing his overall approach. The results of their partnership are incontestable. “In the past, I’ve got a little too aggressive at times, starting chasing a little bit, and ended up chasing the game,”

MIDDLEBURG, Va. — At 13, an age when many children are still cantering fat ponies over low picket gates, Reed Kessler was urged to think about the London Olympics by her coach, the international show jumper Katie Monahan-Prudent. “I was thinking, ‘OK, Katie,’ ” Kessler recalled. “And here we are,” Monahan-Prudent said. After tying Margie Engle, then 53, for the victory at the Olympic selection trials in March, Kessler sits first and fifth on the Olympic long list for American show jumpers with her horses Cylana and Mika. Kessler, a 17-year-old from Armonk, N.Y., now faces a series of competitions observed by the United States team’s Olympic selection committee. She could become the youngest rider in Olympic show-jumping history (the records are incomplete). The first event, the Hagyard Lexington Classic, is Friday in Lexington, Ky. She will be riding for a spot on the team — four riders plus one traveling reserve — alongside international stars more than twice her age, like Beezie Madden, 48, who won consecutive team gold medals at the 2004 and 2008 Olympics. “If you asked somebody before the trials if she was going to do as well as she did, a majority would have said, ‘No way,’ ” said Madden, who is on the Olympic list with three horses. “But I think she proved in the trials that she’s definitely worth consideration.” At the last Olympics, three of the four American show jumpers were in their 40s. Mclain Ward, who won gold in 2004 and 2008 with Madden, was 33. The minimum age requirement in show jumping is 18; Kessler’s birthday is 18 days before the London Games begin. Since completing her first Grand Prix in Switzerland at 13, Kessler has compiled plenty of wins, including young riders’ team victories in the United States and Europe and a Grand Prix win at the glamorous Gucci Masters in Paris two years ago. Last year, she won a Fiat in Italy, which she named Piccola before her parents had her sell it back to the dealer. But the national team’s chef d’equipe, or manager, George Morris, pointed out Kessler has never ridden in senior-level competitions like the Nations Cup or the Pan American Games. “She’s always been a very talented girl, very athletic, very gutsy,” he said. “It is a wonderful thing that she’s done what she’s done, but the jury is out.” Morris said the selection committee for the Olympic team would take into account a horse and rider’s competitive history in addition to performances at events this spring. “She has a very good body of work,” he said of Kessler. “But it hasn’t been at the level Beezie or Laura Kraut or Mclain have exhibited over the years.” Ward, a two-time Olympic gold medalist who shattered his knee at a Grand Prix in January, received a bye from the trials that Kessler won and returns to competition this month. Madden also received a bye on her horse, Coral Reef Via Volo, as did Kraut and her 2008 gold medal partner, Cedric, because it was deemed in the best interest of the horses. Unlike many riders who depend on sponsors, Kessler has the advantage of significant financial backing from her parents, Teri and Murray Kessler, who also ride competitively. Murray Kessler is the chief executive of Lorillard, a tobacco company. Monahan-Prudent said that Kessler had made sacrifices some wealthy young riders were unwilling to make. “They want everything, they want to go to college, they want to travel,” she said. “You don’t get to the Olympics with that attitude. You can’t have it all.”

Quick said. “The puck is coming to you, and you can’t make the saves too difficult.” Self Referrals Welcome

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

A DV EN T U R E SP ORTS

Extreme star Pastrana hopes fans follow his leap to NASCAR

Black Rock Continued from D1 The trail is flanked by a wall of black lava rock. To truly appreciate the geologic wonder, riders can dismount and scramble up the rock, or turn onto an old dirt road that runs up and over the lava field. I made that turn, about halfway to Lava Butte, and soaked up a view that is unique to Central Oregon: a never-ending field of lava rocks with the snowcapped Cascade mountains in the background. Here and there, lonely trees grew out of the rock as if sprouting out of the African savanna. Back on the trail, I pedaled my way to Lava Butte. The gradual climb required some bursts of power from my legs but was generally easy. Once at Lava Butte, I turned around to begin the trip back to Benham Falls. The mostly downhill ride back to the falls was fast and fun, a smooth trip with a few extremely brief technical rock sections. As I made my way back toward Benham Falls, I noticed small wooden stakes with pink flags paralleling the trail, as if a new path might be in the works. Turns out, it is. The U.S. Forest Service and the Oregon Department of Transportation are planning to build a 10-foot-wide, 11-mile-long paved path that runs from Lava Butte to Benham Falls, and from the falls to Sunriver. Much of this paved road — planned to be completed by fall 2013 — will parallel the Black Rock Trail. Marv Lang, a recreation forester for the U.S. Forest Service in Bend, told me the new path will provide a way for folks in Sunriver to reach Benham Falls and the Lava Lands Visitor Center at Lava Butte via bike or foot. “It’s an area we haven’t tapped into much yet,” Lang said. “It’s really more for families. We expect to see most of the use from Sunriver to Benham Falls.” I have mixed feelings about this project. I wonder if the tourist crowd from Sunriver would take away from the solitude and scenery of the Black Rock Trail. But on the other hand, I would not be against taking my young children — too young for mountain biking — riding along a paved trail in such a spectacular location. I guess the project will provide more access to the Lava Lands to more visitors, and in the long run, maybe that’s not such a bad thing.

By Adam Himmelsbach New York Times News Service

Mark Morical / The Bulletin

The Black Rock Trail is quintessential Central Oregon, featuring smooth singletrack, ponderosa pine trees, mountain views and lava rock.

BEND Meadow Picnic Area

Cascade Lakes Hwy. 46

Lava Island Falls Big Eddy Rapids

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Deschutes River Trail 41

Dillon Falls

Benham Falls

Black Rock Trail Lava Butte

SUNRIVER

— Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com

97 Greg Cross / The Bulletin

RICHMOND, Va. — Travis Pastrana crawled through the window of his No. 99 Toyota, kissed his wife and flashed his magnetic smile. Even though he had placed 22nd in his NASCAR Nationwide Series debut last month, he was pleased that he had not wrecked his car or anyone else’s. Pastrana, an action sports star best known for back flips on motorcycles, relaxed outside his car as Richmond International Raceway quietly called it a night. Drivers retreated to their motor homes, maintenance workers filled trash bags and the stands emptied. Then Pastrana, 28, heard a small group of people screaming to him from the bleachers. “I’m going over there,” he said. He hopped a small concrete wall, crossed the track and climbed a flight of stairs to the grandstand, where about 15 of his fans had gathered, including William Evans, 7, of Beaverdam, Va. William persuaded his parents to buy tickets to this race just so he could see Pastrana. He started riding dirt bikes because of him. He watched the X Games because of him. And now here was Pastrana, impossibly, standing next to him. Pastrana pulled off one of his racing shoes and handed it to William, who tucked it under his arm. “You’re the best motocross driver ever,” William said. Now, Pastrana is also a stock car driver. He will make his second Nationwide start Friday at Darlington Raceway in South Carolina. In addition to Pastrana’s bringing an instant jolt of celebrity, NASCAR executives are hoping he will bring his charisma, his sponsors and, most important, his legions of impressionable supporters. “His younger fan base is certainly something we’re interested in; it’s a demographic we’re seeking,” said Steve Phelps, NASCAR’S chief marketing officer. He added, “Relative to our other drivers, he’s already creating a big buzz because of the fact that he’s unique, because he’s different, because he’s a trendsetter.” Drivers from other motor sports, like openwheel stars Juan Pablo Montoya, Sam Hornish Jr. and Danica Patrick, have entered NASCAR in recent years. Motocross star Ricky Carmichael entered his first NASCAR race in 2009. These drivers sparked curiosity and new interest in NASCAR, and they remain marquee names internationally. But their on-track success has been inconsistent. Pastrana is the latest outsider to carry the weight of hopes and expectations, and his connection to the sought-after 18-34-year-old demo-

graphic is undeniable. (Pastrana has more than 385,000 Twitter followers. Jimmie Johnson, the five-time Sprint Cup champion, has about 221,000). “Someone like Travis who has a huge following, it’s great for NASCAR if those fans are exposed to the sport and begin following it to see how he’s doing,” said Patrick, who is in her first full season on the Nationwide Series. “Hopefully, they become fans of NASCAR as well. That helps everybody.” On a motorcycle, Pastrana is a competitor and a showman. He has won motocross races and freestyle trick competitions, performing stunts with quirky names like Backflip Saran Wrap. He has jumped a motorbike into the Grand Canyon with a parachute and jumped out of a plane without one (he met up with a tandem jumper in the air). “Travis can get away with just about anything,” Jeff Gordon said. But when Pastrana announced he would join NASCAR, his core fan base felt abandoned. “I’ve been criticized a lot by the fans who honestly don’t understand how you can come from doing back flips and Nitro Circus to racing in a circle,” he said. Pastrana was scheduled to make his Nationwide Series debut in Indianapolis in July. But just days before that race, he crashed while attempting a 720-degree motorcycle flip in the best trick competition at the X Games. He broke his right foot and right ankle, and his start in NASCAR was delayed until this year. Although much of Pastrana’s popularity stems from his disregard for danger, he joined NASCAR partly for its comparatively safe working conditions. During his action sports career he has sustained more than 60 broken bones and had more than 30 operations. Pastrana noticed drivers like Mark Martin, who is still competing at 53. Of course, a long career generally requires success, and pre-existing fame will carry a driver only so far. “We’re going to go until either I’m good enough to win a championship or I’m bad enough that I don’t get sponsorship,” Pastrana said. “People are asking about how I can bring new fans to races, but no one’s going to follow someone that’s running around in 30th place.” This season Pastrana is scheduled for seven Nationwide Series events, and his performance will be watched closely. After years of booming growth, NASCAR was waylaid by the recession. Ticket sales slowed, television ratings dipped, sponsors recoiled and the fan base thinned. If Pastrana succeeds, it could re-energize the sport and accelerate the expected arrival of motocross stars like Brian Deegan and James Stewart.

A S  C   Please email Adventure Sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a spaceavailability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CLIMBING

PADDLING

BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CLIMBING: Competition team; ages 10-18; focuses on rope/sport climbing with opportunities to compete in USA Climbing’s Sport Climbing Series; 4-6 p.m.; Mondays through Thursdays through July 2; mike@bendenduranceacademy.org; www.BendEnduranceAcademy.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CLIMBING: Development team; ages 10-18; focuses on rope/sport climbing with trips to regional bouldering/climbing areas; 4-6 p.m.; Mondays and Wednesdays through July 2; mike@ bendenduranceacademy.org; www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org.

FREE PADDLING SEMINAR: Thursday, May 17, 6 p.m. at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe in Bend; covers proper paddling mechanics, common paddling injuries and specific exercises for paddlers to minimize such injuries; www. tumalocreek.com; 541-317-9407. MBSEF STAND-UP PADDLE BOARDING: MBSEF is offering stand-up paddle boarding for juniors age 12 and older; sessions will run in June, July, and August; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. KAYAKING CLASSES: Sundays, 4-6 p.m.; for all ages; weekly classes and open pool; equipment provided to those who preregister, first come, first served otherwise; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $3; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org

CYCLING MBSEF CYCLING PROGRAM: May through August for both road biking (age 12 and older) and mountain biking (age 8 and older); 541-3880002, mbsef@mbsef.org, www. mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLING PROGRAMS: Include options in youth development, junior teams, U23/collegiate teams, camps, races and shuttles; age 6 and older; mountain biking, road cycling and cyclocross; info@ bendenduranceacademy.org; www. bendenduranceacdemy.org.

MULTISPORT POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Saturday, May 19; Central Oregon’s signature sporting event; the relay race has six legs that include alpine skiing/ snowboarding, cross-country skiing, biking, running, canoe/kayaking and sprinting to the finish; participants compete as teams, pairs or individuals; starts at Mt. Bachelor and finishes at Bend’s Les Schwab Amphitheater; entry fees range from $42 to $90 per person; family teams are $180 to $190; Kids Mini Pole Pedal Paddle is May 20; PPP is a benefit for MBSEF; www.pppbend. com. THE URBAN GPS ECO-CHALLENGE: Trips on paths and trails along Deschutes River through Old Mill District shops and Farewell Bend Park daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; like a scavenger hunt with clues and checkpoints; $65, includes guide, GPS and instruction, water, materials; 541-389-8359, 800-9622862; www.wanderlusttours.com.

ROLLER DERBY RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY: Practice with the Renegades Sundays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Bend’s Midtown Ballroom; drop-in fee of $7; loaner gear available; contact nmonroe94@gmail.com. PRACTICE WITH THE LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS ALL-FEMALE ROLLER DERBY LEAGUE: 3 to 5 p.m. on Sundays and 8-10 p.m. on Tuesdays; at Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center; $6 per session, $40 per month; deemoralizer@ lavacityrollerdolls.com or 541-306-7364.

RUNNING REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays for a 4- to 8-mile run; contact Dan Edwards at rundanorun1985@ gmail.com or 541-419-0889. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. TEAM XTREME’S RUNNING CLUB IN REDMOND: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Xtreme Fitness Center, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 2- to 5-mile run; free; 541-923-6662.

SCUBA DIVING BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA DIVING CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing; certification

for anyone 12 and older; vacation refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners at 541-3122727 or 541-287-2727.

SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING POLE PEDAL PADDLE PREP NORDIC SKATE SKI CLASSES: MBSEF is offering Pole Pedal Paddle skate ski clinics at Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center May 12, 13, and 17; cost is $20 per session; trail pass, season pass, or spring pass required; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. BIG WAVE CHALLENGE: Saturday, May 12, at Mt. Bachelor; inspired by legendary surfer and Mt. Bachelor ambassador Gerry Lopez;

snowboard-only event will be held in the slopestyle arena under the Pine Marten chairlift; a series of huge sweeping banked corners, quarter pipes and spines will be shaped into wave-like features; riders will be judged on control, speed and power; mtbmarketing@ mtbachelor.com. SAMMY CARLSON INVITATIONAL: Saturday, May 19, noon to 2 p.m., at Mt. Bachelor; freeski event hosted by X Games gold medalist Sammy Carlson; world’s top skiers will compete on a 100-foot big air jump to a 30-foot wall-ride feature for a shot at part of the $20,000 cash purse; invite-only event for participants, but the jump will be in close view from the West Village Lodge and the Clearing Rock Bar for spectators; www.mtbachelor.com. SHRED WITH LAURENNE: Ski racing camp with Laurenne Ross, U.S. Ski Team member and Bend resident; May 19-20 or May 26-

27, at Mt. Bachelor; Olympic gold medalist and three-time overall World Cup giant slalom champion Ted Ligety will be a guest host for the first camp, May 19-20; $200 per person for one, two-day camp; www.mtbachelor.com. ALPINE, NORDIC, AND FREERIDE SUMMER CAMPS: MBSEF will hold summer alpine, nordic and freeride ski and snowboard camps at Mt. Bachelor June 15-29; 541-3880002, mbsef@mbsef.org, www. mbsef.org.

SNOWSHOEING FREE SNOWSHOE TOURS: Discover

70 Years of Hearing Excellence

Call 541-389-9690

Your Northwest provides free snowshoe tours every Saturday and Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; snowshoes provided, no reservations required; age 8 and older; donations accepted; 90minute tours leave from West Village Lodge at Mt. Bachelor; 541-383-4055; terra.kemper@ discovernw.org.


BUSINESS

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Stock listings, E2-3 Calendar, E4 News of Record, E4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

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NASDAQ

CLOSE 2,933.64 CHANGE -1.07 -.04%

IN BRIEF VA clinic gets building permit The city of Bend has issued a building permit for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to construct a new, bigger outpatient clinic on Northeast Courtney Drive, just north of the current facility on Wyatt Court. The project has an estimated value of $2.8 million. The building housed Clear One Health Plans until 2008. According to documents on file with the city, the 25,500-squarefoot facility will house 18 general examination rooms and six eyeexamination rooms, in addition to audiology facilities, a laboratory, conference rooms and offices. The current clinic occupies about 10,000 square feet. The clinic should open by the end of the year, according to The Bulletin’s archives.

Trade deficit widens in March The U.S. trade deficit widened more than forecast in March as American demand for crude oil, computers, automobiles and televisions propelled imports to a record. The gap grew 14 percent to $51.8 billion, the Commerce Department reported in Washington on Thursday. The median estimate of economists surveyed by Bloomberg News called for an increase to $50 billion. A 5.2 percent jump in imports, the biggest in more than a year, swamped the 2.9 percent gain in exports, which also reached a record. The pickup in the value of imports reflected higher fuel prices and a bounce-back in shipments from China following the weeklong Lunar New Year celebrations amid increasing consumer spending. — Staff and wire reports

Central Oregon fuel prices Price per gallon for regular unleaded gas and diesel, as posted Thursday at AAA Fuel Price Finder (www.aaaorid.com).

GASOLINE • Safeway, 80 N.E. Cedar St. Madras . . . . . . .$3.97 • Ron’s Oil, 62980 U.S. Highway 97, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . $4.05 • Chevron, 1745 N.E. Third St., Bend . . . $4.06 • Chevron, 1095 S.E. Division St., Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . $4.06 • Chevron, 2005 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . . . . . . $4.06 • Chevron, 1210 U.S. Highway 97, Madras . . . . . . . . . $4.08 • Chevron, 3405 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . $4.09 • Texaco, 2409 Butler Market Road, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . $4.09 • Chevron, 398 N.W. Third St., Prineville . . . . . . . . $4.09 • Chevron, 1501 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond . . . . . . . $4.09

DIESEL • Chevron, 1210 U.S. Highway 97, Madras . . . . . . . . . $4.25 • Ron’s Oil, 62980 U.S. Highway 97, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . $4.33 • Texaco, 2409 Butler Market Road, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . $4.39 Ashley Brothers / The Bulletin

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DOW JONES

www.bendbulletin.com/business CLOSE 12,855.04 CHANGE +19.98 +.16%

Bing to be revamped in battle for search supremacy

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S&P 500

CLOSE 1,357.99 CHANGE +3.41 +.25%

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BONDS

10-year Treasury

CLOSE 1.86 CHANGE +2.20%

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$1595.10 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$1.40

local doughnuts Central Oregon is sweet on

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SILVER

CLOSE $29.136 CHANGE -$0.061

Housing aid plan paying off for lenders

By Nick Wingfield

By E. Scott Reckard

New York Times News Service

Los Angeles Times

BELLEVUE, Wash. — When Facebook goes public in the coming weeks, there will be a lot of winners. Among them is one of the stalwarts of the tech industry, Microsoft, which has a small stake in the company. But Microsoft has an even bigger bet on Facebook through an alliance between its Bing search engine and the social network. And that partnership is about to get even deeper. On Thursday, Microsoft introduced a set of changes to Bing that it says will improve searches by tapping into the expertise of friends on Facebook and other social networks. The company hopes to mine people’s online social connections to provide more personal search results for everything from hotel searches in Hawaii to movie recommendations. For example, if you are logged into your Facebook page through Bing, and you search for “best hotels in Maui,” you will get results with pictures of friends who have shared some affinity for Maui before on Facebook, whether by listing it as their hometown in their Facebook profile, liking the island on Facebook or posting photos from a previous Maui vacation. “This is a fundamentally different way to look at search,” Qi Lu, president of Microsoft’s online services division, said in a recent interview in a high-rise building here, a few miles from its main campus, where its Internet operations are based. The new version of Bing is the biggest overhaul to the search engine since Microsoft introduced it three years ago. It is the result of a continual conversation at the company about how to make Bing a more effective competitor to that other search engine — Google — and try to stem its considerable losses. In its last fiscal year, Microsoft reported operating losses from its online services division of $2.6 billion. See Bing / E3

LOS ANGELES — A newly streamlined government plan to reward homeowners who diligently pay their underwater mortgages is proving a bonanza for banks, which by one estimate may pocket $12 billion in extra revenue by refinancing loans. The revisions to the Obama administration’s 3year-old Home Affordable Refinance Program have yielded mixed results for homeowners, analysts and mortgage professionals say. Some responsible homeowners are indeed getting lower-interest loans despite owing far more than their homes are worth. But others have loans that don’t qualify, or must jump through hoops the plan was supposed to eliminate, such as on-site appraisals and extensive paperwork. What’s more, critics say, homeowners who get new loans are being stuck with higher rates than necessary, often half a percentage point or more. That’s because banks are refinancing only their own borrowers, instead of competing against one another, which would drive rates down. “The banks should charge lower than the market interest rate because the new version of the program means less work and less risk for them. Instead, they are charging more,” said Amherst Securities analyst Laurie Goodman, who titled a recent report on the program “And the Winner Is … the Largest Banks.”

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Melissa Ward, the owner of Sisters Bakery, said she believes in the power of doughnuts. She’s been selling doughnuts in Sisters since 1995. On a summer day, Ward said, she can sell more than 600.

• The big chain stores have yet to set up shop in the region, leaving bakeries from Sunriver to Sisters to fill the doughnut hole By Rachael Rees The Bulletin

or two years, Kirk Heppler went in and out of Bend restaurants, filling their cases with his doughnuts, and, until a month ago, selling them through the side window at Parrilla Grill of Bend. But in mid-June the doughnut peddler expects to sell his goods from his own store, The Dough Nut, although he still plans to supply his wholesale customers. “You can taste the difference from doughnuts that are made from scratch as opposed to store-bought,” said Heppler. “I feel like it’s kind of a lost art.”

F

“I believe in doughnut power. They just make people happy.” — Melissa Ward, owner, Sisters Bakery

The Dough Nut, which will be located at 1227 N.W. Galveston Ave., will join the half dozen or so Central Oregon bakeries focused primarily on making doughnuts. While Dunkin’ Donuts sells more than 900 million doughnuts across the U.S.

every year, and the name Krispy Kreme makes some mouths water, Central Oregon is untouched by the big doughboys. The region has given its loyalty to local bakers. “The great thing about the Bend community is its support of small businesses, especially those businesses like doughnut shops and bakeries,” Tim Casey, the executive director of the Bend Chamber of Commerce, wrote in an email. “There’s nothing like heading out in the morning for a fishing, hunting, skiing trip and hitting one of the local doughnut shops or bakeries on the way.” See Doughnuts / E3

Thinkstock

A sense of urgency The program is a key part of President Barack Obama’s efforts to bolster the ravaged housing market. Administration officials including Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan are pressuring Congress to pass a law enabling the program to be used to help more homeowners. “There’s a real urgency here because interest rates today are at the lowest level they have ever been,” Donovan testified Tuesday before the Senate Banking Committee. See Housing / E3

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Let High Desert Bank help you build the Home of Your Dreams. Gary Tramontina / New York Times News Service

David King, right, gave up a 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe for a Volt. His son, Bently, drives a 2010 Jeep Wrangler.

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THE BULLETIN â&#x20AC;˘ FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

Consolidated stock listings N m

D

C

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0.48 0.12 1.72 0.60 1.00 0.68 1.52 0.60

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C 30.92 -.40 14.71 -.19 73.70 +.14 53.54 +.64 77.23 +.47 42.63 +.59 33.50 +.12 50.78 +.31 46.96 -.26 2.70 +.04 30.81 +.52 45.28 +.26 44.56 +.06 10.15 +.15 46.95 +.11 102.25 +.38 52.11 +.44 33.69 +1.26 82.46 -.38 34.41 +.08 11.25 -.18 1.64 +.06 13.04 -.15 23.19 -.07 58.91 +.62 32.19 +.06 41.18 +.23 17.72 +.18 48.72 +.32 27.60 -.15 4.65 65.34 +.50 2.75 -.02 52.02 -.07 26.21 -.09 21.79 +.19 14.76 -.12 65.57 +2.23 32.84 +.56 .78 +.02 3.89 -.05 .44 +.06 9.51 +.06

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0.28 0.72 0.48 0.24 1.24 0.08 0.84 0.68 0.52 2.76 0.96 2.00 0.56 0.80 1.15 0.32 0.24 0.32 0.20 0.04 0.04 0.32 0.80 0.08 0.35 2.20 0.64 0.16

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7.39 9.64 41.21 26.14 28.45 42.78 106.51 49.84 7.90 59.86 1.03 35.65 9.01 8.48 22.98 50.00 7.16 44.91 25.25 10.80 10.74 16.25 9.40 8.76 10.80 18.57 3.88 64.81 63.63 8.79 7.90 44.11 11.41 84.05 29.61 30.39 33.05 13.37 11.79 14.71 1.94 32.50 4.53 15.21 48.50 1.27 20.74 7.13 7.93 29.59 40.52 21.66 25.64 8.49 8.75 33.30 6.95 5.59 46.99 74.36 40.47 47.11 34.26 3.31 16.82 19.60 32.67 .14 49.30 8.26 64.62 50.99 .95 44.53 3.89 46.08 159.63 21.03 63.09 9.05 157.54 59.17 21.86 20.82 1.48 26.30 102.43 10.50 24.22 12.31 1.45 7.55 11.16 5.12 38.94 40.91 38.80 23.50 54.34 13.01 29.89 3.68 82.84 39.49 124.08 45.93 21.55 105.62 44.73 11.18 31.86 10.02 12.83 105.18 41.52 13.26 68.46 44.14 86.65 101.00 21.19 8.74 4.61 16.59 4.97 7.40 19.26 32.56 12.53 9.72 14.19 51.30 14.08 21.91 16.62 6.87 6.44 9.09 12.18 14.76 10.59 8.73 12.58 32.59 16.09 16.80 17.60 47.60 27.80 17.06 66.47 .85 7.98 39.53 6.65 12.41 2.99 20.03 111.52 54.60 23.27 83.38 4.17 29.34 10.71 2.06 14.84 33.99 10.77 6.26 23.94 3.46 23.18 21.85 78.70 21.17 13.76 27.66 115.00 35.31 11.10 24.79 1.14 3.50 5.54 16.72

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1.11 32.04 10.42 1.40 6.79 20.60 40.71 23.99 1.20 40.91 18.23 5.61 7.71 3.55 3.71 4.37 1.30 35.86 14.65 21.07 13.32 28.12 59.62 45.39 43.09 .23 11.82 2.37 34.27 81.29 4.03 6.76 27.00 31.07 66.54 19.09 18.11 39.25 3.02 22.37 13.51 8.71 71.55 30.04 2.19 16.29 22.67 6.60 64.68 5.67 22.49 22.64 33.24 8.44 1.54 5.16 25.61 51.25 45.50 9.93 7.20 13.47 43.37 .45 12.76 4.57 5.15 32.54 13.22 25.49 35.36 5.17 1.47 1.10 25.05 106.32 125.00 15.44 10.30 613.66 58.52 11.76 202.40 5.60 18.57 24.45 5.34 1.80 .66 6.68 1.99 20.11 23.07 26.09 7.42 15.99 37.43 12.32 9.06 53.93 9.87 21.07 1.47 26.58 49.82 23.14 41.01 22.05 17.11 26.27 32.20 41.36 31.60 23.49 44.79 27.35 36.80 53.10 9.47 32.31 7.37 32.15 26.65 50.67 42.08 4.29 9.52 41.34 13.03 20.42 19.75 5.71 35.48 29.32 26.60 5.78 4.38 56.24 54.18 20.42 6.67 21.77 26.69 21.48 21.41 13.83 30.75 3.66 4.16 54.82 19.67 46.38 .28 76.11 46.00 4.46 11.12 5.51 68.67 14.79 48.55 23.51 26.70 59.82 14.90 35.00 32.53 19.96 10.56 2.12 15.29 30.28 17.24 50.62 22.84 63.48 25.18 15.01 34.20 58.57 29.24 36.61 10.10 33.77 25.38 16.06 9.92

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FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Doughnuts Continued from E1 Melissa Ward, the owner of Sisters Bakery on East Cascade Avenue, said Central Oregon consumers value local restaurants and small batches, from craft beer to artisan doughnuts. “When you’re looking at volume, it’s just cranking it out,” she said, “as opposed to giving it your full attention by doing small batches and focusing on quality.” Ward said the Sisters Bakery has been in operation since 1981, and under her ownership since 1995. “I believe in doughnut power,” she said. “They just make people happy.” Bend lost one of its oldest doughnut shops, Sweetheart Donuts, in January 2009. But Ward said that even in a recession, people want a little treat, a little joy. In fact, Ward said her biggest sales have been over the past two years. “I consider us a comfort station,” she said. “People want to relax for a little bit, have a treat that they don’t have all the time and not spend a lot of money.” Ward doesn’t think a national doughnut chain would

work in Central Oregon. “I don’t think the community is craving it. They’re pretty well taken care of,” she said. Johnny Robles, an employee at Richard’s Donuts & Pastries on South Third Street in Bend, said the customer experience at the doughnut shop is personal. Richard’s Donuts has been operated by the current owners as a family business since 1992, he said, and the customers see the same people every day. “I’m on first-name terms with about 40 percent of the customers,” he said, adding that about 80 percent of customers are regulars. “We don’t take hellos and thank yous for granted.” A lot of the regulars like to come in and sit down to eat their doughnuts, he said, but there are also people coming in and out all day. By the end of the day, he said, the shelves look pretty bare. Dan Morris, co-owner of Delish Donuts, said his business in the Bend River Promenade will celebrate its three-year anniversary on Saturday. “Our customers come in with smiling faces, and they leave with smiling faces,” he said. “We have so many good,

loyal customers.” Morris said the difference between chain and local doughnut companies is not only customer service, but the quality of ingredients used that essentially determine the taste. “When it melts in your mouth, you know you have a good product,” he said. “If you have to chew a doughnut, you have to wonder.”

the area, distribution channels, and interest for starting a franchise. “It’s to the benefit of local companies that there isn’t a big chain here,” Lee said. Eva Hulett, co-owner of Hot Lava Baking & Coffee Company in Sunriver, said a national bakery chain may be able to offer one-stop convenience. But independent bakers appeal to those looking for doughnuts made from scratch. “Everybody loves Krispy Kreme and Dunkin’ Donuts, but we love our food and our work,” Hulett said. “We aren’t an assembly line. At Hot Lava, 90 percent of everything we make is from scratch.” For more than 30 years, Hot Lava Baking — formerly The Dough Factory — has been serving Sunriver, she said. While Hulett has only owned the business for nearly four years, she attributes its success to the repeat customers. “We do baked doughnuts,” she said. “We don’t fry our doughnuts, which is different, and a lot of people love it. “I think people love that we are a family business and they can come in and see and talk to the owner.”

Chains cool to this market Bill Smith, manager of William Smith Properties Inc. and developer of the Old Mill District, said he thinks doughnut making in the region will remain local. Krispy Kreme or Dunkin’ Donuts would also have to compete with the numerous Starbucks and other competitive coffee companies in the area, he said. With so many alternatives and a smaller population, he figures big doughnut chains wouldn’t be able to find a willing franchisee. Roger Lee, executive director of Economic Development for Central Oregon, said bringing a national chain to the region can be challenging. To start an operation, Lee said, national retailers look at several factors: the size of

— Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

Bing Continued from E1 Strengthening the ties between Bing and Facebook is also another sign of how Microsoft and Facebook are working together to provide a counterbalance to their common adversary, Google. While Google is by far the dominant player in the Internet search business, it also competes with Microsoft in productivity applications and with Facebook through its Google Plus social network. And like Microsoft, Google earlier this year began to integrate data from its social network into its search results through an initiative it calls “search, plus your world.” Google declined to comment for this article. The alliance between Facebook and Microsoft, so far, has barely caused a dent in Google. The two companies first announced a plan to work together on what they called “social search” in late 2010 and a bit later began to pepper Bing search results with a limited amount of data it began to

Stuart Isett / New York Times News Service

Qi Lu, president of Microsoft’s online services division, regularly asks his lieutenants to answer the question, “Why Bing?”

pull from Facebook. If a person searched for the movie “The Avengers,” for example, Bing would annotate the results to indicate whether the searcher’s Facebook friend had “liked” any of the Web pages found in that search previously on the social network. Microsoft executives said that approach, on its own, did not have much success, partly because it cluttered the display of search results.

“It was a good experiment, but it wasn’t working in the way we expected,” said Derrick Connell, a corporate vice president of Bing program management. Microsoft executives say they will show only data from Facebook friends’ pages that could be seen by going directly to the pages. “Bing is taking a thoughtful approach to giving people the option to call on their friends

Northwest stocks Name AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div PE ... 1.16f .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40f .88 .96 ... .28 .48 .22 .90f .12 .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

14 16 ... 39 13 ... 9 17 24 15 16 8 ... 12 8 24 8 ... 21 18 11

YTD Last Chg %Chg 34.00 25.88 7.70 20.76 73.80 5.72 46.77 47.02 83.88 7.64 21.55 23.51 9.64 27.24 7.89 23.08 5.06 9.43 22.93 13.93 30.74

+.08 +.27 -.03 +.15 -.25 +.18 -.05 +.20 +1.26 -.03 ... +.18 +.01 +.05 +.02 +.28 +.12 +.04 +.14 ... -.02

-9.4 +.5 +38.5 +4.0 +.6 +30.6 -.8 +1.0 +.7 +26.9 -14.0 -8.7 -7.3 +12.3 +2.6 -4.7 -14.8 +16.9 +6.8 +2.7 +18.4

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerhsr

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1595.00 $1595.10 $29.136

as part of the search experience,” said Ethan Beard, director of platform partnerships at Facebook. Bing will also suggest other people it deems to be “influential” on a particular search topic by scouring more public social networks like Twitter, LinkedIn and Quora. “I think Bing has very elegantly incorporated a lot of information into the search results page, which is a formidable challenge,” said Rebecca Lieb, an analyst at the Altimeter Group, who had seen the new Bing design. “What really remains to be seen is how users will accept this.” Microsoft’s effort to make Bing stand out from Google in the search business is led by Lu, a wiry, intense former Yahoo executive, who regularly asks his lieutenants to ponder an existential question for Microsoft’s search efforts. “This is one of our key challenges — answering the question, ‘Why Bing?’ ” Lu said recently, as he roamed in front of a whiteboard sketching out his vision for the evolution of search.

Continued from E1 “But as the economy continues to improve, the expectations are this window of record low interest rates may not last for a long time.” In response, Sens. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., and Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., said Tuesday that they would introduce legislation this week to extend streamlined refinancing to all underwater Fannie and Freddie borrowers and eliminate appraisal and upfront fees for homeowners using the program to obtain new loans. The Home Affordable Refinance Program is less controversial than relief plans for delinquent borrowers. Few have objected to its goal of helping homeowners who pay their loans on time but can’t refinance at today’s record low rates because their home values have plummeted. To qualify, borrowers must owe more than 80 percent of the current home value. They can’t have missed a payment for the past six months and are allowed to have been late by 30 days only once in the last year. As this year began, nearly 1 million loans had been replaced using the program, but only 1 in 10 had balances higher than 105 percent of the home value. The changes, phased in during the first quarter, aim to encourage refinances no matter how far underwater the loan is. The program is for loans owned or backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the government-supported mortgage buyers that handle 60 percent of U.S. home loans. It works by having mortgage customer-service providers, which are mainly arms of banks, refinance borrowers into new loans that are sold to Fannie or Freddie. Because Fannie and Freddie already are stuck with the losses if the existing loans go bad, the thinking goes, substituting lower-interest new mortgages actually reduces everyone’s risk. The homeowners have hundreds of dollars more each month, which makes them less likely to default — a boon to their local housing markets and a lift for the economy when they spend their extra cash. The problem, Goodman said, is that the streamlined

Market recap

Div PE 1.44 1.08f 1.78 ... .80f ... 1.68 .12 .58 .75f 1.56 .89f .68 ... .28 .78f .32 .88 ... .60

Housing

YTD Last Chg %Chg

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Prime rate

Pvs Day

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Percent

$1590.00 $1593.70 $29.197

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

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BkofAm S&P500ETF SPDR Fncl Pfizer iShEMkts

1409303 1301930 566774 527879 459704

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-.03 +.28 +.06 +.38 +.17

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Cisco SiriusXM Oracle PwShs QQQ Microsoft

1834697 902520 509714 444759 423846

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SilicGrIn DigitalGen CNinsure AMAG Ph FlowInt

6.17 8.17 6.58 13.67 2.99

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Diary 1,886 1,126 135 3,147 79 28

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Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

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Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

-32.1 -19.1 -15.5 -14.7 -11.8

Diary 269 174 42 485 10 6

program minimizes processing costs for the existing loan servicers but not for competitors, who must collect nearly as much information about borrowers as though they were writing new loans. The program also exempts existing servicers from having to reimburse Fannie and Freddie for losses on certain flawed mortgages — a multibillion-dollar problem these last few years for the big banks — while requiring competitors to bear that same risk.

Improvement Like other administration plans to bolster housing, the voluntary Home Affordable Refinance Program had underperformed until recently. Lenders rarely refinanced loans bigger than 105 percent of the home’s value even though they were permitted to go to 125 percent. But that changed as the new rules loosened restrictions and did away with the 125 percent cap. Applications for these refinances rocketed from less than 5 percent of the mortgage market in December “to close to 25 percent and rising,” Nomura Securities analyst Brian Foran wrote in a recent report. The loans are more profitable as well. In the past, Foran said, lenders typically made 2 percent of the loan amount when selling a loan to Fannie or Freddie, so a $350,000 loan might yield $7,000 in revenue. Because the banks are charging higher than market interest rates for loans made under the program, the mortgages are more valuable to investors and sell for more. The banks are typically making an extra 2 percent of the loan amount, Foran said — another $7,000 on the $350,000 loan, money that drops to the bottom line. By Foran’s calculations, writing more loans at higher profit could yield $12 billion in additional revenue for lenders. All the big banks showed unexpected jumps in their first-quarter mortgage profits, in large part because of the revised government program, said Keefe, Bruyette & Woods research director Frederick Cannon. “Interesting that (the program) would be so good for banks,” he said.

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) NovaGld g CheniereEn Rentech NwGold g GoldStr g

E3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,431 1,039 138 2,608 67 60

52-Week High Low

Name

13,338.66 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 473.97 381.99 8,563.08 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 860.37 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,855.04 5,133.81 471.79 7,852.75 2,335.43 2,933.64 1,357.99 14,258.40 791.75

+19.98 -25.52 +4.78 +32.49 +1.15 -1.07 +3.41 +37.07 +2.83

+.16 -.49 +1.02 +.42 +.05 -.04 +.25 +.26 +.36

+5.22 +2.27 +1.53 +5.03 +2.51 +12.61 +7.98 +8.10 +6.86

+1.25 -5.87 +7.34 -7.14 -1.48 +2.47 +.69 -.37 -6.58

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

s s s s s t s s s t t s s s

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

+9.3

WdsrIIAd 49.64 +0.20 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 31.20 +0.05 DivdGro 16.21 +0.07 Energy 57.54 +0.35 EqInc 23.04 +0.11 Explr 77.77 +0.11 GNMA 11.05 -0.01 GlobEq 17.24 +0.08 HYCorp 5.89 HlthCre 136.21 +0.58 InflaPro 14.47 -0.01 IntlGr 17.59 +0.05 IntlVal 27.97 +0.11 ITIGrade 10.20 -0.01 LifeCon 16.81 +0.01 LifeGro 22.50 +0.05 LifeMod 20.19 +0.03 LTIGrade 10.47 -0.04 Morg 19.50 -0.08 MuInt 14.29 PrmcpCor 14.13 +0.02 Prmcp r 65.18 SelValu r 19.69 +0.09 STAR 19.88 +0.01 STIGrade 10.77 StratEq 20.13 +0.10 TgtRetInc 11.91 +0.01 TgRe2010 23.47 +0.02 TgtRe2015 12.94 +0.01 TgRe2020 22.93 +0.04 TgtRe2025 13.03 +0.03 TgRe2030 22.30 +0.05 TgtRe2035 13.39 +0.03 TgtRe2040 21.98 +0.06 TgtRe2045 13.80 +0.04 USGro 20.22 -0.04 Wellsly 23.64 +0.02 Welltn 32.91 +0.09 Wndsr 13.89 +0.01 WndsII 27.96 +0.11 Vanguard Idx Fds: MidCpIstPl106.19 +0.20 TotIntAdm r22.97 +0.11

302.94 2,187.25 3,130.17 5,543.95 6,518.00 20,227.28 39,170.90 14,004.94 3,569.05 9,009.65 1,944.93 2,903.60 4,353.80 5,546.97

+.96 +1.26 +.37 +.25 +.66 -.51 +.12 +1.69 +.27 -.39 -.27 +.09 +.50 +.11

1.0099 1.6153 .9989 .002053 .1583 1.2951 .1288 .012515 .074324 .0332 .000877 .1441 1.0783 .0340

1.0063 1.6142 .9988 .002046 .1585 1.2945 .1288 .012550 .074323 .0329 .000877 .1454 1.0779 .0341

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.42 +0.11 +9.9 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.57 +0.04 +4.4 GrowthI 27.42 +0.01 +11.6 Ultra 25.23 +10.1 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.56 +0.04 +9.2 AMutlA p 27.20 +0.14 +5.8 BalA p 19.31 +0.05 +6.6 BondA p 12.75 -0.01 +2.6 CapIBA p 50.97 +0.20 +4.5 CapWGA p 34.25 +0.12 +7.1 CapWA p 21.03 -0.02 +3.4 EupacA p 37.61 +0.07 +7.0 FdInvA p 37.93 +0.14 +7.5 GovtA p 14.46 -0.01 +0.8 GwthA p 31.71 +0.10 +10.4 HI TrA p 11.07 +6.6 IncoA p 17.29 +0.06 +4.1 IntBdA p 13.71 -0.01 +1.3 ICAA p 29.08 +0.14 +7.8 NEcoA p 26.87 +0.05 +13.0 N PerA p 28.61 +0.03 +9.4 NwWrldA 49.79 +0.02 +8.0 SmCpA p 37.51 +0.20 +13.1 TxExA p 12.93 +4.6 WshA p 29.85 +0.14 +5.7 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.92 -0.11 +10.5 IntlVal r 26.62 +0.09 +6.1 MidCap 37.74 -0.17 +14.6 MidCapVal 20.56 +0.06 +4.4 Baron Funds: Growth 54.72 +0.13 +7.3 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.98 -0.01 +1.8 DivMu 14.90 +1.7 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 19.12 +0.11 +5.8 GlAlA r 18.90 +0.02 +4.1 BlackRock B&C:

GlAlC t 17.57 +0.02 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 19.16 +0.11 GlbAlloc r 19.00 +0.02 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 50.50 -0.24 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 68.68 +0.06 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.44 +0.07 AcornIntZ 38.20 +0.20 LgCapGr 13.26 -0.11 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 7.88 +0.01 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.71 +0.07 USCorEq1 11.65 +0.04 USCorEq2 11.45 +0.05 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.10 +0.17 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 35.49 +0.18 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.30 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.72 +0.06 EmMktV 27.95 +0.12 IntSmVa 14.63 +0.16 LargeCo 10.73 +0.03 USLgVa 20.52 +0.17 US Small 22.14 +0.10 US SmVa 25.07 +0.15 IntlSmCo 14.88 +0.12 Fixd 10.34 IntVa 15.04 +0.11 Glb5FxInc 11.14 2YGlFxd 10.13 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 71.92 +0.32 Income 13.69 -0.01 IntlStk 30.70 +0.15 Stock 109.63 +0.66 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.23

+3.8 +5.9 +4.2 +8.9 +13.5 +10.4 +11.3 +10.3 -3.7 +5.1 +8.5 +8.3 +8.0 +8.1 +2.9 +8.6 +7.7 +7.7 +8.7 +7.6 +7.9 +8.2 +7.6 +0.6 +2.2 +2.1 +0.5 +7.3 +4.0 +5.0 +8.3 NA

TRBd N p 11.22 Dreyfus: Aprec 42.69 +0.19 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.37 +0.11 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.05 +0.01 GblMacAbR 9.92 LgCapVal 18.42 +0.11 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.46 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.66 FPACres 27.83 +0.03 Fairholme 29.14 +0.09 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.47 StrValDvIS 4.88 +0.03 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 21.90 +0.05 StrInA 12.46 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 22.18 +0.05 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.72 +0.01 FF2010K 12.57 +0.01 FF2015 11.50 +0.01 FF2015K 12.76 +0.01 FF2020 13.87 +0.01 FF2020K 13.15 +0.02 FF2025 11.47 +0.01 FF2025K 13.23 +0.01 FF2030 13.64 +0.02 FF2030K 13.37 +0.02 FF2035 11.28 +0.01 FF2035K 13.23 +0.02 FF2040 7.86 +0.02 FF2040K 13.27 +0.03 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.29 +0.05 AMgr50 15.81 +0.02 AMgr20 r 13.09 Balanc 19.34 +0.04 BalancedK 19.34 +0.04

NA +5.7 NA +4.3 +2.4 NA +7.9 +0.8 +3.9 +25.9 +3.0 +1.5 +11.1 +4.7 +11.1 +5.0 +5.1 +5.2 +5.2 +5.7 +5.8 +6.4 +6.4 +6.5 +6.6 +6.9 +7.0 +7.0 +7.0 +9.4 +5.6 +3.4 +6.7 +6.8

BlueChGr 47.55 CapAp 28.26 CpInc r 9.22 Contra 75.11 ContraK 75.09 DisEq 23.01 DivIntl 27.26 DivrsIntK r 27.24 DivGth 28.41 Eq Inc 43.96 EQII 18.56 Fidel 34.32 FltRateHi r 9.86 GNMA 11.89 GovtInc 10.81 GroCo 91.90 GroInc 19.87 GrowthCoK91.86 HighInc r 9.09 IntBd 11.00 IntmMu 10.62 IntlDisc 29.37 InvGrBd 11.83 InvGB 7.83 LgCapVal 10.81 LowP r 38.94 LowPriK r 38.92 Magelln 69.54 MidCap 29.00 MuniInc 13.41 NwMkt r 16.67 OTC 58.02 100Index 9.62 Puritn 18.99 PuritanK 18.99 RealE 31.57 SAllSecEqF12.30 SCmdtyStrt 8.63 SCmdtyStrF 8.65 SrsIntGrw 10.95 SrsIntVal 8.32 SrInvGrdF 11.83 STBF 8.54 StratInc 11.15

+0.03 +0.13 +0.01 +0.16 +0.16 +0.02 +0.03 +0.04 +0.08 +0.20 +0.09 +0.13 +0.01 -0.02 -0.31 +0.06 -0.31 +0.01

+0.03 -0.01 +0.05 +0.15 +0.14 +0.06 +0.09 -0.01 +0.14 +0.03 +0.03 +0.03 +0.04 +0.05

+0.02 +0.02 -0.01 -0.01

+12.1 +14.8 +8.5 +11.3 +11.4 +7.0 +6.8 +6.9 +9.8 +7.0 +7.2 +10.2 +3.4 +1.4 +0.9 +13.6 +9.4 +13.7 +7.4 +2.1 +2.7 +6.4 +2.2 +2.5 +7.3 +9.0 +9.0 +10.6 +8.8 +4.3 +7.4 +6.1 +9.1 +7.8 +7.9 +14.5 +9.5 -3.7 -3.6 +8.3 +3.0 +2.2 +1.0 +4.7

TotalBd 11.09 -0.01 +2.7 USBI 11.86 -0.01 +1.6 Value 69.61 +0.25 +9.7 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 48.23 +0.14 +8.8 500Idx I 48.23 +0.14 +8.8 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 38.64 +0.12 +10.2 500IdxAdv 48.23 +0.14 +8.8 TotMktAd r 39.27 +0.12 +9.1 First Eagle: GlblA 46.76 +3.6 OverseasA 21.07 +0.01 +3.5 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.15 +0.01 +0.9 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.56 +4.8 FoundAl p 10.41 +0.05 +5.4 GrwthA p 48.43 -0.01 +8.5 HYTFA p 10.76 +6.4 IncomA p 2.15 +0.01 +5.1 RisDvA p 36.55 +0.18 +5.0 USGovA p 6.89 +0.8 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 12.89 +0.03 +5.9 IncmeAd 2.13 +0.01 +5.2 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.17 +0.01 +4.9 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.04 +0.08 +6.2 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 12.93 +0.03 +5.8 GrwthA p 17.07 +0.11 +4.8 WorldA p 14.50 +0.08 +5.5 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 12.95 +0.03 +5.7 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 42.53 +0.06 +9.8 GMO Trust III: Quality 23.27 -0.01 +6.2 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 18.96 +0.14 +0.3 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 10.90 +0.08 +5.7

Quality 23.28 -0.01 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.18 MidCapV 36.51 +0.06 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.65 -0.01 CapApInst 41.88 -0.16 IntlInv t 56.26 +0.05 Intl r 56.83 +0.05 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 31.68 +0.07 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 40.71 +0.03 Div&Gr 20.61 +0.09 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.66 -0.03 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.63 +0.01 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.06 -0.01 CmstkA 16.47 +0.08 EqIncA 8.83 +0.03 GrIncA p 19.94 +0.10 HYMuA 9.86 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.55 -0.07 AssetStA p 24.30 -0.08 AssetStrI r 24.52 -0.08 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.98 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.97 HighYld 7.96 +0.01 ShtDurBd 10.99 -0.01 USLCCrPls 21.59 +0.02 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T21.26 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.01 +0.02 LSGrwth 12.84 +0.03 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.54 +0.06 Longleaf Partners: Partners 28.91 +0.03

+6.2 +7.1 +8.8 +4.3 +13.5 +8.2 +8.4 +9.9 +9.4 +6.6 -6.2 +1.8 +6.3 +8.7 +6.6 +7.7 +7.1 +8.9 +9.2 +9.2 +2.1 +2.2 +6.7 +0.8 +9.4 +5.3 +6.9 +7.8 +10.4 +8.5

Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.64 +6.8 StrInc C 15.13 +0.02 +6.0 LSBondR 14.58 +6.7 StrIncA 15.05 +0.02 +6.3 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.38 +5.3 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.30 +0.05 +7.6 BdDebA p 7.93 +6.2 ShDurIncA p4.60 +2.9 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63 +2.6 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.60 +2.9 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.67 +0.02 +5.5 ValueA 24.20 +0.07 +8.5 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.31 +0.07 +8.6 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.13 +0.03 +7.5 MergerFd 15.82 +0.03 +1.5 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.63 -0.01 +4.0 TotRtBdI 10.63 +4.1 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 36.14 -0.04 +9.8 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.39 +0.12 +4.6 GlbDiscZ 28.76 +0.12 +4.7 SharesZ 21.22 +0.08 +6.4 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 48.47 +0.12 +4.4 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.33 +6.8 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.54 +0.05 +5.5 Intl I r 17.62 +0.14 +6.5 Oakmark 46.05 +0.03 +10.5 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.18 +0.01 +5.9 GlbSMdCap14.62 +0.04 +8.5 Oppenheimer A:

DvMktA p 32.20 +0.05 GlobA p 57.20 +0.13 GblStrIncA 4.21 IntBdA p 6.35 MnStFdA 35.46 +0.17 RisingDivA 16.71 +0.02 S&MdCpVl30.52 +0.13 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.11 +0.01 S&MdCpVl25.88 +0.11 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p15.05 +0.01 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.35 -0.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 31.86 +0.06 IntlBdY 6.35 IntGrowY 27.45 +0.01 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.25 -0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.62 +0.01 AllAsset 12.09 +0.02 ComodRR 6.48 DivInc 11.78 EmgMkCur10.32 +0.02 EmMkBd 11.76 HiYld 9.34 +0.01 InvGrCp 10.80 LowDu 10.47 -0.01 RealRtnI 12.20 -0.01 ShortT 9.82 +0.01 TotRt 11.25 -0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.20 -0.01 TotRtA 11.25 -0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.25 -0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.25 -0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.25 -0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 47.40

+9.8 +5.8 +5.6 +3.7 +10.3 +6.9 +3.0 +6.5 +2.7 +6.6 +9.9 +10.0 +4.0 +7.6 +4.7 +6.9 +5.8 +6.2 +4.7 +6.1 +6.4 +6.0 +2.8 +4.1 +1.8 +4.8 +3.9 +4.6 +4.4 +4.7 +4.7 +2.8

Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 40.64 +0.08 Price Funds: BlChip 44.11 -0.02 CapApp 22.11 +0.03 EmMktS 30.40 +0.07 EqInc 24.69 +0.09 EqIndex 36.68 +0.11 Growth 36.49 -0.02 HlthSci 38.44 +0.31 HiYield 6.78 +0.01 InstlCpG 18.24 -0.08 IntlBond 9.88 -0.02 Intl G&I 12.10 +0.09 IntlStk 13.19 +0.02 MidCap 57.65 -0.06 MCapVal 23.08 +0.08 N Asia 15.47 +0.02 New Era 41.80 +0.18 N Horiz 34.57 +0.10 N Inc 9.78 -0.01 OverS SF 7.75 +0.04 R2010 15.92 +0.02 R2015 12.35 +0.01 R2020 17.09 +0.03 R2025 12.50 +0.02 R2030 17.93 +0.03 R2035 12.67 +0.02 R2040 18.03 +0.04 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 34.40 +0.12 SmCapVal 37.08 +0.15 SpecIn 12.67 Value 24.29 +0.07 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.72 +0.05 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.41 +0.01 PremierI r 19.55 +0.01 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 38.51 +0.10 S&P Sel 21.29 +0.07 Scout Funds: Intl 30.07 +0.04

+5.5 +14.1 +7.2 +6.6 +7.6 +8.7 +14.6 +17.9 +7.2 +13.2 +2.3 +5.0 +7.3 +9.3 +7.9 +11.2 -0.6 +11.4 +2.2 +5.9 +6.0 +6.6 +7.4 +7.9 +8.4 +8.7 +8.8 +1.6 +10.1 +7.5 +4.4 +7.8 +8.4 +6.0 +5.6 +8.9 +8.8 +7.5

Sequoia 159.10 +0.83 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 17.56 +0.12 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 25.27 -0.08 IntValue I 25.84 -0.08 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.17 +0.02 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.99 +0.03 CAITAdm 11.64 -0.01 CpOpAdl 72.08 +0.13 EMAdmr r 34.06 +0.17 Energy 108.03 +0.66 EqInAdm n 48.31 +0.24 ExtdAdm 43.29 +0.11 500Adml 125.41 +0.35 GNMA Ad 11.05 -0.01 GrwAdm 35.19 -0.02 HlthCr 57.47 +0.24 HiYldCp 5.89 InfProAd 28.43 -0.01 ITBdAdml 11.93 -0.01 ITsryAdml 11.70 -0.01 IntGrAdm 55.97 +0.17 ITAdml 14.29 ITGrAdm 10.20 -0.01 LtdTrAd 11.19 LTGrAdml 10.47 -0.04 LT Adml 11.66 MCpAdml 97.46 +0.17 MuHYAdm 11.09 -0.01 PrmCap r 67.63 ReitAdm r 92.72 +0.07 STsyAdml 10.78 STBdAdml 10.64 ShtTrAd 15.94 STIGrAd 10.77 SmCAdm 36.20 +0.10 TtlBAdml 11.06 -0.01 TStkAdm 33.98 +0.09 WellslAdm 57.28 +0.06 WelltnAdm 56.84 +0.15 Windsor 46.87 +0.03

+3.1 +5.2 +5.4 +6.0 +6.0 +3.6 +5.8 +7.6 -2.4 +6.0 +10.0 +8.8 +1.1 +11.0 +5.9 +6.0 +2.9 +2.9 +1.2 +7.7 +3.0 +4.1 +1.0 +3.9 +4.3 +9.3 +4.9 +5.6 +13.8 +0.3 +0.9 +0.5 +2.2 +8.4 +1.7 +9.0 +3.9 +5.7 +8.8

+8.5 +5.7 +5.1 -2.4 +5.9 +8.9 +1.1 +8.4 +5.9 +5.9 +2.8 +7.6 +5.0 +4.0 +4.1 +6.6 +5.4 +3.8 +11.6 +3.0 +4.7 +5.6 +5.9 +6.1 +2.1 +9.8 +3.7 +4.6 +5.2 +5.7 +6.2 +6.6 +7.0 +7.2 +7.2 +12.0 +3.9 +5.7 +8.8 +8.5 +9.4 +5.2

TotIntlInst r91.88 +0.44 +5.2 TotIntlIP r 91.90 +0.44 +5.2 500 MidCap

125.40 +0.36 +8.7 21.47 +0.04 +9.3

SmCap

36.17 +0.11 +8.4

TotBnd

11.06 -0.01 +1.6

TotlIntl

13.73 +0.06 +5.1

TotStk 33.97 +0.09 +9.0 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst

23.00 +0.04 +6.1

DevMkInst 8.79 +0.04 +4.4 ExtIn

43.29 +0.12 +10.1

FTAllWldI r 81.66 +0.39 +5.1 GrwthIst 35.19 -0.02 +11.0 InfProInst 11.58 -0.01 +2.9 InstIdx

124.60 +0.35 +8.8

InsPl

124.61 +0.35 +8.8

InsTStPlus 30.76 +0.09 +9.1 MidCpIst 21.53 +0.04 +9.4 SCInst

36.20 +0.10 +8.4

TBIst

11.06 -0.01 +1.7

TSInst

33.99 +0.10 +9.1

ValueIst 21.81 +0.13 +7.2 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 103.59 +0.29 +8.8 MidCpIdx 30.76 +0.06 +9.4 STBdIdx 10.64

+0.9

TotBdSgl 11.06 -0.01 +1.7 TotStkSgl 32.80 +0.09 +9.0 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.37 Yacktman Funds: Fund p

+3.5

18.38 +0.07 +5.0

Focused 19.64 +0.11 +4.6


E4

THE BULLETIN â&#x20AC;˘ FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

M  

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Submit an Eventâ&#x20AC;? at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

B   C  TODAY RV GOLD RUSH: Featuring an RV show and sale, with gold panning; free; 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541419-8680. BUSINESS STARTUP WORKSHOP: Registration required; $15; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY EXCEL 2010 INTERMEDIATE: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; COCC-Crook County Open Campus, 510 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. HOME BUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 9 a.m.5 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541318-7506, ext. 109. RV GOLD RUSH: Featuring an RV show and sale, with gold panning; free; 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541419-8680.

net/bewattsmart; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 541-389-3111. QUICKBOOKS PRO INTERMEDIATE: Registration required; class continues May 23; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. WORD 2010 BEYOND THE BASICS: Registration required; class continues May 23; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. FAMILY BUSINESS RECEPTION: Co-sponsored by OSU Open Campus and OSU-Cascades for family business owners, educators, and advisers; registration required; 5:30 p.m.; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 800-859-7609. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Presentation by Ruth Williamson and Robin Laughlan on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening with Bend Parks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the Big Pictureâ&#x20AC;?; $15; 5:30 p.m.; Bostonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 61276 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 140. WRITING A WEBSITE THAT SELLS: Registration required; class continues May 24; $69; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

SUNDAY RV GOLD RUSH: Featuring an RV show and sale, with gold panning; free; 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541419-8680.

MONDAY 2012 SAGE AWARDS DINNER: Registration required; contact http://bendchamber.org; 5 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 541-389-3111. BLOGGING FOR BUSINESS AND BEYOND: Registration required; class continues May 21; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. NETWORKING SOCIAL: Crooked River Ranch-Terrebonne Chamber of Commerce; co-hosted by Sunview Motel and Resort and Mercy Dental; free; 5:30 p.m.; SunView Motel & Resort, 5010 S.W. Clubhouse Road, Crooked River Ranch; 541-9232679 or www.crrchamber.com. BE WATTSMART WORKSHOP: Understand how to save energy and money on your electric bills; registration required; contact 503813-5642 or www.pacificpower .net/bewattsmart; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. COMPUTER ESSENTIALS I: Registration required; class continues May 17; $55; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road, Madras; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. PHOTOSHOP FOR WEB AND PRINT: Registration required; class continues May 22; $89; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGING YOUR SITES: Register by May 11; class continues May 17; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORKING INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors welcome; free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789. YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORK: 5 p.m.; Seventh Mountain Resort, 18575 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-382-8711. UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING CREDIT: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541318-7506, ext. 109. BE WATTSMART WORKSHOP: Understand how to save energy and money on your electric bills; registration required; contact 503813-5642 or www.pacificpower.

FRIDAY May 18 TOWN HALL FORUM: With state treasurer Ted Wheeler; registration required; $30 for members and $45 for nonmembers; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. SHAREPOINT FOR COLLABORATION: Register by May 11; $285; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. MANAGE YOUR EMAIL WITH OUTLOOK: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. NONPROFIT GRANT WRITING: Registration required; class continues May 25; $59; 9 a.m.noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. FAMILY BUSINESS STUDENT CONFERENCE: For students from family businesses; registration required; $20 includes lunch; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 800-859-7609. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY May 19 EXCEL 2010 BEGINNING: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; contact 541447-6384 or www.happyhour training.com; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET MEETING: All current members and interested parties are encouraged to attend; free; 1 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015.

MONDAY May 21 FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpactâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Housing Center tools and services which can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109, karenb@neighborimpact.org or www.homeownershipcenter.org. BLOGGING FOR BUSINESS AND BEYOND: Registration required; class continues May 21; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community

College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY May 22 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. THE NAME GAME: Overview on developing business and product names; registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. THE GREAT BALANCING ACT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; FINANCE, FOOD & FAMILY PART 2: Reservations required; $25 for Chamber members and $45 for non-members; 11 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. COMPUTER ESSENTIALS II: Registration required; class continues May 24; $55; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road, Madras; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. GOOGLE ADVANCED: Registration required; $39; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. HOW TO DEVELOP A BUSINESS PLAN: Registration required; class continues May 29; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. BANKING FOR GENERATIONS OF SUCCESS: Business for Breakfast for family business owners and educators; registration required; $25; 7:30 p.m.; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 800-859-7609.

WEDNESDAY May 23 BUSINESS NETWORKING INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors welcome; free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789. EXCEL 2010 BEGINNING: Registration required; class continues May 30; $59; 9 a.m.noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY May 24 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. MANAGERS BREAKFAST â&#x20AC;&#x201D; COLLECTIONS: Homeowner Association Managersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; May Breakfast; registration required; $10 for CAI-CORC members and $15 for non-members; 7:30 a.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436 or http:// www.caioregon.org. ADVICE AT SCHWAB: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com. SBA LOAN BRIEFINS SEMINAR: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. BUILDING PHONE APPS WITH BUZZTOUCH: Registration required; class continues June 7; $79; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. QUICKBOOKS PRO BEGINNING: Register by May 18; class continues May 31; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SBA LOAN BRIEFINS SEMINAR: Registration required; free; 6-7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY May 25 EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Ponderosa Coffee House, 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SUVs Continued from E1 Frank and his fiancee each drive more fuel-efficient cars for work, but neither of those vehicles can fit their two large dogs, carry their mountain bikes and pull a boat for weekend trips. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basically our extra vehicle just to use for our fun stuff,â&#x20AC;? said Frank, 28, an information technology manager at a bank in Chesterfield, Va. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just got it because it fits our needs and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very versatile.â&#x20AC;? In 2008, when gas prices first reached $4 a gallon, Americans could not trade in their hulking trucks and SUVs fast enough, and the castoffs piled up at dealerships as their value seemingly plunged by the hour. A year later, hundreds of thousands of additional gas guzzlers were sent to scrap yards through the governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cash-for-clunkers program. But today, in spite of high gas prices and low fuel economy ratings, big SUVs are no longer the pariahs of the used-car lot. Dealers and analysts say demand for the vehicles is steady and inventories are low, causing their values to stabilize or even increase. Retail prices for 5-yearold full-size SUVs are 23 percent higher than a year ago, according to Edmunds. com, an automotive information website. That is more than double the average price increase of 11 percent for all 5-year-old vehicles. Prices for 3-yearold SUVs are up 6 percent, triple the 2 percent average increase for all vehicles that age. In recent months, large SUVs and crossover vehicles have also accounted for a larger percentage of the used-vehicle market, according to Kelley Blue Book, another research firm. They made up 4.5 percent of sales this year and 4.2 percent of sales in 2011, up from 3.8 percent in 2008. Alec Gutierrez, Kelleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s senior market analyst of automotive insights, said consumers were reacting to gas prices more rationally than in 2008, when some hurriedly bought vehicles that turned out to be too small for their lifestyles. Although SUVs no longer sell

just for their image, people still want them if they have three or more children, need greater cargo capacity or want to tow a trailer, and more of those buyers are coming back into the market after putting off a purchase during the recession. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people with larger families or whatever have just swallowed that gas prices are what they are and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not much you can do about them,â&#x20AC;? said George Fussell Jr., director at AOW Select, which operates two large used-car dealerships near Fort Lauderdale, Fla. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not buying them for looks. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re buying them because they need them.â&#x20AC;? Even though automakers have made big vehicles more fuel-efficient in recent years, the lower upfront cost of a used SUV appeals to some buyers who need something large. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to pay a little bit of a penalty in fuel economy, but ultimately the savings are going to make up for that fuel-economy hit,â&#x20AC;? Gutierrez said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Still, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going out to buy a used Tahoe or Expedition because you want to drive it every day to work 30 or 40 miles away.â&#x20AC;? The drop in new-vehicle sales during the recession means there are fewer 2- and 3-year-old vehicles on the market, pushing up used-car values across all segments. King, the Alabama man who traded in his Tahoe for a Volt, said he was pleasantly surprised by how much he received for the trade-in. Although buying the Volt was more expensive than paying for gas, he said he preferred to put his money toward a new, more efficient car. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was spending between $400 and $500 on gas every month for my Tahoe, and I thought, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got to be a better way,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;? said King, coowner of an accounting firm. But even though an SUV no longer fit his needs, he decided to buy a 2-year-old Jeep Wrangler for his teenage son at the same time. Gas mileage was not as big an issue in that case because his son will not drive the car as far, King said. Besides, he added, â&#x20AC;&#x153;heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be responsible for the gas, so heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be getting some important life lessons.â&#x20AC;?

D Backcountry Recumbent Cycles has moved to a new store at 550 S.W. Industrial Way in Bend. The store specializes in recumbent cycles for touring. For information contact 541-323-3460 or visit www.backcountry recumbentcycles.com.

Companies team up on space hotels By W.J. Hennigan Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; How about a few nights in a space hotel? That one day may be possible under a new agreement between Hawthornebased rocket venture Space Exploration Technologies Corp., better known as SpaceX, and Bigelow Aerospace of Las Vegas. The two companies announced Thursday they plan to offer rides to orbiting Bigelow habitats, using SpaceXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Falcon rocket and Dragon spacecraft, which is designed to carry up to seven people. Bigelow, founded by Budget Suites of America owner Robert Bigelow, is building mini space stations that expand in orbit so paying customers have access to space. They have launched two prototypes, and have future plans to launch a larger version. SpaceXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dragon capsule and Falcon 9 rocket are being readied in Cape Canaveral, Fla., for a May 19 test run to the International Space Station.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012 F1

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Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold/Silver.I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist Elizabeth,541-633-7006 205

Items for Free Horse Manure, large loads, perfect for gardening, will load, FREE. 541-390-6570. 208

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Adorable male AKC Golden Retrievers ready now, dew claws removed, 2 shots given + 2 wormings. $650 ea. 541-8492388 for more details. AKC German Shepherd Puppies Emily 541-647-8803

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Felix needs a caring Moving sale – lots of home! Adorable Higreat stuff: Hot malayan, loves people Springs Prodigy hot & OK with other cats. tub, new cover with Inside only. Found lift, excellent condiabandoned. Altered, tion $3500; Toro has shots, ID chip. Power Clear 180 $75 rehoming fee. snow blower like new 647-2181, 389-8420. $300; 3-piece lighted bookcase great conFREE-Young mom calico dition $250; enterw/4-week-old female tainment center with kitten. Mom is litter-box DVD storage good trained and very loving. condition $150 541-480-7793 541.317.8808 GSP Pups 2 male 1 feNEED TO CANCEL male Black/white, YOUR AD? $750. 503-566-8105 The Bulletin Classifieds has an Havanese, 2.5 yr. old "After Hours" Line male, not fix, moving Call 541-383-2371 must sell, loving com24 hrs. to cancel panion, great w/kids & your ad! other pets, $300, 541-610-2286 or Picnic Table, Redwood, 541-788-0771. 7’x3’,4 chairs+2 seater, $100, 541-388-8966

Dachshund AKC mini pup lovely red LH female, 11 wks, $425. 541-508-4558 Don’t miss the GUN DOG EXPO June 22-23-24, Portland, OR. See: www.GunDogExpo.com DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines, $12 or 2 weeks, $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

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Recliner With Otto- Guns collection for sale: man, large StressCall for details, less (Ekornes),beige, 541-504-1619. good cond., $500, H & H FIREARMS 541-383-3786. HAVANESE puppy Buy, Sell, Trade, AKC, Dewclaws, UTD Rustic sofa & chair 2x6 Consign. Across From shots/wormer, nonpine frame, real sturdy Pilot Butte Drive-In shed, hypoallergenic, $50 503-551-0724, 541-382-9352 $850 541-460-1277. 541-447-6386 Kahr PM45,compact .45 auto, extra magazine, HUSKY 2½-yr-old The Bulletin like new, $850, r ecommends extra black/white/grey 541-419-7001 caution when purmale. Papered/neuchasing products or Rem. auto 12 ga 2 bbls, tered. Fun/energetic. $350. JC Higgins mdl services from out of Current on all shots. 583-18 16 ga, $150. the area. Sending $350 obo 541-617-5997. cash, checks, or 510-326-0626 credit information Smith & Wesson .44 may be subjected to Labradoodles - Mini & Mag, leather holster, FRAUD. For more med size, several colors 629 Classic, $650, information about an 541-504-2662 541-410-0557. advertiser, you may www.alpen-ridge.com call the Oregon S&W 37 Airweight 38 Spl revolver and ankle State Attorney holster; great shape; General’s Office $250. 541-593-1682 Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392. MALTESE PUPS, AKC, toy, champion blood lines, All shots, potty training started, well 212 UTAH Concealed Firesocialized, 1-male arms Permit class w/ Antiques & avail. now. 1 female & LIVE FIRE! $99. Sis1 male avail June Collectibles ters. 5/12. 21st. 541-233-3534 www.maiasminisupremes.com 817-789-5395 or Antiques wanted: tools, http://www.reacttrainfurn., fishing, marbles, ingsystems.com USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! old sports gear, cosWanted: Collector tume jewelry, rock Door-to-door selling with seeks high quality posters. 541-389-1578 fast results! It’s the easiest fishing items. Half Chest,oak, 2 drawer, Call 541-678-5753, or way in the world to sell. orig. shipping tag, 503-351-2746 $300, 541-447-7688 The Bulletin Classiied

Bandit, gorgeous, so541-385-5809 cial Snowshoe, found abandoned. Good w/ Maremma Guard Dog people & other cats. pups, purebred, great Inside only. Altered, dogs, $300 each, has shots, ID chip. 541-546-6171. $75 rehoming fee. 647-2181, 389-8420. Papillon beautiful puppies exceptionally wellBoxer, AKC, pups, born cared for. Registered, 3/4, $700, awesome vet checked. $350pups! 541.306.1504 $450. 541-367-7766. Chihuahua Pups, 1 white female, 1 male, Poodles, Apricot, 1st shots, dewormed, $250, 541-536-1955. $300, 541-977-0035 Find exactly what Pug, AKC, black female, 7 weeks old, you are looking for in the $500, 541-598-5375 CLASSIFIEDS Queensland Heelers CHIHUAHUA PUPS 9 standard & mini,$150 & weeks old Champion up. 541-280-1537 http:// Bloodlines, 1 Blue rightwayranch.wordpress.com Female, 1 Black Fekittens/cats. male, 1 Black & White Rescued 65480 78th St., Bend, Male $950 - $1500 Sat/Sun 1-5; other (ph) 541-350-4810 days by appt. 541647-2181. Altered, Chihuahua Pups, teashots, ID chip, more. cup,1st shots, wormed, $250,541-977-4686 Info: 541-389-8420. Map, photos, more at www.craftcats.org

Chi/Pugs (50-50) 1 boy @$250; 1 girl @$300; 2 little girls @$350. Best of both breeds in one cute pup! No tire kickers/no dog kickers! 541-389-2517

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

Old Out of State License Plates (about 50),$1.50 ea., 541-588-6170

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Sporting Goods - Misc.

The Bulletin reserves X-long goose down the right to publish all mummy sleeping bag. ads from The Bulletin Used 1x. $150 newspaper onto The 541-593-1682 Bulletin Internet web255 site. Computers

Printer HP Officejet 7310, copy, print, fax, $50, 541-550-8257. Crafts & Hobbies THE BULLETIN reCrafters Wanted quires computer adOpen Jury vertisers with multiple Sat., May 19, 9:30 a.m. ad schedules or those Highland Baptist selling multiple sysChurch, Redmond. tems/ software, to disTina 541-447-1640 or close the name of the www.snowflakeboutique.org business or the term "dealer" in their ads. 242 Private party advertisExercise Equipment ers are defined as those who sell one Bowflex, newer, w/free computer. weights, exc. cond., 260 $195, 541-788-7372 Misc. Items Rowing Machine, exc. cond., $50, Buying Diamonds 541-788-7372. Rodent control special/Gold for Cash ists seek work in your Saxon’s Fine Jewelers 245 barn, shop or home in 541-389-6655 Golf Equipment exchange for safe BUYING shelter, food. We'll Taylor Made 2.0 Super- Lionel/American Flyer deliver! 389-8420 fast White Driver, 10.5 trains, accessories. reg. flex, $100; New 541-408-2191. Small dogs, 2 spayed Taylor made Rocket BUYING & SELLING females, 1 yr old,, $50 balls, 3 wood, stiff All gold jewelry, silver ea., 541-504-4527 shaft, $125, Taylor and gold coins, bars, Spring is here and so Made Ghost Putter, rounds, wedding sets, are baby kittens, Cen$60, 541-420-6613. class rings, sterling siltral Ore is in desperver, coin collect, vinate need of Foster 246 tage watches, dental parents, very knowlGuns, Hunting gold. Bill Fleming, edgable people who 541-382-9419. & Fishing can help you with this process. 541-306Captians Bed,solid wood 8462. 541-815-3966 1911 Llama 9mm, $550. w/headboard, 3 drawjbonomo74@gmail.com Bushmaster .223 AR-15, ers, $200, 548-9358. kodakool1@gmail.com, $1050. 541-647-8931 Child’s Concrete Garden WANTED tall Jack Bench, 10”x20”x9” tall, Call a Pro Russell, female, 5-6 (4) $20/ea 541-306-8631. yrs. old, or DachsWhether you need a Garden Bench, Concrete, hund female, black & fence ixed, hedges 15”x30”x16” tall 2 detan, 541-633-7243. signs, $50ea, 306-8631 trimmed or a house 210 built, you’ll ind GENERATE SOME Furniture & Appliances EXCITEMENT professional help in IN YOUR The Bulletin’s “Call a NEIGBORHOOD. A1 Washers&Dryers Service Professional” Plan a garage sale and $150 ea. Full wardon't forget to adverDirectory ranty. Free Del. Also tise in classified! wanted, used W/D’s 541-385-5809 541-385-5809. 541-280-7355 Computer - oak desk with shelf top, nice! $75. 541-706-1051

240

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

GET FREE OF CREDIT CARD DEBT NOW! Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 866-775-9621. (PNDC)

Fridge, 2007 Kenmore, Call The Bulletin At 18.5 cu.ft., top freezer, 541-385-5809 icemaker, works Place Your Ad Or E-Mail great. Biscuit color, At: www.bendbulletin.com MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW! FastStart enone owner, $150 gine. Ships FREE. OBO. 541-548-1447 Compound Bow, w/acOne-Year ces.,55-65lbs,31” draw Money-Back GuarGENERATE SOME ex$150, 541-408-4528 antee when you buy citement in your DIRECT. Call for the Don’t miss the neighborhood! Plan a DVD and FREE Good GUN DOG EXPO garage sale and don't F1b Labradoodles $800 Soil book! June 22-23-24, forget to advertise in Born 3-26-12. Call 877-357-5647. Portland, OR. See: classified! 541-977-2942 (PNDC) www.GunDogExpo.com 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Stepping Stones, Want to buy Alfalfa 16x16x2, $100 at $2/ea standing, in Central Nurse Practitioners OBO, 541-306-8631. Ore. 541-419-2713 For newspaper DO YOU NEED Part Time (24 hours delivery, call the A GREAT per week) position The Bulletin Offers Circulation Dept. at EMPLOYEE available at our Free Private Party Ads 541-385-5800 RIGHT NOW? On-Site Chronic Dis• 3 lines - 3 days Employment To place an ad, call Call The Bulletin ease Management • Private Party Only 541-385-5809 before 11 a.m. and Clinic Located in • Total of items adveror email get an ad in to pubBend, OR. tised must equal $200 classified@bendbulletin.com • Must by proficient in lish the next day! or Less Phlebotomy • Limit 1 ad per month 541-385-5809. • Must be licensed as a • 3-ad limit for same VIEW the Nurse Practitioner and item advertised within Classifieds at: in the state of Oregon. www.bendbulletin.com SUPER TOP SOIL 3 months 421 www.hersheysoilandbark.com • Must have Two - Five Call 541-385-5809 Screened, soil & comSchools & Training years of professional Fax 541-385-5802 TURN THE PAGE post mixed, no clinical experience. Wanted- paying cash rocks/clods. High hu- AIRLINES ARE HIRFor More Ads Contact Genni Fairchild for Hi-fi audio & stumus level, exc. for ING - Train for hands at 704-529-6161 for The Bulletin dio equip. McIntosh, flower beds, lawns, on Aviation Maintemore info. Please fax JBL, Marantz, Dygardens, straight nance Career. FAA to 704-323-7931 or naco, Heathkit, Sanscreened top soil. Housekeeping; approved program. email to genni.fairsui, Carver, NAD, etc. Bark. Clean fill. Deroom prep and Financial aid if qualichild@healthstatinc.c Call 541-261-1808 liver/you haul. quality control. fied - Housing availom 541-548-3949. Hotel resort exp. able. Call Aviation In261 preferred. Part stitute of Remember.... 270 Medical Equipment time/Weekend. Maintenance. Add your web adLost & Found Please apply at 1-877-804-5293. dress to your ad and ATTENTION DIABETWorldmark Eagle (PNDC) readers on The ICS with Medicare. FOUND computer Crest, 1522 Cline Bulletin' s web site Get a FREE talking charger. Falls Rd., Need to get an will be able to click meter and diabetic 541-771-2500. Redmond through automatically ad in ASAP? testing supplies at NO (3rd floor of Hotel) to your site. COST, plus FREE Found Hearing Aid, 4/6, You can place it Les Schwab Amphihome delivery! Best online at: Good classii ed ads tell theater, 541-617-1579 of all, this meter elimithe essential facts in an www.bendbulletin.com Retail Sales nates painful finger FOUND male Blue interesting Manner. Write pricking! Call Design Oriented Heeler, off Burgess from the readers view not 888-739-7199. 541-385-5809 in La Pine. (PNDC) the seller’s. Convert the 541-647-4649. Furniture Outlet, facts into beneits. Show ATTEND COLLEGE 263 part-time, expeFound male, not neuthe reader how the item will ONLINE from Home. tered orange striped Tools rience is helpful. *Medical, *Business, help them in some way. cat, friendly, about 1 Serious appli*Criminal Justice, year. on Smith Rock 2 scaffold boards, 16’ *Hospitality. Job cants with proand 24’, $200 & $300. Way 541-548-4674. placement assistance. fessional ap541-617-5997 Computer available. Found on 5/10 in pearance apply Financial Aid if quali265 morning, large item in in person at: fied. SCHEV certified. middle of Butler Mkt Building Materials Call 866-688-7078 Rd. and Hamehook Maintenance Tech www.CenturaOnline.c 1735 NE Hwy 20, Rd. Call to identify. 32’x44’ Doug fir custom Part-time position, om (PNDC) 541-410-8866 or Bend. made log shell, $39,500 variable schedule, 541-389-6220. obo. Vacation prop avail TRUCK SCHOOL drug free environat Lake Billy Chinook. www.IITR.net Found Pigeon, Fryrear ment. WorldMark 541-595-0246 Redmond Campus Rd., Fri. 5/4, call to ID, Eagle Crest. Call The Bulletin Student Loans/Job 36” full view storm doors 541-617-1716. Dennis for Appt. Recommends extra Waiting Toll Free (2), bronze, $100 obo. 541-923-3564. caution when purFound wedge, Greens 541-389-9268 1-888-438-2235 chasing products or at Redmond golf services from out of Medical Assistant course, call to I.D. 454 the area. Sending Experience required. Get your 541-388-1533 Looking for Employment cash, checks, or We are looking for a business credit information energetic dependable REMEMBER: If you Current COCC 4.0 GPA may be subjected to and outgoing person have lost an animal, graduate in Bus. AdFRAUD. to join our team. We don't forget to check GROW ministration/Accountoffer a superior salary, For more informaThe Humane Society ing, looking for entrytion about an adverexcellent benefit in Bend 541-382-3537 level bookkeeping or with an ad in tiser, you may call package and a four Redmond, management position. the Oregon State day work week. Typ541-923-0882 The Bulletin’s 541-610-7040. Attorney General’s ing and computer Prineville, “Call A Service Office Consumer skills beneficial. Der541-447-7178; 470 Professional” Protection hotline at matology experience OR Craft Cats, Domestic & 1-877-877-9392. a plus. Outstanding 541-389-8420. Directory In-Home Positions patient care, team player and attention to Closing Sale Full-time live in cardetail a must. PosiFarm Discounts, Lumber, egiver wanted for Eldtion involves a variMarket Hardware, Fixtures erly man, room & ety of job duties in a Where can you ind a & Trucks,Backstrom board + salary. fast paced work envihelping hand? Builders CenterMon541-554-2149. ronment. Fax your From contractors to Fri 7-5, Sat. 8-2. 224 resume with a cover Yard work help wanted, NE Thurstone, Bend letter to 541-323-2174 yard care, it’s all here Mowing weed-eating, 541-382-6861 or email in The Bulletin’s pulling weeds, $9/hr, jodi@centraloregon541-389-0034. “Call A Service dermatology.com. 308 Glass Blocks, 8”x8”x4”, No phone calls Professional” Directory used, some w/paint or 476 Farm Equipment chips, 60 at $3/ea., please. Employment & Machinery 541-306-8631 Opportunities Developmental Disabilities Program Manager MADRAS Habitat Community Counseling Solutions has a full John Deere Model RESTORE time salaried position open for a Develop40 1955, nearly Building Supply Resale CAUTION READERS: mental Disabilities Program Manager based in 100% Orig, runs Quality at our John Day, OR office. Qualified Applicant good, exc. tin, 3 LOW PRICES Ads published in "Emwill have a Bachelors degree in a behavioral, point hitch, hydrau84 SW K St. ployment Opportunisocial, health science, public administration, or lics, light, $2000, 541-475-9722 ties" include emhuman service administration and a minimum 541-504-2891 or Open to the public. ployee and of fours years experience, with at least two of 541-977-3120 independent posiPrineville Habitat those years of experience in developmental tions. Ads for posiReStore disability services that provided recent experi325 tions that require a fee Building Supply Resale ence in program management, fiscal manor upfront investment 1427 NW Murphy Ct. Hay, Grain & Feed agement and staff supervision, or six years of must be stated. With 541-447-6934 experience in supervision or six years of expeany independent job Open to the public. 1st quality grass hay for rience staff technical or professional level work opportunity, please horses. Barn stored, no related to developmental disability services. 266 investigate thorrain, 2nd cutting, $220/ The DD program manager provides supervioughly. Heating & Stoves ton. Patterson Ranch, sion and oversight of the developmental disSisters, 541-549-3831 abilities programs in three counties (Lake, Use extra caution when NOTICE TO Harney and Grant) and works under the direcWant to buy Alfalfa applying for jobs onADVERTISER tion of the site manager. Must have excellent standing, in Central line and never proSince September 29, communication skills. Wages are $34,920Ore. 541-419-2713 vide personal infor1991, advertising for 52,380, DOEE. Excellent benefits. For an apmation to any source used woodstoves has Wheat Straw: Certified & plication, please contact Thad Labhart at you may not have rebeen limited to mod- Bedding Straw & Garden 541-575-1466 or email at tlabhart@gobhi.net. searched and deemed els which have been Straw;Compost.546-6171 You can also download an application at to be reputable. Use certified by the Orwww.communitycounselingsolutions.org . Poextreme caution when egon Department of sition open until filled. Looking for your responding to ANY Environmental Qualnext employee? online employment ity (DEQ) and the fedPlace a Bulletin ad from out-of-state. eral Environmental Advertising Account Executive help wanted ad Protection Agency today and We suggest you call (EPA) as having met reach over the State of Oregon smoke emission stanConsumer Hotline at 60,000 readers dards. A certified 1-503-378-4320 each week. woodstove may be identified by its certifiYour classified ad For Equal Opportunity cation label, which is will also Laws: Oregon Bu- The Bulletin is looking for a professional permanently attached appear on and driven sales and marketing person to reau of Labor & Into the stove. The Bulbendbulletin.com help our customers grow their businesses dustry, Civil Rights letin will not knowwhich currently Division, ingly accept advertiswith an expanding list of broad-reach receives over 971-673-0764 ing for the sale of and targeted products. This full time 1.5 million page uncertified position requires a background in views every If you have any queswoodstoves. month at no consultative sales, territory management tions, concerns or extra cost. 267 and aggressive prospecting skills. Two comments, contact: Bulletin Kevin O’Connell years of media sales experience is preferFuel & Wood Classifieds Classified Department able, but we will train the right candidate. Get Results! Manager The Bulletin Call 541-385-5809 WHEN BUYING The position offers a competitive 541-383-0398 or place your ad FIREWOOD...

400

ING

300

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

on-line at bendbulletin.com 345

Livestock & Equipment Simco 17” roping saddle, $375. 541-447-4576 358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

Banking Branch Manager

John Day, Oregon Advanced knowledge & experience in finance & operations. See Old West Federal Credit Unions website for job description & online application. www.oldwestfcu.org

EOE

compensation package including benefits, and rewards an aggressive, customer focused salesperson with unlimited earning potential.

Please send your resume, cover letter and salary history to: Sean L. Tate Advertising Manager state@bendbulletin.com You may also drop off your resume in person or mail it to: 1777 SW Chandler, Bend, OR 97701. No phone inquiries please. EOE / Drug Free Workplace


F2 FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

Rentals

600

Edited by Will Shortz

630

Rooms for Rent Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro & fridge. Utils & linens. New owners.$145-$165/wk 541-382-1885 634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625. 541-330-0719

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

476

Employment Opportunities Transportation OREGON DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 280

286

288

Estate Sales

Sales Northeast Bend

Sales Southeast Bend

25th Year Multi Family ESTATE SALE 2271 Paulina Hwy Yard Sale. Prineville • Fri-Sat, 8-5 Sat. Only, 7am-4pm. (see ad in Wed’s paper) 2889 NE Lotno Dr. Look What I Found! Annual multi-family sale: You'll find a little bit of scrapbooking, crafts, everything in fabric, toys, quality The Bulletin's daily clothing, drapes, lots garage and yard sale of misc. Fri. Sat. 9-5. section. From clothes 1262 NE Burnside. to collectibles, from Sale. housewares to hard- Bazaar/Garage Sat. May 12, ware, classified is 8am-4pm. PIne Foralways the first stop for est Grange Hall, cost-conscious 63214 NE Boyd Acres consumers. And if Rd. you're planning your own garage or yard Everything 4 sale!! sale, look to the clasSaturday, 8-4, sifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find 3434 NE Fieldstone Ct. a better place for bargains! HH F R E E HH Call Classifieds: 541-385-5809 or G a r a g e S a l e K it email Place an ad in The classified@bendbulletin.com Bulletin for your gaTOOLS!!! Estate / ga- rage sale and rerage sale Fri. May ceive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! 11, Sat. May 12, 8-3, 40 year accumulation. KIT IN C L U D E S: Furn., camping, lots of Garage Sale Signs misc. 17090 Deer Run •• 4 $1.00 Off Coupon To Lane, La Pine. Use Toward Your 282

Sales Northwest Bend BIG Garage Sale: Sat. 9-2, 63553 Gold Spur Way, Collectibles, art, housewares, furniture. 284

Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

Sales Southwest Bend

Traffic Systems Technician 3 – Bend

HUGE MOVING SALE, This position directly supports traffic and Fri. & Sat. 7am-4pm. design engineers in 539 SE Edgewater. solving practical Everything goes. Furproblems in the deniture, appli., ansign, construction, tiques, collectables & and operation of intelart work, tools, fishing ligent transportation & shop supplies. systems and their component subTools! Tools! Tools! systems. This journey Lots of misc., some level position requires power tools, Thur.timely and expert apSun., 8 am- ?, 1925 plication of electronic SE Gardenia Ct. off and software stanShadowood. dardized practices to Wed. - Sun. 8am -8pm, extend the life and 559 SE Centennial. improve design of exNice items at great isting and future sysprices. 541-480-5950 tems. To apply, visit www.odotjobs.com or Yard Sale:Sat. 5/12 9-2, call (866) 61397 Fairfield Dr, in ODOT-JOBS or 711 Foxborough, follow (Relay Operator for signs off Brosterhous. the Deaf). Refer to Announcement 290 #ODOT12-0093oc. Sales Redmond Area Application deadline: May 20, 2012 @11:59 2 Family Garage Sale: PM. ODOT is an Sat. 5/12, 3562 SW AA/EEO Employer, 34th, in South Heights, committed to building Oak entertainment workforce diversity. center, gardening, golf, lawn mower, more. Utility Locator - Full time, needed. Must 4-family Sale Fri. & Sat pass background & 9-5. Lots & lots of driving expectations. stuff! Camp/hunt gear, Great Benefits & 401 tools. Misc. 3008 NW offered. Please email Canyon Dr. resume to Garage/Estate Sale: andrea@sctrl.com furniture, tools, riding mower, Fri.-Sun. 8-5, Looking for your next 2335 NW 21st Ct. employee? Garage Sale: Sat. Sat. Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and May 12th, 9-3, 2219 reach over 60,000 SW Metolius Ave, readers each week. corner of SW RimYour classified ad rock Way. will also appear on bendbulletin.com GIANT SISTERS which currently BARN SALE! receives over 1.5 Old, Used, Antiques, million page views Tools, Sporting every month at Goods, Clothes, no extra cost. Rugs, Lots of Brand Bulletin Classifieds New Gift Items, Get Results! Christmas in May, Call 385-5809 Toys, Furniture, or place TOO MUCH TO LIST! your ad on-line at All “Must See!” bendbulletin.com Thurs.-Fri.-Sat. 7:30 -4:30

ANNUAL YARD SALE River Canyon Estates Sat. 9-4,2432 NE Burks Sat. 12th, 9-2. So. on Ct,off Studio. 11’ Raft, Brookswood, x-street Rec Gear, Home ImHollygrape, follow signs prove, Garden, More. Appli., W/D, trampoline, 288 bricks/pavers mower/ Sales Southeast Bend garden tools, baby/ kids. Sat. 8am , 1774 4 Family Yard Sale: SW Forest Ridge. Sat. Only, 9-2, Books, LIQUIDATION SALE! toys, baby clothes & Air compressors, tools, items, foosball table, worm drive skil saw, banjo, armoire, enCraftsman mitre saw, tertainment center, hand levels, socket small oak stereo cabisets, combination net, lots more. Hwy 20 wrenches, 1889 pump to Torkleson to 22063 69328 Holmes Rd. organ -in exc. cond. Stormy Ln. Sisters Pepsi cooler, working Finance ext. cords, antique & Business ELITE REPEAT WWII welder, 100 cup HUGE multi-family back coffee pot. and Much $1 Porch Sale! yard moving sale this Much More! Fri., Sat. ? Sat. May 12, 9-12, Fri. only, 9 a.m. -? 9-5. 19365 Indian 950 SE 3rd St., Furn., kids misc., colSummer Rd. follow between Reed Mkt. lectibles, antiques & Red Hot signs! and Wilson. more. 613 NW 7th St. 541-815-1176 Moving Downsizing Sale. Fri. & Sat. Fri. and Sat., 9-3. 1057 Just bought a new boat? 528 8:30am - 2pm. The SE Valley wood Place Loans & Mortgages Sell your old one in the Parks off Mt. Wash- Tools, furniture, kitchen, classiieds! Ask about our ington Dr., 61495 garden stuff, etc. Super Seller rates! WARNING Cultas Lake Ct. 541-385-5809 The Bulletin recomGigantic Garage Sale: mends you use cauMoving Sale, Fri. Just moved 1001 SE 15th St., tion when you pronoon-6, Sat. 8-4, Suntree #107, Fri. & Sale...downsizing! vide personal 19011 Baker Rd. FurSat. 8-4, music - 500+ Fri,. Sat. & Sun. 9-4. information to companiture, kids stuff, misc. LP’s, records, CD’s, Appl., furniture, art, nies offering loans or also many ceramics, patio & clothes. 1728 Super Sale! Lots of credit, especially household items, NW Jackpine Ave. good stuff. Fri - Sun. those asking for admisc. stuff.No clothes. 19325 Galen Rd DRW vance loan fees or Yard sale Fri-Sat 9-4, companies from out of tools, camping and state. If you have hunting gear, groomconcerns or quesing equip. 16486 Huge Sunriver Home tions, we suggest you Sprague Loop, La Full house, all must go! All quality items in imconsult your attorney Pine follow signs. maculate condition, many custom pieces. Items or call CONSUMER include carved Oriental Rosewood desk, sec- Yard Sale: Sat.-Sun. 8-4, HOTLINE, tional sofa, hide-a-bed, side chairs, 3 queen 3755 SW 34th St, 1-877-877-9392. beds, dressers, large round dining set, enterhome furnishings, tainment center, glass & brass entry table & mirflower pots, outdoor Ever Consider a Reror, side tables. Antiques include: oak comverse Mortgage? At chairs & tools, cleanmode, trunks, oak phone, old crocks & R.R. least 62 years old? ing house - all must go! lanterns, clocks, glassware & china, farm Stay in your home & kitchen table, lots of Oriental items from 25 increase cash flow! 292 years in the Orient, garage items, tools & ladSafe & Effective! Call Sales Other Areas ders, outdoor, lots of pictures & artwork, books, Now for your FREE electronics, many unique carvings & statues, full DVD! Call Now Huge Madras Yard Sale! kitchen of quality kitchenware, Kitchenaid, fish888-785-5938. Fri., Sat., & Sun., 9-5, ing, new 3 wheel bike, lots of pottery, Traeger (PNDC) boats, golf cart, sinks, grill, jewelry. loads of misc! dryer, remodeling supPeople Look for Information Friday & Saturday, May 11 and 12, from 9-4. plies, clothing & much Crowd control numbers Friday 8:30. About Products and more! 1042 NE MeadSigns not allowed so please take directions owlark Ln. Services Every Day through From Hwy 97 take Cottonwood exit, past store, The Bulletin Classifieds take Circle 10 to Circle 9, stay on East Cas- Tumalo - Sat. Only, cade to McNary, turn right, then right on Three 9am-4pm, 19875 7th LOCAL MONEY:We buy Iron Lane to #6. St., 1 block north of secured trust deeds & Attic Estates & Appraisals Hwy 20 off Cook Ave. note,some hard money 541-350-6822 for pics & more info Antiques and Vintage loans. Call Pat Kelley go to atticestatesandappraisals.com 541-382-3099 ext.13. Flea Market.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Close in 2 bdrm, 1 bath WSG, yard maint. incl. No smoking/No pets. $725 per mo. with dep. 541-382-0088 Call for Specials! Limited numbers avail. 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks. MOUNTAIN GLEN, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Located by BMC/Costco, 2 bdrm, 2 bath duplex, 55+,2350 NEMary Rose Pl, #1, $795 no smoking or pets, 541-390-7649 !! NO APP FEE !! 2 bdrm, 1 bath $530 & 540 W/D hook-ups & Heat 573 Pump. Carports & Pet Friendly Business Opportunities Fox Hollow Apts. A Classified ad is an (541) 383-3152 EASY WAY TO Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co. REACH over 3 million 636 Pacific Northwesterners. $525/25-word Apt./Multiplex NW Bend classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for Fully furnished loft Apt on Wall Street in 3-days. Call the PaBend, with parking. All cific Northwest Daily utilities paid. Call Connection (916) 541-389-2389 for appt 288-6019 or email elizabeth@cnpa.com RIVER FALLS APTS. for more info (PNDC) LIVE ON THE RIVER Advertise VACATION WALK DOWNTOWN 1 bdrm. apt. fully furSPECIALS to 3 million Pacific North- nished in fine 50s style. westerners! 30 daily 1546 NW 1st St., $790 newspapers, six + $690 dep. Nice pets welcomed. states. 25-word clas541-382-0117 sified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 638 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advert Apt./Multiplex SE Bend ising_pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest A Sharp Clean 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath apt., NEW Daily Connection. CARPETS, neutral (PNDC) colors, great storage, Extreme Value Adverprivate patio, no pets/ tising! 30 Daily newssmoking, $530 incl. papers $525/25-word W/S/G, 541-633-0663 classified, 3-days. 640 Reach 3 million Pacific Northwesterners. Apt./Multiplex SW Bend For more information call (916) 288-6019 or Spacious 2 bdrm 1½ email: bath townhouse, w/d elizabeth@cnpa.com hkup, fenced yd. NO for the Pacific NorthPETS. Great loc! west Daily Connec$565 & up. 179 SW tion. (PNDC) Hayes 541-382-0162; 541-420-0133 Safely select, evaluate, finance & succeed in a 642 Franchise Business. www.frannet.com/msipe Apt./Multiplex Redmond 541-610-5799 1811 SW 21st Quiet SOCIAL SECURITY spacious 2/2 duplex, DISABILITY BENgorgeous fenced yard EFITS. WIN or Pay w/garage. Mint cond! Nothing! Start Your W/S/G pd, pet ok. Application In Under $715. 541-409-2175 60 Seconds. Call To3 bdrm, 2½ bath 2-story, day! Contact Disabilin Redmond, W/D ity Group, Inc. Lihookup, Fenced yard, censed Attorneys & no smoking. $725 mo., BBB Accredited. Call Megan 541-771-6599 888-782-4075. 648 (PNDC) Houses for Looking for your Rent General next employee? Place a Bulletin help 3 Bay shop, 38x48, 3 wanted ad today and bdrm, 2 bath, for rent, reach over 60,000 CRR, end of road, readers each week. quiet, new hardwood Your classified ad floors, 1500 sq.ft., will also appear on fenced area for 4-H bendbulletin.com animals, avail now, which currently re$900 + $1000 dep., ceives over 1.5 mil541-252-7170 lion page views Rented your propevery month at erty? The Bulletin no extra cost. Classifieds Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Get Results! Call Line. Call 385-5809 or place 541-383-2371 24 your ad on-line at hours to bendbulletin.com cancel your ad!

650

744

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Open Houses

800

When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

Call 541-385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com, currently receiving over 1.5 million page views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Fri. 1-5pm & Sat. 850 11-3pm. Views on 3.8 Acres, 4 Bdrm, 2.5 Snowmobiles bath, 3740 sq.ft., RV parking, 2 garages, 3 Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, stall barn, private stufuel inj, elec start, redio with full bath. verse, 2-up seat, cover, 4900 mi, $2500 $599,900. obo. 541-280-0514 Directions: Old Bend Redmond Hwy, right Snowmobile Helmet, on Rogers, Left on Bombardier, new $249 Tanglewood. sell $120,541-408-4528 Theresa Ramsay, 860 Broker • 541-815-4442 Motorcycles & Accessories

CRAMPED FOR CASH?

745

Homes for Sale 4270 sq ft, 6bd, 6ba, 4-car, corner, .83 ac, mtn view, by owner. $590,000 541-390-0886 See: bloomkey.com/8779

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Clean small 2 bdrm. Large yard. Wood heat. $750+ last + dep. Local ref. No pets. 1015 NW Ogden. 656

Houses for Rent SW Bend 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, W/D, fenced yard, clubhouse & pool, $1000/ mo., 12 mo lease, 503-798-1595. 658

Houses for Rent Redmond $900/mo + dep. 3 bdrm 2 bath, family rm, living rm, 2 car garage, fenced yard, Terrebonne. 541-390-5041 Terrebonne remodeled 3 bedroom, 1 bath, garage, fenced back yard. Pets considered. $795 + last and deposit. 541-420-9432. 659

Houses for Rent Sunriver In River Meadows a 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 sq. ft., woodstove, brand new carpet/oak floors, W/S pd, $895. 541-480-3393 or 541-610-7803 687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 3 Bay shop, 38x48, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, for rent, CRR, end of road, quiet, new hardwood floors, 1500 sq.ft., fenced area for 4-H animals, avail now, $900 + $1000 dep., 541-252-7170 Just too many collectibles? Sell them in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809

Boats & RV’s

BANK OWNED HOMES! FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or

NOTICE:

Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 541-385-5809

Harley Davidson SoftTail Deluxe 2007, white/cobalt, w/passenger kit, Vance & Hines muffler system & kit, 1045 mi., exc. cond, $19,999, 541-389-9188. Harley Heritage Softail, 2003 $5,000+ in extras, $2000 paint job, 30K mi. 1 owner, For more information please call 541-385-8090 or 209-605-5537

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or naHD FAT BOY tional origin, or intention to make any such 1996 preferences, limitaCompletely rebuilt/ tions or discrimination. customized, low We will not knowingly miles. Accepting ofaccept any advertisfers. 541-548-4807 ing for real estate which is in violation of HONDA CRF 250X this law. All persons 2006, senior citizen are hereby informed bought new in 2007, that all dwellings adtrail riding only in vertised are available Camp Sherman, low on an equal opportuhours, not ridden last nity basis. The Bulleyear, JD jetting kit, ratin Classified diator & trans. guards, exc. cond., $3200 750 OBO, 541-595-2559 Redmond Homes $299,900 1747 sq. ft, 2br/2ba 55 and older Honda VT700 Active Adult CommuShadow 1984, 23K, nity. Fabulous one many new parts, level home with pribattery charger, vacy and outstanding good condition, landscaped yard $3000 OBO. backing to the golf 541-382-1891 course. Home-ID882 Eagle Crest Properties Need help ixing stuff? 866-722-3370 www.eagle-crest.com Call A Service Professional ind the help you need. 762 www.bendbulletin.com Homes with Acreage 865

1592 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2 bath, site-built, 2 car attached heated garage, 24x36 heated, finished shop w/10’ ceilings & 220V power, all on 1.22 treed acre lot in CRR, too much to list, $195,000 call 541-633-9613.

ATVs We buy motorcycles, ATV’s, snowmobiles & watercrafts. Call Ken at 541-647-5151.

Garage Sales Garage Sales Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classiieds

Yamaha YFZ450 Sport Quad, 2005, new pipe & jet kit, too much to list, fast, fun bike, $3200 obo. 541-647-8931

Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up 541-385-5809 to 30,000 sq.ft., com870 petitive rate, 5 Acres in CRR - w/ 541-382-3678. mobile home, carport Boats & Accessories & large shop, Warehouse - Industrial $97,500, owner will 12.6’ Smoker Craft ‘92, unit for rent. 5600 15HP Evinrude ‘95; carry, 559-627-4933. sq.ft., $2250/month, 30# thrust MinnKota near Bend High. trolling motor, all perf. 775 541-389-8794. cond.!!! E-Z Load Manufactured/ trailer, Hummingbird Mobile Homes fish finder, oars, rod holders, seats, 2 anReal Estate 10 year warranty! Start chors & boat cover. at 40 per Sq. Ft. More $2450obo. 541-408 5256 For Sale Sq. Feet for less. Call John at J & M Homes, 541-548-5511

700 740

Condo/Townhomes for Sale Splendid View, Furnished, 1 bdrm, 2 bath condo, $85,000. Fronts on River, scenic balcony vistas, HOA dues $420, taxes $600. All utils. paid. incl cable tv, internet, 541-326-7063 after 6 pm.

2 bed, 1 bath $13,000. 2 bed, 1 bath $23,900. 3 bed, 2 bath $25,900. 3 bed, 2 bath $18,000. Call J & M Homes for details, 541-548-5511

12’ alum. Sea King with NEW: seats, cover, 6hp Nissan 4-stroke; also trolling, fish finder, trlr. $1500. 541-312-4504

780

Mfd./Mobile Homes with Land Bank owned Homes on land start at $69,950. Call John at 541-350-1782 for details.

12' Smokercraft 2000 & trailer. 2007 9.9 HP Johnson w/less than 5 hrs use, Exc. shape. $3200, Call 360-903-7873 to view. In town.

500 S h o w Y o u r S t u f f .

ESTATE SALE!

Now you can add a full-color photo to your Bulletin classified ad starting at only $15.00 per week, when you order your ad online. To place your Bulletin ad with a photo, visit www.bendbulletin.com, click on “Place an ad” and follow these easy steps: 1.

Pick a category (for example - pets or transportation) and choose your ad package.

2. Write your ad and upload your digital photo.

3. Create your account with any major credit card. All ads appear in both print and online.

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Please allow 24 hours for photo processing before your ad appears in print and online.

To place your photo ad, visit us online at www.bendbulletin.com or call with questions, 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809 870

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Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

13’ Smokercraft 1997, Alaskan Fish Boat w/ 9.9 Merc & elec. motor, swivel seat, fish finder, anchor, cover & top, trailer, $2450, 541-977-2644.

announcements RON PAUL Sign Wave May 12th in Bend along 3rd and Greenwood Ave; from 1 PM to 3 PM. Please bring your friends, family, and Ron Paul signs to this event (we have signs). 541-279-4202 CentralOR4RP@ gmail.com

16’ Driftboat, like new cond., lots of upgrades, 6 HP LS motor, $6500, call/text, 541-480-8075. 17' Lowe 1994, 60HP Mercury 4-stroke, electric troll motor, GPS fishfinder, 3 batteries, two gas tanks, trailer w/spare. $7000 541-389-7535 19.5’ 1988 373V Ranger Bass Boat, Mercury 115 Motor, Ranger trailer, trolling elec. motor, fish finder & sonor, 2 live wells & all accessories, new batteries & tires, great cond., $6500. 541-923-6555.

CALL A SERVICE PROFESSIONAL Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service

Building/Contracting

Landscaping/Yard Care

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

•Sprinkler Activation & Repair •Back Flow Testing •Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up

•Weekly Mowing •Bi-Monthly & Monthly Maintenance •Flower Bed Clean Up www.hirealicensedcontractor. •Bark, Rock, Etc. com •Senior Discounts or call 503-378-4621.

The Bulletin recom- Bonded & Insured mends checking with 541-815-4458 the CCB prior to conLCB#8759 tracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Spring Clean up. Debris Removal Bi-weekly & monthly maint., debris hauling, property clean-up, JUNK BE GONE bark decoration. I Haul Away FREE Residential & For Salvage. Also Commercial. Cleanups & Cleanouts Free Estimates. Mel, 541-389-8107

Magic Touch. Since 2002. Weekly yard care, cleanups, sprinShelly’s Cleaning & Much kler start up & adjustMore. Quality service at ment, bark, thatching an affordable price. No and aeration. Pruning, job too big or small - Just fertilizer and more. call 541-526-5894 or Chris 541-633-6881 406-670-8861 Home is Where the Dirt Call The Yard Doctor Is! 10 yrs exp. Clean Vafor yard maintenance, cant residences & busithatching, sod, sprinnesses. Refs. Crecencia kler blowouts, water & Norma, 541-306-7426 features, more! Allen 541-536-1294 Handyman LCB 5012 Domestic Services

ERIC REEVE HANDY Aeration / Dethatching BOOK NOW! SERVICES. Home & Commercial Repairs, Weekly / one-time service avail. Bonded, insured, Carpentry-Painting, free estimates! Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. On-time COLLINS Lawn Maint. Call 541-480-9714 promise. Senior Discount. Work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Search the area’s most or 541-771-4463 comprehensive listing of Bonded & Insured classiied advertising... CCB#181595 real estate to automotive, I DO THAT! merchandise to sporting Home/Rental repairs Small jobs to remodels goods. Bulletin Classiieds appear every day in the Honest, guaranteed print or on line. work. CCB#151573 Call 541-385-5809 Dennis 541-317-9768 www.bendbulletin.com Landscaping/Yard Care

More Than Service Peace Of Mind

Spring Clean Up

•Leaves •Cones •Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration •Dethatching Compost Top Dressing Weed free Bark & flower beds ORGANIC PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding Sprinkler Adjustments

Fertilizer included with monthly program Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

B & G Lawncare, accepting new clients. Spring Clean-up. Weekly Maintenance. 541-408-5367 541-410-2953 UGLY YARD? Retired Master Gardener make-overs Starting at $499. 541-633-9895 Organicscapes, Inc. LCB#8906

541.771.9441 www.bendorganiclandscaping.com

Maverick Landscaping Mowing, weedeating, yard detailing, chain saw work & more! LCB#8671 541-923-4324 Holmes Landscape Maint

• Clean-up • Aerate • De-thatch • Free Est. • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. call Josh 541-610-6011 Full Tilt Clean Up, Hauling & Dumping. 541-419-2756 Painting/Wall Covering

All About Painting

Interior/Exterior/Decks. Mention this ad get 15% Off interior or exterior job. Restrictions do apply. Free Estimates. CCB #148373 541-420-6729

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Forest Supervisor's Office, 63095 Deschutes Market Road, Bend, OR 97701 at 11:00 AM local time on 05/22/2012 for an estimated volume of 8 CCF of Lodgepole Pine sawtimber, and 25 CCF of Ponderosa Pine and Other Coniferous species sawtimber marked or otherwise designated for cutting. In addition, there is within the sale area an estimated volume of 11 CCF of All species grn bio cv that the bidder agrees to remove at a fixed

rate. In addition, there is within the sale area an unestimated volume of Landing piles grn bio cv that the bidder may agree to remove at a fixed rate. The Forest Service reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Interested parties may obtain a prospectus from the office listed below. A prospectus, bid form, and complete information concerning the timber, the conditions of sale, and submission of bids is available to the public from the

Bend/Fort Rock Ranger District, 63095 Deschutes Market Road, Bend, OR 97701 phone 541-383-4770 or online at http://www.fs.usda.g ov/goto/centraloregon/timbersales. The USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING A public meeting of the Budget Committee of Four Rivers Vector Control District, Deschutes County, State of Oregon, to discuss the budget for the fiscal years July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2014 will be held at 56478 Solar Drive, Bend, OR. The meeting will take place on the 23rd day of May, 2012 at 7:30 p.m. The purpose is to receive the budget message and to receive comment from the public on the budget. A copy of the budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after May 11, 2012 at 56478 Solar Drive, Bend, Oregon 97707 from the plastic box beside the office door. This is a public meeting where deliberation of the budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee.

LEGAL NOTICE Auction Notice: F-4, 10x30 rented by: Karin J. Lacey of Corvallis, OR; B-13, 5x5 rented by: Jessica Jones of Bend, OR. May 26, 2012, 9:00 a.m., Bend Self Stor, 63273 Nels Anderson Rd., Bend, OR 97701, 541-389-1664. LEGAL NOTICE The Sub Sale is located within Section 18, T.22S., R.11E., Surveyed, WM, Deschutes County, Oregon. The Forest Service will receive sealed bids in public at Deschutes National

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0323192997 T.S. No.: 12-00281-6

Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of June 6, 2011 made by, RICHARD L VALENZUELA, A SINGLE PERSON, as the original grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, as the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, as the original beneficiary, recorded on June 13, 2011, as Instrument No. 2011-21303 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 149912 Lot 5, Block 23, ROMAINE VILLAGE UNIT 9, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 19652 HILLER DRIVE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $3,674.26 as of March 29, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $133,023.14 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.75000% per annum from November 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 14, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 Check out the N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at classiieds online public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the www.bendbulletin.com time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which Updated daily the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 13, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature A-4230510 04/20/2012, 04/27/2012, 05/04/2012, 05/11/2012 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Account: 3047297 County Tax Account Number: 199850 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Andrew J. Boone and Megan E. Boone as grantor, to Western Title & Escrow as trustee, in favor of Bank of the Cascades Mortgage Center, as beneficiary, dated August 14, 2008, recorded August 22, 2008, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, 2008-35021, the beneficial interest was assigned to the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs on September 2, 2008 by 2008-36184 and whereas a successor trustee, Stephen J. Scholz, was appointed pursuant to ORS 86.790(3) by written instrument recorded on March 22, 2012, 2012-010395, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state to wit: (SEE LEGAL DESCRIPTION ON NEXT PAGE) LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Lot 59, HAWK'S RIDGE PHASE 3, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded on March 22, 2012, in 2012-010396, pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes; the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments of $2,481.44 for December 2011 and January 2012 in the amount of $4,962.88, and Monthly payments of $2,485.76 for February 2012 and March 2012 in the amount of $4,971.52, and Late fees of $388.36, and Legal costs of $1,020 as of March 20, 2012, All totaling $11,342.76. AFTER RECORDING RETURN TO: FORECLOSURE SECTION OREGON DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' AFFAIRS 700 SUMMER ST. NE SALEM OR 97301-1285 Until a change is requested, all tax statements shall be sent to the following address: TAX SECTION OREGON DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' AFFAIRS 700 SUMMER ST. NE SALEM OR 97301-1285

Same Day Response NOTICE: OREGON WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on Landscape ContracAugust 28, 2012 at the hour of 10:30 o'clock, a.m., in accord with the tors Law (ORS 671) WESTERN PAINTING Standard of Time established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statrequires all busiCO. Richard Hayman, utes, on the main entrance stop of the County Courthouse located at 1164 nesses that advertise a semi-retired paintNW Bond in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell to perform Landing contractor of 45 at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said descape Construction years. Small Jobs scribed real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the which includes: Welcome. Interior & time of the execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any inplanting, decks, Exterior. ccb#5184. terest which the grantor or his successors-in-interest acquired after the fences, arbors, 541-388-6910 execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby water-features, and secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable installation, repair of RV/Marine charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in irrigation systems to Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the forebe licensed with the closure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment Landscape ContracAdvantage RV to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of tors Board. This For all of your said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) together 4-digit number is to be RV Repairs! with costs and trustee's and attorney's fees as provided by law, at any included in all adver- •All Makes & Models time prior to five days before the date set for said sale. tisements which indi- •Chassis Repair & In construing this instrument, the masculine gender includes the feminine cate the business has Service and the neuter, and the singular includes the plural; the word "grantor" ina bond, insurance and •Appliance/Electrical cludes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as each and all workers compensaRepair & upgrades other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by tion for their employ- •Interior Repair & said Trust Deed; the word "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respecees. For your protecUpgrades tive successors-in-interest, if any. tion call 503-378-5909 •Exterior Repair or use our website: •Collision Repair DATED: March 26, 2012 www.lcb.state.or.us to •Mobile Service check license status available in the Successor Trustee before contracting Central Oregon Area Stephen J. Scholz with the business. Years of Experience Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Persons doing land541-728-0305 700 Summer Street NE scape maintenance 62980 Boyd Acres Rd., Salem OR 97301-1285 do not require a LCB Building B, Suite 2 license. Phone 503-373-2235 Bend, Oregon

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031233075 T.S. No.: 12-00101-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of June 21, 2006 made by, MARCIA S MITCHELL, as the original grantor, to AMERITILE, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as the original beneficiary, recorded on June 30, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-45134 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Indenture Trustee for American Home Mortgage Investment Trust 2006-3, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 247580 LOT ON HUNDRED SIXTY-THREE (163), PARKS AT BROKEN TOP, PHASE 4, RECORDED MARCH 15, 2005, IN CABINET G. PAGE 639, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19563 FISHER LAKE LN, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; less unapplied funds held on account thereof; and which defaulted amounts total: $12,031.95 as of April 18, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $478,791.35 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.94300% per annum from September 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 21, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 20, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature A-4234861 04/27/2012, 05/04/2012, 05/11/2012, 05/18/2012


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

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Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Watercraft

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

19-ft Mastercraft ProStar 190 inboard, 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 hrs, great cond, lots of extras, $10,000 obo. 541-231-8709

19’ Glass Ply, Merc cruiser, depth finder, trolling motor, trailer, $3500, 541-389-1086 or 541-419-8034. Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

25’ Catalina Sailboat 1983, w/trailer, swing keel, pop top, fully loaded, $9500 call for details, 541-480-8060

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Inflatable Raft,Sevylor Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, soFishmaster 325,10’3”, lar, Bose, Corian, tile, complete pkg., $650 4 door fridge., 1 slide, Firm, 541-977-4461. Merc standard shaft 7½ W/D. $75,000 hp outbrd mtr. Best 541-215-5355 offer. 541-416-0758

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Kayak, Eddyline Sandpiper, 12’, like new, $975, 541-420-3277. 880

Coachman Freelander 2011, 27’, queen bed, 1 slide, HD TV, DVD player, 450 Ford, $49,000, please call 541-923-5754.

Motorhomes

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Ads published in the Cummins 330 hp die"Boats" classification sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 include: Speed, fishin. kitchen slide out, ing, drift, canoe, new tires,under cover, house and sail boats. 875 hwy. miles only,4 door For all other types of Watercraft 2002 Country Coach fridge/freezer icewatercraft, please see Intrigue 40' Tag axle. maker, W/D combo, Class 875. Ads published in "Wa400hp Cummins DieInterbath tub & 541-385-5809 tercraft" include: Kaysel. Two slide-outs. shower, 50 amp proaks, rafts and motor41,000 miles. Most pane gen & more! ized personal options. $110,000 $55,000. watercrafts. For OBO 541-678-5712 541-948-2310 "boats" please see A Project: 1971 21’ FiClass 870. The Bulletin Call The Bulletin At berform, cabin style, good 2 axle trailer, 541-385-5809 To Subscribe call 541-385-5809 $450 OBO, 541-385-5800 or go to Place Your Ad Or E-Mail 541-382-2577 www.bendbulletin.com At: www.bendbulletin.com Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Hunter’s Delight! Package deal! 1988 Winnebago Super Chief, 38K miles, great Monaco Dynasty 2004, loaded, 3 slides, shape; 1988 Bronco II 4x4 to tow, 130K $159,000, 541-923- 8572 or 541-749-0037 (cell) mostly towed miles, nice rig! $15,000 both. 541-382-3964, leave msg. CAN’T BEAT THIS! Look before you buy, below market value ! Size & mileage DOES matter, Class A 32’ Hurricane by Four Winds, 2007. 12,500 mi, all amenities, Ford V10, lthr, cherry, slides, like new, can see anytime, $58,000. 541-548-5216

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C,

6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $49,900, 541-480-8648

National Sea Breeze 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, 2 power slides, upgraded queen mattress, hyd. leveling system, rear camera & monitor, only 6k mi. A steal at $43,000! 541-480-0617 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, On-Site Credit Approval Team, Web Site Presence, We Take Trade-Ins. Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495

Springdale 2012 18’ used 3 times (divorce sale) $10,900 OBO. 503-778-0002 Southwind 35.5’ Triton, 2008,V10, 2 slides, Dupont UV coat, 7500 mi. Avg NADA ret.114,343; asking $104,000. Call 541-923-2774

Winnebago Outlook 2008 32’ Ford V10 eng, Wineguard sat. TV, surround sound stereo + more. $55,000 obo. 541-526-1622.

Take care of your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Travel Trailers

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide,Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

SPRINGDALE 2005 27’, has eating area slide, A/C and heat, new tires, all contents included, bedding towels, cooking and eating utensils. Great for vacation, fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 541-408-3811

Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 29’, weatherized, like new, furnished & ready to go, incl Winegard Satellite dish,

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Redmond: 541-548-5254

$26,995. 541-420-9964

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031238058 T.S. No.: 12-00002-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of August 4, 2006 made by, ETHAN A JEFTS, as the original grantor, to AMERITITLE, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as the original beneficiary, recorded on August 15, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-55878 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for American Home Mortgage Assets Trust 2006-5, Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-5, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 158768 LOT SIXTEEN (16), BLOCK ONE (1), STAR BRIGHT ESTATES, RECORDED JULY 24, 1979, IN CABINET B, PAGE 659, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1763 NE TAURUS CT, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; and which defaulted amounts total: $4,766.52 as of March 28, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $243,920.34 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.00000% per annum from September 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 14, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92814 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 13, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature A-4230509 04/20/2012, 04/27/2012, 05/04/2012, 05/11/2012 LEGAL NOTICE INVITATION TO BID Sealed bids for the Serpentine Lot paving and improvements for the Central Oregon Community College will be accepted by Rick Hayes, Construction Project Manager, at the Construction Office, room 103, Campus Center Building 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR 97701 until 2:00 pm, local time, Thursday, May 31, 2012, at which time all bids will be opened and publicly read aloud. First Tier Subcontractor Disclosure Form submittal is required for projects as per ORS 279C.370. Form must be submitted plainly marked "First-Tier Subcontractor Disclosure Form #1404-12" either with the Bid or no later than within two (2) working hours of Bid Closing date and time, no later than 4:00 P.M., May 31, 2012. (Facsimile not accepted). Submit Bids, for the work, on forms furnished by the College, acknowledging receipt of all addenda. Scope of Work: Extend baserock and regrade existing gravel parking lot, install curbs and drainage structures and features, install conduits and light pole bases, entry gate, asphalt paving, striping, and signage at an existing gravel parking lot. Alternate #1 to include wiring and site lighting poles/fixtures. A MANDATORY pre-bid conference and project site-visit will be held at 9:00 AM, local time, on May 17, 2012, at the existing graveled parking lot, Bend, Oregon (See map). The purpose will be to answer any questions bidders may have, review the scope of work, tour the site, and to consider any suggestions Bidders wish to make. Any statements made by the College's representatives at the conference are not binding upon the College unless confirmed by written addendum. The conference is held for the benefit of bidders. Complete sets of Drawings and Project manuals may be ordered from Central Oregon Builders Exchange (COBE), for cost of reproduction and delivery of same, paid before or at time of delivery. Central Oregon Builders Exchange,1902 NE 4th Street, Bend, OR A Bid Bond or Certified Check executed in favor of Central Oregon Community College in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the total Basic Bid Sum and additive alternates, if any, will be required, which sum shall be forfeited as fixed and liquidated damages should the Bidder neglect or refuse to enter into a contract and provide a suitable bond for the faithful performance of the work in the event the contract is awarded to the Bidder. A person shall not submit a bid to do work as a construction "contractor" as defined in ORS701.005(2) unless that person is first registered with the Construction Contractors Review Board. Bids received from persons who fail to comply with this requirement shall be deemed non-responsive and be rejected. This Contract is for Public Work, thus subject to ORS 279C.800 through 279C.870. No award will be considered by the public contracting agency unless the Bid contains a statement by the Bidder, as a part of the Bid, that State of Oregon Prevailing Rates for Public Works Contracts in Oregon shall be followed for all work, including Wage Rates and Certification of payroll as required by the Bureau of Labor & Industries. A 100% performance bond will be required of the successful Bidder. Minority-owned, Women-owned, and Emerging Small Business enterprises are encouraged to submit Bids in response to this solicitation and will be afforded full opportunity and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in consideration for an award of any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement.(ORS279A.110). No Bid will be considered without a statement by the Bidder as a part of their Bid whether Bidder is a "Resident Bidder", as defined by ORS 279A.120. Bidder may not withdraw his/her Bid after the hour set for the opening thereof, before award of Agreement, unless award is delayed for a period of thirty (30) days from the Bid date. Pursuant to ORS 279C.395, the College may reject any bid not in compliance with all prescribed bidding procedures and requirements and may reject all bids if, in the judgment of the College, it is in the public interest to do so. The College reserves the right to waive any or all informalities and irregularities. Central Oregon Community is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Dated this date: May 11, 2012 PUBLISHED: Bend Bulletin

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Scott D. Eckstein and Phyllis A. Eckstein, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated August 29, 2006, recorded September 5, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 60409, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot 120, Elkhorn Estates Phases 9 and 10, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 19955 Powers Road, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,142.09, from October 1, 2010, monthly payments in the sum of $2,170.06, from February 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $2,149.22, from February 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $274,407.28, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.625% per annum from September 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 17, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-12-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 11-106240 LEGAL NOTICE Notice of 30-Day Comment Period on Odell Creek Habitat Restoration Project Opportunity to Comment: The Forest Service, Deschutes National Forest, Crescent Ranger District, is preparing a Decision Memo for a fish habitat improvement project on Odell Creek, just below the mouth of Odell Lake. The project is located in Klamath County, Oregon, with a legal description of T23S, R6E, Section 25 and 26; Willamette Meridian. The purpose of the project is to improve connectivity and complexity of habitat for Bull Trout, a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act, by placing a configuration of approximately 20 down logs across the creek. The document can be accessed on the Forest Service Website at: http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/centraloregon/landmanagement/projects or paper copy can be sent by requesting it from Tim Foley, Phone (541) 433-3200, or by sending a letter of request to: Crescent Ranger District, PO Box 208, Crescent OR 97733. This comment period is intended to provide those interested in or affected by this activity an opportunity to make their concerns known. In light of a recent court ruling (Sequoia ForestKeeper v. Tidwell, 11-cv-00679-LJO-DLB (E.D. Cal.)), the Forest Service will provide public notice, comment, and opportunity for administrative appeal for projects and activities documented with a "Decision Memo" (36 CFR 220.6(e)) until new instructions are issued by the Washington Office, or the Agency issues regulations addressing the Court's ruling. Only those who provide comment or express interest in this proposal during this comment period will be eligible to appeal the decision pursuant to 36 CFR part 215 regulations. How to Comment and Timeframe: Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, oral, and electronic comments concerning this action will be accepted for 30 calendar days following the publication of this notice in the The Bulletin. The publication date in the newspaper of record is the exclusive means for calculating the comment period for this analysis. Those wishing to comment should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. The regulations prohibit extending the length of the comment period. It is the responsibility of persons providing comments to submit them by the close of the comment period. Written comments must be submitted to the Responsible Official, District Ranger Holly Jewkes at PO Box 208, Crescent, Oregon, 97733, or FAX at (541) 433-3224. The office business hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are: 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Oral comments can be provided to Holly Jewkes, only during normal business hours via telephone (541) 433-3200 or in person. Those submitting electronic copies must put the project name in the subject line, and must either submit comments as part of the e-mail message or as an attachment only in one of the following three formats: Microsoft Word, rich text format (rtf) or Adobe Portable Document Format (pdf) and must do so only to the following e-mail address comments-pacificnorthwest-deschutes-crescent@fs.fed.us. In cases where no identifiable name is attached to a comment, a verification of identity will be required for appeal eligibility. If using an electronic message, a scanned signature is one way to provide verification. E-mails submitted to e-mail addresses other than the one listed above, in other formats than those listed, or containing viruses will be rejected. It is the responsibility of persons providing comments to submit them by the close of the comment period. It is the responsibility of persons providing comments by electronic means to ensure that their comments have been received. Individuals and organizations wishing to be eligible to appeal must meet the information requirements of 36 CFR 215.6.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Dana Gregg, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, NA, as Beneficiary, dated October 16, 2006, recorded October 23, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 70714, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot One (1), Fairhaven Phase II, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 346 N.W. 25th Street, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,017.49, from February 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $964.48, from August 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $149,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.025% per annum from January 1, 2001, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 20, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-18-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 11-106420 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1096 T.S. No.: 1357923-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Melissa Adams, An Unmarried Woman, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, as Beneficiary, dated October 04, 2007, recorded October 11, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-54566 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 42 of Willow Springs Phase 2, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3151 SW Juniper Ave Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 15, 2011 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,341.51 Monthly Late Charge $43.34. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $184,063.78 together with interest thereon at 4.940% per annum from November 15, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 16, 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 10, 2012. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-408671 05/11, 05/18, 05/25, 06/01


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012 F5

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Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of March 10, 2010 made by, NORMAN L CHURCH, A MARRIED PERSON AND JASON L BENNETT, A MARRIED PERSON, as the original grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, as the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, as the original beneficiary, recorded on March 29, 2010, as Instrument No. 0118956762 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 105674 1051412 PARCEL I: Lot 8, Block 3, NORTHWEST TOWNSITE COMPANYS FIRST ADD TO BEND, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. PARCEL II: Lot 1, Block 4, KEYSTONE TERRACE, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 505 NE EMERSON AVENUE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $8,192.44 as of March 29, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $211,039.84 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25000% per annum from October 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 14, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 13, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature A-4230515 04/20/2012, 04/27/2012, 05/04/2012, 05/11/2012 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031336969 T.S. No.: 11-04659-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of September 27, 2006 made by, NEVILLE DAVEY, AN UNMARRIED MAN, as the original grantor, to AMERITITLE, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKER CONDUIT, as the original beneficiary, recorded on October 3, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-66744 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for American Home Mortgage Assets Trust 2006-6, Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-6, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 17 12 08C0 01000 THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, STATE OF OREGON, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A TRACT OF LAND SITUATED IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (NW1/4SW1/4) OF SECTION EIGHT (8), TOWNSHIP SEVENTEEN (17) SOUTH, RANGE TWELVE (12), EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE ONE-QUARTER SECTION CORNER COMMON OF SECTIONS 7 AND 8, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON; THENCE SOUTH 00º05'35" WEST ALONG THE LINE BETWEEN SAID SECTIONS 7 AND 8, A DISTANCE OF 927.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING SOUTH 00º05'35" WEST 391.83 FEET TO THE SOUTH SIXTEENTH SECTION CORNER COMMON TO SAID SECTIONS 7 AND 8; THENCE ALONG THE EAST-WEST CENTERLINE OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, SOUTH 89º56'00" EAST 579.97 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING FROM SAID EAST-WEST CENTERLINE, NORTH 0º05'35" EAST 385.73 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89º19'51" WEST 580.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Commonly known as: 63737 OB RILEY RD, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $190,535.80 as of April 11, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $1,364,890.40 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.15300% per annum from June 1, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 21, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 20, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature A-4234859 04/27/2012, 05/04/2012, 05/11/2012, 05/18/2012

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9085 T.S. No.: 1325465-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-11-481932-SH

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0118956762 T.S. No.: 12-00282-6

Reference is made to that certain deed made by MICHAEL R KNIGHT , CYNTHIA J KNIGHT , HUSBAND & WIFE, as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 7/17/2006, recorded 7/24/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County. Oregon in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2006-50353,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 109823 LOT 1, BLOCK J, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19483 COMANCHE LN, BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: Monthly Payment $1,806.75 Monthly Late Charge By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $229,879.51 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.0000 per annum from 7/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that QUALITY LOAN SERVICE CORPORATION OF WASHINGTON, the undersigned trustee will on 9/4/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by QUALITY LOAN SERVICE CORPORATION OF WASHINGTON. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4/24/12 QUALITY LOAN SERVICE CORPORATION OF WASHINGTON, as trustee Signature By: Brian Souza, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: QUALITY LOAN SERVICE CORPORATION OF WASHINGTON c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 A-4237397 05/11/2012, 05/18/2012, 05/25/2012, 06/01/2012 1000

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Roy Marvin Chapman, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated September 14, 2006, recorded September 27, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 65443, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot 27, Block UU, Deschutes River Woods, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 60458 Zuni Road, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,769.54, from January 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,794.98, from June 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $299,971.12, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.875% per annum from December 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 20, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 05-10-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647, S&S 10-104603.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Patrick W Hill An Unmarried Man, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Commonwealth United Mortgage A Division of National City Bank Of Indiana, as Beneficiary, dated January 07, 2005, recorded January 14, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-02194 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot seventeen (17) in block five (5) of Fifth Addition to West Hills, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2088 NW Vicksburg Ave. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2011 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,618.72 Monthly Late Charge $64.55. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $259,094.39 together with interest thereon at 3.250% per annum from December 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 16, 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 10, 2012. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-408654 05/11, 05/18, 05/25, 06/01 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031037559 T.S. No.: 12-00343-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of April 12, 2006 made by, WALLY ROTH, VICTORIA ROTH, as the original grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the original trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as the original beneficiary, recorded on April 26, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-28691 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for HarborView Mortgage Loan Trust, Mortgage Loan Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-7, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 108811 BEGINNING AT A 1/2 INCH IKON ROD ON THE EAST [RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE DESCHUTES MARKET ROAD, WHENCE THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION FOURTEEN (14), TOWNSHIP SEVENTEEN (17) SOUTH, RANGE TWELVE (12), EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, BEARS SOUTH 21 DEGREES 55' WEST, 3924.49 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 56' EAST 646.20 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 21 DEGREES 10'30" WEST, 60.65 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 56' EAST, 560.70 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 01'15" WEST, 384.70 FEET TO THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE HAMEHOOK ROAD AS NOW BUILT; THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 89 DEGREES 59' WEST, 578.85 FEET; THENCE AROUND A CURVE TO THE LEFT SUBTENED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 73 DEGREES 51' WEST, 341.83 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 31' WEST 369.42 FEET ALONG THE RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE DESCHUTES MARKET ROAD TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXCEPTING THEREFROM IN TOWNSHIP SEVENTEEN (17) SOUTH, RANGE TWELVE (12), EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON; SECTION FOURTEEN (14): A PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (SE1/4MW1/4), DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A 1/2 INCH IRON ROD WHENCE THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 14 BEARS SOUTH 33 DEGREES 42' WEST, 4773.04 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 59' WEST, 326.40 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 31 DEGREES 35'30" WEST, 395.85 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 21 DEGREES 10' 30" WEST, 60.65 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 51'15" EAST, 560.70 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 01'15" WEST, 382.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Commonly known as: 63480 DESCHUTES MARKET RD, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $51,355.67 as of April 18, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $580,685.47 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.95300% per annum from October 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 21, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 20, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature A-4235059 04/27/2012, 05/04/2012, 05/11/2012, 05/18/2012


F6 FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

882

916

931

932

933

935

940

975

975

Fifth Wheels

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Ford F-350 XLT 2003, 4X4, 6L diesel, 6-spd manual, Super Cab, short box, 12K Warn winch, custom bumper & canopy, running boards, 2 sets tires, wheels & chains, many extras, perfect, ONLY 29,800 miles, $27,500 OBO, 541-504-8316.

Grand Cherokee “Limited” 1997, Low miles. $4,999 Vin 684939 • Dlr #366

Sundance 29’ 2009, with 3 slides, super clean. $29,950; also 2008 Dodge 250 diesel, hitch, brakes, additional $31,500, exc. cond., 541-610-5178

Tires (4), for Saturn, used Toyo Radials, P195/60R15, $15 ea; Spider Traction Device, for Saturn, $25, 541-383-3483.

1982 INT. Dump w/ArWe Buy Junk borhood, 6k on rebuilt Cars & Trucks! 392, truck refurbished, 885 Cash paid for junk has 330 gal. water vehicles, batteries & tank w/pump & hose. Canopies & Campers catalytic converters. Everything works, Serving all of C.O.! Reduced - now $5000 For sale or trade toCall 541-408-1090 OBO. 541-977-8988 wards 24’-26’ trailer with slide. Lance 932 Squire 9’10” cabover, ‘96, elec. jacks, solar Antique & panel, 2-dr refrig, Classic Autos freezer, awning, outdoor shower, exc. cond, $7000 obo. Peterbilt 359 potable Chevy 1951 pickup, 541-549-1342 water truck, 1990, restored. $13,500 obo; 541-504-3253 or 3200 gal. tank, 5hp 503-504-2764 Lance 9.5’ 1994, X-cab pump, 4-3" hoses, camper, sleeps 5, A/C, camlocks, $25,000. furnace/catylitic heater, 541-820-3724 fantastic fan, in/outside showers, manual jacks, Find It in very good cond., $5500, 541-408-0538 The Bulletin Classifieds! or 541-408-3118. 541-385-5809 Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr., complete, Lance-Legend 990 $15,000 OBO, trades, 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, THRUCKS ‘85 Interplease call exc. cond., generator, 10 Wheel 541-420-5453. solar-cell, large refrig, national 46,000 GVW,‘89 GMC AC, micro., magic fan, 30,000 GVW, ‘91 Ford Chrysler 300 Coupe bathroom shower, 33,000 GVW, ‘01 Fr1967, 440 engine, removable carpet, ieghtliner 33,000 GVW auto. trans, ps, air, custom windows, out- All Dump Flatbed. frame on rebuild, redoor shower/awning Backstrom Builders painted original blue, set-up for winterizing, Center 541-382-6861 original blue interior, elec. jacks, CD/steoriginal hub caps, exc. reo/4’ stinger. $9000. chrome, asking $9000 925 Bend, 541.279.0458 or make offer. Utility Trailers 541-385-9350. Roamin Chariot pop-up camper, fits small Just bought a new boat? pickup, good shape, Sell your old one in the jacks & stand. $2400. classiieds! Ask about our 541-325-6548 Super Seller rates! Big Tex Landscap541-385-5809 ing/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. Autos & GVW, all steel, Transportation $1400. Chrysler SD 4-Door 541-382-4115, or 1930, CDS Royal 541-280-7024. Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, 929 runs, taking bids, Automotive Wanted 541-383-3888, 908 541-815-3318 DONATE YOUR CAR, Aircraft, Parts TRUCK OR BOAT TO & Service HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd, 877-213-9145. door panels w/flowers (PNDC) 1/3 interest in Colum& hummingbirds, bia 400, located at white soft top & hard 931 Sunriver. $138,500. top, Reduced! $5,500. Automotive Parts, Call 541-647-3718 541-317-9319 or Service & Accessories 541-647-8483 1/3 interest in wellequipped IFR Beech 245/70R17 108S hwy Bonanza A36, lotires-40%, $125. cated KBDN. $55,000. 541-447-4576. 541-419-9510 Chrome roll-bar large diameter ‘82-’92 Z28. Ford Galaxie 500 1963, $200. 541-480-5950 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & radio (orig),541-419-4989 Tick, Tock

900

1969 Cesena 182 0520P-Ponk, 3BLD Stol, nice panel, $70,000, 541-884-6567 or 541-881-1519 pm. What are you looking for? You’ll ind it in The Bulletin Classiieds

Tick, Tock...

933

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Dodge Caravan Sport‘01, very clean, runs great, $4400, 541-848-0004.

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

Pickups

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*** Need to sell a CHECK YOUR AD Vehicle? Please check your ad Call The Bulletin on the first day it runs and place an ad toto make sure it is corday! rect. Sometimes inAsk about our structions over the "Wheel Deal"! phone are misunderfor private party stood and an error advertisers can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad 541-385-5809 appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Need to get an ad Deadlines are: Weekin ASAP? days 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If Fax it to 541-322-7253 we can assist you, The Bulletin Classiieds please call us:

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“ W e m a k e c a r b u y i n g e a s y.” 541-389-1178 | VISIT SMOLICHNISSAN.COM All vehicles subject to prior sale, tax, title, license & registration fees. All financing, subject to credit approval. Pictures for illustration purposes only. Offers expires May 14, 2012.

Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through May 14, 2012.


roots punk

the of EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN MAY 11, 2012

Social Distortion comes to Bend, PAGE 3

F I N E A R T S : Artist Randall Martin of Bend, PAGE 12 M O V I E S : ’Dark Shadows’ and two others open, PAGE 25


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

inside

Cover design by Althea Borck / The Bulletin; submitted photo

Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

REPORTERS

MUSIC RELEASES • 9

OUT OF TOWN • 20

Heidi Hagemeier, 541-617-7828 hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Jenny Wasson, 541-383-0350 jwasson@bendbulletin.com

• Norah Jones, Carrie Underwood, Marty Stuart and more

• Actors Hugh Laurie and John C. Reilly bring their bands to Oregon • A guide to out of town events

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. Email to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ADVERTISING 541-382-1811

Take advantage of the full line of Bulletin products. Call 541-385-5800.

The Bulletin

RESTAURANTS • 10 MUSIC • 3 • COVER STORY: Punk masses set to gather at Midtown for Social Distortion • Feedback: MCA and mortality • Lindsey Buckingham comes to Bend • Sweet Bonnie Gayle & The Rural Demons begin Horned Hand residency • Domino hosts David Nelson, Moonalice • The Prairie Rockets at Jackson’s Corner • 4 Peaks fest plans three nights of music • The 2012 Deschutes County Fair lineup • An update on Last Band Standing

• A review of the Airport Cafe

GAMING • 23

FINE ARTS • 12

• A review of “Prototype 2” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

• Randall Martin’s gore and goodness • Charles Finn to read from new book • Crown City quartet plays in Bend • Raku group to hold sale this weekend • Bend Poetry Slam returns Monday • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

OUTDOORS • 15 • Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

CALENDAR • 16

GOING OUT • 8

• A week full of Central Oregon events

• Vagabond Opera’s CD-release show • A listing of live music, DJs, karaoke, open mics and more

PLANNING AHEAD • 18

Every spring the Bulletin honors Central Oregon high school students with a special section spotlighting each school, a list of graduates, salutatorian and valedictorian. Be a part of this well received keepsake magazine to show support of our local graduates.

• A listing of upcoming events • Talks and classes listing

Advertising Deadline: 5:00pm, Tuesday, May 29, 2012 Publishes: Wednesday, June 13, 2012 Call your Bulletin Advertising Representative today

541-382-1811

MOVIES • 25 • “Dark Shadows,” “Footnote” and “The Kid With a Bike” open in Central Oregon • “Tim and Eric’s Billion Dollar Movie,” “The Vow” and “Underworld: Awakening” are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

PAGE 3

music

A true individual • Nearly 35 years into Social Distortion, Mike Ness still does what he wants By David Jasper The Bulletin

M

ike Ness never crossed paths with Beastie Boy Adam “MCA” Yauch. But given that the two were musical contemporaries and veterans of American punk rock’s early days, Ness had some thoughts on Yauch’s passing when he spoke to The Bulletin on Saturday, just 24 hours after the news of Yauch’s death from cancer broke. “Part of your youth is — gone,” said Ness, 50, the singer, songwriter and guitarist for Social

Distortion, a band whose name is synonymous with SoCal punk. “I never met them, but they had a few songs I really liked. I just thought they were cool because they did what they wanted.” Ness knows all about doing what he wants as the only remaining founding member of Social D, which is coming up on its 35th anniversary next year. More immediately, the band is coming to Bend on Wednesday for a show at the Midtown Ballroom (see “If you go”) as part of a six-week tour.

“Punk rock was supposed to be about individuality,” continued Ness, known for his abilities as a between-song storyteller with a biting wit. “So, you know, I think the Beastie Boys are just as punk as Social Distortion because of that (individuality). I’ve seen so many Dickies-wearing, tattooed, f---ing grease-haired generic punk guys I could just puke. There’s more to it, guys, than trying to look like everyone else, and sound (like everyone else). “You know, that’s kind of why

we chose to incorporate Americana into our style,” he said, “because by the mid-’80s, punk, like anything else, was starting to stereotype itself.” Before we continue, let’s review “A Brief History of Social Distortion,” the helpful history page at www .socialdistortion.com: The band formed in 1978 in Orange County, Calif., and before it even released an album proper, Social Distortion’s 1982 tour with two other huge acts of the era, Youth Brigade and Minor Threat, was the subject of a documentary, “Another State of Mind.” Continued Page 5

Submitted photo

Mike Ness has fronted Social Distortion since he formed the band in 1978.

If you go What: Social Distortion with Toadies and Lindi Ortega When: 8 p.m Wednesday, doors open 7 p.m. Where: Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost: $35, available in advance (with additional fees) at www .bendticket.com, www .ticketweb.com and Ranch Records (541-389-6116) in Bend Contact: www.random presents.com


www.smolichmotors.com

PAGE 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

MCA and our mortality • Why the passing of the coolest Beastie Boy hits harder than we expected it would

T

here are (at least) two reasons I probably shouldn’t write this column: 1. Music writers are supposed to be hip, with it and plugged into what’s cool and contemporary. The last thing you want to read from your favorite music writer is 900 hand-wrung words about feeling old and mortal. 2. The news is seven days old now. It was May 4 when word of the death of rap icon Adam “MCA” Yauch of the Beastie Boys began to surface and spread, before completely taking over my Facebook and Twitter feeds for days. It was, in my little part of the world, an outpouring of grief for a musician that exceeded anything I’ve seen in recent memory — not Levon Helm, not Amy Winehouse, not even Michael Jackson. Maybe Kurt Cobain was comparable, but that’s hardly recent; the world was different in 1994, as were the circumstances around his death. But there’s one reason I am going ahead and writing this column, and that’s because I spent much of the past week listening to old Beastie Boys songs and watching the

FEEDBACK BY BEN SALMON

band’s interviews and reading other folks’ thoughts on Yauch, his art, his spiritual journey and what he meant to a generation: people my age (35), and older (up to 50ish, probably), and some outliers on either side of that range. This is not a reaction I would’ve predicted if you’d asked me two weeks ago how I’d feel if Adam Yauch died. Yet seven days later, I’m thinking about him. I don’t believe the outpouring of grief and my own preoccupation with Yauch’s death are borne solely out of the Beastie Boys’ stature in pop music over the past 25 years. They were never the biggest band in the world, nor the best, at least in my mind. It’s not entirely borne out of fandom, either. I, for example, am hardly a Beasties obsessive. I listened to the first four albums a lot and thought they ranged from pretty good to excellent, lost interest in the late 1990s, and was pleasantly surprised that last year’s “Hot

The Associated Press file photo

The Beastie Boys, photographed in 2006. From left are Michael Diamond, Adam Horovitz and Adam Yauch. Yauch died last week at age 47 after a three-year battle against cancer.

Sauce Committee Part Two” record was a solid listen. I’m nowhere close to a super-fan. What I do think is interesting about the reaction to Yauch’s death is that it represents my generation’s reaction to our own mortality, which walked up out of nowhere and slapped us last week. Of course, it doesn’t take the death of a stranger to face the fact that you’re getting older. That’s a feeling I’ve been grappling with a lot over the past few years. But it sure helps reinforce those feelings when that stranger is someone you grew up with, even if he didn’t know it. You see, when Yauch and his band mates — Michael “Mike D” Diamond and Adam “Ad-Rock” Horovitz — burst onto the scene with their controversial “License to Ill” album in the mid-1980s, they were young and crass, prone to pushing buttons and testing limits, guzzling beer and ogling girls. Kind of like a wide swath of their suddenly huge throng of fans. Four years later came the huge artistic leap of “Paul’s Boutique,” followed three years later by a renewed inter-

est in their instruments (the Beasties famously started as a punk band) on “Check Your Head,” and then the ambition and commercial resurgence of “Ill Communication,” the final chapter of what many consider the band’s peak artistic period. Listening to those four records (released over an eight-year span) now is like watching a bratty child grow into a wide-eyed and well-developed college kid. The awkward stages and annoying behavior fade away, replaced by tremendous, world-changing potential. The change is most striking in Yauch, who transformed from a scruffy, beercan-crushing lout into a political activist and spiritual leader who spit gravelly rhymes about respecting both mothers and Mother Earth. If you’re the right age, and you look closely (the benefit of hindsight doesn’t hurt), you can see yourself growing up in Yauch’s example. I clearly remember giggling like a preteen at the bawdiest moments of “License to Ill.” Because, well, I was 10. I recall digging into the vintage funk/soulsample paradise of “Paul’s Boutique” just as my own

affinity for soaking up musical history was beginning to bloom. And one of my most vivid adolescent memories is blasting “Ill Communication” in my friend Mark’s car, cruising our hometown for no good reason other than to celebrate our rapidly expanding freedom. Months later, the climax of the Beasties’ then-megahit “Sabotage” was the highlight of my first Lollapalooza experience. There are a lot of kids … er, old folks like me who watched Adam Yauch mature from afar while experiencing a similar arc in their own lives. And now, he’s gone, and we can’t blame the things that have taken other musicians from us too soon; he wasn’t a junkie or a suicide risk. He was just a guy — a father and husband, a rapper and bassist, a Buddhist, a filmmaker. A guy with his share of gray hairs who battled cancer, like too many others. He looked like me (only much cooler). And losing him is bigger than just losing a Beastie Boy. It feels like losing one of us. — Reporter: 541-383-0377, bsalmon@bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

music

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 5

Mother’s Day at The Horned Hand

A

winter of personal strife had James Ryan Adams, frontman of the local doom-folk band Rural Demons, reaching for the ultimate source of comfort: his mother, a snowbird who lives in Bend in the summer and heads south when it’s cold. “Things were really bad over the winter for me,” Adams said this week. “I’ve been a big ol’ mama’s boy for as long as I can remember, so basically I spent the whole winter wishing (she) was here so I could just sit around and sing with her.” Adams grew up singing old country and gospel songs with his mom, Bonnie Gayle Adams, who has been playing music for more than a halfcentury. So he knew that if he could just get within harmonizing range of her, everything would be OK. He just had to wait until … well, now, when she’s back in town. On Sunday — Mother’s Day, mind you — the two will kick off a fourweek residency at The Horned Hand that’s being billed as “Sweet Bonnie Gayle & The Rural Demons Present: Oh So Many Years.”

The idea is simple: Mom and son and son’s band will spend four Sunday evenings playing country classics and gospel standards like those the son grew up hearing Mom play around the house. The series will end June 3. Each show is free so all can attend, said the younger Adams, though he admits he has his own motive for the residency, too. “I took an idea of just literally miss-

ing my mom and wanting her to sing with me in my living room and made it into (this),” he said. “It’s just me being selfish … and making it into a thing that other people can enjoy.” Sweet Bonnie Gayle & The Rural Demons Present: Oh So Many Years; 8 p.m. Sunday; free; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www.facebook .com/thehornedhand.

From Page 3 Finally, in 1983, Social Distortion released its debut full-length, the seminal “Mommy’s Little Monster,” which included, of course, the driving title track and “Another State of Mind,” perpetual mainstays among Social D’s live sets. The punk scene was still chiefly underground in the mid-’80s, but Social Distortion was among its bigger success stories. “Monster,” as it says on the site, “gained the band a national name in punk circles.” The group began working on its next album by 1985, even though by then Ness was a full-blown heroin addict, as every article written about the band for years to come would explain. Drugs and brushes with the law delayed Social Distortion’s follow-up, “Prison Bound,” until 1988. We now resume where we left off: Ness’ explanation of how the band steered into Americana territory, embracing a multitude of influences beyond the Ramones (not that there’s anything wrong with the Ramones). “The bands that survived were the ones that were not afraid to do what they wanted,” he said, “even though I remember getting flak for covering a Johnny Cash song (‘Ring of Fire’) or writing a song like ‘Ball and Chain.’” (Both are on the band’s 1990 selftitled album.)

“You know, it’s like, ‘Well, that’s not very hardcore,’” Ness said in an excellent impersonation of a judgmental lunkhead. “It’s like, ‘Well, maybe you should listen to the lyrics.’ I love tearing down stereotypes and stuff like that.” He defied expectations further when, in 1999, he released a fine pair of back-to-back solo records exploring his rootsy influences. The first, “Cheating at Solitaire,” included original songs and covers, including Bob Dylan’s “Don’t Think Twice” and Hank Williams’ “You Win Again,” plus a song (“Misery Loves Company”) with one of Ness’ heroes, Bruce Springsteen. Later that same year, a similarly rootsy recording followed called “Under the Influences.” In 2000, Dennis Danell, Social Distortion’s guitarist and second-longest member, died of a brain aneurysm. The band regrouped, but didn’t release another album until 2004’s “Sex, Love and Rock ’n’ Roll.” Ness produced Social Distortion’s most recent studio album, 2011’s “Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes,” which features the band’s current lineup: Ness, of course, along with guitarist Jonny Wickersham, bassist Brent Harding and drummer David Hidalgo Jr. “It was a risk, you know?” Ness said of the fact that he produced the

album. “I didn’t get to where I am today without taking risks.” It stands among his proudest accomplishments, he said, alongside “being acknowledged by such people as Springsteen; those are huge milestones. I enjoyed it so much that I can’t see ever going back” to using other producers. These days, Ness has promising news for Social Distortion fans who have grown accustomed to, and possibly frustrated by, half-decade waits between studio albums. He recently built a new studio near his home. “The place is an inspiration, so I’m really excited to get into the writing … it’s a big man cave,” he said. “We don’t want another large gap to go by in between records. I think this time I realized the creativity didn’t have to stop when the record got finished. “In the past, I’d finish a record, and put the guitars away and get in press and tour mode. I’d put the pen and paper away. This time, I left that door open and it’s a great thing to do. It doesn’t really have to stop when the record is done.” Sounds like, after all these years, he’s still learning. “Of course,” he said. “It’s like anything, be learning until the day you die.”

SWEET BONNIE GAYLE & THE RURAL DEMONS Courtesy Lucy Charlton

— Ben Salmon

— Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com

MAY 17 Lindsey Buckingham

PURE PRAIRIE LEAGUE

19 Pure Prairie League 24 Bend 2030

Amie; Love You Tonight

JUNE 1

Sports Trivia Bowl

2

Cascade School of Music

7

Asleep at the Wheel

14 Singing Chef

Singing Chef

15 Caldera Film Fest

Food and Music of Italy

16 Story Stars

Tickets & Information 541-317-0700 www.towertheatre.org “The Tower Theatre”


PAGE 6 • GO! MAGAZINE

music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

A towering achievement • Lindsey Buckingham comes to Tower Theatre

Mother’s Day Hanging Baskets & Premium Annuals Trees • Shrubs • Perennials • Grasses

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F

or all the things Lindsey Buckingham has done in his life, his place at the helm of Fleetwood Mac’s “Rumours” — one of the 10 bestselling albums of all time, according to the Recording Industry Association of America — continues to tower over his career. One can imagine that shadow as both a blessing and a curse. Without “Rumours,” who knows where Buckingham, a Californian and multi-instrumentalist, would’ve ended up. Certainly his talent for pop music might have carried him to stardom, but there’s no doubt that tens of millions of records sold and an Album of the Year Grammy will open a few doors, including the one to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, which Fleetwood Mac joined in 1998. Surely, Buckingham is appreciative of the opportunities that came his way post-“Rumours.” Still, 35 years after its release, it’s not hard to see how Buckingham might also be tired of hearing about — and playing songs from — his grand, emotionally raw masterpiece, especially given that he continues to record, and prolifically. Last year’s “Seeds We Sow” was his third solo effort in five years. For example: Buckingham will come to Bend Thursday for an intimate oneman show — billed as “an evening

Who’s playing the Deschutes Co. fair?

LIMIT ONE COUPON PER PERSON PER VISIT • COUPON EXPIRES 5/15/12 Call for reservations, location & times: 541.783.7529 ext.209

The Deschutes County Fair’s free concert series has long boasted an array of country acts and classic rock bands, but in 2012 the lineup will include one of the hottest pop acts going, too. Here’s who’s playing the fair, to be held this summer at the fairgrounds in Redmond: Aug. 1 — Chris Young (country) Aug. 2 — Uncle Kracker (rock) Aug. 3 — Bad Company (rock) Aug. 4 — Hot Chelle Rae (pop) Young won the fourth season of “Nashville Star,” which is essentially country’s “American Idol.” Uncle Kracker got his start as a buddy of Kid Rock and has scored a handful

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM Courtesy Jeremy Cowart

with” — in which he’ll play songs from “Seeds” and previous solo faves. Plus, says his website, “a variety of Fleetwood Mac classics.” As if, at this point, he has a choice. Lindsey Buckingham; 8 p.m. Thursday; $62 and $96 plus fees, available through the venue; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; www .towertheatre.org.

Upcoming Concerts May 18 — 23 Shades (altrock), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, www. silvermoonbrewing.com. May 18 — Polyrhythmics (Afro-funk), Players Bar and Grill, Bend, www.p44p.biz. May 18 — Hopeless Jack and the Handsome Devil (blues), The Horned Hand, Bend, www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. May 18 — Huckle (grooverock), The Astro Lounge, Bend, www.4peaksmusic. com. May 19 — Chuck Pyle (zen cowboy), HarmonyHouse, Sisters, 541-549-2209. May 19 — Moondog Matinee (roots-rock), The Horned Hand, Bend, www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. May 19 — Naive Melodies (Talking Heads), Players Bar and Grill, Bend, www.p44p.biz May 19 — Pure Prairie League (country-rock), Tower Theatre, Bend, www. towertheatre.org. May 20 — Aceyalone and Sunspot Jonz (hip-hop), The Summit Saloon & Stage, Bend, www.summitsaloon. com. May 23 — Hey Marseilles (indie-pop), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www.mcmenamins.com. May 25 — The Shins (pop-rock), Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend, www. bendconcerts.com.

— Ben Salmon

of hits since. And Bad Company is the English band behind classic rock radio staples such as “Feel Like Makin’ Love” and “Can’t Get Enough.” But it’s Hot Chelle Rae that stands out here. The ultra-slick pop act comprises four young guys whose parents have had successful careers in music, and whose songs — “Tonight Tonight” and “I Like It Like That” especially — have been inescapable over the past year or so. HCR is, essentially, a guitar-based boy band that has toured with Taylor Swift and won New Artist of the Year at the American Music Awards. And this summer, they’ll stop in Redmond to rock the Hooker Creek Event Center! Tickets will be free and available all over Central Oregon, but you

have to pay admission to the fair to go to the show. Look for more info closer to the fair or visit www .expo.deschutes.org.

David Nelson and Moonalice Saturday Attention fans of the jam: Saturday night at the Domino Room is your night. This show started, kind of, with Bay Area jam band Moonalice booked to play Players Bar & Grill, but then the David Nelson Band was added to (the top of) the bill and — given the sizable audience in our little burg for this kind of stuff — the whole thing was moved to a bigger room. Continued next page


music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

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PAGE 7

WEEKLY RECAP 28 local bands are battling for the title of Last Band Standing each Thursday at the Century Center (70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend).

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On May 3, Death of a Hitman and The Human Microphone advanced to the semifinals. Last night’s winner was chosen after press time. Next week’s battle is at 8 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, visit www.lastbandstanding.net. Last night’s contestants: All You All, Cadence, Cognitive Riot, Demigod, The Great Hiatum Next Thursday’s contestants: Doc Brown’s Delorean, Kleverkill, Stillfear, Truck Stop Gravy Already in the semifinals: Broken Down Guitars, Death of a Hitman, Greyside, The Human Microphone, Jaccuzi, The Vaulted — Ben Salmon

From previous page Why? Well, if you don’t recognize the name David Nelson, you should know that he not only fronts his own namesake band, but he also played with Jerry Garcia for years, including on a bunch of Grateful Dead albums (most notably “Workingman’s Dead” and “American Beauty”). Plus, he’s a founding member of New Riders of the Purple Sage, the band that turned Peter Rowan’s “Panama Red” into a hit. Moonalice should be familiar to local music lovers. The band — led by tech-biz venture capitalist and friend-of-Bono Roger McNamee — has been through Bend many times and is known for broadcasting its concerts via Twitter and for its exploratory improvisational jams. With Mickey Hart in town last week and this show coming up, Deadheads should be in heaven right now. Oh, one more thing: Everyone in attendance gets a free cupcake! David Nelson Band, with Moonalice; 9 p.m. Saturday, doors open 8 p.m.; $17 plus fees in advance at outlets listed on the website below, $20 at the door; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www .randompresents.com.

The Prairie Rockets, sans Patty, tonight It’s been nearly two months since a St. Patrick’s Day auto accident between Bend and Sisters critically injured Patty Meehan, banjo player for local acoustic Americana trio The Prairie Rockets, and claimed the life of her husband, Dean Hale. Meehan is still recuperating and “doing very well,” according to her two band mates, guitarist Shirley Walker and mandolinist Aspen

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Awbrey Glen Golf Club

DAVID NELSON BAND Courtesy Bob Minkin

Clayton, who’ll play their second public gig since the accident tonight at Jackson’s Corner. Meehan won’t perform, which means the Rockets’ breezy, sweet harmonies won’t be operating at 100 percent. But they’ve recruited some friends to help “round out the sound,” including Mäi Hyman of Moon Mountain Ramblers on banjo and Dave Ehle on guitar. Hear ’em (or learn more) at www .theprairierockets.com. The Prairie Rockets; 6-8 tonight; free; Jackson’s Corner, 845 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; www.theprairie rockets.com.

4 Peaks fest plans lots of pre-funks The 4 Peaks Music Festival is just around the corner, with a weekend of acoustic rock soul and bluegrass planned for June 22-24 on a ranch near Tumalo. But the 4 Peaks crew wants to start spreading the love next week,

Get out and Play in May! beginning with a free show by astral jammers High Beamz on Thursday night at The Summit Saloon & Stage. Led by guitarist Chris Zanardi, High Beamz says three times on its Facebook that it aims to make music to crack the portal open. Interpret that however you wish. The 4 Peaks fun continues next weekend, with Bay Area acoustic groove-rockers Huckle (helmed by Simon Kurth, aka former Poor Man’s Whiskey singer Eli Jebidiah) at The Astro Lounge on May 18 and a cast of locals (Mark Ransom, Truck Stop Gravy, Blackstrap, Pitchfork Revolution, etc.) playing Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom on May 19. Both shows will be taking donations at the door. Also, the 4 Peaks crew will have discounted tickets to the festival for sale at all three events. High Beamz; 8 p.m. Thursday; free; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; www.4peaksmusic.com. — Ben Salmon

May 12 ~ Get Golf Ready “Three and Tee” Program starts today at 4pm. Only $99 for three one-hour clinics in May and five 9-hole rounds of golf to hone in your new skills after all three clinics are completed! May 12 ~ Callaway Demo Day May 25 ~ Taylor Made Demo Day June 2 ~ Mizuno Demo Day June 16 ~ US Open Demo Day Junior Season Passes available Collegiate Season Passes available

All Golfers are Welcome! Visit www.awbreyglen.com for more info. Come for the Golf—Stay for the Friendships!

Golf Shop & Restaurant Open to the Public

2 5 0 0 N W AW B R E Y G L E N D R I V E • B E N D w w w. a w b r e y g l e n . c o m • 5 4 1 - 3 8 8 - 8 5 2 6


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

going out HIGHLIGHTS

Looking for something to do? Check out our listing of live music, DJs, karaoke, open mics and more happening at local nightspots. Find lots more at www.bendbulletin.com/events.

TODAY LEE BARKER AND ALAN YANKUS: Jazz; 6 p.m.; 750 Wine Bar & Bistro, 427 S.W. Eighth St., Redmond; 541-504-7111. THE PRAIRIE ROCKETS: Americana; 6 p.m.; Jackson’s Corner, 845 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-647-2198. (Pg. 7) HILST & COFFEY: Chamber-folk; 6:30 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 9570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 190, Bend; 541-728-0095. DOWNHILL RYDER: Roots-rock; 7 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-639-5546. PAT THOMAS: Country; 7 p.m.; Tumalo Feed Co., 64619 U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-2202. TOM AND HEATHER: From Out of the Blue; 7 p.m.; Brassie’s Bar at Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-548-4220. DAVID GILLESPIE: 7:30 p.m.; Velvet, 805 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-728-0303. BOBBY LINDSTROM BAND: Rock and blues; 8 p.m.; Kelly D’s, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., Bend; 541-389-5625.

Courtesy Ben Z. Mund Photography

VAGABOND OPERA’S CD-RELEASE SHOW

BLACKSMITH AFTER DARK: Live DJ; 9 p.m.; The Blacksmith Restaurant, 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-318-0588. LOST MAVEN: Rock; 9 p.m.; $5; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. silvermoonbrewing.com. DJ HARLO AND DJ DARKSYDE: 9 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; www.liquidclub.net. DJ STEELE: 10 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440.

SATURDAY REBECCA HILARY SMITH AND FRIENDS: Classics and Celtic; 1 p.m.; Strictly Organic Coffee Co., 6 S.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-330-6061. DEB YAGER AND BO REYNOLDS: Americana; 6 p.m.; Cork Cellars Wine Bar & Bottle Shop, 160 S. Fir St., Sisters; 541-549-2675. LITTLE BLACK DRESS: Jazz; 6 p.m.; Scanlon’s, 61615 Athletic Club Drive, Bend; 541-382-8769.

DJ CHRIS: Live DJ; 8 p.m.; Checkers Pub, 329 S.W. 6th St., Redmond; 541-548-3731.

ACOUSTIC CAFE WITH JOSH CRUSON: 6:30 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 9570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 190, Bend; 541-728-0095.

KARAOKE: 8 p.m.; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771.

SCOTT WYATT: Rock; 6:30 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-639-5546.

KARAOKE: 8 p.m.; Sandbagger Dinner House, 5165 Clubhouse Drive, Crooked River Ranch; 541-923-8655.

BOBBY LINDSTROM: Blues; 6:30 p.m.; Crave Restaurant, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-504-6006.

LEIF JAMES: Blues; 8 p.m.; Fox’s Billiard Lounge, 937 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-647-1363.

CHRIS BELAND: Folk; 7 p.m.; portello winecafe, 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-385-1777.

THORNS OF CREATION: Metal, with Below Akheron; 8 p.m.; Third Street Pub, 314 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-306-3017.

CAROLYN CRUSO: Folk; 7 p.m.; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-617-9600.

OUT OF HAND BAND: Rock; 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889.

PAT THOMAS: Country; 7 p.m.; Tumalo Feed Co., 64619 U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-2202.

Portland’s Vagabond Opera is the kind of band that sounds well-suited for the eclectic atmosphere at Bend’s McMenamins Old St. Francis School, if not the small stage inside Father Luke’s Room. That’s where the group’s six members will gather Wednesday for a show celebrating their most recent album, “Sing For Your Lives.” Released last summer, it’s a playful and energetic showcase for the band’s globetrotting influences, which range from hot jazz and Balkan folk-punk to klezmer,

TOM AND HEATHER: From Out of the Blue; 7 p.m.; Brassie’s Bar at Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-548-4220. KARAOKE W/ ROCKIN’ ROBIN: 8 p.m.; Kelly D’s, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., Bend; 541-389-5625. JOLIFF: Indie-folk, with Rural Demons; 8 p.m.; $5; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www.facebook. com/thehornedhand. KARAOKE WITH BIG JOHN: 8 p.m.; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771. OUT OF HAND BAND: 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. BLACKSMITH AFTER DARK: Live DJ; 9 p.m.; The Blacksmith Restaurant, 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-318-0588. DAVID NELSON BAND: Jam-band, with Moonalice; $17-$20; 9 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.randompresents.com. (Pg. 6) DJ HUFF AND DJ DARKSYDE: 9 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; www.liquidclub.net. THE SWEATBAND: Funk; $3; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331. DISCO INFERNO: With MC Mystic; 10 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116. DJ STEELE: 10 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440.

SUNDAY ACOUSTIC OPEN MIC: With Burnin’ Moonlight, PA provided; 4 p.m.; Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub, 913 N.E. 3rd St., Bend; 541-383-1694. LISA DAE AND ROBERT LEE TRIO: Jazz; 5 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889.

Gypsy pop and vintage Americana, all rolled into a modern-day Bohemian cabaret that values the visual as much as the sound. And Vagabond Opera’s appeal is neatly captured in its own name: This is the skillful drama of opera pushed through a shaggy, shadowy prism designed to transport you to anywhere but here. “We love storytelling, creating a world on stage or on a recording,” says member Robin Jackson. “We bring people into a dark cabaret where they forget themselves.” Find all the details on the show below.

GREG BOTSFORD: Jam-pop; 6 p.m.; 5 Fusion & Sushi Bar, 821 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-323-2328. SWEET BONNIE GAYLE & THE RURAL DEMONS: Country and gospel classics; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www.facebook. com/thehornedhand. (Pg. 5)

MONDAY DOC BROWN’S DELOREAN: Rock; 5 p.m.; Amalia’s, 915 N.W. Wall St., Bend. BEND POETRY SLAM: Open mic poetry; $3 suggested donation; 8 p.m., sign-ups at 7:30 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St.; 541-480-4054 or loudgirlproductions@live.com. (Pg. 13)

TUESDAY BOBBY LINDSTROM: Rock and blues; 5 p.m.; Velvet, 805 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-728-0303. THEE HOBO GOBBELINS: Thrashicana, with Wild Eyed Revolvers; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www.facebook. com/thehornedhand. ROB WYNIA & THE SOUND: Rock; $7$10; 9 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-2558 or www.p44p.biz.

WEDNESDAY TIM COFFEY: Folk; 5:30 p.m.; Flatbread Community Oven, 375 S.W. Powerhouse Drive; Bend; 541-728-0600. OPEN MIC/ACOUSTIC JAM: With Bobby Lindstrom; 6:30-9 p.m.; Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub, 913 N.E. 3rd St., Bend; 541-383-1694. KARAOKE W/ ROCKIN’ ROBIN: 7 p.m.; Kelly D’s, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., Bend; 541-389-5625. VAGABOND OPERA: Gypsy cabaret; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend;

— Ben Salmon

541-382-5174. SOCIAL DISTORTION: Roots-punk, with The Toadies and Lindi Ortega; $35; 8 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. randompresents.com. (Pg. 3) REGGAE NIGHT W/ MC MYSTIC: 9 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116.

THURSDAY LINDY GRAVELLE: Country and pop; 5:30 p.m.; Brassie’s Bar at Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-548-4220. ARRIDIUM: Rock; 6 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 9570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 190, Bend; 541-728-0095. OPEN MIC: 6-8 p.m.; Strictly Organic Coffee Co., 6 S.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-330-6061. HILST & COFFEY: Folk, with The Quons; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. THE ROCKHOUNDS: Acoustic; 7 p.m.; Kelly D’s, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., Bend; 541-389-5625. 4 PEAKS PRE-FUNK WEEKEND: With High Beamz; free; 8 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; www.4peaksmusic.com. (Pg. 7) LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.lastbandstanding.net. (Pg. 7) OPEN MIC JAM: With Scott Foxx; 8 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. DISCOTHEQUE DJS: Alt-electroncia; with Critical Hit and more; 9 p.m.; The Blacksmith Restaurant, 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-318-0588. n T O SUBMIT: Email events@bendbulletin.com. Deadline is 10 days before publication. Please include date, venue, time and cost.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

PAGE 9

music releases Carrie Underwood

Norah Jones

‘BLOWN AWAY’ Arista Records “Blown Away,” the new album by Carrie Underwood, the shiny but tough country star, starts out loud, sassy, rollicking and wise. “Good Girl” is the first song and it plays out like a sequel to Underwood’s 2006 smash “Before He Cheats,” except instead of taking out her dissatisfaction on her ex, she opts for unity and warns the next woman instead. After that it’s a one-two punch of brutality: a quick-paced “Blown Away,” in which a young woman hides in her basement, waiting out a tornado that she hopes her abusive, alcoholic father sleeping upstairs doesn’t survive; followed by “Two Black Cadillacs,” in which a wife and a mistress conspire to kill the man they share, not a murder ballad so much as a murder celebration. Underwood enjoys rage; her huge voice, both naive and muscular, is well suited to it. Her best songs have historically been in the range between fury and resentment. “Blown Away” is only her fourth album, but that number belies her concrete-hard place in the country firmament, with a combination of vocal ambition and toughness that recalls a younger Martina McBride. While the album starts bold and mechanically impressive, it gets progressively quieter over the course of its first half, as if she’s taking a break from fire-breathing. “Do You Think About Me” is tepid, “Nobody Ever Told You” is bland and blithe,

“LITTLE BROKEN HEARTS” EMI Music Norah Jones is tougher than she appears. Though the Grammy-winning singer has sold millions of albums by creating delicate pop songs tinged with jazz and country, her musical vision is actually quite sturdy. She proves it on “Little Broken Hearts,” a collaboration with producer-performer Danger Mouse, known for his hip-hop creations with Gnarls Barkley. Jones’ gorgeous, unassuming voice could easily have been overwhelmed by the surroundings Danger Mouse provides — the chugging blues-rock of the single “Happy Pills,” the trip-hoppy rhythms of “After the Fall,” the R&B guitar

Here and there Oct. 7 — Rose Garden, Portland; tickets on sale May 18; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673.

and “One Way Ticket” — part Jimmy Buffett, part Jason Mraz — is Underwood at her least convincing. Relaxation is not her milieu. She needs muscles pulled taut, veins popping through the skin. “Blown Away” builds steam again from that point. Underwood holds back her voice on “Good in Goodbye,” but by the rowdy and sinister “Cupid’s Got a Shotgun,” her nostrils are practically flaring. On a few of this album’s early songs, a perplexing amount of digital effects are applied to Underwood’s vocals, processing she neither needs nor benefits from, even if it is par for the course for other country singers. She may be unhappy, but hearing her tense up is half the fun. — Jon Caramanica, The New York Times

The Wanted “THE WANTED” Universal Records You can tell we’re in the midst of another boy-band bonanza by the quality of songs on The Wanted’s eponymous debut. “The Wanted” is packed with top-shelf dancepop like its smash single “Glad You Came,” up-tempo and well crafted — built for a single singer but adapted for a group that sings more in unison than harmony. The quintet actually sounds more at home on the stylish, slightly more buttoned-up Europop of “All Time Low” than the island-tinged “Glad You Came”

Rufus Wainwright “OUT OF THE GAME” Decca Records Finally, Rufus Wainwright returns to pop. Since 2007’s “Release the Stars,” Wainwright has written an opera (“Prima Donna”), released a ponderous album of Shakespeare sonnets turned into songs (“All Days Are Nights: Songs for Lulu”), and recreated, lovingly, Judy Garland’s “Live at Carnegie Hall” set. For “Out of the Game,” Wainwright drafted producer Mark Ronson, who in turn brought in the Dap-Kings, the R&B band he borrowed from Sharon Jones

Here and there Aug. 15 — Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend; www .bendconcerts.com or 541318-5457. Aug. 17 — McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; www .cascadetickets.com or 800514-3849.

work and hip-hop groove of “Say Goodbye.” But Jones holds her own musically and lyrically. “Little Broken Hearts” is, after all, another breakup album, like her previous one “The Fall,” written after another painful failed relationship. Jones examines a much deeper pain this time around, though. She writes of murdering her lover’s mis-

for Amy Winehouse’s “Back to Black.” They crafted a ’70s FM sound inspired by Elton John, “Young Americans”-era David Bowie, and Steely Dan. It’s sometimes extravagant (“Welcome to the Ball”), sometimes languorous (“Respectable Drive”), and mercifully free of pretension (almost — the overly complicated melody of “Montauk” falls flat). It’s good to have Wainwright back in the pop game: Like his father, Loudon Wainwright III, he’s witty and pointed; like his mother, the late Kate McGarrigle, he’s emotionally forthright and nuanced. He doesn’t shy

Marty Stuart and his Fabulous Superlatives

or its trancey new single “Chasing the Sun.” But in any case, The Wanted is certainly living its pop moment to the fullest. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

“NASHVILLE, VOLUME 1: TEAR THE WOODPILE DOWN” Sugar Hill Records Since he teamed up in 2001 with the Fabulous Superlatives — guitarist Kenny Vaughan, drummer Harry Stinson, bassist Paul Martin — Marty Stuart has been making the best music of his career, even if the onetime “Hillbilly Rock” champion is no longer having hits as he did in the ‘90s. He continues on that roll here. As Stuart puts it in the liner notes: “Today the most outlaw

thing you can possibly do in Nashville, Tennessee, is play country music.” OK, that’s a bit of hyperbole, but make no mistake: This

tress in the creepy “Miriam” and twists the simple ballad “She’s 22” into a complaint about being left for a younger woman, while everyone seems to get hurt in “4 Broken Hearts.” The scars show throughout “Little Broken Hearts,” but they seem to have only made Jones stronger. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

from ambition, but these sophisticated pop productions suit his sly, often cynical, songs well. —Steve Klinge, The Philadelphia Inquirer

is country music, no holds barred, from the propulsive twang of the title track to the aching balladry of “A Matter of Time” and the hot picking of the instrumental “Hollywood Boogie.” And the material matches the excellence of the music. Stuart wrote seven of the 10 numbers, augmented by the cautionary tale “Sundown at Nashville,” the honky-tonk lament “Holding on to Nothing,” and Hank Williams’ “Pictures From Life’s Other Side,” on which the always history-minded Stuart duets with Hank III. — Nick Cristiano, The Philadelphia Inquirer


PAGE 10 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

restaurants

Ready for

TAKEOFF

Joe Klin e / The Bulletin

Din e rs lo o k o ve r th e me n u s on a recent morning at Airport Cafe in Bend.

• Bend’s Airport Cafe serves solid breakfast and lunch fare By John Gottberg Anderson The Bulletin

B

old diners who venture east of Bend looking for Tibetan yak, Nalgai antelope or other exotic game meats may come away sorely disappointed when they learn that chef David Hatfield no longer wields a carving knife and spatula at Cafe 3456. But that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t check out the Airport Cafe, which has replaced the 3456 on the second floor of the Bend Municipal Airport’s Professional Air Building. The menu is far less colorful than it was under Hatfield, a well-known local culinary figure who sold the cafe in November when he became the executive chef at Seattle’s Hotel Alexis. There are

no more smoked-trout omelets or bowls of buffalo chili. Under new owners Don and Doug Peterman, the Airport Cafe has stripped down to basics. This is diner-style fare, make no mistake. Breakfast might be a Western omelet or a stack of buttermilk pancakes. Lunch could be a bacon cheeseburger, a BLT or a tuna melt on rye. Expect no frills. But the simple menu is tasty and well-prepared. And the kitchen crew is friendly and efficient, if few in number. Said the young woman who served, cooked and answered phones during my breakfast visit: “There’s no point in having two people in here in the morning. It’s just not busy enough.” Continued next page

Airport Cafe Location: 63136 Powell Butte Highway at Bend Municipal Airport Hours: 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. every day (lunch from 11 a.m.); happy hour 3 to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday Price range: Breakfast $7 to $11, lunch $6 to $12 Credit cards: American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa Kids’ menu: Many selections starting at $4 Vegetarian menu: Veggie omelets, tomato soup and grilled cheese Alcoholic beverages: Full bar Outdoor seating: Limited tables on decks

Reservations: No Contact: 541-318-8989

Scorecard OVERALL: B Food: B. Standard diner fare, uninspired but fresh and wellprepared. Service: B. Friendly and efficient, although the staff is few in number. Atmosphere: A-. Airport cafe has a propeller on the wall and windows on the runway. Value: B. Prices are average for what you get.


restaurants

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 11

From previous page

Aeronautical decor As befits the location of the neatly kept cafe, the decor emphasizes its connection to the airport. A rusted antique propeller, flanked by Oregon Duck and Oregon State Beaver banners, extends from the south wall. Simple posters and photographs extend the aviation theme. Most significantly, a full wall of windows provides an almostbird’s-eye view of Cessnas, Piper Cubs and Lear jets parked on the asphalt behind the building. Every so often, one of them taxis into position on the runway and takes off in full sight of diners. A couple of outside tables on an east-side balcony offer a fully acoustic perspective, best when the morning sun is shining brightly. Indoors, about 40 seats on a hardwood floor are entertained by classic rock of the 1970s and ’80s, streaming from a single flat-screen television. Tom Petty and Journey serenaded me as I lunched on a Cafe Burger. This was a fine sandwich with an excellent combination of flavors but was really nothing that an imaginative cook couldn’t have made at home. The ground beef, cooked medium, was served on a firm bun doctored with a guacamole spread. It was topped with bacon, sauteed onions, mushrooms and two processed cheeses (American and Swiss) as well as lettuce and tomato. I asked the server to recommend from a choice of sides that included potato salad, coleslaw and a green salad. She suggested French fries, which I found to be very ordinary.

Breakfast fare On a morning visit, my dining companion and I both opted for egg dishes — and out of curiosity, shared a pancake on the side. I had a dish called Don’s omelet, obviously a nod to one of the Petermans. (There’s also a Doug’s burger, featuring bacon, ham and egg, on the lunch menu.) My omelet was perfectly cooked and stuffed with fresh vegetables — spinach, sliced mushrooms and onions — as well as tangy Italian sausage. The accompanying red potatoes were chopped into home-fry size and sauteed with onions, and the entire course was nicely plated on a trefoil dish. My companion’s Kitchen Scramble would have contained everything but the kitchen sink had she not asked our server-cook to hold the bell pepper. Tossed with the scrambled eggs were sausage, ba-

A Sustainable Cup Drink it up! • Fair trade coffee makes a thoughtful gift • Convenient before or after the mountain • Supporting many of your favorite non-proits • 2 great locations! www.strictlyorganic.com Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Airport Cafe’s chicken and Swiss sandwich with cheddar, served with a side salad.

Next week: Broken Top Bottle Shop & Ale Cafe Visit www.bendbulletin.com/ restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants.

con and ham; mushrooms, onions, spinach and tomatoes; potatoes and cheese. On another occasion, my friend said, she would ask that the country gravy be served on the side, so that she might add it sparingly to her breakfast. Instead, the scramble was cloaked in the light, peppery, white gravy. Our plate-sized buttermilk pancake was sprinkled with powdered sugar and presented with a small pitcher of maple-flavored syrup. We both had the sense that it could have used another 30 seconds on the grill, as parts of the cake were slightly doughy. But it was a tasty alternative to everyday toast. Who needs Tibetan yak for breakfast when you can have eggs and pancakes?

June 1, then daily through the summer. 25545 S.W. Forest Service Road 1419, Camp Sherman; 541-595-6420, www.kokaneecafe.com. Speaking of Deschutes Brewery, a “Collage” tasting dinner in its brewpub tap room May 18 will celebrate a collaboration with Portland’s Hair of the Dog Brewing and the inauguration of the Conflux series of beers. Chefs will match beers with poached crab legs, cocoabraised oxtail and other courses at the dinner, scheduled from 6 to 9 p.m. A portion of proceeds will benefit NeighborImpact of Central Oregon. The dinner is limited to 80 seats; tickets may be purchased online for $85 per person. 1044 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-9242, http://collagedinnerbend.eventbrite .com. Bend chef Lisa Glickman will make her national television debut tomorrow when she appears at 11:30 a.m. on “The Perfect 3” on the Cooking Channel. Glickman is also scheduled to appear the following Saturday, May 19. In Bend, the segments may be seen through BendBroadband on channels 182 (Analog) and 782 (HD).

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541-330-6328 • 63595 Hunnell Road • Bend, Oregon 97701

BUILDERS

— Reporter: janderson@ bendbulletin.com

SMALL BITES When the Kokanee Cafe reopened last night near the Metolius River for its 2012 season, it had a new chef at its helm. Former Deschutes Brewery executive chef Matt Neltner has taken charge of the kitchen at the popular restaurant 14 miles northwest of Sisters. Open 5 p.m. to close Thursday to Sunday until

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PAGE 12 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

fine arts

Submitted photo

B end artist Randall Martin, 32, stands alongside the self-portrait “86’d Street” on Tuesday in The Gallery at Pinckney Center.

‘A savage wilderness’ • Bend artist takes cultural aspects to new levels in paintings By David Jasper The Bulletin

W

hen the Bend real estate bubble popped a few years ago, it meant a lot of things to a lot of people. But to former house framer Randall Martin, it was a boon — to his art career. Originally from Portland, Martin, 32, began drawing at the age of 7. “I would just look at things and copy them: flowers, things like that, and draw little cartoons. When I wasn’t drawing on paper, I was kind of drawing with my hands, even if I was just walking around,” he said. “I was a weird kid, I guess. Some people are just born like that. (They) think in images.”

Martin spent 13 years as a framer, moving to Bend about five years ago when construction was still booming. “When that fell off,” he said, “I just decided, ‘Well, why not do what I love to do?’” He began studying fine art three years ago at Central Oregon Community College. “I’m just a hundred times happier,” he said. Three of his oil paintings are included in the 2012 COCC Annual Art Student Exhibition, showing through June 1 in The Gallery at Pinckney Center (see “If you go”). “My painting, it’s hard to explain what exactly inspires my stuff,” he said. “My paintings are kind of like sort of a savage wilderness. Sometimes they’re really beau-

tiful; sometimes they’re kind of rough.” “Field Trip” shows children at play. With the Cascades in the background, it’s a scene of normalcy, except that instead of smiles where the faces would be, the figures are adorned with grinning skulls. Martin painted it in December and calls it a seasonally inspired painting. “It was kind of a dark and gloomy day at the Old Mill, and the kids were out there playing,” he said. Next to that is “86’d Street,” a self-portrait of Martin, a skateboarder, pushing south down Wall Street, several police cars in pursuit. Rather than explain meanings behind his work, Martin prefers for people to find their own interpretations. “People evoke what they want out of painting, so rather than explain it, I like for

If you go What: 2012 COCC Annual Art Student Exhibition When: Through June 1; gallery hours are from noon to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday Where: The Gallery at Pinckney Center, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way Cost: Free; prices of works vary Contact: 541-350-7753

people to get their own feeling with it,” he said. “I go for humor as well as, like I said, I want to evoke whatever the audience wants to see.” Continued next page


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

fine arts

GO! MAGAZINE •

Charles Finn to read in Bend

Crown City String Quartet returns

Raku pottery sale to celebrate moms

At 5:30 tonight, High Desert Journal editor and former Bend resident Charles Finn will read from his new book “Wild Delicate Seconds: 29 Wildlife Encounters” in The Nature of Words literary arts center, 224 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend. In his debut collection of 29 “micro essays” from Oregon State University Press, Finn writes of his mostly chance encounters with “a member (or members) of the fraternity of wildlife that call the Pacific Northwest home,” according to its preface. The reading will be followed by a book signing and reception. Admission is free and open to the public. Contact: www.thenatureofwords .org or 541-647-2233. Finn will also read at 2 p.m. Saturday at the High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97. The reading is included with the price of admission: $15 for adults, $12 for those 65 and older, $9 for ages 5-12, free for kids 4 and younger. Contact: www.highdesertmuseum .org or 541-382-4754.

The Crown City String Quartet will close out High Desert Chamber Music’s first year of concerts at The Oxford Hotel with a concert there at 7:30 p.m. Thursday. The group — founder Isabelle Senger, husband and wife Dane Little (cello) and Carrie Holzman-Little (viola), and violinist Ralph Morrison — has been performing in Central Oregon since 2008. Says Senger: “If the past is any indication, we should have record numbers for this evening.” The program includes works by Shostakovich, Mozart and Mendelssohn. Prior to the performance, Spotlight Chamber Players, part of HDCM’s Educational Outreach program, will perform selections by Bach, Haydn, and Mozart. This year’s SCP roster features Mateo Garza (violin), Hannah Ortman (violin), Ben Kroeker (viola) and Jonah Rosberg (cello). General admission is $35, $10 for students. Seating at the Oxford is limited; advance ticket purchase is recommended. The Oxford Hotel is located at 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend. Contact: www.highdesertchamber music.com.

Raku Artists of Central Oregon, or RACO, will celebrate its 20th anniversary with a Raku pottery sale, being held just for Mother’s Day gift giving, from noon to 7 p.m. today and 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at the Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend. The sale will feature platters, vases, pots, wall art, sculpture and jewelry. Admission is free. Contact: 541-350-2662.

From previous page Signs in the background have been altered: Instead of Pizza Mondo, a sign says “Push Mongo,” a skate term describing the act of pushing with one’s front foot. Where the real-world El Jimador would be, the sign reads “El Artista Loco,” “which I have tattooed across my chest,” said Martin, laughing. Martin broke his leg skating a couple of years ago. “Just goofing around, though. You always get hurt when you’re not trying,” he said. Since then, he’s been “painting more than skating, for sure.” The progress he’s made as an artist since he began studying at COCC has been “tremendous,” he said. “I’m at a point now where I’m painting 20, 30 hours a week, and when I get an image in my mind, I have to have it done before I can sleep. I’m busting paintings out like crazy.” Martin also does printmaking and speaks highly of the education he’s receiving at COCC. He works as an assistant to Bill Hoppe, director of the gallery and associate professor of art at the college. “I get to help teach painting, which is cool,” said Martin, who

PAGE 13

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Bend Poetry Slam set at Astro Lounge The next installment of the recently resurrected, monthly Bend Poetry Slam is happening Monday at The Astro Lounge in Bend. Poets of all kinds are welcome, but if you plan to read, you need to sign up by 7:30 p.m. Everybody else should be there by 8 p.m. The Astro Lounge is located at 939 N.W. Bond St. in downtown Bend. A $3 donation to help pay poets is suggested. Contact: loudgirlproductions@live. com or 541-480-4054. — David Jasper

CONTEMPORARY | WHIMSICAL | INSPIRING | COLLECTIBLE

MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY 869 NW WALL ST. 541-388-2107

www.mockingbird-gallery.com

KAREN BANDY DESIGN JEWELER Submitted photo

“Intro to a Revelation” is an oil painting by Randall Martin.

25 NW MINNESOTA AVE. #5 541-388-0155

www.karenbandy.com envisions continuing his art studies, possibly at Portland State University, and teaching art one day. The juried exhibit features 134 pieces representing about 75 students’ work, from still life and figure drawings to abstracts and ceramics. Hoppe said of Martin’s work, “I have complete, total admiration for what he’s doing, because he’s reaching out to places that other people aren’t necessarily trying to go to, and trying to integrate a lot of cultural aspects of contemporary culture into his work. “There’s no nostalgia, or if there is nostalgia, it’s nostalgia for the

macabre. I like that. He’s really willing to take chances.” Hoppe notes that the color field abstract Martin also contributed to the juried show is “just exactly the opposite direction of where he’s working” in the paintings “Field Trip” and “86’d Street.” “It’s exciting for me as an instructor to have a student who’s willing to commit, one, to his own convictions, his own visual imagery, and two, to work on a scale large enough and obsessively enough that we can really see it,” Hoppe said. “It shows up because he makes it show up.” — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com

SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING & GALLERY 834 NW BROOKS ST. 541-382-5884

www.sageframing-gallery.com

RED CHAIR GALLERY 103 NW OREGON AVE. 541-306-3176

www.redchairgallerybend.com www.downtownbend.org


PAGE 14 • GO! MAGAZINE

fine arts

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

ART EXHIBITS ALLEDA REAL ESTATE: Featuring works by Cameron Kaseberg; through May; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 1, Bend; 541-633-7590. AMBIANCE ART CO-OP: Featuring gallery artists; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ART BY KNIGHT: Featuring oil paintings by Laurel Knight and bronze sculpture by Steven L. Knight; 236 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-633-7488 or www. ArtbyKnight.com. ARTISTS’ GALLERY SUNRIVER: Featuring works by Hazel Reeves, Jeff Thompson, Julie McClay, Nancy Becker, Wynne Woolley and Roxanne McKay; through May, reception from 4-7 p.m. Saturday; 57100 Beaver Drive, Building 19; 541-593-4382 or www. artistsgallerysunriver.com. ATELIER 6000: Featuring “Art and Craft”; through May 28; 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759 or www. atelier6000.com. BEND CITY HALL: Featuring “INSIDE::OUT” works exploring how Bend’s external environment inspires its internal environment; through Sept. 28; 710 N.W. Wall St.; 541-388-5505. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004.

Submitted photo

“Paris Cafe,” by Wynne Woolley , will be on display through May at Artists’ Gallery Sunriver. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www. canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. CASCADE CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY: Featuring prints from the “Africa Series” and “Buddha Series”; through May; 390 S.W. Columbia St., Suite 110, Bend; 541-241-2266. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541549-1299 or www.donterra.com. DOWNTOWN BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Joys of Summer”; through Aug. 6; 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037.

FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “In Full Bloom,” works by Natasha Bacca, Joanne Donaca, Annie Ferder and Mike Kelly, with gallery artists; through May 27; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. FURNISH.: Featuring works by Marjorie Wood Hamlin; 761 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-617-8911. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-8683 or www.artlorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HELPING YOU TAX AND ACCOUNTING: Featuring paintings by Carol Armstrong; 632 S.W. Sixth St., Suite 2, Redmond; 541-504-5422. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY:

Redmond School of Dance

NOW ENROLLING Classes in Ballet, Jazz, Hip Hop, Tap and Liturgical 2332 S. Hwy 97, Redmond 541-548-6957 www.redmondschoolofdance.com

Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www. jenniferlakegallery.com. JUDI’S ART GALLERY: Featuring works by Judi Meusborn Williamson; 336 N.E. Hemlock St., Suite 13, Redmond; 360-325-6230. KAREN BANDY DESIGN JEWELER: Featuring new abstract horse paintings and new jewelry; through July 30; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; www.karenbandy.com or 541-388-0155. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson, Katherine Taylor, Donna Young and more; 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-388-4404 or www. lahainagalleries.com. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring photography by Michael C. Jensen; through May 24; 16425 First St.; 541-312-1090. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com. MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “Quiet on the Western Front,” works by Steven Lee Adams and Joseph Alleman; through May; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www. mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixed-media collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. NANCY P’S BAKING COMPANY: Featuring oil paintings by John O’Brien; through May; 1054 N.W. Milwaukee Ave., Bend; 541-322-8778. NORTH RIM LODGE: Featuring works by Karen Bandy; through May; 1500 N.W. Wild Rye Circle, Bend; 541-388-3001. OLD MILL DISTRICT: Featuring “Architects in Schools,” projects by Bend elementary school students; through May; 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 503-542-3825. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St.; 541-382-6694. PRONGHORN CLUBHOUSE: Featuring woven paper images by Alice Van Leunen; through June

5; 65600 Pronghorn Club Drive, Bend; 541-382-9398. QUILTWORKS: Featuring quilts by Dianne Browning and a group show of quilts by the Sew-Ciety Quilt Guild; through May; 926 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Suite B, Bend; 541-728-0527. RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring “Ancient Cutting Edge Art,” works by Larissa Spafford and Janice Rhodes; through May; 103 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-3176 or www.redchairgallerybend. com. ROTUNDA GALLERY: Featuring “Visual Apothecary,” works by Valerie Winterholler; through today; Robert L. Barber Library, Central Oregon Community College; 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7564. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: Featuring “Expressions,” works by Vickie Grive Levis; through May 28; 117 S.W. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-617-0900. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring “Oregon and More” works by Gordon and Kay Baker; through May 26; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: Featuring fiber art by Rosalyn Kliot; 291 E. Main Ave.; 541-549-0251. SISTERS ART WORKS: Featuring “WHAT’S NEW?”; through May 30; 204 W. Adams St.; 541-420-9695. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave.; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Reflections in Acrylic and Clay,” works by Dori Kite and Kim Jones; through June; 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring works by Leslie Cain, Dorothy Freudenberg and Gary Vincent; through Wednesday; 17600 Center Drive; 541-382-9398. THUMP COFFEE: Featuring “Push Tunisia”; through May; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-0226. TOWNSHEND’S BEND TEAHOUSE: Featuring “Paintings from a Developing Narrative,” works by Kenny Spurlock; through May; 835 N.W. Bond St.; 541-312-2001 or www.townshendstea.com. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring the 10 Year Anniversary Retrospective Show, works by past and present artists; through May; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-385-9144 or www.tumaloartco.com.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

PAGE 15

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Deschutes River Trail

Clarno for kids

T

O

he Clarno Unit of the John Day

n foot or by bike, the three-mile stretch of Deschutes River Trail between Benham

Fossil Beds National

Falls East and Sunriver is a great way to see a less

Monument in the John

popular but no less beautiful stretch of river. The

Day Basin is a dramatic

lack of hills makes it an easy jaunt, but be mindful

and spectacular

of the technical sections of exposed rock, which

landscape, its reddish-

will happily snag a pedal or trip a pedestrian.

orange, basalt-pillar

— Bulletin staff

cliffs jutting out of expansive juniper-sage

If you go

grasslands. It’s also

Getting there: From Bend, take U.S. Highway 97 south and exit at Lava Butte. Proceed four miles down Forest Road 9702 to Benham Falls East Trailhead parking area. Difficulty: Easy, but watch for

a great place to take kids for a short hike and to learn about

exposed rocks and blowdown on trail Cost: Day pass or Northwest Forest Pass required Contact: Deschutes National Forest, 541-383-5300

fascinating lessons in local geology. — Bulletin staff Anne Aurand / The Bulletin file photo

If you go Getting there: From Bend, drive north on U.S. Highway 97 through Madras. About 17 miles northeast of Madras, take a right on state Highway 293, toward Antelope and Fossil. About 13 miles later, at Antelope, take a slight right on state Highway 218. Drive about 15 miles to Clarno. A couple of miles after you cross the John Day River at Clarno, you’ll see a large, paved parking and picnic area and the Clarno Unit of John Day Fossil Beds National Monument on the left side of the road. (It’s 18 miles west of Fossil.) Difficulty: Easy Cost: Free Info: www.nps.gov/joda/ planyourvisit/clarno-trails.htm, 541-987-2333

Heather Sterling and her daughter, Lily Sterling, 7, of Bend, stop near the end of Clarno Arch Trail to rest and enjoy the view.

We have the “original recipe” menu and fresh margaritas. Best in Town! Now more fresh cocktail lavors. FRIENDLY PRICES!!

97

Shaniko

Fossil

197

Antelope

Clarno 218

293

Come celebrate with us! John Day Fossil Beds National Monument: Clarno Unit

Madras 97

The Clarno Palisades Mitchell

26

Clarno Arch 26 Trail

Prineville Redmond

218

Geologic Time Trail Picnic area 218

Trail of the Fossils Greg Cross / The Bulletin

2570 Twin Knolls ~ Bend • 541-318-1492 57100 Beaver Dr., Bldg. 19 ~ Sunriver • 541-593-3335 64637 Cook Ave. ~ Tumalo • 541-322-8821


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 2012 • FRI THE11, BULLETIN

event calendar m TODAY RV GOLD RUSH: Featuring an RV show and sale, with gold panning; free; 9 a.m.7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-419-8680. HOME SWEET HOME: Meet Smokey Bear and Woodsy Owl and explore the importance of protecting forest ecosystems; daily through Sept. 16; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. SPROUT FILM FESTIVAL: International touring festival showcases a series of films about people with developmental disabilities; $6 matinee, $10 evening; 11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. (Story, Page 28) RAKU POTTERY SALE: The Raku Artists of Central Oregon host a sale of handcrafted pottery; free admission; noon-7 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-350-2662. (Story, Page 13) AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Charles Finn reads from his book “Wild Delicate Seconds: 29 Wildlife Encounters”; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; The Nature of Words, 224 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233, info@thenatureofwords.org or www. thenatureofwords.org. (Story, Page 13) TIGHT LINES AUCTION & BBQ DINNER: The Deschutes River Conservancy hosts an evening of food, fishing lore, an auction, drinks and more; registration requested; $50; 5:30 p.m.; Aspen Hall, 18920 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541-382-4077, ext. 10, or www.deschutesriver.org. JOHN NILSEN: The jazz and folk pianist and composer performs; registration required; $35; 6-9 p.m.; House on Metolius, Forest Road 980, Camp Sherman; 541-595-6620, jade@metolius.com or www.metolius.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Ceiridwen Terrill reads from her book “Part Wild: One Woman’s Journey with a Creature Caught Between the Worlds of Wolves and Dogs”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave. ,Sisters; 541-549-0866. “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of children held in a concentration camp; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. CASINO NIGHT: With a silent auction, casino games and food; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Honor Flight of Eastern Oregon; $20, $20 buy in; 7-11 p.m.;

VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541536-8888 or Info@jensenone.com. “INSIDE JOB”: A screening of the PG-13rated 2010 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld. org. “SORDID LIVES”: Stage Right Productions presents the black comedy about a woman whose death causes chaos in a Texas town; $18 or $16 students and seniors in advance, $20 at the door; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

SATURDAY May 12 GEAR UP FOR SUMMER: A sale of donated or consigned summer sports gear, with music, a silent auction and a climbing wall; proceeds benefit Deschutes Search & Rescue Foundation; free admission; 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; GoodLife Brewing Co., 70 S.W. Century Drive, 100464, Bend; 541-508-2456. HIGH DESERT CRUISE-IN: The High Desert Mopars host a car show featuring classic cars, rods, trucks and bikes, a raffle, a DJ and more; free to the public, car entry $10; 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; Wagner Square, South U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Odem Medo Road, Redmond; 541-550-0206. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the Sisters High School Mandarin class trip to China; free admission; 8 a.m.5 p.m.; Sisters Community Church, 1300 W. McKenzie Highway; 541-549-4071. VFW BREAKFAST: Mother’s Day brunch; $8; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. MOTHER’S DAY RUN: With breakfast, a motorcycle wash, motorcycle games, live music and more; proceeds benefit two local mothers with connections to the military; $15; 9 a.m., 4:30 p.m. games; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-647-0667 or kickstand07@bendbroadband.com. RV GOLD RUSH: Featuring an RV show and sale, with gold panning; free; 9 a.m.7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-419-8680. RAKU POTTERY SALE: The Raku Artists of Central Oregon host a sale of handcrafted pottery; free admission; 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-350-2662. DOCUMENT SHREDDING AND DRUG DISPOSAL: The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and Data Delete of Oregon partner to safely destroy personal

DON’T MISS ... TODAY Home Sweet Home: An educational event where bears and owls are friends. Sure.

CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY THURSDAY This one’s a children’s concert. Which will make for the most overqualified production of “Mary Had a Little Lamb” ever. Michael Gesme conducts a children’s concert in 2010. An d y Tullis / The Bulletin file photo

TODAY & SATURDAY Raku Pottery Sale: We went once. Honestly, some of it was a crock.

TODAY & SATURDAY Charles Finn readings: About wildlife encounters. Do butterflies attack?

TODAY THRU SUNDAY ‘And a Child Shall Lead’: Let’s hope they were taught to look both ways first.

SATURDAY Salmon Bake: Featuring the slowest wave of last week’s Salmon Run.

WEDNESDAY Social Distortion: Probably a sign that your social camera needs to be focused.

documents and provide identity-theft prevention tips; outdated or unwanted prescription medications will be accepted for disposal; donations of nonperishable food accepted; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office La Pine Substation, 51340 U.S. Highway 97; 541-617-3386. SENSATIONAL SATURDAY: Visit a 1933 ranger station with Smokey the U.S. Forest Service mascot; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway

97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Michael Harris talks about his book “Falling Down Getting Up”; free; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Bikram Yoga, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-389-8599. MINING DAYS: Experience the life of a placer miner and pan for gold; $2 panning fee, plus museum admission; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. SALMON BAKE: Featuring a dinner of

salmon, salad, beans and fry bread, with Native American dance performances and crafts; free; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-318-3782 or http://nativeamerican. cocc.edu. SOLAR VIEWING: View the sun using safe techniques; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE11, BULLETIN DAY, MAY 2012 • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

may 11-17

LIVE MUSIC & MORE See Going Out on Page 8 for what’s happening at local night spots.

A NIGHT OUT WITH AMZ PRODUCTIONS: Featuring audio-visual entertainment and a silent auction; proceeds benefit NeighborImpact; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Ron Bell-Roemer and music by The Hat Band; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. “SORDID LIVES”: 8 p.m. at 2nd Street Theater; see Today’s listing for details. DAVID NELSON BAND: The jam band performs, with Moonalice; free cupcakes will be distributed; $17 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www. randompresents.com. (Story, Page 6)

SUNDAY May 13

BARK FOR LIFE: A noncompetitive walk with dogs; with contests, activities and demonstrations; proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society; $15 for one dog, $25 for two; 12:30 p.m.; La Pine Pet Bed N Bath Inc., 51590 Russell Road; 209840-1450, barkforlifelapinesunriver@ hotmail.com or www.relayforlife. org/barklapineor. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Charles Finn talks about his book “Wild Delicate Seconds”; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum,

59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum. org. BEND GAME NIGHT: Play available board games or bring your own; free; 6 p.m.midnight; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-318-8459. “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of children held in a concentration camp; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.

PAGE 17

RV GOLD RUSH: Featuring an RV show and sale, with gold panning; free; 10 a.m.7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-419-8680. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3:30 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-447-7395. “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of children held in a concentration camp; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. SECOND SUNDAY: Chris Anderson and Cecelia Hagen read from a selection of their works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. “SORDID LIVES”: 3 p.m. at 2nd Street Theater; see Today’s listing for details.

MONDAY May 14 ONE MAKES MANY: A volunteer fair featuring local nonprofit organizations on site to answer questions and offer volunteer opportunities; free; 3-6 p.m.; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-385-8977. “THE HEALTHCARE MOVIE”: A screening of the documentary about health care

systems in Canada and the United States; free; 6 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-318-8169. “DIE WALKURE”: The Metropolitan Opera presents the second opera in Wagner’s “Ring” cycle; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541382-6347 or www.fathomevents.com. (Story, Page 27) BEND POETRY SLAM: Open mic poetry; poets read original pieces in three minutes or less; $3 suggested donation; 8 p.m., sign-ups at 7:30 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St.; 541-4804054 or loudgirlproductions@live.com. (Story, Page 13)

TUESDAY May 15 STUDENTS SPEAK — A WATERSHED SUMMIT: Local students share their watershed projects in art, science, videography and hands-on restoration; free; 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m.; Mt. Bachelor Village Resort Conference Center, 19717 Mount Bachelor Drive, Bend; 541-3895900 or kyake@restorethedeschutes. org. “OREGON STATE ARCHIVES RECORDS COLLECTION”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Lane Sawyer; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-9553 or www. orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. ROB WYNIA & THE SOUND: The Floater guy performs alternative music; $7 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-2558 or www. p44p.biz.

WEDNESDAY May 16 THE INDIAN WAR ERA IN EASTERN OREGON: Eric Iseman talks about “Captain Jack and the Modoc War of 1872-73”; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663 or ruthh@uoregon.edu. “SIEGFRIED”: The Metropolitan Opera presents the third opera in Wagner’s “Ring” cycle; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347 or www .fathomevents.com. (Story, Page 27) “SORDID LIVES”: 8 p.m. at 2nd Street Theater; see Today’s listing for details. SOCIAL DISTORTION: The California-

based punk rockers perform, with The Toadies and Lindi Ortega; $35 plus fees; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.randompresents.com. (Story, Page 3)

THURSDAY May 17 CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY CHILDREN’S CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a children’s concert under the direction of Michael Gesme; preceded by a hands-on instrument exploration; free; 7 p.m., interactive session 6 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-3173941, info@cosymphony.com or www. cosymphony.com. COMEDY NIGHT: David Testroet and P.J. McGuire perform; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. HIGH DESERT CHAMBER MUSIC — CROWN CITY STRING QUARTET: String musicians play selections of chamber music; $35, $10 children and students; 7:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-306-3988, info@highdesertchambermusic.com or www.highdesertchambermusic.com. (Story, Page 13) “SORDID LIVES”: 8 p.m. at 2nd Street Theater; see Today’s listing for details. 4 PEAKS PRE-FUNK WEEKEND: Featuring a performance by High Beamz; free; 8 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; www.4peaksmusic.com. (Story, Page 7) AN EVENING WITH LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM: The Fleetwood Mac guitarist and songwriter performs; $62 or $96, plus fees; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. (Story, Page 6) LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.lastbandstanding.net. (Story, Page 7) “PEDAL-DRIVEN”: A screening of the documentary about trail user conflicts; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Trail Alliance; $5; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-385-8080. (Story, Page 28) n S U BMIT AN EVENT at www.bendbulletin. com/submitinfo or email events@bendbulletin.com. Deadline is 10 days before publication. Questions? Contact 541-383-0351.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

planning ahead MAY 18-24 MAY 18-19 — PLANT SALE: The Redmond Garden Club hosts its annual plant sale of annuals, perennials, shrubs and vegetables; proceeds benefit community projects sponsored by the club; free admission; noon-6 p.m. May 18, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. May 19; 2614 S.W. Quartz Ave., Redmond; 541-788-8510 or http://redmondoregongardenclub.org. MAY 18-19 — “SORDID LIVES”: Stage Right Productions presents the black comedy about a woman whose death causes chaos in a Texas town; $18 or $16 students and seniors in advance, $20 at the door; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater. com. MAY 18 — UPSTREAM FUNDRAISER: Featuring dinner, live music, a conservation program and a silent auction; proceeds benefit The Upstream Project of the Upper Deschutes Wastershed Council; $45; 6-9 p.m.; The Barn in Sisters, 68467 Three Creeks Road; 541-382-6103, ext. 33, or www. restorethedeschutes.org. MAY 18 — BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring performances by The Substitutes, Selfless Riot, Sagebrush Rock and students in the rock band class; proceeds benefit the class; $6, $10 couples, $20 families; 7-11 p.m.; Culver High School, 710 Fifth St.; 541-546-2251. MAY 18 — “MIDNIGHT IN PARIS”: A screening of the PG-13-rated 2011 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. MAY 18 — 4 PEAKS PRE-FUNK WEEKEND: Featuring a performance by Huckle; music giveaway with donation of two cans of nonperishable food; donations accepted; 8 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www.4peaksmusic.com. MAY 19-21 — CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a Beethoven and Copland concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring Young Artist Competition winners; free but a ticket is required; 7:30 p.m. May 19 and 21, 2 p.m. May 20; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-317-3941, info@cosymphony.com or www.cosymphony.com. MAY 19 — POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Participants will race through multiple sports from Mt. Bachelor to Bend; the Les Schwab Amphitheater, which marks the end of the race, will host a festival with music and vendor booths; free for spectators; 9:15 a.m. start time on Mt. Bachelor, 10:45 a.m. booths open; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-

Courtesy Ken Howard / Metropolitan Opera

A scene from the opera “Gotterdammerung,” with Jay Hunter Morris (on boat) as Siegfried, Wendy Bryn Harmer as Gutrune, Iain Paterson as Gunther and Hans-Peter Konig as Hagen. The film will screen May 19. 388-0002 or www.mbsef.org. MAY 19 — “GOTTERDAMMERUNG”: The Metropolitan Opera presents the fourth opera in Wagner’s “Ring” cycle; $15; noon; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347 or www. fathomevents.com. MAY 19 — COOL CATS CASINO NIGHTS: Featuring casino games, a silent auction, food and more; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; $25; 6-10 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, Conference Center, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-923-0882 or www. redmondhumane.org. MAY 19 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jane Kirkpatrick talks about her book “Where Lilacs Still Bloom”; RSVP requested; free; 7 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525 or sunriverbooks@ sunriverbooks.com. MAY 19 — TERRY HOLDER: The Washington-based Americana musician performs; $10; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Sound Garden, 1279 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-633-6804 or www.thesoundgardenstudio.com.

MAY 19 — TRIAGE: The comedy improvisational troupe performs; $5; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803. MAY 19 — 4 PEAKS PRE-FUNK WEEKEND: Featuring performances by Mark Ransom, the Bend Uke Group, Truckstop Gravy and more; donations accepted; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.4peaksmusic.com. MAY 19 — CHUCK PYLE: The Zen cowboy musician performs; $15 suggested donation; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; HarmonyHouse, 17505 Kent Road, Sisters; 541-548-2209. MAY 19 — PURE PRAIRIE LEAGUE: The country-rock band performs; $35 or $40, $50 VIP; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. MAY 22 — GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Secrets of Eden” by Christopher Bohjalian; free; 2 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

MAY 22 — CROSS-OVERS BETWEEN VIDEO GAMES AND SOCIAL MEDIA: A discussion about Alternate Reality Game, which puts characteristics of video game players to use in social media; free; 4:305:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-633-3854 or awoodell@cocc.edu. MAY 23 — HEY MARSEILLES: The indie-pop band performs, with Lemolo; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. MAY 24 — THE INDIAN WAR ERA IN EASTERN OREGON: Paul Patton talks about “Eagan and the Bannock-Paiute War of 1878”; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663 or ruthh@uoregon.edu. MAY 24 — ACCELERATE BEND KICKOFF: Learn about Bend 2030 Vision accomplishments and discuss your vision for Bend; registration requested; free; 7 p.m., doors open 6:15 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St.; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. MAY 24 — COMEDY NIGHT: Phil Perrier

and Benjie Wright perform; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. MAY 24 — LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.lastbandstanding.net.

MAY 25-31 MAY 25 — THE SHINS: The indie rock band performs, with The Head and The Heart and Blind Pilot; $35 plus fees; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www. bendconcerts.com. MAY 26-28 — CELEBRATE SPRING!: Help homesteaders prepare for spring on a 1904 ranch with planting, baking and furniture crafting; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

Talks & classes

MAY 26 — “KIDS CURATE” EXHIBIT OPENS: Explore artifacts chosen by students to reflect their cultural and family history, plus art from students; exhibit runs through July 29; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. MAY 26 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Sere Prince Halverson talks about her book “The Underside of Joy”; RSVP requested; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525 or sunriverbooks@sunriverbooks. com. MAY 26 — TENACIOUS D: The mock-rock band performs, with The Sights; $39 plus fees; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541318-5457 or www.bendconcerts. com. MAY 27 — BECK: The anti-folk rocker performs, with Metric; $41 plus fees; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www. bendconcerts.com.

BEND VIPASSANA GATHERING: Learn about vipassana meditation, with a screening of the film “Dhamma Brothers”; free; 6:30 p.m. Wednesday; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; jtmorehead@ gmail.com or 214-769-1374. HOME COMPOSTING: Learn to use or build a compost system; $29; 6-8 p.m. Thursday; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; http://noncredit.cocc.edu or 541-383-7270. BIRDERS NIGHT: Chad Karges talks the Malheur Comprehensive Conservation Plan; free; 6:30 p.m. Thursday; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; www. ecbcbirds.org. MAKING SENSE OUT OF SENSOR CLEANING: Learn about sensor cleaning for DSLR cameras; $25; 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday; Cascade Center of Photography, 390 S.W. Columbia St., Suite 110, Bend; www. ccophoto.com/making-senseout-of-sensor-cleaning or 541-241-2266. MAY 31 — LET FREEDOM RING: The Bells of Sunriver perform music of America on handbells; free; 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-593-1635. MAY 31 — CONVERSATIONS

ARCHAEOLOGY PRESENTATION: Steve Allely demonstrates flintknapping techniques and shares tool replications; $5 donation requested; 7-8:30 p.m. Thursday; Central Oregon Association of Realtors, 2112 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; http:// ascoinfo.org or 541-548-4394. DRYING FOOD WORKSHOP: Learn the principles of safe food drying and taste foods; registration required by Wednesday; $15; 9 a.m.noon May 18; OSU Extension Service, 3893 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-6088. ALDER SPRINGS BIRDING FIELD TRIP: East Cascades Audubon Society hosts a bird-watching trip; free; 7 a.m.-5 p.m. May 19; Alder Springs, Sisters; www. ecaudubon.org or 541-241-2190. GET TO KNOW YOUR DIGITAL CAMERA: Gain a basic knowledge of your camera’s controls and menus; bring your camera and manual; registration required by Wednesday; $59; 1-4 p.m. May 23; Cascade Center of Photography, 390 S.W. Columbia St., Suite 110, Bend; www.ccophoto.com/getto-know-your-digital-camera or 541-241-2266. ON BOOKS AND CULTURE: Read and discuss “Typical American” by Gish Jen; free; noon-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; kroth1@ cocc.edu.

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 19

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

centraloregonhabitat.org

THE WORKING QUESTIONS: Featuring a field trip to the junk yard; $15; 10 a.m. Saturday; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759. INTRODUCTION TO TANGO: Learn the fundamentals of Argentine tango; $7; 7:30 p.m. Saturday; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; www.bendtango.com or 541-330-4071. LETTERS, LINE, IMAGE, BOOK: Create end papers, letterheads and small prints; $75 plus $35 studio fee; 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, May 14-23; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759. MAGICIAN’S OPEN HOUSE: Learn about magic and a local magic group; free; 7 p.m. Tuesday; 61555 Parrell Road, Bend; 541-550-7121 to RSVP. COOKING CLASS WITH CHEF BETTE: Learn to make your own vinegar and use it in dishes; registration required; $50; 6 p.m. Wednesday; register for Bend location; www.welltraveledfork.com,

chefbette@welltraveledfork.com or 541-312-0097.

planning ahead


PAGE 20 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

out of town The following is a list of other events “Out of Town.”

CONCERTS

S ubm itted photos

J o h n C. Reilly and Friends, left, and H ugh Laurie and the Copper Bottom Band will perform separate shows in Portland and Eugene.

Not just actors • Hugh Laurie and John C. Reilly bring their bands to Oregon By Jenny Wasson The Bulletin

W

hen you hear that a well-known actor is embarking on a music career, it can make your eyes roll. Are they really talented or are they just going by their name alone? Hollywood’s A-listers have had varying degrees of success, from the good (Jack Black, Steve Martin, Zooey Deschanel) to the bad (Steven Seagal, Lindsey Lohan, David Hasselhoff). Now, two more actors are throwing their hats into the ring and you can decide for yourself how they fare. First up is John C. Reilly and Friends on May 26 at the Aladdin Theater in Portland. Then, Hugh Laurie and the Copper Bottom Band brings its New Orleans blues to The Shedd Institute in Eugene on May 31 and Portland’s Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall on June 1. Reilly has already shown his musical chops with singing roles in “Chicago,” “A Prairie Home Companion” and “Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story.” In his Portland concert, Reilly will perform old-timey folk and country tunes with pals Becky Stark and Tom Brosseau, according to a news release. The group

has released two singles on Jack White’s label, Third Man Records. Tickets for John C. Reilly and Friends are $25. To purchase tickets, visit www.ticketmaster.com or call 800-745-3000. Known as the acerbic Dr. Gregory House on the hit FOX television show, “House,” Laurie has loved New Orleans blues music since he was a lad growing up in Oxford, England. Performing piano and vocals, Laurie recently released the album “Let Them Talk” on Warner Bros. Records to critical acclaim. According to his website, “Laurie’s ‘Let Them Talk’ recordings bring together an extraordinary selection of heritage tracks, renowned musicians and vocal legends.” As of press time, tickets for Laurie’s shows were very limited. The Eugene show is sold out and only a few seats remain in Portland for $200 apiece. He is also playing June 2 at the Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox in Spokane, Wash., and June 4 at the Benaroya in Seattle, Wash. For more ticket information, visit www .hughlaurieblues.com. — Reporter: 541-383-0350, jwasson@bendbulletin.com

May 11 — Bassnectar, Roseland Theater, Portland; SOLD OUT; TW* May 11 — Death Cab For Cutie, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* May 11 — Kina Grannis, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 12 — Carrie Rodriguez, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www.theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. May 12 — The Tubes, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 13 — The Emerald City Jazz Kings, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www.theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. May 16 — Jolie Holland/Stefan Jecusco, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TF* May 17 — Janiva Magness, Jimmy Mak’s, Portland; www.tickettomato.com or 800-820-9884. May 17 — U.K., Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 18 — Kottonmouth Kings, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 18 — Lindsey Buckingham, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 18 — Pickwick, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* May 19 — Herb Ohta Jr., Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 21 — Best Coast, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 22 — Bodeans, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 22 — Roger Waters: “The Wall” Live, Rose Garden, Portland; www. rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. May 23 — Loudon Wainwright III, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 24 — Greg Lake, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 25 — Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaires, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 25 — Spiritualized, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* May 25 — Trampled by Turtles, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* May 26 — Fiji, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 26 — John C. Reilly and Friends, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 26 — Mark Lanegan Band, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* May 27 — Apocalyptour, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 27 — Dum Dum Girls, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TF*

May 27 — Imelda May, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CANCELED; CT* May 27-28 — Dita Von Teese, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 28 — Jack White, Hult Center, Eugene; SOLD OUT; www.hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. May 29 — Ben Howard, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* May 29 — Fun., Roseland Theater, Portland; SOLD OUT; TW* May 30 — Mogwai, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* May 31 — Andre Nickatina, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 31 — Hugh Laurie and the Copper Bottom Band, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; SOLD OUT; www.theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. June 1 — Hugh Laurie and the Copper Bottom Band, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. June 2 — Crystal Fighters, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* June 2 — Daughtry, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* June 2 — JD McPherson, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* June 2 — Led Kaapana, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www.theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. June 3 — Asleep at the Wheel, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* June 3 — Chickenfoot, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* June 3 — Idina Menzel, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* June 3 — Reggie Watts, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* June 4 — Destroyer, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* June 5 — Neon Trees, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* June 8 — Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. June 8 — Showtek (Live), Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* June 9 — Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* June 10 — Thrice, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* June 11 — Tinariwen, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* June 11 — The Used, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* June 12 — Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks, Diamond Hitch Mule Ranch, Kimberly; www.mulesacrossamerica. com or 541-934-2140. June 12 — Primus, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW*


June 14 — Tribal Seeds, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* June 16 — Collective Soul, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* June 16 — Dandy Warhols, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TF* June 17 — John Fogerty, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* June 17 — KIN — Rodney Crowell and Mary Karr, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* June 17 — Tedeschi Trucks Band, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* June 17 — The Temper Trap, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW*

LECTURES & COMEDY June 16 — Garrison Keillor, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* June 16 — Jane Lynch, Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM* June 28 — Aziz Ansari, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM*

SYMPHONY & OPERA May 11, 13, 17, 19 — “Candide”: Opera by Leonard Bernstein; Portland Opera; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* May 12 — “Elixir of Love”: Rogue Opera; Grants Pass Performing Arts Center, Grants Pass; 541-608-6400. May 12-14 — “Arnaldo Cohen Plays Tchaikovsky”: Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. March 16, 18 — “Nixon in China”: Eugene Opera; Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. May 17 — “Liszt Piano Concerto”: Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; www. hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. May 20-21 — “Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring”: Oregon Symphony;

THEATER & DANCE Through May 13 — “OVO”: Presented by Cirque du Soleil; Portland Expo Center, Portland; www.cirquedusolel.com or 866-624-7783. Through May 19 — “The Cutting Room”: Presented by BodyVox; Portland; www.bodyvox.com or 503-229-0627. Through June 3 — “Next to Normal”: Rock Musical by Brian Yorkey and Tom Kitt; Artists Repertory Theatre; Alder Stage, Portland; www.artistsrep.org or 503-241-1278. Through June 17 — “Black Pearl Sings!”: Play by Frank Higgins; featuring a cappella renditions of little-known American folk songs; Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; www.pcs.org or 503-445-3700. Through June 22 — Oregon Shakespeare Festival: “Seagull” (through June 22) and “Troilus and Cressida” (through Nov. 4) are currently running in the New Theatre. “The White Snake” (through July 8), “Medea/Macbeth/ Cinderella” (through Nov. 3), “Animal Crackers” (through Nov. 4) and “Romeo and Juliet” (through Nov. 4) are currently in production at the Angus Bowmer Theatre; Ashland; www.osfashland.org or 800-219-8161. May 12 — “Stuart Little”: This special production for all ages features hearing and deaf actors who speak and sign simultaneously; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www. craterian.org or 541-779-3000. May 12-June 3 — “A Lie of the Mind”: Drama by Sam Shepard; Lord Leebrick Theatre Company, Eugene; www.lordleebrick.com or 541-465-1506. May 22-27 — “Million Dollar Quartet,” Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* May 22-June 24 — “It Ain’t Nothin’ but the Blues”: A stirring retrospective of blues classics; Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; www.pcs.org or 503-445-3700. June 9 — “Dance United”: Oregon Ballet Theatre; Keller Auditorium, Portland; www.obt.org or 888-922-5538. July 18-Aug. 12 — “Jersey Boys,” Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* July 26-29 — JAW: A Playwrights Festival: Featuring six new plays drawn from a national search; Gerding Theator at the Armory,

EXHIBITS Through May 13 — Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art: The following exhibits are on display: “Newart Northwest Kids: Global Connections” (through May 13), “Visions of the Orient: Western Women Artists in Asia, 1900-1940” (through June 18) and “Russel Wong: The Big Picture” (through Aug. 19); Eugene; jsma.uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027.

Through May 27 — “Attack of the Bloodsuckers”: Exhibit on mosquitoes, fleas, ticks, leaches and other parasites; The Science Factory, Eugene; www.sciencefactory.org. Through May 27 — Portland Art Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Joseph Beuys” (through May 27), “Mark Rothko” (through May 27), “John Frame: Three Fragments of a Lost Tale” (through May 27), “Emerging: New Photography Acquisitions” (through June 17) and “Cornerstones of a Great Civilization: Masterworks of Ancient Chinese

PAGE 21

Art” (through Nov. 11); Portland; www.portlandartmuseum.org or 503-226-2811. Through May 28 — Maryhill Museum of Art: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Beside the Big River: Images and Art of the Mid-Columbia Indians” (through May 28), “British Painting from the Permanent Collection” (through Nov. 15) and “Ceramics from the Permanent Collection” (through Nov. 15); Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733.

OF CENTRAL OREGON

TM: Ticketmaster, www .ticketmaster.com or 800745-3000 TW: TicketsWest, www .ticketswest.com or 800992-8499 TF: Ticketfly, www.ticket fly.com or 877-435-9489 CT: Cascade Tickets, www .cascadetickets.com or 800-514-3849

Portland; www.pcs.org or 503-445-3700.

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Continued next page

www.bgcco.org

*Tickets

Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343.

out of town

Great Futures Start HERE.

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012


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out of town

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

From previous page

FOUR GAMES TO PLAY, FOUR WEEKS TO WIN! You’ll find something fun for everyone in the family in the

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Through June — Museum of Natural and Cultural History: The following exhibits are on display: “We Are Still Here — Gordon Bettles and the Many Nations Longhouse” (through June), “The Art of Nature by Becky Uhler” (through June 24) and “Out in Space, Back in Time: Images from the Hubble Telescope” (through Feb. 2013); Eugene; natural-history. uoregon.edu or 541-346-3024. Through June 24 — “The Wonder of Learning”: Exhibit explores the creative, intellectual and social capacity of children; Portland Children’s Museum, Portland; www. portlandcm.org or 503-223-6500. Through July 1 — OMSI Film Festival: Featuring 28 films; Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 503-797-4640. Through July 28 — “Generations: Betty Feves”: A retrospective exhibit on the works of Betty Feves; Museum of Contemporary Craft: Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft. org or 503-223-2654. Through July 29 — Oregon Museum of Science and Industry: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Ocean Soul” (through July 29) and “Wild Minds: What Animals Really Think” (through Aug. 19); Portland; www.omsi.edu or 800-955-6674. Opened April 20 — “Zany Maze”: Portland Children’s Museum’s first outdoor exhibit; Portland; www.portlandcm.org or 503-223-6500. May 12-Oct. 7 — “Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition: Featuring works by Pacific Northwest sculptors; Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733. May 22-June 2 — 47th Annual Shell Show, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 800-955-6674. Opening May 26 — “The Sea & Me”: A new children’s interactive exhibit; Oregon Coast Aquarium, Newport; www.aquarium.org or 541-867-3474. May 26-July 22 — “Focus on Nature: Wildcats of the World”: Featuring works by Rochelle Mason and Linda DuPuisRosen; World Forestry Center Discovery Museum, Portland; www.worldforestry.org or 503-228-1367. May 26-Sept. 3 — “Nature Unleashed”: New interactive exhibition takes a look at natural disasters; Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 800-955-6674. June 1 — Zoo Brew: Featuring more than 60 regional beer and cider choices; Oregon Zoo, Portland; www.oregonzoo.org or 503-226-1561. June 9-Sept. 3 — “The Subject is Light: The Henry and Sharon Martin Collection of Contemporary Realist Paintings”: Featuring 23 paintings by living artists of Cape Cod;

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Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733. June 22-24 — Summer Arts Festival, Fir Grove Park, Roseburg; www.uvarts.com or 541-672-2532. July 1-Sept. 9 — “Tough by Nature: Portraits of Cowgirls and Ranch Women of the American West”: Featuring works by artist Lynda Lanker; Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University of Oregon, Eugene; jsma. uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027. Aug. 4-Dec. 31 — “Timberrr! A Nostalgic Look Back at Working in the Woods”: Featuring vintage photographs and rare motion picture films; World Forestry Center Discovery Museum, Portland; www.worldforestry.org or 503-228-1367. Aug. 7-Feb. 16 — “Reflecting on Eric Gronborg”: Works employ archetypes of functional ceramic traditions as conceptual vehicles to explore contemporary culture; Museum of Contemporary Craft: Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft.org or 503-223-2654. Aug. 17-Jan. 5 — “Design with the Other 90%: Cities”: Exhibit explores design solutions that address the challenges created by rapid urban growth in informal settlements; Museum of Contemporary Craft: Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft.org or 503-223-2654.

MISCELLANY Through May 12 — The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. archaeologychannel.org or 541-345-5538. Through May 28 — Finders Keepers on the Beach: Find hand-blown glass floats hidden on the beach; Lincoln City; 800-452-2151. May 12 — Papa’s Toys’ Annual Open House: Featuring street rods, classics and custom car collection; Cornelius; papastoyscarcollection. com or 503-260-6451. May 12 — Rock the Ribbon, Douglas County Fairgrounds, Roseburg; www. trevahoffmanfoundation.com or 503-564-8843. May 18-20 — Ladd Marsh Birdathon, Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, La Grande; www.dfw. state.or.us or 800-720-6339. May 19-20 — Columbia Gorge Wine & Pear Fest, Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum, Hood River; www. wineandpearfest.org or 541-399-2146. May 20 — Asian Kite Festival, Roosevelt Middle School, Eugene; www.asiancouncil.org or 541-913-1965. May 26-27 — Spring Arts & Crafts Festival, Yachats; 541-547-4738. May 26-28 — Memorial Weekend in the Wine Country, Willamette Valley; www. willamettewines.com. June 2-3 — Bricks Cascade: Featuring LEGO creations; Oregon Convention Center, Portland; www.brickscascade.com. July 21-22 — Lavender DAZE Festival, Hood River Lavender Farms, Odell; www. lavenderfarms.net or 888-528-3276. Aug. 18 — Pirate Treasure Hunt, Depoe Bay; www.treasuredepoebay.org or 888-393-6833.


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gaming

Redeeming qualities

TOP 10 ON THE XBOX 360 The editors of Game Informer Magazine rank the top Xbox 360 games for May: 1. “The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings Enhanced Edition” (Warner Bros.) 2. “Fez” (Polytron) 3. “Trials Evolution” (Microsoft Studios) 4. “Prototype 2” (Activision) 5. “Dragon’s Dogma” (Capcom) 6. “Mass Effect 3” (Electronic Arts) 7. “Street Fighter X Tekken” (Capcom) 8. “Skullgirls” (Autumn Games) 9. “Tiger Woods PGA Tour 13” (EA Sports) 10. “Sine Mora” (Microsoft Studios) McClatchy-Tribune News Service

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

‘THE WALKING DEAD: EPISODE 1: A NEW DAY’

In “Prototype 2,” New York City is overrun yet again by the Blacklight virus.

• ‘Prototype 2’ does everything better than the original 2009 edition with his emotions set constantly on angry. With him, Radical eshen the first “Prototype” sentially traded in one story cliche released in 2009, it did a (amnesia) for another (dead wife lot of things right: Tra- and kid). versing the towering skyscrapers Bouncing through the city and of New York City, stealing the iden- pounding the hell out of everything tity of anyone you see and forming is “Prototype 2’s” main focus. The weapons out of your character’s city traversal is some of the best grotesquely morphed appendages. I’ve seen. Like Mercer before him, It fell short in many ways as well, Heller can sprint up a skyscraper but “Prototype 2” feels like a well- in seconds, dash and glide through heard response to fan feedback, the air, and commandeer tanks and addressing nearly every ishelicopters — but now the REVIEW controls feel more natural. sue from the original. Over a year after the I love how I can zip across events of “Prototype,” New the whole city to a mission York is overrun yet again by the in no time and still land on a dime. Blacklight virus. New hero James The mobility improvements are Heller is out for revenge against nice, but combat has evolved even former protagonist Alex Mercer more. Instead of constantly fidfor causing the outbreak that killed dling with a weapon wheel, two his family. Before long, Mercer powers are mapped to separate grants his viral powers to Heller, face buttons, allowing you to mix seeing potential in the experienced up ground-pounding Hammerfist soldier and hoping to win him as area attacks with speedy melee an ally. claws, for example. A new power Mercer slides easily into the an- extends tendrils from your arm tagonist role, since he was always and strings up a target, leaving it more of an antihero. Heller re- vulnerable to limb-slicing or other minds me of “God of War’s” Kra- special attacks. tos, focused entirely on revenge New defensive options make

By Bryan Vore

Game Informer Magazine

W

Weekly download

‘PROTOTYPE 2’ 8.5 (out of 10) Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 Activision, Radical Entertainment ESRB rating: M for Mature

Heller feel like a complete combat package. His shield is easily accessible at all times, and it doesn’t ever break. Time it right and you can even reflect rockets or counter melee attacks with a shield bash covered in long spikes. You can also easily flip over enemies when they attack and start slashing from behind. The difficulty remains relatively mild, with a challenging flareup here and there, but it never gets cheap. Players track targets to consume, put down infected monstrosities, bust/sneak into bases, and pose as a soldier. Some stretches feel repetitive, but things always pick back up soon enough, especially at the end. The final boss puts all of your powers to the

test, and is much more narratively significant than the previous one. Unfortunately, the by-the-numbers, post-battle wrap-up doesn’t leave much of an impact. You could just stick to the core objectives, but it’s wise to keep up with the extra Blacknet missions as well. They provide unique tasks, more evolution points, and unique mutation upgrades. These mutations work outside the standard leveling system, offering boosts to damage, hijack speed and more. They can also be obtained by grabbing collectibles. Don’t worry, there are far fewer than the hundreds of floating orbs in the original, and the brilliant in-game hint system ensures that you can find everything yourself. “Prototype 2” has officially redeemed this franchise. The mechanics feel the way you wished they would have in the first installment, and it’s a rush to abuse your incredible powers any way you see fit. If you’ve stayed away from the first game because of the lackluster word of mouth, don’t hesitate to jump right into the sequel. A slick video catches you up on everything right out of the gate so there’s no excuse to miss this taste of ultimate viral power.

Reviewed for: PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, PC/Mac From: Telltale Games ESRB Rating: Mature Price: $5 for the first episode, $20-25 for a five-episode season pass (PS3/PC/Mac) Telltale Games coasted into a rut with “Back to the Future,” and its stab at something different with “Jurassic Park” was the kind of disaster that shakes your faith in a studio. So the arrival of “The Walking Dead’s” first episode — which finds Telltale again breaking away from formula but subsequently breaking ground instead of confidence — couldn’t be timelier. Set concurrently with the events of the “TWD” television show, “A New Day” tells the story of brand-new character Lee Everett, who has a troubling secret to keep as well as a child to protect from the zombie horde. The meat of “Day’s” gameplay consists of dialogue with other survivors, but instead of asking questions and gathering information, you’re holding answers, playing mental chess and deciding — quickly and without do-overs — whom to trust and whom to deceive. — Billy O’Keefe, McClatchy-Tribune News Service


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

PAGE 25

movies

This film is a bit of a dud • ‘Dark Shadows’ falls flat after first few notes, but Depp is at his best

T

im Burton’s “Dark Shadows” is all dressed up with nowhere to go, an elegant production without a central drive. There are wonderful things in the film, but they aren’t what’s important. It’s as if Burton directed at arm’s length, unwilling to find juice in the story. Yes, the original TV soap opera is a cult classic, but he approaches it as an amusing trifle, and at feature length we need more than attitude to sink our teeth in. The opening is gripping, creating expectations the movie doesn’t satisfy. We learn the early history of the Collins family in America, which would create a fishing dynasty and spawn the vampire Barnabas Collins (Johnny Depp). Burton is famous for his visuals, and here we have a symphonic evocation of the Gothic sensibility. He shows the erection of the Collinwood mansion, a shriek of architecture, on a hill above the new Maine town of Collinsport. We learn how young Barnabas falls in love with the angelic Josette (Bella Heathcote) and spurns the love of Angelique (Eva Green). Angelique is a witch. She forces Josette to flee in terror to a cruel stony finger pointing out from a rocky cliff. Waves dash the stones far below. He pursues her, tries to save her, is unable to stop her from falling to her death from the point. This is great storytelling because it’s played straight. I didn’t expect the whole movie to be pitched at this level, but it sets a note it never matches. Barnabas, made into a vampire by Angelique, is wrapped in chains, sealed in a coffin and buried for 190 years. The story moves forward to 1972, when the joke is that a vampire like Barnabas from the 1700s is out of place. Freed from his entombment, Barnabas returns to Collinwood to find it dilapidated and cobwebby, and the family fortunes in disrepair. As proud of his family as any 18th-century merchant prince, as proud of the mansion as when his

Peter Mountain / Warner Bros. Pictures / The Associated Press

Johnny Depp portrays Barnabas Collins in “Dark Shadows,” based on the campy 1960s soap opera of the same name.

ROGER EBERT

“Dark Shadows” 112 minutes PG-13, for comic horror violence, sexual content, some drug use, language and smoking

parents were building it, he moves in to set things right. The inhabitants in 1972 include Elizabeth Collins Stoddard (Michelle Pfeiffer), who runs the family fortunes, her teenage daughter, Carolyn (Chloe Grace Moretz), her useless brother, Roger (Jonny Lee Miller), Roger’s disturbed son, David (Gully McGrath), and a live-in psychiatrist named Dr. Julia Hoff-

man (Helena Bonham Carter). Family dinners are a depressing event with everyone clustered around one end of a banquet table except Carolyn, who skulks at the other end. Meals are served by Willie Loomis (Jackie Earle Haley), a wizened drunk. Johnny Depp, as pale as anyone might be after two centuries of burial, caresses architectural details with fingernails like talons and treats the others with elaborate courtesy. His performance is arch and mannered, as perhaps it should be, but so is everyone else’s; the result falls between satire and lampoon, and creates such a distance between characters and style that nobody seems to much care what happens — except for the witch Angelique, who is still alive and whose Angel Bay fish cannery is bankrupting the Collins family. Having ordered that he be buried forever, Angelique is still inexplicably hot for Barnabas. But there’s

tension because of the young and beautiful Victoria, who has become the new governess for the children; surely it is no coincidence that she is played by Bella Heathcote, who was also Josette. Much of the amusement in the movie comes from Depp’s reactions to 1970s pop culture. The soundtrack is populated by rock classics, Carolyn’s room is decorated like any teenage girl’s, and Barnabas is torn between alarm and fascination when he sees his first lava lamp. Yes, now you mention it, lava lamps do somewhat resemble coagulated gobs of blood floating in urine. With reasoning suitable for a Jane Austen hero, Barnabas restores Collinwood to its former glory, and decides to hold a formal ball to impress the locals. Carolyn pouts that this is unbelievably out of touch. In a good idea that doesn’t pay off, Alice Cooper is hired to perform. “The ugliest woman I’ve

ever seen!” Barnabas exclaims after examining Alice through his opera glasses. Alice Cooper’s appearance, alas, is limited to a few snatches of songs. We are denied the intriguing prospect of an extended scene between Barnabas and Alice. This is the eighth collaboration between Burton and Depp, who go back to “Edward Scissorhands” (1990) together. We know we can expect a pitch-perfect performance by Depp, who plays Barnabas with a lasered intensity, and we know Burton’s sets and art direction will be spectacular. I think the best use of Depp in a Burton world was “Sleepy Hollow” (1999). Here Depp seems to inhabit a world of his own, perhaps in self-defense. The others seem to be performing parodies of their characters. “Dark Shadows” begins with great promise, but then the energy drains out. — Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.


PAGE 26 • GO! MAGAZINE

movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

‘Footnote’ is a study in family ties W

hen I describe “Footnote,” you may conclude that it offers little for you. In fact, it’s one of the smartest and most merciless comedies to come along in a while. It centers on an area of fairly narrow interest, but in its study of human nature, it is deep and takes no prisoners. There are two main characters: The father has devoted his life to scratching out minute inconsistencies in various versions of the Talmud. His son is a great popularizer of Judaic lore, whose books are best-sellers and whose face is often on television. Eliezer (Shlomo Bar Aba), the father, has labored for years without much recognition. He takes great pride in once having been mentioned in a footnote of a book by a legendary scholar. Uriel (Lior Ashkenazi), the son, is one of those facile popularizers to whom everything comes easily. The film opens in a teeth-grating ceremony where the son is receiving a prestigious prize, and his father is seated stony-faced in the audience. Uriel goes out of his way to praise the old man, but this serves only to reflect on the old man’s obscurity and Eliezer knows it. The film could be about a father-son rivalry in any field. I once had a professor who was a Great Man, the editor of a muchhonored edition of Shakespeare. Among his other feats was the variorum edition of “Romeo and Juliet.” That involved the meticulous comparison of all the editions of Shakespeare’s tragedy, noting every variance and allowing the reader to approach as closely as possible to Shakespeare’s original words. I remember sitting in a campus coffee shop, buzzing with caffeine and underlining passages so that I, too, could determine the correct reading. That may sound boring as hell to you, but I’d been to this man’s book-jammed office in the English building, and his quest seemed to me grand and romantic. Imagine how he would have felt to know that in a few decades, all his heavy lifting would be done by a computer. Ah, but it was his JUDGMENT that mattered, not his years of footnotes. In that sense, Uriel has moved directly to the end stage and made his father’s labor seem like busywork.

Ren Mendelson / Sony Pictures Classics

Lior As hkenazi, left, stars as Uriel Shkolnik and Shlomo Bar Aba stars as his father, Eliezer Shkolnik, in “Footnote.”

ROGER EBERT

“Footnote” 106 minutes PG, for thematic elements, brief nudity, language and smoking

“Footnote,” a 2011 Oscar nominee for Best Foreign Film, benefits from uncanny casting. Much of its success comes from the presence of the actors themselves. The story pendulum swings back and forth between father and son, who are both sympathetic and both tiresome and mean-spirited. We are expected to know nothing about the Talmud except that they believe it justifies their lifework. As we meet their wives, we sense

that what benefit it has done them hasn’t been reflected in their marriages. Nor has it inspired a good father and good son. All of this leads up to a masterful series of ethical dilemmas in the last half of the film. The Talmud provides guidance to Jews about how to lead their lives, but these two Jews have learned nothing that helps them when they find themselves in an impossible situation. Please be aware that a plot point is about to be revealed. The greatest honor available to either man is the Israel Prize. Eliezer receives a phone call congratulating him on having won it. Vindication at last for a lifetime of labor! Then Uriel is told a stunning piece of information. The father was mistakenly called. The prize was actually voted to the son. This cannot be. For the old man to be announced as the winner and then have the prize snatched away is a species of humiliation almost unimaginable.

“Footnote,” a 2011 Oscar nominee for Best Foreign Film, benefits from uncanny casting. Much of its success comes from the presence of the actors themselves. So much for the spoiler. The film’s richest scenes are still to come, and I will not spoil them. They involve an emergency meeting of the Israel Prize committee, and the involvement of the old curmudgeon Grossman (Micah Lewesohn), who is the chairman. There is a deadly serious meeting of six or seven scholars in an office large enough for two, and the choreography is hilarious. An apparent solution is arrived at. Grossman, who has been a life-

long saboteur of Eliezer’s work, has demands that must be met. And then, in a brilliant montage, we see Eliezer at work. The most crucial textual reading of his life takes place, ironically, in connection with this personal crisis. There’s more comedy in the film, some of it involving Eliezer’s ignorance of modern publicity and public relations, some of it indicating that in his ivory tower he doesn’t know what security guards are. It’s a rich irony that when Eliezer is interviewed by a reporter, he shoots himself in his own foot. What happens is a series of events involving academic scholarship, familial jealousy and pride, stubbornness and poetic justice. All of these things come together wonderfully, and are so subtle that only the father and the son will completely understand them. Perfect. — Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.


movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

‘Kid’ is full of empathy T

he fierce young boy is always in motion, his face screwed up in determination, pedaling his bike, running through the streets, pounding on doors and windows, demanding, demanding. He demands the love of his father, but lacking that he wants his bike, and the acceptance of the woman who has become his foster mother on weekends, and recognition from Wes, the teenaged neighborhood hoodlum. He is named Cyril, and as played here by Thomas Doret he becomes an indelible portrait of need. We meet him first in an official boys home, where he was dumped by a father who promised to return but never has. Like a young detective, he methodically tracks him down — visiting the bar and pastry shop his dad took him to, calling a number that is always disconnected, talking his way into his dad’s former apartment, where he is sure he will find his bicycle and perhaps Guy (Jeremie Renier), his father. “The Kid With a Bike” is another empathetic film by Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, the brothers from Belgium who have strong sympathy for alienated children and young people, and who avoid melodrama and sensation in telling their stories so movingly. There are two things that could go seriously wrong in young Cyril’s life, but they don’t quite happen. The Dardennes don’t wring us out like that. They prefer the drama of ordinary life, in which for a boy like Cyril things don’t easily go right. In straightforward scenes, they show a boy who fears he has been thrown away, but persists in feeling that his father only lost him and will be happy to find him again. He can’t stand restraint. He doesn’t accept instruction. When he sees another boy ride past on his bike, he chases him. Samantha (Cecile de France), who owns a local beauty shop, tracks down the boy and buys the bike from his father. What anguish Cyril must feel when he learns the other kid didn’t steal his bike — Guy sold it. He sees a notice in a shop window, in his father’s own handwriting. Cyril is about 11, and will remind some viewers of the hero of Truffaut’s “The 400 Blows.” But that boy had

ROGER EBERT

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 27

A SPECIAL GIFT FOR MOM WHEN YOU JOIN US FOR MOTHER’S DAY BUFFET

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Violet (Emily Blunt) and Tom (Jason Segel) keep getting tripped up on the long walk down the aisle in “The Five-Year Engagement.” “The Kid With a Bike” 87 minutes PG-13, for thematic elements, brief language and smoking In French with English subtitles

a hero, Balzac, and Cyril has only his father, who cannot accept the role. Cyril boldly asks Samantha if he can live at her house. She agrees to take him on weekends. It works out badly. Fearing rejection, he has a way of testing people beyond their endurance. “Why did you let me come here?” he asks. “I don’t know,” she says honestly. He keeps running away, and eventually is led into big trouble by Wes, a few years older, who slicks back his black hair, smokes, drinks and leads a “gang.” The Dardennes are masterful in showing how easily Wes is able to manipulate Cyril to do his will. The film is only 87 minutes long, lean and efficient, intent on Cyril. It doesn’t EXPLAIN him, because he is all there to be seen: his need, his abandonment, his reckless determination, his unprotected youth. Young Thomas Doret fills the role with natural sincerity and focus, and not a second that seems contrived. The most mysterious character in “The Kid With a Bike” is not the kid, who after all has a story that’s fairly easy to understand. It is the hairdresser, played by Cecile de France with her sad beauty. This actress carries lifetimes in her eyes. There is a moment here when she is forced to make a choice, and as she makes it, she reveals so much about how she got to this place in life. “Why did you let me come here?” Cyril asked her. She says she doesn’t know. As she makes her choice, we sense that she knows very well. — Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.

ON LOCAL SCREENS Here’s what’s showing on Central Oregon movie screens. For showtimes, see listings on Page 31.

Reviews by Roger Ebert unless otherwise noted.

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“Battleship” — Taylor Kitsch and Liam Neeson are in the Navy now as sailors take on inhuman invaders in an action tale inspired by the game. Fans can catch a late night screening Thursday at local theaters. (PG-13) — Synopsis from The Associated Press

“The Dictator” — Sacha Baron Cohen outdoes Castro with his wild beard in this comedy about a tyrant battling for untruth, injustice and the totalitarian way. The film opens Wednesday at local theaters. (R) — Synopsis from The Associated Press

“The Metropolitan Opera: Die Walküre” — This extraordinarily powerful work of theater focuses on some of the Ring’s most interesting characters at decisive moments of their lives: Wotan, whose violation of his own laws has jeopardized the gods’ rule; his twin offspring, Siegmund and Sieglinde, who are meant to save the gods; and, above all, his heroic Valkyrie daughter Brünnhilde, who makes a fateful decision that shatters her world. This production marked soprano Deborah Voigt’s first performances as Brünnhilde. Bryn Terfel again is Wotan, Jonas Kaufmann and Eva-Maria Westbroek star as the twins, Siegmund and Sieglinde, and Stephanie Blythe sings Fricka. Part of the “The Metropolitan Opera: Live in HighDefinition” series, the opera was originally transmitted to theaters on May 14, 2011. The encore screening runs at 6:30 p.m. Monday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Tickets are $15. 260 minutes. (no MPAA rating) — Synopsis from The Metropolitan Opera

“The Metropolitan Opera: Siegfried” — Part three of the Ring follows the journey of Siegfried, son of Siegmund and Sieglinde, from naive fearless boy to supreme hero.

Continued next page

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PAGE 28 • GO! MAGAZINE

movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

Diyah Pera / Lionsgate / The Associated Press

From left, Richard Jenkins, Amy Acker and Bradley Whitford star in “The Cabin in the Woods.” Bring a friend and enter to win a free area of Dysport, Botox, Restylane and much more ...

From previous page With the re-forged sword of his father, he conquers magical obstacles to reach his prize, Brünnhilde. Jay Hunter Morris took over the title role, one of the most demanding in the repertoire, days before the production’s premiere and reprised his acclaimed portrayal in this live transmission the following week. Deborah Voigt is Brünnhilde and Bryn Terfel sings the Wanderer. Part of the “The Metropolitan Opera: Live in High-Definition” series, the opera was originally transmitted to theaters on Nov. 5, 2011. The encore screening runs at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Tickets are $15. 265 minutes. (no MPAA rating) — Synopsis from The Metropolitan Opera

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“Pedal-Driven: A Bikeumentary” — The film follows the sometimes-challenging process of creating and sharing trails, along with showcasing the riding in amazing riding areas. “Pedal-Driven” will take you behind both sides of this confrontation and examine the shared philosophies of stewardship and sustainability. One of the many case studies featured in this film is the excellent relationship between the Forest Service and the Central Oregon Trail Alliance. Part of the Pine Mountain Sports Movie Night series, the film screens at 9 p.m. Thursday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. (Doors open at 8:30 p.m.) Cost is $5. Proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance. (no MPAA rating) — Synopsis from McMenamins

“Planet Terror” — “Planet Terror” is a 2007 American action horror film written and directed by Robert Rodriguez, about a group of people attempting to survive an onslaught of zombie-like creatures as they feud with a military unit, including a go-go dancer searching for a way to use her useless talents. The film, a tribute to the zombie film genre, stars Rose McGowan, Freddy Rodriguez, Josh Brolin, Marley Shelton, Naveen Andrews, Michael Biehn, Jeff Fahey, Stacy Ferguson and Bruce Willis. The film screens at 10 p.m. tonight at the Tin Pan Theater in Bend. (R) — Synopsis from film’s website

Sprout Film Festival — Founded in 2003, the Sprout Film Festival is a New York City-based

non-profit organization, dedicated to bringing innovative programming to people with developmental disabilities. Organizers hope to “eliminate stereotypes, promote a greater acceptance of differences and to encourage an awareness of similarities,” according to the news release. The festival screens at 11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. tonight at the Tower Theatre in Bend. Cost is $6 for the matinee and $10 for the evening screening. (no MPAA rating)

WHAT’S NEW “Dark Shadows” — Tim Burton’s film is all dressed up with nowhere to go, an elegant production without a central drive. There are wonderful things in the film, but they aren’t what’s important. It’s as if Burton directed at arm’s length, unwilling to find juice in the story. Johnny Depp is flawless as the vampire Barnabas, transported from the 18th century to 1972, but the other characters get lost in arch mannerisms. As always with Burton, the visual style is wonderful. This film is available locally in IMAX. Rating: Two and a half stars. 112 minutes. (PG-13) “Footnote” — A seriocomic Israeli film about a father who has labored for years without much recognition, and his son who is a facile popularizer to whom everything comes easily. Both work in the same narrow, specialized field, and when they find themselves trapped in an ethical dilemma, there is rich irony to be found. Winner of best screenplay at Cannes 2011; 2012 Oscar nominee for best foreign film. Rating: Four stars. 106 minutes. (PG) “The Kid With a Bike” — An 11-year-old boy has been dumped at a boys home by his father, but is sure it was a mistake and shows a fierce determination to track down his dad and his bicycle. Young Thomas Doret is spellbinding in his intensity as the outcast, and Cecile de France is mysterious, but good, as the hairdresser who agrees to become his weekend foster mother. Another intense, empathetic story of ordinary working-class lives by Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. Winner of the Grand Prize of the Jury at Cannes 2011. Rating: Three and a half stars. 87 minutes. (PG-13)

Continued next page


movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

NEW DVD & B L U - R AY RELEASES

From previous page

STILL SHOWING “21 Jump Street” — Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum play Schmidt and Jenko, who were opposites in high school and now, a few years later, find themselves partners in a police undercover program that enrolls them in high school. They don’t look young enough, but so what? The movie cheerfully ignores the dramatic focus of the 1980s Fox series and becomes a mashup of screwball comedy, action and the “Odd Couple” formula. Better than you might expect. Rating: Three stars. 109 minutes. (R) “American Reunion” — “American Reunion” is a slow and sad, crude and cruel, tame and timid return to the scene of the crime against pastry. “Harold and Kumar” vets Jon Hurwitz and Hayden Schlossberg wrote and directed this trip down Full Frontal Nudity Lane. They’re lost trying to update this exhausted franchise, failing to find any funny new lines, relying on shock laughs involving oral sex, using the toilet in an ice chest and whatever dated dose of crudity Stifler blurts out. There’s still a hint of whimsy in the fatherson scenes between Eugene Levy and Biggs, still a little brassy broad humor in the return of “Stifler’s Mom” (Jennifer Coolidge). But mostly, watching folks in this age range get tanked and make bad decisions isn’t nostalgic. It’s just sad. Just like a real reunion, in other words. Rating: One and a half stars. 113 minutes. (R) — Roger Moore, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“The Artist” — A brand-new silent comedy that’s a charming crowd-pleaser, and has swept up many year-end awards on its march toward the Oscars. Jean Dujardin stars as a 1927 silent star who is

PAGE 29

Three Sisters Women’s Conference May 19, 2012 Mountain View Fellowship in Redmond. Cost is $25.

The following movies were released the week of May 8. “Tim and Eric’s Billion Dollar Movie” — Cult comedy stars Tim Heidecker and Eric Wareheim star as themselves in a 92-minute version of the deliberately bad comedy sketches they do on TV and the Internet. You have to belong to the cult. DVD and Bluray Extras: Three featurettes, deleted and extended scenes and audio commentary. Rating: Half star. 92 minutes. (R) “The Vow” — Rachel McAdams and Channing Tatum play a young Chicago couple who are happily married after four years when they’re in an accident and she loses all her memories of being married to him — or even meeting him. She thinks she’s still living at home with her parents (Sam Neill and Jessica Lange) and engaged to Jeremy (Scott Speedman). What’s a

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threesisterswomansconference.com or call 541-382-8609 for more information or to register. Courtesy Kerry Hayes via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Channing Tatum and Rachel McAdams star in “The Vow.” girl to do? A well-behaved, tenderhearted date movie about impossibly nice people, but too sedate and safe. DVD Extras: A featurette, gag reel and audio commentary; Blu-ray Extras: Three additional featurettes. Rating: Two and a half stars. 104 minutes. (PG-13)

ALSO THIS WEEK: “Underworld: Awakening” COMING UP: Movies scheduled for national release May 15 include “Albert Nobbs,” “The Grey,” “Chronicle” and “Rampart.”

thrown out of work with the rise of talkies, but not forgotten by the little dancer (Berenice Bejo) he was kind to when he was big and she was a nobody. The film is made with warmth, wit, big laughs, unabashed melodrama. A silent movie for people who think they don’t like silent movies. Rating: Four stars. 100 minutes. (PG) “The Cabin in the Woods” — Five college students head out for a weekend in an isolated cabin, and find it contains unguessable levels of reality. The trailer and opening minutes reveal that the cabin is a set for a laboratory experiment — but the plot takes such bizarre turns that’s the least of it. With Kristen Connolly, Chris Hemsworth, Richard Jenkins. Produced and co-written by horror legend Joss Whedon. Rating: Three stars. 105 minutes. (R) “Chimpanzee” — Disney’s 2012 movie offering for Earth Day is a gorgeous and technically dazzling look inside the world of chimpanzees — their use of tools, their nurturing instincts, their means of organization during fights and hunts for smaller monkeys, whom they sometimes eat. But “Chimpanzee” is also a throwback, a documentary that follows a baby chimp named Oscar as he struggles to learn the ways of his tribe and to survive in the dense rain forests of Africa’s Ivory Coast. It’s moving and entertaining as well as informative. Rating: Three stars. 84 minutes. (G)

entirely approve of it, and too big of a sap not to fall for it, at least a little. Rating: Three stars. 108 minutes. (PG-13) “Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax” — From Universal’s “Despicable Me” team, “Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax” is a gorgeous and glorious new film that turns a somewhat gloomy, cautionary tale into a 3-D musical, with catchy tunes and gags borrowed from every film from “Toy Story” to “Babe.” The film is a feast of bright, Seuss colors and wonderful Seuss design — all curvy, undulating lines and shapes and the songs are a stitch. “Lorax” takes on echoes of “WALL-E” as it embraces its gloom. But it’s all a set up for the redemption song, the gospel-tinged “Let it Grow.” This film is available locally in 3-D. Rating: Three and a half stars. 94 minutes. (PG)

— Roger Moore, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“Delicacy” — A sweetheart of a love story, and cornball from stem to stern. It stars the French pixie Audrey Tautou as Nathalie, a Parisian cutie who loves, loses and lives to love again, and there is not the slightest doubt in our minds that she will pass through all three stages. Tender and innocent. I am too good of a critic to

— “DVD and Blu-ray Extras” from wire and online sources

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“The Five-Year Engagement” — “The Five-Year Engagement” plays like a fiveepisode, R-rated story arc from “How I Met Your Mother.” With more profanity and more explicit sex. And considerably less drinking. And no Neil Patrick Harris. Jason Segel, co-star of both the TV show and the movie, and his “Forgetting Sarah Marshall” team, feed us two hours-plus of recycled gags from the show (e.g. Segel’s “Big Foot” impersonation) and bits that might have been in the sitcom, but were too expensive for it. And all that adds up to is an occasionally engaging romantic dramedy that never blows away that “Where have I seen this before?” feeling. Emily Blunt and Segel are Violet and Tom, young lovers in San Francisco planning a wedding. Until she gets a fellowship to study and work at the University of Michigan. Rating: One and a half stars. 124 minutes. (R) — Roger Moore, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Continued next page

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PAGE 30 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

From previous page

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“The Hunger Games” — Jennifer Lawrence is strong and convincing as the lead in a science-fiction parable set in a future where poor young people are forced into deadly combat for the entertainment of the rich. The earth-toned naturalism of forest hunting scenes is in odd contrast to the bizarre oddballs at the top in this society. An effective entertainment, but too long, and it avoids many obvious questions about this society’s morality. Rating: Three stars. 142 minutes. (PG-13) “Jiro Dreams of Sushi” — A documentary about a man whose relationship with sushi wavers between love and madness. Jiro Ono has been making sushi for more than 70 years, and there is a three-month wait for a $300 meal in his Tokyo restaurant, which has 10 stools at a counter. It has received a three-star Michelin rating, the highest. He is a perfectionist. Apprentices spend weeks learning how to properly squeeze a towel. The restaurant will one day be inherited by his 50-year-old son, Yoshikazu, who must be a very patient man. Rating: Three stars. 81 minutes. (PG) “John Carter” — A Civil War veteran (Taylor Kitsch) finds himself transported to Mars, where he lands in the middle of a planetary war between two humanlike cities, with the local four-armed race of Tharks in the middle. Lots and lots of action, a terrific heroine in Dejah Thoris (Lynn Collins), an intriguing alien design and well-done special effects. Director Andrew Stanton lacks the kind of tightly written script he had in “Finding Nemo,” and as science fiction this is a couple of notches down from his “WALL-E,” but the movie is competent weekend action. Rating: Two and a half stars. 132 minutes. (PG-13) “The Lucky One” — Shameless love story about a Marine (Zac Efron) whose life is saved by a photo he finds in Iraq. He tracks down the girl in the picture (Taylor Schilling) and finds her running a dog kennel in impossibly beautiful Louisiana hills. Her nana (Blythe Danner) spots Efron as husband material, but her ex-husband (Jay R. Ferguson) hangs around getting drunk and acting mean. A smooth, pretty adaptation of a smooth Nicholas Sparks novel, if incredible coincidences and romantic cliches don’t bother you; it’s midlevel Sparks, done well. Rating: Two and a half stars. 101 minutes. (PG-13) “Man on a Ledge” — Sam Worthington stars as an ex-cop who escapes from prison, climbs onto the 21st-floor ledge outside a hotel room, draws a big crowd, and acts as a distraction while a diamond heist takes place across the street. Just a shade implausible, eh? Rating: Two stars. 102 minutes. (PG-13) “Marvel’s The Avengers” — A threat to Earth from the smirking Loki, resentful adoptive brother of the Norse god Thor, causes Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) to assemble all of the Avengers: Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Captain America (Chris Evans), the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), Thor (Chris Hemsworth), Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner). The result is sort of like an All-Star Game for Marvel superheroes. Exactly what you’d

Courtesy Sony Pictures Animation

Pirate Captain (voiced by Hugh Grant) holds his beloved Polly in “The Pirates! Band of Misfits.” expect, although more of the same. Gets the job done. This film is available locally in 3-D and IMAX. Rating: Three stars. 142 minutes. (PG-13) “Mirror Mirror” — A retelling of the fairy tale in a sumptuous fantasy setting, with Julia Roberts and Lily Collins wearing the costumes of a career by the late, legendary Japanese designer Eiko Ishioka. They are the Queen and her stepdaughter, Snow White, Armie Hammer plays the charming Prince, and in this version more screen time is given than ever before to the Seven Dwarfs. Looks great, but the dialogue is rather flat, the movie sort of boring, and there’s not much energy in the two places it should really be felt: between the Queen and Snow White, and between Snow and the Prince. Rating: Two and a half stars. 106 minutes. (PG) “The Pirates! Band of Misfits” — There’s an inviolable law of animated films — the more “names” you have in the voice cast, the weaker you know your film is. Aardman, those meticulous Brits who build clay models and painstakingly animate them into Wallace & Gromit cartoons and the hit “Chicken Run,” tip their hand that way with “The Pirates! Band of Misfits.” A pirate picture that’s entirely too late to the party to have much in the line of fresh pirate gags, it is stuffed with name voice actors, from Hugh Grant as The Pirate Captain to Salma Hayek, Brendan Gleeson, Imelda Stanton, Anton Yelchin and Jeremy Piven. And all of them sat in a recording booth and struggled to find funny things to say or funny ways to say the not-so-funny things in the script. Amusing in small doses, “Pirates” is the first Aardman film to suffer a serious shortage of sight gags, the first where the whimsy feels forced and the strain shows. This film is available locally in 3-D. Rating: Two and a half stars. 88 minutes. (PG) — Roger Moore, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“The Raven” — John Cusack stars as Edgar Allan Poe, in an overwrought serial killer melodrama having only the most tenuous connection to the great writer. Starting with one fact, that Poe was found wandering delirious in Baltimore in 1849,

the movie concocts a plot that depends much more on sensational acting than on suspense or atmosphere. With Luke Evans as a detective who teams up with Poe. Rating: Two stars. 111 minutes. (R) “Safe” — His Awesomeness, Jason Statham, has let it be known that he chooses his films based on the fight choreographer the producers hire. Often as not, that blows up in his face. But with “Safe,” working with choreographer J.J. Perry (“Haywire”), that strategy pays off. A slow-building B-movie thriller, the plot is nothing new for Statham. There’s a girl in need of his protection from assorted gangs of bad men. But the dialogue crackles with flinty one-liners. What we have here is basically an American “Transporter,” with Statham caught up in the most jawdropping, quick-cut fights you’ve seen in years. He plows through Russians on the subway, Chinese gangsters in a casino and cops in between, on the mean streets, which he navigates with dazzling automotive dexterity. Rating: Two and a half stars. 94 minutes. (R) — Roger Moore, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“Think Like a Man” — All-star cast, promising premise, doofus behavior. Women seek happiness in romance by leading their lives according to Steve Harvey’s best-seller “Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man.” Then their men catch on and start reading the same book. Tiresome cycling through the couples; might have been better as satire. With Harvey, Michael Ealy, Jerry Ferrara, Meagan Good, Regina Hall, Kevin Hart, Taraji P. Henson, Gabrielle Union, Chris Brown. Rating: Two stars. 122 minutes. (PG-13) “Undefeated” — The story of a high school football team that was possibly the worst in Tennessee, and the volunteer coach who dedicated himself to turning around the team and the lives of its players. Coach Bill Courtney comes across as stubborn and brave in his approach. Winner of an Academy Award as best documentary feature. Rating: Three and a half stars. 113 minutes. (PG-13)


movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

M O V I E T I M E S • For the week of May 11

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time. • As of press time, complete movie times for Wednesday and Thursday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX were unavailable. Check The Bulletin’s Community Life section those day for the complete movie listings.

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE ARTIST (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 4, 9:25 Sun-Thu: 4 DELICACY (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 1, 7 Mon-Thu: 7 FOOTNOTE (PG) Fri-Sat: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:30 Sun: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 Mon-Thu: 4:15, 7:15 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 9:10 Sun: 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 Mon-Thu: 3:15, 6:15 KID WITH A BIKE (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 8:50 Sun: 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 Mon-Thu: 3:45, 6:45 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) Fri-Sat: Noon, 3, 6, 9 Sun: Noon, 3, 6 Mon-Thu: 3, 6 THINK LIKE A MAN (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:20 Sun: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 Mon-Thu: 3:30, 6:30

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

21 JUMP STREET (R) Fri-Tue: 1, 4:20, 7:50, 10:30 BATTLESHIP (PG-13) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m. THE CABIN IN THE WOODS (R) Fri-Tue: 1:40, 4:45, 8, 10:25 CHIMPANZEE (G) Fri-Tue: 10:35 a.m., 1:45, 4:05, 6:20, 9:15 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) Fri-Sun, Tue: 11:45 a.m., 1:10, 2:50, 4, 6:05, 7:25, 9:05, 10:20 Mon: Noon, 1:10, 2:50, 4, 6:05, 7:25, 9:05, 10:20 DARK SHADOWS IMAX (PG-13) Fri-Tue: 1:35, 10:15 THE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT (R) Fri-Tue: 12:40, 3:40, 6:55, 9:50 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) Fri-Tue: 11:40 a.m., 3:30, 6:45, 9:55 THE LUCKY ONE (PG-13) Fri-Tue: 1:20, 3:55, 7:10, 9:40 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) Fri, Mon: 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 3, 3:45, 6:15, 7, 9:25, 10:10 Sat, Tue: 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 3, 3:45, 6:15, 7, 9:25, 10:10 Sun: 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 3, 3:45,

GO! MAGAZINE •

Universal Pictures via The Associated Press

The Lorax (voiced by Danny DeVito), left, and the Once-ler (voiced by Ed Helms) discuss the plight of the trees in “Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax.” 6:15, 7, 9:25, 10:10 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG-13) Fri-Tue: Noon, 12:50, 3:20, 4:30, 6:35, 7:40, 9:45 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS IMAX (PG-13) Fri-Tue: 10:30 a.m., 4:10, 7:15 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: DIE WALKURE (no MPAA rating) Mon: 6:30 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: SIEGFRIED (no MPAA rating) Wed: 6:30 MIRROR MIRROR (PG) Fri-Tue: 12:20, 3:10, 6:30, 9:10 THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS (PG) Fri-Tue: 2:45, 9 THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS 3-D (PG) Fri-Tue: 12:10, 6 THE RAVEN (R) Fri-Sun, Tue: 3:50, 10:25 SAFE (R) Fri-Sun, Tue: 1:25, 7:55 Mon: 1:25

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

AMERICAN REUNION (R) Fri-Wed: 9 DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX (PG) Sat: Noon Wed: 3 JOHN CARTER (PG-13) Sat: 3

MAN ON A LEDGE (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 6 “Pedal-Driven: A Bikeumentary” will screen at 9 p.m. Thursday. (Doors open at 8:30 p.m.) After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

Tin Pan Theater 869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

JIRO DREAMS OF SUSHI (PG) Fri-Sat, Tue-Wed: 6, 8 Sun: 4, 6 Thu: 6 PLANET TERROR (2007 — R) Fri: 10 Theater is closed on Mondays.

REDMOND Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 4:30, 7, 9:30 Sat-Sun: 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 3:05, 6:10, 9:15 Sat-Sun: Noon, 3:05, 6:10, 9:15 THE LUCKY ONE (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 4:15, 6:30 Sat-Sun: 11:45 a.m., 2, 4:15, 6:30 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 3:15, 6:15, 9:15

Sat-Sun: 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 9:15 THE RAVEN (R) Fri-Thu: 8:45

SISTERS Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) Fri: 5, 7:30 Sat-Sun: 2:15, 5, 7:45 Mon-Thu: 6:45 THE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT (R) Fri: 4:45, 7:30 Sat-Sun: 2, 4:45, 7:30 Mon-Thu: 6:30 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) Fri: 4:30, 7:30 Sat-Sun: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 Mon-Thu: 6:15 THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS (PG) Fri: 5 Sat-Sun: 1:30, 3:30 UNDEFEATED (PG-13) Fri: 7:15 Sat-Sun: 5:30, 8 Mon-Thu: 6:45

MADRAS Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG-13) Fri: 3:30, 6:30, 9:30

Sat: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Sun: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 Mon-Thu: 3:30, 6:30 THE LUCKY ONE (PG-13) Fri: 4:30, 6:40, 9:05 Sat: 12:05, 2:20, 4:30, 6:40, 9:05 Sun: 12:05, 2:20, 4:30, 6:40 Mon-Thu: 4:30, 6:40 THE DICTATOR (R) Wed-Thu: 3:40, 5:40, 7:40 THE PIRATES: BANDS OF MISFITS(PG) Fri: 2:45, 5, 7:10 Sat-Sun: 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:10 Mon-Tue: 5, 7:10 THE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT (R) Fri-Sat: 9:15 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) Fri: 4:50, 7:20, 9:50 Sat: Noon, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50 Sun: Noon, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20 Mon-Thu: 4:50, 7:20 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) Fri: 3:20, 6:30, 9:25 Sat: 12:10, 3:20, 6:30, 9:25 Sun: 12:10, 3:20, 6:30 Mon-Thu: 3:20, 6:30

PAGE 31

MISSED THE MOVIE? NEVER AGAIN! Now Available on Video on Demand

MAY Underworld Awakening May 8

One for the Money May 15

The Devil Inside May 15

Chronicle May 15

The Grey May 15

PRINEVILLE Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT (R) Fri (upstairs): 4:30, 7:30 Sat-Sun (upstairs): 1:10, 4:30, 7:30 Mon-Thu: 4, 7 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) Fri: 4, 7:15 Sat-Sun: 12:45, 4, 7:15 Mon-Thu (upstairs): 6 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

The only movie schedule that matters is yours! Catch these movies and hundreds more - including thousands of FREE titles - on VOD from BendBroadband.

Call 541-382-5551

www.bendbroadband.com


PAGE 32 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012

History is the Difference, Knowledge is the Difference, Global is the Difference

Dedicated to Luxury Real Estate

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70 Agents And Thousands Of Listings At www.bendproperty.com 541-382-4123 • 486 SW Bluff Dr., Old Mill District, Bend, OR 97702


Bulletin Daily Paper 05/11/12