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Singletrack at Wanoga

Alison Krauss & Union Station

Kiwa Butte, Dinah Moe Humm trails take shape • SPORTS, D1

Saturday at the Schwab

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Camping with children Bend taps Tips and techniques for your kids’ first time in a tent • new chief of police Adult obesity in Oregon Even in summer, worsens, but snow can endanger most of U.S. FAMILY, E1

WILDERNESS RESCUES

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Jeff Sale, a 32-year law-enforcement veteran and current Cheney, Wash., police chief, is expected to become Bend’s next top cop. City Manager Eric King announced the hiring decision Thursday, but said that before Sale takes over as Bend’s police chief he will need to pass a final background check. Assuming Sale passes, he would replace outgoing Chief Sandi Baxter in early August. Baxter is retiring after more than 30 year with the Bend Police Department. King made the decision to hire Sale after an interview process that included a visit to Cheney Jeff Sale to see how the police chief is per- would replace ceived in the community, and a Sandi Baxter series of meetings with local law as Bend’s top enforcement representatives and cop in early other officials. August. Sale, 54, was one of five finalists from a field of 22. He beat out the city’s other top candidate, Vancouver, Wash., Police Cmdr. George Delgado. “Jeff has really amazing leadership qualities,” King said. “He’s really taken the department up in Cheney and moved it forward.” Sale became Cheney’s police chief in 2004. Before that he was a lieutenant for the Washington State Patrol, where he started his career in 1979. While in Cheney, a town of about 10,500 near Spokane, King said Sale was able to bring in more than $2 million in outside funds, such as through grants, to help bolster his department’s funding. In Bend, where funding is tight, King said this is an important attribute. See Police / A5

is even fatter By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

Obesity rates in Oregon continue to worsen with one in four adults now obese, and three out of five overweight. But the state obesity rate for children age 10 to 17 is the best in the nation. According to a new report issued Thursday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Trust for America’s Health, Oregon had the 35th worst adult obesity rate in the country, at 25.4 percent, improving its ranking from 24th a decade earlier, when 19.9 percent were obese. But Oregon moved down 11 slots only because other states got fatter faster. Oregon’s obesity rate has risen nearly 87 percent over the past 15 years, but that still lagged behind the growth in obesity rates for at least 17 states. See Obesity / A5

Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin

Losing ground

John Zachem and Pete Halmos, both of Bend, ski toward South Sister Thursday morning, with plans for an afternoon summit. Most South Sister hikers start their ascent at Devils Lake, where the snow conditions are somewhat sparse. But as elevation increases, so does the thickness of the snow.

Oregon ranks 35th-worst among the 50 states and the District of Columbia in terms of adult obesity. The state has dropped 11 spots in the ranking over the past 10 years. Now three out of five adult Oregonians are overweight and one in four is obese.

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Even in July, last winter’s record snowfall presents a threat to hikers venturing into the forest unprepared. Tuesday, a 17-year-old Bend boy fell into a 20-foot-deep crevasse shortly after reaching the summit of South Sister. The boy was able to climb out of the crevasse with minor injuries, but Deschutes County Search & Rescue was called in to help him and his climbing party get off the mountain. Wednesday, a Sisters woman was found distraught on State Highway 242, having just come off the Pacific Crest Trail. According to Forest Service law enforcement officers, the woman and her dog had been dropped off where the trail crosses Santiam Pass five days earlier, with arrangements to meet her father at Elk Lake on Wednesday. Instead,

Obesity rates for adults

Years

National ranking Percent (highest obese to lowest)

1988-1990 11.2% 1993-1995 13.6% 1998-2000 19.9% 2008-2010 25.4%

Years

21 35 24 35 National Percent ranking overweight (highest or obese to lowest)

1988-1990 42.7% 1993-1995 49.8% 1998-2000 55.6% 2008-2010 61.1%

26 30 29 42

Source: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

“People are moving out to higher country and to the more remote areas not realizing we still have a lot of snow and the trails are not in the best condition.” — Lt. Scott Shelton, Deschutes County Search & Rescue she encountered heavy snow and made it only a fraction of the way. Having made it about two days south of State Highway 242, the woman ran out of water and panicked. She abandoned her tent and other equipment and headed back north to the highway, leaving behind a note reading “going to 242, please save us.” Chris Sabo, trails specialist for the Deschutes National Forest, said while the Pacific Crest Trail hiker was reunited with her family, her trip — as well as the Bend teen’s trip up South Sister — could have ended disastrously.

The woman suffered scratches from sinking knee-deep into the snow, but this “postholing” easily could have resulted in a broken leg or other serious leg injury, Sabo said. Although she was carrying a cellphone, she did not have service, Sabo said, and did not encounter any other hikers in her six days on the trail. “People (are) going to go out no matter what we tell them, and things like this will happen,” he said. “Search & Rescue is probably going to see a higher blip of missions out there until this melts off.” See Rescues / A6

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

SHUTTLE: Final launch likely to be delayed, Page A2

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Vol. 108, No. 189, 68 pages, 7 sections

By Paul Farhi The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — It might be the ad that ate the Internet. “1 Tip for a Tiny Belly” reads the headline, rendered in fake hand-lettered type and positioned above a crudely animated drawing of a woman’s bare midriff. Try as you might to concentrate on something else, the midriff distracts your eye by shrinking and reinflating — flabby to flat, flat to flabby. “Cut down a bit of your belly everyday by following this 1 weird old tip,” it reads. The “weird old tip” is revealed only after you abandon what you were reading and click on the ad. For months, versions of the ad have been just about everywhere. They have run as pop-ups and display ads on some of the most popular websites, including Facebook, Weather.com and About.com. They have also shown up on the home pages of news organizations such as the Los Angeles Times, MSNBC, The Washington Post and the Guardian newspaper in Britain. See Scheme / A5

Hacking scandal shifts media, political landscape

TOP NEWS INSIDE

Abby

Want a tiny belly? Here’s a tip: Web ads may be a big, fat scam

LONDON — Britain’s media and political landscape shifted Thursday as the powerful Murdoch family summarily announced plans to shut down the disgraced mass-circulation tabloid at the center of a deepening scandal over journalistic malfeasance, and arrest seemed imminent for the paper’s once politically influential former editor. The decision by Rupert Murdoch’s media conglomerate, News Corp., to close the paper, The News of the World, seemed to be a calculated move to help protect Murdoch’s proposed $12 billion takeover of the paytelevision company British Sky Broadcasting. But it hardly put an end to the saga, or to Murdoch’s connection to it.

Rupert Murdoch’s media conglomerate, News Corp., said it is shutting down its disgraced tabloid, The News of the World, following a scandal over phone hacking. The scandal exposes a web of relationships between the Murdochs’ empire on the one hand and the police and politicians on the other. And it poses new challenges for Murdoch, a media tycoon who has at times seemed to hold much of Britain’s political establishment in thrall, cultivating connections to both Labour and Conservative governments and using the prospect of his support — or its with-

drawal — to help drive his political agenda. In a statement of strikingly self-critical apology, Murdoch’s son and heir apparent, James Murdoch, admitted that News International, the company’s British subsidiary, had “failed to get to the bottom of repeated wrongdoings that occurred without conscience or legitimate purpose.” The company’s repeated assertions that the scandal was “confined to one reporter,” had proven untrue, he said, “and those who acted wrongly will have to face the consequences.” According to several people, it appears increasingly likely that Andy Coulson, a former News of the World editor, is to be arrested Friday on suspicion of illegally paying the police for information during his editorship. See Hacking / A6


A2 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Weather likely to postpone start of last shuttle mission By Marcia Dunn

Future of U.S. manned spaceflight looks bleak By Mark K. Matthews The Orlando Sentinel

When Atlantis takes off from Kennedy Space Center, it will be the last time NASA launches astronauts aboard a governmentbuilt spacecraft for perhaps the rest of this decade. The agency that put Apollo in the history books faces the biggest crisis since its formation in 1958. Plans to replace the shuttle with a government-run rocket are beset by budget and design issues. Attempts to bring commercial-rocket companies into the game are promising but far from certain. And a country once willing to put 4 cents of every federal dollar into NASA now spends about half a cent, as the U.S. struggles with more earthbound concerns such as unemployment and health care. “After a half-century of remarkable progress, a coherent plan for maintaining America’s leadership in space exploration is no longer apparent,” astronauts Neil Armstrong, Jim Lovell and Gene Cernan wrote in an op-ed this spring. The reasons — NASA mismanagement, congressional parochialism and an influential aerospace industry — are not new. These problems have plagued NASA for years, but they’re magnified by the end of the 30-year-old shuttle program.

The space shuttle Columbia blasts off on NASA’s first shuttle flight. Over 30 years, NASA’s five space shuttles, Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavor, have flown a combined 134 missions. Today’s planned launch of Atlantis would be the 135th.

Space shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to launch today at 11:26 a.m., from the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Fla., but Thursday’s forecast only gave a 30 percent chance of acceptable weather. Atlantis could blast off as late as Monday. The shuttle’s mission is the 135th and final one for NASA, which will next take aim at asteroids and Mars.

The Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Rain in the forecast threatened to delay the last space shuttle launch, set for today, and a lightning strike near the pad briefly caused a flurry of concern at NASA before engineers concluded the spaceship was OK. The lightning bolt hit a water tower about 500 feet from the launch pad at midday Thursday, the space agency said. Technicians hurried out to check for electrical problems, but a review board ruled out any damage. Over the years, lightning has struck on or near the launch pad occasionally, delaying a few launches but causing no damage. The forecast for today, meanwhile, looked dismal, with only a 30 chance of acceptable weather at launch time, 11:26 a.m. NASA test director Jeff Spaulding pointed out that space shuttles have managed to launch with worse forecasts. “There’s some opportunity there,” he said Thursday as the rain set in. “It’s a really tough day if you make a decision not to go and it turns out to be good weather.” NASA is closing out its 30-year space shuttle program to take aim at asteroids and Mars, destinations favored by the White House. Private companies will take over the job of hauling cargo and crews to the International Space Station, freeing NASA up to focus on points beyond. “We believe that on behalf of the American people, it is time for NASA to do the hard things to go beyond low-Earth orbit,” NASA’s deputy administrator, Lori Garver, told reporters gathering for the launch. The odds of good flying weather improve with each passing day, said shuttle weather officer Kathy Winters. The launch time moves slightly earlier every day, and that helps, she said. NASA has until Sunday, possibly Monday, to get Atlantis and its four astronauts in orbit. Otherwise, the spacecraft will remain grounded until the following weekend because of an Air Force rocket launch that takes priority. Rain or shine, hundreds of thousands of people are expected to jam the area for the launch. Some estimates put the crowd at close to 1 million. Dozens of astronauts already are in town, including the very first shuttle pilot, Robert Crippen, who opened the era aboard Columbia in 1981. “It’s a sad time for me, obviously. But it’s also a time when I feel pride. I’m proud of what the shuttle has done,” Crippen said. “You’ve got to get it back down on the ground safely. So when we finally get ‘wheels stop,’ it will be an emotional moment for me.” Along one of the main roads leading into Kennedy Space Center, busi-

MEMORABLE SHUTTLE MOMENTS April 12, 1981

Associated Press ile photos

Jan. 28, 1986 The space shuttle Challenger explodes shortly after lifting off, killing all seven crew members on board.

May 13, 1992 Astronauts Richard Hieb, Thomas Akers and Pierre Thuot grab the Intelsat VI satellite from the ledges of the payload bay of the space shuttle Endeavour in the first threeman spacewalk.

Stan Honda The Associated Press

Jan. 24, 1998

nesses and even churches joined in the celebration with billboards pronouncing “God Bless Atlantis July 8” and “Godspeed Atlantis and Crew.” The countdown, at least, was going well, with only a few minor technical problems at the pad reported. Atlantis is bound for the International Space Station with a year’s worth of provisions. NASA wants the orbiting outpost well-stocked in case there are delays in getting commercial cargo hauls started. The first privately operated supply run — by Space Exploration Technologies Corp. — is tentatively scheduled for late this year. NASA payload manager Joe Delai got emotional as he showed pictures of the 21-foot-long, shiny metal cargo carrier in Atlantis’ payload bay. That massive bay is the one thing that none of the smaller follow-on craft will have. “This is just beautiful. ... It’s not a piece of metal. It’s a way of life,” he said. “We’re just inches into what we

Shuttle Commander Terrence Wilcutt, right, and Mir Commander Anatoly Solovyev hug after opening hatches between space shuttle Endeavour and the Russian space station Mir.

know, and everything we do now is what I consider the foundation for human spaceflight. “Yeah, it’s emotional, but it’s also part of history. I think that’s what you’re seeing from a lot of folks down here.” Also aboard Atlantis: multiple sets of patches and pins representing all 135 shuttle missions, as well as thousands of shuttle bookmarks for children. The patches and pins will be presented to schools after the flight, Delai said. The 12-day voyage by Atlantis should culminate with a touchdown back at Kennedy on July 20, the 42nd anniversary of man’s first steps on the moon. “There’s an old saying that says it’s better to travel well than to arrive,” Spaulding said. “And I’d have to say after the last 30 years, certainly our program and these shuttles, throughout all of their missions, have traveled very well. And after 135’s landing, I think we can say at that point that we’ve arrived.”

Feb. 1, 2003 Debris from the space shuttle Columbia streaks across the sky over Tyler, Texas. All seven crew members were killed.

May 23, 2011 The space shuttle Endeavour docks with the International Space Station, in a photo taken by Expedition 27 crew member Paolo Nespoli from a departing Soyuz capsule.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 8, 2011 A3

T S South Sudan set to secede amid tensions

N 

 B Grizzly in mauling was only protecting cubs YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. — A grizzly bear that mauled a 57-year-old hiker to death in Yellowstone National Park was only defending its cubs and had not threatened humans before. So park officials on Thursday decided to leave it alone to wander the backcountry. The mauling — the park’s first in 25 years — temporarily closed one of the park’s top attractions, the south rim of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, on one of the busiest days of the year. Some tourists were left to wonder what was going on.

Tougher power plant emission rules issued WASHINGTON — The Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday issued new standards for power plants in 28 states that would sharply cut emissions of chemicals that have polluted forests, farms, lakes and streams across the eastern United States for decades. The agency said the new regulations, which take effect beginning next year, would reduce emissions of compounds that cause soot, smog and acid rain from hundreds of power plants by millions of tons at an additional cost to utilities of less than $1 billion a year. The EPA said the cleaner air would prevent as many as 34,000 premature deaths, 15,000 nonfatal heart attacks and hundreds of thousands of cases of asthma and other respiratory ailments every year.

Hunger strike spreads among Calif. prisoners LOS ANGELES — Thousands of inmates at prisons throughout California have been refusing state-issued food in a mass hunger strike to protest conditions at the state’s highest-security prisons, where some inmates are kept in prolonged isolation. The protest was organized by inmates at Pelican Bay State Prison’s security housing unit, where prisoners are kept in isolation more than 22 hours a day. They stopped eating on July 1, and prisoners around the state have imitated their campaign. About 1,700 prisoners in all were continuing to refuse at least some state-issued meals Thursday, down from a peak of 6,600 last weekend, according to the State Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

Justices decline to stop execution of Mexican WASHINGTON — In a 5-4 decision that split along ideological lines, the Supreme Court on Thursday evening rebuffed a request from the Obama administration that it stay the execution of a Mexican citizen on death row in Texas. The inmate, Humberto Leal Garcia Jr., was executed about an hour later. The administration had asked the court to delay the execution so that Congress might consider recently introduced legislation that would provide fresh hearings on whether the rights of Leal and about 50 other Mexican citizens on death row in the United States had been violated.

Royal newlyweds set to arrive in California LOS ANGELES — Britain’s newest royal couple is scheduled to arrive today, staying in Southern California for a little more than 48 hours on an official visit that palace officials say will “support the interests of the United Kingdom through the prism of the royal couple’s interest.” Apparently, that does not include Disneyland. Instead, Prince William and the former Kate Middleton will shuttle between events that are meant to highlight British businesses and filmmakers, raise money for the prince’s charity at the polo match and stop at an arts organization that caters to poor children and teenagers near downtown. The couple will arrive at Los Angeles International Airport to be greeted by Gov. Jerry Brown and his wife, Anne Gust, then head to a reception at the consulgeneral’s residence. — From wire reports

By Mary Beth Sheridan and Rebecca Hamilton The Washington Post

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama meets with congressional leadership in the Cabinet Room of the White House on Thursday to discuss the debt. From left are House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, House Speaker John Boehner, the president and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.

Boehner endorses call for debt plan By Lori Montgomery and Paul Kane The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Negotiations over the national debt entered a critical phase Thursday as President Barack Obama challenged congressional leaders to embrace an ambitious but politically painful strategy to raise revenue and make changes to popular federal retirement programs. Top Democrats were open to the idea, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., pledged her “full cooperation” after meeting with Obama and other senior lawmakers at the White House. Republicans were more skeptical, with one prominent exception — House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. Boehner enthusiastically endorsed Obama’s call for a far-reaching plan. Later at the Capitol, Boehner made his own pitch to reluctant Senate Republicans, arguing in a closed-door luncheon that securing the nation’s economic future requires bold action.

Boehner also said he expects a deal to come together quickly — or to collapse under the weight of partisan resistance. “He is always an optimistic man, and he was optimistic today,” said freshman Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., who served for three years under Boehner in House leadership. “I think if they can get there, they’ll get there pretty quickly — or they won’t get there.” Obama praised the meeting as “very constructive” and said leaders would convene again Sunday “with the expectation that, at that point, the parties will at least know where each other’s bottom lines are” and will be able to “start engaging in the hard bargaining that’s necessary to get a deal done.” Obama said the parties “are still far apart on a wide range of issues.” He continued, “But, again, I thought that all the leaders here came in a spirit of compromise, in a spirit of wanting to solve problems on behalf of the American people.” Time to solve those problems is rapidly running out. The nation

Egg producers, Humane Society to urge standard on hen cages By William Neuman New York Times News Service

Two groups that are usually squawking at each other — egg farmers and animal welfare advocates — announced an unusual agreement Thursday to work together to seek a federal law that would require larger cages and other improved conditions for the nation’s 280 million laying hens. The deal comes after the egg industry has been put increasingly on the defensive. Animal welfare groups have clandestinely recorded videos showing poor conditions on farms, and various states have sought to set more humane standards for hens. Egg producers have also been struggling to improve their image after tainted eggs from several farms in Iowa sickened thousands of people in a nationwide salmonella outbreak last year.

The agreement was announced by the nation’s main egg industry group, the United Egg Producers, which represents farmers who own about 80 percent of the nation’s laying hens, and the Humane Society of the United States, the nation’s largest animal protection organization. The groups said they would ask Congress to pass a law enacting the new standards, which they said would be the first federal law addressing the treatment of farm animals and would pre-empt efforts in several states to set their own standards. The proposed federal standards would include cages that give hens up to 144 square inches of space each, compared to the 67 square inches that most hens have today. They would also include so-called habitat enrichments, like perches, scratching areas and nesting areas, that would allow the birds to express natural behavior.

faces default on Aug. 2 unless Congress acts to raise the legal limit on government borrowing, and Republicans and Democrats alike are demanding that any increase in the $14.3 trillion debt limit be accompanied by a significant debt-reduction plan. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., warned administration officials that a deal must be sealed by the end of next week to give congressional leaders enough time to draft the legislation, submit it to congressional budget analysts and marshal the votes before the Aug. 2 deadline, aides said. Obama and Boehner have emerged as the most enthusiastic proponents of a big deal that would save as much as $4 trillion over the next decade by overhauling the tax code and tackling all the major drivers of federal spending, including the Pentagon and health and retirement programs. But such a plan would be complicated both politically and substantively, and aides said Senate leaders in both parties are skeptical that such a deal could come together in the

next few days. Reid declined to comment on the talks when he returned to the Capitol at midday Thursday, and his Republican counterpart offered only a modest level of support. “We had a good conversation, and the talks will continue,” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., told reporters. Two other GOP participants in the White House meeting — House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia and Senate Minority Whip Jon Kyl of Arizona also expressed doubts about a big deal, according to Republican sources. And even as Pelosi pledged to back the president’s quest for an ambitious plan to stabilize the nation’s finances, she bluntly rejected cuts to benefits for recipients of Social Security and Medicare, telling reporters: “We are not going to balance the budget on the backs of America’s seniors, women, and people with disabilities.” Obama plans to meet privately with Pelosi today to address rising Democratic anxiety.

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CAIRO, Egypt — More than two dozen onetime officials and allies of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak were charged Thursday with murder, attempted murder and terrorism, accused of organizing one of the most memorable attacks on protesters during the 18-day revolution, in which assailants riding horses and camels charged into the crowds at Tahrir Square. The charges were announced by the Judicial Investigation Commission, an independent office set up by the prosecutor, and came amid rising public anger over the slow pace with which officials and the police have been held accountable for the

killings of more than 840 people during the revolution. Some activists and analysts said they saw the announcement as an effort to neutralize plans for a demonstration scheduled for Friday, in large part to press the interim military government for greater accountability. “The announcement of the accusations against these people happened because of tomorrow’s protest,” said Nabil Abdel Fattah, an analyst at the state-financed Ahram Center for Political and Strategic Studies. “But where is Hosni Mubarak and his two sons? Where is the ex-president of Egypt?” The government had previously announced that Mubarak would stand trial next month in connection with the deaths and on other corruption related charges.

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The map of Africa will be redrawn Saturday as South Sudan becomes an independent nation through a peace process championed by successive U.S. presidents but still beset by lingering tensions from years of war. President George W. Bush put Sudan at the center of his foreign policy in Africa, helping broker a 2005 peace agreement that ended a conflict that had claimed more than 2 million lives. President Obama has rallied international pressure to rescue that accord as it risked unraveling. U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice, who is scheduled to lead the U.S. delegation at the independence ceremony, said in a telephone interview this week that this was “a fraught and fragile moment, but a remarkable one nonetheless.” Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir is expected to attend Saturday’s ceremony. He has promised to accept the oil-rich south’s secession, after initially balking at losing a Texas-size region that had provided much of his government’s revenue. But the north and south remain divided over key issues that were supposed to be resolved by now under the peace accord. They include how to fully demarcate the border, divide oil revenues and determine which side will control the disputed region of Abyei. And northern Sudan is still riven with conflicts. Peace in the Darfur region remains elusive. A month ago, the Sudanese began bombing Southern Kordofan, an oilproducing state that will also remain part of Sudan.

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A4 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Scheme Continued from A1 The ad is so broadly distributed that it’s likely you’ve seen it not just once or twice but hundreds of times. The accumulated number of “impressions” — the number of times it has flashed by someone on the Internet over the past 18 months — runs into “the tens of billions,” estimates Steve Wernikoff, a government lawyer who has tracked it. “It’s just a tremendous amount.” The innocent-seeming “1 Tip” ad is actually the tip of something much larger: a vast array of diet and weight-loss companies hawking everything from pills made from African mangoes to potions made from exotic acai berries. Federal officials have alleged that the companies behind the ads make inflated claims about their products and use deceptive means to market them. The take so far: at least $1 billion and counting. The “1 Tip” ads are the work of armies of “affiliates,” independent promoters who place them on behalf of small diet-product sellers with names such as HCG Ultra Lean Plus. The promoters profit each time someone clicks through to the product seller’s site and orders a free sample. The sample, however, isn’t always so free.

Obesity Continued from A1 “The national rankings are one thing, but we’re really concerned about where we’re going in Oregon,” said Dr. Bruce Gutelius, deputy state epidemiologist. “We do know that Oregon is still facing a crisis with obesity. We have seen a continuing upward trend in both obesity and overweight status in Oregon.” People with a body mass index of 25 of higher are considered overweight, and those with a BMI over 30 are considered obese. A 5-foot-4-inch tall person would be obese carrying 30 extra pounds. Gutelius said rates are growing due a combination of factors that aren’t unique to Oregon. “When we talk about obesity, it’s calories in and calories out, and we need to address them both to make a difference,” he said. Obesity rates have generally been lower in Western and Northeastern states, and higher in the southeast. But no states have made significant progress in slowing the growth of obesity rates over the past decade. Two-thirds of states, including Oregon, now have obesity rates above 25 percent. “Today, the state with the lowest adult obesity rate would have had the highest rate in 1995,” said Jeff Levi, executive director of the trust. “There was a clear tipping point in our national weight gain over the last 20 years and we can’t afford to ignore the impact obesity has on our health and corresponding health care spending.” The consequences of obesity include a higher risk for diabetes and high blood pressure, and Oregon’s rates for both conditions compared to other states fell in line with its obesity ranking. But Oregon did score well in terms of physical activity, finishing second only to Minnesota in the number of adults who got regular exercise. Obesity rates were also closely correlated to socioeconomic factors. Those with less education and lower income were more likely to be overweight or obese. And minority groups tended to have the highest overall obesity rates. Oregon’s above-average status may be linked in part to its racial make-up, with minorities represent only 10 percent of the population. Despite the rising obesity rates for adults, Oregon has attracted the attention of obesity experts trying to decipher why the state child obesity rate — at 9.6 percent — is the lowest in the nation. “Some of the theories I’ve heard is that we have a really high breast feeding rate, and breast feeding has been shown to be protective against obesity,” said Kate Wells, project director for Kids@Heart, a Central Oregon childhood obesity prevention initiative. “But other than that, there’s no way to know which driver is working in our favor.” The Kids@Heart initiative has launched several projects seeking to keep childhood obesity rates from rising any further, including recruiting pediatricians at Mosaic Medical and Central Oregon Pediatric Associates to write prescriptions for healthy, active living for children at risk for obesity and its consequences. For higher risk cases, the program calls in play coaches that can work with families to over-

In lawsuits filed over the past year, the Federal Trade Commission has alleged that the ads are the leading edge of what amounts to a three-step scheme that has conned millions of people. Much like a barker outside a carnival tent, “1 Tip” is merely a come-on, a lure to start the process. People who click on the ad are directed to a second site, which looks like a diet or healthnews page. The sites go by names such as Consumeronlinetips.com and Weeklyhealthnews.com. The sites typically feature an article in which an attractive young TV reporter “investigates” the benefits of a diet involving a series of products. Sometimes the products are made from mangoes or acai berries, a fruit grown in South and Central America. In other cases, the products come from human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone produced by developing embryos and the pituitary gland. “We here at Channel 7 are a little skeptical” of the hCG diet, reads the copy at Consumer onlinetips.com. “So we decided to put these products to the test.” In each case, the sites carry favorable blurbs about the diet from well-known news organizations such as ABC, CNN and USA Today, along with brief, laudatory “reader comments.”

Almost everything about these would-be news sites is bogus, the federal government contends. It has said that the offer of free or low-cost samples is a scheme to capture consumers’ credit card numbers, leading to thousands of complaints about unauthorized charges. In an action aimed at Internet promoters of acai berry products in April, the FTC filed 10 lawsuits against some of the companies and individuals behind the ads. The agency’s allegations are nearly identical in each case: that sites such as Consumeronlinetips.com aren’t legitimate news organizations, that the defendants can’t substantiate the claims of dramatic weight loss and that the sites’ operators don’t disclose that they have financial ties to the diet-product merchants they’re linking to. Although the promoters are apparently unconnected to one another, their sites are remarkably similar. All use what the FTC contends are fake articles. Several used the photo of the reporter supposedly investigating the diet. The woman identified as “reporter Julia Miller” on some of the

sites is a French newscaster, Melissa Theuriau, who has said she was unaware that her image was being used this way. The endorsements from the real news organizations, such as CNN or ABC, are a sham, too, the government says. The promoters use the same formula, and sometimes the exact same ad, “because it’s cheap,” said David O’Toole, an FTC lawyer who has been involved in the agency’s crackdown. “They don’t have to create a new ad from whole cloth. It’s easy to use it again and again because it keeps costs down. And it works.” The website operators are known as affiliate marketers because they’re allied with, but independent of, the merchants whose products they’re promoting. The relationship works like this: The affiliates seed the Internet with the “1 Tip” ad and put up the testimonial websites with their own funds. When a would-be customer clicks the links on the affiliate site and orders products from the merchant’s site, the affiliate receives a cut of the purchase. The payment varies from company to company, but FTC investigators found evidence that it can be as much as $30 per order. One of the companies the government sued, IMM Interactive of Long Island, N.Y., spent more than $1.3 million last year to place “flat belly” ads, which generated more than a billion im-

come barriers to more active lifestyles, such as helping them with the cost of attending recreational programs. The group is also using the successful 5210 framework for healthy living that was first tested in Portland, Maine. The approach urges kids to get five servings of fruits and vegetables per day, no more than two hours of screen time, at least an hour of physical activity and zero sugarsweetened beverages. Local advocates are using 75210, adding a healthy breakfast seven days a week to the recommendations.

“American society couldn’t do a worse job at the moment of keeping children fit and healthy — too much TV, too many food ads, not enough exercise, and not enough sleep,” said Dr. Victor Strasburger, a member of the American Academy of Pediatric panel that last month called for less screen time for children. “We’ve created a perfect storm for childhood obesity — media, advertising, and inactivity.” Oregon officials have implemented a number of statewide initiatives targeting obesity for both adults and children. Last

year, the state required restaurants with 15 or more outlets to provide information on the calories, saturated fat, trans fat, carbohydrates and sodium in their menu items upon request. The Oregon Public Health Division also awarded grants to a dozen counties, including Deschutes County, to form community partnerships addressing the chronic diseases most closely linked to physical inactivity, poor nutrition and tobacco use. The latest report also cited Oregon’s school nutrition policies and complete street laws — which accommo-

FTC: Millions conned

The pages have links that lead to a third site, where consumers can use a credit or debit card to order “trial” samples of the featured products.

Lawsuits allege deceit

THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 8, 2011 A5 pressions, according to the lawsuit. Thanks to all those impressions, more than a million people took the plunge and clicked on the ad, the agency said.

Police

date by cyclists, pedestrians and transit users — as factors that put Oregon’s obesity rates below the national average. “In general, what needs to be addressed are the problems that people have in terms of getting access to healthy food options and being able to have enough opportunities to exercise,” Gutelius said. “And there are multiple different policy options to address those.”

Continued from A1 King said he also likes Sale’s demeanor and approach to community-based law enforcement, and the fact he spent six months as Cheney’s interim city administrator. “He has a broader view of the city,” King said. “He’s not just focused on running a good police department. He’s also a member of an executive team that knows how to run a city.” When Sale begins, he’ll take over a department that has about 100 employees and a budget of $18 million. Sale is expected to earn an annual salary of around $119,000. While in Cheney, Sale oversaw a department of 30 employees with a $3 million budget. He said that when he starts he doesn’t expect to make any radical changes. Instead, he said he’ll try to talk with people both in and out of the department to see what works and what doesn’t. “Change has to be done for the benefit of the city and the community,” Sale said. “The biggest thing I see for the Bend Police Department is trying to create a vision for what it wants to be five years from now and how we’re going to get there.” Sale has experience in community policing. He said that philosophy is a way to change the perception of a police officer from someone out to get you to someone who is there to help you and be an ambassador. An example of this, he said, would be when an officer who is not busy with a call stops to talk to someone tending their garden, for instance, just to have that introduction. “I want to talk to you and I want my officers to talk to you in some other venue than the worst day of your life,” Sale said.

Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or at mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Allegations denied IMM denied almost all of the FTC’s allegations in a court filing June 13. But it conceded that “defendant does not have sufficient information to admit or deny whether the individuals identified on some of the web pages who claim to have tested the products on themselves and experienced positive results actually tested the products and experienced such results.” The company hedged even further in the fine print of one of its newslike websites, which is cited in the FTC complaint, saying, “This website, and any page on the website, is based loosely off a true story, but has been modified in multiple ways including, but not limited to: the story, the photos, and the comments. Thus, this page, and any page on this website, are not be taken literally or as a non-fiction story.” The FTC says that none of the websites can back up its weightloss claims. But the heart of the scam, it says, is the offer of a “free” sample. In fact, the sites disclose only in fine print that a consumer who hands over a credit card number is signing up for much more.

OPEN SATURDAY 12-4

OPEN SUNDAY 1-4

OPEN SUNDAY 12-3

NORTHWEST CROSSING - Great Room plan, large kitchen, 4 bedrooms with master on main. Quality finishes. Fenced back patio & extra parking area. MLS# 201000475 $465,000 DIRECTIONS: Mt. Washington Dr to South High Lakes Loop entrance. 2147 High Lakes Loop

Modest single level 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1615 sq. ft. home - priced below 200K. 3-car garage, large corner lot with beautiful gardens. Lots of storage, great neighborhood. MLS#: 201007994 $184,900 DIRECTIONS: Wickiup up the hill to 36th, turn left. 3106 SW 36th St.

Beautiful new construction in Yardley Estates. Single level, 3 bedroom, 1755 sq. ft., quality materials, hardwood floors, tiled baths, solid core wood doors, beautiful woodwork. See it today! MLS# 201102381 $259,900 DIRECTIONS: From Empire, north on Layton, right on Boulderfield. 63152 Peale St.

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AWBREY BUTTE - 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 4113 sq. ft. home. 1.21 landscaped acres. Main floor master. Open living and beautiful fireplace. 3-car garage. MLS# 201101344 $675,000 DIRECTIONS: Mt. Washington to west on Summit to left on Horizon. 2751 NW Horizon Dr.

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OPEN SUNDAY 12-4

OPEN HOUSE

SISTERS - WINE AND CHEESE OPEN HOUSE!! Remodeled home with incredible mountain views from almost every room! Horse ready too! MLS# 201009496 $450,000 Directions: Hwy 126 east, left on Holmes Rd. When Road T’s, right on Holmes Rd, right on McSwain Dr. 18540 McSwain Rd.

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SW BEND - This has been a 2nd home & is in impeccable condition! Large rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 2499 sq. ft. Granite, hardwood & stainless steel. Corner lot. MLS# 201104105 $299,900 DIRECTIONS: South Brookswood, east on Sweetbriar, on the corner of Sweetbriar and Chamomile. 61031 SW Chamomile Pl.

Unsurpassed & unobstructed Cascade views high up on Awbrey Butte. 1.05 acres. Very quiet, private setting. 2400 sq. ft. of deck on 2 levels. 4 bedroom suites, master on the main, 4881 sq. ft. MLS# 201105004 $1,100,000 DIRECTIONS: Summit Dr to Promontory to Three Sisters Dr. 2819 Three Sisters Dr.

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SW BEND - This has been a 2nd home & is in impeccable condition! Large rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 2499 sq. ft. Granite, hardwood & stainless steel. Corner lot. MLS# 201104105 $299,900 DIRECTIONS: South Brookswood, east on Sweetbriar, on the corner of Sweetbriar and Chamomile. 61031 SW Chamomile Pl.

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NW CROSSING - Earth Advantage energy efficient home. Master on main. Hardwood floors, tile counters, Alder wood cabinetry, 2-car garage. Built by Sage Builders, LLC MLS# 201101240 $369,900 DIRECTIONS: Greenwood Ave west, turns into Shevlin Park Rd, south on NW Crossing Dr. 2494 NW Crossing Dr.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

A6 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Anthony gets 4-year term, will be freed Wednesday By Lizette Alvarez and Timothy Williams New York Times News Service

Casey Anthony was sentenced Thursday to a four-year jail term, the maximum possible, for lying to the police but will be freed Wednesday because she has spent nearly three years behind bars in Orlando, Fla., awaiting trial. Anthony, who was acquitted Tuesday of murdering her young daughter, Caylee, was sentenced to a year for each count of lying but was given credit for 1,043 days in jail, both for time served and good behavior. The judge also ordered her to pay a fine of $4,000, or $1,000 for each count. Judge Belvin Perry Jr., the presiding judge and the chief of the Ninth Judicial Circuit Court in Orlando, said that by telling four lies to police officers — including that she spoke to Caylee by telephone on July 15, 2008 — she led them repeatedly on a “wild goose chase.” “As a result of these four separate and distinct lies, law enforcement expended a great deal of time, energy and manpower looking for young Caylee Marie Anthony,” Perry said. “This search for her went on from July through December, over several months, trying to find Caylee Marie Anthony. Four distinct separate lies.”

Joe Burbank / The Associated Press

Casey Anthony waits in the courtroom before the start of her sentencing hearing in Orlando, Fla., on Thursday. Defense lawyers had argued for a maximum of one year because the four lies were told on the same day, July 16, 2008. Anthony chose not to speak during her sentencing. Her parents, Cindy and George Anthony, sat at the back of the courtroom, showing little emotion. A jury had acquitted her of first-degree murder, aggravated manslaughter and aggravated child abuse in the death of her 2-year-old daughter.

Outside the courthouse, a throng of loud protesters, including some people who had searched for Caylee, held placards reading “Justice for Caylee” and “Plenty of Evidence. No Guts.” The verdict has generated a great deal of anger, and Jose Baez, Anthony’s lawyer, has expressed concern for her safety and is considering hiring bodyguards. The case has riveted much of the country, which became entranced by tales of a duplicitous young mother apparently more interested in boyfriends and bar hopping than in caring for her child. The verdict incited outrage from people who had watched the televised trial and then used Twitter and set up Facebook pages to venomously denounce the verdict. Caylee was last seen June 16, 2008. Her remains were found that Dec. 11 in woods near her grandparents’ home. Anthony failed to report Caylee missing for 31 days. During her daughter’s disappearance, Anthony got a tattoo that said “bella vita” — beautiful life. But there was no direct evidence linking Anthony to the death of her child, and the prosecution’s case rested on circumstantial evidence. The child’s body was too badly decomposed for a cause of death to be determined.

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Hacking Continued from A1 His arrest, if it does take place, would be a huge blow not just to Murdoch, but to the government and to Cameron’s Conservative Party. Coulson most recently worked as the chief spokesman for the prime minister. Cameron has always vouched for Coulson’s integrity and said he believed Coulson’s assurances that he had done nothing wrong. By closing The News of the World, which is 168 years old and is Britain’s largest-circulation newspaper, Murdoch seems determined to try to limit damage from the scandal and remove a possible obstacle to the takeover of British Sky Broadcasting, known as BSkyB. According to a person close to him, the move also gives him an excuse to do something he had planned to do anyway: turn his flagship Sun tabloid into a seven-day operation, thus preserving his lucrative share in the Sunday newspaper market while decontaminating the brand by removing its association with The News of the World. Critics of Murdoch said the move was more expedient than remorseful. “This seems like a cynical rebranding exercise,” said Jeremy Reed, a lawyer for several public figures who have sued The News of the World over allegations that the paper had hacked into, or intercepted, their cellphone messages. The unfolding scandal also raises new questions about the close relationship between the police and the tabloid news media in Britain. According to another person familiar with the possible charges, e-mails recently turned over to the police from The News of the World

Rescues Continued from A1 Late-season snow doesn’t seem to be deterring locals and tourists from heading into the forest, said Lt. Scott Shelton of Search & Rescue. Although nobody has been seriously injured, Shelton said many have found themselves ill-prepared. “People are moving out to higher country and to the more remote areas not realizing we still have a lot of snow and the trails are not in the best condition,” Shelton said. Melt-off is running about three to four weeks behind normal around South Sister, Sabo said, and a bit further behind on the western slopes of the Cascades. Sabo said he went up to South Sister on July 1 for some backcountry skiing and found conditions difficult. Melting snow is opening up crevasses, and the “snow cupping” is abundant. The large melted pits make the snow surface resemble a giant golf ball and complicate travel across the uneven footing. At Moraine Lake, about two miles up the trail from the Cascade Lakes Highway, Sabo observed snow six to eight feet deep and most of the lake frozen

linked Coulson and half a dozen other people, including high-ranking editors, to payments to the police “in the six figures.” The payments were said to be not just for news tips, a standard tabloid practice despite its illegality, but also for substantial information, including sensitive documents held by the police. Not only would any arrests be a blow to News International, but the company also faces the awkward prospect that any current or former News of the World employee facing prison might be tempted to argue, with specific examples, that wrongdoing was widespread at the paper. Accusations of illegal behavior at The News of the World have swirled for some time at no obvious cost to the newspaper, whose salacious focus on frothy sex scandals and show-business gossip helps it sell 2.7 million copies every Sunday. But public revulsion spilled over this week at new allegations — separate from those linked to Coulson — that the paper hacked into the phones of a 13-year-old murder victim, Milly Dowler, the families of slain soldiers and victims of the 2005 subway bombings. The wave of indignation, expressed also by members of Parliament in an extraordinary session in the House of Commons on Wednesday, in turn helped scare off advertisers, who began hastily pulling their business, and cast a cloud over the bid to take over BSkyB. Murdoch already owns a controlling 39.1 percent stake in it; the deal would allow him to own it outright. The British government was set to approve the BSkyB takeover this week and will most likely still allow it to go ahead on the grounds that it does not hamper media competition in Britain. But in the meantime, so many people

8IFSFUIFUFFO XBTGPVOE A Bend teenager fell into a crevasse on Lewis Glacier on the flank of South Sister on Tuesday. The 17-year-old boy was later rescued by Deschutes County Search and Rescue. Carver Glacier

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over. Trails in the area are not well marked, he said, and can be difficult to locate when snow obscures the path. “I think we’re going to get a lot more people that haven’t hiked in these summer snow conditions, and whether it’s falling

have written to the government to express their objections to the deal that the final decision looks likely to be delayed until the end of the summer. “They are sacrificing News of the World in order to get the BSkyB deal through,” said George Brock, the head of the journalism department at City University in London. “It’s, in a way, symbolic of the demise of newspapers in print.” The leader of the opposition Labour Party, Ed Miliband, told the BBC that only the resignation of Rebekah Brooks, the chief executive of News International, would show that the organization was taking responsibility for its actions. “Some people are losing their jobs, but one person who is keeping her job is the person who was editor of The News of the World at the time of the Milly Dowler episode,” Miliband said. He was referring to the hacking of the murder victim’s phone after she was abducted but before her body was found, adding to the distress of her family and confusing the police investigation by deleting some messages to make room for more. Brooks was the paper’s editor at the time, though she has said she knew nothing about the matter. Despite repeated calls for her resignation, she has retained the confidence of the Murdoch family and of Rupert Murdoch, to whom she is particularly close. Speaking to the BBC on Thursday, James Murdoch said he was convinced that Brooks’ leadership was “the right thing” for the company and “absolutely crucial right now.” A person close to Murdoch predicted that after six months or so, News International, News Corp.’s British subsidiary, would relaunch The News of the World as the Sunday edition of its daily Sun tabloid.

into a crevasse, a creek, even a lake, some of them are going to get in trouble,” Sabo said. Shelton said summerlike weather at lower altitudes does not guarantee mild conditions as hikers head into the mountains. “You’ve got to be properly equipped. You don’t hike on a glacier in tennis shoes. It’s common sense.” Early season hiking, horseback riding and mountain biking can damage trails. The trail network linking South Sister, Green Lakes and the Green Lakes Trailhead near Devils Lake is the most-used high-altitude trail system in the state, Sabo said, and heavy traffic there makes it vulnerable to damage while snow is melting off. Hikers who steer around puddles or unmelted snow are likely to trample plant life on either side, inadvertently widening the trail. Additionally, the long snow season has prevented crews from removing blown-down trees on most High Cascades trails, in some cases rendering them impassible for hikers or horseback riders without stepping off into the sensitive vegetation. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

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B

Auto News Auto industry is on a hiring spree, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,872.66 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +38.64 +1.36%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Tech fest to display consumer products Local and national tech companies will show off their home entertainment, security, cable system and other gear Saturday at the Bend TechnologyFest in The Oxford Hotel. The event, which will be held during the Bend Summer Festival, will be open to the public. Food and drinks will be available, according to a news release, and prize drawings will be held. BendBroadband, Samsung, Marantz and other companies are expected to attend the festival, which is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Oxford, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave. The event is being produced by Sisters-based Abbajay Automated Control Systems, which designs and installs automated lighting, media and other systems for homes and businesses. More information can be found at http://bendtechfest .eventbrite.com/

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By Tim Doran The Bulletin

La Pine homeowner Dan Patton expected this morning to sign documents to allow the state of Oregon to begin paying his mortgage — ending a more than six-month wait for him and his family. “We can … breathe,” he said Thursday. “We actually managed to stretch it out this far and not get into trouble.” If Patton signs his loan papers this morning as scheduled, his mortgage will be among about 3,000 being paid, so far, through a $100 million foreclosure prevention programmed funded by the fed-

Inside

• Beefed-up mortgage assistance for jobless homeowners, Page B5

eral government and administered by the state. Some of the total of 5,000 or so Oregon homeowners who qualified for the Mortgage Payment Assistance Program are still waiting for the state to make their first mortgage payments, but so far the Oregon program has paid more than $6 million

in mortgage payments since mid-April, said Ben Pray, spokesman for the Oregon Homeownership Stabilization Initiative, the state agency created to oversee the program. “We would probably acknowledge that the program has taken longer than anticipated,” he said. Last year, the U.S. Treasury Department awarded $7.6 billion to 18 states and Washington, D.C. — those with high unemployment and hit hardest by the housing market collapse — to help homeowners unable to pay their mortgages. See Mortgage / B5

Corn ethanol subsidies no longer untouchable Mark Marquis, president of Marquis Energy, which operates two ethanol plants in Illinois, says the industry understands that times have changed. A $6 billiona-year tax credit for fuel blenders should go away, he said. Peter Wynn Thompson New York Times News Service

Retail sales increase

Prices from the AAA Fuel Price Finder at www .aaaorid.com. Price per gallon for regular unleaded gasoline and diesel, as posted online Thursday.

GASOLINE Station, address Per gallon • Space Age, 20635 Grandview Drive, Bend. . .$3.76 • Chevron, 61160 U.S. Highway 97, Bend . . . . . . .$3.78 • Chevron, 3405 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend . . . . . . .$3.82 • Texaco, 2409 Butler Market Road, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.84 • Safeway, 80 N.E. Cedar St., Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.86 • Chevron, 1210 S.W. Highway 97, Madras . . . . .$3.86 • Chevron, 2005 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . .$3.86 • Texaco, 539 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.88

DIESEL • Texaco, 178 Fourth St., Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4.00 • Chevron, 1210 S.W. Highway 97, Madras . . . . .$4.00 Marla Polenz / The Bulletin

$36.528 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.617

State mortgage relief program Team will taking longer than anticipated Federally funded initiative currently helping 3,000 homeowners; 2,000 still waiting assume duties of founder

The retail occupancy rate in downtown Bend finished the second quarter at 92 percent, a drop of 1 percentage point from the first quarter, according to a news release from the Downtown Bend Business Association. Seven new businesses have opened or soon will open downtown, and several others have relocated, according to Chuck Arnold, the association’s executive director. The new businesses include a photographic studio and gift shop, a wine shop, a boutique and several eateries. For more information, visit www.downtownbend.org/

Central Oregon fuel prices

s

KIRBY NAGELHOUT

Downtown Bend occupancy rate dips

June retail sales blew by analysts’ expectations and suggested that consumers, at least when they were shopping, were feeling good. Despite worries that a drop in consumer confidence and high gas prices would weigh on results, every sector that is tracked by Thomson Reuters, from discount to luxury, on Thursday reported increases at stores open at least a year. — From staff and wire reports

B

As industry matures, some are calling for end to federal support By Clifford Krauss New York Times News Service

Federal subsidies for corn ethanol have long been considered untouchable in Washington — not least because politicians want the votes of Iowans, who have traditionally held the first nominating caucuses in the contest for the presidency. But this year, cutting the budget deficit holds more allure than courting corn farmers, marking a turning point in ethanol politics. In Washington, there is growing consensus that the ethanol industry

has reached financial stability, making much government assistance unnecessary. A strong majority of the Senate recently voted to end most of the subsidies. The pressure prompted three influential senators to announce a compromise Thursday that would drastically cut the financial support and end a tariff on foreign ethanol entirely by the end of July. The White House, which has supported a reduction of the subsidies, said it was encouraged by the latest proposal. Three Republican presidential candi-

dates — Tim Pawlenty, Ron Paul and Rick Santorum — are also seeking to eliminate or phase out subsidies for the industry even if that hurts them in Iowa. Jon Huntsman has decided he will not even contest the caucuses, in large part because of his anti-subsidy record. No one is seeking to end the most important government support for ethanol — a federal mandate that gasoline blenders mix increasing amounts of ethanol into gasoline. See Ethanol / B2

By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

With the death Saturday of Kirby Nagelhout, founder of the Kirby Nagelhout Construction Co., Central Oregonians may wonder about the future of a company that was so defined by its leader. But Nagelhout planned for his company’s future without him — even as he battled cancer during the Jeff Deswert, past four to president of five years. Kirby NagelHe chose hout Contwo people to struction run the business in his stead, and they say the Bend company will not be going anywhere — and in fact it will continue to grow. Mike Taylor, “We’re difgeneral manferent indiager of Kirby viduals, but Nagelhout ( Na g e l h o u t) Construction entrusted the company to be run by the people who he trusted while he was here,” said General Manager Mike Taylor, one of the people Nagelhout tapped to run the company. “We’re going to continue pursuing work like he did. So, yeah, the goal is to continue to grow.” The company’s determination to win contracts will be kept intact, as will current employment levels — and Nagelhout’s name will continue to be the company’s name as well. What will change is the role of the company’s leaders, said Jeff Deswert, who replaced Nagelhout as president at the beginning of 2011. Deswert, who worked in Nagelhout’s company in the 1980s and ’90s, was asked last year was asked by Nagelhout to be the company’s new president. Deswert said he prefers to work on the business, as more of a manager, rather than in the business, unlike his predecessor, who gravitated toward complicated bidding and estimating work while also being the company’s public face. See Nagelhout / B5 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Private sector adds Web providers 157,000 jobs in June, plan penalties far exceeding forecast to slow piracy

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By Greg Robb MarketWatch

By Ben Sisario

WASHINGTON — Private-sector employment rose 157,000 in June, according to Automatic Data Processing Inc.’s employment report released Thursday, in what could be a signal that the recent economic soft patch may not last long. The headline number surprised Wall Street, coming in more than double the 70,000 increase expected by economists. With the report typically considered the first stab at counting job gains each month, markets will be watching the ADP data closely because last month’s report accurately predicted the sharp drop in nonfarm payroll subsequently reported by the government for May. The ADP data indicate job growth in June will be better than the tepid performance in May. Today, the Labor Department will report on June’s nonfarm payrolls, which also include the public sector. Economists polled by MarketWatch are looking for a gain of 115,000 and for the nation’s unemployment rate to remain steady at 9.1 percent. See Jobs / B2

New York Times News Service

Americans who illegally download songs and movies may soon be in for a surprise: They will be warned to stop, and if they don’t, they could find their Internet access slowing to a crawl. After years of negotiations with Hollywood and the music industry, the nation’s top Internet providers have agreed to a systematic approach to identifying customers suspected of digital copyright infringement and then alerting them via e-mail or other means. Under the new process, which was announced Thursday, several warnings would be issued, with progressively harsher consequences if the initial cautions were ignored. The companies took pains to say that the agreement did not oblige Internet providers to shut down a repeat offender’s account, and that the system of alerts was meant to be “educational.” But they noted that carriers would retain their right to cut off any user who violated their terms of service. See Piracy / B2

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B USI N ESS

B2 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M  BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

SATURDAY BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Madras COIC Office, 243 S.W. Third St., Suite A; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY FACEBOOK AND TWITTER BASICS: Registration required; $39; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m; free; ; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. WORKPLACE BENEFITS: Pat Gerhart, Rebecca Morgan and Sandy Stephenson present a panel discussion about workplace benefits. Gerhart is with Deschutes Brewery, Morgan is St. Charles’ senior human resource director and Stephenson is Bend Chamber of Commerce’s chief financial officer and human resource director; free; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL: Hosted by Right At Home In Home Care; free; 5:30 p.m.; Crave Eclectic Fine Dining, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-923-2679 or www.crrchamber.com.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m; free; ; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. COLLEGE SAVINGS OPTIONS: Learn how to develop a plan for your college savings. Registration required; free; ; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

Jobs Continued from B1 This would be a pickup from the slow growth of 54,000 in nonfarm jobs added during May. “A number like this, while it is just one month’s number, suggests that really maybe what happened (in May) was a pause in the economic expansion and that, as we head into summer months, we are going to pick up some momentum,” said Joel Prakken, chair-

Piracy Continued from B1 In bringing together the media companies and Internet carriers, the deal demonstrates how the once-clear line separating those two businesses has been blurred. Eight years ago, the Recording Industry Association of America had to sue Verizon to try to uncover the identity of a customer who was sharing music online. Now the Internet providers are hoping to profit as they pipe music and video of the nonpirated variety to their customers. The system announced Thursday involves a series of six warnings that ISPs can send to a customer whom the media companies have identified as a possible copyright infringer. The warnings escalate from

HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; noon-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CONTRACTOR EDUCATION COURSE: Three-day course which meets the Oregon Construction Contractors Board education requirement. Registration required; $275; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7290 or https://equalityfederation.salsalabs. com/o/35028/p/salsa/event/common/ public/?event_KEY=592.

FRIDAY July 15 TOWN HALL FORUM, MOVING FORWARD, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND THE CITY OF BEND: Bill Mosley, the Bend economic development advisory board chair, Eric Strobel, business development manager for Economic Development of Central Oregon, and Jon Skidmore, Bend business advocate, discuss the city’s new economic development plan. Buffet breakfast included; $30 for Bend Chamber members, $40 for others; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

SATURDAY July 16 HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

MONDAY

free; 11 a.m.; www1.gotomeeting. com/register/799917864.

WEDNESDAY July 20 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m; free; ; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603.

THURSDAY July 21 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m; free; ; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz. soutomaior@schwab.com or www.schwab.com. LA PINE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AFTER HOURS: Toastmasters Club charter party to introduce the newly chartered club. Hamburgers and refreshments will be served; free; 5 p.m.; L&S Gardens and Land Clearing, 50792 S. Huntington Road; 541-536-9771.

FRIDAY July 22 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

July 18 EXCEL 2007 INTERMEDIATE: Two-morning class. Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 4 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. WORRIED ABOUT MAKING HOUSE PAYMENTS?: Learn what to do if you fall behind. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541318-7506, ext. 109.

MONDAY July 25 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY July 26

DISASTER RECOVERY BEST PRACTICES AND LESSONS LEARNED: Agility Recovery CEO Bob Boyd discusses best practices for businesses’ disaster recovery. Boyd will also share several real-world recovery stories and lessons learned;

SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING ON FACEBOOK, IT’S NOT JUST A FAD: Matt Hand, owner of Pinnacle Media, will help attendees understand what social media is all about, the ins and outs of Facebook marketing, how to integrate social media marketing with traditional marketing and how to decide if social media marketing is right for your business. Includes lunch buffet. RSVP required; $25 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members; $45 for others; 11 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org.

man of Macroeconomic Advisers. Job gains were a revised 36,000 in May, compared with the initial estimate of just 38,000, the ADP data also showed. Still, the current labor market remains decidedly weak, and it will take much more than one strong month to move it into healthy territory and make a meaningful dent in the unemployment rate. In the past two years, there have been periods where it looked like some healing would take place, but subsequent months

have proven disappointing. Other indicators have shown continued tough times in the labor market. On Wednesday, outplacement consultancy firm Challenger Gray & Christmas Inc. reported that planned layoffs were 41,432 in June, the second straight monthly rise. In addition, jobless claims have topped the key 400,000 mark for 13 straight weeks after touching a three-year low of 375,000 in late February.

TUESDAY July 19

simple e-mail notifications to, at levels 5 and 6, a set of “mitigation measures,” like reduced connection speeds or a block on Web surfing. As the alerts progress, a customer must acknowledge that he understands the notice. Customers will also have the opportunity to contest the complaint. The effect on consumers, the companies hope, will be more of a deterrent-by-annoyance — rather than the random lightning bolt of litigation that was once the preferred method of enforcement by the Recording Industry Association, one of the parties to the agreement. The media companies were also represented by the Motion Picture Association of America and groups acting on behalf of independent record companies and filmmakers. The Internet carriers involved in the deal in-

clude AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Verizon and Time Warner Cable.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Ethanol Continued from B1 But at a time when many tax breaks are under scrutiny, there seems to be little political will to continue giving $6 billion a year in federal tax credits to fuel blenders that must buy the ethanol anyway. Further undermining support for ethanol are food makers and livestock farmers, who say the industry’s vast demand for corn is driving up their own costs, and the oil industry, which has never been fond of a fuel that displaces some of the gasoline in cars and trucks. Recognizing reality, ethanol makers say they are willing to give up most of the money, although they and their allies in Congress want to spend some of the savings on new subsidies instead. Many top ethanol producers, like Valero Energy, Archer Daniels Midland and POET, are stable and profitable — a contrast to the heavily indebted companies of five years ago, some of which were forced into bankruptcy. Corn prices, meanwhile, have more than tripled since Congress first created an ethanol mandate in 2005, as the portion of the U.S. corn crop devoted to ethanol has grown to nearly 40 percent. Food manufacturers and cattle and chicken farmers say the government’s support for ethanol is, in effect, pushing up food prices. “Over the last two years, the oil industry has been joined by food producers, environmentalists, as well as the poultry producers who use grain as a feed, to create a powerful coalition against ethanol subsidies,” said Divya Reddy, an energy analyst for the Eurasia Group, a consulting firm. Reflecting the new landscape, the Senate voted 7327 in June to end the tariff on foreign ethanol and cut annual tax credits for blenders of ethanol. The vote was largely symbolic since the amendment was attached to a bill that failed. But many analysts view it as a sign that neither benefit is likely to survive this summer’s negotiations between the Obama administration and Congress to deal with the national debt. Many economists say an

Peter Wynn Thompson / New York Times News Service

Distillers grain, a by-product from making ethanol, is stored at a Marquis Energy ethanol plant in Hennepin, Ill. end to the blender’s tax subsidy would have minimal impact. “In the short term, six to nine months, we might see a minor reduction in production,” said David Swenson, an economist at Iowa State University. “But within a year or so, we would expect production to climb back to where it is right now because we still have the mandate, which guarantees demand and maintains the price level of ethanol.” As for the tariff — a 54-cent-agallon tax on imported ethanol first imposed in 1980 — analysts say it is unnecessary at the moment because Brazil, generally a leading source, is tightening production. Brazilian refiners make ethanol from sugar cane, but with sugar prices high on international markets, they are making less ethanol and more sweetener. Mark Marquis, president of Marquis Energy, which operates two ethanol plants in Illinois and Wisconsin, said the industry understands that times have changed. “We don’t need the blender’s

credit,” said Marquis, who is also a director of Growth Energy, an ethanol lobbying group. “It’s time that it goes away.” But that does not mean the ethanol industry wants to give up the money entirely. The fuel blending mandate has resulted in a standard of 10 percent ethanol mixed into gasoline sold at most U.S. service stations. But with gasoline demand essentially flat, so is demand for ethanol. In January, the Environmental Protection Agency said cars and light trucks built since 2001 could safely use a blend with up to 15 percent ethanol, although few stations are now equipped to supply that. So the ethanol industry now wants the government to help it grow by subsidizing gas pumps.

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B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 8, 2011 B3

A N 2 years after nearly collapsing, Automakers balk at auto industry on hiring spree EPA’s plans to allow higher-ethanol fuel

By Dee-Ann Durbin The Associated Press

DETROIT — Volkswagen opened a plant in Tennessee last month with 2,000 workers. Honda is hiring 1,000 in Indiana to meet demand for its best-selling Civic. General Motors is looking for 2,500 in Detroit to build the Chevy Volt. Two years after the end of the Great Recession, the auto industry is hiring again — and much faster than the rest of the economy. As an employer, it’s growing faster than airplane manufacturers, shipbuilders, health care providers and the federal government. The hiring spree is even more remarkable because memories of the U.S. auto industry’s neardeath experience are fresh. In 2009, General Motors and Chrysler both got government bailouts and entered bankruptcy, and auto sales hit a 30-year low. In June of that year, about 623,000 people were employed by the auto industry in the United States, the fewest since the early 1980s. Now the figure is almost 700,000, a 12 percent increase. Sales are back up, too, and automakers are hiring by the thousands to meet increased demand. “The buzz is incredible around here about what opportunity we’re going to get if we can build a great product,” says Ben Edwards, who went to work for Volkswagen in Chattanooga, Tenn., last year and is now a team leader on an assembly line that installs tires and seats. Edwards was working as a general contractor until the housing market dried up. He says the pay at Volkswagen, which starts at $14.50 an hour, is fair and the benefits are generous. Besides hiring 2,000 people itself, Volkswagen figures the plant, where it will make its new Passat, will create 9,000 spin-off jobs in the region, including 500 at autosupplier plants that are springing up nearby.

Bulking up Automakers are hiring again because car sales are rising. Americans bought 10.4 million cars and trucks in 2009 and 11.6 million in 2010. This year, they’re on track to buy 13 million or more, and auto companies are adding shifts to meet the demand. “Everybody got so lean and mean during the downturn that they’re trying to rebuild staff,” says Charles Chesbrough, a senior economist with IHS Automotive. The auto industry’s 12 percent increase in jobs compares with a 0.2 percent gain for the economy as a whole, excluding farming and adjusted for seasonal variation, since June 2009. The Labor Department reports Friday on jobs gained or lost last month. In a normal economic recovery, improvement in the housing market leads the way by creating construction jobs. But home prices haven’t stopped falling, and the construction industry has shed 8 percent of its workers since June 2009 — 474,000 jobs in all. The gains in the auto industry have been small by comparison. But they do create positive ripple effects for the economy. The Cen-

By Aaron Kessler Detroit Free Press

Billy Weeks / The Associated Press

Ben Edwards, team leader on assembly line number 6, makes adjustments to the door frame of a Volkswagen Passat in Chattanooga, Tenn. Edwards is one of many new employees at the Volkswagen plant, which opened May 24.

Since June 2009 … Employment in the auto industry has increased 12 percent. Employment in the economy as a whole has increased 0.2 percent, excluding farming and adjusted for seasonal variation.

ter for Automotive Research estimates that every new auto manufacturing job leads to nine other jobs — from parts makers to restaurants that feed autoworkers. The auto gains have been widespread, with the Midwest the biggest beneficiary. In Ohio alone, auto manufacturing jobs have risen 31 percent the past two years, while parts makers in Michigan have added nearly 20,000 jobs. Parts jobs are also up 15 percent in Alabama, where workers make parts for Mercedes SUVs and Honda minivans, and in Kentucky, where the Chevrolet Corvette and Toyota Camry are made. Before the turnaround, new auto jobs were scarce. Detroit’s auto companies had too many factories, high wages and bloated bureaucratic management. Jobs began disappearing in 2006 and 2007 as U.S. automakers tried desperately to restructure. Dozens of auto suppliers were pushed into bankruptcy. Then came 2008, when gas prices spiked and the financial crisis struck. The industry lost almost one in every four of its jobs. By the time GM and Chrysler got out of bankruptcy, in June 2009, the industry employed about half as many people as it did in 2000. Sales and profits have risen ever since, and payrolls have followed. GM, Ford and Chrysler are all making money for the first time since the mid-2000s and adding workers to build popular models like the revamped Ford Explorer. Foreign companies, stung by the high cost of exporting cars to the U.S. when the dollar is weak, are racing to build more products here. Automakers are doing it with cheaper labor. Four years ago, the United Auto Workers agreed to

a contract that allowed Detroit’s carmakers to hire some new workers at $14 per hour, or half the starting pay of workers at that time. While the UAW doesn’t represent workers at foreign-owned plants, those companies — like Volkswagen — generally match UAW pay. At a recent GM event in Toledo, Ohio — where GM was announcing that it plans to hire or retain 4,000 workers over the next 18 months — UAW Vice President Joe Ashton was unapologetic about the wage cuts and said the union would consider allowing more $14-per-hour jobs in the future. “We’re willing to discuss anything that creates jobs,” he said.

New opportunities Auto companies are racing to hire white-collar workers, too. Monster.com has more than 100 postings for auto engineers, including a handful for Hyundai and Subaru. Electric batteries, touch-screen dashboards and other technology are becoming more common, so automakers need engineers with expertise. Randy Floreska was recruited by GM at a competition for college students to design and build hybrid cars. He says he and other young recruits view the 103-yearold automaker as a trendsetter. “Here in the battery lab, there’s so much youth and so much opportunity for growth,” he says. U.S. auto employment may never reach its previous heights. The industry last topped 1 million workers in 2007, and most analysts don’t expect it to reach that level again. The Center for Automotive Research predicts total industry employment of about 877,000 in 2025. The Detroit carmakers have

Toyota, Ford hybrids get top marks from Union of Concerned Scientists By Jerry Hirsch Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Toyota Motor Corp. and Ford Motor Co. are producing the best hybrid vehicles, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists. In its annual review of vehicles that run on gasoline and electricity, the organization ranked the Toyota Prius and Honda Civic hybrid as the top vehicles in the non-luxury segment of the market. The nonprofit group rated the Lincoln MKZ hybrid, built by Ford, and the Lexus CT 200h, a Toyota product, as the top luxury models. The rankings are based on a combination of fuel economy, greenhouse gas emissions and the number of “options” that buyers are forced to purchase

when buying a hybrid version of a vehicle as opposed to how the standard gasoline model is sold. “We are comparing each model to its conventional gasoline counterpart,” said Don Anair, an analyst with the Union of Concerned Scientists. “The hybrid MKZ gives you a huge boost on fuel economy. You go from 21 to 39 miles per gallon.” The Prius, which is a dedicated hybrid model, was measured against the Toyota Matrix because they have a similar engine size, performance and interior space, Anair said. Hybrid versions of sport utility vehicles, including the Chevrolet Tahoe and Volkswagen Touareg, generally fared poorly in the rankings, although the Toyota Highlander, Lexus 450h and

Cadillac Escalade did get good marks. The hybrid Volkswagen Touareg, for example, gets less than a 10 percent improvement in its global warming emissions over the conventional version, the group said. Most hybrids get about a 40 percent emissions reduction. Some “automakers are using the technology to increase power over the conventional model rather than to achieve fuel savings,” Anair said. The top-selling hybrids achieve 30 mpg or better, he said, and that should be a guideline for automakers who want to have success in the market. Anair said several automakers were working to make hybrid models more accessible for consumers.

shed nine brands — including Pontiac, Mercury and Hummer — and closed 25 plants since 2005. Mexico, China and other countries with cheap labor are competing for jobs, which will limit U.S. growth. And automation lets every company do more work with fewer people. In a struggling U.S. economy, though, it’s significant, since growing auto sales indicate growing consumer confidence. And considering what the auto industry has been through, it’s a bonanza. “I really do believe that we are seeing a renaissance in the American automobile industry,” says James Brock, a professor of economics at Farmer School of Business at Miami University.

WASHINGTON — A dozen domestic and foreign automakers are raising concerns over damage that could be caused by gasoline containing 15 percent ethanol, which the Environmental Protection Agency plans to allow at U.S. gas pumps. The EPA has released its warning sticker for gasoline containing 15 percent ethanol, known as E15 — a final step before the higher blend can be cleared for sale in the United States. The 12 letters protesting E15 were sent to Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wisconsin, in response to requests Sensenbrenner sent to 14 automakers seeking information on whether the higher blend posed problems for their vehicles. Sensenbrenner, vice chair of the House Space, Science, and Technology Committee, has introduced legislation to block the EPA from allowing E15. The automakers who have responded so far raising concerns include: Ford, Chrysler, Honda, Mazda, MercedesBenz, Toyota, Nissan, Volkswagen, Volvo, Hyundai, Kia and BMW. As the Detroit Free Press has reported, the EPA is limiting the use of E15 to newer cars and light trucks from Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

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model year 2001 onward, along with flex-fuel vehicles. It is prohibiting its use for: motorcycles, boats, vehicles with heavy-duty engines like buses and delivery trucks, off-road vehicles, snowmobiles, lawn mowers, off-road equipment and light vehicles from model year 2000 and older. Automakers have expressed concern over potential damage from E15 even in newer models. “You’re talking about a more corrosive product, and we haven’t seen thorough enough studies to convince us it’s not going to be a problem,” Gloria Bergquist, vice president of the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, a trade group representing automakers, told the Free Press last week. “This would be a retroactive change for vehicles that were built up to 10 years ago, that were never designed with E15 in mind.” Bergquist said automakers would have preferred to see a specific warning on the sticker for drivers to check their individual owners’ manuals, as using fuel other than the types listed — which generally would not include E15 — could potentially void their warranties for damage due to the higher blend.

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B USI N ESS

B4 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D AAR ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd ACI Wwde AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMC Net n AMR AOL APACC ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AbitibiB n AboveNet Abraxas Accenture AccretivH Accuray Accuride n Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity AcuraPh Acxiom AdobeSy AdolorCp Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi Adventrx AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeroflex n Aeropostl AeroViron AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirLease n AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn Alanco rsh AlskAir AlaskCom AlbnyMlc Albemarle AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion s Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AldIrish rs AlldNevG AlldWldA AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AllyFn pfB AlmadnM g AlonUSA AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AltairN rs AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria AmBev s AmTrstFin Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Ameresco n Amerigrp AMovilL s AmApparel AmAssets n AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AGreet AIG wt AmIntlGrp AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AVangrd AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ameron Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Ancestry AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter Ann Inc Annaly Anooraq g AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldMatl AMCC Approach AquaAm ArQule ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap s ArchCh ArchCoal ArchDan ArcosDor n ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmourRsd ArmstrW s ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArrwhRsh h ArthroCre ArtioGInv ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRtl AscentSol AscntSl wtB AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth AtlPwr g Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Augusta g AuRico g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay

0.30 1.12 0.56 1.34

30.10 +1.43 26.61 +.70 23.66 +.16 66.16 +.87 35.99 +.70 13.13 +.16 1.20 47.40 +.97 51.38 +1.25 1.80 42.23 +.19 0.20 16.61 +.24 39.52 +.74 5.38 +.09 20.49 -.15 8.44 +3.00 0.58 38.64 +1.70 1.72 31.23 15.85 +.44 0.14 6.48 +.06 1.64 +.02 8.13 +.03 0.05 29.13 +.33 1.92 53.54 +.26 0.70 74.36 +1.89 0.42 7.47 +.12 21.02 +.50 5.00 68.60 -1.31 4.55 +.42 0.90 63.44 +1.34 28.69 -.32 8.30 +.04 12.98 +.18 8.21 +.99 73.53 +.32 32.27 +.12 2.54 -.02 0.17 12.04 +.08 0.04 27.53 +.55 0.52 56.46 +1.05 3.88 +.15 13.06 +.06 32.07 +.42 2.32 +.18 0.36 42.55 +2.17 0.25 7.92 +.36 0.24 59.52 +1.41 1.07 -.03 13.22 +.06 7.15 +.15 0.06 5.75 +.08 3.41 +.15 28.18 +.45 0.04 7.22 +.17 6.73 +.02 13.01 +.03 18.69 +.45 18.56 +1.05 36.28 +1.06 2.34 +.11 0.60 44.40 -.49 108.51 +3.89 7.23 +.33 6.59 -1.41 1.28 +.10 52.38 +.56 0.64 62.95 -1.05 0.11 88.63 +.89 25.06 +.05 2.32 97.79 +.99 6.96 +.15 0.50 12.53 +.05 1.16 70.72 +.72 0.84 32.02 +.29 31.54 +.11 7.20 -.02 1.93 -.11 69.10 -.56 0.86 8.81 +.02 5.06 +.13 0.66 70.55 +.35 6.04 +.20 0.12 16.49 +.25 38.43 +.60 1.80 81.98 +.96 8.14 +.13 48.46 +.65 1.82 +.05 23.88 +.65 19.23 +.53 0.72 62.23 +1.82 0.20 84.48 -.51 97.82 +1.79 3.37 +.05 0.48 7.90 +.03 1.27 19.99 +.88 1.70 41.83 +.02 1.86 -.15 38.57 +.58 0.80 57.61 +.25 2.14 +.07 20.50 +.38 0.84 30.92 +.30 2.13 25.31 +.17 3.61 -.10 0.16 11.60 +.63 46.57 +1.51 3.86 +.12 0.60 7.58 +.03 0.66 6.21 +.02 0.74 16.17 +.06 1.16 -.04 0.24 48.12 +1.04 0.48 22.75 +.31 1.52 27.00 +.18 1.43 33.89 -.30 0.32 23.45 +.49 14.82 +.35 216.74 +2.55 30.97 +.04 27.55 +.34 1.54 29.15 +.14 15.00 +.37 73.56 -1.31 0.26 26.73 +.03 1.05 +.12 0.84 22.99 +.09 11.96 +.62 1.35 37.14 +.37 5.60 30.06 -.21 10.25 +.11 0.44 13.95 +.82 1.84 38.52 +.02 0.10 13.12 +.04 0.72 53.59 +.83 0.60 23.61 -.50 10.49 +.34 30.21 +.83 1.26 +.15 8.88 +.06 53.68 -.06 0.04 13.60 +.05 0.92 30.16 +.15 0.92 59.22 +.71 0.42 43.05 -.04 0.42 24.00 +.15 1.20 85.40 +.18 0.24 46.15 +.16 57.91 +.21 6.53 +.62 0.06 55.55 +1.22 20.09 -.97 13.71 +.27 0.36 80.22 +1.44 3.18 +.15 1.00 40.19 +.56 42.06 +.92 0.20 42.79 +.31 1.16 58.90 +.94 3.25 67.85 +1.04 27.72 +.57 2.59 18.53 +.16 .61 +.01 2.40 +.10 1.00 7.49 +.02 0.60 51.83 +.35 5.37 +.14 0.60 126.38 +2.67 0.48 27.44 +.67 48.89 +1.42 1.12 10.60 +.19 357.20 +5.44 0.32 13.44 +.40 8.72 +.11 24.28 +.12 0.62 22.59 +.02 6.64 +.35 .06 -.00 0.75 35.27 +1.21 33.06 +.42 0.80 37.90 +1.73 0.44 27.34 +.72 0.64 30.45 -.30 0.06 22.46 +.44 1.43 +.06 1.40 16.24 +.24 11.98 35.77 +.34 0.12 26.82 -.08 0.13 30.49 +.92 1.44 7.63 +.03 13.74 47.48 -.41 2.62 +.16 11.87 +.20 41.25 -.15 .56 +.05 33.99 -.01 0.24 12.10 +.45 31.00 +.85 19.24 +.42 35.11 +.60 1.04 +.01 .01 -.00 0.40 12.70 +.02 0.70 66.42 +.18 16.62 +.11 0.60 26.39 +.33 17.15 +.03 0.04 14.01 +.17 0.68 17.19 +.31 0.72 36.40 +.54 0.18 16.86 +.12 0.52 13.38 +.19 2.55 50.56 +.20 46.90 +.60 1.09 16.02 +.26 14.62 +.31 1.36 34.00 +.01 45.11 +.06 5.01 +.44 11.44 -.11 5.81 -.11 39.29 +1.47 40.39 +1.02 1.80 79.77 +1.78 1.44 55.02 +1.02 298.38 +.63 20.44 +.76 0.36 38.66 -.42 6.54 +.14 3.57 137.54 +2.00

Nm AvanirPhm AVEO Ph AveryD AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods B2B Inet BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil BSD Med BabckW n Bacterin Baidu BakrHu BallCp s Ballanty BallyTech BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantSA BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankUtd n BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop BrcIndiaTR Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett BioRefLab Biodel BiogenIdc BioLase BioMarin BioMedR BioMimetic Bionovo rsh BioSante BioScrip BiostarPh BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkBldA n BlkDebtStr BlkEnhC&I BlkEEqDv BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BlueLinx rt BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc BonTon BonaFilm n BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw Braskem BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSoft Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldOfPr BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp Brunswick Buckeye BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE CBS B CDC Cp rs CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNinsure CPFL En s CSG Sys CSX s CTS CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVR Ptrs n CVS Care Cabelas CblvsNY s CabotO&G CACI Cadence CalDive CalaCvOp CalaGDyIn CalaStrTR CalAmp Calgon CaliperLSc Calix CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CamdenPT Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CampCC n CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapOne CapSenL CapitlSrce CapFdF rs CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer CardnlHlth Cardiom g Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd CaribouC CarMax Carnival CarnUK CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CashAm CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CatoCp Cavium CedarF CelSci Celanese Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom Celsion Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterFncl CenterPnt CnElBras lf CentEuro CEurMed

D 3.48 +.04 20.67 +.12 1.00 39.59 +1.14 17.73 +.53 1.10 26.38 +.24 32.86 +.56 0.92 28.74 +1.32 1.87 +.09 0.92 31.08 +.31 0.84 20.75 +.12 1.29 +.03 0.64 26.99 +.23 2.07 39.46 -.24 41.86 +.26 0.68 8.08 +.24 1.82 96.80 +1.74 1.82 80.69 +1.67 54.66 -.15 50.37 +.01 56.50 +1.19 0.42 44.54 +.63 4.05 +.26 1.50 52.72 +.89 0.35 16.70 -.06 3.95 -.04 27.51 +1.10 2.72 -.02 147.01 +1.17 0.60 75.38 +1.36 0.28 40.07 +.42 4.66 +.04 41.10 +.74 0.59 11.22 +.05 0.80 20.35 -.20 0.82 11.28 +.12 1.65 11.35 -.09 0.04 12.26 +.05 0.04 10.92 +.18 5.45 +.10 1.71 +.01 1.80 46.86 +.27 1.05 -.01 2.80 64.04 +.54 0.52 26.39 +.44 2.08 59.89 +.14 0.56 26.39 +.14 48.53 +.74 25.43 +.41 58.14 +1.32 71.78 +2.13 0.36 16.19 +.02 20.11 -.57 47.07 -.94 0.76 113.32 +.08 17.85 +.49 0.48 46.19 +.04 34.90 +1.42 1.24 61.06 +.37 2.40 56.76 +1.25 23.08 -.02 3.64 +.20 0.10 7.75 +1.01 1.64 89.74 +.46 60.31 +1.21 0.24 7.57 +.06 0.96 34.25 +.30 0.32 32.94 +.35 77.77 +1.25 0.30 55.62 +.92 0.64 32.28 +.28 34.69 +1.40 47.52 +.46 20.93 +.12 1.93 +.04 106.52 -1.37 0.10 5.39 +.16 28.72 +.57 0.80 20.26 +.26 4.46 -.17 .79 -.01 3.18 +.26 6.86 +.30 1.22 +.08 1.04 9.39 +.18 44.23 +.04 5.50 198.49 +2.94 1.42 19.04 -.10 0.32 4.30 +.03 1.44 14.58 +.18 0.68 8.24 +.04 1.36 10.32 +.05 0.40 17.20 +.25 0.60 16.37 +.12 21.81 +.23 .11 -.01 2.09 29.32 +.09 1.68 75.99 +1.25 0.80 8.12 +.44 0.20 10.37 +.70 4.75 +.93 80.98 +.58 0.04 6.80 +.14 2.00 111.48 +.86 7.24 +.08 9.26 +.35 0.72 33.23 +.11 0.60 11.97 +.11 1.05 27.83 -.40 1.67 19.79 +.03 27.45 +.45 31.21 +.19 8.75 +.34 1.77 +.02 0.56 26.57 +.71 1.32 29.37 +.15 0.60 50.59 +.92 0.36 35.03 +.98 0.60 24.75 +.16 40.32 +.44 1.48 +.05 6.76 +.07 25.29 +.45 0.52 33.56 +.26 0.56 19.91 +.15 0.34 9.37 +.08 11.35 +.29 0.32 26.06 +.28 0.28 11.07 +.58 20.84 -.23 0.05 21.21 +.12 4.00 65.09 +.32 0.20 29.24 +1.25 0.80 46.04 +1.11 0.10 91.85 +.11 0.49 36.43 -1.03 66.68 -1.17 1.00 71.27 +.89 0.20 23.42 +.26 26.06 +.60 0.84 19.21 +.65 0.40 24.94 +.13 0.40 28.98 +.46 2.14 +.08 0.40 145.69 +2.74 1.16 82.10 +.94 0.04 51.86 -.18 44.17 +.44 5.60 298.99 +2.64 0.84 20.06 +.02 39.04 +.30 7.88 -.14 14.95 +.66 1.52 28.92 +.03 19.07 -.17 0.12 27.01 +.30 0.12 10.02 +.45 0.34 9.60 +.21 26.49 +1.04 23.73 +.56 0.50 38.54 +.78 28.70 +1.04 0.60 27.48 +.12 0.12 66.59 +.10 65.70 -.13 10.72 +.08 6.15 +.27 1.14 13.30 +.13 0.60 8.80 +.04 0.63 9.79 +.09 3.80 +.09 17.11 +.24 8.32 -.07 21.83 -.06 0.04 6.68 +.24 7.24 +.18 16.34 +.18 1.96 67.59 +1.02 0.40 26.58 +.01 13.98 -.92 51.87 +.88 1.16 34.08 -.22 0.64 13.12 +.08 1.30 79.71 -.10 0.36 43.44 +.85 1.20 63.07 +.17 10.95 -.10 .36 +.04 47.89 +.09 0.20 54.31 +1.18 9.86 +.43 0.04 6.30 +.05 0.30 11.88 +.03 1.64 13.43 -.03 1.62 +.05 0.80 167.32 -4.15 0.86 46.83 +.10 4.38 +.14 24.19 +.19 28.12 +.24 22.98 +.85 13.74 -.26 34.74 +.89 1.00 38.10 +.24 1.00 38.85 -.01 0.72 57.76 -.03 42.95 -.16 31.98 +.55 0.60 44.42 +.38 0.14 58.02 +.38 57.89 -1.23 1.84 111.63 +1.55 0.04 17.06 +.28 0.92 27.94 -2.80 45.20 +.98 0.43 21.76 +.82 .50 -.00 0.24 55.53 +.78 8.86 +.11 61.68 +1.15 1.50 -.01 3.64 27.87 -.13 3.48 +.14 8.51 +.15 1.89 20.31 -.11 0.80 38.12 +1.25 37.87 +1.12 6.63 +.04 0.79 19.80 -.01 1.56 13.17 +.01 11.55 +.34 19.22 +.02

Nm CFCda g CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner s Changyou ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng ChespkLdg Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinaAutL ChinaBAK ChinaCEd ChinaDir ChiGengM ChinaInfo ChinaLife ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChiNBorun ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaSun ChinaTcF ChinaUni ChiValve ChiCache n ChinaNet Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel n ChurchD s CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigp pfN Citigrp rs Citigp wtA Citigp wtB CitzRpB rs CitrixSys ClaudeR g CleanEngy CleanH ClearChOut Clearwire CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Coeur CoffeeH CogdSpen CogentC CognizTech Cogo Grp CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColemanC ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs Colmbus Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwREIT CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompDivHd CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComScore ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conns ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copart Copel Corcept CoreLab s CoreLogic CoreSite n CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Cosi Inc Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Credicp CSVS2xVxS CSVelIVSt s CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc CreXus Crocs CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CurEuro CurrCda Cyberonics Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytokinet Cytori DCT Indl DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DUSA DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckrsOut Deere DejourE g Delcath Delek Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemMda n DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One DexCom DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DirecTV A DrxTcBull DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DirDGldBll DrxEMBull

D 0.01 21.31 +.24 16.34 +.47 2.90 40.71 -.20 6.48 +.06 80.10 +.08 33.34 -1.77 64.29 +.63 45.18 -.39 41.99 +.21 4.50 +.17 58.13 +.66 58.54 -.44 58.08 +.22 33.83 +.67 5.53 +.39 18.61 +.16 9.77 +.25 0.35 30.51 +.33 0.80 17.52 +.59 3.12 106.59 +1.51 0.20 39.97 +.51 0.20 16.18 +.54 46.95 +1.00 0.62 3.46 -.02 2.07 +.91 1.08 5.46 +.16 1.06 +.03 1.80 -.13 2.82 +.15 0.91 52.69 +.18 6.25 -.01 1.93 46.88 +.15 7.91 +.95 1.14 +.15 5.29 3.29 -.08 1.98 4.42 +.11 0.12 20.46 +.15 3.78 +.08 10.74 +.39 2.60 +1.01 328.49 +3.55 12.85 +.09 0.24 6.98 +.36 1.56 63.04 +.93 1.91 35.86 +.20 0.68 41.10 +.11 5.76 -.01 17.94 +.41 0.40 88.57 -2.42 3.30 +.03 1.60 29.39 +.30 0.84 20.25 +.10 0.49 34.12 +.41 16.69 +.41 0.24 15.90 +.34 2.13 25.83 1.97 27.89 0.04 42.63 +.62 .78 +.05 .14 +.01 7.52 -.03 82.69 +.47 2.21 +.22 13.36 +.30 108.12 -.50 13.55 +.38 3.87 +.04 0.56 96.52 +1.96 2.40 68.36 +.18 21.67 +.27 0.90 66.88 -.74 14.33 +.24 1.88 68.75 +.22 0.52 29.23 -.19 25.74 +.15 0.12 22.35 +2.33 0.40 6.18 -.05 17.82 +.10 77.62 +1.62 5.21 +.19 1.44 18.08 +.14 0.72 10.24 +.26 56.38 +.17 1.52 +.14 16.83 +.68 2.32 88.78 +.36 15.02 +.30 0.60 21.46 +.44 3.20 +.01 18.22 +.21 0.45 25.58 +.09 0.45 24.51 -.04 0.40 34.70 +.78 0.92 43.81 +.21 0.48 14.36 +.13 2.00 25.91 -.02 26.63 +.50 47.06 +.41 0.38 44.71 -.20 1.44 17.20 +.25 35.75 +1.14 0.80 38.27 +.20 10.15 +.02 27.92 +.88 29.78 +.67 1.00 29.52 +.91 0.40 41.73 -.14 0.92 26.25 +.26 95.72 +3.12 52.12 +.82 9.17 +.42 2.64 76.75 +.72 0.40 50.90 +1.95 2.40 54.04 +.18 25.25 +.44 21.76 +.13 0.96 38.93 +.76 68.24 +1.29 6.24 +.02 13.97 +.21 0.06 82.07 +.34 1.16 62.58 +.83 0.42 20.55 +.45 2.30 34.98 +.18 47.80 +.53 0.66 26.24 -.30 3.98 -.01 1.00 115.60 -.42 16.93 +.36 0.52 17.64 +.43 4.62 +.45 0.64 57.20 +.25 0.20 18.19 -.05 0.60 45.45 +.81 1.65 31.96 +.32 22.85 +.08 12.13 1.01 +.06 0.96 82.06 -.58 8.45 +.11 0.18 9.12 +.09 61.70 -.56 0.30 17.04 +.16 37.72 +.31 0.80 54.27 +.26 3.78 -.08 0.88 49.47 +.68 1.95 84.16 -.70 15.98 -.98 19.17 +.53 1.40 38.53 -.16 0.32 3.27 +.02 33.48 +1.67 0.87 11.30 +.03 27.71 +.09 0.36 12.71 +.58 43.01 +.13 39.13 45.40 +1.70 36.92 +.61 1.84 57.22 +.19 1.05 108.82 +2.04 0.16 142.97 +.42 0.08 103.68 +.69 28.85 +.64 1.25 +.05 51.63 +2.42 0.36 23.34 +1.21 2.40 13.10 +.05 .78 +.05 0.50 57.03 +.53 1.21 +.01 5.26 +.01 0.28 5.49 +.09 0.40 3.79 -.01 0.78 10.02 +.02 1.33 30.37 +.03 0.15 11.93 +.25 0.70 55.24 +.56 54.59 +2.18 2.35 50.64 +.14 5.70 -.77 18.90 +.27 0.08 55.05 +.37 1.72 53.63 +.81 17.00 +.32 89.36 +.86 0.24 62.46 +1.71 12.43 +.06 93.98 +3.02 1.64 86.44 +1.85 .31 -.01 5.68 +.29 0.15 16.23 +.36 17.15 +.24 9.41 +.28 .47 +.01 1.00 26.50 +.52 12.92 -.07 20.41 +.54 41.19 -.42 2.03 +.05 3.90 +.10 0.20 39.16 +.31 8.63 +.18 1.07 58.65 +.20 48.49 +.18 6.60 -.02 0.16 14.88 +.31 0.68 81.55 +1.54 2.88 +.11 15.53 +.56 0.50 70.88 +.25 0.32 11.34 +.20 11.08 +.07 14.80 +.69 40.61 +1.43 1.12 32.65 +.90 2.72 63.60 -.09 33.69 +.54 0.20 59.59 +5.15 52.80 +.88 0.84 48.96 +1.83 30.95 -1.47 41.64 -1.90 31.82 -1.05 31.44 +.09 1.20 40.13 +1.64

Nm

D

DrTcBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxFnBull Dir30TrBear DrxREBull DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscLab rs DishNetwk Disney DrReddy Dolan Co DolbyLab DollarFn s DollarGen DollarTh DollarTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHillSy DblEgl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DuffPhelp DukeEngy DukeRlty DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy

0.01

0.05 0.10 0.24

0.40 0.65

1.97 1.40 1.04

0.52 1.10 1.00 1.28

0.52 1.64 0.48 0.32 1.00 0.68

Nm 18.99 -.79 10.62 -.41 13.41 -.56 49.10 +2.74 16.45 -.66 27.31 +1.11 38.07 +.29 82.75 +3.00 91.02 +3.83 89.13 +2.78 79.61 +3.18 27.52 +.48 42.50 +.89 38.20 +.72 2.31 +.05 31.75 +.77 39.74 +.17 35.00 +.48 8.84 +.45 41.53 +1.12 22.85 +.04 34.13 +.03 74.12 +.10 70.21 +.66 48.96 +.06 25.94 +.12 98.50 +.40 20.44 +.30 2.52 +.22 3.14 +.04 9.71 +.26 20.69 +.14 69.84 +.59 37.17 +.71 41.65 -1.16 5.76 +.29 21.33 +1.21 55.36 +.03 4.98 +.03 70.82 +.96 4.20 +.08 55.84 +.64 26.36 -.06 13.00 19.09 +.02 14.71 +.21 2.04 -.01 2.10 +.02 17.43 +.33 2.95 +.13 6.24 +.01

E-F-G-H ECDang n E-Trade eBay EMC Cp ENI EOG Res EQT Corp EV Engy EagleBulk EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton s EatnVan EV LtdDur EVRiskMgd EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW EVTxBWOp Ebix Inc EchoThera EchoStar Ecolab Ecopetrol EdisonInt EducMgmt EducRlty EdwLfSci 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts ElsterGp n Embraer Emcore lf Emdeon Emeritus EmersonEl EmpirRst h Emulex EnbrEPt s Enbridge s EnCana g EndvSilv g EndoPhrm EndurSpec Ener1 EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyConv EgyFocus h EngyTEq EngyTsfr EngyXXI EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EnterPT EntreeGold EntropCom EnzonPhar Equifax Equinix EqLfPrp EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EsteeLdr EverestRe EvergE rs EvrgrSlr rs ExactSci h ExamWk n ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express ExpScripts Express-1 ExterranH ExtorreG g ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl Ezcorp F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tch s FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FX Ener FactsetR FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal s FedExCp FedMogul FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FiberTwr FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird FinclEngin Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstCwlth FtConnBc n FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FstMarblhd FstNiagara FstRepB n FstSolar FTNDXTc FTArcaBio FTDJInet FT ConDis FT Matls FT Utils FTCloud n FTNDXEq FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FiveStar FlagstBcp Flagstone Fleetcor n Flextrn Flotek FlowrsFd s Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet s Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FredsInc

14.22 +.73 14.16 +.20 33.33 +.41 27.89 +.05 2.67 47.03 +.60 0.64 103.55 +1.28 0.88 54.45 +1.12 3.04 58.74 +.92 2.48 +.18 0.60 11.04 -.01 0.20 7.91 +.07 0.20 20.48 +.10 1.88 105.67 +1.81 2.85 +.03 1.36 52.88 +.94 0.72 30.81 +.36 1.25 16.55 -.07 1.28 12.61 +.07 1.16 11.09 +.10 1.14 10.66 +.11 1.21 12.21 +.10 1.33 12.91 +.11 20.93 +.98 3.72 -.30 38.27 +.33 0.70 56.64 +.02 1.39 42.42 -.37 1.28 38.79 -.01 24.95 +.98 0.28 9.14 +.19 91.09 +.24 5.18 +.32 0.04 20.59 +.19 1.76 35.55 +.03 11.64 -.05 0.10 15.96 -.01 24.83 +.48 16.04 -.15 0.72 31.23 3.05 +.07 13.31 +.37 22.40 +.55 1.38 58.15 +.51 1.13 +.03 8.89 +.11 2.06 30.09 +.10 0.98 33.04 +.31 0.80 30.64 +.07 9.66 -.05 41.53 -.20 1.20 41.66 +.29 1.02 -.04 17.28 +1.06 0.54 59.00 +.98 75.26 +.69 1.23 +.02 .54 +.05 2.50 45.00 +.17 3.58 49.18 +.54 34.66 -.02 5.19 +.05 2.16 31.83 +.23 0.79 23.11 +.14 1.40 53.13 +.08 10.01 -.15 3.32 68.01 +.56 2.39 43.40 +.34 2.80 49.36 +.55 2.24 +.13 9.33 +.17 10.24 +.03 0.64 35.64 +.31 103.16 -.13 1.50 66.70 +.55 0.88 19.59 +.23 1.47 62.82 +.64 0.37 14.80 +.53 0.75 105.79 -.76 1.92 83.47 +1.55 2.30 +.19 .54 +.01 9.20 +.27 25.60 +.51 3.22 +.02 0.16 16.64 -.77 9.22 +.03 2.10 43.74 +.80 4.42 +.26 7.72 +.13 0.28 30.25 +.37 0.50 52.88 +.42 22.94 +.81 54.83 +.68 3.59 +.50 19.62 +.23 14.37 -.12 0.56 22.17 +.17 3.36 +.10 1.88 82.36 +.79 38.07 +.68 117.64 +1.82 40.33 +1.58 0.24 34.68 +.68 0.60 89.33 +.96 45.87 +.95 0.48 10.61 +.04 3.15 +.33 38.00 +.23 9.69 +.21 1.08 102.91 -.08 0.08 30.89 +.40 17.51 +.44 0.72 55.14 +.66 0.52 36.55 +.08 0.52 98.50 +1.72 23.69 +.85 2.68 89.43 +1.02 0.24 6.72 +.08 0.96 24.53 +.48 5.89 -.01 14.15 +.40 1.55 +.31 13.47 +.08 0.48 15.52 -.59 0.20 31.32 +.38 1.28 11.79 +.06 0.24 12.90 +.25 26.00 -.17 19.19 +.95 0.20 23.38 +.78 0.24 15.75 -.15 0.12 5.83 +.04 11.16 +.07 0.04 9.58 +.22 12.23 +.28 20.62 +.29 1.83 +.03 0.64 13.53 +.07 30.56 +.16 132.87 +1.34 0.16 26.65 +.46 44.22 -.21 0.05 38.10 +.53 0.08 22.76 +.39 0.37 25.69 +.18 0.38 18.46 +.07 20.51 +.22 0.14 26.31 +.36 2.20 44.66 +.48 0.64 17.11 +.24 65.22 +.47 5.95 +.08 1.25 +.03 0.16 8.40 +.10 29.70 -.40 6.69 +.22 8.91 +.08 0.60 22.91 +.35 1.28 111.76 +1.49 0.50 66.78 +1.85 32.49 +.48 1.16 67.94 -.29 0.66 23.95 +.63 4.99 +.02 14.12 +.16 5.48 +.11 19.00 +.07 39.92 +.90 24.24 -3.83 9.15 +.18 27.59 -.58 5.01 +.07 0.76 64.99 +.49 123.16 -.85 30.08 +.12 1.96 20.82 +.23 1.00 137.26 +2.55 0.20 14.42 -.07

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FreeSea wtZ FMCG s Freescale n FDelMnt FreshMkt n FrontierCm Frontline FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl FuntalkChi FurnBrds FushiCopp Fusion-io n FuweiFilm GFI Grp GMAC CpT GMX Rs GT Solar GTx Inc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa SA Gallaghr GameStop Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills GenMoly GenMot n GMot wtA GenSteel Gensco GenOn En Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt Genworth GeoGrp GeoGloblR Geores GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac Gibraltar Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GlobCrsg GloblInd GlobPay GlbXSilvM GlbXCopM Globalstar GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GoldFLtd GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech GrahamPk Graingr GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraphPkg GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn GrWlfRes GreenMtC GreenbCos Greenhill GrifolsSA n Group1 GrubbEllis GAeroPac GpTelevisa Guess GugInsidr GugMultAs GugSolar GulfRes GulfportE HCA Hld n HCC Ins HCP Inc HSBC HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HancHld Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HanwhaSol HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx HrtldPay Heckmann Heckmn wt HeclaM Heinz HelenTroy HelixEn HelmPayne HSchein Herbalife s HercOffsh HercTGC HrtgeCo Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg HiTchPhm Hibbett HigherOne HghldsCrdt HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HollyFront Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp HomeAw n Honda HonwllIntl HorizLns Hormel s Hornbeck

D .05 +.00 1.00 55.49 +1.97 20.02 +1.12 0.20 27.34 +.84 39.82 +.35 0.75 8.18 +.04 1.20 14.02 +.10 1.46 +.05 0.30 25.19 +.34 0.20 11.11 6.71 -.03 4.45 +.21 6.71 +.36 30.29 -1.95 3.99 -.22 0.20 4.62 +.05 25.77 +.12 5.13 +.39 17.11 +.36 4.80 +.05 0.56 6.19 +.02 1.68 18.20 +.03 0.29 9.14 +.02 1.32 29.05 +.24 27.22 -.09 0.16 14.60 +.22 0.45 19.28 +.95 0.20 87.15 -.66 2.00 33.74 +.52 .24 +.01 3.65 +.11 31.90 +.89 68.81 +.74 7.49 +.10 6.38 +.05 43.41 +.61 1.88 75.60 +.97 0.60 19.30 +.25 0.40 17.36 +.41 1.16 -.13 1.22 37.01 +.02 4.59 +.15 31.80 +.61 22.76 +.59 1.67 +.09 56.20 +3.03 3.99 +.22 0.18 17.79 -.04 0.48 31.62 +.66 21.02 +.05 1.80 57.37 +.36 10.68 +.22 24.07 +.23 .42 -.03 25.64 +.47 24.74 +1.59 0.27 10.74 +.03 4.00 +.04 0.18 7.65 +.05 11.50 +.10 0.30 35.87 +.55 42.69 +.44 0.52 13.75 +.32 2.11 43.91 +.32 2.00 -.01 0.40 10.14 +.28 3.17 +.01 41.30 +1.50 5.56 +.12 0.08 52.22 +.59 0.25 25.07 +.22 0.10 19.64 +.41 1.22 +.02 0.15 24.43 +.37 5.46 -.02 0.12 12.61 -.36 1.00 37.96 +.15 0.19 14.91 +.07 0.48 23.07 +.41 0.41 50.50 +.89 2.50 +.09 1.40 135.01 +1.12 1.16 96.14 +.41 18.46 +.36 17.43 -.42 546.60+11.24 47.57 -.47 0.84 53.84 +.17 21.58 +.45 25.34 -.01 2.64 160.78 +1.15 6.70 14.66 +.33 5.50 2.01 -.04 0.08 6.15 +.46 3.63 -.05 0.83 21.24 +.17 3.31 +.10 95.14 +1.69 21.97 +.84 1.80 55.39 +1.92 7.50 0.44 44.46 +1.28 .35 1.95 40.78 +.10 0.15 24.01 +.17 0.80 44.52 +.94 0.20 37.23 +.50 1.01 21.84 +.11 0.03 7.09 3.03 -.03 31.65 +.22 34.29 +.30 0.58 31.54 +.17 1.92 38.11 +.43 1.80 50.11 +.06 35.00 +1.27 34.00 0.36 54.30 +1.64 7.15 +.07 0.96 31.49 +.15 30.64 +.44 1.24 +.03 1.10 37.73 +.17 4.13 +.02 81.75 -1.24 5.94 -.14 16.84 +.25 0.50 43.09 +.75 0.30 47.93 +.78 7.25 +.12 0.07 13.30 +.14 1.00 44.90 +.12 0.82 33.76 +.19 0.40 27.03 +.52 12.12 +.18 1.20 45.68 +.25 4.10 29.14 +.30 5.95 +.18 3.34 +.07 2.86 53.79 +.49 11.17 +.12 1.20 21.23 +.18 32.23 -.15 26.88 +.01 48.09 -.27 0.08 17.29 +.16 0.04 20.65 +.07 6.28 +.06 .55 +.03 8.06 +.10 1.92 53.94 +.02 36.58 +.91 17.35 +.44 0.28 69.22 +.96 74.91 +.70 0.50 59.01 -.07 5.55 +.13 0.88 10.80 +.17 5.14 +.07 0.24 5.87 +.06 1.38 58.10 +.36 16.48 -.01 0.40 75.65 +1.24 0.48 36.45 +.25 23.09 +.39 13.64 +.31 29.29 +.40 42.80 +1.00 19.47 -.06 0.54 7.55 -.06 1.70 34.87 +.53 0.45 47.48 +.17 0.76 24.00 +.19 0.60 73.65 +1.68 20.57 +.04 1.00 37.05 +.48 39.76 -.31 2.48 64.19 +.42 41.01 +2.02 39.91 +.11 1.33 60.44 +.75 1.18 +.05 0.51 29.85 -.44 28.77 +1.01

Nm Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HstnAEn HovnanE HubGroup HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk HuntIng n Huntsmn HutchT Hyatt Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 54.22 +.26 1.80 25.05 +.27 0.12 17.55 +.20 0.28 8.40 +.98 0.02 19.85 -.59 2.58 +.05 39.56 +1.13 0.32 8.53 +.12 24.88 +.13 1.00 81.74 -1.81 0.52 49.10 +.85 0.04 6.74 +.20 34.49 -.76 0.40 20.17 +.28 2.87 +.12 43.25 +.71 10.08 +.01 4.22 +.01

I-J-K-L IAC Inter 38.58 -.01 IAMGld g 0.20 19.36 +.11 ICICI Bk 0.63 49.31 +1.11 II-VI s 27.89 +.61 ING GRE 0.54 8.53 +.05 ING GlbDv 1.20 11.16 +.02 ING 12.23 +.09 INGPrRTr 0.30 6.12 +.05 ION Geoph 10.29 +.19 IPG Photon 74.56 -.01 iPass 0.07 1.95 +.15 iShGold 14.96 +.03 iSAstla 1.06 26.08 +.44 iShBraz 3.42 73.50 +.26 iSCan 0.53 32.03 +.19 iShEMU 1.15 38.59 +.35 iShGer 0.67 27.07 +.27 iSh HK 0.42 18.67 +.09 iShItaly 0.49 17.08 +.11 iShJapn 0.17 10.67 +.07 iSh Kor 0.50 67.94 +1.23 iSMalas 0.39 15.46 +.13 iShMex 0.71 63.42 +.70 iShSing 0.50 13.93 +.20 iSPacxJpn 1.73 47.78 +.70 iSSpain 1.92 41.29 +.32 iSSwedn 1.04 32.37 +.73 iSSwitz 0.53 26.50 -.04 iSTaiwn 0.29 15.33 +.07 iSh UK 0.48 18.03 +.09 iShThai 1.55 67.74 +1.60 iShTurkey 1.33 60.45 +1.34 iShSilver 35.50 +.40 iShS&P100 1.14 60.29 +.63 iShDJDv 1.80 54.01 +.40 iShBTips 4.33 110.41 -.04 iShAsiaexJ 1.27 63.33 +.79 iShChina25 0.85 42.80 +.38 iShDJTr 1.08 101.40 +.98 iSSP500 2.45 135.90 +1.48 iShBAgB 3.86 106.57 -.30 iShEMkts 0.84 48.48 +.66 iShiBxB 5.12 110.36 +.03 iSSPGth 1.24 71.67 +.76 iSSPGlbEn 0.79 42.70 +.54 iShSPLatA 1.10 51.86 +.16 iSSPVal 1.31 63.24 +.67 iShB20 T 4.02 94.04 -.28 iShB7-10T 3.18 95.79 -.37 iShIntSelDv 1.52 35.50 +.38 iShB1-3T 0.78 84.26 -.08 iS Eafe 1.68 60.58 +.52 iSRusMCV 0.98 48.72 +.58 iSRusMCG 0.62 63.69 +.65 iSSPMid 1.03 101.10 +1.03 iShiBxHYB 7.39 91.73 +.36 iShMtg 1.44 15.14 +.08 iShC&SRl 1.97 75.92 +.95 iSR1KV 1.30 69.32 +.68 iSMCGth 0.72 115.29 +1.35 iSR1KG 0.77 62.66 +.69 iSRus1K 1.22 75.54 +.78 iSR2KV 1.31 75.48 +1.13 iShBarc1-3 2.67 104.67 -.03 iSR2KG 0.53 98.53 +1.37 iShR2K 0.94 85.65 +1.27 iShBar3-7 2.29 117.05 -.39 iShUSPfd 2.84 39.57 +.08 iShDJTel 0.62 25.47 +.12 iShDJTch 0.32 67.47 +.91 iShREst 2.09 62.92 +.78 iShDJHm 0.07 13.07 +.26 iShSPSm 0.75 75.99 +1.06 iShBasM 1.06 81.50 +1.37 iSRsMic 0.45 53.05 +.95 iShSCGrth 0.62 83.42 +1.16 iStar 8.25 +.04 ITC Hold 1.34 71.88 -.30 ITT Corp 1.00 59.49 +.25 ITT Ed 89.49 +4.24 IconixBr 25.05 +.33 IdenixPh 5.16 +.02 Identive 2.42 -.02 IDEX 0.68 46.94 +.22 iGo Inc 1.96 +.20 ITW 1.36 59.02 +.90 Illumina 76.04 -1.84 Imax Corp 29.13 -.35 Immersion 9.02 +.25 Immucor 26.98 -.01 ImunoGn 13.78 +.41 Imunmd 4.21 +.17 ImpaxLabs 21.43 -.07 ImpOil gs 0.44 47.77 +.77 ImperlSgr 0.08 21.49 +.80 inContact 5.26 +.26 Incyte 19.82 +.34 IndiaFd 3.87 30.76 +.63 Inergy 2.82 35.72 +.32 Infinera 7.60 +.36 InfoSpace 9.48 +.04 Informat 61.06 -.09 Infosys 1.35 68.25 +1.79 IngerRd 0.48 46.77 +.74 IngrmM 18.52 +.34 Inhibitex 4.03 -.10 InlandRE 0.57 9.24 +.13 InnerWkgs 8.89 +.17 InovioPhm .79 +.10 Inphi n 17.70 +.27 InsitTc 22.51 +.52 Insmed rs 12.20 +.13 Insperity 0.60 32.18 +1.38 Insulet 23.04 +.47 IntegLfSci 47.56 +.23 IntgDv 8.05 +.12 IntegrysE 2.72 52.70 +.26 Intel 0.84 23.23 +.48 InteractBrk 0.40 15.80 -.13 IntcntlEx 129.52 +1.69 IntCtlHtl 0.35 21.47 +.49 InterDig 0.40 47.17 +1.52 Intrface 0.08 20.09 +.11 InterMune 36.44 +.66 InterNAP 7.33 +.01 IBM 3.00 176.48 -1.23 IntFlav 1.08 64.96 +.63 IntlGame 0.24 18.14 +.22 IntPap 1.05 30.56 +.51 IntlRectif 28.60 +.39 IntlSpdw 0.18 30.77 +.87 IntTower g 7.81 +.10 InterOil g 61.44 +1.89 Interpublic 0.24 12.84 +.25 Intersil 0.48 13.03 +.24 IntraLks n 17.77 +.12 IntPotash 32.10 +.05 Intuit 52.25 -.09 IntSurg 368.25-12.62 Invesco 0.49 23.90 +.62 InvMtgCap 3.94 22.12 +.26 InVKSrInc 0.29 5.02 InvTech 14.10 +.22 InvRlEst 0.69 8.35 +.05 IridiumCm 8.89 +.06 IronMtn 1.00 35.40 +.40 Isis 9.30 +.26 iSoftStn n 15.94 +.19 ItauUnibH 0.67 23.00 -.38 IvanhoeEn 1.90 -.01 IvanhM g 1.48 26.23 +.35 Ixia 13.01 +.01 JA Solar 5.01 -.22 JDS Uniph 16.70 +.37 JPMorgCh 1.00 41.32 +.76 JPMAlerian 1.95 37.60 +.21 JPMCh pfJ 1.75 25.66 +.08 Jabil 0.28 21.32 +.49 JackHenry 0.42 31.05 +.30 JackInBox 23.36 -.03 JacobsEng 43.67 +.55 Jaguar g 5.19 +.26 JkksPac 18.67 -.10 Jamba 2.22 JamesRiv 20.26 -.51 JanusCap 0.20 10.12 +.56

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D 0.48 10.80 +.20 1.32 +.04 3.99 -.12 2.22 +.06 55.65 +.41 0.12 39.67 +.67 15.05 +.64 10.49 +.49 10.55 +.43 25.21 +1.56 9.17 +.01 5.57 -.05 1.49 +.08 3.60 +.13 4.16 +.12 22.61 +.18 1.76 77.08 +.78 1.28 64.09 +.90 0.64 21.80 -.02 0.73 65.80 -.17 71.87 -4.71 77.24 +.07 26.30 +.73 25.30 -.08 0.30 62.26 +.75 23.18 -.15 1.97 -.04 0.10 15.20 +.40 10.96 +.09 1.16 35.77 +.05 3.38 +.10 0.30 27.29 +.36 0.20 47.80 +.68 30.81 +.88 1.89 40.48 -.16 1.94 33.09 +1.21 0.60 42.27 +.17 0.02 11.61 +.16 10.10 +.23 44.51 +.65 20.31 +.41 1.04 27.93 +.19 6.56 +.20 10.02 -.04 22.05 +.18 12.90 -.27 0.05 16.85 -.36 5.65 +.14 16.89 +.37 13.34 +.03 0.36 18.05 +.45 1.30 40.54 +.60 0.63 35.94 -.02 0.83 31.85 +.22 0.59 41.62 +.57 1.06 77.54 +1.15 0.18 15.66 +.25 0.67 38.30 +.40 0.35 26.60 +.32 1.33 33.89 +.14 3.57 +.11 1.64 75.33 +1.27 0.40 15.90 +.17 4.43 -.10 0.52 40.32 -.10 0.30 58.65 +1.18 1.76 21.15 +.45 11.85 0.72 46.84 +.79 1.10 25.78 +.47 0.40 16.44 +.19 0.24 11.78 +.16 3.46 +.04 93.00 +.50 0.60 36.35 +.17 0.06 8.20 +.20 0.10 15.21 +.13 40.63 +.89 0.14 7.78 +.08 36.78 +1.09 23.56 +.62 32.68 +1.19 37.07 +.68 7.54 +.16 4.00 137.83 +7.52 0.72 60.60 +.75 30.32 +.28 8.59 +.09 1.44 30.38 +.13 0.44 40.88 +.85 0.60 42.88 +.77 20.06 +.19 17.04 -.48 9.92 +.09 10.03 +.30 2.00 24.29 -.06 7.90 +.01 0.04 26.26 +.51 3.14 +.10 39.63 +.87 0.35 9.67 +.40 0.08 8.18 +.13 10.11 +.13 9.53 +.19 38.86 +.90 14.22 +.32 5.60 +.13 19.86 +.07 0.24 13.67 +.09 25.41 -.31 1.57 67.94 -.08 26.18 +.31 0.04 2.13 +.06 2.52 +.11 1.39 -.01 1.04 31.55 +.21 2.00 35.58 +.61 0.72 23.80 -.33 0.20 14.20 +.12 0.20 19.33 +.14 0.72 38.23 +.30 0.85 19.22 +.13 10.03 +.13 3.51 +.11 1.26 48.88 +.48 0.76 54.99 +1.20 59.47 +1.12 16.70 +.35 21.48 0.52 12.76 +.23 15.58 +.10 3.47 +.35 .12 +.02 36.79 -.17 0.27 20.34 -.26 0.80 28.56 +.42 6.35 -.24 11.05 +.71 1.20 51.67 +3.23 4.90 -.02 0.45 24.05 +.69 1.75 62.37 +.79 49.60 +.73 0.60 53.18 +1.05 1.12 9.22 +.02 9.21 +.22 5.06 +.04 0.52 15.58 +.11 0.67 10.39 +.15 0.81 12.90 -.17 3.03 29.07 -.27 1.98 23.87 +.14 0.83 16.61 +.17 19.97 +.45 6.87 +.20 0.08 4.52 +.04 39.83 -.07 0.52 31.13 +.08 69.54 -.43 0.68 47.16 +1.62 6.46 -.02 .95 +.11 46.16 +.72 62.33 +.70 15.19 +.38 28.98 +.33 0.75 31.02 +.43 29.73 +.77 24.48 +.38 16.24 -.92 13.11 +.51 0.83 49.34 +.35 26.91 +.32 0.52 33.46 +.61 0.32 18.25 +.02 0.08 23.46 +.83 24.40 +.94 65.57 +.32 12.70 +.58 10.35 +.31 1.24 37.13 +.01 0.40 29.28 +.31 35.44 +.86 22.32 +1.22 2.20 97.97 +.73 31.20 +.27 1.00 54.84 +.75 1.16 83.05 +1.62 43.09 -.16 .80 +.01 1.92 79.99 +.36 0.94 37.06 +.42 0.20 52.49 +.39 0.02 26.87 +.97 29.10 -.29 0.30 18.58 +.35 10.72 -.01 21.45 +.35 0.44 43.68 +.69 2.64 84.17 +.46 3.16 57.97 +.87 0.28 18.91 +.13 1.19 +.04 0.30 65.89 -.49 5.25 -.14 8.44 +.11 0.58 84.64 +.37 0.48 72.26 +.58 1.68 42.52 -.52 0.88 49.51 +.31 1.63 -.05 9.08 -.63 0.79 62.47 +.24 5.70 +.03 1.64 58.90 +.29 73.82 -2.24 53.69 +.19 .61 -.03 7.14 +.45 .75 +.05 26.78 +.54 41.53 +.31 20.44 +.18 0.36 37.22 +.57 10.60 +.58 0.16 103.56 +2.27 29.80 +.72 0.26 4.98 +.11 0.92 24.00 +.27 1.20 71.08 +.78 13.79 +.18

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Nagelhout

For some jobless, a break on mortgages

Still building Some current Kirby Nagelhout Construction Co. projects • Hillside Elementary School, Eagle Point • Central Oregon Community College science building, Bend • COCC Madras Education Center, Madras • City of Redmond Public Works department facility remodel and construction, Redmond • Warm Springs Telecommunications Company building remodel and construction, Warm Springs Indian Reservation • Lime Wind Energy Project wind farm, Baker City • Raising elevation of U.S. Bureau of Reclamation’s Bowman Dam, south of Prineville • Oregon Department of Forestry building, John Day

Continued from B1 “He put in 16-hour days, 80hour weeks,” Taylor said of Nagelhout. Taylor added that at times, before Nagelhout was diagnosed with cancer, “we’d be leaving here at 5 o’clock, and come back at 5 in the morning, he’s just leaving, and he finished a bid.” Now the work will be spread out among a full-time estimator and project managers who previously did other work and can step in for estimating as needed, Taylor said. Deswert said the company will work more collaboratively now, reflecting what he said is more popular in the leadership of other construction contractors. Instead of Nagelhout taking care of all aspects of the business, his position will be filled with as many as five or six people, Taylor said. The changes are in contrast to the consistency throughout Nagelhout’s tenure at the helm. Nagelhout started the company in 1986 with about five employees, according to Bulletin archives. It has since racked up more than 1,000 projects to its credit valued above $700 million, according to a Wednesday Bulletin article on Nagelhout’s death, at 55. Most projects are located in Central Oregon, although many others are outside the region. The health of the economy has always played a factor in how selective the company has been in bidding, Deswert said. Now, he said, the company is positioning itself to be a bit more selective than Nagelhout was in bidding for projects, while maintaining the traits the company has become known for. “We’re still going to be the most competitive Central Oregon contractor,” Deswert said. “It is our intention to try to pursue the right projects for our company.” Jim Lussier, who was president and CEO of St. Charles Bend and now runs a consulting firm, The Lussier Center, recalls Nagelhout fondly in their working relationship on construction projects. “I always had a great experience with him in terms of bidding jobs, working at the hos-

THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 8, 2011 B5

By Andrew Martin New York Times News Service

Federal help is on the way for some homeowners struggling to make their mortgage payments because of prolonged joblessness. The Obama administration Thursday announced a beefedup program that will allow eligible homeowners to skip part or all of their monthly payments for 12 months or more while they search for a new job. Certain homeowners have been eligible to skip payments for three or four months, far shorter than most unemployed people need to get back on their feet. While officials could not say how many homeowners may qualify for the extended grace

Mortgage

“We’re still going to be the most competitive Central Oregon contractor. … It is our intention to try to pursue the right projects for our company.” — Jeff Deswert, president, Kirby Nagelhout Construction pital, that sort of thing,” Lussier said. “He was always a tremendous contributor and … easy to work with, and fair.” Lussier said he hopes the company will continue to emphasize those values in doing business. Values and culture, he said, can be critical to continuing a company’s success. Leadership transition is something every company ought to think about, he said, adding that it’s a good idea to think both short- and long-term about succession strategy. “You never know what’s going to happen,” Lussier said. Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@ bendbulletin.com.

Continued from B1 Patton, a plasterer, lost his own business in 2009 and then shattered his heel, making any work in his trade impossible. His income had dropped 75 percent since 2008, he said in December when he applied for the program. The value of the home he bought for $239,000 in 2007 had dropped to about $129,000, he said at the time. The father of five, three of whom still live at home, said he used up his savings and sold everything he could, but continued to fall behind on his mortgage, even after working out a payment program with his bank. So he joined nearly 900 Deschutes County residents who applied in December for the program, which will pay mortgages for qualified homeowners for up to a year or $20,000, whichever comes first. About 400 qualified for the program after completing applications, meeting with housing advisers and undergoing document reviews by the state and their lenders. Applicants must have suffered a 25 percent or greater loss of income due to unemployment or underemployment and

period, they predicted that tens of thousands would benefit. Mortgage servicers whose loans are backed by Federal Housing Administration insurance will be required to offer payment deferments to eligible homeowners. Roughly 14 percent of active mortgages are backed by the federal insurance. Servicers who participate in the Treasury Department’s mortgage modification program will be asked to postpone payments for unemployed homeowners, although to date, their record at voluntarily modifying loans has been spotty. The changes will not apply to loans owned or guaranteed by the big mortgage companies Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae,

which account for roughly half of all mortgages. Still, administration officials said they hoped the entire lending industry would follow the federal government’s lead. “Providing the option for a year of forbearance will give struggling homeowners a substantially greater chance of finding employment before they lose their home,” said Shaun Donovan, the secretary of housing and urban development. The maximum term would be 12 months of deferred principal and interest. That means that if a homeowner makes half a payment each month, they could get 24 months of forbearance, Donovan said. Homeowners who are al-

ready enrolled in federal programs to defer mortgage payments can apply to get the length of their deferments extended, he said. The announcement won praise from housing advocates, who have pushed for the administration to strengthen its programs for the unemployed. “This action is another step toward breaking the link between losing your job and losing your home,” said the Rev. Lucy Kolin, of the PICO National Network, a coalition of faith-based organizations. “It’s only fair that the big banks who caused so much job loss in America extend relief to families who’ve lost their jobs as a result of the financial crisis,” she said.

meet other requirements. Their household income had to fall below 120 percent of the statewide median, which equals $74,160 for a family of four. It was a difficult process for some of the people who went through it.

So the Kimmels, who were getting by on unemployment and some help from parents, chose to pay other bills in June, figuring the state would make the mortgage payment. But it did not. On July 1, however, the state came through with the first payment, Brad Kimmel said. He also landed a job in software support. And that missed June payment? The Mortgage Payment Assistance Program could make it retroactively. Pray, the program spokesman, said the state plans to pay monthly mortgage installments from April through June for participants who were unable to pay as the program slowly ramped up. “If they missed those payments,” he said, “then that’s our goal.” The retroactive payments will only extend back to April. Payments missed prior to that are the homeowners’ responsibility.

procedures. “It really, truly is a complicated process with multiple steps,” he said. With Bank of America Corp., Wells Fargo & Co. and other large institutions, the state had no problems, he said. But small credit unions and other lenders required a little more time. So far, he said, lenders representing 95 percent of the applicants have joined the program. The state has started — or soon will start — making payments on more than 3,000 loans. Nationwide, about $480 million has been spent, according to Tuesday’s daily report on the Troubled Asset Relief Program. To maintain eligibility, homeowners must regularly submit documents, fill out forms and watch educational videos about fundamental financial concepts, Pray said. “We’re really going full steam ahead,” he said.

Falling behind “It’s incredibly nerve-racking that it has taken (more than) five months,” said Natalie Kimmel, who was approved along with her husband, Brad. Officials told the Kimmels and others from Deschutes County that the first mortgage payments would be paid sometime in May. But they could not be more precise, Brad Kimmel said, and told the homeowners to keep making payments themselves. Brad Kimmel, a baker, lost his job when his family had to sell the bakery because of medical expenses related to illness. The value of their southeast Bend home dropped more than 40 percent, he said, and when the rate reset on the family’s adjustable rate mortgage, it increased their payments about $700 a month. “I was running out of unemployment benefits,” he said, “and I hadn’t gotten work yet.”

Complicated process Coordinating with lenders led to some of the delay, Pray said. State officials must ensure they can exchange confidential information with the lenders and train them on data control

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Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

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Market update Northwest stocks Name

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... 1.10 .04 .36 1.68 ... .80f .88f .96f ... .24 .48f .22 .84f .12f .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

9 14 20 10 17 16 19 28 26 94 23 9 ... 11 11 14 14 ... 17 31 7

69.10 -.56 +21.9 26.38 +.24 +17.1 10.92 +.18 -18.1 14.94 +.25 -3.9 75.99 +1.25 +16.4 8.93 -.25 +5.7 53.37 +2.79 +12.9 65.63 +.85 +8.8 82.06 -.58 +13.6 8.47 +.19 +14.6 34.68 +.68 +16.6 36.45 +.25 -13.4 11.36 +.10 -7.4 23.23 +.48 +10.5 8.38 +.14 -5.3 25.46 +.33 +13.9 6.68 +.12 +10.2 8.50 +.14 -10.1 23.20 +.16 +14.5 12.93 +.20 +7.8 26.77 +.44 -4.1

Name

Div

PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerh

1.24 .92 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .58f .07 1.46 .86f .52 ... .20 .50 .24 .48f ... .60

21 18 18 13 34 ... 41 23 15 17 19 10 28 9 41 13 24 12 34 ...

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1532.00 $1530.20 $36.528

Pvs Day $1530.00 $1528.70 $35.911

Market recap 93.66 50.56 46.10 7.89 53.39 3.06 41.39 164.18 23.67 58.57 85.96 43.05 40.32 10.60 12.02 25.62 16.91 28.66 17.09 22.57

+1.31 +2.08 +.14 +.32 +1.74 +.24 +.28 -5.82 +.67 +1.32 +.63 +.43 -.10 +.58 +.32 +.32 +.14 +.54 +.52 +.38

+9.6 +19.3 -.8 -55.4 -6.9 +47.8 +10.5 +17.9 +5.2 -11.8 +2.6 -4.6 +25.5 -9.3 -1.3 -5.0 -.1 -7.5 +21.2 +19.2

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

S&P500ETF BkofAm Pfizer FordM iShR2K

1389364 1043561 899171 653661 598198

135.36 +1.39 10.92 +.18 20.23 -.55 14.12 +.16 85.65 +1.27

Gainers ($2 or more) Name ChiNBorun NeoPhoto n Talbots NY&Co ProUMex

Last

Chg %Chg

7.91 +.95 7.99 +.85 3.47 +.35 5.42 +.52 43.22 +3.92

+13.6 +11.9 +11.2 +10.6 +10.0

Losers ($2 or more) Name LumberLiq ForestOil iP SER2K C-TrCVOL CatoCp

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

KodiakO g BarcGSOil AmApparel VirnetX GoldStr g

Last Chg

52457 6.51 +.14 49283 25.43 +.41 34352 1.05 +.12 26901 35.99 -.62 25346 2.50 +.09

Gainers ($2 or more)

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Cisco Intel Microsoft PwShs QQQ NewsCpA

693875 523841 480504 444640 381234

Last Chg 15.90 23.23 26.77 59.19 17.43

+.34 +.48 +.44 +.80 -.04

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Express-1 RennGEnt ClaudeR g Augusta g ChiMarFd

3.59 2.26 2.21 5.01 3.13

+.50 +16.2 +.23 +11.3 +.22 +11.1 +.44 +9.6 +.25 +8.7

ChinaAutL ChinaNet APACC BonaFilm n ChinaSky

2.07 +.91 +78.4 2.60 +1.01 +63.5 8.44 +3.00 +55.1 4.75 +.93 +24.3 2.62 +.49 +23.0

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

18.32 24.24 21.15 22.47 27.94

-7.32 -28.5 -3.83 -13.6 -2.72 -11.4 -2.37 -9.5 -2.80 -9.1

Solitario BowlA Tofutti T3 Motn rs YM Bio g

Name

2,384 661 92 3,137 286 8

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Last

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

2.74 -.28 12.30 -1.20 2.22 -.18 2.13 -.17 2.77 -.14

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

-9.3 -8.9 -7.5 -7.4 -4.8

NwLead rs Affymetrix MagyarBc IBC Cap pf DUSA

332 148 30 510 19 5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Chg %Chg

2.60 -.76 -22.6 6.59 -1.41 -17.6 4.30 -.90 -17.3 17.27 -2.51 -12.7 5.70 -.77 -11.9

Diary 2,001 604 100 2,705 227 19

12,876.00 9,659.01 Dow Jones Industrials 5,577.32 3,872.64 Dow Jones Transportation 441.86 356.32 Dow Jones Utilities 8,718.25 6,428.24 NYSE Composite 2,490.51 1,789.54 Amex Index 2,887.75 2,077.77 Nasdaq Composite 1,370.58 1,018.35 S&P 500 14,562.01 10,657.57 Wilshire 5000 868.57 587.66 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,719.49 5,618.25 438.80 8,476.13 2,411.73 2,872.66 1,353.22 14,399.28 858.11

+93.47 +52.18 +1.79 +79.65 +22.56 +38.64 +14.00 +156.88 +12.88

YTD %Chg %Chg +.74 +.94 +.41 +.95 +.94 +1.36 +1.05 +1.10 +1.52

52-wk %Chg

+9.86 +10.02 +8.35 +6.43 +9.21 +8.28 +7.60 +7.78 +9.50

+25.45 +36.43 +16.76 +25.46 +31.15 +32.05 +26.44 +28.53 +38.34

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday.

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

% Change

345.16 2,572.95 3,979.96 6,054.55 7,471.44 22,530.18 36,583.29 19,735.63 3,460.56 10,071.14 2,180.59 3,125.87 4,666.10 5,710.78

+1.04 s +.94 s +.47 s +.86 s +.54 s +.06 s +.32 s -.24 t -.01 t -.11 t +.43 s +.36 s +.05 s +.59 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0774 1.5963 1.0426 .002165 .1546 1.4351 .1285 .012300 .086536 .0358 .000940 .1581 1.1832 .0347

1.0684 1.5982 1.0355 .002151 .1546 1.4296 .1285 .012350 .086000 .0357 .000936 .1571 1.1900 .0347

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.72 +0.21 +6.3 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.66 +0.20 +6.1 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.58 +0.05 +6.2 GrowthI 28.11 +0.31 +8.8 Ultra 25.15 +0.27 +11.0 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.42 +0.19 +8.9 AMutlA p 27.18 +0.21 +8.6 BalA p 18.98 +0.12 +7.0 BondA p 12.33 -0.02 +2.9 CapIBA p 52.10 +0.18 +6.3 CapWGA p 37.41 +0.25 +6.3 CapWA p 20.98 +4.5 EupacA p 43.68 +0.27 +5.6 FdInvA p 39.51 +0.37 +8.3 GwthA p 32.59 +0.33 +7.1 HI TrA p 11.45 +0.02 +5.3 IncoA p 17.42 +0.08 +7.3 IntBdA p 13.52 -0.02 +1.9 ICAA p 29.62 +0.33 +6.1 NEcoA p 27.54 +0.23 +8.7 N PerA p 30.36 +0.26 +6.1 NwWrldA 56.47 +0.49 +3.4 SmCpA p 40.83 +0.42 +5.1 TxExA p 12.05 -0.01 +4.1 WshA p 29.72 +0.23 +10.4 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 31.19 +0.27 +3.5 IntEqII I r 12.93 +0.12 +3.8 Artisan Funds: Intl 23.44 +0.17 +8.0 IntlVal r 28.82 +0.18 +6.3 MidCap 38.34 +0.25 +14.0 MidCapVal 22.46 +0.13 +11.9 Baron Funds: Growth 57.95 +0.47 +13.1 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.90 -0.03 +3.3 DivMu 14.45 -0.01 +3.0 TxMgdIntl 16.00 +0.11 +1.7

BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 19.04 +0.16 +9.1 GlAlA r 20.35 +0.10 +4.8 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.94 +0.10 +4.4 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 19.09 +0.16 +9.3 GlbAlloc r 20.47 +0.11 +5.0 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 58.08 +0.60 +8.8 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 32.05 +0.37 +10.8 DivEqInc 10.74 +0.14 +7.1 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 33.08 +0.38 +11.0 AcornIntZ 41.69 +0.35 +4.4 LgCapGr 14.43 +0.10 +16.2 ValRestr 52.78 +0.70 +5.0 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.39 +0.14 +0.5 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.68 +0.09 +5.4 USCorEq1 11.99 +0.14 +9.6 USCorEq2 11.93 +0.14 +9.3 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.92 +0.38 +4.6 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 36.34 +0.38 +4.8 NYVen C 34.60 +0.36 +4.2 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.33 -0.01 +3.7 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 22.56 +0.22 +2.3 EmMktV 36.04 +0.43 +0.1 IntSmVa 17.95 +0.16 +5.5 LargeCo 10.68 +0.11 +8.7 USLgVa 22.08 +0.17 +10.4 US Small 23.75 +0.37 +11.5 US SmVa 27.80 +0.50 +8.8 IntlSmCo 17.89 +0.14 +5.3 Fixd 10.35 -0.01 +0.5 IntVa 18.97 +0.14 +5.2 Glb5FxInc 11.19 -0.04 +2.8 2YGlFxd 10.21 +0.6 Dodge&Cox:

Balanced 74.43 +0.52 +7.2 Income 13.41 -0.01 +3.5 IntlStk 36.99 +0.18 +3.6 Stock 115.73 +1.10 +8.3 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.02 NA Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 19.01 +0.20 +4.9 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.03 +2.8 GblMacAbR 10.20 +0.01 +1.5 LgCapVal 19.06 +0.20 +5.0 FMI Funds: LgCap p 17.03 +0.16 +9.1 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.80 +1.7 FPACres 28.14 +0.15 +6.0 Fairholme 32.68 +0.55 -8.2 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 21.41 +0.21 +7.4 StrInA 12.64 +0.02 +4.7 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 21.64 +0.21 +7.6 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.24 +0.07 +5.2 FF2015 11.90 +0.06 +5.3 FF2020 14.52 +0.09 +5.7 FF2020K 13.73 +0.09 +5.8 FF2025 12.17 +0.09 +6.0 FF2025K 13.98 +0.11 +6.1 FF2030 14.56 +0.11 +6.2 FF2030K 14.19 +0.11 +6.2 FF2035 12.16 +0.11 +6.4 FF2040 8.50 +0.08 +6.5 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 13.32 +0.14 +7.8 AMgr50 16.14 +0.08 +5.0 Balanc 19.31 +0.12 +6.3 BalancedK 19.32 +0.12 +6.3 BlueChGr 49.94 +0.59 +10.1 Canada 60.91 +0.42 +4.7 CapAp 27.45 +0.31 +8.3 CpInc r 9.71 +0.05 +6.1 Contra 72.95 +0.73 +7.8 ContraK 72.96 +0.73 +7.9

DisEq 24.50 DivIntl 31.53 DivrsIntK r 31.52 DivGth 30.43 Eq Inc 47.08 EQII 19.44 Fidel 35.32 FltRateHi r 9.83 GNMA 11.66 GovtInc 10.55 GroCo 94.85 GroInc 19.47 GrowthCoK 94.86 HighInc r 9.10 Indepn 26.58 IntBd 10.70 IntlDisc 34.30 InvGrBd 11.58 InvGB 7.53 LgCapVal 12.32 LevCoStk 30.94 LowP r 42.54 LowPriK r 42.55 Magelln 74.93 MidCap 30.18 MuniInc 12.52 NwMkt r 15.97 OTC 61.93 100Index 9.39 Puritn 19.06 SCmdtyStrt 12.50 SrsIntGrw 11.90 SrsIntVal 10.47 SrInvGrdF 11.58 STBF 8.51 SmllCpS r 21.01 StratInc 11.31 StrReRt r 9.96 TotalBd 10.90 USBI 11.46 Value 73.57 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 48.29 Fidelity Spartan:

+0.24 +8.7 +0.20 +4.6 +0.19 +4.6 +0.39 +7.0 +0.48 +6.7 +0.20 +6.8 +0.40 +9.9 +0.01 +1.8 -0.03 +3.4 -0.02 +2.3 +0.89 +14.1 +0.21 +6.7 +0.89 +14.2 +0.02 +5.0 +0.31 +9.2 -0.02 +3.0 +0.27 +3.8 -0.02 +3.1 -0.01 +3.6 +0.14 +7.5 +0.41 +8.9 +0.35 +10.8 +0.36 +10.9 +0.88 +4.7 +0.24 +10.0 -0.01 +4.3 +0.03 +5.0 +0.77 +12.7 +0.10 +7.4 +0.12 +6.8 +0.18 -1.1 +0.11 +5.4 +0.06 +5.3 -0.02 +3.1 -0.01 +1.3 +0.32 +7.2 +0.02 +4.7 +0.05 +4.4 -0.01 +3.5 -0.03 +2.7 +0.80 +7.1 +0.31 -5.5

ExtMkIn 41.76 +0.52 +10.8 500IdxInv 48.15 +0.51 +8.7 IntlInxInv 37.22 +0.25 +6.2 TotMktInv 39.66 +0.43 +9.2 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 48.15 +0.50 +8.7 TotMktAd r 39.66 +0.43 +9.2 First Eagle: GlblA 49.42 +0.23 +6.6 OverseasA 23.82 +0.05 +5.1 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.63 -0.01 +5.0 FoundAl p 11.09 +0.06 +7.6 HYTFA p 9.90 -0.01 +5.6 IncomA p 2.25 +0.01 +7.0 USGovA p 6.79 -0.02 +2.8 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 14.00 +0.06 +5.7 IncmeAd 2.23 +0.01 +6.6 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.27 +0.01 +6.6 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 22.02 +0.13 +6.7 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.53 +0.02 +7.9 GlBd A p 14.04 +0.06 +5.6 GrwthA p 19.50 +0.11 +9.6 WorldA p 15.97 +0.09 +7.6 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 14.07 +0.07 +5.4 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 43.12 +0.52 +7.2 GMO Trust III: Quality 21.76 +0.17 +9.4 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.30 +0.14 +5.6 Quality 21.77 +0.18 +9.5 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.36 +0.02 +4.9 MidCapV 39.36 +0.44 +8.9 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.34 -0.01 +3.3 CapApInst 41.16 +0.36 +12.1 IntlInv t 64.70 +0.46 +7.8 Intl r 65.42 +0.47 +8.0

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.06 +0.44 +1.2 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 35.11 +0.44 +1.4 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 44.27 +0.52 +4.5 Div&Gr 20.98 +0.20 +7.6 TotRetBd 11.22 -0.02 +3.0 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.17 -0.08 -1.0 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.72 +0.12 +6.0 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.58 +0.18 +8.7 CmstkA 16.84 +0.18 +7.8 EqIncA 9.00 +0.07 +5.7 GrIncA p 20.36 +0.21 +6.5 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 26.14 +0.35 +10.2 AssetStA p 27.00 +0.37 +10.6 AssetStrI r 27.25 +0.37 +10.7 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.58 -0.02 +2.8 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.57 -0.02 +2.9 HighYld 8.26 +0.03 +5.0 ShtDurBd 11.00 -0.01 +1.1 USLCCrPls 21.97 +0.27 +6.3 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 47.59 +0.36 -6.0 PrkMCVal T 24.22 +0.24 +7.3 Twenty T 68.21 +0.73 +3.8 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.59 +0.09 +6.2 LSGrwth 13.70 +0.12 +6.7 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 22.04 +0.13 +1.2 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 22.42 +0.14 +1.0 Longleaf Partners: Partners 31.74 +0.31 +12.3 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.89 +0.04 +7.1 StrInc C 15.56 +0.05 +7.0 LSBondR 14.83 +0.04 +6.9

StrIncA 15.48 +0.05 +7.5 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.44 +0.01 +5.2 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 12.09 +0.12 +4.9 BdDebA p 8.02 +0.01 +5.9 ShDurIncA p 4.60 +2.3 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63 +1.9 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.73 +0.08 +5.6 ValueA 24.37 +0.22 +7.6 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.48 +0.23 +7.7 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.22 +0.07 +7.1 MergerFd 16.25 -0.01 +3.0 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.45 -0.01 +2.9 TotRtBdI 10.44 -0.02 +3.1 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 42.69 +0.25 +14.3 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.87 +0.13 +5.8 GlbDiscZ 31.28 +0.13 +5.9 QuestZ 18.76 +0.12 +6.0 SharesZ 22.22 +0.13 +6.9 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 52.08 +0.55 +13.3 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.40 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 29.81 +0.20 +7.5 Intl I r 20.34 +0.01 +4.8 Oakmark 45.22 +0.57 +9.5 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.18 +0.04 +7.4 GlbSMdCap 16.54 +0.14 +8.9 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 36.37 +0.26 -0.3 GlobA p 65.84 +0.60 +9.1 GblStrIncA 4.38 +0.01 +5.3 IntBdA p 6.74 +0.03 +4.8 MnStFdA 34.11 +0.34 +5.3 RisingDivA 16.91 +0.16 +9.7

S&MdCpVl 34.95 +0.37 +9.1 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.33 +0.15 +9.1 S&MdCpVl 29.86 +0.33 +8.6 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 15.27 +0.14 +9.2 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.83 +7.1 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 36.03 +0.26 -0.1 IntlBdY 6.73 +0.02 +4.7 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.01 -0.01 +3.1 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.92 +0.02 +5.1 AllAsset 12.53 +0.03 +5.6 ComodRR 8.96 +0.13 +4.4 DevLcMk r 11.13 +0.06 +6.0 DivInc 11.63 +0.02 +4.7 HiYld 9.42 +0.02 +5.1 InvGrCp 10.68 -0.01 +4.7 LowDu 10.51 +0.01 +2.4 RealRtnI 11.71 +0.01 +5.7 ShortT 9.90 +1.0 TotRt 11.01 -0.01 +3.2 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.71 +0.01 +5.5 TotRtA 11.01 -0.01 +3.0 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.01 -0.01 +2.6 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.01 -0.01 +3.1 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.01 -0.01 +3.2 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.98 +0.20 +6.9 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 43.68 +0.52 +7.1 Price Funds: BlChip 42.14 +0.50 +10.5 CapApp 21.83 +0.15 +7.5 EmMktS 36.22 +0.39 +2.7 EqInc 25.04 +0.26 +6.6 EqIndex 36.47 +0.38 +8.6 Growth 35.09 +0.41 +9.1

HlthSci 36.93 HiYield 6.88 IntlBond 10.31 Intl G&I 14.40 IntlStk 15.02 MidCap 64.48 MCapVal 25.63 N Asia 20.15 New Era 54.68 N Horiz 39.08 N Inc 9.56 R2010 16.27 R2015 12.67 R2020 17.58 R2025 12.91 R2030 18.59 R2035 13.18 R2040 18.77 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 38.74 SmCapVal 39.38 SpecIn 12.61 Value 25.10 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.30 VoyA p 24.33 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 12.92 PremierI r 22.80 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 40.48 S&P Sel 21.26 Scout Funds: Intl 34.05 Selected Funds: AmShD 43.37 Sequoia 146.96 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 21.33 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 52.24 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 29.71 IntValue I 30.37 Tweedy Browne:

+0.23 +22.0 +0.02 +5.3 +5.0 +0.12 +8.2 +0.11 +5.6 +0.71 +10.2 +0.31 +8.1 +0.14 +5.1 +0.80 +4.8 +0.44 +16.7 -0.01 +2.6 +0.09 +6.1 +0.09 +6.6 +0.14 +6.9 +0.11 +7.2 +0.17 +7.6 +0.13 +7.8 +0.18 +7.7 +1.4 +0.51 +12.5 +0.52 +9.0 +0.02 +4.2 +0.27 +7.5 +0.16 +6.1 +0.42 +2.6 +0.16 +10.9 +0.25 +12.0 +0.42 +8.9 +0.22 +8.6 +0.30 +5.7 +0.43 +4.7 +0.74 +13.7 +0.10 +6.4 -0.02 +0.9 +0.07 +6.7 +0.08 +6.9

GblValue 24.88 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.56 CAITAdm 10.97 CpOpAdl 81.31 EMAdmr r 41.02 Energy 136.01 ExtdAdm 45.88 500Adml 124.72 GNMA Ad 10.90 GrwAdm 34.35 HlthCr 59.75 HiYldCp 5.81 InfProAd 26.47 ITBdAdml 11.37 ITsryAdml 11.53 IntGrAdm 65.53 ITAdml 13.54 ITGrAdm 9.96 LtdTrAd 11.07 LTGrAdml 9.43 LT Adml 10.90 MCpAdml 102.47 MuHYAdm 10.30 PrmCap r 73.57 ReitAdm r 89.13 STsyAdml 10.76 STBdAdml 10.61 ShtTrAd 15.91 STIGrAd 10.75 SmCAdm 38.80 TtlBAdml 10.70 TStkAdm 34.20 WellslAdm 54.76 WelltnAdm 56.39 Windsor 47.95 WdsrIIAd 49.23 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 26.30 CapOpp 35.19 DivdGro 15.71 Energy 72.42 EqInc 22.31 Explr 82.81

+0.07 +4.5 +0.13 +6.7 +4.5 +0.94 +5.9 +0.38 +2.9 +1.95 +12.4 +0.56 +11.2 +1.29 +8.7 -0.03 +3.2 +0.38 +9.3 +0.11 +16.6 +0.02 +5.8 +5.8 -0.04 +3.9 -0.05 +3.1 +0.60 +6.5 -0.01 +4.1 -0.02 +3.8 -0.01 +1.9 -0.01 +4.0 -0.01 +4.4 +1.10 +11.2 -0.01 +4.5 +0.82 +7.8 +1.10 +15.4 -0.02 +1.2 -0.02 +1.7 +1.0 -0.01 +1.7 +0.51 +11.6 -0.02 +2.7 +0.37 +9.2 +0.08 +6.1 +0.31 +6.5 +0.44 +5.9 +0.42 +9.2 +0.29 +8.2 +0.41 +5.9 +0.14 +10.4 +1.04 +12.4 +0.18 +11.0 +1.05 +13.6

GNMA 10.90 GlobEq 19.31 HYCorp 5.81 HlthCre 141.57 InflaPro 13.48 IntlGr 20.59 IntlVal 33.41 ITIGrade 9.96 LifeCon 17.00 LifeGro 23.50 LifeMod 20.62 LTIGrade 9.43 Morg 19.82 MuInt 13.54 PrecMtls r 26.16 PrmcpCor 14.96 Prmcp r 70.87 SelValu r 20.52 STAR 20.08 STIGrade 10.75 StratEq 21.15 TgtRetInc 11.68 TgRe2010 23.56 TgtRe2015 13.16 TgRe2020 23.48 TgtRe2025 13.46 TgRe2030 23.20 TgtRe2035 14.06 TgtRe2040 23.10 TgtRe2045 14.51 USGro 20.27 Wellsly 22.60 Welltn 32.65 Wndsr 14.21 WndsII 27.74 Vanguard Idx Fds: DvMkInPl r 110.26 TotIntAdm r 27.65 TotIntlInst r 110.63 500 124.72 MidCap 22.56 SmCap 38.74 SmlCpGth 25.08 SmlCpVl 17.37

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STBnd

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22.56 +0.13 +6.7

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ExtIn

45.88 +0.56 +11.2

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98.73 +0.81 +5.2

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TBIst

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Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

103.02 +1.07 +8.7

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10.61 -0.02 +1.7

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33.01 +0.36 +9.2

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.97

+3.7

Yacktman Funds: Fund p

18.18 +0.10 +9.9


B6 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN


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Inside

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

IN BRIEF Deck fire causes $20,000 in damage A fire that broke out at a southeast Bend residence Thursday morning caused $20,000 in damage, the Bend Fire Department said. Fire crews were alerted to a deck fire on Southeast Douglas Street at around 9 a.m. Crews were able to contain the fire to the deck and prevent it from spreading. There were no injuries. The house is unoccupied. Firefighters determined the improper disposal of a cigarette by cleaning crews caused the fire.

Small brush fire sparked by tractor

Warm Springs blaze surpasses 2,000 acres By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

A fire on the Warm Springs Reservation grew to 2,000 acres Thursday night as firefighters worked to keep the blaze away from Highway 26. The fire started around 2 p.m. in the Upper Dry Creek area of the reservation, northwest of the city of Warm Springs. Winds estimated at up to 45 mph out of the northwest helped the fire crawl over the butte and into Miller Heights by 5 p.m.

A small brush fire that broke out near U.S. Highway 97 Thursday was sparked by a tractor, the Bend Fire Department said. Firefighters responded to a call about a brush fire north of Deschutes Junction along the highway’s southbound lanes at 12:30 p.m. Crews quickly contained the halfacre fire, though the highway was reduced to one lane for more than an hour because of hazardous smoke conditions. There were no injuries or property damage. The fire was caused by an Oregon Department of Transportation tractor mowing in the area after its blade struck a rock, creating a spark that ignited dry grass nearby.

The path of the burn claimed one house and one abandoned building, but no injuries or deaths were reported. Warm Springs Fire Management reported 80 firefighters from Central Oregon, including hotshot crews from Prineville, had been called in by 7 p.m. Officials said they hope to see the fire contained by this morning. “We think we’re going to get a handle on the fire tonight,� said Fire Information Officer

Clay Penhollow. “They have it contained to some back roads, and that has kept the fire off the highway.� Penhollow said the cause was unknown but dry conditions and high winds were responsible for the fire’s rapid growth. Highway 26 remained open as of Thursday night, but the Oregon Department of Transportation recommends travelers check www.tripcheck.com before taking the highway. See Fire / C5

Submitted photo

A hillside adjacent to Natural Resources buildings on the Warm Springs Reservation is charred after a fire swept over it Tuesday.

Deschutes looks for feedback on roads

A MAIN COURSE OF MUSIC WITH DINNER ON THE SIDE

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Brush fire caused by damaged power line A brush fire that broke out near Johnson Road in Bend Wednesday afternoon was caused by a damaged power line, the Bend Fire Department said. Firefighters quickly extinguished the fire that was caused by a power line that had shorted out and dropped sparks onto dry grass. Central Electric Coop later repaired the line. — Bulletin staff reports

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CALIFORNIA Small town seeing greater share of hard times, see Page C2. OREGON Portland’s open reservoirs vulnerable to attack, see Page C3.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Kim Costa, 36, hands out plates of pizza to children belonging to her and a friend at Munch & Music on Thursday evening in Bend’s Drake Park. San Francisco-based Tracorum performed at the first of six free concerts in the series. In addition to performances, Munch & Music features food, beverages, clothing, crafts and a kids’ inflatable fun zone. On July 14, Portland singer-songwriter Curtis Salgado will take the park stage. After that comes Rootz Underground on July 21, Cherry Poppin’ Daddies on July 28, and Big Bad Voodoo Daddy on Aug. 4. The final Munch & Music concert guest will be Shemekia Copeland on Aug. 11. The Thursday events run from 5:30-9:30 p.m.

Panel: Elected mayor not best for Bend By Nick Grube The Bulletin

After a meeting last month, the committee formed to study whether Bend’s mayor should be elected and wield more power than other city councilors rejected the idea. Among the reasons: Committee members believed that someone with enough money would be able to buy an election even if he or she didn’t have

any experience, and they felt the wrong person in that position could turn council relations acrimonious. The problem is that no one outside of that meeting knew about the decision or the deliberations that took place because the city didn’t post public meeting notices as required by law. To remedy the oversight, the city held a second meeting Thursday in which the com-

mittee officially adopted the decision and recommended to the City Council that it leave Bend’s mayoralty an appointed position. But even though the committee decided against an elected mayoral position, it did suggest the current City Council look at ways to extend the current twoyear term up to four years. “Our main emphasis is that we need this continuity,� com-

mittee member Oran Teater said. “And that continuity is a four-year term.� Teater is a former Bend city councilor and mayor. For years he has advocated making the mayor position an elected one because that would allow residents to pick who their “yell king� would be, as well as allow that person to settle into that role. See Charter / C1

Deschutes County faces an annual shortfall of at least $2 million in road maintenance money, and officials want to know whether residents are willing to pay more to keep roads in good condition. The county this week launched a survey that asks whether residents favor various taxes and fees to pay for roads. The county is also asking whether residents support taking some roads back to gravel in order to save money, and officials want to know if residents have their own ideas about how to solve the funding problem. The county’s home page instructs people to read a county staff report on the road maintenance budget shortfall, and then take the survey. The county is at least $2 million short of what it needs each year to fill potholes, put down chip seal and asphalt overlay and do other road maintenance, according to a recent county report. The annual budget hole is expected to grow by more than $1 million when the federal Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act expires next year. As of Wednesday morning, 84 people had responded to the survey, said county spokeswoman Anna Johnson. The survey asks people whether the county should raise money for road maintenance through options such as a bond measure, new tax districts and fees on vehicle registrations and the transportation of aggregate rock. See Survey / C5

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Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Ex-manager of Crook County may appeal bank branch $1M ruling to highest court imprisoned for embezzlement By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

HOW TO SUBMIT Letters and submissions: • Mail: My Nickel’s Worth or In My View, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 • E-mail: bulletin@bendbulletin.com • More details inside this section. Civic Calendar notices: • E-mail: news@bendbulletin.com • Please write “Civic Calendarâ€? in the subject line and include a contact name and daytime phone number. Births, engagements, marriages and anniversaries: • Mail information to Milestones, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708, within one month of the celebration. • More details: Milestones publishes in Sunday’s Community Life section.

Scott Hammers The Bulletin

A former manager of a Bend branch of U.S. Bank was sentenced Wednesday to eight months in prison for embezzlement. Shawn Jewett, 32, of Medford, was convicted in U.S. District Court for taking $91,000 from the bank and bank customers between May 2008 and November 2009. Court documents indicate Jewett used the funds to pay down personal debts, including credit cards and a car loan, and to take a vacation. In some instances, Jewett would take money from one customer’s account. See Embezzle / C5

Crook County officials are considering an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court over a $1 million ruling against the county for halting a residential development in 2003. On Tuesday, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals denied the county’s appeal to rehear the case. Crook County Legal Counsel David Gordon said the county still believes it is in the right by halting the development. “We are considering a potential appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court,� Gordon said. “It will be weeks before that decision is made, however.� The Supreme Court is the county’s final avenue for appeal in what has already been an eight-year dispute. In May 2009, a circuit court jury found the county had

committed the act of taking by stopping development on land belonging to Dave Molony in 2003. The court awarded Molony $1 million compensation, plus attorney fees, to be paid by the county. The county appealed the ruling, and on May 27 the appeals court upheld the judgment. The county then asked for the trial to be reheard, but a three-judge panel unanimously denied the request. Molony, now a 62-year-old rancher, said he is happy to see the county reaching the end of its legal remedies. “I’m feeling pretty good about it right now,� Molony said. “At this point, I’m expecting to see what the jury has awarded to me.�

Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

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C2 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 9:27 a.m. July 5, in the 61300 block of Sally Lane. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 10 a.m. July 5, in the 1800 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 10:37 a.m. July 5, in the 20900 block of Lupine Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 11:15 a.m. July 5, in the 700 block of Northwest Florida Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 11:26 a.m. July 5, in the 600 block of Northwest 14th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:37 p.m. July 5, in the 200 block of Southeast Tee Court. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 5:50 p.m. July 5, in the area of Northwest Harmon Boulevard and Northwest Galveston Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 6:52 p.m. July 5, in the 3000 block of Northeast Raleigh Court. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:53 p.m. July 5, in the 20600 block of Hummingbird Lane. DUII — Laurie Lee Turner, 45, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:55 p.m. July 5, in the 21300 block of Starling Drive. Theft — A dog was reported stolen at 11:39 p.m. July 5, in the 61600 block of Cedarwood Road. DUII — Everett Chase Jacobson, 43, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:39 a.m. July 6, in the area of Northwest Harmon Boulevard and Northwest Milwaukee Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:58 a.m. July 6, in the 1500 block of Northeast Neff Road. Burglary — A burglary was reported and a vehicle reported entered at 9:28 a.m. July 6, in the 61100 block of Dayspring Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:44 a.m. July 6, in the 300 block of Northwest Riverside Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:16 a.m. July 6, in the 1700 block of Southeast Tempest Drive. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 11:48 a.m. July 6, in the 800 block of Northwest Ogden Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 2:23 p.m. July 6, in the 3100 block of O.B. Riley Road. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen at 3:30 p.m. July 6, in the 61600 block of Summer Shade Drive. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 4:45 p.m. July 6, in the area of Southeast Skylark and Southeast Wildcat drives. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 5:19 p.m. July 6, in the 900 block of Southeast Douglas Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:30 p.m. July 6, in the 700 block of Northeast First Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:37 p.m. July 6, in the 1200 block of Northwest Hartford Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 8:23 p.m. July 6, in the 700 block of Northwest Newport Avenue.

Redmond Police Department

DUII — Corey Lee Davis, 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:39 p.m. July 6, in the area of Southwest Fifth Street and Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:08 p.m. July 6, in the 2900 block of Southwest Reindeer Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2 p.m. July 6, in the 1900 block of Southwest Reindeer Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:33 p.m. July 6, in the 2500 block of Southeast Jesse Butler Circle. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:25 a.m. July 6, in the 1300 block of Southwest 17th Street. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 12 a.m. July 6, in the area of Southeast First Street and Southeast Salmon Drive. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — Mail was reported stolen at 8:17 p.m. July 6, in the 56000 block of Browning Drive in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:53 p.m. July 6, in the 15800 block of Burgess Road in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:53 p.m. July 6, in the 500 block of East U.S. Highway 20 in Sisters. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:36 a.m. July 6, in the 16000 block of Aqua Road in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:17 a.m. July 6, in the 63400 block of Gold Spur Way in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:43 a.m. July 6, in the area of Southwest Canal Boulevard and Southwest Helmholtz Way in Redmond. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9 a.m. July 6, in the area of State Highway 126 near milepost 108. DUII — James Tyler Lamkin, 20, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:05 a.m. July 7, in the area of Southeast Third Street and Southeast Reed Market Road in Bend.

BEND FIRE RUNS Tuesday 1:23 a.m. — Brush or brushand-grass mixture fire, 61066 Amethyst St. 2:30 a.m. — Smoke odor reported, 20054 Doanna Way. 9:16 a.m. — Smoke odor reported, Gosney Road. 9:33 a.m. — Smoke odor reported, American Lane. 4:44 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 62227 Powell Butte Highway. 5:28 p.m. — Brush or brushand-grass mixture fire, 2401 Belmont Road. 9:41 p.m. — Smoke odor reported, 1865 N.E. U.S. Hwy 20. 13 — Medical aid calls. Wednesday 9:05 a.m. — Dumpster or other outside trash receptacle fire, 2590 N.E. Ravenwood Dr. 2:45 p.m. — Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, 22410 Calgary Dr. 3:51 p.m. — Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, High Mowing Lane. 4:21 p.m. — Brush or brushand-grass mixture fire, 63560 Johnson Road. 5:01 p.m. — Garbage dump or sanitary landfill fire, 61050 S.E. 27th St. 18 — Medical aid calls.

MARICOPA, CALIF.

The incredible shrinking town Dismal finances, strong-arm police department puts town in tight spot By Steve Chawkins Los Angeles Times

MARICOPA, Calif. — One long day last week, Tina’s Diner in tiny Maricopa served just two customers. The next day, things picked up: There were four. Business isn’t any better down the street at Sandi and Mike Smith’s rock and gem shop. It’s closing in a month or two — just as soon as the Smiths can sell off their inventory. And at Bob Archibald’s Shell station — well, let’s just say this isn’t the Maricopa enthusiastically described by a Los Angeles Times reporter who visited the Kern County oil burg in 1909: “Wages are good, money is plentiful and the town is surging ahead,” the Times wrote. “New houses are being built daily, (and) new business enterprises being started. Oil derricks are to be seen in all directions so that at a distance Maricopa looks like a seaport city, the hundreds of derricks resembling the masts of vessels in a harbor.” In today’s Maricopa — population 1,154 — the only thing surging seems to be hard times. The town’s finances are so dismal that Kern County’s grand jury suggested it give up the cityhood it established 100 years ago this month. The same body urged city fathers to pull the plug on the Police Department, which some business owners blame for heavyhanded traffic enforcement that scares away potential customers.

Not like other struggling towns Though many California cities are struggling with finances, Maricopa is in a different league, according to the grand jury. “With a crumbling infrastructure, the financial resources of the city are insufficient to cover current needs let alone retire outstanding debt,” the panel wrote in its scathing report. Blaming past administrators for failed leadership, the grand jury said the city was deep in debt, kept cash in an unlocked desk, maintained poor records, scraped to pay everyday bills and rarely sought legal advice. At one point, the city borrowed from a private party — later revealed to be a towing company — just to meet payroll. Last week, residents concerned about the grand jury’s bombshells packed a City Council meeting at Gusher Hall, a community center named for a colossal 1910 oil gusher, the world’s largest. Ceiling fans

In 1889, Wall Street Journal first published The Associated Press Today is Friday, July 8, the 189th day of 2011. There are 176 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On July 8, 1776, Col. John Nixon gave the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence, in Philadelphia. ON THIS DATE In 1663, King Charles II of England granted a Royal Charter to Rhode Island. In 1889, The Wall Street Journal was first published. In 1907, Florenz Ziegfeld staged his first “Follies,” on the roof of the New York Theater. In 1911, cowgirl “Two-Gun Nan” Aspinwall became the first woman to make a solo trip by horse across the United States, arriving in New York 10 months after departing San Francisco. In 1947, demolition work began in New York City to make way for the new permanent headquarters of the United Nations. In 1950, President Harry S. Truman named Gen. Douglas MacArthur commander-in-chief of United Nations forces in Korea. (But Truman ended up sacking MacArthur for insubordination nine months later.) In 1975, President Gerald R. Ford announced he would seek a

T O D AY IN HISTORY second term of office. In 1994, Kim Il Sung, North Korea’s communist leader since 1948, died at age 82. FIVE YEARS AGO Four more U.S. soldiers were charged with rape and murder and a fifth with dereliction of duty in the rape-slaying of a 14year-old Iraqi girl and the killings of her relatives in Mahmoudiya. (The soldiers received sentences ranging from five years to 110 years based on their acknowledged roles in the attack.) ONE YEAR AGO The largest spy swap between the U.S. and Russia since the Cold War unfolded as 10 people accused of spying in suburban America pleaded guilty to conspiracy and were ordered deported to Russia in exchange for the release of four prisoners accused of spying for the West. Violent protests erupted in Oakland, Calif., after a Los Angeles jury convicted a white former transit officer, Johannes Mehserle, of involuntary manslaughter (instead of murder) in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man, Oscar Grant.

An old gas pump sits in a park along with a wooden Pacific pumping unit used in WWII in Maricopa, Calif. Kern County’s grand jury suggested it give up the cityhood it established 100 years ago this month.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Singer Jerry Vale is 79. Singer Steve Lawrence is 76. Actor Jeffrey Tambor is 67. Ballerina Cynthia Gregory is 65. Actress Kim Darby is 64. Children’s performer Raffi is 63. Actress Anjelica Huston is 60. Writer Anna Quindlen is 59. Actor Kevin Bacon is 53. Actor Robert Knepper is 52. Rock musician Andy Fletcher (Depeche Mode) is 50. Country singer Toby Keith is 50. Rock musician Graham Jones (Haircut 100) is 50. Rock singer Joan Osborne is 49. Writer-producer Rob Burnett is 49. Actor Rocky Carroll is 48. Actor Corey Parker is 46. Actor Billy Crudup is 43. Actor Michael Weatherly is 43. Singer Beck is 41. Country singer Drew Womack (Sons of the Desert) is 41. Christian rock musician Stephen Mason (Jars of Clay) is 36. Actor Milo Ventimiglia is 34. Rock musician Tavis Werts is 34. Singer Ben Jelen is 32. Actor Lance Gross is 30. Actress Sophia Bush is 29. Rock musician Jamie Cook (Arctic Monkeys) is 26. Actor Jake McDorman is 25. Actor Jaden Smith is 13. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “History must stay open, it is all humanity.” — William Carlos Williams, American author and poet (1883-1963)

Anne Cusack Los Angeles Time

couldn’t dissipate the heat — or the anger. Some people wanted the immediate ouster of Police Chief Derek Merritt; others urged a recall of Virgil Bell and Cynthia Tonkin, council members who have criticized the department. J.R. Phillips, who grew up in Maricopa and travels the West maintaining oil field equipment, called for neighbors to quit climbing down each other’s throats. “We’re always going to be the crappy little town on the way to the coast, and I’m good with that,” he said. “But let’s work together. Let’s keep it real, OK?” But Maricopa these days isn’t exactly Mayberry. Much of the division revolves around the Police Department. Civil liberties lawyers charge that police target motorists they figure are farmworkers, knowing that some are undocumented immigrants without driver’s licenses. When vehicles are towed and stiff fines go unpaid, the city sells them and gets 25 percent of the proceeds, the grand jury noted. “Maricopa has been a shining example of impoundments gone wrong,” said Jennie Pasquarella, an attorney with the ACLU of Southern California. “They’re essentially creating a racket to steal people’s cars.” The city and the police are formulating their response to the grand jury and aren’t saying much about anything in the meantime. But that’s not stopping residents who say their town feels safer, police response is quicker — and that those big signs that Bob Archibald put up outside his gas station-market-sandwich shop last summer don’t speak for them. “Stop the Maricopa Police Dept. Out of Control Traffic Tactics,” one of Archibald’s signs reads. “Your Voices Have the Real Power! Speak Up & Tell Them to Stop!” Archibald, 52, said he acted after seeing “cop cars and tow trucks going crazy in front of our store, impounding cars right and left.” He collected customers’ accounts of their police encounters — from stops

for dirty license plates to confiscation of trucks — and gave two thick binders to the grand jury. At the junction of state highways 33 and 166, Maricopa sits in a vast stretch of sagebrush and oil wells. Though the ocean is nearly 100 miles away, the city’s motto is “Gateway to the Sea” — a nod to motorists from Bakersfield who drive through on their way to Ventura or Pismo Beach.

Police scare motorists For Archibald, there have been a lot fewer since the police started eyeballing traffic so intensively. “In a little while, all my farmworkers started bypassing us,” he said. “The street rod clubs, the motorcyclists, the RVers — they weren’t coming through, either.” Supporters like Councilman Andy Blakely say only lawbreakers have to worry about the beefed-up force. “The law is the law,” said Blakely, owner of Andy’s Septic Tank Service. “They’re just doing their jobs.” As for disincorporation, Blakely said the grand jury failed to acknowledge Maricopa’s accomplishments in recent years, such as securing bus service to Taft, seven miles away, and obtaining state grants that include

more than $800,000 for sewer improvements. “We’ve proved to the state that we’re capable,” Blakely said. But “capable” isn’t bringing the crowds into Tina’s Diner. One recent afternoon, Fatima “Tina” Johnson was there alone, except for a rag doll propped on one of the stools. Johnson has run her restaurant for 38 years and calls Maricopa “my beautiful paradise.” But longtime out-of-town customers tell her they don’t want to risk a trip there. Whether it’s the economy or the police, Johnson said business is down by 60 percent. “I love this town very much,” she said, gazing out the window. “All I want to do is make a living.”

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 8, 2011 C3

O

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

A sign attached to a wrought iron fence warns of the punishment one can incur from polluting Portland’s Reservoir No. 6 in Mount Tabor Park. Even before the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, some experts on urban waterworks had identified contamination by terrorists as a threat to the nation’s drinking water.

Portland’s open water supply an easy target By Tim Fought The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Josh Seater could have done some serious harm when he stepped up to the wrought-iron fence around a Portland reservoir last month if he were holding something more ominous than a full bladder. The open-air reservoir contains treated water that goes directly to people’s spigots, and Seater’s decision to urinate there after a night of drinking led Portland officials to drain the entire basin to keep from rattling the public’s nerves about the purity of the drinking supply. The saga delighted headline and joke writers, but it reveals a threat to urban water supplies in about a dozen cities. Portland has five of up to 30 uncovered reservoirs around the country that contain treated water, some accessible to the public. The fear is that a terrorist could drop or somehow get a toxic chemical agent into a reservoir and sicken people. “You can use your imagination. If somebody wanted to do something malicious, they could,” said Richard Luthy, a Stanford University professor of civil and environmental engineering on a trip to a California reservoir.

Vulnerabilities Luthy and others told congressional panels after Sept. 11 about the vulnerability of infrastructure including water systems. Federal authorities ordered security evaluations, and water systems around the country have added fences, surveillance cameras, officer patrols and other measures. Opinions about the extent of the risk that remains are divided. In a 2004 paper for a NATORussia workshop on protecting urban infrastructure, University of Maryland Professor Gregory

“You can use your imagination. If somebody wanted to do something malicious, they could.” — Richard Luthy, Stanford civil and environmental engineering professor Baecher cited “a catalog of several dozen potential toxins, bacteria, viruses, protozoa and toxic industrial chemicals that have been identified as possible water contaminants that could be used by terrorists.” But Baecher said in a recent interview that dilution is one protection against harm from that sort of attack, and the nation’s many open buildings are softer targets than water supply reservoirs. “If I were a terrorist, this is just not one of the easiest things to do,” he said. The dilution factor is what prompted some people to say that Portland overreacted in draining the reservoir. A pint of urine is a tiny drop in the bucket in a reservoir of 7.5 million gallons where ducks defecate as well. It turns out that the federal government has been cracking down on reservoirs such as Portland’s for reasons that have less to do with speculative threats from al-Qaida than with the known risk of serious health threats — the biggest one being cryptosporidium, a parasite from the feces of infected animals or humans. In 1993 it got into Milwaukee’s water, led to the deaths of as many as 100 people and sickened hundreds of thousands more. Rules the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rolled out in 2006 are putting an end to the sort of reservoir Seater used — an open-air basin that holds treated or “finished” water to be

distributed directly to consumers. The cryptosporidium parasite was a big motivating factor for the changes. Many of these reservoirs date to horse-and-buggy days and were once celebrated in American cities. They often exploited gravity to get water cheaply to growing populations. They provided a ready supply for firefighting. They were installed with architectural flourishes and lights and given central places in parks with surrounding pathways. That sentiment is strong in Portland, where neighbors who enjoy the scenery of the reservoirs call them a gem of the city and have been fighting for years to keep them open. An estimate cited in a paper for the American Water Works Association says there were about 750 open, treated reservoirs in the 1970s. Recently, the Portland water bureau compiled a list of about 30, including some in such cities as New York and Los Angeles, Baltimore, Seattle and Tacoma.

EPA compliance Plans are well along in most cities to comply with the EPA’s rules, although it will take years to finish in some. In 2007, New York City joined Portland in taking the EPA rules over cryptosporidium to federal court, but a federal appeals court slapped down their arguments as “either meritless, irrelevant, or both.” As recently as June, Oregon state authorities told the city of Portland there’s no such thing as a waiver to the rules. The city is building two underground reservoirs expected in a few years to replace the Mount Tabor reservoirs. As for Seater, prosecutors say they have not made a decision about charging him. And the city has finished draining the reservoir and scrubbing the walls.

O  B Sex offender caught posing as woman OREGON CITY — The Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office says a registered sex offender posed as a woman to enter a women’s locker room and hot tub at the Clackamas Aquatic Park where he talked with children. Detective Jim Strovink says a chaperone spotted Thomas Lee Benson and chased and held him Friday until deputies arrived. KGW reported the 39-year-old Gresham man is facing charges that include unlawful contact with a child and unlawfully being in a location where children congregate. Benson was convicted in 1994 for child sexual abuse and was directed to have no contact with children. He reportedly was wearing a bra and lipstick Friday when he entered the women’s locker

room. A 26-year-old chaperone overheard children talking about the man and chased Benson when he tried to leave.

eyes. He was last seen at the Oregon Health & Science University Hospital pain clinic in the new South Waterfront neighborhood.

Mental patient flees from Portland clinic

Pit bull kills small dog in Salem backyard

PORTLAND — Authorities are looking for an Oregon State Hospital patient who escaped custody Wednesday while in Portland for a visit to a pain clinic. Officials say Danny Stebbins walked out of the clinic when the staff member watching him took a restroom break. Stebbins was committed in 2008 after a robbery conviction in Jackson County. The Oregonian reports the 45-year-old psychiatric patient is not believed to be dangerous, but anyone who identifies him should call Oregon State Police without approaching him. Stebbins is 5-foot-9, 183 pounds with blond hair and blue

SALEM — A 50-pound pit bull dog attacked and killed a small dog in an unfenced backyard Wednesday night in Salem. Police say the small dog’s owner suffered a bite wound on her hand when she tried to save her pet. She said the pit bull ran into her backyard, bit the small dog on the head and began shaking it. The pit bull was later captured and taken to Marion County Dog Control. Officers went door-todoor in the neighborhood but did not find the owner. The pit bull was wearing a collar but no tags. — From wire reports

BEND RIVER PROMENADE, 5 41. 317. 6 0 0 0

BEND


C4 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Union talk snares practical changes

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efore this past legislative session began, there was a lot of talk about changing the state retirement system called PERS. Former Gov. Ted Kulongoski set the agenda with

his report recommending that workers start paying part of their required 6 percent pension contribution. The cost of the 6 percent pickup is about $750 million per biennium. Some or all of that money could instead go to schools or any number of other things. Gov. John Kitzhaber wanted that PERS change, too. He called for it in his campaign. He called for it when he was elected. The bill to do it died. Why? Kitzhaber recently offered an explanation to The Oregonian. It was about unions. There was a dispute in another bill that Kitzhaber wanted to reduce state Medicare and Medicaid costs, House Bill 3650. Part of what the bill does is try to encourage chronically ill patients to better manage their health. The way the bill was written, at one point, it would have created a new class of employee to make home visits to help

those patients. Union officials tried to spell out in the bill that the employees must be unionized. Committee members dropped that provision. “It’s pretty straightforward,” Kitzhaber told The Oregonian. “The Democrats would essentially not run out the PERS bill, which was a tough vote for a lot of them, unless the Republicans put collective bargaining in the (health care) transformation bill. That’s where it got high-centered.” Kitzhaber said it would have been a worthy trade-off. He said unions can help workers get good wages and benefits. He may be right about unions, but not about the trade. The bill was about finding new ways to save money and improve health care quality. What does compelling a new class of workers to join a union have to do with that? Nothing.

Herbicides can be part of the solution Y

ou don’t have to be an environmentalist to worry about the overuse of herbicides. They can pollute water, poison wildlife and kill valued plants when applied indiscriminately. Worse, plants can develop tolerance, requiring more, stronger herbicides in the future. Now the Bureau of Land Management, after a nearly 30-year hiatus, is preparing to use herbicides again in Western Oregon, and the Eugene district is seeking public comment on a proposal to make limited use of four of the 17 herbicides available to it in the agency’s management plan. At least one environmental group will comment negatively on the proposal, others will not. Under the proposal, the agency would use herbicides on only about a third of the 1,500 acres it currently mows or weeds by hand to control the worst of the worst on the district, including Scotch broom, knapweed and false brome. That’s a tiny fraction of the estimated 18,000 acres in the district infested with noxious weeds and an even tinier bit of the 300,000 acres the agency controls in its Eugene district. BLM’s proposal is a reasonable answer to a serious problem, the spread of invasive plant species in Oregon. Such things as knapweed, which invade road rights of way, pasture land and fir and pine forests, can be treated by hand, but the effort to do so can be

staggering. In one case, on the Nature Conservancy’s Tom McCall Preserve on the Columbia River, it took more than 300 volunteers pulling knapweed three times annually for about six years to reduce the infestation to a manageable size. The preserve is only 271 acres. Unchecked, the weeds take a toll on both native plants and animals. Knapweed chokes out native plants both by competing for water and nutrients and by exuding a compound that limits the growth of more desirable plants. That destroys habitat for native animals, as well. On cultivated land, it can destroy pastures and be poisonous to domestic animals and humans who attempt to pull it barehanded. Mowing, the seemingly simplest answer to the problem, only creates shorter plants. Scotch brook and false brome pose some of the same problems, and they, too, are nearly impossible to control without the use of herbicides. The BLM’s effort in the Eugene district will be a limited one, not aimed at recently logged lands or at improving livestock forage. Nor will the herbicides be applied by plane or helicopter or spread indiscriminately over a given area. Rather, if the effort is successful, it may help slow the spread of the plants that hitchhike on cars driving through the area. It’s not a perfect solution to a serious problem, but it is far better than what is available now.

My Nickel’s Worth Support Walden’s bill We support the legislation on the Crooked River recently introduced by U.S. Rep. Greg Walden. Brooks Resources or its predecessors have operated in Central Oregon for almost 100 years. We have a vested interest in maintaining the economic viability of all of Central Oregon. No legislation affecting water will ever have 100 percent support from all parties, but the Walden bill will help secure stable water supplies for Prineville, will benefit fish and wildlife and will make Crook County a model for protecting municipal water supplies. This bill, when passed, will protect our farmers, secure future water needs for Prineville and provide additional water for the environment. There is no cost to taxpayers. Mike Hollern is president of Brooks Resources Corp.

Protect families In response to Glenn Eggleston’s June 23 letter to the editor which appeared in The Bulletin under the heading “Protect Marriage”: Protect marriage? Protect families! Marriage is for the purpose of recognizing a family; it binds two people in a way no other word can. I’m at a loss to see how same-sex marriage takes away its decency. Is it not commitment and love that make marriage decent and honorable? Should marriage be reserved only for those who are able to or wish to procreate? Mr. Eggleston, who made this ar-

gument opposing marriage equality, married for a second time at approximately the age of 69. I can only surmise he did so not to “have a family” but rather, to have the committed, family recognition marriage offers. Same-sex couples simply want the same for their families. Our laws protect families bound by marriage. Sadly, thousands of families go unrecognized and unprotected, are seen as “less than” or “indecent” because the focus has been placed on tradition rather on what it means to be a family. Certainly, as compassionate individuals, we must ensure our laws protect all families. Our history is filled with bold legislative changes made when we better understand our responsibility to a democratic society, as in women’s right to vote and emancipation, both of which transcended tradition despite vociferous opposition. I understand a commitment to tradition, but as Americans we have a far deeper commitment to equal treatment and protection for all. Rowena “Beki” Meyer-Allen is a board member of the Human Dignity Coalition of Bend.

Don’t cut money to WIC Rep. Greg Walden must think that Oregonians aren’t paying attention. His vote in favor of HR 2112 will result in cuts of $650 million from WIC (Women, Infants and Children) and will deprive indigent women and children of healthy foods, nutrition counseling and referrals to health care providers they so desperately need.

As usual, he continues to follow the Republican majority at the expense of his constituents. Now he’s decided we can no longer afford to ensure healthy nutrition for every hungry mother and child. Instead he would rather give more and bigger tax cuts to billionaires and petroleum companies. Terry K. Cunningham La Pine

Bend shows interest in art I bet you thought the only reason to go to the Bend City Hall was to conduct city business. Well, now through July you can make City Hall a destination to see “City Walls for City Hall.” Local artists have each selected a photograph from the Des Chutes Historical Museum collection and have rendered their interpretation of the photograph. On the walls of City Hall you will find both the chosen photographs and the artists’ interpretations. You will find paintings, fabric and paper works designed to appeal to many interests. The committee that put this show together has created a truly magical atmosphere in City Hall. I personally appreciate the City Council and the city staff for allowing such a project in their hall. It shows that council members have an interest in the history and art of our area. Please do keep up the idea of art in City Hall. Locals and visitors alike will add a real treat to their summer by visiting “City Walls for City Hall” at Bend City Hall. Elouise Mattox Bend

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

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Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

In an earthbound era for America, heaven has to wait By Frank Bruni New York Times News Service

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his morning, barring thunder or blunder, the space shuttle Atlantis will cough smoke, spit fire and, in a spectacle no less dazzling for its familiarity, bust free of its earthly trappings, some 2,250 tons somehow rising above the clouds. And that will be that. Roll the credits. Its scheduled takeoff — and slated return 12 days later — are the last in the U.S. shuttle program, which now draws to an unsettling close. Ending it, I suppose, makes good sense. Its benefits grew increasingly debatable, at least in relation to its cost: around $200 billion over four decades (including the planning years). Money is tight. What budget NASA still has might be better used in other ways. But as the centerpiece of our country’s gaudily ambitious space adventures, the shuttle program was a pre-eminent symbol of our belief that there were literally no limits to where we could go and no boundaries to what we could accomplish, so long as we hitched our ingenuity to our imagination and marshaled the requisite

will. And there’s no real sense of what big dreams, if any, lie beyond Atlantis. The program’s end carries the force of cruel metaphor, coming at a time when limits are all we talk about. The current political debate and the nascent 2012 election season are utterly earthbound, with a tone so gloomy it’s often shocking. Instead of the defiant trumpet blast that it’s “Morning in America” — Ronald Reagan’s retort to the so-called malaise of the Jimmy Carter years — we have anxious promises to hold back the night. “Let’s stop this American downward spiral,” Rick Perry, the Texas governor, told a conservative convention last month, as he rehearsed lugubrious lines he might use in a presidential bid. Jon Huntsman, declaring his candidacy for the presidency a few days later, observed, “For the first time in history, we are passing down to the next generation a country that is less powerful, less compassionate, less competitive and less confident than the one we got.” Hard decisions had to be made, he added, in order “to avert disaster.” To some degree, such dire language

reflects predictable political gamesmanship. By lamenting the status quo, candidates disparage its designated steward — in this case, President Barack Obama. And the country has certainly survived more devastating and sustained periods of economic distress than the present one, finding renewed prosperity on the far side. But Americans right now are profoundly doubtful. Shaken. For many, the fear isn’t just that there’s no imminent end to high unemployment and tepid economic growth, but that we’ve turned a fundamental corner and our best days really are behind us. A Gallup/USA Today poll conducted in late April found that 55 percent of Americans considered it unlikely that children today would have better lives than their parents, while only 44 percent considered it likely. Those responses were the most negative, by far, over the last quarter-century, and they undercut a central tenet of American optimism. Just last week the Democratic pollster Mark Penn, writing in Time magazine, concluded that “the country is going through one of its longest sustained peri-

There’s no grand mission that represents the kind of storehouse for our confidence and emblem of our can-do spirit that space exploration once did. ods of unhappiness and pessimism ever.” He cited a recent survey suggesting that “more than two-thirds of the country sees the past decade as a period of decline.” And 39 percent of the respondents in a recent New York Times/CBS News poll characterized that decline as permanent, at least in economic terms. That was a marked increase from 28 percent who said so last fall. It’s in this context that many Democrats and Republicans alike nurse a new isolationism, convinced that we can no longer afford broad engagement in the world. It’s in this context that immigrants, wanting pieces of a pie deemed more finite, are vilified.

And it’s in this context that hard-line conservatives cling to the notion of American exceptionalism. They can’t shut out what’s in their peripheral vision — economies in China, India and Brazil that are expanding much faster than ours — and doth protest too much. In Washington and in state capitals, the squabbling is epic, and it’s focused not on what we might dare to build but on what we might manage to preserve, not on degrees of progress but on gradations of regress: how many parks, schools, libraries need be closed. Despite the president’s exhortation that we chart the frontiers of innovation, there’s no grand mission that represents the kind of storehouse for our confidence and emblem of our can-do spirit that space exploration once did. What has happened to our sense of discovery? I’m not sure, but I know what will happen to the spaceship Discovery, one of four remaining shuttles in the fleet. It’s bound for the Smithsonian, where we stockpile the glories of yesteryear. Frank Bruni is a columnist for The New York Times.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 8, 2011 C5

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N   Catherine Lewis, of Ontario May 9, 1942 - July 5, 2011 Arrangements: Lienkaemper Chapel, Ontario, 1-541-889-5353 Services: Services pending.

Delbert Oliver Walkley, of Redmond June 17, 1917 - July 5, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: No services are planned.

Louisea Peck Hall, of Bend Sept. 10, 1916 - July 2, 2011 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Graveside Service Friday, July 8, 2011 at Sunset Hills Cemetery, Portland, Oregon. Contributions may be made to:

Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 NE 27th St., Bend, Oregon 97701.

Nathen Allen Parker, of Roseburg, OR July 31, 1982 - June 26, 2011 Arrangements: Major Family Funeral Home in Springfield, OR 1-541-746-9667. Services: There will be a celebration of life and tie- dye party Saturday August 6, 2011, 1:00 pm at the James D. Myer Center, 990 W. Stanton, Roseburg, Oregon 98747.

Theresa Maureen Jones, of Redmond Feb. 2, 1958 - July 3, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Homes of Bend, 541-382-0903, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No services planned at this time.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Embezzle Continued from C1 He would then transfer money into the account from a second customer’s account to cover his tracks. To avoid detection, Jewett changed the addresses to which customers’ bank statements were mailed so that statements could be mailed to him and intercepted. Jewett accepted a plea deal in February, pleading guilty to one of the original 11 charges against him. As part of the plea deal and sentencing, Jewett will be required to pay full restitution. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Bill Goben

Patricia Kay Thiel

April 5, 1932 - Feb. 21, 2011

Feb. 14, 1947 - July 2, 2011

A memorial service will be held Sat., July 16, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., at Redmond Memorial Cemetery for Bill Goben. Wilbur Earl "Bill" Goben was born April 5, 1932, in Neenah, WI, to Lloyd and Hazel Goben. He passed away, Feb. 21, 2011, in Sun City, AZ, from complications following a car accident Bill was educated in Prineville, graduating from Crook County High School in 1951. During his adult years, he lived in Bend, Yerington, NV, and Sun City West, AZ. Bill was preceded in death by his parents and brother Jack. He is survived by his wife, Arlene; son and daughter-in-law, Shawn & Deanne Goben. Reception will follow memorial at the Bend Riverhouse. golf attire is appropriate, since golf was Bills love. Arrangements by Autumn Funerals.

Private family services will be held at 12:00 noon, Tuesday, July 12 at Shevlin Park to celebrate Patricia’s life. She is survived by her husband, Dale Thiel of Bend, and by a son and a daughter. Arrangements handled by Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471.

Jacob Luke May June 1, 1990 - July 2, 2011 Jacob May was born June 1, 1990, in Portland, Ore., to Gregory Million and Lisa (Bryan) May. He was a Sisters High School graduate, and was planning on attending George Fox University in the Fall. He had completed a couple terms at Ecola Bible School in Cannon Beach, Oregon. He enjoyed woodworking and construction. Jacob is survived by his mother; brother, Jared May; and sisters, Kelsey and Jackie May. He was preceded in death by his father, Gregory Million. Please sign the online guestbook at www.redmondmemorial.com.

Survey Continued from C1 There is also an opportunity for people to write comments on the survey. “We’re hoping we hear something new and different that we haven’t thought of,” Johnson said. County Commissioner Alan Unger said people who moved to Deschutes County from other areas of the country might have ideas that worked in those places. “Maybe they’re from somewhere else that does things differently than we do that we could learn from,” Unger said. “Another thing would be, how important is road maintenance to the citizens, and how strongly would they support solutions that we could bring to them for consideration?”

Elsie M. Yates Spletter January 12, 1923 - July 4, 2011 Elsie M. Spletter, 88 years old, of Bend, died July 4, 2011, a Bend resident since 1953. Born January 12, 1923, in Everly, Iowa, to Ernest and Pearl Yates Fear. She was educated in Everly. She married William M. Spletter of Spencer, Iowa, on March 2, 1942. She was a member of the Church of God Church. She is survived by a son, Mitchell of La Pine; three grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren. She also leaves four sisters, Ester Reese of Peterson, IA, Shirley Ruby of Worthington, MN, Lois Brossart of Escondido, CA, Margaret Shaver of Rialto, CA; many aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews. Preceding her in death are her, mother, father, five brothers, and three sisters, her husband, and one grandson. At her request no services will be held. Deschutes Memorial Chapel is in charge of arrangements. Condolences may be extended to the family at www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

“Maintaining roads is the right thing to do,” Unger said. The survey will remain online for at least two weeks, and Johnson said she might keep it up longer if a lot of people are filling it out. The county is using the company SurveyMonkey, which provides a tally of the results, including how many people participated, Johnson said. County Administrator Dave Kanner and the county commissioners will receive the report and will likely discuss the results. The county’s subscription to SurveyMonkey costs $200 a year, and the county can do an unlimited number of surveys, Johnson said. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Lawrence Newman, 86, ardent advocate for deaf By Dennis McLellan Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Lawrence Newman, a prominent advocate for the rights of deaf people and a former longtime teacher and administrator at the California School for the Deaf in Riverside, has died. He was 86. Newman, who served two terms as president of the National Association of the Deaf, died Monday at his home in Riverside of complications from emergency surgery and a long battle with Parkinson’s disease, said his daughter Laureen Newman-Feldhorn. “Larry was a true gentleman and someone I admired for his hard work and dedication on behalf of the deaf community,” T. Alan Hurwitz, president of Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., said in a statement to the Los Angeles Times on Tuesday. Gallaudet is the world’s only liberal arts university for students who are deaf and hard of hearing. “His legacy for his contributions to the betterment of education for deaf children will forever be remembered,” said Hurwitz, a former president of the National Association of the Deaf who served on its board of directors with Newman. “He was a significant role model for me, and I know he will always be regarded as a giant in the deaf community.” Deaf since he was 5 in 1930, Newman joined the faculty at the California School for the Deaf in Riverside as a mathematics teacher in 1953. He taught there for 20 years and was chosen California Teacher of the Year by the state Department of Education in 1969 — the

Charter Continued from C1 Currently, Bend’s mayor is chosen by a majority vote by the seven-member City Council and holds that position for two years. Though the mayor doesn’t have any more power than the other councilors, the mayor helps set agendas and essentially serves as a ceremonial head of the city who attends ribbon-cuttings and various other events.

Requires election To change the mayoral position to one that is elected by

first deaf teacher so honored in California. Newman always stressed the importance of education in the lives of deaf children and fought for the right of deaf students to be educated using sign language. “If deaf people could get an education, their minds would be set free and the kingdom of the world would be theirs,” he once wrote. After four years as principal of the Taft School for the Aurally Handicapped in Santa Ana, Calif. (now the Taft Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program) beginning in 1973, Newman returned to the California School for the Deaf in Riverside in 1977 as assistant superintendent. He retired in 1988. The youngest of three sons, whose parents ran a small neighborhood bakery in Manhattan, Newman was born in Brooklyn on March 23, 1925. He had normal hearing until he was 5, but a chronic ear infection led to mastoiditis. As chronicled in a 2010 article on Newman in Deaf Life, “the doctor who operated on him accidentally severed the left seventh cranial nerve, which transverses the middle ear and controls the muscles of facial expression on that side.” The operation not only left Newman profoundly deaf but also caused the left side of his face to become motionless. He was a student at the Lexington School for the Deaf in New York before attending the New York School for the Deaf, where he played on the football team. At what is now known as Gallaudet University, he earned

a bachelor’s degree in English and met his future wife, Betty, who was hard-of-hearing most of her life and became deaf in her late 40s. They were married in 1950, and Betty later taught language arts at the California School for the Deaf in Riverside. After earning a master’s degree in English Literature at Catholic University in 1950, Newman launched his teaching career at the Central New York School for the Deaf in Rome, N.Y., where, instead of teaching English, he was assigned to teach high school math. Newman, who served as president of the National Association of the Deaf from 1986 to 1990, established the National Committee on Equal Educational Opportunities for Deaf Children. Earlier, he served as president of the International Association of Parents of the Deaf, which is now known as the American Society for Deaf Children. He also was a leading supporter of closed-captioned television, which has become widely available. Newman wrote two books: “Sands of Time: NAD Presidents 1880-2003,” published by the National Association of the Deaf in 2006, and “I Fill This Small Space: The Writings of a Deaf Activist,” published by Gallaudet University Press in 2009. In addition to his daughter Laureen and his wife of 61 years, Newman is survived by two sons, Mitchell and Warner, two other daughters, Carol Newman, who is deaf, and Rochelle Braithwaite; a brother, Leonard; six grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

voters, the city would need to amend its charter, which is basically Bend’s constitution. Making a change to the city’s charter requires an election, and has only been successfully done twice since 1995. For this reason, the City Council decided earlier this year to form a nine-person charter review committee to study whether Bend should consider having an elected mayor. In addition to Teater, who was the chairman, that committee included former Mayor and City Councilor Bruce Abernethy and former Councilor Suzanne Johannsen. It also included Chuck Arnold, Ron Boozell, Bob Thomas, Don

Senecal, Mike Olin and Greg Fowler. Some other ideas that were discussed included whether the mayor position should pay more than other council positions and if it should be invested with more power. The committee’s report and findings are scheduled to be presented to the Bend City Council on July 20. If the council decides not to follow the committee’s recommendations, it can still go to voters to ask for amendments to the charter. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Kirby Dallas Nagelhout November 17, 1955 – July 2, 2011

Fire Continued from C1 Penhollow said most offices of the Warm Springs government closed at 3 p.m. For residents, evacuations have been voluntary. As the fire spread, the state announced tightened fire restrictions in the Central Oregon district. “The warmer, drier and breezier weather is drying out the vegetation quickly,” said George Ponte, district forester with the Oregon Department of Forestry. “The Central Oregon District is currently experiencing high fire danger, and we expect it to bump up to extreme over the next few days.” Beginning at 6 a.m. Saturday, the state will enact regulated use restrictions on private and state lands protected by the Department of Forestry in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties. Restrictions include: • A ban on smoking while traveling, except in vehicles on improved roads. • Prohibition on open fires, including campfires, charcoal fires, cooking fires and warming fires, except in designated areas or if conducted in compliance with a valid burning permit. • Fireworks are prohibited. • Blasting is prohibited. • Motor vehicles, including motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles, are prohibited except on improved roads or for use by a

landowner and employees of the landowner on their own land. • Drivers must have one shovel and one gallon of water, or one 21⁄2 -pound or larger fire extinguisher, while traveling in motorized vehicles in the forest. All-terrain vehicles and motorcycles must be equipped with an approved spark arrestor. • Chain saw use is prohibited between 1 and 8 p.m. Chain saw use is permitted at all other hours as long as one ax, one shovel and one eight-ounce or larger fire extinguisher nearby. A fire watch is also required at least one hour following the use of each saw. • Cutting, grinding and welding of metal is prohibited between 1 and 8 p.m. At all other times, the area is to be cleared of flammable vegetation and one ax, one shovel and one 21⁄2 -pound or larger fire extinguisher must be in the area. • Mowing of dry grass with power-driven equipment is prohibited between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m., except for the commercial culture and harvest of agricultural crops. • Any electric fence controller in use must be listed by a nationally recognized testing laboratory or be certified by the Department of Consumer and Business Services and operated in compliance with manufacturer’s instructions. Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

After a long and courageous battle against cancer, Kirby Dallas Nagelhout, age 55, passed away July 2, 2011, at Hospice House in Bend, Oregon. Kirby was born November 17, 1955, in Breckenridge, Minnesota, to parents Kenneth and Jan Nagelhout. He was one of six children. The family lived in various locations in Minnesota and both Dakotas prior to their move to Springfield, Oregon, in 1965. At a very early age, Kirby was fascinated by what his father could produce simply with the aid of a hammer, a few nails, and some lumber, and the stage was set for what has become an extremely successful career as a general contractor in Central Oregon. As a youth, building small birdhouses led to the construction of a Soap Box Derby car, a backyard “hangout,” and eventually, following in his father’s footsteps, a Chambers Construction employee. Kirby graduated from Bend High School in 1974, and in 1977, he married Collene Kloos; they have a daughter, Hillary, and a son, Tyler. In 1986, he started Kirby Nagelhout Construction Company (KNCC) and area residents quickly took note of the “Nagelhout green” pickups and signs that began showing up everywhere. Over the years, his company has been honored by hundreds of organizations for both its work and Kirby’s generous philanthropy to the Central Oregon community. KNCC’s accomplishments, to name a few, include the Redmond airport terminal, Deschutes County Fairgrounds, Mt. Bachelor’s Pine Marten Lodge, Deschutes County Library, and many of the schools in the area. KNCC carries on Kirby’s legacy as a prominent leader in the Central Oregon region. In 2002, he married Cathy Guest. A few years ago, Kirby and Cathy moved to a house on the Deschutes River in Redmond, Oregon, where he worked from an office in their home and enjoyed woodworking in his shop and traveling. In 2010, he was named one of Bend High School’s outstanding student alums; his picture and commemorative plaque are displayed along with those of other honorees in the high school cafeteria. Kirby’s family will always lovingly remember the way he assumed the role of caring and generous family patriarch following his father’s death and the great admiration and respect he received from friends and associates in the business community. Survivors include Kirby’s wife, Cathy Nagelhout of Redmond; daughter, Hillary Paige Moor, her husband, Stephen, and their son, Kirby Daniel, of Redmond; son, Tyler Dallas Nagelhout, his wife, Kayla, and their son, Dallas Kirby, of Bend; mother, Jan Davis, of Eugene; sisters Vicki Young of Corvallis, Sheila Phillips of Eugene, Kimberley Nagelhout of Canby, and Heather Burton of Napa, CA; and, Welsh Corgis, Baxter and Joey. He was preceded in death by his father and one sister, Pamela Nagelhout. A public memorial service will be held at Bend Senior High School on Friday, July 15th 2011 at 1:00 PM. The family requests donations be made in Kirby’s memory to Deschutes Children’s Foundation (1010 NW 14th Street, Bend, OR 97701; 541-388-3101), Grandma’s House of Central Oregon, Inc. (PO Box 6372, Bend, OR, 97708; 541-383-3515) or, Partners In Care/Hospice House (2075 NE Wyatt Court #1, Bend, OR 97701; 541-382-5882). Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home is serving the family.


W E AT H ER

C6 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, JULY 8

HIGH Ben Burkel

76

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Today: Mainly sunny, significantly cooler, afternoon and evening breezes.

STATE Western

Government50s Camp

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

75/47

70/46

78/47

54/38

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

78/41

72/33

Willowdale 70s Mitchell

Madras

75/38

76/39

Camp Sherman 71/33 Redmond Prineville 76/36 Cascadia 73/37 75/37 Sisters 74/35 Bend Post 76/36

Oakridge Elk Lake 73/35

63/24

Partly to mostly sunny skies today. Clear to partly cloudy tonight. Central

78/40

73/32

73/32

71/31

Hampton

Vancouver 64/51

Chemult 71/30

Calgary 71/46

50s Seattle

60s

65/50

74/34

66/26

60s

71/33

Fort Rock

71/41

70s

Helena Bend

79/47

Boise

76/36

80/49

Idaho Falls

80s

85/51

99/67

76/35

Elko

79/36

San Francisco Mostly sunny and 66/53 pleasant conditions today. Mostly clear skies tonight.

Crater Lake 64/35

91/53

Reno

90s

92/61

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:30 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:50 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:31 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:50 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:19 p.m. Moonset today . . . 12:10 a.m.

Salt Lake City 85/66

100s

LOW

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Mostly sunny and warm. HIGH

83 46

LOW

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases Full

Last

New

First

July 14

July 22

July 30

Aug. 6

Friday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 62/55/0.04 . . . . . 63/50/pc. . . . . . . 65/51/c Baker City . . . . . . 82/48/0.12 . . . . . . 72/42/s. . . . . . . 80/43/s Brookings . . . . . . 75/51/0.00 . . . . . 70/51/pc. . . . . . . 68/51/s Burns. . . . . . . . . . 86/53/0.03 . . . . . . 75/46/s. . . . . . . 85/48/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 75/49/0.00 . . . . . . 73/45/s. . . . . . . 78/48/s Klamath Falls . . . 85/54/0.00 . . . . . . 79/43/s. . . . . . . 80/46/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 88/52/0.00 . . . . . . 81/49/s. . . . . . . 83/49/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 84/50/0.00 . . . . . . 73/32/s. . . . . . . 76/37/s Medford . . . . . . . 90/63/0.00 . . . . . . 86/53/s. . . . . . . 87/55/s Newport . . . . . . .61/52/trace . . . . . . 62/47/s. . . . . . 63/48/pc North Bend . . . . . 64/54/0.00 . . . . . . 64/49/s. . . . . . 65/50/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 94/63/0.00 . . . . . . 82/56/s. . . . . . . 86/56/s Pendleton . . . . . . 89/57/0.00 . . . . . . 78/50/s. . . . . . . 80/52/s Portland . . . . . . . 70/59/0.00 . . . . . 70/53/pc. . . . . . 75/55/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 81/54/0.00 . . . . . . 73/37/s. . . . . . . 77/42/s Redmond. . . . . . . 85/50/0.00 . . . . . . 78/41/s. . . . . . . 80/42/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 77/59/0.00 . . . . . 78/49/pc. . . . . . . 79/52/s Salem . . . . . . . . . 72/55/0.00 . . . . . . 72/48/s. . . . . . . 77/51/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . 78/49/0.00 . . . . . . 74/35/s. . . . . . . 76/39/s The Dalles . . . . . . 78/67/0.00 . . . . . . 76/53/s. . . . . . . 79/54/s

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

9

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82/55 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 in 1968 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 in 1955 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.14” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.41” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 6.30” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.99 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.35 in 1975 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.....High Sisters...............................Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....Mod. La Pine...............................High Redmond/Madras.........Mod. Prineville ..........................High

LOW

LOW

82 45

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy and warm. HIGH

84 48

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:35 a.m. . . . . .10:11 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:42 a.m. . . . . . .8:09 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .3:06 a.m. . . . . . .6:20 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .1:22 a.m. . . . . . .3:06 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .12:45 p.m. . . . . .12:37 a.m. Uranus . . . . . .12:08 a.m. . . . . .12:21 p.m.

OREGON CITIES City

Missoula

Redding Christmas Valley

Silver Lake

HIGH

BEND ALMANAC

Eugene Mostly sunny and 73/45 pleasant conditions today. Pass Mostly clear skies tonight. Grants 82/50 Eastern

Burns

LOW

80 41

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

70/53

76/34

Crescent

Crescent Lake

HIGH

36

TUESDAY

Mostly sunny and warm.

NORTHWEST

69/33

La Pine

LOW

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 94° Ontario • 44° Meacham

MONDAY

Mostly sunny and pleasant.

Tonight: Mainly clear and chilly.

Portland

Brothers

71/33

SUNDAY

Much of the region will be dry, except for a few showers over the northern Cascades.

Paulina

73/34

Sunriver

SATURDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41,364 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161,393 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 85,093 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 41,387 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145,835 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 487 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,420 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,928 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 20.2 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 64/51

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

Calgary 71/46

Portland 70/53

Boise 80/49

Billings 89/58

Palm Springs, Calif. Fraser, Colo.

• 2.35” Hickory, N.C.

Honolulu 88/75

Las Vegas 101/84

S

Salt Lake City 85/66

Denver 91/63

Juneau 64/47

S S

Quebec 78/59 Halifax 78/55 Portland 72/58 Boston 73/65 New York 78/68

To ronto 79/62

Green Bay Buffalo 82/62 Detroit 74/67 Chicago 84/68 Philadelphia 79/66 Columbus 83/69 86/66 Omaha Des Moines Washington, D. C. 88/69 87/70 Louisville 87/74 83/71 Kansas City 87/71 St. Louis Nashville Charlotte 89/70 89/71 87/70

Little Rock Birmingham 94/76 Dallas 91/73 102/80 New Orleans 92/79 Houston 97/76

Chihuahua 98/67

Mazatlan 86/77

S

Rapid City 84/65

Phoenix 108/88

La Paz 95/71

S

Thunder Bay 79/59

Albuquerque 95/72 Oklahoma City 99/77

Los Angeles 76/64 Tijuana 76/62

Anchorage 63/50

S

St. Paul 87/71

Cheyenne 81/59

San Francisco 66/53

S

Bismarck 87/65

• 111° • 40°

S

Saskatoon 80/55 Winnipeg 84/64

Seattle 65/50

(in the 48 contiguous states):

S

Atlanta 90/73

Orlando 90/75 Miami 89/78

Monterrey 98/75

FRONTS

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . .103/77/0.00 103/75/pc . 104/76/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .86/65/0.00 . 84/58/pc . . . 87/62/s Albany. . . . . . . . .83/64/0.00 . 79/62/pc . . . 85/61/s Albuquerque. . . .97/70/0.00 . . .95/72/s . . 95/73/pc Anchorage . . . . .62/51/0.00 . 63/50/pc . . 67/50/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .94/73/0.00 . . .90/73/t . . . .91/75/t Atlantic City . . . .92/73/0.00 . . .79/69/t . . . 81/69/s Austin . . . . . . . . .97/69/0.00 100/75/pc . 101/75/pc Baltimore . . . . . .95/70/0.00 . . .84/71/t . . 89/70/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .90/62/0.00 . . .89/58/t . . 87/57/pc Birmingham . . . .92/73/0.01 . . .91/73/t . . . .93/73/t Bismarck . . . . . . .83/55/0.00 . . .87/65/t . . . 84/59/s Boise . . . . . . . . . 94/67/trace . . .80/49/s . . . 85/53/s Boston. . . . . . . . .88/70/0.00 . 73/65/pc . . . 78/62/s Bridgeport, CT. . .87/70/0.00 . . .72/66/t . . . 77/67/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .80/63/0.00 . . .74/67/s . . . 83/64/s Burlington, VT. . .78/64/0.38 . 79/61/pc . . . 81/58/s Caribou, ME . . . .75/60/0.00 . 77/55/pc . . 76/54/pc Charleston, SC . .92/75/0.00 . . .89/77/t . . . .92/75/t Charlotte. . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . . .89/71/t . . . .90/70/t Chattanooga. . . .91/72/0.00 . . .89/70/t . . . .92/70/t Cheyenne . . . . . .79/54/0.01 . . .81/59/t . . . .84/59/t Chicago. . . . . . . .82/67/0.00 . . .79/66/s . . . 82/77/s Cincinnati . . . . . .89/66/0.01 . . .82/67/t . . . 88/66/s Cleveland . . . . . .81/71/0.00 . . .81/62/s . . . 83/67/s Colorado Springs 83/61/0.08 . . .87/59/t . . . .88/62/t Columbia, MO . .76/68/0.44 . 88/68/pc . . 90/72/pc Columbia, SC . . .94/71/0.00 . . .93/72/t . . . .92/72/t Columbus, GA. . .96/76/0.00 . . .94/75/t . . 95/75/pc Columbus, OH. . .90/70/0.00 . 86/66/pc . . . 87/65/s Concord, NH . . . .82/57/0.00 . 74/59/pc . . . 83/60/s Corpus Christi. . .95/71/0.00 . 91/78/pc . . 93/76/pc Dallas Ft Worth 102/80/0.00 102/80/pc . 102/79/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .90/68/0.00 . 85/66/pc . . . 87/66/s Denver. . . . . . . . .86/58/0.47 . . .91/63/t . . . .93/62/t Des Moines. . . . .86/70/0.02 . . .87/70/s . . 89/73/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .83/65/0.00 . . .84/68/s . . . 85/68/s Duluth . . . . . . . . .82/61/0.05 . . .75/58/s . . . .75/61/t El Paso. . . . . . . .100/78/0.00 . .102/77/s . 100/76/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .80/54/0.00 . .75/53/sh . . 80/55/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . . .86/69/s . . . .85/66/t Flagstaff . . . . . . .81/51/0.04 . . .82/54/t . . . .81/54/t

Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .80/58/0.00 . . .85/60/s . . . 85/64/s Rapid City . . . . . .84/55/0.00 . . .84/65/t . . . 84/62/s Savannah . . . . . .95/73/0.34 . . .93/76/t . . . .93/74/t Green Bay. . . . . .78/60/0.00 . 82/62/pc . . . .83/68/t Reno . . . . . . . . . .94/67/0.00 . . .92/61/s . . . 92/59/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .67/55/0.03 . 65/50/pc . . . 69/52/c Greensboro. . . . .89/68/0.00 . . .88/70/t . . . .88/69/t Richmond . . . . . .92/66/0.00 . . .88/71/t . . . .89/68/t Sioux Falls. . . . . .88/66/0.00 . 86/68/pc . . . .87/71/t Harrisburg. . . . . .89/73/0.00 . . .80/65/t . . 87/65/pc Rochester, NY . . .80/62/0.00 . . .79/63/s . . . 81/63/s Spokane . . . . . . .89/61/0.00 . . .70/47/s . . . 74/50/s Hartford, CT . . . .91/68/0.00 . . .75/64/t . . . 84/60/s Sacramento. . . . .95/66/0.00 . . .94/60/s . . . 92/58/s Springfield, MO. .88/69/0.28 . 89/72/pc . . 92/75/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .92/55/0.00 . . .79/47/s . . . 79/51/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .87/73/0.18 . 89/70/pc . . . 88/74/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .88/76/1.03 . . .89/77/t . . . .91/77/t Honolulu . . . . . . .87/73/0.01 . . .88/75/s . . . 89/75/s Salt Lake City . . .85/70/0.00 . 85/66/pc . . 87/69/pc Tucson. . . . . . . .101/77/0.00 . .102/78/t . . .102/77/t Houston . . . . . . .97/73/0.00 . 97/76/pc . . . .98/76/t San Antonio . . . .97/77/0.00 . 98/74/pc . . 97/75/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . .104/78/0.00 . 97/75/pc . 102/76/pc Huntsville . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . . .89/70/t . . . .92/70/t San Diego . . . . . .83/71/0.00 . 74/65/pc . . . 73/65/s Washington, DC .95/73/0.00 . . .87/74/t . . 89/71/pc Indianapolis . . . .88/72/0.00 . 86/67/pc . . . 88/68/s San Francisco . . .69/53/0.00 . . .70/53/s . . . 68/53/s Wichita . . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . 92/74/pc . 101/78/pc Jackson, MS . . . .97/70/0.00 . . .97/75/t . . . .96/73/t San Jose . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . .81/56/s . . . 78/55/s Yakima . . . . . . . .91/62/0.00 . . .77/48/s . . . 79/51/s Madison, WI . . . .83/58/0.00 . . .84/64/s . . 86/69/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .95/62/0.00 . 91/60/pc . . 92/64/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .107/84/0.00 109/80/pc . 109/80/pc Jacksonville. . . . .91/71/0.00 . . .92/74/t . . . .95/75/t Juneau. . . . . . . . .65/48/0.00 . . .64/47/c . . . 65/49/c Kansas City. . . . .81/71/1.34 . . .87/71/s . . 92/77/pc Amsterdam. . . . .72/57/0.00 . .68/55/sh . . 70/56/sh Mecca . . . . . . . .111/86/0.00 . .111/85/s . . 114/86/s Lansing . . . . . . . .80/56/0.00 . . .84/59/s . . . 86/64/s Athens. . . . . . . . .89/76/0.00 . . .90/70/s . . . 91/72/s Mexico City. . . . .75/59/0.00 . . .75/54/t . . . .76/55/t Las Vegas . . . . .100/83/0.00 101/84/pc . 102/85/pc Auckland. . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . .56/49/sh . . 58/51/sh Montreal. . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . 79/61/pc . . . 81/62/s Lexington . . . . . .91/67/0.00 . . .81/68/t . . 86/67/pc Baghdad . . . . . .113/86/0.00 . .114/87/s . . 115/86/s Moscow . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . .76/64/t . . . .78/65/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . .84/69/0.47 . . .88/68/s . . 91/74/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .95/81/0.00 . . .93/78/t . . . .91/78/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . 78/56/pc . . 77/57/pc Little Rock. . . . . .92/78/0.00 . 94/76/pc . . 96/74/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . 90/69/pc . . 93/70/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .91/81/t . . . .92/81/t Los Angeles. . . . .76/67/0.00 . 76/64/pc . . . 74/63/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . . .87/76/s . . . 89/77/s New Delhi. . . . . .95/82/0.00 . . .91/81/t . . . .94/82/t Louisville . . . . . . .91/72/0.00 . . .83/71/t . . . 90/69/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . .76/59/sh . . 80/60/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .79/73/0.00 . . .89/76/t . . . .88/76/t Memphis. . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . .92/74/t . . . .95/75/t Bogota . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . .70/48/sh . . 72/49/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . .67/58/sh . . 65/56/sh Miami . . . . . . . . .81/75/0.59 . . .89/78/t . . . .91/80/t Budapest. . . . . . .90/52/0.00 . . .86/66/t . . 89/67/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . .78/61/sh . . . 82/62/s Milwaukee . . . . .75/60/0.00 . . .78/64/s . . 79/68/pc Buenos Aires. . . .61/39/0.00 . . .65/43/s . . 63/44/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . .74/59/sh . . 74/57/sh Minneapolis . . . .87/69/0.00 . . .87/71/s . . . .87/72/t Cabo San Lucas .93/79/0.00 . 90/76/pc . . 88/76/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .64/63/0.00 . . .69/57/s . . . 72/56/s Nashville . . . . . . .90/70/0.87 . . .87/70/t . . . .92/71/t Cairo . . . . . . . . . .95/72/0.00 . . .96/74/s . . . 97/73/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . . .88/69/s . . . 90/69/s New Orleans. . . .95/76/0.00 . . .92/79/t . . . .93/77/t Calgary . . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . .71/46/sh . . 67/45/pc Santiago . . . . . . .72/28/0.00 . . .64/39/s . . 58/38/pc New York . . . . . .92/74/0.00 . . .78/68/t . . . 86/69/s Cancun . . . . . . . .79/72/4.15 . . .85/76/t . . . .86/76/t Sao Paulo . . . . . .55/52/0.00 . . .67/50/s . . . 70/51/s Newark, NJ . . . . .97/73/0.00 . . .79/69/t . . 88/69/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . .62/53/sh . . 64/52/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .82/82/0.00 . . .75/65/r . . 79/66/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .89/71/0.00 . . .88/74/t . . . .86/71/t Edinburgh . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . .63/53/sh . . 62/52/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .77/70/0.00 . .80/70/sh . . . .81/69/t Oklahoma City .108/80/0.00 . 99/77/pc . 103/76/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . .80/61/sh . . . .81/61/t Shanghai. . . . . .100/84/0.00 . . .90/78/t . . . .87/78/t Omaha . . . . . . . .85/73/0.00 . . .88/69/s . . 88/74/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . . .67/44/s . . 67/45/pc Singapore . . . . . .90/82/0.00 . . .89/79/t . . . .88/78/t Orlando. . . . . . . .90/74/0.95 . . .90/75/t . . . .93/76/t Hong Kong . . . . .93/84/0.00 . 92/81/pc . . 92/82/pc Stockholm. . . . . .81/52/0.00 . .76/60/sh . . 74/59/sh Palm Springs. . .111/81/0.00 106/83/pc . 106/81/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . .88/68/s . . . 88/67/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .63/46/0.00 . . .62/44/s . . . 62/43/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .83/67/0.30 . . .85/65/s . . 89/72/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .87/62/0.00 . . .93/68/s . . . 96/70/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . 90/80/pc . . . .88/79/t Philadelphia . . . .95/73/0.01 . . .83/69/t . . . 88/68/s Johannesburg . . .57/34/0.00 . . .56/36/s . . 56/39/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . . .89/74/s . . . 91/74/s Phoenix. . . . . . .107/87/0.00 108/88/pc . 108/86/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .66/63/0.00 . 69/64/pc . . . 70/65/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . .87/77/t . . 90/77/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .89/68/0.00 . . .82/61/t . . . 85/63/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . 79/62/pc . . . 78/60/s Toronto . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . 79/62/pc . . . 82/63/s Portland, ME. . . .83/62/0.00 . 72/58/pc . . 75/60/pc London . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . .65/56/sh . . 69/55/pc Vancouver. . . . . .63/57/0.00 . .64/51/sh . . 67/53/sh Providence . . . . .89/70/0.00 . . .76/65/t . . . 83/62/s Madrid . . . . . . . .88/59/0.00 . . .90/63/s . . . 93/64/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .88/57/0.00 . .80/62/sh . . 84/65/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .94/70/0.06 . . .89/72/t . . . .88/69/t Manila. . . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . . .85/77/t . . . .86/77/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . 84/64/pc . . . 80/61/s

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Golf Inside Cristie Kerr is tied for the lead at the rain-delayed U.S. Women’s Open, see Page D5.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

ADVENTURE SPORTS

C YCLING

LOCAL BASEBALL

Bend to host U.S. Gran Prix of Cyclocross

Little League umpire at just 12 years old?

Bend’s reputation as a biking mecca continues to grow. Officials from the U.S. Gran Prix of Cyclocross announced Thursday that Bend will host the organization’s final two races of the 2011 season on December 10 and 11. The U.S. Gran Prix of Cyclocross is a four-weekend, eight-race series that starts in September and ends in December. The series begins in Madison, Wis., on Sept. 24 and 25 and continues with races in Fort Collins, Colo., (Oct. 8-9) and Louisville, Ky., (Nov. 12-13) before the series concludes in Bend. Races in Bend are expected to be held near Deschutes Brewery’s main distribution site on a course similar to the one used for the 2009 and 2010 USA Cyclocross National Championships. Organizers say the event is expected to attract 800 racers. For more information, go to www.usgpcyclocross.com. — Bulletin staff report

Bend’s Chase Anderman is making calls on the diamond at a regional all-star tournament By Mike Weber For The Bulletin

THE DALLES — Bend North Little League baseball player Chase Anderman has been running around the Kramer Field Ballpark just like the nearly 400 players who make up the 29 teams competing in the Oregon District 5 Little League All Star Tournament here this week. A year ago, Chase earned a position on the age 11U Little League All Star squad and competed in the 2010 district tournament in Bend. This year, an injury prevented him from getting selected to All Stars. Nevertheless, Chase is out there on the diamond, keenly watching every play and making critical decisions that could affect the outcome of games as a member of the umpire crew. At first glance, the 4-foot-7inch 12-year-old doesn’t look like the typical umpire, most of

C YCLING Tour de France at a glance

Mark Morical / The Bulletin

MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAIL GUIDE

Kiwa Butte New trails in Wanoga complex offer fast thrills, stunning vistas Editor’s note: Mountain Bike Trail Guide, by Bulletin outdoor writer Mark Morical, appears in Adventure Sports on alternating Fridays through the riding season.

MARK MORICAL

T

he new Wanoga complex of mountain biking trails southwest of Bend continues to take shape, as volunteers from the Central Oregon Trail Alliance (COTA) are hard at work building and shaping state-of-the-art singletrack. Perhaps the crown jewel of these trails is now ridable in the high country of the Deschutes National Forest. The Kiwa Butte and Dinah Moe Humm trails account for about eight miles of singletrack accessible via Wanoga and Edison sno-parks.

These trails were not completed until fall 2010 (and the finishing touches are still being applied), but already they are being considered for Oregon State Scenic Trail status. The Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) will review the trails and vote over the next month on awarding them “scenic” status, according to Kent Howes, a board member of the council and of COTA. “They’re fun to ride, and they’re in the high country with varied terrain,” Howes says of the trails. Portions of the trails offer unsurpassed views of Cascade mountain peaks, making a strong case for scenic status with ORTAC. See Kiwa / D6

WOMEN’S WORLD CUP

Americans: Quarterfinals or final, bring on Brazil By Nancy Armour The Associated Press

DRESDEN, Germany — The Americans can read a draw as well as anyone else. To win a third World Cup title, they were going to have to see Brazil at some point. OK, so it’s happening earlier than they expected. But quarterfinals or the final, the Americans insist they’re ready for Brazil and dynamic playmaker Marta. Excited about it, too. “Obviously nobody wants to lose in a World Cup,” Lauren Cheney

Breaking down the trail: Kiwa Butte and Dinah Moe Humm DIRECTIONS

LENGTH

From Bend, drive 15 miles southwest along Century Drive to Wanoga Sno-park. Start out on the Tiddlywinks trail, which connects to the Kiwa Butte trail after about three miles (right turn onto singletrack). The Kiwa Butte trail connects to Dinah Moe Humm at a four-way intersection after another three miles (another right turn onto singletrack). Dinah Moe Humm runs for five miles to Edison Sno-park.

Kiwa Butte trail is about three miles and Dinah Moe Humm is about five miles

To Sunriver

O C T E P R CA

FEATURES

YL - TILE OOD - VIN W D R A H M CARPET R ING .C O O O L F O C CARPET

Outstanding Cascade peak views, varied terrain, technical trail features and passing lanes

RATING Aerobically moderate and technically moderate

WAREHOUSE PRICES

ALL REMNANTS 88 ¢ / SQ. FT.

To Bend 46

Cascade Lakes Highway

Funner Trail

Wanoga Swampy Sno-park Lakes Sno-park (snowmobile)

Tiddlywinks Trail

Storm King Trail

41

3300

Dinah Moe Humm Trail Kiwa Butte

45

4180

Kiwa Butte Trail

4613

Edison Butte

said. “We’re still smiling, we’re still enjoying this journey. Our belief in each other is unbelievable. No matter what happens, we believe we can make it and carry on. That’s what we did. From the coaching staff on down, we all still have a lot of confidence.” The expectation all along has been that the top-ranked Americans would win their group, setting up a showdown with twotime defending champion Germany in the semifinals. See World Cup / D4

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Virginia Meissner Sno-park

46

Scoreboard ................................D2 MLB .................................. D3, D5 Golf ............................................D5 Cycling ......................................D5 Prep sports ................................D5 Adventure Sports...................... D6

The Bend North Little League baseball age 11U team won the District 5 championship Thursday with a 20-6 win over Hermiston in the All Star Tournament at Kramer Field in The Dalles. Starting pitcher Marshall Davis struck out three and gave up two hits in 1 2⁄3 innings to help Bend North take a 3-2 lead. Davis was a factor at the plate as well, going three for three with a home run, a double and four runs batted in. Bend North scored five runs in the third inning and three in the fourth to build an 11-5 advantage, then ended the game with nine runs on 11 hits in the fifth inning to win via the 10-run rule. Bend North finished tournament play unbeaten in four games. Dylan Anderman was four for four, Jacob Cockrum was three for four with two RBIs and Chad Williams was two for three for Bend North. Bend North advances to state play starting this weekend at Lakeside Park in Portland. The District 5 champions open with a first-round game Saturday at 3 p.m.

The Kiwa Butte and Dinah Moe Humm trails offer great views of the Cascades.

To Mt. Bachelor

INDEX

whom are usually adults. However, being a young umpire is something he wanted to do to follow in the footsteps of his father, Greg Anderman, who was an umpire at age 13. See Umpire / D4

Bend North wins district title

LISIEUX, France — A brief look at Thursday’s sixth stage of the Tour de France: Stage: A 140.7-mile trek from Dinan to the pilgrimage city of Lisieux. It was the longest stage of this year’s race and featured a 1.86-mile climb to the finish. Winner: Edvald Boasson Hagen of Norway, who held off a late charge from Matt Goss of Australia to claim his first Tour win. Overall leader Thor Hushovd finished third. Horner watch: Chris Horner finished with the main pack in 27th place, in the same time as the leaders. He remains 13th overall, 18 seconds behind. Yellow Jersey: Hushovd kept the overall lead, a second ahead of Australia’s Cadel Evans. Frank Schleck of Luxembourg remained third, four seconds off the pace. Where’s Contador?: The three-time winner is 34th overall, 1 minute, 42 seconds behind Hushovd. Next stage: A 135.4-mile ride from Le Mans to Chateauroux today. The long stage comes a day before the race enters the Massif Central mountains. The end of the stage is flat and looks like a perfect ground for a massive sprint. Ace sprinter Mark Cavendish claimed the first of his 16 stage wins on the Tour in Chateauroux in 2008. For more coverage, see Page D5. — The Associated Press

Edvald Boasson Hagen celebrates as he crosses the finish line to win the sixth stage of the Tour de France Thursday.

Jessica Lovelace / Submitted photo

Bend’s Chase Anderman umpires a game at the District 5 Little League All Star Tournament, Wednesday in The Dalles.

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D2 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A TELEVISION TODAY CYCLING 5 a.m. — Tour de France, Stage 7, Versus network.

GOLF 6:30 a.m. — European Tour, Scottish Open, second round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, John Deere Classic, second round, Golf Channel. 2 p.m. — U.S. Women’s Open, second round, ESPN2. 3:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, First Tee Open, first round, Golf Channel.

AUTO RACING 4:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Feed the Children 300, ESPN.

BOXING 6 p.m. — Friday Night Fights, Henry Buchanan vs. Jesus Gonzalez, super middleweights, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 7 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels, Root Sports. 7 p.m. — Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels or New York Mets at San Francisco Giants, MLB Network.

SATURDAY FOOTBALL 2 a.m. — Australian Football League, Essendon vs. Richmond, ESPN2.

CYCLING 5 a.m. — Tour de France, Stage 8, Versus network.

GOLF 5:30 a.m. — European Tour, Scottish Open, third round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, John Deere Classic, third round, CBS. Noon — U.S. Women’s Open, third round, NBC. 3:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, First Tee Open, second round, Golf Channel.

SOCCER 8:30 a.m. — FIFA Women’s World Cup, quarterfinal, England vs. France, ESPN. 11:15 a.m. — FIFA Women’s World Cup, quarterfinal, Germany vs. Japan, ESPN.

BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, Atlanta Braves at Philadelphia Phillies, Fox. 4 p.m. — MLB, Cincinnati Reds at Milwaukee Brewers or Baltimore Orioles at Boston Red Sox, MLB Network. 6 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels, Root Sports.

AUTO RACING 2:30 p.m. — IndyCar, Honda Indy Toronto, qualifying (same-day tape), Versus network. 4:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Quaker State 400, TNT. 6:30 p.m. — NHRA, O’Reilly Auto Parts Route 66 Nationals, qualifying, ESPN2.

HORSE RACING 4 p.m. — Hollywood Gold Cup, ESPN.

LACROSSE 4 p.m. — Major League Lacrosse, AllStar Game, ESPN2.

SUNDAY SOCCER 3:30 a.m. — FIFA Women’s World Cup, quarterfinal, Sweden vs. Australia, ESPN. 8 a.m. — FIFA Women’s World Cup, quarterfinal, Brazil vs. United States, ESPN. 1 p.m. — MLS, Seattle Sounders at Portland Timbers, ESPN.

CYCLING 5 a.m. — Tour de France, Stage 9, Versus network.

GOLF 5:30 a.m. — European Tour, Scottish Open, final round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, John Deere Classic, final round, CBS. Noon — U.S. Women’s Open, final round, NBC. 4 p.m. — Champions Tour, First Tee Open, final round, Golf Channel.

AUTO RACING 9 a.m. — Formula One, British Grand Prix (same-day tape), Fox. 9 a.m. — IndyCar, Firestone Indy Lights, Versus network. 10 a.m. — American Le Mans Northeat Grand Prix (taped), ESPN2. 11 a.m. — IndyCar, Honda Indy Toronto, Versus network. 6 p.m. — NHRA, O’Reilly Auto Parts Route 66 Nationals (same-day tape), ESPN2.

BASEBALL 10:30 a.m. — MLB, Atlanta Braves at Philadelphia Phillies, TBS. 12:30 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels, Root Sports. 3 p.m. — Minor league, All-Star Futures Game, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — MLB, New York Mets at San Francisco Giants, ESPN.

RADIO SATURDAY BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, San Diego Padres at Los Angeles Dodgers, KICE-AM 940.

SUNDAY BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, New York Mets at San Francisco Giants, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B

SCOREBOARD

Baseball

WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division Wenatchee AppleSox Bellingham Bells Walla Walla Sweets Kelowna Falcons

West Division

Bend Elks Corvallis Knights Kitsap BlueJackets Cowlitz Black Bears Klamath Falls Gems Thursday’s Games Corvallis 5, Kelowna 2 Wenatchee 7, Cowlitz 4 Walla Walla 3, Bellingham 0 Today’s Games Corvallis at Kelowna, 6:35 p.m. Walla Walla at Kitsap, 6:35 p.m. Klamath Falls at Cowlitz, 6:35 p.m. Bend at Bellingham, 7:05 p.m.

FC Dallas 10 4 4 34 26 Seattle 8 4 8 32 25 Real Salt Lake 7 3 6 27 21 Colorado 5 5 9 24 20 Chivas USA 5 7 6 21 23 San Jose 5 6 6 21 22 Portland 5 8 3 18 19 Vancouver 2 9 8 14 18 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Saturday’s Games Chivas USA at Sporting Kansas City, 4:30 p.m. D.C. United at New York, 4:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Vancouver at Colorado, 6 p.m. FC Dallas at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Chicago at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Game Seattle FC at Portland, 1 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

BASEBALL WCL W 24 13 9 8

L 5 14 17 20

W 15 15 14 13 10

L 11 12 13 13 16

Women’s World Cup

MLB MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL All-Star Game Roster Tuesday, July 12 At Chase Field, Phoenix (s-starter, elected by fans; m-managers pick; p-players’ selection; i-injured, will not play; r-injury replacement; f-Final Vote selection) American League PITCHERS — p-Josh Beckett, Boston; m-Aaron Crow, Kansas City; m-Gio Gonzalez, Oakland; p-Felix Hernandez, Seattle; p-Brandon League, Seattle; p-Chris Perez, Cleveland; m-David Price, Tampa Bay; pi-Mariano Rivera, N.Y. Yankees; p-James Shields, Tampa Bay; mJose Valverde, Detroit; p-Justin Verlander, Detroit; r-Jordan Walden, L.A. Angeles; p-Jered Weaver, L.A. Angels; m-C.J. Wilson, Texas. CATCHERS — s-Alex Avila, Detroit; p-Russell Martin, N.Y. Yankees; m-Matt Wieters, Baltimore. INFIELDERS — p-Adrian Beltre, Texas; p-Asdrubal Cabrera, Cleveland; p-Miguel Cabrera, Detroit; s-Robinson Cano, N.Y. Yankees; s-Adrian Gonzalez, Boston; sDerek Jeter, N.Y. Yankees; p-Howie Kendrick, L.A. Angels; f-Paul Konerko, Chicago White Sox; s-Alex Rodriguez, N.Y. Yankees. OUTFIELDERS — s-Jose Bautista, Toronto; mMichael Cuddyer, Minnesota; p-Jacoby Ellsbury, Boston; s-Curtis Granderson, N.Y. Yankees; s-Josh Hamilton, Texas; p-Matt Joyce, Tampa Bay; p-Carlos Quentin, Chicago White Sox. DESIGNATED HITTERS — s-David Ortiz, Boston; p-Michael Young, Texas. National League PITCHERS — m-Heath Bell, San Diego Padres; mMatt Cain, San Francisco; m-Tyler Clippard, Washington; p-Roy Halladay, Philadelphia; p-Cole Hamels, Philadelphia; p-Joel Hanrahan, Pittsburgh; p-Jair Jurrjens, Atlanta; p-Clayton Kershaw, L.A. Dodgers; p-Cliff Lee, Philadelphia; m-Tim Lincecum, San Francisco; p-Jonny Venters, Atlanta; m-Ryan Vogelsong, San Francisco; pBrian Wilson, San Francisco. CATCHERS — s-Brian McCann, Atlanta; p-Yadier Molina, St. Louis. INFIELDERS — m-Starlin Castro, Chicago; s-Prince Fielder, Milwaukee; p-Chipper Jones, Atlanta; p-Brandon Phillips, Cincinnati; s-Placido Polanco, Philadelphia; sJose Reyes, N.Y. Mets; m-Gaby Sanchez, Florida; p-Troy Tulowitzki, Colorado; p-Joey Votto, Cincinnati; s-Rickie Weeks, Milwaukee. OUTFIELDERS — m-Carlos Beltran, N.Y. Mets; sLance Berkman, St. Louis; s-Ryan Braun, Milwaukee; pJay Bruce, Cincinnati; p-Matt Holliday, St. Louis; s-Matt Kemp, L.A. Dodgers; p-Hunter Pence, Houston; m-Justin Upton, Arizona; f-Shane Victorino, Philadelphia.

Little League All Star District 5 Tournament Kramer Field, The Dalles Pool Play ——— Thursday’s Scores 12U Division Bend South 6, Bend North 4 Hood River 26, Sisters 9 11U Division Bend North 20, Hermiston 6 10U Division Hood River 21, Bend North 0 Today’s Schedule 10U Championship Hood River (4-1) vs. The Dalles (4-0), 8:30 a.m. Saturday’s Schedule 12U Championship Hood River (4-1) vs. Bend South (3-0), 8 a.m.

SOFTBALL Little League All Star District 5 Tournament Kramer Field, The Dalles Pool Play ——— Thursday’s Scores Hermiston 13, Columbia 3

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Hall of Fame Championships Thursday At The International Tennis Hall of Fame Newport, R.I. Purse: $500,000 (WT250) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Quarterfinals Tobias Kamke (8), Germany, def. Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France, 3-6, 6-1, 6-3. John Isner (1), United States, def. Alex Bogomolov Jr. (5), United States, 7-6 (5), 6-4.

WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— Swedish Open Thursday At Bastad Tennis Stadium Bastad, Sweden Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Quarterfinals Polona Hercog (8), Slovenia, def. Vesna Dolonts, Russia, 6-2, 6-4. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, def. Lourdes Dominguez Lino (4), Spain, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, def. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez, Spain, 4-6, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (3). Barbora Zahlavova Strycova (7), Czech Republic, def. Flavia Pennetta (2), Italy, 6-4, 5-7, 6-3. Budapest Grand Prix Thursday At Romai Tennis Academy Budapest, Hungary Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Second Round Sara Errani (2), Italy, def. Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, 6-3, 6-1. Estrella Cabeza Candela, Spain, def. Eva Birnerova, Czech Republic, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Roberta Vinci (1), Italy, def. Timea Babos, Hungary, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2.

CYCLING Tour de France Thursday At Lisieux, France Sixth Stage A 140.7-mile ride in the rain from Dinan to Lisieux, with two Category 3 climbs and a 1.86-mile climb to the finish 1. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Sky Procycling, 5 hours, 13 minutes, 37 seconds. 2. Matthew Harley Goss, Australia, HTC-Highroad, same time. 3. Thor Hushovd, Norway, Garmin-Cervelo, same time. 4. Romain Feillu, France, Vacansoleil-DCM, same time. 5. Jose Joaquin Rojas, Spain, Movistar, same time. 6. Arthur Vichot, France, Francaise des Jeux, same time. 7. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Omega Pharma-Lotto, same time. 8. Gerald Ciolek, Germany, Quick Step, same time.

17 18 12 22 22 21 28 26

9. Marco Marcato, Italy, Vacansoleil-DCM, same time. 10. Arnold Jeannesson, France, Francaise des Jeux, same time. 11. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Leopard-Trek, same time. 12. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC, same time. 13. Julien El Fares, France, Cofidis, same time. 14. Sebastien Hinault, France, AG2R La Mondiale, same time. 15. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, RadioShack, same time. 16. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky Procycling, same time. 17. Borut Bozic, Slovenia, Vacansoleil-DCM, same time. 18. Samuel Dumoulin, France, Cofidis, same time. 19. Cyril Gautier, France, Europcar, same time. 20. Linus Gerdemann, Germany, Leopard-Trek, same time. Also 27. Christopher Horner, United States, RadioShack, same time. 32. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Leopard-Trek, same time. 33. Tom Danielson, United States, Garmin-Cervelo, same time. 40. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg, Leopard-Trek, same time. 45. George Hincapie, United States, BMC, same time. 47. David Millar, Britain, Garmin-Cervelo, same time. 48. Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxo Bank Sungard, same time. 49. Christian Vande Velde, United States, Garmin-Cervelo, same time. 91. Levi Leipheimer, United States, RadioShack, 1 minute, 5 seconds behind. 124. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Cervelo, 2:23. 126. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC, same time. 134. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, HTC-Highroad, same time. 150. Danny Pate, United States, HTC-Highroad, same time. 169. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-Cervelo, 5:27. Overall Standings (After six stages) 1. Thor Hushovd, Norway, Garmin-Cervelo, 22 hours, 50 minutes, 34 seconds. 2. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC, 1 second behind. 3. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg, Leopard-Trek, :04. 4. David Millar, Britain, Garmin-Cervelo, :08. 5. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, RadioShack, :10. 6. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling, same time. 7. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky Procycling, :12. 8. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Sky Procycling, same time. 9. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Leopard-Trek, same time. 10. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Leopard-Trek, same time. 11. Tony Martin, Germany, HTC-Highroad, :13. 12. Peter Velits, Slovakia, HTC-Highroad, same time. 13. Christopher Horner, United States, RadioShack, :18. 14. Robert Gesink, Netherlands, Rabobank, :20. 15. Alexandre Vinokourov, Kazakhstan, Astana, :32. 16. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Omega Pharma-Lotto, :33. 17. Jurgen Van Den Broeck, Belgium, Omega PharmaLotto, :39. 18. Carlos Barredo, Spain, Rabobank, :40. 19. Cyril Gautier, France, Europcar, :58. 20. Ivan Basso, Italy, Liquigas-Cannondale, 1:03. Also 31. Levi Leipheimer, United States, RadioShack, 1:23. 34. Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxo Bank Sungard, 1:42. 36. Tom Danielson, United States, Garmin-Cervelo, 1:57. 37. Christian Vande Velde, United States, Garmin-Cervelo, same time. 40. George Hincapie, United States, BMC, 2:10. 75. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, HTC-Highroad, 5:22. 140. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Cervelo, 13:06. 149. Danny Pate, United States, HTC-Highroad, 14:03. 163. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC, 17:44. 177. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-Cervelo, 24:31.

GOLF LPGA Tour U.S. Women’s Open Thursday At The Broadmoor Resort Colorado Springs, Colo. Purse: $3,250,000 Yardage: 7,254; Par 71 First Round Leaders a-denotes amateur Note: Play was suspended, round to be completed Friday SCORE THRU 1. Cristie Kerr -2 15 1. a-Amy Anderson -2 12 3. Inbee Park -1 17 3. Ai Miyazato -1 15 3. Silvia Cavalleri -1 1 6. Cindy LaCrosse E 17 6. Mika Miyazato E 16 6. Maria Hjorth E 16 6. Karrie Webb E 15 6. a-Rachel Rohanna E 12 6. Mi Jeong Jeon E 12 6. Sarah Kemp E 1 6. a-Kyung Kim E 1 6. Na On Min E 1 15. Sue Kim +1 17 15. Anya Sarai Alvarez +1 13 15. Jennifer Johnson +1 1

PGA Tour John Deere Classic Thursday At TPC Deere Run Silvis, Ill. Purse: $4.5 million Yardage: 7,268; Par: 71 (35-36) First Round Kris Blanks 30-33—63 Davis Love III 32-32—64 Matt McQuillan 32-32—64 Steve Marino 33-31—64 Mark Wilson 32-33—65 Kyle Stanley 31-34—65 Charles Howell III 33-33—66 Josh Teater 34-32—66 Lee Janzen 30-36—66 Steve Stricker 33-33—66 D.A. Points 32-34—66 Paul Goydos 34-32—66 Brendon de Jonge 31-35—66 Cameron Percy 33-33—66 Zach Johnson 34-32—66 Cameron Beckman 34-32—66 Chez Reavie 33-33—66 Jim Herman 33-33—66 Chad Campbell 33-34—67 Craig Bowden 32-35—67 Troy Matteson 31-36—67 John Merrick 34-33—67 D.J. Trahan 34-33—67 Greg Chalmers 34-33—67 Charles Warren 35-32—67 Steven Bowditch 34-33—67 David Hearn 32-35—67 Ben Martin 34-33—67

Duffy Waldorf Arjun Atwal Jason Day Michael Sim Will MacKenzie Billy Mayfair William McGirt Troy Merritt Marco Dawson J.J. Henry Michael Bradley Brian Gay Chris Kirk J.P. Hayes D.J. Brigman Frank Lickliter II Kirk Triplett Jhonattan Vegas Briny Baird John Mallinger David Mathis Andres Gonzales Leif Olson Alexandre Rocha Brett Wetterich Nathan Green Vaughn Taylor Dean Wilson Chris DiMarco Michael Connell Chris Stroud Rod Pampling Chris Tidland Nate Smith Joe Ogilvie Tim Petrovic Alex Prugh Woody Austin Paul Stankowski Pat Perez Scott Stallings Kevin Kisner Aron Price Dicky Pride Scott McCarron Cameron Tringale Mark Hensby Kenny Perry Ricky Barnes Kent Jones Brian Davis Bob May Michael Putnam Scott Piercy Chris Baryla Ryuji Imada Chris Couch Michael Letzig Heath Slocum Todd Hamilton Rich Beem Brandt Jobe Chad Proehl Daniel Summerhays Joseph Bramlett Jason Dufner Jerry Kelly Hunter Haas Tag Ridings Jimmy Walker Michael Thompson Shane Bertsch Matt Jones Jonathan Byrd Louis Oosthuizen James Driscoll Andres Romero Bryce Molder Shaun Micheel Matt Weibring Jim Renner Robert Gamez Kevin Stadler Jason Bohn Zack Miller Colt Knost Morgan Hoffmann Sunghoon Kang Brett Quigley Richard S. Johnson Jay Williamson John Rollins Stewart Cink John Daly Marc Leishman Roland Thatcher Blake Adams Scott Gutschewski Brian Maurer Bio Kim Kevin Tway Justin Hicks Garrett Willis Chris Riley Charlie Wi Billy Horschel Will Strickler Jeff Quinney Mike Small Jarrod Lyle Fran Quinn Fabian Gomez Derek Lamely Mike Weir Tommy Gainey Scott Gordon David Duval Chris Smith Martin Piller Bobby Gates Brady Schnell Scott Langley Brad Faxon Matt Bettencourt George McNeill Scott Verplank David Toms Robert Garrigus

33-34—67 33-34—67 33-34—67 31-36—67 34-33—67 34-33—67 33-34—67 34-34—68 34-34—68 34-34—68 33-35—68 33-35—68 36-32—68 35-33—68 36-32—68 35-33—68 35-33—68 30-38—68 32-36—68 34-34—68 33-35—68 32-36—68 32-36—68 33-35—68 35-34—69 36-33—69 34-35—69 34-35—69 32-37—69 35-34—69 34-35—69 34-35—69 34-35—69 34-35—69 33-36—69 35-34—69 34-35—69 36-33—69 34-35—69 35-34—69 36-33—69 35-34—69 32-37—69 36-34—70 36-34—70 34-36—70 35-35—70 36-34—70 33-37—70 34-36—70 34-36—70 35-35—70 36-34—70 35-35—70 32-38—70 34-36—70 34-36—70 34-36—70 35-35—70 34-36—70 33-37—70 35-35—70 33-37—70 34-36—70 36-34—70 36-35—71 34-37—71 33-38—71 36-35—71 36-35—71 36-35—71 36-35—71 34-37—71 37-34—71 35-36—71 34-37—71 38-33—71 35-36—71 33-38—71 33-38—71 36-35—71 36-36—72 38-34—72 35-37—72 35-37—72 35-37—72 37-35—72 32-40—72 36-36—72 33-39—72 38-34—72 38-34—72 34-38—72 35-37—72 37-35—72 36-36—72 39-33—72 38-34—72 37-35—72 34-38—72 37-35—72 36-36—72 33-40—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 35-38—73 37-36—73 37-36—73 35-38—73 38-35—73 37-36—73 37-36—73 37-37—74 38-37—75 38-37—75 39-36—75 37-38—75 38-37—75 36-39—75 37-39—76 36-40—76 34-42—76 40-37—77 40-38—78 76—WD 78—WD WD WD

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts New York 6 3 10 28 Philadelphia 7 4 6 27 Columbus 7 5 6 27 Sporting Kansas City 5 6 6 21 Houston 4 6 8 20 D.C. 4 5 7 19 Chicago 2 4 12 18 Toronto FC 3 8 9 18 New England 3 8 7 16 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts Los Angeles 9 2 9 36

In Germany All Times PDT ——— QUARTERFINALS Saturday, July 9 At Leverkusen, Germany England vs. France, 9 a.m. At Wolfsburg, Germany Germany vs. Japan, 11:45 a.m. Sunday, July 10 At Augsburg, Germany Sweden vs. Australia, 4 a.m. At Dresden, Germany Brazil vs. United States, 8:30 a.m. SEMIFINALS Wednesday, July 13 At Moenchengladbach, Germany England-France winner vs. Brazil-United States winner, 9 a.m. At Frankfurt Germany-Japan winner vs. Sweden-Australia winner, 11:45 a.m. THIRD PLACE Saturday, July 16 At Sinsheim, Germany Semifinal losers, 8:30 a.m. CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday, July 17 At Frankfurt Semifinal winners, 11:45 a.m.

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Indiana 8 3 .727 Connecticut 6 3 .667 New York 5 5 .500 Chicago 5 6 .455 Atlanta 3 7 .300 Washington 2 7 .222 Western Conference W L Pct San Antonio 7 2 .778 Minnesota 6 3 .667 Phoenix 6 4 .600 Seattle 5 4 .556 Los Angeles 4 5 .444 Tulsa 1 9 .100 ——— Thursday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Games New York at San Antonio, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Tulsa, 5 p.m

GB — 1 2½ 3 4½ 5 GB — 1 1½ 2 3 6½

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE—Suspended Chicago Cubs minor league RHP Enyelberth Pena and San Diego minor league RH Miguel Severino 50 games each after testing positive for steroids. American League CLEVELAND INDIANS—Called up RHP Zach McAllister from Columbus (IL). Optioned INF Cord Phelps to Columbus. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Activated OF Josh Willingham and RHP Grant Balfour from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Graham Godfrey adn RHP Guillermo Moscoso to Sacramento (PCL). TAMPA BAY RAYS—Placed RHP Wade Davis on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Brandon Gomes from Durham (IL). National League CINCINNATI REDS—Called up SS Zack Cozart from Louisville (IL). Sent RHP Edinson Volquez to Louisville. NEW YORK METS—Placed SS Jose Reyes on the 15day DL, retroactive to July 3. Called up INF/OF Nick Evans from Buffalo (IL). Agreed to terms with 1B Cole Frenzel. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Called up RHP P.J. Walters from Memphis (PCL). Activated C Gerald Laird from the 15-day DL. Sent RHP Brandon Dickson and 1B Mark Hamilton to Memphis. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Activated INF/OF Brandon Belt from the 15-day DL and optioned him to Fresno (PCL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CLEVELAND CAVALIERS—Announced they have purchased the New Mexico Thunderbirds (NBADL) and will relocate the team to Canton, Ohio. FOOTBALL National Football League TENNESSEE TITANS—QB Kerry Collins announced his retirement. HOCKEY National Hockey League BUFFALO SABRES—Re-signed F Colin Stuart and F Derek Whitmore to one-year contracts. Signed G Drew MacIntyre to a one-year contract. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Traded RW Mike Blunden to Montreal for C Ryan Russell. DETROIT RED WINGS—Signed F Chris Conner to a one-year contract. MONTREAL CANADIENS—Signed F Brian Willsie to a one-year contract. NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Signed F Matt Halischuk and F Nick Spaling to two-year contracts and F Chris Mueller and F Cal O’Reilly to one-year contracts. PHILADELPHIA FLYERS—Agreed to terms with RW Wayne Simmonds on a multiyear contract. PHOENIX COYOTES—Promoted Sean Burke to director of player development/goaltending coach. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Signed LW Alexandre Picard and RW Ryan Shannon to one-year contracts. VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Signed G Matt Climie and D Alexander Sulzer. WINNIPEG JETS—Agreed to terms with F Jason Gregoire. COLLEGE BIG SOUTH CONFERENCE—Added Davidson as an associate member in women’s lacrosse, beginning with the 2013 season. SOUTH ATLANTIC CONFERENCE—Named Eric Wieberg director of strategic communications. KENT STATE—Named Mike McKee director of basketball operations. NORTH GREENVILLE—Named Wilson Nelson director of major gifts for athletics. NORTHERN ARIZONA—Named Charles Huff defensive backs coach. OHIO STATE—Signed men’s swimming coach Bill Wadley to a three-year contract extension through the 2014 season. SAINT FRANCIS (PA)—Promoted Jim Brazill to associate director of athletics for marketing, promotions and communications. SAMFORD—Named Mandy Burford softball coach. SANTA CLARA—Extended the contract of men’s basketball coach Kerry Keating through May 1, 2015. SETON HALL—Announced sophomore men’s basketball G-F Brian Oliver is transferring from Georgia Tech. SOUTHEASTERN LOUISIANA—Named Micheal Cyprien men’s assistant basketball coach. TEXAS-SAN ANTONIO—Named Allie Jordan women’s volunteer assistant golf coach. XAVIER—Announced appointment of Claire Paszkiewicz as assistant volleyball coach.

FISH COUNT GF 34 21 21 22 21 23 19 17 16

GA 23 16 19 23 22 29 22 34 24

GF 25

GA 15

Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd The Dalles 1,110 560 356 152 John Day 1,496 492 214 93 McNary 1,861 599 169 57 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 252,003 90,779 17,330 6,787 The Dalles 182,941 68,364 5,071 2,026 John Day 155,906 64,035 5,061 2,522

• Fan dies after falling from stands at Rangers game: The Texas Rangers say a fan died after falling out of the stands while trying to catch a baseball tossed his way during a game Thursday night. The Rangers said the man fell about 20 feet. Team president Nolan Ryan didn’t get into details about the accident or release the man’s name. Ronnie Hargis was sitting in the stands next to the victim, who was at the game with his young son. The men were talking to each other before the accident. “He went straight down. I tried to grab him but I couldn’t,” Hargis said. “I tried to slow him down a little bit.” TV replays showed the man falling head-first and landing behind a 14foot-high wall supporting a video board for replays and scores. The area where the man fell is out of sight from the field. • Hall of Fame baseball manager Williams dead at 82: Hall of Fame manager Dick Williams, who won two World Series titles with Oakland and led two other franchises to pennants, has died. He was 82. Williams died from a ruptured aortic aneurysm at a hospital near his home in Henderson, Nev., the Hall of Fame said. Williams is one of two managers to win pennants with three teams, joining Hall of Famer Bill McKechnie. But he had his biggest success during three tumultuous seasons in Oakland in the 1970s. Williams led the Athletics to 101 wins and a division title his first year in 1971 before being swept by Baltimore in the American League championship series. • Konerko, Victorino elected to All-Star teams: Phillies outfielder Shane Victorino and White Sox first baseman Paul Konerko have been elected to the All-Star team by online fan voting. Victorino also was elected in baseball’s “final vote” in 2009, when he got a record 15.9 million votes. This year, he received 9.2 million and beat out Andre Ethier of the Dodgers, Todd Helton of the Rockies, Mike Morse of the Nationals and Ian Kennedy of the Diamondbacks. Konerko beat Detroit’s Victor Martinez, Kansas City’s Alex Gordon, Baltimore’s Adam Jones and Tampa Bay’s Ben Zobrist, receiving 8.4 million votes. • Mets’ Reyes on 15-day DL with strained hamstring: Jose Reyes was placed on the 15-day disabled list by the New York Mets on Thursday with a strained left hamstring that will keep him out of next week’s All-Star game. The shortstop injured his hamstring running to first base in the first inning against the New York Yankees on July 2. The move was retroactive to July 3. The Mets made the decision on Reyes during a meeting Wednesday with him, manager Terry Collins, general manager Sandy Alderson, doctors and the training staff.

Basketball • Turkish team in talks with NBA’s Deron Williams: Turkish team Besiktas says it is close to reaching a deal with locked out NBA All-Star guard Deron Williams. Besiktas manager Murat Murtezaoglu told The Associated Press on Thursday that talks are under way with the New Jersey Nets player and U.S. Olympian. Coach Ergin Ataman told the state-run Anatolia news agency that a deal was close. He also told The New York Times that an agreement had been reached. Jeff Schwartz, Williams’ agent, did not immediately return a telephone call seeking comment. The Nets were unable to comment because of the lockout.

Football • Ex-Baltimore Colts Hall of Famer Mackey dies: John Mackey, a Hall of Fame tight end for the Baltimore Colts who caught a deflected 75yard touchdown pass in Super Bowl V but battled with dementia later in life, has died. He was 69. Chad Steele, a spokesman for the Baltimore Ravens, said Thursday that Mackey’s wife notified the team about her husband’s death. Mackey, a speedy five-time Pro Bowler who was drafted second out of Syracuse in 1963, caught 331 passes for 5,236 yards and 38 touchdowns in a 10-season career. He is perhaps best known for catching a deflected pass from Johnny Unitas in Super Bowl V that resulted in a touchdown. The Colts went on to beat the Dallas Cowboys 16-13. He played in five Pro Bowls and was the NFL’s allleague tight end between 1966 and 1968. • Titans veteran QB Kerry Collins retires: Quarterback Kerry Collins is retiring from the NFL after 16 seasons in the league, his agent announced Thursday. Collins, 38, was facing free agency after his contract expired in March, though he said as recently as last month that he still wanted to play. Tennessee has said it plans to trade or release quarterback Vince Young after the NFL lockout ends, which would leave just this year’s eighth-overall draft pick, Jake Locker, and Rusty Smith, a sixth-round pick in last year’s draft, on the roster at the position. • Owners, NFLPA members meet in New York: NFL team owners and players association leaders met for another long negotiating session Thursday, hoping to finally break the labor lockout that has now lasted more than 16 weeks. As NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and NFLPA chief DeMaurice Smith joined in the sixth set of recent talks between the two sides, a regularly scheduled conference call involving players in a lawsuit against the league was planned for Thursday, a person with knowledge of the situation told The Associated Press. The person, who said the call was not related to Thursday’s developments at the negotiating table, spoke on condition of anonymity because the two sides are not announcing details of the talks.

Tennis • Top-seeded Isner moves into semis at Newport: Top-seeded John Isner continued his strong run on Newport’s grass courts Thursday, reaching the semifinals of the Hall of Fame Tennis Championships with a 7-6 (5), 6-4 win over No. 5 seeded Alex Bogomolov. Isner had 21 aces — four in the tiebreak and three in the final game — while becoming the first top seed to gain the semis since Andy Murray in 2006. The top-seeded player has never won the title in the tournament’s 35 years. Isner will face eighth-seeded Tobias Kamke, who beat Edouard Roger-Vasselin, 3-6, 6-1, 6-3, in the other quarterfinal Thursday. They will play on center court Saturday following an induction for the 2011 class. —From wire reports


THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 8, 2011 D3

M AJ O R L E A GUE B A SE BA L L AL BOXSCORES Tigers 3, Royals 1 Detroit AB A.Jackson cf 1 a-R.Santiago ph-2b 3 C.Wells lf-cf 4 Ordonez rf 3 Kelly rf 1 Mi.Cabrera 1b 3 V.Martinez dh 4 Jh.Peralta ss 3 Raburn 2b-lf 4 Avila c 3 Inge 3b 3 Totals 32

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 3

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 3 2

SO 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 2 9

Avg. .245 .226 .260 .206 .246 .317 .319 .310 .206 .287 .189

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Getz 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .258 Me.Cabrera cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .286 A.Gordon lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .295 Butler dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .291 Hosmer 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .278 Francoeur rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .268 Moustakas 3b 4 0 0 1 0 0 .238 B.Pena c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .269 A.Escobar ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .252 Totals 32 1 8 1 1 4 Detroit 020 000 001 — 3 6 0 Kansas City 000 010 000 — 1 8 1 a-fouled out for A.Jackson in the 3rd. E—Crow (1). LOB—Detroit 4, Kansas City 6. 2B—C.Wells (9), Hosmer (10). HR—Raburn (8), off Duffy; Kelly (3), off Crow. RBIs—Kelly (11), Raburn 2 (31), Moustakas (4). SB—Hosmer (3). CS—Getz (5). S—A.Escobar. Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 2 (Mi.Cabrera, Raburn); Kansas City 4 (Moustakas 3, Me.Cabrera). Runners moved up—Francoeur, Moustakas. GIDP— V.Martinez, A.Escobar. DP—Detroit 1 (R.Santiago, Jh.Peralta, Mi.Cabrera); Kansas City 1 (A.Escobar, Hosmer). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Schrzer W, 10-4 6 2-3 6 1 1 0 2 88 4.69 Coke H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 4.94 Benoit H, 12 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 4.28 Vlvrde S, 22-22 1 1 0 0 1 1 24 2.84 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duffy L, 1-4 6 4 2 2 1 6 102 4.85 L.Coleman 2 1 0 0 0 1 33 2.08 Crow 1 1 1 1 1 2 18 2.13 Inherited runners-scored—Coke 2-0. WP—Duffy. T—2:53. A—16,355 (37,903).

Twins 6, White Sox 2 Minnesota Revere cf A.Casilla 2b Mauer 1b Cuddyer rf Thome dh Valencia 3b Tosoni lf a-Repko ph-lf Nishioka ss Butera c Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 3 3 3 1 4 4 38

R H 2 3 0 1 0 3 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 6 13

BI 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .279 .244 .242 .296 .228 .241 .169 .233 .230 .180

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pierre lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .267 Vizquel 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .269 Konerko 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .316 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .163 Rios cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Pierzynski c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .292 Al.Ramirez ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .270 Teahen rf 3 1 1 2 0 1 .221 Beckham 2b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .241 Totals 32 2 6 2 2 6 Minnesota 120 300 000 — 6 13 0 Chicago 000 020 000 — 2 6 1 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Tosoni in the 7th. E—Konerko (4). LOB—Minnesota 7, Chicago 5. 2B—Valencia (17). HR—Teahen (3), off Pavano. RBIs—Revere 2 (12), Mauer 2 (9), Nishioka (8), Teahen 2 (9). SB—Revere (11), A.Casilla (13), Nishioka (2). CS—Revere (4). Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 3 (Valencia, Thome, Repko); Chicago 2 (Konerko 2). Runners moved up—A.Casilla, Tosoni, Pierre, Vizquel. GIDP—Cuddyer. DP—Minnesota 1 (Mauer); Chicago 1 (Beckham, Al.Ramirez, Konerko). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pavano W, 6-6 7 6 2 2 2 4 106 4.10 Perkins 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 1.72 Capps 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 4.66 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Humber L, 8-5 3 2-3 11 6 6 1 2 87 3.10 H.Santiago 4 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 50 0.00 Bruney 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 2.70 Inherited runners-scored—H.Santiago 2-0. IBB—off H.Santiago (Valencia). WP—H.Santiago. T—2:35. A—26,395 (40,615).

Rangers 6, Athletics 0 Oakland J.Weeks 2b Crisp cf Matsui dh Willingham lf 1-Rosales pr S.Sizemore 3b C.Jackson rf Carter 1b K.Suzuki c Pennington ss Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 0 3 4 3 3 3 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 2

SO 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 7

Avg. .303 .263 .211 .232 .148 .274 .243 .160 .227 .237

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .250 Andrus ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .278 J.Hamilton lf 2 0 1 4 0 0 .296 A.Beltre 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Mi.Young dh 3 1 1 1 1 0 .328 N.Cruz rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Moreland 1b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .279 Napoli c 3 0 1 1 1 1 .223 En.Chavez cf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .337 Totals 31 6 10 6 3 3 Oakland 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 Texas 101 211 00x — 6 10 0 1-ran for Willingham in the 9th. LOB—Oakland 6, Texas 7. 2B—Kinsler (20), Moreland (12). HR—Mi.Young (8), off Harden. RBIs—J.Hamilton 4 (46), Mi.Young (59), Napoli (29). SB—En.Chavez (6). S—Andrus. SF—J.Hamilton 2. Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 2 (C.Jackson 2); Texas 4 (En.Chavez, N.Cruz, A.Beltre 2). Runners moved up—Andrus, J.Hamilton. GIDP— Kinsler. DP—Oakland 1 (S.Sizemore, J.Weeks, Carter). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO Harden L, 1-1 5 8 5 5 2 2 De Los Santos 1 1 1 1 1 0 Wuertz 1 0 0 0 0 0 Fuentes 1 1 0 0 0 1 Texas IP H R ER BB SO D.Hlland W, 7-4 9 4 0 0 2 7 WP—Harden, De Los Santos, D.Holland. T—2:31. A—35,041 (49,170).

NP 98 29 8 10 NP 119

ERA 5.73 3.18 2.73 4.86 ERA 4.68

Indians 5, Blue Jays 4 Toronto AB R H Y.Escobar ss 3 0 0 E.Thames rf 5 0 0 Bautista 3b 4 1 1 Lind 1b 5 0 1 A.Hill 2b 4 2 2 Encarnacion dh 5 0 3 Snider lf 4 1 1 Arencibia c 4 0 2 R.Davis cf 4 0 1 Totals 38 4 11

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 4

BB 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

SO 1 2 0 3 0 1 2 1 0 10

Avg. .294 .289 .333 .302 .245 .248 .212 .217 .235

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Brantley lf 5 0 2 0 0 2 .265 A.Cabrera ss 4 1 1 1 1 1 .291 Hafner dh 5 1 3 4 0 0 .347 C.Santana c 2 0 1 0 2 1 .227 G.Sizemore cf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .223 O.Cabrera 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .255 T.Buck rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .252 LaPorta 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .248 Chisenhall 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .267 1-Hannahan pr-3b 2 1 1 0 1 0 .216 Totals 33 5 10 5 5 9 Toronto 010 200 001 — 4 11 0 Cleveland 000 000 005 — 5 10 2 One out when winning run scored. 1-ran for Chisenhall in the 2nd. E—A.Cabrera (7), McAllister (1). LOB—Toronto 11, Cleveland 9. 2B—LaPorta (11). 3B—Hannahan (1). HR—Bautista (29), off Sipp; Hafner (8), off L.Perez. RBIs—Bautista (61), Snider (15), Arencibia (37), R.Davis (19), A.Cabrera (50), Hafner 4 (35). SB—A.Hill (11), Brantley (12). CS—A.Hill (1). Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 5

(Y.Escobar 3, Bautista 2); Cleveland 6 (O.Cabrera 4, A.Cabrera, Brantley). GIDP—Hafner, O.Cabrera. DP—Toronto 2 (A.Hill, Y.Escobar, Lind), (Y.Escobar, A.Hill, Lind). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Villanueva 6 6 0 0 2 7 110 2.99 Rzpcznski H, 10 1 1-3 0 0 0 2 1 20 3.00 Frasor H, 8 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 3.34 F.Francisco 0 2 3 3 1 0 11 5.92 L.Perez L, 1-2 1-3 2 2 2 0 1 11 3.94 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McAllister 4 5 3 2 3 4 94 4.50 R.Perez 2 2 0 0 1 2 36 1.51 Durbin 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 6.81 Herrmann 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 14 4.00 J.Smith 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 0.91 Sipp W, 4-1 1 2 1 1 0 2 25 2.80 F.Francisco pitched to 3 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Frasor 1-0, L.Perez 33, J.Smith 2-0. HBP—by C.Villanueva (Chisenhall). WP—C.Villanueva. T—3:28. A—18,816 (43,441).

Red Sox 10, Orioles 4 Baltimore Hardy ss Pie lf Markakis rf-1b Ad.Jones cf Guerrero dh Wieters c Tatum c D.Lee 1b B.Davis ss Mar.Reynolds 3b Reimold lf-rf Andino 2b Totals

AB 3 1 4 4 4 1 0 4 0 4 4 3 32

R 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 8 3 4

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

Avg. .289 .229 .293 .282 .281 .268 .304 .229 .280 .230 .270 .265

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 3 2 1 2 2 0 .310 Pedroia 2b 5 1 2 3 0 0 .279 1-Sutton pr-2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .318 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 5 1 3 1 0 0 .351 Youkilis 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .276 D.Ortiz dh 4 1 2 1 1 0 .301 Reddick lf 4 2 1 1 0 0 .377 Saltalamacchia c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .257 J.Drew rf 3 0 0 1 1 0 .233 Scutaro ss 3 2 1 0 1 1 .266 Y.Navarro ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Totals 36 10 13 10 5 2 Baltimore 200 100 010 — 4 8 1 Boston 003 112 30x — 10 13 1 1-ran for Pedroia in the 8th. E—Arrieta (2), A.Miller (1). LOB—Baltimore 7, Boston 7. 2B—Guerrero (12), Youkilis (24), D.Ortiz (23). HR—Pedroia (9), off Arrieta; Ad.Gonzalez (17), off Arrieta; Ellsbury (11), off Berken; D.Ortiz (18), off Viola; Reddick (2), off Viola; Saltalamacchia (6), off Viola. RBIs—Hardy (33), Ad.Jones (47), D.Lee (25), Ellsbury 2 (47), Pedroia 3 (42), Ad.Gonzalez (76), D.Ortiz (50), Reddick (11), Saltalamacchia (24), J.Drew (21). SB—Wieters (1). S—Andino. SF—Hardy. Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 3 (D.Lee 2, Ad.Jones); Boston 4 (J.Drew, Ellsbury, Saltalamacchia, D.Ortiz). Runners moved up—Guerrero, Wieters, D.Lee, Reddick, J.Drew. GIDP—Guerrero, D.Lee, D.Ortiz. DP—Baltimore 1 (B.Davis, Markakis); Boston 2 (Scutaro, Pedroia, Ad.Gonzalez), (Scutaro, Pedroia, Ad.Gonzalez). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arrieta L, 9-6 4 1-3 6 5 4 4 1 95 4.90 Berken 2 2 2 2 0 1 29 5.90 Viola 0 3 3 3 1 0 22 9.82 Jakubauskas 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 0 19 6.48 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A.Miller W, 3-0 5 6 3 3 4 0 97 3.57 Aceves H, 7 2 0 0 0 0 0 15 3.60 Atchison 1 1 1 1 0 1 14 5.02 Jenks 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 6.32 Viola pitched to 4 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Berken 2-0, Jakubauskas 1-0. IBB—off Arrieta (D.Ortiz). T—3:05. A—37,981 (37,493).

Rays 5, Yankees 1 Tampa Bay Zobrist 2b Joyce rf Longoria dh Kotchman 1b B.Upton cf Jaso c S.Rodriguez 3b Fuld lf Brignac ss Totals

AB 3 4 5 5 4 2 4 4 4 35

R H 2 3 0 0 0 2 2 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 5 12

BI 1 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 5

BB 2 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5

SO 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 5

Avg. .272 .287 .247 .345 .234 .223 .227 .238 .194

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jeter ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .257 Granderson cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .271 Teixeira 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .241 Al.Rodriguez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .295 Cano 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .297 Swisher rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .249 Posada dh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .237 1-R.Pena pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Martin c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .220 Gardner lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .266 Totals 34 1 6 1 3 6 Tampa Bay 102 020 000 — 5 12 0 New York 000 001 000 — 1 6 0 1-ran for Posada in the 9th. LOB—Tampa Bay 8, New York 9. 2B—Longoria (16), Kotchman (18), Jeter (12), Martin (8). 3B—Zobrist (5). HR—Zobrist (10), off Colon; B.Upton (14), off Colon; Cano (15), off Niemann. RBIs—Zobrist (42), Longoria (42), B.Upton 3 (48), Cano (56). SB—Brignac (3). CS—Zobrist (2). Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 5 (B.Upton, Brignac, S.Rodriguez, Longoria, Kotchman); New York 5 (Cano, Jeter 4). Runners moved up—Granderson. GIDP—Kotchman, Brignac. DP—New York 3 (Cano, Jeter, Teixeira), (Cano, Jeter, Teixeira), (Al.Rodriguez, Cano, Cano, Teixeira). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niemann W, 4-4 7 1-3 6 1 1 2 4 114 4.53 J.Cruz 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 3.06 Farnsworth 1 0 0 0 1 2 22 2.02 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Colon L, 6-4 5 2-3 10 5 5 4 1 92 3.20 Noesi 3 1-3 2 0 0 1 4 43 3.20 Inherited runners-scored—J.Cruz 1-0, Noesi 1-0. WP—Farnsworth. T—3:00. A—47,787 (50,291).

Angels 5, Mariners 1 Seattle I.Suzuki rf Ryan ss A.Kennedy 1b Smoak dh Ackley 2b Olivo c Seager 3b F.Gutierrez cf Peguero lf Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 1

SO 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 2 6

Avg. .271 .252 .260 .238 .298 .219 .000 .190 .190

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. M.Izturis 3b-2b 5 1 0 0 0 1 .277 Tor.Hunter rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .244 Abreu dh 3 1 1 1 1 0 .286 V.Wells lf-cf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .213 H.Kendrick 2b-lf 3 0 1 1 0 2 .307 Aybar ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .284 Trumbo 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Bourjos cf 4 0 3 1 0 0 .272 1-Callaspo pr-3b 0 1 0 0 0 0 .275 Mathis c 3 0 1 1 1 0 .193 Totals 32 5 10 5 2 3 Seattle 001 000 000 — 1 6 0 Los Angeles 003 000 02x — 5 10 0 1-ran for Bourjos in the 8th. LOB—Seattle 6, Los Angeles 8. 2B—Ryan (12), H.Kendrick (20), Aybar (17), Bourjos (15). RBIs—Ryan (25), Abreu (35), V.Wells (32), H.Kendrick (29), Bourjos (17), Mathis (12). SB—F.Gutierrez (4). SF—V.Wells. Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 3 (Smoak 2, Peguero); Los Angeles 4 (Bourjos, Aybar, Mathis 2). Runners moved up—Trumbo. GIDP—Abreu. DP—Seattle 1 (Fister, Ryan, A.Kennedy). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fister L, 3-10 6 7 3 3 1 2 100 3.09 Ray 2 3 2 2 1 1 33 5.55 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver W, 11-4 9 6 1 1 1 6 116 1.86 HBP—by Fister (Trumbo, H.Kendrick). WP—Weaver. T—2:27. A—41,223 (45,389).

NL BOXSCORES Brewers 5, Reds 4 Cincinnati

AB R

H BI BB SO Avg.

Totals

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division Boston New York Tampa Bay Toronto Baltimore Central Division Cleveland Detroit Chicago Minnesota Kansas City West Division Texas Los Angeles Seattle Oakland

W 52 51 49 42 36 W 47 47 43 39 36 W 48 47 43 39

L 35 35 39 47 49 L 39 42 46 47 52 L 41 42 45 50

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Pct .598 .593 .557 .472 .424 Pct .547 .528 .483 .453 .409 Pct .539 .528 .489 .438

GB — ½ 3½ 11 15 GB — 1½ 5½ 8 12 GB — 1 4½ 9

WCGB — — 3 10½ 14½ WCGB — 5½ 9½ 12 16 WCGB — 5½ 9 13½

Thursday’s Games Tampa Bay 5, N.Y. Yankees 1 Cleveland 5, Toronto 4 Boston 10, Baltimore 4 Texas 6, Oakland 0 Detroit 3, Kansas City 1 Minnesota 6, Chicago White Sox 2 L.A. Angels 5, Seattle 1

L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 3-7 1-9 L10 7-3 4-6 5-5 7-3 3-7 L10 7-3 8-2 4-6 4-6

Str W-3 L-2 W-2 L-3 L-4 Str W-2 W-2 L-3 W-1 L-1 Str W-4 W-1 L-2 L-1

Home 25-17 28-19 21-21 19-22 22-22 Home 27-15 27-19 20-23 20-19 23-25 Home 28-18 23-22 23-22 23-21

Away 27-18 23-16 28-18 23-25 14-27 Away 20-24 20-23 23-23 19-28 13-27 Away 20-23 24-20 20-23 16-29

East Division Philadelphia Atlanta New York Washington Florida Central Division Milwaukee St. Louis Pittsburgh Cincinnati Chicago Houston West Division San Francisco Arizona Colorado San Diego Los Angeles

Today’s Games Tampa Bay (Hellickson 8-7) at N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 7-6), 4:05 p.m. Toronto (Jo-.Reyes 3-7) at Cleveland (Talbot 2-5), 4:05 p.m. Baltimore (Britton 6-6) at Boston (Beckett 7-3), 4:10 p.m. Oakland (G.Gonzalez 8-5) at Texas (C.Wilson 8-3), 5:05 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 7-6) at Kansas City (Davies 1-7), 5:10 p.m. Minnesota (Blackburn 6-6) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 6-8), 5:10 p.m. Seattle (Beavan 1-0) at L.A. Angels (E.Santana 4-8), 7:05 p.m.

W 55 53 45 45 40 W 47 47 45 44 36 30 W 50 48 41 40 38

L 33 36 43 44 48 L 42 42 42 45 53 59 L 39 41 47 49 51

Pct .625 .596 .511 .506 .455 Pct .528 .528 .517 .494 .404 .337 Pct .562 .539 .466 .449 .427

Thursday’s Games Atlanta 6, Colorado 3 Chicago Cubs 10, Washington 9 Florida 5, Houston 0 Milwaukee 5, Cincinnati 4 Arizona 4, St. Louis 1 L.A. Dodgers 6, N.Y. Mets 0 San Francisco 2, San Diego 1

GB — 2½ 10 10½ 15 GB — — 1 3 11 17 GB — 2 8½ 10 12

WCGB — — 7½ 8 12½ WCGB 6 6 7 9 17 23 WCGB — 5 11½ 13 15

L10 7-3 9-1 6-4 5-5 6-4 L10 3-7 6-4 6-4 4-6 4-6 2-8 L10 5-5 5-5 3-7 6-4 3-7

Str L-1 W-4 L-1 L-1 W-2 Str W-2 L-2 L-1 L-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-2 W-1 L-5 L-2 W-1

Home 32-14 28-18 19-22 27-16 19-28 Home 31-13 23-20 21-21 23-21 20-26 14-33 Home 26-15 23-19 22-22 19-27 20-27

Away 23-19 25-18 26-21 18-28 21-20 Away 16-29 24-22 24-21 21-24 16-27 16-26 Away 24-24 25-22 19-25 21-22 18-24

Today’s Games Atlanta (Beachy 3-1) at Philadelphia (Halladay 11-3), 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (R.Lopez 1-2) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 5-4), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (Hammel 4-8) at Washington (Lannan 5-5), 4:05 p.m. Houston (Lyles 0-3) at Florida (Vazquez 4-8), 4:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Leake 8-4) at Milwaukee (Greinke 7-3), 5:10 p.m. Arizona (I.Kennedy 8-3) at St. Louis (Lohse 8-5), 5:15 p.m. San Diego (Latos 5-9) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 7-7), 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Dickey 4-7) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 6-1), 7:15 p.m.

29 0

3

0

3

6

Florida AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bonifacio 3b 4 1 3 0 1 0 .277 Infante 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .257 G.Sanchez 1b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .290 H.Ramirez ss 3 1 0 0 1 0 .233 Morrison lf 4 0 2 2 0 0 .262 1-Wise pr-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .175 Cameron cf 3 1 0 0 1 3 .000 Stanton rf 2 1 1 2 2 1 .257 J.Buck c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .214 Hand p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Choate p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Dobbs ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .300 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 28 5 8 5 8 10 Houston 000 000 000 — 0 3 0 Florida 020 021 00x — 5 8 0 a-struck out for Del Rosario in the 8th. b-struck out for Choate in the 8th. 1-ran for Morrison in the 7th. LOB—Houston 5, Florida 9. 2B—Bonifacio (15), Morrison (17). HR—Stanton (18), off Happ. RBIs—Infante (26), Morrison 2 (38), Stanton 2 (49). SB—Bonifacio (12), Wise (2). CS—Stanton (2). S—Infante, Hand. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 5 (Morrison, Infante, Cameron, G.Sanchez, J.Buck). DP—Houston 1 (Ca.Lee); Florida 1 (Stanton, G.Sanchez). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ L, 3-11 5 2-3 5 5 5 7 8 115 5.76 Del Rosario 1 1-3 3 0 0 1 1 28 4.62 Melancon 1 0 0 0 0 1 19 3.15 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hand W, 1-3 7 2 0 0 3 4 106 2.77 Choate 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 0.98 Cishek 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 2.08 Inherited runners-scored—Del Rosario 1-1. IBB—off Happ (H.Ramirez), off Del Rosario (Stanton). T—2:44. A—17,806 (38,560).

Braves 6, Rockies 3

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Rays 5, Yankees 1: NEW YORK — Jeff Niemann gave up Derek Jeter’s 2,998th hit but little else, B.J. Upton homered and drove in three runs and Tampa Bay beat the New York Yankees to start strong in a long stretch of games against its biggest division rivals. Ben Zobrist homered, tripled and singled for Tampa Bay, which tagged Bartolo Colon (6-4) early in one of the worst outings of his surprising comeback season. The Rays won the first of 11 straight games against New York and Boston, the two teams they trail in the AL East. • Indians 5, Blue Jays 4: CLEVELAND — Travis Hafner hit a grand slam in the bottom of the ninth inning to cap Cleveland’s five-run rally. Hafner hit the first pitch from Luis Perez (1-2) deep into the right-field seats for Cleveland’s second gameending slam of the season. Carlos Santana also did it to beat Detroit 9-5 on April 29. • Red Sox 10, Orioles 4: BOSTON — Dustin Pedroia hit a three-run shot and Boston added three consecutive home runs in the seventh. Six different Boston players homered, including three straight by David Ortiz, Josh Reddick and Jarrod Saltalamacchia that helped the Red Sox blow open the game. Jacoby Ellsbury added a two-run homer. • Rangers 6, A’s 0: ARLINGTON, Texas — Derek Holland pitched a four-hitter for his third career shutout and Texas beat Oakland in a game marred by the death of a fan who fell out of the stands while trying to catch a ball. (See Sports in Brief, Page D2.) Holland (7-4) struck out seven, walked two and allowed four singles. Rich Harden (1-1) got the loss. • Tigers 3, Royals 1: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Max Scherzer pitched into the seventh inning and Ryan Raburn hit a two-run homer to lead Detroit to the victory. Scherzer (10-4) scattered four hits over the first six innings before a pair of singles put runners on first and second with two outs in the seventh. Phil Coke sprinted in from the bullpen to protect a 2-1 lead and promptly retired Mike Moustakas on a fly ball to center field to end the threat. • Twins 6, White Sox 2: CHICAGO — Joe Mauer had three hits, drove in two runs and was flawless in his first game at first base, leading Minnesota to the victory. Mauer, the 2009 AL MVP, had started 714 games in the major leagues in the field, all at catcher. He last played first base in 2002 in Class A. Ben Revere also had three hits and two RBIs for the Twins, who beat Chicago for the eighth straight time. Carl Pavano (6-6) allowed two runs over seven innings. • Angels 5, Mariners 1: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Jered Weaver pitched a six-hitter for his 11th victory, and fellow All-Star selection Howie Kendrick extended his hitting streak to 16 games with a run-scoring double in the Los Angeles Angels’ 11th win in 14 games, over Seattle. Weaver (11-4) tuned up for a possible start in the All-Star game with his eighth career complete game and his fifth straight victory during a nine-game streak without a loss.

• Cubs 10, Nationals 9: WASHINGTON — Darwin Barney’s tiebreaking double in the ninth inning capped a wild comeback as the Chicago Cubs rallied from an eight-run deficit to beat Washington. Tony Campana reached on a fielder’s choice, stole second and scored when Barney doubled to right off Henry Rodriguez (3-2). It was Barney’s third hit and RBI of the game. • Marlins 5, Astros 0: MIAMI — Mike Stanton homered and Florida’s Brad Hand allowed two hits over seven innings for his first victory in the major leagues. Logan Morrison drove in two runs and Emilio Bonifacio had three hits for the Marlins. Hand (1-3), a 21-year-old rookie left-hander, had his longest outing and held the Astros without a hit until one out in the fifth when Clint Barmes singled to center. Hand lowered his ERA to 2.77 in five starts. He was sent down to Double-A Jacksonville after the game so he could stay on schedule through the All-Star break. • Brewers 5, Reds 4: MILWAUKEE — Rickie Weeks hit a three-run homer, and Milwaukee’s bullpen held on in the opener of a four-game series. Weeks hit a line-drive shot off Homer Bailey (3-4) as the Brewers built a 5-2 lead in the fifth. LaTroy Hawkins gave up a run in the eighth and John Axford got into serious trouble in the ninth, allowing a leadoff home run to Ramon Hernandez and putting runners on the corners with two outs before getting Brandon Phillips to ground out for his 23rd save. • Braves 6, Rockies 3: ATLANTA — Freddie Freeman hit a three-run homer, his fourth of the series, and Atlanta completed its first four-game sweep of Colorado in 18 years. Jason Heyward homered for the streaking Braves, who have won nine of 10 and 14 of 17. • Giants 2, Padres 1: SAN FRANCISCO — Barry Zito won his third straight start since coming off the disabled list, Eli Whiteside homered, and San Francisco edged San Diego. Zito allowed one run and four hits over eight innings with a season-high seven strikeouts while beating the Padres for the first time in nearly three years. The left-hander did not walk a batter and retired 14 of the final 16 hitters he faced. • Diamondbacks 4, Cardinals 1: ST. LOUIS — Justin Upton hit a two-run homer and Joe Saunders threw five scoreless innings to lead Arizona to a victory over St. Louis. The Diamondbacks won for the fourth time in the past six games. St. Louis, which lost for the fourth time in six games, fell into a first-place tie with Milwaukee in the NL Central. • Dodgers 6, Mets 0: LOS ANGELES — Clayton Kershaw scattered five hits over eight innings and the Los Angeles Dodgers parlayed extra-base hits by Matt Kemp, Juan Uribe, Aaron Miles and Dioner Navarro into a five-run sixth inning to beat the New York Mets and snap a five-game losing skid. The loss ended the Mets’ four-game winning streak and kept them from sweeping the Dodgers for the first time in four games at Chavez Ravine.

Stubbs cf Cairo 3b Votto 1b B.Phillips 2b Bruce rf J.Gomes lf Masset p Cozart ss c-Heisey ph-lf R.Hernandez c H.Bailey p b-F.Lewis ph Ondrusek p Renteria ss Totals

4 5 4 5 3 4 0 3 1 4 2 1 0 1 37

0 1 0 2 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 12

0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 4

1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

.251 .288 .319 .294 .258 .218 --.333 .263 .316 .250 .274 --.227

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. R.Weeks 2b 3 1 2 3 1 0 .275 Morgan cf-lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .324 C.Hart rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .262 Fielder 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .302 Kotsay lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .253 C.Gomez cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .224 Y.Betancourt ss 3 0 1 1 0 0 .241 McGehee 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Lucroy c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .286 Narveson p 1 1 1 0 1 0 .194 a-Counsell ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .173 Saito p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hawkins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Axford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 5 9 5 3 2 Cincinnati 001 100 011 — 4 12 0 Milwaukee 010 040 00x — 5 9 2 a-flied out for Narveson in the 6th. b-grounded out for H.Bailey in the 7th. c-grounded out for Cozart in the 8th. E—Fielder (9), R.Weeks (11). LOB—Cincinnati 9, Milwaukee 6. 2B—H.Bailey (1), Fielder (21), Y.Betancourt (12), Narveson (2). HR—R.Hernandez (9), off Axford; R.Weeks (16), off H.Bailey. RBIs—Cairo (16), Bruce (54), R.Hernandez 2 (23), R.Weeks 3 (37), Kotsay (13), Y.Betancourt (29). SB—C.Hart (3). CS—Stubbs (5), B.Phillips 2 (5). SF—Y.Betancourt. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 6 (Cozart, B.Phillips 2, H.Bailey, R.Hernandez, Heisey); Milwaukee 4 (C.Hart, McGehee, Y.Betancourt, Kotsay). Runners moved up—Bruce, Kotsay. GIDP—Cozart, Morgan. DP—Cincinnati 1 (Votto, Cozart); Milwaukee 1 (Y.Betancourt, R.Weeks, Fielder). Cincinnati IP H.Bailey L, 3-4 6 Ondrusek 1

H R ER BB SO NP ERA 8 5 5 2 1 87 4.13 1 0 0 1 0 25 1.73

Masset 1 0 0 0 Milwaukee IP H R ER Nrveson W, 6-5 6 7 2 2 Saito H, 2 1 0 0 0 Hawkins H, 11 1 2 1 1 Axford S, 23-25 1 3 1 1 WP—Narveson. T—2:51. A—34,102 (41,900).

0 BB 2 0 0 1

1 SO 5 0 0 0

9 NP 96 9 21 21

3.20 ERA 4.75 4.50 1.13 2.90

SO 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 5

Avg. .272 .305 .298 .225 .235 .299 .261 --.270 .296 .032 .000 .318 .125 .266 --.328 ---

Cubs 10, Nationals 9 Chicago Fukudome rf S.Castro ss Ar.Ramirez 3b C.Pena 1b Soto c Byrd cf A.Soriano lf Marshall p d-Campana ph-lf Barney 2b Garza p Samardzija p a-Je.Baker ph J.Russell p b-DeWitt ph Grabow p Re.Johnson lf Marmol p Totals

AB 5 5 3 5 4 5 3 0 1 5 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 41

R 0 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 10

Washington Bernadina lf Espinosa 2b Zimmerman 3b Morse 1b Werth rf Ankiel cf W.Ramos c Desmond ss e-Stairs ph L.Hernandez p Coffey p S.Burnett p c-Bixler ph H.Rodriguez p f-L.Nix ph 1-Cora pr Totals Chicago Washington a-singled for

AB R 6 2 5 1 4 2 5 1 4 1 4 1 4 0 4 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 9 000 006 007 100 Samardzija

H 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 15

BI 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 10

BB 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB SO Avg. 3 1 0 0 .267 2 2 0 1 .249 1 0 1 0 .252 2 2 0 2 .303 1 1 1 1 .218 1 1 0 1 .234 1 2 0 2 .254 1 0 0 2 .217 0 0 0 0 .145 1 0 0 0 .179 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 1 .205 0 0 0 0 --0 0 1 0 .279 0 0 0 0 .237 13 9 3 10 211 — 10 15 3 010 — 9 13 0 in the 5th. b-homered for

J.Russell in the 6th. c-struck out for S.Burnett in the 7th. d-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Marshall in the 9th. e-fouled out for Desmond in the 9th. f-walked for H.Rodriguez in the 9th. 1-ran for L.Nix in the 9th. E—C.Pena (4), Garza (5), Fukudome (2). LOB—Chicago 8, Washington 10. 2B—S.Castro (23), Barney 2 (10), Bernadina (8), Ankiel (9), W.Ramos (12). HR—DeWitt (2), off L.Hernandez; C.Pena (19), off S.Burnett. RBIs—Ar.Ramirez (49), C.Pena 2 (48), A.Soriano (38), Barney 3 (30), DeWitt 3 (14), Bernadina (18), Espinosa 2 (52), Morse 2 (48), Werth (31), Ankiel (11), W.Ramos 2 (29). SB—Campana (10), Bernadina (13), Espinosa (11), Cora (2). S—W.Ramos, L.Hernandez. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 3 (Soto, Barney, Re.Johnson); Washington 6 (Werth, Espinosa 2, W.Ramos, Bernadina 2). Runners moved up—Zimmerman. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garza 2 8 7 6 1 4 67 4.26 Samardzija 2 2 1 0 0 2 27 3.62 J.Russell 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.63 Grabow 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 5.11 Marshall W, 5-2 2 2 1 1 0 3 30 2.40 Mrmol S, 18-23 1 0 0 0 1 0 16 2.21 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA L.Hernandez 5 2-3 10 6 6 0 3 92 4.01 Coffey H, 6 2-3 0 1 1 1 0 16 3.38 S.Burnett 2-3 1 1 1 2 1 17 5.76 H.Rdrgez L, 3-2 2 4 2 2 0 1 43 2.37 Garza pitched to 8 batters in the 3rd. Inherited runners-scored—Samardzija 2-1, S.Burnett 1-1. IBB—off S.Burnett (A.Soriano). HBP—by Marmol (Ankiel), by L.Hernandez (Ar.Ramirez). WP—Marmol, S.Burnett. T—3:31. A—22,016 (41,506).

Marlins 5, Astros 0 Houston AB R Bourn cf 4 0 Ang.Sanchez 3b 3 0 Pence rf 3 0 Ca.Lee 1b 4 0 Keppinger 2b 4 0 Michaels lf 3 0 Barmes ss 2 0 Quintero c 3 0 Happ p 2 0 Del Rosario p 0 0 a-Wallace ph 1 0 Melancon p 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Avg. .288 .262 .328 .270 .314 .204 .248 .241 .250 --.283 ---

Colorado Blackmon lf 1-Wigginton pr-lf J.Herrera ss Giambi 1b S.Smith rf M.Ellis 2b I.Stewart 3b Spilborghs cf Iannetta c Nicasio p Stults p Mat.Reynolds p a-Helton ph 2-Cook pr R.Betancourt p Totals

AB 2 3 4 5 3 3 4 3 4 1 2 0 0 0 0 34

R 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 5

SO 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .255 .251 .253 .274 .298 .393 .086 .214 .221 .143 .500 .000 .315 .182 ---

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schafer cf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .242 Ale.Gonzalez ss 5 1 1 1 0 1 .234 C.Jones 3b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .255 Freeman 1b 4 1 3 3 1 0 .279 Uggla 2b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .183 Heyward rf 4 1 3 2 0 0 .233 D.Ross c 4 0 1 0 0 3 .302 McLouth lf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .231 T.Hudson p 4 0 0 0 0 3 .059 O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Venters p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Kimbrel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 37 6 12 6 4 9 Colorado 101 000 010 — 3 6 1 Atlanta 005 010 00x — 6 12 1 a-walked for Mat.Reynolds in the 8th. 1-ran for Blackmon in the 3rd. 2-ran for Helton in the 8th. E—I.Stewart (4), Uggla (8). LOB—Colorado 10, Atlanta 11. 2B—Giambi (4), Stults (1), Schafer (5), Uggla (13), Heyward (11), McLouth (12). HR—Freeman (13), off Nicasio; Heyward (9), off Stults. RBIs—Giambi 2 (22), Ale.Gonzalez (26), Freeman 3 (42), Heyward 2 (22). SB—Heyward (5), McLouth (3). Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 6 (M.Ellis 4, Wigginton 2); Atlanta 6 (T.Hudson 2, Schafer 2, Heyward 2). GIDP—M.Ellis. DP—Atlanta 1 (C.Jones, Freeman). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nicasio L, 3-2 2 1-3 7 5 5 3 4 71 4.91 Stults 3 1-3 3 1 1 0 1 51 2.70 Mat.Reynolds 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 2 24 3.38 R.Betancourt 1 1 0 0 0 2 10 4.84 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Hdsn W, 8-6 7 1-3 5 3 3 3 3 116 3.57 O’Flaherty 1-3 1 0 0 2 0 18 1.13 Venters H, 19 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 1.52 Kmbrl S, 27-32 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.40 Inherited runners-scored—Stults 2-0, Mat. Reynolds 2-0, O’Flaherty 1-1, Venters 3-0. IBB—off Nicasio (McLouth). HBP—by T.Hudson (S.Smith). WP—O’Flaherty. T—3:16. A—21,541 (49,586).

Giants 2, Padres 1 San Diego AB Denorfia rf 4 Bartlett ss 4 Headley 3b 4 Ludwick lf 3 Maybin cf 3 Guzman 1b 3 O.Hudson 2b 3 Ro.Johnson c 3 Luebke p 2 Neshek p 0 a-Alb.Gonzalez ph 1 Gregerson p 0 Totals 30

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0

SO 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 7

Avg. .288 .242 .301 .252 .263 .275 .233 .177 .000 --.214 ---

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rowand cf-lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .242 M.Tejada ss 3 1 2 0 1 0 .240 P.Sandoval 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .302 Burrell lf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .240 Torres cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .226 Huff 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Schierholtz rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Hall 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Burriss 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Whiteside c 3 1 2 1 0 1 .225 Zito p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Br.Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 29 2 7 2 1 8 San Diego 000 000 100 — 1 5 0 San Francisco 001 001 00x — 2 7 0 a-grounded out for Neshek in the 8th. LOB—San Diego 2, San Francisco 4. 2B—Guzman (4), M.Tejada (16). HR—Ludwick (11), off Zito; Whiteside (3), off Luebke. RBIs—Ludwick (55), Burrell (21), Whiteside (12). SB—Denorfia (7). CS—Bartlett (6). Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 2 (Ludwick, Ro.Johnson); San Francisco 1 (Schierholtz). Runners moved up—O.Hudson. GIDP—Headley, P.Sandoval, Zito. DP—San Diego 2 (Ro.Johnson, Bartlett, O.Hudson), (Bartlett, O.Hudson, Guzman); San Francisco 1 (P.Sandoval, Burriss, Huff). San Diego IP H R ER Luebke L, 2-3 6 5 2 2 Neshek 1 1 0 0 Gregerson 1 1 0 0 SanFran IP H R ER Zito W, 3-1 8 4 1 1 Wlson S, 25-29 1 1 0 0 T—2:14. A—41,521 (41,915).

BB 1 0 0 BB 0 0

SO 8 0 0 SO 7 0

NP 100 15 9 NP 108 12

ERA 2.57 3.52 2.37 ERA 3.18 2.81

Diamondbacks 4, Cardinals 1 Arizona AB R R.Roberts 2b 3 1 S.Drew ss 4 0 J.Upton rf 4 1 C.Young cf 3 1 Montero c 4 0 Nady 1b 4 0 Burroughs 3b 3 0 G.Parra lf 4 1 J.Saunders p 2 0 Owings p 0 0 a-W.Pena ph 1 0 A.Castillo p 0 0 Brazoban p 0 0 c-Miranda ph 1 0 Da.Hernandez p 0 0 Totals 33 4

H BI BB 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 4 2

SO 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Avg. .251 .262 .295 .256 .271 .247 .308 .287 .179 .143 .195 ----.216 ---

St. Louis Theriot ss Freese 3b Pujols 1b Holliday lf Berkman rf Y.Molina c d-Descalso ph Punto 2b Jay cf McClellan p b-T.Cruz ph

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0

Avg. .290 .347 .273 .320 .287 .279 .255 .262 .297 .138 .300

AB 4 2 3 3 4 3 1 4 2 2 0

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Walters p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 28 1 3 1 6 3 Arizona 010 002 100 — 4 6 0 St. Louis 000 001 000 — 1 3 3 a-grounded out for Owings in the 7th. b-walked for McClellan in the 7th. c-flied out for Brazoban in the 9th. d-flied out for Y.Molina in the 9th. E—Punto (1), Theriot (15), Freese (4). LOB—Arizona 5, St. Louis 6. 2B—G.Parra (11), Theriot (17), Holliday (18). HR—J.Upton (15), off McClellan. RBIs—R.Roberts (34), J.Upton 2 (46), Burroughs (3), Holliday (46). SF—Burroughs. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 1 (Miranda); St. Louis 3 (Holliday, Y.Molina 2). GIDP—J.Upton, Pujols, Holliday. DP—Arizona 2 (Burroughs, R.Roberts, Nady), (S.Drew, R.Roberts, Nady); St. Louis 1 (Theriot, Punto, Pujols). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Snders W, 6-7 5 1 0 0 4 1 78 3.86 Owings H, 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 26 3.08 A.Castillo H, 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 16 0.00 Brazoban H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.25 D.Hrnndz S, 6-8 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.35 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McClllan L, 6-6 7 6 4 3 2 1 97 4.24 Walters 2 0 0 0 0 1 29 0.00 T—2:27 (Rain delay: 0:50). A—35,274 (43,975).

Dodgers 6, Mets 0 New York AB R Pagan cf 5 0 Turner 2b 4 0 Beltran rf 3 0 R.Paulino c 3 0 Bay lf 4 0 Dan.Murphy 3b 4 0 Evans 1b 3 0 b-Harris ph 0 0 R.Tejada ss 2 0 Gee p 2 0 Acosta p 0 0 a-Hairston ph 1 0 Isringhausen p 0 0 c-Duda ph 1 0 Totals 32 0

H BI BB SO 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 0 4 11

Avg. .259 .263 .283 .325 .248 .300 .000 .246 .269 .040 --.238 --.239

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gwynn Jr. lf 4 1 3 0 0 0 .253 Carroll ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .299 Ethier rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .313 Kemp cf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .323 Uribe 3b 3 2 1 1 0 1 .210 Loney 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .274 Miles 2b 3 1 1 2 0 0 .320 D.Navarro c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .176 Kershaw p 3 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Kuo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 6 7 6 2 5 New York 000 000 000 — 0 6 3 Los Angeles 010 005 00x — 6 7 0 a-flied out for Acosta in the 8th. b-walked for Evans in the 9th. c-struck out for Isringhausen in the 9th. E—R.Paulino (5), Dan.Murphy (6), Gee (1). LOB— New York 10, Los Angeles 5. 2B—Kemp (19), Uribe (11), Miles (9). 3B—D.Navarro (1). RBIs—Kemp 2 (66), Uribe (27), Miles 2 (23), D.Navarro (8). SB—Pagan (17), R.Tejada (1), Gwynn Jr. (11), Kemp (26). SF—Miles. Runners left in scoring position—New York 5 (R.Paulino 3, Pagan 2); Los Angeles 4 (D.Navarro, Loney, Kershaw, Uribe). GIDP—Dan.Murphy. DP—New York 1 (Beltran, Evans); Los Angeles 1 (Miles, Loney). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gee L, 8-3 5 2-3 5 6 5 1 2 86 3.76 Acosta 1 1-3 2 0 0 1 3 32 7.36 Isringhausen 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.14 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kershaw W, 9-4 8 5 0 0 2 9 113 3.03 Jansen 1-3 1 0 0 2 1 18 4.60 Kuo 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 10 9.00 Inherited runners-scored—Acosta 1-1, Kuo 30. HBP—by Gee (Uribe), by Kershaw (R.Paulino). WP—Gee. T—2:50. A—56,000 (56,000).

LEADERS Through Thursday’s Games ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—AdGonzalez, Boston, .351; Bautista, Toronto, .333; MiYoung, Texas, .328; VMartinez, Detroit, .319; MiCabrera, Detroit, .317; Konerko, Chicago, .316; Ellsbury, Boston, .310; JhPeralta, Detroit, .310. RUNS—Granderson, New York, 77; Bautista, Toronto, 69; MiCabrera, Detroit, 62; Ellsbury, Boston, 61; Kinsler, Texas, 61; AdGonzalez, Boston, 60; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 58. RBI—AdGonzalez, Boston, 76; Beltre, Texas, 67; Teixeira, New York, 65; Konerko, Chicago, 64; Granderson, New York, 62; Bautista, Toronto, 61; MiYoung, Texas, 59. HITS—AdGonzalez, Boston, 124; MiYoung, Texas, 114; Ellsbury, Boston, 108; MeCabrera, Kansas City, 106; Markakis, Baltimore, 104; ACabrera, Cleveland, 102; AGordon, Kansas City, 101. DOUBLES—AdGonzalez, Boston, 28; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 28; Ellsbury, Boston, 25; MiYoung, Texas, 25; Beltre, Texas, 24; AGordon, Kansas City, 24; Quentin, Chicago, 24; Youkilis, Boston, 24. TRIPLES—Granderson, New York, 7; AJackson, Detroit, 7; Bourjos, Los Angeles, 6; RDavis, Toronto, 6; Aybar, Los Angeles, 5; Cano, New York, 5; Crisp, Oakland, 5; Gardner, New York, 5; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 5. HOME RUNS—Bautista, Toronto, 29; Granderson, New York, 25; Teixeira, New York, 25; Konerko, Chicago, 22; NCruz, Texas, 20; MarReynolds, Baltimore, 20; MiCabrera, Detroit, 18; DOrtiz, Boston, 18. STOLEN BASES—Ellsbury, Boston, 28; Andrus, Texas, 25; Crisp, Oakland, 25; RDavis, Toronto, 22; Gardner, New York, 22; ISuzuki, Seattle, 22; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 20. PITCHING—Sabathia, New York, 12-4; Verlander, Detroit, 11-4; Weaver, Los Angeles, 11-4; Lester, Boston, 10-4; Scherzer, Detroit, 10-4; Tomlin, Cleveland, 10-4; Ogando, Texas, 9-3; Haren, Los Angeles, 9-5; Arrieta, Baltimore, 9-6. STRIKEOUTS—Verlander, Detroit, 138; FHernandez, Seattle, 134; Shields, Tampa Bay, 132; Price, Tampa Bay, 122; Weaver, Los Angeles, 120; Sabathia, New York, 117; Lester, Boston, 110. SAVES—League, Seattle, 23; Valverde, Detroit, 22; CPerez, Cleveland, 21; MaRivera, New York, 21; Papelbon, Boston, 19; Walden, Los Angeles, 19; SSantos, Chicago, 18. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—JosReyes, New York, .354; Pence, Houston, .328; Kemp, Los Angeles, .323; Braun, Milwaukee, .320; Votto, Cincinnati, .319; Helton, Colorado, .315; McCann, Atlanta, .314. RUNS—JosReyes, New York, 65; RWeeks, Milwaukee, 62; Bourn, Houston, 59; Braun, Milwaukee, 57; Votto, Cincinnati, 57; CYoung, Arizona, 56; CGonzalez, Colorado, 55; Kemp, Los Angeles, 55; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 55; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 55. RBI—Fielder, Milwaukee, 71; Howard, Philadelphia, 71; Kemp, Los Angeles, 66; Berkman, St. Louis, 62; Braun, Milwaukee, 62; Pence, Houston, 59; Beltran, New York, 57; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 57. HITS—JosReyes, New York, 124; SCastro, Chicago, 112; Pence, Houston, 112; Votto, Cincinnati, 104; Kemp, Los Angeles, 103; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 103; Bourn, Houston, 101. DOUBLES—Beltran, New York, 26; Pence, Houston, 24; CYoung, Arizona, 24; SCastro, Chicago, 23; Ethier, Los Angeles, 23; Headley, San Diego, 23; SSmith, Colorado, 23. TRIPLES—JosReyes, New York, 15; Victorino, Philadelphia, 9; SCastro, Chicago, 8; Bourn, Houston, 7; Maybin, San Diego, 6; Rasmus, St. Louis, 6; SDrew, Arizona, 5; Fowler, Colorado, 5. HOME RUNS—Berkman, St. Louis, 23; Fielder, Milwaukee, 22; Kemp, Los Angeles, 22; Bruce, Cincinnati, 19; CPena, Chicago, 19; Howard, Philadelphia, 18; Stanton, Florida, 18. STOLEN BASES—Bourn, Houston, 35; JosReyes, New York, 30; Kemp, Los Angeles, 26; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 23; Desmond, Washington, 20; Braun, Milwaukee, 19; Rollins, Philadelphia, 19. PITCHING—Jurrjens, Atlanta, 12-3; Halladay, Philadelphia, 11-3; Correia, Pittsburgh, 11-6; Hanson, Atlanta, 10-4; Hamels, Philadelphia, 10-4; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 10-5; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 9-4; DHudson, Arizona, 9-5; ClLee, Philadelphia, 9-6. STRIKEOUTS—Kershaw, Los Angeles, 147; Halladay, Philadelphia, 131; ClLee, Philadelphia, 128; Lincecum, San Francisco, 126; AniSanchez, Florida, 117; Hamels, Philadelphia, 115; Norris, Houston, 113. SAVES—Kimbrel, Atlanta, 27; HBell, San Diego, 26; BrWilson, San Francisco, 25; Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 25; Street, Colorado, 24; Axford, Milwaukee, 23; LNunez, Florida, 23.


D4 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

World Cup

Jessica Lovelace / Submitted photo

Bend’s Chase Anderman umpires a game at the District 5 Little League All Star Tournament Wednesday in The Dalles.

Umpire Continued from D1 “I watched my dad umpiring games with some of his friends and I thought it looked like an interesting thing to do,” said Chase, who before he was injured at midseason also played for the Durham Bulls of the Bend North majors. “Whenever I went to Bend Elks (summer collegiate baseball) games, I would always watch what the umpires are doing, and I just decided that I wanted to give it a try.” The Andermans, father and son, are serving as umpires in the weeklong district tournament, which continues through Saturday. The two have been officiating Bend North Little League games since the beginning of the season in April. “It’s a pretty rare thing to see a kid being an umpire,” said Greg Anderman, 45, president of Bend North Little League. “I’ve only seen one other kid who was an umpire: A 14-year-old boy from La Pine worked at the district tournament last year in Bend. … We’ve tried to encourage more kids to do it, and there’s a junior umpire program available for them learn how to become an umpire.” The Andermans officiated 10U games every Saturday during the Little League regular season. (The 10U level is the only level for which Chase Anderman is approved to umpire.) Often, Chase would play in one game and umpire in another on the same day. “We want to get young kids involved in umpiring so that they’ll develop and understand how to do it,” said Greg Anderman. “Hopefully some other kids will become umpires and then maybe they’ll continue doing it as adults.” Chase played second base and pitched for the Durham Bulls. His brother Dylan is a member of the Bend North squad that played Thursday in the 11U district title game and won 20-6 over Hermiston. Chase’s baseball season was cut short by a broken left foot he suffered in mid-May. He has recovered well from the injury, but he still has a noticeable limp while running around the field. He said it hurts a little when he’s running, adding that he expects to be fully recovered in a few more weeks. This is the first time Chase has ever been an umpire at a tournament, and after he appeared in opening games last Saturday, there were many surprised fans, players and coaches, including John Day River 10U manager Justin McLaughlin, of Dufur. “Prior to our game with The Dalles July 4, we were all wondering why there was a kid with an umpire uniform wandering around on the field,” said McLaughlin. “He did an awesome job out there too, making all the right calls.” Greg and Chase both attended a three-day umpire training camp in February at the Oregon State University practice facility in Corvallis. Chase was instructed about all the rules and participated in numerous drills, including being behind the plate with a pitching machine to help prospective umpires learn how to call balls and strikes. “The camp was a lot of fun and it definitely helped me learn how to become a good umpire,” said Chase, adding that he was the youngest participant at the camp. “In one of the demonstrations by instructors, we were out on the field and we had to make calls to determine whether a baserunner was either safe or out. I

was always in front of everyone and watching closely during each demonstration. I’ve learned so much more about the game being an umpire than I did as a player.” Chase was a plate umpire in a couple of regular-season BNLL games, but he has not been allowed to work behind the plate in the district tournament because of his lack of experience. Chase says he hopes to be calling balls and strikes at next year’s district tournament. “Being a field umpire is fun,” he said. “But being a plate umpire would be even more fun, because you get a little bit more involved in the action.” In a meeting with umpires and Little League presidents earlier

this season, Phyllis Kosanke, the District 5 tournament director, was one of several officials who helped determine that Chase could work as an umpire at the tournament. “The teenager from La Pine did a good job at last year’s tournament, so I thought that it would be intriguing to have Chase as an umpire in The Dalles,” said Kosanke, of Redmond. “Chase is the youngest umpire that we’ve ever had a District 5 Tournament, and he’s done a very good job all week here.” Chase has worked alongside other umpires, such as Michael Blackmer of White Salmon, Wash., as an unpaid volunteer umpire at the tournament. (Ac-

cording to Kosanke, Little League requires that umpires serve on a volunteer basis.) “It was a unique experience for me being in a game with Chase, and I felt a little skeptical having to work with such a young umpire,” said Blackmer, who worked with the younger Anderman during the John Day River versus The Dalles game on Monday. “During the game, I noticed at least two plays that he brought to my attention and he made the proper calls. He’s very alert; he’s definitely loud when he makes calls with an authoratative voice so that everyone can hear and understand him. “He’s going to be a very good umpire when he’s a little older.”

Continued from D1 Win that game, and the U.S. would play Brazil for yet another title — this one at the World Cup. The U.S. beat Brazil to win the gold medal at the past two Olympic Games; Brazil was runner-up at the 2007 World Cup after knocking the Americans out in the semifinals. But the Americans blew the gameplan with their 2-1 loss to Sweden on Wednesday night. Needing only a draw to avoid Brazil, the U.S. instead lost a group stage game for the first time at the World Cup. Rather than the “easy” road laid out for them, the Americans have to go through Brazil just to get to the semifinals. The U.S. and Brazil play Sunday, with the winner taking on either England or France in the semifinals Wednesday. “We go into every game wanting to win. And we didn’t,” Shannon Boxx said. “The good thing is, now we’re into the quarterfinals anyway. We have a tough opponent against Brazil and we’re excited about it. We said we’d have to face them at some point if we went all the way. Now we’re just facing them a little earlier.” What the Americans see as confidence others might call denial. This, after all, is the same team that has lost four games since November after going unbeaten for more than two years. The same team that lost in regional qualifying to Mexico, which had gone oh-fer against the Americans in the first 25 tries. The same team that left more chances on the field in the first three games than some teams will see in three World Cups. But it’s those chances that have the U.S. convinced they are only inches away from a commanding performance that could make all the different scenarios at the World Cup irrelevant. “We had so many chances

and we had good opportunities. We’re happy with the fact we had so many shots on goal,” said Cheney, who put a side volley over the crossbar early in the second half. “So they’re coming. We’re creating chances, which is great. We felt a little unlucky some of them didn’t go in, but that’s just the way soccer is sometimes. “The goals are going to come. We need to just keep doing what we’re doing.” Well, not everything they’re doing. Sweden scored its first goal off a penalty kick after Amy LePeilbet tripped Lotta Schelin in the box in the 14th minute, and the U.S. defense looked downright clunky in the first half as it failed to contain the speedy, aggressive tandem of Schelin and Josefine Oqvist. The U.S. got away from coach Pia Sundhage’s preferred style of offense, reverting back to its old habit of sending long balls over the defense rather than creating plays through the midfield. It didn’t help that the U.S. was without Heather O’Reilly, whose speed on the flanks automatically gives the offense more creativity and versatility. O’Reilly, who sat out the game with a sore groin, is expected to play against Brazil. “We could have been a little more patient, especially in the attacking third,” Sundhage said. “We were too eager to get in the box.” Despite all that, the Americans had a whopping 20-9 advantage in shots, including a 6-5 edge in shots on goal. The U.S. kept Sweden goalkeeper Hedvig Lindahl so busy in the second half she barely had time to catch her breath. “I never once thought we were going to lose, not until the final whistle blew,” Cheney said. “If the effort is there, we’re all talented soccer players. It’s going to come together for us.” If it does, the U.S. might yet be part of blockbuster final after all.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 8, 2011 D5

BASEBALL C O M M E N TA RY

GOLF ROUNDUP

PREP NOTEBOOK

The umpire strikes back, and back, and back again

Local women honored by UO

By Jim Litke The Associated Press

If you tune into baseball games to see the umpire strike back, the All-Star break couldn’t come at a worse time. July is already shaping up as one of the best months ever for ejections. Since the calendar turned over, 17 players, managers and coaches have been sent to cool off early, the same number that were tossed during the first weeks of April, May and June combined. The early leader in the clubhouse for best exit was Blue Jays pitcher Jon Rauch, who got a jump on things by shedding his jersey and hat even before stalking off toward the stalls. Then Tigers manager Jim Leyland did Rauch one better. Leyland was still standing in the dugout when he got tossed for the second time in nine days, shortening his trip to the showers to a matter of steps. “Like I said after that one, something is going on,” Leyland said Thursday. “It’s just not good when there’s that much tension around.” Even with another day to think things over, Leyland hasn’t figured out what’s causing all the pile-ups between the umps and players, managers and coaches. “In no way, shape or form am I blaming the umps. I want to be clear about that,” Leyland said in a phone call from Kansas City, where his Tigers were preparing to play the Royals. “We’ve all got to do better, especially with what happens right after a call somebody doesn’t like is made. For the good of the game, everybody needs to relax a little bit.” Blame it on rising temperatures, the replay videos available at every turn, a handful of Triple-A call-ups filling out the umpiring crews as vacation relief or the mounting frustration some clubs express as their spring-training dreams circle the drain even before the season hits the midway point. Then again, as Angels manager Mike Scioscia suggested the other day, maybe it’s just “cyclical.” “I haven’t noticed anything that would point to it being anything but random,” he said. So far, Scioscia’s guess is as good as any other. According to MLB figures, 93 players, managers and coaches were ejected this season through June 30, less than the average of 102 over the same time period for the past half-dozen seasons. The totals have ranged between a low of 78 and a high of 116. “You’re never going to figure it out. And maybe if the umps got it right once in a while,” chuckled Hall of Famer and former manager Earl Weaver, “you wouldn’t be having all these problems.” Weaver acknowledged a moment later that he’s hardly impartial. He’s third on the managers’ list of all-time ejections with 97, trailing only Bobby Cox (131) and John McGraw (117). Weaver also watches only two dozen or so games a season from his home in Pembroke Pines, Fla., but he does have a theory. “Umps are human beings and they have to take a lot of guff, so to some extent, they’ve always been like that,” he said. “But from what I see, more and more they’re taking exception to just about everything. I had plenty of run-ins, but it seems like the old guys were more secure about the job. It’s almost like the newer guys are being taught how to be mean in ump school or something.” Increased use of instant replay might ease the tension, but current rules allow it only on homerun calls, and there’s no chance of that being expanded anytime soon. But even if a decision to expand the use of instant replay was made, it would require amending the collective bargaining agreement. “I think you could expand it, but to what degree, I don’t honestly know,” Leyland said. “I do not want to take human element out of the game, especially since we ought to be amazed how many times those guys are right.” Jim Litke is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at jlitke@ap.org.

Bulletin staff report

Mark J. Terrill / The Associated Press

Cristie Kerr watches her chip shot to the green on the 13th hole during the first round of the U.S. Women’s Open at the Broadmoor Golf Club, Thursday in Colorado Springs, Colo. Kerr is tied for the lead.

Kerr, amateur lead when storms stop U.S. Open play By Eddie Pells The Associated Press

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Instead of teeing it up when she comes back to the Broadmoor, Cristie Kerr’s next shot at the U.S. Women’s Open will be a blast out of the bunker on the front, right side of the seventh green. A difficult shot. But it could be worse. A quirky day of thunder and lightning — but only spits of rain — suspended play Thursday with only 25 players finished with their first round. It was a bad break on the opening day of the toughest test in golf — balky weather that figures to turn one of the most difficult weeks on the schedule into an even bigger grind. “That’s part of the gamble,” said Christina Kim, who will try to squeeze in 36 holes today. The rain halted a mini streak for Kerr, who had made two straight birdies to get into a tie for the lead at 2-under par with amateur Amy Anderson. After her second birdie, Kerr, who opened her round on the back, teed off into the right rough on No. 7, then hit her approach into the sand. That’s when the siren sounded and the players headed to the clubhouse. “At least I’ll get to practice some long bunker shots before we go out, so maybe it’s a good thing for me,” she said. Everything was relative on this day. After halting play, the USGA kept the players in the clubhouse for 2 1⁄2 hours, but with the thunder still rumbling and the radar blinking red, officials called play. There were 75 players on the course and 66 who hadn’t hit a shot. That means nearly half the field, including defending champion Paula Creamer and Yani Tseng, trying to complete her career Grand Slam, could face 72 holes packed into three days of action on a typically rough U.S. Open setup. The Broadmoor is the first course to measure more than 7,000 yards for the U.S. Women’s Open — quite a haul, even at 6,700 feet in altitude. “We were actually sitting here debating, what’s the better draw?” Kim said. “Is it the one we have and we try to get 36 in in one day, or the one where you have 19 hours between shots in the

same round?” Sarah-Jane Smith of Australia falls into the latter category, but only barely. After hearing her name announced on the first tee box, Smith striped her first shot down the middle of the fairway and started walking. Suddenly, the sirens blared and she made a U-turn back to the clubhouse. “I’ve not teed off at all before,” she said. “But I’ve never hit one, then walked straight back in. I’m looking forward to it.” Then, pointing to her husband and caddie, Duane, she said, “He should have the yardage figured out by tomorrow morning.” For the record, Duane Smith says it will be a 150-yard shot when play resumes at 7:45 a.m. local time Friday. And while Smith is sleeping on one good shot, Anderson will join Kerr in sleeping on the lead. The second-team All-American from North Dakota State hit her approach on the par-5 ninth to tap-in range for her second birdie of the day. That put her at 2 under. “The first-day leader,” she said. “That’s way more than I could have imagined.” She needs to hold onto the lead for six more holes to make it official. The only other players under par when play was suspended were Inbee Park (through 17), Ai Miyazato (15) and Silvia Cavalleri, who birdied No. 1 moments before weather halted play. The best score posted among the 25 players who had finished belonged to Kristy McPherson, who shot 2-over 73. That was one shot ahead of Aree Song and Juli Inkster. Before the clouds rolled in, Inkster stood for about five minutes on the fairway of the par-5, 17th hole, waiting for the green to clear before she tried a 250-yard approach shot on a hole that had been unreachable during the practice rounds. The shot came up about 20 yards short and Inkster settled for par; this was what sufficed for drama on an incomplete day at the Broadmoor. “It’s nice” to be done, Inkster said. “It’s been a while since I’ve been on the good side of the switch. It’s going to be a long day for them.” Sure is.

Typical of the U.S. Open, rounds were averaging more than five hours, which is why some of the players were surprised the USGA didn’t wait a little longer before calling play for the day. They’ll need perfect weather the rest of the week to close out this tournament on Sunday. Kerr, who was scheduled to play her second round this afternoon, said she did the math and figured it’s unlikely she’ll even get it started by then. “It’s golf,” Kerr said. “Especially at the U.S. Open, you have to have your patience game be your ‘A’ game.” Also on Thursday: Late run sents Blanks to Deere Classic lead SILVIS, Ill. — Kris Blanks birdied his final five holes to finish with an 8under-par 63 and grab the first-round lead at the John Deere Classic. Blanks, who played the back nine first, rolled in a 25-foot putt on No. 5 to start his late run and capped it with an 11-footer to leave him alone at the top after Canadian rookie Matt McQuillan and veteran Davis Love III had held that spot much of the day with 64s. Another late starter, Steve Marino, also came in with a 64. Mark Wilson, who has won twice on the tour this year, and Kyle Stanley were another stroke back, while Steve Stricker, seeking his third straight title in the tournament, was part of a large group at 66. Westwood, Tullo share lead at Scottish Open INVERNESS, Scotland — Lee Westwood and tour newcomer Mark Tullo of Chile shot 7-under 65s to share the lead after the first round of the Scottish Open. Westwood made six birdies and an eagle in the warmup event before next week’s British Open. A bogey at the 16th hole was his only setback. With a win at the new links course at Castle Stuart, the second-ranked Westwood would regain the No. 1 ranking held by fellow Englishman Luke Donald. Tullo, ranked No. 232 and in his first season on the European Tour, birdied his first four holes and then five of the back nine to join Westwood atop the leaderboard. ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD Serving Central Oregon Since 1975

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Favorites take no risks at rain-lashed Tour By Jerome Pugmire The Associated Press

LISIEUX, France — Alberto Contador knew it made little sense to take risks on a day when blinding, torrential rain lashed riders in the Tour de France. The 141-mile course Thursday — the sixth and longest stage in the three-week race — made for a dangerous trip. And the field was fortunate to avoid a major crash, a day after riders went tumbling everywhere. “It was another nervous stage and because of the rain I virtually couldn’t see anything,” said Contador, the defending champion and three-time Tour winner who crashed Wednesday. “At the end of the stage I was moving to the very front of the pack, simply to avoid accidents, and not because I wanted to attack.” Contador and his Tour rivals, such as two-time runners-up Cadel Evans and Andy Schleck, played it safe as Edvald Boasson Hagen of Norway led a sprint to capture his first stage on the Tour. He finished in 5 hours, 13

minutes, 37 seconds. “I really surprised myself,” Hagen said. “Lots of people say that I’m a talented guy, so it’s nice to show it by winning a stage.” Matt Goss of Australia was second and overall race leader Thor Hushovd was third, giving Norway the distinction of having the stage winner and yellow jersey holder on the same day. Referring to his compatriot Hushovd, who has twice taken home the Tour’s green jersey awarded to the best sprinter, Hagen said: “I want to be as good as him — or better.” Philippe Gilbert of Belgium, who won Saturday’s first stage, said “everyone was a bit out of breath” and that Hagen “devoured the last 150 meters — he’s impossible to catch when he’s like that.” Hushovd was pleased with his country’s success on Thursday. “Not bad, after all — it’s a good day for Norway,” said the Garmin-Cervelo veteran, who retained the yellow jersey for a fifth consecutive day. As for Hagen, he said: “Clearly he’s got a

big future.” Moving fairly close to the front meant relative safety for Contador, Schleck and Evans. They all were part of the first 50 of the 197 riders who completed the stage. “Yesterday wind, today rain. ... Luckily, there seemed to be some kind of understanding within the peloton not to take too many risks today,” Schleck said. “As if all the teams had suffered enough crashes yesterday.” Evans kept second overall. The Australian is one second behind Hushovd, while Schleck is 12 seconds behind in 10th.

Contador is 1:42 off the lead in 34th place. A rider would have encountered untold trouble if caught behind the peloton in a dominolike crash on the treacherous, narrow roads snaking toward Normandy. Wind made things even more hazardous, as fans watched, soaked to the skin in kinship with the riders. “In the last few kilometers I was thinking only about not falling because it was a dangerous course,” Contador said. “At the end of the stage I got to the front of the peloton not to lose time, to avoid problems.”

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EUGENE — Former Mountain View girls soccer coach Robin Lee Gyorgyfalvy and Bulletin freelance writer Penny Nakamura, both Bend residents, were honored at the University of Oregon’s Matthew Knight Arena for their achievements in women’s athletics. Lee Gyorgyfalvy was awarded a varsity letter for playing collegiate women’s soccer for the Ducks in 1976, 1977 and 1978. Nakamura received a varsity letter for women’s swimming in 1981. Approximately 250 women were honored at the event, which sought to formally recognize women who competed at UO before 1982. From 1940 to 1981 women competed in multiple intercollegiate sports for the Ducks, but were not awarded letters. Buffs hire new football coach MADRAS — Former Madras High football assistant Rick Wells has been named the White Buffaloes’ head varsity coach. Wells, 37, who was an assistant at Madras High the past two seasons, takes over for Clyde Powell, who guided the Buffaloes’ varsity program the past two years. Madras went 2-6 last season and finished tied for fifth in the Tri-Valley Conference with a 1-4 mark. Osborne takes over Madras girls soccer MADRAS — Mike Osborne, the former Madras and Redmond high school girls basketball coach, has been selected as the new Madras High girls soccer coach for the upcoming season. Osborne, who guided the White Buffaloes to the 2003 Class 3A girls state basketball championship, replaces Debbie Taylor. Madras, which has not won a game since 2008, has compiled a record of 4-33-3 over the past three seasons. Rimrock volleyball places 10th at national tourney ATLANTA — The Rimrock Nationals, an 18-yearsold-and-younger volleyball club made up of players from Crook County, Sisters, Mountain View and Summit high schools, finished 10th at the United States Volleyball Association Junior National Championships last weekend. Rimrock went 3-3 in pool play before going 2-1 in the Silver bracket.

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D6 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

A D V EN T U R E S P O R T S

Hardcourt bike polo expands thanks to loyal legion of players

E C 

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

By Colin Fly The Associated Press

MILWAUKEE — Eric Kremin happened upon his first bike polo game rather harmlessly. He was walking along a street festival in Milwaukee when he saw several guys drinking beers and swinging mallets at a ball from their bikes. Three years later, the 22-yearold from Burlington was a world champion, winning a title in Berlin in 2010 that cemented him as one of the best hardcourt bike polo players in the rapidly growing sport. “It seemed like it was a fun party, a mix of underground culture and sports,” Kremin said. “I didn’t see it so much as a sport at the time, more like croquet is a sport. It was a social activity and it seemed like a cool group of people doing something interesting.” Indeed. The sport has traditional polo in its roots using street hockey balls and fashioned mallets, but between the bicycles, the tight spaces and the spectacular crashes, it’s got all the grit of hockey with the balance of a stunt rider. It’s little wonder that bike couriers, used to weaving in and out of traffic all day on busy city streets, take up the sport so quickly. “I thought they were nuts. I thought it was totally insane,” said Lisa Moffatt, who first heard about bike polo in Ottawa in the late ’90s and has been a player for more than four years in Vancouver, British Columbia. “People were crashing into each other. We have pride photos of how black and blue our bodies are from playing bike polo. Fortunately, we’ve matured a little bit and we’re better on our bikes so now it doesn’t happen as often.” It’s fairly straightforward. Three riders a side try to knock a street hockey ball into a goal using mallets. Players are constantly rotating back on defense and contact is discouraged unless it’s incidental — like pedal-to-pedal or malletto-mallet. If a player puts his or her foot on the ground, they must ride to a designated point and tap themselves back in. When the ball is loose, anything goes, and that’s when sprinting and wipeouts can occur. “It’s a combination between

Kiwa Continued from D1 The scenic designation would lead to more signage and notice for the trails, Howes explained. Last weekend I made the 15mile drive from Bend to Wanoga Sno-park to ride the Kiwa Butte and Dinah Moe Humm trails for the first time. The easiest way to find the Kiwa Butte trail is to ride the Tiddlywinks trail from Wanoga for about three miles to the connection with the Kiwa Butte trail. As of last weekend, little signage was available to mark the way, but the trail is located at the top of the climb. At the intersection, a sign points left to continue along Tiddlywinks. Turn right, and you’re on the Kiwa Butte trail.

Morry Gash / The Associated Press

Jacob Newborn takes a shot during a bike polo practice session Sunday in Milwaukee. hockey and smash derby with the cars, where people just run cars into one another because these guys are ruthless,” said bicycle designer Drew Triplett of Milwaukee Bicycle Co. “For the most part, they’re all for the ball and a lot of times they try to get around one another, but it doesn’t happen.” While Kremin jokes about his injuries — he recently suffered a cracked rib — it’s less about the crashes and more about the skills and organization the groups have gone through after pockets of players popped up in dozens of cities recently. Moffatt, who was a former elected regional representative of North American Hardcourt Bike Polo, said there are more than 280 cities worldwide that have some sort of organized games and that typical clubs need at least 20 members — meaning a minimum of 5,600 people are actively playing. The polo organizing body was founded last year in an effort to standardize the game — everything from rules and refereeing to court dimensions. Sheer numbers though don’t tell everything. In recent years, sponsors have jumped on board teams, bicycle companies have begun

making custom gear for players’ rides and bike polo-constructed courts are popping up in parks. “It’s amazing what they’ve done with it in the last year, how they’ve all gotten together and put this organization together and laying ground rules, laying out the tournaments, laying out the dates,” said Triplett, who designs specific polo gear for the teams out of Milwaukee that’s also sold online. “It used to be so haphazard and it’s really impressive what this group has done.” And it only seems to be getting bigger. Moffatt’s club in East Vancouver was vocal in its support of a $2 million renovation of a local park, which included a sportspecific court for bike polo. The $90,000 project that opened this year includes standard dimensions, asphalt, a concrete retaining wall and a fence. Moffatt said it’s the first arena built specifically for bike polo. “The city has invested quite heavily in us,” Moffatt said. Other cities — such as Lexington, Ky., Milwaukee and Washington, D.C. — have been granted space to play from their cities, ranging from worn down tennis or basketball courts to a large

enough area for three courts and lights that keep the pickup games going late into the evening. Moffatt said she’s had bike polo representatives from three other cities ask for the computer-aided drawings of the court Vancouver built to submit them for additional custom-constructed places to play. “It’s a huge problem for a lot of cities; a lot of people are getting chased out of where they play on a regular basis and they’re not even good courts,” Kremin said. “They’re like basketball courts with no boards or tennis courts that have really crappy fences, no nets.” Everyone believes that will soon be in the past. Moffatt said the national organization will continue to put on high-quality tournaments and Kremin believes more exposure will follow. “Hopefully, things will get bigger and bigger, the rules will be more concrete — which they’re starting to become more concrete — sanctioned courts in every city and not necessarily paid to play, but a little more support,” Kremin said. “I’d like a cash prize to pay for your plane ticket and to buy a nice dinner afterward, that sort of thing.”

The trail starts off with a few boulders to ride over and then cuts along the west side of the butte. Green alpine meadows line the trail to the east, while views of South Sister and Broken Top to the west can be found through gaps in the towering pine trees. While the naming of the Kiwa Butte trail is self-explanatory, the naming of the Dinah Moe Humm trail is not as obvious. The trail gets its namesake from a song by Frank Zappa, a popular rock musician in the 1960s and ’70s. Nordic skiing trails near Edison Sno-park are called AC/DC and Tesla, the names of two other rock groups. The naming of Dinah Moe Humm is in keeping with that theme, Howes explains. The Kiwa Butte trail connects to Dinah Moe Humm at Forest Service Road 4133, according

to Howes. I took a right onto the singletrack and began a gradual climb over a few technical rock sections. The trail eventually comes to a doubletrack road, where a left turn leads to “Bowl” Butte, so named by COTA because the top of the butte sinks into a bowl shape. Atop this butte are majestic views of Mount Bachelor and Kwohl Butte to the west, and even Diamond Peak to the far south. Coming down the butte I turned into fast, bermed corners and caught glimpses of Paulina Peak to the east. From this point, with Edison Sno-park still a couple miles away, I turned around and headed back for Wanoga, making for a ride of about 16 miles and three hours.

As more trails are built in the Wanoga complex, loop options will abound. For now, mountain bikers can still enjoy the fruits of COTA’s labor. Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com. Self Referrals Welcome

CYCLING

MULTISPORT

BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLING PROGRAMS: Includes options in youth development, junior teams, U23/collegiate teams, camps, races and shuttles; age 6 and older; mountain biking, road cycling and cyclocross; info@bendenduranceacdemy.org; www.bendenduranceacdemy.org. MBSEF CYCLING PROGRAM: Classes in both mountain and road biking are offered through August; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MOUNTAIN AND ROAD BIKE RIDES: Join Trinity Bikes in Redmond Mondays or Wednesdays for evening rides; road bike ride from shop on Mondays and mountain bike ride at Peterson Ridge in Sisters or Phil’s Trail complex in Bend on Wednesdays; all riding levels welcome; bring own bike or rent from the shop; Trinity Bikes; 541923-5650; www.trinitybikes.com. WEEKLY ROAD RIDE: Saturdays, noon; weekly group road rides starting from Nancy P’s Baking Co., 1054 Milwaukee Ave., in Bend; Glen Bates, glenbates@ bendcable.com, 541-382-4675. GRIT CLINICS: Women-specific mountain bike clinics for beginner and intermediate mountain bikers; designed to increase confidence on the trail by improving bikehandling skills; in Bend: July 30-31, Sept. 10-11; registration is open at Bend’s Pine Mountain Sports; $100 per two-day session; visit www.GritClinics.com, or e-mail info@GritClinics.com.

DESCHUTES DASH WEEKEND SPORTS FESTIVAL: Saturday and Sunday, July 16-17; Olympic triathlon and duathlon; sprint triathlon and duathlon; kids triathlon; kids splash-n-dash; 10K and 5K runs; $15-$105; www.deschutesdash.com. REDMOND AREA TRIATHLON: Saturday, Aug. 13; sprint triathlon with pool swim; duathlon, 5K run, 10K run and kids race; $20$60; www.roguemultisport. com/featureevents/ratrace.html. MULTISPORT PROGRAM IN SWIMMING, BIKING, RUNNING: The Bend Endurance Academy has designed a multisport program for youths ages 12-16; 11-week program teaches swimming, biking and running skills and offers full support at three local triathlon events; Tuesdays (swim), Wednesdays (bike) and Thursdays (run) through Aug. 13; practices will be held at Cascade Middle School or Juniper Swim & Fitness Center from 3 to 4:30 p.m.; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org or 541-848-3691.

DOWNHILL SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING MBSEF ALPINE SUMMER CAMPS: At Mount Hood; Aug. 1-5; for juniors ages 9-13, and juniors ages 13-19; 541388-0002; mbsef@mbsef. org; www.mbsef.org. MBSEF ALPINE SKIING SUMMER DRYLAND TRAINING: Now through August for ages 11-18; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MBSEF FREE-RIDE SKIING AND SNOWBOARD SUMMER DRYLAND TRAINING: Now through August for ages 11-18; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef. org; visit www.mbsef.org.

HIKING GUIDED HIKES: Geared for those age 50 and older; two to three hikes per week in four national forests and four state parks; through Oct. 31; $20 per person; contact Silver Striders guide service at 541-383-8077, strideon@silverstriders.com or www.silverstriders.com.

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NORDIC SKIING BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY SUMMER NORDIC TRAINING PROGRAM: For skiers ages 14-23; through Aug. 15; program runs Tuesdays through Saturdays; strength and agility, skate and classic roller skiing, late-season snow skiing, hiking and running; 541-678-3864; ben@bendenduranceacademy.org; www.bendenduranceacademy.org. MBSEF SUMMER DRYLAND TRAINING: Now through August for ages 11-18; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

PADDLING KAYAKING CLASSES: Sundays, 4-6 p.m.; for all ages; weekly classes and open pool; equipment provided to those who preregister, first come, first served otherwise; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $3; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org.

RUNNING CASCADE LAKES RELAY: Friday, Aug. 5-Saturday, Aug. 6; 216mile running relay from Diamond Lake Resort to Bend; also 132mile walking teams/high school challenge event; $300-$1,380; info@cascadelakesrelay.com; www.cascadelakesrelay.com. HAULIN’ ASPEN: Sunday, Aug. 7; 6:30 a.m.; marathon, half-marathon and 7-mile trail run; $25-$80; 541323-0088; www.haulinaspen.com.


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HELPING CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES THRIVE Inside

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FAMILY

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

INSIDE Dear Abby Secretly remarried mom still collects alimony from dad, Page E2

Family Calendar Listing of family-friendly events, Page E3

Tips, techniques for taking your kids camping for the first time

Eleven-monthold Josephine Johnson pushes a toy around as her parents, Kyle and Anna, unload supplies from their car during the family’s first camping trip July 1.

F A M I LY IN BRIEF Kayak camps available for kids Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe of Bend will host three camps for kids this summer. Students will practice kayaking on Elk Lake, then learn rolling techniques in a pool and then paddling on the Deschutes River. On the final day, students will paddle on the McKenzie River. Children must be ages 8-16. Each camp costs $225 and runs four days. Contact: 411@tumalocreek .com or 541-317-9407.

Local libraries host henna programs Teenagers are invited to take part in library programs focused on teaching the art of henna body art. These events are part of the Deschutes Public Library system’s summer reading program. Ruth Longstroth, a local henna artist, will lead the workshops and talk about the origin and cultural significance of henna. Teenagers will then be able to create their own designs. The workshop is open to 20 teenagers at each location. Teens can register at www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. The programs will take place: July 11: La Pine Public Library, 2 to 4 p.m. July 12: Sunriver Area Public Library, 2 to 4 p.m. July 13: Bend Public Library, 2 to 4 p.m. July 14: Sisters Public Library, 2 to 4 p.m. July 15: Redmond Public Library, 2 to 4 p.m. Contact: www.deschuteslibrary.org — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

B E ST B E T S FOR FAMILY FUN

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Anna and Kyle Johnson purchased a family-sized tent online before going camping for the first time with their daughter, Josephine. The couple liked to go backpacking before becoming parents.

By Alandra Johnson

Into the

wild

Coming next week

The Bulletin

“I

t was a risk-management nightmare,” said Kyle Johnson, of Bend, about taking his 11-month-old daughter, Josephine, camping for the first time last weekend at Sheep Ridge Campground. Johnson and his wife, Anna, kept close watch on their little girl as she got incredibly dirty crawling around, trying to eat bugs, putting rocks in her mouth and trying to put her hands in everything — from the campfire to red ants. “It was a lot of work,” Anna said. Kyle said the campout required constant vigilance. But they worked hard to find a way to enjoy the outdoors,

Guide to local family-friendly campgrounds

while also making sure Josephine didn’t “choke on a rock.” Ultimately, Kyle and Anna both said the effort and challenge were worth it. By the end of the trip, they had fun. Plus they want Josephine to grow up loving nature. The highlight of the camping trip for Kyle was relaxing on a hammock in the sun with his daughter and “being absolutely still” for a few moments. Anna loved the chance for her family to get away from all of the distractions of life. See Camping / E6

Details, Page E3

Animated Film Festival Looking to get out of the heat? Check out this family-friendly event at McMenamins Old St. Francis School running today through Sunday.

Bend Summer Festival This annual street fair has plenty for families to enjoy, from street performers to live music to kids’ activities. The event, which takes place today, Saturday and Sunday in downtown Bend, is free.

Munch & Music Cruise down to Bend’s Drake Park and check out bluesman Curtis Salgado. The free concert Thursday includes a large children’s area.

Giving it her all

Tune up for summer: Easy, affordable ways Mountain View grad confident in speech, life to help kids embrace music around them

Editor’s Note: Standout Students, which runs every other week in The Bulletin, highlights outstanding teenagers in Central Oregon. To suggest a student for consideration, e-mail Megan Kehoe at mkehoe@ bendbulletin.com.

By Barbara Mahany Chicago Tribune

By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

Most high schoolers catch senioritis during their last few weeks of school. But not Kimberly Shanahan, 18. During her last few weeks at Mountain View High School, Kimberly worked just as hard — maybe even harder — as she prepared to go to the National Forensics League Competition in mid-June. “It’s really unusual to see that in someone her age,” said Michele Clements, who was Kimberly’s speech and debate teach for two years. “We were incredibly impressed with her dedication.” Kimberly is a stellar speech writer and deliverer, 4-H enthusiast and a

STANDOUT STUDENTS

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Recent Mountain View High School graduate Kimberly Shanahan, 18, poses for a portrait at the Bend Public Library last week. Kimberly has won awards in speech and debate and plans to study either English or speech pathology at the University of Oregon. lifelong Girl Scout. Kimberly maintained a 3.7 GPA while balancing a rigorous course load of AP classes. In June, Kimberly was the only student from Mountain View to go to the National Forensics League finals

held in Dallas. Competing against 350 students from around the country in the oratory category, Kimberly spoke on the way time is perceived in the United States. See Kimberly / E3

Listen to the pit-a-pat of rain. Tap out a tune on some pots. Blow through a dandelion trumpet. Music, if you keep your ears attuned, is all around. And, according to music-makers who have spent their lives immersed in joyful noise (and even not-so-joyful but deeply soulful sound), parents strapped for funds or time needn’t sign up their children for a single piano lesson, or write one check to the voice teacher across town. “You start by discovering sound. Rub your wet finger around the rim of a glass, and pretty soon everybody at the table starts doing it. You’ve got music right there,” said Ann Sayre Wiseman, co-author of “Making Music” (Storey Publishing, $9.95), who calls herself a “creative inventor.” It doesn’t cost a cent, Wiseman says, to fill your life with music: Sing folk songs around a campfire. Poke holes in a bamboo pole and make it into a musical pipe. Summer is a fine season for mapping out musical journeys — without leaving home, says Homa Sabet Tavangar, author of “Growing Up Global: Raising Children to be at Home in the World” (Ballantine Books, $16). See Music / E3


T EL EV ISION

E2 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Secretly remarried mom still collecting alimony Dear Abby: My parents divorced 20 years ago. The court approved a mutual agreement that Dad would pay monthly alimony until Mom remarried or one of them died. He has never missed a payment. I have recently discovered that Mom secretly married her live-in boyfriend 11 years ago, but has continued receiving the alimony without telling my father. Is she committing a crime for which she could be arrested? And is her husband guilty of any wrongdoing? I am extremely upset over this and want to do something to correct this injustice. It isn’t fair. What can I do? — Furious in the Pacific Northwest Dear Furious: Marriage certificates are public records, so get a copy of your mother’s and mail it to your father. He needs to stop paying the alimony, and he can sue her in family court for any money she wasn’t entitled to. His next move should be to consult an attorney and decide how he wants to handle this. Dear Abby: I apparently have a problem communicating with people. I have had conversations with colleagues, managers, friends — even my girlfriend — and have been told my words were too harsh and made them feel defeated. It’s at the point where people are afraid before I even open my mouth. I don’t mean to be cruel. I just speak the truth as it comes to me and I don’t sugarcoat things. Some folks appreciate my candor, but it’s getting in the way of having decent relationships. How do I learn to communicate differently when I’m just being myself? The words flow naturally out of my mouth. Am I a jerk? — Unvarnished in Inglewood, Calif. Dear Unvarnished: You may be grossly insensitive — or you may have a disorder of some kind. Because you are having difficulty relating to others and it has become a handicap, you

DEAR ABBY should discuss the problem with a psychologist who can help you to gain the tools for better communication. Dear Abby: My wife has a friend who rides to work with her several times a week. My wife is helping “Libby” through a difficult financial time by taking her. The problem is, Libby wears very strong perfume and appears to bathe in it rather than use it sparingly. The passenger seat belt and shoulder harness in my wife’s car have become saturated with this smell. I have reached the point that I don’t want to ride in her car. My wife complains about it as well. Would it be rude for my wife to ask Libby to cut back or eliminate the use of the perfume? I say we have that right, but my wife is afraid it wouldn’t be polite. — Holding My Nose in Florida Dear Holding Your Nose: Many people are allergic to perfumes, and others develop a sensitivity after frequent exposure. It would not be rude for her to tell Libby that the lingering scent of her perfume has made you uncomfortable — and that she should refrain from wearing it during the commute. (She can apply it at work and ride home with someone else.) P.S. The car may have to be professionally cleaned and detailed to get rid of (most) of the smell. You have my sympathy. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Enthusiasm for the 8th season of ‘Curb’ By Verne Gay

‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’

Newsday

Reason to watch: None needed for fans, but the eighth season finally begins. What it’s about: Larry’s (Larry David) attempt in its past season to get estranged wife Cheryl (Cheryl Hines) back into his arms through an elaborate scheme tied to a “Seinfeld” reunion has apparently failed. The new season begins with the episode (not sent to critics) ominously titled “The Divorce” — no, that doesn’t sound good, does it? — and later in the season, Larry ultimately drifts back to New York City. Reason? He’s trying to avoid attending a charity event organized by the TV director Tessler (Michael McKean). In New York, Larry meets ... Ricky Gervais, Michael J. Fox and others. My say: Yup, what I’ve seen of the eighth season is brilliant, hilarious, and even unexpectedly inspirational — for after eight seasons, how can anything still be brilliant and possibly as funny as any season that came before? “Curb” seems to be redefining or at least challenging the established law of TV gravity, stated as that which goes up must come down, to become an insufferable threadbare parody of itself. The gestation for the eighth did take 20 months (the last original aired Nov. 22, 2009), but in Larry David time — he’s a notorious perfectionist — that’s like 20 weeks for everyone else. In fact, David and HBO have obviously thought long and hard about first impressions, which is probably

When: 10 p.m. Sunday Where: HBO

The Associated Press ile photo

Larry David and “Curb Your Enthusiasm” return for an eighth season. why only three episodes were shipped out for review — none in sequence, and not even the season premiere. Instead, there’s “The Palestinian Chicken” (July 24), “The Vow of Silence” (Aug. 7); and “Mister Softee” (Sept. 4). The first will

become a series’ classic — deeply offensive to Jews and Arabs alike and one of the funniest 30 minutes of “Curb” ever put to film, while introducing the world to something called a “social assassin.” (That’s Larry, of course.) It’s about a Palestinian restaurant that makes the best chicken in town, and which is deeply offensive to Larry’s yarmulke-wearing pal Marty Funkhouser (Bob Einstein), who, since last we saw him, has “rededicated” himself to Judaism. But it’s not offensive to Larry, and for reasons other than great chicken. “The Vow” introduces yet another classic Davidism — the “pig parker,” or someone whose car takes up two spaces; and the third, “Mister Softee,” uses a

childhood trauma to restore the honor of Red Sox first baseman Bill Buckner, who let Mookie Wilson’s squib get through his legs in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series. What especially stands out in these three is the inspired use of cameos — comics who need no introduction to other comics but are semi-anonymous craftsmen otherwise. This season the list includes Maggie Wheeler (“Archer”), who plays the “verbaltexting” wife with a partiality to the term “LOL”; “SNL’s” Robert Smigel, who plays Yari, a psychopathic George Steinbrenner wannabe in “Softee,” and Larry Miller, who plays David’s twotiming golf partner in “Chicken.” The “pig parker”? That’s Brett Gelman, from Adult Swim’s “Eagleheart.” Add these to the series’ regulars — like Jeff Garlin, Susie Essman and Einstein — and you’ve got the best comic cast on TV, by far. Bottom line: As twisted, and twistedly funny, as ever.

The Children’s Vision Foundation is now accepting new and gently used items for their annual

Friday, July 22, 23, 24, 29, 30 10:00 am - 3:00 pm at the Bend Factory Stores (61334 S Hwy 97)

ITEMS WANTED: Furniture/decor • Household/kitchen items Sports equipment/tools • Jewelry/collectibles Plants/garden items • Office items Your donations will go directly towards supporting Central Oregon’s Children Vision Screenings. Your donations are tax deductible.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL

541-330-3907 The Children’s Vision Foundation will be doing free vision screenings for children aged 5 and up during the event. The screening includes near and distance acuity, fusion, tracking, depth and near point of connvergence.

Mission Statement

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444

The mission of the Children’s Vision Foundation is to promote public awareness of learning difficulties related to vision problems in children. This is accomplished through community vision screenings, public education, and support for the treatment of these conditions.

541-388-4418

1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

FRIDAY PRIME TIME 7/8/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Hubert Keller News Nightly News King of Queens King of Queens Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Primal Grill Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News KEZI 9 News ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ As Time Goes By My Family ‘PG’ News News That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Steves Europe Music Voyager Wonders-West Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ Masterpiece Mystery! ’ ‘PG’ Å (DVS) Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Garden Home This Old House PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å

8:00

8:30

Shark Tank ’ ‘PG’ Å Friday Night Lights (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Flashpoint Personal Effects (N) ‘PG’ Shark Tank ’ ‘PG’ Å Bones The Daredevil in the Mold ‘14’ News on PDX-TV Ebert at Movie Friday Night Lights (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Smallville Lionel abducts Tess. ‘14’ Hometime ‘G’ organic-michele Washington W’k BBC Newsnight

9:00

9:30

10:00

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Primetime: What Would You Do? ’ 20/20 ’ ‘PG’ Å KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline Dateline NBC Investigating a college student’s death. (N) ’ Å News Jay Leno CSI: NY Vigilante ’ ‘14’ Å Blue Bloods To Tell the Truth ‘14’ News Letterman Primetime: What Would You Do? ’ 20/20 ’ ‘PG’ Å KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline House Recession Proof ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Monk Mr. Monk Makes a Friend ‘PG’ Monk ’ ‘PG’ Å King of Queens King of Queens BBC World News Tavis Smiley ’ Charlie Rose (N) ’ Å PBS NewsHour ’ Å Dateline NBC Investigating a college student’s death. (N) ’ Å News Jay Leno Supernatural ’ ‘14’ Å House of Payne Meet the Browns Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Sewing Room One Stroke Paint Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Primal Grill Lark Rise to Candleford ’ Å Masterpiece Classic Cranford Matty confides in Mary. ‘PG’ Å (DVS)

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds North Mammon ‘PG’ Criminal Minds Normal ’ ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Demonology ’ ‘14’ Criminal Minds Omnivore ‘14’ Å The Glades Old Ghosts ‘PG’ Å 130 28 18 32 Criminal Minds P911 ’ ‘14’ Å ›› “The Matrix Revolutions” (2003) Keanu ››› “The Matrix” (1999, Science Fiction) Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss. A computer hacker learns his ››› “The Matrix Reloaded” (2003, Science Fiction) Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss. Freedom fighters 102 40 39 world is a computer simulation. Å revolt against machines. Å Reeves. Å Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ Å Swamp Wars Cannibal Gator ‘PG’ Swamp Wars Gator vs. Python ‘PG’ Whale Wars Tracking the Enemy ‘14’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ Whale Wars Tracking the Enemy ‘14’ 68 50 26 38 The Most Extreme ’ ‘G’ Å Housewives/OC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Platinum Hit We Are Risk Takers ‘14’ ››› “Troy” (2004, Adventure) Brad Pitt, Eric Bana. Premiere. Achilles leads Greek forces in the Trojan War. 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Country Fried Country Fried The Singing Bee ’ ‘PG’ Å The Singing Bee ’ ‘PG’ Å The Singing Bee ’ ‘PG’ Country Fried Country Fried 190 32 42 53 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Crackberry’d: The Truth About Infor. Crime Inc. Prescription Drugs Mad Money 60 Minutes on CNBC Crime Inc. Prescription Drugs Best Bra Ever! Trade FX 51 36 40 52 60 Minutes on CNBC Piers Morgan Tonight (N) CNN Presents The future of NASA. Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Å Anderson Cooper 360 Å 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Colbert Report (7:54) Tosh.0 ‘14’ (8:25) Tosh.0 ‘14’ (8:56) Ben Bailey: Road Rage ‘MA’ Comedy Central Comedy Central Comedy Central Chappelle Show 135 53 135 47 (4:52) South Park (5:22) Tosh.0 ‘14’ (5:52) Scrubs ‘14’ (6:22) Scrubs ‘14’ Daily Show Journal Joy of Fishing PM Edition Visions of NW The Buzz Epic Conditions Outside Film Festival Word Travels ’ Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 (3:30) Tonight From Washington Wizards-Place So Random! ‘G’ Good-Charlie A.N.T. Farm My Babysitter Wizards-Place A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ (9:05) Fish Hooks Phineas and Ferb My Babysitter So Random! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Shake It Up! ‘G’ Sons of Guns ’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ‘PG’ Dual Survival Shipwrecked ’ ‘14’ Dual Survival Road to Nowhere ‘PG’ Swamp Loggers Land Dispute ‘PG’ Swamp Loggers Hell of a Week ‘PG’ Swamp Loggers Land Dispute ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Sons of Guns ’ SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:30) NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series: Feed the Children 300 (N) (Live) Boxing Friday Night Fights (N) (Live) Å MMA Live (N) SportsNation Å SportsNation Å NASCAR Racing 22 24 21 24 Golf Homecoming With Rick Reilly Å The Lost Son of Havana Å The Lost Son of Havana Å The Teammates Å 23 25 123 25 Boxing From Jan. 29, 2010. (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 ››› “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets” (2002) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint. A malevolent force threatens the students at Hogwarts. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 (3:30) ››› “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” (2001), Rupert Grint Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Best Dishes Iron Chef America Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Outrageous Food Best Thing Ate Unwrapped Unwrapped 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa (4:00) ›› “Step Brothers” (2008) Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Men of Honor” (2000, Drama) Robert De Niro, Cuba Gooding Jr., Charlize Theron. ››› “Men of Honor” (2000, Drama) Robert De Niro. 131 My First Place My First Place Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Hollywood at Home ‘G’ Å Modern Marvels ‘G’ Å Modern Marvels Bombs ‘G’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Restoration Restoration How the States Got Their Shapes 155 42 41 36 (4:00) Holy Grail in America ‘PG’ Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Drop Dead Diva Hit and Run ‘PG’ 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup Boston Lockup Boston One of the largest jail systems in the world. Lockup: Raw Killer Next Door Lockup Boston 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Teen Mom Taking It Slow ‘PG’ Å True Life Caring for newborn twins. True Life ’ › “How High” (2001, Comedy) Method Man, Redman. Premiere. ’ 192 22 38 57 That ’70s Show Bucket, Skinner Bucket, Skinner SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å Big Time Rush Victorious ’ ‘G’ My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids That ’70s Show That ’70s Show George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ 82 46 24 40 Bucket, Skinner Mariners Access Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show (N) MLB Baseball 20 45 28* 26 Action Sports World Championships Gangland Street Law ’ ‘14’ Å › “Punisher: War Zone” (2008, Action) Ray Stevenson, Dominic West, Doug Hutchison. ’ ›› “The Punisher” (2004, Action) Thomas Jane, John Travolta, Will Patton. ’ 132 31 34 46 Gangland Snitch Slaughter ’ ‘14’ ››› “Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country” (1991) William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ Å Haunted Collector Hollywd-Trsr Hollywd-Trsr 133 35 133 45 Star Trek IV Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey Grant Jeffrey Best of Praise Praise the Lord Å Inc’sing Faith Life Focus Kim Clement Changing-World Journey of Light 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ ›› “Last Holiday” (2006) Queen Latifah. A terminally ill woman lives it up on vacation. (11:25) Selena 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond (8:45) ›› “Texans Never Cry” (1951) Gene Autry. A ranger ›› “Wagon Team” (1952) Gene Autry, Pat (11:15) ›› “The Super Cops” (1974) Ron ›› “The Old Corral” (1937) Gene Autry, ›› “Home on the Prairie” (1939, Western) (7:15) ›› “Back in the Saddle” (1941) Gene Autry. A copper 101 44 101 29 Smiley Burnett. Premiere. Gene Autry. Premiere. rush threatens a young cowpoke’s ranch. uncovers a ring of Mexican lottery counterfeiters. Buttram. Premiere. Leibman. Premiere. Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes Dress Say Yes Dress Say Yes: ATL Say Yes Dress Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL 178 34 32 34 Say Yes: ATL Law & Order Deep Vote ’ ‘14’ Law & Order Amends ’ ‘14’ ›› “The Da Vinci Code” (2006) Tom Hanks. A religious mystery could rock foundations of Christianity. Å Memphis Beat Flesh and Blood ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Dissonance ’ ‘14’ MAD ‘PG’ Would Happen Young Justice Generator Rex Ben 10 Ult. Adventure Time Adventure Time Adventure Time King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Paranormal Challenge ‘PG’ Å Paranormal Challenge (N) ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot in Cleveland Happily Divorced 65 47 29 35 Good Times “Hot” underwear. ‘PG’ NCIS Angel of Death ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Bury Your Dead ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Identity Crisis ’ ‘PG’ Å Law & Order: Special Victims Unit CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ Royal Pains ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 NCIS A murder victim in a taxi. ‘PG’ Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ Single Ladies ’ ‘PG’ Behind the Music Ice Cube. ’ ‘14’ ››› “The Brothers” (2001) Morris Chestnut, D.L. Hughley. ’ 191 48 37 54 Basketball Wives Jen is curious. ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:30) ›› “Sex Drive” 2008 Josh Zuckerman. ‘R’ Å (6:20) ›› “Easy Money” 1983 Rodney Dangerfield. ›› “White Chicks” 2004, Comedy Shawn Wayans. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (9:50) ››› “Friday” 1995 Ice Cube. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› The Thing After Film School ›› “Kentucky Woman” 1983, Drama Cheryl Ladd, Philip Levien. Å ››› “Courage Under Fire” 1996, Drama Denzel Washington. ‘R’ Å ›› The Chase ››› “Courage Under Fire” 1996, Drama Denzel Washington. ‘R’ Å Bubba’s World Bubba’s World Shark Fights 2011 Shark Fights 2011 The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Ellismania ‘14’ Shark Fights 2011 The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ PGA Tour Golf Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf John Deere Classic, Second Round From TPC at Deer Run in Silvis, Ill. Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf Champions: Nature Valley First Tee Open, First Round The Waltons The Legend ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ (4:00) Sex Crimes ›› “Charlie St. Cloud” 2010, Drama Zac Efron. A tragedy shat- Wall Street: Money ››› “Inception” 2010, Science Fiction Leonardo DiCaprio, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Ellen Page. A thief enters Real Time With Bill Maher Author Ann Real Time With Bill Maher Author Ann HBO 425 501 425 10 Unit ‘MA’ Å ters the dreams of a college-bound youth. Å Never people’s dreams and steals their secrets. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Coulter. (N) ’ ‘MA’ Å Coulter. ’ ‘MA’ Å (4:45) ››› “House Party” 1990, Musical Comedy Kid ’N Play. ‘R’ Å Commercial Commercial Young Broke ››› “The Descent” 2005, Horror Shauna Macdonald. ‘R’ Å Commercial Young Broke House Party 1990 IFC 105 105 (5:15) ››› “Coming to America” 1988, Comedy Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Hall. An Afri- (7:15) ››› “Identity” 2003 John Cusack. A killer terrorizes (8:45) ››› “The Blind Side” 2009, Drama Sandra Bullock, Tim McGraw, Quinton Aaron. A well-to-do white Femme Fatales (N) Life on Top ’ MAX 400 508 7 can prince and his royal sidekick come to Queens. ’ ‘R’ Å ’ ‘MA’ Å people stranded at a remote hotel. ’ ‘R’ Å couple adopts a homeless black teen. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ‘MA’ Å Monster Fish of the Amazon ‘PG’ Monster Fish Flying Carp ‘PG’ Monster Fish (N) ‘PG’ Monster Fish of the Amazon ‘PG’ Monster Fish Flying Carp ‘PG’ Monster Fish ‘PG’ Dog Whisperer Dogs not walked. ‘G’ NGC 157 157 OddParents OddParents Danny Phantom Reign Storm ’ ‘Y7’ Danny Phantom Phantom Planet ‘Y7’ Danny Phantom Danny Phantom OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ NTOON 89 115 189 Bassmasters From Lakeport, Calif. Spanish Fly Bill Dance Salt. Wanna Fish Match Fish. Speargun Hunter Western Extreme Hunting, Country Bone Collector Profess. Gold Tips 4CE Game Chasers Ducks Unlimited OUTD 37 307 43 › “Push” 2009, Suspense Chris Evans, Dakota Fanning, Camilla Belle. iTV. Rogue ›› “Housebroken” 2009 Danny DeVito. iTV. A man tries to get M1 Challenge XXVI (iTV) (N) ‘14’ Å (4:00) ›› “Letters (5:45) › “The Back-up Plan” 2010 Jennifer Lopez. iTV. A single woman becomes SHO 500 500 to Juliet” pregnant, then meets her ideal man. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å psychics battle a covert government agency. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å his two grown sons to move out. ’ ‘R’ Å Car Science ‘14’ Car Science ‘14’ Car Science ‘14’ Car Science ‘14’ Car Science ‘14’ NASCAR Perfor. Trackside At... (N) NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Quaker State 400, Qualifying Formula 1 Debrief (N) SPEED 35 303 125 (5:15) ››› “Gangs of New York” 2002, Historical Drama Leonardo DiCaprio, Daniel Day-Lewis. ’ ‘R’ Å Starz Studios (8:19) ››› “Salt” 2010 Angelina Jolie. ‘PG-13’ Å Torchwood: Miracle Day (N) ’ ‘14’ Torchwood: Miracle Day ‘14’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:30) ›››› “On Golden Pond” 1981, Comedy-Drama Katha- (6:20) “Far Cry” 2008, Action Til Schweiger. Two reporters “Triage” 2009, Drama Colin Farrell, Christopher Lee, Paz Vega. Premiere. A photogra- › “The Janky Promoters” 2009 Ice Cube. Shady concert promot- “Love Chronicles: TMC 525 525 rine Hepburn, Henry Fonda. ‘PG’ Å investigate the deaths of mercenaries. ’ ‘R’ Å pher’s girlfriend investigates his partner. ’ ‘R’ Å ers get in over their heads. ’ ‘R’ Å Secrets” 2011 Tour de France Stage 7 From Le Mans to Châteauroux. World of Adventure Sports (N) ‘PG’ 2011 Tour de France Stage 7 From Le Mans to Châteauroux. VS. 27 58 30 Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer See No Evil ‘PG’ ›› “Fools Rush In” 1997 ‘PG-13’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 8, 2011 E3

FAMILY CALENDAR

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon

P’ G   M 

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Full events calendar and movie times are in today’s GO! Magazine. FRIDAY KIDS FUN DAY: With hay and pony rides, a petting zoo, children’s play area and more; $10, free ages 3 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; DD Ranch, 3836 N.E. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne; 541-548-1432 or duggan@ddranch.net. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. ANIMATED FILM FESTIVAL: Featuring screenings of films, from cell animation to CGI; see website for schedule; $3 or $1 kids per film; $10 event pass; 3 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. REDMOND FRIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-5156 or redmondfridaymarket@gmail.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-7 p.m.; North Ash Street and West Main Avenue; www. sistersfarmersmarket.com. BEND SUMMER FESTIVAL CONCERTS: Featuring performances by Toad the Wet Sprocket and Night Ranger; with food and drink vendors; free; 5-11 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541389-0995 or www.c3events.com.

SATURDAY SUNRISE SUMMER CLASSIC: 5K, 10K and half-marathon races, with a kids rock race; registration required; proceeds benefit the Redmond Parks Foundation, I Run for Eva Trust Fund and FISH Food Pantry; $25-$40; 7 a.m.; Smith Rock State Park, 9241 N.E. Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne; 541-548-7501 or www.smithrockrace.com. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, 19879 Eighth St., Bend; 541-728-0088. SISTERS OUTDOOR QUILT SHOW: The 36th annual show features a display of more than 1,300 quilts; free; 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-0989 or www. sistersoutdoorquiltshow.org. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxfarmersmarket.com. SAGEBRUSH COMMUNITY CHALLENGE: A scavenger-hunt race, with points and prizes; costumes encouraged; registration required; proceeds benefit regional nonprofits; $20, $10 ages 5-13, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.; corner of Wall Street and Franklin Avenue, Bend; aimee@sagebrush.org or http:// sagebrush.org/communitychallenge. BEND SUMMER FESTIVAL: Featuring artists, street performers, performing arts, children’s activities, live music and more; free; 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995, inquiry@ c3events.com or www.c3events.com.

Kimberly Continued from E1 “It was a ‘stop-and-smell-theroses’ kind of message about how people should slow down instead of living at such a fast pace,” Kimberly said. Even though Kimberly was among the 80 percent of students cut during the first round, she said she was proud of her speech and of making it so far to the tournament. “I kind of didn’t want to go into the room, I was so nervous,” Kimberly said. “It was definitely scary.” Kimberly loved being a part of her high school’s speech and debate team. She said one of the best things about it was the diversity of the students involved, coming from different backgrounds and with different interests. Yet they were all able to get along and find common ground. “We joke that we’re a family,” Kimberly said. “It’s a great bonding opportunity for a lot of kids.” Among other acts of leadership, Clements said, Kimberly consistently supported her teammates. She helped them with

Story times, library youth events for July 8-14 BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS; 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242: • ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday. BETWEEN THE COVERS: 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766: • STORY TIME: 2 p.m. Thursday. DOWNTOWN BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7097: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Monday and Wednesday. • TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 11 a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Friday, 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. • ADVENTURE CORPS: Ages 6-11; 1:30 p.m. Thursday. CROOK COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. • WEE READ: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Monday and Wednesday. • SUMMER PROGRAM: All ages; 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Wednesday. • SUMMER PROGRAM YOUTH: Ages 7-12; 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Tuesday. • SUMMER PROGRAM TEENS: Grades 7-12; 6 to 7 p.m. Thursday. EAST BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 62080 Dean Swift Road, Bend; 541-330-3760 • FAMILY FUN: Ages 0-5; 9:30 a.m. Wednesday. • SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 3-5; 10 a.m. Saturday. • ADVENTURE CORPS: Ages 6-11; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. • PAJAMA PARTY: Ages 3-5; 6:45 p.m. Thursday. • GAME DAY: Grades 6-12; 2 to 4 p.m. Friday. JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.

ANIMATED FILM FESTIVAL: Featuring screenings of films, from cell animation to CGI; see website for schedule; $3 or $1 kids per film; $10 event pass; noon; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. BOARD GAME NIGHT: Play available board games or bring your own; free; 6 p.m.-midnight; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-318-8459 or mgage@bendbroadband.com. ALISON KRAUSS & UNION STATION: The Grammy-winning country act performs, with Jerry Douglas and Good Old War; $39, $62 reserved, plus fees; 6:30 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www.bendconcerts.com.

SUNDAY SAVE IT FOR SUNDAY: Featuring quilts from the Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show throughout the campus, and a lecture by Jean Wells; free, see website for lecture costs; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; FivePine Lodge & Conference Center, 1021 Desperado Trail, Sisters; 541-549-0989 or www. sistersoutdoorquiltshow.org. BEND SUMMER FESTIVAL: Featuring artists, street performers, performing arts, children’s activities, live music and more; free; 11 a.m.6 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541389-0995, inquiry@c3events. com or www.c3events.com. ANIMATED FILM FESTIVAL: Featuring screenings of films, from cell animation to CGI; see website for schedule; $3 or $1 kids per film; $10 event pass; noon; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

Kimberly Shanahan, 18 School: 2011 graduate of Mountain View High School, Bend Movies: “The Sound of Music” TV: “The Office” Books: “The Catcher in the Rye,” “East of Eden,” “The Glass Castle” Football teams: San Diego Chargers, University of Oregon Ducks

speeches, attended their competitions and inspired them with her spirit and enthusiasm, Clements said. “Kim has been such an incredible role model,” Clements said. “She’s a huge part of the reason why the team was so successful this year.” And it’s that enthusiasm that has driven Kimberly to continue being involved in the Girl Scouts. Initially joining as a kindergartner, Kimberly has been with the same troop for the span of her school career. As part of the program, she has participated in numerous community service projects during her high school years, including helping a local

• SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. • TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. • MADRAS SUMMER PROGRAM: All ages; 2 p.m. Tuesday. • WARM SPRINGS SUMMER PROGRAM: All ages; 2 p.m. Wednesday. • CULVER SUMMER PROGRAM: All ages; 2 p.m. Thursday.

The Family Movie Guide should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Only films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment value or educational value for older children with parental guidance. Compiled by St. Petersburg Times film critic Steve Persall.

Meg (Leighton Meester, left), Grace (Selena Gomez) and Emma (Katie Cassidy) take a summer trip to Paris that turns into a fantasy come true in “Monte Carlo.”

LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY; 16425 First St.; 541-312-1090: • FAMILY STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. • ADVENTURE CORPS: Ages 6-11; 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1054: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Thursday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. • TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18 to 36 months; 10:15 a.m. Thursday. • ADVENTURE CORPS: Ages 6-11; 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY; 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070: • FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. • ADVENTURE CORPS: Ages 6-11; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • GAME DAY: Grades 6-12; 2 to 4 p.m. Tuesday. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY; 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080: • FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • ADVENTURE CORPS: Ages 6-11; 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. • PAJAMA PARTY: Ages 3-5; 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. * Story times are free unless otherwise noted.

MONDAY SUMMER SHOWDOWN COW HORSE SHOW: Show includes top riders in a variety of classes; food and beverage available; free; 8 a.m.; Brasada Ranch, 16986 S.W. Brasada Ranch Road, Powell Butte; 425226-6376 or www.nwrcha.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jean Nave reads from her children’s book “Harry and Lola with Smoki the Magical Cat”; free; 11 a.m.; Rec Barn, 12940 Hawks Beard, Black Butte Ranch, Sisters; 541-549-8755, navebbr@ aol.com or www.harryandlol.org.

TUESDAY SUMMER SHOWDOWN COW HORSE SHOW: Show includes top riders in a variety of classes; food and beverage available; free; 8 a.m.; Brasada Ranch, 16986 S.W. Brasada Ranch Road, Powell Butte; 425226-6376 or www.nwrcha.com. REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or www. localharvest.org/redmondfarmers-market-M31522. TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637 or info@sustainableflame.com. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Cowlitz; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541312-9259 or www.bendelks.com.

WEDNESDAY SUMMER SHOWDOWN COW HORSE SHOW: Show includes top riders in a variety of classes; food and beverage available; free; 8 a.m.; Brasada Ranch, 16986 S.W. Brasada Ranch

girls’ home for troubled youth. Kimberly, along with the other girls in her troop, helped mend fences, plant herb gardens and fix up the girls’ home. Kimberly has also been deeply involved in 4-H since fourth grade. Showing rabbits and dogs, she has won numerous awards, including the prestigious reserve champion award for her show rabbits. At one time, her flock of rabbits was almost 100 strong. But she eventually sold most of them to a younger 4-H member. This summer, Kimberly is competing in 4-H’s photography category, venturing into a new, nonanimal competition. Kimberly is the daughter of Meg and Kirk Shanahan. Her mom works in the Bend-La Pine Schools district office, and her dad is a cabinetmaker. She has two older sisters who live in Portland and Florida. She says having a close-knit family has had a huge impact on her ability to do well in school. “My family has supported me so much throughout the years,” said Kimberly. “I couldn’t have done anything without such a strong family unit.” In the fall, Kimberly plans to

Road, Powell Butte; 425-2266376 or www.nwrcha.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or www. bendfarmersmarket.com. MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring country music by the Brian Hanson Band; food vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or redmondsummerconcerts.com. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a jazz and blues performance by Cool Conspiracy; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-4471209 or recreation@ccprd.org. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Cowlitz; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541312-9259 or www.bendelks.com.

THURSDAY SUMMER SHOWDOWN COW HORSE SHOW: Show includes top riders in a variety of classes; food and beverage available; free; 8 a.m.; Brasada Ranch, 16986 S.W. Brasada Ranch Road, Powell Butte; 425-2266376 or www.nwrcha.com. MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by bluesman Curtis Salgado, food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.munchandmusic.com. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Cowlitz; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541312-9259 or www.bendelks.com.

attend the University of Oregon and study either English or speech pathology. She says she’s a little nervous about leaving home, but can’t wait to start working toward a degree. “I really like learning,” Kimberly said. “It’s personally gratifying to know things, and to be aware of everything that’s around you.” After college, she hopes to enter a career in speech pathology. “It’s hard going through life if you’re not confident in your speaking ability,” Kimberly said. “I really want to help people and make a positive impact.” As Kimberly prepares to embark on a new chapter of her life, Clements says her dedication and spirit will take her far. “She always kept her eyes on the goal,” Clements said. “She never let anything stop her from working and progressing.” Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

Courtesy Larry Horricks

By Roger Moore The Orlando Sentinel

‘Monte Carlo’ Rating: PG for brief mild language. What it’s about: A workingclass girl on vacation in Europe is mistaken for an heiress and lives it up, just a bit, while impersonating her. The kid attractor factor: Disney Channel’s Selena Gomez has her first real shot at film stardom. Good lessons/bad lessons: One person’s “seize the moment” is another’s “it’s stealing.” Violence: None Language: Very mild profanity. Sex: Not really Drugs: Everybody is of legal age to have a drink — in France. Parents’ advisory: Gomez’s pre-teen fans won’t get as much from this as those older teens in touch with the fantasy and dress-up moments. OK for 12 and older.

‘Zookeeper’ Rating: PG for some rude and suggestive humor, and language What it’s about: The animals in the care of a lonely zookeeper start talking to him, giving him romantic advice. The kid attractor factor: Talking critters and lots of them

Music Continued from E1 She begins simply enough: Each time you hop in the car, crank out a new sort of music. “If you always have the radio tuned to top 40,” she said, “you’re really limiting” the wee ears in the back seat. From what’s on your iPod to the live concerts you find nearby, make it clear that you love a broad range of music. “Children’s ears become accustomed to different sounds.” Putumayo World Music (putumayo.com) is one of Tavangar’s favorite sources for a global playlist. Keep an eye out for free concerts at museums and parks, or “like” cultural institutions on Facebook, she says, to get updates in your news feed. “And don’t make it a burden,” said Tavangar. “This isn’t homework. Do it because you love it.” One of Tavangar’s favorite ideas is to plot yourself a string of virtual globe-trotting trips. She

Good lessons/bad lessons: “Finding a perfect mate is the most important thing in the world.” Violence: Slapstick and the suggestion of animal cruelty. Language: A few instances of profanity Sex: Broad animal mating jokes, a wolf teaching a man to “mark your territory” Drugs: Alcohol is consumed. Parents’ advisory: It’s a broad low farce with talking animals that sound like Sly Stallone, Cher and Adam Sandler. OK for all ages.

‘Cars 2’ Rating: G — for gearhead What it’s about: That race car and his four-wheeled pals get mixed up in international intrigue when he signs on to a grand prix circuit. The kid attractor factor: They own the toys, they remember the first movie. Good lessons/bad lessons: “Whoever finds a friend finds a treasure.” Violence: Cars are crushed and blown up. Language: Disney clean Sex: Not a hint Drugs: Not even fuel additives Parents’ advisory: Noisier and faster-paced than the first film, this one is suitable for all ages, especially boys 5-8 years old.

A world of music Here are three websites that can locate a global concert near you: afropop.org eyefortalent.com globalrhythm.net

calls it “Continent-in-a-Weekend,” and it goes like this: Spin the globe, and see where you land; anchor your weekend with a musical performance from that continent or country. (See the above websites for ways to search for a global music concert nearby.) And before the concert, find a restaurant (or borrow a cookbook from the library) with good eats from that continent. If your kids fall head over heels for the music of a particular country or genre, Tavangar says, you’ll find ways to deepen their musical discovery. Music, after all, is never out of reach.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly


E4 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 8, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, July 8, 2011: This year, you discover how much you value your home life and those who make your life comfortable. When push comes to shove, you often back off. You also can decide not to become involved or get into control games. Your creativity will become more and more dominant, helping you lasso in what you want. If you are single, you draw many potential suitors. Knowing what you want, you will need someone very special to create that type of bond with. Proceed accordingly. If you are attached, the two of you could become conflicted over an issue. How important is this issue in a total life? SCORPIO understands you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You feel an innate pull between your boundaries and needs and what others are asking. As a result, you could feel a bit irritable. Look at an offer or an expense that would increase the quality of your life. Tonight: Be with someone you enjoy. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You can only do so much for someone, especially if this person refuses to be appreciative. By setting limits, you could antagonize this person, forcing a clearing of the air. A positive attitude goes far in remedying the situation. Tonight: Nap, then decide. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Your creativity and

high energy merge. You could be hard to stop, though a partner might throw a boomerang in your path. Just walk right over it. Your instincts speak to you regarding a gift or decision and money. Tonight: Start the weekend right. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH You want to be home. If you can, make it so. You might be thinking about a difficult situation that surrounds your personal life. Someone you care about could be contrary. Look to the long term. Tonight: Nap, then decide. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Your words don’t fall on deaf ears. You might take a comment too personally. Understand what is happening around you. Consider tossing out a project that demands too much attention, for now. Tonight: Meet friends for munchies. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Be aware of the costs of proceeding in the present fashion. If you look, you might find that a whole other approach works better. Staying focused could be difficult right now. A late meeting launches your weekend. Tonight: Just don’t go overboard immediately. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You know you are looking good. Even if various sectors of your life produce flak, you aren’t perturbed. Still, do remember what is going on later. Make calls toward the end of the day. Tonight: A boss or respected pal might join you for munchies and dinner. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Know when it is best to do little with others. Dig into research

or other solo work. You will enjoy the downtime. Refuse to get into an argument with an associate. It isn’t worth it. Tonight: Nap, then decide. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH A meeting could be important for you socially. You will see a situation change, and quickly at that. Be willing to take a risk emotionally. If you are attached, don’t forget those extra details that make someone feel cared about. Tonight: Where the fun is. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You can be more touchy than you realize. How you approach a situation could change substantially as result. Relax and touch base with someone you care about. Allow a boss to vent without taking it personally. Tonight: The fun starts late. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Make a call to someone you trust. Listen to what is being said by someone you care about. You could be revising your opinions about key people in your life. Be willing to open up and share your thoughts. Tonight: Follow the music. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH A partner shows a lot of interest in what you are doing. Caring abounds around a child or loved one. Your creativity soars beyond the norm. Say what you need to say in order to open up a door and move past an issue. Tonight: How about a cozy meal?

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Camping Continued from E1 The couple had never gone car camping before, but used to backpack a lot. They weren’t used to the noise of RVs and generators, and all of the people. They aren’t sure if they will stay in a campground again, but are planning to do some rustic camping with Josephine near Crater Lake later this summer. Anna says next time she may bring a playpen or gated area to keep Josephine contained on occasion. She thinks parents should consider protection from bugs and the sun. They opted not to use bug spray, but rather used the smoke from the fire and other natural methods to keep away insects. When they were preparing for this trip, Kyle says there was a moment when the experience became “not fun.” Josephine was crying, it was stressful and they began to wonder why there were doing this. That’s when Kyle had to overcome his worries and recognize that “not everything is going to be perfect.” They wouldn’t control everything. They had to let go. And, in the end, they were able to do just that. Camping for the first time with kids isn’t going to be easy. But, with the right attitude and preparation, all the effort and challenges can be well worth it.

Why camp “You’re creating memories,” said Sarah Laufer, CEO of Play Outdoors, a Bend-based children’s outdoor clothing and gear company. Laufer is also an avid outdoors lover and mom of two. “They’re building a connection with nature.” The whole mission of camping changes. Laufer says, “You’re seeing the whole camping experience in a new way, through their eyes.” Jake Wiley, supervisor at REI of Bend, considers himself something of a professional camper. So it was important for him and his partner Elisa Solis to take their infant daughter, Tallulah, camping as soon as they could. The family went camping up the Metolius River two weeks ago, when Tallulah was 4 months old. Wiley wanted Tallulah to begin to experience the “passion and magic” of camping and the outdoors. “I think it’s important to instill in kids how important our outdoor world is,” Wiley said. Lora Shinn, author and blogger of www.cascadiakids.com, believes camping with kids is all about “creating a lifelong love of the outdoors.”

Preparation Perhaps the biggest preparation parents need to go through is a mental one. “(Kids) are going to get dirty. There will be bugs,” Laufer said. Parents should also know they may not get the campsite they want; they may have to deal with noise. Gone are the days of staying up late and passing the flask, Laufer said. “The focus needs to be your kids.” She suggests parents try to camp for at least two nights, because the first night is usually the hardest. That was true for the Johnsons. Anna felt ready to go after the first night, but says the second night was actually better. Wiley said some families may want to consider camping in their own backyard as a trial run. Or families could go to a campground for the day. “Have low expectations,” Wiley said. He also suggested families really focus on organization in advance to avoid scrambling. He also encourages parents to keep the mission in mind. “It’s family time away from normal, everyday life. Relish that,” Wiley said. FOR PARENTS, CONSIDER: • Set easy goals, such as hiking for a mile or going fishing. •Think about this camping trip differently than you did adultsonly trips. • Work on getting organized in advance and keep the day-of fun.

Preparing kids How much preparation children need before camping really depends on each child’s personality, according to Shinn. Children who are slow to warm up to new situations, for instance, may need extra prep to get used to darkness and noises. Children need to understand some basic safety before camping. Parents should talk about the importance of sticking close to camp. Kids need to know not to play with the campfire. If the campsite is near water, kids should also be prepped in water safety. Shinn encourages having children ages 3 and younger wear life preservers if they are playing anywhere near water.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Kyle Johnson, 31, interacts with his 11-month-old daughter, Josephine, while setting up camp with his wife, Anna Johnson, 30, at Sheep Bridge Campground near Wickiup Reservoir. “It makes parents feel more comfortable.” Parents should also talk to kids about camping etiquette, such as no screaming or yelling. Laufer encourages families to think about play in new ways. For instance, her kids use crayons to color rocks and make little dolls out of them. They are using what’s in nature, versus transporting all of their toys from home into the outdoors. Identifying flora and fauna can be fun for all ages, says Shinn, who usually brings along a book or two to help identify species. Wiley suggests parents let older children help in planning and include them in decision-making. Each child could be in charge of his or her own duffle bag, packing it with toys and clothing. That can help kids learn early the kind of organization camping requires, Wiley said. “Create some excitement. It’s all about how you present it,” Wiley said. CONSIDER: • Some kids may benefit from taking a test-run camping trip in the backyard or doing a day trip to a campground. • Think about some easy activities and games for kids. Identifying plants, riding bikes, etc. • Talk about safety issues related to water and fire. • Talk about etiquette.

Gear For the first time out, people may want to overpack. “Bring more than you think you need,” Shinn said. That way you can relax and think, “I am prepared for all contingencies.” One local mom suggested packing three changes of clothes per child per day. Laufer said the first time she went camping with her kids, then ages 1 and 3, she brought all the comforts of home, including air mattresses and toys. “I wanted them to have a good time.” Laufer also thinks it’s OK to bring a portable kids’ potty and have little ones use that rather than brave the pit toilets. “You know how traumatic it is for us to use them,” Laufer joked. In terms of kid-specific gear, Laufer thinks parents may want to purchase sleeping bags for kids, which will keep them warmer than blankets. She also recommends backpack-style hydration bladders for kids. For younger children and infants, parents may want to use a playpen inside a tent for sleeping or purchase a portable crib with an insu-

lated bottom, according to Laufer. On hiking trips, she recommends parents use a backpack child carrier and not a front pack, because parents can crush them in a fall. Wiley suggests parents create a checklist (find a thorough one at Rei.com) and then keep that in their gear box. Even though Wiley is incredibly experienced, camping with an infant brought new challenges. He had to think about sanitation, keeping warm, repelling bugs and safe sleeping. He doesn’t know of any sleeping devices designed for taking infants camping, so he improvised. They brought along a bassinet, raised it off the ground, swaddled with warm blankets, put on a hat and put a sleeping bag over part of the bassinet. Shinn likes bringing along an “endless supply of baby wipes.” She uses them to wipe down hands, tables and anything that needs a quick cleaning. A playpen can also be useful, particularly for infants in the “stumbling-in-thefire age.” She also thinks bringing along a head lamp or another hands-free lighting device is a good idea so parents can hold a child and, say, walk to the bathroom. Some children may also want some sort of night light. CONSIDER: • Playpen or gate for toddlers •Head lamps or electric lanterns • Plant and flower identification books • Portable potty • Bikes, especially for older kids • First aid kit • Bug spray • Flotation devices for the whole family • Lots of clothing layers, including hats, gloves and extra socks • Firewood (or buy on site) Interior Design & Finishes by

Where to camp “You don’t want to create an overambitious experience,” Laufer said. In Central Oregon, there are plenty of campgrounds relatively close to town. That way, “if things go really bad, you can get in your car and come home.” Laufer recommends always having a plan B. She also recommends parents pick a campground close to water, although parents of young children may want a campsite away from the water for safety’s sake. Shinn says parents may want to consider the nearest source of drinking or running water when picking a site. She likes to camp in places with flush toilets and tries to pick a spot relatively close to the restrooms so her kids don’t have too far to walk. CONSIDER: • Camping close to home • Good recreation activities (bike riding, swimming, easy day hikes, etc.) • Amenities: Are you OK with pit toilets or do you want running water? • Shady campsites with a good level spot for a tent • Less-popular campgrounds • Near a restaurant or store in case supplies are needed Alandra Johnson can be reached at 5 4 1 -6 1 7 -7 8 6 0 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.

• Weight Loss & Weight Management • Nutritional Counseling • Hormone Balancing • Age Management

Patty Jones 541.610.3796 www.perryjonesdesigns.com

AGEWISEMD.COM 541.678.5150

CAMP COURAGE 2011 “Healing from grief is not about forgetting, it is the process of remembering with less pain and more joy.” Eileen Grover, MSW Children’s Grief Counselor

A four day, no cost, art camp providing a safe and healing environment where children can learn to express their feelings of loss and grief

July 18-21 Hollinshead Barn and Historical Park 1235 NE Jones Road, Bend Additional information and registration forms are available at www.partnersbend.org You are also welcome to call Eileen at 541-382-5882 or email her at eileeng@partnersbend.org

Camp courage is made possible through donations and community involvement.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 8, 2011 F1

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DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

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Want to Buy or Rent Cash for Gold Douglas Fine Jewelry 541-389-2901

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

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Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

POODLE Pups, AKC Toy or Teacup, B & W, red, black. POMAPOOS too! 541-475-3889

Queen Elizabeth's Favorite dogs we have 6 AKC Pembroke Welsh Corgi pups: 1 female and 5 males. 541-546-6070. They are going fast!

Items for Free Horse Manure, large loads, perfect for gardening, will load, FREE. 541-390-6570.

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Fish Tank, 55 Gal. corner, with wrought iron stand, $200 OBO. 541-389-9268 Free Cat to good home, 8 yr. old, lap cat, moving, call Russ at 541-280-1871. Free- Good Dog needs great home, mellow, female, 7 yrs., mix breed, 541-788-8275. FRENCH BULLDOG male, 10 mo., neutered and shots, $500. 541-706-1055 German Shepherd puppies, black, black/tan, parents on site. $275. 541-536-5538

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ Rottweiler: young almost 2 yrs. Male. Great dog, Purebred. $150 obo. 541-306-4693 Scottish Terrier Pup, CKC reg., 1st shots/wormer, male, $400 541-517-5324.

Shih-Tzu Puppies for sale. Mother is shih-tzu/maltese and father is all shih-tzu. Puppies 75% shih-tzu. Non Shedding, & very cute Females, $350 and Males $300. 541-433-5261, cell 541-531-0810

Shih Tzu Puppies Purebred, 8 weeks! Have first shots, so cute. 209-986-3291 Golden Retriever Pups AKC DOB 5/16. Ready wknd of July 4th. $600. Shots, wormed vet-checked. 509 281-0502. KITTENS! All colors, playful, altered, shots, ID chip, more! Adoption fees temporarily reduced, small kittens just $25, discount for 2! Nice adult cats just $20, or free as a mentor cat w/adoption of kitten. Sat/Sun 1-5 PM, other days by appt, call 541647-2181. Info: 389-8420, or visit www.craftcats.org for directions, photos, more.

AUSSIES

MINI/TOYS

AKC family raised, parents on site, blue merles, black tri, red tri, 1st shots, wormed. 541-788-7799/598-6264 CHUG Puppies (Chi & mini-pug) Est 3 to 5 lbs full grown Females $350 - Males $250. Taking Deposits Now! 541-233-3534 Companion cats free to seniors! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. 389-8420, www.craftcats.org DOG KENNEL- cyclone fence, 10x18, $195. 541-318-8405

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Pets and Supplies

Guns, Hunting and Fishing

Computers

Building Materials

Fuel and Wood

Yellow Lab purebred puppies for sale! 7 males, 3 Females. M=$300, F=$350. (541) 548-1667

210

Furniture & Appliances Air conditioners, It’s Hot! 4 window units all w/remotes, 2 small $50 ea., 2 large $75 ea., 541-548-7137, Redmond !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Bar Stools (3), cushion seats & back, wood legs/frame, exc. cond. $175, 541-923-6487. Freezer, upright, works great, need to sell ASAP, $60 OBO, Please call 541-548-6652 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809. Kenmore Series 80 Washer and Dryer, 6yrs old. Excellent condition,must sell $300 OBO Can deliver locally. Xtra $20 541-771-5109 Magic Chef upright freezer, $195. 541-318-8405 NEED TO CANCEL YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 541-383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel your ad!

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643. Washer, Kenmore, front load and electric dryer. Like new, $450/set. 541-549-0805

We Service All Vacs! Free Estimates! Oreck XL Outlook Upright Only $229 (Was $399) While supplies last.

Bend’s Only Authorized Oreck Store. In the Forum Center

541-330-0420

223 Howa model 1500, bi-pod, with Itasco scope 4x16x40, + ammo, $550. 541-410-0841 Carry concealed in 33 states. Sun. July 24th 8 a.m, Red mond Comfort Suites. Qualify For Your Concealed Hand gun Permit. Oregon & Utah permit classes, $50 for Or egon, $60 for Utah, $100 for both. www.PistolCraft.com. Call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS (4867) to Pre-Register. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

Mossberg 12 gauge 500A, wood stock pump shotgun, 28” bbl, $200. 541-647-8931

260

Misc. Items 1/2 space at Greenwood Cemetery. $450 OBO. 406-600-0234. Aqua Magic Freshwater Flush RV Toilet, $25 Cash, 541-382-4537 BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

Siberian Husky, 4 yrs old, neutered male, has had his shots, $65. 541-548-5564

212

Antiques & Collectibles Antiques Wanted: Tools, fishing, wood furniture, toys, sports gear. 541-389-1578

LOG TRUCK LOADS of dry Lodgepole firewood $1200 for Bend delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more info. Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands! M o s t jo b s c o m ple t e d in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-647-8261 MADRAS Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 84 SW K. St. 541 475-9722 Open to the public. Prineville Habitat ReStore Building Supply Resale 1427 NW Murphy Ct. 541 447-6934 Open to the public.

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

The Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

Draw drapes for dbl-wide patio door, all hardware, off-white, exc cond, $45. 541-317-5154 Fireplace set: tools, wood holder + large screen w/doors, like new, $200 obo. 541-317-5154

Gazebo, 10x10, still in box, $100, please call 541-382-7245.

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496

Rem. 870 Wingmaster Tactical 12 ga. Shotgun. $300 obo. 541-306-8467 Sentry Gun Safe, 1 ft x 11”x 18”, fireproof, w/keys, holds up to 8 pistols, $100. 541-647-8931

Taurus PT 92 AFS 9mm stainless semi-auto handgun with shoulder holster, 2 extra clips, 6 boxes ammo, $495. 541-419-5565 Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

247

266

Heating and Stoves

Glock 23, 40S&W 2 hi-cap mags, nice condition. $400. 541-350-1875

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

Chronic Pain & Fatigue, insomnia, brain fog, anxiety, migraines?

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

308

Farm Equipment and Machinery NEW HOLLAND 426 baler, exc. cond., many extras, field ready. $7500. 541-475-6739.

269

Irrigation Equipment

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com

316 Irrigation pump, 10”, Cornell, V8, Propane, on wheels, a Rain Bird unit, 2100-2800 GPM, Springfield, OR, $2200, 541-741-6994.

Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS

325

Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

Hay, Grain and Feed

541-389-9663

GRASS HAY JUNIPER TIES & BOARDS Full Measure Timbers “ Rot Resistant ” Raised Bed Garden Projects Instantlandscaping.com 541-389-9663

Small bales, in barn, no rain! $185/ton. 541-548-8711

For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

Hay season is fast approaching!

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Quarry Ave

HAY & FEED We have a large inventory of Baling Twine in Stock Now! 541-923-2400 4626 SW Quarry Ave., Redmond

Quality Hay For Sale Delivery Available Please Call 541-777-0128 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

Call 866-700-2424

The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 3 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised must equal $200 or Less • Limit one ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months 541-385-5809 • Fax 541-385-5802 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

263

Tools Tile Masonry Saw, exc. cond., water injection, $250, 541-420-6215; 541-536-3889

Livestock & Equipment 10-year-old Mule, easy to work, rides and packs, 16H. $2300. 541-447-0424 Boer Goats for sale, 1 doe, 1 buck, please call 541-548-1857

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

347

Llamas/Exotic Animals 270

Lost and Found FOUND a black male kitten, 27th and Salmon in Redmond. Call 541-516-8670 Found Dog: Female Yellow Lab, wearing collar, no tag, Fri. 7/1, SW Bend, 541-350-2241 Found Keys, Drake Park area, Friday July 1st. Call to identify, 541-728-3165

Fuel and Wood

There is Hope! Call for FREE DVD Farewell To Fibromyalgia

Sponsors needed for "Miracle", 251 a small Siamese cat found abandoned in the country The Bulletin reserves the right Hot Tubs and Spas to publish all ads from The with a badly infected back Bulletin newspaper onto The Columbia Hot Tub, seats 6, 32 injury, possibly from a pellet Bulletin Internet website. or bullet. He has had surgery jets, excellent condition. & is expected to fully re$2500. 541-848-2214 cover, & then he will need a Advertise your car! good, forever home. Thanks Add A Picture! 253 Reach thousands of readers! for supporting the work of TV, Stereo and Video 240 Call 541-385-5809 Cat Rescue, Adoption & FosThe Bulletin Classifieds ter Team, www.craftcats.org, Crafts and Hobbies HDTV, Philips 60”, big screen, PO Box 6441, Bend 97708. floor model, just serviced, LAB PUPS AKC, black & yellow, 541-389-8420, 598-5488. Sewing Machine, Elna, in cabinew, was, $1500, now $595 titled parents, performance net, has all attachments, $45, OBO, 541-408-7908. pedigree, OFA cert hips & el- Sweet Cockatiels, ready for for541-382-3782. ever homes! 2 at $35 each. bows, $500. 541-771-2330 TV”s 13” RCA, $30; Sanyo 19”. 541-549-8660 www.royalflushretrievers.com 241 $45, please call 541-382-3782. Sweet Lop Babies, 3 @ $12 Labradoodles, Australian Bicycles and each. NOT for snake food. Imports - 541-504-2662 Accessories More info, call 541-548-0747 www.alpen-ridge.com The Bulletin To Subscribe call Labrador, AKC chocolate, 7 wks, Wolf-Husky Pups! Adorable, Schwinn Ladies mtn./timber 541-385-5800 or go to friendly, intelligent, 3 girls bike, new $179, used once, dewclaws, 1st shot, 1 female www.bendbulletin.com left! $275. 541-598-5248. sell $125. 541 389-1922 left! $400. 541-647-7645

300

Split Lodgepole, well seasoned, $145/cord, $280/2 cords, delivered to Bend, Sunriver, La Pine, fast friendly service! 541-410-6792; 541-382-6099

Your Backyard Birdfeeding Specialists!

GENERATE SOME EXCITEMENT IN YOUR NEIGBORHOOD. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809.

Sporting Goods - Misc.

Health and Beauty Items

Farm Market

345

248 The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Lodgepole Seasoned rounds: 1 cord $129; 2@$124ea; 3@ $119ea. Split: 1 cord $159; 2@$154 ea; 3@$149 ea. Bin price 4’x4’x4’, $59 ea. Cash. Delivery avail. 541-771-0800

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

9 7 7 0 2

Alpaca dispersal sale, all reg., quality breeding stock to ribbon winners. All Reasonable offers considered. For info call 541-385-4989.

350

Horseshoeing/ Farriers NILSSON HOOF CARE - Certified natural hoof care practitioner with www.aanhcp.net 541-504-7764.

358

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

Farmers Column

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

All Year Dependable Firewood: Dry , split lodgepole, 1 for $155 or 2 for $300. No limit. Cash, check, or credit. Bend 541-420-3484 Central Oregon Mix, semi-dry, split, delivered, Bend. $135 for one cord or $260 for two. Cash, Check or Credit. 541-420-3484

Found Keys in crosswalk at 27th St. & Bear Creek Rd, on 7/02. 541-382-0114 Found set of keys on Smith Rock Way. 3 miles east of Terrebonne, Sunday July 3. Call to ID. 541-548-4674 Lost Hunting Bow: McDonalds in La Pine, brand new, G5 Hammer, eve. of 6/19, REWARD, 541-553-1335. LOST Newport Ave. area, black male German Shepherd, green collar “Boo”, white socks &chest. 541-255-6747. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

SHEEP SHEARING Small jobs only, Redmond area. 541-504-9210 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


F2 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

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Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

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A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

Employment Opportunities EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Automotive Sales

Employment P START YOUR NEW CAREERP Smolich Motors, Central Oregon’s largest Auto Group of new and used vehicles is looking to fill sales positions within our expanding Bend stores. Smolich Motors is an industry leader with 8 new car franchises and the finest choices of pre-owned vehicles in Central Oregon. We offer you the opportunity to achieve a high level of success and job satisfaction. You must have excellent verbal skills, and display a professional and positive demeanor. Prior sales experience is preferred. We provide the tools you need to succeed including a professional training program that will give you the knowledge and confidence to maximize your potential. We Provide:

Apply in person at our Nissan and Jeep stores across from Pilot Butte, or our Hyundai store on the corner of Hwy 20 and Purcell.

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Estate Sales

Estate Sales Look What I Found!

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

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Independent Contractor

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Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Caregiver

Food Service - Line Cook

Home Instead Senior Care is hiring part-time caregivers throughout Central Oregon with many different shift types for flexible schedules. You will provide seniors with one-on-one care to allow them to maintain their independence. We provide training by our staff RN. We are a locally-owned, family-run business. Please call Mon. - Fri. 10am-3pm only. 541-330-6400. CLERK, part-time. Excellent customer service skills a must. Apply in person at Reddaway, 1701 SE 1st St., Redmond, Mon-Fri., 9-1.

F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F

The Bulletin The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

&

Call Today &

NOW TAKING BIDS for Contract Haulers, delivering bundles of newspapers from Bend to Medford & Grants Pass, Oregon. There is a possibility of more runs in the future. Must have own vehicle with license and insurance and the capability to haul up to 5000 lbs. Candidates must also be able to lift up to 50 lbs. physically. Selected candidates will be independently contracted.

H

is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

Delivery

• Good Work Schedule • Paid Medical Insurance • 401K Retirement Plan • Vacation Pay • Drug Free Work Environment • $75,000 Annual Earning Potential

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

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Billing Administrator Partners In Care Home Health and Hospice is seeking applicants for a part-time Billing Administrator (~28 hrs/wk) to join the six person Accounting Team. Job duties include Billing and Accounts Receivable. Experience with Accounting Software and Patient Care Software is a plus as well as working within a team structure. Qualified candidates are asked to submit a resume to 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend OR 97701 Attn: HR, or via email to HR@partnersbend.org.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

The Bulletin

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Redmond H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

For more info contact James Baisinger at jbaisinger@bendbulletin.com

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Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend HUGE Sale Sat-Sun, 9-3. 65030 Big Sale Sat., 7-noon 19602 Pine Hollow, behind Cascade MS. Gerking Mkt Rd., Tumalo. Toys, electronics, DVDs, bikes, Household items, clothes, sporting goods... Earlies OK! Oak furniture, bike, too many things to list! Also a guide/ Gigantic Moving Sale: Fri.-Sat., outfitter will be selling lots of July 8th & 9th, 61059 sporting & hunting items! Springcrest Dr., dishes, some Large Family Sale - Kids clothfurniture, snowblower, more! ing, household, lots of misc. items. Sat., 8-4. 1807 NW FIND IT! Glassow Dr., off Summit Dr. BUY IT! Massive Multi-Family Sale SELL IT! Fri-Sat, July 8-9, 8-3. ShotThe Bulletin Classiieds guns, rifles, antique trunks, whiskey keg planters, tools, 286 Hot Wheels, DVDs, books, furni ture, camping, sporting, Sales Northeast Bend & more! 63990 OB Riley Rd. 2137 NE Shepherd Rd., Fri. 8-5, Moving Sale - Everything goes! Sat. 8-12, sports items, print4 poster bed, loveseat, Oriers, scanners, household, steental dining table & pictures, reo lots of stuff for everyone! barstools, LOTS more! SatSun 9-5, 1978 NW Sun Ray Ct. 2304 NE Acorn Way, Sat. Multi-Family Yard Sale! Col8-2, new & clean trealectibles, garden supplies, & sures! more! Fri-Sat-Sun, 9-5. 64345 Old Bend-Redmond Hwy. 3-FAMILY YARD SALE: Sat. 8-7, 22914 Yucca Ct., past Sat. 8-12; 321 Drake Rd. KitchBend Airport in Cimmarron enware, collectibles, L-XL City, furniture, sporting nice mens clothes, leather goods, electronics, baby jackets, fishing, old glassitems & tons of misc. ware, furn.,Xmas, misc.

Flea Market

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

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Sales Redmond Area

Sales Redmond Area

Moving Sale: Sat. & Sun., 9-7, Pet supplies & fixtures from Celebration Parking Lot Sale! HUGE Annual Desert Meadclosed pet store; home items, Sat. July 9th, 10am to 2pm. Wicker Furniture, TV’s, ows & Ni-Lah-Sha NeighYou'll find a little bit of everykids, baby things, & much Jewelry, Paintings and many fridge, etc., 64100 N Hwy. borhood Sale. Fri. & Sat. thing in The Bulletin's daily more. on Rickard past Gosother items. 97, #29. 541-312-2998. July 8th & 9th, 8 am - 4 garage and yard sale section. ney look for pink signs. Fri. & 63830 Clausen Dr., MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE! pm. Bring your friends From clothes to collectibles, Sat., 9-3. 23180 Rickard Next to Globe Lighting. Shop, home miscellaneous. Bring your cash. Somefrom housewares to hardContact 541-280-0224 Sat. Only, 8-4, 20470 Pine Vista 7-4 on Friday and Sat. thing for EVERYONE! Even ware, classified is always the Dr, Reddy Kerosene 55,000 122 NE McCartney. a hot dog stand from 11-2. first stop for cost-conscious BTU Heater, power, hand, & H H FREE H H Lots of fun -- TONS of consumers. And if you're Estate Sale! 8-5 July 9-10, and Sunstone Community Garage yard tools, left golf clubs, STUFF. Off Negus behind planning your own garage or 16-17. Furniture, household, Sale: Sat., 8-3, Lotus & OteGarage Sale Kit glassware, camping gear. Redmond Wal-Mart. yard sale, look to the classicollectibles & carpenters lah off Purcell, parking on fieds to bring in the buyers. tools. Follow signs on HunLotus. 290 Place an ad in The Bulletin You won't find a better place HUGE SALE SAT JULY 9 nell Rd, Bend. 541-389-5552 for your garage sale and YARD SALE - July 15-16, 9-5. Sales Redmond Area for bargains! ONLY! 9-5. J. Gordon receive a Garage Sale Kit Lots of good stuff! 1753 NE Call Classifieds: NASCAR collectibles, scuba FREE! Laredo Way, off 27th/Neff 125 SW Canyon Dr. Fri-Sat, 541-385-5809 or email gear, RV BBQ, Echo FLEA MARKET 9-4. Tons of brand name teen Rd, 1 block past Connors. classified@bendbulletin.com weedeater, garage clearance 1000's of items, Iron ButKIT INCLUDES: & women’s clothing, shoes; - “GUY” stuff, fishing gear, terfly store inventory, an• 4 Garage Sale Signs 288 toys, games, household misc. misc. “GAL” stuff, books, tiques, snooker table, de• $1.00 Off Coupon To Use 281 Sales Southeast Bend games, household - TOO 5 Family Sale: Fri., Sat., Sun., signer furniture, lamps, Toward Your Next Ad MUCH TO LIST! 3940 NW El Sales Fundraiser 9-4, 3460 35th Pl. & 3408 mirrors, farm equip., bldg • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale 2 Family Sale - priced right! Fri Camino (off Helmholtz), apSW Xero Ct., Dishes, nice materials, backhoe. 65710 Success!” & Sat., 8-4, 61267 Benham prox 4 miles North of Reinclothes,: girls 4, boys 4, teen, Gerking Market, Tumalo, H H H H • And Inventory Sheet Rd., off Murphy Rd. Tools, deer Ranch off 126, OR, .2 mens & women’s, BBQ bas7/8 12-5, 7/9 10-5, 7/10 The Children’s household, LOTS of misc.! mile South off Coyner. kets, high chair, linens, fur12-5. No early birds. PICK UP YOUR Vision Foundation niture, household goods, car Living Estate/Yard Sale 541 815-1472 GARAGE SALE 7/7-7/10, 8-5 Lots of parts, tools & much more! KIT AT: (CVF) is currently collecting Don’t miss this fun sale! unique items must see-New 1777 SW Chandler Ave. household and office donaAntiques, collectibles, glass, Antiques • Collectibles every day 20461 Jacklight Bend, OR 97702 tions for their Step Above china, household items, Multi-family sale. Fri.&Sat. French Your Average Garage primitives, linens, Chenille, & July 8 & 9, from 8-4. 10466 Sale on July 22, 23 & DON’T MISS THIS! Tools to jewmuch much more! Man Stuff, NW 27th St., Terrebonne. 24th and July 29 & 30th , els & everything in between, tools, fishing items, boat moat Pomegranate at the Bend Factory Stores. chickens & eggs & pigs, too! DIVORCE SALE - 16 yrs; way tor, scroll saw, radial arm Proceeds will go directly Garage Sale, Friday & Saturday, too much to list! "In town" 2 mi. E. of Costco out Hwy saw, etc. You’ll love our Saturday, July 9, 10am-4pm ESTATE SALE towards supporting Central 9-3. 2648 NE Wintergreen 510 ‘F’ Ave., Terrebonne, 20, go right at 62075 Torkelprices! No Early Birds. Sat. AMAZINGLY HUGE SALE! Oregon’s children vision Dr., in Mtn. View Park. LOTS July 8-10, 8am-4pm. son. Sat.-Sun. 8-4 8-3, Sun. 8-11, 1269 NW Bend’s most fabulous flea From antiques to new-in-box including Oriental desk, Oriental screenings and will also be of good stuff come see! Rimrock Dr. market! Antiques, vintage, rugs, 3 Amish fireplaces & 2 Amish rockers, rolltop desk, oak Garage Sale: Fri. & Sat. 7-1, Entire House Sale! FRI July 8, providing free seven step garden & artisan goods. computer desk & file, ship’s wheel dining table, other furn., Garage Sale: Sat 8-4, Tools, 10-6; SAT/SUN 9-4. Some- MOVING. Fri-Sun, 8-4. 2818 Tools, Canning supplies, vision screenings for chil120 NE River Mall Ave., loads of kitchenware most new over 50 pcs stainless cookware, thing for everyone! 695 NE furniture, housewares, artquilting frame, & misc., dren ages 5 and older during SW Bentwood Dr. Somejust north of Macy’s. See 10 roasters, 8 cutlery sets, Kitchenaid, boxes of utensils & gadRedwood Ave., Redmond. work, Dukane BBQ, clothes, 21007 King Hezakiah Way event.. Your donations are thing for everybody! Elecpomegranate-home.com gets, flatware sets, 100’s books/CD’s/records, duck collection, 63122 Watercress Way, near tax deductible. For more intronics, garden, birdhouses, Garage Sale: loads of men’s clothing, lawn mowers, 2 new workbenches, 18th & Empire. formation and donations toys, shoes, etc, etc. Find It in tools of all kinds many new, Stanley & Craftsman rolling tool Sat. 9-1. HUGE SALE! Kreiss furniture, pickup, please call boxes, popcorn machine, teak lounge chairs & other outdoor HUGE CHURCH GARAGE SALE: The Bulletin Classifieds! toys, desks, clothes, exercise, 20668 Songbird Ln. (541) 330-3907 Benefits kids, Sat. 8-4, 63598 items, Karcher pressure washer, model ships, all kinds of elecMoving Sale - Saturday 7/9 Deschutes Jct., between 541-385-5809 Hunters Cir. off Cooley, items Large sale, 21095 SE Lancelot tronics, 2 teak vintage speaker wall units, electric organ. and Sunday 7/10, 8am Bend/Redmond, 65115 N. incl. furniture & much more! Ave. Tools, hunting/sporting Antiques include phonograph w/horn, telephones, 14 wall Kids stuff! Furniture! TV's! Hwy 97. westside of Hwy, Estate Sale: Sat. Only 8 am -8 282 equipment, furn., household, 3525 SW Timber Ave., clocks, copper milk cans & Samovar, 2 side chairs, spinning follow long white fence to pm pellet stove, $500 cash clothes, studded tires, much Redmond - GPS for direcwheel, cider press, carved Oriental tables, hotel radiators, bed driveway entrance. Sat., 8-2. Sales Northwest Bend MOVING/ REMODEL only, generator, $250, lots of more. Fri./Sat. at 9 a.m. tions or call 541-548-8424. & armoire, glass floats, floor scale & brass scales, Mills slot maS A L E: Fri/Sat, 8-4. 22280 tools, many items collected for Big Yard Sale: Sat. 8-3, 2053 chine, Victorian mirror, cast iron enameled wood stove, lots of Erickson Rd. Tools, garden, 50 yrs, 3041 SW Pumice Pl. LAST CHANCE! Household, NW 7th St, housewares, bedcopper & brass, barber chair, drop front oak desk, and so much bikes, closet doors, micro, MOVING SALE Fri Sat 9-4 sundries, tools, rocks, furniding, 4 leather dining chairs, FAMILY GARAGE SALE! Some- NW Redmond Sale! 1645 NW more! Don’t miss this sale! knee board, foosball table, 1530 SE Virginia ture, and more! Fri. & Sat., fabrics, motorcycle helmet, Teak Ave. Fri. 7/8, 5-7 p.m., thing for everyone! Friday Friday, Saturday & Sunday, 9-4 ceiling fan, housewares, 9-3. 21616 Old Red Road. jewelry, clothes & more! Sat. 7/9, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. FurJuly 8th, 8-5; Saturday, 8-3. books, clothes, etc. Numbers Fri. 8 a.m. Mutli family sale: (2) Bdrm sets niture, clothing, misc. items. 2349 NW 19th St. From Brookswood go W. on Powers R on Heron Way R (queen & full), Compound Check out the on Quail Pine Lp R on Kenzie to 61382 Huckelberry Pl Moving Sale Friday 7/8 & SatBow, kids bikes, golf putter, Garage sale NW Crossing. Family Yard Sale: Sale: 6880 NE 1st, Redmond. classiieds online home decor, clothing, misc & 2540 NW Shields Drive urday 7/9, 9am-4pm 21911 3836 SW 35th Pl. Sat. 8-4, Sun. 9-2. FULL ATTIC ESTATES & APPRAISALS www.bendbulletin.com 541-350-6822 Packasport. Sat 7-3pm 7am-noon. No early birds. Butler Market Rd. Lots of Saturday Only - July 9th 8-2 household of furnishings, Updated daily @61584 SE Fargo Ln. 97702 541-325-6944. stuff. No early birds! Lots of GREAT stuff. generator, barbecue, MORE. for pics & info go to www.atticestatesandappraisals.com

ESTATE SALE: 60616 Taos Ct., Bend, 97702; Sat & Sun, 8am-3pm. Huge home, everything goes! Wedgwood bone china, Drexel Heritage, crystal, Ethan Allen, electronics, artwork, TVs, books, furniture, clothes, lots more.

Top-notch person needed to work in an elegant setting. Black Butte Ranch has an immediate opening for seasonal PM Line Cook for our Lodge. 1-2 years cooking experience in high volume kitchen. Basic understanding of butchery (meat, poultry seafood), able to multi task and take direction. This position requires an individual that is passionate about cooking, is critical of their performance and the foods they produce, has a positive attitude and gets satisfaction from being a member of a successful team. Must be able to work all shifts including evenings, weekends and holidays. Must have Deschutes County food handler’s permit. Some benefits. Up to $12.50/hr. DOE. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com, under the About Us section. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE.

Teacher’s Retirement Garage Sale! Thurs-Sat, 9-2. (541-548-4412) 4344 SW Badger Blvd. off S Canal Blvd. Yard Sale Thur-Sat.,9-4. 580 C Ave., Terrebonne. Furniture, tools, household, glassware, original art, much more!

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Sales Other Areas GIGANTIC ANNUAL YARD SALE, Powell Butte Christian Church, 13720 SW Hwy 126, Saturday,July 9, 8-3.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

GREAT SALE Fri., Sat., Sun. 9 a.m. -? Beautiful quilts, jewelry camp and fishing gear, electronics, antique glass, clothes, and much more. 114 W. Adams, Sisters. HUGE Barn Sale, Fri & Sat, 8-5. Paintings, artwork, collectibles, furniture, household items, clothing, too much to list! 67349 Gist Rd off Hwy 20 about 5 miles before Sisters.

HUGE Yard Sale - Dresser, furniture, something for everyone! Saturday only, 9-5, 10208 SW Feather Dr, Culver. MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE July 8-10, 8-5. a lot of everything including tools. 16897 Indigo Lane, LaPine/Sunriver off State Rec Rd., follow signs. Yearly Garage Sale: Fri. & Sat 8-4 - NO Early Birds! 11866 SW Latakomie St., Powell Butte, ‘94 Yamaha 600, Dual sport, low mi, great shape, new Reese 5th Wheel hitch, tow bar w/ break attachment, tools, camping/ fishing, books, Queen Sleep Number bed, clothes, lots of misc. Household.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Home Health / Hospice RN Partners In Care is seeking applicants for a full-time Registered Nurse (RN) to provide care for its Hospice and Home Health patients. Preference given to candidates with Home Health and/or Hospice experience. Qualified candidates are asked to submit their resume to Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701, Attn: HR or via email at HR@partnersbend.org

THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 8, 2011 F3

Membership and Events Director

Finance & Business

Night Auditor & Guest Service Agents

The Ranch is accepting applications for a Part-time Night Auditor & Guest Service Agents. The Night Audit individual must possess an accounting background, use of computer programs, 10-key and basic math computation. Springer-Miller experience preferred. Duties include reconciling department ledgers and running daily reports. May be required to perform front desk duties including taking reservations and checking Licensed CPA people in/out of the Ranch. Immediate opening for a liGuest Service Agents responcensed CPA with 4 to 9 years sibilities include checking of public accounting experiguests in/out of the Ranch, ence. Please visit www.bendprocessing access passes, ascpa.com/jobs for application sisting the reservations desk, information. and effectively communicating with housekeeping and Lumber Mill: maintenance. Now hiring at in Gilchrist. Applicants must be enthusiastic customer service Please apply in person at #1 oriented with positive attiSawmill Rd., Gilchrist, OR. tude and excellent telephone skills. Will be required to Need Seasonal help? work nights, weekend and Need Part-time help? holidays. These are part time Need Full-time help? positions which may lead to Advertise your open positions. full time work. The Bulletin Classifieds Benefits include swimming, golf, food and merchandise MENTAL HEALTH discounts. To apply go on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com THE CHILD CENTER under About Us. BBR is a A Psychiatrict Day Treatment drug free work place. EOE. program for emotionally/behaviorally disturbed children Organist/Accompanist and their families, will have up and running this fall, a Trinity Episcopal Church of Bend, OR is looking for a new ICTS program in the part-time Organist/AccomRedmond area. The Child panist. This position will proCenter currently has openvide organ and piano music ings for: for worship services and other church events. If inPROGRAM terested, please send your SUPERVISOR/THERAPIST resume and cover letter to Master's degree w/two years ministry@trinitybend.org. Post-masters graduate work All applications must be rein psychology, social work or ceived no later than July 15. related mental health fields. More info may be found at Working knowledge of the www.trinitybend.org. principles and techniques of family therapy; two years su- Painter - Body Shop Painters pervised experience in famHelper. JR's Body & Paint ily, individual and group Works. Full-time. One year therapy, demonstrated efexp. req. Fast paced. $10 hr. fectiveness in clinical superup. Start NOW! vision of individual, family 541-389-5242 and marital therapy; working Journeyman. knowledge of educational Plumber Team players only. E-mail resystem; ability to prepare sumes to: meaningful and concise records, reports, and pro- scott@sweeneyplumbinginc.com gram proposals; participate Real Estate Brokers in team-oriented treatment Join our TEAM! We are an and program planning. Salactive/busy office in a prime ary range $33,523 location. Send resumes to $37,003. P.O. Box 796, La Pine, OR 97739. CHILD/FAMILY THERAPIST Minimum qualifications MA or Remember.... Add your web address to MS degree in psychology, soyour ad and readers on cial work or related mental The Bulletin's web site will health fields. Working be able to click through auknowledge of the principles tomatically to your site. and techniques of family therapy; two years superPeople Look for Information vised experience in family, individual and group therapy; About Products and Services Every Day through working knowledge of the educational system; ability to The Bulletin Classifieds prepare records, reports and proposals; team oriented Sales treatment and planning. SalBEND Auto Dealership ary range $31,056 - $34,280. Seeking Applicants for: SERVICE ADVISORS. BEHAVIORAL SUPPORT Email Resume to: SPECIALIST AutoCareers@hotmail.com BA or BS degree. Experience with young special needs The Bulletin children required. Eligible Recommends extra caution for QMHA certification. Salwhen purchasing products ary range $20,027 - $22,016. or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, Employee benefit package for or credit information may all positions. be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about ATTN: (Lori) an advertiser, you may call lcbmsw@earthlink.net the Oregon State Attorney OR General’s Office Consumer Send resume to: Protection hotline at The Child Center, 1-877-877-9392. 3995 Marcola Road, Springfield, OR 97477 EOE

Candidate Qualifications: Responsibility for the direction and leadership of the sales and marketing efforts of Broken Top Club in all its offerings which include Corporate Outings (golf and social), Wedding events, Membership sales, maintenance and promotion, Outside Tournament sales, and High Level reciprocal partnerships. Requirements of the position: Candidate must possess proven front line sales experience with both corporate and private event functions. Proven ability to manage outside vendors and possess the ability to coordinate with the food and beverage staff for directing these events, along with understanding the requirements of event sales and execution. Assist management in production of an annual sales budget. Formulate and develop the strategies to execute the sales budget, inclusive of the development of the necessary criteria, resources, and collateral materials to achieve the sales goal for both events and membership development. Candidate must possess the proven skills to manage outside vendors, including web page maintenance and design, collateral development, and social networking efforts. The candidate must be able to make timely adjustments to marketing strategies with plans to meet changing markets and competitive conditions. Develop a comprehensive public relations plan for the club, which increases the visibility and reputation of the Club within the community. Develop positive relations with key members of the community, local business leaders, and companies doing business with the club, newly signed members, and local media. Coordinate and publish the Club newsletter, e-newsletter, and website updates to the Club. Follow up on all web page inquires for weddings, events, and new membership inquires, and close the sale of same. Prepare timely membership and marketing activity reports for management. Maintain a high profile with the existing membership, attending Club functions and reading the pulse of the membership for management. Manage the macro event calendar to insure timely booking, coordination with F&B, and invoicing with accounting. Create a comprehensive membership event program for all seasons of the year which satisfies all membership categories. Prepare timely membership and marketing activity reports. Job Requirements: Proven successful sales development and closing skills are required. Understanding of the Private Club environment, Club Membership demands and knowledge of the golf industry a plus. Solid computer and writing skills (i.e. iV Word, Excel, Outlook, etc) for business communication required; preferable an understanding of the Jonus system and FourTees booking programs. This position is one of the (4) top management positions at this Club. Compensation can be structured to the candidate and will involve a highly incentivized component for event and membership sales.

Resumes

to:

Careers@Brokentop.com

476

Employment Opportunities

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Building/Contracting

Excavating Levi’s Dirt Works:RGC & CGC

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Concrete Construction JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways... Call Grant, 541-279-3183 • CCB190612 K.A. Veltman Concrete L L C Custom Concrete Work Foundations and Flatwork No Job Too Big or Too Small! 541-923-2168 • CCB #191425

Residential & Commercial subcontracting for all your dirt & excavation needs. • Small & large jobs for contractors & home owners by the job - or hour. • Driveway grading (low cost get rid of pot holes & smooth out your driveway) • Custom pads large & small • Operated rentals & augering • Wet & dry utilities • Concrete CCB#194077 541-639-5282.

NOW

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Computer/Cabling Install QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Domestic Services Honest & Dependable Caregiving, errands, housekeeping,gardening, 541-389-4183 or 541-420-0366.

Electrical Services

All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Quality Builders Electric • Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Handyman Service Repair & Remodel We Move Walls Small jobs welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE

SPECIAL 20%OFF Lawn Re-seeding or Summer Aeration Services! Weekly Maintenance • Thatching • Aeration • Lawn Over-seeding Bark • Clean-ups Commercial / Residential Senior Discounts

Providing full service maintenance for over 20 years! FREE FERTILIZATION with new seasonal Mowing Service!

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

541-382-3883 NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

541-382-3402 LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

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Business Opportunities Turn-key Computer service & repair shop. Incl. inventory. Busy location on 3rd. St. Call for details & info. 541-306-6700.

We are looking for motivated self-starters with previous sales and/or automotive experience! Apply today if you enjoy making money and talking to people!

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or 541-385-5809 Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30am to 5:00pm

APPLY ONLINE TODAY AT www.lithiajobs.com or apply in person at one of our local Lithia dealerships. Questions? Contact Personnel at 541-338-9594

Telephone Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30am - 5pm • Saturday 10am - 12:30pm 24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371: Place, cancel, or extend an ad after hours. 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

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Employment Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Ferris Building & Landscape Maintenance Remodeling, Pole Barns, Landscape Maint., Tree Service & Haul Away. CCB #68496 Harry Ferris 541-408-2262 Summer Maintenance! Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking, One Time Clean Up, Debris Hauling 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. 541-388-6910. ccb#5184 Picasso Painting All Phases Exterior interior 25 yrs exp. CCB# 194351 Affordable • Reliable. Bruce Teague 541-280-9081,

Tile, Ceramic

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Window Cleaning

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION

We are looking for people with a genuine excitement and passion for our products & customers!

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

• Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

LITHIA AUTO GROUP OF BEND HIRING - SALES REPRESENTATIVES

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

LITHIA

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

528

Loans and Mortgages

Sales

Wastewater Operator I CITY OF MADRAS Operates and maintains the City’s wastewater treatment facilities and the wastewater collection system. Reports to the Utilities Supervisor. The position requires the equivalent to an Associate’s Degree in chemistry, biology, or a wastewater treatment discipline, plus one year of experience in wastewater treatment operations. Certifications required are Oregon Wastewater Treatment Level I and Oregon Wastewater Collections Level I. Additional industry training or certification may substitute for some higher education. Must possess a valid Oregon commercial driver’s license with a Class B rating, as well as tanker and air-brake endorsements. Monthly salary range: $2,797 – $3,165 DOQ. Excellent benefit package including fully paid PERS. Send completed city application form, letter of interest and resume to “Wastewater Operator I Recruitment”, City of Madras, 71 SE “D” Street, Madras, OR 97741-1685. For a complete job description and application go to www.ci.madras.or.us Closing date: July 20, 2011 Equal Opportunity Employer

500

Window Cleaning Deliciously Low Prices • All Work Guaranteed • NO Streak Policy • Family Owned & Operated • Same Day Service Free Estimates • Residential/ Commercial 760-601-0013


F4 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 658

Houses for Rent Redmond

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Rentals

600 605

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 642

650

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent NE Bend

seen us lately...

Awbrey Butte Master Bedroom. Great Views. Hot Tub, Deck, A/C, Woodstove, Wifi. $500/mo. Gary 541 306-3977

627

GLENEDEN BEACH Ocean Front – June Sale (prior $210,000) Now $169,000! 1/7th deeded home, other 6/7ths sold. Near Salishan Resort w/ golf privileges Gordon 541-921-8000

630

Rooms for Rent STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent 1100 sq ft, 2 Bdrm, 1½ bath downtown townhome with patio. Home biz OK. 111 NW Hawthorne #6. $795/mo incl water/garbage. 541-388-4053 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

661

Houses for Rent Prineville 2 Bdrm, 2 bath Prineville duplex, garage w/opener, w/d hookup, near schools, 793 Bailey Rd. $550/mo, 1st, last, cleaning, 541-923-2184;541-419-6612

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Office / Warehouse 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. spaces, 827 Business Way, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + $300 dep. 541-678-1404 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., competitive rate, 541-382-3678.

Small 1 bdrm west side cottage, fenced yard, garage, no pets. References and credit check. $525 1st & last + dep. 541-382-3672.

DELUXE 2 BEDROOM Includes storage room &carport, smoke free bldg., fenced dog run, on-site laundry, close to schools, parks and shopping. O BSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com 541-923-1907 Like New Duplex. Nice neighborhood. 2 Bdrm 2 bath, 1-car garage, fenced, central heat & AC. Fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825. Triplex, Very Clean, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, 1200 sq.ft., W/D, dishwasher, micro., garage w/opener, $650 +$800 dep, W/S/G paid, 541-604-0338

648

Houses for Rent General Rented your property? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 541-383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel your ad!

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

726

860

Timeshares for Sale Selling Eagle Crest Timeshare 1/5th 3 bdrm condo. Absolute Bargain! For showing week of July 5 thru 11, call 503-957-5727.

746

Northwest Bend Homes 4 Bdrm,west side, large corner lot, newly remodeled, concrete counters, hardwood & slate throughout. 1159 NW Rockwood $419,900, 541-280-2828

755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, built in ‘03; (2) ½-acre lots, 1 buildable w/well, S. of Sunriver. Price neg. Possible trade for Bend sgl. level of same value. 509-585-9050 Brand New! Custom finished home with 1000 ft river frontage on just under 5 acres. Mtn views. Gourmet kitchen, 4 large bdrms with walk-in closets. 3.5 baths, large bonus rm, ready to move in! Bank owned. $398,500. Bend River Realty, Rob Marken, Broker/ Owner. Call 541-410-4255

3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq.ft., big wood stove, util. room, 1/2 acre lot, RV parking, dbl garage w/openers, $895. 541-480-3393 or 610-7803

870

Boats & Accessories

Motorcycles And Accessories

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

2005 Honda Goldwing Anniversary Edition, exc. cond., many extras, must see, $11,500. 541-848-7663

VESPA 2005 Gran Turismo 200 Perfect Cond., rare vintage green color, top box for extra storage, 2 helmets, incl. complete service by German Master Tech. $3750. 541-419-9928.

CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 541-385-5809

• Forward controls • Quick release windshield • Back rest • Large tank • Low miles! • $4000 Call 541-504-9284 or 541-905-5723

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, 15K mi, lots of upgrades, cstm exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage accessories, $15,500 OBO. 541-693-3975

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Yamaha Grizzly Sportsman Special 2000, 600cc 4-stroke, push button 4x4 Ultramatic, 945 mi, $3850. 541-279-5303

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Fleetwood 1512 sq ft double wide on 1.34 acres, Crooked River Ranch. Heat pump, 2 bdrms, den, 2 full baths, separate guest room & garage with half bath. Great view. $126,500. Call for appointment, 541-923-0574

Blue, Low hours very clean, freshly serviced. $3800. Will consider offers. See at JD Powersports, Redmond. 541-526-0757 • Richard 541-419-0712

693

773

Acreages

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.

Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 3-car garage, lg storage shed, fenced yard. Very clean, great location; no smoking. $1095/mo + $950 dep. 541-420-6667 A Newer 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1168 sq.ft., newer paint & carpet, patio, large lot, RV parking, dbl. garage, w/opener, $850, 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

Harley Dyna FXDWG 1998, custom paint, lots of chrome, head turner, be loud & proud, $7500, 541-280-9563

GAS

SAVER!

Honda Gold Wing GL 1100, 1980. 23,000 miles, full dress plus helmets, $3500 or best offer. Call 541-389-8410

775

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1991, As-is, $13,878; ‘96 3 bdrm., 2 bath, As-is, $14,500; ‘94 2 bdrm, 2 bath, $14,900; 2 bdrm, 2 bath, as-is, $9999, New 3 bdrm, 2 bath homes start at $39,999; Homes on land start at $64,900, Financing avail. OAC, J & M Homes, 541-548-5511.

Honda VT700 Shadow

870 14’ Bayliner Capris 1994, Mercury Force 50, trolling plate, always covered, low hours, $3000 OBO, 541-548-2508. 15’ Alaskan Smokercraft, 9.9 Yamaha, carpet floor and 2-side storage, shade top, extras (life preservers and fish toys) 4 seats. Good cond. throughout, Garage stored. Asking $2500. 541-593-6066

1984, 23K, many new parts, battery charger, good condition, $3000 OBO. 541-382-1891

16’ Esquire Runabout, new paint, upholstery, rebuilt trailer, new Bimini top, 115 HP Merc engine, $5200 invested in rebuild, selling for $3950, Please call 541-536-9281 or 541-948-2617.

KAWASAKI 750 2005 like new, 2400 miles, stored 5 years. New battery, sports shield, shaft drive, $3400 firm. 541-447-6552.

Certified Pre-Owned

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Certified Pre-Owned

Houses for Rent NE Bend

LARGE COZY 1 BDRM CONDO, 754 sq.ft., wood stove, W/S/G pd, utility hook ups, front deck storage, $595 541-480-3393 or 610-7803

Certified Pre-Owned

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, single garage, 1200 sq.ft, RV park, new paint, windows & blinds, no pets/smoking, $875/mo. + dep., 541-480-2468.

642

Managed by

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

880

Motorhomes 30’ Diesel Pusher Safari Sahara 1998. 20k orig. miles, exc. cond., maint. records, 300 h.p. Cat engine, 60 Allison trans., Magnum S26V300 chassis, LR slide, front entry, rear queen bed, full shower, Nomad & Sultan pkgs., low hours on generator. $53,000 • 541-410-3658.

25’ Catalina Sailboat 1983, w/trailer, swing keel, pop top, fully loaded, $11,000, call for details, 541-480-8060 9.5hp Evinrude motor, short shaft, excellent cond., $325. 541-420-6215; 541-536-3889

2006 FORD MUSTANG GT 5 Speed, Leather, A lot of Engine Upgrades

$

18,999 VIN:129932

Certified Pre-Owned

26,988

2008 SUBARU TRIBECA AWD 5-PASSENGER PREMIUM

22,988

2005 GMC SIERRA 2500 HD SLE 4X4 Crew Cab, Duramax Diesel

$ *See dealer for details

2010 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5 PREMIUM Auto, Moonroof, Heated Seats, Roof Rack, Alloy Wheels, 7,087 miles

$

26,998 VIN:766613

Certified Pre-Owned

2009 SUBARU FORESTER XT TURBO PREMIUM All Weather, Moonroof

$

25,999

24,999

VIN:785127

2008 DODGE 3500 QUAD CAB 4X4 DUALLY Laramie, Low Miles, Very Clean, Leather, Loaded

$

35,999 VIN:102465

VIN:816424

0% FOR 60 MOS.

2006 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER

On Select Models. In lieu of rebate. On approved credit.

Nice Car!

NEW 2011 NISSAN SENTRA

$

Auto, CD, ABS, Bluetooth

$

159/mo 39 Month lease. 12,000 Miles per year OAC. $1,995 Total to start. Includes DMV & 1st Payment. VIN: 682706. MSRP $20,025

Auto, AWD, ABS & More

$

21,750 +DMV VIN: 679055. MSRP $23,845, Smolich Discount $1,345, Rebate $750.

NEW 2011 NISSAN FRONTIER

2004 CHEVROLET AVALANCHE 4WD Loaded, Leather, DVD, Low Miles

$

22,995

19,988

2006 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON

$

$

29,590

30,888 VIN:88589

2003 SUBARU FORESTER Automatic, Alloy Wheels

$

11,488 VIN:723200

2006 JEEP LIBERTY 4WD Automatic

17,988

$

13,999

VIN:331045

2002 NISSAN FRONTIER CREW CAB 4X4

VIN:228887

2008 PONTIAC TORRENT

Running Boards, Bedliner, Roof Rack, Off-Road

$

10,999

Low Miles, Very Clean

$

2007 FORD ESCAPE Great MPG!

$

13,995

2004 MERCEDES ML 350 Auto, Leather, Moonroof, Nav., Very Very Nice, AWD

$

15,999

VIN:B59443

2008 FORD F-350 SUPER DUTY FX4 4X4 Super Cab, Lifted, Very Nice!

$

29,888 VIN:E320302

17,995 VIN:304437

VIN:322614

VIN: 428813. MSRP $28,495, Smolich Discount $2,500, Rebate $3,000

Crew Cab, 4x4, Tow, Power Sliding Rear Window, Rockford Fosgate Audio

$

All weather, Auto, Heated Seats

+DMV

NEW 2011 NISSAN TITAN SV

5.9L Diesel, Hard to Find, Low Low Miles-30K

VIN: 337978

Auto, 4x4, Tow Package, Bluetooth

$

7,888

2006 DODGE 2500 QUAD CAB SLT 4X4 LONG BOX

VIN:336522

NEW 2011 NISSAN ROGUE

Studios $375 1 Bdrm $400 Free Move-in Rent!

GSL Properties

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Dancers, 17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices, dry bags, spray skirts, roof rack w/towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1850/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

VIN:411956

SPRING BLAST! • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks! 541-548-8735

The Bulletin Classiieds

Low Miles, Moonroof

$

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

All Weather, Low Miles

638 2 Bdrm in 4-Plex, 1 bath, W/D hookups, storage, deck, W/S paid, $575 + $600 dep. 1-Month Free Option! 541-480-4824

Aluminum Grumman Canoe, 15-ft., great cond, includes paddles, $250. 541-848-2214

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

VIN:796536

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

A

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

21,999

2010 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5X PREMIUM

$

636

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1950 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

VIN:225776

650

Call for Specials!

1550 NW Milwaukee W/D hookup. $615/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 541-382-3678 or

875

Watercraft

19’ Custom Weld Viper 2004 & 2004 Mercury OB, 35 hrs on motor,$16,000. 541-416-1042 19' Duckworth Advantage 2005, Yamaha 115hp, 2007 Yamaha 8hp. All covers, equipped for fishing. Lowrance depth finder. $22,000 541-923-6487

2010 SUBARU LEGACY SEDAN PREMIUM

$

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $610$650/mo. 541-385-6928.

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

18’ Sailboat, Main & Jib, swing keel & rudder,sleeps 2,trailer, $2000 OBO; 9’ Fiberglass Trihull, $400; 10’ Ram-X Dinghy, $475, 541-280-0514.

Manual, All Weather Pkg

#1 Good Deal! 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath townhouse, W/D hookup, W/S paid, $625+ dep., 2922 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615.

541-330-0719

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Boats & Accessories

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625.

18’3” Bluewater 1984, 1 owner, 289 fishing motor & water skis, Calkins trailer, fish finder, sun cover, boat cover, well taken care of, $3500. Call 541-815-7367

Moving - must sell! 1991 Fuqua dbl wide, 3 bdrm, 2 bath on large beautiful lot, w/carport and 3 storage sheds, drive by Four Seasons Park, lot #29. $14,900. 541-312-2998.

Crooked River Ranch, 5 acres horse property fenced, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, W/D hookup, $800 plus deps. 541-420-5197,209-402-3499

634

Alpine Meadows Townhomes

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

865

Yamaha YFZ450 Sport ATV 2008

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

ATVs

HARLEY DAVIDSON CUSTOM 883 2004

762

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

632

870

Boats & Accessories

Homes with Acreage

LOOK AT US NOW!

Why Rent? When you Can own! For as low as $1295 Down. 541- 548-5511 www.JandMHomes.com

The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

3 bdrm/2 bath fully furnished, 2 car garage, 3 decks, new carpet, freshly painted. 14 Timber, $885, 1st/last, dep. 541-345-7794 541-654-1127

When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

Next to Pilot Butte Park 1989 Zachary Ct. #2 2 master bdrms each w/ 2 full baths, fully appl. kitchen, gas fireplace, deck, garage with opener. $725 mo.+$725 dep., incl. w/s/yard care, no pets. Call Jim or Dolores, 541-389-3761 • 541-408-0260

Apt./Multiplex General

Houses for Rent Sunriver

Boats & RV’s

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

700 800

659

Cottage like large 1 bdrm in quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, A newer 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1590 sq. SW Canyon/Antler. Hardft, gas fireplace, great room, woods, W/D. Refs, $550+ huge oversize dbl. garage utils, avail July, 541-420-7613 w/openers, big lot, $1195, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803 If you haven’t

Roommate Wanted

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges

Newer 3/2, 1600 sq.ft., dbl. car, fenced yard, RV-parking,A/C, 2560 SW Wikiup, $1000 mo. +dep,credit check, small dog ? no smoking, 541-322-8718.

Real Estate For Sale

VIN:500526

2001 JEEP WRANGLER Auto, 4x4, Hard Top Sport

$

14,988 VIN:337044

+DMV VIN: 311797. MSRP $38,445, Smolich Discount $4,005, Rebate $4,850

SMOLICH NISSAN “ W e m a ke c a r b u y i n g e a s y. ”

541- 389 -1178 VISIT SMOLICHNISSAN.COM

All vehicles subject to prior sale, tax, title, license & registration fees. All financing, subject to credit approval. Pictures for illustration purposes only. Offers expire Sunday, July 10, 2011 at close of business.

Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through July 14, 2011.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 8, 2011 F5

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 880

880

882

885

916

932

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Canopies and Campers

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Antique and Classic Autos

Alfa See Ya 40 2005. 2 slides, 350 CAT. Tile. 2 door fridge w/ice maker. $98,000. 541-610-9985

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $89,900. 541-215-5355

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Beaver Santiam 2002, 2 slides, 48K, immaculate, 330 Cummins diesel, $75,000. Call for details: 541-504-0874

Best Buy Hurricane 32’ 2007, 12K mi., Cherry Wood, leather, queen, 2 slides, 2 tv’s 2 air, jacks, camera, like new, non smoker, low book $59,900, 541-548-5216.

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179. Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $79,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Carri-lite 28½’ alum. const, AC, 4000 watt Onan gen, lrg LR slide, Oak cabinets, lots of storage, rear kitchen, queen bed w/new matt, double pane windows, forced air gas furnace, new Michelins, excellent cond, always garaged. $12,000 Cell, 541-408-7236; home, 541-548-8415.

881

Travel Trailers Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, frplc, 2 flat scrn TVs. $65,000. 760-644-4160

Fun Finder Model 189FBS, 2008, 7’ wide w/slide; 19’ long, sleeps 5, excellent condition, 3400# dry, $10,500. Call Fred, 541-516-1134

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQS, Loaded, 4 slides, 38’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $34,900, please call 541-330-9149.

JUMPIN' JACK Exc. cond. Used 3 times. Stored inside always. Ready for hunting. $3900. Call Denny 541-536-3045 or leave msg.

FOREST RIVER F24 27’ 5th wheel, 2000, rear kitchen, 1 large slide, new tires, new queen mattress. $9500 OBO. 541-504-2413.

Skyline Layton 25’ 2008, Model 208 LTD. Like brand new. Used 4x Bend to Camp Sherman. Winterized, in storage. 3855 lbs Sleeps 5. Queen walk around bed w/storage, full bathroom, full kitchen & lrg fridge. Dual batteries & propane tanks, awning,corner-leveling jacks, Easylift Elite load hitch w/ bars, furnace, AC, AM/FM stereo. Couch & dining table fold out for extra sleeping. $11,795 OBO. 760-699-5125.

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718

at Bend Airport (KBDN) Fully loaded 38' 2009 Limited Edition Montana 3665RE 5th wheel, 4 slides. Low mileage 2011 Ford F250 Super Duty Lariat QUIET diesel w/hitch, toolbox, Tonneau cover. Montana available alone or buy together. By apptmt In Bend (317) 966-2189.

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

60 feet wide x 50 feet deep, with 55 ft wide x 17 ft high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office & bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. $235K firm. Call 541-948-2126

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Chevrolet 3500 Service Truck, 1992, 4x4, automatic, 11-ft storage bed. Liftgate, compressor & generator shelf inside box, locked storage boxes both sides of bed, new tires, regular maintenance & service every 3K miles, set up for towing heavy equip. $4295 obo. 541-420-1846

GMC 6000 dump truck 1990. 7 yard bed, low miles, good condition, new tires! ONLY $4500 OBO. 541-593-3072

Toy Hauler 2003 Weekend warrior, 22’, Loaded, Ready for fun, Come see $10,000 1-541-598-7183

JAYCO SENECA 2008 36MS, fully loaded, 2 slides, gen., diesel, 8k miles, like new cond., $109,000 OBO. Call for details 1-541-556-8224.

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Executive Hangar

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $64,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

Lance-Legend 990 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, exc. cond., generator, solar-cell, large refrig, AC, micro., magic fan, bathroom shower, removable carpet, custom windows, outdoor shower/awning set-up for winterizing, elec. jacks, CD/stereo/4’ stinger. $10,500 Bend, 541.279.0458

Phoenix Cruiser 2001, 23 ft. V10, 51K. Large bath, bed & kitchen. Seats 6-8. Awning. $35,500 OBO. 541-923-4211

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

Fifth Wheels

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466. Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

925

Utility Trailers

12 ft. Hydraulic dump trailer w/extra sides, dual axle, steel ramps, spare tire, tarp, excellent condition. $6500 firm. 541-419-6552

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

Chevy 18 ft. Flatbed 1975, 454 eng., 2-spd trans, tires 60%, Runs/drives well, motor runs great, $1650. 541-771-5535

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

Chevy

Wagon

(4) Tires 26570R16, high rubber, exc. cond. $250. 541-536-3889 or 420-6215 We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

Wheels (4), new, 20x7.5, GM, ‘10 chrome, aluminum,bolt pattern, 6x132,$200, 541-390-8386

932

Antique and Classic Autos

1957,

932

933

933

Pickups

Pickups

Chev Silverado 04'

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

LT4x4 one owner/owner selling, fully loaded, 83,300 mi., 6.0L, $18,500. See Bend Craig’s List for more info. Call or text 541-410-9421

Ford F-150 2006 LOOKS BRAND NEW! Supercab Lariat 5.4L V8 eng.,approx. 20K mi! 4 spd auto, rear wheel drive. Black w/lots of extras: Trailer tow pkg, Custom bedliner, Pickup bed extender, Tan leather trimmed captain chairs, only $18,000. 541-318-7395

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Dodge pickup 1962 D100 classic, original 318 wide block, push button trans, straight, runs good, $1250 firm. Bend, 831-295-4903

VW Super Beetle 1971, $3000, great cond., with sunroof, 541-410-7679.

New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Ford 2 Door 1949, 99% Complete, $8,500, please call 541-408-7348.

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $30,000. 541-548-1422

exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, shocks, interior seat cover, everything works, 121K orig. mi.,original operators manual and line setting ticket incl. $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401

541-598-3750

Chevy 3/4 Ton 1989, 4x4, 100K miles, 350 engine, Great cond. $3900. Call 541-815-9939

DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Dodge Dakota 2000 Ext. Cab, 143K, new shocks, runs great, $3900. 801-739-4919

WILLYS JEEP 1956

Ford Mustang 1969 Coupe Must Sell! 1 owner; car has been parked since 1972. Very low mi., blue on blue with all parts complete, matching numbers. Body work completed & in primer state. Rebuilt transmission. $2500 obo. 541-514-4228.

Ford F150 2010 Super Cab Lariat loaded, 12,000 miles. VIN#B74273 $25,977

Porsche 1983 911SC Cabriolet. Info: www.83porsche911sccabriolet. com

International Travel All 1967,

70 Monte Carlo All original, beautiful, car, completely new suspension and brake system, plus extras. $5000 obo. 541-593-3072

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Antique and Classic Autos

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, autoA Local Danchuk Dealer Stockmatic, great shape, $9000 ing Hundreds of Parts for OBO. 530-515-8199 ‘55-’57 Chevy’s. Calif., Classic, Raingear Wiper Setups, Call Chris, 541-410-4860.

MUST SELL

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

2 Chrysler transmission 727s, 800 & 900 series. $250 no exchange. 541-385-9350

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call 541-504-9945

Truck with Snow Plow!

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

882

Towmaster Equipment Trailer, 14,000 lb capacity. Tandemn axle, 4-wheel brakes, 18’ bed, heavy duty ramps, spare tire mounted, side mounted fork pockets, all tires in good condition. $4150 or best offer. 541-420-1846.

Ford

Smolich Auto Mall

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686

541-389-5355

Pickups 78 CHEVY PICKUP Newly rebuilt 350 engine runs GREAT! Newer tires &other extras $935 541-419-5390

Dodge Quad Cab Diesel 2008 4X4, 57K Miles & Warranty! Vin #145845

Only $28,998

Ford Ranger 2004 4WD, 4L, 6-cyl, auto, 71K., bed liner, A/C tow pkg, well maint, $11,600, 541-549-2012.

NISSAN

*** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

1986,

Over 150 used to choose from!

Asking $3,999 or make offer.

933

F-250

Lariat, x-cab, 2WD, auto, gas or propane, 20K orig. mi., new tires, $5000, 541-480-8009.

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford Sport Trac Limited Edition 2007, too many extras to list incl. new tires, 106k, $18,995, 541-441-4475

Over 150 used to choose from!

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

Dodge Ram 3500 Dually Diesel 2005 58K Miles! Warranty!

LARGEST INVENTORY EVER! SUMMER CLEARANCE EVENT

Winnebago 32VS 2000, Class A Adventurer. Super slide, 31K mi., new Toyo tires, 11 1/2 ft. overall height, perfect cond,$37,999. 541-312-8974

29’ Alpenlite Riviera 1997 5th whl. 1 large slide-out. New carpeting, solar panel, AC & furnace. 4 newer batteries & inverter. Great shape. Must see to appreciate. $13,900 firm! 541-389-8315.

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $39,500. 541-420-3250

Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355.

$

$

16,995 24,995 +DMV

2011 DODGE RAM 1500

$

18,995

0% FOR 60 MONTHS IN LIEU OF REBATES

Crew Cab 4x4

$

FOR

60 MONTHS

2011 JEEP WRANGLER

2011 DODGE RAM 2500 0% FOR 60 MONTHS IN LIEU OF REBATES

31,995

Auto! Air Conditioning! Bluetooth! 0% FOR 60 MONTHS IN LIEU OF REBATES

$

23,995 +DMV

+DMV

MSRP $22,650; Smolich Discount $1,155; Customer Cash $2,500; VIN: BN573085, Stk#D11141

MSRP $37,485; Smolich Discount $2,990; Customer Cash $2,500; VIN: BG594806, Stk#DT1132

MSRP $25,395; Smolich Discount $400; Customer Cash $1,000; VIN: BW592202, Stk#J11065

2011 DODGE JOURNEY MAINSTREET

2011 DODGE RAM 2500

2011 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED

7-passenger seating & all new Pentastar motor!

Crew Cab 4x4, 6.7L Cummins Turbo Diesel!

$

23,995

0% FOR 60 MONTHS IN LIEU OF REBATES

$

+DMV

0% FOR 60 MONTHS IN LIEU OF REBATES

smolichmotors.com

ON 2011 WRANGLER

+DMV

+DMV

0% FOR 60 MONTHS IN LIEU OF REBATES

23,995

OR

MSRP $27,810; Smolich Discount $2,865; Customer Cash $1,750; VIN: BG612972, Stk#DT11162

ALL NEW 2011 DODGE AVENGER MAINSTREET

$

4x4, 5.7L Hemi

0% FOR 60 MONTHS IN LIEU OF REBATES

MSRP $26,810; Smolich Discount $815; Customer Cash $1,000; VIN: BH560945

0% FOR 60 MONTHS IN LIEU OF REBATES

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

1,000 0%

MSRP $22,070; Smolich Discount $575; Customer Cash $1,500; VIN: BD204973, Stk#J11098

ALL NEW 2011 DODGE CHARGER

$

VIN #23,998

ANNOUNCED! JUST 19,995 CUSTOMER $ CASH +DMV

+DMV

MSRP $18,990; Smolich Discount $495; Customer Cash $1,500; VIN: BD147894, Stk#D11148

350 HP & 27 MPG HWY

Nissan Maxima 2007, 44K mi., $2000 below BlueBook, very good cond., $15,500, 541-815-9939.

CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition & much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $4900, John Day, 541-575-3649

ALL NEW 2011 JEEP COMPASS

2011 DODGE CALIBER MAINSTREET 0% FOR 60 MONTHS IN LIEU OF REBATES

Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, $6500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

37,995

Leather, Navigation, Roof, Tow & Much More! 0% FOR 60 MONTHS IN LIEU OF REBATES

$

+DMV

28,995 +DMV

MSRP $28,740; Smolich Discount $1,995; Customer Cash $2,750; VIN: BT504726, Stk#DT11024

MSRP $45,675; Smolich Discount $4,680; Customer Cash $3,000; VIN: BG588712, Stk#DT11103

MSRP $34,015; Smolich Discount $2,020; Customer Cash $3,000; VIN: BW513446, Stk#J10108

ALL NEW 2011 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING

2011 DODGE NITRO DETONATOR

2011 JEEP PATRIOT

$

18,995 +DMV

MSRP $22,060; Smolich Discount $1,065; Customer Cash $2,000; VIN: BN579991, Stk#C11021

0% FOR 60 MONTHS IN LIEU OF REBATES

w/Navigation!

$

23,995

$

15,995 +DMV

+DMV

MSRP $28,030; Smolich Discount $1,035; Customer Cash $3,000; VIN: BW500514, Stk#DT10130

MSRP $18,265; Smolich Discount $770; Customer Cash $1,500; VIN: BD102823, Stk#J10173

541-389-1177 • 1865 NE Hwy 20 • Bend, Oregon CHRYSLER • DODGE • JEEP

All sale prices after dealer discounts, factory rebates and applicable incentives. Terms vary. See dealer for details. Limited stock on hand. Manufacturer rebates and incentives subject to change. Art for illustration purposes only. Subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typos. Expires 7/10/2011.


F6 Friday, July 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

933

935

935

940

975

975

975

975

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

The Bulletin is your

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

SUBARUS!!!

Over 150 used to choose from!

Over 150 used to choose from!

Employment Marketplace

Suzuki Equator CrewCab 2010 4X4, 3K Extra Low Miles! Warranty! VIN #429358

Now Only $22,555

Toyota Sienna XLE2005 leather, 40k miles, VIN# 306767 $23,977 541-598-3750

Jeep Renegade AWD 2006 Very Clean, 76K Miles & Warranty! Vin #197254

Volkswagen Eurovan 2000 Winnebago conversion, 88,334 miles, very good condition, $29,900, two new tires, new shocks, alternator, water pump, deep cycle battery, sound system, 541-389-6474

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

975

Only $14,988

NISSAN

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Paying Top Dollar For Your Vehicle!

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

541-322-7253

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. 541-480-1884 Subaru Forester S 2001 all wheel drive, 1 owner. $9,995 VIN#745963 541-598-3750

Call Jeremy Cooper 541-749-4025

DLR# 0225

V6, runs great, looks good inside & out, $2500.

VW Touareg 2007

BMW 3 Series Sport Wagon 2007

541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Thousands Less than New! Only 3K Miles! Vin #158726

NISSAN

$19,450! 541-389-5016 evenings. Mercury Mountaineer 1997 V8 5.0L Engine AWD Automatic 169K miles $3395, Peter 541.408.0877

Over 150 used to choose from!

Mitsubishi Outlander LS 2007 4WD, V6, 29k miles. VIN# 02948 $17,577 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Chevy Trailblazer 2004

Smolich Auto Mall

Warranty! Vin #124634

Sale Price $10,575

Mercedes GL450, 2007

541-749-4025 • DLR

All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

366

Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

Over 150 used to choose from!

Chevrolet 1-ton Express Cargo Van, 1999, with tow pkg., good condition, $4200. 541-419-5693

Buick Park Avenue 1996 auto., AC, clean interior, loaded, run great, 23 in-town mpg & 29 hwy mpg! Priced at $2995. Call Ron, 541-419-5060.

CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 All Wheel Drive mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires and wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives excellent!!!. Only $2500. (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639

Dodge Caliber SXT 2007 sport wagon, 41k miles VIN# 58571 $12,995 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

For the budget minded, very nice car! Vin#140994

Mercury Milan 2010

Sale Price $9,688 (photo is for illustration only)

Now Only $19,999 366

Smolich Auto Mall

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366 Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Hyundai Sonata GLS 2011 Two to choose from, not a misprint still in wrapper, low mileage. Vin #022816

Porsche

Sale Price $17,788

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Buicks -Nice luxury cars, 30 mpg highway. 1995 Limited LeSabre, 111k, $3900, gold; 1998 Custom LeSabre, 91k at $4500, silver; 2005 LeSabre Custom 84k, $6900; 2006 Lucerne, 76k, $7900. Call 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639.

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $3950 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Boxter

1999,

exc. cond., 88K, $12,999, call 541-350-1379

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 HYUNDAI

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

541-385-5809 to advertise. www.bendbulletin.com

541-385-5809

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices any addenda prior to submitting a proposal. Proposal results are available from COBE.

LEGAL NOTICE City of Bend Request for Proposals Transportation General Obligation Bond Program Management and Design (ST12CA )

Hyundai Sonata 2006

Over 150 used to choose from!

366

Call

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Smolich Auto Mall

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

smolichmotors.com

• 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

Smolich Auto Mall

Chysler La Baron Convertible 1990, Good condition, $3200, 541-416-9566

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com

541-749-4025 • DLR

Vans 541-389-1178 • DLR

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005

Sale Price $10,888

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com

366

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

smolichmotors.com

940

Sale Price $19,999

541-749-4025 • DLR

Incredible price with incredible MPG! Vin #128955

Premium Pkg. 17K Miles! Warranty! VIN #633381

Only $23,888

HYUNDAI

Sport Utility Vehicles

541-389-0435

52K Miles & Warranty! Vin #Z35138

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

The Bulletin Classifieds 935

541-385-5809

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

$20,872

Hwy 20 in Bend smolichmotors.com

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Chrysler LeBaron Convertible, 1995

Loaded-4WD. VIN# 001068

Jeep Wrangler 2010

CHECK YOUR AD

New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Hyundai Accent GS 2009

Over 150 used to choose from!

Subaru Outback 2008 2.5I wgn, leather-super clean #341084. $21,295 541-598-3750

Over 150 used to choose from!

***

MERCEDES C300 2008

Chevy Lumina Z34 1992, 230K miles, $500 OBO, 541-647-4817.

Smolich Auto Mall

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Smolich Auto Mall

Cadillac XLR Roadster 2005. Retractable hardtop, 12K miles, 320hp V8, always garaged, excellent! Serious buyers only. $49,000. 541-306-1193

The Bulletin Classified

DLR# 0225

We will pay CASH for your vehicle. Buying vehicles NOW!

Lincoln Town Car Signature Series 2001, 4.6L V-8, PW, PDL, A/C, good tires, silver w/grey interior, very nice luxury car, 86K 24 mpg, $7100, 541-317-0116.

Over 150 used to choose from!

DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Porsche Cayenne S 2008 Nearly every option: 20" wheels, navigation, Bi-Xenon lights, thermally insulated glass, tow pkg, stainless steel nose trim, moonroof, Bose sys, heated seats. 66K mi. MSRP was over $75K; $34,900. 541-954-0230

Automobiles

smolichmotors.com

Smolich Auto Mall

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

The City of Bend requests proposals from consultants for program management and design services to implement the Transportation General Obligation Bond program and projects. Sealed proposals must be submitted by August 16, 2011, 3:00 PM, at City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, 2nd Floor, Bend, Oregon, 97701, Attn.: Gwen Chapman, Purchasing Manager. Proposals will not be accepted after deadline. The outside of the package containing the proposal shall identify the project: Transportation General Obligation Bond Program Management and Design (ST12CA). Solicitation packets may be obtained from Central Oregon Builder's Exchange (COBE) at www.plansonfile.com (click on Public Works) or 1902 NE 4th Street, Bend, Oregon. Proposers must register with COBE as a document holder to receive notice of addenda. This can be done on the COBE website or by phone at 541-389-0123. Proposers are responsible for checking the website for the issuance of

The City of Bend reserves the right to: 1) reject any proposal not in compliance with public solicitation procedures and requirements, 2) reject any or all proposals in accordance with ORS 279B.100, 3) seek clarifications of any or all proposals, and 4) to select the proposal which appears to be in the best interest of the City. Published: July 8, 2001 Gwen Chapman Purchasing Manager 541-385-6677 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF AUCTION One (1) storage unit #0619 will be auctioned on Sat., July 16, 2011 at 11:00 am, at All Star Storage, 136 SW Century Dr., Bend, OR. Ph.# 382-8808.

541-385-5809

See the All-New 2011 Subaru Impreza WRX STI Sedans

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Over 150 used to choose from!

(photo for illustration only)

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Nissan Xterra AWD 2004

New 2011 Subaru Forester 2.5X

55K Miles & Warranty! Vin #631269

Smolich Auto Mall

Only $11,998

$

Over 150 used to choose from!

NISSAN

21,999

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

Alloy Wheel Value Package, Roof Rack, Splash Guard Kit, Rear Bumper Cover

366

Model BFB

MSRP $23,335

VIN: BH757289

New 2011 Subaru Impreza 2.5i Premium Dodge Nitro 2008

$

24K Miles! Warranty! VIN #258369

Now Only $14,999

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac.,loaded, dealer maint, $19,500. 503-459-1580.

20,188

Model BJD

MSRP $21,377

Fog Lamp, Power Moonroof, All Weather Pkg: Heated Front Seats, Windshield Wiper De-Icer, Heated Side Mirrors, Center Arm Rest, Dim Mirror/Comp w/Homelink, Splash Guard

VIN:BH520977

New 2011 Subaru Legacy 2.5i

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Ford Explorer 1999 XLT V6 4.0L 106K, 4WD,CD, tape deck, tow bar, auto, fully loaded $4495, Peter 541-408-0877

$

SUPER SUMMER

SAVING!

Model BAB MSRP $22,218 VIN: B3245202

C.V.T Transmission

New 2011 Subaru Outback 2.5i Premium

$

26,388

Model BDD

MSRP $27,628

VIN: B3394494

New 2011 Subaru Tribeca 3.6R Limited

Honda CR-V 2004

$

$9,300. Automatic 4 cyl. 132,000 miles Great condition. Call 541-383-8598

2012 HYUNDAI ACCENT GLS

HERE NOW! Honda CRV 2007 AWD 18mpg City/26 Hwy! 62k mi, MP3, multi-disc CD, sunroof, tow pkg, $17,500. 541-389-3319

Smolich Auto Mall

AWD, Limited, Navigation, & More! 33K Miles & Warranty! Vin #530244

Only $24,988

Model BTD MSRP $37,827

Automatic

VIN: B4402280

40 $14,995 MPG

MSRP $16,015, Smolich Discount $1055 VIN: 074960

2010 SUBARU LEGACY SEDAN LIMITED

2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS Jeep Commander 2007

35,599

Sale Price CHECK OUT THE GAS MILEAGE!

Over 150 used to choose from!

21,388

Leather, Loaded, Moonroof, Low Miles!

2010 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5 PREMIUM

Auto, Moonroof, Heated Seats, Roof Rack, Alloy Wheels, 7,087 Miles!

2010 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5i PREMIUM WAGON Alloy Wheels, Heated Seats

Sale Price

$17,995 MSRP $18,950, Smolich Discount $950 VIN: 190318

40 MPG

VIN:A3245202

$ CHECK OUT THE GAS MILEAGE!

24,995

VIN:766613

$

26,998

VIN:A3362357

$

25,999

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

54 1. 7 4 9. 4 02 5 SMOLICH HYUNDAI 2250 NE Highway 20

PowertrainLimitedWarranty

visit us at: www.smolichhyundai.com Jeep Grand Cherokee Special Edition 2004 4x4, V8, 91K, auto, AC, $8495. 541-598-5111

Photos are for illustration purposes. Prices good through July 10, 2011.

AT THE OLD DODGE LOT UNDER THE BIG AMERICAN FLAG Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through July 14, 2011.


INSIDE: Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show returns for its 36th year, PAGE 12

Bend Summer Festival kicks into gear, PAGE 20 Out of Town summer calendar, PAGE 21


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR Julie Johnson, 541-383-0308 jjohnson@bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

inside

REPORTERS Heidi Hagemeier, 541-617-7828 hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com Jenny Wasson, 541-383-0350 jwasson@bendbulletin.com

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. E-mail to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ADVERTISING 541-382-1811

Cover design by Althea Borck / The Bulletin Photo courtesy Randee St Nicholas

RESTAURANTS • 10

EVENTS • 20

• A review of Broken Top

• Bend Summer Festival takes over downtown

FINE ARTS • 12

MUSIC • 3 • COVER STORY: Alison Krauss & Union Station play the amphitheater • Free outdoor music abounds in Central Oregon • Local metal bands team up at Domino Room • Show raises funds for High & Dry Bluegrass Festival • Accordion Babes come to McMenamins • Portland-based MC Illmaculate is coming to Bend • Polecat doubles up the shows • Plenty of music at Bend Summer Festival • Last Band Standing takes a week off

AREA 97 CLUBS • 8 • Guide to area clubs

MUSIC RELEASES • 9

BIG COUNTRY RV BRINGS YOU THE

FREE

• Take a look at recent releases

• Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show is Saturday, plus smaller version Sunday • Poet Maxine Scates visits Bend library’s Second Sunday • Students produce new show at Greenwood Playhouse • Art Exhibits lists current shows

OUT OF TOWN • 21 • Summer guide looks ahead • A guide to out of town events

GAMING • 25 • Review of “F.E.A.R. 3” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

MOVIES • 26

OUTDOORS • 15

• “Horrible Bosses” and “Zookeeper” open in Central Oregon • “13 Assassins” and “Of Gods And Men” are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon

• Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

CALENDAR • 16 • A week full of Central Oregon events

PLANNING AHEAD • 18 • Make your plans for later on • Talks and classes listing

2011 DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR

CONCERTS

PRESENTED BY:

PRESENTED BY:

PRESENTED BY:

NISSAN • VOLVO • SUZUKI • HYUNDAI CHRYSLER • DODGE • JEEP

THE GUESS WHO

CLAY WALKER

REO SPEEDWAGON

JOAN JETT & THE BLACKHEARTS

7 pm Wednesday, August 3rd

7 pm Thursday, August 4th

7 pm Friday, August 5th

7 pm Saturday, August 6th

CONCERT PASSES AVAILABLE AT ALL CENTRAL OREGON

RESTAURANTS EVERY WEDNESDAY FROM 2 PM TIL 7 PM • BEGINNING JULY 6 • WHILE SUPPLIES LAST, NO PURCHASE NECESSARY

It’s All Part Of The Deschutes County Fair & Rodeo August 3rd through August 7th Celebrating 92 Years Of Jam Packed Fun!


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

PAGE 3

music

HOME AGAIN Courtesy Randee St Nicholas

Alison Krauss & Union Station’s new album, “Paper Airplane,” is their first since 2004. From left are Jerry Douglas, Dan Tyminski, Krauss, Barry Bales and Ron Block.

Alison Krauss returns to Bend with her longtime band, Union Station By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

I

n the “About” section of Alison Krauss & Union Station’s official website, buried near the end of more than 1,300 words about the country/bluegrass crossover band’s new album “Paper Airplane,” there’s a quote from Krauss that stands out from the effusive mumbo jumbo that surrounds it. “I feel like this,” she says, speaking of working with Union Station, “is the best environment for me.” A quick survey of her career re-

inforces just how much that statement means. Slowly, steadily and mostly quietly, Krauss — who’ll bring her band back to Bend on Saturday (see “If you go”) — has built one of the most impressive resumes not just in bluegrass or country music, but in her entire industry over the past three decades. Raised in Illinois, Krauss was a prodigious fiddler who was winning competitions and leading bands before her teenage years. At 14, she signed a record deal with the roots-music specialists at Rounder Records, and at 16, she

released her debut album, “Too Late To Cry.” Over the next decade, Krauss — with Union Station at her side — rose quickly in the bluegrass world, and to dizzying heights. She started racking up Grammy awards and joined the Grand Ole Opry at age 21, and in 1995, Krauss’ cover of Keith Whitley’s “When You Say Nothing At All” was a huge hit, pushing her into mainstream country’s consciousness. As Krauss’ star brightened, doors opened. She performed a duet with country star Brad Pais-

ley on his hit single “Whiskey Lullaby.” She provided the voice for one of the characters in the Adam Sandler film “Eight Crazy Nights.” She sang with Phish. Most importantly, perhaps, she contributed several tracks to the soundtrack of the hit movie “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” To date, that soundtrack has sold more than seven million copies and is widely credited with sparking renewed interest in bluegrass and roots music that continues to flourish in the success of bands like The Avett Brothers. Continued Page 5

If you go What: Alison Krauss & Union Station, with Good Old War When: 6:30 p.m. Saturday, gates open 5 p.m. Where: Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend Cost: $39 (general) and $62 (reserved) plus fees, available at the gate or in advance at www. bendconcerts.com or The Ticket Mill (541-318-5457) in Bend’s Old Mill District. Contact: www.bend concerts.com


PAGE 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

music

Under the sun

Free, outdoor concert series heat up with the temperatures

By Ben Salmon • The Bulletin

M

emorial Day is a distant memory, the summer solstice has come and gone, and now we’re just past the Fourth of July.

For Central Oregon music fans, that means one thing:

Free, outdoor concert series are popping up all over now that sunny, warm weather is here to stay (we hope). In towns across the region, event planners and sponsors have come together to make live music available for any and all who want it. Bend’s popular Munch & Music series started Thursday night, and here are three others, including two that start this week, one that started in late Courtesy Keith Buckley

June, and one that’s brand new.

Alive After 5 comes to Bend’s Old Mill District The new kid on the block in this bunch is Alive After 5, a four-week series set off the northern part of Powerhouse Drive in Bend’s Old Mill District over the next four weeks. Alive After 5 kicks off Wednesday with Quarterflash, the Portland-based band that scored some big hits in the 1980s, including “Harden My Heart.” The band is fronted by Marv and Rindy Ross, who lived in Bend in the 1970s and played in bands around town. The rest of the lineup features Bay Area-based roots/soul artist Nicki Bluhm on July 20, the throwback world-pop of Pepe & the Bottle Blondes on July 27, and the eclectic, multi-instrumental virtuosity of David Lindley on Aug. 3. Each concert will run from about 5 to

Rindy and Marv Ross of Quarterflash will perform Wednesday at Alive After 5 in Bend. 8 p.m. As is almost always the case with these kinds of shows, there will be beer (from 10 Barrel Brewing) and food available for purchase. For more info, visit www.aliveafterfivebend.com.

Music on the Green returns to Redmond Redmond’s popular Music on the Green series started June 29 with County Line, but with five shows left on the schedule, it’s not too late to check it out for some family-friendly fun times. Wednesday’s headliner is Central Oregon’s own country sensation, the Brian Hanson Band, which features furious fiddling, fine harmonies and plenty of twang. The lineup continues with The Notables Swing Band on July 27, local Americana group Cinder Blue on Aug. 10, classic hits by 41 East on Aug. 24 and the Hawaiian

sounds and moves of the Hokulea Dancers on Sept. 7. The concerts happen every other Wednesday from 6-7:30 p.m. in Sam Johnson Park at Southwest 15th Street and Southwest Evergreen Avenue in Redmond. Lawn chairs and blankets are welcome, and there will be food vendors, arts and crafts booths and a children’s area. If parking is scarce, there are additional spots near the Spud Bowl and Redmond High School. For more info, go to www.redmondsummerconcerts.com or 541-923-5191.

Prineville’s ready to Picnic in the Park Every Wednesday night from now through Aug. 24, Prineville’s Pioneer Park (downtown next to the courthouse) will come alive with the sounds of live music

during the seventh annual Picnic in the Park series. The first concert will feature Cool Conspiracy, a band out of the Willamette Valley that does a mix of jazz standards, contemporary R&B and classic blues. Find them at www.coolconspiracy.com. The rest of the lineup includes Brady Goss on July 20, Apropos Musique on July 27, The Notables Swing Band on Aug. 3, Earl Wear & Haywire on Aug. 10, Brian Hanson on Aug. 17 and Rhonda Hart & Band on Aug. 24. The concerts run from 6-8 p.m. and attendees can also check out food vendors and a farmers market. On Aug. 17, there will be a kids’ zone play area. For more info, contact recreation@ ccprd.org or 541-447-1209. Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-3830377 or bsalmon@bendbulletin.com.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

PAGE 5

music

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

541-322-CARE Family Rafting Tubing Kayaking Stand Up Paddle

On July 16, folk troubadour The White Buffalo will return to Bend for a show at The Horned Hand. I know what you’re thinking: Huh? What’s The Horned Hand? Where is it? Who’s behind it? Also ... huh? Good news: A Frequency staffer stopped by the mysterious music spot this week and was excited about what he heard and saw. Check out his report at:

TWO HOUR TO ALL DAY TRIPS

WWW.BENDBULLETIN.COM/FREQUENCY

From Page 3 But it was Krauss’ 2007 collaboration with former Led Zeppelin frontman Robert Plant that completed her progression from bluegrass star to country star to just plain star. Their album, “Raising Sand,� won six Grammys, including Album of the Year, bringing Krauss’ career Grammy haul to 26. There are only two men — and no women — with more. It’s important to note here that Krauss has played with Union Station since the mid-1980s, and the band’s lineup hasn’t changed since the addition of world-class Dobro player Jerry Douglas in 1998. That’s a long time for any band to stick together, much less one with a frontwoman who has experienced so much personal success. But when you start adding up the individual assets in Alison Krauss & Union Station, it’s not hard to see why the group has endured. After all, when you’re part of arguably the most talented band on the planet, where else would you go? Let’s recap those assets, starting with the obvious: Krauss’ divine soprano and impressive fiddle skills, which she pulls out

now and then to remind folks she’s not just a pretty voice. Her right-hand man is guitarist and mandolinist Dan Tyminski, who’s a multi-Grammy winner himself and the International Bluegrass Music Association’s Male Vocalist of the Year four times, not to mention the voice of George Clooney in the hit song “I Am A Man of Constant Sorrow� from the “O Brother� film. Douglas is arguably the world’s greatest Dobro player and one of country music’s best musicians, period. Banjo man Ron Block has written 10 songs for the band. Bassist Barry Bales — IBMA’s Bass Player of the Year in 2008 — provides a rock-solid foundation. It truly is like having a starting lineup of all-star caliber players all on the same team. Together, the quintet is back this year with “Paper Airplane,� their first studio effort since 2004’s “Lonely Runs Both Ways.� The new album is a classic example of a band that knows its strengths and sticks to them; throughout its 11 songs, Krauss’ voice swoops and soars over some of the tightest and most subtly sublime music you’ll

ever hear from a string band. “Paper Airplane� is also deeply emotional, from the plaintive title track to Tyminski’s highlonesome take on Peter Rowan’s “Dust Bowl Children� to covers of Jackson Browne, Richard Thompson and Tim O’Brien. Overall, “Paper Airplane� is the sound of an expert band playing beautiful music darn near perfectly, which is why Paste Magazine said it “may well be the finest album Krauss has ever released.� It’s also the sound of five parts working as one, each with an equally important job to do. Though you wouldn’t know it, to hear the humble Tyminski talk. “I think what makes it work is that, at the end of the day, (Krauss) has the most recognizable and unique voice, probably on this planet,� he told CMT. com last month. “She could most certainly have a different configuration of people and still command your attention. I don’t think we necessarily make it successful. Hopefully, we help.�

3

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To commemorate Alison Krauss & Union Station’s new album, the cover of this week’s GO! Magazine is designed so that you can fold it into your own, functional paper airplane. Just tear off the cover, follow the steps below, and you'll be flying GO! Airlines in no time. Enjoy the plane and the show! 2

TRIPS IN BEND, SUNRIVER, SISTERS & REDMOND Experience the Deschutes, McKenzie & Umpqua Rivers

Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.

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1

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Oct. 12 ....................... Oct. 21 ...................... Oct. 27 ...................... Dec. 22 ...................... Jan. 21 ........................ Feb. 7 ......................... Mar. 10 ...................... Apr. 7 .........................

Shangri-La Acrobats Tower of Power Miles Davis Experience Blind Boys of Alabama Peter Yarrow Tao–Art of Drum Evening with Groucho Bruce Hornsby

Tickets & Info: "OEZ;FJHFSU5IF#VMMFUJO

TowerTheatre.org | Ticket Mill 541.317.0700


PAGE 6 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

music See five local metal bands in one night

CENTRAL OREGON

Open LATER this Saturday for Summer Fest!

centraloregonsaturdaymARKET.COM • centraloregonsaturdaymARKET.COM • centraloregonsaturdaymARKET.COM • centraloregonsaturdaymARKET.COM

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Bend’s hard rock and metal scene is an ever-evolving thing, where bands form and dissolve in the blink of an eye and heavyfriendly venues come and go (and sometimes come again) according to the whims of owners and promoters. To combat such a mercurial milieu, it would seem to be a good idea for some stable bands to bond together and showcase their skills. Strength in numbers, if you will. And that’s exactly what the Bend Metal Fest intends to bring to the table. Tonight at Bend’s Domino

er is he Sienlcle 1974 t e r e h W er s the Mak

OPEN EVERY SATURDAY THROUGH SEPT. 4 DON’T MISS IT! OPEN AT 10 am

DOWNTOWN BEND (across from the PUBLIC library)

• fun to shop •

THE LARGEST SELECTION OF

LOCAL ARTISANS & CRAFTMASTERS east of the

CASCADES • fun to browse • VENDOR INFO: 541-420-9015

Room, five solid local bands will provide a sort of sampler platter for Central Oregon’s heavy scene. Show up and you can taste Tentareign’s highly technical thunder, StillFear’s cool throwback vibe, Shovelbelt’s caustic neo-grunge and Exfixia’s mix of melody and brutality, plus the growling death metal of Embrace the Fear. It’s kind of like The Bite of Band for headbangers. The Bang of Bend! Or something. Seriously, though, if you like your music loud and shredtastic, hit this show. At $5, it’s a bargain. Plus, you can pick up a pass at Sunday Guitars (541-323-2332) in Bend or Habit-tat Studio & Salon (541-923-4703) in Redmond that’ll let you bring a friend for free. Bend Metal Fest, with Tentareign, StillFear, Shovelbelt, Exfixia and Embrace the Fear; 8 tonight, doors open at 7 p.m.; $5 at the door; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.jmrentertainment.co or 541-977-3982.

Support the High & Dry Bluegrass Festival Another week has gone by, and we’re another week closer to the annual High & Dry Bluegrass Festival. Organizers of Central Oregon’s largest gathering of strictly bluegrassers are no doubt hard at work getting their venue — the Runway Ranch east of Bend — suitable for a weekend full of string-band fun. Of course, it costs money to put on such a show, so tonight, a couple of rootsy local faves will play The Barn in Sisters to raise funds for High & Dry. The Anvil

Upcoming Concerts

Exfixia Submitted photo

Blasters and the Runway Ranch Band will get started at around 7, and you should bring $10 to $15 (or more!) to donate to the cause. The Runway Ranch Band is kind of the High & Dry house band, so you know they know what they’re doing. And The Anvil Blasters, well, they’re a heck of a good time. Find ’em at www .anvilblasters.com. High & Dry Bluegrass Festival fundraiser, with The Anvil Blasters and the Runway Ranch Band; 7 tonight; $10-$15 suggested donation; The Barn in Sisters, 68467 Three Creeks Road; www .hadbf.com.

Accordion Babes come to McMenamins Here’s something we don’t see every week in Bend, taken from the McMenamins website: “Renee de la Prade and Amber Lee Baker are making the accordion sexy this summer! They’re touring as The Accordion Babes, sexy

sirens of the squeezebox.” A little online digging reveals that, indeed, de la Prade and Baker are part of an effort by a network of women to spice up the accordion and bring its music to the masses by sultry, seductive means. The centerpiece of that effort is the third annual “Accordion Babes Album & Pin-up Calendar,” which features both a compilation of accordion-powered folk, jazz, Latin and pop music, but also a vintage-style calendar featuring female accordion players in provocative dress and classic pin-up poses. The Accordion Babes’ fiveweek tour stops in Bend on Wednesday. Both de la Prade and Baker are skilled and experienced performers who promise a show that is “part cabaret, part rock ’n’ roll, and all woman!” Find much more at www .squeezeboxgoddess.com. Renee de la Prade and the Accordion Babes; 7 p.m. Wednesday; free; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www.mcmenamins .com or 541-382-5174.

Illmaculate headlines Madhappy Lounge This came in at the last minute, but it’s worth your attention: Portland-based MC Illmaculate is coming to Bend Saturday for a show at Madhappy Lounge. Known to his family as Greg Poe, Illmaculate is a member of the vast and influential Sandpeople hip-hop crew, and in 2004, he became the youngest person ever to win the Scribble Jam freestyle rap competition. What that means is dude can flow. Now, he’s releasing a free album online and playing Bend to celebrate. “The Green Tape” is Illmaculate’s collaboration with producer G_Force in which the duo samples, reshuffles and reworks Al Green’s 2008 album “Lay It Down.” Continued next page

July 15 — Fareed Haque & Mathgames (electronic funk), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, www. silvermoonbrewing.com or 541-388-8331. July 15 — The White Buffalo (folk), Sisters Coffee Co., loudgirlproductions@live. com or 541-480-4054. July 15-16 — 4 Peaks Music Festival (jam-band), Rockin’ A Ranch, Tumalo, www.4peaksmusic.com. July 16 — Breedlove/ Two Old Hippies Festival (acousticpalooza), Breedlove Guitars, Bend, www. breedloveguitars.com. July 16 — The White Buffalo (folk), The Horned Hand, Bend, loudgirlproductions@ live.com or 541-480-4054. July 17 — The Greencards (Americana), Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend, www. bendconcerts.com. July 20 — Nicki Bluhm (roots-pop), Old Mill District, Bend, www.c3events.com. July 21 — Rootz Underground at Munch & Music (reggae), Drake Park, Bend, www. munchandmusic.com. July 22 — Everclear (alt-rock), Century Center, Bend, www. bendliveandlocal.com. July 22 — Tornado Rider (cello-rock), The Horned Hand, Bend, loudgirlproductions@ live.com or 541-480-4054. July 23 — Pink Martini (pop/classical), Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend, www. bendconcerts.com. July 24 — Dangermuffin (roots-rock), Black Butte Ranch, Sisters, www. blackbutteranch.com. July 27 — Freak Mountain Ramblers (roots-rock), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www.mcmenamins. com or 541-382-5174. July 27 — Pepe & the Bottle Blondes (throwback theatrics), Old Mill District, Bend, www.c3events.com. July 28 — Cherry Poppin’ Daddies at Munch & Music (ska/swing), Drake Park, Bend, www.munchandmusic.com. July 29 — Nitty Gritty Dirt Band (country-rock), Tower Theatre, Bend, www.towertheatre. org or 541-317-0700. July 30-31 — Volcanic Funk Festival (funk), Century Center, Bend, www.p44p.biz. July 31 — The David Mayfield Parade (indie rock), Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend, www.bendconcerts.com. Aug. 2-4 — Mike + Ruthy (Americana), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www.mcmenamins. com or 541-382-5174.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

music

Last Band Standing For the past two months, 32 bands have battled for the title of Last Band Standing each Friday at Century Center (70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend). Last week: Necktie Killer and Cadence won enough audience votes to move on to the finals, to be held next week. Tonight, Last Band Standing takes a week off. The finals are July 15, with five bands — Cadence, Kleverkill, Necktie Killer, Sifted and Stillfear — set to compete for the grand prize. The show starts at 8 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are free, available at several Central Oregon locations. Visit http://url .bb/LBS11 for a list of ticket outlets and more information.

— Ben Salmon, The Bulletin

From previous page It’s an interesting and entertaining piece of work, and you can grab it at www.freshselects .com. The Green Tape Tour, with Illmaculate, Top Shelf, Only One, Mikey Vegaz and DJ Hit N Runn; 9 p.m. Saturday; free; Madhappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; madhappylounge@gmail .com or 541-388-6868.

Bellingham’s Polecat plays twice in town Polecat is a relatively young band from Bellingham, Wash., that plays Americana, bluegrass and roots-rock with mild Celtic flavor and a hint of jam. In just a year together, they’ve made a couple of records and played more than 100 shows, including slots where they’ve shared the stage with big names like The Hackensaw Boys, The Moondoggies and Trampled by Turtles. Now, they’re branching down into Oregon and they’re hitting Bend hard. For the daylight types, Polecat will play a 1 p.m. set Saturday on the Bend Summer Fest’s Main Stage downtown. For those more comfortable dancing in the dark of a crowded bar, the band will be at McMenamins Old St. Francis School (700 N.W. Bond St., Bend) at 7 p.m. Thursday. Both shows are free. Polecat plays the kind of party-friendly string music that goes over well in Bend, so if you’re reading this and you dig Yonder Mountain, Hot Buttered Rum or our own Moon Mountain Ramblers, check ’em out. Find more info at www.polecatbluegrass .com.

Lots of music at the Bend Summer Festival The Bend Summer Festival

Polecat Submitted photo

is this weekend, which means downtown will be covered with live music. Highlights on the main stage include ’90s alt-pop faves Toad the Wet Sprocket at 9:30 tonight, and San Francisco rock band Luce at 9 p.m. Saturday. Flamenco guitarist Ottmar Liebert and his band Luna Negra will headline the jazz stage on Saturday at 9:30 p.m. At Troy Field, two local radio stations will hold “listener appreciation” concerts. Tonight, ’80s rockers Night Ranger (“Sister Christian”) will perform for 98.3 FM (The Twins), and on Saturday, country band The Dirt Drifters will play for 99.7 FM (The Mountain). Both bands go on at

8:30 p.m. (after opening acts), and free tickets to each can be obtained by listening to the radio stations. Bend’s community radio station, KPOV, will have a stage dedicated to local acts, with Boxcar Stringband, Eric Tollefson, Five Pint Mary and Hilst & Coffey set to play. And local humanitarian group Rise Up will have a stage with emerging bands like Capture the Flag, Lyible, Rural Demons, Aisea Taimani, Zero Static and more. For more information, see the summer festival story on Page 20 or visit www.bendsummer festival.com. — Ben Salmon, The Bulletin

PAGE 7


PAGE 8 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

area clubs BEND

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Get listed At least 10 days prior to publication, e-mail events@bendbulletin.com. Please include date, venue, time and cost.

SUNDAY

MONDAY

MUSIC TYPE: b c

Blues Country

dj f

TUESDAY

821 N.W. Wall St., 541-323-2328 235 S.W. Century Drive, 541-385-7427

Blacksmith After Dark, 10 pm dj

Bond Street Grill 1051 N.W. Bond St., 541-318-4833

Bo Restobar 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-617-8880

Crossings Lounge 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, 541-389-8810

Domino Room 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-1106

Fox’s Billiards 937 N.W. Newport Ave., 541-647-1363

Grover’s Pub 939 S.E. Second St., 541-382-5119

Jackson’s Corner 845 N.W. Delaware Ave., 541-647-2198

A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm The River Pigs, 9 pm r/p Bend Metal Fest, 8 pm, $5 m (P. 6) Bobby Lindstrom, 8:30 pm b Death of a Hitman, OpenFate, 9 pm m Chris Beland, 7-9 pm f

JC’s 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-383-3000

Kelly D’s Irish Sports Bar 1012 S.E. Cleveland, 541-389-5625

Madhappy Lounge 850 N.W. Brooks St., 541-388-6868

Harley Bourbon, 9 pm r/p

M&J Tavern 102 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-389-1410

Maragas Winery Taverna 634 N.W. Colorado Ave.

McMenamins Old St. Francis 700 N.W. Bond St., 541-382-5174

Northside Bar & Grill 62860 Boyd Acres Road, 541-383-0889

Old Mill Brew Werks 384 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive

The Quons, 6 pm r/p Animated film fest, all day, $3, $1 kids The Substitutes, 8:30 pm r/p

portello winecafe 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, 541-385-1777

River Rim Coffeehouse 19570 Amber Meadow Drive, 541-728-0095

Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 6 pm Little Fish, 6:30-8:30 pm

WEDNESDAY

Blacksmith After Dark, 10 pm dj Bobby Lindstrom, 7 pm b A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm The River Pigs, 9 pm r/p

Hold ‘em free roll, 6:30 pm

KC Flynn, 9 pm r/p Karaoke w/ Rockin’ Robin, 8 pm Illmaculate, Top Shelf, more, 9 pm h (P. 6) HDH, Tentareign, Vaulted, 9 pm r/p Dan Shanahan, 6 pm a Animated film fest, all day, $3, $1 kids The Substitutes, 8:30 pm r/p

Texas hold ‘em, 6:30 pm

21+ Poetry Slam, 8 pm, $3

Animated film fest, all day, $3, $1 kids Smooth jazz w/ Robert & Lisa, 4-7 pm j

Hold ‘em free roll, 6:30 pm

Karaoke w/ DJ MC Squared, 7 pm Love and Light, 9 pm dj

MC Mystic, 9 pm dj

Accordion Babes, 7 pm r/p (P. 6) Rock Hounds, 7-9:30 pm r/p

Polecat, 7 pm a (P. 7) Open mic, 8 pm

Mark Ransom, 7 pm r/p Hold ‘em tourney, 1 pm; Freeroll, 6 pm

Hold ‘em tourney, 1 pm; KO tourney, 6 pm

Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 4 pm

Hold ‘em Bounty tourney, 6 pm

Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 6 pm

Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 6 pm Open mic, 6:30-8:30 pm

The Acorn Project, 9 pm, $7 r/p

24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-8331

125 N.W. Oregon Ave., 541-749-2440

THURSDAY

Phil Hetz, 8 pm b

Silver Moon Brewing Co.

The Summit Saloon & Stage

w

Americana Rock/Pop World

The Quons, 6-8 pm r/p

61615 Athletic Club Drive, 541-385-3062

212 N.E. Revere Ave., 541-719-0580

r/p

Betty Berger Big Band, 6 pm, $7 j

a

Scanlon’s

Slick’s Que Co.

p

Metal Punk

RaiseTheVibe, 7 pm j

635 N.W. 14th St., 541-617-9600

2650 N.E. Division St., 541-550-7771

m

Bellavia, 7 pm j

Parrilla Grill

Rivals Sports Bar and Grill

j

Hip-hop Jazz

Joseph Balsamo, 6-8 pm b

Baldy’s BBQ

211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-318-0588

h

The Quons, 6 pm r/p

5 Fusion & Sushi Bar

The Blacksmith Restaurant

a

DJ Folk

Two/Thirds Trio, 6 pm j DJ Steele, 9 pm dj

DJ Steele, 9 pm dj

Freesound, 9 pm r/p Lindy Gravelle, 6-9 pm c Open mic/acoustic jam, 6:30-9 pm

Tart Bistro 920 N.W. Bond St., 541-385-0828

Open mic, 4 pm

Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub 913 N.E. Third Street, 541-383-1694

Allan Byer, 7 pm f

Velvet 805 N.W. Wall Street

REDMOND Harley Bourbon, 6-8 pm r/p

Baldy’s BBQ 950 S.W. Veterans Highway, 541-923-2271

Pamela McGuire Trio, 6-8 pm j

Brassie’s Bar Eagle Crest Resort, 541-548-4220

Checkers Pub 329 S.W. Sixth St., 541-548-3731

Millennium Cafe 445 S.W. Sixth St., 541-350-0441

Billy Wilson, 8 pm r/p

Sagebrush Rock, 7:30 pm r/p

Live Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 3 pm

Live Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 12 pm

SUNRIVER Zeppa Bistro Sunriver Resort, 541-593-4855

Lindy Gravelle, 6-8 pm c

Live Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 12 pm

Live Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 3 pm

Live Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 3 pm


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

PAGE 9

music releases Sarah Jarosz Here and there

FOLLOW ME DOWN Sugar Hill Records Young Sarah Jarosz’s second album plays out as a kind of coming-of-age song cycle. The romantic yearning on opening tracks “Run Away” and “Come Around” evoke urgent passions in a spooky way that sounds like teen lust but more the mystery that surrounds it. But then the singer-songwriter grows

Aug. 15 — Aladdin Theater, Portland; www.ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000.

Nick 13 NICK 13 Sugar Hill Records If I didn’t know that Nick 13 was the front man for psychobilly/punk band Tiger Army, I’d still think his eponymous debut solo album was one of the better country albums I’ve heard in a while. Based on Tiger Army’s explosiveness, one would expect it to be spilling over with rip-snortin’ rockabilly licks and hard-edged honky-tonk tales, something along the lines of the contents of the solo albums by Social Distortion’s Mike Ness. Instead, Nick 13 delivers mostly smooth, melodic numbers that owe more to Chris Isaak and Roy Orbison than to craggy upstarts such as Johnny

Cash and Merle Haggard, thanks in part to the polished and at times ethereal settings created by producers Greg Leisz and James Intveld. With its moody, undulating guitar and dreamlike vocal, “In the Orchard” resembles a spooky Orbison mid-1960s master, while the spare arrangement, weeping steel guitar and fluid vocal on “All Alone” comes right out of the Isaak playbook. If anything, “Nick 13” could have benefited from more tracks such as “Carry My Body Down” that have more grit in their playing and more bite in their arrangements, as some of the numbers here have an overly smoothed-out feel. Still, it’s an impressive piece of work from a performer better known for tearing it up on the Warped Tour than for skillfully echoing classic country archtypes from distant decades. — Sam Gnerre, Los Angeles Daily News

Here and there

Bon Iver BON IVER Jagjaguwar Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon is a speak-softly, big-stick-carrying kinda guy. He doesn’t need to talk himself up, like his pal Kanye West, who drafted him to sing on “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy.” He doesn’t need showy solos to prove his musicianship. The music speaks for him just fine. And his sophomore album, “Bon Iver,” says plenty with its eclectic arrangements and dreamy, poignant storytelling. Even when it’s hard to make out what he’s singing, it’s not hard to make out what he’s feeling. Vernon’s secret weapon is his inventiveness, and he unleashes it early and often. On the opener, “Perth,” he stacks

YACHT SHANGRI-LA DFA Records YACHT comes with lots of tangential information: the duo of Jona Bechtolt (of the Blow, among other projects) and Claire L. Evans issues manifestos riddled with sci-fi concepts and proclamations about “our particular eco-sociopolitical landscape.” But none of that claptrap matters when you hear their sunny, nostalgic fifth album, “Shangri-La.” What does matter is the secondhand joy of the allusions to dance-pop classics, whether overtly acknowledged, as in

Pitbull

Sept. 24 — McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; www.cascadetickets.com or 800-514-3849.

his falsetto vocals to make them sound mighty, and then he fills the song’s empty spaces with what sounds like a chorus of little bearded folkie angels to help him do his bidding. He builds “Calgary” from something sweet and acoustic to something driven and rocking before he declares “When the demons come, they can’t subside.” “Bon Iver” makes it clear that Vernon’s raw, thrilling debut “For Emma, Forever Ago” was no fluke. He’s now a major player in the indie-rock world, whether he acts that way or not. — Glenn Gamboa Newsday

through an increasingly observational, ever-wiser assessment of the world and her feelings, until finally she sees a gypsy that she could have become, but didn’t. American and English folk traditions blend with jazzier elements as Jarosz takes infinitely more thoughtful steps toward maturity than such contemporaries as Taylor Swift could possibly imagine. — Bob Strauss, Los Angeles Daily News

PLANET PIT J Records Pitbull’s “Planet Pit” sounds more like a trip to a Miami Beach nightclub than an actual album. It’s packed with thumping dance grooves (from producers David Guetta, Dr. Luke and Red One), guest appearances (Enrique Iglesias, Ne-Yo, Kelly

Here and there Sept. 10 — Part of the MusicfestNW; Portland; www.ticketswest.com or 800992-8499.

“Dystopia (The Earth Is on Fire),” which appropriates the chant from “The Roof is on Fire” from Rockmaster Scott & the Dynamic Three; blatantly derivative, as in “Paradise Engineering,”

Rowland and more), and even pickup lines. (“Mama, you’re the Internet,” Pitbull says in “Come N Go,” “and I’m looking for a download.”) The best of the floor-fillers is “Rain Over Me,” featuring Marc Anthony, where his soaring voice matches the thunderous Euro-house, synth-driven groove. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

which could be a castoff from labelmates LCD Soundsystem; or subtly adapted (listen throughout for Talking Heads, the Tom Tom Club, and Kraftwerk). There’s a sci-fi utopian narrative within “Shangri-La,” but it’s secondary to the perky pleasures of the individual electropop tunes. — Steve Klinge, The Philadelphia Inquirer


PAGE 10 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

restaurants

Dining in style Chef Bill Ballard shows his talents at the once-private restaurant By John Gottberg Anderson For The Bulletin

I

t was pure coincidence, said Bill Ballard, that soon after he was hired as food-and-beverage manager and executive chef, Bend’s Broken Top Club opened its restaurant to the public. Previously the executive chef at Sunriver’s Crosswater Golf Club, Ballard joined Broken Top on Dec. 20 of last year. The restaurant went public seven weeks later on Feb. 10. The club is a great addition to the local dining scene. Ballard is a fine chef, as adept at fashioning tasty and stylish entrees as he is at creating award-winning desserts. And the vista from the club-

house dining rooms provides one of the most pleasing atmospheres for a meal in Central Oregon. When it opened in 1993 as a private-membership golf club, Broken Top initially welcomed non-member diners. Later, however, the restaurant was closed to all but its members. It remained so until this year. Ballard, an Illinois native who double-majored in philosophy and physics in college, found his calling not in academia but in the kitchen and on the golf course. “I have to admit, I have a hankering for golfing,” he said. “And once I got into culinary art, I found that in private golf clubs I

had a little more artistic freedom. “I’ve lived in several areas of the country, and in each one, I’ve tried to use ingredients indigenous to that area. When I moved to Oregon (in the mid-1990s), I was like a kid in a candy store, with the plethora of ingredients that are out here for a chef to use.”

Setting the mood When my companion and I arrived for an early dinner, the sun was still high in the southwestern sky. We were greeted by a hostess and promptly seated with a view across a quiet lake to the golf club’s driving range, with the peaks of Broken Top and South Sister in the distance. We saw fish jumping, ducks and geese swimming, and red-winged blackbirds swaying in the boughs of lakeside aspen trees.

Broken Top Club Location: 62000 Broken Top Drive, Bend Hours: 11:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday to Saturday, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday Cuisine: Northwest Price range: Breakfast $4.75 to $12; lunch $9 to $13; dinner appetizers $9 to $14, entrees $18.50 to $31.50 Credit cards: American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa Children’s menu: Posted on one side of an “Etch-a-Sketch” Vegetarian menu: Choices include a tempura-fried artichoke and grilled Portobello mushroom Alcoholic beverages: Full bar

Within the restaurant, the mood was one of casual elegance. We sat upon rustic, rattan-backed chairs at tables with glass tops

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

The interior of the dining room at Broken Top Club is elegant and casual with a view across a lake to the golf course and mountains beyond.

Outdoor seating: Large open deck Reservations: Recommended Contact: www.brokentop.com/dining. htm or 541-383-8200

Scorecard OVERALL: B+ Food: A-. It’s not all perfect, but the menu of Northwest cuisine earns two thumbs up. Service: B. Spotty: Attentive in the evening, lackadaisical at midday. Atmosphere: A. A mood of casual elegance is enhanced by a lovely lakeand-mountain view. Value: B+. The price point is moderate in Bend’s fine-dining universe.

over black tablecloths. An artistic presentation of dishes added to the ambience. Continued next page


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

PAGE 11

restaurants From previous page Our only major complaint, more so at a subsequent Sunday brunch visit than at dinner, had to do with spotty service. At our evening meal, even as the restaurant became busy, orders were quickly taken and delivered, and even our water glasses were kept full by a diligent busboy. But when we arrived for our midday meal, the host stand was unmanned and it took a while before a server noticed and seated us. Although few tables were occupied, service was overly casual. As a table of 12 had been seated just ahead of us, we had a wait of more than a half hour for easy-tomake plates, yet our server never returned to apologize until shortly before our food was delivered.

Copper River salmon is served with heirloom tomato, Dungeness crab salad and smoked tomato vinaigrette. Also shown is a Crab Mosaic with fig syrup, mango puree and arugula.

made zucchini relish. Hand-cut French fries were tossed in garlic and Parmesan cheese. Had we left room, we would have finished with one of Ballard’s personal desserts. His triple-chocolate torte won Bend’s recent Tour du Chocolate competition; it comprises a flourless chocolate torte, chocolate mousse, ganache and a white-chocolate cream. And his banana-toffee ice cream, with hazelnut praline and caramel sauce, will be featured at next weekend’s Sagebrush Classic feast.

Andy Tullis The Bulletin

John Gottberg Anderson can be reached at janderson@ bendbulletin.com.

SMALL BITES

Dinner menu At dinner, my companion started with a simple Caesar salad. She said it was one of the best she’s had in Bend. Chopped hearts of romaine were tossed in a tangy lemon-pepper dressing with aged Asiago cheese, garlic croutons and just a touch of anchovy paste. For an entrée, she chose a dish of angel-hair pasta cooked in coconut milk with a squeeze of Kaffir lime, scallions and capers. The blend included crushed cashews and sliced shiitake mushrooms, as well as several large prawns and a modest chunk of smoked salmon on top. She said she had been in the mood for comfort food, and this fit the bill. I was a little disappointed with my watercress-and-watermelon salad. The delivery was impressive; a handful of watercress greens were bunched in a staunch red-onion ring, topped with crumbled feta cheese and toasted pine nuts, garnished with a few halved, roasted cherries and three small scoops of melon. (Whereas the menu had promised “red and yellow” watermelon, my plate had but a single bit of red watermelon and two bits of cantaloupe melon.) A bigger problem was that the salad was underdressed. Watercress is a bitter herb with a taste that must be balanced with sweetness. A drizzle of orangecitrus vinaigrette was insufficient. When I requested and got additional dressing, I was much happier. My main course, a grilled Copper River salmon, was wonderful. The Alaskan red salmon, available only during a limited season, was beautifully presented: A half-dozen thin asparagus spears sat upon a generous cold relish of crab meat and heirloom tomatoes, which topped the fish. For my taste, the salmon was

cooked perfectly, seared medium-rare with a warm center. It was served atop jasmine rice with a sweet-corn garnish and, according to the menu, an avocado-chive vinaigrette, although I couldn’t find the avocado!

Sunday brunch Service issues aside, we did enjoy returning to Broken Top for Sunday brunch. My companion, in the mood for breakfast, ordered the cornedbeef hash. The blend of beef brisket and hash-brown potatoes was topped with a couple of eggs, over easy. She found the meal bland, and in need of hot sauce to give it a little zest. But she loved the accompanying breakfast bread, which was served with a delicious pumpkin butter and boysenberry jam. Rather than a formal lunch menu, I was presented with Broken Top’s “bar card menu,” nor-

Next week: Baldy’s BBQ in Redmond Visit www. bendbulletin.com /restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants.

mally presented only between the hours of 2 and 5 p.m. Although that reduced my meal options, I was pleased to request a pulled pork sandwich. This had no faults. Shredded, slow-braised pork shoulder was topped with small, lightly fried onions, served on a delicious plank roll with a tangy house dressing. On the side was a slaw of jicama, white cabbage and red bell peppers, heavily seasoned with dill, and a sweet, house-

Avery’s Wine Bar is now the 750 Wine Bar & Bistro. Motherdaughter owners Rebecca Sullivan and Emma Farnsworth, who took over on June 15, plan a July 22 grand opening. Named for the size of a wine bottle (750 ml), the bistro serves tapas-style meals, desserts and daily world-cuisine dinner specials. Open 4 to 9 p.m. Tuesday to Saturday; lunches 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday and Friday beginning July 22. 427 S.W. Eighth St., Redmond; 541-5047111 or www.facebook.com. Cuppa Yo Frozen Yogurt will celebrate the grand opening of its new east-side Bend location on Wednesday with a performance by local musician Mosley Wotta at 7:30 p.m. The Crossroads Plaza shop (at Northeast 27th Avenue and U.S. Highway 20) opened June 29. Hours are the same as at Cuppa Yo’s west-side store: 11

a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday to Thursday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. 547 N.E. Bellevue Ave., Suite 109, Bend (541-706-9352); 937 N.W. Newport Ave., Suite 110, Bend (541-306-6993); www .cuppayo.com.

RECENT REVIEWS Pono Farm & Fine Meats (A-): A carnivore’s delight, this custom butcher shop on Bend’s north side serves quality beef and pork from Pono’s own 200-acre organic livestock ranch near Culver. Sandwiches and combination plates, all priced under $14, are served in a well-maintained cafe. Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday to Saturday; kitchen opens at 11 a.m. 63595 Hunnell Road (at Cooley Road), Suite 100; www. ponofarm.com or 541-330-6328. IHOP (B): The restaurant group formerly known as the International House of Pancakes serves meals that are often humdrum but sometimes excellent. Open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday to Thursday, 6 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday. 30 Bend River Mall Drive, Bend; www.ihop.com or 541-317-9812. Hola! 3 (B+): Extending over the Deschutes River, there are few more beautiful places to dine in Central Oregon. The newest of the locally owned MexicanPeruvian chain has held back on its creative menu to satisfy clientele more interested in traditional fare. Breakfast 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday to Sunday; lunch and dinner 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day. 57235 River Road (access from Circle 3), Sunriver; www.hola-restaurants .com or 541-593-8880.

2011 Bend Elks Lodge #1371 & Marine Corps League #1308

Classic Car Show (pre-1974)

Saturday, July 9, 2011, 9–3 63120 Boyd Acres Road Open to the Public • Air Conditioned Facility New members always Welcome! $20 entry fee (includes 1 lunch) Burgers, hot dogs, chicken burgers, fries and beverages will be available for sale on our patio. Silent Auction • Raffles 1st & 2nd Place Awards • Trophies We are located just north of Empire.

541-389-7438 (Office) or 541-382-1371 (Club) www.elks.org


PAGE 12 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

f in e a r ts

Quilting energy

Submitted photo

V isitors take in the view at the Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show. The annual event, billed as the world’s largest outdoor quilt festival, is in its 36th year.

Young and old flock to Sisters for annual event featuring more than 1,300 quilts By David Jasper T he B ulletin

E

very summer, thousands of people from around the state, country and world blanket the Central Oregon town of Sisters for the Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show, which starts Saturday and, for the first time, continues the following day with a scaled-down version called “Save it for Sunday.” Saturday should see somewhere in the neighborhood of 12,500 descending upon a town of

1,600 for the event, now in its 36th year (see “If you go”). Billed as the world’s largest outdoor quilt festival, it’s grown tremendously since the mid-’70s, when Jean Wells founded the festival by hanging 12 quilts outside her Sisters store, The Stitchin Post. “Thirty-six years ago, she hung about a dozen quilts — hers, her grandmother’s, some of her students’ — outside her shop,” said Ann Richardson, executive director of the festival. “And it just slowly grew year by year, without really

being planned that way. Nobody’s goal was to have 1,300 quilts and 12,000 people come to Sisters, but it just caught on.” And it’s still catching on, she added. “I think quilting is one of those arts or crafts that’s actually in a growth phase,” Richardson said. Though an aging demographic has been of concern to the quilt crowd, there is a growing faction of younger women among festival participants. Case in (needle) point: the Portland Modern Quilt Guild, among the special guests this year. Its members represent a younger wave in quilting, communicating and putting word out about their customary craft via high-tech means. Continued next page

If you go What: Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show When: 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; scaleddown version 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday Where: Downtown Sisters Cost: Free Contact: www.sisters outdoorquiltshow.org or 541-549-0989.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

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PAGE 13

fine arts Maxine Scates at Second Sunday

Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show detour Cascade Avenue in downtown Sisters will be closed to through traffic from 6 a.m. until 5 p.m. Saturday. For detour, follow signs to Locust Street and Barclay Drive. 20

To Eugene, Salem Barclay Drive

126

Fir St.

Pine St.

242

Elm St.

Main Ave. Cascade Ave. Hood Ave.

Locust St.

SISTERS Cascade Ave.

Larch St.

Pine St.

Detour Sisters Parkway

To Redmond

126 20 To Bend Greg Cross / The Bulletin

From previous page “People like the Portland Modern Quilt Guild have this new take on a traditional art form,” she said. “They’re not traditional quilters and they’re not art quilters, but they’re a group of quilters that is of an age (that) is very familiar with, and very comfortable with, using social media, because they grew up with it. They spend a lot of time blogging and communicating and sharing their work through various means on the Internet. “They also really like to follow different fabric designers. They, the younger fabric designers, tend to do a lot of blogging about their new designs. And so it’s a whole different way for quilters to connect. They do traditional guild meetings where they all get together, but they tend to be more connected because of the availability of social media and they way they’ve grown up using it.” As in the past, this year’s festival will feature about 20-30 special exhibits, including one of quilts from Australia. “We’ve got special exhibits … of quilts that, for some reason, all have some special meaning together, and so they hang together in the show as a display,” explained Richardson. “People have brought in all kinds of fun new ways to do quilts, like read a book and interpret it in a quilt. So it’s more than just making a quilt for your bed.” One example is a group of quilts inspired by Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Wonderland,” made by another Portland-area group, the Cover to Cover Book Club Quilters. “They all interpreted that book in a quilt, and we’ve got 15 or 20 quilts that they’ll be displaying, and they’re actually going to set

up a little Mad Hatter’s tea party and have a Mad Hatter costume,” Richardson said. “(The quilts) are going to be really cool, I think, interesting for both adults and kids.” Founder Jean Wells, a Quilters Hall of Fame inductee, will exhibit some of her quilts during the “Save it for Sunday” portion of the weekend. On the event’s website, www.sistersoutdoorquiltshow. org, organizers tout Sunday as a more relaxed, less crowded day to see some quilts you may have missed Saturday, as well as enjoy Sisters. It takes more than 500 volunteers to help pull off such a large event every year, Richardson said, adding she always urges folks driving in from Bend for the festivities to pack their patience with them. “The whole community supports the show,” said Richardson. Meanwhile, the traditional craft of quilting seems to be in good hands. “It’s not your flash-in-the-pan craft; it’s been around for years, centuries,” Richardson said. Such a longstanding practice dovetails nicely with what she refers to as “this whole back-to-the-earth thing.” “I think this whole back-to-theearth, I-want-to-make-it-myself sort of thing is really helping buoy the interest in quilting,” she said. “Everybody’s got chickens, everybody’s got a garden, and people like to make things. There’s the satisfaction of doing things on your own. I think a lot of that really has to do with fueling the energy and the interest behind quilting right now.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@ bendbulletin.com.

Eugene-based poet Maxine Scates will visit Bend on Sunday, offering the poetry-writing workshop “Listening to What the Poem Does and Does Not Want to Say” followed by a reading at Second Sunday, Bend Public Library’s monthly reading and open mic series. Scates is the author of three books of poetry: “Undone,” “Toluca Street” and “Black Loam,” and her work has been published in the journals The American Poetry Review, The Massachusetts Review, Ploughshares and The Virginia Quarterly Review. Among the awards she has received are The Oregon Book Award for Poetry, the Lyre Prize and Pushcart Prize. The poetry workshop will be held from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Deschutes Public Library Administration Building, located at 507 N.W. Wall St. in downtown Bend. The event is free and open to the public but registration is required (RSVP by calling 541-312-1034 or visiting www .deschuteslibrary.org). Second Sunday, which is also free and requires no reservation, begins at 2 p.m. in the Brooks Room of Bend Public Library, located at 601 N.W. Wall St. An open mic will follow Scates’ reading. Contact: www.deschutes library.org or 541-312-1034.

Students produce ‘Necessary Targets’ Rêver Theatre Company, the Bend theater company independently run by students, is back with its third show, “Necessary Targets” by Eve Ensler. The play opens Thursday and runs for a total of six performances at Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend. According to a press release for the play, “Necessary Targets” is the story of two American women — one a Park Avenue psychiatrist, the other a human rights worker. In Bosnia, the two help other women confront their memories of war and change themselves as a result. It also quotes Ensler, in part, as saying, “When we think of war, we do not think of women. Because the work of survival, of restoration, is not glamorous work. Like most women’s work, it is undervalued, underpaid, and impossible. They create peace networks, find ways to bring about healing. They

Event calendar

June

30 Friday

Find out what’s going on around Central Oregon at www.bend bulletin.com/events. Easily searchable by date, city or keyword.

The Bulletin

Submitted photo

Maxine Scates will be reading her poetry during Second Sunday at Bend Public Library. teach in home schools when the school buildings are destroyed. They build gardens in the middle of abandoned railroad tracks. They pick up the pieces, although they usually haven’t fired a gun.” Show times are 7 p.m. July 14-17, with matinee performances at 2 p.m. July 16 and 17. Advance tickets are $12 for adults, $10 for students and seniors, and are available at bit.ly/revertickets. Tickets at the door are $14 for adults, $12 for students and seniors. Contact: www.facebook.com/ revertheatreco, revertheatreco@ gmail.com or 541-788-6555. — David Jasper, The Bulletin

2nd Street Theater & present

Opening: Friday, July 15 @ 7:30pm Sat., July 16 & 23 @ 7:30pm Sun., July 17 & 24 @ 2:00pm For tickets go to www.beattickets.org 541.312.9626


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

fine arts ART EXHIBITS AMBIANCE ART CO-OP: Featuring gallery artists; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ART BY KNIGHT: Featuring oil paintings by Laurel Knight and bronze sculpture by Steven L. Knight ; 236 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-633-7488 or www.ArtbyKnight.com. ARTISTS’ GALLERY SUNRIVER: Featuring works by Carolyn Waissman, Greg Cotton, Carol Webb and Renne Brock; through July, reception from 4-8 p.m. Saturday ; 57100 Beaver Drive, Building 19, Sunriver; 541-593-4382. ARTS CENTRAL: Featuring works by Potters for Education; through July; 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-317-9324. ATELIER 6000: Featuring “Print Arts Northwest, 30 Years of Printmaking 1981-2011”; through July 29; 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-3308759 or www.atelier6000.com. BELLATAZZA: Featuring “Santa Fe: From Landscape to Ranch Life,” photographs by Stuart L. Gordon; through July; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-318-0606. BEND CITY HALL: Featuring “PLACE::TWELVE,” works exploring Bend’s past; through July 29; 710 N.W. Wall St.; 541-388-5505. BEND FURNITURE AND DESIGN: Featuring pottery by Annie Dyer ; 2797 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Suite 500, Bend; 541-633-7250. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Portraits”; through Aug. 1; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1037. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright,

BAR & GRILL EST. 1943

Celebrating Judie’s 26th Year!

HAPPY HOUR 3 Times A Day Mon - Fri 7AM to 9AM, 4PM to 7pm, 10pm to 12AM

TUESDAY LADIES’ NIGHT 4 to close. $1 off all Food & Bev Items

WEDNESDAY

Submitted photo

“A Twist Along the Trail,” by Jack Braman, will be on display through July at Mockingbird Gallery.

LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring works by Mary Lou Wilhelm; through July 27; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090.

and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www.canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. DOUGLAS FINE JEWELRY DESIGN: Featuring “Multicultural Symbology

LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com.

Find Your Dream Home In

Real Estate Every Saturday

and the History of Man,” mixedmedia works by Kim Kimerling; through July; 920 N.W. Bond St., Suite 106, Bend; 541-389-2901. DUDLEY’S BOOKSHOP CAFE: Featuring photography by Paul Carew; through July; 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “High Desert Skies” by Joanne Donaca, Janice Druian and Ann Ruttan; through July 30; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. FURNISH.: Featuring works by Marjorie Wood Hamlin; 761 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-617-8911. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-5498683 or www.art-lorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W.

75¢ TACOS

THURSDAY MENS’ NIGHT

Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HIGH DESERT GALLERY: Featuring “I Spy …” works by John and Robin Gumaelius; through Aug. 17; also featuring “Spectrum of Color,” works by Janet Rothermel and Morgan Madison; through Aug. 2; 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-8964. HOME FEDERAL BANK: Featuring “Travels with Carol,” works by Carol Jacquet; through July; 821 S.W. Sixth St.; 541-548-9977. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www. jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jill Haney-Neal; 20512 Nels Anderson Place, Building 3, Bend; 541-6176078 or www.jillnealgallery.com. KAREN BANDY STUDIO: Featuring “Vibrant Earth,” works by Karen Bandy; through July; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; 541-388-0155. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson, Katherine Taylor, Donna Young and more; 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-3884404 or www.lahainagalleries.com.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION

MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “Illuminations,” works by Jack Braman and Richard McKinley; through July; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www. mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixedmedia collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot ; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-6694. QUILTWORKS: Featuring quilts by Shelia Finzer, and a group show of animal-themed quilts; through July; 926 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Suite B, Bend; 541-728-0527.

RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring “The Jewels of July,” works by Janice Rhodes, Anne VonHeideken and Megan Hazen; through July; 103 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-3176. REDMOND AIRPORT: Featuring “Critters of Central Oregon”; through August; 2522 S.E. Jesse Butler Circle; 541-548-0646. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring illustrations from children’s book authors; through July 30; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1064. RUUD GALLERY: Featuring works by local and regional contemporary artists; 50 S.E. Scott St., Suite 2, Bend; www. ruudgallery.com or 541-323-3231. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring works by Helen Brown; through July 30; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: Featuring fiber art by Rosalyn Kliot ; 291 E. Main Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0251. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SODA CREEK GALLERY: Featuring originals and prints of Western, wildlife and landscape paintings; 183 E. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0600. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring works by Martha Ann Rourke and Carolyn Waissman; through Sept. 9; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring works by Leslie Cain and Mary Rollins; through July 25; 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-382-9398. TBD LOFT: Featuring “Community Portrait: We Need,” an evolving exhibit by various artists; through December; 856 N.W. Bond St., Suite 2, Bend; 541-388-7558. TETHEROW AT THE FRANKLIN CROSSING BUILDING: Featuring paintings of the High Desert by local artist David Wachs; corner of Franklin Avenue and Bond Street, Bend; www. wordsideas.blogspot.com. THUMP COFFEE: Featuring “Coffee or Tea,” fiber works by Journeys Art Quilt Group; through July; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-0226. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring “Mountain Spirit,” works by Mary Marquiss and Marty Stewart; through July; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-3859144 or www.tumaloartco.com.

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Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME


PAGE 15

GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Tumalo Falls

Rockpile Lake Trail

T

If you go

umalo Falls near Bend

Getting there: From Bend, proceed 11.6 miles west on Skyliners Road (4601). After crossing over Tumalo Creek, turn left and proceed 2.6 miles west on Forest Road 4603. Be aware of the potential for numerous other cars zipping along this gravel road. Difficulty: Moderate Cost: Northwest Forest Pass or $5 day pass required Contact: Deschutes National Forest, 541-3835300

boasts a 97-foot water-

fall and, for those who hike another mile up North Fork Trail, Double Falls, a pair of stepped falls. Stubborn snow makes hiking much farther a challenge; bikes, limited to uphill only, will not be permitted for a few more weeks. — Bulletin staff

Tum

alo

Rockpile Lake Trail climbs a fire-thinned ridge, with clear views of the surrounding peaks.

ek

views. Past the Mt. Jefferson Wilderness boundary, however, snow may linger through much of the summer, blocking easy access to Rockpile Lake.

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Greg Cross / The Bulletin

1235

Wasco Lake 1234

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Jack Lake

— Bulletin staff

Deschutes National Forest

Mt. Jefferson Wilderness

If you go

Textron

Round Lake

1210

Square Lake

12

You’ll Be Pleasantly Surprised! Great Prices!

20

126

Suttle Lake To Sisters Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Consignments Wanted Let us work for you!

Zeller Armour

Bridgeford

Getting there: From Sisters, drive west on U.S. Highway 20 for 12 miles and turn right on Jack Lake Road (state Highway 12). After 4.4 miles, turn left on Forest Road 1230 and in 1.6 miles bear left onto Forest Road 1234. Continue for 0.8 mile and turn right onto Forest Road 1235. The trailhead is four miles down the road, at the end of a roundabout. Difficulty: Moderate to wilderness boundary; difficult to Rockpile Lake with significant early season route-finding problems. Cost: Free Contact: Deschutes National Forest, 541-383-5300

Franklin

9th Street

R

Trail

Tumalo Falls

Cre

J

Markian Hawryluk / The Bulletin ile photo

SE Wilson Ave

Call for pick-up & delivery 541-306-3200 email us at: dwellings@bendbroadband.com 380 Bridgeford Blvd., Bend, OR 97701 (Suite C / off Wilson or 9th Street)


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY THE 8, BULLETIN 2011 •F

this w KIDS FUN DAY

SUNRISE SUMMER CLASSIC

TODAY

SATURDAY What: 5K, 10K and half-marathon races, with a kids rock race; registration required; proceeds benefit the Redmond Parks Foundation, I Run for Eva Trust Fund and FISH Food Pantry. Runners start off at last year’s race.

When: 7 a.m. Where: Smith Rock State Park, 9241 N.E. Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne Cost: $25-$40 Contact: www.smithrockrace.com or 541-548-7501

MOUNT EVEREST SLIDE SHOW

MONDAY What: With hay and pony rides, a petting zoo, children’s play area and more. Kids feed cows at the ranch. When: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Where: DD Ranch, 3836 N.E. Smith

TODAY KIDS FUN DAY: With hay and pony rides, a petting zoo, children’s play area and more; $10, free ages 3 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; DD Ranch, 3836 N.E. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne; 541548-1432 or duggan@ddranch.net. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. REDMOND FRIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-5156 or redmondfridaymarket@gmail.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-7 p.m.; North Ash Street and West Main Avenue; www. sistersfarmersmarket.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Marie Bostwick presents her novel “Threading the Needle”; free; 4 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. BEND SUMMER FESTIVAL CONCERTS: Featuring performances by Toad the Wet Sprocket and Night Ranger; with food and drink vendors; free; 5-11 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.c3events.com. (Story, Page 20) AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Marie Bostwick presents her novel “Threading the Needle”; free; 7 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.

Rock Way, Terrebonne Cost: $10, free ages 3 and younger Contact: 541-548-1432 or duggan@ddranch.net

BENEFIT CONCERT: With performances by The Anvil Blasters and the Runway Ranch Band; proceeds benefit the High & Dry Bluegrass Festival; $10-$15 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; The Barn in Sisters, 68467 Three Creeks Road; www.hadbf.com. (Story, Page 6)

SATURDAY July 9 3:THIRTY3: Run or walk up and down the butte for three hours and thirty three minutes; followed by an after party; registration required; proceeds benefit Not Alone; $40; 7 a.m.; Pilot Butte State Park, Northeast Pilot Butte Summit Drive, Bend; 541306-9613 or www.333bend.com. SUNRISE SUMMER CLASSIC: 5K, 10K and half-marathon races, with a kids rock race; registration required; proceeds benefit the Redmond Parks Foundation, I Run for Eva Trust Fund and FISH Food Pantry; $25-$40; 7 a.m.; Smith Rock State Park, 9241 N.E. Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne; 541548-7501 or www.smithrockrace.com. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, 19879 Eighth St., Bend; 541-728-0088. SISTERS OUTDOOR QUILT SHOW: The 36th annual show features a display of

What: Eric Plantenberg talks about climbing Mount Everest and shares photos. Pictured is Plantenberg’s high camp on the slopes of the mountain. When: 6:30 p.m.

AREA 97 CLUBS See what’s playing at local night spots on Page 8. more than 1,300 quilts; free; 9:30 a.m.5 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-5490989 or www.sistersoutdoorquiltshow. org. (Story, Page 12) CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxfarmersmarket.com. QUILT SHOW LUNCHEON: Featuring lunches with deserts and a gift boutique; proceeds benefit the church and its local charities; $7$12; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church, 386 N. Fir St., Sisters; 541-549-8422. SAGEBRUSH COMMUNITY CHALLENGE: A scavenger-hunt race, with points and prizes; costumes encouraged; registration required; proceeds benefit regional nonprofits; $20, $10 ages 5-13, free ages 4 and younger;

10 a.m.; corner of Wall Street and Franklin Avenue, Bend; aimee@ sagebrush.org or http://sagebrush. org/communitychallenge. BEND SUMMER FESTIVAL: Featuring artists, street performers, performing arts, children’s activities, live music and more; free; 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995, inquiry@ c3events.com or www.c3events.com. BEND TECHNOLOGYFEST: Vendors display and demonstrate high-tech products in entertainment, security, conservation and more; free; 11 a.m.6 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave.; 541-382-8436 or http://bendtechfest.eventbrite.com. BOARD GAME NIGHT: Play available board games or bring your own; free; 6 p.m.-midnight; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-318-8459 or mgage@bendbroadband.com. ALISON KRAUSS & UNION STATION: The Grammy-winning country act performs, with Good Old War; $39, $62 reserved, plus fees; 6:30 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www. bendconcerts.com. (Story, Page 3) THE GREEN TAPE TOUR: A hip-hop show featuring Illmaculate, Top Shelf, Only One, Mikey Vegaz and DJ Hit N Runn; free; 9 p.m.; Madhappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or madhappylounge@ gmail.com. (Story, Page 6)

SUNDAY July 10 SAVE IT FOR SUNDAY: Featuring quilts from the Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show and a lecture by Jean Wells at FivePine Lodge and Conference Center; free, see website for lecture costs; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-0989 or www.sistersoutdoorquiltshow. org. (Story, Page 12) BEND SUMMER FESTIVAL: Featuring artists, street performers, performing arts, children’s activities, live music and more; free; 11 a.m.6 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541389-0995, inquiry@c3events. com or www.c3events.com. SECOND SUNDAY: Maxine Scates reads from a selection of her works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121034 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. (Story, Page 13)

MONDAY July 11 SUMMER SHOWDOWN COW HORSE SHOW: Show includes top riders in a variety of classes; food and beverage available; free; 8 a.m.; Brasada Ranch, 16986 S.W. Brasada Ranch Road, Powell Butte; 425226-6376 or www.nwrcha.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jean Nave


GO! MAGAZINE •

RIDAY, JULY THE BULLETIN 8, 2011 • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

week

PAGE 17

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

SUMMER SHOWDOWN COW HORSE SHOW

MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY

SAGEBRUSH STREET FARE

W

WEDNESDAY Where: Jackson’s Corner, 845 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend Cost: Free Contact: 541-647-2198

reads from her children’s book “Harry and Lola with Smoki the Magical Cat”; free; 11 a.m.; Rec Barn, 12940 Hawks Beard, Black Butte Ranch, Sisters; 541-549-8755, navebbr@ aol.com or www.harryandlol.org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “A Confederacy of Dunces” by John Kennedy Toole; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7089 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. MOUNT EVEREST SLIDE SHOW: Eric Plantenberg talks about climbing Everest and shares photos; free; 6:30 p.m.; Jackson’s Corner, 845 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-647-2198.

TUESDAY July 12 SUMMER SHOWDOWN COW HORSE SHOW: Show includes top riders in a variety of classes; food and beverage available; free; 8 a.m.; Brasada Ranch, 16986 S.W. Brasada Ranch Road, Powell Butte; 425226-6376 or www.nwrcha.com. REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or www.localharvest. org/redmond-farmers-market-M31522. TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637

What: Show includes top riders in a variety of classes; food and beverage available. Mike Honald directs a cow during the 2008 event. When: 8 a.m.

or info@sustainableflame.com. CRAFT BEER MONTH CELEBRATION: Taste beers from local breweries, with food and live music; proceeds benefit the Oregon Brewers Guild; free admission; 4-7 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery’s lower warehouse, 399 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-312-6952. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Cowlitz; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541312-9259 or www.bendelks.com. POETRY SLAM: A live poetry reading open to competitors and spectators; ages 21 and older; $3 suggested donation; 8 p.m.; Madhappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

WEDNESDAY July 13 SUMMER SHOWDOWN COW HORSE SHOW: Show includes top riders in a variety of classes; food and beverage available; free; 8 a.m.; Brasada Ranch, 16986 S.W. Brasada Ranch Road, Powell Butte; 425226-6376 or www.nwrcha.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or www. bendfarmersmarket.com. ALIVE AFTER 5: Featuring a performance by ’80s band

Where: Brasada Ranch, 16986 S.W. Brasada Ranch Road, Powell Butte Cost: Free Contact: www.nwrcha.com or 425226-6376

Quarterflash; refreshments available; located off of northern Powerhouse Drive; free; 5 p.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3890995 or www.aliveafterfivebend. com. (Story, Page 4) MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring country music by the Brian Hanson Band; food vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or redmondsummerconcerts. com. (Story, Page 4) PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a jazz and blues performance by Cool Conspiracy; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-1209 or recreation@ ccprd.org. (Story, Page 4) SAGEBRUSH STREET FARE: Festival features local restaurants and live music, with food and beer pairings; proceeds benefit regional nonprofits; $10; 6 p.m.; Oregon Avenue in downtown Bend; 541388-0771 or http://sagebrush.org. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LA FILLE DU REGIMENT”: Starring Natalie Dessay, Juan Diego Florez, Felicity Palmer, Alessandro Corbelli and Marian Seldes in an encore presentation of Donizetti’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend;

What: Festival features local restaurants and live music, with food and beer pairings; proceeds benefit regional nonprofits. Musicians perform at the associated Portland Street Fare in

541-382-6347. (Story, Page 28) BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Cowlitz; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541312-9259 or www.bendelks.com. RENEE DE LA PRADE AND THE ACCORDION BABES: The Bay Areabased accordion folk musicians perform; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. (Story, Page 6)

THURSDAY July 14 SUMMER SHOWDOWN COW HORSE SHOW: Show includes top riders in a variety of classes; food and beverage available; free; 8 a.m.; Brasada Ranch, 16986 S.W. Brasada Ranch Road, Powell Butte; 425226-6376 or www.nwrcha.com. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Animal, Vegetable, Miracle” by Barbara Kingsolver; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “SHE CRIED FOR MOTHER RUSSIA”: Friedl Semans Bell talks about Princess Tatiana Volkonsky, her flight from Russia and the discoveries made after her death; free; 45:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library,

August. When: 6 p.m. Where: On Oregon Avenue in Bend Cost: $10 Contact: http://sagebrush.org or 541-388-0771

Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-4663, ruthh@uoregon. edu or http://osher.uoregon.edu. MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by bluesman Curtis Salgado, food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.munchandmusic.com. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Cowlitz; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541312-9259 or www.bendelks.com. “NECESSARY TARGETS”: Rever Theatre Company presents the story of two American women who travel to Bosnia to help women confront memories of war; $12 or $10 students and seniors in advance; $14 or $12 students and seniors at the door; 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-6555, revertheatreco@ gmail.com or revertheatreco. ticketleap.net. (Story, Page 13) POLECAT: The Bellingham, Wash.based bluegrass act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. (Story, Page 7) KEITH GREENINGER AND DAYAN KAI: The singer-songwriters perform; $15$20 suggested donation; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; The Barn in Sisters, 68467 Three Creeks Road; 775-2331433 or dooleysbarn@gmail.com.


PAGE 18 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

planning ahead Right Around the Corner JULY 15-16 — 4 PEAKS MUSIC FESTIVAL: Camping music festival features performances by Poor Man’s Whiskey, New Monsoon, Elephant Revival and more; $50; 1-10 p.m. July 15, noon-10 p.m. July 16; Rockin’ A Ranch, 19449 Tumalo Reservoir Road, Tumalo; 541-3828064 or www.4peaksmusic.com. JULY 15-17 — SUMMER SHOWDOWN COW HORSE SHOW: Show includes top riders in a variety of classes; food and beverage available; free; 3 p.m. July 15, 8 a.m. July 16-17; Brasada Ranch, 16986 S.W. Brasada Ranch Road, Powell Butte; 425226-6376 or www.nwrcha.com. JULY 15-17 — BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Wenatchee; $5$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541-3129259 or www.bendelks.com. JULY 15-17 — “NECESSARY TARGETS”: Rever Theatre Company presents the story of two American women who travel to Bosnia to help women confront memories of war; $12 or $10 students and seniors in advance; $14 or $12 students and seniors at the door; 7 p.m. each day, 2 p.m. July 16-17; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7886555, revertheatreco@gmail.com or revertheatreco.ticketleap.net. JULY 15-17 — “STEFANIE HERO”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of a young princess who becomes a hero; $15, $10 students ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m. July 1516, 2 p.m. July 17; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541419-5558 or www.beattickets.org. JULY 15 — SAGEBRUSH CLASSIC GOLF TOURNAMENT: Limited to 52 teams; registration required to play; proceeds benefit the Deschutes Children’s Foundation; $3,000 per team to play; 7:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. tee times; Broken Top Club, 61999 Broken Top Drive, Bend; 541-3126947 or www.sagebrush.org. JULY 15 — SINGING IN FIVE DIMENSIONS: Organist Mark Oglesby leads a festival-hymn concert, with audience participation; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3631. JULY 15 — THE WHITE BUFFALO: The acoustic rock troubadour performs; $10 plus fees in advance, $13 at the door; 7 p.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 273 W. Hood Ave.; 541-5490527 or www.bendticket.com. JULY 15 — LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; tickets must be retrieved at participating venues; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; http://url.bb/LBS11. JULY 15 — FAREED HAQUE & MATH GAMES: The Illinois-based guitarist performs, with his trio; $12 plus

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin ile photo

Racers begin to exit the water after completing the swimming portion of the Deschutes Dash last year. This year’s races are July 16-17. fees in advance, $15 day of show; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. JULY 16-17 — DESCHUTES DASH: The weekend sports festival features triathlons, duathlons, 10K and 5K runs, and youth races; free for spectators; 8 a.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-323-0964, race@layitoutevents. com or www.deschutesdash.com. JULY 16-17 — ANTIQUES IN THE PARK: Vendors sell antiques, with live music and a barbecue; proceeds benefit Sisters Habitat for Humanity; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. July 16, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. July 17; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue, Sisters; 541-549-8905. JULY 16 — TWO OLD HIPPIES FESTIVAL: Featuring live music by Betty & the Boy, Off in the Woods, Joshua Craig and more; with clinics and tours; $20; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Breedlove Guitar Co., 2843 N.W. Lolo Drive, Bend; 541-385-8339 or www.breedloveguitars.com. JULY 16 — MILLER’S LANDING COMMUNITY CELEBRATION: Featuring

music, food, boating demonstrations and more; located across the river from the park; free; 4-7 p.m.; McKay Park, 166 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-382-2092. JULY 16 — MUDSPRINGS GOSPEL BAND: The gospel choir performs; with a spaghetti dinner; proceeds benefit Women’s Ministries; $10, $30 per family, or $5 concert only; 6 p.m., 7:30 p.m. concert; Mountain View Fellowship Church, 1475 S.W. 35th St., Redmond; 541-923-4979. JULY 16 — SAGEBRUSH CLASSIC FEAST: Culinary event includes a sampling of gourmet cuisine, Deschutes Brewery beer and live music; proceeds benefit nonprofit organizations serving children and families in Central Oregon; $200; 6 p.m.; Broken Top Golf Club, 62000 Broken Top Drive, Bend; 541-4808555 or www.sagebrush.org. JULY 16 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: The authors of “The Guys’ Home Relationship Maintenance & Improvement Poetry Manual” read from their work; proceeds benefit Saving Grace; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, 1010 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-382-9227.

JULY 16 — THE WHITE BUFFALO: The acoustic rock troubadour performs, with Rural Demons; $7 in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend. JULY 17 — SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERT: The Americana/folk act The Greencards performs; free; 2:30 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3229383 or www.bendconcerts.com. JULY 18 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jean Nave reads from her children’s book “Harry and Lola with Smoki the Magical Cat”; free; 11 a.m.; Rec Barn, 12940 Hawks Beard, Black Butte Ranch, Sisters; 541-549-8755, navebbr@aol. com or www.harryandlol.org. JULY 18 — CELEBRITY GOLF CLINIC: Ian Baker-Finch leads a golf clinic; registration requested; proceeds benefit Devin’s Destiny; $20; 5:30 p.m.; Pronghorn Resort, 65600 Pronghorn Club Drive, Bend; 541322-6024 or www.devinsdestiny.org. JULY 19-21 — BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Klamath Falls; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541-312-9259 or www.bendelks.com.

JULY 19 — PICNIC IN THE PAST: With music, historical games and hands-on activities; bring a picnic dinner and blanket; $2, $5 families of up to four; 6-8 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. JULY 19 — BEAUCOUP CHAPEAUX: The California-based Gypsy-jazz act performs; donations accepted; 6:30 p.m.; El Burrito, 335 N.E. Dekalb Ave., Bend; 541-382-2177. JULY 20 — ALIVE AFTER 5: Featuring a performance by singer-songwriter Nicki Bluhm; refreshments available; located off of North Powerhouse Drive; free; 5 p.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.aliveafterfivebend.com . JULY 20 — PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a pop performance by Brady Goss; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541447-1209 or recreation@ccprd.org. JULY 20 — “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: TOSCA”: Starring Karita Mattila, Marcelo Alvarez and George Gagnidze in an encore presentation of Puccini’s masterpiece; opera performance


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

planning ahead

Talks & classes ANIMAL SOUNDS: Listen and learn about sounds made by animals; free; 2 p.m. Saturday; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. NASA SPACE EXPLORATION AND JUPITER: View the night sky, listen to a presentation and take a constellation tour; $9, $6 ages 2-12, free nature center members; 8-11 p.m. Saturday; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. THE METAPHYSICS OF FORGIVENESS: Terri Daniel gives a talk and leads a meditation on forgiveness; free; 9 a.m. Sunday; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-549-4004. DESCHUTES RIVER STEWARDSHIP: Pick up and pull weeds along the Deschutes River; free; 4:30 p.m. Monday; Old Mill District, north parking lot, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; www. rei.com/bend to register. SUMMER DANCE SAMPLER: Four-week dance and combination classes for all ages; beginning Tuesday; times and prices vary, see website for details; Terpsichorean Dance Studio, 1601 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; www. terpsichoreanbendoregon. com or 541-389-5351. LEARN TO BE A STORYTELLER: Heather McNeil leads a workshop about the art of storytelling; free; 6-8 p.m. Tuesday; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar or 541-617-7099. GUIDED DAY TRIP: Visit Eastern Oregon, see the largest juniper tree and more; registration required by Monday; $45; 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday; near Fort Rock ; www.silverstriders. com or 541 383-8077. UPCYCLED CLASSES: Make prayer flags or bags from recycled plastic bags; $39; 2:30 p.m.; ages 14 and older Wednesday, ages 9-13 July 15 and ages 5-8 July 20; Sara Bella Upcycled, 2748 N.W. Crossing Drive, Suite 100, Bend; 541420-4961 to register. THREE BOOKS IN A BOX: Create three handmade books and collage a box; $55; 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Thursday and July 15; Arts Central, 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; www.artscentraloregon. org or 541-617-1317 to register. THE ART OF HENNA: Learn about the origin and importance of this body art, and create a design; registration required; free; 2 p.m. July 15; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; www.deschuteslibrary. org or 541-312-1055.

transmitted in high definition; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. JULY 21 — GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Half Broke Horses” by Jeanette Wells; bring a lunch; free; noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-312-1092 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. JULY 21 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jean Nave reads from her children’s book “Harry and Lola at the Sisters Rodeo”; free; 12:30 p.m.; Sisters Elementary School, 611 E. Cascade Ave.; 541-549-8755, navebbr@aol. com or www.harryandlol.org. JULY 21 — MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by reggae act Rootz Underground, food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.munchandmusic.com.

Farther Down the Road JULY 22-24 — “STEFANIE HERO”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of a young princess who becomes a hero; $15, $10 students ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m. July 22-23, 2 p.m. July 24; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www.beattickets.org. JULY 22 — TORNADO RIDER: The San Francisco-based rock band performs, with Judgement Day; $5; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend. JULY 23-24 — SISTERS ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL: Featuring arts, crafts, food, entertainment, a silent auction and a classic car cruise in on July 23; proceeds benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. July 23, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. July 24; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-549-8905.

JULY 23-24 — “GISELLE”: The Central Oregon School of Ballet presents the tragic ballet about a young maiden who tries to save her beloved; $10; 7 p.m. July 23, 3 p.m. July 24; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-389-9306. JULY 23 — PINK MARTINI: The cosmopolitan pop band performs; $33 or $63 reserved, plus fees; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3185457 or www.bendconcerts.com. JULY 23 — JAZZ AT JOE’S: The Jazz at Joe’s series presents The Warren Rand Quartet; $25; 7-9:30 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-771-6446 or www. raisethevibe.net/jazzatjoes. JULY 23 — STAND UP AGAINST HUNGER: A comedy show featuring comedians from ComedyCore of Bend; proceeds benefit NeighborImpact’s food bank; $23; 8-10 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. JULY 27 — PICKIN’ AND PADDLIN’ MUSIC SERIES: Includes boat demonstrations in the Deschutes River, and music by electroacoustic blackgrass act The Pitchfork Revolution; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; donations accepted; 4 p.m. demonstrations, 7 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407. JULY 27 — PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a pop/country-rock performance by Apropos Musique; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-4471209 or recreation@ccprd.org. JULY 28 — MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by ska swing band Cherry Poppin’ Daddies, food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.munchandmusic.com.

The Most Romantic Ballet of All Time

Saturday July 23rd at 7pm

Sunday July 24th at 3pm

Tickets: $10 Presented by

Central Oregon School of Ballet

541-389-9306 www.centraloregonschoolofballet.com

Bend Senior High Auditorium Tickets available at the door or Central Oregon School of Ballet 1155 SW Division St., Suite B11

PAGE 19


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

even ts

Summer magic Scott Hammers / The Bulletin ile photo

Bend sculptor Greg Congleton, wearing sunglasses, talks about “Papoose,” a Native American mother and child made from scrap metal and found objects, at Bend Summer Festival last year. Nearly 200 artists will show their works at this year’s festival.

Anne Aurand can be reached at 541383-0304 or at aaurand@bendbulletin. com.

Arts Central

Food and microbrew court

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Av e. Main Stage Or eg Beer area on Fr a Av nk e.* lin Children’s Mi Av Locals e. nn area es Stage ot a Food and wine street Jazz Stage Ave.

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of sounds available over the weekend, Coco Montoya, Ottmar Liebert, Luce, and the Dirt Drifters will entertain on Saturday. But there’s more to the festival than music. “Still, at its core, it’s a festival of the arts — food, wine, fine arts, demonstration art, performing arts, it’s all there,” Clark said. This will be the 21-year-old Summer Festival’s largest undertaking ever, he said. The festival has added a business

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sS

What: Bend Summer Festival When: Limited events from 5 to 11 tonight; full festival 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday Where: Downtown Bend Cost: Admission is free Contact: 541-389-0995, inquiry@ c3events.com or www.c3events.com

marketplace at Wall Street and Greenwood Avenue featuring “green living,” wellness, and “made in Central Oregon” vendors. “It’s our way of supporting local businesses during the festival,” Clark said. The Souk de Summerfest, an international crafters market, will be located on Oregon Avenue between Wall and Brooks streets. The “Jazz, Wine and Gourmet Foods Street” will host 18 vintners and gourmet food vendors on Minnesota Avenue. Artists booths will line Wall Street. “We have never attempted to manage some 200 art vendors, some 50 food and wine vendors, a gaggle of children’s entertainment, some 30 or more commercial and nonprofit vendors, while simultaneously presenting more than 44 music acts over the span of the three day weekend,” Clark said. “It is enormous!”

Bo

T

he annual Bend Summer Festival, a community celebration of music, food, art and entertainment for all ages, kicks off tonight. The free downtown festival continues through Sunday (see “If you go”). “The festival has ramped up to be a premier music event,” said Cameron Clark, owner of C3 Events, the event organizer. Two free shows tonight include Toad the Wet Sprocket at 9:30 p.m. at the Main Stage and Night Ranger at 8:30 p.m. at Troy Field (see map). Toad the Wet Sprocket, the California folk/pop-rock quartet that scored a string of hits (“All I Want,” “Walk On the Ocean,” “Fall Down”) in the early 1990s, broke up in 1998, but demand from fans pushed the band back into touring in 2006 and they are working on new material. Night Ranger, a rock band that peaked in the mid-1980s with “Sister Christian,” also continues to tour after a hiatus. To widen the genre

If you go

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The Bulletin

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By Anne Aurand

Bend Summer Festival venues and road closures Souk de Summerfest

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Festival marks 21st year of music, arts, crafts

Troy Field Ka ns as Av

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Closed roads Roads will be closed from 10 tonight until 2 a.m. Monday. *One block of Oregon Ave. will close earlier to accommodate concerts on the Main Stage tonight. Greg Cross / The Bulletin


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

PAGE 21

out of town S U M M E R CALENDAR

Warming up By Jenny Wasson • The Bulletin

W

ith a seemingly nonexistent spring, it felt of cabin fever. as if summer would never arrive in Cen-

If you are itching for an adventure, there are plenty

tral Oregon. But warmer days are upon of events scheduled around Oregon to whet your ap-

us, and it is time to finally shake off this severe bout petite. Here are a few highlights of the season.

THE SHOW MUST GO ON

Coming next season Highlights of the fall season include the world premiere of the Oregon Ballet Theatre’s “Petrushka/Carmen” in Portland (Oct. 8-15), the Blue Man Group in Eugene (Oct. 4-6) and Portland (Oct. 18-23), Pilobus in Portland (Oct. 5), Greg Brown in Eugene (Oct. 7), “The Lord of the Rings in Concert: The Fellowship of the Ring” in Portland (Oct. 18), the Portland Opera’s “The Marriage of Figaro” in Portland (Nov. 4, 6, 10, 12), Michael Jackson The IMMORTAL Tour in Eugene (Nov. 15-16) and Portland (Nov. 18-20), “A Lincoln Portrait” narrated by Tom Brokow in Eugene (Nov. 22) and “A Christmas Story” in Portland (Nov. 22-Dec. 4).

On June 18, Ashland’s Oregon Shakespeare Festival discovered a crack in a supporting beam in its Angus Bowmer Theatre. With the help of the community, the festival amazingly managed to cancel only one performance of “Measure for Measure” during this time. Starting this weekend, Angus Bowmer Theatre plays are being performed in a large tent structure in Lithia Park. These plays include “Measure for Measure,” “The Imaginary Invalid” and “August: Osage County.” “The African Company Presents Richard III” runs July 20-Nov. 5. While the Angus Bowmer Theatre has had a tumultuous month, the plays at New Theatre and Elizabethan Stage are going strong. “Julius Caesar” (through Nov. 6) and “Ghost Light” (through Nov. 5) are running at the New Theatre. “Henry IV, Part Two” (through Oct. 7), “The Pirates of Penzance” (through Oct. 8) and “Love’s Labor’s Lost” (through Oct. 9) are in production at the Elizabethan Stage. The Pirate King (Michael Elich) leaps onstage as his shipmates look on with awe in “The Pirates of Penzance.”

A FAIR TO REMEMBER The Oregon State Fair, the state’s biggest fair, runs Aug. 26-Sept. 5 in Salem. This year’s festivities include a Cirque style show by iL CiRCo and the Stihl Timbersports Series. Cheap Trick kicks off the fair’s concerts on Aug. 27. The lineup also includes SessionFest featuring SouLive, Ozomatli, pictured below, and Kenny Wayne Shepherd (Sept. 1), The Band Perry (Sept. 2), The Judds (Sept. 3) and Selena Gomez & The Scene (Sept. 5).

Courtesy Christian Lantry

Courtesy T. Charles Erickson


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

out of town 10 YEARS AT HORNINGS Progressive bluegrass pickers Yonder Mountain String Band will celebrate its 10th annual Northwest String Summit, July 21-24 at Horning’s Hideout. Located in North Plains at the edge of the Horning Reservoir, the festival lineup includes Railroad Earth, Keller and the Keels, pictured at right, Todd Snider & Great American Taxi, The Travelin’ McCourys and the Emmitt-Nershi Band. Other outdoor festivals and music are in full swing, including the Britt Festival in Jacksonville (through Sept. 17), The Oregon Zoo Concert Series in Portland (through Aug. 27) and the McMenamins Edgefield Concerts on the Lawn in Troutdale (through Sept. 24).

The following is a list of other events “Out of Town.”

Concerts July 8 — AfroCubism, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* July 8 — Neko Case, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* July 8 — The Rosebuds, Mississippi Studios, Portland; www.mississippistudios. com or 503-288-3895. July 8-9 — Portland Cello Project, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TF* July 9 — American Idol Live!, Rose Garden, Portland; www. rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. July 9 — Darude, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* July 9 — JD Souther, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* July 10 — Gillian Welch, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* July 11 — Suicide Silence/Unearth/All Shall Perish/Indelible Terror/Gaia, Hawthorne Theatre, Portland; TW* July 12 — Albert Lee & John Jorgenson, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* July 12 — Gillian Welch, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* July 13 — Jimmie Vaughan & The Tilt-A-Whirl Band, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* July 13 — Plena Libre, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* July 14 — Eddie Vedder/Glen Hansard, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* July 14 — Jon Anderson, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* July 14 — The Music of ABBA — Arrival from Sweden, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 15 — Alkaline Trio, Hawthorne Theatre, Portland; TW* July 15 — Archeology/Hurtbird/Water & Bodies/Boy Eats Drum Machine, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TF* July 15 — Bobby McFerrin and the Yellowjackets, Britt Pavilion,

THE BEST OF THE NORTHWEST The MusicfestNW returns to the streets of Portland, Sept. 7-11. According to its website, it has become the third largest indoor music festival in the U.S. This year’s festival is bigger than ever, adding three concerts at Portland Courthouse Square. Iron and Wine, pictured, Markéta Irglová and Sallie Ford & the Sound Outside perform Sept. 9. Explosions in The Sky, The Antlers, Typhoon and Guests perform Sept. 10. Band of Horses, Cass McCombs, Morning Teleportation and Bobby Bare Jr. perform Sept. 11. Submitted photos

Jacksonville; www.brittfest. org or 800-882-7488. July 15 — Shpongle Presents the Shpongletron Experience, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* July 15-17 — Tayberry Jam Music Festival, Cougar Mountain Farm, Eugene; www.tayberryjam. com or 541-767-3798. July 16 — The Avett Brothers, LB Day Amphitheatre, Salem; TM* July 16 — Gypsy Soul, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 16 — Langhorne Slim/Weinland, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TF* July 17 — The Avett Brothers, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 17 — The BoDeans, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* July 17 — Owl City, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* July 19 — The Decemberists, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 19 — Mark Phillips & IIIrd Generation Bluegrass Band, Freedom Foursquare Church, Portland; eastsidebluegrass@yahoo.com. July 19 — Nanci Griffith, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* July 19 — Sara Bareilles, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* July 20 — Sara Bareilles, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 21 — Steel Pulse/The Wailers, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 21-24 — Northwest String Summit, Horning’s Hideout, North Plains; TW* July 22 — eTown/Railroad Earth/ The Travelin’ McCourys, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 22 — Indigo Girls, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* July 22 — Katy Perry, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter. com or 877-789-7673. July 22 — Steel Pulse/The Wailers,

Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* July 22 — TV on the Radio, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* July 23 — Cults, Mississippi Studios, Portland; www.mississippistudios. com or 503-288-3895. July 23 — Kenny Chesney, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter. com or 877-789-7673. July 23 — Klamath Blues Festival, Veterans Park, Klamath Falls; www. klamathblues.org or 541-332-3939. July 23 — Steel Pulse, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* July 23 — Thurston Moore, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* July 24 — Fleet Foxes, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* July 24 — Los Lobos/Los Lonely Boys, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* July 24 — Slightly Stoopid, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* July 25 — Summer Slaughter Tour, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* July 26 — Slightly Stoopid, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 27 — k.d. lang and The Siss Boom Bang, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 27 — Water & Bodies, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* July 28 — Matisyahu, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* July 28 — Queens of the Stone Age, Roseland Theater, Portland; SOLD OUT; TW* July 28 — Willie Nelson and Family, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; SOLD OUT; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 29 — Chris Isaak, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* July 29 — Floydian Slips, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* July 29 — Willie Nelson and Family, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* July 29-30 — Whitesnake, Chinook Winds Casino, Lincoln City; www.chinookwindscasino. com or 1-888-624-6228.

July 30 — Brandi Carlile, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* July 30 — Chris Isaak, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 30 — Jo Dee Messina, Hood River County Fair, Odell; www. hoodriverfair.com or 541-354-2865. July 30 — YES and Styx, Maryhill Winery, Goldendale, Wash.; www. maryhillwinery.com/concerts.asp. July 31 — Béla Fleck & the Flecktones/Bruce Hornsby, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Aug. 3 — Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Aug. 4 — Digitalism, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Aug. 4 — KMFDM, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Aug. 5 — Jonny Lang, Seven Feathers Casino Resort, Canyonville; www. sevenfeathers.com or 800-585-3737. Aug. 5 — Rasputina, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TF* Aug. 5 — Slayer/Rob Zombie, Memorial Coliseum, Portland; www. rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. Aug. 6 — Gipsy Kings, Maryhill Winery, Goldendale, Wash.; www. maryhillwinery.com/concerts.asp. Aug. 7 — George Thorogood and the Destroyers, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Aug. 10 — Eels, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Aug. 10 — Imelda May, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Aug. 11 — Adele, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* Aug. 11 — Arctic Monkeys, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Aug. 11 — Awolnation, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Aug. 11 — Peter Frampton, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Aug. 11-15 — Beloved Open Air Sacred Art & Music Festival, Tidewater; www.belovedfestival.com. Aug. 12 — Amos Lee/Calexico, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT*

Aug. 12 — Beirut, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Aug. 12 — k.d. lang and the Siss Boom Bang, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Aug. 12 — Y La Bamba, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TF* Aug. 12-14 — Northwest World Reggae Festival, Eugene; www. nwworldreggae.com or 503-922-0551. Aug. 13 — George Duke/Marcus Miller/David Sanborn, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Aug. 13 — The Go-Go’s, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Aug. 13 — Satin Love Orchestra, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Aug. 14 — Amos Lee, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Aug. 14 — Reba McEntire/Phil Vassar, Camp Rilea, Warrenton; TW* Aug. 14 — Tribal Seeds, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Aug. 14 — Warped Tour 2011, Washington County Fairplex, Hillsboro; TW* Aug. 15 — Nick 13 (Tiger Army), Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Aug. 15 — Sade/John Legend, Rose Garden, Portland; www. rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. Aug. 16 — Buck 65, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TF* Aug. 16 — Diamond Head, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Aug. 16 — The Little Roy and Lizzy Show, Foursquare Church, Portland; eastsidebluegrass@yahoo.com. Aug. 16 — Reckless Kelly, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Aug. 16 — SiA/Oh Land, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Aug. 18 — Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Aug. 18 — Miranda Cosgrove, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Aug. 19 — Carolina Chocolate Drops/The Be Good Tanyas, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Aug. 19-20 — Loretta Lynn, Chinook Winds Casino, Lincoln


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out of town City; www.chinookwindscasino. com or 1-888-624-6228. Aug. 20 — Aimee Mann/The Weepies, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Aug. 21 — 100 Monkeys, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Aug. 24 — Sergent Garcia, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Aug. 24 — Tapes ‘N Tapes, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TF* Aug. 25 — 311/Sublime, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Aug. 25 — Dave Alvin & The Guilty Ones, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Aug. 25 — The Decemberists, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* Aug. 26 — Josh Groban, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter. com or 877-789-7673. Aug. 26 — Cloud Cult, Mission Theatre, Portland; CT* Aug. 26 — Daniel Johnston, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Aug. 26-28 — BurntWoodsStock 2011, Blodgett; www. burntwoodsstock.com. Aug. 27 — Cheap Trick, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. oregonstatefair.org or 800-833-0011. Aug. 27 — Huey Lewis and the News, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Aug. 27 — Reverend Horton Heat, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Aug. 29 — Cheap Trick, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 30 — Janet Jackson, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Sept. 1 — John Butler Trio, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 1 — SessionFest, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. oregonstatefair.org or 800-833-0011. Sept. 2 — The Band Perry, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. oregonstatefair.org or 800-833-0011. Sept. 2 — Butthole Surfers, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Sept. 2 — Dispatch, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 2 — Rockapella/The Coats, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 3 — The Naked and Famous, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 3 — Chris Botti, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 3 — The Judds, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. oregonstatefair.org or 800-833-0011. Sept. 4 — Ray Lamontagne, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* Sept. 5 — Selena Gomez & The Scene, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www.oregonstatefair. org or 800-833-0011. Sept. 6 — Taylor Swift, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter. com or 877-789-7673. Sept. 7 — The Kills, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Sept. 7 — Reverend Horton Heat, WOW Hall, Eugene; www. wowhall.org or 541-687-2746.

Sept. 7-11 — MusicfestNW, Portland; TW* Sept. 8 — Butthole Surfers, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 9 — B-52s, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest. org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 9 — Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 9 — Pretty Lights, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Sept. 10 — John Prine/Ani Difranco, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* Sept. 10 — Neurosis, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 11 — Ke$ha, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter. com or 877-789-7673. Sept. 12 — John Prine, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Sept. 14 — Deva Premal & Miten, Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM* Sept. 14 — Thievery Corporation, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Sept. 15 — Cecilio & Kapono, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 16 — Cake, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* Sept. 16 — David Bromberg Quartet, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 16 — Michael McDonald and Boz Scaggs, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 17 — Blue October, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 17 — Low, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 17 — Michael McDonald with Boz Scaggs, Maryhill Winery, Goldendale, Wash.; www. maryhillwinery.com/concerts.asp. Sept. 17 — Smokey Robinson, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 18 — Montrose, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 19 — UFO, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 20 — James McMurtry, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 22 — Pat Metheny, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 23-25 — Further, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Sept. 24 — Bon Iver, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale, CT*

Lectures & Comedy July 8 — Oregon Book Awards Author Tour, Crossroads Art Center, Baker City; www.literary-arts.org. July 10-17 — Summer Fishtrap Workshops & Gathering, Wallowa Lake Camp & Retreat Center, Wallowa Lake; www.fishtrap. org or 541-426-3623. July 15 — “Mingle, Muse and Munch”: With writers Jennifer Boyden and Heather Swan, Sitka Center for Art and Ecology, Otis; www. sitkacenter.org or 541-994-5485. July 17 — Terri Daniel, New Renaissance Books, Portland; www. newrenbooks.com or 503-224-4929 July 29 — George Lopez, Keller

*Tickets • TM: Ticketmaster, www. ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000, • TW: TicketsWest, www. ticketswest.com or 800-9928499, • TF: Ticketfly, www.ticketfly. com or 877-435-9489. • CT: Cascade Tickets, www. cascadetickets.com or 800514-3849. Auditorium, Portland; TM* Aug. 15-18 — Oregon Christian Writers Summer Conference, Aldersgate Conference Center, Turner; www.oregonchristianwriters. org or 503-393-3356. Aug. 20 — “Horticulture in Biblical Times”: Lecture by Lytton John Musselman; The Oregon Garden, Silverton; www.oregongarden. org or 503-874-8100. Aug. 26 — Bill Maher, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 9 — John Oliver, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Sept. 10 — Eric Nelson, The Oregon Garden, Silverton; www. oregongarden.org or 503-874-8100. Sept. 10 — An Evening with Cesar Millan, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Sept. 15 — “Madame Marie Dorion”: Lecture by Jane Kirkpatrick; Liberty Theater, Astoria; www. astoria200.org or 503-325-5922.

Symphony & Opera Through July 10 — Oregon Bach Festival, Eugene; www. oregonbachfestival.com or 800-457-1486. Through July 9 — Oregon Bach Festival’s Portland MiniFest, Portland; www.uoregon. edu/obf or 541-346-4363. July 29-Aug. 6 — Oregon Festival of American Music, Eugene; www. theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Sept. 10 — Chris Botti, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony. org or 800-228-7343. Sept. 11-13 — Pink Martini, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony. org or 800-228-7343. Sept. 22 — “Opening Night”: Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter. com or 541-682-5000. Sept. 24-26 — “Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 2,” Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343.

Through July 10, 14-16 — “Jesus Christ Superstar”: Presented by the Columbia Center for the Arts; Hood River; www.columbiaarts. org or 541-387-8877. Through Oct. 7 — Oregon Shakespeare Festival: The following plays are in production at the Angus Bowmer Theatre: “August: Osage County” (through Nov. 5), “The Imaginary Invalid” (through Nov. 6), “Measure for Measure” (through Nov. 6) and “The African Company Presents Richard III” (July 20-Nov. 5). “Ghost Light” (through Nov. 5) and “Julius Caesar” (through Nov. 6) are playing at the New Theatre. “Henry IV, Part Two” (through Oct. 7), “The Pirates of Penzance” (through Oct. 8) and “Love’s Labor’s Lost” (through Oct. 9) are playing at the Elizabethan Stage; Ashland; www. osfashland.org or 800-219-8161. July 18-23 — OBT Exposed, Director Park, Portland; www. obt.org or 888-922-5538. July 22-23 — “Evil Dead The Musical,” Wonder Ballroom, Portland; www. evildeadtour.com or 503-284-8686. July 26-July 30 — “The Commedia Puss in Boots”: Presented by Mad Duckling Children’s Theatre; Amazon Park, Eugene; 541-346-4192. July 29-Aug. 12 — “Girl Crazy,” Hult Center, Eugene; www. hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. Aug. 2-7 — “Les Miserables,” 25th anniversary production of Boublil & Schonberg’s legendary musical; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Aug. 23-28 — “Mamma Mia!,” Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Sept. 13-18 — “Shrek the Musical,” Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Sept. 16-Oct. 8 — “Avenue Q,” Lord Leebrick Theatre Company, Eugene; www.lordleebrick. com or 541-465-1506.

Exhibits Through July 9 — Museum of Contemporary Crafts: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Era Messages: Selecitons by Garth Johnson” (through July 9) and “Laurie Herrick: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow” (through July 30); Upcoming exhibits include “75 Gifts for 75 Years” (July 28-Feb. 25) and

“Northwest Modern: Revisiting the Annual Ceramic Exhibitions of 195064” (Aug. 18-Feb. 25); Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft. org or 503-223-2654. Through July 10 — Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Peter Sarkisian: Video Works 1996-2008” (through July 10) and “Excessive Obsession” (through July 31); University of Oregon, Eugene; jsma. uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027. Through July 31 — “Intermation”: An exhibit of animated works; Philip Feldman Gallery + Project Space at Pacific Northwest College, Portland; www.pnca.edu. Through July 31 — Jennifer Diehl and Susan Koch, Lawrence Gallery Salishan, Gleneden Beach; www. lawrencegallery.com or 541-764-2318. Through July 31 — “Running Fruit Ladders” exhibit, along highways near Hood River, Mosier and The Dalles; www.gorgeartists.org. Through July 31 — “Urban Art: A Cultural Exploration,” Columbia Center for the Arts, Hood River; www. columbiaarts.org or 541-387-8877. Through July — Jody Ake, Newspace Center for Photography; www. newspacephoto.org or 503-963-1935. Through Aug. 28 — “The Last Polar Bear: Facing the Truth of a Warming World”: Featuring photographer Steven Kazlowski; University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History Galleria, Eugene; http://natural-history.uoregon.edu. Through Aug. 31 — “From Top Hats to Bell Bottoms, Men’s 20th Century Fashions,” North Lincoln County Historical Museum, Lincoln City; 541-996-6614. Through Aug. 31 — “KidsBuild”: Kids can plan, build and create their own model cities; Portland Children’s Museum, Portland; www. portlandcm.org or 503-223-6500. Through Sept. 5 — “Dinosaurs!”: Featuring animatronic dinosaurs, Oregon Zoo, Portland; www. oregonzoo.org or 503-226-1561. Through Sept. 11 — Oregon Jewish Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “That’s

Continued next page

Summer Festival Music Tickets on sale Now! 34th Season ~ Six Concerts ~ Aug 9 - 17 Sunriver Music Festival Orchestra with Thomas Lauderdale at the Pops

AUGUST 9 Classical Concert I “American Music” with mountain dulcimer + Mendelsshon

AUGUST 11 Classical Concert II “Night at the Opera” featuring Sarah Mattox & Courtney Huffman

AUGUST 12

Theater & Dance Through July 9, 12-16 — “The Commedia Pinocchio”: Presented by Mad Duckling Children’s Theatre; Amazon Park, Eugene; 541-346-4192. Through July 10 — “Mary Poppins,” Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM*

541-593-9310 tickets@sunrivermusic.org www.sunrivermusic.org


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

out of town From previous page All Folks! The Mel Blanc Story,” “Transformations–A Collaboration Between Bill Aron and Victor Raphael” and “The Heavens Spread Out Like a Prayer Shawl” (through Sept. 4); Portland; www.

ojm.org or 503-226-3600. Through Sept 11 — Portland Art Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “The Allure of the Automobile” (through Sept. 11) and “Contemporary Northwest Art Awards” (through Sept.);

Portland; www.portlandartmuseum. org or 503-226-2811. Through Sept. 18 — “Game On 2.0”: A hands-on experience of video game history and culture; Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 503-797-4000.

Through Sept. 30 — “Brain Builders Bonanza”: Featuring hands-on activities on a range of science and engineering topics; The Science Factory, Eugene; www. sciencefactory.org or 541-682-7888. Through Sept. 30 — “Cleveland Rockwell Fine Art Exhibit,” Columbia River Maritime Museum, Astoria; www.astoria200.org or 503-325-2323. Through Oct. 2 — “Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition,” Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; www. maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733. Through Oct. 30 — “Caravanning and Collecting”: An exhibit on Airstream creator Wally Byam; Baker Heritage Museum, Baker City; www.bakerheritagemuseum. com or 541-523-9308. Through Dec. 31, 2012 — “Astor Party & the Founding of Astoria,” Heritage Museum, Astoria; www. astoria200.org or 503-338-4849. July 11-15 — “Ocean’s Blue,” Portland Children’s Museum, Portland; www. portlandcm.org or 503-223-6500. July 16-Nov. 1 — “Beside the Big River: Images and Art of the Mid-Columbia Indians”: Featuring 40 photographs by Lee Moorhouse, Thomas H. Rutter and J.W. Thompson; Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; www. maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733. Aug. 4-6 — Doug Tracy, National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, Baker City; oregontrail. blm.gov or 541-523-1843. Aug. 18-Oct. 29 — “Cutting Her Own Path: Papercuts by Nikki McClure, +1996-2011”: A retrospective exhibition of Nikki McClure’s original papercuts, made with black paper and an X-ACTO blade; Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft. org or 503-223-2654. Sept. 8-18 — Time-Based Art Festival, Portland; www. pica.org or 503-242-1419. Sept. 17 — Jellyfish Jubilee, Oregon Coast Aquarium, Newport; www.aquarium.org.

Miscellany Through July 10 — Dulcimer Week in the Wallowas, Wallowa Lake; www.wvmusicalliance.org. Through July 10 — Oregon Country Fair, Veneta; www. oregoncountryfair.org. Through July 10 — Rip City Riders 4th Annual Summer Fun Run & Festival, Klamath Falls; ripcityriderseventsoregon.com. Through Oct. 15 — Eagle Cap Excursion Train: Saturdays; Elgin; www.eaglecaptrain. com or 800-323-7330. July 8 — The Dairy Farmers of Oregon’s second-annual Ice Cream Churn-ament, Pioneer Courthouse Square, Portland; www.dairyfarmersor.com. July 8-17 — Fort Dalles Days and Rodeo, The Dalles; www. fortdallesdays.com or 800-255-3385. July 9 — Philomath Frolic & Rodeo, Philomath; www.philomathrodeo. org or 541-929-2611. July 9-10 — Oregon Lavender Festival, various locations in Oregon; www. oregonlavenderdestinations.com.

July 9-Aug. 27 — Historic Trolley Tours: Saturdays; Corvallis; 800-334-8118. July 10 — The Ultimate Elvis Tribute Artist Contest, Chinook Winds Casino Resort, Lincoln City; www. chinookwindscasino.com. July 14-17 — La Lucha 2011: CelebrAcción, Eastbank Esplanade, Portland; www. latinogaypridepdx.com. July 15-17 — Portland International Beerfest, Pearl District North Park Blocks, Portland; www. seattlebeerfest.com. July 16-17 — Hood River Cherry Celebration, Fruit Loop, Hood River Valley; www.hoodriverfruitloop. com or541-386-7697. July 18-22 — Britt Festivals Rock Camp, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org/rockcamp. July 18-24 — Puckerfest 5, Belmont Station, Portland; http://puckerfest.com/ July 23 — Inaugural Barrel to Keg Relay: 69 miles from Philomath to Newport; www.runnerspace. com/EclecticEdgeRacing or mbarretts@aol.com. July 27-30 — 2011 Hood River County Fair, Odell; www.hoodriverfair. com or 541-354-2865. July 28 — 2011 Brewers Brunch and Parade: McMenamins Crystal Ballroom to Tom McCall Waterfront Park, Portland; www.oregonbrewfest.com. July 29-31 — SolWest Fair, Grant County Fairgrounds, John Day; www. solwest.org or 541-575-3633. Aug. 6 — Fremont Festival, Northeast Fremont Street between 42nd and 50th avenues, Portland; http://beaumontbba.com. Aug. 6-7 — Van Gogh Days, Rasmussen Farms, Hood River; www.rasmussenfarms. com or 800-548-2243. Aug. 7-28 — Bike Oregon Wine Country, Eola Hills Wine Cellars, Rickreall; www.eolahillswinery. com or 503-623-2405. Aug. 10-14 — Astoria Regatta Festival, Astoria; www.astoriaregatta. org or 800-875-6807. Aug. 19 and 20 — 2011 We Like ’Em Short Film Festival, Eltrym Theater, Baker City; http://www.eltrym. com/schedule/filmfestival.htm Aug. 20 — 6th Annual Depoe Bay Pirate Treasure Hunt, Depoe Bay; www.treasuredepoebay. org or 541-765-4373. Aug. 20-21 — Columbia Gorge Paddle Challenge, Waterfront Park, Hood River; www.gorgepaddlechallenge. com or 541-386-6086. Aug. 26-Sept. 5 — Oregon State Fair, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www.oregonstatefair. org or 800-833-0011. Aug 27-28 — Oregon Open Ocean Classic Stand Up Paddleboard Race, Nye Beach, Newport; www.oregonopenocean. com, annfinlay404@yahoo. com or 425-530-0388. Sept. 15 — “Wait...Wait...Don’t Tell Me”: Presented by National Public Radio; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM*


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

gaming Not much will scare you

PAGE 25

TOP 10 ACROSS THE BOARD The editors of Game Informer Magazine rank the top 10 games for July:

‘F.E.A.R.3’ lacks a good story but still entertains

1. “Shadows of the Damned” (PS3, X360)

By Matt Bertz

5. “Infamous 2” (PS3)

2. “NCAA Football 12” (PS3, X360) 3. “The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings” (PC) 4. “L.A. Noire” (PS3, X360)

Game Informer Magazine

6. “DiRT 3” (PS3, X360)

W

hen big names like film director John Carpenter (“The Thing,” “Halloween”) and comic book writer Steve Niles (“30 Days of Night”) attach themselves to a project, it’s not unreasonable to expect certain degree of terror. After Warner Bros. announced the two were collaborating with Day 1 Studios to develop “F.E.A.R. 3,” I anticipated a game that would re-embrace the dedication to scaring the bejesus out of players that many, including myself, felt was lost in the action-heavy sequel. “F.E.A.R. 3” features many of the integral pieces necessary to deliver frights — haunting sound effects, an arresting atmosphere and foreboding environments — yet too often the game recycles old techniques that proved scary in 2005 but do little to raise my blood pressure now. Alma’s apparition has strolled across my path so many times at this point she’s more like an annoying pest than a fearsome poltergeist. The uninspired story does even less to make the hairs stand up on the back of your neck. At the end of “Project Origin,” protagonist Michael Beckett somehow impregnated the demented psychic. Now estranged brothers Point Man and Paxton Fettel have reunited, and Fettel wants the family to attend the birth of their new sibling. Before they start buying Hallmark cards, however, the brothers have some issues to work out. The primary gripe? Point Man murdered his bro in the first game. This uneasy alliance sets the

7. “Dungeon Siege III” (PS3, X360, PC) 8. “Child of Eden” (X360) 9. “Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3-D” (3DS) 10. “F.E.A.R. 3” (PS3, X360, PC) McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Weekly download M c C l a t c h y - T r i b u n e News Service

“ F . E . A. R . 3” continues the twisted story of Alma and her offspring but offers few new scares. stage for the campaign, a fivehour experience best played in co-op. One user plays as Point Man, a weapons expert who can momentarily slow down time during battle. The other controls Fettel, the infinitely more interesting apparition who can suspend enemies in the air, shock them to death from afar, and inhabit enemy bodies for a short time to use their weapons. It’s a shame the abilities aren’t more balanced, because his unique skills make Fettel the clear-cut preference. “F.E.A.R. 3’s” campaign is short on terror, but the satisfying action keeps it from being a complete loss. The enemies are more aggressive than typical shooters; opposing soldiers constantly trying to flank you in open spaces, the dog-like scavengers attack in packs, and cultists rush at you like hordes of brain-dead zombies. The few mech encounters in particular are menacing. Some levels are so poorly designed it’s hard to tell where you’re supposed to go next, but

EW RE V I

New game releases The following titles were scheduled for release the week of July 3:

‘F.E.A.R. 3’ 7.75 (out of 10) PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, PC Warner Bros. Interactive, Day 1 Studios ESRB rating: M for Mature many have a memorable atmosphere. As you move through the quarantined city’s abandoned prisons, desolate suburbs and ruined commercial districts, the bleakness of the circumstance is palpable. My favorite locations were an abandoned bulk retail outlet, where a crazed group of freaks spring from behind walls of glowing HDTVs, and the creepy suburban neighborhood, which featured candlelit homes defaced with demonic ramblings scribbled in blood on white walls. While playing through the campaign, each player racks up points for completing specific challenges. Though the game never tells you outright, these scores de-

• “Resistance Dual Pack” (PS3) • “Jewel Match” (DS) • “Fishdom” (DS) • “PlayStation Move Ape Escape” (PS3)

termine which ending you see. If Point Man has a higher score, he becomes the dominant character in the conclusion. If Fettel wins, his decisions drive the finale. It would have been nice to know beforehand because it may have encouraged more backstabbing and point hoarding during my playthrough, during which Reiner and I often shared the wealth. The single player campaign may lack suspense, but the multiplayer delivers it in bulk. Day 1 Studios deserves credit forgoing the deathmatch/team deathmatch/capture the flag multiplayer mode holy trinity in favor of more colorful choices. In many ways, the “F.E.A.R.” story feels like it has run its course. Like most long-running horror series, the scares that thrilled us years ago no longer do the trick, and as I learn more about Alma’s family, the less interested I become in trudging forward. However, if you hardly pay attention to narratives and are looking for a fun multiplayer experience, “F.E.A.R. 3” is worth checking out.

• “Earth Defense Force: Insect Armageddon” (PS3, X360) • “Sniper: Ghost Warrior” (PS3) — Gamespot.com

“GREG HASTINGS PAINTBALL 2” For: PlayStation 3 (via PlayStation Network) From: Majesco ESRB Rating: Everyone 10-plus Price: $20 Yes, it seems silly to have a video game that essentially emulates the very same thing other games emulate with bullets and blood instead of paint pellets. But “Greg Hastings Paintball 2” earns its place not simply because it simulates simulated gunplay. It also pulls in the rules and metrics of the sport, which allows it to accommodate modes and features — team/gear management, licensed players, tournament schedules, in-game play formations, even cheering crowds — that are more the domain of sports games than first-person shooters. Additionally, it creates a tense combat scenario where one pellet can eliminate you and where, among other factors, a shot across the field has to account for a pellet’s tendency to arc in ways a bullet wouldn’t. “Paintball” makes an awful first impression with graphics and sound that look pre-PlayStation 2 and a hideous menu system that arguably predates the first PlayStation. It may be the least attractive game on the PS3. Provided you can make peace with this, though, and provided you can appreciate the angle this game is taking, what lies beneath is much better than what first impressions imply. — Billy O’Keefe, McClatchy-Tribune News Service


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

movies

Courtesy Warner Bros. Pictures

Dale Arbus (Charlie Day, left), Kurt Buckman (Jason Sudeikis) and Nick Hendricks (Jason Bateman) meet up to plot the demise of their bosses in the comedy “Horrible Bosses.”

Film is a wicked comedy Acting gives ‘Horrible Bosses’ an extra punch of humor

‘H

orrible Bosses” is funny and dirty, in about that order. Of George Carlin’s famous “seven words you can never say on television,” it omits only the usual one, I think, makes free with the others, and adds several that didn’t make Carlin’s cut. It also contains what the MPAA describes as “crude and sexual content,” which I guess means both kinds at once. The story involves three horrible bosses and the three employees who vow to murder them. What makes the movie work is how truly horrible the bosses are, what pathetic victims the

employees are, and how bad the employees are at killing; they’d be fired in a second by Murder Inc. The movie causes particularly painful twinges at this moment, when employees are in a weak position and their bosses know it. The bosses display an impressive array of vile behavior. In a well-cast movie, each one plays to the strengths of the actor portraying him. Consider Dave Harken (Kevin Spacey), a supercilious sadist who toys with his middle manager Nick (Jason Bateman). Few are better than Spacey at regarding others with contempt and humiliating

them with pleasure. Many other actors, given his dialogue in this film, would seem unconvincing and over the top. Spacey demonstrates why he is getting praise right now in London for his work as Shakespeare’s “Richard III.” You remember him: the king who murdered Henry VI and his son Edward, and later during the funeral boasted of his plans to marry Edward’s widow, Lady Anne. The second boss we meet is Dr. Julia Harris (Jennifer Aniston), an erotomaniac dentist. Her target is Dale (Charlie Day), her dental assistant, who is engaged to be married, but so what? She

ROGER EBERT

“Horrible Bosses” 100 minutes R, for crude and sexual content, pervasive language and some drug material wants him and she will have him, indulging in blatant and aggressive sexual harassment. You know those little water pics dentists have? You don’t want

to know what she does with one after aiming it at Dale’s netherlands. The third boss is Bobby Pellit (Colin Farrell, almost unrecognizable). Bobby has taken control of the company from his beloved father, Jack (Donald Sutherland), and uses it to fund a lifestyle of wretched excess. His employee Kurt (Jason Sudeikis) was a protege of the old man and now watches with horror as Bobby runs roughshod over environmental restrictions in order to increase short-term profits. Nick, Dale and Kurt meet after work on too many days to bitch and moan about their bosses, and one night become inspired to murder them. Continued next page


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

PAGE 27

movies

‘Zookeeper’ is stellar slapstick Realistic animals garner attention in otherwise silly family comedy

‘Z

ookeeper” is a goodnatured comedy about how the animals at the zoo coach Kevin James on his romantic life. Since he ends up with Rosario Dawson, they must know what they’re talking about. What it comes down to is a buddy movie where the best buddy is a gorilla. I confess to a sinking feeling when the first animal began to talk. I understand why animals talk in animated films, but in live-action films it usually just feels creepy. Studiously avoiding all contact with publicity for the movie, I naively expected a story about the profession of zookeeping — you know, some natural history, maybe some insights into animal psychology. What I got instead were animals that speak perfectly in a variety of accents, ranging from Bernie the Gorilla (Nick Nolte), Donald the Monkey (Adam Sandler), Joe the Lion (Sylvester Stallone) and Janet the Lioness (Cher) down the evolutionary scale to Don Rickles doing Frog, who doesn’t have a first name. Kevin James stars as the socially inept Griffin, a zookeeper who deeply cares for his animals and discovers they like him just as much. He’s sweet and goofy, and somehow once had the sexy Stephanie (Leslie Bibb) as his girlfriend. The story is, she broke up with him because of his low salary. But now it looks as if he’ll get a job at his brother’s luxury car dealership, and she’s interested again. Problem is, he’s paralyzed by shyness. The animals team up to advise

From previous page This leads them to an unsavory bar in search of a hit man, and they meet a man named Jones (Jamie Foxx). Even the initials of his nickname don’t belong in a family newspaper, qualifying as they do as a familiar adaptation of one of Carlin’s seven words.

The Associated Press

Kevin James, right, chats with his good friend Bernie the Gorilla (voiced by Nick Nolte) while at a restaurant in the comedy “Zookeeper.” him, suggesting such tactics as aggression (the lions), marking his territory (the wolves) and puffing out his throat (Frog). He takes them so seriously that he marks his territory at his brother’s rehearsal dinner by peeing in a potted plant. Meanwhile, right there in plain view and sharing his love of animals is his fellow zookeeper Kate (Rosario Dawson), who has never looked more ravishing. Why would he prefer the shallow Stephanie? Because the plot requires him to, of course.

That’s the law in a romcom: The guy falls in love with the topbilled woman, but not before skirting romantic disaster. It’s not the romcom that’s so entertaining, anyway; it’s the slapstick. Griffin busts up his brother’s wedding by swinging from long cloth strips that fortuitously hang from the ceiling, and later engages in a thrilling chase scene while assisted by Bernie the Gorilla. It is also funny when they go out to dinner together at T.G.I. Friday’s, which Bernie has long eyed from over

the top of the zoo walls. Look, a great movie this is not. Pleasant summer entertainment it is. I think it can play for all ages in a family audience, it’s clever to have the animals advising humans on their behavioral strategies, and besides, I’m getting a teensy bit exhausted by cute little animated animals. The creatures in this zoo all have the excellent taste to be in 2-D.

The movie, directed with cheerful and wicked energy by Seth Gordon, is situation slapstick, much of it set (as many desperate lad pictures are) outside the houses of the targets, as the plotters peep and spy. There’s a particularly ingenious series of scenes involving Kevin Spacey, one of

them finding a legitimate excuse to recycle perhaps the single most famous shot of “Pulp Fiction.” Spacey is superb, but the surprise for many viewers may be Jennifer Aniston. Her career has drifted into such shallows that it’s possible to forget how good she was in a movie like “The Good

Girl” (1999). Here she has acute comic timing and hilariously enacts alarming sexual hungers. The default rating for comedies these days is PG-13. A plain PG warns teenagers a movie is too tame, and an R (allegedly) means they can’t get in. Every season brings a couple of R-rated comic

Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.

ROGER EBERT

“Zookeeper” 104 minutes PG, for some rude and suggestive humor and language

raunch-a-ramas, however, and on the heels of the “Hangover” franchise here perhaps comes another one. In strict logic it’s hard to see how a sequel would be possible, but they’ll find a way. Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.


PAGE 28 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

movies ON LOCAL SCREENS H ere’s what’s showing on Central Oregon movie screens. For showtimes, see listings on Page 31.

HEADS UP “Charlotte’s Web” — A gently adapted homage to E.B. White’s universal and enduring story. Dakota Fanning delivers another delightful and authentic performance as Fern, the farm girl who rescues Wilbur the piglet, and Julia Roberts is pitchperfect as the voice of Charlotte. Rating: Three stars. 97 minutes(G)

— Part of the Regal Summer Movie Express “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part II” — The final installment of the “Harry Potter” series opens July 15. Fans can catch a late night screening Thursday at local theaters. (PG-13) “The Metropolitan Opera: La Fille du Régiment” — Laurent Pelly’s hilarious production stars two of the greatest bel canto singers. Natalie Dessay is the tomboy of the title and Juan Diego Flórez plays the man in love with her, tossing off nine high Cs in his famous aria. Legendary actress Marian Seldes makes a

Courtesy Disney/Pixar

Finn McMissile (voiced by Michael Caine), left, Mater (voiced by Larry the Cable Guy) and Lightning McQueen (voiced by Owen Wilson) are awestruck by the sights and sounds of the big city in “Cars 2.” special appearance as the Duchess of Krakenthorp and Marco Armiliato conducts. This performance was originally transmitted live on April 26, 2008. The encore screening begins at 6:30 Wednesday at the Regal Old

Mill Stadium 16 in Bend. Tickets are $15. 140 minutes. (no MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from The Metropolitan Opera “Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The

Lightning Thief” — A teenage New Yorker (Logan Lerman) discovers he is a demigod: The son of the Greek god Poseidon (Kevin McKidd) and a human mother (Catherine Keener). Accused by an angry Zeus (Sean Bean) of having stolen his lightning bolt, he finds himself in the middle of an Olympian feud also involving Hades (Steve Coogan), Medusa (Uma Thurman), Persephone (Rosario Dawson) and Pierce Brosnan as the centaur Chiron. Directed as goofy fun by Chris Columbus. Rating: Three stars. 120 minutes. (PG)

— Part of the Regal Summer Movie Express

WHAT’S NEW “Horrible Bosses” — Very funny and very dirty, in about that order. Involves three horrible bosses and three employees who vow to murder them. The movie works because of how truly horrible the bosses are, what pathetic victims the employees are, and how bad the employees are at killing. Kevin Spacey and Jennifer Aniston stand out in a strong cast including Jason Bateman, Jason Sudeikis, Colin Farrell, Jamie Foxx and Charlie Day. Rating: Three and a half stars. 100 minutes. (R) “Zookeeper” — A good-natured comedy about how the animals at the zoo coach Kevin James on his romantic life. Since he ends up with Rosario Dawson, they must know what they’re talking about. What it comes down to is a buddy movie where the best buddy is a gorilla. The animals all talk, and are voiced by such as Nick Nolte, Adam Sandler, Sylvester Stallone and Cher. Rating: Three stars. 104 minutes. (PG)

STILL SHOWING “Bad Teacher” — Immediately brings “Bad Santa” to mind, and suffers by the comparison. Its bad

teacher is neither bad enough nor likable enough. What’s surprising is that Elizabeth Halsey (Cameron Diaz) is so nasty and unpleasant. With supporting work by Justin Timberlake, Jason Segel. The one effective actor is Lucy Punch, as a rival teacher. Rating: Two stars. 92 minutes. (R) “Bridesmaids” — Kristen Wiig’s new comedy is about a group of women friends who are as cheerfully vulgar as the guys in “The Hangover.” Wiig plays Annie, whose Milwaukee bakery shop has just gone bust, and whose longtime friend Lillian (Maya Rudolph) is getting married. Naturally, she expects to be maid of honor, but begins to fear a rival in Helen (Rose Byrne), the rich and overconfident trophy wife of the groom’s boss. Gifted with getting in her own way, she creates havoc during a bachelorette trip to Vegas; the level of raunch approaches “The Hangover,” and is sometimes sort of brilliant. Rating: Three and a half stars. 128 minutes. (R) “Buck” — Buck Brannaman was the original “horse whisperer,” the character Nicholas Evans based his novel on and Robert Redford used as the on-set consultant for his 1998 film. Traveling the country giving clinics, he’s an advocate for an empathetic approach to horses in which firm kindness is used that respects a horse’s feelings. We learn that Buck was beaten as a child, and we intuit that he treats horses as he wishes he had been treated. Wonderful horse scenes and a touching portrait of a good man. Rating: Three stars. 88 minutes. (PG) “Cars 2” — The inventor of a new alternative fuel (voice by Eddie Izzard) sponsors a World Grand Prix, which comes down to a duel between Lightning McQueen (Owen Wilson) and Francesco Bernoulli (John Turturro).

Continued next page


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

PAGE 29

movies From previous page They get mixed up in a secret war involving defenders of fossil fuels and the British spies Finn McMissile (Michael Caine) and Holley Shiftwell (Emily Mortimer). Great fun by the animation master John Lasseter, and better than “Cars” (2006). See it in 2-D if you can. Rating: Three and a half stars. 107 minutes. (G) “Green Lantern” — Ryan Reynolds stars as a test pilot who is chosen by the race of aliens who enforce peace in the universe to be a member of the Green Lantern Corps. He is given a magic ring and a lantern, and his task is to battle a malevolent, egomaniac fallen alien named Parallax. A fellow test pilot (Blake Lively) becomes his romantic interest, and a nerdy genius (Peter Sarsgaard) is thrown into the mix. Lots of aggressive special effects, a silly plot, a good villain: You know, a comic book movie. I saw the 2-D version, which was crisp, bright and clear. Rating: Two and a half stars. 105 minutes. (PG-13) “The Hangover Part II” — Not merely a sequel to the 2009 hit, but literally a remake, with the same story transported laterally from Las Vegas to Bangkok. This time Stu (Ed Helms) is the groom-to-be, and his buddies (Bradley Cooper, Justin Bartha and Zach Galifianakis) are in the wedding party, along with the bride’s 16-year-old kid brother (Mason Lee), who on the morning after is missing, except for a severed finger wearing a Stanford class ring. Galifianakis has many of the best moments, but the film plays like some kind of a test of how much raunch a weekend movie crowd can tolerate. Directed again by Todd Phillips. Rating: Two stars. 101 minutes. (R) “Kung Fu Panda 2” — Exactly as you’d expect, and more. The animation

is elegant, the story is much more involving than the original, and there’s boundless energy. The kingdom faces the prospect that it will be conquered and ruled by an evil peacock, Lord Shen (Gary Oldman), whose minions have designed a new weapon. Po (Jack Black) and the Furious Five go into battle with the villain, and along the way the panda discovers his real father was not a goose. Lovely animation; shame about the 3-D. Rating: Three and a half stars. 90 minutes. (PG) “Larry Crowne” — Tom Hanks and Julia Roberts and a good premise and a colorful supporting cast, but no reason for existing. The screenplay carries blandness to a point beyond tedium. The sinking realization sets in that Larry Crowne was born a nice guy, will always be a nice guy, will find few bumps in his road and is destined for a happy ending. Hanks plays an unemployed man who signs up for community college and falls in love with his teacher (Roberts). As pleasant as watching bread rise. Rating: Two stars. 99 minutes. (PG-13) “Midnight in Paris” — Woody Allen’s enchanting new comedy stars Owen Wilson as an American who visits Paris with his fiancee (Rachel McAdams), and finds himself seduced by dreams of living there in the 1920s when Hemingway and Fitzgerald hung out at Gertrude Stein’s fabled salon. With charm and whimsy, Allen tickles the fantasies of everyone who ever loved an American lit class. With Kathy Bates, Adrien Brody, French first lady Carla Bruni, Marion Cotillard and Michael Sheen. Rating: Three and a half stars. 94 minutes. (PG-13) “Monte Carlo” — A harmless, innocuous tweener fantasy that seems constructed out of bits and pieces of movies we must surely

have seen before. The cute-asa-button Selena Gomez stars as a new high school graduate who has saved up for a graduation trip to Paris. She’s saddled with her stepsister (Leighton Meester) and accompanied by her BFF (Katie Cassidy), and when she’s mistaken for a rich British heiress, they’re whisked off to Monte Carlo and a taste of glamour and luxury. Think “Sex and the City” except with no sex, one fewer girl and different cities. Rating: Two stars. 109 minutes. (PG) “Mr. Popper’s Penguins” — A stupefyingly dumb family movie proving that penguins have limited charisma as pets. Jim Carrey stars as a rich man who inherits the penguins from his father and takes them into his duplex co-op in Manhattan. He’s divorced from his wife (Carla Gugino), but she turns up with their kids at the drop of a plot point, and there is suspense about sending the penguins to the zoo. Based on a classic children’s book; maybe children who like the book will like the movie, although penguins are more entertaining as a concept in a story than as characters on a screen. Rating: One and a half stars. 97 minutes. (PG) “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides” — Johnny Depp is back and at sword point with Penelope Cruz, as they join Blackbeard and British and Spanish ships in a race to find the Fountain of Youth. With Geoffrey Rush as the sandpapery Barbossa and Astrid Berges-Frisbey as a mermaid whose tears are needed to allow the fountain’s magic to work. During this fourth installment of the series, I decided I was all Pirates of the Caribbean-ed out. Rating: Two stars. 134 minutes (PG-13)

Courtesy Sony Pictures Classics

Marion Cotillard stars as Adriana and Owen Wilson stars as Gil in the Woody Allen film “Midnight in Paris.”

General Admission Tickets or Hot Dogs & Sodas and More! Just $2 each!

Tuesday, July 12, 6:35 PM • Cowlitz Bears

Continued next page Sponsored By:

Let’s get animated! McMenamins is currently presenting a companywide animated film festival through Sunday. Entitled “Animated: A Film Festival,” the festival will feature traditional cell animation, computer-generated animation and stop-motion animation. The following films will be screened at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend.

TODAY — “PUPPETS & CLAY” • 3 p.m. — “Chicken Run” (G) • 6 p.m. — “Corpse Bride” (PG) • 9 p.m. — “Fantastic Mr. Fox” (PG)

SATURDAY — “ABRACADABRA” • Noon — “The Secret of NIMH” (G) • 2:30 p.m. — “The Secret of Kells” (no MPAA rating) • 5:30 p.m. — “The Lord of the Rings” (1978) (PG) • 9 p.m. — “Coraline” (PG)

SUNDAY — “BUNNY” • Noon — “Looney Tunes — The Golden Collection” (G) • 3 p.m. — “Wallace & Gromit in The

Curse of the Were-Rabbit” (G) • 5:30 p.m. — “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” (PG) • 9 p.m. — “Watership Down” (PG) Tickets are $3 per film, $1 for children (ages 12 and younger) or $10 to see all of the films. For more information, visit www.mcmenamins.com or contact 541-330-8562.

Wednesday, July 13, 6:35 PM • Cowlitz Bears

Thursday, July 14, 6:35 PM • Cowlitz Bears

“Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit” will screen at 3 p.m. Sunday. The Associated Press

Friday, July 15, 6:35 PM Wenatchee AppleSox

Ticket Information: 541.312.9259 • WWW.BENDELKS.COM Purchase tickets online at bendelks.com


PAGE 30 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

movies NEW DVD & B L U - R AY RELEASES

From previous page

The following movies were released the week of July 5.

“13 Assassins” — In the opening scene, a man kneels in a courtyard and disembowels himself in protest against Lord Naritsugu (Goro Inagaki), the half-brother of the shogun — a villain who ascends to a realm of barbaric madness. To correct this evil in the land, Sir Doi (Mikijiro Hira) seeks the samurai Shimada (Koji Yakusho), and persuades him to recruit another dozen warriors to kill Naritsugu. Director Takashi Miike evokes the samurai tradition elegantly with wonderful costumes, idealistic dialogue, sharp characterizations, and a gloriously choreographed fight sequence that must extend, in one form or another, for 40 minutes. DVD and Blu-ray Extras: Interview with Miike and deleted scenes. Rating: Three and a half stars. 126 minutes. (R) “Of Gods and Men” — In the 1990s, eight monks and their monastery are threatened by terrorists and have to decide whether to stay or flee. Solemn and engrossing, but leaves a key question unasked: Did they reach

The Associated Press

Lambert Wilson, left, Jean-Marie Frin and Philippe Laudenbach star in the drama “Of Gods and Men.” the right decision? DVD and Blu-ray Extras: Two featurettes. Rating: Three stars. 122 minutes. (PG-13) COMING UP: Movies scheduled for national release July 12

include “The Lincoln Lawyer” and “Insidious.” Check with local video stores for availability.

— Roger Ebert, The Chicago SunTimes (“DVD and Blu-ray Extras” from wire and online sources)

“Priest” — Paul Bettany, voted “Most Likely to Wear a Cowl” at Drama Centre London, is a caped crusader once again in “Priest,” a mad mash-up of sci-fi, Western, sacrilegious silliness and vampire movie. What lifts it to “I’ve seen worse” status is the previous teaming of star and director Scott Charles Stewart, who last gave us the archangel-fighting-off-otherangels fiasco “Legion.” And then there are the wonderful antecedents that this graphic novel adaptation borrows from. In an animated prologue, we learn of the war between vampires and humans, of how the Church saved humanity by training a warrior caste of priests. The vampires were vanquished and packed into reservations. The Church became the all -powerful theocracy ruling over walled cities scattered across a “Mad Max” wasteland. But when a remote farm run by a fellow named Owen is raided, we know the “vamp-packs” are back on the warpath, and that somebody adapting this remembers “Stars Wars.” Rating: One and a half stars. 87 minutes. (PG-13)

— Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel “Super 8” — Young teenagers in a small 1970s Ohio town are making an 8mm zombie film when they witness a spectacular train wreck

and suspect something very strange is happening. When Air Force troops pour into town, they continue their snooping. Directed by J.J. Abrams (“Star Trek”) and produced by Steven Spielberg, it evokes the spirit and innocence of Spielberg’s magical early films, although the last act is a little shaky. Good acting by the young cast, especially Joel Courtney, Elle Fanning and Riley Griffiths, and by Kyle Chandler as the hero’s dad, a deputy sheriff. Rating: Three and a half stars. 112 minutes. (PG-13) “Thor” — The first summer comic book blockbuster out of the gate has a lot of that winking wit we’ve come to expect from our post-“Spider Man” Marvel movies. It has a hunky, selfmocking young star, solid support from a couple of Oscar winners and the slick sheen that state-of-the-art effects can give you. But if it weren’t for all those effects (the 3-D seems an afterthought), for all the story’s attention to “franchise” and “there’s more money to be made from FUTURE movies,” it might feel something more than incomplete. The esteemed Kenneth Branagh (“Hamlet,” “Much Ado About Nothing,” “Henry V”) directs, Chris Hemsworth stars, and Natalie Portman and Anthony Hopkins take on supporting roles. Rating: Three stars. 114 minutes. (PG-13)

— Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel “Transformers: Dark of the Moon” — A visually ugly film with an incoherent plot, wooden characters and inane dialogue. One of the more unpleasant experiences I’ve had at the movies. More of a plot than previous “Transformers,” as mankind discovers the Arc of the robots on the dark side of the moon, and the Autobots and Decepticons move their battle for the universe to the corner of Michigan Avenue and Wacker Drive in Chicago. Rating: One star. 154 minutes. (PG-13) “The Tree of Life” — A film of vast ambition and deep humility, attempting no less than to encompass all of existence and view it through the prism of a few infinitesimal lives. Terrence Malick remembers his boyhood in Waco, Texas, in deep and loving detail, and in the selfdiscovery of the characters, he shows humans feeling their way through the immensity of time and space. A masterpiece. With Brad Pitt as the father, the ethereal Jessica Chastain as the mother, Hunter McCracken as the oldest son, and Sean Penn as the son in adulthood. Rating: Four stars. 138 minutes. (PG-13)

— Roger Ebert, The Chicago SunTimes (unless otherwise noted)

Event calendar

June

30 Friday

Find out what’s going on around Central Oregon at www.bend bulletin.com/events. Easily searchable by date, city or keyword.

The Bulletin


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

PAGE 31

movies M O V I E T I M E S • For the week of July 8 REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6

REDMOND CINEMAS

2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

BRIDESMAIDS (R) Fri-Sat: 11:35 a.m., 2:30, 6:10, 8:50 Sun: 11:35 a.m., 2:30, 6:10 Mon-Thu: 2:30, 6:10 BUCK (PG) Fri-Sat: 11:50 a.m., 2:05, 4:20, 8:40 Sun: 11:50 a.m., 2:05, 4:20 Mon-Thu: 2:20, 4:35, 6:50 HORRIBLE BOSSES (R) Fri-Sat: 12:10, 2:25, 4:40, 6:55, 9:10 Sun: 12:10, 2:25, 4:40, 6:55 Mon-Thu: 2:05, 4:20, 6:35 LARRY CROWNE (PG-13) Fri-Sat: Noon, 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, 9 Sun: Noon, 2:15, 4:30, 6:45 Mon-Thu: 2:15, 4:30, 6:45 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:45 a.m., 2, 4:15, 6:30, 8:45 Sun: 11:45 a.m., 2, 4:15, 6:30 Mon-Thu: 2, 4:15, 6:30 THE TREE OF LIFE (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:30 a.m., 2:35, 6, 8:55 Sun: 11:30 a.m., 2:35, 6 Mon-Thu: 2:25, 6

CARS 2 (G) Fri, Mon-Thu: 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9:15 Sat-Sun: 10 a.m., 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9:15 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:05 a.m. HORRIBLE BOSSES (R) Fri, Mon-Thu: 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15 Sat-Sun: 10 a.m., 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15 LARRY CROWNE (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:15, 9:30 Sat-Sun: 10:15 a.m., 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:15, 9:30 TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 1:30, 5, 8:30 Sat-Sun: 10 a.m., 1:30, 5, 8:30

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BAD TEACHER (R) Fri-Wed: 1:05, 3:35, 8, 10:15 BRIDESMAIDS (R) Fri-Wed: 7:35, 10:25 CARS 2 (G) Fri-Wed: 1, 3:45, 7:10, 10 CARS 2 3-D (G) Fri-Wed: 11:55 a.m., 2:45, 6:20, 9:30 CHARLOTTE’S WEB (G) Tue-Thu: 10 a.m. GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) Fri-Tue: 1:35, 6:55 Wed: 1:35 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) Fri-Tue: 4:20, 9:45 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (DP — PG-13) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:08 a.m. HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m., 12:03 a.m., 12:04 a.m., 12:05 a.m., 12:06 a.m. 12:07 a.m HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 3-D (PG-13) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:02 a.m. HORRIBLE BOSSES (R) Fri-Wed: 12:30, 1:30, 4, 5, 6:45, 7:45, 9:15, 10:10 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (DP — PG) Fri-Wed: 11:45 a.m. LARRY CROWNE (PG-13) Fri-Mon: 12:40, 4:30, 7:40, 10:05 Tue: 12:40, 4:30, 7:40, 10:05 Wed: 12:40, 4:30, 7:40, 10:05 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LA FILLE DU REGIMENT (no MPAA rating) Wed: 6:30 MONTE CARLO (PG) Fri-Wed: 12:20, 3:15, 6:40, 9:40

Submitted photo

Paul Bettany stars in the action thriller “Priest.” MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS (PG) Fri-Wed: 1:20, 4:40 PERCY JACKSON & THE OLYMPIANS: THE LIGHTNING THIEF (PG) Tue-Thu: 10 a.m. PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) Fri-Wed: 11:50 a.m., 3:05, 6:10, 9:35 SUPER 8 (PG-13) Fri-Wed: 1:40, 4:50, 7:55, 10:30 TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (PG-13) Fri, Mon: 12:05, 2:40, 6, 7, 9:20, 10:20 Sat: 12:05, 2:40, 6, 7, 9:20, 10:20 Sun: 12:05, 2:40, 6, 7, 9:20, 10:20 Tue-Wed: 12:05, 2:40, 6, 7, 9:20, 10:20 TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON 3-D (PG-13) Fri-Wed: 12:50, 3:25, 4:10, 7:30 ZOOKEEPER (PG) Fri-Wed: 12:10, 1:15, 2:55, 3:55, 6:30, 7:20, 9:25, 9:55

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) Wed: 3 PRIEST (PG-13) Mon-Thu: 9 THOR (PG-13) Mon-Thu: 6 EDITOR’S NOTE: McMenamins is currently hosting “Animated: A Film Festival” through Sunday For a full schedule, see Page 29.

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

BAD TEACHER (R) Fri-Thu: 8 CARS 2 (G) Fri, Mon-Thu: 5:45 Sat-Sun 3:15, 5:45 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13) Thu night/Fri morning: Midnight LARRY CROWNE (PG-13) Fri: 5:45, 8 Sat-Sun: 3:30, 5:45, 8 Mon-Thu: 5:15, 7:30 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 5 TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 7 Sat-Sun: 4, 7:15 ZOOKEEPER (PG) Fri, Mon-Thu: 5:30, 7:45 Sat-Sun: 3:15, 5:30, 7:45

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Movie times in bold are opencaptioned showtimes. • There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. • Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter. • As of press time, complete movie times for Thursday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 were unavailable. Check The Bulletin’s Community Life section that day for the complete movie listings. 4:40, 7:10, 9:40 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m. HORRIBLE BOSSES (R) Fri-Thu: 1, 3:05, 5:15, 7:20, 9:35 LARRY CROWNE (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:40, 2:50, 5, 7:15, 9:30 TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON 3-D (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 11:50 a.m., 3:10, 6:30, 9:40 ZOOKEEPER (PG) Fri-Thu: Noon, 2:15, 4:35, 7, 9:20

Coming to Video on Demand

JULY Source Code – July 8

The Lincoln Lawyer – July 12

Insidious – July 12

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

MR. POPPERS PENGUINS (PG) Fri, Mon-Thu: 4, 7 Sat-Sun: 1, 4, 7 TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (UPSTAIRS — PG-13) Fri: 3:30, 7:15 Sat-Sun: 12:15, 3:30, 7:15 Mon-Thu: 6 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Arthur – July 15

Limitless – July 19

Find It All Online www.bendbulletin.com

MADRAS CINEMA 5

1101 SW Hwy 97 Madras

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

www.madrascinema5.com

CARS 2 (G) Fri-Thu: 11:40 a.m., 2:10,

MISSED THE MOVIE? NEVER AGAIN!

541-475-3505 Friday July 1 - Monday July 11 Zookeeper PG

12:00 2:15 4:35 7:00 9:20

Horrible Bosses R

1:00 3:05 5:15 7:20 9:35

Transformers: Dark of the Moon 3D PG13

11:50 3:10 6:30 9:40

Disney’s Cars 2 2D G

11:40 2:10 4:40 7:10 9:40

Larry Crowne PG13

12:40 2:50 5:00 7:15 9:30

The only movie schedule that matters is yours! Catch these movies and hundreds more - including thousands of FREE titles - on VOD from BendBroadband.

Call 541-382-5551

For more information www.madrascinema5.com 3D* features are $8 before 6 pm and $10 for adults after 6pm. Children 11 & under, Seniors 62+ and Military w/ID always $6. Show times before 6 pm are $6. After 6 pm are $8

Featuring Digital Cinema Projection & Sound Stadium Highback Rocker Seating

w w w. b e n d b r o a d b a n d . c o m


PAGE 32 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

WE’RE GIVING AWAY

CONCERT TICKETS LOOK INSIDE THE BULLETIN’S ONLY IN THE BULLETIN’S GO! MAGAZINE This summer your ticket to the season’s best concerts may be inside GO! Magazine. Look for it every Friday in The Bulletin.

WIN TICKETS FOR: ALISON KRAUSS & UNION STATION featuring JERRY DOUGLAS

PINK MARTINI Make sure you buy a copy of The Bulletin on July 1 & 8 for your chance to win! Plus, look for GOLDEN TICKETS all summer long as we’re putting tickets to SIX other premium concert events inside GO! MAGAZINES. Don’t Miss It!! Golden Ticket for two concert tickets must be redeemed at the Ticket Mill in the Old Mill District. Original Golden Ticket must be presented. Golden Ticket is only good for the concert listed on the ticket. Golden Tickets can be found in home delivery and single copy newspapers (store copies only, no racks). Golden Tickets have no cash value.

WIN TICKETS TO SOME OF THE BEST SHOWS IN BEND, INCLUDING: JULY 9TH 6:00 PM | LES SCHWAB AMPHITHEATER

JULY 23RD 6:00 PM | LES SCHWAB AMPHITHEATER

BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

TO SUBSCRIBE CALL: 541-385-5800

FOR THE LATEST CONCERT INFO VISIT www.bendconcerts.com

Bulletin Daily Paper 07/08/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Friday July 8, 2011

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