Issuu on Google+

Rental prices climbing • E1

SPRINGTIME ON THE SLOPES D1 •

APRIL 13, 2012

FRIDAY 75¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

Investment scammer gets 6-year prison term By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

As Todd Surgeon was sentenced to six years in prison for his role in an investment scam, Deschutes County Circuit Court Judge Stephen Forte gave him some career advice for when he gets out. “You need to figure out a new line of work,” Forte said Thursday, as a courtroom Surgeon with about 10 of Surgeon’s victims watched. Surgeon, 41, of Bend, was also sentenced to four years of post-prison supervision for luring investors into putting money into a purported franchise of alternative medicine centers. After taking their money, Surgeon never followed up on his promises of providing equipment, leaving investors empty-handed. His crimes were committed through his business, Surgeons Inc. “You maybe once in a lifetime come across someone like him,” Deschutes Deputy District Attorney Van McIver said at the sentencing. McIver was quick to say that’s not a good thing, either. Surgeon had no regard for whether his victims were elderly, disabled or gave him their life savings, McIver said. See Scam / A4

POTHOLE REPAIR

Road crews start to fill in the gaps

By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

SISTERS — After giving their city manager a less-than-glowing review, the Sisters City Council showed there may be a path forward in repairing relations. The council unanimously approved a performance evaluation for City Manager Eileen Stein at Thursday night’s council meeting. And while the contents of the review show there is still a split Stein opinion among councilors regarding Stein’s performance, one of her biggest critics spoke in a positive light. Councilor Sharleen Weed, who declined to comment before the meeting, said she had met with Stein on Thursday afternoon and the two were jointly asking to “add in a line that a work plan be created on how (the review’s) goals can be met.” Stein agreed with the addition, saying she would develop the work plan in the next two weeks. The council agreed on the addition and unanimously passed the evaluation. This comes just a few months after a January special council meeting during which Stein’s employment was nearly terminated without cause. At the time, some councilors felt Stein was not performing up to par. But after an hourlong meeting in which residents and city staff spoke unanimously in favor of Stein, the motion was tabled in favor of first completing a performance review that began in December. The council then entered into two executive sessions, facilitated by Sisters Country resident and retired Judge Paul Lipscomb, to perform the review and discuss differences among council members. See Sisters / A4

Fewer women earn degrees in high-tech fields

States aim to curb patients’ burden for costly drugs

By Meagan Pant Cox Newspapers

DAYTON, Ohio — Fewer women are pursuing education in high-tech fields even though employers say they have more of these better-paying positions than candidates to fill them. A new report from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research found fewer women nationwide are getting degrees in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math, known collectively as STEM. “Women do make significantly more in these fields,” said Cynthia Costello, author of a report on increasing STEM opportunities for women. Women in STEM careers’ median earnings range from about $41,000 for engineering technicians to $71,900 for electrical engineers, while women overall had median annual earnings of $35,600 in 2009. “Their under-representation in STEM fields, and especially those you can move into with a community college certificate or degree, means that opportunities in those higher paying fields are closed off to them,” Costello said. See STEM / A5

By Andrew Pollack New York Times News Service Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

City of Bend employee Will Smith tamps asphalt on a pothole Thursday at Southwest Reed Market Road and Southwest Silver Lake Boulevard in Bend. Most potholes should be fixed by fall.

By Sigourney B. Nuñez • The Bulletin

I

t’s pothole season in Bend. Beginning next week, crews will begin repairing potholes

in earnest, replacing temporary fixes with permanent ones.

Over the winter, potholes were filled with a coal mix that can cover a damaged area for a few years. With warmer, drier weather approaching, crews will start using a hot mix of asphalt to create a stable coat. Most potholes should be fixed by fall. Bend officials are uncertain of the number of potholes. “We do not count them; there’s no way,” said Virgil Breeden, Bend street supervisor. One thing is clear. Potholes drive

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper Vol. 109, No. 104, 66 pages, 7 sections

MON-SAT

We use recycled newsprint

U|xaIICGHy02329lz[

Sisters council, manager reconcile

INDEX Calendar Comics

B3 B4-5

Crosswords B5, F2 Dear Abby B3 Editorials C4 Family B1-6

Horoscope B3 Movies GO! 31 Obituaries C5 Sports D1-6 Stocks B2-3 TV B2

motorists crazy. Snowmelt, fluctuating temperatures and deteriorating streets combine to create a pothole. “The more moisture we have, the more potholes we will see on the streets,” Breeden said. “(The number of) potholes have gone up, though we’ve had a pretty limited winter. Aged roads play a factor to potholes. If it wasn’t due to winter, it was just due to the infrastructure.” See Pothole / A5

TODAY’S WEATHER

Possible storms High 52, Low 29 Page C6

Inside • What causes potholes — and how crews repair them, A5

Correction An information box that accompanied a story headlined “Topsy-turvy landing,” which appeared Wednesday, April 11, on Page A1, listed an incorrect weight for the Fairchild 24 C8C. The plane’s maximum gross takeoff weight is approximately 2,400 pounds. The Bulletin regrets the error.

The hemophilia drug that saves 7-year-old William Addison from uncontrolled bleeding costs $100,000 a year. His family’s insurance pays virtually all of it. But his mother, Victoria Kuhn, says she is terrified that the insurance company may start requiring patients to pay as much as a third of the cost of the drug. “I don’t know where we’d find $30,000,” said Kuhn, who lives in Falmouth, Maine. Spurred by patients and patient advocates like Kuhn, lawmakers in at least 20 states, from Maine to Hawaii, have introduced bills that would limit out-of-pocket payments by consumers for expensive drugs used to treat diseases like cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and inherited disorders. Pharmaceutical companies would also benefit from such legislation because high co-payments discourage patients from taking their medicines. The pharmaceutical giant Pfizer has been helping the legislative drive behind the scenes, even drafting some of the bills, according to legislators and patient advocates. The bills aim to counter efforts by health plans to reduce the amount they pay for expensive medicines by making the patients pay a percentage, typically 20 to 35 percent, of the cost. See Drugs / A4

TOP NEWS N. KOREA: Rocket fails after liftoff, A3 TRAYVON MARTIN CASE: Zimmerman appears in court, A3

Enter Todd Snider’s world


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

A2

The Bulletin

S S

How to reach us STOP, START OR MISS YOUR PAPER?

541-385-5800 Phone hours: 5:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 6:30 a.m.-noon Sat.-Sun.

GENERAL INFORMATION

541-382-1811 ONLINE

www.bendbulletin.com EMAIL

bulletin@bendbulletin.com NEWSROOM AFTER HOURS AND WEEKENDS

541-383-0367 NEWSROOM FAX

541-385-5804 NEWSROOM EMAIL Business ..... business@bendbulletin.com City Desk...........news@bendbulletin.com Community Life......................................... communitylife@bendbulletin.com Sports.............. sports@bendbulletin.com

OUR ADDRESS Street Mailing

1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702 P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

ADMINISTRATION Chairwoman Elizabeth C. McCool ...........541-383-0374 Publisher Gordon Black .....................541-383-0339 Editor-in-Chief John Costa .........................541-383-0337

DEPARTMENT HEADS Advertising Jay Brandt ..........................541-383-0370 Circulation and Operations Keith Foutz .........................541-385-5805 Finance Karen Anderson...541-383-0324 Human Resources Traci Donaca ......................541-383-0327 New Media Jan Even ........541-617-7849

TALK TO AN EDITOR Business ............................541-383-0360 City Editor Erik Lukens ......541-383-0367 Assistant City Editor Mike Braham......................541-383-0348 Community Life, Health Julie Johnson.....................541-383-0308 Editorials Richard Coe ......541-383-0353 Family, At Home Alandra Johnson................541-617-7860 GO! Magazine Ben Salmon........................541-383-0377 News Editor Jan Jordan ....541-383-0315 Photos Dean Guernsey......541-383-0366 Sports Bill Bigelow.............541-383-0359

TALK TO A REPORTER Bend Nick Grube................541-633-2160 Business Tim Doran ..........................541-383-0360 Elon Glucklich ....................541-617-7820 Jordan Novet......................541-633-2117 Calendar ............................541-383-0351 Consumer Heidi Hagemeier ................541-617-7828 Crook County Duffie Taylor .......................541-504-2336 Deschutes County Hillary Borrud.....................541-617-7829 Education Patrick Cliff .........................541-633-2161 Ben Botkin (Redmond/Sisters)...541-977-7185 Family/Aging Mac McLean ......................541-617-7816 Features/Fine Arts David Jasper ......................541-383-0349 Health Anne Aurand ......................541-383-0304 Betsy Q. Cliff.......................541-383-0375 Markian Hawryluk..............541-617-7814 Jefferson County Duffie Taylor .......................541-504-2336 La Pine/Sunriver ...............541-383-0348 Music Ben Salmon ............541-383-0377 Public Lands Dylan J. Darling..................541-617-7812 Public Safety Scott Hammers..................541-383-0387 Redmond/Sisters Erik Hidle ............................541-617-7837 Salem Lauren Dake ...........541-419-8074 Special Projects Sheila G. Miller ...................541-617-7831 Washington, D.C. Andrew Clevenger..............202-662-7456

REDMOND BUREAU Street address .......226 N.W. Sixth St. Redmond, OR 97756 Mailing address ....P.O. Box 788 Redmond, OR 97756 Phone.................................541-504-2336 Fax .....................................541-548-3203

CORRECTIONS The Bulletin’s primary concern is that all stories are accurate. If you know of an error in a story, call us at 541-383-0358.

TO SUBSCRIBE Home delivery and E-Edition: One month: $11 (Print only: $10.50) By mail in Deschutes County: One month: $14.50 By mail outside Deschutes County: One month: $18 E-Edition only: One month: $8 TO PLACE AN AD Classified...........................541-385-5809 Advertising fax ..................541-385-5802 Other information .............541-382-1811

OTHER SERVICES Photo reprints....................541-383-0358 Obituaries ..........................541-617-7825 Back issues .......................541-385-5800 All Bulletin payments are accepted at the drop box at City Hall. Check payments may be converted to an electronic funds transfer. The Bulletin, USPS #552-520, is published daily by Western Communications Inc., 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702. Periodicals postage paid at Bend, OR. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Bulletin circulation department, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. The Bulletin retains ownership and copyright protection of all staff-prepared news copy, advertising copy and news or ad illustrations. They may not be reproduced without explicit prior approval.

Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, names in the news — things you need to know to start your day.

TODAY

CUTTING EDGE

It’s Friday, April 13, the 104th day of 2012. There are 262 days left in the year.

A ‘game changer’ for stroke patients By Patricia Anstett Detroit Free Press

DETROIT — A new generation of devices could significantly improve care for patients who have some of the most devastating types of strokes. The Solitaire flow-restoration device, which gained federal approval last month, is used in the brains of stroke patients much like an arteryopening angioplasty procedure for heart blockages. Robert Lee Burns, 73, of Clay Township, Mich., credits it with saving his life. “I thought it was over,” said Burns. “Maybe there wasn’t enough room upstairs for me yet.” A retiree who has worked on oil rigs and automotive assembly lines, Burns was one of the first five Michiganders to undergo the procedure. His surgery was Monday at St. John Hospital and Medical Center in Detroit. “This is a very promising new technology,” said Dr. Sandra Narayanan, a Detroit Medical Center interventional neurologist. “I think it’s going to be a game changer.” Doctors hope the new device proves to be more effective and easier to use than the first generation of products, which worked in a similar way, but weren’t as good at removing clots. Studies of the new device in Europe and Canada show that it significantly improved stroke outcomes. “We hope to replicate some of the results,” said Dr. Andrew Xavier, director of interventional neurology at Oakwood. Just a little more than a decade ago, doctors had few options for patients with the most devastating strokes that cause blockages in the brain. The addition of a drug called a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) helped many people, but doctors say that as much as 40 percent to 50 percent of the time, the clot is too big to dissolve with the drug, which ideally is given within the first hour of stroke symptoms and no more than 4½ hours later. Earlier devices also were technically demanding to use and proved a challenge for all but doctors in high-volume practices who performed the techniques often, said Dr. Richard Fessler, chief of surgery for the St. John Providence Health System . The Solitaire device, made by Covidien of Dublin, Ireland, is minimally invasive.

Removing brain blocks A new device is being used to remove stroke-causing blood clots in brain arteries. How the instrument, called Solitaire Flow Restoration Device, works: Blood clot Stent

Brain artery

e

ub

t er

Inn

1 Usually starting in the leg, a thin tube

is threaded to the area of the clot in the brain; smaller inner tube, containing a stent, is pushed forward through the clot

be Tu

HAPPENINGS

IN HISTORY

• Nuclear officials from the U.S., Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia gather in Istanbul. • Mitt Romney addresses the National Rifle Association at its convention in St. Louis. • President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden release their income tax returns. • President Obama travels to the Summit of the Americas in Cartagena, Colombia.

Highlight: In 1970, Apollo 13 was crippled when a tank containing liquid oxygen burst. (The astronauts returned safely.)

BIRTHDAYS Singer Al Green is 66. Bluegrass musician Sam Bush is 60. Chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov is 49. — From wire reports

2 The inner tube is retracted; as the

inner tube is removed, the stent expands into the soft blood clot

3 A balloon is blown up to block blood

flow; suction starts and the stent is pulled back in to the tube, taking the clot with it

Balloon Source: St. John Hospital

© 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Robert Lee Burns, of Michigan, who suffered a stroke last week, says the Solitaire flow-restoration device saved his life. Regina H. Boone Detroit Free Press

Doctors thread a thin tube through an artery — typically in the top of the leg — up to the brain. Then they advance within that tube another instrument with a miniature, Slinky-like stent to the blockage. The stent expands, helping doctors remove the clot more easily. Burns, known to many in the Algonac area as Scrapper Bob because he salvages yards for scrap, was returning home in his truck Monday afternoon when he felt his right hand and leg go numb. He had not felt well that day, he recalled. “I thought, ‘My God, I’m having a stroke,’ ” Burns said. He pulled over to get his phone out of his pocket, but was too weak to retrieve it.

A man who saw him outside his home responded to his call for help. A computer tomography scan at St. John River District Hospital in East China Township found that he had a blockage that was so big it was unlikely it would be helped by tPA, Fessler said. An ambulance brought Burns to River District’s bigger sister hospital, St. John in Detroit. Burns already is taking steps, has slight numbness but no major paralysis or other stroke complications, and most likely will be able to go home soon. He should be able to get back to his life with a few weeks of physical therapy, Fessler said. “He’s doing beautifully.”

TIDBITS

Accidentally flushed, $6,000 wedding ring found in sewer The Associated Press BOISE, Idaho — A Boise woman says she believes in miracles after sewer workers found the $6,000 diamond wedding ring she accidentally flushed down the toilet 18 months ago. Mechelle Rieger claimed the seven-diamond ring Thursday morning at City Hall in Kuna, bringing with her a photo and the March 2001 appraisal from the jeweler that made it. Rieger thanked city workers Travis Fleming and Carey Knight, who spotted the ring along with loose coins in a filtration basket while doing routine maintenance last week. Rieger said she freaked out and “just started screaming” when the ring accidentally fell in the toilet. She says there was more screaming involved when she got a voice message from a friend relaying the news about a ring being found in the sewer in her old neighborhood.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday

PERFECT SMALL ACREAGE

DOWNTOWN, PARKS,TRAILS, ROAD TO MT. BACHELOR

This is a beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on elevated 2.29 acre lot with mountain views. Irrigation on property. Could be set up for horses. Very close to town and shopping. $295,000 CALL LISA KIRBS AT 541-480-2576. MLS: 201201669

Excellent sunny floor plan. 3 or 4 bedroom, bonus room, 2 car garage with alley access. Level lot with Southern orientation, a gardeners dream. Extra parking. Shows great. $265,000 CALL CARMEN COOK AT 541-480-6491. MLS: 201109244

HEART OF SUNRIVER Located near the Sunriver Village, the fully furnished condo backs up to the Meadows Golf Course. 2 bedroom, 2 bath unit with 3 decks. $199,900 CALL TAMMY SETTLEMIER AT 541-410-6009. MLS: 201201389

THE BEST OF URBAN LIVING In the heart of the Old Mill district, Otter Run is located on the banks of the Deschutes, across the river from the amphitheater. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, townhome with private elevator. $439,500. CALL JAYNEE BECK AT 541-480-0988. MLS: 201200290

BIG YARD AND BONUS ROOM, NWX DOWNTOWN COMMERCIAL BUILDING Remodeled 724 sq. ft. one level building. Excellent parkway visibility. $160,000 CALL LARRY JACOBS AT 541-480-2329. MLS: 201202079

3 bedroom, 2000 sq. ft. home that is warm and comfortable. Oversized garage for all your toys. $387,900 CALL JACQUIE SEBULSKY AT 541-280-4449 OR MICHELE ANDERSON AT 541-633-9760. MLS: 201107594

Bend ~ Main Office Dayville/John Day ~ Branch

Tel 541-382-8262 Tel 541-987-2363

IMMACULATE HOME IN DESIRABLE NW NEIGHBORHOOD Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with vaulted ceilings, skylights, granite counters, SS appliances, patio, fully fenced, dual-door garage and 1759 sq. ft. $310,000 CALL TERRY SKJERSAA AT 541-383-1426. MLS: 201106958

} } www.dukewarner.com

REALTOR


T S N   B

TRAYVON MARTIN CASE

Catholic bishops push for religious freedom

Shooter gets day in court, new lawyer

The nation’s Roman Catholic bishops issued a proclamation Thursday calling for every priest, parish and layperson to participate in a “great national campaign” to defend religious liberty, which they said is “under attack, both at home and abroad.” In particular they urged every diocese to hold a “Fortnight for Freedom” during the two weeks leading up to the Fourth of July, for parishioners to study, pray and take public action to fight what they see as the government’s attempts to curtail religious freedom. “To be Catholic and American should mean not having to choose one over the other,” said the statement, issued by the bishops ad hoc committee on religious freedom. For more than half a year, the bishops have put the religious liberty issue front and center, but it has not yet galvanized the Catholic laity and has even further polarized the church’s liberal and conservative flanks.

Jury selection begins in John Edwards trial GREENSBORO, N.C. — After years of investigation, denials and delays, jury selection began Thursday for the criminal trial of former presidential candidate John Edwards. Edwards sat at the defense table as about 180 potential jurors filed into a Greensboro, N.C., courtroom. U.S. District Judge Catherine Eagles then asked Edwards to stand and face them. He grinned and nodded as the judge introduced him. The trial had been scheduled to begin in late January, but was delayed after Edwards’ lawyers told the judge he had a serious heart problem that required treatment. Compared with the quick-smiling candidate of four years ago, the former U.S. senator, now 58, appeared slightly gaunt in the cheeks but still had no trace of gray in his carefully parted hair. Edwards faces six criminal counts related to nearly $1 million in secret payments made by two campaign donors to help hide the married Democrat’s pregnant mistress as he sought the White House in 2008.

Deputy, another man shot dead in standoff MODESTO, Calif. — A sheriff’s deputy and another man trying to serve an eviction notice at a Modesto apartment complex were shot dead Thursday by a man who holed up and was surrounded by a battalion of SWAT teams. The standoff, still under way at 8:40 p.m., began right after the shootings occurred about 11 a.m. Dozens of neighbors were evacuated to a nearby church. About 6:30 p.m., the Stanislaus County Sheriff’s Department identified the deputy killed as Robert Paris, 53, a 16year veteran of the force. The other victim’s name was being withheld pending notification of his relatives.

Proposed rule aims to stop runaway cars DETROIT — Federal safety regulators plan to require all new cars and trucks to have a brake-throttle override system, giving drivers the ability to step on the brake to stop the car if the accelerator pedal sticks or malfunctions. The proposed rule, released Thursday for public comment, is aimed at preventing runaway-car crashes like the one near San Diego in 2009 that killed an off-duty California Highway Patrol officer and his family. That event and an outpouring of complaints about unintended acceleration prompted Toyota to recall millions of vehicles in the last few years. “America’s drivers should feel confident that any time they get behind the wheel, they can easily maintain control of their vehicles — especially in the event of an emergency,” Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said in a statement. — From wire reports

By Serge F. Kovaleski and Lizette Alvarez New York Times News Service

SANFORD, Fla. — A tall, lanky redheaded lawyer named Mark O’Mara appeared in court here on Thursday, standing next to his newest client, George Zimmerman, one of the most recognizable defendants in the country but a man he had met for the first time only the night before at the county jail. Zimmerman, 28, has become known to millions as the neighborhood watch organizer who shot and killed Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager, six weeks ago, but who was initially not charged with any crime — unleashing a nationwide protest. O’Mara, a criminal defense lawyer for nearly three decades, is perhaps best known in central Florida as a lowkey legal analyst on television who frequently commented on the trial last year of Casey Anthony, who was accused — and acquitted — of killing her young daughter. It was Zimmerman’s first moment in court, and he looked wide-eyed and grim in a one-piece blue-gray prison uniform. O’Mara said that his client would plead not guilty and that he would try to get him out of jail within the next couple

Gary W. Green / The Associated Press

After weeks in hiding, George Zimmerman made his first courtroom appearance Thursday in the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. Prosecutors outlined their murder case, saying the neighborhood watch volunteer followed and confronted the black teenager after a police dispatcher told him not to.

of weeks. Until then, Zimmerman, who was charged with second-degree murder on Wednesday, is being held in protective custody. A conviction could result

in a prison term of 25 years to life. After seeing his client on Thursday, O’Mara said in an interview that Zimmerman was distraught. “He is stressed and tired after long weeks of not being able to go out in public,” O’Mara, 56, said. Zimmerman and his family have maintained that he was trailing Martin because the young man appeared suspicious. Martin then disappeared from view, only to re-emerge, confront him and assault him, they say. In the fight, they contend, he shot Martin in self-defense. Florida’s expansive self-defense law, Stand Your Ground, was cited initially as a reason why no charges were brought. In a four-page charging affidavit filed in court on Thursday, prosecutors added little to the known facts in the case. But the affidavit contradicted the Zimmerman family account in at least one crucial respect. “Martin attempted to run home,” it said, “but was followed by Zimmerman who didn’t want the person he falsely assumed was going to commit a crime to get away before the police arrived.” “Zimmerman confronted Martin and a struggle ensued,” it stated. It also asserted that Zimmerman “profiled” Martin.

Syria quieter as cease-fire takes hold Colum Lynch The Washington Post

David Guttenfelder / The Associated Press file photo

A North Korean soldier stands in front of the country’s Unha-3 rocket at the launch site in Tongchang-ri. North Korea fired the long-range rocket early today, South Korean and U.S. officials said, defying international warnings against the launch widely seen as a provocation.

Defiant North Korea fails in rocket test By Choe Sang-hun and Rick Gladstone New York Times News Service

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea defied international warnings of censure and further isolation early today, launching a rocket that the United States and its allies called a provocative pretext for developing an intercontinental ballistic missile that might one day carry a nuclear warhead. But in what was a major embarrassment to the North and its young new leader, the rocket disintegrated moments after the launching, and U.S. and Japanese officials said its remnants fell harmlessly into the sea. After hours of silence, North Korea’s state-run media announced that the satellite the rocket had been carrying had not entered orbit, Reuters reported. But there was no explanation of the rocket failure from the reclusive North Korea leadership, which had trumpeted the event as a showcase of patriotic pride meant to exalt the 100th anniversary of the birth of the country’s founder, Kim Il Sung, grandfather of the new leader, Kim Jung Un. Only two days earlier, North Korea had elevated the grandson to the highest levels of state power. Officials from Japan, South Korea and the United

States, which had been monitoring for signs of the launching, condemned it as a belligerent act that endangered regional stability — even though it had failed. U.S. officials said food aid that it had planned to send to North Korea to help feed its malnourished population would be suspended. “North Korea is only further isolating itself by engaging in provocative acts and is wasting its money on weapons and propaganda displays while the North Korean people go hungry,” the White House press secretary, Jay Carney, said in a statement Thursday evening, which was Friday morning in Asia. The United States, Carney said, “remains vigilant in the face of North Korean provocations and is fully committed to the security of our allies in the region.” The consequences of such a public relations fiasco were unclear for the young Kim or the elders who have surrounded and groomed him, and the conspicuous absence of a prompt explanation for what had gone awry deepened the mystery. “Obviously, the rocket launch is pretty embarrassing for Kim Jung Un and North Korea,” said Tate Nurkin, a director at Jane’s Strategic Advisory Service, in an emailed reaction. “North Korea is all about ceremony and stature and grand, symbolic gestures.” One Obama administration official suggested that the failChange your mind. Change your life.

(541) 728-0505 www.neurofloat.com

ure might speed the North’s determination to conduct a nuclear test — the country’s third — “simply to show that it can.” Test preparations are under way, satellite photographs suggest. The only remaining mystery is whether the test, if it happens, would be designed to show off a new weapon made from highly enriched uranium, the newest fuel the North is experimenting with, rather than the plutonium bombs that it tested, with mixed success, in 2006 and 2009. In Japan, government officials said the three-stage rocket, which the North had said was carrying a communications satellite, appeared to fly for more than a minute after it was launched at 7:40 a.m. local time, then broke up at an altitude of 400,000 feet and tumbled in four pieces into international waters west of the Korean Peninsula. In Washington, the Pentagon said in a statement that the first stage of the rocket fell into the sea about 103 miles west of Seoul, and the remaining stages “were assessed to have failed and no debris fell on land.” It said the debris had never been a threat.

BEIRUT — A shaky truce took effect in Syria on Thursday, bringing a respite from the intense bloodshed of recent weeks and prompting the United States to step up pressure for a Security Council resolution that will oblige the Syrian government to fully comply with the terms of a U.N.-brokered peace plan. But with both sides to the conflict exchanging allegations of violations and no indication that Syrian security forces were preparing to relax their stranglehold on opposition flash points, there was skepticism about whether the lull would last. Activist groups said at least five people were killed when Syrian troops opened fire on demonstrators and on civilians returning to their homes, and President Bashar al-Assad’s government accused “terrorists” of carrying out two bombings and an assassination in which at least two people died. It was clear, however, that Syria was quieter than it has been for months, leading to cautious hope that the six-point peace plan proposed by the joint U.N.-Arab League envoy Kofi Annan may help end the bloodshed and usher in a negotiated settlement to the country’s 13-month-old uprising.

May 19, 2012

“First Timers” Pole Pedal Paddle Seminar Tuesday, April 17 5:15 pm Downtown Branch of U.S. Bank 1025 NW Bond – Bend FREE A seminar will feature past winners discussing training, logistics and the course. Send your RSVP by e-mail to: molly@mbsef.org

Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation www.mbsef.org

www.smolichmotors.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A3


A4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

Campaigns plan maximum push to raise money By Nicholas Confessore New York Times News Service

Aides and leading donors to Mitt Romney are preparing a major expansion of the campaign’s fundraising efforts to prepare for a general election contest against President Barack Obama, with the goal of raising up to $600 million, according to several people involved in the discussions. Republican-leaning outside groups and Democratic-leaning unions are planning to spend hundreds of millions more. And Obama, who raised $750 million in 2008, is likely to meet or exceed that this year, according to people involved in his fundraising operation. Those goals make it virtually certain that neither party’s nominee will accept public funds for the general election or the spending limits that come with them — the likely death knell for a cornerstone of the post-Watergate campaign finance reforms intended to limit the influence of money in federal elections. “This is going to be the most moneyed election in the history of the United States,” said Bob Edgar, president of Common Cause, a group that favors greater restrictions on campaign spending. Edgar, a former congressman who was among the Democratic “Watergate babies” elected in the wake of the scandal, added, “There is a sense of coming full circle, of forgetting our history — the reason we installed a system for financing campaigns that didn’t rely on corporate or wealthy money.” Obama has already held more than 100 major fundraisers for his campaign, jointly raising large amounts with the Democratic National Committee, and Romney is moving quickly to catch up. His campaign is planning dozens of fundraisers through the end of June, high-dollar events that will feature Romney as well as the campaign’s top allies and other elected officials. The campaign is setting a goal of raising at least $1 million for most events featuring Romney personally. Those efforts will be aided by a new joint fundraising agreement with the Republican National Committee that allows Romney to command far larger checks than he has during the primaries. Under the agreement, guests at major Romney events will be able to write checks as large as $75,000 to a “Romney Victory” committee. About half of that sum would go Romney’s campaign or the Republican committee, mimicking the arrangement under which Obama, as an incumbent, has been raising money since last spring for his campaign and the Democratic National Committee. The remainder will be split among

Scam Continued from A1 “He takes all that they have and then he goes and takes more,” McIver said. Surgeon entered an Alford plea in March to 11 charges involving theft, fraud and unlicensed security sales. Originally, 45 charges were filed against him in the case. In an Alford plea, the defendant doesn’t admit guilt but does acknowledge there’s a likelihood of being found guilty if the case goes to trial. Surgeon gets credit for jail time served, which began after he was arrested in December 2010. The sentence requires Surgeon to pay restitution. An initial tally shows that Surgeon owes nearly $200,000, but that amount is likely to increase because the state is still contacting victims. Surgeon had a checkered past before the case. He served an eight-year prison term in Nevada for a conviction involving racketeering, embezzlement and securities fraud. Several victims testified, including Joanne Lee, who had invested about $49,000 and even moved from Bend to Eugene to run a franchise that

Obama defends Romney’s wife, says candidates’ families should be off-limits CHICAGO — President Barack Obama, addressing the swirling controversy over a Democratic strategist’s comments about Ann Romney, declared that “there is no tougher job than being a mom” and that the families of candidates should be off-limits. The president said he knows how hard mothers work from his own upbringing and from raising daughters with his wife, Michelle. “When I think about what Michelle’s had to do, when I think about my own mom, a single mother raising me and my sister, that’s work,” the president said in a Thursday interview at the White House with anchor Bruce Aune of KCRG-TV of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. “So anybody who would argue otherwise I think probably needs to rethink their statement.” Obama, whose wife became part of the political debate in the 2008 campaign and has been a target of criticism during her time as first lady, said pundits should limit their focus to candidates, and not “civilians” in their family. “I don’t have a lot of patience for commentary about the spouses of political candidates,” he said. Vice President Joe Biden called Hilary Rosen’s comments about Ann Romney “outrageous.” Rosen on Wednesday criticized Mitt Romney for touting his wife as a trusted economic adviser because, Rosen claimed, Ann Romney has “never worked a day in her life.” Rosen initially stood by her comments on Thursday morning, and then tried to clarify them by saying she was making the point that life is far more difficult for mothers who have to raise children and hold a job to make ends meet. — Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau

Republican state parties in Massachusetts, Idaho, Oklahoma and Vermont and later re-allocated to the most critical battleground states. “It’s going to ramp up dramatically,” said Woody Johnson, owner of the New York Jets and one of Romney’s national finance co-chairmen. “The response I’ve been getting, of people willing to max out on the victory side, has been very, very good, very enthusiastic.”

turned out to not even exist. She said a six-year sentence isn’t long enough because she doesn’t believe Surgeon will ever change his ways. Surgeon is a good talker who “could sell ice to the Eskimos,” Lee said, adding that her efforts to get her money back from him were rebuffed. “Trying to get money out of him is like trying to hold onto a wiggling bar of soap,” she said. Surgeon, for his part, said: “I am very sorry” and sought to explain his business efforts as sincere. “It was a beautiful dream,” he said. “I will make full restitution if I ever can.” Laurie Rose, Surgeon’s business partner, was also charged in the case. She got 75 days in jail after entering an Alford plea in January 2011 to charges of first-degree theft, aggravated first-degree theft, unlicensed sale of securities and the sale of unregistered securities. She also agree to testify against Surgeon if his case went to trial. At Thursday’s hearing, Rose asked for a sentence for Surgeon that focused on mental rehabilitation, saying that prison isn’t going to cure him. — Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

Drugs Continued from A1 While some insurers have said the laws are not necessary because of the federal health care law, supporters say the state bill would supplement the federal law and take effect before 2014, when the bulk of the federal law is to become operative. In addition, they say, too much uncertainty remains about how the federal law will work and whether it will survive the challenge now before the Supreme Court. New York state passed the first law prohibiting such high patient payments in 2010. Vermont enacted a one-year moratorium that lasts until July 1. Maine’s governor, Paul LePage, signed a bill into law on Monday that would set a yearly cap on patient payments for such expensive drugs. Hearings on similar bills were held last month in Connecticut and Rhode Island. Delaware’s Health Care Commission just finished a study on the matter. And a bill that would cover all states was recently introduced in the House by David McKinley, R-W.Va. Insurance companies are pushing back, so some bills are dying, as in Washington state, or being watered down, as was the one in Maine. The insurers argue that reducing payments by users of the expensive drugs would raise premiums for everyone else. “There’s no free dollars in the mix here,” Melvin Sorensen, a lobbyist for insurers, said at a hearing in the Washington state Senate in late January. The controversy centers on so-called specialty drugs, a somewhat imprecise term that generally encompasses products that can cost tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. Such drugs account for only 1 percent of total drug use, but 17 percent of drug spending by private insurers, according to IMS Health. And costs are soaring as more such drugs come to market and as manufacturers raise prices. In 2010, spending on specialty drugs jumped 17.4 percent, compared with only 1.1 percent for other drugs, according to Medco Health Solutions, a pharmacy benefits manager that merged this month with Express Scripts.

Sisters Continued from A4 The product of those meetings was released this week in the form of a city manager evaluation that shows a stark difference in opinion on Stein’s performance. The review ranks Stein quantitatively across 30 different criteria, with 1 representing the lowest score and a 5 being the highest. In nearly every category, one councilor gives Stein the highest mark while another awards her the lowest score. None of the scores identify how a council member voted. A narrative following each section also fails to identify which comments were made by which councilor. Before Thursday’s meeting, Mayor Lon Kellstrom said some of the comments were concerning. “We have never had such radical accusations made before,” Kellstrom said. “These are serious accusations, and they aren’t frivolous concerns.” Kellstrom joined the rest of council in voting in favor of the plan, but did

Craig Dilger / New York Times News Service

Victoria Kuhn prepares to inject her son William Addison, 7, with a hemophilia medication, at their home in Falmouth, Maine. At least 20 states have introduced bills that would limit out-ofpocket payments for expensive drugs.

Insurers typically encourage patients to use less expensive drugs by classifying products into tiers with successively higher co-payments, like $10, $30 and $50. Generic drugs are usually in the lowest tier, preferred brand-name drugs in the second tier and other brand-name drugs in the third. But some insurers are now putting specialty drugs into a fourth tier of their own with extra high co-payments, or even co-insurance, in which the patient pays a percentage of the drug cost. About 14 percent of workers with insurance are in plans that have four or more tiers, up from 7 percent in 2008, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s 2011 survey of benefits. Patient advocates say that for some diseases, like multiple sclerosis, none of the drugs are inexpensive, making it impossible to avoid the high outof-pocket costs unless people stop taking their medicine and endanger their health. That discriminates against people with certain diseases, they say, and contravenes the whole idea of insurance, which is to help people pay for costly medical problems. Mark Merritt, president of the Pharmaceutical Care Management Association, which represents pharmacy benefit managers, said the real problem was the price of the drugs. The legislation, he said, was an effort by the pharmaceutical industry to “turn a pricing problem into a coverage issue.” Sharon Treat, executive director of the National Legislative Association on Prescription Drug Prices, an organization of state lawmakers, said

that was a drawback of the bills. Insulating patients from the cost of their drugs, she said, “gives the drug companies a free ride to charge as much as they want.” Still, Treat, a Democratic legislator in Maine, supported the bill in her state. And patient advocates say that while insurance is regulated, there is little they can do about drug prices. Drug companies often help patients with their co-payments, but patient advocates say those programs do not solve the entire problem. While pharmaceutical trade groups have expressed opposition to specialty tiers, Pfizer, which sells drugs for cancer, hemophilia and other diseases, has vigorously pushed the legislation, though it generally does not testify publicly. “I was approached by a lobbyist from Pfizer with the original language,” said Stacey Allen Fitts, the state senator who introduced Maine’s bill. He said patient groups contacted him only afterward. State Rep. Cale Keable, a Rhode Island Democrat, and state Sen. Joshua Green, a Democrat in Hawaii, said a Pfizer lobbyist provided or suggested language for the bills they introduced. Bryon Wornson, vice president for public affairs in Pfizer’s specialty care business unit, said the company was working “in partnership with the patient groups,” adding, “I don’t think we are doing anything that is not fully transparent.” The state bills — which would not apply to employers that insure themselves since their plans are not regulated by states — take various approaches.

New York’s law basically prohibits a fourth tier. At the time the legislation was enacted, no insurer in the state had a fourth tier, and it is not clear whether any would have started one had the law not been enacted. Maine’s bill initially prohibited specialty tiers. The law as enacted allows them, but sets a limit of $3,500 a year for patient co-insurance payments for drugs, Louisiana and Texas both enacted laws last year that do not limit out-of-pocket drug costs, but prohibit insurers from raising them in the middle of a contract year. Some state bills, like one introduced recently in California, and one that died in Washington, take the same approach as the federal law, but would have it apply earlier. The federal law requires insurers, starting in 2014, to cap total yearly out-of-pocket costs, including for drugs, at about $6,000 for an individual and $12,000 for a family. That is still a lot for many patients, though some say it would be better than nothing. “At least I can go, ‘OK, this is the maximum it’s going to cost my family,’ ” said Heidi Barrett of Mukilteo, Wash. She and her four children have psoriatic arthritis and her husband has ulcerative colitis. Three family members combined use about $13,000 worth of the drug Remicade, which is used to treat both conditions, each month. Because of a change in her husband’s insurance, the family will have to pay 10 percent of the drug’s cost starting next year. “I don’t know what we’re going to do,” she said.

not comment during council discussion. One comment in the review states, “as far as leadership of staff ... Eileen is a terrible role model. It appears that she encourages staff to provide faulty information in order to support her desired outcome.” The comments also claim Stein “manipulates situations and encourages, or demands staff to do the same.” In another section, Stein rebuts those claims. “Accusations, particularly those made publicly, by citizens — (and) councilors — about staff providing false information and/or changing stories has had a negative effect on staff morale. Despite those challenges, staff carried out council directives efficiently, positively (and) professionally; regularly reported on current plans, activities (and) issues anticipated to come before council; and implemented council priorities.” Councilors’ comments also refer to projects Stein “overlooked” but, again, the source of the comments is unattributed. Projects mentioned include a water rate issue that the council debated for nearly two years, finding a solution for a potentially unneeded recycle center and procuring tempo-

rary directional signs. Stein responds in writing in the document that “this was a more difficult year in terms of council-staff relations, with a few instances where lack of trust and respect were felt and/or expressed between councilors, citizens and staff, especially in regard to the water rate issue.” In a separate section, Stein further defends her and her staff’s use of time. “I continue to work at delegating more and more to the department directors while continuing to recognize the effect of their heavy workloads personally and their families. Given the (fulltime employment) reduction this year and the fact that citizen expectations have not abated, staff is being responsive to the best of its abilities while continually seeking ways to better manage the workload.” Unattributed comments further accuse Stein of complicating matters as a “purposeful diversion,” being “prickly and defensive” with the public and being defensive about her workload. Despite the accusations in the narrative, Stein’s final score in the evaluation works out to a 2.92 out of 5. And while most of the sec-

tions show scores across the spectrum, Stein scores high on intergovernmental affairs, with no councilor rating her below a 3. Kellstrom said he’s perplexed by that. “How do you square the rest of the evaluation with that rating,” Kellstrom asked. “If she is doing good in intergovernmental affairs then presumably she is doing well (in other areas) such as following council direction.” The review concludes with a section of “future goals and objectives.” The council finalized those goals down to nine points Thursday night. Most of the goals focus on councilors feeling they are receiving equal treatment from Stein. One goal calls for the creation of a council request tracking system. The work plan Stein is preparing is intended to fulfill each of those goals. Kellstrom said an additional review of Stein is scheduled in six months. — Reporter: 541-617-7837 ehidle@bendbulletin.com

✔ Tired? ✔ Need Better Sleep?

541-678-REST (7378)

Sells Cars? YES!

and Takes Trades... Check out the great buy on this... ‘11 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Limited Call Bob today. bhoffman@ aaaautosource.com

or call 541-598-3750 or 541-480-6470

VIN#240721

• Leather • Moonroof • MP3 •16k Miles

www.aaaoregonautosource.com

$24,995

Dealer #0225

at the corner of Hwy 97 & Empire

Don’t Replace ... Reface and save thousands!

Call today for a free consultation!

541-647-8261 www.cabinetcuresbend.com


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Pakistan demands end to drone strikes New York Times News Service ISLAMABAD — In a rare show of unity, the government and opposition joined Thursday to present the United States with a list of stringent demands, including an immediate end to CIA drone strikes, that were cast in uncompromising words but could pave the way for a reopening of NATO supply lines through the country.

W  B Bo ouster may unify communists in China BEIJING — Bo Xilai’s downfall and the arrest of his wife on suspicion of murdering a U.K. citizen may have a stabilizing influence on China’s economy by unifying the ruling Communist Party before a once-in-a-decade leadership transition. The party on Tuesday suspended Bo, 62, from the ruling Politburo, saying he was suspected of committing “serious discipline violations,” China’s official Xinhua News Agency reported. His wife, Gu Kailai, 53, and an aide were put in custody for suspicion of murdering British businessman Neil Heywood, Xinhua reported separately. Bo’s removal may foster more stability in the world’s second-biggest economy ahead of the 18th Communist Party Congress, said Ronald Wan, a Hong Kong-based managing director at China Merchants Securities. The congress later this year will pick a new party head and Politburo. Bo threatened to upset China’s consensus-dependent leadership if he remained in the inner circle, said Jonathan Fenby, China director of the British investment-research service Trusted Sources.

Mali swears in interim president BAMAKO, Mali — Twentytwo days after a military coup ended more than two decades of peaceful democratic rule in Mali, the leader of the country’s national assembly was sworn in as interim president Thursday. The official, Dioncounda Traore, a 70-year-old labor union activist who had been jailed in Mali’s earlier struggle against dictatorship, will lead a temporary government that aims to organize new elections within 40 days and guide the country back to constitutional rule. But he must also face the challenge of reuniting a country torn in two. During the chaos of the coup, an opportunistic uprising by Tuareg militiamen in the north seized strategic towns and declared an independent nation. “Mali has never experienced such difficult times,” Traore said in remarks after he was sworn in. “Its very existence as a nation is at stake.”

Vaccinations begin in cholera-ravaged Haiti A year and a half after cholera first struck Haiti, a tiny portion of the population Thursday began receiving vaccinations against the waterborne disease that has infected more than 530,000 Haitians and killed more than 7,040. Organizers of the vaccination campaign, who have been pushing for vaccinations since the epidemic began, cleared their final political hurdle this week when a national bioethics committee approved their plan to use all available doses of the cheapest cholera vaccine to immunize about 1 percent of the population. On Thursday, tens of thousands of slum dwellers in Portau-Prince took their first of two doses of the oral vaccine, Shanchol; tens of thousands of rural residents of a rice-growing community near St. Marc will begin this weekend. The second dose will be administered in two weeks. — From wire reports

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

After 2½ weeks of contentious negotiations, the main parties agreed on a parliamentary resolution that, in addition to the drone demand, called on the Obama administration to apologize for U.S. airstrikes in November that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers. It declared that “no overt or covert operations inside Pakistan shall be permitted” — a broad reference

that could be interpreted to include all CIA operations. But on the issue of NATO supply lines, the resolution specified only that arms and ammunition cannot be transported through Pakistan, opening the door to the resumed delivery of critical Afghan war supplies like food and fuel for the first time since the November airstrikes. And in practice,

arms and ammunition were rarely, if ever, transported in convoys through Pakistan. “Today’s resolution will enrich your respect and dignity; I assure you that we will get these enforced in letter and spirit,” Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani told Parliament, although he stopped short of declaring when the supply route would reopen.

“We know our obligations as well as the importance of the United States,” he said. Victoria Nuland, a State Department spokeswoman, praised the “seriousness” of the Parliament’s debate. “We seek a relationship with Pakistan that is enduring, strategic and more clearly defined. We look forward to discussing these policy recommendations,” she said.

What causes a pothole

Repairing potholes

Water from melting snow or ice seeps into the pavement and softens it. During repeated cold spells, the water in the pavement freezes and expands, breaking up the pavement, on and below the surface.

Ideally, crews remove debris, square the hole’s edges, ensure the sub-base is adequate and lay a new patch of pavement, according to Hardy Hanson, Street Division Manager for the City of Bend. But this takes time, and in the interest of tackling as many holes as possible, crews often just remove debris, fill the hole with a cold-weather pavement mix and compress it with a roller or tamper.

1

As the ice melts, it leaves gaps inside the pavement and moisture continues to soften it. As passing vehicles drive over the pavement, it begins to break up. 3 As more vehicles drive over the area, the roadway continues to erode and material is kicked out to form the pothole. 2

Water and ice Pavement Sub-base

Filled hole Gap in pavement

Roadway erodes

Soil

Source: ODOT Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Pothole Continued from A1 Asphalt roaming crews, each with about eight to 10 workers, will use about 1,300 tons of material on pothole patching per year. The city sets aside about $62,000 a year for repairs. The roaming street crews prioritize bigger potholes in traffic-dense areas.

Residents can call around the clock to point out a pothole or to report a popped tire. Potholes also cost drivers. Motorists with newer models need to be wary near bumpy roads, said Bob Burks, owner of the Tire Factory in Bend. “The sidewall has shrunk considerably in the newer tires, so when you hit a bump it punches the wall up against the rim and it bends the rim,”

Burks said. “Now it doesn’t need to be a big (pothole) to either damage the tire or the wheel because the profile of the tires are getting so small there isn’t much cushion between the two.” Andy Hoard, an estimator at Precision Body & Paint, a collision repair facility in Bend, said depending on the impact, vehicles can sustain damage to the suspension, particularly in

the knuckles and tie rods. If a car is low enough, damage can occur on the rocker panels, bumper covers and underside. The results come with a price. “It can range from a tire and wheel at $100 into the thousands. Depending on the damage, it can be expensive as that,” Hoard said.

OPEN SATURDAY 12–3

JACKIE FRENCH, BROKER 541-480-2269

OPEN SATURDAY 12-4

STEM Continued from A1 Women have been underrepresented in STEM occupations for the last decade, steadily holding less than a quarter of the jobs, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce. Although women in STEM careers will earn one-third more than those in other jobs, the number of women nationwide attaining STEM associate degrees has dropped 26 percent since 2000. They represent 27.5 percent of STEM degrees and certificates. The number of women earning certificates has fallen even further, by 50 percent during that time, according to the report. Women hold also a disproportionately low number of STEM bachelor degrees, according to the commerce department. STEM jobs are expected to grow at nearly twice the rate of other fields, the report states. But currently women who do earn credentials are more likely to use their degree in “traditional” roles, such as in education, which is nearly 74 percent female, according to the report. Costello said a lack of female role models could be a factor in the national decline of women earning STEM degrees. Costello said colleges need to offer students support through the financial aid process and provide access to child care. Students must also be actively recruited starting at a young age and through their first year at college. Community colleges will need more resources to implement strategies to recruit and retain female students, Costello said. “There’s more lip service paid to the importance of community colleges than there are investments that match up to that,” she said. “We need serious investments.”

OPEN SUNDAY 1-4

DOWNTOWN BEND- Updated 5 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 3709 sq.ft. home 1 block from Drake Park. Private master on main, 2nd master upstairs. Gorgeous kitchen with great room. MLS#:201108606 $1,050,000 DIRECTIONS: Riverside to Kansas, 1 block from Drake Park. 456 Kansas Ave.

— Reporter, 541-617-7811, snunez@bendbulletin.com

OPEN HOUSE

NW BEND-Light & bright 5 bedroom, 2.75 bath home. hardwood floors, modernized kitchen, slab granite counters, Large fenced lot, deck, mature landscaping. MLS#:201201757 $345,000 DIRECTIONS: West on Greenwood Ave. turns into Newport Ave. South on Knoxville. 1158 Knoxville Blvd.

BONNIE SAVICKAS, BROKER 541-408-7537

OPEN SATURDAY 12-3

CUL-DE-SAC 4 bedroom, 4000 Sq. ft. NW contemporary home. Main level living with great room, den & master suite. Junior suite & 2 bedrooms on lower level, home theater. MLS#201109467 $399,000 DIRECTIONS: Mt. Washington south of Skyliner traffic circle to East on Hosmer Lake, Left on Outlook Vista 269 NW Outlook Vista

SUE CONRAD, BROKER, CRS 541-480-6621

OPEN SATURDAY 12-3

Recently updated 4 bedroom, 2.75 bath, 2200 sq. ft. home across the street from the river. Large 2 car garage & shop area. Near Drake Park & Downtown. MLS#:201201264 $475,000 Directions: West on Galveston Avenue, north on Harmon Boulevard 825 NW Harmon Boulevard.

541-382-4123 70 Agents And Thousands Of Listings At www.bendproperty.com 486 SW Bluff Dr., Old Mill District Bend, OR 97702 or ind us at: youtube.com/coldwellbankermorris facebook.com/bendproperty twitter/buybend

NW BEND-Light & bright 5 bedroom, 2.75 bath home. hardwood floors, modernized kitchen, slab granite counters, Large fenced lot, deck, mature landscaping. MLS#:201201757 $345,000 DIRECTIONS: West on Greenwood Ave. turns into Newport Ave. South on Knoxville. 1158 Knoxville Blvd.

VIRGINIA ROSS, BROKER, ABR, CRS, GRI 541-480-7501

OPEN SATURDAY 12-3

NW RIVERS EDGE VILLAGE - Elegant single level home. Cherry wood flooring & cabinetry. Spacious master suite & bath. Large kitchen, sunny breakfast nook. MLS#:201200094 $379,000 DIRECTIONS: 3rd St. to Mt. Washington Drive, north on Fairway Heights Dr., (Rivers Edge Village entrance) to Divot Dr. 520 NW Divot Dr.

NATALIE VANDENBORN, BROKER 541-508-9581

DAVID GILMORE, BROKER 541-312-7271

A5

OPEN SATURDAY 12-3

OPEN SATURDAY 10-1

OPEN SATURDAY 12-2 & 4-6

EAGLE CREST - 2558 sq.ft. vacation home, rental or permanent home. Tennis, 3 golf courses, spa, recreational trails & swimming. Nice deck overlooking the 14th fairway. MLS#:201201972 $340,000 DIRECTIONS: Enter resort side of Eagle Crest (Sign side). Turn right on Mt. Quail, follow around golf course, go through gate, turn left on Osprey. 1955 Osprey Ct.

SUNRIVER- Well-kept home. Elegant cathedral entry, 3 fireplaces, Beautiful wood slatted ceilings jetted tub in master. MLS#201201665 $329,500 DIRECTIONS: Hwy. 97 south, right exit at Cottonwood Rd., right on East Cascades, left on Pro Staff. 13 Pro Staff Lane

Brand new, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 2260 sq. ft. Landscaped front and back, quality finishes. quiet cul-de-sac location. Priced to sell. MLS#201202651 $250,000 DIRECTIONS: NE 27th to NE Yellow Ribbon.Home is at the end on the right. 3179 NE Yellow Ribbon

SYDNE ANDERSON, BROKER, CRS, WCR, CDPE, GREEN 541-420-1111

GINA DUNKER, BROKER 541-408-4972

BRANDON FAIRBANKS, BROKER, SRES, GRI, CDPE 541-383-4344


A6

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

UCLA issues an apology for mistaken admissions By Larry Gordon Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Congratulations, you’re in! Oops, never mind. That was a mistake. In an email about financial aid awards, the University of California, Los Angeles, told 894 high school seniors last weekend that they were admitted to the highly competitive campus. Those students actually remain on the waiting list. UCLA is apologizing for the error. Officials, however, are not yet moving anyone into the admitted category. “We realize this is a particularly anxious and stressful time for students and their families as they try to make decisions about college admissions. We sincerely apologize for this mistake that may have led some of them to think they were admitted when they remain on the waiting lists,” said campus spokesman Ricardo Vazquez. The error occurred when updated notices of provisional financial aid were sent Saturday and Sunday to thousands of admitted students as well as to students on the waiting list for possible freshman admission in the fall, Vazquez said. The note to students on the waiting list mistakenly included the line: “Once again congratulations on your admission to UCLA, we hope that this information will assist you in making your decision to join the Bruin Family in the fall.” UCLA’s financial aid office on Monday sent out messages telling the 894 that they were not admitted, along with an apology. Vazquez attributed the mix-up to human error and said UCLA is looking into how the mistake was made.

2 Sudans edge closer to war By Robyn Dixon Los Angeles Times

JOHANNESBURG — Sudan and South Sudan teetered dangerously on the edge of war Thursday after South Sudan refused to withdraw its troops from a disputed border area despite calls to do so by the United Nations and African Union. Sudan, furious about South Sudan’s seizure a day earlier of its most important oil field in the town of Heglig, bombed a bridge outside the South Sudan oil town of Bentiu, killing one civilian and wounding four, officials said. The fighting between the two nations was the worst since South Sudan seceded from the north in July after a January 2011 independence referendum. The deepening conflict threatens to dash peace talks to unravel the tangle of disputes between the two neighbors, which engaged in two decades of civil war ending in 2005. With much of the region’s oil in South Sudan and the only pipeline to port routed through Sudan, the two countries have been at loggerheads over how to split the oil revenue, how much South Sudan should pay in oil transit fees and how the border should be drawn. Efforts to resolve the differences have all but collapsed since Sudan withdrew from the peace talks Wednesday. Leaders of each side on Thursday accused the other of wanting war. South Sudan President Salva Kiir told parliament that he would not withdraw forces from Heglig, saying that his country had been acting in self-defense after air and ground attacks from Sudan. Kiir also threatened that South Sudanese forces would take control of the disputed area of Abyei, which is occupied by Sudan, and demanded that the U.N. pressure Sudan to abandon the region. He said he did not want to see South Sudan plunged back into meaningless war, but that the country should prepare for it if Sudan repudiated the peace talks.

Conflict escalates In remote southwest Sudan, 30,000 troops of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army-North (SPLA) have been fighting government forces since June.

50 miles

Dibebad

Delling ing

Where rebels are advancing

• Tess and Buram Towns where rebels ambushed government troops who left several tanks behind • Trogi In February, SPLA defeated 6,000 government troops to take control of town they last held in 1994 • Rashad and Abassiya Rebels push eastward to these towns; north toward Dalami and Habila and surround Laghawa to the west

South Kordofan Laghawa Kadugli Tess Korongo Abdalla

Nuba Mountains

Buram

Rebel-held territories

Trogi

as of April 10

CHAD

Contested towns

Red Sea

Nile River

SUDAN

• Airpower Antonov bombers and MiGs and Sukhois fighters attack villages, fields, terrorizing civilians, disrupting farming

Rashad

Habila

Khartoum

Government’s advantage

ERITREA

Detail

S. SUDAN

ETHIOPIA

Juba Source: McClatchy Washington Bureau, United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, ESRI

Abassiya

Dalami

• Kadugli Rebels are within 10 miles of the South Kordofan state capital • Talodi Town under siege by rebels is key to controlling a supply road into South Sudan

El Rahad

SUDAN

Key road

Malakal

SOUTH SUDAN 200 miles

Judy Treible, Robert Dorrell / © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“I always say we will not take the people of South Sudan back to war, but if we are being aggressed like this we will have to defend ourselves,” he said. “I am appealing to the citizens of the Republic of Sudan, especially the mothers, not to allow their children to be dragged into a meaningless war.” Sudanese President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir said war was possible because of decisions made by South Sudan. “Our brothers in South Sudan have chosen the path of war, implementing plans dictated by foreign parties who supported them during the civil war,” Bashir told reporters. “War is not in the interest of either South Sudan or Sudan but, unfortunately, our brothers in the South are thinking neither of the interests of Sudan or of South Sudan.” Sudan vowed to mobilize its army to swiftly drive South Sudan’s forces back, raising the threat of a return to fullscale war.

The African Union and U.N. called on South Sudan to withdraw its troops. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has called for a presidential summit to end hostilities. Kiir told parliament that there had been several international appeals to him to command his forces to leave Heglig. “Last night I never slept because of the telephone calls,” said Kiir, who described a call from Ban. “He gave me an order that ‘I’m ordering you to immediately withdraw from Heglig.’ I said, ‘I’m not under your command.’ ” South Sudan’s invasion follows several cases of Sudanese war planes bombing South Sudanese oil wells in recent months, as well as bombings of border areas. Fighting between Sudan’s forces and rebels loyal to South Sudan has been raging along the border, with Sudan accusing its neighbor of arming and supporting the rebels. Last week South Sudan claimed to have shot down a

Sudanese fighter jet after two Sudanese war planes bombed South Sudan’s oil fields. Sudan denied that a plane was shot down. Both sides have been talking of war for months, as peace talks have foundered and the key issues of oil revenue sharing and the border have remained unresolved. In January, after Sudan commandeered several ships loaded with South Sudanese oil, South Sudan accused it of theft and abruptly turned off its oil production, which amounted to 350,000 barrels a day, equal to more than 95 percent of South Sudan’s budget revenue. Since then, relations have deteriorated sharply. The U.S. State Department on Wednesday condemned South Sudan’s seizure of Heglig, which it said increased tension to a dangerous level. It also condemned Sudan’s bombings of South Sudan. Britain and the European Union issued similar condemnations.

Facebook offers more disclosure to users By Kevin J. O’Brien New York Times News Service

Facebook, seeking to address criticism of the social network’s privacy practices, said Thursday that it would provide users with an expanded, downloadable archive of the many types of data on individuals that the company stores and tracks. In a posting on its privacy blog, Facebook said that it was expanding its downloadable archive feature, called Download Your Information, to provide greater transparency on the types of data on individuals that the company stores. The expanded archive, which Facebook said would be rolled out gradually to its 845 million monthly active users, goes beyond the first archive made available in 2010, which has drawn scrutiny from privacy advocates and regulators in Europe. Facebook is preparing for an initial public stock sale planned for May, which is expected to value the company at $100 billion in the most definitive valuation of a social networking business. Online social networks offer free services to users and make money primarily through advertising, which can often be targeted more effectively using the information the network has collected on them. The archive Facebook published two years ago gave users a copy of their photos, posts, messages, list of friends and chat conversations. The new version includes previous user names, friend requests and the Internet protocol addresses of the computers that users have logged in from. More categories of information will be made available in the future, Facebook said.


FAMILY

TV & Movies, B2 Calendar, B3 Dear Abby, B3

B

Horoscope, B3 Comics, B4-5 Puzzles, B5

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/family

IN BRIEF Labor’s getting longer, study says A new study from the National Institutes of Health says women are now spending longer in labor than 50 years ago. For first-time mothers, the first stage of labor (before pushing) increased 2.6 hours from 3.9 hours to 6.5 hours (the women were already dilated 4 centimeters). The researchers compared births in the 1960s with births in the 2000s, an analysis of almost 140,000 deliveries. Researchers concluded the longer time is likely related to a change in delivery room practices. Modern births were more likely to include the use of epidurals to relieve pain, which can increase delivery time. Modern births, however, also were more likely to include the use of the hormone oxytocin, which is given to speed up labor. The deliveries in the 1960s were much more likely to use forceps and episiotomy, an incision intended to speed up delivery. Babies born in recent years also tended to be born five days earlier and weighed more than those in the 1960s.

Kids under thumb more likely to lie A study that appeared in a recent issue of the journal Child Development examined the issue of lying in young children. In this study, 3and 4-year-olds in West Africa came from either a strict, punitive school or a nonpunitive school. The children were placed in a room and told not to peek at a toy that was hidden. Most children could not resist peeking. When the researcher asked the child if they had peeked, most of those from the strict environment lied, while those in the less-strict school were much less likely to lie. The children from the punitive school were also likely to tell more lies to keep the deception going.

Illustration by Greg Cross The Bulletin

The

self-esteem By Alandra Johnson The Bulletin

S

elf-esteem was once thought of as something of a cure-all. During the 1980s and 1990s in particular, schools and parents encouraged children to believe in themselves, to see themselves as special and unique. If children had a good self-image, psychologists and educators thought, they would make good choices. Having positive self-esteem would help teens avoid pregnancy, resist drugs and alcohol, get good grades and on and on. Turns out that connection wasn’t true. Now that research has caught up with the self-esteem movement, it seems most of the supposed benefits didn’t pan out. In an extensive summary of research about

Fewer poor moms breast-feed Mothers who have low incomes are significantly less likely to meet their breast-feeding goals than more affluent women, according to a recent study from Michigan State University. Less than 2 percent of women in poverty who planned to breast-feed for a year were able to accomplish that goal, compared with 50 percent of more affluent women. The study authors believe this is due to the many obstacles lower-income women face when breast-feeding, including not having resources to turn to if breast-feeding becomes difficult. — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

BEST BETS FOR FAMILY FUN Details, B3

self-esteem, Florida State University psychology professor Roy Baumeister and co-authors found that while high self-esteem made people feel good, it “does not prevent children from

Is your child ready for a pet? Editor’s Note: Good Question is a biweekly feature in which a local expert in a particular field answers a question related to family life. Have a question about your family? Send it to family@ bendbulletin.com. By Megan Kehoe

This free festival in Bend’s NorthWest Crossing neighborhood will have a chalk art competition Saturday and live music and fun Saturday and Sunday.

The Bulletin

COCC hosts this free festival Saturday. It will include food, dancing, music and crafts.

• Having a positive self-image doesn’t necessarily lead to success, research shows

GOOD QUESTION

Bend Spring Festival

Asian/Pacific Islander Festival

trap

smoking, drinking, taking drugs, or engaging in early sex. If anything, high self-esteem fosters experimentation.” Research also shows that having high self-esteem doesn’t lead to academic achievement or success, according to San Diego State University professor of psychology Jean Twenge, co-author of “The Narcissism Epidemic.” “Initially people felt self-esteem was key to success in life or something, and it’s not,” said Carl Pickhardt, a Texas psychologist and author of the upcoming book “Surviving Your Child’s Adolescence.” He believes having a good self-esteem can be a good thing. It just isn’t everything. “Self-esteem doesn’t mean you are a good person. You can do terrible things and have high self-esteem.” See Self-esteem / B6

L a u re n Stayer, a veterinarian at Bend Veterinary Clinic, says getting a pet should always be a family decision.

My child wants to get a dog. Q: How can I tell if my child is responsible enough to take care of a pet? Lauren Stayer is a veterinarian at the Bend Veterinary Clinic. She has been with the clinic for one year, and a veterinarian for three years. She has also worked with Bend Spay and Neuter Project and the Humane Society of Redmond. Stayer says getting a pet should always be a family decision, because it affects every family member.

Submitted photo

A:

“First off, parents should want to have the pet around,” Stayer said. “They should be on board with the idea because they’re most likely going to be doing some of the work.” Stayer says it’s difficult to know

for sure if a child is ready to take on pet responsibility, as each kid is different. She says it’s unrealistic to expect younger children to take on the full duties of pet care. See Question / B6

Study weighs impact of war deployments on military families By Mark Brunswick (Minneapolis) Star Tribune

MINNEAPOLIS — For the next four years, hundreds of military families in Minnesota will submit to wearing heart sensors to monitor the stresses they exert on each other and allow video cameras to record their interactions as part of an extraordinary first-in-the-nation look at the toll exacted by deployments to war zones. The research, which is being conducted by the University of Minnesota, is aimed especially at gauging the impact on families of Guard and Reserve members, who have made up nearly half of the U.S. forces sent to Iraq and Afghanistan over the past decade. That number is likely to have a ripple effect on family life for years as soldiers return home and resume their civilian lives. “This is an important window. Minnesota has an opportunity to really share incredible knowledge that will help the next generation of reserve component families,” said Abigail Gewirtz, an associate professor of family social science at the University of Minnesota. See Military / B6


B2

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

TV & M 

Find local movie times and film reviews inside today’s GO! Magazine.

Series puts parental maxims to the test “Dateline NBC� 7 p.m. Sunday, NBC

TV SPOTLIGHT

By David Bauder The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Correspondent Natalie Morales ended up in tears when she put herself and her 8-year-old son through the same parenting test that “Dateline NBC� is subjecting others to for a series that starts Sunday. Using hidden cameras and actors, the network set up scenarios to see if kids really follow their parents’ instructions to avoid strangers, don’t get into a car with a drunk driver or don’t cheat. The results will probably depress you. Time and again, children gave their names and addresses to a “stranger� who had taken their picture and talked about putting them on TV. Promised free ice cream, they climbed into a van driven by an actor who could easily close the door on them and speed away. Parents watched it all on monitors nearby. “I would have lost my money if I put a bet on it,� one cringing parent said after watching a youngster climb into a car with an actor pretending to be drunk behind the wheel. For four consecutive Sunday nights, “Dateline NBC� will show the scenarios, which also test whether kids would cheat or discriminate if given the opportunity. NBC hopes parents and children watch the programs together and discuss them, said Liz Cole, executive producer of “Dateline.� Four mothers who work at “Dateline� came up with the

idea, an outgrowth of a show on bullying that aired last year. Not “news� in the strict sense, these types of shows tend to do well for newsmagazines: ABC’s “What Would You Do� series on “Primetime,� which sets up various social experiments, is particularly popular among younger viewers, which news shows have trouble reaching. “It’s reality TV at its best,� Morales said, “because these are truly teachable moments.� During the special on driving, several teenagers swear to their parents that they never text or talk on their cellphones when behind the wheel. Their cars were equipped with cameras for a few months, and even though they knew they were being watched, most youngsters exhibited the behavior they said they would never do. The teens were also set up with actors who pretended to be drunk or high on drugs. Despite the doubt on many faces, most let the actor grab the keys and get behind the wheel. It’s the power of peer pressure; too many youngsters go along with the crowd unless someone is strong enough to take a stand. In the “Dateline� episode, a girl whose uncle was killed in a drunk driving accident was the strong one. Parents need to be persistent and specific with their instructions, the “Dateline� experts said, and be mindful of their own behavior. If you

don’t want your children to text and drive, don’t do it yourself. “We’ve all had that moment when kids are throwing back what you should or shouldn’t do to your face,� Morales said. Aside from not getting into vans or giving out personal information to strangers, one tip “Dateline� offers regarding strangers is for children to stand up and look straight into the person’s eyes. Confidence could scare away someone looking to prey on a vulnerable person. Watching their children via the hidden cameras is frequently nerve-racking and emotional. “Dateline� dials up the drama, with Morales saying it “could be their worst parenting nightmare or their proudest moment.� She doesn’t shy away from the experience herself, setting up her son Josh in the experiment with the actor driving the ice cream truck. “It’s hard for me to watch,� she said, before the tears flowed. Did she cry because her son had learned his lessons well or forgot them? That’s a “Dateline NBC� mystery to be revealed Sunday.

for appointments call 541-382-4900

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

P’ G   M  This guide, compiled by Orlando (Fla.) Sentinel film critic Roger Moore, should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment or educational value for older children with parental guidance. By Roger Moore

Chris Diamantopoulos, left, Sean Hayes and Will Sasso star as Moe, Larry and Curly in “The Three Stooges.�

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

‘THE THREE STOOGES’ Rating: PG for slapstick action violence, some rude and suggestive humor, including language. What it’s about: Three orphans grow up to wear very bad haircuts and solve their problems with dope slaps. The kid attractor factor: Their parents, or maybe grandparents, will have told them about the Stooges. Good lessons/ bad lessons: Don’t try this eye-poking/ hammer hitting/ slapping/ punching/ pinching thing at home, kids. Violence: Non-stop slapstick. Language: Shockingly clean. Sex: Sofia Vergara’s breasts make a funny sound when squished. Drugs: None at all. Parents’ advisory: The spirits of Larry, Moe and Curly return to life in this kid-friendly farce, suitable for all ages.

‘THE CABIN IN THE WOODS’ Rating: R for strong bloody horror violence and gore, language, drug use and some sexuality/ nudity.

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT. 541-382-4171 541-548-7707 2121 NE Division Bend

641 NW Fir Redmond

20th Century Fox via The Associated Press

What it’s about: College pals head off to a relaxing weekend at a cabin. In the woods. Tragedy follows. The kid attractor factor: A horror movie that toys with horror movie conventions. Good lessons/ bad lessons: Words to live by in a horror movie — “No matter what happens, we should stick together.� Violence: Oodles and oodles. Language: Profanity, but not as much as you might think. Sex: Suggested, with topless moments, here and there. Drugs: One character is a pothead. So yeah, dude. Parents’ advisory: Kids will want to see the “hot� new horror picture, but it’s entirely too violent, too sexual and too pot-friendly for anybody younger than 15.

‘MIRROR MIRROR’ Rating: PG for some fantasy action and mild rude humor. What it’s about: Snow White’s wicked Queen/ stepmom wants to off her, but seven snarky dwarfs save the day. The kid attractor factor: A fairytale come to life. Good lessons/bad lessons: “Your weakness is only a weakness if YOU think of it that way.� Violence: Sword fights. Language: Disney clean. Sex: A little kissing, a little joking around the idea of “took advantage of me.� Drugs: A glass of wine. Parents’ advisory: Perfectly kid-friendly.

NWX Community Garden Registration Day is April 28. For more information, contact Anne Perce, anne_perce@yahoo.com www.nwxevents.com

www.denfeldpaints.com

L  TV L   High definition and sports programming may vary BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

FRIDAY PRIME TIME 4/13/12 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Meet, Browns Ciao Italia ‘G’

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News Meet, Browns Jacques Pepin

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Ă… Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Travelscope ‘G’ Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens Midsomer Murders ‘PG’ Ă…

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Shark Tank (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Who Do You Think You Are? ‘PG’ How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Undercover Boss (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Shark Tank (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Big Bang Big Bang The Finder Willa is arrested. ‘14’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Washington W’k BBC Newsnight Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Who Do You Think You Are? ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Nikita Origins ’ ‘14’ Ă… Masterpiece Mystery! Oxford estate. ’ ‘PG’ Price-Antiques

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

11:00

11:30

Primetime: What Would You Do? 20/20 (N) ’ Ă… KATU News (11:35) Nightline Grimm Love Sick (N) ‘14’ Ă… Dateline NBC (N) ’ Ă… News Jay Leno ACM Presents: Lionel Richie and Friends -- In Concert (N) ’ ‘PG’ News Letterman Primetime: What Would You Do? 20/20 (N) ’ Ă… KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Fringe The Consultant (N) ’ ‘14’ News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Midsomer Murders ‘PG’ Ă… Masterpiece Classic Orphan boy becomes a gentleman. ’ ‘PG’ Grimm Love Sick (N) ‘14’ Ă… Dateline NBC (N) ’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno Supernatural Slash Fiction ’ ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘PG’ ’Til Death ‘14’ That ’70s Show World News Tavis Smiley (N) Charlie Rose (N) ’ Ă… PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC E! ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK OWN ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… (3:30) ›› “The ›› “Overboardâ€? (1987, Comedy) Goldie Hawn, Kurt Russell, Edward Herrmann. An amnesiac ››› “O Brother, Where Art Thou?â€? (2000, Comedy-Drama) George Clooney, John Turturro. ››› “O Brother, Where Art Thou?â€? (2000, Comedy102 40 39 Jerkâ€? millionairess is duped by a cunning carpenter. Three escaped convicts embark on an unusual odyssey. Ă… Drama) George Clooney, John Turturro. Ă… River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ Alaska Wildlife Troopers ’ ‘PG’ Gator Boys ’ ‘PG’ Ă… North Woods Law On Thin Ice (N) North Woods Law: On the Hunt North Woods Law On Thin Ice ’ 68 50 26 38 Fatal Attractions ’ ‘14’ Ă… (3:45) ›› “Hostageâ€? (2005) Bruce Willis. Ă… (6:20) ›››› “The Silence of the Lambsâ€? (1991) Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins. ›››› “The Silence of the Lambsâ€? (1991) Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins. 16 Blocks Ă… 137 44 › “Broken Bridgesâ€? (2006, Drama) Toby Keith, Kelly Preston, Burt Reynolds. ’ Ă… ›› “Footlooseâ€? (1984, Drama) Kevin Bacon, Lori Singer, John Lithgow. ’ Ă… Texas Women 190 32 42 53 (3:45) ››› “Pure Countryâ€? (1992) George Strait. American Greed Mad Money The Celebrity Apprentice The teams each create a commercial. ‘PG’ Roy Orbison Hoover Max 51 36 40 52 (4:30) NHL Hockey Detroit Red Wings at Nashville Predators (N) (Live) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… South Park ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Always Sunny Always Sunny South Park ‘MA’ › “Joe Dirtâ€? (2001, Comedy) David Spade, Dennis Miller. Ă… Tosh.0 ‘14’ 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Talk of the Town Desert Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. 11 Politics & Public Policy Today 58 20 12 11 Politics & Public Policy Today Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Jessie (N) ‘G’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Fish Hooks ‘G’ Good-Charlie Austin & Ally ’ Good-Charlie Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Jessie ‘G’ Ă… 87 43 14 39 Jessie ‘G’ Ă… American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. Jesse James: Outlaw Garage ‘14’ Deadliest Catch The Gamble ‘14’ Deadliest Catch Deckhands ‘14’ Deadliest Catch The Gamble ‘14’ 156 21 16 37 American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. (4:00) ››› “Knocked Upâ€? (2007) Seth Rogen. The Soup ‘14’ E! News (N) Fashion Star ‘PG’ Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar Fashion Police (N) ‘14’ Chelsea Lately E! News 136 25 NBA Basketball Dallas Mavericks at Portland Trail Blazers (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… 21 23 22 23 NBA Basketball Phoenix Suns at Houston Rockets From the Toyota Center in Houston. NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series: O’Reilly Auto Parts 300 (N) (Live) Boxing Michael Katsidis vs. Albert Mensah (N) (Live) Ă… NBA Tonight (N) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… NFL Live Ă… 22 24 21 24 Countdown Friday Night Lights ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “The Jackie Robinson Storyâ€? (1950) Ă… ››› “The Jackie Robinson Storyâ€? (1950) Ă… ›› “Fallen Champ: The Untold Story of Mike Tysonâ€? (1993) ‘PG’ 23 25 123 25 Friday Night Lights ‘PG’ Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ›› “The Princess Diariesâ€? (2001, Comedy) Julie Andrews, Anne Hathaway. ›› “The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagementâ€? (2004) Anne Hathaway. The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… 67 29 19 41 (3:30) “A Walk to Rememberâ€? Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Best Dishes Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Wantedâ€? (2008, Action) James McAvoy, Morgan Freeman, Angelina Jolie. The Ultimate Fighter Live (N) ‘14’ UFC Primetime ››› Wanted 131 Property Bro Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l House Hunters: Million Dollar HGTV Green Home 2012 (N) ‘G’ House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hotel Impossible ‘PG’ Ă… 176 49 33 43 Property Bro Modern Marvels Toys ‘G’ Ă… Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… Full Metal Jousting ‘14’ Ă… Full Metal Jousting ‘14’ Ă… (11:01) Full Metal Jousting ‘14’ 155 42 41 36 Modern Marvels Dogs ‘PG’ Ă… America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted (N) ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ 138 39 20 31 America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup: New Mexico Lockup: New Mexico Lockup: Santa Rosa Lockup: New Mexico Lockup: New Mexico Body bag. 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) Nicki Minaj: My Time Now ’ Hip-Hop POV America’s Best Dance Crew Punk’d ’ ‘PG’ Punk’d ’ ‘PG’ Savage U ‘14’ Pauly D Project ›› “Malibu’s Most Wantedâ€? (2003) Jamie Kennedy, Taye Diggs. ’ 192 22 38 57 16-Pregnant SpongeBob Monster High: Skull Shores SpongeBob SpongeBob Fred: The Show SpongeBob George Lopez George Lopez That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Deranged Henry Lee Lucas ‘14’ Solved Grandparents slain. ‘14’ Solved Poisoned by Love ’ ‘14’ Solved A dark secret. ‘14’ Ă… Solved Truth in Shadows ’ ‘14’ Solved Poisoned by Love ’ ‘14’ 161 103 31 103 Deranged Charles Manson. ‘14’ Mariners Pregame (N) (Live) MLB Baseball Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show MLB Baseball 20 45 28* 26 Boys in the Hall Mariners Gangland ’ ‘14’ Ă… ›› “Rambo: First Blood Part IIâ€? (1985) Sylvester Stallone. ’ ›› “Rambo IIIâ€? (1988, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna, Marc de Jonge. ’ Big Easy Just. 132 31 34 46 Gangland Los Angeles. ‘14’ Ă… ››› “X-Menâ€? (2000, Action) Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellen. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! ’ Ă… Dream Machines Being Human 133 35 133 45 Thor: Hammer Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey Harvest Ă… Perry Stone Praise the Lord (Live). Ă… Frederick Price The Fabric of Time ’ Creflo Dollar I Thirst: The Crucifixion Story 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ House of Payne House of Payne House of Payne House of Payne ›› “Tyler Perry’s I Can Do Bad All By Myselfâ€? (2009) Tyler Perry. 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ›››› “Casablancaâ€? (1942, Drama) Humphrey Bogart. Nazis, intrigue and ›››› “Forbidden Gamesâ€? (1952) Brigitte Fossey, Georges Poujouly. Two ››› “Cape Fearâ€? (1962) Gregory Peck, Robert Mitchum. Southern lawyer “The Iron Roseâ€? (1973, Horror) Fran101 44 101 29 romance clash at a Moroccan nightclub. Ă… (DVS) children make a cemetery for animals outside 1940 Paris. sets houseboat trap for ex-convict psycho. Ă… çoise Pascal. Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding ‘PG’ Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride 178 34 32 34 My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding ‘PG’ Law & Order Progeny ’ ‘14’ Law & Order House of Cards ‘14’ Law & Order Fame ’ ‘14’ ›› “We Are Marshallâ€? (2006, Drama) Matthew McConaughey, Matthew Fox. Ă… We Were Soldr 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Merger ’ ‘14’ Johnny Test ’ Regular Show Level Up ‘PG’ Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time NinjaGo: Mstrs Cartoon Planet ‘G’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Travel Nation Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Ă… Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Ă… Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Ă… Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Ă… The Dead Files ‘PG’ Ă… Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Ă… 179 51 45 42 Travel Nation M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Home Improve. Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens 65 47 29 35 Bonanza ‘PG’ Ă… Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Fairly Legal Gimme Shelter ‘PG’ In Plain Sight (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Suits Mike’s first solo case. ‘14’ 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Ă… Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Ă… Consignment Consignment Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ La La’s Life La La’s Life 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Ă… PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:20) ››› “Beetlejuiceâ€? 1988 Michael Keaton. ››› “Poltergeistâ€? 1982, Horror Craig T. Nelson. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “Poltergeist II: The Other Sideâ€? 1986 ‘PG-13’ Poltergeist III ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:35) ›› “The Craftâ€? 1996 Robin Tunney. ’ ‘R’ FXM Presents › “Date Movieâ€? 2006 Alyson Hannigan. ‘PG-13’ FXM Presents › “Epic Movieâ€? 2007 Kal Penn. ‘PG-13’ Ă… FXM Presents › “The Master of Disguiseâ€? 2002 Dana Carvey. FXM Presents FMC 104 204 104 120 Master › “The Spiritâ€? (2008, Action) Gabriel Macht. Premiere. Ă… › “Hellraiser: Hellseekerâ€? (2002) Ashley Laurence, Doug Bradley. › “The Spiritâ€? (2008) Gabriel Macht, Samuel L. Jackson. Ă… › “Hellraiser: Hellseekerâ€? (2002) FUEL 34 PGA Tour Golf RBC Heritage, Second Round From Hilton Head, S.C. Ă… Golf Central (N) 19th Hole (N) PGA Tour Golf School of Golf GOLF 28 301 27 301 Haney Project Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘G’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Elopement ‘G’ (5:15) ››› “Quiz Showâ€? 1994, Docudrama John Turturro, Rob Morrow. Congress investigates a (7:45) ›› “Fast Fiveâ€? 2011, Action Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Jordana Brewster. Dom Toretto and Real Time With Bill Maher (N) ’ Real Time With Bill Maher ’ ‘MA’ Ă… HBO 425 501 425 501 TV game show for fraud in the 1950s. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… company ramp up the action in Brazil. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… › “Buffy the Vampire Slayerâ€? 1992 Kristy Swanson. ‘PG-13’ › “Buffy the Vampire Slayerâ€? 1992 Kristy Swanson. ‘PG-13’ ›› “Shiversâ€? 1975, Science Fiction Paul Hampton, Joe Silver. ‘R’ ›› “High Tensionâ€? 2003 ‘R’ IFC 105 105 “William Shake- (5:20) › “Little Fockersâ€? 2010, Comedy Robert De Niro, ››› “The Usual Suspectsâ€? 1995, Suspense Stephen (8:45) ››› “Sevenâ€? 1995, Suspense Brad Pitt, Morgan Freeman, Gwyneth Paltrow. A killer dis- The Girl’s Guide Sex Games CanMAX 400 508 508 speareâ€? Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Baldwin, Gabriel Byrne. ’ ‘R’ Ă… patches his victims via the Seven Deadly Sins. ’ ‘R’ Ă… to Depravity (N) cun ’ ‘MA’ Save the Titanic With Bob Ballard Titanic: The Final Word With James Cameron ‘PG’ Save the Titanic With Bob Ballard Titanic: The Final Word With James Cameron ‘PG’ Border Wars Dirty Money ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Power Rangers Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Power Rangers Power Rangers SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Avatar: Air. Spanish Fly Wanna Fish Pro Fishing Strike King Pro Bassmasters Hook-N-Look Big Water Major League Fishing Project West. Extremes Amer. Archer OUTD 37 307 43 307 Zona’s Show (4:00) ›› “Janie Jonesâ€? 2010 Abigail “The Entitledâ€? 2011 Kevin Zegers. A kidnapper holds three › “Scary Movie 2â€? 2001, Comedy Shawn Wayans, Marlon ››› “Screamâ€? 1996, Horror Neve Campbell, David Arquette. A psychopath Bryan Callen: Man Class ’ ‘MA’ Ă… SHO 500 500 Breslin. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… children for a $3 million ransom. ‘R’ Wayans, Anna Faris. ’ ‘R’ stalks the teens of a sleepy California town. ’ ‘R’ Drive! Hollywood’s Hottest Car Chases Hollywood’s Hottest Car Chases Trackside At... (N) Dumbest Stuff Formula 1 Debrief (N) Mobil The Grid Formula One Racing SPEED 35 303 125 303 SPEED Center (6:40) › “The Smurfsâ€? 2011, Comedy Hank Azaria. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (8:23) ››› “Midnight in Parisâ€? 2011 ‘PG-13’ Ă… Magic City Feeding Frenzy (N) ’ Magic City Feeding Frenzy Ă… STARZ 300 408 300 408 (5:05) › “The Roommateâ€? 2011 Leighton Meester. (4:15) “All Good Thingsâ€? 2010, Mys- ››› “Fair Gameâ€? 2010, Drama Naomi Watts, Sean Penn. Valerie Plame is “King of Paper Chasin’â€? 2009, Crime Drama D.L., Jason Rivera. Carter battles (10:10) ›› “Martin Lawrence Live: Runteldatâ€? 2002, Comedy Martin LawTMC 525 525 tery Ryan Gosling. ’ ‘R’ Ă… revealed as a CIA agent. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… to make his business legitimate. ’ ‘R’ Ă… rence. The comic performs his stand-up routine. ’ ‘R’ Ă… NHL Hockey Los Angeles Kings at Vancouver Canucks (N) (Live) NHL Live Post Poker After Dark Darts VS. 27 58 30 209 (4:30) NHL Hockey Philadelphia Flyers at Pittsburgh Penguins (N) Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “Shallow Halâ€? 2001 ‘PG-13’ WE 143 41 174 118 Frasier ’ ‘PG’


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A & A 

Family looks for gentle way to reduce visits from Pop Dear Abby: My husband and I have been married for 16 years and have two teenagers. “Mom� died two years ago, and my husband is an only child. How can we tell my widowed father-in-law that we need a weekend to ourselves? “Pop,� who’s 87, lives an hour away and drives to see us every weekend, staying until Monday afternoon. We don’t doubt that he’s lonely, although he does play bridge twice a week and has dinner with friends occasionally. We love him dearly and would never want to hurt his feelings, but we long for a weekend for “just us.� How do we ask Pop not to visit? We believe he’s still in mourning over the loss of his wife of 60 years. We don’t want to add to his heartache. — Torn in Texas Dear Torn: You do need to talk to your father-in-law and set some boundaries. Accomplish it by setting a predetermined visitation schedule that allows you time alone with your husband and nuclear family without him being present. A way to get that message across would be to say: “Pop, we love you, but we need some time to ourselves, so let’s schedule your visits for twice a month. YOU pick the weekends.� Dear Abby: The neighbor above my apartment has a snoring problem. My bedroom is directly below his. Around 10 every night he starts snoring to the point that it sounds like an elephant lives above me. I have to sleep with my TV on and sometimes the radio. Please tell me what to do. Should I confront this neighbor? Should I complain to management? Or should I just live with it? — Fed Up in New Jersey Dear Fed Up: Write your neighbor a letter and explain to him there is a problem. He may not know that he snores.

DEAR ABBY If he’s snoring steadily, but stops for 20 or 30 seconds before starting again, it could indicate that he has a serious medical condition that should be discussed with his doctor. If the apartment above you has poor insulation, a carpet under his bed could muffle some of the sound. Playing a tape of “white noise� could block it out more restfully than your television or radio. Or, because adequate sleep is so important, you could ask a real estate attorney about the possibility of breaking your lease and leaving without penalty. Dear Abby: I am a 23-yearold woman who will graduate from college soon. I am looking to undergo a post-college makeover. I want to find some clothes that will work in the professional world, but also mix for more casual environments. Taking a recent college grad’s budget for this into account, what signature pieces should a young female have in her wardrobe? And what tips do you have for building a great collection over time? — Young, Broke, but Fabulous Dear Y.B.F.: Start with two suits — one with a jacket and matching skirt, the other with jacket and slacks. Make the suits interchangeable and in a neutral color — black, navy or beige — whatever looks best on you. Add a couple of blouses and sweater sets, several pairs of shoes and a good handbag. Make sure to look for “classic� styles rather than trendy, and you will have the basis for a business wardrobe and the beginning of a great collection. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Friday, April 13, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year the more conscious you are of your feelings, the greater success you will experience. Know that you cannot sit on your anger. You will learn to express your feelings in an effective manner. Sometimes, if you are honest with yourself, you feel overwhelmed by your responsibilities. If you are single, you will have a lot to work through personally. Choose a person with understanding. If you are attached, the two of you are more connected than in the past. You might choose to make a commitment together to your family or community. AQUARIUS is a loyal friend. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You might feel as if everyone is throwing boulders in your path. Surprise! You’ll just skip over them as you clear out a lot of issues. You have an unusual opportunity to start the weekend early. Tonight: Join friends for a dinner and maybe even a movie. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH How you deal with a commitment could change. Use your excellent sense of timing. Your fatigue with the status quo comes through. Others finally agree with you, once they get your logic. Tonight: Out and about. A force to be dealt with. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Keep reaching out for an important person in your life. You might feel as if you could lose the connection between you. That won’t happen if you relax and refrain from standing on ceremony. The other party will sense a change in your perspective. Tonight: Break past a self-imposed barrier. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Rethink a personal decision. Deal with others on a one-onone level. You might not be sure about what you want. Once you can nail that down, you will have a sympathetic audience. Tonight: Be around music. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Stay mellow, despite what is going on. Others seek you out, but they might not be as positive or upbeat as you would like. In fact, you might need to deal with someone who is depressed. You could be surprised by how much anger this person unleashes. Stay on top of your priorities. Tonight:

Where the crowds are. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Remain sure of yourself. Recognize that someone who always makes you feel a bit insecure could be projecting his or her issues onto you. If you have kept a situation bottled up for too long, do not be surprised if you let it out now. Tonight: Pace yourself, and do not push. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Curb any negativity, and you’ll make yourself and others happier. Sometimes, by not feeding into negativity, you can move through your feelings quickly. Allow lighter thoughts with more mirth to come out. Others gravitate toward you. Tonight: Play up the moment. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH If you can take some muchneeded personal time, please do. You have pushed past what is normal. Note the slant you put on different solutions. Look at the same issues next week at a happier moment. See the difference. Tonight: Spending a lot of energy on a friend. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Listen to news, return calls and ask questions. You might understand why someone has been pushing you away. Realize that you cannot do anything to change the situation. Someone you look up to clearly expresses his or her thoughts. Tonight: Hang out. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Sometimes you need to build yourself up to make yourself feel better. Today, take stock of what you have done this week and all that you have to offer, and reconsider a judgment. You are your harshest critic. Decide to toss yourself 100 percent into all areas of your life. Tonight: Meet a friend. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Consider your options more openly. The feedback you get during a discussion with your friends might surprise you. A friend or loved one finally tells you exactly where he or she is coming from. This person could surprise you. Tonight: Be spontaneous. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH If you’re feeling off, just say so. Everyone needs some time off from their lives. You are no exception. Listen to a friend and what he or she says. This person is trying to help you out. Allow others to carry the ball. Tonight: Play it low-key. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

F  C 

B3

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon.

Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Find a full community events calendar inside today’s GO! Magazine.

FRIDAY MY OWN TWO HANDS: Art event, themed “Lookin’ Up,� features a parade and art stroll, and a performing arts evening at FivePine Lodge & Conference Center; proceeds benefit the Sisters Americana Project; free, $5 for performing arts evening; 4 p.m. parade, 6:30 p.m. arts evening; downtown Sisters; 541-549-4979, info@ sistersfolkfestival.org or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD�: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of children held in a concentration camp; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www.beattickets.org. “FAIRYTALE�: A screening of the film about a Norwegian songwriter and performer; donations accepted; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, 549 N.W. Harmon Blvd., Bend; 541-382-4333. “GASLAND�: A screening of the 2010 PG-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

SATURDAY GARDEN WORK PARTY: Clean and prepare the center’s learning garden in preparation for spring planting; free; 9 a.m.-noon; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-3856908, denise@envirocenter.org or www.envirocenter.org. SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; $5, $4 with a trade gun, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-6237. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and a street chalk art competition; free; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@brooksresources.com

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin file photo

Brandon Roadman assists Matthew Seals across one of the many obstacles set up for kids of all ages to play on during the Bend Spring Festival in 2010. or www.nwxevents.com. SOLAR VIEWING: View the sun using safe techniques; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754 or www.highdesert museum.org. ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER FESTIVAL: With food, dancing, music and crafts; free; 1-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7592. VFW DINNER: A dinner of turkey sandwiches; $7; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. BEND GAME NIGHT: Play available board games or bring your own; free; 6 p.m.-midnight; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-318-8459. “THE LOGGER’S DAUGHTER�: A screening of the film about an African American woman born in Eastern Oregon who sets out to explore her family’s past; $5, $3 for members; 6:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. 241, aarbow@highdesertmuseum.org or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD�: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of children held in a concentration camp; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or

www.beattickets.org. “THE FAT BOY CHRONICLES�: A screening of the film about a young obese boy who is bullied; free, but a ticket is required; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “URBAN JUNGLE� FASHION SHOW: High-school students present fashions from local retailers; with a silent auction; event will take place behind the school on Alden Avenue; proceeds benefit the school’s DECA chapter; $10, $5 students, $15 VIP; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; www.bend.k12.or.us/bsh.

Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www.beattickets.org. “THE POWER OF TWO�: A screening of the documentary about twins afflicted with cystic fibrosis; proceeds benefit Donate Life Northwest and Cystic Fibrosis Research Institute; $15; 4-7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-788-0312, sadougherty@ bendbroadband.com or www .thepoweroftwomovie.com.

MONDAY No Family event listings.

SUNDAY TUESDAY SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; $5, $4 with a trade gun, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-6237. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@ brooksresources.com or www.nwxevents.com. “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD�: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of children held in a concentration camp; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 2 p.m.; 2nd Street

VFW DINNER: A dinner of cheeseburgers; $5, free ages 5 and younger; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775.

WEDNESDAY No Family event listings.

THURSDAY “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD�: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of children held in a concentration camp; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www.beattickets.org.

S  T  L   Y   E  For the week of April 13-19 Story times are free unless otherwise noted. Barnes & Noble Booksellers 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242

ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday. Between the Covers 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766

Downtown Bend Public Library 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7097

BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Monday and 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 11 a.m. Tuesday. PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 35; 10:30 a.m. Friday, 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. FAMILY STORIES: Ages 3-5; 12:15 p.m. Saturday.

STORY TIME: 2 p.m. Thursday. East Bend Public Library C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-388-1188

STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Thursday. Crook County Public Library 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. WEE READ: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Monday and Wednesday.

62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3760

FAMILY FUN: Ages 0-5; 9:30 a.m. Wednesday. SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 0-5; 10 a.m. Saturday. SPANISH STORIES AND SONGS: Ages 0-5; Stories and songs in Spanish; 11 a.m. Saturday.

WILD WEDNESDAYS: Ages 7-12; treasure hunt; 12:30 p.m. to close Wednesday. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Ages 3-4; explore museum’s animal habitat, share stories and songs; 10 to 11 a.m. Thursday; $15 per child nonmembers, $10 per child members. TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; storytelling about animals and people of the High Desert; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. Jefferson County Public Library 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. La Pine Public Library

High Desert Museum 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www .highdesertmuseum.org; 541-382-4754; unless noted, events included with admission ($10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older and ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger)

16425 First St.; 541-312-1090

TEEN TERRITORY EARTH DAY BIZARRE: Grades 6-12; make crafts from upcycled materials; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. Redmond Public Library 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1054

BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Thursday. PRESCHOOL PARADE STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18 to 36 months; 10:15 a.m. Thursday. Sisters Public Library 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070

FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. Sunriver Area Public Library 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080

FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Thursday.

FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday.

LAPTOP LAB: Grades 6-12; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Monday.

TEEN TERRITORY OPEN DAY: Ages 12-17; 1:30 to 3 p.m. Wednesday.

Answering the call on proper cellphone use By Dr. Gregory Ramey Cox Newspapers

I don’t think you reQ: ally understand how important things like cellphones and Facebook are to young people. These are not privileges like toys to be taken away when parents get upset. They are our way of keeping in contact with our friends and are just as

important to us as a car is to an adult. Parents can’t protect kids forever and need to give them the freedom to learn how to use technology. I think you’re right. Neither parents nor profesA: sionals can truly appreciate how much texting, cellphones and social media really mean to their kids. This stuff is all so

new that parents really have limited experience in how to help their kids manage this technology. Here’s the advice I give to parents: No cellphones before junior high. Monitor your child’s texting until high school. Cellphones, computers and video games are expensive privileges, and their use should be contingent upon

your child’s behavior. Parents have an obligation to restrict such privileges if they are used irresponsibly or if they are detracting from kids getting good grades in school. I’d be interested in readers’ perspectives on this issue. Dr. Gregory Ramey is a child psychologist and vice president of outpatient services at the Children’s Medical Center of Dayton, Ohio.


B4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


B6

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

Military Continued from B1 Minnesota’s demographics work well for the research. Its mostly citizen-soldiers are generally older and more likely to have families than those on active duty. And those families often blend back in to small towns and cities after a deployment without the support system that a military base offers. But the research will do more than put military families under a microscope. It also is designed as a practical method for improving parenting skills, using a well-established model for parenting intervention and applying it to the special demands faced by military families. It is called “After Deployment: Adaptive Parenting Tools,” or ADAPT. “This is more about giving to our Guard families than it is about taking,” said Thad Shunkwiler, the outreach coordinator for the program and a 12-year member in the Minnesota Guard. The $3.2 million research project, funded through the National Institute of Drug Abuse and National Institutes of Health, will look at 400 families over a five-year period to see whether the parenting techniques they are taught will affect such things as their kids’ risk of substance abuse and behavioral and emotional problems. Participating families will be interviewed four times over the course of the research. Between 10 and 18 percent of returning Iraq and Afghanistan troops are likely to have post-traumatic stress disorder. Compounding their stress, nearly one in five will return without a job. Previous research has shown that citizen soldiers have had higher levels of PTSD, drug use and other combat-related adjustment problems compared with active-duty personnel. The first year back for these soldiers can often prove more stressful for families than the deployment in a war zone. “They’re helping us prepare for the future,” said Maj. Aaron Krenz, chief of Deployment Cycle Support for the Guard.

Self-esteem Continued from B1 Other researchers, such as Twenge, say the self-esteem movement may even have been harmful. In the her book, she points to research showing a spike in narcissistic tendencies in recent years. Nearly 10 percent of people in their 20s experienced some symptoms of a narcissistic personality disorder, meanwhile just 3 percent of those 65 and older had ever shown those tendencies. Brad Bushman, professor of communication and psychology at Ohio State University, says we got it backwards. We believed making people feel good would lead to good behavior. “Self-esteem should follow behavior, not precede it.”

What is it? “Self-esteem is a useful concept,” said Pickhardt — it’s how we think of ourselves and how we evaluate ourselves. He says it affects all the ways we see the world. “It makes a huge difference in how we feel about our lives and about ourselves.” Young people crave boosts in their self-esteem. Bushman performed research experiments looking at self-esteem in college students. The students preferred receiving a self-esteem boost above any other pleasant activity — above free food, alcohol, seeing friends, sex or money. Bushman sees this desire for self-esteem above all else as troubling. He says the trends are not good — self-esteem scores have increased over the years, while narcissism has increased and empathy has gone down. “If you already think you’re great, you are not going to try hard to become better,” said Bushman. Bushman has studied aggression through the years. He says it had been assumed that people who were violent had low self-esteem, when in fact the opposite turned out to be true, and criminals actually had inflated views of themselves.

What went wrong Twenge’s research initially focused on the good traits associated with younger generations. She found, for instance,

Photos by Jeff Wheeler / Minneapolis Star Tribune

Joe Vogel holds his son Graydon, 2, on his lap after arriving home while his other son, William, 5, takes a nap. Vogel and his wife, Molly, participated in a program conducted by researchers at the University of Minnesota that studies the impact of military deployments on families, particularly among Guard and Reserve members.

Both John Thomas, and his wife, Mora, participated in the ADAPT program after Thomas’ return from deployment, and said the program gave them valuable parenting skills to use with their daughters, Claire, 4, seated, Isabella, 6, left, and Sophie, 9. Claire plays with the ADAPT program binder at the family’s home in Lakeville, Minn.

The project is still in its infancy. But as a reflection of the lack of academic work in the subject, researchers have been fielding interest in embracing the program even before the results are known. Gewirtz, the project’s principal investigator, recently heard from an Air Force general who wants to install the program at 25 air bases. For the military families participating, the study is intensive: a 14-week commitment, with two hours each week

meeting in church basements and community centers. After returning from a year in southern Iraq to his wife and two sons, Joe Vogel wasn’t much interested in sitting on a folding chair and sharing his feelings. But his brother, a psychologist who also is in the Guard, encouraged Vogel and his wife, Molly, to participate. The couple thought they wouldn’t qualify because they were doing well with their

that younger women were more assertive and more willing to take charge than women in previous generations. She and co-author Keith Campbell, who studied narcissism, wondered if narcissism has also increased over the years. It had. Twenge says there is a difference between self-esteem and narcissism. Self-esteem is confidence, whereas narcissism is overconfidence. She says it is the difference between thinking you are a person of worth and believing you are better than everyone else. People with high selfesteem, she says, also tend to think a lot about relationships and other people, whereas narcissists do not. Twenge believes there is a direct link between the increase in narcissism and the self-esteem movement and it has to do with how self-esteem is taught in schools, in particular the emphasis on specialness. She highlights a song often taught to children with the refrain “I am special, I am special, look at me!” The feeling of specialness and wanting to be the center of attention are two traits of narcissism. She believes the way we think about success is rooted in some fallacies. For instance, there’s a pervasive notion that if you just “believe in yourself, then anything can happen.” College students tell her they have to be self-centered because the world is so competitive. But, research shows that “self-esteem does not relate to success,” said Twenge. A 2007 study published in the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology demonstrated that boosting self-esteem doesn’t help academic performance. In the study, researchers divided academically lowperforming college students into three groups: one received review questions, one received review questions and self-esteem bolstering, and the third received review questions plus directives to take responsibility and control. While the researchers expected those receiving encouragement to show academic improvement, the opposite was true. Those students receiving self-esteem boosts actually performed worse; those in the other groups did not change.

While Twenge believes there is a little more awareness now about the dangers of narcissism, she thinks the support for self-esteem continues. “There’s a basic belief that self-esteem is really really important. I have not seen it challenged.” She believes it is still just as prevalent in schools today as it was in the ’90s. Twenge found a preponderance of elementary schools, for instance, mention building good self-esteem as part of their mission statement. And she’s also seen it in her personal life. Her kindergartner recently came home from school with lyrics to the “I am special” song. When Twenge called the school to ask about it, she says the staff didn’t understand her concerns.

Praise and criticism Parental overpraising is also an issue linked to inflated selfesteem. “Sometimes parents get carried away,” said Pickhardt. They are enamored of their children and share these feelings. Twenge says parents need to focus on specifics and effort when offering praise, rather than on generalities (“Remember when you did that math problem last week? I know you can do this one, too.” vs. “You are so smart.”) She believes in teaching kids to work hard versus teaching them self-importance. Bushman agrees, saying children receive compliments such as “you are great, you are wonderful” that are not contingent upon actual behavior. “Don’t just give them praise for doing nothing.” Pickhardt encourages parents to keep praise moderate. Pickhardt also encounters parents who are overly critical. When kids make a mistake, parents should try to focus on the child’s choices rather than to be critical of the child’s character. Otherwise, Pickhardt says, adolescents can internalize the judgment and end up punishing themselves. Low self-esteem can be a problem for some kids, but Twenge says it’s a symptom, not a cause. Children may develop low self-esteem due to an unstable family background and other “more deeply rooted problems,” she said.

two boys, 5-year-old William and 2-year-old Graydon, and had the support of both their families. But they found the simple tools offered during the meetings subtly changed their parenting styles. They used charts to offer encouragement for good behavior and learned a technique for calmly confronting the boys at their own level to get them to pick up their toys. “Once you sign up and commit to it, we use it all the time,” Molly Vogel said. “Any family deals with stress and conflict, it’s just normal part of day to day. When you take a spouse out of the equation for more than a year, rules and expectations change and are set differently.” The Vogels have confronted the unique nature of Joe’s job with their boys — that sometime soldiers don’t come home. Three members of the Minnesota Guard were killed during his deployment, and Joe wears a bracelet bearing their names. “These are soldiers that died,” William said, slouching on the couch and eating a frozen treat. The program has had 100 families participate but hopes to recruit more. So far, 80

Parents’ roles Parents who are worried about narcissistic tendencies can try to give kids a reality check, says Twenge. If a teen says, “I am the best at X,” ask, “How do you know that?” Also, she encourages parents to focus on teaching empathy and social skills. Twenge is also leery of the “princess phenomenon,” in which clothing items and other material goods are marketed to young girls with princess slogans and imagery. She suggests parents remember that if their daughter is a princess, that turns them into loyal subjects. Also, what might be cute at age 2 is not cute at age 14. “We want (kids) to define themselves broadly and judge themselves kindly,” said Pickhardt. Where kids go wrong, he says, is when they define themselves narrowly — as

percent of the families are two-parent homes, averaging 8.9 years of marriage and 2.4 kids. In 85 percent of the families, it has been the dad who has deployed. With three active daughters and two full-time jobs, John and Mora Thomas also were hesitant to commit to the program. To top it off, John, an aviator in the Naval Reserve, hadn’t been deployed since he was on active duty more than eight years ago. But researchers encouraged them and they reconsidered. A Naval Academy grad, John believed in the occasional spanking to discipline his daughters. But after going through the program, he is trying new techniques, such as escalating time-outs of five to 10 minutes or taking away something of value. They find that they now get less back talk from the kids, particularly with their oldest, 9-year-old Sophie. She has noticed a change, too. “They were acting nicer when it came to punishment,” she said of her parents. And her own reaction? “I didn’t get as mad.” Now, the tools they have learned will become even more valuable. John just got word that he will be deployed this summer for a year as a pilot, flying Navy P-3 airplanes for reconnaissance and surveillance. Before they had children, John was deployed twice while stationed at naval bases in Maine and Florida. Sophie was only a few months old when he returned from his last deployment. “This should be a walk in the park, but I’ve experienced it in a different way,” Mora said. “I had the support of a Navy community during those deployments. Here, that’s my biggest concern. I’m in middle-class suburbia, and nobody gets it.” The Thomases haven’t told the girls of their dad’s deployment. They plan a family meeting to break the news.

only an academic or athlete or dancer. Then, when they experience a setback in that area, they feel as if they have nothing left. “You kind of want to diversify your portfolio so you can withstand the downturns,” said Pickhardt. Parents can help by opening doors and encouraging their kids to try different things. How parents see themselves can affect family life and the way their children see themselves, according to Pickhardt. He knows sometimes parents feel stressed at work and come home in a “wounded” state” and end up taking their bad feelings out on their families. “We are the model and the example,” said Pickhardt. If parents feel bad about themselves, it will permeate through the family. When he sees a parent

Question Continued from B1 “It really depends on maturity level, but kids should be about 14 or 15 years old if you want them to be taking on the majority of the responsibility,” Stayer said. One of the important steps of getting a pet is talking with children about responsibility and the importance of following through, she said. “Parents need to have that conversation with their children,” Stayer said. “A pet is a long-term commitment. It takes dedication. It’s not just over in two weeks.” Stayer said parents should not agree to get a pet unless they believe their children are able to make a commitment to the animal. In terms of responsibility level, certain pets are a better fit for younger children. She recommends fish as a great place for kids to start learning about pet responsibility, as they are relatively easy to care for. Hamsters and rats are also good options. Cats can be a better fit for younger children, as kittens are already trained to use a litter box and do not need as much training as dogs. If a child’s heart is set on getting a dog, an older dog may be a better option than a puppy. She recommends adopting from an animal shelter, but says children should visit the shelter with the parents to make sure the dog or cat is child-friendly. Puppies can be a lot of work, Stayer says, and may not always be a good fit for young children. Stayer also says it’s also important to go over safe handling techniques with children before any pet is brought into the home. This is crucial, Stayer says, so that children can avoid getting hurt, and can avoid hurting the new pet. Stayer says that ultimately, parents themselves should want the pets, too. Otherwise, it may end up being a bad decision for the entire family. — Reporter: 541-383-0354, mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

who is treating the family in a hurtful way, he says there’s “an injured relationship the parent has with themselves.” One common thing he sees is a mom who has become the self-sacrificial parent who has no independent way of defining herself, says Pickhardt. “It’s the example we set that is more powerful than the communication we give,” said Pickhardt. He says people became enamored with the concept of self-esteem when it first came out, but “maybe it’s time to reconsider it in a more moderate way.” People need to understand that self-esteem is connected to how people treat themselves and treat other people, and that it’s not just the kids’ self-esteem that matters, but the parents’ as well. — Reporter: 541-617-7860, ajohnson@bendbulletin.com


LOCALNEWS

Reader photo, C2 Editorials, C4

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING Work to close La Pine crossing A railroad crossing on Finley Butte Road in La Pine will be closed for two days while crews work to replace it. The construction will begin Wednesday, and the crossing will be closed to traffic during construction. Russell Road can be accessed through Reed Road until the work is complete.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

$50M sought in Bend midwife suit • The parents of boy born with cerebral palsy sue a birth center, the state and 2 midwives over what they deem negligence By Sheila G. Miller T he B ul l etin

The parents of a child who suffered complications at birth are suing the state, a Bend-based birth center and two of its midwives for

medical negligence and fraud. They are asking for more than $50 million. In a lawsuit filed April 2, Kristine and Greg Andrews — on behalf of their son — are suing the state of Oregon,

Motherwise Community Birth Center, midwife Nicole Tucker and midwife Christyn King for the medical problems they say the baby faces as a result of oxygen starvation during birth. The lawsuit asks for $25 million in noneconomic damages as well as $22.5 million in economic damages in the form of ongoing medical and therapeutic care and lost wages. It also asks for $3 mil-

lion in noneconomic damages to Kristine Andrews for the experience she had with her son’s birth. The Andrews’ attorney, J. William Savage, said he hoped to serve the lawsuit this week. “This child’s health care costs are going to be substantial,” Savage said. “He’ll never earn a living in a conventional sense and will never have a normal life.” See Midwife suit / C2

— Bulletin staff report

News of Record, C2

Shooting hoops in the fleeting sun STATE NEWS Portland • • Estacada • Salem

• Portland: Mayor refuses to reinstate fired police officer. • Estacada: Judge’s order clears transients from property. • Salem: Court rules lawmakers must testify. Stories on C3

rea der photos

Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

Streets closed Sections of Northwest Crossing Drive and Fort Clatsop Street will be closed from 10 p.m. tonight through 2 a.m. Monday for the Bend Spring Festival.

N.W. Crossing Dr. John Fremont St. Fort Clatsop St. n Dr. shingto

Mt. Wa

Sk

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

N

ick Simonich, 15, of

B E N D

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Corrections In a story headlined “Prineville, county officials list enterprise zone pros” that appeared Thursday, April 12, on Page C1, the school district that was the recipient of funds from Facebook was incorrectly reported. The Crook County School District received $340,000 from the company. In a graphic that appeared on Page C1, Thursday, April 12, 2012, the dates for road closures during the Bend Spring Festival were incorrect. The correct dates for the road closures appear in the graphic on today’s C1. The Bulletin regrets the errors.

Springtime conditions are

by partly sunny skies with

Bend, attempts a dunk

expected to provide limited

occasional rain and a chance of

on the short hoop

opportunities for outdoor

a thunderstorm. Today’s high is

on the playground at Highland

recreation today, with Bend’s

expected to be near 52 degrees.

Magnet School at Kenwood af-

forecast calling for a chance of

ter school Thursday afternoon.

snow early in the day, followed

FEDERAL CONSERVATION EFFORTS

U.S. Forest Service plans to purchase 1,640 acres in state The Bulletin

. Rd

• Candidate forum, Tuesday: Forum featuring all candidates running for Deschutes County Circuit Court justice position 2 and Republican candidates running for Deschutes County Commission position 2; 7 p.m.; Bend Shilo Inn meeting room, 3105 N.E. O.B. Riley Road, Bend; dcrpnews@gmail.com or 541-241-0888. • Deschutes County commissioner candidate forum, Wednesday: A forum featuring Republican candidates running for Deschutes County commissioner position No. 2, including Tom Greene and Philip Henderson; noon to 1 p.m.; Deschutes County Administration Building, 1300 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541382-2724 or mspenh@ bendbroadband.com. • Meet the candidates event, April 23: Central Oregon Legal Professionals hosts candidates for the Deschutes County Circuit Court judge position 2, including Beth Bagley, Andrew Balyeat, Aaron Brenneman, and Thomas Spear Jr.; 6 to 8 p.m.; Bend Community Center, 1036 N.E. 5th St., Bend; RSVP to catherine@ bendtel.net by April 20; 541-323-3200.

ELECTION INFORMATION

By Andrew Clevenger

ers ylin

ELECTION CALENDAR

More election events, C2

We ll s h o t! • Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@ bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication.

C

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Forest Service will buy two properties in Oregon for almost $1.7 million, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced last week. The first is a 1,481-acre parcel inside the Imnaha Canyon in the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area in the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest in northeast Oregon. The $1.4 million purchase completes the acquisition of 5,907 acres from The Nature Conservancy. The second obtains 159 acres in the Major Creek drainage of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area for $247,000. It is the second and final phase of a 1,964-acre purchase from The Trust for Public Land. “The pristine wildernesses, flowing waters and majestic vistas help define what makes this country great,” U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell said in a prepared statement. “These projects will help ensure a long future of quality open space for those hunters and anglers, hikers, campers and other nature lovers who enjoy America’s great outdoors.” Forest service officials say

“These projects will help ensure a long future of quality open space for those hunters and anglers, hikers, campers and other nature lovers who enjoy America’s great outdoors.” — Tom Tidwell, chief, U.S. Forest Service

that the Wallowa-Whitman acquisition will help protect habitats for a number of federally protected fish — including Snake River steelhead, chinook salmon and bull trout — and the purple flowers known as MacFarlane’s four-o’clock. The area is also home to Oregon’s largest Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep herd. In addition, the property will enable public access to thousands of acres for fishing, hunting, hiking and other recreation opportunities, according to the Forest Service. See Parcels / C2

For the detailed five-day forecast, see Page C6.

Former 4-H volunteer faces sexual abuse trial in August By Duffie Taylor The Bulletin

The trial of a Culver man facing sexual abuse charges involving a girl he met while serving as a 4-H volunteer will begin Aug. 27 in Jefferson County Circuit Court. Steven Stoltz, 66, is charged with second-degree custodial interference, three counts of sex abuse in the third degree — a class A misdemeanor — and one count of sex abuse in the second degree, a class C felony.

Stoltz’s 25-year-old daughter, Savallah Amber Stoltz, and his 24-year-old son-inlaw, John Straight, have been charged with custodial interference in connection with the case. The three were arrested Dec. 30 following a grand jury indictment and a fourmonth investigation by the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office. They have pleaded not guilty and are free on bail. See Abuse trial / C2

REDMOND

City will seek bids to plan for parking development By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

REDMOND — The city of Redmond expects demand for downtown parking to increase in the coming years as various economic development efforts produce results. To prepare, the Downtown Urban Renewal Advisory Committee decided earlier this week to request bids from firms capable of creating an inventory of existing parking spaces and developing a plan to add more. The city placed a $15,000 ceiling on the

project’s budget. “The goal is to look at the parking map (that comes from the study) and understand where the use currently is,” said Jon Williams, Redmond’s economic development project manager. “The second piece is to plan, as growth happens downtown, what to do for parking.” To spur economic development, Redmond has approved various loans, grants and tax cuts for employers willing to open up shop downtown. See Redmond / C2

Oregon’s primary election will take place May 15. • New voters to Oregon must register to vote by April 24. • Current voters must update their registration in writing if their residence or mailing address has changed. Voters can accomplish this by submitting a new voter registration card to the county clerk’s office or updating registration online at www.oregonvotes.org. • In a primary election, the ballot a voter receives is based on his or her residential address and party affiliation. If a voter wants to change party affiliation, the deadline to do so is April 24. Postmarks do not count. To change party affiliation, submit a new voter registration card to the county clerk’s office or update online at www.oregon votes.org. • If a voter’s signature has changed, a voter should submit a new voter registration card with the current signature. • There is now an Independent Party in Oregon. If a voter does not want to be affiliated with any party, select on the voter registration card “Not a member of a party.” • Ballots will be mailed April 27. They cannot be forwarded. • Absentee forms are available online and at the county clerk’s office if a voter will be away from home for one or more elections. • Voter registration cards are available at city halls, libraries, DMV offices, post offices, county clerks’ offices, the last page of the government section (blue pages) of the Qwest Dex Phone book or online at www. deschutes.org/clerk or www.oregonvotes.org. For more information, go online to www .deschutes.org/clerk or www.oregonvotes.org. — Bulletin staff reports


C2

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

E L E C TI O N CALENDAR Continued from C1

• Televised Deschutes County commissioner candidate forum, April 24: A “Talk of the Town” televised forum featuring candidates running for Deschutes County commissioner position No. 2, including Tom Greene and Philip Henderson; 5:30 p.m.; Cascades Theatrical Company, 148 N.W. Greenwood Avenue, Bend; RSVP required to talk@ bendbroadband.com. 541-388-5814 or www. talkofthetownco .com. • Candidate forum, April 29: A forum featuring all Republican candidates running for Deschutes County commissioner, state Senate, state representatives and nonpartisan candidates for Deschutes County Circuit Court judge and the Bend City Council; 2 to 4 p.m.; Awbrey Glen Clubhouse, 2500 N.W. Awbrey Glen Dr., Bend; 541-317-1881 or carol.peters@bend cable.com. — The Bulletin will run listings of election events. The event must be free and open to the public. To submit a listing, email information to news@ bendbulletin.com, with “Election calendar.”

“We have heard from some merchants that things really fill up at certain times, such as the lunch hour. But until we do this study we won’t know how big of an issue that really is.” — Jon Williams, economic development project manager, Redmond

Redmond Continued from C1 The city also has tentative plans to renovate the historic New Redmond Hotel downtown and bring a movie theater and aquatic center into the city center. If those efforts work, more people — and cars — will flock downtown, boosting demand for parking. City officials won’t say whether they expect the parking study to generate significant proposals — such as a parking garage — but they do expect some change to the status quo. Redmond’s downtown streets use unpaid, parallel parking spaces. “We have heard from some merchants that things really fill up at certain times, such as the lunch hour,” Williams said. “But until we do this study we won’t know how big of an issue that really is.” Ken Streater, a member of the Downtown Urban Renewal Advisory Committee, cites anecdotal evidence of parking problems such as one encountered by his 81-year-old mother, who drove for several blocks before finding a parking space. “And you worry that some people might not be so patient when looking for a space,” Streater said. But Streater, a commercial broker, doesn’t think Redmond’s parking problem is critical yet. Nonetheless, he said, “this is absolutely the right time to be studying the issue and studying it with an eye toward future commercial entities.” By developing a plan, in addition, the city can demonstrate to potential employers that parking won’t be a problem, said Streater. “I do believe business will react positively to studying the issue,” Streater said. Streater added: “I think that all alternatives need to be examined, from a big parking garage to leaving things the way it is to something in between, like a single-story parking lot.” — Reporter: 541-617-7837 ehidle@bendbulletin.com

Well shot! R E ADER PHOTOS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

Abuse trial Continued from C1 Judge Daniel Ahern ordered Stoltz to have no contact with children during a February pretrial conference but has since modified the no-contact requirement to allow Stoltz to see his grandchildren. Stoltz had been active in a Jefferson County 4-H youth development program for three decades and met the alleged victim through a program he led called Jefferson Kids and Kritters. He was suspended from his volunteer role shortly after police began their investigation. According to Oregon law, custodial interference in the second degree occurs when “the person takes, entices or keeps another person from the other person’s lawful custodian or in violation of a valid joint custody order with intent to hold the other person permanently or for a protracted period.” — Reporter: 541-383-0376, dtaylor@bendbulletin.com

Parcels

A HILL OFT SKIED Gayle Schofield, of Bend, snapped this photo of the Cone at Mt. Bachelor using a Panasonic Lumix ZS3 with a Leica 25mm wide-angle lens. “I thought it came out very well with the contrasting blue skies, snow and trees,” said Schofield. “Plus the detail of the skiers’ tracks.”

Midwife suit Continued from C1 Savage added that the child will need constant care and, because he is not ventilatordependent or tube-fed, he will likely have a near-normal life expectancy. Tucker, who started Motherwise Birth Center in 2007, did not return a call for comment. According to the lawsuit, the Andrewses contracted with Motherwise to provide midwifery services for the birth of their child. The child was expected to be born in April 2010. The lawsuit alleges that Motherwise, Tucker and King did not have malpractice insurance and did not alert the Andrewses to that fact. According to Oregon administrative rules, licensed birth centers and midwives must provide patients with a disclosure form that includes, among other things, whether they hold malpractice coverage. “Had the required disclosure been made to Kristine Andrews or Greg Andrews about the absence of any malpractice coverage, they would not have agreed to proceed with midwifery or (licensed direct entry) services from defendants Motherwise LLC, Tucker and/or King,” the lawsuit states. The Andrewses’ son was born April 5, 2010. According to the lawsuit, in the weeks leading up to the birth, Kristine

“Had the required disclosure been made to Kristine Andrews or Greg Andrews about the absence of any malpractice coverage, they would not have agreed to proceed with midwifery or (licensed direct entry) services from defendants Motherwise LLC.” — Excerpt from lawsuit filed by Kristine and Greg Andrews against Motherwise Birth Center in Bend

Andrews had indications of high blood pressure, which can cause a variety of problems for both mother and baby. Kristine Andrews went to Motherwise on April 2, 2010, to try to start labor through stripping the membranes, a procedure involving the membrane separating the amniotic sac from the uterine wall. The procedure causes the body to release hormones that can lead to contractions. Andrews was then sent home, but returned two days later. According to the lawsuit, Andrews still had high blood pressure “and signs of a developing infection” and was sent home once again. When she returned to the birth center on April 5, her blood pressure remained elevated for three more hours, including during the birth of her son. The lawsuit states no monitoring equipment was used to check the fetal heart rate. Nevertheless, “the fetal heart rate was noted to indicate periodic bradycardia (slow heart rate)

and nonreassuring decelerations of the fetal heart rate.” When born, the infant did not respond to stimulation and did not breathe on his own. He was taken to St. Charles Bend, and 10 days later was discharged with signs of brain damage caused by oxygen starvation from birth. The baby suffered, among other things, significant brain damage and cerebral palsy. “These injuries, harms and losses are expected to be permanent in nature,” the lawsuit states. The lawsuit alleges Motherwise and the two midwives should have referred Kristine Andrews to an obstetrician/ gynecologist for prenatal and labor and delivery services. It also alleges the birth center and its midwives should have told the Andrewses they had no malpractice insurance. Finally, the lawsuit alleges the state was negligent. The Oregon Administrative Rules have a list of “absolute risk factors” for birthing

centers. When a risk factor is present, the regulations state a pregnant mother should be transferred to a higher level of care, like a hospital. One of the risk factors is hypertension. The state listed the threshold at a blood pressure of 150/100. According to the lawsuit, that threshold was “inappropriate and not evidence based.” The Andrewses allege the state was negligent for several reasons, most notably because of the blood pressure level it lists as a risk factor. The lawsuit also alleges the state didn’t require a mandatory disclosure form be produced to members of the public receiving services from midwives, licensed direct entry midwives or birthing centers, and that it didn’t implement “evidence based standards for the protection of Oregon citizens.” “The state, if it’s going to require mandatory disclosures be made, it should implement a uniform disclosure form to ensure those requirements are being satisfied,” Savage said. “It’s a very simple system, but beginning with airline pilots and now in the medical field in terms of hospitals, checklists are becoming more predominant and it just ensures that people are told what they need to be told, which in this case didn’t occur.” A pretrial hearing is slated for July. — Reporter: 541-617-7831, smiller@bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 4:20 p.m. April 4, in the 61000 block of Honkers Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 7:10 a.m. April 5, in the 1100 block of Southwest Long Creek Lane. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 8 a.m. April 5, in the 2700 block of Northeast 27th Street. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 8:07 a.m. April 5, in the 2600 block of Northeast Brian Ray Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 10:28 a.m. April 5, in the 1100 block of Southwest Silver Lake Boulevard. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 8:36 p.m. April 7, in the 700 block of Southeast Third Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:04 a.m. April 9, in the 62800 block of Boyd Acres Road. Theft — Two bicycles were reported stolen at 7:15 a.m. April 9, in the 19700 block of Mount Bachelor Drive. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was

reported at 8:29 a.m. April 9, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 9:35 a.m. April 9, in the 63400 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:36 p.m. April 9, in the 20500 block of Empire Avenue. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen at 4:23 p.m. April 9, in the 2400 block of Northeast Moonlight Drive. DUII — Kimberly Maureen Kluth, 57, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 6:01 p.m. April 9, in the area of Murphy Road and Third Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:49 p.m. April 9, in the 19300 block of Soda Springs Drive. Redmond Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 7:29 p.m. April 11, in the 2100 block of Northwest 11th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:12 p.m. April 11, in the 1600 block of Southwest Odem Medo Road. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:21 p.m. April 11, in the 800 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 3:12 p.m. April 11, in the 2300 block of Northwest 11th Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 1:30 p.m. April

11, in the 3000 block of Northwest Eighth Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:33 p.m. April 11, in the 2400 block of Southwest Timber View Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:05 p.m. April 11, in the 2200 block of Northwest 12th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:01 p.m. April 11, in the 800 block of Southwest 17th Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:36 a.m. April 11, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:15 a.m. April 11, in the 1800 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 8:52 p.m. April 11, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 1:45 p.m. April 11, in the 16400 block of First Street in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:17 p.m. April 11, in the 20000 block of McConnell Drive in Bend. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 9:43 a.m. April 11, in the area of Mt. Bachelor. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was

Part of 1964 program The government pays for the purchases through the Land and Water Conservation Fund. Created in 1964, the program uses proceeds from offshore oil and gas drilling to identify and buy properties at fair market prices. Four agencies — the Forest Service, the National Park Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Bureau of Land Management — identify desirable properties. Each year, Congress appropriates up to $900 million for the fund. So far, the Land and Water Conservation Fund has spent $9 billion on more than 7 million acres, with 1.5 million of those acres within or next to national forests or grasslands. Roughly one-third of those purchases were made at the state or community level, according to the Forest Service. — Reporter: 202-662-7456, aclevenger@bendbulletin.com

N  R POLICE LOG

Continued from C1 The Major Creek drainage provides a migration corridor between the Columbia River and the uplands above the Gorge Walls. The purchases are part of $40.6 million in acquisitions approved for 2012 in 15 states. According to the Forest Service, the purchases are designed to “safeguard watersheds, provide recreational access, restore healthy forests, mitigate climate change, defend communities from wildfire, create management efficiency, and reconnect fragmented landscapes and ecosystems.”

reported at 6:49 p.m. April 11, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 159.

BEND FIRE RUNS Wednesday 6:18 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 19623 Manzanita Lane. 10:27 p.m. — Building fire, 2245 N.E. Division St. 15 — Medical aid calls.

80th Anniversary 1932-2012 Only Authorized Dyson Service Center in Bend

All Dyson Vacuum Cleaners on Sale See store for details. Expires 4/30/12

The Largest Selection in the NW Low Price Guarantee! Sewing Machine Repair & Service

STARK’S VACUUMS HWY 20E & Dean Swift Rd. (1 block West of Costco) 541-323-3011 • starks.com Mon.-Fri. 9-7 Sat. 9-6 Sun. 11-5

Hair Stylist & Cranial Hair Prosthesis/Wigs Specialist

20% Off All Services Exp. 4/20/12

Located Downtown Bend

541-408-6244 Call for your appointment.


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

C3

O N Snowpack is above average in much of Oregon, report shows The Associated Press ALBANY — A wet March led to an above-average snowpack for much of Oregon, a federal report shows. The Natural Resources Conservation Services reported Tuesday that measurements of water in the snowpack were at 124 percent of average in the Willamette Basin in March and 132 percent on Mount Hood. The report predicts that more water than usual will flow through streams in the western and northern parts of the state. But the snowpack was well below normal in Southeastern Oregon, where measurements

were less than half the normal level. The lowest measurement was 46 percent of average. The federal agency predicts stream volumes will be well below normal this year in that part of Oregon. Nearly all snow meters reported above-average precipitation last month, the Albany Democrat-Herald reported. Twenty-five of 80 meters reported their wettest March ever, with some exceeding their previous records by 4 to 6 inches. “Cooler temperatures in early March combined with abundant precipitation caused

an unusual amount of low-elevation snow accumulation on the west side of the Cascade Mountains,” said Julie Koeberle, NRCS hydrologist with the Oregon Snow Survey team. The federal Snow Survey measures snow and provides stream-flow forecasts and snowpack data for communities, water managers and recreationists across the West. A robust snowpack is important to farmers who depend on spring runoff to water their crops. Melting snow also provides fish habitat in rivers and streams, and it feeds municipal water supplies.

The Oregonian file photos

Ethel “Punki” McNamee, 69, stands in front of a structure, currently vacant, that has housed homeless people in Estacada.

Facing stiff fine, Estacada woman clears transients from her property The Associated Press ESTACADA — After years of complaints from residents of a small Oregon town and now a judge’s order, a 69-year-old woman who let as many as 30 down-on-their-luck people at a time stay in various shed-like outbuildings on her property has given up her struggle with the city and turned out most of the inhabitants. The Oregonian reports Ethel “Punki” McNamee faced a $10,000 fine if she didn’t clear the structures. A handful of the people who stayed on her property have temporarily moved into McNamee’s house while they seek permanent housing. On Wednesday, 48-year-old Matthew Smith came to McNamee looking for a place to stay but was turned away. He hoped for a spot at the area referred to as “Punki’s Place,” but will likely have to keep asking friends for help. “I’m just an old dog,” he said. “I have nowhere to go.” On April 4, Municipal Judge Maryann Meaney gave McNamee 30 days to force residents out of the accessory structures, which were mostly empty by the trial. “I echo the concern of the community and the City Council,” Meaney said. “Peo-

SALEM — Although the Oregon Constitution protects state lawmakers from being sued for what they say in the heat of debate, an appeals court says they can be ordered to testify on other matters related to governing. The decision Wednesday means Senate President Peter Courtney of Salem and former House Speaker Dave Hunt of Gladstone can be compelled to testify in a case involving six anti-war protesters. They were arrested in January 2009 during an all-night vigil on the Capitol steps. The Oregonian reports Courtney and Hunt helped rewrite the rules on overnight demonstrations, but they re-

The Associated Press PORTLAND — Mayor Sam Adams said Thursday he won’t implement an arbitrator’s ruling that a police officer fired after he shot an unarmed man in the back in 2010 should be reinstated. The city attorney thinks there are sufficient legal grounds to challenge the reinstatement of Officer Ronald Frashour, Adams said in a statement. Arbitrator Jane Wilkinson ruled last month that Portland should reinstate Frashour with lost wages, finding that the city didn’t prove just cause for his termination. Police training instructors testified at the arbitration hearings that Frashour followed his training when he used deadly force against 25year-old Aaron Campbell on Jan. 29, 2010. “Our standards for the allowed use of deadly force are more restrictive than national standards and the local standards of other police departments,” said Adams, who serves as police commissioner. “I believe Frashour violated our policy and training protocols regarding allowed use of deadly force.” The mayor said if the police union challenges his decision, he’ll ask that the state Employment Relations Board expedite a decision. The board is a state agency that resolves labor disputes between union-

“Our standards for the allowed use of deadly force are more restrictive than national standards and the local standards of other police departments. I believe Frashour violated our policy and training protocols regarding allowed use of deadly force.” — Sam Adams, mayor, Portland

represented workers and public and private employers. Officer Daryl Turner, president of the Portland Police Association, said the union plans a legal challenge of Adams’ decision. Turner called Wilkinson “a nationally recognized arbitrator who was hand-selected by the city.” Her decision “should be the end of this matter,” he said. Turner called the mayor’s decision politically motivated and expensive for the city. About 200 people protested April 2 outside City Hall in the wake of Wilkinson’s decision, calling for the officer to leave town and indicating that without a resolution, the city could witness a summer of unrest. The Portland Police Bureau is already under a Department of Justice probe for its interactions with the mentally ill. The Justice Department declined to investigate the bureau over Campbell’s shooting, but the Campbell family agreed to settle a federal wrongful death suit against the city for $1.2 million in February.

Campbell was distraught over his brother’s death when he emerged from a Portland apartment, with his back toward officers and his hands behind his head. One officer fired six bean bag rounds at the man. Campbell ran toward a parked car. Frashour fired a single rifle shot, killing Campbell. Police Chief Mike Reese has said it was unreasonable for Frashour to believe that Campbell posed an “immediate threat” of death or serious injury. The City Council voted this week to pay another $300,000 to an outside law firm defending city sanctions against three other officers accused of botching their encounter with Campbell. The city has already spent $450,000 with the law firm, Littler Mendelson, in its defense of the city’s firing of Frashour. The Oregonian reported that three other officers who were disciplined in the case have filed grievances that are set to go before an arbitrator.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet Rebecca Nonweiler, MD, Board Certified

1000’s Of Ads Every Day

(541) 318-7311

www.northwestmedispa.com

★ ★ MOTORS ★ ★

★ WE BUY TRUCKS, CARS, SUVS ★ $

0

0 199

Only

OnlyDOWN

$

Paul Jones, 54, sits in the chair he sleeps on inside the storage structure he rents in Estacada. He is among more than 10 people who currently live at the property owned by Ethel “Punki” McNamee, who has been housing homeless people.

ple shouldn’t be living in some of these structures.” Like most small cities and rural areas of Oregon, Estacada has no emergency shelter. Homeless people might wait years for an opening. By contrast, at Dignity Village — a city-recognized encampment near the Portland International Airport — it can take more than six months to move through the queue for a 10-foot-by-12-foot structure similar to those in McNamee’s yard. Earlier this year, 80 Estacada residents signed a petition

to force McNamee’s renters off her property, complaining about noise, police presence and proximity to Clackamas River Elementary. McNamee said that while she’s sad to have to end her open-door policy, she plans to comply with the city’s decision and keep her operation legal. “These people deserve to live better, and there’s better places out there for them,” Mayor Becky Arnold said. “When they’re enabled to live there like that, they ultimately end up hurting themselves.”

O  B 

Lawmakers must testify, court rules

Portland mayor refuses to reinstate fired officer

fused to testify in the trespass case. Lawyers for the demonstrators say the rules were changed to stifle speech the leaders didn’t like.

Eugene police wrap Occupy killing probe EUGENE — A man was fatally beaten in December at the Occupy Eugene camp, and no one has been arrested or charged, although the case remains open. Police have wrapped up their investigation of two men involved in the fight. A Lane County deputy district attorney, Erik Hasselman, told The Register-Guard in Eugene on Wednesday he would not speculate on whether charges will be filed in the

2010 NISSAN SENTRA S

00

1e9r m9onth

p

$11,995 72 months @ 6.5% on approved credit plus Title and license. 720 above credit score.

34 MPG!

Vin# L66105. Stk.#F6661A.

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★★ $

219

Only

00

00

2010 $ h TOYOTA t n o per m COROLLA S

OnlyDOWN

219

$12,995 72 months @ 6.99% on approved credit plus Title and license. 720 above credit score.

34 MPG!

Vin# 361798. Stk.#F6663A

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★★

death of 51-year-old Rick Youngblood of Florence. Authorities previously characterized the fight as mutual combat. The fight and other violence prompted the City Council to drop its support of the Occupy Eugene encampment.

$

0

0 23N5

OnlyDOW

Only

$

00

2er3m5onth

p

$13,995 72 months @ 6.99% on approved credit plus Title and license. 720 above credit score.

Oregon bank heists dropped in 2011 BEND — There were fewer bank robberies in Oregon last year than the year before. The FBI reports 110 bank holdups in 2011 in the state, compared with 130 in 2010. FBI spokeswoman Beth Anne Steele in Portland told KTVZ most robbers are drug addicts who get very little cash and almost always get caught. — From wire reports

2010 MAZDA 6I

Vin# M25004. Stk.#F6662A

Right on the Corner of Third Street and Franklin in Bend. Right on the Price.

murrayandholt.com murrayand holt.com 541-382-2222

All Financing on Approved Credit. Prices good through 04/20/2012


C4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

E Experience makes Volpert fit for seat on appeals court

T

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

im Volpert, a Portland lawyer who specializes in appeals, is the voters’ best choice in the May 15 election for a seat on the Oregon Court of Appeals.

Volpert, 56, is competing with administrative law Judge Allan Arlow and Linn County Circuit Court Judge James C. Egan for the position. The court, created by the Legislature in 1969, handles 3,000 to 4,000 cases per year, including nearly all appeals from Oregon’s trial courts and administrative agencies. Volpert is a partner at Davis Wright Tremaine LLP, where he has focused on appellate law for more than 20 years. His most famous case, Vernonia School District v. Acton, took him before the U.S. Supreme Court in 1995, where he successfully argued that schools can legally require random drug testing. Volpert grew up in Indiana and graduated from Oregon’s Willamette University College of Law in 1981. He began to specialize in appellate law in 1994, and says he has experience with virtually all of the types of cases the appellate court handles. In the community, Volpert helped found the Grant High School Constitution Team, where he and other attorneys have volunteered to teach law and history for 12 years. He has also volunteered in the Senior Law Project of Legal Aid Services of Oregon. For 13 years, Arlow, 68, has been an administrative law judge for the Oregon Public Utility Commission and the Oregon Board of Maritime Pilots. He graduated from George-

(Tim Volpert) has spent decades learning the ins and outs of appellate proceedings while working on a wide variety of cases. town University Law Center and practiced corporate law in Washington, D.C., and Chicago before moving to Oregon in 1998. Much of his legal career has focused on telecommunications law. Egan, 55, was appointed to his Linn County judgeship by Gov. Ted Kulongoski in July 2010. Previously, he specialized in personal injury, workers’ compensation and Social Security disability as well as business and real estate as a partner in Kryger, Alexander, Egan, Elmer & Carlson. He also served as a command judge advocate in Kuwait as a member of the U.S. Army Reserve, and earlier served in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. Egan earned his law degree at the University of Oregon School of Law. Of the three candidates, Volpert’s experience is most relevant in this election. He has spent decades learning the ins and outs of appellate proceedings while working on a wide variety of cases. That experience best prepares him for the unique requirements of the appellate court, which operates under vastly different rules and standards than trial courts.

State law regarding Bend district biased

S

ocial scientists have puzzled for years over what not voting in an election means for a voter. Alienation? Satisfaction? Too busy to vote? It doesn’t usually mean voting yes. For downtown property owners in Bend, not voting in the decision to renew the downtown improvement district is the same thing as voting yes. If approved on May 2, it would be the fourth time the district was renewed. The money raised goes to pay for all sorts of important downtown improvements — graffiti removal, sweeping, getting snow off the sidewalk, trash cans, benches, holiday lighting, marketing and more. The executive director of the Downtown Bend Business Association, currently Chuck Arnold, is paid to manage the district. The proposed assessment rate is 18 cents per square foot. For the three years of the district, that is

expected to raise about $150,000 a year. There are at least three peculiarities to this vote. First, if the owners of more than one-third of the area in the district vote no, the district does not get approved. Second, if a property owner does not vote, it is counted as a yes vote. Third, state law says even if an assessment is approved, councilors may find “that assessments shall not be levied on any lot or parcel of property if the owner of that property submitted written objections at the public hearing.� We are not arguing that there is something wrong with Bend’s downtown improvement district. We have a problem with the state law. We don’t believe there should be a bias in a tax vote that bends it toward approval. Some may argue that the other two peculiarities in the law balance that. We can’t see how not voting should mean yes.

My Nickel’s Worth Run more chair lifts How does Mt. Bachelor decide to have 50 percent of the lifts running while charging the top red rates? You might want to check out some of your competitors in British Columbia, Colorado and Utah to compare lift and run availability for their paying guests. Check out Park City, 100 percent; Alta, 100 percent; Taos, 100 percent; Snowbasin, 78 percent; Vail, 100 percent; and Sun Valley, 90 percent, for example. Most of these resorts have less snow and available ski terrain. It’s a disgrace to not have Outback lift running during the week, depriving guests of a large part of great intermediate terrain. The argument that this terrain is available through the use of Northwest lift is specious at best. Guests have the right to use all the mountain facilities — weather permitting, of course — when they are charged top dollar. Furthermore, when there is inclement weather preventing Northwest and or Summit chair operation, Red Chair and Outback should be spinning to alleviate the overcrowding of Pine Marten Chair. If Mt. Bachelor wants to be considered a first-class resort, it needs to revise its lift operating policies to ensure guests are getting their money’s worth. Let’s make Mt. Bachelor a first-class operation. John Schleicher Bend

Trapping is animal abuse In all the debate over trapping, I have read trapper accounts that claim animals caught in traps feel no pain, and that they do not suffer. Years ago, I was accidentally caught in a huge conibear trap that had been set for beaver in a stream

near my home. The trap snapped onto my left wrist and the pain I experienced was excruciating. I had to drive myself to a neighbor’s house for help. Even after the trap was removed, the pain did not stop. My left hand was paralyzed and it was nine months before I regained complete use. Meanwhile, the pain was unrelenting, and I suffered for several weeks before it began to let up. I sustained severe nerve damage to my wrist, and 15 years later, I can still feel the effects. I completely understand how the pain would drive a trapped animal to chew off its own leg in an attempt to escape. If anyone other than a licensed trapper willfully inflicted this kind of pain and suffering on an animal, they would go to jail. Wanting to ban trapping is not just about keeping our pet dogs out of traps, it is about saving thousands of Oregon’s wildlife from suffering pain, and an agonizing death, at the hands of a few people in the name of “sport.� Oregon’s wildlife belongs to all Oregonians, not just to a few to torture and kill for fun and a few dollars’ profit. In my opinion, trapping is legally sanctioned animal abuse. Jennifer Kirkpatrick Bend

Racial profiling must end We live in a pretty idyllic part of the country. Perhaps the events in Sanford, Fla., seem far away and irrelevant to the lives of many of us. Not for me. I, too, have a son who looks like Trayvon Martin. Racial profiling is a very real and scary phenomenon in our society. Until we face up to this issue head-on, racial profiling will continue to ravage the lives of our young men of color. The death of Trayvon Martin

should haunt us all. Like any 17year-old kid, Trayvon Martin wasn’t perfect, but he didn’t cause his own death and he didn’t deserve to be singled out by George Zimmerman — who found him suspicious as a young black male in his neighborhood. We desperately need to have an honest conversation about race profiling in this country. We need justice for Trayvon Martin. We need tolerance for our kids. “An injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere� (Martin Luther King Jr., Letter from Birmingham Jail, April 1963). Please join me in this conversation here in Bend and help me search for solutions that will end the senseless targeting of our young men of color. Beth Hoover Bend

Obama partial to blacks We’ve been told repeatedly that Barack Obama is president and that he stands for all of us. Obviously this isn’t true. He carefully picks who his choices are. In the recent case of Trayvon Martin, Obama says, “If I had a son, he’d look like Trayvon.� Those are fightin’ words since Obama has never mentioned the names of thousands of victims of killings whether they be blacks, Latinos, whites or anyone who looks different from him. Obama has had hundreds of early demises of numerous young folks of all colors to comment on, yet he chose only this one to make clear that the young man struck his fancy. Shame, shame on you, Obama, for showing such obvious partiality. Carol Hoffman Redmond

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Community colleges must address dropout rates to be viable By Mark Schneider and Lu Michelle Yin Special to Los Angeles Times

C

ommunity colleges are central to the nation’s higher education system, enrolling almost 30 percent of all postsecondary students. But their record of success is spotty. Nationally, only about a quarter of full-time community college students complete their studies within three years — the official measure of a school’s graduation rate. At more than a third of California’s community colleges, graduation rates are 20 percent or less. Of the full-time, degree-seeking students who entered California community colleges in 2007, more than 35,000 had not earned their degrees three years later, and most of them were no longer enrolled in any postsecondary institution. This happens year after year after year, and it’s not only the dropouts

who are harmed. When students fail to complete their degrees, taxpayers also lose. Community colleges are subsidized through direct state and local government appropriations and through student grant programs. Every student who drops out represents an investment loss by the taxpayers in that student’s uncompleted education. Because students who complete their degrees earn more money than high school graduates or dropouts, taxpayers win when students graduate. The higher wages they earn as a result generate higher income taxes. We recently calculated that if the schools could reduce by half the number of students who drop out each year, more than 150,000 more students nationwide would get associate degrees each year. We further calculated that these

newly minted community college graduates would earn an additional $1.4 billion in income nationwide, which would translate into an additional $200 million in federal income taxes and $60 million in state income taxes each year. The question is: What can be done to make this happen? We know that the longer a student takes to complete a degree, the more likely it is that something will happen to derail his plans. Many students start at community colleges needing remedial classes to bring them to the point where they can handle college work. One important step to reducing the number of dropouts would be to streamline remediation programs so that students can more quickly get to a level where the classes they take earn them college credits. Community colleges could expand

their online course offerings as well. Online delivery of class content renders the traditional limitations of geographic distance, physical capacity and time moot. Instructors can reach far more students online than in traditional physical classrooms, and online courses can start any day of any week and any week of the year. Another way to reduce the number of dropouts would be to replace a system that awards degrees based on “seat time� with a system that rewards subject mastery. This would allow students to move at their own pace through a course of study, progressing from one concept to the next after passing assessment tests. Finally, for-profit institutions embody a host of ideas that community colleges should emulate. Many forprofit colleges are leading the way in developing innovative online learning

platforms and redefining an approach to curriculum development and faculty training to encourage uniformity in instruction across multiple sites and instructors. Faculty at the best forprofit institutions are evaluated on the basis of their students’ learning outcomes. Graduation rates at two-year for-profit institutions are almost three times higher than at public community colleges. Reforms such as these could transform today’s inefficient and costly community college system. These reforms are not necessarily expensive, as well as the billions of dollars in government appropriations that subsidize the tuition paid by students who fail to graduate. — Mark Schneider is vice president at the American Institutes for Research. Lu Michelle Yin is an economist at the American Institutes for Research.


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O    D N   Caleb Jonthan Breshears, of Bend Sept. 7, 1982 - April 9, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend (541) 318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Celebration of Life will be held Saturday, April 14, 2012 at 1:00 P.M. at the Christian Life Center, 21720 Highway 20, Bend, OR 97701. Contributions may be made to:

House of Hope Ministries, P.O. Box 5608, Bend, OR 97708.

Jerry Kennith Holland, of Bend April 17, 1943 - April 2, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: A Celebration of Life will be held at a later date.

Marilyn L. Knutson, of Bend Feb. 2, 1923 - April 9, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592;

www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: A Private Family Gathering was held on Thursday, April 12, 2012. Followed by entombment at Deschutes Memorial Gardens Mausoleum.

Mary E. Arata, of Bend Dec.11, 1920 - April 6, 2012 Services: A private family memorial will take place this summer in La Pine.

Sharon Louise Gerads, of Prineville Oct. 14, 1950 - April 11, 2012 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: There will be a memorial service Saturday, April 14, 2012 at the Prineville Elks Lodge at 10:00am for all family and friends.

Wanda L. Souza, of La Pine Nov. 6, 1945 - April 9, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine. 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No services are planned at this time.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

FEATURED OBITUARY

Cuban exiles revered Bishop Roman McClatchy-Tribune News Service MIAMI — Agustin Roman, the beloved emeritus auxiliary bishop of Miami who was considered the spiritual leader of South Florida’s Cuban exile community, died Wednesday night of a heart attack. He was 83. A humble, gentle man with an iron will and a steadfast moral compass, he was viewed by older Cuban exiles as a champion of freedom and faith. Roman, who had retired in 2003, served his God and his people, said those who knew him. He made his final public appearances in Miami during Pope Benedict XVI’s visit to Cuba last month and on Easter Sunday after the pope honored Cuban-born Rev. Felix Varela by bringing him closer to sainthood. Roman had suffered from heart disease for several years. He was found slumped over the wheel of his car on the grounds of Our Lady of Charity Shrine, known in Spanish as Ermita de la Caridad del Cobre, where for decades he lovingly served his flock and carried the Cuban exile banner. Roman spent more than half his life in exile, first in Spain, then in Chile and the United States, yet he never surrendered to bitterness, never lost hope. “I am a Cuban, and I will always love the country where I was born,� Roman once said. “I hope that before I go to heaven, I will see Cuba again. But I love America, too. This is the country that welcomed me.� His influence permeated the Cuban exile and Roman Catholic communities, and extended well beyond them. In the early 1960s, Roman led the campaign to build La Ermita de la Caridad. He asked each exile for 10 cents. He ended up collecting $240,000. The shrine, on South Miami Avenue along the edge of Biscayne Bay, opened in 1967. It attracts almost 500,000 visitors a year. Roman found himself thrust into the national spotlight when he served as a key mediator during the 1987 Mariel prisoner uprisings at the prisons in Atlanta and Oakdale, La. Refugees at both rioted and seized hostages after learning they might be deported after serving their time. His help sought by the White House, Roman spoke with the prisoners at Oakdale. He addressed them as “dear brothers� and assured them that a deal offered by authorities was fair and just. In minutes, they surrendered. A week later, Roman and his attorney and close friend, Rafael Penalver, walked into the besieged prison in Atlanta. Alone. Angry prisoners lurked everywhere. Their lives in jeopardy, Roman whispered to Penalver: “Bless you, and put yourself in the hands of the Virgin.� The armed prisoners all dropped their shivs on a pile. Roman kept one of the weapons in his home, framed, a gift from the federal government.

NORTHWEST NEWS

Medical pot states mull driving laws By Maggie Clark McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Twelve years after Colorado legalized the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes, more than 85,000 people have been certified by the state health department to use it. Now, there is increasing concern about a rise in traffic accidents caused by people under the influence of marijuana. Between 2006 and 2010, more than 300 fatal accidents involved drivers who tested positive for cannabis, according to the Colorado Department of Highway Safety. That’s why Republican state Sen. Steve King wants Colorado to set a legal limit for marijuana intoxication, somewhat similar to the 0.08 percent blood alcohol limit states put on driving under the influence of alcohol. And in California, Democratic Assemblywoman Norma Torres wants to set a zero-tolerance ban on driving under the influence of any drug, including marijuana. But bills put forward by both King and Torres have run into opposition from those who say the science around what marijuana does to the body and mind is not conclusive enough to set a legal limit. In Colorado, critics also note that King’s approach would cost the state public defender’s office about $600,000 per year to defend those accused of “drugged driving� charges. Yet concerns over cannabis intoxication won’t go away. Voters in Colorado and Washington state will decide whether to legalize recreational marijuana use, while a dozen more states are considering legalizing marijuana for medical purposes. In this explainer, Stateline examines the research surrounding marijuana and road safety, and explores why it’s so difficult to say how high is too high to drive. How does marijuana affect the body? The active ingredient in marijuana is called delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. Whether marijuana is ingested through smoking or eating, THC rapidly goes through the bloodstream to the brain. In the brain, THC slows down receptors that communicate brain functions between synapses, throwing the brain’s natural information flow off balance. Users experience diminished pain sensitivity, which explains marijuana’s medicinal purpose. But users also experience slowed reaction time, impaired memory function, impaired coordination and altered judgment. How does marijuana’s effect on drivers compare to alcohol? Although the symptoms for THC intoxication are similar to alco-

Q: A:

Q: A:

hol intoxication, the effects on drivers are very different. According to a study by researchers from Yale University, alcohol-impaired drivers struggle with complex tasks like merging onto a crowded highway, but can generally perform automatic functions like turning on the car. Marijuana users, however, can better handle complex situations than simple tasks like following the curve of a road. Users of alcohol and marijuana also differ in their perceptions of their own impairment. Alcohol users tend to underestimate their level of impairment and drive faster and more recklessly. By contrast, marijuana users tend to overestimate their impairment and don’t display as many obvious impairment symptoms. How does the risk of traffic accidents following marijuana consumption compare with the risks of accidents after alcohol consumption? Driving within three hours of consuming cannabis increases the risk of vehicle crashes by about two or three times, according to research published this February from Mark Asbridge, an associate professor at Dalhousie University in Canada. Concerning as that is, it is much less of a risk than alcohol consumption, which increases vehicle crash risk by five to 16 times. What laws do states have in place now? According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 17 states have what are known as “per se� laws regarding drugs and driving. That means anyone driving with traces of an illegal or impairing drug in his or her system is breaking the law. This is closer to a “zero tolerance� policy than the 0.08 percent blood alcohol content states have for drunk driving. However, of those states that have per se laws, Arizona, Delaware, Michigan, Nevada and Rhode Island also allow medicinal marijuana, setting up an inherent conflict. Do states try to measure marijuana intoxication like blood alcohol content? That’s what Nevada has done. In an attempt to create something like the clear standard that exists for alcohol intoxication, Nevada set a limit for THC in the blood at 2 nanograms of THC per milliliter of blood. That’s about 2 billionths of a gram of THC — one gram is about the weight of a paperclip — in one drop of blood. In Colorado, state King’s bill would set a limit of 5 nanograms of THC per milliliter of blood. And in Washington state, the ballot initiative that would legalize recreational use of marijuana would also set a limit of 5 nanograms of THC per milliliter of blood. Advocates of medical marijuana say the science isn’t supportive of adopting such specific limits. They worry that this approach will cause drivers who aren’t impaired but have lingering traces of THC in their blood to lose their driver’s licenses.

Q: A:

Q: A:

Q: A:

A RECREATIONAL SALE

D E  Deaths of note from around the world: Ed Savko, 86: Bought a small-town grocery known as the Rock Store on Mulholland Highway in 1961 and turned it into an internationally recognized motorcycle mecca frequented by celebrities, businessmen, outlaw clubs and other bikers. Died April 2 in

Thousand Oaks, Calif., of congestive heart failure. Howard Ziff, 81: Journalism professor at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst who culled lessons from his own newspaper experience to teach a generation of students. Died Tuesday in Amherst of heart failure. — From wire reports

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Steve Van Houten walks through a lineup of Big Country Class C RVs during the first day of the Central Oregon RV Dealers Show & Sale at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds and Expo Center on Thursday in Redmond. The event, an admission-free sale of various types of RVs, is open from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. through Sunday. For more information, contact 541-419-8680.

C5


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, APRIL 13

52

Bob Shaw

Tonight: Partly cloudy.

Today: Partly to mostly cloudy, isolated afternoon showers, possible thunderstorms.

HIGH Ben Burkel

SATURDAY

LOW

Astoria 54/41

50/45

Cannon Beach 52/42

Hillsboro Portland 59/41 58/38

Tillamook 58/41

Salem

54/40

60/37

65/38

Maupin

58/32

Yachats

56/37

56/43

50s

51/26

54/42

Gold Beach

54/37

53/44

Hampton 49/24

45/24

Baker City 53/31

John Day

Unity 50/31

52/32

50s Juntura 56/32

52/25

Jordan Valley 48/31

Frenchglen

WEST Showers with snow above 3,500 feet today. Rain and snow ending tonight.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46/32 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.38” Record high . . . . . . . . 81 in 1940 Average month to date. . . 0.30” Record low. . . . . . . . . 11 in 1968 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.46” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Average year to date. . . . . 3.65” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.29.72 Record 24 hours . . .0.37 in 1956 *Melted liquid equivalent

CENTRAL Cloudy with showers likely today. Showers early tonight.

OREGON CITIES

Yesterday���s state extremes • 63°

50/36

• 24°

Fields

McDermitt

51/32

Burns

49/25

-30s

-20s

-10s

Yesterday’s extremes

0s

Vancouver 55/45

10s Calgary 57/32

20s

30s

Saskatoon 56/32

Seattle 59/43

40s Winnipeg 51/45

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 52/38

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 56/36

Halifax 46/32 Portland Portland To ronto 57/37 59/41 St. Paul Green Bay 59/38 Bismarck Buffalo Boston • 92° 56/50 64/38 57/47 55/39 Boise 56/44 Fort Stockton, Detroit 56/37 New York 60/47 Rapid City Texas 66/48 Cheyenne 60/39 Des Moines Philadelphia Columbus Chicago 56/36 • 17° 66/55 65/47 64/46 61/53 Omaha Salt Lake Washington, D. C. Hibbing, Minn. 73/56 City San Francisco 65/46 St. Louis Denver • 1.53” Louisville 56/38 Kansas City 56/46 70/60 66/36 69/53 73/61 Auburn, Calif. Charlotte 70/43 Albuquerque Las Oklahoma City Nashville Vegas 70/46 Little Rock 77/64 75/55 Los Angeles 80/61 66/45 Phoenix Atlanta 58/50 78/56 Honolulu 73/50 Birmingham 83/69 Dallas Tijuana 77/54 81/66 57/46 New Orleans 80/67 Orlando Houston 82/63 83/71 Chihuahua Miami 87/51 84/69 Monterrey La Paz 91/69 81/56 Mazatlan Anchorage 81/55 46/33 Juneau 53/33

(in the 48 contiguous states):

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:24 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:48 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:23 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:49 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:27 a.m. Moonset today . . . 12:29 p.m.

Moon phases Last

New

First

April 13 April 21 April 29 May 5

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m. Astoria . . . . . . . .52/40/0.02 Baker City . . . . . .56/32/0.03 Brookings . . . . . .48/42/0.46 Burns. . . . . . . . . 52/24/trace Eugene . . . . . . . .58/39/0.43 Klamath Falls . . .46/33/0.05 Lakeview. . . . . . .48/34/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .45/31/0.25 Medford . . . . . . .57/40/0.24 Newport . . . . . . .52/43/0.23 North Bend . . . . .54/43/0.09 Ontario . . . . . . . .62/37/0.14 Pendleton . . . . . .60/34/0.08 Portland . . . . . . .59/42/0.11 Prineville . . . . . . .47/33/0.16 Redmond. . . . . . .51/30/0.22 Roseburg. . . . . . .58/42/0.03 Salem . . . . . . . . .58/37/0.04 Sisters . . . . . . . . .48/31/0.26 The Dalles . . . . . 62/36/trace

Full

. . . .54/41/pc . . . . .56/42/pc . . . .53/31/sh . . . . .55/33/pc . . . .52/43/sh . . . . .55/44/pc . . . .53/29/sh . . . . .55/31/pc . . . .56/37/sh . . . . .58/39/pc . . . .46/29/sh . . . . .53/29/pc . . . . 47/28/rs . . . . .51/27/pc . . . .50/23/sn . . . . .47/28/pc . . . .56/39/sh . . . . .61/39/pc . . . . .53/41/c . . . . .54/41/pc . . . .54/42/sh . . . . .55/41/pc . . . . .59/37/c . . . . .63/39/pc . . . .62/36/pc . . . . .61/39/pc . . . .59/41/pc . . . . .59/42/pc . . . .52/28/sh . . . . .52/29/pc . . . .56/27/sh . . . . .54/30/pc . . . .58/40/sh . . . . .60/40/pc . . . .58/37/sh . . . . .59/39/pc . . . . . 52/26/r . . . . .48/27/pc . . . .65/38/pc . . . . .62/41/pc

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

5

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

PRECIPITATION

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . .157-185 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . 157 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . .97-103 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . 190 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .24-32 Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . . . 2 . . . . . .50-90 Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . . . . . . No restrictions Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . .45-60 Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Squaw Valley, California . . . . . . . 16 . . . . . .27-94 Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .30-70 Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . Closed for season Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .19-21 For links to the latest ski conditions visit: For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html www.tripcheck.com or call 511 Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

59 40

TEMPERATURE

Hermiston

47/28

HIGH LOW

57 38

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .5:35 a.m. . . . . . 5:22 p.m. Venus . . . . . .8:04 a.m. . . . . 11:59 p.m. Mars. . . . . . .3:04 p.m. . . . . . 4:53 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . .7:22 a.m. . . . . . 9:35 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .7:38 p.m. . . . . . 6:48 a.m. Uranus . . . . .5:45 a.m. . . . . . 6:02 p.m.

52/30

Lakeview

HIGH LOW

59 37

PLANET WATCH

47/29

Klamath Falls 46/29

HIGH LOW

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of rain showers.

BEND ALMANAC

46/27

Ashland

Mostly cloudy, scattered rain showers.

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Rome

50/28

TUESDAY

Mostly sunny start, mostly cloudy finish, warmer.

54 28

Ontario EAST 59/37 Cloudy with showers likely today. Nyssa Showers ending 58/37 tonight.

49/28

51/30

Chiloquin

56/39

52/43

Vale 59/37

Paisley

Brookings

50/29

Union 54/32

Burns Riley

53/26

Silver Lake

40s Medford

Joseph

La Grande

Christmas Valley

46/21

Grants Pass

50/29

47/29

Brothers 51/23

Fort Rock 52/25

46/22

Chemult

58/40

Port Orford 53/43

Crescent

44/17

Roseburg

52/29

La Pine 50/23

Crescent Lake

54/41

Bandon

56/30

50/24

Oakridge

Cottage Grove 56/38

Coos Bay

Spray 57/32

Enterprise

Meacham

Mitchell 53/29

Prineville 52/28 Sisters Redmond Paulina 47/24 52/26 54/27 Sunriver Bend

Eugene

48/30

Granite

50/24

54/42

Florence

Wallowa

54/33

51/31

Madras

Camp Sherman

59/39

62/36

Condon

Warm Springs

Corvallis

60s

Pendleton

54/33

60/34

56/31

59/39

Hermiston 64/36

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

63/38

59/33

58/37

53/41

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 44/28

59/38

63/36

The Biggs Dalles 61/38

59/41

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

MONDAY

Mostly to partly sunny and seasonably cool.

HIGH LOW

29

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

SUNDAY

Billings 59/36

FRONTS

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .81/65/0.00 . . . 86/65/s . . .89/63/t Akron . . . . . . . . . .56/28/0.00 . . . 62/45/s . . .62/54/t Albany. . . . . . . . . .58/37/0.01 . . . 62/35/s . 68/53/pc Albuquerque. . . . .68/46/0.00 . . . 70/46/s . . 56/33/c Anchorage . . . . . .43/26/0.00 . .46/33/pc . 46/30/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . . .65/40/0.00 . .73/50/pc . . 76/57/s Atlantic City . . . . .60/37/0.00 . . . 59/43/s . . 64/51/s Austin . . . . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . .82/69/pc . .83/71/w Baltimore . . . . . . .62/37/0.00 . . . 64/45/s . . 71/53/s Billings . . . . . . . . .62/47/0.04 . .59/36/pc . 55/34/sh Birmingham . . . . .69/40/0.00 . .77/54/pc . 82/59/pc Bismarck. . . . . . . .63/43/0.00 . .64/38/sh . 64/36/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . . .61/43/0.00 . .56/37/sh . . 59/38/c Boston. . . . . . . . . .56/44/0.32 . . . 56/44/s . . 67/50/s Bridgeport, CT. . . .58/43/0.03 . . . 63/44/s . . 63/49/s Buffalo . . . . . . . . .50/35/0.00 . . . 55/39/s . . .63/50/t Burlington, VT. . . .57/39/0.00 . . . 61/39/s . 64/46/pc Caribou, ME . . . . .50/37/0.00 . .53/33/pc . 56/37/pc Charleston, SC . . .67/41/0.00 . . . 69/47/s . . 73/57/s Charlotte. . . . . . . .63/33/0.00 . . . 70/43/s . . 74/52/s Chattanooga. . . . .65/39/0.00 . . . 72/48/s . 78/55/pc Cheyenne . . . . . . .62/41/0.01 . .56/36/pc . 51/33/sh Chicago. . . . . . . . .63/32/0.00 . .61/53/sh . . .70/60/t Cincinnati . . . . . . .62/28/0.00 . . . 66/51/s . . 73/55/c Cleveland . . . . . . .56/29/0.00 . . . 55/46/s . . .61/53/t Colorado Springs .66/46/0.00 . .60/35/pc . 62/31/pc Columbia, MO . . .65/34/0.03 . . . 70/59/t . . .76/64/t Columbia, SC . . . .67/41/0.00 . . . 73/47/s . . 76/53/s Columbus, GA. . . .69/46/0.00 . .75/52/pc . 78/57/pc Columbus, OH. . . .60/31/0.00 . . . 65/47/s . . .69/55/t Concord, NH. . . . .56/36/0.01 . . . 62/30/s . 67/40/pc Corpus Christi. . . .86/73/0.00 . .84/73/pc . .86/74/w Dallas Ft Worth. . .79/62/0.00 . .81/66/pc . . .83/69/t Dayton . . . . . . . . .60/32/0.00 . . . 65/50/s . . .72/55/t Denver. . . . . . . . . .67/47/0.00 . .66/36/pc . . 59/32/c Des Moines. . . . . .61/35/0.00 . .66/55/sh . . .74/57/t Detroit. . . . . . . . . .59/33/0.00 . . . 60/47/s . . .65/55/t Duluth. . . . . . . . . .55/29/0.00 . .47/43/sh . 62/41/sh El Paso. . . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . . 83/61/w . .79/49/w Fairbanks. . . . . . . .49/24/0.00 . . .44/26/c . 49/26/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .68/32/0.00 . .57/43/sh . 64/38/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . .52/34/0.00 . .47/25/pc . .37/24/rs

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .58/33/0.00 . .63/51/pc . . .65/55/t Green Bay. . . . . . .59/30/0.00 . .57/47/sh . . .68/50/t Greensboro. . . . . .62/32/0.00 . . . 67/44/s . . 73/51/s Harrisburg. . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . . . 63/41/s . 69/54/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .58/41/0.02 . . . 64/38/s . . 70/48/s Helena. . . . . . . . . .58/44/0.11 . .57/33/pc . 54/32/pc Honolulu. . . . . . . .80/67/0.00 . . . 83/69/s . . 82/70/s Houston . . . . . . . .83/65/0.00 . .83/71/pc . 84/72/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .66/36/0.00 . .74/51/pc . 80/57/pc Indianapolis . . . . .61/33/0.00 . .65/53/pc . . .72/61/t Jackson, MS . . . . .73/48/0.00 . .82/58/pc . 84/64/pc Jacksonville. . . . . .71/51/0.00 . .72/53/pc . 78/55/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . . .62/33/0.00 . . .53/33/c . 55/35/pc Kansas City. . . . . .53/39/0.05 . . . 73/61/t . . .77/61/t Lansing . . . . . . . . .57/29/0.00 . . . 62/49/s . . .67/56/t Las Vegas . . . . . . .69/49/0.00 . .66/45/sh . . 60/50/c Lexington . . . . . . .59/29/0.00 . . . 65/51/s . . 74/59/c Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .54/42/0.29 . . . 78/56/t . . .80/58/t Little Rock. . . . . . .69/47/0.00 . .80/61/pc . 82/66/pc Los Angeles. . . . . .61/50/0.00 . .58/50/sh . 61/50/pc Louisville. . . . . . . .62/34/0.00 . .69/53/pc . 80/63/pc Madison, WI . . . . .62/35/0.00 . .59/49/sh . . .70/56/t Memphis. . . . . . . .68/43/0.00 . .80/62/pc . 82/63/pc Miami . . . . . . . . . .88/67/0.00 . .84/69/pc . 81/69/pc Milwaukee . . . . . .58/31/0.00 . .51/48/sh . . .62/53/t Minneapolis . . . . .63/34/0.00 . .56/50/sh . 67/47/sh Nashville. . . . . . . .64/33/0.00 . .75/55/pc . 82/61/pc New Orleans. . . . .79/63/0.00 . .80/67/pc . 82/70/pc New York . . . . . . .61/43/0.00 . . . 66/48/s . . 72/51/s Newark, NJ . . . . . .62/43/0.00 . . . 65/45/s . 72/50/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . . .62/45/0.00 . . . 62/43/s . . 73/55/s Oklahoma City . . .73/55/0.00 . . . 77/64/t . . .79/62/t Omaha . . . . . . . . .52/40/0.05 . . . 73/56/t . . .76/59/t Orlando. . . . . . . . .85/63/0.00 . .82/63/pc . 81/62/pc Palm Springs. . . . .77/49/0.00 . . .67/46/c . 70/51/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . . .63/32/0.00 . .64/56/sh . . .73/63/t Philadelphia . . . . .59/43/0.00 . . . 64/46/s . . 70/51/s Phoenix. . . . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . .78/56/pc . 64/47/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . . .56/30/0.00 . . . 63/42/s . . 66/53/c Portland, ME. . . . .57/36/0.01 . . . 57/37/s . 62/42/pc Providence . . . . . .57/42/0.05 . . . 63/42/s . . 68/48/s Raleigh . . . . . . . . .63/32/0.00 . . . 68/41/s . . 75/52/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . . .60/39/c . 57/38/sh Reno . . . . . . . . . . .57/37/0.00 . . 43/30/rs . . 56/36/c Richmond . . . . . . .64/39/0.00 . . . 65/43/s . . 75/54/s Rochester, NY . . . .60/40/0.00 . . . 57/37/s . 68/52/pc Sacramento. . . . . .62/48/0.65 . .55/40/sh . 64/42/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . . .64/36/0.00 . . . 70/60/t . . .78/66/t Salt Lake City . . . .52/41/0.57 . .56/38/sh . 55/40/sh San Antonio . . . . .83/69/0.00 . .82/69/pc . .85/72/w San Diego . . . . . . 65/55/trace . .61/53/sh . 61/54/pc San Francisco . . . .61/50/0.36 . .56/46/sh . 58/47/pc San Jose . . . . . . . .64/49/0.40 . .57/44/sh . 63/44/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . . .63/40/0.00 . .63/40/pc . . . 49/28/

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .69/45/0.00 . . . 72/51/s . . 75/59/s Seattle. . . . . . . . . .57/44/0.02 . .59/43/pc . 59/44/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . . .51/40/0.22 . . . 70/47/t . 66/44/sh Spokane . . . . . . . .57/39/0.00 . .55/36/pc . 56/37/pc Springfield, MO . .60/43/0.00 . . . 72/59/t . . .76/62/t Tampa. . . . . . . . . .85/66/0.00 . .82/65/pc . 84/64/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . . .71/48/0.00 . . . 77/52/s . 61/40/sh Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .70/51/0.00 . . . 76/64/t . . .78/67/t Washington, DC . .63/42/0.00 . . . 65/46/s . . 72/54/s Wichita . . . . . . . . .65/51/0.53 . . . 78/63/t . . .78/66/t Yakima . . . . . . . . .64/32/0.01 . .63/36/pc . 60/39/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . . .76/54/0.00 . .77/49/pc . 70/48/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .55/34/0.00 . . .54/37/c . 54/42/pc Athens. . . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .69/57/sh . 72/54/pc Auckland. . . . . . . .68/61/0.00 . .68/54/pc . . 70/54/s Baghdad . . . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . .84/60/pc . . 83/58/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .97/81/0.00 . . . 94/82/t . . .93/81/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . . 75/53/s . . 79/55/s Beirut . . . . . . . . . .68/59/0.00 . . . 71/60/s . 75/61/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .50/43/0.00 . .58/41/sh . . 61/43/c Bogota . . . . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . .61/49/sh . 58/49/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .55/36/0.00 . .66/50/pc . . 62/48/c Buenos Aires. . . . .75/57/0.00 . .81/67/pc . 79/56/pc Cabo San Lucas . .81/57/0.00 . . . 81/61/s . . 79/59/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . . .86/72/c . . 92/79/c Calgary . . . . . . . . .46/32/0.00 . .57/32/pc . .43/28/rs Cancun . . . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . .84/71/pc . 84/72/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . . .52/36/0.00 . .49/37/pc . 45/35/pc Edinburgh. . . . . . .50/39/0.00 . .44/32/sh . 49/32/pc Geneva . . . . . . . . .50/43/0.00 . .59/43/pc . 48/42/sh Harare. . . . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . .67/49/pc . . 68/47/s Hong Kong . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . .86/72/pc . 85/73/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . . . 65/52/s . 73/58/sh Jerusalem . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . . . 69/55/s . 79/61/pc Johannesburg. . . .70/52/0.00 . .70/49/sh . 70/49/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . . 82/69/s . 81/69/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .59/52/0.00 . .62/54/sh . 62/52/sh London . . . . . . . . .55/37/0.00 . . .54/36/c . 55/37/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .59/48/0.00 . .58/39/sh . 55/37/sh Manila. . . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . .93/77/pc . 94/76/pc

Mecca . . . . . . . . . .99/81/0.00 . . . 97/76/s 100/79/pc Mexico City. . . . . .79/57/0.00 . . . 76/51/t . 74/49/sh Montreal. . . . . . . .54/37/0.00 . . . 59/39/s . 59/49/sh Moscow . . . . . . . .46/34/0.00 . . .52/38/c . 54/37/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . . . 76/62/t . . .73/64/t Nassau . . . . . . . . .86/63/0.00 . .79/67/sh . 77/64/pc New Delhi. . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . .97/72/pc . 96/73/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . .62/51/sh . 64/49/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .46/36/0.00 . . .45/32/c . .41/31/rs Ottawa . . . . . . . . .55/36/0.00 . . . 59/38/s . 55/47/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .57/39/0.00 . .62/40/sh . 58/43/sh Rio de Janeiro. . . .90/75/0.00 . .86/73/sh . 89/73/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . . . 58/49/r . 60/49/sh Santiago . . . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . .65/52/sh . . 74/53/s Sao Paulo . . . . . . .84/32/0.00 . . . 83/68/t . . .86/70/t Sapporo . . . . . . . .43/43/0.00 . . . 44/31/s . . 51/39/s Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .55/37/0.00 . .62/43/pc . . 66/45/s Shanghai. . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . .66/54/sh . 66/56/sh Singapore . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . . 86/79/t . . .86/79/t Stockholm. . . . . . .54/39/0.00 . .45/35/sh . . 46/33/c Sydney. . . . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . .72/57/pc . 75/62/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . .91/74/pc . 89/74/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . . . 75/59/s . 82/61/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . .65/53/sh . 63/51/sh Toronto . . . . . . . . .52/36/0.00 . . . 59/38/s . 62/53/sh Vancouver. . . . . . .55/45/0.00 . .55/45/pc . 57/45/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . . .50/37/0.00 . .62/45/pc . 55/44/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . . .63/37/0.00 . .60/41/pc . . 61/43/c

Gold prospectors draw crowd to North Bend event By JESSIE HIGGINS The World of Coos Bay

NORTH BEND — Panning for gold takes patience, keen eyes and steady hands. Without training, novice gold-seekers will find it unproductive. So, the hands-on gold-panning display at the North Bend Prospectors’ first South Coast Outdoor Adventure Show on Saturday at the North Bend Community Center was popular. “Through here there’s been a steady stream,” said Milo Summerville, a ten-year member of North Bend Prospectors. Periodically there was a line out the door, he said. Although the club has existed for decades, this is the first year members put on a local show. Usually they raise funds by going on the road with other gold prospecting groups. But this year, gas prices were too high, said Bob Baldwin, president of North Bend Prospectors Inc. So they’re hoping to start a tradition. “Our purpose here mostly is to inform the public what we’re

“Our purpose here mostly is to inform the public what we’re about. It doesn’t hurt the environment like most people think it does.” — Milo Summerville, member, North Bend Prospectors

about,” said Summerville, who started gold panning 35 years ago. “It doesn’t hurt the environment like most people think it does.” In Oregon rivers and streams, gold occurs as small flakes that are mixed with sand and sediment. To remove the gold, prospectors slowly and methodically shake out the lighter materials and wash them away, leaving behind the gold flecks. It is not easy. At the panning display, club members supervised a large tub of water with sand and sediment at the bottom. Visi-

tors could practice using a pan to remove and clear the lighter dirt and debris, leaving the heavier dark sand and gold at the base of the pan. Hundreds came through to learn the art. Children were drawn to the dirt and water. They generally lacked coordination and patience, but still splashed the pan of sand in the water, trying to mimic the adults’ movements. Baldwin said gold panning is a fun family activity. When Baldwin joined the prospectors ten years ago there were 40 members. Now there are more than 200. “The price of gold is going up, and the baby boomers need something to do,” he said. The price of gold is currently more than $1,600 an ounce. But enthusiasts caution that it’s nearly impossible to make much money from gold panning. For experienced prospectors, who can invest a lot of time, gold panning could provide supplemental income. But most in the group consider it a hobby, Summerville said.

Benjamin Brayfield / The World of Coos Bay

Bill Peabody demonstrates how to separate gold from black sand during the gold prospectors’ show in North Bend on Saturday. Peabody has been prospecting as a hobby for 30 years. He started combing the ground for fossils in the Midwest. While he’s never struck it rich, the idea keeps him going. “Maybe if I roll one more rock it’ll be gold,” he said.


S P ORTS

Scoreboard, D2 Golf, D2 NBA, D3 NHL, D3

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

NBA

PREP GOLF

Wade backs off Olympic pay MIAMI — Heat guard Dwyane Wade says money is not his motivation for the London Games this summer. In a statement Thursday, Wade said, “I do not want to be paid to go to the Olympics.” Wade was quoted Wednesday saying he thinks “guys should be compensated” for playing over the summer and noted the schedule demands of being an Olympian. He said he was responding to a question about Olympians being paid, and never said he needed to be paid to play. Wade later tweeted that pride for his country “motivates me more than any $$$ amount.” Wade played for the U.S. at Athens in 2004 and Beijing in 2008, and has said the London Games would be his last.

D

MLB, D4 Prep sports, D5 Adventure Sports, D6

Summit High golfer Dylan Cramer tees off on No. 1 during a tournament at Pronghorn Club’s Nicklaus Course on Thursday. Cramer tied for first.

Summit High golfer Madison Odiorne tees off on No. 16 during a tournament at Pronghorn Club’s Nicklaus Course on Thursday. Odiorne won the event. Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Summit boys, girls prevail in tourney at Pronghorn • Storm hold off Bend High and Redmond in victory Bulletin staff report Taking advantage of a rare chance to play Pronghorn Club’s Nicklaus Course on Thursday, Summit teammates Cole Ortega and Dylan Cramer shared medalist honors at the High Desert Classic while leading the Storm to victory at the four-team boys

golf tournament. The two Summit seniors each shot a 4-over-par 76 to best Redmond’s Mason Rodby (77) and their teammate Ryan Blackwell (77). As a team, the Storm posted a 313 to win the singleday event. See Boys / D5

• Freshman leads Storm once again in four-team event Bulletin staff report Bend High was hoping to at least give powerful Summit a run. As it was, the Lava Bears barely forced the Storm into a trot. Summit, the three-time defending Class 5A state champion, got all five players in under 100 Thursday — no

simple accomplishment on a cold and unpleasant Central Oregon day — and rolled to a convincing victory in the High Desert Classic girls golf tournament at Pronghorn Club. Led by medalist Madison Odiorne, the Storm posted a team total of 360 strokes. See Girls / D5

— The Associated Press

ADVENTURE SPORTS

NFL

NBA Saints name interim coach NEW ORLEANS — Sean Payton handed over control of his team to Joe Vitt once before and the Saints have decided to do it again. The Saints Thursday named Payton’s trusted Vitt second-incommand their interim coach, despite the fact that Vitt will miss a third of the season for his role in New Orleans’ bounty system. For his part, Payton received a season-long suspension — which begins Monday; Vitt, who takes over Monday, was handed a six-game suspension. Saints general manager Mickey Loomis said in his announcement that the team will address at a later time how to divvy up Vitt’s responsibilities during his six-week absence. “It is important that we keep Sean Payton’s philosophy front and center during this season,” Loomis said. “Sean has been the driving force behind the tremendous success our team has enjoyed during the past six years, his leadership will be missed. But we need to set a course of action that gives us the best chance to win this season without our head coach. “We considered a number of great options to handle Payton’s duties both internally and externally, but believe this will provide the most seamless transition for our players and our coaching staff, allowing our offensive and defensive staffs to remain intact with the fewest changes,” Loomis continued. “This is the same structure we used last season during Sean’s knee injury.”

Spring shredding • Winter lingers at Central Oregon ski areas, but area skiers and snowboarders eagerly await spring corn snow

S

kiers and snowboarders all love MARK fresh powder. But this time of year, many MORICAL are ready for the warmer days of spring and the unique snow that comes with them. Central Oregon is still in winter mode, as Mt. Bachelor ski area reported 3 inches of new snow Thursday morning and snow flurries made their way across the region.

On Monday I headed up to Bachelor, hoping to shred some coveted springtime “corn” snow on a mostly sunny day when the temperature was forecast to reach 48 degrees. The problem was, it never got warm enough to completely soften the snow into the smooth, large-grained crystals formed from repeated freezing and melting. See Spring / D6

Spring operations at Central Oregon ski areas Mt. Bachelor ski area: Open daily from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. through April 29; open Thursdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. from May 3 to May 27; starting this Monday, the only operating chairlifts will be Pine Marten, Skyliner and Summit (weather permitting); visit www. mtbachelor.com. Hoodoo Mountain Resort: Open this Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and April 21-22 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; closed for the season after April 22; visit www.hoodoo.com. Willamette Pass ski area: Open this Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; closed for the season after Sunday; visit www. willamettepass.com.

Below, Peter Butsch, of Bend, arcs his snowboard through a turn on the cinder cone at Mt. Bachelor Friday morning. Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Blazers’ Aldridge to have surgery on hip By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Trail Blazers forward LaMarcus Aldridge will have surgery on his right hip and miss the rest of the season. The team said Thursday no date has been set for the arthroscopic procedure, which will repair a slight labral tear. Aldridge says he has had pain for about two weeks and is unsure how the injury occurred. “I’m just happy we know what it is now and we can move forward,” said Aldridge, who traveled to Vail, Colo., this week for a closer look at the injury after an earlier MRI didn’t show it. Aldridge is averaging 21.7 points, 8.0 rebounds and 2.4 assists this season while shooting a career-high 51.2 percent. The 6-foot-11 power forward in his sixth year called the tear “minor” and said he was being proactive in having the procedure. Aldridge had surgery to repair torn cartilage in his left hip when he was at Texas in 2005. He said that injury was much more severe. “LaMarcus’ priority is that he’s 100-percent healthy going into training camp this fall and we all feel this is the best course,” Blazers acting general manager Chad Buchanan said in a statement. “He’s had an All-Star year and his long-term health is the most important thing to consider.” See Aldridge / D5

COLLEGE FOOTBALL COMMENTARY

— The Associated Press

CORRECTION In a story that appeared in The Bulletin on Thursday, April 12, headlined “BMX Great Northwest Nationals roll in to Redmond,” event organizer Tracy Stephens’ name was spelled incorrectly. The Bulletin regrets the error.

For better or worse, BCS postseason format is about to change By Blair Kerkhoff McClatchy-Tribune News Service

H

ark, the sounds of spring football: Coaches barking, pads bashing, motorcycles crashing. If we’re finished rubber-necking at the wreckage of a Harley and a coaching career at Arkansas, it’s time to move on to an issue with wider impact in college football. During the next couple of months,

the quiet and steady progress of restructuring the national championship will come to a resolution. “We’re getting down to it,” said Bill Hancock, executive director of the Bowl Championship Series. “Pretty soon, it’s going to be time to make a decision, and I’m confident the game will be better for it.” Coaches like the shamed Bobby Petrino come and go, but the idea of

crowning a college football champion through what in all likelihood will be a playoff is revolutionary stuff for a sport that kicked off 143 years ago and largely identified its champion through opinion polls and computer rankings. Last week, a position paper surfaced that detailed the most discussed options of change among conference commissioners. Those with visions of eight- or 16-team playoffs will be disappointed.

Let’s start with the option that, from interviews, seems to have the most traction: a four-team event with seeded semifinals and a championship game. This model works because it satisfies the desire for change without, traditionalists believe, diminishing the value of the regular-season and bowl games. New school and old school forging a new path. It sells. See BCS / D5


D2 THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION Today GOLF 6 a.m.: PGA European Tour/Asian Tour, Malaysian Open, second round, Golf Channel. 9:30 a.m.: Champions Tour, Encompass Insurance Pro-Am, first round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, RBC Heritage, second round, Golf Channel. BASEBALL 11 a.m. or noon: Chicago Cubs at St. Louis Cardinals (noon) or Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox (11), MLB Network. 4 or 4:30 p.m.: Milwaukee Brewers at Atlanta Braves (4:30) or New York Mets at Philadelphia Phillies (4), MLB Network. 7 p.m.: MLB, Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. MOTOR SPORTS 2 p.m.: NASCAR, Nationwide Series, O’Reilly Auto Parts 300, qualifying, ESPN2. 5:30 p.m.: NASCAR, Nationwide Series, O’Reilly Auto Parts 300, ESPN2. HOCKEY 4:30 p.m.: NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, Philadelphia Flyers at Pittsburgh Penguins, NBC Sports Network. 4:30 p.m.: NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, Detroit Red Wings at Nashville Predators, CNBC. 7 p.m.: NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, Los Angeles Kings at Vancouver Canucks, NBC Sports Network. BASKETBALL 5 p.m.: NBA, Phoenix Suns at Houston Rockets, ESPN. 7:30 p.m.: NBA, Dallas Mavericks at Portland Trail Blazers, ESPN. BOXING 8 p.m.: Michael Katsidis vs. Albert Mensah, ESPN2.

Saturday SOCCER 4:30 a.m.: English Premier League, Norwich City vs. Manchester City, ESPN2. 12:30 p.m.: Major League Soccer, Columbus Crew at Philadelphia Union, NBC Sports Network. 1 p.m.: Major League Soccer, Colorado Rapids at Seattle Sounders, Root Sports. 7:30 p.m.: Major League Soccer, Portland Timbers at Los Angeles Galaxy, CW. 9:30 p.m.: Major League Soccer, Portland Timbers at Los Angeles Galaxy (same-day tape), Root Sports. GOLF 6 a.m.: PGA European Tour/Asian Tour, Malaysian Open, third round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m.: PGA Tour, RBC Heritage, third round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, RBC Heritage, third round, CBS. 3:30 p.m.: Champions Tour, Encompass Insurance Pro-Am, second round, Golf Channel. SOFTBALL 9 a.m.: College, LSU at Tennessee, ESPN. Noon: College, East Carolina at Houston, Root Sports. HOCKEY Noon: NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, Washington Capitals at Boston Bruins, NBC. 4 p.m.: NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, Ottawa Senators at New York Rangers, NBC Sports Network. 4:30 p.m.: NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, San Jose Sharks at St. Louis Blues, CNBC. 7 p.m.: NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, Chicago Blackhawks at Phoenix Coyotes, NBC Sports Network. BASEBALL 10 a.m.: MLB, regional coverage, Texas Rangers at Minnesota Twins or Los Angeles Angels at New York Yankees or Chicago Cubs at St. Louis Cardinals, Fox. 4 or 5 p.m.: MLB, Milwaukee Brewers at Atlanta Braves (4) or Arizona Diamondbacks at Colorado Rockies (5), MLB Network. 6 p.m.: MLB, Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. MOTOR SPORTS 11 a.m.: Sprint racing, Lucas Oil Chili Bowl Nationals (taped), CBS. 2 p.m.: National Hot Rod Association, Four-Wide Nationals, qualifying (same-day tape), ESPN2.

3 p.m.: IndyCar, Grand Prix of Long Beach, qualifying (taped), NBC Sports Network. 4 p.m.: NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Samsung Mobile 500, Fox. 4:30 p.m.: American Le Mans Series at Long Beach (same-day tape), ESPN2. BASKETBALL 4 p.m.: High school boys, Jordan Brand Classic, ESPN. 6 p.m.: NBA, Phoenix Suns at San Antonio Spurs, ESPN.

Sunday BASEBALL 2:30 a.m.: College, UCLA at Arizona (taped), Root Sports. 10 a.m.: College, Alabama at LSU, ESPN2. 10:30 a.m.: MLB, Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox, TBS. 1 p.m.: MLB, Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. 5 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Angels at New York Yankees, ESPN. GOLF 6 a.m.: PGA European Tour/Asian Tour, Malaysian Open, third round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m.: PGA Tour, RBC Heritage, final round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, RBC Heritage, final round, CBS. 4 p.m.: Champions Tour, Encompass Insurance Pro-Am, final round, Golf Channel. HOCKEY 9 a.m.: NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, Nashville Predators at Detroit Red Wings, NBC. Noon: NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, Pittsburgh Penguins at Philadelphia Flyers, NBC. 4:30 p.m.: NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, New Jersey Devils at Florida Panthers, NBC Sports Network. 7:30 p.m.: NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, Vancouver Canucks at Los Angeles Kings, NBC Sports Network. BASKETBALL 10 a.m.: NBA, Miami Heat at New York Knicks, ABC. 12:30 p.m.: NBA, Dallas Mavericks at Los Angeles Lakers, ABC. 3 p.m.: NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Sacramento Kings, Comcast SportsNet Northwest. MOTOR SPORTS 10 a.m.: American Motorcyclist Association, Supercross World Championship (taped), CBS. 12:30 p.m.: Indy Car, Grand Prix of Long Beach, NBC Sports Network. 4 p.m.: National Hot Rod Association, Four-Wide Nationals (same-day tape), ESPN2. BOWLING 10 a.m.: Professional Bowlers Association, Tournament of Champions, ESPN. 11:30 a.m.: Women’s college, NCAA championship (taped), ESPN. RODEO 11 a.m.: Professional Bull Riders, Built Ford Tough Invitational (taped), CBS. SOFTBALL 1 p.m.: College, LSU at Tennessee, ESPN.

RADIO Today BASEBALL 5:30 p.m.: College, ArkansasPine Bluff at Oregon State, KICEAM 940. BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m.: NBA, Dallas Mavericks at Portland Trail Blazers, KBNDAM 1110, KRCO-AM 690.

Saturday BASEBALL 2 p.m.: College, Arkansas-Pine Bluff at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940.

Sunday BASEBALL 1 p.m.: College, Arkansas-Pine Bluff at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940. BASKETBALL 3 p.m.: NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Sacramento Kings, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

ON DECK

IN THE BLEACHERS

Today Baseball: Bend at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Sweet Home, 4:30 p.m.; Elmira at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; Madras at Gladstone, TBA; Santiam at Culver, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Bend at Crook County (DH), 3 p.m.; Sweet Home at La Pine, 4:30 p.m.; Molalla at Madras, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 4:30 p.m.; Culver at Burns (DH), TBA Track and field: Redmond at Aloha Relays in Aloha, 1:30 p.m. Boys golf: Redmond, Bend, Sisters at Eagle Crest Ridge Course, 9 a.m. Boys tennis: Hood River Valley at Redmond, 11 a.m.; Hermiston at Summit, 11 a.m.; The Dalles Wahtonka at Mountain View, noon; The Dalles Wahtonka at Redmond, 3 p.m.; Pendleton at Summit, 3 p.m.; Pendleton at Bend, 4 p.m.; Hood River Valley at Mountain View, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Redmond at Hood River Valley, 11 a.m.; Summit at Hermiston, 11 a.m.; Mountain View at The Dalles Wahtonka, noon; Bend at Hermiston, noon; Redmond at The Dalles Wahtonka, 3 p.m.; Summit at Pendleton, 3 p.m.; Bend at Pendleton, 4 p.m.; Mountain View at Hood River Valley, 4 p.m.; Madras at Sisters, 4 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Redmond at Summit, 8 p.m. Saturday Track and field: Summit at Roseburg Invitational in Roseburg, 10 a.m.; Madras, Culver at Burns Invitational, noon; Sisters, La Pine at Elmira Relays, 11:30 a.m. Softball: Estacada at Madras, TBA Girls tennis: Redmond, Sisters at Madras Invitational, 8 a.m. Girls lacrosse: Crescent Valley at Bend United (Summit High), 11 a.m.; West Salem at Bend United (Summit High), 3 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Southridge at Bend, 3 p.m. Sunday Girls lacrosse: Roseburg at Bend United (Summit High), 11 a.m.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers 1, Ottawa 0 Thursday, April 12: NY Rangers 4, Ottawa 2 Saturday, April 14: Ottawa at NY Rangers, 4 p.m. Monday, April 16: NY Rangers at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 18: NY Rangers at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 21: Ottawa at NY Rangers, 4 p.m. x-Monday, April 23: NY Rangers at Ottawa, TBD x-Thursday, April 26: Ottawa at NY Rangers, TBD Boston 1, Washington 0 Thursday, April 12: Boston 1, Washington 0, OT Saturday, April 14: Washington at Boston, noon Monday, April 16: Boston at Washington, 4:30 p.m. Thursday, April 19: Boston at Washington, 4:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 21: Washington at Boston, noon x-Sunday, April 22: Boston at Washington, TBD x-Wednesday, April 25: Washington at Boston, TBD Florida vs. New Jersey Today, April 13: New Jersey at Florida, 4 p.m. Sunday, April 15: New Jersey at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 17: Florida at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Thursday, April 19: Florida at New Jersey, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 21: New Jersey at Florida, 3:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 24: Florida at New Jersey, TBD x-Thursday, April 26: New Jersey at Florida, TBD Philadelphia 1, Pittsburgh 0 Wednesday, April 11: Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 3 (OT) Today, April 13: Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 15: Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, noon Wednesday, April 18: Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 20: Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m. x-Sunday, April 22: Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, TBD x-Tuesday, April 24: Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles 1, Vancouver 0 Wednesday, April 11: Los Angeles 4, Vancouver 2 Today, April 13: Los Angeles at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Sunday, April 15: Vancouver at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 18: Vancouver at Los Angeles, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 22: Los Angeles at Vancouver, TBD x-Tuesday, April 24: Vancouver at Los Angeles, TBD x-Thursday, April 26: Los Angeles at Vancouver, TBD San Jose 1, St. Louis 0 Thursday, April 12: San Jose 3, St. Louis 2, 2OT Saturday, April 14: San Jose at St. Louis, 4:30 p.m. Monday, April 16: St. Louis at San Jose, 7 p.m. Thursday, April 19: St. Louis at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 21: San Jose at St. Louis, 4:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 23: St. Louis at San Jose, TBD x-Wednesday, April 25: San Jose at St. Louis, TBD Phoenix 1, Chicago 0 Thursday, April 12: Phoenix 3, Chicago 2, OT Saturday, April 14: Chicago at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 17: Phoenix at Chicago, 6 p.m. Thursday, April 19: Phoenix at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Saturday, April 21: Chicago at Phoenix, 7 p.m. x-Monday, April 23: Phoenix at Chicago, TBD x-Wednesday, April 25: Chicago at Phoenix, TBD Nashville 1, Detroit 0 Wednesday, April 11: Nashville 3, Detroit 2 Today, April 13: Detroit at Nashville, 4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 15: Nashville at Detroit, 9 a.m. Tuesday, April 17: Nashville at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 20: Detroit at Nashville, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, April 22: Nashville at Detroit, TBD x-Tuesday, April 24: Detroit at Nashville, TBD

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts Sporting Kansas City 5 0 0 15 New York 3 2 0 9 Houston 2 1 0 6 Columbus 2 2 0 6 New England 2 3 0 6 D.C. 1 2 2 5 Chicago 1 1 1 4 Montreal 1 4 1 4 Philadelphia 0 3 1 1 Toronto FC 0 4 0 0 Western Conference W L T Pts Real Salt Lake 5 1 0 15

GF GA 8 1 14 8 2 2 4 6 4 6 5 5 2 3 5 12 2 6 2 9 GF GA 11 4

San Jose 4 1 0 12 8 Colorado 3 2 0 9 7 Vancouver 2 1 2 8 4 Seattle 2 1 1 7 5 FC Dallas 2 2 1 7 6 Chivas USA 2 3 0 6 3 Portland 1 3 1 4 7 Los Angeles 1 3 0 3 5 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Saturday’s Games Columbus at Philadelphia, 12:30 p.m. Colorado at Seattle FC, 1 p.m. D.C. United at New England, 1 p.m. Chivas USA at Toronto FC, 1:30 p.m. San Jose at New York, 4 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Montreal at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Portland at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Game Houston at Chicago, 4 p.m.

2 7 3 2 8 4 8 8

BASEBALL College Pacific-12 Conference All Times PDT ——— Conference All Games W L W L Arizona 9 3 23 9 UCLA 8 4 22 7 Oregon 8 4 22 9 Oregon St. 6 6 20 11 Arizona St. 6 6 20 13 USC 5 6 19 11 Stanford 4 5 21 7 Washington 4 5 17 13 Washington St. 3 5 16 13 Utah 4 8 8 23 California 2 7 17 14 Today’s Games Washington at California, 2:30 p.m. Oregon at Stanford, 5:30 p.m. Utah at Washington State, 5:30 p.m. x-Arkansas-Pine Bluff at Oregon State, 5:35 p.m. UCLA at Arizona, 6 p.m. USC at Arizona State, 6:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Oregon at Stanford, 1 p.m. Washington at California, 1 p.m. Utah at Washington State, 2 p.m. x-Arkansas-Pine Bluff at Oregon State, 2:05 p.m. UCLA at Arizona, 6 p.m. USC at Arizona State, 6:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Utah at Washington State, 11 a.m. Oregon at Stanford, noon UCLA at Arizona, noon USC at Arizona State, 12:30 p.m. Washington at California, 1 p.m. x-Arkansas-Pine Bluff at Oregon State, 1:05 p.m. Monday’s Game x-Arkansas-Pine Bluff at Oregon, 6 p.m. x=nonleague

TENNIS Professional Grand Prix Hassan II Thursday At Complexe Sportif al Amal Casablanca, Morocco Purse: $520,000 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Second Round Jeremy Chardy, France , def. Florian Mayer (1), Spain, 6-3, 6-1. Albert Ramos (7), Spain, def. Victor Hanescu, Romania, 6-2, 6-4. Barcelona Ladies Open Thursday At Centre Municipal Tennis Vall d’Hebron Barcelona, Spain Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Second Round Yuliya Beygelzimer, Ukraine, def. Flavia Pennetta (5), Italy, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 6-4. Dominika Cibulkova (3), Slovakia, def. Klara Zakopalova, Czech Republic, 5-7, 6-4, 6-4. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, def. Laura Pous-Tio, Spain, 7-6 (4), 6-7 (6), 6-2. Julia Goerges (3), Germany, def. Garbine Muguruza

Blanco, Spain, 7-5, 5-7, 6-2. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, def. Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, 1-6, 6-3, 6-1. e-Boks Open Thursday At Farum Arena Copenhagen, Denmark Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Second Round Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Pauline Parmentier, France, 6-2, 6-1. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, def. Monica Niculescu (4), Romania, 6-7 (6), 6-4, 6-1. Angelique Kerber (2), Germany, def. Anne Keothavong, Britain, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3. Jelena Jankovic (3), Serbia, def. Yulia Putintseva, Russia, 6-3, 6-1. U.S. Men’s Clay Court Championships Thursday At River Oaks Country Club Houston Purse: $442,500 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Second Round Kevin Anderson (5), South Africa, def. Sam Querrey, United States, 7-6 (3), 3-6, 7-6 (2). Juan Monaco (4), Argentina, def. Tatsuma Ito, Japan, 6-3, 6-3. Ryan Sweeting, United States, def. Bobby Reynolds, United States, 6-3, 6-2. Michael Russell, United States, def. Mardy Fish (1), United States, 6-3, 6-1. John Isner (2), United States, def. Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, 6-7 (3), 6-4, 6-2. Ryan Harrison, United States, def. Igor Kunitsyn, Russia, 6-2, 6-4.

GOLF PGA Tour RBC Heritage Thursday At Harbour Town Golf Links Hilton Head, S.C. Purse: $5.7 million Yardage: 7,101; Par: 71 (36-35) First Round a-denotes amateur Chad Campbell 32-35—67 Vaughn Taylor 32-35—67 Colt Knost 35-32—67 Jim Furyk 35-33—68 Charlie Wi 34-34—68 Harris English 34-34—68 Matt Every 33-35—68 Blake Adams 36-33—69 John Mallinger 34-35—69 Chez Reavie 36-33—69 Tommy Gainey 35-35—70 Jason Bohn 37-33—70 Rory Sabbatini 34-36—70 Kevin Na 34-36—70 Tom Gillis 33-37—70 Joe Durant 35-35—70 Kevin Chappell 36-34—70 John Rollins 35-35—70 Boo Weekley 35-35—70 Carl Pettersson 34-36—70 John Daly 37-33—70 Will Claxton 34-36—70 Glen Day 36-34—70 Greg Chalmers 33-38—71 Chris Couch 33-38—71 Hunter Haas 37-34—71 Heath Slocum 37-34—71 Stephen Ames 37-34—71 Kyle Stanley 35-36—71 Brandt Snedeker 36-35—71 Marc Leishman 37-34—71 Michael Thompson 35-36—71 Lee Janzen 35-36—71 Trevor Immelman 35-36—71 Webb Simpson 37-34—71 Zach Johnson 35-36—71 Bud Cauley 36-35—71 Robert Garrigus 34-37—71 Fredrik Jacobson 36-35—71 Bob Estes 36-35—71 Brian Harman 36-35—71 Gary Christian 35-36—71 Brendon de Jonge 35-37—72 Troy Matteson 36-36—72 Shaun Micheel 37-35—72 Robert Karlsson 37-35—72

J.J. Henry Alex Cejka Martin Laird Charles Howell III Ernie Els James Driscoll J.J. Killeen Kevin Stadler Ken Duke Brian Davis Jerry Kelly Lucas Glover Matt Kuchar Rickie Fowler Billy Mayfair a-Corbin Mills Rocco Mediate Bryce Molder Mark Wilson Jeff Overton Chad Collins Mark Anderson Daniel Summerhays Spencer Levin Hank Kuehne Tim Clark Scott Verplank Matt Bettencourt Stuart Appleby Cameron Beckman Sean O’Hair Aaron Baddeley Jason Kokrak Jeff Maggert Greg Owen David Mathis Briny Baird Joe Ogilvie D.J. Trahan Bill Lunde Scott Piercy Bill Haas Padraig Harrington Michael Bradley D.A. Points Henrik Stenson Kris Blanks William McGirt John Merrick Kevin Streelman Nick O’Hern Graham DeLaet Charley Hoffman Bo Van Pelt Geoff Ogilvy Ricky Barnes Chris DiMarco Tim Herron Luke Donald Martin Flores Sunghoon Kang Tom Pernice Jr. Brian Gay George McNeill Ryuji Imada Arjun Atwal Chris Kirk Mike Weir David Duval Seung-Yul Noh Tommy Biershenk Brendon Todd John Huh Jose Maria Olazabal Rich Beem Todd Camplin David Hearn Josh Teater Jason Dufner Justin Leonard Robert Allenby Stewart Cink Camilo Villegas Scott Stallings Fred Funk

36-36—72 36-36—72 36-36—72 38-34—72 34-38—72 36-36—72 37-35—72 36-36—72 35-37—72 36-36—72 36-36—72 37-35—72 36-36—72 36-36—72 35-37—72 35-37—72 36-37—73 35-38—73 36-37—73 39-34—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 35-38—73 35-38—73 36-37—73 37-36—73 39-34—73 37-36—73 35-38—73 35-38—73 37-36—73 38-35—73 37-36—73 35-39—74 36-38—74 36-38—74 39-35—74 38-36—74 36-38—74 34-40—74 35-39—74 35-39—74 38-36—74 36-38—74 36-38—74 35-39—74 36-38—74 36-38—74 37-37—74 38-36—74 37-37—74 37-37—74 37-37—74 36-38—74 36-38—74 37-37—74 36-39—75 36-39—75 38-37—75 35-40—75 36-39—75 36-39—75 36-39—75 39-36—75 37-39—76 40-36—76 38-38—76 39-37—76 37-39—76 38-38—76 40-36—76 37-39—76 40-37—77 38-39—77 38-39—77 40-37—77 40-38—78 39-39—78 40-38—78 39-39—78 41-37—78 43-36—79 37-42—79 38-42—80 42-39—81

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Placed OF Lorenzo Cain on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Jarrod Dyson from Omaha (PCL). National League HOUSTON ASTROS—Optioned INF Brian Bixler to Oklahoma City (PCL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Promoted INF Greg Picart to Indianapolis (IL). Assigned OF Anthony Norman to Altoona (EL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS—Signed F Diamon Simpson for remainder of the season. FOOTBALL National Football League CINCINNATI BENGALS—Traded LB Keith Rivers to the N.Y. Giants for a 2012 fifth-round draft pick. Agreed to terms with CB Terence Newman. Waived CB Rico Murray. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS—Named Joe Vitt interim coach. NEW YORK JETS—Waived C Taylor Boggs. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Signed TE Andre Hardy. PITTSBURGH STEELERS—Agreed to terms with WR Jerricho Cotchery and OL Trai Essex. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Agreed to terms with LB Leroy Hill and LB Matt McCoy to one-year contracts. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL—Fined Nashville D Shea Weber $2,500 for slamming Detroit F Henrik Zetterberg’s head against the glass at the end of Wednesday’s game. Suspended Vancouver F Byron Bitz for two games for boarding Los Angeles F Kyle Clifford during Wednesday’s game. CALGARY FLAMES—Fired coach Brent Sutter and assistant coach Dave Lowery. NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Assigned G Jeremy Smith to Milwaukee (AHL). Recalled G Chet Pickard from Milwaukee. NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Assigned D Marc Cantin from Reading (ECHL) to Bridgeport (AHL). ST. LOUIS BLUES—Assigned G Jake Allen to Peoria (AHL). COLLEGE COLORADO STATE—Named Larry Eustachy men’s basketball coach. MICHIGAN STATE—Reinstated junior C Derrick Nix to the men’s basketball team. NORTHERN ARIZONA—Named Jack Murphy men’s basketball coach. TULSA—Named Brett Ballard and Steve Woodberry men’s assistant basketball coaches and Justin Bauman director of basketball operations. VILLANOVA—Announced junior G Dominic Cheek will enter the NBA draft WINTHROP—Named Mark Prosser and Brian Thornton men’s assistant basketball coaches.

Three share PGA Tour lead at Hilton Head Th e Associated Press HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. — Chad Campbell used a fast start, and Vaughn Taylor and Colt Knost had strong finishes to share the first-round lead at 4-under 67 in the RBC Heritage on Thursday. Campbell birdied four of his first seven holes, Knost birdied three of his last five, and Taylor holed out from the fairway for a closing eagle on the par4 ninth hole at Harbour Town Golf Links. Jim Furyk, the 2010 winner, was a stroke back along with Harris English, Charlie Wi and Matt Every. Forty-two players, including John Daly in just his second PGA Tour event this year, were at even par or better. Masters winner Bubba Watson took the week off, as

G O LF RO UNDUP did most players ranked in the world’s top 20. No. 1 Luke Donald, who has been second, third and second here the past three years, opened with a 75. He has to finish in the top eight or surrender to the top spot to No. 2 Rory McIlroy next week. Matt Kuchar was tied for the lead at Augusta National with three holes left before finishing two shots out of the playoff between Watson and Louis Oosthuizen, Kuchar hoped to continue his strong play at Harbour Town, but ended in a large group at 1-over 72. Campbell held a first-round lead for the first time since the 2009 Masters. His game has faded some since then — he recorded just one top 10, at the

British Open, last year, his fewest since coming out on tour in 2002 — and has missed five cuts in nine tournaments this year. “I haven’t felt like I’ve been that far off,” Campbell said. “But the results haven’t been good at all.” Campbell got it going quickly at Harbour Town with an 8-foot birdie putt on No. 2 and then consecutive birdies on the fourth and fifth holes. He moved to 4 under two holes later, rolling in a 20-footer for birdie. Campbell added a final birdie on the 15th. Campbell said the wind reminded him of his days playing golf in West Texas. “Other than the trees and the ocean,” he joked. Taylor caught Campbell with his stunning shot from

103 yards out on his final hole, the ninth. Taylor, a native of Augusta, Ga., also has struggled and teed off at the RBC Heritage on a sponsor’s exemption. Knost joined the leaders with a late charge of his own, collecting birdies on the 14th, 16th and 18th holes. Also on Thursday: Schwartzel on top of Malaysian Open KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — South Africa’s Charl Schwartzel shot an 8-under 64 to take a one-stroke lead over India’s Jeev Milkha Singh after the first round of the Malaysian Open. South Africa’s Louis Oosthuizen, coming off a playoff loss to Bubba Watson in the Masters, was two strokes back along with American Jason Knutzon and India’s Jyoti Randhawa.


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

S  B

Football • Petrino apologetic in text messages: Former Arkansas coach Bobby Petrino was apologetic in text messages sent to a series of athletic department employees, including athletic director Jeff Long, following the revelation of his affair and the presence of a 25-year-old employee during the April 1 motorcycle accident that led to his downfall. The content of Petrino’s text messages still available on his phone were obtained by The Associated Press through a Freedom of Information Act request Thursday night. In the messages, Petrino tells Long he appreciated how he handled the April 5 news conference in which Long placed Petrino on paid leave. Petrino was fired Tuesday for failing to disclose his relationship with Jessica Dorrell, whom he hired last month without disclosing his relationship with her or the fact he had once paid her $20,000. • NFL allowing limited casino ads: The NFL will allow teams to accept advertisements for casinos and other state-licensed gambling-related establishments during the next two seasons. Those ads can appear only in game programs, on local radio broadcasts and in the upper bowl and inner concourses of stadiums. The league told the 32 clubs on Thursday that the change in policy will allow such advertising on a limited basis from casinos in their markets.

Baseball • Indians near deal with Damon: The Cleveland Indians are close to signing veteran outfielder Johnny Damon to help awaken their struggling offense. The club has been in talks to finalize a deal with the 38-year-old, who is 277 hits shy of 3,000. Damon played with Tampa Bay — his sixth AL team — last season, batting .261 with 16 homers and 73 RBIs in 150 games. Damon would probably need some time to get ready after not being in a spring training camp. If Damon signs, the Indians would be his fourth team in four years.

NHL PLAYOFFS ROUNDUP

Rangers use big period to top Sens in Game 1 The Associated Press NEW YORK — The biggest moment of the New York Rangers’ postseason-opening win came when play was stopped, and the top-seeded team in the Eastern Conference tried to catch its breath at the bench. The Rangers were nursing a one-goal lead in the second period, but the Ottawa Senators were all over them. Coach John Tortorella used his lone timeout, and shifted momentum completely. Marian Gaborik and Brian Boyle scored minutes apart shortly after, and the Rangers rolled to a 4-2 victory over the Senators on Thursday night. “We wanted to stop slapping the puck around,” Tortorella said. “We kept smacking it back to them.” The Rangers, the No. 1 seed in the East for the first time since they won the Stanley Cup in 1994, shook off their 1-2-1 regular-season mark against the Senators and easily dispatched them in Game 1. Ryan Callahan scored in the first period, Gaborik and Boyle pushed the lead to 3-0, and Brad Richards added a goal in the third for the Rangers. New York will host the No. 8 Senators again on Saturday night before the best-of-seven series shifts to Ottawa for Games 3 and 4. “That is the way we have to play to win,” Callahan said. “We felt like we’ve been playing playoff hockey right through the season. “It’s still a long series left. Taking Game 1 doesn’t mean much.” Henrik Lundqvist was sharp early, stopping Jason Spezza on a partial breakaway and then turning aside Jim O’Brien, who weaved his way through

NHL: Linesman erred on call in Flyers-Penguins

Frank Franklin II / The Associated Press

the New York defense before getting off an in-close drive that was knocked away. Lundqvist’s only blemishes came in the third period. Daniel Alfredsson wrecked his shutout bid at 10:05, and Erik Condra made it 4-2 with 2:19 left. Lundqvist finished with 30 saves. Craig Anderson stopped 27 shots, but it wasn’t enough for him to maintain his perfect mark at Madison Square Garden. The Senators dominated play throughout the second period, but a couple of late lapses turned a tight game into a virtual runaway. They took solace in playing a strong third period. “It was a pretty even game, but then we got off our game plan for a few minutes and it’s 4-0,” Spezza said. “We have

Basketball • Sacramento group wants Kings sale: Sacramento business leaders are asking NBA Commissioner David Stern to “strongly encourage” the Maloof family to sell the Kings so a deal for a new arena can move forward. In a letter signed by about two dozen of Sacramento’s most powerful businesses leaders and sent to Stern on Thursday, the group accuses Kings owners Joe, Gavin and George Maloof of not negotiating in good faith. It also questions whether the Maloofs have the finances and motivation to keep the team in Sacramento.

Soccer • MLS to expand to Southeast?: The president of Major League Soccer says he’s “a firm believer” there are markets in the Southeast that would support a team from his league. Mark Abbott spoke Thursday to a fan forum of about 100 during his visit to the Raleigh, N.C. area. Abbott says MLS wants to add a second team in the New York metropolitan area to join the Red Bulls and give the league 20 teams. He says the league has no timetable for expansion beyond that. — From wire reports

to build off what we did in the third period. Even with three straight power plays that spanned the first and second periods, the Senators were frustrated by either Lundqvist or players in front of him who dived to block shots from ever getting through. “We have to get more traffic in front of Lundqvist,” Spezza said. “They are going to block a lot of shots. When he can see it, he’s one of the best.” In other playoff games on Thursday: Coyotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Blackhawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 GLENDALE, Ariz. — Martin Hanzal scored 9:29 into overtime and Phoenix opened the playoffs with a win over Chicago. Despite losing leading goal scorer Radim Vrbata to an injury early, Phoenix had

NBA ROUNDUP

a 2-1 lead after Taylor Pyatt and Antoine Vermette scored in the second period. Coyotes goalie Mike Smith stopped two shots without his stick during a power play in the third period, but Chicago defenseman Brent Seabrook put a rebound past him with 14.2 seconds left in regulation to send the game to overtime. Bruins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Capitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 BOSTON — Chris Kelly scored on a long slap shot 1:18 into overtime to lift the Bruins in the series opener. Braden Holtby made 29 saves for Washington, while Tim Thomas stopped all 17 shots he faced for Boston. Sharks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Blues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ST. LOUIS — Martin Havlat scored his second goal of the game 3:34 into the second

Bulls 96, Heat 86 (OT)

Chicago Bulls guard C.J. Watson drives to the basket past Miami Heat guard Mario Chalmers during the second half of Thursday night’s game in Chicago.

Bulls defeat Heat in overtime, 96-86 83-81 with 49 seconds left in regulation. But with a chance to seal the game, he missed the first of two free throws with 11.4 seconds remaining. That kept the Bulls in it and Watson made a three to tie it at 84 with 2.2 seconds left. The game went into overtime when Wade missed a baseline jumper at the buzzer. Also on Thursday: Spurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 SAN ANTONIO — Tim Duncan had 28 points and 12 rebounds and the Spurs snapped out of a funk to top surging Memphis. Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Timberwolves. . . . . . . . . . . . 82 MINNEAPOLIS — Blake Griffin had 19 points and 13 rebounds and Caron Butler scored 17 points to lead Los Angeles to a victory over Minnesota. Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Greg Monroe had 25 points and 11 rebounds to help Detroit salvage a four-game road trip with a rout of the woeful Bobcats. Mavericks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 OAKLAND, Calif. — Dirk Nowitzki scored 27 points, leading Dallas past Golden State. David Lee had 30 points for the Warriors.

overtime, giving San Jose a win over St. Louis in Game 1 of their series. Andrew Desjardins tied it for San Jose with 5:16 in regulation. Patrik Berglund scored his first two career playoff goals in the third period for the Blues.

Eastern Conference

Thursday’s Games

Nam Y. Huh / The Associated Press

— The Associated Press

NBA SCOREBOARD Summaries

The Associated Press CHICAGO — Had he known he was going to play so poorly, Derrick Rose might have sat this one out. Good thing for him, his Chicago teammates picked up the slack. C.J. Watson scored 16 points, including the gametying three-pointer at the end of regulation, and the Chicago Bulls pulled away in overtime to beat the Miami Heat 96-86 on Thursday night. Carlos Boozer scored 19 points and Kyle Korver added 17 for the Bulls, who outscored Miami 12-2 in overtime to boost their lead in the Eastern Conference to four games. The Bulls were able to pull off the victory despite a horrible shooting night by Derrick Rose, who scored a career-low two points. LeBron James scored 30 points for Miami but missed a free throw that would have made it a two-possession game late in regulation. Dwyane Wade added 21 points, Chris Bosh scored 20, but the Heat lost for the sixth time in 11 games. “This is one of the worst feelings in the regular season I’ve had this year,” James said. Things were looking good for Miami when James nailed a three that made it

TORONTO — NHL executive Colin Campbell said Thursday that linesman Tony Sericolo erred in not whistling the play dead for offsides before Danny Briere’s first goal in Game 1 of the Penguins-Flyers series. “There’s no other way to explain it but a missed call,” the NHL’s senior executive vice president of hockey operations told The Canadian Press. “We’re as upset as Pittsburgh, almost. It’s a mistake.” Briere scored Philadelphia’s first goal on Wednesday night after being sent in on a breakaway by teammate Brayden Schenn. The long pass came immediately after a neutral-zone turnover and replays showed Briere was a couple feet offside. The play started a big comeback for the Flyers, who erased a three-goal deficit and beat Pittsburgh 4-3 in overtime. However, the Penguins refused to use it as an excuse for their collapse. “That’s not why we lost the game,” coach Dan Bylsma said immediately afterward.

New York Rangers’ Brian Boyle celebrates after scoring a goal during the second period of Game 1 of a playoff series against the Ottawa Senators Thursday night in New York.

Cycling • Martin breaks cheekbone in training: Time trial world champion Tony Martin has broken his cheekbone during a training run accident near his Swiss home. His team Omega Pharma-Quick Step said Martin hit a car during his run on Wednesday and was briefly unconscious before being taken to a hospital. It said his condition on Thursday was stable and that surgery was being considered. The 26-year-old German is one of the top riders on the tour and earned 12 victories last year, including Paris-Nice and the Tour of Beijing. He is considered one of the favorites to win gold in the Olympic time trial in London. Defending champion Fabian Cancellara broke his collarbone earlier this month.

D3

MIAMI (86) L.James 11-24 5-7 30, Bosh 8-16 4-6 20, Haslem 2-2 0-0 4, Chalmers 2-7 0-1 4, Wade 10-21 1-2 21, Miller 1-9 0-0 3, Battier 1-2 0-0 2, Turiaf 0-0 0-0 0, Anthony 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 36-82 10-16 86. CHICAGO (96) Deng 6-13 1-4 16, Boozer 9-19 1-2 19, Noah 1-3 3-4 5, Rose 1-13 0-0 2, Hamilton 3-6 0-0 7, Watson 610 2-4 16, Gibson 4-9 3-3 11, Asik 0-2 0-0 0, Brewer 1-2 1-2 3, Korver 6-8 0-0 17, Butler 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 37-86 11-19 96. Miami 22 19 21 22 2 — 86 Chicago 19 17 24 24 12 — 96 3-Point Goals—Miami 4-11 (L.James 3-6, Miller 1-3, Chalmers 0-1, Bosh 0-1), Chicago 11-22 (Korver 5-6, Deng 3-5, Watson 2-5, Hamilton 1-2, Brewer 0-1, Rose 0-3). Fouled Out—Gibson. Rebounds—Miami 55 (Turiaf, Bosh 8), Chicago 54 (Boozer 11). Assists— Miami 17 (L.James 5), Chicago 26 (Watson 9). Total Fouls—Miami 16, Chicago 15. A—23,015 (20,917).

Spurs 107, Grizzlies 97 MEMPHIS (97) Gay 7-22 5-7 19, Speights 5-10 5-5 15, Gasol 5-8 4-6 14, Conley 4-12 2-2 11, Pondexter 1-3 0-0 2, Randolph 4-10 2-2 10, Mayo 5-9 3-5 16, Arenas 3-6 0-0 6, Cunningham 2-5 0-0 4, Pargo 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-85 21-27 97. SAN ANTONIO (107) Leonard 2-5 2-2 6, Duncan 10-15 8-11 28, Blair 1-3 0-0 2, Parker 5-12 3-5 13, Green 3-9 2-2 10, Bonner 3-8 0-0 7, Ginobili 4-9 11-11 20, Jackson 2-5 0-0 5, Splitter 2-2 0-0 4, Neal 3-5 0-0 7, Diaw 2-3 0-0 5. Totals 37-76 26-31 107. Memphis 21 28 25 23 — 97 San Antonio 27 18 37 25 — 107 3-Point Goals—Memphis 4-19 (Mayo 3-4, Conley 1-5, Randolph 0-1, Cunningham 0-1, Speights 0-1, Pondexter 0-1, Arenas 0-3, Gay 0-3), San Antonio 7-20 (Green 2-5, Neal 1-1, Diaw 1-1, Jackson 1-2, Ginobili 1-4, Bonner 1-6, Leonard 0-1). Fouled Out—Mayo. Rebounds—Memphis 50 (Randolph 11), San Antonio 49 (Duncan 12). Assists—Memphis 15 (Conley, Gay 4), San Antonio 19 (Parker 9). Total Fouls—Memphis 25, San Antonio 21. Technicals—Gasol, San Antonio defensive three second. A—18,581 (18,797).

y-Chicago x-Miami Indiana d-Boston Atlanta Orlando Philadelphia New York Milwaukee Detroit New Jersey Cleveland Toronto Washington Charlotte

W 45 40 36 34 34 34 31 30 28 22 21 19 20 14 7

L 14 17 22 24 24 24 27 28 30 36 38 37 39 44 50

Pistons 109, Bobcats 85 DETROIT (109) Prince 3-14 0-0 6, Maxiell 8-8 1-2 17, Monroe 1114 3-4 25, Knight 8-12 2-2 21, Stuckey 2-7 5-5 9, Wallace 0-1 0-0 0, Jerebko 2-6 1-2 5, Gordon 1-3 6-6 9, Bynum 4-6 0-0 9, Wilkins 3-5 0-0 6, Villanueva 1-4 0-0 2, Russell Jr. 0-1 0-0 0, Daye 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 43-82 18-21 109. CHARLOTTE (85) Brown 6-11 0-0 13, Mullens 2-5 1-2 6, Biyombo 3-8 3-4 9, Augustin 4-10 4-5 13, Henderson 4-9 0-2 8, White 5-9 2-2 12, Walker 3-8 2-2 9, Carroll 1-3 0-0 3, Williams 3-5 0-0 7, Diop 0-1 0-0 0, Higgins 0-1 5-6 5. Totals 31-70 17-23 85. Detroit 22 30 40 17 — 109 Charlotte 18 22 22 23 — 85 3-Point Goals—Detroit 5-13 (Knight 3-4, Bynum 1-1, Gordon 1-2, Stuckey 0-2, Villanueva 0-2, Prince 0-2), Charlotte 6-11 (Carroll 1-1, Williams 1-1, Brown 1-1, Mullens 1-2, Augustin 1-3, Walker 1-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Detroit 51 (Monroe

GB — 4 8½ 10½ 10½ 10½ 13½ 14½ 16½ 22½ 24 24½ 25 30½ 37

L10 6-4 5-5 7-3 8-2 6-4 4-6 4-6 7-3 6-4 6-4 6-4 2-8 4-6 3-7 0-10

Str W-2 L-2 W-2 W-4 L-1 L-1 W-2 W-1 L-2 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-4 W-2 L-14

Home 24-6 24-4 19-8 21-9 19-8 19-11 19-12 19-10 15-14 15-12 9-20 10-19 11-19 8-21 4-23

Away 21-8 16-13 17-14 13-15 15-16 15-13 12-15 11-18 13-16 7-24 12-18 9-18 9-20 6-23 3-27

Conf 34-8 30-10 24-17 27-13 27-15 27-16 24-16 23-18 21-19 17-24 15-26 11-29 12-29 10-30 5-37

Away 18-10 17-11 14-16 15-14 13-17 12-16 12-17 14-14 10-20 13-17 8-20 12-19 10-19 5-25 8-20

Conf 29-11 27-13 28-13 25-18 22-21 23-20 21-20 17-24 21-21 20-20 20-21 19-25 15-25 14-28 10-31

Western Conference W L Pct GB L10 y-Oklahoma City 42 16 .724 — 6-4 x-San Antonio 41 16 .719 ½ 9-1 d-L.A. Lakers 37 22 .627 5½ 7-3 L.A. Clippers 36 23 .610 6½ 8-2 Memphis 34 24 .586 8 7-3 Dallas 33 26 .559 9½ 6-4 Houston 32 26 .552 10 6-4 Denver 32 26 .552 10 6-4 Utah 31 28 .525 11½ 5-5 Phoenix 30 28 .517 12 6-4 Portland 28 31 .475 14½ 5-5 Minnesota 25 35 .417 18 2-8 Golden State 22 36 .379 20 2-8 Sacramento 19 40 .322 23½ 2-8 New Orleans 16 42 .276 26 4-6 d-division leader; x-clinched playoff spot; y-clinched division Thursday’s Games Detroit 109, Charlotte 85 Chicago 96, Miami 86, OT L.A. Clippers 95, Minnesota 82 San Antonio 107, Memphis 97 Dallas 112, Golden State 103

Clippers 95, Timberwolves 82 L.A. CLIPPERS (95) Butler 6-13 0-0 17, Griffin 9-16 1-5 19, Jordan 2-4 0-0 4, Paul 3-8 1-1 8, Foye 4-14 0-0 11, Martin 4-4 0-0 8, Young 3-11 3-4 10, M.Williams 6-11 0-0 14, Bledsoe 2-8 0-0 4, Evans 0-0 0-0 0, Thompkins 0-1 0-0 0, Simmons 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-91 5-10 95. MINNESOTA (82) Johnson 1-6 2-2 4, D.Williams 1-7 1-2 4, Pekovic 6-12 5-8 17, Barea 4-9 0-0 10, Webster 3-8 3-3 10, Beasley 6-15 2-4 14, Randolph 7-12 2-3 16, Lee 2-6 0-0 5, Tolliver 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 31-77 15-22 82. L.A. Clippers 21 26 26 22 — 95 Minnesota 26 22 20 14 — 82 3-Point Goals—L.A. Clippers 12-31 (Butler 58, Foye 3-8, M.Williams 2-4, Paul 1-2, Young 1-5, Simmons 0-1, Bledsoe 0-3), Minnesota 5-21 (Barea 2-4, Lee 1-3, D.Williams 1-3, Webster 1-4, Tolliver 0-1, Beasley 0-3, Johnson 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Clippers 55 (Griffin 13), Minnesota 55 (Beasley 10). Assists—L.A. Clippers 22 (Paul 8), Minnesota 20 (Barea 11). Total Fouls—L.A. Clippers 22, Minnesota 12. Technicals—L.A. Clippers Bench, Minnesota Coach Adelman. A—16,016 (19,356).

Pct .763 .702 .621 .586 .586 .586 .534 .517 .483 .379 .356 .339 .339 .241 .123

Str L-1 W-1 W-2 W-2 L-1 W-2 L-1 W-2 W-2 L-1 W-1 L-8 L-3 L-6 W-1

Today’s Games Cleveland at Indiana, 4 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Orlando, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Charlotte at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Washington at New York, 4:30 p.m. Phoenix at Houston, 5 p.m. Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Utah at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at Detroit, 5 p.m. Denver at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Portland, 7:30 p.m.

11), Charlotte 36 (Mullens 6). Assists—Detroit 28 (Stuckey, Knight 7), Charlotte 22 (Augustin 5). Total Fouls—Detroit 25, Charlotte 15. Technicals—Stuckey, Henderson, Walker. A—10,828 (19,077).

Mavericks 112, Warriors 103 DALLAS (112) Marion 2-8 3-4 7, Nowitzki 10-23 6-7 27, Haywood 2-3 0-1 4, Kidd 3-6 0-0 9, West 4-9 0-0 8, Terry 6-12 2-2 16, B.Wright 6-8 4-4 16, Carter 5-7 0-0 12, Beaubois 5-9 0-0 11, Mahinmi 1-3 0-2 2, Cardinal 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 44-88 15-20 112. GOLDEN STATE (103) D.Wright 3-8 0-0 6, Lee 11-20 8-9 30, Tyler 1-4 0-0 2, Jenkins 3-6 2-2 8, Thompson 8-17 5-5 24, Biedrins 1-1 0-0 2, Rush 4-7 0-0 9, Jefferson 1-4 4-6 7, McGuire 1-2 0-0 2, Robinson 4-8 0-0 10, Gladness 1-4 1-1 3. Totals 38-81 20-23 103. Dallas 27 36 26 23 — 112 Golden State 20 29 30 24 — 103 3-Point Goals—Dallas 9-24 (Kidd 3-5, Carter 2-4, Terry 2-6, Beaubois 1-2, Nowitzki 1-5, West 0-1, Marion 0-1), Golden State 7-18 (Thompson 3-6, Robinson 2-3, Jefferson 1-3, Rush 1-3, D.Wright 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Dallas 46 (Marion 12), Golden State 49 (Lee 8). Assists—Dallas 30 (Kidd 12), Golden State 27 (Thompson 8). Total Fouls—Dallas 18, Golden State 14. Technicals—West. A—17,929 (19,596).

Leaders Through Thursday’s Games SCORING G FG FT PTS AVG Bryant, LAL 56 558 372 1572 28.1 Durant, OKC 58 563 357 1597 27.5

James, MIA Love, MIN Westbrook, OKC Wade, MIA Anthony, NYK Aldridge, POR D. Williams, NJN Nowitzki, DAL Griffin, LAC Howard, ORL Ellis, MIL Lee, GOL Jefferson, UTA Paul, LAC Pierce, BOS Smith, ATL J. Johnson, ATL Jennings, MIL Howard, ORL Love, MIN Bynum, LAL Cousins, SAC Humphries, NJN Griffin, LAC Gasol, LAL Chandler, NYK Gortat, PHX Smith, ATL Rondo, BOS Nash, PHX Paul, LAC Calderon, TOR D. Williams, NJN Rubio, MIN

Home 24-6 24-5 23-6 21-9 21-7 21-10 20-9 18-12 21-8 17-11 20-11 13-16 12-17 14-15 8-22

Saturday’s Games Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 12:30 p.m. Cleveland at Washington, 4 p.m. Boston at New Jersey, 4:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Utah at Memphis, 5 p.m. Indiana at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. Phoenix at San Antonio, 6 p.m.

56 561 55 474 58 521 46 399 48 369 55 483 53 384 55 413 59 498 54 416 52 407 57 464 54 460 54 376 55 353 58 446 52 369 58 409 REBOUNDS G OFF 54 200 55 226 54 180 57 240 56 213 59 190 59 169 56 190 58 157 58 120 ASSISTS

340 379 302 223 256 223 248 274 219 281 199 219 127 220 258 177 137 156

1511 1432 1402 1036 1049 1191 1131 1164 1217 1113 1071 1147 1048 1042 1054 1096 980 1086

27.0 26.0 24.2 22.5 21.9 21.7 21.3 21.2 20.6 20.6 20.6 20.1 19.4 19.3 19.2 18.9 18.8 18.7

DEF 585 508 479 390 403 456 449 372 411 442

TOT 785 734 659 630 616 646 618 562 568 562

AVG 14.5 13.3 12.2 11.1 11.0 10.9 10.5 10.0 9.8 9.7

G AST AVG 48 549 11.4 54 598 11.1 54 481 8.9 53 468 8.8 53 457 8.6 41 336 8.2


D4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Zimmerman 3b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .192 LaRoche 1b 5 0 2 2 0 0 .345 Werth rf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .296 Nady lf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .211 Bernadina cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Ramos c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .278 1-B.Carroll pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Flores c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .429 G.Gonzalez p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .333 a-Tracy ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Clippard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lidge p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-DeRosa ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .077 Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 37 3 9 2 4 2 Cincinnati 000 000 002 0 — 2 5 0 Washington 000 020 000 1 — 3 9 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-flied out for G.Gonzalez in the 7th. b-struck out for LeCure in the 8th. c-walked for Lidge in the 9th. d-struck out for Arredondo in the 10th. 1-ran for Ramos in the 9th. E—Zimmerman (1). LOB—Cincinnati 6, Washington 10. 2B—Rolen (2), Bruce (2), Valdez (1), Mesoraco (1), Ramos (2). DP—Cincinnati 1.

AL Boxscores Twins 10, Angels 9 Los Angeles M.Izturis ss H.Kendrick 2b Pujols 1b Tor.Hunter rf Trumbo dh V.Wells lf Callaspo 3b Bo.Wilson c c-K.Morales ph Iannetta c Bourjos cf Totals

AB 4 4 5 5 4 5 5 2 1 1 3 39

R 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 9

H 2 0 1 1 2 2 1 2 0 0 2 13

BI 2 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 2 8

BB 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

SO 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .400 .208 .217 .320 .455 .217 .125 .667 .286 .357 .294

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 5 1 4 1 1 0 .348 J.Carroll ss 4 1 1 0 2 1 .143 Mauer c 5 2 3 3 0 1 .261 Morneau dh 5 1 1 2 0 0 .273 Willingham lf 5 2 3 1 0 2 .409 Parmelee 1b 5 1 2 0 0 2 .313 Valencia 3b 5 2 3 1 0 2 .263 Revere rf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .182 A.Casilla 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .143 a-Burroughs ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-L.Hughes ph-2b 1 0 1 2 0 0 .250 Totals 43 10 20 10 3 9 Los Angeles 050 010 012 — 9 13 0 Minnesota 000 030 34x — 10 20 1 a-was announced for A.Casilla in the 7th. b-hit a sacrifice fly for Burroughs in the 7th. c-flied out for Bo.Wilson in the 8th. E—Mauer (2). LOB—Los Angeles 8, Minnesota 13. 2B—V.Wells (1), Bourjos (1), Span (1), Parmelee (1), Valencia (1). HR—Trumbo (1), off Liriano; Mauer (1), off Haren; Willingham (4), off Jepsen; Morneau (1), off Thompson. SB—M.Izturis 2 (2), H.Kendrick (2), Trumbo (1), Bourjos (1), Span (1), L.Hughes (1). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Haren 5 9 3 3 1 7 94 6.97 Takahashi H, 1 2-3 2 0 0 1 0 24 7.71 Jepsen H, 1 2-3 3 3 3 0 0 18 10.13 S.Downs BS, 1-1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 5 0.00 Thompson L, 0-1 1 1-3 5 4 4 1 2 39 15.43 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Liriano 5 7 6 5 3 2 91 10.00 Al.Burnett 2 1 0 0 0 3 30 0.00 Burton 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 4 16.20 Duensing 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 18 0.00 Gray W, 2-0 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.00 Capps S, 2-2 1 3 2 2 0 0 24 6.00 T—3:44. A—31,782 (39,500).

Cincinnati IP H R Latos 5 5 2 LeCure 2 0 0 Arredondo 2 3 0 Simon L, 0-1 2-3 1 1 Washington IP H R G.Gonzalez 7 2 0 Clippard H, 2 1 1 0 Lidge BS, 1-2 1 2 2 Stammen W, 1-0 1 0 0 T—3:12. A—40,907 (41,487). Evan Vucci / The Associated Press

Cincinnati Reds relief pitcher Alfredo Simon (31) watches as Washington Nationals’ Roger Bernadina (2) cheers for Ryan Zimmerman (11) as he scores the winning run during the 10th inning of Thursday’s game in Washington. The Nationals won 3-2.

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES American League Tampa Bay Toronto Baltimore New York Boston

W 4 4 3 3 1

L 2 2 3 3 5

Detroit Chicago Kansas City Minnesota Cleveland

W 5 3 3 2 1

L 1 2 3 4 4

Texas Seattle Oakland Los Angeles

W 5 4 3 2

L 2 4 4 4

Rangers 5, Mariners 3 Seattle AB R Figgins cf 4 0 Liddi 3b 4 0 I.Suzuki rf 4 0 Smoak 1b 4 0 J.Montero dh 4 1 Seager 2b 4 1 Olivo c 4 0 C.Wells lf 3 0 a-M.Saunders ph 1 0 Ryan ss 3 1 Totals 35 3

H 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 7

BI 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 2 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 9

Avg. .303 .400 .303 .212 .280 .321 .143 .000 .250 .200

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 3 3 1 0 0 .370 M.Young dh 4 1 3 4 0 0 .321 Hamilton lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .357 Beltre 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .231 N.Cruz rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .160 Napoli 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .077 Torrealba c 4 1 2 0 0 0 .231 Alb.Gonzalez ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Gentry cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Totals 32 5 9 5 1 6 Seattle 000 001 101 — 3 7 0 Texas 100 020 20x — 5 9 1 a-grounded out for C.Wells in the 9th. E—Kinsler (1). LOB—Seattle 5, Texas 5. 2B—Figgins (2), Olivo (1), Ryan (3), Kinsler (3), Torrealba (1). HR—Seager (1), off D.Holland; M.Young (1), off Vargas. SB—Kinsler (1), Beltre (1). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Vargas L, 1-1 6 2-3 7 4 4 1 6 96 3.44 E.Ramirez 1 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 24 4.15 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA D.Holland W, 1-0 7 1-3 5 2 2 0 8 115 3.38 Uehara H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 0.00 Adams S, 1-1 1 2 1 1 0 1 18 1.80 T—2:33. A—31,513 (48,194).

Tigers 7, Rays 2 Tampa Bay Jennings cf C.Pena 1b Longoria 3b Keppinger dh Zobrist rf S.Rodriguez ss Lobaton c J.Molina c E.Johnson 2b Joyce lf Totals

AB 3 3 4 5 3 4 3 1 3 4 33

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 0 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 7

BI 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 5

SO 2 0 1 0 2 3 0 0 0 1 9

Avg. .250 .429 .476 .250 .238 .067 .200 .200 .143 .200

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .435 Boesch rf 4 0 2 4 0 0 .222 Mi.Cabrera 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .381 Fielder 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .364 D.Young lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .286 R.Santiago 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Avila c 3 2 2 1 1 0 .389 Jh.Peralta ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .304 Dirks dh 4 2 2 1 0 1 .400 Raburn 2b-lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .105 Totals 33 7 10 6 2 8 Tampa Bay 001 000 100 — 2 7 0 Detroit 000 030 22x — 7 10 0 LOB—Tampa Bay 11, Detroit 4. 2B—Longoria (3), J.Molina (2). 3B—Avila (1), Dirks (1). HR—C.Pena (3), off Smyly. SB—A.Jackson (1), Avila (1). DP—Detroit 1. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niemann L, 0-1 5 4 3 3 2 6 102 5.40 Howell 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 W.Davis 2-3 2 2 2 0 0 18 10.80 McGee 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 14 10.80 Jo.Peralta 1 2 2 2 0 1 14 16.20 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Smyly 4 4 1 1 3 4 90 2.25 Balester W, 1-0 2 0 1 1 2 2 39 3.86 Villarreal H, 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 5 0.00 Coke H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 3.38 Benoit H, 1 1 2 0 0 0 2 15 4.91 Valverde 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 4.91 Smyly pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Balester pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. T—3:23. A—30,288 (41,255).

NL Boxscores Phillies 3, Marlins 1 Miami Reyes ss Bonifacio cf H.Ramirez 3b Stanton rf Morrison lf G.Sanchez 1b Infante 2b J.Buck c Buehrle p Choate p Cishek p b-Dobbs ph Mujica p Totals

AB 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 2 0 0 1 0 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .233 .370 .160 .240 .188 .125 .360 .190 .000 ----.333 ---

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Victorino cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .333 Polanco 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .227 Rollins ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .280 Pence rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .391 Mayberry lf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .263 Wigginton 1b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .167 Ruiz c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .375 Galvis 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .150 Blanton p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Thome ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Qualls p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Papelbon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 3 8 3 0 3 Miami 000 010 000 — 1 6 1 Philadelphia 000 200 10x — 3 8 1 a-struck out for Blanton in the 7th. b-grounded out for Cishek in the 8th. E—Stanton (2), Galvis (1). LOB—Miami 7, Philadelphia 4. 2B—Infante (3), J.Buck (2), Pence

East Division Pct GB WCGB .667 — — .667 — — .500 1 1 .500 1 1 .167 3 3 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .833 — — .600 1½ ½ .500 2 1 .333 3 2 .200 3½ 2½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .714 — — .500 1½ 1 .429 2 1½ .333 2½ 2

Thursday’s Games Detroit 7, Tampa Bay 2 Minnesota 10, L.A. Angels 9 Texas 5, Seattle 3

National League

L10 4-2 4-2 3-3 3-3 1-5

Str Home Away L-1 3-0 1-2 W-2 2-1 2-1 L-3 3-3 0-0 W-3 0-0 3-3 L-2 0-0 1-5

L10 5-1 3-2 3-3 2-4 1-4

Str Home Away W-1 5-1 0-0 W-2 0-0 3-2 L-1 0-0 3-3 W-2 2-1 0-3 L-2 1-4 0-0

L10 5-2 4-4 3-4 2-4

Str Home Away W-1 5-2 0-0 L-1 0-0 4-4 W-1 3-4 0-0 L-2 1-2 1-2

Today’s Games L.A. Angels (E.Santana 0-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 0-1), 10:05 a.m. Tampa Bay (Price 1-0) at Boston (Beckett 0-1), 11:05 a.m. Detroit (Scherzer 0-0) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy 0-0), 11:10 a.m. Cleveland (D.Lowe 1-0) at Kansas City (Hochevar 1-0), 1:10 p.m. Baltimore (Tom.Hunter 1-0) at Toronto (Morrow 0-0), 4:07 p.m. Texas (M.Harrison 1-0) at Minnesota (Swarzak 0-1), 5:10 p.m. Oakland (Colon 1-1) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 1-0), 7:10 p.m.

Washington New York Philadelphia Atlanta Miami

W 5 4 3 2 2

L 2 2 3 4 5

St. Louis Milwaukee Houston Cincinnati Pittsburgh Chicago

W 5 4 3 3 2 2

L 2 3 3 4 4 5

Los Angeles Arizona Colorado San Francisco San Diego

W 6 5 2 2 2

L 1 1 4 4 5

East Division Pct GB WCGB .714 — — .667 ½ 1 .500 1½ 2 .333 2½ 3 .286 3 3½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .714 — — .571 1 1½ .500 1½ 2 .429 2 2½ .333 2½ 3 .286 3 3½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .857 — — .833 ½ — .333 3½ 3 .333 3½ 3 .286 4 3½

Thursday’s Games Washington 3, Cincinnati 2, 10 innings Chicago Cubs 8, Milwaukee 0 San Francisco 4, Colorado 2 Philadelphia 3, Miami 1 Arizona 3, San Diego 1 L.A. Dodgers 3, Pittsburgh 2

L10 5-2 4-2 3-3 2-4 2-5

Str Home Away W-3 1-0 4-2 L-2 4-2 0-0 W-2 2-1 1-2 W-2 0-0 2-4 L-2 0-1 2-4

L10 5-2 4-3 3-3 3-4 2-4 2-5

Str Home Away L-1 0-0 5-2 L-1 1-2 3-1 L-2 3-3 0-0 L-1 3-3 0-1 L-3 2-1 0-3 W-1 2-5 0-0

L10 6-1 5-1 2-4 2-4 2-5

Str Home Away W-3 3-0 3-1 W-1 3-0 2-1 L-1 1-2 1-2 W-1 0-0 2-4 L-1 2-5 0-0

Today’s Games Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 1-0) at St. Louis (Wainwright 0-1), 12:15 p.m. Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 0-0) at San Francisco (M.Cain 0-0), 1:35 p.m. Cincinnati (Arroyo 0-0) at Washington (Zimmermann 0-1), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Dickey 1-0) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 0-0), 4:05 p.m. Houston (Harrell 1-0) at Miami (Nolasco 1-0), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Wolf 0-1) at Atlanta (Jurrjens 0-1), 4:35 p.m. Arizona (D.Hudson 1-0) at Colorado (Nicasio 0-0), 5:40 p.m. San Diego (Richard 1-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Harang 0-1), 7:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Tigers 7, Rays 2: DETROIT — Brennan Boesch drove in four runs on his 27th birthday, leading Detroit past Tampa Bay for its fifth win in six games to start the season. Drew Smyly gave up a run in fourplus innings in his major league debut. Despite having the American League’s best record, Tigers starters have not earned a win. • Rangers 5, Mariners 3: ARLINGTON, Texas — Michael Young hit a two-run homer and had four RBIs to back Derek Holland, leading the Rangers over Seattle. Young put Texas ahead with an RBI single. Then with the Rangers leading 1-0 in the fifth inning for the third straight game, Young hit an oppositefield homer into the first row in right for a 3-0 lead against Jason Vargas (1-1). Young added a runscoring single in the eighth off Erasmo Ramirez. • Twins 10, Angels 9: MINNEAPOLIS — Justin Morneau hit a two-run, tiebreaking homer in the eighth inning and Minnesota rallied from six runs down to beat the Angels. Joe Mauer went deep, too, hitting a three-run shot off Dan Haren in the fifth that cut into a 6-0 lead the Angels built against Francisco Liriano. Every Twins batter had at least one of the team’s 20 hits, enough to make up for the 14 men left on base, including eight in scoring position.

• Giants 4, Rockies 2: DENVER — No win for the ages. Or, for that matter, the aged. Madison Bumgarner took a no-hit bid into the sixth and scattered four hits over 7 1⁄3 innings as San Francisco beat Colorado. At 49, the Rockies’ Jamie Moyer failed in his second attempt to become the oldest pitcher to win a major league game. • Dodgers 3, Pirates 2: LOS ANGELES — Chris Capuano struck out seven in his first home game with the Dodgers, who scored all of their runs in the first inning and completed a three-game sweep. The Dodgers’ 6-1 start is their best since 1981, when they went on to win the World Series. • Diamondbacks 3, Padres 1: SAN DIEGO — Ian Kennedy struck out nine in six innings to remain perfect for his career against San Diego, and Jason Kubel doubled in the go-ahead run in the sixth inning to lead Arizona to the victory. • Phillies 3, Marlins 1: PHILADELPHIA — Shane Victorino and Ty Wigginton homered, Joe Blanton pitched seven strong innings and Philadelphia beat Miami in the Marlins’ second game without suspended manager Ozzie Guillen. • Nationals 3, Reds 2: WASHINGTON — Ryan Zimmerman scored on Alfredo Simon’s wild pitch with two outs in the 10th inning, helping the Nationals extend their best start since moving to Washington. • Cubs 8, Brewers 0: CHICAGO — Matt Garza pitched three-hit ball for 8 2⁄3 innings, and the Cubs roughed up Zack Greinke to avoid a four-game sweep.

(2). HR—Victorino (1), off Buehrle. DP—Philadelphia 1. Miami IP Buehrle L, 0-2 6 1-3 Choate 1-3 Cishek 1-3 Mujica 1

off Buehrle; Wigginton (1), H 8 0 0 0

R 3 0 0 0

ER BB SO NP 3 0 2 92 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9

ERA 3.65 0.00 0.00 4.50

Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP Blanton W, 1-1 7 3 1 1 1 3 85 Qualls H, 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 22 Papelbon S, 2-2 1 2 0 0 0 0 12 T—2:20. A—44,751 (43,651).

ERA 2.35 0.00 3.00

Giants 4, Rockies 2 San Francisco Pagan cf Me.Cabrera lf Sandoval 3b Posey c Pill 1b Schierholtz rf Theriot 2b Burriss 2b B.Crawford ss Bumgarner p Romo p Ja.Lopez p Br.Wilson p Totals

AB 5 4 5 4 3 4 4 0 4 4 0 0 0 37

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

H 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 8

BI 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 7

Avg. .130 .385 .346 .294 .333 .222 .125 .375 .261 .200 -------

Colorado Scutaro 2b Fowler cf C.Gonzalez lf Tulowitzki ss Cuddyer rf Rosario c Pacheco 1b Rogers p a-E.Young ph Brothers p R.Betancourt p b-Giambi ph 1-J.Herrera pr Nelson 3b c-Helton ph

AB 5 2 4 3 4 4 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 3 1

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0

BI 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Avg. .182 .278 .269 .261 .375 .111 .143 --.500 ----.500 .000 .235 .211

Moyer p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Colvin 1b 2 1 1 1 1 0 .375 Totals 33 2 7 2 4 3 San Francisco 001 102 000 — 4 8 0 Colorado 000 001 001 — 2 7 2 a-grounded out for Rogers in the 7th. b-singled for R.Betancourt in the 9th. c-lined out for Nelson in the 9th. 1-ran for Giambi in the 9th. E—Nelson (2), Fowler (1). LOB—San Francisco 8, Colorado 8. 2B—Me.Cabrera (3), B.Crawford (3), Tulowitzki (1). 3B—Colvin (1). DP—San Francisco 1. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bumgarner W, 1-1 7 1-3 4 1 1 2 2 117 3.97 Romo H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 7 0.00 Ja.Lopez H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.00 Br.Wilson S, 1-1 1 3 1 1 1 1 32 9.00 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Moyer L, 0-2 5 2-3 8 4 2 1 3 112 4.22 Rogers 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 23 0.00 Brothers 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 0.00 R.Betancourt 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 0.00 T—3:20. A—25,860 (50,398).

Cubs 8, Brewers 0 Milwaukee R.Weeks 2b Morgan cf Braun lf Hart rf Aoki rf Gamel 1b Dillard p a-Kottaras ph Ale.Gonzalez ss Lucroy c C.Izturis 3b Greinke p M.Parra p Ishikawa 1b Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 1 3 0 1 3 2 3 1 1 1 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

SO 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 9

Avg. .179 .190 .304 .353 .333 .240 --.375 .167 .357 .000 .000 .000 .000

Chicago DeJesus rf Barney 2b S.Castro ss

AB 3 3 4

R 2 1 1

H 2 1 2

BI 0 1 2

BB 0 1 0

SO 0 0 0

Avg. .318 .259 .296

A.Soriano lf 3 1 1 2 0 1 .304 Mather lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 I.Stewart 3b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .292 LaHair 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .375 Clevenger c 4 2 3 0 0 0 .667 R.Johnson cf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .182 Garza p 4 0 0 0 0 4 .000 Camp p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 8 13 7 1 10 Milwaukee 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 Chicago 006 200 00x — 8 13 1 a-grounded out for Dillard in the 9th. E—Ale.Gonzalez (3), Garza (1). LOB—Milwaukee 5, Chicago 4. 2B—Clevenger 2 (3). SB—A.Soriano (1). DP—Milwaukee 3; Chicago 1. Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Greinke L, 1-1 3 2-3 9 8 8 1 5 84 6.75 M.Parra 2 1-3 2 0 0 0 4 35 3.86 Dillard 2 2 0 0 0 1 21 9.00 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garza W, 1-0 8 2-3 3 0 0 2 9 119 1.23 Camp 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 7.36 T—2:47. A—36,311 (41,009).

Nationals 3, Reds 2 (10 innings) Cincinnati Stubbs cf Cozart ss Votto 1b Rolen 3b Bruce rf Ludwick lf Valdez 2b Mesoraco c Latos p LeCure p b-Heisey ph Arredondo p d-Harris ph Simon p Totals

AB 5 5 3 4 3 4 4 4 2 0 1 0 1 0 36

R 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 3 3 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 12

Avg. .160 .370 .292 .143 .308 .133 .400 .222 .000 --.214 --.000 ---

Washington Desmond ss Espinosa 2b

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 1 3 0 0 0 .406 3 1 0 0 2 0 .182

ER BB SO NP 2 3 1 99 0 0 1 20 0 1 0 28 1 0 0 16 ER BB SO NP 0 0 7 97 0 0 2 23 2 2 0 24 0 0 3 10

ERA 5.59 3.60 5.40 8.10 ERA 3.38 2.25 6.00 1.93

Diamondbacks 3, Padres 1 Arizona Bloomquist ss Kubel lf G.Parra lf J.Upton rf M.Montero c C.Young cf Overbay 1b Blum 3b A.Hill 2b I.Kennedy p Ziegler p Shaw p b-R.Roberts ph Putz p Totals

AB 4 4 0 3 4 4 2 3 4 3 0 0 1 0 32

R 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6

BI 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 1 0 0 2 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .364 .211 .111 .133 .238 .364 .429 .000 .167 .000 ----.150 ---

San Diego Maybin cf Venable rf Headley 3b Guzman lf Alonso 1b Hundley c O.Hudson 2b Bartlett ss Bass p Owings p Spence p Gregerson p a-Parrino ph Cashner p Thatcher p Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 32

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 2 3 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 13

Avg. .214 .211 .174 .172 .190 .000 .130 .250 .000 .000 ----.286 -----

Arizona 000 011 010 — 3 6 0 San Diego 100 000 000 — 1 5 1 a-struck out for Gregerson in the 7th. b-flied out for Shaw in the 9th. E—Bartlett (2). LOB—Arizona 6, San Diego 6. 2B—Kubel (1), C.Young (3), A.Hill (1), Bartlett (1). 3B—Maybin (1). HR—C.Young (3), off Cashner. DP—San Diego 1. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP I.Kennedy W, 2-0 6 5 1 1 1 9 98 Ziegler H, 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 Shaw H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 Putz S, 4-4 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP Bass 4 1-3 3 1 1 2 5 88 Owings L, 0-2 2-3 1 1 0 1 0 24 Spence 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 Gregerson 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 2 26 Cashner 1 1 1 1 0 1 17 Thatcher 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 Owings pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. T—3:02. A—20,858 (42,691).

ERA 2.84 5.40 0.00 2.25 ERA 2.16 3.00 0.00 0.00 2.25 0.00

Dodgers 3, Pirates 2 Pittsburgh Tabata rf J.Harrison 2b d-Walker ph-2b McCutchen cf McGehee 1b Navarro lf Presley lf Barmes ss P.Alvarez 3b McKenry c e-McLouth ph Karstens p a-G.Jones ph b-Hague ph Resop p Grilli p f-Barajas ph Totals

AB 3 3 1 3 4 2 1 4 4 2 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 32

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 1 0 0 3 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .190 .250 .056 .409 .385 .000 .318 .105 .077 .333 .167 .000 .182 .125 ----.071

Los Angeles D.Gordon ss M.Ellis 2b Kemp cf Ethier rf J.Rivera lf Guerra p Loney 1b Uribe 3b A.Ellis c Capuano p MacDougal p Elbert p c-A.Kennedy ph Lindblom p Guerrier p Gwynn Jr. lf Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 0 4 4 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 30

R 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 0 2 2 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .200 .222 .414 .308 .320 --.050 .273 .235 .000 ----.167 ----.200

Pittsburgh 000 011 000 — 2 8 0 Los Angeles 300 000 00x — 3 8 0 a-was announced for Karstens in the 6th. b-lined out for G.Jones in the 6th. c-grounded out for Elbert in the 6th. d-grounded into a double play for J.Harrison in the 7th. e-grounded out for McKenry in the 9th. fpopped out for Grilli in the 9th. LOB—Pittsburgh 7, Los Angeles 7. 2B—McCutchen (2), Kemp (3). HR—McKenry (1), off Capuano. DP—Los Angeles 1. Pittsburgh IP H R Karstens L, 0-1 5 7 3 Resop 2 1 0 Grilli 1 0 0 Los Angeles IP H R Capuano W, 1-0 5 1-3 6 2 MacDougal H, 2 1-3 1 0 Elbert H, 1 1-3 0 0 Lindblom H, 1 1 1 0 Guerrier H, 3 1 0 0 Guerra S, 5-5 1 0 0 T—2:38. A—28,328 (56,000).

ER BB SO NP ERA 3 1 3 71 3.27 0 0 0 22 0.00 0 0 1 10 3.00 ER BB SO NP ERA 2 0 7 81 5.40 0 1 0 12 3.86 0 0 0 2 10.80 0 1 0 16 0.00 0 0 1 15 0.00 0 0 1 11 0.00

Leaders Through Thursday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Longoria, Tampa Bay, .476; Konerko, Chicago, .450; Sweeney, Boston, .444; AJackson, Detroit, .435; CPena, Tampa Bay, .429; Willingham, Minnesota, .409; Avila, Detroit, .389. HOME RUNS—Willingham, Minnesota, 4; MiCabrera, Detroit, 3; Cespedes, Oakland, 3; Kinsler, Texas, 3; CPena, Tampa Bay, 3; 13 tied at 2. STRIKEOUTS—Weaver, Los Angeles, 17; Lewis, Texas, 15; Sabathia, New York, 15; Verlander, Detroit, 14; DHolland, Texas, 13; FHernandez, Seattle, 13; Haren, Los Angeles, 12; Masterson, Cleveland, 12; Vargas, Seattle, 12. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—Freese, St. Louis, .429; Kemp, Los Angeles, .414; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, .409; Furcal, St. Louis, .407; Desmond, Washington, .406; Pence, Philadelphia, .391; MeCabrera, San Francisco, .385. HOME RUNS—Beltran, St. Louis, 3; Bruce, Cincinnati, 3; Freese, St. Louis, 3; Hart, Milwaukee, 3; Infante, Miami, 3; CYoung, Arizona, 3; 12 tied at 2. STRIKEOUTS—Volquez, San Diego, 15; Billingsley, Los Angeles, 15; Dempster, Chicago, 15; Strasburg, Washington, 14; Garza, Chicago, 14; GGonzalez, Washington, 13; JSantana, New York, 13.

Finally, M’s set to play at home By Tim Booth The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Mariners manager Eric Wedge is all set to return to his house tonight, for the first time in nearly 2½ months. From Washington state to Arizona, to Japan, back to Arizona, to California, to Texas and finally back to the Pacific Northwest, Seattle’s two-month, transcontinental spring training/opening road trip will finally come to an end tonight when it hosts Oakland. “I was just talking to my wife — we’ve been gone forever,” Wedge said. All the traveling has been taxing on the players and coaches. But the Mariners are off to a respectable 4-4 start considering the circumstances surrounding a road trip that started in Asia and concluded in Texas. Some of the excitement about Seattle’s start was tempered by dropping three of four in Texas, but the Mariners will play the next nine games at home. Oakland, Cleveland and the Chicago White Sox come to town for three games apiece before the Mariners head out on the road again. The Mariners completed their opening road trip with a 5-3 loss to the Rangers on Thursday. All told, they traveled more than 15,000 miles by air, including 11,500 to and from Tokyo. It’s an extraordinary early season amount for a team that’s regularly among the most traveled in all of baseball. “Even by baseball standards (it’s long),” Wedge said. “Like I said to all of our guys, I think everybody’s done a really nice job of handling it well. Nobody’s complained about it. Everybody’s been on point and doing what they need to be doing.” Felix Hernandez will make his third start of the season against Oakland in the home opener. The Mariners juggled their rotation after coming back from Japan so Hernandez would get the ball when Seattle finally returned home. He’ll be greeted by a huge home crowd and the return of his own cheering section — the hugely successful “King’s Court” — stationed out near the left-field foul pole with specially designed bright yellow t-shirts and a raucous college atmosphere. “It’ll be awesome, man. It’s going to be crazy,” Hernandez said. “A lot of opening days, eh? But being at home, it’s always good.” Hernandez (1-0) was brilliant in the season opener in Tokyo, throwing eight innings and allowing only one run, only to come away without a no-decision in Seattle’s 3-1 victory that took 11 innings. Back in the U.S., Hernandez was roughed up for six runs and eight hits in 6 1⁄3 innings by the same A’s lineup, yet came away with the victory in Oakland. The rough effort against the A’s only heighted concerns about Hernandez’s velocity appearing to be down. “Actually we did well against him last time, we just gave up a few too many runs,” Oakland manager Bob Melvin said. “Hopefully we can keep that same approach. We all know what he brings to the table and what he does confidence-wise for their team, but hopefully we can gain some confidence off the last time.” Melvin will send Bartolo Colon (1-1) to the mound for his third start of the year against Seattle. Like Hernandez, Colon pitched very well in Japan, retiring the first 13 batters he faced on his way to a 4-1 A’s victory. Colon gave up just one run and three hits in eight innings.


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BCS

PREP ROUNDUP

Summit defeats Bend High 6-3 in Intermountain Conference baseball Bulletin staff report D.J. Wilson went the distance on the mound for Summit on Thursday, scattering seven hits while striking out four to lead the Storm past Bend High 6-3 in Class 5A Intermountain Conference baseball action. Summit, which has won three of its past four games, improved to 2-1 in IMC play and 9-3 overall with the victory at Bend High. Nick Sweet sparked the Storm offense, going two for two with a double, two runs batted in and two runs scored. Landon Frost added a triple and two RBIs to pace Summit, which trailed 2-1 after three innings but scored twice in the top of the fourth inning and three times in the fifth to seize control of the game. Lava Bear starter Caleb Gardner took the loss. The Bend High junior gave up just three hits over four innings but allowed four runs, two of which were unearned. Ben Kramer led the Lava Bears at the plate, going two for three with a double, an RBI and a run scored. Both teams are back on the field today, weather permitting, as Summit hosts Crook County, while Bend High is at Mountain View. In other prep events on Thursday: BASEBALL Elmira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 ELMIRA — The Hawks dropped to 1-4 in Sky-Em League play with the shutout defeat. La Pine (2-11 overall) plays at Sweet Home today. SOFTBALL Elmira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0

D5

ELMIRA — Falcon pitcher Allyson Boytz threw a no-hitter as the Hawks fell to 0-4 in Sky-Em League play. Elmira scored six runs in the first inning and four more in the second in the league game. La Pine (2-12 overall) hosts Sweet Home today. BOYS TENNIS Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 PRINEVILLE — Tosh Harrington led Summit to a Intermountain Hybrid win over Crook County, defeating Oliver Peterson 6-0, 6-2 in the No. 1 singles match. Brady Slater and Jared Anderson of Crook County defeated Connor Steele and Davis Calande 6-3, 6-4 in the No. 1 doubles contest. Summit hosts Hermiston and Pendleton today. Crook County plays today at Ontario. Mountain View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 The visiting Cougars took three of four singles matches and split the four doubles contests to claim the Class 5A Intermountain Conference win. In No. 1 singles, Mountain View’s Matt Larraneta was a 6-1, 6-0 winner over Joel Johnson, while at No. 1 doubles, the Lava Bears’ Cameron Tulare and Casey Collier took a 4-6, 6-4, 10-5 decision over Matt Van Hemelryck and Dylan Wells. Both Bend and Mountain View play a pair of home matches today: The Lava Bears entertain Hermiston and Pendleton, while the Cougars are host to The Dalles Wahtonka and Hood River Valley. Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 MADRAS — The White Buffaloes split four singles matches and won all four doubles con-

tests to defeat the Outlaws in nonleague play. In the No. 1 doubles match, the Madras duo of Alexsis Penaloza and Caleb Freshour defeated Evan Rickards and Devon Calvin 7-6 (9), 61. The Outlaws’ Paul Fullhart won the No. 1 singles match against Ryan Hutchins 6-1, 6-3. Madras will host Molalla on Monday, while Sisters hosts Crook County on Tuesday. GIRLS TENNIS Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Haley Younger led the Storm to a home victory, winning the No. 1 singles match against Elsa Harris 6-0, 6-2. Summit swept the singles competition in the Intermountain Hybrid dual as Lindsay Brodeck, Ariel Steele and Morgan Demeyer also won matches for the Storm. Catie Brown and Kayla Morgan of Crook County posted a victory in the No. 1 doubles contest against Hannah Shephard and Kelsey Collis 6-4, 6-4. Both teams head east today as Crook County is at the Treasure Valley Invitational in Ontario, and Summit plays duals at Hermiston and Pendleton. Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Mountain View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 The Lava Bears won three of four singles matches en route to the Class 5A Intermountain Conference victory. Kaylee Tornay paced Bend High at Mountain View, knocking off Hayati Wolfenden 6-1, 6-3 in the No. 1 singles match. The Cougars’ No. 1 doubles team of Jess Cesar and Betsy Daniel led Mountain View with a 63, 6-2 win over Allison Daley and Claire Nichols. Today Bend is at Pendleton and Hermiston and the Cougars are at Hood River Valley and The Dalles Wahtonka.

Girls Continued from D1 Bend was a distant second at 404 on the par-72 Nicklaus Course, followed by Crook County at 410 and Redmond at 425. Mountain View was represented by just one player, but Cougar senior Hailey Ostrom shot an 87 to rank second among individual scorers for the event. Odiorne, a freshman, carded a 10-over 82 for her third tournament victory of the season. In general, scores soared above typical for nearly every player in the field, according to Bend coach Lowell Norby. “It wasn’t what it’s been all year for anybody today,” said Norby. “It was pretty cold out there, and Pronghorn is a difficult course — probably the toughest course we’ll play all year … that or Tetherow.” Summit coach Jerry Hackenbruck had much the same take. Andy Tullis / The Bulletin “I think all the girls are taken aback when they play Prong- Mountain View High School golfer Hailey Ostrom tees off on No. 16 during a tournament at Pronghorn Club on horn,” Hackenbruck said. “It’s a Thursday afternoon. Ostrom finished in second place. tough course for the girls — for anybody, really. But we like to have our girls play a real diffiNorby noted that, aside from in practice to bring those things with his team’s performance cult course. It makes them better Froelich, no Bend High player to the course today,” Norby said. Thursday. down the road.” broke 100 for the tournament, “We make a bad shot and get “I’m pleased that our girls Bend’s Heidi Froelich and Sum- which the coach said was unchar- down on ourselves, and fall in the played as well as they could, unmit’s Kristen Parr tied for third in acteristic of his team regardless trap of not leaving that bad shot der the conditions,” he said. the individual scoring with scores of the playing conditions or the behind.” Mountain View hosts Bend, of 89. Next were Crook County’s difficulty of the golf course. Summit’s Hackenbruck said Summit, Redmond and Crook Kirsti Kelso and Redmond’s Chel“I don’t think we translated the that, while he saw room for im- County at Awbrey Glen Golf Club sea Driggers, both at 91. things we’ve been working on provement, he was not unhappy on Tuesday.

Continued from D1 The devil, as is his custom, plunges his pitchfork into the details. Would the semifinals be played in bowls, where the bowl experience becomes a business trip and fans of the winning team would have to travel twice? Or would the semis be contested on campus? The smaller classifications make it work, but Division I-A scale is much different. National semifinals would be the second-largest productions of a season, with enormous attention from the news media. BCS bowls and NCAA Final Fours in large cities can handle the congestion. Could Manhattan, Kan., or Stillwater, Okla.? This concern has been quietly expressed. Also discussed as a four-team option would be holding the semis and final at neutral sites through a bid process not branded as bowl games. If this were a PowerPoint presentation, Cowboys Stadium and Jerry Jones would fill the screen. A piece of two of the models may work best: semifinals at bowl sites — the winner could get an Orange Bowl trophy like the AFC champion hoists the Lamar Hunt Trophy — and the finalists advance to the bidded-out College Bowl (OK, you come up with a name). Applying last year’s BCS standings, the winners between LSU-Stanford and Alabama-Oklahoma State would have met in a championship. Three other models for determining a national champion are offered in the paper, and fall into two categories: Not enough and too much. First are two ideas that aren’t bold enough. One thought is to stay the current BCS course but eliminate the limit of teams from one conference and do away with the automatic qualifiers that have kept out higher-ranked teams. The other thought is the original “plus-one,” selecting two teams after the bowls. The third model intends to preserve the Rose Bowl. The two highest-ranked teams from the Big Ten and Pac-12 would always play in Pasadena, Calif., and if it were part of a national-title structure, fine. If not, fine. The Rose Bowl was/is/always will be special and has survived the invasion from Oklahoma, Texas and TCU. The Granddaddy can keep its Big Ten/Pac12 game, dropping in the standings for a matchup if the champions are involved in a four-team playoff. But if Oregon and Wisconsin were topfour teams, they’d have to line up with the rest of college football and engage in the playoff. It doesn’t work otherwise. The commissioners have talked about more than a championship. Also on the table are models to reshape the highestprofile bowls, with matchups determined by a committee “with the aim of providing the most evenly matched and attractive games that make geographic sense for the participants.” Five to 10 bowls would be involved, and this would be the postseason experience for conference champions of non-playoff participants plus at-large teams. BCS officials meet later this month in Florida, but Hancock said no action would be taken on the postseason format’s future. Conference meetings in May and June will bring university presidents up to speed, and a new college football postseason world is expected to be unveiled by July 1, to become effective with the 2014 season. It won’t arrive with the suddenness of a motorcycle crash, but change is coming. An official close to the BCS told me recently, “Don’t be surprised if the BCS as we know it goes away.”

Aldridge Boys Continued from D1 Bend High finished second with a 330, Redmond placed third with a 339 and Crook County ended the day fourth with a score of 383. “This is a real treat,” Storm coach Mark Tichenor said about playing

the Nicklaus Course. “Like a lot of our courses here in Central Oregon, it’s a high-quality championship golf course.” Jaired Rodmaker led the Lava Bears with a 79, while Jon McGrew paced Crook County with a 91. “This is a great opportunity and a great challenge,” Tichenor said.

Kyle Wells added an 84 for Summit and Max Higlin recorded a 90 for the Storm, who look to make a run at the Class 5A state championship in May. Ortega’s 76 was especially impressive as he shot an 88 on the same course a year ago. “It’s great to see that improve-

ment,” Tichenor said. “I’m super proud. He’s our warrior.” All four teams are back on the links Monday at Bend Golf and Country Club. Today, Redmond hosts the 16-team High Desert Challenge, including Bend and Sisters, on the Ridge Course at Eagle Crest Resort.

PREP SCOREBOARD Golf Thursday’s Results ——— Girls ——— High Desert Classic At Pronghorn, Nicklaus Course Par 72 Team scores — Summit 360, Bend 404, Crook County 410, Redmond 425, Mountain View inc. Medalist — Madison Odiorne, Summit, 82 SUMMIT (360) — Madison Odiorne, 41-41—82; Kristen Parr, 45-44—89; Ashley Dolinar, 46-48—94; Megan Mitchell, 49-46—95; Alyssa Kerry, 52-47—99. BEND (404) — Heidi Froelich, 44-45—89; Madeline Rice, 51-50—101; Danae Walker, 54-52—106; Lili Bornio, 55-53—108; Haley Nichols, 53-64—117. CROOK COUNTY (410) — Kirsti Kelso, 45-46—91; Sierra Morgan, 46-54—100; Kalie Solomon, 55-54—109; Caitlin Dalton, 52-58—110; Chelsea Shank, 61-58—119. REDMOND (425) — Chelsea Driggers, 46-45—91; Emily Roundtree, 55-48—103; Cayla Lussier, 54-51—105; Ann Williams, 64-62—126; Raelyn Lambert, 61-70—131. MOUNTAIN VIEW (inc.) — Hailey Ostrom, 48-39—87. Boys ——— High Desert Classic At Pronghorn, Nicklaus Course Par 72 Team scores — Summit 313, Bend 330, Redmond 339, Crook County 383. Co-medalists — Cole Ortega, Summit, 36-40—76, and Dylan Cramer, Summit, 40-36—76. SUMMIT (313) — Cole Ortega, 36-40—76; Dylan Cramer, 40-36—76; Ryan Blackwell, 36-41—77; Kyle Wells, 4044—84; Max Higlin, 41-49—90. BEND (330) — Jaired Rodmaker, 40-39—79; Ryan DeCastilhos, 42-40—82; Jack Klar, 42-42—84; Ryan Crownover, 43-42—85; Chapin Pedersen, 42-44—86.

REDMOND (339) — Mason Rodby, 37-40—77; Tyler Herrmann, 43-40—83; Tim Messner, 44-42—86; Ben Moore, 44-49—93; Riley Cron, 48-45—93. CROOK COUNTY (383) — Jon McGrew, 42-49—91; Kody Kuk, 48-46—94; Ben McLane, 48-47—95; Zach Harris, 46-57—103; Willy Lockman, 49-62—111.

Pitchers/catchers not available. 2B—Culver: Knepp. ——— Second game Crook County JV 011 002 0 — 4 Culver 211 301 x — 8 Pitchers/catchers not available. 2B—Culver: Porter.

Softball

Tennis

Thursday’s Results ——— Class 4A Sky-Em League ——— (5 innings) La Pine 000 00 — 0 0 3 Elmira 643 1x — 14 8 0 K. Parrish and Fisher; Boytz and Thoms. W—Boytz. L—K. Parrish. 2B—Elmira: Boytz. 3B—Elmira: Shaeffer. HR—Elmira: Loy.

Thursday’s Results ——— Boys ——— Class 5A Intermountain Conference Mountain View 5, Bend 3 At Bend High Singles — Matt Larraneta, MV, def. Joel Johnson, B, 6-1, 6-0; Philip Atkinson, MV, def. Ankit Chopra, B, 6-3, 6-2; Bryce Tipton, MV, def. Colton Davis, 6-0, 6-2; Zach Hite, B, def. Garrett Sheller, MV, 6-4, 6-3. Doubles — Cameron Tulare/Casey Collier, B, def. Matt Van Hemlryck/Dylan Wells, MV, 4-6, 6-4, 10-5. Kristian Raymond/Jasper Harris, B, def. Toby Webb/Brooks Larraneta, MV, 7-6, 6-2. Dillon Warner/Chad Schoenborn, MV, def. Amit Chopra/Isaac Johnson, B, 6-0, 6-4; Garrett Menster/Albert Kolodziejczyk, MV, def/ Derek Miller/Tim Stumpfig, Bend, 6-3, 6-7, 10-6. ——— Intermountain Hybrid Summit 7, Crook County 1 At Crook County Singles — Tosh Harrington, Summit, def. Oliver Peterson, Crook County, 6-0, 6-2; Alek Fefferman, Summit, def. Brick Woodward, Crook County, 6-1, 6-3. Doubles — Slater/Anderson, Crook County, def. Steele/Calande, Summit, 6-3, 6-4; Audette/Demonty, Summit, def. Rotta and Curtis, 6-0, 6-1; Summit wins by forfeit; Summit wins by forfeit. ——— Class 4A Nonconference

Baseball Thursday’s results ——— Class 5A Intermountain Conference ——— Summit 010 230 0 — 6 5 2 Bend 020 000 1 — 3 7 1 Wilson and Mingus; Gardner, DeGaetano (5) and Kramer. W—Wilson. L—Gardner. 2B—Summit: Wilson, Rooks, Sweet; Bend: Kramer. 3B—Summit: Frost. Wednesday’s Results ——— Class 2A/1A Nonleague ——— First game Crook County JV 043 050 Culver 001 200

0 2

— 12 — 5

Madras 6, Sisters 2 At Madras Singles — Paul Fullhart, Sisters, def. Ryan Hutchins, Madras, 6-1, 6-3; Luke Gnos, Sisters, def. Ryan Fine, Madras, 6-0, 6-1; Carlos Garcia, Madras, def. Ryan Houston, sisters, 6-1, 6-2; Josh Pillette, Madras, def. Tyrell Gilmore, Sisters, 6-7 (7), 6-0, 6-0. Doubles — Penaloza/Freshour, Madras, def. Rickards/Calvin, Sisters, 7-6(9), 6-1; Garcia/Gemelas, Madras, def. Baldessari/Standon, Sisters, 6-2, 6-0; Jack-Parks/Turner, Madras, def. Kaping/Stengel, Sisters, 6-0, 6-4; Vasquez/Maldonado, Madras, def. Small/Horton, Sisters, 6-1, 6-0. Girls ——— Class 5A Intermountain Conference Bend 5, Mountain View 3 At Mountain View Singles — Kaylee Tornay, B, def. Hayati Wolfenden, MV, 61, 6-3; Jenna Wells, MV, def. Katie Fowlds, B, 6-3, 6-3; Mariah Taunton, B, def. Justyne Graham, MV, 6-1, 6-3; Missy Watkins, B, def. Bermet Alikeeva , MV, 7-6 (5), 3-6, 10-2. Doubles — Cesar/Daniel, MV, def. Daley/Nichols, B, 6-3, 6-2; Anderson/Mays, MV, def. Palcic/Peterson, B, 6-1, 6-3; Perkins/Stranak, B, def. Cole/Horrell, MV, 6-4, 7-5; Bailey/Clair, B, def. Coplin/Walters, MV, 6-3, 7-5. ——— Intermountain Hybrid Summit 6, Crook County 2 At Summit Singles — Haley Younger, Summit, def. Elsa Harris, Crook County, 6-0, 6-2; Lindsay Brodeck, Summit, def. Natasha Wiersch, Crook County, 6-0, 6-0; Ariel Steele, Summit, def. Brooke Buswell, Crook County, 6-2, 6-0; Morgan DeMeyer, Summit def. Jackie Nelson, Crook County, 6-1, 6-0. Doubles — Morgan/Brown, Crook County, def. Shephard/ Collis, Summit, 6-4, 6-4; Apperson/Pham, Crook County, def. Evans/Forest, Summit, 6-3, 2-6, 10-2; Caine/Dodson, Summit, def. Teater/Fraser, Crook County, 6-3, 6-1; Handley/Todd, Summit, def. Bowers/Slawter, Crook County, 6-2, 6-2.

Continued from D1 Aldridge is a finalist for the U.S. men’s basketball team that will play in the London Olympics. He told reporters on Thursday that he was unsure if he’d be recovered in time to play, and wouldn’t rush his rehab. Aldridge’s surgery is the latest blow to the Blazers in what has been a turbulent season. Before it started, Aldridge had to undergo a procedure to treat a heart condition that kept him out of training camp. On the same day that his procedure was announced, All-Star guard Brandon Roy revealed that he was retiring because of problems with both his knees, and the team said that former No. 1 draft pick Greg Oden had suffered a setback in his recovery from knee surgery. The Blazers struggled in the lockoutshortened season, and the team dismissed popular coach Nate McMillan at the NBA trade deadline. Two starters, Marcus Camby and Gerald Wallace, were traded, and Oden was waived on the same day. Although Portland (28-31) has not been eliminated from the playoffs, they are 4 1⁄2 games out of the eighth and final playoff spot in the Western Conference. The team has seven games remaining. The Blazers have gone 8-8 since McMillan’s firing under interim coach Kaleb Canales, who has been juggling his lineups to give younger players a look. Portland was coming off a 118-110 victory over Golden State on Wednesday night. “I’m very disappointed,” Aldridge said. “I feel we have a really good group of guys here. ... I feel we’re starting to find a really good rhythm together. So it’s definitely hard to do right now.”


D6

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

A  S  C   Please email Adventure Sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CLIMBING BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CLIMBING: Competition team; ages 10-18; focuses on rope/sport climbing with opportunities to compete in USA Climbing’s Sport Climbing Series; 4-6 p.m.; Mondays through Thursdays through July 2; mike@ bendenduranceacademy.org; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CLIMBING: Development team; ages 10-18; focuses on rope/sport climbing with trips to regional bouldering/climbing areas; 4-6 p.m.; Mondays and Wednesdays through July 2; mike@ bendenduranceacademy.org; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org.

CYCLING MBSEF CYCLING PROGRAM: May through August for both road biking (age 12 and older) and mountain biking (age 8 and older); 541-388-0002, mbsef@mbsef. org, www.mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLING PROGRAMS: Include options in youth development, junior teams, U23/collegiate teams, camps, races and shuttles; age 6 and older; mountain biking, road cycling and cyclocross; info@bendenduranceacademy. org; www.bendenduranceacdemy. org. WEEKLY ROAD RIDE: Saturdays, noon; weekly group road rides starting from Nancy P’s Baking Co., 1054 Milwaukee Ave. in Bend; Glen Bates, glenbates@ bendcable.com, 541-382-4675.

MULTISPORT CENTRAL OREGON EXTREME ADVENTURE COMBO: Grades three through seven; explore sports in a safe, structured environment; all gear provided; Wednesday, April 25, skating at Redmond Skate Park; Thursday, April 26, BMX at High Desert Sports Complex; 4:30-5:30 p.m. both days; $25; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Saturday, May 19; Central Oregon’s signature sporting event; the relay race has six legs that include alpine skiing/ snowboarding, cross-country skiing, biking, running, canoe/ kayaking and sprinting to the finish; participants compete as teams, pairs, or individuals; starts at Mt. Bachelor and finishes at Bend’s Les Schwab Amphitheater; entry fees range from $37 to $90 per person; family teams are $165 to $190; a benefit for MBSEF; www.pppbend. com. THE URBAN GPS ECOCHALLENGE: Trips on paths and trails along Deschutes River through Old Mill District shops and Farewell Bend Park daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; like a scavenger hunt with clues and checkpoints; $65, includes guide, GPS and instruction, water, materials; 541-389-8359, 800962-2862; www.wanderlusttours. com.

PADDLING KAYAKING CLASSES: Sundays, 4-6 p.m.; for all ages; weekly classes and open pool; equipment provided to those who preregister, first come, first served otherwise; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $3; 541-548-7275; www.raprd. org

ROLLER DERBY RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY: Practice with the Renegades Sundays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Bend’s Midtown Ballroom; dropin fee of $7; loaner gear available; contact nmonroe94@gmail.com. PRACTICE WITH THE LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS ALL-FEMALE ROLLER DERBY LEAGUE: 3 to 5 p.m. on Sundays and 8-10 p.m. on Tuesdays; at Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center; $6 per session, $40 per month; deemoralizer@lavacityrollerdolls. com or 541-306-7364.

TRAINING PROGRAM: This 25-week program includes two coached workouts, technical t-shirt, and training program; returning members $100, new members $125; starts April 21; meets at FootZone in Bend; www. usafitbend.com; 541-550-8686. THREE SISTERS MARATHON DISCOUNT SIGN UP DAY: Register at Fleet Feet in Bend on April 21, from noon to 4 p.m., and save 10 percent; Three Sisters Marathon, Marathon Relay or 5K is June 9; 541-388-1860; rosemary@ smithrockrace.com; www. smithrockracegroup.com. COLLEEN/MAX’S GROUP TRAIL RUN NO. 1: With FootZone employees and runners Colleen Moyer and Max King; Saturday, April 28; 7:30 a.m.; meet at FootZone and carpool to trailhead; for experienced runners; take water and post-run snack, and dress appropriately for the weather; free; register at www. footzonebend.com/events. REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays for a 4- to 8-mile run; contact Dan Edwards at rundanorun1985@ gmail.com or 541-419-0889. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. TEAM XTREME’S RUNNING CLUB IN REDMOND: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Xtreme Fitness Center, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 2to 5-mile run; free; 541-923-6662.

SCUBA DIVING BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA DIVING CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing; certification for anyone 12 and older; vacation refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners at 541-312-2727 or 541-287-2727.

SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING FIS SPRING SERIES SPEED DOWNHILL: For alpine race athletes from around the world; April 13-18 at Mt. Bachelor on Cliffhanger run; 541-388-0002, mbsef@mbsef.org, www.mbsef. org. MBSEF MAY DAY RACE: For alpine race athletes from around the Pacific Northwest; April 2022 at Mt. Bachelor on Cliffhanger run; 541-388-0002, mbsef@ mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. BIG WAVE CHALLENGE: Saturday, May 12, at Mt. Bachelor; inspired by legendary surfer and Mt. Bachelor ambassador Gerry Lopez; snowboard-only event will be held in the slopestyle arena under the Pine Marten chairlift; a series of huge sweeping banked corners, quarter pipes and spines will be shaped into wave-like features; riders will be judged on control, speed and power; mtbmarketing@mtbachelor.com. SAMMY CARLSON INVITATIONAL: Saturday, May 19, noon to 2 p.m., at Mt. Bachelor; freeski event hosted by X Games gold medalist Sammy Carlson; world’s top skiers will compete on a 100-foot big air jump to a 30-foot wall-ride feature for a shot at part of the $20,000 cash purse; invite-only event for participants, but the jump will be in close view from the West Village Lodge and the Clearing Rock Bar for spectators; www. mtbachelor.com. SHRED WITH LAURENNE: Ski racing camp with Laurenne Ross, U.S. Ski Team member and Bend resident; May 19-20 or May 2627, at Mt. Bachelor; Olympic gold medalist and three-time overall World Cup giant slalom champion Ted Ligety will be a guest host for the first camp, May 19-20; $200 per person for one, two-day camp; www.mtbachelor.com. ALPINE, NORDIC, AND FREERIDE SUMMER CAMPS: MBSEF will hold summer alpine, nordic and freeride ski and snowboard camps at Mt. Bachelor June 15-29; 541-388-0002, mbsef@ mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org.

RUNNING PETERSON RIDGE RUMBLE TRAIL RACE: Sunday, April 15, 7 a.m.; trail race on Peterson Ridge Trail System (20 and 40 miles); benefits Sisters High School cross-country; 20-mile race is $50; 40-mile race is $60; start and finish at Sisters Middle School; must register by April 13; 541-549-1298; sean@ petersonridgerumble.com; www. petersonridgerumble.com. USA FIT BEND MARATHON

SNOWSHOEING FREE SNOWSHOE TOURS: Discover Your Northwest provides free snowshoe tours every Saturday and Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; snowshoes provided, no reservations required; age 8 and older; donations accepted; 90-minute tours leave from West Village Lodge at Mt. Bachelor; 541-3834055; terra.kemper@discovernw. org.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Bend skier Kevin Healy, 25, lofts over a step-up jump in the terrain park near Skyliner chairlift at Mt. Bachelor Wednesday afternoon.

Spring Continued from D1 But after skiing hardpacked snow most of the morning, I switched to my snowboard, and I noticed the snow beginning to soften a bit just after noon. It became more forgiving, but not ideal. Now with winter back again, we’ll have to wait at least a few more days for spring conditions. Tom Lomax, the mountain manager at Bachelor, says the transition from winter snow to spring corn snow can be a three- to five-day process, a period when temperatures are above freezing during the day and below freezing at night. “Perfect corn snow, on a nongroomed run, the sun softens it up to slush, making it carvable and smooth,” Lomax says. “The tracks melt in the afternoon, and it sets up firm that night. The next day, the sun hits it and softens it up again.” In spring, the snow conditions on the mountain can change rapidly, depending on the temperature. A run that is icy and crunchy can become soft and smooth in less than an hour, according to Lomax. Some areas can also get too warm, making the slush excessively deep and sticky. Most skiers and snowboarders looking for corn snow find it off piste. But groomed runs can offer a half-inch to an inch of soft slush as well on warmer days. “A connoisseur of corn snow would prefer nongroomed slopes, just like a connoisseur of powder,” Lomax explains. “When (corn snow) is perfect, it’s somewhat like making a powder turn.” But some days when temperatures are not high enough to soften the tracked-out ungroomed slopes, venturing off the groomed runs can be a bumpy, painful endeavor. Such was the case at Bachelor on Monday, when off-piste areas were just too frozen to ski or snowboard. But on the groomed run along the Summit chairlift, the wind was transporting “fresh” snow across the slope in some spots, making for nearly an inch of powder that I turned through effortlessly on my skis. It had not snowed in three days, but there I was, skiing fresh snow. Even in the spring, the wind can have a dramatic effect on snow conditions. “It’ll take any loose particles that are on the ridges, pick them up in the stream, and blow them onto areas across the slope,” Lomax says of the wind. “That can really be a bonus.” After abundant March snowfall, all the areas off the summit should hold well through the spring, according to Lomax. Bachelor is scheduled to remain open through May 27 (though limited to Thursdays through Sundays beginning May 3). Spring operations begin this Monday, with only the Pine Marten, Skyliner and, weather permitting, Summit chairlifts running. The lifts will run from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lomax says 2,000 of Bachelor’s 3,000 acres will still be

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

“Perfect corn snow, on a nongroomed run, the sun softens it up to slush, making it carvable and smooth. The tracks melt in the afternoon, and it sets up firm that night. The next day, the sun hits it and softens it up again.” — Tom Lomax, mountain manager at Mt. Bachelor

available to ski, with most slopes off the summit open, except the lower west side. The season closure of the Northwest Express lift this Monday will make that area inaccessible. “You can ski a lot of terrain off the west side down to the 21 Road,” Lomax says. “It brings you back to the saddle of the Cinder Cone and Leeway Run (to the Pine Marten lift).” The east side of the summit will also remain open, though snowriders must take the catch line east, as it will be closed to the west. A cut and groomed trail runs from underneath the closed Sunrise lift and back to the open Skyliner lift. “That opens up the ability

to ski the (east) backside, and Cow’s Face on the southeast side, and that’s really what is the best in the spring,” Lomax says. “That gets more sun and tends to corn up the best. The west side can get overcooked in the afternoon sun.” Another popular Central Oregon ski and snowboard area, Hoodoo Mountain Resort, plans to be open this Saturday and Sunday, and April 21-22, before closing for the season, according to mountain manager Matthew McFarland. While Bachelor currently boasts a 13-foot base of snow, Hoodoo is not far behind with 10 feet. “There’s tons of snow,” McFarland says. “It’s never a lack

of snow, it’s just a lack of interest. It’s hard to stay open for four people. But there should be some good corn snow (this weekend and next). Spring slush is always a lot of fun. I like it on a snowboard more than powder.” The forecast calls for considerable sunshine this weekend on the slopes, but winter always seems to linger. “Our opportunities for sunny spring days are pretty good,” Lomax says. “But it can be winter all the way through.” — Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com

RV INDEPENDENCE - GO WHERE YOU WANT! WHEN YOU WANT!

BLOW-OUT PRICES

NEW & ED PRE-OWN

OST GET THE MUR O Y FOR MONEY!

23rd Anniversary April 12-15, 2012 • Deschutes Expo Center

4 DAYS ONLY! Show Hours: Thurs.-Sat. 9am-6pm • Sun. 10am-5pm AT THE DESCHUTES EXPO CENTER FREE SHOW * FREE PARKING * FREE PRIZES HUNDREDS OF RVS TO BE SOLD AT A FRACTION OF THEIR CURRENT VALUE. • FACTORY REPS ON HAND. • NEW & USED RV’S, BOATS • THIS IS THE LARGEST CENTRAL OREGON RV SHOW OF 2012! • CLASS A MOTOR HOMES, CLASS C MOTOR HOMES, 5TH WHEELS, TRAILERS, ULTRA LIGHT TRAILERS, TOY HAULERS, CAMPERS • SAVE TIME AND SHOP OVER 40 OF AMERICA MOST POPULAR BRANDS The Best Selection and Prices in Central Oregon • Save Time and Shop Over 50 Brands Subject to prior sale • First Come First Served • Don’t Wait • Trade-ins welcome • Factory Incentives BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

BIG COUNTRY RV

FREE SHOW | FREE PARKING | FREE PRIZES


B US IN E S S

E

Stock listings, E2-3 Calendar, E4 News of Record, E4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

s

NASDAQ

CLOSE 3,055.55 CHANGE +39.09 +1.30%

IN BRIEF Trade deficit narrows The U.S. trade deficit narrowed in February for the largest percentage drop since May 2009, according to a government report released Thursday that led analysts to raise estimates for first-quarter economic growth. The deficit measuring the difference between the nation’s imports and exports hit $46 billion in February, compared with $52.5 billion in January — a 12.4 percent drop, according to the Commerce Department.

s

DOW JONES

www.bendbulletin.com/business CLOSE 12,986.58 CHANGE +181.19 +1.41%

s

S&P 500

CLOSE 1,387.57 CHANGE +18.86 +1.38%

s

BONDS

10-year Treasury

CLOSE 2.05 CHANGE +.99%

s

$1679.50 s SILVER GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$20.50

Bend rental prices are climbing By Elon Glucklich

Portland property developer Herb Hoffart and Co. has several homes for rent near Mt. Washington Drive and Skyliners Road in Bend.

The Bulletin

The competition for Central Oregon rental properties is getting fiercer, as available properties dwindle and homes on the rental market consistently see multiple applicants. That competition means many rental homes cost 20 percent more today than just a year ago. Former homeowners who lost their properties through foreclosure or short sale are adding to the region’s tenant pool, driving inventory down and prices up, local property management officials say.

Pete Erickson The Bulletin

The Central Oregon Rental Owners Association last week released its 2012 rental survey. Its findings, compiled over the

first quarter of 2012, showed that just 4.4 percent of the more than 5,700 rental units surveyed were vacant over

that time, the lowest rate since the real estate market crashed in 2008. In addition to low vacancy rates, the 2012 survey showed price increases in rental homes over the last year, and slight jumps in apartment rents. Of the 940 three-bedroom houses surveyed in Bend, for instance, rent averaged $1,231 so far this year. In 2011, rent on a three-bedroom home was $1,012. For a four-bedroom house, average rent jumped from $1,255 in 2011 to $1,489 this year. See Rentals / E4

Grocery prices up in first quarter A basket of meats, cheese and other grocery store products cost 6.9 percent more in the first quarter of 2012 than it did a year earlier, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation. A group of 16 items, including cheddar cheese, sirloin-tip roast, salad, orange juice and eggs, cost consumers $52.47 during the first three months of the year, the farm group said. During the same period last year, the price was $49.07. In the fourth quarter of 2011, it cost $49.23.

Google revenue jumps 24 percent Google Inc. reported first-quarter revenue of $10.65 billion, a 24 percent rise over the same quarter a year ago, and said it would introduce a new class of stock in what it called a “2-for-1 stock split.” For the three months ended March 31, profit totaled $2.89 billion, or $8.75 a share, compared with $1.8 billion, or $5.51; that was better than Wall Street expected. The company said its operating income was $3.39 billion, or 32 percent of revenue. — From wire reports

Central Oregon fuel prices Price per gallon for regular unleaded gas and diesel, as posted Thursday at AAA Fuel Price Finder (www.aaaorid.com).

GASOLINE • Ron’s Oil, 62980 U.S. Highway 97, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . $3.98 • La Pine Mini Mart, 52530 U.S. Highway 97, La Pine. . . . . . . . . . $3.99 • Safeway, 80 N.E. Cedar St. Madras . . . . . . .$4.05 • Chevron, 61160 U.S. Highway 97, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . $4.08 • Chevron, 1001 Railway, Sisters . . .$4.13 • Chevron, 1210 U.S. Highway 97, Madras . . . . . . . . . .$4.15 • Chevron, 398 N.W. Third St., Prineville . . . . . . . . .$4.16 • Chevron, 1501 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond . . . . . . . .$4.16 • Chevron, 1400 N.W. College Way, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . .$4.19 • Gordy’s Truck Stop, 17045 Whitney Road, La Pine. . . . . . . . . . .$4.19

DIESEL • Ron’s Oil, 62980 U.S. Highway 97, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . $4.31 • Chevron, 2005 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . . . . . . $4.46 • Chevron, 1210 U.S. Highway 97, Madras . . . . . . . . . $4.49 Ashley Brothers / The Bulletin

Fred R. Conrad / New York Times News Service

Andy Dunn, the founder of the online clothes retailer Bonobos, recently partnered with department store giant Nordstrom in a symbolic deal that gives Bonobos a distribution outlet and Nordstrom access to Bonobos’ online expertise.

Retailers team up to find a perfect fit By Evelyn M. Rusli New York Times News Service

When Andy Dunn helped start Bonobos five years ago, he wanted to shake up the retail industry with a menswear brand exclusively sold online. Now, Dunn, 33, is embracing the brickand-mortar model, striking a partnership with Nordstrom, the 111-year-old department store. It’s a symbiotic deal. Bonobos will get $16.4 million in cash and more than 100 stores to sell its clothes, while Nordstrom

will gain expertise on email marketing and online branding. “We’ve been thinking about where growth is going to come from across all retail over the next 10 years,” said Jamie Nordstrom, the head of Nordstrom.com and the great-grandson of the company’s founder. “And certainly square-footage growth is not where that growth is coming from.” As consumers grow increasingly comfortable online, price-wise and technology-focused, established brick-and-mortar

players and fledgling e-commerce sites are finding they need each other. With sales under pressure, traditional retailers, which have struggled to establish a unique online identity, are trying to tap into the innovative, fast-paced startup mentality. At the other end of the spectrum, young Internet companies, facing fierce competition and the limits of their growth, are warming to deals with industry giants that have substantial resources and significant distribution outlets. See Retail / E4

CLOSE $32.515 CHANGE +$1.004

AUTO NEWS

When cars can talk, crashes may be avoided Ashley Halsey III The Washington Post

Fender benders, rearenders and those three-car pileups that back up traffic may be going the way of the buggy whip. Within a few years, cars whizzing down the highway will begin chatting among themselves. Once they all are equipped to join the conversation, every car will know the speed, distance and direction of every other car close enough to pose a risk. Are cars slowing abruptly just beyond that tractor-trailer you can’t see around? You may get an alert, but if there’s no time for discussion, you may just feel your brakes squeeze on. A speeding pickup truck seems likely to run the red light as you approach the intersection? Your car may decide to stop rather than put you in danger. Just as it has changed so many other aspects of life, wireless technology is about to revolutionize the way we drive. “This is really a gamechanging technology that could help cars from crashing into one another,” said Christopher Poe, assistant director at the Texas Transportation Institute. “You, in essence, could help prevent two cars from ever colliding, that being the ultimate goal.”

A simple concept The concept is fairly simple. All cars will be equipped with short-range transmitters that use dedicated bandwidth to send information 10 times per second about where they are and what they are doing. The transmitters also will receive and make sense of the same information from every other vehicle within range. The car will decide whether to give a heads-up to the driver or take appropriate defensive action itself. A driver alert could be a verbal warning, a seat vibration or a slight jerk on the seat belt. See Cars / E3

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Foreclosure activity dropped to near 5-year low in March By Alex Veiga The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — More U.S. homes are entering the foreclosure process, setting the stage for a surge in properties repossessed by lenders this year. The number of homes that received first-time foreclosure notices rose 7 percent in March from the previous month, foreclosure listing firm RealtyTrac Inc. said Thursday. That marks the third consecutive monthly increase this year and reflects stepped-up efforts by banks to take action against homeowners who fail to keep up with mortgage payments. “We’re not out of the woods yet with foreclosures,” said Daren Blomquist, a

“We’re not out of the woods yet with foreclosures. There are more batches of foreclosures coming through the pipeline.” — Daren Blomquist, vice president, RealtyTrac

vice president at RealtyTrac. “There are more batches of foreclosures coming through the pipeline.” Foreclosure activity, as measured by the number of homes receiving foreclosure-related notices, slowed sharply in the fall of 2010 when claims surfaced that some banks and mortgage

servicers were processing foreclosures without verifying documents. A $25 billion settlement reached in February between the nation’s biggest mortgage lenders and state officials has paved the way for banks to take action on unpaid mortgages, many of which have been in a procedural limbo for months or years. And it’s those homes that could ultimately be foreclosedupon and end up back on the market. Foreclosures typically sell at a discount to other homes and can drag down the value of neighboring properties, so the prospect of more foreclosures means it could take longer for home prices in some areas to bounce back. See Foreclosure / E4

Now more than ever...

Know who you bank with. We are your community bank. Our president and board of directors are local and we are proud to know each of our clients personally. Now more than ever, it is good to know who you bank with. 1000 SW Disk Dr. Bend, OR 97702

541-848-4444 www.highdesertbank.com

“Local Service – Local Knowledge”


E2

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

Consolidated stock listings N m

D

C

A-B-C-D AAR 0.30 ABB Ltd 0.71 ABM 0.58 ACE Ltd 1.64 AES Corp AFLAC 1.32 AGCO AGL Res 1.84 AK Steel 0.20 AMC Net n AOL ASML Hld 0.59 AT&T Inc 1.76 ATP O&G AU Optron 0.14 AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons 0.06 Aastrom AbtLab 2.04 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 AbitibiB AboveNet Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaRlt 0.72 Accenture 1.35 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Accuride Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePw h ActivsBliz 0.18 Actuant 0.04 Acuity 0.52 Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran 0.36 AdvAmer 0.25 AdvAuto 0.24 AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi 0.11 AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AdvActBear AdvisBd AecomTch AegeanMP 0.04 Aegon 0.13 Aegon cap 1.59 Aegon 7.25 1.81 AerCap Aeropostl AEterna g Aetna 0.70 AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agilent 0.40 Agnico g 0.80 Agrium g 0.45 AirProd 2.56 Aircastle 0.60 Airgas 1.28 AkamaiT Akorn AlaskAir s AlaskCom 0.20 Albemarle 0.80 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 Alere AlexBld 1.26 AlexREE 1.96 AlexcoR g Alexion s Alexza h AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 AlliData AllnceRes 3.96 AlliBInco 0.48 AlliBern 1.14 AlliantEgy 1.80 AlliantTch 0.80 AlldNevG AlldWldA 1.50 AllisonT n AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate 0.88 AlnylamP AlonUSA 0.16 AlphaNRs Alphatec h AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 1.00 AlteraCp lf 0.32 AlterraCap 0.56 Altria 1.64 Alumina 0.24 AlumChina 0.04 Alvarion AmBev 1.23 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren 1.60 Amerigrp AMovilL s 0.28 AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.00 AmCapLtd ACapMtg n 1.90 AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.88 AEqInvLf 0.12 AmExp 0.80 AFnclGrp 0.70 AGreet 0.60 AIG wt AmIntlGrp ARltyCT n 0.70 AmSupr AmTower 0.84 AVangrd 0.10 AmWtrWks 0.92 Amerigas 3.05 Amrign Ameriprise 1.12 AmeriBrgn 0.52 Ametek 0.24 Amgen 1.44 AmkorT lf Amphenol 0.42 Amylin Amyris Anadarko 0.36 Anadigc AnalogDev 1.20 Ancestry AnglogldA 0.49 ABInBev 1.57 AnikaTh Anixter Ann Inc Annaly 2.37 Annies n Ansys AntaresP Anworth 0.90 Aon plc 0.60 A123 Sys Apache 0.68 AptInv 0.72 ApogeeE 0.33 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 0.80 ApolloRM n 1.05 Apple Inc 10.60 ApldIndlT 0.84 ApldMatl 0.36 AMCC Approach AquaAm 0.66 ArQule Arbitron 0.40 ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap s ArchC pfC 1.69 ArchCoal 0.44 ArchDan 0.70 ArcosDor n 0.18 ArcticCat ArdeaBio ArenaPhm AresCap 1.48 AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest 0.12 ArmHld 0.16 ArmourRsd 1.20 ArmstrWld 8.55 ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArthroCre ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRt s AshfordHT 0.44 Ashland 0.70 AsiaInfoL AspenTech AsscdBanc 0.20 AsdEstat 0.72 Assurant 0.72 AssuredG 0.36 AstoriaF 0.52 AstraZen 2.80 athenahlth AtlPwr g 1.15 AtlasAir AtlasEngy 0.96 AtlasPpln 2.20 Atmel ATMOS 1.38 AtwoodOcn AuRico g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv 1.88 AutoData 1.58 AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch 0.52

16.25 19.93 23.60 73.02 12.66 44.21 45.61 38.20 7.65 42.75 25.60 48.91 30.84 6.80 4.98 1.10 6.14 25.30 2.19 59.72 48.17 7.30 13.47 83.07 3.05 40.17 22.00 64.13 11.83 19.36 7.23 8.32 9.64 28.06 24.64 .81 12.48 28.50 55.44 14.13 33.55 30.65 10.48 89.95 12.42 7.92 4.89 3.04 .63 21.03 85.26 22.08 7.54 4.95 23.67 24.75 10.80 21.04 .70 48.19 110.74 11.32 4.19 43.53 34.34 86.38 89.49 11.96 89.19 36.54 11.57 35.27 2.60 63.72 2.06 10.17 23.36 49.00 71.64 6.75 90.10 .62 27.27 17.99 41.37 93.19 125.04 58.31 8.11 14.54 42.84 51.89 31.85 69.26 22.11 1.82 23.88 16.29 32.87 10.33 9.20 16.08 2.23 6.43 4.70 16.46 38.42 22.62 31.31 5.00 12.34 .58 42.74 9.71 190.69 31.57 13.75 31.56 66.86 24.16 1.04 11.19 44.31 30.05 8.71 21.90 16.70 37.37 12.21 58.04 38.15 14.89 12.30 33.23 11.00 4.24 63.81 24.84 33.37 38.79 15.48 54.73 38.81 48.25 66.92 5.91 59.11 24.28 3.61 76.59 2.38 38.83 23.37 34.30 72.29 14.72 70.87 28.46 15.79 41.00 63.54 3.13 6.43 48.50 .93 94.90 26.16 13.30 37.17 7.33 18.54 622.77 39.10 12.07 6.85 36.93 21.71 7.55 37.32 18.24 37.86 25.37 10.63 31.10 18.63 42.30 20.26 2.81 16.15 15.27 34.56 18.63 28.16 6.78 46.28 3.47 11.11 41.04 25.25 21.43 27.70 21.26 8.94 61.65 12.26 20.02 13.53 16.19 39.45 15.24 9.23 45.03 71.61 13.74 47.42 36.85 33.29 9.21 31.12 44.03 9.11 4.78 33.34 40.46 64.82 54.98 378.73 18.30 38.15

-.04 +.38 +.20 +.91 +.18 +1.17 +1.86 +.26 +.48 +.24 +1.29 +1.80 +.39 +.28 +.11 +.03 +.25 +.30 +.11 +.06 +.72 +.04 +.03 +.01 +.14 +.77 +.26 +.51 +.14 +.25 +.41 +.33 -.51 +1.12 +.02 +.02 +.11 +.47 +1.33 +.20 +.55 -.08 +.29 +.16 +.28 -.06 +.21 +.01 -.43 -.40 +.59 +.49 +.07 +.07 +.03 +.23 +.42 -.02 +.50 +3.17 -.14 +.17 +1.06 +1.97 +1.62 +2.15 +.15 +1.35 +.56 -.05 +.81 +1.74 +.02 +.27 +.39 +.75 +1.44 +.46 +.29 +.03 +.52 +.26 +2.14 -.12 +1.47 +2.79 -.03 +.15 +.49 +1.70 +1.26 +.36 +.26 +.01 +.35 +.31 +.63 +.05 +.41 +1.45 -.01 +.11 +.07 +.10 +.86 +.13 +.10 +.12 +.60 -.02 +.60 +2.72 +.40 +.36 +.09 +3.96 +.72 +.08 +.16 +.38 +.16 +.40 +.07 +.25 +.10 +.26 +1.09 +.61 +.01 +.79 +1.36 +.02 +.72 +.66 +.27 -.31 -.16 +.88 +.03 +.83 +.19 +.20 +1.47 +.52 -.08 +2.22 +.03 +.90 +.20 +.70 +1.20 +.92 +.78 +.69 +.09 +1.90 +.65 +.08 +.11 +.56 -.01 +2.09 +.56 -.44 +.91 +.16 +.09 -3.43 +.56 +.15 +.08 +1.93 +.08 -.32 -.03 +.79 +.07 +.12 +.72 +.11 +.25 +.30 +.11 -.20 +.15 +.13 +1.54 +.10 +.44 +.03 +.57 -.01 +.16 +.78 +.50 +.28 +.37 +.01 +.24 +1.80 +.22 +.31 +.23 +.23 +.56 +.49 +.18 +.61 +.42 +.06 +.84 +.14 -.55 +.21 +.21 +1.66 +.48 +.11 +.12 +.84 +.94 +.36 +1.68 +.07 +.67

N m

D

AvalnRare AvalonBay 3.88 AvanirPhm AVEO Ph AveryD 1.08 AvidTch AvisBudg Avista 1.16 Avnet Avon 0.92 Axcelis AXIS Cap 0.96 B&G Foods 1.08 BB&T Cp 0.80 BBCN Bcp BBVABFrn 1.10 BCE g 2.17 BE Aero BGC Ptrs 0.68 BHP BillLt 2.20 BHPBil plc 2.20 BJsRest BMC Sft BP PLC 1.92 BPZ Res BRE 1.54 BRFBrasil 0.42 BT Grp 1.23 BabckWil Bacterin Baidu BakrHu 0.60 BallCorp 0.40 BallyTech BanColum 1.12 BcBilVArg 0.57 BcoBrad pf 0.81 BcoMacro 2.08 BcoSantSA 0.82 BcoSBrasil 0.36 BcpSouth 0.04 BkofAm 0.04 BkAm pfH 2.05 BkAm wtA BkHawaii 1.80 BkIreld rs BkMont g 2.80 BkNYMel 0.52 BkNova g 2.20 BkAtl A rs Banro g BarcGSOil BiPAg BiPNG Barclay 0.39 Bar iPVix BarVixMdT Bard 0.76 BarnesNob BarrickG 0.60 BasicEnSv Baxter 1.34 BaytexE g 2.64 BeacnRfg Beam Inc 0.82 BeazerHm BectDck 1.80 BedBath Belden 0.20 Belo 0.32 Bemis 1.00 BenchElec Berkley 0.32 BerkH B BerryPet 0.32 BestBuy 0.64 BigLots BBarrett BioRefLab BioDlvry lf BioFuelE h BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR 0.86 BioSante h BioScrip BlkRKelso 1.04 BlackRock 6.00 BlkBldAm 1.58 BlkDebtStr 0.32 BlkEngyRs 1.62 BlkEEqDv 0.68 BlkIntlG&I 0.88 BlkRsCmdy 1.40 Blackstone 0.88 BlockHR 0.80 BlueNile Boeing 1.76 Boise Inc 0.48 BonTon 0.20 BorgWarn BostPrv 0.04 BostProp 2.20 BostonSci BttmlnT BoydGm BradyCp 0.74 Brandyw 0.60 Braskem 1.05 BreitBurn 1.80 BridgptEd BrigStrat 0.44 Brightcv n Brightpnt BrigusG g Brinker 0.64 Brinks 0.40 BrMySq 1.36 Broadcom 0.40 BroadrdgF 0.64 BroadSoft BroadVisn Broadwd h BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g 0.56 BrkfInfra 1.50 BrkfldOfPr 0.56 BrklneB 0.34 BrooksAuto 0.32 BrwnBrn 0.34 BrownShoe 0.28 BrukerCp Brunswick 0.05 Buckeye 4.15 BuckTch 0.28 Buckle 0.80 Buenavent 0.63 BuffaloWW BungeLt 1.00 C&J Egy n CA Inc 1.00 CBL Asc 0.88 CBOE 0.48 CBRE GRE 0.54 CBRE Grp CBS B 0.40 CEVA Inc CF Inds 1.60 CH Robins 1.32 CIT Grp CLECO 1.25 CME Grp 8.92 CMS Eng 0.96 CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC 6.81 CPFL En s 1.84 CRH 0.86 CSX s 0.48 CTC Media 0.52 CVB Fncl 0.34 CVR Engy 0.32 CVR Ptrs 1.57 CVS Care 0.65 CYS Invest 2.00 Cabelas CblvsNY s 0.60 Cabot 0.72 CabotOG s 0.08 CACI Cadence Caesars n CalDive CalaGDyIn 0.74 CalaStrTR 0.84 Calgon CalifWtr s 0.63 Calix CallGolf 0.04 CallonPet Calpine CalumetSp 2.12 CamdenPT 2.24 Cameco g 0.40 Cameron CampSp 1.16 CdnNRy g 1.50 CdnNRs gs 0.42 CP Rwy g 1.20 CdnSolar CapOne 0.20 CapitlSrce 0.04 CapFedFn 0.30 Caplease 0.26 CapsteadM 1.84 CpstnTrb h CarboCer 0.96 CardnlHlth 0.86 Cardiom g Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd CaribouC Carlisle 0.72 CarMax Carmike Carnival 1.00 CarpTech 0.72 Carrizo Carters CashAm 0.14 CasualMal Caterpillar 1.84 CathayGen 0.04 Cavium CedarRlty 0.20 CelSci Celanese 0.24 Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh Celsion Cemex 0.32 Cemig pf 1.78 CenovusE 0.88 Centene CenterPnt 0.81 CnElBras pf 0.03 CenElBras 1.56

C 2.74 139.66 2.97 10.85 30.64 8.50 13.00 25.38 35.29 23.07 1.58 33.49 21.16 31.18 10.66 5.92 40.04 44.81 6.94 71.81 61.02 49.15 39.19 42.96 3.96 49.63 19.02 34.94 24.30 2.46 151.32 41.77 42.81 46.53 65.77 7.14 17.16 17.79 6.70 9.03 13.00 9.17 25.24 4.40 47.70 6.10 59.00 23.94 55.65 5.34 4.33 26.03 55.16 3.75 14.33 18.31 48.24 96.57 10.98 42.20 15.86 58.71 49.93 25.24 57.01 3.03 76.28 70.14 35.29 6.95 31.44 15.54 36.97 80.06 45.76 22.24 45.35 23.47 23.62 2.84 .59 125.50 33.00 18.80 .61 6.96 9.54 201.71 21.64 4.17 24.91 7.40 7.75 14.52 14.79 16.99 31.55 73.50 7.53 7.71 83.68 9.59 102.01 5.82 26.32 7.98 30.29 11.03 15.80 17.80 21.60 17.69 18.41 7.50 .79 27.54 22.78 32.55 37.41 23.41 41.44 29.10 .41 5.55 18.11 31.01 30.85 17.15 9.06 12.03 23.92 8.90 14.77 25.30 58.09 33.17 45.22 42.03 87.05 68.41 17.41 26.69 18.33 26.98 8.00 18.86 32.18 22.94 188.89 64.53 40.83 39.18 287.49 21.53 42.57 7.58 203.32 29.57 20.07 22.06 11.13 11.59 28.38 28.00 43.48 13.29 38.83 13.42 42.90 30.68 60.93 11.60 15.64 3.63 8.54 9.58 14.81 17.66 7.84 6.70 5.77 16.99 26.56 64.63 21.02 52.20 33.14 79.17 33.15 76.47 3.39 54.65 6.66 11.81 4.18 13.14 .99 95.65 41.30 .61 25.55 26.01 7.35 16.99 51.13 31.81 13.45 31.44 53.15 26.81 49.35 44.26 3.19 106.44 17.32 29.52 5.01 .44 47.07 9.21 78.58 1.21 4.19 1.98 7.06 25.37 34.56 43.70 19.26 12.23 8.81

+.05 +2.32 -.07 -.06 +.96 -1.78 +.21 +.14 +.46 +.36 +.06 +.09 +.60 +.17 +.18 +.35 +1.36 +.11 +2.47 +2.13 +1.25 +.86 +.91 +.15 +.90 +.07 +1.02 +.56 +.05 +5.16 +1.29 +.08 +.34 +.26 +.36 -.32 +.48 +.17 +.31 +.17 +.16 +.62 +.58 +1.07 +.47 +.97 +.51 +.13 +.31 +.72 -.03 +.84 -1.73 -1.62 +.68 -.75 +1.16 +.29 +.58 +1.92 +.27 +.32 +.16 +.23 +.07 +.07 +.21 +.35 +.26 +.53 +1.01 +1.75 +.28 +.99 +.61 +.35 +.07 +.47 +.72 +.26 +.03 +.11 +.14 +3.90 -.05 +.04 +.23 +.08 +.13 +.13 +.16 +.18 +1.33 +1.73 +.21 +.08 +2.26 +.19 +1.56 +.08 +.76 +.15 +.49 +.23 +.49 -.49 +.27 +.34 +.73 +.01 +.05 +.36 +.62 -.04 +.87 -.04 +2.94 +2.65 +.01 +.06 +.63 +.51 +.78 +.25 +.09 +.21 +.20 +.19 +.34 +.60 -.28 +.81 +.57 +.84 +.76 +.70 -.01 +.24 +.18 +.08 +.10 +.59 +.54 +.97 +7.04 +.53 +.49 +.36 +3.36 +.01 +3.05 +.22 +6.12 -.50 +.68 +.75 +.17 +.14 +.17 +1.10 -.27 +.19 +.57 -.01 +1.25 +.87 +.91 +.22 +.36 -.10 +.10 +.12 +.23 +.04 -.11 +.12 +.18 +.30 -.19 +1.09 +1.32 +1.31 +1.59 +1.64 +2.39 +.08 +.92 +.12 +.11 +.07 +.15 -.01 +1.48 +.04 +.01 -.01 +.36 +.22 -.46 +1.48 +.07 +.15 +.19 +1.47 +.92 +.45 -.13 +.09 +4.69 +.25 +.83 +.01 -.01 +2.34 +.25 +.06 +.01 -.26 +.13 +.16 -.05 +.83 +1.82 +.19 +.23 +.19

N m

D

CentEuro CFCda g 0.01 CentAl CntryLink 2.90 Cenveo Cepheid Cerner s CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura CheniereEn ChesEng 0.35 ChesGran n 1.31 Chevron 3.24 ChicB&I 0.20 Chicos 0.21 ChildPlace Chimera 0.48 ChiArmM ChiCeram ChiCBlood ChinaLife 0.55 ChinaMble 2.14 ChinaNutri ChinaUni 0.16 ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb 1.64 ChungTel 1.91 ChurchD s 0.96 CienaCorp Cigna 0.04 Cimarex 0.48 CinciBell CinnFin 1.61 Cinemark 0.84 Cintas 0.54 Cirrus Cisco 0.32 Citigrp rs 0.04 CitzRpB rs CitrixSys CityNC 1.00 CityTlcm 0.77 Clarcor 0.48 ClaudeR g CleanEngy CleanH s Cleantch rs ClearChn s 6.08 Clearwire ClevBioL h CliffsNRs 2.50 Clorox 2.40 CloudPeak Coach 0.90 CobaltIEn CocaCola 2.04 CocaCE 0.64 Coeur CoffeeH 0.12 CogentC Cognex 0.40 CognizTech CohStInfra 1.44 CohStQIR 0.72 Coinstar ColdwtrCrk Colfax ColgPal 2.48 CollctvBrd ColonPT 0.72 ColumLb h ColSprtw 0.88 Comcast 0.65 Comc spcl 0.65 Comerica 0.40 CmcBMO 0.92 CmclMtls 0.48 CmclVehcl CmwREIT 2.00 CmtyBkSy 1.04 CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao 0.17 CompDivHd 1.44 CmplGnom CompSci 0.80 Compuwre ComstkRs Comverse Con-Way 0.40 ConAgra 0.96 ConchoRes ConcurTch Conns ConocPhil 2.64 ConsolEngy 0.50 ConEd 2.42 ConstantC ConstellA ContlRes Cnvrgys CooperCo 0.06 Cooper Ind 1.24 CooperTire 0.42 CopaHold 1.64 Copart s Copel 1.00 CoreLabs 1.12 CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts 0.80 Corning 0.30 CorpExc 0.70 CorpOffP 1.10 CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd 0.28 Costco 0.96 Cntwd pfB 1.75 CousPrp 0.18 Covance CovantaH 0.60 CoventryH 0.50 Covidien 0.90 CowenGp Crane 1.04 Credicp 2.30 CS VS3xSlv CSVS2xVxS CSVelIVSt s CredSuiss 0.82 CrSuiHiY 0.32 Cree Inc CreXus 1.17 CrimsnExp Crocs CrosstexE 0.44 CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubeSmart 0.32 CubistPh CullenFr 1.84 Cummins 1.60 Curis CurEuro 0.30 CurAstla 4.03 CypSemi 0.44 CytRx h Cytec 0.50 Cytori DCT Indl 0.28 DDR Corp 0.48 DDi Corp 0.48 DFC Glbl DHT Hldgs 0.12 DNP Selct 0.78 DR Horton 0.15 DSW Inc 0.60 DTE 2.35 DanaHldg 0.20 Danaher 0.10 Darden 1.72 Darling DaVita DeVry 0.30 DealrTrk DeanFds DeckrsOut Deere 1.84 DejourE g Delcath Delek 0.15 Dell Inc DelphiAu n DelphiFn 0.48 DeltaAir Deluxe 1.00 DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dentsply 0.22 Depomed DeutschBk 1.07 DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevonE 0.80 Dex One h DexCom Diageo 2.68 DiamndF lf DiaOffs 0.50 DiamRk 0.32 DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg 0.50 Diebold 1.14 DigitalRlt 2.92 DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards 0.20 Diodes DirecTV A Dx30TBr rs DxEMBll rs 2.24 DxFnBull rs DrxTcBull DirSCBear DirFnBear DirLCBear DirDGldBr 1.98 DirDGldBll 1.02 DrxTcBear DrxEnBear DrxSOXBll DirEMBear Dir30TrBull 0.54 DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover 0.40 DiscCm A

C 4.66 +.43 22.03 +.41 8.71 +.44 38.47 +.35 2.82 +.11 38.82 +.19 73.55 -.36 3.68 35.69 +.65 6.04 +.12 71.37 +2.04 61.06 +.50 62.51 +.05 29.79 +.15 2.05 -.10 16.89 +.19 15.70 +.29 20.66 +.67 25.32 +.35 102.59 +1.64 42.93 +1.40 15.06 +.25 49.23 -.12 2.80 +.03 .82 -.08 3.48 +.12 2.85 +.15 39.83 +1.28 54.73 +.74 .45 +.07 16.65 +.32 15.45 +.48 433.22 +10.56 8.63 +.22 2.03 +.16 70.51 +.90 30.60 +.19 50.17 +.35 16.22 +.61 48.42 +.84 70.94 +2.45 3.77 -.11 34.03 +.54 22.29 +.47 38.68 +.32 23.93 +.62 20.06 +.05 34.63 +1.04 16.44 +.37 74.86 +.81 52.03 +.84 12.37 -.30 48.24 +.49 .96 +.01 20.22 +.54 66.30 +.52 4.79 +.02 7.66 +.06 2.19 +.07 1.62 71.16 +4.42 69.85 +.37 15.41 +.37 74.85 +1.20 29.57 +.91 72.22 +.10 27.55 +.12 23.02 +1.18 9.45 -.26 18.47 40.95 +.25 76.76 +1.39 17.15 +.09 9.98 +.23 61.31 -1.84 .96 -.01 32.24 +.66 97.44 +.90 19.30 +.46 21.53 +.26 .69 +.01 48.79 +1.40 29.68 +.71 29.18 +.59 31.35 +.69 40.06 +.90 15.05 +.78 10.39 +.01 18.57 +.22 28.36 +.34 22.39 +1.01 51.60 +1.00 49.67 +2.53 14.90 +.20 2.75 27.69 +.30 8.71 +.14 16.28 +1.02 6.48 +.10 33.21 +1.41 25.94 +.14 98.70 +3.49 55.98 +1.05 17.47 -.01 74.53 +.98 34.75 +1.01 57.87 +.48 29.18 +.92 21.49 +.28 83.33 +2.87 13.27 +.22 83.63 +1.74 62.26 +1.63 15.05 +.18 81.30 -.19 25.64 +.49 24.00 +.18 134.57 +2.26 15.77 +.35 3.85 +.08 56.15 +.43 13.73 +.20 40.13 +.33 21.84 +.22 29.12 +.42 14.14 -.52 87.18 -.14 23.82 -.01 7.23 +.09 46.44 +1.26 15.88 +.10 33.31 +.54 53.90 +1.40 2.54 +.04 47.55 +1.16 133.84 -.43 38.59 +2.70 8.02 -1.39 11.08 +.86 27.04 +.95 3.13 +.04 32.54 +1.35 10.32 4.54 +.28 20.77 +.77 13.71 +.23 54.38 +.49 36.98 +.22 21.69 +.63 11.70 +.13 40.86 +.26 57.08 +.46 116.05 +4.24 4.65 +.07 131.28 +.85 104.52 +1.42 14.72 +.25 .36 +.01 64.06 +6.57 2.42 +.06 5.72 +.05 14.18 +.13 12.96 +.01 17.31 +.68 .84 -.00 10.32 +.17 15.19 +.46 54.20 +.71 54.52 +.40 14.45 +.50 54.49 +.59 49.79 -.06 16.54 +.01 86.74 +1.09 32.53 +.82 29.85 +.56 11.58 +.04 62.90 -.25 79.34 +1.79 .32 +.01 3.07 +.11 15.76 +.55 16.27 +.01 31.77 +.28 45.46 +.06 10.26 +.35 22.46 +.33 18.46 +.83 9.30 -.13 1.54 +.20 39.74 +.86 6.27 +.29 46.46 +1.40 53.51 +1.09 4.59 -.08 69.13 +1.41 1.27 -.02 9.78 +.13 97.79 +1.66 20.93 -.40 66.02 +1.51 10.28 +.26 7.86 +.16 9.92 +.21 49.85 +.91 38.20 +.65 72.57 +.71 18.16 +.42 12.92 +.35 63.15 +.78 22.83 +.82 49.24 +.24 74.22 +.98 102.40 +7.38 103.37 +5.34 64.34 +2.49 18.95 -.93 21.46 -1.27 20.89 -.93 44.41 -5.35 14.77 +1.42 8.80 -.37 10.53 -.73 39.57 +2.06 12.64 -1.08 60.89 -.71 57.15 +2.42 82.42 +3.38 46.82 +2.78 33.27 +.59 51.29 +.58

N m

D

DiscCm C DiscovLab DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGen DollarTh DollarTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar g Donldson s DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DuffPhelp DukeEngy DukeRlty Dunkin n DurectCp h Dycom Dynavax Dynegy DynexCap

2.00 0.60 0.65

2.11 3.00 1.40 0.32 1.04 0.60 1.26 1.28 1.36 0.48 0.12 1.64 0.48 0.36 1.00 0.68 0.60

1.12

C 48.19 2.59 32.01 42.15 33.75 37.47 9.72 46.63 79.36 95.91 50.30 35.37 94.77 35.50 12.17 1.79 22.17 60.86 32.67 39.14 17.42 48.93 4.59 66.38 3.41 52.41 23.67 16.15 20.38 14.18 31.29 .71 22.37 4.79 .38 9.26

+.59 -.03 +.08 +.78 +.24 +.47 +.11 +.77 +.13 +1.17 +.13 -.13 +.88 +.60 +.11 +.05 +.27 +.71 +.80 -.33 +.16 +1.75 -.02 +1.80 +.22 +.96 +.52 +.61 +.03 +.31 +.49 -.02 +.23 -.02 +.17

0.15

0.20 2.85 0.68 0.88 3.05 0.40 0.84 0.20 0.40 2.08 1.04 1.52 0.76 1.05 1.25 1.28 1.04 1.16 1.14 1.17 0.20 0.80 1.60 1.30 0.28 0.04 2.00 0.18 0.46 1.60 1.00 2.13 1.13 0.80

1.24 0.56 2.50 3.58 2.16 0.77 1.50 3.32 2.48 3.00 0.06 0.72 1.75 0.88 1.58 0.37 4.40 0.53 0.28 0.20 0.80

0.16 0.41 0.10 2.10 0.36 0.50

0.80 1.88 0.28 0.72 0.48 1.08 0.84 0.68 0.52 2.76 0.96 2.00 0.56 0.80 1.15 0.32 0.24 0.32 0.12 0.04

0.04 0.32 0.80 0.18 0.01 0.08 0.62 2.20 0.64

0.16 0.60 1.44 0.64 0.14 1.16 0.72 0.20

0.05

1.90 1.08 0.24 1.25

0.40

0.34 0.28 1.20 0.20

10.11 6.33 10.66 36.46 29.20 26.97 43.60 105.22 46.60 7.92 64.55 1.76 33.49 9.39 7.94 22.73 48.61 52.77 47.72 27.17 10.79 15.96 10.60 15.38 9.43 8.78 10.95 21.74 61.82 62.49 41.71 12.97 10.70 72.60 4.05 29.95 33.53 13.62 14.40 16.52 38.28 34.72 51.02 19.65 7.24 9.43 30.60 38.90 18.22 11.93 9.40 35.81 3.97 13.41 39.34 47.60 72.24 1.97 39.40 47.02 34.31 4.34 19.34 20.04 33.16 40.84 53.53 8.95 66.16 50.09 46.38 1.57 5.31 44.05 156.04 67.42 19.89 60.52 9.78 150.78 62.41 32.08 24.16 1.94 26.01 10.10 23.98 1.76 6.19 11.76 4.98 37.89 2.60 2.96 32.02 46.99 24.07 57.50 13.28 28.24 4.29 83.60 30.75 124.15 24.14 105.07 48.25 11.72 4.45 37.89 98.50 14.45 4.05 64.44 48.87 89.84 16.25 96.48 21.46 4.17 14.03 5.41 8.35 18.15 32.89 9.43 14.48 22.26 18.47 21.22 16.87 4.12 42.07 5.96 10.21 11.98 16.31 1.01 11.73 9.35 12.65 32.96 22.00 24.61 20.88 16.93 17.50 45.20 16.34 69.11 3.23 .84 7.49 7.03 12.27 20.85 112.56 59.43 25.55 82.78 30.52 12.07 3.16 14.86 33.73 12.01 5.85 27.79 3.75 4.21 20.99 21.75 133.00 22.34 13.74 28.97 124.54 14.48 1.85 37.89 14.36 52.01 1.27 4.20 7.00 24.03 1.33 32.32 10.42 6.47 28.31 40.87 3.40

He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e es s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed So E

PE

Foo no N w w Em m m T

m w

m

C m mN w

P PE w W

w A d nd Foo no

C m

M

R w

m S

T

w

w N w

m S m

m M m

w

w w

W

U A

m S m

D w

C

m w

E

w P

m w

Am w

C w

S w H

m Am

m

D

w C m

m D

m

w

w

m D

C

w

w m m C

w

m

w m

P

m

E-F-G-H E-CDang E-House E-Trade eBay EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp eResrch EV Engy EagleBulk EagleMat EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp Eastgrp EastChm s Eaton EatnVan EV EEq2 EV LtdDur EVRiskMgd EV SrFlt EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ebix Inc Ecolab Ecopetrol EdisonInt EducMgmt EducRlty EdwLfSci 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts ElizArden Embraer EmersonEl EmpDist EmpIca Emulex EnbrEPt s Enbridge s EnCana g EndvrIntl EndvSilv g EndoPhrm Endocyte Endologix EndurSpec Energen Energizer EnrgyRec EngyTEq EngyTsfr EngyXXI EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys EnPro ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EnterPT Entravisn EntropCom Equifax Equinix EqLfPrp EqtyOne EqtyRsd Ericsson EssexPT EsteeLdr s EtfSilver EthanAl Euroseas Evercore ExactSci h ExactTgt n ExcelM ExcoRes Exelis n Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia s ExpdIntl Express ExpScripts ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl Ezcorp F5 Netwks FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FactsetR FairchldS FairptCom FamilyDlr Fastenal s FedExCp FedMogul FedRlty FedInvst FelCor Ferrellgs Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird FinclEngin Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBcpPR FstCashFn FstCwlth FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FstMarb h FMidBc FstNiagara FstPotom FstRepBk FstSolar FT ConStap FTCloud n FT RNG FTMstrDv FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FiveStar FlagstBc h Flagstone Flextrn Flotek FlowrsFd s Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil s FormFac Fortinet s Fortress FortunaSlv FBHmSc n ForumEn n Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel Francesc n FrankRes FredsInc FreeSeas FMCG Freescale n FreshMkt FriendFd n FrontierCm Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl FushiCopp Fusion-io n GATX GFI Grp

N m

How to Read the Market in Review

+.34 +.06 +.35 +.70 +.60 +.58 +.60 +2.44 +.54 +.04 +.04 +.50 +.34 +.17 +.41 +.36 +1.85 +1.56 +.55 +.09 -.13 +.06 -.14 +.04 +.06 +.08 +.28 +1.53 -.01 +.05 -.32 +.08 +.95 -.02 +.19 +.18 -.25 +1.55 +.63 +1.28 +.27 +1.29 -.03 +.37 +.11 +.15 +.15 +.26 +.27 +.50 +.54 -.12 -.07 +.49 +.63 +.77 -.05 +.39 +.71 +1.11 +.22 +.25 +.11 +.73 +.97 +1.81 +.28 +.75 +.78 +.39 +.02 +.08 +.60 +3.53 +.50 +.11 +.70 -.01 +1.82 +1.46 +.78 +.77 +.01 +.64 +.10 +.09 +.09 +.24 +.28 -.04 -.29 +.13 +.16 +.13 +.95 +.28 +1.14 +.47 +.24 +.17 +.90 +.55 +1.50 +.31 +2.62 +.76 +.08 -.02 +.37 +1.04 +.52 +.07 +1.06 -.76 +1.93 +1.39 +.32 +.15 +.06 +.05 +.32 +.27 +.45 +.11 -.01 +.22 +.41 +.63 +.16 +.43 -.04 +.54 +.01 +.24 +.26 +.99 -.02 +.19 +.11 +.26 +.41 -.50 +.11 +.38 +.59 +.08 +.18 +.21 +.76 -.01 -.01 +.10 +.08 +.49 +.19 +2.49 +1.60 +.91 +1.59 +.51 +.16 +.15 +.12 +.19 +.84 +.12 +.51 +.09 +.19 +.45 -.02 +.78 -.07 -.92 +2.56 +.32 +.70 +2.11 +.52 +2.44 +.18 +.09 +.40 +.82 +.08 +.49 +.13 +.25 +3.65 +.88 -.01

M Mu u

m

w E

Fund Foo no F m S

P R B

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe N m D GMX Rs GNC 0.44 GSI Tech GSV Cap n GT AdvTc G-III GabDvInc 0.96 GabelliET 0.58 Gafisa SA 0.29 GalenaBio Gallaghr 1.36 GamGldNR 1.68 GameStop 0.60 Gannett 0.80 Gap 0.50 GardDenv 0.20 Garmin 2.00 Gartner GascoEngy GasLog n Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam 2.04 GenElec 0.68 GenGrPrp 0.40 GenMills 1.22 GenMoly GenMotors GenesWyo GenesisEn 1.80 GenOn En Genpact 0.18 Gentex 0.52 Gentiva h GenuPrt 1.98 Genworth GeoGrp GeoEye GaGulf Gerdau 0.21 GeronCp GettyRlty GiantInter s 0.30 Gildan 0.30 GileadSci Glatfelter 0.36 GlaxoSKln 2.33 Gleacher GlimchRt 0.40 GlobalCash GlobPay 0.08 GlbXSilvM 0.04 Globalstr h GlbSpcMet 0.20 GluMobile GolLinhas 0.42 GolLNGLtd 1.30 GoldFLtd 0.44 GoldResrc 0.60 Goldcrp g 0.54 GoldenMin GoldStr g GoldmanS 1.40 Goodrich 1.16 GoodrPet Goodyear Google GovPrpIT 1.68 vjGrace Graco 0.90 GrafTech Graingr 2.64 GranTrra g GraniteC 0.52 GraphPkg GrtBasG g GrLkDrge 0.08 GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn 0.85 GrWlfRes GreenDot GreenMtC GrnHCmdty GreenbCos Greenhill 1.80 GrifolsSA n 0.55 Groupon n GrpoFin 0.05 GpTelevisa 0.15 GuanwR h Guess 0.80 GugSPEW 0.70 GugRus50 1.97 GulfMrkA GulfportE HCA Hldg 2.00 HCC Ins 0.62 HCP Inc 2.00 HDFC Bk s 0.22 HMS Hld s HSBC 2.05 HSBC Cap2 2.00 HSN Inc 0.50 HainCel HalconR rs Hallibrtn 0.36 Halozyme HancHld 0.96 Hanesbrds HanwhaSol HarleyD 0.62 Harman 0.30 Harmonic HarmonyG 0.08 HarrisCorp 1.32 HarrisTtr 0.56 HWinstn g Harsco 0.82 HartfdFn 0.40 HarvNRes Hasbro 1.44 HatterasF 3.80 HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT 2.96 HlthCSvc 0.65 HltMgmt HlthcrRlty 1.20 HealthNet HlthSouth Healthwys HrtldPay 0.24 HeartWare Heckmann HeclaM 0.05 Heico s 0.12 Heinz 1.92 HelixEn HelmPayne 0.28 HSchein Herbalife s 1.20 HercOffsh HercTGC 0.92 Hersha 0.24 Hershey 1.52 Hertz Hess 0.40 HewlettP 0.48 Hexcel HighwdPrp 1.70 Hill-Rom 0.50 HillenInc 0.77 HimaxTch 0.24 Hittite HollyFrt s 0.40 Hologic HomeDp 1.16 Home Inns HomeProp 2.64 HomeAw n HomexDev Honda HonwllIntl 1.49 Hormel 0.60 Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT 1.80 HostHotls 0.24 HotTopic 0.32 HstnAEn HovnanE HubbelB 1.64 HudsCity 0.32 HugotnR 1.10 HumGen Humana 1.00 HuntJB 0.56 HuntBnk 0.16 Huntsmn 0.40 Hyatt Hyperdyn

C 1.41 +.07 34.67 -.32 4.23 +.13 19.93 +.01 7.62 +.26 27.91 +.79 16.11 +.20 5.50 +.06 4.50 +.18 1.76 +.07 35.07 +.20 16.05 +.36 21.56 +.29 15.07 +.43 25.96 +.48 61.89 +1.89 45.30 +.39 42.46 +.24 .24 -.01 11.28 +.48 2.65 +.09 30.84 +.89 65.64 +1.12 5.51 +.16 6.86 +.13 28.72 +1.74 69.66 +.31 19.30 +.29 16.78 +.37 38.76 +.19 3.16 +.01 24.30 +.27 53.55 +1.29 30.55 +.36 1.98 +.04 15.94 +.21 24.65 +.60 8.50 +.33 62.98 +1.08 7.85 +.31 20.25 +.48 23.71 +.86 32.06 +.05 9.59 +.28 1.56 +.03 15.65 +.19 5.40 -.08 27.33 +.64 45.72 +.31 15.68 +.21 45.47 +.50 1.15 -.10 9.88 +.17 7.63 +.17 45.45 +.98 21.76 +.95 .60 +.00 14.51 +.31 4.66 +.25 5.98 +.10 37.03 +.26 13.07 +.28 25.48 +.50 41.96 +1.36 7.16 +.10 1.64 +.05 120.39 +4.46 125.31 +.21 15.96 +.80 10.96 +.32 651.01 +15.05 23.43 +.09 55.89 +1.57 53.08 +1.15 11.85 +.40 214.00 +2.39 6.48 +.48 27.85 +.38 5.42 +.08 .69 +.04 7.11 +.30 2.10 +.03 19.69 +.11 7.33 -.02 25.97 +.19 43.62 +.41 29.80 +.40 18.35 +1.00 40.95 +.43 7.88 +.03 13.56 +.48 6.31 +.37 20.67 +.29 1.68 -.03 29.69 +.21 51.01 +.82 101.76 +1.16 48.96 +1.70 27.74 +1.36 27.57 +.84 31.31 +.15 39.08 +.58 34.09 +.66 28.92 -.06 43.75 +.81 27.25 +.25 37.75 +.46 44.85 +.81 9.79 +.41 33.18 +1.05 11.36 +.46 35.25 +.10 27.58 -.18 1.27 -.04 48.52 +.92 45.94 +.91 4.93 +.04 10.29 +.25 44.34 +.53 38.33 +.38 13.98 +.22 22.25 +.74 20.57 +.62 6.24 +.31 36.26 +.23 28.47 +.23 5.19 +.23 4.01 +.16 53.68 +.61 21.50 -.04 7.40 +.32 21.20 +.24 37.78 +.73 20.67 +.51 6.79 +.25 29.45 +.30 64.75 +1.93 4.08 +.09 4.37 +.19 50.58 +.63 52.86 +.15 17.34 +.59 54.38 +2.18 75.07 +.84 68.67 +.61 4.66 +.16 10.99 +.05 5.51 +.15 61.65 +.80 14.66 +.34 56.66 +1.19 25.10 +1.69 26.70 +2.33 32.83 +.35 32.31 +.41 21.71 +.21 2.24 +.02 53.16 +.25 30.52 +.95 21.18 +.37 50.63 +.88 27.26 +.91 59.16 -.03 24.47 +.87 16.65 +.33 36.56 +.53 58.79 +1.71 28.25 -.12 42.41 +1.32 11.56 +.68 35.20 +.16 26.90 +.50 16.40 +.39 9.66 +.14 3.97 -.07 2.09 +.06 77.20 +1.56 6.88 +.13 13.57 -.09 7.41 -.14 89.85 +.52 55.84 +1.34 6.43 +.10 14.63 +.66 40.49 +.54 .90 -.01

N m

D

C

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk iGateCorp IHS Inc ING GlbDv ING ING 7.375 INGPrRTr ION Geoph IPG Photon iRobot iShGold iShGSCI iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShItaly iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSSpain iSSwedn iSTaiwn iSh UK iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSh ACWI iSEafeSC iShEMBd iSSPGth iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShIntSelDv iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iShBFxBd iSR1KV iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarIntC iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShPeru iShDJOE iShDJOG iSSCVal iStar ITT Cp s ITT Ed Iberiabnk iBio Icon PLC IconixBr IdenixPh IDEX Ikanos h ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immersion ImunoGn ImpaxLabs ImpOil gs ImperlSgr Incyte IndiaFd IndoTel Inergy Infinera Informat Infosys IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE InnerWkgs InovioPhm Insulet IntgDv IntegrysE Intel InterXion InteractBrk IntcntlEx InterDig Intrface InterMune IBM IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntTower g InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntraLinks IntPotash Intuit IntSurg InvenSen n Invesco InvMtgCap InvVKDyCr InVKSrInc InvTech InvRlEst IridiumCm IronMtn IronwdPh Isis IstaPh ItauUnibH IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia j2Global JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian Jabil JackHenry JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JiveSoft n JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesGrp JonesLL JosABank JoyGlbl JnprNtwk K12 KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KEYW Hld KIT Digitl KKR KKR Fn KKR Fn 42

0.48 49.05 +.76 0.25 12.83 +.55 0.63 34.78 +.62 17.17 +.22 97.26 +1.85 1.12 9.24 +.08 7.47 +.21 1.84 24.05 +.68 0.36 5.57 -.06 5.68 +.20 49.71 +.66 24.96 +.46 16.32 +.17 34.76 +.43 1.09 23.45 +.61 1.50 63.62 +1.74 0.56 27.96 +.72 1.17 29.91 +.52 0.67 20.86 +.43 0.67 22.37 +.44 0.41 17.54 +.39 0.55 12.07 +.27 0.20 9.83 +.05 0.70 59.40 +.88 0.60 14.76 +.28 0.78 61.23 +.80 0.47 12.75 +.20 1.71 43.50 +1.11 1.93 66.52 +1.56 2.92 27.16 +.02 1.04 27.89 +.87 0.47 13.13 +.18 0.53 17.11 +.36 31.42 +.77 1.21 63.21 +.78 1.89 55.38 +.53 3.88 118.57 -.22 1.05 56.70 +1.35 0.77 37.45 +1.29 1.25 93.56 +2.05 2.63 139.30 +1.96 3.33 110.02 -.11 0.81 42.81 +1.08 4.87 115.45 +.05 1.02 46.38 +.81 1.14 39.35 +.76 5.47 112.94 +.54 1.37 74.78 +.87 1.41 46.86 +1.02 1.38 63.59 +1.01 3.77 114.98 -.48 2.82 104.50 -.21 1.60 31.55 +.50 0.55 84.40 +.01 1.71 53.34 +.96 0.93 47.20 +.72 0.53 62.20 +1.08 1.57 109.11 +1.78 1.16 97.57 +1.72 6.94 90.14 +.80 0.04 119.80 +.60 2.20 75.10 +1.02 3.44 108.23 -.03 1.51 68.77 +1.00 0.81 65.56 +.93 1.36 76.90 +1.09 1.38 71.16 +1.03 3.94 108.86 -.05 2.26 104.79 -.03 0.68 92.67 +1.44 1.10 80.60 +1.14 2.27 38.74 +.33 2.20 61.31 +.86 0.07 14.53 +.39 0.85 57.60 +1.06 0.57 40.27 +.85 0.79 74.45 +1.02 1.00 46.09 +.59 0.19 53.03 +1.74 0.33 63.10 +1.70 0.96 76.49 +1.19 7.13 +.04 0.36 21.82 +.28 65.39 +1.84 1.36 52.55 +.84 1.42 -.11 21.49 -.48 16.91 +.05 8.14 -.18 0.80 41.28 +.94 .69 +.01 1.44 56.69 +1.33 49.51 -3.06 23.04 +.84 5.32 -.14 12.97 +.18 24.09 0.48 43.94 +.88 4.15 -.20 18.11 +.10 1.20 22.14 +.31 1.38 32.97 +.21 2.82 16.16 7.78 +.29 51.60 +.74 0.75 56.77 +.30 0.64 40.23 +1.22 18.81 +.30 0.57 8.34 +.06 10.50 -.14 .60 18.24 +.54 7.08 +.14 2.72 51.76 +.54 0.84 28.48 +.63 18.30 +.20 0.40 17.00 +.22 134.13 +.64 0.40 34.02 +.40 0.08 13.69 +.53 11.99 +.12 3.00 205.32 +2.74 1.24 58.53 +1.02 0.24 16.67 +.56 1.05 33.27 +.53 21.71 +.64 4.04 +.19 59.25 +2.70 0.24 11.00 +.29 0.48 10.89 +.15 5.01 -.02 23.30 +1.10 0.60 60.60 +.57 551.59 +11.58 15.42 +.38 0.49 25.37 +.56 3.07 17.26 +.33 0.90 11.68 +.05 0.32 4.84 -.01 10.72 +.10 0.52 7.31 +.03 8.73 +.12 1.00 29.55 +.66 12.85 -.15 7.87 9.04 0.84 17.92 +.50 .97 +.02 13.65 +.44 11.85 +.26 0.84 26.24 1.38 27.50 +.86 13.26 +.41 1.20 44.84 +.83 1.89 38.70 +.39 0.32 23.37 +.40 0.46 33.52 +.19 43.66 +.99 3.72 +.18 1.92 +.05 5.01 +.30 0.20 8.39 +.22 40.01 +.88 44.64 -1.79 0.30 17.58 +.33 4.93 +.22 26.15 +.80 1.24 -.02 2.28 64.15 +.02 0.72 31.83 +.97 0.20 11.88 +.02 0.30 81.57 +2.40 51.14 +.65 0.70 76.81 +3.32 22.02 +.27 24.62 +1.06 37.27 +1.27 0.25 8.46 +.27 0.20 34.95 +.71 8.74 +.66 7.34 +.30 0.74 14.42 +.52 0.72 9.35 +.18 1.78 25.38 +.13

N

m E

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

N m D KLA Tnc 1.40 KT Corp KC Southn 0.78 KapStone Kaydon s 0.80 KA MLP 2.07 KeeganR g Kellogg 1.72 KellySA 0.20 Kemet Kenexa Kennamtl 0.56 KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp 0.12 KilroyR 1.40 KimbClk 2.96 Kimco 0.76 KindME 4.64 KindMorg 1.24 KindMM 4.64 KindredHlt Kinross g 0.16 KirbyCp KnghtCap KnightTr 0.24 Knoll Inc 0.40 KodiakO g Kohls 1.28 KoreaElc KosmosE n Kraft 1.16 KratonPP KrispKrm Kroger 0.46 KronosW s 0.60 Kulicke L&L Engy L-3 Com 2.00 LDK Solar LG Display LKQ Corp LPL Inv 2.00 LRR Egy n 1.90 LSI Corp LaZBoy LabCp LkShrGld g LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar 0.22 LaredoP n LVSands 1.00 LaSalleH 0.44 Lattice Layne Lazard 0.64 LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp 0.56 LeeEnt h LeggMason 0.32 LeggPlat 1.12 LenderPS 0.40 LennarA 0.16 Lennox 0.72 LeucNatl 0.25 Level3 rs LexiPhrm LexRltyTr 0.50 Lexmark 1.00 LbtyASE 0.33 LibGlobA LibGlobC LibCapA LibtyIntA LibtProp 1.90 LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LillyEli 1.96 LimelghtN Limited 1.00 Lincare 0.80 LincEdSv 0.28 LincNat 0.32 Lindsay 0.36 LinearTch 1.00 LinkedIn n LinnEngy 2.76 LionsGt g Liquidity LiveNatn LiveDeal 0.14 LizClaib LloydBkg LockhdM 4.00 Loews 0.25 Logitech LogMeIn LonePne gn LoopNet Lorillard 6.20 LaPac Lowes 0.56 LucasEngy Lufkin 0.50 lululemn gs LumberLiq LyonBas A 1.00

53.73 13.61 72.74 18.69 24.30 29.88 3.19 53.20 15.02 9.15 31.15 44.37 1.46 15.04 8.35 45.80 74.17 18.33 82.00 38.52 73.48 8.24 9.52 64.22 12.75 17.00 15.42 9.61 49.92 9.78 12.76 37.14 27.37 6.88 23.62 23.11 12.47 2.31 69.56 3.35 11.99 30.10 37.00 18.91 8.33 14.33 89.52 .96 43.42 30.77 56.91 23.96 61.05 27.83 6.48 21.45 27.51 8.68 8.19 44.42 1.18 26.13 22.44 25.01 26.50 38.42 24.85 25.86 1.63 8.64 32.99 4.83 48.63 46.69 84.99 18.81 35.60 47.11 49.14 39.18 39.58 3.20 47.81 25.22 7.46 24.70 66.12 32.48 105.90 38.11 12.21 50.53 8.68 4.53 13.17 2.00 90.17 39.43 8.30 34.76 6.38 18.30 136.06 8.73 31.50 2.28 78.89 73.13 24.18 42.83

C +.53 -.01 +3.21 +.41 +.51 +.11 -.02 +.19 +.59 +.15 +1.39 +1.01 +.01 +.36 +.06 +.42 +.23 +.33 +.90 +.29 +.72 -.02 +.33 +1.16 +.35 +.11 +.03 +.56 +.69 +.14 +.57 +.27 +.72 +.14 +.16 +1.20 +.24 +.07 +1.33 -.02 +.38 +.37 -.39 +.19 +.62 -.02 +.07 +.83 +.64 +.49 +.18 +.56 +.76 +.34 +.42 +1.03 +.37 +.20 +.44 +.04 +.67 +.42 +.61 +.75 +.80 +.99 +.53 -.05 +.21 +.64 +.05 +.79 +.94 +.38 +.30 +.59 +.69 +.68 +.62 +.11 +.19 +.44 +.30 +.18 +.91 +3.50 +.34 +8.24 +.17 -.57 +2.46 +.08 +.28 +.19 +.10 +1.68 +.64 +.45 -.09 +.24 -.28 -.07 +.32 +.48 +.04 +1.79 +.07 +.18 +1.61

M-N-O-P M&T Bk 2.80 MAP Phm MBIA MCG Cap 0.68 MDC 1.00 MDU Res 0.67 MEMC MFA Fncl 0.96 MIN 0.54 MGIC MGM Rsts MI Devel 2.00 MIPS Tech MKS Inst 0.60 MPG OffTr MRC Gbl n MSC Ind 1.00 MSCI Inc Macerich 2.20 MackCali 1.80 Macys 0.80 Magal MagicJck s MagnaI gs 1.10 MagHRes MaidenBrd Majesco MAKO Srg Malaysa 1.77 MgHiYP 0.19 Manitowoc 0.08 MannKd ManpwrGp 0.80 Manulife g 0.52 MarathnO s 0.68 MarathP n 1.00 MktVGold 0.15 MV OilSv s MV Semi n MktVRus 0.58 MkVEMBd 1.32 MktVJrGld 1.59 MktV Agri 0.30 MkVBrzSC 4.01 MktVIndo 0.45 MktV Viet 0.16 MkVHiYMu 1.81 MktAxess 0.44 MarkWest 3.04 MarIntA 0.40 MarrVac n MarshM 0.88 MartMM 1.60 MarvellT Masco 0.30 Masimo Mastec MasterCrd 1.20 MatadorR n Mattel 1.24 MattrssF n Mattson MaximIntg 0.88 Maximus s 0.36 McClatchy McCorm 1.24 McDrmInt McDnlds 2.80 McGrwH 1.02 McKesson 0.80 McMoRn McEwenM MeadJohn 1.20 MeadWvco 1.00

86.33 13.14 10.28 4.16 25.83 22.04 3.72 7.21 6.38 4.35 13.86 34.55 6.58 28.45 2.20 21.04 78.07 36.42 58.18 27.62 40.33 5.57 23.23 46.10 6.24 22.47 2.36 41.56 10.12 2.19 14.28 2.18 44.28 13.43 30.34 41.76 48.16 40.20 35.02 30.34 26.16 23.72 52.26 43.17 30.01 20.60 31.38 35.93 57.95 37.57 28.71 32.02 83.82 15.31 12.57 22.00 16.84 433.98 11.02 34.30 42.57 2.39 27.77 40.54 2.77 54.01 11.69 97.65 49.03 91.34 9.16 4.13 82.66 31.22

+1.23 -.16 +1.21 +.01 +.95 +.24 -.02 +.03 +.04 +.01 +.26 +1.01 +1.37 +.65 -.04 -.11 +.73 +1.05 +.51 +.94 +.32 -.42 +1.06 +.38 -.20 +.13 +.37 +.14 +.01 +1.41 +.03 +.61 +.88 +1.11 +.25 +1.66 +1.28 +.62 +.55 +.18 +1.05 +1.18 +.81 +.64 +.72 -.06 -.46 +.75 +.23 +.31 +.17 +1.03 +.24 +.37 +.17 +.24 +3.94 +.62 -1.43 +.01 +.51 +.26 +.02 +.20 +.19 -.92 +.74 +3.44 +.36 +.15 -.05 +.78

N m D Mechel Mechel pf MedAssts h MedProp 0.80 MediCo Medicis 0.40 Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic 0.97 MelcoCrwn MensW 0.72 MentorGr MercadoL 0.44 Merck 1.68 Meredith 1.53 MergeHlth MeritMed s Meritage Meritor Metalico Methanx 0.68 MetLife 0.74 MetroPCS MetroHlth MettlerT MKors n Micrel 0.16 Microchp 1.40 MicronT MicroSemi Microsoft 0.80 MidAApt 2.64 MdwGold g MillMda n MillerEnR MillerHer 0.09 Mindspeed Mitcham MitekSys MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileMini MobileTele 1.06 Modine Mohawk Molex 0.80 MolinaH s MolsCoorB 1.28 Molycorp Momenta Monsanto 1.20 MonstrBv s MonstrWw Montpelr 0.42 Moodys 0.64 MorgStan 0.20 Mosaic 0.50 MotrlaSolu 0.88 MotrlaMob Motricity Movado 0.20 MuellerWat 0.07 MultimGm MurphO 1.10 Mylan MyriadG NABI Bio NCI BldSy NCR Corp NFJDvInt 1.80 NIC Inc 0.25 NII Hldg NN Inc NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy 0.52 NXP Semi NYSE Eur 1.20 Nabors NasdOMX NBGrce rs NatCineM 0.88 NCity pfcld 1.66 NatFnPrt NatFuGas 1.42 NatGrid 3.00 NatInstrm 0.56 NOilVarco 0.48 NatPenn 0.28 NatRetPrp 1.54 NavideaBio Navios 0.24 Navistar NeenahP 0.48 NektarTh NeoStem NetApp NetEase Netflix Netlist NetQin n NtScout NetSolT h NetSpend NetSuite NBRESec 0.24 Neurcrine NeuStar Nevsun g 0.10 NwGold g NwOriEd s NY&Co NY CmtyB 1.00 NY Times Newcastle 0.80 NewellRub 0.32 NewfldExp NewLeadH NewmtM 1.40 NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA 0.17 NewsCpB 0.17 Nexen g 0.20 NextEra72 NextEraEn 2.40 NiSource 0.92 NielsenH NikeB 1.44 NipponTT NobleCorp 0.54 NobleEn 0.88 NokiaCp 1.26 NorandaAl 0.16 NordicAm 1.20 Nordson 0.50 Nordstrm 1.08 NorflkSo 1.88 NA Pall g NoWestCp 1.48 NoestUt 1.18 NthnO&G NorTrst 1.20 NorthropG 2.00 NStarRlt 0.54 NwstBcsh 0.48 NovaGld g Novartis 2.46 Novavax Novlus NuSkin 0.80 NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor 1.46 NutriSyst 0.70 NvCredStr 0.80 NvEPOp 1.12 NuvMuVal 0.47 NvPfdInco 0.76 NuvQPf2 0.66 Nvidia NxStageMd OCZ Tech OGE Engy 1.57 OReillyAu OaktreeC n OasisPet OcciPet 2.16 OceanRig n Oceaneer s 0.60 Och-Ziff 0.40 Oclaro OcwenFn OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax Oi SA 4.22 OilStates OldDomFrt OldNBcp 0.36 OldRepub 0.71 Olin 0.80 OmegaHlt 1.64 Omncre 0.28 Omnicom 1.20 OmniVisn

9.41 3.50 13.02 8.90 20.07 38.14 18.97 75.28 71.63 38.24 14.06 37.12 14.45 97.60 38.27 31.18 4.51 11.61 26.07 7.36 4.20 32.25 36.34 8.62 8.77 179.88 43.98 9.75 36.18 7.15 20.80 30.98 65.91 1.34 19.10 4.20 21.34 5.35 23.45 6.09 4.83 3.11 19.47 18.30 8.43 63.12 27.25 26.08 40.82 33.29 14.81 78.34 62.58 9.02 19.47 42.91 18.22 51.17 49.03 39.19 1.18 26.14 3.54 11.61 53.45 22.39 24.01 1.85 11.61 21.65 17.10 11.60 19.28 8.13 6.65 14.74 15.60 24.80 27.84 16.98 24.95 2.51 14.29 25.40 14.59 45.08 51.47 26.97 80.46 9.11 26.79 2.73 3.83 37.51 27.73 7.38 .33 40.94 56.92 104.26 3.03 11.06 19.28 .43 7.19 48.49 4.19 7.52 37.03 3.68 10.00 27.87 3.66 13.50 6.42 6.24 17.24 33.72 3.64 49.55 7.56 17.12 19.35 19.68 18.39 25.45 62.52 23.90 29.43 108.65 22.33 36.53 94.82 4.23 10.35 14.53 53.02 55.09 67.91 2.63 34.31 35.72 20.49 46.79 61.29 5.39 12.59 7.00 55.00 1.27 48.55 55.84 16.21 24.47 42.25 10.92 8.97 12.16 9.99 8.84 8.57 14.68 18.64 6.80 51.65 94.28 42.39 30.13 91.12 17.50 53.41 9.15 3.65 15.00 2.93 3.27 4.95 14.71 77.42 47.78 12.80 10.64 21.27 21.07 35.11 49.49 20.21

C +.58 +.06 +.12 +.17 +.07 +.07 +.12 +.04 +.29 +.52 +.39 -.11 +.18 +2.31 -.22 +.29 -.06 -.16 +.55 +.32 +.15 +1.87 +1.01 +.05 +5.27 +1.08 +.21 +.63 -.02 +.53 +.63 +.47 +.02 +.16 +.28 +.39 +.22 +.47 -.25 +.01 +.18 +.45 +.27 +.95 +.47 +1.32 +.02 +1.61 -.26 +2.22 -.54 +.13 +.17 +1.06 +.71 +1.19 +.44 +.03 +1.25 +.11 +.28 +1.53 +.49 +.46 -.01 +.43 +1.24 +.09 -.21 +.33 +.65 +.15 +.09 +.09 +.94 +.34 +.83 +.22 +.10 -.11 +.03 +.42 +.81 +.46 +.36 +3.49 +.11 +.07 +.06 +.09 +.74 +.54 +.01 +.07 -.63 +4.45 +.01 +1.21 +.21 +.03 -.07 +.73 +.01 -.13 +.41 +.19 +.47 +.08 +.20 +.10 +.10 +.15 +.35 +1.43 -.83 +1.55 +.09 +.17 +.50 +.56 +.83 +.27 +.12 +.17 +.25 +.40 -.03 +1.05 +2.37 -.01 +.72 +.13 +1.39 +.46 +1.74 +.04 +.12 +.60 +.77 +1.10 +.13 +.06 +.47 +.63 +.04 +.95 -.05 +.36 +.42 +1.10 +.15 -.01 +.20 +.01 +.01 +.02 +.34 +.38 +.11 +.48 +.46 +1.61 +2.31 +1.24 +2.41 +.14 +.09 +.05 +.20 +.15 -.10 +.01 +2.37 +.89 +.11 +.23 +.27 +.36 +.92 +1.29 +.82

D

OnAssign OnSmcnd Oncothyr ONEOK 2.44 Oneok Pt s 2.44 OnyxPh OpenTxt OpenTable OpnwvSy OpkoHlth OpntTch 0.48 Opnext OptimerPh Oracle 0.24 OrbitalSci Orexigen OrientEH OriginAg OshkoshCp OvShip OwensMin 0.88 OwensCorn OwensIll PDL Bio 0.60 PF Chng 0.99 PG&E Cp 1.82 PHH Corp PimcoTR 0.12 PMC Sra PNC 1.60 PNM Res 0.58 POSCO 2.26 PPG 2.28 PPL Corp 1.44 PSS Wrld PVH Corp 0.15 Paccar 0.72 PacerIntl PacBiosci PacEth rs PacSunwr PaciraPhm PackAmer 1.00 PallCorp 0.84 PanASlv 0.15 Panasonic 0.12 Pandora n PaneraBrd ParPharm ParagShp h ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan 1.56 ParkerVsn Parlux PartnerRe 2.48 PatrkInd PatriotCoal Patterson 0.56 PattUTI 0.20 Paychex 1.28 PeabdyE 0.34 Pearson 0.68 Pebblebrk 0.48 Pembina gn 1.56 Pengrth g 0.84 PnnNGm PennVa 0.23 PennVaRs 2.04 PennWst g 1.08 Penney 0.80 PenRE 0.60 PennyMac 2.20 Penske 0.40 Pentair 0.88 PeopUtdF 0.63 PepBoy PepcoHold 1.08 PepsiCo 2.06 PeregrinP h PerfectWld 2.00 PerkElm 0.28 Perrigo 0.32 PetSmart 0.56 PetrobArg 0.45 PetrbrsA 1.23 Petrobras 1.23 PetroDev PtroqstE Pfizer 0.88 PhrmAth Pharmacyc PhilipMor 3.08 PhilLD 4.45 PhilipsEl 1.00 Phill66 wi PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG 1.20 PiedmOfc 0.80 Pier 1 0.16 PilgrimsP PimcoHiI 1.46 PinnclEnt PinWst 2.10 PionDrill PioNtrl 0.08 PiperJaf PitnyBw 1.50 PlainsAA 4.18 PlainsEx Plantron 0.20 PlatUnd 0.32 PlugPwr rs PlumCrk 1.68 Polaris s 1.48 Polycom s PolyOne 0.20 Polypore Popular PortGE 1.06 PortglTel 3.10 PostPrp 0.88 Potash 0.56 PwrInteg 0.20 Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS Agri PS USDBull PwShHiYD 0.32 PSTechLdr 0.04 PSPrivEq 0.63 PSFinPf 1.25 PS SP LwV 0.75 PSHYCpBd 1.15 PwShPfd 0.93 PShEMSov 1.49 PSIndia 0.02 PwShs QQQ 0.49 Powrwv rs Pozen Praxair 2.20 PrecMxNik 0.09 PrecCastpt 0.12 PrecDrill PremExhib PriceTR 1.36 PrSmrt 0.60 priceline PrimoWtr PrinFncl 0.72 PrivateB 0.04 ProLogis 1.12 ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow 0.29 PrUlShDow ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ ProUltSP 0.27 PrUShtFin ProUShL20 PrUltSCh25 ProUltSEM ProUltSOG ProUltSBM ProUltFin 0.25 PrUPShQQQ ProUPShD30 PrUPShR2K ProUltO&G 0.05 ProUBasM 0.05 PrUPR2K ProShtR2K PrUltPQQQ ProUltR2K 0.01 ProSht20Tr ProUSSP500 PrUltSP500 0.03 PrUVxST rs PrUltSYen rs PrShtVixST ProUSSilv PrUltCrude PrUShCrde ProVixSTF ProUltSGld ProSUltNG ProUltSlv s ProUShEuro ProceraN ProctGam 2.10 ProgrssEn 2.48 ProgsvCp 0.41 ProUSR2K PrUShEur ProspctCap 1.22 ProspBcsh 0.78 Protalix ProtLife 0.64 Prudentl 1.45 PSEG 1.42 PubStrg 4.40 PulteGrp PPrIT 0.36 PyxisCrdt 0.42

C 17.82 +.31 8.72 +.23 4.27 -.01 80.47 -.07 53.01 +.06 40.73 +.07 60.95 +1.87 42.11 +1.85 2.66 +.13 4.48 -.09 22.86 -.19 1.49 +.03 13.00 28.70 +.56 12.99 +.46 4.00 +.03 10.04 +.13 1.96 -.07 22.01 +.59 10.41 +.16 29.05 -.02 34.62 +.75 23.80 +.28 6.17 -.05 39.61 +.06 42.65 +.46 15.75 +.20 102.46 -.10 7.08 +.20 63.41 +.94 18.00 +.07 84.17 +2.86 96.83 +2.29 27.10 +.03 24.45 +.46 88.50 +.44 43.30 +.85 6.61 +.29 3.03 +.01 1.02 1.60 +.01 9.73 -.39 29.09 +.56 58.92 +1.14 20.40 +.36 8.29 +.17 8.98 +.37 161.90 +1.35 40.44 +.75 .81 +.11 20.91 +.32 2.47 26.21 +.14 5.63 +.21 83.69 +1.68 1.17 -.09 5.62 +.03 67.61 +.75 9.17 +.73 6.21 +.46 33.08 +.55 17.02 +.67 31.21 +.25 29.34 +2.04 18.21 +.18 22.25 +.32 29.50 -.02 9.07 +.19 41.92 +.14 4.42 +.18 26.09 +.24 17.58 +.48 34.46 +.03 14.95 -.14 18.79 +.30 25.81 +.15 44.16 +.37 12.74 +.16 14.93 +.01 18.46 +.15 65.38 +.23 .44 -.02 14.23 +.53 26.90 +.47 103.94 +.65 56.90 +.97 12.19 +.69 24.10 +.75 25.13 +.72 33.49 +1.17 5.92 +.32 21.92 -.04 1.56 +.03 26.40 -.15 87.26 -.26 60.72 +.43 18.57 +.49 34.00 2.23 +.14 6.40 +.30 29.53 -.08 17.07 +.13 17.89 6.76 -.07 12.83 +.16 11.11 +.03 46.34 +.22 8.63 +.44 107.83 +4.19 26.24 +.37 17.07 +.30 78.85 +.54 42.19 +1.52 38.00 +.37 35.89 +.36 1.29 -.04 41.43 +.62 72.72 +2.50 13.96 -.07 14.04 +.47 37.20 +.82 1.89 +.03 24.70 +.22 4.98 +.01 45.32 +.37 43.50 +.74 37.63 +1.33 4.29 +.11 37.56 -.82 28.63 +.37 27.98 +.28 21.98 -.15 9.31 +.09 27.30 +.37 9.22 +.21 17.91 +.17 26.46 +.14 18.65 +.06 14.41 +.12 28.22 +.18 18.79 +.38 67.21 +.76 2.15 -.11 7.18 +.35 113.62 +2.25 14.24 +.12 171.24 +3.04 9.50 +.63 2.42 +.14 63.07 +1.27 78.00 +2.77 742.15 +12.58 1.60 -.05 28.49 +1.10 14.84 +.36 33.88 +.50 36.06 -.51 25.75 -.30 36.20 -.52 15.48 -.43 68.23 +1.92 13.20 -.39 117.58 +2.53 30.53 -.70 56.70 +1.58 41.50 -1.53 19.29 +.16 24.78 -1.91 25.87 -1.43 24.25 -1.11 15.24 -1.08 60.78 +2.11 10.89 -.40 20.10 -.90 9.45 -.42 44.72 +1.84 37.31 +2.27 63.42 +2.68 26.70 -.42 117.41 +3.81 41.38 +1.17 32.29 +.13 9.38 -.43 81.33 +3.39 16.90 -3.50 44.83 -.03 88.58 +7.17 10.43 -.57 43.21 +.90 34.61 -.75 38.92 -3.67 16.59 -.37 6.51 -.06 54.35 +2.52 19.39 -.24 23.40 +.54 66.09 -.35 51.49 +.11 22.59 -.03 31.05 -.98 38.03 -1.68 10.83 +.28 45.24 +.88 6.30 +.33 28.81 +.76 61.40 +1.03 29.41 +.05 137.97 +1.15 8.66 +.27 5.44 +.02 6.28 +.04

Q-R-S-T QEP Res QIAGEN QR Energy QiaoXMob Qihoo360 QlikTech Qlogic Qualcom QualityS s QuanexBld QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFuel Quaterra g Quepasa QstDiag QuestRM g QuestSft

0.08 28.99 15.13 1.90 19.18 .88 22.89 30.68 16.75 1.00 68.33 0.70 40.39 0.16 18.07 20.98 2.42 .68 .45 3.57 0.68 58.83 2.22 23.08

+1.01 +.23 -.14 +.79 +.42 +.31 +2.11 +.27 +.50 +.25 +.02 +.11 +.04 +.19 -.74 +.07 +.08

N m

D

Questar 0.65 Questcor QksilvRes Quiksilvr QuinStreet RAIT rs 0.32 RF MicD RPC s 0.32 RPM 0.86 RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM Rackspace RadNet RadianGrp 0.01 RadioShk 0.50 Ralcorp RLauren 0.80 Rambus Randgold 0.20 RangeRs 0.16 RaptorPhm RareEle g RJamesFn 0.52 Rayonier s 1.60 Raytheon 2.00 RealD RealPage RltyInco 1.75 RedHat RedwdTr 1.00 RegalBel 0.72 RegalEnt 0.84 RgcyCtrs 1.85 RegncyEn 1.84 Regenrn RegionsFn 0.04 Regis Cp 0.24 ReinsGrp 0.72 RelStlAl 0.60 RenaisRe 1.08 ReneSola Renren n RentACt 0.64 Rentech RentechN n Replgn RepubAir RepubSvc 0.88 RschMotn ResMed ResoluteEn ResrceCap 0.80 ResConn 0.20 Respnsys n RetailOpp 0.48 RetailPrp n RexEnergy Rexnord n ReynAmer 2.24 RichrdElec 0.20 Richmnt g RigelPh RioTinto 1.45 RitchieBr 0.45 RiteAid RiverbedT RobbMyer 0.20 RobtHalf 0.60 RockTen 0.80 RockwlAut 1.70 RockColl 0.96 RockwdH RogCm gs 1.58 Rollins 0.32 Roper 0.55 RsttaG rsh RosettaR RossStrs s 0.56 Roundys n RousePr n Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g 2.28 RBScotlnd RylCarb 0.40 RoyDShllB 3.36 RoyDShllA 3.36 RoyGld 0.60 Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues rue21 Ryanair Ryder 1.16 Ryland 0.12 SAIC 0.48 SAP AG 0.82 SBA Com SCANA 1.98 SEI Inv 0.30 SGOCO h SK Tlcm SLGreen 1.00 SLM Cp 0.50 SM Energy 0.10 SpdrDJIA 3.51 SpdrGold SpdrEuro50 1.54 SpdrDJ RE 1.12 S&PBRIC40 0.63 SpdrIntRE 1.40 SP Mid 1.65 S&P500ETF 2.64 SpdrBiot Spdr Div 1.76 SpdrHome 0.16 SpdrS&PBk 0.39 SpdrLehHY 3.70 SpdrNuBST 0.32 SpdrNuBMu 0.88 SP IntTip 2.64 SPLeIntTB 2.25 SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrS&P RB0.46 SpdrRetl 0.53 SpdrOGEx 0.38 SpdrOGEq 0.11 SpdrMetM 0.51 SPX Cp 1.00 STEC STMicro 0.40 STR Hldgs SVB FnGp SXC Hlth SabaSoftw SABESP 2.96 Safeway 0.58 StJoe StJude 0.92 Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty SamsO&G SJuanB 1.51 SandRMiss 2.68 SanderFm 0.68 SanDisk SandRdge SandRdg n 1.27 SangBio Sanmina Sanofi 1.76 Sanofi rt Santarus Sapient 0.35 SaraLee 0.46 Sasol 2.11 Satcon h SavientPh Schlmbrg 1.10 Schnitzer 0.75 Scholastc 0.50 SchwUSMkt 0.59 SchwUSLgC 0.59 SchwEMkt 0.57 Schwab 0.24 SciClone SciGames Scotts 1.20 ScrippsNet 0.48 SeaChange SeabGld g SeadrillLtd 3.06 SeagateT 1.00 SealAir 0.52 Sealy Seangy rs SearsHldgs 0.33 SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedHld SemGroup SempraEn 2.40 Semtech Senesco SenHous 1.52 SensataT Sensient 0.84 Sequenom ServiceCp 0.20 SvcSource SvArts rsh ShandaG s 1.02 ShawGrp ShengInn rs Sherwin 1.56 ShipFin 1.20 Shire 0.45 ShoreTel ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderurNac 0.81 Siemens 4.04 SifyTech SigmaDsg SigmaAld 0.80 SignatBk SignetJwlrs 0.48 SilganHld 0.48 SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilicnMotn Slcnware 0.28 SilvStd g SilvWhtn g 0.24 SilvrcpM g 0.10 SimonProp 3.80 Sina Sinclair 0.48 SinoClnEn SinoGlobal SiriusXM SironaDent Skechers Skullcdy n Sky-mobi SkyWest 0.16 SkywksSol SmartBal SmtHeat rs

C 19.04 40.27 4.36 3.73 11.37 4.98 4.48 9.49 26.12 22.01 23.12 56.23 3.40 3.73 6.11 73.66 171.80 5.91 90.11 56.30 6.35 5.85 36.13 43.56 52.70 11.96 18.69 37.74 60.81 11.48 64.06 13.27 43.13 24.45 123.00 6.30 17.52 57.89 53.07 75.19 1.89 6.86 37.27 2.16 27.95 6.17 5.00 30.89 13.35 30.83 10.43 5.19 13.36 12.71 12.00 9.15 9.86 21.79 41.79 12.15 7.20 8.03 56.15 21.39 1.72 26.37 50.94 29.53 64.29 80.18 57.21 50.62 40.13 20.76 98.60 .16 48.33 59.05 11.73 13.45 30.08 33.99 57.12 8.28 27.73 69.90 67.86 63.69 3.07 9.69 7.03 29.26 34.89 51.00 18.71 12.49 65.85 51.95 44.40 20.25 2.55 13.85 74.35 15.23 67.42 129.72 162.70 30.52 38.50 24.79 36.38 177.74 138.79 76.35 55.80 21.03 23.46 39.20 24.32 23.92 60.63 59.85 45.82 27.88 60.55 54.54 35.58 49.53 76.92 9.02 7.24 4.15 64.00 77.69 10.36 76.30 20.67 17.84 40.30 10.86 158.30 48.97 25.22 2.05 18.24 29.70 50.79 42.16 7.55 22.32 4.51 10.67 36.82 1.28 5.62 12.40 21.31 46.36 .43 2.09 70.34 41.18 34.74 33.44 33.05 25.44 14.23 6.52 11.47 52.85 47.50 8.12 19.35 37.27 26.99 18.77 2.13 4.04 58.85 19.08 33.44 7.35 29.86 62.89 27.25 .23 21.17 33.00 37.05 3.93 10.94 15.84 .12 5.47 31.27 1.22 115.58 13.72 93.29 5.05 17.29 29.64 9.34 96.36 3.35 4.98 72.33 64.61 47.07 43.93 9.32 5.71 19.33 5.84 14.54 32.03 6.80 145.73 65.23 10.02 1.67 3.59 2.26 50.02 13.30 16.68 3.43 10.68 27.02 6.06 7.02

+.14 -.04 +.22 +.05 +.23 +.13 +.26 +.16 +.63 +.39 +1.45 +1.48 +.11 +.04 +.09 -.59 +.95 +.13 +4.82 +1.28 +.17 +.15 +.78 +.38 +1.19 -.04 +.13 +.06 +1.28 +.11 +1.90 +.22 +.44 +.17 +1.59 +.11 +.16 +.41 +1.48 +.40 -.09 +.69 +.73 +.08 +.62 +.04 +.04 +.40 +.29 +.31 +.13 -.02 +.10 +.71 +.10 +.50 +.19 +.13 +.37 +.36 +.10 +3.10 -.21 +.02 +.83 +1.25 +.72 +.76 +3.06 +1.14 +1.95 +.62 +.10 +2.24 -.20 +1.99 +.90 +.06 +.06 +.46 +2.99 +1.04 +.29 +.62 +.77 +.11 +1.53 +.17 +.12 +.13 +.69 +.30 +.60 +.44 +.10 -.07 +.39 +.40 +.28 +1.82 +.16 +1.47 +.29 +3.08 +1.87 +1.64 +.43 +.42 +.67 +.50 +3.12 +1.79 +.21 +.68 +.52 +.40 +.28 -.04 -.06 +.65 +.38 -.01 +.35 +.77 +1.77 +1.12 +2.21 +2.38 +.28 +.29 +.10 +1.49 +.71 +.19 +1.23 +.48 +.33 +1.07 +.30 +.22 +.88 +.01 +.02 +.09 +.31 +.20 +.38 +.37 +.21 +.43 +.31 -.01 +.08 +.35 +.09 +1.23 -.06 +.02 +2.22 +1.48 +.37 +.51 +.45 +.55 +.36 -.01 +.15 +.91 +.67 +.01 +.27 +1.17 +1.10 +.40 +.09 +.26 +.19 +.31 +.85 +.07 +.03 +.21 +.22 +.01 +.17 +.73 +.72 +.22 +.20 +.54 -.01 -.05 +1.57 +.04 +.76 +.34 +.60 +.16 +.10 +.96 +.27 +.97 +.22 +.19 +1.24 +.50 +.60 +.45 +.21 +.24 +.82 +.69 +1.45 +.30 +2.37 +3.90 +.01 +.01 -.39 +.01 +1.41 +.26 -.07 +.15 +.08 +.67 +.02 -.44

N m

D

SmithWes SmithAO 0.64 SmithMicro SmithfF Smucker 1.92 SnapOn 1.36 SocQ&M 1.03 SodaStrm Sohu.cm SolarWinds Solazyme n Solera 0.40 Solutia 0.15 SonicAut 0.10 SonicCorp SonocoP 1.16 Sonus SonyCp 0.16 Sothebys 0.32 SouFun 2.00 Sourcefire SouthnCo 1.89 SthnCopper 2.07 SwstAirl 0.02 SwstnEngy SpanBrd rs Spansion SpectraEn 1.12 SpectPh SpiritAero SpiritAir n Spreadtrm 0.40 SprintNex SprottSilv SprottGold Stamps.cm SP Matls 0.76 SP HlthC 0.71 SP CnSt 0.89 SP Consum 0.62 SP Engy 1.10 SPDR Fncl 0.22 SP Inds 0.75 SP Tech 0.39 SP Util 1.40 StdMic StdPac StdRegis StanBlkDk 1.64 Staples 0.44 StarBulk 0.06 StarScient Starbucks 0.68 StarwdHtl 0.50 StarwdPT 1.76 StateBkFn StateStr 0.96 Statoil ASA 1.10 StlDynam 0.40 Steelcse 0.36 Stericycle Steris 0.68 Sterlite 0.18 StewEnt 0.16 StillwtrM StoneEngy Stratasys StratHotels Stryker 0.85 SturmRug 0.59 SumitMitsu SunCmts 2.52 SunHlth SunLfFn g 1.44 SunCoke n Suncor gs 0.44 SunesisPh Sunoco 0.80 SunPower SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst 0.20 SupEnrgy Supvalu 0.35 SusqBnc 0.12 SwRCmATR SwERCmTR SwftEng SwiftTrans SwisherHy Symantec SymetraF 0.28 Synaptics Syngenta 1.75 Synopsys Synovus 0.04 SyntaPhm SynthBiol Syntrolm h Sysco 1.08 TAL Intl 2.20 TAM SA 0.72 TCF Fncl 0.20 TD Ameritr 0.24 TE Connect 0.72 TECO 0.88 THQ h TICC Cap 1.08 TIM Part n TJX s 0.46 TOP Ship rs TPC Grp TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi 0.52 TakeTwo Talbots TalismE g 0.27 TangerFac 0.84 Tangoe n TanzRy g TargaRsLP 2.49 Targacept Target 1.20 Taseko TASER TataMotors 0.45 Taubmn 1.85 TearLab Teavana n TechData TeckRes g 0.80 Teekay 1.27 TeekayTnk 0.72 TlcmArg 1.15 TelcmNZ s 1.07 TelItalia 0.81 TelItaliaA 0.97 Teleflex 1.36 TelefBrasil 1.86 TelefEsp 2.14 TelData 0.49 Tellabs 0.08 TmpEMI 1.00 TempurP Tenaris 0.68 TenetHlth Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium 0.75 TescoCp TeslaMot Tesoro TesseraTch 0.40 TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm 0.96 Texas Inds TexInst 0.68 TexRdhse 0.36 Textron 0.08 Theravnce ThermoFis 0.52 ThmBet ThomCrk g ThomsonR 1.28 Thor Inds 0.60 Thoratec 3D Sys s 3M Co 2.36 ThrshdPhm TibcoSft Tidwtr 1.00 Tiffany 1.16 TimberlnR TW Cable 2.24 TimeWarn 1.04 Timken 0.92 Titan Intl 0.02 TitanMach TitanMet 0.30 TiVo Inc TollBros TopImage Trchmrk s 0.60 Torm h Toro Co 0.88 TorDBk g 2.88 Total SA 2.38 TotalSys 0.40 TowerGrp 0.75 Towerstm Toyota 1.26 TractSupp 0.48 TrCda g 1.76 TrnsatlPet TransDigm TransGlb Transocn 3.16

C 8.18 45.19 1.79 20.85 79.37 59.75 58.19 34.59 52.85 37.80 12.82 45.75 28.05 17.55 7.22 32.55 2.88 18.73 38.53 18.42 49.07 44.76 31.86 8.14 28.95 6.41 11.27 30.45 9.91 24.75 21.15 16.72 2.75 13.41 14.40 28.64 36.57 36.95 33.63 44.67 69.75 15.49 36.80 30.08 34.45 26.85 4.51 .93 77.65 15.66 .89 2.92 60.63 56.27 20.74 17.39 44.18 26.11 14.17 9.26 86.67 31.04 8.54 6.19 12.06 27.69 36.05 6.33 54.86 50.91 6.55 41.25 6.64 24.82 14.57 31.09 2.77 38.41 6.03 6.15 9.91 2.80 23.55 25.76 6.57 9.61 9.02 8.88 27.69 11.08 1.94 18.29 11.30 33.46 69.59 30.19 2.06 4.00 1.89 .91 29.44 36.12 24.72 11.30 19.51 35.23 17.33 .49 9.50 32.69 39.76 2.91 42.86 44.60 10.80 21.57 14.92 14.75 3.13 12.80 29.63 18.76 5.00 41.00 4.36 57.93 3.29 4.20 28.39 73.59 4.26 19.52 53.59 37.12 35.45 5.71 17.27 10.39 10.92 9.05 61.30 30.17 15.36 23.06 3.86 15.28 84.81 36.91 5.35 37.23 68.90 16.78 23.39 24.66 14.76 33.44 24.55 17.15 26.51 9.37 44.58 35.15 32.51 16.58 27.35 21.47 55.12 71.86 6.62 28.51 31.99 32.90 24.39 86.86 6.20 32.86 53.89 67.37 .48 80.22 36.03 50.20 23.58 35.26 14.00 11.31 23.15 4.16 49.28 .56 70.93 83.94 49.04 22.92 21.71 4.58 83.01 97.95 43.00 1.22 117.06 13.86 50.27

+.33 +1.88 +.11 +.39 -.42 +1.04 +.33 +.91 +1.91 +.67 +.07 +.46 +.23 +.02 +.02 +.69 +.16 -.02 +1.27 +.15 +2.66 +.26 +1.66 +.19 +.31 +.21 +.19 +.28 +.09 +.97 +.47 -.02 +.24 +.14 +1.01 +.98 +.20 +.03 +.56 +1.49 +.29 +.77 +.37 +.11 +.51 +.20 -.08 +1.62 +.04 +.03 -.17 +1.33 +.86 +.15 -.01 +.86 +.39 +.68 +.32 +1.10 +.43 +.32 +.03 +.39 +1.22 +1.67 +.22 +1.03 +1.40 +.06 +.38 +.15 +1.94 +.49 +1.13 +.14 +.79 +.13 +.19 +.24 +.07 +.31 +.88 +.02 +.09 +.13 +.14 +1.21 +.44 -.12 +.32 +.18 +.25 +1.85 +.34 +.01 +.04 -.06

N m

w

m

m m

W M

m m m

m M

W m

M

m

m m w m

+.74 +.18 +.55 +.07 +.53 +.73 -.03 +.09 +.68 +1.06 +.35 +.36 +.95 +1.95 +.66 +.04 -.07 +.24 +.07 +.06 +.73 +.24 -.04 +.28 +.08 +.05 +1.64 +.73 +.27 +1.19 +1.38 +.67 +1.31 +1.14 +.51 +.35 +.64 +.19 +.44 +.40 +.46 +1.22 +.52 +.19 +.42 +.32 +1.76 +.10 +.16 +.31 +.61 +.35 +1.29 +1.51 -.31 +.51 +1.43 +.61 -.01 +1.15 +.31 +1.55 +1.07 +3.21 +.61 +.21 +.47 +.11 +.64 +.05 +1.84 +1.41 +.52 +.24 +.52 -.12 +.50 +5.65 +.37 +.02 +2.83 +.76

m M

+.16 +1.61 +.18 +.20 +.41 +.65 +.22 +.21 +.84 +.18 +.53 -.50 +.94 +.18 +.29 +.13 +.01

m

m Mw

M W& W WM W W W W W W M W W W W W W W W W M W W W W W W W W m W M W W WW W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W m W W W W W W W W Wm Wm Wm W W W m W W W W m W W W W m W W WW W w W W Ww W W m W M

m M

m m

m

m w

m w M w w

w mm

M

UVWXYZ

D

m m w w

C


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Cars Continued from E1 “The technology is solid, but you have to prove that the right type of data can be moved from one vehicle to another vehicle and that vehicle could take action on that data,” said Poe, whose institute is a leading research agency affiliated with Texas A&M University. It could cut highway fatalities and injuries by more than half, eliminating billions of dollars in medical bills. It could reduce by millions more what it costs to repair damage from the more than 6 million crashes each year. By governing the flow of traffic with real-time information, it can reroute drivers to avoid congestion and reduce time and fuel wasted while stuck in traffic. “This connected vehicle technology could address about 80 percent, or four out of five, of all the unimpaired driving crashes in America,” said Ron Medford, deputy director of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Nearly half of all crashes examined by the Highway Loss Data Institute in 2007 were rear-end collisions, a type of accident that information swapping between cars could virtually eliminate. “It’s really a communications technology,” Poe said. “You don’t have to wait a decade for this to happen. Because technology is moving so fast, you will get some applications that will be developed in the interim. You will still see companies and entrepreneurs trying to develop additional applications.”

Vehicle-to-Infrastructure NHTSA hopes a pilot program with 3,000 cars under way in Ann Arbor, Mich., will prove the reliability of the technology. The testing of vehicle-to-vehicle communication, or V2V, continues through summer 2013, and if all goes well officials plan to grapple with the policy issues by the end of next year. V2V is just half of the technological equation. Even while it is busy chatting with other vehicles, the car trans-

“This connected vehicle technology could address about 80 percent, or four out of five, of all the unimpaired driving crashes in America.”

Connecting cars via wireless communication The Transportation Department and the auto industry are developing vehicle collision avoidance systems that use wireless, short-range technology to let vehicles communicate their speed, location and direction of travel with each other. The goal is to increase driver awareness of surroundings and better manage traffic congestion. Here’s how it may work.

VEHICLE-TO-VEHICLE COMMUNICATION (V2V)

VEHICLE-TO-INFRASTRUCTURE COMMUNICATION (V2I)

A transmitter in each vehicle sends data 10 times per second up to 1,000 feet away to broadcast its speed, direction and movement.

A transmitter in a vehicle sends a request to a traffic light signal for priority to pass through the intersection.

Each car’s transponder relays information to the driver via audible or sensory alerts. The information can also be sent to a passenger’s mobile device.

If the traffic light transponder does not detect other vehicles present, the signal’s controller extends the green light for the approaching vehicle.

Car 1 is traveling northbound at 60 mph, 20 feet from the other car

TRANSMITTER

Car 1 is traveling northbound at 10 mph, 20 feet from intersection. Request green light.

CAR 2

CAR 1

TRANSPONDER Keeping data secure: The communication’s security system does not allow identification data (owner’s name, license plate number, vehicle ID number) to be exchanged.

— Ron Medford, deputy director of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

No oncoming traffic detected. Extend green light for Car 1.

TRANSMITTER

“Warning: the vehicle behind you is too close.” Car 3 is traveling northbound at 60 mph, 24 feet from other cars

CAR 3

SIGNAL CONTROLLER

Sources: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Research and Innovative Technology Administration

Cristina Rivero / The Washington Post mitter also will be talking on the same short-range bandwidth with helpful friends at the roadside. This is called vehicle-toinfrastructure, or V2I, communication, and it provides the car with a steady stream of useful information — for example, about an accident or work zone that is slowing traffic just over the next hill. Linked with a couple of useful tools, such as the Global Positioning System, V2I could suggest a bailout route that would get you home faster. V2I also communicates with traffic signals. With reliable V2I information, the dream commute of catching green lights all the way home would not require special alignment of the stars. “You can adjust traffic signals to allow more traffic to travel through what we call the green band, so they don’t get stopped as much,” said Poe, who specializes in V2I research. “If you have the roadside talking to the vehicle, you can tell the driver, ‘Hey, if you drive at this speed you’re less likely to hit red lights,’ and where you lose a lot of your fuel efficiency

adaptive headlights, which respond to the direction and speed of the vehicle, about a third of fatal crashes and 20 percent of those that result in injury could be prevented or mitigated. The current generation of devices also may be integrated into V2V systems as they begin to find their way to the dashboard. “The connected vehicle, that’s probably going to come on a little slower than some of the other concepts, because V2V only really works once every vehicle is equipped with this technology,” said Adrian Lund, president of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. “To be honest with you, I think that where V2V may be most useful isn’t safety — it’s congestion management. I don’t want to dismiss the potential safety benefits. I just think they’re farther off.” Some devices on the mar-

is stopping and accelerating from a dead stop.”

Already on the road It may take a decade or longer before all vehicles are fully equipped, but the vanguard of what is to come already is in evidence on U.S. roadways. Acura, for example, made a big advertising buy during the recent NCAA basketball tournament to tout its backup sensors, which apply the brakes automatically to avert danger. It is among several automobile manufacturers that are using infrared distance sensors, radar and cameras to provide warnings about safe distances and when other vehicles are sliding dangerously into the next lane. Those and similar advancements that preceded V2V are expected to significantly reduce accidents, which the Insurance Information Institute said cost more than $1 billion in claims in 2010. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety estimated that if all passenger vehicles were equipped with forward collision warning, lane departure warning, side-view assist and

E3

ket, and many more apps coming soon, provide drivers with real-time help in routing around traffic trouble spots. But the combination of V2V and V2I provides data more immediately than traffic cameras or the network of location sensors now installed on many trucks and fleet vehicles. If a great many cars suddenly slow a mile ahead, V2V could recommend that a driver take the next exit. If traction control is triggered on several cars just head, V2V could send a warning to be alert for slippery conditions.

Implementation Unless the federal government makes V2V mandatory, as it did with air bags and seat belts, it could take 10 to 20 years before most cars are equipped. But drivers could be encouraged to buy V2V equipment more rapidly if

companies that make smartphones and GPS devices see a market edge in incorporating V2V and V2I applications. “If it costs a whole lot to retrofit, that’s going to be a tough sale,” Lund said. “But if you lived in a place like San Francisco or Washington, D.C., where the commutes can be pretty horrible, then if there’s something you could buy that would give you an advantage in knowing how to avoid congestion in real time, I think there might be a market for that.” Although no one is willing to put a price tag on a V2V transmitter, there’s general agreement that they would be less expensive than an array of cameras and sensors. Medford said that NHTSA has anticipated public fear that transmitters could be used to keep track of people but that the nature of the system does not allow that. “It is just a message that is received and acted on in the vehicle,” Medford said. “Nothing is retained, and nothing is identified in that message.” Lund theorized that one way to get the system fully functioning more quickly would be to equip all vehicles with a bare minimum of a transmitter that sends a signal indicating it’s position. “Then, vehicles that had smarter systems could at least know where they were and react to them,” Lund said. “But that’s all to be figured out. It’s kind of like ‘Star Wars.’ ”

Providing unparalled service across a variety of industries since 1983.

541-389-1505 400 SW Bluff Dr Ste 200 Bend , OR 97702

70 Years of Hearing Excellence

desertorthopedics.com

Call 541-389-9690

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

Northwest stocks Name AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div PE ... 1.16f .04 .44 1.76f ... 1.40f .88 .96 ... .28f .48 .22 .84 .12 .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

12 15 ... 16 14 ... 9 16 25 14 17 9 ... 12 8 25 10 ... 20 19 11

YTD Last Chg %Chg 35.27 25.38 9.17 20.57 73.50 5.75 47.75 48.79 87.18 7.32 24.14 25.10 9.57 28.48 8.35 23.62 6.48 8.73 22.04 14.45 30.98

+.81 +.14 +.31 +.10 +1.73 -.10 +1.02 +1.40 -.14 -.06 +.31 +1.69 +.07 +.63 +.06 +.16 +.34 +.32 +.24 +.18 +.63

-6.1 -1.4 +64.9 +3.1 +.2 +31.3 +1.2 +4.8 +4.6 +21.6 -3.7 -2.6 -8.0 +17.4 +8.6 -2.5 +9.1 +8.2 +2.7 +6.6 +19.3

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerhsr

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1678.00 $1679.50 $32.515

Market recap

Div PE 1.44 1.08f 1.78 ... .72a ... 1.68 .12 .58 .75f 1.56f .89f .68 ... .28 .78f .32 .88f ... .60

www.expresspros.com

Bend Redmond 541.388.2333 541.548.9159

YTD Last Chg %Chg

23 108.65 +.40 +12.7 17 55.09 +.46 +10.8 19 44.58 +.11 -7.0 13 4.95 -.10 +9.0 15 43.30 +.85 +15.5 ... 1.86 -.12 -2.6 35 41.43 +.62 +13.3 21 171.24 +3.04 +3.9 14 20.67 +.48 -1.8 13 41.18 +1.48 -2.6 28 115.58 +.76 +29.5 13 40.12 +1.17 +9.2 36 60.63 +1.33 +31.8 21 6.10 +.17 +25.2 20 13.14 +.20 +6.1 13 31.34 +.47 +15.9 16 16.92 +.31 +20.9 12 34.02 +.40 +23.4 12 19.45 +.41 +24.7 32 21.07 +.55 +12.9

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1657.00 $1659.00 $31.511

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm S&P500ETF SPDR Fncl NokiaCp iShEMkts

2132038 9.17 +.31 1419945 138.79 +1.79 797702 15.49 +.29 792513 4.23 -.01 608622 42.81 +1.08

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Fusion-io n MBIA NetQin n EldorGld g Cytec

28.31 10.28 11.06 14.40 64.06

Chg %Chg +3.65 +1.21 +1.21 +1.55 +6.57

+14.8 +13.3 +12.3 +12.1 +11.4

Losers ($2 or more)

Amex

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

Name

Vol (00)

CheniereEn NovaGld g Rentech AmApparel NwGold g

Last Chg

42296 15.70 +.29 37336 7.00 +.47 32863 2.16 +.08 32325 1.04 +.08 25590 10.00 +.47

Gainers ($2 or more)

Vol (00)

MicronT PwShs QQQ Microsoft Intel SiriusXM

Last Chg

563383 7.15 -.02 499699 67.21 +.76 371175 30.98 +.63 362633 28.48 +.63 341122 2.26 +.01

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

GranTrra g DocuSec AlexcoR g NovaGld g CKX Lands

6.48 3.28 6.75 7.00 13.65

+.48 +.24 +.46 +.47 +.84

SthcstFn 2.24 +.78 +53.4 MIPS Tech 6.58 +1.37 +26.3 TOP Ship rs 2.91 +.53 +22.3 EagRkE wt 3.19 +.47 +17.3 KeyTrn 10.74 +1.12 +11.6

+8.0 +7.9 +7.3 +7.2 +6.6

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

PrUVxST rs CSVS2xVxS iP SESPX iP SXR1K DirDGldBr

16.90 8.02 18.91 18.19 44.41

-3.50 -1.39 -2.59 -2.45 -5.35

-17.2 -14.8 -12.0 -11.9 -10.8

ContMatls ASpecRlty AmShrd WizrdSft rs BowlA

15.34 -1.16 4.54 -.33 3.17 -.23 2.67 -.13 12.75 -.62

2,498 542 107 3,147 59 16

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Indexes

Last

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

-7.0 -6.8 -6.6 -4.7 -4.6

NewLeadH AvidTch ElbitImg FFinSvc AltoPlrm

3.64 -.83 -18.6 8.50 -1.78 -17.3 2.82 -.29 -9.3 3.74 -.31 -7.7 16.90 -1.30 -7.1

294 170 28 492 7 3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Chg %Chg

Diary 1,856 636 114 2,606 50 22

52-Week High Low

Name

13,297.11 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 467.64 381.99 8,718.25 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 868.57 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,986.58 5,248.20 453.39 8,039.95 2,376.23 3,055.55 1,387.57 14,574.41 808.59

+181.19 +113.80 +2.37 +127.10 +33.92 +39.09 +18.86 +207.49 +12.00

+1.41 +2.22 +.53 +1.61 +1.45 +1.30 +1.38 +1.44 +1.51

+6.29 +4.55 -2.43 +7.53 +4.30 +17.29 +10.33 +10.50 +9.13

+5.71 -.04 +10.08 -3.99 -1.07 +10.70 +5.56 +4.38 -2.28

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

s s s s s s s s s s t s s s

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

+6.3

CapOpp 32.15 +0.51 DivdGro 16.35 +0.18 Energy 59.70 +1.36 EqInc 23.18 +0.27 Explr 79.80 +1.45 GNMA 11.05 GlobEq 17.78 +0.28 HYCorp 5.81 HlthCre 136.32 +1.00 InflaPro 14.33 -0.02 IntlGr 18.41 +0.37 IntlVal 29.16 +0.52 ITIGrade 10.11 LifeCon 16.90 +0.09 LifeGro 22.94 +0.27 LifeMod 20.44 +0.18 LTIGrade 10.29 -0.03 Morg 20.26 +0.30 MuInt 14.15 -0.01 PrecMtls r 18.90 +0.65 PrmcpCor 14.48 +0.22 Prmcp r 66.96 +1.03 SelValu r 20.08 +0.29 STAR 20.22 +0.20 STIGrade 10.75 StratEq 20.57 +0.34 TgtRetInc 11.93 +0.04 TgRe2010 23.63 +0.14 TgtRe2015 13.09 +0.11 TgRe2020 23.25 +0.22 TgtRe2025 13.24 +0.14 TgRe2030 22.74 +0.27 TgtRe2035 13.69 +0.18 TgtRe2040 22.49 +0.30 TgtRe2045 14.12 +0.19 USGro 21.28 +0.32 Wellsly 23.52 +0.08 Welltn 33.08 +0.29 Wndsr 14.31 +0.24 WndsII 28.41 +0.40 Vanguard Idx Fds: MidCpIstPl108.26 +1.81 TotIntAdm r23.93 +0.42 TotIntlInst r95.72 +1.70

310.88 2,264.36 3,269.79 5,710.46 6,743.24 20,327.32 39,357.56 14,869.91 3,487.09 9,524.79 1,986.63 2,978.14 4,361.71 5,641.00

+1.01 +1.34 +.99 +1.34 +1.03 +.93 +.49 +1.23 +.63 +.70 -.39 +1.08 +.79 +1.13

1.0442 1.5970 1.0055 .002074 .1585 1.3196 .1288 .012376 .076592 .0340 .000878 .1484 1.0983 .0339

1.0299 1.5904 .9961 .002050 .1585 1.3099 .1288 .012358 .076088 .0337 .000874 .1469 1.0902 .0338

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.86 +0.32 +12.3 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.58 +0.06 +4.6 GrowthI 28.22 +0.40 +14.9 Ultra 26.36 +0.41 +15.0 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.94 +0.28 +11.2 AMutlA p 27.22 +0.31 +5.9 BalA p 19.49 +0.20 +7.5 BondA p 12.68 +1.8 CapIBA p 50.86 +0.38 +4.3 CapWGA p 34.91 +0.52 +9.1 CapWA p 20.94 +0.05 +2.9 EupacA p 38.92 +0.69 +10.7 FdInvA p 38.77 +0.61 +9.9 GovtA p 14.41 +0.3 GwthA p 32.46 +0.48 +13.0 HI TrA p 10.98 +0.02 +5.2 IncoA p 17.29 +0.14 +4.1 IntBdA p 13.67 -0.01 +0.8 ICAA p 29.45 +0.35 +9.2 NEcoA p 27.44 +0.39 +15.4 N PerA p 29.46 +0.49 +12.6 NwWrldA 51.45 +0.78 +11.6 SmCpA p 38.23 +0.58 +15.2 TxExA p 12.77 -0.01 +3.1 WshA p 30.02 +0.37 +6.3 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.66 +0.43 +14.3 IntlVal r 27.27 +0.42 +8.7 MidCap 39.50 +0.64 +20.0 MidCapVal 21.23 +0.31 +7.8 Baron Funds: Growth 54.91 +0.83 +7.6 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.89 +1.0 DivMu 14.81 -0.01 +0.9 TxMgdIntl 13.62 +0.27 +9.1 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 19.34 +0.24 +6.6 GlAlA r 19.39 +0.20 +6.8

BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.03 +0.18 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 19.39 +0.24 GlbAlloc r 19.48 +0.20 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 53.92 +0.91 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 65.62 +0.87 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 31.14 +0.49 AcornIntZ 38.93 +0.57 LgCapGr 14.37 +0.22 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.21 +0.09 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.15 +0.20 USCorEq1 11.91 +0.18 USCorEq2 11.69 +0.19 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.83 +0.56 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 36.22 +0.56 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.22 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 19.61 +0.30 EmMktV 29.60 +0.51 IntSmVa 15.39 +0.30 LargeCo 10.95 +0.15 USLgVa 21.06 +0.38 US Small 22.59 +0.36 US SmVa 25.69 +0.46 IntlSmCo 15.51 +0.31 Fixd 10.34 +0.01 IntVa 15.79 +0.31 Glb5FxInc 11.10 +0.01 2YGlFxd 10.12 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 73.15 +1.01 Income 13.58 IntlStk 31.88 +0.63 Stock 112.21 +2.04 DoubleLine Funds:

+6.5 +6.6 +6.8 +16.2 +8.4 +13.0 +13.5 +19.6 +0.4 +9.8 +10.9 +10.6 +10.2 +10.4 +1.7 +13.7 +14.0 +13.3 +10.9 +10.4 +10.1 +10.9 +12.1 +0.5 +7.3 +1.7 +0.4 +9.1 +3.1 +9.0 +10.9

TRBd I 11.22 -0.01 TRBd N p 11.22 Dreyfus: Aprec 43.79 +0.47 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.55 +0.27 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.00 GblMacAbR 9.96 LgCapVal 18.60 +0.27 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.68 +0.23 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.64 FPACres 28.25 +0.32 Fairholme 30.37 +0.84 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.40 -0.01 StrValDvIS 4.82 +0.02 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 22.55 +0.27 StrInA 12.33 +0.02 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 22.84 +0.28 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.92 +0.10 FF2010K 12.87 +0.09 FF2015 11.64 +0.09 FF2015K 12.92 +0.09 FF2020 14.07 +0.11 FF2020K 13.34 +0.11 FF2025 11.71 +0.12 FF2025K 13.48 +0.14 FF2030 13.94 +0.14 FF2030K 13.63 +0.14 FF2035 11.56 +0.14 FF2035K 13.73 +0.16 FF2040 8.06 +0.10 FF2040K 13.78 +0.17 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.64 +0.17 AMgr50 15.97 +0.12 AMgr20 r 13.11 +0.04 Balanc 19.64 +0.17

+3.4 +3.5 +8.5 +8.6 +3.4 +2.5 +8.7 +9.4 +0.7 +5.5 +31.2 +2.1 +0.1 +14.4 +3.3 +14.4 +6.3 +6.4 +6.5 +6.5 +7.2 +7.3 +8.3 +8.4 +8.6 +8.7 +9.6 +9.6 +9.5 +9.6 +12.6 +6.6 +3.4 +8.4

BalancedK 19.64 BlueChGr 50.01 CapAp 28.76 CpInc r 9.15 Contra 77.36 ContraK 77.33 DisEq 23.89 DivIntl 28.23 DivrsIntK r 28.20 DivGth 29.46 Eq Inc 44.55 EQII 18.65 Fidel 35.14 FltRateHi r 9.81 GNMA 11.87 GovtInc 10.74 GroCo 97.05 GroInc 20.30 GrowthCoK96.99 HighInc r 8.95 IntBd 10.94 IntmMu 10.53 IntlDisc 30.52 InvGrBd 11.75 InvGB 7.77 LgCapVal 11.08 LowP r 40.01 LowPriK r 40.00 Magelln 72.23 MidCap 29.70 MuniInc 13.26 NwMkt r 16.49 OTC 63.12 100Index 9.81 Puritn 19.28 PuritanK 19.27 SAllSecEqF12.65 SCmdtyStrt 8.99 SCmdtyStrF 9.01 SrsIntGrw 11.32 SrsIntVal 8.52 SrInvGrdF 11.75 STBF 8.54 StratInc 11.04

+0.17 +0.73 +0.36 +0.03 +0.94 +0.94 +0.38 +0.45 +0.45 +0.52 +0.52 +0.22 +0.48 -0.02 -0.01 +1.34 +0.27 +1.34 +0.02 -0.01 -0.01 +0.55 -0.01 -0.01 +0.15 +0.58 +0.58 +0.98 +0.46 -0.01 +0.03 +0.96 +0.13 +0.16 +0.15 +0.17 +0.11 +0.11 +0.23 +0.12 -0.01 +0.02

+8.5 +17.9 +16.8 +7.2 +14.7 +14.7 +11.1 +10.6 +10.7 +13.9 +8.5 +7.7 +12.8 +2.7 +1.0 +0.2 +20.0 +11.7 +20.0 +5.3 +1.3 +1.6 +10.5 +1.3 +1.5 +10.0 +12.0 +12.0 +14.7 +11.4 +2.8 +5.9 +15.4 +11.2 +9.4 +9.4 +12.6 +0.3 +0.4 +12.0 +5.4 +1.3 +0.9 +3.4

TotalBd 11.02 +1.8 USBI 11.80 -0.01 +0.9 Value 71.17 +1.16 +12.1 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 49.21 +0.67 +11.0 500Idx I 49.21 +0.67 +11.0 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 39.80 +0.67 +12.2 500IdxAdv 49.21 +0.67 +11.0 TotMktAd r 40.17 +0.57 +11.2 First Eagle: GlblA 48.10 +0.47 +6.6 OverseasA 21.59 +0.17 +6.0 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.39 -0.01 +3.0 FoundAl p 10.54 +0.11 +6.7 GrwthA p 49.93 +0.67 +11.9 HYTFA p 10.58 -0.01 +4.3 IncomA p 2.14 +0.01 +4.1 RisDvA p 36.72 +0.37 +5.5 USGovA p 6.90 +0.7 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.04 +0.07 +6.7 IncmeAd 2.13 +0.02 +4.7 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.16 +0.01 +3.9 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.29 +0.23 +7.5 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 13.07 +0.07 +6.5 GrwthA p 17.64 +0.23 +8.3 WorldA p 14.97 +0.23 +9.0 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.10 +0.07 +6.5 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 43.94 +0.72 +13.4 GMO Trust III: Quality 23.73 +0.22 +8.3 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 19.42 NA GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.35 NA Quality 23.74 +0.22 +8.3 Goldman Sachs Inst:

HiYield 7.10 +0.02 MidCapV 37.01 +0.56 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.52 -0.01 CapApInst 43.94 +0.68 IntlInv t 58.35 +1.22 Intl r 58.93 +1.23 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.96 +0.62 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 42.37 +0.77 Div&Gr 20.88 +0.27 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.59 -0.12 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r16.04 +0.16 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.42 +0.22 CmstkA 16.72 +0.26 EqIncA 8.86 +0.08 GrIncA p 20.08 +0.25 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.72 +0.42 AssetStA p 25.49 +0.43 AssetStrI r 25.72 +0.43 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.91 -0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.90 -0.01 HighYld 7.86 +0.01 ShtDurBd 10.99 USLCCrPls 22.19 +0.33 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 36.57 +0.69 PrkMCVal T21.74 +0.33 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.15 +0.11 LSGrwth 13.11 +0.16 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.51 +0.28 Longleaf Partners: Partners 29.34 +0.45 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.64 +0.07

+5.3 +10.2 +3.2 +19.1 +12.2 +12.4 +14.4 +13.9 +8.0 -6.8 +4.4 +8.5 +10.3 +7.0 +8.5 +14.3 +14.5 +14.6 +1.3 +1.4 +4.9 +0.7 +12.4 +16.4 +7.7 +8.1 +10.1 +16.1 +10.1 +6.4

StrInc C 15.17 +0.09 +6.0 LSBondR 14.58 +0.06 +6.3 StrIncA 15.09 +0.09 +6.2 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.36 +0.03 +4.7 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.58 +0.18 +10.2 BdDebA p 7.89 +0.02 +5.2 ShDurIncA p4.59 +0.01 +2.3 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.62 +0.01 +2.1 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.58 +2.1 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.84 +0.14 +6.5 ValueA 24.67 +0.34 +10.6 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.78 +0.34 +10.7 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.49 +0.16 +13.0 MergerFd 15.77 +0.02 +1.2 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.58 +3.2 TotRtBdI 10.58 +3.3 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 38.08 +0.58 +15.7 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.67 +0.28 +5.6 GlbDiscZ 29.04 +0.28 +5.7 SharesZ 21.46 +0.23 +7.6 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 48.84 +0.82 +5.2 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.25 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.75 +0.28 +6.3 Intl I r 18.60 +0.31 +12.4 Oakmark 47.07 +0.68 +12.9 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.22 +0.04 +6.5 GlbSMdCap15.00 +0.23 +11.4 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 33.48 +0.47 +14.2 GlobA p 59.99 +0.94 +11.0

GblStrIncA 4.19 +0.01 IntBdA p 6.33 +0.02 MnStFdA 36.54 +0.42 RisingDivA 17.19 +0.24 S&MdCpVl31.61 +0.53 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.56 +0.22 S&MdCpVl26.83 +0.45 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p15.50 +0.22 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.23 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 33.11 +0.47 IntlBdY 6.33 +0.02 IntGrowY 28.56 +0.62 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.16 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.61 +0.05 AllAsset 12.11 +0.05 ComodRR 6.69 +0.07 DivInc 11.66 +0.01 EmgMkCur10.46 +0.07 EmMkBd 11.66 +0.02 HiYld 9.23 +0.02 InvGrCp 10.65 +0.01 LowDu 10.44 RealRtnI 12.08 -0.02 ShortT 9.80 -0.01 TotRt 11.16 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.08 -0.02 TotRtA 11.16 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.16 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.16 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.16 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.52 +0.55 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 40.92

+4.6 +3.1 +13.6 +10.0 +6.7 +9.7 +6.4 +9.8 +7.5 +14.3 +3.3 +11.9 +3.6 +6.8 +5.9 +3.2 +4.8 +6.0 +4.9 +4.6 +4.2 +2.3 +2.8 +1.6 +3.6 +2.7 +3.5 +3.3 +3.6 +3.6 +5.3 NA

Price Funds: BlChip 46.05 +0.68 CapApp 22.36 +0.19 EmMktS 31.81 +0.39 EqInc 25.02 +0.35 EqIndex 37.43 +0.51 Growth 37.96 +0.55 HlthSci 37.59 +0.37 HiYield 6.70 +0.01 InstlCpG 19.20 +0.28 IntlBond 9.88 +0.05 Intl G&I 12.57 +0.22 IntlStk 13.83 +0.26 MidCap 58.83 +0.97 MCapVal 23.43 +0.36 N Asia 15.75 +0.13 New Era 43.52 +1.21 N Horiz 35.39 +0.58 N Inc 9.73 OverS SF 7.99 +0.15 R2010 16.09 +0.13 R2015 12.54 +0.13 R2020 17.40 +0.20 R2025 12.77 +0.16 R2030 18.37 +0.26 R2035 13.01 +0.19 R2040 18.52 +0.27 ShtBd 4.84 SmCpStk 34.71 +0.61 SmCapVal 37.53 +0.59 SpecIn 12.63 +0.04 Value 24.79 +0.40 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.11 +0.23 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.79 +0.20 PremierI r 20.25 +0.34 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 39.29 +0.55 S&P Sel 21.72 +0.30 Scout Funds: Intl 31.23 +0.52 Sequoia 159.40 +1.55 Templeton Instit:

+19.1 +8.4 +11.6 +9.1 +10.9 +19.3 +15.3 +5.3 +19.1 +2.1 +9.1 +12.5 +11.6 +9.5 +13.2 +3.5 +14.1 +1.4 +9.2 +7.1 +8.3 +9.4 +10.3 +11.1 +11.6 +11.8 +1.2 +11.1 +8.8 +3.8 +10.0 +11.5 +9.6 +9.3 +11.1 +11.0 +11.7 +9.6

ForEqS 18.11 +0.24 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 26.38 +0.39 IntValue I 26.96 +0.40 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.48 +0.22 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 23.19 +0.19 CAITAdm 11.52 -0.01 CpOpAdl 74.26 +1.19 EMAdmr r 35.72 +0.56 Energy 112.09 +2.55 EqInAdm n 48.58 +0.55 ExtdAdm 44.14 +0.74 500Adml 127.96 +1.74 GNMA Ad 11.05 GrwAdm 36.27 +0.50 HlthCr 57.52 +0.42 HiYldCp 5.81 InfProAd 28.14 -0.05 ITBdAdml 11.80 -0.01 ITsryAdml 11.60 -0.01 IntGrAdm 58.57 +1.18 ITAdml 14.15 -0.01 ITGrAdm 10.11 LtdTrAd 11.16 LTGrAdml 10.29 -0.03 LT Adml 11.52 -0.01 MCpAdml 99.37 +1.66 MuHYAdm 10.95 -0.01 PrmCap r 69.48 +1.07 ReitAdm r 88.64 +1.20 STsyAdml 10.77 STBdAdml 10.63 ShtTrAd 15.93 STIGrAd 10.75 SmCAdm 36.88 +0.63 TtlBAdml 10.99 -0.01 TStkAdm 34.67 +0.49 WellslAdm 56.98 +0.20 WelltnAdm 57.13 +0.49 Windsor 48.27 +0.80 WdsrIIAd 50.43 +0.71 Vanguard Fds:

+9.8 +10.0 +7.5 +7.0 +2.3 +8.9 +12.8 +1.3 +6.6 +12.2 +11.0 +0.9 +14.4 +6.0 +4.0 +1.8 +1.5 +0.2 +12.7 +1.8 +2.9 +0.6 +1.7 +2.8 +11.5 +3.3 +8.5 +8.8 +0.2 +0.7 +0.4 +1.8 +10.5 +0.8 +11.2 +3.4 +6.3 +12.1 +10.2

+8.9 +6.0 +1.3 +6.6 +11.7 +0.9 +11.8 +4.0 +6.0 +1.8 +12.6 +9.5 +2.8 +4.7 +8.7 +6.7 +1.7 +16.0 +1.8 +0.6 +7.3 +8.5 +8.0 +8.0 +1.7 +12.2 +3.8 +5.3 +6.4 +7.2 +7.9 +8.7 +9.4 +9.7 +9.7 +17.9 +3.4 +6.3 +12.1 +10.2 +11.5 +9.6 +9.6

TotIntlIP r 95.74 +1.70 +9.6 500 MidCap

127.96 +1.74 +11.0 21.89 +0.36 +11.4

SmCap

36.85 +0.63 +10.4

TotBnd

10.99 -0.01 +0.8

TotlIntl

14.31 +0.25 +9.6

TotStk

34.66 +0.49 +11.2

Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst

23.20 +0.19 +7.0

DevMkInst 9.14 +0.16 +8.6 ExtIn

44.13 +0.74 +12.2

FTAllWldI r 85.10 +1.49 +9.5 GrwthIst 36.27 +0.51 +14.4 InfProInst 11.46 -0.02 +1.8 InstIdx

127.14 +1.74 +11.0

InsPl

127.14 +1.73 +11.0

InsTStPlus 31.38 +0.45 +11.3 MidCpIst 21.95 +0.37 +11.5 SCInst

36.88 +0.63 +10.5

TBIst

10.99 -0.01 +0.8

TSInst

34.68 +0.50 +11.3

ValueIst

22.03 +0.30 +8.3

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 105.70 +1.44 +11.0 MidCpIdx 31.36 +0.53 +11.5 STBdIdx 10.63

+0.7

TotBdSgl 10.99 -0.01 +0.8 TotStkSgl 33.46 +0.47 +11.2 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.29

+2.5

Yacktman Funds: Fund p

18.60 +0.19 +6.2

Focused 19.82 +0.18 +5.5


E4 THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

M  

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Rentals

D  Hydro Flask in Bend has been selected for the 2012 Best of Bend Award in the camping equipment and gear category by the U.S. Commerce Association, a nongovernmental public relations, marketing and advertising business. This year Hydro Flask has also

been awarded the Mountain Mama Outdoor Family Award in the nursing mama category and was named one of the best new companies by The Green Girl Next Door at the Natural Products Expo West. Hydro Flask makes insulated bottles that are recyclable and BPA free.

For information visit www .hydroflask.com Dutch Bros. Coffee will open a new location today at 442 East Hood Ave. in Sisters. In honor of the grand opening, the store will serve free drinks from 5:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. For information visit www.dutchbros.com

B   C 

TODAY

Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER COURSE: Contact 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu; $475; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700. SPRING RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2012 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

MONDAY FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services which can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109, karenb@neighborimpact.org or www.homeownershipcenter.org. MICROSOFT CERTIFIED TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST PREP: For students planning to take the specialist exam; contact http:// noncredit.cocc.edu or call 541-3837270; $289; 6-8 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. GETTING THE WORD OUT: To register contact http://noncredit. cocc.edu or call 541-383-7270; $69; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837700.

TUESDAY

College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. JAVASCRIPT FOR APP BUILDING: To register contact http://noncredit. cocc.edu or call 541-383-7270; $79; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3881133. MICROSOFT CERTIFIED TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST PREP: For students planning to take the specialist exam; contact http://noncredit.cocc.edu or call 541-383-7270; $149; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-5042900. IRRIGATION BASICS: Approved for 8 hours of continuing education for landscape contractors through the Oregon LCB; contact 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu; $69; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. SAVING AND INVESTING: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: With Bend City Councilor Jodie Barram; RSVP by April 17 to president@sibend.org or 541-7280820; $12; 5:30-7 p.m.; Johnny Carino’s, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97; 541-318-6300. EXCEL 2010 BEGINNING: To register contact http://noncredit.cocc.edu or call 541-383-7270; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. LIVE CONTRACTOR EDUCATION COURSE: Local contractors can get CCB license education; registration required; contact 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit. cocc.edu; $299; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837700.

QUICKBOOKS PRO BEGINNING: Contact http://noncredit.cocc.edu or call 541-383-7270; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. SPRING RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2012 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Provided by The Partnership to End Poverty; learn about tax credits and access a free online tax filing program; certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance; registration preferred; free; noon-5 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-504-1389 or www.takecredit.org.

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. LEED EXAM PREP COURSE: For building professionals; contact 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit. cocc.edu; $295; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. VISIT BEND BOARD MEETING: open to the public; to reserve a seat contact valerie@visitbend.com; 8 a.m.; Bend Visitor Center, 750 N.W. Lava Road; 541-382-8048. EXCEL 2010 BEGINNING: To register contact http://noncredit. cocc.edu or call 541-383-7270; $59; 6-9 p.m.; COCC-Crook County Open Campus, 510 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-447-6228. EXCEL 2010 BEGINNING: To register contact http://noncredit. cocc.edu or call 541-383-7270; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837700.

SUNDAY

WEDNESDAY

April 20

SPRING RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2012 models; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport

BUSINESS START-UP WORKSHOP: Registration required, contact 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc. edu; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W.

COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER COURSE: Contact 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu; $475; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700.

Retail

applications for Apple’s iPad and iPhone devices. Last year, Nordstrom put more than 6,000 mobile hand-held devices in its stores for easy checkout and inventory lookup. Nordstrom, which has a large, carefully curated men’s store, was initially interested in a simple distribution deal with Bonobos, a brand popular with well-to-do young professionals who fancy crisp plaid shirts and red chambray pants. But the retailer developed a deeper interest after taking a closer look at Bonobos’ operations and how it engaged with its online audience. Nordstrom was particularly impressed with Bonobos’ emails to consumers, which included customized elements and links to quirky YouTube videos that weren’t related to fashion but appealed to Bonobos’ male clientele. “We certainly thought: There’s a way we can help them and they can help us,� Nordstrom said.

SATURDAY

Continued from E1 In March 2011, the pharmacy chain Walgreen acquired its online rival Drugstore.com for roughly $409 million. One month later, Wal-Mart Stores paid about $300 million for Kosmix, a social-media startup that now serves as the retailer’s lab for building and testing new Web and mobile applications. The world’s largest retailer also owns a controlling stake in Yihaodian, a fast-rising online retailer in China. “These guys are usually slow and lumbering giants,� said Sucharita Mulpuru, a Forrester Research analyst. “But they need to make proactive investments. Because, left to their own devices, they could never emulate these businesses.�

Nordstrom gets proactive Nordstrom has been among the most aggressive retailers online. Last February, it acquired HauteLook, for $180 million in stock; the takeover of the “flash sales� site was the first of its kind for a traditional retailer. Nordstrom is also a lead investor in Sole Society, a shoe subscription service that was spun out of HauteLook. The retailer is also retooling its own site to compete with upstarts. Nordstrom.com has introduced same-day shipping in certain markets and it has

Online laboratories For a big retailer like Nordstrom, such e-commerce bets don’t have all that much impact on the bottom line. In late 2010, Bonobos was averaging a little more than $1 million in sales each month. By comparison, Nordstrom recorded net sales of more than $10 billion last year. Instead, retailers see the

FRIDAY

ventures as an opportunity to improve their practices, using their online partners as laboratories where they can develop new e-commerce strategies. Kosmix, renamed WalmartLabs, is an experimental factory for social media applications. Since joining Wal-Mart last April, the team has introduced a mobile app for gift-giving, improved the company’s online search function, and started a Web competition called “Get on the Shelf,� where small businesses compete to sell their products in Wal-Mart stores. Nordstrom’s online effort has already been influenced by its purchases. In the last year, the company has improved the personalization and targeting of emails to consumers, mirroring efforts by HauteLook. Such tweaks have increased engagement “pretty significantly,� according to Jamie Nordstrom. The new relationship could be equally advantageous to Bonobos, which is dealing with rising competition online. The hope is that the Nordstrom partnership will expose Bonobos to new clients, particularly those who may not be shopping online. Although Nordstrom may cannibalize some of Bonobos’ existing sales, Dunn, the company’s chief executive, said any loss in direct sales would be offset by the marketing benefits.

Continued from E1 Those increases can be attributed to a growing demand for rental houses — a demand that is outpacing apartments for the time being, said Kevin Restine, president of the rental association and general manager of Plus Property Management in Bend. As foreclosures and short sales push more families out of their homes, many are looking to move into rental houses instead of apartments, because a house is what they’re used to, Restine said. As a result, demand for rental houses has shot up each of the last few years, and prices have followed. The rental market “will continue to be driven primarily by the foreclosures� that are still taking their toll on the for-sale market, Restine said. Though the number of default notices in Central Oregon is down notably from 2009 and 2010, “I think we’re going to continue to see people lose their homes, and continue to see people that used to be homeowners become tenants.� The annual survey covers prices and vacancy rates for apartments, duplexes, triplexes and homes in Bend and other Central Oregon communities. The whole region’s 4.4 percent vacancy rate is down from 5.2 percent last year. As recently as 2009, more

Foreclosure Continued from E1 The U.S. housing market remains weak, even after the best winter for home sales in five years and steady improvement in the job market. Home prices are now back to 2002 levels, according to the Standard & Poor’s/CaseShiller U.S. home price index. Rather than a large wave of bank-owned homes crashing onto the market at once, it’s likely the new crop of foreclosures will arrive in smaller waves throughout the year, Blomquist said. Still, many of the homes entering the foreclosure process now are properties with loans that have gone unpaid for a long time, not instances of borrowers just starting to

than 12 percent of Central Oregon’s rental properties were vacant.

Area-specific

most of its rental units. When demand is as high as it is, she said, companies can get away with price increases.

Today, rental companies like Austin Property Management say up to twice as many prospective renters are coming through the door than in the years leading up to, and immediately after, the 2008 real estate crash. Particularly on Bend’s west side, competition for apartments and rental houses is driving prices up, said Stephanie Kramer, coowner of Austin Property Management. “It’s area-specific,� Kramer said of price increases. West Bend rentals “are higher in demand than the east side, which is why we haven’t been able to raise (prices) as much on east-side properties.� Across the board, most types of apartments have gotten a bit more expensive over the past year. A one-bedroom apartment in Bend averaged $549 in the first quarter of 2012, up from $521 last year. Other units saw increases in the $10- to $30-a-month range. Competition for apartments is just as tough as for rental homes, said Andee Jessee, co-owner of A Superior Property Management Co. in Bend. “I would say there’s just more people moving to the area,� despite the recession, Jessee said. Her company is seeing multiple applicants for

In-migration

fall behind. That suggests the possibility that the number of homes at risk of foreclosure could begin to taper off once banks tackle the crop of homes with long-overdue mortgage payments. “The faster we can move some of these old foreclosures through the pipeline, the faster the market can be in a place to recover,� Blomquist said. At the end of last year, some 1.5 million U.S. homes had mortgages that had gone unpaid at least 90 days, according to Mortgage Bankers Association data. First-time foreclosure notices, such as warnings of initial default, are the first step in the process that can potentially result in a home being foreclosed upon. Homes can exit the process if the overdue

payments are paid. Sometimes, a bank will allow that the home be sold for less than what the borrower owes on their mortgage, a so-called short sale. All told, 101,939 U.S. homes received a first-time notice in March, the biggest monthly increase since October, RealtyTrac said. Thirty-one states posted a monthly increase in homes with a first-time foreclosure notice. Nevada led the pack with an increase of 153 percent. Even so, foreclosure activity overall — as measured by the number of properties receiving a notice of default, scheduled for auction or repossessed by lenders — sank in March to the lowest level since July 2007, the firm said.

Kramer with Austin Property Management guessed that 50 percent of the prospective tenants coming through her company’s doors are people considering moving into the area — most of them from California. A lot of those new residents seem to be looking at rentals instead of purchase properties, she said, adding that the trend could be a case of housing market jitters keeping them from jumping into an investment like buying a home. “A lot of people who have the money (to buy) are just renting, because they maybe want to check the area out for a year or so,� Kramer said. Restine with Plus Property Management pointed to a 6 percent vacancy rate as healthy for the local market. Anything significantly higher means property owners aren’t finding qualified applicants. But when it’s lower, like the current vacancy rate at 4.4 percent, renters can hit the point where they’ll need to rely on new construction to replenish supply. The low vacancy rate “could motivate people to build,� spurring demand for new construction, he said. — Reporter: 541-617-7820 eglucklich@bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 F1

CLASSIFIEDS The Bulletin

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

EMPLOYMENT

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

LEGAL NOTICES

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

Find Classifieds at

www.bendbulletin.com

RENTALS/REAL ESTATE

contact us:

TRANSPORTATION

hours:

Place an ad: 541-385-5809

FAX an ad: 541-322-7253

Business Hours:

Place an ad with the help of a Bulletin Classified representative between the business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Include your name, phone number and address

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Subscriber Services: 541-385-5800

Classified Telephone Hours:

Subscribe or manage your subscription

24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371

On the web at: www.bendbulletin.com

Place, cancel, or extend an ad

T h e

B u l l e t i n :

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns, Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. 263 - Tools

General Merchandise

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold/Silver.I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist Elizabeth,541-633-7006 Wanted: Old Oriental Rugs, any size or cond., Call toll free, 1-800-660-8938.

1 7 7 7

264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found GARAGE SALES 275 - Auction Sales 280 - Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets & Supplies

Pets & Supplies

C h a n d l e r

A v e . ,

B e n d

O r e g o n

9 7 7 0 2

208

212

246

246

255

258

Pets & Supplies

Antiques & Collectibles

Guns, Hunting & Fishing

Guns, Hunting & Fishing

Computers

Travel/Tickets

Rescued adult comTHE BULLETIN re- DUCK TICKETS (2), panion cats FREE to Antique Hutch - 6’x3’ Springfield trap door great seats, $100 & quires computer adWanted: Collector seniors, disabled & up. 541-573-1100. vertisers with multiple seeks high quality Carbine 45/70, 1903, 100 yrs + $200 OBO veterans! Tame, alad schedules or those fishing items. A3 & 1903 30.06, for info 541-330-6097 260 tered, shots, ID chip, selling multiple sysRuger 44 mag semi Call 541-678-5753, or more. Will always take Antiques wanted: Tools, Misc. Items tems/ software, to dis503-351-2746 auto rifle & 17HMR 96 back if circumstances wood furn, fishing, close the name of the leather NIB, REM 14 Wanted: WWII M1 Carchange. Photos, info marbles, old signs, business or the term BBQ - Char-Broil Compump 30 REM & 221 bine, Garand, Colt 1911, at www.craftcats.org. beer cans, costume mercial Series gas "dealer" in their ads. 22LR pump, Savage Colt Commando, S&W 541-389-8420; 647jewelry. 541-389-1578 grill, stainless, 4 Private party advertis99 284 & 22 High Victory. 541-389-9836. 2181. Sat/Sun 1-5, burner, never used, ers are defined as The Bulletin reserves power lever, WIN 88 other days by appt. full tank & cover, paid those who sell one 253 the right to publish all 308 & 100 308, 1894 65480 78th St., Bend. $450, asking $350 computer. ads from The Bulletin 30.30 & 32 Cal & TV, Stereo & Video OBO, 541-549-6036. Rescued kittens/cats. newspaper onto The 1906 22LR pump, Buying Diamonds 65480 78th St., Bend, Bulletin Internet web70-225, Marlin 444 & Light Oak TV cabinet 257 Sat/Sun 1-5; other /Gold for Cash site. 30.30 levers. w/storage, like new, Musical Instruments days by appt. 541Saxon’s Fine Jewelers H & H FIREARMS $80. 541-388-0865 647-2181. Altered, 541-389-6655 541-382-9352 Fender Blues Junior III shots, ID chip, more. TURN THE PAGE 5 tube amp, 6 mo. BUYING Info: 541-389-8420. 240 new. 5 yr. warranty. Lionel/American Flyer For More Ads Map, photos, more at trains, accessories. $200. 541-480-5950 Crafts & Hobbies www.craftcats.org The Bulletin 541-408-2191. Share your love with a Treadle cat. Foster cats avail., WHITE Sewing Machine fixed, shots, ID chips, great working, cabiokay w/other cats, net in good condifree, 541-408-3010 tion, including many Shih Tzu female, 8 mo., accessories. $350. small, $450, senior 541.610.5791 discount, 541-788-0090 210

245

Furniture & Appliances

Golf Equipment

A1 Washers&Dryers

Golf cart, older, room to haul stuff, runs great, $500. 541-350-4656

$150 ea. Full warranty. Free Del. Also wanted, used W/D’s 541-280-7355

246

Guns, Hunting & Fishing

Australian Labradoodle Free Calico cat, needs Bunk beds, mahogany good home, mature, Puppies! Multi-genstained, good cond., 2 Pup shot gun, WIN neutered, litter trained, eration pups from linens & mattresses $300. Ithica $200. no front claws, loving. strong, healthy line; incl., $100. 541-617-5997 541-480-7793 cream male, black 541-312-4752 Bend local pays CASH!! female; call Computer Desk, Oak, for Guns, Knives & 541-953-4487 Ammo. 541-526-0617 large, L shaped, exc. cond. $200. 541-480-5950 Browning Buck Mark Nickel plated pistol Custom made log bed. .22 long rifle. 5.5 German Shepherds, $400.00 OBO inch bull barrel less white, AKC, $650; Marsha, 541 923 7519 than 100 rounds Bulldog/Boxers - Valley Ready to go now. shot. Great shape, Bulldog puppies, CKC 541-536-6167 great price $300. Reg, 2 brindle females, snowywhiteshepherds.com DRESSERS snowywhiteshepherds@gma $800. 541-325-3376 541-610-9816. :One long one, one il.com

Labradoodles - Mini & med size, several colors 541-504-2662

www.alpen-ridge.com Want to buy Chicken Brooder, reasonable Maltese Pups, 7 weeks, price. 541-388-3535 Chihuahua Pups, as1 male, $350, 2 fesorted colors, teacup, males,$450 ea., ador205 1st shots, wormed, able & frisky, parents $250,541-977-4686 Items for Free on site, 541-923-8727 Dachshund AKC minRecliner, light blue iature adult male, 1 cloth, comfortable, black/tan, 1 choc./tan. small, FREE, you $250 each. For info. haul, 541-306-9055. 541-420-6044 or 541-447-3060 208 Dachshund AKC mini pup Maltese Pups, AKC reg, Pets & Supplies toy size, champion lovely red LH F, 10 wks blood lines, $1000 $425. 541-508-4558 females, 1 male for The Bulletin recom$800, 541-233-3534 mends extra caution when purchasMaremma Guard Dog ing products or serpups, purebred, great vices from out of the dogs, $300 each, area. Sending cash, 541-546-6171. checks, or credit in- Dachshund Minis, 1 Papillon & Poodle mix. formation may be male, $450, 1 female, Blk and white. Way subjected to fraud. $325, 541-416-2530 too cute. Low shed For more informa- highdesertdogs@live.com under 10 lbs. 9 wks tion about an adver$150. 541-350-1684 tiser, you may call DO YOU HAVE the Oregon State SOMETHING TO Pembroke Welsh Corgi Attorney General’s SELL AKC, Red Female 1 Office Consumer FOR $500 OR yr $350 541-383-4552 Protection hotline at LESS? 1-877-877-9392. Pomeranian, black feNon-commercial male, 7 wks, adorable, advertisers may $250, 541-504-8060 place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" Find exactly what 1 week 3 lines, $12 you are looking for in the or 2 weeks, $18! CLASSIFIEDS Ad must include price of single item Poodle pups, toy, for American Staffordshire of $500 or less, or SALE. Also Rescued Terriers, born 2/10. multiple items Poodle Adults for 1st shots. $300 Come whose total does adoption, to loving see! 541-318-6997 not exceed $500. homes. 541-475-3889 AUSSIES, AKC MINI Pug-a-Poo Pups, cute, Call Classifieds at Blk/blue/red must see! looking a new home, 541-385-5809 541-598-5314 / 788-7799 $375, 541-385-8350. www.bendbulletin.com facebook.com/pugapoo

Aussies, Mini & Toy size, all colors, $280 cash. 541-678-7599

S . W .

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Free barn/shop cats, Queensland Heelers fixed, shots, some standard & mini,$150 & friendly, some not. We up. 541-280-1537 http:// deliver! 541-389-8420 rightwayranch.wordpress.com

shorter four drawers. SET 75.00 CALL 541-617-0077

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809. Mission Style Oak king bdrm set, oak coffee table, lthr loveseat, Persian rugs, I-pad, I-touch, tandem bike & bike rack, camp equip. 541-410-4794 NEED TO CANCEL YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 541-383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel your ad! New sectional, couch w/chaise, 2 ottomans, $600. 541-350-4656 Washer & Dryer Whirlpool, 1 yr old, 1 person household, $400. 541-350-4656 The Bulletin r ecommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com

Marlin .22 LR semi-auto rifle, $150. 541-647-8931. NEF Sportster 22 cal. Model SS1 w/3x9 Buschnell, $150 cash, 541-549-1947. Remington 770 7mm bolt action syn rifle, $200. 541-647-8931 Sportsman Jamboree Gun, Knife & Coin Show

LaPine Parks&Rec Bldg (corner 1st & Morson) Sat 4/14 9-5; Sun 4/15 9-3 Adults $5 ($4 w/trade gun) Children 12 & under free! 541-536-6237 ext. 303. Proceeds to support La Pine Senior Center

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or 541-385-5809 Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30am to 5:00pm Telephone Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30am - 5pm • Saturday 10am - 12:30pm 24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371: Place, cancel, or extend an ad after hours. 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

F2 FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

T H E N E W YO R K T I M E S C R O S S W O R D

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $17.50 7 days .................................................. $23.00 14 days .................................................$32.50 28 days .................................................$60.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 260

260

261

266

269

325

Misc. Items

Misc. Items

Medical Equipment

Heating & Stoves

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Hay, Grain & Feed

BUYING & SELLING READERS & MUSIC ATTENTION DIABETAll gold jewelry, silver ICS with Medicare. LOVERS. 100 Greatand gold coins, bars, Get a FREE talking est Novels (audio rounds, wedding sets, meter and diabetic books) ONLY $99.00 class rings, sterling siltesting supplies at NO (plus s/h.) Includes ver, coin collect, vinCOST, plus FREE MP3 Player & Accestage watches, dental home delivery! Best sories. BONUS: 50 gold. Bill Fleming, of all, this meter elimiClassical Music 541-382-9419. nates painful finger Works & Money Back pricking! Call Guarantee. Call ToFAST TREES 888-739-7199. day! 1-888-764-5855. Grow 6-10 feet yearly! (PNDC) (PNDC) $13.95-18.95 delivered. The Bulletin Offers Potted. Brochure online: 263 Free Private Party Ads www.fasttrees.com Tools • 3 lines - 3 days or 509-447-4181 • Private Party Only 2 Extension ladders, (1) • Total of items adverGENERATE SOME 20 ft., $200 & (1) 32ft. tised must equal $200 EXCITEMENT $125. 541-617-5997 or Less IN YOUR • Limit 1 ad per month NEIGBORHOOD. 265 Plan a garage sale and • 3-ad limit for same Building Materials item advertised within don't forget to adver3 months tise in classified! 36” full view storm doors Call 541-385-5809 541-385-5809. (2), bronze, $100 obo. Fax 541-385-5802 541-389-9268 Infrared Sauna, 2 per- Wanted- paying cash son. Pictures availMADRAS Habitat for Hi-fi audio & stuable; used 3 mos, RESTORE dio equip. McIntosh, $500. 541-815-0213 JBL, Marantz, Dy- Building Supply Resale Quality at naco, Heathkit, SanLOW PRICES Kenmore 2 burner gas sui, Carver, NAD, etc. 84 SW K St. bbq. Side burner, new Call 541-261-1808 541-475-9722 5 gallon tank. $50. Open to the public. 541-480-5950 Need to get an Log shell, 32’x44’ Douad in ASAP? MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. glas fir, $39,500 obo. NEW! FastStart enYou can place it Vacation property also gine. Ships FREE. online at: avail, Lake Billy ChiOne-Year nook. 541-595-0246 Money-Back Guar- www.bendbulletin.com antee when you buy Prineville Habitat DIRECT. Call for the 541-385-5809 ReStore DVD and FREE Good Building Supply Resale Soil book! 1427 NW Murphy Ct. Women’s Designer 877-357-5647. 541-447-6934 Clothing, XL16-18. (PNDC) Chico’s 541-385-8744 Open to the public.

280

286

286

Estate Sales

Sales Northeast Bend

Sales Northeast Bend

Look What I Found! You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardware, classified is always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if you're planning your own garage or yard sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains! Call Classifieds: 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

282

Sales Northwest Bend April 14, 8-4. Misc. item: dishware, 50s & 60s LPs, Victorian clothing, 2 bath sinks, Women’s 18 spd bike, Wharfdale speakers. 801 & 803 NW Saginaw. 284

Sales Southwest Bend 3

Family Sale: Sat. April 14th, 9-2, Harley Gear, kitchen, garden, pottery, quilts, furniture, too much to list! 60934 SW Summerwood Way in River Rim community off Brookswood.

Garage Sale - Benefit, Fri. & Sat., 7:30-2:30, 61454 Linton Lp., on way to Mt. Bachelor. 286

Sales Northeast Bend BIG SALE SAT., APRIL 14, 9-3! Nice home decor items, bike rack, wii, etc. 20619 Boulderfield Ave.

ESTATE SALE

Beautiful home full, king & queen beds, sofa, side chairs, dressers, washer/ dryer, 3 file cabinets, ladies M/L clothing, bedding, yard & garden, tools, fishing gear, golf clubs, portable massage table, mid century sideboard, artwork and mirrors, lots of art supplies, jewelry, books. ANTIQUES include 1850s chest and work table, Victorian dresser, wicker and child’s rocker, dollhouse furniture, pocket watches, china cabinet, Castleton china set, 2 sterling flatware sets, interesting small items. Fri.-Sat., 9-4 Numbers 8 a.m. Fri.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves. 267

Fuel & Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Dry Juniper Firewood $190 per cord, split. 1/2 cords available. Immediate delivery! 541-408-6193

Moving Sale: Fri.-Sat. Dry, seasoned Lodgepole, guaranteed cords. 11-2, 20776 Alpine Prompt delivery & split Ridge Pl, furniture, pi$200/cord. ano, etc., 330-1823. 541-350-3393 290

Sales Redmond Area

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Garage Sale: Fri. & Sat., 8-Dusk, 2144 SW 37th St., FurniWeed ture, kids items, misc. Craftsman Whacker/brush cutter, Just bought a new boat? 3 attachments, $160, Sell your old one in the 541-408-4528. classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! For newspaper 541-385-5809 delivery, call the Large Estate Sale: Fri. Circulation Dept. at & Sat, 8-4 pm., 6268 541-385-5800 W Hwy 126, 2.5 miles To place an ad, call W. of Redmond High. 541-385-5809 or email 292 Sales Other Areas

classified@bendbulletin.com

69340 Hinkle Butte Dr. Sisters, OR 97759 Sat & Sun. 8 a.m. - 6 Mower, electric, Earth3083 NE Yellow p.m. 541-549-9383 wise, 20”, bag, $100 Ribbon off 27th 14' Valco boat, 14hp OBO, 541-504-1421. ATTIC ESTATES motor, trailer; Float & APPRAISALS Tube w/wet suit & Older lawn tractor, 541-350-6822 boots; X-country skis MW/Briggs & Stratton, for pics & info go to w/shoes, poles & snow runs, needs work www.atticestatesanshoes; Golf clubs; ex$150. 541-350-4656. dappraisals.com ercise equip.; bikes, Estate Sale: Sat. Only tents; 35mm camera w/ access.; DVDs, CDs, 8-3 (no early sales), clothes, books, vinyl 62692 Larkview Rd., records, electric typeoff Eagle. writer, furniture. misc. items: kitchen, ChristHH FREE HH mas and paintings.

SUPER TOP SOIL

www.hersheysoilandbark.com

Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949. 270

Lost & Found

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

400

Groundskeeper/ Found Keys, 4/9, NW City View & 12th. Call Maintenance person to I.D., 541-977-3007 wanted. Knowledge in all Found: Pair of Gloves, phases of lawn and on Hwy by Vista Dental Assistant plant upkeep, yard Butte, call to ID, 421 needed in our machinery, tools, fer541-350-1701. Schools & Training Bend office. tilizer and irrigation. Lost Denim purse with Basic building maint, Schedule is 3 10-hr AIRLINES ARE HIRid & belongings, near pool/spa maint, and days/week X-Ray/ ING - Train for hands Homes or Fryrear Rd. winter snow removal. EFDA certs reon Aviation MainteCall 541-504-4193. Pay DOE. Must be quired. Come join nance Career. FAA 333 dependable, have a our dedicated Lost French Bulldog approved program. valid ODL and perPoultry, Rabbits, mix, female, 3/28 in team! Competitive Financial aid if qualisonal transportation. Redmond. “Frankie” & Supplies pay & excellent fied Housing availSend resume to PO has health problems. benefits! able. Call Aviation InBox 3938, Sunriver, Reward! 541-548-5304 Chicken Brooder Apply Online: stitute of OR 97707. Ph or 541-548-3881 www.willamettedental.com wanted at reasonable Maintenance. 541-593-1502. price. 541-388-3535 REMEMBER: If you 1-877-804-5293. E-mail: have lost an animal, (PNDC) lmoody@stoneridge341 don't forget to check townhomes.com DO YOU NEED ATTEND COLLEGE Horses & Equipment The Humane Society A GREAT ONLINE from Home. in Bend 541-382-3537 *Medical, *Business, EMPLOYEE Circle J gooseneck Redmond, Just too many *Criminal Justice, trailer, 1990, 16” long, RIGHT NOW? 541-923-0882 collectibles? *Hospitality. Job 7’ wide, 6½ high, rubCall The Bulletin Prineville, placement assistance. ber mats, 10-ply tires, before 11 a.m. and 541-447-7178; exlnt cond, $6500. Computer available. get an ad in to pubSell them in OR Craft Cats, Tow pickup avail. Call Financial Aid if qualilish the next day! 541-389-8420. The Bulletin Classiieds 541-330-8349 fied. SCHEV certified. 541-385-5809. 275 Call 866-688-7078 VIEW the COLT STARTING www.CenturaOnline.c 541-385-5809 Auction Sales Classifieds at: We build solid foundaom (PNDC) www.bendbulletin.com tions. No 30 day Sealed Bid Auction: wonders, 90s rates. Oregon Medical TrainMarketing Coordinator: Vacated warehouse to ing PCS Phlebotomy Steeldust Stables Ruffwear, the leader be sold on Saturday, classes begin May 7th. FIND IT! 541-419-3405 in Performance Dog April 14 at 10 a.m. www.steelduststable.com Registration now open: BUY IT! Gear, is seeking a Sale to be held at www.oregonmedicalSELL IT! Marketing Coordina358 Clark Storages, 107 training.com tor ready to bring their The Bulletin Classiieds SE 9th Street, Bend. 541-343-3100 Farmers Column passion and inspiraCash only. All goods The Bulletin tion to help build the removed from unit 10X20 STORAGE Ruffwear brand. For To Subscribe call Food Service within 72 hours. Email BUILDINGS job details see inquires to clarkstor541-385-5800 or go to for protecting hay, www.ruffwear.com/caages@yahoo.com. McMenamins www.bendbulletin.com firewood, livestock reers No phone calls. Old St. Francis etc. $1496 Installed. TRUCK SCHOOL 541-617-1133. School www.IITR.net CCB #173684. Medical Redmond Campus Farm McMenamins Old St kfjbuilders@ykwc.net Student Loans/Job Francis School in Market Wanted: Irrigated farm Waiting Toll Free Bend is now hiring ground, under pivot ir1-888-438-2235 Line Cooks. Past rigation, in Central Grande Ronde Hosexp preferred and 476 OR. 541-419-2713 pital in La Grande is the ability to work looking for a RespiEmployment independently re375 ratory Therapist. Full quired. All appliOpportunities Meat & Animal Processing time with Benefits. cants must have a 325 Must be a graduate flex sched including Academic Coordinator 100 Percent Guaran- Part-time contract posiof an AMA apHay, Grain & Feed weekends/holidays. teed Omaha Steaks proved RT program tion, Bend/Redmond/ Please apply on-line SAVE 65 percent on and licensed as a High quality barn-stored Sisters area. Cultural 24/7 at www.mcmethe Family Value Respiratory Care hay, 3x3x8 bales, $90 Homestay Internanamins.com or pick Collection. NOW Practitioner (LRCP). tional is a non-profit per bale. Call RL up a paper applicaONLY $49.99 Plus 3 Current OR license. educational student 541-504-0157 tion after 2pm at any FREE GIFTS & One year experiexchange organizaMcMenamin locaOrchard Grass Hay, right-to-the-door deence preferred. tion. Seeking people tion. Mail to 430 N. Small bales, barn livery in a reusable For further who enjoy people, esKillingsworth, Portstored, $225/ton, Macooler. ORDER TOpecially teenagers, to information call land OR, 97217 or dras, 541-480-8648. DAY at secure & work with Kristi 541-963-1475 fax: 503-221-8749. host families, and 1-888-691-6645 or or apply @ Wanted: Irrigated farm Call 503-952-0598 oversee foreign stuwww.OmahaSteaks.c www.grh.org. ground, under pivot irfor info on other dents while they are om/family25, use EOE rigation, in Central ways to apply. here in the U.S. Work code 45069TVT. OR. 541-419-2713 Please no phone around your schedule (PNDC) calls or emails to Wheat Straw: Certified & & community. TrainProgressive Activists! individual locations!! Bedding Straw & Garden ANGUS BEEF Quarter, ing/24-hr support proFULL TIME $14/hour!! E.O.E. Straw;Compost.546-6171 Half or Whole. vided. Compensation 541-639-9054 Grain-fed, no horbased per placement Look at: of student into host mones $3/pound Bendhomes.com family, + potential bohanging weight, cut & Sales nuses. Email resume: for Complete Listings of wrapped incl. Bend, Central Oregon Nickel Ads - the region's chikathy@chinet.org 541-383-2523. Area Real Estate for Sale premier rack-distribution advertising tabloid is looking for a charismatic and professional addition to our sales team! Qualified candidates should posses current market knowledge, an advertising background, and should be driven to turn over every rock in search of our next customer. A proven track record of closing sales is a must.

300

Clearance. Clearance. Clearance.

Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

Powell Butte Moving Sale:Fri.-Sat 9-5, Furniture, tools, bowflex, misc. 17697 Mt Adams Lp., West Powell Butte Estates, Follow yellow signs. BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Search the area’s most comprehensive listing of classiied advertising... real estate to automotive, merchandise to sporting goods. Bulletin Classiieds appear every day in the print or on line. Call 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

Central Oregon Nickel Ads is a key part of the Western Communications family of publications. The position offers a competitive salary + bonus opportunities, and a commensurate benefits package including medical & dental insurance and 401K. If you think you have what it takes, please send your resume and cover letter along with recent salary history to: Sean Tate, Sales Manager Central Oregon Nickel Ads 1777 SW Chandler Avenue Bend, OR 97701 or e-mail it to state@wescompapers.com No phone calls please.

5 4 1 -3 8 5 -5 8 0 9

Wescom is a drug free environment and an equal opportunity employer.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Public Safety Officer

RN Partners In Care is seeking applicants to fill the role of a full-time Weekend On-Call RN. This position will primarily provide care to our home health and hospice patients in and around the La Pine area. Applicants MUST have a current Oregon RN license. Previous home health / hospice experience preferred. Qualified candidates are asked to submit a resume and cover letter to: Partners In Care / Human Resources, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend OR 97701, or via email to HR@partnersbend.org.

Mt. Bachelor Ski and Summer Resort is currently accepting applications for a Public Safety Officer. This is a full time, graveyard position. Experience in Public Safety/Security with a current DPSST certification helpful, but we are willing to train the right individual. Please visit our website, www.mtbachelor.com for a complete job description and to apply.

Get your business

G

GROWIN

with an ad in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin' s web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Good classiied ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not the seller’s. Convert the facts into beneits. Show the reader how the item will help them in some way.

Sales Analyst -

Call a Pro Whether you need a fence ixed, hedges trimmed or a house built, you’ll ind professional help in The Bulletin’s “Call a Service Professional” Directory

541-385-5809

announcements RON PAUL Sign Wave April 14th in Bend along 3rd & Greenwood Ave; from 1pm3pm. Please bring your friends, family, & Ron Paul signs to this event (we have signs). 541-279-4202; CentralOR4RP@ gmail.com

personals

American Licorice Company has a Sales Analyst position open in Bend, OR. Please visit www.americanlicorice.com

to review the job description and apply.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Heart of Jesus. j.d.

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 F3 636

Finance & Business

500 600 528

604

Loans & Mortgages

Storage Rentals

Storage yard, large WARNING area, fenced, $400/ The Bulletin recommonth Call for info, mends you use cau541-420-6816 tion when you provide personal 605 information to compaRoommate Wanted nies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for ad- Roommate needed, avail. now. Own bath, quiet vance loan fees or duplex, $350 mo., $200 companies from out of dep.+½ util., internet state. If you have incl. 541-728-5731. concerns or quesRoommate wanted, tions, we suggest you $350/mo. in La Pine, consult your attorney Jennifer, 541-876-5106 or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 630 1-877-877-9392. Rooms for Rent Take care of Bend, 8th/Hawthorne, your investments laundry & cable incl., parking, no smoking with the help from $400. 541-317-1879 The Bulletin’s Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ “Call A Service cable, micro & fridge. Professional” Directory Utils & linens. New owners.$145-$165/wk Ever Consider a Re541-382-1885 verse Mortgage? At 632 least 62 years old? Stay in your home & Apt./Multiplex General increase cash flow! Safe & Effective! Call 5 min from downtown Sisters near wilderness Now for your FREE trails, small 1bdrm furn DVD! Call Now apt on 5 acres; garden 888-785-5938. area. Avail 5/1. No (PNDC) smkg. $600, utilities inLOCAL MONEY:We buy cluded. 541-549-3838 secured trust deeds & 634 note,some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 541-382-3099 ext.13. 2210 NE Holliday,3bdrm, 573 2 bath, garage, gas heat, Business Opportunities fireplace, quiet. No smkg $750/mo - 1/2 OFF April A Classified ad is an rent! 541-317-0867 EASY WAY TO REACH over 3 million Alpine Meadows Pacific NorthwesternTownhomes ers. $525/25-word 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. classified ad in 30 Starting at $625. daily newspapers for 541-330-0719 3-days. Call the PaProfessionally cific Northwest Daily managed by Connection (916) Norris & Stevens, Inc. 288-6019 or email elizabeth@cnpa.com Beautiful 2 Bdrms for more info(PNDC) in quiet complex, park- like setting. No Advertise VACATION smkg. Near St. SPECIALS to 3 milCharles. W/S/G pd; lion Pacific Northboth W/D hkup + westerners! 30 daily laundry facil. newspapers, six $625-$650/mo; states. 25-word clas541-385-6928. sified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) Duplex 2bdrm close to 288-6019 or visit downtown. Hardwood, gas fireplace, W/D, www.pnna.com/advert garage. W/G & yard ising_pndc.cfm for the maint incl. No smokPacific Northwest ing/pets. $700 + dep. Daily Connection. 541-382-0088 (PNDC) Call for Specials! SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BEN- Limited numbers avail. 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. EFITS. WIN or Pay W/D hookups, patios Nothing! Start Your or decks. Application In Under MOUNTAIN GLEN, 60 Seconds. Call To541-383-9313 day! Contact DisabilProfessionally ity Group, Inc. Limanaged by Norris & censed Attorneys & Stevens, Inc. BBB Accredited. Call 888-782-4075. Located by BMC/Costco, (PNDC) 2 bdrm, 2 bath duplex, 55+,2350 NEMary Rose Pl, #1, $795 no smoking or pets, 541-390-7649

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Debris Removal

JUNK BE GONE

I Haul Away FREE

For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel, 541-389-8107 Excavating Levi’s Dirt Works,RGC/ CGC: All your dirt/excavation needs: Small jobs for Homeowners, Wet/ dry utils, Concrete, Public Works, Subcontracting, Custom pads,Driveway Grading,Operated rentals/augering,CCB# 194077 541-639-5282

Landscaping/Yard Care

Rentals

Landscaping/Yard Care

More Than Service Peace Of Mind

Spring Clean Up

•Leaves •Cones •Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration •Dethatching Compost Top Dressing Weed free Bark & flower beds ORGANIC PROGRAMS

•Sprinkler Activation & Repair •Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding Sprinkler Adjustments

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maintenance, thatching, sod, sprinkler blowouts, water features, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Aeration / Dethatching BOOK NOW!

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Weekly / one-time service avail. Bonded, insured, free estimates!

EXPERIENCED

COLLINS Lawn Maint. Call 541-480-9714

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

Same Day Response NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise Handyman to perform Landscape Construction ERIC REEVE HANDY which includes: SERVICES. Home & planting, decks, Commercial Repairs, fences, arbors, Carpentry-Painting, water-features, and Pressure-washing, installation, repair of Honey Do's. On-time irrigation systems to promise. Senior be licensed with the Discount. Work guarLandscape Contracanteed. 541-389-3361 tors Board. This or 541-771-4463 4-digit number is to be Bonded & Insured included in all adverCCB#181595 tisements which indicate the business has Margo Construction a bond, insurance and LLC Since 1992 workers compensa• Pavers • Carpentry tion for their employ• Remodeling • Decks ees. For your protec• Window/Door tion call 503-378-5909 Replacement • Int/Ext or use our website: Paint CCB 176121 www.lcb.state.or.us to 541-480-3179 check license status I DO THAT! before contracting Home/Rental repairs with the business. Small jobs to remodels Persons doing landHonest, guaranteed scape maintenance work. CCB#151573 do not require a LCB license. Dennis 541-317-9768

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds 648

Houses for Rent General Rented your property? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line. Call 541-383-2371 24 hours to cancel your ad! 650

Houses for Rent NE Bend When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

Call 541-385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com, currently receiving over 1.5 million page views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

700 744

Open Houses Broken Top Golf Home 19244 Green Lakes Lp $579k 3bed/2.5 bath Open Sat & Sun 11-3 TOTAL• 541-788-8997 745

Homes for Sale BANK OWNED HOMES! FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or

Garage Sales Garage Sales Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809

Newly Remodeled 1200 sq.ft., 2 Bdrm 2 Bath,½ acre lot. Great views & room for RV. $800. 541-923-6513 659

Houses for Rent Sunriver

682

to 30,000 sq.ft., competitive rate, 541-382-3678.

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

773

750

Redmond Homes

Acreages

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

CHECK YOUR AD

***

CRR,3 Bdrm,2 bath, mfd, Just bought a new boat? 4 acres,mtn view,$675, Sell your old one in the no inside pets, 1st, last, classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! dep., stable income 541-385-5809 req., 503-679-4495.

Farms, Ranches w/private patio, new & Acreage paint & carpet, no smoking or pets, 1000 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. Madras, 40 view acres, 3 bdrm. 2 bath, 2400 541-633-7533. sq.ft., RV shop, 7 stall 636 barn, indoor pool, $1500, 541-546-2284. Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

+ $690 dep. Nice pets welcomed. 541-382-0117

Real Estate For Sale

RENT OWN, $795/mo, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, fresh paint, new carpet, 756 nice, easy qualify, $34,900, $2000 down, Jefferson County Homes Call 541-548-5511 Metolius 2 Bdrm + bo656 nus, 1 bath, Cascade Houses for Rent Mtn view, many upgrades, immaculate SW Bend condition. Traditional sale! $60,000. ColdMountain & Park Views well Banker Dick Clean & move-in ready, Dodson, Mike Ahern, 3 bdrm, 2½ bath, broker, 541-420-9000 2040 sq ft, dbl car gaor 541-475-6137 rage, adjacent to park, close to trails, schools 762 & golf. 19424 SW Brookside Wy. $1300 Homes with Acreage / mo, 1-year lease. Call 541-408-0086 5 Acres in CRR - w/ mobile home, carport 658 & large shop, Houses for Rent $105,000, owner will carry, 559-627-4933. Redmond

•Weekly Mowing 687 & Edging RIVER FALLS APTS. Commercial for •Bi-Monthly & Monthly LIVE ON THE RIVER Maintenance WALK DOWNTOWN Rent/Lease •Flower Bed Clean Up 1 bdrm. apt. fully fur•Bark, Rock, Etc. nished in fine 50s style. Office/Warehouse lo1546 NW 1st St., $790 cated in SE Bend. Up •Senior Discounts

Landscape Maintenance

Commercial & Residential

Small clean studio near library. All util. paid, no pets. $450 mo., $425 dep. 541-330-9769 541-480-7870 Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

!! NO APP FEE !! 2 bdrm, 1 bath $530 & 540 In River Meadows a 3 W/D hook-ups & Heat bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 Pump. Carports & Pet sq. ft., woodstove, Friendly brand new carpet/oak Fox Hollow Apts. floors, W/S pd, $895. (541) 383-3152 541-480-3393 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co. or 541-610-7803

Nelson Landscape Very Nice - $525 Clean, quiet 1 bdrm., Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. 541-385-5809 Thank you! The Bulletin Classified ***

Tick, Tock Tick, Tock... ...don’t let time get away. Hire a professional out of The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory today! 775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

541-385-5809

1989 Ridgewood 70x14 2 bedroom/2 bath, incl. People Look for Information appl,newly Remodeled, About Products and CenturyDrive Park,near Services Every Day through Bus/COCC/Downtown The Bulletin Classifieds $19,999, 541-610-5595

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin reaches

80% of all Deschutes County adults each week.*

! D L O S

975 Automobiles

Range Rover, 2006, low miles, excellent condition, 6 disc CD, A/C, leather interior, great SUV for winter driving.

4 Seasonal Services Lawn maintenance, aeration, thatching, spring cleanup, quality guaranteed.541-306-7875 Holmes Landscape Maint

• Clean-up • Aerate • De-thatch • Free Est. • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. call Josh 541-610-6011 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds RV/Marine

Reach out today.

Advantage RV

For all of your RV Repairs! •All Makes & Models •Chassis Repair & Service •Appliance/Electrical Repair & upgrades •Interior Repair & Upgrades •Exterior Repair •Collision Repair •Mobile Service available in the Central Oregon Area Years of Experience 541-728-0305 62980 Boyd Acres Rd., Building B, Suite 2 Bend, Oregon

Thousands of ads daily in print and online.

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809 *American Opinion Research, April 2006


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

F4 FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Boats & RV’s

865

870

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

880

880

881

882

882

908

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Aircraft, Parts & Service

RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, On-Site Credit Approval Team, Web Site Presence, We Take Trade-Ins. Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, W/D. $75,000 541-215-5355 Redmond: 541-548-5254

Coachman Freelander 2011, 27’, queen bed, 1 slide, HD TV, DVD player, 450 Ford, $49,000, please call 541-923-5754. Say “goodbuy” to that unused item by placing it in The Bulletin Classiieds

800

Harley Davidson SoftTail Deluxe 2007, white/cobalt, w/passenger kit, Vance & Hines muffler system & kit, 1045 mi., exc. cond, $19,999, 541-389-9188.

Yamaha Raptor 660R 25’ Catalina Sailboat 2004 w/reverse. All stk 1983, w/trailer, swing 541-385-5809 but new exhaust pipe; keel, pop top, fully runs/rides great. $2600 loaded, $9500 call for Scenic obo. 541-647-8931 details, 541-480-8060 Gulfstream Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, 870 Cummins 330 hp dieAds published in the sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 "Boats" classification Boats & Accessories in. kitchen slide out, include: Speed, fishnew tires,under cover, ing, drift, canoe, 17’ Seaswirl tri-hull, hwy. miles only,4 door house and sail boats. walk-thru w/bow rail, fridge/freezer icegood shape, EZ load For all other types of maker, W/D combo, trailer, new carpet, watercraft, please see Interbath tub & new seats w/storage, Class 875. motor for parts, $1500 shower, 50 amp pro541-385-5809 obo, or trade for 25-35 pane gen & more! elec. start short-shaft $55,000. motor. Financing 541-948-2310 avail. 541-312-3085 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Hunter’s Delight! PackUpdated daily age deal! 1988 WinGENERATE SOME exnebago Super Chief, citement in your neig38K miles, great 19-ft Mastercraft Proborhood. Plan a gashape; 1988 Bronco II Star 190 inboard, rage sale and don't 4x4 to tow, 130K 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 forget to advertise in mostly towed miles, hrs, great cond, lots of classified! 385-5809. nice rig! $15,000 both. extras, $10,000 obo. 541-382-3964, leave 541-231-8709 msg.

Harley Heritage Softail, 2003 $5,000+ in extras, $2000 paint job, 30K mi. 1 owner, must see, in Bend. Asking $12,750. Call 541-385-8090 or 209-605-5537

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

850

Snowmobiles Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, fuel inj, elec start, reverse, 2-up seat, cover, 4900 mi, $2500 obo. 541-280-0514 860

Motorcycles & Accessories

CRAMPED FOR CASH?

Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 541-385-5809

19’ Glass Ply, Merc cruiser, depth finder, trolling motor, trailer, $3500, 541-389-1086 or 541-419-8034.

875

Honda VT700 Shadow 1984, 23K, many new parts, battery charger, good condition, $3000 OBO. 541-382-1891 Kawasaki Mean Streak 1600 2007, special edition, stored inside, custom pipes & jet pack, only made in 2007, no longer in production, exc. cond., 1500 mi., $7995, 541-390-0632. Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Watercraft 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

CAN’T BEAT THIS! Look before you buy, below market value ! Size & mileage DOES matter, Class A 32’ Hurricane by Four Winds, 2007. 12,500 mi, all amenities, Ford V10, lthr, cherry, slides, like new, can see anytime, $58,000. 541-548-5216

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C,

6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $49,900, 541-480-8648

Inflatable Raft,Sevylor Monaco Dynasty 2004, Fishmaster 325,10’3”, loaded, 3 slides, complete pkg., $650 $159,000, 541-923- 8572 or 541-749-0037 (cell) Firm, 541-977-4461.

SPRINGDALE 2005 27’, has eating area slide, A/C and heat, new tires, all contents included, bedding towels, cooking and eating utensils. Great for vacation, fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 541-408-3811

Southwind 35.5’ Triton, 2008,V10, 2 slides, Du- Springdale 29’ 2007, pont UV coat, 7500 mi. slide,Bunkhouse style, Avg NADA ret.114,343; sleeps 7-8, excellent asking $104,000. condition, $16,900, Call 541-923-2774 541-390-2504

Winnebago Access 31J, Class C Top-selling Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 motorhome, 1-owner, 29’, weatherized, like non-smoker, always new, furnished & garaged, only 7,900 mi, ready to go, incl Wineauto leveling jacks, rear gard Satellite dish, camera/monitor, 4 KW $26,995. 541-420-9964 Gas Generator, (2) slides, queen pillow top mattress, bunk beds, (3) flat screen TVs, lots of storage, sleeps 10! Well maint., extended warranty avail. Price reduced! Must see at Viking Legend 2465ST Model 540 2002, exc. $69,995! 541-388-7179 cond., slide dining, toi881 let, shower, gen. incl., $5500. 541-548-0137 Travel Trailers

Executive Hangar

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $12,750. 541-923-3417.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin

T-Hangar for rent at Bend airport. Call 541-382-8998. Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 slide, AC, TV,full awning, excellent shape, $23,900. 541-350-8629

Cardinal 34.5 RL 2009 (40’). 4 slides, boat hitch, many more options. 2 year warranty + tires. $49,900 obo. May take smaller 5th whl in trade. Cell # 406 980-1907 CRR, OR.

Airstream 28-ft Overlander, 1958. Project; solid frame, orig interior, appls & fixtures. $4000. 541-740-8480

Cougar 29’ 2003

14’ slide, weatherized, exc. cond., awning, Air cond. $12,500. 541-504-2878.

Prowler 28’ 1985, 4 new tires, sleeps 6, full bath, no leaks, good shape, $2250 OBO, 541-306-0813.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com Want to impress the relatives? Remodel your home with the help of a professional from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

916

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale 1982 INT. Dump with Arborhood, 6k on rebuilt 392, truck refurbished, has 330 gal. water tank with pump and hose. Everything works, $7500 OBO. Road Ranger 1985, 541-977-8988 24’, catalytic & A/C, Fully self contained, 70D Excavator, thumb $2795 , 541-389-8315 & quick coupler. $8000. Call for details, 885 541-420-6816 Canopies & Campers

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 6½’ canopy, fits short bed ext’d cab, win 4 slideouts, indoor, picture window, verter, satellite double T rear sys, fireplace, 2 handles, $500 obo 541-382-6310 after 3 GMC 9 Yard Dump flat screen TVs. Truck 1985, 350, 2 $60,000. Lance-Legend 990 bbl, steel box, $4500 541-480-3923 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, OBO, 541-306-0813

exc. cond., generator, solar-cell, large refrig, AC, micro., magic fan, bathroom shower, removable carpet, custom windows, outdoor shower/awning Peterbilt 359 potable water truck, 1990, set-up for winterizing, 3200 gal. tank, 5hp elec. jacks, CD/stepump, 4-3" hoses, reo/4’ stinger. $9500. camlocks, $25,000. Bend, 541.279.0458 541-820-3724

COACHMAN 1997 Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, 2011 R-POD w/slide, AC, fuel station, exc cond. bunks, TV/DVD, cover.As sleeps 8, black/gray new. $12,900. 389-0099 interior, used 3X, $27,500. 541-389-9188

at Bend Airport (KBDN) 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high MONTANA 3585 2008, bi-fold door. Natural exc. cond., 3 slides, gas heat, office, bathking bed, lrg LR, Arcroom. Parking for 6 tic insulation, all opcars. Adjacent to tions $37,500. Frontage Rd; great 541-420-3250 visibility for aviation bus. 1jetjock@q.com 541-948-2126

Catalina 5th wheel 23’, slide, new tires, extra clean, below book. $6,500. 928-345-4731

Fleetwood Wilderness 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts & Service Laredo 29BH 2004, 13’ slide, all-weather pkg, fiberglass w/alum frame. Great shape, $15,000. 801-554-7913 (in Bend)

Montana 34’ 2003, 2 slides, exc. cond. throughout, arctic winter pkg., new 10-ply tires, W/D ready, $23,000, 541-948-5793

Need help ixing stuff? Call A Service Professional ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Truck with Snow Plow!

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. Price reduced to $5000 OBO. Call 541-390-1466. 925

Utility Trailers

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718 1/3 interest in wellequipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, located KBDN. $55,000. 541-419-9510

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Free Classified Ads! $ 00 No Charge For Any Item Under 200 1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item per 30 days.

www.bendbulletin.com

To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 F5

%

% 1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

nor child set forth in this notice in the District Court of Johnson County, Kansas. The hearing on Petitioner's Petition for Appointment of Guardian for a Minor shall be held on Wednesday, May 9, 2012 at 2:30 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in Division 15 of the District Court of Johnson County, Kansas, 100 N. Kansas Avenue, Olathe, Kansas 66061. If you fail to appear or timely assert your objections, if any, the Court may proceed with the hearing and grant the relief requested by Petitioner. The Court has made a finding that excuses the presence of the minor child at trial due to her young age. The Court has appointed a temporary guardian for the minor child, and you may request a hearing in writing to object to that appointment within three days of the entry of the ex parte order and you must file your written request with the District Court of Johnson County, Kansas. The Court has appointed Danielle J. Alexander as temporary guardian and her address is P.O. Box 322, Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66201. LEGAL NOTICE INVITATION TO BID:

to the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI) Prevailing Wage Rates Effective April 1, 2012 for Region 10. The bid proposal (“Bid”) shall be submitted in a sealed envelope clearly labeled: “Activity Center Addition – SW Canal Project.” A mandatory pre-bid conference will be held on Tuesday, April 24 at 10:00 AM (PST), located at 2433 SW Canal Blvd., Redmond, OR. Plans, specifications, addenda, and notifications of bid results for this project may be viewed, printed or ordered on line from Central Oregon Builders Exchange at http://www.plansonfile.com, then click on Public Works Projects. Bidders are responsible for checking this web site for the issuance of any addenda prior to submitting a bid. “Prime” bidders should register with Central Oregon Builders Exchange as a plan holder to bid this project. Register at plansonfile.com. If you have questions contact Central Oregon Builders Exchange at 541-389-0123, Fax 541-389-1549 or email at admin@plansonfile.com. If the prime bidder/general contractor does not register with the plan center, the general contractor will still be held responsible for all addenda’s/changes to the documents and will be considered nonresponsive if their bid does not reflect those addenda/changes. All design questions and clarification inquiries shall be made to Darren Kosanke, Project Manager, 541-548-7275 or email dkosanke.raprd@gmail.com. All questions will be responded to in written addenda, issued three days prior to bid opening. LEGAL NOTICE NATIONAL FOREST TIMBER FOR SALE

Coniferous species Sawtimber, Marked or otherwise designated for cutting, and 1314CCF of Green Biomass Convertible Products that the Offeror agrees to remove at a fixed rate. In addition, the contract area contains an unestimated volume of All Species Green Biomass Convertible Products that the Offeror may agree to remove. Also included in the contract are three mandatory restorative service projects and one optional restorative service project to be completed by the Contractor. The contract will be awarded based on a Best Value determination. One award will be made to the Offeror (a) whose proposal is technically acceptable and (b) whose technical/price relationship is the most advantageous to the Government. The Forest Service reserves the right to reject any and all proposals. Interested parties may obtain a prospectus from the office listed below. A prospectus, offer form, and complete information concerning the timber, the restoration service projects, the conditions of sale, and submission of offers is available to the public from the Bend/Fort Rock Ranger District, (541) 383-4770, or by contacting Carl Maass at (541) 383-5590 or cmaass@fs.fed.us. Contract information and offer documents can be found on the Deschutes National Forest web page, http://www.fs.usda.g ov/goto/centraloregon/timbersales.

Legal Notices y 2012, at 16405 1st Street La Pine OR 97739, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

LEGAL NOTICE INFORMATION TO INTERESTED PERSONS IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT In the Matter of the Estate of MARY LEE HILLIER, Deceased. Case No. 12PB0031

for the relief prayed for in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in which the Plaintiff requests that the Plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in the following described real property: LOT 12, BLOCK 1, EAST VILLA, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON.

Commonly known as: 62960 Florence Drive, NOTICE TO INTERBend, Oregon 97701. ESTED PERSONS. NOTICE IS HEREBY NOTICE TO GIVEN that Thomas DEFENDANTS: S. Hillier has been READ THESE appointed personal representative. All PAPERS CAREFULLY! persons having claims A lawsuit has been against the estate are started against you in required to present the above-entitled them, with vouchers court by Federal Naattached, to Thomas tional Mortgage AssoS. Hillier, c/o Michelle ciation, its succesBuck-Romero, Davis sors in interest and/or Wright Tremaine LLP, assigns, Plaintiff. 1300 SW Fifth AvPlaintiff's claims are enue, Suite 2400, stated in the written Portland, OR 97201 complaint, a copy of within four months which was filed with after the date of first the above-entitled publication of this noCourt. tice, or the claims may be barred. All perYou must "appear" in sons whose rights this case or the other may be affected by side will win automatithe proceedings may cally. To "appear" obtain additional inyou must file with the formation from the court a legal paper records of the court, called a "motion" or the personal repre"answer." The "mosentative, or the attortion" or "answer" must neys for the personal be given to the court representative. clerk or administrator within 30 days of the Dated and first pubdate of first publicalished XXX tion specified herein 2012. along with the required filing fee. It Michele Buck-Romero, must be in proper Esq form and have proof DAVIS WRIGHT of service on the TREMAINE LLP Plaintiff's attorney or, 1300 S.W. Fifth if the Plaintiff does not Avenue, Suite 2400, have an attorney, Sealed bids for the conPortland, Oregon 97201 proof of service on the (503) 241-2300 struction of the RedPlaintiff. mond Area Park and LEGAL NOTICE Recreation District, IN THE CIRCUIT If you have any quesActivity Center AddiCOURT FOR THE tions, you should see tion – SW Canal STATE OF OREGON an attorney immediproject addressed to IN AND FOR THE ately. If you need the Katie Hammer, COUNTY OF help in finding an atExecutive Director, DESCHUTES torney, you may conRedmond Area Park tact the Oregon State and Recreation DisFEDERAL NATIONAL Bar's Lawyer Referral trict, 465 SW Rimrock, MORTGAGE Service online at Redmond, Oregon ASSOCIATION, its www.oregonstatebar. 97756 will be acsuccessors in interest org or by calling (503) cepted until 3:00 PM and/or assigns, 684-3763 (in the on May 10, 2012 and Plaintiff, Portland metropolitan then publically opened v. area) or toll-free elseand read at 3:00PM in JERRY HAYES; where in Oregon at the meeting room loINTEGRATED DEANA HAYES; and (800) 452-7636. cated at Cascade RESOURCE Occupants of the Swim Center, 465 SW TIMBER CONTRACT Premises, This summons is isRimrock, Redmond, - STEWARDSHIP Defendants. sued pursuant to Oregon. No bids will ORCP 7. be received after DESCHUTES Case No. 11CV0836 closing. The first tier NATIONAL FOREST ROUTH CRABTREE subcontractor list is SUMMONS BY OLSEN, P.C. required to be sub- The Bind/EXF PUBLICATION mitted by 5:00 PM, Stewardship InteBy Chris Fowler, same day as required grated Resource TO THE DEFENOSB # 052544 by ORS 279C.370. Timber Contract is DANTS: JERRY Attorneys for Plaintiff The District will reject located within Sec. HAYES; DEANA 621 SW Alder St., a bid if the bidder fails 31 and 32, T20S, HAYES; AND OCCUSuite 800 to submit the required R9E; Sec. 5 and 6, PANTS OF THE Portland, OR 97205 disclosure form by this T21S, R9E, W.M., PREMISES: (503) 459-0140; deadline. Deschutes County, Fax 425-974-1649 Oregon. The ForIn the name of the cfowler@rcolegal.com The work includes, but is not limited to, furest Service will reState of Oregon, you nishing all labor, maceive technical and LEGAL NOTICE are hereby required to terials, equipment and price proposals (no appear and answer In the District Court of miscellaneous work public opening) at Johnson County, the complaint filed necessary to demolthe Deschutes NaKansas against you in the ish existing residentional Forest Probate Division above-entitled Court tial building and conSupervisor's Office, and cause on or be- In the Matter of the struct a new 1,600 SF 63095 Deschutes Guardianship of: fore the expiration of building with covered Market Road, Bend, Aryan "Ana: Hope 30 days from the date driveway area, parkOR 97701 no later Trapp, a minor of the first publication ing lot, and desigthan 11:00 AM local of this summons. The Danielle J. Alexander, nated site drainage time on or before Petitioner date of first publicafacilities in accorMay 15, 2012 for an tion in this matter is dance with provided estimated Notice To: Richard March 23, 2012. If you plans and specifica16,808CCF of PonS. Trapp fail timely to appear tions. derosa pine SawA Petition has been and answer, Plaintiff This is a Public Works timber, 5,380CCF of filed to appoint a will apply to the Contract and subject White fir and Other Guardian for the miabove-entitled court

The USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING: LA PINE PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT A public meeting of the Budget Committee of the La Pine Park & Recreation District, Deschutes County, State of Oregon, to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012, will be held at 513890 Walling Ln. La Pine OR 97739. The meeting will take place May 2, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. The purpose of the meeting is to receive the budget message and to receive comment from the public on the budget. A copy of the budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after May 2,

This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the budget committee. For more information please contact Justin Cutler, Director, La Pine Park & Recreation District at 541.536.2223. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS STEWART W. GITTINGS has been appointed personal representative of the Estate of CORA G. HOUSTON, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, Crook County, Probate No. 12 PB 0004. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them with proper vouchers attached, to the personal representative c/o Richard E. Forcum, Attorney at Law, 141 NW Greenwood Ave. Ste. 101, Bend, OR 97701, within four months from the date of first publication of this notice as stated below, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by this proceeding may obtain additional information from the court records, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative. DATED and first published: March 30, 2012. RICHARD E. FORCUM, OSB #640340 Attorney for Personal Representative 141 NW Greenwood Ave., Ste. 101 Bend, OR 97701 Tel: 541-389-6964 Fax: 541-389-6969 E-mail: info@forcumlaw.com LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS The undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the Estate of Gael Mae Turk, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, County of Deschutes, Probate No. 12-PB-0029. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present their claims with proper vouchers within four months from this date, to the undersigned, or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the undersigned, or the attorneys named below. Dated and first published: March 30, 2012.

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7137 T.S. No.: 1354707-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Albert L Shirk An Unmarried Man, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank Of Indiana, as Beneficiary, dated February 10, 2006, recorded February 15, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-10663 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 4, Woodland Park Homesites, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 15933 Burgess Rd. La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due May 1, 2011 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,017.51 Monthly Late Charge $42.48. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $119,470.03 together with interest thereon at 7.055% per annum from April 01, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 06, 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 29, 2012. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-406063 03/30, 04/06, 04/13, 04/20

Judith Stern, aka Judie Stern Personal Representative c/o ALISON G. HOHENGARTEN OSB #012897 FRANCIS HANSEN & MARTIN, LLP 1148 NW Hill Street Bend, OR 97701 LEGAL NOTICE OREGON WATER WONDERLAND UNIT II SANITARY DISTRICT NOTICE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING A public meeting of the Budget Committee of the Oregon Water Wonderland Unit II Sanitary District, Deschutes County State of Oregon to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013 will be held at the District's office, located at 55841 Swan Road.

The meeting will take place on Thursday April 19th, 2012 at 6:30 p.m.

Notice is hereby given This is a public meetthat the following veing where deliberahicle will be sold, for tion of the Budget cash to the highest Committee will take bidder, on 4/26/2012. place. The sale will be held at 10:00am by: LEGAL NOTICE Public Auction ROBERT FRIEND Public Auction to be held on Saturday, 68307 GEO CYRUS RD., SISTERS, OR April 28th, 2012 at 11:30 a.m. at A-1 95 FREIGHTLIN Westside Storage, FL 70 TK 317 SW Columbia St., VIN = Bend, Oregon 97701. 1FV6HLAA4SL626216 (Unit F-213). LEGAL NOTICE Amount due on lien PUBLIC NOTICE $10,525.00 FOR SEALED BID AUCTION: Vacated Reputed owner(s): warehouse to be sold RYAN D. & PATRICIA I. on Saturday, April 14 CROSSLEY at 10am. Sale to be CREDIT held at Clark Stor- ACCEPTANCE CORP. ages, 107 SE 9th Street, Bend. Cash only. All goods reAdvertise your car! moved from unit A Picture! within 72 hours. Email ReachAdd thousands of readers! inquires to clarkstor- Call 541-385-5809 ages@yahoo.com. The Bulletin Classifieds No phone calls.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-USB-12011992 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, GREGORY A. SCOTT, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as beneficiary, dated 11/24/2010, recorded 11/30/2010, under Instrument No. 2010-47654, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 8, EMILY ESTATES, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 646 NW GREEN FOREST CIRCLE REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 6, 2012 Delinquent Payments from June 01, 2011 10 payments at $ 1,474.67 each $ 14,746.70 (06-01-11 through 03-06-12) Late Charges: $ 471.92 Foreclosure Fees and Costs $ 1,355.00 TOTAL: $ 16,573.62 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared ail sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $214,081.67, PLUS interest thereon at 4.375% per annum from 5/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 25, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying ail costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/6/2012 Michael J. Long, As Trustee By; Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc. as agent for the Trustee Angela Barsamyan Foreclosure Assistant 5900 Canoga Avenue, Suite 220, Woodland Hills, CA 91367 Phone: (877)237-7878 A-4213196 03/23/2012, 03/30/2012, 04/06/2012, 04/13/2012

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Opportunity to Comment Soda Creek Channel Restoration Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger District, Deschutes National Forest The Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger District is providing an opportunity to comment on the following proposed action: Soda Creek Channel Restoration. This project is located in Township 18 South, Range 8 East, Southeast ¼ Section 11. This project involves the re-design of 0.5 miles of Soda Creek's channel below the crossing with Highway 46 (Cascade Lakes National Scenic Byway). The re-design will create the proper sinuosity, width, and depth of the channel. Restoration work attempted in 1997 following flood damage created channel instability which will be rectified. Project includes the use of heavy equipment to reconstruct the channel and also includes planting riparian vegetation. Expected benefits are improved fisheries and riparian habitat. The project is located in the Intensive Recreation allocation of the Deschutes Land and Resource Management Plan and is also within the Administratively Withdrawn allocation of the Northwest Forest Plan. This action will involve measures to prevent in the introduction and spread of invasive plants, such as washing equipment before it enters National Forest System lands. This project is expected to be documented in a Decision Memo and implementation is planned for fall 2012. Additional information regarding this action can be obtained from: Tom Walker, District Fisheries Biologist, at the Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger District (541) 383-4787. How to Comment and Timeframe The opportunity to provide comments ends 30 days following the date of publication of this notice in The Bulletin. Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, oral, and electronic comments concerning this action will be accepted. The publication date of this notice in The Bulletin is the exclusive means for calculating the comment period for this proposed action. Those wishing to comment should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. Written comments must be submitted to: Shane Jeffries, District Ranger, at 63095 Deschutes Market Road, Bend, Oregon, 97701. The office business hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are 7:45 am to 4:30 pm Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Oral comments must be provided at the Responsible Official's office during normal business hours via telephone (see contact information above) or in person, or at an official agency function (i.e. public meeting) that is designed to elicit public comments. Electronic comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), portable document format (.pdf), or Word (.doc) to comments-pacificnorthwest-deschutes-bend-ftrock@fs.fed.us. In cases where no identifiable name is attached to a comment, a verification of identity will be required for appeal eligibility. If using an electronic message, a scanned signature is one way to provide verification. Please include the name of the proposed action in the email subject line. It is the responsibility of persons providing comments to submit them by the close of the comment period. Only those who submit timely and substantive comments will have eligibility to appeal the subsequent decision under 36 CFR 215. Individuals and organizations wishing to be eligible to appeal must meet the information requirements of 36 CFR 215.6.

LEGAL NOTICE PURSUANT TO ORS CHAPTER 87

www.bendbulletin.com

541-385-5809


F6 FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Opportunity to Comment Bend Broad Band Fiber Optic Cable Installation and Powerline Installation to the Scenic Byway Welcome Station Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger District, Deschutes National Forest Bend Broadband is proposing to bury fiber optic cable in Forest Service Road (FSR) 4600100 (Meadow Camp Road) for approximately 0.25 mile and within the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) right-of-way (ROW) and an existing utility corridor adjacent to FSR 46 (Century Drive) for approximately 0.4 mile. This would be in place of the proposed line across private property that was part of the October 6, 2011 decision. Pacific Power is proposing to bury a power line within the ODOT ROW for approximately 1.0 mile along FSR 4600 from Widgi Creek to provide power for the Scenic Byway Welcome Station. Voice and fiber optic line installation would also likely be placed within the ROW and the proposed, or a portion of, utility corridor. Both projects are located within the Scenic Views management allocation of the Deschutes Forest Plan. Project activity maps are available on the Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests website: http://www.fs.fed.us/nepa/project_list.php?forest=110601. This action will involve measures to prevent the introduction and spread of invasive plants, such as cleaning equipment before it enters National Forest System lands. No Threatened, Endangered, or Sensitive species or their habitat will be affected by the project. These projects are expected to be documented in a Decision Memo and implementation is planned for summer or fall of 2012. Additional information regarding these actions can be obtained from: Rick Wesseler, Special Uses Administrator, at the Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger District (541) 383-4722. How to Comment and Timeframe The opportunity to provide comments ends 30 days following the date of publication of this notice in The Bulletin. Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, oral, and electronic comments concerning this action will be accepted. The publication date of this notice in The Bulletin is the exclusive means for calculating the comment period for this proposed action. Those wishing to comment should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. Written comments must be submitted to: Shane Jeffries, District Ranger, at 63095 Deschutes Market Road, Bend, Oregon, 97701. The office business hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are 7:45 am to 4:30 pm Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Oral comments must be provided at the Responsible Official's office during normal business hours via telephone (see contact information above) or in person, or at an official agency function (i.e. public meeting) that is designed to elicit public comments. Electronic comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), portable document format (.pdf), or Word (.doc) to comments-pacificnorthwest-deschutes-bend-ftrock@fs.fed.us. In cases where no identifiable name is attached to a comment, a verification of identity will be required for appeal eligibility. If using an electronic message, a scanned signature is one way to provide verification. Please include the name of the proposed action in the email subject line. It is the responsibility of persons providing comments to submit them by the close of the comment period. Only those who submit timely and substantive comments will have eligibility to appeal the subsequent decision under 36 CFR 215. Individuals and organizations wishing to be eligible to appeal must meet the information requirements of 36 CFR 215.6. 1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE The trust deed to be foreclosed pursuant to Oregon law is referred to as follows (the “Trust Deed”): Grantors: Carey T. Huber and Tammy L. Huber, as tenants by the entirety Trustee: Western Title & Escrow Company Beneficiary: Northwest Community Credit Union Date: December 14, 2007 Recording Date: December 19, 2007 Recording Reference: 2007-64690 County of Recording: Deschutes County The Successor Trustee is Patrick L. Stevens and the mailing address of the Successor Trustee is: Patrick L. Stevens, Successor Trustee, Hutchinson, Cox, Coons, Orr & Sherlock, P.C., PO Box 10886, Eugene, OR 97440.The Trust Deed covers the following described real property in the County of Deschutes and State of Oregon, (“the Property”): Tract 12, PINE MEADOWS TRACTS, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as 15697 Dawn Road, La Pine, OR 97739. APN: 139611.Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3).The default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums. The monthly installment payments of $2,466.71, beginning July 1, 2011, and continuing through the installment due February 1, 2012, plus interest and late charges; real property taxes, plus interest and penalties; and other liens and penalties. Total default as of February 3, 2012 is $20,597.06. By reason of said default, he Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following to wit: $402,173.31, together with the sum of $17,095.01, which represents unpaid contractual interest, late charges and fees through February 3, 2012, together with interest on the principal sum of $402,173.31 at the rate of 5.875% per annum from February 4, 2012, until paid, together with insurance paid by the Beneficiary on the property, late charges and penalties, trustee fees, attorney fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the trust deed. The date, time and place of the sale is: Date: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 Time: 11:00 o’clock a.m. PST Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1100 NW Bond St., Bend, OR 97701. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser’s requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the Trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the Trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the Trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 1, 2010. The name of the Trustee and the Trustee’s ailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included in the next paragraph. There are government agencies and nonprofit organizations that can give you information about foreclosure and help you decide what to do. For the name and phone number of an organization near you, please call the statewide phone contact number at 1-800-SAFENET (1-800-723-3638). You may also wish to talk to a lawyer. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636 or you may visit its Website at: http://www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs that provide legal help to individuals at no charge, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org and http://www.osbar.org/ public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html RIGHT TO CURE The right exists under ORS 86.753 to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by doing all of the following at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale: (1) Paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion as would not then be due, had no default occurred); (2) Curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the Trust Deed; and (3) Paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the Obligation and Trust Deed, together with Trustee’s and attorney’s fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “Grantors” includes any successor in interest to the Grantors as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words “Trustee” and “Beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used to collect the debt. Cashier’s checks for the foreclosure sale must be payable to Northwest Community Credit Union. Dated: April 9, 2012. /s/ Patrick L. Stevens, Patrick L. Stevens, Successor Trustee Hutchinson, Cox, Coons, Orr & Sherlock, P.C. Attorneys at Law, PO Box 10886, Eugene, OR 97440 Phone: (541) 686-9160, Fax: (541) 343-8693. Date of First Publication: Date of Last Publication:

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

929

933

935

940

975

975

Automotive Wanted

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Nissan Xterra S - 4x4 2006, AT, 76K, good all-weather tires, $13,500 obo. 858-345-0084

Town & Country 2003 LX ready to use at $3900. Also my pet 1996 Nissan QuestGXE. Call Bob at 541-318-9999. Did you know about the free trip to D.C. for WWII vets?

LeSabre Limited, 1995, 2nd owner, a very nice care. We’d like $3000. Other nice Buicks, too. Call Bob at 541-318-9999 Did you know about the Free Trip to Washington, D.C. for WWII Veterans?

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Chevy 1500 Z71 1994, 5.7 V8, New tires, Care Of. 120K miles, $3200. 877-213-9145. 541-279-8013 (PNDC) 931

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

PORSCHE 914, 1974 Roller (no engine), lowered, full roll cage, 5-pt harnesses, racing seats, 911 dash & instruments, decent shape, very cool! $1699. 541-678-3249 Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Advertise your car! Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, Add A Picture! 1995, extended cab, Reach thousands of readers! long box, grill guard, Call 541-385-5809 (4) 15” aluminum running boards, bed The Bulletin Classifieds wheels, 4 hole 3 1/4“ rails & canopy, 178K Porsche Cayenne 2004, centers, nice wheels, miles, $4800 obo. 975 86k, immac, dealer What are you $120. 541-480-5950 208-301-3321 (Bend) Mercedes S550, 2007, Automobiles maint’d, loaded, now We Buy Junk only 46K mi, always looking for? $17000. 503-459-1580 Dodge 250 Club Cab garaged, immac cond Cars & Trucks! 1982, long box, You’ll ind it in AUDI QUATTRO in/out, must see to Cash paid for junk canopy, tow pkg., a/c, appreciate. Incl 4 new The Bulletin Classiieds CABRIOLET 2004, vehicles, batteries & rebuilt engine, new Range Rover 2005 studded snow tires. extra nice, low milecatalytic converters. tires and brake, autoHSE, nav, DVD, $37,500. 541-388-7944 age, heated seats, Serving all of C.O.! matic transmission w/ local car, new tires, new Michelins, all Call 541-408-1090 541-385-5809 under drive, $2995. 51K miles. wheel drive, 541-548-2731 932 $24,995. $12,995 503-635-9494 Looking for your 503-635-9494. Antique & next employee? Classic Autos Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and Chevy 1951 pickup, BMW 525i 2004 Mercury Cougar reach over 60,000 Range Rover, restored. $13,500 obo; New body style, 1994, XR7 V8, readers each week. 2006 Sport HSE, 541-504-3253 or Steptronic auto., 77K mi, exc. cond, Dodge 3500 2007 Quad Your classified ad nav, AWD, heated 503-504-2764 cold-weather packREDUCED $4500 Cab SLT 4x4, 6.7L will also appear on seats, moonroof, age, premium packOBO. 541-526-1443 Cummins 6-spd AT, bendbulletin.com local owner, Harage, heated seats, after-market upgrades, which currently reman Kardon, extra nice. $14,995. superb truck, call for ceives over 1.5 mil503-635-9494. $23,995. details, $28,000 OBO. lion page views 503-635-9494 541-385-5682 every month at Cadillac DeVille Seno extra cost. BulleChevy Chevelle 1967, dan 1993, leather intin Classifieds Where can you ind a 283 & Powerglide, very terior, all pwr., 4 new Get Results! Call helping hand? clean, quality updates, tires w/chrome rims, 1980 Classic Mini 385-5809 or place $21,000, 541-420-1600 dark green, CD/radio, From contractors to Cooper your ad on-line at under 100K mi., runs All original, rust-free, bendbulletin.com yard care, it’s all here The Bulletin exc. $2500 OBO, classic Mini Cooper in Ford F-150 1995, 112K, in The Bulletin’s To Subscribe call 541-805-1342 perfect cond. $8,000 Just bought a new boat? 4X4, long bed, auto, 541-385-5800 or go to “Call A Service very clean, runs well, OBO. 541-408-3317 Sell your old one in the * * * new tires, $7500. Professional” Directory www.bendbulletin.com classiieds! Ask about our CHECK YOUR AD 541-548-4039. Super Seller rates! Find It in Please check your ad 940 541-385-5809 on the first day it runs The Bulletin Classifieds! Vans to make sure it is cor541-385-5809 The Bulletin recomrect. Sometimes inFord F150 2006, Dodge Ram conversion structions over the Mitsubishi 3000 GT mends extra caution van, 2000. 92K mi, when purchasing phone are misundercrew cab, 1 owner, 1999, auto., pearl Chevy Wagon 1957, raised roof, leather products or services stood and an error 59,000 miles, white, very low mi. 4-dr. , complete, seats, entertainment from out of the area. can occur in your ad. $15,500, $9500. 541-788-8218. $15,000 OBO, trades, system, custom lightSending cash, If this happens to your 541-408-2318. please call ing, sunroof, many checks, or credit inad, please contact us 541-420-5453. more extras. White formation may be the first day your ad Need to sell a exterior/gray int. Great appears and we will subject to FRAUD. Vehicle? Chrysler 300 Coupe condition! $11,999. be happy to fix it as For more informaCall The Bulletin 1967, 440 engine, 541-504-8568 soon as we can. tion about an adverand place an ad toauto. trans, ps, air, Deadlines are: Weektiser, you may call day! frame on rebuild, re- GMC ½-ton Pickup, Mercury Monterey 2005 days 12:00 noon for the Oregon State Ask about our 1972, LWB, 350hi painted original blue, Maroon Mini-van/111k next day, Sat. 11:00 Attorney General’s "Wheel Deal"! motor, mechanically original blue interior, miles $5,000/OBO a.m. for Sunday; Sat. Office Consumer for private party A-1, interior great; original hub caps, exc. Very clean/runs great! 12:00 for Monday. If Protection hotline at advertisers body needs some chrome, asking $9000 More info? See we can assist you, 1-877-877-9392. TLC. $4000 OBO. or make offer. Craig's list add or call please call us: Call 541-382-9441 541-385-9350. Kathy 541-350-1956 541-385-5809 or Jim 541-948-2029 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified to see/ test drive. FIND IT! BUY IT! Chrysler SD 4-Door SELL IT! 1930, CDS Royal The Bulletin Classiieds Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, International Flat 541-815-3318 Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480. FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd, Mazda B4000 2004 door panels w/flowers Cab Plus 4x4. 4½ yrs & hummingbirds, or 95,000 miles left on white soft top & hard ext’d warranty. V6, top, Reduced! $5,500. 5-spd, AC, studded 541-317-9319 or tires, 2 extra rims, 541-647-8483 tow pkg, 132K mi, all records, exlnt cond, Ford Mustang Coupe $9500. 541-408-8611 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great 935 shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199 Sport Utility Vehicles

Lincoln Mark IV, 1972, needs vinyl top, runs good, $3500. 541-771-4747

4-WHEELER’S OR HUNTER’S SPECIAL! Jeep 4-dr wagon, 1987 4x4, silver, nice wheels, 183K, lots of miles left yet! Off-road or on. Under $1000. Call 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639. Free trip to D.C. for WWII Vets!

‘01 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER LTD. Leather, moonroof. Vin# 619578

$

4,995

‘03 SUBARU OUTBACK LTD. Auto, moonroof. Vin# 624822

$

11,888

PORTLAND SWAP MEET 48th ANNUAL April 13th, 14th and 15th, 2012

Collector cars and parts for sale 503-678-2100 fax 503-678-1823 pdxswap@aol.com down load apps: portlandswapmeet.com

Discount tickets avail. at BAXTERS' AUTO PARTS Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $ 500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for: $ $

10 - 3 lines, 7 days 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

(Private Party ads only) 933

Pickups

*** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, Need help ixing stuff? please call us: Call A Service Professional 541-385-5809 ind the help you need. The Bulletin Classified www.bendbulletin.com ***

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005, low miles., good tires, new brakes, moonroof Reduced to $15,750 541-389-5016. Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 4x4. 120K mi, Power seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd row seating, extra tires, CD, privacy tinting, upgraded rims. Fantastic cond. $9500 Contact Timm at 541-408-2393 for info or to view vehicle.

3rd row, Flex Fuel, parking sensors, Roof rack. Vin# 136278 $20,999

‘07 JEEP COMPASS 4X4 ‘02 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER Auto, CD. Vin# 274835

CD, AWD. Vin# 586098

SUBARU LEGACY 11,999 ‘11 Auto, alloy wheels, heated seats, (carmel). $ Vin# 211403 21,999

$

$

5,995 ‘05 CHEVY EQUINOX AWD, Moonroof Vin# 048898

‘07 CHEVROLET HHR

$

11,999 ‘10 SUBARU OUTBACK 5 Spd. Manual, Silver Steel wheels. $ Vin# 351293 21,999

Leather, moonroof, loaded, auto. $ Vin# 516361 8,995 Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

‘08 CHRYSLER ASPEN LTD.

‘05 CHRYSLER 300 Vin# 667311

$

13,999

‘07 HYUNDAI ACCENT

‘10 VW JETTA TDI

$

8,999

Vin# 025770

Vin# 033147

$

21,999

‘07 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4 Moonroof, heated seats. Vin# 646827

$

14,999

‘98 SUBARU FORESTER

‘11 SUBARU LEGACY

Vin# 763743

Heated seats, alloy wheels, auto. (black) $ Vin# 211860

$

8,999

23,999

‘04 TOYOTA CAMRY Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $24,000, call 541-923-0231.

Vin# 155018

$

14,999

‘06 FORD EXPLORER V6 XLT AWD, Automatic Vin# A18848

‘04 FORD F350 KING RANCH CREW CAB

$

9,995 ‘02 FORD F350, 7.3 L. DIESEL

Loaded, 6.0 Diesel, long bed, (white). $ Vin# A34788

23,999

6 Spd. manual trans., 4x4 XCab. $ Vin# B57477 15,995 Jeep Cherokee 1990, 4WD, 3 sets rims & tires, exlnt set snow tires, great 1st car! $1800. 541-633-5149

Leather, Moonroof Vin# 061953

USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

541-385-5809

‘11 SUBARU LEGACY

‘05 VOLVO V50 WAGON $

10,488 ‘04 SUBARU FORESTER PREMIUM All weather pkg. Auto. $ Vin# 761966 16,988

10,995 ‘03 FORD F350

‘03 SUBARU OUTBACK Vin# 601509

Heated seats, bluetooth, alloy wheels, auto, (red). Vin# 215361 $

27,999

$

Vin# C44464

Jeep Willys 1947 cstm, small block Chevy, PS, OD, mags + trlr. Swap for backhoe? No a.m. calls, pls. 541-389-6990

$

10,999

23,999

‘12 SUBARU OUTBACK

‘02 SUBARU WRX SEDAN Manual, AWD. Vin# 511695

Heated seats, Silver Alloy Wheels. $ Vin# 242506

$

17,999

SUBARU OUTBACK 3.6 LTD. ‘11 SUBARU LEGACY (CPO) ‘10 Auto, leather, moonroof, navigation, bluePremium wheels, roof rack, auto, (gold). $ Vin# 505521

18,999

tooth, heated seats, rear camera (white) Vin# 317459

$

30,999

877-266-3821 Mazda Tribute 2004, all pwr., sunroof, snow tires, 1-owner, 94K $8900, 541-923-8010.

Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through April 15, 2012.


EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN APRIL 13, 2012

Inside the WEIRD &

wonderful

mind of

TODD SNIDER PAGE 3

E V E N T S : Bend Spring Festival returns, PAGE 20

M O V I E S : ’The Three Stooges’ and four others open, PAGE 25


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

inside

Cover design by Althea Borck / The Bulletin; submitted photo

Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

REPORTERS

MUSIC RELEASES • 9

EVENTS • 20

Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Jenny Wasson, 541-383-0350 jwasson@bendbulletin.com

• Nicki Minaj, Rascal Flatts, Esperanza Spalding and more

• Bend Spring Festival!

RESTAURANTS • 10

DESIGNER

• A review of Taj Palace in Bend

• “Anna Karenina” plays in Portland • A guide to out of town events

Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

FINE ARTS • 12

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. Email to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ADVERTISING 541-382-1811

MUSIC • 3 • COVER STORY: Todd Snider comes to the Tower Theatre • Last Band Standing returns for third act • Roach Gigz brings the Bay to Bend • Hear the call of The White Buffalo • Matt Hopper stops in at Players Bar • Basin & Range plays The Astro Lounge • The River Pigs celebrate their new CD • Tickets on sale today for Norah Jones, Huey Lewis at Les Schwab Amphitheater

GOING OUT • 8 Take advantage of the full line of Bulletin products. Call 541-385-5800.

The Bulletin

• The Dig and The We Shared Milk • A listing of live music, DJs, karaoke, open mics and more

• Bend Experimental Art Theatre stages “And A Child Shall Lead” • My Own Two Hands is this weekend • CTC previews “Rabbit Hole” Thursday • Pronghorn hosts “Wine Country Quilts” • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

OUTDOORS • 15 • Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

CALENDAR • 16 • A week full of Central Oregon events

PLANNING AHEAD • 18 • A listing of upcoming events • Talks and classes listing

OUT OF TOWN • 21

GAMING • 24 • A review of “Xenoblade Chronicles” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

MOVIES • 25 • “The Three Stooges,” “Lockout,” “The Cabin in the Woods,” “Melancholia” and “The Raid: Redemption” open in Central Oregon • “Into the Abyss,” “The Iron Lady” and “The Darkest Hour” are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon

A guide to Central Oregon and out-of-area camps, programs, and activities for children of all ages.

Publishes Friday, April 20, 2012


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

PAG E 3

music

The bard of the bar • Todd Snider talks about his local watering hole, his attitude, and why he might be done making records By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

M

usic publications of all stripes have been clamoring to write about Todd Snider in the wake of his excellent new album “Agnostic Hymns & Stoner Fables,” which came out last month and has garnered the veteran singer-songwriter some of the best reviews of his two-decade-old career. The thing is, when you read those articles, you end up reading almost as much about Drifters, a modest bar in Nashville’s East End neighborhood, as you do about Snider. “I got to look at the interviews I’ve been doing lately and they owe me (some) drinks, man,” Snider said in a scratchy drawl that sounds like a guy who puts the “stoner” in stoner fables. “When I get home I’m taking a pile of articles in and going, ‘Look, man … I shouldn’t have to pay for a drink for two days.’” If Drifters has received free publicity from the hubbub around “Hymns,” it’s probably a fair trade. After all, Snider — who’ll bring a full band to the Tower Theatre on Tuesday (see “If you go”) — lives within walking distance of the bar and finds plenty of inspiration for his songs in the place and its people. Continued Page 5

If you go What: Todd Snider, with Ashleigh Flynn When: 7 p.m. Tuesday, doors open 6 p.m. Where: Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend Cost: $28.25 or $39.50 plus fees, available through the venue Contact: www.towertheatre.org or 541317-0700

Todd S nider was born and raised in the Portland area before moving to Texas and Memphis. He has lived in Nashville for the past 12 years. Submitted photo


PAGE 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

Who’s playing when? THURSDAY Downhill Ryder The Dream Symphony Greyside OpenFate The Vaulted

RNING: Flipping GO! EDITOR’S WA own to keep sh en be s ha d the bir the newspaper. your face out of

APRIL 26 Broken Down Guitars Jaccuzi Strive Roots Subliminal

MAY 3 Death of a Hitman The Human Microphone Open Defiance Sifted Sons of Dirt

MAY 10 Courtesy Jim Williams Photography

Participants in this year’s Last B and Standing gathered Monday at Amalia’s in Bend. If this were the Internet, we’d ask you to tag yourself!

Last Band Standing By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

I

f you were to make a list of events that provide exposure for a wide swath of Central Oregon’s bands, it wouldn’t take long before you wrote down the words Last Band Standing. Now in its third year, LBS is both a showcase of local musical talent and a battle of the bands, even if organizers like to play down the competition aspect of the whole thing. But the fact is, over the next two months, 28 locally based bands will gather in small groups each Thursday (except May 31) at Century Center and play their hearts out in hopes of winning votes from the audience at the end of the night. Whoever wins the most votes — two bands from each qualifying week — will move on to the semifinals on June 7 and June 14. Four of those 12 semifinalists will advance to the finals on June 21.

returns

Last year’s winner was ska powerhouse Necktie Killer. In 2010, hip-hop band Mosley Wotta took the title. There’s more than just a title at stake, however. Top finishers in the contest will take home $20,000 in prizes, said Jennifer Meyer of Meyer Media, which is producing the event. Those prizes include three days of recording time at Ninkasi Studios in Eugene, a vehicle for loading up the band and going on tour, a photo shoot, tacos for a year, music gear, and marketing tools to help with promotion. Last year’s winners — LBS happens in other cities, too, like Eugene, Boise and Bellingham, Wash. — were also included on a compilation of Northwest music included in packages of Ninkasi beer that were distributed in five states.

Meyer tweaked Last Band Standing a bit this year. First of all, it’s moving back to Thursday nights, where it started in 2010. Last year’s shows were held on Friday nights, when there is a lot more for music lovers to do around town. But more importantly, the 2012 version of LBS is open to bands with members at least 18 years old. The 21+ rule of previous years has been abolished in hopes of attracting new blood. “This year we (are) digging a little deeper into bands that are just getting their feet wet,” Meyer said. However, attendees must still be at least 21 years old. And while Last Band Standing is free

to get into, you must have a free ticket to vote for your favorite band. Tickets can be picked up at all sponsor locations, and they’ll be available at the door, too. One last addition this year: LBS is also putting on Free Music Mondays at Amalia’s Mexican Restaurant in downtown Bend, with a lineup that features mostly bands in this year’s competition. For more info on Last Band Standing, visit www.lastband standing.net. You can also keep up with who’s competing and who’s moving on in GO! Magazine or at The Bulletin’s music blog, Frequency, at www.bend bulletin.com/frequency. — Reporter: 541-383-0377, bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

All You All Cadence Cognitive Riot Demigod The Great Hiatum

MAY 17 Doc Brown’s Delorean Kleverkill Stillfear Truck Stop Gravy

MAY 24 3 Beers 2 Function Avery James and the Hillandales Travis Ehrenstrom ScarLitt Fever Tentereign

If you go What: Last Band Standing When: 8 p.m. Thursday, doors open 7 p.m. Where: Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend Cost: Free Contact: www.lastband standing.net


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

music

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 5

We have a pair of tickets each to see Huey Lewis and the News, The Shins, Beck, Norah Jones and Tenacious D this summer at Les Schwab Amphitheater in Bend, and we don’t know what to do with them. So we’re giving them away! Tune into The Bulletin’s music blog, Frequency, to find out how you can win. But don’t delay … the contest for the Huey Lewis tickets ends today!

www.bendbulletin.com/frequency From Page 3 “I did a lot of my work there this time,” he said in a telephone interview last week. “I go there Sunday mornings … and sometimes I’ll go down for happy hour. It’s the same group of people all the time. “Even (as) a kid in Memphis, I’d get up really early and I’d work on my songs until about 2 in the afternoon, and then I’d walk down to the bar and fall in with that day-drinkin’ crowd,” Snider said. “And there’s always somebody saying something that I end up using. Stuff like ‘That don’t cut no ice with me.’ Just different ways people talk.” (It should be noted here that when Snider says he was a kid in Memphis, he means when he was a younger man. He was born and raised in the Portland area, moved to Texas, and then on to Memphis, where he got a record deal. He has lived in Nashville for the past 12 years.) Snider’s neighborhood is rife with songwriters and aspiring career musicians, and despite his success in the industry — or perhaps because of it — he tends to lay low at Drifters. He blends in. He’s one voice among the chatter. “I just like to sit around and listen to it. And I don’t write it on a napkin in the moment like an ass,” he said. “I just remember it, you know? I don’t sit there and try to act like …” Like some barstool poet? “Yeah,” he said. “No, I’m just a drunk. Well, I try not to be too bad of one, but I probably have been a barfly most of my life, and I’m not ashamed of it. It’s just something I like. I like that environment, always have.” In case it’s not clear, Snider’s acerbic wit and affinity for life’s grittier side courses through everything he says and does, especially his songs, which are folk-rock in sound, often charged with social and/or political

commentary, and loaded with crafty lyrics that’ll make you laugh, then think, and then laugh again. This is a man, after all, who named his 2008 album “Peace Queer.” For “Agnostic Hymns,” Snider recorded in the home studio of a regular associate, Eric McConnell, and, according to his website, told the players involved he wanted to “make a mess” of a recording. “I like that cacophony kind of … chaos sound. To me, it sounds inspired and less premeditated,” he said. “I always liked records that sounded more artistically ambitious than financially ambitious. (Records that) sound like a good time. “I don’t think I like stuff that sounds like it’s done to make parents proud,” Snider said. “Like, ‘Oh, I’m glad your dad likes your record. Good for you.’” To that end, “Hymns” is a success. The album skillfully walks the line between Snider’s “Viva Satellite”-era alt-country crunch and the folksy, storytelling nature of his more recent work. But no matter the style, there is a constant: Snider’s clever, sideways view of religion, love, corporate greed, karma, and whatever other topics strike his fancy. Paste Magazine called “Hymns” a “serious contender for the album with the worst attitude of 2012.” When he hears this, Snider laughs. “I think I have a nice attitude. I don’t know if other people would agree,” he said. “But I don’t see what makes optimism such a virtue or such a noble thing. I would love it if everyone thought I was pleasant, maybe.” And then, without missing a beat, he quickly retreats: “I don’t know if I’d like that, actually.” Regardless of what others think of him, Snider says he isn’t sure how much longer he’ll be, as he calls his job, “making up songs.” As usual, it’s hard to tell if he’s serious or not. The

exchange goes like this: “I’m wrapping it up. I’m doing this Jerry Jeff thing (Editor’s note: Snider will release an album of Jerry Jeff Walker covers April 24) and then I’m gonna … quit altogether.” Wait, what? Really? “I mean, I think I should stop making records, yeah. I may go out and try to tour for a while and really … work on my guitar playing and learning my old songs … but I think I’ve said the s--t I need to say. I don’t see any reason for me to say more s--t. People have given me plenty of attention.” Even after releasing a critically acclaimed and (relatively) commercially successful album? Even as your reputation as a songwriter continues to grow? “You gotta ask yourself how many songs the world needs, you know? God. There’s already so many, and in my neighborhood, I promise you, there’s 10 since me and you started talking. There’s 10 more songs in this poor world,” Snider said. “Maybe there could be something else I could write … maybe a bunch of love songs, (but) that last bit felt like the last bit of throw-up, the bile part. I like it. I think it might be my favorite one. But I (also) think I might’ve said what I was supposed to say, if I was even supposed to say anything.” It sounds far-fetched to think Snider is done making records. But if he chooses to go that route, at least he has a bar to hang out at back home. He thinks. “If people don’t start showing up (there) now just to give me a bunch of s--t, then I’ll have to switch. I should’ve kept my mouth shut. I should’ve said it was something else,” he said. “No, but I wanted those free drinks. I’ll take the free drinks.” — Reporter: 541-383-0377, bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

MAY STUART LITTLE Especially for families

PURE PRAIRIE LEAGUE

4

A Novel Idea

7

Mickey Hart

9

Stuart Little

11

Sprout Film Festival

17

Lindsey Buckingham

19

Pure Prairie League

Montreal & Cali Guitar Trios fornia - April 27

Classic country rock

Tickets & Information 541-317-0700 www.towertheatre.org “The Tower Theatre”


PAGE 6 • GO! MAGAZINE The White Buffalo returns to Bend It’s amazing to see the progression of The White Buffalo over the past few years. When he first started regularly playing in Central Oregon, the man his parents call Jake Smith seemed to be a mysterious, vagabond troubadour, a little-known name with no web presence and only some self-released recordings to his name. Over the next couple of years, he’d stop in Bend once or twice a year, packing rooms and wowing folks with sturdy, stirring folk songs and the voice of God. Outside Bend, you could see things happening, too. Now in early 2012, The White Buffalo is releasing his muchanticipated new album “Once Upon a Time in the West” on a well-connected indie label, and he has tastemakers at National Public Radio and Billboard paying attention. And then there’s this little mention from The New Yorker: “He has a deeply resonate voice that comes from the same cavern where Leonard Cohen’s can be found, echoing in the darkness. On his new album … Smith and his band work up breezy folk-rock songs and ballads that will stop you in your tracks.” The New Yorker catches on to what we’ve known for years ’round here. Feels good, doesn’t it?

music The White Buffalo, with Shireen Amini and Kylan Johnson; 9 p.m. Monday, doors open 8 p.m.; $12 in advance (outlets listed at the website below), $15 at the door; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.random presents.com.

All the way from the Bay: Roach Gigz In 2012, the Bay Area hiphop scene comprises quite the cast of characters. There’s E-40, Too $hort and Hieroglyphics: legends still grinding. Rising gangsta stars like Andre Nickatina and The Jacka. Eccentric Internet sensations Mistah F.A.B. and Lil B. Plus whatever you wanna call Kreayshawn. And then there’s Roach Gigz, a young, cocky and talented rapper who knows how to be both foul-mouthed and funny, often within the same stanza. Born and raised in San Francisco, the guy’s songs — you can find tons on YouTube — are a bracing mix of rap-standard boasts and drug/ drink/sex-fueled rhymes, but also sly observational humor, all delivered in a distinctive, unconventional cadence. A Roach Gigz track is full of stylistic and thematic twists and turns, and in hip-hop, that’s welcome, a fact evident in the kudos he has received

R O ACH GIGZ Submitted photo

from outlets such as MTV, The Fader and Pitchfork. Even more impressive are the beats, which are invariably meaty, bouncy and buzzing. Every one is a banger, no joke. Catch up to what’s fresh at www.roachgigz.com. Roach Gigz, with Berner, Clyde Carson, Nima Fadavi, Young Shotty and Isaiah Valentino; 9 tonight, doors open 8 p.m.; $12 plus fees in advance (outlets listed at the website below), $15 at the door; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www .randompresents.com.

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

Players Bar & Grill hosts Matt Hopper

Upcoming Concerts

We here at GO! Magazine hate to say we told you so but, uh … well, we’ve been telling you for a few years now that Alaska/Idaho pop-rock wunderkind Matt Hopper was destined for bigger things, given a break here or there. The evidence? Mainly Hopper’s songs, which are swaggering slabs of psychedelic pop-rock with hints of Stonesy blues that shine through on a regular basis. The guy can write a hook, and then another, and then another, ad infinitum. Go to www.matt hopper.com, click on “Music” and listen to his “Jersey Finger” album for oodles of proof. Hopper’s also got a natural rock star quality and he’s a hard-working dude who’s spent a ton of time on the road over the years selling the sound. It’s paying off. Later this month, Hopper and his Roman Candles band will headline Boise’s Knitting Factory, a venue with a capacity of 1,000. Players Bar & Grill, where Hopper’s playing in Bend tonight, holds … not 1,000. So go see him in a place that small while you still can. Matt Hopper, with Matt Lewis; 9 tonight; $7 plus fees in advance at www.bendticket. com, $10 at the door; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.p44p.biz.

April 20 — Yonder Mountain String Band (newgrass), Midtown Ballroom, Bend, www.randompresents.com.

Basin & Range visits The Astro Lounge For those of you who loved Empty Space Orchestra (and yes, in case you missed it, that’s in past tense, since the band is on an “indefinite hiatus”), The Astro Lounge will provide a chance to catch a little of that feeling Saturday night when

Get a taste of Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday

April 20 — The Thoughts (indie rock), The Horned Hand, Bend, 541-728-0879. April 20 — Tony Smiley (one-man band), The Astro Lounge, Bend, www. astroloungebend.com. April 20 — Tipper and Papadosio (electronic), Century Center, Bend, www. slipmatscience.com. April 20-21 — Hot Tea Cold (blues), Northside Bar & Grill, Bend, www.northsidebarfun. com. April 21 — Jason & The Punknecks (punkgrass), The Horned Hand, Bend, www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. April 25 — Crown Point (rock), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com. April 27 — California Guitar Trio and Montreal Guitar Trio (acoustic), Tower Theatre, Bend, www.towertheatre.org or 541-317-0700. April 27 — Mann (hip-hop), Domino Room, Bend, www. bendticket.com.

Eugene’s Basin & Range comes to town. Thanks in large part to the presence of a saxophone and an attraction to deep, instrumental grooves, there are times when B&R’s new album, “Is My Sound Working?” sounds a lot like ESO, especially on tracks like “The Spread” and “Basilisk.” But whatever electro-dabbling the Empty Spacers were inclined to do, Basin & Range takes a step or two further, employing synthesized squiggles to settle into disco-funk jams like “Talk to the Fatman” and “Dance Whisperer.” Overall, it’s a good time, especially if you’re, say, hanging out in a bar and just want to noodledance the night away. Find ‘em (and a stream of the new album) at www .basinandrangeband.com. Basin & Range, with DJ Harlo; 10 p.m. Saturday; $3; The Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www.astrolounge bend.com. — Ben Salmon


music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

T H E RIVER PIG S Submitted photo

The River Pigs release new CD F

or six years, The River Pigs have been one of the hardest working bar bands in Central Oregon, holding down regular gigs at spots like Northside Bar & Grill, The Owl’s Nest in Sunriver, and The Riverhouse, plus choice slots at local festivals such as the Bend Roots Revival. But unless you caught them live, it was hard to hear the Pigs’ fun and finely tuned mix of covers and originals. That changes this weekend, when the band releases “When Pigs Fly,” its long-awaited debut album. “Pigs” is an eight-track tour of The River Pigs’ wide range of soulful sounds, which stretch from Jeff Leslie’s twangy blues (“Going Down in Memphis,” “Easy to Love You”) to Scott Foxx’s Celtic-flavored fiddle jams (“Barnhouse”) and gritty, slow-burning rockers (���What’s the Color of a Hero”) to Thomas T.’s “Blue Reggae,” a tune

that needs no description. The album features plenty of Thomas T.’s work on the bass and Jeff Ingraham’s drums, but both have since left the band to focus on playing with Mosley Wotta and Merle Haggard, respectively. Their replacements, Val Billington and Scott Wyatt, contributed to the recording, too. You can dig deeper into the band at www.the riverpigs.com. Leslie, Foxx, Billington and Wyatt will showcase their stylistic diversity during two CD-release shows tonight and Saturday at one of their favorite ol’ haunts, the Northside Bar. It’s two of the band members’ birthdays, too, so go out and help ’em celebrate! The River Pigs; 8:30 tonight and 8:30 p.m. Saturday; $2; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; www.theriverpigs.com.

Norah Jones, Huey Lewis tickets on sale today

(reserved seating), plus fees. Tickets will be available through www.bendconcerts.com, www.ticket fly.com, or by phone at 877-435-9849. Or you can buy ’em in person at The Ticket Mill in Bend’s Old Mill District. Tickets to the amphitheater’s Memorial Day weekend shows — The Shins on May 25, Tenacious D on May 26 and Beck on May 27 — are already on sale at all those same outlets. For more info, visit www.bend concerts.com.

Tickets to see jazz-pop chanteuse Norah Jones and ’80s hit-makers Huey Lewis and the News at Bend’s Les Schwab Amphitheater go on sale today at 10 a.m. Jones will play the amphitheater Aug. 15, and tickets cost $39 (general admission) and $60 (reserved seating), plus fees. Lewis will play Sept. 11, and tickets cost $39 (general admission) and $78

— Ben Salmon

— Ben Salmon

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 7


PAGE 8 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

going out HIGHLIGHTS

Looking for something to do? Check out our listing of live music, DJs, karaoke, open mics and more happening at local nightspots. Find lots more at www.bendbulletin.com/events.

TODAY ALLAN BYER: Folk and Americana; 6 p.m.; Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub, 913 N.E. 3rd St., Bend; 541-383-1694. LEE BARKER AND ALAN YANKUS: Jazz; 6 p.m.; 750 Wine Bar & Bistro, 427 S.W. Eighth St., Redmond; 541-504-7111. ARRIDIUM: Rock; 6:30 p.m.; Cross Creek Cafe, 507 SW 8th St., Redmond; 541-548-2883. BELLAVIA: Blues and jazz; 6:30 p.m.; Crave Eclectic Fine Dining, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-504-6006. CHRIS BELAND: Folk; 6:30 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 9570 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-728-0095. FINN MILES AND LAUREN KERSHNER: Pop; 6:30 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-639-5546. HILST & COFFEY: Chamber-folk; 6:30 p.m.; Jackson’s Corner, 845 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-647-2198. LINDY GRAVELLE: Country and pop; 7 p.m.; Brassie’s Bar, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-548-4220. PAT THOMAS: Country; 7 p.m.; Tumalo Feed Co., 64619 U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-2202. BOBBY LINDSTROM BAND: Blues and rock; 7:30 p.m.; Kelly D’s, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., Bend; 541-389-5625. DJ CHRIS: Live DJ; 8 p.m.; Checkers Pub, 329 S.W. 6th St., Redmond; 541-548-3731. HOPELESS JACK & THE HANDSOME DEVIL: Blues, with Truckstop Darlin’; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. JAZZ AT THE OXFORD: Featuring the Michael Allen Harrison Superband; $30; 8 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436 or www.oxfordhotelbend.com. LEIF JAMES: Blues; 8 p.m.; Fox’s Billiard Lounge, 937 N.W. Newport

Submitted photo

SO MUCH MUSIC, SO LITTLE TIME!

Ave., Bend; 541-647-1363. THE RIVER PIGS: Rock; CD release; $2; 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. (Pg. 7) MATT HOPPER: Pop-rock, with Matt Lewis; $7 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-3892558 or www.p44p.biz. (Pg. 6) ROACH GIGZ: Hip-hop, with Berner, Clyde Carson and more; $12-$15; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. randompresents.com. (Pg. 6) DJ STEELE: Live DJ; 10 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440.

SATURDAY JAZZ AT THE OXFORD: Featuring the Michael Allen Harrison Superband; $30; 5 and 8 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436 or www.oxfordhotelbend.com. ACOUSTIC CAFE WITH GARTH OSBORN: Blues; 6 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 9570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 190, Bend; 541-728-0095. CHRIS BELAND: Americana and rock; 6 p.m.; Scanlon’s, 61615 Athletic Club Drive, Bend; 541-382-8769. COSA SONG OF THE YEAR SHOW: The Central Oregon Songwriters Association presents its annual show; $5; 6 p.m.; The Sound Garden, 1279 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-420-2949. DUNCAN MCNEILL: Jazz, blues and funk saxophone; 6 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-639-5546. SONGS FROM THE PAST: Featuring a performance by Glenda and Friends; proceeds benefit Bethlehem Inn; $6 or $10 per couple, $1 less with donation of nonperishable food item; 6-10 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-322-8768 or www. bethleheminn.org.

Here’s stuff we couldn’t fit elsewhere. Find times, costs and more details in the listing below: • Thursday at The Horned Hand, New York’s The Dig (pictured at left) will bring their Strokes-ian sound to town to play a show with Oregon fuzz-rockers The We Shared Milk and My Autumn’s Done Come. • Underground hip-hop will take over JC’s Bar & Grill Saturday, as clever Ontario-based MC Oso Negro headlines a bill packed with left-of-center rappers.

BELLAVIA: Blues and jazz; 6:30 p.m.; Crave Eclectic Fine Dining, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-504-6006. HILST & COFFEY: Chamber-folk; 7 p.m.; portello winecafe, 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-385-1777. LEIF JAMES: Blues; 7 p.m.; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-617-9600. LINDY GRAVELLE: Country and pop; 7 p.m.; Brassie’s Bar, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-548-4220. PAT THOMAS: Country; 7 p.m.; Tumalo Feed Co., 64619 U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-2202. BOBBY LINDSTROM: Rock and blues; 7:30 p.m.; Velvet, 805 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-728-0303. AVERY JAMES AND THE HILLANDALES: with Problem Stick; rock and blues; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. THE RIVER PIGS: Rock; CD release; $2; 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. (Pg. 7) THE AN APPLE A DAY TOUR: Hip-hop, with DJ Ganzobean, Pat Maine, MC Pigpen and Oso Negro; free; 9 p.m.; JC’s Bar & Grill, 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-383-3000 or www. reverbnation.com/show/7161721. WARM GADGET: with Adonija; heavy industrial; $4; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331. BASIN & RANGE: Electro-rock, with DJ Harlo; $3; 10 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116 or www.astroloungebend.com. (Pg. 6) DJ STEELE: Live DJ; 10 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440. RAISETHEVIBE: Funk; 10 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-2558.

• Jazz lovers! Head downtown this weekend for the final three shows in The Oxford Hotel’s concert series, featuring the eclectic, contemporary jazz of the Michael Allen Harrison Superband. • Locals Warm Gadget will fill Silver Moon with their rad, industrial-strength sludgery Saturday. Gadget shows are too rare, so don’t miss this one. • Central Oregon Songwriters Association will hold its annual showcase Saturday at The Sound Garden. It’ll be an great place to sample local talent!

SUNDAY ACOUSTIC OPEN MIC: with Burnin’ Moonlight, PA provided; 4 p.m.; Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub, 913 N.E. 3rd St., Bend; 541-383-1694. LISA DAE AND ROBERT LEE TRIO: Jazz; 5 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. MATT GWINUP: 6 p.m.; 5 Fusion & Sushi Bar, 821 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-323-2328.

MONDAY THE WHITE BUFFALO: Folk, with Shireen Amini and Kylan Johnson; $12-$15; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. randompresents.com. (Pg. 6)

TUESDAY BOBBY LINDSTROM: Rock and blues; 5 p.m.; Velvet, 805 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-728-0303.

WEDNESDAY OPEN MIC/ACOUSTIC JAM: with Bobby Lindstrom; 6:30-9 p.m.; Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub, 913 N.E. 3rd St., Bend; 541-383-1694. TIM COFFEY: Folk; 6:30 p.m.; Velvet, 805 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-728-0303. ARRIDIUM: Rock; 7 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. LIVE WIRE: Classic rock and country; 7 p.m.; Old Mill Brew Werks, 384 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend; 541-633-7670. THE NORTHSTAR SESSION: Pop; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. ONWARD, ETC.: Folk; $5 suggested donation; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand.

— Ben Salmon, The Bulletin

REGGAE NIGHT W/ MC MYSTIC: Music; 9 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116.

THURSDAY OPEN MIC: 6-8 p.m.; Strictly Organic Coffee Co., 6 S.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-330-6061. LINDY GRAVELLE: Country and pop; 7 p.m.; Brassie’s Bar, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-548-4220. SCOTT PEMBERTON: Rock; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. THE ROCKHOUNDS: Acoustic; 7 p.m.; Kelly D’s, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., Bend; 541-389-5625. BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring a performance by Dennis Orwig; proceeds from CD sales benefit the Spiritual Awareness Community; free; 7:30 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-508-1059. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www. lastbandstanding.net. (Pg. 4) OPEN MIC JAM: with Scott Foxx; 8 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. THE NORTHSTAR SESSION: Pop; 8 p.m.; Maverick’s Country Bar, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; www.maverickscountrybar. com. THE DIG: Pop-rock, with The We Shared Milk and My Autumn’s Done Come; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. STRIVE ROOTS: Reggae; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331. n T O SUBMIT: Email events@bendbulletin.com. Deadline is 10 days before publication. Please include date, venue, time and cost.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

PAGE 9

music releases Here and there Aug. 3 — Part of the Oregon Jamboree; Sweet Home; www .oregonjamboree.com or 888613-6812.

Rascal Flatts “CHANGED” Big Machine Records Rascal Flatts is the union of a kick in the gut and a warm bath, the tension between feeling as assault and feeling as salve. That’s in the lyrics, sure, but just as often in the song structures themselves, which veer between high-drama up-tempo numbers and higherdrama ballads. Fluency in ballads is what’s made Rascal Flatts into one of the most successful country acts of the last decade. The frontman Gary LeVox has a gargantuan voice, steeped in Nashville’s pathos if not its twang. What’s notable at the beginning of the sometimes rowdy (for this group) “Changed,” its eighth album, is LeVox’s willingness to tone it down. He subjugates himself

to the music, which on the single, “Banjo,” and “Hot in Here” is lighthearted and loose and, unlike some of this group’s grand slow songs, very affirmedly country. “Can’t take a breath without getting sick/ I’ve had enough of this concrete jungle,” LeVox sings on “Banjo,” adding later, “Sometimes you gotta go beyond the pavement.” That’s a mandate this group has often avoided, but on this album has largely taken to heart, perhaps as a rejoinder to groups like Lady Antebellum and Little Big Town, which have effectively blended country’s urban and rural impulses. And so even though there are hints here of the ambitious melancholy that’s become this group’s trademark (for instance, “Hurry Baby,”) what stands out are the new moods, on songs like the jumpy “She’s Leaving,” which cloaks hurt in a sparkly package. — Jon Caramanica, The New York Times

“PINK FRIDAY: ROMAN RELOADED” Universal Records Nicki Minaj is a one-of-a-kind talent. That’s why her decision to spend so much time trying to be anyone but herself on “Pink Friday: Roman Reloaded” makes so little sense. The first half of “Roman Reloaded” is the Nicki we’ve come to love. The pride of Jamaica, Queens, is brash and in your face, messing with gender roles and delivering all sorts of zingers. In first-rate hip-hop like “I Am Your Leader,” where she holds her own

Of Monsters and Men “MY HEAD IS AN ANIMAL” Universal Republic Records Of Monsters and Men take the sonics of Arcade Fire and the psychedelic, Earth-loving images of their Icelandic homeland and mold them into something gorgeous and uplifting on their debut, “My Head Is an Animal.” On “Mountain Sound,” the sextet from Reykjavik conjures

with Rick Ross and Cam’ron, and “Champion,” where she takes on Nas and Young Jeezy, Minaj cements her rep as hip-hop’s brightest new star. When she pays tribute to Jay-Z in “HOV Lane” and faces off with Lil Wayne in the

April 25 — McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; www.cascadetickets.com or 800-514-3849.

Esperanza Spalding

vese (among others) to bear on her subtly layered productions. Save for two riveting tunes coproduced with rapper Q-Tip (their “Crowned & Kissed” is one of the album’s high points) and two covers (Wayne Shorter, Stevie Wonder), this is Spalding’s shining hour. She pens smartly emotional lyrics for Shorter’s “Endangered Species” and turns it into rubbery bop-pop. — A.D. Amorosi, The Philadelphia Inquirer

“WORSHIP SOUL” EMI Gospel The excellent gospel singer Anita Wilson can sometimes sound as if she’s going to put down the microphone and tell you about company policy. On her first album, “Worship Soul,” her voice is bright, clear, amiable, professional. Her long tones are even; even when her voice deepens and roughens slightly, her phrases remain tight and effective. Like an insurer, she brings you confidence and urges you not to worry. God does his work perfectly, and as long as you believe, then hold on, wait, trust, pray, keep still. “It’s done,” she sings in one of the tracks, meaning her “healing,” her “victory.” “What I shall be, I already am,” she sings. “Worship Soul” was recorded live at Fellowship Baptist Church in Chicago, where she’s the choir director; it’s introduced by Don-

title track, she’s hard to beat. However, there’s another side to “Roman Reloaded,” where hiphop isn’t enough for Minaj. She wants to conquer pop as well. That’s where we get the current RedOne-produced single “Starships,” which is like a twisted Katy Perry song, and “Marilyn Monroe,” which is like a Rihanna ballad. This side of Minaj has her moments, in the sweaty dance pop of “Pound the Alarm” and the clubby “Whip It,” which could be mistaken for a J.Lo single. But there are way too many anonymous dance numbers like “Automatic” and “Fire Burns” that could have come from a dozen singers. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

a catchy vagabond indie-folk soundtrack that is begging for a Disney animated video filled with woodland creatures. Their buzzed-about hit, “Little Talks,” is a soaring, Sugarcubes-fueled, horn-filled fantasy that simultaneously floats and stomps — a fitting introduction for a band that rocks and yet seems ethereal enough to disappear at any moment. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

Anita Wilson

Here and there

“RADIO MUSIC SOCIETY” Heads Up International If 2010’s Chamber Music Society was bassist/composer/vocalist Esperanza Spalding’s hat tip to her classical roots, this new album looks at her popping funk history and the fellow jazz players who helped make the music. Like a neo-soul Steely Dan, Spalding’s arrangements bring differently swinging drummers Terri Lyne Carrington and Jack DeJohnette, spiky guitarist Jef Lee Johnson, salty saxophonist Joe Lovano, vocalist Gretchen Palato, and keyboardist Leo Geno-

Nicki Minaj

ald Lawrence, the singer and bandleader on whose recent albums she has appeared. In his short, rousing introduction, he mentions her “tone” — an almost clinical detail to bring up at that moment. But he’s right: Her tone seems to come first, followed by the rest of her. You notice it, and keep noticing it. You need restraint to understand abandon. The ballad “Speechless” ran to nearly five minutes when it came out as a

single last year, and here it’s more than six minutes long; it doesn’t truly get good until almost halfway through. The track is a microcosm of the record, which works at maintaining a natural link between gospel and various kinds of R&B — ’70s, ’90s, current — with a band that wants to use its feeling for Sly and the Family Stone, for ParliamentFunkadelic, for D’Angelo, for J Dilla. Most of “Worship Soul” uses the language of assurance, but Wilson — who wrote most of the album’s songs, sometimes with the producer Rick Robinson — saves the language of desire for the end of the record, in a slow ballad, “More of You.” Typically, it builds its meaning as its lines repeat and repeat. “I am so desperate/ just to be closer to you,” she sings. “I give you all of me/ I need more of you.” — Ben Ratliff, The New York Times


PAGE 10 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

restaurants

Oasis of

Indian cuisine • As Bend’s South Asian outpost, Taj Palace is hit and miss on the food By John Gottberg Anderson The Bulletin

I

ate last week at a wonderful Indian restaurant in metropolitan Portland. It served to remind me how much I enjoy really good South Asian cuisine. It’s not that Bend’s Taj Palace doesn’t fill a niche in Central Oregon. Pullareddy “Reddy” Lakireddy and his family — wife, mother, son, daughter and sister-in-law, occasionally assisted by a brother from Southern California — have done a solid job since opening in early 2003. As Oregon’s only Indian restaurant east of the Cascade mountains, to the best of my

knowledge, the Taj is a solitary purveyor in this region of the food and culture of the world’s second most populous nation. The simple but colorful decor, the aromas of turmeric and coriander wafting from the kitchen and the music of sitar and tabla playing in the background offer a peek into an exotic land on the other side of the world. But this is not top-flight Indian cuisine, as I was reminded by my visit to Hillsboro’s tiny but authentic Chennai Masala restaurant. On two separate visits to Taj Palace, both before and after my Portland-area experience, I found that nothing in Bend compared.

Mood and service Taj Palace is a spacious restaurant, perhaps better known for its daily luncheon buffets and monthly belly-dancing performances than it is for its multi-course “thali” dinners. Most patrons seem to prefer tables on a raised platform above the buffet area than at a booth or table on the main floor. But no matter where they sit, they are immersed in Little India. Shiny foil ornaments, red, green and gold in color, hang from the ceiling to celebrate Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights. Never mind that it’s still seven months away, in November. Continu ed next page

Joe Klin e / The Bulletin

Pa tro n se a tlu n c h a tTaj Pal ace on Wall Street in downtown Bend.

Taj Palace Restaurant Location: 917 N.W. Wall St., Bend Hours: Lunch 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. every day; dinner 5 to 9 p.m. Monday to Thursday, 5 to 9:30 p.m. Friday to Sunday Price range: Lunch buffet $7.95; dinner appetizers $4.50 to $6.95, entrees $10.95 to $15.95, Friday night buffet $13.95 Credit cards: MasterCard, Visa Kids’ menu: No, but the buffet price is reduced according to age Vegetarian menu: Wide range of choices including aloo gobi (potatoes and cauliflower) and saag paneer (spinach and cheese) Alcoholic beverages: Full bar

Outdoor seating: No Reservations: Large groups only Contact: 541-330-0774, www. tajpalacebend.com

Scorecard OVERALL: BFood: B-. Inconsistent; the better dishes are inferior to those served at big-city Indian cafes. Service: B-. Seemingly uninterested, performing basic service tasks but little more. Atmosphere: B. Simple but colorful décor, with wall hangings and Indian background music. Value: B+. Best deal is the $7.95 all-you-can-eat luncheon buffet.


restaurants

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

From previous page Paintings of scenes from the country’s folklore and photographs of scenic locations — including the namesake Taj Mahal palace — hang on the walls. It seems a shame that the lower sections of the walls are covered with dreary wood paneling that covers up the far more interesting red brick rising above it. There’s not much to the service. A family member will tell you to “sit anywhere,” deliver a pitcher of water and menus if you haven’t headed straight for the buffet, and ask if you want anything to drink. Even when I have come for a more elaborate dinner — “thali” includes soup, rice, naan bread, a main entree, a vegetable curry and dessert — no one has ever checked back to see if I’m satisfied with my meal.

Chicken and meats In southern India, vegetarianism is the norm. In northern India, meats are more widely consumed. And chicken, as often as not, is the meat of choice. I have had the opportunity to taste five different chicken dishes at the Taj, with varying results. My favorite is chicken makhani, tender chunks of boneless chicken cooked in a creamy, butter-based tomato sauce. Tandoori chicken was a big disap-

PAGE 11

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

The lunch buffet at Taj Palace in Bend.

Buffet dining Indeed, I may not be. While I like the mildly piquant spice level (hot sauces are available for diners who need a boost), I find myself unimpressed with many of the foods I’ve eaten at Taj Palace. Spinach-and-onion pakora, an appetizer deep-fried in chickpea flour, was too heavy for my taste. Fried vegetables — okra with peas and potatoes, cabbage with carrots and onions — seemed greasy, or at least oily. A yellow-lentil dhal with spinach and eggplant was pasty and uninviting in flavor. Zucchini masala was overcooked. But a couple of saag (creamed spinach) plates — saag paneer with squares of cottage cheese, vege saag with mushrooms, cauliflower and tomatoes — were very palatable. And a savory mushroom curry with button mushrooms, peas, onions, tomatoes and chickpeas in a brown sauce were good as well. I also liked two soups that I sampled. Sambar is a thick and peppery lentil-vegetable soup with onions, tomatoes and carrots. Rasan is a spicy curried soup with tamarind, along with onions, green peppers and whole chilies. Both are a better choice than the one-time British colonial standard, mulligatawny, which I did not see offered here.

GO! MAGAZINE •

Next week: Takoda’s Restaurant Visit www.bendbulletin .com/restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants.

pointment. I normally like chicken and other dishes that are marinated in yogurt and herbs, then baked in a tandoor, a traditional Indian clay oven. Here, on both of my recent visits, I found it tough and overcooked. And that also affected the chicken tikka masala, a dish that features tandoori chicken in a creamy tomato-and-coriander sauce. Chicken karai, whose meat was cooked with bell peppers and onions, was tasty enough. But chili chicken, breaded and fried, was bland and flavorless. Among other meat dishes, lamb vindaloo was excellent. Tender, boneless pieces of meat were cooked with potatoes in a mildly spicy brown sauce. Raita, a homemade yogurt with minced onions, cucumbers and tomatoes, perfectly complemented the lamb. A pork curry, served with potatoes in an orange sauce, was decent. But kima curry, featuring ground beef with peas and onions, reminded me of taco filling from a drive-thru.

Bread and rice The best thing from the Taj’s tandoor was the warm naan bread. A yeasty flatbread, it is excellent with the hummus-like coconut chickpea dip offered as a condiment. I prefer the restaurant’s biryani rice — seasoned with yellow saffron and tossed with peas, carrots, corn and beans — instead of plain white rice.

My favorite dessert was rice kheer, a warm pudding made with coconut milk. But I have friends who prefer the Taj’s mango custard with apple slices. And for those without a sweet tooth, orange slices and cantaloupe chunks are also available for dessert. The restaurant has a full bar, but I find the best beverage to wash down spicy Indian food is an Indian beer. Three different import brands are offered. — Reporter: janderson@bendbulletin.com

SMALL BITES Hola! opened its new downtown Bend restaurant and lounge April 5 with an abbreviated menu that emphasizes small plates, including pupusas (stuffed Salvadoran flatbread) and several versions of seafood ceviche. The popular Peruvian-Mexican group has taken over the groundfloor space in St. Clair Place that previously was the Tart Bistro. Open 11 a.m. to midnight every day. 920 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-728-0069, www.holabend.com. Another Mexican restaurant, La Rosa, announced plans to establish a second store in Brookswood Meadow Plaza on Bend’s south side. Owner Carol DeRose said she projects a fall opening. 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; www.larosabend.com. Boken has signed a lease to expand into the adjacent downtown Bend space formerly held by the Madhappy Lounge. Justin Cook, owner and executive chef of Boken and Kanpai, said the expansion will enable his pan-Asian bistro to add private tatami dining rooms and a large bar. Cook indicated he hopes to open the space — called Dojo — by late June. 852 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-706-9091, www.boken bend.com.

PRIME RIB EVERY FRIDAY 8 oz. $9.95 | 12 oz. $12.95

“Non-alcoholic” beverage free with meal from 6-10 a.m., Mon.-Fri.

927 NW BOND ST. • 541.382.4592 NOW TAKING VISA & MASTER CARD


PAGE 12 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

fine arts

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Children of Terezin Concentration Camp get acquainted with a new arrival in a rehearsal for Bend Experimental Art Theatre’s production of “And a Child Shall Lead,” a drama opening tonight at 2nd Street Theater in Bend.

‘PASSIVE RESISTANCE’ • BEAT stages two productions of Holocaust play ‘And a Child Shall Lead’ By David Jasper The Bulletin

A

mong the infamous Nazi concentration camps that dotted Europe during World War II, Terezin, an 18th-century Czech fortress north of Prague, was uniquely poised as a temporary home to Jewish artists, musicians, writers and thinkers. Early in the war, Hitler sent them there thinking they could prove useful entertaining him or his troops, according to Leila Smith-Daines,

director of Bend Experimental Art Theatre’s (BEAT) production of the play “And a Child Shall Lead,” set in Terezin. It opens tonight at 2nd Street Theater (see “If you go”). “They made it a way station for all the Jewish intelligentsia,” explained Howard Schor, executive director of BEAT. Having just wrapped up the musical “Annie Get Your Gun” last weekend at Bend High School, the growing company is in the midst of staging two separate productions of “And

a Child Shall Lead,” written by Michael Slade. Schor notes that along with death camps and work camps — think Treblinka or Auschwitz — lesser-known camps such as Terezin served as way stations before Jews could be sent to parts unthinkable. The Nazis “had the bright idea … of making it a showplace, to show the world and the Red Cross how well they treated Jews,” Schor said. “They actually did a film about this

great camp called Terezin, but behind the scenes they were killing people, and shipping them out.” Nearly 200,000 men, women and children passed through the gates of Terezin, according to www .jewishvirtuallibrary.org. At least some sent to the camp used their time there to create poetry, art and more. The site puts the number of drawings discovered at Terezin at 6,000. When the camp was liberated, “they found all of these artistic artifacts there, poems, a symphony,” Schor said. Continued next page

If you go What: “And a Child Shall Lead” When: Opens tonight at 7 p.m., with performances at 7 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays, through April 22 Where: 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend Cost: $15, $10 for ages 18 and younger, available at www .beattickets.org Contact: www.beatonline.org or 541-419-5558


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

From previous page “They had art classes, they had an underground newspaper. It was kind of a hotbed of culture because all these artists and intellectuals were there before they shipped them out. … It was kind of this weird thing where they were doing all this artwork, and then they were gone.” Slade gained permission from the Czech government to visit archives, resulting in “And a Child Shall Lead.” The play strings together stirring moments in which children are torn from their families and forced into one of the 20th century’s cruelest moments. They perform acts that serve as a testament to their humanity, defying their captors by stealing paper, along with moments to express and educate themselves, before they can be taken away by train, illness or bullet. The children defy their captors further by producing an underground newspaper — a deed punishable by death if they’re caught. According to the play’s publisher, Playscripts Inc.,

My Own Two Hands event starts today My Own Two Hands, a twoday celebration of the arts in Sisters, begins today. During the Art Stroll from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m., 26 businesses will display paintings, ceramics, sculpture, woodworking and other media. A Community Parade will get afloat at 4 p.m. It features “parade-able art” by students and community members, according to a press release for the event. The parade, whose theme is “Lookin’ Up,” takes place along South Pine Street and Hood Avenue. FivePine Conference Center, 1021 Desperado Trail, will host the Performing Arts Evening from 6:30 to 9:30 tonight, with performances by singers from Sisters High School and students participating in the Americana Project. Admission is $5, $10 if you want your music with a plate from the pasta bar Three Creeks Brewing Co. will be hosting. It all culminates with the My Own Two Hands Art Auction

fine arts

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Riley Gibson, left, and Marley Forest star as Miraslov and Eva in Bend Experimental Art Theatre’s production of “And a Child Shall Lead.”

Slade wrote it in such a manner that productions can use anywhere from 8 to 30 actors ages 7 to 18 in the play, which features a low-key barracks set dominated by a pair of bunk beds. BEAT previously put on a production of “And a Child Shall Lead” as its first production in 2006. This time around, Bend filmmaker Skip Clark is shooting a doc-

and Party from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday at Ponderosa Forge & Ironworks, 207 W. Sisters Park Drive, with catered food, beer, wine and music by Portland’s Three Leg Torso. Tickets for the auction and party are $55. Contact: www.sistersfolk festival.org or 541-549-4979.

Take a peek down the ‘Rabbit Hole’ At 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Cascades Theatrical Company will hold a preview of its next production, the drama “Rabbit Hole,” by David Lindsay-Abaire, the same playwright whose “Fuddy Meers” kicked off CTC’s season in September. New York Times critic Ben Brantley wrote in a 2006 review of “Rabbit Hole”: “The wrenching new play … inspires such copious weeping among its audience that you wonder early on if you should have taken a life jacket.” However, if you’re one of those crying-averse types, Brantley went on to say in his positive review that there’s humorous material, too.

umentary about the play, including footage of Holocaust survivor Hans Biglajzer’s two-hour visit with the cast after a recent rehearsal. As for having two separate productions of the same play, BEAT’s Schor explained: “We never turn away any actors, and so we had so many actors that wanted to do it that we’re doing it this week and again in May.”

Admission is $10. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Greenwood Playhouse is located at 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., in Bend. Contact: www.cascades theatrical.org or 541-389-0803.

‘Wine Country Quilts’ exhibit at Pronghorn Fine art and fine wine will converge at Pronghorn Resort starting Tuesday, when up goes an exhibit of artist Alice Van Leunen’s woven paper images of Oregon wine labels. Van Leunen’s “Wine Country Quilts” show features mixed-media paper works based on traditional log cabin quilts. The artist weaves the paper in a waffle weave pattern similar to the pieced fabric of log cabin quilts. The exhibit displays until June 5 at the Pronghorn Clubhouse, 65600 Pronghorn Club Drive. The resort invites the public to visit the exhibition during clubhouse hours of 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Contact: 541-693-5300. —David Jasper

GO! MAGAZINE •

That production is being directed by Denice Lewis and will be staged at Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave,. with performances at 7 p.m. May 1012 and 2 p.m. May 13. (BEAT recommends the play for audiences ages 10 and older.) At the play’s start in 1942, we hear laughter and the shuffle of feet as the children enter the barracks. They play a game of tag, but any semblance of childhood normalcy is soon derailed as a train arrives bearing more souls. One of the most poignant moments comes when the children introduce themselves by reciting their name, age and barrack numbers. The new arrivals are just as tragic as they give the location of their former homes. Inside the barracks, we see the day to day interactions of the children as their ranks swell and relationships form. The main four are motherly Eva, played by Marley Forest, pragmatic Miraslov (Riley Gibson), along with Pavel (Sandro Ditta) and Gabrielle (Sonya Arnis). The decision is made to

“It’s quite — this may be the wrong word — entertaining in the way they set up these kids and what they do.” — Howard Schor, executive director of BEAT

continue their education as well as create an underground newspaper, which sparks disagreement within the barrack. In the end, telling the truth of their circumstances, even if it’s only read by other prisoners, outweighs the risks. “It’s quite — this may be the wrong word — entertaining in the way they set up these kids and what they do,” Schor said of the play’s structure. On the whole, their actions are “almost like a Martin Luther King thing, in a way. Passive resistance. What they could do to keep their dignity.” — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com

CONTEMPORARY | WHIMSICAL | INSPIRING | COLLECTIBLE

MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY 869 NW WALL ST. 541-388-2107

www.mockingbird-gallery.com

KAREN BANDY DESIGN JEWELER 25 NW MINNESOTA AVE. #5 541-388-0155

www.karenbandy.com

SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING & GALLERY 834 NW BROOKS ST. 541-382-5884

www.sageframing-gallery.com RED CHAIR GALLERY 103 NW OREGON AVE. 541-306-3176

www.redchairgallerybend.com

www.downtownbend.org

PAGE 13


PAGE 14 • GO! MAGAZINE

fine arts

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

ART EXHIBITS

When You Give To The Red Cross, You Help Our Community.

www.mountainriver.redcross.org

ALLEDA REAL ESTATE: Featuring acrylics by David Kinker; through April; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 1, Bend; 541-633-7590. AMBIANCE ART CO-OP: Featuring gallery artists; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ART BY KNIGHT: Featuring oil paintings by Laurel Knight and bronze sculpture by Steven L. Knight; 236 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-633-7488 or www. ArtbyKnight.com. ARTISTS’ GALLERY SUNRIVER: Featuring works by Kim Jones, Susan Harkness-Williams, Pat Cross and Carolyn Waissman; through April, reception from 4-7 p.m. Saturday; 57100 Beaver Drive, Building 19; 541-593-4382 or www. artistsgallerysunriver.com. ATELIER 6000: Featuring “Upcycled Art”; through April; 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759 or www.atelier6000. com. BEND CITY HALL: Featuring “INSIDE::OUT” works exploring how Bend’s external environment inspires its internal environment; through Sept. 28; 710 N.W. Wall St.; 541-388-5505. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www. canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. CLEARWATER GALLERY: Featuring “Reflection on Earth and Sky,” works by Elizabeth Ganji; reception from 4:30-7 tonight; 391 W Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-4994.

Submitted photo

“The Sisters from Indian Ford Meadow,” by Nancy Misek, will be on display through April 28 at Sage Custom Framing and Gallery. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-1299 or www.donterra.com. DOWNTOWN BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Serenity”; through April; 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “Art in the Atrium,” works by Christian Heeb, Rick Samco and gallery artists; through April 29; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. FURNISH.: Featuring works by Marjorie Wood Hamlin; 761 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-617-8911.

A Sustainable Cup Drink it up! • Fair trade coffee makes a thoughtful gift • Convenient before or after the mountain • Supporting many of your favorite non-proits

Oregon Mountain River Chapter

• 2 great locations! www.strictlyorganic.com Café & Roastery– 6 SW Bond @ Arizona Coffee Bar – 450 Powerhouse Dr. @ the Old Mill

THE GALLERY AT THE PINCKNEY CENTER: Featuring works from the collection of Bill Rhoades; through April 27; Pinckney Center for the Arts, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-5498683 or www.art-lorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HELPING YOU TAX AND ACCOUNTING: Featuring paintings by Carol Armstrong; 632 S.W. Sixth St., Suite 2, Redmond; 541-504-5422. HOME FEDERAL BANK: Featuring works by Gretchen VanOsdol Pennington and Carol Jacquet; through April; 821 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-9977. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www. jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jill Haney-Neal; 20512 Nels Anderson Place, Building 3, Bend; 541-6176078 or www.jillnealgallery.com. JUDI’S ART GALLERY: Featuring works by Judi Meusborn Williamson; 336 N.E. Hemlock St.,

Suite 13, Redmond; 360-325-6230. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson, Katherine Taylor, Donna Young and more; 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-3884404 or www.lahainagalleries.com. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring photography by Michael C. Jensen; through May 24; 16425 First St.; 541-312-1090. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com. MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “Here and There”; through April; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www.mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixedmedia collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. NANCY P’S BAKING COMPANY: Featuring oil paintings by John O’Brien; through May; 1054 N.W. Milwaukee Ave., Bend; 541-322-8778. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring

photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St.; 541-382-6694. PRONGHORN CLUBHOUSE: Featuring woven paper images by Alice Van Leunen; through June 5; 65600 Pronghorn Club Drive, Bend; 541-382-9398. QUILTWORKS: Featuring quilts from the 2012 A Novel Idea … Read Together program; through May 3; 926 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Suite B, Bend; 541-728-0527. RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring “Emerging Artists,” works by Bend, Mountain View and Sisters high school students; through April; 103 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-3063176 or www.redchairgallerybend. com. ROTUNDA GALLERY: Featuring “Visual Apothecary,” works by Valerie Winterholler; through May 11; Robert L. Barber Library, Central Oregon Community College; 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7564. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: Featuring “Expressions,” works by Vickie Grive Levis; through May 28, reception from 3-6 p.m. Saturday; 117 S.W. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-617-0900. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring pastels by Nancy Misek; through April 28; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: Featuring fiber art by Rosalyn Kliot; 291 E. Main Ave.; 541-549-0251. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave.; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring images from the Sisters Area Photography Club; through April 29; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar Ave.; 541-312-1070. ST. CHARLES REDMOND: Featuring works by the High Desert Art League; through April 26; 1253 N.W. Canal Blvd.; 541-617-8623. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Pottery and Pastels,” works by Ceci Capen and Barbara Bailey; through April 28; 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring works by Michael Kelly, Ann Ruttan and gallery artists; through April; 17600 Center Drive; 541-382-9398. THUMP COFFEE: Featuring works by Audrey Colker and Robert Johans; through April; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-0226. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring “Natura,” works by Susan Luckey Higdon and Danae Bennett Miller; through April; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-3859144 or www.tumaloartco.com.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

PAGE 15

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Trout Creek Trail

Hidden Forest Cave

T

he Trout Creek Trail — a rails-to-trails conversion along the Deschutes River south

of Warm Springs — offers a spacious, pretty hike that is often dry even when other areas of Central Oregon are covered in snow. — Bulletin staff

Trout Creek Recreation Area Campground WARM SPRINGS INDIAN RESERVATION

Coleman Rd. Trout Creek

h ut e

Trail iver sR

Bridge

Gateway

26 D e s c

Clemens Dr.

Cook Lane

Clark Dr.

Warm Mecca Rd. Buckley Lane Springs

David Jasper / The Bulletin file photo

26

The view looking out of Hidden Forest Cave’s mouth. The cave is small, but its high ceiling gives it a cathedral-like feel.

97

Cora Dr.

Madras

J

97

and nearby Arnold Ice caves provide a

Leave the icebox that is Arnold to the experts, but Hidden Forest is accessible to the average spelunker. Don’t forget the

BEND

20

18 China Hat

Road

Horse Butte

Deschutes Redmond Bend County

1815

Deschutes National Forest

1810

Boyd Cave

La Pine

1819

Greg Cross G C / The h B Bulletin ll

Arnold Ice Cave 200 18 1820

Getting there: From Knott Road in Bend, take China Hat Road southeast 11.1 miles and turn right onto Forest Road 300. (Note: There’s an unsigned road shortly before

Crook County

Sunriver

Skeleton Cave

Hidden Forest Cave 300 that you’ll think you should turn on, but don’t do it). The trailhead is a half-mile ahead at the end of the road. Difficulty: Moderate Cost: Free Contact: Deschutes National Forest, 541-383-5300

Madras

Camp Sherman Prineville Sisters

— Bulletin staff

If you go

Area of detail

Jefferson County

9711

flashlights and batteries.

Getting there: From Madras, head north on U.S. Highway 97 for 3.5 miles. Turn left onto Cora Drive, and continued onto Clark Drive and Bulkley Lane for 8.3 miles to Gateway. Turn right onto Clemens Drive and follow five miles to the Trout Creek Recreation Area. The trail starts at the western end at the day-use area. Difficulty: Easy Cost: Free Contact: Bureau of Land Management, Prineville District Office, 541-416-6700

97 26

ust minutes from Bend, Hidden Forest

double whammy of adventure and history.

If you go

9710

NOW ! OPEN

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

2115 NE HWY 20 B E N D

5 4 1- 6 7 8- 5 6 9 9


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 2012 • FRID THE13, BULLETIN

event calendar a TODAY SPRING RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2012 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. MY OWN TWO HANDS: Art event, themed “Lookin’ Up,” features a parade and art stroll, and a performing arts evening at FivePine Lodge & Conference Center; proceeds benefit the Sisters Americana Project; free, $5 for performing arts evening; 4 p.m. parade, 6:30 p.m. arts evening; downtown Sisters; 541-5494979, info@sistersfolkfestival.org or www. sistersfolkfestival.org. (Story, Page 13) BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, music and wine samples; free; 6-9 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; www.c3events.com or www.nwxevents.com. (Story, Page 20) “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of children held in a concentration camp; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www. beattickets.org. (Story, Page 12) “FAIRYTALE”: A screening of the film about a Norwegian songwriter and performer; donations accepted; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, 549 N.W. Harmon Blvd., Bend; 541-382-4333. “GASLAND”: A screening of the 2010 PGrated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “WAITING FOR GODOT”: Innovation Theatre Works presents Beckett’s play about two people waiting endlessly for Godot; $20, $18 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www. innovationtw.org. JAZZ AT THE OXFORD: Featuring a performance by the Michael Allen Harrison Superband; $30 plus fees in advance; 8 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436 or www. oxfordhotelbend.com. SASSPARILLA: The Portland-based blues band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. MATT HOPPER: The Boise, Idaho-based psychedelic rocker performs, with Matt Lewis; $7 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-2558 or www.p44p.biz. (Story, Page 6)

ROACH GIGZ: The Bay Area-based hiphop artist performs, with Berner, Clyde Carson, Nima Fadavi, Young Shotty and Isaiah Valentino; $12 plus fees in advance, $15 day of show; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www. randompresents.com. (Story, Page 6)

SATURDAY April 14 FLEA MARKET FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the grange; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Terrebonne Grange Hall, 8286 11th St.; 541-788-0865 or myrna@ threecreekscomputing.com. GARDEN WORK PARTY: Clean and prepare the center’s learning garden in preparation for spring planting; free; 9 a.m.-noon; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-385-6908, denise@ envirocenter.org or www.envirocenter.org. SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; $5, $4 with a trade gun, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-6237. SPRING RV SHOW AND SALE: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. at Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center; see Today’s listing for details. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LA TRAVIATA”: Starring Natalie Dessay, Matthew Polenzani and Dmitri Hvorostovsky in a presentation of Verdi’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 9:55 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and a street chalk art competition; free; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; www.c3events.com or www. nwxevents.com. SOLAR VIEWING: View the sun using safe techniques; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER FESTIVAL: With food, dancing, music and crafts; free; 1-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7592. A NOVEL IDEA KICKOFF: An overview of events in the 2012 A Novel Idea … Read Together program; with a presentation by Stacey Donohue and a quilt exhibit;

free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. JAZZ AT THE OXFORD: 5 and 8 p.m. at The Oxford Hotel; see Today’s listing for details. VFW DINNER: A dinner of turkey sandwiches; $7; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. BEND GAME NIGHT: Play available board games or bring your own; free; 6 p.m.midnight; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-318-8459. COSA SONG OF THE YEAR SHOW: The Central Oregon Songwriters Association presents its annual show, with live performances including The Dream Symphony; $5; 6 p.m.; The Sound Garden, 1279 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-420-2949. MY OWN TWO HANDS: An art auction and party with a performance by 3 Leg Torso; proceeds benefit the Sisters Americana Project; $55; 6-9 p.m.; Ponderosa Forge & Iron Works, 207 W. Sisters Park Drive, Sisters; 541-549-4979, info@sistersfolkfestival.org or www. sistersfolkfestival.org. SONGS FROM THE PAST: Featuring a performance by Glenda and Friends; proceeds benefit Bethlehem Inn; $6 or $10 per couple, $1 less with donation of nonperishable food item or hygiene supply; 6-10 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-322-8768 or www.bethleheminn.org. “THE LOGGER’S DAUGHTER”: A screening of the film about an African American woman born in Eastern Oregon who sets out to explore her family’s past; $5, $3 for members; 6:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. 241, aarbow@highdesertmuseum.org or www. highdesertmuseum.org. “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD”: 7 p.m. at 2nd Street Theater; see Today’s listing for details. “THE FAT BOY CHRONICLES”: A screening of the film about a young obese boy who is bullied; free; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “URBAN JUNGLE” FASHION SHOW: Highschool students present fashions from local retailers; with a silent auction; event will take place behind the school on Alden Avenue; proceeds benefit the school’s DECA chapter; $10, $5 students, $15 VIP; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; www.bend.k12.or.us/bsh. “WAITING FOR GODOT”: 7:30 p.m. at Innovation Theatre Works; see Today’s listing for details.

D ON’T MISS ... TODAY THRU SUNDAY Bend Spring Festival: A festival for those unsure of where or when they are.

MY OWN TWO HANDS TODAY & SATURDAY Our two hands aren’t particularly artistic or musical. But we make some pretty fantastic shadow puppets with them. Look … it’s a duck! Students celebrate at the 2010 parade. Submi t t ed photo

SATURDAY Asian/Pacific Islander Festival: Or the Festival of Places You Wish You Lived.

SATURDAY A Novel Idea Kickoff: Now with quilts, to dispel the novel’s stodgy reputation.

SATURDAY ‘The Logger’s Daughter’: Spoiler! It’s a remake of “The Lumberman’s Girl-child.”

SATURDAY ‘Urban Jungle’ Fashion Show: Expect camouflage. And gum stuck to shoes.

THURSDAY Last Band Standing: Or sitting, if you’re the drummer.

BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller James Hutson and music by Hands4; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. TRIAGE: The comedy improvisational troupe performs; $5; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803. HOPELESS JACK & THE HANDSOME DEVIL: The Portland-based blues band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned

Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. THE AN APPLE A DAY TOUR: Featuring hip-hop performances by DJ Ganzobean, Pat Maine, MC Pigpen and Oso Negro; free; 9 p.m.; JC’s Bar & Grill, 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-383-3000 or www.reverbnation.com/show/7161721. BASIN & RANGE: The Eugene-based electronica band performs, with DJ Harlo; $3; 10 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116 or www. astroloungebend.com. (Story, Page 6)


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE13, BULLETIN DAY, APRIL 2012 • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

april 13-19

LIVE MUSIC & MORE See Going Out on Page 8 for what’s happening at local night spots.

MONDAY April 16 “JAZZ — SWING, THE VELOCITY OF CELEBRATION”: A screening of the Ken Burns documentary film about jazz musicians of the 1930s; free; 3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. THE WHITE BUFFALO: The folk singer performs, with Shireen Amini and Kylan Johnson; $12 plus fees in advance, $15 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents. com. (Story, Page 6)

TUESDAY April 17 “DESCHUTES COUNTY RECORDS ONLINE”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Jeff Sageser; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb. org/deschutes/bend-gs. BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “The Rules of Civility” by Amor Towles; free; 10 a.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3760 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. VFW DINNER: A dinner of cheeseburgers; $5, free ages 5 and younger; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. TODD SNIDER: The subversive singersongwriter performs, with Ashleigh Flynn; $28.25 or $39.50, plus fees; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. (Story, Page 3)

WEDNESDAY April 18

SUNDAY April 15 SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; $5, $4 with a trade gun, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-6237. SPRING RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2012 models; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800

S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; www.c3events. com or www.nwxevents.com. “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD”: 2 p.m. at 2nd Street Theater; see Today’s listing for details. “WAITING FOR GODOT”: 2 p.m. at Innovation Theatre Works; see Today’s listing for details. SECOND SUNDAY: Local poets and writers

PAGE 17

read from a selection of works from New York poets of the 1930s; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “THE POWER OF TWO”: A screening of the documentary about twins afflicted with cystic fibrosis; proceeds benefit Donate Life Northwest and Cystic Fibrosis Research Institute; $15; 4-7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-788-0312, sadougherty@ bendbroadband.com or www. thepoweroftwomovie.com.

“JAZZ — SWING, THE VELOCITY OF CELEBRATION”: A screening of the Ken Burns documentary film about jazz musicians of the 1930s; free; 2 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. THE INDIAN WAR ERA IN EASTERN OREGON: Paul Patton talks about “Five Crows and The Cayuse War 1847-1855”; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663 or ruthh@uoregon.edu. “WAITING FOR GODOT”: 7:30 p.m. at Innovation Theatre Works; see Today’s listing for details.

ONWARD, ETC.: Folk music from Alaska; $5 suggested donation; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www. reverbnation.com/venue/thehornedhand.

THURSDAY April 19 BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “The Rules of Civility” by Amor Towles; free; noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-536-0515 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. TAKE BACK THE NIGHT: Climb to the top of the butte in support of sexual-assault survivors; free; 6 p.m.; Pilot Butte State Park, Northeast Pilot Butte Summit Drive, Bend; 541-382-9227 or lauren@savinggrace.org. “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD”: 7 p.m. at 2nd Street Theater; see Today’s listing for details. “THE GRATEFUL DEAD MEET-UP AT THE MOVIES”: A screening of the 1989 concert at the Alpine Valley Music Theatre; $12.50; 7 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541382-6347 or www.fathomevents.com. UO MUSIC FESTIVAL: Featuring Dean Kramer and Claire Wachter playing duo piano music; free; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “RABBIT HOLE”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of a drama about a family navigating feelings of grief after a terrible accident; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. (Story, Page 13) “WAITING FOR GODOT”: 7:30 p.m. at Innovation Theatre Works; see Today’s listing for details. COMEDY NIGHT: Mike Walley Walter and Lynn Ruth Miller perform; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www. lastbandstanding.net. (Story, Page 4) THE DIG: Indie pop-rock from New York City, with The We Shared Milk and My Autumn’s Done Come; 8 p.m.; $5; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. n SUBMIT AN EVENT at www.bendbulletin. com/submitinfo or email events@bendbulletin.com. Deadline is 10 days before publication. Questions? Contact 541-383-0351.


PAGE 18 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

planning ahead benefit CASA; $30 or $20 for the 10K and 5K races, $10 for the 1K; 9 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-389-1618 or www. casaofcentraloregon.org. APRIL 22 — THE SOCIAL DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHS OF WALKER EVANS: Matthew Johnston examines how written texts made Evans’ photographs effective for social change; free; 1 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. APRIL 22 — MONEY ENOUGH FOR A MARTINI AN HOUR: Jamie Bufalino talks about women, work and leisure in 1930s New York; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

APRIL 20-26 APRIL 20-22 — “AND A CHILD SHALL LEAD”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of children held in a ghetto; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m. April 20-21, 2 p.m. April 22; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; www.beattickets.org. APRIL 20-22, 25-26 — “RABBIT HOLE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a drama about a family navigating feelings of grief after a terrible accident; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m. April 20-21 and 25-26, 2 p.m. April 22; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. APRIL 20-22 — “WAITING FOR GODOT”: Innovation Theatre Works presents Beckett’s play about two people waiting endlessly for Godot; $20, $18 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m. April 20-21, 2 p.m. April 22; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www. innovationtw.org. APRIL 20-21 — CENTRAL OREGON MASTERSINGERS: The choir presents “Choralscapes,” under the direction of Clyde Thompson; $15; 7:30 p.m.; Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541-385-7229 or www.comastersingers.com. APRIL 20-21 — HOT TEA COLD: The Portland-based classic rock act performs; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. APRIL 20 — WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD PARADE AND FUN IN THE PARK: Parade begins and ends in the park; with children’s activities, music and more; free; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets, Madras; 541-325-5040. APRIL 20 — CHILDREN’S ART WALK: Art from students in the Redmond School District is displayed in participating businesses; free; 4-8 p.m.; downtown Redmond; redmondartwalk@gmail.com. APRIL 20 — IMAGINE YOURSELF ON MUSIC: Featuring performances by Tipper, Papadosio, Govinda and more; $20 in advance, $25-$30 at the door; 4 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.slipmatscience.com. APRIL 20 — EAT, PLAY, LOVE!: Familyfriendly event with dinner, live music and activities; free; 4:30-7 p.m.; Ensworth Elementary School, 2150 N.E. Daggett Lane, Bend; 541-383-5958 or www. kidscenter.org. APRIL 20 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jackie Hooper talks about her book “The Things You Would Have Said: The Chance to Say What You Always Wanted Them to Know”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866.

APRIL 23 — “JAZZ — SWING, THE VELOCITY OF CELEBRATION”: A screening of the Ken Burns documentary film about jazz musicians of the 1930s; free; 10 a.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-536-0515 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. Submitted photo

The Thoughts will perform April 20 at The Horned Hand in Bend. APRIL 20 — “BLIND MOUNTAIN”: A screening of the 2007 unrated Chinese film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. APRIL 20 — THE THOUGHTS: The Seattle-based indie-rock band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. APRIL 20 — YONDER MOUNTAIN STRING BAND: The newgrass band performs, with Brown Bird; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541788-2989 or www.randompresents. com. APRIL 21 — BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY SPRING SEMINAR: Dick Eastman presents four seminars on genealogy and computer topics; with breakfast and lunch; registration required; $70 or $60 members before April 13, $80 after; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-317-9553 or www. orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. APRIL 21 — GARDEN PARTY: Learn about local food, community gardens, lot reclamation and more; with local food, live music and more; free; 9 a.m.2:30 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 S.E. Brosterhous Road, Bend; sameeves@yahoo.com. APRIL 21 — REDMOND EARTH DAY

FAIR: Featuring booths, volunteer projects, live music, craft and costume making, a recycled-costume parade and more; proceeds benefit the Redmond Parks Foundation; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way; info@redmondearthday. com or www.redmondearthday.com. APRIL 21 — EARTH DAY FAIR AND PARADE: Includes interactive activities, art, live music, a bike rodeo and more; the costumed parade through downtown Bend, featuring costumes connected to the natural world, will kick off festivities; free; 11 a.m.-3 p.m., 10:30 a.m. parade staging; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-385-6908, ext. 15 or www.envirocenter.org. APRIL 21 — “JAZZ — SWING, THE VELOCITY OF CELEBRATION”: A screening of the Ken Burns documentary film about jazz musicians of the 1930s; free; 2 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3760 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. APRIL 21 — WILLIAM STAFFORD POETRY READING: Central Oregon poets read their own and Stafford’s poetry; free; 2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road, Madras; 541475-5390 or ramseyjarold@yahoo.com. APRIL 21 — MONEY ENOUGH FOR A MARTINI AN HOUR: Jamie Bufalino talks about women, work and leisure in 1930s New York; free; 3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.;

541-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. APRIL 21 — THE SOCIAL DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHS OF WALKER EVANS: Matthew Johnston examines how written texts made Evans’ photographs effective for social change; free; 3 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7040 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. APRIL 21 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jackie Hooper talks about her book “The Things You Would Have Said: The Chance to Say What You Always Wanted Them to Know”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. APRIL 21 — PRS REDMOND INVITATIONAL: The Professional Roughstock Series presents a rodeo with bareback, bronc and bull riding; $13 in advance, $17 at the gate; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way; www.prstickets.com. APRIL 21 — JASON & THE PUNKNECKS: The Nashville, Tenn.based country punk band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. APRIL 22 — LIGHT OF HOPE: Court Appointed Special Advocates of Central Oregon hosts a 10K, 5K and 1K run/ walk; registration required; proceeds

APRIL 24 — BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “The Rules of Civility” by Amor Towles; free; 2 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. APRIL 24 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jane Kirkpatrick talks about her book “Where Lilacs Still Bloom”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. APRIL 24 — THE AMERICAN DREAM?: Joel Clements talks about “The Great Gatsby,” the construction of identity and the American Dream; free; 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. APRIL 24 — HISTORY PUB: Bob Boyd talks about “Buckaroos of the High Desert”; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. APRIL 25 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jane Kirkpatrick talks about her book “Where Lilacs Still Bloom”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. APRIL 25 — BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “The Rules of Civility” by Amor Towles; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-617-7089 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. APRIL 26 — CONVERSATIONS ON BOOKS AND CULTURE: Read and discuss “The Complete Persepolis” by Marjane Satrapi; followed by a film screening and discussion; free; noon, film at 4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7412.


planning ahead

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

APRIL 26 — THE AMERICAN DREAM?: Joel Clements talks about “The Great Gatsby,” the construction of identity and the American Dream; free; 6:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-3121032 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. APRIL 26 — SIMA SAMAR: The Nobel Peace Prize nominee and Afghan human rights pioneer presents “The Question of Afghanistan”; $15 or $25; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700, kaylward@ cocc.edu or www.towertheatre.org. APRIL 26 — COMEDY NIGHT: Vince Valenzuela and Russell Parker perform; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520.

APRIL 27-MAY 3 APRIL 27-28 — ART ON THE RIVER: Featuring art sales and more; a portion of proceeds benefits the Redmond School District art programs; free; 5-8 p.m. April 27, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. April 28; River Run Event Center, 1730 Blue Heron Drive, Redmond; 541548-4244 or mhlkeldy@yahoo. com. APRIL 27-28 — “THE WIZARD OF OZ”: The Trinity Lutheran drama department presents a musical about Dorothy, Toto and their adventures in the land of Oz; $10, $5 students, $25 VIP; 7 p.m. April 27, 2 p.m. April 28; Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 541-382-1832 or jon.vevia@ saints.org. APRIL 27-29, MAY 2-3 — “RABBIT HOLE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a drama about a family navigating feelings of grief after a terrible

Talks & classes ART OF WALDORF: Learn simple art techniques; $20; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday; Waldorf School of Bend, 19888 Rocking Horse Road; 541-330-8841. MILONGA TANGAZO: Learn tango dancing, followed by a social dance; no partner required; $7; 7:30 p.m. Saturday; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; www.bendtango.com. WOMEN’S DRUM GATHERINGS: Explore playful, educational and sacred drumming modes; $5 requested donation per class; 4:30-5:30 p.m. Mondays in April; Center for Compassionate Living, 828 N.W. Hill St., Bend; shireen.amini@gmail.com. TANGO CLASSES: Learn fundamentals, or work on musicality and improvisation; free; 6 p.m. beginners, 7:30 p.m. intermediate; Tuesdays, April 17-May 22; register for Bend location; bendtango@gmail.com or 541-330-4071. BIO-CONTROL TALK: Eric Coombs talks about the introduction of natural enemies to combat invasive species; $3, free for members; 6 p.m. Tuesday; High Desert Museum, accident; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m. April 27-28 and May 2-3, 2 p.m. April 29; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical. org. APRIL 27 — HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS: The skilled basketball team presents a game full of tricks, jokes and antics; $19-$64 plus fees; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 800-745-3000 or www. harlemglobetrotters.com. APRIL 27 — CALIFORNIA GUITAR TRIO AND MONTREAL GUITAR TRIO: Two virtuoso guitar groups perform separately and with each other; $25 or $30; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.

GO! MAGAZINE •

59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; aarbow@ highdesertmuseum.org or 541-382-4754, ext. 241, to RSVP. INTRODUCTION TO STROBE LIGHTING AND STUDIO PORTRAITURE: Learn how lights work and how to use lighting; registration required; $59; 6 p.m. Wednesday; Cascade Center of Photography, 390 S.W. Columbia St., Suite 110, Bend; welcome@ccphoto.com or 541-241-2266. BIRDERS NIGHT: Matt Orr talks about habitat restoration for white-headed woodpeckers; free; 6:30 p.m. Thursday; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; www. ecbcbirds.org. THOREAU WORKED AT WALDEN?: William Rossi talks about why Walden is well-known but little-read; free; 6:30 p.m. Thursday at East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 1 p.m. April 20 at Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; www.deschuteslibrary. org or 541-312-1032. NONPROFIT GRANT WRITING: Learn to select grant opportunities and write successful applications; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. April 20 at Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 9

towertheatre.org. APRIL 28 — BENDING RULES: A TEDx event featuring 12 people presenting local and international perspectives to inspire and spark conversations; registration recommended; $55; noon; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; www. tedxbend.com. APRIL 28 — CENTRAL OREGON FILM FESTIVAL: A screening of one- to 15-minute films made by Central Oregonians; free; 6 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; filmfestival@ localcentraloregon.com or www. localcentraloregon.com. MAY 1 — VOLUNTEER FAIR: Speak with nonprofit representatives and find a volunteer opportunity that fits

a.m.-noon May 18 and 25 at Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; http://noncredit.cocc.edu or 541-3837270 to register. BICYCLE MAINTENANCE & REPAIR: Cyclists learn to tackle common repair problems; registration required by April 20; $49; 6:30-9 p.m. Wednesdays, April 25-May 16; Central Oregon Community College, Mazama Gymnasium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; http://noncredit.cocc.edu or 541-383-7270. AVOIDING THE SLUSH PILE: Learn editing tips to make your manuscript more marketable; bring pages for review; $15, $10 for Central Oregon Writers Guild members; 9:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. April 21; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop; www.centraloregonwritersguild.com or 541 408-6306. WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE TALK: Annemarie Hamlin talks about how American writers represented women prior to the 19th Amendment; registration required by Wednesday; $5 or $13; 9:30 a.m.-noon April 21; Touchmark, 19800 SW Touchmark Way, Bend; bendaauw@officeliveusers.com.

your needs; free; 4-7 p.m.; Sisters Area Chamber of Commerce, 291 E. Main Ave.; 541-385-8977 or www.volunteerconnectnow.org. MAY 2 — “IT’S IN THE BAG” LECTURE SERIES: Christine Pollard presents the lecture “Exercise and Sports Science:

Non-Contact ACL, Knee Injury in the Female Athlete”; free; noon-1 p.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541322-3100, info@osucasades. edu or www.osucascades. edu/lunchtime-lectures.

Buy One Entree, Get the Second for 1/2 off There’s No Place Like The Neighborhood™

$

5

BURGER NIGHT Sun & Mon 5pm-Close

Coupon Expires 4/21/12 Available only at Bend and Redmond locations.

Bend 541-318-5720 • Redmond 541-923-4777

*off equal or lesser value, not valid on 2 for $20

FREE KIDS MEAL!! One Free Kids Meal, per Adult Entree with this coupon.

PAGE 19


PAGE 20 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

events If you go What: Bend Spring Festival When: 6-9 tonight, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday Where: Northwest Crossing Drive near Mt. Washington Drive roundabout, Bend; see area map below for street closures Cost: Free Contact: www.c3events.com or www.nwxevents.com

Music schedule SATURDAY

Hello spring!

11 a.m. — Chris Barron of the Spin Doctors (acoustic) 1 p.m. — 2nd Hand Soldiers (reggae) 2:30 p.m. — Katt and Roots Revolution (reggae) 4:30 p.m. — Diego’s Umbrella (gypsy-rock) 6:30 p.m. — Necktie Killer (ska) 8 p.m. — Fire and aerial show by The Spinsterz 8:30 p.m. — Todd Haaby and Sola Via (nuevo flamenco)

SUNDAY R y an Brennecke / The Bulletin file photo

Holden K o rish and his sister Ari Korish lean in to take a closer look at what Tina Myers, aka “Silly Lilly” was painting on the face of Mac Hamlin at the 2010 Bend Spring Festival.

• Bend Spring Festival takes over part of NorthWest Crossing By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

S

N.W. Crossing Dr. John Fremont St. Fort Clatsop St. n Dr. shingto

— Reporter: 541-383-0377, bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

Streets closed Sections of Northwest Crossing Drive and Fort Clatsop Street will be closed from 10 tonight to 2 a.m. Monday.

Mt. Wa

pring is in the air in Central Oregon, and any time a new season rolls around, you just know someone, somewhere will be ready to throw a festival and celebrate. This weekend, that somewhere is NorthWest Crossing, where the Bend Spring Festival will take over the neighborhood’s main retail corridor and fill it with art, food, wine, live music, bikes, vendors, a play area for kids and more. The festivities begin tonight with the Cascade School of Music Art and Wine Bop, which will feature festival artists and live music by friends and faculty of the school, plus wine tastings by participating merchants. For folks looking to drop their kids before they bop, Mama Bear Oden’s Preschool (www .mamabearodenspreschool.com) will provide free child care for ages 3-10.

On Saturday and Sunday, the full festival gets under way. Here are some of the highlights: • Street Chalk Art Competition and Exhibition. Building on last year’s competition, which had more than 100 participants, this year’s contest will run from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. There will be free spaces and chalk for sidewalk artists who want to enter, and six cash prizes awarded for kids and adults. Four luminary exhibition artists, including two from Bend, will also chalk their creations Saturday. • Cycle/Recycle. The theme for the weekend will celebrate Bend’s bike culture and local people who make art and clothing from repurposed materials. The Bend Endurance Academy will host a Bike Rodeo for kids, Bend Velo will hold simulated head-to-head 400-meter sprints at its booth, and a bunch of artists will feature

repurposed materials with cycling themes. Plus, organizer C3 Events will bring in expanded bike racks. • Souk de Spring Festival Block. An openair market featuring food, clothing and other goods from around the world. • Fine Artists Promenade. More than 50 fine artists from around Oregon will gather on Northwest Crossing Drive, featuring sculpture, jewelry, soaps, rugs, photography and more. • Children’s Area. Including stilt walking, arts and crafts workshops, high tea with the Spring Fairy, yoga for kids (register at sarah@c3events.com), face painting, bouncy playthings, rock-climbing wall, petting zoo and pony rides, a performance stage featuring drummers, a play, dance, rock music and more. For more information, visit www.c3events .com and click on Bend Spring Festival, or visit www.nwxevents.com.

11 a.m. — Five Pint Mary (Celtic rock) 1 p.m. — Abigail Nyman (folk) 3 p.m. — The Oxfords (rock)

Sk

ers ylin

. Rd

BEND

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

PAGE 21

out of town The following is a list of other events “Out of Town.”

CONCERTS

Count Vronsky (Michael Sharon) and An n a (Katy Selverstone) share a stolen moment in Portland Center Stage’s production of “Anna Karenina” by Kevin McKeon, adapted from the novel by Leo Tolstoy. Courtesy Patrick Weishampel

TRAGIC LOVE • ‘Anna Karenina’ play adaptation comes to Portland theater By Jenny Wasson The Bulletin

A

s a director, actor and adaptor at Seattle’s Book-It Repertory Theatre, Kevin McKeon has made a living bringing the page to stage. His adaptations include “A Tale of Two Cities” and the critically acclaimed “Snow Falling on Cedars.” Now, with the help of Portland Center Stage, he has turned his attention to Leo Tolstoy’s tragic love story, “Anna Karenina.” Developed during the 2011 JAW (Just Add Water) festival, “Anna Karenina” is currently running at the Gerding Theater at the Armory in Portland. Founded in 1998, the JAW festival was created for playwrights to develop works in progress. Held in July, the festival includes staged readings, rewrites and artist labs. According to a news release, the world premiere adaptation of “Anna Karenina” was “an audience favorite at the 2011 festival.” “It was thrilling to hear a work, that I spent many months with in my head, being read

and discovered by a great cast of actors,” said McKeon in the play’s resource guide. “And the insight and perspective they and other participants in JAW shared with me was invaluable in shaping the play.” Set in Imperial Russia, “Anna Karenina” is about “uncontrollable passions, and emotional and sexual betrayal, set against one of the most romantic periods of world history,” according to the news release. The play runs approximately two hours and 45 minutes with one intermission. Due to an illness in the cast, the schedule and casting has changed slightly since the play was first advertised. The play has been extended to May 6. Anna Karenina will now be played by Kelley Curran. Ticket prices range from $20 to $64, depending on day of performance and seat location. To purchase tickets and for more information, visit www.pcs.org or call 503-445-3700. — Reporter: 541-383-0350, jwasson@bendbulletin.com

Through April 25 — Soul’d Out Music Festival, Portland; www. souldoutfestival.com. April 13 — Con Bro Chill, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* April 13 — Diego’s Umbrella, WOW Hall, Eugene; www.wowhall.org or 541-687-2746. April 13 — Elvis Costello & The Imposters, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* April 14 — Counting Crows, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* April 14 — Hayes Carll, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* April 17 — Escape the Fate, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* April 18 — Kansas, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* April 18 — Todd Snider, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* April 18-19 — Jeff Mangum, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* April 19 — Wanda Jackson, WOW Hall, Eugene; www.wowhall.org or 541-687-2746. April 19 — Yonder Mountain String Band, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* April 20 — Dar Williams, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* April 20 — Greensky Bluegrass, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* April 21 — Celtic Woman, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* April 21 — Horse Feathers, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* April 21 — The Infamous Stringdusters, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* April 21 — Wanda Jackson, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* April 23 — Ingrid Michaelson, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* April 23 — The Naked and Famous, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* April 24 — Coldplay, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. April 24 — Justice, Roseland Theater, Portland; SOLD OUT; TW* April 24 — Matthew Sweet Girlfriend Tour, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* April 25 — Esperanza Spalding, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* April 25 — M83, Roseland Theater, Portland; SOLD OUT; TW* April 26 — Betty LaVette, Aladdin

Theater, Portland; TM* April 26 — Rusko, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* April 26 — Zeds Dead, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* April 27 — Ben Kweller, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* April 27 — Miguel Dehoyos and Alex Depue, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; 541-434-7000. April 28 — Keola Beamer & Raiatea, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. April 30 — James Morrison, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* April 30 — Tierney Sutton Band, Jimmy Mak’s, Portland; www. ticketsoregon.com or 800-820-9884. May 2 — Lambchop, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TF* May 2 — Snow Patrol, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; SOLD OUT; CT* May 2 — Tech N9ne, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* May 3 — Tech N9ne, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 4 — Brian Jonestown Massacre, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* May 4 — Curtis Salgado & His Big Band, WOW Hall, Eugene; www. wowhall.org or 541-687-2746. May 4 — Wild Flag, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* May 4 — Zoë Keating, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 5 — Delta Spirit, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* May 7 — The Black Keys, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. May 8 — Curren$y, WOW Hall, Eugene; www.wowhall.org or 541-687-2746. May 9 — Curren$y, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 10 — Mickey Hart Band, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* May 10 — Yann Tiersen, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* May 11 — Bassnectar, Roseland Theater, Portland; SOLD OUT; TW* May 11 — Death Cab For Cutie, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* May 22 — Roger Waters: “The Wall” Live, Rose Garden, Portland; www. rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. May 25 — Spiritualized, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* May 25 — Trampled by Turtles, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT*

Continued next page


PAGE 22 • GO! MAGAZINE

out of town

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

From previous page Self Referrals Welcome

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend www.highdesertbank.com

541-706-6900 EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

Flooring • Back Splash • Counters We have a tile to make your space unique. American Olean Walker Zanger

Pentel

www.Complementshome.com 541.322.7337

April 2 & May 7

May 26 — Mark Lanegan Band, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* May 27 — Imelda May, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CANCELED; CT* May 28 — Jack White, Hult Center, Eugene; SOLD OUT; www.hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. May 29 — Ben Howard, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* May 29 — Fun., Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 30 — Mogwai, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* May 31 — Hugh Laurie and the Copper Bottom Band, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; 541-434-7000. June 1 — Hugh Laurie and the Copper Bottom Band, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. June 2 — Daughtry, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* June 3 — Chickenfoot, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* June 3 — Idina Menzel, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* June 17 — John Fogerty, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* June 21 — Nickelback, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. June 27 — Foster the People, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLD OUT; CT* July 5 — Ben Harper, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* July 15 — Ringo Starr & His All Starr Band, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* July 19-22 — The String Cheese Incident, Horning’s Hideout, North Plains; SOLD OUT; TM* July 22 — Florence + The Machine, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLD OUT; CT* July 26 — Emmylou Harris & Her Red Dirt Boys and Steve Martin & Steep Canyon Rangers, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* Aug. 3 — An Evening with Yanni, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Aug. 31 — Diana Krall, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM*

LECTURES & COMEDY

LIMIT ONE COUPON PER PERSON PER VISIT • COUPON EXPIRES 4/9/12

April 14 — Tree School East: Featuring 36 classes on forestry and logging; Baker High School, Baker City; 541-523-6418. April 15 — Rachel Maddow, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* April 21 — Doug Benson, WOW Hall, Eugene; TM* April 27 — Craig Ferguson, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 3 — Chimamanda Adichie, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.

*Tickets TM: Ticketmaster, www.ticket master.com or 800-745-3000 TW: TicketsWest, www.tickets west.com or 800-992-8499 TF: Ticketfly, www.ticketfly.com or 877-435-9489 CT: Cascade Tickets, www .cascadetickets.com or 800-5143849 literary-arts.org or 503-227-2583. May 5 — Natasha Leggero, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM*

SYMPHONY & OPERA April 14-16 — “The Classical Guitar”: Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony. org or 800-228-7343. April 21-22 — “The Perfect Storm”: Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony. org or 800-228-7343. April 26 — “Midori & The Eugene Symphony”: Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. April 28, 30 — Nadja SalernoSonnenberg: With the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. May 4 — Brandi Carlile: With the Oregon Symphony; Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. May 11, 13, 17, 19 — “Candide”: Opera by Leonard Bernstein; Portland Opera; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* May 12-14 — “A. Cohen Plays Tchaikovsky”: Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. March 16, 18 — “Nixon in China”: Eugene Opera; Hult Center, Eugene; www. hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. May 17 — “Liszt Piano Concerto”: Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. May 20-21 — “Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring”: Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343.

THEATER & DANCE Through April 14 —The Göteborg Ballet: North American premiere; Newmark Theatre, Portland; www.whitebird.org or 503-245-1600. Through April 15, 19-21 — “Standing on Ceremony — The Gay Marriage Plays”: Featuring nine 10-minute plays by renowned playwrights; in partnership with Basic Rights Oregon; Artists Repertory Theatre; Morrison Stage, Portland; www. artistsrep.org or 503-241-1278.

Through April 22 — Northwest Ten — The Festival of Ten-Minute Plays, Lord Leebrick Theatre Company, Eugene; www. lordleebrick.com or 541-465-1506. Through April 29 — “Anna Karenina”: Kevin McKeon’s new adaptation of Tolstoy’s classic story; Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; www.pcs.org or 503-445-3700. Through May 13 — “OVO”: Presented by Cirque du Soleil; Portland Expo Center, Portland; www.cirquedusolel.com or 866-624-7783. Through June 22 — Oregon Shakespeare Festival: “Seagull” (through June 22) and “Troilus and Cressida” (through Nov. 4) are currently running in the New Theatre. “The White Snake” (through July 8), “Animal Crackers” (through Nov. 4) and “Romeo and Juliet” are currently in production at the Angus Bowmer Theatre; Ashland; www. osfashland.org or 800-219-8161. April 14-15 — “Stravinsky Gala”: Eugene Ballet Company; Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. April 18-Nov. 3 — “Medea/Macbeth/ Cinderella”: Three plays interwoven into an astonishing whole; adapted by Bill Rauch and Tracy Young; Oregon Shakespeare Festival; Angus Bowmer Theatre, Ashland; www.osfashland.org or 800-219-8161. April 19-28 — “Chromatic Quartet”: Oregon Ballet Theatre; Newmark Theatre, Portland; www.obt.org or 888-922-5538. April 24-June 3 — “Next to Normal”: Rock Musical by Brian Yorkey and Tom Kitt; Artists Repertory Theatre; Alder Stage, Portland; www.artistsrep.org or 503-241-1278. April 24-June 17 — “Black Pearl Sings!”: Play by Frank Higgins; featuring a cappella renditions of little-known American folk songs; Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; www.pcs. org or 503-445-3700. May 2 — Lar Lubovitch Dance Company, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.whitebird.org or 503-245-1600. May 7 — Sol Flamenco, Southern Oregon University, Ashland; www.sou.edu/music or 541-552-6101. May 9 — Compagnie Käfig: United States premiere; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.whitebird.org or 503-245-1600. May 12 — “Stuart Little”: This special production for all ages features hearing and deaf actors who speak and sign simultaneously; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www.craterian.org or 541-779-3000. May 12-June 3 — “A Lie of the Mind”: Drama by Sam Shepard; Lord Leebrick Theatre Company, Eugene; www. lordleebrick.com or 541-465-1506. May 22-27 — “Million Dollar Quartet,” Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* May 22-June 24 — “It Ain’t Nothin’ but the Blues”: A stirring retrospective of blues classics; Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; www.pcs.org or 503-445-3700.


out of town

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

GO! MAGAZINE •

June 9 — “Dance United”: Oregon Ballet Theatre; Keller Auditorium, Portland; www.obt.org or 888-922-5538. July 18-Aug. 12 — “Jersey Boys,” Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM*

Beautiful”: Featuring Greek and Roman sculpture from British Museum; Portland Art Museum, Portland; www. portlandartmuseum.org or 503-226-2811.

EXHIBITS

MISCELLANY

Through April 8 — Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art: The following exhibits are on display: “Newart Northwest Kids: Global Connections” (through May 13); Eugene; jsma.uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027. Through April 29 — Oregon Museum of Science and Industry: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Art of the Brick” (through April 29), “Ocean Soul” (through July 29) and “Wild Minds: What Animals Really Think” (through Aug. 19); Portland; www. omsi.edu or 800-955-6674. Through April 29 — Portland Art Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Robert Hanson” (through April 29), “Joseph Beuys” (through May 27), “Mark Rothko” (through May 27), “John Frame: Three Fragments of a Lost Tale” (through May 27), “Emerging: New Photography Acquisitions” (through June 17) and “Cornerstones of a Great Civilization: Masterworks of Ancient Chinese Art” (through Nov. 11); Portland; www. portlandartmuseum.org or 503-226-2811. Through May 6 — “Masters of the Night: The True Story of Bats”: Exhibit includes multi-sensory interactive displays; World Forestry Center Discovery Museum, Portland; www.worldforestry.org or 503-228-1367. Through May 27 — “Attack of the Bloodsuckers”: Exhibit on mosquitoes, fleas, ticks, leaches and other parasites; The Science Factory, Eugene; www.sciencefactory.org or 541-682-7888. Through May 28 — “Beside the Big River: Images and Art of the Mid-Columbia Indians”: Featuring photographs by Lee Moorhouse, Thomas Rutter and J.W. Thompson; Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733. Through June — Museum of Natural and Cultural History: The following exhibits are on display: “We are Still Here — Gordon Bettles and the Many Nations Longhouse” (through June), “The Art of Nature by Becky Uhler” (through June 24) and “Out in Space, Back in Time: Images from the Hubble Telescope” (through Feb. 2013); Eugene; natural-history. uoregon.edu or 541-346-3024.

Through May 28 — Finders Keepers on the Beach: Find handblown glass floats hidden on the beach; Lincoln City; 800-452-2151. April 13 — Ladies Night Out, The Oregon Garden, Silverton; www. silvertonladiesnightout.com or 503-873-5615. April 14 — Hood River Valley Blossom Festival, Hood River; www.hoodriver.org or 541-386-2000. April 18-22 — Cinema Pacific, University of Oregon, Eugene; cinemapacific.uoregon.edu or 800-824-2714. April 21-22 — Hood River Valley Blossom Craft Show and Blossom Fest Quilt Show, Hood River; www.hoodriverfair.com or 541-354-2865.

Submitted photo

The Portland Children’s Museum is opening its first outdoor exhibit, “Zany Maze,” on April 20. The exhibit is an “everchanging, natural garden space where children explore the outdoors,” according to sources. Through June 24 — “The Wonder of Learning”: Exhibit explores the creative, intellectual and social capacity of children; Portland Children’s Museum, Portland; www.portlandcm.org or 503-223-6500. Through July 28 — “Generations: Betty Feves”: A retrospective exhibit on the works of Betty Feves; Museum of Contemporary Craft: Portland; www. museumofcontemporarycraft.org or 503-223-2654. April 14 — Packy’s 50th Birthday Party, Oregon Zoo, Portland; www. oregonzoo.org or 503-226-1561. Opening April 20 — “Zany Maze”: Portland Children’s Museum’s first outdoor exhibit; Portland; www. portlandcm.org or 503-223-6500. April 21-June 18 — “Visions of the Orient: Western Women Artists in Asia, 1900-1940”: Featuring works by Helen Hyde, Bertha Lum, Elizabeth Keith and Lilian Miller; Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University of Oregon, Eugene; jsma.uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027. April 21-Aug. 19 — “Russel Wong: The Big Picture”: Featuring more than 30 black-and-white and color images spanning the breadth of the artist’s career; Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University of Oregon, Eugene; jsma.uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027. May 8-July 1 — OMSI Film Festival: Featuring 27 films; Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 800-955-6674.

May 22-June 2 — 47th Annual Shell Show, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 800-955-6674. Opening May 26 — “The Sea & Me”: A new children’s interactive exhibit; Oregon Coast Aquarium, Newport; www.aquarium.org or 541-867-3474.

April 27-28 — Oregon Garden Brewfest, The Oregon Garden, Silverton; www.oregongarden.org or 503-874-8100. April 27-29 — Crab, Seafood & Wine Festival, Clatsop County Fairgrounds, Astoria; www. oldoregon.com or 800-875-6807. May 8-12 — The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. archaeologychannel.org or 541-345-5538. May 19-20 — Columbia Gorge Wine & Pear Fest, Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum, Hood River; www. wineandpearfest.org or 541-399-2146. May 26-27 — Spring Arts & Crafts Festival, Yachats; 541-547-4738. May 26-28 — Memorial Weekend in the Wine Country, Willamette Valley; www.willamettewines.com. Aug. 18 — Pirate Treasure Hunt, Depoe Bay; www. treasuredepoebay.org or 888-393-6833.

May 26-July 22 — “Focus on Nature: Wildcats of the World”: Featuring works by Rochelle Mason and Linda DuPuis-Rosen; World Forestry Center Discovery Museum, Portland; www. worldforestry.org or 503-228-1367. May 26-Sept. 3 — “Nature Unleashed”: New interactive exhibition takes a look at natural disasters; Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 800-955-6674. June 22-24 — Summer Arts Festival, Fir Grove Park, Roseburg; www.uvarts.com or 541-672-2532. July 1-Sept. 9 — “Tough by Nature: Portraits of Cowgirls and Ranch Women of the American West”: Featuring works by artist Lynda Lanker; Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University of Oregon, Eugene; jsma.uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027. Aug. 4-Dec. 31 — “Timberrr! A Nostalgic Look Back at Working in the Woods”: Featuring vintage photographs and rare motion picture films; World Forestry Center Discovery Museum, Portland; www.worldforestry.org or 503-228-1367. Oct. 6-Jan. 27 — “The Body

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

BendPineNursery.com

PAGE 23


PAGE 24 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

gaming

‘Xenoblade’ is fresh, exciting • Latest Japanese role-playing game brings new life to an often stale genre By Phil Kollar Game Informer Magazine

I

f you need proof that the Japanese role-playing genre is struggling from the North American perspective, you need only look at the story behind “Xenoblade Chronicles.” Somehow, despite early showings at E3 and rave reviews in Japan and Europe, Nintendo of America very nearly didn’t bring the game to our shores. If you’re even remotely interested in JRPGs, give thanks that this dark future was avoided. “Xenoblade Chronicles” is a mustMc Clatchy-Tribune News Service play game that single-handedly “Xenoblade Chronicles” has a strange setting in which the characters exist in colonies on the backs of two proves there’s still fresh, exciting giants frozen in time. ground to cover in this often-stale genre. “Xenoblade” finds the first of always comes through in the end. ‘XENOBLADE CHRONICLES’ many unique touchstones in its They go on a journey to figure “X enoblade Chronicles” 9.5 (out of 10) setting. The people of this uni- out how humanity can survive is the first JRPG I’ve verse have settled in makeshift against the overpowered generic played this generation colonies on the backs of two war- robotic enemies called Mechons. Wii ring giants that are frozen in Similarly unsurprising new party that has me excited for Nintendo, Monolith Soft time. These colossi have adapted members are collected at a reguESRB rating: T for Teen the future rather than natural, well-tread terrain, includ- lar pace along the way. simply reminding me of ing massive grasslands and labyThe characters may not stray rinthine swamps, but you’ll often from comfortable conventions, but happy memories from catch sight of the opposing giant this game has one important leg up game’s imposing length. my past. in the clear afternoon on the average stereotypeOne of the most innovative REVIEW heavy JRPG: voice acting. systems is Shulk’s ability to tell sky or flashes of a far-off body part during thunThe refreshing British cast the future. While this power derstorms. These brief lends the strongly trans- is frequently used to move the with my expectations from Japaglimpses of future destinations lated script an austere air that plot forward, it also has impor- nese games. Other smart design build atmosphere for this strange makes it easy to get drawn into tant gameplay ramifications. In decisions that help prevent player world. As you progress from area the drama. At different points in battle, the game pauses to show frustration include fast travel, the to area, the game frequently re- the story, Shulk could easily have you when an enemy’s next attack ability to change the time of day, minds you where you’re located come off as either whiny or cloy- is going to kill one of your party and the ability to save anywhere. on the giant, letting you track your ingly optimistic. Thanks to both members. This gives you time I fell in love with JRPGs in the progress around and inside of the the writing and the voice acting, to react by shielding, healing, or 16-bit era because they constantly massive creatures. “Xenoblade” handily avoids that even briefly taking over as that showed me things I’d never seen Though the world is unique, common problem. character and making a last at- before. Somewhere in the last 15 the characters are disappointing “Xenoblade” backs up the story tempt at survival. These psychic years, most RPG developers in Jaarchetypes. Protagonist Shulk is with a complicated but approach- abilities lead to some incredibly pan have lost sight of that, instead a bright-eyed teenager eager to able battle system. Fast-paced en- tense moments, especially during rehashing the same fantasies and leave his village and discover the counters challenge players to use the challenging, puzzle-like boss floating by on nostalgia. world. He gets to do so when he a wide variety of skills, many of battles. “Xenoblade Chronicles” is the discovers he is one of a handful which gain bonuses depending on Outside of combat, premoni- first JRPG I’ve played this genof chosen warriors who can wield your positioning. Combined with tions also inform you when you’ve eration that has me excited for the the Monado, a powerful weapon the mountains of upgradable loot picked up an item you’ll need for future rather than simply remindthat can wipe out the game’s bad and deep character development, a later quest. “Xenoblade Chroni- ing me of happy memories from guys. His best friend Reyn is the players have a lot of strategy cles” is packed with user-friendly my past. Monolith Soft deserves loud-mouthed comic relief who to uncover and master over the designs like this that are at odds praise for creating it.

TOP 10 ON THE PS3 The editors of Game Informer Magazine rank the top PS3 games for April: 1. “Mass Effect 3” (Electronic Arts) 2. “Journey” (Sony Computer Entertainment) 3. “MLB 12: The Show” (Sony Computer Entertainment) 4. “I Am Alive” (Ubisoft) 5. “Street Fighter X Tekken” (Capcom) 6. “Asura’s Wrath” (Capcom) 7. “UFC Undisputed 3” (THQ) 8. “Syndicate” (Electronic Arts) 9. “Tiger Woods PGA TOUR 13” (EA Sports) 10. “Silent Hill HD Collection” (Konami) McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Weekly download ‘CLOSURE’ For: PlayStation 3 From: Eyebrow Interactive ESRB Rating: E for Everyone Price: $15 If it’s in the dark, it doesn’t exist in “Closure,” a deviously clever 2-D sidescroller that once again proves all the brilliant ideas for rethinking 2-D games aren’t yet taken. In “Closure,” the vast majority of a level exists in complete blackness, and anything that exists in blackness doesn’t exist at all. The object is to employ the available light sources — some static, some maneuverable like adjustable floodlights, some you can push around or carry with you — to design a tenable path to the exit. If the path in front of you is entirely blackened, you need to illuminate it, lest you fall into a bottomless pit of nothingness. And if walls block the exit from all sides, you must suppress the light to make one of those walls disappear. Sounds easy, right? Sure. But “Closure’s” method of terrain manipulation represents an abstract new way to get from A to B, and success frequently entails disobeying ageold 2-D gaming truths and forcing yourself to think along dramatically different new lines. — Billy O’Keefe, McClatchy-Tribune News Service


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

PAGE 25

movies

Peter Iovino / 20th Century Fox / The Associated Press

Chris Diamantopoulos, left, Sean Hayes and Will Sasso star as Moe, Larry and Curly in “The Three Stooges.”

Don’t try this at home, kids • ‘The Three Stooges’ evokes the same slapstick humor as the original, but you might not laugh

T

he Farrelly brothers have made probably the best Three Stooges movie it’s possible to make in 2012, and perhaps ever, since the Stooges stopped making them themselves. Much depends on whether that was what you were hoping to hear. The movie has the look and feel of a Stooges classic and possibly some of the same

gags. So there’s that. I missed the whole Three Stooges thing. Either they weren’t on the station in my hometown, or we hadn’t bought a TV set yet, or they came to town too late for me. I’m pretty sure that at the right age I would have loved them. No doubt many parents will want to share their formative experience with their children.

For example, at the screening I attended, Mancow Muller was there with his twin daughters, Ava Grace and Isabella Sofia, who are sweethearts. No doubt he was grateful for the public service announcement at the end of the movie by the Farrellys, who demonstrated to the audiences that the hammers and sledgehammers the Stooges hit each other on the head with were rubber props. They also used slow motion to show that no Stooge is REALLY being poked in the eye, but at the eyebrows.

As much as anything else in the movie, this cautionary lecture evoked the era when the Stooges reigned at kiddie matinees and low-rent TV stations. “Warning — kids!” we were always being told. “Don’t try this yourself!” Solemn stories were told about the kid who shot his eye out with a BB gun, or ate a lot of Kool-Aid powder and then drank an RC Cola and his stomach exploded. As nearly as I can recall, nobody was hit over the head with a sledgehammer. Continued next page

ROGER EBERT

“The Three Stooges” 92 minutes PG, for slapstick action violence, some rude and suggestive humor including language


PAGE 26 • GO! MAGAZINE

movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

‘Lockout’ is an entertaining one-man show I

t’s a mission so impossible that not even the U.S. Marines can do the job. No, this one will take — don’t hold your breath — yes, One Man. The invention of the One Man Movie has been one of the handiest story devices to come along since the fruit cart. All I need do is quote two sentences from the trailer and in your mind you know exactly how the Deep-Voiced Trailer Guy sounds when he says them: “My daughter … is on a goodwill mission on that station. There’s only One Man who can get her out … Snow!” OK, now, hold onto your seat. The worried father who is speaking is — why, the president of the United States, of course. And where is the station where his daughter, Emilie (Maggie Grace), is on a goodwill mission? I’ll bet you can guess this one. It’s a maximum-security prison in orbit around the Earth, naturally. And what about One Man Snow? He is a brilliant and versatile man of action, capable of all things, and yet the Secret Service is pursuing him because he has his hands on a briefcase and is suspected of spying. And what is in the briefcase? My best guess is: a MacGuffin. I probably mention MacGuffins half a dozen times a year. I wonder if there’s anyone left who doesn’t know what one is. First defined by Alfred Hitchcock, the MacGuffin is whatever everyone

in the movie is in a lather about. All we need to know is that Snow has it and the Secret Service wants it. It doesn’t matter in the slightest what’s in the briefcase; Snow doesn’t know, so why should we? Snow, played by Guy Pearce, is an overwritten hero who talks like a character on a sitcom. Every line is a wisecrack, a gag, or what he fondly thinks of as a witticism. If you were on a mission to rescue the president’s daughter, who was being held hostage on a space station in Earth orbit by a tattooed psychotic with glowing eyeballs (Vincent Regan), would you have time to think up oneliners? Of course you wouldn’t. That’s why this job can only be undertaken by … One Man Snow! They say no one has ever escaped from Alcatraz by swimming. A prison in orbit is even

From previous page The casting of the three leads is just about ideal. Larry, Curly and Moe are played by Sean Hayes, Will Sasso and Chris Diamantopoulos, who are made to look enough like the originals to justify no complaints. This movie has been in development hell for something like a decade, and survived the bankruptcy of MGM. Perhaps we should be grateful for the delay. Over the years websites

breathlessly reported the casting of such as Benicio del Toro, Sean Penn, Hank Azaria, Johnny Knoxville and Jim Carrey, but it’s better this way because it’s less distracting. Sean Penn is an excellent actor, but I don’t know if I could get into the spirit with him as Larry. The film is wisely brief, 92 minutes, divided into three segments that are linked together with the Stooges being raised in an or-

ROGER EBERT

“Lockout” 95 minutes PG-13, for intense sequences of violence and action, and language including some sexual references

Film D istrict / The Associated Press

Guy Pearce is sent to rescue Maggie Grace from a prison space station in “Lockout.”

more escape-proof. And there’s another detail. Many of the prisoners have been cryogenically frozen and are being held in suspended animation. A pris-

oner like that, he isn’t going anywhere. Why, you might ask, would the president’s daughter take it into her head to go on a goodwill mission to an orbiting prison? She wants to be sure the deep-frozen prisoners aren’t being mistreated. This woman is all heart. Unluckily, some of the most violent prisoners have taken over the prison, and with Emilie as their hostage, they’re in a powerful position. The generator of this story is the inexhaustible French producer Luc Besson (“The Fifth Element,” “Leon: The Professional,” “La Femme Nikita,” “Ong-Bak” and dozens of others). He has skillfully assembled the story elements and left them in the hands of directors Stephen St. Leger and James Mather, who reason that with breakneck action and shiny special effects, we will

have no complaints. It just about works. The idea of the president’s daughter being held captive isn’t blindingly original (it’s an alarmingly dangerous occupation), but placing the story on a space station is a masterstroke, since we’re about filled up to here with prison movies set on Earth. I imagine the movie’s intended audience will enjoy itself. I enjoyed myself in my own peculiar way. I like to ask myself how real people would feel in a situation like this. If I were sent on Snow’s mission, I would be paralyzed by fright most of the time. But then I’m not One Man. I would be dead several times over by the ending of this film. But not to worry. I’m not gonna tell you they parachute to Earth and land in New York City. Nothing like that.

phanage. They spent not only their childhoods there, but their entire lives until the present day — parents, for some reason, being reluctant to adopt them. Segments 2 and 3 center around the bankruptcy of the orphanage and the pledge by the Stooges to raise $830,000 almost overnight to keep it open. The nuns running the orphanage are also well-cast: Jane Lynch as the Mother Superior, Larry

David (yes, Larry David) as the autocratic Sister Mary-Mengele, and Jennifer Hudson, slender and warm as Sister Rosemary. As they forage the city in search of funds, the Stooges get involved in a murder plot against a millionaire, and Moe finds accidental stardom in the cast of a popular TV program that I will not reveal. Having said all of these things, I must say one more: I didn’t laugh much. I don’t think the Stooges

are funny, although perhaps I might once have. Some of the sight gags were clever, but meh. The three leads did an admirable job of impersonation. I think this might be pretty much the movie Stooges fans were looking for. I have no idea what their children will think about it. I guess what I’m wondering is, was it really necessary?

The idea of the president’s daughter being held captive isn’t blindingly original (it’s an alarmingly dangerous occupation), but placing the story on a space station is a masterstroke, since we’re about filled up to here with prison movies set on Earth.

— Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.

— Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

movies

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 27

You think you know the story • ‘The Cabin in the Woods’ puts a few twists in the classic house of horror tale

Y

ou’re not going to see this one coming. You might think you do, because the TV ads and shots at the top reveal what looks like the big surprise — and it certainly comes as a surprise to the characters. But let’s just say there’s a lot more to it than that. “The Cabin in the Woods” sets off with an ancient and familiar story plan. Five college students pile into a van and drive deep into the back woods for a weekend in a borrowed cabin. Their last stop is of course a decrepit gas station populated by a demented creep who giggles at the fate in store for them. In these days when movies are sliced and diced for YouTube mash-ups, I’d love to see a montage of demented redneck gas station owners drooling and chortling over the latest carloads of victims heading into the woods. It will seem that I’m revealing a secret by mentioning that this is no ordinary cabin in the woods, but actually a set for a diabolical scientific experiment. Beneath the cabin is a basement, and beneath that is a vast modern laboratory headed by technology geeks (Richard Jenkins and Bradley Whitford) who turn dials, adjust levers and monitor every second on a bank of TV monitors. Their scheme is to offer the five guinea pigs a series of choices, which will reveal — something, I’m not sure precisely what. There is some possibility this expensive experiment is involved with national security, and we get scenes showing similar victims in scenarios around the world. Now, in your standard horror film, that would be enough: OMG! The cabin is being controlled by a secret underground laboratory! Believe me, that’s only the beginning. The film has been produced and co-written by Joss Whedon (creator of “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” “Angel” and other TV icons) and directed by his longtime collaborator Drew Goddard (writer of “Cloverfield”). Whedon has described it as a “loving hate

Diyah Pera / Lionsgate / McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Fran Kranz, left, Chris Hemsworth and Anna Hutchison star in “The Cabin in the Woods.”

ROGER EBERT

“The Cabin in the Woods” 105 minutes R, for strong bloody horror violence and gore, language, drug use and some sexuality/nudity

letter” to horror movies, and you could interpret it as an experiment on the genre itself: It starts with five standard-issue characters in your basic cabin in the woods, and we can read the lab scientists as directors and writers who are plugging in various story devices to see what the characters will do.

In some sense, the Jenkins and Whitford characters represent Whedon and Goddard. Ah, but they don’t let us off that easily. That’s what I mean when I say you won’t see the ending coming. This is not a perfect movie; it’s so ragged, it’s practically constructed of loose ends. But it’s exciting because it ventures so far off the map. One imagines the filmmakers chortling with glee as they devise first one bizarre development and then another in a free-for-all for their imaginations. They establish rules only to violate them. That begins with the characters. They’re stock archetypes. We get an action hero (Curt, played by Chris Hemsworth); a good girl (Dana, played by Kristen Connolly); a bad girl (Jules, played by Anna Hutchison); the comic relief (Marty the pothead, played by

Fran Kranz); and the mature and thoughtful kid (Holden, played by Jesse Williams). What the scientists apparently intend to do is see how each archetype plays out after the group is offered various choices. There are even side bets in the lab about who will do what — as if they’re predicting which lever the lab rats will push. This is essentially an attempt to codify free will. Do horror characters make choices because of the requirements of the genre, or because of their own decisions? And since they’re entirely the instruments of their creators, to what degree can the filmmakers exercise free will? This is fairly bold stuff, and grows wilder as the film moves along. The opening scenes do a good job of building conventional suspense, the middle scenes allow deeper alarm to creep in, and by the end we re-

alize we’re playthings of sinister forces. Horror fans are a particular breed. They analyze films with such detail and expertise that I am reminded of the Canadian literary critic Northrop Frye, who approached literature with similar archetypal analysis. “The Cabin in the Woods” has been constructed almost as a puzzle for horror fans to solve. Which conventions are being toyed with? Which authors and films are being referred to? Is the film itself an act of criticism? With most genre films, we ask, “Does it work?” In other words, does this horror film scare us? “The Cabin in the Woods” does have some genuine scares, but they’re not really the point. This is like a final exam for fanboys. — Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.


PAGE 28 • GO! MAGAZINE

movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

‘Melancholia’ shows death in a new light

ON LOCAL SCREENS

L

Reviews by Roger Ebert unless otherwise noted.

ars von Trier’s “Melancholia” opens with music from Wagner’s “Tristan und Isolde,” mourning and apocalyptic, and disturbing images of a world not right. A woman dressed as a bride runs through a forest whose branches seem to grab at her in a Disney nightmare. She floats in a pond, holding flowers, like Ophelia. Another woman makes her way with a child over marshy grass that sucks at her. Looming in the sky is another planet, vast in size. The Earth is about to end. These scenes are isolated prologue. As time begins to run, we meet a newlywed couple being driven to their wedding party at a grand estate. It is a small gathering, only large enough to establish that few in this family can abide one another, and some may be mad. The bride is Justine (Kirsten Dunst). Her husband is Michael (Alexander Skarsgaard). Her sister is Claire (Charlotte Gainsbourg). Their estranged parents are Gaby (Charlotte Rampling) and Dexter (John Hurt). The mansion is owned by the brother-in-law John (Keifer Sutherland). Joining the party is Jack (Stellan Skarsgaard), Justine’s boss, who owns an ad agency and is attending primarily to wrest an advertising tagline from her. The wedding planner is played by the ominous Udo Kier, who you will agree is correctly cast to run a wedding at the end of the world. Not much of an attempt is made to fashion these people into a plot anything like a wedding party you’ve seen in a movie before. Even when the bride steals out of her husband’s bed to have rough sex in the sand trap of a golf course, there is no sense of intrigue, just a desperate acting out. Every moment is saturated with the common knowledge that Earth is about to collide with an enormous planet named Melancholia. I’m not sure if the planet has been officially named, or if the name simply attached itself. One thinks of Robert Burton’s book “The Anatomy of Melancholy,” published in 1621, which marshaled all the arts and sciences known to him into a study of what we could call clinical depression. The new planet is first seen by Justine as they pause on their way

Here’s what’s showing on Central Oregon movie screens. For showtimes, see listings on Page 31.

HEADS UP

Christian Geisnaes / Magnolia Pictures / The Associated Press

Alexander Skarsgaard, left, Kirsten Dunst and Charlotte Gainsbourg celebrate a wedding while the world is about to end in “Melancholia.”

ROGER EBERT

“Melancholia” 135 minutes R, for some graphic nudity, sexual content and language

to the party. It is the brightest of the evening stars. During an undefined period of days it will grow larger and larger, until it fills the sky. Curiously, the characters do not spend all of their time talking about it, and we pick up little information about when it was first seen. Von Trier limits himself entirely to the meandering conversations at the house party. He avoids all the usual sci-fi cliches; there are no TV news updates, no Cabinet meetings, no nuclear rockets fired at it, no surging mobs in the streets. It looms larger. It “appeared from behind the sun.” If I were choosing a director to make a film about the end of the world, von Trier the gloomy Dane might be my first choice. The only other name that comes to mind is Werner Herzog’s. Both understand that at such a time silly little romantic subplots take on a vast irrelevance. Doctor Johnson told Boswell: “Depend upon it, sir, when a man knows he is to be hanged

in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully.” In the cast of von Trier’s characters, impending doom seems to have created a mental state of dazed detachment. They continue to act as if their personal concerns have the slightest relevance. The film is divided into two halves, titled “Justine” and “Claire.” It appears that the two sisters exchange personalities, but to no great effect. Maybe the approach of an overwhelming event has dissolved the membranes of personalities. In any film involving the destruction of the globe, we know that, if it is not to be saved, there must be a “money shot” depicting the actual cataclysm. I doubt any could do better than von Trier does here. There are no tidal waves. No animals fleeing through burning forests. No skyscrapers falling. None of that easy stuff. No, there is simply a character standing on a hill and staring straight at the impending doom, as von Trier shows it happening in what logically must be slow motion, with a fearsome preliminary merging of planetary atmospheres. Violent death is often a shabby business in the movies. Here is a character who says, I see it coming, I will face it, I will not turn away, I will observe it as long as my eyes and my mind still function. Is it fair of me to speculate that von Trier himself regards death in that way? — Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.

“Crazy Horse” — Frederick Wiseman’s new documentary invites the viewer to contemplate the intricacies of the creative process, the daily rhythms of a complex organization, and the tensions between artistic ambition and practicality — and also to look at very beautiful women wearing very little. “Crazy Horse,” a behindthe-scenes look at a famous Paris erotic revue, takes up themes that this supremely observant, subtly analytical filmmaker has explored before in films like “Ballet” (1995), “La Danse: The Paris Opera Ballet” (2009) and “Boxing Gym” (2010). In each case, the graceful movement of particular bodies — at rest, at work, in rehearsal, and in performance or competition — provides a counterpoint to the frenzy and inertia of the collective bodies in which they dwell. This film screens at the new Tin Pan Theater in Bend. Cost is $6 ($3 for the 10:30 p.m. screenings). This film was not given a star rating. (no MPAA rating) — A.O. Scott, The New York Times

“Farmageddon” — A documentary exploring the friction among small farms, agribusiness, policymakers and law enforcement. Directed by Kristin Canty. The film screens at the new Tin Pan Theater in Bend. Cost is $6. (no MPAA rating) — Synopsis from Los Angeles Times

“The Fat Boy Chronicles” — Inspired by a true story, the film shines a light on the world of a bullied teen and demonstrates how he copes with his abuse. Fourteenyear-old Jimmy is obese and must face daily taunts from kids at school over his weight. With the support of his family and his church friends, Jimmy tackles his weight issue and manages to find love in the process. Presented by Serendipity West Foundation, the film screens at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Tower Theatre in Bend. Tickets are free but must be ordered in advance from the Tower Theatre website. (no MPAA rating) — Synopsis from the Tower Theatre

“Grateful Dead Meet-Up at the Movies” — The Grateful Dead are returning to the big screen. The event features unreleased footage from the iconic Alpine Valley Music Theatre concert July 18, 1989. The film screens at 7 p.m. Thursday at

the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50. 150 minutes. (no MPAA rating) “Man with a Movie Camera” — Directed by Dziga Vertov, “Man With a Movie Camera” is a 1929 early documentary cinema film from the Soviet Union. The film features a new score by The Cinematic Orchestra. The film screens at the new Tin Pan Theater in Bend. Cost is $3. (no MPAA rating) “The Metropolitan Opera: La Traviata” — Natalie Dessay will put on the red dress in Willy Decker’s stunning production, in her first role as Violetta at The Metropolitan Opera. Matthew Polenzani sings Alfredo, Dmitri Hvorostovsky is Germont, and Principal Conductor Fabio Luisi is on the podium. “The Metropolitan Opera: Live in HighDefinition” series features 12 opera performances transmitted live in highdefinition to movie theaters around the world. The event screens at 9:55 a.m. at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Tickets are $24 for adults, $22 for seniors and $18 for children. 195 minutes. (no MPAA rating) — Synopsis from The Metropolitan Opera

WHAT’S NEW “The Cabin in the Woods” — Five college students head out for a weekend in an isolated cabin, and find it contains unguessable levels of reality. The trailer and opening minutes reveal that the cabin is a set for a laboratory experiment — but the plot takes such bizarre turns that’s the least of it. With Kristen Connolly, Chris Hemsworth, Richard Jenkins. Produced and co-written by horror legend Joss Whedon. Rating: Three stars. 105 minutes. (R) “Lockout” — The president’s daughter (Maggie Grace) goes on a goodwill mission to determine the well-being of violent prisoners who have been frozen in suspended animation in a maximumsecurity prison in orbit around Earth, and is taken hostage. Only One Man can save her: the heroic Snow (Guy Pearce). Wall-to-wall action and lots of shiny special effects, but the hero has an annoying way of speaking in one-liners and wisecracks, even in moments of paralyzing peril. Rating: Two and a half stars. 95 minutes. (PG-13) “Melancholia” — As the Earth moves inexorably toward a collision with a much larger planet, Lars von Trier focuses on a few people at an odd wedding party. The bride is Kirsten Dunst, her groom Alexander Skarsgard, her sister Charlotte Gainsbourg, her parents John Hurt and Charlotte Ramping, the owner of the vast estate Kiefer Sutherland. In the sky above, the planet Melancholia looms ever larger, and von Trier treats it not as a science fiction event but as a profound mental disturbance. Beautiful visuals; haunting, disjointed dialogue. Rating: Three and a half stars. 135 minutes. (R)

Continued next page


“21 Jump Street” — Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum play Schmidt and Jenko, who were opposites in high school and now, a few years later, find themselves partners in a police undercover program that enrolls them in high school. They don’t look young enough, but so what? The movie cheerfully ignores the dramatic focus of the 1980s Fox series and becomes a mashup of screwball comedy, action and the “Odd Couple” formula. Better than you might expect. Rating: Three stars. 109 minutes. (R) “Act of Valor” — Actual Navy SEALs are used in a war thriller involving the freeing of a kidnapped CIA agent and a field operation to prevent terrorists from entering the U.S. through tunnels from Mexico. The action footage is nonstop and effective. The characters are not seen in any depth. The SEALs seem real, all right, but are required to do little character acting. The film opens and closes with strong appeals to patriotism, but in between it’s a Friday night special for teenage action fans. Rating: Two and a half stars. 101 minutes. (R) “American Reunion” — “American Reunion” is a slow and sad, crude and cruel, tame and timid return to the scene of the crime against pastry. “Harold and Kumar” vets Jon Hurwitz and Hayden Schlossberg wrote and directed this trip down Full Frontal Nudity Lane. They’re lost trying to update this exhausted franchise, failing to find any funny new lines, relying

on shock laughs involving oral sex, using the toilet in an ice chest and whatever dated dose of crudity Stifler blurts out. There’s still a hint of whimsy in the father-son scenes between Eugene Levy and Biggs, still a little brassy broad humor in the return of “Stifler’s Mom” (Jennifer Coolidge). But mostly, watching folks in this age range get tanked and make bad decisions isn’t nostalgic. It’s just sad. Just like a real reunion, in other words. Rating: One and a half stars. 113 minutes. (R) — Roger Moore, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“The Artist” — A brand-new silent comedy that’s a charming crowd-pleaser, and has swept up many year-end awards on its march toward the Oscars. Jean Dujardin stars as a 1927 silent star who is thrown out of work with the rise of talkies, but not forgotten by the little dancer (Berenice Bejo) he was kind to when he was big and she was a nobody. The film is made with warmth, wit, big laughs, unabashed melodrama. A silent movie for people who think they don’t like silent movies. Rating:

Four stars. 100 minutes. (PG) “Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax” — From Universal’s “Despicable Me” team, “Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax” is a gorgeous and glorious new film that turns a somewhat gloomy, cautionary tale into a 3-D musical, with catchy tunes and gags borrowed from every film from “Toy Story” to “Babe.” The film is a feast of bright, Seuss colors and wonderful Seuss design — all curvy, undulating lines and shapes and the songs are a stitch. “Lorax” takes on echoes of “WALL-E” as it embraces its gloom. But it’s all a set up for the redemption song, the gospel-tinged “Let it Grow.” This film is available locally in 3-D. Rating: Three and a half stars. 94 minutes. (PG) — Roger Moore, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“The Grey” — An unrelenting demonstration that wolves have no opinion. When they attack, it’s not personal. Stranded in the far north after a plane crash, a small group of oil company workers try to walk to safety and are tracked by a large group of ravenous wolves. Liam Neeson plays a wolf hunter

LEGACY MOTORSPORTZ INC. 1110 SE Reed Market Rd.

541-388-5688

SUBARU EXPERTS We Work On Older Cars! • REBUILT ENGINES • FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

AFFORDABLE RATES! FREE DIAGNOSTICS • FREE PICK UP LICENSED • INSURED • WARRANTIES 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE

film is available locally in 3-D. Rating: Two and a half stars. 132 minutes. (PG-13) “Journey 2: The Mysterious Island” — A transcendently goofy boy’s own adventure tale, with young Josh Hutcherson and his mom’s boyfriend (Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson) rescuing his grandfather (Michael Caine) from a lost island in the South Pacific, after teaming up with a helicopter pilot (Luis Guzman) and his sultry daughter (Vanessa Hudgens). With elephants as small as dogs, lizards the size of dinosaurs, bees so big you can ride them bareback, an exploding volcano, the lost city of Atlantis, Captain Nemo’s submarine Nautilus, and The Rock performing “It’s a Wonderful World” with a ukulele. It’s even in 3-D. I’m exhausted just describing it. Fun in the 1950s Disney adventure movie way. Rating: Two and a half stars. 94 minutes. (PG) “Mirror Mirror” — A retelling of the fairy tale in a sumptuous fantasy setting, with Julia Roberts and Lily Collins wearing the costumes of a career by the late, legendary Japanese designer Eiko Ishioka. They are the Queen and her stepdaughter, Snow White, Armie Hammer plays the charming Prince, and in this version more screen time is given than ever before to the Seven Dwarfs. Looks great, but the dialogue is rather flat, the movie sort of boring, and there’s not much energy in the two places it should really be felt: between the Queen and Snow White, and between Snow and the Prince. Rating: Two and a half stars. 106 minutes. (PG) “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” — A rich sheikh enlists a fisheries expert (Ewan McGregor) to work on his scheme to dam a desert river and introduce his favorite sport to his homeland.

Continued next page

TM

STILL SHOWING

Universal Pictures and Illumination Entertainment via MCT

The Lorax (Danny Devito) demands to know who chopped down the Truffula Tree in “Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax.”

who takes charge. This movie is not merely effective; the way I felt in my gut, it was all too effective. Rating: Three and a half stars. 117 minutes. (R) “The Hunger Games” — Jennifer Lawrence is strong and convincing as the lead in a science-fiction parable set in a future where poor young people are forced into deadly combat for the entertainment of the rich. The earth-toned naturalism of forest hunting scenes is in odd contrast to the bizarre oddballs at the top in this society. An effective entertainment, but too long, and it avoids many obvious questions about this society’s morality. Rating: Three stars. 142 minutes. (PG-13) “Jeff, Who Lives at Home” — Jeff (Jason Segel) is 30 and lives in his mother’s (Susan Sarandon) basement, smoking pot. His brother, Pat (Ed Helms), is stuck in a dead marriage with Linda (Judy Greer). Jeff believes the Shyamalan movie “Signs” contains signs that are key to the universe. During one eventful day, many signs manifest themselves to the characters, who also include Rae Dawn Chong in a warm supporting role. A whimsical, sweet comedy. Rating: Three stars. 83 minutes. (R) “John Carter” — A Civil War veteran (Taylor Kitsch) finds himself transported to Mars, where he lands in the middle of a planetary war between two humanlike cities, with the local four-armed race of Tharks in the middle. Lots and lots of action, a terrific heroine in Dejah Thoris (Lynn Collins), an intriguing alien design and well-done special effects. Director Andrew Stanton lacks the kind of tightly written script he had in “Finding Nemo,” and as science fiction this is a couple of notches down from his “WALL-E,” but the movie is competent weekend action. This

LIVE UNITED

“The Raid: Redemption” — A visualized video game sparing the audience the inconvenience of playing it. A gangster lord has his headquarters on the top floor of a 15-story building. A SWAT team enters on the ground floor. Their assignment: Fight their way to the top, floor by floor. Wall-to-wall violence. Against many of those walls, heads are pounded again and again, into a pulpy mass. If I estimated there are 10 minutes of dialogue, that would be generous. Rating: One star. 101 minutes. (R) “The Three Stooges” — The Farrelly brothers have made probably the best Three Stooges movie it’s possible to make in 2012, and perhaps ever, since the Stooges stopped making them themselves. Much depends on whether that was what you were hoping to hear. I’ve never been a Stooges fan myself. If you are, you’ll possibly be impressed by how well Larry, Curly and Moe are played by Sean Hayes, Will Sasso and Chris Diamantopoulos. So it’s your call. Rating: Two and a half stars. 92 minutes (PG)

PAGE 29 twitter

From previous page

GO! MAGAZINE •

facebook

movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012


movies

PAGE 30 • GO! MAGAZINE

N Neewws!! OOwwnneerrs Open Daily for Breakfast & Lunch , 7am –3pm

New Menu!

Come Join Us for Happy Hour & Dinner Fridays & Saturdays til 6pm Watch the Sunset From our Decks! Group Dinners & Private Parties Any Day By Request

Breathtaking Views • Full Bar Bend’s Newest Old-Style Cafe Located at The Bend Municipal airport

 63136 Powell Butte Hwy • Bend • 541-318-8989 

presents

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

NEW DVD & B L U - R AY RELEASES The following movies were released the week of April 10.

“Into the Abyss” — Time stands completely still during the fifth chapter of “Into the Abyss.” There, Fred Allen — the former captain of the Walls Unit Death House in Huntsville, Texas, and an overseer of more than 125 executions during his tenure — tells an eight-minute story about the execution that finally wrecked his ability to even endorse capital punishment, much less engage in it. Watching Allen unload his burden almost redeems “Abyss’ ” price of admission all by itself. Arguably, it has to do exactly that. The notion of an unvarnished look at capital punishment through Werner Herzog’s unique filter of compassionate but uncomfortable bluntness is enormously intriguing, and in flashes, this documentary demonstrates why. But “Abyss” parlays its premise into a heavy focus on a trio of murders that sentenced two people to death row, and the fallout from the case’s aftermath — with regard to the victims’ families, one alleged killer’s (also incarcerated) father, a woman who fell in love with the other alleged killer while fighting for his innocence — takes hold of the movie. Herzog is the master of calmly and warmly asking brutally uncomfortable questions that regularly get answers, and the conversations he has on film are enthralling in their explorations of everything from regret over choices not made to a paralyzing fear of answering the telephone in case more bad news awaits on the other end of the line. But a lot of “Abyss” also comes down to people pleading cases

Alex Bailey / The Weinstein Company / The Associated Press

Jim Broadbent portrays Dennis Thatcher and Meryl Streep portrays Margaret Thatcher in “The Iron Lady.” the movie can’t crack, and the actual process of capital punishment receives surprisingly little direct attention beyond Allen’s scene. If that’s what brought you here, what awaits may disappoint in spite of how well it’s presented. No extras were listed for this film. This film was not given a star rating. 107 minutes. (PG-13) — Billy O’Keefe, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“The Iron Lady” — Meryl Streep is flawless in a biopic about British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and her rise to power from humble origins as “the grocer’s daughter from Grantham.” Director Phyllida Lloyd and writer Abi Morgan seem to have little clear idea of what they think

about her, or what they want to say. She’s all dressed up with nowhere to go. DVD and Blu-ray Extras: Five featurettes. Rating: Two stars. 105 minutes. (PG-13) — Roger Ebert, The Chicago Sun-Times

ALSO OUT THIS WEEK: “The Darkest Hour” COMING UP: Movies scheduled for national release March 13 include “Shame” and “Mission: Impossible — Ghost Protocol.” Check with local video stores for availability. — Roger Ebert, The Chicago Sun-Times (“DVD and Blu-ray Extras” from wire and online sources)

Fireside Jazz I n t h e C l u bh o u s e G r e a t R o o m

T H U R S DAY APR I L 19, 2012 5 : 3 0– 7: 30 pm Featuring SMUDGE Jazz Duo SMUDGE is an inspired jazz duo, featuring Elise Franklin on vocals and Warren Zaiger on electric bass. The listener hears fresh, original arrangements of jazz standards, blues and R&B in the warmth and comfort of our living room. Wine, drinks and appetizers are available from the bar and the Restaurant will be serving dinner in the Lakeside Room until 8:00 pm. NEW Dining Room Hours: Breakfast: Friday –Saturday –Sunday 8 am –2 pm Lunch: Tuesday –Sunday 11am –2 pm Abbreviated Lunch: Tuesday –Sunday 2 pm –9 pm Dinner: Tuesday –Sunday 5 pm –9 pm

From previous page With Emily Blunt as the sheikh’s assistant and the fishologist’s love interest, and Kristin Scott Thomas, funny as the right hand of the British PM. Could have been rich satire; is instead soppy romance. Rating: Two and a half stars. 111 minutes. (PG-13) “The Secret World of Arrietty” — The new anime version of “The Borrowers,” titled “The Secret World of Arrietty” by screenwriter and “supervisor” Hayao Miyazaki, has the fascination with household “spirits,” the same lovely color palette and attention to detail for which his films are famous. But Miyazaki, director of “Ponyo,” “Spirited Away” and “My Neighbor Totoro,” didn’t direct this Studio Ghibli film. Perhaps that is why it lacks his sense of whimsy, that little sprinkling of Miyazaki magic that the Japanese director has given his best work over the decades. The gorgeous pastels of Studio Ghibli films and famous attention to detail are much in evidence in this Hiromasa Yonebayashi film. But Miyazaki, who co-wrote the script, had nowhere to take it. Rating: Two and a half stars. 94 minutes. (G) — Roger Moore, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“This Means War” — As stupid action comedies go, this one scales the heights of inanity. Reese Witherspoon plays a Los Angeles cutie who meets two men (Chris Pine and Tom Hardy) through an online dating service, and it turns out they’re best buddies who both work for the CIA. Engaged in a romantic struggle for her charms, they use high-tech electronic surveillance equipment to spy on her most private moments — including her dates with both of them — which they sometimes watch together. The plot gimmick might work in a stupid teenage comedy, but the average age of the actors in this movie is 33.33. That’s old enough for their agents to know better. Rating: One and a half stars. 97 minutes. (PG-13) “Titanic 3-D” — The 1997 masterpiece retains all of its original power and is still a magnificent motion picture. For me personally, the 3-D doesn’t add anything necessary, but at least it provided a reason for this sparkling restoration and re-release, and director James Cameron knows what he’s doing. This time, it especially occurred to me that Kate Winslet, in wading through all that ice-cold water to save Leonardo DiCaprio, should

have had chattering teeth — or maybe be dead of hypothermia. This film is available locally in IMAX and 3-D. Rating: Four stars. 194 minutes. (PG-13) “We Need to Talk About Kevin” — Tilda Swinton in a raw and courageous performance as a woman whose psychopathic son has driven her over the edge. Kevin (Ezra Miller and Jasper Newell) hates her and knows exactly what buttons to push. Her husband (John C. Reilly) is benign to the point of cluelessness. She is the wrong person in the wrong life with the wrong child. Directed by Lynne Ramsay. Rating: Four stars. 111 minutes. (R) “Wrath of the Titans” — A great confusion of exploding mountains, fireballs, horrid monsters and gods shouting laughable dialogue at one another, all filmed in dim, dusty 3-D. Occasionally an action set-piece works (like a trip through a massive labyrinth), but the (human-sized) gods seem too puny; we don’t see how they can possibly survive unless they slipped a few bucks to the screenwriters. With Sam Worthington, Liam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes, Rosamund Pike. This film is available locally in 3-D. Rating: Two stars. 99 minutes. (PG-13)


movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012

M O V I E T I M E S • For the week of April 13

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE ARTIST (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 8:40 Sun-Thu: 1:15, 4:15, 6:40 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) Fri-Sat: Noon, 3, 6, 9 Sun-Thu: 1, 4, 7 JEFF, WHO LIVES AT HOME (R) Fri-Sat: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:10 Sun-Thu: 2:15, 5:15, 7:10 THE RAID: REDEMPTION (R) Fri-Sat: 1, 4, 7, 9:30 Sun-Thu: 2, 5, 7:30 SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 8:50 Sun-Thu: 1:30, 4:30, 6:50 WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN (R) Fri-Sat: 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:20 Sun-Thu: 1:45, 4:45, 7:20

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

21 JUMP STREET (R) Fri: 1:55, 4:55, 7:35, 10:25 Sat-Sun: 1:50, 4:55, 7:35, 10:25 Mon-Thu: 12:20, 3:05, 6:15, 8:55 ACT OF VALOR (R) Fri-Sun: 7:05, 10 Mon-Thu: 6, 8:40 AMERICAN REUNION (R) Fri: 12:15, 1:30, 3:30, 5:05, 6:35, 8:15, 9:35 Sat: 11:50 a.m., 1:20, 3:30, 5:05, 6:35, 8:15, 9:35 Sun: 11:50 a.m., 1:20, 3:30, 5:05, 6:35, 8:15, 9:35 Mon, Wed: 12:10, 1, 3, 3:45, 6:20, 7:20, 9:10 Tue, Thu: 12:10, 1, 3, 3:45, 6:20, 7:20, 9:10 CABIN IN THE WOODS (R) Fri: 2, 5:10, 8:10, 10:30 Sat-Sun: 1:55, 5:10, 8:10, 10:30 Mon-Thu: 12:50, 3:50, 7, 9:25 DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX (PG) Fri: 12:30, 6:55 Sat-Sun: 12:10, 6:55 Mon-Thu: 12:25, 2:45, 5:45, 8:35 DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX 3-D (PG) Fri-Sun: 3:45, 9:15 GRATEFUL DEAD MEET UP 2012 (no MPAA rating) Thu: 7 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) Fri: Noon, 1, 3:15, 4:10, 6:30, 7:20, 9:40, 10:30 Sat: 11:30 a.m., 12:50, 3:15, 4:10, 6:30, 7:20, 9:40, 10:30 Sun: 11:30 a.m., 12:50, 3:15,

GO! MAGAZINE •

K imberley F rench / 20th C entury F ox / The Associated Press

Reese Witherspoon and Chris P ine star in the action comedy “This Means War.” 4:35, 6:30, 8:05, 9:40 Mon-Thu: Noon, 2:55, 3:55, 6:05, 7:10, 9:15 JOHN CARTER (PG-13) Fri: 12:05, 6:25 Sat: 3:20, 6:25, 9:30 Sun: 11:40 a.m., 6:25 Mon-Wed: Noon, 6:25 Thu: Noon, 3:10 JOHN CARTER 3-D (PG-13) Fri, Sun: 3:20, 9:30 Mon-Wed: 3:10, 9:30 JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (PG) Fri: 1:50, 4:20 Sat-Sun: 1:40, 4:20 Mon-Thu: 12:30, 3:20 LOCKOUT (PG-13) Fri: 12:45, 5:15, 7:40, 10:10 Sat-Sun: 12:30, 5:15, 7:40, 10:10 Mon-Thu: 12:40, 3:35, 6:35, 9 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LA TRAVIATA (no MPAA rating) Sat: 9:55 a.m. MIRROR MIRROR (PG) Fri: 1:10, 3:55, 6:45, 9:25 Sat-Sun: 1, 3:55, 6:45, 9:25 Mon-Thu: 12:05, 2:35, 6:10, 8:45 THE THREE STOOGES (PG) Fri: 12:20, 1:20, 3:35, 4:45, 6:15, 7:15, 9:05, 9:50 Sat-Sun: Noon, 1:10, 3:35, 4:45, 6:15, 7:15, 9:05, 9:50 Mon-Thu: 12:05, 1:05, 2:30, 3:30, 5:50, 6:50, 8:30, 9:20 TITANIC IMAX (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 12:40, 4:50, 9:20 Mon-Thu: 1:15, 5:35 TITANIC 3-D (PG-13) Fri: 12:25, 4:30, 9:10 Sat-Sun: 12:20, 4:30, 9:10 Mon-Thu: 1:10, 5:30 WRATH OF THE TITANS (PG-13) Fri: 1:40, 7:25 Sat-Sun: 1:30, 7:25 Mon-Thu: 12:45, 6:45

WRATH OF THE TITANS 3-D (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 4:05, 10:20 Mon-Thu: 3:35, 9:15

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

THE GREY (R) Fri-Thu: 9 JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 3 THE SECRET WORLD OF ARRIETTY (G) Sat-Sun: Noon Wed: 3 THIS MEANS WAR (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

REDMOND Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

AMERICAN REUNION (R) Fri: 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 Sat-Sun: 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 Mon-Thu: 4:15, 6:45 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) Fri: 3:05, 6:10, 9:15 Sat-Sun: Noon, 3:05, 6:10, 9:15 Mon-Thu: 3:05, 6:10 MIRROR MIRROR (PG) Fri: 4, 6:30, 9 Sat-Sun: 11:30 a.m., 1:45, 4, 6:30, 9 Mon-Thu: 4, 6:30 THE THREE STOOGES (PG) Fri: 3:45, 6:15, 8:30 Sat-Sun: 11:15 a.m., 1:30, 3:45, 6:15, 8:30 Mon-Thu: 3:45, 6:15

SISTERS

Tin Pan Theater

Sisters Movie House

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, tinpantheater@gmail.com

720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

CRAZY HORSE (no MPAA rating) Fri-Sat: 8 Sun: 6 Tue-Thu: 10:30 FARMAGEDDON (no MPAA rating) Tue-Thu: 5:15 MAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA (2010 — no MPAA rating) Fri: 10:30 MELANCHOLIA (R) Fri-Sat: 5:15 Sun: 3 Tue-Thu: 8

21 JUMP STREET (R) Fri-Sat: 7:45 Sun: 6:45 AMERICAN REUNION (R) Fri: 7:30 Sat: 5:15, 7:45 Sun: 4:15, 6:45 Mon-Thu: 6:30 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) Fri: 7 Sat: 4, 7 Sun: 3, 6 Mon-Thu: 6:15 MIRROR MIRROR (PG) Fri: 5:30 Sat: 3:15, 5:30

Sun: 2:15, 4:30 Mon-Thu: 6:30 THE THREE STOOGES (PG) Fri: 5:30, 7:45 Sat: 3:15, 5:30, 7:45 Sun: 2:15, 4:30, 6:45 Mon-Thu: 6:45 WRATH OF THE TITANS (PG-13) Fri: 5:15 Sat: 3 Sun: 2

PAGE 31

MISSED THE MOVIE? NEVER AGAIN! Now Available on Video on Demand

APRIL The Iron Lady April 10

Albert Nobbs April 10

MADRAS Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

AMERICAN REUNION (R) Fri: 4:35, 7, 9:30 Sat: Noon, 2:10, 4:35, 7, 9:30 Sun: Noon, 2:10, 4:35, 7 Mon-Thu: 4:35, 7 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) Fri: 6:30, 9:25 Sat: 12:10, 3:20, 6:30, 9:25 Sun: 12:10, 3:20, 6:30 Mon-Thu: 6:30 LOCKOUT (PG-13) Fri: 5, 7:10, 9:15 Sat: 1, 3, 5, 7:10, 9:15 Sun: 1, 3, 5, 7:10 Mon-Thu: 5, 7:10 THE THREE STOOGES (PG) Fri: 4:50, 6:50, 9 Sat: 12:50, 2:50, 4:50, 6:50, 9 Sun: 12:50, 2:50, 4:50, 6:50 Mon-Thu: 4:50, 6:50 WRATH OF THE TITANS 3-D (PG-13) Fri: 5:05, 7:25, 9:40 Sat: 12:15, 2:45, 5:05, 7:25, 9:40 Sun: 12:15, 2:45, 5:05, 7:25 Mon-Thu: 5:05, 7:25

PRINEVILLE Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE HUNGER GAMES (UPSTAIRS — PG-13) Fri: 4:10, 7:10 Sat-Sun: 1:10, 4:10, 7:15 Mon-Thu: 6 THE THREE STOOGES (PG) Fri, Mon-Thu: 4, 7 Sat-Sun: 1, 4, 7 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

The Darkest Hour April 10

Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol April 17

IMAX: Born to be Wild April 17

The only movie schedule that matters is yours! Catch these movies and hundreds more - including thousands of FREE titles - on VOD from BendBroadband.

Call 541-382-5551

www.bendbroadband.com


PAGE 32 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012


Bulletin Daily Paper 04/13/12