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AT OSU CASCADES

A waiting game for crash victim’s family

Oregon State University President Ed Ray discusses the state of the OSU system, and OSUCascades in particular, at Cascades Hall on the COCC campus on Monday. Ray said OSUCascades may buy a building in Bend to house its graduate programs.

A grand jury is still considering what charges, if any, to bring against Andrea Orozco — who has a long record of driving offenses — in the Nov. 21 collision that killed Metolius resident Leonard Ross

Pete Erickson The Bulletin

School may expand to southwest Bend By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Oregon State University-Cascades Campus may try to purchase a new building on the southwest side of town to house its graduate programs, OSU President Ed Ray told more than 60 faculty, students and community members on Monday during his State of the University speech. Ray, who was on hand to deliver the address after a planned trip to Egypt was cancelled because of the unrest there, spoke about the university’s increase in research funding, its faculty’s roles nationwide and its attempts to help economic development around the state. “The past 10 years were sometimes exciting, sometimes excruciating, and never boring,” Ray said. “And the continuing development of this campus is gratifying to watch.” The branch campus is celebrating its 10th year, and Ray said he expects to see continued expansion and improvements in the coming 10 years. “I think the best way to celebrate this extreme accomplishment is to double down” and accomplish even more in the coming decade, he said. Part of that celebration could be further expansion. OSU-Cascades is housed in Cascades Hall on the Central Oregon Community College campus. As enrollment has increased to more than 600 students, campus officials have considered how best to expand. See OSU / A4

About the Bend campus: “The past 10 years were sometimes exciting, sometimes excruciating, and never boring. And the continuing development of this campus is gratifying to watch.” About expansion: “I’m committed to solutions for continuing growth and expansion. ... (College officials are) trying to do whatever we can.”

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

A wooden cross stands Monday near the site of the two-vehicle crash that killed Metolius resident Leonard Franklin Ross on Nov. 21. The crash happened at the intersection of Southwest Culver Highway and Southwest Highland Lane.

By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

Prosecutors expect it will take a grand jury until the end of the month to determine whether a Madras woman with a long record of driving offenses will face criminal charges for a deadly crash she allegedly caused last fall. The Jefferson County District Attorney’s Office is remaining quiet on what charges are being discussed against 28-year-old Andrea Orozco for the Nov. 21 accident. But Orozco’s attorney, Angela Lee, said she believes the jury may be considering charges not related to the death of Metolius resident Leonard Franklin Ross.

Expanded Web addresses could be a mixed blessing By Ian Shapira

Web more intuitive or create more cluttered, maddening The pillar of the basic Web experiences. address — the trusty .com doNo one knows yet. But with main — is about to face an infinite number of vast new competition naming possibilities, that will dramatically Inside an industry of Web transform the Web as wildcatters is racing to • A look at we know it. grab these potentially some of the New Web sites, with lucrative territories top domain more subject-specific, with addresses that names so far, are bound to provoke. sometimes controPage A5 versial suffixes, will Who gets to run soon populate the on.abortion Web sites line galaxy, such as — people who support .eco, .love, .god, .sport, .gay or abortion rights or those who .kurd. don’t? Which individual or This massive expansion to mosque can run the .islam or the Internet’s domain name .muhammad sites? system will either make the See Web / A5 The Washington Post

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MINNEAPOLIS — Ryan Hughes, a computer analyst for the Minneapolis Police Department, pulls up a map of the Twin Cities on his screen. “Here, here, here,” he says, pointing to six red dots, each marking a robbery probably committed by the same man. “And here,” he points to another dot, “is where I predicted he would go next.” Such scenes are becoming more common as more police departments turn to the emerging science of using recent crime data to predict where criminals will strike next. See Crime / A4

Love may make the world go ’round, but is it powerful enough to lower one’s blood pressure, reduce depression and speed the healing of an injury? With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, we set out to find the answer and discovered that science says yes. “Our relationships help us cope with stress, so if we have someone we can turn to for emotional support or advice, that can buffer the negative effects of stress,” says Julianne Holt-Lunstad, an associate professor of psychology at Brigham Young University. See Love / A5

Vol. 108, No. 39, 38 pages, 7 sections

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Minneapolis Police Sgt. Jeff Egge points out some hot spots where crime is likely to occur.

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be behind the wheel of a car again.” According to the Oregon Judicial Information Network, Orozco has been cited by police on eight occasions over the course of four years in Jefferson, Crook and Clackamas counties for offenses including speeding, failing to drive within her lane and failure to use a seat belt. She has been cited for driving with a suspended license four times. Her most recent conviction comes from driving with a suspended license and failing to carry proof of insurance on Oct. 2, 2010, just under two months before she allegedly caused the fatal crash. See Crash / A4

Crime prediction is becoming a Love may be the best question of technology, not ESP medicine, scientists say

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Ultimately, though, “It’s basically up to the grand jury” to decide whether to bring criminal charges in Ross’ death or “in any injuries to the passengers or anything of that nature,” said Lee. Meanwhile, Ross’ daughter, Susan Steele, said her family is waiting anxiously. “We hope the grand jury comes back with something,” said Steele, a 48-yearold Metolius resident. “We want to move on. We want the case to move forward. We don’t want this woman to spend rest of life in jail, we really don’t, but she needs to be held accountable. We just want her to understand that what she did was wrong and we don’t want her to ever

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EGYPT: Leaders strive to project an air of normalcy amid turmoil, Page A3


A2 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

4 10 23 32 34 36 Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $5.4 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

Seeking the fountain of old age Companies aim for insight into needs of seniors, to help them design more inviting, useful consumer products

New technologies Devices for I’ve-fallen-and-Ican’t-get-up catastrophes, say longevity-focused researchers, including Coughlin, represent the old business of old age. The new business of old age involves technologies and services that promote wellness, mobility, autonomy and social connectivity. These include wireless pillboxes that transmit information about patients’ medication use, as well as new financial services, like “Second Acts” from Bank of America Merrill Lynch, that help people plan for longer lives and second careers. Together, those kinds of products and services are already a multibillion-dollar market, industry analysts say. And if such innovations prove to promote health and independence, delaying entry into long-term care, the potential savings to the health care system could be even greater. That’s the upbeat message that Eric Dishman, the global director of health innovation at Intel, has been trying to get across to policymakers and industry executives for more than a decade. In his office in Beaverton, he demonstrates some prototypes, like a social networking system for senior housing centers, that older Americans are testing. Often field studies of his gadgets result in “success catastrophes” — the devices prove so popular that testers and their families are loath to return them. The people testing the social network devices, for example, asked for extra models for off-campus friends.

After 100-plus years, it’s time to change the light bulb, FTC believes The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — America, prepare to embrace “lumens.” For more than a century, buying light bulbs has been a fairly straightforward transaction: Consumers have judged pearshaped incandescent bulbs by how much wattage, or power, they consume. But the government wants the next generation of bulbs to be measured by brightness. And that means lumens. In a nation with 4.4 billion light sockets, it’s a tall order. “It’s a big deal, and it’s going to take a while for customers to get used to the difference,” said Jorge Fernandez, who buys light bulbs for Home Depot. “It’s going to take people years to get accustomed to it.”

New York Times News Service

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — It’s not easy being gray. For the first time ever, getting out of a car is no picnic. My back is hunched. And I’m holding on to handrails as I lurch upstairs. I’m 45. But I feel decades older because I’m wearing an Age Gain Now Empathy System, developed by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Agnes, they call it. At first glance, it may look like a mere souped-up jumpsuit. A helmet, attached by cords to a pelvic harness, cramps my neck and spine. Yellow-paned goggles muddy my vision. Compression knee bands discourage bending. Layers of surgical gloves make me all thumbs. Researchers at MIT AgeLab designed Agnes to help product designers and marketers better understand older adults and create innovative products for them. Many industries have traditionally shied away from openly marketing to people 65 and older, viewing them as an unfashionable demographic. But now that Americans are living longer and more actively, a number of companies are recognizing the staying power of the mature market. “Aging is a multidisciplinary phenomenon, and it requires new tools to look at,” Joseph Coughlin, director of AgeLab, tells me. “Agnes is one of those tools.” AgeLab, like a handful of other research centers at universities and companies around the country, develops technologies to help older adults maintain their health, independence and quality of life. Companies come here to understand their target audience or to have their products, policies and services studied. Often, visitors learn hard truths at AgeLab: Many older adults don’t like products, like big-button phones, that telegraph agedness. “The reality is such that you can’t build an old man’s product, because a young man won’t buy it and an old man won’t buy it,” Coughlin says. The number of people 65 and older is expected to more than double worldwide, to about 1.5 billion by 2050 from 523 million last year, according to estimates from the U.N. That means people 65 and older will soon outnumber children under 5 for the first time.

LOOKING AT LUMENS

By Juliet Eilperin

By Natasha Singer

New labeling

C.J. Gunther / New York Times News Service

Katii Gullick, a student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, wears an Age Gain Now Empathy System suit, developed by MIT AgeLab researchers, that simulates some of the effects of old age. The goal is to help product designers and marketers better understand senior consumers and create products tailored for them. “There is an enormous market opportunity to deliver technology and services that allow for wellness and prevention and lifestyle enhancement,” he says. “Whichever countries or companies are at the forefront of that are going to own the category.” Industry is beginning to hear his message. Last month, a group including Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson and Aegon said it had formed the Global Coalition on Aging to help governments and industries better handle the age boom. “Companies are starting to think about how they can be agefriendly much the same way they have been thinking about how they could be environmentally friendly over the last couple of decades,” says Andy Sieg, the head of retirement services at Bank of America.

Portland experiment The Mirabella, a new $130 million high-rise in the South Waterfront section of Portland, may be the greenest luxury retirement community in the nation. The building has solar-heated water, a garage where valets stack cars in racks atop one another, sensors that turn off the lights when stairways are empty, and platinum certification from Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, the group that sets national benchmarks for sustainable building. But never mind the free loaner Priuses in the garage. The Mirabella also aspires to be the grayest — by providing an opportunity to develop and test the latest homehealth technology and design concepts for older adults. The building’s architects, Ankrom Moisan Associated Architects, turned on its head the idea of putting retirees out to pasture. This urban high-rise, conveniently located next to Oregon Health & Science University, en-

ables residents to stay as healthy, engaged and socially connected as possible, says Jeff Los, a principal in the firm. “Historically, upscale senior housing has been a rural threestory entity spread over 30 acres,” he says. “This is a 30-story building on one acre with a streetcar stop at the front door.”

Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

The Federal Trade Commission is proposing that labels for all light bulbs put brightness — measured in lumens — at the top, with watts below under “energy used.” (Although lumens have been included on lightbulb packaging since 1994, few have noticed the tiny print.) The labels would also identify the bulb’s estimated annual energy cost, its life and how warm or cool its light is. The idea is to help people pick light bulbs that have the amount of brightness they need and to move away from thinking about watts, because manufacturers are going to be making more efficient, lower-watt bulbs. The labels — which were set to appear in June but will probably be delayed six months at the request of the lighting industry — will apply to conventional incandescent, compact fluorescents, halogen and lightemitting diode bulbs. Lumens will not be as clean a number as watts, though, because even among bulbs with the same wattage, brightness

will vary. A 60-watt bulb is about 800 lumens, but because the brightness of a bulb varies depending on the manufacturer, customers may see a lumen estimate of as low as 750 or as high as 1049 on the new boxes. Watts will no longer reflect the traditional lighting strength of the bulb. On Jan. 1, 2012, manufacturers will have to produce the equivalent of a 100-watt bulb using 72 watts of power; a year later, they will have to replace 75-watt bulbs with ones that are 28 percent more efficient; by Jan. 1, 2014, they will have to do the same with 60-watt and 45-watt bulbs.

Signs of the times There’s a simple explanation for why light-bulb labeling hasn’t kept up with the times: It’s because, until recently, neither the technology nor the terminology had changed for decades. This is an industry where the main trade group, the National Electrical Manufacturers Association, refers to its light-bulbmaking members as “lamp manufacturers” even though such members make the things that screw into lamps. And as Peter Soares, director of consumer channel marketing for Philips Lighting observed, “What other industries can you find where the product developed a hundred years ago is still the number one seller?” All of that is changing. Three-quarters of U.S. households have at least one compact fluorescent bulb, according to Soares, and CFLs make up 25 percent of the nation’s overall light-bulb market. Ikea became the first major retailer in the United States to stop selling incandescent bulbs as of Jan. 4. And California got language in the 2007 law that allows it to phase in the new standards a year early, so its 100-watt bulbs are already 28 percent more efficient.

Illuminating lumens Because there are so many new types of bulbs, the Federal Trade Commission has proposed labels that emphasize lumens, a measure of brightness. The more lumens, the brighter the bulb.

TWO EXAMPLES: 13-watt compact fluorescent bulb

60-watt incandescent bulb

‘Possibilities to get you set up at home’ The developers, Pacific Retirement Services, bought land from the university with the idea of encouraging research next door, at the school’s Oregon Center for Aging & Technology, also known as Orcatech. As part of that project, the company spent nearly a half-million dollars to install fiber-optic cables so that Mirabella residents could be encouraged to volunteer for a “living laboratory” program in which wireless motion sensors, installed in their apartments, track their mobility and, by extension, their health status in real time. About 30 older adults in the greater Portland area have volunteered to participate in the Orcatech living laboratory program. Dorothy Rutherford, 86, a petite redheaded woman with a deadpan wit, is one of them. Her favorite experiment so far involved an anthropomorphic robot from Vgo Communications, nicknamed Celia, that was equipped with a video screen. Rutherford’s granddaughter and great-granddaughter in Wyoming could remotely operate Celia any time they wanted to follow her around for a video chat. “When I saw Celia the robot, I thought, there are all kinds of possibilities to get you set up at home,” she says. “Why would somebody go to a retirement community if they can figure out a way to keep people home longer?”

For more on cleanup and safe disposal, visit epa.gov/cfl. Approximate number of lumens equivalent to traditional incandescent bulbs: 450 lumens Bulb wattage:

45 watts

Source: Department of Energy

1100

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, February 8, 2011 A3

T S Local projects in limbo after Congress’ ban on earmarks

United States has little choice but to rely on Egypt’s vice president

By Jennifer Steinhauer

New York Times News Service

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Vice President Omar Suleiman of Egypt says he does not think it is time to lift the 30-year-old emergency law that has been used to suppress and imprison opposition leaders. He does not think President Hosni Mubarak needs to resign before his term ends in September. And he does not think his country is yet ready for democracy. But, lacking better options, the United States is encouraging him in negotiations in a still uncertain transition process in

WASHINGTON — Gone for now are the likes of the taxpayerfinanced teapot museum or studies on the mating habits of crabs. But also shelved are a project to help consolidate information about arrests in Brazos County, Texas, and staffing for two new shelters for abused women and children in Salt Lake City. A rural Wisconsin county will not be able to upgrade its communication system, and a road in Kentucky will not be widened next year. Across the country, local governments, nonprofit groups and scores of farmers, to name but a few, are waking up to the fact that when Congress stamped out earmarks last week, it was talking about their projects, too.

TURMOIL IN EGYPT

By Helene Cooper and David E. Sanger

Egypt. In doing so, it is relying on the existing government to make changes that it has steadfastly resisted for years, and even now does not seem impatient to carry out. After two weeks of recalibrated messages and efforts to keep up with a rapidly evolving situation, the Obama administration is still trying to balance support for some of the basic aspirations for change in Egypt with its concern that the prodemocracy movement could be “hijacked,” as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton put it, if change were to come too quickly. Faced with questions about

Suleiman’s views, expressed in a series of interviews in recent days, the White House on Monday called them unacceptable. “The notion that Egypt isn’t ready for democracy I think runs quite counter to what we see happening in Tahrir Square and on the streets in cities throughout the country,” Robert Gibbs, the White House press secretary, said. But it remains unclear how much leverage President Barack Obama has to keep Suleiman moving toward fundamental change, especially as Egyptian authorities begin to reassert control.

Harsh reality Tensions are particularly acute in districts where new conservative lawmakers, many of whom criticized throughout their campaigns the practice of quietly inserting earmarks into spending bills, are coming face to face with local governments and interest groups who were counting on federal dollars to help shore up their own collapsing budgets. The issue is hardly limited to Republican districts. Democrats, led by President Barack Obama — who recently said earmarks were a bad thing — also agreed to give up the practice. Last week, Sen. Daniel K. Inouye, D-Hawaii, the Senate Appropriations Committee chairman who has long cherished earmarks, announced they would be banned from this year’s appropriations bills. But he was not happy about it. “The reality,” Inouye said, “is that critical needs in communities throughout the country will be neglected: roads and bridges in disrepair, job training programs shuttered, and vital resources for national defense and law enforcement cut off, to name just a few.”

‘We have to cut from somewhere’ Many citizens, even those who sympathize with cuts in spending, insist that not all pork is cured with the same untoward salt. “I do agree we have to cut from somewhere,” said Steve Tribble, the county judge executive of Christian County in Kentucky, where a planned road project is now imperiled. “I am against some earmarks. Not the good ones. I can promise you this is not a road to nowhere.” Rep. Sean Duffy, R-Wis., who devoted part of his 2010 campaign to decrying the penchant of his predecessor, David Obey — a Democrat who retired after four decades in Congress — for securing earmarks, said he traveled to his district last week to gently explain to local governments that times had changed. “I am being honest with people,” Duffy said in a telephone interview. “I draw them a pie chart.” But even Duffy said he had come to see that not every earmark was of the much-maligned teapot museum quality, and that he would help his constituents “work through the grant process” to secure needed financing in other ways.

Facing constituents But there’s the rub. With Obama proposing a five-year freeze on domestic spending, and the Republican-controlled House vowing to cut spending in federal agencies by hundreds of millions of dollars, it is almost certain that every agency will have far less money to spend on thousands of legitimate projects that were approved after extensive review. Simply put, without earmarks to turn to, far more applicants will be scrambling for a smaller pot of grant money. The result? Scores of lawmakers are going to find themselves explaining to the people back home why their bridges will not be finished, their rape-victim programs canceled before they started, their federal requirements ignored.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange arrives at Belmarsh Magistrates’ Court in London on Monday. Matt Dunham The Associated Press

Extradition hearing for WikiLeaks founder under way in London By Anthony Faiola The Washington Post

LONDON — Attorneys for Wikileaks founder Julian Assange launched a blistering attack on the credibility of Swedish prosecutors and two women accusing the 39-year-old Australian of sexual assault, arguing on day one of an extradition hearing that he faces the prospect of a closed-door show trial if British authorities send him to Stockholm. Assange, who is wanted for questioning on allegations of sexual molestation, unlawful coercion and rape, appeared calm as he scribbled notes throughout the first half of the two-day hearing to determine whether British authorities will agree to honor a Swedish warrant. Assange is under partial house arrest in Britain as he fights extradition.

The defense

Bertrand Combaldieu / The Associated Press

Soldiers patrol in front of the Sphinx at the site of the Giza pyramids, Egypt’s most famous tourist attraction, on Monday. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country last week in an exodus sure to hammer Egypt’s vital tourism sector.

Nation’s leaders striving to project air of normalcy By Anthony Shadid New York Times News Service

CAIRO — As Egypt’s revolt entered its third week the government of President Hosni Mubarak sought to seize the initiative from protesters still crowding Tahrir Square on Monday, offering a pay raise for government employees, announcing a date for opening the stock market and projecting an air of normalcy in a city reeling just days ago. The confidence, echoed by state-controlled media that have begun acknowledging the protests after days of the crudest propaganda, suggested both sides believed the uprising’s vitality might depend on their ability to sway a population still deeply divided over events that represent the most fundamental

Freed Google executive recounts time in captivity

realignment of politics here in nearly three decades. “Now it feels like Hosni Mubarak is playing a game of who has the longest breath,” said Amur el-Etrebi, who joined tens of thousands in Tahrir Square on Monday.

Is this what victory looks like? After showing an ability to bring hundreds of thousands to downtown Cairo, protest organizers have sought to broaden their movement, acknowledging that numbers alone are not enough to force Mubarak’s departure. The government — by trying to divide the opposition, offering limited concessions and remaining patient — appears to believe it can weather the biggest

challenge to its rule. Underlining the government’s perspective that it has already offered what the protesters demanded, Naguib Sawiris, a wealthy businessman who has sought to act as a mediator, said: “Tahrir is underestimating their victory. They should declare victory.” Cairo’s chronic traffic jams returned Monday as the city began to adapt to both the protests in Tahrir Square, a landmark of downtown Cairo, and the tanks, armored personnel carriers and soldiers who continued to block some streets. Banks again opened their doors as people lined up outside, and some shops took newspapers down from windows, occasionally near burnt-out vehicles still littering some streets.

The warrant hinges on allegations by two Swedish women with whom Assange had brief affairs in Stockholm in August 2010. Both women claim that encounters with Assange became nonconsensual, with one saying he engaged in unwanted, unprotected sex with her while she was asleep, an act considered criminal rape in Sweden. Geoffrey Robertson, one of Assange’s lead attorneys, argued that the alleged acts would not be considered crimes in Britain and thus were not extraditable offenses. He called to the stand a former Swedish judge, Brita Sundberg-Weitman, who described Marianne Ny, the Swedish prosecutor seeking Assange’s arrest, as an overzealous women’s rights crusader with

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a bias against men. “I think she is so preoccupied with the situation of battered women and raped women that she has lost balance,” Sundberg-Weitman said. Crown prosecutors representing their Swedish peers rejected the assertions about Ny. Robertson also criticized Swedish prosecutors for their apparent readiness to file serious criminal charges against Assange while he is only wanted for questioning.

The prosecution Clare Montgomery, a prosecuting attorney, rejected defense assertions that Sweden was in collusion to hand Assange over to the United States if U.S. officials file charges against him associated with the disclosures of secret documents on the Internet. In comments in the court, and in witness testimony by a blogger who claimed one of the women had deleted a light-hearted tweet about Assange posted after an alleged act of sexual assault, the defense sought to paint his accusers as jilted lovers out for revenge. But Montgomery sought to bring home the seriousness of the allegations, graphically describing the account of one of the women who said she had protested the continuation of sex after a condom broke. His action constituted “violent, unlawful coercion,” she said. Though the hearing is scheduled to end today, many experts predict that Judge Howard Riddle will not issue an immediate ruling, instead releasing a written verdict in coming days.

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February 11, 2011 – 8:30-Noon The Associated Press CAIRO — The young Google Inc. executive detained by Egyptian authorities for 12 days said Monday he was behind the Facebook page that helped spark what he called “the revolution of the youth of the Internet.” A U.S.-based human rights group said nearly 300 people have died in two weeks of clashes. Wael Ghonim, a marketing manager for the Internet company, sobbed throughout an emotional TV interview just hours after he was freed as he described how he spent 12 days in detention blindfolded while his worried parents didn’t know where he was. Ghonim said he was treated with respect, but was taken aback when the security forces holding him branded him a traitor.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Crash

OSU

Continued from A1 Despite Orozco’s record, Lee said she does not believe there is sufficient evidence to support a criminal charge in Leonard Ross’ death. Lee did say there is a chance the jury could be considering assault charges as a result of injuries to the passengers in Orozco’s vehicle or injuries to Linda Ross. However, she did not share her reasons for believing Orozco might escape charges in Ross’ death. “The grand jury looks at the entire incident,” Lee said. “I honestly don’t know what to expect.” Lee said if criminal charges are brought she will ask for the trial to be moved outside of Jefferson County. She also would ask that the trial be moved outside Central Oregon. “The newspaper and the television stations are available in all three counties,” Lee said, referring to Jefferson, Crook and Deschutes counties. “I don’t think people would be purposefully biased against my client, people just get caught up in emotions.”

Continued from A1 On Monday, Ray said he will help the campus with any capacity issues. “I’m committed to solutions for continuing growth and expansion,” he said. OSU-Cascades Vice President Becky Johnson said college officials may consider purchasing a building near the roundabout at Simpson and Colorado avenues to house graduate programs. “There are five or six buildings for sale in that area,” Johnson said. “We would move our graduate programs and create a graduate center. Those students don’t have COCC classes so they don’t have to be on the campus. So there would be classrooms and offices.” Ray said Oregon Treasurer Ted Wheeler has suggested a moratorium on facilities funding, but he believes the campus could get bonding for a new building or some other facility funding, particularly if the community can provide matching funds. “We’re trying to do whatever we can,” Ray said, noting that the real-estate market in Bend makes this an opportune time to consider purchasing a new facility. He hopes to talk with leg-

The crash According to Oregon State Police, the crash occurred after Orozco ran a stop sign while driving a Ford Expedition with eight passengers, six of whom were children ranging in age from 2 to 14. Upon entering the intersection of Southwest Culver Highway and Southwest Highland Lane, Orozco’s vehicle collided with a Toyota four-door driven by Linda Ross, 61, of Metolius, with Leonard Ross, 71, in the passenger seat. Leonard Ross died of his injuries at St. Charles Redmond later that night. Police said three of the passengers were thrown from Orozco’s

Crime Continued from A1 The potentially revolutionary step could fundamentally alter the nature of police work. The idea is that everyone, even criminals, are creatures of habit. With enough information about past crimes, it’s possible to forecast their future target. “We usually look at the last week and say, ‘This is what happened in the last week,’” said Minneapolis Chief Tim Dolan. “Well, we’ve added to that, saying, ‘This is what we think’s going to happen next week.’” Dolan says that kind of thinking has already paid off in north and southwest Minneapolis, areas that led the city last year in reducing overall crime rates.

Looking for patterns The strategy looks slightly different everywhere it’s used, but predictive policing relies mainly on a police department’s ability to accumulate deep databases of crime information that detail time, location, methods and numerous other bits of revealing data. Crunched by a computer analyst, the numbers reveal patterns. That’s the task facing a crew of five such crime analysts who work out of a second-floor office in City Hall. Every day, they pore over recent crime data, slicing it different ways and using software to crunch it further. If a pattern emerges, they mark it down for consideration on an internal crime map that gets passed along to the chief for his weekly meeting with top inspectors and lieutenants. A handful of police departments around the country have spent tens of thousands of dollars on more advanced software, or are working with university researchers and technology companies on algorithms to help them spot crime trends. It’s akin to predicting where an earthquake’s aftershocks will be felt, says a Santa Clara University mathematician developing formulas for such police work. As for Hughes’ prediction of where the Minneapolis robber

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

According to Oregon State Police, Linda Orozco ran this stop sign at the intersection of Southwest Culver Highway and Southwest Highland Lane, causing the crash that killed 71-year-old Leonard Ross. vehicle, and everyone in the crash was hospitalized. Ross was the only one to die of his injuries. Police said they do not believe Orozco was intoxicated at the time of the crash. Jefferson County District Attorney Steven Leriche said his office continues to present evidence to the grand jury, which convened last Wednesday. “They are still in session,” Leriche said. “They are still taking information. They don’t have a deadline, but I’m guessing we are looking at two weeks.” Leriche said he is in the process of calling individuals involved in the investigation to testify. He would not discuss the charges under consideration, but did con-

would strike next? It was made using free software distributed by the National Institute of Justice. The estimate of the robber’s next target turned out to be a mile off. But in the world of crime prediction, that’s still counted as a success — the kind of information that could put a patrol car close to the action. Hughes, who hopes the Minneapolis department will eventually use more high-powered software for predictive policing, said that his maps have accurately predicted the locations of 45 percent of the city’s violent crime. “I have a better batting average than Joe Mauer,” he said.

The Pop-Tarts model To better understand predictive policing, consider the Pop-Tarts story. Businesses such as Wal-Mart have long anticipated customers’ needs based on weather and time of year. Coastal stores knew that as hurricanes approached, customers stocked up on bottled water and duct tape. Those things made sense, but looking more closely at customer data and comparing it to weather patterns, analysts at Wal-Mart noticed that customers anticipating a hurricane also bought more strawberry Pop-Tarts. It’s the sort of anecdote that the emerging industry of predictive policing embraces because it shows how analyzing data can turn up surprises, things that can be used to predict future behavior. The promise of doing the same thing with crime has prompted some large police departments such as Los Angeles to invest in partnerships with university researchers to devise predictive algorithms or formulas. As exotic as it sounds, it’s just the next step in the changing world of police work, said William Bratton, the celebrated former chief of police in L.A. and New York City. “It’s really the continuation of the evolution of policing,” he said. Starting in the 1990s, when police began using crime reports to identify hot spots, the focus has been on putting police officers

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firm that the involvement of a grand jury means that criminal charges are being contemplated. If the jury finds there is sufficient evidence to charge Orozco with a crime, the case will move to a trial court. Leriche originally said he didn’t believe the crash would result in criminal charges, but after continued investigation into the matter he elected to call the grand jury.

The Ross family Steele said the past few months have been “a struggle” as her family deals with the loss of her father, a man she said was loved by the community. “He had a big heart,” Steele said. “On the surface he seemed kind of

near high-crime areas. Putting laptops in squad cars and publishing crime maps helped shorten response time. Now, police departments can quickly analyze a lot of crime data to spot crime trends as they’re occurring. “So after two or three incidents we can put a stop to it instead of waiting for 20 or 30,” said Bratton, who now works as an independent security consultant. “This is potentially labor-saving,” he said. “That’s very important because as we’re going into very tough times with public financing, it’s going to become more and more critical.” The hope is that predictive policing will help supplant random patrolling, which studies have shown doesn’t work well. “It’s not enough to send people out and expect that they will have an impact on crime,” said Chuck Wexler, executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum in Washington.

How it’s working Minneapolis police estimate that half of the city’s most serious crime takes place on 6 percent of its land area. Many of the worst areas are under video surveillance, as the city expands its use of closed circuit cameras. But even within those high crime areas, there might be a few blocks that are particularly rough on any given week, said Sgt. Jeff Egge, the head of the department’s Crime Analysis Unit. His staff of five analysts make predictions by printing color-coded maps that show blocks or small sectors where they expect crimes such as burglary, robbery and aggravated assaults. The techniques are less effective for “episodic” crimes such as homicide, which are more random. The strategy adds a predictive element to the department’s CODEFOR program, begun in 1998 to map the city’s crime hot spots. “When we started CODEFOR, we looked at where crime occurred last week,” said Deputy Chief Rob Allen. “What we’ve asked people to do is to focus more on where we anticipate crime is going to occur next week. We’ve

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like a grumpy old man, but the truth was he would do anything for anybody. Everyone in the area knew my dad and everyone loved him.” Steele said her stepmother, Linda Ross, still has a cast on her left leg as she waits for the broken bones in her ankle to heal. Estimates for her medical care are nearing $100,000. “She has no health insurance,” Steele said. “This has been a very difficult time for us.” Donations for the Ross family are being accepted at Mid Oregon Credit Union and U.S. Bank in Madras. Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

made it sort of future-oriented rather than assuming the same patterns will continue.” It’s had its successes, police say. Last October, two felons walked into the Dunn Brothers coffee shop in Uptown, pistol-whipped one of the two clerks, tied them up in a back room and took a bag of cash. Witnesses called 911. Police arrived in time to catch the robbers. The two now face federal charges due to their criminal histories.

islators in early March about whether the university can get funding and move on a purchase. Former Deschutes County Commissioner Dennis Luke asked Ray about the future of OSU’s Extension Service, which could be among the list of programs facing state budget cuts. The extension service, which receives funding from the state, provides agricultural expertise in every Oregon county for ranchers, gardeners, food preservers and kids raising livestock. Ray said the possibility concerns him. “You could charge for 4-H, you could charge for nutrition and health programs, but these are generally accessed by the least advantaged people who need the programs the most,” he said. “We are looking at pretty difficult circumstances and various scenarios to accommodate the cuts.” That could mean fewer extension offices or consolidated agricultural experiment locations or forest research stations. To minimize the impact on the extension program, Ray said the university may fund some of the state budget shortfall to sustain the programs. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Suu Kyi’s party considers backing Myanmar sanctions New York Times News Service BANGKOK — The officially disbanded but defiant party of Myanmar’s leading dissident, Aung San Suu Kyi, appeared to be preparing to reaffirm its support for the continuation of Western sanctions against the country, a top party official said Monday. Tin Oo, the vice chairman of the party, the National League for Democracy, told the Reuters news agency that the trade embargo and other economic sanctions “affect only the leaders of the ruling regime and their close business associates, not the majority of the people.”

Other news reports suggested the party would back a more nuanced policy of “targeted” sanctions rather than the blanket economic sanctions now in place.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Web Continued from A1 Can the Ku Klux Klan own .nazi on free speech grounds, or will a Jewish organization run the domain and permit only educational Web sites — say, www. remember.nazi or www.antidefamation.nazi? And who’s going to get .amazon — the Internet retailer or Brazil?

It’s up to ICANN The decisions will come down to a little-known nonprofit based in Marina del Rey, Calif., whose international board of directors approved the expansion in 2008 but has been stuck debating how best to run the program before launching it. Now, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, is on the cusp of completing those talks in March or April and will soon solicit applications from companies and governments that want to propose and operate the new addresses. Next week, hundreds of investors, consultants and entrepreneurs are expected to converge in San Francisco for the first “.nxt” conference, a three-day affair featuring seminars on ICANN’s complicated application guidelines. The conference’s Web site, which has a list of applicants, is not without a sense of humor: “Join the Internet land rush!” a headline screams, above a photograph of the Tom Cruise character galloping on a horse in the movie “Far and Away,” the 1992 film about giveaways out West in the late 19th century. These online territories are hardly free. The price tag to apply is $185,000, a cost that ensures only well-financed organizations operate the domains and cuts out many smaller grassroots organizations, developing countries or dreamers, according to critics. (Rejectees get some of the application fee returned.) That’s on top of the $25,000 annual fee domain operators have to pay ICANN. Lauren Weinstein, co-founder

A rush for Web territory About 202 million domain names are registered in the Internet address system worldwide.

DOMAIN TYPE AS A PERCENTAGE OF ALL DOMAIN NAMES: .com: 46 percent .de (Germany): 7 percent .net: 7 percent .uk (United Kingdom): 5 percent .org: 4 percent .info: 3 percent Other domains: 28 percent

TOP DOMAIN NAMES (IN MILLIONS, 2010): .com: 92.7 .de: 14 of People for Internet Responsibility, a grass-roots firm in Los Angeles, alleges that the new domains are designed purely to make money for ICANN and the companies that control the domains. The new Web addresses, he added, will only mean more aggravation for trademark holders and confusion for the average Internet user. Peter Dengate Thrush, chair of the ICANN board of directors, argued that the high application fee is based on the nonprofit’s bet that it’s going to get sued, and to protect against cybersquatters or other organizations ill equipped to manage an entire domain of hundreds, if not thousands of Web sites. “These critics are the same kind of people who said at the end of the 19th century that everything that’s been invented has been invented,” Thrush said. “Our job is to protect competition and give extra choices for consumers and entrepreneurs.”

Fierce competition Many organizations are competing for the same domain names, in disputes that often will be settled by an ICANN-sponsored auction or by an ICANN board decision. Two companies

Love on the brain Arthur Aron, a social psychologist at Stony Brook University in New York, has dedicated his professional life to understanding the science of love. Specifically, Aron does brain scans with fMRI machines of people at various stages of the romantic journey: newly in love, in long-term relationships and recently rejected. Though most of his studies are small, involving only 15 to 20 people, Aron has consistently found that feelings of love trigger the brain’s dopamine-reward system. Dopamine is a powerful neurotransmitter that affects pleasure and motivation. It is activated in many people, for instance, by winning a lot of money or taking cocaine. In a study released in the Janu-

Source: Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers

vying for the environmentally friendly .eco domain have competing endorsements: one from a nonprofit chaired by former vice president Al Gore; the other from a group founded by former Soviet Union president Mikhail Gorbachev. The Internet has 21 generic domains such as .com, .net., .edu or .org and hundreds of others for countries, such as .de for Germany. The most prevalent generic domains are .com and .net, which account for about half of the world’s 202 million Internet addresses. Since 2000, ICANN has expanded the number of “generic top-level domains” only twice, and only in tiny doses to such sites ending in .biz, .jobs, .museum, or .mobi (for mobile sites). Those domains have so far yet to attract huge audiences. But many entrepreneurs expect that the new expansion of Web addresses — the first of which won’t go live until early 2012 — will catch on with users and make money. Many budding domain operators expect to earn millions of dollars, according to Kieren McCarthy, a former ICANN general manager who is organizing next week’s domain name conference in San Francisco.

In 2007, the Department of Health and Human Services reported that married people are happier, live longer and have fewer doctor’s visits than unmarried folks.

Love Continued from A1 Holt-Lunstad has been publishing studies for the past 10 years on social relationships and their influence on health and disease. Most studies on the health benefits of love have focused on married couples. In 2007, after reviewing research on the health effects of matrimony, the Department of Health and Human Services issued a 68-page report that found that, in general, married people are happier, live longer, drink less and even have fewer doctor’s appointments than unmarried folks. Of course, “we all know that not all marriages are happy,” Holt-Lunstad says. Very few of the thousands of marriage studies take the quality of the union into account; “I can think of maybe seven.” So, Holt-Lunstad set out to see what kind of links there might be between love and health, and in 2008, she identified one, in a study published that year about marriage and blood pressure. She found that happily married people have lower blood pressure than unmarried people. But unhappily married people have higher blood pressure than both groups. So, when it comes to blood pressure, at least, you’re probably better off alone than in a troubled marriage. Loving spouses tend to encourage preventive care, reinforce healthy behaviors such as exercise and flossing, and dissuade unhealthy ones, such as heavy drinking, according to many studies. Romantic relationships also can provide a sense of meaning and purpose in life that can translate to better self-care and less risk taking, Holt-Lunstad says

.net: 13.8 .uk: 9 .org: 8.7 .info: 6.9 .cn (China): 6 .tk (Tokelau): 4.5 .nl (Netherlands): 4.1 .eu (European Union): 3.3 .ru (Russia): 3.1 .ar (Argentina): 2.2 .br (Brazil): 2.1 .biz: 2.1 .it (Italy): 2 .pl (Poland): 1.9 .au (Australia): 1.9 .fr (France): 1.9 .us (United States): 1.7 .ca (Canada): 1.5

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ary 2011 issue of Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, Aron compared the brain scans of 17 people who had been married for an average of 21 years with data from his 2005 study of 17 people (10 women and 7 men, median age of 21) who were newly in love. Both groups had neural activation in the dopamine system but, interestingly, the brains of the newer lovebirds also lit up in areas associated with anxiety, obsession and tension. “When you’ve just fallen in love and the person goes out of your sight for five minutes, you think, ‘Are they dead? Did they find someone else?’ “ Aron says.

Feeling good Hugging and hand-holding, meanwhile, have been found to release the hormone oxytocin, which lowers the levels of stress hormones in the body, reducing blood pressure, improving mood and increasing tolerance for pain, according to research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. If being in love makes you happy, it may also have another welcome health benefit: fewer colds. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh assessed 334 healthy volunteers, ages 18 to 54, for their emotional styles. Those who tended to experience positive emotions such as happy, pleased and relaxed were more resistant to the common cold than those who felt anxious, hostile or depressed. Since the study covered anyone with positive emotions, the results could apply to those in happy relationships - or anyone with a sunny outlook. A happy marriage may also speed the rate that wounds heal, according to a 2005 study at Ohio State University. It found that a married couple’s 30-minute positive, supportive discussion sped up their bodies’ ability to recover from an injury by at least one day. Researchers Jan Kiecolt-Glaser and Ronald Glaser fit 42 married couples with small suction devices that created eight tiny blisters on

their arms. On one visit after being subjecting to the blistering device, the researchers prompted the couple to talk about “an area of disagreement, something that inherently had an emotional element,” Kiecolt-Glaser says. On another visit, the couple had a loving discussion after the blistering. Those blisters healed a day sooner.

Don’t give up! For those who aren’t in love right now, all is not lost. Holt-Lunstad and colleagues found that strong connections to friends, family, neighbors or colleagues improve odds of survival by 50 percent. She examined data from 148 studies that followed 308,849 people an average of 7½ years. Social connectedness proved as beneficial to survival as quitting smoking and exceeded the benefits of exercise. Meanwhile, it’s worth noting that love gone wrong can have health consequences as well. “Lots of the data on suicide and depression show that one of the

The future operator of .sport, for instance, could sell as many as 200,000 or more Web addresses for wholesale prices ranging from $6 to $50 to such companies as Go Daddy. These firms then resell the Web sites to consumers for higher prices. McCarthy also said ICANN is debating whether the domain operators could sell Web addresses directly to consumers.

Finding a niche Ron Andruff, president and chief executive of dotSport LLC, a New York-based outfit, said he believes more users will find niche interests and communities more easily with the new addresses. “Google and Bing are not in business of helping you find what you are looking for,” he said. “They’re in the business of generating revenue from those willing to bid the highest to get on their search results page.” Scott Seitz, the CEO of DotGay LLC, wants to build a universe of sites — he expects 300,000 initially — with addresses such as www.lawyers.gay, www.aids. gay, www.hotels.gay or www. communitycenter.gay. He has the backing of several prominent gays rights groups including Human Rights Campaign and the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLADD). Seitz, who is gay, said the simple idea of operating the domain devoted to the gay movement exerts its own pressures. “I have a responsibility, and I am in awe of that,” said Seitz, adding that he and his business partners intend to donate twothirds of their revenue to various social causes. For people who might propose controversial domains — such as .nazi, which ICANN officials have worried about — approval will be based on the applicant’s identity and intentions, and on the grounds of “morality and public order.” Such companies as Canon or IBM will be given priority for .canon or .ibm, and so will municipalities for such domains as .paris or .nyc.

major causes, especially among younger people, is rejection in love or unrequited love,” Aron says. Divorce can damage one’s physical health so dramatically that the person never recovers. A 2009 study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior found that divorced or widowed people have 20 percent more chronic health conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer, than married people. They also have 23 percent more mobility limitations, such as trouble walking up stairs. Remarriage offset this trend a bit, but not completely.

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, February 8, 2011 A5

WATTS TOWERS

Los Angeles struggles to spotlight (and save) its iconic sculptures By Adam Nagourney New York Times News Service

LOS ANGELES — The Watts Towers rose up against a clear blue sky as James Janisse unlocked the 10-foothigh gate that surrounds the soaring outdoor sculpture. “Behold the work of the man,” said Janisse, a tour guide, and his audience took it in: the Gaudi-esque mashup of towers, cathedrals, fountains and ships, constructed from pipes, broken bottles, seashells and cracked ceramic, climbing 100 feet into the air. The towers are an iconic work of folk art with a back story — built by an eccentric Italian immigrant working alone in his yard over 33 years — that is nearly as captivating as the installation itself. But they are endangered, threatened by budget cuts that are crushing governments across the nation. And they are struggling to draw crowds to this neighborhood that is far off the tourist track and is still identified, despite the passage of time, with some of the worst urban riots in U.S. history. Amid increased concern about the towers’ fate, the city of Los Angeles, which operates the installation, last month contracted the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to restore and maintain it; the three city workers in charge of taking care of the site were lost to budget cuts. The museum is turning to its donor network to raise money for the project — preliminary estimates put the initial restoration at $5 million — and not incidentally, to promote the installation to arts patrons in Los Angeles itself. But for the museum, promoting the towers might be

“My biggest concern right now is making sure the towers are stable and safe.” — Olga Garay, executive director of L.A.’s Department of Cultural Affairs

as daunting as keeping them in shape. The towers are open for tours just four days a week. Most people who come to Watts view the installation from outside the locked gates, an impressive enough view but one that deprives visitors of the dazzling details inside: the cactus garden, church buttresses, detailed flowers decorating the floor and what remains of the house of the man who built it all, Simon Rodia. While some restoration is clearly necessary, the towers are not in a state of disrepair. But given the intricacy of the work and the fragility of the products they have always required a good deal of care and maintenance. “My biggest concern right now is making sure the towers are stable and safe,” said Olga Garay, the executive director of the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs.

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A6 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

AFGHANISTAN

Kandahar hit by 3rd suicide attack in 10 days By Alex Rodriguez and Hashmat Baktash Los Angeles Times

KABUL, Afghanistan — A suicide bomber killed at least one person and injured five others at a customs house in Kandahar on Monday, the third suicide attack in 10 days in the volatile southern Afghanistan city regarded as the Taliban’s spiritual birthplace. The target may have been a group of NATO soldiers who

Green River killer expected to plead guilty in woman’s 1982 slaying

were at or near the building at the time of the blast, Afghan officials said. A NATO spokesman said two of its soldiers, both Americans, were injured in the attack. No other details were immediately available. While NATO says it has been making major gains in the southern provinces of Kandahar and Helmand, the Taliban heartland, insurgents have still been able to strike back with attacks such as

Monday’s blast as well as a suicide bombing Jan. 29 that killed Kandahar province’s deputy governor. On Friday, two people were injured during a suicide car bomb attack on the home of Kandahar’s police chief. The chief, Khan Mohammad Mujahid, was home at the time but was not hurt. In early January, a suicide bomber detonated his explosives in a public bathhouse in the bor-

der town of Spin Buldak in Kandahar province, killing 17 people. The Taliban claimed responsibility for Monday’s blast in Kandahar, as well as for the assassination of a local government official in Khowst province. The official, acting Bak district chief Sayed Mohammad, was driving from his home to his office Monday morning when gunmen fatally shot him, said Mobariz Zadran, a provincial spokesman.

FIRE DESTROYS WAREHOUSES — AND CARNIVAL DREAMS

By Jennifer Sullivan The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — The attorney for Green River killer Gary Ridgway says he is expected to plead guilty to a count of aggravated murder filed Monday in connection with the slaying of a 20-year-old woman who vanished after leaving a SeaTac motel in 1982. “He takes responsibility for it,” attorney Mark Prothero said Monday. The woman, Becky Marrero, was long believed to be a victim of Ridgway, who confessed to her slaying when he agreed to plead guilty to 48 other murders eight years ago in a deal that likely spared his life. But it wasn’t until December, after three teens stumbled upon her remains in an Auburn ravine, that prosecutors had the evidence they needed to charge Ridgway with her slaying. In recent discussions with the serial killer, Prothero said he has indicated that he wants to plead guilty at his upcoming arraignment. If Ridgway decides to plead not guilty, he could jeopardize the earlier plea deal and could potentially face the death penalty, according to the Prosecutor’s Office. Because Ridgway previously confessed to Marrero’s killing, the new charge falls under the terms of his controversial 2003 plea agreement, prosecutors said. “I don’t expect any surprises, but nothing is 100 percent done until it’s done,” Prothero said of Ridgway’s expected plea. If Ridgway enters a guilty plea to Marrero’s death, he will maintain his current status of serving life in prison without the possibility of parole under the agreement, according to the Prosecutor’s Office.

Felipe Dana / The Associated Press

A fire Monday gutted warehouses in Rio de Janeiro holding many of the elaborate, featherand-sequin costumes and extravagant floats for the Carnival parade, destroying the dreams and hard work of thousands of mostly poor Brazilians who toil year-round to stage one of world’s most spectacular celebrations. The fire devoured about 8,400 outfits and the ornate sets built each year in the battle to be the city’s top samba group. Three hours into the early morning blaze, the flames were controlled and 10 warehouses were unscathed, but some of the top contenders and

up-and-comers in next month’s Carnival parade were knocked out of the competition. “Do you know what it feels like to work all day, into the night, to make this happen, and then this?” asked seamstress Graziela Goncalves Carvalho. “It’s over. There’s nothing. This Carnival is over for us.” Carnival is a time when Rio’s residents and more than 700,000 visitors pour into the streets for a nearly weeklong party. The revelry culminates in the two-day competitive parade of the elite samba groups, and ends on Ash Wednesday, when order is restored.

Think you know how your kid got swine flu? You might be surprised By Nicholas Bakalar New York Times News Service

If you or your child came down with influenza during the H1N1, or swine flu, outbreak in 2009, it may not have happened the way you thought it did. A new study of a 2009 epidemic at a school in Pennsylvania has found that children most likely did not catch it by sitting near an infected classmate, and that adults who got sick were probably not infected by their own children. Closing the school after the

epidemic was under way did little to slow the rate of transmission, the study found, and the most common way the disease spread was a through child’s network of friends. Researchers learned all this when they studied an outbreak of H1N1 at an elementary school in a semirural community in spring 2009. They collected data in real time, while the epidemic was going on. With this information on exactly who got sick and when, plus data on seating charts, activities

and social networks, they were able to use statistical techniques to trace the spread of the disease from one victim to the next. Their report appears online in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The scientists collected data on 370 students from 295 households. Almost 35 percent of the students and more than 15 percent of their household contacts came down with flu. The most detailed information was gathered from fourth-graders, the group most affected by the outbreak.

W   B Sudan will accept South’s secession KAMPALA, Uganda — With the announcement of final voting results, President Omar Hassan al-Bashir of Sudan said Monday that his government would accept the choice of the long-embattled region of southern Sudan’s PresiSudan to dent Omar als e p a r a t e Bashir from the north, setting the stage for the creation of the world’s newest country this summer. According to the final count, announced in Sudan’s capital, Khartoum, 98.83 percent of the more than 3.8 million registered voters in southern Sudan chose to separate from the north. In many parts of the country the vote was more than 99 percent. “Today we received these results, and we accept and welcome these results, because they represent the will of the southern people,” al-Bashir said in a statement on state television, according to Reuters.

if Russia does not leave the region. The Kavkaz Center website says it received the video late Monday. It was not clear when or where the video was recorded. The Jan. 24 attack at Moscow’s Domodedovo Airport killed 36 people. Investigators say the bomber was a 20-year-old man from the Caucasus region that includes Chechnya, but have not released his name or other details. Umarov, who seeks to create a Caucasus emirate independent from Russia and governed by Sharia law, said in the earlier video that he could call on 50 to 60 suicide bombers if necessary.

Haiti’s president plans to extend his term

Chechen rebel leader claims airport blast

MEXICO CITY — President René Préval of Haiti said Monday that he would stay in office for three more months, extending his term until after a March 20 runoff to choose his successor. Preval’s term had been scheduled to end Monday, but an emergency law passed after last’s year’s devastating earthquake allowed him to stay longer because his 2006 inauguration was delayed. His chief of staff, Fritz Longchamp, told The Associated Press that Préval would leave May 14. Préval’s decision was largely expected by Haitians and the international community, in part because it is unclear who would take his place. — From wire reports

MOSCOW — A website affiliated with Chechen rebels has released a video in which insurgent leader Doku Umarov claims responsibility for last month’s deadly suicide bombing at Russia’s largest airport and threatens more bloodshed

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Goody’s advertised in The Bulletin and received 170 coupons in just one day. We’re The Bulletin, your local source for news, entertainment, information and savings. Each day 70,000 readers turn to the pages of our print edition for saving opportunities from local businesses. Plus we deliver grocery and shopping inserts every week with additional ways to stretch your dollars — locally. The Bulletin ... there when you need it most.

Goody’s was interested in reaching new customers. So they decided to do something cool. They decided to run a one-day-only coupon in The Bulletin. The response was absolutely SWEET! And here’s the scoop: They received 170 coupons in just one day — a MONDAY! You could say it was one tasty little promotion that a number of Bulletin readers just couldn’t resist.

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AOL buying Huffington Post in effort to recharge its ad revenue, see Page B4. www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,783.99 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +14.69 +.53%

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12,161.63 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +69.48 +.57%

STOC K S R E P O R T

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1,319.05 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +8.18 +.62%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.64 treasury CHANGE -.27%

Room-tax collections rise in Bend, county

Passenger boardings at Redmond Airport declined last month from December 2010 figures, but increased over January 2010, according to statistics released Monday by the airport. In January, 19,826 passengers took off from Redmond Airport, a nearly 6 percent decrease from the 21,057 boardings in December 2010. Last month’s total, however, was more than 6 percent higher than the 18,621 who flew out last January.

Continental to cut 500 jobs in Houston Continental Airlines will cut about 500 downtown Houston jobs beginning in April as the carrier combines with Chicago-based United Airlines. On Oct. 1, Continental merged with United to become the world’s largest airline. — From staff and wire reports

Record viewership

Nursery, grass seed sectors struggle alongside housing By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

In Central Oregon and statewide, cattle were king in Oregon’s agricultural sector last year. Cattle represented the state and region’s No. 1 ag commodity, generating $709 million and $42 million in gross sales, respectively, last year, according to an annual Oregon State University Extension Service report. Those represented increases of 12.8 and 13.6 percent over 2009, respectively. Including all agricultural products, Oregon’s farmers and ranchers grossed $4.3 billion in sales last year, 3.8 percent more than 2009, which was the state’s worst year since 1966, according to the report. Some sectors, such as grass seed and nursery stock, contin-

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Curtis Grant, of Bend, holds a signature skateboard, which he made in his Bend workshop, that he personalized for his son, Gage.

Turning your memories into …

ridable art Craftsman’s creations capture life stories on sporting boards

120 million

111.0 million 90

60

30

24.4 ’00

What: Curtis A Grant Signature Boards Employees: One Phone: 541-639-2577 E-mail: curt@crossfirearts.com Website: http://curtisagrant.com

By Tim Doran The Bulletin

T

aking a ride on one of Curtis Grant’s custom skateboards becomes the trip of your lifetime. Grant, who markets the skateboards as gifts for significant events, incorporates personal photos, documents, movie images, music CDs, action figures, candy and other memorabilia from the life of the board’s recipient. “I don’t even know many of the (stories) behind the pictures, but I know the person on the other end does,” said Grant, the sole employee of Curtis A Grant Signature Boards. You can also ride them, although attempting a grind — sliding along the skateboard deck — will probably damage much of what

McClatchy -Tribune News Service

’90

The basics

makes Grant’s boards one of a kind. “My work will stand as art, unique works of art that you can ride,” he said. Grant, 54, relocated to Bend from Maui in June and works in a shop at his east-side home. He also makes custom surfboards and stand-up paddle boards, although they’re personalized differently given the additional element of water. The idea grew out of his career and personal passions, and his mother may have planted the seed with a childhood activity — having Grant and his siblings take all the things they collected while combing the beach and glue them to what they called beachcombing boards. See Boards / B3

By Claudia Buck

Super Bowl TV viewers

’80

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$29.348 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.284

ued to struggle, however, with the continued slump in the housing industry. “Sales of grass seed continue to be down, and it’s tied to the recession,” said Bill Young, the statewide seed specialist with OSU Extension. “There are fewer new houses and lawns to plant. People are golfing less, and some golf courses that have used Oregon seed are closing or using less seed.” Statewide, overall crop sales dipped 0.5 percent to $2.86 billion, but that decline was more than offset by surging sales of livestock, dairy products and poultry — which increased 13.6 percent to $1.42 billion. The report shows agriculture continues to be a major contributor to the Central Oregon economy, with total farm and ranch sales for Crook County of $37.3 million in 2010, up from $30.1 million in 2009; $21.2 million in Deschutes County, up from $19.8 million, and $63.1 million in Jefferson County, up from $62.8 million. See Agriculture / B4

Obama Big banks presses to pay more hiring, for insurance investing FDIC

By Eric Dash New York Times News Service

By Michael D. Shear

Big financial institutions will pick up a greater portion of the cost to protect deposits when banks fail, under a plan adopted Monday by regulators. The new fee structure, which takes effect in April, will result in about 110 large banks covering about 80 percent of the premiums paid into the government’s deposit insurance fund each year, up from 70 percent. The fund, administered by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, is expected to collect $14 billion in premiums this year. The change, approved unanimously by the fivemember board of the agency, was a result of the DoddFrank financial regulations that passed last year. See FDIC / B3

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama urged U.S. businesses Monday to “get in the game” by letting loose trillions of dollars they are holding in reserve, saying they can help create a “virtuous cycle” of more sales, higher demand and greater profits that will put people back to work. “If there is a reason you don’t believe that this is the time to get off the sidelines — to hire and invest — I want to know about it. I want to fix it,” Obama said in a speech to business leaders at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. In the speech, Obama pledged to eliminate unneeded regulations and simplify the tax code. See Obama / B3

Paid Advertisement

Internet swindlers find new tools for scams in social networking

Super Bowl XLV had the most viewers of any program in television history, surpassing last year’s Super Bowl, which had set the record with 106.5 million viewers.

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$1347.60 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$0.70

Cattle reign among state commodities

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

Airport releases January boardings

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AGRICULTURE

EXECUTIVE FILE

For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B2-3

Room-tax collections jumped again in Bend and unincorporated Deschutes County in December, figures released Monday show. The collections are considered an indicator of tourism activity. Collections rose for the 13th consecutive month in Bend and second consecutive month in the county, which has posted increases nine of the past 11 months. Collections in Bend rose 16.1 percent over December 2009. Halfway through the 2010-11 fiscal year, collections are running 13.5 percent ahead of the same period a year ago. In the county, tax collections rose 6 percent over December 2009, with collections up 3.5 percent through the first six months of the fiscal year. “The results are better than I initially expected,” Doug La Placa, president and CEO of Visit Bend, wrote of the city’s performance. Bend’s gain in December came on top of a 22.8 percent rise in December 2009 over December 2008, he noted in the e-mail to Visit Bend board members and staff. “This is very good news and is a reflection of gains in both occupancy and (room) rate citywide.” Bend hosted the USA Cycling Cyclo-cross National Championships each of the past two Decembers, providing a surge of visitors. “Forecasts for January and February (room-tax) collections reflect a continuation of the positive (year over year) momentum,” La Placa said.

B

A perfect pair?

’11

Source: The Nielsen Company AP

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — For Sacramento grandmother Pat Blucher, it was a financial plea she couldn’t resist. A few weeks ago, her distraught granddaughter called from Canada, saying she’d been arrested on drug charges and needed bail money. Immediately. Only it wasn’t her granddaughter, but someone setting a financial trap. It’s an old scam but with a newer twist: Facebook. Using details apparently pulled from Facebook pages, the scam artist peppered the

TECH FOCUS conversation with enough family facts — husband’s and baby’s names, a girlfriend’s wedding — to persuade Blucher to wire $4,600 to Canada. “They’re so clever. They had all the information to fool me,” said Blucher, a retired elementary school teacher who’s convinced her Facebook page gave the caller access to too many personal details about her family.

The incident is yet another example of a classic cybercrime — using the Internet to foist financial fraud on unwitting victims. From the “I Love You” computer worm in 2000 to last year’s “stranded traveler” swindles, online scams have been around since the Internet’s dawn. But they’ve become increasingly sophisticated — and lucrative — for cybercrooks. Last year, the Internet Crime Complaint Center, which is affiliated with the FBI, logged its 2 millionth consumer complaint, a number that’s doubled in about three years. See Scams / B3

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B USI N ESS

B2 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ACE Ltd AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGIC Cv AGIC Cv2 AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL ARYxTh h ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abiomed AbitibiB n Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh Accenture AccoBrds Accuray Accuride n AcetoCorp Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Actuate Acuity Acxiom ADAM Adecaog n AdeonaPh AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvPhot AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlaPw pfN AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch AllegiantT Allergan AlliData AlliFibO rs AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AllisChE AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlonUSA AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria AlumChina Alvarion AmBev s Amarin Amazon AmbasInt rs Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAssets n AmAxle ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AIntGr pfA AIG wt AmIntlGrp AmerMed AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amsurg Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Ancestry AnglogldA ABInBev AnikaTh Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Ansys AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldMatl AMCC Apricus rs AquaAm ArQule ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCoal ArchDan ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld ArmourRsd ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArrwhRsh h ArubaNet ArvMerit AscenaRtl AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasEngy AtlasPplH AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AudCodes Audvox Augusta g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv

5.61 -.01 27.42 +.11 0.48 23.65 +.26 1.30 62.83 -.23 12.55 +.13 1.20 58.70 +1.23 53.46 +1.24 1.08 10.90 +.20 1.02 10.15 +.14 1.76 37.42 +.02 0.20 15.94 +.10 17.82 +.11 1.12 33.50 +.40 6.09 -.07 7.33 +.32 21.19 -.75 .33 -.02 0.54 43.84 +.41 1.72 27.96 -.01 18.14 +.27 10.07 +.05 2.13 +.05 12.08 +.80 0.05 20.04 +.07 2.71 -.15 1.76 45.69 -.43 0.70 51.85 +.42 0.42 6.75 -.01 13.37 +.23 28.28 +.91 4.76 -.02 26.28 +.81 1.83 +.05 0.90 52.67 +.12 8.51 9.98 +.63 15.77 +.63 0.20 8.69 -.02 5.60 +.28 70.59 +.60 22.32 -.22 2.36 +.14 0.15 11.80 +.06 0.04 28.59 +.92 5.04 -.03 0.52 57.01 +.85 17.62 +.37 7.60 +.16 13.10 -.40 1.38 +.02 33.56 +.20 0.36 44.96 +.56 0.25 6.09 -.30 0.24 64.50 +.52 3.72 -.04 15.44 +.26 8.33 -.07 1.88 0.06 6.55 +.01 7.57 -.09 28.70 -.11 0.04 8.81 -.03 7.55 -.06 15.68 +.20 24.87 +.24 1.62 +.01 0.60 36.87 -.55 101.83 +2.08 6.66 -.08 5.01 -.08 2.51 -.02 44.44 +1.45 0.64 72.04 -.73 0.11 93.56 +1.86 1.96 89.25 +.64 0.40 11.65 +.28 1.16 63.18 -.53 7.40 +.04 0.18 42.96 +.97 47.39 -.49 5.29 -.03 1.30 24.46 -.14 61.30 -.11 0.86 9.51 +.20 0.56 57.43 -.41 0.34 37.22 -.01 3.46 +.04 0.12 17.32 +.18 3.95 164.08 +.09 39.93 +.26 1.80 77.68 +2.03 7.29 -.08 84.29 -.69 1.33 -.05 21.00 -.86 14.07 +.04 0.60 26.35 +.21 0.72 67.25 +.36 0.75 40.01 -1.29 0.20 71.54 -.07 77.94 +1.43 15.50 3.75 -.17 0.48 7.70 +.02 1.51 21.58 +.32 1.70 37.84 +.28 0.80 71.16 -.36 .82 +.07 28.50 +.51 7.56 -.07 3.32 +.12 14.43 +.79 21.78 +.33 0.80 31.88 +.53 3.84 +.02 0.16 9.51 +.72 53.57 +.48 0.40 6.96 -.04 0.66 6.16 +.04 0.25 16.11 -.03 0.24 40.66 -.35 0.48 21.96 +.11 1.52 24.06 +.06 24.85 -.56 2.00 0.99 26.61 +.04 8.59 -.04 176.43 +.50 1.02 -.13 29.45 +.09 34.70 +.25 1.54 28.63 +.40 52.67 +.12 0.52 56.83 -.68 1.17 +.05 21.16 +.10 14.63 +.14 5.60 29.07 +.20 8.45 +.12 0.44 14.83 -.03 1.84 36.04 +.42 0.10 13.26 +.09 0.72 44.82 +1.00 0.65 34.05 +.50 6.38 6.75 +.24 15.17 +1.07 42.18 +2.18 19.78 +.20 2.36 +.04 28.38 -.61 53.66 +.07 0.88 26.80 +.07 0.72 58.70 +.62 0.40 36.48 -.08 0.42 15.42 +.22 0.24 41.97 +.32 54.88 -.32 8.34 +.18 0.06 57.58 +.06 22.22 +.21 28.22 +1.06 16.07 -.39 0.36 79.27 +.95 6.79 -.13 0.88 39.86 -.14 36.89 +.50 0.18 44.98 +.25 0.49 56.29 +.70 8.85 -.54 3.25 68.03 +.16 23.70 -.05 2.65 17.86 +.20 55.04 +.78 1.66 +.04 0.88 7.05 +.10 0.60 48.70 +.54 9.31 +.30 0.60 117.77 +.93 0.48 24.30 -.05 42.50 +.36 1.12 12.00 -.04 351.88 +5.38 0.28 16.39 -.10 10.21 +.01 4.06 +.09 0.62 23.40 -.01 6.72 +.33 .23 -.04 0.75 36.78 +.64 0.40 33.24 -.26 0.64 35.95 -.14 1.67 +.02 1.40 17.05 +.11 6.46 +.12 29.78 +.31 0.12 29.68 +.23 1.44 7.65 +.04 2.99 13.04 +.05 41.44 -.01 .90 +.01 24.49 +.22 19.26 -.06 29.75 +.27 10.42 +.10 0.60 58.80 -.23 20.81 +.04 0.60 30.74 +.37 14.47 -.02 0.04 14.48 +.23 0.64 39.66 +.20 0.18 14.99 +.11 0.52 14.82 +.04 2.41 48.00 +.44 46.13 +1.38 44.56 -.01 45.86 +.04 0.28 14.80 +.38 1.48 25.68 +.19 14.65 -.27 1.36 33.25 +.18 43.06 +2.26 7.87 +.36 8.13 +.43 4.58 -.01 6.97 +.02 31.67 +.83 43.52 -.17 1.60 75.92 +1.68

Nm AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvidTch AvisBudg Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B2B Inet BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BP Pru BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu BallCp BallardPw BallyTech BalticTr n BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BkAtl A h BankUtd n BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR BiPGrain BarcBk pr BiPNG Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob BarrickG Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBand h BBarrett Biocryst Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioLase BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo rs BioSante BioScrip BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkBldA n BlkCorpHY BlkDebtStr BlkEnDiv BlkGlbOp BlkrkHigh BlkIntlG&I BlkSenHgh Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BlueNile BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm Brandyw BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq BritATob Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm BroncoDrl Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfInfra BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CKX Inc CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNinsure CSX CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CACI CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaCvOp CalaStrTR Calix n CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdnP Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar Canon CapOne CaptlTr CapitlSrce CapFdF rs CapsteadM CpstnTrb h Cardero g CardnlHlth Cardiom g CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters CasellaW Caseys CatalystPh Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CelSci Celanese Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE

D 1.44 49.49 +.15 258.03 -.67 23.80 +.49 0.07 30.79 -.41 6.85 +.35 3.57 114.75 +.95 4.17 +.11 1.00 39.20 +.42 6.21 -.02 20.83 +1.75 14.95 +.37 36.63 -.29 0.92 29.35 +.10 2.75 -.03 0.92 36.56 +.36 1.15 +.01 0.60 28.72 +.28 1.97 36.90 -.03 38.24 +.82 0.48 8.22 +.07 1.74 95.15 +.87 1.74 81.93 +.66 48.89 +.63 48.82 +.17 0.07 46.54 +.51 8.80 105.59 -4.93 5.95 +.02 1.50 44.94 +.66 0.10 16.69 -.10 4.48 -.27 30.09 -.08 118.96 +1.28 0.60 68.47 +.66 0.56 73.47 -.25 2.13 +.09 39.25 +.20 0.32 8.83 -.08 1.34 56.36 -.65 0.55 12.23 +.10 0.82 17.91 -.11 0.78 12.16 +.07 0.45 11.28 +.11 0.44 16.13 +.38 0.04 14.67 +.38 8.09 +.17 2.94 +.12 2.16 26.53 +.07 1.80 46.86 +.21 1.04 2.44 +.14 2.80 60.06 +.41 0.36 31.84 +.84 1.96 58.88 -.12 1.17 +.04 29.07 +.71 0.04 2.43 +.04 49.20 -.44 24.10 -.45 65.47 +.46 55.87 -.33 1.66 23.61 +.03 7.46 -.39 0.28 20.14 +.25 28.77 -.44 54.03 -.91 0.72 94.34 +1.02 1.00 16.32 -.14 0.48 47.83 -.28 1.24 48.85 +.33 .30 +.00 19.63 +.50 5.45 +.09 0.10 5.85 +.16 0.76 82.65 +7.48 1.64 85.64 +1.14 48.32 -.02 0.20 39.32 +.36 7.44 +.11 0.96 32.70 +.02 19.93 +.11 0.28 29.00 +.02 84.10 +.93 0.30 45.24 -.19 0.60 34.99 -.25 39.20 +5.25 2.70 +.07 38.97 -.17 4.22 +.14 2.09 -.11 .82 -.12 65.25 -.68 3.60 +.08 25.95 -.02 0.68 18.20 +.10 .84 -.02 2.14 +.08 4.65 +.02 1.28 11.90 +.10 40.66 +.74 4.00 196.00 +1.65 1.42 17.26 -.34 0.61 7.13 -.02 0.32 4.08 +.09 0.98 8.56 +.06 2.28 19.16 +.05 0.17 2.13 +.01 1.36 10.40 +.03 0.30 4.19 +.21 0.40 17.17 -.03 0.60 12.80 -.02 30.26 +.32 62.87 +1.81 2.06 32.72 +.46 1.68 71.93 +.55 0.40 9.05 +.04 .37 -.02 70.47 +3.44 0.04 7.16 +.26 2.00 94.69 +1.35 6.95 -.04 11.01 +.29 0.60 12.00 +.23 0.44 20.89 +.38 29.35 +.06 12.61 +.42 1.66 -.05 0.56 23.42 -.32 0.40 30.60 +.35 1.32 25.83 +.13 3.24 78.77 +1.59 0.36 45.41 -.41 0.60 23.25 +.35 37.41 +1.72 1.89 -.02 6.03 -.06 7.73 +.14 23.03 +.51 0.52 33.00 -.12 1.10 22.79 +.29 0.56 17.52 +.06 0.34 10.94 -.28 12.13 -.64 0.32 24.67 +.01 0.28 13.88 +.14 1.28 67.08 -.10 18.01 +.24 0.05 21.26 +.42 0.20 25.99 +1.01 0.80 36.71 +.08 0.10 90.89 +.01 0.46 45.05 +1.14 47.39 +.16 0.92 69.70 -.21 0.16 24.91 +.38 23.74 -.21 0.80 17.74 +.66 0.40 24.30 +.32 0.20 20.83 +.61 0.40 146.23 +3.57 1.16 74.11 +.05 0.04 42.31 -.52 48.22 +.49 3.73 +.17 1.00 31.46 +.28 4.60 303.68 -.50 0.84 19.49 +.14 0.40 30.19 +2.45 49.45 +.62 6.46 +.15 0.26 17.29 -.11 1.04 70.70 +1.00 0.34 8.59 +.07 18.42 +.78 0.50 32.93 +.26 26.74 +.18 0.50 36.07 +.04 0.72 44.17 +.29 0.12 41.07 -.31 56.86 -.22 7.29 -.04 9.64 +.15 6.30 +.09 1.14 13.46 +.17 0.63 9.59 +.13 17.99 +.61 0.04 7.74 +.13 8.10 -1.09 14.64 +.06 1.86 +.01 1.80 55.93 +.31 0.40 41.39 -.49 23.20 +1.07 56.96 -.05 1.16 34.23 -.19 1.30 68.76 +.38 0.30 44.50 -.14 1.08 67.32 +.40 14.36 +.28 48.07 -.46 0.20 49.53 +.77 2.09 +.22 0.04 8.05 +.01 0.30 12.22 +.09 1.51 13.22 +.12 1.38 +.07 2.06 +.05 0.78 41.74 -.12 6.14 -.69 28.00 +.57 22.90 +.29 0.68 42.47 +3.62 34.23 +.21 1.00 46.41 +.62 0.72 41.95 +.37 32.52 -.04 29.70 +.37 7.67 -.18 0.54 42.77 -.33 1.16 +.04 1.76 100.47 +.88 0.04 18.56 +.49 42.76 -.28 .72 +.00 0.20 43.25 +.32 11.19 +.09 50.95 -.34 .36 +.01 3.59 31.10 +.51 3.63 +.05 0.43 9.76 +.25 1.19 16.25 +.13 0.80 34.29 +.02

Nm Centene CenterPnt CntrStBks CnElBras pf CnElBras lf CentEuro CFCda g CenGrdA lf CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid CeragonN Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaCEd ChinaDir ChiGengM ChinGerui ChGerui wt ChinaGreen ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChinaLdg n ChiMarFd ChinaMda ChinaMed ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChinNEPet ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaRE ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaUni ChiValve ChXDPlas ChiXFash n ChinaYuch Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel n ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigrp Citigp wtA Citigp wtB CitiTdecs CitzRepB h CitrixSys ClaudeR g CleanEngy ClearChOut ClearEFd n Clearfield Clearwire CliffsNRs ClinicData Clorox CloudPeak Coach CocaCE CocaCl Codexis n Coeur Cognex CognizTech Cogo Grp CohStQIR Coherent Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColBnkg ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant Conmed ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold Copart Copel Corcept CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp Crane Credicp CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs Crossh g rs CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurrCda CurJpn Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp Cytec Cytori DCP Mid DCT Indl DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DTE DanaHldg Danaher s DaqoNEn n Darden Darling Datalink DaVita DeVry DeanFds DearbrnBc DeckOut s Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemMda n DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DermaSci n DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One DexCom Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver

D 27.75 -.19 0.79 16.34 +.20 0.04 7.56 -.39 0.03 16.45 +.10 1.56 13.67 +.04 22.60 -.44 0.01 19.43 +.05 9.66 +.07 15.26 +.33 2.90 44.17 +.53 5.44 -.08 60.41 +.45 24.70 +.65 12.62 +.09 99.73 +.85 3.36 +.01 36.69 -.30 3.20 +.13 41.21 +3.15 46.99 +1.52 29.96 -.41 4.96 +.07 17.55 +.29 8.00 -.01 0.30 31.27 +1.21 2.88 97.66 +.55 34.52 +.44 0.16 11.47 +.09 43.34 -.80 0.69 4.28 +.02 9.81 -.18 12.71 -.20 1.90 -.04 7.14 +.09 1.46 -.02 3.23 +.06 5.82 +.02 .80 -.02 8.26 -.03 6.09 -.05 1.54 58.27 -.20 19.03 +.03 3.70 +.20 13.14 -.75 13.15 +.12 9.62 +.22 1.85 49.22 -.29 4.99 -.26 2.79 108.74 -2.22 1.85 +.06 7.31 +.01 4.70 -.11 6.36 -.06 0.23 16.37 -.13 7.22 +.03 6.81 +.07 5.61 -.42 0.25 30.36 +.17 247.55 +1.24 16.46 +.12 1.48 58.86 +.16 30.19 -.11 0.68 69.84 +1.09 4.59 +.03 26.72 -.18 0.32 102.97 -.48 3.10 +.08 1.60 33.14 -.01 0.84 17.50 +.02 0.49 29.37 +.47 24.09 -.72 22.03 -.02 4.90 +.08 .99 .25 +.01 7.50 138.80 +1.75 .72 +.01 66.33 -.07 2.58 +.04 12.62 +.54 14.82 +.53 1.40 22.51 +.11 5.50 +.69 5.65 -.19 0.56 90.78 +.51 29.65 -.93 2.20 65.71 +.05 23.83 +.17 0.60 55.89 +1.30 0.48 25.90 +.09 1.76 62.52 -.04 10.58 -.12 24.73 +.11 0.32 34.83 +1.88 74.72 -.70 9.40 +.24 0.72 9.57 +.11 55.45 +1.14 40.44 +1.48 3.00 +.04 2.12 76.28 +.04 21.90 +.26 0.60 19.15 +.28 0.12 20.32 +.41 2.59 -.01 0.38 23.54 +.27 0.38 22.19 +.24 0.40 39.15 +.55 0.92 41.32 +.35 0.48 16.96 +.13 36.63 -.24 34.17 +.44 0.36 36.17 -.40 26.00 +1.24 0.80 56.21 +.45 10.96 +.04 27.10 +.48 0.40 31.89 -1.30 0.92 22.71 -.07 96.02 +.40 50.93 -.42 2.10 +.01 27.47 +1.03 2.20 72.29 +.62 0.40 48.27 -1.06 2.40 49.89 +.30 29.14 +.59 19.97 +.21 0.96 32.70 +.03 62.54 -.43 13.85 +.05 .39 0.06 59.35 +.70 1.08 62.82 -.15 0.42 22.05 +.01 1.09 57.25 +.28 40.36 +.20 0.72 25.08 -.05 4.07 -.10 1.00 91.29 +.20 20.50 +.39 4.97 +.15 0.56 48.22 0.20 22.69 -.68 1.65 35.89 +.12 25.42 +.42 13.33 -.10 0.82 74.25 +.12 8.27 +.03 0.18 8.67 +.06 53.44 +.51 1.50 17.54 +.21 31.34 +.02 0.80 49.24 +.37 4.16 -.10 0.92 46.70 +1.19 1.70 101.72 -2.12 1.85 46.12 -.03 0.32 3.11 +.02 52.06 -.59 18.00 +.35 2.48 +.26 44.40 -.50 36.52 +.20 .14 -.10 42.11 +.65 22.39 +.36 1.80 59.05 +.50 1.05 111.81 +2.12 2.99 +.07 0.01 135.34 -.02 0.03 100.44 -.17 120.05 -.16 1.47 -.01 48.83 -.84 23.21 -.12 2.40 12.76 +.02 0.50 54.96 +.11 5.55 +.16 2.47 41.65 +.09 0.28 5.52 +.06 28.21 +1.04 0.40 4.73 +.07 0.78 9.63 +.10 1.33 26.53 +.29 0.15 12.12 +.39 2.24 46.33 +.03 17.36 +.31 0.08 49.03 +1.05 13.74 +.56 1.28 48.23 -.76 14.26 +.28 8.34 -.03 75.96 -.60 0.24 53.49 +.50 10.36 1.61 -.12 82.84 +1.90 1.40 94.14 +.93 .32 -.01 0.36 18.98 +.03 10.52 -.23 13.99 +.10 11.55 +.15 .74 -.01 1.00 25.66 +.14 19.12 -.51 21.57 +.68 35.82 +.31 4.13 +.16 4.10 +.07 0.20 36.65 +.25 9.89 +.02 10.90 +.16 0.93 63.51 +.67 16.18 +.07 38.30 -.01 8.78 -.01 0.16 14.34 +.29 0.64 86.98 -1.71 5.59 +.04 14.57 +.25 2.38 80.13 +.75 0.50 72.12 +.45 12.43 +.25 12.17 +.04 16.00 -.13 38.16 -.06 1.08 31.96 +.43 2.12 54.96 +.53 33.71 +.05

Nm

D

DigitalGlb Dillards DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBr DrxSOXBll DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscLab rs DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHill h DblEgl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DuoyGWat Dynavax Dynegy rs

0.16 0.51 0.19

0.71 0.01

0.39 0.11 1.55 0.41 0.08

0.40 0.24

1.97 1.00 1.04

0.40 1.10 0.60 1.00

0.52

1.64 0.48 0.98 0.68

Nm 29.86 -.07 40.45 +.35 42.64 -.17 56.05 +.80 37.83 +.01 18.96 -.32 13.90 -.44 15.73 -.56 16.91 -.36 10.70 +.11 69.09 -.72 21.30 -.08 7.89 -.33 32.36 +1.24 49.44 -.72 63.40 +1.94 78.54 +2.35 7.53 -.14 82.17 +1.64 75.90 +1.53 21.13 +.52 42.27 +.58 37.31 +.65 3.04 +.20 22.11 +.27 40.94 +.23 34.21 -.53 55.12 -1.44 14.39 -.41 27.90 +.43 50.70 +.47 49.74 +.03 43.42 -.19 16.39 -.13 90.45 +2.60 18.69 +.26 1.33 +.03 3.64 +.62 9.80 -.74 18.35 +.27 65.85 +.56 37.62 +.61 35.71 +.07 8.26 +.14 28.56 +.17 46.50 +2.21 4.59 +.02 80.19 +2.84 1.92 +.04 5.05 +.04 53.33 +.80 22.90 +.24 18.15 +.14 13.52 +.28 9.66 -.36 3.06 +.04 6.07 -.03

E-F-G-H ECDang n 27.60 +.34 E-House 0.25 14.67 -.22 ETrade rs 17.55 +.38 eBay 32.24 +.03 EMC Cp 26.00 +.31 EMCOR 31.98 +.19 ENGlobal 5.45 +.45 ENI 2.51 49.23 -.16 EOG Res 0.62 105.59 -1.19 EQT Corp 0.88 48.39 +.01 EXFO g 11.39 -.05 EagleBulk 4.11 -.18 EaglRkEn 0.60 9.20 +.10 ErthLink 0.20 8.40 -.04 EstWstBcp 0.04 22.69 +.57 EastChm 1.88 92.29 +.58 EKodak 3.67 +.03 Eaton 2.72 109.23 -.33 EatnVan 0.72 32.49 +.91 EV EEq2 1.11 12.37 +.15 EVRiskMgd 1.28 13.07 -.03 EV TxDiver 1.16 11.48 +.01 EVTxMGlo 1.14 10.84 +.01 EVTxGBW 1.56 12.50 Ebix Inc 24.58 +.62 EchoGLog 12.54 +.40 Ecolab 0.70 50.46 +.18 Ecopetrol 0.97 41.72 +.33 EdisonInt 1.28 36.80 +.05 EducRlty 0.20 7.68 +.02 EdwLfSci s 86.67 +.73 8x8 Inc 2.73 -.01 ElPasoCp 0.04 16.86 -.06 ElPasoPpl 1.76 35.37 +.15 Elan 6.83 +.20 EldorGld g 0.10 16.46 -.23 ElectSci 16.62 +.40 ElectArts 18.28 +.05 ElizArden 28.07 +.80 eMagin 8.50 +.29 Embraer 0.64 34.46 +1.18 Emcore lf 1.86 +.08 EMS 70.38 +1.19 Emergent 0.40 8.37 +2.31 EmersonEl 1.38 60.85 +.26 Emulex 11.97 +.23 EnCana g 0.80 31.97 -.10 EndvSilv g 6.82 +.06 EndoPhrm 34.97 -.02 Endocyte n 7.49 -.24 Ener1 3.78 -.02 EnerNOC 23.99 -.17 Energen 0.54 58.27 +.67 Energizer 67.59 +.21 EngyConv 4.42 +.06 EnrgyRec 3.66 EngyTEq 2.16 38.75 -.05 EngyTsfr 3.58 53.07 -.23 EngyXXI 31.96 +.38 EnergySol 6.29 +.15 Enerpls g 2.16 32.12 -.12 Enersis 0.61 20.69 +.18 ENSCO 1.40 52.13 -2.28 Entegris 8.67 +.21 Entergy 3.32 73.91 +.66 EntPrPt 2.36 43.80 +.21 EntGaming .39 +.01 EntropCom 10.72 +.01 EnzonPhar 11.32 -.09 EpiCpt rsh .85 +.10 EpicorSft 11.31 +.09 Epocrates n 25.48 -1.03 Equifax 0.64 36.77 +.56 Equinix 92.43 +.90 EqtyOne 0.88 18.48 +.04 EqtyRsd 1.47 53.71 +.63 EricsnTel 0.28 12.81 +.05 EssexPT 4.13 113.87 +1.35 EsteeLdr 0.75 91.35 -1.65 EvergE rs 4.54 +.09 EvrgrSlr rs 2.34 +.02 ExactSci h 5.87 +.21 ExcelM 4.93 -.10 ExcoRes 0.16 20.03 +.07 Exelixis 9.92 +.16 Exelon 2.10 43.24 +.49 ExeterR gs 5.43 +.07 ExideTc 10.45 +.49 Expedia 0.28 25.30 +.05 ExpdIntl 0.40 51.32 +.15 Express n 18.76 +.01 ExpScrip s 57.12 -.01 Express-1 2.94 +.01 ExterranH 24.78 -.02 ExtraSpce 0.40 19.75 +.23 ExtrmNet 3.95 +.10 ExxonMbl 1.76 83.93 +.65 EZchip 32.40 +1.52 F5 Netwks 124.23 +.59 FEI Co 32.12 -.11 FLIR Sys 31.98 -.15 FMC Corp 0.50 81.08 +.87 FMC Tech 95.00 -.06 FNBCp PA 0.48 10.45 +.14 FSI Intl 4.08 -.07 FTI Cnslt 36.94 +.32 FX Ener 9.85 +.11 Fabrinet n 27.38 -1.06 FairchldS 18.91 +.26 FalconStor 3.75 +.07 FamilyDlr 0.72 41.84 +.33 Fastenal 1.00 61.98 +.40 FedExCp 0.48 91.46 -.28 FedRlty 2.68 80.33 +1.06 FedInvst 0.96 26.68 -.03 FelCor 7.85 +.13 Ferro 15.64 +.28 FibriaCelu 15.07 +.05 FidlNFin 0.48 13.98 -.02 FidNatInfo 0.20 30.96 FifthStFin 1.28 13.21 -.01 FifthThird 0.04 15.36 -.03 Finisar 38.93 -.04 FinLine 0.20 16.52 +.17 FstAFin n 0.24 15.66 -.06 FstBcPR rs 5.49 +.22 FstCwlth 0.12 6.54 -.01 FstHorizon 0.04 11.80 +.03 FstInRT 10.63 +.24 FMajSilv g 13.52 +.07 FMidBc 0.04 12.06 +.22 FstNiagara 0.64 14.52 -.01 FstSolar 159.30 +1.36 FTDJInet 0.04 35.93 +.20 FT ConDis 0.09 20.35 +.17 FT Fincl 0.19 15.31 +.14 FT Matls 0.38 25.04 +.20 FT Tech 0.01 25.11 +.04 FT RNG 0.05 21.08 +.16 FirstEngy 2.20 39.92 +.29 FstMerit 0.64 16.93 -.12 Fiserv 60.47 +.20 FlagstB rs 1.67 +.02 Flextrn 7.94 -.03 Flotek h 7.04 +.09 FlowrsFds 0.80 25.58 -.07 Flowserve 1.16 132.13 +1.65 Fluor 0.50 70.59 +1.90 FocusMda 26.56 +.11 FEMSA 0.64 54.79 +1.09 FootLockr 0.60 18.43 +.09 ForcePro 5.53 +.06 FordM 16.11 +.39 FordM wt 7.49 +.33 FordC pfS 3.25 52.95 +.50 ForestCA 17.66 +.36 ForestLab 33.50 +.25 ForestOil 38.98 -.08 FormFac 9.30 -.11 Fortinet 39.76 -1.11 Fortress 6.74 +.18 FortuneBr 0.76 61.44 -.46 Fossil Inc 76.56 FosterWhl 37.65 +.32 FranceTel 1.77 22.41 -.01 FrankRes 1.00 124.67 +2.23 FMCG s 1.00 55.62 -1.14 FresKabi rt .05 +.00 Fronteer g 14.58 +.12 FrontierCm 0.75 9.40 +.01 FrontierOil 22.58 +.16 Frontline 2.00 26.15 -.01

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FuelSysSol FuelCell FullHseR FullerHB FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds GATX GFI Grp GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GSI Tech GT Solar GabDvInc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s GainCap n Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap Garmin Gartner GascoEngy GaylrdEnt GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenMot n GM cvpfB GenOn En Genpact Gentex GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme Geores GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln GlimchRt GlobalCash GloblInd GlobPay GblX Uran GlbXLith n GlbXSilvM GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech GrahamP n Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrayTelev GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GreenMtC s GreenPlns GreenbCos Greenhill Group1 GrubbEllis GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugSolar GulfMrkA GulfportE HCC Ins HCP Inc HSBC CTI HSBC HSBC Cap2 HSBUS pfH HSN Inc Haemon HainCel Hallibrtn HancHld Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HansenMed HansenNat HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HarteHnk HartfdFn HartFn pfA HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCSvc s HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HghldsCrdt HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HimaxTch HiSoft n HollyCp Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HubGroup HubbelB HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn Hyatt Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 28.00 +1.00 1.94 +.10 4.85 -.07 0.28 22.87 +.14 0.12 10.66 +.04 5.15 +.05 3.82 1.16 34.31 +.47 0.20 5.59 +.22 4.76 +.01 22.50 +.10 9.42 +.15 10.72 -.38 0.84 15.93 +.04 0.68 6.22 +.04 1.68 18.95 +.13 0.14 12.06 +.02 8.68 -.31 1.32 30.19 +.14 20.14 +.09 8.18 +.01 0.16 17.12 +.46 0.40 20.34 +.24 1.50 31.99 +.05 36.59 +.32 .48 -.02 36.06 +1.21 11.89 -.24 5.22 +.06 40.41 -.23 1.68 76.44 +.82 0.56 20.87 +.31 15.20 +.24 0.04 3.08 -.03 1.12 35.37 -.18 5.52 +.04 36.70 +.11 2.38 54.60 +.16 4.19 +.11 0.18 15.49 +.20 0.44 31.14 -.03 1.64 53.11 +.54 .55 +.00 13.00 +.09 74.02 +.62 28.26 -.38 28.40 +.35 0.32 13.54 -.15 4.95 +.04 1.26 +.02 0.30 31.32 +.29 38.38 -.41 0.52 14.13 +.02 2.04 39.13 +1.12 0.40 9.06 +.26 3.70 +.02 8.07 +.06 0.08 48.67 +.03 0.40 21.76 -.20 0.28 22.58 +.30 0.25 23.88 +.07 0.15 19.49 +.17 3.47 +.12 0.40 13.81 -.19 0.68 18.39 +.52 0.16 16.21 +.06 0.36 41.24 -.40 3.94 +.06 1.40 167.13 +2.30 1.16 93.06 -.03 21.15 -.20 12.95 +.19 614.29 +3.32 36.12 +.02 0.84 41.38 +.83 22.70 +.44 16.72 -.51 2.16 134.66 +1.21 4.60 +.47 9.30 +.30 18.27 -.13 0.52 25.96 +.48 4.97 +.04 1.90 -.04 2.79 0.07 8.73 +.20 0.83 19.79 +.10 39.63 +.02 11.63 24.86 +.95 1.80 75.52 +.88 0.40 40.90 +.16 1.27 +.08 15.76 -.24 24.68 +.17 0.80 45.80 +.60 0.03 8.44 +.14 39.82 +.73 25.47 +.32 0.58 31.16 +.18 1.92 37.01 +.24 8.67 -.07 1.70 56.84 +.09 2.00 27.59 +.04 1.63 24.32 +.07 28.51 +.25 60.53 -.61 28.62 +.83 0.36 46.18 +.26 0.96 32.60 +.06 26.04 +.39 1.27 +.02 2.05 -.14 55.76 -1.15 0.40 41.27 +.16 49.12 -.14 9.56 -.28 0.07 11.06 +.18 1.00 48.29 +.93 0.82 34.69 +.63 0.32 12.71 +.40 0.40 29.76 +.53 1.81 27.57 +.34 11.72 +.01 1.20 45.63 +.81 4.40 28.80 +.10 1.24 25.16 +.21 6.84 +.06 5.40 +.02 2.76 48.72 +.41 0.62 17.16 +.63 9.46 +.08 1.20 21.57 +.40 29.29 -.58 22.54 +.19 31.30 -.61 0.08 15.91 -.06 5.16 +.04 9.65 -.02 1.80 48.06 -.13 12.65 +.04 0.24 59.60 +.50 66.57 +.27 1.00 67.26 +.27 3.59 +.10 0.20 6.77 +.12 1.38 49.80 -.69 15.32 +.39 0.40 83.15 +.81 0.32 48.14 +.71 20.66 +.39 18.67 -.03 32.39 +.42 0.63 7.58 -.20 1.70 32.76 +.09 0.41 40.02 -.17 0.76 21.80 +.16 0.25 2.62 +.07 33.12 +1.26 0.60 54.40 +1.75 19.61 +.11 0.95 36.60 -.20 34.30 +.30 2.32 54.24 +.09 42.98 -.23 1.33 57.13 +.01 1.02 50.51 -.09 23.42 -.11 13.86 +.45 52.64 +.29 1.80 25.62 +.76 0.04 19.44 +.39 0.28 5.39 -.01 4.32 +.06 34.02 -.10 1.44 63.43 +.05 0.60 11.18 +.04 25.34 +.01 58.74 -1.80 0.52 41.13 +.07 0.04 7.56 +.10 0.40 17.72 +.25 48.85 -.15 9.83 +.28 4.99 -.26

I-J-K-L

Nm IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk IDT Corp iGateCorp IHS Inc ING GRE ING GlbDv ING INGPrRTr ION Geoph iPass iShGold s iShGSCI iSAstla iShBelg iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShItaly iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShNeth iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSSpain iSSwedn iSTaiwn iSh UK iShBRIC iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShBarAgcy iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSEafeSC iShEMBd iSSPGth iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShNMuBd iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iShBFxBd iSR1KV iSMCGth iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarIntC iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShB10-20 iShR2K iShUSPfd iShDJTel iShREst iShDJHm iShHltcr iShFnSc iShDJBkr iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShBasM iShPeru iShDJOE iShEur350 iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed iBio Icagen rs Icon PLC IconixBr IDEX iGo Inc Ikanos ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs ImpOil gs ImperlSgr inContact Incyte IndBkMI rs IndiaFd IndiaGC wt Inergy Infinera InfoSpace Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE InovioPhm InsitTc Insmed h InspPhar IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel InterXion n InteractBrk IntcntlEx InterDig Intrface InterMune InterNAP IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntTower g InterOil g Interpublic Intersil inTestCp IntraLks n IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech IridiumCm IronMtn Isis ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia JCrew JA Solar JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHw h JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap JpnSmCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoesJeans

D 30.78 +.36 20.40 -.36 43.73 +.64 25.01 +1.25 17.56 +.43 82.89 +1.68 0.54 8.36 +.21 1.20 10.94 +.01 12.16 +.15 0.30 6.01 +.07 9.52 +.21 0.07 1.66 +.05 13.20 +.01 34.54 -.28 0.82 25.95 +.09 0.24 13.66 +.09 2.53 71.32 -.73 0.50 32.19 -.02 0.95 38.10 +.19 0.66 26.25 +.12 0.29 25.59 +.20 0.45 19.47 -.13 0.33 18.45 -.00 0.14 11.34 -.01 0.39 62.95 -.19 0.34 14.58 +.04 0.54 62.31 +.27 0.33 22.20 +.14 0.43 13.87 -.01 1.56 47.81 -.04 1.82 66.52 -.55 2.15 41.91 +.12 0.55 31.92 0.29 16.06 +.04 0.43 18.23 +.14 0.86 47.29 -.21 1.28 62.36 +.10 28.66 +.26 1.08 59.49 +.40 1.91 108.78 -.29 1.70 50.72 +.17 2.51 105.81 -.02 0.97 62.64 -.02 0.63 42.47 -.40 1.06 91.60 +.28 2.36 132.46 +.83 3.93 104.30 +.04 0.64 46.56 +.06 5.23 107.23 +.12 1.35 43.77 +.34 5.68 104.86 -.37 1.16 68.23 +.33 0.58 44.00 +.17 1.18 51.28 -.15 1.24 63.15 +.46 3.74 98.56 +.06 3.85 89.27 +.46 3.29 91.77 -.04 0.84 83.69 -.04 1.42 60.98 +.19 0.86 47.14 +.35 0.57 59.63 +.34 1.48 106.74 +.76 0.97 95.13 +.75 7.77 92.04 +.17 0.51 94.05 -.10 1.90 68.84 +.74 6.27 104.08 -.21 1.29 67.91 +.46 0.57 105.40 +.85 0.73 60.33 +.36 1.13 73.36 +.48 1.16 73.01 +.72 4.47 104.68 -.05 2.96 104.31 +.08 0.58 90.47 +.89 4.10 109.21 0.89 80.66 +.79 2.89 39.10 -.01 0.70 23.50 +.06 1.97 58.51 +.65 0.07 13.56 +.23 1.05 66.99 -.04 0.59 60.39 +.85 0.47 30.41 +.46 0.49 42.82 +.31 0.74 70.62 +.69 0.87 79.35 +.25 0.89 50.00 +.12 0.27 62.16 +1.00 0.98 41.80 +.25 8.88 +.26 1.00 60.47 +.08 66.24 +1.70 5.50 3.81 +.09 21.86 +.05 20.13 +.56 0.60 41.25 +.53 4.18 +.56 1.21 -.06 1.36 55.23 +.98 71.23 +.11 27.04 -.17 20.31 +.26 8.54 +.06 3.28 +.02 24.00 +.14 0.44 45.27 -.66 0.08 11.35 -.65 3.42 +.25 14.74 -.22 4.05 +.25 3.87 30.05 +.24 .02 -.01 2.82 41.31 -.21 8.57 +.12 8.80 -.09 48.83 +.56 0.90 68.74 +1.06 0.28 48.58 +.68 20.67 +.19 0.57 9.36 +.22 1.30 +.02 29.58 +1.04 .59 +.00 3.91 +.05 7.63 -.04 11.17 +.53 2.72 48.48 +.26 0.72 21.69 +.01 15.08 +.28 1.79 16.07 -.01 120.32 -.06 0.40 53.51 +2.70 0.08 17.61 +.03 36.60 -.31 7.68 -.02 2.60 164.82 +.82 9.04 +.66 1.08 59.36 +.45 0.24 17.59 +.08 0.75 29.34 +.12 32.71 +.25 10.13 +.06 73.82 -.04 11.72 -.03 0.48 12.99 -.24 4.24 +.39 22.60 +1.01 37.20 +.21 48.79 +.39 333.42 +2.16 0.44 25.60 +.20 3.49 22.72 +.06 0.29 5.02 +.01 18.05 +.45 7.93 -.04 0.75 26.29 +.63 8.80 -.04 0.65 20.98 +.17 62.12 -2.02 3.34 -.10 1.48 28.91 +.48 18.10 -.40 43.46 -.03 7.32 +.07 22.64 -.12 0.20 45.50 +.91 1.81 37.66 -.02 0.28 21.55 +.33 0.42 31.12 +.38 22.67 -.03 1.61 +.05 52.94 +.84 5.49 -.09 2.36 +.05 21.59 -.18 0.04 13.10 +.18 0.08 9.67 +.21 0.33 34.77 +.30 22.15 +.27 0.30 25.89 +.80 5.80 -.01 28.79 +1.64 1.52 -.01

0.08 0.53 0.88 0.26

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D 2.16 0.64 0.20 0.20

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M-N-O-P M&T Bk MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MSG n MagelMPtr MagelPt MagicSft Magma MagnaI gs Magnetek h MagHRes Majesco MAKO Srg ManTech Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinaB rs MktVGold MkVStrMet MktVRus MktVEgypt MktVJrGld MktV Agri MktVIndo s MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd MatrixSv Mattel Mattson

2.80 87.99 +.50 11.05 +.28 0.37 7.20 +.05 1.00 30.63 +.94 0.65 20.73 -.11 2.90 +.10 13.45 +.14 8.13 -.19 0.94 8.31 +.10 0.56 6.23 +.01 8.74 +.38 14.94 +.13 13.52 +.05 30.03 -1.16 4.05 -.09 36.09 +1.29 2.00 48.79 +.40 1.80 34.45 +.25 0.20 23.51 +.69 1.12 +.02 26.95 +.96 3.03 56.76 -.24 2.37 -.16 0.50 9.19 +.08 6.03 +.18 0.72 57.10 +.44 2.34 -.09 7.00 +.20 1.32 -.02 16.06 +.29 41.79 +1.29 0.08 18.94 +.28 5.34 +.19 0.74 68.00 -.67 0.52 19.34 +.26 1.00 46.40 +.54 1.09 -.01 0.40 56.12 +.01 25.06 +.44 0.18 40.18 +.06 0.16 18.15 +.30 2.93 37.53 +.01 0.33 57.06 +.53 0.27 27.25 +.09 0.19 46.98 -.02 2.60 42.55 -.10 0.35 39.96 -.04 0.84 28.43 +.04 0.04 7.29 +.04 31.47 +.01 1.60 88.62 +2.62 20.08 +.34 0.30 14.37 +.35 2.75 28.86 +.01 0.24 63.04 +.64 15.82 +.60 0.60 249.98 +2.74 11.63 +.51 0.92 25.38 +.13 2.40 +.03

Nm MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MecoxL n MedcoHlth MediaGen Mediacom MedProp Medicis Medidata Medifast Medivation Mednax MedQuist n Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck MercGn Meredith MergeHlth Mesab Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetLfe pfB MetroPCS Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MidAApt MdwGold g MillerHer Millicom MincoG g Mind CTI MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolexA MolinaH MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MorgSt pfA Mosaic MotorcarP MotrlaSol n MotrlaMo n Motricity n Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NIC Inc NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NXP Sem n NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFuGas NatGrid NatInstru NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NavigCons Navios NaviosMar NaviSite Navistar NektarTh NeoPhoto n Net1UEPS NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netflix Netlist NtScout NetSolTch NetSuite NetwkEng NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NJ Rscs NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource NielsenH n NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordion g Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaMeas NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NovoNord NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NvIMO

D 0.84 26.15 +.01 4.99 -.01 1.12 44.78 -.17 22.42 +.29 2.44 73.45 -.60 1.00 36.82 +.24 0.72 77.18 -.56 17.25 +.34 47.90 -.05 0.90 59.20 +.46 1.00 29.03 +.18 33.17 -.32 10.40 +.21 6.02 +.23 62.56 -.11 6.01 +.58 8.81 -.02 0.80 11.01 +.06 0.24 27.64 -.36 26.00 +1.55 24.73 +.42 14.75 -.56 61.72 +.49 9.05 0.90 39.54 +.30 7.37 +.01 0.48 27.80 +.03 13.76 +.27 69.96 +.44 9.79 +1.37 1.52 33.00 +.11 2.40 39.50 -3.44 1.02 33.82 +.13 5.07 +.13 2.49 34.06 -.86 5.71 +.06 1.12 0.62 28.51 +.13 0.74 48.63 +1.29 1.63 25.17 +.06 12.85 -.10 0.14 13.18 -.03 1.38 37.48 -.13 6.22 -.05 11.29 +.24 47.16 +.62 23.14 +.01 0.64 28.20 +.43 1.95 +.03 2.51 62.22 +.68 1.27 +.07 0.09 24.66 +.51 7.24 94.74 +1.13 2.47 +.01 0.20 2.82 +.08 0.20 28.59 +.06 7.29 -.01 10.57 +.09 5.45 +.08 4.07 +.05 19.66 +.15 16.02 -.09 58.25 +1.98 0.70 27.48 +.33 0.70 22.89 +.40 32.05 +1.30 1.12 48.15 +.68 51.31 +.01 12.98 +.12 2.85 +.10 15.77 +.13 1.12 75.55 +.89 16.05 +.19 0.40 20.38 +.22 0.46 30.03 +.18 0.20 30.42 +.57 1.01 19.59 +.06 0.20 83.75 +1.22 14.80 +.27 40.41 +1.10 29.98 -1.36 22.12 +2.15 2.26 +.08 0.07 3.86 1.10 67.60 +.20 23.32 +.17 19.48 -.22 18.87 +.58 37.24 +.91 1.80 17.88 -.01 .57 +.01 0.55 10.25 -.01 42.15 -.24 2.14 +.11 8.57 +.11 21.17 +.44 0.48 14.54 +.07 26.31 -1.04 1.20 33.76 +1.11 25.84 +.14 0.14 27.50 -.24 18.81 +.17 26.78 +.22 0.29 2.05 +.01 1.38 71.32 +1.77 7.04 45.11 +.31 0.60 47.06 +.95 0.44 77.71 +1.26 0.04 8.34 +.19 1.52 24.60 +.19 0.40 15.27 -.29 1.88 36.99 +.36 9.80 +.26 0.24 4.99 -.20 1.72 19.24 -.10 5.50 +.01 64.75 +.87 10.80 -.30 17.20 -.11 11.13 -.29 39.61 -1.28 58.64 +.71 41.46 -.01 218.02 -2.05 2.57 +.12 24.97 +.08 2.29 +.13 28.84 +.47 2.02 +.05 26.82 +.26 15.82 +.42 6.35 -.03 .06 +.00 9.27 +.15 1.44 41.56 +.17 6.03 +.12 1.00 18.66 +.27 10.90 +.29 0.28 15.55 -.02 7.18 +.14 0.20 19.68 +.07 73.04 -1.66 0.60 57.15 +.18 6.00 -.04 17.46 +.36 0.15 16.59 -.29 0.15 18.08 -.29 0.20 24.36 +.13 2.00 55.19 +.45 0.92 18.66 +.26 25.79 -.29 1.24 86.50 +.76 15.82 +.06 23.64 -.05 0.90 37.87 +.27 0.72 88.71 -.64 0.55 11.29 +.23 6.41 +.05 1.70 24.55 +.04 11.38 -.06 0.80 44.59 +.88 1.60 61.50 +.43 7.25 +.09 1.03 33.81 +.07 21.08 +.06 26.90 +.14 1.12 52.12 +.28 2.74 +.05 1.88 70.35 +.78 0.40 4.96 +.12 0.40 12.07 +.07 9.87 +.11 14.61 -.12 2.53 56.61 +.19 7.29 +.13 2.17 +.02 5.94 -.02 38.64 -.17 1.41 111.72 +.13 1.70 44.34 -.15 0.54 31.09 -.05 29.15 -.25 20.55 +.22 1.45 47.99 +.02 0.70 19.01 0.86 13.26 -.04

D

NuvMuVal 0.47 8.98 +.02 Nvidia 24.60 -1.07 NxStageMd 22.35 +.34 O2Micro 7.44 +.07 OCZ Tech 7.94 -.16 OCharleys 6.27 -.22 OReillyAu 57.74 +.16 OasisPet n 31.96 +.97 OcciPet 1.52 97.54 +.03 Oceaneer 78.53 +.34 Och-Ziff 0.88 16.75 +.15 Oclaro rs 15.60 -.28 OcwenFn 10.58 +.20 OdysMar 3.48 -.13 OfficeDpt 5.69 +.06 OfficeMax 16.77 +.20 OilSvHT 2.40 156.18 +.69 OilStates 68.23 +1.67 Oilsands g .54 -.01 OldDomF s 30.19 -.30 OldNBcp 0.28 11.25 +.13 OldRepub 0.69 12.40 +.17 Olin 0.80 19.19 +.41 OmegaHlt 1.48 22.19 +.15 OmegaNav 1.10 -.03 Omncre 0.13 26.98 +.35 Omnicom 0.80 47.80 -.11 OmniVisn 26.44 -.19 OnSmcnd 11.56 +.02 OnTrack 3.42 +.31 ONEOK 2.08 59.51 +.50 OnlineRes 6.80 +.05 OnyxPh 36.15 -.09 OpenTxt 55.85 +.21 OpenTable 84.80 +.22 OpnwvSy 2.09 +.07 OpkoHlth 4.24 +.25 OplinkC 26.78 -.28 Opnext 2.56 -.01 OptimerPh 12.38 +.54 optXprs 4.50 15.53 +.40 Oracle 0.20 32.98 +.36 Orexigen 3.95 +.35 OrientEH 13.07 +.43 OrientPap 5.25 +.15 OriginAg 9.95 +.20 OshkoshCp 38.68 +.41 OvShip 1.75 33.11 +.27 OwensM s 0.80 30.62 +.46 OwensCorn 34.45 +.75 OwensIll 29.88 +.11 Oxigene h .18 +.01 PDL Bio 1.00 4.94 +.02 PG&E Cp 1.82 46.57 +.32 PHH Corp 25.10 +.37 Pimc1-5Tip 0.69 52.72 -.01 PMC Sra 8.22 +.06 PMI Grp 3.02 +.04 PNC 0.40 62.75 +.75 PNM Res 0.50 13.72 +.12 POSCO 1.43 107.07 +.98 PPG 2.20 86.09 +.24 PPL Corp 1.40 24.81 -.27 Paccar 0.48 50.97 +.37 PacerIntl 6.63 +.22 PacEth h .76 -.05 PacSunwr 4.32 +.07 PaciraPh n 7.04 +.01 PackAmer 0.60 28.74 +.19 PallCorp 0.70 54.45 +.27 PanASlv 0.10 34.33 +.14 Panasonic 0.05 13.15 -.05 PaneraBrd 97.05 -1.82 Pantry 15.75 -.15 ParagShip 0.20 3.16 -.06 ParamTch 23.20 +.00 ParaG&S 3.52 -.17 Parexel 21.08 +.42 ParkDrl 4.56 +.02 ParkerHan 1.28 91.71 +.70 PartnerRe 2.20 82.35 -.70 Patni 0.13 20.00 +.05 PatriotCoal 25.57 +.47 Patterson 0.40 33.63 +.24 PattUTI 0.20 26.09 +.77 Paychex 1.24 33.29 +.04 PeabdyE 0.34 63.04 -.44 Pengrth g 0.84 12.64 -.08 PnnNGm 37.02 -.18 PennVa 0.23 17.25 +.30 PennVaGP 1.56 26.73 -.50 PennWst g 1.08 26.52 -.38 Penney 0.80 33.39 +1.80 PenRE 0.60 14.68 +.63 Penske 18.60 +.64 Pentair 0.80 38.12 -.06 PeopUtdF 0.62 13.15 -.04 PepBoy 0.12 14.46 +.26 PepcoHold 1.08 18.73 +.26 PepsiCo 1.92 63.68 -.16 PeregrineP 2.40 +.06 PerfectWld 22.50 -.37 PerkElm 0.28 26.45 -.19 Prmian 1.38 20.97 -.41 Perrigo 0.28 71.42 -.25 PetMed 0.50 15.30 +.38 Petrohawk 20.62 -.06 PetrbrsA 1.20 32.66 -1.16 Petrobras 1.20 36.85 -1.19 PtroqstE 8.48 +.73 PetsMart 0.50 41.73 +.25 Pfizer 0.80 19.04 -.26 PhrmAth 3.31 PhmHTr 2.42 65.45 -.25 PharmPdt 0.60 28.00 +.17 Pharmacyc 4.99 +.02 Pharmerica 12.65 +.66 PhilipMor 2.56 59.00 +.33 PhilipsEl 0.95 31.29 +.25 PhlVH 0.15 62.77 +1.21 PhnxCos 2.63 +.08 PhotrIn 6.75 +.04 PiedNG 1.12 28.22 +.19 PiedmOfc n 1.26 19.73 +.17 Pier 1 9.93 +.10 PilgrimsP 8.16 +.18 PimCpOp 1.38 19.38 +.36 PimcoHiI 1.46 13.43 +.01 PinnclEnt 15.12 +.18 PinWst 2.10 41.39 +.35 PionDrill 9.95 +.39 PioNtrl 0.08 95.00 -.75 PitnyBw 1.46 24.76 +.65 PlainsAA 3.83 63.68 -.09 PlainsEx 37.03 -.26 Plantron 0.20 35.28 -.04 PlatGpMet 2.40 +.01 Plexus 28.65 -.47 PlugPwr h .78 -.04 PlumCrk 1.68 41.55 +.63 PluristemT 2.98 -.02 Polo RL 0.40 113.84 +1.28 Polycom 46.53 +.23 PolyMet g 2.32 -.14 PolyOne 14.30 -.12 Polypore 50.64 +.54 Poniard h .40 -.01 Popular 3.53 +.18 PortGE 1.04 22.63 +.06 Potash 0.84 184.11 +2.67 Potlatch 2.04 36.98 +.40 PwrInteg 0.20 42.39 -1.18 Power-One 8.75 -.51 PwshDB 28.59 -.08 PS PrcMet 48.99 +.11 PS Agri 34.41 +.09 PS Oil 28.67 -.15 PS BasMet 24.95 -.12 PS USDBull 22.43 PS USDBear 27.41 +.01 PwSClnEn 10.90 +.12 PwSWtr 0.11 19.75 +.19 PSTechLdr 0.05 24.98 +.16 PSFinPf 1.27 17.90 PSETecLd 0.06 17.81 +.01 PShNatMu 1.12 21.91 -.03 PwShPfd 0.97 14.16 -.02 PShEMSov 1.57 26.25 -.05 PSIndia 0.24 22.28 +.30 PwShs QQQ 0.33 57.65 +.28 Powrwav 3.52 -.23 Praxair 2.00 95.09 -.15 PrecCastpt 0.12 147.39 +2.41 PrecDrill 10.56 +.12 PrmWBc h .33 -.01 PriceTR 1.08 67.01 +.93 priceline 437.20 +3.77 PrideIntl 39.80 +5.41 Primedia 0.28 5.34 -.04 PrinFncl 0.55 33.70 +.14 PrisaA n 10.90 +.33 PrisaB n 11.21 +.04 ProShtDow 42.10 -.23 ProShtQQQ 32.65 -.17 ProShtS&P 41.72 -.25 PrUShS&P 21.50 -.29 ProUltDow 0.37 60.10 +.69 PrUlShDow 18.69 -.22 ProUltMC 0.04 69.80 +1.12 PrUShMC 10.71 -.18 ProUltQQQ 90.99 +.87 PrUShQQQ 10.30 -.10 ProUltSP 0.43 52.75 +.65 ProUShL20 40.50 -.39 PrUSCh25 rs 30.45 +.46 ProUSEM rs 32.83 -.08 ProUSRE rs 16.43 -.33 ProUSOG rs 30.74 -.44 ProUSBM rs 18.08 -.13 ProUltRE rs 0.41 55.03 +1.12 ProUShtFn 14.06 -.41 ProUFin rs 0.07 72.92 +1.90 PrUPShQQQ 25.94 -.37 PrUPShR2K 20.51 -.64 ProUltO&G 0.23 55.04 +.78 ProUBasM 0.04 52.96 +.32 ProShtR2K 31.06 -.35 ProUltPQQQ 174.01 +2.49 ProUSR2K 11.66 -.24 ProUltR2K 0.01 45.24 +.88 ProSht20Tr 46.10 -.20 ProUSSP500 16.68 -.33 ProUltSP500 0.38 235.43 +4.16 ProUltCrude 11.13 -.40 ProUSSlv rs 10.44 -.18 ProUShCrude 11.08 +.38 ProSUltSilv 141.04 +2.84 ProUltShYen 16.06 +.03 ProUShEuro 19.54 +.01 Procera rs 7.40 +.70 ProctGam 1.93 64.55 +.94 PrognicsPh 5.70 -.06 ProgrssEn 2.48 45.81 +.34 ProgrsSft s 30.25 +.44 ProgsvCp 1.40 20.04 -.09 ProLogis 0.45 14.99 +.16 ProspctCap 1.21 11.75 +.10 Protalix 10.15 -.26 ProtLife 0.56 29.49 +.60 ProvEn g 0.54 8.15 -.06 Prudentl 1.15 64.02 +1.11

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1.37 32.61 +.39 3.20 110.28 +1.17 12.24 -.43 0.10 4.96 +.01 7.61 +.07 0.71 6.45 +.01

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0.08 40.29 +.01 18.62 +.14 1.65 21.99 -.31 2.68 -.10 23.60 +.30 18.26 +.12 0.76 55.07 -.16 23.61 +.02 2.86 +.03 .43 -.01 0.40 58.57 -.40 25.06 -.42 0.56 17.72 +.02 14.50 -1.01 6.00 +.01 15.11 -.15 4.59 +.09 23.55 +.16 0.32 7.27 +.08 0.03 3.05 +.10 7.56 +.46 0.28 17.58 +.09 0.84 23.74 -.04 12.81 +.14 1.76 -.10 36.79 +.70 3.52 -.19 0.01 6.80 -.02 .63 -.01 1.51 +.10 0.25 15.79 -.26 59.40 -.93 1.60 -.05 21.15 -.01 2.45 -.12 0.17 82.05 +2.09 0.16 49.03 -.03 3.75 -.02 14.34 +.33 0.52 37.14 +.09 2.16 60.45 +.51 1.50 51.15 +.95 25.04 -1.49 3.90 +.02 1.73 34.83 +.28 44.11 +.54 7.07 -.19 1.00 15.50 +.22 0.84 12.48 +.01 1.85 42.29 +.29 1.78 26.45 +.05 0.59 90.02 +1.50 0.04 7.79 -.05 0.24 17.04 -.05 0.48 60.82 +.43 0.40 55.11 +.07 1.00 67.09 +.44 11.39 +.20 0.24 32.25 -.04 1.26 +.02 3.74 +.38 1.20 32.06 -.06 6.36 +.11 0.80 30.55 +.45 9.14 +1.84 63.20 -.49 32.38 +.18 18.14 +.09 1.00 7.26 1.71 107.08 +.22 12.20 +.24 1.84 +.36 1.96 31.80 -.14 0.08 13.23 +.17 27.64 +.14 0.90 74.17 +1.03 0.42 25.83 +.56 1.25 38.01 +.90 0.18 43.08 +1.38 0.52 33.49 -.12 0.80 67.73 +.83 1.40 84.12 +1.57 0.96 66.49 +.44 42.55 +.69 37.07 -.23 1.28 35.39 -.97 0.28 19.44 +.20 0.44 80.70 +.72 39.18 -.30 0.88 69.44 -.45 64.77 +1.09 37.77 +1.19 2.00 55.07 -.53 14.27 +.14 46.03 +.67 3.36 70.53 +.78 3.36 70.15 +.47 0.44 47.80 +.22 5.55 +.10 17.98 +.15 14.22 -.03 0.52 35.98 +.02 10.92 +.30 4.78 +.12 2.29 30.59 -.05 1.08 50.04 -.35 0.63 49.72 +.32 0.12 17.87 +.42 16.75 +.05 0.67 59.07 +.16 42.70 -.25 1.90 42.80 +.29 0.20 23.59 +.29 13.21 +.64 17.65 -.02 0.40 73.30 +.82 14.30 -.13 0.10 63.87 +.72 3.39 +.14 2.92 121.35 +.66 131.68 +.02 3.39 39.29 +.11 0.55 31.94 +.22 1.51 173.02 +1.41 2.37 131.97 +.82 1.74 53.00 +.24 0.33 18.02 +.28 0.13 27.29 +.38 0.67 44.65 +.52 1.79 63.56 +.74 1.82 42.24 +.21 1.34 32.42 -.13 4.58 40.63 +.09 1.00 21.29 -.01 0.37 58.51 -.22 45.85 -.01 0.35 26.82 +.28 0.49 48.38 +.27 0.20 57.76 +.25 0.28 40.51 +.78 0.38 70.58 +.56 1.00 84.37 +1.45 27.03 -.06 18.75 -.26 23.44 +.31 0.28 12.42 +.16 19.80 +.20 53.36 -.62 2.55 49.97 +1.04 0.48 21.04 +.02 29.35 +2.28 44.00 +2.04 11.45 +.32 136.90 -1.05 40.12 -.14 14.28 -.25 2.71 +.09 0.68 42.05 -.94 47.80 -.23 8.09 +.30 7.74 +.25 16.37 -.01 1.63 34.60 +.20 0.35 12.82 +.03 0.46 16.92 -.10 1.46 51.63 -.69 4.89 -.06 9.59 -.06 32.10 +.11 1.00 89.83 +.50 0.44 31.89 +.23 0.46 31.45 +.21 0.33 35.77 +.34 0.24 18.55 +.43 0.60 56.61 +.49 4.22 +.15 10.07 +.09 1.00 52.73 +.46 0.30 48.98 +.43 9.26 +.49 29.31 -.15 1.70 +.08 2.41 35.43 +.80 14.38 +.05 7.68 +.69 0.52 28.33 +.16 2.80 +.13 83.01 -.65 15.85 +.16 10.23 +.08 0.56 35.68 -.13 1.56 52.82 +.70 22.47 1.48 22.01 +.03 6.57 +.34 32.03 +.34 0.84 32.99 -.59 6.95 -.02 0.16 9.01 +.03 5.00 +.50 39.08 +.44 1.44 83.97 -.14 1.44 19.60 +.23 0.34 80.14 +.80 7.79 +.23 10.30 -.11 42.69 +.09 0.58 16.98 -.06 3.72 127.43 +.16 14.26 -.04 2.51 -.07 11.17 -.39 0.64 64.31 +.78 43.88 +.38 14.58 +1.33 8.67 -.26 45.61 -.13 7.18 +.05 0.41 7.14 +.03 24.09 +.02 34.08 +.22 0.08 11.58 -.16

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D 2.44 +.01 3.20 105.03 +1.56 0.50 28.84 +.34 90.70 -.39 0.43 9.57 +.22 1.79 +.04 49.54 -.34 23.41 +.60 11.82 -.16 8.05 -.39 4.85 -.08 35.54 +.62 7.51 +.57 8.99 -.07 3.73 0.56 42.83 +.03 13.02 +.06 22.47 -.27 1.76 62.87 +.43 38.74 +.17 1.28 58.85 +.45 0.73 54.29 +.25 44.38 +1.89 85.35 -.41 8.57 -.06 19.52 +.52 0.30 51.60 +.12 24.43 +.47 2.95 -.07 0.10 14.05 +.72 9.61 -.03 14.94 +.14 1.12 36.44 +.21 3.03 +.01 0.14 34.97 -.66 0.20 43.25 +.04 25.58 +.04 1.82 37.47 +.13 1.83 45.97 -.35 0.60 27.50 +.18 0.02 12.02 +.30 39.46 +.12 21.03 +.24 1.04 26.32 +.13 6.51 +.29 24.47 +.37 22.81 -.40 4.40 13.11 +.15 12.16 +.09 1.86 -.01 1.17 39.79 +.21 0.57 32.28 -.05 0.78 29.34 +.04 0.49 38.41 +.20 0.99 74.56 +.43 0.16 16.85 +.24 0.60 37.13 +.35 0.32 26.82 +.13 1.27 32.01 +.21 4.32 +.12 1.36 72.91 +.39 0.36 22.50 -.07 1.83 +.04 0.52 32.35 -.10 0.30 62.84 +1.13 1.60 22.47 +.36 0.04 47.32 +.95 1.02 24.62 -.41 0.30 19.08 +.13 0.16 10.20 +.01 .96 -.01 3.51 +.15 84.91 +1.28 0.60 35.75 +.45 0.06 9.06 +.10 0.08 14.76 +.09 42.56 +1.06 66.25 +.90 23.81 -.27 24.19 +.38 2.30 29.43 +.42 6.59 +.39 0.72 59.48 +.97 31.29 .16 7.15 +.08 1.44 33.66 +.21 0.40 40.79 -.32 .42 +.01 0.60 42.10 -.26 7.20 +.14 15.74 +.73 15.44 +.66 8.48 +.19 10.61 +.28 9.09 +.18 0.04 31.86 +.36 15.42 +.39 2.47 +.04 37.05 +.68 0.35 7.86 -.02 0.04 9.69 +.10 11.45 9.49 -.03 13.94 -.01 5.85 -.04 18.26 +.10 29.04 -.08 31.15 +.82 1.13 64.85 -.21 28.30 -.03 0.04 2.85 +.13 1.04 28.01 -1.84 0.92 21.40 -.02 0.20 15.74 +.03 0.20 20.77 +.01 0.82 18.24 -.01 9.95 +.07 5.43 -.13 0.71 37.35 +.29 0.60 49.79 +.09 58.69 +1.16 17.89 +.68 18.09 +.32 0.47 13.66 +.04 14.36 +.24 5.42 +.17 24.93 +.11 30.95 +.25 0.25 23.17 +.12 0.78 27.09 +.39 6.70 -.07 2.19 32.81 -.03 1.00 54.80 +.53 5.90 -.06 4.13 +.01 0.32 25.06 +.08 1.75 52.95 +.34 49.31 +.27 0.60 62.80 +.29 1.28 11.35 +.05 11.80 +.22 4.42 -.09 1.65 15.55 +.14 0.77 8.50 -.18 1.75 25.26 +.02 0.77 17.29 -.08 9.97 -.19 0.45 35.86 -.04 8.46 +.23 1.07 +.07 0.08 5.58 +.10 0.40 7.23 +.37 0.52 24.21 -.19 0.54 10.57 +.11 46.04 -.05 0.68 46.29 -.44 6.72 +.05 .78 -.03 40.95 +1.15 45.70 +.69 17.92 +.13 36.57 -.13 18.94 -.01 23.07 -.39 21.25 +.46 18.01 +.18 23.99 11.75 +.22 0.75 54.98 +.88 25.22 +.23 0.52 35.26 -.18 17.37 -.24 0.08 27.74 +.54 24.60 +.03 56.03 +.07 53.78 -.08 14.23 -.01 1.16 41.45 -.50 0.40 36.04 +.41 26.20 +.64 2.10 88.79 +.50 24.57 +.31 1.00 55.77 +.27 1.00 62.38 +.42 0.52 41.45 -.25 28.87 +.63 1.19 +.09 1.92 69.50 +.35 0.94 36.11 +.19 0.72 49.97 +.99 0.02 21.14 +.85 19.56 +.20 10.70 -.07 20.55 +.55 0.64 64.42 +.82 13.15 -1.87 18.39 +.01 2.44 78.92 -.39 3.13 59.06 -.19 0.28 17.66 +.25 1.43 +.05 0.30 56.99 +.16 4.73 +.39 4.00 -.05 1.05 85.13 +.38 0.28 52.44 +.01 7.01 +.26 1.60 38.65 +.16 0.84 51.59 +.04 2.94 -.06 80.98 +1.73 15.17 +1.64 79.75 -.24 12.05 +.05 1.44 57.18 -.23 41.60 -3.52 .39 +.00 1.39 -.01 48.05 +.17 27.24 +.38 0.32 28.46 +.02 14.05 +.43 21.53 +.77 0.60 9.79 +.12 1.20 54.44 +.67 0.66 15.86 +.15 1.48 10.14 +.01 0.64 36.97 +.08 0.86 46.40 +.27

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0.28 10.03 +.18 18.39 -.05 0.74 23.68 +.32 19.07 +.53 1.00 31.97 -.07 1.73 30.72 +.22 44.35 +.10 9.72 +.48 1.18 +.01 7.11 +.19 1.75 +.04 5.86 +.01 17.36 +.87 40.39 +.32 13.05 +.52 49.92 +.87 25.83 +.35 .09 -.00 0.20 11.51 +.23 65.51 +1.81 1.12 29.88 +.03 1.12 29.68 +.10 1.52 94.61 +.36 38.29 +1.79 52.90 +.54 1.80 +.15 26.42 +.77 0.08 3.43 +.04 38.49 +.30 0.40 7.16 +.15 2.08 74.25 -.09 31.14 +.64 0.20 27.95 +.53 68.19 +.01 5.59 -.27 36.66 -.68 0.20 58.94 +.82 1.70 83.66 +1.14 65.88 -.07 0.50 41.81 -.68 0.96 28.92 -.51 2.00 20.30 -.08 1.92 37.86 +.12 37.62 +.31 0.20 43.11 +.49 6.81 -.11 0.37 26.14 +.36 3.11 -.12 5.65 -.12 6.07 -.18 3.21 -.13 35.11 +.35 23.13 +.11 2.52 86.49 -.44 31.98 +.58 0.76 34.34 -.06 0.76 30.36 -.22 0.38 39.80 -.27 1.56 +.04 0.20 27.30 +.77 0.88 30.87 +.44 0.72 13.68 +.15 0.72 37.79 +.08 6.58 +.49 14.53 +.24 36.20 +1.22 2.29 80.08 +.02 3.21 79.34 +.01 0.55 57.01 +.56 0.67 64.11 +.30 0.89 78.42 +.48


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Obama

Boards

President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in Washington on Monday.

Continued from B1 But Obama said companies had responsibilities to help the economy recover. “Ultimately, winning the future is not just about what the government can do to help you succeed,” he said. “It’s about what you can do to help America succeed.” The president’s comments came as he sought to reassure members of the business community that he was not their adversary and to mend fences with their forceful lobbying advocate in Washington. The chamber has opposed most of Obama’s health care and banking agenda and spent more than $50 million during last year’s midterm elections to cast the president and his party as anti-business and a threat to capitalism. But the chamber, too, is ea-

Drew Angerer New York Times News Service

ger to tone down the rhetoric, according to senior officials there. At the height of the highprofile fight with the White House, several big-name companies left its board, citing concern about the chamber’s opposition to the administration’s efforts. Obama’s remarks reflected the careful effort of a White House eager to seem more probusiness but anxious about the

FDIC

accusations of betrayal by some of the Democratic president’s most liberal allies. The president’s basic message to the business community — “I get it,” he said of the profit-making imperative — was joined with an admonition that corporate America must feel some sense of duty as well. That effort to walk a political line appeared to please neither side completely Monday.

lars on a series of bailouts and the Federal Reserve took on billions more in potential liabilities to stabilize the financial system. Although the Obama administration and Democratic lawmakers had raised the idea of recouping some of that money with a new tax on banks’ deposits and other liabilities, the proposal stalled and was later withdrawn after it appeared likely that the Treasury would turn a profit from its bank investments. The final DoddFrank Act called for retooling the FDIC’s fee system. The new fee rules will not raise any additional money for the fund, which continues to insure depositors for up to $250,000 per account. But they aim to shift more of the insurance burden onto banks with

Continued from B1 Addressing complaints by small banks that they were taking on too much of the financial burden to save failing banks, the law directed the FDIC to re-evaluate the fees according to the value of assets held by each bank, instead of the level of deposits. Even before the collapse of hundreds of small and midsize banks caused the agency’s fund to slip into the red in the fall of 2009, lawmakers and federal regulators had proposed overhauling the way deposit insurance fees were assessed. A year earlier, taxpayers had led a broad rescue of the nation’s biggest banks, as the Treasury Department spent billions of dol-

Scams

more than $10 billion in assets. Today, in the aftermath of the bailouts, those institutions have amassed an even greater share of the nation’s deposits, holding nearly 80 percent of domestic deposits, compared with about 75 percent before the crisis. Regulators hope the new fee structure will also discourage the excessive leverage and speculative trading that contributed to the financial crisis by forcing large banks to pay higher assessments as they take on more risk, rather than paying higher fees to prop up the fund after conditions deteriorate. Premiums on smaller institutions are expected to be reduced, on average, by about 30 percent. Fees will be increased on only about 84 of the nation’s 7,661 smaller banks.

ers sought bragging rights by cracking codes and worming their way into government and business computer networks in order to cause mischief. But by 2003, the motive had turned to money. “Since then it’s almost exclusively about finances,” such as stealing bank account information or conning people into wiring funds, said Dave Marcus, security research director for McAfee Labs. And the millions of users hanging out online via social networking accounts are increasingly vulnerable, he said. “Because of the sheer volume of

Continued from B1 From 2000 through 2009, total financial losses because of Internet crimes were roughly $1.7 billion, according to the IC3, with a median dollar loss of more than $500 per complaint. A new study, “A Good Decade for Cybercrime,” released in January by software company McAfee Labs, details how Internet crime has morphed from merely malicious to financially devastating. Back in 2000, Internet fraud was relatively benign: Hack-

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, February 8, 2011 B3

people on Twitter and Facebook, it’s a very fertile target group.” Among the more recent scams: Fake requests for password resets or logins. Fraudsters also comb social networking sites looking for popular topics or seasonal subjects to set their traps. “You’ll see Twitter bombarded with IRS stuff when it’s tax season or fake romance scams around Valentine’s Day,” Marcus said. Last July, midway through the summer travel season, the Internet Crime Complaint Center, or IC3, warned of “stranded traveler” scams, where fake e-mails or Facebook messages go out, supposedly from friends

build a life-size wave out of fused glass, he said, and continues to work out the engineering of the piece, which someone else would have to finance. In October, however, Grant created an 8-foot stainless steel wave that he featured at the Central Oregon Builders Association — Fall Home & Garden show. That led him to think about surfboards, he said, as aesthetically pleasing yet still ridable. In the High Desert, however, surfboards are not the fixtures they are in coastal areas. But stand-up paddle boards have become popular in Central Oregon, and skateboards are popular most everywhere. Just as when he created water features, Grant’s skateboards take shape after he meets with the significant person involved in the recipient’s life, such as a mother, wife, fiancee or other family member, who provides the personal memorabilia. “It’s treasuring the childhood, and the child, in all of us,” he said. The skateboards typically cost about $600, roughly $350 more than the most expensive longboards sold online or in some shops. Grant works by appointment only, although he will be displaying his pieces at Tryst Clothing Co. during First Friday Gallery Walks and he plans to attend Bend WinterFest, the Bend Summer Festival and Munch & Music. Grant agreed to answer some questions about his boards and art in general.

Continued from B1 Born and raised in Seattle, Grant started his career in construction, working as a finish carpenter, building curved stairways and other intricate woodwork. Eventually, he got bored, he said. Creating a bigger company did not excite him, so Grant began looking for work he would find interesting. He settled on building water features inside homes. Each house brought a fresh work space, or canvas. Meeting with the homeowners became the starting point. Essentially, Grant would interview the clients to understand their vision and meld it with his own artistic ideas, integrating it all into the interior space. The finished work reflected the homeowner’s vision, which Grant believes is important. “The placement strengthens when you connect with the client,” he said. “It’s my passion that’s the undercarriage.” In early 2006, Grant sold everything and moved to Hawaii. He decided to build a water feature, along with a house — on spec — on Maui. Grant and a partner designed and built a 3,000-square-foot house, featuring eight sets of French doors with fused-glass accents opening onto the pool, a glass-ceiling entryway and wood and glass trim and features throughout. Then, as it did nearly everywhere else, the real estate market collapsed. The home sold for a loss. Grant returned to mainstream construction, and last year he and his family decided to move to Bend, the hometown of his wife, Kristi, who works at St. Charles Bend. An avid surfer and artist who works in glass, metal and stone, Grant returns to wave themes in his pieces. He’s always wanted to

You see your skateboards being given as gifts for significant events? I’m sure a lot of people will say, ‘Come on, a skateboard as a wedding gift?’ It’ll probably be the one gift the groom will be excited about. … It’s the best gift they’ve ever gotten. It’s one of those you don’t forget. It will be around. As a gift-giver, you’ve

saying they’ve been robbed and need cash in a hurry to pay a hotel bill or return to the United States. Vulnerability to cybercrime comes partly from our eagerness to share so much of ourselves and increasingly conduct more of our financial transactions — from banking to shopping — online, say Marcus and other security experts. “Cyber criminals will use any publicly available information, including from social networking sites, to extort victims … to steal your money or cause financial harm to your business,” said FBI special agent Tom Osborne.

His advice for Facebook and Twitter users: “Avoid accepting unknown friend requests and only post information you would want your Mom or Dad to read.” Likewise, avoid opening e-mails from unknown individuals and never click on photos or hyperlinks in those e-mails. The California Office of Privacy Protection also urges vigilance online. Among Marcus’ recommendations: Be familiar with your mobile devices. Keep your privacy settings high on social networking sites. If you’re using a cell phone, turn off the GPS when it’s not in use “so you’re not

Q: A:

just scored. How many gifts have you given (that are still around)?

Q: A:

What prompted the shift from finish carpentry to water features? I got to the point where I was bored with it. There wasn’t anything else to learn. The only way to progress would be to have more and more employees (and expand the company). Running a construction crew doesn’t feed my soul. That’s when I started to look for something that interests me, that I would have some passion about.

Q: A:

Why do you make such an effort to involve your clients? It allows the client to be reflected, and to me it’s important to have the client reflected. I’m fortunate that I have connected with just about every client I’ve ever sold to, and I enjoy the process.

Q: A:

What happens when your vision and the client’s clash? If I completely object to something, I typically explain what it is that’s bothering me, and then I step aside. I’ll usually submit to where a client wants to go. My favorite clients are the ones that say, ‘I hate it,’ or ‘I love it.’ Both those statements are wonderful statements because they give you clear vision, and with clear vision you can go forward.

Q: A:

Why do you use fused glass? I like working with glass. I’ve never been drawn to blown glass or fused glass platters. I like what you can do with glass. You can melt it and get different textures. It just kind of lends itself to doing a multitude of things and different techniques. Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

broadcasting where your device — and you — are located.” If doing online banking from a cell phone, be sure your access is password-protected. And if you do get snagged, report the crime. Blucher, who contacted the local Better Business Bureau, the California attorney general’s office and local police after her Canadian scam, said getting snared by fraudsters alerted her to the prevalence of online crime. “If something good can come of this, it’s that more people can be aware … so they don’t get scammed and lose their hardearned money like I did.”

Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

... 1.10f .04 .36f 1.68 ... .40 .80a .82 ... ... .32 .22 .72f .04 .42 ... ... .65f ... .64

9 15 22 24 16 ... ... 28 25 53 21 12 ... 11 21 13 14 ... 15 ... 7

YTD Last Chg %Chg 61.30 23.24 14.67 15.04 71.93 9.48 49.71 63.24 74.25 7.36 31.98 48.14 10.94 21.69 9.58 22.33 6.66 10.86 20.73 13.76 28.20

-.11 +.28 +.38 +.20 +.55 +.31 +.51 +.28 +.12 -.16 -.15 +.71 +.23 +.01 +.13 ... +.03 +.35 -.11 +.27 +.43

Name

+8.1 +3.2 +10.0 -3.3 +10.2 +12.2 +5.1 +4.9 +2.8 -.4 +7.5 +14.3 -10.8 +3.1 +8.2 -.1 +9.9 +14.8 +2.3 +14.7 +1.0

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1361.00 $1347.60 $29.348

Pvs Day $1348.00 $1348.30 $29.064

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.24f .80 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .86f .52 ... .20 .20 .24f .20 ... .60f

21 18 16 23 41 ... 33 22 ... 18 19 10 24 14 ... 18 15 15 85 ...

86.50 +.76 +1.3 44.59 +.88 +5.2 44.47 +.11 -4.3 16.77 +.20 -5.3 50.97 +.37 -11.1 2.73 +.07 +31.9 41.55 +.63 +10.9 147.39 +2.41 +5.9 21.04 +.02 -6.4 60.94 +.71 -8.2 83.97 -.14 +.3 45.86 +.44 +1.6 32.35 -.10 +.7 14.05 +.43 +20.2 11.51 +.23 -5.5 27.95 +.53 +3.6 17.71 +.16 +4.7 33.32 +.57 +7.5 3.41 +.08 +20.9 23.61 -.69 +24.7

Prime rate Time period

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp BkofAm FordM S&P500ETF iShEMkts

3726150 1442861 1164802 962033 593255

Last Chg 4.90 14.67 16.11 131.97 46.56

+.08 +.38 +.39 +.82 +.06

Gainers ($2 or more) Name PrideIntl BigLots KV PhB lf KV PhmA CrwfdA

Last

Chg %Chg

39.80 +5.41 +15.7 39.20 +5.25 +15.5 4.19 +.54 +14.8 4.16 +.48 +13.0 3.26 +.35 +12.0

Losers ($2 or more) Name GerovaF rs CallonP h Amrep CSVS2xVxM MercGn

Last

Chg %Chg

17.01 8.10 11.50 55.57 39.50

3.25 3.25 3.25

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

DenisnM g RexahnPh NthgtM g Taseko NovaGld g

Last Chg

56675 4.13 51184 1.84 45348 2.74 43881 5.90 41925 14.61

+.16 +.36 +.05 -.06 -.12

Vol (00)

Microsoft SiriusXM Cisco MicronT Intel

671888 509860 497740 449225 423450

Last Chg 28.20 1.79 22.03 11.29 21.69

+.43 +.04 -.02 +.24 +.01

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Emergent NovaBayP Crossh g rs Procera rs OpkoHlth

8.37 +2.31 +38.1 2.15 +.28 +15.0 2.48 +.26 +11.7 7.40 +.70 +10.4 4.24 +.25 +6.3

Name

Last

DotHill h MercerIntl iGo Inc Clearfield FuweiFlm

3.64 +.62 +20.5 9.79 +1.37 +16.3 4.18 +.56 +15.5 5.50 +.69 +14.3 5.36 +.67 +14.3

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

-2.40 -12.4 -1.09 -11.9 -1.25 -9.8 -5.29 -8.7 -3.44 -8.0

PolyMet g ChinNEPet Hyperdyn PyramidOil ParaG&S

2.32 4.99 4.99 5.30 3.52

-.14 -.26 -.26 -.26 -.17

-5.7 -5.0 -5.0 -4.7 -4.6

Toreador Cardiom g SRISurg eLong h MidPenn

2,089 954 96 3,139 342 12

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last

286 187 32 505 24 2

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

Indexes

Chg %Chg

13.15 -1.87 -12.5 6.14 -.69 -10.1 5.71 -.63 -9.9 15.32 -1.63 -9.6 8.33 -.87 -9.5

Diary 1,810 856 109 2,775 258 18

12,092.42 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,256.80 3,742.01 Dow Jones Transportation 416.47 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 8,300.76 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,273.19 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,769.70 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,311.00 1,010.91 S&P 500 13,884.73 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 807.89 580.49 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,161.63 5,070.71 413.83 8,336.64 2,273.48 2,783.99 1,319.05 13,979.17 808.32

+69.48 +15.04 +2.82 +48.14 +17.02 +14.69 +8.18 +96.47 +8.21

YTD %Chg %Chg +.57 +.30 +.69 +.58 +.75 +.53 +.62 +.69 +1.03

52-wk %Chg

+5.05 -.71 +2.18 +4.68 +2.95 +4.94 +4.88 +4.63 +3.15

+22.74 +33.69 +13.18 +24.17 +28.73 +30.95 +24.82 +27.47 +37.82

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

369.85 2,724.47 4,090.80 6,051.03 7,283.62 23,553.59 37,451.84 22,793.01 3,387.41 10,592.04 2,081.74 3,192.18 4,964.30 5,944.37

+1.19 s +1.19 s +1.08 s +.89 s +.93 s -1.49 t -.76 t +.77 s +.58 s +.46 s +.47 s -.59 t +.11 s +.66 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0141 1.6121 1.0098 .002087 .1523 1.3591 .1285 .012151 .083521 .0342 .000906 .1549 1.0469 .0344

1.0137 1.6098 1.0120 .002087 .1524 1.3587 .1284 .012159 .083368 .0340 .000905 .1542 1.0466 .0344

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.53 +0.17 +5.3 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.50 +0.16 +5.2 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.41 +0.03 +2.8 GrowthI 27.13 +0.16 +5.0 Ultra 23.86 +0.14 +5.3 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.69 +0.09 +4.6 AMutlA p 26.17 +0.12 +3.4 BalA p 18.55 +0.08 +3.5 BondA p 12.09 +0.01 -0.5 CapIBA p 50.50 +0.14 +1.2 CapWGA p 36.65 +0.17 +2.6 CapWA p 20.43 +0.03 EupacA p 42.19 +0.18 +2.0 FdInvA p 38.25 +0.17 +4.2 GovtA p 13.72 -1.3 GwthA p 31.59 +0.12 +3.8 HI TrA p 11.53 +0.01 +2.8 IncoA p 17.01 +0.05 +2.8 IntBdA p 13.34 -0.4 ICAA p 29.27 +0.17 +3.9 NEcoA p 26.45 +0.13 +4.4 N PerA p 29.36 +0.13 +2.6 NwWrldA 53.67 +0.07 -1.7 SmCpA p 39.34 +0.22 +1.2 TxExA p 11.60 -0.01 -1.5 WshA p 28.22 +0.14 +3.7 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.44 +0.12 +1.0 IntEqII I r 12.55 +0.05 +0.7 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.39 -0.01 +3.2 MidCap 35.11 +0.32 +4.4 MidCapVal 21.47 +0.11 +6.9 Baron Funds: Growth 53.09 +0.40 +3.6 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.62 -0.3 DivMu 14.15 -0.01 -0.4 TxMgdIntl 16.35 +0.05 +3.9

BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.21 +0.09 GlAlA r 19.85 +0.05 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.53 +0.05 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.25 +0.10 GlbAlloc r 19.94 +0.06 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 55.94 +0.25 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 30.04 +0.21 DivEqInc 10.55 +0.09 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 31.03 +0.22 AcornIntZ 41.20 +0.21 ValRestr 51.65 +0.13 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.44 -0.06 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.85 +0.06 USCorEq2 11.53 +0.09 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.50 +0.22 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 35.87 +0.22 NYVen C 34.31 +0.21 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.17 +0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.67 -0.03 EmMktV 35.57 -0.03 IntSmVa 18.06 +0.14 LargeCo 10.40 +0.06 USLgVa 21.47 +0.19 US Small 22.17 +0.24 US SmVa 26.58 +0.32 IntlSmCo 17.90 +0.11 Fixd 10.32 IntVa 19.62 +0.08 Glb5FxInc 10.80 2YGlFxd 10.14 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 73.65 +0.32 Income 13.24 +0.01

+3.9 +2.2 +2.1 +4.0 +2.3 +4.8 +2.7 +4.5 +2.8 +0.7 +2.3 +1.1 +5.2 +5.1 +3.4 +3.4 +3.3

-2.2 -1.6 +5.0 +5.1 +6.7 +3.8 +3.9 +4.2 +6.7 -0.7 -0.1 +4.9 +0.1

IntlStk 36.83 Stock 114.63 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.83 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.09 GblMacAbR 10.26 LgCapVal 18.89 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.30 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.89 FPACres 27.44 Fairholme 36.29 Federated Instl: KaufmnR 5.52 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.65 StrInA 12.50 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.85 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.87 FF2015 11.59 FF2020 14.15 FF2020K 13.53 FF2025 11.86 FF2030 14.21 FF2030K 14.04 FF2035 11.88 FF2040 8.31 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 13.31 AMgr50 15.77 Balanc 18.78 BalancedK 18.78 BlueChGr 47.63 Canada 60.31 CapAp 26.43 CpInc r 9.79 Contra 70.06 ContraK 70.04 DisEq 23.82 DivIntl 31.04 DivrsIntK r 31.02

+0.12 +3.1 +0.64 +6.4 +0.11 +3.3 +1.9 +0.4 +0.12 +3.4 +0.03 +4.4 +0.4 +0.02 +2.4 +0.47 +2.0 +0.04 +0.4 +0.09 +3.5 +0.01 +1.4 +0.09 +3.5 +0.03 +0.03 +0.05 +0.04 +0.04 +0.05 +0.06 +0.05 +0.04 +0.10 +0.05 +0.09 +0.09 +0.26 +0.04 +0.23 +0.04 +0.30 +0.30 +0.21 +0.12 +0.12

+2.1 +2.2 +2.6 +2.6 +3.0 +3.2 +3.2 +3.6 +3.7 +5.1 +2.3 +3.0 +3.0 +5.0 +3.7 +4.3 +4.4 +3.6 +3.6 +5.7 +3.0 +3.0

DivGth 29.89 EmrMk 25.85 Eq Inc 46.70 EQII 19.26 Fidel 33.79 FltRateHi r 9.90 GNMA 11.35 GovtInc 10.30 GroCo 87.69 GroInc 19.21 GrowthCoK 87.65 HighInc r 9.17 Indepn 25.39 IntBd 10.48 IntmMu 9.91 IntlDisc 33.94 InvGrBd 11.29 InvGB 7.34 LgCapVal 12.41 LatAm 55.75 LevCoStk 30.05 LowP r 39.86 LowPriK r 39.85 Magelln 74.74 MidCap 30.04 MuniInc 12.04 NwMkt r 15.49 OTC 59.13 100Index 9.18 Ovrsea 33.62 Puritn 18.51 SCmdtyStrt 12.67 SrsIntGrw 11.36 SrsIntVal 10.63 SrInvGrdF 11.29 STBF 8.44 SmllCpS r 21.01 StratInc 11.19 StrReRt r 9.68 TotalBd 10.67 USBI 11.21 Value 72.52 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 49.03

+0.21 -0.09 +0.43 +0.18 +0.24 -0.01 +0.37 +0.12 +0.37 +0.01 +0.20 -0.01 +0.20 +0.01 +0.08 -0.15 +0.22 +0.16 +0.17 +0.24 +0.22 -0.01 -0.02 +0.31 +0.06 +0.14 +0.10 -0.09 +0.05 +0.05

+0.22 +0.01

+0.58

+5.1 -1.9 +5.5 +5.5 +5.1 +1.4 -0.7 -1.0 +5.5 +5.0 +5.5 +3.2 +4.3 -0.4 -0.7 +2.7 -0.7 -0.4 +4.9 -5.6 +5.7 +3.9 +3.9 +4.3 +4.1 -1.4 -0.5 +7.6 +5.0 +3.5 +3.4 +0.2 +0.6 +6.9 -0.7 -0.1 +7.2 +1.3 +1.0 -0.1 -0.8 +5.6

-0.07 -7.7

Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 39.82 +0.36 500IdxInv 46.72 +0.29 IntlInxInv 36.92 +0.18 TotMktInv 38.22 +0.26 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 46.72 +0.29 TotMktAd r 38.22 +0.26 First Eagle: GlblA 47.28 +0.16 OverseasA 22.83 +0.05 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.10 FoundAl p 10.95 +0.05 HYTFA p 9.42 IncomA p 2.25 +0.01 USGovA p 6.66 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.23 +0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.27 +0.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.54 +0.12 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.49 +0.03 GlBd A p 13.59 +0.03 GrwthA p 18.81 +0.08 WorldA p 15.69 +0.05 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.61 +0.03 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 42.43 +0.23 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.71 +0.06 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.77 -0.04 Quality 20.72 +0.06 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 37.62 +0.19 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.44 +0.01 MidCapV 37.90 +0.19 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.07 +0.01

+4.3 +5.0 +5.0 +4.9 +5.0 +4.9 +2.0 +0.8 -1.6 +4.7 -1.8 +4.3 -0.8 +0.3 +3.9 +4.2 +4.4 +7.3 +0.4 +5.7 +5.7 +0.3 +5.5 +3.0 +1.2 +3.0 +4.8 +2.7 +4.8 -0.2

CapApInst 38.31 +0.22 IntlInv t 61.62 +0.04 Intl r 62.20 +0.03 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 36.14 +0.17 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 36.15 +0.16 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 44.52 +0.23 Div&Gr 20.56 +0.11 Advisers 20.02 +0.07 TotRetBd 10.88 +0.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.85 -0.09 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.17 +0.07 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.92 +0.07 CmstkA 16.62 +0.10 EqIncA 8.96 +0.04 GrIncA p 20.32 +0.10 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.11 +0.10 AssetStA p 24.82 +0.10 AssetStrI r 25.04 +0.11 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.39 +0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.38 +0.01 HighYld 8.37 +0.01 IntmTFBd 10.67 -0.01 ShtDurBd 10.95 USLCCrPls 21.54 +0.12 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 52.74 +0.37 PrkMCVal T 23.49 +0.14 Twenty T 67.85 +0.29 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.27 +0.05 LSGrwth 13.28 +0.06 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 20.91 +0.09 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.29 +0.09 Longleaf Partners:

+4.3 +2.7 +2.7 +4.4 +4.4 +5.1 +5.4 +3.6 -0.1 -3.6 +2.7 +4.6 +5.7 +4.3 +5.7 +1.6 +1.7 +1.7 -0.4 -0.4 +3.3 -0.6 -0.1 +4.2 +4.1 +4.1 +3.2 +2.9 +3.4 -4.0 -4.1

Partners 29.75 +0.26 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.44 +0.04 StrInc C 15.08 +0.04 LSBondR 14.39 +0.04 StrIncA 15.00 +0.04 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.11 +0.02 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 12.21 +0.10 BdDebA p 7.99 +0.02 ShDurIncA p 4.60 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.41 +0.07 ValueA 23.86 +0.17 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.97 +0.17 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.98 +0.03 Matthews Asian: PacTgrInv 22.63 +0.01 MergerFd 15.97 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.34 TotRtBdI 10.34 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 38.92 +0.32 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.39 +0.20 GlbDiscZ 30.76 +0.21 QuestZ 18.34 +0.14 SharesZ 21.71 +0.12 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 47.45 +0.30 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 49.16 +0.31 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.45 +0.01 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.35 +0.09 Intl I r 20.47 +0.14 Oakmark r 43.57 +0.26 Old Westbury Fds:

+5.3 +1.6 +1.8 +1.6 +1.9 +0.3 +5.4 +2.9 +0.4 +0.4 +2.4 +4.6 +4.6 +4.3 -3.5 +1.2 +0.1 +0.2 +4.2 +4.1 +4.2 +3.7 +4.4 +3.2 +3.2 +2.8 +2.2 +5.5 +5.5

GlobOpp 7.98 +0.03 GlbSMdCap 15.88 +0.12 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 45.04 +0.16 DvMktA p 34.79 -0.04 GlobA p 63.40 +0.24 GblStrIncA 4.29 IntBdA p 6.44 -0.01 MnStFdA 33.35 +0.21 RisingDivA 16.16 +0.09 S&MdCpVl 33.40 +0.16 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.65 +0.08 S&MdCpVl 28.63 +0.14 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.60 +0.08 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.41 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.42 -0.04 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.78 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.53 AllAsset 12.12 +0.01 ComodRR 9.34 -0.07 HiYld 9.48 +0.02 InvGrCp 10.46 +0.01 LowDu 10.38 RealRtnI 11.22 -0.01 ShortT 9.87 TotRt 10.78 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.22 -0.01 TotRtA 10.78 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.78 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.78 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.78 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 45.75 +0.09 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 42.37 +0.29

+3.5 +2.7 +3.4 -4.6 +5.0 +0.6 -1.4 +3.0 +4.2 +4.2 +4.0 +4.1 +4.1 -2.9 -4.6 -0.3 -0.4 +0.6 +0.5 +2.7 +0.4 +0.2 -1.1 +0.2 -0.3 -1.1 -0.3 -0.4 -0.3 -0.3 -0.1 +3.4

Price Funds: BlChip 40.04 CapApp 21.03 EmMktS 34.29 EqInc 24.92 EqIndex 35.56 Growth 33.64 HlthSci 31.61 HiYield 6.93 IntlBond 9.90 IntlStk 14.46 MidCap 62.04 MCapVal 24.62 N Asia 18.67 New Era 55.00 N Horiz 34.89 N Inc 9.39 R2010 15.72 R2015 12.24 R2020 16.98 R2025 12.48 R2030 17.95 R2035 12.74 R2040 18.14 ShtBd 4.83 SmCpStk 35.69 SmCapVal 37.04 SpecIn 12.43 Value 24.73 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.28 VoyA p 25.21 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 12.14 PremierI r 21.20 TotRetI r 13.53 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 39.04 S&P Sel 20.55 Scout Funds: Intl 33.50 Selected Funds: AmShD 42.80 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 21.09

+0.25 +0.08 -0.08 +0.17 +0.22 +0.16 +0.01 +0.06 +0.24 +0.15 +0.06 +0.13 +0.23 +0.06 +0.05 +0.07 +0.06 +0.08 +0.07 +0.09 -0.01 +0.31 +0.39 +0.01 +0.15

+5.0 +3.5 -2.8 +5.2 +5.0 +4.6 +4.4 +2.9 -0.3 +1.6 +6.0 +3.8 -2.7 +5.4 +4.2 -0.7 +2.5 +2.9 +3.3 +3.7 +3.9 +4.2 +4.1 -0.2 +3.7 +2.5 +1.0 +6.0

+0.10 +5.5 +0.20 +6.3 +0.10 +4.2 +0.16 +4.2 +0.10 +2.7 +0.25 +5.0 +0.13 +5.0 +0.14 +3.5 +0.25 +3.4 +0.08 +5.2

Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 53.12 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 28.76 IntValue I 29.40 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.36 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 21.94 CAITAdm 10.56 CpOpAdl 80.63 EMAdmr r 39.17 Energy 131.44 ExtdAdm 43.18 500Adml 121.65 GNMA Ad 10.62 GrwAdm 33.01 HlthCr 53.52 HiYldCp 5.80 InfProAd 25.21 ITBdAdml 11.04 ITsryAdml 11.16 IntGrAdm 62.70 ITAdml 13.10 ITGrAdm 9.83 LtdTrAd 10.96 LTGrAdml 9.06 LT Adml 10.47 MCpAdml 97.11 MuHYAdm 9.89 PrmCap r 71.40 ReitAdm r 81.75 STsyAdml 10.64 STBdAdml 10.50 ShtTrAd 15.85 STIGrAd 10.75 SmCAdm 36.30 TtlBAdml 10.47 TStkAdm 33.13 WellslAdm 53.01 WelltnAdm 55.54 Windsor 48.13 WdsrIIAd 48.17 Vanguard Fds:

-0.26 +2.6 +0.14 +2.6 +0.15 +2.7 +0.12 +2.3 +0.09 +2.6 -1.0 +0.05 +5.0 -0.19 -1.7 +0.12 +7.9 +0.40 +4.6 +0.76 +5.0 -0.01 -0.8 +0.18 +4.5 +0.01 +3.6 +2.5 -0.02 -1.3 -1.1 -0.01 -1.2 +0.07 +1.9 -0.01 -0.9 -0.3 -0.1 +0.04 -2.4 -1.5 +0.61 +5.4 -1.6 +0.18 +4.6 +1.01 +4.2 -0.3 -0.3 +0.1 +0.1 +0.36 +4.4 -0.9 +0.22 +4.9 +0.07 +0.9 +0.24 +3.4 +0.17 +5.6 +0.35 +5.7

AssetA 25.27 CapOpp 34.91 DivdGro 14.91 Energy 70.00 EqInc 21.16 Explr 76.57 GNMA 10.62 GlobEq 18.59 HYCorp 5.80 HlthCre 126.82 InflaPro 12.84 IntlGr 19.71 IntlVal 33.48 ITIGrade 9.83 LifeCon 16.61 LifeGro 22.81 LifeMod 20.04 LTIGrade 9.06 Morg 19.00 MuInt 13.10 PrecMtls r 25.77 PrmcpCor 14.33 Prmcp r 68.81 SelValu r 19.67 STAR 19.56 STIGrade 10.75 StratEq 19.35 TgtRetInc 11.35 TgRe2010 22.66 TgtRe2015 12.69 TgRe2020 22.67 TgtRe2025 12.99 TgRe2030 22.41 TgtRe2035 13.58 TgtRe2040 22.32 TgtRe2045 14.02 USGro 19.15 Wellsly 21.88 Welltn 32.15 Wndsr 14.27 WndsII 27.14 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntlInst r 108.53 500 121.63

+0.15 +0.03 +0.03 +0.06 +0.06 +0.52 -0.01 +0.03 +0.03 +0.03 +0.06 +0.04 +0.10 +0.08 +0.04 +0.11 -0.01 +0.16 +0.06 +0.17 +0.14 +0.07 +0.14 +0.02 +0.06 +0.04 +0.08 +0.05 +0.10 +0.06 +0.11 +0.07 +0.10 +0.03 +0.13 +0.06 +0.20

+3.4 +5.0 +3.7 +7.9 +3.8 +5.0 -0.8 +4.1 +2.5 +3.6 -1.2 +1.9 +4.1 -0.4 +1.5 +3.4 +2.4 -2.4 +5.4 -0.9 -3.7 +4.1 +4.6 +4.9 +2.5 +0.1 +5.6 +0.6 +1.6 +2.2 +2.6 +2.9 +3.4 +3.7 +3.8 +3.9 +4.9 +0.8 +3.4 +5.6 +5.7

+3.0 +0.76 +5.0

Growth

33.00 +0.17 +4.4

MidCap

21.39 +0.13 +5.3

SmCap

36.27 +0.36 +4.4

SmlCpGth

23.05 +0.22 +5.2

SmlCpVl

16.58 +0.17 +3.6

STBnd

10.50

-0.3

TotBnd

10.47

-0.9

TotlIntl

16.22 +0.03 +2.9

TotStk

33.12 +0.22 +4.9

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.45 +0.04 +4.7

ExtIn

43.18 +0.40 +4.6

FTAllWldI r

96.57 +0.13 +2.9

GrwthIst

33.01 +0.18 +4.5

InfProInst

10.27 -0.01 -1.3

InstIdx

120.79 +0.75 +5.0

InsPl

120.79 +0.75 +5.0

InsTStPlus

29.96 +0.20 +5.0

MidCpIst

21.45 +0.13 +5.4

SCInst

36.30 +0.36 +4.4

TBIst

10.47

TSInst

33.14 +0.22 +5.0

-0.9

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

100.48 +0.62 +5.0

STBdIdx

10.50

-0.3

TotBdSgl

10.47

-0.9

TotStkSgl

31.98 +0.22 +5.0

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.74 +0.01 +0.1

Yacktman Funds: Fund p

17.26 -0.01 +4.4


B USI N ESS

B4 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M   BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-388-1133 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-548-6325 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. EFFECTIVE NEGOTIATION SKILLS, INCREASE YOUR PLANNER POWER WHEN NEGOTIATING: Learn the best way to negotiate in difficult situations; $30; 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Mt. Bachelor Village Resort Conference Center, 19717 Mount Bachelor Drive, Bend; 541-389-5900 or http://mpioc.org/events/2011/2/ mpi-oc-feburary-satellite-program -effective-negotiation-skills -increase-your-planner-p. STRUCTURED INVESTING: This two-hour seminar examines the science of investing. RSVP to reception@finchamfinancial.com or 541-382-8773. Lunch or dinner provided; 11:30 a.m.; Awbrey Glen Golf Club, 2500 N.W. Awbrey Glen Drive, Bend; 541-388-8526. STRUCTURED INVESTING: This two-hour seminar examines the science of investing. RSVP to reception@finchamfinancial.com or 541-382-8773. Lunch or dinner provided; 6 p.m.; Awbrey Glen Golf Club, 2500 N.W. Awbrey Glen Drive, Bend; 541-388-8526.

WEDNESDAY BUILDING DIALOGUE IN AN AGE OF DEMONS: Presented by the Bend Chamber of Commerce, a discussion about overcoming negative communication patterns, how to communicate respectfully to solve problems and keep connected with others. Register by Feb. 8; free; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. bendchamber.org. FAMILY POLICIES TODAY HELP FAMILY BUSINESS TOMORROW: Discuss written agreements for family businesses. Register at http://128.193.77.3/index. php?option=com_content&view =article&id=85:businessforbreakfast series&catid=11 or call 1-800-8597609; $30; 7:30-9:30 a.m.; The Governor Hotel, 614 S.W. 11th Ave., Portland; 503-224-3400. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-388-1133 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions

provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-548-6325 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. IMPLEMENTING LEAN OFFICE: Five-session online course providing tools, resources and skill development to implement LEAN Office protocols. LEAN Office is a work improvement method focused on eliminating waste, reducing costs and improving efficiency. Register at www.simplicated.com/component /option,com_dtregister/Itemid,9. Course dates: Jan. 26, Feb. 9, Feb. 23 and March 9; $199; 9 a.m.; 541788-7001. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish translators will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule with an interpreter call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-504-1389 or visit www. yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. PROACTIVE SELLING IN A DIFFICULT ECONOMY: Obtain information about how to achieve the most from your sales efforts. This online course teaches how to shift the emotion of the buying process onto the prospect by understanding their strengths and weaknesses and how they act and react. For more information and to register visit http://www.targettrainingonline. com/webinar_communication.html; $179.00; 10 a.m. ONLINE MARKETING WITH FACEBOOK & TWITTER: Part of the Online Marketing Series. Class continues Feb. 16. Registration required; $69; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-388-1133 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-548-6325 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz. soutomaior@schwab.com or www. schwab.com.

FRIDAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide access to free tax preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance with tax preparation. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-536-6237 or visit www.

yourmoneyback.org; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-504-1389. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-388-1133 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-548-6325 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. NONPROFIT GRANT WRITING: Registration required; 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc. edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. SISTERS CHAMBER BLACK AND WHITE GALA: Celebration of Sister’s business successes throughout 2010. No-host bar, dinner and awards. Reservations available until Feb. 4; $50 per person; 5:30 p.m.; FivePine Lodge & Conference Center, 1021 Desperado Trail; 541-549-0251 or jeri@sisterscountry.com.

SATURDAY BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.4 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. INTERMEDIATE DREAMWEAVER: Learn advanced website navigation tools. Class continues Feb. 19. Registration required; $89; 9 a.m.1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. PROPERTY MANAGEMENT FOR OWNERS: Discover how to successfully, legally and profitably operate a business of owning and managing residential rentals. Register at http://noncredit.cocc.edu or call 541-383-7290; $59; 9 a.m.4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish translators will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule with an interpreter call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-504-1389 or visit www. yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-447-3260 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Prineville COIC Office, 2321 N.E. Third St.; 541-4473119.

NEWS OF RECORD DEEDS Deschutes County

Russell C. and Wendy D. Mahaney to Gary and Rachel North, Sun Dance, Phase 1, Lot 2, Block 2, $280,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc. to John E. and Donna M. Gilmore, River Canyon Estates, Lot 44, $207,131 Bruce A. Ohara to Marilyn Anthony, Squaw Back Woods Addition to Indian Ford Ranch Homes, Lot 38, $199,000 Ronald J. and Elissa A. Davis to Christopher R. and Heather L. Cordes, Awbrey Butte Homesites, Phase 14, Lot 18, Block 7, $587,551 Flagstar Bank, trustee to Secretary of Housing & Urban Development, Deschutes River Woods, Lot 12, Block A, $192,250.35 Luke Guynup to Jeffrey L. Fucile trustee of Jeffrey L. Fucile Living Trust, Township 20, Range 11, Section 30, $290,000 Wells Fargo Bank N.A. to Martin S. Fitzpatrick and Hillary Egna, trustees of Egna-Fitzpatrick Living Trust, Shevlin Reserve, Lot 13, $250,000

Northwest Trustee Services Inc. to Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Hillman, Lots 1-16, Blocks 132 and 139, $351,147 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Scott and Lisa McIntyre, Skyliner Summit at Broken Top, Phase 2, Lot 99, $298,500 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Chanin and Sangwan Osathanon, Fairhaven, Phase 11, Lot 5, $165,000 Nancy K. Cary to Oregon Housing & Community Services Department, Rim Rock Acres, Lot 4, Block 4, $189,134.39 Wells Fargo Bank N.A. to Theresia Tangkilisan, View Ridge, Lot 16, $169,000 HSBC Bank USA N.A. to Richard L. Orazetti, Awbrey Glen Homesites, Phase 4, Lot 75, $450,000 David A. Weibel to U.S. Bank National Association, Stonehaven, Phase 2, Lot 56, $200,000 Regional Trustee Services to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., Township 15, Range 12, Section 24, $182,998 Hayden Homes LLC to Ashley B. Reed, Village at Cold Springs, Phase 2, Lot 61, $194,990

Jared and Wendy W. Christensen to Jennifer Wegner, Forest Grove Estates, Phases 3 and 4, Lot 59, $321,000 Charlie Leo and Ting L. Sun to Salvatore C. Collura, Ridge at Eagle Crest 53, Lot 26, $167,500 Jeffrey and Trinity Kretz to James W. and Michelle M. Hanus, Second Addition to Whispering Pines Estates, Lot 4, Block 23, $219,000 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corp. to Citimortgage Inc., Gardenside PUD, Phase 1, Lot 5, $253,159.96 David E. and Loy-Dene J. Carter to James L. Reyburn and Georgia M. Sherburne, Wild River, Phase 3, Lot 23, Block 5, $235,000 R.L. Kelley, trustee of Kelley Family Irrevocable Trust to Ronald A. Moschetti, Hillman, Lots 14-19, Block 133, $245,000 Paul Ruedi to Jeffrey G. and Mary L. Gregg, Township 18, Range 12, Section 5, $175,000 J. Kyle Schmid to Federal National Mortgage Association, Partition Plat 1998-7, Parcel 1, $308,161

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

AOL to buy Huffington Post in bid to reignite ad revenue By Jessica Guynn Los Angeles Times

SAN FRANCISCO — In a bid to make itself relevant again, struggling Internet pioneer AOL Inc. announced late Sunday that it would buy the Huffington Post, the well-known news and opinion site, for $315 million in cash and stock. As part of the deal, Huffington Post co-founder Arianna Huffington will oversee a new group responsible for bringing together all editorial content from both companies including news, technology, music and local media websites. The deal, which was signed Sunday with approval from the boards of both companies, is something of a gamble for AOL, which is looking to reignite growth in advertising revenue. The Huffington Post could give AOL a much-needed boost in talent, traffic and ad inventory. Perhaps more important, it could also give the company an image makeover. But it remains to be seen whether the acquisition will be the turning point AOL Chief Executive Tim Armstrong has been looking for in his strategy to transform AOL into major purveyor of content and advertising.

Agriculture Continued from B1 In Crook County, cattle sales totaled $21.4 million in 2010, up from $13.9 million in 2009; Deschutes County cattle sales totaled $8.4 million, up from $5.8 million; and cattle sales totaled $12.2 million in Jefferson County, up from $11 million. Dairy products came in second statewide with gross sales of $473 million, for an increase of 17.1 percent, even though sales of dairy products in Central Oregon were not enough to register in the report. “Milk was up in 2010 because 2009 was a miserable year, one of the lowest on record for dairy farmers,” said Mike Gamroth, OSU Extension dairy specialist in the Willamette Valley. Nursery crops ranked third statewide with gross sales of $456 million, despite a 14 percent decline in sales from 2009, which was attributed to continued slowness in home construction and sales activity, and declining values. “The nursery industry continued to suffer from the economic turndown,” said Larry Burt, the OSU Extension Service economist who complied the report. Deschutes County soared above Central Oregon counties for sales of nursery plants and other specialty crops, totaling $3.4 million, compared with $5,000 in for Crook County and $246,000 for Jefferson County. Those figures are virtually unchanged from 2009, according to the report. Wheat posted the largest percentage increase in gross sales statewide, climbing 36.5 percent to $354.1 million for the fourth highest sales value of 2010. Some of the increase is attributed to low grass seed prices, which prompted some farmers to replace grass seed acreage with wheat, according to Mary Corp, a cereals specialist in the OSU Extension office in Umatilla County. A drought in Russia also pushed wheat prices up, Corp said. Crook County posted sales of $1.2 million for wheat and other grains, up from $1.1 million in 2009 and Jefferson County had $7.1 million in sales, up from $5.4 million. Deschutes numbers were too low to register in the report. Alfalfa hay ranked fifth in gross sales statewide at $175.7 million, down 4.3 percent from 2009. In Central Oregon, where hay and forage ranks second in gross sales, sales totaled $10.4 million in Crook County in 2010, down from $11.7 million in 2009; $5.5 million in Deschutes County, down from $6.8 million; and $10.9 million in Jefferson County, down from $13.5 million. Mylen Bohles, OSU Extension crops agent in Crook County, said low hay prices in 2009 prompted

The Associated Press ile photo

Arianna Huffington, co-founder and editor-in-chief of Huffington Post, will oversee a new group with AOL responsible for all editorial content for both companies. The Internet firm has announced it will buy the Huffington Post for $315 million. So far his efforts have yet to wow Wall Street. Armstrong, a former top Google Inc. executive, has said he is placing his faith in the future of content on the Web. That would make the Huffington Post a natural target for acquisition. The high-traffic website has been the talk of acquisition rumors and even an initial public offering. It got its start in 2005 as a lib-

eral blog with a tiny staff and a $1 million investment, growing since then into one of the most visited news websites in the U.S. It had 25 million unique visitors in December, according to research firm ComScore. The combination of the two firms will reach a total of 117 million unique U.S. visitors, according to AOL. AOL has been looking to reinvent itself as a standalone entity since it disentangled itself in 2009 from its merger with Time Warner. Going it alone, the company has focused on ramping up its editorial content, betting it can make a comeback by selling ads alongside its articles, videos and other original items. It’s concentrating on display advertising and local advertising — types that search giant Google does not dominate. AOL, with its blogs on autos, music, sports and news, as well as its local news site Patch.com and video production resources, has the tools to help the Huffington Post meet its goals, Huffington said. This is AOL’s biggest acquisition since it parted ways from Time Warner. The deal is likely to be completed in the first quarter or early in the second, AOL said.

Agriculture sales rebound

2009

2010

G ross farm and ranch sales for Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties.

Crook County $15.7M $15.2M $13.9M $21.4M $30.2M $37.3M

All crops Cattle and calves Total

Deschutes County All crops Cattle and calves Total

$12.3M $11M $5.8M $8.4M $19.8M 21.2M

Jefferson County $50M $49M

All crops Cattle and calves

$11M $12.2M

Total

$62.8M $63.1M

Source: Oregon State University Extension Service

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

some growers to plant wheat and other crops in 2010. “In general, prices for agricultural commodities in 2010 were higher than the surprisingly low prices in 2009, but sales did not spring back as much as we hoped,” Burt said. Gross sales plunged 15 percent in 2009 from the previous year, marking the biggest percentage drop in more than three decades. Sales of grass and legume seeds fell 16.2 percent to $255.9 million from 2009, according to the report. Field crop sales, which primarily included potatoes grown for seed on 430 acres in Central Oregon, totaled $1.6 million in Crook County in 2010, up from $1.2 million in 2009; and $17.1 million in Jefferson County, down from $15.5 million. Deschutes County potato/field crop sales dropped to zero in 2010, down from $5.5 million the year before, according to the report. Fahrettin Goktepe, potato researcher at the Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center between Madras and Powell Butte, said the price for seed potatoes grown in Central Oregon averaged around $12 per 100-pound sack in 2010, which he said is a fairly good price compared with the lows he’s seen during his five years doing potato research in Central Oregon. “I’d say $12 is not a bad prices for seed potatoes. It’s between the highs of $15 to $16 per hundred pounds, and lows of $7 to $8,” he said. Statewide, the vegetable and truck crop sector increased to $294.5 million in sales, 2.6 percent higher than in 2009. Central Oregon vegetable sales, mostly in vegetable seed crops, totaled $530,000 in Crook County in 2010, up from $408,000 in 2009; $276,000 in Deschutes County, up

from zero; and $626,000 in Jefferson County, down from $1.4 million. The leading vegetable crop in Oregon, dry-storage onions, posted $122.9 million in sales last year, 44 percent more than 2009. In other sectors, sales of chickens and eggs, at $142.7 million, were 9.2 percent higher than in 2009. New markets in India and China helped drive demand for Oregon berries, said Wei Yang, agricultural small fruits specialist at OSU’s North Willamette Research and Extension Center in Aurora. Sales of tree fruits and smallfruit crops in Central Oregon didn’t total enough to register on the report. Statewide, small fruits and berries totaled $108.1 million, up 10 percent from 2009. Despite a reduction in yields because of bad weather, sweet cherries’ gross sales jumped 88 percent to $71 million. That’s because the price per ton skyrocketed to $2,054 compared with $846 for the 2009 harvest, Burt said. On the downside, sales of wine grapes declined 17 percent, to $65.3 million, because adverse weather reduced yields by almost 20 percent in some areas, Burt said. Sales of hazelnuts dipped 4 percent, to $34.2 million, versus 2009. Yields were lower, but the price increased to a near record of $1.07 per pound, Burt said. Of Oregon’s 36 counties, Marion County reported the most sales, at $511 million in 2010, up almost 1 percent from the prior year, according to the report, which is available online at: http://ir.library .oregonstate.edu/xmlui/bitstream /handle/1957/19967/sr790-10.pdf. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@bendbulletin.com.


L

Inside

C OREGON Underemployed face economic hurdles, see Page C3. Lawmakers tout energy efficiency in schools, see Page C6.

OBITUARIES Maria Altmann fought for return of Nazi-seized art, see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2011

Bill would up penalty for assault on reserve officers

Well sh t!

WORKSHOP: DEPTH OF FIELD

Last Tuesday we asked readers to submit their best examples of pictures utilizing depth of field. Follow the series at www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot Coming up: Feb. 22: Virtual field trip to the Old Mill District • March 8: Rule of thirds • March 22: Virtual field trip to downtown • April 5: Triptychs • And more...

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

SALEM — After firing shots at three police officers in Madras in May, Aldo Inez Antunez pleaded guilty to two counts of attempted aggravated murder and one count of attempted murder. IN THE The lesser LEGISLATURE plea was allowed because one of the men Antunez targeted was a reserve police officer rather than a certified officer. At least one lawmaker, Rep. Rep. John John Huffman, Huffman, R-The Dalles, R-The Dalles would like the law to place reserve and fulltime officers on the same footing when it comes to sentencing. Currently, reserve police officers are not covered under the aggravated murder statute. Aggravated murder is a specific type of murder, such as the murder of a police officer or a juror, that carries the possibility of the death penalty upon conviction. The maximum penalty for murder is 25 years to life. See Officers / C5

Sisters’ budget outlook sunnier

Submitted by user Mark

“Fancy hat”

Submitted by user Alastair

“Portland’s Union Station” “Seeing stars” Submitted by user Keith Bagwell

Submitted by user Kristin Wolter

“Logan in the backyard”

Five Buttes logging project in owl habitat gets go-ahead

Submitted by user Curzon

“Thistle flower”

The city of Sisters appears likely to avoid significant budget shortfalls and cuts as it begins to prepare its 2011-12 budget. Budget pressures across the region have begun to increase as cities consider the effects of declining property valuation on next year’s budget. In Redmond, for instance, property values have declined by about 12 percent in the last year, leading the way to reduced tax revenues and a shortfall that could reach $2 million. Cities also face increasing costs that include health insurance and employee retirement funds. That doesn’t look to be the case in Sisters, where property values have declined only by about a half percent, according to City Manager Eileen Stein. Stein said the city’s economic outlook is a relief, though the roughly $9 million budget remains tight. “We are continuing to tighten our belts and look at priorities for the city,” Stein said. “I’m optimistic that the critical services we provide the community, we’ll continue to be able to provide to the community.” The city staff will be a smaller next year. Sisters has two positions open — one each in public works and planning — and the city will not fill those, saving about $150,000 in salary and benefit costs. That move reduces the city’s work force to 17 positions. See Sisters / C5

Middle school boundaries studied to cut overcrowding

By Kate Ramsayer

By Sheila G. Miller

The Bulletin

The Bulletin

The U.S. Forest Service is planning to move forward with the controversial Five Buttes Project west of La Pine, which includes some commercial logging in spotted owl habitat. Last month, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals denied a petition from conservation organizations to stop the project. The project includes logging and treatments to remove fireprone vegetation, such as shrubs and trees, across more than 5,500 acres near Odell and Davis lakes. To help prevent large wildfires from sweeping unchecked through the area, the Forest Service proposed removing vegetation in different spots across the landscape — including commercial logging in about 620 acres of spotted owl habitat within the Davis Late Successional Reserve. The 9th Circuit Court decision gives the Forest Service the opportunity to analyze the effects of logging or thinning in other stands similar to those covered in Five Buttes project, said John Allen, Deschutes National Forest supervisor. “It doesn’t mean we’re going to treat all owl habitat” on the east side of the Cascades, Allen said. “But we do have the opportunity to do treatments where it makes sense.” The goal, he said, is to create areas across a landscape that are less dense so wildland firefighters could put out a blaze before spreads farther and burns up high-quality owl habitat, as the Davis Fire did in 2003. “The Deschutes National Forest has lost 40 percent of its nesting sites in the last 10 years due to stand-replacing fires,” Allen said. “This is trying to prevent that catastrophic loss.” See Logging / C6

A committee charged with altering middle school boundaries for the 2011-12 school year has formed a subgroup to find new options to solve the overcrowding at Cascade Middle School. On Wednesday, the subgroup will meet to find new alternatives that would cut overcrowding at Cascade Middle School and fill open space at Sky View and Pilot Butte middle schools. “We have four or five (options) on the table, and we want more,” said Julianne Repman, the district’s spokeswoman. Last Wednesday, the committee debated four options: one to send Pine Ridge Elementary students to Pilot Butte Middle instead of Cascade, and another that would make the Pine Ridge change and send Ensworth Elementary kids to Sky View. The other two options involve High Lakes Elementary students who live north of Portland Avenue. In those two scenarios, those students would either go to Sky View or Pilot Butte middle schools. But according to Deputy Superintendent John Rexford, all but one of those options are off the table. Only the option of sending Pine Ridge students to Pilot Butte instead of Cascade, and Ensworth students to Sky View instead of Pilot Butte, remains. The High Lakes options, Rexford said, didn’t have the right number of students to make for a permanent change. See Schools / C5

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Attention, photographers! These photos were among scores readers posted on www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot. We publish reader photos every other Tuesday, the week after our photographers offer advice. The Bulletin assumes that submitted photos are the original work of the entrants and that no excessive postprocessing has altered the content of the images.

On the Web Go to http://bit.ly/msboundary for updated information on the Bend-La Pine Schools middleschool boundary process.


C2 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Driver in fatal crash pleads not guilty Stacia Roberts pleaded not guilty Monday to charges of manslaughter, assault and drunken driving stemming from a crash that killed two in August. A trial has been scheduled for May. At about 7:30 a.m. on Aug. 17, Roberts, 23, of Bend, was driving east on Highway 20 with three friends in her car: 19-year-old Joshua Herrin, of Bend; 18-year-old Nina Blackmore, of Sisters; and 20-yearold Casey Hoyle, of Bend. Prosecutors say Roberts had at least three controlled substances in her blood when she swerved near Black Butte, crossing the oncoming lane of traffic and smashing into a large tree. When deputies and medics arrived on the scene, Herrin was already dead. Blackmore, who had been critically injured, was flown by Air Link to St. Charles Bend, where she died the following day. Roberts and Hoyle were taken to the hospital by ambulance and were later released.

Fire Marshall Casey Kump said crews were able to extinguish the fire in the 500-squarefoot building, but an estimated $30,000 in damage was caused to the structure and merchandise. The store was closed at the time of the fire, and no one was injured, Kump said. Officials believe the fire was caused by a faulty power cord to a cooling unit.

Volunteers with dogs wanted for goose help The Bend Park & Recreation District is seeking volunteers with well-trained dogs to help manage geese in Bend parks, according to the district. Volunteers will help with goose management efforts throughout the spring and summer, and volunteers with well-trained herding dogs are preferred. To become a volunteer, participant dogs must respond to verbal commands. Those interested in volunteering will need to complete a volunteer application and pass a background check. Participants must also attend training sessions. For more information about the program, call 541-388-5435.

Arsonist-murderer gets 35-year term

Redmond Airport seeks commissioner

Jerome Phillip Spino, 32, was sentenced to 35 years in prison on Monday by a U.S. District Court judge for arson and two counts of second-degree murder. Spino pleaded guilty to the charges on Nov. 4, saying he started a fire on May 28, 2008, at a residence on Shepard Lane in Warm Springs that killed a 43-year-old man and a 49-year-old woman. Spino admitted to spreading gasoline about the residence and setting the fire with a lighter, intending to kill himself, but lost his nerve and escaped through a window at the last moment.

Applications to fill a volunteer Redmond Airport Commission position are being accepted through March 4, according to the Deschutes County Board of Commissioners. The commissioners are seeking a qualified candidate with airport-related experience to fill the position on the committee, which acts as an advisory group to the airport manager. The Redmond Airport Commission meets once every two or three months, normally on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. in the Redmond Airport conference room. Those interested in being considered for the position should send a letter of interest listing aviation-related experience to Anna Johnson, Deschutes County Services Center, 1300 N.W. Wall St., Bend, OR 97701 by March 4. Applicants can also e-mail annaj@ deschutes.org. Those interested can also call 541-330-4640 to find out more about the vacancy and the committee.

$30,000 in damage in grocery store fire Crook County Fire & Rescue responded to a fire at F & F Grocery on Southeast Davis Loop in Juniper Canyon about 7 p.m. Sunday.

Report: Pilot in crash was inexperienced By The Associated Press BOISE, Idaho — A preliminary report by the National Transportation Safety Board says the pilot in a small plane crash in Oregon near the Idaho border had earned his private license less than three months before the accident. KBOI-TV in Boise, Idaho, reports the cause of the crash that killed three people from the Nampa-Boise area remains under investigation.

But according to the NTSB preliminary report, the flight left Ontario in Eastern Oregon about 15 minutes before the Jan. 29 accident and there was fog reported in the area. The bodies of the pilot, Andrey Pasechnikov, 38; his mother, Vera Pasechnikov, 69; and his brother-in-law, Yuriy Ludan, 24, were found Jan. 30 in the wreckage of a single-engine Cessna 182 in a canyon near Adrian in Malheur County.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:29 a.m. Feb. 2, in the 61100 block of Larkwood Drive. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 1:07 p.m. Feb. 2, in the 61700 block of Darla Place. Theft — A guitar was reported stolen at 2:59 p.m. Feb. 2, in the 500 block of Northeast 15th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and arrest made at 3 p.m. Feb. 2, in the 61200 block of Parrell Road. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 4:31 p.m. Feb. 2, in the 19400 block of Hollygrape Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 9:30 p.m. Feb. 2, in the 1200 block of Northwest Davenport Avenue. DUII — Jonathan Michael Wallace, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:49 a.m. Feb. 3, in the area of Northeast Ninth Street and Northeast Norton Avenue. DUII — Michael John Chappell, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:41 a.m. Feb. 3, in the area of Larkspur Loop and Snap Dragon Lane. DUII — Dustin Leeroy Hager, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:55 p.m. Feb. 3, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 5:42 a.m. Feb. 4, in the 61100 block of Lodgepole Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:36 a.m. Feb. 4, in the 800 block of Northwest Wall Street. Redmond Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 2:57 p.m. Feb. 4, in the 1800 block of Southwest Obsidian Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 1:18 p.m. Feb. 4, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:41 a.m. Feb. 4, in the 2200 block of Southwest Metolius Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 10:10 a.m. Feb. 4, in the 1200 block of Southwest 28th Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:49 a.m. Feb. 4, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 10:59 p.m. Feb. 5, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. DUII — Anthony William Johnson, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:48 p.m. Feb. 5, in the area of Southwest Timber Avenue and Southwest Timber View Court. DUII — Beau Allen Rogers, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5:22 p.m. Feb. 5, in the area of Southwest Sixth Street and Southwest Glacier Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:16 p.m. Feb. 5, in the 700 block of Northwest Fifth Street. Criminal mischief — Slashed tires were reported at 1:18 p.m. Feb. 5, in the 1000 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:53 p.m. Feb. 5, in the 600 block of Northwest Canyon Drive.

Criminal mischief — Slashed tires were reported at 12:19 p.m. Feb. 5, in the 2700 block of Southwest Timber Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:55 a.m. Feb. 5, in the 2700 block of Southwest Metolius Avenue. Burglary — A safe was reported stolen at 7:11 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 400 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:30 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 11:23 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 3400 block of Southwest Juniper Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:56 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 500 block of Southwest 14th Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:38 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 1200 block of Southwest 18th Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 7:46 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 2900 block of Southwest Lava Avenue. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A child’s ATV was reported stolen at 3:12 p.m. Feb. 4, in the 12700 block of Northwest Chinook Drive in Crooked River Ranch. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:49 a.m. Feb. 4, in the 53700 block of Big Timber Drive in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:11 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 2300 block of Southwest 58th Street in Redmond. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:21 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 2500 block of Northeast Sedgewick Avenue in Terrebonne. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:27 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 60000 block of Turquoise Road in Bend. DUII — Tymen Jager, 77, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5:03 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 8100 block of North U.S. Highway 97 in Terrebonne. Criminal mischief — Paintballing was reported at 7:33 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 15600 block of Westwind Court in La Pine. Criminal mischief — Paintballing was reported at 11:36 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 53000 block of Holiday Drive in La Pine. Criminal mischief — Paintballing was reported at 11:59 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 15700 block of Old Mill Road in La Pine. Criminal mischief — Paintballing was reported at 12:43 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 15700 block of Sunrise Boulevard in La Pine. Criminal mischief — Paintballing was reported at 3:04 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 53200 block of Andrews Road in La Pine. Criminal mischief — Paintballing was reported at 3:07 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 15800 block of Green Forest Road in La Pine. Criminal mischief — Paintballing was reported at 4:51 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 53200 block of Andrews Road in La Pine. Criminal mischief — Paintballing was reported at 4:59 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 15700 block of Old Mill Road in La Pine. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 1:38 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 56500 block of Meteor Drive in La Pine. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 12:46 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 56600 block of Solar Drive in La Pine.

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NASDAQ holds first trading day in 1971 By The Associated Press Today is Tuesday, Feb. 8, the 39th day of 2011. There are 326 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Feb. 8, 1910, the Boy Scouts of America was incorporated. ON THIS DATE In 1587, Mary, Queen of Scots was beheaded at Fotheringhay Castle in England after she was implicated in a plot to murder her cousin, Queen Elizabeth I. In 1693, a charter was granted for the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg in the Virginia Colony. In 1837, the Senate selected the vice president of the United States, choosing Richard Mentor Johnson after no candidate received a majority of electoral votes. In 1904, the Russo-Japanese War, over control of Manchuria and Korea, began as Japanese forces attacked Port Arthur. In 1924, the first execution by gas in the United States took place at the Nevada State Prison in Carson City as Gee Jon, a Chinese immigrant convicted of murder, was put to death. In 1960, work began on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, located on Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street in Los Angeles. In 1968, three college students were killed in a confrontation with highway patrolmen in Or-

T O D AY IN HISTORY angeburg, S.C., during a civil rights protest against a whitesonly bowling alley. In 1971, NASDAQ, the world’s first electronic stock exchange, held its first trading day. In 1989, 144 people were killed when an American-chartered Boeing 707 filled with Italian tourists slammed into a fog-covered mountain in the Azores. In 2007, model, actress and tabloid sensation Anna Nicole Smith died in Florida at age 39 of an accidental drug overdose. TEN YEARS AGO The House Government Reform Committee opened hearings into former President Bill Clinton’s last-minute pardon of fugitive financier Marc Rich, with former prosecutors complaining that they hadn’t been consulted before the pardon was granted. President George W. Bush sent his proposed $1.6 trillion 10-year tax cut plan to Congress. FIVE YEARS AGO President George W. Bush condemned deadly rioting sparked by cartoons of the prophet Muhammad as he urged foreign leaders to halt the spreading violence. U2 captured five Grammy awards for their album “How to Dismantle An Atomic Bomb.�

ONE YEAR AGO Endeavour and six astronauts rocketed into orbit, hauling a new room and observation deck for the International Space Station. Michael Jackson’s physician, Dr. Conrad Murray, pleaded not guilty to involuntary manslaughter in the death of the pop superstar. The Nielsen Co. estimated that 106.5 million people watched the New Orleans Saints upset the Indianapolis Colts, beating the 1983 “M*A*S*H� finale, which had 105.97 million viewers. U.S. Rep. John Murtha, 77, died at a hospital in Arlington, Va., of complications from gall bladder surgery. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Composer-conductor John Williams is 79. Former ABC News anchor Ted Koppel is 71. Actor Nick Nolte is 70. Actorrock musician Creed Bratton is 68. Author John Grisham is 56. Environmental Protection Agency administrator Lisa P. Jackson is 49. Actress Mary McCormack is 42. Retired NBA player Alonzo Mourning is 41. Actor Seth Green is 37. Rock musician Phoenix (Linkin Park) is 34. Actor Ryan Pinkston is 23. Actress Karle Warren (“Judging Amy�) is 19. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Consistency is a paste jewel that only cheap men cherish.� — William Allen White American journalist (1868-1944)

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Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 11:09 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 17200 block of Covina Road in La Pine. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 9:44 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 56500 block of Meteor Drive in La Pine. Theft — Snowboards were reported stolen from a vehicle at 8:53 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 56600 block of Lunar Drive in La Pine. DUII — Steven Robert Parker, 46, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:32 a.m. Feb. 6, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and La Pine State Recreation Road in La Pine. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Robbery — A robbery was reported at 11:06 a.m. Jan. 30, in the 100 block of Northwest Depot Road in Madras. Oregon State Police

DUII — William T. Warren, 38, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:51 p.m. Feb. 4, in the area of state Highway 126 near milepost 109. DUII — David Hickey, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:27 a.m. Feb. 5, in the area of East U.S. Highway 20 and Northeast Seventh Street in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:30 p.m. Feb. 4, in the area of West U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 12. DUII — Levi Strunk, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:30 a.m. Feb. 6, in the area of China Hat Road near milepost 12. DUII — Jared Andrew Gaskill, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:57 p.m. Feb. 6, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 127. DUII — Bryce Rory Bowden, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:37 p.m. Feb. 6, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 124. DUII — Samuel Luke Emerson, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:59 p.m. Feb. 6, in the area of Southeast Third and Southeast Division streets in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:26 p.m. Feb. 6, in the area of Southeast Third and Southeast Division streets in Bend.

DUII — Jason Dominic Rodoni, 33, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:29 a.m. Feb. 7, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Northeast Greeley Avenue in Bend.

BEND FIRE RUNS Wednesday 8:04 a.m. — Chimney or flue fire, 1337 N.E. Pilot Butte Drive. 9:43 a.m. — Building fire, 2248 N.E. Fourth St. 3:33 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, in rear of 64900 Hunnell Road. 20 — Medical aid calls. Thursday 4:12 p.m. — Flammable liquid spill, 3071 N.E. Weddell Road. 26 — Medical aid calls. Friday 3:04 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 2424 N.W. Marken St. 13 — Medical aid calls. Saturday 12:47 p.m. — Animal rescue, 1680 N.E. Sonya Court. 2:37 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 2500 N.E. Fourth St. 3:17 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 19754 Foster Lane. 3:49 p.m. — Chimney or flue fire, 20685 Hawkin Place. 23 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 7:21 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 330 S.E. Woodland Boulevard. 7:58 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, McClain Drive. 18 — Medical aid calls.

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, February 8, 2011 C3

O Underemployed face challenges By Diane Dietz The Register-Guard

EUGENE — Lee Thompson can’t help it. Each day when the 54-yearold Eugene man rides his bicycle home from his part-time job as a sign waver for a mattress store, he stops on a bridge and peers over the railing at what has become — for him — the economic abyss. Every day he sees a new tent pitched inside a blackberry bush down there. Every day he dreads the idea of finding himself sleeping at the Eugene Mission or under a bridge. After waving a sign outside for a second winter, he knows enough about the rain and cold. Thompson has taken an economic tumble in the three years since he lost a $13-an-hour job installing Corian soap dishes in luxury motor homes. Then, he had the confidence of 30 plus years of solid work history behind him. He saw a decent retirement ahead. “I thought I pretty well had it made,” he said. But then came March 2008, the third month of the worst national recession since the Great Depression. The Lane County recreational vehicle industry repeatedly cut employees 100 at a time. One day, the company supervisors showed up at Thompson’s work station. “They came in and said, ‘Lee, bring your tools and come into the office.’ I almost had a heart attack.”

Many can’t pay bills That was the last day Thompson had full-time work. Today, he’s one of about 170,000 involuntary part-time workers in Oregon, people who are not counted in the monthly unemployment numbers but who can’t get enough work to pay their bills. Economists describe them as “employed part-time for economic reasons.” Nationally, their numbers “roughly doubled” during the recession, said Heidi Shierholz, an economist with the Economic Policy Institute, which is based in Washington, D.C. In 2007, there were 4.4 million involuntary part-timers, and by December 2010 the number had grown to 8.9 million, she said. “All we know is they want a full-time job, they’re available to work for full time and they have to settle for part-time hours,” she said. Oregon’s group of involuntary part-timers grew about 3 percent faster than the rate in the rest of the country over the past six years, according to the state Employment Department. Their inability to find full-time work is a drag on the state’s per capita earnings, bringing the figure down to $36,125 — 9 percent lower than the national per capita income, according to an Employment Department report. And when you add the invol-

“I never give up. I kept putting in applications even though I’m not making it. I’m trying to keep a good spirit up.” — Lee Thompson, 54, who works part-time as a sign-waver untary part-timers, plus the discouraged job-seekers who are no longer putting out resumes, to Oregon’s already high 10.6 percent unemployment rate, it shows what Oregon businesses are up against when it comes to reviving the postrecession labor market. The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics figures that factoring in the involuntary part-timers and discouraged job-seekers along with the jobless people officially counted as unemployed puts Oregon’s 2010 unemployment rate at 20 percent. That places Oregon in the company of the nation’s hardluck states, including Michigan, California and Nevada. “You’ve got a lot of folks waiting tables or stocking shelves at Fred Meyer who would like full-time work,” Lake Oswego economist Bill Conerly said. “It’s people who would normally have a full-time office job taking a lesser job in retail or hospitality just so they have something.”

Recession took its toll Thompson has been at work steadily since the mid-1970s, when he started working while still in high school at the old Drive N Save on West 11th Avenue. He became a warehouseman — after he quit high school — and worked in a succession of distribution centers, including those supplying the windowmaker Empire Pacific Industries and Bi-Mart. In the mid-1990s, Thompson went to work in RV manufacturing, first at Monaco Coach and later at Country Coach. He specialized in assembling showers. “I worked 37 years solid until 2008 and I never had trouble finding a job,” he said. But in the mid-2000s, the RV industry in Lane County began a severe contraction, going from 4,500 jobs in 2005 to 900 jobs today. Thompson didn’t wait around after his March 2008 layoff. He wanted to get back into warehouse work, but it’s tough now because the inventory is tracked by computer. It’s no longer enough to be a good forklift driver. At age 54, he’s trying to teach himself to type. He haunts government-sponsored job centers, sometimes putting out 30 applications a day. “When I first got laid off in ’08, it wasn’t quite so bad,” he said. “People were still kind of hiring. I had six or seven interviews in a month.” His unemployment checks, meanwhile, often weren’t enough to cover his expenses, he said, which included $450 a month for rent and $400 for child sup-

port. He was doing OK when the checks were initially for $251 a week, he said, but they soon tapered to $59 a week. For a while, “every month, I got $150 behind,” he said. He learned to tap social services to survive. “Every stitch of clothes I’ve got on right now, I got through the churches,” he said. Then an employment agent called with an offer for the signwaving job. “I said ‘I need some kind work; I’ll do anything.’”

Multiple jobs The first year Thompson was unemployed, he got a $9-an-hour gig with Crowd Management Services, working security at University of Oregon games. He also worked as a Salvation Army bell ringer. For a year now, Thompson has waved a sign 5½ hours a day in front of Mattress Mania on Gateway in Springfield or on West 11th Avenue in Eugene — about a block from the site of the grocery store where he started his work life. “I wear long johns. I have, like, five sweatshirts I put on. If you put a poncho on it keeps the wind from blowing through. And I’ve got hand warmers.” For $8.40 an hour he stands on the sidewalk. He waves his sign until his shoulders ache. He yells “SAVE LIKE CRAZY.” Time passes slower than the dinnertime traffic on West 11th. “It seems like a lifetime out there,” Thompson said. When Thompson learned that Mattress Mania had paid a guy $150 to clean the two store windows, he said he’d do it for $100 — and so he got himself another part-time job. He’s approaching business owners for more regular commercial window cleaning jobs. And he still hopes for a fulltime job. “I never give up,” he said. “I kept putting in applications even though I’m not making it. I’m trying to keep a good spirit up.”

tice Center. He works 520 hours a year, putting in two- or five-hour days, as needed by Lane County, which is his employer. Working part-time during the past four years has had some benefits, he said. He became the main parent for his son, Timothy, volunteering in his classroom and coaching his ice hockey team. But the Schaaf family is living on the edge economically, he said. “We’re check to check, so when our car breaks down it messes us up for two or three months,” he said. Schaaf wants to build a cushion of three to six months’ savings for his family but can’t on his part-time earnings. The Schaafs carry full insurance for their boy, but the parents are scantily covered. “Our deductible is like $3,000 or $5,000, so right now, if something were to happen, we’d be in a lot of trouble,” Schaaf said. His hope is to get on fulltime at Serbu, which would mean a raise of up to $25 an hour. The Schaafs were confident at first when the recession came, believing Nadya’s job was secure because everybody always needs insurance. That confidence was shaken as the recession ground on. Nadya’s employer insured a lot of building contractors — accounts that evaporated with the retraction of the housing market. She’s still working but the uncertainty is unnerving. Schaaf said the possibility of homelessness has crossed his mind but he believes extended family would certainly take them in if it came to that. “We try to not let it stress us out,” he said. “Everything is working right now. We have a happy son. He’s 10 years old and happy. We’re not wanting for anything.”

O  B Endangered whale enters Oregon waters

Oregon City officer, OSP trooper collide

A highly endangered whale that spends summers off Russia has moved into waters off the Oregon Coast. The 13-year-old, male western Pacific gray whale, dubbed “Flex,” is giving U.S. and Russian researchers insight into where the rare whales may spend winters. Only 130 western Pacific gray whales remain. The stock is distinct from eastern gray whales that spend summers feeding off Alaska and winters breeding and giving birth off Mexico. Researchers attached a satellite tag to Flex on Oct. 4. It moved east across the Bering Sea and then south through the Aleutian Islands. Researchers lost the signal for five days but picked it up as the whale moved to 280 miles west of Vancouver Island and then to shallow water roughly 15 miles off Washington and Oregon.

GLADSTONE — An Oregon City police officer suffered minor injuries in a collision with an Oregon State Police trooper in Gladstone. The trooper was not injured. Oregon State Police say both officers were responding to help look for a suspect Sunday night when they crashed at an intersection. The accident is being investigated by a team made up of several agencies in Clackamas County. The suspect who had fled on foot from another trooper was captured.

Prosecution unlikely if petty criminals flee KLAMATH FALLS — The cost of extradition means that petty criminals who flee from Oregon are unlikely to face prosecution unless they return to the state. More than 100 people a month are transported to and within Oregon to face criminal charges in various jurisdictions under a cooperative system of extraditing and transporting suspects that is fairly simple but isn’t cheap, the Herald and News in Klamath Falls reported. Oregon counties must help pay part of the cost because of the state’s budget crisis, limiting resources to more serious crimes. Fran Lushenko, state director of extradition services, says the state typically pays only for extraditions related to severe felonies — murder, attempted murder, felony assault, burglary, robbery and kidnapping, and certain sex and drug offenses.

Boy, 14, will be tried as adult in fatal stabbing HILLSBORO — A Washington County judge has decided that a 14-year-old charged with aggravated murder in a fatal stabbing will be tried as an adult. Juan Carlos Negrete-Vasquez was 13 when he was arrested in October 2009, several days after 19-year-old Eduardo AldradeAlcanter was killed in a park and left on a river bank in Cornelius, Ore. Police say Negrete-Vasquez struck the victim several times in the back of the head with a tire iron, and he and a 20-year-old man took turns stabbing him. — From wire reports

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Hard even with degree Mike Schaaf and his wife, Nadya, can pay their rent and bills on her full-time salary as an insurance customer service representative, but his inability to get full-time hours leaves them little margin for mishap. For the past four years, Mike Schaaf, who has a degree in psychology and sociology from the University of Wyoming, has been an on-call group worker at the John Serbu Youth Campus and Lane County Juvenile Jus-

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C4 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editorial writer

Don’t kill charters with new rules

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regon’s history with charter schools has been a checkered one. Oregon did not embrace the notion of new public schools run by folks outside the education establishment

and that establishment accepted charter schools only grudgingly. The law allowing charter schools made it through the Legislature in 1999 after three earlier attempts failed. Meanwhile, the Oregon Education Association, the state’s largest teachers union, continues to oppose the schools 12 years later. The schools have not been without their problems, to be sure. Online charters have given school districts and lawmakers fits, and the collapse of a series of charters and their single administrative company last year did nothing to improve the situation. The 15 AllPrep academies, including three in Sisters, folded in March and April of last year and EdChoices, the administrative company, soon followed suit. In the wake of EdChoices’ demise, parents and school districts had trouble obtaining student records, making transfer into other schools difficult. An investigation into the schools showed what can most kindly be called financial mismanagement. It’s no wonder that lawmakers are looking to tighten the laws governing charters this year. The danger is that they’ll tighten them up too much. One bill currently before the Legislature would require that a charter school’s student records be transferred to the school district if the charter dissolved or was forced to close. Had such a law been in place when the AllPrep academies failed, presumably students would have faced no particu-

lar hurdles when they tried to enroll in their local district-run schools. Too, lawmakers are right to try to tighten the rules surrounding charter schools’ finances, as a second bill would do. Annual audits that go to the sponsoring school district make good sense. The only question we might have is why they haven’t been required all along. After all, charter schools spend public money to educate their students, and the public is entitled to know how its money is being spent. Of greater concern is a section of the latter measure that would allow the local school board to take into account a charter school applicant’s prior experience in running a charter or providing education services. That requirement could all too easily become a vehicle for killing many charter school proposals. Moreover, it flies in the face of the idea that charters are to be different and innovative: If only those with “experience” are to be given serious consideration, many who want to shake things up will be eliminated because they lack experience. We’re all for requiring a charter to have its books audited and the results sent to the local school district. We also favor ensuring the school records arrive in the proper hands in a timely fashion. But experience running schools shouldn’t be required, and lawmakers should remove that part of HB 2028 before they go further.

Gunning for the barred owl Federal wildlife officials are planning to give the Northern Spotted Owl armed reinforcements. Officials are going to replace natural selection with shotgun management. The plan is to shoot 1,200 or more of the bird’s rival, barred owls. The spotted owl can’t handle the competition. The spotted owl is picky. It needs just the right kind of forest and pretty much likes flying squirrels for dinner. But what wildlife officials say is the spotted owl’s biggest threat is its biological cousin, the barred owl. Barred owls don’t care so much about habitat or what they eat. They are aggressive, territorial. They easily bully the spotted owl out. The environmental impact statement on killing barred owls may be completed this summer. We don’t have a problem with killing barred owls. But anybody has to wonder about the cost, the necessity, and, of course, if it will work. First, the barred owls would have to be hunted out of an area. Infiltrators would have to be intercepted and shot. And keep being intercepted and shot. That would seem to be a forever war. It’s not clear how much that will cost, though one estimate is $1 million

a year. We just hope federal officials don’t get wildly ambitious with their hunting experiment. How is that going to restore a proper balance to nature? The barred owl is not an invasive species. The two birds can interbreed. And there really isn’t much difference between the owls. Some biologists believe they were at one point the same species and split off during the ice age. The barred owl proved to be more flexible and aggressive. It spread. No animal has succeeded as well as the spotted owl at endangering Oregon’s timber industry. Before the 1990 listing of the owl, Oregon loggers cut 4.9 billion board feet of timber on federal land. In 2009, the total was 240 million board feet, according to The Oregonian. The policies to save the bird since 1990 have failed. If under federal direction, the spotted owl’s competition is taken out and it still doesn’t recover, what then? Something else will no doubt be tried. Perhaps breeding for more aggressive and less finicky spotted owls. The natural name for that would be a barred owl.

My Nickel’s Worth An overlooked skill I thoroughly enjoyed the piece on folks who are frequent writers of “Letters to the Editor.” I have long felt that these short, pithy compositions are an under-appreciated literary genre. The ability to clearly convey a point of view in a few well-crafted paragraphs is a skill to be encouraged, and enriches the public dialogue on issues that are important to all. Several years ago, I started a web podcast — “Rantcaster” — in which I read selected letters to the editor from newspapers around the world, including Africa, the Mideast, Asia and Europe. The idea was to focus on what people were “ranting” about in other cultures. I found, not surprisingly, that messy, argumentative democratic cultures produced the most reliable supply of literary gems; India, Australia, South Africa and Ireland top the list. I also found, not surprisingly, that the issues that motivated letter-writers in those countries were not that different from here at home: government competence (or lack thereof), the environment, social justice, corruption, war, education — all universal themes, but viewed from a different, and always interesting, perspective. Your “What You Write” article might just motivate me to rekindle “Rantcaster,” which petered out after an 18month run. Bill Valenti Bend

You don’t tax to get skinny Tax on soda pop. Now there’s a good idea! Marah Hall, campaign manager

for Upstream Public Health, is lobbying to impose a tax on soda pop under the guise that the money would be used to eradicate obesity. Wouldn’t you know that a Democrat, Rep. Mitch Greenlick of Portland, will back HB 2644 to make it a new tax law. Both these people must be naive or stupid to think they can legislate skinniness. This is just another tax burden on the public to be wasted by the liberal Legislature. I’ve often heard the difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has limitations. This principle is alive and well in Portland. Dennis Harrison Redmond

A bad ad I was unpleasantly amazed to read the following in an ad for Frequency in the latest Go! magazine: “Word on the streets is the kids love to watch moving pictures on the Internet. Hey, it’s easier than reading.” We are living in times when parents and educators are often at a loss to persuade kids to read. My colleagues teach at community colleges and report that disturbingly high numbers of freshmen have the literacy levels of fourthgraders. Please address that ill-advised pitch for the Frequency. After all, you are a newspaper. Mary Sojourner Bend

Mirror Pond plan A recent Bulletin article quoted Ryan Houston as saying, “when we look at a project like Mirror Pond, we really try to put all of the crazy ideas on the ta-

ble.” With that in mind, here’s a couple of mine. Should it be dredged? Let it slowly revert to a wetland? Remove the dam and once again become a free-flowing river? My vote would be to remove the built-up silt and let it remain the visual centerpiece of Bend that it has been for 100 years. Another question is how to pay for the improvements. Studies so far have pointed toward trying to get a government grant, which means tax dollars, which means dealing with Salem and Washington, D.C. It will be difficult enough working through the government permitting process even without taking their dollars. I would suggest organizing a pledge drive and raising the money locally. After all, the Bend community will benefit the most, residents and businesses alike. A pledge drive would also quickly determine community support for the project. No money equals no support. It would be interesting to have someone Photoshop what the existing pond area would look like as a wetland and as a free-flowing river. What about construction methods? All that has been suggested so far is to do a dredging project at a cost of up to $5 million? Why not ask some local earth-moving contractors if it would be feasible to drain the pond, as is done periodically, move in equipment to load up the material and truck it to a dump site. It might be cheaper and could put some locals to work. Temporary access roads could be left in place for a time and the removal done in stages as the money becomes available. Dick Bryant Redmond

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Obamacare is not the right answer for health care By Keith Sime Bulletin guest columnist

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veryone agrees that health care costs have been spiraling out of control and that the status quo cannot be maintained. The central issue is whether spending should be controlled by moving to a free market that relies on competition to provide value for money and economic efficiencies or through centralized government regulation, government bureaucracies, administrative pay formulas and price controls. The current administration’s answer — the latter — is wrong and is embodied in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare. The 2,700-page act that takes over one-sixth of the U.S. economy was passed by a veto-proof Democrat majority on a straight party-line vote on Christmas Eve 2009. Because of the election of Republican Scott Brown to replace Sen. Ted Kennedy and the loss of their supermajority, the Democrats had to revert to reconciliation to allow the Senate to pass the later House version of the bill. On March 9,

2010, then-Speaker Pelosi, speaking at the 2010 Legislative conference for the National Association of Counties, stated that “we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it, away from the fog of the controversy.” The president signed the reconciled bill into law on March 30, 2010. Obamacare was advertised as reducing the deficit while adding more than 30 million individuals to the health care system, questionable on its face. In fact, according to Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., the new chairman of the House Budget Committee, the law excludes $115 billion needed for implementation, double counts over $500 billion in Social Security payroll taxes and Medicare reductions and was written to measure 10 years of tax increases to offset six years of new spending. Other costly provisions, such as the “Dr. Fix” that were included in the original Congressional Budget Office score, were stripped out and enacted separately. According to a January 2011 study by the House Budget Committee, the law will cost taxpayers $2.6 trillion when

IN MY VIEW fully implemented and add $701 billion to the deficit in the first 10 years. The law mandates that everyone purchase a government “accepted” health care plan or pay a penalty, clearly unconstitutional in my view, and be monitored by the IRS. Furthermore, it has new mandates that penalize employers with over 50 employees for failing to offer coverage deemed acceptable to the government. The Department of Health and Human Services is empowered to grant waivers to entities and has already granted over 700 such waivers. Moreover, Sens. Ron Wyden and Scott Brown offered legislation that would give states waivers to implement their own health care plans. The law provides for the creation of nearly 160 boards, bureaus, bureaucracies and commissions that will make the rules for every aspect of our health care. It is estimated that it will take roughly 10,000 pages of new regulations to gov-

ern the implementation of the new law. By April 2010, the number of states suing the federal government over the health care overhaul bill was up to 18. Their lawsuit argues that the bill infringes on people’s constitutional rights by forcing them to have health care insurance or pay a tax penalty and further claims the bill violates the Constitution’s 10th Amendment by imposing rules on states by requiring them to spend billions of dollars without providing them with federal assistance. On Jan. 26, Richard Foster, the chief actuary of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, testified before the House Budget Committee. He reconfirmed his earlier reports, which said that Obamacare would not suppress health care costs and would not allow people to keep their present providers. Not mentioned in Foster’s testimony was the part of the Actuary Office’s detailed report that predicted Obamacare would drive doctors away from accepting Medicare, and would expand insurance coverage to an estimated 34 million people who now lack it, creat-

ing a demand for services that could be difficult to meet initially and could lead to price increases, cost-shifting and changes in providers’ willingness to treat patients with low-reimbursement health coverage. In place of Obamacare, which is off to a very shaky start, we need a system to reduce health care costs while improving the quality of health care services. Only through systemic change into a patient-centered, consumer-driven system that depends on the free market, competition and tort reform can we accomplish this. Toward this end, I believe that the House has rightfully passed a bill to repeal Obamacare as it accomplishes few of its aims and there is no way that it can be fixed without removing the mandates that are the cornerstones of the law. The Senate voted and did not agree. The Republican House leadership has announced that it is its intent to defund as much of Obamacare as it can. Let the debate begin. Keith Sime lives in Sunriver.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, February 8, 2011 C5

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N   Harold Redfern, of La Pine Jan. 24, 1936 - Feb. 4, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, OR. 541-536-5105 www.bairdmortuaires.com Services: No service is scheduled.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Officers Continued from C1 Attempted aggravated murder is a Measure 11 crime, so it carries a 120-month mandatory minimum sentence. The maximum penalty for attempted murder is 90 months, according to information provided by Jefferson County District Attorney Steve Leriche. “These are volunteers that go through training and they wear a uniform,” Huffman said of reserve officers. He is sponsoring a bill that would change the law to include reserve police officers under the aggravated murder statute. Huffman said people from Madras brought the issue to his attention. City Administrator Mike Morgan said officials were surprised after last spring’s shooting to discover that reserve police officers don’t have the same protections under the law as certified officers. The Madras Police Department has 11 fulltime officers and about 10 reserve officers. Morgan said city officials felt it was important to push this legislation because the community relies so heavily on the volunteers. “I was appalled to hear that one of our reserves officers was not treated under the law the way another officer was,” Morgan said. “I don’t think most of us realized this loophole existed.” One man who was aware of the loophole is Don Swift, a reserve captain at the Redmond Police Department. He’s pushed lawmakers unsuccessfully in previous sessions to look into changing the law. Swift said reserve police of-

Sisters Continued from C1 Lisa Young, the city’s finance director, said leaving those positions open will help make up for spending increases in 2011-12 that are tied to staff benefits and salaries. Following the same move last year, Sisters will not give cost-ofliving increases next year, saving about $10,000. City staff, howev-

James Gardner Dalton July 2, 1924 - January 17, 2011 James Gardner Dalton, (86) beloved husband, father and grandfather, gracefully passed away Monday evening, January 17, 2011, at St. Charles Hospital, in Bend, Oregon. Born July 2, 1924, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Gardner F. James Gardner Dalton and Grace E. Dalton Dalton, he attended Lawrence College and the University of Wisconsin where he studied law and accounting. After serving in the Navy as Lieutenant in World War II, he went on to a distinguished career in accounting and business management, working for Ernst and Ernst, American Gypsum, the Hudspeth Lumber Industries, and most recently the Woodard Corporation in Prineville, Oregon. Living in Prineville for over 10 years, he and his wife, Betsy, enjoyed family and friends and often traveled to Seattle, the Midwest and the Southwest. He will be remembered for his steadfast love, elegant demeanor and independent spirit. James is survived by his children, Hugh Dalton of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Doug Dalton of Albuquerque, New Mexico, Liz Pozzi of Renton, Washington, John Brown of Bend, Oregon, Heather and Ben Smith of Bellevue, Washington; and his grandchildren, Kari, Patrick, Sarah, Frank, Margaret and Grace. He was preceded in death by his beloved wife, Betsy and his son, James. A private family graveside service will be held in Portland, Oregon, where he will be buried at Willamette National Cemetery.

ficers go through more than 400 hours of training and are assigned to similar assignments as fulltime police officers, from working special events to patrol duties. Swift said he believes the change in law would offer a reserve police officer more protection. He likened it to a domestic violence crime, pointing out that someone who hits a spouse is eligible for different penalties than somebody who assaults another person randomly on the street. There is no evidence demonstrating that crimes would be prevented or lives saved by the change in law, he said, though he does believe it could stave off misconduct. But even if it doesn’t prevent people from shooting at police officers, Swift considers it a good idea to equalize the status of reserve and certified officers in the way Huffman’s legislation would. “Why should (a reserve officer) put his life on the line if he doesn’t have the protection of a regular police officer?” Swift said. Leriche, with Jefferson County, said he believes the legal change might deter a person who hasn’t yet made the decision to shoot. Huffman has not officially introduced his bill yet, so it has not been assigned a number. So far, he said he’s worked on gathering support for the bill and has found many people who seem interested in making the change. Antunez led officials on a two-month manhunt before he was arrested and sentenced to 15 years in prison. No police officers were injured. Lauren Dake can be reached at 419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

er, will be eligible for merit raises of up to 3 percent, Stein said. That could cost the city about $25,000. “I’m not seeing anything in inflationary trends that cause me to think people need cost-of-living increases,” Stein said. “We still like to reward people with merit raises.” The city also expects to see its contributions to the state’s Public Employees Retirement System, or PERS, jump from about $84,000 to $132,000. Sisters plans to spend more

Maria Altmann, who fought for return of art seized by Nazis, dies By Anne-Marie O’Connor

“They delay, delay, delay, hoping I will die. But I will do them the pleasure of staying alive.”

Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Maria Altmann, who escaped Nazioccupied Vienna as a newlywed and returned to wage a triumphant fight to recover Gustav Klimt’s iconic gold portrait of her remarkable aunt, has died. She was 94. Altmann died Monday at her home in the Cheviot Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles after a long illness, said family friend E. Randol Schoenberg. Altmann was an 82-yearold grandmother living in Cheviot Hills in 1998 when she enlisted Schoenberg, an attorney who was the son of a friend, to investigate the Nazi theft of her Jewish family’s Klimt collection. The collection included Klimt’s famous “Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer,” hanging in the Austrian National Gallery. The seemingly unwinnable battle took Altmann and Schoenberg to the U.S. Supreme Court — which ruled that the case could go forward. An Austrian mediation panel ultimately awarded Altmann and four other heirs the five Klimt paintings in January 2006. “They delay, delay, delay, hoping I will die,” Altmann said in 2001. “But I will do them the pleasure of staying alive.” Her family’s triumph sent shockwaves through the art restitution world, museums — and the art market. Cosmetics baron Ronald S. Lauder bought the gold portrait of Adele, calling it the “Austrian Mona Lisa,” for $135 million, a record at the time. It remains on permanent display at Lauder’s Neue Galerie in New York. The four other paintings brought $192.7 million at auction at Christie’s and disappeared into private

— Maria Altmann, in 2001

Al Seib / Los Angeles Times ile photo

Maria Altmann, who waged a triumphant fight to recover Gustav Klimt’s iconic gold portrait of her aunt, died Monday at 94. collections after being shown at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Neue Galerie. “She never stopped believing that the paintings would come out,” Lauder said. “I thank her for her resilience.” The seven-year legal battle

was a raison d’etre for Altmann, a retired dress shop owner who was still selling clothes from her home when she began the case. She asked interviewers to excuse her when clients arrived, serving everyone Viennese coffee with dollops of whipped cream, ad-

dressing them as “my darling” and “my love.” Born Marie Viktoria BlochBauer in Vienna on Feb. 18, 1916, Altmann was the youngest of five children of Therese Bauer and Gustav Bloch. Her mother’s sister, Adele, married Gustav’s brother, Ferdinand, who had taken over his father’s sugar factory. After the Bauer sons died, the families united their surnames as Bloch-Bauer, in the style of Vienna aristocrats. The Bloch-Bauers had their portraits painted by artists. Adele was a newlywed when Klimt began the gold-encrusted painting influenced by the Byzantine mosaics of Ravenna that became the “Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer.” Along with “The Kiss,” his erotically charged portrait of a passionately entwined couple, and “Judith,” in which he portrays the Old Testament heroine as a barebreasted femme fatale, the “Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer” was a masterpiece of his gilded phase and a sublime embodiment of Vienna’s golden moment of artistic and intellectual vitality. The portrait was a sensation when it was unveiled in 1907, and it made Adele an instant celebrity. Studded with Egyptian motifs and subtly erotic symbols, Adele’s face floated in the painting like a silent screen star. Klimt painted Adele with an expression of such vivid restlessness and longing that viewers would question the relationship between Adele and the artist, a notorious seducer.

Grandson of oil baron, J. Paul Getty III had ear cut off by captors By Bruce Weber New York Times News Service

J. Paul Getty III, who was a grandson of the oil baron once believed to be the richest man in the world and who achieved tragic notoriety in 1973 when he was kidnapped by Italian gangsters, died Saturday at his home near London. He was 54. His son, the actor Balthazar Getty, confirmed the death in a statement relayed in an e-mail from Laura Hozempa, one of his agents. J. Paul Getty had been using a wheelchair since 1981, when a drug overdose caused him to have a stroke that left him severely paralyzed, unable to speak and partly blind. At the time of his abduction, Getty was just 16 and living on his own in Rome, where his father, J. Paul Getty II, had, for a time, helped oversee the family’s Italian business interests.

Schools

Expelled from a private school, the young Getty was living a bohemian life, frequenting nightclubs, taking part in left-wing demonstrations and reportedly earning a living making jewelry, selling paintings and acting as an extra in movies. He disappeared on July 10, 1973, and two days later his mother, Gail Harris, received a ransom request. No longer married, she said she had little money. “Get it from London,” she was reportedly told over the phone, a reference either to her former father-in-law, J. Paul Getty, the billionaire founder of the Getty Oil Co., or her former husband, who lived in England. The amount demanded was about $17 million, but the police were initially skeptical of the kidnapping claim; even after Harris received a plaintive four-page letter from her son, and a subsequent phone call in which a man saying he was a kidnapper offered to send her a severed finger as proof

Continued from C1 Now the committee is trying to figure out how many incoming middle-schoolers from a variety of neighborhoods will enter district schools in the coming years. “That’s why they’re meeting in subcommittee,” he said. “We’re pulling numbers from six different neighborhoods.”

Those neighborhoods include several in the Jewell, Bear Creek and Buckingham boundaries; another option may be to split the Pine Ridge attendance area into two groups. Cascade Middle has more than 930 students enrolled, with a capacity of 800 students, while High Desert Middle School has 790 students, Sky View has 693, and Pilot Butte just 618 students. Pilot Butte’s capacity is 850 students. Rexford said Cascade Middle’s

on its employees’ health insurance, the cost of which could rise as much as 15 percent, or about $33,000, Young said. That cost could be lower, but the city is using a conservative projection, she said. “We put that in at the high end,” Young said. Pressure on the city’s budget may have been worse had the city not won an election and a legal fight to push through a 3-cent gas tax in the last year. In the

current fiscal year, Sisters expects to bring in about $140,000, about $14,000 more than originally projected. In past years, the city’s general fund has helped fund road construction. Taking advantage of a rare instance in the region of increased revenues, the Sisters City Council recently decided to begin spending it even though the legal battle remains unresolved. The Oregon Petroleum Association backed a lawsuit against Sisters last year.

he was still alive. Investigators suspected a possible hoax or an attempt by the young Getty to squeeze some money from his notoriously penurious relatives. “Dear Mummy,” his note began, “Since Monday I have fallen into the hands of kidnappers. Don’t let me be killed.” The eldest Getty refused to pay the kidnappers anything, declaring that he had 14 grandchildren and “If I pay one penny now, I’ll have 14 kidnapped grandchildren.” His son said he could not afford to pay. Three months after the abduction, the kidnappers, who turned out to be Calabrian bandits with a possible connection to organized crime, cut off Getty’s ear and mailed it, along with a lock of his hair, to a Roman newspaper. Photographs of the maimed Getty, along with a letter in which he pleaded with his family to pay his captors, subsequently appeared in another newspaper. The teenager, malnourished,

overcrowding is due to continued growth on the west side of Bend, while other areas have seen little or no growth. After the subgroup meets Wednesday, the full committee will reconvene on Feb. 16 to review every option and try to narrow those down to a final three for the public to weigh. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

After the city won in Deschutes County Circuit Court, the case was appealed to the Oregon Court of Appeals, where it could receive a hearing in the spring. “They just said, ‘Let’s start getting some streets improved,’ ” Stein said. “We’ll be putting together projects for the work to begin this spring,” Stein said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

bruised and missing an ear, was released on Dec. 15; he was found at an abandoned service station, shivering in a driving rainstorm. Nine men eventually were arrested. Two were convicted and sent to prison; the others, including the man prosecutors said was the head of the Calabrian Mafia and the mastermind behind the abduction, were acquitted for lack of evidence. The aftermath of the ordeal left Getty as a reckless personality; the year after his release he married a German photographer whose name has been variously reported as Gisela Zacher and Martine Zacher. They lived for a time in New York, where they consorted with the downtown art crowd of Andy Warhol. Getty became a drug user and a heavy drinker, reportedly becoming addicted to cocaine and heroin. His grandfather had died in 1976, and after his overdose, he sued his father for $28,000 a month to pay for his medical needs.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In


W E AT H ER

C6 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2011.

TODAY, FEBRUARY 8 Today: Mostly cloudy, partial clearing late, cool.

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

36/21

34/23

44/25

30/23



Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

Mitchell

Madras



42/20

41/17

Camp Sherman 39/12 Redmond Prineville 43/15 Cascadia 41/16 42/16 Sisters 41/14 Bend  Post 43/15

Oakridge Elk Lake 40/14

31/3



39/12

40/11

50/30

38/12

Chemult 37/9

Mostly cloudy, chance of rain and snow showers to the north.

Crater Lake 32/15

41/21



Idaho Falls 20/-1

Elko



34/12



46/14



Boise

59/38

33/10

Silver Lake

23/5

43/15

Redding Christmas Valley

12/1

Missoula

Bend

50/27

42/13

34/5

Helena



Grants Pass 

Eastern

Hampton Fort Rock

City

46/33

Eugene

Reno

41/17

San Francisco

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:14 a.m. Moon phases Sunset today . . . . . . 5:25 p.m. First Full Last Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:13 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 5:26 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 9:12 a.m. Moonset today . . . 11:26 p.m. Feb. 10 Feb. 18 Feb. 24

Salt Lake City

60/44

36/18

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

New

March 4

Astoria . . . . . . . . 49/43/0.27 . . . . . 47/34/pc. . . . . . . 50/35/s Baker City . . . . . .43/28/trace . . . . . . 36/15/c. . . . . . 34/21/pc Brookings . . . . . . .NA/42/NA . . . . . . 54/44/c. . . . . . 58/45/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . .40/31/trace . . . . . 35/14/pc. . . . . . . 36/20/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 51/37/0.03 . . . . . 50/30/sh. . . . . . . 49/30/s Klamath Falls . . . 44/27/0.00 . . . . . . 40/16/c. . . . . . . 45/18/s Lakeview. . . . . .not available . . . . . 36/12/pc. . . . . . . 40/15/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 40/34/0.00 . . . . . 39/11/pc. . . . . . . 41/17/s Medford . . . . . . .53/36/trace . . . . . 49/25/sh. . . . . . . 52/26/s Newport . . . . . . . 48/45/0.17 . . . . . 49/35/sh. . . . . . . 56/37/s North Bend . . . . . 50/46/0.04 . . . . . . 47/35/s. . . . . . . 52/35/s Ontario . . . . . . . . 35/27/0.08 . . . . . 41/22/pc. . . . . . 35/24/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 48/40/0.00 . . . . . 40/26/sh. . . . . . 43/26/pc Portland . . . . . . . 49/43/0.21 . . . . . 47/32/sh. . . . . . . 49/32/s Prineville . . . . . . . 45/36/0.00 . . . . . 41/16/pc. . . . . . . 44/21/s Redmond. . . . . . . 47/37/0.00 . . . . . 43/22/pc. . . . . . . 44/21/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 52/45/0.02 . . . . . . 51/31/c. . . . . . 51/34/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 50/43/0.16 . . . . . 49/32/sh. . . . . . . 48/32/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . 41/35/0.00 . . . . . 41/14/pc. . . . . . . 42/19/s The Dalles . . . . . . 54/45/0.01 . . . . . 46/27/pc. . . . . . . 47/29/s

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

2

MEDIUM 4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41/34 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 in 1987 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . -16 in 1929 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.33” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.48” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 2.09” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.19 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.01 in 1938 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:54 a.m. . . . . . .4:20 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:38 a.m. . . . . . .1:50 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .7:18 a.m. . . . . . .5:15 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .8:58 a.m. . . . . . .9:05 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .10:06 p.m. . . . . . .9:41 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .8:45 a.m. . . . . . .8:39 p.m.

2

LOW

51 26

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, scattered showers. HIGH

55 28

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

14/5

Seattle

30/6

Crescent 37/20

41/31

47/32

Burns

La Pine

Calgary

SATURDAY Mostly sunny and warmer.

52 21

BEND ALMANAC

Vancouver

Mostly cloudy, chance of scattered showers.

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Portland

Brothers

LOW

45 16

NORTHWEST

35/12

39/13

Sunriver

HIGH

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 54° Hermiston • 27° Ontario

FRIDAY Mostly sunny and warmer.

Partly cloudy near the coast, cloudy inland. Chance of scattered rain and snow showers.

Paulina

39/11

Crescent Lake

Partly cloudy with a chance of scattered showers. Central

45/21

44/22

39/12

LOW

15

STATE

THURSDAY

Mainly sunny and pleasant.

Tonight: Gradual clearing and cold.

43

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

WEDNESDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 36-50 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 38-39 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 38-80 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 71-91 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . 69 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 27-34 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . 97 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 22 Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 20-58

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . 2 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . . . . 49-50 . . . . 110-205 . . . . . . . . 84 . . . . . . . 109 . . . . . . 45-62 . . . . . . 42-50 . . . . . . . . 73

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .47/28/0.00 . 57/13/pc . . . 22/17/s Akron . . . . . . . . .34/29/0.11 . . .16/3/sn . . . . 18/1/c Albany. . . . . . . . .37/29/0.00 . . .29/7/sn . . . . 23/3/s Albuquerque. . . .46/18/0.00 . .46/16/sh . . 31/10/pc Anchorage . . . . . .19/7/0.00 . .30/26/sn . . 34/24/sn Atlanta . . . . . . . .53/32/0.00 . 45/29/pc . . 50/34/pc Atlantic City . . . .48/25/0.01 . . .42/20/s . . . 35/21/s Austin . . . . . . . . .58/40/0.00 . 60/43/pc . . 42/24/sh Baltimore . . . . . .48/26/0.00 . . .38/17/s . . . 36/22/s Billings. . . . . . . . . .19/8/0.26 . . 11/-5/pc . . . 24/11/s Birmingham . . . .50/33/0.06 . . .44/28/s . . . 45/29/c Bismarck . . . . . . . 10/-8/0.00 . . . . 5/-9/s . . . .12/-2/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .46/30/0.01 . . .41/21/c . . 38/24/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .42/29/0.00 . .34/10/sn . . . 29/11/s Bridgeport, CT. . .41/26/0.00 . . 37/12/rs . . . 27/16/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .34/30/0.08 . .17/12/sn . . . . 18/8/s Burlington, VT. . .35/31/0.00 . . .23/8/sn . . .20/-6/sn Caribou, ME . . . .29/10/0.02 . . 27/-8/sn . .12/-15/sn Charleston, SC . .52/45/0.56 . . .56/35/s . . 55/41/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .50/27/0.00 . . .48/22/s . . . 45/32/s Chattanooga. . . .51/30/0.05 . 41/24/pc . . 44/28/pc Cheyenne . . . . . . .37/2/0.00 . . . 9/-7/sf . . . . 20/7/s Chicago. . . . . . . .32/19/0.12 . . . .11/0/s . . . .13/-5/s Cincinnati . . . . . .41/32/0.07 . . .21/7/pc . . . 23/9/pc Cleveland . . . . . .35/28/0.04 . . .17/5/sn . . . 19/2/pc Colorado Springs .35/8/0.00 . . 14/-6/sn . . .17/-1/pc Columbia, MO . .31/24/0.00 . . .16/6/sn . . . .16/-1/c Columbia, SC . . .48/29/0.01 . . .53/27/s . . . 51/32/s Columbus, GA. . .54/32/0.04 . . .48/30/s . . 55/35/pc Columbus, OH. . .36/30/0.09 . . .20/7/pc . . . 22/6/pc Concord, NH . . . .39/19/0.00 . . 31/-3/sn . . . . 22/0/s Corpus Christi. . .64/42/0.00 . 67/57/pc . . 66/31/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .49/35/0.00 . 53/26/pc . . 26/13/sn Dayton . . . . . . . .35/28/0.03 . . .20/4/pc . . . 21/4/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . .44/4/0.00 . . 11/-7/sn . . . 25/2/pc Des Moines. . . . . .27/7/0.00 . . . 7/-5/pc . . . . . 8/-6/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .32/26/0.00 . . . 19/9/sf . . . . 19/5/sf Duluth . . . . . . . . . 14/-2/0.00 . . . 10/-6/s . . . .5/-8/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .56/26/0.00 . . .68/28/s . . . 45/22/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . 0/-23/0.00 . . . 15/-3/c . . . . 20/5/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . . 0/-14/0.00 . . . 3/-13/s . . . .3/-9/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .53/16/0.00 . .39/11/sn . . . 36/9/pc

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 41/31

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

Calgary 14/5

Saskatoon 6/-11

Boise 41/21 Cheyenne 9/-7 Las Vegas 62/39

• 2.60” Inverness, Fla.

Salt Lake City 36/18

Los Angeles 64/48 Honolulu 80/68

Tijuana 64/51

Denver 11/-7 Albuquerque 46/16

Phoenix 71/43

Chihuahua 75/32

Anchorage 30/26

La Paz 77/51 Juneau 30/29

Logging Continued from C1 After the Five Buttes project was approved in 2007, several conservation organizations sued the agency, concerned about the logging in a late successional reserve, which is an area set up in the Northwest Forest Plan to conserve habitat and old-growth forests. The U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon agreed with the conservation groups in 2008, stating the project was “arbitrary and capricious.” The Forest Service appealed the decision, and in August a three-judge panel of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled, 2-1, that the project could go forward. Circuit Court Judges Milan Smith Jr., who was appointed by President George W. Bush, and Richard Tallman, who was appointed by President Clinton, were the majority. Circuit Court Judge Richard Paez, who was also appointed by Clinton, wrote the dissent. But the conservation groups petitioned the court to have a hearing “en banc,” which would mean that 11 judges on the 9th Circuit would decide on the case, said Josh Laughlin, campaign director with Cascadia Wildlands, one of the groups involved in the lawsuit. “We thought this was such an issue of significance — the fact that we’re talking about a late successional reserve that was set up and designed to recover endangered species,” Laughlin said. But the court decided to let the earlier decision stand, and Laughlin said that although the groups still believe reserves were designed to be left alone, they proba-

Winnipeg 6/-14

Rapid City 9/-9

Melbourne, Fla. San Francisco 60/44

S

Mazatlan 79/50

S

S

PORTLAND — It’s that time of year again for parents to make sure that immunization records are up to date for their children. Oregon health officials are reminding parents that schools and child care centers must have proof of immunization by Feb. 16 or the child will be sent home. State law requires all children in public and private schools, preschools, Head Start and certified child care facilities to be upto-date on their immunizations, or have a religious or medical

S

S

St. Paul 8/-8

S S

Quebec 14/-2

Thunder Bay 10/-10 To ronto 16/11

Green Bay 10/-6

Halifax 34/16

Portland 36/4 Boston 34/10 17/12 New York 36/14 Philadelphia 39/15 Washington, D. C. 39/19

Buffalo

Detroit 19/9

Des Moines Columbus 7/-5 Chicago 20/7 11/0 Omaha 4/-7 Louisville 28/16 Kansas City 12/4 St. Louis Charlotte 20/10 48/22 Oklahoma City Nashville 36/12 Little Rock 33/21 36/23 Atlanta 45/29 Birmingham Dallas 44/28 53/26 New Orleans 53/37 Orlando Houston 66/44 59/46

Miami 73/56 Monterrey 80/51

FRONTS

Forest Service to proceed with logging plans The U.S. Forest Service’s Five Buttes Project, which includes logging in more than 600 acres of old-growth habitat suitable for spotted owls, will go forward now that it has passed another legal challenge. Conservation groups had petitioned for a larger group of judges from the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals to rule on their lawsuit objecting to the project, but the petition was denied in January. Crane Prairie Reservoir

Old-growth reserve

46

The Associated Press

42

DESCHUTES N ATION A L FOREST

Wickiup Reservoir

97

La Pine

62

Davis Lake

58

DESCHUTES COUNTY K L A M AT H COUNT Y 31

Odell Lake 97 61

Crescent nt Lake

58

Gilchrist Crescent

MILES 0

5

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

bly won’t pursue the case further. “We’ve disagreed with the Forest Service through the entire process,” he said. “We believe that reserve was functioning on its own fine and doesn’t need an industrial-scale logging project on it.” It’s unclear how the court decisions will affect future projects, Laughlin said, and conservation groups like Cascadia Wildlands will continue to review them as they come up. “There’s opportunities for restorative thinning if done right,” he said. “We just want to review it carefully when it surfaces.” While the Five Buttes Project involves logging in spotted owl habitats, the plan does not call for logging activity in areas where spotted owls currently

exemption. Last year, local health departments sent nearly 36,000 letters to parents and guardians informing them that their children needed immunizations to stay in school or child care. Nearly 5,000 children were kept out of school or child care until the necessary immunization information was submitted.

Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday

nest or in their range, said Holly Jewkes, Crescent District ranger. And before the agency goes forward with the project, it will consult again with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to make sure the project meets current critical habitat regulations. About 20 percent of the Five Buttes work was already completed before an injunction associated with the lawsuit stopped the logging, Jewkes said. Other contracts for both logging and fuels reduction have not yet been awarded, she said, but that should happen in the late summer or early fall of this year. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .20/5/0.11 . . . 9/-9/pc . . 23/10/pc Savannah . . . . . .51/47/0.61 . . .54/35/s . . 58/44/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .67/28/0.00 . 41/17/pc . . 47/21/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .48/42/0.13 . 46/33/pc . . 46/35/pc Richmond . . . . . .56/29/0.00 . . .48/18/s . . . 42/28/s Sioux Falls. . . . . . . 8/-7/0.00 . . 1/-10/pc . . . . . 7/-3/s Rochester, NY . . .36/30/0.01 . .19/14/sn . . . . 21/9/s Spokane . . . . . . .37/32/0.06 . . 32/19/sf . . 32/18/pc Sacramento. . . . .70/41/0.00 . 57/36/pc . . . 59/37/s Springfield, MO. .32/25/0.00 . .24/15/sn . . . 19/1/sn St. Louis. . . . . . . .32/28/0.00 . 20/10/pc . . . . 21/7/c Tampa . . . . . . . . .75/57/0.33 . . .63/45/s . . . 67/53/s Salt Lake City . . .50/33/0.04 . . 36/18/sf . . . 31/20/c Tucson. . . . . . . . .72/34/0.00 . 73/38/pc . . . 65/35/s San Antonio . . . .59/39/0.00 . 63/48/pc . . . 51/27/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .44/30/0.00 . .36/14/sn . . .22/-2/sn San Diego . . . . . .78/55/0.00 . . .61/48/s . . . 67/47/s Washington, DC .50/30/0.00 . . .39/19/s . . . 37/25/s San Francisco . . .66/48/0.00 . . .59/42/s . . . 60/44/s Wichita . . . . . . . .38/29/0.00 . .23/10/sn . . .17/-2/sn San Jose . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . . .63/39/s . . . 63/42/s Yakima . . . . . . . .54/29/0.00 . 40/24/pc . . . 42/25/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .44/27/0.00 . . .33/1/sn . . . 22/5/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .78/51/0.00 . . .75/48/s . . . 69/43/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .50/45/0.00 . . .44/34/s . . 49/38/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .67/33/0.00 . . .64/41/s . . . 62/42/s Auckland. . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . .71/64/sh . . 70/62/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .59/34/0.00 . .53/44/sh . . 58/41/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .93/75/0.00 . 91/72/pc . . . 92/72/s Beijing. . . . . . . . .39/21/0.00 . . .48/25/s . . 40/22/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .61/54/0.17 . 63/50/pc . . 64/50/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .46/41/0.00 . . .44/31/s . . . 41/30/s Bogota . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . .64/51/sh . . . .66/47/t Budapest. . . . . . .57/23/0.00 . . .51/29/s . . . 43/25/s Buenos Aires. . . .77/63/0.00 . 81/65/pc . . . .82/66/t Cabo San Lucas .81/59/0.00 . . .78/54/s . . . 77/55/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . . .67/57/s . . 66/54/pc Calgary . . . . . . . . . .5/1/0.33 . . .14/5/pc . . . 28/21/s Cancun . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . 79/65/pc . . 82/67/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .52/36/0.26 . .47/41/sh . . 48/43/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .43/36/0.00 . 41/36/pc . . 46/39/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .55/25/0.00 . . .50/34/s . . . 50/32/s Harare . . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . .82/61/t . . . .83/61/t Hong Kong . . . . .75/66/0.00 . . .73/60/s . . . 75/62/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .55/37/0.00 . . .55/40/s . . . 52/36/s Jerusalem . . . . . .53/37/0.04 . .53/39/sh . . 54/38/pc Johannesburg . . .81/61/0.00 . . .76/60/t . . 80/59/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . 80/69/pc . . 81/68/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . .57/46/sh . . 58/43/sh London . . . . . . . .54/37/0.00 . 48/42/pc . . 51/44/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .64/30/0.00 . . .59/33/s . . . 58/33/s Manila. . . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . . .87/76/t . . . .89/76/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .93/75/0.00 . . .91/70/s . . . 85/65/s Mexico City. . . . .75/41/0.00 . 77/47/pc . . 79/48/pc Montreal. . . . . . .34/30/0.07 . . 12/-3/sf . . . 7/-13/sf Moscow . . . . . . .30/23/0.03 . .32/29/sn . . 30/10/sn Nairobi . . . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . . .88/58/s . . . 87/57/s Nassau . . . . . . . .82/73/0.00 . 81/66/pc . . 81/67/pc New Delhi. . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . .74/50/s . . . 72/48/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .54/39/0.00 . . .55/35/c . . 54/34/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .30/10/0.03 . 30/16/pc . . 27/14/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .32/28/0.05 . . 10/-4/sf . . . 5/-11/sf Paris. . . . . . . . . . .59/34/0.00 . 49/37/pc . . . 51/40/s Rio de Janeiro. . .91/75/0.00 . 95/76/pc . . 95/77/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .59/34/0.00 . . .62/41/s . . . 59/40/s Santiago . . . . . . .86/55/0.00 . 88/59/pc . . . 83/56/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .91/70/0.00 . . .89/71/t . . . .85/72/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .32/19/0.01 . 25/18/pc . . 28/19/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .37/18/0.00 . 41/25/pc . . . 39/24/s Shanghai. . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . 64/44/pc . . 55/39/pc Singapore . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . 89/73/pc . . 89/74/pc Stockholm. . . . . .36/30/0.00 . 30/23/pc . . . 25/10/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . . .76/64/s . . 77/64/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . . .74/59/s . . . 76/61/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .63/54/0.22 . .63/50/sh . . 63/49/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .57/41/0.00 . 54/43/pc . . 53/42/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .32/21/0.07 . 16/11/pc . . . 15/-1/sf Vancouver. . . . . .46/43/0.03 . .41/31/sh . . . 43/35/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .59/34/0.00 . 48/32/pc . . . 45/31/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .46/39/0.14 . 40/29/pc . . 35/26/pc

Lawmakers: Energy efficiency in schools would pay for itself By Jonathan J. Cooper

Project boundary

Immunization records due soon By The Associated Press

S

Bismarck 5/-9

Billings 11/-5

Portland 47/32

• 89° Crookston, Minn.

S

Seattle 46/33

(in the 48 contiguous states):

• -15°

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Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .31/24/0.02 . . .18/6/sn . . . 18/3/sn Green Bay. . . . . 22/17/trace . . 10/-6/pc . . . .9/-7/pc Greensboro. . . . .52/29/0.00 . . .45/23/s . . 44/28/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .40/26/0.00 . 33/14/pc . . 31/19/pc Hartford, CT . . . .40/22/0.00 . . .32/6/sn . . . . 26/9/s Helena. . . . . . . . .20/12/0.32 . . . 12/1/sf . . . 27/10/s Honolulu . . . . . . .81/69/0.00 . 80/68/pc . . . 80/69/s Houston . . . . . . .56/43/0.00 . . .59/46/s . . 57/30/sh Huntsville . . . . . .52/34/0.00 . 41/24/pc . . . 40/25/c Indianapolis . . . .34/28/0.00 . . .18/6/pc . . . 18/2/pc Jackson, MS . . . .49/37/0.15 . . .48/25/s . . 49/28/sh Madison, WI . . . .25/20/0.01 . . . . 7/-7/s . . . .7/-10/s Jacksonville. . . . .54/48/1.86 . . .57/35/s . . 63/44/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .34/19/0.00 . 30/29/pc . . . .38/35/r Kansas City. . . . .30/16/0.00 . . .12/4/sn . . .16/-5/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .29/23/0.00 . . .17/3/sn . . . . 18/0/sf Las Vegas . . . . . .70/44/0.00 . 62/39/pc . . . 57/38/s Lexington . . . . . .39/30/0.34 . 26/14/pc . . 27/15/sn Lincoln. . . . . . . . .27/11/0.00 . . . 5/-6/sn . . . .13/-2/s Little Rock. . . . . .42/33/0.23 . 36/23/pc . . 27/15/sn Los Angeles. . . . .76/51/0.00 . . .64/48/s . . . 73/50/s Louisville . . . . . . .41/32/0.29 . 28/16/pc . . . 27/18/c Memphis. . . . . . .44/32/0.15 . 35/22/pc . . 31/17/sn Miami . . . . . . . . .85/68/0.00 . . .73/56/s . . . 74/62/s Milwaukee . . . . 27/21/trace . . . 9/-1/pc . . . . . 9/-7/s Minneapolis . . . . .23/3/0.00 . . . . 8/-8/s . . .9/-12/pc Nashville . . . . . . .44/32/0.33 . 33/21/pc . . 33/19/sn New Orleans. . . .56/45/0.00 . . .53/37/s . . 57/42/pc New York . . . . . .45/36/0.00 . . 36/14/rs . . . 28/17/s Newark, NJ . . . . .45/32/0.00 . . 39/14/rs . . 29/17/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .55/32/0.00 . . .48/23/s . . . 40/32/s Oklahoma City . .42/28/0.00 . .36/12/sn . . . 17/4/sn Omaha . . . . . . . . .28/4/0.00 . . . . 4/-7/c . . . .11/-3/s Orlando. . . . . . . .85/58/0.09 . . .66/44/s . . . 71/51/s Palm Springs. . . .77/50/0.00 . . .64/47/s . . . 68/43/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .29/21/0.00 . . .11/4/pc . . .13/-4/pc Philadelphia . . . .48/29/0.00 . 39/15/pc . . . 32/20/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .72/42/0.00 . 71/43/pc . . . 66/41/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .37/32/0.12 . . .20/9/sn . . . . 22/6/s Portland, ME. . . .38/18/0.00 . . .36/4/sn . . . 26/13/s Providence . . . . .39/27/0.00 . .37/10/sn . . . 29/14/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .58/30/0.00 . . .47/23/s . . 45/29/pc

SALEM — Proponents of a plan to put people to work by retrofitting public school buildings with energy efficient technology said Monday the savings in energy costs would help the idea pay for itself. Gov. John Kitzhaber made the concept central to his election campaign last year. On Monday, it got its first review in the Legislature as the House Education Committee held hearings on three proposals to encourage more energy-efficient schools. One proposal, House Bill 2203, would require that new and remodeled schools be certified as LEED Silver or better if the construction was paid for with new state bonds that voters approved in May as Measure 68. Silver certification means the building meets standards developed by Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. Another idea, House Bill 2194, would allow schools to take out loans for energy efficiency upgrades and pay off the debt using the money saved in utility costs. The idea would create cleaner and healthier conditions for students and teachers, supporters said. “What a great opportunity in our public schools to be able to update these schools for energy efficiency as we make them into healthier learning

environments,” said Rep. Jules Bailey, D-Portland. Bailey said schools are longterm investments that aren’t bought and sold like houses and businesses, so they present a unique opportunity to experiment with funding solutions and cost-effective efficiency ideas. Rep. Julie Parrish, R-West Linn, said it’s an interesting idea but she’s concerned vendors might try to take advantage of schools, trapping them in contracts that they can’t get out of

without huge costs. “In my experience, I never saw a contract that was written to benefit a school,” Parrish said. House Bill 2888 would authorize the Oregon Department of Energy to sell bonds that would pay for loans and matching grants for school districts that want money to improve their facilities. The committee did not vote on the ideas, and supporters said Monday’s hearings were a first step to spark discussion.


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NBA Inside LaMarcus Aldridge scores 42 points in leading Portland over Chicago, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2011

FUNDRAISER Hoop fundraiser at Mountain View to help Freiboth family Members of the boys basketball program at Mountain View High School, including its youth players, plan to shoot free throws Wednesday evening to raise funds for multiple causes, including the family of Jason Freiboth. A popular youth sports supervisor with the Bend Park & Recreation District and a longtime youth basketball official in Central Oregon, Freiboth died of cancer in December at age 40. He left behind a wife and two young sons. According to Mountain View head coach Craig Reid, the Freiboth family will receive one-third of the money taken in by the fundraiser. The remaining funds raised will be divided equally by the Mountain View boys basketball program and the team members, whose portions are to help cover the cost of participating in the high school basketball program. To raise funds, each player is expected to shoot 100 free throws Wednesday night at Mountain View High. And for each player, the number of shots made will be multiplied by the donation pledged for each successful attempt. (The minimum suggested donation is 25 cents per made free throw; maximum is $1.) For more information or to pledge a donation to a player, contact Craig Reid at 541318-8014 or at creid@bendcable.com. — Bulletin staff report

Rockies’ manager back on track Jim Tracy gets over an irregular heartbeat that caused him to faint By Janie McCauley The Associated Press

Jim Tracy fainted three times in a fiveyear span, nothing that concerned the Colorado manager enough to seek medical help. He was always away from the baseball field anyway.

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Yet Tracy has experienced moments during the season when he felt physically off and dizzy, even fatigued beyond what is normal over the course of a grueling 162game schedule or for the quick turnaround to play a day game after a night game. Never one to run to the doctor or bring extra attention to himself when his focus is always all on his players, he kept quiet about any issues — though heart disease runs in Tracy’s family. The last thing the

longtime skipper wanted was for his bosses, or anyone else for that matter, to think he wasn’t sharp enough to write the lineup card every day or make a tough decision from the dugout with the game on the line. “I didn’t say anything because I didn’t want them to think I was losing my edge,” Tracy said. “I never felt like I was having a heart attack (during the fainting). I never felt like I had symptoms. I never felt physically in danger.” It took collapsing at the winter meetings two months ago in Florida for Tracy to change his tune. See Tracy / D3

Gene J. Puskar / AP ile

Colorado Rockies manager Jim Tracy fainted three times in a five-year span.

Colleen Kingsbury, 24, and her 6-year-old American Quarter Horse, Cinco, practice their barrel racing technique together on her family’s ranch land in Powell Butte Sunday morning. Kingsbury’s mother, Rhonda, is the organizer of the annual Turn ’N Burn barrel racing indoor series. Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

NFL NFL knew about problem with seats at Super Bowl DALLAS — The NFL knew last week there were problems with the installation of temporary Super Bowl seating sections and hoped until hours before kickoff that they could be fixed. “At the end, we just ran out of time,” NFL executive vice president Eric Grubman said Monday. Four hundred people were forced to give up their seats for the Green Bay Packers’ 3125 victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers on Sunday night, and instead had to watch the game on monitors or use standingroom platforms in corners of Cowboys Stadium. Another 850 fans were moved from their seats in the temporary sections to other seats. “It was obviously a failure on our behalf, and we have to take responsibility for that,” NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said. “We had, obviously, a lot of challenges this week. There were a lot of things we were trying to deal with. But there’s no excuses. When you put on an event like this, you know you’re going to have those sorts of challenges.” While saying that, overall, the stadium exceeded the expectations for a Super Bowl host, Cowboys owner Jerry Jones also acknowledged the seating blunder and reached out to the fans affected by it. “We deeply regret their Super Bowl experience was impacted by this error, and we share that responsibility with the NFL,” he said in a statement. Goodell said the league would give tickets for next year’s Super Bowl to the 400 fans left without a place to sit Sunday. The league already had said it would offer those 400 people refunds of triple the face value of their Steelers-Packers tickets. — The Associated Press

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Golf ............................................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 NHL ...........................................D3 College basketball .....................D3 Community Sports ................... D4

A place to ride Barrel racers avoid the winter blues with the Turn ‘N Burn indoor series in Prineville By Amanda Miles The Bulletin

Even in winter, the rodeo doesn’t have to end. At least not the barrel racing — not around here, thanks to a longtime indoor winter series in Prineville. The Turn ’N Burn winter series is in its 17th annual season, providing a place for cowgirls — and even cowboys — of all ages and skill levels to hone their can-chasing skills. “It’s just something fun to do and it’s just a big family,” Rhonda Kingsbury says of the local series. “Everyone that’s been a part of it I’ve known forever, and it’s a lot of fun. Everybody knows each other, and all their kids, they rodeo, too.”

COMMUNITY SPORTS Kingsbury, 47 and of Powell Butte, has been the organizer of the Turn ’N Burn since its inception in the mid-1990s. She started barrel racing as a child while growing up in Central Oregon and even once won the Oregon Barrel Racing Association’s year-end title. The OBRA is one of the organizations through which the Turn ’N Burn is sanctioned. Starting in November each year, Turn ’N Burn events take place once per month at the Crook County Fairgrounds

indoor arena. The final two events of the 2010-11 series are scheduled for Feb. 19 and March 19. The series offers a number of different competition classifications, ranging from an open division down to children age 10 and younger. “Those little guys are die-hards,” Kingsbury observes, “and they mean business.” That might be because money and other prizes are on the line. In each class, winners receive belt buckles and top placewinners earn checks, which are distributed on a ratio of roughly one for every three competitors. So the swiftest riders in each class can win back their entry fee and more. Entry fees range from $14 to $40 per run, depending on the class. See Ride / D4

If you go What: Turn ’N Burn winter barrel racing series When: Final two events in 2010-11 series are set for Feb. 19 and March 19; time-only runs start at 10 a.m., first session begins one hour later Where: Crook County Fairgrounds indoor area, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville Cost: $5-$40 per run, depending on the division; free for spectators Noteworthy: Go to www. oregonbarrelracing.com for a schedule of events, including others in Central Oregon

SKIING

Vonn struggling with injury on eve of world championships By Andrew Dampf The Associated Press

GARMISCH-PARTENKIRCHEN, Germany — Lindsey Vonn has overcome a long list of injuries in her storied skiing career. This latest one — a concussion that at times disrupts her mental focus — may prove her most challenging. “This injury is a lot different than anything I’ve ever faced before,” Vonn said Monday, a day before she’s due to defend her gold medal in the super-G that opens the world championships. “It’s not like it’s the knee injury or you have a bruise,” she added. “There’s no pain. It’s just I don’t have any focus and concentration, and it’s very difficult. I’ve had a lot of pain before. I can fight through it, but this is not the same.” Vonn landed on her head during a spectacular fall in giant slalom training in Austria last week — the video posted on her Facebook page is worth watching — and pulled out of Friday’s World Cup slalom. She’ll make a decision on competing here moments before today’s race. Vonn finished 18th in Sunday’s giant slalom in nearby Zwiesel. “I felt good until about three-quarters of the way down the hill and then I just

Ford expected to compete for men The men’s competition at the 2011 Alpine Ski World Championships begins Wednesday with Super G and concludes Feb. 20 with slalom. Bend’s Tommy Ford will likely compete in giant slalom, scheduled for Feb. 17-18. At World Cup races in Hinterstoder, Austria, this past weekend, Ford, 21, finished 11th in Super G and 18th in giant slalom. In Sunday’s giant slalom, Ford finished ahead of two other U.S. skiers with whom he was battling for a start in the world championships — Warner Nickerson finished 26th, and Tim Jitloff did not finish his first run. — Bulletin staff report sort of lost focus and stopped attacking, stopped skiing basically,” the Minnesota native said during a news conference Monday. “In both runs I lost almost a second in the last 15-20 seconds and I feel like that’s mostly because of my head. See Vonn / D3

Michael Probst / The Associated Press

U.S. skiers Julia Mancuso and Lindsey Vonn, right, share a laugh during a news conference prior to the start of the Alpine Ski World Championships in GarmischPartenkirchen, Germany, on Monday.


D2 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Indiana at Purdue, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Cincinnati at DePaul, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Tennessee at Kentucky, ESPN. 7 p.m. — High school girls, Mountain View at Redmond, COTV (taped).

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Buffalo Sabres at Tampa Bay Lightning, VS. network.

WEDNESDAY SOCCER 11:55 a.m. — Men’s, France vs. Brazil, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Georgetown at Syracuse, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Marquette vs. South Florida, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — Men’s college, Montana at Northern Arizona, FSNW. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, North Carolina at Duke, ESPN. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Texas at Oklahoma, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Seattle Pacific at Central Washington, FSNW. 8 p.m. — Men’s college, Utah State at Idaho, ESPN2.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL, Montreal Canadiens at Boston Bruins, VS. network. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

ON DECK Today Girls basketball: Mountain View at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Junction City, 5:45 p.m.; Elmira at La Pine, 5:45 p.m.; Madras at Gladstone, 7 p.m.; Bend at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Santiam at Culver, 5 p.m. Boys basketball: Redmond at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Elmira at La Pine, 7;15 p.m.; Sisters at Junction City, 7:15 p.m.; Gladstone at Madras, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Bend, 7 p.m.; Santiam at Culver, 6:30 p.m.

Basketball • Ducks’ Catron receives Pac-10 honor: University of Oregon senior forward Joevan Catron was named Pac-10 men’s basketball player of the week for the week of Jan. 31-Feb. 6, the conference announced Monday. Catron led the Ducks to a sweep of Washington State and thenNo. 20 Washington over the weekend, averaging 18.5 points, 9.0 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 2.0 steals in the two games. • Wyoming fires head men’s basketball coach: Wyoming has fired head men’s basketball coach Heath Schroyer. Schroyer compiled a 49-68 record over the three 1⁄2 seasons he was coach. His best season was 2008-09 when the team went 19-14. He took over the UW program in 2007 after previous coach Steve McClain, who was also fired.

Auto racing • NASCAR Nationwide Series driver Annett gets DWI: NASCAR Nationwide Series driver Michael Annett has been charged with driving while impaired following a twocar accident. Annett, entering his first season for Rusty Wallace Racing, also was charged with resisting arrest, failure to reduce speed and unlawful use of a mobile phone to text or send e-mail. All counts are misdemeanors. He has a March 18 court date. According to Mooresville Police, Annett had a blood-alcohol level of 0.32 percent — well above the 0.08 legal limit in North Carolina — after he rear-ended another car at a red light at 1:32 a.m. Sunday.

Football • Titans hire Mike Munchak as head coach: The Tennessee Titans have hired Mike Munchak as the franchise’s 16th head coach, deciding to promote from within to replace Jeff Fisher. The Titans confirmed the hiring Monday. Munchak was the first man interviewed to replace Jeff Fisher and had been considered the top candidate as a favorite of team owner Bud Adams. This will be the first head coaching job for Munchak, who turns 51 in March, with the only franchise the offensive line coach and Hall of Fame lineman has ever played or worked for since being selected eighth overall by the then-Houston Oilers in 1982.

Tennis • Monfils beats Sampras in exhibition at SAP Open: Gael Monfils outran, outserved and outplayed 14-time Grand Slam winner Pete Sampras on the way to a 7-6 (4), 6-4 victory Monday in an exhibition on the opening night of the SAP Open. Monfils got the best of Sampras in a lighthearted match. Monfils took a photographer’s camera to snap a shot of Sampras at one point, did a push up, sprint and sit-up while Sampras rested after a long point and tried a few between-the-leg shots. The 39-year-old Sampras was appearing here in an exhibition for the fourth straight year. He showed off his stellar serve-andvolley game and bantered with the crowd throughout the match. • Llodra beats Davydenko in 1st round of ABN Amro: Michael Llodra of France defeated Nikolay Davydenko of Russia 6-3, 7-6 (4) Monday on the opening day of the ABN Amro World Tennis Tournament. Fifth-seeded Jurgen Melzer of Austria downed Dutch wild card Jesse Huta Galung 6-4, 6-4 to set up a second-round match with Marin Cilic of Croatia. Cilic downed German qualifier Mischa Zverev 6-2, 6-4.

Hockey • Bruins’ Savard done for season with concussion: Bruins center Marc Savard will miss the rest of the season after he was placed on long-term injured reserve on Monday with his second concussion in less than a year. Savard was injured in the Bruins’ Jan. 22 game against Colorado, when he was checked into the end boards’ glass by former teammate Matt Hunwick. Savard also sustained a concussion against Pittsburgh on March 7, 2010. He did not return until the second round of the playoffs and missed the first 23 games of this season.

Cycling • Boonen wins 1st stage of Tour of Qatar: Tom Boonen won Monday’s opening stage of the Tour of Qatar, his first major race since undergoing knee surgery last May. The Belgian finished the 90.4-mile ride from Dukhan to Al Khor in 2 hours, 59 minutes, 29 seconds. Heinrich Haussler of Australia and countryman Mark Renshaw were next. It was Boonen’s 18th stage win in Qatar. He won the race in 2006, ’08 and ’09. — The Associated Press

56 24 22 10 58 162 183 52 23 23 6 52 140 141 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 53 32 15 6 70 176 156 Nashville 54 28 19 7 63 141 129 Chicago 53 27 22 4 58 168 150 Columbus 52 25 22 5 55 141 162 St. Louis 51 23 20 8 54 138 153 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 54 35 10 9 79 183 127 Calgary 55 27 21 7 61 157 161 Minnesota 52 27 20 5 59 135 138 Colorado 53 25 22 6 56 164 175 Edmonton 53 16 29 8 40 133 180 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 53 30 18 5 65 152 150 Phoenix 55 27 19 9 63 156 156 San Jose 53 28 19 6 62 150 144 Anaheim 54 29 21 4 62 146 150 Los Angeles 53 29 22 2 60 150 129 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Monday’s Games Toronto 5, Atlanta 4 Detroit 3, N.Y. Rangers 2 Edmonton 4, Nashville 0 Calgary 3, Chicago 1 Phoenix 3, Colorado 0 Vancouver 4, Ottawa 2 Today’s Games Carolina at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Toronto at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Columbus at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. San Jose at Washington, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. St. Louis at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. San Jose at Columbus, 4 p.m. Nashville at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Colorado at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Ottawa at Calgary, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at Edmonton, 6:30 p.m. Anaheim at Vancouver, 7 p.m.

Thursday Girls basketball: Culver at Kennedy, 5:30 p.m. Boys basketball: Culver at Kennedy, 7 p.m. Wrestling: Lakeview at La Pine, 5:30 p.m. Friday Girls basketball: La Pine at Junction City, 5:45 p.m.; Cottage Grove at Sisters, 5:45 p.m.; North Lake at Gilchrist, TBA; Madras at Estacada, 7 p.m.; Redmond at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Summit at Bend, 5:15 p.m. Boys basketball: La Pine at Junction City, 7:15 p.m.; Cottage Grove at Sisters, 7:15 p.m.; Estacada at Madras, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Summit at Bend, 7 p.m.; North Lake at Gilchrist, TBA Wrestling: Bend, Mountain View and Summit at 5A regional tournament at Willamette High in Eugene, TBA; Redmond at 6A regional tournament in Roseburg Swimming: Summit, Bend, Mountain View at 5A Intermountain Conference district meet in Bend, 1 p.m.; Madras hosts 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 district meet, TBA; Sisters at 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 district meet in Albany, TBA Saturday Girls basketball: Gilchrist at Butte Falls, TBA Boys basketball: Gilchrist at Butte Falls, TBA Wrestling: Bend, Mountain View and Summit at 5A regional tournament at Willamette High in Eugene, TBA; Redmond at 6A regional tournaments in Roseburg Swimming: Summit, Bend, Mountain View at Intermountain Conference district meet in Bend, 10 a.m.; Madras hosts 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 district meet, TBA; Sisters at 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 district meet in Albany, TBA Nordic skiing: OHSNO skate and relay race at Teacup, TBA; OISRA classic race at Chemult, 11:30 a.m. Alpine skiing: OISRA SL race on Ed’s Garden at Mt. Bachelor, 10 a.m.

FOOTBALL NFL

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Atlanta Florida

IN THE BLEACHERS

NFL Draft Order At New York April 28-30 First Round W-L Pct Pct 1. Carolina 2-14 .125 .574 2. Denver 4-12 .250 .516 3. Buffalo 4-12 .250 .578 4. Cincinnati 4-12 .250 .582 5. Arizona 5-11 .313 .465 6. Cleveland 5-11 .313 .570 7. San Francisco 6-10 .375 .488 8. Tennessee 6-10 .375 .508 9. Dallas 6-10 .375 .512 10. Washington 6-10 .375 .516 11. Houston 6-10 .375 .523 12. Minnesota 6-10 .375 .539 13. Detroit 6-10 .375 .543 14. St. Louis 7-9 .438 .449 15. Miami 7-9 .438 .539 16. Jacksonville 8-8 .500 .453 17. Oakland 8-8 .500 .469 18. San Diego 9-7 .563 .457 19. N.Y. Giants 10-6 .625 .453 20. Tampa Bay 10-6 .625 .477 21. Kansas City 10-6 .625 .414 22. Indianapolis 10-6 .625 .473 23. Philadelphia 10-6 .625 .492 24. New Orleans 11-5 .688 .469 25. Seattle 7-9 .438 .484 26. Baltimore 12-4 .750 .484 27. Atlanta 13-3 .813 .484 28. New England 14-2 .875 .504 29. Chicago 11-5 .688 .473 30. N.Y. Jets 11-5 .688 .492 31. Pittsburgh 12-4 .750 .500 32. Green Bay 10-6 .625 .520 Note: Picks 21-32 determined by playoffs

W-L 147-109 132-124 148-108 149-107 119-137 146-110 125-131 130-126 131-125 132-124 134-122 138-118 139-117 115-141 138-118 116-140 120-136 117-139 116-140 122-134 106-150 121-135 126-130 120-136 124-132 124-132 124-132 129-127 121-135 126-130 128-128 133-123

BASKETBALL Men’s college Monday’s Games ——— EAST Iona 85, Manhattan 67 Loyola, Md. 76, Siena 69 Pittsburgh 71, West Virginia 66 SOUTH Alabama A&M 74, Ark.-Pine Bluff 52 Alabama St. 90, MVSU 63 Delaware St. 91, Norfolk St. 83 Florida A&M 60, Coppin St. 58 Grambling St. 61, Alcorn St. 60 High Point 82, N.C. Central 74 Howard 65, S. Carolina St. 53 Jackson St. 72, Southern U. 43 Jacksonville St. 76, Tennessee St. 73, OT Kennesaw St. 78, Campbell 64 Md.-Eastern Shore 83, N. Carolina A&T 82 Morgan St. 65, Bethune-Cookman 57 Tennessee Tech 70, Austin Peay 64 UNC Greensboro 86, The Citadel 74 MIDWEST Butler 72, Ill.-Chicago 65 Detroit 81, Cleveland St. 78 Kansas 103, Missouri 86 Murray St. 66, E. Illinois 53 SE Missouri 83, SIU-Edwardsville 63 Wright St. 74, Youngstown St. 70 SOUTHWEST Savannah St. 63, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 57, OT Texas-Arlington 93, Cent. Arkansas 70 FAR WEST Fresno St. 79, CS Bakersfield 49 New Mexico St. 75, Louisiana Tech 57 POLLS AP Top Twenty Five The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,

records through Feb. 6, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Ohio St. (65) 24-0 1,625 1 2. Kansas 22-1 1,519 2 3. Texas 20-3 1,509 3 4. Pittsburgh 21-2 1,438 4 5. Duke 21-2 1,341 5 6. San Diego St. 23-1 1,259 7 7. BYU 22-2 1,212 8 8. Notre Dame 19-4 1,185 9 9. Villanova 19-4 1,047 12 10. Connecticut 18-4 1,040 6 11. Georgetown 18-5 1,009 13 12. Syracuse 20-4 919 17 13. Wisconsin 17-5 790 19 14. Purdue 18-5 754 11 15. Arizona 20-4 630 21 16. Louisville 18-5 604 15 17. Florida 18-5 534 — 18. Kentucky 16-6 519 10 19. Missouri 18-5 511 14 20. North Carolina 17-5 461 23 21. Utah St. 22-2 347 22 22. Texas A&M 17-5 231 16 23. Vanderbilt 16-6 128 23 24. Temple 17-5 110 — 25. West Virginia 15-7 93 25 Others receiving votes: Minnesota 88, Wichita St. 29, Coastal Carolina 26, Cincinnati 22, Saint Mary’s, Calif. 22, Alabama 21, George Mason 19, Washington 15, Marquette 12, Xavier 12, Florida St. 11, Belmont 5, Illinois 5, UCLA 5, UNLV 5, Baylor 4, Colorado St. 2, Tennessee 2, UTEP 2, Cleveland St. 1, Duquesne 1, Missouri St. 1. USA Today/ESPN Top 25 Poll The top 25 teams in the USA Today-ESPN men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 6, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Ohio State (31) 24-0 775 1 2. Kansas 22-1 732 2 3. Texas 20-3 721 3 4. Pittsburgh 21-2 678 4 5. Duke 21-2 642 5 6. San Diego State 23-1 614 6 7. Notre Dame 19-4 575 8 8. Brigham Young 22-2 564 9 9. Connecticut 18-4 496 7 10. Villanova 19-4 495 12 11. Georgetown 18-5 447 14 12. Purdue 18-5 401 10 13. Syracuse 20-4 369 17 14. Wisconsin 17-5 361 18 15. Louisville 18-5 350 13 16. Arizona 20-4 273 22 17. Utah State 22-2 257 21 18. Kentucky 16-6 246 11 19. Florida 18-5 243 23 20. Missouri 18-5 234 15 21. North Carolina 17-5 165 — 22. Texas A&M 17-5 128 16 23. Saint Mary’s 20-4 64 — 24. Vanderbilt 16-6 39 24 25. Minnesota 16-7 37 20 Others receiving votes: West Virginia 29, Temple 27, Washington 21, Coastal Carolina 15, George Mason 13, Xavier 13, Wichita State 12, UCLA 9, Alabama 8, Florida State 6, Texas-El Paso 4, Illinois 3, Virginia Commonwealth 3, Marquette 2, UNLV 2, Valparaiso 2.

Women’s college Monday’s Games ——— EAST Fairleigh Dickinson 83, Wagner 71 Long Island U. 77, Sacred Heart 59 Mount St. Mary’s, Md. 51, Monmouth, N.J. 45 Quinnipiac 56, St. Francis, NY 52 Robert Morris 64, Bryant 45 St. Francis, Pa. 68, Cent. Connecticut St. 51 SOUTH Alabama A&M 65, Ark.-Pine Bluff 50 Alabama St. 62, MVSU 52 Alcorn St. 64, Grambling St. 57

Chattanooga 83, Furman 65 Coll. of Charleston 61, Davidson 52 Delaware St. 66, Norfolk St. 48 Florida A&M 73, Coppin St. 63 Florida Gulf Coast 81, ETSU 65 Florida St. 78, Virginia 74 Georgia Southern 71, Elon 69, OT Hampton 79, N.C. Central 44 Howard 59, S. Carolina St. 25 Kennesaw St. 71, Campbell 60 Louisiana Tech 85, New Mexico St. 63 Morgan St. 55, Bethune-Cookman 45 N. Carolina A&T 80, Md.-Eastern Shore 68, OT N. Dakota St. 71, Centenary 62 North Carolina 62, Duke 60 Presbyterian 54, Savannah St. 47 Samford 68, Wofford 48 Southern U. 72, Jackson St. 55 Stetson 80, S.C.-Upstate 76 Tennessee 73, Kentucky 67 W. Carolina 57, UNC-Greensboro 53 MIDWEST IPFW 84, IUPUI 59 Oakland, Mich. 56, W. Illinois 47 SOUTHWEST Oral Roberts 85, S. Dakota St. 78

TENNIS WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION Open Gaz de France Monday Paris Singles First Round Kristina Barrois, Germany, def. Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, 5,7, 6-4, 6-4.

AP Women’s Top Twenty Five The top 25 teams in the The Associated Press’ women’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 6, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Baylor (23) 21-1 981 1 2. Connecticut (16) 22-1 973 2 3. Stanford (1) 20-2 914 4 4. Tennessee 21-2 871 5 5. Duke 21-1 825 3 6. Texas A&M 19-2 815 6 7. Xavier 19-2 763 7 8. Notre Dame 20-4 719 8 9. UCLA 19-2 666 10 10. DePaul 21-3 614 9 11. Michigan St. 29-3 565 11 12. Maryland 20-3 562 12 13. North Carolina 20-3 510 15 14. Oklahoma 17-5 472 13 15. Kentucky 18-4 442 16 16. Georgetown 19-5 403 17 17. West Virginia 20-4 325 14 18. Wis.-Green Bay 22-1 296 21 19. Florida St. 18-5 273 19 20. Miami 20-3 267 18 21. Marquette 19-4 173 23 22. Iowa St. 16-6 150 22 23. Penn St. 20-5 121 — 24. Georgia 18-5 107 24 25. Marist 21-2 47 — Others receiving votes: Iowa 39, Georgia Tech 35, Gonzaga 20, Houston 18, Boston College 8, Louisiana Tech 8, Temple 8, Ohio St. 5, Kansas St. 3, Duquesne 1, Princeton 1.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts Philadelphia 53 35 13 5 75 Pittsburgh 54 34 16 4 72 N.Y. Rangers 56 29 23 4 62 New Jersey 53 19 30 4 42 N.Y. Islanders 52 17 28 7 41 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts Boston 53 30 16 7 67 Montreal 54 30 19 5 65 Buffalo 51 24 22 5 53 Toronto 53 22 26 5 49 Ottawa 54 17 29 8 42 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts Tampa Bay 54 33 16 5 71 Washington 54 29 15 10 68 Carolina 53 26 21 6 58

Pattaya Women’s Open Monday Pattaya, Thailand Singles First Round Maria Kirilenko (3), Russia, def. Alberta Brianti, Italy, 6-0, 4-6, 6-2. Peng Shuai (6), China, def. Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, 7-6 (8), 6-0. Jill Craybas, United States, def. Noppawan Lertcheewakarn, Thailand, 6-3, 6-3. Zhang Shuai, China, def. Zuzana Kucova, Slovakia, 6-4, 6-2.

ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS AMRO World Tournament Monday Rotterdam, Netherlands Singles First Round Marin Cilic, Croatia, def. Mischa Zverev, Germany, 6-2, 6-4. Michael Llodra, France, def. Nikolay Davydenko, Russia, 6-3, 7-6 (4) Viktor Troicki, Serbia, def. Thomas Schoorel, Netherlands, 6-2, 7-6 (1). Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, def. Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, 6-4, 7-5. Jurgen Melzer (5), Austria, def. Jesse Huta Galung, Netherlands, 6-4, 6-4. SAP Open Monday San Jose, Calif. Singles First Round Michael Russell, United States, def. Alex Kuznetsov, United States, 6-4, 6-2. Tim Smyczek, United States, def. Robert Farah, Colombia, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3. Denis Istomin (5), Uzbekistan, def. Roman Borvanov, Moldova, 6-3, 7-5. Donald Young, United States, def. Dustin Brown, Germany, 7-6 (2), 6-4. James Blake, United States, def. Jesse Levine, United States, 7-5, 6-1. Exhibition Gael Monfils, France, def. Pete Sampras, United States, 7-6 (4), 6-4.

GOLF PGA Tour GF 180 164 155 113 128

GA 137 122 138 154 169

GF 161 139 145 138 119

GA 119 131 149 166 178

GF 164 150 159

GA 162 134 164

Phoenix Open Monday At TPC Scottsdale Scottsdale, Ariz. Purse: $6.1 million Yardage: 7,216; Par: 71 Final (x-won playoff on second hole) x-Mark Wilson (500), $1,098,000 65-64-68-69—266 Jason Dufner (300), $658,800 65-68-67-66—266 Vijay Singh (163), $353,800 69-65-68-66—268 Martin Laird (163), $353,800 68-71-64-65—268 Nick Watney (100), $222,650 70-66-65-68—269 J.B. Holmes (100), $222,650 65-70-67-67—269 Gary Woodland (100), $222,650 68-66-69-66—269 Brandt Snedeker (75), $164,700 69-68-66-67—270 Webb Simpson (75), $164,700 70-66-67-67—270 Y.E. Yang (75), $164,700 69-65-67-69—270 Chris Couch (75), $164,700 66-65-68-71—270

Tommy Gainey (75), $164,700 Ryuji Imada (56), $111,020 Cameron Beckman (56), $111,020 Joe Ogilvie (56), $111,020 Geoff Ogilvy (56), $111,020 Rickie Fowler (56), $111,020 Brian Gay (52), $82,350 D.A. Points (52), $82,350 Ben Crane (52), $82,350 Bo Van Pelt (52), $82,350 Frank Lickliter II (46), $54,987 Rory Sabbatini (46), $54,987 Pat Perez (46), $54,987 Alex Prugh (46), $54,987 William McGirt (46), $54,987 Brendon de Jonge (46), $54,987 Michael Connell (46), $54,987 Dustin Johnson (39), $37,134 Charley Hoffman (39), $37,134 Hunter Mahan (39), $37,134 Bubba Watson (39), $37,134 Lucas Glover (39), $37,134 Matt Bettencourt (39), $37,134 Phil Mickelson (39), $37,134 Bill Haas (39), $37,134 Tom Lehman (33), $28,060 Charlie Wi (33), $28,060 Jonathan Byrd (33), $28,060 Aaron Baddeley (33), $28,060 Hunter Haas (27), $20,771 Justin Leonard (27), $20,771 Fred Couples (27), $20,771 Marc Leishman (27), $20,771 Chris Kirk (27), $20,771 J.J. Henry (27), $20,771 Jeff Overton (27), $20,771 Chez Reavie (27), $20,771 Jimmy Walker (21), $15,220 Brian Davis (21), $15,220 Vaughn Taylor (21), $15,220 Angel Cabrera (21), $15,220 Brendan Steele (17), $14,193 John Rollins (17), $14,193 Martin Piller (17), $14,193 Jeff Maggert (15), $13,908 Bill Lunde (12), $13,542 Davis Love III (12), $13,542 Troy Kelly (0), $13,542 Nathan Green (12), $13,542 Troy Matteson (12), $13,542 Jarrod Lyle (7), $12,871 Bryce Molder (7), $12,871 Robert Allenby (7), $12,871 Jason Bohn (7), $12,871 Stephen Ames (7), $12,871 Paul Goydos (7), $12,871 Tom Gillis (2), $12,322 Michael Putnam (2), $12,322 Josh Teater (2), $12,322 Andres Romero (1), $12,017 Brett Wetterich (1), $12,017 Ryan Moore (1), $11,773 Cameron Tringale (1), $11,773

63-65-68-74—270 68-67-69-67—271 65-70-67-69—271 67-67-69-68—271 67-66-67-71—271 70-62-69-70—271 69-68-65-70—272 68-66-69-69—272 66-68-68-70—272 68-66-67-71—272 72-64-65-72—273 70-66-68-69—273 69-67-67-70—273 70-67-66-70—273 70-65-68-70—273 67-72-68-66—273 69-70-64-70—273 64-73-70-67—274 65-71-68-70—274 68-68-68-70—274 70-68-66-70—274 66-68-69-71—274 67-67-68-72—274 67-65-71-71—274 65-65-68-76—274 65-72-69-69—275 68-68-67-72—275 68-65-73-69—275 65-68-72-70—275 74-63-70-69—276 70-66-69-71—276 67-71-67-71—276 67-69-69-71—276 66-72-73-65—276 66-73-67-70—276 67-72-69-68—276 68-71-68-69—276 69-68-71-69—277 70-68-69-70—277 72-67-69-69—277 68-71-66-72—277 72-65-71-70—278 73-65-73-67—278 72-66-68-72—278 70-66-73-70—279 69-68-70-73—280 71-68-71-70—280 67-72-70-71—280 68-71-68-73—280 71-68-71-70—280 70-67-73-71—281 70-68-70-73—281 68-67-71-75—281 65-73-70-73—281 70-68-68-75—281 69-70-70-72—281 65-71-72-74—282 71-67-70-74—282 73-66-71-72—282 72-66-67-78—283 68-70-71-74—283 69-68-69-79—285 71-68-70-76—285

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League DETROIT TIGERS—Agreed to terms with RHP Lester Oliveros, RHP Jose Ortega, RHP Brayan Villarreal, LHP Duane Below, LHP Phil Coke, LHP Charlie Furbush, 1B-OF Ryan Strieby and INF Audy Ciriaco on one-year contracts. National League HOUSTON ASTROS—Agreed to terms with OF Jason Bourgeois and RHP Aneury Rodriguez on one-year contracts. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Agreed to terms with INF Aaron Miles on a minor league contract. NEW YORK METS—Named Brad Andress strength and conditioning coach. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS—Suspended G Aaron Brooks for one game for leaving the court in the fourth quarter of their game on Feb. 4. Recalled G Ishmael Smith from Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES—Signed G Jason Williams. PHILADELPHIA 76ERS—Recalled F Craig Brackins from Springfield (NBADL). TORONTO RAPTORS—Signed G Trey Johnson to a second 10-day contract. FOOTBALL National Football League CAROLINA PANTHERS—Named Joe Kenn strength and conditioning coach. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Released OT Jordan Black. Signed C Bradley Vierling. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Named Mike Caldwell linebackers coach and Michael Zordich secondary/safeties coach. TENNESSEE TITANS—Named Mike Munchak coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League ATLANTA THRASHERS—Reassigned G Edward Pasquale from Chicago (AHL) to Gwinnett (ECHL). BOSTON BRUINS—Recalled F Jordan Caron from Providence (AHL). ST. LOUIS BLUES—Assigned G Ben Bishop to Peoria (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Reassigned G Jaroslav Janus from Norfolk (AHL) to Florida (ECHL). VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Voided the reassignment of D Lee Sweatt to Manitoba (AHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer FC DALLAS—Signed MF Ricardo Villar. MONTREAL IMPACT—Signed MF Hassoun Camara. NEW ENGLAND REVOLUTION—Re-signed MF Pat Phelan. COLLEGE ARMY—Named Boo Corrigan director of athletics. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA—Named Patrick Knapp associate director of athletics for external operations and Alton McKenzie cross country and track and field coach. GEORGIA—Named Will Friend offensive line coach. MICHIGAN—Named Curt Mallory secondary coach and Jerry Montgomery defensive line coach. MISSISSIPPI STATE—Suspended senior basketball G Ravern Johnson indefinitely because of “inappropriate tweets” that were critical of his role with the team and of fans. WYOMING—Fired men’s basketball coach Heath Schroyer.

Wilson wins playoff in Phoenix Open By John Nicholson The Associated Press

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Mark Wilson won the frost-delayed Phoenix Open on Monday for his second victory in three starts this year, holing a 9-foot birdie putt on the second hole of a playoff with Jason Dufner. Wilson, two strokes ahead when play resumed Monday, closed with a 2-under 69 to match Dufner at 18 under. Dufner shot a 66, birdieing Nos. 16 and 17. “I’m just enjoying the ride here and that’s just kind of the way I’m going to look at the year here, just ride this train as long as I can,” Wilson said. “Right now, the plan is to play through Bay Hill, take a week off, get ready for the Masters.” Wilson, the 36-year-old Wisconsin player who won the Sony Open last month in a 36hole Sunday finish, made a 4½-foot par putt on the par-4 18th to extend the playoff after Dufner tapped in for par. Wilson won on the par-4 10th, setting up the deciding putt with a 7-iron approach from the middle of the fairway. “That was an easy putt,” Wilson said. “Just thankfully, I started it on line and knocked it in.” Dufner was facing a 7½-foot par putt when Wilson ended the playoff. “Came out and made a couple birdies to put maybe a little heat on Mark, and he played great,” Dufner said. “Great two-putt on the first playoff hole from 70-plus feet and makes birdie on the next hole.” Delays for frost and frozen turf the first four days forced the Monday finish.

GOLF Wilson earned $1,098,000 for his fourth PGA Tour title. The former University of North Carolina player also won the 2007 Honda Classic and 2009 Mayakoba Golf Classic. He jumped from 91st to 51st in the world ranking — locking up a spot in the 64-man Match Play field — after finishing last season at No. 230. After resuming play Monday on the 13th green, Wilson made seven straight pars before holing the winning birdie putt. He nearly drove into the water on the left side of the 18th hole in regulation, but the ball cleared the hazard and ended up in a bunker. He hit a 9-iron approach to about 14 feet and two-putted to force the playoff. “I got away with a bad tee shot on 18, but luckily got a good bounce and was hoping I’d finish it off there,” Wilson said. “But the playoff was fun.” Dufner is winless on the PGA Tour. He also settled for par on the final hole of regulation after nearly holing out from a greenside bunker. “It’s a good start to the year,” Dufner said. “To be honest, this is a course that I never really thought I could compete on. History on this golf course is a lot of long-ball hitters. Mark and myself probably aren’t the longest, but we’re probably not the shortest. But to be able to compete and be at the top of the field for the week is good, so it’s definitely good momentum for the rest of the West Coast swing.”

Matt York / The Associated Press

Tommy Gainey pats Mark Wilson, right, on the back on the 18th green after Gainey finished his round during the final round of the Phoenix Open Monday in Scottsdale, Ariz. Wilson won the tournament with an 18 under par.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, February 8, 2011 D3

Tracy

NHL ROUNDUP

NBA ROUNDUP

Coyotes shut out Avalanche

Aldridge helps lead Blazers over Bulls

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Coming off consecutive embarrassing losses that included 11 straight goals against, the Phoenix Coyotes needed goalie Ilya Bryzgalov to play better and to play better in front of him. Check and check. Phoenix squeezed its defensive end for the second straight game and Bryzgalov made the big saves for his second straight shutout, lifting the Coyotes to a 3-0 win over the struggling Colorado Avalanche Monday night. “It’s been a little bit of both,” Coyotes coach Dave Tippett said. “Bryz has been solid and when he’s had to make big saves, he has, but we’ve been more committed in front of him, playing stronger defense.” Bryzgalov was superb last season in leading the Coyotes to the playoffs, but had been sporadic this year, allowing four or more goals five times in a seven-game span. Helped by a defense that had again cinched in around him, Bryzgalov had 25 saves in a 1-0 win over Minnesota on Saturday and backed that up with another sterling performance, turning away 26 shots to give Phoenix consecutive shutouts. In other events on Monday: Canucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Senators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Mikael Samuelsson scored his second goal into an empty net and added an assist as streaking Vancouver built an early lead and hung on for a win over struggling Ottawa. Flames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Blackhawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 CALGARY — Curtis Glencross scored the winner in the third period and Miikka Kiprusoff turned aside 22 shots for Calgary. Red Wings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 DETROIT — Pavel Datsyuk had a goal and an assist for Detroit after missing 19 games with a broken right wrist. Maple Leafs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Thrashers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 TORONTO — Nikolai Kulemin and Tim Brent each scored third-period goals to lift Toronto. Oilers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Edmonton’s Devan Dubnyk had 37 saves for his first career shutout.

PORTLAND — LaMarcus Aldridge scored so easily against Chicago that he allowed himself a broad smile and a few high-fives from teammates before the game was even over. “It was fun,” he said after putting up a careerhigh 42 points Monday night in the Portland Trail Blazers’ 109-103 victory over the Bulls. So was there a little I-told-you-so feeling after not being selected for the All-Star game? No, Aldridge insisted. “Me getting 42 tonight isn’t going to change their mind, so what is it going to do for me?” he said. “I thought tonight I just came out and got those easy dunks early and that was my big thing that got me going.” Derrick Rose had 36 points for the Bulls, who lost their second straight. He was blunt about the problem. “I think our offense is there, but defensively we’re terrible right now,” he said. Chicago, which has not lost three in a row this season, visits the Jazz today. Aldridge’s 20-foot jumper with 1:11 left made it 100-93 and appeared to seal it for the Blazers, but Rose answered with a 3-pointer with just more than a minute to go. Aldridge hit a turnaround jumper and Andre Miller made a pair of free throws with 30 seconds left to make it 104-96. Luol Deng had a reverse layup on the other end, but the Bulls could not catch up. “Every aspect of the defense was missing. This is two games in a row we’ve put ourselves in a bad position by not guarding,” Chicago coach Tom Thibodeau said. In other games on Monday: Mavericks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Cavaliers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 DALLAS — Over one season or two, no team in NBA history has lost as many games in a row as these Cleveland Cavaliers. Surging Dallas beat Cleveland, making it 25 straight losses for the Cavs. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Kobe Bryant scored 19 points and Lamar Odom had 15 points and 11 rebounds to lead Los Angeles over Memphis. Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Hornets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 NEW ORLEANS — Kevin Love had 27 points and 17 rebounds, and struggling Minnesota maintained its surprising dominance of playoff-contending New Orleans. Rockets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 DENVER — Kevin Martin scored 37 points and

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Big second half lifts Jayhawks The Associated Press LAWRENCE, Kan. — Marcus Morris had 22 points and reserve Mario Little added 17, sparking a second-half charge that led No. 2 Kansas past No. 19 Missouri 103-86 on Monday night. Markieff Morris added 16 points for the Jayhawks (23-1, 8-1 Big 12), who beat their archrivals at home for the 12th straight time. Missouri (18-6, 4-5) dropped to 0-5 in conference road games and 14-41 all time in Allen Fieldhouse. Kansas came in leading the nation with a 52 percent field goal percentage and shot 61 percent against Missouri’s pressure defense. The Tigers made seven of their first nine shots and wound up shooting 52 percent. Laurence Bowers, who fouled out with a little less than 5½ minutes to go, had 19 points for Missouri and Phil Pressey had 17. Also on Monday: No. 4 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . .71 No. 25 West Virginia . . . . . . .66 MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — Nasir Robinson scored 15 points and Pittsburgh overcame an awful start to beat West Virginia.

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Portland Trail Blazers’ LaMarcus Aldridge goes to the basket as he is fouled by Chicago Bulls’ Keith Bogans (6) during the third quarter of their NBA basketball game Monday in Portland. The Trail Blazers defeated the Bulls 109-103. Houston took advantage of Nene’s absence and Chauncey Billups’ early exit to beat Denver despite Carmelo Anthony’s 50-point effort that tied his career high. Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Gerald Wallace scored 19 points, including the clinching free throws with 3 seconds left, and Charlotte overcame top scorer Stephen Jackson’s ejection to beat short-handed Boston. Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Al Jefferson scored 23 points and Deron Williams had 21 points and nine assists to help Utah rally past Sacramento. Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 OAKLAND, Calif. — Steve Nash had 14 points and 15 assists, leading Phoenix over Golden State on his 37th birthday.

Continued from D1 He was taken to a hospital for a mild arrhythmia, or irregular heartbeat. Once back in Denver, he underwent a stress test and a tilt table test of the cardiovascular system to determine why he was fainting from time to time. Now, headed for the start of spring training at Colorado’s sparkling new spring training facility in Scottsdale, Ariz., in a matter of days, Tracy feels like a new person. The 55-year-old Tracy was diagnosed with high blood pressure during spring training 2003 while managing the Los Angeles Dodgers and went on blood pressure medication that included a diuretic. After his December episode, Denver cardiologist Dr. Barry Molk decided to drastically decrease Tracy’s meds — and it turned out to be the right move. He has more energy than he has in some time. He no longer is on the diuretic. “I’m doing better than I was doing physically at any point during the course of the 2010 season,” Tracy said in a phone interview. “I just didn’t need as much medicine. And I needed that little tap on the shoulder from upstairs that I needed to go in for a little tuneup.” Tracy was ready to get onto an elevator at the winter meetings hotel with Colorado coaches Carney Lansford and Tom Runnells when he collapsed around 1 a.m. on Dec. 7. He was carried out on a stretcher and taken to a hospital in the Orlando area, then released later that day. Tracy is quick to point out that his health scare pales in comparison to what one of his former pitchers has endured.

John Green is the Los Angeles Dodgers scout whose 9-yearold daughter, Christina, was killed in the Tucson shooting rampage last month that left six dead and 13 more injured, including U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona. In his first managerial gig in 1987, Tracy had Green at ClassA Peoria, Ill., the Chicago Cubs’ affiliate in the Midwest League. “There’s not a word to describe that. I encourage everybody to offer a prayer for John and (wife) Roxanna,” Tracy said. “It hit really close to home. I kept looking at the television in disbelief.” Tracy, who stopped a decades-long habit of chewing tobacco last February, learned this winter just how important it is to get regular checkups and stay on top of any health concerns — no matter how minor they might seem. His mother needed a pacemaker and his grandfather died at age 55 from a heart attack. And Tracy works in the pressure-packed world of professional sports. He managed the Dodgers from 2001-2005 and Pittsburgh in 2006-07 before taking over the Rockies in late May 2009. Tracy earned NL Manager of the Year honors that season after replacing Clint Hurdle and leading Colorado to a 74-42 record and the NL wild card. The Rockies went 83-79 last season for a third-place division finish behind the World Series champion San Francisco Giants and San Diego. Tracy should be much improved in terms of energy in 2011. He sure hopes so. “I was physically tired during the season, sometimes even before going to work,” Tracy said. “Wow, it was like you’d been drug through the wringer.”

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Monday’s Games

Blazers 109, Bulls 103 CHICAGO (103) Deng 7-15 1-3 15, Boozer 8-13 1-2 17, Thomas 1-4 0-0 2, Rose 14-27 7-8 36, Bogans 0-2 0-0 0, Brewer 4-9 0-0 8, Korver 5-7 1-1 14, Gibson 1-3 0-0 2, Asik 4-8 1-4 9, Watson 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 44-89 11-18 103. PORTLAND (109) Batum 4-8 4-4 12, Aldridge 15-23 12-14 42, Przybilla 0-2 0-0 0, Miller 7-11 13-13 27, Matthews 3-12 0-0 6, Fernandez 4-9 8-9 18, Marks 1-1 0-0 2, Mills 1-2 0-0 2, Babbitt 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-68 37-40 109. Chicago 26 24 22 31 — 103 Portland 28 22 25 34 — 109 3-Point Goals—Chicago 4-16 (Korver 3-4, Rose 1-6, Bogans 0-2, Deng 0-4), Portland 2-8 (Fernandez 2-3, Mills 0-1, Batum 0-2, Matthews 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Chicago 52 (Boozer 12), Portland 36 (Aldridge 8). Assists—Chicago 16 (Rose 6), Portland 21 (Miller 11). Total Fouls—Chicago 25, Portland 15. A—20,534 (19,980).

Atlantic Division Boston New York Philadelphia New Jersey Toronto

W 38 26 23 15 14

Miami Atlanta Orlando Charlotte Washington

W 37 33 32 22 13

L 14 18 20 29 37

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland

W 34 21 19 19 8

L 16 27 30 32 44

Lakers 93, Grizzlies 84 L.A. LAKERS (93) Artest 4-11 2-6 13, P.Gasol 6-11 5-9 17, Bynum 4-6 3-6 11, Fisher 4-7 0-0 10, Bryant 6-17 7-7 19, Odom 5-14 4-7 15, Blake 1-1 0-0 3, Brown 2-7 0-0 5, Walton 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-74 21-35 93. MEMPHIS (84) Gay 7-15 3-4 18, Randolph 2-14 4-4 8, M.Gasol 5-14 0-0 10, Conley 5-12 2-3 13, Young 9-19 2-2 22, Allen 2-5 2-2 6, Vasquez 1-2 0-0 2, Arthur 2-2 1-2 5, Thabeet 0-0 0-0 0, Henry 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 33-83 14-17 84. L.A. Lakers 26 24 23 20 — 93 Memphis 29 16 23 16 — 84 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 8-16 (Artest 3-6, Fisher 2-3, Blake 1-1, Brown 1-2, Odom 1-3, Bryant 0-1), Memphis 4-10 (Young 2-3, Conley 1-2, Gay 1-3, Randolph 0-1, Allen 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Lakers 58 (Odom 11), Memphis 51 (Randolph, M.Gasol 12). Assists—L.A. Lakers 22 (Bryant 6), Memphis 18 (Randolph, Conley 4). Total Fouls—L.A. Lakers 15, Memphis 25. Technicals—L.A. Lakers defensive three second, Gay. A—18,119 (18,119).

T’wolves 104, Hornets 92 MINNESOTA (104) Beasley 6-16 2-2 14, Love 6-12 14-14 27, Milicic 0-0 0-0 0, Flynn 5-10 2-2 13, Brewer 1-4 0-0 3, Pekovic 4-4 4-4 12, Johnson 1-7 0-0 3, Hayward 0-2 0-0 0, Tolliver 4-8 0-0 12, Telfair 3-6 0-0 9, Ellington 4-10 3-3 11, Koufos 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 34-79 25-25 104. NEW ORLEANS (92) Pondexter 1-5 2-2 4, West 7-16 4-4 18, Gray 2-4 0-2 4, Paul 5-11 7-8 17, Belinelli 6-16 0-0

Pct .745 .520 .460 .288 .275

GB — 11½ 14½ 23½ 24

L10 6-4 4-6 6-4 4-6 1-9

Str L-1 W-1 L-1 L-3 W-1

Home 23-4 14-10 16-8 12-13 9-15

Away 15-9 12-14 7-19 3-24 5-22

Conf 27-7 16-11 15-19 8-23 9-24

Away 18-9 16-11 14-13 9-16 0-25

Conf 24-7 23-9 22-11 13-18 8-23

Away 11-12 8-16 8-19 6-21 3-27

Conf 20-9 14-15 13-13 12-17 7-25

Southeast Division Pct .725 .647 .615 .431 .260

GB — 4 5½ 15 23½

L10 7-3 7-3 5-5 5-5 1-9

Str W-6 W-3 L-1 W-1 L-8

Home 19-5 17-7 18-7 13-13 13-12

Suns 104, Warriors 92

Central Division Pct .680 .438 .388 .373 .154

GB — 12 14½ 15½ 27

L10 7-3 5-5 4-6 4-6 0-10

Str L-2 W-4 L-4 W-2 L-25

Home 23-4 13-11 11-11 13-11 5-17

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Mavs 99, Cavs 96 CLEVELAND (96) Eyenga 7-15 0-0 15, Jamison 8-23 1-1 18, Hickson 12-18 2-4 26, Sessions 6-12 7-7 19, Parker 3-10 0-0 7, Gibson 1-5 0-0 2, Moon 2-5 0-0 4, Hollins 1-2 3-5 5, Graham 0-1 0-0 0, Harris 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 40-91 13-17 96. DALLAS (99) Stojakovic 3-9 1-2 8, Nowitzki 5-11 2-2 12, Chandler 3-7 4-4 10, Kidd 2-6 0-0 6, Stevenson 1-4 0-0 3, Barea 4-9 0-0 9, Terry 7-16 7-7 23, Marion 5-15 7-8 17, Mahinmi 4-6 3-4 11, Cardinal 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 34-83 24-27 99. Cleveland 28 21 24 23 — 96 Dallas 29 30 18 22 — 99 3-Point Goals—Cleveland 3-14 (Eyenga 13, Parker 1-4, Jamison 1-6, Moon 0-1), Dallas 7-22 (Kidd 2-5, Terry 2-5, Barea 1-3, Stevenson 1-3, Stojakovic 1-6). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Cleveland 50 (Hickson 12), Dallas 57 (Chandler 11). Assists—Cleveland 18 (Sessions 13), Dallas 21 (Kidd 8). Total Fouls—Cleveland 20, Dallas 18. Technicals—Cleveland defensive three second. A—19,875 (19,200).

L 13 24 27 37 37

Southwest Division San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Memphis Houston

W 42 36 32 27 25

L 8 15 21 26 28

Oklahoma City Utah Denver Portland Minnesota

W 33 31 30 28 12

L 17 22 22 24 39

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 36 24 22 19 12

L 16 25 28 31 36

Pct .840 .706 .604 .509 .472

GB — 6½ 11½ 16½ 18½

L10 8-2 9-1 5-5 7-3 5-5

Str W-2 W-9 L-3 L-2 W-3

Home 25-2 20-8 20-7 16-8 14-10

Away 17-6 16-7 12-14 11-18 11-18

Conf 29-5 19-7 16-16 15-16 15-19

Away 15-10 14-12 9-15 10-17 3-23

Conf 19-12 16-16 18-14 18-15 4-28

Away 17-8 10-14 6-17 3-17 5-16

Conf 21-11 13-15 12-19 13-21 7-21

Northwest Division Pct .660 .585 .577 .538 .235

GB — 3½ 4 6 21½

L10 6-4 4-6 6-4 6-4 2-8

Str W-3 W-1 L-1 W-2 W-1

Home 18-7 17-10 21-7 18-7 9-16

GB — 10½ 13 16 22

L10 Str 6-4 W-2 6-4 W-1 5-5 L-1 4-6 L-3 3-7 L-3 ——— Monday’s Games

Charlotte 94, Boston 89 Minnesota 104, New Orleans 92 Houston 108, Denver 103 Utah 107, Sacramento 104

Home 19-8 14-11 16-11 16-14 7-20

L.A. Lakers 93, Memphis 84 Dallas 99, Cleveland 96 Portland 109, Chicago 103 Phoenix 104, Golden State 92 Today’s Games

Philadelphia at Atlanta, 4 p.m. San Antonio at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Toronto at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Houston, 5:30 p.m.

L.A. Clippers at Orlando, 4 p.m. Indiana at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Memphis at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Wednesday’s Games

Detroit at Cleveland, 4 p.m. New Orleans at New Jersey, 4 p.m. San Antonio at Toronto, 4 p.m. L.A. Clippers at New York, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at Sacramento, 7 p.m.

Charlotte at Indiana, 4 p.m. Orlando at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Milwaukee at Washington, 4 p.m. Chicago at Utah, 6 p.m. Denver at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. All Times PST

15, Smith 2-3 0-2 4, Green 3-6 3-4 11, Pavlovic 2-8 0-0 4, Andersen 2-4 0-0 4, Mbenga 1-2 0-0 2, Jack 1-3 0-0 2, Thornton 3-6 0-0 7. Totals 35-84 16-22 92. Minnesota 23 37 22 22 — 104 New Orleans 23 23 24 22 — 92 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 11-26 (Tolliver 4-7, Telfair 3-5, Brewer 1-2, Love 1-2, Flynn 1-2, Johnson 1-3, Beasley 0-1, Hayward 0-1, Ellington 0-3), New Orleans 6-24 (Belinelli 3-8, Green 2-4, Thornton 1-3, Pondexter 0-2, Paul 0-3, Pavlovic 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Minnesota 52 (Love 17), New Orleans 48 (Gray 8). Assists—Minnesota 21 (Flynn 6), New Orleans 22 (Paul 13). Total Fouls—Minnesota 20, New Orleans 24. Technicals—Minnesota defensive three second, Paul. A—13,401 (17,188).

PHOENIX (104) Hill 5-12 7-8 18, Frye 7-14 0-0 19, Lopez 13 3-4 5, Nash 6-13 1-2 14, Carter 3-12 3-4 10, Gortat 4-8 0-0 8, Dudley 5-11 0-0 12, Pietrus 4-7 1-2 12, Warrick 3-4 0-0 6, Dowdell 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 38-87 15-20 104. GOLDEN STATE (92) D.Wright 3-13 3-4 9, Lee 7-14 2-2 16, Biedrins 1-1 0-0 2, Curry 7-17 1-1 15, Ellis 5-17 10-13 21, Radmanovic 1-5 0-0 2, Williams 8-10 2-4 19, Udoh 3-5 0-2 6, B.Wright 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 36-83 18-26 92. Phoenix 33 29 27 15 — 104 Golden State 17 28 30 17 — 92 3-Point Goals—Phoenix 13-30 (Frye 5-9, Pietrus 3-5, Dudley 2-4, Hill 1-2, Nash 1-5, Carter 1-5), Golden State 2-18 (Williams 1-2, Ellis 1-3, Radmanovic 0-3, D.Wright 0-4, Curry 0-6). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Phoenix 51 (Frye 11), Golden State 58 (Ellis 12). Assists—Phoenix 32 (Nash 15), Golden State 20 (Curry 8). Total Fouls—Phoenix 19, Golden State 14. Technicals—Phoenix defensive three second, Golden State defensive three second 2. A—18,002 (19,596).

Jazz 107, Kings 104

Paciic Division Pct .692 .490 .440 .380 .250

0-1, Robinson 0-3), Charlotte 5-16 (Augustin 2-5, Diaw 1-2, Najera 1-3, Wallace 1-3, Henderson 0-1, Jackson 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Boston 42 (Garnett 14), Charlotte 61 (Wallace 16). Assists—Boston 25 (Rondo 14), Charlotte 16 (Augustin 4). Total Fouls—Boston 23, Charlotte 17. Technicals—Garnett, Pierce, K.Brown, Jackson 2, Charlotte defensive three second. Ejected— Jackson. A—19,081 (19,077).

Bobcats 94, Celtics 89 BOSTON (89) Pierce 6-14 9-10 22, Garnett 4-11 1-2 9, Perkins 4-6 0-2 8, Rondo 4-13 2-2 10, Allen 9-17 5-5 25, Davis 1-5 5-6 7, Wafer 1-5 0-0 3, Harangody 1-1 0-0 3, Robinson 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 31-76 22-27 89. CHARLOTTE (94) Wallace 6-16 6-8 19, Diaw 3-5 0-0 7, K.Brown 1-9 2-2 4, Augustin 3-9 1-1 9, Jackson 4-7 3-5 11, Henderson 5-13 5-5 15, Najera 2-5 0-0 5, Mohammed 1-4 1-2 3, Livingston 7-10 4-6 18, D.Brown 1-1 1-1 3. Totals 33-79 23-30 94. Boston 29 21 19 20 — 89 Charlotte 25 26 14 29 — 94 3-Point Goals—Boston 5-14 (Allen 2-2, Harangody 1-1, Wafer 1-2, Pierce 1-5, Rondo

UTAH (107) Kirilenko 3-6 4-6 10, Millsap 5-11 8-8 18, Jefferson 10-18 3-4 23, Williams 9-16 3-6 21, Bell 8-16 1-2 17, Miles 2-8 0-0 5, Fesenko 58 1-4 11, Watson 1-3 0-0 2, Price 0-1 0-0 0, J.Evans 0-0 0-0 0, Hayward 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 43-88 20-30 107. SACRAMENTO (104) Casspi 3-11 1-4 10, Thompson 6-10 2-3 14, Cousins 8-16 9-10 25, Udrih 4-7 2-2 11, T.Evans 9-16 3-3 21, Dalembert 4-8 1-1 9, Greene 1-2 1-1 4, Landry 1-5 0-0 2, Jeter 1-4 1-2 3, Head 1-2 2-3 5. Totals 38-81 22-29 104. Utah 30 25 25 27 — 107 Sacramento 30 26 31 17 — 104 3-Point Goals—Utah 1-9 (Miles 1-4, Watson 0-1, Williams 0-2, Bell 0-2), Sacramento 6-15 (Casspi 3-7, Head 1-1, Udrih 1-1, Greene 1-2, Jeter 0-1, T.Evans 0-3). Fouled Out—Millsap, Cousins. Rebounds—Utah 52 (Kirilenko 8), Sacramento 53 (Cousins 14). Assists—Utah 19 (Williams 9), Sacramento 18 (T.Evans, Thompson 4). Total Fouls—Utah 26, Sacramento 24. A—11,509 (17,317).

Rockets 108, Nuggets 103 HOUSTON (108) Battier 0-4 0-0 0, Scola 9-16 7-8 25, Hayes 5-8 2-2 12, Lowry 1-9 8-10 11, Kev.Martin 12-26 9-12 37, Budinger 4-9 0-0 11, I.Smith 0-2 0-0 0, Miller 1-2 1-3 3, Lee 3-5 0-0 7, Patterson 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 36-83 27-35 108. DENVER (103) Anthony 16-24 16-18 50, Ken.Martin 3-8 02 6, Harrington 4-12 2-2 10, Billups 2-3 0-0 5, Afflalo 2-3 0-0 4, Andersen 0-0 1-2 1, Lawson 6-13 7-10 19, J.Smith 2-9 3-5 7, Forbes 0-4 1-4 1, Carter 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 35-77 30-43 103. Houston 25 27 29 27 — 108 Denver 26 24 16 37 — 103 3-Point Goals—Houston 9-22 (Kev.Martin 48, Budinger 3-4, Lee 1-2, Lowry 1-6, Battier 0-1, Miller 0-1), Denver 3-13 (Anthony 2-3, Billups 12, Carter 0-1, Forbes 0-1, J.Smith 0-2, Harrington 0-4). Fouled Out—Afflalo. Rebounds—Houston 51 (Hayes 10), Denver 59 (Anthony 11). Assists—Houston 27 (Kev.Martin 7), Denver 14 (Lawson 5). Total Fouls—Houston 30, Denver 31. Technicals—Scola, Houston defensive three second, Houston Bench, Denver Coach Karl, Ken. Martin. A—14,595 (19,155).

Alessandro Trovati / The Associated Press

Lindsey Vonn speeds down the course during the first run of an alpine ski, World Cup women’s giant slalom, in Arber-Zwiesel, Germany, Sunday.

Vonn Continued from D1 “We have to make a smart decision. That’s why I pulled myself out of the slalom in Zwiesel, because I felt like I couldn’t safely ski down. So I just have to see how I feel in the morning, and see if my condition improves, and take it from there.” Vonn said she had a good read on whether she was feeling better or not. “It’s been getting progressively better every day but I basically just lose track of what I’m saying or just basically don’t have as much focus as I usually do,” she said. “So I’m going to do my normal warmup in the morning, work out and see how I feel and do the inspection, and I think I’m just going to wait until the last moment and then make a decision.” Vonn is getting used to these last-minute decisions. When she sliced her thumb open on a champagne bottle during a victory celebration at the last worlds in Val d’Isere, France, two years ago, she used duct tape so she could grip her pole with a cast on and returned for the slalom. When she injured her shin on the eve of last year’s Vancouver Olympics, she introduced the world to topfen cheese as a home remedy, smearing the semisoft dairy product over her wounded leg as she won gold in the downhill and bronze in the super-G. All the injuries have led to some speculation that Vonn has gotten into the habit of exaggerating her problems at major competitions to reduce expectations. “That’s totally ridiculous — I mean, come on,” Vonn said, interrupting a reporter who made just such a suggestion. “Life happens and I’m skiing and trying to win races and that means I have to work hard and train hard and sometimes you fall. ... It could happen at any time.

It absolutely has nothing to do with big events, world championships, Olympics, whatever. It’s just me being me and me crashing. That’s all there is to it.” Vonn had daily checks on her head over the weekend. “Medically she’s cleared,” said U.S. women’s coach Alex Hoedlmoser. “She still feels a little weak at the end of courses, and that’s something she needs to find out in her warmup.” Vonn will also have to consider the level of difficulty of the Kandahar course, which is icier and harder than the courses the women usually race on. “It’s too dangerous for the women,” Vonn said. “There are already people crashing just in the warmup runs. ... It’s way too icy. It’s way too icy, and I am basically shocked by it. It’s unbelievable.” In a streak stretching back two years, Vonn has reached the podium in her last 19 superG’s, winning 13 of them. One of the few races she didn’t win came at the Olympics, after which her husband and chief adviser Thomas accused the Austrian coach who set the course, Juergen Kriechbaum, of deliberately putting down a layout to slow Vonn. Austria’s Andrea Fischbacher won the Olympic race, and Vonn settled for bronze. Guess what? Kriechbaum has also been selected to set the super-G at these championships under a weighted draw that favors the top skiers in the discipline. Swiss teenager Lara Gut, who won two silver medals at the last worlds but missed all of last season with a dislocated right hip, announced her full recovery with a super-G win in Zauchensee, Austria, last month. Vonn has also not fully recovered from a strained left knee. But knowing Vonn’s resilience, it will take a lot to prevent her from competing. “My gut feeling is she’ll race,” said U.S. women’s speed coach Chip White.


C OM M U N I T Y S P ORT S

D4 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

I B Baseball/softball • New program for children: The Bend Park & Recreation District is offering a new “Tiny Tots Baseballâ€? program for boys and girls ages 4 to 6, with weekly sessions beginning later this month. The program will focus on motor skills such as throwing, catching, hitting, base-running and agility, as well as tasks such as listening and following directions. The program is noncompetitive in nature. Two sessions are available: from Feb. 23 to March 16, and April 6-27. All practices will be held on Wednesdays at 2:30 p.m. for 50 minutes at the Bend Fieldhouse, 401 S.E. Roosevelt Ave. Parents may be asked to participate with their children. Cost is $36 for park district residents, $49 otherwise. For more information, contact Greg Brady, park district sports coordinator, at 541-706-6124 or at Greg@bendparksandrec.org. • Girls softball organization conducting tryouts: The Central Oregon Voodoo, a girls competitive fast-pitch softball organization, plans to hold tryouts later this month for its 14-and-under and 16-and-under teams. The tryouts, which are free, are scheduled for Feb. 19 and 26 from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in Redmond on the fields at Bowlby City Park, located on Southwest Highland Avenue near Redmond High School. For more information, contact Jeff Edwards at 541-3502621 or at jedwards29@msn.com.

Martial Arts • Central Oregon martial artists advance to national competition: Six members of the High Desert Martial Arts studio in Bend placed among the top three in their respective classifications at the Oregon State Taekwondo Championships, held Saturday in Portland. By virtue of their finishes, the High Desert participants qualified for the 2011 Junior Olympics. That event, a national competition, will take place June 28 to July 1 in San Jose, Calif. The qualifying High Desert students include Joni Ransom, 10; Brian Thomas, 14; Luke Mocke, 10; Reece King, 8; Hunter Harris, 12; and Colby Spencer, 10. Ransom, Mocke and King all finished first in sparring, while Thomas and Hunter took first in forms.

Multisport • Pole Pedal Paddle registration open: Registration is now available online for this year’s 35th annual Pole Pedal Paddle, which will take place Sunday, May 21. The race includes downhill and cross-country skiing, cycling, running and paddling from Mount Bachelor to the Les Schwab Amphitheater in Bend’s Old Mill District. The PPP is the primary fundraiser for the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation, which provides training in alpine and cross-country skiing, snowboarding and cycling to youths and adults. To register, go to www.pppbend.com. Entry fee varies from $70 to $190, depending on the number of participants per team and date of registration. For more information, contact Molly Cogswell-Kelley at 541-388-0002 or at molly@mbsef.org.

Skiing • Ski film to play in Bend: McMenamins Old St. Francis School and Oregon Adaptive Sports are teaming up to present a screening of the Ski Channel original movie “The Storyâ€? later this month. The screening is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 24, at 8:30 p.m. “The Storyâ€? stars skiing luminaries such as Bode Miller and Lindsey Vonn and includes footage of locations such as Whistler, British Columbia, and Vail, Colo. Admission is $15, and doors open at 8 p.m. Adults 21 and older only will be admitted. Proceeds from the event will go to Oregon Adaptive Sports, an organization that provides skiing opportunities for individuals with disabilities. For more information, call 541-848-9390 or e-mail oasbend@gmail.com. • Central Oregon skiers perform well in Junior Olympic qualifier: Youth cross-country skiers from Central Oregon competed in the Race of the Methow Junior Olympic qualifier in Winthrop, Wash., this past weekend, and a number of them recorded high finishes. From the Bend Endurance Academy, division winners included Reitler Hodgert (MOJ skate sprint and 10-kilometer classic), Nick St. Clair (MJ1 skate sprint and 10K classic), Isabel Smith (FOJ skate sprint and 5-kilometer classic) and Peter Biskup (MJ4 skate sprint and 2.5-kilometer classic). Bend’s Joe Madden, who skis for the Central Oregon Community College Nordic Club, won the MSR skate 5K, sprint and 10K classic races. The event was also a United States Collegiate Ski and Snowboard Association national qualifying race for the West. From the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation, Max Millslagle (MJ2 5K classic and skate sprint), Piper McDonald (FJ2 5K classic), Leo Lukens (MJ3 3.3-kilometer classic) and Emily Hyde (FJ2 skate sprint) also were event winners. — Bulletin staff reports

C  S  C Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

BASEBALL TINY TOTS BASEBALL: Through the Bend Park & Recreation District; for boys and girls ages 4-6; noncompetitive program, and focus is on motor skill development and skills such as listening and following directions; two session options: Feb. 23March 16 and April 6-27 on Wednesday afternoons: $36 for district residents, $49 otherwise; Greg Brady, 541-7066124; Greg@bendparksandrec.org.

BIKING ICE CRIT 2011: Saturday, Feb. 26, at 7 p.m.; at Wanoga Sno-park; fun criterion “race�; $10; registration begins at 6 p.m.; costumes encouraged; 541-382-7002; www.cogwild.com. WEEKLY RIDE: Saturdays, 11 a.m.; weekly group road rides starting from Nancy P’s Baking Co., 1054 Milwaukee Ave. in Bend; Glen Bates, glenbates@ bendcable.com, 541-382-4675

MISCELLANEOUS OREGON TRAIL APPALOOSA HORSE CLUB MEETING: Thursday, at 7 p.m.; monthly gathering open to all horse breeds who want to enjoy equestrian events together; at SR Ranch, 5305 N.W. 83rd St., Redmond; 541-306-9957; www.otahc.org. BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU SEMINAR: With noted instructor Marcelo Alonso; Friday, Feb. 11, from 6-9 p.m. and Saturday, Feb. 12, from 9 a.m. to noon; $50 for one day or $80 for both, family discount available; High Desert Martial Arts, 2535 N.E. Studio Road, Bend; 541-617-1220; www.bendhighdesertmartialarts.com. TUMBLING/BEGINNING GYMNASTICS: Ages 5-11; Mondays and Wednesdays through Feb. 28; 6:45-7:30 p.m.; basic exercises such as rolls, cartwheels, handstands, and low balance beam; wear comfortable clothes and hair pulled back; RAPRD Activity Center; $35; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. ARCHERY FOR YOUTH: Ages 8-13; includes proper safety, bow handling, archery etiquette; Feb. 3-24; 5:30-7 p.m.; equipment provided; at CentWise, 533 S.W. 5th St., Redmond; $25; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. ACROVISION TAE KWON DO: For ages 6 and up; Tuesdays and Thursdays; through Feb. 27; 7-8 p.m. in Redmond; students will train in a complete martial arts system; uniforms are required and will be available for purchase; $69; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.

RUNNING RUN FOR CHOCOLATE 5K: Saturday,

Feb. 19, at 10 a.m.; at Sunriver Resort; $25-$30; online registration available until 6 p.m. on Feb. 17; day-ofrace registration available; www. sunriver-resort.com/chocolate. NO BOUNDARIES 5K/RUN HAPPY 10K TRAINING PROGRAM: Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. from Feb. 19-April 9; $65 before Feb. 12, $75 otherwise; training program for the Light of Hope 5K and 10K races on April 17; registration available online and at Fleet Feet Sports Bend; 541-389-1601; training@fleetfeetbend. com; www.fleetfeetbend.com.

SNOW SPORTS TOUR DE MEISSNER CROSS-COUNTRY SKI RACE: Saturday, at 9:30 a.m.; Virginia Meissner Sno-park; skiers may choose skate or classic technique; youths under 12, three kilometers; juniors, 3K or 15K; adults 15K; competitive race and touring options available; $8-$40; youths under 12 free; 541335-1346; www.meissnernordic.org. OREGON ADAPTIVE SPORTS FUNDRAISER: Wednesday at 7 p.m.; hosted by the Bend Ski Club; Phoenix Inn Suites, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; includes presentation by OAS athlete Ravi Drugen, raffle, and free pizza and dessert; www.bendskiclub.org. COCC INTERMEDIATE SNOWSHOE COURSE: Learn about the basics of snowshoeing, trail selection, clothing, gear choices, route finding and safety, then practice technique and winter trail etiquette with four intermediate level snowshoe excursions; classroom session today from 3-5 p.m. and four field sessions Wednesdays through March 2, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; return times var; classes held in all weather conditions; COCC Community Learning; 541-3837290; http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SKI FILM SCREENING: Ski Channel original movie “The Story�; Thursday, Feb. 24, at McMenamins Old St. Francis School: 8:30 p.m.; doors open at 8 p.m.; $15; proceeds will benefit Oregon Adaptive Sports; adults 21 and over only; 541-848-9390; oasbend@gmail.com. JOHN DAY MEMORIAL CROSSCOUNTRY SKI RACE: Sunday, Feb. 20; at Diamond Lake Resort near Crater Lake; includes 20-kilometer freestyle and 10-kilometer classic races, junior five-kilometer freestyle and classic races, and 5K fun ski; citizen race open to skiers of all ages and abilities; entry fee $2-$20; T-shirts, $12; awards luncheon, $6-$12; Dan Bulkley; 541-535-5979; http://southernonc.tripod.com/id6.html. NORDIC SKI LESSONS: Central Oregon Nordic Club and Pine Mountain Sports provide a free personal lesson and

Ride Continued from D1 Riders can also accrue points toward the series standings, and those with the highest totals after the series-ending March competition win additional prizes, such as saddles, horse or saddle blankets, or tack. Kingsbury, who works in the business office of the High Desert Education Service District in Redmond, tries to get creative with those prizes, and she says one year she even gave out electronics such as GPS units and DVD players. Competitors who belong to various barrel racing associations can also accumulate points toward those associations’ year-end standings. In addition to the OBRA, three other associations sanction the Turn ’N Burn series: BRN4D, Northwest 5D, and CWP (Cascade West Productions). That means riders who belong to all four associations earn points toward the yearend standings in each one with a single run at the Turn N’ Burn series. But membership in any of those organizations is not necessary to compete and earn “day money� — the prize money at a single event. The Turn ’N Burn series features a doubleheader format with separate morning and afternoon sessions. The morning session starts at 11 o’clock, and the afternoon session follows

free ski rental to those who wish to learn to Nordic ski; highly experienced CONC volunteers from CONC will teach the basics; e-mail bendskibuddy@ gmail.com to set up a lesson. COCC/BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC SKIING CLUB: Open to all COCC students with some crosscountry skiing experience who are taking at least six credits during winter term; through March 20; free for COCC students; Tuesday, Thursday and Friday afternoons, and Saturday and Sunday mornings; skate and classic techniques; Brenna Warburton; 541-678-3865; brenna@bendenduranceacademy.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC MASTERS: Technique group and training group options; for adults ages 20 and older with intermediate to advanced nordic skiing abilities; weekday and weekend options through Feb. 23; portion of proceeds will go to Meissner Nordic Community Ski Trails; enrollments vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3864. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION JUNIOR ALPINE WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older at Mt. Bachelor; through March; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION FREERIDE SKI AND SNOWBOARD WINTER PROGRAMS: Enrollment for ages 8 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; through March; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef. org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION MASTERS ALPINE WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 21 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; through March; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION NORDIC WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; through March; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION MASTERS NORDIC WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 21 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; through March; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC SKIING: Programs conducted at Virginia Meissner Sno-park on Century Drive southwest of Bend; transportation provided from Bend; Development Team for ages 11-18; Youth Club for ages 7-11; times vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3865.

SOFTBALL CENTRAL OREGON VOODOO TRYOUTS: For 14-and-under and 16-and-under

immediately after. Holding two sessions means riders can compete in a single run or opt to participate in both sessions, doubling their chances of winning. Riders can also run multiple horses in each session, if they have them. Perhaps one of the most attractive features of the Turn ’N Burn series is its accessibility: Anyone with a horse to race — from novice to professional barrel racer — is welcome to participate, as are cowboys, even though barrel racing is predominantly a female-oriented sport. And competitors can participate in “timeonly� runs, which cost $5 and start at 10 a.m., before the first session begins. Racers in this class receive a time and are not eligible for money and other prizes, but the runs can be useful to newbies, or even to veteran riders who are working with inexperienced horses. For adults, classes are broken down by the amount of prize money a horse has earned, so barrel racers on horses in their first event do not compete directly against mounts that might have won thousands upon thousands of dollars. “We try to make it open to anybody who wants to come,� Kingsbury says. And the barrel racers do. Kingsbury says that a single day in the series typically includes 100 to 200 runs or more, depending on factors such as weather. The series has drawn competitors from across the state, as well as from Washington and Idaho.

teams in girls competitive fastpitch softball organization; Feb. 19 and 26, 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; at Bowlby Fields in Redmond; free; Jeff Edwards; 541-350-2621; jedwards29@msn.com GIRLS SOFTBALL TRYOUT: Saturday, Feb. 19, at 10 a.m.; at Bowlby Fields on Southwest Parkland Drive, Redmond; ASA fast pitch softball; for girls 10 and under who live in Central Oregon; Jeremy, 541-3253689; Hayes, 541-604-6735.

SWIMMING WATERBABIES: Basic water skills for infants and toddlers; ages 6 months through 3 years; games and challenges; through Feb. 24; Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6 p.m.; at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $28.50; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. PRE-COMP KIDS: Grades 1-8; advanced swim-lesson program that serves as a feeder for Cascade Aquatic Club; children must be able to swim one length of crawl stroke with side breathing and one length of backstroke in a level position; meets Tuesday and Thursdays through Feb. 24, 5:30-6:15 p.m. at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $32; 541548-7275; www.raprd.org. YOUTH SWIM LESSONS: For ages 12-17; learning to swim and improving fitness; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays Feb. 21March 11; 5:30-6 p.m. at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $28.50; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. ADULT SWIM-STROKE CLINIC: For ages 18 and older; some swimming experience required; meets Mondays and Wednesdays, through March 2, 6-6:30 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $28.50; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. SPRINGBOARD DIVING: For all ages; must be able to swim one length of the pool; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, through Feb. 18, 7:25-8:25 p.m. at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $32; 541548-7275; www.raprd.org. COSMIC SWIM: For middle school students only (student ID required); Feb. 19, 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $2.50; 541548-7275; www.raprd.org.

VOLLEYBALL REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT VOLLEYBALL CAMP: For boys and girls in grades 3-6; Saturdays, Feb. 26-March 19, from 2:30-4 p.m.; will focus on the fundamentals; shirt included if registration is done at least eight days prior to first day of camp; $25; at the RAPRD Activity Center; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org.

Kingsbury used to compete at her events herself until she decided it was too much. “It just got too intense trying to put the thing on and have it be semiproductive and run around trying to get my own horse going and stuff,� she explains. These days, she leaves the racing to her daughter, Colleen, 24, who followed her mother’s footsteps into the sport and began participating in professional rodeos last year. “It’s nice that she does (the series) because it gives all of us girls a place to go to that’s close to home, especially when fuel is $3.60 a gallon,� Colleen Kingsbury says. “It’s nice to have somewhere close where you can keep your horse running instead of having to drive hundreds of miles.� Dee Dee Schumacher, of Tumalo, has ridden in the Turn ’N Burn series practically every year since its beginning. With her children and a career to keep her busy, she is also grateful for the opportunity to participate in the sport she loves at the Turn ’N Burn and other Central Oregon barrel racing events. “I think we all appreciate it because it takes people like (Rhonda) to step up and put on these races,� Schumacher says. “Otherwise we wouldn’t have them.� Amanda Miles can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at amiles@bendbulletin.com.

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD BASKETBALL BEND PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT Adult Basketball League Week 12 Standings and Results Men’s A Division Standings: 1, Riverside Market, 10-1. 2, Furnish, 8-2. 3, Country Catering, 5-5. 3, COCC Bobcats, 5-5. 5, Olson Heating, 4-6. 6, Hustlaz, 4-7. 7, Team Sizzle, 0-10. Results: Riverside Market 97, Olson Heating 66; Furnish 97, Hustlaz 73; Country Catering 89, COCC Bobcats 72. Men’s B Division Standings: 1, Uniballers, 9-1. 1, Antioch, 9-1. 1, Cojs Knightryderz, 9-1. 4, Bend Basketball Club, 7-3. 5, Court Vision, 6-4. 6, Smokin’ Aces, 5-6. 7, Eye of the Chicken, 4-6. 8, Tailblazers, 4-7. 9, The Ballers, 2-8. 10, John Holpuch Dentistry, 1-9. 11, Bri, 0-10. Results: Smokin’ Aces 55, Tailblazers 51. Men’s Over 35 Division Standings: 1, Athletic Club of Bend, 9-2. 2, Swish, 8-3. 2, Southwest Hoodies, 8-3. 4, Cabinet Cures, 5-6. 4, Widgi Creek, 5-6. 6, Newman Brothers, 4-7. 7, You Know My Name, 3-8. 8, N the Zone. 2-9. Results: none Women’s Division Standings: 1, Redmond, 9-2. 2, Cedar Creek Landscape, 7-4. 3, Kozak Company Realtors, 5-6. 4, Warm Springs, 1-10. Results: none Central Oregon Basketball Organization Boys Week 6 Standings and Results Grades 5 and 6 Standings: Bend 42, Mountain View 31; Sisters (6th) 30, Redmond 28; Madras 33, Tumalo 20; Summit B 6th 36, Redmond B 6th 16; Redmond 33, Tumalo 13; Redmond B 6th 42, Crook County 20; Summit B 6th 49, Summit 46; Bend 43, Crook County 25; Mountain View 25, Sisters (6th) 24 (3 OT); Summit 69, Madras 28. Results: 1, Summit B 6th, 12-0. 2, Summit, 9-3. 2, Sisters (6th), 9-3. 2, Bend, 9-3. 5, Mountain View, 7-5. 6, Redmond B (6th), 5-7. 7, Redmond, 4-8. 8, Madras, 3-9. 9, Crook County, 2-10. 10, Tumalo, 0-12. Grades 6 and 7 Standings: 1, Summit, 12-0. 2, Bend, 9-3. 3, Mountain View, 8-4. 3, Bend B (7th), 8-4. 5, Redmond, 5-7. 6, Redmond B (7th), 4-8. 7, Crook County, 2-10. 8, Madras, 0-12. Results: Redmond B 7th 49, Crook County 29; Bend B 7th 60, Redmond 12; Mountain View 64, Crook County 10; Summit 64; Bend 16; Summit 46, Mountain View 28; Bend 39, Madras 37; Bend B 7th 36, Madras 12; Redmond B 7th 33, Redmond 31

(2OT). Grades 7 and 8 Standings: 1, Mountain View, 10-0. 2, Summit, 10-2. 3, Bend B (8th), 7-5. 4, Crook County, 6-6. 5, Bend, 5-7. 6, Redmond, 4-7. 6, Madras, 4-7. 8, Redmond B (8th), 0-12. Results: Summit 51, Bend 35; Redmond 45, Bend B 8th 42; Mountain View 55, Bend 29; Madras 51, Crook County 49; Bend B 8th 74, Redmond B 8th 20; Summit 52, Crook County 39; Madras 59, Redmond B 8th 49. Grade 8 Standings: 1, Madras, 11-0. 2, Bend, 10-2. 3, Mountain View, 7-4. 4, Summit, 3-9. 5, Redmond, 3-9. 6, Sisters, 0-10. Results: Redmond 62, Summit 51; Madras (8th) 60, Mountain View (7th) 55; Madras (8th) 54, Redmond 32; Redmond (7th) 40, Sisters (8th) 37; Bend 61, Mountain View 47; Bend 70, Sisters 23; Mountain View 45, Summit 36. Girls Week 6 Standings and Results Grades 5 and 6 Standings: 1, Bend, 11-0. 2, Summit, 10-1. 3, Madras, 7-4. 4, Redmond B (6th), 7-5. 5, Mountain View (#1), 6-6. 5, Redmond #1 (5th), 6-6. 7, CC Spurs, 5-7. 8, Mountain View (#2), 2-10. 9, Redmond #2 (5th), 2-11. 10, Culver, 0-12. Results: Madras 31, Redmond #1 5th 8; Bend 34, Culver 10; Redmond B 6th 34, Mountain View #2 19; Summit 44, Redmond #2 5th 6; Redmond #1 5th 18, Mountain View #2 17; Madras 36, Redmond #2 5th 10; CC Spurs 22, Redmond #1 5th 12; Madras 35, Mountain View #1 33; Bend 36, CC Spurs 19; Redmond B 6th 35, Culver 14; Summit 32, Mountain View #1 10. Grades 6 and 7 Standings: 1, Summit, 10-2. 2, Redmond, 9-3. 3, Bend, 9-3. 4, La Pine (Ramirez), 5-5. 5, Mountain View, 3-8. 6, La Pine (Mickel), 1-10. Results: Redmond 27, Bend 25; La Pine (Ramirez) 19, Mountain View 18; Bend 17, La Pine (Ramirez) 16; La Pine (Ramirez) 28, Redmond B 7th 21; Summit 25, La Pine (Mickel) 24; Redmond 37, La Pine (Mickel) 26; Summit 19 Mountain View 18. Grades 7 and 8 Standings: 1, Summit, 11-1. 2, Bend, 9-3. 3, Redmond A, 8-5. 4, Mountain View, 6-6. 5, CC Spurs, 1-11. 6, Redmond B (7th), 1-10. Results: Summit 34, Bend 15; Redmond A 44, CC Spurs 22; Bend 38, Redmond A 21; Summit 62, CC Spurs 11; Redmond A 32, Mountain View 30; Mountain View 39, Redmond B 7th 5. Grade 8 Standings: 1, Bend, 10-2. 2, Redmond, 9-3. 3, Summit, 8-4. 4, Tumalo, 3-9. 4, Madras, 3-9. 4, Mountain View, 3-9. Results: Redmond 42, Bend 39; Summit 37, Madras 23; Bend 41,

Mountain View 21; Summit 32; Tumalo 19; Mountain View 29, Tumalo 25; Redmond 51, Madras 43.

BOWLING LEAGUE STANDINGS AND HIGH SCORES Lava Lanes, Bend Jan. 23-29 Casino Fun — Craftsman Carpet; Brandon Zitek, 238/570; Krystal Highsmith, 209/571. Win, Lose or Draw — The Mispins; Tim Wilson, 190/519; Becky Lorentz, 179/476. Sundae Jubliee — Team 10; Rommel Sundita, 235/640; Leia Hollis, 212/440. His and Hers — Bound to Get One; Terry Lussier, 280/718; Carolyn Wirth, 223/547. Jack and Jill — Shari’s Team; Dave Jones, 206/586; Peanee Denmark, 200/522. Guys and Gals — More Wine Please; Jeremy Moyer, 239/683; Michelle Smith, 247/597. Early Risers — Dolls; Edie Roebuck, 209/524. Rejects — Kee Tee; Eric Holcomb, 223/602; Shirley King, 191/497. Lava Lanes Classic — Pin Heads; Travis Holmes, 249/721; Pennie Olson, 190/500. Wednesday Inc. — Tropical Beach Tanning; Mike Caisse, 289/731; Phil Lonczyna, 268/718. Tea Timers — Pick Up Girls; Chris Gray, 215/620. Afternoon Delight — The Whatevers; Andrew Waltosz, 227/569; Amanda Baessler, 202/479. Latecomers — No Threat; Jane Supnet, 205/517. Progressive — High Desert Auto Supply; Ryan Ziegle, 268/718. Free Breathers — He’s and She; David Hunter, 238/636; Edie Roebuck, 194/524. T.G.I.F. — Bowlcano; TM Pete, 279/739; Deanna Olsen, 224/623. Adult/Junior Bowlopolis — League Champions: The Purple Dragons; Tucker Hess, 204/423; Tasha Marler, 142/372.

GYMNASTICS ACROVISION GYMNASTICS John Lanz Invitational At Beaverton Feb. 5 Boys (Floor exercise, pommel horse, still rings, vault, parallel bars, high bar, all-around; scores and places) Level 4 Ryland Gustafson: 14.40 (2nd); 12.90 (7th); 14.90 (1st); 14.80

(2nd); 14.60 (1st); 14.80 (1st); 86.40 (1st). Kyler Rekow, Jr.: 13.40 (17th); 13.10 (10th); 13.70 (17th); 14.70 (4th); 12.60 (19th); 13.00 (9th); 80.50 (13th). Eli Vossler, Jr.: 14.90 (3rd); 13.30 (7th); 14.20 (11th); 14.50 (7th); 14.80 (5th); 13.50 (8th); 85.20 (5th). Team: 252.10 (5th). Level 6 Tyler Black: 12.90 (6th); 13.50 (5th); 12.10 (4th); 14.30 (8th); 11.10 (10th); 14.50 (3rd); 78.40 (7th). Travis Fields: 13.90 (9th); 13.70 (12th); 13.10 (10th); 14.50 (8th); 13.70 (13th); 14.40 (7th); 83.30 (10th). Level 7 Blaine Davis: 15.00 (1st); 13.30 (1st); 14.00 (3rd); 15.10 (2nd); 13.20 (9th); 14.90 (1st); 85.50 (2nd).

RUNNING SUPER BOWL SUNDAY DAM RUN At Prineville Feb. 6 Five miles 1, James Blanchard, Prineville, 34:12. 2, Scott Brown, Redmond, 36:36. 3, Jenni Mishler, Prineville, 37:39. 4, Ronald Wortman, Prineville, 38:22. 5, Gabe Mason, Prineville, 39:22. 6, John Foley, Prineville, 39:52. 7, Karlene Austin, Prineville, 41:01. 8, Darren Moore, Prineville, 41:41. 9, Walt Carter, Prineville, 43:01. 10, Jill Schwartz, Bend, 43:45 11, Jim Crouch, Prineville, 43:53. 12, Alan Yankus, Prineville, 45:46. 13, Tammy Shelton, Prineville, 46:52. 14, Lewis Hollander, Bend, 47:07. 15, Gary Deaver, Bend, 48:27. 16, Heather Moore, Redmond, 49:14. 17, Deanna Smith, Bend, 49:15. 18, Carri Hanson, Bend, 49:29. 19, Jessica Freauff, Prineville, 50:06. 20, Daniel Freauff, Prineville, 50:07. 21, Scott Willard, Bend, 51:06. 22, Cinnamon Crandall, Redmond, 53:02. 23, Jenniffer Smith, Bend, 53:25. 24, Heidi Bauer, Redmond, 55:22. 25, Lenora James, Bend, 56:41. 26, Amber Blanchard, Prineville, 58:28. 27, Irene Morales, Prineville, 58:30. 28, Pamela Bicart, Prineville, 1:01:08. 29, Ellen Gallagher, Redmond, 1:01:09. 30, Katy Williams, Redmond, 1:01:10. 31, Melinda Crone, Prineville, 1:04:31. 32, Kristi Reed, Prineville, 1:04:40. 33, JoAnn Hand, Bend, 1:08:34. 34, Bruce Hatfield, Prineville, 1:08:35. 35, Raelynn Fitzwater, Madras, 1:08:54. 10 miles 1, Frans Alajoki, Bend, 1:00:03. 2, Mike Olson, Bend, 1:03:50. 3, Rusty Clemons, Bend, 1:08:31 4, Brandon Brasher, Prineville, 1:09:44. 5, Jake Akerberg, Prineville, 1:11:22. 6, Kellie Foley, Prineville, 1:12:59. 7, Lynn Aldrow, Bend, 1:16:04. 8, Rod Thompson, Bend, 1:17:20. 9, Peter Hatton, Bend, 1:18:38. 10, Elizabeth LeFever, Bend, 1:19:05. 11, Jeannie Groesz, Redmond, 1:19:19. 12, Jennefer Lloyd,

Bend, 1:22:15. 13, Thomas Holt, Redmond, 1:23:12. 14, Alison Dean, Prineville, 1:25:24. 15, Dennis Miller, Bend, 1:26:47. 16, Cindy Sloan, Terrebonne, 1:28:49. 17, Kevin Bauer, Redmond, 1:32:09. 18, Kerry Cotter, Bend, 1:32:34. 19, Sue Henderson, Bend, 1:32:51. 20, Ashley Hoxie, Prineville, 1:37:08. 21, Cheri Cook, Powell Butte, 1:38:16. 22, Korey Hehn, Prineville, 1:40:47. 23, Cassey Hehn, Prineville, 1:40:48. 24, Don Hildebrand, Sisters, 1:44:40. 25, Kathy Leim, Bend, 1:47:14. 26, Tonya Koopman, Bend, 1:47:15. 27, Anne Marie Clover, Bend, 1:48:45. 28, Richard Arnold, Bend, 1:50:15. 29, Linda Hehn, Prineville, 1:55:00. 30, Charlotte Brady, Bend, 2:00:00. 31, Judy Gervais, Prineville, 2:02:59. 32, Thia Scher, Vancouver Wash., 2:10:13. 33, Lew Hollander, Bend, 2:10:14. 34, Chris Brophy, Sisters, 2:20:12. 35, Kim Addison, Sisters, 2:22:44. 36, Linda Bafford, Sisters, 2:22:45. 20 miles 1, Sean Meissner, Sisters, 2:03:54. 2, Josh Nordei, Sisters, 2:08:29. 3, Chris Askew, Bend, 2:20:07. 4, Johanna Olson, Bend, 2:22:33. 5, Darla Askew, Bend, 2:24:45. 6, Chris Felton, Prineville, 2:29:59. 7, Monica Freeman, Bend, 2:46:56. 8, Jana Clemons, Bend, 2:49:40. 9, Al MacInnis, Bend, 2:32:24. 10, Laura Kantor, Bend, 3:06:50. 11, Wendy Joslin, Bend, 3:24:00. 12, Geof Hasegama, Bend, 3:25:52. 13, Bill Groesz, Redmond, 4:15:00.

SKIING MINI WORLD CUP At Mt. Bachelor Feb. 6 Slalom Boys Ages 7-8: 1, Maximus Nye, 1:09.22. 2, Canon Settlemier, 1:18.66. 3, Jerry Nye, 1:35.83. 4, Luke Bundy, 1:41.87. 5, Ruger Vinecki, 1:42.77. 6, John-Francis Schiemer, 1:43.56. 7, Alexander Fraser, 1:47.37. 8, Carter Archuleta, 3:41.83. Ages 9-10: 1, Jonathan Wimberly, 51.98. 2, Jack Smith, 54.56. 3, Harrison “Laz� Glickman, 56.88. 4, Morgan Tien, 59.17. 5, Spencer Burgess, 1:10.67. 6, Jace Marshall, 1:11.85. 7, Jack Cauble, 1:14.37. 8, J. Wyatt Topping, 1:14.98. 9, Reed Kellar, 1:21.34. 10, Colton Seymour, 1:21.87. 11, Tyler Eriksson, 1:23.13. 12, Jack Schaffer, 1:25.83. 13, Cole Geenty, 1:26.30. 14, Magnum Vinecki, 1:28.14. 15, Nick Telenko, 1:32.87. 16, Blake Babb, 1:37.41. 17, Jack McColgan, 1:43.38. 18, Chance Settlemier, 1:44.26. 19, Will Stuermer, 1:47.94. Ages 11-12: 1, Walter Lafky, 53.81. 2, Hayden Hall, 55.22. 3, Giovanni Ricci, 1:00.08. 4, Minam Cravens, 1:01.75. 5, Ryan Griffiths, 1:02.40. 6, Andrew Bristow, 1:04.59. 7, Scotty Bundy, 1:06.89. 8, Ian Lafky, 1:14.97. 9, Sean Wilson, 1:16.17. 10, Reece Marshall, 1:17.14.

11, Cole Fuller, 1:23.18. 12, K. Ragnar Schmidt, 1:24.48. 13, Zackery Crane, 1:30.93. 14, Nick Rasmussen, 1:35.85. Girls Ages 7-8: 1, Alice Bouchard, 1:15.95. 2, Maria Wold, 1:20.51. 3, Tiger Gingold, 1:22.03. 4, Nakita “Kiki� Lindsay, 1:26.50. 5, Lola Springer, 1:27.52. 6, Carly Walther-Porino, 1:28.36. 7, Coco Bouchard, 1:30.52. 8, Olivia Pulliam, 1:38.62. 9, Ashley Hillman, 1:38.94. 10, Teaghan Knox, 1:40.56. 11, Sophie Cauble, 1:46.85. 12, Shea Campbell, 1:52.81. 13, Bella Millette, 2:00.82. 14, Julia Watson, 2:19.54. Ages 9-10: 1, Addison Beasley, 54.93. 2, Lillian Turman, 1:16.06. 3, Parker Campbell, 1:17.59. 4, Tia Lindsay, 1:20.61. 5, Olivia Colton, 1:20.65. 6, Katherine Skovborg, 1:20.84. 7, Zayna Farah, 1:21.73. 8, Carolyn Scherbinske, 1:23.54. 9, Jenelle Neumann, 1:23.99. 10, Sara Dingman, 1:24.06. 11, Kate Singer, 1:24.58. 12, Keely Buchanan, 1:27.45. 13, Dagny Donohue, 1:30.16. 14, Annabel Hueske, 1:31.50. 15, Birdie Wieche, 1:32.91. 16, Megan Kaiser, 1:33.98. 17, Peyton Willman, 1:34.01. 18, Eva Merrill, 1:36.59. 19, Vivienne Cornutt, 1:43.92. 20, Callie McCoun, 1:48.35. Ages 11-12: 1, Taye Nakamura-Koyama, 57.06. 2, Erin Smith, 57.96. 3, Sophia Sahm, 58.97. 4, McElle Kelley, 1:04.24. 5, Kelsey Olson, 1:04.61. 6, Natalie Merrill, 1:04.98. 7, Angelina Lindsay, 1:09.14. 8, Lili Bouchard, 1:11.38. 9, Winter Vinecki, 1:12.16. 10, Madison Brown, 1:13.66. 11, Alexandra Kaiser, 1:15.04. 12, Anna Popp, 1:16.32. 13, Sarah Rose Buchanan, 1:18.14. 14, Ashlyn Bronson, 1:19.00. 15, Josephine Fraser, 1:20.28. 16, Sidney Doyle, 1:20.68. 17, Paget Rathbun, 1:23.58. 18, Madison Archuleta, 1:29.48. Ages 13-14: 1, Kiersten Rowles, 1:10.47. 2, Alex Popp, 1:13.37.

VOLLEYBALL REDMOND VOLLEYBALL ASSOCIATION Standings as of Feb. 4 (Wins-Losses-Ties) Women’s 1, Hit List, 6-0. 1, S.W.A.T., 6-0. 3, Just Lucky, 5-0-1. 4, G N O, 4-4-0. 5, Lady Slammers, 3-4-1. 6, Pink Panthers, 2-3-1. 7, Dinkin & Divin, 1-4-1. 8, Volley Girls, 1-5-0. 8, Orphans, 1-5-0. 8, Victorious Secret, 1-5-0. Tuesday Coed 1, Benz Electric, 36-5-1. 2, Trybz, 33-10-1. 3, Marks Auto Body, 29-13-0. 4, Penguins, 28-12-2. 5, Super Awesomes, 20-21-1. 6, Storm Water Services, 14-29-1. 7, All Stars, 10-31-1. 7, Dysfunctionals, 10-31-1. 8, Go Easy, 8-36-0. Thursday Coed 1, Net Results, 22-2-0. 2. @1st We Tried, 20-4-0. 3, Peak Performance, 18-5-1. 4, LMFAO, 12-12-0. 5, Number One, 10-13-1. 6, C O Sound & Security, 5-18-1. 7, Ducks, 4-20-0. 8, All Stars, 3-20-1.


CL

COMMUNITY LIFE

FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT Inside

‘Justified’ Walter Goggins brings flavor of the South to FX drama, Page E2

Native crowned Pioneer Queen Phyllis Coe Long, 92, a Central Oregon native, was crowned 2011 Pioneer Queen by the Deschutes Pioneer Association in January. Long grew up in Bend and graduatedfrom Bend Senior High School, which was still downtown at the time. She Phyllis left to attend Coe Long college in Redlands, Calif., but returned after one year due to the Great Depression. She worked for a time at area institutions like the Pine Tavern and Shevlin-Hixon Lumber Mill. Then, during World War II, she applied for a job with the American Red Cross to help wounded soldiers in battle areas. She got the appointment, and after training in Washington, D.C., was sent to England. After the war she was sent to France, Germany, Japan and Korea. During this time she took up the accordion, and Long’s director in Korea decided to send her to various Army posts to keep the troops’ spirits up. She returned to the U.S. and, in 1949, married Ed Long, of Alfalfa. His career with the Federal Aviation Administration took them to Alaska, where they remained for 15 years. The couple had four children, three born there. Then, in 1968, Ed Long was transferred to Redmond Airport. He died in 2004. Phyllis Coe Long now lives in Redmond. She will reign through the year, representing the Deschutes Pioneer Association at parades throughout the region.

Growing

GAINS T

The Bulletin

he next time you’re about to tell your child, “Grow up,” you may want to think twice: “Slow down” may be a wiser choice of words — and a better course of action. That’s according to a new book co-written by Oregon State University professor Richard Settersten, which spells out how a slower path to adulthood — including living with parents while finding gainful employment and a firm footing in life — may lead to more prosperous independence. When Richard SetterThe Bulsten, 46, is the letin spoke author of “Not with him Quite Adults,” by phone about a last week, decadelong reSettersearch project sten, 46, that suggests a explained well-conducted that he slow course to was at his adulthood is Corvallis often the best home, takroute. ing care of a sick daughter. “She’s not in her 20s, is she?” we asked. “Good question,” he replied, chuckling. “No, she’s 11.” If we could gaze a decade ahead into a crystal ball, Settersten, an expert in issues of youth, fatherhood and aging, would not be immune to caring for his 21-year-old fighting a cold. He bears the title of Professor of Human Development and Family Sciences and Endowed Director of the Hallie Ford Research Center for Healthy Children and Families. He has served as an editor, author or co-author of several books on youth and aging, including “On the Frontier of Adulthood” and “Invitation to the Life Course: Toward New Understandings of Later Life.” See ‘Adults’ / E6

Volunteers in Medicine Clinic of the Cascades is seeking nominations for its new Heart of Healthcare Award, which will recognize health care providers who volunteer their time to help ease the suffering of others. The award is open to any Central Oregon doctor, dentist, nurse, mental health provider or other licensed medical professional. Deadline for nominations is Feb. 28. Guidelines and applications are available on the VIM website. The winner will be honored at a banquet at Seventh Mountain Resort on May 5. Contact: www.vim-cascades .org or 541-330-9054.

If you go What: Science Pub with Richard Settersten When: 6 p.m. Feb. 15 Where: McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend Cost: Free; limited to 100; reservations must be made by 5 p.m. the previous day Contact: www. osucascades.edu/ sciencepubs, info@ osucascades.edu or 541-322-3100

Tumalo Feed to host Mountain Oyster Ball Tumalo Feed Company will celebrate 20 years of serving steaks by throwing a Mountain Oyster Ball on Sunday. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Bend Rotary Club Foundation. A no-host “howdy hour” begins at 6 p.m. The prime rib and scampi dinner will be served at 7:30 p.m. Live music and dancing will follow. Tickets cost $75 and must be purchased in advance because seating is limited to 130. Dress is “cowboy formal.” To purchase tickets, call 541-382-2202, or for more information, www.tumalofeedcom pany.com.

The First Presbyterian Church in Bend is inviting knitters to come make prayer shawls for St. Charles Health System patients. A group of knitters gets together every Thursday from 1:30 to 3 p.m. in the prayer room at the church, 230 N.E. Ninth St. Participants pray as they knit the shawls so the patients then can wrap themselves in prayer. The shawls are given to patients who want a bit of extra comfort. About 10 shawls are given out each month. Contact: dklotz@bendtel.net. — From staff reports

Living at home longer has advantages, says OSU professor, author By David Jasper

Nominees for Heart of Healthcare sought

Call for local knitters to make prayer shawls

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/communitylife

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2011

SPOTLIGHT

E

Illustration by Greg Cross / The Bulletin

OK, guys, here’s a Valentine’s Day game plan By Greg Morago Houston Chronicle

Who waits until Feb. 14 to plan for Valentine’s Day? That sound you heard is millions of guilty men raising their hands. As important as the lover’s holiday is to the fairer sex, you would think guys would put some effort into making Valentine’s Day special for their significant others. But how many times have you seen desperate dudes grabbing stray bouquets at the supermarket at 5 p.m. or stopping at Walgreens for a Whitman’s

Sampler and hasty Hallmark card? It doesn’t have to be that way. With a bit of planning, men can make Cupid proud Monday. Here are some ideas for bringing your A-game to the day when romance rules.

To make the very best Anyone can sign some X’s and O’s on a store-bought greeting. But how cool would it be if you got out some scissors, construction paper and glue and fashioned your own homemade declaration

of undying affection? She’d love it, said Marcie McGoldrick, Martha Stewart Living’s editorial director of holiday and crafts. “It doesn’t have to be the most artful card in the world. It can be funny and playful. You could even do something like write a message on a photograph of yourself,” she said. “Anything like that is appreciated because it takes extra thought. To me it’s a much bigger gesture than buying a card in a store.” Need ideas for making valentines? The February issue of Martha Stewart Living has plenty.

The nose knows We are creatures driven by the most primal of instincts. Pleasurable scents can make both men and women swoon. Think of that fragrance behind her ear, on the nape of her neck, on the back of her knee. OK, so now you’ve got the picture: perfume makes a scentsational Valentine’s Day gift. Rochelle Bloom, president of the Fragrance Foundation, suggests guys use the iPhone app iPerfumer. See Valentine’s / E6


T EL EV ISION

E2 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Independent woman can’t find right balance of love Dear Abby: I’m an independent, 41-year-old woman who attracts men who are 10 to 13 years younger than I am. I’m not interested in them because I feel they are only after one thing. Another problem is, when I start getting close to a man my own age, he always makes me feel “smothered.” It seems I’m either loved too much or not at all. Is there a balance, or am I just afraid of getting close? — Avoiding Getting Hurt in Milwaukee Dear Avoiding: I suspect that it’s the latter. All younger men are not interested in only one thing. Some are, but not all. And men your age who are ready for commitment are not “smothering” you — but they do seem to want something you are unwilling or unable to give. Unless you can determine what’s holding you back, you will remain single and looking. A psychologist could help you get to the heart of the matter quickly, and that’s what I’m recommending so I won’t hear from you with this same problem when you’re 50. Dear Abby: After nine years of marriage, my husband, “Brett,” and I welcomed our first child 10 months ago. We are happy except for a problem with Brett’s mother, “Carol.” Carol and I have had a rocky relationship, although in recent years things seem to have gotten better. My complaint (and Brett’s as well) with Carol is that she is intrusive. She always wants to be in the middle of everything and won’t ease up on “mothering” Brett. Furthermore, Carol has decided our child should call her “Grandmommy” or “Mommy Smith.” I object to that name because I feel “Mommy” is the one name reserved for me. I don’t mind “Grandma,” ‘’Grandmother” or “Granny.” But Carol won’t back

DEAR ABBY down. We tried coming up with another name, but she has ignored our suggestions. Am I being unreasonable? Please advise. — The Only Mommy Here Dear Only Mommy: You and Brett need to calm down. Your child won’t be doing a lot of talking for a while. And when your baby does, he or she isn’t going to be calling Carol by any multisyllabic appellations. Your child will probably call her a name that’s easy to pronounce and entirely original. Dear Abby: I am the youngest of three children. Whenever my mom looks through our family photo albums, she makes comments about “the good old days” while she’s looking at the pictures taken before I was born. It offends me when I hear it, because it feels like she’s saying the years she remembers most fondly are the ones before she had me. Am I overreacting, or do those comments seem inappropriate to you as well? — Out of the Picture, Lewiston, Idaho Dear Out of the Picture: When your mother looks at the photo albums, she may be reminded of a time when she was younger, experienced less stress and had fewer responsibilities. Not knowing her, I can’t tell you if you’re overreacting. But I can suggest that you discuss this with her because your feelings may be a mile off target. Please don’t wait and let this fester. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

A son of the South with many accents By Jeremy Egner Timothy Olyphant may embody the steely eyed, whitehatted hero on “Justified,” the backwoods crime drama on FX based on stories by Elmore Leonard, but Walton Goggins supplies the show’s tortured soul. His character, Boyd Crowder, began the series, which returns for its second season Wednesday, as a seemingly psychotic white supremacist. But as the show progressed, an apparent spiritual awakening led the character to break with his father, a crime boss, and, in the season finale, save his on-again, off-again adversary, played by Olyphant, in a climactic shootout. Goggins grounded the pulpy twists with an understated portrayal that mixed the series’ florid dialogue with an unhinged ambiguity. Boyd’s motives were never entirely clear, and a character originally presented as a “stereotypical, over-the-top redneck racist,” as Goggins put it, was revealed to be an intelligent manipulator and a cagey counterpoint to the U.S. marshal Raylan Givens, the protagonist, played by Olyphant. The evolution happened on the fly. The original script killed off Boyd in the pilot, and when the producers decided to keep him around, Goggins helped them take the character beyond a stereotype. “I wasn’t interested in playing that person in the pilot,” he said. “I’m from the South — I’m not going to sell out my own culture for the sake of a television show.”

When: 10 p.m. Wednesday Where: FX

brates rural people. I don’t think it makes fun of them. On some level we’re trying to be authentic — without authenticity nothing rings true, and why do it?

The Associated Press

Walter Goggins stars as Boyd Crowder in the return of FX’s “Justified.” Goggins spoke with Jeremy Egner about “Justified” and about life as a professional loose cannon. There are interesting parallels between Boyd and Raylan — it’s hard to imagine what the show would have been like without you. I think they thought it was going to be more of a procedural, and I don’t know that that’s why audiences tune into FX. I think you need a healthy dose of the stand-alone episodes, but it’s the overarching story lines of the characters that bring people to a cable series.

Q.

A.

You said you didn’t want to “sell out” Southern culture. How do you feel about the characters on “Justified,” which is set mostly in and around Harlan, Ky., who are cooking meth or using slurs or whatever? There are things said here and there, but I think for the most part, the show cele-

Q.

A.

Do you see your character as a villain? Not at all. This is a guy who lives in the extreme, he has to believe fervently in something in order for the universe to make sense. Whatever he does, he does 100 percent and becomes consumed by it. Whether it’s blowing things up, like in the pilot, or whether it’s a real belief in God.

Q. A.

Was it real belief? There was a persistent question last season over whether his newfound religion was genuine. It was my job to keep people guessing, because that’s when Boyd is strongest, when he keeps people in Harlan guessing. But in his private moments with Raylan in the finale, you saw that the conversion was real. This season you’re going to get to really see who this guy is, and what’s interesting, hopefully, is that the audience will be the only people who believe Boyd Crowder this year. No one else on the show will.

Q. A.

Many people know you as the rogue cop Shane Vendrell on “The Shield.” Do you see any overlap between these two roles? I don’t. Shane was a guy who showed up in a room 20 seconds too late and spent the rest of his time trying to catch

Q.

Why do you think people like to cast you as loose cannons? It’s both a blessing and a curse. Even in “Predators” or this new movie, “Cowboys and Aliens,” it seems like I get to take these characters who you shouldn’t like and make them likable and make you feel for them. I’d like to be in a romantic comedy as much as anybody, you know? (Laughs)

Q. A.

Do people ever expect you to resemble these characters in reality? Yeah, everybody! They expect me to be humorless and, with Shane, not very smart. I did this interview with Terry Gross on “Fresh Air” on NPR, and she said: “Walton, the reason I didn’t want to talk to you for eight years is I just didn’t think you were a very smart person. But then I saw the first season of ‘Justified,’ and you convinced me otherwise.” Certainly people associate you with the characters you play, but hopefully they don’t see me as a psychopath.

Q. A.

Do you have any more “crazy Southern guy” roles in you? I’ve been trying to put that to bed for a while. People said that Shane was Southern, and I never saw that. I guess there was the occasional cowboy hat, but I never saw him as rural.

Q. A.

A.

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up. His actions are reactive, not proactive. Boyd is the antithesis of all of that. He’s a guy who more often than not is ahead of the curve.

‘Justified’

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BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Victory Garden Woodwright PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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The First 48 Blackout ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Waterworld ‘PG’ Å The First 48 ‘PG’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å 130 28 18 32 Dog the Bounty Hunter ‘PG’ Å (3:00) ›› “Blood ›››› “Rocky” (1976, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burgess Meredith. A heavyweight champ ››› “Rocky II” (1979, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burgess Meredith. Underdog Philly fighter ››› “Rocky II” (1979) Sylvester Stallone. Underdog Philly 102 40 39 Work” gives a club fighter a title shot. gets another shot at heavyweight champ. fighter gets another shot at heavyweight champ. 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Å College Basketball 2008 North Carolina at Duke From March 8, 2008. 23 25 123 25 Boxing: 1994 Cardona vs. Whitaker SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls Say Something ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Bobby Flay Best Thing Ate Challenge Cupcake Wars Valentine’s Day (N) Chopped Rattle & Roll ‘G’ Private Chefs of Beverly Hills ‘G’ 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa Bensinger Mark Few Show World Poker Tour: Season 8 Football Celebrity Beach Bowl From Dallas. The 10 The Final Score Sports Stories The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 Action Sports World Tour (3:00) Déjà Vu Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Death Race” (2008, Action) Jason Statham, Tyrese Gibson, Ian McShane. Premiere. Lights Out The Comeback (N) ‘MA’ (11:01) Lights Out ‘MA’ 131 House Hunters My First Place My First Place Hunters Int’l Selling New York House Hunters Hunters Int’l Property Virgins Property Virgins 176 49 33 43 Bang, Your Buck Bang, Your Buck Income Property Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Larry the Cable Guy Top Shot (N) ‘PG’ Å Larry the Cable Guy 155 42 41 36 Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Old Christine Old Christine “The Boy She Met Online” (2010) Alexandra Paul, Tracy Spiridakos. Å Funny Kids Funny Kids One Born Every Minute (N) ‘PG’ How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word My Life as Liz ’ My Life as Liz ’ My Life as Liz My Life as Liz My Life as Liz ’ Teen Mom 2 Change of Heart ‘PG’ Teen Mom 2 ’ ‘PG’ Teen Mom 2 (N) ’ ‘PG’ My Life as Liz ’ Teen Mom 2 ‘PG’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob Power Rangers iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 iCarly ‘G’ Å Ways to Die (6:14) 1,000 Ways to Die ’ ‘14’ Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Three Sheets (N) MANswers ‘MA’ MANswers ‘MA’ 132 31 34 46 Ways to Die Star Trek: Enterprise ’ ‘PG’ Å Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Requiem Requiem 133 35 133 45 Stargate SG-1 Forever in a Day ‘PG’ Behind Scenes Joyce Meyer John Hagee Hillsong ‘G’ Å Praise the Lord Å ACLJ This Week Dino ‘G’ Full Flame Å Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘14’ The Office ‘14’ Conan (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond “The Sin of Madelon ››› “Gaslight” (1944, Suspense) Charles Boyer, Ingrid Bergman, Joseph Cotten. A ›››› “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979, Drama) Dustin Hoffman, Meryl Streep. A divorced ›››› “Glory” (1989, Historical Drama) Matthew Broderick, Denzel Washington, Morgan Freeman. Col. 101 44 101 29 diabolical husband tries to drive his wife insane. Å (DVS) couple battle for custody of their young son. Å Robert G.Shaw trains, then leads an all-black Civil War regiment. Å Claudet” Kitchen Boss (N) Ultimate Cake Off Ballet cake. ‘PG’ 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count What Not to Wear Holly ‘PG’ Å What Not to Wear Janet (N) ’ ‘PG’ Fabulous Cakes (N) ’ ‘G’ Å What Not to Wear Holly ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ‘PG’ Law & Order Promote This! ’ ‘14’ Bones A Boy in a Tree ‘PG’ Å ››› “The Bourne Supremacy” (2004, Suspense) Matt Damon. Å Southland Cop or Not (N) ‘MA’ Å Memphis Beat Great Men ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Blood Money ’ ‘14’ Garfield Show Codename: Kids Codename: Kids Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Scooby-Doo Hole in the Wall Adventure Time King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Carnivore Carnivore Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Retired at 35 Hot in Cleveland 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit White Collar Countermeasures ‘PG’ Royal Pains A History of Violins ‘PG’ 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit La La’s Wed La La’s Wed La La’s Full Court Wedding ’ ‘PG’ What Chilli Wants RuPaul’s Drag Race ’ ‘14’ RuPaul’s Drag Race ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ Brandy & Ray J What’s Love 191 48 37 54 La La’s Wed PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:15) ››› “District 9” 2009 ‘R’ (6:10) ›› “Jumanji” 1995, Fantasy Robin Williams. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Paul Blart: Mall Cop” 2009 Kevin James. ’ ‘PG’ (9:35) ››› “Chicago” 2002 Catherine Zeta-Jones. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (11:35) District 9 ››› “Rising Sun” 1993, Mystery Sean Connery, Wesley Snipes, Harvey Keitel. ‘R’ Å ›› “Best of the Best II” 1993 ‘R’ ››› “Blood Feud” 1983, Drama Robert Blake, Cotter Smith. Jimmy Hoffa and Robert Kennedy fight a decade-long battle. Å Danny & Dingo Danny & Dingo Danny & Dingo The Daily Habit Danny & Dingo Stnd. Snowboard Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit College Exp. The Daily Habit Danny & Dingo Stnd. Snowboard Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit Haney Project Pipe Dream Haney Project Pipe Dream (N) School of Golf World of Golf Golf Central Inside PGA Tour Haney Project Pipe Dream School of Golf World of Golf Golf Central Inside PGA Tour Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Skate for the Heart ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å “The Good Witch” (2008, Drama) Catherine Bell, Chris Potter. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Big Love The Oath Nicki pushes for Cara (4:45) ›› “The Last Legion” 2007 Colin Firth. After Rome falls, ››› “Cast Away” 2000, Drama Tom Hanks, Helen Hunt, Nick Searcy. A courier company executive is ma- ›› “The Wolfman” 2010 Benicio Del Toro. A nobleman becomes The Eagle: HBO HBO 425 501 425 10 its last emperor journeys to Britannia. Å First Look ‘PG’ Lynn’s adoption. ’ ‘14’ Å rooned on a remote island. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å the embodiment of a terrible curse. ’ ‘R’ “Monty Python’s Life of Brian” 1979 Onion News Portlandia ‘MA’ Freaks and Geeks ’ ‘PG’ Å Larry Sanders (8:35) › “Shopping” 1994 Sadie Frost. A reckless gang leader clashes with larcenous rivals. Freaks and Geeks ’ ‘PG’ Å IFC 105 105 (4:50) › “The Unborn” 2009, Horror Odette Yustman, Gary Old- (6:20) › “Cop Out” 2010 Bruce Willis. Two NYPD detectives (8:15) ››› “Gattaca” 1997, Science Fiction Ethan Hawke, Uma Thurman. An outsider ›› “Sherlock Holmes” 2009, Action Robert Downey Jr., Jude Law. The detective and MAX 400 508 7 man, Cam Gigandet. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å must retrieve a valuable baseball card. ‘R’ Å poses as a genetically superior citizen. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å his astute partner face a strange enemy. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å CIA Secret Experiments ‘14’ Hard Time Prison City ‘14’ Hard Time Breaking the Rules ‘14’ CIA Secret Experiments ‘14’ Hard Time Prison City ‘14’ Hard Time Breaking the Rules ‘14’ Drugs, Inc. Cocaine ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents OddParents The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Wolverine-XMn Wolverine-XMn NTOON 89 115 189 Driven TV Ted Nugent Hunting, Country Truth-Hunting Western Extreme Dream Season Hunting TV Adv. Abroad Truth-Hunting Hunting, Country Bone Collector Steve’s Outdoor Friends of NRA Game Chasers OUTD 37 307 43 (4:15) “Lower Learning” 2008, Comedy ›› “Transporter 3” 2008, Action Jason Statham, Natalya Rudakova. iTV. Frank Martin (7:50) ›› “The Twilight Saga: New Moon” 2009 Kristen Stewart. iTV. Bella finds her- Californication ’ Episodes Episode 5 Shameless Three Boys Frank gets bad SHO 500 500 ’ ‘MA’ medical news. ’ ‘MA’ Å Jason Biggs. iTV. ’ ‘R’ Å becomes involved with a Ukrainian woman. ’ ‘PG-13’ self drawn into the world of werewolves. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ‘MA’ Å Monster Jam Monster Jam Bubba’s World Bubba’s World Monster Jam Monster Jam Bubba’s World Bubba’s World NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 Starz Studios (6:50) ››› “Julie & Julia” 2009 Meryl Streep, Amy Adams. ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Alice in Wonderland” 2010, Fantasy Johnny Depp. ‘PG’ Å ›› “2012” 2009 John Cusack. ››› “Solitary Man” 2009 Michael Douglas. ‘R’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:00) ›› “Proud” Black Filmmaker ›› “Valkyrie” 2008, Historical Drama Tom Cruise, Kenneth Branagh. Col. Claus von ››› “Cairo Time” 2009 Patricia Clarkson. An unexpected love ›› “Control” 2004, Suspense Ray Liotta. Premiere. A convict (11:15) ›› “Twilight” 2008, Romance TMC 525 525 2005 ’ Showcase ‘14’ Stauffenberg attempts to assassinate Hitler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å affair catches a pair by surprise. ‘PG’ Å undergoes behavior modification. ’ ‘R’ Kristen Stewart. ’ ‘PG-13’ (4:30) NHL Hockey Buffalo Sabres at Tampa Bay Lightning (Live) Hockey Central Sports Jobs NHL Overtime (Live) World Extreme Cagefighting NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? A Stand Up Mother (N) ‘14’ Å A Stand Up Mother ‘PG’ Å Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? Ghost Whisperer Do Over ’ ‘PG’ Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, February 8, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY “EATING”: A screening of the documentary about the standard American diet; free; 6 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017.

WEDNESDAY FLY-FISHING FILM TOUR: A screening of fly-fishing films from independent outdoor filmmakers; $12 in advance, $15 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.flyfishingfilmtour. com. “9500 LIBERTY”: A screening of the documentary about an explosive immigration-policy battle in Virginia; free; 6:30 p.m.; Becky Johnson Center, 412 S.W. Eighth St., Redmond; 541-383-7412 or http://multicultural. cocc.edu/events. “KING CORN”: A screening of the documentary about two friends and an acre of corn; with a potluck dinner; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Grandview Hall, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; slowfoodhighdesert@gmail.com. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. DINNER FUNDRAISER: A pizza and dessert dinner, with a raffle and a presentation by athlete Ravi Drugen; free; 7 p.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-419-3495. IGNITE BEND: A series of fiveminute presentations on a range of topics, each chosen by the presenter; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St.; 541-480-6492 or www .ignitebend.com. SONNY HESS BAND: The rhythm and blues act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

THURSDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “The Call of the Wild”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Half Broke Horses” by Jeannette Walls; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3121055 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. “I’M NOT YOUR INDIAN MASCOT ANYMORE”: Cornel Pewewardy talks about countering the assault of Native American mascots in schools; free; 3:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-318-3782 or http://multicultural .cocc.edu/events. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kai Strand reads from her children’s book “The Weaver”; free; 6 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. FLY-FISHING FILM TOUR: A screening of fly-fishing films from independent outdoor filmmakers; $12 in advance, $15 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.flyfishing filmtour.com. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290.

BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring performances by Five Pint Mary and Brent Alan, with comedy by Triage and Jumpin’ Joyce Respess; proceeds benefit The Loft; $30 minimum donation; 7-10 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-318-3436. BUDDY WAKEFIELD: The slam poet performs; free; 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7257 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS: The California-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “FOREVER PLAID”: Barter Theatre presents the musical about high school crooners who return from the afterlife for one last shot at glory; $37 or $42; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “OLIVER!”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Lionel Bart’s musical about a lovable orphan who asks for more; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. CONSPIRATOR: The electronica act performs, with Break Science featuring Adam Dietch; $15; 9:30 p.m., doors open 8:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

FRIDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “The Call of the Wild”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. “9500 LIBERTY”: A screening of the documentary about an explosive immigration-policy battle in Virginia; free; 6 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7412 or http:// multicultural.cocc.edu/events. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. TRIVIA BEE: The Education Foundation for the Bend-La Pine Schools holds a trivia competition between three-person teams; with hors d’oeuvres; ages 21 and older only; proceeds benefit the foundation; $20; 7 p.m., live music and appetizers at 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. “OLIVER!”: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Lionel Bart’s musical about a lovable orphan who asks for more; with champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “THE FALLEN IDOL”: A screening of the 1948 unrated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. ARCHAEOLOGYFEST FILM SERIES: The best films from the 2010 The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival; $6, free ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-345-5538, rpettigrew@aol.com or www.archaeologychannel.org.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

WILLIAMS AND REE: The comedy team performs; ages 21 and older; $15-$25; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-553-1112 or http://kahneeta.com.

SATURDAY VFW VALENTINE BRUNCH: Community breakfast with breakfast foods, fruit, coffee and more; $7.50; 9-11 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, NIXON IN CHINA”: Starring Kathleen Kim, Janis Kelly and James Maddalena in a presentation of John Adams’ masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. ART WEEKEND: Share ideas and learn to make books or other projects; $10, free for those who bring art supplies; noon-4 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jon Stewart talks about his book “Pilgrimage to the Edge: The Pacific Crest Trail and the U.S. Forest Service”; with a slide show; free; 3 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813. “WOLVES OF THE AIR”: A screening of the documentary about Harris hawks; writer Jim Dawson will discuss his field research; $5, free museum members; 5:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. 241. “EAT, DRINK AND BE DEADLY!”: Buckboard Mysteries presents a Valentine’s Day dinner theater mystery; reservations recommended; $49, $45 seniors; 6-9 p.m.; Cafe 3456’, 63136 Powell Butte Highway, Bend; 541350-0018 or www. buckboardmysteries. com. “FOR THE LOVE OF MUSIC”: Todd Haaby performs; proceeds benefit the Summit High School Friends of Music; $25, $18 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. DANCING AND CHOCOLATE: An evening of line dancing and chocolate treats; proceeds benefit the Gospel Choir of the Cascades; $5 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-390-2441. “OLIVER!”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lionel Bart’s musical about a lovable orphan who asks for more; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. ARCHAEOLOGYFEST FILM SERIES: The best films from the 2010 The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival; $6, free ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-345-5538, rpettigrew@aol.com or www. archaeologychannel.org. MOUNTAIN COUNTRY IDOL: Central Oregon musicians compete to see who is the best country artist; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital; $5; 8 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-7700 or www.mountain997.com. SATURDAY NIGHT JOKERS & JAMS: Local comics perform, with a performance by Franchot Tone; $10; 8 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677. DEL THE FUNKY HOMOSAPIEN: The Oakland, Calif.-based hip-hop act performs, with Bukue One, Serendipity Project, Attribute and

Tony G; $17 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com. DUSU MALI BAND: The Portlandbased African-fusion band performs; $8 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY ART WEEKEND: Share ideas and learn to make books or other projects; $10, free for those who bring art supplies; noon-4 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. “OLIVER!”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lionel Bart’s musical about a lovable orphan who asks for more; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “THE JACKET”: Nanda, a four-man circus-ninja-dance-comedy-action performing arts group, presents the story of a magical jacket that gives its wearer superhuman power; $12, $8 ages 12 and younger; 2 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. CHARITY BINGO: Event includes a baked-goods sale; proceeds benefit Prineville Habitat for Humanity; $5; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. SECOND SUNDAY: Ellen Waterston reads from a selection of her works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. BUNCO FOR CHARITY: Play the dice game; instructions provided; registration requested; proceeds benefit the service projects of Soroptimist International of Bend; $15; 2:30-5:30 p.m.; Suntree Village Mobile Home Park, Clubhouse, 1001 S.E. 15th St., Bend; 541-382-4580. BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring students and local musicians; proceeds benefit the Sisters High School graduation party; $10 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; The Barn in Sisters, 68467 Three Creeks Road; 541-588-0083. BUSDRIVER: The underground hip-hop artist performs; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

TUESDAY Feb. 15 “CREATING LEGACY OR HERITAGE ALBUMS”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Lori Hill; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-3178978,541-317-9553 or www. orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. “THE CARTEL”: A screening of the documentary about America’s public school crisis; free; 6:15 p.m.; Highland Baptist Church, 3100 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond; rdmpatriot@gmail.com. “TWELVE ANGRY JURORS”: The Sisters High School drama department presents the story of a jury trying to decide the fate of a man charged with murder; $7, free students and staff with ID; 7 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-5494045, ext. 1020. KY-MANI MARLEY: The Grammynominated reggae and hip-hop musician performs; $30 or $35; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

WEDNESDAY Feb. 16 YOUNG READERS BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “Call Me Hope” by Gretchen Olson; free; 6:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134.

M T For Tuesday, Feb. 8

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

127 HOURS (R) 2:20, 4:30, 7:10 ANOTHER YEAR (PG-13) 2, 4:40, 7:20 BLACK SWAN (R) 2:15, 4:55, 7:35 BLUE VALENTINE (R) 2:10, 4:50, 7:30 THE ILLUSIONIST (PG) 2:25, 4:35, 7 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 2:05, 4:45, 7:25

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 1:15, 4:40, 7:30 COUNTRY STRONG (PG-13) 3:35, 9:25

THE DILEMMA (PG-13) 1:05, 4:05, 7:55 THE FIGHTER (R) 1:35, 4:50, 8 THE GREEN HORNET (PG-13) 12:45, 3:25, 7:15, 9:55 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 12:30, 6:15 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 1, 3:35, 6:25, 9:05 THE MECHANIC (DP — R) 1:40, 4:35, 7:40, 10 NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) 1:10, 3:50, 6:35, 9:10 THE RITE (PG-13) 12:55, 3:55, 7:10, 9:50 THE ROOMMATE (PG-13) 1:25, 4:25, 6:50, 9:20 SANCTUM 3-D (R) 1:20, 4:10, 7:25, 10 TANGLED (PG) 12:35, 3:10, 6:55 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 1:30, 4:55, 7:50 TRON: LEGACY 3-D (PG) 3:05, 6:10, 9

TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 12:50, 4:20, 7:05, 9:40 YOGI BEAR 3-D (PG) 12:40, 3:40, 6:40 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: DLP technology uses an optical semiconductor to manipulate light digitally. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 9 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 6

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE MECHANIC (R) 4:30, 6:30 NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) 4, 6:30 THE RITE (PG-13) 4:15, 6:45 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 3:45, 6:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

COUNTRY STRONG (PG-13) 6:45 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 6:30 NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) 6:45 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

COUNTRY STRONG (PG-13) 7 THE DILEMMA (PG-13) 4

N   N  Elvis Costello revives his spinning songbook

Director Soderbergh hit with paternity suit

NEW YORK — Elvis Costello is dusting off his “Spectacular Spinning Songbook” for a concert tour this spring. The device, a huge game showlike wheel filled with the names of 40 Elvis songs, is spun Costello by invited audience members to help select part of the concert playlist that Costello and his band, the Imposters, will perform. Costello used it on a mid-1980s concert tour. It was filled with a combination of well-known songs like “Alison,” a handful of obscurities and covers like Prince’s “Sign O’ the Times.” The “Revolver” tour starts May 7 in Reno, Nev., and hits seven other cities.

NEW YORK — An Australian woman says Academy Awardwinning filmmaker Steven Soderbergh fathered her baby daughter, and she’s suing for child support. S o d e r Steven bergh’s lawSoderbergh yer declined to comment Thursday on the lawsuit, and his manager didn’t immediately return a call. Frances Lawrencina Anderson’s paternity suit says the “Traffic” and “Ocean’s Eleven” director helped pay medical expenses during Anderson’s pregnancy, and a DNA test showed he was the father of the girl she had in August. “(Soderbergh) has acknowledged that he is the father of the child verbally,” adds the lawsuit, filed Wednesday in a state court in Manhattan. Soderbergh married TV personality and novelist Jules Asner in 2003. Anderson’s lawsuit says she and Soderbergh had a sexual relationship at points including December 2009, when his play “Tot Mom” opened in her hometown of Sydney. Soderbergh wrote and directed the play, which reflects on media coverage of the case of slain Florida toddler Caylee Anthony.

Gabor going home for 94th birthday LOS ANGELES — Zsa Zsa Gabor is going home to her Bel Air mansion, just in time for her 94th birthday. City News Servicereports the “Moulin Rouge” and “Queen of Outer Space” star Zsa Zsa was released Gabor from the hospital Sunday. Gabor, a sex symbol of the 1950s and 1960s, had most of her right leg amputated last month because of gangrene.

Jaime Pressly pleads not guilty to DUI in LA LOS ANGELES — Jaime Pressly has pleaded not guilty to drunken driving charges in Los Angeles. Court records show the former “My Name is Earl” co-star entered the plea through her at- Jaime torney Friday. Pressly Prosecutors in Santa Monica on Wednesday charged Pressly with driving under the influence and having a blood alcohol content of more than .20. Pressly was arrested Jan. 5 after police say she was stopped for a traffic violation. She was released after posting $15,000 bail.

Christie Brinkley joins ‘Chicago’ on Broadway NEW YORK — The Tony Award-winning hit musical “Chicago” is getting a supermodel makeover — Christie Brinkley is joining the Broadway cast. Brinkley will appear as the jailed killer Roxie Hart. The 57-year-old model made her acting debut in 1983 opposite Chevy Chase in “National Lampoon’s Vacation” and its 1997 sequel, “Vegas Vacation.”

Autopsy awaited on Thin Lizzy guitarist MADRID — Spain’s Interior Ministry said Monday police will await the outcome of an autopsy on Thin Lizzy guitarist Gary Moore before deciding if an investigation into his death is needed. Moore, a former member of the influential Irish band, died early Sunday at a hotel in the southern Spanish town of Estepona, where he was vacationing. He was 58. A ministry spokeswoman in nearby Malaga city said there were no signs of foul play. Born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, in 1952, Moore was a member of Dublin band Skid Row before joining Thin Lizzy in 1973, playing on tracks for the “Nightlife” album. Thin Lizzy had global hits in the 1970s with songs like “The Boys are Back in Town” and “Whiskey in the Jar,” before Moore rejoined them. Lynott died in 1986, but with a different lineup the band continues to tour today.

Lohan’s attorney denies actress stole necklace LOS ANGELES — Lindsay Lohan’s attorney said Saturday that her client did not steal a $2,500 necklace and would fight any charges if they are filed. The statement from attorney Shawn Chapman Holley was the first official word from the actress’ camp since police revealed they were investigating the troubled starlet for grand theft. Kamofie & Co., a Venice custom jewelry store, reported the necklace stolen Jan. 22, roughly three weeks after the actress was released from three months of court-ordered rehab at the Betty Ford Center. — From wire reports


E4 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, February 8, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. For best results, readers should refer to the dates following each sign. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011: This year, you are energized and verbal. Sometimes people absolutely love this more expressive you. Other times, you push people away. Be aware of the dimensions of your rhetoric. News from a distance could be more touchy than in the past. If you are single, you meet people with ease. With your hot temper, an easy, steady bond might be difficult to achieve. Relating becomes easy if you are attached, once you soften your style. Your sweetie will want to come in closer as a result. TAURUS can be an albatross. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You might be slow to start, but you zoom by midday. Accept a difficult person. He or she is not changing for a while, if ever. A male friend could be unusually assertive. Tonight: Where the action is. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HH Assume a low profile. Fatigue drags you down. A boss could become difficult. You know the words to soothe his or her soul. Be ready to back up what you say with action. Tonight: Get as much R and R as possible. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Go for what you want.

When speaking to a group of people, express your imagination. Fatigue could mark a child or loved one who might be difficult. Go back and do more research as more facts appear. Tonight: Where the crowds are. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH An active stance surprises no one. A family member doesn’t support your approach or desire to get key matters under control. A partner or associate could be too assertive for your taste. Know that anything can happen. Tonight: Burning the candle at both ends. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Make an effort to get past another person’s vitriol and to get to the real issue. This person might not be able to explain his or her stance, forcing you to do the work to decipher his or her message. Conversations will allow more give-and-take once there is mutuality. Tonight: Follow the music. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You often defer to a partner. Today this person is happy to pitch in. You might be overwhelmed by others’ need to get to the bottom of a problem. Everyone wants something done yesterday. You can and will be able to cover all the bases with help. Tonight: Togetherness is the theme. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH If you stop and consider various situations, you could be raining on your own parade -- the problem is you, not others. Rather than sabotage yourself, express your emotions. Your creativity encourages a fiery display. Tonight: Listen to a suggestion. Take this person seriously. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Your ability to make a

difference reflects in your productivity when you are focused. Evaluate what a family member really expects. Keep the different elements of your life separate. This style of living might be necessary with all the needy people in your life. Tonight: Working too late! SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Once more, let your imagination flow. You might push away a friend who is touchy, but you cannot remain positive and upbeat with “that someone” around. Self-expression remains highlighted. Your words are heard. Tonight: Talking up a storm. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Stay anchored and direct. Fatigue marks your professional interactions. You could be too involved sometimes, and not taking good care of yourself. You might decide to spend a lot of money in order to add to your comfort. A family member is delighted by your focus. Tonight: Deal with a situation. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You might be uncomfortable or too direct. You wonder what is going on and have a tremendous need for answers. Someone close could walk away from you, causing more conflict. Be patient, and you’ll get answers. Tonight: Hanging out with a friend. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Curb a tendency to overdo it. What you think is helping could be quite off. More and more, a partner becomes closed off. Take some time alone to center before you cause yourself a problem. Ask yourself what role money plays in your life. Tonight: Fun doesn’t need to cost. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

‘Adults’

Settersten and Ray, who has a science-writing background and coordinated communications for the research network, used information learned by the group, including insights gleaned from hundreds of interviews, commissioned by the network, of young people in San Diego, New York, Detroit, Minneapolis/St. Paul and a rural Iowa community. “The work was just so socially relevant that we wanted to take some of the messages to the pub-

lic,” Settersten says. “So often with science, we basically write journal articles for people just like us, and they’re sort of read by narrow circles of experts.”

“Our big punchline is that a slower path to adulthood today is actually a good one, and a fast path is risky,” he says. In today’s world, “it takes a lot longer to find jobs that allow you to live

independently, let alone to raise a family on.” That’s a change from a pattern that was in place for a few decades, Settersten says. In that pattern, the traditional route into adulthood involved leaving home, finishing school, finding work, getting married and having kids. He refers to those steps as “the big five” of adulthood. It often occurred in that exact order, and usually by age 25, he says. “Just a few decades ago, those things were lockstep.” Interestingly, however, the big five is mostly a post-World War II phenomenon. “It turns out that those years are really the anomaly in the bigger picture,” Settersten says. “If you cast your glance to the decades before World War II, starting with 1900 through the 1940s, let’s say, you actually see that living at home … was actually more common than it is now.” Nevertheless, today’s young adults are emerging in a different world than their parents did in the 1950s, ’60s or ’70s. That is, if they’re emerging at all. Young adults are living at home longer, or returning home for periods of time after college graduation. These not-quite-adult 20somethings are taking longer to grow up, in other words. Generally speaking, they’re delaying marriage, job “shopping” for the right fit and, among the middle class, moving back home after college. That’s a good thing, Settersten says, although there’s “still a lot of stigma about living at home in the U.S., partly because we’ve always thought that leaving home is the sure sign that you’re an adult.” Those young adults, who are welcome in their parents’ homes longer, fare better in life.

orders at least a week ahead. “But if you wake up Monday morning, call your local florist and ask what types of options are available.”

The key is choosing a dish you have made before, that is not too heavy, and that you know your lady friend actually likes to eat. A chicken Tagine with apricots and spice pine nuts could be perfect — pine nuts are loaded with zinc, which is needed for vigor and stamina. Other aphrodisiac ingredients include honey, oysters, chocolate, ginger and garlic. Either way, the nicest gift you can give anyone on Valentine’s is to tell them you love them.”

“Well, my first choice would be rosé Champagne — and specifically a vintage rosé. If you could find one from the year you met your girlfriend or wife or some other significant year for the two of you, so much the better!” said Ray Isle, executive wine editor of Food & Wine. What if you’re just looking for a special wine? “I always think a bottle of Chateau Calon-Segur is a great idea. It’s a top-quality Bordeaux, and the label design

More Science Pub

Continued from E1 Settersten recently co-wrote a new book, “Not Quite Adults: Why 20-Somethings are Choosing a Slower Path to Adulthood, and Why It’s Good for Everyone,” published in December by Bantam Books. It brings him to Bend next week for a Science Pub, the popular lecture series hosted by OSU-Cascades at Central Oregon watering holes. The idea of the series, which runs monthly corresponding roughly with the school calendar, is to take science somewhere less stuffy than the lab. The talks are free, but require reservations, and fill up quickly (see “If you go”). He wrote “Not Quite Adults” with colleague Barbara Ray, a Chicago-based executive editor of the website Spotlight on Digital Media and Learning for the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The two knew they didn’t want to trot out just another book about “Millennials, Generation X, Twixters and the many other names this generation has been tagged with. We don’t want to add yet another ungrounded opinion to the heap,” they write in the introduction. Instead, their book translates into laymen’s terms the findings of an eight-year study conducted by Settersten and 11 of his academic-world colleagues, a sort of science-world A-Team known as the MacArthur Research Network on Transitions to Adulthood. “The foundation brought together scientists from different fields — sociology, psychology, economics, public policy — and they basically wanted us to take a fresh look at this period of life between 18 and 34,” he explains.

Valentine’s Continued from E1 “Type in the fragrance she already uses, and in a few keystrokes it will provide some lovely alternatives.” The holiday also gives men the opportunity to explore new scents for their lovelies. “One drop of fragrance can say it all, do it all. A gorgeous fragrance can make any woman feel sensual, pampered, sophisticated and cherished.”

Power of flowers Valentine’s Day ranks tops as the holiday for fresh flower purchases. Makes sense: You can never go wrong with roses. Unless, of course, you wait until the day of to find them. “Don’t wait until the last minute. Call your florist right away. The earlier you place your order the better; the more options you’ll have,” said Jenny Scala, director of marketing for the Society of American Florists. Since the holiday falls on a Monday, guys will really have to plan ahead this year. While red roses symbolize passionate love, there are other impressive buds in the garden. Gerbera daisies are extremely popular, as are miniflowers such as mini-carnations, mini-roses and mini-Gerbera daisies, she said, adding that tulips also are always welcome. Orchids convey an exotic note. Place flower

The following lectures remain in the Science Pub series: species that’s furry, round-eared • March 15 — “Views from the and smaller than a rabbit — under Middle of the Mountains,” by the U.S. Endangered Species Barbara Bond, OSU College of Act. Recently, OSU-Cascades Forestry, Department of Forest faculty and students discovered an Ecosystems and Society undocumented population of pika Both vilified and glorified for in Central Oregon. Shinderman will research done there in the discuss plans to monitor closely late-20th century, the Andrews the population, as well as how it Forest, tucked between Eugene and factors into the species’ survival. Sisters, has inexorably changed the way we understand and manage (McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend) forests and forest streams. (Three Creeks Brewery, Sisters) • June 21 — “The Ecology of • April 19 — “Sports in Our Society — Does it Build Character or Characters?” by Terry Liskevych, head coach, OSU Women’s Volleyball Along with an overview of athletics and volleyball at OSU, Liskevych will provide an analysis of sport worldwide and in the USA, including youth, Olympic and professional levels, and suggest a collegiate model that would change the present system. • May 17 — “The American Pika: Victim of Climate Change or Adaptive Species?” by Matt Shinderman, OSU-Cascades, Natural Resources In 2007, authorities rejected a petition to protect pika — a

Love is all-consuming Valentine victuals can get obvious: the caviar, lobster, chateaubriand for two and a shared molten chocolate cake. Obvious verging on boring. Still, lovers need to eat to keep up their amorous energy. Tanya Steel, editor in chief of Epicurious.com, offers tips for dining out or dining in. “I think most women would love anything that involves some sort of preparation or thought, even if it’s remembering to snag a reservation at the cozy romantic restaurant around the corner,” she said. “If you’re going the restaurant route, I would suggest choosing a smaller, calm place, not the hot spot of the moment. When ordering, choose lighter foods; you don’t want to gorge on a meal only to head home, take a Tums and go to bed clutching your stomach. Also, you shouldn’t want to drink your date under the table. Rather, have a glass or two of Champagne or wine to go with the meal. And you don’t need to order the fanciest menu items, just choose foods you actually love.” Her advice for dining at home: “If a guy decides to make dinner at home, most women will love anything he makes, giving him an ‘A’ for effort right off the bat.

Fear: The Role of Large Predators in Environmental Harmony,” by Bill Ripple, OSU College of Forestry, Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society With fewer large predators in the West, increased elk and deer browsing appears to have adversely affected plant communities and led to a loss of biodiversity. Ripple has researched the role of large predators in a natural environment, with studies in Yellowstone, Yosemite and other national parks. In Yellowstone National Park, it appears that plant fortunes are improving following the reintroduction of wolves. (McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend)

‘Big Five’

“The most successful young people are the ones who can not only count on their parents for financial support, but can also turn to them for emotional support and to get real and helpful guidance about their futures. Active, involved parents is not just a good thing, but a necessary thing in ensuring that young people do well.” Settersten says. “We’re not advocating helicopter parenting in (its) extreme form, but what the evidence shows over and over, in the U.S., kids who get support from their parents are kids who do much better over the long haul.” “What you see very strongly is that parents matter. They matter a whole lot in our society,” he says. Though a person is legally considered an adult at 18, getting kids launched into adulthood is a private matter for families, says Settersten. “It’s up to young people and their families to amass whatever resources they can marshal to help them on their way. There again, those who are well-positioned at the beginning of adulthood, whose families can and do support them in these ways, do far better. Because that’s how you get supported in our society. “It’s a kind of sink-or-swim model. If kids sink or swim, it’s largely determined by what their parents can do. That’s just the reality of our society.” Not necessarily good things: Parents who remain altogether uninvolved or believe in “hardknocks parenting,” in which kids are expected to hit the road — or at least hit the ground running — at 18 or 21. “There’s a really big group of young people whose futures are pretty precarious, and we’ve got to figure out how to hook them

prominently features a heart. Again, I think looking for a significant year is a nice idea, too — websites like wine-searcher. com or snooth.com can be very useful in that regard.” So what grape varietal best suggests romance? “I’d say pinot noir, but specifically when it’s great Burgundy that’s been aged for a while,” Isle said. “The aroma of a great old Burgundy is wine’s equivalent to the feeling you get when you’re falling in love.”

in,” Settersten says. One factor is the economy, and not just because of the recession. “These patterns have been in the works for a while. The economy for the past several decades has just been inherently restructured,” he says. Manufacturing jobs have evaporated, and there’s a two-sector economy emerging: One is knowledge-based and requires higher education, and the other is a service economy, offering low-paying jobs. Hard-knocks parents have a dated model in their heads, one that’s more typical of workingclass and low-income families. “It’s exactly those kids who really don’t have other kinds of resources, so staying at home for under-resourced kids can be a really smart thing, if it means they can be in school or even a low-paying job that will give them skills for a better life later. “What we know about those kinds of kids … who leave home before they’re ready, and if they’re under-resourced, those are the kids who spiral downward in debt, and they spiral downward in poverty,” he says. Settersten would like to see the stigma of living at home longer disappear altogether. Meanwhile, in the short amount of time “Not Quite Adults” has been out, he’s been pleased with the way parents and families have responded to the book, which, he says, is changing the conversations they’re having and decisions they’re making. And as for his own his 11-yearold: “I’m more worried about her teen years than I am her 20s,” Settersten says. David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.

541-388-4418

Cocoa loco No other edible is more closely aligned with Valentine’s Day than chocolate. Even a woman who’s watching her weight will sneak a nibble of chocolate. “Women always lust for chocolate. It must be built into our DNA,” said Katrina Markoff, chocolatier and founder of Vosges Haut Chocolat. “Women want something experiential that transports them into the now,” Markoff said, adding that the aphrodisiacal properties of chocolate have been exploited since the days of Casanova. (Be sure to read Wednesday’s Savvy Shopper section for local chocolate ideas for your Valentine.)

ENTER TO WIN A TWO NIGHT STAY AT THE FIRESIDE MOTEL IN YACHATS!

Grape expectations Anyone can grab a bottle of bubbles on the way home. So what can a guy do to really put the fizz into this special day?

City seeks public comment on street improvement bond projects The City of Bend is holding an open house to receive public comment on proposed street reconstruction projects. The projects would be funded by a measure on the May 2011 ballot. The City Council is expected to finalize the measure at its February 16 meeting. If passed by voters, the bond measure would replace an expiring Downtown Bend Urban Renewal Special Levy. The open house is scheduled for Thursday, February 10 from 5 to 7 pm in the City Council Chambers at City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street in Bend. Project maps and information will be available, and City staff will be on hand to answer questions and receive input and comments from the public. In addition, residents can visit the City’s website, www.ci.bend.or.us, to review the projects online and comment via email. All comments will be provided to the City Council. For more information, call Justin Finestone 541-388-5516.

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AH

HOMES, GARDENS AND FOOD IN CENTRAL OREGON

F

Dip ’em right Martha Stewart shares tips to coating these lovelies in chocolate, Page F6

AT HOME

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2011

GARDEN

Tomato maniacs, 2011 is our year By Liz Douville For The Bulletin

Three rounds of “hip-hip-hooray” for the tomato. This year has been declared the “Year of the Tomato,” according to the National Garden Bureau. Those who are aware of my loyalty to growing tomatoes know that a tomato does not pass my lips from the last one harvested from my garden in the fall to the first one ripened by the summer sun. I have no interest in eating a sliced red cardboard ball, and I am not convinced that a tomato shipped thousands of miles has any nutritional value.

Tomato history The wild tomato most likely was found first in the Andes Mountains, but the fruit was not cultivated until it had reached the pre-Mayan people 2,000 miles north of its center of origin. Hernán Cortés and his explorers are credited with finding the tomato in an Aztec market around 1520 and transporting the seed to Spain. From there, the tomato traveled throughout Europe and to England. The earliest written records of the tomato in herbal books placed it in the nightshade family and considered it poisonous. An English country doctor in 1600 wrote, “This plant is more pleasant to the sight than either to the taste or smell because the fruit being eaten provoketh loathing and vomiting.” Gardeners grew them for curiosity and, according to the botanist for King Charles I, “for the amorous aspect or beauty of the fruit.” See Tomatoes / F5

HOME

Want some tips for clean carpets? Naturally

FOOD

Add some

zest to dinner

By Alison Highberger

By Alison Highberger

For The Bulletin

For The Bulletin

Winter is hard on carpeting and rugs. Damp shoes and boots pick up the volcanic cinders, crushed basalt and sand that are scattered on roads, sidewalks and driveways to improve traction when it’s icy. Rock salt, magnesium chloride and other deicers may get tracked into the house and absorbed into floor coverings. There are some simple fixes to help keep carpets and rugs clean in the winter and throughout the year. The solutions we found are also eco-friendly, since we consulted with Rachelle Strauss, author of “Household Cleaning Self-Sufficiency,” a guidebook for low-cost, green housecleaning. Strauss, 38, is married and has a young daughter. She is an avid environmentalist in the United Kingdom who writes about green living in her local newspaper and in a blog (http://littlegreenblog .com). Strauss became interested in making her own cleaning products when she was pregnant. “I was determined to have an organic baby!” she writes in “Household Cleaning SelfSufficiency.” See Carpet / F4

C Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Chef Tim Garling at Bend’s Jackalope Grill likes to add citrus to his savory dishes to perk up eaters’ taste buds. To harvest just the flavorful outer skin, he uses either a vegetable peeler for big strips or a microplane (above) for a fine consistency.

itrus is a diplomatic family of fruits that gets along beautifully with both sweet and savory flavors. Think key lime pie or lemon basil chicken. Lemon icebox cake or spicy orange beef. Citrus is comfortable being sweet, tart or in between. Today we’re focusing on citrus’s savory side, exploring how it can add what chefs and culinary experts call “brightness” to savory dishes — foods that are pungently flavorful without sweetness. Chef Tim Garling of Bend’s Jackalope Grill loves the way citrus perks up his savory menu offerings. “Whenever I make anything, I add acidity. Acidity perks up the taste buds. I call it brightness. I’ll add lemon or lime juice or vinegar — white balsamic vinegar is very citrusy — to add that acidity,” Garling said. His Orange-Ginger Braised Short Ribs (see recipe, Page F2) include orange juice concentrate and orange zest, the fragrant, colorful outer skin of a citrus fruit. Garling likes to use a microplane grater

to get the zest off oranges or any citrus. Unlike traditional graters, microplanes shave very thin slivers from food with their multiple razor-sharp, tiny blades. “With a metal box grater, it just sticks to the inside. There’s nothing like a microplane. I absolutely believe in them, and don’t see how you can cook without one. “It’s so sharp that you’re not going to get that pithy white part that’s bitter. The microplane pulverizes the zest into a dust, so it’ll sort of disappear into the dish,” Garling said. Sometimes Garling likes to cook with big slabs of zest, and for that he uses a vegetable peeler. He said he sometimes leaves the larger strips of zest in his cooked dishes, or he’ll display them on the plate. “I hate to have people bite into a big chunk. I leave it in large pieces so it’s up to them if they want to eat it,” he said. Molly Stevens loves the flavor of cooked citrus zest. She’s a contributing editor of Fine Cooking Magazine and developed the recipe for Orange-Roasted Salmon with Yogurt-Caper Sauce (see Page F2). See Citrus / F2

T O DAY ’ S R E C I P E S • CITRUS, FENNEL, AND ROSEMARY OLIVES, F2 • JACKALOPE GRILL’S ORANGEGINGER BRAISED SHORT RIBS, F2

• ORANGE-ROASTED SALMON WITH YOGURT-CAPER SAUCE, F2 • CITRUS SALT, F2 • CELERY CITRUS SALAD WITH BALSAMIC VINEGAR AND

FETA, F2 • CHICKEN TENDERLOIN, BUTTERNUT SQUASH AND CHICKPEA STEW, F3 • FRESH SPINACH SOUP, F6

• POTATO AND CELERIAC GRATIN, F6 • VANILLA-FLAVORED CELERY MASH WITH POMEGRANATE SAUCE, F6


F2 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

F

Next week: Super root The humble beet can add earthy wonder to meals.

COVER STORY

Citrus

Citrus sources

Continued from F1 “We eat preserved lemons. I often roast lemons along with fish, meat — veal, pork — and love to eat that tenderized bit of citrus,” she said in a phone interview from New York City. Stevens said the thing that’s important to know about citrus flavoring, especially in savory foods, is there are two layers of flavors happening. “You have the flavor of the juice, which is very fresh, water-based, almost ethereal, like a fresh squeeze of juice at the end of cooking. You also have the zest — an oil-based flavor that’s got legs; it lasts longer. You can put it in at the beginning, so it permeates the dish. I often use both: a little zest at the beginning and juice at the end,” Stevens said. She, too, is a big fan of the microplane, and said she loves the rasp style. Stevens recommends zesting citrus fruit right over the food that’s being mixed. Don’t zest it onto a plate and then transfer it to the recipe. “If you shined a light while you’re zesting, you’d see little particles of oil, so zest it right over the bowl so all those little drops of oil and flavor go right into the dish,” Stevens suggested. Her salmon recipe calls for a sprinkle of fine orange zest and other seasonings on the fish before 10 to 15 minutes of baking, and her rule of thumb is, “the longer the cooking the bigger the piece of zest.” “If you’re doing a long braise, you wouldn’t put in fine zest, it would disperse. I’d take a vegetable peeler and peel off two-

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The large family of citrus fruits, notable for tartness and vitamin C, includes: citron, grapefruit, kumquat, lavender gem, lemon, lime, orange, mandarin orange, oro blanco, pomelo, shaddock, tangelo, tangerine and ugli fruit. Store citrus fruits in the humidified drawer of the fridge, according to University of California, Davis researchers. Oranges should last from three to eight weeks. — From “The New Food Lover’s Companion” by Sharon Tyler Herbst and Ron Herbst and UC Davis Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources

and-a-half-inch by three-quarter-inch-wide pieces of zest and add those at the beginning of a long-cooked stew or braise. That way, the zest will slowly release the flavor over a long cooking time,” she said. Since citrus zest is a stronger flavor than citrus juice, Garling said he avoids overdoing the zest. “If I’m using three oranges, I’ll zest one and a half of them. If I’m using the juice of one lemon, I’ll zest that one,” he said. The next time you see fresh lemons, limes and oranges, think about their affinity for savory cooking, or stop by the Jackalope Grill for Orange-Ginger Braised Short Ribs if you’re not in the mood to cook. “It’s a lot easier, and we’ll even wash the dishes,” said Garling. Alison Highberger can be reached at ahighberger@mac .com.

CITRUS, FENNEL, AND ROSEMARY OLIVES A mix of fruity and meaty olives works well in this recipe. They are ideal for cocktail platters, antipasto, snacking or as a gift when placed in a decorative jar. 22 oz (about 4 C) assorted olives (such as nicoise, arbequina, kalamata and picholine) 2 C extra-virgin olive oil 1 C finely chopped fennel bulb 1 TBS chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley 1½ tsp chopped fresh rosemary 1 tsp grated lemon zest ¾ tsp crushed red pepper flakes 3 garlic cloves, minced

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

JACKALOPE GRILL’S ORANGE-GINGER BRAISED SHORT RIBS Makes 6-8 servings. 2-3 TBS canola or grapeseed oil 5 lbs boneless beef short ribs, cut into 8- or 9-oz pieces All-purpose flour for dredging 2 TBS fresh grated ginger 1 TBS diced fresh garlic 2 tsp red pepper flakes 1½ C orange juice

concentrate 1½ C water Zest from 1 lg orange 2 ⁄3 C hoisin sauce ¼ C tomato paste ¼ C honey 2 TBS soy sauce Salt Freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Heat the vegetable oil over medium-high heat in a heavy, ovenproof frying pan, about 12 to 14 inches in diameter, with a lid. Salt and pepper the ribs, and rub the seasoning into the meat. Then dredge the ribs in the flour, shaking off any excess, and add the ribs to the hot pan, being careful not to crowd the pan. You can brown the ribs in batches. Brown the ribs on all sides, about 2 minutes per side. Remove the ribs from the pan and set aside. Pour out any excess oil from the pan, and then add the ginger, garlic and red pepper flakes to the pan, and cook about 1 minute or until fragrant. Add the orange juice concentrate, water, zest, hoisin sauce, tomato paste, honey and soy sauce to the pan, stir to combine and scrape the bottom of the pan to loosen any browned bits. Return the beef to the pan, cover, and place the pan in the preheated oven. Bake for 2 to 3 hours, turning the pieces over every half hour. To make a delicious crust on the ribs, remove the pot lid and baste the ribs every 15 minutes. If the sauce is getting too thick, add a little more water. The ribs are done when the beef is tender and the sauce is thick. Chef Tim Garling’s notes: I like to serve this dish with coconut jasmine rice. Boneless short ribs can be hard to find, but worth the search. These are best made a day in advance. Remove the ribs from the pan, and refrigerate the ribs and sauce overnight. The excess fat rendered during cooking is then easily removed. The next day, rewarm the sauce and ribs over low heat, being careful not to burn them. — From Chef Tim Garling, Jackalope Grill, 1245 S.E. Third St., Bend; 541-318-8435, www.jackalopegrill.com (adapted from a recipe by Anne-Marie Ramo)

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 400 degrees. Lightly oil a heavy-duty rimmed baking sheet. Arrange the salmon skin-side down on the baking sheet, drizzle with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon of the orange zest, the salt, and a few grinds of black pepper. Gently rub the seasonings into the fish. Let sit at room temperature while the oven heats. Combine the yogurt in a small bowl with the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil, ½ teaspoon orange zest, and the parsley, capers and orange juice. Stir to combine. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. The sauce can be made up to several hours ahead and kept refrigerated. Roast the salmon until just cooked through, with a trace of bright pink in the center (cut into a piece to check), 10 to 15 minutes. Serve immediately, drizzled with the yogurt sauce. — From Molly Stevens, courtesy of Fine Cooking Magazine (www.finecooking.com)

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1 TBS fresh lime zest 1 TBS fresh orange zest

CELERY CITRUS SALAD WITH BALSAMIC VINEGAR AND FETA Makes 4 servings. 5 honey tangerines, Murcotts or Satsumas 1 oz (about ¼ C) feta cheese crumbles 2 TBS balsamic vinegar

can imagine!

to taste Freshly ground black pepper ¾ C plain whole-milk yogurt 2 TBS finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley 1½ TBS capers, drained, rinsed, and chopped 1 TBS fresh orange juice

Preheat oven to 225 degrees. Mix salt with zest and spread evenly on a baking sheet. Place in oven and bake 2 hours, until zest is dry. Place in a food processor or blender and pulse until evenly mixed. Divide evenly and package in decorative containers for gift giving. — From www.wholefoodsmarket.com

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2 TBS extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for the baking sheet 6 1-inch-thick, skin-on, center-cut salmon fillets (about 6 oz each), pin bones removed 1½ tsp finely grated orange zest ¾ tsp kosher salt, plus more

2 C sea salt, grey salt or fleur de sel 2 TBS fresh lemon zest

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Makes 6 servings. Because it’s such a delicious roast, you’ll be tempted to save this dish for company, but don’t. Ready in the time it takes to make a salad and set the table, it’s perfect for a weeknight meal, and the citrusy-tangy sauce is one you’ll want to whip up anytime you want to add something special to a simple fish.

Makes 2 cups or enough for 4 (½ C) gifts. Lemon, lime and orange zest add bright, fresh flavor to gourmet sea salt. A great addition to any seafood dish, from grilled fish to shrimp stir-fry, and perfect for the rim of margarita glasses, too.

Combine all ingredients in a large bowl; stir well to combine. Cover and refrigerate 48 hours. Serve at room temperature. Note: Refrigerate for up to 1 month. — From Cooking Light Magazine, November 2009

While supplies last

ORANGE-ROASTED SALMON WITH YOGURTCAPER SAUCE

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Chef Tim Garling’s short ribs at the Jackalope Grill get a citrus boost from orange juice concentrate and orange zest.

4 C (about ¼ lb) mixed salad greens 3 C sliced celery 1 C roughly chopped celery leaves

Squeeze juice from one tangerine into a large bowl. Add feta cheese and vinegar and mix with a fork, mashing some of the cheese to make a dressing. Peel the remaining citrus and separate into segments. Transfer to the bowl with the dressing. Add the salad greens, celery and celery leaves. Toss well and serve immediately. — From www.wholefoodsmarket.com

Seeing red in the produce aisle By Bill Daley Chicago Tribune

Shoppers soon will be seeing more red in the produce aisles of supermarkets, thanks to the introduction of ruddy types of watercress and celery. Green-veined and colored a deep maroon, the red watercress has a lively peppery flavor similar to its green cousin. It now can be found in certain supermarkets in 24 states and the District of Columbia. It is marketed by

B&W Quality Growers of Fellsmere, Fla., reportedly the world’s largest watercress grower. The red watercress was discovered in a semitropical wetland at the northern headwaters for the Florida Everglades. The exact location remains a secret “to protect the area from excessive human traffic and poaching,” according to a company spokesman. A head of red celery looks much like a regular one, but the base of the stalks is red instead of

white. It is grown by Oviedo, Fla.based Duda Farm Fresh Foods in Southern California and will be test-marketed under the brand name Celery Sensations in select markets in California and the Southeast. The red celery was produced by crossing an existing green celery with an Old World heritage celery root, or celeriac. “It has the same great crisp, fresh flavor as regular celery,” company President Dan Duda said.

Green-veined and colored a deep maroon, ... red watercress has a lively peppery flavor similar to its green cousin. It now can be found in certain supermarkets in 24 states.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, February 8, 2011 F3

F When it’s tea time Real tea comes from one plant and one plant only. But understanding its many complexities is far from simple. By Craig Sailor McClatchy-Tribune News Service

It’s hard to believe one plant can spawn so many different kinds of drinks over so many thousands of years. But that’s what the tea plant has done. Considered to be the second most widely consumed beverage on earth (after water) tea occupies a venerated and ancient place in Asian cultures and somewhat a faddish one in Western. But it seems to be a fad here to stay. Many people’s idea of tea is a glass of iced Lipton at the local diner (sweetened in Canada and the American South) or one of numerous flavored teas that are churned out like Beanie Babies by big manufacturers. There have been many health claims about tea in the last few years leading a manufacturing rush to include just about every food and beauty product possible with tea. Yet, few Americans bother to take There’s one the time to investigate what real tea thing that all is. tea purveyors First, let’s get straight what tea seem to agree isn’t. There’s only on: The best tea one plant in the world, Camellia siis whole leaf. nensis, that grows Tea bags are tea leaves. The plant is finicky. filled with dust While it can and fannings, grow even in the the leftovers of Pacific Northwest, prefers certain tea processing. itclimates and soils that limit it to equatorial regions in Asia, India and Africa to grow tea-worthy leaves. While herbal teas are a huge market, they are not, technically, tea. Peppermint tea? An infusion. Chamomile tea? Lovely, but still not tea. The tea plant contains caffeine as does coffee, chocolate and other plants. The lighter teas have less caffeine than darker ones. But most teas contain less caffeine than coffee. Nevertheless, a few cups will quickly add up. Proceed with caution if you are caffeine sensitive or have high blood pressure. At the Mad Hat Tea Co., in Tacoma, Wash., co-owner Tobin Ropes offers only whole-leaf tea in his convivial space filled with a tea bar, art, tea-making implements and a lounge.

By Stephanie Witt Sedgwick Special to The Washington Post

White-meat chicken doesn’t lend itself to long cooking because the meat tends to dry out. One solution is a quick braise. Chicken tenderloins are a great choice for that method; they’re just the right size. To achieve

maximum flavor, the other ingredients have to deliver fast. Here, butternut squash, chickpeas and cumin provide big taste. Lemon and parsley bring the dish into balance. Is it technically a stew? Maybe not, but it’s a wonderful onepot meal.

CHICKEN TENDERLOIN, BUTTERNUT SQUASH AND CHICKPEA STEW Makes 6 servings. 11⁄2 lbs chicken tenderloins 11⁄2 tsp ground cumin Salt Freshly ground black pepper 2 TBS olive oil 1 sm onion, cut into very small dice (2⁄3 C) 12 oz peeled butternut squash, cut into 1⁄2 -inch

Info to know While the tea plant has many varieties, the dramatic differences in tea come mainly from its processing, Ropes said. It can be as simple and light as white, which is processed in a manner of hours by simply dehydrating. Or it can be as complex as puerh (also spelled pu-erh), an oddity of a tea that is sold in compressed bricks and rings with only a few Chinese practitioners knowing the secret process that involves composting and yeast. There’s one thing that all tea purveyors seem to agree on: The best tea is whole leaf. Tea bags are filled with dust and fannings, the leftovers of tea processing. Felix D’Allesando, who along with his wife Carol Welch owns Olympia, Wash.’s Tea Lady, agrees. And they sell hundreds of teas by the bag. But the bags, he argues, are for convenience. And convenient they are. Using whole leaf teas is a bit of a commitment. It requires measuring, an infuser and cleanup. D’Allesando calls it a ritual. But the result, Ropes says, is a world-class drink that can be made for pennies. Nothing can beat the human hand, carefully selecting a bud and two leaves. “Manufactured tea is like robots making wine,” Ropes said. And wine is something Ropes knows a little about. He spent 20 years as a wine distributor, a world where a $200 bottle of wine sells for its reputation as much as its taste. It was a world that Ropes was only too happy to leave behind. “I got over the whole ‘I’m right and you’re wrong (thing).’” Now he chooses only what he and his customers like. But that’s not to say his wine background hasn’t taught him to be discriminating. He turns down five teas for every one that he chooses. Both D’Allesando and Ropes agree that how you make tea is crucial to its enjoyment. First, use filtered water, not tap. Tea generally is a subtly flavored beverage, and you don’t want chemicals to divert the flavor. Heat the water in a kettle, or pot; just don’t use a microwave. Different teas need to be steeped at different temperatures. Generally, the lighter the tea the lower the temperature. While the temperatures in the chart at right are optimum, don’t sweat the digits. Just keep the water from boiling. Only puerh needs boiling water. Generally, use one teaspoon of tea per cup. A benefit of tea is that it can be re-steeped. White, green and oolong can be re-steeped two to three times. Black teas can be resteeped more.

Chicken, squash shine in this speedy stew

Janet Jensen / Tacoma News Tribune

From top: Green, black, white, puerh and oolong teas, in leaf and steeped forms, are some of the varieties available at Mad Hat Tea Co. in Tacoma, Wash.

Types of teas GREEN Process: Leaves are briefly withered Characteristics: Grassy, assertive Color: Chinese is yellow, Japanese is bright green Steeping temperature: 170-175 for Japanese, 180-195 for Chinese Variety to try: Dragonwell (Chinese) and sencha (Japanese)

BLACK Process: Leaves are withered at length and heavily bruised Characteristics: Strong, but less nuanced in flavor Color: Amber to brown Steeping temperature: 195-210 Varieties to try: Darjeeling — the champagne of tea; Asam — strong; Ceylon — vibrant; Chinese — softer, forgiving, not brisk; and Kenyan — the newcomer on the tea scene

How big a buzz? Beverage ......................... Caffeine (in milligrams)

BREWED TEA Black tea, 8 oz .......................................... 40-120 Black tea, decaffeinated, 8 oz ........................2-10 Starbucks Tazo Chai Tea Latte, 16 oz .............100 Stash Premium Green, 6 oz ..............................26

ICED TEA Lipton Brisk Lemon Iced Tea, 12 oz ................... 7 Nestea Iced Tea, 12 oz ......................................26 Snapple Plain Unsweetened, 16 oz .................. 18 Source: The Mayo Clinic

WHITE

dice (3 C) 11⁄2 C cooked no-salt-added chickpeas, drained 2 C homemade or no-saltadded chicken broth 1 TBS cornstarch Freshly squeezed juice of 1 lemon (2 TBS) 2 TBS coarsely chopped parsley, for garnish

Sprinkle the chicken with 1 teaspoon of the cumin; season with salt and pepper to taste. Add 1 tablespoon of the oil to a skillet or shallow braising pan that is large enough to hold all of the ingredients; heat over medium-high heat. Working in batches, add the chicken tenderloins. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes on the first side, until lightly browned; turn them over and cook for about 2 minutes on the second side, until lightly browned. Transfer to a plate. Add the remaining tablespoon of oil to the skillet or pan (still over mediumhigh heat). Add the onion and the remaining 1⁄2 teaspoon of cumin. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes, stirring, until the onion softens. Add the squash, chickpeas and broth. Bring to a boil, then cover and reduce the heat to medium or as needed so the liquid barely bubbles. Cook for 8 to 10 minutes or until the squash is just tender. Return the chicken tenderloins plus their accumulated juices to the skillet or pan. Cover and cook for 7 to 8 minutes (reduce the heat as needed so the liquid barely bubbles), until the chicken is cooked through. Whisk together the cornstarch and the lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup until well combined. Uncover the skillet or pan; increase the heat to medium-high and stir in the cornstarch mixture. Allow the liquid to boil for 1 to 2 minutes, until it is lightly thickened; stir to make sure there are no lumps. Remove from the heat. Divide among wide, shallow bowls. Serve hot, topped with the chopped parsley. Nutrition information per serving: 250 caloThinkstock ries, 26 g protein, 24 g carbohydrates, 6 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 75 mg cholesterol, 135 mg sodium, 4 g dietary fiber, 2 g sugar.

Process: Leaves dried with heat Characteristics: Soft, gentle, light, earthy Color: Very pale green Steeping temperature: 180-185 Variety to try: Pai Mu Dan

PUERH (also spelled pu-erh) Characteristics: Extremely strong Process: Secretive process involving composting and yeast Color: Dark brown Steeping temperature: Boil

OOLONG Process: Leaves are withered, bruised and heated Characteristics: Floral to dried grain Color: Green to amber Steeping temperature: 190 Variety to try: Ti Kwan yin (green) and formosa (amber)

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Generic brewed, 8 oz ................................95-200 Generic brewed, decaffeinated, 8 oz .............2-12 Starbucks Vanilla Latte, 16 oz ........................150

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F4 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

H

Next week: At Home With ... Camalli Book Co.’s Tina Walker Davis.

Get the picture? From clocks to blankets to pillows and more By Lisa Gutierrez

Do it yourself

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — I’ve always wanted a grand piano. Not because I play but because I adore those decorating-magazine tableaus of beautifully framed photos sitting atop a piano. That would certainly solve a problem for me: I don’t have a lot of space to display pictures around the house. So how can I show off my favorite photos of Grandma, the hubby and the dogs — other than posting them on Facebook? (Yawn.) Apparently I’m not the only one looking for something fun and different to do with my digital photos. “We’re seeing a big increase in people wanting to know how to take better pictures and what to do with their pictures,” says professional photographer Shari Hartbauer of Digital Labrador. She recently taught a workshop on how to use digital photos to customize gifts such as snow globes, notepads, playing cards and board games. You can have a photo reproduced on virtually anything. (Photo-customized cupcake wrappers? They make them.) Or personalize blankets, serving trays, mouse pads, paper weights, candles, wall clocks, lamps and dog beds. Inspiration for photo gifts is hard to miss, with online resources such as www.snapfish.com, www.walmart.com and www .kodakgallery.com. In Pittsburg, Kan., Mpix, a division of Miller’s Professional Imaging, will print photos on puzzles and wall clings to calendars and statuettes. One home decor item that caught my eye at www.mpix.com: Gallery wraps, or photos printed on canvas and wrapped around wooden stretcher frames. Prices range from $55 for the smallest, 8 inches by 10 inches, to $170 for the largest, 24 inches by 36 inches. One of Hartbauer’s favorite resources is www.photojojo.com, which has a free newsletter with do-it-yourself photo projects. At www.walgreens.com, get photo customization on more than 100 items, the most popular of which is a computer mouse pad. “If you go to the website, you can shop by product and you’ll see ... pillow cases, collages, fleece blankets, a clock, a keepsake box, pillow shams, placemats, throw blankets, posters. There is a lot of stuff for the home,” says Mona Furlott Kelly in Chicago, general merchandise manager for photo and front-end services for Walgreens. When Kelly started working in the photo business in the early ’70s, making a print was the most exciting thing anyone could do with a photograph. Now? “It’s the digital age,” says Kelly, who put a photo of her Cavalier King Charles spaniel on a set of coasters for her mother. “The ability to transfer an image from a jpeg to an apron ... it’s really doing more with your photos.” It’s not expensive, she says, noting that Walgreens can customize an apron with a photo for $14.99, and those coasters were $24.99. But the memories such items

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If you’re comfortable with a hot glue gun and scissors, you can make home accessories out of your favorite photographs. You can find project ideas at: www.marthastewart.com: photo cube bookends, picture pillows, photo trays, calendars. www.parents.com: custom magnets, Warhol-inspired wall collages, mobiles. www.ehow.com: photo lampshades, calendars, photo sculptures. Type “photo crafts” in the search box.

Picture this

Tammy Ljungblad / Kansas City Star

You can have a photo reproduced on virtually anything. Personalize blankets, serving trays, mouse pads, paper weights, candles, wall clocks, lamps and dog beds.

Face your inner crafter

Contact cement Small magnets or thumbtacks

As a collector of refrigerator magnets, I couldn’t resist this Martha Stewart craft project that uses bottle caps and photos. Note that twist-off caps work best because they don’t bend when you take them off the bottle. If your computer software has a contactsheet mode, use it to reduce pictures to fit the caps.

HOW-TO

TOOLS AND MATERIALS 1-inch circular craft punch Craft glue Bottle caps Clear casting resin

preserve, she says, are priceless. When her nephew died at age 22, “I got my sister a blanket with his picture on it,” she says. “How can you beat something like that? “You can’t just show a picture of my nephew on a media card. And that’s what I’m afraid of, that people are going to leave their images on a media card or cell phone.” Hartbauer led her students to Light Affection (www.lightaffection.com). The company makes custom night-lights and lamps by carving images from photographs onto translucent material and illuminating them from behind. Prices start at $44.95. “These are amazing and so beautiful,” she says. She was also excited to discover Mykea, which develops artistic “skins” that adhere to plain Ikea furniture and make it more personal. You can upload your own photo or choose from artists’ creations. “We love the well-designed furniture. But we don’t like the fact

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1. Cut out pictures with the craft punch. Using craft glue, attach one picture to the inside of each bottle cap. Let dry. 2. Cover a work surface to protect it from spills, and lay caps on top. Following manufacturer’s instructions for clear casting resin, fill each bottle cap to the rim. Let dry overnight. 3. With contact cement, attach magnets or thumbtacks to the backs of the bottle caps. Let dry overnight before using. Source: Martha Stewart Living

that we see the same Ikea interior everywhere around us,” it says on www.thisismykea.com. The removable decals fit a handful of Ikea pieces, including the Billy bookcase, Pax wardrobe and Expedit coffee table. Prices range from $30 to $100. Matt Keith’s North Kansas City, Mo., company, Custom Color, prints photographs on bedspreads, pillow shams, comforters, pillows and wall murals for a home decor company called Vision Bedding (www .visionbedding.com). Photos of grandparents and soldiers on blankets were especially popular during the holiday season. Among Vision Bedding’s personalized products: posters starting at $20, dog beds from $99 to $149 and baby blankets for $99. I’ve got my eye on the $149 custom photo shower curtain that can be personalized with a message. How about “Got soap?” Keith notes the growing number of websites that will turn photographs into wall art, like the 15-foot-wide mural of an F-

What digital photos work best on customized items? According to the experts at www.photoworks.com, images should be at least 200 pixels per inch (ppi) relative to the size of the product being ordered. For example, an image that is 800 by 1,200 pixels can be reproduced to a 4-inchby-6-inch size. Whether your project requires an even higher resolution depends on the subject matter. Some items demand more detail than others. For instance, on pillowcases, woven throws, cutting boards or anything 8 inches by 12 inches or larger, you will probably need a highresolution file of at least 1,500 by 1,000 pixels. If you’re not sure your photo will work, contact customer service through the website before placing your order. 16 fighter jet that he made for his son’s bedroom. At www.designyourwall.com, for example, you can upload your own image for custom sheets of wallpaper on a variety of materials, including polyester and grass cloth. Prices range from $6.50 per foot for paper, $9.25 for Mylar or foil. Go to www.personalthrows .com to turn a photo into a wall mural made of hand-painted canvas panels that can either resemble an actual photo or an oil painting. They come in four sizes, starting at $400 for a 32-inch-by-48inch mural up to $1,300 for a 96inch-by-96-inch mural. Stephen Fraser started his North Carolina company, Spoonflower, in October 2008 when his wife, who sews, wondered why she couldn’t design her own fabric. Fraser, a marketing consultant, knew that “you can print on anything under the sun.” But, like his wife, he’d never heard of customized fabric. Consulting with textile experts at North Carolina State University, he learned that digitally designed custom fabrics were available to the fashion industry but not the general public. They are now, through www.spoonflower.com. “There are a lot of sites where you can get finished products,” says Fraser, who lives in Durham, N.C. “But we’re kind of in a different category because we’re not providing finished goods. But people are creating all kinds of things just because these fabrics are really unique.”

COVER STORY

Carpet Continued from F1 “I couldn’t believe how easy it was to make these (cleaning) products! They actually worked and saved me money. If that wasn’t enough, I was saving packaging from the landfill and keeping toxic chemicals out of the environment. And my home looked and smelled great, too,” she writes. Strauss conversed with us via e-mail from England about carpet cleaning.

Prevention Adopt a “no shoes” rule in the house. “I’m all for prevention rather than cure when it comes to any cleaning job,” Strauss said. “Offer good quality mats outside your home, ask your “The majority guests and of dirt comes in family memon the bottom bers to wipe of our shoes, their shoes including and leave them chemicals, by the front bacteria and door. The madust, so it jority of dirt makes sense to comes in on avoid bringing the bottom of in this dirt in our shoes, inthe first place.” cluding chemi— Rachelle cals, bacteria Strauss and dust, so it makes sense to avoid bringing in this dirt in the first place,” she said.

Vacuum more often Vacuum frequently so that dust and dirt don’t build up in carpet and rug fibers. “Vacuum at least once a week and consider using a carpet sweeper in between times to gather any fluff and dirt,” she writes in her book.

Catch spills immediately Strauss recommends mopping up spills as they happen, and blotting or gently scraping — not rubbing — to avoid pushing the spill deeper into the carpet or rug. “As soon as a spill touches the carpet, pour soda water over it to fizz up the stain. Then immediately put some old, clean towels over the area and stamp on them to draw out as much liquid as possible,” Strauss writes in “Household Cleaning.”

Steam it to clean it Strauss advocates for natural, nonchemical cleaning products and warns that spot cleaners and carpet cleaning products include “a cocktail of artificial fragrances, optical brighteners, pesticides, fungicides and solvents.” “The best thing to do is to use a steam cleaner, which doesn’t require any chemicals at all. My mantra is to keep it simple,” she e-mailed. Strauss suggests steam cleaning all carpets at least once a year to keep the fibers in good condition. For dirty carpets and rugs, Strauss has a recipe for a mild carpet shampoo (see “Make it at home”).

Cover up Consider covering your carpets and rugs with mats or throw rugs. “Rugs can be taken outside and aired, and some can be washed in a washing machine,” Strauss said.

Pet towel or paw bath Finally, this reporter suggests keeping an old towel ready in-

Make it at home HOMEMADE CARPET DEODORIZER 1 TBS dried lavender, peppermint, lemon balm or a few drops of your favorite essential oil 1¼ C (9 oz) baking soda Mix ingredients together, sprinkle liberally on a freshly vacuumed carpet and leave it there overnight. The following day, vacuum thoroughly.

HOMEMADE CARPET SHAMPOO The following mix can be put into the cleaning reservoir of a carpet cleaner. 4-5 tsp liquid castile soap or nontoxic dishwashing liquid 2 gal hot water For really dirty carpets, add ½ teaspoon borax or soda crystals per 4 cups of water.

SHAMPOO FOR HAND-CLEANING This recipe can be made in a large bowl or bucket if you want to clean your carpet by hand. Combine one part liquid castile soap or nontoxic dishwashing liquid with one part of hot water. Work the suds into the carpet with a brush and blot dry with old towels. The carpet should be damp, not wet. Allow to dry thoroughly before vacuuming. If you saturate the carpet, you risk getting damp in the backing, which could potentially lead to mildew and carpet shrinkage, so go lightly!

SPOT CLEANER FOR RUGS Borax is an effective spot cleaner. Make sure you test on an inconspicuous area of carpet first. Although borax is safer than many conventional products, it is still toxic, so wear a pair of rubber gloves. 2 ⁄3 C (4.5 oz) borax 4¼ C hot water Dissolve the borax in the water. Apply with a stiff brush, and work from the outside of the stain inward. Remember not to saturate the carpet, just keep it damp. When you have finished, absorb any excess moisture with old towels. From: “Household Cleaning SelfSufficiency” by Rachelle Strauss, Skyhorse Publishing 2009

side the door to wipe Fido’s paws after a walk. Fill a designated dishpan or small bucket with some warm water before you take your dog for a walk, and give the dirty paws a quick swish upon return.

Greener cleaning If you decide to go greener with your carpet cleaning, and have several products in your cupboard that you no longer want to use, Strauss has an idea about how to dispose of them. “We try to waste as little as possible at home, so if you really don’t want to use stain removers and cleaners you already have, there will be someone else who does. Although it might feel a little uneasy to offer your products to someone else once you realize what is in them and the harm they can cause, not everyone feels the same way! Why not offer your products on Freecycle or to a work colleague? It’s better than throwing them away, and the recipient is bound to be grateful that they can save some money,” Strauss said. Alison Highberger can be reached at ahighberger@mac .com.

Bed test: Do wrinkle-free sheets deliver? By John Ewoldt Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

When my house was being remodeled last summer and the dust hadn’t settled, I splurged and spent a night at the Ivy Hotel in downtown Minneapolis. I can still recall slipping into the sheets and thinking “whoa!” I lifted the corners to find the brand. When I discovered that it was Sferra, I was slightly disappointed because I have the same

brand at home, and they don’t feel as soft and smooth. Then I realized why Ivy’s were better — they were ironed. Talk about a letdown. Appreciating the luxury of ironed sheets is one thing, but getting out the Rowenta is another. That’s when I started noticing that retailers are selling sheets labeled “wrinkleresistant.” These aren’t poly-cotton blends — they’re 100 percent cotton that claim to defy cotton’s

worst flaw — wrinkles. I had to know. Can “wrinklefree” sheets feel as good as ironed ones? I washed Target’s no-iron set and found that it definitely wrinkles less, although to call any of these sheets wrinkle-free would be an overstatement. In May 2010 when Consumer Reports tested sheets, it included a couple of wrinkle-free models, but they didn’t fare well. The Can-

opy sheets from Walmart ($35 to $39 for queen and king sets) and the Eddie Bauer Lodge Collection (now discontinued) still wrinkled, according to the magazine. But consumers who are hesitant about trying the wrinkle-free sheets can rest easy. First, most of the all-cotton sheets aren’t expensive. Paying less than $50 for a king set at most discounters is a good value, although some are more expensive.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, February 8, 2011 F5

G

Next week: Waiting for spring The greenhouse in winter — thoughts on offseason uses.

Joys of a rustic hot tub: Chop wood, light fire, soak By Jennifer Bleyer New York Times News Service

Marty Picco, a 51-year-old software developer in Santa Cruz, Calif., does not seem like a back-to-the-land type. He has an iPhone, an iPad, two MacBooks, two desktop computers, a digital single-lens reflex camera and a plasma television. But when he bought a hot tub, he went for the lowest-tech model around. Picco and his wife, Liz, 56, bought a red cedar tub that relies on a wood-fired stove to heat its water, an unusually primitive apparatus in an age of electric fiberglass spas outfitted with hydrotherapy jets, air blowers and underwater lights. The cedar tub, 6 feet in diameter, seemed to fit better with their home, a mid-19thcentury redwood farmhouse, especially when he placed the tub outside in a nest of beargrass and wild sweet peas. But there was more to his choice than that. “It’s fun, like a ritual that you plan for hours in advance,” Picco said about his simple tub, which he bought a few years ago. “You chop the wood, get the firebox going and get really good at managing the fire to keep the water in a narrow range of 104 to 106 degrees. You have a real outdoor experience, as opposed to a Las Vegas experience.” By all accounts, rustic woodfired hot tubs constitute a tiny niche of the broad hot-tub market. Their most prominent manufacturer, Snorkel Hot Tubs in Seattle, estimates that it has sold a total of 15,000 tubs, a mere drop compared with the 6.3 million conventional hot tubs installed in the United States, according to the Association of Pool and Spa Professionals in Alexandria, Va. But the recession sent sales of conventional hot tubs plummeting more than 60 percent from 2005 to 2009, according to P.K. Data, a market research firm. At the same time, wood-fired versions have begun to acquire a certain cachet, with people valuing them for reasons of thrift, environmentalism or, like Picco, a personal desire to slow down and commune with nature.

‘Renewed interest’ Precise sales figures are difficult to find because sellers of wood-fired hot tubs operate independently of mainstream industry associations. But Tom Slater, the owner of Snorkel Hot Tubs, said that while the recession dampened his sales last year, they have “picked up dramatically” since then. “There seems to be a lot of renewed interest,” he said, citing the same “earthy essence” quality of the tubs that attracted Picco. Similarly, Doug Brubaker, the owner of Forest Lumber and Cooperage, a business in Sooke, British Columbia, that sells various kinds of hot tubs, said orders for the wood-heated kinds have risen from 30 percent of sales to 50 percent since 2006. Dan Jung, who sells 1,000 hot tubs a year at Northern Lights Cedar Tubs in Winnipeg, Manitoba, said woodburning tubs had risen from 5 to 10 percent of his sales. And there are new sellers, too: a Chinese venture called Richy (Foshan) Trading, which started making the tubs in 2008, and has already sold 100 this year compared with 80 in 2009. Attractive prices may help propel these gains. The cost of wood-fired hot tubs hovers around $3,000; Slater’s models, for example, range from $2,300 to $4,100. But electric tubs with jets and enough room for five to seven people typically cost $3,000 to $7,000 — or much higher, depending on the features added. As for operating costs, the electric variety can typically reach around $350 a year, according to the pool and spa association, while woodburning tubs cost little or even nothing for owners who use their own wood. “Economics is certainly a reason why someone chooses them,” said Jung. “They have no operating costs other than wood, and a cord of wood, at around $150, could last years.” The modern wood-fired hot tub was developed in 1979. In the previous decade, regular hot

Photos by Erik Jacobs / New York Times News Service

Frank Rudy Schaeffer adds wood to the firebox of his hot tub at his home in Phillipston, Mass. “The power can go out, and I don’t care.”

COVER STORY

Tomatoes Continued from F1 Thomas Jefferson raised tomatoes as ornamental plants at Monticello in 1781, but it wasn’t until the 1800s that people in North America began eating tomatoes. The most popular legend involving overcoming the belief that tomatoes were poisonous comes from the 1820s. In Salem, N.J., Col. Robert Gibbon Johnson staged an event and set out to eat a basketful of tomatoes at the local courthouse in front of an audience that had gathered to watch the writhing spectacle of his death. The story has been embellished and enshrined, but never verified, according to the National Garden Bureau. However it happened, it took a leap of faith by someone to overcome the common belief that tomatoes could kill you. In 1880, James Vick’s Flower and Vegetable Catalog of Rochester, N.Y., listed six types of tomato seeds. We think of the yellow tomatoes as being relatively new to the tomato market, but in W. Atlee Burpee’s 1888 Farm Annual catalog, “Golden Queen” tomatoes were described as having “handsome yellow slices making a beautiful contrast in (a) dish with red tomatoes.” Burpee listed 21 varieties for sale that year, including the revered “Brandywine” heirloom that is still so popular. An heirloom is defined as a variety that has been in circulation for more than 50 years.

Modern tomatoes

Schaeffer’s hot tub is the latest model from Snorkel, with a submersible firebox. tubs had become a wink-wink symbol of debauchery, but there was nothing lascivious about this woodsy new entry. Roger Evans, a 29-year-old engineering student at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, had a cabin in the Talkeetna Mountains where the only bathing option was to jump in a frigid stream. Eager for the occasional hot bath there, he tinkered in his university’s welding room and developed an aluminum firebox that could be immersed directly into a vat of water; its high heatconduction properties efficiently fired up the water, and the metal resisted rusting and corrosion. Evans dubbed his invention the Snorkel stove and soon sold several hundred a year through advertisements in magazines like Mother Earth News and Popular Science. Evans’ company, Snorkel Hot Tubs, is now owned by Slater, and a handful of other firms also make tubs with submersible fireboxes. Other varieties of woodfired hot tubs have arrived on the market as well. The Chofu heater from Japan, a wood-fired device that sits outside a tub and uses a “thermo-siphoning” system to heat the water within, is rigged up to agricultural stock tanks for do-it-yourself hot tubs that cost less than $1,000, as well as to traditional handmade Japanese tubs. And there is the Dutchtub, a portable soaking tub that looks like a giant cereal bowl with an attached heating coil for burning wood. Seventy of the distinctively modern Dutchtubs, which cost around $6,000, have been sold in the United States.

Out in the country While some wood-fired hot tubs are installed in urban areas — Dutchtubs, in particular, have landed in backyards in Brooklyn, N.Y.; Oakland, Calif.; Los Angeles; Austin, Texas; and Montreal — they may be best suited to those with easy access to plentiful wood, like Frank Rudy Schaeffer, 58, a fifth-grade teacher from Cambridge, Mass.

Schaeffer’s second home is set on 17 forested acres in Phillipston, Mass., 65 miles west of Boston, and he bought his first wood-fired hot tub for that property in 1987, based on a magazine ad. “I got it sight unseen, just knowing it was going to be a great pleasure,” he said. After years of steady use, he upgraded to the latest model of Snorkel hot tub last spring. Unlike conventional hot tubs, his has virtually no operating costs, he said. “I have my own water and my own wood,” said Schaeffer, whose tub sits on a fir deck overlooking a trout stream. Besides the low-to-no operating cost, he said, “the power can go out, and I don’t care.” Many owners of wood-fired tubs also point out that they do not burn fossil fuels or pour sanitizing chemicals in their water. Generally, they explain, the water in wood-burning tubs is used for a short time and then drained out, while in conventional spas the water remains for months. Moreover, they say, the water in conventional tubs is usually kept continuously warm — a practice they liken to keeping a car idling in the garage in case someone might want to go for a drive. But others say wood-fired tubs are not all that green: Although wood may be a renewable resource, its smoke does contribute to air pollution. And Kirstin Pires, a spokeswoman for the pool and spa association, noted that conventional tubs had become far more energy efficient because of consumer demand and new public standards, like those mandated by the California Energy Commission in 2006. The owners of wood-fired hot tubs also concede that they are deprived of one of the chief pleasures of a conventional tub: spontaneity. “Sometimes I come home from work and it’s the kind of wet, bone cold you get here, and I want to take a hot tub, but by the time I get the fire going, it’ll be too late and I’ll want to go to bed,” Picco admitted. “In those situations, it would be nice if it was just hot.” But others relish the ritual. Charles von Simson, 42, a lawyer who lives in Buffalo, N.Y., bought a Dutchtub four years ago for his family’s weekend home in the Finger Lakes region. He thoroughly enjoys what he calls his twice-yearly “wood cut production” — chopping a couple of wheelbarrows’ worth of logs, cutting them into 6-inch discs with a chain saw, and splitting those chunks into smaller pieces with an ax. “You have to be somebody who likes the process,” von Simson agreed.

The modern age of tomato development was ushered in by Dr. Oved Shifriss, director of vegetable research for Burpee from 1942-1950. Shifriss bred “Big Boy,” one of the first F1 hybrids offered by Burpee in 1949 and is still offered in their catalog. Thousands of hybrids are now available, offering gardeners desirable traits such as earliness, crack resistance and compact habits. Breeding efforts have produced more healthful tomatoes with increased lycopene, the antioxidant compound that gives tomatoes and other fruits and vegetables their bright red color. Tomatoes provide abundant vitamins

Growing tomatoes can be challenging, but the reward is sweet-tasting fruit in summer. The Bulletin ile photo

and minerals. One cup of cherry tomatoes will provide 25 percent of daily recommended vitamin A, 32 percent of vitamin C, and a substantial amount of vitamin K and potassium. For the best tasting, most nutritious tomatoes, grow your own or purchase them at the local farmers markets. Modern tomatoes tolerate diseases caused by fusarium and verticillium fungi, nematodes and viruses. These tolerances make it easier for gardeners and farmers to grow tomatoes without using pesticides. From smallest to largest, popular fruit shapes include cherry, plum, standard and beefsteak. Cherry tomatoes can range from ¼ ounce to 1 ounce and are generally produced in clusters. Plum tomatoes are shaped as the name implies and generally weigh between 2 and 6 ounces. They are also known as paste tomatoes, due to their meaty interiors and thick fruit walls. Standard-sized tomatoes can range from 4 to 16 ounces and beefsteaks can weigh up to 2 pounds. Beefsteaks are more difficult to bring to maturity in our climate as they require a longer growing season. Grape, currant and saladette are relatively recent tomato types. Currant tomatoes are only about half the size of cherries; grape tomatoes are oval shaped and appeared in the late 1990s. Saladettes are larger than cherry, but often smaller than plum tomatoes, usually two to three bites. For more than 40 years, vegetable breeders at Oregon State

University have been developing tomatoes well suited to the diverse growing conditions of Oregon. “Legend” has been one of the most popular developments. “Legend” is a large-fruited tomato that sets fruit under cool conditions. It is resistant to late blight, a fungal disease that kills tomato plants. Currently the breeders are in the final stages of introducing an improved purple tomato. The variety, still unnamed, includes anthocyanins — the same class of health-promoting pigments in red wine that function as antioxidants and are believed to prevent heart disease, according to an OSU Agricultural Research update. Quoting Jim Myers, OSU professor of vegetable breeding, “Tomatoes are second only to the potato in terms of the top vegetable consumed in the world. Per capita use in the U.S. in 2003 was 89 pounds of tomatoes per person. If we could boost the nutritional value of tomatoes, a large part of the population would benefit.” As a tribute to the “Year of the Tomato,” I propose this to those of you who grow tomatoes: Grow a variety you have never tried. To those of you who have never grown a tomato, this is the year to try. Your first success may be with an OSU-developed variety with a maturity of 60 to 75 days. Then, there will be no stopping you. Liz Douville can be reached at douville@bendbroadband.com.

Sustenance, edible and otherwise, from the garden By Barbara Mahany Chicago Tribune

“The Kitchen Gardener’s Handbook” by Jennifer R. Bartley, Timber Press, $22.95 What it is: “The Kitchen Gardener’s Handbook” supplies a four-season spin through the kitchen garden, chock-full of plant notes and recipes, and dreamy photos of fresh-from-the-garden bouquets. You’ll find sustainable garden plans, sketches and plant lists, so you can dig along with author Jennifer Bartley. In turns, Bartley considers the vegetables, fruits, greens and herbs for every season. At heart, this is a book pulsing with the belief that we are richer for our connection to the patch of earth outside our kitchen door — whether it’s the food we bring to our table or the beauty we tuck in a vase. Above all, it’s a survival guide for those among us who hunger for what the garden so willingly gives. What makes it armchairworthy: A perfect antidote for those offseason gardening blues. This is the tome to reach for when you’ve reached your limit reading about some faroff picture-perfect garden, or can’t stand to mull one more metaphysical garden query. This is the self-help guide you need when the only cure

around is plotting your kitchen potager. It’s a book you can’t help but tuck with scraps of paper and turned-down page corners, as you harvest a bumper crop of fine ideas. One fine line: “Edible gardening is not like a canoe that floats

by and, if missed, cannot be recaptured. There is no single perfect planting, growing or harvesting moment. Instead, edible gardening is a continuous process; you can participate at any stage in the continuum. ... Plant a seed and watch it grow.”

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F6 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Straightforward spinach soup A couple of tricks, tips By Julie Rothman The Baltimore Sun

Anna Biebl, of Belcamp, Md., was looking for a recipe for spinach soup. She said the Double T Diners serve one that she is particularly fond of, and she wanted to be able to make it — or something similar — at home. Elaine Martin, of Short Hills, N.J., sent in a recipe for fresh spinach soup that she found on the web from Earthbound Farm Organic products (www.eb farm.com). While this may be different than what is served at the diner, it is nonetheless quite delicious and healthy to boot. The recipe is straightforward and easy to prepare, and if you are concerned about calories, the soup can be made without the cream. When I tested the recipe, I used a good quality store-bought, low-sodium chicken stock and about 1⁄2 of a cup of heavy cream. After tasting, I bumped up the curry powder for a little extra heat. Thanks to the ready availability of bagged baby spinach,

RECIPE FINDER

FRESH SPINACH SOUP Makes 4 servings. 2 TBS butter or olive oil 2 TBS minced shallot 1 sm leek, thinly sliced 1 lb baby spinach, washed 4 C vegetable or chicken stock

½ C heavy cream 1 TBS fresh lemon juice 1 tsp curry powder Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Heat the butter or oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the shallots and leeks, and cook until soft, stirring frequently, 5 to 10 minutes. Turn heat to high. Add the spinach and the stock to the pan. Cook until the spinach completely wilts and is tender, about 5 minutes. Puree the soup in batches in a blender or food processor. Return the puree to the pan and stir in the cream and the curry powder. Gently reheat the soup, but don’t allow it to boil. Stir in the lemon juice and season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve hot. this soup can be made any time of year and would make an elegant first course or a satisfying and healthy lunch with the addition of a hearty loaf of bread. REQUESTS: Judith Fieldhouse, of Hampstead, Md., is looking for a recipe for cinnamon rice. It was served as an accompaniment to duck that she had at the Bluestone Grill in Cockeysville, Md., and she has never been able to figure

out how to make it. If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request, write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278. If you send more than one recipe, please put each on a separate piece of paper with your name, address and daytime phone number. Please list the ingredients in order of use and note the number of servings each recipe makes.

Cooks, meet celeriac, and don’t be scared By Wendy Donahue Chicago Tribune

Gnarly, pocked and bulbous, celeriac’s looks could kill appetites. The root vegetable sprouts a Muppet-like shock of bright green stalks that wave pleasantly enough from a mound of soil. The tuber that lies just beneath, however, looks like a candidate for surgical-strength nose-hair trimmers. Even clean-shaven, its ivory flesh hardly screams “Bite me!” — except in the sardonic sense. Which would partly explain why American cooks regard celeriac suspiciously, despite its long tradition in the Old World as both an aphrodisiac and a winter staple. Also called celery root, knob celery or turnip-rooted celery, celeriac is best known in the slawlike French classic celeri remoulade, cut into matchsticks, blanched in lemon juice, then dressed with mayonnaise and mustard or creme fraiche. Its flavor is reminiscent of parsley and celery. Its texture, however, resembles potato, without the starch. Moving from France, Beatrice Peltre shopped in vain for celeriac her first year in the United States in 1995. “My mother made it as a salad at least once or twice a week, and she always added it to the broth in pot-au-feu, a very old dish of boiled beef, with onion, carrots, leek and potatoes,” said Peltre, whose award-winning blog La Tartine Gourmande has engendered a cookbook, out this fall. Scottish-born celebrity chef and international restaurateur Gordon Ramsay also has praised celeriac’s nutty note in soups, stews, curries and gratins. Celeriac is, bit by bit, gaining ground in the U.S. Jack Staub, whose vegetable and herb gardens at Hortulus Farm in Wrightstown, Pa., have been featured in many publications, deemed celeriac worthy of his book “75 Exciting Vegetables for Your Garden.” He describes celeriac as a cousin to anise, carrots, parsley and parsnips. “I love the taste of celeriac, even though you can tell it’s a vegetable oddity — a troll-like bundle of roots about sums it up,” he said. “But all you have to do is cut off that exterior and you’ve got a lovely white, turniplike substance inside. “I’m crazy about mashing it with potatoes and some cream and butter and all the bad things that go with the potatoes. And adding truffle oil is superb. I also like roasting it with turnips and carrots and some fennel.” Half a cup of celeriac contains about 30 calories, no cholesterol or fat, and provides dietary fiber, Staub said. Like other root vegetables, celeriac can be stored for weeks, even months, if kept cool and dry, making it a winter workhorse. Peltre happily finds it in Boston now, not only at sea-

POTATO AND CELERIAC GRATIN Makes 8 servings. 1½ C each: whole milk, whipping cream 3 cloves garlic, 2 crushed, 1 whole 3 sprigs thyme 1½ lbs Yukon gold potatoes, peeled, thinly sliced

1¼ lbs celeriac, peeled, thinly sliced ¾ tsp salt ½ tsp pepper 2 tsp butter 1 ⁄8 tsp nutmeg 1 TBS finely chopped parsley

Heat milk and cream just to a boil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the 2 crushed garlic cloves and the thyme. Remove from the heat; cover. Let infuse 30 minutes. Strain. Heat oven to 350 degrees. Place the potatoes and celeriac on two different plates; season with salt and pepper. Rub the inside of a large gratin or baking dish (or individual gratin dishes) with the garlic clove; grease dish liberally with butter. Arrange the vegetables in alternating layers, starting and ending with potatoes. Add the chopped parsley to the milk/cream mixture; pour Bill Hogan / Chicago Tribune over the vegetables. Sprinkle Celeriac, or celery root, has with nutmeg. long been a staple in the winter Bake until the vegetables are in Europe and is beginning to tender and most of the liquid is catch on in America. absorbed, about 1 hour, 15 minutes (if your molds are small, check after 35 or 40 minutes). Nutrition information per serving: 287 calories, 60 percent of calories from fat, 19 g fat, 12 g saturated fat, 69 mg cholesterol, 24 g carbohydrates, 5 g protein, 320 mg sodium, 2 g fiber.

VANILLA-FLAVORED CELERY MASH WITH POMEGRANATE SAUCE Makes 4 servings. Adapted from a recipe by Beatrice Peltre (latartinegourmande .com), who writes, “If you cannot find pomegranate molasses — I find mine in a Lebanese delicatessen — I suggest buying pomegranate juice (with sugar) and reducing it on low heat until the consistency is syrup-like.” 1 TBS each: butter, olive oil 1 lb celery root, peeled, cut in chunks 1 C whole milk 2 sprigs thyme ½ vanilla bean, split, seeds

scraped out Freshly ground pepper 1 ⁄3 C pomegranate molasses 2 to 3 TBS fresh pomegranate seeds, optional ½ tsp coarse salt

Melt the butter in a medium skillet over medium heat; add the olive oil. Heat; add the celery root. Cook, stirring occasionally, 5 minutes. Add the milk, thyme and vanilla bean. Heat to a simmer; cook until the celery root is tender, about 20 minutes. Discard the vanilla bean and thyme. Transfer the celery root and milk to a food processor; puree. Season with pepper. Heat the pomegranate molasses in a saucepan on low heat. Divide the puree among 4 plates. Drizzle pomegranate sauce over each; sprinkle with pomegranate seeds and salt. Nutrition information per serving: 209 calories, 36 percent of calories from fat, 9 g fat, 4 g saturated fat, 14 mg cholesterol, 31 g carbohydrates, 3 g protein, 372 mg sodium, 2 g fiber. sonal farmers markets but also supermarkets. “One of the first times I bought it in a more common place, the people asked me, ‘What do you do with this thing?’” she said. Where to begin? she thought: soups, salad, roasted, Frenchfried, in gratin dauphinois (combined with thin slices of potatoes, milk, cream and nutmeg — “no need of cheese,” she insists). But proper handling requires some skill. “You have to cut it in half, and

to coating strawberries

sometimes it has a spongy texture in the middle that you have to remove,” Peltre said. “If you have a mandoline to slice the vegetable, it makes the job much easier. It wouldn’t slice as easily as potatoes because it’s much firmer.” She has even mashed it with vanilla, added fresh pomegranate seeds and drizzled pomegranate molasses on the side, which makes for two aphrodisiacs in one dish. Valentine’s dinner, anyone?

Use any high-quality chocolate for coating strawberries. Dark chocolate will provide a more intense flavor to contrast with the sweet berries. Just remember, the fewer ingredients the better the chocolate, in general.

MARTHA STEWART

Q:

What chocolate should I use to make chocolatecovered strawberries, and how should I store them? High-quality milk and white chocolates are excellent choices. And if you like more intense flavor, dark or bittersweet kinds provide a welcome contrast to the strawberries. Wash and dry the berries before coating them in melted chocolate, because even a drop of water can cause clumps to form. Once dipped, lay the coated fruits on parchment, and refrigerate them in an airtight container for up to two days. If the confections won’t be eaten right away, you may want to temper the chocolate to prevent blooming — white spots that sometimes appear, over time, on the surface. Bloomed chocolate is edible, but it is not as visually appealing. Chocolate that contains additives or fats other than cocoa butter may not temper properly. In general, the fewer ingredients the chocolate has, the better. For detailed tempering instructions, go to marthastewart .com/tempering.

A:

Q: A:

I want to start a vegetable garden from seed. How should I do it? Consider where you live and what vegetables you want to grow. If you live in a region with a cold climate, you’ll need to plan around the first and last frosts. Check the seed packet for sowing information. Tomatoes, for example, need six to eight weeks of indoor growth before being transplanted outside; count backward from the last spring frost to determine when to sow. (In the U.S., frost dates are available from cooperative extension offices. To find one near you, go to csrees .usda.gov/Extension.)

Thinkstock

But not all seeds should be started inside. Some root vegetables, including carrots and beets, do not take well to transplantation. Many leafy greens, such as spinach, grow quickly and should be planted outside. When it’s time to sow, gather pots and a sterile potting or seedling mix (available at garden centers). Plant the seeds, and water with a fine spray. Water whenever the soil is dry to the touch. Or set the pots in a basin of water to moisten the soil; then remove them, letting the soil drain thoroughly. A windowsill may seem like an ideal place for growing seeds, but it doesn’t provide sufficient light. Instead, put the pots where you have space to hang a shop light overheard. Mount it to the ceiling using adjustable chains, and equip it with one cool fluorescent tube and one warm fluorescent tube; these will provide the full spectrum of light that plants need. Set the fixture to hover an inch or two above the pots, and raise it as the seedlings grow.

Q:

I have lush Montauk daisies in East Hampton, N.Y. When should I prune them so that they’ll bloom in summer? Last year, I pruned them in fall. The Montauk daisy is a beautiful, sturdy and bushy white flower with a yellow center. It performs best when it’s cut back almost to the ground in spring. From now on, leave them in the garden after they bloom. But I understand: You were just trying to clean up the garden.

A:

Questions should be addressed to Ask Martha, c/o Letters Department, Martha Stewart Living, 601 W. 26th St., 9th floor, New York, NY 10001. Questions may also be sent by e-mail to: mslletters@ marthastewart.com. Please include your name, address and daytime telephone number. Questions of general interest will be answered in this column; Martha Stewart regrets that unpublished letters cannot be answered individually.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, February 8, 2011 G1

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263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Chihuahua Pups, Apple Head, well bred, small, $200. 541-420-4825.

Kittens & cats for adoption! Sat/Sun 1-4. Other days by appt (call 647-2181). Foster home also has small kittens (815-7278). Altered, shots, ID chip, more. Support your local all-volunteer, no-kill rescue group. Sanctuary at 65480 78th, Bend, 389-8420, 598-5488, www.craftcats.org for photos/map/much more!

CHI-POM PUPPIES born 12/17/10. Two females @ $175 one male @ $150. First shot available. 541-480-2824 DACHSHUND MICRO-MINI just turned 2, registered female intact. Beautiful little dog, house-trained, $350. 541-604-4333.

S . W .

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260

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Misc. Items

Fuel and Wood

Lost and Found

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

S w e e t P u p p y fo r S ale! 11-week-old male, part Llahso Apso, Pug, Chihuahua and Terrier. Great temperament. $75. Call 541-475-5697 or email meganv@madras.net Toy/Mini Aussie pups, $450 +. High quality. Shots, vet, tails, etc. Call 541-475-1166

210

Furniture & Appliances !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Computer Desks (2), glass tops, new cond., $40 each, 541-317-5156. Dishwasher, Maytag portable, white, approx. 2 years old, $200 OBO. 541-603-3465 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Exercise Equipment

Free Schnauzer/Cocker Spaniel mix pups, 8 wks, 3 left, to approved homes, 541-416-1739.

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/

Treadmill, SportCraft, TX300 $125; CardioMax 530R Exercise bike, $100. Exc. cond., like new. 541-728-0283.

Shih Tzu pups, gold & white, gold w/ black mask, & black, $385-$750, 541-788-0090

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Golden Retriever AKC Pups health & intelligence, reduced to $1000, 541-756-3688. www.goldenpondkennels.net

Siberian Husky pups, exceptional markings & temperaments. Call 541-330-8627 or stones-siberians@live.com

Chihuahua Male, 6 mos, 4.5 lbs. shots. $150, or $200 CKC Reg., cash. 541-610-4414

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300 win mag Ruger M77, walnut, scope, $625. Ruger M-77 30-06, $525. 541-647-8931

Siberian Husky/Lab mix, 9 wks, 1st 2 shots, wormed. Beautiful markings; 2 have blue eyes. Socialized with kids /dogs. $100 ea. 541-279-4250

O r e g o n

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

PUG PUPS: Purebred, fawn, ready Feb. 20, $250, 541-771-1141.

German Shepherd pups, born on Christmas, parents on site, $400. 541-390-8875 Chihuahua, absolutely tiniest teacups, rare colors, vet German Shorhair Pointers 3 checked, $250, 541-977-4686 male pups, 4 mos old, $400 each. 1 Female solid liver, 6 mos, $600. 1 Female liver & white, 8 mos, $800. 1 male, 4 yrs, $800. All shots/wormed. 541-923-8377 541-419-6638

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208

FREE BOXER MIX MALE great with kids, needs home ASAP. 541-610-5552.

Free to good homes 2 female cats, both good mousers & in good health, looking for a barn to call home. 541-382-0707.

A v e . ,

Pets and Supplies

Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, costume Jewelry. Top dollar FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is paid for Gold & Silver. I buy grand sire. Deep pedigreed by the Estate, Honest Artist. performance/titles, OFA hips English Bulldog puppies! An all Elizabeth, 541-633-7006 & elbows. 541-771-2330 white female and a dark www.royalflushretrievers.com brindle & white female left. WANTED: SAIGA 12 $1,500 obo. 541.588.6490 212 Labradoodles, Australian GAUGE AND 2 STAINLESS Imports - 541-504-2662 English Bulldogs AKC exc qualAntiques & RUGER 10/22 CASH IN www.alpen-ridge.com ity, 3 males, 2 white/brindle. HAND. CALL 541 633 3489 Collectibles $1300. 541-290-0026 Lab/Rotweiler Pups, Rescued, 8 weeks, 4 females, 2 males,$50, Furniture 208 English Springer Spaniel 541-576-3701,541-576-2188 AKC Puppies Pets and Supplies Lhasa Apso/Shih Tzu pups Champion Bloodlines adorable, $200. Linda Black and white and liver 503-888-0800 Madras. The Bulletin recommends tri-color females. extra caution when Ready to go to their Visit our HUGE home decor Maremma Guard Dog pups, purchasing products or new homes Feb. 10th. consignment store. New purebred, great dogs, $300 services from out of the 541-388-8256 items arrive daily! 930 SE each, 541-546-6171. area. Sending cash, checks, Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., or credit information may Bend • 541-318-1501 European German Shep- Newfoundland, male black, 6 be subjected to fraud. For www.redeuxbend.com mo. old. Rehome. Great dog, herd Pups, AKC,grandfather more information about an moving out of state. AKC but is World Trade Center hero advertiser, you may call the for this price I won't sell with Looking for appraiser to look at ‘Uno’, black/red, guaranteed Oregon State Attorney my die-cast collection, and papers. Sell for $400 paid health, shots, 541-767-3392. General’s Office Consumer possibly to buy Coke, Texaco, $1500. 541-316-0638. shepherd4@q.com Protection hotline at and misc. 541-504-9210. 1-877-877-9392. Free adult companion cats for Olde English Bulldogge pupThe Bulletin reserves the right pies. Ready 2/18. Excepseniors & disabled! Altered, to publish all ads from The tional color, great lines. 2 shots, ID chip, more. Will alBulletin newspaper onto The males left. See at www.legways take back for any reaBulletin Internet website. endarybulldog.com call or son. Visit Sat/Sun 1-4. Other text 208-571-5360 Amazon Parrot, approx 30 days by appt (call 647-2181). yrs., talks & is hilarious, $900 65480 78th, Bend, 389-8420, incl. cage, 503-385-5934 598-5488, www.craftcats.org Pomeranian puppies 3 females 1 male, 8 weeks old, sweet 240 personalities and adorable CATS 2 loving lap cats need Free barn/shop cats. Fixed, shots, some friendly, others faces. $350. (541) 480-3160 Crafts and Hobbies new home together. 4 yrs, not so much. Natural rodent beautiful, healthy, fixed; free POODLE Pups, AKC Toy control in exchange for safe Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ to good hm. 808-344-2246 Black/white, chocolate & other shelter, food & water. We'll blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein colors, so loving! 541-475-3889 deliver! 389 8420, lv. msg. $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989

Chesapeake Puppies, AKC, great hunting/family dogs. Dews; hips certified. Males & females, $500. 541-259-4739

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

40cal Taurus, stainless compact, ammo, holster & bag, like new, $375.541-647-8931 A Collector Pays Ca$h, hand guns, rifles, etc., 541-475-4275,503-781-8812 Beautiful, Upgraded Wood, SKB 12 Ga. Trap combo, 34/30, adjustable, less than 500 rounds fired, $2900, 541-420-3474.

Deluxe Taurus PT22 w/leather holster $200. Weatherproof 6 latch hard gun travel case $100. 541-610-3287

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

N o n-c o m m e r cial a d v e r ti s e r s c a n place an ad for our

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

GUNS: (1) Winchester 30-30 rifle. (2) 7.6x54 foreign rifles. Please call for more details: 541-815-7072

"Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

Ad must include price of item

HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte Sat. Feb. 12, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

Moss. 500 pistol grip f&r holds ten shells. 20" barrel and also has 28" barrel with 5-shot tube and also come with reg. wood stock and hard case. 2 guns in 1. $450 OBO. 541 633 3489 Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

WTB:

Kodiak/Anaconda .44 mag. Ruger SS Mini-30 or 6.8. Kimber or Gold Cup .45. WSM .300 or .270. Tanker Garand or SOCOM .308. Call: 541-788-0132

247

Sporting Goods - Misc. Olhausen 8' Pool Table, oak, accessories/chairs. Excellent cond. $1995. 541-408-3392.

248

Health and Beauty Items

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498

CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

• Receipts should include,

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Tools Table Saw, Craftsman 10”, Computer control; Radial Arm Saw, 10”, Craftsman, $900 both OBO, 541-546-8724 leave msg. or 541-390-3707.

NO EXERCISE. $50 off 1st order. Eat all day! 40 lbs in 8 weeks. Ron 541-728-1945.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry lodgepole, $160 for 1 cord or $300 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

Dry Seasoned Red Fir $185 per cord, split and delivered, Please Call 541-977-2040.

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

WINTER SPECIAL - Dry Seasoned Lodgepole Pine, guaranteed cords. Split delivered, stacked. Prompt delivery! $175/cord. 541-350-3393

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email

classified@bendbulletin.com For newspaper delivery questions, call Circulation Dept. 541-385-5800

Computers

260

Misc. Items BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

300 325

Hay, Grain and Feed Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

WANTED: Horse or utility trailers for consignment or purchase. KMR Trailer Sales, 541-389-7857 www.kigers.com

358 292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net Free barn cats, fixed & shots, natural rodent control in exchange for safe shelter, food & water. We will deliver. 541-389-8420, leave msg.

375

TV, Stereo and Video

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Farm Market

Meat & Animal Processing

Complete Surround Sound System. Still in Box, never been used. $300. Ron 541-728-1945

255

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

286

253

TV, 55” Mitsubishi Projection HDTV, $475, Call 541-420-0794.

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Sales Northeast Bend

BarkTurfSoil.com 263

LOST Woman’s Wallet, dark brown leather, western-style looking, with crystal cross on front Between La Pine & Bend. Reward! Please call 541-536-3383, 536-3344 or 771-4107, ask for MaryAnn.

9 7 7 0 2

265

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves. Osburn woodstove, 3yrs old, 1600 model w/fan, $350 OBO. 541-382-6310 aft 4pm

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter:

d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

d WARM CLOTHING d Rain Gear, Boots Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE 5th St., Bend (312-2069) For special pick-ups, call Ken Boyer 389-3296 or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found Found 2 chrome rails for hosp. bed, Cooley/18th St. roundabout, 1/30. 541-389-0826 FOUND around NE Purcell and Wells Acres, Calico cat, female, about 1 yr old, peach/ pink collar. 480-322-4272. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Found cell phone, top of mailbox 1/27 on Business Way; battery dead. 541-389-8008 Found Fishing Tackle, incl. 2 reels, near Wilson/15th, Call to ID, 541-389-9836. Found single key on keyring, to vehicle? SW Roosevelt, Feb. 3. Call to I.D. 541-390-0040 Found women’s watch, public parking lot behind Foot Zone 2/2. Call 805-245-0757 to ID LOST German Shorthair Male, has orange training collar, dragging cable. 19th & Larch in Redmond, Jan. 31. Call 541-390-8766 541-923-2424

Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grain fed, no hormones $3.10/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included, please call 541-383-2523.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale


G2 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Assistant Superintendent - We are currently seeking an experienced, qualified construction supervisor to join our project team in Sunriver, Oregon. For complete job description go to www.lcgpence.com/ careers.asp. E-mail resume to employment@lcgpence.com. Caregiver Prineville senior care home looking for Care Manager for two 24-hour shifts per week. Must be mature and compassionate, and pass criminal background check. Ref. required. 541-447-5773. Clerical/Research Assistant Qualifications Include: • Highly Self-Motivated • Organized • Flexible Schedule (Mon.Fri.) • Exc. Interpersonal and Communication Skills • Comfortable Learning new computer programs • Keen Attention to detail • College degree or previous office experience preferred This position is full-time and is mostly clerical in nature. Pre-employment drug screening required. To apply submit a resume and letter of interest to: Box 16325434, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

OPERATIONS McMurry Ready Mix Co. An Equal Opportunity Employer, is currently hiring a Ready Mix Operations Supervisor For Casper, WY Must have 5 years experience and be proficient on computers. Job Duties include: Supervision of all aspects of Ready Mix operations including Sales,Batching, Delivery, Quality Control, & Cost Control. Will be accountable for profitability of Ready Mix Operations. Excellent Pay & Benefits

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Cochenour Consulting, inc is seeking integration architects, developers and interns to assist with the development and deployment of an enterprise scale integration solution on the Microsoft platform. Experience with BizTalk Server or Sharepoint Server a bonus. Wage based on experience level. Some travel required. Please submit resume's to careers@cochenourconsulting.com or visit our website at www.cochenourconsulting.com.

Submit resume to: PO Box 2488, Casper WY 82602 Or fax (307) 235-0144 Contact Ron McMurry @ (307) 473-9581

Come join the Best Team Around! Drug Free Workplace. Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H La Pine & Prineville H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Ophthalmic Technician Busy ophthalmology practice is looking for an experienced technician. Must have an enthusiastic personality and be a team player. We offer flexibility and a pleasant environment. Pay/benefits commensurate with experience. Fax resume to 541-318-7145.

Pharmacy

Technician

Full or part time, experience preferred, in Madras. 541-325-1059.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386 The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Finance & Business

Rentals

500 600 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Business Opportunities

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

627

634

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

$99 MOVE-IN SPECIAL! 1 & 2 bdrm apts. avail. starting at $575.

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

!! Snowball of a Deal !! $300 off Upstairs Apts. 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts.

(541) 383-3152 1751 NE Wichita, W/S/G paid, on-site laundry, small $99 MOVES YOU IN !!! pet on approval .$525/mo. Cabo San Lucas Playa Grande Limited numbers available 541-389-9901. Resort, 2 Bed/3 Bath 2 story 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. Penthouse Suite on the Beautiful 2 bdrm., 2.5 bath W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, beach !! 3/6 - 3/13. Sleeps util., garage, gas fireplace, no 541-383-9313 6. $ 1800. 541-350-2974 smoking or pets. $675 Professionally managed by 1st+last+sec. Please Call Spring Break at Melia Norris & Stevens, Inc. 541-382-5570,541-420-0579 Cabo Real, anytime, 2 bdrm, 1 week, $700, Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet Nice 2 bdrm., 2 bath duplex complex, park-like setting. 541-350-6865. close to amenities, walk-in No pets/smoking. Near St. closet, gas fireplace, deck, 630 Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d garage, no smoking/pets. hkup + laundry facil. $550Rooms for Rent $825 mo. 402-957-7261 $595/mo. 541-385-6928. Awbrey Heights, furn., no smoking/drugs/pets. $350 +$100 dep. (541) 388-2710.

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges

Attractive 2 bdrm. in 4-plex,

SWEETHEART

Budget Inn, 1300 S. Hwy 97, Royal 541-389-1448; & Gateway Motel, 475 SE 3rd St., 541-382-5631, Furnished Rooms: 5 days/$150+tax

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

SPECIAL

1/ 2 OFF ALL MOVE-IN RENTS w/ Lease Agreements

COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053 •Cute Apt. in Central Location - 1 Bdrm/1Bath with private fenced back yard and patio. No pets. $425 WSG. • Near Downtown. Large 2 Bdrm/1 Bath Apts. W/D Hookups. Small fenced yard. End Units. Pets ??? $495 WST. • Spacious 2 Bdrm/1 Bath apartments. Off-street parking. On-site laundry. Near hospital. Just $525 WST. • Good NE Location. 2 Bdrm/1 Bath Duplex. Carport/W/D Hook-ups. Unfenced yard. Pets?? $525 WS • Newly Refurbished Duplex. 2 Brdm/1 Bath, sgl. garage. Partially fenced back yard. Large deck. Wood stove. W/D hookups. $575 WS • Charming, cozy 2 Bdrm/1 Bath cottage in central location. New carpet. Fenced backyard. $595 per month. •Small House Near Downtown 2 Bdrm/1 Bath. Laundry room. Fenced yard. Cute kitchen with extra work space. Pets? $625 WST • 4 Bdrm/2 Bath in NE - Fenced back yard. RV parking. Sgl. level. Sgl. garage. Gas forced air heat. Pets ok. $895 per mo. •Beautiful 1990 sq. ft. NE Home Upscale subdivision. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Master bedroom separation. Sgl. level. Triple garage. Extra RV parking $1050 per mo. ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com

541-382-3402 573

Call 541-385-5809


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, February 8, 2011 G3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

636

642

648

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

1015 Roanoke Ave. - $575/ mo, $500 dep. W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb, 541-420-9848.

ASK ABOUT OUR New Year Special! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Houses for Rent General

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwauke hookup, $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us a t541-382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz Find exactly what you are looking for in the CL AS S I F I E DS A CLEAN 1 bdrm. in 4-plex next to Park, 2 decks, storage, laundry on site, great location, W/S/G paid, no dogs, $550/mo. 541-318-1973 Beautiful 1 bdrm, 2 bath fully furnished Condo, $695, $400 dep., near downtown & college, completely renovated, 2 verandas, no pets/smoking, all amenities, pics avail. by request. W/S/G/elec./A/C & cable included, Available now. call 541-279-0590 or cheritowery@yahoo.com River Views! 2 bdrm., 1½ bath, W/D hook-up. W/S/G paid, $650/mo. $600 dep. small pets allowed. 930 NW Carlon, 541-280-7188.

640

Call about our $99 Special! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $415 to $575. • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

PARKS AT BROKEN TOP. Nice studio above garage, sep. entry, views! No smoking/ pets. $550/mo. + dep., incl. all util. + TV! 541-610-5242.

Two-story, 3/2.5 Townhouse for rent. Large fenced yard, all appliances, single garage. $775/mo. 2752 Juniper Avenue. 541-389-9851

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

648

Houses for Rent General

1815 SW 21st - Spacious 2 Bdrm 2 Bath, gorgeous fenced duplex with garage. Mint cond! W/S/G paid; pet OK. $695. 541- 549-2228

personals

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

Polaris Trail Deluxe 1991, matching pair, exc cond, under 2500 mi, elec start, covers. $650 ea. 541-430-5444

3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath+bonus, in Fieldstone Crossing, Redmond. Near schools. Community Pool. Furnished+all appl. avail 3/11. $1000+util. 907-738-1410. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace, pantry, fenced, sprinklers. No smoking/pets. $875+deposits. 541-548-5684.

2 blocks from DT, 4 Bdrm, 1.5 bath, large fenced yd. W/D, finished basement, shed, new paint. Pets OK. $1195, 1st + security. 541-948-4531 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1 level, lots of light, new carpet, kitchen, bath, paint, A/C, dbl. garage, near St. Charles, great neighborhood, $995, 541-306-4404

NOTICE:

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend 3 bdrm, 1 bath house with double and single garage. 20431 Clay Pigeon Ct., $800 mo. 1st/last, $400 refundable deposit. 541-388-2307.

2 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1/2 acre, fenced, $650 per mo., 1st., last, $600 dep., $400 pet dep., 17134 Oxnard Rd., 541-593-1477, 805-479-7550

664

Houses for Rent Furnished RIVERFRONT: walls of windows with amazing 180 degree river view with dock, canoe, piano, bikes, covered BBQ, $1250. 541-593-1414

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1195. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Warehouse with Offices in Redmond,6400 sq.ft., zoned M2, overhead crane, plenty of parking, 919 SE Lake Rd., $0.40/sq.ft., 541-420-1772.

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Domestic Services Dawn’s Cleaning: “Morning Fresh Clean!� Residential Cleaning, Senior Discounts Has openings now, CALL TODAY! 541-410-8222

Drywall Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs No Job Too Small. Free Exact Quotes. 541-408-6169 CAB# 177336

Electrical Services BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768 Mark’s Handyman Service • Fix • Replace • Install • Haul Free Est. - Reasonable Rates Mark Haidet•541-977-2780 License #11-00008985

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Thatch, Aerate, weeding, raking & monthly maint. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Snow Removal

Masonry

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

385-5809

Redmond Homes

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

CHECK YOUR AD

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

V Spring Clean Up! V

•Pruning Trees And Shrubs •Thinning Over Grown Areas •Removing Unwanted Shrubs •Hauling Debris Piles •Evaluate Seasonal Needs

***

The Bulletin Classified ***

YARD WORK / YARD CLEAN-UP By the hour + dump fee to haul debris away. CALL GARY TODAY! 541-408-2996

Landscape Management

Motorcycle Trailer

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof Tops • De-Icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945

The Bulletin is your

Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise.

Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

IP CTURE YOU

R

VFZPV

STFB

Eagle Crest Bungalow, Desert Sky neighborhood, 1908 sq.ft., 2 bdrm., 2.5 bath, garage, mtn. views from Bachelor to Hood, $279,900, 3% Courtesy to agents. 541-215-0112.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes La Pine home on 1 acre. 4 bdrm., 2 bath, like new. All Offers Considered. www.odotproperty.com. 503-986-3638 Steve Eck. Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

773

Acreages 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

www.bendbulletin.com

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

880

Motorhomes

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981 motorhome, 2-tone brown, perfect cond, 6 brand new tires. engine perfect, runs great, inside perfect shape. See to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Lane off Day Rd in La Pine. Asking $8000. 541-876-5106.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds 881

Travel Trailers ALPENLITE 1984. A Beauty! Extras, 5th wheel hitch, A/C, microwave, tires are good, large fridge, radio, propane tanks have been certified. Spare tire & wheels. $3000. 923-4174. Forest River Sierra 1998, 26’, exc. cond, $6900, call 541-548-5886.

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $16,900, 541-390-2504

JANUARY

8 / FEBRU

ARY 12

E M HO DPOUJO

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

XXX SDIPO

CFOEI

PNFTD

PN

750

Same Day Response NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

870

Boats & Accessories

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

When it’s time to buy, sell or enhance your home‌ please choose the following valued advertisers:

Hayden Homes HiLine Homes Crooked River Realty Juniper Realty The Garner Group JBOT 0SFHPO M B US O F  $ Duke Warner Realty UIBO GNPSF NFTP P I F I OUPU J E F JU *OW D&D Realty Group, LLC Bobbie Strome - John L. Scott Real Estate Heather Hocket - Century 21 Gold Country Realty LOOK FOR Redmond RE/MAX Land & Homes Real Estate PICTURE YOUR Budget Blinds of Central Oregon HOME Ginny Kansas-Meszaros - Steve Scott Realtors IN TODAY’S Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty BULLETIN! TUBUF

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which Harley Davidson makes it illegal to advertise Screamin’ Eagle "any preference, limitation or Electric-Glide 2005, discrimination based on race, 103� motor, 2-tone, candy color, religion, sex, handicap, teal, 18,000 miles, exc. familial status, marital status cond. $19,999 OBO, please or national origin, or an incall 541-480-8080. tention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant Harley Davidson Ultra women, and people securing Classic 2008, clean, lots custody of children under 18. of upgrades, custom exhaust, This newspaper will not dual control heated gloves & knowingly accept any advervest, luggage access. 15K, tising for real estate which is $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975. in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll Honda Shadow Deluxe free telephone number for American Classic Edition. the hearing impaired is 2002, black, perfect, ga1-800-927-9275. raged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161 541-788-3896

SFBMF

Building/Contracting

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Homes for Sale

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Suzuki Quad Runner 1995 4x4, 1850 miles, excellent cond, $1500 firm. 541-480-2765.

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $69,500 OBO. 541-923-3510

SFHPO

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

745

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

OUSBM0

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

Motorcycles And Accessories

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prineville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

875

4-wheeler, black in color, custom SS wheels/tires, accessories, exc. cond., 240 miles, $5,000. Call 541-680-8975, and leave message.

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at 140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Handyman

860

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

Houses for Rent Sunriver

Watercraft

Polaris Sportsman X2 2009 800 CC, AWD, “21 Miles New�, sage green, extras, $6500, 541-815-0747.

659

$

Barns

700 Triple, 1996 600, Tilt Trailer, front off-load, covers for snowmobiles, clean & exc. cond., package price, $3800, 541-420-1772.

713

4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room with woodstove, new carpet, pad & paint, single garage w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

Polaris Sportsman 2008, 800 CC, AWD,

Yamaha Snowmobiles & Trailer, 1997

Real Estate Wanted Cash For West Side Homes: Fast Closings Call Pat Kelley, Kelley Realty 541-382-3099

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

PG$F

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

850

Snowmobiles

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

BSJFUZ

Reach thousands of readers!

705

Real Estate Services

3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big yard, dbl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac. $995 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

880

Motorhomes

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

658

2 bdrm house with full basement, close to downtown, $800 mo. 1st last + dep. lawn maintenance required. 541-420-2980.

870

Boats & Accessories

JOHBW

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

650

700 800

Houses for Rent Redmond

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 Classified Rep. to get the sq.ft., living room, family new rates and get your ad room, new paint, private .5 started ASAP! 541-385-5809 acre lot near Sunriver, $895. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803.

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Boats & RV’s

865

ATVs

GFBUVS

Classic January 1941 Model One of a kind and irreplaceable. High mileage but all parts are original. Warranty long expired. Very reliable and good working condition. Backfires occasionally. Ignition activates after 9 a.m. only. Asking Price: Not for Sale: SHE’S PRICELESS! Happy 70th Dana!

2-STORY 3 BDRM/2 BATH 2 car garage, newer well-built quiet 1600+ sq.ft., yard, vaulted ceiling, NE Bend washer/dryer dishwasher. GO SEE! 20812 Liberty Ln. please do not disturb tenants. $995/mo $1000 dep. monthly or lease possible. Call (530) 307-1137 Karrie karreyn@gmail.com

3 Bdrm 2 bath, 1.15 ac. 800 sq ft shop/4-car garage, utilities furnished except elec. $995/mo + $750 sec dep. 541-228-5131; 541 517-4345

Real Estate For Sale

'3&&

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend

t pplemen

sing Su

Adverti

Presenting 300,000 more reasons to list your properties in Picture Your Home.

PICTURE 5 TIMES MORE MARKET COVERAGE WITH THE NEW AND IMPROVED PICTURE YOUR HOME REAL ESTATE MAGAZINE. Now every property advertised in PYH will also run as an in-column ad for 4 Saturdays in The Bulletin’s Real Estate section and 4 weeks in The Central Oregon Nickel.

THATS AN IMPRESSIVE 300,000 ADDITIONAL PRINT IMPRESSIONS FOR FREE! Plus, Picture Your Home will be appear on bendbulletin.com in the Special Projects section. Viewers can view the entire book online and click on active web-links!

Painting, Wall Covering

WANT EVEN MORE VALUE? PICTURE THIS!

MARTIN JAMES

On the second Saturday of every month, The Bulletin will publish a quarter page, full color directory - highlighting every participating Realtor in Picture Your Home.

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541-815-2888

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Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

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G4 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 932

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Antique and Classic Autos

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

C-10 AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent 881

882

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Tacoma from ‘95-’05. $700 OBO 541-382-6310 after 4pm

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $10,000,541-280-5677 Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $12,000, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP, 90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

931

1964 327 Camel Hump, 461 heads, new valve job, resurfaced bore guides. New parts have receipts. Excellent cond. $450 firm. 541-480-2765 1988 FORD RANGER XLT tailgate with all hardware, $200; grill N.I.B. $200. 541-593-6156

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phe- Bench seat split-back, out of a ‘92 Ford F-250, gray, $400 nomenal condition. $17,500. OBO. 541-419-5060/pics 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, Impala SS 1964 rear seat & set 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as of hub caps, excellent, $400 unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160 both, OBO. 541-480-2765

Chevy

Wagon

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833 Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350. Classic January 1941 Model One of a kind and irreplaceable. High mileage but all parts are original. Warranty long expired. Very reliable and good working condition. Backfires occasionally. Ignition activates after 9 a.m. only. Asking Price: Not for Sale: SHE’S PRICELESS! Happy 70th Dana!

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

FORD F150 4X4 1996

Eddie Bauer pkg., auto. 5.8L, Super Cab, green, power everything, 156,000 miles. Fair condition. Only $3500 OBO. 541-408-7807.

Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686 Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

933 CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition and much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $5700, 541-575-3549 tra cab 4x4, auto, tow pkg, matching canopy. $14,950. 541-548-6057 503-951-0228

Buick LeSabre 2004,

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

control, heated seats, Premium audio, rubber floor mats, 2 sets wheels, (1 winter), 108,000 miles, all records. Good condition. $10,500. Call Bruce 541-516-1165.

Toyota 4-Runner 1994 4x4, V6, 4-dr PS, PB, PW, PDL, am/fm /cd, great shape, good tires, tinted windows, 176K mi, $5100.Call/text 541-419-9057

Chevy Cavalier , rare 2001. 120K miles, 38mpg, 4-dr, AM/FM CD, summer/winter on rims, tilt, tags good to 2012, garaged. Slight deer damage to hood. $2000 OBO. 541-604-4494

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica AWD, leather, video sys, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi, $13,950. 541-382-3666

940

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

READY FOR SNOW! All Wheel Drive! 5 spd, loaded with all power equipment, sound system. All weather tires. Runs and drives good, Only $1800. 909-570-7067.

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2000. 541-322-6261

Cute as a Bug! Black 1965 VW BUG in Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

MERCEDES C300 2008

New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

PORSCHE CARRERA 4S 2003 - Wide body, 6

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT- Perfect, garaged, factory super charged, just 1623 miles $20,000. 541-923-3567

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr Ford Mustang Convertible brks, plus mntd stud snows. 2000, V6 with excellent $7500 obo. 541-330-0616 maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for 975 more information or to Automobiles schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

speed, all wheel drive, no adverse history, new tires. Seal gray with light gray leather interior. $32,950. 503-351-3976

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

SUBARUS!!!

Honda Pilot 2010 Like new, under 11K, goes great in all conditions. Blue Bk $30,680; asking $26,680. 541-350-3502

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

Dodge Ram 2001, short Jeep CJ7 1986 6-cyl, 4x4, Audi bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005

FORD EXPLORER 1992

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

• 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

Honda Accord EX V6 2001 62k auto leather seats studs 6 cd sunroof roof rack optional Runs great!$8500 OBO 541-420-0049 Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Vans

541-389-5016 evenings.

DODGE DAKOTA 1989 4x4, 5 speed transmission, 189,000 miles, new tires, straight body, 8’ long bed. $1500 OBO. 541-815-9758.

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $6000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

$19,450!

Dodge 1500 XLT 4x4, 2007, 10K miles, running boards, many options, tow package, $18,500 OBO. 541-815-5000

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Pickups

1957, Chevy Silverado Z71 2005 Ex-

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $13,900 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

SUBARU FORESTER 2003 XS leather, auto climate

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

925

885

Ford 2 Door 1949, 99% Complete, $14,000, please call 541-408-7348.

Chevy El Camino 1979,

Automotive Parts, Leer Camper Shell, fiberglass 6½’, fits old body style Service and Accessories

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

916 Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford crew cab 1993, 7.3 Diesel, auto, PS, Rollalong package, deluxe interior & exterior, electric windows/door locks, dually, fifth wheel hitch, receiver hitch, 90% rubber, super maint. w/all records, new trans. rebuilt, 116K miles. $6500, Back on the market. 541-923-0411

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

350 auto, new studs, located in Sisters, $3000 OBO, 907-723-9086,907-723-9085

Canopies and Campers

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $3850, 541-410-3425.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

1969,

Autos & Transportation

882

Fifth Wheels

Pickup

5-spd., exc. cond., consider trade, $7950, please call 541-593-4437.

A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $8900. 541-420-9478

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Toyota Tercel 1997 exc. cond, one owner, 136,300 miles, $3800, Please Call 541-815-3281.

Free Classified Ads! No Charge For Any Item Under

$

00

200

1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item per 30 days.

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To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, February 8, 2011 G5

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LEGAL NOTICE Howard Elliot Johnson Fuels and Vegetation Management Draft EIS USDA - Forest Service Ochoco National Forest Crook County, OR 45-day Comment Period The Lookout Mountain Ranger District has prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Howard Elliot Johnson Fuels and Vegetation Management Project. This project proposes commercial thinning, precommercial thinning, and underburning forested stands on Lookout Mountain Ranger District, Ochoco National Forest, Crook County, OR, in order to improve forest health and reduce risk of large-scale disturbance. The Draft EIS is available for review at the Lookout Mountain Ranger District office, 3160 NE Third Street, Prineville, Oregon or on the internet at http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/cen traloregon/projects/units/lo okout/nepa_project.shtml?pr oject=32582. Additional information regarding this action can be obtained from Kristy Swartz, 3160 NE Third Street, Prineville, Oregon or (541) 416-6500. The purpose of this comment period is to provide an opportunity for the public to provide meaningful participation on a proposed action prior to a decision being made by the Responsible Official. The Environmental Protection Agency published a Notice of Availability (NOA) for the Draft EIS in the Federal Register on February 4, 2011; the opportunity to provide comments to establish eligibility to appeal under 36 CFR 215 ends 45 days following that date. Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, oral, and electronic comments concerning this action will be accepted. The publication date of the NOA in the Federal Register is the exclusive means for calculating the comment period. Those wishing to comment should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. Written comments must be submitted to: Slater Turner, Lookout Mountain District Ranger, Ochoco National Forest, at the address listed above. Comments can be submitted via facsimile at (541) 416-6695. The office business hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 am to 4:30 pm Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Oral comments must be provided at the Responsible Official's office during normal business hours via telephone (541) 416-6500 or in person. Electronic comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), portable document (.pdf) or Word (.doc) to comments-pacificnorthwestochoco@fs.fed.us. In cases where no identifiable name is attached to a comment, a verification of identity will be required for appeal eligibility. If using an electronic message, a scanned signature is one way to provide verification. It is the responsibility of persons providing comments to submit them by the close of the comment period. Only those who submit timely comments will have eligibility to appeal the subsequent decision under 36 CFR 215. Individuals and organizations wishing to be eligible to appeal must meet the information requirements of 36 CFR 215.6.

LEGAL NOTICE Project: Central Oregon Community College Science Building Skanska Contact: Todd Predmore, phone #503-641-2500, e-mail: todd.predmore@skanska.com BID DATE and Time: Feb. 10th, 2011 at 2:00pm Prevailing wage/BOLI requirements apply. For information on how to obtain Bonding, Insurance, or lines of credit, contact Allied Insurance at (510) 578-2000 or Skanska USA Building, Inc. Skanska is an equal opportunity employer and actively requests bids from all DBE, MBE, WBE, and ESB firms as well as all SBA recognized firms including VOSB, HUBzone, SDB, WOSB, and SDVB.

Ad Run Date(s): Jan. 28, Feb. 1, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9 and 10

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FAA-101497 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, PAUL RICHARD DELUCA AND ROBIN H. DELUCA, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR COLUMBIA RIVER BANK DBA CRB MORTGAGE TEAM, as beneficiary, dated 8/7/2006, recorded 8/16/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-56058, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Residential Credit Solutions, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit LOT 270 & 271, ESTATES AT PRONGHORN, PHASE 3, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: LOT 270 AND 271 ESTATES AT PRONGHORN PHASE 3 MAY ALSO BE KNOWN AS 66440 PRONGHORN ESTATES DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Total Amount Due as of January 5, 2011 $988,365.18 By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and

payable, said sums being the following: ALL DUE AND PAYABLE BALANCE OF $988,865.18 AS OF 1/5/2011, PLUS interest thereon at 7.000%, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on May 12, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Notwithstanding the use of the term "reinstatement" or "reinstated", this obligation is fully mature and the entire principal balance is due and payable, together with interest, costs, fees and advances as set forth above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 1/10/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3878743 01/18/2011, 01/25/2011, 02/01/2011, 02/08/2011

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-105265

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0178699732 T.S. No.: 11-00334-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, HOLLY G. HAMILTON as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, as Beneficiary, recorded on October 14, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-41860 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 177775 LOT TWO (2), BLOCK TWO (2), GEMSTONE ESTATES REPLAT, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 63040 MOONSTONE LANE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$11,035.35 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $277,236.75 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.00000% per annum from August 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on June 6, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes

any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 1, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3901802 02/08/2011, 02/15/2011, 02/22/2011, 03/01/2011

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"Call A Service Professional" Directory LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030967616 T.S. No-: 10-12265-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JAMES E. DUNCAN AND TRACY KAY DUNCAN as Grantor to NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on January 25, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-05666 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 108718 THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, STATE OF OREGON, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE WEST OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT WHENCE THE CENTER QUARTER CORNER BEARS SOUTH 00 DEGREES 25' 37" WEST 1320 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 25' 37" EAST, 330 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 09' 09" EAST, 659.41 FEET THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 23' 36" WEST, 330 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 09' 09", WEST, 659.62 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE WESTERLY 30 FEET RESERVED FOR ROADWAY PURPOSES. Commonly known as: 63520 CRICKETWOOD RD., BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total;$19,051.80 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $456,903.06 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25000% per annum from August 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the

Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on May 16, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 10, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3880447 01/18/2011, 01/25/2011, 02/01/2011, 02/08/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMG-91918

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-105109 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, LARRY PRINCE AND SHELLEY PRINCE, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE &ESCROW, as Trustee, in favor of INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., as beneficiary, dated 11/2/2006, recorded 11/8/2006, under Instrument No. 200674327, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: PARCEL 1, PARTITION PLAT NO. 2005-78, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3641 SOUTHWEST HILLCREST COURT REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of January 27, 2011 Delinquent Payments from June 01, 2010 8 payments at $ 3,043.13 each $ 24,345.04 (06-01-10 through 01-27-11) Late Charges: $ 1,369.44 Beneficiary Advances: $ 66.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $25,780.48 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $541,000.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from 5/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 1, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of

DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 1/27/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3896890 02/08/2011, 02/15/2011, 02/22/2011, 03/01/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031416043 T.S. No.: 10-12264-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DANIEL D. GRIFFIN, MICHELLE M. GRIFFIN as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on October 31, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-72659 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 17 12 26CD00332 LOT THIRTY-TWO (32), VIEW RIDGE, RECORDED OCTOBER 4, 2005, IN CABINET G, PAGE 859, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 3149 NE ANGELA AVENUE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with

late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$9,683.37 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $328,825.29 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.70200% per annum from July 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued iate charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on May 16, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 10, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized SignatureASAP# 3880442 01/18/2011, 01/25/2011, 02/01/2011, 02/08/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 etseq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, etseq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-102133

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CONNIE MCCRACKEN, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGE IT, INC., as beneficiary, dated 2/22/2007, recorded 2/27/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-11926, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT SIX (6), LARKSPUR VILLAGE PHASES I AND II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61169 LARKSPUR LOOP BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to Amount due as of January 13, 2011 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2010 11 payments at $ 1,246.88 each $ 13,715.68 1 payments at $ 1,248.77 each $ 1,248.77 (02-01-10 through 01-13-11) Late Charges: $ 950.04 Beneficiary Advances: $ 3,539.86 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 19,454.35 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $191,200.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.525% per annum from 01/01/10 to 1/1/2011, 6.625% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on May 18, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1184 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 1/13/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, GONZALO O. NAJAR AND RAMONA NAJAR, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS. INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MERITAGE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 4/14/2005, recorded 4/27/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-25642, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Meritage Mortgage Loan Trust 2005-2. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ONE (1), FORREST COMMONS, RECORDED SEPTEMBER 19, 2003, IN CABINET G, PAGE 46, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1364 NORTHWEST 19TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of January 14, 2011 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 1 payments at $ 1,066.31 each $ 1,066.31 6 payments at $856.55 each $ 5,139.30 1 payments at $ 1,090.98 each $ 1,090.98 7 payments at $ 1,163.14 each $ 8,141.98 (11-01-09 through 01-14-11) Late Charges: $ 692.01 Beneficiary Advances: $ 3,669.25 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $ 19,799.83 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $167,813.10, PLUS interest thereon at 7.625% per annum from 10/01/09 to 12/1/2009, 7.625% per annum from 12/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on May 23, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 1/14/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, RICHARD D. BROWN, AN UNMARRIED MAN AND RHONDA J. NELSON, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, AS SURVIVING JOINT TENANTS, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of INDYMAC BANK F.S.B., as beneficiary, dated 3/2/2006, recorded 3/8/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-15937, rerecorded 11/23/2009 under Auditor's/Recorder's No. 2009Â49920 rerecorded 11/25/2009 under Auditor's/Recorder's No. 2006-82040, and an agreement to modify the terms and provisions of said Deed of Trust recorded on 12/15/2009 under Auditor's/Recorder's No. 2006Â82040, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, for CSMC Mortgage-Backed Trust 2007-4. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT FIFTEEN (15), BLOCK TWENTY (20), LAKE PARK ESTATES, RECORDED JUNE 18, 1971, IN CABINET A, PAGE 483, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: LAKE PARK ESTATES LOT 15 BLOCK 20 MAY ALSO BE KNOWN AS 4545 NORTHEAST UPAS AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of January 27, 2011 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2009 6 payments at $2,793.61 each $16,761.66 12 payments at $3,687.85 each $44,254.20 (08-01-09 through 01-27-11) Late Charges: $3,199.86 Beneficiary Advances: $6,985.70 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $71,201.42 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $463,764.87, PLUS interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from 07/01/09 to 2/1/2010, 6.625% per annum from 2/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 1, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 1/27/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

ASAP# 3884224 01/25/2011, 02/01/2011, 02/08/2011, 02/15/2011

ASAP# 3884690 01/25/2011, 02/01/2011, 02/08/2011, 02/15/2011

ASAP# 3896976 02/08/2011, 02/15/2011, 02/22/2011, 03/01/2011


G6 Tuesday, February 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0306726161 T.S. No.: OR-224714-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BOB ALLEN, A MARRIED MAN as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of NORTH AMERICAN MORTGAGE COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 5/27/1998, recorded 6/2/1998, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. 496 at page No. 0718, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 98-23155 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 180647 LOT TWO (2), BLOCK ONE (1), AVONLEA ESTATES, RECORDED DECEMBER 23, 1991, IN CABINET C, PAGE 599, DESCHUTES COUNTY RECORDS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 21190 ANNE LANE BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $69,513.05; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 8/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $759.32 Monthly Late Charge $28.91 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $69,513.05 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.25% per annum from 7/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 4/7/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the

feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 11/18/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# FNMA3822159 01/18/2011, 01/25/2011, 02/01/2011, 02/08/2011

any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 11, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized SignatureASAP# 3880424 01/18/2011, 01/25/2011, 02/01/2011, 02/08/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-105462 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, SHANNA SMITH, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE CO. OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 1/17/2007, recorded 1/26/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-05206, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 29 OF WILLOW CREEK AT MOUNTAIN HIGH, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 60829 WILLOW CREEK LOOP BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of January 24, 2011 Delinquent Payments from October 01, 2010 4 payments at $ 1,860.02 each $ 7,440.08 (10-01-10 through 01-24-11) Late Charges: $ 372.00 Beneficiary Advances: $ 22.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 7,834.08 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation se-

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0099720146 T.S. No.: 10-12700-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, BILLY D. POLTERA AND CLARA R. POLTERA, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, as Beneficiary, recorded on April 20, 2009, as Instrument No. 200916262 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 114697 LOT TWELVE (12), BLOCK FIVE (5), CONIFER ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 15450 FEDERAL ROAD, LA PINE, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$2,293.24 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $70,663.80 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.00000% per annum from August 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on May 16, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes

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cured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $336,908.48, PLUS interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from 9/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on May 26, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 1/24/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3892934 02/01/2011, 02/08/2011, 02/15/2011, 02/22/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-103937

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0429141203 T.S. No.: OR-222171-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JASON L. MARCOULIER AND KENDRA M. MARCOULIER, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 6/9/2006, recorded 6/16/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-41569 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 100517 / R 1-001 171228 AD 04500 LOT THIRTY TWO (32), BLOCK TWO (2), NORTH PILOT BUTTE ADDITION, RECORDED MAY 29, 1962, IN CABINET A-90, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1205 NORTHEAST THOMPSON DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $189,504.71; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 6/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,484.60 Monthly Late Charge $64.86 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $189,504.71 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from 5/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 4/13/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tender-

ing the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 11/23/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# FNMA3827212 01/25/2011, 02/01/2011, 02/08/2011, 02/15/2011

541-385-5809 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-105779 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CHAD HICKS AND CHERA HICKS, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR PLAZA HOME MORTGAGE, INC., as beneficiary, dated 8/4/2006, recorded 8/9/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-54606, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 38, MAPLEWOOD - PHASE 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2448 NORTHWEST 13TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of January 20, 2011 Delinquent Payments from September 01, 2010 5 payments at $ 813.75 each $ 4,068.75 (09-01-10 through 01-20-11) Late Charges: $ 101.32 Beneficiary Advances: $ 214.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 4,384.07 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that

you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $225,264.77, PLUS interest thereon at 2% per annum from 08/01/10 to 4/1/2015, 2% per annum from 4/1/2015, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on May 25, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 1/20/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3890520 02/01/2011, 02/08/2011, 02/15/2011, 02/22/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-105660 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JIMMIE W. EDMONSON, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC., as beneficiary, dated 9/11/2006, recorded 9/15/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-62722, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 6, CANYON PARK FIRST ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2939 NORTHEAST VILLAGE COURT BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of January 27, 2011 Delinquent Payments from September 01, 2010 4 payments at $ 1,551.97 each $ 6,207.88 1 payments at $ 1,561.16 each $ 1,561.16 (09-01-10 through 01-27-11) Late Charges: $ 342.15 Beneficiary Advances: $ 123.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 8,234.19 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evi-

dence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $189,149.16, PLUS interest thereon at 7.125% per annum from 08/01/10 to 1/1/2011, 7.125% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 1, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 1/27/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee KAREN JAMES AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3896887 02/08/2011, 02/15/2011, 02/22/2011, 03/01/2011 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 etseq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, etseq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-105267

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMG-105821

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DOUG GOTTRON AND VALERIE GOTTRON, as grantor, to TRANSNATION TITLE INSURANCE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 8/15/2007, recorded 8/17/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-45441, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 427, NORTHWEST CROSSING, PHASES 9 & 10, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2209 NORTHWEST HIGH LAKES LOOP BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of January 20, 2011 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2009 24 payments at $ 2,917.57 each $ 70,021.68 1 payments at $ 4,965.48 each $ 4,965.48 (01-01-09 through 01-20-11) Late Charges: $ 3,938.76 Beneficiary Advances: $ 2,157.75 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 81,083.67 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $437,636.00, PLUS interest thereon at 8% per annum from 12/01/08 to 1/1/2011, 8% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on May 25, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 1/20/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, PATRICIA E MORGAN AND JOHN T. MORGAN AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to GUARANTEE TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 5/9/2007, recorded 5/15/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-27624, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (SW 1/4 SE 1/4 NW 1/4) OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 15600 LAKE LANE LA PINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of January 6, 2011 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2009 12 payments at $1,620.97 each $19,451.64 7 payments at $1,742.54 each $12,197.78 (07-01-09 through 01-06-11) Late Charges: $567.84 Beneficiary Advances: $4,513.91 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $36,731.17 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $423,150.47, PLUS interest thereon at 5.789% per annum from 06/01/09 to 7/1/2010, 5.789% per annum from 7/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on May 11, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 1/6/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1 st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, BRIAN J. BROWN, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMP., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR DECISION ONE MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, as beneficiary, dated 12/20/2006, recorded 12/27/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-83922, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley ABS Capital I Inc. Trust 2007-HE5. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 21 OF WISHING WELL PHASE IV, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 20742 NORTHEAST TOWN DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of January 20, 2011 Delinquent Payments from April 01, 2009 4 payments at $ 1,694.90 each $ 6,779.60 6 payments at $ 1,556.18 each $ 9,337.08 12 payments at $ 1,474.78 each $ 17,697.36 (04-01-09 through 01-20-11) Late Charges: $ 280.85 Beneficiary Advances: $ 4,982.72 Suspense Credit: $ -1,049.75 TOTAL: $ 38,027.86 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following:UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $183,437.20, PLUS interest thereon at 9.375% per annum from 03/01/09 to 8/1/2009, 9.375% per annum from 08/01/09 to 02/01/1 0, 9.375% per annum from 2/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust.WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on May 25, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee.Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753.In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same.DATED: 1/20/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERViCES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

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25% OFF Select Signature Series ® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds ®

Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Budget Blinds is a registered trademark of Budget Blinds, Inc. and a home franchise Concept Brand. Offer valid through 3/31/11.

Call today for your complimentary in-home consultation

541-788-8444 Find us online at www.BudgetBlinds.com At participating franchises only. Valid on select Signature Series ® Window Treatments only. Offer valid at time of initial estimate only. Offer not valid with any other offers. Some restrictions may apply. Offer available for a limited time only. ©2010 Budget Blinds, Inc. All rights reserved. Each franchise is independently owned & operated. Budget Blinds is a registered trademark of Budget Blinds, Inc.

Chem-Dry of Bend

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties Independently Owned & Operated

*Mounted & Balanced

$

59995* Installed

Not valid with any other offer. Bring this coupon with you. Good through 2/28/11.

541-389-3031 • www.SubaruofBend.com • 2060 NE Hwy 20

25% Off Select Signature Series® Window Treatments

836 NW Wall Street | 541-389-4688 | Across from the Tower Theatre in Bend

Our cleaner, The Natural®, is green certiied, non-toxic, so it’s safe for your family and pets who are allergy sensitive! Tile & Stone cleaning too!

THAI O RESTAURANT Tel. 541.548.4883

By Osathanon’s Family

Lunch Special FREE SOUP Dine-in only. Open til 3:00 pm daily

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541.548.4883 (fred meyer shopping center)

Up to 40%OFF

Carpet, Upholstery and Tile & Stone Cleaning. Call for details!

541-388-7374 Bend 541-923-3347 Redmond Offer valid with coupon only. Not including RVs & stairs. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: 2-28-2011

Only Buy Two entrees $ 00 get Third entree Chicken Pad Thai

free One per customer

5

or Thai Fried Rice

All DayDine In or Take Out

With purchase of any menu item of equal or greater value.

Coupon Required | Expires 3-7-11 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

Coupon Required | Expires 3-7-11 | Cannot be combined with other offers.


C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

Call for FREE Information Package

(800) 970-0153

of Central Oregon Plan #1491

Plan #1491

Only

✓ Guaranteed Build Time ✓ Price Lock Guarantee ✓ Customizable Floor Plans

$

75,900 5 14

Bonus Discount Special

Save $$$ Save now on any Parts or Service! If you spend: $50 - $100 $101 - $200 $201 - $300 $301 - $400 $401 - $500 $501 - $700 $701 - $900 $901 or more

You Save: $10 Off $20 Off $30 Off $40 Off $50 Off $70 Off $90 Off $110 Of

FREE BRAKE INSPECTION Good brakes save lives! Take advantage of this FREE brake inspection to ensure your brakes are working properly. • Inspect brake pads &/or shoes, rotors/ drums, calipers & wheel cylinders • Add brake fluid as needed • Road test

FREE

Must present coupon. Expires 2/28/11

W 4N

Rim ple Ma

IICRC Certiied Technician

Ct .

Recommended Regular Maintenance Service 30,000/60,000/90,000/120,000 To promote a long life and eliminate unexpected repairs. We will perform the services as described in your Warranty & Maintenance booklet or per dealer recommendation. • Includes a multi-point vehicle inspection • Includes complimentary car wash *Additional charges for Timing Belt replacement or platinum spark plugs may apply.

10% Off

Must present coupon. Expires 2/28/11

541-593-1799

Must present coupon. Expires 2/28/11

Buy Two entrees get Third entree

FREE One per customer

With purchase of any menu item of equal or greater value.

Coupon Required | Expires 3-7-11 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

THAI O

Only

$ 00

5

By Osathanon’s Family

All DayDine In or Take Out Coupon Required | Expires 3-7-11 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

FREE SOUP Dine-in only.

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541.548.4883

LMF

Michael A. Addington, EA, LTC

SENIOR

(EA License #62542, LTC License #5093C)

22 years experience specializing in individual and small business taxes

541-389-1343 Fax 541-388-5618 notaxman@qwestoffice.net

• Form 1040, Schedule A and Oregon starting at $160.00 • S-Corporation & Partnership returns starting at $300.00 • 1099-Misc and 1096 Forms prepared for $10.00 each • Referral Sweepstakes with a $300.00 Grand Prize Drawing • No cost initial consultation & tax preparation cost estimate (1/2 hour) • Free 2009 Tax Return Review

$ CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY

3

00 off

WITH COUPON. Expires 2-21-2011

836 NW Wall Street | 541-389-4688 | Across from the Tower Theatre in Bend

NEW OWNERSHIP! Brand Name Clothes at Affordable Prices Clothing, Shoes, Jackets, Handbags, Swimwear, Formal Gowns

100s of Items Now on Sale $5 or Less!!!

1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

541-548-5195

61419 S. Hwy. 97 Suite G • Bend, Oregon 97702

*Cannot be combined with any other offer. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Cannot be used on previous purchases. Good 2/15/11-3/15/11.

Open til 3:00 pm daily

(fred meyer shopping center)

Is looking for a few good clients

any single purchase of $100 or more*

Lunch Special

Chicken Pad Thai or Thai Fried Rice

Excellence In Taxes, Inc.

$20 OFF

RESTAURANT Tel. 541.548.4883

$20 Off

TWO GREAT OFFERS...

START YOUR 2011 OFF RIGHT!

142 E. Main • Sisters • 541-549-6900 • Mon. - Sat. 9am - 7pm

Any Chimney or Vent Cleaning (See reverse side for Dryer Vent Special)

Standard Rate $109 Per Chimney Coupon Discount Rate Only

$89!

Standard Clean Includes: Single Story House • Wood Stove • Fireplace Insert • Natural Gas • Dryer & Dryer Vent Cleaning

BEND • REDMOND • LA PINE • MADRAS WWW.ANYTIMEHEALTH.COM • EMAIL: BENDOREGON@ANYTIMEFITNESS.COM

WWW.ANYTIMEFITNESS.COM • 541-389-6063

25% OFF Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

Expires March 31,

2011

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

25% OFF

a style for every point of view® We fit your style and your budget! Shop-at-home convenience Personal Style Consultants Thousands of window coverings Professional measuring & installation

Our Hot Carbonating Truck Mount Extraction cleans deep! We use one-fifth the amount of water compared to steam cleaners so carpet dries in 1 to 2 hours.

Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

Our cleaner, The Natural®, is green certified, non-toxic, so it’s safe for your family and pets who are allergy sensitive! Leaves no sticky residue!

We bring you the best brands including:

a style for every point of view®

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 3/31/11

Using Chem-Dry resists re-soiling so your carpet fibers stay cleaner, longer! ®

by Budget Blinds ®

Call 1-541-788-8444 or visit us online at www.budgetblinds.com

• 541-388-1580

a style for every point of view

®

Don’t forget your area rugs & upholstery too!

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION

Chem-Dry of Bend

Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 3/31/11

541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

AS

Hw

l Park

Rd.

ont

a Rd

TO P RINE

ROUND BUTTE ROUND SEED GROWERS

. SW Iris Ln.

ROUND BUTTE ROUND SEED GROWERS BUTTE SEED

y 26

VILL E

C St.

SW Huber Ln.

Lam

N

®

Store in Oregon

BUTTE SEED

SW

Cu lve r

Hw

.

AND READY

y

BEND

PRINEVILLE

CULVER

63353 Nels Anderson Bend, OR 97701

1225 NW Gardner Rd. Prineville, OR 97754

603 1st St. Culver, OR 97734

(541) 385-7001

(541) 447-5609

(541) 546-6603

Visit our Web site: www.rbseed.com

IS OPEN

N

Hw y . 97

U-Haul

Hwy 97

Nels Anderson Rd.

ROUND BUTTE BUTTE ROUND SEEDSEED GROWERS

TO M A DR

dustr ia

Your newest

LOVEJOY’S

7th Ave.

Nels Anderson Pl.

NW

NW In 3RD BUSINESS ON THE RIGHT

C.E. Culver Hwy

N

SW Larch Dr.

Cascade Village

ROUND BUTTE SEED THREE TRI-COUNTY LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

TO SERVE YOU.

541-389-6714

C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market • 19530 Amber Meadow Drive • Bend OR 97702


C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

LMF SENIOR

$

.

CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY

3

00 off

Call for FREE Information Package

(800) 970-0153

Plan #1491

Plan #1491 ✓ Guaranteed Build Time ✓ Price Lock Guarantee ✓ Customizable Floor Plans

Only

$

75,900 NW 54 14

WITH COUPON. Expires 2-21-2011

p le Ma

Rim

Ct.

1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

541-548-5195

541-389-6714

Excellence In Taxes, Inc. Is looking for a few good clients Michael A. Addington, EA, LTC

TWO GREAT OFFERS...

START YOUR 2011 OFF RIGHT!

(EA License #62542, LTC License #5093C)

22 years experience specializing in individual and small business taxes

541-389-1343 Fax 541-388-5618 notaxman@qwestoffice.net

• 541-388-1580

Your newest

C.E.

• Form 1040, Schedule A and Oregon starting at $160.00 • S-Corporation & Partnership returns starting at $300.00 • 1099-Misc and 1096 Forms prepared for $10.00 each • Referral Sweepstakes with a $300.00 Grand Prize Drawing • No cost initial consultation & tax preparation cost estimate (1/2 hour) • Free 2009 Tax Return Review

BEND • REDMOND • LA PINE • MADRAS WWW.ANYTIMEHEALTH.COM • EMAIL: BENDOREGON@ANYTIMEFITNESS.COM

WWW.ANYTIMEFITNESS.COM • 541-389-6063

61419 S. Hwy. 97 Suite G • Bend, Oregon 97702

®

Store in Oregon

LOVEJOY’S NEW OWNERSHIP!

IS OPEN AND READY

of Central Oregon

541-593-1799

Brand Name Clothes at Affordable Prices

TO SERVE

IICRC Certiied Technician

Clothing, Shoes, Jackets, Handbags, Swimwear, Formal Gowns

YOU.

100s of Items Now on Sale $5 or Less!!! 142 E. Main • Sisters • 541-549-6900 • Mon. - Sat. 9am - 7pm

$20 Off

$20 OFF

any single purchase of $100 or more*

Any Chimney or Vent Cleaning (See reverse side for Dryer Vent Special)

Standard Rate $109 Per Chimney Coupon Discount Rate Only

$89!

*Cannot be combined with any other offer. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Cannot be used on previous purchases. Good 2/15/11-3/15/11.

Standard Clean Includes: Single Story House • Wood Stove • Fireplace Insert • Natural Gas • Dryer & Dryer Vent Cleaning

Save $$$

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

Save now on any Parts or Service!

Don’t forget your area rugs & upholstery too!

Chem-Dry of Bend 541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

FREE One per customer

With purchase of any menu item of equal or greater value.

Coupon Required | Expires 3-7-11 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

Only

$ 00

5

Chicken Pad Thai or Thai Fried Rice All DayDine In or Take Out Coupon Required | Expires 3-7-11 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

THAI O RESTAURANT Tel. 541.548.4883

FREE Must present coupon. Expires 2/28/11

*Additional charges for Timing Belt replacement or platinum spark plugs may apply.

10% Off Must present coupon. Expires 2/28/11

N

Nels Anderson Pl. ROUND BUTTE BUTTE ROUND SEEDSEED GROWERS

3RD BUSINESS ON THE RIGHT

TO M

A DR

AS

NW In dustr

Hw

NW L ial Pa

rk Rd .

nta

ROUND BUTTE ROUND SEED GROWERS

Rd. SW Iris Ln.

ROUND BUTTE ROUND SEED GROWERS BUTTE SEED

y 26

TO P

RINE

VILL E

C St.

SW Huber Ln.

amo

BUTTE SEED

N

SW

N

Cu

lve rH

wy

BEND

PRINEVILLE

CULVER

63353 Nels Anderson Bend, OR 97701

1225 NW Gardner Rd. Prineville, OR 97754

603 1st St. Culver, OR 97734

(541) 385-7001

(541) 447-5609

(541) 546-6603

Visit our Web site: www.rbseed.com

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

Buy Two entrees get Third entree

Must present coupon. Expires 2/28/11

• Inspect brake pads &/or shoes, rotors/ drums, calipers & wheel cylinders • Add brake fluid as needed • Road test

7th Ave.

Using Chem-Dry resists re-soiling so your carpet fibers stay cleaner, longer!

You Save: $10 Off $20 Off $30 Off $40 Off $50 Off $70 Off $90 Off $110 Of

30,000/60,000/90,000/120,000 To promote a long life and eliminate unexpected repairs. We will perform the services as described in your Warranty & Maintenance booklet or per dealer recommendation. • Includes a multi-point vehicle inspection • Includes complimentary car wash

ROUND BUTTE SEED THREE TRI-COUNTY LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU SW Larch Dr.

Our cleaner, The Natural®, is green certified, non-toxic, so it’s safe for your family and pets who are allergy sensitive! Leaves no sticky residue!

If you spend: $50 - $100 $101 - $200 $201 - $300 $301 - $400 $401 - $500 $501 - $700 $701 - $900 $901 or more

Recommended Regular Maintenance Service

Culver Hwy

Our Hot Carbonating Truck Mount Extraction cleans deep! We use one-fifth the amount of water compared to steam cleaners so carpet dries in 1 to 2 hours.

FREE BRAKE INSPECTION Good brakes save lives! Take advantage of this FREE brake inspection to ensure your brakes are working properly.

Hw y . 97

Bonus Discount Special

Nels Anderson Rd.

2011

U-Haul

836 NW Wall Street | 541-389-4688 | Across from the Tower Theatre in Bend

Hwy 97

Expires March 31,

Cascade Village

C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market • 19530 Amber Meadow Drive • Bend OR 97702

By Osathanon’s Family

Lunch Special

25% OFF Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

FREE SOUP Dine-in only. Open til 3:00 pm daily

We fit your style and your budget! Shop-at-home convenience Personal Style Consultants Thousands of window coverings Professional measuring & installation

541.548.4883 (fred meyer shopping center)

Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

We bring you the best brands including:

a style for every point of view®

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

25% OFF

a style for every point of view®

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 3/31/11

® by Budget Blinds ®

Call 1-541-788-8444 or visit us online at www.budgetblinds.com

a style for every point of view®

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 3/31/11

Bulletin Daily Paper 02/08/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Tuesday February 8, 2011

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