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When red meat isn’t so bad ... It may be healthier than some other options Also: Which popular diet beats the rest? IN HEALTH

Low count gives geese reprieve in Bend parks

Bar: DA was incorrect By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

SALEM — The Oregon State Bar said Deschutes County District Attorney Patrick Flaherty was incorrect when he said the release of personal information about his employees broke the law. In a June 9 letter to Flaherty, Susan Roedl Cournoyer, the state bar’s assistant disciplinary counsel, also suggested Flaherty’s actions — regarding a grand jury he convened in February to investigate the matter — violated state bar rules against conflicts of interest and “conduct prejudicial to the administration of justice.”

The letter was released to The Bulletin on Wednesday afternoon. The state bar has been investigating Flaherty’s grand jury investigation following an ethics complaint. A key point of contention involves Flaherty’s assertion that Deschutes County Legal Counsel Mark Pilliod committed official misconduct by releasing personal information — which Flaherty says was against the law — about new hires in the District Attorney’s office following a request by The Bulletin for copies of their applications. See Flaherty / A6

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Patrick Flaherty says the release of personal information broke the law. The state bar disagrees.

State health savings bill draws fire from union By Hillary Borrud

By Nick Grube

The Bulletin

The Bulletin

SALEM — Oregon House Republicans introduced a bill Wednesday that they say would save the state $69 million in the general fund in this biennium by requiring state employees to IN THE pay a portion LEGISLATURE of their health insurance premiums. The bill enraged the director of one of the largest state employee unions, who said lawmakers were interfering with issues that have traditionally been negotiated between unions and employers. “We’re very angry,” said Ken Allen, director of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Council. “This is like what they’ve done in Ohio and Michigan and Wisconsin, with taking away workers’ rights to bargain over these issues.” See Bill / A4

Though they may not realize it, Bend’s Canada geese just received a stay of execution. The Bend Park & Recreation District on Wednesday announced it will not use lethal measures to reduce goose populations this summer. The decision, sure to please local goose advocates, comes after officials realized the birds’ impact on the parks — measured mainly in feces and feathers — hasn’t been as bad as in years past. “I’m really pleased with where we are right now,” Bend Park & Recreation Natural Resources Manager Paul Stell said. “Because if we can get to a manageable situation without having to euthanize any birds that’s just great. And that’s what we were hoping.” Recent goose counts have found that there are about 250 geese living in Bend parks right now. This is much less than last year, when there were about 400 geese during the June molting season. See Geese / A4

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Fans watch professional mountain biker Matt Slaven of Portland launch off the Tetherow Golf Club practice tees Wednesday during the Blitz to the Barrel race. Adam Craig of Bend was the overall winner.

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happen to call Bend home? The answer is the Blitz to the Barrel, an invitation-only, mostly downhill 19mile mountain bike race from Wanoga Sno-park to Bend. The event — which included 16 pro mountain bikers, 12 from Central Oregon — returned for its second year Wednesday night. It was a chance for cycling fans to watch some of the biggest names in Adam Craig of Bend pedals mountain biking — and for the comacross the Tetherow Golf Club on petitors to win big money. Wednesday on his way to winning Bend’s Adam Craig was first to the the Blitz to the Barrel mountain finish at 10 Barrel Brewing Co. on bike race by about 20 seconds. Galveston Avenue in Bend. But before his victory was complete, he had to finish a pint of beer, per race rules. He took his victory. one deep breath and then downed it. “I started thinking about (having to Craig, a former national champion drink a beer) at about the crest of the and 2008 Olympian, earned $2,000 for last climb on Skyliners (Road), and I was

like, ‘I’ve got to ease up just a little bit, so that I don’t puke when I pound a pint of delicious microbrew,’ ” Craig said. Chris Sheppard, also of Bend, finished second, about “It’s kind of 20 seconds behind Craig, to take home what Bend’s $1,500. Bend’s Carl all about. Decker was third, There’s a winning $500. They all finished the race lot of grassin about one hour. roots events, “A lot of fast guys and Bend single- and this is a track, so it was re- mountain bike ally fun to just rip it up,” Sheppard said. community.” “It was a good day — Chris Sheppard, for everyone.” Finishing in the of Bend, who top three was not came in second the only way by at the Blitz to the which racers could Barrel win money. Cash prizes of $250 were awarded to Australia’s Josh Carlson, who held the longest wheelie in the Wanoga parking lot before the race; to Portland’s Matt Slaven, who launched the biggest air off a rock drop on Funner Trail; to Ashland’s Nathan Riddle, who launched the biggest air off the patio at Tetherow Golf Club; and to Portland’s Nick Gibson and Bend’s Damian Schmitt, who tied for the highest speed (38 mph) on Skyline Ranch Road, as determined by a law enforcement radar gun. See Blitz / A6

More schools cap homework, assignments over summer By Winnie Hu New York Times News Service

GALLOWAY, N.J. — After Donna Cushlanis’ son, who was in second grade, kept bursting into tears midway through his math problems, she told him not to do all of his homework. “How many times do you have to add seven plus two?” Cushlanis, 46, asked. “I have no problem with doing homework, but that put us both over the edge. I got to the point that this is enough.” Cushlanis, a secretary for the Galloway School District, complained to the superintendent. It turned out that the district was already re-evaluating its homework policies. The school board will vote this summer on a proposal to limit weeknight homework and ban assignments on weekends, holidays and school vacations. Galloway is part of a wave of districts across the nation trying to remake homework amid concerns that testing and competition for college have fueled a nightly grind that stresses out children yet does little to raise achievement. See Homework / A4


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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

19 20 38 41 43 29 Power Play: 4. The estimated jackpot is $36 million.

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

11 14 32 42 44 45 Nobody won the jackpot Wednesday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $16.4 million for Saturday’s drawing.

F / Education

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Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

On college applications, question of race can perplex

For life’s next stage, gallows humor and sage advice

By Susan Saulny and Jacques Steinberg

By Lisa W. Foderaro

freshman class at Emory is considered mixed-race. At Carleton College in Minnesota, there were, until recently, clear protocols intended to address the issues with which Emory was wrestling: students who signaled on their application that they were black, Hispanic and white, for example, were considered black; American Indian and white, then they were American Indian. Now, such students would be among the nearly 9 percent of the freshman class at Carleton who are multiracial.

New York Times News Service

HOUSTON — At the start of the college application season last fall, Natasha Scott, a high school senior of mixed racial heritage in Beltsville, Md., vented about a personal dilemma on College Confidential, the go-to electronic bulletin board for anonymous conversation about admissions. “I just realized that my race is something I have to think about,” she wrote, describing herself as having an Asian mother and a black father. “It pains me to say this, but putting down black might help my admissions chances and putting down Asian might hurt it.” “My mother urges me to put down black, to use AA” — African-American — “to get in to the colleges I’m applying to,” added Scott, who identified herself on the website as Clearbrooke. “I sort of want to do this but I’m wondering if this is morally right.” Within minutes, a commenter had responded: “You’re black. You should own it.” Someone else agreed: “Put black!!!!!!!! Listen to your mom.” No one advised marking Asian alone. But one commenter weighed in with advice that could just as well have come from any college across the country: “You can put both. You can put one. You’re not dishonest either way. Just put how you feel.” Students can now choose from a menu of new boxes of racial and ethnic categories — because the Department of Education started requiring universities this past school year to comply with a broad federal edict to collect more information about race and ethnicity. The change has made it easier for students to claim a multiracial identity, and the number of applicants who identify themselves as multiracial has mushroomed, adding another layer of anxiety, soul- (and family tree-) searching and even gamesmanship to the process. Some worry that the growth in multiracial applicants could further erode the original intent of affirmative action, which is to help disadvantaged minorities. “How do we include multiracials in our view of an egalitarian society and not do it in a way that disadvantages other groups?” said Ulli Ryder, visiting scholar at the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at Brown University. “You know kids are gaming the system every way they possibly can, from private counselors who write essays to massaging their statistics,” said Scott White, a college counselor at Montclair High School in New Jersey. “It comes up all the time. If one grandparent is of Spanish heritage, should this kid be getting an admissions bump?”

A growing category Rice University in Houston might, given its early history, seem an unlikely place to find admissions officers wrestling with questions of race as they size up their applicants. The private and highly selective institution was founded in the early 1900s by a wealthy Houston businessman as an exclusively white institution, a designation it maintained through the late 1960s. And yet these days, white students are now only 43 percent of the student body at Rice, where

Within the system Philip Andrews / New York Times News Service

Natasha Scott, the daughter of an Asian mother and a black father, had trouble deciding what race to indicate on her college applications. an applicant’s racial identification can become an admissions game changer. This can be especially true during the “committee round” in early spring, when only a few dozen slots might remain for a freshman class expected to number about 1,000. At that stage, a core group of five to seven bleary-eyed admissions officers will convene for debate around a rectangular laminate table strewn with coffee cups and half-eaten donuts as the applications of those students still under consideration are projected onto a 60-inch plasma TV screen. For most of the nearly 14,000 who applied this year, the final decision — admit or deny — was a relatively straightforward one resolved early on, based on the admissions officers’ sampling of a mix of factors like test scores, grades, extracurricular activities and recommendations. But there are several thousand applicants whose fate might still be in limbo by the committee round because their qualifications can seem fairly indistinguishable from one another. This is when an applicant’s race — or races — might tip the balance. “From an academic standpoint, the qualifying records, the test scores, how many AP courses, they may all look alike,” said Chris Munoz, vice president for enrollment at Rice since 2006. “That’s when we might go and say, ‘This kid has a Spanish surname. Let’s see what he wrote about.’ Right or wrong, it can make a difference.” How much of a difference — and whether more or less weight should be given to that student based on how many boxes were checked — is hardly clear, either at Rice or at dozens of other selective institutions. Before Emory University in Atlanta upgraded its computer system about a decade ago, if an applicant signaled that he or she was African-American and white, or African-American and Asian, someone in the admissions office would make the judgment call that the student was African-American because there were no set guidelines on how to define an applicant’s race. “We had to pick one,” Jean Jordan, the dean of admission, said. “I’d say it was pretty arbitrary.” Actually, it may not have been so arbitrary. Emory, like other colleges, was acting at least in part to ensure a sizable AfricanAmerican student population, which the college’s leaders consider an institutional priority. Now, about 5 percent of the

Munoz, who is ultimately responsible for Rice’s effort to promote diversity on campus, says he has been guided by the template of his own mixed-race family. He is Mexican-American, the first in his family to go to college, while his wife is of Irish descent. They have three grown children. “I am honoring, best I can, how the students see themselves,” Munoz said. “If they say they’re mixed, I’m not going to say, ‘Oh, no, you’re black.’ I’m going to say, ‘You’re mixed.’ Isn’t that OK?” Still, he acknowledges, such questions give applicants (and their families) wide latitude. “There are players out there,” said Julie Browning, dean of undergraduate admission at Rice. Mindful of that, Rice admissions officials try to reconcile whatever boxes an applicant may have checked with the rest of the application. For example, in its customized supplement to the Common Application, Rice asks an essay question about “the unique life experiences and cultural traditions” that a student might bring to campus. “If they care about their cultural heritage, it comes through,” Browning said. “If they’re lukewarm about it, and they’re trying to make it something they care about, it comes through.” The subject of affirmative action is a personal one for Tamara Siler, coordinator of minority recruitment in the Rice admissions office, who is black and who graduated from Rice in 1985. She said that her grandparents and aunt had wanted to attend Rice, but could not because of its history of segregation. Siler said she realized that some students being admitted to Rice as multiracial would probably not fit the original definitions of affirmative action, but that students who categorize themselves as multiracial bring a valuable and unique perspective to campus. “At some point I have to say we can’t fix society’s ills,” she said. “That’s not our job as an institution.” “For the most part,” Siler said, “whenever someone does all those boxes, we say, ‘Yeah, yeah, but how do you really live your life?’ ” When Munoz was asked if, within the multiracial pool, there is a hierarchy of sorts for getting an edge in the admissions process, he took a long pause. “Not in an intentional way, but it’s just the reality. I don’t sit with my group and say, OK, JapaneseAmerican is going to be treated this way, African-American-Hispanic is going to be treated this way,” he said. “It’s part of, what’s the story? How underrepresented is this group on campus?” “At any point in time,” he concluded, “the given weights of what you’d consider to be important change.”

New York Times News Service

They spoke of courage in an uncertain economy, warned against technology overload and tried to redefine success for a new generation. They railed against fear, conformity, stasis and self-involvement. And they asked row upon row of young men and women to do nothing less than save the world. They were this season’s commencement speakers — writers, politicians, executives, actors and, at the nontraditional Hampshire College, a cafeteria cashier — charged with sending newly minted college graduates into the world with parting words of wisdom. Each year, the speeches gauge the national mood, youthful obsessions, geopolitical flashpoints and planetary health. The New York Times measured the frequency of key words in 40 of the hundreds of speeches delivered this spring. Perhaps as an indicator of the still-guarded condition of the national economy, the words “world,” “country” “love” and “service” showed up far more often than “money,” “happiness” and “success.” The author Jonathan Franzen, at Kenyon College, rhapsodized about “love” and “passion,” using the words some 40 times; Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer of Facebook, said “Facebook” more than anyone else. In contrast to last year, a new resignation about the job market seemed to have settled in. A kind of gallows humor wended its way like a soup line through the speeches, with jokes about the parental basement as the cool new bachelor pad. “The games look better on their big screens anyway,” Brad Ellsworth, a former Democratic congressman from Indiana, told graduates at the University of Southern Indiana. David Gergen, political analyst, Bentley University: “I won’t detain you long today. We have research from the department of psychology at Harvard that if a college commencement speaker drones on for more than 15 minutes, only about a quarter of students continue to pay attention; another quarter drift off to sleep; and the other half — these being undergraduates — engage in sexual fantasies.” Anna Quindlen, writer, Grinnell College “Your parents, proudly here today, and their parents before them, perhaps proudly here today, understood a simple equation for success: Your children would do better than you had. Ditch digger to cop to lawyer to judge. “We’re now supposed to apologize to you because it seems that that’s no longer how it works, that you won’t

inherit the SUV, which was way too big, or the McMansion that was way too big, or the corner office that was way too big. “But I suggest that this is a moment to consider what ‘doing better’ really means. If you are part of the first generation of Americans who genuinely see race and ethnicity as attributes, not stereotypes, will you not have done better than we did? If you are part of the first generation of Americans with a clear understanding that gay men and lesbians are entitled to be full citizens of this country with all its rights, will you not have done better than we did? If you are part of the first generation of Americans who assume women merit full equality instead of grudging acceptance, will you not have done better than we did?” Mary Richardson, former television journalist, Stonehill College “Reach out to others. And in your reaching out, you will not only grow as a human being, but you will do something very practical — you’ll enhance your résumé. Be open to possibilities. And finally, remember if you are terrified that you’ll never get a job and that you will still be living at home when you’re 35, remember your parents are even more terrified by that possibility!” Samantha Power, National Security Council, Occidental College “You’ve got to be all in. This means leaving your technology behind occasionally and listening to a friend without half of your brain being preoccupied by its inner longing for the red light on the BlackBerry. “In many college classes, laptops depict split screens — notes from a class, and then a range of parallel stimulants: NBA playoff statistics on ESPN.com, a flight home on Expedia, a new flirtation on Facebook. I know how good you all are at multitasking. And I know of what I speak, because I, too, am a culprit. You have never seen a U.S. government official and new mother so dexterous in her ability simultaneously to BlackBerry and breastfeed. “But I promise you that over time this doesn’t cut it. Something or someone loses out. No more than a surgeon can operate while tweeting can you reach your potential with one ear in, one ear out. You actually have to reacquaint yourself with concentration. We all do. We should all become, as Henry James prescribed, a person ‘on whom nothing is lost.’ ” Steve Ballmer, chief executive, Microsoft, University of Southern California “People think passion is something you either have or you don’t. People think passion is something that has to manifest itself in some kind of explosive and emotional format. It’s not. It’s the thing that you find in your life that you can care about, that you can cling to, that you can invest yourself in, heart, body and soul. Finding passion is kind of your job now.”

Wisconsin chancellor resigns to lead Amherst College New York Times News Service Carolyn Martin, chancellor of the University of WisconsinMadison, a flagship public research university with 29,000 undergraduates, is resigning to become president of Amherst College, a prestigious liberal arts college with 1,750 students. For most of this year, Martin, 60, and her campus have occupied center stage in the nation’s raging, politically charged battles over higher education. In February, Wisconsin was roiled by the fight over the collective-bargaining rights of public employees, including those at the university. In March, a state Republican

Party official sought the release of the e-mails of a tenured professor in Madison who had criticized both Gov. Scott Walker, a Republican, and the party’s position on collective bargaining. And Martin and Walker spent months on an unsuccessful effort to split Madison from the rest of the state’s higher-education system, giving it greater flexibility in an era of reduced state financing. “Does everything that’s occurred over the last year play a role?” Martin, who is known as Biddy, asked in an interview. “It would be foolhardy to say it played no role, but neither I nor anyone else could say exactly

what role it played. I feel like I’m leaving this university in a position where it will continue to make great progress.”

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 A3

T S Pakistan’s military chief is fighting to keep job

CARRIER THAT BURIED BIN LADEN RETURNS HOME Greek leader vows to reset Cabinet

By Jane Perlez New York Times News Service

ISLAMABAD — Pakistan’s army chief, the most powerful man in the country, is fighting to save his position in the face of seething anger from top generals and junior officers since the U.S. raid that killed Osama bin Laden, according to Pakistani officials and people who have met the chief in recent weeks. Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, who has led the army since 2007, faces such intense discontent over what is seen as his cozy relationship with the United States that a colonels’ coup, while unlikely, was not out of the question, said a well-informed Pakistani who has seen the general in recent weeks, as well as a U.S. military official involved with Pakistan for many years. The Pakistani army is essentially run by consensus among 11 top commanders, known as the Corps Commanders, and almost all of them, if not all, were demanding that Kayani get much tougher with the Americans, even edging toward a break, Pakistanis who follow the army closely said. Washington, with its own hard line against Pakistan, had pushed Kayani into a defensive crouch, along with his troops, and if the general was pushed out, the United States would face a more uncompromising anti-American army chief, the Pakistani said.

W  B

Gregory Bull / The Associated Press

Seaman Quincy Fermer hugs his four-month-old daughter, Thiana, after seeing her for the first time after disembarking from the USS Carl Vinson Wednesday in San Diego. The aircraft carrier from which the body of Osama bin Laden was buried at sea has returned to its home port in San Diego Bay.

Giffords moves to outpatient care By Thomas H. Maugh II Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Five months after she was shot in the head while greeting constituents, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords was released Wednesday from the Houston hospital where she has been undergoing physical therapy. The Arizona congresswoman will travel from a Houston suburb to the hospital each weekday for physical therapy, officials said. “Congresswoman Giffords has shown clear, continuous improvement from the moment she arrived at TIRR (Memo-

rial Hermann Hospital) five months ago,” Dr. Gerald Francisco, the hospital’s chief medical officer, said in a statement. “We are very excited that she has reached the next phase of her rehabilitation and can begin outpatient treatment.” Giffords, 41, will move into the home of her husband, astronaut Mark Kelly, in League City, where she will receive care from a 24-hour home health provider. Francisco will continue to oversee her rehabilitation. An expert who is not involved in Giffords’ care hailed the step as progress.

ATHENS — Prime Minister George Papandreou of Greece said Wednesday that he would reshuffle his cabinet and request a vote of confidence in Parliament after talks with the opposition about a unity government foundered. Earlier in the day, as thousands took to the streets to protest austerity measures, Papandreou offered to step aside so that his Socialist party could form a coalition government with the center-right opposition, but only if the opposition would support a new bailout plan for the debt-ridden country. Greece needs to pass a new round of austerity measures by the end of the month in return for fresh loans from the International Monetary Fund and the European Union.

U.N. warns of panic in central Sudan NAIROBI, Kenya — United Nations officials warned on Wednesday of “a growing sense of panic” in the volatile Kordofan area of central Sudan, with 60,000 people displaced, aid convoys blocked, ethnic clashes erupting and dozens dead — including possibly several U.N. workers. President Barack Obama urged the Sudanese government to cease “its military actions immediately.” Aid workers and historians of Sudan said that what

By Josh Funk and Grant Schulte The Associated Press

HAMBURG, Iowa — Construction crews on Wednesday put the final touches on a makeshift levee standing between a small Iowa town and the creeping advance of Missouri River floodwater, as communities downstream took advantage of a temporary dip in water levels to bolster their own strained defenses. Water that breached the primary river levee just south of the Missouri-Iowa border on Monday had advanced to within 500 yards of the temporary floodwall guarding Hamburg, 5 miles to the northeast, and was expected to reach the structure by Thursday, said Robert Michaels, the Army Corps of Engineers official who has overseen construction of the new levee. Any hopes the breaches might alleviate the long-term flooding

Nati Harnik / The Associated Press

Missouri River floodwaters rise around statues in Omaha, Neb. The river could reach 5 to 7 feet above flood stage. threat for communities downstream were short-lived, as river levels that dipped slightly from the release of pressure began their re-ascent Wednesday.

The river has been rising for weeks as the corps releases increasing amounts of water from its upstream dams to clear out heavy spring rain and snowmelt. Releases at Gavins Point Dam in South Dakota hit the maximum planned amount of 150,000 cubic feet of water per second Tuesday, and the corps wasn’t planning to reduce the amount it’s releasing from its dams until August at the earliest. Parts of Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota already have been flooded, and towns and cities farther south were still bracing for the worst. This summer’s flood fight along the Missouri River will certainly be a costly one. South Dakota officials estimate the state already has spent about $10 million in the first two weeks of work to prevent flooding in Pierre, Fort Pierre and Dakota Dunes.

White House defends U.S. role in Libya

California Democrats send budget to Brown

By Charlie Savage and Mark Landler

By Shane Goldmacher and Anthony York

New York Times News Service

Los Angeles Times

WASHINGTON — Pushing hard against criticism in Congress over the deepening air war in Libya, the White House asserted Wednesday that President Barack Obama had the authority to continue the military campaign without congressional approval because U.S. involvement fell short of full-blown hostilities. In a 38-page report sent to lawmakers describing and defending the NATO-led operation, the White House said the mission was prying loose Moammar Gadhafi’s grip on power. In contending that the limited U.S. role did not oblige the administration to ask for authorization under the War Powers Resolution, the report asserted that “U.S. operations do not involve sustained fighting or active exchanges of fire with hostile forces, nor do they involve U.S. ground troops.” Still, the White House acknowledged, the operation has cost the Pentagon $716 million in its first two months and will have cost $1.1 billion by September at the rate. The report came a day after the House Speaker, John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, had sent a letter to Obama warning him that he appeared to be out of time under the Vietnam-era law that says presidents must terminate a mission 60 or 90 days after notifying Congress that troops have been deployed into hostilities, unless lawmakers authorize the operation to continue. Boehner had demanded that Obama explain his legal justification for passing the deadline.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California Democratic lawmakers passed a rare on-time state budget Wednesday over Republican objections, but the plan — balanced with a blend of taxes, cuts and clever accounting — faces an uncertain fate at the hands of Gov. Jerry Brown. After warning for months that devastating cutbacks to schools and public safety would occur without the renewed taxes that Brown has sought but has been unable to sell to Republicans, Democrats averted the most severe reductions. But they did so by returning to old strategies that have papered over California’s deficits for years: delaying the payment of billions in bills, skipping debt repayments and penciling in money that may not materialize. Using their new authority to pass a budget on a majority vote — and under threat of lost pay if a spending plan was not approved by Wednesday — the Democrats pushed through provisions to hike car registration fees and local sales tax rates and force online retailers, such as Amazon.com, to collect sales tax. The plan would also cut more deeply into higher education, the courts and local law enforcement. “It is not perfect. It is Plan B,” said Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento, who nonetheless called the package “worthy of the governor’s signature.”

Militants strike back in southern Yemen city SANAA, Yemen — Militants made a serious incursion early Wednesday into a provincial capital in Yemen’s southeast, warning government officials to leave or face retaliation. The attack was the latest case of armed groups taking advantage of the security vacuum created by the country’s prolonged political crisis. Southern Yemen is a hotbed for antigovernment factions, including separatists and Islamic militants, only some of whom be-

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Syrians flee another town, fearing attack GUVECCI, Turkey — Hundreds fled a town in northern Syria on Wednesday that appeared to be the next target of a military seeking to crush a three-month uprising against President Bashar Assad, activists said, joining thousands already displaced in a growing crisis that has embarrassed the Syrian government. In a succession of often bloody operations, the Syrian military has sent tanks and soldiers to the country’s most restive areas. This week, forces were deployed to eastern Syria as well as the northern town of Ma’arrat an Nu’man. — From wire reports

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was happening in the Kordofan region, as described by U.N. officials, had the echoes of previous conflicts in the country that had spiraled out of control, including the bloodshed in Darfur. “The ingredients for an explosion are all present,” said Eric Reeves, a professor at Smith College and an outspoken activist who has written frequently on Sudan. “The violence in South Kordofan threatens peace in Sudan like no other crisis, and there are many.”

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A4 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Homework Continued from A1 “There is simply no proof that most homework as we know it improves school performance,” said Vicki Abeles, a mother of three from California, whose documentary “Race to Nowhere,” about burned-out students caught in a pressure-cooker educational system, has helped reignite the anti-homework movement. “And by expecting kids to work a ‘second shift’ in what should be their downtime, the presence of schoolwork at home is negatively affecting the health of our young people and the quality of family time.” So teachers at Mango Elementary School in Fontana, Calif., are replacing homework with “goal work” that is specific to individual student’s needs and that can be completed in class or at home at his or her own pace. The Pleasanton School District, north of San Jose, Calif., is proposing this month to cut homework times by nearly half and prohibit weekend assignments in elementary grades because, as one administrator said, “parents want their kids back.” Ridgewood High School in New Jersey introduced a homework-free winter break in December. Schools in Tampa, Fla., and Bleckley County, Ga., have instituted “no-homework nights” throughout the year. And the 2-

Bill Continued from A1 With only days left to go in the legislative session, the lastditch effort to curtail state employee costs is unlikely to pass, said Rep. Gene Whisnant, RSunriver, a co-sponsor of the bill. A spokesman for the House Democratic Caucus called the bill a political strategy by Republicans. It’s unclear whether any of the bill’s savings would make their way to local schools, public safety agencies and other governments.

year-old Brooklyn School of Inquiry, a program for gifted and talented elementary students, has made homework optional: It is neither graded nor counted toward progress reports. Research has long suggested that homework in small doses can reinforce basic skills and help young children develop study habits, but that there are diminishing returns, said Harris Cooper, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University. The 10-minute guideline has generally been shown to be effective, he said, adding that overall, “there is a minimal relationship between how much homework young kids do and

how well they test.” Still, efforts to roll back homework have drawn sharp criticism from some teachers and parents who counter that there is not enough time in the school day to cover required topics and that students must study more — not less — if they are to succeed in life. In Coronado, Calif., the school board rejected a proposal by the superintendent to eliminate homework on weekends and holidays after some parents said that was when they had time to help their children and others worried it would result in more homework on weeknights. “Most of our kids can’t spell without spell check or add un-

less it comes up on the computer,” said Karol Ball, 51, who has two teenage sons in the Atlantic City district, near Galloway. “If we coddle them when they’re younger, what happens when they get into the real world? No one’s going to say to them, ‘You don’t have to work extra hard to get that project done; just turn in what you got.’” Homework wars have divided communities for more than a century, fanned by shifting social, political and cultural norms. In the 1950s, the launching of Sputnik ushered in heavier workloads for American students in the race to keep up with the Soviet Union. The 1983 report “A Nation at Risk” brought renewed demands for homework as American test scores lagged behind those of other countries. The testing pressures of the No Child Left Behind law over the past decade have resulted in more homework for children at younger ages. A few public and private schools have renounced homework in recent years. But most have sought a middle ground, defining for the first time what homework should — and should not — be. In Galloway, the new policy will stipulate that homework should cover only topics and skills already addressed in class. And Coronado, having rejected the weekend-holiday ban, is now at work on grade-specific homework guidelines.

Both sides acknowledged that any savings on state employee wages and benefits are now most likely to come from contract bargaining under way between the governor’s office and employee unions. Currently, the state is in talks with the Service Employees International Union, Local 503, which represents about 45,000 state workers, and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Council, or AFSCME, which represents about 6,500 state employees. Under House Bill 2011, state employees would have to pay 5 percent of their base salaries

toward health benefits. The minimum monthly employee contribution would be $50, and it would be capped at $500 per month. For nonrepresented state employees, the bill’s requirements on health insurance contributions would take effect in January 2012 at the earliest. Those requirements would go into effect gradually for state employees represented by unions, because the requirements would only apply to state employee unions that negotiate contracts on or after the date that HB 2011 would become law. Geoff Sugerman, communications director for the House

Democratic Caucus, said it’s too late in the legislative session for the bill to go anywhere. “The bill was introduced with a week or less left in the session, and it was introduced as more of a political strategy than a policy strategy,” Sugerman said. Sugerman said he expects the state budget will contain concessions by state employee unions, but those are being negotiated by the governor’s office and unions. Whisnant said Oregon is the only state that pays the entire tab for employee health insurance. At the beginning of the legislative session, Whisnant said,

Jessica Kourkounis / New York Times News Service

Cathy Clark teaches sixth-graders at Arthur Rann Elementary School in Galloway, N.J. Many school districts are limiting homework amid concerns that it does little to raise achievement.

Geese Continued from A1 That year the district euthanized 109 geese. This caused a stir with some who opposed the killings who held a vigil for the dead birds. The park district recently received state approval to kill up to 100 birds if officials found there were more than 150 adult geese in the area. That permitted killing was denounced by about a halfdozen people who showed up to last week’s park district board meeting with petitions in hand. While the current population numbers give the district the authority to kill geese this summer, Stell said he doesn’t see a reason to go through with it because the parks have remained relatively clean. He credits the district’s goose management program, which aims to reduce populations through hazing birds and oiling eggs to prevent them from hatching. But Stell also said the biggest impact has been a new initiative that uses about 20 volunteers to chase the birds using dogs. “That’s had a remarkable effect,” Stell said. Over the next two weeks, U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services employees plan to catch the adult geese in Bend’s parks and place bands on the birds’ legs. Those bands will be used to help monitor their movement. The Wildlife Services will also capture juvenile geese and relocate the young birds to Summer Lake Wildlife Refuge as a way to prevent them from migrating to Bend’s parks in the future. Stell said the district will begin hazing the geese again in mid- to late July when the molt is over. In August, he said officials will then reassess the population to see how effective the nonlethal measures truly were. “Next year is next year. We’ll see how the summer goes,” Stell said. “Lethal control is still on the table. It’s one of the tools in the toolbox, and if we need it we can use it. And if not, that’s great.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

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B E N D R I V E R P R O M E N A D E , B E N D • 5 4 1 . 3 17. 6 0 0 0

House Dems could strip Weiner of committee seat By Felicia Sonmez The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — House Democratic leaders on Thursday afternoon are likely to discuss the next steps in their response to the scandal surrounding Rep. Anthony Weiner, including potentially relieving the New York Democrat of his spot on a key committee in an effort to pressure him to resign. The noon huddle comes more than a week after Weiner admitted that he had repeatedly lied to cover up his inappropriate online communications with several women. Several top Democratic and Republican leaders have called on Weiner to resign, and President Barack Obama said that if he were in Weiner’s position, he would step down. But Weiner has insisted that he will not resign, and on Monday the House approved a two-week leave of absence while he seeks professional treatment. Weiner’s wife, senior State Department aide Huma Abedin, returned to Washington early Wednes-

many lawmakers expected to reform the Oregon Public Employees Retirement System. However, plans to change the pension system have stalled, in part because the House is evenly split between the two major parties and because many of the proposed changes must be bargained with unions. Whisnant said he does not expect the health insurance legislation to fare much better. Republican lawmakers introduced similar legislation last year, and it did not pass. Allen said AFSCME and the state are bargaining over different health cost containment

day from a trip to the Middle East and North Africa with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. Senior Democrats have privately worried that the threeweek-old scandal has taken the focus off the party’s message, which had been trained on criticism of House Republicans’ plans to overhaul Medicare. While House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California, Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Chairman Steve Israel of New York and other Democratic leaders have called on Weiner to resign, other top Democrats have refrained. Weiner retains a bloc of about 10 close friends in the House who have condemned his behavior but have objected to calls that he step aside. If Democratic leaders choose to act more forcefully to pressure Weiner to give up his seat, one available option is relieve Weiner of his spot on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which oversees a broad range of issues, from consumer protection and the telecommunications industry to public health and the environment.

initiatives, including a plan to require annual health risk assessments for state employees. The assessments would identify health problems early on, and nurses would help employees manage those conditions, Allen said. “It’s more of an inclusive plan that results in much diminished costs and cost increases in the long run,” Allen said. The state cannot simply rein in employee health costs with a bill, he said. “That’s the wrong approach.” Hillary Borrud can be reached at 617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 A5

K S A A

HEALTH PROFESSIONAL c/o The Bulletin • 1526 NW Hill St., Bend OR 97701

N AT U RAL M EDICINE

PLASTIC SURGERY

QUESTION: I suspect I have a yeast problem. Could you explain the symptoms and treatments available for Candida albicans?

and they told me that I have lost volume in my face, especially my cheeks. I am 58 years old so I expect to have some aging in my face, but what does that really mean and how can I correct it?

ANSWER: As part of the aging process we not only loose, to a certain extent, the elasticity of our facial skin but also the underlying volume or fat. This is especially noticeable in our cheek regions and is due to genetic and environmental factors. These changes cause our face to looked aged, sometimes prematurely. Solutions to this include volumization of the face, resurfacing of the face and lifting of the facial soft tissue (if needed). Many times simple volumization makes a dramatic change in a patient’s facial aesthetic. At Bend Plastic Surgery, we specialize in all aspects of facial volumization and rejuvenation. Adam Angeles, M.D.

ADAM ANGELES, M.D. 916 SW 17th ST. • Suite 202 • Redmond • 541-923-4257 www.CenterforIntegratedMed.com

BEND PLASTIC SURGERY 2460 NE Neff Rd., Suite B • Bend www.bendprs.com, drangeles@bendprs.com 541-749-2282

PERMANENT MAKEUP

PHYSICAL THERAPY

QUESTION: I know fillers for lips are extremely popular. As I have gotten older, my lips have become smaller and are losing their shape. Even applying lipstick had become a struggle. Can permanent makeup help me? ANSWER: Permanent makeup is a excellent alternate to turn back the clock. Lip liner/ Susan Gruber, lip color procedures can reshape the lips Certified Permanent Cosmetic Professional and enhance the color. Bleeding of lipstick into the surrounding skin is prevented and the age lines around the lip actually appear diminished. Multiple choice in colors are available from subtle to dramatic and the benefits will last much longer then the fillers. The consultation is free ... the results are priceless!

PERMANENT MAKEUP BY SUSAN, CPCP 1265 NW Wall Street • Bend 541-383-3387 www.permanentmakeupbysusan.com

QUESTION: I see advertisements all the time that talk about conservative dentistry. What exactly does that mean?

QUESTION: I have been to several cosmetic surgeons

ANSWER: Candida albicans is a fungus (yeast) that is normally present on the skin and in mucous membranes such as the vagina, mouth, or intestines. The fungus also can travel through the intestines. It becomes an infectious agent when there is some change in the body environment Kerie Raymond, (such as the pH or normal flora) that allows it to grow out N.D. of control. A common cause of infection may be the use of antibiotics that destroy beneficial, as well as harmful, microorganisms in the body, permitting yeast to multiply in their place. Symptoms of Candida can range from skin infections to other non-specific symptoms such as gas, indigestion, insomnia, sweats, cravings, allergies, sinus congestion, tired/fatigued, depressed, memory problems, vision disturbances, and rectal or nasal itching. Contributing Factors include: Use of oral contraceptives, steroids, antacids, anti-ulcer medications, or frequent or long-term use of antibiotics, high-sugar diets, pregnancy, smoking, food allergies and intolerances, and Diabetes. Call us to schedule an appointment to discuss evaluation and treatment of Candida.

COSMETIC DENTISTRY ANSWER: Technology today is playing a major factor in the way we can fix teeth. There used to be two ways in which we would fix teeth. We would either replace the missing tooth structure with an amalgam (silver filling) or we would fix it with a crown (cap). Replacing tooth structure with an amalgam requires changing the shape of the tooth to accommodate and hold the amalgam. Amalgam can’t be too thin or else it will break and Kelley Mingus, it doesn’t bond to the tooth so the tooth has to be reshaped with D.M.D. undercuts, requiring additional tooth structure to be removed. These undercuts weaken the tooth and eventually lead to a fracture. Crowns are even more aggressive as they require a layer of tooth structure to be removed all the way around the entire tooth to the gum line. Teeth treated with amalgams will usually become a crown at some point. These treatment options worked well when we didn’t have the options that we have today but they were by no means conservative. Conservative treatment to me means the preservation of tooth structure. Although technology is providing us with some amazing treatment options for replacing teeth, the fact remains that nothing works as well as your natural tooth. Technology is now providing us a way to treat teeth without removing as much tooth structure as well as providing the ability to bond the tooth to the filling. These newer treatment options allow us to minimize the number of times a tooth will need dental work during your lifetime, resulting in a more conservative treatment not just now but also in the future. In my office I now treat at least 50% of the teeth that used to be crowns with a much more conservative treatment. Ultimately conservative dentistry is about preserving your natural teeth.

DISTINCTIVE DENTISTRY AT BROKEN TOP 1475 SW Chandler Ave., Suite 201, Bend www.bendcosmeticdentist.com

541-382-6565

WELLNESS

QUESTION: I hurt my back while working in my yard. My doctor has sent me for Physical Therapy, but he has not ordered an MRI or even any X-rays. Shouldn’t these be done?

QUESTION: When is a good time to help older family members address power of attorney and other directives?

ANSWER: More and more medical professionals are

ANSWER: The briefest answer is today. Naturally,

acknowledging that tests like MRIs and X-Rays should be used when the possibility of fractures or other structural problems are indicated, as they Zeyla Brandt, might be in a fall or an automobile accident. In PT the case of a back injury like a strain (which is likely in a snow-shoveling injury), it is unlikely that an X-Ray would show anything significant, and so it is often not chosen as part of the initial case management strategy. It is also fiscally responsible to limit testing in the early stages of treatment. If the patient does not respond to conservative treatment, like Physical Therapy, then further testing, including radiology, would be appropriate.

families want to support senior family members to their highest reasonable level of independence. At the same time, it’s very important to address these key directives and talk with older family members about a support network.

Physical Therapists are trained in the management of injuries such as back strains, and would be able to help set your mind at ease as to the need for further investigation. At Healing Bridge Physical Therapy our individual one hour treatment protocol is ideal for treating people with these types of injuries.

Scott Neil, MSW

Given today’s busy society, we find that many families wait too long. Some then find themselves dealing with a near-term or long-term health crisis on top of coping with directives and legal documentation that could have been taken care of earlier. It’s always best to plan ahead, which helps everyone involved. We recommend that people consider and prepare the following directives: Durable Power of Attorney—Health and Financial, Advanced Directives, and Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment. All parties should consult with a qualified legal representative to make the best decision for each individual situation.

SCOTT NEIL, MSW

ZEYLA BRANDT, PT WWW.HEALINGBRIDGE.COM

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EYE CARE Q UESTION : I used to have long, dark eyelashes but as I have gotten older, my eyelashes are shorter and thinner. Is there any product that can help my eyelashes grow longer? ANSWER: Yes, there is such a product that can enhance the appearance of eyelashes. Allergan recently released a product called LATISSE. This product is the first and only FDA approved prescription treatment that stimulates eyelash growth. Eyelashes grow longer and darker with the use of this product. Ask your eye care specialist if you are a candidate for LATISSE. Patricia Buehler, M.D.

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E L E C T R O LY S I S

SPORT / SPINE

QUESTION: Is electrolysis new? ANSWER: Electrolysis is a tried-and-true method of hair removal. It was first developed in 1875, and for 132 years has been used by doctors and Electrologists as the only method of permanent hair removal approved by the FDA. Invented at first to treat ingrown eyelashes, it has evolved to be one of the most popular ways to remove unwanted Tana Anderson Licensed hair. With this established safety record there are Electrologist few worries when getting electrolysis. There can be slight redness after your treatment, some swelling may occur in some individuals. This usually disappears within an hour. Sometimes a honey colored crust called a lymph crust will appear over the follicle, this is natures “band-aid” and should be left alone to heal. Very rarely does anyone have a more severe reaction as it is done on such a microscopic level. I have been an Electrologist for 29 years and have not met one person that I wasn’t able to help get rid of their unwanted hair. I can treat any hair, anywhere, no matter what color or texture the hair is and it will permanently be gone. It is a series of treatments to achieve permanent results because of the way hair grows – it doesn’t all grow at once and it doesn’t all shed out at once.

ELECTROLYSIS BY TANA ANDERSON

QUESTION: I have been experiencing dizziness and balance problems along with persisting neck pain following a rear end car crash several months ago. My doctor thought I might have a problem in my inner ears. Are there other causes of dizziness following a whiplash injury? ANSWER: Dizziness and vertigo are common symptoms following whiplash injuries affecting 40-70% of chronic whiplash patients. Several recent studies indicate that Brad Pfeiffer, injury and inflammation of the cervical spine itself is in DC many cases responsible for dizziness/vertigo symptoms. Balance is a complex function in the body, controlled by the inner ear, the visual system, and proprioceptors in the cervical spine. Proprioception is how the body tracks movement and position. It’s how we can determine our body’s position in the dark for example. Balance requires all three of these systems to work together smoothly. In whiplash injuries, joint and ligament damage can cause inflammation of the cervical facet joints causing a disruption of proprioceptive nerve signals to the brainstem, resulting in vertigo. The good news is that proper treatment of the injured neck tissues should help alleviate these symptoms. However, it’s important to remember to be properly evaluated to determine the nature of the dizziness or vertigo as there may be other more serious causes such as brain injury. If you have further questions, please feel free to contact our office.

1012 NW Wall St. • Bend

541.388.3730 Brad Pfeiffer, DC • 541-383-4585

www.electrolysisbytana.com

Ask any Health Question in the area of: • Homeopathic/Holistic Medicine • Plastic Surgery • Permanent Make-up • Chiropractic • Ophthalmology • Pain Medicine • Electrolysis • Optometry • Wellness • Cosmetic Dentistry • Family Medicine • Aesthetics Send, fax or email your question to:

Ask a Health Professional c/o Kristin Morris, The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

Fax: 541-385-5802 • kmorris@bendbulletin.com My question is:

Ask a Health Professional

Send questions by fax: (541) 385-5802, email: kmorris@bendbulletin.com, or mail to P.O Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708


A6 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Flaherty Continued from A1 Cournoyer said the records release was not a violation of the law, and asked Flaherty to justify his actions. Flaherty declined to comment Wednesday afternoon, citing an ongoing investigation. “I just think it’s best to wait until the investigation is complete,” he said. County officials could not be reached for comment Wednesday evening. The job applications contained telephone numbers, mailing addresses and some employees’ driver’s license numbers, but no Social Security numbers. The state bar investigation arose from an anonymous complaint filed in March that alleges Flaherty misused a grand jury to settle a personal score with Pilliod and The Bulletin. The complainant also says it was a conflict of interest for Flaherty to convene a grand jury for a case in which the potential victims are employees in his office. The bar notified Flaherty on May 18 that it was forwarding the case to its disciplinary office. State bar rules specify that complaints be referred to the disciplinary unit when an initial investigation finds enough evidence to support a reasonable belief that misconduct may have occurred. Cournoyer wrote to Flaherty that she had reviewed all of materials he submitted, along with those provided to the bar by Pilliod. Cournoyer asked Flaherty to explain several aspects of his handling of the grand jury process by June 30.

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Major events in Flaherty’s tenure as DA May 18, 2010: In a primary election, Patrick Flaherty, who once served as chief deputy DA, unseats Deschutes County District Attorney Mike Dugan, who was first elected to the office in 1986. The heated race was the first time Dugan had faced an opponent in more than 15 years. Sept. 14, 2010: Deschutes County prosecutors vote to unionize amid discussions about possible employment shake-ups in the DA’s Office. Jan. 3, 2011: Flaherty is sworn into office and fires five deputy DAs. Traci Anderson is hired as chief deputy DA. Feb. 28: Flaherty subpoenas at least three county employees, ordering them to appear before a grand jury over a public records request by The Bulletin to obtain hiring information of recently hired employees in the DA’s Office. March 1: Flaherty subpoenas Bulletin reporter Hillary Borrud. March 24: Flaherty calls off the grand jury investigation. County legal She asked Flaherty for more specifics on how he believed Pilliod broke the law, because state law gives government agencies the right to withhold personal information in response to a public records request if the person who requested the information did not make a good case, but the law does not prohibit its release. Cournoyer wrote that “the statute appears to allow a public agency to decline a public records request based on this exemption, rather than prohibit a public agency from disclosing

counsel Mark Pilliod issues a letter expressing regret for his releasing information on the job applications. March 25: An anonymous complaint is filed against Flaherty, accusing him of trying to “settle a personal score” by opening an unjustified criminal investigation. April 5: The Oregon State Bar asks Flaherty to justify his handling of the grand jury investigation. April 19: Flaherty defends his actions in a letter to the state bar, saying that the grand jury investigation revealed sufficient evidence to file criminal charges against Pilliod. May 18: The state bar notifies Flaherty that it has found evidence of possible misconduct and refers the matter to its disciplinary office. June 9: The state bar says Flaherty was incorrect in saying the release of personal information broke the law. The bar also suggests he violated state bar rules against conflicts of interest and “conduct prejudicial to the administration of justice.” information of this nature if the party seeking disclosure fails to make such a showing.” She asked Flaherty to “please explain your theory that disclosure of the exempt information at issue knowingly violated a statute and constituted the crime of official misconduct when the statute does not appear to actually prohibit the disclosure.” On the issue of conflict of interest, Cournoyer wrote Flaherty: “You represented the state in presenting evidence to a grand jury regarding a possible crime of

official misconduct in which the persons harmed by the alleged crime (official misconduct by releasing public records containing personal information) were employees of your office,” Cournoyer wrote. “Please advise whether the fact that the affected persons worked under your supervision gave rise to any personal conflict of interest on your behalf. If not, please explain why not.” Cournoyer also asked whether Flaherty took any steps to bring in a special prosecutor to handle the matter, and whether any of the deputy district attorneys who worked on the grand jury matter were among those whose personal information was released. Cournoyer is also seeking more information about an allegation that Flaherty discouraged Pilliod from cooperating with the state bar investigation. In April, a state bar attorney asked Pilliod to submit any information relevant to its investigation. Pilliod wrote in a May letter to the bar that Flaherty told Pilliod’s defense attorney, Larry Matasar, that if Pilliod cooperated with the bar investigation, it would violate an agreement under which Flaherty stopped the grand jury investigation. Flaherty previously denied in a letter to the bar that he made such comments. Cournoyer asked Flaherty to relate any conversations he had with Pilliod’s defense attorney since March 24, when Pilliod issued a letter in which he expressed regret for his decision to release personal information on the job applications Hillary Borrud can be reached at 617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Life expectancy slips for females in parts of U.S. By Noam N. Levey McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Women in large swaths of the U.S. are dying younger than they were a generation ago, reversing nearly a century of progress in public health and underscoring the rising toll of smoking and record obesity. Nationwide, life expectancy for American men and women has risen over the last two decades, and some U.S. communities still boast life expectancies as long as any in the world, according to newly released data. But over the

last decade, the nation has experienced a widening gap between the most and least healthy places to live. In some parts of the United States, men and women are dying younger on average than their counterparts in nations such as Syria, Panama and Vietnam. Overall, the United States is falling further behind other industrialized nations, many of which have also made greater strides in cutting child mortality and reducing preventable deaths. In 737 U.S. counties out of more than 3,000, life expectan-

cies for women declined between 1997 and 2007. For life expectancy to decline in a developed nation is rare. Setbacks on this scale have not been seen in the U.S. since the Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918, according to demographers. “There are just lots of places where things are getting worse,” said Dr. Christopher Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, which conducted the research. “We’re not keeping up.”

The backsliding for women began before 1997, but researchers found it had accelerated in the last decade. Only 227 counties saw women’s life expectancy decline between 1987 and 1997, according to the study. The grim trend is fueled largely by smoking, high blood pressure and obesity, according to Murray and other population health experts. American women historically smoked more heavily than women in other countries, particularly after World War II.

Allen Craig descends a staircase at the Tetherow Golf Club, where hundreds of spectators had gathered. The mountain bike race started at Wanoga Sno-park and finished at 10 Barrel Brewing Co., where racers had to drink a pint of beer. Rob Kerr The Bulletin

Blitz Continued from A1 The course started at Wanoga, southwest of Bend, and followed the Funner Trail, which parallels Century Drive. The riders crossed Century and continued east along the C.O.D. Trail toward Tetherow. At the golf club, where hundreds of cheering spectators lined the course, racers cruised down several staircases and two big drops before riding along a section of the driving range. Craig was surprised how many spectators showed up at Tetherow, and noted how strange it was for mountain bike fans to crowd a golf club. “My line into the grass was blocked by cars,” Craig said. “The place was packed. There’s a little paradigm shift for (the golf club). But they were stoked on it, I’m sure.” From Tetherow, racers sped down Skyline Ranch Road to Galveston Avenue to the chug-a-beer finish at 10 Barrel, where live music and hundreds

more revelers awaited. “It’s kind of what Bend’s all about,” Sheppard said of the Blitz to the Barrel. “There’s a lot of grass-roots events, and this is a mountain bike community.” The women’s edition of Blitz to the Barrel is scheduled for Tuesday, July 12. An industry invitational will conclude the series on Aug. 17. “I just feel like races should be more of an event,” said Blitz organizer Erik Eastland. “It’s just supposed to be a party atmosphere with a great race.” Craig was all smiles after the race — not just because of his victory, but because of how much fun he had on his bike, knowing his friends were somewhere behind him. “This is what mountain biking should be,” Craig said. “Starting up in the hills with a bunch of your buddies, and just riding down to the pub, and having a good time. This is a pretty awesome format.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@bendbulletin.com.

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Personal Finance Frugal shoppers go to extremes for savings, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011 2,631.46 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -47.26 -1.76%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

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11,897.27 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE -178.84 -1.48%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 2.97 treasury CHANGE -3.88%

First came the pay freezes and unpaid furloughs. Then came the higher contributions for health insurance. Now, in the most definitive sign yet that the era of generous compensation for public-sector employees is ending, workers in more than half the states face the prospect

of paying more of their salary toward their pensions. So far this year, eight states, including Wisconsin and Florida, have decided to require government employees to contribute more, sometimes far more, to their pensions. Governors and legislators in 10 other states, including California and Illinois, are proposing their own

pension changes as they grapple with budget deficits and underfunded pension plans. Government employees’ unions are not accepting these changes without a fight, complaining that the increased pension contributions often amount to a significant cut in take-home pay. See Pensions / B2

93.0 92

REDMOND Jack in the Box Red Rock Center phase 1

Maple Ave. Larch Ave.

Walmart Supercenter

Hemlock Ave. 97 Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Redmond city records and the developer, Vin Mehta, owner of Jack in the Box franchises throughout Oregon and southern Washington. See Redmond / B5

By Pallavi Gogoi

Prepaid cards

The Associated Press

Ed Merriman / The Bulletin

Chip and Lainey Booth, owners of the retail store StandUpPaddle Bend, prepare to repaint a rental board. “It dumbfounds me a little bit how big this sport has become in such a short time,� Chip Booth said.

A stand-up kind of sport Paddleboarding is catching on quickly, fueling strong growth for several Central Oregon businesses

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As prepaid debit cards go mainstream, experts warn of the downsides

tand-up paddleboarding may hold the potential to boost the Bend area’s tourism and outdoor recreation economy as much as windsurfing did in the Columbia Gorge, according local tourism officials, water sports enthusiasts and shop owners who are reporting “phenomenal growth� in the sport. “The fact that the World Paddle Association (WPA) is holding two of its sanctioned stand-

96

$35.406 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.004

Construction projects represent return of national retailers to city, experts say Construction on Redmond’s first Jack in the Box and a separate retail center — the city’s first new commercial projects in some time— will begin within days, according to developers. Both projects will be built on the north side of Redmond near the Walmart Supercenter. When complete, the area may resemble a large food court, with as many as four restaurants. Project developers, city officials and commercial real estate experts say the construction indicates national retailers are returning to the market. “We haven’t seen a lot of that in the recent past,� said Heather Richards, Redmond Community Development director. “So we’re happy to see it.� The Jack in the Box will be located on North U.S. Highway 97 next to the Sonic restaurant, according to

The Bulletin

Industrial production index 2007=100

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The Bulletin

By Ed Merriman

Factory output and capacity utilization

$1525.60 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$1.80

By Tim Doran

BofA apologizes to Oregon homeowners PORTLAND — Bank of America has apologized for mistakenly sending letters that accused nearly 5,000 Oregon residents of being late on property taxes and saying they might be risking foreclosure, The Oregonian reported. Bank officials said Wednesday they are in the process of notifying affected customers in 14 Oregon counties where the mistaken letters went out. “We sincerely apologize to those who received the letter in error,� said Jumana Bauwens, a bank spokeswoman. Rich Hobernicht, director of the Washington County Department of Assessment and Taxation, estimates his office has received 1,000 calls since Monday from homeowners who received letters from BAC Tax Services Corp., an arm of the bank’s BAC Home Loan Servicing division. In Multnomah County, the bank said it sent 1,600 letters in error, according to county spokesman Shawn Cunningham. Judy Crawford, of Aloha, said the letters indicated she and her husband were delinquent on their property taxes but that was wrong and they are up to date. The letter said they had 30 days to pay the bill or the bank might do it for them and impose an escrow account to cover its costs, raising their monthly payment. “We have always been in good standing in the 15 years we’ve owned our home,� Crawford said. “My husband and I are truly furious.� — From staff and wire reports

s

States look to public workers Work to start to raise pension contributions on restaurant, retail center New York Times News Service

Cascade Bancorp, the parent company of Bend-based Bank of the Cascades, has made the preliminary list of companies to be added to the Russell 3000 Index, a financial index that serves as a barometer of the broader stock market. Russell Investments recreates the index each year, adding companies and deleting others, to more accurately reflect the broader market, according to a news release from the bank. Investment managers and institutional investors use Russell indexes as guides when making investment strategy. The final list of companies on the Russell 3000 Index for the next year is scheduled to be released June 24. In the news release, Patricia Moss, CEO of Cascade Bancorp, said the bank is pleased to be included in the index. Cascade Bancorp is listed on the Nasdaq under the symbol CACB.

1,265.42 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -22.45 -1.74%

REDMOND

By Steven Greenhouse

Stock index to add Cascade Bancorp

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MARKET REPORT

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up paddleboard events in Bend this summer shows this area is recognized as one of the top spots on the West Coast,� said Kevney Dugan, sports development manager at Visit Bend. One of those WPA-sanctioned events — the Bend Paddleboard Challenge — takes place Saturday on a stretch of the Deschutes River at Bend’s Riverbend Park beginning at 9 a.m. The second event, called the Race for the River, is scheduled Aug. 13 at the same location, Dugan said. See Paddleboard / B2

Rising fees have chased millions of people away from banks and into prepaid debit cards. In just a handful of years, prepaid cards have become the fastest-growing payment method in the U.S. Just this week, American Express became the first mainstream financial company to offer a prepaid card. But the cards have problems of their own. Complex fee schedules. Few of the consumer protections afforded to bank and credit card customers. No ability to build credit history. See Prepaid / B5

The amount of funds on prepaid debit cards rose 60 percent from 2006 to 2009, with continued growth projected. U.S. total prepaid loads in billions. $700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0

$672

’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10 ’12 ’11 ’13 Projected

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Sobriety has returned to the market for new Internet companies — at least for one day. Shares of Pandora Media, a popular but unprofitable online music service, made their New York Stock Exchange debut on Wednesday, ending the day up 8.9 percent, at $17.42, after rising as high as $26. It was a solid performance — all the more so because it came on a day of a broad slump in the

overall stock market. Yet the Pandora initial public offering paled in comparison to recent incandescent Internet IPOs. Last month, shares of LinkedIn, the social network for professionals, more than doubled on their first day of trading. And just a few days later, Yandex — often described as the Google of Russia — climbed 55 percent on its market debut. Both stocks have since pulled back, but remain well above their offer prices. See Pandora / B5

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B2 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Pensions Continued from B1 A burst of labor opposition in New Jersey is threatening a tentative deal between the Republican governor, Chris Christie, and Democratic legislative leaders that would require government employees to contribute at least 1 percent more of their pay toward their pensions. One powerful union warned Democratic lawmakers not to join Christie’s “war on the middle class.” But even many of labor’s traditional allies are demanding pension changes. Last week, New York’s governor, Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, proposed that all future state and New York City

employees pay 6 percent of their salary toward their pensions, double the current 3 percent. John Kitzhaber, Oregon’s Democratic governor, is pushing state and local employees to contribute as much as 6 percent of pay, up from zero at present. Twelve states, including Arizona, Michigan, Minnesota and Virginia, imposed higher employee contributions in 2010. That leaves just a handful of states where employees do not contribute toward their pensions. “You can call this an exponential increase in activity to have state employees contribute more,” said Ronald Snell, a pension expert with the National Conference of State Legislatures. “Before 2010, this hardly ever happened.” States are demanding the high-

C OV ER S T OR I ES er contributions as they reach for new ways to cut budget deficits. The easy savings, like furlough days, have been achieved, and now lawmakers are tackling more complicated cost issues like the long-term shortfalls in their pension funds. The Pew Center on the States estimates there is a more than $1 trillion funding gap for government employees’ retirement benefits in the 50 states. At the same time, many voters resent that public employee pensions are generally better than their own. “States have less revenues coming in and higher bills for their pensions, and it’s really focused their attention,” said Susan Urahn, managing director of the Pew Center, a nonpartisan research

group that analyzes state policies. Alabama, Arizona, Kansas, Maryland, Mississippi and Oklahoma have all acted this year to require employees to pay more. In one of the most extreme proposals, a legislative committee in Illinois, daunted by the state’s estimated $80 billion pension shortfall, voted to have state workers either contribute 17 percent of their pay toward their pensions or accept less generous pension benefits. According to the Pew Center, actuarial reports say the 50 states should have contributed $117 billion in 2009 toward their pension plans to help bring them to full funding, two and a half times more than they contributed a decade ago and well over the $73

Paddleboard Continued from B1 “Both events are going to have multiple categories, so people of all skill levels can compete in the races, or you can just show up, watch the races and sign up for a free paddleboard lesson, or just enjoy the culture,” Dugan said. Based on the growth of standup paddleboarding over the past few years, Dugan said he believes Bend has the potential to become a destination for standup paddleboarding in the same way Hood River and The Dalles have become tourist destinations for windsurfing. “I think that potential is huge. We’ve got plenty of water. We’ve got plenty of places for people to come here for a week to participate or watch one of these events, or to just enjoy stand-up paddleboarding,” Dugan said. Amy Meadow, of Bend, rode a stand-up paddleboard for the first time Wednesday afternoon on the Deschutes River along Riverbend Park, with a rented board and paddle. “I did OK. This was my first time out by myself,” Meadow said. “It was fun.” She said watching others riding stand-up paddleboards on the river, and hearing about how easy and fun it is from friends, piqued her interest in trying it. Then she heard about a yoga paddleboard class, but when she inquired about signing up she learned that participants were required to have at least an hour of paddleboarding experience, so she rented a board and paddle from the Stand-up Paddle Board shop located along Industrial Way in Bend. “I like doing yoga outside, and I like getting out on the water,” Meadow said. “It looked like a fun approach to getting out on the water.”

Business opportunities Growing demand for standup paddleboards and paddles prompted Chip Booth and his wife, Lainey, to purchase a homebased board and paddle shop and relocate to a storefront location along Industrial Way in the Old Mill District last year. The business name is StandUpPaddle Bend. “It dumbfounds me a little bit how big this sport has become in such a short time,” said Chip Booth, 44, who grew up surfing in the ocean waves near his home in Malibu, Calif., before moving to Bend and taking up stand-up paddleboarding. Booth said some of the topranked surfers in the world played a big role in the rise of the stand-up paddle sport in Bend and internationally, including surfing legend Gerry Lopez, who starred in the 1970s surfing movie “Big Wednesday” and now lives in Bend. “He is one of the defining surfers from the 1970s from Hawaii — an icon of surfing in every form,” Booth said. “Gerry Lopez was instrumental in growing the stand-up paddle sport and developing boards and equipment.” At his StandUpPaddle Bend shop, Booth carries the Gerry Lopez signature stand-up paddleboards manufactured by a company called SurfTech, based on Gerry Lopez designs. Booth also carries stand-up paddles made of wood, carbon fiber or a blend of materials by the Bend-based Kialoa Paddles. Dave Chun, who owns Kialoa Paddles with his wife, Meg, said that during his first 14 years in business (1991 to 2005) building primarily outrigger canoe paddles, the company’s sales consistently grew about 5 to 10 percent a year. But, since adding a line of stand-up paddles in 2006, sales have surged 30 percent or more each year. The Chuns founded Kialoa Paddles in Hawaii but moved the business headquarters to Central Oregon in 1992. Since then, the company has grown from two employees (the Chuns) to 14.

At Tumalo Creek Kayak and Canoe in Bend, James Frederick, a store manager, describes the different types of standup boards available to rent or buy. The inventory of about 40 boards ranges from an entrylevel model that sells for about $1,000 to a racing board that sells for about $1,650.

billion they actually contributed in 2009. Requiring employees to divert 3 percent to 6 percent of their paychecks toward funding their pensions will help, though it will not come close to solving the shortterm budget problems in most states, Urahn said. But every bit helps. In Wisconsin, for example, Gov. Scott Walker said the state government would save $226 million a year from state employees’ paying a 5.8 percent contribution previously paid by the state. Over time, the budgetary savings can be substantial. Because of New York’s constitutional restrictions against changing current workers’ pensions for the worse, Cuomo is proposing increased pension contributions for

new employees only. But even so, his office says this change would save New York State and public employers outside New York City $50 billion over 30 years. “The pension system as we know it is unsustainable,” Cuomo said last week. He added that his proposal would “bring government benefits more in line with the private sector while still serving our employees and protecting our retirees.” Kitzhaber defended his pension proposal, saying he wanted to negotiate an agreement that shared responsibility for health and pension benefits in a “fair and affordable total compensation package.” He added, “It’s about shared responsibility within a very limited budget.”

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

Ed Merriman The Bulletin

“Growth of stand-up paddle is the biggest factor driving the growth of Kialoa Paddles,” said Meg Chun, noting that the company has posted a 43 percent increase in paddle sales so far this year over the same period in 2010.

Soaring demand At the Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe shop in Bend’s Old Mill District, James Frederick, a manager, said that in response to calls from locals and tourists alike in 2007, the company by summer 2008 added stand-up paddleboards and paddles to their lineup of canoes, kayaks and other water sports equipment. “It was driven by demand. People would call us and ask if we had stand-up paddleboards, and we didn’t,” Frederick said. “We realized the sport was growing exponentially. “The first year we added paddleboards, we sold about 12 boards,” Fredericks said, and since then, he observed sales grew to 30 boards in 2009 and to 40 boards in 2010. “At this point it is roughly 20 percent of our sales,” he said. This year, he said, the company has about 40 boards in stock and expects to order more by midsummer. The rental of stand-up paddleboards and the tall paddles used to propel and guide the boards across the water has also soared from four rental boards that accounted for a small share of the rental income at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe in 2008. Fredericks said the company now has 15 rental boards and that standup paddleboard and paddle rentals — at $40 per hour or $50 per day — now “account for a very large percentage” of the shop’s rental income. Prices for boards at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe and at StandUpPaddle Bend range from a low of around $800 to $1,000 for soft-top, entry-level boards made of plastic and fiberglass skin over a plastic foam core, to a high of $1,700 to $2,000 for a high-end board made of carbon fiber. Stand-up paddles range in price from about $70 for a plastic and fiberglass paddle to a high of nearly $400 for top-end carbon fiber paddles, according to Fredericks and Booth.

Anyone can do it Bob Jumper, a carpenter and woodworker known to many locals as Captain Sawdust, relocated from Hawaii to Bend 15 years ago and has been building wooden stand-up boards here for about seven years. He builds handmade wooden boards to order. “In the last three yeas my business has more than doubled,” Jumper said. “One of the reasons it is growing in popularity is because people of all shapes and sizes can do it. You don’t have to be a super jock, and it is a terrific core workout.” Jens Williford, a sales rep for Angulo surfboard manufacturing company of Hawaii, was in Bend Wednesday talking with lo-

cal shop owners about carrying his company’s boards. He said Angulo, founded by legendary surfer Ed Angulo, started out in the 1960s making boards for ocean surfing, and later added windsurfing, kite surfing and stand-up paddleboarding. “Bend is a great place for stand-up paddleboarding,” Williford said. “There is more potential for stand-up paddle than for windsurfing because you can do it pretty much year-around and you don’t have to stand around waiting for a big wave or for the wind to blow,” said Williford, who brought his family with him to Bend this week and is mixing work with vacation time.

“Riding a stand-up board is so easy you can learn to do it in 15 minutes. Just climb on the board and go,” Williford said. “My kids are 10 and 11, and they can get out on the river and do it with me.” In addition to the flat-water version of stand-up paddleboarding, Williford said there’s also a more extreme whitewater version of the sport in which boarders can ride in places along the Deschutes with rapids, as well as an ocean version in which riders combine surfboards and paddles. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 B3

P F   Inspired by show, consumers take shopping to the extreme

Save up for a vacation by reducing energy use

‘Couponing’ trend is catching on across the country

Recent bumps in the economic recovery and higher gas prices are putting a dent in plans for summer vacations this year. A recent survey found fewer than 50 percent of business owners plan to take a vacation this year, down from more than 60 percent last summer. Finding extra money to take that muchneeded break is possible if you use the right strategies. One way is by reducing energy costs. Begin by looking around your home. You will need to make a small investment in improving the energy-efficiency of your home, but in the long run it will pay dividends. Many local utility companies will do an energy audit on your home for little or no cost. Start by calling them. Or visit www.energysavers.gov and click on Your Home for tips on energy assessments. Common areas that can be improved to reduce gas and electric bills are sealing window leaks, adding insulation and having your air conditioning unit tuned up. If you need a

By Bethany Clough McClatchy-Tribune News Service

FRESNO, Calif. — Getting $1,000 worth of body wash, toothpaste and other personal products nearly free with coupons? Impossible, right? Not according to “extreme shoppers” who got the items by paying only sales tax. The shoppers are part of a new breed of bargain hunter who scour the Internet for creative ways to use coupons that can cut a $300 Target shopping trip down to $150, and bring some bills down to zero. Inspired by the new TLC show “Extreme Couponing” and the economic downturn, the trend is taking hold across the country. “We can find coupons for anything,” said Jen Dote of Fresno, Calif. “You never should pay for toothbrushes and toothpaste.” Dote says she isn’t as extreme as some of the couponers featured on the show — like the woman who has a 40-year stockpile of toilet paper or the man with 1,000 tubes of toothpaste. But she and a friend donated the $1,000 worth of products to the Marjaree Mason Center and the Fresno Rescue Mission last month. “Everything that we donated we received for free and we just paid sales tax on, or we made money on” via register rewards that shoppers can use like cash in the store, Dote said. Many shoppers give up on coupons when they realize generic versions are often cheaper even without coupons. But extreme couponers say there’s a method for even bigger savings than buying generics. They troll blogs and websites devoted to couponing and visit multiple stores.

Anatomy of a deal Some recent extreme deals: John Frieda shampoo at Target Normally: $4.99 each Manufacturer’s coupon: $3 off each Target coupon: $3 off any two John Frieda items Total bill: .98 cents for two, plus sales tax Savings: $9 Splenda, two 100-packet boxes at Walgreens Regular price: $5.79 Walgreens sale: $2.99 Manufacturer coupons: $3 off each Total bill for two boxes: $0 Savings: $11.58 Register Rewards earned: $3 to spend at Walgreens Fresh Express bagged salad at Vons Regular price: $3.99 Vons sale: .99 cents Online coupon: $1 off Total bill: $0

WEBSITES TO FOLLOW NerdFamilyThings.com TheFrugalFind.com Hip2save.com MoneySavingMom.com SavingtheFamilyMoney.com TotallyTarget.com

BY THE NUMBERS An average week in the lives of extreme couponers Jen Dote and Rebekah Hescox: 3,332: number of coupons clipped last week 30: hours a week spent researching deals, clipping coupons and shopping 600: items donated to local charities 30: blogs and websites researched for deals $2,000: total retail value of items they have donated, paying only sales tax

Craig Kohlruss / Fresno Bee

By Dan Serra McClatchy-Tribune News Service

new air conditioner or hot water heater, tax rebates are available this year. These two units use the most energy in a home so updating them with more efficient technology can pay off the most. Secondary are your home appliances. Check to make sure refrigerators are not too cold (37 degrees is recommended for refrigerator, 3 degrees for freezer). And only run washing machines and dishwashers with full loads. Outside the home, keep gas prices down by checking GasBuddy.com or GasPriceWatch.com for the best prices in town (or downloading the apps on your smartphone). Fill up your tank on Wednesday or Thursday before 10 a.m., recommends Chris Faulkner, CEO of Breitling Oil & Gas. Gas prices rise on Thursdays in anticipation of weekend travel, he says, and 10 a.m. is when most station owners make their price change for the day. Making money doesn’t all have to be earned. Adjusting habits is an easier way to get more money for summer fun.

Rebekah Hescox, left, and Jen Dote clip coupons on Dote’s living room floor in Fresno, Calif., earlier this month. The women get together each Monday to clip coupons from the Sunday paper. They use many “extreme” tactics in their couponing and often pay only sales tax for items. They combine manufacturer cut by 20 percent. The family and store coupons. They hold on realized it needed to make fito their coupons for future sales nancial changes, and Spencer they learn about online. And said she now saves about $100 a they get money back from drug- month on groceries and housestore register rewards. hold items by couponing. Dote and friend Rebekah HesIt takes time, however. cox, both stay-at-home moms Spencer spends about nine with five kids between them, hours a week browsing blogs started extreme couponing af- and websites, clipping coupons ter seeing the show in February. and organizing them in a 2-inch When they realized they could binder with clear plastic baseget items for free, they began ball card holders. donating them to charities and Some couponers say they families dealing know the practice with layoffs. can get on peoThe friends “We can find ple’s nerves. So collect between coupons for they try to limit 20 and 50 Sunthe hassle, warnday newspa- anything. You ing people behind pers each week never should pay her in line that — buying some, her transaction collecting some for toothbrushes will take a while. from friends, and toothpaste.” And Dote has and asking Starworked with store bucks for leftover — Jen Dote, shopper in managers to spenewspapers. cial order a case Fresno, Calif. After the kids of body wash go to bed on Monahead of time days, they clip coupons and so there would be some left afput together their game plan. ter she bought 40 bottles. Since Throughout the week they hit most stores are reimbursed up stores, usually one a day. the value of the coupon, plus 8 The two run a couponing blog, cents for processing time, Dote fresnocouponing.com, and have said she doesn’t see a problem started teaching other shoppers buying a large quantity with how to find deals. coupons. Other couponers look for deals on a smaller scale out of ‘Medium couponing’ necessity. Jackie Cromwell, a homeschooling mom with four kids Hard work younger than 10, describes her“I don’t have 40 years’ worth of self as a “medium couponer.” toilet paper,” said Shelley SpenShe writes about extreme cer, a part-time Latin teacher at deals on her blog, NerdFamiFresno High. But she does stock lyThings.com, but says she up on items she knows she’ll use doesn’t shop at different stores — like the four boxes of 80-load every day, nor even use coupons Tide in her cabinet — to get her every week. through to the next sale. She knows how to get a deal Spencer started extreme cou- — like the $4 pair of shoes she poning more than a year ago scored using a coupon on shoes when her husband’s hours were already on clearance.

The dark side of extreme couponing What do you do with 100 bottles of mouthwash? Some extreme couponers are labeled “hoarders.” You can’t live on discount cookies alone. Coupons rarely apply to fruits and vegetables. Instead, they’re mostly for processed foods that critics say aren’t healthy. It guzzles gas. Driving from store to store can save money, but that much driving costs money. Stores hate it, said Arun Jain, a University of Buffalo professor of marketing strategy who has researched the topic. They don’t like couponers who clean out a shelf, leaving nothing for others. It also slows down the checkout line. And it defeats the point of a coupon: getting a customer in the door with a deal in hopes they’ll buy other things too. Some might be gaming the system. Some extreme couponers complain that a few methods used on TLC’s “Extreme Couponing” involve tricking cash registers into discounts on items other than the ones featured in the coupons. It takes time. Couponers spend hours each week following blogs and researching deals.

She signs up for retailers’ newsletters to get coupons and notifications of sales. And she’ll try a new mascara if it comes with a coupon and register rewards. The money she saves by couponing allows her to spend more freely elsewhere — like Starbucks. She can spend more on fresh vegetables and meat, which rarely have coupons. “The reality is, I have somewhat expensive tastes and I want to feed my family real food,” she said. “You cannot live on chicken nuggets.”

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Keynote Address: Peter C. Yesawich, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Ypartnership. Ypartnership is an integrated marketing and communications company and the firm is best known for their Research and Brand Strategy Group, regarded as one of the most respected sources of insights on the emerging travel habits, preferences and intentions of Americans; coauthors of the widely acclaimed National Travel MONITOR survey with Yankelovich Partners. Dr. Yesawich will present the most current tourism and travel trends available in the nation. You do not want to miss this engaging and fascinating presentation by this world-renowned speaker. COVA Members: $30 per ticket or $300 for Corporate Table Non-Members: $40 per ticket or $400 for Corporate Table For Reservations: laura@visitcentraloregon.com • 1-800-800-8334

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

All attendees will be eligible to win a variety of exciting prizes, showcasing the best of Central Oregon Travel & Tourism from COVA’s generous members!

Presented by Karnopp Petersen LLP Sponsored by The Bulletin


B USI N ESS

B4 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Nm

D

DrxEMBull DrTcBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DirEMBear DrxFnBull Dir30TrBear Dir30TrBull DrxREBull DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy

0.84 34.07 -2.34 24.56 +1.25 13.87 +.65 17.00 +1.03 19.91 +1.18 22.65 -1.48 35.30 -2.06 0.62 38.67 +1.97 0.39 64.16 -3.65 68.66 -3.77 0.16 72.61 -3.96 0.05 64.31 -4.40 0.24 22.95 -.23 39.78 -.70 35.63 -.82 27.80 -.33 0.40 38.39 -.20 0.65 34.46 -.35 43.60 -.54 33.36 -.09 72.21 -.22 62.73 -.40 1.97 47.10 -.59 23.67 -.32 1.40 92.65 -2.84 0.60 55.00 -.89 1.04 19.38 -.36 1.78 -.03 0.52 19.31 -.57 1.10 61.49 -1.22 1.00 34.62 -.96 1.28 40.72 -.40 21.38 -.04 49.30 -.81 0.52 4.66 -.10 64.27 -2.02 3.86 -.06 1.64 49.54 -.75 0.48 24.54 -.41 0.98 18.39 -.15 0.68 13.34 -.23 1.44 74.92 -1.23 2.79 -.21 2.03 -.09 14.76 -.28 2.52 -.06 5.85 -.05

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12.17 -.71 0.25 7.58 -.22 13.53 -.53 28.66 -1.10 26.49 -.60 28.43 -.50 32.81 -.01 2.67 44.56 -2.00 0.64 102.87 -2.16 0.88 50.51 -1.04 2.48 -.07 0.60 10.67 -.34 0.20 7.41 -.13 0.20 18.61 -.16 1.88 96.70 -4.07 3.35 -.01 4.43 -.28 1.36 46.52 -.89 0.72 29.08 -.71 1.25 16.08 -.08 1.28 12.00 -.15 1.16 10.44 -.22 1.14 10.11 -.18 1.21 12.00 -.17 1.33 12.55 -.30 20.38 -.43 0.70 54.90 -.24 1.39 43.13 -1.68 1.28 38.71 -.41 0.20 8.34 -.20 83.88 -1.70 3.51 -.09 0.04 19.15 -.46 0.88 29.38 -.50 1.76 33.80 -.10 10.70 +.14 0.10 14.01 -.29 22.72 -.48 15.81 -.44 0.64 31.64 -.48 2.21 -.06 1.38 51.88 -.78 18.95 +.04 .71 +.12 0.24 15.96 -.04 8.16 -.19 2.06 29.85 -.10 0.98 31.20 -.62 0.80 31.22 -.76 7.95 -.12 38.81 -.48 7.83 +.21 1.20 40.45 -.51 1.40 +.12 0.54 55.85 -1.15 69.50 -.59 1.15 -.04 3.58 46.93 -.52 29.25 -.66 4.87 +.22 2.16 30.47 -.64 0.79 21.56 -.22 31.26 -.78 1.40 52.32 -1.01 9.10 -.06 3.32 68.32 -1.05 2.39 41.35 -.21 2.80 44.71 -.84 7.63 -.17 10.06 -.16 17.57 +1.65 0.64 34.46 -.60 96.09 -2.49 1.50 61.38 -.34 0.88 17.60 -.20 1.47 59.08 -.49 0.37 13.64 -.42 2.06 67.75 -1.00 4.16 132.28 -2.77 0.75 97.15 -2.45 35.57 +.20 0.72 33.12 -1.26 1.92 82.34 -1.55 .63 +.03 7.36 -.08 5.87 -.19 3.06 -.14 0.16 18.88 -.20 9.23 -.04 2.10 41.09 -.92 4.74 +.09 7.10 -.14 0.28 27.23 -.49 0.50 46.86 -.42 20.02 -.41 55.32 -1.31 2.95 +.42 19.92 -.32 1.91 24.34 +.08 0.56 19.80 -.44 3.14 -.08 1.88 78.66 -1.72 31.20 -.33 103.61 -3.03 36.62 -1.34 0.24 33.10 -.62 0.60 79.02 -.97 40.24 -1.25 0.48 10.32 -.12 4.01 +.11 37.00 -.49 7.84 -.08 1.08 98.65 -1.25 0.08 28.26 -.55 15.59 -.47 0.72 52.25 -.46 0.52 31.84 -.42 0.52 86.49 -.81 2.68 82.33 -1.01 0.24 5.84 -.15 0.96 24.05 -.46 7.80 -.08 5.24 -.09 2.00 22.56 +.04 12.76 -.14 1.04 -.02 13.78 -.22 0.48 15.02 -.09 0.20 30.80 -.77 1.28 11.74 -.04 0.24 12.32 -.14 17.73 -1.31 0.20 22.32 -.09 0.24 14.66 -.55 0.16 4.83 -.20 0.12 5.28 -.06 0.48 15.40 -.21 0.04 9.86 -.10 10.51 -.24 16.84 -.50 0.04 11.47 -.27 0.64 13.60 -.10 33.53 -.23 116.76 -2.54 0.10 24.92 -.52 42.47 -.03 0.09 20.47 -.31 0.38 23.92 -.58 0.01 22.60 -.40 0.35 38.58 -1.98 0.05 20.65 -.37 2.20 43.02 -.78 0.64 15.83 -.14 61.24 -1.36 5.10 -.38 1.30 +.02 30.09 -.07 6.78 -.23 7.91 -.38 0.90 31.61 -.45 1.28 103.80 -2.05 0.50 62.38 -1.51 27.11 -1.03 1.16 62.52 -.05 0.66 22.77 -.18 4.53 -.13 13.15 -.28 4.63 -.24 17.78 -.34 38.58 -.34 25.88 -.44 8.84 -.16 22.31 -.58 4.72 +.13 0.76 62.08 -1.54 106.40 -1.32 30.15 -1.31 1.96 20.12 -.93 1.00 122.83 -3.18 0.76 12.10 -.50 1.00 48.53 -1.35 15.85 -.33

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D 34.91 -.60 4.15 0.75 7.82 -.04 0.24 30.19 -.53 1.20 15.73 -.58 1.41 -.05 0.30 21.79 +.46 0.16 10.49 -.13 4.14 -.09 5.75 +.04 22.17 -1.13 0.20 4.44 -.07 24.84 -.41 4.73 -.10 19.58 -.11 29.55 +.01 13.12 -.23 5.55 +.04 0.96 15.77 -.25 0.56 5.85 -.10 1.68 17.45 +.03 0.29 9.80 -.33 1.32 28.03 -.33 26.12 -.31 0.16 13.40 -.22 0.45 17.72 -.15 0.20 77.48 -2.08 2.00 32.69 -.15 37.53 +.29 .24 +.01 3.25 -.09 28.55 -.60 68.30 -.96 6.94 +.07 5.93 -.15 37.61 -.34 1.88 70.85 +.41 0.60 18.39 -.21 0.40 15.69 -.26 1.47 -.02 1.12 37.73 -.55 4.29 -.29 28.95 -.16 3.74 -.10 0.18 15.34 -.49 0.48 27.51 -.20 1.80 50.50 -.48 9.89 -.45 22.68 -1.02 21.11 -.29 25.05 -1.35 11.02 +.03 0.27 10.32 -.10 3.93 -.12 1.92 25.10 +.06 0.18 7.41 -.06 0.30 33.10 -1.13 39.65 -.13 0.52 13.34 -.06 0.36 14.37 -.40 2.11 41.53 -.83 2.13 -.05 0.40 9.19 -.23 2.70 -.05 34.16 -.93 5.35 -.19 0.08 48.86 -.82 0.25 22.81 -.56 1.16 -.03 0.15 20.60 -.85 4.64 -.36 0.12 11.80 -.30 1.00 30.46 -.66 0.19 14.53 -.08 0.48 22.96 -.29 0.41 47.77 +.69 2.24 -.12 1.40 134.85 -2.25 1.16 88.17 -.52 18.14 -.62 14.95 -.07 502.95 -5.42 41.93 -1.49 0.84 47.97 -.62 18.77 -.55 25.89 -.39 2.64 143.14 -2.55 6.26 -.21 13.52 +.28 0.52 24.54 -1.17 5.10 -.21 1.76 -.09 0.08 5.21 -.29 3.27 +.25 0.83 20.39 -.19 33.82 -1.63 79.85 +.01 20.17 -1.14 1.80 52.57 -.39 9.85 -.11 7.08 -.17 .40 -.03 0.05 12.65 -.04 0.15 22.91 -.28 0.80 40.67 -.86 0.03 6.70 -.20 3.03 -.05 25.35 -.50 33.15 -.39 0.58 31.33 -.36 1.92 35.94 -.43 0.92 22.51 -.83 1.80 49.37 -1.11 1.55 24.30 +.04 31.30 -.57 30.80 -.79 0.36 46.77 -1.12 6.31 -.15 0.96 30.50 -.58 27.09 -.73 .99 -.04 1.10 37.62 -.94 2.67 -.05 72.20 -.78 5.45 -.58 14.30 -1.09 0.50 35.82 -.47 0.10 43.09 -.51 6.83 -.08 0.07 12.73 -.22 1.00 44.55 -1.02 15.19 -.59 0.82 29.97 -.10 0.32 7.96 -.20 0.40 23.81 -1.20 12.45 -.50 1.20 43.60 +.03 4.20 28.78 -.11 1.24 23.47 -.37 5.45 -.06 2.88 -.10 2.86 50.92 -.59 10.33 -.04 1.20 20.03 -.35 30.36 -.44 25.05 -.68 42.16 -.66 0.08 15.80 -.19 0.04 19.03 -.63 5.77 -.07 7.15 -.27 1.92 53.02 -.69 15.11 -.66 0.28 59.16 -1.52 69.15 -.62 0.50 54.05 -.51 5.27 -.23 0.24 5.21 -.09 1.38 54.72 -.40 15.05 -.35 0.40 70.98 -2.38 0.48 34.26 -.47 19.83 -.16 14.57 +.11 38.36 -1.32 18.02 +.29 1.70 32.15 -.47 4.87 -.25 0.45 45.21 -.05 0.60 62.73 -1.11 10.78 +1.09 19.83 -.37 1.00 33.88 -.87 34.60 -1.16 2.48 59.67 -.99 36.50 +.52 1.33 56.05 -1.14 0.44 14.78 -.30 1.08 -.01 0.51 28.48 -.44 24.54 -.35 11.17 -.32 53.81 -.33 1.80 22.91 +.78 0.12 15.80 -.32 0.28 7.13 +.03

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D 0.32 1.00 0.52 0.04 0.40

1.96 8.04 25.78 78.27 44.07 6.33 36.16 17.58 2.46 38.97 9.18 4.24

-.11 -.21 -1.44 -.13 +.05 -.42 -.14 +.11 -.92 -.19 -.11

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35.26 -.19 0.08 19.75 -.58 0.63 45.61 -1.54 73.10 -1.10 0.15 15.80 -1.09 0.54 8.10 -.09 1.20 10.88 -.14 11.28 -.52 0.31 6.13 -.04 8.50 -.24 65.21 -3.44 14.95 +.06 34.91 -1.05 0.82 25.34 -.72 0.25 22.16 -.80 2.53 71.45 -1.23 0.50 30.63 -.64 0.95 37.15 -1.59 0.66 26.12 -1.09 0.29 25.90 -.89 0.45 18.33 -.34 0.33 17.14 -.90 0.14 10.00 -.20 0.44 62.55 -1.32 0.34 14.84 -.12 0.54 59.63 -.85 0.43 13.42 -.25 1.56 46.41 -1.17 2.15 39.77 -2.07 0.55 30.84 -1.57 0.32 26.56 -.71 0.29 15.10 -.29 0.43 17.52 -.51 0.54 71.65 -1.36 1.28 58.75 -2.41 34.88 +.21 1.09 56.73 -.96 1.75 51.51 -.79 3.86 110.66 +.57 0.97 60.56 -1.12 0.63 42.34 -.79 1.05 92.78 -1.11 2.46 127.45 -2.30 3.87 107.32 +.27 0.64 46.08 -1.01 1.01 43.61 -1.29 5.13 111.03 +.61 0.81 46.76 -1.06 1.20 66.58 -1.12 1.18 49.82 -.64 1.27 59.92 -1.11 4.01 96.92 +1.73 3.20 97.25 +1.04 1.30 34.89 -1.22 0.79 84.42 +.12 1.42 58.29 -1.98 0.91 45.83 -.80 1.59 104.35 -1.67 1.00 93.20 -1.44 7.43 89.47 -.38 1.46 14.79 -.09 0.51 102.76 -1.17 1.90 70.31 -1.25 1.25 65.67 -1.12 0.76 58.04 -1.01 1.18 70.75 -1.24 1.24 69.68 -1.16 4.37 107.01 +.24 2.71 105.00 +.10 0.53 88.72 -1.61 0.89 78.03 -1.42 0.10 110.23 +.01 2.87 39.23 -.15 1.25 75.83 -1.29 0.72 24.06 -.33 1.98 58.53 -.98 0.07 12.04 -.29 0.61 54.09 -1.12 0.74 69.34 -1.05 0.93 74.74 -1.64 1.06 39.22 -.89 0.98 40.87 -1.53 7.46 -.19 1.34 69.30 -.50 1.00 55.68 -.11 80.16 -2.62 21.61 -.58 1.20 38.34 -.32 5.04 +.31 0.68 42.72 -.62 1.36 -.04 1.36 54.30 -1.25 70.89 -1.36 30.00 -1.83 19.60 -.42 11.03 +.14 3.61 -.09 20.93 -.02 0.44 45.76 -1.01 0.08 18.73 -1.27 3.95 -.02 17.76 +.17 3.87 29.10 -.76 1.50 33.55 -.22 2.82 34.71 -.43 6.07 -.23 53.59 -1.01 1.35 62.27 -1.37 0.48 43.00 -.82 17.08 -.32 3.62 -.17 0.57 8.49 -.27 .61 -.05 17.90 -.39 18.81 -.38 7.54 -.38 8.91 -.30 2.72 49.79 -.65 0.84 21.42 -.40 0.40 15.92 +.11 7.10 +.08 116.52 -2.05 0.35 19.15 -.55 0.40 35.28 -.52 32.79 -.23 7.67 -.12 3.00 162.33 -1.79 1.08 61.31 -.68 0.24 16.42 -.20 1.05 27.06 -.81 25.30 -.47 54.03 -3.74 0.24 11.62 -.14 0.48 12.89 -.37 12.87 +.05 17.63 -.08 30.39 -1.24 49.66 -1.08 0.49 22.91 -.35 3.94 21.02 -.10 0.29 4.98 -.07 13.46 -.26 13.74 -.28 0.69 8.83 -.47 8.40 -.14 1.00 32.26 -.29 15.59 -.27 8.76 -.07 10.98 -.31 7.43 -.45 0.67 22.56 +.19 47.66 -.56 2.00 -.05 1.48 23.01 -.46 5.26 -.12 16.53 -.67 1.00 40.68 -.93 12.94 -.61 1.95 35.96 -.20 1.68 25.68 0.28 18.92 -.82 0.42 28.87 -.54 21.17 +.10 41.18 -1.43 4.49 -.15 2.06 -.04 18.68 -.52 0.20 9.27 -.15 0.35 32.04 -1.05 28.71 +1.01 0.30 20.91 -.52 5.62 -.08

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M-N-O-P M&F Wld M&T Bk MAG Slv g MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MEMC MER Tele MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macquarie Macys MadCatz g MSG MagelnHl MagelMPtr MagicSft Magma MagnaI gs MagHRes MaidenH Majesco MAKO Srg Manitowoc MannKd ManpwrGp Manulife g MarathonO MarinaB rs MktVGold MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVIndo s MktV Viet MktVCoal MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MartenT MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson

24.33 2.80 86.04 9.59 0.04 18.43 8.06 0.68 6.05 1.00 24.18 0.65 21.98 8.63 1.70 7.40 0.94 7.95 0.55 6.34 6.23 12.46 6.62 0.60 24.00 2.77 37.62 2.00 49.32 1.80 31.38 0.80 27.23 0.40 27.29 1.56 26.63 52.48 3.08 58.42 4.58 7.73 1.00 45.67 6.17 0.28 9.07 3.33 28.49 0.08 15.14 3.74 0.80 53.33 0.52 16.13 1.00 50.77 .27 0.40 53.06 0.18 38.10 2.93 33.72 0.33 51.53 3.58 55.80 0.27 30.61 0.34 20.73 0.19 44.95 0.40 33.48 0.88 29.63 0.04 7.61 0.08 20.21 4.09 1.60 79.76 14.05 0.30 11.83 0.75 29.59 17.53 0.60 270.47 0.92 25.63 1.68

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0.48 13.33 +.07 Prudentl 1.15 57.77 -2.59 PSEG 1.37 31.14 -.74 PubStrg 3.80 109.71 -2.20 PulteGrp 7.00 -.24 PureBio .87 -.04 PMIIT 0.47 5.62 -.20 PPrIT 0.61 6.44 -.05

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13.16 -.25 1.59 10.57 -.10 1.00 46.61 -1.01 24.08 -.42 0.16 17.59 -.51

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9.97 17.66 24.50 30.31 31.19 42.33 8.23 5.86 15.34 2.28 3.23 13.64 19.20 1.48 57.03 45.54 16.47 .04 11.20 68.07 31.35 31.26 99.43 24.41 23.16 2.09 22.67 2.55 5.61 69.11 23.21 23.99 48.78 11.64 37.58 42.53 32.99 83.27

-.17 -.59 -.37 -.52 -.35 -.70 +.06 +.01 -.05 -.04 -.27 -.12 -.14 -.08 -2.28 -.38 -.16 -.00 -.09 -1.61 -.99 -.80 -2.25 -.54 -.09 +.05 +.19 -.06 -.10 -.75 -.51 -1.86 +.01 -1.52 -.66 -.89 -.75


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Redmond Continued from B1 Mehta, who also owns the Jack in the Box on Northeast Third Street in Bend, said the Redmond restaurant will be one of six he plans to build this year. “It’s coming back,” he said about the economy. “It’s better than last year.” Like others in the San Diegobased chain, the Redmond Jack in the Box will be open 24 hours. It will employ 45 people, Mehta said. He expects it to open in late August. Russell Huntamer, a broker with Compass Commercial Real Estate Services in Bend, represented Mehta. Just east of the restaurant, Dickerhoof Properties, of Corvallis, expects to begin construction in days on a 6,820-square-

Prepaid Continued from B1 Consumer advocates are raising concerns and demanding more oversight, and at least one state is investigating prepaid card issuers. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is expected to step up oversight of the industry when it launches in July. “People are using prepaid cards as checking accounts and the government ought to regulate it similarly,” says Suzanne Martindale, staff attorney for Consumers Union, a nonprofit advocacy group that is concerned about unfair prepaid card fees. Even so, Americans spent $140 billion using prepaid cards in 2009, according to the latest data available from the Federal Reserve. That’s a 21.5 percent increase each year over four years. The amount of money loaded onto the cards is expected to reach $552 billion in 2012 from $330 million three years ago, according to the Mercator Advisory Group, a research firm.

Refuge from fees Prepaid cards have gone mainstream by catering to the ranks of the unbanked — people who don’t have a bank account. Nearly one in five Americans are unbanked, a 2009 government report found, and the number is

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 B5

foot building with five retail spaces. It will be phase one of the Red Rock Center, according to Darren Dickerhoof, who handles property acquisition, leasing and financing. Three national retailers have signed up for space in the building, according to Dickerhoof and Stephen Toomey, broker with Compass Commercial. While neither Dickerhoof nor Toomey said they could name the tenants, Redmond building records identify them as GameStop, the video game retailer based in Texas; Great Clips, the Minneapolis-based hair salon chain; and U.S. Cellular. The developer would like to lease one of the remaining units to a restaurant, Toomey said. It would join the Jack in the Box, Sonic and Panda Express, which already operates on Northwest

Oak Tree Lane and Highway 97. A type of tenant for the remaining retail space has not been identified, he said. Development of Red Rock Center began about three years ago, Dickerhoof said, but it stopped when the economy stalled. “Now we feel the economy has gotten better,” he said, “and we’ve had some businesses come back.” Dickerhoof also recently bought land just south of the Jack in the Box property. The site was previously slated for construction of a LibertyBank branch. But regulators shut down the Eugene-based bank last year. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. sold the property, said Dickerhoof, who added that he has been negotiating with a tenant that he could not name. The development around Highway 97 and Oak Tree Lane

has one common draw, Toomey said: the Walmart Supercenter. National retailers covet the customers attracted to the big-box stores daily, estimated to be in the thousands, he said. “That’s the equivalent of a small town going by your (front door) every day,” Toomey said. “It really is a significant traffic flow.” Sean Cook, Redmond senior planner, agrees. “I think it makes sense that we’ve seen the most commercial development going around Walmart,” he said, “because it’s a big traffic generator.” Next, he said, will be the area less than a half-mile north around Home Depot.

growing. Prepaid cards can be used to pay bills or buy merchandise in the same places a bank-issued debit card can be used. So it’s no wonder prepaid is the fastestgrowing method of payment over the last five years. This year, the IRS issued tax refunds on prepaid cards to about 600,000 bank account-free households. Social Security payments for the unbanked have been loaded onto prepaid cards since 2008. And a growing number of small companies pay employees using the cards. On Tuesday, American Express joined the fray. The card giant launched a prepaid card in an effort to expand its customer base. Most new prepaid card customers are seeking refuge from new and escalating fees, consumer advocates say. Among them: $3 to print an account summary at a Bank of America ATM; $12 a month for checking accounts with a balances below $1,500 at Chase and Bank of America; overdraft fees of $35 that most banks charge. “Even the smallest fee can upend the world of people who are functioning on a break-even basis,” says Rachel Schneider, a vice president at the Center for Financial Services Innovation, an organization that works with nonprofit and government groups to look for solutions for the unbanked. “It could mean

not having the $2 fare to catch the bus to work.”

everyday purchases and to pay bills online. She gets a daily text showing her account balance. “This is just convenient,” Gamboa says. Green Dot’s revenue rose to $364 million last year from $258 million in 2009. Competitor NetSpend Holdings Inc. reported revenue of more than $275 million in 2010, up from $225 million the year before. NetSpend’s profits were $24 million in 2010, up 33 percent from the year before. Card issuers make money in two ways. They charge fees to customers to activate, reload and maintain the cards. Merchants also pay a fee every time a card is swiped to make a purchase. The web of prepaid card fees has attracted the attention of law enforcement. Last month the Florida Attorney General’s office began investigating the industry after consumers complained about hidden fees. Subpoenas were issued to five companies — First Data Corp., Account Now Inc., Unirush Financial Services LLC, Green Dot and NetSpend. Officials at the firms say they are cooperating and insist that they disclose their fees. Prepaid cards have other drawbacks. Their use isn’t reported to major credit bureaus so they don’t help build a user’s credit history or credit score. For someone who primarily uses a prepaid card, that could make it harder to get a loan later on.

A prepaid push Pioneering the push to prepaid cards are companies such as Green Dot Corp., NetSpend Holdings Inc., Mango Financial and SmartyPig. They sell cards mostly through big box retailers like Wal-Mart, or at supermarkets and drug stores. The cards come with a Visa or MasterCard logo, and most allow people to use the cards to pay bills online. Frustrated former bank customers represent a big share of Green Dot’s new customers, says Steve Streit, founder and CEO of the Monrovia, Calif.-based company. The largest of the prepaid card providers, Green Dot has more than 4.3 million cards in circulation, a 230 percent increase from three years ago. Between January and March, $4.6 billion was loaded onto the company’s cards, 62 percent more than the same period last year. Several $35 overdraft fees over a three month period left Erin Gamboa’s checking account $200 in the red. With her budget too tight to absorb that and other mounting bank fees, the divorced, single mother of two moved her financial life to Green Dot in February. Now, her $850 bimonthly paycheck is deposited directly onto a prepaid debit card. She uses the card to pay for

Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

Pandora Continued from B1 In Pandora’s case, “underwriters were better able to match investor demand with the IPO pricing, but probably more likely it demonstrated that some of the euphoria that drove LinkedIn to $100-plus has subsided,” said Paul Bard, vice president for research at Renaissance Capital, an IPO advisory firm. “It shows that there is at least some price discipline in the marketplace and that is a good thing.” (Morgan Stanley and JPMorgan Chase were among the underwriters for both Pandora and LinkedIn.) Still, Pandora’s ability to go public at $16 a share — roughly double its initial target range of $7 to $9 — reflects a robust demand for Internet stocks, particularly those with a large base of users. Pandora is not yet profitable, like many of its peers, but the company has more than 90 million subscribers and is adding a new user about every second. Demand for Pandora’s initial public offering was also amplified because of limited supply. There is not a flood of Internet companies rushing to market as there was more than a decade ago during the dot-com boom. And those that are going public are showing restraint. Both Pandora and LinkedIn offered less than 10 percent of their total shares. The investor exuberance for new Internet companies troubles some analysts, who say that the multibillion-dollar valuations do not match the fundamentals of the businesses. That concern could swell in the coming months, as some of the most talked about private Internet companies — Facebook, Groupon and Zynga — take steps toward making market debuts. All three are expected to go public within the next 12 months. Groupon, which was valued at roughly $1.4 billion last year, may seek a valuation of $30 billion with its IPO, according to two people close to the compa-

“This is a 2-plus billion-dollar valuation, for a company that isn’t making any money yet.” — Richard Greenfield, an analyst at BTIG Research. ny who were not authorized to speak. The social shopping site posted a loss of $456 million last year on revenue of $713 million. Pandora, which has never posted an annual profit, recorded a loss of $1.8 million in 2010. “Pandora is a company where the advertising business is still at a very early stage,” said Richard Greenfield, an analyst at BTIG Research. “This is a 2-plus billion-dollar valuation, for a company that isn’t making any money yet.” Despite the hurdles ahead, Pandora said it still has an enormous opportunity to grow market share. Joseph Kennedy, the company’s chief executive, said that Pandora had room to expand because it has only about 3 percent of the domestic, radiolistening market. “We’re really focused on just improving the experience we provide to our listeners everyday and giving them that opportunity to listen to Pandora everywhere they’re demanding to listen to it, in the car, in the home, those are the great nearterm opportunities,” he said. The company sold 14.7 million shares on Tuesday evening, raising $234.9 million. Its lead underwriters, Morgan Stanley, JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup, also have the option to sell an additional 2.2 million shares. At Wednesday’s closing stock price, the company is valued at about $2.78 billion. Kennedy wanted to look beyond the IPO in an interview on Wednesday. “Many years from now, we’ll look back on this as just one step in the process of building a lasting great company,” he said. “We don’t pay attention to the market. We’re focused on the opportunity.”

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Market update Northwest stocks Name

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AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.10 .04 .36 1.68 ... .80f .88f .96f ... .24 .48f .22 .84f .12f .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

8 13 19 10 16 19 16 25 24 ... 22 8 ... 10 11 13 13 ... 16 31 6

64.03 -.74 +12.9 24.11 -.35 +7.1 10.50 -.30 -21.3 13.98 -.40 -10.1 73.85 -.79 +13.2 10.58 -.97 +25.2 43.49 -.81 -8.0 58.76 -1.12 -2.6 77.93 -1.31 +7.9 9.48 -.20 +28.3 33.10 -.62 +11.3 34.26 -.47 -18.6 10.59 -.16 -13.7 21.42 -.40 +1.9 8.05 -.06 -9.0 22.95 -.27 +2.6 6.01 -.15 -.8 7.37 -.26 -22.1 21.98 -.40 +8.4 12.84 -.34 +7.0 23.74 -.48 -14.9

Name

Div

PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerh

1.24 .92 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .58f .07 1.46 .86f .52 ... .20 .50f .24 .48f ... .60

19 16 17 11 29 ... 38 21 14 14 18 10 24 10 39 13 13 11 32 ...

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1525.00 $1525.60 $35.406

Pvs Day $1525.00 $1523.80 $35.410

Market recap 80.39 43.51 43.93 6.75 45.75 2.81 38.52 151.12 21.95 53.13 81.32 40.37 34.86 11.50 11.20 23.99 15.49 26.55 16.06 20.01

-1.85 -.69 -.29 +.08 -1.14 -.08 -.46 -2.15 -.26 -1.71 -1.28 -.67 -.41 -.23 -.09 -.51 -.15 -.47 +.02 -.59

-5.9 +2.7 -5.5 -61.9 -20.2 +35.7 +2.9 +8.6 -2.4 -20.0 -2.9 -10.6 +8.5 -1.6 -8.0 -11.0 -8.5 -14.3 +13.9 +5.7

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Vol (00)

S&P500ETF BkofAm SPDR Fncl FordM iShR2K

2670883 2052824 1474848 836926 801678

Last Chg 127.02 10.50 14.73 13.15 78.03

-2.30 -.30 -.33 -.28 -1.42

Gainers ($2 or more) Name CSVS2xVxS C-TrCVOL DST Sys BiPLSpxVM iPSEEafe

Last 24.14 34.98 54.51 13.44 81.95

Chg %Chg +3.48 +4.28 +6.20 +1.51 +7.36

+16.8 +13.9 +12.8 +12.7 +9.9

Losers ($2 or more) Name VlyNB wt18 OwensIll CtrySCkg n CenPacF s DirxDMBull

Last 2.65 25.54 10.15 12.42 62.86

3.25 3.25 3.25

Vol (00)

GoldStr g NthnO&G NovaGld g NwGold g RareEle g

Last Chg

50652 2.24 -.12 43443 19.21 +.29 41864 9.04 -.41 41097 9.08 -.02 39887 10.25 +.39

Vol (00)

SiriusXM Cisco PwShs QQQ Microsoft Intel

Gainers ($2 or more)

954857 906508 519964 482988 474767

Last Chg 1.95 14.84 54.29 23.74 21.42

-.01 -.24 -1.05 -.48 -.40

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Express-1 EngySvcs EstnLtCap EngySvc un GtPanSilv g

2.95 3.50 3.71 3.50 3.27

+.42 +.49 +.37 +.32 +.25

NeurogX WashFd wt NF EngSv Hollysys ChinaMed

+16.6 +16.3 +11.1 +10.1 +8.3

Last

Chg %Chg

2.66 +1.04 +64.2 6.97 +1.28 +22.5 2.90 +.51 +21.3 10.78 +1.09 +11.2 8.97 +.89 +11.0

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

-29.3 -13.5 -13.2 -12.1 -10.0

OrsusXel rs Neoprobe T3 Motn rs NDynMn g FieldPnt

5.54 3.32 4.95 8.60 2.63

-.99 -15.2 -.33 -9.0 -.40 -7.5 -.66 -7.1 -.18 -6.4

Toreador SunPwr B SurModic QuantFu rs SunPowerA

482 2,595 81 3,158 23 76

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

147 329 28 504 2 11

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg -1.10 -4.00 -1.54 -1.71 -6.96

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Indexes

4.04 16.97 11.01 3.16 17.66

Chg %Chg -1.02 -3.60 -2.29 -.55 -3.01

-20.2 -17.5 -17.2 -14.8 -14.6

Diary 548 2,063 105 2,716 10 114

12,876.00 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,565.78 3,872.64 Dow Jones Transportation 441.86 353.53 Dow Jones Utilities 8,718.25 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,490.51 1,770.05 Amex Index 2,887.75 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,370.58 1,010.91 S&P 500 14,562.01 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 868.57 587.66 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,897.27 5,104.52 420.88 7,967.81 2,271.43 2,631.46 1,265.42 13,403.26 779.46

-178.84 -63.62 -5.75 -164.96 -49.46 -47.26 -22.45 -232.01 -14.53

YTD %Chg %Chg -1.48 -1.23 -1.35 -2.03 -2.13 -1.76 -1.74 -1.70 -1.83

52-wk %Chg

+2.76 -.04 +3.92 +.05 +2.85 -.81 +.62 +.32 -.53

+14.29 +15.51 +10.92 +14.22 +20.38 +14.12 +13.53 +14.39 +17.01

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

% Change

334.04 2,562.63 3,806.85 5,742.55 7,115.08 22,343.77 35,318.39 19,918.52 3,506.37 9,574.32 2,086.53 3,054.82 4,635.40 5,697.99

-1.03 t -1.06 t -1.49 t -1.04 t -1.25 t -.68 t -.36 t -2.16 t +.50 s +.28 s +.47 s -.08 t -.34 t -.88 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0544 1.6175 1.0188 .002137 .1542 1.4169 .1284 .012350 .083776 .0356 .000920 .1543 1.1718 .0347

1.0696 1.6386 1.0331 .002145 .1543 1.4468 .1285 .012420 .084839 .0359 .000923 .1582 1.1848 .0346

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 19.49 -0.38 -0.1 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 18.50 -0.30 -0.2 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.24 -0.09 +1.5 GrowthI 25.94 -0.48 +0.4 Ultra 23.11 -0.42 +2.0 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.12 -0.29 +1.5 AMutlA p 25.80 -0.30 +2.6 BalA p 18.16 -0.20 +2.4 BondA p 12.41 +0.05 +3.4 CapIBA p 51.16 -0.74 +3.5 CapWGA p 36.17 -0.81 +1.7 CapWA p 21.00 -0.10 +4.1 EupacA p 41.69 -0.98 +0.8 FdInvA p 37.11 -0.75 +1.8 GwthA p 30.42 -0.54 -0.1 HI TrA p 11.41 -0.02 +4.5 IncoA p 17.03 -0.20 +3.9 IntBdA p 13.58 +0.04 +2.2 ICAA p 27.86 -0.49 -0.2 NEcoA p 25.85 -0.46 +2.1 N PerA p 28.72 -0.62 +0.3 NwWrldA 54.10 -0.80 -0.9 SmCpA p 38.56 -0.58 -0.8 TxExA p 12.07 +0.01 +4.0 WshA p 28.05 -0.46 +3.7 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 29.61 -0.60 -1.8 IntEqII I r 12.25 -0.26 -1.7 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.08 -0.53 +1.8 IntlVal r 27.64 -0.71 +2.0 MidCap 34.84 -0.57 +3.6 MidCapVal 21.33 -0.29 +6.2 Baron Funds: Growth 53.30 -0.70 +4.0 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.99 +0.06 +3.7 DivMu 14.49 +3.1 TxMgdIntl 15.25 -0.49 -3.1

BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 17.93 -0.31 GlAlA r 19.65 -0.26 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.30 -0.20 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.97 -0.31 GlbAlloc r 19.76 -0.26 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 52.93 -1.14 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.15 -0.48 DivEqInc 10.11 -0.20 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.08 -0.50 AcornIntZ 40.03 -0.78 ValRestr 49.29 -1.02 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.39 -0.16 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.11 -0.31 USCorEq2 11.05 -0.20 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 33.94 -0.70 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 34.33 -0.71 NYVen C 32.71 -0.68 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.37 +0.03 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.53 -0.29 EmMktV 34.51 -0.56 IntSmVa 17.11 -0.39 LargeCo 9.97 -0.18 USLgVa 20.59 -0.43 US Small 21.49 -0.39 US SmVa 25.13 -0.51 IntlSmCo 17.13 -0.40 Fixd 10.36 +0.01 IntVa 18.00 Glb5FxInc 11.23 +0.04 2YGlFxd 10.22 +0.01 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 71.55 -0.95 Income 13.56 +0.03

+2.7 +1.2 +0.9 +2.9 +1.3 -0.8 +0.8 +0.4 +0.9 +0.3 -2.3 +0.5 +0.3 +1.2 -1.2 -1.0 -1.5 +3.8 -2.3 -4.1 +0.6 +1.5 +3.0 +0.8 -1.6 +0.9 +0.6 -0.1 +3.2 +0.7 +2.4 +3.6

IntlStk 35.25 Stock 109.31 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.08 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.85 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.05 GblMacAbR 10.15 LgCapVal 17.89 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.05 FPA Funds: FPACres 27.64 Fairholme 31.01 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.82 StrInA 12.62 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.03 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.83 FF2015 11.55 FF2020 14.02 FF2020K 13.25 FF2025 11.68 FF2030 13.94 FF2030K 13.59 FF2035 11.58 FF2040 8.09 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.45 AMgr50 15.66 Balanc 18.56 BalancedK 18.56 BlueChGr 45.75 Canada 57.14 CapAp 25.58 CpInc r 9.54 Contra 67.44 ContraK 67.44 DisEq 22.88 DivIntl 30.04 DivrsIntK r 30.03 DivGth 28.32

-0.93 -1.3 -2.02 +1.8 NA -0.36 -1.5 +2.8 -0.02 +0.8 -0.36 -1.5 -0.29 +2.8 -0.34 +3.2 -0.67 -12.8 -0.32 -0.5 -0.02 +4.3 -0.33 -0.4 -0.11 -0.10 -0.14 -0.14 -0.15 -0.19 -0.18 -0.19 -0.13 -0.24 -0.13 -0.18 -0.19 -0.89 -1.15 -0.44 -0.05 -1.10 -1.11 -0.48 -0.76 -0.76 -0.55

+2.2 +2.2 +2.1 +2.1 +1.8 +1.6 +1.7 +1.3 +1.4 +0.7 +1.9 +2.1 +2.2 +0.9 -1.7 +0.9 +3.9 -0.3 -0.3 +1.6 -0.4 -0.3 -0.4

EmrMk 25.74 Eq Inc 44.46 EQII 18.35 Fidel 32.75 FltRateHi r 9.83 GNMA 11.72 GovtInc 10.63 GroCo 86.43 GroInc 18.43 GrowthCoK 86.43 HighInc r 9.05 Indepn 24.24 IntBd 10.77 IntlDisc 32.61 InvGrBd 11.64 InvGB 7.57 LgCapVal 11.62 LevCoStk 28.70 LowP r 40.03 LowPriK r 40.03 Magelln 70.07 MidCap 27.89 MuniInc 12.56 NwMkt r 15.88 OTC 56.39 100Index 8.79 Ovrsea 32.32 Puritn 18.21 SCmdtyStrt 12.55 SrsIntGrw 11.27 SrsIntVal 10.00 SrInvGrdF 11.65 STBF 8.53 SmllCpS r 19.53 StratInc 11.29 StrReRt r 9.84 TotalBd 10.95 USBI 11.54 Value 69.26 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 45.61 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 38.29 500IdxInv 44.97

-0.34 -0.83 -0.36 -0.67 +0.02 +0.05 -1.50 -0.33 -1.50 -0.02 -0.53 +0.04 -0.81 +0.05 +0.04 -0.23 -0.50 -0.62 -0.62 -1.29 -0.48 +0.01 -0.02 -1.08 -0.15 -0.85 -0.21 -0.20 -0.28 +0.06 +0.01 -0.35 -0.02 -0.05 +0.04 +0.05 -1.38

-2.3 +0.7 +0.8 +1.9 +1.6 +3.7 +2.9 +3.9 +1.0 +4.0 +4.0 -0.5 +3.5 -1.3 +3.4 +3.9 +1.4 +1.0 +4.3 +4.4 -2.1 +1.6 +4.3 +4.0 +2.7 +0.6 -0.5 +2.0 -0.7 -0.2 +0.6 +3.6 +1.5 -0.3 +4.3 +3.2 +3.8 +3.3 +0.8

-0.35 -10.7 -0.64 +1.6 -0.79 +1.5

IntlInxInv 35.46 -0.94 TotMktInv 36.90 -0.60 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 44.97 -0.80 TotMktAd r 36.90 -0.60 First Eagle: GlblA 47.32 -0.61 OverseasA 23.03 -0.25 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.60 FoundAl p 10.85 -0.17 HYTFA p 9.91 IncomA p 2.21 -0.01 USGovA p 6.83 +0.01 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv x 13.79 -0.11 IncmeAd 2.19 -0.02 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.23 -0.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.20 -0.30 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.32 -0.17 GlBd A px 13.83 -0.11 GrwthA p 18.60 -0.40 WorldA p 15.20 -0.30 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC px 13.85 -0.11 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 40.27 -0.76 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.76 -0.34 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 13.66 -0.22 Quality 20.76 -0.35 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 36.24 -0.62 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.33 -0.01 MidCapV 36.56 -0.62 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.38 -0.01 CapApInst 37.34 -0.70 IntlInv t 61.06 -1.64 Intl r 61.72 -1.66

+1.2 +1.6 +1.5 +1.6 +2.1 +1.6 +5.1 +3.7 +5.3 +4.6 +3.1 +4.1 +4.2 +4.2 +2.8 +4.9 +4.0 +4.6 +2.9 +3.7 +0.1 +3.8 +0.9 +3.8 +0.9 +4.0 +1.1 +3.1 +1.7 +1.8 +1.9

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 33.07 -0.68 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 33.11 -0.68 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.63 -0.87 Div&Gr 19.79 -0.38 TotRetBd 11.25 +0.05 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.43 +0.08 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.03 -0.23 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.66 -0.26 CmstkA 15.80 -0.30 EqIncA 8.67 -0.09 GrIncA p 19.30 -0.30 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.79 -0.48 AssetStA p 24.56 -0.50 AssetStrI r 24.79 -0.50 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.66 +0.05 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.66 +0.05 HighYld 8.23 -0.02 ShtDurBd 11.03 +0.01 USLCCrPls 20.40 -0.30 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 45.47 -1.12 PrkMCVal T 22.96 -0.30 Twenty T 62.96 -1.11 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.08 -0.15 LSGrwth 12.96 -0.21 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.08 -0.32 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.45 -0.32 Longleaf Partners: Partners 29.79 -0.38 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.78 -0.06 StrInc C 15.40 LSBondR 14.72 -0.07

-4.5 -4.4 -1.7 +1.5 +3.2 +1.1 +1.9 +3.0 +0.8 +1.4 +0.7 +0.3 +0.6 +0.7 +3.2 +3.4 +4.1 +1.2 -1.3 -10.2 +1.7 -4.2 +1.8 +0.9 -3.2 -3.3 +5.4 +5.9 +5.5 +5.7

StrIncA 15.32 -0.08 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.47 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.41 -0.23 BdDebA p 7.96 -0.01 ShDurIncA p 4.61 +0.01 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.64 +0.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.29 -0.14 ValueA 23.22 -0.43 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.33 -0.44 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.86 -0.24 MergerFd 16.16 -0.04 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.52 +0.03 TotRtBdI 10.52 +0.03 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 39.25 -0.72 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.77 -0.48 GlbDiscZ 30.16 -0.49 QuestZ 18.12 -0.24 SharesZ 21.39 -0.33 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 47.68 -0.68 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 49.36 -0.71 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.40 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.43 -0.26 Intl I r 19.58 -0.43 Oakmark r 42.23 -0.73 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.04 -0.06 GlbSMdCap 15.83 -0.28 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 35.05 -0.55 GlobA p 62.19 -1.46 GblStrIncA 4.36 -0.02 IntBdA p 6.66 -0.08

+5.9 +5.0 -1.3 +4.7 +2.2 +1.9 +2.3 +2.1 +2.2 +2.9 +2.4 +3.4 +3.6 +5.1 +2.0 +2.1 +2.4 +2.9 +3.7 +3.6 NA +2.5 +0.9 +2.3 +4.3 +2.3 -3.9 +3.0 +4.5 +3.3

MnStFdA 31.94 -0.53 RisingDivA 15.80 -0.30 S&MdCpVl 32.81 -0.56 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.33 -0.27 S&MdCpVl 28.04 -0.48 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.28 -0.27 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.77 +0.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.72 -0.54 IntlBdY 6.66 -0.08 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.02 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.99 -0.02 AllAsset 12.51 -0.05 ComodRR 9.43 -0.14 DevLcMk r 10.98 -0.12 DivInc 11.59 -0.02 HiYld 9.37 -0.02 InvGrCp 10.74 +0.03 LowDu 10.50 RealRtnI 11.69 +0.04 ShortT 9.90 TotRt 11.02 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.69 +0.04 TotRtA 11.02 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.02 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.02 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.02 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 47.69 -0.25 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 40.92 -0.70 Price Funds: BlChip 38.26 -0.73 CapApp 20.92 -0.24 EmMktS 34.15 -0.46 EqInc 23.77 -0.40

-1.4 +2.3 +2.4 +1.9 +2.0 +1.9 +5.7 -3.7 +3.4 +3.0 +4.7 +4.4 +4.3 +4.4 +4.0 +4.1 +5.0 +2.1 +5.1 +1.0 +3.1 +4.9 +3.0 +2.6 +3.0 +3.1 +4.1 +0.1 +0.3 +3.0 -3.2 +0.7

EqIndex 34.21 Growth 31.95 HlthSci 34.65 HiYield 6.85 IntlBond 10.27 Intl G&I 13.71 IntlStk 14.27 MidCap 60.18 MCapVal 24.16 N Asia 19.16 New Era 50.74 N Horiz 35.34 N Inc 9.61 R2010 15.68 R2015 12.12 R2020 16.72 R2025 12.22 R2030 17.51 R2035 12.38 R2040 17.61 ShtBd 4.87 SmCpStk 35.41 SmCapVal 35.97 SpecIn 12.53 Value 23.70 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.47 VoyA p 22.33 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.84 PremierI r 21.18 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 37.75 S&P Sel 19.86 Scout Funds: Intl 32.55 Selected Funds: AmShD 41.02 Sequoia 139.07 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.55 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 50.02 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 28.69

-0.61 +1.4 -0.60 -0.6 -0.48 +14.4 -0.01 +4.4 -0.14 +4.4 -0.40 +3.0 -0.35 +0.3 -0.91 +2.8 -0.37 +1.9 -0.15 -0.1 -1.23 -2.7 -0.48 +5.5 +0.04 +2.9 -0.15 +2.2 -0.15 +1.9 -0.23 +1.7 -0.19 +1.5 -0.29 +1.3 -0.22 +1.2 -0.32 +1.1 +0.01 +1.5 -0.52 +2.8 -0.52 -0.4 -0.04 +3.2 -0.40 +1.5 -0.25 -0.1 -0.39 -5.8 -0.18 +1.6 -0.30 +4.1 -0.66 +1.5 -0.36 +1.5 -0.80 +0.5 -0.83 -0.9 -2.31 +7.6 -0.51 +2.5 -0.81 -3.4 -0.55 +2.4

IntValue I 29.33 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.23 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 21.77 CAITAdm 10.97 CpOpAdl 76.36 EMAdmr r 39.06 Energy 127.30 ExplAdml 70.17 ExtdAdm 42.04 500Adml 117.05 GNMA Ad 10.97 GrwAdm 31.77 HlthCr 57.87 HiYldCp 5.78 InfProAd 26.73 ITBdAdml 11.49 ITsryAdml 11.64 IntGrAdm 61.53 ITAdml 13.57 ITGrAdm 10.04 LtdTrAd 11.09 LTGrAdml 9.60 LT Adml 10.91 MCpAdml 94.91 MuHYAdm 10.31 PrmCap r 68.93 ReitAdm r 82.54 STsyAdml 10.78 STBdAdml 10.65 ShtTrAd 15.91 STIGrAd 10.79 SmCAdm 35.35 TtlBAdml 10.77 TStkAdm 31.95 WellslAdm 54.39 WelltnAdm 54.74 Windsor 45.66 WdsrIIAd 46.80 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 24.70 CapOpp 33.05 DivdGro 14.98

-0.57 +2.6 -0.27 +1.7 -0.18 +2.4 +4.3 -1.34 -0.5 -0.62 -2.0 -3.00 +5.2 -1.09 +3.4 -0.71 +1.9 -2.07 +1.5 +0.03 +3.7 -0.54 +0.8 -0.70 +12.9 -0.01 +4.8 +0.16 +5.3 +0.09 +4.7 +0.07 +3.9 -1.60 +4.1 +0.06 +4.3 +1.9 +0.20 +5.5 +4.3 -1.68 +3.0 +0.01 +4.3 -1.24 +1.0 -1.42 +6.0 +0.01 +1.3 +0.02 +2.0 +0.9 +0.01 +1.9 -0.60 +1.6 +0.05 +3.2 -0.56 +1.6 -0.14 +4.4 -0.60 +2.6 -0.93 +0.2 -0.80 +2.7 -0.40 +1.0 -0.58 -0.6 -0.22 +4.2

Energy 67.78 EqInc 21.25 Explr 75.35 GNMA 10.97 GlobEq 18.17 HYCorp 5.78 HlthCre 137.11 InflaPro 13.61 IntlGr 19.33 IntlVal 31.67 ITIGrade 10.04 LifeCon 16.60 LifeGro 22.34 LifeMod 19.91 LTIGrade 9.60 Morg 18.17 MuInt 13.57 PrecMtls r 24.78 PrmcpCor 14.00 Prmcp r 66.41 SelValu r 19.25 STAR 19.47 STIGrade 10.79 StratEq 19.28 TgtRetInc 11.54 TgRe2010 22.87 TgtRe2015 12.68 TgRe2020 22.52 TgtRe2025 12.84 TgRe2030 22.02 TgtRe2035 13.27 TgtRe2040 21.78 TgtRe2045 13.68 USGro 18.45 Wellsly 22.45 Welltn 31.69 Wndsr 13.53 WndsII 26.36 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 26.30 TotIntlInst r 105.21 500 117.02 MidCap 20.90 SmCap 35.30

-1.62 +5.2 -0.37 +5.0 -1.18 +3.3 +0.03 +3.6 -0.36 +1.7 -0.01 +4.7 -1.67 +12.9 +0.08 +5.3 -0.50 -0.1 -0.81 -1.5 +0.06 +4.2 -0.10 +1.9 -0.37 +1.3 -0.23 +1.7 +0.20 +5.4 -0.33 +0.8 +4.0 -0.65 -7.2 +1.7 -1.20 +0.9 -0.32 +2.6 -0.21 +2.0 +0.01 +1.9 -0.35 +5.2 -0.03 +2.8 -0.15 +2.5 -0.12 +2.1 -0.25 +1.9 -0.17 +1.7 -0.33 +1.6 -0.23 +1.4 -0.38 +1.3 -0.24 +1.3 -0.38 +1.1 -0.06 +4.4 -0.35 +2.5 -0.27 +0.1 -0.48 +2.7

SmlCpGth

22.63 -0.38 +3.2

SmlCpVl

15.98 -0.28 -0.2

-0.60 -2.59 -2.07 -0.30 -0.60

CorePlus I

-0.2 -0.2 +1.5 +2.9 +1.6

STBnd

10.65 +0.02 +1.9

TotBnd

10.77 +0.05 +3.1

TotlIntl

15.72 -0.39 -0.3

TotStk

31.94 -0.56 +1.6

Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst

21.77 -0.19 +2.4

DevMkInst

10.05 -0.29 +0.7

ExtIn

42.04 -0.71 +1.9

FTAllWldI r

93.81 -2.36

GrwthIst

31.77 -0.54 +0.8

InfProInst

10.89 +0.07 +5.4

InstIdx

116.23 -2.06 +1.5

InsPl

116.24 -2.06 +1.5

InsTStPlus

28.90 -0.50 +1.7

MidCpIst

20.97 -0.37 +3.0

SCInst

35.35 -0.60 +1.7

TBIst

10.77 +0.05 +3.2

TSInst

31.95 -0.57 +1.6

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

96.69 -1.71 +1.5

MidCpIdx

29.95 -0.53 +3.0

STBdIdx

10.65 +0.02 +2.0

TotBdSgl

10.77 +0.05 +3.2

TotStkSgl

30.84 -0.54 +1.6

Western Asset: 11.01 +0.03 +3.8

Yacktman Funds: Fund p

17.31 -0.24 +4.7


B USI N ESS

B6 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M  BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. EXCEL 2007 BEGINNING: Twoafternoon class. Registration required; $59; 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. HOME-BUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

Register by June 10; $50; 8 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-6088, reaza.mansur@ oregonstate.edu or http://extension. oregonstate.edu/deschutes/. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 4 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. ENTREPRENEUR’S SPOTLIGHT, MAINTAINING BUSINESS SUCCESS: Small Business Association’s monthly web chat. 2011 Rhode Island business person of the year, Kathleen Devlin, will share her success story of building her business, All About Home Care, from one employee to a staff of 68. Questions for the chat can be posted online in advance; free; 10 a.m.; www.sba.gov. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. GET STARTED WITH INVESTING: Understand the basics of risk, asset allocation, diversification and feel more confident making investment decisions. Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

FRIDAY TOWN HALL FORUM, 2011 COUNTY FORECAST BREAKFAST: Deschutes County Administrator Dave Kanner and Commissioners Tammy Baney, Tony DeBone and Alan Unger will answer questions about Deschutes County government. Registration required; $30 for Bend Chamber members, $40 for others; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

MONDAY FARM AND TRACTOR SAFETY TRAINING: A two-day course for 14- to 17-year-olds with classroom work as well as hands-on experience with a variety of tractors and implements.

CRISIS COMMUNICATION PLANNING: Agility Recovery and Small Business Association present a discussion about learning the steps and best practices for developing an emergency communication process; free; 11 a.m.; https://www1.gotomeeting. com/register/748002384. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Midstate Electric Cooperative, 16755 Finley Butte Road, La Pine; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY June 22 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. CENTRAL OREGON VISITORS ASSOCIATION 40TH ANNIVERSARY LUNCHEON: Keynote provided by Peter Yesawich, chairman and chief executive officer of Ypartnership; $30 for Central Oregon Visitor Association members; $40 for others; corporate tables also available; 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 800-800-8334, laura@ visitcentraloregon.com or http:// visitcentraloregon.com/. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Celebrate Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home 100 years of service; free; 5 p.m.; Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 105 N.W. Irving Ave.; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org. UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING CREDIT: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-3187506, ext. 109.

THURSDAY June 23 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201,

FCC chairman urges companies to expand broadband networks By Meg James

executives to figure out ways to blanket the country with highLOS ANGELES — Federal speed Internet lines. Without Communications Commission access to the Internet, he said, Chairman Julius Genachowski many people are hobbled in gently prodded telecommuni- their efforts to find meaningcations companies to build out ful employment. Four-fifths of Fortune 500 compatheir broadband netnies use the Internet works in order to drato advertise openings matically increase the and recruit employnumber of homes that ees, Genachowski have access to highsaid. speed Internet. The cable industry The effort is vital to is a captive audience the nation’s economic because, for many cahealth, Genachowski ble companies, hightold several hundred Julius Genaspeed Internet service people attending chowski, FCC has become a fasterthe National Cable chairman growing — and more & Telecommunicaprofitable — area of tions Association annual convention in Chicago on their businesses than the traWednesday. About 67 percent ditional packages of cable teleof the country’s homes now vision channels. Still, extendhave high-speed or broadband ing cable lines into rural areas is a costly proposition for the Internet, he said. “Broadband access is ab- companies. Genachowski singled out solutely key in helping us recover from the terrible eco- Cox Communications Inc. and nomic situation of the last few Comcast Corp. for being leadyears — and making sure we ers in rolling out broadband. have sustainable growth,” said This year, Comcast committed Genachowski, who heads the to making broadband Interagency that serves as watchdog net more widely available and more affordable as part of its of the public airwaves. Genachowski announced agreement with the FCC to win that he would form a task force approval of its takeover of meof government and industry dia giant NBC Universal. Los Angeles Times

Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

FRIDAY June 24 WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers the fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the requirements of ODOT’s construction specifications. Registration required; $79; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

SATURDAY June 25 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Advance reregistration is required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY June 27 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. WORRIED ABOUT MAKING HOUSE PAYMENTS?: Learn what to do if you fall behind. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541318-7506, ext. 109.

TUESDAY June 28 POWER NETWORKING FOR BUSINESS SUCCESS: Learn effective ways to create positive first impressions and establish immediate rapport; $25 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members; $45 for others; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org.

WEDNESDAY June 29 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Prices rise faster in May, raising fears of stagflation By Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee Los Angeles Times

WASHINGTON — Higher prices seeped from the gas pump into the broader U.S. economy in May, adding new hurdles for the sluggish recovery and the government’s options for boosting it. The combination of a stagnant economy and rising inflation led some economists to worry that the country might be headed toward a repeat of the 1970s phenomenon of stagflation, which hobbled growth for years. Wednesday’s Labor Department report rattled financial markets already spooked by the worsening debt situation in Greece and raised the specter that the Federal Reserve might have to raise interest rates sooner than expected to blunt inflation pressures. The report helped accelerate the recent slide in the stock markets. The Dow Jones industrial average plummeted 178.84 points, or nearly 1.5 percent. Economists cautioned that inflation is volatile and could sink in coming months if gasoline prices continue their recent downward trend. But for a nation still struggling to shake off the effects of the deep recession, the prospect of higher prices for clothing, hotel rooms and a host of goods and services while wages remain flat could open up another pothole on the road to recovery. “It complicates efforts to deal with the economy,” said Gary Schlossberg, senior economist at Wells Capital Management in San Francisco. “I don’t want to jump the gun. I don’t think we’re at stagflation. But it certainly is an issue that bears watching.” Consumer prices rose 0.2 percent last month, the smallest increase in six months, as lower gasoline prices helped keep

The Associated Press ile photo

A customer shops for dairy products at a Superior Grocers store in Los Angeles in May. Consumers paid more for food, cars and clothing in May, though overall consumer prices rose by the smallest amount in six months. overall costs down, the Labor Department said Wednesday. But core inflation — which reflects prices of goods other than food and energy — was 0.3 percent, the highest since July 2008. That helped push up overall consumer prices 3.6 percent over the last 12 months. Chris Rupkey, chief financial economist for the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi in New York, called the new data “unsettling” and predicted that they would increase pressure on the Fed to start raising near-zero interest rates. The news may end any efforts that the nation’s central bank might have been contemplating to further spur the slow recovery. “A couple of months ago, they said, ‘Don’t worry about food and energy, focus on the core.’ Now some of the food and energy cost is affecting the price of other goods,” Rupkey said. Energy prices declined 1 per-

OSU-CASCADES

cent in May, the first drop in nearly a year, aided by a 2 percent drop in gasoline prices that had been sky high. But food prices continued their rise in May, up 0.4 percent, the same as in April. The increase in core inflation in May was spurred by higher prices for clothing, new vehicles, hotel rooms and recreation. Core inflation was 0.2 percent in April. Although rising inflation can develop into a problem, a small dose isn’t necessarily bad, economists said. It could, for instance, help raise the value of real estate while effectively making money cheaper, which could increase spending, said Vincent Reinhart, a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and former Fed official. “You’re not going to get a central bank to applaud an increase in inflation, but you’re also not going to make them real nervous if inflation’s below their expectations,” Reinhart said.

Matt Shinderman | Faculty

2001–2011

Natural Resources

CELEBRATING

10

YEARS AS CENTRAL OREGON’S

UNIVERSITY

NEWS OF RECORD PERMITS City of Bend

Tennant Family Limited Partner, 2320 N.W. Lolo, $264,324 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19702 Harvard, $280,707 Charles H. Douthit, 2269 N.W. High Lakes, $238,614 Jeana L. Persson, 1345 N.W. Hartford, $151,958 Deschutes Brewery, 901 S.W. Simpson, $2,120,000 Chet Antonsen, 61711 S.E. Rigel, $200,243 Tennant Family Limited Partner, 2133 N.W. Clearwater, $140,857 Meadow Phase 2 LLC, 19749 Clarion, $248,676 Leigh Ann Arthur, 60966 Woods Valley, $284,589 Deschutes County

Mike Plunkett, 64395 Deschutes Market Road, Bend, $174,306.59 James E. Bohan, 10088 Juniper Glen Circle, Redmond, $258,336.54 Larry J. Spires Insurance LTD, 15355 Windigo Trail, Sisters, $119,605.10 Daniel J. and Mary Sweeney, 53464 Bridge Drive, La Pine, $280,223.10 City of Redmond

Bruce Brown, 480 N.W. 16th Place, $230,472 Matt Wittmer, 1112 N.W. Redwood Place, $157,207 School District #2J, 1314 S.W. Kalama Ave., $1,198,769 School District #2, 209 N.W. 10th St., $802,344 Robert L. and Connie L. Housman, 3655 S.W. Hillcrest Court, $194,628

I am Naturally Smart

At OSU-Cascades, we are naturally smart. hat means more than just appreciating what we have in Central Oregon. It means working to better understand — and maintain — the critical balance between people and their environment. Matt Shinderman takes his Natural Resources students into our vast natural laboratory, giving them hands-on experience managing ecosystems through a holistic, multi-disciplinary approach.

Learn more at OSUcascades.edu Central Oregon’s university.


L

Inside

Two Columbia River ports considered for coal terminals, see Page C6.

OBITUARIES Al Schwimmer, smuggled U.S. planes to Israel, see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011

IN BRIEF Release hearing delayed in rape trial A hearing to consider changing release conditions for a Bend man accused of rape was delayed Tuesday. Authorities want a Deschutes County judge to modify his release conditions because of several violations. Thomas Bray, who was arrested by Bend Police on Feb. 26 on suspicion of raping a Bend woman, allegedly has violated his release conditions three times by allowing his GPS tracking bracelet to run out of batteries and traveling outside his agreed-upon boundaries. Bray’s hearing has not yet been rescheduled. His trial is set for Oct. 18.

REDMOND’S 2011-12 FINANCIAL PLAN

Council approves budget; funding to nonprofits cut

Several campsites at Big Bend to close Several Big Bend Campground campsites will close starting Tuesday while construction takes place at Bowman Dam. Six of the 15 campsites will be closed while crews install a 6-foot high concrete parapet wall on top of the dam, located 20 miles southeast of Prineville. Crews will also raise a portion of the spillway walls by two feet for flood control. The construction will last through Nov. 1. The nine campsites that remain open through construction are accessible to those with physical disabilities. For more information, call 541-389-6541.

Traffic to shift for Highway 97 project Starting Friday, southbound traffic passing through the Lava Butte Project on U.S. Highway 97 will be switched to a permanent outside lane. Currently, southbound traffic is diverted through a temporary single lane on the inside of the highway. The construction is expected to be completed later this summer and will eventually provide two-lane travel routes in each direction between Lava Butte and the Sunriver interchange.

Bend seeking safety committee members The city of Bend is seeking applicants for its Traffic Safety Advisory Committee. Members of the committee make recommendations on traffic safety improvements and safety programs and are appointed to the committee by the City Council. Currently, there are two open positions. Applicants must be residents of Bend and must apply by 5 p.m. July 8. For applications and questions, call 541-388-5505 or visit www.ci.bend.or.us. Those interested can also contact the city at 710 N.W. Wall St., Bend, OR 97701. — Bulletin staff reports

News of Record on Page C2.

Bill would require warrant for device tracking By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

Prineville police seek driver in hit-and-run Police are searching for a driver who struck a pedestrian in Prineville and fled the scene. Authorities say that around 7:10 a.m. Tuesday, a 31-year-old Prineville woman was walking eastbound on Northeast Laughlin Road when she was struck from behind by a vehicle that had left the roadway. The woman was thrown several feet and suffered minor injuries and was treated at Pioneer Memorial Hospital and released. The vehicle fled without stopping. The vehicle was described as a white sedan and would most likely have damage to the passenger-side mirror. Anyone with any information about the incident is asked to call the Prineville Police Department at 541-447-4168.

C

OREGON Residents sue state over drifting herbicides, see Page C3.

WASHINGTON — Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., introduced legislation Wednesday that would make police get a search warrant before they can obtain information about an individual’s location from the person’s cellphone in a nonemergency situation. Many electronic devices, including cellphones and global positioning systems, can track the user’s whereabouts. Under the Geolocation Privacy and Surveillance Act, law enforcement agencies would have to obtain a warrant, much as they do for a wiretap, before they could compel private companies to turn over a customer’s geolocation data. The Oregon Supreme Court has ruled that electronic tracking is the legal equivalent of a search, and that police must first get a warrant. However, this ruling does not apply to federal agents, as a national law would. “New tools require new rules, and the laws have yet to be updated to keep up with this technical revolution,” Wyden said as he announced the legislation alongside co-sponsor Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah. “We’d like to create a process where government agencies can go to court, show probable cause, and get a warrant to obtain geolocation information, the same way they were getting warrants for wiretaps.”

IN CONGRESS

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Lisa Burbidge, the executive director of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon, stands in the game room at the organization’s Redmond branch Wednesday. Despite cuts to funding, the branch will remain open. Summer programs start Monday.

City focuses on infrastructure, public safety and water; groups say they will make do with less By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

REDMOND — The 2011-12 budget for the city of Redmond was approved Tuesday night, calling for cuts to staff raises and infrastructure projects, a restructuring of employee medical plans and a reduction in donations to nonprofit groups. The City Council passed the budget by a 4-2 vote. Mayor George Endicott called the budget “austere” and said it provides the most crucial services needed despite the reduction in spending. “The way I look at the city and budget and the way we operate is we have certain things we need to (fund),” Endicott said, pointing out the need for water service, public safety and infrastructure. “All of those are required that we do.” The final budget is $70.7 million with a general fund of $14.1 million. According to Finance and Budget Manag-

er Jason Neff, the city made $1.6 million in cuts to spending but will still use $400,000 from reserve funds. Donations to nonprofits were cut by $28,000 from last year, prompting the only public comment on the budget before the vote.

‘Invest in our youth’ Lisa Burbidge, executive director of Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon, spoke before the vote, asking councilors to reconsider cutting a $15,000 donation the club received last year. “We need to invest in our youth now,” Burbidge said. “The need is great.” Despite her plea, the budget was approved without the funding. Also losing out on funding are United Way Central Oregon 211, Redmond Masonic Lodge and Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center. See Redmond / C5

Donations cut In a budget approved Tuesday night by the Redmond City Council, some donations to nonprofits in 2011-12 were eliminated, one was reduced and another was unaffected.

ELIMINATED • Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon ......................... $15,000 • Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center ............................ $3,000 • Redmond Masonic Lodge............................. $1,500 • United Way Central Oregon 211................................. $1,000

REDUCED • Economic Development for Central Oregon .....was $22,500, now $15,000

UNAFFECTED • Redmond Economic Development Inc. ........$50,000

Victim likely linked to home invaders, police say By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office expects there may be “more to the story” in a reported home invasion robbery in La Pine early Wednesday. At 12:40 a.m., deputies were called to a house on Holgate Court to investigate a reported robbery.

The man living at the house said three people broke into his home. One member of the group pepper-sprayed him to incapacitate him, while a second pointed a gun at him. The invaders took multiple firearms and other items and fled in a dark-colored SUV, possibly a Jeep Cherokee, the man said.

Capt. Marc Mills said detectives didn’t accomplish as much as hoped while investigating the incident Wednesday, but have ruled out the possibility that the victim was selected at random. He said the Sheriff’s Office should be able to release more details on the case within a few days. “We believe it’s isolated,

Redmond July 4 show will go on By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

Redmond’s Fourth of July fireworks show is a go for this year, and the financial problems that have pestered the annual display for the past few years appear to be solved. Mike Moore, owner of High Desert Aggregate & Paving, informed the Redmond Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday — the final day donations could be received — that his company would make up any shortfall in the annual show’s $7,000 price tag. On Tuesday, the company was the largest contributor with a $2,500 promise. As of Tuesday night, the show

was still $3,000 short, but Eric Sande, executive director of the chamber, said community response on the final day of donations was strong. A contract needed to be signed with the company providing the fireworks by the end of business on Wednesday. That’s when Moore and his company stepped in. Sande said the total donation from the company could end up being around $5,000 when all donations are counted. The contribution not only saves the show for this year, but the company has put its name on future donations. “They called us (on Wednesday) and said, ‘We will write a

check for whatever you don’t get,’ ” Sande said. “The neat thing is that Mike wants to be the sponsor for the future too. We’re very impressed.” Sande also credited other donors. “The community has also stepped up with donations,” he said. “It’s been unbelievable.” Fireworks will be launched from the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center at dusk July 4. Phone messages left for Moore by The Bulletin were not returned. Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

and that there should be no alarm to the public that we have a group of people running around doing home invasions,” Mills said. “We believe that the victim has had past associations to individuals that are connected to these suspects, or direct knowledge of the suspect.” See Invaders / C5

Includes exceptions for rescuers, parents The new law contains exceptions for situations where a person’s life may be in danger. For example, rescuers can use tracking data to find a lost hiker. Parents could give permission for their child to be tracked via cellphone, or if a device is reported stolen, police could — with the owner’s permission — access its location electronically. The proposed legislation would also help clear up the current ambiguity regarding geolocation for police created by conflicting legal opinions, Wyden said. Without a sufficient legal framework on the issue, it is hard to strike a balance between citizens’ expectations of privacy and legitimate law enforcement uses, he said. Chaffetz said he anticipates broad support for the measure from the technology industry. “(Technology companies) are calling and screaming for clarity in the law,” he said. “The last thing that technology companies want is for people to be afraid of their phones.” See Geolocation / C5

OREGON YOUTH CHALLENGE

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Uriel Gerardo Olivas, 17, center, prepares with other cadets of the Oregon Youth Challenge to enter their graduation ceremony at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds & Expo Center in Redmond on Wednesday morning.


C2 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 6:54 a.m. June 13, in the 2000 block of Northwest Shevlin Park Road. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 8:20 a.m. June 13, in the 1300 block of Northwest Albany Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 10:17 a.m. June 13, in the 100 block of Northeast Butler Market Road. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 10:27 a.m. June 13, in the 100 block of Northeast Bend River Mall Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 12:36 p.m. June 13, in the 20000 block of Old Rock House Road. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 1:10 p.m. June 13, in the 1400 block of Northeast First Street. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 2 p.m. June 13, in the 400 block of Southwest Powerhouse Road. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 6:09 p.m. June 13, in the area of the Old Mill footbridge. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 10:51 p.m. June 13, in the 63400 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 5:01 a.m. June 14, in the area of Aaron Way and Brentwood Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items valued at approximately $1,000 stolen at 7:45 a.m. June 14, in the 63300 block of Lavacrest Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a tree was reported at 7:49 a.m. June 14, in the 20200 block of Knightsbridge Place. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 8:04 a.m. June 14, in the 20300 block of Sonata Way. Redmond Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 11:03 p.m. June 14, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:13 p.m. June 14, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:55 p.m. June 14, in the 100 block of Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 4:30 p.m. June 14, in the 900 block of Northwest Canal Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 3:23 p.m. June 14, in the

900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 1:08 p.m. June 14, in the 300 block of Northwest Eighth Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:04 p.m. June 14, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:41 p.m. June 14, in the area of Southwest Veterans Way and South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:42 a.m. June 14, in the 300 block of Northwest Seventh Street. Theft — Prescription drugs were reported stolen at 9:57 a.m. June 14, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:32 a.m. June 14, in the 400 block of Northwest 16th Place.

House votes to trim welfare benefits The Associated Press SALEM — The state House has voted to roll back benefits for welfare recipients. The House voted 52-2 on Wednesday to approve the bill, which was written to help balance the budget for the Department of Human Services. The bill allows the state to stop new enrollments in the Parents as Scholars program,

IN THE LEGISLATURE which helps pay college expenses for 1 percent of families on the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program. It also suspends payments for families that are transitioning

Today is Thursday, June 16, the 167th day of 2011. There are 198 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On June 16, 1911, the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Co. was incorporated in New York State; it later became known as International Business Machines, or IBM. ON THIS DATE In 1567, Mary, Queen of Scots, was imprisoned in Lochleven Castle in Scotland. (She escaped almost a year later but ended up imprisoned again.) In 1858, accepting the Illinois Republican Party’s nomination for the U.S. Senate, Abraham Lincoln said the slavery issue had to be resolved, declaring, “A house divided against itself cannot stand.” In 1903, Ford Motor Co. was incorporated. In 1932, President Herbert Hoover and Vice President Charles Curtis were renominated at the Republican national convention in Chicago. In 1933, the National Industrial Recovery Act became law. (It was later struck down by the Supreme Court.) In 1941, National Airport (now Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport) opened for business with a ceremony attended by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1959, actor George Reeves, TV’s “Superman,” was found dead of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound in the bedroom of his Beverly Hills, Calif., home; he was 45. In 1963, the world’s first female space traveler, Valentina Tereshkova, was launched into orbit by the Soviet Union aboard Vostok 6. In 1970, Kenneth Gibson of Newark, N.J., became the first black politician elected mayor of a major Northeast city. Chicago Bears running back Brian Piccolo, 26, died at a New York hos-

off of welfare. Demand for temporary cash assistance has gone up 65 percent since 2007. The changes would save the state about $11 million. Advocates for low-income families hope the economy will rebound so the services can revert to their current design. The measure now goes to the Senate.

The Associated Press PORTLAND — The city of Portland was forced to temporarily take a key water supply off line after a 21-year-old man caught on video admitted urinating in a city reservoir. The Oregonian reported that Portland police responded early Wednesday but did not cite the man or his friends. Video surveillance of the Mt. Tabor reservoir and police and Portland Water Bureau reports will be submitted to the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office for possible criminal charges. City officials said about 7.8 million gallons of drinking water will be discarded because of the incident at a cost of about $36,000. Covering Portland’s openair reservoirs has been a politically charged topic in recent years, and the city Water Bureau is working to comply with federal regulations.

NORTHWEST WELCOMES ENDANGERED LEOPARDS

Prineville Police Department

Burglary — A burglary, theft and criminal mischief were reported at 12:42 p.m. June 14, in the area of Southwest Cliffside Lane. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:25 p.m. June 14, in the area of North Main Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Bradley Roy Rumbarger, 53, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:14 p.m. June 14, in the 200 block of West Black Crater Avenue in Sisters. Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 4:25 p.m. June 14, in the 18500 block of Century Drive in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:59 p.m. June 14, in the 100 block of East Washington Avenue in Sisters. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 1:35 p.m. June 14, in the 400 block of West U.S. Highway 20. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:56 p.m. June 14, in the 56700 block of Stellar Drive in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:40 a.m. June 14, in the area of Big Lava Lake Campground. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:02 a.m. June 14, in the 15700 block of Burgess Road in La Pine. Criminal mischief — Damage to solar yard lights was reported at 6:32 a.m. June 14, in the 16800 block of Downey Road in Bend. Oregon State Police

Theft — Steel traps were reported stolen at 2:30 p.m. June 14, in the area of Paisley. Criminal mischief — Damage to a fence was reported at 2:45 p.m. June 14, in the 6900 block of U.S. Highway 26 in Madras. DUII — John Robert Montchalin III, 26, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:16 a.m. June 15, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 141.

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Pipeline workers find skull with bullet hole The Associated Press KLAMATH FALLS — Natural gas pipeline workers in Southern Oregon have found a skull with a bullet hole that may be the remains of a California man missing since 2008. The Herald and News in Klamath Falls reported that Ruby Pipeline workers found the skull last week. Lake County Deputy Sheriff Chuck Pore said DNA analysis will be needed to positively identify the remains. He said the family of the

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y pital after battling cancer. In 1978, President Jimmy Carter and Panamanian leader Omar Torrijos exchanged the instruments of ratification for the Panama Canal treaties. TEN YEARS AGO Face to face for the first time, President George W. Bush and Russian President Vladimir Putin pledged during a meeting in Slovenia to deepen their nations’ bonds and to explore the possibility of compromise on U.S. missile defense plans. City lawmakers elected Klaus Wowereit Berlin’s first openly gay mayor.

dock is 72. Songwriter Lamont Dozier is 70. Rhythm-and-blues singer Eddie Levert is 69. Actress Joan Van Ark is 68. Actor Geoff Pierson is 62. Rhythmand-blues singer James Smith (The Stylistics) is 61. Boxing Hall of Famer Roberto Duran is 60. Pop singer Gino Vannelli is 59. Actress Laurie Metcalf is 56. Model-actress Jenny Shimizu is 44. Actor James Patrick Stuart is

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missing man was notified and asked to provide a sample for analysis.

May contain adult content & launguage

Suicide note The victim’s name was not released, but Pore said he was from the San Francisco Bay area and abandoned his vehicle west of Renner Lake in southern Lake County in August 2008. Authorities found a suicide note with the vehicle. DNA analysis was expected to take several months.

In 1963, Soviets launch first woman into orbit The Associated Press

Urination costs Portland $36K in lost water

43. Actor Clifton Collins Jr. is 41. Actor John Cho is 39. Actor Eddie Cibrian is 38. Actress China (chee-nah) Shavers is 34. Actress Missy Peregrym is 29. Actress Olivia Hack is 28. Singer Diana DeGarmo (“American Idol”) is 24. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me.” — Dudley Field Malone, American attorney (1882-1950)

& Diaper Drive” Saturday, June 18th 8 am to 2 pm “BEND TAKING CARE OF ITS OWN” Coldwell Banker Morris is hosting The Mother of All Garage Sales and Diaper Drive with all the diapers and proceeds going to The Bend Community Center and the homeless community that they serve.

5 WAYS YOU CAN HELP: 1. Donate a package of diapers* 2. Donate garage sale items to be sold on June 18th * 3. Shop at the Garage Sale 4. Eat lunch or dinner at Pastini Pastaria and mention the Coldwell Banker Morris Pasta-thon on Mon. or Tues., June 20th & 21st 5. Direct donation to Bend Community Center See BCC Garage Sale Video at http://www.youtube.com/coldwellbankermorris#p/a/u/0/YMG-Q9uWf M

*All donations are being accepted at Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate at 486 SW Bluff Drive in the Old Mill District or call with any questions 541-382-4123 For tax purposes, we can give you a receipt for your donation.

FIVE YEARS AGO The House rejected a timetable for pulling U.S. forces out of Iraq, 256-153. In Iraq, three 101st Airborne Division soldiers were killed in an attack while two others were abducted (their mutilated bodies were found three days later). In Martinez, Calif., Susan Polk, 48, was convicted of second-degree murder for stabbing to death her millionaire psychotherapist husband, Felix Polk, whom she had first met as a 14year-old girl in treatment. “Lonelygirl15,” a fictitious video blogger played by actress Jessica Lee Rose, made her online debut. ONE YEAR AGO After meeting with President Barack Obama at the White House, BP Chairman Carl-Henric Svanberg announced the oil giant was establishing a $20 billion claim fund and suspending dividends as he insisted, “We care about the small people.” Movie director Ronald Neame (“The Poseidon Adventure”) died in Los Angeles at age 99. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Bill Cobbs is 76. Author Joyce Carol Oates is 73. Country singer Billy “Crash” Crad-

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 C3

O I B

7 sue state, blaming herbicide drift for plant harm, human illnesses

Mother accused of murdering girl, 11 PORTLAND — An Oregon woman accused of strangling her 11-year-old daughter has been arrested and charged with murder. The Oregonian reported that 38-year-old Kristina Buckley was arrested Wednesday after she was released from medical care following the June 2 death of her daughter, Cecilia Buckley, at their home in suburban Sherwood. According to court records, police responding to a report of an injured child found Kristina Buckley locked in a bathroom inside the home, holding a kitchen knife with self-inflicted cuts to her wrists and neck. Her husband had just arrived home and was trying to revive their daughter. Kristina Buckley was being held without bail at the Washington County Jail in Hillsboro.

House approves free tuition for foster kids SALEM — The state House has voted to allow former foster children to attend Oregon public universities and community colleges for free. Lawmakers approved the bill on a 49-9 vote Wednesday. It would apply to people under 25 years old attending universities, community colleges and Oregon Health and Science University. It is co-sponsored by Democratic Rep. Michael Dembrow of Portland and Republican Rep. Matt Wingard of Wilsonville. Proponents say the measure would go a long way toward helping young people get a comfortable start in adulthood after aging out of the foster care system. But others call it a handout and question how the state would pay for it. The measure now goes to the Senate.

Campus police bill goes to Kitzhaber SALEM — Public universities in Oregon may establish a campus police force — possibly armed — under a bill that cleared the Legislature on Tuesday. A spokeswoman for Gov. John Kitzhaber says he’s not against it but wants to make sure all is in order before he signs it into law. The Oregonian reported the University of Oregon requested the bill and is likely to be the first of seven campuses to ask the state Board of Higher Education for permission to hire police. — From wire reports

The Associated Press

Bob Pennell / The (Medford) Mail Tribune

Architectural designer Ken Snelling looks over volunteers’ progress on an apartment for Army Pfc. Cody Smith on Monday. More than a dozen businesses are helping build the apartment free of charge for the 20-year-old Smith, whose legs were paralyzed by a gunshot wound in Afghanistan.

Community builds new home for paralyzed vet By Paul Fattig The (Medford) Mail Tribune

RUCH — Albert Obrist didn’t hesitate for a second when asked why he is volunteering his time and expertise for a stranger. “Anybody willing to go into the service for their country deserves a lot of respect when they come back, especially in a situation like this,” said Obrist, 28, a service technician for Spring Air Inc. of Jacksonville. “We are more than happy to help out,” he said Monday morning. Spring Air is among more than a dozen local small businesses helping to build, free of charge, a new studio apartment with wheelchair access and other amenities for Army Pfc. Cody Smith, 20, whose legs were paralyzed by a rifle bullet in Afghanistan this past winter. The apartment is being built into the soldier’s childhood home, a classic Craftsman-style house constructed just before World War I. A 2009 graduate of South Medford High School where he was a standout football player, Cody is the son of Chris and Vicki Smith of Ruch. “Cody sacrificed a whole bunch for us as Americans,” said volunteer Ken Snelling, an architectural designer. “Anything we can do to help is great.” Since it was first envisioned late in May, volunteers with expertise and materials have poured into the project, said Army veteran Rush Behnke, a Medford building contractor organizing the effort with Snelling. The pace picked up even more speed following media coverage in recent weeks. “We are probably approaching $40,000 now,” Behnke said of

contributed expertise, labor and materials. “And we are just getting started. This project will be worth well over $100,000 by the time we wrap it up. And it is all being donated. “Most of the people doing the work are the small businesses,” he added. “They are really stepping up.”

Help through hoops The Jackson County Building Department has been extremely understanding in working with the volunteer effort, Snelling noted. “They are bending over backwards to help us get through the hoops,” he said. More than two dozen volunteers worked on the project Saturday, doing work in preparation for receiving a permit. The goal is to complete the work within two weeks once the building permit is approved, Behnke said. Saturday’s work crew included 11 service people from Spring Air, whose contributions, including a new gas garage heater, were worth more than $20,000, Behnke said. “The work wasn’t supposed to start for at least another week, but we ended up going gangbusters, everybody was jumping in, wanting to work,” Snelling said.

Shot in Afghanistan Cody Smith is now at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs hospital in Palo Alto, Calif., where he has been undergoing physical therapy and other medical treatment for the past two months.

A soldier in the 101st Airborne Division, he was shot in the lower back on Feb. 17, the bullet shattering a vertebra. The insurgent attack on his unit came during Operation Northern Avalanche in Kunar Province in northern Afghanistan. The division is based at Fort Campbell, Ky. “It’s huge what they are doing, overwhelming,” his father said in an earlier interview. Their son hopes to return home by Aug. 9, his 21st birthday, Chris said. Monday morning found Obrist and a co-worker completing the finishing touches on the heating/ cooling system put in Saturday. “We’re getting the last of it tied up today,” Obrist said. Plans call for the existing family room, bath and dining area in the home to be remodeled to create the one-bedroom studio apartment. The volunteers already have stripped that area down to the studs. Carpenters, electricians, plumbers, painters, roofers, drywall workers, stone masons, concrete pourers and other volunteers are lined up, ready to roll up their sleeves and go to work once the permit is approved, Behnke and Snelling said. “We aren’t quite sure what else we need because people have been so generous,” Snelling said. “But we will need more donations for concrete.” The Knife River Co. has donated 20 yards of concrete for the ramp, patio and back porch.

EUGENE — Some rural Oregon residents have filed a lawsuit against the state over rules they say protect forest and farm landowners who spray herbicides that can drift over to neighboring property. The seven people filing the lawsuit this week in Lane County Circuit Court in Eugene live in Western Oregon. Three are in the Blachly area; two are near Sublimity, a little east of Salem; and two live near Walton east of Mapleton on Highway 126, The Register-Guard reported. Their complaint alleges that laws passed by the state Legislature in 1993 give them no legal recourse in the courts from the periodic episodes of herbicide drift from neighboring landowners. Gary Hale and Jan Wroncy of Blachly say the problems with herbicide drift go back decades. They’ve lived and farmed organically on seven acres since purchasing the land in 1987. Their son, Forest Wroncy-Hale, is the third plaintiff from Blachly. Their property is surrounded by privately owned forested slopes frequently treated with herbicides in an effort to knock down weeds so that tree saplings can quickly grow, according to the lawsuit.

Tainted water Hale said that there are times of year when the irrigation water they take from Lake Creek actually inhibits the growth of their plants because it contains herbicides that have drifted into the creek from where the products have been applied. “The plant growth just slows tremendously,” Hale said. All seven landowners al-

lege that herbicides from forest and farm operations regularly drift onto their property, causing a range of problems from human illness to damage to the plants and trees they grow and the death of wildlife. The complaint, filed by Eugene attorney David Force, alleges the state statutes collectively known as the “Right to Farm and Right to Forest Act” give owners of large timber and agricultural parcels immunity from lawsuits for trespass or nuisance, two types of civil claims that have been recognized by both British and American courts for centuries. “These cases go back to the 1600s in England,” Force said. “They’re recognized everywhere, including in Oregon.”

‘Injured’ property The complaint said the Oregon Constitution, which went into effect in 1859, gives people the right to sue when they or their property have been “injured,” and prohibits the state from enacting laws that deprive people of that legal option. The more recent statutes say that because farming and forestry are critical to the state’s economic welfare, farmers and foresters can’t be sued in trespass or nuisance cases unless their practices result in damage to a commercial crop, or in someone’s death or serious injury. The state Department of Justice declined comment on the suit. The office generally doesn’t comment on litigation until it submits court filings, spokesman Tony Green said.

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C4 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Choose the least harm for students

T

he 2011-12 school year promised to be a bleak enough one already in Redmond. And then this week the school district’s teachers union dug in its heels and rejected the dis-

trict’s latest contract proposal. The two remain far apart on everything from the length of the contract itself to what if any more sacrifices teachers or the district should make for the coming year.

The school board has approved the district’s 2011-12 budget. The total is $114 million with a general fund of $52.6 million. Money for instruction, which includes teacher salaries, is $30.1 million. There are $8 million in cuts embedded in those totals that the district still must reach to balance its budget. How the district gets there is the $8 million question. Clearly, something must give. If the district must revert to the current contract next year, it must proceed as if teachers will be paid for a 190-day work year. There will be raises for teachers both for time in the system and for educational level, as well as cost-ofliving increases. Given the size of the district’s shortfall, the district would run out of money well before the end of the school year. It could lay off more teachers — 60 already have gone — or it could simply close the doors when the money runs out. It is illegal for Redmond or any other school district in Oregon to run in the red. We believe something will give, though just what remains to be seen.

Redmond school district employees, all of them, already have seen salaries rise far more slowly than they had expected just a few years ago. That’s not pleasant. They’ve seen friends leave, and they’ve seen the school year shortened. Nor are disagreements limited to discussions of salaries and working conditions. Teachers want a one-year contract; district officials prefer the longer period of certainty gained by a two-year agreement. That means there’s still wiggle room, both for teachers and for the district, and that’s good. It’s good because in the end, if the two sides cannot work something out, it’s their students who will suffer. In reality, students, like teachers, administrators and classified staff, already have suffered, though their pain has not been monetary. As both sides return to their respective drawing boards, they must keep that in mind. Students are the single reason school districts exist and teachers have jobs. Whatever agreement is reached should be crafted to cause students the least possible harm.

11 not a magic number

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t sounds good on the face of it. Large state agencies should have no more than one manager for every 11 employees. It sounds so good to most members of the Oregon House of Representatives, in fact, that recently they overwhelmingly approved a measure what would push the state in that direction. Yet House Bill 2020 is seriously flawed, so much so that if it isn’t defeated or altered in the Senate, Gov. John Kitzhaber should veto it. Here’s the problem: There’s absolutely no valid reason for the 11/1 employee/manager ratio, except that the state of Texas, which has such a limit, uses it. In fact, the ratio may make sense for some large agencies; for others, not so much. HB 2020 applies only to state agencies with more than 100 employees. It requires the Department of Administrative Services to develop a plan that would attain the magic number by 2013. Then, in turn, agencies and the Legislature would use the ratio in determining agency budgets. The public employee unions which first put forth the idea and support the bill believe the state will save money as a result. In fact, Oregon’s Service Employees International Union studied Oregon agencies and found the statewide

average for agencies with over 1,000 people is one supervisory manager for each 7.7 staff. Adding in non-supervisory managers brings the ratio to 6.1 staff to 1 manager, according to the union. We’re all for cutting bureaucracy, to be sure, but to slash it simply for the sake of slashing makes no sense. We don’t know, for example, what the ideal ratio of employees to supervisor is from agency to agency. It may be far lower than 11 to 1. State police, too, tend to work in small offices scattered around Oregon. While there are larger regional offices, surely someone at smaller worksites has some management tasks, even relatively small ones. In fact, many of Oregon’s largest agencies have relatively small offices in rural parts of the state, and each one of those needs some management by someone. Rather than set an arbitrary ceiling on the number of managers Oregon agencies may have, the state should take a far more reasoned approach. It should decide how many managers are needed, office by office and agency by agency. Some may do well with more than 11 employees per manager. Others may well need a higher level of management. Both should be justified and budgets prepared accordingly.

My Nickel’s Worth Valuable Redmond field trip Stan Cherzan wondered in a June 5 letter why a Redmond school bus was spotted in Newport when school budgets are stretched so tightly. I can answer that question as the teacher responsible for the students who traveled to Newport. The bus in question transported my College Now Marine Biology students to the coast to reinforce class curriculum. The “kids” in question were junior and senior high school students challenging themselves with rigorous curriculum, many earning dual credit through Redmond High School and COCC. By taking this collegiate-level course in high school, students may earn four credits through COCC, saving approximately $350 per student. In science, we explore the difference between “fact” and “inference.” It appears that inference was the case here. An inaccurate assumption leads to a wrong conclusion. Students in this course paid field trip fees to cover their entrance and program costs. All remaining expenses (gas, driver fees, substitute teacher, scholarships, etc.) were the result of hundreds of donated hours of fundraising, not by the students, but by me, their instructor. Redmond School District did not pay a cent of the field trip costs. Cherzan wrongly states that “it is only a few dollars.” Costs of such a trip require substantial fundraising, and I have already begun to plan for next year’s trip. I am proud to teach in the Redmond School District. Providing meaningful learning experiences for my students allows me to

fulfill the district’s mission of providing “Every Child, Every Chance, Every Day.” Debi Dewey Bend

No conspiracy here Since the report of Osama bin Laden’s death, I’ve patiently awaited the conspiracy theories to raise their ugly heads, and thanks to Mike Trotta’s letter of May 22, I’ve not been disappointed. First, none of our allies, including Saudi Arabia, wanted bin Laden’s body buried in their country to become a magnet for his followers. Second, we didn’t have to “invade his body” for DNA since he was shot two times and we can assume blood was then readily available. So here’s a test for you conspiracy theorists: Only one of these “government cover-up” statements is true. (1) Area 51 is a CIA cover-up for UFOs and alien bodies. (2) The moon landing was actually faked and filmed on a Disney Studio backlot. (3) The government is aerial spraying Central Oregon residents with dangerous chemicals via contrails (why only us?). (4) The Bush administration distorted the facts, lied about WMD, and promised the war in Iraq would be paid for by oil revenues from that country (“Mission accomplished”). Please folks, turn off “Faux News,” stop listening to Rush and his ilk on talk radio, and I promise you the voices you’re hearing in your head should go away in a few days. If not, then obviously it’s the government sending messages surreptitiously over our televisions. John Poe Bend

Protect the students Recently Bend students launched a campaign about dogs at school. They made posters about dog messes on the playground and posted them all over the fence surrounding a school. Few acknowledged the children’s plea. Considering what happens across America about abducted and missing children, I have questions. Why are adult strangers allowed to be on the school grounds at our elementary schools? High schools have security guards there, but no security measures for the young children? Is our town so lax as to believe that small children cannot be abducted here? I live next to a grade school and see cars come to the back of the school playground and drivers stop and talk to children. There are gates at the playground; children can leave the school area to get into a car with anyone! I now see that children are permitted to leave campus and walk to local stores. Do their parents know? People bring dogs during school hours and recess, not only creating the piles for children to play in but also posing a biting hazard. Predators can lure a child with a dog, the same as with a bag of candy! I hope nothing ever happens to any children, anywhere! I wish those in charge would open their eyes to dangers our society faces. Do school faculty, city officials, police or anyone think it’s OK for that not-so-innocent adult who has a cute dog, instead of a bag of candy, to mingle with children on their playground? Steve Cordle Bend

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Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

In Saudi Arabia, the camel’s nose is poking under the wheel By Mau reen Dowd New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — guess you don’t get to be the richest man in Saudi Arabia without being able to sum up a situation quickly. When I called him in Riyadh on Tuesday night, the Arabian Warren Buffett, as the billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal bin Abdulaziz al-Saud is known, was quite definite in his views on allowing Saudi women to drive. “We’re not calling for diplomatic relations with Israel,” he said. “We’re just asking for ladies to drive the car. Please, give me a break. Even in North Korea, women can drive. It’s a joke. The issue of women driving can happen tomorrow morning because it’s not really an issue at all. Frankly speaking, we need strong political leadership to do it and get it behind us. What are we waiting for?” Of course, Prince Alwaleed is a pillar of modernity in the medieval kingdom. In his skyscraper office in Riyadh, women in tight jeans and suits rule the

I

roost, working side by side with men, something that is forbidden elsewhere. Government offices in Saudi Arabia are segregated by gender. The prince made a point of hiring a woman, born in the holy city of Mecca, and training her to be the pilot of his private jet. In 1990, 47 women from the Saudi intelligentsia were so inspired by U.S. troops — and female soldiers — gathering in the kingdom for the first President Bush’s war against Saddam that they went for a joy ride to protest Saudi Arabia being the only country where women can’t drive. The fundamentalist clerics went into overdrive, branding the women “whores” and “harlots.” They lost their jobs and were harassed. Their passports were revoked and they had to sign papers agreeing not to talk about the drive. When I interviewed some of them 12 years later, they were only beginning to shake off the vengeful backlash. For all the highfalutin talk of George and Laura Bush about how W.’s wars

MAUREEN DOWD would help expand the rights of women in the Middle East, there’s only so much pressure America can put on Saudi Arabia about letting women drive without jeopardizing the flow of oil that lets people drive here. President Barack Obama did not even mention Saudi Arabia in his big speech about the Middle East last month. Driving may not be as important an issue as the end of male guardianship, but it is the high-octane nexus where our hypocrisies interlock. The latest drive to drive started last month, a Twitter and Facebook feminist blossoming in the Arab Spring, following a Saudi “Day of Rage” in March where nobody showed up except the police.

King Abdullah passes for progressive in Saudi Arabia. (He just passed a decree allowing women, instead of men, to sell women lingerie.) Frightened by the uprisings all around him, he snuffed out wisps of democratic protests the Saudi way: with his checkbook. After the “Day of Rage” fizzled, he rewarded his complacent citizens with $130 billion in salary increases, new housing and financing for religious organizations. But then a 32-year-old single mother named Manal al-Sharif, an Internet consultant for the state-run oil company Aramco, posted a video of herself on YouTube, driving in a black abaya in the Eastern Province city of Al-Khobar. She told CNN that the last straw was one night when she was trying to get home to her 5-year-old son and she couldn’t catch a cab or find her brother to pick her up or get away from male drivers harassing her as she walked alone. “I’m a grown-up woman,” she said, adding: “And I was crying like a kid in the street because I couldn’t find someone to

pick me up to take me back home.” She was put in jail for a week and forced to sign a document agreeing not to talk to the press or continue her calls for reform. This had a chilling effect on women. But, this week, Reem al-Faisal, a princess, activist and Jidda photographer who is the granddaughter of the late King Faisal and the niece of the Foreign Minister Saud al-Faisal, spoke out, writing in The Arab News that “it is truly tragic that we have to fight for such an essential yet mediocre right” and be treated as “eternal minors.” She suggested that women simply drive pollution-free camels. Except then men would “deny women camel-driving rights, too. “Then we will have to content ourselves with taking the backseat of the camels or start looking for other options — mules maybe?” Maureen Dowd is a columnist for The New York Times.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 C5

O    Janice L. Brown

D N Jean Ann Notdurft, of Redmond Dec. 13, 1941 - June 12, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, (541) 382-0903, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A celebration of Jean’s life will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Shepherd Of The Hills Lutheran Church - Memorial Fund, 386 N. Fir Street, PO Box 1056, Sisters, OR 97759, www.shepherdofthehills.com

Peter Thomas Kepler, of Bend Mar. 7, 1950 - June 6, 2011 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592; www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Memorial Services with Inurnment in Ft. Snelling, MN. will be held at a future date by his family. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt St., Bend, OR 97701.

Robert "Sparky" Howard Slye, of Bend March 23, 1934 - June 11, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: Services will be held at a later date in Eugene, Oregon.https://sites.google.c ome/site/roberthslye Contributions may be made to:

Dorenbeckers Children's Hospital, Portland, Oregon, The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation or Partners In Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Redmond Continued from C1 Economic Development for Central Oregon is having its donation level cut from $22,500 to $15,000. Burbidge said the organization would continue to operate in Redmond despite the cut, which made up approximately 8 percent of the organization’s budget. “We will continue to operate in Redmond with our summer program starting on Monday,” she said. “We just have to meet and decide what the trade-off is. We’ve been a part of the Redmond budget since 2001, and we had anticipated and hoped we would be part of the budget this year as well. Still, the city has been a good partner, and while we’re sad we don’t have the financial support, we will continue to work with them.” Ron Terry, secretary for the Redmond Masonic Lodge, wasn’t in attendance at the meeting but said losing a $1,500 donation will likely affect two programs.

May 2, 1925 - June 8, 2011 Janice was born in Baker (City), Oregon, to William (Pops), and Arlene Clark. After a fire that destroyed their sheep ranch, they moved to Southern Oregon. She grew up in the Grants Pass area, and graduated from Crater High School in Central Point. She worked at Harry and David’s packing Janice L. Brown pears through her school days. She then became an usher at the Criterion Theater in Medford, where she was introduced to her husband. Jan became a devoted house wife. She decided to join the work force in 1957, and became a bookkeeper at Crater Lake Machinery in Medford. After moving to Central Oregon in 1969, she became a bookkeeper for a local chiropractor. She retired in Roseburg in 1990, as a chiropractic assistant. In 1993, Jan and her husband returned to Bend. Here she could enjoy partaking in all of her hobbies. Painting became her passion along with gardening. Jan was an excellent baker, canner, and seamstress. She was a bowler and traveled nationally to compete. She was preceded in death by her husband, Donald F. Brown; four sisters and two brothers. She is survived by her daughter, Connie Kelley; grandson, Marcus McCloskey; and her stepson, Jerry Brown and wife, Claudia, all of Bend, sister, Josephine Hakala from Grants Pass. A memorial service is planned for Sat., June 18, at 2:00 p.m., at the Victory Baptist Church, on Butler Market Rd., where she was a member. Contributions may be made to the Victory Baptist Church, in Jan’s name or to Partners In Care, in Bend, Oregon. Autumn Funerals, Bend, is handling the arrangements, 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com

Geolocation Continued from C1 In some cases, police can place geotracking devices on a suspect’s car without their knowledge or consent, he said. “I happen to think that’s wrong.” In addition to service providers, large companies like Google and Apple have been accumulating large amounts of data regarding their customers’ locations. The new law would allow companies to still collect this information in the normal course of business, but would monitor how — and to whom — they divulge it. According to CTIA, an international wireless telecommunications association, Americans employed almost 302 million wireless communication devices in December 2010, which repre-

A child identification program, which provides parents with photos and fingerprints of their children in case of emergency, is in danger of being cut as well as “Bikes for Books,” which encourages children to read multiple books for a chance to win a new bicycle. “It is going to be a little tough,” Terry said. “We just barely swung the money for the programs this year, so next year I’m not sure.” The two dissenting councilors are Jay Patrick, who took issue with the way rates were calculated in the budget, and Ed Onimus, who said he wanted to see the council have a discussion about the role of a municipal government. Councilor Ed Boero was absent for the vote. Councilor Camden King said he had difficulty with the cuts but believes the primary role of the council is to provide city services. “I think what it comes down to is a question,” King said. “ ‘What is the role of a municipal government?’ … And I still go back and

Kathryn Tucker Windham, 93, Southern storyteller By Dennis Hevesi

Kathryn Tucker Windham was a scholar of Southern folklore, cherished recipes and ghost stories, and was known for her commentaries on public radio. She died June 12 at her home in Selma, Ala., at age 93.

New York Times News Service

Kathryn Tucker Windham, who wove a tapestry of Southern folklore, bucolic scenes, reminiscences, cherished recipes and ghost stories through books and commentaries on public radio, died Sunday at her home in Selma, Ala. She was 93. Her friend Alvin Benn confirmed her death. Windham told tales of why she always paused until a buzzard flapped its wings: “’Cause everybody knows that if you see one buzzard, it’s real bad luck — something awful is going to happen to you unless he flaps his wings.” Of what she called the “false dawn,” when at first glint of day, birds fill a swamp with a cacophonous chorus, then go silent until the sun really rises. Of ghosts, many ghosts. It was on the porch of her childhood home in Thomasville, Ala., that little Kathryn Tucker was imbued with family history, strange tales and a keen eye for nature’s quirks. Her father, James, a banker, was a gifted storyteller who regaled family and friends as Kathryn sat beside him. And so, of Windham’s 26 books, one of the most popular is “Alabama: One Big Front Porch” (1975), which tells of hoop snakes, mules, rabbits, fox hunts, gardens and great-greatgrandmothers she came across while wandering throughout her state. In her last book, “Spit, Scarey Ann & Sweat Bees” (2009), Windham touched on childhood memories of being frightened by a grasshopper, the wooden doll she kept in a box, the day her mother caught her striking matches, and encounters with sweat bees, which land on people and lick perspiration. Six of Windham’s books are based on her travels through Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee and Georgia gathering ghost stories. In “13 Alabama

sents 96 percent of the country’s total population. Five years earlier, those figures were 208 million and 69 percent.

‘Massive privacy violation,’ ACLU says “Whether they realize it or not, Americans are carrying tracking devices with them wherever they go. Whether they visit a therapist, liquor store, church or gun range, Americans’ activities are often available to law enforcement in realtime or even months after the fact,” said Laura Murphy, director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Washington legislative office. “Tracking our locations and movements without warrants or probable cause is a massive privacy violation. With unclear

look at that question. I just don’t believe (giving donations to nonprofits) is the role of the municipal government.” More substantial cuts in this year’s budget include no cost-ofliving raises for city employees. Steps, which are raises based on experience, will be kept intact. The city is also restructuring its medical plan for employees. The savings on employee expenses are expected to be between $400,000 and $600,000, but Neff said the final numbers are still being worked on. Road improvement expenditures are cut from $1 million to $485,000. Capital improvements, such as a new city hall, are being delayed to save expenditures. Restructuring of departments will also save the city “several hundred thousand,” Neff said. The need for the cuts comes from a drop in property tax revenues by approximately 15 percent from last year. Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

Ted Tucker Kathryn Tucker Windham Museum

Ghosts and Jeffrey” (1969), for example, she tells of the Red Lady of Huntingdon College, who breezes through Pratt Hall at night in a red gown and under a parasol, silent but for her clicking heels. Huntingdon, in Montgomery, is the college from which Windham graduated in 1939. With a deliberate drawl, Windham offered reflections on Alabama Public Radio for more than two decades, starting in 1984. Between 1985 and 1987, her commentaries were also broadcast on “All Things Considered” on National Public Radio. “Her pauses were almost as long as the content,” said Art Silverman, a producer of “All Things Considered.” “She slowed us down to feel like we were in central Alabama.” Among the titles of her commentaries: “Grits Is a Singular Delicacy,” “Honeysuckle Blossoms Smell Wonderful”

standards to regulate the collection of this information, our Fourth Amendment rights are left largely unprotected.” The new law also sets criminal penalties for individuals who use someone’s mobile device to track them, for example, an ex-husband who hacks into his former wife’s cellphone to stalk her. Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., the influential chairman of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Intellectual Property, Competition and the Internet, has also signed on as a co-sponsor. “He’s the go-to person in the House” on technology issues, Wyden said, adding that he anticipates bipartisan support for the bill in both chambers. Andrew Clevenger can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at aclevenger@bendbulletin.com.

Invaders Continued from C1 Mills said the nature of the associations between the victim and the people who invaded the home is not clear. Deputies who responded to the incident said they believe the man was peppersprayed, Mills said, but he was not seriously injured and did not require medical treatment. The victim described the invaders as two Hispanic men in their mid-20s, one about 6 feet 1 inch tall, the other about 5 feet 8 inches tall, and a Hispanic woman in her late 20s to early 30s, about 5 feet 6 inches tall. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In

and “The Tree-Sitting Record of Clark County, 1930s.” Windham was born in Selma on June 2, 1918, to James and Helen Tucker, and grew up in Thomasville. At 12, she began writing movie reviews for The Thomasville Times, owned by her cousin Earl. After graduating from Huntingdon, she was hired as a police reporter by The Alabama Journal, in Montgomery — an unusual job for a woman back then. In 1943, she was hired by The Birmingham News. There she met Amasa Windham, another reporter, whom she married in 1946. The family later moved to Selma. Windham is survived by a daughter, Dilcy Hilley; a son, Benjamin Jr.; and two grandsons. Her husband died in 1956. The name Jeffrey appears in the title of seven of Windham’s ghost books — a nod to the apparition that apparently occupied the Windham home. “Actually, I’ve never seen a ghost,” Windham revealed on a YouTube video. “Do they exist or don’t they exist? That’s something you can decide for yourself,” she continued. “Good ghost stories do not require that you believe in ghosts.” Perhaps hedging her bets, several years ago Windham had a coffin built and stored in a shed behind her house. On Monday, her friend Benn said, it was taken to the cemetery in the back of a red pickup truck.

Al Schwimmer, 94, smuggled U.S. planes in Israeli war By Elaine Woo Los Angeles Times

Al Schwimmer, a former aircraft engineer who smuggled American planes to Israel for its 1948 war of independence, founded its aerospace industry and later became a figure in the Iran-Contra affair, died in Tel Aviv on Friday, his 94th birthday. The cause was complications of pneumonia, according to a spokesperson for Israel Aerospace Industries, the company he developed and led for more than 25 years. Schwimmer was a 2006 recipient of the Israel Prize, considered the state’s highest honor. “He was a leader that was not deterred by dangers or wars” who “laid the foundations for Israel’s superiority in … advanced technology,” President Shimon Peres said in a statement after Schwimmer’s death. Born in New York in 1917, Schwimmer was a TWA flight engineer when he was approached by Jews from Palestine to help them obtain U.S. planes for the coming ArabIsraeli conflict, which began after the Jewish state of Israel was declared in May 1948. A veteran of World War II who had flown missions over Europe, Schwimmer recruited fellow Jewish veterans to help him. He established two aircraft companies, one of which was in Burbank, Calif., and bought and refurbished a few dozen used transport planes, including some that were Air Force surplus from the war. The planes were modified in a terminal by Schwimmer and his associates and flown to the nascent Jewish state via Florida and Czechoslovakia. The FBI suspected that Schwimmer was part of a ring that was violating a U.S. embargo on the shipment of planes and arms and nearly apprehended him several times. He fled to Canada and then to Israel, where he joined other volunteer engineers and pilots in the war effort there. In 1949, he returned to the U.S. to face charges that he had violated the U.S. Neutrality Act by transporting planes to Israel. Tried in Los Angeles federal court and convicted in 1950, he did not go to prison but was stripped of many of the rights he had held as a U.S. citizen.

We Will Remember Kenneth Fairchild Kenneth Dwain Fairchild was born on February 22, 1931 in Enterprise, Oregon to Verdo and Olive Fairchild. He passed away peacefully on June 10, 2011 after a long struggle with emphysema. He was 80 yrs old. Ken’s family moved to Redmond in 1941 and he graduated from Redmond Union High School in 1949. He married his high school sweetheart Suzanne “Sue” Skinner in Redmond on November 19, 1950. They raised their family of five in Central Oregon. After Ken’s retirement from his career as a plumber and pipefitter in 1993, he and Sue moved to Enterprise. They were active in the community and the Enterprise Christian Church. Ken enjoyed being part of a mission team that traveled to Honduras to build homes and a church. He loved playing Santa for the children in Enterprise and Sue would join him as Mrs. Claus, they were quite a team! In 1998 he was awarded the Wallowa County Unsung Hero honor for his multiple volunteer activities. The Fairchilds returned to Central Oregon in 2003 and settled in Prineville. They became members of the Powell Butte Christian Church and Ken enjoyed attending as often as his health allowed. Ken was a friend to many and a stranger to no one. He was generous to a fault, helping anyone in need. Ken became a Christian later in life and he shared his faith easily with others. He wanted everyone to know if God’s grace was able to save someone like him it could save anyone! Ken is survived by his five children: Scott and Cindy Fairchild and Sharon Fairchild of British Columbia, Kristi and Bruce Dunlap and Shelley and Scott Knutz of Powell Butte and Karen Roberts of Prineville, 12 grandchildren and 9 great-grandchildren. Ken is also survived by his brother Bob Fairchild of Ellensburg, WA and Bob’s five fabulous daughters. He was preceded in death by his precious wife, Suzanne and his parents. Ken’s family would like to express their sincere appreciation to Dr. Maggie King for her continuous compassion and care. The excellent Pioneer Memorial Hospice team treated Ken and his family with kindness and dignity. God bless you all! Ken will be laid to rest at Pilgrims Rest Cemetery in Powell Butte. A private family service will be held at a later date. Memorial contributions may be made to: Pioneer Memorial Hospice, 1201 NE Elm St, Prineville, OR 97754. Arrangements in the care of Prineville Funeral Home.


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, JUNE 16

FRIDAY

Today: Mostly sunny and mild.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

68

34

Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp



75/48

71/46

69/45

51/34

 Marion Forks

Mitchell

Madras 69/37

 Camp Sherman 63/31 Redmond Prineville 68/34 Cascadia 65/35 67/35 Sisters 66/33 Bend Post 68/34

Oakridge Elk Lake 65/33

55/22

64/31

65/30

Burns

70/46

Bend

Boise

68/34

67/44

75/45

64/43



Idaho Falls Elko

90/59

67/41

73/42

67/33

Reno

68/36

Partly cloudy skies today.



55/34



Helena

Grants Pass

Eastern

63/31

64/42

Eugene

Redding

Silver Lake

Crater Lake

Missoula

68/51

Christmas Valley

63/28





67/50

66/32

Chemult

Calgary

Portland

Hampton

58/24



66/52

Seattle

66/32

Fort Rock

Vancouver

61/31

65/30

63/29

BEND ALMANAC SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Paulina

La Pine

70 43

NORTHWEST Yesterday’s regional extremes • 76° Medford • 33° Klamath Falls

80/54

San Francisco



64/55

Salt Lake City 77/53



Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:51 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:51 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 9:49 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 6:10 a.m.

New

First

Full

June 23 July 1

July 7

July 14

City

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy.

HIGH

LOW

Astoria . . . . . . . . 61/50/0.04 . . . . . . 62/49/c. . . . . . 62/51/pc Baker City . . . . . .59/40/trace . . . . . 65/39/pc. . . . . . 69/44/pc Brookings . . . . . . 68/47/0.00 . . . . . 65/51/pc. . . . . . . 63/53/c Burns. . . . . . . . . . 65/41/0.00 . . . . . 66/42/pc. . . . . . 71/47/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 67/50/0.00 . . . . . 70/46/pc. . . . . . 72/48/pc Klamath Falls . . . 72/33/0.00 . . . . . . 69/38/s. . . . . . . 73/40/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 72/34/0.00 . . . . . . 70/40/s. . . . . . . 72/45/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 63/41/0.00 . . . . . . 65/30/s. . . . . . 72/41/pc Medford . . . . . . . 76/50/0.00 . . . . . 75/49/pc. . . . . . 81/50/pc Newport . . . . . . . 59/50/0.02 . . . . . 60/47/pc. . . . . . 61/50/pc North Bend . . . . . 61/52/0.00 . . . . . . 61/48/c. . . . . . . 61/50/c Ontario . . . . . . . . 71/52/0.00 . . . . . 70/49/pc. . . . . . 75/53/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 66/48/0.00 . . . . . . 71/48/s. . . . . . . 75/52/s Portland . . . . . . . 65/50/0.02 . . . . . 68/51/pc. . . . . . 72/53/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 58/41/0.00 . . . . . 65/35/pc. . . . . . 74/46/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 66/43/0.00 . . . . . . 69/43/s. . . . . . 73/46/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 70/52/0.00 . . . . . 71/49/pc. . . . . . 75/51/pc Salem . . . . . . . . .66/50/trace . . . . . 69/48/pc. . . . . . 73/50/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 64/44/0.00 . . . . . . 66/33/s. . . . . . 73/41/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 65/53/0.00 . . . . . . 74/51/s. . . . . . . 77/55/s

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

7

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62/37 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 in 1974 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.11” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 in 1957 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.45” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.27” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 5.86” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.08 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.52 in 1937 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Low Sisters.................................Low Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Low La Pine................................Low Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville ...........................Low

LOW

LOW

76 43

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Friday Hi/Lo/W

Mainly sunny and warmer. HIGH

70 41

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases Last

MONDAY

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:40 a.m. . . . . . .9:25 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:24 a.m. . . . . . .7:29 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .3:42 a.m. . . . . . .6:27 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .2:39 a.m. . . . . . .4:13 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .2:08 p.m. . . . . . .2:03 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .1:34 a.m. . . . . . .1:47 p.m.

OREGON CITIES Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

SUNDAY

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers, cooler, LOW breezy.

HIGH

A low pressure system will generate showers and thunderstorms in the northern Rockies.

Central

Sunny to partly cloudy and pleasant.

LOW

75 43

48/48

Brothers

Sunriver

HIGH

67/36

65/32

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Coastal fog and clouds early in the day.

70/38

71/39

64/31



Willowdale

Warm Springs

Mostly sunny and warmer.

Tonight: Mostly clear and cold.

HIGH

STATE

SATURDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46,268 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176,275 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 81,593 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 42,663 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149,087 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 514 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,400 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,030 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 653 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 535 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 765 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 66/52

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

Honolulu 88/75

Winnipeg 73/57

San Francisco 64/55

Los Angeles 64/59

Tijuana 71/58

Las Vegas 102/78

Cheyenne 81/51 Denver 87/58

Albuquerque 96/63

Phoenix 106/78

Chihuahua 103/69

La Paz 98/65 Anchorage 61/47

Juneau 63/46

S

S

Mazatlan 90/71

S

S

S S Halifax 70/48

Thunder Bay 75/50

St. Paul 79/64 Rapid City 73/56

Salt Lake City 77/53

S

Quebec 81/57

Bismarck 76/57

Boise 67/44

• 3.17” Dodge Center, Minn.

S

Saskatoon 66/52

Billings 69/48

Portland 68/51

Laredo, Texas Stanley, Idaho

S

Seattle 67/50

• 111° • 26°

S

Calgary 48/48

Portland 73/56 Boston 82/63 Buffalo 76/61 New York 83/65 Philadelphia 80/64 Washington, D. C. 77/65

To ronto 68/59

Green Bay 70/54

Chicago Des Moines 76/58 Detroit 81/66 75/62 Omaha Columbus 84/68 79/64 Kansas City 87/72 Louisville St. Louis 86/67 88/69

Charlotte 87/65

Nashville 90/67 Atlanta Oklahoma City Little Rock 92/70 Birmingham 95/79 94/75 95/73 Dallas 98/79 New Orleans 93/76 Houston 98/77

Orlando 95/73 Miami 91/78

Monterrey 102/75

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . .103/76/0.00 . .103/76/t . 105/76/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .76/50/0.00 . . .76/58/t . . . .77/59/t Albany. . . . . . . . .82/48/0.00 . . .84/60/s . . . .74/60/t Albuquerque. . . .93/61/0.00 . . .96/63/s . . . 94/63/s Anchorage . . . . .56/46/0.39 . 61/47/pc . . 64/49/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .93/69/0.00 . 92/70/pc . . . .92/70/t Atlantic City . . . .84/53/0.00 . 78/65/pc . . . .82/65/t Austin . . . . . . . .103/77/0.00 101/75/pc . 100/77/pc Baltimore . . . . . .84/53/0.00 . . .75/65/t . . . .82/65/t Billings. . . . . . . . .75/46/0.00 . 69/48/pc . . . .69/50/t Birmingham . . . .98/73/0.00 . 95/73/pc . . . .96/75/t Bismarck . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . 76/57/pc . . . .73/54/t Boise . . . . . . . . . .69/49/0.00 . 67/44/pc . . 72/48/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .69/57/0.00 . . .82/63/s . . . .71/61/t Bridgeport, CT. . .80/54/0.01 . . .78/62/s . . . .74/63/t Buffalo . . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . 76/61/pc . . . .75/59/t Burlington, VT. . .81/52/0.00 . 85/59/pc . . . .79/59/t Caribou, ME . . . .77/48/0.00 . . .76/56/t . . . .76/56/t Charleston, SC . .89/74/0.00 . . .91/73/t . . . .90/73/t Charlotte. . . . . . .85/57/0.00 . . .87/65/t . . . .91/65/t Chattanooga. . . .86/66/1.04 . 91/66/pc . . . .92/67/t Cheyenne . . . . . .79/42/0.00 . . .81/51/t . . . .79/55/t Chicago. . . . . . . .71/57/0.74 . . .76/58/t . . 74/62/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .67/55/0.52 . 83/64/pc . . . .86/65/t Cleveland . . . . . .78/53/0.00 . . .75/60/t . . 73/61/pc Colorado Springs 90/51/0.00 . 89/54/pc . . 83/54/pc Columbia, MO . .83/66/0.78 . . .86/69/t . . 89/72/pc Columbia, SC . . .93/69/0.00 . . .93/70/t . . . .95/70/t Columbus, GA. . .98/73/0.00 . 96/69/pc . . . .97/72/t Columbus, OH. . .73/55/0.00 . . .79/64/t . . 84/63/pc Concord, NH . . . .81/46/0.00 . . .84/57/s . . . .77/57/t Corpus Christi. . .96/78/0.00 . 97/78/pc . . 97/79/pc Dallas Ft Worth 100/78/0.00 . 98/79/pc . 100/79/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .68/55/0.13 . . .79/64/t . . 84/64/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .86/52/0.00 . 87/58/pc . . 84/58/pc Des Moines. . . . .81/66/0.26 . . .81/66/t . . . .79/68/t Detroit. . . . . . . . .74/54/0.00 . . .75/62/t . . 78/60/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .59/50/0.41 . . .58/47/c . . 60/48/pc El Paso. . . . . . . .103/72/0.00 . .103/75/s . . 103/75/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .56/49/0.10 . .70/44/sh . . 73/48/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .73/61/0.54 . 77/59/pc . . . .77/60/t Flagstaff . . . . . . .83/41/0.00 . . .79/40/s . . . 76/40/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .70/55/0.14 . . .71/56/t . . 76/59/sh Green Bay. . . . . .63/57/0.26 . .70/54/sh . . 74/55/pc Greensboro. . . . .81/59/0.00 . . .85/63/t . . 89/65/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .82/53/0.00 . 75/61/pc . . . .80/62/t Hartford, CT . . . .83/53/0.00 . . .85/60/s . . . .75/61/t Helena. . . . . . . . .63/46/0.00 . 64/43/pc . . 69/46/sh Honolulu . . . . . . .87/77/0.00 . 88/75/pc . . 87/74/pc Houston . . . . . .100/76/0.00 . 98/77/pc . . 98/77/pc Huntsville . . . . . .98/71/0.00 . 94/69/pc . . . .94/71/t Indianapolis . . . .75/60/0.95 . . .81/64/t . . 84/66/pc Jackson, MS . . . .96/76/0.00 . 95/74/pc . . 96/73/pc Madison, WI . . . .67/56/0.33 . . .76/57/c . . 78/61/pc Jacksonville. . . . .98/71/0.00 . . .95/73/t . . 95/71/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .60/48/0.00 . 63/46/pc . . . 63/45/c Kansas City. . . . .86/64/0.00 . . .87/72/t . . 92/75/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .69/52/0.06 . . .72/58/t . . 76/59/sh Las Vegas . . . . .107/80/0.00 . .102/78/s . . 97/75/pc Lexington . . . . . .72/58/0.63 . 84/63/pc . . 84/65/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .86/60/0.00 . . .87/69/t . . . 88/72/c Little Rock. . . . . .99/80/0.00 . 94/75/pc . . 96/75/pc Los Angeles. . . . .70/57/0.00 . 64/59/pc . . 64/58/pc Louisville . . . . . . .79/61/0.74 . 86/67/pc . . . .87/69/t Memphis. . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . 95/76/pc . . 97/78/pc Miami . . . . . . . . 95/77/trace . . .91/78/t . . 90/79/pc Milwaukee . . . . .62/55/0.03 . .71/55/sh . . 69/58/pc Minneapolis . . . .74/57/0.43 . 79/64/pc . . 78/62/pc Nashville . . . . . . .86/64/1.13 . 90/67/pc . . . .91/71/t New Orleans. . . .97/76/0.00 . 93/76/pc . . 93/75/pc New York . . . . . .83/56/0.00 . 83/65/pc . . . .76/65/t Newark, NJ . . . . .87/55/0.00 . 85/66/pc . . . .79/65/t Norfolk, VA . . . . .77/67/0.00 . . .80/66/t . . . .89/70/t Oklahoma City . .94/66/0.00 . 95/79/pc . . 96/76/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .83/61/0.00 . . .84/68/t . . . .85/72/t Orlando. . . . . . . .98/75/0.37 . . .95/73/t . . 94/74/pc Palm Springs. . .106/74/0.00 . .101/69/s . . . 96/68/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .76/62/2.63 . 81/64/pc . . . .82/67/t Philadelphia . . . .84/57/0.00 . 80/64/pc . . . .82/65/t Phoenix. . . . . . .110/78/0.00 . .106/78/s . . 103/76/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .77/50/0.00 . . .76/60/t . . . .77/59/t Portland, ME. . . .74/52/0.00 . . .73/56/s . . . .75/57/t Providence . . . . .75/55/0.00 . . .84/62/s . . . .74/63/t Raleigh . . . . . . . .83/58/0.00 . . .84/65/t . . . .90/68/t

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .77/43/0.00 . . .73/56/t . . . .74/54/t Savannah . . . . .102/75/0.00 . . .94/73/t . . 92/71/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .89/58/0.00 . . .80/54/s . . 78/53/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .65/48/0.06 . . .67/50/c . . 67/53/pc Richmond . . . . . .81/60/0.00 . . .80/65/t . . . .88/66/t Sioux Falls. . . . . .77/59/0.00 . 83/63/pc . . . .80/66/t Rochester, NY . . .83/48/0.00 . 81/61/pc . . . .77/58/t Spokane . . . . . . 62/45/trace . 64/47/pc . . 70/50/pc Sacramento. . . MM/60/0.00 . . .89/58/s . . . 87/56/s Springfield, MO. .87/64/0.33 . . .88/69/t . . 91/71/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .87/69/0.14 . 88/69/pc . . . .87/75/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .95/83/0.00 . . .93/79/t . . 93/76/pc Salt Lake City . . .85/54/0.00 . . .77/53/t . . . .71/52/t Tucson. . . . . . . .105/70/0.00 . .104/72/s . . 103/71/s San Antonio . . .101/76/0.00 100/78/pc . 100/78/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .95/68/0.00 . 95/75/pc . . 96/78/pc San Diego . . . . . .69/59/0.00 . 68/60/pc . . 67/62/pc Washington, DC .84/59/0.00 . . .77/65/t . . . .83/65/t San Francisco . . .71/53/0.00 . 67/55/pc . . 65/54/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .90/60/0.00 . . .98/75/t . . 98/76/pc San Jose . . . . . . .86/59/0.00 . 75/54/pc . . 72/54/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .71/44/0.00 . . .73/49/s . . . 75/53/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .90/53/0.00 . . .90/51/s . . . 89/53/s Yuma. . . . . . . . .109/78/0.00 . .107/68/s . . 103/69/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .72/54/0.00 . .64/52/sh . . 63/54/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .78/69/0.00 . . .81/66/s . . . 82/67/s Auckland. . . . . . .59/54/0.00 . . .60/54/c . . 58/53/sh Baghdad . . . . . .100/79/0.00 . .107/86/s . . . 83/81/s Bangkok . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . .91/80/t . . . .88/79/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .88/70/0.00 . . .83/70/t . . 86/66/sh Beirut. . . . . . . . . .79/72/0.00 . . .83/71/s . . . 84/72/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . . .79/61/t . . 72/54/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . . .65/52/c . . 63/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . . .81/61/t . . . .80/59/t Buenos Aires. . . .61/55/0.00 . . .63/49/t . . . 62/47/s Cabo San Lucas .93/77/0.00 . . .93/71/s . . . 91/72/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .90/72/0.00 . . .90/72/s . . . 89/67/s Calgary . . . . . . . .57/48/0.00 . . .48/48/r . . 57/48/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . 88/77/pc . . 85/76/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 . .59/45/sh . . 60/46/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . .61/45/sh . . 59/50/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . . .79/55/t . . . 73/59/c Harare . . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .73/51/s . . . 74/50/s Hong Kong . . . . .91/84/0.00 . . .87/83/t . . . .86/81/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . .79/64/c . . 81/68/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .86/57/0.00 . . .82/61/s . . . 81/60/s Johannesburg . . .61/46/0.00 . . .67/46/s . . . 60/39/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . 71/64/pc . . 72/65/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . . .77/61/s . . 79/63/pc London . . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . 64/50/pc . . 63/52/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .91/61/0.00 . 90/61/pc . . 91/62/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . .89/82/t . . . .90/78/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .108/81/0.00 . .111/77/s . . 110/76/s Mexico City. . . . .84/55/0.00 . . .82/60/t . . . .85/58/t Montreal. . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . . .84/68/s . . 79/63/sh Moscow . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . .68/48/sh . . 67/46/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . 79/61/pc . . 77/55/sh Nassau . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . .87/80/s . . . 88/77/c New Delhi. . . . . .93/79/0.00 . 97/84/pc . 100/82/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . .76/67/r . . . .78/66/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . .64/48/sh . . . .57/47/r Ottawa . . . . . . . .86/57/0.00 . 86/59/pc . . 75/59/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .73/63/0.00 . .68/46/sh . . 69/55/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .75/63/0.00 . . .75/63/s . . . 76/64/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . .84/68/s . . . 83/66/s Santiago . . . . . . .50/37/0.00 . . .59/36/s . . . 63/35/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . . .73/54/s . . . 72/55/s Sapporo. . . . . . . .61/59/0.00 . . .69/56/s . . . 72/55/s Seoul . . . . . . . . . .88/63/0.00 . . .83/57/s . . 82/55/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .70/66/0.00 . . .80/70/t . . . .79/69/t Singapore . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . .88/78/t . . . .89/79/t Stockholm. . . . . .61/45/0.00 . . .70/54/s . . . .68/59/r Sydney. . . . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . .63/51/sh . . . 64/52/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .95/82/0.00 . . .89/81/t . . . 88/80/c Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . . .84/70/s . . . 83/69/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . .71/65/sh . . 72/66/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . .68/59/sh . . 72/61/pc Vancouver. . . . . .63/52/0.00 . 66/52/pc . . . 68/52/c Vienna. . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . 82/63/pc . . . 75/61/c Warsaw. . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . 77/57/pc . . . .73/55/t

2 Oregon river ports considered for coal terminals The Associated Press PORTLAND — Two Columbia River ports in Oregon are being considered as sites for shipping coal to Asia as demand increases in China, The Oregonian reported. Legal documents filed by environmentalists indicate the Port of St. Helens is talking with a coal export developer. The Port of Morrow near Boardman recently signed a lease option with Australian coal giant Ambre Energy to shift Montana and Wyoming coal from trains to river barges, a move that could open more Northwest ports for coal export.

Currently, the only West Coast coal export terminal is in British Columbia. An interest in coal by the Port of St. Helens was indicated in a complaint filed by Columbia Riverkeeper, which opposes coal export, asking a judge to require the port to release coal-related documents. In a response, a lawyer for the port said it would violate a confidentiality agreement and “would result in the greatest harm to the public interest which can be imagined — a loss of jobs in our community.” The activity has caught the attention of Gov. John Kitzhaber,

a Democrat with strong backing from environmental groups. In a statement to The Oregonian on Tuesday, Kitzhaber stopped short of taking a position on coal terminals, with his staff noting that no port or developer has contacted the governor’s office about one.

Transparency urged But development of a terminal “should not happen in the dead of night,” Kitzhaber said. “We must have an open, vigorous public debate before any projects move forward.” Columbia Riverkeeper helped

stall development of an Ambre Energy and Arch Coal export terminal at a private port site in Longview, Wash., earlier this year. A subsidiary, Millennium Bulk Terminals, temporarily withdrew its permit application after internal e-mails obtained during an appeal by environmental groups showed it planned to eventually export far more coal than it had disclosed publicly. Environmental groups also plan to oppose a terminal proposed near Bellingham, Wash., by a joint venture that includes Peabody Energy, the largest coal producer in the Powder River Basin, a swath

of productive coal lands in Montana and Wyoming. The proposed terminal would export at least 24 million tons of coal a year.

Community qualms Community activists in Longview and Bellingham — including Bellingham’s mayor — say they worry about coal dust and increased train traffic. Environmental groups also note that both Washington and Oregon are phasing out their only coal-fired power plants to reduce pollution and carbon emissions, and argue that the emissions shouldn’t sim-

ply be shifted to China, India and other Asian countries. Some ports, including the ports of Portland and Tacoma, Wash., have said they’re not interested in coal. Patrick Trapp, Port of St. Helens executive director, said he couldn’t confirm or deny the port’s interest in coal given confidentiality agreements. But the port has received inquiries about many exports, he said, and “is nowhere near committing to any of these particular commodities.” If a decision were made, there would be public notice and a vote by the port’s commission, Trapp said.


S

D

MLB Inside Mariners take 3-1 victory over Angels, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Ducks suspend cornerback Harris indefinitely PORTLAND — Oregon Ducks coach Chip Kelly has suspended Cliff Harris indefinitely after the cornerback was cited for speeding while driving with a suspended license. Harris, 20, was cited Sunday morning after police said they clocked him driving at 118 mph on a suspended license in a rental car. Kelly announced the suspension Wednesday after the school said its compliance office was looking into the matter because the car Harris was driving had been rented by a university employee. Kelly said in a statement that at the very least, Harris will sit out Oregon’s season opener against LSU at Cowboys Stadium in Texas on Sept. 3. After that, Harris’ status would be dependent on his adherence to the football program’s rules. “Cliff’s future clearly is in Cliff’s hands,” Kelly said. “Earning an opportunity to represent the University of Oregon and this football program certainly rests far beyond a player’s ability on the field of play. Our behavior out of the spotlight often is more important and will be held to a higher standard. Until Cliff is able to conform to the same standards all of us must comply with, his status will remain unchanged.” Harris was pulled over about 4:35 a.m. PDT Sunday south of Albany. Two other Oregon football players were passengers in the car. Police did not identify them and they were not cited. Oregon State Police said Harris was cited for driving with a suspended license and exceeding the speed limit in excess of 100 mph. The fine for driving a vehicle faster than 100 mph is $1,148. The fine for driving on a suspended license is $427. — The Associated Press

WCL BASEBALL Elks win second game of series over Bellingham, 2-1 For the second night in a row, Bellingham’s ninth-inning rally fell short as the Bend Elks won the second game of a three-game West Coast League series 2-1 at Vince Genna Stadium on Wednesday. Down 2-0 in the top of the ninth inning, Bellingham got on the scoreboard when Ryan Moore singled to drive home Jeff Calhoon and cut the deficit in half. But that was as close as the Bells would get as Bend pitcher Daniel Grazzini wrapped the game up with a save. Elks hurler Jeff Brigham recorded the victory after throwing five innings. He had five strikeouts. Bellingham scored two runs in the top of the ninth inning on Tuesday night to tie the score at 4 before falling 5-4 in nine innings. Third baseman Tyler Christian belted two doubles to lead Bend’s offense. Designated hitter Bo Walter hit two for four with an RBI. The Elks are back in action tonight when they finish their series with the Bells. First pitch is scheduled for 6:35 p.m. Bend will then hit the road for a three-game series with Kitsap starting Friday at 6:35 p.m. — Bulletin staff report

HIGH SCHOOL RODEO 2011 Oregon High School Rodeo Association Championship State Finals Rodeo at the Crook County Fairgrounds, Prineville

SCHEDULE Today: Slack, 10 a.m.; first go-round, 6 p.m. Friday: Slack, 10 a.m.; second go-round, 6 p.m. Saturday: Final go-round, noon Cost: $8 per go-round or $20 for a season ticket good for all performances Notes: The top 20 competitors in the OHSRA season-ending standings in each rodeo discipline are eligible for the state finals. Those events are: bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, bull riding, team roping, tie-down roping, steer wrestling, barrel racing, boys and girls cutting, breakaway roping, goat tying and pole bending. For more information, go to www.ohsra.org.

Madras saddle bronc rider ready for final go-rounds

Dan Oliver / The Bulletin

By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

For most of the past decade, Central Oregon has been known as a hotbed for up-and-coming bareback riders. Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association standouts Jason Havens (Prineville) and Steven Peebles (Redmond) as well as four-time world champion Bobby Mote (Culver) all make the High Desert their home. Recent Madras High School graduate Clint Johnson, though, hopes to put the area on the map for saddle bronc riding. See Rider / D5

GOLF: OREGON OPEN

Beavers band together at Open By Zack Hall The Bulletin

The Oregon State University golfers competing in the Oregon Open Invitational are technically not teammates, at least not this week. Perhaps it’s the orange-andblack Beaver golf bags they are all carrying, or the fact that they have just finished another college golf season that keeps them all connected. But the Beavers — three currently on the team and another who graduated in 2010 — are both competing against and rooting for their college teammates this week as they take on the best club professionals in the Pacific Northwest at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend. “We all look at each other’s name on the leaderboard to see who wins and who is the big dog of the day,” said Nick Sherwood, who recently completed his sophomore season in Corvallis and was easily identifiable Wednesday wearing his Oregon State hat, shirt and bag. See Open / D5

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Derek Westover, of Redmond, aims his unloaded sniper’s rifle near Redmond last week. Westover competed in the 2011 Oregon Sniper Challenge this past weekend.

Sniper’s challenge Redmond resident is one of few civilians to compete in sniping event By Mark Morical The Bulletin

Derek Westover discovered his passion for the sport of sniping through bowhunting. That may seem unusual, but not to Westover. Just as bowhunters must be quiet and crafty as they stalk to within close range of their prey, competitive snipers, though shooting with rifles and from much longer distances, must incorporate that same stealth. “I do more bowhunting than any-

HUNTING & FISHING thing, and that’s how I got into sniping,” Westover said. “Being sneaky and stealthy ... I loved to shoot firearms, but I really wasn’t doing anything with them. And so then it kind of led into the stealthiness and the long-range thing.” Westover, a 47-year-old Redmond

resident who builds his own rifles, competed this past weekend in the 2011 Oregon Sniper Challenge at the Douglas Ridge Rifle Club in Eagle Creek, just southeast of Portland. He finished 43rd out of 60 participants. Westover said he was one of only about 10 civilians going up against military and law enforcement personnel. Shooting rifles with scopes, the participants fired from helicopters and from behind barricades in standing, kneeling and sitting positions. See Sniper / D5

Oregon Open Where: Awbrey Glen Golf Club, Bend What: Pacific Northwest PGA golf tournament, 54-hole stroke play Today: Final round, leaders expected to tee off at 11:30 a.m. Admission: Free

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N H L : S TA N L E Y C U P F I N A L S

Bruins take Stanley Cup with Game 7 victory over Canucks By Greg Beacham The Associated Press

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Tennis ........................................D2 Major League Baseball ..............D3 Golf ........................................... D4 Basketball ................................. D4 Hunting & Fishing ............... D5, 6

Clint Johnson, here taking part at the 2010 OHSRA state finals, will be defending his title in the saddle bronc competition this weekend in Prineville.

Darryl Dyck / The Associated Press

Boston Bruins goalie Tim Thomas hoists the Stanley Cup after the Bruins beat the Vancouver Canucks 4-0 in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Finals on Wednesday in Vancouver, British Columbia.

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — The Boston Bruins had waited 39 long years for another drink from the Stanley Cup, and Tim Thomas was awfully thirsty. When the Bruins and their brilliant goalie barged into a hostile Canadian rink surrounded by another 100,000 screaming fans outside for Game 7, they emerged with the championship they wanted. Thomas made 37 saves in the second shutout of his landmark finals performance, Patrice Bergeron and rookie Brad Marchand scored two goals apiece and the Bruins beat the Vancouver Canucks 4-0 Wednesday night for their first championship since 1972. “I think I went even further than I thought,” Thomas said. “I never envisioned three Game 7s in one playoff series and still being able to come out on top.” Bergeron scored the eventual game-winner in the first period and added a short-handed score in the second to keep the Cup away from the Canucks, who have never won it in nearly 41 years of existence. See Bruins / D5

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D2 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 7 a.m. — PGA Tour, U.S. Open, first round, ESPN. Noon — PGA Tour, U.S. Open, first round, NBC. 2 p.m. — PGA Tour, U.S. Open, first round, ESPN.

BASEBALL 9:30 a.m. — MLB, Baltimore Orioles at Toronto Blue Jays or Texas Rangers at New York Yankees, MLB Network. 4 p.m. — MLB, Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay Rays or New York Mets at Atlanta Braves, MLB Network.

LACROSSE 4:30 p.m. — Major League Lacrosse, Chesapeake Bayhawks at Long Island Lizards, ESPN2.

SOCCER 8 p.m. — MLS, Vancouver Whitecaps at Seattle Sounders (taped), Root Sports.

FRIDAY GOLF 7 a.m. — PGA Tour, U.S. Open, second round, ESPN. Noon — PGA Tour, U.S. Open, second round, NBC. 2 p.m. — PGA Tour, U.S. Open, second round, ESPN.

BASEBALL 11:15 a.m. — MLB, New York Yankees at Chicago Cubs, MLB Network. 4:30 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at Atlanta Braves or Milwaukee Brewers at Boston Red Sox, MLB Network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Philadelphia Phillies at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports.

BOXING 6 p.m. — Friday Night Fights, Grady Brewer vs. Fernando Guerrero, ESPN2.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 6:30 p.m. — WCL, Bellingham Bells at Bend Elks, KPOV-FM 106.7. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

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Track and field • Oregon State breaks ground on new facility: Oregon State University kicked off the groundbreaking of its new track and field facility on Tuesday in front of 400-plus guests in Corvallis. More than 60 former track and field alumni were in attendance including All-Americans Gerry Church (1955 — javelin), Gary Stenlund (1960, 1963 — javelin), Dan Likens (1961 — javelin), Jan Underwood (1964 — 800 yard run), Tom Woods (1972-75 — high jump), Dan Fulton (1979 — 5,000 meters), Tim Fox (1979 — discus) and five-time All-American Darrell Horn (195961 — long jump and triple jump). Former coaches Sam Bell (1959-65), Berny Wagner (1966-75), Chuck McNeil (1984-88) and Pat Ingram (1975) were also in the crowd.

Baseball • Tennessee names Dave Serrano new baseball coach: Tennessee hired Cal State Fullerton coach Dave Serrano as the Volunteers’ new baseball head coach. Joan Cronan, interim vice chancellor for athletics, announced the hiring Wednesday. Serrano will be introduced at a news conference today. • Angels release struggling left-hander Scott Kazmir: The Los Angeles Angels have given up on struggling lefthander Scott Kazmir, releasing the once promising starter. Kazmir was released by the Angels on Wednesday as they closed out a three-game series in Seattle. Once considered among the most promising young starters in baseball, Kazmir has seen a rapid descent. In five starts with Salt Lake, Kazmir had a 17.02 ERA in 15 1⁄3 innings, giving up 29 earned runs and 22 hits. • Francona thinks realignment proposal a good idea: Boston Red Sox manager Terry Francona thinks a potential realignment plan has some merit. MLB is considering a proposal that would have 15 teams in the American League and 15 clubs in the National League, as opposed to the present format of 16 teams in the NL and 14 in the AL. “I love the idea of a more balanced schedule,” Francona said before Wednesday night’s game against Tampa Bay. “Any player, coach, manager probably does because you’re talking about the fairness of it. Just the idea of a more balanced schedule is probably a good thing.” Under the possible plan, the leagues would not be split into divisions. The top three teams would make the playoffs. The fourth- and fifthplace clubs would be wild cards and play for one spot.

GOLF Local OREGON OPEN INVITATIONAL Wednesday at Awbrey Glen Golf Club Par 72 Second Round Made 36-Hole Cut Derek Berg (Glendale CC) 71-69–140 Brian Nosler (Dick’s Sporting Goods) 69-71 –140 Casey King (Tokatee GC) 70-70–140 John Kawasoe (Astoria G&CC) 71-70–141 Bryan Stevens (Mark Bass Golf School) 68-73 –141 Jeff Neeley (Harbour Pointe GC) 72-70 –142 Rob Gibbons (Arrowhead GC) 71-71–142 Nick Sherwood (Spring Hill CC) 70-72 –142 Corey Prugh (Manito G&CC) 73-69–142 Tyler Simpson (Trysting Tree GC) 69-73 –142 Ryan Malby (Village Greens GC) 69-73 –142 Reid Martin (Everett G&CC) 70-72–142 Russell Grove (Avondale G&TC) 69-74 –143 Alex Moore (Trysting Tree GC) 71-73 –144 Matt Epstein (Everett G&CC) 73-71–144 Eric McCardle (Whidbey G&CC) 72-72 –144 David Phay (Whidbey G&CC) 73-72–145 Ian Dahl (Mint Valley GC) 70-75–145 Ryan Benzel (Pro Golf - Lynnwood) 70-75 –145 Cameron Fife (Persimmon CC) 69-76–145 Bruce Stewart (Arrowhead GC) 70-75 –145 Mike Roters (Gateway Golf Discount) 73-72 –145 Taylor Porter (Avondale G&TC) 71-75 –146 Tim Feenstra (Broadmoor GC) 69-77–146 Tim O’Neal (Royal Oaks CC) 73-73–146 Eric Fiskum (Illahe Hills CC) 71-75 –146 Glen Griffith (Spring Hill CC) 72-74 –146 Chris Griffin (Pro Golf - Tacoma) 73-73 –146 Mitch Runge (Tacoma C&GC) 76-70–146 Jeff Coston (Semiahmoo G&CC) 77-69 –146 Michael Haack (Meridian Valley CC) 74-72 –146 Nick Ellis (Wenatchee G&CC) 70-76–146 Fred Haney (The Reserve Vineyards) 73-74 –147 Dick Bartholomew (Tualatin CC) 72-75 –147 Bill Winter (Columbia Edgewater CC) 72-75 –147 Tim Fraley (Awbrey Glen GC) 74-73–147 Tyler Nelson (Columbia Edgewater CC) 72-75 –147 Jason Aichele (Meadow Springs CC) 78-69 –147 Bob Rannow (Sandpines GL) 71-76–147 Tyler Sweet (Sunland G&CC) 74-73–147 Colin Tucker (Langdon Farms GC) 72-76 –148 Derek Barron (Oakbrook G&CC) 75-73 –148 Charles Kingsbaker (Black Butte Ranch) 74-74 –148 Aaron Curtis (Columbia Point GC) 75-73 –148 Jeff Fought (Black Butte Ranch) 79-70 –149 Scott Krieger (Broadmoor GC) 75-74 –149 Jesse Heinly (Tetherow GC) 73-76–149 Clayton Moe (Tetherow GC) 73-76–149 James Chrisman (Awbrey Glen GC) 72-77 –149 Greg Chianello (The Reserve Vineyards) 70-79 –149 Dylan Goodwin (Harbour Pointe GC) 71-78 –149 Tom Sovay (GC at Redmond Ridge) 75-75 –150 David Nuhn (University of Idaho GC) 76-74 –150 Brian Thornton (Meridian Valley CC) 76-74 –150 Mark Poirier (The Creek at Qualchan) 78-72 –150 Greg Smith (Willow Lake GC) 75-75–150 Chris Repass (Peninsula GC) 76-74–150 Mark Gardner (The Creek at Qualchan) 75-75 –150 Wayne Clark (Hidden Valley Lake) 75-75 –150 Dan Ostrin (Widgi Creek GC) 75-75–150 Scott Erdmann (Oswego Lake CC) 76-75 –151 Scott Leritz (Royal Oaks CC) 73-78 –151 Luke Baker (Deer Park GC) 73-78–151 Aaron Johnson (The Golf Club at Black) 76-75 –151 Bill Raschko (Albany) 74-77–151 Chris Everson (Horn Rapids GC) 73-78 –151 Chuck Milne (Vanco Driving Range) 75-76 –151 Steven DaSilva (Rock Creek CC) 74-77 –151 Luke Bennett (Semiahmoo G&CC) 74-77 –151 Casey McCoy (The Dalles CC) 75-76–151 Tyler McDougall (Wenatchee G&CC) 75-76 –151 Locals who did not make the cut Brad Mombert (Bend G&CC) 76-78–154 Ron Seals (Awbrey Glen GC) 74-81–155 Harry Paik (Awbrey Glen GC) 77-79–156 Bob Garza (Lost Tracks GC) 77-79–156 Louis Bennett (Broken Top Club) 73-83 –156 Mark Amberson (Awbrey Glen GC) 79-77 –156 Jim Wilkinson (Broken Top Club) 81-75 –156 Daniel Wendt (Brasada Ranch) 80-77 –157 George Mack Jr. (Black Butte Ranch) 85-73 –158 Tom Baker (Black Butte Ranch) 76-82 –158 Pat Huffer (Crooked River Ranch) 82-78 –160 Andy Heinly (Tetherow GC) 82-79–161 Mark Vukanovich (Broken Top Club) 85-79 –164 Ross Kranz (Tetherow GC) 84-81–165 Charlie Rice (Bend G&CC) 85-80–165 Jeff Ward (Juniper GC) 85-81–166 Erik Nielsen (Bend G&CC) 83-85–168 Charles Cushman (Broken Top Club) 84-85 –169 Bill Widmer (Eagle Crest Resort) 103-92 –195

AUTO RACING MADRAS DRAGSTRIP ——— June 11 Results (ET, MPH, Dial) High School — W: Jeffery Taylor, Salem (2005 T & A), 11.8, 59.52, 11.79. R/U: Jamie Ladd, Welches (2002 Halfscale), 10.9, 63.11, 10.99. Sportsman — W: Ken Green, Happy Valley (1967 Chevelle), 8.67, 75.13, 8.69. R/U: James Love, Bend (1967 Buick Skylark), 9.19, 73.41, 9.23. Semis: Chance Linquist, Powell Butte (car not available), 10.1, 71.20, 10.09. Pro — W: Larry Holm, Eagle Creek (1966 El Camino), 6.91, 98.68. 6.88. R/U: Annie Hausinger, Madras (1970 Ply GTX), 7.02, 97.40, 7.03. Semis: Gerald Ballard, Bend (1967 Buick Skylark), 7.58, 89.64, 7.56; Jack Kuzma, The Dalles (1985 Mustang), 7.37, 95.74, 7.35. Super Pro — W: Tom Stockero, Bend (1967 Camaro), 5.99, 117.4, 5.94. R/U: Brad Halvorson, Madras (1983 Chev S10), 7.15, 97.19, 7.16. Semis: Garen Ballard, Madras (1970 Plymouth Cuda), 6.58, 104.1, 6.57; Loy Petersen, Madras (Buick), 6.85, 100.2, 6.80. Motorcycle/Snowmobile — W: Jeffery Taylor, Salem (2005 T & A), 7.61, 80.07, 7.41. R/U: James Taylor, Salem (1985 Honda), 8.47, 83.33, 7.78. Semis: Enes Smith, Madras (car not available), 8.78, 83.18, 8.80; Buffy Taylor, Salem (1991 Yamaha), 7.07, 97.61, 6.92. Jr. Lightning — W: Casey Ladd, Welches (2006 Halfscale), 7.91, 80.65, 7.90. R/U: Jeffery Taylor, Salem (2005 T & A), 7.95, 80.65, 7.92. Jackpot — W: Chuck Ziegler, The Dalles (1984 Olds), 9.03, 75.89, 9.32. Runner: Dick Clark, Eagle Creek (car not available), 6.57, 111.3, 6.54. Semis: Shelly

Saturday’s Games Seattle FC at Toronto FC, 4 p.m. Chicago at New England, 4:30 p.m. Columbus at Houston, 5:30 p.m. D.C. United at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Colorado, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Vancouver, 7 p.m. FC Dallas at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Game New York at Portland, 7 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— AEGON International Wednesday At Devonshire Park Eastbourne, England (Premier) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Janko Tipsarevic (3), Serbia, vs. James Ward, Britain, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2. Second Round Igor Kunitsyn, Russia, def. Illya Marchenko, Ukraine, 6-3, 1-6, 6-2. Andreas Seppi, Italy, def. Donald Young, United States, 7-6 (1), 6-3. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, def. Kevin Anderson (6), South Africa, 6-3, 6-2. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (1), France, 6-2, 6-3. Julien Benneteau, France, def. Somdev Devvarman, India, 7-6 (1), 6-7 (6), 6-3. Kei Nishikori, Japan, leads Rainer Schuettler, Germany, 3-2. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, tied with Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, 3-6, 7-6, 1-1.

Goodman, Canby (1972 Nova), 7.47, 90.91, 7.45; Chuck Ziegler, The Dalles (1984 Olds), 9.43, 71.54, 9.22. June 12 Results (ET, MPH, Dial) High School — W: Jamie Ladd, Welches (2002 Halfscale), 10.9, 62.76, 10.91. R/U: Jeffery Taylor, Salem (2005 T & A), 11.7, 60.08, 11.79. Sportsman — W: James Love, Bend (1967 Buick Skylark), 9.22, 72.00, 9.19. R/U: George Fix, Molalla (1977 Nova), 8.46, 79.93, 8.41. Semis: Rob Kennard, Tieton, Wash. (2011 Subaru), 11.6, 55.62, 11.59), 11.6, 55.62, 11.59; Joe Kirkwood, Madras (car not available), 7.82, 88.41, 7.90. Pro — W: Gerald Ballard, Bend (1968 Cutlass), 7.57, 89.11, 7.55. R/U: Shelly Goodman, Canby (1972 Nova), 7.48, 91.28, 7.45. Semis: Patrick Arnott, Redmond (1982 Camaro Z28), 7.24, 95.74, 7.21); Larry Holm, Eagle Creek (1966 El Camino), 6.89, 97.83, 6.87. Super Pro — W: Jim Lovoi, Crooked River Ranch (1965 Nova), 6.53, 101.3, 6.49. R/U: David Regnier, Bend (1966 Chev Nova), 6.63, 103.6, 6.61. Semis: Brad Halvorson, Madras (1983 Chev S10), 7.24, 96.57, 7.12; Loy Petersen, Madras (Buick), 0.00, 0.00, 6.78. Motorcycle/Snowmobile — W: James Taylor, Salem (1985 Honda), 7.83, 91.84, 7.79. R/U: Mike Merritt, Bend (1996 Snowmobile), 5.97, 113.3, 5.96. Semis: Buffy Taylor, Salem (1991 Yamaha), 6.90, 98.68, 6.92; Jeffery Taylor, Salem (2005 T & A), 7.42, 91.46, 7.41. Jr. Lightning — W: Jeffery Taylor, Salem, 8.00, 75.38, 7.90. R/U: Casey Ladd, Welches (2006 Halfscale), 8.01, 81.82, 7.90. Jackpot — W: Dan Barnes, Redmond (Pickup), 9.70, 69.12, 9.68. R/U: Vicki McKelvy, Madras (1973 Camaro), 8.24, 81.82, 8.26. Semis: Jeffery Taylor, Salem (2005 T & A), 7.51, 90.91, 7.55.

GB — ½ ½ 1 1½ 2 GB — ½ 1 1½ 2½ 4

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division Wenatchee AppleSox Walla Walla Sweets Bellingham Bells Kelowna Falcons West Division Kitsap BlueJackets Bend Elks Corvallis Knights Klamath Falls Gems Cowlitz Black Bears Wednesday’s Games

Wednesday’s Summary

Elks 2, Bells 1 Bellingham 000 000 001 — 1 7 0 Bend 000 110 00X — 2 7 1 Howard, Nylund (4), Palewicz (7) and Calhoon. Bringham, Bailey (6), Cuneo (9), Grazzini (9) and Demello. W — Bringham. L — Howard. 2B — Bend: Christian (2).

College NCAA College World Series At TD Ameritrade Park Omaha Omaha, Neb. All Times PDT Double Elimination x-if necessary Saturday, June 18 Game 1 — North Carolina (50-14) vs. Vanderbilt (52-10), 11 a.m. Game 2 — Texas (49-17) vs. Florida (50-17), 4 p.m. Sunday, June 19 Game 3 — California (37-21) vs. Virginia (54-10), 11 a.m. Game 4 — South Carolina (50-14) vs. Texas A&M (4720), 4 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Indiana 3 1 .750 Chicago 2 1 .667 Connecticut 2 1 .667 New York 2 2 .500 Washington 1 2 .333 Atlanta 1 3 .250 Western Conference W L Pct San Antonio 3 0 1.000 Minnesota 3 1 .750 Los Angeles 2 1 .667 Seattle 1 1 .500 Phoenix 0 2 .000 Tulsa 0 5 .000 ——— Today’s Game Connecticut at Washington, 7 p.m. Friday’s Games Atlanta at Minnesota, 5 p.m. New York at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. San Antonio at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Indiana at Seattle, 7 p.m.

Bend 2, Bellingham 1 Kelowna 5, Kitsap 0 Wenatchee 7, Cowlitz 2 Klamath 3, Walla Walla 1 Today’s Games Bellingham at Bend, 6:35 p.m. Kelowna at Kitsap, 6:35 p.m. Klamath Falls at Walla Walla, 7:05 p.m.

W 11 6 3 2

L 1 4 6 6

W 8 5 3 4 2

L 4 3 5 6 7

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Playoffs All Times PDT ——— STANLEY CUP FINALS (Best-of-7) Boston 4, Vancouver 3 Wednesday, June 1: Vancouver 1, Boston 0 Saturday, June 4: Vancouver 3, Boston 2 (OT) Monday, June 6: Boston 8, Vancouver 1 Wednesday, June 8: Boston 4, Vancouver 0 Friday, June 10: Vancouver 1, Boston 0 Monday, June 13: Boston 5, Vancouver 2 Wednesday, June 15: Boston 4, Vancouver 0

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Philadelphia 6 3 4 22 16 New York 5 2 7 22 21 Houston 4 5 6 18 19 Columbus 4 4 6 18 14 D.C. 4 5 4 16 18 Toronto FC 2 5 9 15 15 Chicago 2 4 8 14 16 New England 3 7 5 14 11 Sporting Kansas City 2 6 4 10 16 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 8 2 7 31 22 FC Dallas 7 4 4 25 18 Seattle 5 4 7 22 18 Colorado 5 3 7 22 17 Real Salt Lake 6 3 3 21 14 San Jose 5 4 4 19 20 Chivas USA 4 5 5 17 17 Portland 5 6 2 17 15 Vancouver 1 6 8 11 16 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Wednesday’s Game New England 0, Toronto FC 0, tie Friday’s Game San Jose at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m.

GA 11 13 18 16 24 25 19 18 20 GA 14 16 15 14 7 16 16 19 22

UNICEF Open Wednesday At Autotron Rosmalen Den Bosch, Netherlands (Intl.) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Men Second Round Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, def. Nicolas Mahut, France, 7-6 (2), 3-6, 6-3. Alex Bogomolov Jr., United States, def. Filippo Volandri, Italy, 7-6 (2), 6-2. Xavier Malisse (3), Belgium, def. Jesse Huta Galung, Netherlands, 7-6 (2), 6-4. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def. Michael Berrer, Germany, 7-6 (6), 6-3. Denis Gremelmayer, Germany, def. Jarkko Nieminen (5), Finland, 7-6 (3), 2-6, 7-6 (5). Marcos Baghdatis (2), Cyprus, def. Robin Haase, Netherlands, 7-5, 6-4. Wimbledon Qualifying Wednesday At Bank of England Sports Ground Roehampton, England Singles Men Second Round Jurgen Zopp, Estonia, def. Ricardo Hocevar, Brazil, 6-4, 6-7 (4), 7-5. Women Second Round Junri Namigata (13), Japan, def. Olga Savchuk, Ukraine, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3. Estrella Cabeza Candela, Spain, def. Anna Floris, Italy, 6-4, 7-6 (5). Stephanie Foretz Gacon (14), France, def. Mariya Koryttseva, Ukraine, 4-6, 6-4, 8-6. Lesia Tsurenko (15), Ukraine, def. Beatriz Garcia Vidagany, Spain, 4-6, 7-6 (2), 6-0. Ekaterina Ivanova, Russia, def. Carla Suarez Navarro (8), Spain, 6-2, 6-4. Arina Rodionova, Russia, def. Kurumi Nara (18), Japan, 6-3, 6-4. Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, def. Sophie Ferguson, Australia, 6-2, 6-4. Chang Kai-chen (19), Taiwan, def. Noppawan Lertcheewakarn, Thailand, 6-4, 6-4. Nina Bratchikova, Russia, def. Sloane Stephens (12), United States, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3. Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada, def. Kathrin Woerle, Germany, 6-2, 6-3. Tamarine Tanasugarn (5), Thailand, def. Regina Kulikova, Russia, 6-4, 6-1. Irina Falconi (4), United States, def. Elena Bogdan, Romania, 6-2, 6-2. Kristyna Pliskova, Czech Republic, def. Eva Birnerova (9), Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-2. Lindsay Lee-Waters, United States, def. Arantxa Rus (3), Netherlands, 6-7 (1), 7-6 (3), 6-4. Silvia Soler-Espinosa (20), Spain, def. Erika Sema, Japan, 6-3, 6-2. Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, def. Nathalie Agnes Piquion, France, 6-0, 6-1. Misaki Doi (17), Japan, def. Melanie South, Britain, 7-5, 6-3. Stephanie Dubois (23), Canada, def. Heidi El Tabakh, Canada, 6-3, 6-2. Zuzana Kucova, Slovakia, def. Nuria Llagostera Vives (1), Spain, 6-4, 6-4. Tetiana Luzhanska, Ukraine, def. Edina Gallovits-Hall (6), Romania, 6-1, 6-1. Alexa Glatch, United States, def. Caroline Garcia, France, 6-1, 6-0. Mona Barthel, Germany, def. Valeria Savinykh (24), Russia, 6-1, 7-6 (3). Vitalia Diatchenko, Russia, def. Maria Elena Camerin (7), Italy, 6-3, 6-3. Camila Giorgi, Italy, def. Yvonne Meusburger (16), Austria, 2-6, 7-5, 6-3.

WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— AEGON International Wednesday At Devonshire Park Eastbourne, England (Premier) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Women Second Round

Venus Williams, United States, def. Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, 6-3, 6-2. Victoria Azarenka (3), Belarus, def. Elena Baltacha, Britain, 6-1, 7-6 (0). Petra Kvitova (5), Czech Republic, def. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 7-6 (8), 7-6 (4). Sam Stosur (7), Australia, def. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, 6-3, 6-2. Agnieszka Radwanska, Poland, def. Francesca Schiavone (4), Italy, 6-3, 6-2. Vera Zvonareva (1), Russia, def. Serena Williams, United States, 3-6, 7-6 (5), 7-5. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, def. Li Na (2), China, 7-6 (7), 6-3. Marion Bartoli (6), France, def. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez, Spain, 6-3, 6-3. UNICEF Open Wednesday At Autotron Rosmalen Den Bosch, Netherlands (Intl.) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Women Second Round Yanina Wickmayer (3), Belgium, def. Arantxa Parra Santonja, Spain, 7-6 (4), 6-7 (4), 7-5. Jelena Dokic, Australia, def. Flavia Pennetta (4), Italy, 6-3, 6-4. Dominika Cibulkova (5), Slovakia, def. Kristina Barrois, Germany, 6-0, 6-1. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, def. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, 6-2, 5-7, 6-4. Roberta Vinci (7), Italy, def. Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania, 6-2, 6-1. Svetlana Kuznetsova (2), Russia, def. Sara Errani, Italy, 3-6, 7-6 (3), 6-1.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended Atlanta minor-league RHP Matthew Suschak (Rome-SAL) 50 games after testing positive for an amphetamine. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Placed RHP Alfredo Simon on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 13. Recalled RHP Jason Berken from Norfolk (IL). LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Requested waivers on LHP Scott Kazmir for the purpose of giving him his unconditional release. MINNESOTA TWINS—Reinstated SS Tsuyoshi Nishioka from the 60-day DL. NEW YORK YANKEES—Agreed to terms with RHP Cory Wade and added him to the 25-man roster. TEXAS RANGERS—Agreed to terms with LHP Will Lamb and assigned him to Spokane (NWL). National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Activated OF Jason Heyward from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Matt Young to Gwinnett (IL). CHICAGO CUBS—Activated OF Alfonso Soriano from the 15-day DL. Placed 2B Darwin Barney on the 15day DL. Announced OF Brad Snyder cleared waivers and was assigned outright to Iowa (PCL). HOUSTON ASTROS—Placed RHP Brandon Lyon 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Fernando Abad from Oklahoma City (PCL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Sent C Wil Nieves outright to Nashville (PCL). Purchased the contract of C George Kottaras from Nashville. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Optioned RHP Elih Villanueva to New Orleans (PCL). Recalled INF Jose Lopez from New Orleans. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Activated RHP Kyle McClellan off the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Matt Carpenter to Memphis (PCL). SAN DIEGO PADRES—Designated INF Jorge Cantu for assignment. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Optioned RHP Yunesky Maya to Syracuse (IL). Recalled RHP Collin Balester from Syracuse. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MIAMI HEAT—Extended a qualifying offer to G Mario Chalmers, making him a restricted free agent. FOOTBALL National Football League WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Announced the retirement of area scout Bill Baker. Named Kyle Smith area scout for the Southwest region. Announced area scout Chip Flanagan will move to the Southeast region. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Signed senior advisor of hockey operations Scotty Bowman to a contract extension. Promoted Marc Bergevin to assistant general manager, Norm Maciver to director of player personnel and Kyle Davidson to hockey administration coordinator. NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Signed D Teemu Laaksoto a one-year contract. ST. LOUIS BLUES—Re-signed F Vladimir Sobotka to a three-year contract extension. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Re-signed C Mike Angelidis to a one-year contract. WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Re-signed D Patrick McNeill to a two-year contract. COLLEGE AUSTIN PEAY—Named Gary Shephard linebackers coach. HARVARD—Named Brian Adams men’s assistant basketball coach. TENNESSEE—Named Dave Serrano baseball coach. WYOMING—Announced G Joe Hudson has left the men’s basketball team. YALE—Promoted Eddie Ardito to women’s assistant ice hockey coach.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 2,511 975 188 48 The Dalles 2,494 845 48 10 John Day 1,166 527 21 4 McNary 1,484 542 12 0 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 202,965 66,038 7,061 2,363 The Dalles 143,558 49,422 1,693 804 John Day 117,309 47,214 2,992 1,783 McNary 110,375 36,393 2,750 1,590

Sailing • Competitive teams named for America’s Cup: Eight challengers from seven nations have been confirmed for the opening race of the new America’s Cup World Series in August in Portugal. Also competing with two boats will be defending champion Oracle Racing of San Francisco. Representatives from Oracle Racing, Team New Zealand, Artemis Racing of Sweden, China Team, Team Korea, Venezia Challenge of Italy and two teams from France, Energy Team and Aleph-Equipe De France, appeared together Wednesday in San Francisco. That’s where the 34th America’s Cup will be contested in 2013. The identity of the eighth foreign challenger will be announced in Europe on June 23.

Football • NFL, NFLPA negotiators meet for second day: NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and several owners met with NFL Players Association chief DeMaurice Smith and a group of players for a second straight day in Maryland to try and work out a new labor deal. The two sides released a joint statement Wednesday afternoon once talks concluded for the day, saying that U.S. Magistrate Judge Arthur Boylan oversaw the discussions. All 32 NFL owners are scheduled to meet in Chicago next week, when a framework for a collective bargaining agreement could be presented. • NFL fan code of conduct center of court case: City Attorney Jan Goldsmith believes the NFL has a right to enforce its code of conduct, including ejecting fans for making obscene gestures and using foul language. A criminal defense attorney disagrees, saying the code of conduct is unenforceable. At a hearing set for Friday, attorney Mary Frances Prevost will ask San Diego Superior Court Judge Gale Kaneshiro to clear the arrest record of Jason Ensign. Kaneshiro recently threw out battery charges against Ensign, a Kansas City fan who was detained by private security guards during a Chiefs-Chargers game at Qualcomm Stadium in 2009. — From wire reports

Li Na expected to spark Chinese tennis boom TENNIS

By Caroline Cheese The Associated Press

EASTBOURNE, England — First came the Russians. Now, women’s tennis is preparing for a Chinese boom after Li Na’s historic win at the French Open. Anna Kournikova’s success in the late 1990s inspired a succession of Russians to follow in her footsteps, and according to the WTA tour’s chief marketing officer Andrew Walker, Li Na’s win could have a similar effect in China. “It’s the tip of the iceberg in terms of the potential of the China market for women’s tennis,” Walker told The Associated Press in a telephone interview. “No question, it will inspire in China many young girls to pick up a racket who might not otherwise have done so. “I think we’re all very optimistic that it’ll have a domino effect in terms of continuing the growth of the women’s game in China at a much faster speed.” There are two Chinese players in the top 50 of the women’s game compared to 11 Russians, but the rankings could have a very different look in 10 years’ time.

Kirsty Wigglesworth / The Associated Press

Li Na of China plays a return to Tamira Paszek of Austria during their singles tennis match in Eastbourne, England, Tuesday. The 29-year-old Li became the first player from China to win a Grand Slam singles title when she beat Francesca Schiavone in the French Open earlier this month. The match was watched by 116 million people in her home country, making it the most-watched sporting event in China this year and the most-watched tennis match ever in the country.

Li is already one of the biggest sports stars in China, on a level with basketball player Yao Ming, and the WTA knows her success could have a wide-reaching impact on the game globally. “No question, it’s great news in terms of growing the game not only at the grassroots level, but in terms of attracting investment from Chinese brands as well as multinational brands into women’s tennis,” Walker said. The WTA already has two tournaments based in China. More could follow. Li hasn’t yet experienced the impact of her win in person. She stayed in Europe after winning at Roland Garros, and said she turned off her phone and didn’t look at the Internet because “people (were) a little bit crazy about the winner.” Following her first-round win at Eastbourne on Tuesday, she joked that she might never go back if she wins Wimbledon, which begins Monday. “For me when I think about

Wimbledon, it’s bigger than the other three Grand Slams. I really want to do well,” she said. “I hope I can do that (win Wimbledon). If I win at Wimbledon, I will stay in Europe rather than go back to Shanghai!” Li’s success wasn’t a bolt from the blue. China invested heavily in tennis, like other sports, before it hosted the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, and it was rewarded with a bronze medal in women’s doubles for Zheng Jie and Yan Zi. Li pulled out of China’s government-run sports training system in 2008, preferring to take control of her career, but the image of the tattooed star lifting the French Open trophy is expected to be the defining image that inspires a new generation of tennis players in China. The WTA hopes it will also improve the game as a whole. “I think if you look at the stars in the women’s game historically, it’s been quite cyclical in terms of the country they’ve come from,” Walker said. “Part of the reason for that is what I believe will be the Li Na phenomenon, that one player inspires others.”


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 D3

MA JOR L E AGUE BA SE BA L L AL BOXSCORES Mariners 3, Angels 1 Los Angeles Aybar ss Tor.Hunter rf Abreu dh V.Wells lf H.Kendrick 2b Trumbo 1b Bourjos cf c-M.Izturis ph Bo.Wilson c a-Conger ph-c Romine 3b b-Branyan ph-3b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 1 2 1 2 0 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 1 2

SO 0 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .287 .225 .290 .193 .307 .247 .250 .284 .200 .225 .143 .161

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. I.Suzuki rf 4 1 2 0 1 0 .269 Ryan ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .251 Smoak 1b 2 0 1 0 2 0 .250 Peguero dh 4 0 1 2 0 1 .223 Olivo c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .229 Carp lf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .278 Halman lf 1 1 1 1 0 0 .409 F.Gutierrez cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .193 Figgins 3b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .198 Ja.Wilson 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .239 Totals 32 3 9 3 4 7 Los Angeles 000 000 010 — 1 5 0 Seattle 000 000 21x — 3 9 0 a-fouled out for Bo.Wilson in the 8th. b-walked for Romine in the 8th. c-flied out for Bourjos in the 9th. LOB—Los Angeles 6, Seattle 10. 2B—Bourjos (11), I.Suzuki 2 (12), Smoak (15), Figgins (11). HR—Halman (1), off R.Thompson. RBIs—Aybar (25), Peguero 2 (15), Halman (3). SB—I.Suzuki 2 (18). S—Ja.Wilson. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 5 (Bo. Wilson 2, Romine, Abreu, M.Izturis); Seattle 5 (Olivo 3, I.Suzuki, Smoak). Runners moved up—Trumbo, Bo.Wilson. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Santana L, 3-7 6 2-3 8 2 2 3 7 121 4.25 R.Thompson 2-3 1 1 1 1 0 23 3.07 Cassevah 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 0.00 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bedard W, 4-4 7 3 0 0 0 5 96 3.16 Pauley H, 5 1 1 1 1 2 1 19 1.14 Lgue S, 19-22 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 4.03 Inherited runners-scored—R.Thompson 2-0, Cassevah 1-0. IBB—off E.Santana (I.Suzuki, Smoak). T—2:47. A—19,321 (47,878).

Indians 6, Tigers 4 Cleveland G.Sizemore cf C.Santana 1b Brantley lf A.Cabrera ss Choo rf LaPorta dh O.Cabrera 2b Hannahan 3b Marson c Totals

AB 4 4 5 5 4 4 4 2 3 35

R H 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 3 2 1 2 1 3 0 1 0 2 6 13

BI 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 6

BB 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 3

SO 0 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 5

Avg. .246 .221 .278 .296 .236 .247 .251 .231 .239

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .254 a-Dirks ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .254 Kelly 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .238 Boesch lf 4 1 1 2 1 0 .282 Mi.Cabrera 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .315 V.Martinez dh 4 1 2 0 0 1 .322 Ordonez rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .173 Avila c 2 0 2 2 2 0 .304 Jh.Peralta ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .294 Santiago 2b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .237 Totals 34 4 8 4 4 8 Cleveland 000 410 100 — 6 13 0 Detroit 300 100 000 — 4 8 1 a-struck out for A.Jackson in the 9th. E—Boesch (2). LOB—Cleveland 8, Detroit 8. 2B—O.Cabrera (9), V.Martinez 2 (19). HR—Boesch (9), off Carmona. RBIs—G.Sizemore (18), LaPorta 2 (31), O.Cabrera 2 (30), Marson (7), Boesch 2 (36), Avila 2 (38). S—Hannahan, Marson, Kelly. SF—G.Sizemore. Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 4 (Hannahan, Brantley, Marson, C.Santana); Detroit 4 (Jh.Peralta 3, Mi.Cabrera). Runners moved up—G.Sizemore, LaPorta, Boesch. GIDP—G.Sizemore, C.Santana, Mi.Cabrera. DP—Cleveland 1 (A.Cabrera, O.Cabrera, C.Santana); Detroit 2 (Jh.Peralta, Mi.Cabrera), (Mi.Cabrera, Jh.Peralta, Penny). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Crmona W, 4-8 5 8 4 4 2 3 103 5.79 R.Perez H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 1.32 Pestano H, 8 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 15 1.52 Sipp H, 13 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 13 2.22 Perez S, 17-18 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 2.49 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Penny 3 1-3 8 4 4 2 0 73 4.93 Furbush L, 1-1 1 2-3 3 1 1 1 2 41 2.00 Schlereth 1 1-3 1 1 0 0 2 14 2.61 Alburquerque 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.53 Purcey 2 1 0 0 0 1 20 2.35 Inherited runners-scored—Furbush 2-1, Alburquerque 1-1. WP—Penny, Alburquerque. T—3:34. A—26,711 (41,255).

Yankees 12, Rangers 4 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss J.Hamilton lf Mi.Young dh A.Beltre 3b N.Cruz rf Moreland 1b Torrealba c En.Chavez cf Totals

AB 3 4 5 3 3 4 4 4 4 34

R H 2 2 1 2 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 4 10

BI 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 4

BB 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 4

Avg. .236 .278 .292 .306 .262 .221 .303 .253 .361

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Swisher rf 3 1 1 0 2 0 .229 Dickerson rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Granderson cf 3 2 0 1 1 1 .278 Teixeira 1b 5 3 3 4 0 0 .257 Al.Rodriguez dh 3 1 0 0 2 0 .284 Cano 2b 5 1 2 3 0 1 .286 An.Jones lf 2 1 1 1 1 0 .221 Gardner lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .279 E.Nunez ss 4 1 2 1 1 0 .250 Cervelli c 3 0 1 1 1 0 .185 R.Pena 3b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .500 Totals 34 12 12 12 8 3 Texas 202 000 000 — 4 10 0 New York 210 123 03x — 12 12 1 E—E.Nunez (7). LOB—Texas 8, New York 7. 2B— J.Hamilton (12), Swisher (12). HR—Kinsler (8), off Nova; Teixeira (20), off D.Holland; E.Nunez (2), off D.Holland; R.Pena (1), off M.Lowe; Teixeira (21), off M.Lowe; Cano (14), off Feliz. RBIs—Kinsler (24), J.Hamilton (24), Mi.Young (43), A.Beltre (49), Granderson (52), Teixeira 4 (53), Cano 3 (45), An.Jones (11), E.Nunez (9), Cervelli (11), R.Pena (1). SB—Kinsler (13), Al.Rodriguez (4), Cano (6), E.Nunez 2 (8), Cervelli (3). SF—A.Beltre. Runners left in scoring position—Texas 3 (N.Cruz 2, Andrus); New York 4 (E.Nunez 2, Teixeira, Swisher). Runners moved up—A.Beltre, Granderson, Al.Rodriguez, Cano. GIDP—N.Cruz, E.Nunez. DP—Texas 1 (D.Holland, Andrus, Moreland); New York 2 (E.Nunez, Cano, Teixeira), (Teixeira). Texas IP H R ER BB SO Holland L, 5-2 5 7 6 6 5 0 M.Lowe 1 2 3 3 1 2 D.Oliver 1 1 0 0 1 0 Feliz 1 2 3 3 1 1 New York IP H R ER BB SO Nova W, 6-4 5 2-3 7 4 4 3 2 Ayala H, 1 1 1-3 2 0 0 1 1 Wade 1 0 0 0 0 1 Marquez 1 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Ayala 1-0. D.Holland (Granderson). WP—Nova. T—3:20. A—45,969 (50,291).

NP ERA 103 4.78 31 5.00 24 2.84 24 2.31 NP ERA 89 4.46 15 1.25 13 0.00 14 3.00 HBP—by

Repko lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .170 Tolbert 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .193 Butera c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .169 Totals 33 4 11 4 2 6 Chicago 000 001 000 — 1 6 0 Minnesota 003 000 01x — 4 11 0 LOB—Chicago 4, Minnesota 7. 2B—Al.Ramirez (17), A.Dunn (11), Beckham (8), Revere (2), A.Casilla (9), Valencia (12). RBIs—Morel (14), A.Casilla (13), D.Young 2 (19), Valencia (28). SB—Revere (6), A.Casilla (10), Cuddyer 3 (6). Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 3 (Pierre, Pierzynski 2); Minnesota 4 (D.Young, Valencia, A.Casilla, Tolbert). Runners moved up—Beckham. GIDP—Pierre, Pierzynski, A.Dunn, Beckham, Valencia. DP—Chicago 2 (Konerko, Al.Ramirez, Floyd), (Morel, Konerko); Minnesota 4 (Tolbert, A.Casilla, L.Hughes), (L.Hughes, A.Casilla, Pavano), (Pavano, A.Casilla, L.Hughes), (A.Casilla, Tolbert, L.Hughes). Chicago IP H R ER Floyd L, 6-6 8 11 4 4 Minnesota IP H R ER Pavano W, 4-5 9 6 1 1 IBB—off Floyd (Dinkelman). T—2:06. A—37,437 (39,500).

BB 2 BB 3

SO 6 SO 5

NP 117 NP 96

ERA 3.94 ERA 4.20

Blue Jays 4, Orioles 1 Baltimore Hardy ss Markakis rf Ad.Jones cf Guerrero dh Wieters c D.Lee 1b Mar.Reynolds 3b Reimold lf Andino 2b Totals

AB 4 2 3 4 4 4 2 3 3 29

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 4 1 4 12

Avg. .295 .251 .291 .281 .276 .219 .202 .244 .253

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Y.Escobar ss 4 1 3 1 0 0 .292 C.Patterson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Bautista rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .333 Lind dh 3 1 2 2 1 1 .337 J.Rivera 1b 4 1 3 1 0 1 .254 Arencibia c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .233 A.Hill 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .247 R.Davis cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .247 J.Nix 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .182 Totals 34 4 11 4 2 7 Baltimore 000 000 001 — 1 4 1 Toronto 100 001 20x — 4 11 0 E—D.Lee (3). LOB—Baltimore 5, Toronto 8. 2B— Hardy (9), J.Rivera (10), A.Hill (13). HR—Y.Escobar (8), off Arrieta; J.Rivera (5), off Arrieta; Lind (13), off Rapada. RBIs—Wieters (31), Y.Escobar (26), Lind 2 (41), J.Rivera (24). Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 2 (Guerrero, D.Lee); Toronto 4 (Arencibia 2, J.Rivera, J.Nix). GIDP—Guerrero, D.Lee. DP—Toronto 2 (Y.Escobar, A.Hill, J.Rivera), (J.Nix, A.Hill, J.Rivera). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arrieta L, 8-4 6 2-3 9 3 3 2 5 102 4.45 Rapada 0 1 1 1 0 0 4 7.84 Berken 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 10 7.79 Gregg 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 3.08 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Romero W, 6-6 8 3 1 1 4 12 114 3.01 Frncisco S, 6-9 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 5.21 R.Romero pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Rapada pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Rapada 1-1, F.Francisco 2-1. IBB—off Arrieta (Lind). T—2:27. A—14,541 (49,260).

Red Sox 3, Rays 0 Boston AB R Ellsbury cf 3 0 Pedroia 2b 4 1 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 3 1 Youkilis 3b 4 1 Ortiz dh 3 0 C.Crawford lf 3 0 Lowrie ss 3 0 J.Drew rf 3 0 Varitek c 2 0 Totals 28 3

H BI BB 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 3 3

SO 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2

Avg. .315 .262 .343 .259 .317 .244 .272 .225 .229

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Damon dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .277 Zobrist 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Joyce rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .322 Longoria 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Kotchman 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .335 B.Upton cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .213 Jaso c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .230 Ruggiano lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .348 Brignac ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .174 Totals 28 0 1 0 0 6 Boston 000 000 300 — 3 4 1 Tampa Bay 000 000 000 — 0 1 0 E—Beckett (1). LOB—Boston 1, Tampa Bay 1. 3B—Pedroia (1). HR—Youkilis (10), off Hellickson. RBIs—Youkilis 3 (45). CS—Ellsbury (9). Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 1 (Damon). GIDP—Pedroia, Ad.Gonzalez. DP—Tampa Bay 2 (Longoria, Brignac, Kotchman), (Longoria, Zobrist, Kotchman). Boston IP H R ER BB Beckett W, 6-2 9 1 0 0 0 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB Hllickson L, 7-5 7 4 3 3 2 C.Ramos 2-3 0 0 0 1 A.Russell 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—A.Russell Hellickson (Ad.Gonzalez). T—2:20. A—19,388 (34,078).

SO NP ERA 6 97 1.86 SO NP ERA 2 94 3.09 0 15 3.32 0 8 2.13 1-0. IBB—off

Athletics 2, Royals 1 Kansas City A.Gordon lf Me.Cabrera cf Hosmer 1b Francoeur rf Butler dh Moustakas 3b Treanor c Getz 2b A.Escobar ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 4 2 3 3 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

H BI BB 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 7 1 2

SO 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 3

Avg. .282 .276 .288 .268 .302 .294 .218 .239 .245

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeJesus rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Pennington ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .266 Matsui dh 1 0 0 0 2 0 .219 Willingham lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Sweeney cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .275 S.Sizemore 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Barton 1b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .215 Powell c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .204 J.Weeks 2b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .321 Totals 26 2 5 2 2 0 Kansas City 000 000 010 — 1 7 0 Oakland 000 001 10x — 2 5 1 E—Outman (1). LOB—Kansas City 5, Oakland 3. 2B—A.Escobar (12). RBIs—A.Gordon (37), Pennington (19), Barton (18). SB—A.Escobar (10), J.Weeks (1). CS—Me.Cabrera (2). S—S.Sizemore. Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 2 (Moustakas, Hosmer); Oakland 1 (Willingham). GIDP—A.Gordon, Getz, Willingham, Powell. DP—Kansas City 2 (A.Escobar, Hosmer), (A.Escobar, Hosmer); Oakland 2 (Pennington, Barton), (Barton, Pennington, Barton). Kansas City IP H R ER Hochevar L, 4-7 7 5 2 2 Collins 1 0 0 0 Oakland IP H R ER Outman W, 2-1 7 4 0 0 Fuentes H, 1 1 3 1 1 A.Bailey S, 2-3 1 0 0 0 T—2:14. A—16,392 (35,067).

BB 2 0 BB 2 0 0

SO 0 0 SO 2 0 1

NP 91 13 NP 97 21 14

ERA 4.87 3.53 ERA 3.14 4.85 1.50

NL BOXSCORES

Twins 4, White Sox 1 Chicago Pierre lf Al.Ramirez ss Quentin rf Konerko 1b Pierzynski c Rios cf A.Dunn dh Beckham 2b Morel 3b Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 2 2 3 3 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 6 1 3

SO 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 5

Avg. .258 .293 .265 .319 .279 .210 .183 .242 .253

Minnesota Revere cf A.Casilla ss Cuddyer rf D.Young dh L.Hughes 1b Valencia 3b Dinkelman lf

AB 4 4 3 4 4 4 3

R 1 1 2 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 2 0 0 2 1 0 2 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 1

SO 0 1 1 0 3 0 0

Avg. .282 .268 .278 .246 .269 .218 .286

Phillies 8, Marlins 1 (first game) Florida Coghlan cf Bonifacio ss Morrison lf G.Sanchez 1b Mujica p Badenhop p c-J.Buck ph Stanton rf Dobbs 3b Infante 2b Hayes c E.Villanueva p Sanches p a-Helms ph-1b Totals

AB 3 4 4 3 0 0 1 4 4 4 3 1 1 1 33

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 1

SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 6

Avg. .232 .279 .294 .311 --1.000 .229 .254 .311 .258 .318 .000 .250 .219

Reds 7, Dodgers 2

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W Boston 40 New York 38 Tampa Bay 36 Toronto 34 Baltimore 30 Central Division W Cleveland 36 Detroit 37 Chicago 33 Kansas City 30 Minnesota 27 West Division W Texas 36 Seattle 35 Los Angeles 33 Oakland 29

L 27 28 32 34 35 L 30 31 36 38 39 L 33 34 37 40

Pct .597 .576 .529 .500 .462 Pct .545 .544 .478 .441 .409 Pct .522 .507 .471 .420

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — 1½ 4½ 6½ 9 GB — — 4½ 7 9 GB — 1 3½ 7

Wednesday’s Games Cleveland 6, Detroit 4 N.Y. Yankees 12, Texas 4 Toronto 4, Baltimore 1 Boston 3, Tampa Bay 0 Minnesota 4, Chicago White Sox 1 Oakland 2, Kansas City 1 Seattle 3, L.A. Angels 1

WCGB — — 3 5 7½ WCGB — 2 6½ 9 11 WCGB — 4½ 7 10½

L10 9-1 6-4 6-4 5-5 5-5 L10 3-7 6-4 5-5 5-5 8-2 L10 3-7 4-6 3-7 2-8

Str W-1 W-2 L-1 W-2 L-4 Str W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 W-3 Str L-4 W-1 L-1 W-1

Home 19-13 22-17 15-17 17-17 20-18 Home 20-12 21-14 16-17 21-20 10-16 Home 20-13 19-17 15-20 15-16

Away 21-14 16-11 21-15 17-17 10-17 Away 16-18 16-17 17-19 9-18 17-23 Away 16-20 16-17 18-17 14-24

Today’s Games Baltimore (Guthrie 2-8) at Toronto (Z.Stewart 0-0), 9:37 a.m. Cleveland (Talbot 2-3) at Detroit (Scherzer 8-2), 10:05 a.m. Texas (C.Wilson 7-3) at N.Y. Yankees (B.Gordon 0-0), 10:05 a.m. Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 6-4) at Minnesota (Blackburn 5-4), 10:10 a.m. Kansas City (Francis 3-6) at Oakland (G.Gonzalez 5-5), 12:35 p.m. Boston (C.Buchholz 5-3) at Tampa Bay (Price 7-5), 4:10 p.m.

East Division W Philadelphia 43 Atlanta 38 New York 34 Florida 32 Washington 32 Central Division W Milwaukee 39 St. Louis 38 Cincinnati 37 Pittsburgh 34 Chicago 27 Houston 25 West Division W San Francisco 39 Arizona 37 Colorado 33 Los Angeles 31 San Diego 30

L 26 31 34 36 36 L 30 31 33 33 40 44 L 29 32 35 39 40

Pct .623 .551 .500 .471 .471 Pct .565 .551 .529 .507 .403 .362 Pct .574 .536 .485 .443 .429

GB — 5 8½ 10½ 10½ GB — 1 2½ 4 11 14 GB — 2½ 6 9 10

Wednesday’s Games Philadelphia 8, Florida 1, 1st game Cincinnati 7, L.A. Dodgers 2 Colorado 6, San Diego 3 Philadelphia 5, Florida 4, 10 innings, 2nd game Washington 10, St. Louis 0 N.Y. Mets 4, Atlanta 0 Milwaukee 9, Chicago Cubs 5 Pittsburgh 7, Houston 3 San Francisco 5, Arizona 2

WCGB — — 3½ 5½ 5½ WCGB — — 1½ 3 10 13 WCGB — 1 4½ 7½ 8½

L10 8-2 6-4 7-3 1-9 7-3 L10 6-4 4-6 7-3 6-4 4-6 2-8 L10 7-3 4-6 6-4 3-7 3-7

Str W-6 L-3 W-2 L-6 W-5 Str W-1 L-5 W-3 W-3 L-1 L-2 Str W-3 L-2 W-2 L-3 L-2

Home 27-12 17-15 15-17 15-22 16-12 Home 25-9 18-12 20-15 15-18 14-20 13-24 Home 19-12 20-15 17-18 15-19 14-26

Away 16-14 21-16 19-17 17-14 16-24 Away 14-21 20-19 17-18 19-15 13-20 12-20 Away 20-17 17-17 16-17 16-20 16-14

Today’s Games Florida (Vazquez 3-6) at Philadelphia (Cl. Lee 6-5), 10:05 a.m. Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 4-4) at Houston (Lyles 0-1), 11:05 a.m. Milwaukee (Greinke 6-1) at Chicago Cubs (Garza 2-6), 11:20 a.m. St. Louis (Lohse 7-3) at Washington (Lannan 4-5), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Dickey 3-7) at Atlanta (Minor 0-2), 4:10 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 4-1) at Arizona (I.Kennedy 7-2), 6:40 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Mariners 3, Angels 1: SEATTLE — Carlos Peguero’s two-out groundball in the seventh inning ricocheted off second base, over the head of Angels shortstop Erick Aybar and into center field to score a pair and help give Seattle a win over Los Angeles. Erik Bedard (4-4) threw seven shutout innings and the Mariners salvaged the finale of the three-game series. • Red Sox 3, Rays 0: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Josh Beckett pitched a one-hitter, allowing only an infield single in the third inning by Reid Brignac, and led Boston to victory over Tampa Bay. Kevin Youkilis hit a three-run homer and that was plenty for Beckett (6-2). • Yankees 12, Rangers 4: NEW YORK — Mark Teixeira hit two-run homers from each side of the plate and the New York Yankees connected five times, romping past Texas. Robinson Cano and youngsters Eduardo Nunez and Ramiro Pena homered as New York handed Texas its seasonhigh fourth straight loss. • Blue Jays 4, Orioles 1: TORONTO — Ricky Romero struck out 12 and gave up three hits in eight-plus innings as Toronto beat Baltimore for the 16th straight time at the Rogers Centre. Adam Lind, Yunel Escobar and Juan Rivera each hit home runs. • Indians 6, Tigers 4: DETROIT — Orlando Cabrera had three hits, including a go-ahead double in the fifth inning, and Cleveland beat Detroit. The Indians (36-30) pulled back ahead of the Tigers (37-31) at the top of the AL Central by a percentage point. • Twins 4, White Sox 1: MINNEAPOLIS — Carl Pavano kept up his recent surge with a six-hitter for Minnesota in a victory over the Chicago White Sox. Pavano (4-5) walked three, struck out five and recorded six one-pitch outs against the freeswinging White Sox. • Athletics 2, Royals 1: OAKLAND, Calif. — Josh Outman allowed four hits over seven innings and Oakland gave new manager Bob Melvin his first home victory by beating Kansas City. Cliff Pennington and Daric Barton had RBI singles off starter Luke Hochevar (4-7), who took a no-hit bid into the sixth inning before it all fell apart.

• Phillies 8-5, Marlins 1-4: PHILADELPHIA — Carlos Ruiz’s RBI single to center with two outs in the 10th inning gave Philadelphia a comeback victory over Florida and a sweep of a doubleheader. Ryan Madson (3-1) pitched a scoreless 10th for the Phillies, who have won nine of 11. The Marlins had two on with two outs in the 10th, but Madson struck out Mike Stanton. In the opener, Jimmy Rollins hit a three-run homer and Wilson Valdez had a three-RBI triple for Philadelphia. • Reds 7, Dodgers 2: LOS ANGELES — Scott Rolen had three hits and drove in three runs, leading Cincinnati to its first three-game sweep of the Los Angeles Dodgers since 2004. Rolen hit two RBI doubles and added a run-scoring single. Ryan Hanigan and Fred Lewis both drove in two runs. • Rockies 6, Padres 3: DENVER — Jhoulys Chacin scattered three hits over six innings and Seth Smith hit a tiebreaking single as part of a fiverun sixth to lift Colorado past San Diego. Chacin (8-4) gave up a solo homer to Rob Johnson. • Nationals 10, Cardinals 0: WASHINGTON — Livan Hernandez pitched a three-hitter and Michael Morse homered twice and doubled to lead Washington to its fifth straight win. • Pirates 7, Astros 3: HOUSTON — Pinch-hitter Xavier Paul doubled, then stayed in the game and hit a two-run homer and single as Pittsburgh moved over .500 with a win over Houston. Neil Walker tripled and drove in three runs for the Pirates. • Mets 4, Braves 0: ATLANTA — Dillon Gee combined with three relievers for a two-hit shutout, Angel Pagan hit a two-run homer and the surging New York Mets beat Atlanta. Gee gave up one hit in four innings. • Brewers 9, Cubs 5: CHICAGO — Rickie Weeks homered and doubled twice as Milwaukee beat the Chicago Cubs to take sole possession of the NL Central lead on a night when heavy rain delayed the start by 1 hour, 42 minutes. • Giants 5, Diamondbacks 2: PHOENIX — Madison Bumgarner went six innings and got enough run support for a change, helping him pitch San Francisco past Arizona.

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 5 1 2 4 0 0 .262 Victorino cf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .286 Utley 2b 3 1 0 0 0 1 .267 J.Romero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Gload ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Baez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Howard 1b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .250 Do.Brown rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .240 B.Francisco lf 2 2 0 0 2 0 .217 W.Valdez 3b 4 1 3 3 0 0 .253 Sardinha c 3 1 0 0 1 2 .219 K.Kendrick p 2 0 0 0 1 1 .125 M.Martinez 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .200 Totals 32 8 8 8 6 6 Florida 100 000 000 — 1 6 0 Philadelphia 116 000 00x — 8 8 1 a-grounded out for Sanches in the 7th. b-struck out for J.Romero in the 8th. c-struck out for Badenhop in the 9th. E—Do.Brown (2). LOB—Florida 6, Philadelphia 7. 2B—Victorino (9), Howard (16). 3B—W.Valdez (1). HR—Morrison (9), off K.Kendrick; Rollins (6), off E.Villanueva. RBIs—Morrison (25), Rollins 4 (27), Howard (56), W.Valdez 3 (12). Runners left in scoring position—Florida 1 (Helms); Philadelphia 3 (Do.Brown, Victorino, Gload). Runners moved up—Rollins, Do.Brown. GIDP— Bonifacio. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Howard, Rollins). Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Vlanueva L, 0-1 3 5 8 8 5 2 92 24.00 Sanches 3 1 0 0 1 2 38 1.98 Mujica 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 8 3.18 Badenhop 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 16 3.26 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kendrick W, 4-4 7 5 1 1 1 5 88 3.12 J.Romero 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.86 Baez 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 3.98 Inherited runners-scored—Badenhop 1-0. IBB—off E.Villanueva (B.Francisco). HBP—by E.Villanueva (Utley). T—2:41. A—44,758 (43,651).

Phillies 5, Marlins 4 (second game, 10 innings) Florida H.Ramirez ss Coghlan cf b-Bonifacio ph-cf Morrison lf G.Sanchez 1b M.Dunn p Stanton rf Dobbs 3b Jo.Lopez 2b J.Buck c Ani.Sanchez p Choate p c-Infante ph L.Nunez p Helms 1b Totals

AB 4 3 1 5 4 0 4 3 3 4 3 0 1 0 0 35

R 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 4 3

SO 2 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .206 .233 .277 .286 .310 --.250 .312 .211 .229 .143 --.257 --.219

Philadelphia Rollins ss Victorino cf Utley 2b Howard 1b Polanco 3b Ibanez lf Do.Brown rf Ruiz c Halladay p a-B.Francisco ph Bastardo p Stutes p d-Gload ph

AB 4 5 5 4 4 5 4 3 2 1 0 0 1

R 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 1 2 2 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

SO 0 2 1 1 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 0

Avg. .258 .288 .275 .250 .304 .241 .228 .252 .057 .216 ----.286

1-M.Martinez pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .200 Madson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 38 5 9 5 5 9 Florida 200 200 000 0 — 4 6 1 Philadelphia 100 010 002 1 — 5 9 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Halladay in the 7th. b-popped out for Coghlan in the 8th. c-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Choate in the 9th. d-singled for Stutes in the 9th. 1-ran for Gload in the 9th. E—J.Buck (3). LOB—Florida 7, Philadelphia 10. 2B—H.Ramirez (7), Dobbs (12), Jo.Lopez (5), Utley (5), Polanco (10). 3B—Utley (2). HR—G.Sanchez (12), off Halladay. RBIs—Morrison (26), G.Sanchez (43), J.Buck 2 (26), Victorino 2 (23), Utley 2 (12), Ruiz (13). SB—Victorino 2 (11). S—Bonifacio. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 2 (Infante, Stanton); Philadelphia 6 (Polanco 2, Halladay 2, Ibanez, Utley). Runners moved up—Coghlan, Morrison, Rollins, Do.Brown. Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ani.Sanchez 7 4 2 2 4 6 125 3.02 Choate H, 9 1 1 0 0 0 2 21 0.71 L.Nunez 1 3 2 2 0 0 22 3.77 M.Dunn L, 4-5 2-3 1 1 1 1 1 20 4.15 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Halladay 7 6 4 4 0 8 112 2.56 Bastardo 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 10 1.05 Stutes 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 24 2.25 Madson W, 3-1 1 0 0 0 2 1 22 2.10 IBB—off Ani.Sanchez (Ruiz), off Madson (G.Sanchez). HBP—by M.Dunn (Howard), by Halladay (Dobbs), by Stutes (Jo.Lopez). T—3:30. A—45,880 (43,651).

Nationals 10, Cardinals 0 St. Louis AB R Theriot ss 3 0 Franklin p 0 0 M.Hamilton 1b 1 0 Rasmus cf 4 0 Pujols 3b 3 0 Descalso 3b 0 0 Berkman 1b 3 0 Tallet p 0 0 A.Brown rf 3 0 Jay lf 3 0 Y.Molina c 2 0 T.Cruz c 1 0 Schumaker 2b 3 0 McClellan p 1 0 a-Greene ph-ss 2 0 Totals 29 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0

SO 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 6

Avg. .296 .000 .125 .263 .272 .243 .313 --.143 .314 .303 .273 .230 .174 .204

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Werth rf 5 2 1 1 0 1 .239 Bernadina cf 5 0 3 1 0 0 .269 Zimmerman 3b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .316 L.Nix lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .295 Bixler lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .172 Morse 1b 4 3 3 3 0 0 .312 Espinosa 2b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .226 I.Rodriguez c 4 2 3 1 0 0 .223 L.Hernandez p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Desmond ss 4 0 1 2 0 0 .235 Totals 38 10 15 10 0 3 St. Louis 000 000 000 — 0 3 3 Washington 011 301 31x — 10 15 0 a-struck out for McClellan in the 6th. E—Pujols 2 (7), Greene (5). LOB—St. Louis 2, Washington 6. 2B—Jay (8), Bernadina (5), Morse (11), Espinosa (10), I.Rodriguez (6). HR—Morse (11), off McClellan; Morse (12), off Franklin; Espinosa (11), off Franklin; Werth (9), off Tallet. RBIs—Werth (25), Bernadina (10), Zimmerman (6), Morse 3 (40), Espinosa (37), I.Rodriguez (16), Desmond 2 (19). CS—Theriot (3). S—L.Hernandez 2. Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 1

(Y.Molina); Washington 4 (L.Nix, Zimmerman 2, Desmond). GIDP—Werth, Zimmerman. DP—St. Louis 2 (Pujols, Schumaker, Berkman), (Greene, Schumaker, Berkman); Washington 1 (I.Rodriguez, I.Rodriguez, Desmond). St. Louis IP H R ER BB McClelan L, 6-3 5 7 5 3 0 Franklin 1 2-3 7 4 4 0 Tallet 1 1-3 1 1 1 0 Washington IP H R ER BB Hrnndez W, 4-8 9 3 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Tallet 2-0. T—2:23. A—27,130 (41,506).

SO 3 0 0 SO 6

NP 77 38 18 NP 105

ERA 3.96 8.17 7.15 ERA 3.77

Rockies 6, Padres 3 San Diego AB R Denorfia rf 5 0 Bartlett ss 5 0 Headley 3b 3 0 Ludwick lf 2 0 Rizzo 1b 4 0 Maybin cf 4 0 Alb.Gonzalez 2b 4 1 Ro.Johnson c 4 1 Latos p 2 0 Qualls p 0 0 b-Venable ph 0 0 Luebke p 0 0 Scribner p 0 0 d-Forsythe ph 1 1 Totals 34 3

H BI BB SO 2 2 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 3 3 10

Avg. .308 .259 .278 .259 .190 .259 .202 .177 .045 --.220 .000 --.167

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Gonzalez cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .277 J.Herrera 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .246 Helton 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .315 Tulowitzki ss 3 0 1 0 1 2 .274 S.Smith rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .307 Wigginton 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .259 Blackmon lf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .343 J.Morales c 4 1 2 0 0 0 .267 Chacin p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .103 a-Spilborghs ph 1 0 1 2 0 0 .248 Lindstrom p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Mat.Reynolds p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Giambi ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 R.Betancourt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 6 13 6 1 4 San Diego 000 010 101 — 3 7 0 Colorado 000 015 00x — 6 13 2 a-singled for Chacin in the 6th. b-walked for Qualls in the 7th. c-flied out for Mat.Reynolds in the 8th. d-doubled for Scribner in the 9th. E—J.Morales 2 (5). LOB—San Diego 8, Colorado 6. 2B—Bartlett (8), Alb.Gonzalez (4), Forsythe (2), Tulowitzki (16). HR—Ro.Johnson (2), off Chacin. RBIs—Denorfia 2 (13), Ro.Johnson (6), C.Gonzalez (38), S.Smith (29), Wigginton (22), Blackmon (4), Spilborghs 2 (15). SB—Headley (8), Blackmon (5). CS—Bartlett (4), C.Gonzalez (4). S—Chacin. Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 4 (Rizzo, Maybin 2, Headley); Colorado 3 (J.Herrera 2, Giambi). DP—San Diego 1 (Alb.Gonzalez, Rizzo). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Latos L, 4-8 5 1-3 8 4 4 1 2 94 4.06 Qualls 2-3 4 2 2 0 1 23 2.31 Luebke 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.09 Scribner 1 1 0 0 0 0 22 2.08 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chacin W, 8-4 6 3 1 1 2 7 97 2.81 Lindstrom 2-3 2 1 1 1 1 28 2.93 Reynolds H, 9 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.54 R.Betancourt 1 2 1 1 0 1 16 3.58 Inherited runners-scored—Qualls 2-2, Mat.Reynolds 2-0. PB—J.Morales. Catchers’ interference—J.Morales. T—3:22. A—35,877 (50,490).

Cincinnati Heisey cf Renteria ss Votto 1b B.Phillips 2b Rolen 3b J.Gomes lf F.Lewis rf Arredondo p Bray p Masset p Hanigan c Tr.Wood p Bruce rf Totals

AB 5 4 4 5 5 4 3 0 0 0 3 2 1 36

R H 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 3 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 7 11

BI 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 7

BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

SO 3 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 8

Avg. .272 .231 .331 .281 .252 .209 .253 ------.267 .077 .282

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon ss 5 0 2 0 0 0 .333 Carroll 2b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .314 Ethier rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .313 Kemp cf 4 0 2 0 1 1 .335 Uribe 3b 3 0 0 1 2 0 .218 M.Thames lf 3 0 0 1 1 0 .152 Loney 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Barajas c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .222 Billingsley p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .308 a-Blake ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .259 Lindblom p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Gwynn Jr. ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Guerrier p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Guerra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Miles ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .303 Troncoso p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 34 2 8 2 6 4 Cincinnati 024 100 000 — 7 11 2 Los Angeles 100 000 100 — 2 8 0 a-popped out for Billingsley in the 4th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Lindblom in the 6th. c-singled for Guerra in the 8th. E—Renteria 2 (8). LOB—Cincinnati 7, Los Angeles 12. 2B—Rolen 2 (15), F.Lewis 2 (4), Ethier (17), Kemp (15). RBIs—Rolen 3 (26), F.Lewis 2 (8), Hanigan 2 (16), Uribe (22), M.Thames (6). CS—Renteria (1), D.Gordon (1). S—Tr.Wood. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 5 (Heisey 4, J.Gomes); Los Angeles 7 (Loney 3, Carroll, Ethier, M.Thames, Uribe). Runners moved up—B.Phillips, J.Gomes, Kemp, Uribe. GIDP—Carroll, M.Thames. DP—Cincinnati 2 (Renteria, B.Phillips, Votto), (Renteria, B.Phillips, Votto); Los Angeles 1 (Barajas, Barajas, D.Gordon). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tr.Wood W, 5-4 6 5 1 1 5 2 114 5.11 Arredondo 1 2 1 1 0 0 12 3.95 Bray 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 1.52 Masset 1 0 0 0 1 1 17 3.79 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Billingsly L, 5-6 4 9 7 7 4 3 88 4.65 Lindblom 2 1 0 0 0 1 28 1.00 Guerrier 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 4.24 Guerra 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 2.92 Troncoso 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 6.28 IBB—off Tr.Wood (Kemp). HBP—by Tr.Wood (Ethier). PB—Barajas. T—3:12. A—30,443 (56,000).

Pirates 7, Astros 3 Pittsburgh AB R H Tabata lf 6 1 2 Diaz rf 3 1 1 b-G.Jones ph 1 1 1 D.McCutchen p 1 0 0 d-Ciriaco ph 1 0 0 Resop p 0 0 0 Hanrahan p 0 0 0 A.McCutchen cf 3 1 1 Walker 2b 3 0 2 Overbay 1b 4 0 0 Br.Wood 3b 4 0 0 McKenry c 5 1 2 Cedeno ss 5 0 2 Morton p 1 0 0 a-Paul ph-rf 3 2 3 Totals 40 7 14

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 7

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 5

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 1 1 0 11

Avg. .269 .248 .250 .000 .000 ----.293 .261 .229 .214 .182 .225 .038 .284

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .283 Keppinger 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .294 An.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Michaels ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .196 Melancon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Pence rf 5 0 2 0 0 2 .321 Ca.Lee lf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .268 Wallace 1b 3 0 2 1 2 1 .318 C.Johnson 3b 3 1 0 0 0 0 .229 Del Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Fe.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --M.Downs 2b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .282 Barmes ss 5 0 1 1 0 0 .212 Towles c 4 1 0 0 1 1 .198 Happ p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .304 Ang.Sanchez 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Totals 39 3 12 3 3 6 Pittsburgh 101 003 200 — 7 14 1 Houston 001 110 000 — 3 12 1 a-doubled for Morton in the 6th. b-singled for Diaz in the 6th. c-singled for An.Rodriguez in the 8th. d-grounded out for D.McCutchen in the 9th. E—Br.Wood (1), Wallace (4). LOB—Pittsburgh 13, Houston 14. 2B—Tabata (13), Diaz (7), A.McCutchen (15), Paul (1), Barmes (8). 3B—Walker (1). HR—Paul (1), off Fe.Rodriguez. RBIs—G.Jones (21), A.McCutchen (38), Walker 3 (45), Paul 2 (8), Bourn (22), Wallace (21), Barmes (9). SB—A.McCutchen (13), Bourn 2 (29), Pence (4). S—Morton, Happ. SF—Walker. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 9 (Overbay 2, Br.Wood 2, Tabata, McKenry 2, D.McCutchen, Ciriaco); Houston 11 (C.Johnson 2, Barmes 2, Pence 2, Towles 3, Ca.Lee 2). Runners moved up—Walker, Overbay. Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton W, 7-3 5 8 3 3 2 3 109 3.21 McCutchen H, 2 3 3 0 0 0 1 51 2.34 Resop 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 21 4.20 Hnrn S, 19-19 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 1.39 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ 5 6 2 2 4 7 107 4.95 DRosario L, 0-1 1 3 3 2 0 1 27 4.65 Fe.Rodriguez 2-3 3 2 2 0 1 23 3.65 An.Rodriguez 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 2 19 5.80 Melancon 1 2 0 0 0 0 15 1.62 Inherited runners-scored—Hanrahan 2-0, An.Rodriguez 1-0. IBB—off Happ (Walker). HBP—by D.McCutchen (Bourn). T—3:47. A—29,866 (40,963).

Mets 4, Braves 0 New York AB R Jos.Reyes ss 4 1 R.Tejada 2b 4 0 Beltran rf 4 0 Dan.Murphy 3b 4 1 Pagan cf 4 1 Bay lf 4 0 Duda 1b 3 1 Thole c 2 0 Fr.Rodriguez p 0 0 Gee p 1 0 a-Pridie ph 1 0 D.Carrasco p 0 0 b-Harris ph 1 0 Parnell p 0 0 R.Paulino c 0 0 Totals 32 4

H BI BB 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 4 3

SO 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .345 .295 .281 .299 .252 .214 .139 .234 .000 .050 .236 --.226 --.324

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schafer cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .211 Uggla 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .178 McCann c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .296 C.Jones 3b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .258 Hinske 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .262 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .265 Heyward rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .211 Mather lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .222 T.Hudson p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .040 C.Martinez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Linebrink p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Conrad ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .205 O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 29 0 2 0 2 12 New York 100 200 100 — 4 6 0 Atlanta 000 000 000 — 0 2 1 a-struck out for Gee in the 5th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for D.Carrasco in the 7th. c-singled for Linebrink in the 8th. E—Heyward (2). LOB—New York 4, Atlanta 4. 2B—Jos.Reyes (20), Ale.Gonzalez (12). HR—Pagan (2), off T.Hudson. RBIs—Jos.Reyes (28), R.Tejada (10), Pagan 2 (17). SB—Bay (5). CS—Pagan (3). Runners left in scoring position—New York 3 (Gee, R.Tejada 2); Atlanta 1 (Mather). Runners moved up—Jos.Reyes, R.Tejada. New York IP Gee 4 D.Carrasco 2 Parnell W, 1-1 2 Fr.Rodriguez 1 Atlanta IP T.Hudson L, 5-6 4

H 1 0 1 0 H 4

R 0 0 0 0 R 3

ER 0 0 0 0 ER 2

BB 2 0 0 0 BB 1

SO 5 1 5 1 SO 4

NP 53 22 32 7 NP 67

ERA 2.86 4.85 3.46 2.73 ERA 4.08

C.Martinez 2 1-3 1 1 1 2 Linebrink 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 O’Flaherty 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Linebrink T.Hudson (Thole). T—2:27. A—31,161 (49,586).

2 49 3.62 0 17 4.15 1 13 1.38 3-1. IBB—off

Brewers 9, Cubs 5 Milwaukee AB R H R.Weeks 2b 5 1 3 Morgan cf 5 0 1 Braun lf 5 3 3 Fielder 1b 2 3 1 McGehee 3b 4 2 1 C.Hart rf 4 0 3 Y.Betancourt ss 5 0 1 Lucroy c 4 0 1 Narveson p 3 0 0 Dillard p 0 0 0 Hawkins p 0 0 0 b-Jo.Wilson ph 1 0 0 Loe p 0 0 0 e-Kotsay ph 1 0 0 Axford p 0 0 0 Totals 39 9 14

BI 1 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

BB 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 2 1 1 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 10

Avg. .288 .326 .311 .302 .229 .286 .231 .272 .154 ----.273 --.252 ---

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. S.Castro ss 4 1 0 0 1 1 .305 Re.Johnson cf 5 1 2 3 0 0 .368 Je.Baker 1b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .347 Ar.Ramirez 3b 5 0 1 0 0 2 .277 Soto c 4 0 0 0 1 2 .213 Montanez rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .290 c-Fukudome ph-rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .293 DeWitt lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .283 LeMahieu 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .250 Zambrano p 1 1 0 0 1 1 .313 a-A.Soriano ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .270 J.Russell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 C.Carpenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Grabow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Campana ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 R.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 38 5 9 5 4 10 Milwaukee 000 230 211 — 9 14 2 Chicago 100 030 010 — 5 9 1 a-struck out for Zambrano in the 6th. b-grounded out for Hawkins in the 8th. c-grounded out for Montanez in the 8th. d-grounded out for Grabow in the 8th. e-struck out for Loe in the 9th. E—McGehee 2 (13), S.Castro (15). LOB—Milwaukee 9, Chicago 10. 2B—R.Weeks 2 (18), Braun 2 (15), McGehee (12), C.Hart (10), DeWitt (7). HR—R.Weeks (13), off Grabow; Je.Baker (2), off Narveson; Re.Johnson (3), off Narveson. RBIs—R.Weeks (31), McGehee 2 (27), C.Hart 2 (19), Y.Betancourt 2 (22), Lucroy 2 (29), Re.Johnson 3 (21), Je.Baker (15), LeMahieu (1). CS—Braun (4). SF—Lucroy. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 6 (McGehee, Narveson, Y.Betancourt, Lucroy, Kotsay 2); Chicago 4 (S.Castro 2, LeMahieu, Fukudome). Runners moved up—McGehee, DeWitt, Campana. Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nrveson W, 4-4 5 1-3 5 4 4 3 5 88 4.48 Dillard H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.53 Hawkins H, 7 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 0.52 Loe 1 2 1 1 0 0 13 5.35 Axford 1 1 0 0 1 3 20 2.87 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zmbrano L, 5-4 6 9 5 5 2 6 110 4.59 J.Russell 1-3 1 2 0 1 1 14 5.30 C.Carpenter 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 16 0.00 Grabow 1 1 1 1 0 0 14 4.71 R.Lopez 1 2 1 1 0 2 22 6.57 Inherited runners-scored—Dillard 1-0, C.Carpenter 2-2. IBB—off Zambrano (Fielder). HBP—by R.Lopez (McGehee). T—3:02. A—39,821 (41,159).

Giants 5, Diamondbacks 2 San Francisco Rowand cf-lf M.Tejada ss P.Sandoval 3b C.Ross rf Huff 1b Burrell lf S.Casilla p Romo p d-Schierholtz ph Br.Wilson p Hall 2b Whiteside c Bumgarner p a-Torres ph-cf Totals

AB 5 4 4 3 4 2 0 0 1 0 4 3 2 2 34

R H 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 5 10

BI 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

SO 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

Avg. .250 .223 .308 .269 .239 .225 ----.259 --.229 .211 .167 .250

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bloomquist lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .250 K.Johnson 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .218 J.Upton rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .285 C.Young cf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .256 S.Drew ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Nady 1b 4 0 0 0 0 4 .258 R.Roberts 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .256 H.Blanco c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .222 b-Montero ph-c 1 0 1 0 1 0 .285 J.Saunders p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .192 c-Burroughs ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Da.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Putz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Miranda ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Totals 34 2 9 2 2 8 San Francisco 100 101 002 — 5 10 0 Arizona 001 100 000 — 2 9 0 a-flied out for Bumgarner in the 7th. b-singled for H.Blanco in the 7th. c-grounded into a double play for J.Saunders in the 7th. d-grounded out for Romo in the 9th. e-grounded out for Putz in the 9th. LOB—San Francisco 5, Arizona 7. 2B—C.Ross (13), Hall (8), C.Young (20), R.Roberts (10). 3B—Burrell (1), Whiteside (1). HR—Bloomquist (2), off Bumgarner; C.Young (13), off Bumgarner. RBIs—Huff (35), Burrell (16), Hall (14), Whiteside (4), Bloomquist (8), C.Young (36). CS—Rowand (3), K.Johnson (2). Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 3 (Burrell, Bumgarner, Whiteside); Arizona 3 (S.Drew, Nady, Miranda). Runners moved up—Huff. GIDP—M.Tejada, Whiteside, Burroughs. DP—San Francisco 1 (Hall, M.Tejada, Huff); Arizona 2 (S.Drew, K.Johnson, Nady), (S.Drew, K.Johnson, Nady). SF IP H R ER Bmgrner W, 3-8 6 5 2 2 S.Casilla H, 2 1 1 0 0 Romo H, 10 1 2 0 0 Wlson S, 20-22 1 1 0 0 Arizona IP H R ER Saunders L, 3-7 7 8 3 3 Da.Hernandez 1 0 0 0 Putz 1 2 2 2 WP—Putz. PB—Whiteside. T—2:55. A—24,194 (48,633).

BB 1 0 0 1 BB 3 0 0

SO 6 0 1 1 SO 4 0 0

NP 101 11 13 23 NP 116 13 20

ERA 3.21 1.04 2.18 2.53 ERA 4.50 2.81 2.48

LEADERS Through Wednesday’s Games ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—AdGonzalez, Boston, .343; Bautista, Toronto, .333; Joyce, Tampa Bay, .322; VMartinez, Detroit, .322; Konerko, Chicago, .319; Ortiz, Boston, .317; MiCabrera, Detroit, .315; Ellsbury, Boston, .315. RUNS—Granderson, New York, 58; Bautista, Toronto, 54; MiCabrera, Detroit, 50; Ellsbury, Boston, 49; AdGonzalez, Boston, 46; Boesch, Detroit, 45; Kinsler, Texas, 43. RBI—AdGonzalez, Boston, 60; Teixeira, New York, 53; Granderson, New York, 52; Konerko, Chicago, 52; Beltre, Texas, 49; Quentin, Chicago, 47; MiCabrera, Detroit, 46. HITS—AdGonzalez, Boston, 94; Ellsbury, Boston, 85; ACabrera, Cleveland, 81; MiYoung, Texas, 81; Konerko, Chicago, 79; MeCabrera, Kansas City, 78; AGordon, Kansas City, 77; Ortiz, Boston, 77; AlRamirez, Chicago, 77. DOUBLES—AdGonzalez, Boston, 22; Ellsbury, Boston, 21; AGordon, Kansas City, 20; Quentin, Chicago, 20; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 20; VMartinez, Detroit, 19; MiCabrera, Detroit, 18; Ortiz, Boston, 18; Youkilis, Boston, 18; MiYoung, Texas, 18. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—JosReyes, New York, .345; Kemp, Los Angeles, .335; Votto, Cincinnati, .331; Pence, Houston, .321; Wallace, Houston, .318; Helton, Colorado, .315; Carroll, Los Angeles, .314. RUNS—Braun, Milwaukee, 51; JosReyes, New York, 50; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 49; RWeeks, Milwaukee, 49; Votto, Cincinnati, 48; Kemp, Los Angeles, 47; Pujols, St. Louis, 47. RBI—Fielder, Milwaukee, 59; Howard, Philadelphia, 56; Kemp, Los Angeles, 56; Pence, Houston, 50; Braun, Milwaukee, 49; Berkman, St. Louis, 48; Bruce, Cincinnati, 48. HITS—JosReyes, New York, 98; Pence, Houston, 90; SCastro, Chicago, 85; Kemp, Los Angeles, 85; Votto, Cincinnati, 83; GSanchez, Florida, 81; Braun, Milwaukee, 80; Polanco, Philadelphia, 80; RWeeks, Milwaukee, 80. DOUBLES—Beltran, New York, 20; Coghlan, Florida, 20; JosReyes, New York, 20; CYoung, Arizona, 20; CJones, Atlanta, 19; Montero, Arizona, 19; Pence, Houston, 19.


D4 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

GOLF C O M M E N TA RY

GOLF: U.S. OPEN

BASKETBALL

Thompson following dad’s path to NBA

Tickling golf’s funny bone at the U.S. Open

By Colin Fly The Associated Press

By Jim Litke The Associated Press

BETHESDA — obody ever laughs much during U.S. Open week. Small wonder. Howls, curses, grimaces and groans, players doubled over with heads in hands — those are the familiar sounds and sights that hold sway during golf’s toughest test, beginning with the moment players set eyes on the brutal championship layout and lasting until the last putt drops mercifully on Sunday. Not this year. In what could charitably be called a pre-emptive strike on the game’s most buttoned-down event, Ben Crane and pals Rickie Fowler, Bubba Watson and Hunter Mahan released their send-up of a boy-band video titled “Oh Oh Oh” earlier this week — poking fun at everything from how players dress to the exaggerated manners on display from tee to green. To celebrate the launch, Crane, the band’s leader and chief provocateur, arrived for the tournament’s final practice session turned out in pink accents from the tip of his cap down to his saddle shoes. “All these guys asked at some point if they could do a video and wanted to be in one and so, it just kind of fell into, you know, a boy band-type deal. So we became the golf boys,” he chuckled. “It was kind of hot.” Judge for yourself on YouTube, where the two-minute long clip had already generated more than 130,000 hits by mid-afternoon Wednesday. It’s not the kind of video you can imagine Jack Nicklaus or Arnold Palmer ever taking part in, though they once posed together in a famous photo wearing women’s wigs. But as Crane’s manager, Tommy Limbaugh, noted, “I can’t imagine Jack not laughing when he saw it.” No doubt. Crane, who’s released a handful of goofy videos previously, wears a crash helmet and bright orange body surfing suit in this one. Watson, playing barefoot, opted for bib overalls and Fowler donned black jeans and jacket with an array of scarfs in typical boy-band style. But it’s Mahan who’s likely to grab the costuming Oscar for his tiger-stripe pants and sleeveless Alpaca vest. Asked whether he ever imagined golfers promoting their sport that way, the 66-year-old Limbaugh simply shook his head. “You’re talkin’ to an old football coach when you ask that question. Absolutely not. No way to foresee this day coming,” he replied. But a moment later, he added, “It’s good.” So good, in fact, that Limbaugh hasn’t found the time to respond to any but a few of the hundreds of e-mails rolling in, nearly all of which have been positive, let alone keep up with requests from media outlets to put Crane on the air. He did appear on a segment at The Golf Channel, where former player Frank Nobel, one of the show’s over-40 hosts, gave the video a hearty thumbs up. In this era of Twitter and social networking, younger fans expect to see the curtain pulled back on just about every endeavor, including golf. As Crane made his way from the range to the first tee, fans called out “loved the video” on either side of him. He politely said thanks and squelched any talk about the video transforming him into the game’s version of a rock star. “Just a golfer,” he said pausing. “A golfer who likes to enjoy himself.” If the blue blazers who run the U.S. Golf Association had any problem with the video, they held their tongues during the organization’s annual “State of the Game” news conference. The PGA Tour, on the other hand, is in the business of merchandising their golfers, which might explain why the video was prominently posted on its website. Crane made no apologies, saying the timing was intentional. “We planned it for this week. Everybody is excited about golf this week,” he said. “I thought the timing was good.” If Limbaugh’s inbox and voicemail count is any indication, Crane is spot on.

N

Matt Slocum / The Associated Press

Rory McIlroy, of Northern Ireland, signs autographs during a practice round for the U.S. Open golf tournament in Bethesda, Md., Wednesday.

Open is a tough test without being hard By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

BETHESDA, Md. — Golf’s second major championship of the year seems to have a new name. It’s the U.S. Wide Open. Only a small part of that is because of Tiger Woods. He’s not at Congressional because of injuries to his left leg, and he has been missing from the top of leaderboards for more than a year. This is the first U.S. Open since 1999 that Woods is not No. 1 in the world. The top two players in the world ranking are Luke Donald and Lee Westwood, neither of whom has won a major. Parity has returned to golf so much so that 10 players have won the last 10 majors, and the last three major champions are still in their 20s. But there’s another reason why the U.S. Open figures to be up for grabs when it gets under way today: No one is complaining. Jack Nicklaus, a four-time U.S. Open champion, used to listen to players gripe about the narrow fairways, thick rough and rockhard greens and rule them out of contention. Before long, it was a short field he had to beat. Congressional isn’t getting much criticism this week. The last several years, the USGA has been trying make the U.S. Open live up to its reputation as the “toughest test in golf” with-

out simply making the course as hard as it could. “If you’re complaining about playing this course,” Padraig Harrington said Wednesday, “you’re complaining that you can’t hit the shots.” The Irishman, who has fallen out of the top 50 in the world, spent his final day of practice with Masters runner-up Adam Scott and World Golf Championship winner Nick Watney. They’re part of a field loaded with players who have won something, but no one who has won everything. The USGA didn’t have the course exactly as it wanted because of oppressive heat the week before that kept them from cutting the green as low as usual, fearful of them dying. Even so, there already were brown patches on some of them Wednesday, and Stewart Cink couldn’t help but notice a sheen on the putting surfaces before the championship even begins. About the only complaint from Harrington — more subject for architectural debate — was moving back the tee on No. 12 to make it play 471 yards. It took away the option of hitting a draw around the dogleg, and replaced it with another strong hole to start the back nine. It was suggested to Harrington that Congressional already had ample length at the end. “It’s an ample start,” he said. “And the middle is not that easy,

either.” Some things never change. There was another Nicklaus comment that caught the attention of Geoff Ogilvy, who won the U.S. Open five years ago at Winged Foot. “The U.S. Open is 72 holes of bad breaks with the occasional surprise,” Nicklaus once said. “Which is kind of how it feels,” Ogilvy added. “It really is 72 holes of trying to not get annoyed at bad breaks. They’re the guys who do it best.” Even so, Ogilvy has found the U.S. Open to be more about “fair” than “tough” in the five years that Mike Davis, the new executive director of the USGA, has been in charge of setting up the golf courses. He has kept the graduated rough — it gets deeper the farther a tee shot strays from the fairway — and shaved some of the sides of bunkers to allow balls to roll into the sand. On some holes, particularly the par5 16th, the sides of the greens have been turned into collection areas that will send shots into the pine needles beneath the trees. That at least allows for options in chipping. “All I’d like them to do is come to a golf course and say, ‘How do we make this golf course find the best player this week?’ It’s getting more that way,” Ogilvy said. “It used to be, ‘How do we make this the hardest course we possibly can?’ ”

U.S. OPEN NOTEBOOK

Rough on the rough: Heat affects tournament planning By Joseph White The Associated Press

BETHESDA, Md. — The year’s first major dose of stifling weather came and went last week in suburban Washington, D.C., but it’s still having an effect on the U.S. Open. Temperatures that flirted with 100 degrees stunted the growth of the grass at Congressional Country Club. Crews had to cut back on the number of mowings and rollings. The heat, combined with a long dry spell, got officials behind as they prepared the Blue Course. “Last week was brutal,” said Mike Davis, executive director of the USGA, who is in charge of setting up the course. “We had not only humidity, but the temperatures were way up. We had to come into this Open not exactly where we want to be.” The USGA likes to have the course in its ideal U.S. Open setup when players arrive Monday for the first practice rounds. Instead, the rough wasn’t quite as high as hoped, and the greens weren’t playing at the targeted speed. The revised goal is to have the course ready by today’s first round. Scrambling over fried eggs Fried eggs are on the menu

at the U.S. Open. The Blue Course at Congressional has a different type of sand than the norm, and that could lead to some unsavory lies — the ones that are half-buried in the bunker. “I suspect we’re going to get some fried eggs this week, I really do,” said Mike Davis, executive director of the USGA. “Having said that, we don’t want a plethora of them, and that’s one of the things we’ll be looking at very carefully. “We get in these bunkers and we test them,” Davis said. “There’s even firmness measurements that we can take. It’s not a perfect science, and some of the bunkers if we do the same thing to every bunker, some of them that are south facing that get more sun, they dry out and get puffier a little faster than some of

the other ones.” Hot ticket The U.S. Open keeps drawing a crowd. The USGA said Wednesday that the tournament is sold out for the 25th straight year. Some 35,000 fans are expected each day of the championship. Such a popular event presents special challenges in the area around traffic-congested Washington, D.C. The USGA secured about 15,000 satellite parking spaces, and they’re running 475 buses each day. They only needed 275 last year at Pebble Beach. USGA President Jim Hyler said was asked if the logistics might affect Congressional’s chances of hosting the event again. “Who knows about the future?” Hyler said. “We’re just trying to get through this week and have a successful U.S. Open this week.”

MILWAUKEE — Washington State standout Klay Thompson is rising up draft boards around the NBA after some polished performances in individual workouts for a dozen teams. Thompson was at it again Wednesday for the Milwaukee Bucks, who are well aware like everyone else in the NBA of Thompson’s pedigree. He’s the middle son of former No. 1 overall draft pick Mychal Thompson, who was picked by Portland in 1978 and went on to win three NBA titles with the Lakers. “Once he gets into the workout, much like the European players, he’s so fundamentally sound that going to the workouts are really a benefit to him and the teams looking at him,” Bucks scouting director Billy McKinney said. Klay Thompson has had to grow up quickly after dealing with a marijuana citation near the Pullman campus. He was suspended for one game after the March incident. “I’m not going to say I’m happy it happened, but it was almost good it happened sooner or later because I was going down the wrong path and if I want to fulfill my potential and play in this league, I can’t be messing around with that stuff,” Thompson said. “I haven’t done it since.” The 21-year-old was a sharpshooter at Washington State, with the type of height and length that NBA scouts fawn over — he’s 6-foot-7 and can play point guard, shooting guard or small forward. He finished first on the Cougars’ all-time list in three-point field goals (242) and third in points (1,756) in just three seasons. Thompson also has some inside knowledge of the Bucks. His older brother, Mychel, worked out for the team on Tuesday and the boys are both friends with Bucks point guard Brandon Jennings. “I think I’d be a perfect fit playing alongside Brandon, that kid is great with the ball,” Klay Thompson said. “I can stretch the floor, be a great threat from the off-guard position and be a complete guard — defend, rebound, pass, do whatever coach asks me to do.” Milwaukee picks 10th in next Thursday’s draft and the organization is interested in Thompson. Colorado’s Alec Burks and Texas’ Jordan Hamilton are in the mix, too. Thompson is hoping to move past the questions about the marijuana citation. He must appear before authorities on July 7 and provide a clean drug test for the

AP File

Washington State’s Klay Thompson, center, almost surely will not reach the heights of his father in the NBA draft. That’s because Mychal Thompson went first overall in 1978 to Portland and went on to win three titles with the Lakers. incident to be removed from his record. The citation included a $500 fine. His father was critical of his son’s decisions at the time, saying Klay had embarrassed himself and let down his teammates and his school. Klay Thompson was more embarrassed. “He was really disappointed, but I think I was the most upset at myself,” Thompson said. “I learned a tremendous amount about myself, just being able to apologize in front of my fans and it was a humbling experience. I’m glad I went through it and fought through it.” Thompson also has had to answer the question repeatedly for every team looking to invest the future of their franchises in him. “It’s understandable. It’s humbling,” he said. “I just tell them the truth, because if you don’t, they’re going to find out either way.” Mychal Thompson was selected No. 1 overall in a draft that featured Larry Bird going sixth to Boston. The 6foot-10 Thompson played with three teams in 12 NBA seasons, including the Spurs and Lakers. He won three titles in 1987, 1988 and 1991 as a top reserve with Los Angeles. That experience has helped Klay, McKinney said, but only to a point. “I’d say one of the things that matters a lot is that he’s had a tremendous amount of experience talking to his dad about the transition to the NBA,” McKinney said. “The bottom line is, you can have a father that’s played, but you’ve got to get it done between the lines, and Klay has proven he can do that on a consistent basis.”

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 D5

Open Continued from D1 “We’re always checking to see how the Oregon State guys are doing,” said Tyler Simpson, who graduated from Oregon State after the 2010 season. They must like what they see through 36 holes at the Oregon Open. OSU’s Casey King, who is from Blue River and once was a top golfer in the Central Oregon Junior Golf Association, is in a three-way tie for first place at 2 under par after Wednesday’s cool and breezy second round. He is tied with former Oregon Open champions Derek Berg (2010) and Brian Nosler (2009). King’s Beaver teammates are not far behind. Sherwood and Simpson are only two shots back and in a tie for sixth place. Alex Moore is in 14th place at even par. Not bad in a field of more than 180 golfers, many of whom are considered the best club pros in the Pacific Northwest. And don’t think there isn’t some pride involved when four Oregon State golfers are in contention heading into today’s final round. “Obviously you want those guys (teammates) to play well,” said Moore, OSU’s top player and an all-Pac-10 Conference selection as a junior this past season. “It’s encouraging for me, because I know that if they are doing well, then I can do well because we’ve done it together for so long. “We’re just trying to represent the university.” The Oregon Open offers a valuable measuring stick for amateurs. The tournament features a few pros — such as Washington pro Jeff Coston, who played on the PGA Tour in the 1980s, and Seattle-area pro Ryan Benzel, who has played in the PGA Championship four times — who have at least some PGA Tour experience. “It means a lot,” said Simpson, who has plans to turn pro-

fessional later this year. “We all have the next level in the back of our minds. … It’s good to be in the field like this and play the same course with the same pins with all those guys, and to see how your game matches up with those guys. That’s worth something.” And the tournament is a bit out of a college golfer’s comfort zone. “It’s different than the setups we are used to,” said King, a soon-to-be senior whose father, Dan, is the head pro at Tokatee Golf Club in Blue River. “The course is shorter and the rough isn’t as high. It’s more of a putting contest than we are used to seeing in college golf.” So to see a bunch of Beavers in contention? That speaks well of the Oregon State program, Simpson said. “It shows where the program is going, I think,” said Simpson. “We’ve been good in the past. We haven’t struggled, but we haven’t lived up to our expectations. And I think that is kind of changing now.” Camaraderie aside, the Oregon State golfers want to beat one another, too. After all, outside of college, golf is usually an individual’s game. “We all compete against each other,” said Sherwood, who is sharing a room in Sunriver this week with King. “Every day we have a little fire to beat each other. I know Casey and I have a little game going — just for pride.” Does beating a teammate create a conflicted feeling? No way, says Moore. “We want to beat each other,” said Moore, whose stroke average of 70.74 last season was second-best ever for OSU’s program. “I think we want to beat each other during the season, even. You put five scores together to make it a team score, but everyone wants to be the best.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

Sniper Continued from D1 Some shots, he said, were from as far away as 1,000 yards. Depending on the event, scoring was based on either a “hit or miss” basis or by utilizing a scoring target with varying points awarded for hitting different areas of the target. After struggling on Saturday, Westover made up enough ground on Sunday to move up 10 places. “The competition level over there was incredible,” Westover said. “I moved up more places than anyone on Sunday. It’s about overcoming your problems, and I did that on Sunday.” Participants are selected for the Oregon Sniper Challenge (www.coldborecomps.com) on an invitation-only basis. According to Westover, competitors included active-duty military, police, members of SWAT teams and even Pentagon Emergency Response Team snipers. “The guy standing right next to you might be heading back to Afghanistan 10 days later,” Westover observed. “I really commend and honor the snipers out there. They’re an elite team but they’re part of the military, and they don’t view themselves any differently as any other guy in the military. But they save a lot of lives.”

Derek Westover Westover was invited back to the state event after competing in the 2010 Oregon Sniper Challenge. The mental aspect of the discipline is key, according to Westover. Shooters must know their “dope” — the numbers to which they must dial their scope in order for the bullet to hit the target. Competitors in the Oregon Sniper Challenge fired .308- or .223-caliber rifles, both military weapons. “A lot of it is a mental game, and it’s knowing today’s conditions or tomorrow’s conditions,” Westover explained. “Every day, everything changes. And throughout the day it changes.”

Rider Continued from D1 The 2010 Oregon High School Rodeo Association saddle bronc champ, Johnson has cruised through the OHSRA season this year, winning all seven rodeos he has entered. The former White Buffalo enters this weekend’s state final at the Crook County Fairgrounds in Prineville in first place in the saddle bronc standings, more than 30 points ahead of current runner-up Myles O’Loughlin of YamhillCarlton, 70-36. (At this weekend’s state final rodeo 50 points are up for grabs: 10 for the winner in the first go-round, 10 for the winner in the second go-round, 10 for the winner in the short go-round and 20 for the average.) “I’m still not that great,” says a modest Johnson, who also ran away with last year’s state title. “I’ve still got a lot of learning to do.” Competing in arguably the most technical of all the roughstock events, Johnson has been riding broncs since his freshman year in high school.

Bruins Continued from D1 Star goalie Roberto Luongo again failed to match Thomas’ brilliance, giving up 18 goals in the last five games of the finals. Mark Messier and the New York Rangers won Game 7 in Vancouver’s last finals appearance in 1994. This time, Thomas silenced the NHL’s highest-scoring team, erased nearly four decades of Bruins playoff blunders and crushed an entire Canadian city desperate to take the Stanley Cup to Stanley Park. Thomas limited the Canucks to eight goals in seven spectacular games in the finals, blanking Vancouver in two of the last four. Boston dropped the first two games in Vancouver but became just the third team since 1966 to overcome that deficit. “All the physical work we’d done throughout the whole series added up,” Thomas said. “Being the last series, we didn’t save anything, and we used that physicality again and that was the difference.”

Though he was never in the military or in law enforcement, Westover said he has always had a keen interest in long-range shooting. And after he began building his own rifles, he started reading and learning more about sniping. The science behind the discipline is part of what drew him to it. “And it’s something that not every person out there can do,” he explained. “Everybody can grab a rifle, put the cross hairs on something, and pull the trigger and make it go ‘bang.’ But it’s picking a target at 1,000 yards (that distinguishes the sniper).” Westover decided to get into the competitive side and took part in last year’s Oregon Sniper Challenge. He admitted he had a poor showing, as his gun malfunctioned on several occasions. But he was dedicated to returning this year, and reuniting with friends he made at last year’s event. “It’s a real tight community,” Westover said. “(The Oregon Sniper Challenge) is for the active-duty military and police. But they also recognize that there’s a lot of civilians out there that do this, and do it well, and want to be a part of it.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

Prineville Youth Pond stocked Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: CENTRAL ZONE

EAST LAKE: The lake is accessible. Contact the resort at 541-536-2230 for up-to-date ice conditions.

ANTELOPE FLAT RESERVOIR: Anglers have reported good fishing for very healthy trout.

HAYSTACK RESERVOIR: Trout fishing has been good and anglers are reporting the fish are very active.

BIG LAVA LAKE: The lake is open and is accessible for fishing.

LITTLE LAVA LAKE: Little Lava is fully accessible and fishing should be good.

CLEAR LAKE: The road to Clear Lake has been opened, and the lake has been stocked. Limited early reports have indicated good fishing.

LOST LAKE: Has been stocked, and early reports have been encouraging from anglers. Camping remains limited due to late snow; campers should contact the USFS Hood River Ranger District 541-352-6002 for camping information.

CRANE PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: Fishing is good with reports of large rainbows and brook trout. CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: High flows can limit success and anglers are encouraged to monitor flows before venturing out (river flows near Prineville). DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the Pelton Regulating Dam): Trout fishing should

METOLIUS RIVER: Trout fishing has been good. Insect hatches should offer opportunities for good dry-fly fishing. ODELL LAKE: Fishing for lake trout is good and kokanee fishing is improving with warming weather; the evening bite is typically better than the

Bergeron added a Stanley Cup ring to his gold medals from the Olympics and the world championships with his biggest game of a quiet series. He scored his first goal of the finals late in the first period on a shot Luongo saw too late, and Marchand added his 10th goal of the postseason in the second before Bergeron’s short-handed goal, which inexplicably slid under Luongo. The Bruins are the first team in NHL history to win a Game 7 three times in the same postseason, and they drew another dose of inspiration from forward Nathan Horton, whose concussion in Game 3 irrevocably changed the series’ momentum. Horton attended Game 7, and he apparently poured a bottle of Boston water onto the ice in front of the Bruins’ bench 90 minutes before warmups. He joined his teammates in the raucous postgame celebration, putting on his skates and taking a celebratory turn with the Stanley Cup held high above his

early morning bite. PAULINA LAKE: The lake is accessible. Contact the resort at 541-338-7869 for up-to-date conditions. PINE HOLLOW RESERVOIR: Pine Hollow has been stocked. Conditions should be excellent for angling, but no recent reports have been received. PRINEVILLE YOUTH FISHING POND: The pond received trout on June 10 and will receive more bass on June 17. ROCK CREEK RESERVOIR: Rock Creek has been stocked and should be great for spring trout fishing. TAYLOR LAKE: Taylor Lake should offer anglers a good opportunity to catch trout. The lake was stocked with legal and trophy trout last fall and this spring. The lingering cool weather has extended fishing opportunities at Taylor Lake, and catches should remain good until the lake warms. WALTON LAKE: Anglers have reported excellent fishing for very healthy trout — some exceeding 20 inches long. WICKIUP RESERVOIR: Fishing is good. Anglers have been reporting success jigging and trolling for kokanee.

Pro Rodeo Association circuit, is the first to admit he still has a long way to go to be competitive at the pro level. “Right now (at the high school level), I’m just staying on (the bronc) a lot more than everyone else,” Johnson says. “(The pro level) is a lot more technique, a lot more timing and spurring. I can’t even really spur a bucking horse yet, I’m still a beginner. … I don’t even come close to winning (at NPRA) rodeos. All those older guys can spur.” Despite his inexperience against veterans on the pro tour, Johnson looks to cap his high school career with a second consecutive state title and a better experience at the national high school rodeo, where last year he was bucked off twice in two rides. “I just want to get horses rode,” Johnson says about his goals for this season. “After high school I’d like to do the NPRA and maybe the (PRCA) Columbia River Circuit. … If I ever get to the (PRCA) level, I’d like to stay in the Northwest and ranch.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-3830305 or at beastes@bendbulletin.com.

head. Horton was lost for the series with a concussion on a big hit from Vancouver’s Aaron Rome. The Bruins rallied for four wins in five games after Horton’s injury. During a two-week Stanley Cup finals that ranks among the NHL’s weirdest in recent years, the only predictable aspect had been the home teams’ dominance. Vancouver eked out three one-goal victories at home, while the Bruins won three blowouts in Boston. The loss capped a spectacular collapse by Luongo, the enigmatic goalie who backstopped Canada to Olympic gold medals on this same ice sheet a year ago. Luongo was pulled from the Canucks’ last two games in Boston after giving up 15 goals on the road, and he was fatally shaky in Game 7. Luongo praised his own positional game earlier in the series,

but he didn’t recover in time to stop Marchand’s second-period goal. Five minutes later, he inexplicably failed to close his legs on a slowly sliding puck on Bergeron’s goal — the seventh allowed by Luongo on the last 21 shots he faced dating back to Game 4. Luongo wasn’t alone in deserving Vancouver’s blame: The Sedin twins are the NHL’s last two scoring champions, but they capped a disastrous finals by being on the ice for ALL of Boston’s goals. Captain Henrik Sedin, last season’s MVP, scored just one goal in the series, while Daniel Sedin had two goals and two assists, scoring in just two of the seven games.

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FISHING REPORT

be good with improving weather and dropping flows. Spring hatches are in full swing on the lower Deschutes and the famed salmonfly hatch is still occurring. A few reports of early summer steelhead have been received from the Sherars Falls area.

“I started on bulls in the summer between my eighth-grade and my freshman year,” Johnson says. “Then I went to a bible rodeo camp that summer and got on my first saddle bronc.” Johnson’s first experience in the saddle was not a pretty one. “I absolutely hated it,” he recalls. “I landed on my head. But my second ride, it was the funnest thing I’ve ever done.” Johnson rode bulls in the fall of his freshman year, but by the time the spring rodeo season started he was spurring on saddle bronc horses. In his sophomore season he placed fourth in the OHSRA state saddle bronc standings, and last year he won easily, earning a spot at the National High School State Finals in Gillette, Wyo. “I’ve been around horses all my life,” says Johnson, whose family has a 200-head cattle ranch near Willowdale. “I’d gotten on 20 to 30 bulls and never rode one. When I started saddle bronc riding it was easier for me. It just felt better.” Johnson, who said he has no college plans next year but hopes to ride on the Northwest

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H U N T I N G & F ISH I N G

D6 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Shooting skills taught at Youth Safari Challenge G A RY LEWIS

A

t the BB-gun range, a 5-year-old boy blurted out, “This is the most fun ever!” Twenty yards away, on the archery range, an 8-year-old girl looked the volunteer instructor in the eyes and said, “This is the most funnest thing I’ve ever done.” Out on the shotgun range, a 12-yearold, who had never handled a gun before, missed his first target. After he smoked the next four clay pigeons, the quiet young man said, “This is just like a video game, only way cooler.” Kris Bales, who volunteered at the archery range, reported that his 11-yearold granddaughter told him afterward that now she wanted to be a professional volleyball player AND a professional archer. She just needs a bow and arrows, Grandpa. We held our sixth Youth Safari Challenge in the desert east of Bend on the last Saturday in May. Out of the 260-plus people gathered at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association (COSSA) Range, 109 were kids, ranging

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

Mojave Mick coaches a young shooter in a timed cowboy-themed event. from 5 to 18 years of age. Events were geared to each age group — the .22 rimfire varmint and BB gun small-game shoots were reserved for the youngest, while older kids tried wingshooting, cowboy-lever-action rifle, and archery. On the shotgun range, Clark Linss and

Larry Goodwin ran the wing-shooting stage where the clay pigeons streaked like doves startled from the grass. At the range themed as an old mining town, the Pine Mountain Posse’s Palaver Pete trained the kids in the safe care and feeding of a lever-action .22 rifle. Station six was the most difficult

event this year. Under the tutelage of the Horse Ridge Pistoleros — Mojave Mick, Texas Jack Morales, Leggs Ballou and Last Chance Morales — a youngster learned the safe operation of a lever-action .45 Long Colt. Next, the young cowboy or cowgirl adopted a nickname like Shifty Slim or Seenyor Steezy, thumbed six rounds into the loading gate and stepped up to meet the black-hatted Pooney Bill. They’d pound him with five rounds to his headgear, gloves and boots then shoot the steel buffalo over his shoulder. The top five competitors scored rifle scopes from Leupold and Alpen. Survival expert Leon Pantenburg taught fire-making with primitive tools. Dozens of kids went away with a better understanding of survival techniques. Door prizes were laden on the participants. Gifts included binoculars, Marlin and Red Ryder BB guns, Crosman air rifles, bows-and-arrows and hunting knives. Outdoor Chef Kurt and his wife Anita cooked hamburgers, hot dogs and French fries for over 260 kids, parents and volunteers. The Challenge is an annual presentation of the High Desert Safari Club in cooperation with the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association (COSSA), Bend Chapter of the Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Ma-

B y Gary Lewis

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin. com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin. com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

YOUTH FISHING EVENT AT SHEVLIN POND: Today, 9 a.m. to noon; free; open to youths 17 and younger; ODFW staff and volunteers will be on hand to help young anglers learn how to bait a hook, cast a rod and land a fish; there will be loaner fishing poles and bait available for kids who don’t have their own equipment; contact ODFW at 541-388-6363. FLY-FISHING BEGINNING ON THE CROOKED RIVER: Overview of equipment and terminology, fly selection and fishing techniques; fishing license required; $16 payable to instructor for flies and leader; class meets Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; cost is $175; to register call 541-383-7270 or email ceinfo@cocc.edu. YOUTH FLY-FISHING CAMP: June 2022, 9 a.m. to noon; at Bend’s Shevlin Park; ages 9-13; offers children the opportunity to experience and learn fly-fishing basics; experts from the Central Oregon Fly Fishers Club will teach campers various fly casts, fishing techniques and strategies, fly-tying, safe wading and the basic bugs that fish like to eat; space is limited; $60 in-district, $81 otherwise; 541-389-7275. DESCHUTES CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED: Meets on the first Monday of each month at the Environmental Center in Bend; meeting starts at 6:45 p.m. for members to meet and greet, and discuss what the Chapter is up to; 541-306-4509; communications@deschutestu. org; www.deschutestu.org. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station. Contact: www.sunriveranglers.org.

HUNTING THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend. Contact: Bendchapter_oha@yahoo.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville Fire Hall, 405 N. Belknap St. Contact: 447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

SHOOTING HIGH DESERT BOWLING PINSHOOT: Saturday, June 18, 3 p.m.; at Redmond Rod and Gun Club; handgun event for all calibers and experience levels; open to non-club members; entry fee $10 per event; pinshoot@gmail.com. BEND TRAP CLUB: Five-stand and skeet shooting Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m; trap shooting on Thursdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; located east of Bend, at Milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-388-1737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: 13-station, 100-target course and 5-Stand open Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to dusk, and Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 11 a.m. to dusk (closed Wednesday); located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www. birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Rifle and Pistol are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays beginning at 10 a.m.; trap is Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to closing, and

Gary Lewis is the host of “Adventure Journal” and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www. GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

FLY-T Y ING CORNE R

E C 

FISHING

jor funding was provided by the Oregon Friends of NRA. The next afternoon, a friend of mine rang. “As soon as we got home from the Youth Safari Challenge,” he said, “I had to drag cardboard boxes out and draw targets for the kids. Erica got a BB gun, Amanda won a pellet gun and Wyatt and Stephanie both got the bow and arrows.” They went out “hunting.” Sunday morning, their friend, Sarah, showed up and they all went out “hunting” again. “Her dad found an old fire pit, extracted a piece of charcoal and drew a bison on a cardboard target, just like primitive man, and they all took turns flinging arrows at it.” It may be 11 months before the next Youth Safari Challenge, but the COSSA Kids will host their next monthly shoot this Saturday. And the cowboy groups are always ready to entertain young and old who want to try their hand with a six-gun and a lever-action. To learn more, check out www.oregonshooting. com.

For The Bulletin

Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; 2011 Family Memberships now available for $50; non-members are welcome; www.rrandgc.com. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-318-8199 or www.pinemountainposse.com.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Mihulka’s Skinny Leech Fiery Brown, courtesy Rainy’s Flies.

If you’re fishing still waters, it’s hard to go wrong with a leech pattern. In hard-fished lakes and ponds, sometimes a sparse tie will pay off in more takes than a built-up fly. Chris Mihulka originated this Skinny Leech, an easy to tie pattern that can imitate leeches, minnows, damselfly and dragon fly nymphs. Watch for fish taking bugs close to the shore. Trout like

to stage in shore-side cover or cruise just off the shallows. Use a slow-sinking intermediate or floating line and a slow, erratic retrieve with two-inch strips and long pauses. Tie Mihulka’s Skinny Leech with 8/0 brown thread on a No. 6-10 Dai-Riki 270 hook. For the tail, use fiery brown marabou and root beer Krystal Flash. Wrap the body with fiery brown marabou and rib with fine gold wire.

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PINK MARTINI Make sure you buy a copy of The Bulletin on June 10, 17 and 24 for your chance to win! Plus, look for GOLDEN TICKETS all summer long as we’re putting tickets to SIX other premium concert events inside GO! MAGAZINES. Don’t Miss It!! Golden Ticket for two concert tickets must be redeemed at the Ticket Mill in the Old Mill District. Original Golden Ticket must be presented. Golden Ticket is only good for the concert listed on the ticket. Golden Tickets can be found in home delivery and single copy newspapers (store copies only, no racks). Golden Tickets have no cash value.

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O

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ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS Inside

OUTING

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011

Photos by Markian Hawryluk / The Bulletin

Vincent Dunn, of Salem, steps onto a rocky outcropping with great views of the Detroit Lake area on the way up Sardine Mountain.

Shhhhhh ... it’s a secret Sardine Mountain: rough, unmarked adventure By Markian Hawryluk

Area of detail

The Bulletin

T

Dunn traverses the snow slope below the summit ridge on Sardine Mountain. Until the snow melts, the final approach to the summit requires good snow skills and no fear of steep slopes.

he e-mail was deliberately vague. “I’m planning another hike in the Detroit dam area tomorrow,” my friend Vincent Dunn wrote. I was intrigued. Upon further questioning, Dunn told me he planned to hike up Sardine Ridge to Rocky Top. I flipped through my guidebooks. The standard route to Rocky Top makes no mention of a Sardine Ridge. Now I was really intrigued. As it turned out, the route was a secret trail built by a former climber gone rogue. (I could tell you his name, but then I’d have to kill you.) We’ll just call him Jerry. Jerry gave up more serious climbing for health reasons and has made pioneering new trails in the Detroit area his passion. He pulls out a map, finds a suitable destination, then reads the topographic lines to find the most direct route of attack, usually straight up the ridge. He links together game trails and marks his routes with surveyor’s tape, rock cairns or the occasional sawed-off tree branch. But the trails aren’t in any guidebook. They’re passed on by word of mouth from one hiker to another. Dunn showed me one of Jerry’s trails on Sunday. Now I’m telling you. But let’s just keep it between us. I met Dunn at a small turnoff on U.S. Highway

Snow slowly gives in to summer By Lydia Hoffman The Bulletin

TRAIL UPDATE

Cascade Lakes Highway is now open, but that doesn’t mean the high country is clear of snow. The driving lanes have been plowed, but there is still 5 to 6 feet of snow on either side, which means parking along the highway is not possible. Parking is also not available at a number of lakes and hiking areas, including Broken Top, Green Lake, Sparks Lake, Mirror Lake, Devils Lake and Elk Lake. These areas will likely be under snow for at least two more weeks, said Chris Sabo, U.S. Forest Service trails specialist. McKenzie Pass Highway is still closed to motorized traffic but has been cleared enough to welcome bikers and hikers. Bikers should be aware that there may be icy patches on the road and should watch their speed on

McKenzie Pass Highway is still closed to motorized traffic but has been cleared enough to welcome cyclists and hikers. Cyclists should be aware that there may be icy patches on the road and should watch their speed on the downhill sections to avoid collisions with others. the downhill sections to avoid collisions with others. Dutchman Flat Sno-park is still open for winter recreation, with 4 to 5 feet of snow. The snow line is about 4,900 feet. In wilderness areas, the two main concerns are snow and significant numbers of fallen trees on the trails, said Sabo. If you head out into a wilderness area, bring snowshoes or skis, suggested Sabo. Hiking is not advised, because snow can become unstable

during the warm part of the day and hikers can be injured if it collapses under them. There is avalanche danger in the backcountry and the potential for ice or chunks of hard snow to fall from cornices as well. Recreationists going into these areas should be skilled enough to assess such dangers. Trails in wilderness areas will be cleared of the fallen trees slowly over the summer. Most trails are in need of heavy maintenance. See Trails / E3

Madras

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Sardine Mountain

20

Sisters

Little Sweden 22 No rth Sa nti am

Trail

Bend

Trailhead

Riv er

Detroit Dam

Detroit e ak L t i tro De

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Greg Cross / The Bulletin

22, about a tenth of mile east of the Big Cliff Dam, at the end of Detroit Lake. That’s when he told me the real plan. Rocky Top was apparently a diversion, just a ruse to throw off anybody who might be listening. We were headed for Sardine Mountain, a 4,938foot mountain in the Detroit Ranger District of the Willamette National Forest. See Outing / E6

SPOTLIGHT Shaniko will re-create setting of pioneer era Pioneer Days in Shaniko, a virtual ghost town in Wasco County on U.S. Highway 97, will celebrate local history with a variety of events Saturday and Sunday. Pioneer Days is free and open to the public. Entertainment includes a coal forge blacksmith working with handmade tools and an opportunity to learn about the trade. Covered wagons will depart from the stagecoach station about every half-hour. Cowboy, country and Western tunes by Bob Connolly will start around 7 p.m. Saturday. Other attractions include live re-enactments, such as street shoot-outs, shops, history and food vendors. An old-

fashioned beef stew fundraiser for the Shaniko Chamber of Commerce costs $7. Free camping is available all around Shaniko. Contact: 541-489-3434.

Oyster Off-Road Race seeking volunteers The Deschutes River Conservancy is seeking volunteers to help with the Oyster Off-Road Adventure Race on June 25 in Bend. The event is a one-day adventure race that involves running and mountain biking, as well as yet-to-be-revealed events that could include rafting, orienteering and climbing. Volunteers will receive a T-shirt, invitation to the after-party at Deschutes Brewery, meals and drinks. Contact: Marisa Hossick, marisa@deschutesriver.org, www.deschutesriver.org, or 541382-4077 ext. 25. — From staff reports


T EL EV IS IO N

E2 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Possibilities aplenty NBC affiliate spurns ‘Playboy Club’ why daughter can’t stay in relationship By Lisa de Moraes

The Washington Post

Dear Abby: I have never been moved to write in response to a letter until I read “Concerned About My Girl in Kentucky” (May 9). It was from a mom who was worried that while her daughter “Celia” had no problem attracting men, she has a problem keeping them. My intelligent, caring, creative, adventurous and beautiful daughter had successful, handsome and wonderful men throwing themselves at her. A couple of dates and they were never heard from again. When I asked, “What’s the problem?” she would shrug her shoulders. I thought she was being too picky, and when the right man came along he’d sweep her off her feet and all would be well. One day, my daughter came to me and said she had met someone. I said, “Tell me about him.” She replied, “Who said it has to be a ‘him’?” My daughter was just as surprised as I was to discover she is a lesbian. She is now in a relationship with a wonderful woman. I’m glad she realized this at 25 instead of 55, after living a life that wasn’t hers because she thought that was what was “expected.” She’s happy now, and so am I. — Proud Mom in Rochester, N.Y. Dear Proud Mom: Thank you for sharing your daughter’s happy revelation. The following responses may offer other interesting insights for “Concerned” to consider. Read on: Dear Abby: You suggested Celia ask her friends for feedback. My very attractive friend “Jan” has had two failed marriages and four short-term rela-

DEAR ABBY tionships. In the last five years, she has had many first dates — only. She asks, “What is wrong with these guys? Don’t they know what they want?” None of us will respond because Jan isn’t really looking for an answer, and we’re all afraid of being the target of her wrath. It’s ALWAYS the other person’s fault. When a friend tries to be helpful by offering gently worded suggestions, this friend gets her head bitten off and returned on a platter. Some people don’t want to improve themselves because they’re content to complain and blame someone else instead of taking their own inventory. — Backing Off in Massachusetts Dear Abby: My mother’s dream was to have all her children married with six or more children and living happily ever after in wedded bliss. MY dream was to live alone with five dogs in a quiet, rural area. “Concerned” may be putting too much pressure on her daughter, causing her to rush into relationships and scaring the men away. Celia needs to sit down and figure out what she wants for herself. Then, maybe, the man of her dreams will come to her. — Realistic Reader in Michigan Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

The NBC station in Salt Lake City has informed the network that it will not air the new fall series “The Playboy Club” because the affiliate does not want to be associated with the Playboy brand. “For us, the issue is about the Playboy brand, something we believe is associated with pornography and something we don’t want to further in our programming,” Michelle Torsak, programming chief at station KSL, told The TV Column on Monday. Torsak said that station execs had not yet seen the full pilot episode for “The Playboy Club” — just the four-minute-ish “sizzle reel” shown to station execs and advertisers in mid-May at NBC’s Upfront Week presentation in Manhattan. The drama series, produced by Ron Howard/Brian Grazer’s Imagine Television (with 20th Century Fox TV), stars Eddie Cibrian as one of the patrons of the original Playboy Club in 1960s Chicago. KSL’s decision “screams hypocrisy,” Salt Lake Tribune TV critic Scott Pierce said Monday, insisting that “The Playboy Club” pilot episode is far less “adult” than “every episode” of the long-running NBC series “Law & Order: SVU,” which KSL broadcasts. Pierce, on a roll, also noted that KSL aired nearly 200 episodes of the now-defunct NBC sitcom “Will & Grace,” which, he snipped, “never met a dirty joke it didn’t like.” But, Torsak emphasized to the TV Column, “It really is a brand question.” “It’s entirely possible that the actual content of ‘The Playboy Club’ is comparable to anything else on network television,” she said. And in an interview with the Deseret News, Mark Wil-

Courtesy NBC

Amber Heard stars as Maureen in the television show “The Playboy Club,” which will debut in the fall on NBC. lis, president and chief executive of the KSL parent company, Deseret Media Companies, went with: “We would never accept an ad from ‘The Playboy Club,’ just as we don’t accept ads for alcohol or gambling.” The Deseret News is also owned by Deseret Media Companies which, in turn, is controlled by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Despite all the “It’s the brand, stupid” talk, KSL — upon offi-

cially announcing its decision to its viewers in one of its newscasts Monday — explained that it had based its decision on its “longterm policy to screen programming for material which significant portions of our audience might find objectionable.” Here’s a good place to note that in 2003, KSL also declined to air NBC’s prime-time remake of Brit-com “Coupling”; and in 2000, it said “No, thanks” to the NBC animated comedy, “God,

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the Devil and Bob.” KSL also does not air NBC’s “Saturday Night Live.” Torsak insisted that was a “revenue decision” made when KSL became the NBC affiliate in the market; the station was already airing a lucrative local sports program in the time slot, she said. “While we are disappointed with KSL’s decision, we are confident that the show will find another home in the Salt Lake City market,” NBC said Monday in a statement. If you’re a gambling man, put your money on the CW station in that market, KUCW, which seems to be NBC’s go-to station when KSL pre-empts its programming. Most recently, NBC’s coverage of the French Open was moved to KUCW when KSL preempted it for the Children’s Miracle Network telethon. Salt Lake City is the country’s 33rd-largest TV market. In its newscast item Monday morning to announce its decision not to air “The Playboy Club,” KSL noted that its parent company is a sponsor of an Out in the Light Campaign, “which seeks to educate people on problems associated with viewing sexually explicit material.” In that campaign, the company is partnered with the Utah Coalition Against Pornography. Coalition chairwoman Pamela Atkinson noted in a guest editorial on KSL that “on television, in movie theaters, in music, on the Internet, virtually everywhere — you can find an outlet for material which we find pornographic, or at least, objectionable.” “There is a growing body of research,” Atkinson continued, “that shows exposure to such material indeed leads to many personal and social problems.”

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7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Victory Garden Woodwright PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

Wipeout ’ ‘PG’ Å Community ‘14’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Big Bang Theory Engagement Wipeout ’ ‘PG’ Å So You Think You Can Dance ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Oregon Art Beat Ore. Field Guide Community ‘14’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ The Vampire Diaries ’ ‘14’ Å Amer. Woodshop Moment-Luxury Oregon Art Beat Ore. Field Guide

9:00

9:30

Wipeout ’ ‘PG’ Å The Office ‘PG’ Parks/Recreat CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ Wipeout ’ ‘PG’ Å Glee Comeback ’ ‘14’ Å Without a Trace White Balance ‘PG’ Doc Martin Date; car vandal. ’ ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Parks/Recreat Nikita Rough Trade ’ ‘14’ Å Love of Quilting Joy/Painting Doc Martin Date; car vandal. ’ ‘PG’

10:00

10:30

Rookie Blue Big Nickel ’ ‘14’ Å Love Bites Keep on Truckin’ (N) ‘14’ The Mentalist Bloodsport ‘14’ Å Rookie Blue Big Nickel ’ ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Without a Trace Requiem ‘PG’ Å The Story of India ’ ‘PG’ Love Bites Keep on Truckin’ (N) ‘14’ House of Payne Meet the Browns Mexican Table Julia-Jacques The Story of India ’ ‘PG’

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens History Detectives ’ ‘PG’ Å News Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Cooking Odyss Hubert Keller History Detectives ’ ‘PG’ Å

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter The First 48 Last Fare ‘14’ Å The First 48 One Heart ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘PG’ Å The First 48 (N) ‘PG’ Å The First 48: Missing Persons ‘PG’ The First 48: Missing Persons ‘PG’ 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter ››› “Se7en” (1995, Suspense) Brad Pitt, Morgan Freeman, Gwyneth Paltrow. A killer dispatches his victims via the Seven Deadly The Killing Beau Soleil The police connect ››› “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” (1991, Science Fiction) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton, Edward Furlong. Cyborgs 102 40 39 battle over a youth who holds the key to the future. Å Sins. Rosie to a website. ’ ‘14’ Anaconda Adventure ’ ‘G’ Å Life Insects ’ ‘PG’ Å Must Love Cats ’ ‘PG’ Å Cats 101 ’ ‘G’ Å Cats 101 ’ ‘G’ Å Must Love Cats ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 26 38 Wild Kingdom ’ ‘PG’ Å Million Dollar Decorators ‘14’ Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC What Happens Housewives/NYC 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition ››› “The Rookie” (2002, Drama) Dennis Quaid. A middle-aged pitcher makes it to the Major Leagues. ’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å 190 32 42 53 My Big Redneck Wedding ‘14’ Å Target: Inside the Bullseye Surviving the Future Mad Money Target: Inside the Bullseye Surviving the Future Paid Program Paid Program 51 36 40 52 Inside the Mind of Google Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Colbert Report (7:58) South Park (8:29) South Park South Park ‘MA’ Futurama ’ ‘14’ Futurama ’ ‘14’ Futurama ’ ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 (4:56) South Park (5:26) Tosh.0 ‘14’ (5:56) Scrubs ‘14’ (6:26) Scrubs ‘14’ Daily Show Desert The Yoga Show PM Edition Cooking City Club of Central Oregon The Buzz Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Wizards-Place Phineas and Ferb Good-Charlie Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ “The Suite Life Movie” (2011) Dylan Sprouse. ‘G’ Å Good-Charlie Suite/Deck Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Shake It Up! ‘G’ Cash-Chicago Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Deadliest Catch Sea Change ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å Swords: Life on the Line ‘14’ Å Swords: Life on the Line (N) ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 2011 U.S. Open Golf Championship Best of the First Round From Congressional Country Club in Bethesda, Md. Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter From Bethesda, Md. NASCAR Now (N) NFL Live Å 2011 U.S. Open Golf Championship Best of the First Round (N) Å 22 24 21 24 MLL Lacrosse Tennis First-round, from June 22, 2010. Å Tennis First-round, from June 22, 2010. Å 23 25 123 25 NBA Basketball SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ ››› “Meet the Parents” (2000, Comedy) Robert De Niro, Ben Stiller, Blythe Danner. ›› “Along Came Polly” (2004) Ben Stiller, Jennifer Aniston. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å 5 Ingredient Fix Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Flay vs. Burke Iron Chef America NIC vs. Yang Summer Snacks Unwrapped 24 Hour Restaurant Battle (N) Chopped Get It Together! 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa ››› “Iron Man” (2008, Action) Robert Downey Jr. A billionaire dons an armored suit to fight criminals. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Definitely, Maybe” (2008) Ryan Reynolds, Isla Fisher. Premiere. 131 Curb/Block Property Virgins Property Virgins Hunters Int’l House Hunters My First Place My First Place Selling New York Selling New York House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Curb/Block MonsterQuest African monster. ‘PG’ MonsterQuest Giant squid. ‘PG’ Swamp People It’s Personal ‘PG’ Swamp People Beat the Clock ‘PG’ Mounted in Al. Mounted in Al. Modern Marvels Cold Cuts ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 Prehistoric Monsters Revealed ‘PG’ Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Protector Pilot ‘PG’ Å 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show The Real World ’ ‘14’ Å 16 and Pregnant ’ ‘14’ Å 16 and Pregnant Taylor ‘14’ Å “The Truth Below” (2011) Gillian Zinser, Reid Ewing. Premiere. ’ 192 22 38 57 That ’70s Show SpongeBob The Penguins iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ That ’70s Show That ’70s Show The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Timbers in 30 Barfly (N) World Poker Tour: Season 9 MLS Soccer Vancouver Whitecaps FC at Seattle Sounders FC Ball Up Streetball Maloof Money Cup (N) 20 45 28* 26 Action Sports World Tour (5:40) Jail ’ ‘14’ Å (6:20) Jail ’ ‘14’ Jail ’ ‘14’ Å (7:40) Jail ’ ‘14’ Å (8:20) Jail ’ ‘14’ iMPACT Wrestling (N) ’ ‘14’ Å “Damage” (2009) Steve Austin. 132 31 34 46 Jail ’ ‘14’ Å American Ninja Warrior ‘PG’ American Ninja Warrior ‘PG’ American Ninja Warrior ‘PG’ American Ninja Warrior ‘PG’ American Ninja Warrior ‘PG’ American Ninja Warrior ‘PG’ 133 35 133 45 American Ninja Warrior ‘PG’ Behind Scenes David Jeremiah Destined Reign This Is Your Day Praise the Lord Å Live-Holy Land The Evidence Grant Jeffrey Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ ›› “American Pie 2” (2001, Comedy) Jason Biggs, Shannon Elizabeth. Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan (N) 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ›› “The Cyclops” (1957, Science Fiction) › “Attack of the 50-Foot Woman” (1958, Science Fiction) Allison › “Village of the Giants” (1965, Fantasy) Tommy Kirk. Gargan- › “Queen of Outer Space” (1958) Zsa Zsa Gabor, Eric Fleming. › “Mars Needs Women” (1966) Tommy Kirk. Human females 101 44 101 29 Hayes, William Hudson, Yvette Vickers. tuan teenagers gain the upper hand on adults. Earthmen land in 1985 on all-female Venus. are needed to help repopulate Mars. James Craig, Gloria Talbott. Ultimate Cake Off ’ ‘PG’ Å NY Ink The Gloves Are Off ‘14’ Å Police Women of Broward County Police Women of Broward County NY Ink Dis-Appointment (N) ’ ‘14’ Police Women of Broward County 178 34 32 34 Ultimate Cake Off ’ ‘PG’ Å Bones The Man in the Mud ’ ‘14’ Bones The Baby in the Bough ‘14’ Bones The Verdict in the Story ‘14’ Bones The Shallow in the Deep ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å CSI: NY Hush ’ ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Bones Player Under Pressure ‘14’ Regular Show Hole in the Wall Sidekick ‘Y7’ Almost Naked World of Gumball Adventure Time Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (5:44) Sanford & Son ‘PG’ Å Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond (11:12) Everybody Loves Raymond 65 47 29 35 The Jeffersons NCIS Smoked ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Jet Lag ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Blowback ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Recoil ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Murder of a naval officer. ‘14’ Covert Affairs Good Advices ‘PG’ 15 30 23 30 NCIS Pop Life ’ ‘PG’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live Presidential Bash 2008 ’ ‘14’ Å 40 Greatest Pranks 2 ’ ‘14’ Mob Wives ’ ‘14’ Å 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33

››› “Casino” 1995 Robert De Niro. A mob employee makes a play for power in 1970s Las Vegas. ’ ‘R’ Å › “When in Rome” 2010 Kristen Bell. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (9:35) ››› “Sleepless in Seattle” 1993 Tom Hanks. ’ ‘PG’ Å (4:00) “Smilla’s Sense of Snow” ‘R’ After Film School ›› “Grand Canyon” 1991 Danny Glover. A white lawyer befriends a black tow-truck driver. ›› “The Name of the Rose” 1986, Mystery Sean Connery, F. Murray Abraham. ‘R’ Å Moto: In Out Moto: In Out Moto: In Out Moto: In Out AMA MX Highlights 2011 (N) Å The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘PG’ Dirt Demons Dirt Demons AMA MX Highlights 2011 The Daily Habit

› Money Train Naked Lunch ‘R’ Thrillbillies ‘PG’

(4:00) Live From the U.S. Open (N) Live From the U.S. Open Live From the U.S. Open Live From the U.S. Open The Waltons The Silver Wings ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ (4:45) ››› “A Matter of Taste: Serving Up ›› “Nanny McPhee Returns” 2010, Comedy Emma Thompson. A nanny uses magic › “Our Family Wedding” 2010, Romance-Comedy America Fer- Max Kellerman Treme Delmond pitches his project to Dr. The Best of Real Sex: How to Be a BetHBO 425 501 425 10 Paul Liebrandt” 2011 ’ to teach mischievous children a lesson. ’ ‘PG’ Å rera, Forest Whitaker. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Face Off John. ’ ‘MA’ Å ter Lover Sex and food. ’ ‘MA’ ›› “Lord of War” 2005 Nicolas Cage. A relentless Interpol agent tracks an arms dealer. ‘R’ ›› “Lord of War” 2005 Nicolas Cage. A relentless Interpol agent tracks an arms dealer. ‘R’ › “Superstition” 1985, Horror James Houghton, Albert Salmi. ‘NR’ Å IFC 105 105 › “Vampires Suck” 2010 Matt Lanter. A spoof of “Twilight” fea- ›› “Predators” 2010, Science Fiction Adrien Brody, Topher Grace, Alice Braga. Fear(3:35) ›› “Preda- (5:20) ›› “Beavis and Butt-head Do (6:45) ››› “Drag Me to Hell” 2009, Horror Alison Lohman. A young woman must MAX 400 508 7 tors” 2010 ‘R’ America” 1996 ’ ‘PG-13’ Å shatter a powerful curse placed upon her. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å tures a love-struck vampire and werewolf. some aliens hunt a band of human fighters. ’ ‘R’ Å Naked Science (N) ‘PG’ Known Universe Escaping Earth (N) Earth Under Water (N) ‘G’ Naked Science ‘PG’ Known Universe Escaping Earth Earth Under Water ‘G’ Geo Bee 2011 ‘G’ Geo Bee 2011 ‘G’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Voltron Force (N) ’ ‘Y7’ Å Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Voltron Force New Defenders Trilogy ’ ‘Y7’ Å Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Voltron Force ’ NTOON 89 115 189 Beyond the Hunt Whitetail Nation Magnum TV Wardens Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Whitetail Pro Ted Nugent Trophy Quest Beyond the Hunt Wild Outdoors Outdoors Trophy Hunt Adv. Abroad OUTD 37 307 43 ››› “The Times of Harvey Milk” 1984 Harvey Milk. Profiles the Nurse Jackie Bat- United States of (5:15) “Against the Current” 2009, Drama Joseph Fiennes, Justin Kirk. iTV. A troubled ››› “Color Me Kubrick” 2005, Comedy John Malkovich, Jim The Real L Word The Morning After Romi SHO 500 500 man decides to swim the lower Hudson River. ’ ‘R’ Å Davidson. iTV. ’ ‘NR’ Å slain San Francisco gay-rights activist. ‘NR’ ting Practice ‘MA’ Tara Crunchy Ice and Kelsey’s fizzled sex life. Speedmakers Electric Vehicles ‘G’ Speedmakers ‘G’ American Trucker American Trucker Speedmakers Electric Vehicles ‘G’ Speedmakers ‘G’ American Trucker American Trucker NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (5:15) ››› “The Devil’s Own” 1997, Suspense Harrison Ford. ‘R’ Å (7:10) ›› “Takers” 2010, Action Matt Dillon, Idris Elba. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å › “The Bounty Hunter” 2010 Jennifer Aniston. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Year One” 2009 Jack Black. STARZ 300 408 300 (3:50) “Dorian Gray” 2009, Horror Ben (5:50) ››› “The Game” 1997, Suspense Michael Douglas, Sean Penn. A business- ›› “Martin Lawrence Live: Runteldat” 2002, Comedy Martin Lawrence. The comic (11:45) ›› “The ›› “Zack and Miri Make a Porno” 2008, Romance-Comedy TMC 525 525 Barnes, Colin Firth. ’ ‘R’ Å man takes part in an unusual form of recreation. ’ ‘R’ Å performs his stand-up routine. ’ ‘R’ Å Seth Rogen, Elizabeth Banks. ’ ‘R’ Joneses” 2009 World Series of Poker ‘PG’ World Series of Poker ‘PG’ World Series of Poker ‘PG’ World Series of Poker ‘PG’ World Series of Poker ‘PG’ World Series of Poker ‘PG’ WEC WrekCage Å VS. 27 58 30 Bridezillas Where Are They Now? Bridezillas Where Are Bridezillas Erica’s nasty attitude. ‘14’ Amsale Girls ‘PG’ Å Cupcake Girls Cupcake Girls Ghost Whisperer Pieces of You ‘PG’ Amsale Girls ‘PG’ Å WE 143 41 174


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY PUPPET SHOW: Penny’s Puppet Productions presents “Basil the Bookworm’s Trip Around the World”; part of Familypalooza; free; 10:30 a.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-617-7099 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Little Bee” by Chris Cleve; bring a lunch; free; noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-3121092 or www. deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. JAMS FOR JOPLIN: Live music benefits the Red Cross locally and in the greater Ozarks; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-388-6999. WINE TASTING AND YAPPY HOUR: With wine, appetizers, a silent auction, trick contests and more; proceeds benefit Greyhound Pet Adoption Northwest; $20; 6-8 p.m.; Eastside Bend Pet Express, 420 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive; 800-767-5139 or www.gpa-nw.org. CLEAR SUMMER NIGHTS: Singersongwriter Brett Dennen performs, with Dawes; $20; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-385-3062 or www. athleticclubofbend.com. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Bellingham; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541312-9259 or www.bendelks.com. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org.

FRIDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or www. bendfarmersmarket.com. REDMOND FRIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-5156 or redmondfridaymarket@gmail.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-7 p.m.; North Ash Street and West Main Avenue; www .sistersfarmersmarket.com. SISTERS WINE & BREW FESTIVAL: Wineries and breweries of the Pacific Northwest offer selections of their products; live music, cooking demos, art vendors and more will be on hand; free admission; 3-9 p.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-385-7988, info@ specialized-events.com or www. sisterswineandbrew.com. VFW DINNER: A dinner of roast beef; proceeds benefit local veterans; $7; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. “PETER AND THE WOLF”: Bendbased Academie de Ballet Classique presents a ballet adaptation of the musical about a boy and his animal friends; $11.50 in advance, $13.50 day of show, free ages 5 and younger; 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Rick Steber reads from his book “Caught

in the Crosshairs”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. JAZZ AT THE OXFORD: Featuring a performance by jazz-fusion pioneer Jeff Lorber, with Patrick Lamb; $40; 6:30 and 9:15 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436 or www.oxfordhotelbend.com. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Tumwater; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541-312-9259 or www. bendelks.com. “ALICE IN WONDERLAND”: Redmond School of Dance presents the classic story in ballet form; $12, $5 ages 11 and younger; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-548-6957 or www.redmondschoolofdance.com. “THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE”: The Children’s Theater Co. presents C.S. Lewis’ tale of four children transported to Narnia; $5; 7 p.m.; The Bridge Church of the Nazarene, 2398 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; 541-460-3024, childrenstheater@me.com or www. childrenstheatercompany.net. TOGETHER, WE TOO CAN CHANGE OUR WORLD: The Terpsichorean Dance Studio presents a dance recital interpreting history throughout the ages; proceeds benefit the studio’s scholarship fund; $9 in advance, $10 at the door; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3300. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org. HIPPY FIASCO: Nathan Moore and his band perform folksy jams; reservations requested; $10; 8 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Largent Studio House Concert, Bend; 541-420-4165 or moonmountainramblers@gmail.com. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; tickets must be retrieved at participating venues; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; http:// url.bb/LBS11. EDDIE VALIANT: Pop and hiphop performance, with Abadawn and Northorn Lights; free; 9 p.m.; Madhappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868. ZEPPARELLA: The San Franciscobased female Led Zeppelin tribute band performs, with Tony G; $15 plus fees in advance, $18 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www .randompresents.com.

SATURDAY DIAMONDS IN THE ROUGH: Featuring a garage and tack sale, silent auction, adoption fair, pony rides and more; proceeds benefit Equine Outreach; donations accepted; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Equine Outreach Ranch, 63220 Silvis Road, Bend; 541-419-4842 or www.equineoutreach.com. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: With a diaper drive; proceeds benefit

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Bend’s Community Center; donations of diapers accepted; 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate, 486 S.W. Bluff Drive, Bend; 541-382-4123. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the Natural Mind Dharma Center; free; 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; Repeat Performance Sports, 507 N.W. Colorado, Bend; 541-610-5333, dpnsyrnyk@gmail.com or www .naturalminddharma.org. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643. BEND PADDLEBOARD CHALLENGE: Competitive paddleboard courses in three heats; with gear demonstrations; registration required to compete; proceeds benefit the Bend Paddle Trail Alliance and the Bend Recreation Foundation Scholarship Fund; $15$25, free for spectators; 9 a.m., 8 a.m. registration; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-639-2655, Info@ BendPaddleboardChallenge.com or www.BendPaddleboard Challenge.com. BOOK AND DRESS SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit What I Wore; free admission; 9 a.m.4 p.m.; 1489 N.W. Jackpine Ave., Redmond; 541-504-1201. CLASSIC CAR EXPO: A show of classic cars restored to their original condition; proceeds benefit Friends with Flowers; free, $10 to enter a car; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-388-1495. PET PARADE AND YARD SALE: A pet parade, with a yard sale and live music; free; 9 a.m.3 p.m.; downtown Culver; 541-546-6494. ALPACA SHEARING FESTIVAL AND CAR SHOW: Featuring live music, demonstrations, a barbecue, a silent auction, a classic-car show and adoptable animals; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; donations accepted, $20-$25 to enter a car; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Crescent Moon Ranch, 70397 Buckhorn Road, Terrebonne; 541-923-7620, alondra_or@hotmail.com or www.redmondhumane.org. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www.central oregonsaturdaymarket.com. KITCHEN KALEIDOSCOPE: Tour homes in Bend’s NorthRim and NorthWest Crossing neighborhoods; with vendors and chefs offering samples; proceeds benefit the Assistance League of Bend; $20 in advance, $25 day of event; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.541-389-2075 or www.assistanceleaguebend.com. RHYTHM AND RHYME FESTIVAL FOR YOUNG CHILDREN: Featuring readings, rhyme creation, music and other activities for children; free; 10 a.m.-noon; Sisters Elementary School, 611 E. Cascade Ave.; 541280-9686 or linda@together-forchildren.org. RIDE FOR TWO RIVERS: Cycling event features 51-mile or 25-mile rides beginning and ending at the ranch; proceeds benefit the National Forest Foundation’s Tale of Two Rivers conservation site; $100 for 51-mile route, $50 for 25-mile route, $25 ages 17 and younger; 10 a.m.; Black Butte Ranch, milepost 93, U.S. Highway 20, Sisters; 503-241-0467. SUMMER SHOOTOUT MARBLE TOURNAMENT: Learn to play marbles and then play in a tournament, with lawn games, a picnic and more; registration

required; proceeds benefit the Deschutes County Historical Society; $10; 10 a.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813 or www .deschuteshistory.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: An illustration display, with readings and talks from children’s book authors and illustrators Patricia Wilson, Sharon Bean, Kai Strand and KC Snider; free; 10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-420-1625 or sawatkinds@ hotmail.com. SISTERS WINE & BREW FESTIVAL: Wineries and breweries of the Pacific Northwest offer selections of their products; live music, cooking demos, art vendors and more will be on hand; free admission; 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-385-7988, info@ specialized-events.com or www .sisterswineandbrew.com. 50 YEARS OF PEACE CORPS: Speak with volunteers who lived and worked in Africa, Asia, the South Pacific and more; free; 1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1081 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: D. Hilleren talks about the novel “Battered Earth”; free; 4-6 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Heather Sharfeddin talks about her book “Damaged Goods”; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525 or sunriverbooks@ sunriverbooks.com. POETHOUSE BENEFIT: Featuring live music and hors d’oeuvres, followed by a dance and costume party; proceeds benefit PoetHouse Art; $5; 5 p.m.; PoetHouse Art, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-7280756 or www.poethouseart.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Rick Steber reads from his book “Caught in the Crosshairs”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Tumwater; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541312-9259 or www.bendelks.com. “ALICE IN WONDERLAND”: Redmond School of Dance presents the classic story in ballet form; $12, $5 ages 11 and younger; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-548-6957 or www.redmondschoolofdance.com. “THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE”: The Children’s Theater Co. presents C.S. Lewis’ tale of four children transported to Narnia; $5; 7 p.m.; The Bridge Church of the Nazarene, 2398 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; 541-460-3024, childrenstheater@me.com or www .childrenstheatercompany.net. JAZZ AT JOE’S: The Jazz at Joe’s series presents The Renato Caranto Quartet; $25; 7-9:30 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-771-6446 or www.raisethe vibe.net/jazzatjoes. TOGETHER, WE TOO CAN CHANGE OUR WORLD: The Terpsichorean Dance Studio presents a dance recital interpreting history throughout the ages; proceeds benefit the studio’s scholarship fund; $9 in advance, $10 at the door; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3300. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 2, 4:40, 7:20 CAVE OF FORGOTTEN DREAMS (G) 2:25, 4:25, 6:55 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 2:45, 5:10, 7:35 MEEK’S CUTOFF (PG) 2:15, 4:50, 7:10 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13) 2:20, 4:35, 7:05 WINTER IN WARTIME (R) 2:05, 4:30, 7

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 1:25, 4:15, 7:15, 10:10 FAST FIVE (PG-13) 12:15, 3:35, 6:35, 10:15 GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m. GREEN LANTERN 3-D (PG-13) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:02 a.m. THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 12:45, 2, 3:45, 5, 6:45, 8, 9:40, 10:35 JUDY MOODY AND THE NOT BUMMER SUMMER (PG) 12:35, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30

KUNG FU PANDA 2 (DP — PG) 1:30, 4:30, 7:25, 9:50 KUNG FU PANDA 2 3-D (PG) 12:30, 3:15, 6:15, 9:20 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 1:15, 4:25, 7:30, 10:30 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES 3-D (PG-13) 12:05, 3:05, 6:05, 9:25 SUPER 8 (PG-13) 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 10:05 SUPER 8 (DP — PG-13) 1:55, 4:55, 7:55, 10:40 THOR (PG-13) 1:40, 4:40, 7:40 THOR 3-D (PG-13) 10:20 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG-13) 12:20, 3:20, 6:20, 9:45 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) Noon, 12:55, 3, 3:55, 6, 6:55, 9:15, 9:55 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (DP — PG13) 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:45 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) 4:45, 7:30

MADRAS CINEMA 5 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) LIMITLESS (PG-13) 6 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 9

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15 SUPER 8 (PG-13) 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) 2:15, 5:15, 8:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 5, 7:45 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 5:30, 8 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 5:15 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 7:30

‘Van’ fails to deliver the comedic goods By Hank Stuever The Washington Post

“Jon Benjamin Has a Van,” and indeed he does: a windowless blue number that is meant to conjure up images of creeps and perverts and other van owners meant to be generally avoided. With a garish paint job featuring Benjamin as a nude cherub with a reporter’s microphone, the van is ostensibly set loose with a mission to bring back humorous stories in this disappointingly unfunny series that premiered Tuesday night on Comedy Central. This is the sort of show Comedy Central could actually use to complement its fake-news lineup. If Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert function as rough analogues to Walter Cronkite and Bill O’Reilly (and in fact have audiences that rely on them to filter the real news into something more ironically palatable), then what about a full-time Charles Kuralt on the road? Benjamin has the potential to be that guy. He is a 45-year-old comic known best for his malleable, rich speaking voice heard in cartoons aimed at adults, able to sound drolly slacker-esque (as he did all those years ago as Ben Katz in “Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist”) and also brazenly macho (as he currently does for the title role of FX’s “Archer”). In person, he is a short, balding, bearded man with the bluest eyes on television, with a knack for seeming likable and unctuous all at once. How to work that talent for wry schlubbiness? Some of the best moments in the history of “The Daily Show” have come from those manufactured dispatches from the American yonderplace, beyond Manhattan and Wash-

Trail

M T For Thursday, June 16

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m. THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 12:45, 3, 5:15, 7:30, 9:45 KUNG FU PANDA 2 3-D (PG) 12:50, 3:05, 5:10, 7:15, 9:15 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:40 SUPER 8 (PG-13) Noon, 2:25, 4:50,7:20, 9:50 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) 12:35, 3:30, 6:30, 9:20

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

FAST FIVE (PG-13) 7 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (UPSTAIRS — PG) 5 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) 4 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

C ontinue d f rom E1 Metolius-Windigo Trail is free of snow but there are 80 to 100 downed trees per mile on the trail. In the Sisters Ranger District, Cabot Lake Trail is accessible, but has moderate to heavy numbers of fallen trees and solid snow at 5,000 feet. Jack Lake Trailhead is blocked by snow after a quarter mile. Black Butte has patchy snow at the summit, but the trail is in good shape. There will be a reroute of the trail at the top starting July 5. Metolius River Trail has been cleared for hikers, but there may be some mud and flowing water on the trail. The head of Jack Creek is cleared from the trailhead and campground and open for hikers only. Tam MacArthur Rim and Three Creeks trails are blocked by snow. South of Bend, trails around Newberry Crater are blocked except Peter Skene Ogden Trail, which is clear for five miles. Diamond Peak Wilderness still has three to four feet of solid snow. Fawn Lake Trail is accessible for a quarter mile before it becomes blocked with snow. Oldenburg Trail, south of Crescent Lake, is clear of snow for 1

‘Jon Benjamin Has a Van’ When: 10 p.m. Tuesdays Where: Comedy Central

ington, where everyday people — farmers, morticians, assorted kooks — have happily complied with the show correspondents’ impulses to create something not entirely true, yet not entirely fictional. But it is clear from the first few moments of “Jon Benjamin Has a Van” that this isn’t what the show intends to be; that it only pretended in its ad campaign to be about a scruffy correspondent delivering inappropriate stories about interesting people. Instead, it is filled with weak attempts at sketch comedy, resulting in a few funny moments here and there, but not enough. There’s one bit where Benjamin pushes his producer across the U.S.-Mexico border without his passport and leaves him there; Benjamin returns to Mexico a year later to discover that the man has learned Spanish, married a peasant and now runs a farm. Benjamin pushes him across another border, and then another, triggering events over several years that eventually promote the producer to drug kingpin. Another funny bit involves walking into offices and lobbies with his camera crew and seeing how long it takes — mere seconds, really — for a security officer to appear and say “You can’t shoot here.” It’s as if Benjamin and company are trying to invent a kind of Michael Moorebased drinking game.

1/2 miles, but has moderate numbers of fallen trees. The area above Tumalo Falls into the North Fork is still closed to mountain bikers and will probably not be opening up for another two weeks. Hikers can get half a mile above the viewpoint before they reach solid snow. Mountain bikers may be able to enjoy Mrazek and Farewell trails this weekend, but should be aware there may be snow on the trail in some areas. It may be advisable to start on the Mrazek side of the trail in Shevlin Park and bike to the summit. Expect to find increasingly busy trails at the lower elevations into the summer season, especially with the limited access to the wilderness trails. Trails in the lower elevations, including Deschutes River Trail and Phil’s Trail complex, are in good condition. Mountain bikers should be aware that there will be a bike race Saturday at Phil’s Trail. Lava Cast Forest is also now open for hiking. The weather continues to be cool enough that the mosquitoes are not pestering us at full capacity, but watch out for ticks in the forests. Ly dia H of f m an can be reached at 541-383-0358 or at lhoffman@bendbulletin.com.


E4 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, June 16, 2011: This year, your focus needs to remain on a key partnership. For some of you, two relationships could take a higher priority. One could be professional. Finances and taking risks could be hot issues. There could be many more twists and turns than you expected, as surprises seem to greet you frequently. Your ability to flex and adjust could be very important. If you are single, you will quickly fall into a close bond. Be careful not to jump into the first situation that comes along. Alternatives will come forward. If you are attached, the two of you become closer, but often there are periods of withdrawal, followed by greater closeness. CAPRICORN helps ground you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Your ability to handle a problem allows for greater efficiency. Your intuition guides you with someone you put on a pedestal or must answer to. The unexpected occurs. Presently, you have a way of triggering that type of event. Tonight: A must appearance. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Touch base with an expert before making a full declaration about your next step. You might not be comfortable with what is being suggested. Intuitively, you make the right choice, which becomes more and more natural. Tonight: Look at a different approach.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH A partnership increases in importance. Your instincts come through for you once more, though you need to keep yourself under control. A partner’s or associate’s position could totally change, tossing you into limbo. Tonight: Dinner for two. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Defer to friends or associates. A boss tends to act in the most unexpected manner. Look at the situation positively; at least you are not bored. Be more upbeat and positive in your dealings with those close to you. Tonight: Go with a suggestion. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Recognize what you must accomplish. Whether it’s the thought of the weekend or the pressure of a situation, you focus and do what is needed. Remain open to new technology or a suggestion that could transform the nature of your work. Tonight: Get some rest. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You might be amused by someone’s unpredictability, but it might be wise not to let this person know. Communicate your intentions in a meeting or gettogether. Others will run with your idea, though they might continually update it. Maintain a sense of humor. Tonight: Say “yes” to an offer. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Work with a family member and don’t back off. Your ability to move in a new direction and let go could be stalemated. You need to deal with a key person directly, though on some level you find this person unpredictable. Tonight: Order in.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Your ability to communicate your needs allows greater flex from others. Sometimes you get quite nervous as you deal with one associate or person in your daily life. You never know what he or she will do next! Tonight: Join a friend. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Be sensitive to the costs of making a certain choice. As a natural risk-taker, you might decide to just go for it. Transforming your finances could go either way. Make sure you are acquainted with the facts. Tonight: Your treat. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Your ability to move in a new direction comes out. Someone close could feel somewhat jeopardized by your ability to morph right in front of him or her. A partner communicates his or her fears. Now is the time for a key discussion. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HH Know when to back off, and you’ll get great results. Someone speaks or acts in a manner that actually might stun you. Though you might be revising your perceptions about this person, don’t finalize anything right now. Tonight: Do just for you. PISCES (Feb.19-March 20) HHHHH Your focus is important in a decision, meeting and/or an evolving friendship. Don’t do anything that involves risks and finances, despite another person’s confidence. Face facts — it’s your wallet that is going to take a hit. Tonight: Where you want to be, doing what you want. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C D  

ORGANIZATIONS TODAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat. org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371. BINGO: 6:30-9 p.m.; Summit Saloon & Stage, Bend; 541-383-3502. DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS: 6:30 p.m.; Bend VFW Hall; 541-389-0775. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541382-6287 or www.harmoneers.net. INTERFAITH SILENT MEDITATION: 6:30-7:30 p.m.; 258 S.W. Fifth St., Redmond; 541-923-7607. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191.

Outing Continued from E1 According to the book “Oregon Geographic Names” by Lewis A. McArthur and Lewis L. McArthur, Sardine Mountain was named after Sardine Creek, which was so named by Thomas Henness, who, in 1867, found a sardine tin in the river. A moment of great excitement for him, no doubt, as sardine cans were quite rare in these parts in those days. We found plenty of empty beer cans, but alas, no sardine tins. We donned our daypacks and hiked up Sardine Creek Road, a dirt road that runs from the highway north into the woods alongside the creek. The road connects to a series of forest roads, but they aren’t safe for cars and trucks, due to large drainage ditches that cut through the middle of them. The key to the hike up Sardine Mountain is finding the start of the trail. Walk up the road for about three-quarters of a mile, or about 15 minutes, to a creek that passes beneath the road. On the far side of the creek, turn right. Head uphill for about 100 feet to find a trail that heads back in the direction of the road. The trail turns back uphill quickly and starts to climb directly up the ridgeline, with almost no switchbacking to mitigate the ascent. The route climbs up a mossy staircase, gaining about 1,500 feet over the next mile and a half. With little regular foot traffic, the trail is not well-developed, and can be slippery in places where moss grows undisturbed. The lower portion of the route tops out to another dirt road at the 3,000-foot level. Take a left turn on the road and hike another 200 feet to a fork in the road. It’s a good spot to take a break and refresh before tackling the next steep part of the trail. You can see a rock outcropping high above the road. It’s not the summit of Sardine Mountain, but another landmark along the route. The trail picks up again on the right side of the road, just before the fork. It’s also marked with surveyor’s tape. Again the trail climbs steeply through the forest, eventually opening up to a more sparsely treed section. Route finding is a major challenge here as the trail at times becomes almost imperceptible. Dunn had hiked the trail for the first time the previous Saturday and returned the next day to hike it again. Despite his being on the route for the third time in a week, we still had to backtrack at times when we lost the trail. Generally the route follows the ridge, which has informally come to be known as Dislocation Ridge after a particularly gruesome shoulder injury incurred by a hiker there. As you climb higher, the views open up around you. You can see down to Detroit Lake, and over to the surrounding summits: Rocky Top, Water Tower Mountain, Mayflower. The final 500 feet of the climb traverses an airy summit ridge. On Sunday, there was still snow on the northwest side of the ridge. A sharp, rocky point on the ridgeline forced us to drop down and traverse a steep slope by kicking steps in the snow. Just below the summit, the edge of the snow was melting out fast, undercutting the snow where it met the summit rocks. Exercising extreme caution not

REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-9453. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course, Redmond; 541-419-1889 or www. redmondoregonrotary.com. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Noon June 23; reservations required by Wednesday; Black Bear Diner, Bend; www.sibend. org or 541-815-4173.

FRIDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat. org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND KNITUP: $1; 10 a.m.noon; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, Bend; 541-728-0050. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107.

THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. NATIONAL ACTIVE AND RETIRED FEDERAL EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION, CENTRAL OREGON CHAPTER: 10 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-2228. OREGON TRAIL APPALOOSA CLUB: 7 p.m.; Lazy SR Ranch, Redmond; www.otahc.org or 541-504-4282.

DANCE HOUR: 2-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133.

MONDAY

BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat. org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 10 a.m.; Brookside Manor, Redmond; 541-410-6363.

BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678. CASCADE CAMERA CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-389-0663. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7311 or 541-848-7523. VFW DEXTER FINCHER POST 1412: 6:30 p.m.; Veterans Hall, Prineville; 541-447-7438.

SUNDAY

TUESDAY

BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688.

BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster

SATURDAY

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND COIN CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; High Desert Community Grange, Bend; bendcoinclub@hotmail. com or 541-693-3438. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. MODERN QUILT GUILD INTEREST GROUP: 5-8 p.m.; QuiltWorks, Bend; kayla.traver@vandals.uidaho.edu. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133.

WEDNESDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229

or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CASTING CLUB: 6 p.m.; Orvis, Bend; bendcastingclub@ gmail.com or 541-595-8362. BEND KNITUP: 5:30-8 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 888-227-7414. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 and 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-548-5935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; Newberry Hospice, La Pine; 541-536-7399. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05-1 p.m.; Home Federal Bank, Prineville; 541-416-6549. WEDNESDAY MORNING BIRDERS: 7 a.m.; Nancy P’s Baking Co., Bend; 541-383-4039.

If you go Getting there: Drive west on U.S. Highway 22 past Detroit and the Detroit Dam. When the Big Cliff Dam is in sight, look for a turnoff on the right side of the road just past a bridge over Sardine Creek. The turnoff is about one-tenth of a mile east of the dam. Difficulty: Strenuous with route-finding challenges Cost: Free Contact: Detroit Ranger District, Willamette National Forest, 503-854-3366 to break through the edge of the snow, we gingerly stepped out on the rocks and scrambled to the top of the mountain. It may be another couple of weeks until the snow melts out enough to avoid that kind of maneuver. From the top, the vista stretched beyond the surrounding peaks to Mount Jefferson, the Three Sisters, even a faint image of Diamond Peak on the far horizon. The route climbs about 3,700 feet in a bit more than five miles. It’s a challenging, steep climb, and the area is teeming with ticks. (Do a full body check when you get home.) We also saw plenty of red eft salamanders and a number of snakes along the way. The wildflowers are just starting to emerge, including some wild irises down by the road. We returned the way we came, stepping carefully to avoid slip-

Markian Hawryluk / The Bulletin

Vincent Dunn wipes sweat from his brow low on the trail up Sardine Mountain. The trail climbs up a steep ridge, some 3,700 feet to the summit. ping on the loose rock or slick moss. Despite our best efforts, we both had several slips coming down.

But then, that’s to be expected on a secret trail that doesn’t get a lot of traffic. So if you go, be ready for steep climbing and

route-finding challenges. And remember, try not to tell too many people. After all, it’s a secret.

Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.


H

Informatio n

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HEALTH

By special ty categor

Anesthesia : 35 Cardiovasc ular: 69 Dermatolog ic: 11 Endocrine: 31 Gastrointes tinal: 52 Ear, nose & throat: 34 Hematolog y-oncology : 66 Infectious disease: 47 Neurology: 168 Obstetrics-g ynecol

Medicine Long warning labels on prescriptions make decisions more complex, Page F3

y

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011

MONEY

NUTRITION

Change for rural health Potential shifts in Medicare payment areas could benefit some, hurt others By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

FITNESS

Cut the cold cuts and

EAT RED

Spider tape comes in a variety of cuts for all different body parts. Made of a cotton material with acrylic, hypoallergenic adhesive, it is water-resistant and breathable. Submitted photo

By Anne Aurand

RED MEAT Red meat refers to beef, pork and lamb.

The Bulletin

ed meat has developed a bad reputation, because its consumption has been linked to heart disease, cancers and higher death rates. But newer studies have delineated a difference between fresh red meat and processed red meat, and suggested that the processed meats are the bigger culprits. “Meat is fine,” said Bend registered dietitian Lori Brizee. “It’s the cured and processed stuff that is bad.” Processed red meat is generally considered lamb, beef or pork that’s been smoked, salted or treated with preservatives. Think sausage, salami, hot dogs. While fresh red meat may not be quite the villain it once was, national health groups still say people should limit its consumption.

R

The health risks Numerous studies have linked both unprocessed and processed red meats with fatal heart disease and cancers. Among them: Last year, Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, published a study that said high red meat intake, two servings a day, increases the risk of coronary heart disease. That risk can drop 20 to 30 percent when other sources of protein — nuts, fish and poultry — are chosen instead. In 2009, the National Institutes of Health and AARP studied more than 545,000 people and found that men who ate the most, about four ounces of red meat and 1.5 ounces of processed meat daily, had a 31 percent higher death rate than those who ate the least. See Meat / F4

Colorectal cancer risk RED MEAT If a person eats 3.5 ounces of red meat every day (24.5 ounces per week), their risk of colorectal cancer will be

17% higher than someone who eats no red meat. If they eat 7.0 ounces of red meat every day (49 ounces per week), their risk will be

34% higher.

Inside • A map of the proposed payment areas, Page F5

PROCESSED MEAT If a person eats 3.5 ounces of processed meat every day (24.5 ounces per week), his or her risk of colorectal cancer will be

Falling pa ymen

ts A report from paid to phy the Institute of Me dicine sicians in rura increased l areas be recommends that num of metropolita ber of metropolita redistributed to pay money currently n proposal wou n areas are paid mor areas. Currently, phy physicians in an sicians in a e than in the ld increase handfu that number rest to about 440 of the state; the new l Current pay metro area ment are s. as

36% higher than someone who eats no processed meat. If he or she eat 7 ounces of processed meat every day (49 ounces per week), his or her risk will be

payment

Web of benefits

Processed meat’s link to cancer is no baloney, experts say

Rural doctors could see a drop in Medicare payments if recommendations contained in a new Institute of Medicine report are followed. The report, released earlier this month, said the current method of determining reimbursements to physicians and hospitals under the Medicare program is flawed, and it recommended changes to make payments more equitable. If the recommendations are followed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, urban areas like Bend could see an increase, though rural surrounding counties could see a drop in payments. “What this is going to do is perpetuate and accentuate the inequities,” said Dr. Michael Knower, a family physician in Prineville. “We’re already underserved.” Physicians and hospitals are currently reimbursed at different rates by Medicare based on where they are, known as a geographic adjustment. The idea is that because it costs more to live and run a business in a large city versus a small town, doctors should be compensated at higher rates in those areas. Office rents and average wages are used to compute the adjustment. The report finds many flaws in the current system used to compute that adjustment and recommends technical changes. The Medicare system for reimbursing physicians is very complex. To change it, the report recommends that many states, including Oregon, expand the number of places classified as metropolitan areas for purposes of Medicare reimbursement. Currently, CMS splits the country into 89 distinct payment areas, which are both cities and states. Oregon, for example, has two payment areas: Portland and the rest of Oregon. Physicians in Alaska are paid at the highest rate per procedure and those in Arkansas and Puerto Rico are paid the least. Portland doctors fall about in the middle; the rest of the state falls in the bottom 20 percent. See Medicare / F5

Proposed

F

IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

72% higher.

areas

Source: World Cancer Research Fund/ American Institute for Cancer Research’s Continuous Update Project expert panel Thinkstock

INSIDE

MEDICINE

NUTRITION

FITNESS

Vital stats

Better choices

In motion

Injuries in the bathroom are more common than you think, Page F3

Jenny Craig diet ranks the highest in recent study, Page F4

Do toning shoes really help you burn more calories? Page F6

PROCESSED MEAT Processed meat is meat preserved by smoking, curing or salting, or by the addition of preservatives. Examples include ham, bacon, pastrami and salami, as well as hot dogs and sausages.

Spider tape helps keep pain under wraps By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

Superdave swears by Spider tape. Dave Thomason (aka Superdave) is a 39-year-old runner and mountain biker in Bend who, from time to time, experiences pain. Kinesiology tape has been around for decades for use in various types of physical therapies. A Japanese company makes SpiderTech, a line of precut shapes of kinesiology tape called Spider tape that wraps and supports various body parts to improve performance, or, as in Thomason’s case, reduce pain. Thomason thought maybe his pain came from some sort of Achilles injury. He went to Mark DeJohn, owner of Active Therapeutics, who practices a form of muscular therapy called “active release technique” and is the only certified SpiderTech tape practitioner in Central Oregon. (There are six certified SpiderTech practitioners in Oregon, but most work on the west side of the Cascades.) Spider tape, as with regular kinesiology tape, is generally applied in conjunction with various therapeutic treatments, such as chiropractic care and physical therapy. DeJohn has taught other types of therapists how to apply the intricate Spider tape, but said a therapist doesn’t need to be certified. “You’d have a hard time hurting anyone doing it wrong,” DeJohn said. Many physical therapists and physicians use generic kinesiology tape on patients for a variety of purposes. See Tape / F6

Correction In a story headlined “Urinary trouble: Experts offer comforting advice for uncomfortable incontinence,” which appeared Thursday, June 9, on Page F1, physical therapist Hilary Garrett’s name was misspelled. The Bulletin regrets the error.


F2 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

H D GROUP: 541-317-3568. • TULEN CENTER FOR MARTIAL ARTS AND WELLNESS: 541-550-8550. • WILLRACE PERFORMANCE TRAINING STUDIO: 541-350-3938 or willpower05@msn.com. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: 541-350-0064. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: 541-419-9699. • YOGA FOR 55 +: 541-948-9770. • YOGA FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE: 541-322-9642 or info@ bend-yoga.com. • YOGA HEART OF REDMOND: 541633-0530 or www.ericamason.net. • YOGA TO GO: robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com or 541-948-9770. • ZUMBA: 541-383-1994.

CLASSES A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO WEIGHT LOSS: Dr. Wiles Goss discusses weight loss with an emphasis on eating; free; 6 p.m. today; Whole Foods Market, 2610 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; matt.collins@ wholefoods.com or 541-389-0151. TAI CHI: Gentle exercises taught by a certified instructor; registration required; $50; 5:30-6:30 p.m. Thursdays, June 23-Aug. 11; St. Charles Redmond, 1253 N.W. Canal Blvd.; http://stcharleshealthcare. org or 541-706-6390. YOGA FOR LIFE: Increase strength, flexibility and balance; registration required; $65; 4 p.m. Thursdays, June 23-Aug. 25; 6 p.m. Thursdays, July 7-Sept. 8; or 4 or 5:45 p.m. Mondays, July 11-Sept. 19; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; http://stcharleshealthcare. org or 541-706-6390. ZUMBA: Dance fitness classes in a variety of genres; $5 per class or $45 for 10 classes; 6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays; Urban Pointe Dance Center, 1245 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite B1, Bend; 541-306-0621. ZUMBATOMIC: Dance fitness classes for ages 4-12; $5 per class or $3 per class for gym members; 9:30 a.m. Mondays and Thursdays; Elite Fitness and Education, 61470 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 3, Bend; 541-728-0002. • ACTIVE LIFE FITNESS: Tai Chi; 541-389-7536 or 541-788-7537. • AFTERNOON FIT KIDS: Ages 5-12; 541-389-7665. • ASMI YOGA: 541-385-1140 or www.asmiyoga.com. • BABY BOOMERS & BEYOND: Yoga instruction; 541-948-9770. • BAKESTARR: 541-598-4483 or www.bakestarr.com. • BALANCE YOGA CLASSES & RETREATS: 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • BEND FELDENKRAIS CENTER: 541-788-9232. • BEND SENIOR CENTER: 541-388-1133. • BEND YOGA: 503-998-8902. • BIKRAM’S YOGA COLLEGE OF INDIA: 541-389-8599 or www. bikramyogabend.com. • BOOT CAMP FITNESS FOR WOMEN: 541-815-3783. • BOOST FAMILY FITNESS: 541-3905286 or www.boostfam.com. • CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE: 541383-7290 or www.cocc.edu. • CHRONIC PAIN CLASSES: 541-3187041 or www.healingbridge.com. • CLASSIC HATHA YOGA/ANANDA INSPIRED: 541-385-9465 or www.wellnessbend.com. • CORE: Yoga; 541-389-6595 or www.coreconditioning.info. • FIT FOR THE KING EXERCISE MINISTRY: 541-923-3925 or www.fitfortheking.info. • FITNESS GUIDE SERVICE: 541-388-1685 or www.fitness guideservice.com. • FOCUS PHYSICAL THERAPY: 541-385-3344 or www. focusphysio.com. • FUNCTIONAL FITNESS TRAINING: 541-647-1346. • GOLF FITNESS AND PERFORMANCE: 541-350-1631 or ccooper@taiweb.com. • HEALING BRIDGE PHYSICAL THERAPY: 541-318-7041 or www.healingbridge.com. • HEALTHY HABITS YOGA STUDIO OF REDMOND: www.facebook.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Submitted photo

Dr. Wiles Goss will lecture on holistic weight loss. See the Classes listing for details. com/healthyhabitsredmond or 541-526-1097. • HEALTHY HAPPENINGS: 541-706-6390 or www. stcharleshealthcare.org. • HULA HOOP CLASSES: www.hoop dazzle.com or 541-312-6910. • IMAGINE HEALTH NOW: 541-318-4630 or www .imaginehealthnow.com. • INNERGYSTICS: 541-388-7395. • IYENGAR YOGA OF BEND: 541-3181186 or www.yogaofbend.com. • IYENGAR YOGA CLASSES: 541-948-9770 or robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com. • JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. • KIDS YOGA: 541-385-5437. • LAUGHTER YOGA: 541-420-2204. • LAUGHTER YOGA CLUB: 541389-0831 or www.pcoco.org. • LIVING FITNESS: 541-382-2332. • MOVEMENT THAT MATTERS: 541-548-6067. • NAMASPA: 541-550-8550 or www.namaspa.com. • PILATES CENTER OF BEND: 541-389-2900 or www.pilatescenter ofbend.com. • PILATES CONNECTION: 541-420-2927 or www. bendpilatesconnection.com. • PILATES MAT AND EQUIPMENT INSTRUCTION: FreshAirSports.com/ pilates or 541-318-7388. • PLAY OUTDOORS: 541-678-5398. • QIGONG CLASSES: 541-330-8894. • REBOUND PILATES: 541-585-1500 or www.reboundpilates.com. • REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. • REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: dedwards@bendbroadband.com. • SALLY’S HATHA YOGA: 541-3900927 or www.sallyshathayoga.com. • SILVER STRIDERS: 541-3838077 or www.silverstriders.com. • SPIRIT OF PILATES INC.: 541-4205730 or www.spiritofpilates.com. • STROLLER STRIDES: 541-5985231 or www.strollerstrides.com. • THERAPEUTIC YOGA PROGRAM: 541-350-1617. • TUESDAY PERFORMANCE

ADHD ADULT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-420-3023. AIDS EDUCATION FOR PREVENTION, TREATMENT, COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND SUPPORT (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7402. AIDS HOT LINE: 800-342-AIDS. AL-ANON: 541-728-3707 or www.centraloregonal-anon.org. AL-ANON PRINEVILLE: 541-416-0604. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA): 541-548-0440 or www.coigaa.org. ALS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-977-7502. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION: 541-548-7074. ALZHEIMER’S/DEMENTIA CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-948-7214. AUTISM RESOURCE GROUP OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-788-0339. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING: 541-385-1787. BEND S-ANON FAMILY GROUP: 888-285-3742. BEND ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-382-6122 or 541-382-6651. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-382-5882. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP/ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 541-383-3910. BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-382-9451. BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP: 541-350-7243 BREAST-FEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: 541-385-1787. CANCER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. CANCER INFORMATION LINE: 541-706-7743. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. CELEBRATE RECOVERY: New Hope Church, Bend, 541-480-5276; Faith Christian Center, Bend, 541382-8274; Redmond Assembly of God Church, 541-548-4555; Westside Church, Bend, 541-3827504, ext. 201; Metolius Friends Community Church, 541-546-4974. CENTRAL OREGON ALZHEIMER’S/ DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-504-0571 CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM ASPERGER’S SUPPORT TEAM: 541-633-8293. CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM SPECTRUM RESOURCE AND FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-279-9040. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS: 541-385-3320. CENTRAL OREGON DEPRESSION AND

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

ANXIETY GROUP: 541-420-2759 CENTRAL OREGON DOWN SYNDROME NETWORK: 541548-8559 or www.codsn.org. CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES WITH MULTIPLES: 541-3305832 or 541-388-2220. CENTRAL OREGON LEAGUE OF AMPUTEES SUPPORT GROUP (COLA): 541-480-7420 or www.ourcola.org. CENTRAL OREGON RIGHT TO LIFE: 541-383-1593. CHILD CAR SEAT CLINIC: 541-504-5016. CHILDREN’S VISION FOUNDATION: 541-330-3907. CHRONIC PAIN SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7730. CLARE BRIDGE OF BEND: 541-385-4717 or rnorton1@ brookdaleliving.com. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS: 541480-0667 or 541-536-1709. CORIL SUPPORT GROUP: 541 388-8103, ext. 203. CREATIVITY & WELLNESS — MOOD GROUP: 541-647-0865. CROOKED RIVER RANCH ADULT GRIEF SUPPORT: 541-548-7483. DEFEATCANCER: 541-706-7743. DESCHUTES COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH 24-HOUR CRISIS LINE: 541-322-7500. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE: 541-5499622 or 541-771-1620. DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-617-0543. DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP: 541-598-4483. DISABILITY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-8103. DIVORCE CARE: 541-410-4201. DOUBLE TROUBLE RECOVERY: 541-317-0050. DYSTONIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-2577. ENCOPRESIS: 541-548-2814 or encopresis@gmail.com. EVENING BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-460-4030 FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES: 541-322-7400. FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER: 541-389-5468. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Redmond 541-280-7249, Bend 541-390-4365. GAMBLING HOT LINE: 800-233-8479. GLUCOSE CONTROL LOW CARB DIET SUPPORT GROUP: kjdnrcd@ yahoo.com or 541-504-0726. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE GROUP

(CELIAC): 541-389-1731. GRANDMA’S HOUSE: 541-383-3515. GRIEFSHARE GRIEF RECOVERY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-382-1832. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541306-6633, 541-318-0384 or mullinski@bendbroadband.com. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7483. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-771-3247. GRIEFSHARE RECOVERY CLASS: 541-389-8780. HEALING ENCOURAGEMENT FOR ABORTION-RELATED TRAUMA : 541-318-1949. HEALTHY BEGINNINGS: 541-383-6357. HEALTHY FAMILIES OF THE HIGH DESERT: 541-749-2133 HEARING LOSS ASSOCIATION: 541-848-2806 or hlaco2@gmx.com. HEARTS OF HOPE: 541-728-4673. IMPROVE YOUR STRESS LIFE: 541-706-2904. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. LA LECHE LEAGUE OF BEND: 541-317-5912. LIVING WELL (CHRONIC CONDITIONS): 541-322-7430. LIVING WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. LUPUS & FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-526-1375. MADRAS NICOTINE ANONYMOUS GROUP: 541-993-0609. MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH PROGRAM: 541-322-7400. MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. NARCONON: 800-468-6933. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA): 541-416-2146. NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-408-7779 or 541-504-1431. NEWBERRY HOSPICE OF LA PINE: 541-536-7399. OREGON COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND: 541-447-4915. OREGON CURE: 541-475-2164. OREGON LYME DISEASE NETWORK: 541-312-3081 or www.oregonlyme.org. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 541-306-6844. PARENTS OF MURDERED CHILDREN SUPPORT GROUP: 541-410-7395.

PARISH NURSES AND HEALTH MINISTRIES: 541-383-6861. PARKINSON’S CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-317-1188. PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. PARTNERS IN CARE: 541-382-5882. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: 541-317-2334 or www. pflagcentraloregon.org. PLAN LOVING ADOPTIONS NOW (PLAN): 541-389-9239. PLANNED PARENTHOOD: 888-875-7820. PMS ACCESS LINE: 800-222-4767. PREGNANCY RESOURCE CENTERS: Bend, 541-385-5334; Madras, 541-475-5338; Prineville, 541-4472420; Redmond, 541-504-8919. PULMONARY HYPERTENSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7489. RECOVERING COUPLES ANONYMOUS: 541-389-0969 or www.recovering-couples.org. SAVING GRACE SUPPORT GROUPS: Bend, 541-382-4420; Redmond, 541-504-2550, ext. 1; Madras, 541-475-1880. SCLERODERMA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-480-1958. SELF-ESTEEM GROUP FOR WOMEN: 541-389-7960. SEXAHOLICS ANONYMOUS: 541-595-8780. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE TESTING: 541-322-7400. SOUP AND SUPPORT: 541-548-7483. SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILIES WITH DIABETIC CHILDREN: 541-526-6690. TOBACCO FREE ALLIANCE: 541322-7481. TOPS OR: Bend, 541388-5634; Culver, 541-546-4012; Redmond, 541-923-0878. VETERANS HOTLINE: 541-408-5594 or 818-634-0735. VISION NW: 541-330-0715. VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 541-330-9001. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-385-0747 WOMEN’S SELF-ESTEEM GROUP: 541-389-7960. WOMEN’S SUPPORT GROUP FOR ANGER, ANXIETY, OR DEPRESSION: 541-389-7960. WOMEN SURVIVING WITH CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. WOMEN WITH HIDDEN DISABILITIES PEER GROUP: 541-388-8103, ext. 207. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-388-3179.

Thinking of Spinal Surgery? Read this first before you do anything! I am Dr. David Herrin, DC. I specialize in a unique Non-Surgical Spinal Decompression Program here in Central Oregon. I see people reduce pain medications, avoid surgery, and get their life back - every day... and all that without surgery. Yes, you heard me right. I specialize in disc degeneration, herniated discs, bulging discs, spinal stenosis, and sciatica.

Discover What The Pro Athletes Are Using To Get Out Of Pain – Without Surgery If you haven’t heard of non-surgical decompression yet, it’s a shame. People all over the country are embracing this therapy. There are PGA pros, professional football players, and people just like you getting back to their old self – Fast! Here is the “conventional” procedure for back pain patients. “Take these drugs and get some rest. Let’s see what happens in a month.” When that doesn’t work there’s always the option of getting a needle filled with steroids placed directly into your back. Down the road when it’s finally bad enough you may need surgery. This might seem like a good plan for some. I work with those who want to get their old life back without going under the knife.

Forgive Me For Expressing My Opinion About Surgery. I Believe Surgery Should Be A Last Resort, And That There Are Effective Non-invasive Solutions Available. I have a better solution. People in my office get out of pain fast, and can be back doing the things they love while they are being treated. And you don’t have to feel like you are a drug addict to feel good.

The New Solution – Fast And Long-Lasting Relief We have a non-surgical, non-drug solution. And it’s fast and effective. It’s called non-surgical spinal decompression. Let me give you a summary on this ground breaking technology. This is a computerized decompression machine that stretches the spine in a unique way. It creates negative pressure deep in the diseased disc.

The negative pressure acts like a vacuum that pulls the disc material away from the spinal cord and spinal nerves. Eliminating pain and symptoms. At the same time the negative pressure pulls nutrients, water and oxygen into the disc. You see with disc diseases, the disc is actually sick! It’s dehydrated. And shrinking. That is how many of our patients regain their life.

Do Any Of These Case Studies Sound Familiar To You? Case #125. Darlene D. After her surgery she was left in some serious pain. This pain lasted 32 years. She came in to us and in three weeks she was out of pain. In five weeks she was on her roof working with her husband. Case #89. Bruce F. After a traumatic car accident, Bruce was left in pain. He went here and there but didn’t find relief. So he came to see us. The treatments were painless. He got out of pain. He now runs, walks the beach, and plays with his kid. All without pain. Case #320. John M.’s MRI said, “Annular Tear,” Ouch! His episodes of pain put him on his back for two weeks every couple months. He began treatment and his pain decreased almost immediately. Over the course of treatment his back felt stronger and more flexible. No episodes to this day. Case #25. Kevin. Headaches everyday of his life since an accident. Headaches gone after first treatment. Peace could be defined as finding a solution to a problem that has you feeling completely crazy. Imagine how Kevin must have felt, and how he feels now! You don’t need a referral to see me. You are invited to be evaluated by me. I will cover the cost. There is a catch – you have to qualify. I will only treat those I can help.

Don’t Delay Your Pain Relief Come And See If You’re A Good Candidate To Eliminate Your Pain This examination typically costs $245. Right now you can get it for free. That is – if you qualify. Call now to see if you qualify for this exclusive evaluation.

It’s A Free Consultation Why you’re in so much pain? How long it will take to get you better?

Before you stop reading this, call our number to schedule your free appointment now!

(541) 923-2019 Redmond Wellness & Chiropractic • 1655 SW Highland Ave., Suite 6 Redmond, OR 97756


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 F3

M

Next week Protein-rich plasma helps heal injuries on a cellular level.

Side effects of long warning labels Overlabeling can make decisions on prescriptions more complex

Information overload A recent analysis of prescription drug labeling inserts found that medications carry an average of 70 warnings of potential adverse events per label.

Average number of warnings By dispensing frequency Top 200 Drugs: 79 All other drugs: 47

By specialty category

By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

When a TV commercial for a prescription drug starts to list the side effects, do you tune out? Do you even bother reading the package insert that comes along with the medication? The lists of potential side effects of drugs have swelled to considerable lengths as pharmaceutical companies list any reported side effects, no matter how infrequent or how dubious in causation. But now the lists have become so long that many health experts are concerned the important warnings are getting lost. Researchers from Indiana University analyzed more than 5,600 drug labels and found the medications carried an average of 70 potential side effects. The most commonly prescribed drugs averaged about 100 warnings, and one label listed 525 possible side effects. “Having all these labeled side effects can overwhelm doctors who must weigh the risks and benefits when prescribing a medication,” said Dr. Jon Duke, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Indiana School of Med- Dr. Jon Duke, icine, who led an assistant the research. professor at “The Food and the UniverDrug Admin- sity of Indiana istration has School of taken steps Medicine, to discourage says weighsuch over- ing risks and warning, but at benefits of present, infor- medications is mation over- tough due to load is the rule overlabeling. rather than the exception.” The lists of side effects are so voluminous it would have taken the researchers months to read through all the individual labels. Instead, they used computer software designed to identify side effects listed in the text of the labels. The analysis found that newer prescription drugs listed more side effects than older drugs, and drugs prescribed in the fields of neurology, rheumatology and psychiatry had the highest average number of effects listed.

Legal concerns The lists are compiled by drug manufacturers from results of clinical trials testing the drugs prior to FDA approval, and from

Anesthesia: 35 Cardiovascular: 69 Dermatologic: 11 Endocrine: 31 Gastrointestinal: 52 Ear, nose & throat: 34 Hematology-oncology: 66 Infectious disease: 47 Neurology: 168 Obstetrics-gynecology: 49 Opthalmology: 18 Pain: 42 Psychiatry: 116 Pulmonary: 34 Rheumatology: 111 Urology: 55

Date of approval 1950s: 34 1960s: 43 1970s: 39 1980s: 63 1990s: 89 2000s: 63

By label format Old format: 47 New format: 72 Source: Indiana University School of Medicine Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

post-marketing surveillance of the drugs. Duke said that although the FDA discourages listing potential side effects that occur at the same rate as for patients taking a placebo, concerns over lawsuits prompt companies to list them anyway. “If something is present on the label, the pharmaceutical companies are able to say that a patient has been adequately warned, so if there is, down the road, a lawsuit, they’re able to have a stronger case,” Duke said. “If they’ve not warned the patient, it’s what’s called failure to warn, and there is a higher risk in terms of their legal liability.” But Duke stresses that a longer list of side effects does not mean the drug is less safe. The number of warnings listed can be affected by the patient population or differing regulatory approaches. “Cancer drugs are generally not overwhelmingly overloaded with side effects, compared to some drugs like antidepressants or drugs for restless leg syndrome,” he said. “And one of the reasons is that cancer drugs, because the condition itself is so serious, minor side effects and minor symptoms don’t even register. They’re not even on the radar of a patient that has much bigger concerns.” Similarly, different classes of drugs are approved by different

departments at the FDA. And some departments, he said, are more aggressive than others about what side effects should be listed. FDA revised its standards for listing side effects in 2006, but the analysis showed that the move has had little impact on trimming the lists. Drugs using the old label format contained an average of 47 side effects, while drugs using the new label had 72.

Interpreting risk All those side effects mean doctors must work that much harder to filter through the noise to find the warnings that truly affect their patients. “They put these reports out there of billions of potential side effects for every drug and then it’s legally an obligation that we have to inform the patient not just of the important ones, but of every side effect,” said Dr. Mike Bell, a neurologist with Bend Neurological Associates. Knowing patients can’t process information about 100 side effects anyway, doctors try to narrow the list to the ones that will have the most impact on patients. “Most of us try to list off the three or five most common and most serious,” he said. “Usually I try to tell patients what are the

How to prevent age spots By Alison Johnson Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

Ask any dermatologist how to prevent brownish spots as you get older and you’ll likely get the answer given by Dr. Elizabeth McBurney, clinical professor of dermatology at Louisiana State University School of Medicine: “Sunscreens, sunscreens, sunscreens!” More details: Start protection early. Age spots are the result of a lifetime of exposure to the sun or tanning beds. Young people also aren’t immune: Damage can appear in people in their 20s. Pick the right sunscreen. Choose waterproof brands with a sun protection factor of at least

15 — McBurney suggests SPF 50 or higher — that protects against both UVA and UVB rays. Put it on about 20 minutes before heading outside and reapply it every two hours. Pay attention to trouble areas. The back of your hands and your face and chest are most likely to develop age spots. Slather on sunscreen. Cover up. Wear a widebrimmed hat, sit under an umbrella and cover your arms and legs with lightweight fabrics. Remember that the sun’s rays are most intense between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Protect yourself in the car. Invest in a tinted or clear window screen that blocks UVA rays,

which travel easily through glass. Be careful with certain nail polishes. New long-lasting shellac polishes use ultraviolet light to harden and can cause freckling on the back of hands. Put on sunscreen before applying the polishes, which are safe after they dry. Live healthy. Eat plenty of vegetables and fruits and exercise regularly to improve blood circulation to skin throughout your body. Consider treatment. Fade creams, chemical peels and laser resurfacing can reduce or eliminate age spots. Also consult a doctor to make sure any new spots aren’t something dangerous.

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AT HOME

worst things and what are the most common things.” Often, however, that requires additional research reading the published studies to determine what side effects are likely in what patients and the use of their clinical experience. Doctors soon learn what side effects are worrisome for each drug, and can tailor their message about side effects to the particular patient. It does make the evaluation of new drugs, for which the doctor has little experience or published research on which to base his or her advice, rather difficult. “So you often wait a few years to see what people are saying about it before you start using it a lot,” Bell said. “Or you test the waters a bit and you use it a few times and gain some clinical experience.” Physicians are also well-versed in weighing the benefits and risks of various treatments, and can help patients put the real risks of the long list into the proper context. Some side effects of a drug may be common but could represent just a minor inconvenience, while others could be rare but represent a serious risk to the patient. And some of the listed side effects may apply only when a drug is used to treat a certain condition or in a given dosage. “I think what really has to happen is a discussion of risk, alternatives and benefits,” said Dr. Dan Fohrman, a rheumatologist with Deschutes Rheumatology in Bend. “There are so many factors. That’s the advantage of sitting down with somebody, and basically it’s a team decision. Here’s what your choice are, and here’s what you can do.” Having that informed discussion with a physicians is better than the alternatives, he said, when patients are either overwhelmed by the list of side effects or completely tune them out. “People who are worried about everything would take nothing and not treat their disease, and people who are oblivious to all of it and have problems, don’t pay attention to it,” Fohrman said. “I don’t encourage either.” Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

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VITAL STATS Nonfatal bathroom injuries

Non-fatal bathroom injuries

About 230,000 people older than 14 were injured in their bathrooms in 2008, according to a report released last week from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That number represents about 1 percent of all nonfatal injuries that year.

Falls by far the most common mechanism of injury

Bathing and showering most common activity for injuries

Cut or pierce 1.2% Struck by or against 6.4%

Tripped .9%

Fire or burn .6% Other 1.3%

Fall 81.1%

Overexertion 9.4% * Transferring is defined as moving between a wheelchair or walker and the toilet, sink, shower or tub.

Other 4.5% Not specified 16.7% Bathing or showering 27.5%

Transferring* 1.5%

Getting into shower or tub 2.2% Loss of consciousness 5.5% Getting out of the tub or shower 9.8%

Slipped 17.3% Standing up from, sitting down on, or using the toilet 14.1%

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

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F4 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N Meat Continued from F1 An especially damning report for processed meat came out last year. Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health analyzed 20 studies that examined the link between processed meats and cancer or heart disease deaths. Researchers concluded that eating 1.8 ounces of processed meats per day was associated with a 42 percent higher risk of heart disease, but they didn’t find an increased risk from eating unprocessed beef, pork or lamb. The report also said those who regularly ate processed meats had a 19 percent higher risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, but unprocessed red meats were not associated with an increased risk. And another report from scientists who analyzed about 1,000 studies on colorectal cancer concluded recently that both red and processed meat increased colorectal cancer risk. The report for the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research’s Continuous Update Project also indicated that consuming processed meats, ounce for ounce, increased the cancer risk twice as much as consuming fresh red meat. Researchers involved with these studies have indicated that more study is called for to explain why processed meats, including bacon, ham, smoked meats, pepperoni and cold cuts, appear to have higher health risks. But different theories have emerged blaming higher levels of sodium, nitrate/nitrite preservatives and chemicals used to add smoky flavors to meats.

Meat eaters Despite all this, some die-hard fans of red meat and nutritional experts swear by its value and strength-building properties, especially for the athletic types. Jeff Browning, 39, is a successful local ultramarathoner who says up to 40 percent of his diet comes from protein, mostly meat and eggs. He eats a lot of red meat, and, “I eat all the fat,” he said. But he knows better than to eat cured meats very often. “We don’t buy processed meats at all for home. I do buy a cold cut sandwich occasionally in a pinch.” Growing up on a farm in Missouri, Browning was raised on fresh beef, venison and veggies from the garden. In in his early independent years, he started eating more fast and processed foods. He married a vegetarian, and generally dropped meat from his diet. “She thought it was healthy,” he said. “My opinion: It’s not sustainable.” In his late 20s, Browning started the kind of serious running for which he’s locally known. He was not recovering well after long runs, and he was losing weight. And after his first son was born in 2002, his wife, Jennifer, wanted to breast feed, but she was dropping weight and feeling weak. After many different nutritional attempts to improve their strength, they eventually discovered the Weston A. Price diet and began eating meat, fats, vegetables, minimal

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Great news for those who go on daily coffee jags: A recent study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reports that the life-giving brew does not boost blood pressure. Take our quiz on what this —

Beef steak, broiled or baked, includes lean and fat, about 9 ounces. (Recommended serving size is 3 ounces, so consider that this steak should be shared with a friend or some of it saved for leftovers.)

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Jeff Browning cuts into a steak while eating Thursday at Jackson’s Corner in Bend.

How much meat to eat? The American Institute for Cancer Research recommends that people limit red meat consumption to 18 ounces (cooked weight) per week of beef, lamb or pork. The institute recommends avoiding processed meat entirely. The American Heart Association recommends no more than six ounces of “lean meat” per day. The AHA also recommends eating baked or grilled fish at least twice a week. In general, the association says, chicken and fish have less saturated fat than red meats (beef, pork and lamb). The unsaturated fats in fish, such as salmon, may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

grains and nothing processed. Just months later, they were both stronger and healthier, Browning said. Now, when they eat pizza and bagels, he feels sluggish and she gets migraines. After a long run or a race, “I’m craving red meat!” Browning said. “Meat is building,” he said. “We have canines (teeth) for a reason.”

Protein needs Kelly Harrington, a local registered dietitian who specializes in sports performance, says her message to a guy like Browning is: “Keep eating what you’re eating,” even though it’s more protein than the average person needs. Typically, she said, protein should be 15 to 20 percent of an athletic man’s diet. Harrington said there are different protein needs between men and women, and between athletes and nonathletes. Anyone who is breaking down muscle tissue in their sport needs

and other studies — have found about that cup of joe surgically attached to your hand.

1.

The AJCN study says that there’s no appreciable difference in hypertension risk even for people who drank how many cups of coffee per day? a) 3 b) 5 c) 11

2.

In a study of 12,204 middle-age coffee drinkers, those who reported drinking four or more cups daily had a lower risk of developing what condition than those who “almost never” drink coffee. a) Type 2 diabetes b) arthritis c) kidney failure

Thinkstock

Chia seeds have been glorified by Dr. Oz, Oprah and others. What is their real nutritional value?

Nutrition info for a beef steak

protein to rebuild it. A distance runner doesn’t need as much as a body builder, Harrington said. But a football player in the off season, who might be doing some heavy weight lifting, might want to eat more protein. The general recommended daily allowance for protein is 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight, for most adults. Generally, the average man needs 56 grams of protein a day, and the average woman needs 46 grams of protein a day, although pregnant and lactating women need more. An endurance- or strengthtraining athlete should eat 1.2 to 1.7 grams of protein daily per kilogram of body weight, or about 0.75 grams per pound of body weight, for ideal performance and health, Harrington said. For a 150 pound person, that’s 112 grams. A six-ounce steak has about 50 grams of protein. Animal products are the best source of a complete protein, she said. “I think protein needs can be met on a vegetarian diet, but it’s much harder and a person needs to know what they’re doing,” she said. Beans are not a complete protein source — they have an incomplete sequence of amino acids — unless paired with rice, corn or another grain, said local dietitian and chef Garrett Berdan. “There’s nothing wrong with eating red meat. It is a source of high-quality protein that an active body can use to repair muscles and structural tissues,” he said. “It’s important that, like with all other foods, it is consumed moderately as part of a varied diet. You don’t have to ditch the steak, you might just want to include other lean proteins, including beans, on the weekly menu.” From a health perspective, he advises choosing lean cuts of red meat over prime, fatty, marbled red meats. That means at the

It’s time to test your coffee IQ By Sam McManis

Next week

3.

True or false: People who reported drinking one to three cups of

coffee per day were 20 percent more likely to be hospitalized for abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) than nondrinkers.

4.

A 2009 Scandinavian study showed that people who consumed three to five cups of coffee daily were what percentage less likely to develop dementia and Alzheimer’s disease compared with nondrinkers? a) 25 percent b) 35 percent c) 65 percent

5.

In study results that may surprise, high coffee consumption also decreases the chances of what type of cancer? a) prostate b) liver c) bladder

ANSWERS: 1: b; 2: a; 3: false; 4: c; 5: a. Sources: www.tuftshealthletter.com; www.webmd.com

Calories: 628 Protein: 74 g Fat, total: 35 g (14 g saturated) Carbohydrate: 0 Sugars, total: 0 Fiber, total dietary: 0 Cholesterol: 215 mg Calcium: 40 mg Copper: 0.207 mg Iron: 5 mg Magnesium: 56 mg Phosphorus: 533 mg Potassium: 795 mg Selenium: 80 mcg Sodium: 986 mg Zinc: 13 mg Vitamin: B-6 1 mg Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture’s online nutritional information

store, choose the meat with fewer veins of visible fat. Bison and elk are other great sources of lean protein, he said. Ultimately, he said, based on his unscientific research, “Red meat just tastes good. It’s got great flavor. And really, a fatty, nicely marbled steak is going to be especially good. But even a nice lean flank steak has wonderful flavor.” Anne Aurand can be reached at 541-383-0304 or at aaurand@bendbulletin.com.

B ET TER CHOICE S Consumer health group ranks Jenny Craig as winning diet plan The Jenny Craig diet plan, which combines portion-controlled pre-made foods with counseling, and a side dish of something homemade, was the winner of a Consumer Reports Health ranking of diet plans. Consumer Reports Health rates diets on their adherence to the 2010 U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, participants’ weight loss and drop-out rates. With an overall score of 85 points, Jenny Craig surpassed the popular Slim-Fast (63 points) and Weight Watchers (57 points) programs. One factor that contributed to Jenny Craig’s high ranking is 92 percent of its participants stuck with the program for two years, a long time to maintain a diet. Those participants lost an average of 8 percent of their weight. “The point of the report is to give dieters a side-by-side comparison of the main diet programs so they can choose for themselves. Jenny Craig is worth considering, but if you don’t like the idea of eating prepackaged meals, it may not be the best option for you,”

Thinkstock

The Jenny Craig diet plan got a thumbs-up from Consumer Reports Health, mostly for its high adherence rate.

said Nancy Metcalf, senior program editor of Consumer Reports Health. “The best diet is the one that you can stay on. Because if you can’t stick with it, then you won’t lose weight, nor will you be able to keep off any weight you do manage to lose.” — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

Source: Ratings are available at www.ConsumerReportsHealth.org to subscribers

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 F5

M Medicare Continued from F1 Under the system recommended by the institute, the number of payment areas would increase to more than 400 by making each distinct metropolitan area its own payment area. Bend, Eugene, Salem and Medford would be classified this way. Metropolitan areas would not automatically get higher reimbursements but would likely do so because the reimbursement system is based on things like wages and office rents, which tend to be higher in cities. The proposal needs to be budget neutral, meaning that it doesn’t cost anything extra, so the additional money flowing to the newly created metropolitan areas would be taken from the reimbursements currently going to rural areas. For rural doctors, “it wouldn’t be beneficial,” said Bruce Steinwald, an independent health care consultant and one of the report’s authors. Shifting payments that were dispersed across the whole state to cities, he said, “could cause some redistribution from the rural to the new (metropolitan) payment areas.” Dr. Sean Rogers, an internal medicine physician at Bend Memorial Clinic, said he felt ambivalent about the change even though Bend doctors might benefit. “Even if it’s good for us in Deschutes County, it’s not going to be good for other areas of the state. So it’s not really a win-win.” Betsy Boyd-Flynn, a spokeswoman for the Oregon Medical Association, which represents physicians, said she was concerned about the impact on physicians statewide. “My hope would be that CMS would take this work and not ding rural physicians.” Ironically, the impetus for the study came primarily from rural Congressional legislators in the Midwest and West. During debate about the passage of the federal health reform legislation in 2010, about 30 Democratic legislators in the House of Representatives threatened to vote no on the bill unless it addressed disparities in Medicare payments. To appease them, the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services promised a series of studies of the issue. U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio, a Democrat who represents southwest Oregon, was one of the most vocal advocates for the study. He was not available for comment for this story. Andrew Whelan, spokesman for Republican U.S. Rep. Greg

Falling payments A report from the Institute of Medicine recommends that money currently paid to physicians in rural areas be redistributed to pay physicians in an increased number of metropolitan areas. Currently, physicians in a handful of metropolitan areas are paid more than in the rest of the state; the new proposal would increase that number to about 440 metro areas.

Current payment areas

Employers find value in clinics that provide care at the office By Michelle Andrews Special to The Washington Post

Proposed payment areas

Source: Institute of Medicine Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Walden, who represents Central Oregon, said the office was still digesting the report but would be examining its implications. Whelan said Walden “is concerned about any policies that would lead to increased reimbursements to urban areas as opposed to rural areas.” Whelan also said the office was concerned with the overall low rate of reimbursements in Oregon compared with other states, a concern shared by BoydFlynn and the association that represents Oregon hospitals, the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems. “Hospitals and doctors in Oregon are severely underpaid by the Medicare program in relation to other states,” wrote Andy van Pelt, a spokesman for the hospital association in an e-mailed statement. “Our overall objective is to be adequately reimbursed.” Van Pelt said the association

was concerned that large, politically powerful states could coopt the process of implementing the recommendations, resulting in Oregon remaining at the low end of the reimbursement scale. If the recommendations do go into effect, it will likely not happen for a number of years. The committee is scheduled to produce two additional reports, one specifically focusing on physician reimbursement and another on the effects of the new geographic adjustment formula. For Knower in Prineville, any further cuts could cause major problems. “We’re going to continue to see physicians sucked from rural to urban areas,” he said. “If we want to address the shortage of health care personnel in rural areas, we need to reverse the trends.”

“That’s where the money is,” Willie Sutton famously quipped when asked why he robbed banks. There’s a similar rationale for employers who hope to improve workers’ health and contain costs with workplace health clinics: That’s where the people are. Day in and day out, workers troop into the office, spending the better part of their waking hours there. What better place to have medical staff on hand, not only to treat sore throats and cut fingers but also to help employees stay healthy by offering on-site preventive tests and screenings, and coaching to encourage healthful habits? “They come in for a runny nose, and we have an opportunity to engage them about their weight, their smoking,” said Stuart Clark, president of commercial services for Comprehensive Health Services, a Reston, Va.-based company that operates more than 100 on-site health clinics. “They may not be ready for that, but we’re in the building with them,” he says. “We’ll work with them … every day.” Until the 1980s, workplace health clinics generally existed to treat people who were injured on the job. Although that is still a key function, many employers are expanding the clinics’ role to include primary health care services. In 2010, 15 percent of employers with 500 or more employees had clinics providing primarycare services, according to the consulting firm Mercer. An additional 10 percent said they were considering doing so this year or next.

Employer interest in on-site primary care is motivated by several factors, say experts. By making it easy for employees to get a mammogram or check their blood pressure, companies hope to avert expensive medical problems down the road. In addition, employers hope that by ensuring that their clinic staff follows evidence-based guidelines for care, their workers will receive treatment that’s appropriate to their medical needs, said Ha Tu, a senior health researcher at the Center for Studying Health System Change. Although some workplace clinics aim to function as their employees’ primary-care provider, most clinics supplement rather than replace their workers’ doctors. Prices for clinic services are usually lower than those at a community-based clinic; sometimes they’re free. More than 30 million people are expected to gain health insurance under the health care overhaul that became law last year, and many employers are worried that

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it will further strain an already overburdened primary-care system, said Bruce Hochstadt, a physician who heads up Mercer’s work site health practice. Rather than abandoning coverage, he said, “we’re seeing a lot of employers maintaining coverage or adding clinics on-site.”

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Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Join us for a Cool Night Out as we introduce to you CoolSculpting. Enjoy cool drinks and good food as you learn about the new non-invasive way to reduce fat.

Arts & Entertainment Every Friday COMMUNITY EDUCATION SERIES

J UNE 22, 2011

Partners In Care Hospice and Home Health invites you to

5:00–7:00 PM

Problem Solving in Dementia Care

at the Athletic Club of Bend

• An interactive discussion: problem solving real issues in dementia care • Review of what dementia is and is not • Update on available treatment • Understanding goals of treatment

PLEASE RSVP (541) 678-0020

Friday, June 17 | NOON – 1:00pm Partners In Care; large conference room 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend Lunch provided with RSVP Presenter: Tim Malone, LCSW Gero-psychiatric Specialist Supervisor, Deschutes County Health Services, Seniors Mental Health Program RSVP TO Lisa H. 541-382-5882 or email at: lisamh@partnersbend.org

Before Procedure by Ivan A. Rosales-Berber, MD Patient number: SLP 023

www.centraloregondermatology.com to schedule your consultation Mark Hall MD • 541-678-0020 388 SW Bluff Drive • Bend

4 Months After One CoolSculpting Procedure


F6 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

F

Next week A local child-abuse prevention program is adding a new service to its menu: fitness.

Tape

Mark DeJohn wraps Spider tape across the bottom of Dave Thomason’s foot during an active release technique therapy session.

Continued from F1 Thomason said he sees DeJohn about three times during a summer, when he’s running a lot. On a recent day, he lay face down on DeJohn’s table, while DeJohn, using active release techniques, pressed his thumbs in Thomason’s calf muscles to break up adhesion from scar tissue that built up from chronic inflammation. Then DeJohn applied the Spider tape. Thomason flexed his foot while DeJohn stretched a long piece of blue kinesiology tape across its bottom. Two small forks of tape anchored between some toes and longer arms of tape wrapped up the back of his lower leg. “Magic,” Thomason said with a smile as he slipped on his jacket and shoes and left for a run. Kinesiology tape, a cotton material with acrylic, hypoallergenic adhesive, is water-resistant and breathable, and can be worn for several days. The tape is the same thickness and elasticity as skin, DeJohn said. The word kinesiology pertains to movement.

PEOPLE Please send information about people involved in health issues to communitylife@bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Linda Stelle has joined the Leavitt completed his resiboard of directors at Partners dency at Dartmouth College. He In Care. Stelle is the president of is a former employee of Great AmeriTitle, and she has served Works Family Practice in South on Partners In Care’s commu- Berwick, Maine. nity advisory council. She is a St. Charles Health System graduate of Oregon has been recognized State University. as a top-performMt. Bachelor Acuing health system by puncture & Herbal Thomson Reuters. The Clinic has opened an ofstudy ranks hospitals fice at 1558 S.W. Nancy on clinical quality and Way, Bend. The clinic efficiency, using data will offer acupuncture, from the Medicare Proherbal therapy, cupping vider Analysis and Reand dietary counseling Linda Stelle view and the Centers services. for Medicare and MedDrs. Nancy Brennan icaid Services’ Hospiand Peter Leavitt will join the tal Compare. This is the third staff of St. Charles Family Care consecutive year St. Charles — Bend, which will open in Sep- has received the designation. tember. Brennan is a Bend naPatrick Varga, the CEO at St. tive who completed her residen- Charles Redmond, has left his cy in Arizona. She has practiced position. He has held the post medicine in Central Oregon for since 2006, and will now work 18 years. for a hospital in Redding, Calif.

How the tape works Spider tape addresses tendons, ligaments and nerves in the body in three different ways, according to DeJohn: • Structural changes. For example, an “H”-shaped tape can be stuck across a person’s upper back so the longer reaches of the four arms of the “H” spread across the shoulders. With perfect posture, a person wouldn’t feel the tape. If the person slumped, he would feel the tape tighten across the skin and correct his posture, reteaching the brain and the muscles to engage better posture. “I try to change the way people hold their bodies,” DeJohn said. • Neurosensory changes. If applied to an area that is feeling pain, the sensations or signals from the tape will overrule the signals of pain going to the brain, so the neural patterns of pain stop strengthening. Called “gate theory,” it’s like a distraction from pain. The signals from the tape break the cycle of pain

Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

that has become established in the nervous system, he said. • Microcirculation. If applied to an area that is swollen and inflamed, such as a wrist, the tape lifts the skin slightly, creating a space between the tissues and the skin, which relieves pressure under the skin and can reduce swelling and inflammation, DeJohn said. For example, a person can cock the wrist slightly before the tape is applied. When the wrist returns to a normal position, the tape lifts the skin. Kinesiology tape has been

INMOTION Toning shoes are a step in the wrong direction, researchers say Manufacturers of toning shoes, which can sell from $100 to $245, claim they’ll help runners and walkers burn more calories and more beautifully shape their buttocks and thighs than regular shoes. But a team of researchers says the claim is false, and a Consumer Reports Health analysis of a consumer complaint database suggests the shoes can be downright dangerous. A podiatrist told attendees at a recent American College of Sports Medicine health exposition that toning shoes were among the hottest trends in footwear. And it’s no wonder; who wouldn’t want a better body with no additional effort? “Shoe manufacturers claim the unstable and highly curved outsole of these shoes activates more leg muscles than flat-soled shoes,” according to a news release from the ACSM. “The shoes’ instability may encourage more muscle expenditure, but they could also be harmful to those without adequate feeling in their feet, such as diabetics with neuropathy.” Last year, the American Council on Exercise published its independent research on toning shoes’ effectiveness and concluded that “toning shoes are not the magic solution consumers were hoping they would be, and simply do not offer any benefits that people cannot reap through walking, running or exercising in traditional athletic shoes.” ACE enlisted researchers from the Exercise and Health Program at the

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin ile photo

Shoes similar to Skechers’ Shape-Ups with rounded soles have been flagged by the American College of Sports Medicine and Consumer Reports Health for ill-effectiveness. University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, and found no evidence to suggest that the shoes help wearers exercise more intensely, burn more calories or improve muscle strength and tone. Because of the rounded sole, people often find they get sore muscles while their gait accommodates a new form. If the shoes do have any benefit, the researchers said, it’s just motivation to move. Consumer Reports Health recently analyzed a product complaint database and reported in late May that between March 11 and May 22, 36 people reported injuries associated with toning shoes, which is more than any other single type of product in the database. Injuries were mostly minor, such as tendinitis or foot, leg, and hip pain. But 15 of the reports were of broken bones, some requiring surgery. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

used in health care for more than 20 years, but generally it comes in uniform rolls, like other athletic tapes, and can be purchased at many sporting goods stores. Spider tape, made by Nitto Denko in Japan, evolved from original, long-established kinesiology taping therapies. The Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy in 2008 published a study about the efficacy of kinesiology tape for shoulder pain. Of 42 subjects with clinically diagnosed rotator cuff tendonitis or impingement, half were randomly and

blindly assigned to a therapeutic kinesiology tape group, and the others were given sham tape for therapy. After two, three-day intervals, those with kinesiology tape showed improvement in pain-free movement. And a small Polish study in 2007 showed an increase in the bioelectrical activity of a muscle of the quadriceps (the vastus medialis) after 24 hours of kinesiology taping. Anne Aurand can be reached at 541-383-0304 or at aaurand@bendbulletin.com.

Smile ... We provide dental services for the entire family. Dr. Mingus believes everybody, regardless of age, deserves the opportunity to have exceptional, conservative dentistry.

www.bendcosmeticdentist.com 1475 S.W. CHANDLER AVE. SUITE 201, BEND

Call Today 541.382.6565 Appointments Available Monday-Saturday

DR. KELLEY MINGUS • FULL SERVICE DENTISTRY


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 G1

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263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

General Merchandise

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

200

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

202

Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume Jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold & Silver. I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist. Elizabeth, 541-633-7006

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Items for Free Free garage stuff, camping, paint, toys, misc., chicken feeders, Call 541-416-0386.

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Guns, Hunting and Fishing

Misc. Items

Fuel and Wood

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Lost and Found

Siberian Husky pups. $700+ AKC reg. 541-330-8627 stones-siberians@live.com

Lost Orange Cat, long hair, fluffy very friendly, ‘Tigger’, Tumalo area, Cline Falls Hwy 1 mi. N. of Tumalo store & High Ridge Dr., 4/15, Reward, 541-385-0194.

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

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To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

“Come fishing with the Locals”

www.twodudesflyfishing.com

Mossberg 12g pump, wood stock shotgun, 28” bbl, with case, $200. 541-647-8931

Vaccuum Cleaner, Kirby, used very little, like new, $500, 541-389-1086.

Cycling Clothers Sale

S&W 1500 7mm bolt hunting rifle, walnut stock, w/3x9 scope, $425. 541-647-8931

Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

US ARMY COLT 1911, made in 1918, issued leather holster, $1750 OBO, 541-728-1036

Building Materials

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Exercise Equipment Treadmill, good cond., $80, OBO; Olympic Weight set & Bench, curling bar, etc., $75 OBO, 541-390-1161.

Sponsors needed for vet bill for Guns, Hunting Logan, who was run over. A woman saw the injured cat & and Fishing took him to a vet clinic, who refused to help under the 12g Mossberg 500 pump shotGood Samaritan policy & gun, 18” bbl, syn stock, turned them away. CRAFT $200. 541-647-8931 was called & rushed Logan to a vet. He was badly hurt & 1911 Taurus 45acp SS, $650. AR-15 .223, $750. Rem. 30-06 may lose a leg, but 2 days w/3x9, $350. 541-647-8931 later it is obvious he wants to live & deserves a chance. No 40 cal. Glock 23, extra clip, in owner can be found, so he box, like new, $475. Call will be available for adoption 541-306-7241 when he recovers. Thank you for supporting the work of BE PREPARED! Cat Rescue, Adoption & FosOregon’s Largest ter Team, www.craftcats.org, PO Box 6441, Bend 97708, 3 Day 541-389-8420, 598-5488. GUN & KNIFE Toy Poodle Puppies for sale. SHOW Little Girl $300 and Little Boy April 15-16-17 $200 Plus Senior Discount Portland Expo Center home raised and spoiled. 541 Featuring 771-0522

Leupold 4x power scope, black glossy, works great, $175. Call 541-647-8931

UTAH + OR CCW: Oregon and Utah Concealed License Class. Saturday June 18 9:30 a.m. at Madras Range. $65 Utah, $100 OR+UT. Includes Utah required photo, Call Paul Sumner (541)475-7277 for prereg, email and info

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

All Year Dependable Firewood: Dry , split lodgepole, 1 for $155 or 2 for $300. No limit. Cash, check, or credit. Bend 541-420-3484

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 541-312-6709 Open to the public .

541-322-7253

Health and Beauty Items Fatigue, insomnia, cold hands, skin dryness, chronic pain?

Lodgepole Seasoned rounds: 1 cord $129; 2@$124ea; 3@ $119ea. Split: 1 cord $159; 2@$154 ea; 3@$149 ea. Bin price 4’x4’x4’, $59 ea. Cash. Delivery avail. 541-771-0800

Call 866-700-1414 and find out how to get better today!

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TV, Stereo and Video TV, Sony 50”, HD, 1080P, $175, please call 541-388-4424 for more info.

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541-647-8261 Sisters Habitat ReStore Building Supply Resale Quality items. LOW PRICES! 150 N. Fir. 541 549-1621 Open to the public.

Wood Floor Super Store

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

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Misc. Items Refrom sale, OBO.

Business Owners: Gifts for clients or employees? (40) 1-lb. boxes of Gourmet Bridgeton Fudge at cost, $6.25/box. All or part. Call 541-923-0574 BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Men’s shirts, excellent condition, 2X & 3X sizes, 20 @ $5 each. 541-508-3886

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496 266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Found Clothes on hangers, S. Huntington Rd, La Pine, 6/11, call to ID, 541-536-5072.

Found Ring: NE Bend, 6/5, call to describe and identify, 541-312-0188.

JUNIPER TIES & BOARDS Full Measure Timbers “ Rot Resistant ” Raised Bed Garden Projects Instantlandscaping.com 541-389-9663 For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

The Hardwood Outlet

Computers

Amish fireplace, $250; cliner/Loveseat new Wilson’s, health forces pd. $1500, sell $1000 541-905-9162.

Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

Found Camera, corner of Westview & 15th in Bend, 6/13, call to ID, 541-318-8789.

BarkTurfSoil.com Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands!

Lost and Found

Found Hi-Point semi-auto pistol Hwy 97 betwn LaPine & Sunriver. Call to ID 541-350-4416

Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

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Farm Equipment and Machinery 1959 Ford Tractor with hydraulic front-end loader, $2500. Call 541-513-2191, after 6pm

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment

541-389-9663

Call for FREE DVD Thyroid Health Secrets Revealed.

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

FOUND black and white young female cat, might be from downtown, jumped into car. 541-389-9670.

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Farm Market

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend

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Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

•Current treatments offering no relief? • Been told to “Live with it”? •Tired of taking drugs that don’t fix the problem or make it worse? There is Hope!

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

• Receipts should include, Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

Remington Wingmaster Model 870, refinished stock, $200, 541-728-1036.

New brand name jerseys, shorts & more! June 17-18 8am. Cash only. Mothers Juice Cafe 1255 NW Galveston Ave., Bend - (760) 518-4085

Hummingbirds Are Back!

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

McKenzie and Willamette River Guided Fly Fishing Tours.

Bicycles and Accessories

Free Boxer Mix, neutered, to approved without small kids, Pickup camper top, for full size good dog, 541-280-5264. Preparedness pickup & boat loader for pickup canopy, free, German Shepherd AKC pups, and Survival Products 541-389-1086. $700. 509-406-3717 I-5 exit #306B www.sbhighdesertkennels.com Admission $9 TOPSOIL - Approximately 5 Fri. 12-6, Sat. 9-5, yards, you haul, FREE! Call German Shepherd Purebred Pups all colors avail, shots, micro541-604-4316 Sun. 10-4 Zebu Cows (3), world’s oldchipped, $400+, 208-404-9434 1-800-659-3440 est & smallest cattle breeds, www.smsgsd.com 208 www.collectorswest.com make offer, photo is of 3 Kittens/cats avail. thru rescue adults in field. 541-389-2636 Pets and Supplies group, 389-8420, 647-2181. CASH!! Kitten foster home 815-7278. 210 For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Altered, shots, ID chip, more. The Bulletin recommends Supplies. 541-408-6900. For hours, directions, photos, Furniture & Appliances extra caution when COLT IV Series 80-.380 auto., etc. see www.craftcats.org. purchasing products or !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! never fired, in box, $650 services from out of the LAB PUPS AKC, black & yellow, A-1 Washers & Dryers OBO. 541-728-1036. area. Sending cash, checks, titled parents, performance $125 each. Full Warranty. or credit information may pedigree, OFA cert hips & elFree Del. Also wanted W/D’s Cowboy Shooters: Lawrence be subjected to fraud. For leather bandoliers, holsters, bows, $500. 541-771-2330 dead or alive. 541-280-7355. more information about an shotgun, pistol. www.royalflushretrievers.com GENERATE SOME excitement in advertiser, you may call the 541-389-1392 Labradoodles, Australian your neighborhood! Plan a Oregon State Attorney Imports - 541-504-2662 garage sale and don't forget General’s Office Consumer DO YOU HAVE www.alpen-ridge.com to advertise in classified! Protection hotline at SOMETHING TO SELL 541-385-5809. 1-877-877-9392. Lhasa Apso 2 yr. female, house FOR $500 OR LESS? broken, crate trained, loves Late 40’s Vanity, excellent conNon-commercial children, to approved home dition, curved glass mirror, advertisers may only, $150, 541-548-0747 $180. 541-279-4634 place an ad with our "QUICK CASH Mini Dachshund Pups, 1 girl METAL BED FRAME Adult foster cats: 1-5 yrs, orSPECIAL" $275;, 2 boys $250 ea. fits twin or double, $10. ange, tabbys, all shots, ready Prineville. 360-607-0604. 541-383-4231 1 week 3 lines to adopt $10 ea 541-548-5516 $12 or POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Rolltop Desk, good condition, 2 weeks $18! Aquarium for fish, 150 gal., Pomapoos too! Lovable, happy $150, please call saltwater, self contained, Ad must tail-waggers! 541-475-3889 503-504-0590. $300, 541-389-2636. include price of single item Second Hand of $500 or less, or mulAT STUD unregistered black Mattresses, sets & tiple items whose total & white parti-poodle, teadoes not exceed $500. singles, call cup size @ only 4 lbs! 541-598-4643. $150. 541-546-7305. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 Aussie's Mini/Toy, AKC, all col- Portuguese Podengo Males (2), The Bulletin www.bendbulletin.com ors, family raised, 1st shot, 10-12 lbs., very rare breed recommends extra caution wormed, parents on site. dating back to days of when purchasing products GUNS 541-788-7799; 541-598-6264 Christorpher Columbus, best or services from out of the Buy, Sell, Trade offer over $500 each, area. Sending cash, checks, 541-728-1036. Bearded Dragon - 1.5 yrs. old 541-389-2636. or credit information may nocturnal, great lizard. Full be subjected to F R A U D . H.K.91.308, Test Fired only!!, set up included. $115 Quaker Parrot, 1 yr. old, with For more information about $3500, Hunting Rifles: Rugall accessories, $150, call 541-771-8377 an advertiser, you may call ers - 7 mm mag x2, Rem541-548-0747. the Oregon State Attorney ington .338 Win Mag, WinBoxer pups, AKC & CKC Regis- Shih-Tzu male, older puppy, General’s Office Consumer chester .280 Remington, .338 tered, 2 females left, all shots. $485. Call 541-788-0090 or Protection hotline at Winchester mag, call for de$500-$650. 541-325-3376 www.bluemoonshihtzus.com 1-877-877-9392. tails, 541-447-4101. Dachshund AKC mini puppies, See: www.bendweenies.com 2 left! $310 Bend, 503-470-0729

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O r e g o n

Antiques & Collectibles Furniture

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

B e n d

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

T h e

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Lost Cat, Grey tabby, female, short hair, missing 6/6, SE Bend, 541-318-6030

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Hay, Grain and Feed Hay for Sale - Grass & Grass/Alfalfa mix, 3 tie and 3x4 bales. Call 541-548-3086 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

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Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies FREE Red Frizzle Bantam, three 541-617-9501

roosters, months.

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Horses and Equipment

LOST

DOG

$500 REWARD FOR RETURN "CHIRPA" - 8 year old female, gray Pekingese Shih Tzu. Lost in The Greens in SW Redmond on Sunday 5/29. OK to call anytime!! CALL 541-414-4424

COLT STARTING We build solid foundations that stay with the horse forever. No 30 day wonders, 90s rates. Steeldust Stables 541-419-3405 www.steelduststable.com Ranch Bred, Breeding Stock and their AQHA Reg. yearlings. 1 Reg- TB Mare, & her 4 yr. old filly w/90 days on her - fast, barrel, performance, race, 541-388-2706,541-610-5028 Saddles, new, 15-16.5” parade & pleasure, $350-$495, call 541-416-1083,541-280-7657

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Education/Schools

Week of June 13, 2011

Legal Services

ALLIED HEALTH career DIVORCE $135. Complete training. Attend college preparation. Includes children, 100% online. Job placement custody, support, property assistance. Computer available. and bills division. No court Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV appearances. Divorced in 1-5 certified. Call 800-481-9409, weeks possible. 503-772-5295, www.paralegalalternatives.com, www.CenturaOnline.com. divorce@usa.com.

Business Opportunity

Help Wanted

LOOMIX(R) FEED supplements DRIVERS/COMPANY-Lease is seeking dealers. Motivated - Work for us or let us work individuals with cattle knowledge for you! Unbeatable career and community ties. Contact opportunities. Trainee, company Bethany @ 800-870-0356 / driver, lease operator, earn up bjenkins@loomix.com to find to $51k. Lease Trainers earn up out if there is a dealership to $80k. 877-369-7104. www. centraltruckdrivingjobs.com. opportunity in your area.


G2 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 350

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Horseshoeing/ Farriers

Meat & Animal Processing

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

NILSSON HOOF CARE - Certified natural hoof care practitioner with www.aanhcp.net 541-504-7764.

1/4 Angus Beef, no hormones or antibodies, farm raised, $2.70/lb, incl. Cut & wrap, avail. 6/27, 541-504-1470,541-280-6130

Employment

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Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

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Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Haying Contractor will mow rake & bale for percentage, or will buy standing hay. Call 541-948-2125 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

541-385-5809

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

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For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403

541-385-5809

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Estate Sales

Estate Sales

Estate Sales

Estate Downsize Sale

CAUTION

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin

541-383-0398

Dental Assistant

Bend Dental Group is looking for an enthusiastic team player to join our busy practice and amazing staff. The ideal candidate would need to possess the following qualifications: EFDA Cert., digital x-ray, Eaglesoft, treatment planning, sterilization, time mgmt, and excellent communication/custom service skills. This is a full time position with benefits. Please e-mail cover letter and resume to pams@benddentalgroup.co m.

Dental Assistant Full Time DA needed in our Bend office. Schedule is 4 10-hour days/ week. OR X-Ray/ EFDA required. 2+ years exp preferred. Come join our dedicated team! Competitive pay & excellent benefits! Apply Online: www.willamettedental.com

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Director of Nursing East Cascades Retirement Community in Madras Oregon is looking for a new Director of Nursing (DON) for our 20 bed Skilled Nursing Home. Must have: • Valid Oregon RN license • Exp. in Long-Term Care • Passion for working with seniors DON experience is preferred but not a requirement. This is a great opportunity for an experienced nurse ready to make the leap to DON. vernon@srhousingmgmt.com DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

DRIVER Dedicated route, west coast, home 3 nights a week. Refrigerated. Call 541-815-9404

Drivers: Local moving company seeks Class A Drivers. Top pay, benefits; experience preferred. Please call weekdays: 541-383-3362.

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EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions 476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Field Data Collector

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE Caretaker, Live-in, needed for managing & operating equipment on property for private residence & hangar. Experience needed in landscaping, irrigation, fence repair, detailing & maintaining vehicles; handyman, craftsman, plumbing & some electrical. Able to operate small gas equipment. Person must be hands-on, professional, discrete; have good verbal, written & computer skills. Strong organizational skills, self motivated, taking pride in their work and enjoying being part of a team. Salary DOE + benefits. Email resume to PMLHRdepartment @hotmail.com

Perform fieldwork & computer reporting for a national industry leader. No exp. Paid training. Performance based pay, $12/hr., PT. Apply at

www.muellerreports.com 800/875-8339 ext 347 Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Looking for experienced concrete finishers. Need to be willing to travel. Good wages, 401k, and health insurance. For more information please call 541-318-6200

286

ESTATE

ESTATE

SALE-

ANTIQUES++ Thousands of items priced to sell. Victrola, records, Franciscan Ware, crystal, china, furniture, lamps, clocks, silver plate, ornaments, toys, books, musical instruments, stoves, dog kennel, scales, traps, camp/hunt items, cameras, typewriters, crocks, 1941 Chevy Sedan, 1963 Impala SS. CASH/CREDIT CARD ONLY. (5% fee on credit cards) Friday/Saturday, 6/17-18th, 9-4--4804 S. Briar Rd, Powell Butte. Follow signs off Hwy 26 from post office or grange hall.

SALE

Household furniture and goods; outdoor items; miscellaneous; all must go. 353 NE Latigo Lane, Prineville (Hwy 126, North on Main to right on Rawhide, right on Buckboard, left on Latigo). Fri. & Sat., June 17 &18, 9 to 5.

Backyard Sale, 740 NW Federal Fri. 10-3:30, Sat-Sun., 9:303:30. Dinette set, queen bed, computer desk, Christmas, vintage, jewelry, lots more!

“The Mother of All Garage Sales & Diaper Drive”

Railroad Vegetation Vegetation control on railroad tracks in western US. Seeking Class B Hazmat/ Tank. Ability to pass pesticide license requirements. Various states, extended travel, full time, benefits, lodging/per diem. 503-362-8322

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

288

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend

Garage Sale, Sat June 18, 9-2, 3 Family Sale: Sat. 6/18, Garage Sale Sat-Sun, 9-3, 63390 Old Deschutes Rd. 881 NW Fort Clatsop St. 8-6, TV’s, designer clothes, Tools, canner, free stuff... Samsung 32” flat screen TV, all sizes, bedding sets, See Craigslist for details. West Elm twin bed frame & purses, jewelry, computer mattress, Nikon VN/750 table, twin bed, miniature Sale: Raffle, 8mm video camera, & more! doll furniture, kitchen items, Garage/Tack pony rides, Sat. June 18th baby play stuff, too much to 8-5 & Sun. June 19th 8-3, mention, rain or shine, 1225 CASCADE VILLAGE PARK SALE- Moving Sale: Sat. 9-5, 2880 NW Melville, household, NE 9th & Lafayette silent auction, June 18th 1-4, Sat. 9-2, 14+ Homes particitools, desk, filing cabinet, lot come enjoy food, great barpating. Off 97 & Cooley Rd. BIG Sale Fri-Sat, 9am-3pm, of great items! gains and meet our horses. Take Ranch Village Rd to 1520 NE Providence. Lots All proceeds benefit Equine Valentine St., 1st St. in Park. 282 of collectibles, prints, aviaTwenty Seven Years of Outreach. 63220 Silvis Rd, Sales Northwest Bend tion art, frames, old radio, STUFF! Great Variety, off Butler Market. photo, old telephones, mili64568 Findley Ln, (off DeApt. Complex Sale: at 8-2, Fri-Sat. 9-4, 64756 Old Bend/ tary, old Army stove, Pepsi schutes Market Rd at 64110) Huge Multi-Family/Moving Redmond Hwy. Delta Orbital Discovery Park Lodge - N. cooler, women’s dress Sat. & Sun., 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3, Deck furspindle sander, 3-pt tractor Side, 2868 Northwest clothing...just a lot of stuff! niture & outdoor items, bookblade + post, gun hard case, Crossing Dr. (across from cases, appl., computer stand, 284 tools, S/S sink, hsehld, misc. Cedar Creek Townhomes Summit HS). Tools, furniture, furniture, bed sets, Sail board 15th Annual Multi-Family Sales Southwest Bend appl,clothes books, bake sale! & equip., paintball gun & Garage Sale - Fri & Sat, equip., rugs, TV’s, bikes, tires. June 17 & 18, 8am-5pm, 20052 Sorrento Ct. Bend, Sat 63330 Old Deschutes Rd. 1050 NE Butler Market Rd, -Sun, (8am-4pm) Books, Stan & Barbara Welchman corner of 8th & Butler Mkt. clothes, equipment, key Huge Multi-Family Sale! Furniboard, electronics, misc. ture, kids’ toys, clothing, crib, changing table, strollers, 3700 Falcon Ridge HH FREE HH DRW - 18992 Baker Rd. Fri. & Saturday, June 18, 2011 books, washer, tack, tools, Sat., 8:30am -4:30pm. Large Wyndemere Estates, Bend Garage Sale Kit snowshoes, hair station, pedi 8:00 am 2:00 pm items - furniture to small. FRIDAY, JUNE 17 • SATURDAY, JUNE 18 stool, treated landscape timDon’t Miss! Hours 9:00 to 5:00, Crowd control admittance numbers bers, household items...too Place an ad in The Bulletin issued at 8:00 a.m. on Friday. Coldwell Banker Morris is hosting much to list! Fri., June 17, for your garage sale and MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE Take OB Riley road 1/2 mile to Archie Briggs Rd., -follow 8-4. 23135 Alfalfa Market Rd. receive a Garage Sale Kit 8am-4pm Friday only. “The Mothers of All Garage Sales Archie Briggs Rd. for 1+ miles to Falcon Ridge and turn FREE! 19845 Mahogany (corner of & Diaper Drive”. left to sale site. No sign up sheet accepted. Parking can Estate Sale Mt. High Aspen), in Romaine Village. be congested, please be courteous) Subdivision Sat. & Sun. KIT INCLUDES: Watch for details in Friday’s • 4 Garage Sale Signs Not Just a Garage Sale! Lots of Pair of Bronze cranes; Krugerrand; 50" Projection TV; Mario BesAll proceeds are going to Bulletin! • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use men’s stuff, tools, etc., chi Italian 20 ga. shotgun; Very nice bridge-over TV bookcase Attic Estates & Appraisals The Bend Community Center Toward Your Next Ad women’s craft & sewing, anunit; Leather double reclining loveseat; Ethan Allen dining table 541-350-6822 • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale tique furniture, new RV with eight chairs and two leaves; Shannon glassware; Maple and the homeless community for pics & info go to www.atSuccess!” stove, Fri-Sat-Sun, 8-4, dresser and two nightstands; Nice burgundy color sofa; Crystal, that they serve. ticestatesandappraisals.com • And Inventory Sheet 18827 Tuscarora Lane, DRW. cut glass; pottery; Set of Sang dishes; Shannon glassware; lots of stemware; more small electrical appliances than we ever PICK UP YOUR Sunrise Village Neighborhood 288 5 Ways You Can Help: had; Pots and pans; betaware over; Very nice 14K. jewelry and GARAGE SALE Garage Sale Fri-Sat, June 17lots of silver dollars and silver dimes; Kitchen tools; Microwave; 1. Donate a package of diapers* Sales Southeast Bend KIT AT: 18, 9am-3pm, Clubhouse Antique small coffee grinder; Silverberry items; lots of platters; 2. Donate garage sale items to be sold on June 18th 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Parking lot, 19560 Sunshine Sofa table; 20 plus table and floor lamps; end and casual 2 Family Estate Sale: Fri. & 3. Shop at the Garage Sale Bend, OR 97702 Way. Something for everyone! tables; Framed Desna prints and other lovely pictures; Loader; Sat., 8-3, 1009 SE Castle4. Eat lunch or dinner at the Pastini and mention the and other figurines; Mud men; 24 Madame Alexander small wood Dr, Antiques, colColdwell Banker Morris “Pasta-thon” on Mon. 6/20 or This & That Sale: Fri.-Sat, 9-3, dolls; Two Composition dolls; Several older TV's; Lots and lots lectibles, misc, furniture, 60940 Amethyst, HouseTues., June 21, 2011. of cabinets; Picture frames; Books; Office supplies; Stereo unit; additional contents of hold, gardening books, an5. Direct donation to Bend Community Center. VCR's,DVD's; Large gold framed beveled mirror; Occasional large storage unit. tique glassware, toddler/baby Garage Sale FRIDAY ONLY, 8-4. chairs; Antique rocker and footstool; Vases and faux flowers; items, furniture, back packs, Brass and glass coffee table; Mink and Beaver jackets; lots and 2389 NE Lynda Lane, off Big Estate Sale: Sat.-Sun., *All donations are being accepted at small tents, fly tying items, lots of ladies and mens clothing and suits and shoes; hundreds Butler Market & Purcell. It’s a June 18th & 19th 8-4, Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate, of towels, blankets and etc.; Lots of Christmas items; and other big one! Lots of variety... 21616 Old Red Rd, house486 SW Bluff Drive YARD SALE FUNDRAISER. holiday items; Shabby chic blue china cabinet; Tools; Work hold & kitchen, art supplies, in the Old Mill District or call with any questions Natural Mind Dharma Center, Garage Sale: Fri.-Sat. 7-4, 9th bench; Foos ball table; ping pong table; Vacuums; Garage style costume jewelry, tools, books, & Norton, Armoire, canning, 541-382-4123. 345 SW Century Drive, #2, refrigerator; lots of outdoor furniture; barbecue; two fountains; crystals, lapidary, much more! bike, linens, books, knickbehind Repeat Performance lawn and garden decor; Two nice wood rockers; buffet warmer (For tax purposes, we can give you a receipt for your donation). knacks, twin mattress, lamps, Sports. Saturday, June 18, table on wheels; About two hundred comic books, lots 10 cent gardening, videos, bike rack, DOWNSIZING SALE! Fri-Sat 8am to 2pm. For more info, cost originally and several Mad magazines from the 60's.; long 8-4, 21785 Coyote Drive. ExSinger featherweight macontact (541) 610-5333. carpeted handicapped ramp; twenty feet of storage cabinets; tra furniture & yard goods, chine, quilting stuff. lots of garden tools and chemicals and cleaning supplies; eleclots of miscellaneous! trical and plumbing supplies. Don't miss this one! 286 GARAGE SALE - Fri.-Sat.., June 17-18, 8am-5pm Fri. & Sat. 8-4, misc. glass and Sales Northeast Bend See pictures on the web page!!! dishes, hundreds of records, Collectibles, housewares, LOTS AND LOTS OF OTHER MISC. ITEMS. 1 week Estate Sale: Full house furn. and more, good stuff! washer/dryer, vintage elecHandled by: Deedy's Estate Sales Co. LLC w/handy man equip, call for 11 mile marker, east on Hwy tronics, tools, DVDs & more! appointment & info, full 20 turn right on Rickard, 1st 541-419-2242 days 541-382-5950 eves 1050 NE Butler Market Rd., household, 541-317-8993. driveway on left. www.deedysestatesales.com #48 (corner 8th & Butler Mkt) Fri-Sat, June 17th & 18th, 9-4, 3391 NE 29th St., Redmond Antiques, all wood furniture, patio set, marble dressers w/ mirrors, oriental rugs, chipper, rollaway bed, collectibles,silver dishes, books & baskets, etc.

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Fri/Sat, 8-4, Sun, 8-12. Many clothes, furniture, tools, sporting goods, household items, and more. 61435 Steens Mtn. Loop. Off 27th/ Wilderness Way HUGE 4-Day Sale: 387 SE Dell Ln., off Wilson or 3rd St., Jewelry, $1 hats, household, antiques, kids items, tools, yard care & more daily! Thur., Fri., Sat. 10-6, Sun. 1-6 call for details or directions, 541-420-7328, look for black painted “SALE” signs.

Huge Moving Sale, Sat only, 9-4, 2150 SE Harley Lane. Antiques, freezer, sectional couch, king bed, much more! Moving/Garage Sale: Fri. & Sat. 8-3, tools, tools, tools! ladders, saws, edger, trunks, golf travel bag, 10” TV, small tables, linens, computer table, lamps, kitchen items, too much to list, no junk. Cash only. From S. Albertson’s go E. on Murphy Rd. to Tapadera, left to 20240 Gains Ct.

290

Sales Redmond Area Once a Year Garage Sale “The Cliffs of Redmond” 18th St. & Nickernut Place/Cliffside Way. Gates open 9am4pm Fri & Sat., June 17th & 18th. Quality furniture, beautiful French armoire, signed pictures, silver, art, antiques, glassware, linens, unique patio & yard items, upscale clothing, books, tools, childrens toys & clothing.

292

Sales Other Areas Clothing, housewares, fabric, skis & accessories, golf clubs, Christmas items, some collectibles & more. 5755 Haddock Rd., CRR, June 17-18, 8 am-2pm, 548-6594.

Moving Sale - Inside! 1001 SE 15th, #94, Fri & Sat., 8-3. Furniture & LOTS MORE! Multi-Family Garage Sale: Fri.-Sat. 8-3, on Via Sandia between Cottonwood & Magnolia, old wood windows, steel stakes, antique glass, Kitchen Aid mixer, more!

La Pine Multi-Family Sale: Sat. 9-4, 51405 Mac Ct, 1/2 mi. E. of Hwy 97 between William Foss & Finley Butte Rds.

290

Sales Redmond Area 1515 NW TEAK AVE., 6/17 & 18, 9-5. treadmill, convection oven, kitchenware, breadmaker, tools, clothes and much more! GREAT YARD SALE! June 17 & 18, 10-4. 2733 SW 50th St., corner of Wickiup and Helmholtz, collectibles, housewares, camping, tools, much more. No early birds. Multi-family Sale - Fri & Sat, 6/17-18, 8-3. Clothes, fishing, household, books & more. 2821 SW Cascade Ave. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 G3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 476

476

642

658

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent Redmond

Real Estate For Sale

Eagle Crest gated 3 Bdrm 2½ bath home w/3-car garage & workshop. Reverse living, pvt hot tub, beautiful mountain views, 2200 sq ft. Pool, tennis & exercise facilities. $1400/mo + security dep and utils/maintenance. Lease w/option; owner may carry. Call 541-923-0908.

700

Ranch Hand - Seeking full time ranch hand for smoke free workplace. Duties include operating tractors, hay equipment, sprinkler irrigation, fence repair, feeding cattle. Experience with horses & mechanical repair helpful. Houseing & utilities provided. Send resume & references to 89037 Hwy 293, Madras, OR 97741 or e-mail jams@wildblue.net Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site. RESTAURANT

LINE COOKS Experience necessary. Full-time. Pay is based on experience. To apply, please mail resume to:

P.O. Box 400 Redmond, OR97756

Sales Associate Mercedes Benz of Bend is seeking a motivated individual to join our team as a Sales Associate. No experience needed, will train. This is a great place to grow if you are a current sales professional. Apply in person, 61440 S. Hwy 97, Bend. Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-848-6403 or call Mr. Green 541-330-0640.

SECURITY OFFICERS $10.00/hr GUARDSMARK, LLC A nationwide leader in security services is hiring a FT officer to work a night shift for the Redmond area. Applicants must have or be able to obtain a DPSST certification. They must also have a clean criminal background, good computer skills, a professional demeanor and excellent customer service skills. This position requires several miles of walking per day. Individuals with any security, law enforcement or military backgrounds are encouraged to apply! Please fax resume to 503-224-2057. For further company information please visit www.guardsmark.com

Volunteers in Medicine: Opening for Full Time Director of Development. Complete job posting and instructions: www.vim-cascades.org

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

486

Independent Positions Supplemental income! Place/ supervise international high school students in your community. Training, compensation and international trip available. Call Sid @ 1-855-299-6167 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

630

Rooms for Rent Room for Rent, $300+1/3 util. +$300 Dep. Nice Redmond. Dezeray 541-610-9766 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

541-382-3402 LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

573

Business Opportunities Elk Lake Lodge One-quarter ownership for sale. Includes year-round cabin usage. $525,000. Courtesy to Brokers. Call 541-390-6776

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

2 Bdrm. Starting at $525 1 Month FREE w/Lease or Month to Month Chaparral & Rimrock Apts Clean, energy efficient, w/patios,on-site laundry, storage avail. Near schools, pools, skateboard park & shopping. Large dog run, some large breeds OK w/mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

648

Houses for Rent General

661

Houses for Rent Prineville

745

Homes for Sale Foreclosures For Sale All Central OR Avail. Buy on the Court steps w/Cashier’s Checks Oregon Group Realty, LLC 541-948-4397

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1550 NW Milwaukee W/D hookup. $615/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 541-382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz Beautiful 1 bdrm, 2 bath fully furnished Condo, $695, $400 dep., near downtown & college, completely renovated, 2 verandas, no pets/smoking, all amenities, pics avail. by request. W/S/G/elec./A/C & cable included, Available now. call 541-279-0590 or cheritowery@yahoo.com SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, wood floors, underground parking/storage area, laundry on site, $650/mo. 541-480-3666

SPRING BLAST! Studios $375 1 Bdrm $400 Free Move-in Rent! • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks! 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend A quiet 4 bdrm, 2 bath, 1748 sq.ft., living room w/wood stove, newer carpet & inside paint, pellet stove, big 1/2 acre fenced lot, dbl garage w/opener. $1195. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

658

A Newer 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1168 sq.ft., newer paint & carpet, patio, large lot, RV parking, dbl. garage, w/opener, $850, 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

Electrical Services

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

K.A. Veltman Concrete L L C Custom Concrete Work Foundations and Flatwork No Job Too Big or Too Small! 541-923-2168 • CCB #191425

Quality Builders Electric

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. No smoking; pets negotiable. $900/mo. + deposits. Call 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660 Crooked River Ranch, 5 acres horse property fenced, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, W/D hookup, $800 plus deps. 541-420-5197,209-402-3499

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Handyman

Computer/Cabling Install

• Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

QB Digital Living

Excavating

CCB#180420

Levi’s Dirt Works:RGC & CGC

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107 fifi’s Hauling & More. Yard clean up, fuel reduction, con struction & misc. clean up, 10 yd. hyd. trailers, 20 ft. flatbed, 541-382-0811.

Concrete Construction

Concrete / Paving

JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways... Call Grant, 541-279-3183 • CCB190612

Old World Cobblestone Inc. Paver Installation Specialists Ask about special Spring Prices! oldworldcobblestoneinc.com 541-408-6947 • CCB 82623

Residential & Commercial subcontracting for all your dirt & excavation needs. • Small & large jobs for contractors & home owners by the job - or hour. • Driveway grading (low cost get rid of pot holes & smooth out your driveway) • Custom pads large & small • Operated rentals & augering • Wet & dry utilities • Concrete CCB#194077 541-639-5282.

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

DELUXE 2 BEDROOM $495 per mo.

Concrete Construction

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1991, As-is, $13,878; ‘96 3 bdrm., 2 bath, As-is, $14,500; ‘94 2 bdrm, 2 bath, $14,900; 2 bdrm, 2 bath, as-is, $9999, New 3 bdrm, 2 bath homes start at $39,999; Homes on land start at $64,900, Financing avail. OAC, J & M Homes, 541-548-5511.

PROVIDENCE. 3/2 single story; Large Fenced Yard; RV parking; Pets; $1150. 541-480-9200.

Houses for Rent Redmond

incl. storage room and carport, smoke free bldg., fenced dog run, on-site laundry, close to schools, park and shopping. O BSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com 541-923-1907

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

A newer 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1590 sq. ft, gas fireplace, great room, huge oversize dbl. garage w/openers, big lot, $1195, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Barns

•Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

4 BDRM., 3 BATH, 2150 sq.ft. home, incl. 500 sq.ft. office on site, no garage, avail. 7/1, $1200, No smoking. 509-947-9662.

Get 3 lines, 4 days for $17.50.

To place an ad, call 541-548-2184

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Need help ixing stuff 4 Bdrm., 2 bath, 2032 sq.ft. around the house? mobile in Prineville, 40x36’ PUBLISHER'S Call A Service Professional shop, 2.28 fenced acres, NOTICE and ind the help you need. setup for horses, pets alAll real estate advertising in www.bendbulletin.com 631 lowed, hot tub, private well, this newspaper is subject to $950/mo., deposits neg., call Condo / Townhomes the Fair Housing Act which 750 541-416-2557. makes it illegal to advertise For Rent Redmond Homes "any preference, limitation or 687 discrimination based on race, 1100 sq ft, 2 Bdrm, 1½ bath Eagle Crest ~ Owner will Commercial for color, religion, sex, handicap, downtown townhome with carry with down. Gated 3 familial status, marital status patio. Home biz OK. 111 NW Rent/Lease bedroom, 2½ bath home or national origin, or an inHawthorne #6. $795/mo incl with 3-car garage & worktention to make any such water/garbage. 541-388-4053 Office / Warehouse shop. Reverse living, private preference, limitation or dis1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. hot tub, beautiful mountain Avail. 6/25, Furnished 1 bdrm. crimination." Familial status spaces, 827 Business Way, views, 2200 sq ft. Enjoy condo at 7th Mtn., all utils+ includes children under the Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + Eagle Crest’s pool, tennis & cable & wifi paid, deck, pools, age of 18 living with parents $300 dep. 541-678-1404 exercise facilities. $399,000. hot tubs, $700+dep., no or legal custodians, pregnant Call 541-923-0908. smoking/pets, 541-979-8940 women, and people securing Office/Warehouse located in custody of children under 18. SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., Long term townhomes/homes 757 This newspaper will not competitive rate, for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. knowingly accept any adver541-382-3678. Crook County Homes included, Spacious 2 & 3 tising for real estate which is bdrm., with garages, in violation of the law. Our The Bulletin offers a LOWER, BY OWNER-Prineville 541-504-7755. MORE AFFORDABLE Rental Traditional Sale - Not Short readers are hereby informed rate! If you have a home to that all dwellings advertised Sale! In the heart of town 632 rent, call a Bulletin Classified 773 763 in this newspaper are avail(Knowledge St.) close to all Rep. to get the new rates and Apt./Multiplex General able on an equal opportunity schools, churches, shopAcreages Recreational Homes get your ad started ASAP! basis. To complain of disping. 1996 ranch style, 3 and Property 541-385-5809 The Bulletin is now offering a crimination call HUD toll-free Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° bdrm (split plan), 2 bath, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental at 1-800-877-0246. The toll Warehouse/Office space, 1235 views in farm fields, septile kitchen counters, upElk Lake Lodge One-quarter rate! If you have a home or free telephone number for graded kitchen appl., cartic approved, power, OWC, sq ft, large roll-up door. ownership for sale. Includes apt. to rent, call a Bulletin the hearing impaired is pet, & linoleum, gas FA 10223 Houston Lake Rd., 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple year-round cabin usage. Classified Rep. to get the 1-800-927-9275. w/AC, large fully fenced $114,900, 541-350-4684. net; $500/mo, 1st + dep. $525,000. Courtesy to Bronew rates and get your ad lot, gated access to RV 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541 kers. Call 541-390-6776 started ASAP! 541-385-5809 The Bulletin is now offering a Just bought a new boat? parking w/30 amp hookup. LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Sell your old one in the $111,000. Courtesy to broThe Bulletin Rental rate! If you have a classiieds! Ask about our 634 kers. 541-749-0024. home to rent, call a Bulletin To Subscribe call Super Seller rates! Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 773 Classified Rep. to get the 541-385-5800 or go to 541-385-5809 762 new rates and get your ad Acreages www.bendbulletin.com started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Homes with Acreage 775 Alpine Meadows 2 Adjacent 1-Acre Lots in 693 Why Rent? Manufactured/ Townhomes Fleetwood 1512 sq ft double Oregon Water WonderWhen you Can own! Ofice/Retail Space wide on 1.34 acres, Crooked Mobile Homes 1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. land off Century Dr., 55405 For as low as $1295 Down. River Ranch. Heat pump, 2 for Rent Gross Dr. S., 1 lot w/septic, Starting at $625. 541- 548-5511 bdfrms, den, 2 full baths, 1992 dbl. wide Nashua, 1040 $49,000, 1 without, $39,000, www.JandMHomes.com 541-330-0719 sepa guest room & garage sq.ft., good shape, 2+bdrm, An Office with bath, various will carry and/or build to Professionally managed by w/ 1/2 bath. Great view. 2 bath, $6800 left on assumsizes and locations from suit, 541-698-7720. 650 Norris & Stevens, Inc. $126,500. Call for appointable loan. Must be moved. In $200 per month, including Houses for Rent ment, 541-923-0574 Madras 541-475-2143. utilities. 541-317-8717 NE Bend Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq.ft., big wood stove, util. room, 1/2 Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d acre lot, RV parking, dbl gahkup + laundry facil. $610rage w/openers, $895. $650/mo. 541-385-6928. 541-480-3393 or 610-7803 Renovated 2 bdrm., 1 bath, Advertise your car! blocks from St. Charles & PiAdd A Picture! lot Butte. W/S/G paid. Laun- Reach thousands of readers! dry onsite. Parking. No pets/ Call 541-385-5809 smoking.$625. 541-410-6486 The Bulletin Classifieds

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Children's Care Coordinator

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

600

642

SOCIAL SERVICES In Grants Pass, OR. Full-time Children's Care Coordinator(s) position open for wrap-around and intensive community-based treatment services. Master's degree in psychology or related field preferred, but bachelor's degree with experience with child-serving agencies will be considered. Competitive salary commensurate with degree and experience. Excellent benefits. For more information and an application, visit www.optionsonline.org and click on Jobs, or call 541-476-2373. EOE. Fax application to 541-479-3514.

Rentals

All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Does your lawn have snow mold problems? We can help! SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching & Aeration

FREE AERATION & FERTILIZATION with new seasonal Mowing Service!

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

541-382-3883 Handyman Service

YUCK

J. L. SCOTT

Providing full service maintenance for over 20 years!

Home Improvement

I do not want to clean gutters again! Then Call B&R 541-389-8008 1-800-580-8008 and we will! ccb#103411

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Remodeling, Carpentry

Weekly Maintenance • Thatching • Aeration • Lawn Over-seeding Bark • Clean-ups Commercial / Residential Senior Discounts

I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

Since 1978

(This special package is not available on our website)

Repair & Remodel We Move Walls Small jobs welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Ferris Building & RGK Contracting & Landscape Maintenance Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages Remodeling, Pole Barns, Landscape Maint., Tree Service •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com & Haul Away. CCB #68496 541-480-8296 CCB189290 Harry Ferris 541-408-2262 Summer Maintenance! Monthly Maint., Weeding, Rooing Raking, One Time Clean Up, Debris Hauling AMERICAN ROOFING 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 Quick, efficient, quality work www.bblandscape.com New • Re-roofs • Repairs Spring Clean Up! Aerating, Free Estimates CCB #193018 thatching, lawn restoration, Call Jorge - 541-497-3556 Vacation Care. Free aeration with full season agreement, Call Mike Miller, 541-408-3364 Tile, Ceramic Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, Steve Lahey Construction hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, Tile Installation water features, walls, more! Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184


G4 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Boats & RV’s

800 850

Snowmobiles

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles 870

880

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

860

916

932

933

935

935

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Over 150 used to choose from!

Over 150 used to choose from!

Over 150 used to choose from!

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

Fifth Wheels

17.5’ Bayliner 175, 135HP merc, perfect cond., Bimini Top, Lawrence fish finder, all safety equip., Kay trailer w/breakaway tongue, $8000 OBO, 541-350-2336.

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $64,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cardinal 34.5 JRL (40’) 2009, 4 slides, convection oven + micro., dual A/C, fireplace, extra ride insurance (3 yr. remaining incl. tires), air sleeper sofa + queen bed, $52,900 OBO, must see to appreciate, 406-980-1907, Terrebonne

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

25’ Catalina Sailboat 1983, w/trailer,

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike! $8800 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, 15K mi, lots of upgrades, cstm exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage accessories, $15,500 OBO. 541-693-3975

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 1999, $15,000 or trade for late model fiberglass camper, 541-416-1083,541-280-7657

Harley Dyna FXDWG 1998, custom paint, lots of chrome, head turner, be loud & proud, $7500, 541-280-9563

GAS

swing keel, pop top, fully loaded, $11,000, call for details, 541-480-8060 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Houseboat 38 x10, triple axle trailer incl. 20’ cabin, 12’ rear swim deck plus 6’ covered front deck. Great price! $14,500. 541-788-4844

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435 875

Watercraft

SAVER!

Honda Gold Wing GL 1100, 1980. 23,000 miles, full dress plus helmets, $3500 or best offer. Call 541-389-8410

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $2450 for all. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Honda Trail 90 1969, Yellow, very nice, dual spd. trans, rack, street legal, $1995, 541-318-5010

Honda VT700 Shadow 1984, 23K, many new parts, battery charger, good condition, $3000 OBO. 541-382-1891

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Dancers, 17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices, dry bags, spray skirts, roof rack w/towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1850/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

880

JAYCO SENECA 2008 36MS, Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, fully loaded, 2 slides, gen., satellite sys, frplc, 2 flat scrn diesel, 8k miles, like new TVs. $65,000. 760-644-4160 cond., $109,000 OBO. Call for details 1-541-556-8224. Cedar Creek 2006, Call The Bulletin At RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 541-385-5809. 5500W gen., fireplace, CoPlace Your Ad Or E-Mail rian countertops, skylight At: www.bendbulletin.com shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

30’ Diesel Pusher Safari Sahara 1998. 20k orig. miles, exc. cond., maint. records, 300 h.p. Cat engine, 60 Allison trans., Magnum S26V300 chassis, LR slide, front entry, rear queen bed, full shower, Nomad & Sultan pkgs., low hours on generator. $53,000 • 541-410-3658.

865

ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $97,400. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $89,900. 541-215-5355

Yamaha YFZ450 Sport ATV 2008 Blue, Low hours very clean, freshly serviced. $3950. Will consider offers. See at JD Powersports, Redmond. 541-526-0757 • Richard 541-419-0712

870

Boats & Accessories 12” Sea Nymph Aluminum Boat, motor & trailer, clean outfit, $500, 541-617-8610.

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

Beaver Santiam 2002, 2 slides, 48K, immaculate, 330 Cummins diesel, $75,000. Call for details: 541-504-0874

Best Buy Hurricane 32’ 2007, 12K mi., Cherry Wood, leather, queen, 2 slides, 2 tv’s 2 air, jacks, camera, like new, non smoker, $61,000, 541-548-5216.

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Winnebago 32VS 2000, Class A Adventurer. Super slide, 31K mi., new Toyo tires, 11 1/2 ft. overall height, perfect cond,$37,999. 541-312-8974

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179.

Winnebago Class C 2003, 28’, tow pkg, gen, 2 slides, awning, V-10 Ford 450, one owner, non-smkg, exc care, see to appreciate! $34,000 541-815-4121 541-593-7257

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $39,500. 541-420-3250

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, shocks, interior seat cover, everything works, 121K orig. mi.,original operators manual and line setting ticket incl. $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401

Suzuki Equator CrewCab 2010 4X4, 3K Extra Low Miles! Warranty! VIN #429358

Now Only $23,998

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yes., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

932

Antique and Classic Autos

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

MUST SELL

70 Monte Carlo All original, beautiful, car, completely new suspension and brake system, plus extras. $5000 obo. 541-593-3072

Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call 541-504-9945

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

900 908

The Bulletin Classifieds

Komfort 31’ 2006, Model, 271TS. Like new, only used 4x. 14’ slide-out, 27” TV, AM/FM/CD stereo, DVD player & surround sound. 21” awning, couch w/queen hideabed, AC, heavy duty hitch w/sway bars, daylight shades, pwr front jack, & more! $25,000. 541-382-6731

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Asking $3,999 or make offer.

933

Pickups CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition & much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $4900, John Day, 541-575-3649

We will pay CASH for your vehicle. Buying vehicles NOW! Call Mike Springer 541-749-4025

Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob. Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355.

366

Chevrolet ½-ton 1979 4x4, 350 eng, 86K miles, recent overhaul eng & trans, great cond, $1800. 541-409-1849

Smolich Auto Mall

Over 150 used to choose from!

Over 150 used to choose from!

Over 150 used to choose from!

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Sale Price $12,250

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

5 4 1 -3 2 2 -7 2 5 3 Ford Explorer 1999 XLT V6 4.0L 106K, 4WD,CD, tape deck, tow bar, auto, fully loaded $4995, Peter 541-408-0877

Grand Laredo

Cherokee

1998, 6 cyl., 4L, 180K mi., new tires & battery, leather & alloy, ask $3450, Bill, 541-480-7930.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $13,500. 541-408-2111

Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

Honda CRV 2007 AWD 18mpg City/26 Hwy! 62k mi, MP3, multi-disc CD, sunroof, tow pkg, $17,500. 541-389-3319

Jeep Wrangler 2010 Thousands Less than New! Only 3K Miles! Vin #158726

Sale Price $21,388

Cadillac Escalade AWD 2007

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

41K Miles! Warranty! VIN #140992

366

Jeep Commander 2007 smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

AWD, Limited, Navigation, & More! 33K Miles & Warranty! Vin #530244

Only $24,988

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005 • 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

Dodge Quad Cab Diesel 2008 4X4, 57K Miles & Warranty! Vin #145845

Only $28,998

366

99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

4X4, 4 Cyl., 41K Miles & Warranty! Vin #786719

Over 150 used to choose from!

Chevrolet Avalanche 2002, 4WD, 130K miles, green, sunroof, tow pkg, leather. $7500. 541-707-0157

Smolich Auto Mall

351 V-8, manual, 4WD, Lariat, 137K, exc. cond., $2750 OBO, 541-447-3327.

Ford Mustang 1969 Coupe Must Sell $3,000 obo. 1 owner; car has been parked since 1972. Very low mi., blue on blue with all parts complete, matching numbers. Body work completed & in primer state. Rebuilt trans; 6 long block rebuilt, still at shop, add $2065, making total $5065. 541-514-4228.

Jeep Wrangler 2004

HYUNDAI

Dodge 3500 2009, 4X4, Turbo Diesel, 48K, loaded, $36,500, 541-416-2365, 541-788-9500

Ford 3/4 Ton 1990,

UNBELIEVABLE

366

Now Only $27,788

541-389-1178 • DLR

Ford 2-Dr. Sedan 1951, exc., original, ready to cruise, $8500, 541-388-0137.

541-389-1178 • DLR

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Dodge pickup 1962 D100 classic, original 318 wide block, push button trans, straight, runs good, $1250 firm. Bend, 831-295-4903

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

GMC 6000 dump truck 1990. 7 yard bed, low miles, good condition, new tires! ONLY $4500 OBO. 541-593-3072

541-749-4025 • DLR

Sport Utility Vehicles

NISSAN

916

Chevrolet 3500 Service Truck, 1992, 4x4, automatic, 11-ft storage bed. Liftgate, compressor & generator shelf inside box, locked storage boxes both sides of bed, new tires, regular maintenance & service every 3K miles, set up for towing heavy equip. $4495 obo. 541-420-1846

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

935

Ford 2 Door 1949, 1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718

HYUNDAI

Paying Top Dollar For Your Vehicle!

Hwy 20 in Bend smolichmotors.com

smolichmotors.com

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Only $14,988

WILLYS JEEP 1956

Chevy 3/4 Ton 1989, 4x4, 100K miles, 350 engine, Great cond. $3900. Call 541-815-9939

Autos & Transportation

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Toyota Tacoma 2002, X-Cab, 4X4, 145K, 5-spd. manual trans., 3.4L V-6, loaded, $10,995. 541-598-5111.

The Bulletin Classiieds

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

881

HOLIDAY RAMBLER IMPERIAL 35’ 1993, queen size walk around bed, full bath, FSC, solid oak interior, good condition, price reduced $5995 541-604-1349

www.83porsche911sccabriolet. com

$19,450!

Travel Trailers

Fun Finder Model 189FBS, 2008, 7’ wide w/slide; 19’ long, sleeps 5, excellent condition, 3400# dry, $10,500. Call Fred, 541-516-1134

Porsche 1983 911SC Cabriolet. Info:

Very Clean, 76K Miles & Warranty! Vin #197254

smolichmotors.com

VIN #C45909

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

885

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

(photo for illustration only)

Ford Expedition AWD 1998

Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $7500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

Wagon

Warranty! Vin #124634

Sale Price $10,575

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

541-389-5355

Chevy

Jeep Renegade AWD 2006

Chevy Trailblazer 2004

Now Only $5,995

Canopies and Campers

Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $79,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, Dodge Brougham Motor541-390-2504 home, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Surveyor Model #264, 2011, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self used 1x, exlnt cond, always contained, Cab-over, needs under cover, Cherry cabinets, TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or slide-out, automatic awning. 503-585-3240. $22,500. 541-977-5358 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Cougar 30’ 2004, 2 slides, clean, exc. condition, new tires, $13,500, 360-901-5922.

Storage Cover for Class A, 3740’, zipper sides, never used, in box, $225, 541-617-1249.

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Yamaha Grizzly Sportsman Special 2000, 600cc 4-stroke, push button 4x4 Ultramatic, 945 mi, $4100. 541-678-4030

12 ft. Hydraulic dump trailer w/extra sides, dual axle, steel ramps, spare tire, tarp, excellent condition. $6500 firm. 541-419-6552

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Motorhomes

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

International Travel All 1967,

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Like Brand New

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail Classic 2006, Vance-Hines pipes, crash bar w/foot pegs, Power Command, Stage 1 backrest w/luggage rack, Dyno-tune, all work performed by Jerry’s Custom Cycle, exc. cond, $13,900 OBO. 541-549-4834, 588-0068

Truck with Snow Plow!

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

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Motorcycles And Accessories

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail, 2009. 682 mi., 7 yr ext. warranty, upgraded pipes, engine guard bar. Bike has been lowered; mint cond. Consider trade. $15,500. 541-420-5855

Towmaster Equipment Trailer, 14,000 lb capacity. Tandemn axle, 4-wheel brakes, 18’ bed, heavy duty ramps, spare tire mounted, side mounted fork pockets, all tires in good condition. $4295 or best offer. 541-420-1846.

Utility Trailers

Summer Price Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $850! Sled plus trailer package $1550. Many Extras, call for info, 541-548-3443.

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Travel Trailers

Ford F-150 2006 LOOKS BRAND NEW! Supercab Lariat 5.4L V8 eng.,approx. 20K mi! 4 spd auto, rear wheel drive. Black w/lots of extras: Trailer tow pkg, Custom bedliner, Pickup bed extender, Tan leather trimmed captain chairs, only $18,000. 541-318-7395

Ford F-250 1992, 4X4,460 eng, steel flatbed, headache rack, ~10K on new trans, pro grade tires, $2600, 541-815-7072.

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

541-389-5016 evenings.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Special Edition, 2004, 4x4, V8, 91K, Auto, AC, 541-598-5111 $8895

Mercury Mountaineer 1997 V8 5.0L Engine AWD Automatic 169K miles $3895, Peter 541.408.0877


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 935

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Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Mercury Mountaineer 1999

Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

Mercedes GL450, 2007 All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

leather, full power, running boards, cd, only 56k mi. Vin# J36326 $7,997 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Smolich Auto Mall

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 16, 2011 G5

BMW 3 Series Sport Wagon 2007

Over 150 used to choose from!

Only $32,888

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Nissan Xterra AWD 2004

Mercury Milan 2010 Premium Pkg. 17K Miles! Warranty! VIN #633381

Now Only $19,999

55K Miles & Warranty! Vin #631269

Only $11,998

Buick Park Avenue 1996, loaded, 27 mpg, $2700, 541-419-5060.

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

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Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

NISSAN

Buicks -Nice luxury cars, 30 mpg highway. 1995 Limited LeSabre, 111k, $3900, gold; 1998 Custom LeSabre, 91k at $4500, silver; 2005 LeSabre Custom 84k, $6900; 2006 Lucerne, 76k, $7900. Call 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Chysler La Baron Convertible 1990, Good condition, $3800, 541-416-9566

Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Smolich Auto Mall

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac.,loaded, dealer maint, $19,500. 503-459-1580.

Over 150 used to choose from!

Dodge Avenger 2008 44K Miles! Warranty! Vin #210631

Sale Price $11,599

Toyota Camry 2004 Vin #880152

Sale Price $10,998 HYUNDAI

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. 541-480-1884

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Vans

Chevrolet 1-ton Express Cargo Van, 1999, with tow pkg., good condition, $4200. 541-419-5693

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 All Wheel Drive mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires and wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives excellent!!!. Only $2500. (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

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Ford Focus SE, 2001, 4-dr, 5-spd, 37 mpg, 94K miles, silver in color, power windows & doorlocks, keyless entry, AC, dual airbags, cruise control, CD. Maintained extremely well, runs & drives great, non-smoker, always garaged, $5400 OBO. 541-350-9938

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

FORD TAURUS LX 98 with 74K miles, gold color, one owner, non smoker, 27 mpg, V-6 motor, nice car and almost new! $3900 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $3950 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

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Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

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Central Oregon Law Enforcement Services (COLES) will hold a public hearing on June 29 , 2011 at 12:00 p.m. in the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Lobby, 63333 W. Hwy 20, Bend, Oregon for the purpose of oral and written comments to the proposed 2011 budget. Copies of the proposed budget may be obtained from Captain Marc Mills at the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office. Deschutes County conducts public meetings in locations which are wheelchair accessible. Deschutes County also provides reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. For persons who are deaf, or who have hearing or speech impairments, dial 7-1-1 to access the State transfer relay service for TTY. The County will provide an interpreter for hearing impaired persons who give at least 48 hours notice of the request. Written information will be made available in large print or audio format. To request these services, please call (541) 388-6571. LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department In the Matter of the Estate of Robert Eugene Taylor, Deceased. Case No. 11PB 0070BH NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Richard E. Taylor has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative’s attorney at Widmer Mensing Law Group, LLP. 339 SW Century Drive, Suite 101, Bend, Oregon 97702, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the Court, the Personal Representative, or the lawyers for the Personal Representative, Widmer Mensing Law Group, LLP. Dated and first published on June 16, 2011. Jeffrey S. Patterson, Attorney for Personal Representative

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

Automobiles

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE COLES BUDGET HEARING

Smolich Auto Mall

52K Miles & Warranty! Vin #Z35138

Over 150 used to choose from!

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Infiniti J30 1993 118.6K miles. 1 owner. Great shape. 4 separate studded tires on wheels incl. $3200. 541-382-7451

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

MERCEDES C300 2008 New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Personal Representative: Richard E. Taylor 1730 NW Lewisberg Avenue Corvallis, OR 97330 Ph: (541) 745-7821 Attorney for Personal Representative: Jeffrey S. Patterson, OSB #024193 339 SW Century Drive, Suite 101 Bend, Oregon 97702 Ph.: (541) 318-3330 Fax: (541) 323-1030 e-mail: jeff@bendlawgroup.com LEGAL NOTICE Sealed bids for ITB 1367-11 Beverage Vending Services for Central Oregon Community College will be accepted by Julie Mosier, Purchasing Coordinator, in the CFO Department, Metolius Hall, Room 212C, 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR 97701 until 4:00PM, local time, June 29, 2011. Bids received after the time fixed for receiving bids cannot and will not be considered. ITB documents may be obtained from the Purchasing Coordinator Office, located at Metolius Hall, Room 212C, 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR 97701 by emailing jmosier@cocc.edu. Central Oregon Community College invites bids from vendors for the purpose of selecting a vendor to provide carbonated beverage equipment and services for the College at its Bend, Redmond and Madras campuses. All bids submitted shall contain a statement as to whether the Bidder is a resident or non-resident Bidder, as defined in ORS279.A.120. Pursuant to ORS 279B.100, the College may reject any bid not in compliance with all prescribed bidding procedures and requirements and may reject all bids if, in the judgment of the College, it is in the public interest to do so. No Vendor may withdraw their bid after the hour set for the opening thereof and before award of the Contract, unless award is delayed beyond thirty (30) days from the bid opening date. The College may waive any or all informalities and irregularities, may reject any bid not in compliance with all prescribed public procurement procedures and requirements, and may reject for good cause any or all bids upon a finding of the College that it is in the public interest to do so. Central Oregon Community is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Dated this June 16, 2011 PUBLISHED:Bend Bulletin

LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS COURT: Deschutes County Circuit Court. CASE #: 11CV0356ST. CASE NAME: THE STATE OF OREGON, Plaintiff, v. $29,880.00 IN U.S. CURRENCY, Defendant, In Rem. Claimant: Michael Paul Garrison. Notice to all Potential Claimants: Read These Papers Carefully! If you have an interest in the defendant in rem named above, you must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear," you must file with the court a legal document called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff's attorney. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: May 26, 2011. SUMMARY STATEMENT of the object of the Complaint and the demand for relief: On April 19, 2011, the property described above and named as defendant in rem was seized for civil forfeiture from Michael Paul Garrison, in Deschutes County, Oregon, by the Oregon State Police. The property is subject to forfeiture pursuant to ORS chapter 131A, because it constitutes the proceeds of, or was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating, the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances including the unlawful manufacture, delivery or possession of marijuana. The demand for relief in the above-entitled case is forfeiture of the defendant in rem described above. "Forfeiture" means that all right, title and interest in the property will belong to and vest in the State of Oregon and any person with an interest in the property will have that right, title and interest extinguished without compensation. DATED this 16th day of May 2011. /s/ Jennifer Gardiner, OSB 040614, Assistant Attorney General and Attorney for Plaintiff, 610 Hawthorne Ave SE - Ste. 210, Salem, OR 97301; Telephone (503) 378-6347; jennifer.gardiner@doj.state. or.us LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0090867391 T.S. No.: 11-01699-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of August 27, 2008 made by, KRISTY L. MARTIN, A SINGLE PERSON . as the original grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, as the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA., as the original beneficiary, recorded on August 29, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-35924 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA., (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 191828 LOT THIRTY-EIGHT (38). STONEHEDGE WEST PHASE 2, RECORDED OCTOBER 21, 1996, IN CABINET D, PAGE 276. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 845 SW 25TH CT., REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $11,774.24 as of June 9, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $142,898.74 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.50000% per annum from September 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on October 11, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default

occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEED NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 9, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorial Signature ASAP# 4019105 06/16/2011, 06/23/2011, 06/30/2011, 07/07/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0173258203 T.S. No.: 11-01694-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of November 12, 2007 made by, ANDREW R. ZAPP AND ALLEE ZAPP, as the original grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as the original beneficiary, recorded on November 15, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-59963 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 124047 THE EAST HALF (E1/2) OF LOT FIVE (5) IN BLOCK ONE (10), CANYON VIEW, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1734-1738 SOUTHWEST LAVA AVENUE, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $9,177.48 as of June 8, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $184,556.64 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25000% per annum from December 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on October 11, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 9, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4020153 06/16/2011, 06/23/2011, 06/30/2011, 07/07/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx2852 T.S. No.: 1325573-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Ted Johnson, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Greater Northwest Mortgage, Inc., Its Successors and Assigns, as Beneficiary, dated June 28, 2007, recorded July 05, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-37427 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Unit 31, Cascade Courtyard Condominiums, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. together with an undivided interest in and to the common elements appertaining to said unit as set forth in the declaration of condominium ownership recorded April 20, 2007, instrument no. 2007-22651. Commonly

known as: 1031 Southeast 4th Street, Unit # 10 Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2011 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $701.60 Monthly Late Charge $26.26. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $74,116.88 together with interest thereon at 7.250% per annum from December 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges

thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on September 21, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0210597837 T.S. No.: 11-00466-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of October 24, 2008 made by, DAVID WHITSON, as the original grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as the original beneficiary, recorded on October 31, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-44137 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 175964 The portion of Lot Numbered One (1) in Block Numbered Five (5) of DANA-BUTLER, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows, to-wit; Beginning at the Southeast comer of said Lot Numbered 1; thence Northerly along the East line of said Lot a distance of 249.67 feet; thence Westerly along a line parallel with the North line of said Lot numbered 1 a distance of 175 feet; thence Southerly along a line parallel to the East line of said Lot numbered 1 a distance of 249.67 feet, to the Southerly line of said Lot numbered 1; thence Easterly along said South line a distance of 175 feet to the point of beginning. EXCEPTING THEREFROM Parcels One (1) and Two (2) of Partition Plat 1995-15, a parcel of land located in a portion of Lot One (1), Block Five (5), of DANA-BUTLER in Section Twenty (20), Township Fifteen (15) South, Range Thirteen (13), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion of Lot One (1), Block Five (5), DANA-BUTLER, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of said Lot 1; thence North 00º14'21" West along the East line of said Lot, a distance of 70.00 feet to the true point of beginning; thence continuing North 00º14'21" West along the East line of said Lot 1, a distance of 75.00 feet; thence South 89º21'34" West along a line parallel with the South line of said Lot 1, a distance of 107.20 feet; thence South 00º14'21" East along a line parallel with the East line of said Lot 1, a distance of 75.00 feet; thence North 89º21'34" East along a line parallel with the South line of said Lot 1, a distance of 107.20 feet to the East line of said Lot 1 and the true point of beginning. Commonly known as: 2995 SW 23RD STREET, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $14,649.53 as of May 24, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $150,035.31 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.00000% per annum from April 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on September 29, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 25, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4007580 06/02/2011, 06/09/2011, 06/16/2011, 06/23/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE TO:Darrell W. Tappert 16902 Jacinto Road Bend, OR 97707 Other Interested Parties Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the undersigned Trustee provides you with the following information: Reference is made to that certain Residential Trust Deed, Security Agreement, Assignment of Lease and Rents and Fixture Filing (hereinafter "Trust Deed"), dated December 18, 2009 and recorded December 18, 2009 under instrument number 2009-53272, in the official real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, wherein Darrell W. Tappert, is named Grantor, James D. Mullins Attorney at Law is named Trustee, and Dolores Y. Thoreson, by and through her Guardian, is named Beneficiary; and, pursuant to the Appointment of Successor Trustee by Beneficiary, dated January 26, 2010, and recorded in the real property records of Deschutes County, OR, under instrument number 2011-04375, Charles A. Isely is named as Successor Trustee of said Trust Deed; and which Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property in said County: Lot Thirty (30), Block Thirty (30), DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, UNIT 5, recorded August 7, 1963, in Cabinet A, Page 107, Deschutes County, Oregon. Tax Lot Number: 20 10 12C0 21100. Account No. 116024. Property Address: 16902 Jacinto Road, Bend, OR 97707. Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property described herein to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3), in the real property records for Deschutes County, Oregon on February 22, 2011 under recording number 2011-06768; the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: A. Monetary Defaults: Delinquent Installments: 1.Monthly payments of $750.00 from July 1, 2008 through February, 2011 in the total amount of $24,000.00 in satisfaction of a General Agreement, dated May 1, 2007, which has been merged into that Order Granting Summary Judgment and Judgment RE: Defendant Darrell W. Tappert on December 10, 2009 under Clark County, Washington Superior Court Case No. 09-2-02271-6 (hereinafter referred to as the "Note"). Subtotal of Monetary Defaults as of February 15, 2011: $24,000.00. The monetary defaults listed Section A.1 herein are in addition to title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said defaults. The amount of monetary defaults, listed herein, shall increase by each delinquent payment and applicable late fee. B. Non-monetary default for which foreclosure is made: N/A. By reason of said defaults, the Beneficiaries have declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: unpaid principal balance of $133,145.92, accruing interest at the rate of 12% per year, beginning December 10, 2010; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said defaults; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiaries for the protection of the Premises and their interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, Charles A. Isely, Attorney at Law, the undersigned Trustee will on Friday, July 15, 2011 at the hour of 10:00 AM in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with the statute addressed to the Trustee either by personal delivery to the Trustee's physical offices located at 105 W. Evergreen Blvd., Suite 200, Vancouver, WA 98660, or by certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the Trustee at the same address. Notice is given that any persons named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have his foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the Trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include the respective successors in interest, if any. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Dated this 11th day of March, 2011 by: /s/ Charles A. Isely, Attorney at Law, Trustee. FAIR DEBT COLLECTION NOTICE: The amount of your debt as of the date of this Notice is $24,000.00, plus applicable costs and fees. The amount of your debt will increase by each delinquent payment, plus additional late fees and interest. The name of your creditors is the Estate of Dolores Y. Thoreson. We will assume the debt is valid unless, within thirty (30) days after you have received this notice, you notify our office that you dispute this debt or any portion thereof. If you send us written notice within the thirty (30) day period that you dispute this debt or any portion thereof, we will obtain verification of the debt, or a copy of the judgment against you, and mail you a copy of the verification or judgment. If you send us a written request within the thirty (30) day period, we will send you the name and address of the original creditor if it is different from the current creditor named in this letter. Further please note: We are attempting to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.


G6 Thursday, June 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 16, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-381997 06/16/11, 06/23, 06/30, 07/07 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 1158070246 T.S. No.; 11-01659-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of March 15, 2007 made by, HERMAN MCMULLEN AND GAYLE E MCMULLEN, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as the original grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC., as the original beneficiary, recorded on March 21 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-16685 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for MortgageIT Securities Corp. Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2007-1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, and (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 187936 LOT TWENTY (20), DEER POINTE VILLAGE, PHASE III, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 792 NE MAJESTY LANE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $12,091.69 as of June 8, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $220,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.12500% per annum from October 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on October 11, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due

(other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252Â-4900 FOR SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: 714-730-2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 9, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4020160 06/16/2011, 06/23/2011, 06/30/2011, 07/07/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-USB-11010598 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JOLENE S. COLEMAN AND ERIC M. COLEMAN, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as beneficiary, dated 6/26/2008, recorded 6/30/2008, under Instrument No. 2008-28057, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by US BANK, NA. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 16, BLOCK 19, OREGON WATER WONDERLAND UNIT 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 55862 SWAN ROAD BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 26, 2011 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2010 7 payments at $1,403.49 each $9,824.43 (11-01-10 through 05-26-11) Late Charges: $281.09 Foreclosure Fees and Costs $1,194.00 TOTAL: $11,299.52 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $182,320.26, PLUS interest thereon at 6.000% per annum from 10/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 3, 2011, at the hour

of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/26/2011 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC Trustee By; Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc. as agent for the Trustee, By: Angela Barsamyan Foreclosure Assistant 5900 Canoga Avenue, Suite 220, Woodland Hills, CA 91367 Phone: (877)237-7878 ASAP# 4008697 06/09/2011, 06/16/2011, 06/23/2011, 06/30/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 etseq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-109791 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JEFFREY D. EVANS AND PATTI G. EVANS HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 1/8/2007, recorded 1/17/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-03185, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT EIGHT (8), TRI-PEAKS III, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 20478 KARCH DRIVE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 26, 2011 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2008 30 payments at $1,607.84 each $48,235.20 4 payments at $1,464.13 each $5,856.52 (08-01-08 through 05-26-11) Late Charges: $1,627.02 Beneficiary Advances: $6,413.2 0 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $62,131.94 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $226,861.52, PLUS interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from 07/01/08 to 2/1/2011, 6.375% per annum from 2/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 30, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/26/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# FNMA4008552 06/09/2011, 06/16/2011, 06/23/2011, 06/30/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trust Deed to be foreclosed pursuant to Oregon law is referred to as follows (the "Trust Deed"): 1. TRUST DEED INFORMATION: Grantor: Gene W. Hoskin and Judy R. Hoskin. Beneficiary: Columbia State Bank successor in interest to Columbia River Bank. Trustee: Amerititle. Successor Trustee:Heather J. Hepburn, Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt P.C., 360 SW Bond St. Suite 400, Bend, OR 97702, (541) 749-4044. Recording Date:May 23, 2005. Recording Reference:Document No. 2005-31837. County of Recording:Deschutes. The Trust Deed was modified by the following modifications: Modification of Deed of Trust recorded as Document No. 2008-16821 on April 17, 2008. 2.LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY (the "Property"): A tract of land located in the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NE1/4SE1/4) Section Thirty-Four (34), Township Fourteen (14) South, Range Thirteen (13), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said NE1/4SE1/4; thence North 89 degrees 37'54" West along the North line of said NE1/4SE1/4, 5.78 feet to the West boundary of existing county road; thence South 01 degrees 35'01" West along the said West road boundary, 20.01 feet to the South boundary of existing county road and the true point of beginning; thence continuing South 01 degrees35'01" West along said West road boundary, 970.43 feet; thence North 89 degrees 36'11" West, 422.76 feet; thence North 00 degrees 43'11" East, 970.02 feet to the South boundary of said existing county road; thence South 89 degrees 37'54" East along said South boundary, 437.39 feet to the true point of beginning. 3.DEFAULT: The Grantor or any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed. The default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to do the following: Failure to make monthly payments on the note of $1,323.79 due November 15, 2010, through February 15, 2011, secured by the above referenced trust deed. 4.AMOUNT DUE: By reason of the default just described, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following: Principal balance of $189,862.20, together with unpaid interest of $5,473.26, other fees of $3,164.76 through February 9, 2011, Trustee's fees, attorney's fees, costs of foreclosure and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of the Trust Deed. Interest continues to accrue on the unpaid principal balance at the rate of 18 percent per annum from February 10, 2011, until paid. 5.ELECTION TO SELL: The Beneficiary hereby elects to foreclose the Trust Deed by advertisement and sale as provided under ORS 86.705 to 86.795, and to cause the property to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the described property which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by the Grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest the Grantor or Grantor's successor in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed, including the expenses of the sale, compensation of the Trustee as provided by law and the reasonable fees of the Trustee's attorneys. 6.DATE AND TIME OF SALE: Date: August 1, 2011. Time: 11:00 A.M. (in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110). Location: Bond Street Entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse; 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701. 7.RIGHT TO REINSTATE: Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by doing all of the following: a. payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred; b.curing any other default that is capable of being cured, by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed; and c.paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the Trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. 8.NOTICE FOR PROPERTIES INCLUDING ONE OR MORE DWELLING UNITS: NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for August 1, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED: IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2014. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than July 2, 2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT: Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE: The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information and a directory of legal aid programs for where you can obtain free legal assistance is available at http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: March 7, 2011. /s/ Heather J. Hepburn. Heather J. Hepburn, Successor Trustee.

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L522904 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000017531/HAUN Investor No: 4003069181 AP #1: 106654 Title #: 110039666 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by BRADFORD D. HAUN, KAREN HAUN as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated April 22, 2003, Recorded April 28, 2003 as Instr. No. 2003-27802 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON AND AN ADDENDUM TO NOTE DATED 04/22/03 covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 5 AND THE EAST 1/2 OF LOT 6, BLOCK 153, SECOND ADDITION TO BEND PARK, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. TOGETHER WITH THAT PORTION OF VACATED ALLEY THAT INURES THERETO BY REASON OF VACATION ORDINANCE NO. NS-1666, RECORDED OCTOBER 4, 1996 IN VOLUME 424, PAGE 2883, DESCHUTES COUNTY RECORDS. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE $216,475.25 INTEREST @ 4.8750 % FROM 01/01/10 THRU 03/10/11 $12,605.17 ACCRUED LATE CHARGES $259.32 IMPOUND/ESCROW DEFICIT $3,073.87 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $823.00 $823.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$233,225.21 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 45 SW ROOSEVELT AVENUE, BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $216,475.25, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 01/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on July 18, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales TAC# 937449 PUB: 06/02/11, 06/09/11, 06/16/11, 06/23/11 DATED: 03/10/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trust Deed to be foreclosed pursuant to Oregon law is referred to as follows (the "Trust Deed"): 1.TRUST DEED INFORMATION: Grantor: Gene Hoskin and Judy Ruth Hoskin. Beneficiary: Columbia State Bank successor in interest to Columbia River Bank. Trustee: Amerititle. Successor Trustee:Heather J. Hepburn. Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt P.C., 360 SW Bond St. Suite 400, Bend, OR 97702, (541) 749-4044. Recording Date: June 19, 2006. Recording Reference: Document No. 2006-42223. County of Recording: Deschutes. 2. LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY (the "Property"): Lots Nine (9) and Ten (10), Block Seven (7), Townsite of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. DEFAULT: The Grantor or any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed. The default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to do the following: Failure to make monthly payments on the note of $1,796.55 due February 8, 2010, through February 8, 2011, secured by the above referenced trust deed and failure to pay real property taxes when due in the amount of $3,451.40 plus interest and penalties. 4. AMOUNT DUE: By reason of the default described above, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following: Principal balance of $247,245.10, together with unpaid interest of $46,372.17, other fees of $6,638.56 through February 9, 2011, Trustee's fees, attorney's fees, costs of foreclosure and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of the Trust Deed. Interest continues to accrue on the unpaid principal balance at the rate of 18 percent per annum from February 10, 2011, until paid. 5. ELECTION TO SELL: The Beneficiary hereby elects to foreclose the Trust Deed by advertisement and sale as provided under ORS 86.705 to 86.795, and to cause the property to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the described property which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by the Grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest the Grantor or Grantor's successor in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed, including the expenses of the sale, compensation of the Trustee as provided by law and the reasonable fees of the Trustee's attorneys. 6. DATE AND TIME OF SALE: Date: August 1, 2011. Time: 11:10 A.M. (in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110). Location: Bond Street Entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse; 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701. 7. RIGHT TO REINSTATE: Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by doing all of the following: a. payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred; b. curing any other default that is capable of being cured, by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed; and c. paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the Trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. 8. NOTICE FOR PROPERTIES INCLUDING ONE OR MORE DWELLING UNITS: NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for August 1, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED: IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2014. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than July 2, 2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT: Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE: The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information and a directory of legal aid programs for where you can obtain free legal assistance is available at http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: March 7, 2011. /s/ Heather J. Hepburn. Heather J. Hepburn, Successor Trustee.

Bulletin Daily Paper 06/16/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Thursday June 16, 2011