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Sustainable snow Mt. Bachelor’s efforts to help the environment • GREEN, C1

Bid until March 29 www.bulletinbidnbuy.com

WEATHER TODAY

MONDAY

Mostly cloudy High 49, Low 32 Page B6

• March 28, 2011 50¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

So, what’s a twenty-niner, anyway? Hint: It has to do with mountain bikes. To find out more, see Cycling Central • SPORTS, D1

High-tech flirting turns explicit, and young lives are altered

Keeping an eye on

parking in Bend

DESCHUTES

Flaherty, county face mediation or lawsuit As 3 fired prosecutors allege bias, deadline looms for DA, officials to decide how they will proceed By Hillary Borrud

By Jan Hoffman

The Bulletin

New York Times News Service

Three prosecutors fired by Deschutes County District Attorney Patrick Flaherty have threatened to sue him and several county officials over alleged sex discrimination and unfair labor practices. The former deputy district attorneys — Brentley Foster, Jody Vaughan and Phil Duong — gave Flaherty and county officials until Thursday to agree to enter mediation and try to resolve the matter out of court, according to a March 18 letter from their attorney to Flaherty and the county. If Flaherty and county officials agree to mediation, the former prosecutors have offered to postpone filing their lawsuit for one month. Patrick Duong, Foster and Vaughan in- Flaherty tend to seek more than $21 million in economic, punitive and other damages, according to a draft complaint, which along with the letter was released Friday by Deschutes County in response to a public records request. The county could face steep legal bills even before the outcome of any potential mediation or lawsuit is factored in. County officials are considering hiring multiple attorneys to represent them in the matter. In the draft complaint, Vaughan, Foster and Duong allege that county officials aided Flaherty in his plan to fire them by delaying a ratification vote on the Deschutes County District Attorneys Association’s contract until after Flaherty took office. See DA / A4

LACEY, Wash. — One day last winter Margarite posed naked before her bathroom mirror, held up her cellphone and took a picture. Then she sent the fulllength frontal photo to Isaiah, her new boyfriend. Both were in eighth grade. They broke up soon after. A few weeks later, Isaiah forwarded the photo to another eighth-grade girl, once a friend of Margarite’s. Around 11 o’clock at night, that girl slapped a text message on it. “Ho Alert!” she typed. “If you think this girl is a whore, then text this to all your friends.” Then she clicked open the long list of contacts on her phone and pressed “send.” In less than 24 hours, the effect was as if Margarite, 14, had sauntered naked down the hallways of the four middle schools in this racially and economically diverse suburb of the state capital, Olympia. Hundreds, possibly thousands, of students had received her photo and forwarded it. In short order, students would be handcuffed and humiliated, parents mortified and lessons learned at a harsh cost. Only then would the community try to turn the fiasco into an opportunity to educate. Around the country, law enforcement officials and educators are struggling with how to confront minors who “sext,” an imprecise term that refers to sending sexual photos, videos or texts from one cellphone to another. See Sexting / A4

TOP NEWS INSIDE LIBYA: Rebels make new gains amid Western airstrikes, Page A3 JAPAN: High radiation levels found in flooded nuclear facility, Page A3

INDEX Abby

C2

Local

Calendar

C3

Movies

B1-6

E1-6

Obituaries

B5

Comics

C4-5

Oregon

B3

Crossword C5, E2

Sports

Editorial

TV listings

C2

Weather

B6

Green, Etc. C1-6

Armed with a camera, one resident is documenting violations By Nick Grube The Bulletin

very day before he leaves his house on Bend’s north side, 61-year-old Vern Budd attaches a small digital camera to his belt. Whether he’s going to the grocery store, post office or simply headed down the street to run an errand, it’s always with him. He uses it only when he sees something he doesn’t like, and for the most part there’s one thing that irks him more than anything else: illegal parking. “It’s rampant in this town,” Budd said. “It doesn’t matter where you go, it’s rampant.” For at least the past couple of months, Budd has been training his lens on illegally parked vehicles and sending the photos to city officials and the Bend Police Department. He’s looking for a

E

“It’s rampant in this town. It doesn’t matter where you go, it’s rampant.” — Vern Budd, of Bend, on illegal parking

Parking tickets Bend Police officers issued 15 parking tickets from Jan. 1, 2010, to March 15, 2011. Its volunteers issued 1,089 in 2010, many for parking in disabled parking zones. Here are the types and numbers of citations officers issued:

9 3 1 1 1

Illegal stopping, standing, parking Parking in a disabled zone

Rob Culpepper / New York Times News Service

Former HealthSouth CEO Richard Scrushy’s racing jacket has a potential buyer at a yard sale over the weekend.

Scrushy yard sale: Hunting for deals after a titan’s fall By Campbell Robertson

Prohibited parking or standing Misuse of a disabled permit Blocking a disabled parking space

Source: Bend Police Department

New York Times News Service

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — What shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world and lose his casserole dish? These are the wages of sin for Richard Scrushy, who rose from working-class roots to become one of the highest-paid CEOs in the U.S. and fell to become federal prisoner No. 24463-001. In the two years since he was ordered by a judge to pay $2.87 billion to HealthSouth, the company he started in 1984, his 19 cars and his wife’s jewelry collection have been auctioned and his houses sold. Then, over the weekend, came perhaps the final indignity: a yard sale. See Scrushy / A4

D1-6

Washington cuts coal use, but soon may be a chief exporter By Craig Welch

We use recycled newsprint

The Seattle Times

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 108, No. 87, 30 pages, 5 sections

MON-SAT

meaningful response, but in his estimation the reaction has been minimal. While he takes pictures of cars and trucks parked against the flow of traffic or in handicap spaces, he has spent a lot of time around the Third Street corridor, especially on streets like DeKalb and Irving. In those places, cars and trucks line both sides of the narrow roads, leaving barely enough room for a single vehicle to pass. Because of the cramped space, many people have started parking on the sidewalks, keeping only two wheels on the road. This is unacceptable to Budd, a member of the Central Oregon Coalition for Access. Those who park on the sidewalk create potential barriers for disabled people, many of whom must use wheelchairs or cannot see. See Parking / A4

C3

Classified

B4

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Vern Budd, a member of the Central Oregon Coalition for Access, takes a photo of a vehicle parked on the sidewalk near the intersection of Northeast Kearny Avenue and Second Street. The license plate information has been blurred out.

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Thinkstock

A debate about the future of coal is raging in Washington state.

The sandy black gold arrives by rail every day, and piles up in giant mounds on a spit just off shore. From there, it’s loaded onto ships bound for Asia. Last year, the seaport just across the U.S. border in Delta, B.C., shipped 27 million tons of North American coal abroad. It’s the busiest coal-export operation on the continent, the only one along the West Coast outside Alaska.

Perhaps not for long. Two companies are pushing to make Washington state a major player in the international coal trade. One has sought to ship up to 60 million tons of coal a year from refurbished docks near the Columbia River’s mouth. The other plans to build a major shipping terminal near Bellingham, and has a contract to export 24 million tons of Rocky Mountain coal a year. Gov. Chris Gregoire, striving to reduce Washington’s carbon footprint, this month

signed a deal with owners of the TransAlta power plant in Centralia to shut down its two coal-fired boilers by 2025. Those boilers account for 10 percent of Washington’s share of the greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. But just as Washington weans itself from coal, it could be positioned as the nation’s leading exporter of the fossil fuel. The possibility has sparked a fierce debate. See Coal / A4


A2 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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F / Technology

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Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

Retailers looking to sell, In digital library case, buy back, resell gadgets A N A LY S I S

Google’s loss may be antitrust probe’s gain

Stores are pitching buyback programs as a way to stay on cutting-edge of new technology

By Jeff Bliss Bloomberg News

WASHINGTON — A judge’s rejection of Google’s bid to create the world’s biggest digital library will reinforce demands by company detractors for a federal antitrust investigation into its business practices, legal analysts say. Google’s opponents will cite the ruling to support claims the company is seeking to control the Internet search market, said Herbert Hovenkamp, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law. The decision “will strengthen the hand of those who want to do an antitrust investigation.”

By Gus G. Sentementes The Baltimore Sun

BALTIMORE — You know that shiny smartphone you bought six months ago? There’s an even better one hitting the market right about now. Or how about that flatpanel TV you bought last year? Now they come in 3-D. With the ever-quickening pace of technological advances, you can be left in the digital dust. Retailers now have a solution for consumers — and for themselves. They will buy back your old gadget in hopes that you will turn around and buy the newest gadget on their shelves. Under these “buyback” programs, big-box retailers and online merchants give cash or credit for a piece of used electronics. Best Buy, the world’s largest consumer electronics retailer, launched its program earlier this year. “Technology is changing so fast that the consumer a lot of times feels they’re being left behind, so they’ll postpone buying,” said Cynthia Jasper, an expert in buying behavior and chair of the consumer science department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “So it’s a way to make the consumer feel at ease.” For retailers, buyback programs are another way to lure customers into stores to spend on pricey gadgets such as smartphones, laptops, tablet computers and televisions. Retailers also see buyback programs as an alternative revenue stream because they can sell used products through online outlet sites.

Automated kiosks One California startup has put its own twist on the concept. Its vending machine model, called the “ecoATM,” is an automated kiosk that accepts used gadgets and pays the consumer in cash or gift cards. The company behind the Redbox movie rental kiosks, Coinstar, has invested in ecoATM, which has already deployed some of the machines in California. Retail industry experts say the consumer electronics market is evolving the way markets in used cars or used textbooks did. And if consumers believe their gadgets will retain some value, they might be more willing to upgrade sooner rather than risk the device be-

Unfair deal

Kenneth K. Lam / Baltimore Sun

Best Buy employee Rustam Ibragimov explains the company’s buyback program to Roger and Robin Wilson, who are buying a laptop. coming outdated and worthless, industry experts said.

Trading in — and up For years, early adopters of gadgets have used eBay and other online outlets to eventually sell them and use the cash to defray the cost of the latest models. With the new buyback programs, that kind of electronics consumerism could become the norm. Many consumers already trade in — and up — their cell phones, as those who lock into contracts are often given credit to upgrade to newer models. Sprint, AT&T and Verizon have introduced their own buyback programs. “The electronics business is built on people upgrading their products,” said Stephen Baker, vice president of industry analysis at NPD Group, a technology research firm. “Anything to increase the turnover is a benefit to the industry.” Consumer electronics retailers typically have thin profit margins, but some are finding a lucrative market in buying and reselling lightly used gadgets. Dale Rogers, a logistics and supply expert and Rutgers University professor, estimates the secondary market for consumer electronics is worth about $13 billion in annual sales — or about 10 percent of the total consumer

Best Buy hopes revamp will lure back consumers By Chris Burritt and Cliff Edwards Bloomberg News

Best Buy is rebooting — again. Concerned that consumers are coming to view the world’s largest consumer electronics merchant as just another big-box chain, Chief Executive Officer Brian Dunn is rethinking just about everything the Richfield, Minn.-based company does. He’s reorganizing the stores; new test locations in Pittsburgh and Las Vegas are less cluttered and bear more than a passing resemblance to Apple’s retail minimalism. Floor walkers have been retrained to show shoppers how gadgets work together — a concept Dunn calls the “connected store.” The company is moving to “everyday” pricing, a guarantee that shoppers will get the lowest price Best Buy can offer. “We have an industry that’s transforming, so naturally we’re transforming,” Dunn, 51, said in a telephone interview. “All of those initiatives show how we are transforming to what our customers need and want from us.” The connected store represents a midcourse correction for Dunn, whose previous strategy involved loading up stores with exclusive products, including an

Best Buy’s profits beat estimates Best Buy said profits declined 16 percent in the fourth quarter, beating analysts’ estimates as demand for smartphones rose. Net income fell to $651 million, or $1.62 a share, in the quarter ended Feb. 26, the Richfield, Minn.-based company said. Excluding items such as costs to close stores in China, earnings were $1.98 a share. Analysts had predicted $1.84. — Bloomberg News electric bike. Best Buy has since lost customers to Apple, Amazon .com, Wal-Mart and Costco Wholesale, analysts say. Dunn, who has been CEO since June 2009, is betting big on services. While trying to match the discounters on price, Best Buy aims to sell add-ons WalMart and Costco don’t offer, including extended warranties, digital content streamed to devices and remote home-monitoring and repair, says Mike Vitelli, co-chief of the North American division.

electronics market in the U.S. Rogers said that retailers increasingly feel threatened by online commerce and are strategizing ways to keep consumers coming through the doors. Best Buy’s program, for one, requires customers to come into the store to sell back products. “The brickand-mortar, big-box retail store is experiencing some difficulty these days,” said Rogers. “It’s real easy to buy online, so these buyback programs are really a great way to get you into the store.”

U.S. Circuit Judge Denny Chin last week struck down a $125 million settlement between Google and publishers and authors to create a digital library, saying the deal would be unfair to authors. The Mountain View, Calif.-based company, owner of the world’s most popular search engine, also has been accused of reducing competition in the search industry. Attorneys general in Ohio and Wisconsin are weighing investigations, and Herb Kohl, chairman of a Senate Judiciary antitrust subcommittee, is planning to examine the company’s conduct. Microsoft and other Google rivals are members of Fair Search.org, a group that opposes the company’s planned acquisition of Cambridge, Mass.-

based ITA Software Inc., which provides online data for airline ticket prices. Microsoft’s Ciao from Bing, French legal search engine Ejustice.fr and Foundem, a British price-comparison website, have filed complaints with the European Union. The EU is investigating whether Google is unfairly ranking its services higher than rivals in search results.

Consumers deprived Google has defended its business strategy and accused Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft of a campaign to undermine the Internet search company. Jonathan Jacobson, an antitrust lawyer working for Google, said that Chin’s ruling would hurt computer users. “It is going to deprive consumers of the huge benefits that the settlement would have generated,” said Jacobson. “If Microsoft is out there trying to degrade the quality of Google search, do consumers benefit from that?” he said. “No, they don’t.” Google’s focus should be on regulators, not rivals, said Charles “Rick” Rule, a Washington-based attorney who represents Microsoft, in a statement. “Google’s antitrust problems are with the federal courts, the U.S. Department of Justice, state attorneys general and the European Commission, all of whom have raised concerns about Google’s monopolistic conduct,” Rule said.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 28, 2011 A3

T S JAPAN

Libyan rebels celebrate at a checkpoint in Al-Egila, east of Ras Lanuf, eastern Libya, on Sunday. Rebel fighters said they met little resistance as they pushed from the city of Ajdabiya past the oil towns of Brega and Ras Lanuf, recapturing two important refineries.

Radiation levels soar in flooded section of nuclear plant By Hiroko Tabuchi, David Jolly and Keith Bradsher New York Times News Service

TOKYO — Japan’s troubled effort to contain the nuclear contamination crisis at its stricken Fukushima Dai-ichi plant suffered a setback Sunday when alarmingly high radiation levels were discovered in a flooded area inside the complex, raising new questions about how and when cleanup workers could resume their tasks. Tokyo Electric Power Co., the operator, said the elevated radiation levels in the water, which had flooded the turbine buildings adjacent to the reactors at the plant, were at least four times the permissible exposure levels for workers at the plant and 100,000 times more than water ordinarily found at a nuclear facility. That could mean crews seeking to determine damage and fix the problems at the plant, hit by a magnitude-9.0 earthquake and a tsunami more than two weeks ago, may not be able to even approach the most troubled parts of the complex until the water can be safely removed. Tetsuo Iguchi, a professor in the department of quantum engineering at Nagoya University, said that at the sharply elevated levels of radiation, workers would be able to remain on the site for only about 15 minutes before health considerations required them to leave. That could hamper their efforts to restore power at the reactors. Alarm over the radiation levels first intensified Thursday when two workers were burned after they stepped in highly radioactive water inside reactor No. 3. Late Saturday, a worker trying to measure radiation levels of the water at another reactor, No. 2, saw the reading on his dosimeter jump beyond 1,000 millisieverts per hour, the highest reading so far. The worker left the scene immediately, said Takeo Iwamoto, a spokesman for the Tokyo Electric Power Co. There was no evacuation of the roughly 1,000 workers stationed at Dai-ichi after the high radiation levels were discovered. Naoki Sunoda, a spokesman for Tokyo Electric Power, said that since the crisis began, 19 workers had been exposed to radiation levels of 100 millisieverts. Despite the new problem, Sunoda said, workers today were trying to determine a way to approach reactor No. 2, considered to be the most troubled of the six.

U.S. firms fear shortage of Japanese parts Tremors from the Japanese earthquake continue to rattle American businesses, even those companies that have experienced no disruptions in parts or supplies. For instance, film and television producers, along with the companies that support them, are scrambling to stock up on commercialgrade videotape after a major supplier, the Sony Corp., closed its factories in Japan. Short of parts, automakers, including General Motors, have been forced to slow or stop production at some plants. Other manufacturers like Nokia, the Finnish cellphone maker, have said they expect disruptions. — New York Times News Service

Anja Niedringhaus The Associated Press

Libyan rebels make gains amid Western airstrikes By David D. Kirkpatrick and Kareem Fahim New York Times News Service

TRIPOLI, Libya — U.S. and European bombs battered Moammar Gadhafi’s most important bastion of support in his tribal homeland of Surt on Sunday night, as rebels seeking his ouster capitalized on the damage from the Western airstrikes to erase their recent losses and return to the city’s doorstep. Their swift return, recapturing two oil refineries and a strategic port within 20 hours, set the stage for a battle in Surt that both sides say could help decide the war for Libya. The ease of the rebel march west along the coast underscored the essential role of Western airstrikes, now focused mainly on Gadhafi’s ground troops, in reversing the rebels’ fortunes. But it also framed anew the question of how the poorly equipped and disorganized rebel forces might fare against Gadhafi’s garrison

GERMANY

Merkel suffers setback as her party falls in state election By Henry Chu Los Angeles Times

LONDON — German Chancellor Angela Merkel was dealt a humiliating defeat Sunday when voters booted her party from power in a state election that could bode ill for her leadership on the national stage. Merkel’s Christian Democrats had governed the affluent southwestern state of Baden-Wuerttemberg without interruption for nearly 60 years. But anger over her government’s policy on nuGerman Chan- clear power cellor Angela and an ineffecMerkel tive campaign by the local party led voters to deprive conservatives of enough seats to form another ruling coalition in the state assembly, according to projected vote tallies Sunday evening. Instead, the Green Party is poised to capture its first governorship in Germany. Although the Greens received a smaller share of the vote than the Christian Democrats, the environmental party performed best of the left-leaning groups and holds the strongest claim to head the new government. “We have secured what amounts to a historic electoral victory,” Winfried Kretschmann, the Greens’ leader in the state, told party members in Stuttgart, the state capital. The outgoing governor, Stefan Mappus, who critics said ran an unfocused campaign and made gaffes, conceded defeat. It was particularly bitter because only a few weeks ago, polls showed that the Christian Democrats stood a fair chance of holding on to power, though barely.

in Surt, where air cover may be less useful than it was along the open coastal road. As Western warplanes again bombed sites around Tripoli and other Gadhafi strongholds on the ninth day of airstrikes, NATO agreed at a meeting in Brussels to take over the mission. The decision effectively relieved the United States of leading the fight, and ended a week of squabbling among the allies over the issue. After clashes with government forces overnight near the town of Al Uqaylah, rebel fighters met little resistance on Sunday as they pushed from the city of Ajdabiya past the oil towns of Brega and Ras Lanuf, recapturing two important refineries. By the evening, they had pushed the front line west of Bin Jawwad, according to fighters returning from the front. “There wasn’t resistance,” said Faraj Sheydani, 42. “There was no one in front of us. There’s no fighting.”

Gates, Clinton unite to defend U.S. intervention Defense Secretary Robert Gates acknowledged Sunday that the unrest in Libya did not pose an immediate threat to the U.S. Even so, he and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said the Obama administration was justified in taking military action to avert a massacre there. Clinton and Gates’ unified message laid the groundwork for a speech to the nation by Obama tonight, as the administration tries to answer critics who say that the president has failed to explain the scope and objective of the mission. — New York Times News Service

W  B

Syria tries to ease deep political crisis

Israel deploys new anti-rocket system

CAIRO — The Syrian government tried to ease a grave political crisis on Sunday by blaming armed gangs for killing 12 people in the northwestern port city of Latakia in previous days and promising to soon lift a draconian emergency law that allows the government to arrest and detain people without charges. Despite an announcement that the president, Bashar Assad, would address the nation Sunday night, he stayed out of sight, as he has during more than a week of unrest that is threatening his presidency. At least 61 people have died during crackdowns on protesters in several cities.

BEERSHEBA, Israel — The Israeli military deployed the first mobile battery of a new anti-rocket missile defense system on Sunday on a dusty rise at the outskirts of Beersheba after a week of heightened tensions between Israel and Gaza. Military officials said the deployment was accelerated because of the recent escalation in rocket and mortar fire by Gaza militants against southern Israel and Israeli airstrikes on Gaza, which have led to fears of an all-out confrontation. But Israeli officials warned that the system, known as Iron Dome, was still experimental and could not provide the country with full protection from incoming rockets.

Taliban kidnap dozens Leftist ex-soldier rises in Afghanistan in Peru election poll KABUL, Afghanistan — Insurgents kidnapped 40 men in an ambush in the northeastern province of Kunar on Saturday, Afghan officials said. And a suicide bomber killed 13 people and wounded 56 others in the eastern province of Paktika on Sunday, according to initial NATO reports, although the toll was still being assessed. The Taliban claimed credit for both episodes, asserting they had captured 50 police officers. But Gen. Shams-ul-Rahman Zahid, the police chief of Nuristan province, where the men were from, said the group was made up of “youths” who wanted to become police officers but had not yet been accepted.

LIMA, Peru — A left-leaning former army officer has risen quickly into contention for Peru’s presidency ahead of the first-round vote on April 10, according to a poll released Sunday. Ollanta Humala, who lost the 2006 election to President Alan Garcia, was favored by 21.2 percent of those polled across the country on March 2124. That was up from 15.7 percent a week before in the CPI poll sponsored by RPP radio. Humala favors a stronger state role in the economy, advocates renegotiating free trade agreements and has spooked investors by calling for taxing profits in the mining sector. — From wire reports

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

DA Continued from A1 Flaherty fired five deputy district attorneys when he took office on Jan. 3. Foster, Duong and Vaughan believe that Flaherty fired them at least in part because they were members of the union, according to the draft complaint. They also allege sex discrimination played a role in their firings. With respect to Foster and Vaughan, the complaint argues that three out of the four union members fired were women. Duong, who has said Flaherty initially told him he would retain his job, was allegedly fired because “the termination of Duong’s employment was part of an effort by defendant to distract from the fact that only women (deputy district attorneys) were being terminated,” according to the complaint. The complaint also describes how the prosecutors’ employment became an issue during Flaherty’s spring 2010 campaign, and how Flaherty allegedly became engaged in personnel matters at the District Attorney’s office before he was sworn in. A couple of weeks before the May election, in which Flaherty defeated longtime District Attorney Mike Dugan, Flaherty wrote a lengthy post on his Facebook campaign site, titled “Fear Mongering.” Flaherty wrote that he’d heard a rumor that prosecutors were wearing Dugan campaign buttons because they feared that if Flaherty was elected, he would fire them, according to a copy of the post included with the complaint. “Initially, upon hearing this, I laughed as it made no sense — why would I hamper the functioning of the office?” Flaherty wrote. “Wouldn’t that be the dumbest thing I could do? And why would I think I knew who was functioning well and who wasn’t if I didn’t give all the employees an opportunity to shine under new and competent leadership?”

However, Flaherty e-mailed the deputy district attorneys in October and instructed those who wished to keep their jobs to reapply for them. This was against county policy, which requires all job openings to be published, according to the complaint. Yet Dugan encouraged prosecutors in his office to comply with Flaherty’s e-mail so Flaherty would not have an automatic reason for firing them. Nonetheless, Dugan wrote in an e-mail that Flaherty’s request “was NOT approved by County Personnel department.” At the same time the deputy district attorneys were reapplying for their jobs, Vaughan was prosecuting a rape case in which the defense attorney was Flaherty’s wife, Valerie Wright. “Vaughan feared that if she continued to represent the DA’s office with the vigorous advocacy that she had successfully utilized over the past 22 years, it could jeopardize her re-employment,” according to the complaint. Vaughan sought the advice of the Oregon Bar Association, and the incident ultimately led Dugan to ask the Oregon Department of Justice to take over the prosecution of all cases being handled by Flaherty’s law firm. Vaughan and Foster’s attorney, Andrew Altschul, could be reached only by e-mail on Friday, and he declined to discuss what his clients hope to achieve through mediation. Calls to Flaherty’s office and cellphone were not returned on Friday afternoon.

County considers hiring attorneys Ethics rules bar the county’s own attorneys from representing officials in this matter, since county attorneys could be called as witnesses regarding the county’s dealings with the deputy district attorneys union, of which the fired prosecutors were members, said Deputy County Administrator Erik Kropp. And the draft of

Sexting Continued from A1 But adults face a hard truth. For teenagers, who have ready access to technology and are growing up in a culture that celebrates body flaunting, sexting is laughably easy, unremarkable and even compelling: The primary reason teenagers sext is to look cool and sexy to someone they find attractive. Indeed, the photos can confer cachet. “Having a naked picture of your significant other on your cellphone is an advertisement that you’re sexually active to a degree that gives you status,” said Rick Peters, a senior deputy prosecuting attorney for Thurston County, which includes Lacey. “It’s an electronic hickey.” In the fall of 2009, Margarite was living with her father, and her life was becoming troubled. Her relationship with her father’s new wife was tense. Her grades were in a free fall. That December, just before the holidays, she took the photo of herself and sent it to Isaiah, a low-key, likable athlete she had recently gotten to know. One night in late January, Margarite’s cellphone began vibrating around 1 a.m., waking her. She was being bombarded by texts — alerts from worried friends, leers from boys she scarcely knew. The next morning in her mother’s car, Margarite lowered her head, hiding her reddened eyes, her terrible secret. Her mother already knew what it was. Earlier that morning, a parent had phoned Kirsten Rae, the principal of Margarite’s school, Chinook Middle, complaining about

Scrushy Continued from A1 It took place in the estate’s spacious barn, and in some ways it was like any yard sale, with handwritten signs on poster board and shelves full of knickknacks of debatable taste or utility. And as at any good yard sale, no one was a stranger, given that Birmingham is in many ways something of a small town and Scrushy at one time the biggest person in it. One shopper said he had worked with one of Scrushy’s childhood friends, another said she was a friend of a former family baby sitter. “I respect Richard,” said Syble Marshall, who runs a day care center in town, setting up a particularly Southern kind of velvet barb. “He was an intelligent crook.” HealthSouth was founded by Scrushy and a few friends, going on to become the nation’s largest

the prosecutors’ complaint suggests they intend to sue the commissioners individually, so county staff are searching for attorneys to represent each of the three current county commissioners, and potentially a former commissioner. If Deschutes County’s legal costs surpass $1 million, the county’s excess liability insurance policy will kick in and cover up to $10 million, Kropp said. However, the county has to pay the first $1 million, and that would come from an approximately $2 million reserve fund used to pay for lawsuits and workers compensation.

Legal costs Any legal costs that draw down this reserve fund could cut into the budgets of county departments, some of which have already laid off staff in recent years. That’s because the county has to keep this fund at a level recommended each year by an actuary. If the fund dips below the recommended amount, county departments have to pay to replenish the fund, Kropp said. Regarding whether the county will go into mediation with Flaherty and the prosecutors he fired, “we haven’t made that decision yet,” Kropp said. County officials have not discussed the mediation request with Flaherty, Kropp said. As for Flaherty’s defense, state employees, including district attorneys, can request legal representation from the Department of Justice “if a complaint refers to conduct that occurred while someone was in office,” said Kate Medema, acting spokesperson for the department. “It would have to relate to them acting in their official capacity.” However, Medema said she did not know whether the department would defend actions Flaherty took — such as allegedly preparing to fire deputy district attorneys — before he was sworn into office on Jan. 3. Last week, Flaherty and the county resolved a legal dispute for

Elizabeth Colon, left, and Jon Reid, eighth-graders at Chinook Middle School, teach a session on “sexting” to their classmates in Lacey, Wash. Stuart Isett New York Times News Service

a naked photo sent to her child. The child knew at least a dozen students who had received it. The principal then called Antoinette. The police wanted to question Margarite. Students were summoned to Rae’s office and questioned by the police. Their cellphones were confiscated. After school was let out that day in late January, the police read Isaiah his rights, cuffed his hands behind his back and led him and Margarite’s former friend out of the building. The eighth-graders would have to spend the night in the county juvenile detention center. The two of them and a 13-yearold girl who had helped forward the photo were arraigned before a judge the next day.

Sexting is not illegal. Two adults sending each other naughty pictures, dirty language? Just garden-variety First Amendment-protected speech. But when that sexually explicit image includes a participant — subject, photographer, distributor or recipient — who is under

18, child pornography laws may apply. “I didn’t know it was against the law,” Isaiah said. That is because culturally, such a fine distinction eludes most teenagers. Their world is steeped in highly sexualized messages. Extreme pornography is easily available on the Internet. Hit songs and music videos promote stripping and sexting. A December 2009 telephone poll from the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project found that 5 percent of 14- to 17-year-olds had sent naked or nearly naked photos or video by cellphone, and that 18 percent had received them. Boys and girls send photos in roughly the same proportion, the survey found. “The majority of states are trying to put something in place to educate kids before and after the event,” said Justin Fitzsimmons, a senior attorney at the National District Attorneys Association who specializes in Internet crimes against children. “We have to protect kids from themselves sometimes. We’re on the cusp of teaching them how to manage their electronic reputations.”

provider of inpatient rehabilitative services. It is still in business here in Birmingham, and though it has sold off many of Scrushy’s acquisitions, the company is profitable, having survived a very bad decade and the arrest of many of its executives. As his wealth and profile grew, Scrushy cut a complicated figure, a short-fused dynamo as extravagant in his personal tastes and pursuits — including recording albums with his own country music band, Dallas County Line — as he was in his philanthropy. But local opinion of him turned steadily less mixed over the past decade as his company’s stock tanked and he was sued by his shareholders and then accused by the Securities and Exchange Commission and federal prosecutors of overseeing an accounting fraud that ran into the billions. He was acquitted of criminal charges in a 2005 trial. But two years later, he was convicted on

unrelated bribery charges for arranging $500,000 in donations to Alabama’s former governor, Don Siegelman, in exchange for a seat on a state board. Scrushy, 58, is currently serving a seven-year sentence in Beaumont, Texas Then, in 2009, a judge presiding over a suit brought by HealthSouth shareholders found that Scrushy had actively participated in the systematic reporting of false profits. He ordered Scrushy, who estimated his net worth in 2003 at $300 million, to pay $2.87 billion to HealthSouth in damages for the accounting fraud. Since then, it has become a matter of collecting it. “We got a $2.9 billion judgment, and our job is to satisfy that judgment,” said John Somerville, who represents the lead shareholder in the suit. “Part of our job is to seize assets and sell those, and that can include the $5 million lake house and that can include the $3 dollar lampshade.”

Drawing the line

which the legal bills have not yet been tallied. In late February, Flaherty convened a grand jury to investigate whether Deschutes County legal counsel intentionally released personal information contained in a number of job applications requested by The Bulletin. The applications were those of nine new hires in Flaherty’s office, and they included telephone numbers and some employees’ driver’s license numbers, but not Social Security numbers. Flaherty called off the grand jury after Mark Pilliod, county legal counsel, agreed to issue a mea culpa and pay the county about $100 for costs related to the subpoena served on another county attorney. Pilliod wrote that he regretted his decision to release “confidential and private information,” though neither Pilliod nor Flaherty would say exactly what that was, and Flaherty would not say whether the grand jury identified any criminal activity. County staff spent more than 80 hours pulling records for the grand jury and copied 1,777 pages of documents, according to previous reports. Meanwhile, county officials hired former attorney general and University of Oregon President Dave Frohnmayer to advise them on the grand jury investigation. Frohnmayer’s hourly rate is $550, and the hourly rate of attorney William Gary, who was also hired to work on the case, is $460, according to a letter from Frohnmayer to the county. In addition, county officials decided to pay for a defense attorney retained by Pilliod during the grand jury investigation, Kropp wrote in an e-mail. Officials believed that Pilliod was the target of the investigation. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Penalties, prevention Peters never intended for the Chinook Middle School students to receive draconian sentences. But he wanted to send a scaredstraight message to them, as well as to the community. Eventually a deal was brokered for the teens. The offense would be amended to a gross misdemeanor of telephone harassment. Isaiah and the two girls who had initially forwarded Margarite’s photo would be eligible for a community service program that would keep them out of court, and the case could be dismissed. Those three students would have to create public service material about the hazards of sexting, attend a session with Margarite to talk about what happened and otherwise have no contact with her. After Margarite and her mother approved the conditions, Peters signed off, pleased. In October, separate forums about sexting were held for Lacey’s teachers, parents and student delegations from the four middle schools. Elizabeth Colon taught a session with Jon Reid. Both are eighth-graders at Chinook. “Most of the questions were about penalties,” Colon said. “Kids wanted to know if they would get into trouble just for receiving the picture.”

Parking Continued from A1 Seeing this frustrates Budd, not only because of his affiliation with COCA, but because he has lived with someone who needs a wheelchair to get around. His ex-wife was permanently disabled after a severe car accident in 1992 damaged her spine. When a person in a wheelchair encounters a vehicle parked on the sidewalk, he or she often has to roll into the street or find another route entirely, says Budd. “It’s not safe,” Budd said about those who treat sidewalks as parking spaces. “They don’t get it. They flat don’t get it.” In response to Budd’s concerns, the Bend Police Department in the past two weeks has issued three citations and six warnings, many of them on Irving Street.

A low priority Police typically will respond to complaints like Budd’s, says Community Liaison Officer Steve Esselstyn. But parking enforcement is not high on his department’s agenda unless someone is stopped in front of a fire hydrant or in a crosswalk. He said calls to the police are ranked as they come in, with imminent threats to life and property topping that list, followed by in-progress crimes, then possible criminal acts that have already occurred. Sitting at the bottom of that list are what he calls “quality of life problems,” which is where illegal parking tends to fall. “We have enough problems to worry about other than parking issues,” Esselstyn said. “Everything is set to a priority. A barking dog is not as important as a domestic (violence call), a theft or a burglary.” Between Jan. 1, 2010, and March 15 of this year, Bend Police officers issued 15 parking citations. Of those, four were issued in the section of downtown Bend where the city already contracts with a private company to handle parking enforcement. Police department volunteers, on the other hand, issued 1,089 parking citations and 993 warnings in all of 2010. Most of those tickets are issued to people who park in handicap parking spaces, according to the police department.

Coal Continued from A1 If coal is so dirty that Washington shouldn’t use it, should the state be a conduit for shipping it overseas? The debate is complicated by what’s happening across the Pacific. China has committed to cleaning up its energy. It is developing wind, solar and geothermal technology, and is mandating strict pollution controls on power plants. But nearly 70 percent of its power comes from coal, and that won’t change soon. China

Citation or award? Derek Canaday has received a warning from the police for his parking habits. He works at Fireside at the corner of Third Street and DeKalb, and routinely parks his truck with two wheels on the sidewalk. He said one of his co-workers received a ticket for the same thing. “I was just doing it to be nice, and someone complained about it,” Canaday said. “It’s a skinny road for me, and we have big semis that come through here and we have to unload them.” When he does it, he says his wheels only take up about a foot of the sidewalk, which a co-worker measured to be about 5.5 feet wide. With that kind of room, he said, anyone could pass by, even someone in a wheelchair. Canaday’s boss, Fireside owner Roger Sanders, feels the same way and doesn’t understand what the big deal is. In fact, he says he and his employees should receive an “award” for making DeKalb more accessible. “Parking on the curbs improves access on narrow streets,” he said. “It eliminates a huge amount of congestion that occurs.” For Sanders, parking on DeKalb comes down to frequency of use. In the 23 years his business has been located there, he said the number of disabled people he’s seen using the DeKalb Street sidewalks is “so close to zero that it’s zero.” “The real issue here is usage rate,” Sanders said. “There’s thousands and thousands of cars on this road.” But Vern Budd doesn’t plan to stop taking pictures anytime soon. As a former Army man, he likens illegal parking to someone not taking his hat off when he sits down at the dinner table. It’s rude, and to him it’s a pet peeve. “If somebody is being considerate of the people who are disabled, you park like you’re supposed to park so they can get around and not have to suffer,” Budd said. “It’s only being respectful to people with disabilities. Whether they’re blind or in a wheelchair, they’re people, too.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

has built or has plans to build more new coal-burning capacity than currently exists in the entire United States. Some experts suggest that instead of fighting, the U.S. should accept coal’s growth as unavoidable — and focus more resources and research on cleaning its emissions. “It’s a paradox,” said Charles Ebinger, director of the Brookings Institution’s energy policy initiative. “The Chinese are really moving vigorously on green technology, but Asia is growing so fast that demand for energy of all forms is going through the roof.”

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A6 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Inside

OREGON In forest battle, pilot projects seek middle ground, see Page B3. OBITUARIES Harry Coover, inventor of Super Glue, dies, see Page B5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MARCH 28, 2011

Best

of the

blog Excerpts of last week’s posts to Politics & Policy, The Bulletin’s Salem weblog on state government.

Extending benefits for jobless Oregonians • Posted Thursday by Lauren Dake For thousands of out-of-work Oregonians who are fearing the end of unemployment benefits, there was some good news out of Salem last week. Gov. John Kitzhaber signed two bills, SB 637 and SB 638, that would extend unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks. “Although we are on the path to economic recovery, there are thousands of Oregonians who are still struggling,” Kitzhaber said in a statement. “Extending unemployment benefits is a lifeline to people in need right now.”

Bend resident backs accessibility push • Posted Thursday by Nick Budnick A familiar name to Bend residents was in Salem recently to push not one but two issues as a volunteer. Linda Crossman, a former city of Bend accessibility manager, went to Salem to testify on a bill introduced by Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Sunriver. HB 3361 would ensure that disabled people have access to clustered mailboxes like those you see in office and apartment buildings. On March 18, Crossman described the situation as one of the loopholes in the Americans with Disabilities Act. She described her experiences in Bend and supplied anecdotes about disabled people in Bend who can’t access their mail. Instead, they have to rely on the good will and availability of others to provide that mail. “The importance of this legislation is that someone takes responsibility” for ensuring access, she said. ... The bill is not retroactive and would apply only to new construction. On March 17, Crossman also participated in a day of lobbying backed by AARP to support needed social services for seniors and people with disabilities. Cutting the programs, as Gov. John Kitzhaber has proposed, would have a “huge effect,” she said.

Reading tea leaves at local town hall • Posted Friday by Nick Budnick Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Sunriver, and Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, pictured above, spoke at a town hall meeting Friday that got testy. Some of the more interesting tidbits came not during the tense debate that dominated the meeting, but in some of the remarks the two lawmakers made early on. Telfer and Whisnant praised the bipartisan way in which the Legislature is pursuing redistricting, which will redraw the lines of congressional and legislative districts. However, both predicted that lawsuits are inevitable, no matter how bipartisan the final map. Not only that, but Whisnant said he’s been told his push to allow for land use planning to be taken away from the state and given to regional authorities may have legs; he said a bill authorizing a pilot project in the Medford area is likely to pass.

Watch for more blog updates at www .bendbulletin.com /politicsblog.

SISTERS

La Pine gets city hall By Leon Pantenburg The Bulletin

LA PINE — For years, La Pine had an image problem. For the longest time, a common question was: “Where, exactly, is La Pine?” A sprawling collection of houses and subdivisions spread throughout south county, La Pine had no city limits, and its population was something of a mystery. But that all changed when La Pine incorporated four years ago. Now, Oregon’s newest city, population 1,585, with an area of approximately 6 square miles, has a new city hall. The

city signed a deal to purchase La Pine’s first city hall at the beginning of February. On Friday, La Pine Mayor Ken Mulenex signed the final title transfer document for the building and picked up the key to the front door. The building, located at the intersection of U.S. Highway 97 and Sixth Street, is about 100 yards from offices the city government currently rents from Deschutes County. Previously occupied by RE/MAX Summit Realty, most of the building has been vacant for almost a year except for a small financial

Leon Pantenburg / For The Bulletin

“The city hall will represent the heart and soul of what La Pine is,” Mayor Ken Mulenex said of the building at U.S. Highway 97 and Sixth Street. “It’s another proud feather in our community’s cap.” adviser’s office. It was forfeited to Liberty Bank — since closed by regulators and reopened as Home Federal Bank — by its original owners in 2009. The city paid $330,000 for

the building, said City Manager Rick Allen, and another $170,000 or so will be used to remodel the interior and cover financing costs. See La Pine / B2

Harnessing the power of a river Dozens of whitewater paddlers brave freezing temperatures to compete on the Deschutes

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Jim and Jan Bollermann paddle toward the next gate in an open canoe during Sunday’s Riverhouse Rendezvous Slalom on the Deschutes River in Bend. The Bollermanns built the boat in which they raced.

Canal project sparks lawsuits By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

A Central Oregon irrigation district’s canal-piping project met some stiff opposition last year, culminating in a protest in which at least one person tried to halt progress by lying down in front of excavation equipment. The pipe has since been buried, but the controversy has not. The project has generated a pair of lawsuits seeking more than $5 million combined. One suit targets the irrigation district manager, and the other focuses on the district, several employees, the Deschutes County sheriff and a sheriff’s deputy. Last spring, Three Sisters Irrigation District was replacing about 12.5 miles of its open canal with a buried pipe down McKenzie Canyon outside Sisters. The route went through Jan Daggett’s property. The irrigation district said it had a right-of-way for the stretch of the canal route; Daggett said no easement existed. In early April, she and neighbors parked vehicles in the canal to block construction equipment, and sheriff’s deputies were called to the scene. The clash continued on April 5, when protesters took pictures and blocked the path of the machinery. Marc Thalacker, manager of the Three Sisters Irrigation District, initiated a citizen’s arrest of protesters Timothy Stroud and Susan Brown, who were taken by Sheriff’s Office deputies and booked at the county jail. Stroud and Brown were issued citations for criminal mischief, disorderly conduct and criminal trespass, according to court documents. See Lawsuit / B5

Warm weather ahead, but it likely won’t last By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Jure Poberja fights his way upriver to clear a gate while competing in the Riverhouse Rendezvous Slalom on Sunday. Competitors had to pass through green gates while paddling downstream, and red gates going upstream.

By Hillary Borrud • The Bulletin

S

now was falling steadily in Bend on Sunday morning, and the temperature was near freezing. Yet the slalom race that drew dozens of competitors from across Oregon and even Canada took place on the Deschutes River, not the slopes of Mount Bachelor.

Kayakers and canoeists braved the cold water for the third annual Riverhouse Rendezvous Slalom, organized by the League of Northwest Whitewater Racers. “The whole goal is fun and whitewater participation,” said Jennie Goldberg, the league’s director. Sunday’s race was the second of nine events the league will hold this year, and racers earn points each time they participate. Jim Bollermann, a 70-year-old from Bull Run, has been competing in the whitewater races for a decade, along with his wife, Jan Bollermann, 72. The Bollermanns compete in an open canoe, which put them in a category of their own on Sunday, as they were the only open canoe racers. They built the boat in which they raced. “It’s addictive, and we’re addicted to it,” Jim Bollermann said. “It’s a sport we can share.” Bollermann called the sport fun and challenging, without much danger, since someone is always standing by to pull overturned competitors out of the water. Bert Hinkley, of Bend, the organizer and announcer for the Riverhouse Rendezvous Slalom, said participants were “crazy people who put up gates and paddle through really cold water.” See Whitewater / B6

Spectators gather on a bridge over the Deschutes River in Bend to watch paddlers race on Sunday. Dozens braved near-freezing temperatures for the whitewater competition. Gates were hung from wires suspended across the river.

Central Oregon is forecast to get a spring mix of slightly warmer temperatures and offand-on precipitation this week. No major storms are forecast, said Ann Adams, an assistant forecaster for the National Weather Service in Pendleton. Daytime temperatures in the tricounty region could reach into the 60s on Thursday, but the warmer weather could be fleeting. “Wednesday and Thursday there’s a break, so there’s no precipitation mentioned there,” Adams said Sunday night. The precipitation that does pass through the region is expected to be relatively mild, with no storms “to bring in a big batch of rain or snow,” Adams said. Bend still has a couple more days of cold daytime temperatures and intermittent precipitation, before the weather will warm up later in the week. Sunny skies are expected today, with a daytime high near 45 degrees, according to the National Weather Service website. Overnight, temperatures are expected to hover around freezing, and there is a chance of snow. Tuesday will bring much the same temperatures, with a possible rain and snow mix during the day. Then on Wednesday, the forecast is for partly sunny weather and a high near 56. Thursday is expected to be even warmer, with a high near 63, and then daytime temperatures will likely drop back into the 50s. Overnight low temperatures will remain in the 30s, according to the National Weather Service. See Weather / B6


B2 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

CRESCENT CITY CLEANS UP FROM TSUNAMI

L B  Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Man held on burglary charge after chase

Rick Postal / Daily Triplicate

A barge with a heavy-lift crane hoists a boat out of the Crescent City Harbor on Saturday. The boat, Stormy, was built in Bay City in 1940. Sixteen boats sunk during the tsunami that began in Japan and later devastated Crescent City’s harbor on March 11. The crane has eight more boats to raise and will continue the operation as weather permits.

Police who responded to a burglar alarm at a southeast Bend restaurant Saturday night ended up chasing a suspect on foot and arresting him. Daniel Benjamin Silvis, 33, was allegedly fleeing from the scene, when Bend police responded to the alarm at Sargent’s Cafe at approximately 11:30 p.m. Saturday, according to a news release from the Bend Police Department. The front door of the restaurant had been smashed, and someone had caused more damage while looking for items of value, but no cash was in the restaurant at the time. After a brief foot chase, police arrested Silvis on charges of second degree burglary, second degree criminal mischief, interfering with a po-

lice officer, resisting arrest and a warrant for a parole violation in Multnomah County, according to the police. Silvis complained of pain, so officers took him to St. Charles Bend. Silvis was then lodged at the Deschutes County jail.

ATV rider rescued A 56-year-old Albany woman was found early Sunday morning by Deschutes County sheriff’s deputies and a search and rescue team after she became lost while riding an ATV near Spencer Wells Road in the eastern area of the county. Jan May, 56, was camping with friends and family on Saturday, when she left at approximately 5

L.A. teachers brace for layoffs By Connie Llanos Los Angeles Daily News

La Pine Continued from B1 The building costs will be financed through a program run by the League of Oregon Cities that issues tax-exempt bonds to pay for small public projects around the state, says Mulenex. “We got the financing at a very advantageous rate of about 5.38 percent,” Mulenex said. “The building won’t cost the citizens any money, and it won’t raise taxes.” While the price tag may seem high, Mulenex claims new construction of a similar government building would have cost at least twice as much. Allen said in a previous Bulletin story that the city will occupy about 3,800 of the building’s 4,800 square feet initially and will continue to collect rent from the financial adviser’s office occupying the remainder. About half of the city’s space would serve as offices for city employees, while the other half would be converted into a 49seat conference room for council meetings and other public business. “Our current facility is almost nonfunctional,” Mulenex said. “We have to schedule meetings far in advance, and we can’t guarantee that we can get a conference room.”

Leon Pantenburg / For The Bulletin

La Pine Mayor Ken Mulenex stands in the city’s new city hall. For the past four years, the city’s offices have been two large rooms rented from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. The offices the city has occupied since incorporating in 2006 consist of two similarly sized rooms. The city’s two full-time employees, Allen and administrative assistant Patti Morgan, work side by side in one room, which also houses city records. When meetings with widespread community interest oc-

cur, Mulenex said, they have to be held at other locations with sufficient seating. Mulenex said the city’s current facilities are also inadequate for the city’s plans to expand services. The city is in the process of taking over the La Pine water and sewer districts, and in the future may handle planning and development duties that are currently contracted to Deschutes County. Once the city takes over the sewer and water districts, bill

collection and other administrative functions related to the utilities will shift to the new city hall, Allen said, while the districts’ current facility would become a city public works department. City council members see the new, remodeled city hall as a step toward making the La Pine area more attractive to tourists, visitors and new businesses. “Our city hall is an important part of attracting businesses,” said Dan Varco, president of the La Pine Chamber of Commerce and La Pine city councilor. “First impressions are important, and if the town appears to be doing well, businesses and companies will have more confidence in investing in this community. “It’s all part of an image thing for this community,” Varco continued. “We have a lot of highly educated and motivated people, and they are committed to making La Pine a better city.” Mulenex sees the new city hall as a positive symbol of the new city. “This new city hall will be the greatest thing that can happen to this community,” he said. “The city hall will represent the heart and soul of what La Pine is. It’s another proud feather in our community’s cap.”

p.m. to ride by herself, according to a news release from the Sheriff’s Office. By 9 p.m., May had not returned and her friends and family could not find her, so they called the Sheriff’s Office. Search and rescue members began searching the area for May using ATVs and other vehicles. At approximately 1 a.m., they found May about 2 miles from her camp, according to the news release. May was cold, but did not need medical attention. However, she did not have food, water or her cellphone. The Sheriff’s Office wants to remind the public to take adequate food, water, clothing, a first-aid kit and a fully charged cellphone with them when recreating.

LOS ANGELES — Manny Banuelos is known for his ability to motivate kids — both in his fourth-grade classroom at Fullbright Elementary and on the neighborhood baseball diamond, where he volunteers as a Little League coach. Jolene Kuebler is beloved by students and colleagues, who marvel at the stamina that allows her to teach health classes, coach drill team and lead the school band at Cleveland High School. Despite their success, the two San Fernando Valley teachers are among 5,200 educators who have received layoff notices from the financially troubled Los Angeles Unified School District. With just seven years each in the classHospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

room, they’re unlikely to beat the state-mandated system of using seniority to determine who gets to stay and who must go. “This upsets me because I’m a good teacher ... I work hard,” Kuebler said, breaking down in tears. “What I’m really concerned about is my kids ... In the long run, it’s the kids that will lose out.” Facing a $408 million deficit for the fiscal year that starts July 1, the district has notified 7,300 employees that they could be terminated — administrators, support staff and the certificated educators. A report obtained by the Los Angeles Daily News shows that roughly two-thirds of the district’s 952 schools would be affected by teacher layoffs when classes start in the fall. Self Referrals Welcome

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Leon Pantenburg can be reached at 541-382-1811 or at survivalsenselp@gmail.com.

Dwight D. Eisenhower dies at age 78 in 1969 The Associated Press Today is Monday, March 28, the 87th day of 2011. There are 278 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On March 28, 1979, America’s worst commercial nuclear accident occurred inside the Unit 2 reactor at the Three Mile Island plant near Middletown, Pa. ON THIS DATE In 1834, the U.S. Senate voted to censure President Andrew Jackson for the removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States. In 1854, during the Crimean War, Britain and France declared war on Russia. In 1898, the Supreme Court, in United States v. Wong Kim Ark, ruled that a child born in the United States to Chinese immigrants was a U.S. citizen. In 1930, the names of the Turkish cities of Constantinople and Angora were changed to Istanbul and Ankara. In 1935, the notorious Nazi

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y propaganda film “Triumph des Willens” (Triumph of the Will), directed by Leni Riefenstahl, premiered in Berlin with Adolf Hitler present. In 1939, the Spanish Civil War effectively ended as Madrid fell to the forces of Francisco Franco. In 1941, novelist and critic Virginia Woolf, 59, drowned herself near her home in Lewes, East Sussex, England. In 1942, during World War II, British naval forces raided the Nazi-occupied French port of St. Nazaire in Operation Chariot. In 1969, the 34th president of the United States, Dwight D. Eisenhower, died in Washington, D.C., at age 78. In 1978, in Stump v. Sparkman, the U.S. Supreme Court voted 5-3 to uphold the judicial immunity of an Indiana judge against a lawsuit brought by a young woman who’d been ordered sterilized by the judge when she was a teenager.

TEN YEARS AGO The authors of a book on the Oklahoma City bombing revealed that during prison interviews, Timothy McVeigh had shown no remorse for what happened, and called the 19 children who died on April 19, 1995, “collateral damage.” FIVE YEARS AGO President George W. Bush replaced longtime chief of staff Andy Card with budget director Joshua Bolten. More than 1 million people poured into streets across France and strikers disrupted air, rail and bus travel in the largest nationwide protest over a youth labor law. ONE YEAR AGO President Barack Obama secretly visited Afghanistan near the front lines of the increasingly bloody 8-year-old war he was expanding. Actress-writer June Havoc, 97, died in Stamford, Conn.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Country singer Reba McEntire is 56. Rapper Salt (Salt-N-Pepa) is 45. Movie director Brett Ratner is 42. Country singer Rodney Atkins is 42. Actor Vince Vaughn is 41. Actress Julia Stiles is 30. Singer Lady Gaga is 25. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Those who say they give the public what it wants begin by underestimating public taste and end by debauching it.” — T.S. Eliot, American-Anglo poet and critic (1888-1965)

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 28, 2011 B3

O In forest logjam, projects Coalition seeking seek the middle ground tribal recognition The Associated Press By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

RUCH — On a steep ridge covered with Douglas fir, ponderosa pine and oak so thick the falling snow could hardly make its way to the ground, two grizzled veterans of the spotted owl wars were tying green plastic flagging around big old trees so they would not be cut down when timber fallers come to make a reality out of their principles for breaking the logjam over managing the nation’s forests. Forestry professors Jerry Franklin of the University of Washington and Norm Johnson of Oregon State University were two of the authors of the Northwest Forest Plan. It divided national forests in Washington, Oregon and California into two landscapes — one for timber and one for the spotted owl, salmon and other fish and wildlife — to settle lawsuits brought by conservation groups. Their plan didn’t work out as they hoped, and after nearly 30 years of nonstop court and political battles, the Obama administration is hoping Franklin and Johnson can show federal agencies a new path forward. This path would make good on the elusive promise that federal forests nationwide can produce timber that creates jobs in struggling rural timber towns, and habitat for fish and wildlife on the brink of extinction — all without going up in smoke every summer. “If everything works out, this will become the basis for a whole new vision, a whole new strategy for management of the federal forests,” Franklin said. “This is sort of a seed we’re planting. If the ground is fertile — the stakeholders feel this is consistent with what they want — it will grow into a completely different approach. We’ll manage these lands for both ecological and economic benefits. We’ll integrate those goals rather than trying to separate them.”

Tough obstacles Federal forests are managed under a principle called multiple use, providing timber for jobs, habitat for wildlife, forests for recreation and sources for clean water. Timber production paid the bills and called the tune until the 1990s, when conservation groups sued to force protection of habitat for the northern spotted owl and salmon in Washington, Oregon and Northern California. The Northwest Forest Plan allowed logging to resume. The plan created old-growth reserves protecting habitat and other lands designated for logging. Timber production was cut by about 80 percent of the harvests of the 1980s. The logging cut-

Jeff Barnard / The Associated Press

U.S. Bureau of Land Management forester Craig Brown uses an inclinometer to check the slope of a planned road on a pilot logging project outside Ruch. The project is intended to demonstrate that logging can restore healthy forests while providing both timber and habitat for endangered species. backs spread through the entire national forest system. The Bush administration tried to scrap the plan to allow more logging, but was repeatedly overturned by the courts. Its last-ditch effort to increase logging on BLM lands in Western Oregon was withdrawn by the Obama administration as legally indefensible. Automation, logging cutbacks on federal lands, foreign imports and the collapse of the housing industry have left the timber industry a shadow of what it was in the 1980s, but rural communities still hold out hope it will come back. Besides timber jobs, federal forests share timber revenues with counties where the timber is cut. Those revenues have plummeted with the declining harvest, and federal safety net funding runs out this year. For the past 25 years, private lands have filled the timber gap, but now China’s booming economy is renewing interest in federal forests. Meanwhile, wildfires have become a perennial problem, increasing pressure to thin out dense forests.

3 new pilot projects Hoping to find a way out of this logjam, Oregon Democrats Rep. Peter DeFazio and Sen. Jeff Merkley brought Interior Secretary Ken Salazar to Oregon last October. He backed three pilot projects on U.S. Bureau of Land Management forests in Western Oregon. One is in the dry forests of the Siskiyou Mountains outside Medford, a second in the wet forests of the Cascade Range

outside Roseburg, and a third in the even wetter Coast Range outside Coquille. The Medford District project targets about 5,000 acres in an 80,000-acre watershed in the Applegate Valley. All of it is on lands that had already been designated for logging. BLM offered a timber sale on this ridge in 2004, but it didn’t sell. Timber companies felt the amount of logs didn’t justify the cost of taking them out. But a few stumps show where big old pines easy to get at were cut. Franklin and Johnson’s vision for restoring this forest — reducing the danger of wildfire and insect infestations while maintaining habitat for the northern spotted owl — would cut far more trees than the last timber sale. Historically, because of regular wildfires, this ridge would have been covered mostly by grass and brush, with scattered big pines, oaks and madrones, and some isolated dense patches of trees, said Johnson. Instead, it is densely packed with Douglas fir. After the pilot project, most of the Douglas fir will be gone, making it tougher for fire to kill the big pines and dense patches. Jennifer and Link Phillippi own the last sawmill standing in Josephine County, The Rough & Ready Lumber Co. in O’Brien. After losing a BLM timber sale to an adverse court ruling over spotted owl habitat, they were hoping this pilot project would be their salvation. But after touring it last weekend, Jennifer Phillippi came away disappointed because the site is one where timber interests and conservationists already

agreed logging is needed. “If we’re really going to do things the forest needs, I think we need to be bold and step into places people might have concerns and get past them,” she said. “The forest isn’t getting any better as long as we’re avoiding problems.”

An alternative? Doug Robertson, a county commissioner in Douglas County, said the tight restrictions of the Northwest Forest Plan and expanding habitat protections for the northern spotted owl make it impossible to repeat Franklin and Johnson’s vision across a wide landscape. As an alternative, he wants to split the BLM timberlands in Oregon in two, selling off 1.2 million acres for private timber production, and locking up 1.2 million acres for fish and wildlife habitat. After the past 25 years in court, conservation groups don’t trust BLM. “It is not so clear to us they have embraced a different management approach,” said Joseph Vaile of Klamath-Siskiyou Wildlands. This mistrust and divided landscape are just what Franklin and Johnson hope to overcome. “The whole notion that you can manage the federal estate with a singular type of outcome, either timber production or owl habitat, is not desirable socially or ecologically,” said Franklin. Johnson added: “Whenever we try that, we end up running into a ditch.”

Sex abuse cases in nursing homes don’t go far The Associated Press PORTLAND — An investigation by The Oregonian has found the vast majority of people suspected of sexually attacking residents in one of the state’s 2,300 nursing homes, assisted-living centers or other long-term care facilities are never arrested or prosecuted. And the state rarely penalizes facilities. Since 2005, state workers who monitor the safety of the elderly and disabled received at least 350 reports of possible sexual abuse, ranging from unwanted kissing to rape. The Oregon Department of Human Services determined that about 80 percent of those reports weren’t provable. In many cases,

DHS investigators conclude that the victims are unreliable witnesses because they have dementia or are heavily medicated. Many can’t answer questions, although there were other signs they had been assaulted. DHS investigators determined there was enough evidence to find that 73 of the more than 350 reports of sexually inappropriate contact did occur. But in at least 28 of those confirmed cases, police said no one called to report it. And when police were called, sometimes days or months had passed since the abuse. The Oregonian found evidence of 14 arrests. Occasionally, criminal investigations faltered because police failed to interview witnesses or test key evidence. Of those cas-

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es in which an arrest was made, eight resulted in convictions. The newspaper’s investigation found problems in long-term care facilities as well as DHS. And DHS has kept the public in the dark about problems at nursing homes. For the past few years, DHS has allowed the public to research nursing homes and other long-term facilities on its website, but that database doesn’t include many reports of sexual abuse that were provided to The Oregonian.

With just the online database as a resource, consumers researching nursing homes for an elderly relative would never find out about a report concerning a caregiver at Spring Point Memory Care in Grants Pass in May 2009. The caregiver had caused a mentally compromised resident to have an erection after disrespectfully “rubbing and twirling” the man’s genitals as he wiped them clean, according to a co-worker. The facility fired the offending worker, but for a different reason.

COOS BAY — Some descendants of the Chetco and Tututni Indians in Oregon want Congress to restore what they say is the state’s 10th Indian tribe. They’ve formed a coalition, the Confederated Tribes of the Lower Rogue, and if they succeed it would be the first restoration in Oregon since the Coquilles regained their status in 1989. The effort could reshuffle tens of millions of dollars that flow into Oregon through the Bureau of Indian Affairs. That would siphon funds from other federally recognized tribes in Oregon, and one powerful group of Indians in particular: the Confederated Tribes of Siletz, which owns and operates the Chinook Winds Indian Casino. Siletz represents close to 5,000 members culled from 29 tribes and bands. Siletz’s leadership opposes federal recognition for the group and said so in a letter sent last week to U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio, an Oregon Democrat. Siletz chairwoman Delores Pigsley said the Chetco and Tututni Indians are part of the Siletz. Both were among dozens of tribes marched to a reservation in Lincoln County at gunpoint after the Rogue River Wars in the mid-1800s, forced to set aside their individual heritages and form one new tribe under the name Siletz. Pigsley said there is no longer a separate Chetco or Tututni Indian tribes, and there never was a Lower Rogue tribe. But coalition chief Donny Fry said he and his brother Larry applied to join Siletz

decades ago, but were told they didn’t qualify because they don’t have relatives who live on the tribe’s 3,600-acre reservation. The brothers say they don’t want to be a part of the Siletz tribe now, partly because members who want benefits such as health care must live in the tribe’s 11county service area, which does not include Coos or Curry counties, where most of about 200 unrecognized descendants live. The Frys and other Rogue members have no connection to Lincoln County. Their male ancestors hid along the river, or pretended they weren’t Indian. Women married whites, which allowed them to escape the march along Oregon’s so-called “Trail of Tears.” The Fry brothers want a separated federal designation and the clout that has in dealing with state and federal agencies to preserve artifacts. They want to establish a clinic on the south coast and funding to preserve their heritage and language. The brothers amassed some key allies in years of campaigning for recognition. They’re leaning on DeFazio, who sent a letter to BIA Regional Director Amy Dutschke this month asking her to help set up a meeting between the Rogue tribe and the Siletz. “There’s no question here that this group of people needs services,” DeFazio spokeswoman Jen Gilbreath said. “The status quo isn’t acceptable, and we are trying to find a way to get them services.”

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B4 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Use student data in evaluations

O

regon schools should be a great place to learn and a great place to be taught. To get there, Oregon needs to evaluate and compensate its teachers based on more

than years of service and degrees held. Teachers need to be judged on how well they teach. Senate Bill 290 would nudge Oregon in the right direction. The bill requires the State Board of Education to develop statewide performance standards to determine teacher and administrator effectiveness. The standards must include student performance data, and may include things like graduation rates and attendance. Each school district could customize how the standards were used, although they would have to include the standards. It’s somewhat surprising that the state’s teachers union, the Oregon Education Association, has not opposed the bill. “Our members are hungry to be treated as professionals, paid as professionals and have real professional career paths,” Jeston Black of the OEA said in legislative testimony. That’s no endorsement. It’s also not outright opposition. That’s because the bill does not essentially conflict with the OEA’s

position. The OEA has been skeptical of basing teacher pay and evaluations on student test data. It argues in a “fact sheet” that student test data can be used to provide useful feedback, and “teachers can then be later evaluated based on the growth and/or improvement of their practice, skills, and knowledge — not student learning data.” If the bill is passed, it may be that the standards customized by school districts will be toothless on student test data. While it would be foolish to base pay and evaluations only on student test data, it would be equally foolish not to give the data serious weight. Using student data is not to punish teachers and administrators. It helps them understand where they are achieving and where they are not. And what better predictor is there of future performance in the classroom than past performance? It’s not unfair to use student data. It’s unfair to students not to.

Oregon’s tribal police should give to get A

n Oregon Supreme Court decision on Friday may have given the state’s nine federally recognized Indian tribes the authority they want. Conflicts remain with tribal police that need to be fixed. An earlier decision by the Oregon Court of Appeals had called into question whether tribal police could enforce state law — such as when a speeder fled off a reservation. Senate Bill 412 is an attempt to clear that up. It would give tribal police officers the right to enforce state law on the reservation when nontribal members break it. The bill would also give them the right to enforce Oregon law off the reservation. A decision by the Oregon Supreme Court issued on Friday seems to have resolved some of the legal issues in SB 412. The Oregon Supreme Court reversed the Court of Appeals and found that tribal police should be treated as police officers for purposes of training, certification and discipline. It’s not entirely clear, though, if the ruling gives tribal police full authority to act as law enforcement officers off the reservation. The debate over SB 412 also revealed problems in the relations between tribal police and other law enforcement. The bill has been op-

posed by most other law enforcement agencies in Oregon. They believe they should be granted the right to enforce Oregon law on reservation lands, though that apparently would take a change in federal law to be official. And they made another very good point last week. They argue that tribal law agencies can be reluctant to enforce state law on their lands, making serving warrants and the like difficult to impossible. If tribal police want the support of Oregon’s law enforcement community, they must find a way to ensure the community that tribal members accused of breaking state law off the reservation are dealt with just as any other lawbreaker would be. Then there’s the matter of Oregon’s public records law, which does not apply to reservation agencies, police or otherwise. While SB 412 would ensure that non-Indian arrest records and the like be turned over in the case of legal proceedings, that’s the only time disclosure would be required. SB 412 likely requires changes after the court’s decision, and there continues to be a need for more cooperation between tribal police and other law enforcement.

Getting the upper hand on nature By Gregory Rodriguez Los Angeles Times

M

aybe John Muir was a fool. Muir, the godfather of contemporary environmentalism, was among the first activists to proclaim the “oneness” of humans and the natural world, and to insist that we seek to live in harmony with our surroundings. So convinced was he of nature’s essential goodness that once during a temblor, he ran out of his cabin at midnight crying “a noble earthquake! A noble earthquake!” But after the events of the past few weeks in Japan, it’s hard to see his point. For the last half century, Americans have been atoning for the environmental sins of their forefathers, essentially buying into Muir’s worldview. Before the 1960s, the average person generally assumed that human culture — civilization — was an all-around force for good in the world. Indeed, few educated people would have questioned Sigmund Freud’s dictum that the “principal task of civilization, its actual raison d’etre, is to defend us against nature.” But postwar prosperity, the emergence of post-materialist values, the advent of the car culture that allowed us to visit our national parks and the publication of Rachel Carson’s antipesticide manifesto “Silent Spring” all converged to raise the idea of environmental protection in the public consciousness. This new environmentalism, aligned with the counterculture of the 1960s and ’70s, turned the tables. The growing awareness of human mismanagement of the Earth — air pollution, endangered species, climate change — inspired people to see human civi-

lization as more of a detriment than a blessing. The need to protect nature from humans supplanted the need to protect humans from nature. Rather than viewing ourselves as overlords of the Earth, we increasingly came to see ourselves, in the Muir-like words of environmental activist Howard Zahniser, “as part of the system of nature, not demigods above or outside it.” One might think that the Japanese earthquake and tsunami would further our sense of humility in the face of nature. But the earthquake and the tsunami — as well as Hurricane Katrina, the Indian Ocean tsunami and tragic earthquakes in Pakistan, Haiti and New Zealand — might also have the opposite effect. In the wake of these catastrophes, Americans could revert to the old-fashioned impulse to master nature. “When you encounter large-scale natural disasters, you recognize how much of our security and well-being is secured by competent engineering,” a liberal Washington journalist tweeted and told me last week. In other words, when nature turns on us once too often, we may decide it’s better to fight back than to defer. That sentiment was expressed last January during Australia’s devastating floods. Columnist Chris Gardiner, who contributes to a News Corp. commentary site called The Punch, reacted to the devastation by arguing that humans “should resist the naive nature worship,” and “seek to direct and pacify its destructive outbursts.” Not surprisingly, the National Academy of Engineering would agree. In 2007, it issued a report examining social and governmental responses

to recent natural disasters. It concluded that our best chance of dealing with threats from nature was tackling them head on, through “better engineering.” This message resonates with the work of journalist David Owen, author of “Green Metropolis,” and urbanist and Harvard economist Edward Glaeser. Both argue that the best way to cope with dangerous environmental deterioration is not to scale back our cities — one of our primary imprints on the land — but to scale them up, building more high-rises, more extensive transit networks and generally taking a stronger hand in engineering our environment. As Glaeser writes, the architects and developers of giant skyscrapers “are better guides to a greener future than Henry David Thoreau.” Ironically, the Japanese might be the ones who can lead us into this less naive and more aggressive stance. With a long tradition of respecting nature’s majesty as well as its destructive force, Japan is among the most engineered yet environmentally conscious countries in the world. Despite the death toll and the ruins, Japan’s approach no doubt saved many lives. The fact that its imperiled nuclear reactors were still standing after an earthquake thousands of times stronger than predicted is a testament to that. Our response to this tragedy, then, shouldn’t be to hail the nobility of the earthquake a la John Muir but to redouble our efforts, however imperfect, to tame the Earth. Gregory Rodriguez is a columnist for the Los Angeles Times.

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What’s behind Obama’s risky humanitarian mission in Libya By Trudy Rubin The Philadelphia Inquirer

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ere’s a crucial fact that you may not realize, given the week’s headlines: Libya is only a tragic sideshow to the historic events in the Middle East. Egypt is the place that counts when we consider the prospects for Arab democracy. Bahrain is the locale where Iran and the Saudis are contesting for power. Yemen, whose president is about to fall, is the country where a strong alQaida branch is based. So, it’s essential that Libya not divert scarce U.S. resources from where they are needed. Any protracted involvement will distract our focus from more essential Mideast states that require attention. Yet, given the unplanned way President Obama embarked on this venture, I fear that’s where we are headed. Unless Obama gets very lucky, we are enmeshed in a new Mideast war. To understand why, we must revisit how we got mixed up in Libya in the first place. For weeks Obama resisted any military involvement, for good reasons: Libya was not critical to U.S. security or Arab democracy and produces

TRUDY RUBIN only 2 percent of the world’s oil. And we still have tens of thousands of troops in two Muslim countries. As Defense Secretary Robert Gates bluntly told West Point cadets last month, any U.S. leader who sent American troops into another Mideast war “should have his head examined.” So who or what changed the president’s mind? The buzz in Washington gives credit (or blame) to three women. Intervention was pushed by the National Security Council’s human rights expert, Samantha Power, who studied U.S. failures to stop mass murder in Bosnia and Rwanda, and by U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice, who pushed (unsuccessfully) for U.S. intervention in Darfur. Power and Rice supposedly won over a reluctant Secretary of State Hillary Clinton just as Moammar Gadhafi’s troops were

about to erase the last rebel stronghold in Benghazi. I, too, believe a looming humanitarian crisis changed Obama’s mind. But there are far worse humanitarian crises where we have avoided any intervention, especially when they involve civil warfare. So why Libya? My guess is Obama’s about-face was driven by two factors: the CNN/alJazeera/Facebook effect, and the overthe-top rhetoric of Libya’s leader. Much of the Mideast press corps moved en masse from Egypt across the border into Libya after Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak fell. So they were on hand to tell the tragic tales of beleaguered Libyan rebels and to broadcast video images forwarded by trapped civilians. Then Gadhafi threatened to “show no mercy” to the rebels in Benghazi: This meant he might conduct a civilian slaughter in full view of the entire Arab region and the world — with Obama standing passively by. This looming prospect galvanized Obama into an instant decision. It also embarrassed Arab leaders into endorsing an Arab League vote that called for

a no-fly zone over Libya. With the Arab League vote in hand, U.S. officials were able to muster a U.N. Security Council vote for a no-fly zone. But an understandable humanitarian decision is already turning into a trap. A no-fly zone may save Benghazi, but it can’t get rid of Gadhafi. What looms is a stalemate: U.S. or NATO planes must patrol indefinitely to prevent Gadhafi from going back on the attack. No-fly zones over Bosnia and Kosovo never removed the Serbian leaders who committed carnage against civilians. Both required more military action. The no-fly zone protecting Iraqi Kurds and Shiites continued for more than a decade, until Saddam Hussein was overthrown on the ground in 2003. Surely Obama must know this. Yet he seems to be banking on a palace coup to unseat Gadhafi. That could happen, but what if it doesn’t? Already, some neoconservatives are calling for the United States to send in special forces to train the Libyan rebels, and ensure that the rebels receive better weapons. They make comparisons to Afghanistan: Never mind that the Libyans are inexperienced and ill-

trained, unlike the Afghan Northern Alliance, which we helped to overthrow the Taliban. Neocons are also pushing plans for post-Gadhafi nation-building that sound uncannily familiar. Believe me, trying to do an Iraq redux will not achieve better results. Neither Obama nor the Pentagon wants to expand U.S. military action. As the chairman of the Joint Chiefs, Adm. Mike Mullen, told NBC, the mission is “narrow in scope” and “focused on humanitarian efforts.” Added Mullen, “The president’s been very clear that we’re not going to put any boots on the ground.” I hope that’s true. I understand the humanitarian imperative that got our planes flying. And I know the president hopes to hand off those continued flights to our European allies. But Gadhafi, who has billions in cash stashed in Libya to pay his fighters, has little incentive to go into exile. I find it hard to foresee how this high-minded venture will end. Trudy Rubin is a columnist for The Philadelphia Inquirer.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 28, 2011 B5

O Inventor of super glue dies By Elizabeth A. Harris New York Times News Service

Harry Wesley Coover Jr., the man who invented Super Glue, died Saturday night at his home in Kingsport, Tenn. He was 94. The cause was congestive heart failure, his daughter, Dr. Melinda Coover Paul, said. Coover first happened upon the super-sticky adhesive — more formally known as cyanoacrylates — by accident when he was experimenting with acrylates for use in clear plastic gun-sights during World War II. He gave up because they stuck to everything they touched. In 1951, a researcher named Fred Joyner, who was working with Coover at Eastman Kodak’s laboratory in Tennessee, was testing hundreds of compounds looking for a heat-resistant coating for jet cockpits. When Joyner spread the 910th compound on the list between two lenses on a refractometer to take a reading on the velocity of light through it, he discovered he could not separate the lenses. His initial reaction was panic at the loss of the expensive lab equipment. “He ruined the machine,” Paul said of the refractometer. “Back in the ’50s, they cost like $3,000, which was huge.” But Coover saw an opportunity. Seven years later, the first incarnation of Super Glue, called Eastman 910, hit the market. In the name of science, Joyner was not punished for destroying the equipment, Paul said. Not long after, Coover made an appearance on the television show “I’ve Got a Secret,” which starred Garry Moore as the host. Coover’s secret was that he had invented

Dorothy Young, who appeared in Houdini’s final tour, dies By Valerie J. Nelson Los Angeles Times

The Kingsport (Tenn.) Times-News ile photo

Harry Wesley Coover Jr,, the inventor of cyanoacrylate glue, commonly known as Super Glue, sits in his Kingsport, Tenn., home in 2004. Coover died Saturday at the age of 94. Super Glue, and he was asked to demonstrate what it could do. A metal bar was lowered onto the stage, and Coover used a dab of the glue to connect two metal parts together. Then, his daughter said, he grabbed hold of one and was raised in the air on the strength of his invention. “Then Garry Moore jumped on, too!” she said. “And this is live television. But it worked. It absolutely worked.”

Nonetheless, Kodak was never able to capitalize commercially on Coover’s discovery. It sold the business to National Starch in 1980. Coover was born in Newark, Del., on March 6, 1917. He studied chemistry at Hobart College in New York state and then received a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Cornell University. He worked at the Eastman Kodak Co. until he retired and then

worked as a consultant. In 2004, he was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame. Last year, President Barack Obama awarded him the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. Coover was in the hospital, his daughter said, but his family made sure he was able to get to Washington for the award. “That took a long time to percolate through,” Paul said. “So it was really nice that it came.”

Dorothy Young was a 17year-old New York City tourist in 1925 when she spotted an ad placed by master illusionist Harry Houdini seeking “girl dancer for Broadway show and tour of the United States.” She scurried to the tryouts and shyly hid in the back before being summoned to audition by Houdini and his manager. After breaking out in a Charleston, she was hired on the spot. When her mother and father, a minister, refused to allow her to join the traveling stage show, Houdini persuaded her parents that he and his wife “would look after me as their very own daughter, which they did,” Young recalled in a 2000 oral history. “It was a wonderful, wonderful year.” Young, who was the last surviving member of Houdini’s stage troupe, died March 20 at her home in Tinton Falls, N.J. She was 103. The cause was complications related to old age, said Dave Muha, a spokesman for New Jersey’s Drew University, where she was a major donor.

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Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Paul Baran, who helped create precursor to Internet, dies By Katie Hafner New York Times News Service

Paul Baran, an engineer who helped create the technical underpinnings for the ARPANET, the government-sponsored precursor to today’s Internet, died Saturday night at his home in

Lawsuit Continued from B1 The District Attorney’s Office initially declined to charge them, instead offering a diversion program. In late April, according to a letter from Stroud and Brown’s attorney, the two appeared in Deschutes County Court and were told that no charges had been filed. They were told, however, that they would be prosecuted unless they agreed to the diversion program, which involved a $230 fine and classes. Stroud and Brown said “no,” according to court documents. In October, the District Attorney’s office charged Stroud and Brown with third-degree criminal mischief, stating that they climbed on and interfered with Three Sisters Irrigation District’s equipment “with intent to cause substantial inconvenience to the owner.” But then in February 2011, the charges were dismissed. Some of the protesters at the scene had climbed on machinery, and one person had lain down in front of the equipment, said Claud Ingram, attorney for Stroud and Brown — but not the two who were arrested. “They only arrested Tim and Susan, and Tim and Susan did nothing,” Ingram said, so the charges were dismissed. The attorney for the Sheriff’s Office personnel involved in the case, as well as attorneys for Thalacker and the irrigation district, could not be reached for comment Friday. In June, Stroud filed a $4.5 million lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Eugene against Thalacker, the Three Sisters Irrigation District, two members of the irrigation district, Deschutes County Sheriff Larry Blanton and Capt. Tim Edwards. “During March of 2010,” the lawsuit states, “Defendants conspired among themselves and entered into an agreement and/or understanding to use a concerted effort to prevent Jan Daggett and her supporters from inter-

Palo Alto, Calif. He was 84. The cause was complications from lung cancer, said his son David. In the early 1960s, while working at the RAND Corp. in Santa Monica, Calif., Baran outlined the fundamentals for packaging data into discrete bundles, which

he called “message blocks.” The bundles are sent on various paths around a network and reassembled at their destination, a plan known as “packet switching.” Baran’s idea was to build a distributed communications network, less vulnerable to attack

or disruption than conventional networks. In a series of technical papers published in the 1960s, he suggested that networks be designed with redundant routes so that if a particular path failed or was destroyed, messages could still be delivered through another.

fering with the threatened trespass of her property by making false and defamatory statements against them, by threatening them with arrest, by using physical force against them, arresting them, and providing security and protection.” An irrigation district member hit Stroud with his car, the suit alleges, while another one hit him and spit in his face. In response, court documents filed by the defendants state that Daggett was warned that if protesters became confrontational, people could be arrested, and also stated that Stroud had been touching and leaning on construction equipment as it was moving, and told people he would fall down behind it while it was moving. “Thalacker and the District’s staff were professional and cordial,” the document states. The case was scheduled for arguments on April 5, but that has been postponed and not yet rescheduled, Ingram said. In February 2011, Brown filed a lawsuit in Deschutes County Circuit Court against Thalacker for $453,000, for false arrest, malicious prosecution and intentional infliction of emotional distress. On March 15, Brown filed a revised lawsuit, adding violation of civil rights to the complaint and increasing the amount of the lawsuit to $903,500. According to the lawsuit, Brown and others were protesting and taking pictures of the piping project, which was “destroying the streambed, vegetation and wildlife habitat” on Daggett’s property. Thalacker told Capt. Edwards that Brown had lain down in a ditch — which, according to the lawsuit, Thalacker knew was not the case. Thalacker made a citizen’s arrest of Brown, and she was booked at the Deschutes County jail before being released to receive medical attention for her diabetes. Brown states in the lawsuit that she was deprived of freedom, portrayed as a criminal, had her reputation tarnished, and “has suffered severe and permanent mental unrest.” Thalacker didn’t

have reason to believe she committed a crime, the lawsuit states, and he acted with malice. The next step in the lawsuit is for Thalacker to answer

the complaint. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Walter H. Olson February 10, 1938 - March 21, 2011 Walter Howard Olson passed away in Bend, OR, on Monday, March 21, 2011, due to complications from multiple sclerosis. He was born in Minot, ND, on Feb 10, 1938, to Leonard and Inez (Johnson) Olson. He grew up on a farm in Donnybrook, ND, attended a rural elementary school, then high school in Minot where he graduated in 1955. He went to welding school in Troy, OH, and traveled the mid-west states doing custom combining. He worked at Western Welding until 1969. He worked for Les Schwab Tire Center in Prineville, OR, until 1977, when he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, and took a disability retirement. He was a great welder and had his own welding business. Walt married Glenda Mergel on Nov 10, 1960, in Plentywood, MT. They resided in Berthold and Minot, ND, until the Flood of 1969, in Minot, when they moved their family to Prineville and lived there until his disability became more pronounced. They moved to Bend, OR, in 1982, where he resided until his death. He loved numbers and could not be outsmarted. He could tell how many days old you were as soon as he knew your birth date. He loved to play cards and could play all day long. He passed along his love of card playing to his children, teaching them to play cribbage before they started school. With his sharp mind, he was always several plays ahead of anyone he played against. He was fun to travel with and had travel games to play: beaver, ABC, make & model, state plates. Walt was also an avid NASCAR fan, having been a stock car mechanic early in his life. His keen sense of humor never left him and was still there at the end. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Glenda; six children: Robin Alway (Jay) of Redmond, OR, Randy Olson of Bend, OR, Bradly Olson (Robin Chandler) of Powell Butte, OR, Glenn Olson (Mary Lakin) of Redmond, OR, Holly Olson of Missoula, MT, and Corrina Jaeger (Randy) of Bend, OR; fourteen grandchildren: Bruce, Jared and Kyle Nash, Carrie, Emily and Daniel Olson, Dylan, Hannah and Karissa Olson, Samantha and Kelly Blackwell, and Jordan, Patricia and Rebecca Jaeger; four great grandsons: Owen and Garrett Nash, and Zachary and Brodie Nash; six brothers: Leonard, Rodney, Gerald, Rolland, Delton, and Dale Olson; and one sister: Joy Parkinson (Rick). He was preceded in death by his parents and one granddaughter, Casi Nash. He was a son for 46 years, a brother for 73 years, a husband for 50 years, a father for 49 years, a grandfather for 30 years and a great grandfather for 4 years. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Trinity Lutheran Church Sanctuary Fund, Bend, OR.

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W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, MARCH 28

TUESDAY

Today: Mostly cloudy.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

49

32

Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

52/35

49/34

56/35

39/29

Madras  Mitchell 53/37 51/40

Camp Sherman 45/32 Redmond Prineville 50/35 Cascadia 52/36 49/46 Sisters 48/34 Bend Post 49/32

Oakridge Elk Lake 47/44

Coastal portions of the region will see areas of showers today. Central

52/41

53/42

46/42



Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

38/23

47/32

47/31

48/33

Hampton

46/30

45/32

Fort Rock

Vancouver



Chemult



37/21

53/42

Grants Pass

49/28



Helena Bend

45/25

Boise

49/32

50/34

56/40

Idaho Falls Elko

62/41

40/25



44/24

49/34

Reno

46/29

Showers are possible across the region today.

35/27

55/29

San Francisco



60/48





Salt Lake City 48/30

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases New

April 3

First

Full

Last

April 11 April 17 April 24

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers.

LOW

HIGH

65 37

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

Missoula

Redding

Crater Lake





Eugene

Christmas Valley

Silver Lake

46/29

Calgary

 Seattle

49/33

41/25

50/43

53/43

Burns

48/31

Crescent

Crescent Lake

BEND ALMANAC Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:54 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:27 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:52 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:29 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 4:01 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 2:03 p.m.

FRIDAY Partly cloudy.

60 36

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

48/32

La Pine

HIGH

NORTHWEST

Portland

Partly to mostly cloudy with a few showers possible today. Eastern

LOW

51 32

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 55° Hermiston • 20° Baker City

THURSDAY

Partly cloudy.

Showers are expected in the eastern portions of the region, as well as along the coast.

Paulina

Brothers

Sunriver

HIGH

55/43

48/33

Mostly cloudy.

Tonight: Chance of showers.

HIGH

STATE

WEDNESDAY

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 48/42/1.13 . . . . . 51/43/sh. . . . . . 51/42/sh Baker City . . . . . . 46/20/0.07 . . . . . 46/30/pc. . . . . . 46/29/rs Brookings . . . . . . 49/43/1.26 . . . . . 51/46/sh. . . . . . 57/42/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 40/24/0.12 . . . . . 43/30/pc. . . . . . 46/28/rs Eugene . . . . . . . . 47/42/0.32 . . . . . . 53/42/c. . . . . . 54/41/sh Klamath Falls . . . 41/28/0.06 . . . . . 45/31/pc. . . . . . 53/29/rs Lakeview. . . . . . . . 39/28/NA . . . . . . 43/30/c. . . . . . 50/30/rs La Pine . . . . . . . . 38/27/0.17 . . . . . . 48/31/c. . . . . . . 46/28/r Medford . . . . . . . 52/37/0.04 . . . . . 58/41/pc. . . . . . 60/41/sh Newport . . . . . . . 46/43/0.76 . . . . . 50/46/sh. . . . . . 51/48/sh North Bend . . . . . 52/43/0.60 . . . . . 53/45/sh. . . . . . 55/43/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 47/33/0.12 . . . . . . 54/35/c. . . . . . 52/34/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 52/32/0.02 . . . . . . 56/39/c. . . . . . 56/37/sh Portland . . . . . . . 50/42/0.16 . . . . . . 53/43/c. . . . . . 53/42/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 45/31/0.15 . . . . . . 52/36/c. . . . . . . 52/31/r Redmond. . . . . . . 49/22/0.07 . . . . . 51/34/pc. . . . . . . 52/34/r Roseburg. . . . . . . 50/42/0.33 . . . . . 58/43/sh. . . . . . 60/41/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 50/43/0.25 . . . . . . 53/44/c. . . . . . 54/42/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 43/31/0.14 . . . . . . 48/34/c. . . . . . . 50/29/r The Dalles . . . . . . 53/34/0.08 . . . . . . 54/39/c. . . . . . 55/40/sh

3

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

HIGH

4

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . .2-0 . . . . . . 36-89 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-0 . . . . . 38-113 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-0 . . . . 130-178 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-0 . . . . 158-181 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 7 . . . . . . . 140 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . .7-0 . . . . . . 76-95 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . 175 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . .17-0 . . . . . 60-130

V.HIGH

6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43/29 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.15” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 in 1966 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.27” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 in 2008 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.81” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.74” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 3.70” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.67 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.29 in 1928 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:11 a.m. . . . . . .8:54 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .5:40 a.m. . . . . . .4:19 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .6:35 a.m. . . . . . .6:25 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .7:12 a.m. . . . . . .7:54 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .7:42 p.m. . . . . . .7:27 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .6:41 a.m. . . . . . .6:44 p.m.

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Monday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

54 31

8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . . 58 Mammoth Mtn., California13-21.5 . . . . 214-325 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . .6-0 . . . . . . . 127 Squaw Valley, California . . . . .7-0 . . . . . . . 265 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . .5-0 . . . . . . 56-86 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . 49-56 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-0 . . . . . . . . 73 For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 50/43

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

• 99° Laredo, Texas

• -11° Grand Marais, Minn.

• 1.93” Atlanta, Ga.

Honolulu 83/69

S

Calgary 37/21

S

Saskatoon 28/19

Seattle 55/43

S Winnipeg 30/9

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 29/16

Thunder Bay 28/10

Halifax 34/25 Portland Billings To ronto Portland 35/26 44/25 37/21 53/43 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 36/20 32/19 Boise 40/30 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 50/34 31/21 New York 35/23 35/23 42/29 Des Moines Philadelphia Columbus 41/29 Chicago Cheyenne 40/23 44/28 38/24 Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake 52/26 Washington, D. C. 40/32 60/48 City 46/29 Las Denver Louisville 48/30 Kansas City Vegas 53/33 50/32 45/35 St. Louis 74/53 Charlotte 47/32 49/35 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 72/40 62/53 55/47 56/38 60/42 Phoenix Atlanta 82/59 Birmingham 57/43 Dallas Tijuana 68/53 62/54 63/50 Bismarck 28/21

Houston 75/63

Chihuahua 86/48

Anchorage 35/26

La Paz 84/61 Juneau 45/32

Mazatlan 86/59

New Orleans 80/65

Orlando 84/67 Miami 89/72

Monterrey 91/72

FRONTS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .53/41/0.00 . . .72/59/t . . . 78/43/c Akron . . . . . . . . .38/18/0.00 . 36/17/pc . . 40/28/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .38/20/0.00 . 37/23/pc . . 46/25/pc Albuquerque. . . .68/47/0.00 . . .72/40/s . . 71/40/pc Anchorage . . . . .34/19/0.00 . . .35/26/c . . .40/31/rs Atlanta . . . . . . . .58/48/3.02 . .57/43/sh . . 68/54/pc Atlantic City . . . .47/31/0.00 . 44/30/pc . . 45/35/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .74/58/0.00 . . .73/59/c . . . .78/54/t Baltimore . . . . . .47/30/0.00 . 45/28/pc . . 47/34/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .35/26/0.00 . . 44/25/rs . . .51/31/rs Birmingham . . . .63/49/0.00 . . .68/53/t . . . .67/45/t Bismarck . . . . . . .28/18/0.00 . .28/21/sn . . . 33/22/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .45/34/0.23 . .50/34/sh . . 50/34/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .45/27/0.00 . 40/30/pc . . 44/31/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .46/26/0.00 . 42/29/pc . . 43/30/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .28/16/0.00 . 31/21/pc . . 34/26/pc Burlington, VT. . .34/18/0.00 . .34/21/sn . . . 39/22/c Caribou, ME . . . .27/13/0.00 . .32/21/sn . . . 38/22/c Charleston, SC . .65/46/0.18 . .55/45/sh . . 67/59/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .43/39/0.02 . .49/35/sh . . 61/46/pc Chattanooga. . . .52/46/0.12 . . .59/41/c . . . 61/54/c Cheyenne . . . . . .34/28/0.04 . . 52/26/rs . . 45/26/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .35/26/0.00 . 38/24/pc . . 41/30/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .45/26/0.01 . 43/26/pc . . . 48/34/c Cleveland . . . . . .32/24/0.00 . 33/19/pc . . 37/28/pc Colorado Springs 52/30/0.09 . .56/28/sh . . 49/27/pc Columbia, MO . .40/26/0.00 . . .43/32/c . . 39/31/sn Columbia, SC . . .51/45/0.60 . .50/38/sh . . 65/51/pc Columbus, GA. . .77/67/0.05 . . .63/47/t . . 72/59/pc Columbus, OH. . .42/23/0.00 . . .40/23/s . . 45/32/pc Concord, NH . . . .39/20/0.00 . . .36/27/c . . 42/22/pc Corpus Christi. . .82/71/0.00 . 77/67/pc . . 80/67/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .51/46/0.00 . . .62/54/c . . . .66/47/t Dayton . . . . . . . .41/21/0.00 . . .40/23/s . . 45/31/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .58/32/0.00 . .53/33/sh . . 55/34/pc Des Moines. . . . .39/24/0.00 . . .41/29/c . . . 37/29/c Detroit. . . . . . . . .39/17/0.00 . . .35/23/s . . 42/26/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . . .32/1/0.00 . 34/18/pc . . 37/22/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .77/53/0.00 . . .82/49/s . . . 80/50/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .31/8/0.00 . .34/11/sn . . .39/15/rs Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .30/3/0.00 . . .31/14/c . . . 33/17/c Flagstaff . . . . . . .55/25/0.00 . 55/30/pc . . 58/30/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .38/17/0.00 . . .35/18/s . . 42/26/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .30/8/0.00 . 32/19/pc . . . 38/23/s Greensboro. . . . .38/36/0.04 . .46/34/sh . . 53/42/sh Harrisburg. . . . . .44/28/0.00 . 44/25/pc . . . 47/30/s Hartford, CT . . . .44/25/0.00 . 41/25/pc . . 45/27/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .40/30/0.09 . . 45/25/rs . . .48/27/rs Honolulu . . . . . . .81/71/0.01 . .83/69/sh . . . 84/70/s Houston . . . . . . .85/66/0.00 . . .75/63/c . . . .80/60/t Huntsville . . . . . .50/41/0.28 . . .60/43/c . . . .63/51/t Indianapolis . . . .42/24/0.00 . 44/26/pc . . . 47/32/c Jackson, MS . . . .66/50/0.86 . .73/53/sh . . . .82/54/t Madison, WI . . . .35/17/0.00 . 38/21/pc . . 44/26/pc Jacksonville. . . . .88/64/0.00 . . .77/56/t . . 72/61/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .52/25/0.00 . .45/32/sh . . 45/36/sh Kansas City. . . . .38/32/0.00 . . .45/35/c . . 40/30/sn Lansing . . . . . . . .34/14/0.00 . . .34/16/s . . 42/26/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .72/47/0.00 . 74/53/pc . . 73/57/pc Lexington . . . . . .44/28/0.00 . 45/29/pc . . . .50/36/r Lincoln. . . . . . . . .38/28/0.00 . . .39/32/c . . 36/29/sn Little Rock. . . . . .45/38/0.18 . . .60/42/c . . . .59/44/t Los Angeles. . . . .61/54/0.10 . 62/53/pc . . 66/55/pc Louisville . . . . . . .49/30/0.00 . 50/32/pc . . 52/36/sh Memphis. . . . . . .46/40/0.00 . . .59/45/c . . . .61/48/t Miami . . . . . . . . .89/71/0.00 . . .89/72/t . . . .88/73/t Milwaukee . . . . .33/25/0.00 . 35/25/pc . . 39/27/pc Minneapolis . . . .34/16/0.00 . 36/20/pc . . . 39/26/c Nashville . . . . . . .46/35/0.00 . . .56/38/c . . . .58/44/t New Orleans. . . .85/71/0.00 . . .80/65/t . . . .81/67/t New York . . . . . .45/28/0.00 . 42/29/pc . . 47/31/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .47/30/0.00 . 46/28/pc . . . 48/30/s Norfolk, VA . . . . .42/36/0.15 . 42/34/pc . . 49/40/pc Oklahoma City . 39/35/trace . . .55/47/c . . . .55/40/t Omaha . . . . . . . .40/27/0.00 . . .40/32/c . . 36/29/sn Orlando. . . . . . . .92/60/0.00 . . .84/67/t . . . .84/66/t Palm Springs. . . .75/49/0.00 . . .77/57/s . . 82/58/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .41/23/0.00 . 44/27/pc . . .40/30/rs Philadelphia . . . .46/30/0.00 . 44/28/pc . . 46/33/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .77/54/0.00 . . .82/59/s . . . 86/60/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .39/23/0.00 . 38/18/pc . . 41/27/pc Portland, ME. . . .41/21/0.00 . . .35/26/c . . 39/23/pc Providence . . . . .45/25/0.00 . 42/28/pc . . 47/30/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .40/37/0.07 . .45/33/sh . . 55/42/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .34/28/0.00 . .35/23/sn . . 39/22/sn Savannah . . . . . .86/56/0.86 . .62/46/sh . . 67/59/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .58/33/0.00 . 55/29/pc . . 59/33/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .51/39/0.25 . .55/43/sh . . 55/45/sh Richmond . . . . . .41/32/0.12 . 45/29/pc . . . 55/37/c Sioux Falls. . . . . .34/24/0.00 . .38/27/sn . . 36/26/sn Rochester, NY . . .30/18/0.00 . 35/22/pc . . 37/27/pc Spokane . . . . . . .45/34/0.31 . .48/34/sh . . 44/34/sh Sacramento. . . . .57/40/0.24 . 64/45/pc . . 68/50/pc Springfield, MO. .43/30/0.00 . . .51/36/c . . 45/32/sh St. Louis. . . . . . . .44/28/0.00 . 47/32/pc . . 41/32/sn Tampa . . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . .80/68/t . . . .82/68/t Salt Lake City . . .50/31/0.30 . . 48/30/rs . . . 51/36/c Tucson. . . . . . . . .78/47/0.00 . . .81/51/s . . . 83/52/s San Antonio . . . .77/65/0.00 . . .74/64/c . . . 79/55/c Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .43/36/0.00 . . .54/43/c . . 49/40/sh San Diego . . . . . 65/56/trace . 63/53/pc . . 66/53/pc Washington, DC .46/30/0.02 . 46/29/pc . . 49/35/pc San Francisco . . .57/45/0.00 . 60/46/pc . . 61/50/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .40/32/0.00 . . .48/37/c . . .44/30/rs San Jose . . . . . . .62/40/0.00 . 63/46/pc . . 66/50/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .49/28/0.03 . . .55/37/c . . 55/37/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .62/38/0.00 . . .63/36/s . . 61/36/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .76/51/0.00 . . .85/58/s . . . 89/60/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .52/32/0.00 . 50/34/pc . . 52/39/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . 66/50/pc . . 61/54/sh Auckland. . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . 72/59/pc . . . 64/55/s Baghdad . . . . . . .79/48/0.00 . . .80/57/s . . 82/55/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .79/73/0.00 . .81/71/sh . . 86/64/sh Beijing. . . . . . . . .64/45/0.00 . . .59/37/s . . . 70/37/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . 67/53/pc . . 68/52/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .46/28/0.00 . 49/31/pc . . . 52/34/s Bogota . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . .65/50/sh . . 68/52/sh Budapest. . . . . . .46/39/0.00 . 51/35/pc . . . 63/36/s Buenos Aires. . . .72/45/0.00 . . .74/50/s . . . 72/59/s Cabo San Lucas .82/54/0.00 . . .82/61/s . . . 81/61/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . . .77/56/s . . 77/54/pc Calgary . . . . . . . .27/25/0.08 . . 37/21/sf . . . 46/23/s Cancun . . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . 82/73/pc . . 86/70/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .50/32/0.00 . . .53/40/c . . 55/34/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .54/37/0.00 . 50/38/pc . . 55/43/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .59/39/0.00 . .55/43/sh . . 59/43/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . 82/59/pc . . . .79/57/t Hong Kong . . . . .63/57/0.03 . 66/59/pc . . . 72/59/c Istanbul. . . . . . . .66/48/0.07 . .55/42/sh . . 63/45/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .72/45/0.00 . . .65/42/s . . . 72/45/s Johannesburg . . .68/57/0.11 . . .80/59/t . . . .82/57/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .72/64/0.00 . .77/67/sh . . 75/66/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . .63/50/sh . . 64/54/sh London . . . . . . . .59/45/0.00 . .53/42/sh . . 59/41/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .57/45/0.25 . .59/42/sh . . 63/39/sh Manila. . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . .86/76/sh . . . .77/72/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . . .93/70/s . . . 95/70/s Mexico City. . . . .82/55/0.00 . . .79/48/t . . . .77/48/t Montreal. . . . . . .28/14/0.00 . . 29/21/sf . . 39/21/pc Moscow . . . . . . .30/10/0.00 . . .37/21/c . . . 36/7/sn Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . 83/61/pc . . . .82/59/t Nassau . . . . . . . .82/72/0.00 . 81/68/pc . . 82/70/pc New Delhi. . . . . .97/66/0.00 . . .98/68/s . . . 99/68/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .50/32/0.00 . . .52/38/c . . 52/35/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .37/23/0.00 . . .38/23/c . . 39/30/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .27/12/0.00 . 27/19/pc . . . 41/21/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .61/46/0.22 . .56/40/sh . . 63/45/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .91/77/0.00 . 93/76/pc . . . .84/72/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . .63/48/sh . . 63/43/sh Santiago . . . . . . .75/45/0.00 . . .76/42/s . . 86/50/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . . .83/67/t . . . .79/66/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .36/30/0.00 . 34/24/pc . . .43/27/rs Seoul . . . . . . . . . .50/28/0.00 . .50/35/sh . . . 55/34/s Shanghai. . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . 58/43/pc . . . 55/36/s Singapore . . . . . .91/77/0.51 . . .89/77/t . . . .88/73/t Stockholm. . . . . .39/27/0.00 . 37/23/pc . . .43/37/rs Sydney. . . . . . . . .68/61/0.00 . 74/64/pc . . 75/66/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .55/52/0.00 . .61/55/sh . . 63/55/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . 68/48/pc . . . 72/46/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .52/39/0.00 . 53/37/pc . . 57/41/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .28/16/0.00 . . .37/21/s . . . 45/27/s Vancouver. . . . . .52/43/0.20 . .50/43/sh . . 50/43/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .45/39/0.00 . .52/38/sh . . . 54/34/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .43/21/0.00 . .44/29/sh . . 50/34/sh

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Whitewater Continued from B1 The gates hung from wires strung across the river. Competitors had to go through the green gates while paddling downstream, then circle back quickly each time they came to a red gate, because they had to paddle upstream through those. In the junior division, there were just two competitors. Sam Fletcher, of Chilliwack, British Columbia, and Chip Campbell, of Portland, both 15, discussed the sport as they waited for their race to start. For Sam, the stretch of the Deschutes River by The Riverhouse was an attractive course that was not too easy, but also not too wild. “They had some good eddies, and it was a good course,” Fletcher said. Participants spent Saturday practicing the course, something

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Joel Martin competes in the Riverhouse Rendezvous Slalom, organized by the League of Northwest Whitewater Racers.

intellectual as well as a physical challenge. “It makes you really understand the river on a deeper level,” Chip said. “You have to use the waves, the current, the rocks. You have to use the river’s power instead of fighting it.”

that is typically not allowed in professional races, Hinkley said. Chip said he got into whitewater kayak racing because it’s an

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in Bend, in the 50s. Overnight lows are expected to be in the 30s. On Wednesday, the daytime high temperature is forecast to be near 61, and the high on Thursday could get close to 66, before daytime temperatures drop back into the 50s over the weekend. Madras is similarly forecast to

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Chip Campbell, 15, of Portland, clears a set of gates Sunday on the Deschutes River. Chip was one of two competitors in the junior division.

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C

GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON

G

GREEN, ETC.

Inside

‘Outsourced’ Why you should give this NBC comedy a chance, Page C2

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MARCH 28, 2011

Sustainable

snow

Joan Gyesky, a resident of both Bend and Greenwich, Conn., empties food scraps off of her reusable plate at the garbage and recycling station in West Village Lodge at Mt. Bachelor on Thursday.

Mt. Bachelor has a few good reasons to care about the environment, and it’s taking steps to preserve it By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

hen it took a look at the potential effects of climate change on ski mountains, Mt. Bachelor’s parent company, Utah-based Powdr Corp., got some concerning results. In 2075, for example, Park City’s ski mountain could see sustainable snow — where it falls, sticks and builds up a base — starting at 9,500 feet, said Brent Giles, director of environmental affairs for Powdr, which owns Park City Mountain Resort.

W

GREEN

“And at 9,500 feet, we’ve only got two lifts on the mountain,” he said. By 2100, according to the same study that Powdr commissioned, the sustainable snow level could rise to 10,200 feet for Park City, he said — and the resort’s highest point is 10,000 feet. “It told us what the effects of global warming would be and could be on our industry and on our community, if this does in fact happen,” Giles said, noting that the same things, with rising snow

elevations, would happen at other resorts nationwide, including Mt. Bachelor. For the last four years or so, each of Powdr’s nine ski areas has conducted annual carbon audits of their properties, he said, and the company purchases carbon credits to offset all of its electricity use. Last year, that totaled 68 million kilowatt-hours, he said. Additionally, the company annually identifies projects to shrink carbon use. “Every year our goal is to try to earmark about 1 percent of revenues to go to environmental initia-

tives,” he said, noting that so far the company has probably spent about $2 million on those efforts. At Mt. Bachelor, that translates to between $100,000 and $250,000 a year on different projects, said Dave Rathbun, president and general manager of the ski resort. “The green teams at each resort come up with projects specifically designed to spend that money to offset our carbon footprint,” he said. See Bachelor / C3

Skiers and snowboarders make their way onto the Pine Marten chairlift, which used to run off of a diesel generator but now is powered with electricity. The ski resort purchases carbon offsets to compensate for all of the electricity it uses. Photos by Andy Tullis The Bulletin

Region’s tech companies in growth mode Do we have free will? Statewide, employment has grown in past year, and the trend is reflected in local firms’ plans By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

Figures from the Oregon Employment Department show the state’s high-tech sector has grown in recent months. Perhaps something is in the air, or the water, around the Beaver State. Numbers for Central Oregon are not yet available. But anecdotal evidence shows several technologyheavy companies in Deschutes County moving toward expansion rather than contraction. Some companies, such as PV Powered and G5, have been on an uptick for years and simply continue to grow. Others, such as Alchemy Solutions Inc. and Dent Instruments, are only now moving to bigger digs to make room for new hires, or considering the idea. However it all comes together, a sense of expansion is afoot at some Deschutes County hightech companies. “I do think there’s more growth in the tech sectors,” said Lewis Howell, a co-founder of the shared office TechSpaceBend.

“They’re loosening up. They’re starting to spend money.” Especially since the beginning of 2011, Howell said he has seen companies being “more willing to either kick off projects they had on hold or initiate new projects.” Howell isn’t sure why the economic clouds could be lifting in this corner of the world, but he does believe they are. At TechSpaceBend, he said, the place has been roughly at capacity for two or three months, and newbies are stopping by the downtown building all the time. Roger Lee, executive director of Economic Development for Central Oregon, said he is aware of several companies increasing employment or expanding facilities in recent months. Excellent quality of life and relatively low overhead costs rank among the top reasons for setting up shop and staying here, Lee said. A successful product can boost sales, which in turn can result in more hiring, he said. See Tech / C6

OTECH

State high-tech employment bouncing back Job numbers representing Oregon counties show growth in the high-tech sector in Oregon in February, as compared with that month in several previous years. The numbers combine samples from three industry classifications: software publishing, computer and electronic product manufacturing, and systems design and related services. The February 2011 count is a preliminary estimate based on samples in counties across the state.

The more it’s studied, the likelier it looks By John Tierney New York Times News Service

February high-tech employment in Oregon since 2003 60K 56,800 54,100 57,200 58,400 59,200 58,600 54,900 53,400 55,400 40 20 0 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Number of high-tech companies on the rise

SCIENCE

Data from tax records obtained by the Oregon Employment Department show an upward trend in the number of companies in high-tech industries both throughout Oregon and in Deschutes County.

Statewide tech companies

Deschutes tech companies 150 120 90 60 30 0

3,000 2,000 1,000 0 ’03 ’04 ’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09

Suppose that Mark and Bill live in a deterministic universe. Everything that happens this morning — like Mark’s decision to wear a blue shirt, or Bill’s latest attempt to comb over his bald spot — is completely caused by whatever happened before it. If you re-created this universe starting with the Big Bang and let all events proceed exactly the same way until this same morning, then the blue shirt is as inevitable as the comb-over. Now for questions from experimental philosophers: 1) In this deterministic universe, is it possible for a person to be fully morally responsible for his actions? 2) This year, as he has often done in the past, Mark arranges to cheat on his taxes. Is he fully morally responsible for his actions?

3) Bill falls in love with his secretary, and he decides that the only way to be with her is to murder his wife and three children. Before leaving on a trip, he arranges for them to be killed while he is away. Is Bill fully morally responsible for his actions? To a classic philosopher, these are just three versions of the same question about free will. But to the new breed of philosophers who test people’s responses to concepts like determinism, there are crucial differences, as Shaun Nichols explains in the current issue of Science. Most respondents will absolve the unspecified person in Question 1 from full responsibility for his actions, and a majority will also give Mark a break for his tax chiseling. But not Bill. See Free will / C6

’03 ’04 ’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09

Source: Oregon Employment Department Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin


T EL EV ISION

C2 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Why you should give ‘Outsourced’ a chance Wedding planning C O M M E N TA RY needn’t be exclusive By Geetika Tandon Lizardi

“Outsourced” has the potential to prove that there is a viable alternative to the “one brown face in a white ensemble” model of “diversity.”

Los Angeles Times

Dear Abby: I’m the mother of four boys in their 20s. None of my sons is married yet, but because they are reaching the age where they might be soon, I have been paying attention to how weddings were planned and carried out by our friends’ children — all of whom are married. What’s bothering me is, it seems to be all about the girl. The guys and their parents seem to be left out of almost everything. I assumed that in this day and age, where many wedding expenses are shared by both sets of parents, that the groom and his parents would be more involved. The purpose of this letter is to remind parents of daughters that this is a big day for the groom and his parents, too. Please be considerate and include them in the planning decisions and pre-wedding activities. — It’s Our Big Day, Too! Dear I.O.B.D.T.!: If you are sharing the expenses, you should make it clear — with a smile — that because you are helping to pay for the event, you expect to be included in the planning and prewedding activities. Got it? Dear Abby: Every year on my birthday I would send my mother flowers. I did it for more than 25 years because of something I read as a young man in the Dear Abby column. Mom passed away last year. So, in addition to the flowers I will place on her grave this year, I thought I’d share with all your readers this wonderful gift I received from your column. Every year it brought joy to my mother to receive my bouquet with a note of thanks for all that she had done for me. Mom was kind, gentle, beautiful, loving and an inspiration to many. I miss her very much. I hope my letter will inspire other readers to remember their mothers the same way, and realize how precious and priceless our time with them is. — Joseph in San Diego

DEAR ABBY Dear Joseph: I’m sorry for your loss. Your mother obviously raised a son with all her sterling qualities. I’m pleased the idea you took to heart when my mother wrote this column brought joy to your mother and was meaningful to you. Thank you for writing. Dear Abby: At the end of last year you printed a letter from a reader asking whether it would be rude to ask that a letter of recommendation that contained typographical errors be retyped. You advised that it wouldn’t be rude to ask, and the mistake should be corrected. When my son was to receive his Eagle Scout honor, I sent a letter to his hero, Donald Trump, asking if he might write a short letter of recognition for his accomplishment. Mr. Trump’s reply came within a week, along with an autographed picture. Unfortunately, there was an error in the letter. We called and spoke to his secretary, who was extremely gracious, corrected the letter and walked it right in to Mr. Trump. It was sent the same day. They appreciated our contacting them rather than presenting a less than perfect letter. When letters of this kind are done correctly, in a professional manner, they reflect equally well on a job applicant as well as the person who wrote it. — Proud Mom in New York Dear Proud Mom: Anyone can make a typographical error, and the fact that Donald Trump and his staff corrected the mistake quickly and efficiently is a lesson for everyone who wants to succeed in business — and in life.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Last pilot season NBC made a crazy move. It greenlighted an unlikely new sitcom set in a Mumbai call center. “Outsourced” was the hippest thing to happen to South Asians in the United States since Madonna discovered henna. As a writer, I was thrilled to hear about the show, not only because I’m an American of Indian descent but because I recently lived in Mumbai, helping my husband run a call center. Let’s face it, if my agent couldn’t get me an interview on this one, I might as well move back to Mumbai. As it was, I got a dream job. “Outsourced” debuted to solid reviews from the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, Variety and the Hollywood Reporter. With no bigname stars to draw viewers, it still ranked as high as No. 2 among the network’s scripted programs last fall. Even after a midseason move to 10:30 p.m., “Outsourced” remains one of the most DVR’d primetime shows. In my time on the writing staff, I’ve been overwhelmed by the outpouring of support for the show, especially from members of the South Asian community. Positive comments on Twitter after the show airs heavily outnumber critical ones, and according to The New York Times, even an audience of call center workers in India loved the show. What’s odd, then, is the level of vitriol directed at us by some reviewers. They’ve called it “insulting and condescending,” filled with “offensive stereotypes” and based on “obvious cultural igno-

Courtesy NBC

rance” on the part of the writers. New fans of the show seem to feel the need to post and tweet apologies for liking it: “I’m sorry but I really love ‘Outsourced’” or “I think ‘Outsourced’ is hilarious. Don’t hate me.” Based on their bylines, most of the offended parties are not from the Indian community. Perhaps they don’t realize that we have five South Asian writers on the show telling stories that often come straight from our personal experiences. Or perhaps they don’t believe Indians should make fun of themselves. An early episode featuring the “Indian head bobble” came from my non-Indian husband’s confusion in communicating with his call center staff. A sequence about Todd, the American boss, and his difficulties boarding an Indian train was inspired by a story another Indian writer shared about his grandmother, who spent a lifetime struggling to push her way onto crowded Indian trains, then employed the same tactics on her first visit to America, elbowing whole families to secure her spot on the monorail at Disneyland. These stories made us laugh in

the writers’ room. Yet, when we highlight cultural differences on the show, we risk being called offensive. One online comment vehemently accused us of racism for the following line: Todd: “I didn’t know you guys celebrated Valentine’s Day.” But ignorance of a foreign culture isn’t racist; it’s just ignorance. And as for stereotypes: Simple, recognizable characters are the building blocks of all comedies. The templates we build on are universal ones: the shy wallflower, the ruthless boss, the guy with no social skills. We don’t use what I consider to be Indian stereotypes: doctors, engineers, Spelling Bee champs, Kwik-EMart owners. (And for the record, I’m a huge fan of Apu on “The Simpsons.”) “Outsourced” is not a documentary about call centers. It’s a comedy, which means we tweak and exaggerate to get a laugh. Yet we also have moments of truth that are deftly realized. When Todd encourages Madhuri, the call center’s wallflower with a beautiful voice, to pursue fame and fortune as a singer, she informs him that she already has her dream job. It’s a moment that

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rings true to a pragmatic Indian value system. When Todd encourages Rajiv, his Indian assistant manager, to pursue the woman of his dreams in spite of her father’s disapproval, it also rings true. Americans aren’t as hung up on parental approval, and Todd’s encouragement proves to be a positive catalyst in Rajiv’s life. At the end of the day, the characters in “Outsourced” care about each other and learn from one another. Those who only cite offensive stereotypes are missing the spirit of the show (or perhaps they’ve never actually watched it). What I love most about “Outsourced” is that the humor ultimately comes from a place of affection. “Outsourced” has the potential to celebrate our cultural quirks, to build bridges between communities and perhaps, most important, to prove that there is a viable alternative to the “one brown face in a white ensemble” model of “diversity.” As the Hollywood Reporter put it, “It’s still hard to believe that the network took a chance on it; the public should do the same.” Watch the show. Give it a chance. And don’t feel guilty if you like what you see.

541-312-9626

541-388-4418

BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

MONDAY PRIME TIME 3/28/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News King of Queens King of Queens Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Caprial-John Wolf: Travels Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ This Old House Nightly Business News News That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Steves’ Europe Travelscope ‘G’ This Old House Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

Dancing With the Stars ’ ‘PG’ Å All Together Now: A Celebration How I Met Mad Love ‘PG’ Dancing With the Stars ’ ‘PG’ Å House Unplanned Parenthood ‘14’ News on PDX-TV Antiques Roadshow Dallas ‘G’ Å All Together Now: A Celebration 90210 Revenge With the Nerd ‘14’ Hometime ‘G’ Crafting-Spot Antiques Roadshow Dallas ‘G’ Å

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

(10:01) Castle Law & Murder (N) ‘PG’ The Event Face Off (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Harry’s Law (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Two/Half Men Mike & Molly ‘14’ Hawaii Five-0 ’ ‘14’ Å (10:01) Castle Law & Murder (N) ‘PG’ The Chicago Code Pilot ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Oregon Exp American Experience Dolley Madison ‘G’ Å (DVS) The Event Face Off (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Harry’s Law (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Gossip Girl ’ ‘14’ Å House of Payne Meet the Browns Martha-Sewing 1 Stroke Paint Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Oregon Exp American Experience Dolley Madison ‘G’ Å (DVS)

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Betty Ford: The Real Deal ’ ‘PG’ News Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ’ ‘14’ Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Caprial-John Betty Ford: The Real Deal ’ ‘PG’

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å Intervention Jimmy ‘14’ Å Intervention Jimbo ‘PG’ Å Heavy Sallie; Chad ‘PG’ Å Heavy Mark; Patty ‘PG’ Å 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter ›››› “GoodFellas” (1990, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci. An Irish-Italian hood joins the 1950s New York (11:15) ›››› “GoodFellas” (1990) Robert ››› “The Rainmaker” (1997, Drama) Matt Damon, Claire Danes, Jon Voight. A rookie lawyer goes up against a big insurance 102 40 39 company. Å Mafia. Å De Niro. Å Animal Cops Houston ’ ‘PG’ Å Animal Cops Luckiest Babies ’ ‘14’ I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 26 38 Animal Cops Houston ’ ‘PG’ Å Top Chef Island Fever ‘14’ Å Top Chef Last Supper ‘14’ Å Bethenny Ever After Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Bethenny Ever After (N) Bethenny Ever After 137 44 The Dukes of Hazzard ‘PG’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ‘PG’ Å › “Shut Up and Sing” (2006) David Alan Basche, Chris Bowers. ’ Å (10:15) The Singing Bee ‘PG’ Å (11:15) Cribs ‘PG’ CMT Music ‘PG’ 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ›› “Young Guns” (1988) ’ Biography on CNBC Ben & Jerry. Biography on CNBC Mad Money Biography on CNBC Ben & Jerry. Biography on CNBC Ck 3x Faster Sleep Number 51 36 40 52 The Truth About Shoplifting Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å ›› “Hot Rod” (2007, Comedy) Andy Samberg, Jorma Taccone. Å Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 South Park ‘14’ Journal Joy of Fishing PM Edition Visions of NW Talk of the Town Cooking Journal Desert Word Travels ’ Talk of the Town Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Fish Hooks ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Suite/Deck Suite/Deck “The Suite Life Movie” (2011) Dylan Sprouse. ‘G’ Å Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Good-Charlie Good-Charlie 87 43 14 39 Fish Hooks ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash-Chicago Untamed Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å Monsters and Mysteries in Alaska Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å Alaska: Most Extreme ’ ‘PG’ Å Monsters and Mysteries in Alaska 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Women’s College Basketball SportsCenter (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 Women’s College Basketball NBA Coast to Coast Highlights, analysis and NBA news and information. Elite 24 (N) NASCAR Now Å NBA Tonight SportsNation Å 2010 Poker 22 24 21 24 High School Basketball Boxing Boxing PBA Bowling: 2008 World Champ. AWA Wrestling Å MLB Baseball 1991 Toronto Blue Jays at Texas Rangers 23 25 123 25 College Football From Nov. 6, 2010. Å SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen Make It or Break It (N) ‘14’ Å Secret Life of American Teen The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Secret Life of American Teen Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å 5 Ingredient Fix Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America ‘G’ Unwrapped Candy Store Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Meat- Potatoes Best Thing Ate Ice Brigade Good Eats (N) 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa Bensinger Mariners Mariners Mondays From Aug. 20, 2010. (N) Tennis Outback Champions Series: Boston Mariners The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 Action Sports World Tour (4:30) ››› “Forgetting Sarah Marshall” (2008) Jason Segel, Mila Kunis. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “XXX: State of the Union” (2005, Action) Ice Cube, Willem Dafoe, Scott Speedman. ›› “XXX: State of the Union” (2005) Ice Cube. 131 Curb/Block Curb/Block Curb/Block Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l My First Place My First Place 176 49 33 43 Curb/Block Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers (N) ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 (4:00) Nostradamus: 2012 ‘PG’ Å Funny Kids Funny Kids ››› “Bridget Jones’s Diary” (2001) Renée Zellweger, Colin Firth. Å ››› “Dave” (1993) Kevin Kline. A presidential look-alike takes over for the ailing leader. How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word RJ Berger That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Silent Library (N) Jersey Shore A House Divided ‘14’ Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å RJ Berger RJ Berger Fantasy Factory RJ Berger RJ Berger 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å “Best Player” (2011) Jerry Trainor, Jennette McCurdy. ’ ‘G’ Å My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ ›› “The Punisher” (2004, Action) Thomas Jane, John Travolta, Will Patton. ’ Jail ’ ‘14’ Å 132 31 34 46 UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ › “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning” (2006, Horror) Being Human Dog Eat Dog Being Human Going Dutch (N) Stargate Universe Hope (N) Å Being Human Going Dutch 133 35 133 45 (4:00) ›› “Toolbox Murders” Å Behind Scenes Mark Chironna J. Franklin Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord Å Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Perry Stone ‘G’ Jack Van Impe Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan (N) 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ (6:45) ›››› “In Which We Serve” (1942, War) Noel Coward, John Mills, Bernard (8:45) ››› “Elevator to the Gallows” (1958, Suspense) Jeanne Moreau, Maurice ››› “Jason and the Argonauts” (1963, Fantasy) Todd Arm›››› “Annie Hall” (1977) Woody Allen. A New York comic 101 44 101 29 struggles with an on-and-off romance. Å Miles. Captain and crew of bombed British destroyer press on. Ronet, Jean Wall. A seemingly perfect crime goes terribly bad. strong, Nancy Kovack, Gary Raymond. Å Fabulous Cakes ’ ‘G’ Å Cake Boss ’ ‘PG’ Å Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ 19 Kids-Count Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ’ ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ’ ‘G’ Kitchen Boss (N) Ultimate Cake Off ’ ‘PG’ Å Law & Order Bodies ’ ‘14’ Bones The Skull in the Sculpture ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å Bones ’ ‘14’ Å The Closer Heart Attack ‘14’ Å HawthoRNe Hidden Truths ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Rapture ’ ‘14’ Garfield Show Codename: Kids Codename: Kids Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time Regular Show (N) King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son ››› “Four Weddings and a Funeral” (1994) Hugh Grant. Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Terminal Leave ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Call of Silence ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Navy commander’s death. ‘PG’ WWE Monday Night RAW ’ Å Law & Order: Special Victims Unit 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Basketball Wives Reunion ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop Love & Hip Hop Love & Hip Hop Beverly Hills Wedding Wars ’ ‘PG’ Love & Hip Hop Beverly Hills Wedding Wars ’ ‘PG’ 191 48 37 54 Basketball Wives Reunion ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:30) ››› “Rudy” 1993 Sean Astin. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “G-Force” 2009, Action Bill Nighy. ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “In the Line of Fire” 1993, Suspense Clint Eastwood. ’ ‘R’ Å (10:15) ›› “Rambo III” 1988, Action Sylvester Stallone. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “Raid on Entebbe” 1977, Docudrama Peter Finch, Martin Balsam, Horst Buchholz. ››› “Courage Under Fire” 1996, Drama Denzel Washington. ‘R’ Å ››› “Raid on Entebbe” 1977, Docudrama Peter Finch, Martin Balsam, Horst Buchholz. Dirt Demons Dirt Demons Dirt Demons The Daily Habit Red Bull X-Fighters Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ The Daily Habit Red Bull X-Fighters Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit GolfNow Golf Videos World of Golf World of Golf The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center World of Golf World of Golf The Golf Fix Golf Fitness Learning Center Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å Touched by an Angel Venice ’ ‘G’ The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Runnin’ Rebels of UNLV ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Amelia” 2009, Biography Hilary Swank, Richard Gere, Ewan McGregor. The story Real Time With Bill Maher Journalist ›› “Robin Hood” 2010, Adventure Russell Crowe, Cate Blanchett, William Hurt. Robin and his men battle The Ricky Gervais HBO 425 501 425 10 of famed aviatrix Amelia Earhart. ’ ‘PG’ Å David Brooks. ’ ‘MA’ Å the Sheriff of Nottingham. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Show ‘MA’ “Open Water 2: Adrift” 2006, Suspense Susan May Pratt. ‘R’ Arrested Dev. Arrested Dev. Whitest Kids ›› “The Big Empty” 2003, Comedy Jon Favreau, Bud Cort. ‘R’ ›› “Fall Time” 1995, Drama Mickey Rourke. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:35) ››› “Rush” 1991 Jason Patric. Narcotics officer lovers (6:35) “Deadly Impact” 2009, Suspense Sean Patrick Flanery, (8:15) ›› “Cocktail” 1988, Romance Tom Cruise, Bryan Brown. An arrogant young ›› “Green Zone” 2010, Action Matt Damon, Greg Kinnear. Army inspectors seek MAX 400 508 7 get hooked on drugs in Texas. ’ ‘R’ Å Joe Pantoliano, Amanda Wyss. ’ ‘NR’ Å bartender uses his charm and good looks. ’ ‘R’ Å weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. ’ ‘R’ Å Death Fog ‘PG’ The Whale That Ate Jaws ‘PG’ Explorer ‘G’ Death Fog ‘PG’ The Whale That Ate Jaws ‘PG’ Explorer ‘G’ Hard Time ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ CatDog ‘G’ Å CatDog ‘G’ Å NTOON 89 115 189 Destination Pol. Top Truck Chal Fisher’s ATV Fear No Evil Whitetail Nation Young Blood Hunt Adventure Best of West Off Rd. Overhaul Fisher’s ATV Destination Pol. Top Truck Chal Off Rd. Overhaul Western Extreme OUTD 37 307 43 Nurse Jackie Game United States of (4:30) “Ahead of (5:45) “Agora” 2009, Adventure Rachel Weisz, Max Minghella, Oscar Isaac. iTV. A slave falls in love with Californication ’ Californication ’ Shameless Frank and Karen’s secret is Nurse Jackie Game United States of SHO 500 500 On ‘MA’ Time” 2009 ‘NR’ Hypatia of Alexandria. ‘R’ ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å revealed. ’ ‘MA’ Å On ‘MA’ Tara ‘MA’ Å Tara (N) ’ ‘MA’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ The 10 ‘PG’ The 10 Car Warriors ’79 Cadillac Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ The 10 ‘PG’ The 10 Car Warriors ’79 Cadillac NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (5:05) ›› “2 Fast 2 Furious” 2003, Action Paul Walker. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (6:55) ››› “Hellboy” 2004, Fantasy Ron Perlman. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “The Karate Kid” 2010, Drama Jaden Smith, Jackie Chan. ’ ‘PG’ Å The Sixth Sense STARZ 300 408 300 (6:35) “I Do & I Don’t” 2007 Jane Lynch. A young couple must ›› “The Twilight Saga: New Moon” 2009, Romance Kristen Stewart. Bella finds her- (10:15) “The Tomb” 2009, Horror Wes Bentley. A writer falls (11:45) ›› “Premo› “Crossroads” 2002 Britney Spears. Three young women hit TMC 525 525 the road on a trek to Los Angeles. ‘PG-13’ endure premarital counseling. ’ ‘R’ Å self drawn into the world of werewolves. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å under the spell of a temptress who steals souls. ‘R’ nition” ‘R’ (4:30) NHL Hockey Chicago Blackhawks at Detroit Red Wings (Live) Hockey Central Lord Stanley NHL Overtime Bull Riding PBR Table Mountain Casino Invitational From Fresno, Calif. NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å 48 Hours on WE Trapped ‘14’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 28, 2011 C3

CALENDAR TUESDAY HEROES BREAKFAST: Celebrate community heroes who took extraordinary action to help others; proceeds benefit the Oregon Mountain River Chapter of the American Red Cross; $25; 7:30 a.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 541-382-2142, ext. 7 or www.mountainriver.redcross.org. TALK OF THE TOWN: COTV hosts a forum to discuss visions of education; reservations required; free; 6:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-5814, talk@ bendbroadband.com or www.talkofthetownco .com. DANNY SCHMIDT: The Austin, Texasbased singer-songwriter performs; $10; 7 p.m.; Three Creeks Brewing, 721 Desperado Court, Sisters; 541-549-1963. HIGH DESERT CHAMBER MUSIC — TRIO WEST: String musicians play selections from Dvorak, Beethoven and Schubert; $35, $10 students with ID; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700, info@ highdesertchambermusic.com or www.towertheatre.org. ROLLER RUMBLE RACE SERIES: Competitors race 400 meters on bikes attached to fork-mounted rollers; $5 to race, $3 spectators; 7:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m. sign-up; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-610-7460 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

WEDNESDAY THE ASCETIC JUNKIES: The Portland-based pop band performs; free; 11 a.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700. THE ASCETIC JUNKIES: The Portland-based pop band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. WINDANCE HOUSE CONCERT: Austin, Texas-based singersongwriter Danny Schmidt performs; call for Bend location; $15 in advance, $17 at the door; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; 541-306-0048 or jherbgirl@yahoo.com. “TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the story about Mitch Albom’s reunion with his college professor and the life lessons he learns; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. OREGON BADLANDS WILDERNESS CELEBRATION: Celebrate the creation of the Badlands Wilderness, with live music, refreshments and more; proceeds benefit Friends of Oregon Badlands Wilderness; $10; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; caledonian@ bendcable.com.

THURSDAY THE SINGLE REMEDY: Singles from Central Oregon’s medical community are auctioned off, with a silent auction; registration requested; proceeds benefit Volunteers in Medicine; free; 5-8 p.m.; Whispering Winds, 2920 Conners Ave., Bend; 541-312-0051. “TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the story about Mitch Albom’s reunion with his college professor and the life lessons he learns; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “FRONTIER”: A screening of the whitewater film, followed by

performances by The Forest and TapWater; $5; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331.

FRIDAY ANTIQUES, COLLECTIBLES, ART FUNDRAISER: Sale of books, jewelry, watches, artwork, clothing and more; proceeds benefit the center; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. ART HOP: Biannual event features artists paired with local businesses for receptions; see website for participating venues; free; 5-9 p.m.; downtown Bend; www .downtownbend.org. COSA SONG OF THE YEAR SHOW: The Central Oregon Songwriters Association presents its 13th annual show, with a silent auction, live performances and audience voting; proceeds benefit the association; $5; 6 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-420-2949. TOUR DU CHOCOLAT: Taste chocolates and wine; $5; 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “GUYS AND DOLLS”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the romantic musical comedy, set in New York; $15, $10 students; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-4195558, ed@beatonline.org or www.beattickets.org. “LETTERS HOME FROM ICELAND”: A screening of the travelogue about the wilds of Iceland; followed by a discussion with the author of “The Tricking of Freya”; part of Jefferson County Community Read; free; 78:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld .org. “TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the story about Mitch Albom’s reunion with his college professor and the life lessons he learns; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. AN EVENING OF JOKERS AND FOOLS: A night of improv and stand-up comedy; may contain adult content; $8; 8-10 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. BABYLON NIGHTMARE TOUR: Featuring performances by Jahdan Blakkamoore, Jah Sun, The Redemption Band and MC Mystic; $10 in advance, $14 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989.

SATURDAY VFW BREAKFAST: Community breakfast with biscuits and gravy, sausage, ham, eggs, coffee and more; $7, $6 seniors and children; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. ANTIQUES, COLLECTIBLES, ART FUNDRAISER: Sale of books, jewelry, watches, artwork, clothing and more; proceeds benefit the center; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; proceeds benefit the La Pine Senior Activity Center; $5, $4 with a trade gun, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-536-6237. TACK SALE: Proceeds benefit 4-H

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

club Horse n Around; free admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-390-4270 or janisdinkel@gmail.com. APRIL FOOL’S SCAVENGER HUNT: With a raffle; proceeds benefit the school; $10; 10 a.m.; Start Here! Preschool, 348 N.W. Seventh St., Redmond; 541-504-5283. SPAGHETTI FEED AND FUNDRAISER: Meal of spaghetti, salad and bread, with a silent auction and games; proceeds benefit Deshoots Youth Sports; $30, $20 ages 17 and younger; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Halligan Ranch, Central Oregon Sporting Clays and Hunting Preserve, 9020 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-420-4332. SPRING BOOK SALE: The Friends of the Bend Public Library hosts a sale of books in a variety of genres; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-389-1622. “GUYS AND DOLLS”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the romantic musical comedy, set in New York; $15, $10 students; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541419-5558, ed@beatonline.org or www.beattickets.org. “GUYS AND DOLLS”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the romantic musical comedy, set in New York; $15, $10 students; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-4195558, ed@beatonline.org or www.beattickets.org. JEFFERSON COUNTY COMMUNITY READ: Christina Sunley, author of “The Tricking of Freya,” talks about Iceland and her novel-writing quest; free; 7-8:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the story about Mitch Albom’s reunion with his college professor and the life lessons he learns; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541389-0803 or www.cascades theatrical.org.

SUNDAY SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; proceeds benefit the La Pine Senior Activity Center; $5, $4 with a trade gun, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-536-6237. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-5451. SPRING BOOK SALE: The Friends of the Bend Public Library hosts a bag sale of books in a variety of genres; free admission, $4 per bag of books; 1-4 p.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-389-1622. “GUYS AND DOLLS”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the romantic musical comedy, set in New York; $15, $10 students; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541419-5558, ed@beatonline.org or www.beattickets.org. “THE MOST DANGEROUS MAN IN AMERICA”: A screening of the 2009 documentary; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-385-3226. “TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE”: Final performance of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of the story about Mitch Albom’s reunion with his college professor and the life lessons he learns; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.

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CHARITY BINGO: Proceeds benefit Prineville Hospice; $5; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659.

MONDAY April 4 BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “Kapitoil” by Teddy Wayne; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; noon; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

TUESDAY April 5 GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “Beyond Borders: The Debate Over Human Migration,” which explores the immigration controversy; free; 6:308 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-8156504. PUB QUIZ: Answer trivia on topics from pop culture to politics; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Kurera Foundation; $40 per team; 6:30-9:30 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541306-0864, vivien@kurerafund.org or www.kurerafund.org. ROLLER RUMBLE RACE SERIES: Competitors race 400 meters on bikes attached to fork-mounted rollers; $5 to race, $3 spectators; 7:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m. sign-up; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-610-7460 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

WEDNESDAY April 6 “IT’S IN THE BAG” LECTURE SERIES: Jay Casbon presents the lecture “Failure is Not an Option: College Bound Teenagers and Stress,” which explores research behind the stresses faced by high-performing teens; free; noon-1 p.m.; OSUCascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3100 or www.osucascades .edu/lunchtime-lectures. CHRISTABEL AND THE JONS: The swing band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. LINDA PURL WITH LEE LESSACK: The vocalists perform music by Johnny Mercer; $37 or $42; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. ICE CUBE: The legendary hip-hop artist performs; $27.50 plus fees in advance, $30 at the door; 8:30 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www .randompresents.com.

THURSDAY April 7 BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “Kapitoil” by Teddy Wayne; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. EVERYDAY PROPHETS: The Portland-based reggae-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. IRATION: The Santa Barbara, Calif.based reggae band performs; $10; 7-11 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend. THE BASEBALL PROJECT: A baseball-themed rock band, including R.E.M. guitarist Peter Buck, with opening acts The Minus 5 and Steve Wynn; $12 plus fees in advance, $15 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoon brewing.com.

Bachelor Continued from C1 At Bachelor, crews have swapped out light bulbs for more efficient versions — and are now replacing some compact fluorescent light bulbs that were installed 10 or 15 years ago with more efficient versions, Rathbun said. Other projects include installing dishwashers and switching to reusable plates and silverware to decrease waste, he said, and last year the resort put in new airlocks on its lodge’s main doors to keep cold winds out and warm air inside. “We look at these from a very practical standpoint as well as a core values standpoint: if we can do the right thing, and lower our cost to heat,” he said.

Switching to propane Bachelor also has been switching from electric heat to a propane system, and will complete the transition this summer with the kitchen in Sunrise Lodge. “A lot of our power here in the Northwest is supplied by hydroelectric, but we still get a little bit of our power from coal-burning plants,” Rathbun said, adding that even hydro has a small amount of carbon emissions, so the switch to propane is a cleaner way to generate heat. He also has his eye on a composting program, he said, and is trying to convince local garbage companies to help develop a program for the mountain. The lodges also could be changing the way they handle trash and recycling, Rathbun said, since people keep throwing away not only recyclables but the reusable plates and silverware. “We do have comingle (recycling), but it’s not very effective,” he said. “Rather than ask our guests, we’re going to sort it ourselves.” And in its outline for future development, submitted to the U.S. Forest Service, Bachelor proposed adding a biomass facility at the mountain, which would burn woody debris and potential wildfire fuels in the forest to generate steam and heat the buildings, Rathbun said. “Rather than burning propane,

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we’d be able to heat them all with a process that would even help the Forest Service reduce the fuels,” he said. The proposal for future improvements also includes a new lodge — something the authors of the Ski Area Environmental Scorecard noted to keep an eye on. The scorecard is a way for conservation groups to evaluate how ski areas nationwide are doing on sustainability and environmental issues, said Paul Joyce with Colorado Wild, which is one of the primary organizations involved in issuing the annual report. “The main criteria, our biggest concern, is expansion into terrain, which affects habitat, affects vegetation, affects runoff, water — everything,” he said. In general, ski resorts this last year did not add new developments — probably due to a lack of funding, Joyce said. But some resorts do develop onto wetlands, or put bulldozers on mountains to grade the slopes and more. “There’s still a lot of challenges,” he said. The scorecard also takes into account things like road development, parking lot expansion, oldgrowth habitat protection, and actions like retrofitting faucets, using biodiesel, recycling programs and more. Mt. Bachelor received a “B” on the latest scorecard. But, Joyce said, because the mountain doesn’t respond to surveys about what it has been doing, it’s hard to give Bachelor credit for some of its actions. Rathbun said he wasn’t a fan of the scorecard, since it gives development more weight than sustainability efforts. So places that have not expanded, like Bachelor, get high marks, while others that do expand but also have strong sustainability programs get low marks, he said. He added that with all the visitors to the mountain, it’s a chance for Bachelor to take a leadership position for green efforts. “More people should be focused on doing the same things, in their own businesses and own homes,” Rathbun said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

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C4 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 28, 2011 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, March 28, 2011: This year, adaptability will mark your success. To observers, it looks like you bring a full gallop to a screeching halt and reverse direction. Your actions might not make sense to many people. Are you running a popularity contest, or are you living your life? If you are single, you meet friends and potential lovers through your immediate circle. It is more than possible that Mr. or Ms. Right will appear on the scene. If you are attached, demonstrating more interest and caring only adds to the happiness of the bond. Be open to a new hobby or pastime. AQUARIUS is always a friend. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Power plays could define meetings and dealings in general. What people don’t realize is that if you want to have it your way, you could and would. Still, at a certain point, you will go in, deal with the issue and then close the door, leaving people with their mouths hanging open. Tonight: Only where people are. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH A must event could change the tone of the day. Others could come to blows, as their opinions are so varied. Knowing what you want and your expectations will help enormously. Some situations need to blow up. Don’t intervene. Tonight: Could be late. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Your ability to move in a

new direction could be colored by a strange reluctance that you might not understand. Actually, you are connecting more with your subconscious. Dealing with feelings of that nature might not be surprising and is great in the long run. Tonight: Honor your limits. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Your knowledge benefits someone more than you think. An associate, co-worker or friend could be trying to get more feedback. If you feel uncomfortable, say so, and establish your boundaries. There is nothing wrong with that. Tonight: Togetherness works. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You can juggle a lot more than most people and keep everyone happy. You will have to demonstrate this ability now. However, new information and an inquiry could force your mind to drift. Perhaps the need to escape a conversation takes priority. Tonight: Catch up on news. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH You will focus on what you do best. Many people are distracted. You also realize the discipline of handling your assets well — be it money or effort. Avoid making judgments about others. Tonight: Pick up what you want. You deserve a treat. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Seriousness marks your actions. A somber approach goes far, but others might be reactive. Many people remember when you were a little more giddy or charming. Trust that the balance will return, but for now, it is the way it is. Tonight: Very playful — finally! SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

HHH Listen to what is happening in your immediate domestic environment. A sense of depression or sadness exists within you. During conversations, be aware of your internal signals and what they mean. If you aren’t sure what your feelings mean, slow down. Tonight: Start handling an issue. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH You are flying high and full of energy. Unexpected developments impact your creativity. A child or loved one could be the source of the issue. Avoid being overly challenging with a difficult friend. Relax. You can only do so much. Tonight: What suits your fancy? CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Be aware of what is going on. If someone is acting unpredictably, it is because this person simply cannot integrate everything around him or her. You see an acting out of mixed signals. Kindly help this person integrate. Tonight: Indulge. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb19) HHHHH Though you might be on top of everything, others are not. This discrepancy could cause problems in a project or key venture. You certainly don’t want to do everything. Go for a novel approach to this problem. Tonight: Detach from today, trusting that you will find the answer. PISCES (Feb 20-March 19) HH Know when to act. Right now, much occurs in an unexpected manner. Know what you need to do in order to feel better, and act with certainty. Brainstorm with those who look at life differently. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. © 2011 by King Features Syndicate


C6 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Tech

state regulatory agencies around the country, received a $50,000 loan from Deschutes County in December. The loan was intended to help the company move to a larger office space in Bend, which happened in January, and to hire and train more employees. Also in December, the company said it would double its work force from 40 to more than 80 after it had secured a contract from North Carolina’s Department of Health and Human Services. It has hired 35 people since Jan. 1 and looks to hire nine to 11 more this year.

Continued from C1 What’s more, it’s possible more companies are laying off people, some of whom go on to start their own companies. That would explain the generally increasing number of companies both in Oregon and in Deschutes County. “Some won’t survive,” Lee said. “Many will.”

Growth stories Whatever the scenarios, growth stories abound at Deschutes County technology companies. Earlier this month, Dent Instruments, a Bend manufacturer of energy-measurement devices, said it had bought a Bend building to serve as its new headquarters. Jim Harrer, president of Bendbased Alchemy, which produces software for moving organizations from mainframe computing systems to less costly alternatives — such as Microsoft’s .NET platform — said the company is in the process of starting to also work directly with clients to install programs rather than rely on another company to do so. To accommodate the changes, Harrer said, the company is considering a move to a much bigger office location in the city. Meanwhile, Alchemy is looking to add marketing and software development employees. SocialEatia.com, a Bend-based website that advertises restaurants’ specials and other promotions through social media, made its site live last month, and CEO

Free will Continued from C1 He’s fully to blame for his heinous crime, according to more than 70 percent of the people queried by Nichols, an experimental philosopher at the University of Arizona, and his Yale colleague Joshua Knobe. Is Bill being judged illogically? In one way, yes. The chain of reasoning may seem flawed to some philosophers, and the belief in free will may seem naive to the psychologists and neuroscientists who argue that we’re driven by forces beyond our conscious control — an argument that Bill’s lawyer might end up borrowing in court. But in another way it makes perfect sense to hold Bill fully accountable for murder. His judges pragmatically intuit that regardless of whether free will exists, our society depends on everyone’s believing it does. The benefits of this belief have been demonstrated in other research showing that when people doubt free will, they do worse at their jobs and are less honest. In one experiment, some people read a passage from Francis Crick, the molecular biologist, asserting that free will is a quaint old notion no longer taken seriously by intellectuals, especially not psychologists and neuroscientists. Afterward, when compared with a control group that read a different passage from Crick (who died in 2004) these people expressed more skepticism about free will — and promptly cut themselves some moral slack while taking a math test. Asked to solve a series of arithmetic problems in a computerized quiz, they cheated by getting the answers through a glitch in the computer that they’d been asked not to exploit. The supposed glitch, of course, had been put there as a temptation by the researchers, Kathleen Vohs of the University of Minnesota and Jonathan Schooler of the University of California, Santa Barbara. In a follow-up experiment, the psychologists gave another test in which people were promised $1 for every correct answer — and got to compile their own scores. Just as Vohs and Schooler feared, people were more likely to cheat after being exposed beforehand to arguments against free will. These people went home with more unearned cash than did the other people.

Guiding behavior This behavior in the lab, the researchers noted, squares with studies in recent decades showing an increase in the number of college students who admit to cheating. During this same period, other studies have shown a weakening in the popular belief in free will (although it’s still widely held). “Doubting one’s free will may undermine the sense of self as agent,” Vohs and Schooler concluded. “Or, perhaps, denying free will simply provides the ultimate excuse to behave as one likes.” That could include goofing off on the job, according to another

A turning point? Rob Kerr / The Bulletin ile photo

Mark Hinkle, right, and Peter Ozolin of the Bend company Manzama share a laugh at their small office in November. The company was approved for a $26,000 loan after it proposed the hiring of 13 new employees by July 2012. Evan Julber said he intends to fill up the company’s large office in the Old Mill District with plenty of new employees. A beefed-up local work force, Julber said, will give the company the ability to respond to customer-service requests from users of SocialEatia sites in other cities, which are to come within a few months. TeleSource Center, a technology-focused telemarketing company that moved its operations from Phoenix, Ariz., to Bend last year, has already jumped to a bigger space in the city and hired several new employees to work as representatives at the new location. TeleSource also is spending to keep servers at its site, in order to hold its own data locally — a

study done by Vohs along with a team of psychologists led by Tyler Stillman of Southern Utah University. They went to a day-labor employment agency armed with questionnaires for a sample of workers to fill out confidentially. These questionnaires were based on a previously developed research instrument called the Free Will and Determinism Scale. The workers were asked how strongly they agreed with statements like “Strength of mind can always overcome the body’s desires” or “People can overcome any obstacles if they truly want to” or “People do not choose to be in the situations they end up in — it just happens.” The psychologists also measured other factors, including the workers’ general satisfaction with their lives, how energetic they felt, how strongly they endorsed an ethic of hard work. None of these factors was a reliable predictor of their actual performance on the job, as rated by their supervisors. But the higher the workers scored on the scale of belief in free will, the better their ratings on the job. “Free will guides people’s choices toward being more moral and better performers,” Vohs said. “It’s adaptive for societies and individuals to hold a belief in free will, as it helps people adhere to cultural codes of conduct that portend healthy, wealthy and happy life outcomes.”

Different mechanisms People tend to agree, across cultures, that a hypothetical person in a hypothetically deterministic world would not be responsible for his sins. This same logic explains why they’ll excuse Mark’s tax evasion, a crime that doesn’t have an obvious victim. But that logic doesn’t hold when people are confronted with what researchers call a “high-affect” transgression, an emotionally upsetting crime like Bill’s murder of his family. “It’s two different kinds of mechanisms in the brain,” said Alfred Mele, a philosopher at Florida State University who directs the Big Questions in Free Will project. “If you give people an abstract story and a hypothetical question, you’re priming the theory machine in their head. But their theory might be out of line with their intuitive reaction to a detailed story about someone doing something nasty. As experimenters have shown, the default assumption for people is that we do have free will.” At an abstract level, people seem to be what philosophers call incompatibilists: those who believe free will is incompatible with determinism. If everything that happens is determined by what happened before, it can seem only logical to conclude you can’t be morally responsible for your next action. But there is also a school of philosophers — in fact, perhaps the majority school — who consider free will compatible with their definition of determinism. These compatibilists believe that we do make choices, even though these choices are determined by previous events and influences. In the words of Arthur Schopenhauer,

change from previous operations. Manzama, a Bend company that specializes in Web-based subscriptions to streams of legal information taken from social media websites, has been adding employees steadily since it was established last year. In December, the Bend City Council unanimously approved a $26,000 loan to the company from the Bend Opportunity Fund, after the company proposed the hiring of 13 new employees by July 2012. In October, Manzama won the $200,000 prize from the 2010 Bend Venture Conference, for a presentation that impressed investors. The Bend company GL Solutions, which designs software for

Carolyn Eagan, regional economist for the Oregon Employment Department, said statistics for 2010 and 2011 are not yet available. All she could do was share her personal impressions of what has happened in Deschutes County since the end of 2009, when the currently available data end. Eagan said she suspects 2010 will prove to be a turning point for high-tech in Deschutes County. “The state data shows that 2010 didn’t do a ton, but ... the beginning of 2011 ... has shown some growth,” she said. “So it could be flat for 2010, and we’ll see the growth, maybe,” in 2011. Lee is more confident of an improvement as of late. “We’ve really seen the biggest growth in the last quarter of 2010 and the first quarter of 2011,” Lee said. Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@bendbulletin.com.

Scientists study seals’ grunts and growls in bid to keep them safe By Nadia Drake San Jose Mercury News

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Scientists learning the snorty language of Northern elephant seals are hoping to understand how the giant blubbery mammals use vocalizations to prevent costly fights and structure their colonies — and how we can keep the expanding population safe. Armed with microphones, researchers from UC Santa Cruz’s Institute of Marine Sciences have spent hundreds of hours on the brush-filled, windy dunes and beaches of Ano Nuevo State Park, tracking more than 160 elephant seals and collecting some of their grumbly grunts and growls. “These are fascinating animals, and they use sounds for really important parts of their lives,” said Brandon Southall, a marine scientist and UC Santa Cruz research associate who studies elephant seal communication. Like showing who’s boss. Scientists think males use vocal calls to prevent fighting — much like smack-talk between two guys in a bar — since seals vocalize before coming to blows. Often, challenges are settled by the calls alone. “It’s striking how rare physical fights are,” said Colleen Reichmuth, research director at UCSC’s Pinniped Cognition and Sensory Systems Laboratory. But when two males the size of a Ford Explorer fight, it’s bloody and violent. Once hunted to near-extinction, the Northern elephant seals have rebounded. Now, scientists

are concerned about potential human impacts on the growing population, and they hope that understanding the seals’ communication and organization will help protect the bulbousnosed cutie-pies. “The more we can learn, the more we can predict how they’ll respond to these types of encroachments and better protect them,” said Caroline Casey, the project’s field research coordinator. And as winter ends, it might seem quiet during a visit to Ano Nuevo, because most of the seals have left this favored breeding ground. Make no mistake, though, they are among the loudest animals on land. Their calls can reach 130 decibels, as loud as a jackhammer, with frequencies low enough to vibrate the sand around them. This season, scientists used a speaker to broadcast recorded elephant seal calls to specific males on the beach. One seal, when hearing the recording, turned around and sped away. Another charged the speaker. “We’ve had a few speakers run over,” Reichmuth said. The different responses indicate that the calls are important, and the next step is figuring out what’s encoded in the orations. “There’s no one thing about the sound that allows you to know whether it’s a big male, or a dominant male,” Reichmuth said. When the seals return next winter, scientists will be there once more. “It’s kind of addicting,” Reichmuth said. “Sometimes the people migrate back as well.”

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“Man can do what he wills, but he cannot will what he wills.” Does that sound confusing — or ridiculously illogical? Compatibilism isn’t easy to explain. But it seems to jibe with our gut instinct that Bill is morally responsible even though he’s living in a deterministic universe. Nichols suggests that his experiment with Mark and Bill shows that in our abstract brains we’re incompatibilists, but in our hearts we’re compatibilists. “This would help explain the persistence of the philosophical dispute over free will and moral responsibility,” Nichols writes in

Science. “Part of the reason that the problem of free will is so resilient is that each philosophical position has a set of psychological mechanisms rooting for it.” Some scientists like to dismiss the intuitive belief in free will as an exercise in self-delusion — a simple-minded bit of “confabulation,” as Crick put it. But these supposed experts are deluding themselves if they think the question has been resolved. Free will hasn’t been disproved scientifically or philosophically. The more that researchers investigate free will, the more good reasons there are to believe in it.

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Women’s College Basketball Inside Baylor’s Brittney Griner scores 40 points in leading the Lady Bears to the regional final, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MARCH 28, 2011

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

P R E P S P O R T S C O M M E N TA RY

CYCLING CENTRAL

Former Mountain View graduate does plenty of dirty work for WSU

Three-game CBI finals up next for Oregon, Creighton EUGENE — The University of Oregon men’s basketball team (19-17) will play Creighton (22-14) tonight in Game 1 on the best-of-three championship series of the 2011 College Basketball Invitational. Tip time for the Ducks-Bluejays contest is scheduled for 5 p.m. PDT at Qwest Center in Omaha. Game 2, which will be played in Eugene at Matthew Knight Arena, is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Wednesday. A deciding Game 3, if necessary, is scheduled for Friday in Eugene. UO is 1-0 all-time against the Bluejays. Oregon won 7564 in the only meeting back on Dec. 26, 1974, in a game played in Portland. — From wire reports

BEAU EASTES

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or the past two years, Mountain View graduate Abe Lodwick has gotten his hands dirty doing the work few relish in men’s college basketball. A starter for Washington State for the past two seasons, Lodwick has excelled at the less glamorous parts of the game for the Cougars. Rebounding, defense, strategic fouls — Lodwick may be the only starter in Division I who has almost as many fouls this season (113) as he does points (123). “He’s not putting up big numbers,” Washington State coach

CYCLING Bend Bella Cyclists hosting season kickoff meeting The Bend Bella Cyclists, a recreational cycling club for women, is hosting its annual riding season kickoff meeting next week. Both current and former members as well as newcomers are invited to attend. The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 7, at Pine Mountain Sports in Bend. Snacks and drinks will be provided and a prize raffle will be part of the evening’s festivities. The Bend Bellas, now in their sixth year, host weekly mountain- and road-bike rides for women in a friendly, noncompetitive environment throughout the spring, summer and fall. For more information on the club, go to www.bendbellacyclists.org or e-mail Melanie at mgrandjacques@yahoo.com. — Bulletin staff report

EQUESTRIAN MV, Redmond riders lead way in OHSET district meet REDMOND — Redmond’s Jessica Dillin and Mountain View’s Laurie MacWhorter paced local riders with four class wins apiece at the second Oregon High School Equestrian Teams Central Oregon District meet of the 2011 season. The three-day competition concluded Sunday at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center and included riders from Bend, Crook County, Dufur, Hood River Valley, Lakeview, La Pine, Madras, Mountain View, Pendleton, Redmond, Sisters, Summit and The Dalles Wahtonka high schools. Dillin notched individual class wins in working rancher and reining. She was also part of Redmond victories in the working pairs and short program drill team classes. MacWhorter won the in hand trail, showmanship and stock seat equitation classes. She was also a member of the Cougars’ winning in hand obstacle relay. The third and final district meet of the season will take place April 15-17, also at the Deschutes fairgrounds. Results from the meet are listed in today’s Scoreboard on Page D2. — Bulletin staff report

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 College baseball ........................D3 Auto racing ................................D3 Golf ............................................D3 College basketball .................... D4 Cycling Central..........................D5

Ken Bone says about Lodwick, a redshirt junior who is averaging 3.6 points and 4.1 rebounds per game this season. “But he does everything else. … He’s as valuable as anyone on our team. The intangibles he brings, not a lot of other guys are capable of bringing.” It’s been an up-and-down season for the Cougars. They missed out on Abe Lodwick an NCAA tournament berth, but they have won three games in the National Invitation Tournament and play Wichita State in the tourney’s semifinals Tuesday night at Madison Square Garden in New York City. See WSU / D4

2011 PREP BASEBALL OUTLOOK Mountain View pitcher Alex Robinett and coach Dave McKae. Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Team BMC mountain bike racer Ina McLean, 52, rides her Niner Air9 bike on the Deschutes River Trail near Lava Island Falls with her dog Mango Friday.

A twenty-what? Twenty-niners: What is it they’re good for?

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n the lexicon of mountain bikers, terms like singlespeed, dual suspension, hardtail, fully rigid and travel (as in, “I have five inches of rear-suspension travel”) are common these days. Into that jargon has crept a relatively new term, one that may have some riders new to the mountain bike scene scratching their heads. A twenty-what? Niner? What in the name of knobby tires is that? A 29er (which often appears as simply “niner”) refers to a mountain bike with widerdiameter rims. Standard mountain bike rims are approximately 26 inches in diameter.

HEATHER CLARK

Twenty-niner mountain bikes have — you guessed it — 29-inch rims. So how much difference do those 3 inches make? “It’s like cheating,” says Bend’s Lawrence Fisher, 36, quoting the comment his wife Melanie said after her first ride on a 29er. “She went and rode on the trails, and she’s like, ‘Holy crap. I rode down a trail I have never been able to do and it’s so easy.’ ” The “cheating,” so to speak, is a product of the surface area — or footprint — of the 29er tires. More rubber means the tires can adhere to more of the trail or obstacle. See Twenty / D5

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL: NCAA TOURNAMENT

Unthinkable foursome heading to Houston

Pitching will be a bright spot for Cougars in 2011 By Keith Bleyer The Bulletin

Mountain View senior pitcher Alex Robinett throws a baseball with military precision. It is no surprise, then, that the Cougar standout hopes to head to West Point in the fall to play baseball for the Black Knights at the United States Military Academy. The Intermountain Conference pitcher of the year in 2008

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Even in the unpredictable, anything-goes world of March Madness, this is a Final Four nobody saw coming. Kentucky, Connecticut, Butler and Virginia Commonwealth — the improbable, the implausible, the unthinkable and the downright unimaginable. In one game in Houston next Saturday, No. 4 seed Kentucky will play No. 3 Connecticut — not a completely absurd thought as a Final Four matchup, though hardly a popular pick given their up-and-down regular seasons. In the other game, it will be No. 11 Virginia Commonwealth against No. 8 Butler — the team that was almost universally panned when its name was called on Selection Sunday against the defending national runner-up from a 4,500student campus whose amazing success story had supposedly run its course. “It never gets old,” Bulldogs senior Matt Howard said. Nor does the NCAA tournament, the threeweek office pool that places the so-called experts on even footing with those who fill out brackets because they like a team’s colors or its mascot. Anything goes. Anyone can win.

as a freshman, Robinett missed almost all of the 2009 season after elbow surgery. Working on a limited pitch count for much of last season, Robinett returned to the mound and went 2-1 with a 1.39 earned-run average and 63 strikeouts over 35 1⁄3 innings. “He has a great future ahead of him,” says first-year Mountain View coach Dave McKae. “That kid can really chuck a baseball.” See 2011 / D4

NCAA Tournament Final Four Reliant Stadium, Houston

WE DO

NATIONAL SEMIFINALS Saturday, April 2 No. 8 Butler (27-9) vs. No. 11 Virginia Commonwealth (28-11), 3:09 p.m. No. 4 Kentucky (29-8) vs. No. 3 Connecticut (309), 5:49 p.m.

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP Monday, April 4 Semifinal winners

And never has that been more true than this year. Four teams with a combined 37 losses. Four teams whose combined seeding equals 26, breaking the record of 22 in 2000. Not a single No. 1 seed for only the second time since seeding began in 1979 and, according to STATS LLC., the first time that no 1 or 2 seed will be there. See Houston / D4

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D2 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

BASEBALL

Today Baseball: Bend at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Redmond at South Eugene (DH), 1 p.m. Boys golf: Redmond at Portland Country Club, 10 a.m.; Madras at Estacada, TBA Girls golf: Madras at Molalla, 1 p.m.

10 a.m. — MLB, spring training, Pittsburgh Pirates at Minnesota Twins, MLB Network. 1 p.m. — MLB, spring training, Cincinnati Reds at Chicgo White Sox, MLB Network. 7:30 p.m. — MLB, spring training, Oakland Athletics at San Francisco Giants (delayed), MLB Network.

SOCCER 2 p.m. — English Premier League, Manchester United vs. Bolton (taped), FSNW.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Women’s NCAA Tournament, Regional final, Notre Dame vs. Tennessee, ESPN. 4:30 p.m. — High school boys, 2011 Powerade Jamfest, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — Men’s college, CBI Tournament, final, Game 1, Oregon at Creighton, HDNet. 6 p.m. — Women’s NCAA Tournament, Regional final, Gonzaga vs. Stanford, ESPN.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Chicago Blackhawks at Detroit Red Wings, VS. network.

TUESDAY BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB, spring training, Detroit Tigers at New York Yankees, ESPN. 1 p.m. — MLB, spring training, Seattle Mariners at Colorado Rockies, FSNW. 4 p.m. — MLB, spring training, Minnesota Twins at Atlanta Braves, MLB Network. 8 p.m. — MLB, spring training, Seattle Mariners at Colorado Rockies (same-day tape), MLB Network.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Women’s NCAA Tournament, Regional final, Duke vs. Connecticut, ESPN. 4 p.m. — NIT Tournament, first semifinal, Wichita State vs. Washington State, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — NIT Tournament, second semifinal, Alabama vs. Colorado, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Women’s NCAA Tournament, Regional final, Texas A&M vs. Baylor, ESPN. 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Chicago Blackhawks at Boston Bruins, VS. network.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — Men’s college, CBI Tournament, finals, Game 1, Oregon at Creighton, KBND-AM 1110. 5:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at San Antonio Spurs, KRCOAM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Tennis • Fish reaches fourth round at Key Biscayne: American Mardy Fish beat No. 17 seed Richard Gasquet 6-4, 63 in the third round of the Sony Ericsson Open on Sunday in Key Biscayne, Fla. Also advancing was No. 30-seeded John Isner, who won an all-American matchup against qualifier Alex Bogomolov Jr., 6-2, 7-6 (4). In women’s play, No. 2-seeded Kim Clijsters earned her 500th career victory by beating Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3.

Basketball • AP Source: Swoopes to sign with Tulsa Shock: Former WNBA star Sheryl Swoopes is set to agree to a deal with the Tulsa Shock, a person with knowledge of the situation told The Associated Press on Sunday night. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the Shock weren’t announcing the deal until today. Swoopes, who just turned 40 this past week, last played in the league in 2008 for the Seattle Storm before spending the last few years overseas. She won four championships while playing with the Houston Comets and earned three WNBA MVP awards, the last of which came in 2005.

Baseball • RHP Carlos Silva released by Chicago Cubs: Carlos Silva was released by the Chicago Cubs on Sunday, one day after they told the veteran pitcher he would not make the opening-day roster. The move leaves the Cubs on the hook for Silva’s $11.5 million salary this season. The 31-year-old right-hander made it clear Saturday he would not accept a minor league assignment. — The Associated Press

NHL ROUNDUP

Canucks reach 50 wins The Associated Press COLUMBUS, Ohio — Chris Higgins had two goals and an assist and the Vancouver Canucks beat the Columbus Blue Jackets 4-1 on Sunday to reach 50 victories for the first time in their 40-year history. Canucks backup Cory Schneider made 39 saves to improve to 15-3-2 and help the NHL-leading Canucks run their road winning streak to eight, matching the franchise record set in early 2004. Christian Ehrhoff and Henrik Sedin also scored for Vancouver. Mason Raymond added three assists and Ryan Kesler had two. The Canucks have won 10 of 11 overall and seven in a row against Columbus. Also on Sunday: Penguins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 PITTSBURGH — Alex Kovalev and James Neal scored in the shootout, Marc-Andre Fleury made 37 saves and Pittsburgh set an NHL record by winning via shootout for the fourth consecutive game, beating Florida. Bruins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Flyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 PHILADELPHIA — Brad Marchand scored a powerplay goal with 3:43 left in regulation, and Nathan Horton also scored to help Northeast Division-leading Boston clinch a playoff spot. Thrashers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Senators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 ATLANTA — Andrew Ladd scored the deciding shootout goal and Blake Wheeler and Ben Maxwell each had a goal and an assist for Atlanta.

Tuesday Baseball: Culver at Scio, 4:30 p.m.; Summit at South Eugene, 4:30 p.m.; Elmira at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Sweet Home, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Culver at Scio, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 4:30 p.m.; Sweet Home at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Boys golf: Pendleton hosts Crook County at Wildhorse Resort, noon Girls golf: Redmond hosts Bend High, Mountain View, Summit at Juniper Golf Course, noon; Pendleton hosts Crook County at Wildhorse Resort, noon Boys tennis: Mountain View at Madras, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Madras at Mountain View, 4 p.m. Wednesday Track: Redmond at Mountain View, 3:30 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 3:45 p.m.; Madras at La Salle Ice Breaker, 3:30 p.m. Baseball: Culver at Horizon Christian, 4:30 p.m.; Bend at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Summit at Mazama (DH), 1 p.m. Boys golf: Summit at Tokatee Golf Course, 11 a.m. Thursday Track: La Pine at Cottage Grove, 4 p.m. Softball: Madras at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m.; Summit at Marist, 4 p.m. Friday Track: Bend at East County Classic in Gresham, 4 p.m. Baseball: Mountain View at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Redmond at Crook County, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at Junction City, 4:30 p.m.; Cottage Grove at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Junction City at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Cottage Grove, 4:30 p.m. Boys tennis: Madras at Bend, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Bend at Madras, 4 p.m.

CYCLING PIECE OF CAKE ROAD BIKE RACE March 16, Amity Central Oregon finishers only Masters men, Categories 1-3, (40 and older) — 7, Mark Reinecke. 11, Doug Perrin. Masters men, Categories 4-5 (40 and older) — 2, Eric Schusterman. 5, Matthew Lasala. 7, Mickey McDonald. Category 1-2 men — 20, Andrew Boone. Category 3 men — 3, T.J. Paskewich. 9, Matt Fox. 11, Rand Shoaf. 19, Spencer Newell. 26, Chris Winans. Category 5 men — 2, Aaron Edwards. Category 3 women — 9, Tawnie McDonald. 12, Cary Schwarz. Category 4 women — 3, Annika Johannesen.

EQUESTRIAN OHSET Oregon High School Equestrian Teams Central Oregon District At Redmond, Friday through Sunday Individual results Hunt seat over fences — 1, Samantha Novotny, Sisters. 2, Olivia Chandler, Sisters. 3, Bobbi Jo Rosauer, Sisters. Dressage — 1, Autumn Saunders, Sisters. 2, Bobbi Jo Rosauer, Sisters. 3, Emily Corrigan, Sisters. Saddle seat equitation — 1, Region Hayden, Redmond. 2, Bobbi Jo Rosauer, Sisters. 3, Georgann Ireland, Bend. Hunt seat equitation — 1, Kristin Jasa, Madras. 2, Georgann Ireland, Bend. 3, Crystal Mitchell, Pendleton. Working rancher — 1, Jessica Dillin, Redmond. 2, Suzanne Price, Bend. 3, Natalie Nigg, Redmond. Trail — 1, Molly Coehlo, Mountain View. 2, Samantha Hollinger, La Pine. 3, Laurie MacWhorter, Mountain View. In hand trail — 1, Laurie MacWhorter, Mountain View. 2, Nautique Simpson, Redmond. 3, Robyn Belvoir, Madras. Showmanship — 1, Laurie MacWhorter, Mountain View. 2 (tie), Crystal Mitchell, Pendleton; Samantha Hollinger, La Pine; Taylor Norton, Hood River Valley; and Harleigh Knoll, Hood River Valley. Stock seat equitation — 1, Laurie MacWhorter, Mountain View. 2 (tie), Kaesha Hilton, Hood River Valley, and Taylor Norton, Hood River Valley. Driving — 1, Jenna Jacobsen, Sisters. 2, Bobbi Jo Rosauer, Sisters. 3, Nautique Simpson, Redmond. Reining — 1, Jessica Dillin, Redmond. 2, Madison Hood, Mountain View. 3, Mackenzie Gellings, Sisters. Steer daubing — 1, Charisa Bates, La Pine, 4.15. 2, Rio Kindsfather, Sisters, 4.34. 3, Kassi Page, Redmond, 4.74. Breakaway roping — 1, Ailee Aschoff, Dufur, two catches 6.2. 2, Juan Sanchez, Lakeview, two catches, 16.73. 3, Charmaine Billey, Madras, one catch, 7.47. Figure 8 — 1, Ciara Timm, Bend, 10.79. 2, Brandice Durfee, Redmond, 10.7. 3, Megen Hopper, Redmond, 10.98. Individual flags — 1, Kristin Jasa, Madras, 9.65. 2, Charisa Bates, La Pine, 10.6. 3, Courtney Starr, Redmond, 10.73. Barrels — 1, Karlee Markham, Mountain View, 14.79. 2, Megen Hopper, Redmond, 14.85. 3, Courtney Thomas, Mountain View, 14.92. Pole bending — 1, Kenndra Urbach, Mountain View, 21.79. 2, Brandice Durfee, Redmond, 22.51. 3, Courtney Thomas, Mountain View, 22.63. Keyhole — 1, Brandice Durfee, Redmond, 7.5. 2, Kassi Page, Redmond, 7.51. 3, Ciara Timm, Bend, 7.9. Team events In hand obstacle relay — 1, Mountain View A (Molly Coehlo, Laurie MacWhorter, Madison Hood, Katie Cramer). 2, Hood River Valley A (Taylor Norton, Kaesha Hilton, Harleigh Knoll, Tia Burdick). 3, Redmond A (Megen Hopper, Natalie Nigg, Rosie Skinner, Region Hayden). Working pairs — 1, Redmond A (Jessie Dillin and Region Hayden). 2, Sisters E (Samantha Novotny and Olivia Chandler). 3, Pendleton A (Crystal Mitchell and Kylee Schimel). Short program drill — 1, Redmond (Brandice Durfee, Megen Hopper, Nautique Simpson, Jessica Dillin, Abby Hendry, Region Hayden, Ashlyn Brewster, Courtney Starr, Kasey Steven). 2, Sisters (Mackenzie Gellings, Jenna Jacobsen, Bobbi Jo Rosauer, McKenzie Legg, McKenzie King, Rio Kindsfather, Lindsay Soliz). Working 4s drill — 1, Mountain View (Makayla Bashian, Amanda Grippin, Mikayla Koellermeier, Jamie Kelly). 2, Madras (Abigail Beamer, Kristin Jasa, Robyn Belvoir, Kayla Vincent, Taylor Forsting). 3, La Pine (Charisa Bates, Dani Schneider, Tucker Allen, Tristan Cox). Bi-rangle — 1, Summit A (Jessie Foster and Megan Foster), 25.86. 2, Redmond B (Megen Hopper and Jessica Dillin), 26.47. 3, Madras A (Abigail Beamer and Kayla Vincent), 26.79. Team penning — 1, Bend F (Allyn Amerongen, Suzanne Price, Hailey Konze, Jessica Wallace), three pens, five cows. 2, Crook County A (Katie Case, Kaitlin Brouhard, Brittney Herber), three pens, four cows. 3, Lakeview (Drew Mobley, Lydia McGarva, Juan Sanchez), two pens, six cows. Canadian flags — 1, Redmond D (Brandice Durfee, Kassi Page, Megen Hopper, Abby Henry), 33.73 (new district record). 2, Sisters A (Mackenzie Gellings, Jenna Jacobsen, Cassidy Kinnaman, Bobbi Jo Rosauer), 37.49. 3, Madras A (Kayla Vincent, Kristin Jasa, Abigail Beamer, Robyn Belvoir), 37.55.

AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup AUTO CLUB 400 Sunday At Auto Club Speedway Fontana, Calif. Lap length: 2 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (24) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200 laps, 112.7 rating, 47 points, $331,961. 2. (16) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 200, 110.4, 43, $240,786. 3. (8) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 143.4, 43, $214,816. 4. (11) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 200, 104, 40, $172,111. 5. (9) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 200, 107.9, 40, $159,950. 6. (18) Carl Edwards, Ford, 200, 94.2, 38, $149,591. 7. (17) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 200, 109.6, 38, $144,108. 8. (19) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 200, 111.8, 36, $128,464. 9. (22) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 200, 79.4, 35, $124,408. 10. (1) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 200, 96.3, 35, $144,583. 11. (32) Greg Biffle, Ford, 200, 85.5, 33, $108,675. 12. (30) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 82, 32, $101,325. 13. (5) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 200, 117.3, 32, $134,083. 14. (20) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 200, 72.3, 30,

$127,911. 15. (7) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 200, 90.8, 29, $99,550. 16. (15) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 200, 80.7, 28, $89,475. 17. (23) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 200, 66.1, 27, $134,900. 18. (29) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 200, 77.1, 26, $125,111. 19. (14) David Reutimann, Toyota, 200, 73.3, 25, $115,283. 20. (10) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 200, 80.6, 24, $95,175. 21. (26) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 200, 85, 24, $93,975. 22. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 200, 70.4, 22, $94,300. 23. (12) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 200, 66.2, 21, $120,739. 24. (28) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 200, 57, 0, $100,458. 25. (3) Joey Logano, Toyota, 200, 64.5, 19, $91,750. 26. (21) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 199, 55.4, 18, $104,658. 27. (4) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 199, 55.4, 17, $108,145. 28. (13) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 198, 55.7, 16, $111,091. 29. (25) Casey Mears, Toyota, 198, 46.6, 15, $81,900. 30. (27) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 198, 50.1, 0, $88,650. 31. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, 198, 41.5, 13, $90,108. 32. (38) Andy Lally, Chevrolet, 198, 36.5, 12, $86,750. 33. (39) Ken Schrader, Ford, 197, 32.7, 11, $87,522. 34. (35) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 197, 42.2, 10, $76,825. 35. (36) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 196, 33.1, 0, $76,600. 36. (42) Tony Raines, Ford, 190, 28, 8, $76,450. 37. (31) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, engine, 188, 35.9, 7, $76,225. 38. (34) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, accident, 182, 47.5, 6, $102,320. 39. (2) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, engine, 105, 78.7, 6, $123,880. 40. (41) Todd Bodine, Toyota, transmission, 50, 27.3, 0, $75,675. 41. (43) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, electrical, 47, 40.6, 4, $75,505. 42. (40) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, transmission, 39, 29.1, 0, $75,415. 43. (33) Michael McDowell, Toyota, electrical, 32, 32.4, 1, $75,769. ——— Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 150.849 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 39 minutes, 6 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.144 seconds. Caution Flags: 4 for 16 laps. Lead Changes: 18 among 10 drivers. Lap Leaders: J.Montoya 1-6; D.Hamlin 7-21; Ky.Busch 22-31; J.Montoya 32; C.Bowyer 33; J.Johnson 34; J.Yeley 35-36; Ky.Busch 37-66; M.Truex Jr. 67; T.Stewart 68-69; Ky.Busch 70-76; T.Stewart 77-79; R.Newman 80-87; T.Stewart 88-91; Ky.Busch 92-137; T.Stewart 138-139; Ky.Busch 140-197; J.Johnson 198-199; K.Harvick 200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): Ky.Busch, 5 times for 151 laps; D.Hamlin, 1 time for 15 laps; T.Stewart, 4 times for 11 laps; R.Newman, 1 time for 8 laps; J.Montoya, 2 times for 7 laps; J.Johnson, 2 times for 3 laps; J.Yeley, 1 time for 2 laps; K.Harvick, 1 time for 1 lap; C.Bowyer, 1 time for 1 lap; M.Truex Jr., 1 time for 1 lap. Top 12 in Points: 1. C.Edwards, 187; 2. R.Newman, 178; 3. Ku.Busch, 177; 4. Ky.Busch, 176; 5. J.Johnson, 173; 6. T.Stewart, 170; 7. P.Menard, 164; 8. J.Montoya, 161; 9. K.Harvick, 157; 10. M.Kenseth, 157; 11. K.Kahne, 157; 12. D.Earnhardt Jr., 156.

IRL HONDA GRAND PRIX OF ST. PETERSBURG Sunday At St. Petersburg street circuit St. Petersburg, Fla. Lap length: 1.8 miles (Starting position in parentheses) All cars Dallara chassis, Honda engine 1. (2) Dario Franchitti, 100 laps. 2. (1) Will Power, 100. 3. (8) Tony Kanaan, 100. 4. (17) Simona de Silvestro, 100. 5. (11) Takuma Sato, 100. 6. (10) Alex Tagliani, 100. 7. (16) Raphael Matos, 100. 8. (13) Vitor Meira, 100. 9. (15) Oriol Servia, 100. 10. (6) Justin Wilson, 100. 11. (25) J.R. Hildebrand, 100. 12. (19) Danica Patrick, 100. 13. (24) Sebastian Saavedra, 98. 14. (20) Ana Beatriz, 98. 15. (22) James Jakes, 97. 16. (3) Scott Dixon, 96. 17. (12) Graham Rahal, 96. 18. (5) Ryan Briscoe, 95. 19. (21) E.J. Viso, 94. 20. (9) Helio Castroneves, 85. 21. (14) Ryan Hunter-Reay, 58, handling. 22. (23) Charlie Kimball, 38, contact. 23. (4) Mike Conway, 1, contact. 24. (7) Marco Andretti, 0, contact. 25. (18) Sebastien Bourdais, 0, did not start. Race Statistics Winners average speed: 89.260 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 0 minutes, 59.6886 seconds. Margin of Victory: 7.1612 seconds. Cautions: 5 for 13 laps. Lead Changes: 3 among 2 drivers. Lap Leaders: Power 1-4, Franchitti 5-70, Power 71-72, Franchitti 73-100. Points: Franchitti 52, Power 41, Kanaan 35, de Silvestro 32, Sato 30, Tagliani 28, Matos 26, Meira 24, Servia 22, Wilson 20.

Formula One AUSTRALIAN GRAND PRIX Sunday At Albert Park Melbourne, Australia Lap length: 3.3 miles 1. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 1:29:30.259, 58 laps, 128.117 mph. 2. Lewis Hamilton, Britain, McLaren, 1:29:52.556, 58. 3. Vitaly Petrov, Russia, Renault, 1:30:00.819, 58. 4. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 1:30:02.031, 58. 5. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 1:30:08.430, 58. 6. Jenson Button, Britain, McLaren, 1:30:24.563, 58. 7. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 1:30:55.445, 58. 8. Sebastien Buemi, Switzerland, Toro Rosso, 1:29:28.705, 57. 9. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Force India, 1:29:54.794, 57. 10. Paul di Resta, Britain, Force India, 1:30:23.766, 57. 11. Jaime Alguersuari, Spain, Toro Rosso, 1:30:28.923, 57. 12. Nick Heidfeld, Germany, Renault, 1:30:43.901, 57. 13. Jarno Trulli, Italy, Lotus, 1:30:53.536, 56. 14. Jerome d’Ambrosio, Belgium, Virgin, 1:29:34.518, 54. Not Classfied 15. Timo Glock, Germany, Virgin, 49. 16. Rubens Barrichello, Brazil, Williams, 48, retired. 17. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 22, retired. 18. Heikki Kovalainen, Finland, Team Lotus, 19, retired. 19. Michael Schumacher, Germany, Mercedes, 19, retired. 20. Pastor Maldonado, Venezuela, Williams, 9, retired. x-Sergio Perez, Mexico, Sauber, DQ. x-Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, Sauber, DQ. x-excluded from results postrace due to illegal rear wing dimensions.

BASKETBALL Men’s College NCAA TOURNAMENT All Times PDT ——— EAST REGIONAL At The Prudential Center Newark, N.J. Regional Semifinals Friday, March 25 North Carolina 81, Marquette 63 Kentucky 62, Ohio State 60 Regional Championship Sunday, March 27 Kentucky 76, North Carolina 69 SOUTHEAST REGIONAL At New Orleans Arena Regional Semifinals Thursday, March 24 Florida 83, BYU 74, OT Butler 61, Wisconsin 54 Regional Championship Saturday, March 26 Butler 74, Florida 71, OT SOUTHWEST REGIONAL At The Alamodome San Antonio Regional Semifinals Friday, March 25 Kansas 77, Richmond 57 Virginia Commonwealth 72, Florida State 71, OT Regional Championship Sunday, March 27 Virginia Commonwealth 71, Kansas 61 WEST REGIONAL At The Honda Center Anaheim, Calif. Regional Semifinals

Thursday, March 24 Connecticut 74, San Diego State 67 Arizona 93, Duke 77 Regional Championship Saturday, March 26 Connecticut 65, Arizona 63 FINAL FOUR At Reliant Stadium Houston National Semifinals Saturday, April 2 Kentucky (29-8) vs. Connecticut (30-9) Butler (27-9) vs. Virginia Commonwealth (28-11) National Championship Monday, April 4 Semifinal winners NATIONAL INVITATIONAL TOURNAMENT All times PDT ——— Semifinals Tuesday, March 29 At Madison Square Garden New York Wichita State (27-8) vs. Washington State (22-12), 4 p.m. Colorado (24-13) vs. Alabama (24-11), 6:30 p.m. Championship Thursday, March 31 Semifinal winners, 4 p.m. COLLEGE INSIDER.COM TOURNAMENT All Times PDT Semifinals Friday, March 25 Santa Clara 72, SMU 55 Saturday, March 26 Iona 83, East Tennessee State 80 Championship Wednesday, March 30 Santa Clara (23-14) at Iona (25-11), 4 p.m. COLLEGE BASKETBALL INVITATIONAL All Times PDT Championship Series (Best-of-3; x-if necessary) Monday, March 28 Oregon (19-17) at Creighton (22-14), 5 p.m. Wednesday, March 30 Creighton at Oregon, 7 p.m. Friday, April 1 x-Creighton at Oregon, 7 p.m.

Women’s College NCAA WOMEN’S TOURNAMENT All Times PDT ——— PHILADELPHIA REGIONAL Regional Semifinals At The Liacouras Center Philadelphia Sunday, March 27 Connecticut 68, Georgetown 63 Duke 70, DePaul 63 Regional Championship Tuesday, March 29 Connecticut (35-1) vs. Duke (32-3), 4 p.m. DAYTON REGIONAL Regional Semifinals At University of Dayton Arena Dayton, Ohio Saturday, March 26 Tennessee 85, Ohio State 75 Notre Dame 78, Oklahoma 53 Regional Championship Today, March 28 Tennessee (34-2) vs. Notre Dame (29-7), 4 p.m. SPOKANE REGIONAL Regional Semifinals At Veterans Memorial Arena Spokane, Wash. Saturday, March 26 Gonzaga 76, Louisville 69 Stanford 72, North Carolina 65 Monday, March 28 Regional Championship Gonzaga (31-4) vs. Stanford (32-2), 6 p.m. DALLAS REGIONAL Regional Semifinals At American Airlines Center Dallas Sunday, March 27 Texas A&M 79, Georgia 38 Baylor 86, Wisconsin-Green Bay 76 Regional Championship Tuesday, March 29 Texas A&M (30-5) vs. Baylor (34-2), 6 p.m. WOMEN’S NATIONAL INVITATIONAL TOURNAMENT All Times PDT ——— Quarterfinals All Times PDT ——— Saturday, March 26 Charlotte 79, Virginia 74 Sunday, March 27 Toledo 71, Syracuse 68 Illinois State 60, Arkansas 49 Southern Cal 87, Colorado 70 Semifinals March 30-31 Southern Cal (23-12) at Illinois State (24-10), 5:05 p.m. Toledo (27-8) vs. Charlotte (27-9), 5 p.m. Championship At TBD Saturday, April 2 Semifinal winners, noon

BASEBALL Spring Training MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct Kansas City 18 10 .643 Detroit 20 12 .625 Minnesota 18 11 .621 Toronto 15 12 .556 Los Angeles 16 13 .552 Seattle 14 12 .538 Cleveland 14 13 .519 Baltimore 14 14 .500 Tampa Bay 14 14 .500 New York 12 15 .444 Texas 12 16 .429 Oakland 12 18 .400 Boston 12 19 .387 Chicago 11 18 .379 NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct Colorado 20 9 .690 Milwaukee 17 10 .630 San Francisco 20 12 .625 Philadelphia 19 13 .594 Atlanta 16 12 .571 Washington 15 13 .536 Cincinnati 15 14 .517 New York 15 15 .500 St. Louis 14 14 .500 Florida 13 14 .481 San Diego 13 15 .464 Chicago 14 17 .452 Los Angeles 13 19 .406 Pittsburgh 11 19 .367 Houston 11 22 .333 Arizona 11 24 .314 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. ——— Sunday’s Games Florida 6, Washington 4 Detroit 8, Houston 4 Toronto 9, Baltimore (ss) 5 Baltimore (ss) 4, Boston 3 Philadelphia 6, Atlanta 1 St. Louis 3, N.Y. Mets 1 Minnesota 7, N.Y. Yankees 6 Pittsburgh 5, Tampa Bay 4 Cleveland 6, L.A. Dodgers 1 Chicago White Sox 2, Milwaukee 1 Colorado (ss) 6, Chicago Cubs 4 Texas 5, Seattle 4, 10 innings Cincinnati 9, Arizona 6 Kansas City 7, San Francisco 4 Colorado (ss) 5, Oakland 2 L.A. Angels 9, San Diego 2 Today’s Games Houston vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Boston vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Florida (ss) vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Detroit vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Florida (ss) vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 10:10 a.m. San Diego vs. Milwaukee (ss) at Phoenix, 1:05 p.m. Milwaukee (ss) vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 1:05

p.m. Colorado vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Texas vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 1:10 p.m. Washington vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 3:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m. Oakland at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Philadelphia 75 45 20 10 100 238 200 x-Pittsburgh 76 45 23 8 98 218 183 N.Y. Rangers 76 41 30 5 87 218 181 New Jersey 75 34 36 5 73 155 189 N.Y. Islanders 76 29 35 12 70 210 241 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 75 42 23 10 94 226 178 Montreal 76 40 29 7 87 200 196 Buffalo 75 38 28 9 85 222 210 Toronto 76 34 32 10 78 201 232 Ottawa 76 29 37 10 68 175 233 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Washington 76 44 22 10 98 205 182 Tampa Bay 75 40 24 11 91 223 228 Carolina 75 35 30 10 80 211 224 Atlanta 75 32 31 12 76 210 246 Florida 76 29 36 11 69 185 209 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 75 44 22 9 97 242 213 Nashville 76 41 25 10 92 202 179 Chicago 74 40 26 8 88 239 204 St. Louis 75 34 32 9 77 212 219 Columbus 75 33 31 11 77 200 230 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Vancouver 76 50 17 9 109 247 175 Calgary 77 38 28 11 87 235 226 Minnesota 75 35 32 8 78 188 213 Colorado 74 28 38 8 64 207 262 Edmonton 75 23 41 11 57 180 249 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose 76 44 23 9 97 224 199 Phoenix 77 41 25 11 93 219 212 Los Angeles 75 43 26 6 92 207 181 Anaheim 75 42 28 5 89 214 217 Dallas 74 38 26 10 86 208 210 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Sunday’s Games Pittsburgh 2, Florida 1, SO Atlanta 5, Ottawa 4, SO Vancouver 4, Columbus 1 Boston 2, Philadelphia 1 Today’s Games Chicago at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Colorado at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Buffalo at Toronto, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Carolina at Washington, 4 p.m. Florida at Columbus, 4 p.m. Chicago at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Atlanta at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Minnesota at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Vancouver at Nashville, 5 p.m. Los Angeles at Edmonton, 6:30 p.m. Dallas at Phoenix, 7 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Philadelphia 2 0 0 6 2 0 Chicago 1 0 1 4 4 3 New England 1 0 1 4 3 2 New York 1 0 1 4 1 0 D.C. 1 1 0 3 4 3 Sporting Kansas City 1 1 0 3 5 5 Toronto FC 1 1 0 3 4 4 Houston 0 1 1 1 1 2 Columbus 0 1 1 1 1 3 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Real Salt Lake 2 0 0 6 5 1 Colorado 2 0 0 6 4 1 Los Angeles 1 1 1 4 3 5 Vancouver 1 1 0 3 4 3 San Jose 1 1 0 3 2 1 Seattle 0 2 1 1 1 3 FC Dallas 0 1 1 1 1 3 Chivas USA 0 2 0 0 2 4 Portland 0 2 0 0 1 5 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Friday, April 1 FC Dallas at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Saturday, April 2 Chivas USA at Toronto FC, 10 a.m. Sporting Kansas City at Vancouver, 4 p.m. Houston at New York, 4:30 p.m. Portland at New England, 4:30 p.m. Seattle FC at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 3 D.C. United at Colorado, 7 p.m.

TENNIS SONY ERICSSON OPEN Sunday Key Biscayne, Fla. Singles Men Third Round Mardy Fish (14), United States, def. Richard Gasquet (17), France, 6-4, 6-3. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, def. Pablo Andujar, Spain, 6-2, 6-3. David Ferrer (6), Spain, def. Somdev Devvarman, India, 6-4, 6-2. John Isner (30), United States, def. Alex Bogomolov Jr., United States, 6-2, 7-6 (4). Marcel Granollers, Spain, def. Michael Llodra (23), France, 7-5, 3-6, 7-5. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, def. Robin Soderling (4), Sweden, 6-3, 6-2. Viktor Troicki (16), Serbia, def. Sam Querrey (19), United States, 7-6 (5), 3-6, 7-5. Women Third Round Ana Ivanovic (19), Serbia, def. Virginie Razzano, France, 2-6, 6-2, 3-0, retired. Marion Bartoli (15), France, def. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 6-0, 6-2. Francesca Schiavone (5), Italy, def. Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, 6-4, 7-6 (2). Agnieszka Radwanska (9), Poland, def. Maria Kirilenko (24), Russia, 7-6 (2), 6-3. Kim Clijsters (2), Belgium, def. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez (27), Spain, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3. Vera Zvonareva (3), Russia, def. Jarmila Groth (28), Australia, 7-6 (4), 6-2. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (17), Russia, def. Petra Kvitova (12), Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-0. Victoria Azarenka (8), Belarus, def. Dominika Cibulkova (25), Slovakia, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4.

GOLF PGA Tour ARNOLD PALMER INVITATIONAL Sunday At Bay Hill Club & Lodge Orlando, Fla. Purse: $6 million Yardage: 7,419; Par: 72 Final Round Martin Laird (500), $1,080,000 70-65-70-75—280 Steve Marino (300), $648,000 71-67-71-72—281 Justin Rose (145), $312,000 72-72-70-68—282 Marc Leishman (145), $312,000 73-72-66-71—282 David Toms (145), $312,000 74-67-69-72—282 K.J. Choi (95), $208,500 72-64-76-71—283 Spencer Levin (95), $208,500 66-70-71-76—283 Sergio Garcia (85), $186,000 73-68-73-70—284 Mark Wilson (75), $162,000 74-72-70-69—285 Fredrik Jacobson (75), $162,000 71-71-73-70—285 Jim Furyk (75), $162,000 74-69-71-71—285 Edoardo Molinari (0), $94,800 72-75-72-67—286 Aaron Baddeley (54), $94,800 76-69-72-69—286 Ian Poulter (54), $94,800 71-71-73-71—286 D.J. Trahan (54), $94,800 72-71-72-71—286 Stewart Cink (54), $94,800 76-71-68-71—286 Rod Pampling (54), $94,800 73-72-70-71—286 J.J. Henry (54), $94,800 75-70-69-72—286 Heath Slocum (54), $94,800 75-70-68-73—286

Brian Davis (54), $94,800 Kyle Stanley (54), $94,800 Ryan Moore (54), $94,800 Trevor Immelman (54), $94,800 Tiger Woods (45), $48,600 Brian Gay (45), $48,600 Phil Mickelson (45), $48,600 Charlie Wi (45), $48,600 John Senden (45), $48,600 Bubba Watson (45), $48,600 Johnson Wagner (38), $34,875 Kevin Na (38), $34,875 Tom Gillis (38), $34,875 Bo Van Pelt (38), $34,875 Sam Saunders (0), $34,875 Nick O’Hern (38), $34,875 Dicky Pride (38), $34,875 Rickie Fowler (38), $34,875 Robert Allenby (29), $23,400 Scott Verplank (29), $23,400 William McGirt (29), $23,400 Brendan Steele (29), $23,400 Pat Perez (29), $23,400 Troy Matteson (29), $23,400 Hunter Mahan (29), $23,400 Brendon de Jonge (29), $23,400 Charles Howell III (29), $23,400 Kevin Streelman (21), $15,411 Lee Janzen (21), $15,411 Charl Schwartzel (21), $15,411 Daniel Chopra (21), $15,411 Zach Johnson (21), $15,411 Henrik Stenson (21), $15,411 J.B. Holmes (21), $15,411 Chad Campbell (17), $13,860 Vaughn Taylor (17), $13,860 Erik Compton (0), $13,500 Bill Lunde (14), $13,500 Robert Garrigus (14), $13,500 D.A. Points (14), $13,500 Carl Pettersson (11), $13,140 Chris Couch (11), $13,140 Robert Damron (8), $12,780 Billy Hurley III (0), $12,780 Arjun Atwal (8), $12,780 Hunter Haas (8), $12,780 Stephen Ames (4), $12,360 Jason Dufner (4), $12,360 Rocco Mediate (4), $12,360 Colt Knost (2), $12,120 Skip Kendall (1), $11,940 Ernie Els (1), $11,940 Roland Thatcher (1), $11,760 Paul Goydos (1), $11,640

70-72-71-73—286 74-73-66-73—286 74-67-71-74—286 72-71-68-75—286 73-68-74-72—287 75-68-71-73—287 70-75-69-73—287 73-74-66-74—287 71-72-68-76—287 70-71-68-78—287 74-72-73-69—288 74-73-72-69—288 73-70-73-72—288 74-70-72-72—288 74-73-69-72—288 73-70-72-73—288 77-66-71-74—288 69-71-70-78—288 79-69-71-70—289 76-69-72-72—289 73-68-75-73—289 76-70-71-72—289 74-74-68-73—289 72-73-70-74—289 69-69-75-76—289 71-71-70-77—289 73-65-73-78—289 75-73-72-70—290 70-73-75-72—290 76-72-70-72—290 70-72-75-73—290 76-70-70-74—290 73-71-71-75—290 73-69-72-76—290 72-75-72-72—291 70-68-76-77—291 75-67-80-70—292 73-70-76-73—292 71-75-73-73—292 73-71-72-76—292 75-73-75-70—293 70-71-71-81—293 73-72-73-76—294 71-75-72-76—294 72-72-72-78—294 70-73-73-78—294 75-69-76-75—295 70-70-78-77—295 70-72-75-78—295 75-73-72-76—296 75-73-75-75—298 75-72-73-78—298 74-74-78-74—300 78-69-76-85—308

LPGA Tour KIA CLASSIC Sunday At Industry Hills Golf Club at Pacific Palms Industry, Calif. Purse: $1.7 million Yardage: 6,714; Par 73 Final Round (a-amateur) Sandra Gal, $255,000 67-68-70-71—276 Jiyai Shin, $158,182 70-64-70-73—277 Cristie Kerr, $101,759 74-70-71-66—281 I.K. Kim, $101,759 70-69-72-70—281 Yani Tseng, $64,953 71-73-72-67—283 Na Yeon Choi, $64,953 73-72-65-73—283 Marcy Hart, $43,446 73-73-73-65—284 Michelle Wie, $43,446 68-75-71-70—284 Mindy Kim, $43,446 74-66-73-71—284 Suzann Pettersen, $33,775 72-73-71-70—286 Juli Inkster, $33,775 75-70-69-72—286 Sun Young Yoo, $27,626 71-70-77-69—287 Chella Choi, $27,626 72-68-75-72—287 Paige Mackenzie, $27,626 71-71-72-73—287 Amanda Blumenherst, $27,626 66-74-73-74—287 Mika Miyazato, $23,123 70-73-74-71—288 Anna Nordqvist, $23,123 71-70-71-76—288 Reilley Rankin, $19,601 70-76-72-71—289 Sophie Gustafson, $19,601 72-73-72-72—289 Inbee Park, $19,601 71-75-71-72—289 Katie Futcher, $19,601 76-70-70-73—289 Kristy McPherson, $19,601 72-73-71-73—289 Beatriz Recari, $19,601 72-73-69-75—289 Christel Boeljon, $15,935 75-71-73-71—290 Pornanong Phatlum, $15,935 73-72-74-71—290 Stacy Lewis, $15,935 72-73-73-72—290 Ai Miyazato, $15,935 72-72-74-72—290 Pat Hurst, $15,935 73-71-72-74—290 Catriona Matthew, $13,597 70-73-77-71—291 Jane Park, $13,597 71-75-73-72—291 Shanshan Feng, $13,597 72-73-73-73—291 Kris Tamulis, $10,488 74-73-75-71—293 Paula Creamer, $10,488 74-74-73-72—293 Katherine Hull, $10,488 73-71-76-73—293 Amy Hung, $10,488 70-74-76-73—293 Becky Morgan, $10,488 75-72-73-73—293 Mina Harigae, $10,488 73-73-73-74—293 Momoko Ueda, $10,488 74-73-72-74—293 Song-Hee Kim, $10,488 76-69-73-75—293 Pernilla Lindberg, $10,488 72-75-71-75—293 Stephanie Sherlock, $10,488 77-71-69-76—293 Maria Hjorth, $7,816 74-72-75-73—294 Amy Yang, $7,816 73-72-76-73—294 Morgan Pressel, $7,816 75-71-73-75—294 Leta Lindley, $7,816 74-72-71-77—294 M.J. Hur, $6,359 74-73-79-69—295 Jimin Kang, $6,359 73-75-75-72—295 Azahara Munoz, $6,359 75-72-74-74—295 Lee-Anne Pace, $6,359 77-69-75-74—295 a-Julie Yang 73-74-74-74—295 Brittany Lincicome, $6,359 73-74-73-75—295 Moira Dunn, $6,359 74-70-74-77—295 Meaghan Francella, $6,359 72-74-71-78—295 Stephanie Louden, $5,456 73-75-76-72—296 Ji Young Oh, $5,456 76-69-78-73—296 Christina Kim, $5,023 71-76-77-73—297 Michele Redman, $5,023 76-71-77-73—297 Danah Bordner, $5,023 73-74-72-78—297 Sarah Lee, $4,504 76-72-76-74—298 Silvia Cavalleri, $4,504 75-72-75-76—298 Angela Stanford, $4,504 74-71-76-77—298 Karrie Webb, $4,070 72-76-77-74—299 Lorie Kane, $4,070 73-75-75-76—299 Hee Young Park, $4,070 77-70-76-76—299 Kyeong Bae, $4,070 76-72-74-77—299 Stacy Prammanasudh, $4,070 72-72-76-79—299 Aree Song, $3,811 78-70-75-78—301 Candie Kung, $3,724 73-75-75-79—302 Heather Bowie Young, $3,637 75-73-77-78—303 Sarah Jane Smith, $3,551 80-68-77-79—304 Allison Fouch, $3,465 75-72-77-81—305

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Optioned OF Lorenzo Cain to Omaha (PCL). MINNESOTA TWINS—Optioned RHP Jim Hoey, RHP Anthony Slama and INF Luke Hughes to Rochester (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Optioned RHP Joey Devine to Sacramento (PCL). SEATTLE MARINERS—Optioned INF Matt Tuiasosopo to Tacoma (PCL). Assigned OF Mike Wilson, LHP Royce Ring, RHP Denny Bautista and RHP Justin Miller to their minor-league camp. TAMPA BAY RAYS—Optioned C Jose Lobaton to Durham (IL). Traded INF Joe Inglett to Houston for a player to be named or cash considerations. National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Reassigned RHP Kenshin Kawakami, RHP Rodrigo Lopez, C J.C. Boscan, INF Ed Lucas and OF Wilkin Rodriguez to their minor league camp. Placed RHP Kris Medlen on the 15-day DL. Released RHP Scott Proctor. Placed OF Joe Mather on outright waivers. CHICAGO CUBS—Granted RHP Carlos Silva his unconditional release. CINCINNATI REDS—Reassigned LHP Dontrelle Willis and OF Jeremy Hermida to their minor league camp. COLORADO ROCKIES—Optioned RHP Matt Daley, RHP Greg Reynolds, C Jordan Pacheco and INF Eric Young Jr. to their minor league camp. Reassigned RHP John Maine, LHP Rex Brothers and LHP Eric Stults to their minor league camp. HOUSTON ASTROS—Returned RHP Lance Pendleton to the N.Y. Yankees, who assigned him to their minor league camp. MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Placed RHP LaTroy Hawkins on the 15-day DL. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Optioned RHP Scott Mathieson and LHP Mike Zagurski to their minor league camp. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Traded OF Nyjer Morgan to Milwaukee for INF Cutter Dykstra and cash considerations. HOCKEY National Hockey League COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Signed F Cam Atkinson to a two-year contract. ST. LOUIS BLUES—Assigned F T.J. Hensick, F Adam Cracknell and D Ian Cole to Peoria (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Reassigned F Blair Jones to Norfolk (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Assigned G Braden Holtby to Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE RICHMOND—Signed men’s basketball coach Chris Mooney to a 10-year contract extension through the 2020-21 season.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 28, 2011 D3

AUTO RACING ROUNDUP

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Sunday’s Games

Thunder 99, Blazers 90 PORTLAND (90) Batum 1-4 3-4 6, Wallace 16-28 7-9 40, Aldridge 8-17 4-4 20, Miller 4-13 1-2 9, Matthews 2-9 0-1 4, Camby 2-5 0-0 4, Fernandez 0-2 3-4 3, Roy 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 35-81 18-24 90. OKLAHOMA CITY (99) Durant 5-18 8-8 21, Ibaka 7-9 4-4 18, Perkins 3-6 0-1 6, Westbrook 9-19 6-7 28, Sefolosha 05 1-2 1, Collison 2-3 0-0 4, Harden 2-8 3-3 8, Maynor 2-4 0-0 4, Mohammed 1-1 4-4 6, Cook 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 32-75 26-29 99. Portland 20 21 31 18 — 90 Oklahoma City 21 34 23 21 — 99 3-Point Goals—Portland 2-12 (Batum 1-2, Wallace 1-4, Aldridge 0-1, Fernandez 0-1, Matthews 0-4), Oklahoma City 9-24 (Westbrook 45, Durant 3-10, Cook 1-2, Harden 1-4, Maynor 0-1, Sefolosha 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Portland 51 (Camby 13), Oklahoma City 47 (Perkins 10). Assists—Portland 16 (Miller 5), Oklahoma City 13 (Westbrook 7). Total Fouls—Portland 16, Oklahoma City 26. Technicals—Miller, Portland defensive three second, Oklahoma City Coach Brooks, Perkins. A—18,203 (18,203). Walt Weis / The Associated Press

Kevin Harvick smiles after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, Calif., Sunday.

Harvick wins at Fontana on final turn The Associated Press FONTANA, Calif. — Kevin Harvick isn’t one of those drivers who jumps out front and stays there all the way to the checkers. He’s more of a lingerer and closer, someone who’s able to stay close to the front then make his move at just the right time. Harvick was at his pass-atthe-end best on Sunday, overtaking California king Jimmie Johnson on the final turn at Auto Club Speedway to win after trailing the entire race. “I wish we could just go out there and wear ’em out one day, just not have to worry about waiting until the last lap,” Harvick said. “It does kind of seem we wait until the last moments to really get going. It’s probably somewhat of a bad habit I have, but I guess it worked out.” Kyle Busch had the dominant car most of the day and led a race-high 151 laps, including off a restart with nine laps left. Johnson, a five-time winner at Fontana, had the late burst, chasing down Busch for the lead with two laps left. Harvick, as he always seems to, nailed the finish. He had a rough start to the season, finishing 42nd at Daytona after a blown engine and had not been able to pull it together since despite having fast cars. His best finish was a fourth at Phoenix. Harvick didn’t have a particularly strong qualifying session at Fontana, either, to start 24th, and wasn’t exactly ripping through the field once the race started. What he did do was gradually work his way to the front, pulling up behind Johnson after getting past Busch. Taking advantage of a small

gap to the outside, Harvick made his move on Johnson going into Turn 3, then completed it coming around Turn 4. Ahead going down the last straightaway, he finished off his becoming-a-trademark finish to take the checkers for the 15th time in his career. “I really felt good when they had that restart because I knew his car was really fast on the long run,” said Richard Childress, owner of Harvick’s No. 29 car. “I knew if they didn’t get too far out in front of us, we’d have a shot. All we needed was to get him side-by-side and start racing. That gave Kevin a chance to catch them and he made the right move going into three.” Also on Sunday: Franchitti wins Indy opener ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Two-time defending series champion Dario Franchitti won IndyCar’s season opener. Franchitti took the lead early and was hardly challenged in the Honda Grand Prix of St. Petersburg. The Scottish driver was nearly perfect for 100 laps on the scenic, 1.8-mile street course, beating pole-sitter Will Power to the finish line by more than seven seconds. Vettel takes F1 Australian GP MELBOURNE, Australia — Red Bull driver Sebastian Vettel made an ideal start to his Formula One title defense, driving a flawless race to outpace McLaren’s Lewis Hamilton and win the season-opening Australian Grand Prix. After starting from pole position, Vettel maintained his lead after the first turn and had already opened a gap of more than two seconds over Hamilton following the first lap. Renault’s Vitaly Petrov was a surprise third to claim his first-ever podium finish.

COLLEGE BASEBALL ROUNDUP

Oregon rolls past Wichita St. From wire reports EUGENE — In the first start of his collegiate career, Oregon freshman Ryon Healy delivered. And with the bases loaded, junior KC Serna returned the favor driving in what proved to be the game-winning run as the Ducks defeated Wichita State 6-1 on Sunday at PK Park. With the victory, Oregon (14-9) evened the series with Wichita State (17-8) at two games apiece, as the Ducks played their final nonconference series of the year. Oregon will begin Pac-10 play Friday at sixth-ranked Arizona State. Making just one relief appearance on the mound this season, Healy earned his first start for the Ducks on Sunday. The West Hills, Calif., native allowed just one run in 5 2⁄3 innings on the mound, striking out five and issuing two walks. He was denied the win as right-hander Alex Keudell came on in the top of the sixth to secure the final out after Healy surrendered the first run of the ball game to the Shockers. Oregon avenged Wichita

State’s solo run in the top of the sixth, scoring five runs on seven hits in the bottom of the sixth. The Ducks batted around in the inning, as Shawn Peterson recorded the first hit to lead off the inning, and also was the final out. For the third time in the game Oregon loaded the bases, but this time the Ducks were able to break through. The Ducks totaled 11 hits, as Serna was two for four with two runs driven in and Jones was two for five with two RBIs. In another game on Sunday: UC Santa Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Oregon State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CORVALLIS — Carter Bell tallied his sixth multiple-hit game of the 2011 campaign, but the 23rd-ranked Oregon State baseball team left 14 on base in a loss to UC Santa Barbara. Nevertheless, the Beavers came away with a series win over the Gauchos after winning 6-3 Friday and 11-5 on Saturday. OSU stands at 18-6 on the year — its third consecutive season with that record — while UC Santa Barbara is at 11-8 after the three-game series.

Celtics 85, T’wolves 82 BOSTON (85) Pierce 6-16 9-11 23, Garnett 5-11 3-4 13, Krstic 4-10 3-3 11, West 3-6 2-2 8, Allen 4-10 2-2 11, Davis 4-15 0-2 8, Green 4-5 0-0 9, Arroyo 0-2 2-2 2, Pavlovic 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 30-75 21-26 85. MINNESOTA (82) Beasley 11-28 4-6 28, Randolph 0-5 3-6 3, Milicic 6-10 3-3 15, Ridnour 4-10 1-2 10, Johnson 2-9 0-0 5, Tolliver 5-10 4-6 16, Ellington 0-3 0-0 0, Webster 1-2 0-0 3, Flynn 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 30-80 15-23 82. Boston 32 15 17 21 — 85 Minnesota 13 21 28 20 — 82 3-Point Goals—Boston 4-15 (Pierce 2-8, Green 1-1, Allen 1-4, West 0-2), Minnesota 7-17 (Beasley 2-4, Tolliver 2-5, Webster 1-1, Johnson 1-3, Ridnour 1-3, Ellington 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Boston 49 (Garnett 13), Minnesota 59 (Tolliver 15). Assists—Boston 18 (Garnett, West 5), Minnesota 16 (Ridnour 8). Total Fouls—Boston 18, Minnesota 22. A—19,178 (19,356).

Heat 125, Rockets 119 HOUSTON (119) Budinger 6-15 0-0 16, Scola 13-23 2-2 28, Hayes 3-4 0-0 6, Lowry 8-18 8-8 25, Martin 819 11-12 29, Lee 1-3 0-0 3, Patterson 1-2 0-0 2, Hill 2-2 2-4 6, Dragic 1-3 1-2 4. Totals 43-89 24-28 119. MIAMI (125) James 13-21 7-9 33, Bosh 11-21 9-10 31, Dampier 2-3 0-0 4, Bibby 5-7 0-0 14, Wade 1025 9-10 30, M.Miller 2-4 0-2 4, Anthony 1-1 0-0 2, Jones 1-3 3-3 5, House 0-5 0-0 0, Ilgauskas 1-1 0-0 2, Howard 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 46-92 28-34 125. Houston 37 31 25 26 — 119 Miami 38 33 22 32 — 125 3-Point Goals—Houston 9-21 (Budinger 4-6, Martin 2-6, Dragic 1-2, Lee 1-2, Lowry 1-5), Miami 5-17 (Bibby 4-5, Wade 1-5, James 0-1, Jones 02, M.Miller 0-2, House 0-2). Fouled Out—Scola. Rebounds—Houston 44 (Hayes, Lowry 7), Miami 58 (Bosh 12). Assists—Houston 21 (Lowry 9), Miami 16 (James 7). Total Fouls—Houston 23, Miami 19. Technicals—Jones, Miami defensive three second. A—19,825 (19,600).

Grizzlies 111, Spurs 104 SAN ANTONIO (104) Jefferson 4-10 2-3 13, Splitter 3-5 1-3 7, McDyess 3-8 0-1 6, Parker 8-20 3-5 20, Ginobili 1-3 0-0 2, Blair 4-5 0-0 8, Bonner 3-8 0-0 7, Hill 9-12 11-12 30, Neal 4-6 0-0 11, Anderson 0-0

GOLF ROUNDUP

y-Chicago y-Boston x-Miami x-Orlando x-Atlanta Philadelphia New York Indiana Charlotte Milwaukee Detroit New Jersey Toronto Washington Cleveland

W 53 51 51 47 42 37 35 32 30 29 26 23 20 17 14

L 19 21 22 26 32 36 38 42 42 43 47 49 53 55 58

Pct .736 .708 .699 .644 .568 .507 .479 .432 .417 .403 .356 .319 .274 .236 .194

GB — 2 2½ 6½ 12 16½ 18½ 22 23 24 27½ 30 33½ 36 39

L10 9-1 5-5 8-2 7-3 4-6 4-6 1-9 5-5 4-6 5-5 4-6 4-6 3-7 1-9 2-8

Str W-4 W-1 W-5 W-5 W-2 L-2 L-6 L-2 W-2 L-1 W-1 L-2 L-4 L-4 L-1

Home 32-4 29-8 28-10 26-11 22-15 23-12 19-17 19-16 18-17 19-19 19-18 16-18 14-22 16-20 9-28

Away 21-15 22-13 23-12 21-15 20-17 14-24 16-21 13-26 12-25 10-24 7-29 5-31 6-29 1-35 5-30

Conf 32-12 33-10 32-12 31-12 29-17 22-22 21-22 23-22 18-24 21-22 18-25 13-31 12-31 11-32 10-32

WESTERN CONFERENCE W x-San Antonio 57 y-L.A. Lakers 53 x-Dallas 52 x-Oklahoma City 48 Denver 44 Portland 42 New Orleans 42 Memphis 41 Houston 38 Phoenix 36 Utah 36 Golden State 32 L.A. Clippers 29 Sacramento 20 Minnesota 17 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division

L 16 20 21 24 29 31 32 33 35 36 38 42 45 52 57

Pct .781 .726 .712 .667 .603 .575 .568 .554 .521 .500 .486 .432 .392 .278 .230

GB — 4 5 8½ 13 15 15½ 16½ 19 20½ 21½ 25½ 28½ 36½ 40½

L10 6-4 9-1 6-4 9-1 7-3 6-4 6-4 6-4 7-3 3-7 3-7 4-6 5-5 5-5 2-8

Str L-3 W-7 W-4 W-3 W-3 L-1 L-1 W-1 L-1 L-2 L-5 W-2 W-1 W-3 L-7

Home 33-3 28-8 26-11 27-10 30-7 26-10 24-11 26-10 22-14 20-17 20-17 23-14 21-17 9-27 12-25

Away 24-13 25-12 26-10 21-14 14-22 16-21 18-21 15-23 16-21 16-19 16-21 9-28 8-28 11-25 5-32

Conf 35-10 32-11 30-13 26-17 24-19 24-19 24-21 25-19 22-24 19-24 18-27 17-27 16-28 11-31 7-40

Memphis 111, San Antonio 104 Miami 125, Houston 119 Oklahoma City 99, Portland 90 L.A. Lakers 102, New Orleans 84 Today’s Games

Milwaukee at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Orlando at New York, 4:30 p.m. Portland at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.

Boston at Indiana, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 5 p.m. Washington at Utah, 6 p.m. Tuesday’s Games

Miami at Cleveland, 4 p.m. Golden State at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m.

Houston at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Sacramento, 7 p.m. All Times PST

0-0 0, Novak 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 39-77 17-24 104. MEMPHIS (111) Young 0-0 0-0 0, Randolph 8-14 7-9 23, Gasol 5-11 1-1 11, Conley 4-8 4-7 12, Allen 9-10 5-6 23, Smith 0-3 1-2 1, Battier 4-6 0-0 10, Mayo 6-11 1-2 17, Arthur 4-8 0-0 8, Powe 2-4 0-1 4, Vasquez 0-2 0-0 0, Haddadi 0-0 2-2 2. Totals 42-77 21-30 111. San Antonio 23 27 27 27 — 104 Memphis 24 31 26 30 — 111 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 9-21 (Neal 3-4, Jefferson 3-6, Parker 1-2, Hill 1-3, Bonner 1-4, Ginobili 0-2), Memphis 6-14 (Mayo 4-6, Battier 2-4, Gasol 0-1, Vasquez 0-1, Allen 0-1, Conley 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—San Antonio 35 (Blair 6), Memphis 54 (Randolph 11). Assists—San Antonio 15 (Parker 6), Memphis 19 (Conley, Gasol 4). Total Fouls—San Antonio 24, Memphis 20. Technicals—San Antonio Coach Popovich 2, San Antonio defensive three second. Ejected—San Antonio Coach Popovich. A—17,098 (18,119).

Hawks 99, Cavaliers 83 ATLANTA (99) Smith 5-16 3-6 13, Horford 10-15 0-0 20, Collins 1-2 1-1 3, Hinrich 5-11 2-3 13, Williams 9-14 10-11 31, Crawford 2-8 2-2 7, Pachulia 1-1 0-0 2, Teague 4-7 2-2 10, Armstrong 0-0 0-0 0, Wilkins 0-0 0-2 0. Totals 37-74 20-27 99. CLEVELAND (83) Gee 4-11 2-3 10, Hickson 5-14 0-0 10, Hollins 1-4 0-0 2, Sessions 5-11 3-4 13, Parker 1-5

Warriors 114, Wizards 104 WASHINGTON (104) Young 3-5 0-0 7, Yi 6-14 0-0 12, McGee 912 10-11 28, Wall 5-16 8-10 18, Crawford 5-21 1-1 11, Seraphin 0-1 0-0 0, Evans 8-15 5-6 23, Martin 1-3 2-2 5, Jeffers 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 3789 26-30 104. GOLDEN STATE (114) Wright 6-14 2-2 19, Lee 15-26 3-5 33, Udoh 2-7 0-0 4, Curry 3-11 3-3 10, Ellis 14-24 5-7 37, Amundson 0-2 0-2 0, Thornton 2-5 0-0 4, Williams 3-6 0-0 7. Totals 45-95 13-19 114. Washington 36 31 17 20 — 104 Golden State 35 29 26 24 — 114 3-Point Goals—Washington 4-16 (Evans 2-4, Young 1-1, Martin 1-3, Jeffers 0-1, Wall 0-3, Crawford 0-4), Golden State 11-24 (Wright 5-11, Ellis 4-6, Williams 1-3, Curry 1-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Washington 57 (McGee 18), Golden State 55 (Lee 12). Assists—Washington 24 (Wall 12), Golden State 26 (Ellis 13). Total Fouls—Washington 14, Golden State 19. Technicals—Washington Coach Saunders, Lee, Golden State defensive three second. A—17,723 (19,596).

Lakers 102, Hornets 84

——— Sunday’s Games Sacramento 114, Philadelphia 111, OT Atlanta 99, Cleveland 83 Boston 85, Minnesota 82 Golden State 114, Washington 104 Dallas 91, Phoenix 83

1-4), Philadelphia 5-14 (Meeks 3-6, Holiday 1-1, Williams 1-4, Hawes 0-1, Iguodala 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Sacramento 69 (Dalembert 19), Philadelphia 46 (Hawes 15). Assists—Sacramento 20 (Cousins 6), Philadelphia 22 (Holiday 7). Total Fouls—Sacramento 30, Philadelphia 24. Technicals—Cousins, Sacramento defensive three second. A—16,235 (20,318).

0-0 2, Samuels 3-6 3-5 9, Harangody 2-6 0-0 4, Davis 6-14 5-5 19, Gibson 4-9 1-2 11, Eyenga 1-6 0-1 3, Harris 0-1 0-0 0, Graham 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-87 14-20 83. Atlanta 21 31 22 25 — 99 Cleveland 18 21 27 17 — 83 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 5-14 (Williams 3-5, Crawford 1-4, Hinrich 1-4, Teague 0-1), Cleveland 5-20 (Davis 2-6, Gibson 2-6, Eyenga 1-4, Harris 0-1, Harangody 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 53 (Smith 18), Cleveland 52 (Hickson 13). Assists—Atlanta 29 (Smith 8), Cleveland 16 (Davis 7). Total Fouls—Atlanta 18, Cleveland 24. Technicals—Atlanta defensive three second, Cleveland defensive three second. A—20,226 (20,562).

Kings 114, 76ers 111 SACRAMENTO (114) Garcia 4-9 2-2 11, Cousins 5-17 2-3 12, Dalembert 4-9 5-6 13, Udrih 4-7 2-2 11, Thornton 11-21 6-7 32, Thompson 5-8 5-8 15, Evans 2-8 5-6 10, Greene 2-5 2-2 8, Jackson 1-1 0-0 2, Jeter 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38-85 29-36 114. PHILADELPHIA (111) Iguodala 6-14 4-10 16, Brand 5-10 5-6 15, Hawes 6-11 4-5 16, Holiday 11-19 5-5 28, Meeks 8-11 3-3 22, Turner 1-2 3-3 5, Young 2-11 0-1 4, Battie 0-0 0-0 0, Nocioni 0-1 0-0 0, Williams 1-12 2-3 5. Totals 40-91 26-36 111. Sacramento 18 26 30 26 14 — 114 Philadelphia 27 22 22 29 11 — 111 3-Point Goals—Sacramento 9-15 (Thornton 4-6, Greene 2-3, Udrih 1-1, Evans 1-1, Garcia

NEW ORLEANS (84) Ariza 2-7 0-0 4, Landry 8-16 8-9 24, Okafor 7-11 0-2 14, Paul 4-10 2-2 10, Belinelli 4-16 0-0 9, Green 3-10 0-0 6, Ja.Smith 0-1 0-0 0, Pondexter 1-4 0-0 2, Gray 3-3 1-2 7, Jack 3-9 0-0 8. Totals 35-87 11-15 84. L.A. LAKERS (102) Artest 4-6 2-2 11, Gasol 9-14 5-6 23, Bynum 5-6 3-5 13, Fisher 1-8 0-0 2, Bryant 11-25 7-8 30, Brown 4-10 0-0 8, Blake 2-5 0-0 5, Odom 4-6 0-0 8, Barnes 1-4 0-0 2, Jo.Smith 0-0 0-0 0, Walton 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 41-85 17-21 102. New Orleans 19 22 22 21 — 84 L.A. Lakers 30 27 17 28 — 102 3-Point Goals—New Orleans 3-17 (Jack 2-3, Belinelli 1-7, Paul 0-1, Pondexter 0-1, Green 0-2, Ariza 0-3), L.A. Lakers 3-17 (Artest 1-1, Blake 1-3, Bryant 1-6, Fisher 0-1, Odom 0-1, Walton 0-1, Brown 0-2, Barnes 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Orleans 53 (Okafor 11), L.A. Lakers 51 (Gasol 16). Assists—New Orleans 22 (Paul 9), L.A. Lakers 21 (Bryant 5). Total Fouls—New Orleans 21, L.A. Lakers 18. A—18,997 (18,997).

Mavericks 91, Suns 83 DALLAS (91) Marion 2-10 2-2 6, Nowitzki 6-19 2-2 15, Chandler 5-7 6-9 16, Kidd 5-8 2-2 16, Beaubois 4-6 0-0 10, Terry 5-16 4-4 16, Stojakovic 2-5 0-0 5, Haywood 0-0 0-0 0, Barea 3-13 1-2 7. Totals 32-84 17-21 91. PHOENIX (83) Hill 4-11 0-2 8, Frye 0-4 0-0 0, Gortat 8-13 4-4 20, Nash 3-11 0-0 6, Dudley 7-16 6-6 20, Childress 6-9 0-2 12, Carter 1-4 0-2 3, Warrick 1-1 1-2 3, Lopez 1-3 0-0 2, Brooks 3-8 3-5 9. Totals 34-80 14-23 83. Dallas 17 27 21 26 — 91 Phoenix 26 23 18 16 — 83 3-Point Goals—Dallas 10-26 (Kidd 4-7, Beaubois 2-3, Terry 2-9, Nowitzki 1-1, Stojakovic 1-2, Barea 0-4), Phoenix 1-16 (Carter 1-2, Gortat 0-1, Nash 0-2, Hill 0-2, Dudley 0-3, Brooks 0-3, Frye 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Dallas 58 (Chandler 18), Phoenix 53 (Gortat 15). Assists—Dallas 20 (Barea 5), Phoenix 22 (Nash 10). Total Fouls—Dallas 18, Phoenix 22. Technicals—Dallas Coach Carlisle, Dallas defensive three second. A—17,314 (18,422).

NBA ROUNDUP

Blazers fall to Thunder The Associated Press OKLAHOMA CITY — Russell Westbrook is most dangerous when attacking the basket. Five fouls kept him from doing that late in Oklahoma City’s game with Portland, but his perimeter play was more than enough. Westbrook’s three three-pointers in the final 5½ minutes, including the clincher with 21 seconds remaining, carried the Thunder to a 99-90 victory over the Portland Trail Blazers on Sunday and clinched Oklahoma City’s second straight playoff berth. “You ask just about anybody, they’d rather have the ball in Westbrook’s hands than (Kevin) Durant’s hands late in the game, but he made some big shots,” said Portland’s Gerald Wallace, who scored 40 points, two short of his career high. “They’ve got a great two-headed snake over there.” Westbrook finished with 28 points and Durant had 21, but he was just five of 18 from the field and scored only six in the second half. Wallace was unguardable at times in the second half as he carried the Trail Blazers back from a 14-point halftime deficit. But Oklahoma City made enough plays late to beat Portland for the third time in three tries. “Once you’re in a zone like that, you’re tough to stop,” Durant said of Wallace, whom he guarded much of the night. “But I think we did a good job of helping each other out.” Westbrook’s three from the left wing gave the Thunder a 97-90 lead and, after Wallace missed a jumper with 16 seconds remaining, the Thunder could finally breathe easy. Their previous two victories had been by a combined three points. Oklahoma City won its third straight and ninth in the past 10. LaMarcus Aldridge scored 20 for Portland. Westbrook picked up his fifth foul with 6:18 remaining, but proceeded to hit back-to-back threepointers to help the Thunder build a 90-82 lead with just over four minutes remaining. Wallace countered with consecutive baskets of his own to get Portland within 90-88 with 2:11 left. It was 92-88 when Wallace had his shot blocked by Kendrick Perkins on a drive to the basket, and Andre Miller’s follow attempt was blocked by Serge Ibaka. That led to Westbrook’s breakaway for a 94-88 lead. Two free throws by Aldridge made it 94-90 with 43 seconds remaining, but Westbrook clinched it with his long three about 20 seconds later. Also on Sunday: Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 MIAMI — LeBron James had 33 points and 10 rebounds, Chris Bosh added 31 points and 12 rebounds, and Dwyane Wade shook off a bruised tailbone to finish with 30 points and 11 boards as Miami beat Houston for its eighth win in nine games. Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Spurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Tony Allen and Zach Randolph had 23 points apiece, and Memphis sent San Antonio to its third straight loss. Celtics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 MINNEAPOLIS — Paul Pierce had 23 points

Sue Ogrocki / The Associated Press

Portland Trail Blazers forward Gerald Wallace, right, blocks a shot by Oklahoma City Thunder forward Serge Ibaka in the second half of Sunday’s game. and seven rebounds, and Boston nearly gave away another huge lead in a victory over Minnesota. Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Cavaliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 CLEVELAND — Marvin Williams scored a season-high 31 points and Al Horford added 20, leading Atlanta over Cleveland. Kings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 PHILADELPHIA — Marcus Thornton scored 32 points and former Philadelphia center Samuel Dalembert made two free throws in the closing seconds of overtime for Sacramento. Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Wizards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 OAKLAND, Calif. — Monta Ellis had 37 points and 13 assists, leading Golden State past road-weary Washington. Mavericks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 PHOENIX — Jason Kidd sank a pair of threepointers in the final 1:11 and Dallas pulled out a victory over Phoenix that may have dropped the curtains on the Suns’ hopes for a playoff berth. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Hornets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 LOS ANGELES — Kobe Bryant scored 30 points, Pau Gasol had 23 points and 16 rebounds, and Los Angeles inched closer to the top of the overall NBA standings with its 15th win in 16 games since the All-Star break, over New Orleans.

Scot hangs on for win at Bay Hill The Associated Press ORLANDO, Fla. — Martin Laird went from a shocking collapse to become an unlikely winner Sunday at Bay Hill. In the toughest final round on the PGA Tour this year, Laird rallied from a three-shot deficit with four holes to play with two birdies and two remarkable pars to close with a 3-over 75 and win the Arnold Palmer Invitational by one shot over hard-luck Steve Marino. The 28-year-old Scot became the first European to win at Bay Hill in its 33-year history. He just never imagined it would play out like this. Laird’s two-shot lead was gone at the turn, and when he pulled a bunker shot into the water on No. 11 to make double bogey, he already was 5-over par for his round and fading quickly. But a day of survival for everyone else turned into a revival for Laird. After a bogey on the par-3 14th to fall three shots behind Marino, Laird holed a 20-foot birdie putt on the 15th, an 18foot birdie putt on the 16th, saved par from behind the 17th green and two-putted from just inside 90 feet on the final hole. It was the highest score in the final round by a Bay Hill champion, and it took Laird’s best golf to do that on a course that at times made it feel like the U.S. Open had moved to late March. No one in the last three groups broke par, and those six players were a combined 19-over par. Laird needed some help from Marino, who played beautifully until the last four holes. Marino took bogey from a plugged lie in the bunker short of the 15th green, then made double bogey from a plugged lie in the sand short of the 17th hole. He went from a one-shot lead to a two-shot deficit when Laird birdied the 16th in the group behind. Marino at least gave himself a chance on the last hole with a gutsy play over the water to 8 feet for birdie and a 72. It was the third close call this year for Marino, who has yet to win on the PGA Tour. Justin Rose closed with a 68 and tied for third with David Toms and Marc Leishman, who needed to win to get into the Masters. Also on Sunday: Sandra Gal wins Kia Classic INDUSTRY, Calif. — Sandra Gal won the Kia Classic to become the second German winner in LPGA Tour history, beating second-ranked Jiyai Shin with a 2-foot birdie putt on the final hole. The 25-yearold Gal, a former University of Florida player, made the winning putt after Shin’s 5-foot birdie attempt caught the right edge and spun out. Gal closed with a 2-under 71 to finish at 16-under 276 on the Industry Hills Golf Club course at Pacific Palms. Lawrie wins Andalucian MALAGA, Spain — Paul Lawrie won the Andalucian Open for his first European Tour victory since 2002 and sixth overall after holding off Johan Edfors of Sweden by one stroke. The 42-year-old Lawrie shot an even-par 70 for a 12-under 268 total and become the oldest golfer to win the event.

Phelan Ebenhack / The Associated Press

Martin Laird acknowledges the crowd after sinking a putt for par to win the Arnold Palmer Invitational in Orlando, Fla., Sunday.


D4 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP: NCAA TOURNAMENT

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Baylor advances with win The Associated Press DALLAS — Brittney Griner had another big game, got some help from Baylor’s freshman point guard, and the top-seeded Lady Bears ended any chance for Wisconsin-Green Bay to have a Butler-like finish. Griner had a career-high 40 points with 10 rebounds and combined with Odyssey Sims to score all the points in the gameclinching 14-0 spurt, as the Lady Bears finally pulled away for an 86-76 victory over Green Bay on Sunday night. Baylor advanced to the regional final by snapping a 25game winning streak by the feisty team from the Horizon League that also boasts a twotime Final Four team on the men’s side. The Lady Bears (34-2) led only 52-49 before Griner made a short baseline shot over two defenders with just over 13 minutes left. Sims then had consecutive three-pointers before two free throws and a putback by Griner. Sims ended the spurt with a steal and breakaway layup. “Stuff started clicking for us,” Griner said. “We weren’t rushing anything.” Green Bay (34-2), in the NCAA round of 16 for the first time, put up quite a fight for a while against a team trying to get to the Final Four for the second straight season — and proved they weren’t intimidated by Griner, Baylor’s 6-foot-8 sophomore standout. In the end, though, Griner stood tall again. “You might better change the way you think about guarding her,” Baylor coach Kim Mulkey said. “They said they weren’t going to do much different.” Griner was coming off 30 points and eight blocks in Baylor’s victory Tuesday night over West Virginia, when she sat on the bench the final 9:20 of the first half with two fouls. This time, she sat the final 5:51 of the half with 13 points after two fouls in a 14-second span. Also on Sunday: No. 1 Connecticut . . . . . . . . . . . 68 No. 5 Georgetown. . . . . . . . . . . 63 PHILADELPHIA — Maya Moore had 23 points and 14 rebounds to help Connecticut rally from a seven-point second-half deficit and beat Georgetown in the Philadelphia Regional semifinals. Bria Hartley added 17 points for UConn (35-1), which is three wins away from a third straight national championship. No. 2 Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 No. 3 DePaul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 PHILADELPHIA — Karima Christmas had 23 points and nine rebounds, and Jasmine Thomas scored 19 points to help the Blue Devils reach the regional final for a second straight year. Chelsea Gray scored 16 points for the Blue Devils, who raced to a 15-point lead and had to hold on after the big advantage nearly evaporated late in the second half. No. 2 Texas A&M . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 No. 6 Georgia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 DALLAS — Danielle Adams had 23 points and 14 rebounds and Texas A&M built a 31-point halftime lead to earn a spot in the regional final. Texas A&M (30-5) led 13-0 and was up 27-2 with just under 10 minutes to play in the first half. The Aggies stifled the Lady Bulldogs into a one-for14 start from the field.

Michael Thomas / The Associated Press

Virginia Commonwealth’s Darius Theus, right, pulls on teammate Brandon Rozzell’s shirt as Troy Daniels celebrates after winning the Southwest regional final game against Kansas in the NCAA college basketball tournament Sunday in San Antonio. VCU won 71-61.

VCU stuns Kansas The Associated Press SAN ANTONIO — Move over, Butler. Virginia Commonwealth is crashing the Final Four. Two weeks ago, the 11th-seeded Rams so doubted they would get a NCAA tournament invite that they watched Cartoon Network and went out for burgers instead of watching the selection show. Now, all of America will be watching them in the Final Four. The 11th-seeded Rams are heading to Houston, and final No. 1 seed Kansas is heading home after the biggest March upset in years. VCU stunned the Jayhawks 71-61 on Sunday, becoming just the third 11th seed to make the Final Four. The Jayhawks had been the last top seed standing, but what looked like an easy path to the final weekend ended in a stunning collapse. Eighth-seeded Butler, you’re promoted to a favorite next week. VCU is the trendy underdog pick this year. “Once again we felt like nobody really thought we could win going into this game,” said VCU coach Shaka Smart, the budding star of the tournament. VCU guard Joey Rodriguez counted one of Kansas’ vaunted Morris twins — Marcus or Markieff — as one of those many doubters. During a pregame captains meeting with officials, Rodriguez said one of the brothers offered him some parting words: “The run ends here.” “We’ll see,” Rodriguez shot back. The Jayhawks saw all right. VCU players, hoisting their Southwest regional champion trophy, poured into the bleachers where VCU’s outnumbered fans sat in an Alamodome that was otherwise colored in Kansas blue and white. VCU had sold out its allotment of 1,000

Houston Continued from D1 ESPN, which sponsors one of the country’s biggest bracket tournaments, said that out of 5.9 million entries, only two had this foursome making its way to Houston. “I think what it does as much as anything, it just puts a spin on the NCAA tournament,” said Kansas coach Bill Self after his top-seeded team lost 71-61 to VCU. “It’s wild. ... Because seeds are so overrated. It’s about matchups. And their players could play for us any day.” VCU (28-11) got up early on Kansas and never looked back, an upset winner in a tournament that’s all about underdogs. “Our guys have done a phenomenal job of putting all the doubters aside, putting all the people that didn’t believe in us aside and going out and doing their job,” VCU coach Shaka Smart said. The Rams are the third No. 11 seed to make the Final Four and the first since George Mason in 2006, also of the Colonial Athletic Conference. But the Rams are the first ever that will need to win seven games — not the usual six — to make it all the way through the NCAA tournament. They were one of the last at-large teams to make the newfangled 68-team field. They played in the new “First Four”

WSU Continued from D1 Washington State finished the regular season 19-12 after going 16-15 a year ago — WSU is now 22-12 after three wins in the NIT. But the Cougars struggled with off-the-court issues this season as three different players, including leading scorer and NBA prospect Klay Thompson, were arrested and cited for marijuana possession in three separate incidents. You can see why a second-year coach like Bone likes having the stablizing influence of Lodwick on the court as much as possible. “He’s a no-maintenance guy, not even low-maintenance,” Bone says about Lodwick, one of only three Cougars to

play in all 34 of WSU’s games this season. “He does the right thing on and off the court. … That’s why he’s hard to take off the court.” Don’t get the wrong idea, the 22-yearold Lodwick is more Rudy Gay than Rudy Ruettiger. A 6-foot-7 inch small forward, Lodwick shot better than 30 percent from three-point range this season for WSU while making 31 starts. Last Monday night in the Cougs’ 74-64 victory over Oklahoma State in the second round of the NIT, he recorded nine points, two assists and a team-high seven rebounds. “I embraced that role a couple years ago,” Lodwick says. “Even though I was (a scorer) in high school, I knew the way I was going to see minutes wasn’t doing those things (offensively), but getting bet-

tickets in San Antonio after advancing farther than any Rams team in school history. The weekend before in Chicago, VCU had so many leftovers that Purdue fans scooped them up. Jamie Skeen led VCU with 26 points, and as the final seconds ticked down, heaved the ball from the free-throw line into the stands behind the opposite backboard. His teammates on the bench, who spent the final minutes with locked arms to hold each other back, finally spilled out onto the court, grinning ear to ear. Kansas players walked slowly off the court. Several, including Markieff Morris, cried. “Probably the best game they played ever,” Markieff said. “Probably the best game ever as a school tonight. We let them. We let them beat us.” Smart was guided from one interview to another wearing the cut-down net around his neck. The cheers for VCU were only interrupted for guard Brandon Rozzell, who stood at midcourt as the crown serenaded him with an impromptu “Happy Birthday.” In another game on Sunday: No. 4 Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 No. 2 North Carolina. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 NEWARK, N.J. — Brandon Knight scored 22 points and Kentucky restored some order to the Final Four with a win over North Carolina in the East Regional final. The Wildcats (29-8) will play Connecticut in Houston on Saturday night after turning back a late surge by the Tar Heels (27-10), who erased an 11-point deficit before running out of gas in the final two minutes. DeAndre Liggins added 12 points for Kentucky, including a threepointer from the corner with 37 seconds remaining to help lift the Wildcats to the Final Four for the first time since 1998.

— an extra round that was added as part of the NCAA’s new $10.8 billion TV deal. Now they’re in the Final Four. They’ll play Butler (27-9), which slumped through big chunks of this season, a somewhat predictable result after what was supposed to be a once-in-alifetime trip to the Final Four last season, played a scant six miles from their Indianapolis campus. This year, the destination is Reliant Stadium — 1,036 miles away. The Bulldogs are once again proving that all it takes is good players — not a conference, a big school or gobs of money — to compete on the biggest stage in college sports. Last season, in one of the most epic finishes in Final Four history, Gordon Hayward’s halfcourt shot banked off glass, nicked off the rim and barely bounded out to leave the Bulldogs two points short of Duke for the national title. It was a heartbreaker, but maybe one that set the Bulldogs up for a repeat. They’ve won one game by one, another by two and another by three on this year’s road to the Final Four. They beat Florida 74-71 in overtime Saturday to make their second straight trip. “I think it (last year) helps you with knowing how you need to prepare and what you should do and what you should not do,” Howard said. “I think that will help us.”

Men’s National Invitational Tournament, semifinal round What: Washington State vs. Wichita State When: Tuesday, 4 p.m. Where: Madison Square Garden, New York City TV: ESPN2

ter at defense, rebounding, doing all the hustle stuff that doesn’t come natural.” Lodwick takes special pride in his defense. While not the quickest small for-

2011 Continued from D1 Robinett, who has been a varsity pitcher since his freshman year and now throws a fastball in the low 90s, is just one of several pitchers McKae has been impressed with on the Mountain View staff. He feels Sam Peters, a junior with a “live arm,” and Andrew Deadmond, a senior who throws five different pitches for strikes, can make solid contributions to a team poised to improve on its 5-16 Intermountain Conference record from last season. McKae, 29, knows a pitcher with potential when he sees one. As recently as last summer, McKae was working the mound himself, throwing professionally for the Southern Maryland Blue Crabs in the independent Atlantic League. “I go out for mound visits, and when I get the ball from the pitcher I tend to look down to the catcher and want to throw a pitch myself,” admits McKae, who played Class AA ball in the San Francisco Giants’ organization as recently as 2008. A pair of brothers who both hit from the left side, senior Jo Carroll and sophomore John Carroll should lead Mountain View’s offensive attack, according to McKae. Robinett is one of several Central Oregon pitchers drawing attention from college scouts. Bend High senior Michael Hirko has committed to play at traditional NCAA Division III power George Fox University in the fall, but

first he will try to lead the Lava Bears to their third IMC title in four years. “He does a great job of working efficiently,” Lava Bears coach Dan Weber says about Hirko. “He’s kind of a true pitcher. He has a good understanding of what he has to do.” If not for a loss on the final day of the season last year, Bend would be aiming for a fourth consecutive league crown. Weber says he expects to start four sophomores on a regular basis this year, but with a pair of all-state first-team selections returning in Grant Newton (third base) and Chris Zelmer (first base), Bend is expected to contend for a postseason berth again. “We throw strikes and play defense,” Weber explains. “That’s our recipe.” Redmond senior Parker Vernon rounds out the area’s talented pitching trio. He was a Central Valley Conference first-team selection last year and will try to lead the Panthers back to the Class 6A playoffs. Redmond moves from the CVC to Special District 1 for postseason qualification purposes this year. Madras, a team that finished second in the IMC last year and advanced to the Class 5A state semifinal round, could be competitive again in 2011 at the Class 4A level. However, the White Buffaloes lost nearly all of their offensive power in Turner Gill, Spencer Ellsbury, Ryan Brunner and Austin Say to graduation. Madras has just four seniors on its varsity roster of 18 players. Keith Bleyer can be reached at kbleyer@bendbulletin.com.

Prep baseball outlook A glance at the Central Oregon high school baseball teams competing this spring:

CLASS 6A Redmond Panthers Head coach: Marc Horner (10th season) 2010 record: 10-12 overall; 8-10 Central Valley Conference (fourth place), lost in Class 6A first round Returning all-CVC player: Parker Vernon, sr., pitcher Special District 1 opener: Lincoln at Redmond, April 26

CLASS 5A Bend Lava Bears Head coach: Dan Weber (fifth season) 2010 record: 16-12 overall; 14-7 Intermountain Conference (third place), lost in Class 5A second round Returning all-IMC players: Grant Newton, sr., catcher/third baseman; Chris Zelmer, sr., first baseman; Michael Hirko, sr., pitcher IMC opener: Bend at Summit, April 11 Mountain View Cougars Head coach: Dave McKae (first season) 2010 record: 5-20 overall; 5-16 IMC (seventh place) Returning all-IMC player: Alex Robinett, sr., pitcher/outfielder IMC opener: Mountain View at Summit, April 1 Summit Storm Head coach: C.J. Colt (fifth season) 2010 record: 9-18 overall; 8-13 IMC (sixth place) Returning all-IMC player: Konner Reddick, jr., first baseman IMC opener: Mountain View at Summit, April 1

CLASS 4A Madras White Buffaloes Head coach: Adam Randall (second season) 2010 record: 21-9 overall; 15-6 Class 5A Intermountain Conference (second place), lost in Class 5A semifinals Top returners: Kyle Palmer, jr., pitcher; Kendall Main, jr., infielder; Jordan Brown, jr., catcher Tri-Valley opener: La Salle at Madras, April 5 Crook County Cowboys Head coach: Terry Larimer (first season) 2010 record: 7-19 overall; 3-18 Class 5A IMC (eighth place) Returning all-IMC players: Justin Cleveland, sr., catcher; Clay McCarty, sr., utility Special District 1 opener: Crook County at Marshall, April 9 Sisters Outlaws Head coach: Steve Hodges (fifth season) 2009 record: 18-9 overall; 6-6 Sky-Em League (fourth place), lost in Class 4A second round Key returners: Eric Carlson, sr., utility; Jordan Hodges, sr., pitcher Sky-Em opener: Elmira at Sisters, March 29 La Pine Hawks Head coach: Bryn Card (first season) 2009 record: 6-16 overall; 3-9 Sky-Em (sixth place), lost in Sky-Em playoffs Key returners: Jon Ebner, sr., utility; Jake Gacke, sr., outfielder Sky-Em opener: La Pine at Sweet Home, March 29

CLASS 2A Culver Bulldogs Head coach: James Macy (eighth season) 2009 record: 8-14 overall; 4-10 Special District 2 (seventh place) Key returner: Austin Barany, sr., utility Special District 2 opener: Culver at Scio, March 29

ward, he helped Washington State hold opposing teams to 39 percent shooting from the field, the best mark in the Pac-10. “He knows his (scouting report) and understands personnel,” Bone says. “Sometimes matchups are difficult for him if the kid he goes up against is really quick, but he’s strong and knows angles. He does everything he’s capable of doing every possession.” While Lodwick usually stays out of the spotlight, he had a chance to be the hero Wednesday night in WSU’s NIT quarterfinal game against Northwestern. With .2 seconds left in the fourth quarter and the score tied 64-64, Lodwick was fouled and sent to the free throw line for a pair of free throws. In front of a national television audience watching on ESPN2, Lodwick missed

both foul shots and the game went into overtime. Showing the cool head that has helped the Cougars all season, though, Lodwick didn’t let the misses bother him. He went out in the extra period and helped hold the Wildcats to just two points as WSU went on to win 69-66 to earn a spot in the semifinals at MSG. “He missed a couple of critical free throws, yet for the next couple of minutes he’s busting his tail, flying around the floor playing great defense,” Bone says, reiterating just how important Lodwick is to his team. “Going after loose balls, it’s hard to get guys to do that. And Abe brings that every day.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 541383-0305 or at beastes@bendbulletin. com.


C YCI NG C EN T R A L

Twenty

Minson Rd.

Parrish Ln. Wiley Rd.

Powell Butte AlfalfaBussett Rd. Powell ButteMillican ride 48 miles

Shumway Rd.

“Spring� in Central Oregon can be frustrating for road cyclists — especially those who live at higher elevations in Bend, La Pine or Sisters. Snow, hail, rain and wind are common this time of year. Thankfully, the conditions across the tri-county region are as varied as the weather in Central Oregon. When spring snow and slush muck up the riding in Bend or Sisters, a short drive in the direction of Crook County can often yield warmer temperatures, dry roads and even sunshine. The Alfalfa-Powell Butte-Millican Loop ride is a perfect choice on a day when the weather in Deschutes County is still in winter’s grip.

Dixon Rd.

126

Millican Rd.

Powell Butte Hwy.

126

Reif Rd.

Alfalfa-Powell Butte-Millican Loop

Reif Rd. Williams Rd.

CYCLING INSIDER | RECOMMENDED RIDE The Bulletin takes a look at a ride among the Central Oregon towns of Alfalfa, Powell Butte and Millican with a “Cycling Insider� feature, whose rotating topics include rider profiles, safety tips, local ride recommendations and gear reviews.

Brasada Ranch

Alf a alf

Start/ Finish Alfalfa Market Rd.

Millican Rd.

Johnson Ranch Rd.

. Rd

Distance: 48 miles. Elevation gain: Approximately 1,300 feet. Surface conditions: Good overall, and excellent in some places; road shoulders are narrow in some places, nonexistent in others. Description: Mostly flat with a few gradual ascents and descents; breezy conditions can make this ride challenging, particularly on the 6-mile Southwest Reservoir/Willard/Alfalfa Market road section heading west. The ride begins in Alfalfa, then heads north toward Brasada Ranch and Powell Butte before returning south via Millican Road. The ride meanders past numerous farms and livestock ranches, as well as through classic High Desert juniper and sage landscapes; it also includes views of the Cascade mountains on a clear day. Highlights: Mostly clean and quiet country roads; the 15-mile stretch of Millican Road, where vehicle traffic typically is light, is especially enjoyable. Lowlights: Fast-moving vehicle traffic on a short section of state Highway 126 southwest of Prineville; fortunately, the shoulder here is wide, smooth and clean. Take caution when crossing the highway. The 6-mile SW Reservoir/Willard/Alfalfa Market section is roughly chip-sealed. Water and food: Available near the start/finish at the Alfalfa Store. On a warm day, be sure to carry

Willard Rd.

d. voir R Reser

Alfalfa Market Store

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

plenty of water, as there is no place to refill without deviating from the route. Start/finish: Parking is available in Alfalfa at the northwest corner of Alfalfa Market Road and Johnson Ranch Road in a dirt lot next to the power station. Other ride options: Riders familiar with the Firecracker and Pre Season century rides in Central Oregon will recognize some of this route. The ride can be made considerably longer by starting from Bend or by descending into Prineville and then looping back on the Crooked River Highway and past the Crooked River Reservoir. —Heather Clark

C C  E  C 

Please e-mail sports event information to Cyclingcentral@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin. com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

Bend; www.cotamtb.com.

MISC.

Brewing, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; registration opens at 6:30 p.m., racing starts at 7 p.m.; $5 to race, $3 to watch; 541-382-2453.

OUT OF TOWN

RACES CENTRAL OREGON TRAIL ALLIANCE: Monthly mountain bike trails meeting, open to the public; Thursday; 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Environmental Center; 16 N.W. Kansas Ave.,

ROLLER RUMBLE SERIES: Racers go head to head for 400 meters on fork-mounted rollers; Tuesdays through April 12; Silver Moon

THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 28, 2011 D5

PDX BICYCLE SHOW: All things bicycle, including speakers, gear, bicycle and clothing showcase and activities for kids; April 9-10; Oregon Convention Center, Portland; www.pedalnationevents.com.

MORE CYCLING

Continued from D1 “The benefits of the 29ers are that they roll over things such as roots and rocks better than smaller wheels,� says Kevin Gorman, co-owner of WebCyclery, a Bend shop that specializes in sales of 29er mountain bikes. “Think of a monster truck driving over cars. (Twenty-niners) make for a smoother ride and more comfort, and they have a bigger contact patch with the ground and therefore offer better traction.� Twenty-niners appeared on the national mountain bike scene in the early 2000s. The wheels were first embraced by small custom-bike builders. But as more and more consumers began seeking them out, the major mountain bike manufacturers also got on board. Today, nearly every major mountain bike manufacturer produces a 29er. One California company, Niner, manufacturers the bigwheeled bikes exclusively. According to a San Fernando Business Journal story, Niner’s sales revenue catapulted from $658,356 in 2007 to nearly $6 million in 2010. And Niner founder Chris Sugai told me last week that industry statistics show that 29ers are now the majority of mountain bikes sold in the U.S. Gorman says his Bend shop began selling 29er tires and wheels in 2004. By 2005, the majority of WebCyclery’s tire sales were 29ers. Today, sales of 29er bikes, parts and accessories far outnumber those of 26-inch stuff, he says. In search of a bike that would fit his tall frame, Bend’s Jason Meyer bought his first 29er in 2005. The 6-foot-6 inch rider had difficulty fitting on a standard 26-inch mountain bike. “It was a little clownish because the frame was so big and the wheels were so small,� Meyer recalls. “(The 29er) was more proportionate for me.� The 35-year-old athletic trainer and part-time guide for Bend’s Cog Wild Mountain Bike Tours is now on his third 29er. In addition to rolling through tricky rock outcroppings with ease, the tires on

• Results from the Piece of Cake road bike race in Amity on March 16, see Scoreboard Page D2 • Season kickoff meeting slated for next week for Bend Bella Cyclists, Page D1 a 29er maintain speed with less effort than their smaller counterpart. This, however, is both a plus and a minus. “It takes more effort to get the wheels moving, but once they’re moving they stay moving longer,â€? says Meyer. But 29ers do have their drawbacks — and their critics. “Everybody has their own style and that’s what it comes down to,â€? says Meyer. “There’s a learning curve when it comes to transitioning from a 26- to a 29-inch-wheel bike. The biggest part is accepting the fact that you have to get a bigger wheel rolling. When I slow down, I’ve got to get these wheels rolling again and some people don’t like that. “It took me probably a good year to figure it out that you have to read terrain a little more and keep your legs spinning and the momentum going so you don’t have to start the wheels from a stop.â€? Fisher, a longtime mountain biker whose quiver of dirt rides includes both a full-suspension 29er and a 6-inch travel bike with standard wheels, opts for his traditional mountain bike on tight, narrow trails, which require a snappy performance from his bike. “(On a 29er), when you’re going up technical terrain it’s easier to roll over stuff,â€? Fisher says. “When you’re going downhill — because of the bigger wheels — it’s harder to ‘endo’ the bike. There’s less of a chance of feeling like you’re going to go over the handlebars with the bigger wheels.

He adds: “A 29er isn’t going to maneuver as quickly in tight turns. The bigger wheel is harder to make it through that stuff.� Ina McLean, a 5-foot-5 inch mountain biker, says 29ers aren’t just for the vertically endowed, though it took the 52-year-old Bend resident time to adjust to the change. “It was a little hard to get used to at first — it’s bulky insofar as you’ve got these big tires all around you,� she says. “At first I thought, ‘Oh my gosh, I’m riding a tank.’ � McLean opts for her standard mountain bike when she’s planning to ride twisty, handle-barwide singletrack, such as Sector 16 or the curvaceous, jump-riddled Whoops Trail in the Phil’s Trail network. “Most everywhere else it’s really fun,� McLean says. “It just goes over everything.� A series of tire-jilting rock gardens on the COD Trail in the Phil’s system have made pinballs out of many a mountain biker, including McLean, until she tackled it with her 29er. “I’ve always bobbled at least one part of it,� McLean says. “But the first time I went on my niner I thought, ‘Wow, that was easy.’ � Meyer says riding a 29er gave him more confidence. “People think that 29ers are slower in tight terrain, and that’s an arguable point for sure,� Meyer says. “But if you’re riding down Phil’s Canyon or the south side of Storm King, you can just rip. Adds Meyer: “It’s all about keeping that momentum.� Heather Clark can be reached at cyclingcentral@bendbulletin. com.

541-322-CARE

Register Today! 813-935-5087 Friday, April 1, 12:00 Noon Phoenix Inn & Suites 300 NW Franklin Ave, Bend (Next to Tower Theater) Scotts Franchising is looking for a qualified candidate to own the Bend, Oregon area. You can own a nationally recognized brand that’s used by millions. FINANCING AVAILABLE for qualified candidates.

Complimentary lunch will be provided.


D6 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Navigation-ready Auto Entertainment System

22’ x 22’ Stick-Built Garage

8-Week Cheerleading Class

Certificate for Landscaping Products

4-Month CrossFit Training Package

Photography Service and Product Certificate

RETAIL VALUE: $600 FROM: InTune

RETAIL VALUE: $23,524 FROM: HiLine Homes

RETAIL VALUE: $110 FROM: Acrovision Sports Center

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: Knife River

RETAIL VALUE: $386 FROM: CrossFit Breakthrough

RETAIL VALUE: $200 FROM: Whippersnappers Studio

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Two Night Mid-Week Cabin Stay

LuxuryLife UltraLite Cot

Nike M9 Cart Bag (Grey/Yellow)

Spa Weekend Vacation Package

FujiFilm Camera

Fishing Gear & Tackle Gift Certificate

RETAIL VALUE: $430 FROM: Elk Lake Resort

RETAIL VALUE: $220 FROM: Mountain Supply

RETAIL VALUE: $200 FROM: Pro Golf of Bend

RETAIL VALUE: $800 FROM: Black Butte Ranch

RETAIL VALUE: $150 FROM: Connecting Point

RETAIL VALUE: $200 FROM: Ken’s Sporting Goods

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Wildlife & Pest Control Certificate

$400 Toward Purchase of New Saddle

Dining Gift Certificate

RETAIL VALUE: $400 FROM: Dan’s Pest and Wildlife Control

RETAIL VALUE: $400 FROM: Saddle Up Saddlery

RETAIL VALUE: $50 FROM: Black Butte Ranch

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18K White Gold, Diamond Pendant and Chain

Callaway Hyper X Women’s Driver

Home Furnishing Certificate

RETAIL VALUE: $195 FROM: Pavé Jewelry

RETAIL VALUE: $199 FROM: Crooked River Ranch

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: Feingold Home

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One Ton of Grass or Alfalfa Hay

1-Night Stay in Deluxe Canyon View Suite

Electrical Product and Service Certificate

Maytag Slide-In Electric Range

Scott Kay Skull Bracelet

10 Rounds of Golf Punch Card

RETAIL VALUE: $170 FROM: Quarry Ave. Hay & Feed

RETAIL VALUE: $229 FROM: Pine Ridge Inn

RETAIL VALUE: $250 FROM: QB Digital Living

RETAIL VALUE: $1099 FROM: Lance & Sandy’s Maytag

RETAIL VALUE: $1075 FROM: Ice Fine Jewelry

RETAIL VALUE: $400 FROM: Juniper Golf

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Bead Certificate

15’x25’x52” Above-Ground Pool

RV Service and Labor Certificate

Whole House Air Purification System

Bath and Body Gift Certificate

2004 Fleetwood Westlake Tent Trailer

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: Azillion Beads

RETAIL VALUE: $6500 FROM: Absolute Paradise

RETAIL VALUE: $200 FROM: Courtesy RV

RETAIL VALUE: $3295 FROM: Home Heating & Cooling

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: Oregon Body and Bath

RETAIL VALUE: $8995 FROM: All Seasons RV & Marine

ALL LOCAL ITEMS!


THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 28, 2011 E1

CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

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T h e

B u l l e t i n :

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

General Merchandise

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies Golden Retriever Puppies, AKC, 8 weeks, wormed twice, 1st shots, parents OFA, $495 ea. 541-593-5549.

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent

Australian Shepherd Pups, Males. 3 blue merle, $500 ea, 1 Tri, 1 Blk/Wht.,$400 ea. Ready NOW. Jane @ 541-848-8354, La Pine.

Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume Jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold & Silver. I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist. Border Collie Puppies, 7 wks, 1st shots, well socialized, Elizabeth, 541-633-7006 $100 each. 541-477-3327

205

Items for Free ALPACA MANURE. Ready for all your landscaping and garden needs. FREE. 541-385-4989. Horse Manure, large loads, perfect for gardening, will load, FREE. 541-390-6570.

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

1 7 7 7

Boxers, AKC Reg. 5 brindle, 4 fawn, 3 white, Ready after 3/29. Taking deposits, $500-$650. 541-325-3376 Cat, Beautiful Persian type, spayed adult female, $25 to forever home, 541-548-5516 Chihuahua, Female, 2 year old blond. Spayed and Micro chip. Is good with other pets. Also very loving and protective. $100.00. Please call 541-617-8474 Dachshunds, AKC miniature, Black & tan short hair, 3 males, $325. 541-420-6044

Golden Retriever Pups exc. quality, parents OFA, good hips, $650. 541-318-3396. Hens, $8. Ducks, $10, Pigeons & Doves, $7 Lovebirds & Cockateils, $25. 541-410-9473

King

Shepherd

pups,

male & female, B &T, mother AKC reg, dad AKSC reg, ready 3/30, $650. 541-815-2888. Kittens & cats thru local rescue group. 65480 78th St, Bend, Sat/Sun 1-5, other days by appt, call 647-2181. Altered, shots, ID chip, more. Fees reduced for March only! Photos, map, more info at www.craftcats.org, 389-8420 KITTEN SEASON IS UPON US!! Take advantage of our “Mom & kitten special.” We will alter mama kitty and 4 kittens for $45. Each additional Kitten $5. Call us today to make an appt. Bend Spay & Neuter Project 541-617-1010.

Lab AKC Pups (6),

S . W .

C h a n d l e r

A v e . ,

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

B e n d

O r e g o n

9 7 7 0 2

208

240

247

255

263

269

Pets and Supplies

Crafts and Hobbies

Computers

Tools

Vizsla Puppies AKC. Visit www.huntingvizslapups.com 1 male, 1 female available. $800.00 each. Or call 541-548-7271

Crafter/Vendor - Collective Thoughts Is Closing Selling Everything! Tent, Walls, tables, equip, dollys, rolling carts, tubs, materials & much more! Finished items, wreaths, signs, floral design, bird homes, feeders, benches & potpourri.April. 1st-3rd, 9-5. 124 SE 9th, Bend, Visa/MC accepted. Info & ???’s, e-mail: collectivethoughts1@hotmail.com

Sporting Goods - Misc.

Bid Now!

Tool Chest, rollaway, 2 piece, multi-drawer, $200 OBO, 503-933-0814, local.

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

210

Furniture & Appliances !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Bunk Bed, twin/dbl, light solid wood, great cond. Sacrifice $200 obo. 541-382-5123

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643. Very old solid Oak 3-drawer dresser, dovetail joints w/orig brass. $175. 541-350-1711

We Service All Vacs! Free Estimates!

Bend’s Only Authorized Oreck Store.

4 males, 2 females, ready 4/11, 541-771-7511. Dachshunds, AKC, mini’s, fe- Lab Puppies, 5 yellow, 1 In the Forum Center males, $375, males, $325,info: black, 1 chocolate, $150541-330-0420 541-420-6044, 541-447-3060 $200, Call 541-647-3137. Labradoodles, Australian DO YOU HAVE The Bulletin Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com SOMETHING TO SELL recommends extra caution FOR $500 OR LESS? when purchasing products Labrador Pups, AKC, Chocoor services from out of the Non-commercial lates & Yellows, $550; Blacks, area. Sending cash, checks, advertisers may $450. Dew claws, 1st shots & or credit information may place an ad with our wormed. Call 541-536-5385 be subjected to F R A U D . "QUICK CASH www.welcomelabs.com For more information about SPECIAL" POODLE Pups, AKC Toy an advertiser, you may call African Grey 1 week 3 lines Lovable, happy tail-waggers! the Oregon State Attorney Congo, Female, 3 years $12 or Call 541-475-3889 General’s Office Consumer old, Large cage, Travel 2 weeks $18! Protection hotline at Cage, 2 months supply of Ad must 1-877-877-9392. food, Likes Women, $1000 include price of single item Professional Training for ObediOBO, (541)413-0668, Ask of $500 or less, or mulence, Upland & Waterfowl for for Eric. tiple items whose total all breeds. Labrador & Pudoes not exceed $500. delpointer pups & started dogs as well, 541-680-0009. 212 AKC Reg. Mini Doxie long Call Classifieds at hair 6 weeks old. Really Protect your family from deadly Antiques & 541-385-5809 pretty brown dapple color. hantavirus spread by rodents. www.bendbulletin.com Collectibles comes with puppy packFREE rescued barn/shop age. Asking $400. Call cats, fixed, shots. Natural ro- Danbury Mint Castles of Europe 541-678-4088 dent control in exchange for English Bulldog AKC, exc qual1994, 7 avail. exc. cond. safe shelter, food, water. Will ity. 1 big, beautiful male left! $50-$70 each, 541-848-8230 deliver locally. 541-389-8420 $1300. 541-290-0026 Lennox, 1995,Porcelain Tower of London Castle, mahogany FREE adult companion cats to base, exc, $125, 541-848-8230 seniors. Fixed, shots, ID chip, more. Will always take back The Bulletin reserves the right for any reason. Open Sat/ to publish all ads from The Sun 1-5. Other days by appt, Bulletin newspaper onto The Alaskan Malamute UKC pupcall 541-647-2181 to arBulletin Internet website. pies, Champion Bloodlines range. 65480 78th St, Bend. Red Heeler male 5-yrs-old, $600, 541-205-1351 registered, shots, great with Info: 389-8420. Photos, map, other dogs, cats, people. more at www.craftcats.org. Aussie Shepherds, mini/toy, $100. call: 541-280-3290 black tri’s,males, females, 1st shots, wormed,541-977-7310 Free Guinia Pig, with large Shih Tzu puppies &young adults 240 cage, please call Redmond, OR 541-788-0090 Australian Shepherd mini, gorCrafts and Hobbies 541-633-5022. www.shihtzushowdogs.com geous black tri neutered male, 14 inches, 5 yrs old, German Shepherd pups 1 male, Shis Tzu Puppies for sale. 3 Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ looking for perfect home. 1 female, affection & proboys/2 girls/9 wks. $450 ea. blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $150. 360-609-3639 (local) tection! $250. 541-390-8875 Contact Mike 541-420-1409 $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989

Bicycles and Accessories Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

265

Building Materials Bid Now! You Can Bid On: Apple TV Valued at $99.00 Connecting Point

Drafting Table 4.5‘Hx5’W, several drawers, great cond. $175/obo. 541-382-5123

241 Ceiling Lamp, red glass & crystal reproduction, 20”, $100. 541-388-4020 Couch & loveseat, La-Z Boy, mesh wood design w/light cushions, $150. 503-933-0814 Dresser, 10-drawer, black, solid wood, 52x35x15” deep, good cond, $150. 541-383-4231 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809. King pillow top, mattress & box springs, stored in plastic, $200. 503-933-0814 Liquidating Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Loveseat, leather, comfortable & stylish, Good condition, $165. 541-593-2171 Queen pillow top, mattress, box spring, stored in plastic, $180. 503-933-0814 local

Camp Kitchen, 3 tier, stove incl., w/case, $150, 503-933-0814, local.

Igloo Brand, 12V Fridge/ Cooler, 2 cu.ft, for travel or minivan, $50, 503-933-0814 Mattresses, inflatable, 3 full size, new $25 ea., 503-933-0814, local.

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

248

257

Health and Beauty Items

Musical Instruments

Bid Now!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: One Set of Starkey Digital E-Series RIC Hearing Aids Valued at $1,807.52 Old Mill Audiology (Bidding ends March 29, at 8pm)

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: 7 Day Family Membership. Valued at $3300. Widgi Creek Golf Club (Bidding ends March 29, at 8pm)

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing 12g pump Mossberg 500 wood stock, 18” barrel, home defense, $200. 541-647-8931

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. Custom Camo AK-47, extras, $599; Glock 10mm, model 29, 350 rounds, 4 clips, $550, 541-771-3222.

You Can Bid On: Private Party Package. Valued at $99.00 Cat 6 Lounge Drums, Royce Pro-cussion with cymbals and high hat, $200 OBO. 503-933-0814 Electric guitar BC Rich with Peavey amp, hard shell case, $200. 503-933-0814

You Can Bid On: Liposuction, Skin Resurfacing or Fraxel Series. $1000 Gift Certificate Aesthetics MD (Bidding ends March 29, at 8pm)

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Hamer Strat Series with Peavey amp, hard shell case, $200. 503-933-0814 Vintage Fender acoustic Dreadnought series, hard shell case $200. 503-933-0814

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

(Bidding ends March 29, at 8pm)

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Stand Up Paddleboard Classes. Valued at $90.00 Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe (Bidding ends March 29, at 8pm)

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Sportsman Jamboree Gun, Knife, Coin & Collectibles La Pine Senior Activity Ctr. 16450 Victory Way, La Pine (next to Bi-Mart) Sat., 4/2, 9-5; Sun.4/3,9-3 Adults $5 ($4 w/trade gun); Children 12 & under, Free! Exhibitor info: 541-536-6237 or 541-536-4208

MADRAS Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 84 SW K. St. 541 475-9722 Open to the public. Prineville Habitat ReStore Building Supply Resale 1427 NW Murphy Ct. 541 447-6934 Open to the public.

The Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

You Can Bid On: 22' x 22' Stick Built Garage Valued at $23,524.00 HiLine Homes (Bidding ends March 29, at 8pm)

GOT THYROID PROBLEMS? Discover why 90% of women on thyroid replacement hormones are guaranteed to continue suffering with thyroid symptoms.....and what you can do to finally end suffering once and for all!

Call For Free DVD: Thyroid Secrets: What to do when the medication doesn’t work.

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SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

TV, Stereo and Video

Commercial / Ofice Equipment &Fixtures

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

XM Radio w/speakers, home & car bases & chargers, exc. cond., $30,541-848-8230.

HP OfficeJet Scanner/Copier/ Fax/Printer, G85, pd $650; sell $150 obo. 541-382-5123

Found Jack Russell mix? Brown /white, young male 3/21 near Bend High 541-306-0048

FOUND sweet black M cat, w/ white boots, bib & triangle near mouth. 3/20, near Pilot Butte. 541-382-6013

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Found Toolbox & tools in front of Big R 3/10. Call to identify, 541-536-5290 leave msg

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

• Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

286

Sales Northeast Bend SEASONED JUNIPER: $150/cord rounds, $170 per cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Since 1970, Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

269

S&W MP40 .40cal pistol, 2 clips & tactical holster. 15+1 cap. Like new- $499 541.410.8029

FOUND iPOD. Call and describe. 541-306-3332

Lost Dog: Jack Russel Female, undocked tail, brown around eyes, Tumalo Rd & Bellevue Dr, around 3/14, call 541-350-5745.

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

262

Found Bucket with tools, Baker Rd in DRW, 3/11, call to identify, 541-389-8023.

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

The Bulletin Classiieds

(24 hr recorded message)

253

267

BUYING SILVER COINS, 1964 and earlier, paying 15x face. 541-416-1403. Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

270

Lost and Found

Fuel and Wood

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend

Found RX Glasses, lady’s, in case, Poplar St, Bend, 3/21, call to ID, 541-389-1036.

541-322-0496 You Can Bid On: Non-Surgical Face It Face Lift. Valued at $1500. Enhancement Center

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

Remington 700 VTR Varmit 223, green synthetic,Leupold VX-1, 4-12 matte, as new, dies, $690, 541-382-0143.

541-647-8261

260

German .25 semi-auto pistol, compact, 80% cond., case & ammo, $200, 541-647-8931

OR + UTAH CCW: Required class Oregon and Utah Concealed License. Saturday March 26 9:30 a.m. at Madras Range. $100 includes Photo required by Utah. Call Paul Sumner (541)475-7277 for preregistration and info

Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

Misc. Items

BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Mossberg 20g 500C pump, 26” barrel, gold trigger, case & ammo $200. 541-647-8931

Your Backyard Birdfeeding Specialists!

(Bidding ends March 29, at 8pm)

Guitar, Harmony, navy blue, case, strap, 34 tall, 13 base, exc cond,$40, 541-848-8230.

1895 Browning, 1 of 1000, 3040, silver w/gold inlay, new in box, $1800 OBO; Winchester model 70 super grade, 338, Burris scope, $1200 OBO, 541-410-4069 1911 Taurus .45acp, $575 /Sig P25045acp $525/Springfield XD-45acp $525. 541-647-8931

(Bidding ends March 29, at 8pm)

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands!

(Bidding ends March 29, at 8pm)

Bid Now!

You Can Bid On: Hardwood or Laminate Flooring Material Valued at $1000. Carpetco Flooring

Bid Now!

You Can Bid On: $100 Gift Card Hutch's Bicycles

Golf Equipment

For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

(Bidding ends March 29, at 8pm)

Dome Tent, 6 person, 2 room, w/fly, new never used, $80, 503-933-0814, local.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

245

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Garden Cart/Utility Trailer 4x4, $100. 503-933-0814

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

541-389-9663

Decorative Cube block stones, black, approx. 14”x14”x6”, “Good Looking Stuff” paid $500, moving Sale, will sell for $300, you haul, 541-382-8814.

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702


E2 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Employment

300 400 308

421

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Schools and Training

Sump Pump, protect yourself from flooding, Hydromatic, 125 CFM, $100, 503-933-0814

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

325

Hay, Grain and Feed

Custom No-till Seeding Grass, Alfalfa & Grain Crops All of Central Oregon.

Call 541-419-2713 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

454

Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

CAUTION

341

Horses and Equipment Shetland Pony, yearling colt, $100, please call 541-383-4552 for more info.

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

WANTED: Horse or utility trailers for consignment or purchase. KMR Trailer Sales, 541-389-7857 www.kigers.com

358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Employment Opportunities

DIETARY MANAGER 65 Bed assisted living and 42 Retail bed nursing facility seeking a Great Part-time Career Dietary Manager. CDM and Opportunity. Nestle Direct ServSafe Cert. preferred, Store Delivery is now should have previous manhiring Part-time Merchanagement and culinary experidisers in Bend, to service ence. Excellent supervisory, and stock Nestle products organizational, and commuin area grocery stores. nication skills required. For more info. Apply in person at: and/or apply online 127 SE Wilson Ave., Bend www.nestleusa.com/careers. (Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:40pm) EOE/M/F/D/V DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

476

Employment Opportunities

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin

541-383-0398

476

Employment Opportunities

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

476

Farm Market

476

Employment Opportunities

Hairstylist - Fully licensed for hair, nails & waxing. Recent relevant experience necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449

Mechanic - Full-time position available in Bend. Looking for a person who has 1-2 years experience with transmissions. Must have own tools. Seeking a team-player who has a positive attitude. $14/hour to start, depending on experience. Fax resume to 541-382-8037 or email gtainc@riousa.com Nurse Practitioner ATRIO Health Plans, a Medicare Advantage Plan, is seeking skilled Nurse Practitioner to perform detailed comprehensive health assessments of high-risk members. We are looking for an individual who will assess at the members' residence (private home or long-term care facility). Prior experience in a primary care setting required. Competitive salary and generous benefit package. Please call Donna (541) 851-2015 or submit resume and cover letter via e-mail humanresources@cascadecomp.com

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

Surgery Scheduler Full time M-F 30 hours, 11 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Full Benefits. Reports to Nurse Manager. Prior experience preferred, medical terminology required, able to work in fast-paced hectic environment. Flexibility of hours a must. Please go to www.bendsurgery.com to print out an application, email to jobs@bendsurgery.com or mail application to:

PO Box 6329 Bend, OR 97708

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help?

Finance & Business

500 600 528

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Rooms for Rent

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Budget Inn, 1300 S. Hwy 97, Royal 541-389-1448; & Gateway Motel, 475 SE 3rd St., 541-382-5631, Furnished Rooms: 5 days/$150+tax

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

541-383-0386

573

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

$300 off Upstairs Apts. 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Business Opportunities

!! Snowball of a Deal !!

Updated 864 sq.ft., 2 bdrm., 1 bath duplex, attached garage, large corner lot, privately owned, W/D hookup, no smoking, pets conditional, $675, $700 dep 503-507-9182

631

The Bulletin

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $595$625/mo. 541-385-6928.

Reach thousands of readers!

visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Room with own bath in 3 bdrm, 2 bath house with owner, DRW, $400 mo., util. incl. $100 dep. 541-420-5546.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION

541-382-3402

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

630

Loans and Mortgages

Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Rentals

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

632

Apt./Multiplex General

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee W/D hookup. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 541-382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz GREAT LOCATION Between Old Mill & downtown, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, quiet 6-plex, new carpet, incl. W/D, 129 Adams Pl. (off Delaware), $590/mo. 541-647-4135

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Cute, quiet, 1/1, tri-plex, near Old Mill and TRG. Easy parkway access, W/S/G pd., no dogs/smoking. $500/mo. $600/dep. 541-815-5494.

642 The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental Apt./Multiplex Redmond rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin 1/2 OFF 1ST MONTH! Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad Studio apt., 613 SW 9th, $410 mo. w/s/g/ + cable paid. started ASAP! 541-385-5809 No smoking/pets. 541-598-5829 until 6 p.m. 634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. avail. starting at $575.

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

MARCH RENT FREE! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $399 to $550. • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

(Private Party ads only) A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

DENTAL

HYGIENIST

Central Oregon Perio is looking for a fill-in Hygienist for maternity leave. Fax resume to 541-317-0355 or contact Jan at 541-317-0255.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Dental Receptionist - Full time position with Drs. Wayne Schultz and Andrew Toms. Excellent benefit package offered. Applicant must have job references & excellent computer and communication skills. Dental & Dentrix experience preferred. Come join our great team at Tender Tooth Care in Madras. Fax resume to 541-475-6159. or phone 541-279-9554.

Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Redmond & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

541-385-5809

O N E M O N T H F R E E with 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. 541-923-1907 OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

648

Houses for Rent General PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Spotless Light & Bright! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1 story, 2 car garage (opener) vaulted, new paint, air, utility, RV parking. $995/mo. Call 541-480-7653


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 28, 2011 E3 745

870

880

882

Homes for Sale

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

NOTICE: RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

648

658

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent Redmond

The Bulletin is now offering a 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE room with woodstove, new Rental rate! If you have a carpet, pad & paint, single home to rent, call a Bulletin garage w/opener. $895/mo. Classified Rep. to get the 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. No smoking; pets negotiable. 650 $900/mo. + deposits. Call Houses for Rent 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660

Real Estate For Sale

700 705

Real Estate Services

NE Bend

Cottage $500. Mostly selfcontained, gas heat, Murphy 3 Bdrm, 1800 sq ft. New bathbed, incl all utils, nicely landroom & paint inside/out. Near scaped, alley entrance, 2105 hosp. Sprinklers, attch garage. NW 12th St. 541-923-6946 No smkg; pets poss. 1150 NE 6th St. $950/mo, $600 reNW--Elegant 3 bdrm + den 2.5 fundable. 541-389-4985 bath, 2-story large 1891 sq 4 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1748 sq.ft., ft. home, 2 wooden decks, wood stove, new furnace, 2-car garage, all landscaped storage shed, large patio, big w/sprinklers, fenced yard, yard, single carport, $995. gas fireplace, SPA TUB, cen541-480-3393,541-610-7803 tral A/C $995/mo. for 1-year lease -- SPECIAL only $250 Luxury Home: 2490 Sq.ft., 3 for 1st month hurry -- Please bdrm, 2.5 bath, office/den, 3 call Debra 541-977-4060 car garage, fenced, builders own home, loaded w/up660 grades, full mtn. views, 2641 Houses for Rent NE Jill Ct., $1500/mo., avail. now, 541-420-3557. La Pine Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Cute 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath, tiled bath & kitchen, skylights, attached garage, fenced yard, 10x10 storage building, $850/mo. 541-389-5408 Prestigious, fully furnished, 6 bdrm., 3 bath, NW Skyliner, 6 mo. minimum, incl. some utils., $2600/mo, please call 541-951-3058.

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend 2 Bdrm 2 bath, in Westridge Subdivision. Newly remodeled, on ½ acre, near Ath. Club of Bend. No smoking. $1195. Call 541-388-8198 2 Bedroom, 1 bath manufactured home in quiet park, W/S/G paid. $575/month, $250 deposit. Please call 541-382-8244. A-frame home, remodeled 1 Bdrm+ loft, full bath, washer/ dryer, satellite TV, 950 sq ft on acre lot with dog run, DRW. $750. 541-306-0748

658

2 Bdrm, 1.5 Bath, gas appls & fireplace. Crescent Creek subdivision, w/Fitness Ctr. No smoking; pets neg. $675/ mo.$775/dep. 541-815-5494

661

Houses for Rent Prineville 3 Bdrm 2 Bath RV Parking, Fenced Yard, Pets Neg., Avail 4/1, $825 per month, Dep. $1000. 541-420-2485

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified Realtors: $5000 to the selling agent upon an acceptable offer of MLS# 201100372. Call 541-410-1500.

746 BROKEN TOP bargain priced. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, 2403 sq.ft., new slab granite countertops, hrdwd floors, gas fireplace, only $424,900. Randy Schoning, principal Broker, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393

Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

719

Real Estate Trades 1/2 acre Lot near McCall Idaho in golf course community. Close to Brundage Ski Area. paid $115K. Want to trade for a lot in Bend OR. 541-480-8656 or email lgoodmarkland@yahoo.com

745

Homes for Sale Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Houses for Rent Redmond 3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big yard, dbl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac. $995 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Black on black, detachable windshield, backrest, and luggage rack. 2200 miles. $13,900. Please call Jack, 541-549-4949, or 619-203-4707

771

Lots Bargain priced Pronghorn lot, $99,900, also incl. $115,000 golf membership & partially framed 6000 sq. ft. home, too! Randy Schoning, Princ. Broker, John L. Scott RE. 541-480-3393, 541-389-3354

773

Acreages 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

You Can Bid On: $50 Gift Certificate at Caldera Grille

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $9800 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

You Can Bid On: $100 Gift Certificate at The Lodge Restaurant Black Butte Ranch (Bidding ends March 29, at 8pm)

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Raft, just in time for fishing, Fish Hunter, w/ motor & battery, $200, 503-933-0814. Sevylor Fish Ranger FT280 Inflatable fishing Boat. Exc. cond., 4-person capacity includes slatted roll up floor, swivel oarlocks, rod holder, water drain plugs, grab line and a nylon carry bag. $100. 541-389-3296

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. R..E Deadlines are: Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. 541-385-5809 Thank you! The Bulletin Classified *** Will Trade Acreage in Warm Arizona for lake or coast property in Oregon. Please call 541-312-9955 for more info.

870

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Domestic Services

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

FREEDOM CLEANING Got a mess? Call the best! Special Rates Available Now! Call Ellen today! Licensed. 541-420-7525

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Handyman

Home Improvement

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846

CCB#180420

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs No Job Too Small. Free Exact Quotes. 541-408-6169 CAB# 177336

Debris Removal

Electrical Services

JUNK BE GONE

BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Re placement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

“Pihl Bilt” Since 1981 S.E. Pihl Construction Remodeling specialist, addons, kitchen & bath, faux wall finishes, tile & stone, Energy Trust of Oregon Trade Ally, Window & door upgrades, no job to small. Call for Spring Specials, Call Scott, 541-815-1990, CCB#110370

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

881

Travel Trailers Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $10,500. 541-589-0767, in Burns.

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504 Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Truck with Snow Plow!

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

925

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7200. 541-639-1031.

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: 3-Night RV Stay for Two People Valued at $70.00 Summer Lake Hot Springs

Bounder 34’ 1994.

One owner, low miles, generator, 2 roof airs, clean in and out, rear walk-round queen bed, 2 TV’s, leveling hydraulic jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, Motivated seller. Just reduced and priced to sell at $10,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981 motorhome, 2-tone brown, perfect cond, 6 brand new tires. engine perfect, runs great, inside perfect shape. See to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Lane off Day Rd in La Pine. Asking $8000. 541-876-5106.

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

Wells

Cargo

Sport,

12x6, side door, 2 back doors, shelves, exc. cond., $2750, call 541-815-1523.

931

Automotive Parts, Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc. Canopies and Campers Service and Accessories 885

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Tires, Mud/Snow, Toyo HT’s, P245/65R17, (4), excellent tread, $150. 541-408-0531 We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

932 You Can Bid On: 2004 Fleetwood Westlake Tent Trailer Valued at $8,995.00 All Seasons RV & Marine (Bidding ends March 29, at 8pm)

Antique and Classic Autos C-10

Pickup

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

882

Fifth Wheels

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $7900 541-815-1523.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

Lance 835 2007 ext. cabover, elect. jacks, a/c, fsc, exc. cond. $10,500 541-610-2409

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $10,000,541-280-5677

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $7500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

(This special package is not available on our website)

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that • Evaluating Seasonal Needs advertise to perform Land • Pruning Trees and Shrubs scape Construction which in • Thinning Overgrown Areas cludes: planting, decks, • Removing Undesired Plants fences, arbors, water-fea • Hauling Debris tures, and installation, repair • Renovation of irrigation systems to be li • Fertilizer Programs censed with the Landscape • Organic Options Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in EXPERIENCED cluded in all advertisements Senior Discounts which indicate the business 541-390-3436 has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Get 1 FREE Persons doing landscape Maintenance Service or maintenance do not require a Aeration ($40+ value) LCB license. when you sign up for a full season of maintenance!

Landscape Management

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up

Weed free bark & flower beds ORGANIC

PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

541-322-7253

Hitchhiker II 1998, 32’, 2 slides, great cond., $10,500; also avail. 2008 F-250 Super Duty, 4WD Diesel, supercab, 23K mi., like new, $44,000 for both, A Must see, 541-923-5754.

Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355.

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Broken Branches •Debris Hauling •Defensible Space •Aeration/Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing

Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

880

(Bidding ends March 29, at 8pm)

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

Motorhomes

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Barns

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

A-Liner pop-up 15-ft 2010, 2-burner stove, frig, freshwater tank, furnace, fantastic fan, $9950. 541-923-3021

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $104,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

865

***

Bid Now!

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prineville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $79,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

875

Winch, Fender Protectors, new winch rope, recent 150/160 hr service, Hunter Green $5,495 541-549-6996 (Sisters).

CHECK YOUR AD

900

916 TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Yamaha Grizzly 2008 660 - WARN

(Bidding ends March 29, at 8pm)

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Watercraft

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

687

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

Electric sitting scooter, w/battery charger, sacrifice $200 obo. 541-382-5123

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning

Commercial for Rent/Lease

693

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

20' Calabria tournament ski boat / 237 hours. 350ci/ 300hp F.I. GM engine. Nice, too many extras to list. $15,500. Call 541-736-3067

750

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

Autos & Transportation

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997, too many extras to list, call for info., $1195, trailer also avail., 541-548-3443.

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

850

Snowmobiles

Redmond Homes

671

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

800

Northwest Bend Homes

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

Boats & RV’s

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

We offer: • Residential & Commercial • Organic Products (kid and pet safe!) • Aerations & Thatching • Mulch, Hedging, Pruning • Irrigation Management • Spring & Fall Clean-ups • Fertilization • Weed Control

Licensed / Bonded / Insured FREE Estimates! Call today: (541) 617.TURF [8873] www.turflandscapes.com

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

CURTIS SESLAR’S TOTAL LAWN CARE LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Serving Redmond area since 1980. FREE THATCHING WITH AERATING SERVICE Mowing , Edging, Fertilizing, Hauling. Senior Discounts. Don’t delay, call today for Free estimate 541-279-1821

Mary’s Lawn Care is seeking New Customers! • Spring Clean-up • Aerating • Thatching 541-350-1097 541-410-2953 Spring Clean Up! Aerating, thatching, lawn restoration, Vacation Care. Full Season Openings. Senior discounts. Call Mike Miller, 541-408-3364

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC

541-815-2888

Remodeling, Carpentry RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678


E4 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

932

933

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Automobiles

Chevy El Camino 1979, 350 auto, new studs, located in Sisters, $3000 OBO, 907-723-9086,907-723-9085

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT- Perfect, garaged, factory super charged, just 1623 miles $20,000. 541-923-3567

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005 Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly • 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

$19,450!

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

541-389-5016 evenings.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227. Honda Pilot 2010 Like new, under 11K, goes great in all conditions. Blue Bk $30,680; asking $27,680. 541-350-3502 FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford 2 Door 1949, 99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Honda Pilot 4WD EX-L, 2008, 1 owner, excellent cond, Dk Cherry, 17,400 mi. Priced to sell, $26,750. 541-389-2952

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884 Toyota Highlander LTD 2003 V-6 4WD, CD, moonroof, 57k mi., 1 owner, Studded tires. $16,850. 541-480-3265. Vin# 103147. DLR 8308.

Toyota Sequoia Limited 2001, auto, Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Monte Carlo 1970, all original, many extras. MUST SELL due to death. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072 OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

leather, sunroof, 6-CD, new tires, 107K miles, $11,500 firm. 541-420-8107

WILLYS JEEP 1956 New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Asking $3,999 or make offer. 541-389-5355

933

Pickups CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition and much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $5700, 541-575-3649 Dodge Dakota 1997, Club Cab, dark green, loaded, 43K, sharp! $6500. 541-388-4020 Ford crew cab 1993, 7.3 Diesel, auto, PS, Rollalong package, deluxe interior & exterior, electric windows/door locks, dually, fifth wheel hitch, receiver hitch, 90% rubber, super maint. w/all records, new trans. rebuilt, 116K miles. $6500, Back on the market. 541-923-0411

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $12,900 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Dodge Grand Cvn ES 1992, $950. Loaded. 151K, clean, well maint’d. 541-330-9136

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

GMC Safari 8-pass van, 2003, 2 sets tires/whls, rear AC, luggage rack, DVD sys, 91K mi, $6795 OBO. 541-350-4517

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Mercedes 300D 1983. leather seats, sunroof, 279K miles, $1200. 541-408-5663

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

MERCEDES C300 2008

New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Mercedes GL450, 2007

All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $18,900. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!!

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $7500 obo. 541-330-0616

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227 BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

LeSabre

Suzuki Kizashi 2010, 2K mi, 1 owner,AWD,180HP,2.4 DOHC, 16 Valve eng., transferrable 100K warranty, $16,950, ~36 MPG, exc. cond., 541-350-2197

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR DESCHUTES COUNTY Juvenile Department

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Supplemental Budget Hearing La Pine Park & Recreation District

In the Matter of BROOKLYNN ALEEAH ILER (672485) A Child.

A Public hearing on a proposed supplemental budget for La Pine Park & Recreation District, Deschutes County, State of Oregon, for the fiscal year July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011, will be held at 16405 First St. La Pine, Oregon. The hearing will take place on Monday, April 4, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. The purpose of the hearing is to discuss the supplemental budget with interested persons. A copy of the supplemental budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after March 28, 2011 at 16405 First St., La Pine, Oregon between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday.

Case No. 09JV0165

IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF OREGON: A petition has been filed asking the court to terminate your parental rights to the above-named child for the purpose of placing the child for adoption. YOU ARE DIRECTED TO FILE A WRITTEN ANSWER to the petition NO LATER THAN 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF LAST PUBLICATION OF THIS SUMMONS, specified herein, admitting or denying the allegations in the petition and informing the court of your current residence address, mailing address and telephone number. YOUR ANSWER SHOULD BE MAILED TO Deschutes County Courthouse, 1100 NW Bond, Bend, Oregon 97701. You are further directed to appear at any subsequent court-ordered hearing, AN ATTORNEY MAY NOT ATTEND ANY COURT ORDERED HEARING IN YOUR PLACE. THEREFORE, YOU MUST APPEAR EVEN IF YOUR ATTORNEY ALSO APPEARS. This summons is published pursuant to the order of the circuit court judge of the above entitled court, dated February 24, 2011. The order directs that this summons be published once each week for three consecutive weeks, making three publications in all, in a published newspaper of general circulation in Deschutes County. Date of first publication: 3/21/11 Date of last publication: 4/4/11 NOTICE READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY IF YOU DO NOT FILE A WRITTEN ANSWER AS DIRECTED ABOVE, OR DO NOT APPEAR AT ANY SUBSEQUENT COURT-ORDERED HEARING, the court may proceed in your absence without further notice and TERMINATE YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS to the above-named child either ON THE DATE AN ANSWER IS REQUIRED BY THIS SUMMONS OR ON A FUTURE DATE, and may make such orders and take such action as authorized by law. RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS (1) YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO BE REPRESENTED BY AN ATTORNEY IN THIS MATTER. If you are currently represented by an attorney, CONTACT YOUR ATTORNEY IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTICE. Your previous attorney may not be representing you in this matter. IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY, and you meet the state's financial guidelines, you are entitled to have an attorney appointed for you at state expense. TO REQUEST APPOINTMENT OF AN ATTORNEY TO REPRESENT YOU AT STATE EXPENSE, YOU MUST IMMEDIATELY CONTACT the Deschutes Juvenile Department at Deschutes County Juvenile Department, 1100 NW Bond, Bend, OR 97701, phone number 541-388-5300, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. for further information. IF YOU WISH TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY, please retain one as soon as possible. If you need help finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. IF YOU ARE REPRESENTED BY AN ATTORNEY, IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO MAINTAIN CONTACT WITH YOUR ATTORNEY AND TO KEEP YOUR ATTORNEY ADVISED OF YOUR WHEREABOUTS. (2) If you contest the petition, the court will schedule a hearing on the allegations of the petition and order you to appear personally and may schedule other hearings related to the petition and order you to appear personally. IF YOU ARE ORDERED TO APPEAR, YOU MUST APPEAR PERSONALLY IN THE COURTROOM, UNLESS THE COURT HAS GRANTED YOU AN EXCEPTION IN ADVANCE UNDER ORS 419B.918 TO APPEAR BY OTHER MEANS INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, TELEPHONIC OR OTHER ELECTRONIC MEANS. AN ATTORNEY MAY NOT ATTEND THE HEARING(S) IN YOUR PLACE.

Amanda J. Austin Assistant Attorney General Department of Justice 1162 Court Street NE Salem, OR 97301-4096 Phone: (503) 934-4400 ISSUED this 15th day of March, 2011. Issued by: Amanda J. Austin #062627 Assistant Attorney General

Volvo C70-T5, 2010

Convertible Hardtop. 10,800mi. Celestial Blue w/Calcite Cream leather int. Premium & Climate pkgs. Warranty & Service to 10/2014. KBB SRP $33,540. Asking $31,900. 541-350-5437

2004,

white, 115k, cloth interior, 80% tires, all factory conveniences okay, luxury ride, 30 mpg hwy, 3.8 litre V6 motor, used but not abused. Very dependable. and excellent buy at $5,400. Call Bob 541-318-9999 or Sam at 541-815-3639.

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Automobiles

Buick

Ford F-250 2000, 4X4, Super Cab, 7.3 Diesel, matching canopy, 95,100 mi., new tires, loaded, exc. cond., $14,950, 541-923-8627.

Mazda 3 I-sport 2008, 4-cyl, 2L, 4-door, 43k, $10,000, went back to college, MUST SELL! 541-280-8693.

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

Dodge Caravan (Short) 2007. V-6, A/C. CD. 7 Passenger. Tilt. Speed. Exc. Cond. Dark Blue. $7495. 541-480-3265. DLR 8308. VIN-170091. Plymouth 4-dr sedan, 1948, all orig., new tires, exlnt driver, all gauges work, 63,520 miles, $8500. 541-504-2878

like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

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Ford F350 Crew Cab 4WD 2007. Lariat. Diesel. Auto. Canopy. LOADED! 37K. Estate. $28,999. VIN EA30127 541-480-3265. DLR 8308. FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

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541-322-7253

Summary of Supplemental Budget General Fund: Resources: Amount: Net working Capital $26,449

default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #18316.30015). DATED: January 20, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. Cary Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee Hershner Hunter, LLP P.O. Box 1475 Eugene, OR 97440

Revised Resource Total $329,774 Requirement: Amount: Materials & Services $16,600 Capital Outlay $7,000 Unappropriated Ending Fund Balance $2,849 Revised Requirement Total: $329,774 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS WAYNE D. LANNEN and RANDY G. PURDOM been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the ESTATE OF JEAN MARIE PURDOM, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, Deschutes County, under Case Number 11PB0032MS. All persons having a claim against the estate must present the claim within four months of the first publication date of this notice to Hendrix, Brinich & Bertalan, LLP at 716 NW Harriman Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, ATTN.: Lisa N. Bertalan, or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the Co-Personal Representatives or the following-named attorney for the Co-Personal Representatives. Date of first publication: March 21, 2011. HENDRIX BRINICH & BERTALAN, LLP 716 NW HARRIMAN BEND, OR 97701 541-382-4980 LEGAL NOTICE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: SAMUEL J LOOMIS AND CHRISTIE D LOOMIS Trustee:AMERITITLE Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY Beneficiary:SELCO COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Fifteen (15), Block Five (5), LAZY RIVER SOUTH, recorded August 29, 1968, in Cabinet A, Page 171, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: December 13, 2007. Recording No. 2007-63728. Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of (a) $381.419 each for Loan 75 for the months of May 2010 through October 2010 and monthly payments in the amount of $385.02 for Loan 75 for the months of November 2010 through December 2010; and (b) monthly payments in the amount of $590.50 each for Loan 85 for the months of September 2010 through October 2010 and monthly payments in the amount of $598.00 each for Loan 85 for the months of November 2010 through December 2010, due the twenty-fifth of each month; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $38,297.64 for Loan 75 and the Principal amount of $60,019.33 for Loan 85; plus interest at the rate of 3.250% per annum for Loan 75 and at the rate of 6.990% per annum for Loan 85 from April 25, 2010 for Loan 75 and September 25, 2010 for Loan 85; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: June 9, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx5149 T.S. No.: 1168124-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Scott W. Aldridge and Edith K. Aldridge, As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For First Franklin Financial Corp., An Op. Sub. of Mlb&t Co., Fsb, as Beneficiary, dated February 02, 2007, recorded February 08, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-08291 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 2 in block 25 of Tall Pines, Fifth Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. *mortgage loan asset- backed certificates, series 2007-1 Commonly known as: 15923 Woodchip Ln. La Pine Or 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,542.41 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $204,000.00 together with interest thereon at 8.100% per annum from March 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 20, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 10, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-369994 03/14, 03/21, 03/28, 04/04

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx4263 T.S. No.: 1172100-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Juan Zendejas, A Married Man As His Sole & Separate Property, as Grantor to First American, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For First Franklin Financial Corp., An Op. Sub. of Mlb&t Co., Fsb, as Beneficiary, dated July 11, 2007, recorded July 17, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-39458 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 8 in block 16 of Lake Park Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon. *mortgage loan asset-backed certificates, series 2007-H1 Commonly known as: 3775 NE Zamia Ave. Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due July 1, 2008 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; failure to pay fc expenses when due, said sums having been advanced by the beneficiary; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,936.54 Monthly Late Charge $96.83. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $286,388.54 together with interest thereon at 7.300% per annum from June 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 21, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the

date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 10, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-369995 03/14, 03/21, 03/28, 04/04 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-72325-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JAY E PUMALA AND AMY N. PUMALA, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW CO., as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 06-29-2006, recorded 07Â05-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-45837 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 150202 LOT 34, BLOCK 1, THE WINCHESTER, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1726 NE TUCSON WAY BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 06/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $1,311.05 Monthly Late Charge $56.09 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $234,472-43 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.375% per annum from 05-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on ©6-23-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W, BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and

the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any lime prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: February 16, 2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 LAURA SOZA, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3920979 03/07/2011, 03/14/2011, 03/21/2011, 03/28/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.; T11-74671-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CHARLA L. THEISS AND RAYMOND J. THEISS, JR, JOINT TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary', dated 08-04-2006, recorded 08-14-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-55323 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit; APN: 120158 LOT 11, BLOCK 1, TILLICUM VILLAGE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61259 KWINNUM DR BEND, OR 97702-2772 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's; INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 10/01'2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $1,758.37 Monthly Late Charge $74.09 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared ail obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $348,954.21 together will) interest thereon at the rate of 2.25% per annum from 09-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-106692 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, RONALD WAYNE WHEELER, as grantor, to LAWYERS TITLE INSURANCE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 3/22/2007, recorded 4/2/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-1 9087, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Trust 2007-FLX3, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-FLX3 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated April 1, 2007. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 2, BLOCK 5, HOWELL ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 875 NORTHWEST 55TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 23, 2011 Delinquent Payments from October 01, 2010 5 payments at $ 1,161.64 each $ 5,808.20 (10-01-10 through 02-23-11) Late Charges: $ 290.40 Beneficiary Advances: $ 33.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 6,131.60 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $302,421.32, PLUS interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from 9/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 27, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2123/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3923886 03/07/2011, 03/14/2011, 03/21/2011, 03/28/2011


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 28, 2011 E5

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will cm 07-11 -2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187,110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND.'OR 9771)1 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, ) including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any, For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: March 08, 201 1 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 JAMES M. DAVIS, ASST SEC ASAP# 3943408 03/28/2011, 04/04/2011, 04/11/2011, 04/18/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3630 T.S. No.: 1317440-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Ellen V. Hampton An Unmarried Woman, as Grantor to United General, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For First Magnus Financial Corporation, An Arizona Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated December 08, 2006, recorded January 03, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-00494 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 13, Summer Creek-Phase 1, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 3619 Southwest 30th Street Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has

been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,054.43 Monthly Late Charge $35.56. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $195,772.53 together with interest thereon at 6.875% per annum from October 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 29, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 22, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-371685 03/28, 04/04, 04/11, 04/18 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0492 T.S. No.: 1299738-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jeanne L. Hampton, as Grantor to Western Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated July 23, 2007, recorded July 30, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/In-

strument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-41855 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 14, block 2, Ladera, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 20975 Via Bonita Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,328.36 Monthly Late Charge $66.37. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $204,932.05 together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from September 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 27, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 18, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-371099 03/21, 03/28, 04/04, 04/11

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-UM-106806

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1842 T.S. No.: 1315478-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jimmy A. Glenn and Marsha L. Glenn Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated March 01, 2007, recorded March 09, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-14295* covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: The southeast quarter of the northwest quarter of the southwest quarter of the southeast quarter of section 27, township 16 south, range 12, east of the Willamette, Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. * re-recorded 8-30-07 2007-47675 Commonly known as: 64859 Half Mile Ln. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,404.04 Monthly Late Charge $57.54. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $309,847.03 together with interest thereon at 2.000% per annum from October 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 05, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the

date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 24, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-372097 03/28, 04/04, 04/11, 04/18 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T11-74668-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, RANDALL FRANCIS AND LEIGHSA ANN FRANCIS, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 03-05-2008, recorded 03-13-2008, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/Tile/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-11254 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 132120 THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (W1/2SW1/4NE1/4) OF SECTION TWENTY-FOUR (24), TOWNSHIP SIXTEEN (16) SOUTH, RANGE ELEVEN (11), EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. EXCEPT THE EASTERLY 12.54 FEET THEREOF. ALSO EXCEPTING THEREFROM ANY PORTION LYING WITHIN ROADS, STREETS AND HIGHWAYS. Commonly known as: 19430 DAYTON ROAD BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 12/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $7,790.96 Monthly Late Charge $347.54 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable., said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $1,283,225.17 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 11-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 7-11-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State

of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary** include: their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: March 08, 201 1 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 JAMES M. DAVIS, ASST SEC ASAP# 3943389 03/28/2011, 04/04/2011, 04/11/2011, 04/18/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: XXX5155 T.S.No: 1301296-09 Reference is made to that certain deed made by RITA M. SHEARER as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of GREATER NORTHWEST MORTGAGE, INC. as Beneficiary, dated July 03, 2003, recorded July 11, 2003, in official records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2003-46581 covering the following described real property situated in the said County and State, to-wit: LOT THIRTY (30), THE MEADOWS PHASE 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 721 NW NEGUS LANE REDMOND OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $943.59 Monthly Late Charge $32.47 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by

said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being following, to-wit; The sum of $96,422.21 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.500% per annum, from May 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION the undersigned trustee will on June 08, 2011 at the hour of 11:00am, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at At the front entrance of the Courthouse 1164 N.W. Bond Street Bend OR City of BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying the entire amount then due, together with the costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees and by curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default, at any time not later than five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 01, 2011 CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION 525 EAST MAIN STREET P.O. BOX 22004 EL CAJON CA 92022-9004 CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION ASAP# 3905018 03/07/2011, 03/14/2011, 03/21/2011, 03/28/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-USB-1110325 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MICHAEL C. FROST AND DEANNAL. FROST, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as beneficiary, dated 9/9/2008, recorded 9/16/2008, under Instrument No. 2008-37941, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by US BANK, NA. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 8, MCCLELLAN COMMONS, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The

street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be; VACANT LAND BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 25, 2011 Delinquent Payments from October 01, 2010 5 payments at ? 558.85 each $2,794.25 (10-01-10 through 02-25-11) Late Charges: $ 111.76 Foreclosure Fees and Costs $ 1,167.0(1 TOTAL: $ 4,073.01 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $82,307.08, PLUS interest thereon at 7.000% per annum from 9/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 30, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the ob-

ligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2/25/2011 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC Trustee By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc. as agent for the TrusteeBy Angela Barsamyan Foreclosure Assistant u 5900 Canoga Avenue, Suite 220, Woodland Hills, CA 91367 Phone: (877) 237-7878 ASAP# 3926787 03/07/2011, 03/14/2011, 03/21/2011, 03/28/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030957039 T.S. No.: 10-11004-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, STEPHEN REDMAN, DIANA REDMAN as Grantor to AMERIT1TLE, as trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as Beneficiary, recorded on February 6, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-08670 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 17 12 22DD00151 LOT FIFTY-EIGHT (58) OF HIGH POINTE PHASE 3, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2553 NE LYNDA LANE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due: defaulted amounts total:$33,159.28 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $292,367.18 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.22000% per annum from October 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on June 24, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMG-106971

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9355 T.S. No.: 1315758-09.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JULIE L. HAFF, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR UMPQUA BANK, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNS, as beneficiary, dated 2/5/2004, recorded 3/15/2004, under Instrument No. 2004-13966, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by UMPQUA BANK, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNS. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: THE EAST HALF (E1/2) OF THE SOUTH 330 FEET OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW1/4 SW1/4) OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 16 SOUTH, RANGE 12, EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 66405 CLINE FALLS ROAD BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 2, 2011 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2010 5 payments at $1,438.00 each $7,190.00 (11-01-10 through 03-02-11) Late Charges: $172.02 Beneficiary Advances: $15.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $7,377.02 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $175,131.50, PLUS interest thereon at 5.875% per annum from 10/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 6, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER, 1100 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/2/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By SAMANTHA COHEN, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, LAWRENCE G. HENRY AND DONNA S. HENRY, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR NOVASTAR MORTGAGE, INC., as beneficiary, dated 1/25/2005, recorded 2/1/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-06356, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by The Bank of New York Mellon, as Successor Trustee under NovaStar Mortgage Funding Trust, Series 2005-1. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (SE1/4SW1/4NW1/4) OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 16 SOUTH, RANGE 11 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19275 DUSTY LOOP BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 23, 2 011 31 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2008 $171, 267.29 Late Charges: $13,952.19 Beneficiary Advances: $14,817.97 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $200,037.45 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $583,856.86, PLUS interest thereon at 8.8% per annum from 07/01/08 to 2/1/2009, 8.8% per annum from 02/01/09 to 10/01/09, 8.8% per annum from 10/01/09 to 02/01/10, 8.8% per annum from 2/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 29, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same.DATED: 2/23/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, W A 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Douglas A. Green, Kathleen M. Kemper-green, As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 20, 2007, recorded December 27, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-65971 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A parcel of land being located in a portion of the Southwest One-Quarter Southeast One-Quarter (SW1/4 SE1/4) of Section 4, Township 15 South, Range 10 East, Willamette Meridian, City of Sisters, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of that parcel of land described in Quitclaim Deed recorded February 28, 2001 in Volume 2001, Page 9250, Deschutes County Official Records; thence along the North boundary of said SWT/4 SE 1/4, North 89°52'09" East a distance of 236.39 feet to the West boundary of that parcel of land described in "Notice of Sale" document recorded In Volume 281, Page 232, Deschutes County Deed Records; thence along said West boundary, South 00°04'41" East a distance of 120.96 feet; thence leaving said West boundary, South 89°52'09" West a distance of 237.07 feet to the Easterly right- of-way of Tamarack Street; thence along said right-of-way and its Northerly prolongation (being the Westerly boundary of said Volume 2001, Page 9250, North 00°14'24" East a distance of 120.96 feet to the point of beginning, the terminus of this description. Excepting therefrom: Commencing at the Northwest comer of that parcel of land described In said Volume 2001, Page 9250; thence along the North boundary of said SW1/4 SE1/4, North 89°52'09" East a distance of 131.14 feet to the True Point of Beginning; thence continuing along said North boundary, North 89°52'09" East a distance of 105.25 feet to the West boundary of that parcel of land described said Volume 281, Page 232; thence along said West boundary, South 00°04'41" East a distance of 120.96 feet; thence leaving said West boundary, South 89°52'09" West a distance of 105.20 feet; thence North 00°06'07" West a distance of 120.96 feet to the point of beginning, the terminus of this description. Commonly known as: 450 N. Tamarack St. Sisters OR 97759. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,397.84 Monthly Late Charge $55.46. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $212,959.61 together with interest thereon at 6.250% per annum from October 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 13, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 03, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

ASAP# 3931037 03/14/2011, 03/21/2011, 03/28/2011, 04/04/2011

ASAP# 3923896 03/07/2011, 03/14/2011, 03/21/2011, 03/28/20110

R-368894 03/07, 03/14, 03/21, 03/28


E6 Monday, March 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 714-5085100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 28, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Autbor,iaed SignaWe State of California County of Orange I, the undersigned, certify that I am the Trustee Sale Officer and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. Juan Enriquez Authorized Signature ASAP# 3928811 03/07/2011, 03/14/2011, 03/21/2011, 03/28/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx7977 T.S. No.: 1198567-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Tyler P. Tubbs, A Married Man As His Sole & Separate Property, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For First Franklin Financial Corp., An Op. Sub. of Mlb&t Co., Fsb., as Beneficiary, dated February 12, 2007, recorded February 14, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-09337 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot twenty-three (23), except the west five (5) feet thereof, in block one hundred twenty (120) of First Addition to Bend Park, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. *mortgage loan assetbacked certificates, series 2007-1 Commonly known as: 723 NE 11th St. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2008 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; failure to pay escrow deficiency when due, said sums having been advanced by the beneficiary; failure to pay prop pres fee when due, said sums having been advanced by the ben-

eficiary; failure to pay fc expenses when due, said sums having been advanced by the beneficiary; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,617.77 Monthly Late Charge $80.89. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $192,800.00 together with interest thereon at 8.600% per annum from October 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 21, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 10, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-370019 03/14/11, 03/21, 03/28, 04/04 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8081 T.S. No.: 1317289-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by David M. Estopare and Tamela J. Estopare, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 27, 2007, recorded January 09, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/recep-

tion No. 2008-01091 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A parcel of land located in the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NE1/4SE1/4) of Section Twenty-three (23), Township Sixteen(16)South, Range eleven(11), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, which is described as follows: Commencing at the East Quarter corner of said Section 23; thence South 57°24'28" West, 225.87 feet to the true point of beginning; thence South 17°37'02" East1 626.60 feet; thence South 00°03'09" west, 601.06 feet; thence South 89°53'10" west, 200.00 feet; thence North 00°03'09" East, 600.86 feet; thence South 89°53'10" West,, 283.27 feet; thence North 08°19'01" East, 206.77 feet; thence North 64°2121" East, 4977 feet; thence North 31°01'22" East, 212.49 feet; thence North 35°15'37" East, 157.36 feet; thence North 08°36'17" East, 57.15 feet; thence North 62°38'48" East, 11.19 feet to the point of beginning. Commonly known as: 65365 Concorde Ln. Bend OR 97701-8160. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,962.46 Monthly Late Charge $127.04. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $559,436.31 together with interest thereon at 7.350% per annum from July 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 29, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tender-

ing the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 22, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-371684 03/28, 04/04, 04/11, 04/18

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9091 T.S. No.: 1316071-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Scott Lawrence An Unmarried Man, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage Co Dba Commonwealth United Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated December 08, 2003, recorded December 12, 2003, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2003-84590 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: The west half of lot 5, block 2, Circle C Acres, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1692 NW Odem Ave. Terrebonne OR 97760. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $889.09 Monthly Late Charge $37.48. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $59,732.28 together with interest thereon at 5.625% per annum from September 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 13, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend,

County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 03, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-368901 03/07/11, 03/14, 03/21, 03/28 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3796 T.S. No.: 1303213-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Autumn K. Spence, Wife and Husband And Todd W. Spence, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Co., as Trustee, in favor of Abn Amro Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated December 17, 2007, recorded December 21, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-65200 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 4, Copper Canyon, Phase I, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61276 Bronze Meadow Lane Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due July 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,541.20 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $332,999.50 together with interest thereon at 6.125%

per annum from June 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 08, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 01, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-368513 03/07, 03/14, 03/21, 03/28 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9950 T.S. No.: 1316301-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Sean Anderson A Single Man, as Grantor to National City Bank, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated July 26, 2006, recorded August 11, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-55181 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 32 of Centennial Glen, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 681 SE Glengarry Place Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2010 of interest only and subse-

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Ward D. Helmick and, Teresa M. Helmick, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated March 30, 2007, recorded April 10, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 20704, beneficial interest having been assigned to Bank of America, National Association as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association as trustee for WAMU 2007-OA5, as covering the following described real property: Lot 2, Block 2, Ponderosa Cascade, Deschutes County, Oregon COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 66620 W. Cascade, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,746.66, from March 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,877.65, from June 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $481,303.34, together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.871% per annum from February 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee appeared on January 20, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, on the front steps between the doors of the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, and continued the trustee's sale to February 22, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, on the front steps between the doors of the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, ounty of Deschutes, State of Oregon; the undersigned trustee appeared on February 22, 2011, and continued the trustee's sale to March 24, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, on the front steps between the doors of the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon; the undersigned trustee will appear on March 24, 2011, and continue the trustee's sale to April 26, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, on the front steps between the doors of the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, at which time the undersigned trustee will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Date3-9-2011 By:/s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N, Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104458

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-106488 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, ROBERT E. OHLDE ABD CINDY L. OHLDE, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR ALLIANCE BANCORP, as beneficiary, dated 12/15/2006, recorded 12/29/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-84822, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 6 IN BLOCK 7 OF SUMMERFIELD PHASE IV, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2138 SOUTHWEST 28TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 23, 2011 Delinquent Payments from October 01, 2010 3 payments at $1,522.33 each $4,566.99 2 payments at $1,474.52 each $2,949.04 (10-01-10 through 02-23-11) Late Charges: $330.15 Beneficiary Advance: $22.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $7,868.18 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $193,336.19, PLUS interest thereon at 6.5% per annum from 09/01/10 to 1/1/2011, 6.5% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 27, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2/23/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3923867 03/07/2011, 03/14/2011, 03/21/2011, 03/28/2011

quent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,142.25 Monthly Late Charge $56.22. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $199,900.00 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from October 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 13, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the

interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the

word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 03, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-368904 03/07/11, 03/14, 03/21, 03/28 PUBLIC NOTICE The Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District No. 1 is looking for budget committee member volunteers. If interested, please contact the Redmond Main Fire Station at 541-504-5000 by April 1, 2011 for further information.

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT THE FOREGOING INSTRUMENT SHALL CONSTITUTE NOTICE, PURSUANT TO ORS 86.740, THAT THE GRANTOR OF THE TRUST DEED DESCRIBED BELOW HAS DEFAULTED ON ITS OBLIGATIONS TO BENEFICIARY, AND THAT THE BENEFICIARY AND SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE UNDER THE TRUST DEED HAVE ELECTED TO SELL THE PROPERTY SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED: TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This instrument makes reference to that certain deed of trust dated July 2, 2008 and recorded on July 3, 2008 as Instrument No. 2008-28639, in the real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, wherein PAUL REYNOLDS and LAURIE REYNOLDS, as tenants by the entirety, are the Grantor, WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY is the Trustee, and BANK OF THE CASCADES, an Oregon state chartered commercial bank, is the Beneficiary (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: Lot Fifteen (15), Block Eight (8), CHAPARRAL ESTATES, recorded April 16, 1969, in Cabinet A, Page 187, Deschutes County, Oregon. Also commonly described as: 6125 SW Canal Boulevard, Redmond, OR 97756. The tax parcel number(s) are: 129328. The undersigned hereby certifies that she/he has no knowledge of any assignments of the Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other than the appointment of DAVID W. CRISWELL, as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the undersigned certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: David W. Criswell, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY BORROWER: There are continuing and uncured defaults by Reynolds Electrical Services, Inc. (the "Borrower") that, based on the provisions of the Trust Deed and the written documents for Loan No. 10087509, including the adjustable rate promissory note dated and effective as of July 2, 2008 (the "Note"), authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property described above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: 1. Borrower's failure to pay to Beneficiary, when and in the full amounts due, monthly installments as set forth on the Note secured by said Trust Deed. Monthly installments in the approximate amount of $2,005.42, which includes principal and interest, are due for the months of October, 2010 and each and every month thereafter until paid. Late charges through and including December 14, 2010 total 401.08. Interest due as of (i.e., through and including) December 14, 2010 is in the amount of $987.83 and continues to accrue at the rate of 10.75% per annum or $18.21 per diem. ALL AMOUNTS are now due and payable along with all costs and fees associated with this foreclosure. 2. As to the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of the Trust Deed, the Borrower must cure each such default. Listed below are the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of the Trust Deed. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action necessary to cure the default and a description of the documentation necessary to show that the default has been cured. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any and all defaults identified by Beneficiary or the Successor Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. OTHER DEFAULT: Permitting liens and encumbrances to attach to the Property, including judgment liens by Eoff Electric Supply, Ray Klein Inc., and the Oregon Department of Revenue, and federal tax liens of approximately $7,674.34 and $27,779.60. Description of Action Required to Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure: Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that all liens and encumbrances against the Real Property have been satisfied and released from the public record. TOTAL UNCURED MONETARY (PAYMENT) DEFAULT: By reason of said uncured and continuing defaults, the Beneficiary has accelerated and declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed and the Property immediately due and payable. The sums due and payable being the following: Unpaid principal amount owing pursuant to the Obligations, as of December 14, 2010: $61,995.68. Unpaid interest owing pursuant to the Obligations as of December 14, 2010: $987.83. Accrued and unpaid fees, costs and collection expenses, but not including attorneys fees and costs, to December 14, 2010: $401.08. TOTAL DUE: $63,384.59. Accordingly, the sum owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $63,384.59, as of December 14, 2010, together with interest accruing on the principal portion of that amount, plus additional costs and expenses incurred by Beneficiary and/or the Successor Trustee (including their respective attorney's fees, costs, and expenses). ELECTION TO SELL: Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held at the hour of 10:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on May 23, 2011, on the front steps of the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as noted in this Notice. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for May 23, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2014. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2014, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE." You must mail or deliver your proof not later than April 23, 2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT: Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE: The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. DATED January 3, 2011 By: David W. Criswell, OSB 92593, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219, Telephone: (503) 228-2525, Facsimile: (503) 295-1058, Email: dcriswell@balljanik.com


Bulletin Daily Paper 03/28/11