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3 Central Oregon job seekers and their continued searches • IN BUSINESS

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• January 1, 2011 50¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

Dennis Luke, ‘an institutional memory,’ bows out

Dennis Luke spent 12 years on the Deschutes County Commission and nearly a decade in the Oregon Legislature.

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

The Dec. 8 Deschutes County Commission meeting began mildly enough, as commissioners dedicated a new road and took public comments on a contract with the deputy district attorneys’ union. Eventually, the commissioners

Rob Kerr The Bulletin

2010

chatted with kids in the audience. It was then that the orange and black lawn flamingos appeared. The University of Oregon’s football team had just beaten Oregon State 37-20 in the Civil War game, and Commissioner Dennis Luke, a devoted Beaver fan, had called Planning Director Nick Lelack and Sen-

ior Planner Paul Blikstad — both Ducks — to the front of the room. At Luke’s direction, the visiting high schoolers gave the birds, painted in OSU colors, to the planners. “As you may know, to the victor goes the spoils,” Luke said, according to Lelack’s recollection. Digressions such as this were

A year in review Mysteries unresolved

Central Oregonians knew him as Jason Evers,

Two high-profile cases will carry over from 2010 into the new year: the disappearance of Lori “Woody” Blaylock and the shooting of Stephen Trono. Blaylock’s husband has been charged with murder, and investigators believe they have located — though not yet recovered — her body in the North Santiam River. The Trono investigation is still open, and both cases will be in the hands of Patrick Flaherty, who takes over as Deschutes County district attorney Monday. One mystery partially solved: The body of Justin Burkhart, who disappeared on a latenight walk in 2009, was recovered from the Deschutes River near the Newport Dam in July.

the Oregon Liquor Control Commission’s hammer on local bartenders. Friends knew him as a nice guy who kept his past to himself. Then federal agents arrested him, saying “John Doe” had stolen

LOCAL & STATE NEWS

a murdered Ohio child’s identity. In the end, he was revealed to be Doitchin Krastev, a Bulgarian

The state stirs up trouble

who came to the U.S. for an education, then

Unhappy Bend residents forced state government to reconsider decisions to relocate the DMV office in a shopping center and mental health treatment homes in residential neighborhoods — without notifying neighbors. But the public backlash against the OLCC’s decision blocking homebrewing contests, including at the Deschutes County Fair, so far has been less successful. What’s next: The DMV is still looking for a new location, and though a residential treatment home is opening in Bend, the state is re-evaluating the process it uses to decide where to locate one. And legislators may decide whether to overrule the OLCC on where home brew can be consumed.

dropped out and started a new life — eventually using his new identity to get a job with the state.

The voters speak

Update: On Jan. 18, having pleaded guilty to identity theft, Krastev will be sentenced, likely to a minimum of two years in federal prison, which then will probably lead to deportation. Months ago he requested permission to marry a local woman in a Portland jail, but there’s been no ceremony yet. Submitted photo

In another bleak year for the economy, BUSINESS

there was some great news: Facebook’s decision to locate a data center in Prineville and Bank of the Cascades’ deal with investors that will

Oregon opted for a return to John Kitzhaber as governor and kept the same congressional representation. But on the home front, the November election did mean longtime District Attorney Mike Dugan and his wife, state Rep. Judy Stiegler, both have to find new jobs. New faces: Some new people we’ll be getting used to in 2011, in addition to new DA Flaherty: Tony DeBone, who will take Dennis Luke’s spot on the Deschutes County Commission; Jason Conger, who unseated Stiegler for Bend’s seat in the Legislature, and Mike McLane, who will represent a swath of the region in Salem.

turn around its fortunes. But 2010 also saw two banks change hands, a suffering business and real estate climate and record unemployment across the region. See story on Page C1.

The oil spill

The Bulletin ile photo

in the Gulf of Mexico and tragedies elsewhere An Olympic year saw three Central Oregon athletes performing on the global stage of the Winter Games in Vancouver, British Columbia. But 2010 brought an assortment of other memorable sports achievements by our athletes and teams: Ashton Eaton’s dominance in the Pac-10 and NCAA decathlon; a 16th state high school track and field championship by sprinter Kellie Schueler; the Bend Elks’ summer baseball playoff surge; and Bobby Mote’s ride to another world rodeo bareback title in December. We had plenty to cheer throughout the year.

outscoring their opponents 592-221 and making a strong run for their

SPORTS

first national championship. Whether they come out on top will be decided Jan. 10, when Oregon takes on the Auburn Tigers in the BCS national title game.

highlighted a year of disaster. But 2010 also was a time of discovery and

NATION & WORLD

Local accomplishments

The Ducks went 12-0,

technological advancement that allowed these stories and others to become global. See Page A7.

See Page D1. The Associated Press ile photo

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Teen OK after Bachelor ordeal By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

A 14-year-old boy who spent several hours in frigid temperatures on Mount Bachelor was located shortly after midnight on Friday. Jake Denham, of Portland, walked out of the woods toward rescuers at the base of the Northwest Express chairlift around 12:10 a.m., according to Rhett Hemphill, deputy operations manager for the Deschutes County Search and Rescue team. It was approximately 5 degrees below zero when Denham was found. He was evaluated by medics and judged to be in good condition, given food and water, and reunited with his family. Denham was reported missing by family members after the lifts closed for the day. About 5:30 p.m., the Deschutes County Search and Rescue team put together a search operation involving a range of agencies and organizations. A total of 86 people were on the mountain looking for Denham when he was located, including representatives from Mt. Bachelor ski area, the Crook County and Jefferson County search and rescue teams, AirLink and the Oregon Army National Guard. See Rescue / A6

To Iran’s dismay, TV satire is a hit By Tara Bahrampour The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — For the past 30 years, state-approved television in Iran has consisted largely of Islamic prayers, interviews with government ministers, melodramatic soap operas and talk shows in which mullahs expound on the depravities of the West and the righteousness of their own society. Iranians responded by juryrigging satellite dishes to spice up their entertainment choices with offerings from abroad. “Baywatch” was a longtime favorite. But lately, a couple of irreverent expats in Washington have captivated Iranians with a show that pokes fun at the absurdities of life in the Islamic republic. See Iran / A6

TOP NEWS INSIDE

INDEX

The Bulletin

common during Luke’s three terms on the commission, the last of which ended in December. The former homebuilder delights in references to his alma mater, where he returned to earn a degree nearly three decades after leaving in 1968 to work in construction. See Luke / A6

Obituaries

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Stocks

Sudoku

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TV listings

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JUDGES: Partisan politics keeping federal judges off the bench, Chief Justice Roberts writes, Page A2


A2 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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No pardon for Billy the Kid By Marc Lacey New York Times News Service

541-382-1811

PHOENIX — In his final weeks in office, Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico flew to Cuba and North Korea on freelance negotiating trips and then traveled back in history, to the Old West, to decide whether to pardon a notorious outlaw. When Richardson announced in Santa Fe on Friday, his last day in office, that he would not pardon Billy

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the Kid, he prompted sighs of relief from descendants of those who hunted down the young gunman. “If one is to rewrite a chapter as prominent as this, there had better be certainty as to the facts, the circumstances and the motivations of those involved,” Richardson said in announcing that he would not tamper with the history of a man whose life was spent “pillaging, ravaging and killing the deserving and the innocent alike.”

At issue was a pardon that Lew Wallace, a territorial governor, apparently offered Billy the Kid in 1879 if the outlaw would testify before a grand jury about a killing he had witnessed. The Kid testified, but Wallace never followed through. Richardson, a history buff, said his reading of the record convinced him a pardon was offered but said he lacked enough evidence to know why Wallace had decided against the deal.

By Salman Masood William Bonney, also known as Billy the Kid

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Alastair Grant / The Associated Press

Fireworks explode over Big Ben in London, above, and light up Dubai’s Burj Khalifa tower, right; meanwhile, Monica Neira from Argentina waits for the ball to drop in New York’s Times Square as millions gathered worldwide to ring in the new year. In Europe, Greeks, Irish and Spaniards began partying through the night to help put a year of economic woe behind them. In central London, an estimated quarter-million revelers saw in the new year as red, white and blue fireworks — the colors of the Union Jack — shot from around the London Eye, lighting up the sky over the River Thames. In the United States, people said they would be setting aside concerns about the economy, bad winter weather and even potential terrorist threats to ring in 2011 at large and small gatherings. Even more than most years, New York was the city in the spotlight as it battled back from a severe snowstorm and security concerns eight months after a Pakistani immigrant tried to detonate a car bomb in Times Square. Seth Wenig / The Associated Press Police Commissioner Ray Kelly said the city wasn’t the target of a New Year’s Eve terror threat. But police had a strict security plan in place, with sealed manhole covers, counter-snipers on rooftops and checkpoints for partygoers to pass through on their way to the country’s largest annual New Year’s celebration. — The Associated Press

Roberts urges end to partisan blocks of federal judges

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGA MILLIONS The numbers drawn are:

10 12 13 35 56 9

x4

Nobody won the jackpot Friday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $290 million for Tuesday’s drawing.

By Robert Barnes The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — There is an “urgent need” for Senate Democrats and Republicans to put aside their bickering and fill federal judicial vacancies, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote Friday in his annual State of the Judiciary report. It was his first comment about the partisan gridlock on judges that affects President Barack Obama’s nominees. But Roberts noted that Democratic and Republican presidents have been frustrated by the “persistent problem” of senators from the opposing party blocking action on nominees. “Each political party has found it easy to turn on a dime from decrying to defending the blocking of judicial nominations, depending on their changing political fortunes,” he wrote. “This has created acute difficulties for some judicial districts.” Roberts said he was “heartened” that the Senate recently approved half of Obama’s 38 pending nominees. “There remains, however, an urgent need for the political branches to find a long-term solution to this recurring problem,” he wrote. Democrats are likely to use Roberts’s words to try to hasten action on the nominees. Roberts personally knows about the cost of the process. He was nominated to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia in 1992 by President George

H.W. Bush but never received a confirmation vote. The same is true for Justice Elena Kagan, who was picked for the D.C. circuit by President Bill Clinton and whose nomination also languished. Roberts made it clear that he was not urging confirmation of Obama’s nominees, just action. “We do not comment on the merits of individual nominees,” he wrote. Roberts’ call came in the 13th paragraph of his 16-paragraph message. In that way, it was more muted than a previous challenge issued by William Rehnquist, his fellow Republican and predecessor as chief justice. Rehnquist caused a stir in his 1997 report when he urged Republicans, who then controlled the Senate, to get moving on Clinton’s nominees. “Vacancies cannot remain at such high levels indefinitely without eroding the quality of justice that traditionally has been associated with the federal judiciary,” he wrote. He later repeated the message when the tables had turned, and Democratic senators were delaying votes on President George W. Bush’s nominees. The Senate has confirmed 60 of Obama’s nominees to district and circuit courts, far fewer than the 100 confirmed in the first two years of George W. Bush’s presidency. But Republicans counter that Obama was slower than Bush in sending nominations to the Senate.

Pakistanis rally against altering ban on blasphemy

Farhad Berahman / The Associated Press

New York Times News Service

ISLAMABAD — A crippling strike by Islamist parties brought Pakistan to a standstill on Friday as thousands of people took to the streets and forced businesses to close, to head off any change in the country’s blasphemy law, which rights groups say has been used to persecute minorities, especially Christians. The blasphemy law was introduced in the 1980s under the military dictatorship of Gen. Mohammad Zia ul-Haq as part of a policy of promoting Islam to unite this deeply fractious society. Many attempts to revise the law have since been thwarted by the strong opposition of religious forces, which continue to gather strength. In fiery speeches across all major cities and towns, religious leaders warned the government on Friday against making any changes in the law. “The president and prime minister should take the nation into confidence and assure in unequivocal terms that there will be no change in the blasphemy law under any international pressure,” Sahibzada Fazal Kareem, a religious leader and member of Parliament, said at a rally in the southern port city of Karachi, where the police fired tear gas to stop protesters from marching toward Bilawal House, one of the residences of President Asif Ali Zardari. The governing Pakistan Peoples Party, which is struggling to keep its government coalition intact, has been conciliatory on the issue. Syed Sumsam Ali Bokhari, the minister for information, tried to placate religious forces by assuring them that the government did not intend to amend or repeal the law. “Neither the Pakistan Peoples Party nor the government has discussed the issue to bring any amendment in the blasphemy law,” Bokhari said Thursday at a news briefing. But such assurances failed to calm the religious parties, who on Dec. 15 issued their call for a countrywide strike.


T OP S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 1, 2011 A3

New Year’s Eve tornadoes kill 6 in South, Midwest By Jill Zeman Bleed The Associated Press

The Associated Press ile photo

Travelers wait at a Transportation Security Administration checkpoint earlier this week at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Sixteen airports, including San Francisco and Kansas City international airports, have switched to private security firms since 2002.

As public’s frustration grows, airports consider private security By Derek Kravitz The Washington Post

Every spring, private security officers at San Francisco International Airport compete in a workplace “March Madness”-style tournament for cash prizes, some as high as $1,500. The games: finding illegal items and explosives in carry-on bags; successfully picking locks on difficult-to-open luggage; and spotting a would-be terrorist (in this case Covenant Aviation Security’s president, Gerald Berry) on security videos. “The bonuses are pretty handsome,” Berry said. “We have to be good — equal or better than the feds. So we work at it, and we incentivize.” Some of the nation’s biggest airports are responding to recent public outrage over security screening by weighing whether

Australia floodwaters disrupt more than 200K New York Times News Service Rising waters have knocked out roads and several highways in northeastern Australia, trapping motorists, marooning entire towns and driving thousands from their homes as flooding stretched into its second week today. More than 200,000 people have been affected so far by the floods, local media reported. The floodwaters that have spread across roughly half the state of Queensland, on the continent’s northeastern coast, showed no sign of retreating as river surges continued to make their way toward the sea. The flooding began last week as Cyclone Tasha crashed into the northeastern coast. While the heaviest rains have abated, wet weather continued in parts of the state early today and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology forecast little reprieve. Flood warnings were in effect for a dozen rivers around the northeastern Australian state into the new year. “This disaster is a long way from over,” said Anna Bligh, the Queensland premier, as she toured flood-ravaged areas with Prime Minister Julia Gillard on Friday, The Sydney Morning Herald reported. Bligh warned that some towns could remain saturated for days and that cleanup efforts could cost billions of dollars. About 300,000 square miles, an area larger than the state of Texas, have been affected by the flooding, officials told the Australian Broadcasting Corp. The government has sent Blackhawk helicopters and other military aircraft to assist in the evacuation and relief effort, dropping supplies to trapped towns, officials said. The flooding also affected Queensland’s inland coal mines, damaging one of Australia’s major export industries.

they should hire private firms such as Covenant to replace the Transportation Security Administration. Sixteen airports, including San Francisco and Kansas City International Airport, have made the switch since 2002. One Orlando, Fla., airport has approved the change but needs to select a contractor, and several others are seriously considering it. For airports, the change isn’t about money. At issue, airport managers and security experts say, is the unwieldy size and bureaucracy of the federal aviation security system. Private firms may be able to do the job more efficiently and with a personal touch, they argue. Airports that choose private screeners must submit the request to the TSA. There are no specific criteria for approval, but federal officials can decide whether to

grant the request “based on the airport’s record of compliance on security regulations and requirements.” The TSA pays for the cost of the screening and has the final say on which company gets the contract. Rep. John Mica, R-Fla., the incoming chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, has written to 200 of the nation’s largest airports, urging them to consider switching to private companies. The TSA was “never intended to be an army of 67,000 employees,” he said. “If you look at [the TSA’s] performance, have they ever stopped a terrorist? Anyone can get through,” Mica said in an interview. “We’ve been very lucky, very fortunate. TSA should focus on its mission: setting up the protocol, adapting to the

changing threats and gathering intelligence.” The differences between private firms’ employees and federal workers are often imperceptible to the everyday traveler. Covenant security details use different badges and insignia and have higher pay for new employees. Procedures in airport security lines do not change. Thirty private firms are contracted by the TSA to potentially work as screeners, and their employees are required by federal law to undergo the same training, use the same pat-down techniques and operate the same equipment — such as full-body scanners — that the TSA does. With a reduced role, the TSA could become more of a regulatory agency, leaving much of the daily work on the ground to forprofit companies.

‘Civil war situation’ in Ivory Coast, PM says By Marco Chown Oved The Associated Press

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — A top ally of Ivory Coast’s internationally recognized leader said Friday that the country is already in a “civil war situation,” while the incumbent leader who refuses to step down after the disputed election accused world leaders of launching a coup to oust him. The United Nations has said that the volatile West African nation, once divided in two, faces a real risk of return to civil war, but Prime Minister Guillaume Soro told reporters that the country is already at this point — “indeed in a civil war situation.” “This is what’s at stake: Either we assist in the installation of democracy in Ivory Coast or we stand by indifferent and allow democracy to be assassinated,” Soro said at a news conference, adding that more than 200 people already have been killed and 1,000 others wounded by gunfire. Human rights groups accuse incumbent Laurent Gbagbo’s security forces of abducting and killing political opponents, though Gbagbo allies deny the allegations and say some of the victims were security forces

Sunday Alamba / The Associated Press

A U.N. soldier stands guard Friday inside the U.N. headquarters in Abidjan, Ivory Cost. The United Nations has said the Ivory Coast risks civil war. Prime Minister Guillaume Soro told reporters that the country is already “in a civil war situation.” killed by protesters. The U.N. has confirmed at least 173 deaths. Gbagbo gave an address late Friday on state television in which he accused the international community of mounting a coup d’etat to oust him and said Ivorians were being subjected to international hostility. “No one has the right to call on foreign armies to invade his country,” Gbagbo said. “Our greatest duty to our country is to

defend it from foreign attack.” The United Nations had been invited by all parties to certify the results of the Nov. 28 presidential runoff vote. The U.N. declared Alassane Ouattara the winner, endorsing the announcement by the country’s electoral commission. But Gbagbo has refused to step aside now for more than a month, defying international condemnation and growing calls for his ouster.

W   B Taliban official killed in Afghanistan Coalition forces killed the topranking Taliban official in restive Kunduz province during an overnight raid, according to Afghan police and a local governor. The officials said Mullah Bahador, the Taliban’s shadow governor in the province, was killed late Thursday night. Abdul Rahman Saidkhaili, the provincial police chief, said the raid targeted a house in the

Chardara District. In a statement, coalition forces confirmed they had killed an insurgent leader who “makes improvised explosive devices and suicide vests, leads a group of Taliban fighters and employs anti-aircraft weapons against Afghan and coalition forces.”

Blast targets Nigeria army barracks party ABUJA, Nigeria — A bomb blast tore through a beer garden

at a Nigerian army barracks where revelers had gathered to celebrate New Year’s Eve, witnesses said, and state-run television reported Friday that 30 people died, though police immediately disputed that. No one immediately claimed responsibility for the explosion in this oil-rich nation where citizens remain uneasy after bombings at other locations had killed dozens of people several days earlier. — The Associated Press

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Tornadoes fueled by unusually warm air pummeled the South and Midwest on Friday, killing at least six people and injuring dozens more across Arkansas, Missouri and Illinois. Forecasters said storms could hit along a stretch from near Chicago to New Orleans later in the evening as New Year’s Eve celebrations begin. Three people died in the northwestern Arkansas hamlet of Cincinnati when a tornado touched down just before sunrise, and three others died when a storm spawned by the same weather system ripped up the Missouri countryside near Rolla. A number of storms were also reported in the St. Louis area. Storms later Friday knocked out power to more than 19,000 Mississippi residents, while broad swaths of Louisiana and

Mississippi were under severe weather watches and warnings that threatened New Year’s Eve revelry. “It sucked me out of my house and carried me across the road and dropped me,” Chris Sisemore of Cincinnati told The Associated Press on Friday. “I was Superman for a while. … You’re just free-floating through the air. Trees are knocking you and smacking you down.” Sisemore said he tried to crawl under his bed and cling to the carpet, fearful a nearby pecan tree would fall into his home. As he nursed cuts, scrapes and bruises to his arms, knees and back, he recalled opening his eyes as he flew because he didn’t believe he’d see 2011. “I wanted to see the end coming. You’re only going to see it one time, and I thought that was it,” he said. “It takes more than a tornado to get me.”

Kelley McCall / The Associated Press

A couple walk past a toppled tree and damaged house Friday near Rolla, Mo., where three people died Friday as a severe storm ripped up the countryside.

Standoff at Texas bank ends with hostages OK The Associated Press PEARLAND, Texas — A standoff at a suburban Houston bank where two masked gunmen took seven hostages and three other people hid in a closet ended peacefully Friday after a negotiation of more than four hours. The last two hostages and the second suspect inside the Chase Bank branch left the building about 4 p.m., Pearland Police Lt. Onesmio Lopez said. Lopez called the removal of the last gunman, accomplished with the help of a diversionary device that simulated gunfire, a successful end to a long day for negotiators. “They talked him out,” he said. Also at the end, police brought out three bank employees who had been hiding in a closet. Lopez said police knew that the employees were hiding but never mentioned it publicly to ensure their safety.

Five hostages, including the bank manager, came out earlier, as did the first gunman. The Houston Chronicle reported that Malford Lewis, 40, one of those released in the earlier group, had gone to the bank to make a deposit. Lewis’ girlfriend, Donetta Gardner, said she found out her boyfriend was being held when her brother, Johnnie Hicks, tried to call him on his cell phone. “It turned out one of the bank robbers answered the phone,” Gardner said. The robber told her brother, “‘Don’t call anymore, I’m using the phone to talk to police.’” The standoff began at 11:30 a.m. when the gunmen entered the bank, injuring the manager when he refused to open the vault, Lopez said.

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A4 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

R  I B Ken Wytsma will share the traditional New Year biography message on “Søren Kierkegaard” at the 9:30 a.m. service and lead the 11:15 Redux service Sunday at Antioch Church, held at Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend. • Pastor Dave Miller will continue the series “A Novel Idea — Prayer: We Need to Talk” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Bend Christian Fellowship, 19831 Rocking Horse Road. The 4twelve youth group meets Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Virgil Askren will share a sermon titled “The Forgiveness of Sins” as part of a new series “Hungry for God” at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St. • Pastor Jerry Joubert will share the message “Who Would You Rather Trust in 2011 — God or the Stock Market?” at 9:15 a.m. today at Bend Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 21610 N.E. Butler Market Road. • Pastor Dean Catlett will share the message “Changing,” based on Romans 12:2, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Church of Christ, 554 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • January topic is “Finding the Simplicity of the Christ through Reading God’s Word with Understanding” at 1:30-3 p.m. Fridays at Christian Science Reading Room Resource Workshops, 115 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend. • Pastor Dave Drullinger will share the message “I Will Make All Things New,” based on 2 Corinthians 5:16-21, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Discovery Christian Church, 334 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • Pastor John Lodwick will share the message “Who Ya Gonna Please in 2011?,” based on Hebrews 11:6, at 6 p.m. today and at 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend. • Pastor Mike Johnson will share the message “All Things New” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Faith Christian Center, 1049 N.E. 11th St., Bend. Fuel youth services are held Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • The Rev. Dr. Steven Koski will speak on the topic “A New Year — Renewed Relationships: Love is Patient” at the 9 a.m. contemporary service, 10:45 a.m. traditional service and 5:01 p.m. evening service Sunday at First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend. • Pastor Thom Larson will share the message “At the Start of a New Year,” based on Ecclesiastes 3:1-13 and Matthew 25:31-46, at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend. • Pastor Joel LiaBraaten will share the messages “Ready to Receive Mercy in 2011?” and

“The Big Gift” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Grace First Lutheran Church, 2265 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. • Pastor Dan Dillard will share the message “The Way of the Lord” at 10:30 a.m. and will begin a study of Leviticus at 6 p.m. Sunday at Grace Reformed Presbyterian Church, 62162 Hamby Road, Bend. • Pastor George Bender will share the message “This Year: No Regrets!” for “Ignite” worship at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Radiant Life Fellowship, 60670 Brookswood Blvd., Bend. • Anakha Coman will share the message at 9 a.m. Sunday at Spiritual Awareness Community of the Cascades, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • Pastor Robert Luinstra will share the message “Do You Not Know That I Must Be in My Father’s House?” based on Luke 2:40-52, at the 10 a.m. service Sunday at Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend. • The Rev. Heather Starr and Starr Hedden will speak on the topic “Choosing to Let It Go” at 11 a.m. Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Central Oregon, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • The Rev. Jane Meyers will speak on the topic “Silence and Epiphany” at 10 a.m. Sunday at The Unity Community of Central Oregon, held at Eastern Star Grange, 62855 Powell Butte Highway, Bend. • Bo Stern will share the message “Authentic” at 8, 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Westside Church, 2051 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. and at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at the Westside South Campus, held at Elk Meadow Elementary School, 60880 Brookswood Blvd., Bend. • Pastors Myron Wells, Greg Strubhar and Darin Hollingsworth will share the message “A Little Heaven in 2011” at the 9 and 10:30 a.m. services Sunday at Christian Church of Redmond, 536 S.W. 10th St. • Pastor Rob Anderson will share the message “Do You Have Unrealized Potential?,” based on John 1:1-18, at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond. • Pastor Glen Schaumloeffel will share the message “Excel Still More,” based on 1 Thessalonians 4:1 and Hebrews 12:1-2, at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Community Bible Church at Sunriver, 1 Theater Drive. • The Rev. Willis Jenson will share the message “Eternal Life is Certain through God’s Election in Christ from Eternity,” based on Ephesians 1:4, at 11 a.m. Sunday at Concordia Lutheran Mission held at Terrebonne Grange Hall, 8286 11th St., Terrebonne.

Astrid Riecken / For The Washington Post

“I feel there is something powerful here because people are thinking about God all the time and not just about their own life or studies,” says Ali Basiri, a Muslim from Iran who is a graduate student at Catholic University in Washington.

At Catholic colleges, Muslim influx amazes, at times baffles both camps By William Wan The Washington Post

On a quick break between classes last week, Reef Al-Shabnan slipped into an empty room at Catholic University in Washington to start her daily prayers to Allah. In one corner was a life-size painting of Jesus carrying the cross. In another, the portrait of a late priest and theologian looked on. And high above the room hung a small wooden crucifix. This was not, Shabnan acknowledged, the ideal space for a Muslim to pray in. After her more than two years on campus, though, it has become routine and sacred in its own way. You can find Allah anywhere, the 19-yearold from Saudi Arabia said, even at the flagship university of the U.S. Catholic world. In the past few years, enrollment of Muslim students such as Shabnan has spiked at Catholic campuses across the country. Last year, Catholic colleges had an even higher percentage of Muslim students than the average four-year institution in the United States, according to the Higher Education Research Institute. The influx has astonished and sometimes befuddled administrators. Some Catholic campuses are creating prayer rooms for new Muslim students and hiring Islamic chaplains to minister to them. Others are unsure how to adapt. One of the sharpest increases in Muslims students has been at Catholic University in Washington. In the past five years, as the number of self-identified Catholics on the campus has decreased, the number of Muslims has more than doubled, from 41 in 2006 to 91 this fall. The largest group of international students by far now comes from Saudi Arabia.

“It’s not strange or weird to care about your religion here, to pray and make God a priority.” — Reef Al-Shabnan, a Muslim student at Catholic University

Muslim students say they enroll at Catholic schools for many of the same reasons as their classmates: attractive campuses, appealing professors and academic programs that fit their interests. But there is also a spiritual attraction to the values that overlap the two faiths. “Because it is an overtly religious place, it’s not strange or weird to care about your religion here, to pray and make God a priority,” said Shabnan, a political science major who often covers her head with a pale beige scarf. “They have the same values we do.” Echoing Islam’s conservative culture, the school separates men and women in its dorms and imposes visiting hours. The university prohibits sex before marriage. Daily prayer and periodic fasting are common concepts. At the same time, courses in theology are an undergraduate requirement. That’s how Shabnan found herself buying her first Bible, for a required Old Testament class. It’s also the reason, she said with a smile, that she registered for an introductory course on Islam. “I was looking for an easy course,” she said. “I learned a lot that was new to me … and just seeing how someone completely outside our religion views it was fascinating.” But there are also drawbacks to being Muslim on an overwhelmingly Catholic campus. Most of the students eat everything but the pork in the student

union. For the more orthodox, eating can be a tricky proposition that involves driving as far as Potomac, Md., to find halal meat, which is slaughtered according to strict guidelines. Although other Catholic schools have established prayer rooms and student associations for their growing Muslim populations, Catholic University has neither. For their five daily prayers, Muslims often scramble to find empty classrooms where they can kneel, face Mecca and bow before God. Some students even meditate in the school’s chapels and at the structure that looms over the entire campus — the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. During his more than four years as a graduate student at Catholic, Ali Basiri has become one of the regulars at the small chapel in Caldwell Hall, the oldest building on campus. Basiri, 27, has spent so much time in the chapel’s pews that he has befriended the organist who practices there. It took him a while to adjust to life outside Iran. During his first semester, he lived in the dorms and tried not to be shocked when women held out their hands to shake his and sometimes hugged him. In Iran, Basiri said, all schools run by the Islamic government are religious. The Iranian university where he studied for his bachelor’s degree was named after a Muslim cleric, and his engineering department had detailed rules

for praying and a dedicated room separated for men and women by blankets. But at Catholic, he has forged new ways to connect spiritually. Several times a week, the electrical engineering student makes his way past the marble statue of the Virgin Mary at the Caldwell chapel entrance and listens in the pews to Islamic prayers on his MP3 player. “I feel there is something powerful here because people are thinking about God all the time and not just about their own life or studies,” Basiri said. He has struck up friendships with equally fervent Catholic believers. “We do this thing where he teaches me his prayers in Arabic, and I share with him the prayers I say as a Catholic,” said one of his friends, Kenny White, 20, a sophomore from Annapolis. “I’ve learned about God by learning about him and his own faith. It’s been a really important and beautiful part of being here.” It was that kind of exchange that prompted Basiri’s attempts to start a Muslim student association. He found a faculty adviser and filled out the required paperwork but heard nothing back for a while. Then, an administrator pulled him aside and said it wouldn’t work to have a Muslim group at such a major Catholic institution. When asked about the experience, Basiri is hesitant to say anything negative about a school that he says has embraced him so fully and given him a chance to grow in faith and academics. “I understand the difficulty,” he said. “In Iran, if you tried to start a Catholic group at a Muslim university, that would be just as strange and hard to make it work.”

Pope’s master of liturgy helps push to restore traditions By Jason Horowitz The Washington Post

ROME — On a rainy Christmas Eve, Pope Benedict XVI followed a procession of Swiss guards, bishops and priests down the central nave of St. Peter’s Basilica to celebrate midnight Mass before dignitaries and a global television audience. And Monsignor Guido Marini, as always, followed the pope. A tall, reed-thin cleric with a receding hairline and wire-framed glasses, Marini, 45, perched behind the pope’s left shoulder, bowed with him at the altar and adjusted the pontiff’s lush robes. As master of pontifical liturgical celebrations, he shadows the pope’s every move and makes sure that every candle, Gregorian chant and gilded vestment is exactly as he, the pope and God intended it to be. “The criterion is that it is beau-

tiful,” Marini said. But beauty, especially when it comes to the rituals of Roman Catholic liturgy, is a topic of great debate between conservative and liberal Catholics, who share differing views on everything from the music and language of the Mass to where a priest should stand and how he should give Communion. Some of the key trappings of the Mass — the vestments and vernacular, the “smells and bells” — have taken on a more ancient air since Benedict succeeded John Paul II, and since Guido Marini succeeded Piero Marini. Piero Marini, 68, is a gruff Vatican veteran, a progressive who advocates a more modern ritual that reflects the great church reforms of the 1960s. The younger and more punctilious Guido Marini, who is not related to Piero, has argued for more traditional liturgical symbols and gestures

— like the pope’s preference that the faithful kneel to accept Communion — that some church liberals interpret as the harbinger of a counter-reformation. The coincidence of their shared last names has resulted in YouTube links like “Battle of the Marinis.” (“These things on the YouTube are fun but not important,” said Marini the Second.) But within Vatican and wider liturgical circles, the Marini schism is actually a profound one about the direction of the church. The liturgical changes enacted under Guido Marini are “a great microcosm for broader shifts in the church,” said John Allen, a veteran Vatican watcher with the National Catholic Reporter. Since the Marini II era began in October 2007, the papal Masses clearly have a stronger traditional element. Guido Marini, who has degrees in canon and civil law

and a doctorate in the psychology of communication, caused considerable consternation among some progressive Catholics in January when he talked to English-speaking priests about a “reform of the reform.” In an interview Thursday, he argued that the changes should not be seen as a liturgical backlash to modernity but as a “harmonious development” in a “continuum” that takes full advantage of the church’s rich history and is not subject to what he has called “sporadic modifications.” Liturgical progressives are concerned that Marini considers the reforms of the 1960s ecumenical council known as Vatican II as being among those sporadic modifications. At most papal Masses, a large crucifix flanked by tall candles is now displayed on the altar, even though many progressives say the ornaments block the view of

the priest and the bread and wine. They argue that this obstructs the accessibility urged by liturgical reforms associated with the Second Vatican Council. Marini responds by saying that the crucifix reminds the faithful of who is really front and center in the Mass. He also says that the pope cannot sit in front of the altar when it bears the crucifix because

“the pope can’t give his back” to sacraments on the altar. For Marini, Gregorian chants must be the music of the church because they best interpret the liturgy. And in September, ahead of the pope’s visit to Britain, Marini told the Scottish paper the Herald that the pope would celebrate all the prefaces and canons of his Masses in Latin.

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 1, 2011 A 5 “The Wheel of Dharma” Buddhism

“Celtic Cross” Christianity

“Star of David” Judaism

You Are The Most Important Part of Our Services “Omkar” (Aum) Hinduism

“Yin/Yang” Taoist/Confucianism

“Star & Crescent” Islam

Christian

Foursquare

\Lutheran

Presbyterian

POWELL BUTTE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Cowboy Fellowship Saturdays Potluck 6 pm Music and the Word 7 pm Sunday Worship Services 8:30 am - 10 am - 11 am Nursery & Children’s Church Pastors: Chris Blair, Glenn Bartnik & Ozzy Osbourne 13720 SW Hwy 126, Powell Butte 541-548-3066 www.powellbuttechurch.com

DAYSPRING CHRISTIAN CENTER Terrebonne Foursquare Church enjoys a wonderful location that overlooks the majestic Cascade Range and Smith Rock. Our gatherings are refreshing, our relationships are encouraging, and family and friend oriented. Come Sunday, encounter God with us, we look forward to meeting you!

NATIVITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 60850 Brosterhous Road at Knott, 541-388-0765

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 230 NE Ninth, Bend (Across Ninth St. from Bend High) All Are Welcome, Always!

SERVICE TIMES 9:00 AM Informal Service Children will be dismissed from service at 9:15 AM for the Junior Church for kids preschool to 5th grade 11:00 AM Formal Service This week’s sermon is “The Kingdom of God is not a Place” to be given by Pastor David Nagler. Both the 9:00 AM and 11:00 AM services to be posted with the Junior Church at 9:15 AM.

Rev. Dr. Steven H Koski Senior Pastor

REAL LIFE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Like Hymns? We've Got 'em! at the RLCC Church, 2880 NE 27th Sunday Services 8 am Traditional Service (No child care for 8 am service) 9:30 am Contemporary Service with full child care 11 am Service (Full child care) For information, please call ... Minister - Mike Yunker - 541-312-8844 Richard Belding, Associate Pastor “Loving people one at a time.” www.real-lifecc.org

Christian Schools Assembly of God

Bible Church

FAITH CHRISTIAN CENTER 1049 NE 11th St. • 541-382-8274 SUNDAYS: 9:30 am Sunday Educational Classes 10:30 am Morning Worship

CROSSROADS CHURCH Come join us as one family of Believers, young and old,to worship our great God. You can expect a time of Christ-centered meaningful worship and verse by verse practical biblical teaching. We believe the gospel of Jesus Christ is the central theme of Scripture and speaks to every area of the Christian life.

This Sunday at FAITH CHRISTIAN Pastor Mike Johnson will share his Sunday message titled, “All Things New” beginning at 10:30 am On Wednesday “Fuel” youth service begins at 7:00 PM. Childcare is provided in our Sunday morning service. A number of Faith Journey Groups meet throughout the week in small groups, please contact the church for details and times. The church is located on the corner of Greenwood Avenue and NE 11th Street. www.bendfcc.com

Sunday mornings at 9:30. Acts Series: Christ on the Crossroads. 1st Sunday of each month is HomeFront Sunday; we focus on scriptural truths in our roles and relationships in life. Extended fellowship time follows.

REDMOND ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1865 W Antler • Redmond • 541-548-4555 SUNDAYS Morning Worship 8:30 am and 10:30 am Life groups 9 am Kidz LIVE ages 3-11 10:30 am Evening Worship 6 pm

www.crossroadschurchbend.com 63945 Old Bend-Redmond Hwy (On the corner of Old Bend-Redmond Hwy and Highway 20 on the NW side of Bend)

WEDNESDAYS FAMILY NIGHT 7PM Adult Classes Celebrate Recovery Wednesday NITE Live Kids Youth Group

CALVARY CHAPEL BEND 20225 Cooley Rd. Bend Phone: (541) 383-5097 Web site: ccbend.org Sundays: 8:30 & 10:30 am Wednesday Night Study: 7 pm Youth Group: Wednesday 7 pm Child Care provided Women’s Ministry, Youth Ministry are available, call for days and times. “Teaching the Word of God, Book by Book”

Pastor Duane Pippitt www.redmondag.com

Baptist EASTMONT CHURCH NE Neff Rd., 1/2 mi. E. of St. Charles Medical Center Saturdays 6:00 pm (Contemporary) Sundays 9:00 am (Blended worship style) 10:30 am (Contemporary) Sundays 6:00 pm Hispanic Worship Service Weekly Bible Studies and Ministries for all ages Contact: 541-382-5822 Pastor John Lodwick www.eastmontchurch.com FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH CBA “A Heart for Bend in the Heart of Bend” 60 NW Oregon, 541-382-3862 Pastor Syd Brestel SUNDAY 9:00 AM Sunday School for everyone 10:15 AM Worship Service At the First Baptist Church, Al Hulbert is speaking on the topic “What Does God Want from Me” from Micah 6:8 For Kidztown, Middle School and High School activities Call 541-382-3862 www.bendchurch.org FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sundays Morning Worship 10:50 am Bible Study 6:00 pm Evening Worship 7:00 pm Wednesdays Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 pm Tom Counts, Senior Pastor Ernest Johnson, Pastor 21129 Reed Market Rd, Bend, OR 541-382-6081 HIGHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH, SBC 3100 SW Highland Ave., Redmond • 541-548-4161 SUNDAYS: Worship Services: 9:00 am & 6:00 pm Traditional 10:30 am Contemporary Sunday Bible fellowship groups 9:00 am & 10:30 am For other activities for children, youth & adults, call or go to website: www.hbcredmond.org Dr. Barry Campbell, Lead Pastor PARA LA COMUNIDAD LATINA Domingos: Servicio de Adoración y Escuela Dominical - 12:30 pm Miércoles: Estudios biblicos por edades - 6:30 pm

Bible Church BEREAN BIBLE CHURCH In Partnership with American Missionary Fellowship Near Highland and 23rd Ave. 2378 SW Glacier Pl. Redmond, OR 97756 We preach the good news of Jesus Christ, sing great hymns of faith, and search the Scriptures together. Sunday Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Bible Study - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. Pastor Ed Nelson 541-777-0784 www.berean-bible-church.org COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH AND CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL 541-593-8341 Beaver at Theater Drive, PO Box 4278, Sunriver, OR 97707 “Transforming Lives Through the Truth of the Word” All are Welcome! SUNDAY WORSHIP AND THE WORD - 9:30 AM. Coffee Fellowship - 10:45 am Bible Education Hour - 11:15 am Nursery Care available • Women’s Bible Study - Tuesdays, 10 am • Awana Kids Club (4 yrs - 6th gr.) Sept. - May • Youth Ministry (gr. 7-12) Wednesdays 6:15 pm • Men’s Bible Study - Thursdays 9 am • Home Bible Studies are also available Preschool for 3 & 4 year olds Call for information Senior Pastor: Glen Schaumloeffel Associate Pastor: Jake Schwarze visit our Web site www.cbchurchsr.org Listen to KNLR 97.5 FM at 9:00 am. each Sunday to hear “Transforming Truth” with Pastor Glen.

Calvary Chapel

Catholic HOLY REDEEMER CATHOLIC PARISH Fr. Jose Thomas Mudakodiyil, Pastor www.holyredeemerparish.net Parish Office: 541-536-3571 HOLY REDEEMER, LA PINE 16137 Burgess Rd Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday Mass 9:00 AM Sunday Mass — 10:00 AM Confessions: Saturdays — 3:00–4:00 PM HOLY TRINITY, SUNRIVER 18143 Cottonwood Rd. Thurs. Mass 9:30 AM; Sat. Vigil Mass 5:30 PM Sunday mass 8:00 AM Confessions: Thurs. 9:00 - 9:15 AM NEW YEAR’S DAY Mass* 11:00 AM OUR LADY OF THE SNOWS, Gilchrist 120 Mississippi Dr Sunday Mass — 12:30 PM Confessions: Sundays 12:00 –12:15 PM HOLY FAMILY, near Christmas Valley 57255 Fort Rock Rd Sunday Mass — 3:30 PM Confessions: Sundays 3:00–3:15 PM *The Feast of Mary, Mother of God, Sat. Jan. 1, 2011 is not a Holy Day of Obligation. ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI 541-382-3631 Pastors: Fr. Francis X. Ekwugha Fr. Joseph Levine Masses NEW CHURCH – CATHOLIC CENTER 2450 NE 27th Street Saturday - Vigil 5:00 PM Sunday - 7:30, 10:00 AM 12:30 PM Spanish & 5:00 PM Mon., Wed., Fri. - 7:00 AM & 12:15 PM St. Clare Chapel - Spanish Mass 1st, 3rd, 5th Thursdays 8:00 PM January 1, Blessed Virgin, Mother of God, 10 AM, New Church (Not a Holy Day of obligation) There are no bilingual masses this year Masses HISTORIC DOWNTOWN CHURCH Corner of NW Franklin & Lava Tues., Thurs., Sat. 7:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 12:15 PM Exposition & Benediction Tuesday 3:00 - 6:00 PM Liturgy of the Hours will be recited at 6:40 AM, before Mass each day. NEW Reconciliation Schedule* New Church at Catholic Center Wed: 7:30 - 8:00 AM & 6:00 - 7:00 PM Saturday 3:00 - 5:00 PM Historic Downtown Church Tues: 7:30 - 8:00 AM & 5:00 - 5:45 PM Saturday 8:00 - 9:00 AM *No confessions will be heard during Mass. The priest will leave the confessional at least 10 minutes prior to Mass. ST. THOMAS CATHOLIC CHURCH 1720 NW 19th Street Redmond, Oregon 97756 541-923-3390 Father Todd Unger, Pastor Mass Schedule: Weekdays 8:00 a.m. (except Wednesday) Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m. First Saturday 8:00 a.m. (English) Sunday 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. (English) 12:00 noon (Spanish) Confessions on Wednesdays from 5:00 to 5:45 p.m. and on Saturdays from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m.

Christian CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF REDMOND 536 SW 10th Redmond, OR 97756 541-548-2974 Fax: 541-548-5818 2 Worship Services 9:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M. Sunday School-all ages Junior Church Kidmo Friday Night Service at 6:30 P.M. Pastors Myron Wells Greg Strubhar Darin Hollingsworth Sunday, January 2 Sermon Title: “A Little Heaven in 2011” from various scriptures Senior Pastor, Myron Wells; Associate Pastor, Greg Strubhar; and Youth Pastor, Darin Hollingsworth

CENTRAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Christ Centered Academic Excellence Fully Accredited with ACSI & NAAS Comprehensive High School Educating Since 1992 15 minutes north of Target 2234 SE 6th St. Redmond, 541-548-7803 www.centralchristianschools.com EASTMONT COMMUNITY SCHOOL “Educating and Developing the Whole Child for the Glory of God” Pre K - 5th Grade 62425 Eagle Road, Bend • 541-382-2049 Principal Peggy Miller www.eastmontcommunityschool.com MORNING STAR CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Serving Christian Families and local churches to develop Godly leaders by providing quality Christ centered education. Fully Accredited NAAS. Member A.C .S.I. Small Classes Emphasizing: Christian Values A-Beka Curriculum, High Academics. An interdenominational ministry located on our new 18 acre campus at 19741 Baker Rd. and S. Hwy 97 (2 miles south of Wal-Mart). Phone 541-382-5091 Bus Service: from Bend, La Pine & Sunriver. www.morningstarchristianschool.org SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI SCHOOL Preschool through Grade 8 “Experience academic excellence and Christian values every day.” Limited openings in all grades. 2450 NE 27th St. Bend •541-382-4701 www.saintfrancisschool.net TRINITY LUTHERAN SCHOOL 2550 NE Butler Market Rd. 541-382-1850 Preschool ages 3 and 4 - 10th grade High Quality Education In A Loving Christian Environment Openings Still Available www.saints.org

Christian Science FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1551 NW First St. • 541-382-6100 (South of Portland Ave.) Church Service & Sunday School: 10 am Wed. Testimony Meeting: 7:30 pm Reading Room: 115 NW Minnesota Ave. Mon. through Fri.: 11 am - 4 pm Sat. 12 noon - 2 pm

Eckankar

Adult Bible Study, Sunday 9:30 AM Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 AM DYG (High School) & Trek (Middle School) Monday 6:30 PM Come and meet our pastors, Mike and Joyce Woodman. 7801 N. 7th St. Terrebonne West on “B” Avenue off of Hwy. 97; South on 7th St. at the end of the road 541-548-1232 dayspringchristiancenter.org WESTSIDE CHURCH “Authentic” Bo Stern WEST CAMPUS 2051 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 97701 Sunday at 8, 9 and 10:45 am Due to the holidays there will be no services on Saturday at 6:45 pm Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 3rd grade Sunday at 9:00 and10:45am Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm 4th Grade: Sun. 9:00 and 10:45am 5th Grade: Sun. 9:00 and 10:45am 6th thru 8th Grades: Wednesday at 6:45pm Sun. at 9:00am 9th thru 12th Grades: Tues. at 6:45pm and Sun. at 10:45am College/Young Adults: Sun. 6:30 pm Adults: Bible Studies, Classes, Life Groups & Activities. Visit our website for more information SOUTH CAMPUS “Authentic” Bo Stern Elk Meadow Elementary School 60880 Brookswood Blvd, Bend 97702 Sunday at 10:30am Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 5th grade Sunday at 10:30am www.westsidechurch.org 541-382-7504

Jewish Synagogues JEWISH COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Serving Central Oregon for 20 Years. We Are a Non-Denominational Egalitarian Jewish Community All are Welcome!

ECKANKAR Religion of the Light and Sound of God

Our Synagogue is located at 21555 Modoc Lane, Bend, Oregon 541-385-6421 - www.jcco.bend.com

541-728-6476 www.eckankar-oregon.org www.eckankar.org

Resident Rabbi Jay & Rebbetzin Judy Shupack

FREE discussion of all faiths: “Spiritual Wisdom on Relationships”. No matter who we are, where we are, we all have relationships whether it’s family, friends, or even our pets and it can get pretty overwhelming at times. There are good times, bad times and everything in between. We will discuss on how using just a few tools can make our relationships go smoother, have more understanding and most of all how we can fill our hearts with love. Saturday, January 15, 2:00PM in the new COCC Campus Center, downstairs conference room. 2600 College Way, Bend, OR. For contact info: 541-728-6476 (msg) www.eckankar.org

Episcopal ST. ALBANS - REDMOND 3277 NW 10th • 541-548-4212 www.saintalbansepis.org Sunday Schedule 9:00 am Adult Education Presider for Sunday, 1/2/11, is The Rev. Dick Brown. This will be a Eucharist service. Tuesday - 3 pm Bible Study Wednesday - 12:00 noon Holy Eucharist The Rev. Paul Morton The Rev. Dcn. Ruth Brown TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 469 NW Wall St. • 541-382-5542 www.trinitybend.org Sunday Schedule 8 am Holy Eucharist 9:30 am Christian Education for all ages 10:30 am Holy Eucharist (w/nursery care) 5 pm Holy Eucharist The Rev. Christy Close Erskine, Pastor

Evangelical THE SALVATION ARMY 755 NE 2nd Street, Bend 541-389-8888 SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP Sunday School 9:45 am Children & Adult Classes Worship Service – 11:00 am Major’s Robert & Miriam Keene NEW HOPE EVANGELICAL 20080 Pinebrook Blvd.• 541-389-3436 Celebrate New Life at New Hope Church! Saturday 6:00 pm Sunday 9:00, 10:45 am, Pastor Randy Myers www.newhopebend.com

Foursquare CITY CENTER A Foursquare Fellowship Senior Pastors Steve & Ginny McPherson 549 SW 8th St., P.O. Box 475, Redmond, OR 97756 • 541-548-7128 Sunday Worship Services: Daybreak Café Service 7:30 am Celebration Services 9:00 am and 10:45 am Wednesday Services High Definition (Adult) 7:00 pm UTurn - Middle School 7:00 pm Children’s Ministries 7:00 pm Thursdays High School (Connection) 6:30 pm Home Bible Studies throughout the week City Care Clinic also available. Kidz Center School, Preschool www.citycenterchurch.org “Livin’ the Incredible Mission”

Religious Education, Hebrew program & Bar/Bat Mitzvah Training Weekly Torah Study & Adult Education Teen Youth Group Upcoming Events: Sat., Jan. 8 at 10 am - Shabbat service and Torah study followed by potluck vegetarian lunch TEMPLE BETH TIKVAH Temple Beth Tikvah is a member of the Union for Reform Judaism. Our members represent a wide range of Jewish backgrounds. We welcome interfaith families and Jews by choice. Our monthly activities include social functions, services, religious education, Hebrew school, Torah study, and adult education Rabbi Glenn Ettman Friday, January 7 at 6:00 pm Shabbat Service Saturday, January 8 at 9:00 am Torah Study Saturday, January 8 at 10:30 am Torah Service Saturday, January 8 at 7:00 pm Havdallah for members and guests Sunday, January 9 at 11:00 am Adult Education (call for information) All services are held at the First United Methodist Church 680 NW Bond Street Sunday School, Hebrew School and Bar/Bat Mitzvah Classes For more information about our education programs, please call: David Uri at 541-306-6000 For more information and complete schedule of services go online to www.bethtikvahbend.org or call 541-388-8826 \Lutheran CONCORDIA LUTHERAN MISSION (LCMS) The mission of the Church is to forgive sins through the Gospel and thereby grant eternal life. (St. John 20:22-23, Augsburg Confession XXVIII.8, 10) 10 am Sunday School 11 am Divine Service The Rev. Willis C . Jenson, Pastor. 8286 11th St (Grange Hall), Terrebonne, OR

Come worship with us. (Child care provided on Sundays.) www.nativityinbend.com Evangelical Lutheran Church in America TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH AND SCHOOL Missouri Synod • 541-382-1832 2550 NE Butler Market Road A Stephen Ministry Congregation Fall schedule Contemporary Worship at 8:00 AM Traditional Worship at 11:00 AM Sunday School & Bible Study at 9:30 AM Nursery provided on Sundays www.trinitylutheranbend.org church e-mail: church@saints.org Pastor Robert Luinstra • Pastor David Carnahan All Ages Welcome School: 2550 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-382-1850 • www.saints.org school e-mail: info@saints.org ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA Worship in the Heart of Redmond Sunday Worship Service 8:30 am Contemporary 11:00 am Traditional Sunday School for all ages at 10:00 am Midweek Advent Soup Supper 6:15 pm & Worship Service 7:00 pm Wednesday, December 1, 8 & 15 Children’s Room available during services Come Experience a warm, friendly family of worshipers. Everyone Welcome - Always. A vibrant, inclusive community. A rich and diverse music program for all ages Coffee, snacks and fellowship after each service M-W-F Women’s Exercise 9:30 am Wed. Bible Study at noon 3rd Th. Women’s Circle/Bible Study 2:00 pm 4th Tues. Men’s Club 6:00 pm, dinner Youth and Family Programs Active Social Outreach 1113 SW Black Butte Blvd. Redmond, OR 97756 ~ 541-923-7466 Pastor Eric Burtness www.zionrdm.com

Nazarene BEND CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1270 NE 27 St. • 541-382-5496 Senior Pastor Virgil Askren SUNDAY 9:00 am Sunday School for all ages 10:15 am Worship Service 5 pm Hispanic Worship Service Nursery Care & Children’s Church ages 4 yrs–4th grade during all Worship Services “Courageous Living” on KNLR 97.5 FM 8:30 am Sunday WEDNESDAY 6:30 pm Ladies Bible Study THURSDAY 10:00 am 50+ Bible Study WEEKLY Life Groups Please visit our website for a complete listing of activities for all ages. www.bendnaz.org

Non-Denominational CASCADE PRAISE CHRISTIAN CENTER For People Like You! NE Corner of Hwy 20 W. and Cooley Service Times: Sunday, 10 am Wednesday, 7 pm Youth: Wednesday, 7 pm Nursery and children's ministries Home fellowship groups Spirit Filled Changing lives through the Word of God 541-389-4462 • www.cascadepraise.org SOVEREIGN GRACE CHURCH Meeting at the Golden Age Club 40 SE 5th St., Bend Just 2 blocks SW of Bend High School Sunday Worship 10:00 am Sovereign Grace Church is dedicated to worshipping God and teaching the Bible truths recovered through the Reformation. Call for information about other meetings 541-385-1342 or 541-420-1667 http://www.sovereigngracebend.com/

Open Bible Standard CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER 21720 E. Hwy. 20 • 541-389-8241 Sunday morning worship 8:45 AM & 10:45 AM Wednesday Mid-Week Service & Youth Programs 7:00 PM Nursery Care provided for all services. Pastor Daniel N. LeLaCheur www.clcbend.com

Presbyterian

www.lutheransonline.com/ condordialutheranmission Phone: 541-325-6773

COMMUNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 529 NW 19th Street (3/4 mile north of High School) Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 548-3367

GRACE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 2265 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 541-382-6862

Rev. Rob Anderson, Pastor Rev. Heidi Bolt, Associate Pastor

Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. (Child Care Available) Sunday School 10:50 a.m. Education Hour 11:15 a.m. Women’s Bible Study Tuesday 9:15 a.m. Men’s Bible Study Wednesday 7:15 a.m. High School Youth Group Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Pastor Joel LiaBraaten Evangelical Lutheran Church in America www.gflcbend.org

8:30 am - Contemporary Music & Worship 8:30 am - Church School for Children 9:45 am - Adult Christian Education 11:00 am - Traditional Music & Worship 12:15 pm - Middle School Youth 2:00 pm - Senior High Youth Wednesday: 4:30 pm - Elementary School Program Small Groups Meet Regularly (Handicapped Accessible) www.redmondchurch.org

“A New Year- Renewed Relationships: Love is Patient” 9:00 am Contemporary 10:45 am Traditional 5:01 pm Come as you are Child care at all services Through the Week Youth Groups (See Youth Blog: http://bendfpyouth.wordpress.com) Choirs, music groups, Bible study, fellowship and ministries every week Wednesdays 6:00 pm Contemplative Worship 230 NE Ninth, Bend www.bendfp.org 541 382 4401

Unitarian Universalist UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON “Diverse Beliefs, One Fellowship” We are a Welcoming Congregation Sunday, Jan 2, 2011 Rev. Heather Starr & Starr Hedden: “Choosing to Let It Go” The new year is an opportunity to step forward into a new chapter of our lives and genuinely, deliberately, choose to leave behind that which no longer serves us. What is it you are finally, now, ready to let go of? Join us for this Burning Bowl Ceremony and setting of intentions for the new year. Childcare is provided! Everyone is Welcome! See our website for more information Meeting place: OLD STONE CHURCH 157 NW FRANKLIN AVE., BEND Mail: PO Box 428, Bend OR 97709 www.uufco.org (541) 385-3908

Unity Community UNITY COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Join the Unity Community Sunday 10:00 am with Rev. Teri Hawkins Youth Program Provided The Unity Community meets at 62855 Powell Butte Hwy (near Bend Airport) Learn more about the Unity Community of Central Oregon at www.unitycentraloregon.com or by calling 541-388-1569 United Church of God

United Church of Christ ALL PEOPLES UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Diverse spiritual journeys welcomed. United by the teachings of Christ. HAPPY NEW YEAR! Come worship with us at 10 a.m., Sunday, January 2nd at the Summer Creek Clubhouse, 3660 SW 29th St. in Redmond. Our next worship will be Sunday, January 16th. For details, directions and possible help with car-pooling, call: 541-388-2230 or, email: prisbill@earthlink.net

Church of God UNITED CHURCH OF GOD Saturday Services 1:30 pm Suite 204, Southgate Center (behind Butler Market Store South) 61396 S. Hwy. 97 at Powers Rd. 541-318-8329 We celebrate the Sabbath and Holy Days of the Bible as “a shadow of things to come” (Col. 2:16-17) and are committed to preaching the gospel of the Kingdom of God (re. Christ’s coming 1000-year rule on earth). Larry J. Walker, Pastor P.O. Box 36, La Pine, OR 97739, 541-536-5227 email: Larry_Walker@ucg.org Web site: www.ucgbend.org Free sermon downloads & literature including The Good News magazine & Bible course

United Methodist FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (In the Heart of Down Town Bend) 680 NW Bond St. / 541-382-1672 Pastor Thom Larson Sermon: “At the Start of a New Year” Ecclesiastes 3:1-13 & Matthew 25:31-46 8:30am Praise & Worship 9:30am Sunday School 11:00am Traditional Service *During the Week:* Womens Groups, Mens Groups, Youth Groups, Quilting, Crafting, Music & Fellowship. Open Hearts. Open Minds. Open Doors. Rev. Thom Larson firstchurch@bendumc.org

CHURCH & SYNAGOGUE DIRECTORY LISTING 4 Saturdays and TMC:

$105 5 Saturdays and TMC:

$126 The Bulletin: Every Saturday on the church page. $21 Copy Changes: by 5 PM Tuesday CO Marketplace: The First Tuesday of each month. $21 Copy Changes: by Monday 1 week prior to publication

Call Pat Lynch 541-383-0396 plynch@bendbulletin.com

Directory of Central Oregon Churches and Synagogues


A6 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Egyptian church blast kills at least 21 at New Year’s Mass The Associated Press CAIRO — A car exploded in front of a Coptic Christian church as worshippers emerged from a New Year’s Mass in the Egyptian city of Alexandria early today, killing at least 21 people, officials said. After the blast, enraged Christians emerging from the church clashed with police and stormed a nearby mosque, prompting fights and volleys of stone throwing with Muslims, police and witnesses said — a sign of the sectarian anger that has been arising with greater frequency in Egypt. Nearly 1,000 Christians were attending the Mass at the Saints Church in the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria, said a priest at the church, the Rev. Mena Adel. The service had just ended, and worshippers were leaving the building when the blast went off, about a half-hour after midnight. “I was inside the church and heard a huge explosion,” Adel told The Associated Press. “People’s bodies were in flames.” The blast came from a car parked outside the church, but police said they were still investigating whether the car had been rigged with explosives or if a bomb had been placed under it. Witnesses reported seeing the charred chassis of the destroyed car, with the remains of several bodies nearby and dozens wounded.

Rescue Continued from A1 Hemphill said another 32 rescuers were en route to join the search, and were turned back after Denham was found. Mt. Bachelor’s electronic ticketing system indicated Denham’s last lift ride of the day had been at around 3 p.m. on the Northwest Express lift, allowing searchers to concentrate their efforts on the western flank of the mountain. Resort spokesman Andy Goggins said the ability to track individual ticket holders’ lift usage is a fortunate side benefit of the ticketing system should a skier or snowboarder get lost on the mountain. “It definitely helps in these situations,” he said. “It’s more for the efficiency of our ticketing system, but it allows us to do quite a bit. This is just one area where it benefits us.” Hemphill said searchers spent hours combing the large area accessible from the top of the Northwest Express lift. Mt. Bachelor turned on the lift to allow downhill skiers to join the search, while others fanned out on snowshoes and snowmobiles. A helicopter flew over Denham twice, Hemphill said, and while Denham saw it, the helicopter’s spotlight narrowly missed him both times. Denham told rescuers he had seen the headlamps and other lights used by members of the search party waiting near the bottom of the Northwest Express lift, Hemphill said, and left a snow cave he had built to walk out and meet them. Rescuers learned Denham’s last trip up the mountain had led him to the Sparks Lake Run, a black-diamond rated slope and the westernmost trail on the mountain. Black diamond is considered advanced. Denham was skiing alone, and when he encountered terrain that was too difficult for him, he decided to take off his skis and walk down. Denham walked down the ungroomed run for some time, Hemphill said, eventually leaving his skis behind and heading across the mountain into the trees where he dug his snow cave after becoming cold and tired. Goggins said Mt. Bachelor ski patrollers had performed a sweep run on the Sparks Lake Run at the end of the day, but Denham had not yet been reported missing, and patrollers did not see him. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Luke Continued from A1 As of Monday, when Commissioner-elect Tony DeBone takes office, the antics could disappear from the County Commission. Also gone will be Luke’s institutional memory of county and state government, which covers his 12 years on the commission and nearly a decade in the Oregon Legislature. DeBone, a La Pine resident who turns 44 today, defeated Bend resident Luke, 64, in the May Republican primary. Despite a long political career, Luke could be brusque as a commissioner. He said — and voted — exactly what he thought during his tenure on the County Commission and in the Oregon House. In at least one case — Deschutes County’s effort to protect groundwater in the southern portion of the county — that approach cost Luke the support of some residents who said Luke did not listen to their concerns. “You never have to wonder what Dennis really thinks,” County Administrator Dave Kanner said. Luke always voted for what he thought was right, said his friend Dave Hellbusch, a fellow retired homebuilder who often meets Luke for coffee.

History, education Born and raised in Salem, Luke has lived in Central Oregon since 1973 and proudly recites history about the area and his wife Joanne’s family connections to Deschutes Junction and other areas. Luke attended Oregon State University for three years, beginning in 1965. He came close to earning a degree, but left school around the time he got married. At the time, Luke had only a year to go before he would have earned his degree, said Dave Stauph, a writer in the university’s news office. Luke started working in construction, but never forgot his unfinished degree. Nearly 30 years later, he began taking classes in 1995, shortly after winning election to the state Legislature. Luke earned his bachelor’s degree in liberal studies in 1998, Stauph said. “My other education before that was life,” Luke said Wednesday. He continued on to earn a master’s degree in public administration from Portland State University in 2003, said Scott Gallagher, director of communications for the university. Another source of pride for Luke is his son Brian, a Navy commander, according to former County Administrator Mike Maier. In 1994, the Lukes’

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Dennis Luke talks about pictures from his career in public office during his Dec. 15 retirement party at the Deschutes County offices. After scanning the room, Luke said he was “very happy to see a lot of friends here.” eldest son, Matthew, died of cancer at the age of 25, The Bulletin reported. Later in the same year, Brian Luke, then 24, was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma and underwent chemotherapy.

What next?

Into politics Before entering politics, Luke spent two decades building homes and small commercial projects and had his own company. His interest in politics developed during a 1991 term as president of the Oregon Home Builders Association. “I think that’s where he got interested in politics and realized the things you need to get done, you can get done through politics,” Hellbusch said. Luke won election to the first of three terms in the Oregon House in 1992, after entering the race late, recalled Neil Bryant, a Bend business attorney who was in the midst of his first Oregon Senate campaign at the time. “The Republican candidate for the House seat resigned suddenly, and we needed another good candidate quickly,” Bryant said. Luke was a full-time homebuilder, but jumped right into the campaign and won despite his opponent’s head start. In 1998, after Luke reached the term limit for the Oregon House, he ran for Deschutes County commissioner and was elected.

Fiscal legacy One of Luke’s legacies is Deschutes County’s relatively good financial health, in comparison to other government agen-

Luke listens to Commissioner Alan Unger at a Dec. 15 meeting. cies weathering the recession, according to two people who worked with him. Luke also said saving money was one of his top priorities. Savings built up during good times have allowed the county to largely avoid major cuts in services, despite sharp declines in some revenues. “Dennis was a saver,” said Maier, who worked as Deschutes County administrator until 2006 and is now a member of the county’s budget committee. “I think the county’s financial situation now, which I think is good, is because of Dennis’ feeling on not wasting the funds and socking them away until you really need them.” Tim Knopp, executive vice president of the Central Oregon Builders Association and a former Republican state legislator, agreed. “I think the biggest testament is the county budget is in good shape compared to other municipal budgets,” Knopp said. Luke said his proudest

Iran Continued from A1 Operating out of Voice of America’s Persian News Network, Kambiz Hosseini and Saman Arbabi have started a weekly program, “Parazit,” that has drawn comparisons to Jon Stewart’s “The Daily Show” for its satiric take on Iran’s news of the day. President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is a favorite target. “His bloopers are fantastic,” said Arbabi, 37, as he and Hosseini, 35, cozied up to pints of Guinness in a bar. “The same way Bush was — he says a lot of dumb things without thinking about it, and at the same time he’s president of one of the most important countries in the region. And they have nukes.” Hosseini grinned. In one segment, he said, “Saman and I sort of re-enacted how when his family’s asleep, he goes under the blanket and has a flashlight and goes on Facebook,” which is blocked in Iran. To the dismay of Ahmadinejad’s government, the show has struck a nerve in Iran. “Their following is incredible,” said Steve Redisch, VOA’s executive editor. Although VOA doesn’t know how many people watch “Parazit” via their forbidden satellite dishes, posts from its Facebook page have been viewed more than 17 million times in the past month — a staggering number compared with other VOA programming. The show’s YouTube channel generates another 45,000 hits each week. Iranians have coined a new term: “Paraziti,” or like “Parazit,” with fans dressing as Arbabi or sending in images of their families watching the show. “You’ll see 18 Iranians of all ages — from an old bald man to teenage girls — all sitting qui-

Astrid Riecken / For The Washington Post

“Parazit” host Kambiz Hosseini, left, and producer Saman Arbabi finish recording a segment of the show broadcast from Washington as part of Voice of America’s Persian News Network. Both were born in Iran but now are U.S. citizens. etly, watching “Parazit,’ ” Arbabi said. It is a scene that couldn’t have taken place if the two had not joined the exodus of Iranians who left the country after the 1979 revolution. The show’s creators met in 2007, after Arbabi, a VOA videographer, had an Iranian-style music video accepted by the Tribeca Film Festival, and Hosseini interviewed him for Radio Free Europe, where he was working at the time. Both were born in Iran, but their lives had taken starkly different paths after the revolution that ended the reign of the shah and brought the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to power. Arbabi, who was 6 at the time, quickly learned to lead a double life, lying at his Tehran school about the fact that his family owned a VCR, played cards, drank liquor and listened to VOA radio. He left in 1985 at age 12, when 13-year-old boys were being drafted to fight in Iran’s war against Iraq. His family eventu-

quired property owners in the south county to install nitratereducing septic systems, or take other measures to prevent nitrates from seeping into the groundwater. But residents raised concerns about the cost, and some questioned the scientific studies. Voters repealed the ordinance in March 2009 through a citizen-initiated referendum. The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has since taken over the search for solutions. DeBone, Luke’s primary election opponent, said in April that many residents felt Luke’s approach “left us with a bad taste in our mouths.” For example, Luke threatened to shut down a March 2008 hearing on the nitrate ordinance after one woman’s comment that residents would “no longer tolerate your dictatorial attitude” drew a burst of applause from the audience. “Dennis was a smart guy, there’s no doubt about it,” said Robert Ray, a south county resident recently. “I just thought he got disconnected from the people.”

ally settled in Rockville, Md., where Arbabi embraced American culture, playing varsity football, dating girls, playing drums and listening to Led Zeppelin. Hosseini, an actor, writer and stage director who grew up in the cities of Rasht and Mashhad, didn’t leave Iran until he was much older. He immigrated to the United State a decade ago to follow a girlfriend to Portland and eventually wound up at VOA as an art critic and the host of a cultural show. Both Hosseini and Arbabi became U.S. citizens, and neither has returned to Iran. But they also haven’t left it behind. “We used to hang out and just vent,” said Arbabi, who got his satirical bent from his late father, a chemist-turned-architect who loved dark comedy and biting political cartoons. Combining their frustration with Iran’s status quo with their love for high-energy clowning around, Arbabi and Hosseini came up with an idea to satirize the Iranian news. It was a far cry from regular

achievements include various road projects, such as improving the road between Sunriver and Mount Bachelor, and working to reduce the risk of wildfire in the county.

Groundwater When Deschutes County began moving ahead with an ordinance to address groundwater pollution in the southern area of the county several years ago, Luke believed the county’s approach was correct. State and federal studies had shown nitrate pollution from septic systems was a looming problem in the area, Luke said Wednesday. Nitrates in the groundwater get into rivers, Luke said, and “that comes downstream to Bend and Redmond and Madras. It was important to get it in check as quickly as possible so it doesn’t get into the river system.” In July 2008, Luke and Commissioner Tammy Baney, who was re-elected this year, approved an ordinance that re-

VOA fare, which is funded by the U.S. government. But they were given a 10-minute segment on another VOA show. They called it “Parazit,” which means “static,” a reference to the Iranian government’s repeated attempts to jam foreign satellite programming. It launched shortly before the June 2009 presidential election in Iran. At first their treatment of the election was lighthearted. But when the disputed election resulted in the largest and most violent anti-government protests since the 1979 Islamic revolution, “Parazit” took on a grimmer, more urgent cast. As stories came out of Iran of young people shot on the streets and raped and tortured in prisons, Hosseini and Arbabi tapped into their countrymen’s growing cynicism and anger. “Those were my brother, my sister, my friends in the street,” Hosseini said of the Green Movement, as it came to be called. “Parazit” has been compared to “The Daily Show,” but “there’s a lot of darkness to it; there’s a lot of sad news,” said Arbabi, who lives in Washington. “We have to walk a fine line. We come from that generation of kids who got up in Iran and protested the government. We share their politics, so we echo their voice.” By 2010, the show was so popular that the two were given their own half-hour slot. With about 200 employees, the Persian News Network is currently VOA’s largest foreign language service, reaching an estimated 19.5 percent of adults in Iran, according to VOA. (Those who don’t have satellite dishes can view “Parazit” online or watch it on bootlegged DVDs.) Most Persian News Network programming is made up of straight news and commentary. The hosts are older than Hosseini and Arbabi and generally don’t go on camera in Sex Pistols

While Luke served as county commissioner, he was the one who tracked state legislation that could affect Deschutes County residents. Kanner is still figuring out who will take over that job, but it will likely be a staffer, not a commissioner. “He has an institutional memory of Deschutes County history that will be difficult to replace,” Kanner said. “Actually there was a great deal that I learned from Dennis when I came on board.” At a November commission meeting, Luke joked, “I can do that after January 1, but it won’t be free.” As for what will come next for Luke, he said he does not know, except that he will not seek elected office. In the meantime, he plans to do some work around the house and go fishing. In August, he registered a new business entity — D. Luke Enterprises LLC — with the secretary of state’s office. “I have a lot of expertise on local and state government,” Luke said. Jobs that interest him include working as a project manager representing government agencies on construction projects, or working as a consultant or lobbyist. “What you do in construction is you work very hard to finish the job you’re on, so you can move to the next job,” Luke said Wednesday. “I’m ready to move on to the next one.” Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

T-shirts, nose rings, and greenand black-painted fingernails. “I don’t know if VOA has ever done anything like this,” said Redisch, who has been thrilled with the results. “Parazit” has more than 200,000 Facebook fans. Many of them write in to praise it, criticize it or offer up the latest unintentionally funny material from inside Iran. “We have 70 million correspondents,” said Arbabi, referring to Iran’s population. “They show us what the priorities are in Iran.” It was viewers who urged them to cover a story in which the Iranian government promised to give a free apartment to any athlete who brought home a gold medal from the Asian Games, which were held in November. But when a woman won the gold for wushu, a Chinese martial art, they reneged, saying she had to be married to get the apartment. The announcement was not popular with Iranians, or with the show’s hosts, who frequently dress down Iranian government ministers by name. “We were like, ‘Dude, give her her house,’ ” said Hosseini, who lives in Arlington, Va. The men’s Western-style forthrightness, combined with their innate understanding of the East, mirrors the schizophrenic relationship many young Iranians have with their society. Sometimes it is enough to simply repeat the news from Iran, as Hosseini did in one segment: “The representative of the supreme leader at the University of Yazd said that since the skin of one’s elbow is similar to the skin of a man’s testicles, people should refrain from wearing short-sleeved shirts.” Hosseini paused, a tiny smile tugging at his lips. “This is really real news. This guy really said that.”


2010 • A year in review

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 1, 2011 A7

Disaster, disclosure and discovery As most years are, 2010 was filled with stories of joy, misfortune and perseverance. Unlike in any year before it, though, continuing advancements in science, technology and social media — and massive disclosures of government secrets — made the biggest stories even bigger. More than ever, events like a devastating earthquake in Haiti, a thrilling mine rescue in Chile and a lingering oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico became shared global experiences.

Feb. 12: At least a dusting of snow is recorded in every U.S. state but Hawaii.

Jan. 12: A 7.0-magnitude earthquake strikes Haiti’s capital, killing as many as 300,000 and leaving more than 1.5 million homeless.

NATION & WORLD

March 23: President Barack Obama signs the $1 trillion health care overhaul, concluding his historic push for nearuniversal health coverage — though questions over the law’s constitutionality are winding their way through the courts. July: Weeks of heavy monsoon rains trigger record floods in Pakistan, killing 2,000 and affecting 20 million.

April 23: Arizona enacts the nation’s toughest immigration law that opponents say will encourage discrimination. Its legality is being challenged by the Obama administration.

July 8: In the biggest spy swap since the Cold War, 10 Russians are deported in exchange for four Americans.

May 1: Pakistan-born U.S. citizen Faisal Shahzad fails in an attempt to set off a homemade bomb in an SUV parked in Times Square. He is later sentenced to life in prison.

POLITICS

Jan. 21: The Supreme Court strikes down several campaign finance laws that had limited corporate and union donations. May 18: Following his 2009 party switch, five-term Sen. Arlen Specter is defeated in Pennsylvania’s Democratic primary. He is just one of many longtime incumbents from both parties to be ousted in 2010.

Aug. 17: A mistrial is declared as a jury convicts ousted Gov. Rod Blagojevich on just one count.

Aug. 28: Glenn Beck and Sarah Palin headline their “Restoring Honor” rally in Washington. In October, Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart throw their own “Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear.” Both are attended by tens of thousands.

March 7: Neither Sunnis nor Shiites win a majority in Iraq’s elections, starting nine months of political deadlock and no government.

March 26: A South Korean warship explodes and sinks, killing 46 sailors. April 5: An underground explosion kills 29 miners in West Virginia.

April 15: Ash from an Icelandic volcano, drifting over northern Europe, causes the largest disruption of flights since the 9/11 attacks.

WikiLeaks, the once-fringe whistleblowing website founded by Julian Assange in 2006, rocked the foreign policy world in 2010 by publishing a trove of military records and diplomatic cables, denounced by authorities in the U.S. and elsewhere but hailed by open-government advocates. Massive document dumps began in April — and Assange, though under house arrest, promises more will come.

Aug. 19: The last U.S. combat brigade leaves Iraq, 71⁄2 years after the invasion began. Two weeks later, Obama announces the Iraq War has ended. Oct. 13: After being trapped for more than two months, all 33 Chilean miners are rescued alive.

July 19: The USDA pressures Shirley Sherrod to resign after edited video shows her apparently making racist remarks. After reviewing the entire video, the White House apologizes.

May 31: Israel’s botched raid of a Gaza-bound aid flotilla ends in the deaths of nine activists of Turkish descent. Jan. 19: Massachusetts voters — in an early sign of trouble for President Obama and the Democrats — elect little-known Republican Scott Brown to fill the seat of the Senate’s late liberal lion, Ted Kennedy.

Aug. 7: Elena Kagan is sworn in as a U.S. Supreme Court justice.

Feb. 27: In Chile, an 8.8-magnitude quake kills 521 people and leaves more than 200,000 homeless.

April 20: An oil rig explodes and sinks, killing 11 and triggering the worst oil spill in U.S. history. BP takes 16 weeks to seal the rupture; an estimated 4.9 million barrels of oil seeps into the Gulf of Mexico.

Oct. 4: Long-shot Republican Senate candidate Christine O’Donnell disputes claims about her past: “I’m not a witch. I’m nothing you’ve heard. I’m you.” She loses in November.

Nov. 23: North Korea bombards a South Korean island, further escalating tensions.

Nov. 26: Somali-born Oregonian Mohamed Osman Mohamud, 19, is arrested during an FBI sting and accused of planning a terror attack in Portland. December: Lawmakers furiously push through a tax-cut package, a nuclear treaty and a repeal of the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” ban on gays as Congress’ lame-duck session comes to a close.

Nov. 2: Republicans, riding the support of independents and the energy of tea party activists, take back the House and bolster their ranks in the Senate — a strong rebuke to Obama.

11,500

11,000

ECONOMY & BUSINESS

Daily close of the Dow Jones industrial average January: Toyota recalls millions of vehicles to fix accelerator pedals, launching an epic auto recall. JANUARY

FEBRUARY

Jan. 11: Home run king Mark McGwire admits he used steroids and human growth hormone.

April: The oil spill devastates local economies and slashes market value from BP and other companies. MARCH

May 26: After a two-week slide attributed to concerns over European debt, the Dow closes below 10,000 for the first time in nearly four months. APRIL

MAY

JUNE

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

Jan. 15: The longest annular solar eclipse of the second millennium starts off the year (left), while 2010 ends with a total lunar eclipse during the winter solstice (right).

Nov. 1: The San Francisco Giants win the World Series 3-1 over the Texas Rangers.

Jan. 26: Dinosaur fossils are discovered with pigmented hairlike filaments, perhaps proving that their “dino fuzz” may be related to modern-day bird feathers. Jan. 27: Apple CEO Steve Jobs attempts to revolutionize computing by unveiling the iPad. May: Scientists sequence the Neanderthal genome, allowing them to make the first direct biological comparisons between modern humans and our ancestors. Also, in a first for biology, scientists produce a living cell powered by manmade DNA. July 8: An experimental Swiss solar-powered plane successfully completes its first 24-hour test flight.

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

10,000

DECEMBER

9,500

Jan. 25: James Cameron’s sci-fi spectacle “Avatar” overtakes his shipwreck saga “Titanic” to become the world’s highest-grossing film.

March: NASA reports that the quake in Chile (the fifthstrongest recorded) may have shortened the length of a day by a tiny fraction of a second.

September: Astronomers studying a nearby star find evidence of the first potentially habitable world, aka the “Goldilocks planet,” likely with liquid water, considered vital for life. Though they aren’t sure if this planet even exists, some perspective: In 2000, we knew of just 26 planets outside of our solar system; by 2010, we could count 502. Nov. 17: Physicists trap 38 atoms for more than a 10th of a second in the first time antimatter has been captured.

ENTERTAINMENT

HEALTH & SCIENCE

SPORTS

July 11: Over the drone of vuvuzela horns in South Africa, a goal in extra time gives Spain a 1-0 World Cup victory over the Netherlands.

JULY

10,500

December: Following in Greece’s footsteps, Ireland accepts an $89 billion bailout from the EU and IMF to prop up its banks.

July 21: President Obama signs the most sweeping overhaul of lending and high-finance rules since the Great Depression.

Feb. 7: The New Orleans Saints win 31-17 over the Indianapolis Colts in their first Super Bowl appearance.

Feb. 12: The opening ceremonies of the Vancouver Winter Olympics are dedicated to luger Nodar Kumaritashvili, a 21-year-old from the Republic of Georgia killed hours earlier in a training run. Canada picks up a record 14 gold medals, and the U.S. captures 37 medals overall, the most ever in a Winter Olympics. Feb. 19: Tiger Woods makes his first public appearance since his sex scandal; several companies have dropped the golfer from product endorsements.

November: In a bid to keep interest rates low and spur borrowing, the Fed pledges to buy up to $600 billion in Treasury securities.

Jan. 31: Beyoncé collects six trophies to become the most decorated female at a Grammy ceremony.

March 7: The Iraq War thriller “The Hurt Locker” snags six Academy Awards, while Kathryn Bigelow accepts the first directing Oscar awarded to a woman.

May 8: Betty White, 88, hosts NBC’s “Saturday Night Live” at the behest of half a million Facebook fans. July 12: Director Roman Polanski is finally declared a free man after Swiss authorities reject a U.S. extradition request on a 32-year-old sex conviction.

Nov. 8: Conan O’Brien returns to late-night TV, on TBS, after nine months on the sidelines.

Nov. 21: Justin Bieber, 16, receives four American Music Awards and is the youngest singer to win artist of the year.

OBITUARIES

J.D. Salinger, 91, author, “Catcher in the Rye” (Jan. 27)

John Murtha, 77, outspoken veteran and politician (Feb. 8)

Alexander McQueen, 40, edgy fashion designer (Feb. 11)

Alexander Haig, 85, soldier and statesman (Feb. 20)

Corey Haim, 38, teen heartthrob and TV pitchman (March 10)

Peter Graves, 83, actor, “Mission: Impossible” series (March 14)

Robert Culp, 79, groundbreaking actor, “I Spy” (March 24)

Corin Redgrave, 70, of the famous British acting family (April 6)

Lech Kaczynski, 60, Polish activist turned politician, president (April 10)

Dixie Carter, 70, star of TV’s “Designing Women” (April 10)

Dorothy Height, 98, leading female civil rights activist (April 20)

Lynn Redgrave, 67, 1960s British acting sensation (May 2)

Lena Horne, 92, jazz singer who broke racial barriers (May 9)

Ronnie James Dio, 67, leading heavy metal singer (May 16)

Art Linkletter, 97, media personality, “People Are Funny” (May 26)

Gary Coleman, 42, 1970s child star turned D-list actor (May 28)

Dennis Hopper, 74, edgy actor and filmmaker (May 29)

Rue McClanahan, 76, sexy Southern “Golden Girl” (June 3)

John Wooden, 99, revered UCLA basketball coach (June 4)

Jimmy Dean, 81, country star turned sausage maker (June 13)

Robert Byrd, 92, Senate’s longest-serving member (June 28)

George Steinbrenner, 80, longtime Yankees owner (July 13)

Daniel Schorr, 93, journalist on Nixon’s “enemies list” (July 23)

Patricia Neal, 84, willowy actress best known for “Hud” (Aug. 8)

Ted Stevens, 86, Alaska’s longserving senator (Aug. 9)

Edwin Newman, 91, longtime NBC News correspondent (Aug. 13)

Paul Conrad, 86, Pulitzerwinning political cartoonist (Sept.4)

Eddie Fisher, 82, troubled 1950s pop singer (Sept. 19)

Arthur Penn, 88, classic director, “Little Big Man” (Sept. 28)

Tony Curtis, 85, heartthrob turned respected actor (Sept. 29)

Barbara Billingsley, 94, actress, mother in “Leave It to Beaver”(Oct.16)

Tom Bosley, 83, actor best known for “Happy Days” (Oct. 19)

Leslie Nielsen, 84, dramatic turned comedic actor (Nov. 28)

Elizabeth Edwards, 61, health care advocate, political wife (Dec. 7)

Richard Holbrooke, 69, longtime diplomat (Dec. 13)

Bob Feller, 92, teen pitching sensation, Hall of Famer (Dec. 15)

Graphic by The Associated Press and David Wray / The Bulletin


A8 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT Inside

Hangover help Have a few too many glasses of Champagne last night? Here’s what to do, Page B6

B

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/communitylife

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 2011

B e s t p h ot o s of 2 0 1 0 Photographers capture the images that go with the year’s most important events, but they also give us a Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Three Sisters Backcountry Inc. co-owner Shane Fox, of Bend, skis through a deep powder chute in an area known as Proboscus, on the Tam McArthur Rim on Jan. 27.

window into life in our communities. Here we celebrate the Bulletin’s most powerful photographs from 2010.

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Adrian Pinto, then 2½, from Bend, plays in a water fountain at Juniper Swim and Fitness Center during his first trip to the pool on the first day of summer, June 21.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

An American Robin feeds three newborns in a nest on the front porch of a west Bend neighborhood home on July 16.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Willi Chevalier, of Sigmaringen, Germany, shows off his beard for the crowd during the National Beard and Moustache Championships held June 5 at the Les Schwab Amphitheater in Bend.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Caitlyn Sakelik, front, grimaces after hail hit her head near the Deschutes River in Bend on July 26. She and her friend Ashley Davis, right, use a raft and float tubes to shield themselves. Redmond’s Cody Bulkley makes a diving catch on a shallow fly ball in a game against Mountain View on March 19. Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Deda Porter, of Canyon City, participates in a protest of a proposed purchase of property for a new Aryan Nation headquarters in John Day on Feb. 26.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Freddy Finney-Jordet can barely contain his excitement during the Tour du Chocolat event at Bend’s Tower Theatre on April 2.

National Guard Staff Sgt. John Gates, of Klamath Falls, plays with his daughter Madison as he and other troops reconnect with their families at Vince Genna Stadium in Bend on April 18.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

A young male black bear reacts to being shot by a tranquilizer dart in the backyard of a Bend home on Sept. 27.


T EL EV ISION

B2 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

New year full of possibility succeeds hard year for many Dear Readers: Welcome to 2011! While the last year has been arduous for many of us, a new one has arrived, bringing with it our chance for a new beginning. Today is the day we discard destructive old habits for healthy new ones, and with that in mind, I will share Dear Abby’s often-requested list of New Year’s Resolutions — which were adapted by my mother, Pauline Phillips, from the original credo of Al-Anon: Just for Today: I will live through this day only. I will not brood about yesterday or obsess about tomorrow. I will not set farreaching goals or try to overcome all of my problems at once. I know that I can do something for 24 hours that would overwhelm me if I had to keep it up for a lifetime. Just for Today: I will be happy. I will not dwell on thoughts that depress me. If my mind fills with clouds, I will chase them away and fill it with sunshine. Just for Today: I will accept what is. I will face reality. I will correct those things that I can correct and accept those I cannot. Just for Today: I will improve my mind. I will read something that requires effort, thought and concentration. I will not be a mental loafer. Just for Today: I will make a conscious effort to be agreeable. I will be kind and courteous to those who cross my path, and I’ll not speak ill of others. I will improve my appearance, speak softly, and not interrupt when someone else is talking. Just for today, I will refrain from improving anybody but myself. Just for Today: I will do something positive to improve my health. If I’m a smoker, I’ll quit. If I am overweight, I will eat healthfully — if only just for today. And not only that, I will get off the couch and take a brisk walk, even if it’s only around the block. Just for Today: I will gather the courage to do what is right and take responsibility for my own actions. And now, Dear Readers, I would like to share an item that was sent to me by I.J. Bhatia, a reader who lives in New Delhi, India:

DEAR ABBY

‘Robert E. Lee’ a disappointing kickoff to Civil War retrospectives By Hank Stuever

Dear Abby: This year, no resolutions, only some guidelines. The Holy Vedas say, “Man has subjected himself to thousands of self-inflicted bondages. Wisdom comes to a man who lives according to the true eternal laws of nature.” The prayer of St. Francis (of which there are several versions) contains a powerful message: “Lord, make me an instrument of your peace: “where there is hatred, let me sow love, “where there is injury, pardon; “where there is doubt, faith; “where there is despair, hope; “where there is darkness, light; “and where there is sadness, joy. “O Divine Master, “grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console; “to be understood, as to understand; “to be loved, as to love; “for it is in giving that we receive, “it is in pardoning that we are pardoned, “and it is in dying that we are born to Eternal Life.” And so, Dear Readers, may this new year bring with it good health, peace and joy to all of you. — Love, Abby

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To receive a collection of Abby’s most frequently requested poems and essays, send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 to: Dear Abby — Keepers Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447.

The Washington Post

It seems we have about four years of Civil War sesquicentennial stuff ahead of us, which is good news for history professors and re-enactment dweebs, but what does it mean for television? Looking across the corpse-strewn field of Civil War documentaries that have come before, one doesn’t yet see much hope of anyone outdoing Ken Burns’ epic series of 1990. But there’s plenty of time and plenty of work left to be done. “Robert E. Lee,” a sturdy new documentary from the folks at public television’s “American Experience” series, airs Monday night, and it isn’t much of a stirring opening salvo in retrospectives. To its credit, it exhibits an artfully taut, no-nonsense approach that relies on documents, drawings, paintings, photographs, experts and simple narration, all principally guided by the tiny type in its subtitle: “At War With His Country ... and Himself.” (I’m just relieved nowadays when these docs don’t have B-list TV actors re-creating historical moments, and this one doesn’t.) The film, by Mark Zwonitzer and Mark Samels, posits no groundbreaking theories about Lee’s psychological state, interior life or military prowess. Lee still is what he always was to most of us: a statue, an address, an icon of the old (and new) South

— and, to those who adored late1970s prime-time schlock, a nickname for the muscle car in the “The Dukes of Hazzard.” Yet Lee’s story remains a central and fascinating element of the great American conflict: Born in 1807 into the Virginia elite, this son of an Army colonel and Virginia governor was educated at West Point, where the grueling austerity and hard work instilled in him a lifelong adoration for discipline, obedience and honor. He served in the U.S. Army, building his reputation in campaigns through the Mexican interior. As a handsome young man, he successfully wooed and married one of the uppermost young women of Virginia society (Mary Custis, step-granddaughter to George Washington). Then it goes a little wrong or a lot right — or a little right and a lot wrong. That one can take issue with how scholars portray Lee’s decision in 1861 to resign his Army post and join the Confederacy is merely the first sigh in a long talk about unresolved vibes that lurk beneath history. “Robert E. Lee” exhibits no ambivalence about the man or his decision to rebel. He was the picture of valor and yet he was wrong. The film summons forth a smattering of endowed-chair academics and other history professors — Civil War experts all — to explain how Lee backed the wrong side for the wrong reasons. In short, he was a slavery apologist who let his own Old Dominion snobbery and sense of honor lead him to a righteous path of

“American Experience: Robert E. Lee” When: 9 p.m. Monday Where: PBS

war. “He certainly never questioned the values of his class,” history professor Michael Fellman observes. “He would talk about ‘my people’ ... the white people of his social class, born to rule. His honor is involved in the defense of his ‘people.’ ” Complicated, ill-tempered, rigid, mean; entirely gray-haired just six months into the war; initially disrespected by his troops and reviled by the Confederate citizenry. But then tides turn — some battles are won — and the transformation begins, leading to defeat but also leading to immortality. Yes, I’ve glossed over a lot, and rest assured, “Robert E. Lee” moves at a much more reasonable pace. But why not take a moment to think about what we want to see on TV about the Civil War between now and 2015? This could almost be an open letter to PBS, the History Channel and anyone else who feels up to the task. As the anniversaries of this skirmish and that battle trundle through, I’m more eager to know of the domestic details of the 1860s, nuggets of everyday life on the periphery of the Civil War. In the 21st century, we are more emotionally and academically equipped to revisit the war era

through the eyes of blacks, Native Americans and women. We are more able to have conversations about culture, fashion, food, song — all the things that exist on the margins. To use “Robert E. Lee” for one handy example of what I’m looking for, it barely glimpses the life of Mary Custis Lee, who, for a number of reasons, sparked my interest this time — perhaps even more than my interest in her husband’s role in the Civil War. One of the film’s more interesting, fleeting tangents quotes a letter from Lee scolding his daughters for attending too many social events while battles raged and tens of thousands of men died. This resonates in today’s culture, in which so many Americans go off to fight a war on the other side of the world while the rest of us party on. (Lee’s daughters seem to have a paid a price anyhow, remaining unmarried all their lives.) “Robert E. Lee” should in no way have to shoulder this wish list in its concise 90 minutes. It’s a nice appetizer. Lee, we can all agree, was a whole lotta man. Yet it would be a shame to squander the sesquicentennial on too many trips to the same old battlefields to re-examine welldocumented troop movements; to spend more time quoting the letters sent to and from Richmond; to enumerate body counts and reassess failed strategies once more. How come the Civil War always has so much guy stuff, military stuff, white stuff? Doesn’t it belong to all Americans by now?

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Premiere. ’ 132 31 34 46 (3:00) ››› “Die Hard” (1988) ’ Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone 133 35 133 45 Twilight Zone In Touch With Dr. Charles Stanley Hour of Power ‘G’ Å Billy Graham Classic Crusades ›› “The Moment After” (1999) David A.R. White. ›› “The Moment After” (1999) David A.R. White. In the Blink of an Eye 205 60 130 King of Queens ››› “Men in Black” (1997) Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith. Å ››› “Bad Boys” (1995, Action) Martin Lawrence, Will Smith. Å (10:05) › “Rush Hour 3” (2007, Action) Jackie Chan, Chris Tucker. Å 16 27 11 28 King of Queens ›››› “The Pride of the Yankees” (1942, Biography) Gary Cooper, Teresa Wright, ››› “My Darling Clementine” (1946, Western) Henry Fonda, Linda Darnell. Wyatt (9:15) ››› “Tammy and the Bachelor” (1957) Debbie Reynolds, Leslie Nielsen. A ›››› “Sergeant York” (1941, War) Gary 101 44 101 29 Earp and comrades face a showdown at the O.K. Corral. Å Babe Ruth. The life of baseball great Lou Gehrig. Å backwoods girl nurses a downed pilot back to health. Cooper. Å (DVS) Sister Wives ‘14’ Sister Wives ‘14’ Sister Wives ‘14’ Sister Wives ‘14’ Sister Wives ‘14’ Sister Wives ‘14’ Sister Wives ’ ‘14’ Å Sister Wives Special ’ ‘14’ Å Sister Wives ‘14’ Sister Wives ‘14’ 178 34 32 34 Sister Wives ’ ‘14’ Å ›››› “Saving Private Ryan” (1998, War) Tom Hanks. U.S. troops look for a missing comrade during World War II. Å ›› “Righteous Kill” (2008) Robert De Niro. Premiere. 17 26 15 27 (4:45) ››› “Air Force One” (1997) Harrison Ford, Gary Oldman. Å (4:30) “Ben 10: Alien Swarm” ‘PG’ “Teen Titans: Trouble in Tokyo” (2006), Scott Menville “Firebreather” (2010) Voices of Jesse Head. ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill God, Devil Bob Family Guy ‘PG’ The Boondocks The Boondocks 84 Bert-Conqueror Bert-Conqueror Bert-Conqueror Bert-Conqueror Bert-Conqueror Bert-Conqueror Bert-Conqueror Sturgis Sturgis Cops ‘G’ Å Sturgis Wild Ride The 2010 Rally. ‘G’ Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Bert-Conqueror Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Hot in Cleveland Hot in Cleveland Hot in Cleveland Hot in Cleveland Hot in Cleveland Hot in Cleveland Hot in Cleveland ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Andy Griffith NCIS Double Identity ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS A Navy diver is murdered. ‘PG’ NCIS Moonlighting ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Obsession ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Borderland ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Truth or Consequences ’ ‘14’ 15 30 23 30 NCIS Masquerade ’ ‘PG’ Å Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ ›› “Barbershop” (2002) Ice Cube, Anthony Anderson. Premiere. ’ ››› “Baby Boy” (2001, Drama) Tyrese Gibson, Omar Gooding. ’ 191 48 37 54 Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:55) ›› “Jaws 2” 1978, Horror Roy Scheider, Lorraine Gary. ‘PG’ Å › “Jaws III” 1983, Horror Dennis Quaid. ’ ‘PG’ Å (8:40) › “Jaws the Revenge” 1987 Lorraine Gary. Å (10:10) ›››› “Jaws” 1975, Horror Roy Scheider. ’ ‘PG’ Å (4:19) ›››› “Patton” 1970, Biography George C. Scott. ‘PG’ Å Fox Legacy Fox Legacy (7:46) ››› “All That Jazz” 1979 Roy Scheider. ‘R’ Fox Legacy (10:07) ››› “Speed” 1994, Action Keanu Reeves. ‘R’ Å Firsthand ‘PG’ Firsthand ‘PG’ Insane Cinema: Chasing the Lotus Renner/Moto Cubed ‘14’ Firsthand ‘PG’ Firsthand ‘PG’ Insane Cinema: Chasing the Lotus Renner/Moto Cubed ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘PG’ Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Central Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Academy Golf Academy (4:00) “All I Want for Christmas” ›› “Eloise at Christmastime” (2003, Comedy) Julie Andrews. ‘G’ Å ›› “Home Alone 2: Lost in New York” (1992, Comedy) Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci. Å (10:45) ›› “Home Alone 2: Lost in New York” (1992) 24/7 Penguins/Capitals: Road to the (6:15) “War Games: The Dead Code” 2008, Suspense Matt Lanter. Premiere. Govern- ›› “Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief” 2010 Logan Lerman. A ›› “The Day the Earth Stood Still” 2008 Keanu Reeves. The arrival of an extraterresHBO 425 501 425 10 NHL Winter Classic ’ Å ment officials track a teenage computer whiz. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å youth learns that his father is the Greek god Poseidon. ‘PG’ trial visitor triggers global upheaval. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders IFC 105 105 (3:30) ›› “Orphan” (5:35) ››› “Catch Me if You Can” 2002, Comedy-Drama Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hanks. A teenage scam ››› “National Lampoon’s Animal House” 1978, Comedy John Belushi. Delta House ››› “Greenberg” 2010, Comedy-Drama Ben Stiller, Greta Gerwig. Premiere. Two lost MAX 400 508 7 2009 ‘R’ artist poses as a pilot, surgeon and lawyer. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å members try to save their repulsive fraternity. ’ ‘R’ Å souls in Los Angeles make a connection. ’ ‘R’ Å Locked Up Abroad Panama ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad Spain ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad Bangkok ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad Panama ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad Spain ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad Bangkok ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad Tokyo ‘14’ NGC 157 157 T.U.F.F. Puppy T.U.F.F. Puppy Ren & Stimpy Ren & Stimpy ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Glenn Martin Iron Man: Arm. Iron Man: Arm. Iron Man: Arm. NTOON 89 115 189 Trophy Hunt Best of West Outdoors Steve’s Outdoor Lethal Game Chasers Outdoors American Archer Ted Nugent Hunt Masters Fast and Furious Outdoor America Best of West Adv. Abroad OUTD 37 307 43 ›› “Valkyrie” 2008, Historical Drama Tom Cruise, Kenneth Branagh. iTV. Col. Claus Inside the NFL (iTV) NFL news and high- ›› “Knowing” 2009, Science Fiction Nicolas Cage, Rose Byrne. iTV. A note found in a ››› “Inglourious Basterds” 2009, War Brad Pitt. iTV. Jewish-American soldiers seek SHO 500 500 von Stauffenberg attempts to assassinate Hitler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å lights. ’ ‘PG’ Å time capsule predicts disastrous events. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Nazi scalps in German-occupied France. ’ ‘R’ Barrett-Jackson Auction Marathon From Scottsdale, Ariz. Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘G’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘G’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘G’ SPEED 35 303 125 (6:35) › “The Master of Disguise” 2002 Dana Carvey. ›› “The Proposal” 2009 Sandra Bullock. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Dear John” 2010, Romance Channing Tatum. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “G-Force” 2009, Action Bill Nighy. ’ ‘PG’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:15) ›› “Pontypool” 2008, Horror Ste- (5:55) › “The Objective” 2008 Jonas Ball. A special ops team “The Devil’s Ground” 2008 Daryl Hannah. College students › “Halloween II” 2009, Horror Malcolm McDowell. Premiere. Unstoppable Michael My- (10:50) › “Sorority Row” 2009 Briana TMC 525 525 phen McHattie. ’ ‘NR’ Å becomes lost in an evil place. ’ ‘NR’ Å explore an American Indian burial ground. ‘R’ Å ers continues his murderous rampage. ’ ‘R’ Å Evigan. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Å WEC’s Greatest Knockouts WEC’s Best Submissions WEC Best of 2010 A review of the best fights, knockouts and submissions. World Extreme Cagefighting WEC’s Greatest Knockouts VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls ›› “Random Hearts” 1999, Drama Harrison Ford. ‘R’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 1, 2011 B3

CALENDAR TODAY POLAR BEAR PLUNGE: Take an icy plunge into the Lodge Village’s outdoor pool; hot chocolate served; free; 10 a.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 800-486-8591 or www.sunriver-resort. com/traditions. ON THE ONES PARTY: Featuring a performance by Portland-based artist DJ Mud, with Mosley Wotta; $7 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-5451. VIOLIN RECITAL: Morganne Aaberg performs selections from Mozart, Bach, Albeniz, Brahms and more; free; 4 p.m.; Holy Trinity Church, 18143 Cottonwood Road, Sunriver; 541-593-1084 or www.sunrivermusic.org.

MONDAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Finding Nouf” by Zoe Ferraris; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7085 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

TUESDAY GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “I Am Because We Are,” which explores Madonna’s journey to Malawi to see how AIDS and poverty affect children; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY “IT’S IN THE BAG” LECTURE SERIES: Hospitality management professor Sandy Chen presents the lecture “This Ain’t No Leisurely Bus Tour,” which will explore senior travel; free; noon-1 p.m.; OSUCascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541322-3100 or www.OSUcascades. edu/lunchtime-lectures. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DON CARLO”: Starring Roberto Alagna, Marina Poplavskaya, Anna Smirnova, Simon Keenlyside and Ferruccio Furlanetto in an encore presentation of Verdi’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541382-6347. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portlandbased acoustic band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

THURSDAY BIG BOOK SALE: A selection of books, puzzles and books on tape will be on sale; proceeds benefit the United Senior Citizens of Bend and the Bend Senior Center; 9 a.m.2:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Happenin’ Hibernation”; $15, $10 museum members; 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.

GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Zookeeper’s Wife” by Diane Ackerman; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1081 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “BOOMERS, XERS AND MILLENNIALS — CAN WE ALL GET ALONG?”: Explore characteristics, communications styles and more about different generations; free; 6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portland-based acoustic band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: Preview night for the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; with a champagne and dessert reception; $10; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.beattickets.org.

FRIDAY BIG BOOK SALE: A selection of books, puzzles and books on tape will be on sale; proceeds benefit the United Senior Citizens of Bend and the Bend Senior Center; 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Happenin’ Hibernation”; $15, $10 museum members; 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “BOOMERS, XERS AND MILLENNIALS — CAN WE ALL GET ALONG?”: Explore characteristics, communications styles and more about different generations; free; 1 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5-9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: Nine actors present a live-radio version of the classic holiday tale about George Bailey and his guardian angel; $5, free ages 5 and younger; 7 p.m.; Madras High School, 390 S.E. 10th St.; 541-475-7265 or dhayes@509J.net. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portland-based acoustic band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES”: A screening of the R-rated 2009 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-4753351 or www.jcld.org. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org. GRANT SABIN: The Colorado Springs, Colo.-based indie-folk act performs, with Empty Space Orchestra; $5 plus fees in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

SATURDAY Jan. 8 “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST”: Starring Deborah Voigt, Marcello Giordani and Lucio Gallo in a presentation of Puccini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. WINTER TRAILS DAY: Try snowshoeing, with guided hikes and refreshments; wear weatherappropriate clothing and waterproof boots; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Swampy Lake Sno-park, Cascade Lakes Highway 17 miles west of Bend, Bend; 541-385-0594 or www.rei.com/stores/events/96. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: Nine actors present a live-radio version of the classic holiday tale about George Bailey and his guardian angel; $5, free ages 5 and younger; 7 p.m.; Madras High School, 390 S.E. 10th St.; 541475-7265 or dhayes@509J.net. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller William Watson and music by the Tune Dawgs; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.beattickets.org. “THE BIG LEBOWSKI”: A screening of the R-rated 1998 film, with a costume contest; $10; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. JON WAYNE & THE PAIN: The Minneapolis-based reggae rock act performs; $5 plus fees in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.bendticket.com.

SUNDAY Jan. 9 “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org. SECOND SUNDAY: Suzanne Burns reads from a selection of her works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121034 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 3:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. CHAMPAGNE CHAMPAGNE: The Seattle hip-hop group performs, with Mad Rad, Cloaked Characters and Joanna Lee; $8; 8 p.m.; Old Mill Music Lounge, 360 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, #210, Bend; www.bendticket.com.

MONDAY Jan. 10 BOWL GAME SCREENING: Watch Auburn play Oregon in the BCS National Championship game; $10; 5:30 p.m.; Pine Theater, 214 N. Main St., Prineville; 541-416-1014.

TAILGATE AT THE TOWER: Watch the Oregon Ducks play the Auburn Tigers, with a barbecue buffet; proceeds benefit the Oregon Club of Central Oregon and the Tower Theatre Foundation; $25; 5:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL WINTER CONCERT SERIES: Featuring a performance by the North Carolinabased Steep Canyon Rangers; $15, $10 students in advance, $20, $12 students at the door; 8 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org.

TUESDAY Jan. 11 “THE AMERICAN CHARACTER”: Discuss how ideas of individualism and volunteerism are at odds within the American character; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. RECESS — BREAK TIME FOR GROWNUPS: A night of games or crafts for adults; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1081 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

WEDNESDAY Jan. 12 “THE BEAT GENERATION”: Turn on to the Beat generation with Steven Bidlake; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.beattickets.org.

THURSDAY Jan. 13 BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “What’s the Matter?”; $15, $10 museum members; 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Unaccustomed Earth” by Jhumpa Lahiri; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. COUNTERINSURGENCY IN AFGHANISTAN: Joseph A. L’Etoile talks about spending 10 months in Afghanistan advising the U.S. and allied governments on counterinsurgency operations; free; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7257. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org.

FRIDAY Jan. 14 BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “What’s the Matter?”; $15, $10 museum members; 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “THE HUSTLER”: A screening of the unrated 1961 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

M T For Saturday, Jan. 1

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BLACK SWAN (R) 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 4:55, 7:35, 10:10 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 11:20 a.m., 2:10, 5, 7:50 HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:40, 7:20, 9:55 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 11:25 a.m., 2:05, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 2:30, 5:05, 7:45, 10:15 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:30, 10

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 11:40 a.m., 9:15

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER 3-D (PG) 11:05 a.m., 1:45, 4:25, 7:05, 9:45 THE FIGHTER (R) 12:10, 2:50, 5:25, 8:05, 10:40 GULLIVER’S TRAVELS 3-D (PG) 11:55 a.m., 2, 4:05, 6:45, 9:25 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 11:20 a.m., 2:30, 6:25, 9:35 HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 2:15, 5:05, 7:50, 10:35 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 12:20, 2:10, 2:40, 4:30, 5:15, 6:50, 7:45, 9:20, 10:05 TANGLED (PG) 11:15 a.m., 1:35, 4, 6:35, 9:10 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 12:15, 2:45, 5:20, 7:55, 10:30 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 11 a.m., 4:35, 7:20 TRON: LEGACY 3-D (PG) Noon, 3:55, 6:40, 9:40, 10:45 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 11:10 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:40, 2:25, 4:15, 5, 7:10, 7:35, 9:50, 10:15

UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 4:50, 7:30, 10 YOGI BEAR (PG) 2:20, 4:40, 7 YOGI BEAR 3-D (PG) 11:30 a.m., 1:55, 4:10, 6:30, 8:40 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) EDITOR’S NOTE: The Rose Bowl will screen at 1 p.m. and the Fiesta Bowl will screen at 5:30 p.m. today. Doors open an hour before the game.

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

GULLIVER’S TRAVELS (PG) 10 a.m., noon, 2, 4, 6, 8

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 10:30 a.m., 1, 3:30, 6, 8:30 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 10:15 a.m., 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 YOGI BEAR (PG) 10 a.m., 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 12:30, 3 GULLIVER’S TRAVELS (PG) 1, 3:15, 5:15, 7:30 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 12:30, 3, 5:30, 8 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 5:30, 7:45 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 1, 4, 7

TNT launches 3rd season of superb ‘Southland’ By David Wiegand San Francisco Chronicle

SAN FRANCISCO — You could almost call it a television miracle, not just that the superb cop procedural “Southland” is about to launch its third season on Tuesday, but, more important, that it has pretty much maintained its quality despite being batted around by NBC before getting rescued by TNT last year. Executive producer Ann Biderman (“NYPD Blue”) has stuck with this show since the beginning, and you can tell with every episode that it’s a labor not only of love, but of art. Unlike Dick Wolf’s multi-headed “Law & Order” franchise, or the more recently successful “CSI’s,” “Southland” has always been at least as much about the men and women who try to keep the peace in Los Angeles as it is about the actual crimes. It’s a rather delicate balance, because Biderman and her writers have to make sure that there is enough cops-and-thugs stuff in there to catch our initial interest, but not so much that it obscures what really keeps us coming back, characters like middle-aged Officer John Cooper (Michael Cudlitz), who’s been popping pain pills and girdling his midsection every day just to be able to move; Detective Lydia Adams (Regina King) whose calm and sympathetic style is already at odds with that of her showboating new partner, Detective Josie Ochoa (Jenny Gago); Detective Sammy Bryant (Shawn Hatosy) and his partner in the gang division, Detective Nate Moretta (Kevin Alejandro); and Officer Ben Sherman (Ben McKenzie), the hunky rookie who’s proving he’s a lot more than just a pretty face. The show premiered on NBC in April 2009 and was picked up for a second season a month later. At the last minute, the second-season premiere in September 2009 was pushed back and then canceled. Last spring, TNT bought the original episodes as well as the shows from the unaired second season. Why didn’t “Southland” work with NBC? In large part because it wasn’t given much of a chance. The aborted second season prevented the establishment of a solid viewer base. Had “Southland” returned on NBC in September, it would have moved to

Friday, which would have been that proverbial kiss of TV death. One way or another, “Southland” was doomed on NBC. There are some small changes in the show under the TNT banner. The focus is a bit narrower, but the highly detailed characterization has not been lost. Tom Everett Scott’s Russell Clarke, Adams’ former partner, is on desk duty now, and makes a brief cameo appearance in the season opener. But remember, “Southland” is very much an ensemble show, which keeps the door open for any character to gain more screen time in the future. Tuesday’s episode focuses on the murder of two young Latino men by thugs working for the father of a teenage rape victim, and the rape-murder of an office cleaning woman by a security guard. Ochoa and Adams are pretty sure they’ve got the cleaning woman’s killer, but they have to play him while they await DNA tests. The delay enables us to see the potential for conflict in their partnership. Before the cleaning woman’s body is found, Adams tells the woman’s daughter that they’ll find her mother. Later, Ochoa takes issue with giving the young woman false hope. On the other hand, they do a mean good-cop, bettercop when they confront their suspect, as Ochoa distracts him with a lot of sly chatter about how cool his car is, effectively, as they put it, messing with his head. The characterizations are carefully nuanced in “Southland,” and the performances are equal to the quality of writing. The acting is superb throughout, but Cudlitz’s John Cooper is the pained heart of the series. He is a man in constant agony, not only from the physical pain of his back problems, but the emotional pain of his broken marriage. In the end, he has to be helped into the patrol car by Sherman after a bloody downtown shoot-out and then drives himself to the hospital to try to get his former wife, Laurie (Hedy Burress), to get him more painkillers. But we know that meds can never numb the real pain at the core of Cooper’s being. The TV landscape is awash with cop shows, but few come close to the quality of “Southland.” Its fans should be grateful that it’s found a home, at last, on TNT.

A taste of what’s on OWN The Washington Post The Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) debuts today at noon on stations previously known as Discovery Health (check with your cable or satellite provider or try a channel locator device at Oprah.com). Winfrey will start things off herself, hosting a one-hour show detailing the network’s programs. • “Oprah Presents Master Class” (one hour) has a preview episode tonight at 7 (featuring Jay-Z); regular episodes (beginning with Diane Sawyer) start Sunday at 10 p.m.

• “In the Bedroom with Dr. Laura Berman” (one hour) debuts Monday at 10 p.m. • “Enough Already” (one hour) has a preview episode today at 3; series airs Monday at 8 p.m. • “Kidnapped by the Kids” (one hour) has a preview episode today at 1 p.m.; series will return in the spring. • “Miracle Detectives” (one hour) has a preview episode at 5 tonight; series airs Wednesday at 10 p.m. • “The Gayle King Show” (one hour) will air weekdays at 10 a.m. beginning Monday, Jan. 10.


B4 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 1, 2011 B5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, Jan. 1, 2011: This year, you could be unusually ambitious and dynamic. Communication excels, as you learn far more effective ways of exchanging ideas. You also might be buying new toys for communicating, from cell phones to cars. Just keep your budget in mind. If you are single, you meet people with ease. Summer 2011 could be unusually romantic. If you are attached, the two of you might take a course in how to relate more effectively. As a result, you will be more connected than in the past. SAGITTARIUS understands you better than you understand yourself. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH There is an intuitive quality that emerges when dealing with others. Reach beyond your normal thoughts and ideas. You could be surprised by the insights you gain. Others reveal much about themselves. Use this information sensitively. Tonight: Walk in someone else’s shoes. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH A friendship that starts right now or one in your life that gains in importance might play a far more enormous role than you thought possible. Be open to a partner, best friend or loved one. This person’s sharing is heartfelt. Spend time with a loved one. Tonight: Forget tomorrow and resolutions. Live now. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Others continue to seek you out in an unprecedented

manner. Juggling all the attention could be exhausting. In hindsight, you will often smile when thinking of this moment. You gain a strong insight into a parent or loved one. Tonight: A must appearance. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Somehow, you are always the centerpiece in making parties, situations and anything else work. You might be more involved in helping others relax. Give up the role of chief clean-up person from the recent holidays. Tonight: Just for you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Many people seem to get your feedback. Make time for a key loved one or several loved ones. Your one-on-one time means more than you realize. Add that light, playful quality others enjoy. Help the year start correctly. Tonight: Still enjoying every moment. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH What you see in others, especially a key partner, could be most shocking or surprising. You simply didn’t understand this person in this light. Emphasize home, family and loved ones. You don’t have to go far from your home. Tonight: Make it easy. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH You will continue the New Year rituals, when many people won’t today. You seem to remember everyone and have time for a conversation with them all. Your friendly ways might have you reorganizing some plans. You really don’t care. Tonight: Where people are. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You might have gone

overboard last night and are continuing the theme. Your sign is prone to extremes. Perhaps looking at this moment in time as a phase might be helpful. If you are single, a double opportunity could appear on the horizon ... which person will you get to know? Tonight: Let the good times roll. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Honor your sense of what you need to do. A close family member or roommate reveals a very interesting side or development. You might be surprised but also delighted. Tonight: Whatever you want seems to work. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You still might feel somewhat reclusive, as if you want to hide out! No such luck. Whether by phone, email or a knock on your door, people seek you out. You hear delightful but unanticipated news. Still, you feel best being quiet. Tonight: Do what works. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Surround yourself with friends, and enjoy every one of them for as long as you can. Whether at a party or at a spontaneous happening, take advantage of the moment. Still, use care with your finances. However, if you feel lucky, get that lottery ticket. Tonight: With friends, of course. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Others seek you out. You might wonder why you didn’t throw a party if you are one of the few Pisces who did not. Others simply want to share and need your feedback. Touch base with an older friend or relative. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


B6 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Help for that hangover? By Lynda Shrager Albany Times Union

No, the ink is not smeared on this page nor is the newspaper vibrating in your hands. As a savvy, informed consumer, you probably read this column bright and early to stay up to date with important news. Today, if you are reading this later in the day in a dimly lit room with an ice pack on your head, you can join the countless others who are sharing the very unpleasant symptoms of a hangover. Happy New Year. If you had a few too many last night, it’s unfortunate that this article didn’t appear earlier. At least by the time you got to the end of the column, you would have known a few of the ways to decrease the chances of feeling so rotten. Of course the only way to have totally prevented a hangover was not to drink. In general, three to four alcoholic drinks for a woman and five to six for a man are enough to put you over the edge. My college-age kids think these numbers are woefully low. What do kids know? So what could you have done to make for a better next-day experience? Having a bite to eat before you started drinking would have been wise, as alcohol is absorbed slower if something is in your stomach. A good way to pace yourself would have been to drink a whole glass of water between each drink. This would have kept you hydrated and caused you to drink less. Hopefully you were smart enough to stay with the same type of alcohol instead of mixing it up. Another good tip would have been to choose drinks with less congeners. A congener is an ingredient used in the fermentation process that gives an alcoholic beverage its flavor and color. For some reason it also makes for a potentially worse hangover. So avoid brandy, whisky, bourbon, tequila, dark beer and red wine. But that’s all water under the bridge. Too late now. Now your head hurts, you’re nauseous, over-sensitive to light and sound, dizzy, shaky and unable to concentrate. Your eyes are probably bloodshot and you are very tired. Hopefully you didn’t drink so heavily that you have actual alcohol poisoning. If you did, you must call 911, as this is life-threatening. Otherwise, I have bad news. The only sure cure for your hangover is time. Sad, but true. In eight to 24 hours, you’ll be good

as new. Although there are many folk remedies that have been handed down through the ages, most agree that few of them really work. Mom’s Rx — along with help from experts at Mayo Clinic — to ease your discomfort while you wait for tomorrow to come is to try the following: • Sip water or fruit juice to prevent dehydration. • Bland foods containing complex carbohydrates such as toast or crackers may boost your blood sugar and possibly relieve nausea. • Clear soups can replace lost salt and potassium. • Be careful with the pain relievers. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory products may reduce your headache but may irritate your stomach. Acetaminophen products (Tylenol) should be avoided as they may cause liver damage when interacting with the alcohol. • Drinking a bloody Mary — the “hair of the dog that bit you” remedy — does not have much backing from doctors. • Go back to bed.

By Steve Spears St. Petersburg Times

Pet rocks. Stonewashed jeans. MTV’s “The Real World.” Alas, the seemingly endearing glow of all great pop culture icons eventually fades. Whoa there. We’re not telling you to throw away those precious time capsules; you never know when the world will need another Chia pet. And God help us all, as much as we try to ignore it, MTV’s first reality show featuring a dozen undeserving slackers living together is still on the air after nearly 20 years. As Western civilization sits poised on the edge of another new year, it seems poetic to peer into the future and prognosticate on what beacons of culture may pass into the next dimension over the next 52 weeks and what new phenoms will take their place. Oh, Magic 8 Ball, we’re so glad we kept you after all these years. Let’s give you a lucky shake and see what 2011 has in store for pop culture fans.

“American Idol” Hello, Steven Tyler and Jennifer Lopez. Goodbye, Simon Cowell, Ellen DeGeneres and Kara DioGuardi. (You left before fans even learned to spell or pronounce your name!) Fox’s show has been a punch line for a few years now, and with the changes at the judging table now stands on the precipice of the abyss. Will Idol finally begin tumbling from the top of the TV ratings this coming season? Magic 8 Ball says: “It is decidedly so.”

The Taylor Swift reign

Thinkstock

New year, by the numbers Vive la Resolution! By Lana Berkowitz Houston Chronicle

With a new year comes a new opportunity to contemplate the cool/odd/scary factor of the month-day-year alignment. For 2011 we will get the obligatory nonsense story out of the way early. The calendar numbers game started getting crazier when Sept. 9, 1999, rolled around. It was the first test for those worried about Y2K. Remember when the computers were predicted to crash as 2000 dawned and electronics-dependent humans would be groping in the dark while longing for the good old days? With that crisis averted, we could look forward to Jan. 1, 2001; Feb. 2, 2002; March 3, 2003; April 4, 2004; and May 5, 2005. Then came 6-6-06. Holy moly! However, 7-7-07 looked pretty lucky. A lot of couples chose that day for their weddings, including actress Eva Longoria and NBA star Tony Parker, who recently announced their split. But for many Asians 8-8-08 is considered luckier than triple sevens. It was another good day

Which of these pop icons will fade?

to get married, start a business or declare a personal holiday. For some soothsayers Sept. 9, 2009, seemed like a good day for the world to end. But it didn’t. While 10-10-10 looks impressive, there was not a lot of significance attached to the date. So now the question is, will 11-11 be of historical importance to you? Maybe it will be more exciting than Jan. 1, 2001, simply because the Oprah Winfrey Network goes on the air New Year’s Day 2011. What will you be doing when the clock strikes 11 on the 11th day of January 2011? This year also brings us Sept. 10, 2011 (9-10-11). And don’t forget Nov. 11, 2011 (11-11-11), which could be a Veterans Day extravaganza. Of course, this is all trivial compared to the doomsday predictions for 2012. If the planet is still rotating in the heavens after Dec. 12, 2012, the Mayans have predicted a cataclysmic event will occur Dec. 21, 2012. That will be on a Friday, which should make it more convenient for those who are planning end-of-the-world parties yet have to be sober for work the next Monday.

By Monica Hesse The Washington Post

Everything you ate over the holidays — the cookies, the candy, the spiral-cut ham — every glob has turned to goo and grafted itself to your belly region, the dreaded pooch area. Every bit of it will stay there, stay there until next December and beyond, unless you resolve to do something about it this very Jan. 1. What comes next is this: “They’re banging on the machines,” the new guys are, says Mike Sponseller. “It’s like watching ‘2001: A Space Odyssey,’ ” the scene where the ape uses a bone as a club, only instead of discovering a use for tools, the newbies are trying to figure out how to turn on a StairMaster. January at the Gym: The Attack of the Resolutionaries. A turf struggle. A melodrama played out in moisture-wicking active wear. A new group of people storming the health clubs who have vowed to get fit but cannot seem to understand that you do not use your own iPod during yoga. “January is kind of like our tax season,” says Dave Reiseman, a spokesman for Gold’s Gym, which can see 100 percent increases in gym attendance during the first month of the year.

“We do a lot of preparation to make sure that new guests” have everything they need for a strong start. Gold’s offers an equipment orientation. An eight-week customized health and fitness plan. An infinitely available staff. All of this preparation is no match for the resolutionary who hogs the 30-minute treadmill for two hours straight, not so much jogging as sauntering in inappropriate foot attire. They know not when they act like abominations of good fitness stewardship, when they are behaving like the gym equivalent of American tourists in giant fanny packs. Humans have a need for rituals and routine. Humans in gyms display this need in a hyper-developed, ’roidy kind of way, which makes sense: The gym is the place we go to control one of the few things in life we can control (dumpiness) and so it becomes the place where we become the people who try to control everything else (diva-ness!). The gym is a microcosmic symbol for how splendidly the world could work, if only everyone would wait their turn, properly hydrate and remember to wipe down whatever they touched with a lemony Pine-Sol solution.

The 21-year-old crooner has won every award short of the Wendy’s Hamburgers Employee of the Month plaque. But her shy and innocent routine is wearing thin. Even her tabloidfriendly romance with actor Jake Gyllenhaal seems a little too sudden and manufactured to be believed. Can Lil Miss Nashville continue her winning streak in 2011? Magic 8 Ball says: “Outlook not so good.”

Meet your new Muse Matthew Bellamy and the brainy Brit boys in Muse have opened for U2, dated supermodels and scored a breakthrough hit with 2009 album “The Resistance.” What’s next? Well, if everything goes right in 2011 — new album, new tour, new supermodels — how about world domination? Magic 8 Ball says: “It is certain.”

The ’90s revival The dark shadow began growing across the land when the Backstreet Boys and New Kids on the Block announced a joint tour for 2011. And just when we thought we could dismiss Mariah Carey, she announced she was preggers with twins. What’s next — Seinfeld returning to TV? We could spare a square for that. So are we about to fall in love with the ’90s? Magic 8 Ball says: “Better not tell you now.”

The end of sequels Cineplexes are going to run out of numerals for their signs in 2011. “Scream 4.” “Transformers 3.” “The Hangover 2.” “Harry Potter 7.” It’s hard to believe there are all these subpar and pointless sequels out there and Steve Guttenberg still can’t get a job acting. Please tell us the sequel silliness is going to end. Magic 8 Ball says: “My sources say no.”

Midlife crisis beards Disturbing amounts of facial hair sprouted on the faces of antsy, middle-aged men everywhere. Conan O’Brien sported a full-on ginger face blanket for the start of his new show. Brad Pitt’s hideous goatee channeled a miniature schnauzer. Gorgeous sexpot Jon Hamm ruined his bone structure with primordial face fur. And let’s not even talk about Joaquin Phoenix. Razors in vogue for 2011? Magic 8 Ball says: “Without a doubt.”

Betty White mania Even the 88-year-old Golden Girl is getting tired of seeing herself on television these days. Her “Hot in Cleveland” sitcom was picked up for 2011, but it appears on TV Land, a network harder to find than ESPN 8. Unless she runs for political office or kisses Sandra Bullock at the 2011 MTV Video Music Awards, her days in the spotlight are over, right? Magic 8 Ball says: “Signs point to yes.”

Leggings/jeggings The stretchy, ’80s-tastic replacement for pants have populated the collective fashion conscience for the past few years. People finally have a handle on how to wear them properly — no short shirts, for the love of butt. And there is no denying they’re almost as comfortable as wearing no pants at all. So are pants in peril in 2011? Magic 8 Ball says: “Yes definitely.”

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L

Inside

OREGON Interstate 5 rest stop offers shelter for panhandlers’ dogs, see Page C2. BUSINESS How local music stores fared this holiday season, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Man who brought baseball team to Texas dies, see Page C7.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 2011

CROOK COUNTY SCHOOLS

District seeks public input in superintendent hunt the screening, the more likely to satisfy the many constituents.” Applications to sit on the district’s screening committee are posted on the district’s website. The application deadline is 2 p.m. Tuesday. The district is looking for approximately 15 people who would be available to commit the necessary time to the process. Applicants must be available at 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 31 to meet with the superintendent consultant. The application review process is scheduled to start Feb. 1 and last until Feb. 11.

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

The Crook County School District is asking the community for help as it launches its search for its next superintendent. “The superintendent can affect a broad swath of the community,” said school board member Scott Cooper. “Not just parents, but employers depending on the schools to get the kids ready (for employment). … Everyone has an interest in making sure that person understands the particular area of concern. The more people in

C

Crook County Superintendent Ivan Hernandez announced earlier that this school year would be his last with the district. This is his second year with the district. Coming to the district, his main goal was to put it on a more sustainable financial path. Hernandez came in 2009 bracing for a projected $5 million shortfall. Nearly 40 positions were cut. Funding for athletics and extracurricular activities was pulled. An elementary school was closed and reopened as a charter school. School days

were cut. Several school board members believe Hernandez helped the district make the necessary cuts to improve its financial footing. School officials hope that having the district in a more stable financial spot will help with recruiting the next superintendent. “Like every school district that does a superintendent search, we’re looking for a superman or superwoman who can do everything,” said school board member Patti Norris. See Crook / C7

New year, high lights

2010

A year in review

Region’s businesses saw ups and downs Facebook bringing jobs to Crook County; banks, housing industry eagerly await economic recovery By Tim Doran The Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Lights in hand, participants begin their ascent of Pilot Butte during Bend’s First 1,000 Lights Community Walk and Family Festival on Friday.

Walk to top of Pilot Butte raises funds for food bank By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

Flickering lights crept up Pilot Butte on New Year’s Eve as walkers of all ages braved the cold and slick roads to participate in Bend’s First 1,000 Lights Community Walk and Family Festival. The event, now in its fourth year, started out just as an illuminated walk up the butte with people carrying lights of some sort, said Brian Douglass, president of the Smith Rock Race Group. “It’s a tradition,” he said. Many communities have similar walks or runs timed to the new year, Douglass noted, and he felt Bend should have one as well. Last year the event, which raises money for the La Pine

“It’s just a fun way to spend New Year’s with the family.” — Maria Flores, participant, Bend’s First 1,000 Lights Community Walk and Family Festival

Community Kitchen, grew to include a family festival at Juniper Elementary School. And on Friday evening, kids sang along with a children’s singer, and some had their faces painted before the walk began. Kelli Orleck and her 5-year-old daughter, Genevivee, came at the suggestion of a friend. And as Genevivee got her face painted as a tiger, Kelli Orleck said that they came both for the entertain-

ment and the walk. “I think that it’s great this community has things like this,” she said. Faith Gilpin of Bend said that she always likes to exercise on holidays — she’s done the Turkey Trot, a 5K race on Veterans Day, snowshoe trek for fun on Christmas and more, and thought she’d give this event a try. “It feels good and supports a good cause,” Gilpin said.

The La Pine Community Kitchen is an organization that distributes food boxes and serves meals to people in southern Deschutes County. Maria Flores was at the event with her two children, ages 5 and 7, and said it was a festive event the family looks forward to. “It’s just a fun way to spend New Year’s with the family,” she said. As the family festival continued with a magic show and more music, groups of people put on headlamps, flicked on their flashlights and headed up Pilot Butte. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Madras Aquatic Center to close for a month By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

The Madras Aquatic Center will close for a month this spring, part of a wider effort to cut costs at Jefferson County’s only public pool. Bobby DeRoest, general manager of the facility, said the pool is looking at a $90,000 shortfall in its roughly $700,000 annual operating budget. To try to close the gap, the pool will close between March 28 and May 1, shut down two hours earlier on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, reduce staffing and consider restructuring outstanding debts. DeRoest said the aquatic center gets about 27 percent of its revenue from a property tax levy of 25

cents per $1,000 in assessed value, and 73 percent from income from memberships, swim lessons and other programs. In 2004, Jefferson County voters approved an $8.1 million bond to build the aquatic center, which includes a 25-yard, six-lane lap pool, a recreation pool with a water slide, and a whirlpool. With additional funding from grants and other sources, the pool opened in January 2008. DeRoest said the center’s budgetary woes are largely the result of sluggish economic conditions that have persisted through most of its three years of operation, and rising utilities prices. See Center / C7

Metolius Elementary School students practice kicking along the pool wall at the Madras Aquatic Center during class. Rob Kerr The Bulletin ile photo

Prineville, the town that still has a menswear store on Main Street, became the center of the hightech universe last year when Facebook decided to build its first data center in the Crook County city. Coming in January, the announcement brought positive news to a county reeling from the economic crisis. Crook County recorded the highest seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in the state every month from January through November. December’s rate will not be released until later this month. Facebook’s announcement became one of the brightest highlights in a year in which the economy, although officially no longer in recession, dragged Central Oregon along like a lead ball chained to an ankle. November’s unemployment rates in all three Central Oregon counties stood about 3 percentage points above where they began in January. Housing values reached at least five-year lows. Foreclosures in Deschutes County appeared headed toward a new record high. Bank failures continued, with regulators closing The Dalles-based Columbia River Bank and Eugene-based LibertyBank, both of which had branches in Central Oregon. “It’s an excruciatingly slow recovery,” said Carolyn Eagan, regional economist with the Oregon Employment Department. Clouds did not shroud all industries, however. Renewable energy got hot, fueled by federal stimulus dollars. Bicycles, beards and beer helped drive up tourism in Bend. A boutique lodging establishment, The Oxford Hotel, opened in downtown Bend in January. See Business / C7

Bend police seek suspects in 3 armed robberies By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

The Bend Police Department is investigating three armed robberies or attempts that occurred at three locations across Bend between about 10:15 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Thursday, and say the events could be connected. The three victims — a 19-year-old man, a 49year-old woman and a 50-year-old man — provided similar descriptions of a suspect and his car, police Sgt. John Carlon said. Police are searching for an adult male, possibly Latino, who is about 5 feet 8 inches tall and had a handgun. Carlon described the vehicle as a darkcolored compact car. “It’s pretty unusual to have three of those sort of events that were so similar, even in the limited details that we have,” he said. The first incident occurred on Bend’s west side, Carlon said, and details were still being determined Friday evening. “Our victim was threatened by an individual with a gun, and they were either trying to get cash or his vehicle or both,” Carlon said. The other two incidents were in the central and northeast parts of town, he said. One was similar to the first, Carlon said. A suspect approached the victim while the victim was in the victim’s car and displayed a handgun, but it was unclear whether he wanted money or the car or both. “But the victim backed up quickly, and the suspect left the scene without taking anything,” Carlon said. During the final incident, however, the victim was on foot, and the suspect injured the victim and took some cash, Carlon said The injuries did not require medical attention, Carlon said. See Robberies / C2


COV ER S T ORY

C2 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Text message will alert victims when protected by state courts

Prolific burglar fesses up to stealing 36 cars

ONE LAST SALE

The Associated Press SALEM — A Salem police bait car ensnared an alleged burglar who confessed to stealing 36 cars since October. Police say 35-year-old Michael J. Sparks admitted to stealing the cars in Marion and Polk counties, during which time he’s been arrested and released on separate crimes. Salem Police Lt. Steve Birr says Sparks told police he ex-

The Associated Press MEDFORD — Victims of abuse or stalking will find out days earlier if they’re protected from their alleged abusers. Victims who request protective orders will get immediate notice from an e-mail or text message when the order takes effect. The service is a new collaboration among state courts, the state police and the Oregon Department of Justice. It comes following an increase in domestic violence homicides in Oregon. Protective orders are effective the moment they’re served. But victims are currently notified by mail — a delay during which victims don’t know whether an alleged abuser is allowed near them. It also will cut down on victims’ calls to the court or sheriff’s office to ask about the status of their order. The optional service will also remind victims that their protective orders are expiring or are eligible for renewal.

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff report

Dog rescued from icy Mirror Pond A dog that ventured out on to thin ice on Mirror Pond in downtown Bend was rescued from the Deschutes River by Bend firefighters Friday. At around 9:42 a.m., firefighters were sent to Drake

The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

Robberies Continued from C1 Carlon added that a second person was driving the car the suspect was in, and there could be a third suspect involved as well. “We’re really digging hard on this thing,� Carlon said. “We’re following every little lead that we’ve got trying to figure this thing out.� Anyone with information on the incidents is asked to contact the Bend Police Department by calling the 911 Dispatch Center at 541-693-0911

Bend Police Department

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Shoppers leave Nordstrom under sale signs as people shop for year-end, last-minute deals in Portland on Friday.

Shelter keeps panhandlers’ dogs warm By Shaun Hall The Grants Pass Daily Courier

GRANTS PASS — An agency that supervises and maintains the Interstate 5 Manzanita rest areas north of the freeway’s Merlin off-ramp has built a day-use doghouse for animals belonging to panhandlers. On Wednesday, the doghouse was well-used. Two of the four dogs using it belonged to a grateful Keith Merrill, a frequent panhandler at the rest area. “I love it,� Merrill said. “My dogs love it. All the dogs love it. The dogs get along. They don’t have to be out in the weather no more.� As he spoke, Merrill stood outside a restroom at the northbound rest area, holding a sign that read

Park on reports of a dog on the ice. The dog walked around for a few minutes with firefighters watching, according to a news release, then fell through the ice. A firefighter in a dry suit tethered to the shore was sent out on to the ice, and was able to rescue the dog without incident.

N  R POLICE LOG

Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin. com.

pected to go back to prison, and saw no reason to stop stealing cars, only some of which have been recovered. A string of car break-ins at a parking structure led police to leave a bait car with several valuable items inside, the Statesman Journal reports. Sparks allegedly arrived in a stolen car and stole items from the bait car. He was later arrested by Linn County sheriff’s deputies.

“Homeless. Anything helps. God Bless.� One purpose behind the doghouse is to get dogs away from the restrooms, where they might intimidate visitors, said Mark Grinde, who mans an office at the rest area for the Oregon Travel Information Council. “Not everybody is a dog lover,� Grinde said. “We came to an accommodation.� The doghouse was built from scraps. “We just slapped it together,� Grinde said. The travel council also maintains rest areas near Salem, Wilsonville and along Interstate 84 east of Portland. Employees provide visitor information and assistance. Grinde, a former Oregon

Department of Transportation employee, said he is not aware of any other rest area that has a doghouse. He estimated that six people are regular panhandlers at the rest area. “When we stepped into the facility (last January), they were all here,� he said. Merrill, 57, said he has lived nearby for “a couple years.� He currently lives atop a hill west of the freeway, staying warm and dry by living in a small tent placed inside a larger tent, all under a tarp. His friend, Anita Brazille, 36, camps nearby. “It’s not easy living out here,� said Brazille who was hanging out with Merrill and others at the rest area.

People seemed generous with them. A man driving a pickup truck bearing a California license plate gave them some food. A few people gave them money. Merrill said he was given a backpack on Tuesday at the Seventh-day Adventist Church and got a sleeping bag and thermal underwear on Sunday from the Merlin Community Baptist Church. He said he was expecting a Good Samaritan visit later on Wednesday from someone with the Disabled American Veterans organization. Merrill declined to specify what he makes panhandling. “Some days I don’t make nothing,� he said. “Other days I’ve done better.�

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:39 a.m. Dec. 29, in the 61300 block of Parrell Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:58 p.m. Dec. 29, in the 900 block of Northwest Wall Street. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen at 1:46 p.m. Dec. 29, in the 2000 block of Northeast Professional Court. Criminal mischief — Punctured tires were reported at 2:49 p.m. Dec. 29, in the 1100 block of Northwest Bend Street. Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 3:25 p.m. Dec. 29, in the 61400 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 4:25 p.m. Dec. 29, in the 63400 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 6:43 p.m. Dec. 29, in the 2200 block of Northeast Mays Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:39 p.m. Dec. 29, in the 61000 block of Brosterhous Road. DUII — Dennis Lawrence Smith, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:06 p.m. Dec. 29, in the area of Northwest Colorado Avenue and U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Jennifer Dawn Warren, 31, was arrested on

suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:40 p.m. Dec. 29, in the 200 block of Northeast Franklin Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8 a.m. Dec. 30, in the 2400 block of Northeast Lakeridge Drive. Redmond Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 5:28 p.m. Dec. 30, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:50 p.m. Dec. 30, in the 1600 block of Southwest Odem Medo Road. Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen at 9:50 a.m. Dec. 30, in the 100 block of Southeast Franklin Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:01 a.m. Dec. 30, in the 2700 block of Southwest Volcano Court. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:32 p.m. Dec. 30, in the 500 block of East U.S. Highway 20 in Sisters. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:24 p.m. Dec. 30, in the area of 93rd Street and Old Bend Redmond Highway in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:50 p.m. Dec. 30, in the area of Deschutes Market Road and U.S. Highway 97 in Bend. DUII — Patrick James Taylor, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:27 a.m. Dec. 30, in the area of Northwest 101st Street and Northwest Maple Lane in Redmond.

BEND FIRE RUNS Wednesday 23 — Medical aid calls.

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Pasadena hosts first Tournament of Roses in 1890 The Associated Press Today is Saturday, Jan. 1, the first day of 2011. There are 364 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Jan. 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring that slaves in rebel states were free. ON THIS DATE In 1511, the first Henry, Duke of Cornwall, son of King Henry VIII of England and Catherine of Aragon, was born. (However, the baby died less than two months later.) In 1861, Mexican forces loyal to Benito Juarez recaptured Mexico City, effectively ending the Reform War. In 1890, the first Tournament of Roses was held in Pasadena, Calif. In 1892, the Ellis Island Immigrant Station in New York formally opened. In 1911, Baseball Hall-of-Famer Hank Greenberg, considered

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y the sport’s first Jewish superstar, was born in New York. In 1953, country singer Hank Williams Sr., 29, was discovered dead in the back seat of his car during a stop in Oak Hill, W.Va., while he was being driven to a concert date in Canton, Ohio. In 1959, Fidel Castro and his revolutionaries overthrew Cuban leader Fulgencio Batista, who fled to the Dominican Republic. In 1961, in the first American Football League Championship Game, the Houston Oilers defeated the Los Angeles Chargers, 24-16, at Jeppesen Stadium. In 1984, the breakup of AT&T took place as the telecommunications giant was divested of its 22 Bell System companies under terms of an antitrust agreement. In 1994, the North American Free Trade Agreement went into effect. TEN YEARS AGO It was announced that Tyson Foods Inc. would buy beef and

pork giant IBP Inc. in a deal valued at $3.2 billion in cash and stock. (Tyson later tried to back out, but IBP sued, and a judge ordered Tyson to complete the deal.) In time for the year 2001, a mysterious black monolith, standing 9 feet tall, appeared in Seattle’s Magnuson Park, placed there by guerrilla artists. Actor Ray Walston died in Beverly Hills, Calif., at age 86. FIVE YEARS AGO President George W. Bush strongly defended his domestic spying program, calling it legal as well as vital to thwarting terrorist attacks. The Medicare prescription drug plan went into effect. American teenager Farris Hassan, who’d traveled alone to Iraq to experience the lives of its people, returned home to Florida after three weeks in the Middle East. New England’s Doug Flutie converted the NFL’s first successful drop kick in 64 years during a 28-26 loss to Miami.

ONE YEAR AGO A suicide bomber detonated a truckload of explosives on a volleyball field in northwest Pakistan, killing at least 97 people. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Former Sen. Ernest Hollings, D-S.C., is 89. Actor Ty Hardin is 81. Documentary maker Frederick Wiseman is 81. Actor Frank Langella is 73. Rock singer-musician Country Joe McDonald is 69. Writer-comedian Don Novello is 68. Actor Rick Hurst is 65. Country singer Steve Ripley (The Tractors) is 61. Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., is 57. Rapper Grandmaster Flash is 53. Actress Ren Woods is 53. Actress Dedee Pfeiffer is 47. Actress Embeth Davidtz is 45. Country singer Brian Flynn (Flynnville Train) is 45. Actor Verne Troyer is 42. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “It is better to know some of the questions than all of the answers.� — James Thurber, American humorist (1894-1961)

541-382-3882

304 N.E. 3rd St. • Bend


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www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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NASDAQ CC LHOA SNEG E2,652.87 -10.11 -.38%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages C4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

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DOW JONES CC LHOA SNEG E11,577.51 +7.80 +.07%

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S&P 500 CC LHOA SNEG E1,257.64 -.24 -.02%

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By Nelson D. Schwartz

Borders Group Inc. faces serious trouble as it moves into the new year, following an announcement that it has delayed payments to vendors, a move that puts the company in jeopardy. The nation’s second-largest bookseller said it’s working with vendors to restructure payment arrangements as it looks for a solution to a potential liquidity shortfall. Borders is in discussions with lenders to refinance and get enough cash to pay vendors and buy new inventory, spokeswoman Mary Davis said. The company’s stock price fell to less than a dollar — for the first time since February — after the market closed Thursday, amid news of its financial woes. Shares closed at 90 cents Friday. Industry watchers said it’s not surprising that Borders is facing serious financial troubles following several quarters of losses. The timing of the announcement is particularly ominous, said Ken Dalto, a retail analyst in Farmington Hills. “This is the best time for liquidity for any retailer. If they don’t have the cash after the Christmas season, it’s a serious problem,” he said.

Ten-year C L O S E 3.30 treasury C H A N G E -2.08%

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GOLD CC LHOA SNEG E$1421.10 +$15.50

Despite year of tumult, some investors flourish Stocks did well while much of economy struggled

Borders delays vendor payments

BONDS

New York Times News Service

An economy stuck in neutral. Unemployment that refused to go down. And a near financial disaster in Europe. Despite all the negatives — and a few surprises, like the terrifying “flash crash” of the stock market in May — 2010 proved in the end to be a pretty good year for investors, especially if you owned shares in high-flying technology stocks, old-fashioned industrials

or gold. “In many cases, the conventional wisdom was wrong,” said Byron Wien, a market strategist at the Blackstone Group. “The market still managed to do well, and the rise in gold and other commodities was a big surprise.” The typical U.S. equity fund returned nearly 19 percent in 2010, while the Standard and Poor’s 500-stock index rose 12.8 percent. That was below the gains of 2009, when the

markets rebounded from the financial crisis and the S&P index soared 23 percent. Few expected such robust results for 2010 when the year began, said Tobias Levkovich, chief U.S. equity strategist at Citigroup. “People were worried about interest rates going up, double dips and the housing market falling,” Levkovich said, just to name a few concerns. Those fears have not disappeared, “but a level of optimism has returned. We didn’t go off the cliff.” So why did stocks do well this year when so much seemed to be going wrong? See Markets / C5

CD sales are down but not out in Bend

Bank of America hits setback in lawsuit WASHINGTON — Bank of America’s hangover from the housing bubble could be harder to shake in the new year as a result of a recent court decision. The bank lost a major procedural ruling in a lawsuit over its liability for allegedly toxic mortgages. The ruling will make it harder for the bank to defend itself in that case, and it could set a standard for similar disputes. Bank of America had tried to set a high bar for plaintiff MBIA Insurance Corp. by requiring that the files for each of 368,000 or more disputed loans be evaluated individually. That process would have cost MBIA $75 million, and it would have taken a team of 24 people more than four years, MBIA estimated. For the bank, it was “the next best thing to avoiding trial altogether,” MBIA argued. Instead, the New York State Supreme Court in late December declared that MBIA can pursue its case by focusing on a statistical sample of 6,000 disputed loans. That could pave the way for a trial to proceed as scheduled in 2011. “It’s a big setback” for Bank of America’s “scorched-earth strategy,” said David Grais, a lawyer involved in other suits against the bank. MBIA still must prove its case, and “this we believe it cannot do,” Bank of America spokesman Jerome Dubrowski said in a statement. — From wire reports

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Friends Cathy Kiggins, 18 and visiting from Castle Rock, Wash., and Zack Frey, 18 and from Bend, look through the CDs at Ranch Records on Friday. Store co-owner John Schroeder says it’s mostly older customers who are still buying CDs.

Vinyl sales, however, are on the upswing By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

The handful of Bend stores that sell CDs have seen a decrease in sales of that medium in recent years, but they have no plans to stop stocking the shiny round discs. Ironically, one Bend store has seen a surge in sales of its vinyl record albums. Figures from Nielsen SoundScan reports show online and physical album sales dropping almost every year in the past decade. People paying for online downloading is rising, though, according to the Recording Industry Association of America. But sometimes people download

albums for free, which can leave stores and musicians unpaid. Either way, the demand for physical CDs, locally and nationally, is falling. Folks who’ve lived in Bend for more than a few years will likely remember Boomtown, which sold CDs in a store on Harriman and Greenwood streets in Bend from 1998 to 2007. Few stores selling music on CD, record or cassette remained in the area after Boomtown’s disappearance. One store that did remain was a Ranch Records location a few blocks away on Wall Street in Bend. (There are other Ranch Records stores in Salem and

McMinnville.) The store has an emphasis on rock — the Descendents, P.O.D., Dylan and so on. Having originally opened on Franklin Avenue in 1996, Bend’s Ranch Records competed with Boomtown for music buyers. A few months after Boomtown closed in 2007, the Bend Ranch Records had its best December to date, thanks to the old Boomtown customers’ business, said one of its co-owners, John Schroeder. But overall, he said, the best year was 2004 — the year before a Best Buy store opened in Bend’s Cascade Village Shopping Center, and iPod sales were taking off. Each year since 2004, Schroeder said, sales have gone down a little bit more. See CDs / C5

CVS to buy Medicare D unit for $1.25B

Seasonally adjusted annual rate 120 110

By Azam Ahmed

92.2

New York Times News Service

100 90 80 70 2009 2010 Source: National Association of Realtors AP

SILVER CC LHOA SNEG E$30.910 +$0.488

10 ways to get the most out of technology By Sam Grobart New York Times News Service

Your gadgets and computers, your software and sites — they are not working as well as they should. You need to make some tweaks. But the tech industry has given you the impression that making adjustments is difficult and timeconsuming. It is not. And so below are 10 things to do to improve your technological life. They are easy and (mostly) free. Altogether, they should take about two hours; one involves calling your cable or phone company, so that figure is elastic. If you do them, those two hours will pay off handsomely in both increased free time and diminished anxiety and frustration. You can do it.

Get a smart phone Why: Because having immediate access to your e-mail, photos, calendars and address books, not to mention vast swaths of the Internet, makes life a little easier. How: This does not have to be complicated. Upgrade your phone with your existing carrier; later, when you are an advanced beginner, you can start weighing the pluses and minuses of your carrier versus another. Using AT&T? Get a refurbished iPhone 3GS for $29. Verizon? Depending on what’s announced next week at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, get its version of the iPhone, or a refurbished Droid Incredible for $100. Sprint? Either the LG Optimus S or the Samsung Transform are decent Android phones that cost $50. T-Mobile users can get the free LG Optimus T.

Stop using Internet Explorer

Home sales rise Pending U.S. home sales index

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CVS Caremark on Friday agreed to buy a Medicare business for $1.25 billion, an acquisition that may open the nation’s largest pharmacy health care provider to further criticism about anti-competitive practices. Under the terms of the deal, CVS will buy Universal American’s Medicare Part D unit, which focuses on the federal prescription benefit program. The purchase will more than double CVS’ presence in the fast-growing market, to 3.1 million members from 1.2 million. CVS has struggled somewhat over the

past year, in part due to its shrinking base of Medicare Part D members. In the third quarter, revenues fell 3.1 percent to $23.9 billion. Profits dropped 19.8 percent to $820 million over the same period. The stock is off more than 6 percent from its 52-week high. Shares of CVS on Friday dropped slightly to close at $34.77, while Universal American’s stock spiked nearly 40 percent to $20.45. Strategically the deal makes sense for CVS. If approved, it will make the company one of the largest providers of prescription drug services for Medicare recipients.

Medicare Part D — which was started in 2006 to address concerns many seniors lacked drug coverage — today serves nearly 28 million people, according to data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, part of the Department of Health and Human Services. But the expansion comes as the federal and state governments are taking a closer look at CVS. The Federal Trade Commission is investigating whether the company engaged in anti-competitive practices. Attorneys general in 24 states are conducting a similar inquiry, according to CVS Caremark.

Why: Because, while the latest version has some real improvements, Internet Explorer is large, bloated with features and an example of old-style Microsoft excess. How: Switch to either Mozilla Firefox or G o o g l e Chrome. Both are f i r s t- r a t e , s p e e d y browsers, and both are free. It New York Times remains a News Service tight race between the two, but Chrome has had the lead lately in features and performance. Both browsers include useful things like bookmark syncing. That means that your bookmarks folder will be the same on every computer using Chrome or Firefox, and will update if you change anything.

Upload your photos to the cloud Why: Because you’ll be really sorry if an errant cup of coffee makes its way onto your PC, wiping away years of photographic memories. Creating copies of your digital photos on an online service is a painless way to ensure they’ll be around no matter what happens to your PC. It is also an easy way to share the photos with friends and family. How: There are many good, free choices. To keep things simple, use Picasa, Google’s service. After your initial upload — which may take a while, so set it up before you go to sleep — you will have a full backup of your photo library. And by inviting people to view it, privately, with passwords, you will not have to e-mail photos anymore. Anytime you have new pictures, upload them to Picasa, send a message to your subscribers, and they can view your gallery at their leisure. See Tech / C5


BUSI N ESS

C4 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

The weekly market review New York Stock Exchange Name

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A-B-C ABB Ltd 22.45 +.18 +.45 ACE Ltd u62.25 -.12 +.12 AES Corp 12.18 -.02 -.05 AFLAC 56.43 +.34 -.68 AGCO u50.66 -.11 +.11 AGL Res 35.85 -.33 -.49 AK Steel 16.37 +.26 -.19 AMB Pr 31.71 +.08 +.58 AMR 7.79 +.03 +.01 AOL 23.71 -.31 -.68 AT&T Inc 29.38 +.05 +.18 AU Optron 10.42 +.02 +.14 AbtLab 47.91 +.34 +.10 AberFitc u57.63 -.48 +.29 Accenture 48.49 +.07 +.15 Actuant 26.62 -.14 -.48 AdvAuto 66.15 -.57 -.42 AMD 8.18 +.04 +.14 AdvSemi 5.74 +.21 +.24 AegeanMP 10.43 -.08 -.20 Aegon 6.13 +.04 +.10 AerCap 14.12 -.04 +.26 Aeropostl s 24.64 -.43 -.52 Aetna 30.51 +.09 -.36 Agilent u41.43 -.16 +.36 Agnico g 76.70 +.23 +1.09 Agria Cp 1.92 +.02 +.41 Agrium g u91.75 +.07 +5.72 AirProd u90.95 ... +.64 Airgas 62.46 -.14 -.06 AirTran 7.39 ... +.03 AlbertoC n 37.04 -.03 +.10 AlcatelLuc 2.96 +.03 +.07 Alcoa 15.39 +.18 +.05 Alcon 163.40 -.16 +1.01 AllgEngy 24.24 -.15 +.02 AllegTch 55.18 -.62 -2.46 Allergan 68.67 -.05 -.76 AlliBInco 7.93 +.07 +.09 AlliBern 23.33 +.60 +.17 AldIrish .88 -.02 -.08 AllisChE u7.09 -.02 +.76 Allstate 31.88 +.08 -.06 AlphaNRs u60.03 -.13 +4.61 AlpGPPrp 7.09 +.01 +.25 AlpTotDiv 5.92 -.02 +.10 AlpAlerMLP 16.07 +.02 +.20 Altria 24.62 +.02 -.23 AmBev s u31.03 -.09 +.65 Amdocs 27.47 ... +.48 Ameren 28.19 +.12 -.10 Ameresco n u14.36 -.03 +1.16 Amerigrp 43.92 -.63 -1.75 AMovilL 57.34 +.58 +.75 AmAxle 12.86 +.09 -.02 AmCampus 31.76 -.01 +.54 AEagleOut 14.63 -.14 +.18 AEP 35.98 -.07 +.06 AmExp 42.92 +.41 +.15 AGreet 22.16 -.35 +.22 AmIntlGrp u57.62 +.09 +3.29 AmOriBio 2.40 -.01 +.11 AmTower 51.64 +.17 +1.11 AmWtrWks u25.29 -.15 -.11 Ameriprise u57.55 -.12 -.18 AmeriBrgn u34.12 -.10 -.28 Ametek s 39.25 -.07 -.16 Amphenol 52.78 -.12 +.26 Anadarko u76.16 +.57 +7.62 AnalogDev 37.67 -.29 ... AnglogldA 49.23 +.46 +1.22 ABInBev 57.09 -.24 -.21 AnnTaylr 27.39 -.50 +.03 Annaly 17.92 +.01 +.07 Anworth 7.00 -.03 ... Aon Corp u46.01 -.04 +.14 Apache u119.23 -.69 +.75 AptInv u25.84 -.09 +.32 AquaAm u22.48 -.20 -.14 ArcelorMit 38.13 +.35 +.90 ArchCoal u35.06 -.20 +.61 ArchDan 30.08 +.18 -.13 ArvMerit 20.52 -.16 -.60 Ashland 50.86 -.32 -.98 AspenIns 28.62 -.04 -.23 Assurant 38.52 +.28 +.32 AssuredG 17.70 -.03 -.04 AstoriaF 13.91 -.17 ... AstraZen 46.19 +.13 +.16 AtwoodOcn 37.37 -.11 -.08 AutoNatn u28.20 -.26 +.10 Autoliv 78.94 -.43 -2.55 AvalonBay 112.55 -.47 +2.79 AveryD 42.34 -.10 -.09 Avnet 33.03 -.22 +.31 Avon 29.06 +.02 -.01 BB&T Cp 26.29 -.11 -.05 BCE g u35.46 -.21 +.09 BHP BillLt u92.92 +.02 +.59 BHPBil plc u80.50 -.20 +.46 BJs Whls u47.90 -.65 +2.96 BP PLC 44.17 +.28 +.17 BPZ Res 4.76 +.11 +.19 BRE 43.50 -.05 +.84 BRFBrasil s u16.88 -.04 +.49 BakrHu u57.17 +.35 +.44 Baldor 63.04 -.05 -.07 BallCp 68.05 -.95 -1.16 BanColum 61.91 -.19 +1.35 BcBilVArg 10.17 +.16 -.02 BcoBrades 20.29 +.09 +.64 BcoSantand 10.65 +.11 +.01 BcoSBrasil 13.60 +.03 +.21 BcpSouth 15.95 -.22 +.10 BkofAm 13.34 +.06 +.28 BkAm pfL 956.97 -.01 +9.10 BkAm wtB 2.67 +.01 +.06 BkIrelnd 2.65 -.05 +.26 BkMont g 57.57 +.35 +1.18 BkNYMel 30.20 +.02 +.11 BkAtl A h 1.15 ... -.01 Barclay 16.52 +.13 -.11 Bar iPVix rs 37.61 -.31 -.19 Bard 91.77 -.75 -1.57 BarnesNob 14.15 -.18 -.15 BarrickG 53.18 +.58 +1.55 Baxter 50.62 -.10 -.47 BeazerHm 5.39 -.03 +.06 BectDck 84.52 -.62 -.12 Belo 7.08 +.04 -.15 Bemis 32.66 -.33 -.45 Berkley 27.38 +.03 +.04 BerkH B s 80.11 +.71 +.25 BestBuy 34.29 -.01 +.09 BigLots 30.46 -.05 +.19 BioMedR 18.65 -.05 +.50 BlackRock 190.58 +2.56 +1.91 BlkBldA n 17.36 +.14 +.19 BlkDebtStr 3.81 +.01 +.04 BlkIntlG&I 10.17 +.16 +.16 Blackstone 14.15 -.12 -.40 BlockHR 11.91 +.12 -.78 Boeing 65.26 +.25 +.20 Boise Inc 7.93 +.07 +.10 Borders .90 -.26 -.28 BorgWarn 72.36 -.51 -.78 BostProp 86.10 -.43 +1.19 BostonSci 7.57 -.15 -.13

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BoydGm 10.60 +.04 +.77 Brandyw 11.65 +.03 +.39 Brinker 20.88 -.38 -.42 BrMySq 26.48 +.03 +.16 BroadrdgF 21.93 -.13 +.48 BrkfldAs g u33.29 +.23 +.92 BrkfldPrp 17.53 +.01 +.17 Buenavent 48.96 +.59 +.72 BungeLt 65.52 +.33 +1.52 CB REllis 20.48 -.30 -.46 CBIZ Inc 6.24 +.16 +.23 CBL Asc 17.50 -.22 +.06 CBS B 19.05 ... -.33 CF Inds u135.15 -1.52 +.16 CIGNA 36.66 +.41 +.03 CIT Grp u47.10 +.75 +1.45 CMS Eng 18.60 -.16 -.56 CNO Fincl 6.78 -.09 -.12 CSX 64.61 +.15 +.93 CVS Care 34.77 -.23 +.06 CablvsnNY 33.84 -.25 +.06 CabotO&G 37.85 +.16 +.92 CalaStrTR 9.26 +.04 +.06 Calgon 15.12 -.43 -.35 Calpine 13.34 +.01 -.21 CamdnP u53.98 -.12 +.95 Cameco g u40.38 +.26 +.77 Cameron 50.73 +.16 +.59 CampSp 34.75 +.19 +.27 CdnNRy g 66.47 -.05 +.41 CdnNRs gs u44.42 +.04 +.18 CapOne 42.56 +.09 +.20 CapitlSrce u7.10 +.03 +.10 CapsteadM 12.59 -.09 +.01 CardnlHlth 38.31 -.20 -.43 CareFusion 25.70 -.30 +.48 CarMax 31.88 -.37 -.71 Carnival 46.11 +.19 -.19 Caterpillar 93.66 -.21 -.79 Celanese 41.17 +.13 +.35 Cemex 10.71 -.02 +.08 Cemig pf 16.59 +.03 +.54 CenovusE u33.24 +.34 +.78 CenterPnt 15.72 -.04 -.18 CnElBras lf 13.75 +.09 +.55 CntryLink 46.17 -.19 -.11 ChRvLab 35.54 -.18 -.16 ChesEng 25.91 -.06 +.38 Chevron u91.25 -.35 +.57 Chicos 12.03 -.05 +.17 Chimera 4.11 -.01 +.01 ChiMYWd n 11.50 +.09 +.86 ChinaMble 49.62 +.22 +.14 ChinaSecur 5.33 +.14 +.07 ChinaUni 14.25 +.11 -.41 Chipotle 212.66 -5.11-15.63 ChrisBnk 6.15 -.16 +.45 Chubb 59.64 -.09 -.34 ChungTel u25.27 -.03 +.45 CIBER u4.68 -.09 +.40 Cimarex u88.53 -1.02 -.86 CinciBell 2.80 -.01 +.35 Cinemark 17.24 -.10 -.51 Citigrp 4.73 -.03 +.05 CliffsNRs 78.01 -.37 +.01 Clorox 63.28 -.36 -.53 CloudPeak 23.23 +.49 +1.20 Coach 55.31 -.70 -.59 CobaltIEn 12.21 ... -.01 CocaCE 25.03 -.03 -.24 CocaCl 65.77 +.27 +.19 Coeur u27.32 +.13 +.81 ColgPal 80.37 +.07 -.16 CollctvBrd 21.10 +.15 +.68 ColonPT 18.05 -.12 +.03 Comerica 42.24 -.20 -.02 CmclMtls 16.59 -.11 -.23 ComScop 31.22 -.01 -.01 CmtyHlt 37.37 -.20 +.38 Compellent 27.59 ... -.01 CompPrdS 29.55 +.64 -.91 CompSci 49.60 ... +.59 ComstkRs 24.56 -.45 +.88 Con-Way 36.57 -.38 +.33 ConAgra 22.58 -.05 +.18 ConchoRes 87.67 +.47 +.52 ConocPhil u68.10 +.10 +1.02 ConsolEngy 48.74 -.07 +1.99 ConEd 49.57 +.15 -.03 ConstellA u22.15 +.21 -.16 ConstellEn 30.63 -.11 -.46 ContlRes 58.85 +.25 -.26 Cnvrgys 13.17 -.09 -.16 Cooper Ind 58.29 -.25 -.47 CooperTire 23.58 -.17 -.13 Copel 25.17 +.26 +1.00 CoreLogic 18.52 +.10 -.12 Corning 19.32 -.03 -.07 CorpOffP 34.95 -.55 +.45 CorrectnCp 25.06 -.09 +.11 Cosan Ltd 13.62 -.10 +.41 Cott Cp u9.01 +.03 +.18 CousPrp 8.34 -.01 +.25 CovantaH 17.19 -.14 -.19 CoventryH 26.40 ... -.39 Covidien 45.66 +.01 -.33 CredSuiss 40.41 +.07 +.07 CrwnCstle 43.83 +.38 +1.34 CrownHold 33.38 -.44 -.42 Cummins u110.01 -.15 -.90 CurEuro 133.09 +.74 +2.42 CypSharp 12.91 -.04 +.01 Cytec 53.06 -.93 -.72

D-E-F DCT Indl 5.31 DNP Selct 9.14 DPL 25.71 DR Horton 11.93 DTE 45.32 DanaHldg 17.21 Danaher s 47.17 Darden 46.44 DaVita 69.49 DeVry 47.98 DeanFds 8.84 Deere 83.05 DelMnte 18.80 DeltaAir 12.60 Deluxe u23.02 DenburyR 19.09 DeutschBk 52.05 DBGoldDS 7.98 DevelDiv 14.09 DevonE u78.51 Diageo 74.33 DiaOffs 66.87 DiamRk u12.00 DianaShip 12.02 DicksSptg u37.50 DigitalRlt 51.54 Dillards u37.94 DrxTcBll s u45.50 DrxEMBll s 41.31 DrSCBear rsd15.61 DREBear rs 18.01 DrxEBear rs d22.55 DirEMBr rs d20.29 DirFnBear d9.45

+.02 -.01 +.05 -.02 -.27 -.53 -.08 +.02 -.06 -.16 +.15 -.20 +.03 +.06 -.41 -.31 -.30 +.07 -.07 -.07 +.18 +.55 -.25 -.18 +.03 +.05 +.11 +.37 -.23 -.18 +.09 -.09 +.32 +.13 -.21 -.51 +.10 +.39 +.31 +1.13 +.46 -.53 +.94 +1.85 -.08 +.43 +.20 -.78 -.31 -.01 +.07 +1.77 -.49 -.42 -.12 +.05 +.96 +2.68 +.32 +.26 +.06 -1.14 -.09 -.81 -.47 -1.51 -.02 -.17

Name

Last

Chg Wkly

DrxFBull s 27.84 +.11 +.47 Dir30TrBear 43.21 -1.53 -2.59 DrxREBll s 56.82 -.42 +3.11 DirxSCBull u72.43 -1.65 -1.57 DirxLCBear d8.77 -.01 -.04 DirxLCBull u71.50 +.09 +.40 DirxEnBull u58.45 +.13 +1.82 Discover 18.53 +.36 +.09 Disney 37.51 +.03 -.19 DrReddy 36.96 -.05 -.02 DoleFood 13.51 +.05 -.04 DollarGen 30.67 +.09 -.14 DomRescs 42.72 -.18 -.24 Dominos 15.95 -.05 -.05 DoralFncl 1.38 -.06 +.11 DEmmett 16.60 -.29 -.03 Dover 58.45 -.14 -.23 DowChm 34.14 -.11 -.12 DrPepSnap 35.16 -.51 -1.08 DresserR u42.59 -.59 -.70 DuPont u49.88 +.19 +.11 DuPFabros 21.27 +.04 +.63 DukeEngy 17.81 +.01 +.04 DukeRlty 12.46 +.09 +.25 Dynegy rs 5.62 -.07 -.24 ECDang n 27.07 -.84 -.63 E-House 14.96 +.37 +.35 EMC Cp u22.90 ... -.12 ENI 43.74 +.09 +.03 EOG Res 91.41 -.34 -.04 EQT Corp 44.84 -.06 -.21 EastChm u84.08 +.13 +1.68 EKodak 5.36 -.16 -.26 Eaton 101.51 +.35 +.04 EatnVan 30.23 -.10 -.63 EVRiskMgd 13.28 +.08 +.13 EV TxDiver 11.31 +.02 +.32

Name

Last

FordM wt 8.15 +.15 +.01 ForestCA u16.69 +.16 +.46 ForestLab 31.98 +.01 -.40 ForestOil u37.97 -.09 +.13 Fortress u5.70 +.04 -.07 FortuneBr 60.25 -.50 -.65 FranceTel 21.08 +.18 -.01 FrankRes 111.21 +.71 +2.90 FMCG u120.09 +1.14 +1.92 FrontierCm u9.73 +.07 +.23 FrontierOil u18.01 +.18 +.35 Frontline 25.37 -.10 -.44 FurnBrds 5.14 +.04 +.09

G-H-I GMX Rs GabelliET Gafisa s GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GencoShip GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills s GenMot n GM cvpfB GenSteel GenOn En Genpact GenuPrt Genworth Gerdau GiantIntac

5.52 5.67 14.53 22.88 8.19 15.09 22.14 d14.40 70.96 18.29 15.48 3.25 35.59 u36.86 u54.11 2.87 3.81 15.20 51.34 13.14 13.99 7.12

Name

Chg Wkly

+.13 -.06 ... -.17 -.10 +.63 -.07 +.66 +.23 +.47 +.09 -.34 -.22 +.78 +.01 -.06 +.19 -.06 +.10 +.25 -.22 -.01 -.03 -.26 +.09 -.15 +.04 +2.05 -.03 +2.30 -.02 +.21 -.01 -.06 -.18 -.03 -.03 +.30 +.08 -.17 +.14 +.11 -.02 +.05

How to Read the Market in Review Here are the 1,133 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 830 most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 255 most active on American Stock Exchange. Stocks in bold changed 10 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letter’s list. Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. Chg: Loss or gain for last day of week. No change indicated by “…” mark. Wkly: Loss or gain for the week. No change indicated by … Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for last day of the week. Wkly: Weekly net change in the NAV. Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. cld - Issue has been called for redemption by company. d - New 52week low. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. ec - Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Marketplace. g - Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h - temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus listing qualification. n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf - Preferred stock issue. pr - Preferences. pp - Holder owes installments of purchase price. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. rt - Right to buy security at a specified price. s - Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi - Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd - When distributed. wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u - New 52-week high. un - Unit,, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Previous day’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Source: The Associated Press and Lipper, Inc. Sales figures are unofficial.

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Mohawk 56.76 -.93 -2.09 MolsCoorB 50.19 -.22 -.74 Molycorp n u49.90 -2.09 +4.55 Monsanto 69.64 -.08 +3.04 MonstrWw 23.63 -.49 -.25 Montpelr 19.94 -.03 +.30 Moodys 26.54 +.05 +.21 MorgStan 27.21 -.12 -.20 MS Cap6 23.70 +.28 +.28 Mosaic u76.36 +.53 +5.31 Motorola 9.07 +.15 +.02 MuellerWat 4.17 +.01 -.25 MurphO u74.55 +.05 +.56 NCR Corp 15.37 +.07 +.08 NFJDvInt 17.51 -.03 +.09 NRG Egy 19.54 -.01 +.35 NV Energy 14.05 -.02 -.13 NYSE Eur 29.98 +.07 +.29 Nabors 23.46 +.18 +.66 NalcoHld 31.94 +.22 +.06 NBkGreece d1.68 -.01 -.01 NOilVarco u67.25 +.36 +1.44 NatRetPrp 26.50 -.20 +.53 NatSemi 13.76 -.02 -.06 NatwHP 36.38 -.13 +1.64 Navios 5.28 +.08 +.03 Navistar 57.91 -.09 +.36 NY&Co 4.42 +.11 +.03 NY CmtyB u18.85 -.18 -.38 NY Times 9.80 +.07 -.16 NewAlliBc u14.98 -.18 -.09 Newcastle 6.70 -.03 -.01 NewellRub 18.18 +.16 -.01 NewfldExp 72.11 +.09 -.82 NewmtM 61.43 +.35 +1.35 NewpkRes 6.16 +.01 -.02 Nexen g 22.90 -.02 +.82

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PennWst g u23.92 Penney 32.31 PenRE 14.53 Penske 17.42 PepcoHold 18.25 PepsiCo 65.33 PerkElm 25.82 Petrohawk 18.25 PetrbrsA 34.17 Petrobras 37.84 PtroqstE 7.53 Pfizer 17.51 PhilipMor 58.53 PhilipsEl 30.70 PhlVH 63.01 PhnxCos 2.54 PiedmOfc n 20.14 Pier 1 10.50 PimCpOp 16.97 PimcoHiI 12.71 PinWst 41.45 PioNtrl u86.82 PitnyBw 24.18 PlainsEx 32.14 PlumCrk 37.45 Polo RL 110.92 PolyOne 12.49 PortGE 21.70 PostPrp u36.30 Potash u154.83 PwshDB u27.55 PS Agri u32.35 PS USDBull 22.71 PwSClnEn 10.39 PSFinPf 17.61 PShNatMu 22.54 PwShPfd 14.12

Name

-.06 -.13 -.09 -.19 -.15 -.18 ... +.35 -.05 -.20 +.21 -.36 -.10 -.26 +.11 -.03 +.41 +3.16 +.28 +3.56 +.09 -.27 +.02 -.10 +.04 -.14 +.30 +.78 -.83 -2.58 +.01 ... -.05 +.01 -.14 -.16 +.10 +.85 +.16 +.27 -.08 -.36 -.12 +.20 -.26 -.36 -.04 +.75 +.04 +.40 -1.65 -.63 -.28 -.80 -.08 -.38 +.08 +1.35 +2.31+10.50 +.51 +.43 +.50 +.30 -.21 -.49 -.06 -.06 +.15 +.30 +.04 -.09 +.08 +.17

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541.848.4444 www.highdesertbank.com *Free at all on-premises Instant Cash ATMs. Loans subject to credit approval. EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ecolab EdisonInt EdwLfSci s ElPasoCp Elan EldorGld g Embraer EmersonEl Emulex EnCana g Energizer EngyTsfr EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis ENSCO Entergy EntPrPt Equifax EqtyOne EqtyRsd EsteeLdr EvergE rs ExcelM ExcoRes Exelon ExtraSpce ExxonMbl FMC Tech FNBCp PA FairchldS FamilyDlr FedExCp FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FstBcPR h FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FirstEngy FlagstB rs Flotek h Fluor FootLockr FordM

10.53 -.01 +.34 12.25 +.01 +.21 50.42 -.06 +.17 u38.60 -.06 +.22 80.84 -.04 -.48 13.76 +.03 +.11 5.73 +.02 -.31 18.57 +.03 +.50 29.40 +.21 +.17 57.17 -.19 -.30 11.66 -.01 -.17 29.12 +.19 +.47 72.90 -.26 -1.69 51.82 -.08 +1.82 5.57 -.05 +.02 u30.84 -.26 -.05 23.22 +.07 -.28 53.38 +.32 -.02 70.83 +.03 -.72 41.61 -.08 +.40 35.60 -.39 +.10 18.18 -.24 +.41 51.95 -.34 +.61 u80.70 +1.03 +.78 .65 -.05 +.12 5.63 +.05 -.02 19.42 +.06 -.03 41.64 +.16 -.25 17.40 -.14 +.04 u73.12 -.24 -.08 88.91 +.41 +2.50 9.82 -.14 -.20 u15.61 -.36 +.37 49.71 -.62 +.04 93.01 +.05 ... 26.17 +.01 -.06 7.04 -.09 -.26 14.64 -.23 -.49 16.00 ... -.14 13.68 -.09 -.13 27.39 -.28 +.07 12.14 -.15 +.29 .46 +.01 +.07 11.78 -.05 +.07 8.76 +.01 +.47 u14.52 +.66 +2.20 37.02 -.23 -.02 1.63 +.02 +.09 u5.45 +.64 +1.18 66.26 +.10 +.28 u19.62 -.15 +.03 16.79 +.10 +.01

Gildan 28.49 GlaxoSKln 39.22 GlimchRt 8.40 GlobPay 46.21 GlbXChiFn 13.35 GlbXSilvM 27.13 GolLinhas 15.38 GoldFLtd 18.13 Goldcrp g 45.98 GoldS60 n 23.15 GoldmanS 168.16 Goodrich 88.07 GoodrPet 17.64 Goodyear 11.85 GrafTech 19.84 Gramrcy 2.31 GpTelevisa 25.93 Guess 47.32 GugSolar 7.30 GushanE rs 5.55 HCP Inc 36.79 HSBC 51.04 Hallibrtn 40.83 Hanesbrds 25.40 HarleyD 34.67 HarmonyG 12.54 HarrisCorp 45.30 Harsco 28.32 HartfdFn 26.49 HatterasF 30.27 HawaiiEl 22.79 Headwatrs 4.58 HltCrREIT 47.64 HltMgmt 9.54 HealthNet 27.29 HlthSouth 20.71 Heckmann 5.03 HeclaM u11.26 Heinz 49.46 HelixEn 12.14 HelmPayne u48.48 Hersha 6.60 Hershey 47.15 Hertz 14.49 Hess u76.54 HewlettP 42.10 Hexcel 18.09 hhgregg 20.95 HighwdPrp 31.85 HollyCp u40.77 HomeDp 35.06 HonwllIntl 53.16

+.11 -.30 +.17 +.04 +.05 +.39 -.43 +.38 +.05 +.34 +.60 +2.14 +.05 +.39 +.20 +.33 +.70 +1.23 +.02 -.33 +.52 +.56 +.44 +.11 +.04 +.20 -.06 +.02 +.16 +.04 -.03 +.04 +.01 -.05 -.72 -.83 +.02 -.10 -.21 +1.71 -.02 +.81 +.16 -.43 -.18 +.51 -.27 +.05 +.06 +.05 +.16 +.21 -.04 -.55 -.16 +.41 +.18 -.21 -.13 +.28 -.13 +.34 -.15 -.37 ... +.40 ... +.05 -.18 +.09 -.22 -.57 -.14 +.25 +.13 +.49 +.08 -.25 -.07 -.36 -.40 -.24 -.03 +.12 -.12 -.82 +.18 +.26 +.10 +.70 -.16 +.36 -.10 -.25 -.61 -.86 -.38 +.43 +.14 +.90 +.20 -.03 +.20 -.27

Hormel 51.26 +.03 -.55 Hospira 55.69 -.07 -.93 HospPT 23.04 -.06 +.76 HostHotls u17.87 +.06 +.32 HovnanE 4.09 +.16 +.06 Humana 54.74 +.15 -.69 Huntsmn 15.61 +.07 -.08 IAMGld g 17.80 +.06 +.16 ICICI Bk 50.64 +.31 +.93 ING GRE 7.75 +.03 +.09 ING GlbDv 10.85 -.01 -.06 ING 9.79 +.13 +.21 INGPrRTr 5.69 -.05 -.07 ION Geoph 8.48 ... -.23 iShGold s 13.90 +.18 +.41 iShGSCI u34.10 +.63 +.19 iSAstla 25.44 +.02 +.24 iShBraz 77.40 +.42 +3.10 iSCan u31.00 +.07 +.50 iShGer 23.94 +.17 -.10 iSh HK 18.92 -.14 +.09 iShJapn u10.91 +.04 +.16 iSh Kor u61.19 +.36 +2.48 iSMalas 14.38 +.12 +.40 iShMex u61.92 +.58 +.55 iShSing 13.85 +.07 +.61 iSPacxJpn 46.98 -.01 +.65 iSTaiwn u15.62 +.16 +.58 iSh UK 17.37 +.17 +.12 iShSilver u30.18 +.42 +1.57 iShS&P100 56.67 +.03 +.07 iShDJDv 49.86 -.14 -.15 iShBTips 107.52 +.74 +.77 iShChina25 43.09 +.42 +.49 iSSP500 126.25 +.01 +.16 iShBAgB 105.75 +.43 +.78 iShEMkts 47.64 +.33 +1.06 iShiBxB 108.44 +.27 +.48 iSSPGlbEn u39.06 +.19 +.61 iShSPLatA 53.86 +.36 +1.19 iSSPVal 59.59 +.03 +.17 iShB20 T 94.12 +1.03 +1.51 iShB7-10T 93.82 +.47 +.70 iShB1-3T 83.98 +.10 +.21 iS Eafe 58.22 +.35 +.50 iSRusMCV u45.01 -.10 +.09 iSSPMid 90.69 -.43 -.24 iShiBxHYB 90.29 +.16 +.69 iSR1KV u64.87 +.04 +.19 iSR1KG 57.26 -.08 -.04 iSRus1K u69.86 -.02 +.09 iSR2KV u71.09 -.49 -.24

CVB Fncl 8.67 -.12 -.16 CadencePh 7.55 +.01 -.15 Cadence 8.26 -.03 -.03 Cal-Maine 31.58 -.49 -2.24 CdnSolar 12.39 +.04 -.58 CapProd 9.68 -.07 +.20 CapFdF rs 11.91 +.10 +.32 CpstnTrb h .96 +.03 -.01 Cardica u4.38 -.09 +.36 Cardiom g 6.42 -.13 +.60 CareerEd 20.73 -.28 +.24 Carrizo u34.49 ... +1.16 CathayGen u16.70 -.26 +.43 CaviumNet 37.68 -.74 +.24 CeleraGrp 6.30 +.11 -.09 Celgene 59.14 -.29 -.55 CelldexTh 4.12 -.05 -.03 CentEuro 22.90 -.13 -.59 CenGrdA lf 9.88 -.07 -.10 CentAl 15.53 -.18 -.27 Cephln 61.72 -.44 -2.28 Cepheid 22.75 -.43 -.64 CeragonN u13.18 +.12 +.48 Cerner 94.74 -.90 -.41 CerusCp 2.46 -.02 ... ChrmSh 3.55 -.01 -.04 ChkPoint u46.26 +.24 +.41 Cheesecake 30.66 -.33 -.44 ChildPlace 49.64 -.31 +.25 ChAdvCons 4.68 +.11 +.83 ChinAgri s 12.27 -.42 +.92 ChinaArc rs d1.62 -.06 -.11 ChinaBAK 1.93 -.01 -.03 ChinaBiot 14.70 -.39 +.93 ChinaCEd 7.76 +.05 +.40 ChinaDir 1.51 -.35 +.26 ChinaInfo 5.21 -.11 +.01 ChinaMda 15.84 +.09 +.09 ChinaMed 11.24 -.35 -.48 ChinaNGas 5.51 -.10 +.29 ChinaRE 9.60 +.62 +.62 ChinaSun 4.18 +.06 -.04 ChinaTcF 4.20 -.01 +.35 ChiValve 10.48 +.11 +.20 ChinaWind 3.58 -.06 -.03 ChiCache n d20.80 -.54 -.50 CienaCorp 21.05 -.17 +.65 CinnFin 31.69 -.08 -.24 Cintas 27.96 -.10 -.38 Cirrus 15.98 -.01 -.14 Cisco 20.23 ... +.54 CitrixSys 68.41 +.03 -.26 CleanEngy 13.84 -.17 -.62 Clearwire 5.15 -.07 +.01 ClinicData 15.91 -.19 -.65 CognizTech u73.29 -.55 +.46 Cogo Grp u8.85 -.02 +.46 Coinstar 56.44 +.09 -1.56 ColdwtrCrk 3.17 -.01 +.23 ColumLabs u2.27 +.08 +.10 Comcast 21.97 -.11 -.21 Comc spcl 20.81 +.03 -.04 CmcBMO 39.73 -.31 +.16 CommVlt 28.62 -.48 -.75 Compuwre u11.67 -.07 -.14 Comtech 27.76 -.13 -.14 ConcurTch 51.93 -1.32 -1.50 Conexant 1.63 -.02 -.01 Conns 4.68 +.05 +.65 CopanoEn u33.75 +.36 +1.82 Copart 37.35 -.14 +.06

CorinthC 5.21 CostPlus u9.70 Costco u72.21 CowenGp 4.69 Cree Inc 65.89 CrimsnExp 4.26 Crocs 17.12 Ctrip.com s 40.45 CubistPh 21.40 Curis 1.98 Cyclacel 1.47 CyprsBio h u6.48 CypSemi u18.58 Cytokinet 2.09 Cytori 5.19

+.03 -.25 -.64 -.14 -.18 +.15 -.34 -.89 -.18 -.04 -.01 -.01 +.20 ... -.03

F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FSI Intl FX Ener Fastenal FifthThird FinEngin n Finisar FinLine FstBusey FMidBc FstNiagara FstSolar FTNDXTc FstMerit Fiserv Flextrn FlowInt FocusMda FormFac Fortinet Fossil Inc FosterWhl FresKabi rt FreshMkt n FrozenFd FuelSysSol FuelTech FuelCell FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FushiCopp

iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShREst iShSPSm iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed ITW IndiaFd IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE IntegrysE IBM Intl Coal IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif Interpublic IntPotash Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc IronMtn ItauUnibH IvanhM g Ivanhoe rt

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104.28 +.23 +.33 87.42 -.72 -.80 78.24 -.52 -.48 38.80 +.15 +.41 u74.95 -.08 +.05 55.96 -.07 +.91 68.47 -.75 -.69 u7.82 +.05 +.45 52.11 +.07 +.12 63.69 -2.01 -1.29 53.40 -.20 +.28 35.11 +.41 -.39 u47.09 -.27 +.21 u19.09 -.16 +.43 8.80 -.06 +.28 48.51 -.30 -.69 146.76 +.09 +.87 7.74 -.10 +.50 17.69 +.19 +.23 27.24 +.05 +.23 29.69 -.07 +.33 10.62 -.01 -.14 u37.29 +.44 +1.07 24.06 +.39 +.38 21.84 -.10 -.43 4.69 ... +.04 25.01 ... +.04 24.01 +.14 +.65 22.92 -.38 -.04 d1.40 -.06 -.17

J-K-L JCrew 43.14 JPMorgCh 42.42 JPMAlerian 36.35 Jabil u20.09 JacksnHw h 2.17 JacobsEng 45.85 Jaguar g 7.13 JanusCap 12.97 Jarden 30.87 Jefferies 26.63 JinkoSol n 20.12 JoAnnStrs 60.22 JohnJn 61.85 JohnsnCtl 38.20 JonesGrp 15.54 JnprNtwk 36.92 KB Home 13.49 KBR Inc 30.47 KKR n 14.20 KKR Fn 9.30

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87.05 11.99 20.27

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Name

18.12 22.10 31.41 8.07 18.49 44.98 46.34 25.92 34.20 45.65 14.93 11.74 42.24 7.00 16.60 8.74 27.94 29.86 34.64 u7.38 106.48 32.62 71.66 .88 30.60 58.26 39.12 34.91 52.36 u47.00 66.67 66.78 u52.64 u47.31 17.03

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Nasdaq National Market Name

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B USI N ESS

Tech

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE Melissa Riverman has joined Western Title & Escrow as an escrow officer. She has more than 27 years of experience in the industry. The Oregon Travel Information Council has announced the election of Drew Roslund as chairman of the council’s governing board. Roslund is a graduate of Oregon State and Washington State universities, and is current president of Be Our Guest Inc., a hospitality-oriented business in Bend. He has served the last four years as a Travel Information Council member. Brett Thomas of Silver Moon Brewing in Bend has been named recipient of the Glen Hay Falconer Foundation American Brewers Guild scholarship. Thomas will attend the American Brewers Guild’s intensive brewing science and engineering course from January through July 2011. The brewing scholarship is a full-tuition grant offered with the co-sponsorship of the American Brewers Guild. Three attorneys from Karnopp Petersen LLP in Bend have been selected for the Oregon Super Lawyers 2010 list and two have been identified as “Rising Stars.” Tom J. Sayeg and Jim Petersen were selected as “Super Lawyers” in the field of business and corporate law, and Mike Dillard for business litigation. Kurt Barker and Jinnifer Jeresek were designated as “Rising Stars” in employment defense litigation and business litigation, respectively. Super Lawyers magazine names attorneys in each state who received the highest point totals from their peers and through independent research. Rising Stars are attorneys who are 40 or younger, or who have been practicing law for fewer than 10 years. Petersen is a fellow in the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, has served as state chairman from 1999 through 2004 and is a member of the American Bar Association, Oregon State Bar and Deschutes County Bar Association. Sayeg is a member of the Oregon State Bar Estate Planning and Administration Section Executive Committee, and is a fellow in the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel. He has been active in the business and taxation sections of the Oregon State Bar, serving in various officer positions and as the chairman of both of those sections’ executive committees.

CDs Continued from C3 He didn’t have an article to cite, but he knows this for sure: CDs just are not in demand the way they were in their heyday. Back then — probably in the 1990s, he said — 75 percent of the store’s sales was in CDs. That has changed. Rock CDs — the store’s biggest category, Schroeder said — have brought in about 42 percent of total sales in December, the month of greatest sales, in the past few years, according to his calculations. Sales of CDs in all genres comprise more than 50 percent of total sales, but not anything near 75 percent. So what’s growing? Vinyl, for one thing. In December 2006, 3 percent of total sales were from records. In December of 2009, that figure was 11 percent. Explaining that, Schroeder said some people like touching the album, putting the needle on the record, hearing the warmer sound, reading the liner notes and enjoying the bigger art. As for the CDs, who keeps buying them? Older people are, Schroeder said. “You always have to have the Beatles, you always have to have the Stones, you always have to have the classics — always, always, always,” he said.

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 1, 2011 C5

Continued from C3

Get music off your computer

Tom J. Sayeg

Jim Petersen

Dillard’s practice emphasizes commercial litigation and assisting clients in the resolution of business disputes with particular experience in real property, corporate, commercial and employment law. Dillard is a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, has served as special counsel to the Oregon Commission on Judicial Fitness and Disability and has served as a lecturer and panelist on various aspects of business litigation. Barker is the chair of Karnopp Petersen’s employment law department and serves on the board of the Human Resource Association of Central Oregon. His practice emphasizes the defense and counsel of clients in all aspects of employment-related issues. For three consecutive years, Oregon Super Lawyers has named Barker a Rising Star in employment litigation defense. Jeresek was appointed to the Oregon State Bar Public Service Advisory Committee, is a member of the J.R. Campbell Inns of Court, the Oregon Women Lawyers, Cascade Women Lawyers and the Deschutes County Bar Association. Jeresek has worked on a variety of matters including disputes involving trade secrets, partnerships, trusts and estates, homeowner associations, neighbor conflicts, tribal matters and other civil litigation. Spanish Immersion Camps Inc. of Bend has announced camp staff and counselors for the summer 2011 camp sessions. All were chosen for their Spanish language and surfing abilities, and previous experience working with children. Cole Ortega was a camp counselor last summer and will return as the boys counselor for session one. Ortega is a junior at Summit High School, part of the Bend Surf Club and a competitive snowboarder and golfer. Taylor Hedlund also was a camp counselor in 2010 and will return for all three sessions of 2011 to assist the director and counselors. Hedlund is a graduate of Summit High School and a

Schroeder believes the CD will continue to be around. “They’ll never go away, just like the record,” he said. The Open Book, on Greenwood Avenue in Bend, specializes in used-book sales and purchases. But about 500 used CDs take up much of the shelf space in a nook near the store’s entrance. There are Yanni and Joe Cocker, Andrea Bocelli and the Cowboy Junkies. Doug Peabody, the store’s owner, said he introduced the nook into the store after buying it from its previous owner, Jerry Weick, in 1995. The stock of CDs on the floor has not changed since then, he said. Before moving back to his native Bend, Peabody had been the manager of the Music Millennium store in Northwest Portland. Music, he said, is “my background. It’s kind of my first love.” In came the CDs — assorted, with a small classical section. Then and now, books have outnumbered CDs in the store about 100 to 1. Most of his business is in books. In the 15 years Peabody has run The Open Book, he has seen a gradual decease in CD demand. “I think it’ll continue to dwindle,” he added. This does not surprise him. Online music sales began in earnest before books, he said. And as a result, people have gotten more comfortable buying music

Mike Dillard

Jinnifer Jeresek

Kurt Barker

Karinda Love-Boone

sophomore at Oregon State University majoring in psychology and Spanish. Olivia Grout is a graduate of Summit High School and is a freshman at Gonzaga University. Grout was a member of the Summit varsity dance team, assisted dance classes at The Vibe dance studio and is now a member of the Gonzaga dance team. She is a skier, surfer and sailor, and is a member of the Gonzaga ski and snowboard team. Keenan Keeley is a longtime Bend resident and an Oregon native who will graduate from the University of Oregon in the spring in product design. Keenan has spent many summers in Encinitas, Calif., where he did junior lifeguarding. Courtney Timms is a Summit High School graduate and is a sophomore at Portland State University studying to be a dental hygienist. Timms joined the camp last summer to assist with activities and will return as the girls counselor for summer 2011. Connor Johnson is a senior at Summit High School. He is a water sports enthusiast and enjoys surfing, waterskiing and wakeboarding. He has studied Spanish since the sixth grade. Alicia Vickery has worked in the Bend-LaPine school district as an elementary school teacher for the past eight years. Vickery holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Oregon and a master’s in teaching from Oregon State University-Cascades. Karinda Love-Boone is a graduate of Mt. Vernon College. She worked in real estate sales and marketing for over 20 years before establishing Spanish Immersion Camps Inc.

on the Internet sooner than they have with buying books, he said. If anything, he said, “I’m starting to get a little worried about books — Kindles and iPads, things like that.” Nowadays, he said, “it’s more impulse” inspiring CD purchases than targeted searching or relaxed browsing. He said, “I think people just go, ‘Oh!’ That type of thing.” At Rico’s Market on Northeast Third Street in Bend, the CDs have Spanish lyrics, or at least were made by Spanish speakers. Musical styles include merengue, bachata, reggaeton and salsa. The store also sells DVDs, food, beverages and clothing. Antonio Rico, the owner, says CD sales make up between 10 and 15 percent of total sales. In the summer, though, it can rise to 25 percent. He said his store, which opened in 1995 and has changed locations in Bend more than once, has seen CD sales slide downward in the past few years. He believes people are finding music they want on the Internet, but they aren’t paying for it. What moves faster this time of year? “This is the time of year when I do real good in blankets,” he said. Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@ bendbulletin.com.

Why: Because music bought digitally wants to be free, not imprisoned in your portable player or laptop. It wants to be sent around the home, filling rooms like good old - f a s h io ne d hi-fi. How: Using iTunes for your digital music? Buy Apple’s Airport Express for $99 and connect it to your stereo. When you play music on your computer, you can stream it to the Express and, therefore, your stereo’s speakers. Have an iPhone, iPod Touch or iPad? Download Apple’s free Remote app and you will be able to control your music from anywhere in the house.

Back up your data Why: Because photos are not the only important things on your computer. With online backup services, you do not have to buy any equipment; you just install software, which sits on secure servers and runs in the background, regularly updating a mirror image of all your files while you spend time on more important things, like confirming that Ben Gazzara really was the bad guy in “Road House” (he was). How: Go to sosbackup.com. Pay $80 a year. Install the software. Sleep easy.

Use a free file-sharing service Why: Because while e-mailing yourself files is a perfectly

Markets Continued from C3 One factor, analysts say, was the unexpected surge in corporate earnings throughout the year, helped largely by cost-cutting. Then the government pitched in: The Federal Reserve’s decision in early November to pump $600 billion into the economy by buying Treasury assets, along with tax cuts passed by the lameduck Congress in December, helped propel a year-end rally, lifting the benchmark S&P index by about 6.5 percent in December alone. On Friday, the Dow Jones industrial average closed up 7.8 points, to 11,577.51. The Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index was less than a point lower, at 1,257.64. The technologyheavy Nasdaq lost 10.11 points, or 0.38 percent, to 2,652.87. While stocks performed well overall for the year, a small group of listings played an outsize role. Within the S&P 500, Levkovich said, the top 50 performing stocks contributed about 60 percent of the jump in the index. Technology was again a star, paced by Netflix, up 219 percent,making it the single best performer in the index. F5 Networks, which makes equipment to manage Internet traffic, was the second-best performer, rising about 146 percent. Cummins, the engine maker, took third place with a 140 percent gain. Automakers also did well, with Ford rising about 68 percent even as General Motors returned to the stock market in a $23 billion initial public offering, the biggest in U.S. history. But many individual investors missed the party, having

decent workaround, there are easier, more elegant ways to move files around — and they do not cost anything, either. How: Go to dropbox.com and set up a free account. You will then get an icon that sits on your desktop. Drag and drop files onto that icon, and they are immediately copied to the cloud. The free account gives you up to two gigabytes of disk space; 50and 100-gigabyte are also available, but they cost $10 or $20 a month. Set up your account on all your other computers, and they all have the access to the same files. You can set up shared, private and public folders, and apps for iPhone, iPad, BlackBerry and Android mean you can gain access to shared files from anywhere.

Get free antivirus software Why: Because attacks on unwitting users are more widespread and tactics are growing more advanced. How: Windows users should download Avast Free Antivirus. Mac users can download iAntiVirus Free Edition. Both applications will provide a basic level of security against a variety of so-called malware. And they cost zero.

Get a better deal on telecom services Why: Because it does not take much to get them to give you free (or cheaper) services. These companies are generally indifferent to customer needs,

but they are quick to cough up discounts — if you ask. How: Just call and ask — they will probably give you something. Other tactics: Measure your Internet speed, using dslreports.com/speedtest; if it is less than what you are paying for, ask for a free upgrade. Or ask to speak to the cancellation department. That usually scares them.

Calibrate your HDTV Why: Because that awesome 1080p plasma or LCD TV you bought has factory settings for color, brightness, contrast and so forth that are likely to be out of whack. They need to be adjusted. How: Order Spears and Munsil High Definition Benchmark: Blu-ray Edition, a DVD, for $25. Its regimen of tests and patterns will help you adjust your TV’s settings to more natural levels. After you use it, you may want to fine-tune the TV some more, but you can do so knowing you are getting the most out of your display.

Buy a lot of charging cables Why: Because you should never have a gadget’s battery die on you, and they are cheap. Smart phone user? Have a charging cable at the office, one in the car and a couple at home. Laptops? Have enough chargers in the house, so you are not tethered to the den when the power runs low. How: eBay. Search for what you need with terms like “original” or “oem” (original equipment manufacturer). You will often see accessories for as little as one-tenth their normal retail price. Buy them by the gross.

taken their money out of stocks. They were scared off, it seems, because of the volatility that followed the brief 1,000-point drop May 6, as well as lingering concerns from the financial crisis of 2008, including a housing and unemployment hangover. “Investors in general tend to have a reduced tolerance for risk,” said Brian Reid, chief economist of the Investment Company Institute. The government bond market was precarious as well. Typically, bond prices go up and yields drop when economic growth is anemic, reversing course when economic activity picks up and the threat of inflation reawakens. Indeed, as it became clear the economy was sputtering in the spring and the European debt crisis worsened, investors began pouring money into bonds, eventually sending yields to all-time lows by early October. The yield on the two-year government bond, for example, fell below 0.4 percent in early October, a record low. Bonds may be a traditional refuge in turbulent markets, but it was gold, a haven for value since ancient times, that really shined. Like bonds, gold benefited from a flight to safety spurred by the European debt crisis. But it also raced higher on fears that budget deficits in Western countries, including the United States, are unsustainable and that lax monetary policies would weaken the value of paper currencies over time. “People are disenchanted with paper currencies. They want to own something real, and over centuries gold has proven to be real,” Wien said. The returns were real too, with

the typical gold mutual fund, including mining companies and a range of precious metals, moving higher by 40 percent. Gold itself rose from $1,096.95 at the start of the year to $1,418 Friday afternoon. Crude oil, another closely watched commodity, rose from $79.86 a barrel to $91.17 a barrel Friday afternoon, after rising 78 percent in 2009. Underpinning the rally, most analysts said, were strong earnings, but in what is likely to be a worry for next year, the profits were bolstered by job cuts and other restructuring efforts, rather than revenue growth. With only so much room to cut costs, analysts say that kind of performance will be difficult to repeat, perhaps boding ill for stocks this year. Analysts expect profits to increase 13.4 percent in 2011, far lower than the estimated 37.8 percent gain for 2010, according to Thomson Reuters. To make matters worse, Wall Street is brimming with optimism, which in the looking-glass world of investing can actually be a signal to sell. “The good news has been priced in, and the potential negatives have been ignored,” said Jason Hsu, chief investment officer of Research Affiliates, a money manager in Newport Beach, Calif., that oversees $70 billion in assets. “The market is going to get more nervous at these valuations.”

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Chg Wkly

AbdAsPac 6.75 +.05 +.09 AbdAustEq 11.98 +.01 -.08 AbdnChile 22.67 +.77 +1.07 AbdnIndo 13.31 +.16 +.50 AdeonaPh 1.25 +.11 +.31 AdvPhot u1.62 -.05 +.05 Advntrx rs 2.61 -.06 -.26 AlexcoR g 8.19 +.43 +.79 AlldNevG 26.31 -.02 +.52 AlmadnM g 4.73 +.20 +.37 AlphaPro 1.78 +.03 +.17 AmApparel 1.66 -.04 +.01 AmDefense .17 -.00 +.01 AmLorain 2.61 -.05 +.02 Anooraq g 1.63 +.03 +.19 AntaresP 1.70 -.01 +.06 AoxingP rs 2.79 +.01 -.13 ArcadiaRs .30 +.01 +.00 ArmourRsd 7.81 +.07 +.12 Augusta g 3.81 +.05 +.11 Aurizon g 7.32 +.01 +.17 AvalRare n u6.24 -.16 +1.74 BMB Munai .86 +.02 -.03 Ballanty 7.77 -.15 -.31 Banks.com .32 +.01 +.01 Banro g 4.02 +.17 +.58 BarcUBS36 u49.12 +.85 +1.06 BarcGSOil 25.61 +.55 -.04 BrcIndiaTR 77.66 +1.19 +1.91 BioTime u8.33 -.10 -1.18

BlkMuIT2 13.10 BlkMunvst 9.46 Brigus grs u2.10 BritATob 77.70 CAMAC En d1.99 CanoPet .38 CapGold n 5.07 CaracoP 4.54 Cardero g u2.30 CardiumTh .39 CelSci .82 CFCda g u20.73 CentGold g 54.35 CheniereEn 5.52 CheniereE u21.31 ChiArmM 3.88 ChiGengM u5.15 ChIntLtg n 2.72 ChiMarFd 5.40 ChinNEPet 5.76 ChinaNutri 2.79 ChinaPhH 3.03 ChinaShen u8.40 ChShengP .81 ClaudeR g u2.19 CloughGEq 15.12 ClghGlbOp 13.45 CmtyBkTr 1.05 Contango u57.93 CornstProg 7.50 CornstTR 7.88 CornerstStr 8.84

+.29 +.13 +.18 +.26 +.05 +.20 +.60 +.20 +.04 -.04 +.02 +.08 +.06 +.08 -.07 -.58 +.35 +.60 -.01 -.10 -.01 -.08 +.11 +.91 +.48 +1.69 -.19 +.13 +.31 +1.00 -.41 +.85 +.97 +3.46 ... +.21 +.12 +.30 +.10 +.35 +.09 -.10 -.01 +.24 +.40 +4.27 -.03 +.03 +.03 +.15 +.10 +.18 +.02 +.05 -.06 +.04 -.87 -1.98 ... +.20 +.13 +.17 +.11 +.15

CrSuisInco 3.56 CrSuiHiY 2.89 Crossh g rs u2.52 Crystallx g .31 CubicEngy 1.00 Cytomed .59 DejourE g .32 DelaMN2 12.62 DenisnM g 3.42 DocuSec 5.39 Dreams 2.67 DryfMu 8.93 EstnLtCap 5.06 EV CAMu 11.25 EV LtdDur 16.05 EVMuniBd 11.48 EVMuni2 12.00 EV NYMu 12.18 eMagin u6.00 EmersnR h 1.98 EndvrInt rs u13.80 EndvSilv g 7.34 EngyInco 26.88 EntGaming .36 EntreeGold 3.46 EvolPetrol u6.52 ExeterR gs 6.21 Express-1 2.56 FT WindEn 10.25 FiveStar 7.07 FrkStPrp 14.25 FrTmpLtd 13.10

... -.01 -.10 +.01 +.06 -.02 ... +.29 -.02 +.01 +.07 +.24 +.06 +.40 +.10 +.22 +.33 +.33 +.18 -.01 -.03 +.12 -.05 +.01 +.15 -.04 +.06 +.19 +.12 -.14 -.06 -.01

+.02 -.01 +.54 +.02 -.03 +.10 +.03 +.28 +.20 -.02 +.24 +.47 -.04 +.49 +.35 +.18 +.33 +.56 +.61 +.01 +.52 +.55 +.13 ... +.35 +.19 +.20 +.24 +.21 -.20 +.23 -.07

FredHolly .90 Fronteer g 11.73 GabGldNR 19.27 GascoEngy .35 Gastar grs 4.30 GenMoly u6.48 GeoGloblR .79 Geokinetics 9.29 GeoPetro .44 GoldRsv g u1.81 GoldResrc u29.40 GoldenMin 26.70 GoldStr g 4.59 GldFld .31 GormanR 32.32 GranTrra g 8.05 GrtBasG g 2.96 GreenHntr .81 GpoSimec 7.83 GugFront 24.44 HKN 3.50 HQ SustM 4.77 HSBC CTI 8.56 HearUSA .91 Hemisphrx .49 HooperH .70 HstnAEn 18.09 Hyperdyn 4.96 IEC Elec u7.62 ImpOil gs 40.52 IndiaGC .58 IndiaGC wt .01

+.02 -.02 +.18 +.03 +.32 +.69 +.00 -.02 ... +.11 -.20 +1.08 -.02 +.04 +.19 +.45 +.02 +.01 -.01 -.01 +.16 +1.59 +.03 +2.11 -.01 -.02 -.03 +.00 -.34 -3.83 +.11 +.02 +.04 +.07 -.04 -.09 +.03 -.20 +.14 +.66 +.05 -.13 -.05 +.22 +.14 +.13 +.04 +.04 +.00 -.02 -.01 ... -.13 +.05 +.02 -.14 +.26 +.45 ... +.96 -.02 +.01 +.00 +.00

Innovaro 1.43 InovioPhm 1.15 Intellichk 1.37 IntTower g u10.07 InvVKAdv2 11.35 InvVKSelS 11.22 IsoRay 1.13 Iteris 1.82 KimberR g 1.40 KobexMn g .94 KodiakO g 6.60 LadThalFn 1.17 Lannett 5.59 Libbey u15.47 LongweiPI 2.59 LucasEngy 2.33 MAG Slv g u12.44 MGT Cap .26 MadCatz g 1.02 MagHRes u7.20 MagHR pfC 25.00 Metalico 5.88 Metalline 1.25 MetroHlth 4.47 MdwGold g .84 MincoG g u2.73 Minefnd g 11.04 MinesMgt u4.18 MtnPDia g u6.55 NIVS IntT 2.26 NTN Buzz .38 NeoStem 1.41

+.09 +.02 -.01 ... -.02 -.14 +.19 +.29 +.17 +.24 +.31 +.33 +.05 -.02 -.04 +.05 +.03 +.03 -.07 -.04 +.04 -.18 ... +.03 +.02 +.38 +.25 +.31 +.13 +.26 +.08 -.05 +.06 +1.06 +.02 +.06 +.03 +.03 -.38 +.48 ... ... +.23 +.29 +.03 +.20 -.03 -.09 +.05 +.06 -.02 +.48 -.02 +.28 +.25 +.84 +.02 +.79 +.02 +.02 +.01 +.02 -.01 ...

NeuB HYld 13.50 NBIntMu 14.01 NBRESec 3.99 Neuralstem 2.12 NevGCas 1.02 Nevsun g u7.53 NDragon .05 NewEnSys 7.73 NwGold g 9.76 NA Pall g u6.94 NDynMn g u14.29 NthnO&G u27.21 NthgtM g 3.20 NovaBayP d1.66 NovaGld g 14.27 NuvCADv2 13.10 NCADv3 11.96 NvDCmdty 25.80 NuvDiv2 13.30 NuvDiv3 13.29 NICADv 13.22 NvInsDv 13.60 NuvInsTF 13.39 NMuHiOp 11.45 NuvREst 10.11 NvTxAdFlt 2.18 Oilsands g .42 OpkoHlth 3.67 OrientPap 6.36 OrionEngy 3.34 OrsusXel .17 Pacholder 8.45

Biggest mutual funds +.08 +.20 +.20 +.45 +.01 +.12 +.05 -.03 -.01 -.01 +.29 +.48 -.00 -.01 +.01 +.45 +.06 +.52 +.14 +.48 +.36 +1.07 -.48 -.16 -.01 +.16 -.01 -.08 -.11 +.07 +.24 +.44 +.15 +.28 +.07 +.51 +.30 +.28 +.30 +.14 +.28 +.28 +.21 +.34 +.35 +.29 +.21 +.33 -.17 -.27 +.02 -.02 +.01 +.01 -.04 -.11 +.17 +.01 ... +.07 -.01 +.02 +.22 +.11

Palatin rs 1.35 ParaG&S u3.99 PhrmAth 4.23 PionDrill 8.81 PlatGpMet 2.66 PolyMet g 2.39 ProceraNt .62 ProlorBio 6.47 Protalix 9.98 PudaCoal 14.25 PyramidOil 5.12 Quaterra g 1.98 RadientPh 1.01 RaeSyst 1.61 RareEle g u16.06 ReavesUtl u22.35 Rentech 1.22 RexahnPh 1.12 Richmnt g 5.11 Rubicon g 5.71 SamsO&G 1.32 ScolrPh .37 SeabGld g 30.68 SearchMed 3.11 Senesco .28 SinoHub 2.61 Solitario u3.63 SondeR grs u3.61 SparkNet 2.97 SprottRL g 1.77 SulphCo .17 TanzRy g 7.30

+.06 +.36 +.30 +.71 +.24 +.32 +.02 -.01 -.03 +.32 +.16 +.36 -.02 +.01 -.09 -.50 -.01 +.17 +.45 +2.14 -.22 +.29 +.15 +.26 +.05 +.19 +.01 ... -.68 +5.90 -.21 -1.03 +.01 -.01 -.03 -.06 ... +.12 +.05 +.23 -.01 +.19 +.02 +.04 +.79 +1.22 +.10 -.08 -.00 -.01 +.03 +.02 -.10 +.15 +.06 +.23 -.03 -.02 ... ... -.01 -.01 +.02 +.23

Taseko 5.25 Tengsco .63 TianyinPh 2.72 TimberlnR 1.19 TrnsatlPet 3.33 TravelCtrs 3.77 TriValley .57 Tucows g .73 TwoHrbInv 9.79 UQM Tech 2.29 US Geoth 1.17 Uluru .11 Univ Insur 4.87 Ur-Energy u2.99 Uranerz 3.99 UraniumEn 6.04 VangTotW 47.80 VantageDrl 2.03 VantDrl wt .00 VirnetX 14.85 VistaGold 2.39 WalterInv 17.94 WFAdvInco 9.63 WFAdMSec 15.32 WFAdUtlHi 11.59 WidePoint 1.34 WirelessT .87 WT DrfChn 25.37 WT Drf Bz u26.55 WizzardSft .25 YM Bio g 2.33 ZBB Engy 1.08

+.08 +.22 +.02 -.02 +.01 -.01 +.09 +.34 +.01 -.04 -.02 -.03 -.12 +.07 +.02 -.05 -.10 +.04 -.12 -.08 -.01 +.02 +.00 +.01 -.02 -.03 +.01 +.32 +.35 +.63 -.13 +.44 +.15 +.44 ... +.01 -.01 -.01 +.07 +1.54 -.09 -.10 +.05 -.16 ... +.11 +.27 +.21 ... +.01 +.01 -.01 ... +.13 -.01 +.22 -.06 +.56 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.05 -.09 +.30

Name

Total AssetsTotal Return/Rank Obj ($Mins) 4-wk

PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRet n American Funds A: GwthFdA p Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk n Fidelity Invest: Contra n American Funds A: CapInBldA p American Funds A: CapWGrA p Vanguard Instl Fds: InstIdx nx American Funds A: IncoFdA p American Funds A: InvCoAA p Dodge&Cox: Intl Stk Dodge&Cox: Stock Vanguard Admiral: 500Adml n Vanguard Admiral: TotStkAdm n Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 n American Funds A: EupacA px Vanguard Idx Fds: TotlIntl nx American Funds A: WshMutA p PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRetAd n Frank/Temp Frnk A: IncoSerA p American Funds A: NewPerA px

IB LG XC LG BL GL SP BL LC IL LV SP XC SP IL IL LC IB BL GL

143,530 63,045 61,363 58,903 56,569 52,156 50,822 50,190 46,301 41,949 41,481 41,479 41,001 38,029 37,624 37,609 36,877 34,830 32,801 31,604

0.0 +2.7 +3.3 +0.9 +2.1 +2.3 +3.1 +2.0 +3.1 +2.7 +3.9 +3.1 +3.3 +3.1 +2.2 +3.5 +2.9 0.0 +2.3 +2.9

12-mo

Min 5-year

Init Invt

Percent Load

NAV

+8.8/B +12.3/D +17.1/B +16.9/B +8.7/E +7.7/E +15.0/A +12.0/C +10.9/E +13.7/B +13.5/C +15.1/A +17.3/B +14.9/A +9.4/D +11.1/C +13.3/C +8.6/B +12.9/B +12.8/C

+47.4/A +13.2/C +15.6/B +26.9/A +23.8/B +26.2/B +12.2/A +23.8/B +13.0/B +27.8/B +0.2/D +12.1/A +16.2/B +11.6/A +31.2/A +24.2/B +10.7/C +45.6/A +32.9/A +34.0/A

1,000,000 250 3,000 2,500 250 250 5,000,000 250 250 2,500 2,500 100,000 100,000 3,000 250 3,000 250 1,000,000 1,000 250

NL 5.75 NL NL 5.75 5.75 NL 5.75 5.75 NL NL NL NL NL 5.75 NL 5.75 NL 4.25 5.75

10.85 30.44 31.56 67.73 49.91 35.72 115.01 16.55 28.16 35.71 107.76 115.83 31.57 115.82 41.37 15.76 27.21 10.85 2.18 28.62

G – Growth. GI – Growth & Income. SS – Single-state Muni. MP – Mixed Portfolio. GG – General US Govt. EI – Equity Income. SC – Small Co Growth. A – Cap Appreciation. IL – International. Total Return: Change in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Percent Load: Sales charge. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA – Not avail. NE – Data in question. NS – Fund not in existence.


C6 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E Prineville should add Santa Claus

The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

P

rineville residents saw their city’s holiday display dismantled early this season, thanks to the efforts of the Freedom From Religion Foundation. The group, acting on what it

said was a complaint from a Prineville resident, called City Hall in late December and pointed out the Nativity scene on display violated the constitutional prohibition against a governmental show of support for a particular religion. Oh, my. The foundation is about what you’d expect, a group of folks whose distaste for anything religious is as strong as an ayatollah’s distaste for an animist. Each sees sin in the other’s beliefs, though the foundation no doubt calls it something else. Either way, both ends of this particular spectrum are most notable for their intolerance of any point of view but their own. As for the Prineville Nativity scene, it was, indeed, a constitutional violation of the establishment clause of the First Amendment, which prohibits government’s involvement in religion. At least it is if it’s there alone, according to a 1989 U.S. Supreme Court ruling. There’s hope, however. If Prineville

puts up Santas and reindeer, or perhaps candy canes and elves, the Nativity scene can stay next year. With other, non-religious, items accompanying it, the city apparently rids itself of the appearance that it is somehow endorsing Christianity with the display. Thus the court ruled in 1986, and more recent rulings have stuck with that somewhat pained logic. In the end, we’d have to agree with Betty Roppe, who will take over as mayor of Prineville in 2011. She wishes that whoever was offended by the Nativity in the first place had simply come to the city directly with his or her concerns. Surely, she notes, something could have been worked out.

FROM THE ARCHIVES Editor’s Note: The following editorial, which appeared on Jan. 1, 1981, does not necessarily reflect the views of The Bulletin’s editorial board today.

Central Oregon growing There are about half a million more Oregonians in 1981 than there were in 1971, the U.S. Bureau of the Census reported Wednesday. And, as almost everyone recognizes, that increase is not all made up of youngsters under the age of 10. Oregon has grown, and much of its growth has come from persons moving here from other states. Central Oregon has grown along with — no, ahead of — the rest of the state. The number of new residents appears to have dropped off in the past few months, but we still have an idea from where they come. The greatest numbers come from somewhere else in Oregon. The second largest group comes from California. New residents from Washington and Idaho are next in line, followed by persons moving here from one or another of the other 46 states. That’s been a boon to some, a bane to others. It’s given Bend, for

example, the highest numbers of doctors of medicine per resident of almost any essentially rural area in the country. It’s given Bend more fast food franchises and banks than one would have thought could have operated successfully in a town of its size. The new census figures will have special benefits for some Oregonians. Oregon will elect a new Congressman, to fill the seat in the new Fifth District, in 1982, presuming the legislature and Gov. Vic Atiyeh can agree on the district’s boundaries. Counties such as Deschutes will get bigger chunks of federal funds, now that the population figures are final, and official. The new numbers will have a different meaning in some states. New York will lose five members of the U.S. House of Representatives. States like Pennsylvania, Illinois and Ohio will lose two each. California, Texas, and Florida with be among the gainers. And, for another 10 years, civic boosters in town after town all across America can boast that their towns are growing, without fear that anyone can successfully contradict them until the 1990 census has been taken.

Whistleblower a hero, not a violator By Jonathan Gurwitz San Antonio Express-News

I

f you are Julian Assange and you put hundreds of thousands of classified documents on the Internet, you become a folk hero who is somehow beyond the reach of the U.S. government. But if you are a licensed commercial pilot who posts a handful of cell phone videos that show potential holes in airport security, that’s another story. According to a biography on his website, Chris Liu is an Army veteran, a helicopter pilot who rose to the rank of captain before leaving the military to pursue a career in commercial aviation — first as an instructor, and ultimately as a pilot for a major airline. He volunteered for the Federal Flight Deck Officer program, begun after 9/11, that trains and deputizes select pilots to carry firearms in the cockpit. After psychological and background checks, he was accepted. Now Liu is in trouble with the government that only a few weeks ago entrusted him with the lives of airline passengers. On Dec. 2, six federal agents and sheriff’s deputies arrived at his home outside Sacramento to confiscate his FFDO credentials and his government-issued handgun. The Transportation Security Administration suspended Liu. In a letter, the agency said he had violated the FFDO’s rules for nondisclosure and standards of conduct.

How? In November, Liu anonymously posted video on YouTube, since removed, showing security weaknesses at San Francisco International Airport. While passengers and even flight crews endure body scans and pat downs, ground crews face limited screening. “The doors, gates and other access points where they can access the tarmac are not being manned by TSA and certainly do not have the same metal detectors, body scanners, x-ray equipment, dogs or other security measures that the rest of us are all too painfully forced to undergo,” Liu writes on his website. “The real problem is that ground crews can access the airport tarmac and any aircraft, without having to go through any level of immediate screening and can therefore bring anything they want onto a waiting aircraft, drugs and bombs included.” In 2007, 10 ground crew workers at John F. Kennedy International Airport were charged with smuggling millions of dollars worth of cocaine and heroin. Similar indictments were handed down against members of ground crews at Puerto Rico’s Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport in 2009 and at Miami International and Newark Liberty Airport in 2010. Another individual familiar with airport security, who requested anonymity, told me this weakness also

encompasses airport vendors. “The problem with airport security is that if all other weaknesses were addressed, then fortifying the (TSA) checkpoint makes sense. However, there remains ‘the back door problem’ — an industry term — in which persons enter the sterile area of the terminal without submitting to screening.” These aren’t exactly state secrets. And Liu’s videos merely show what’s visible to thousands of people every day at airports around the nation. So why is he being punished? TSA may have solid reasons for suspending Liu from the Federal Flight Deck Officer program, and the intimidating way it confiscated his credentials and weapon. Those reasons might even be unrelated to his YouTube video. The boilerplate of TSA’s suspension letter doesn’t provide any details. But the punitive actions against Liu come as the Department of Homeland Security is trying to gin up support for its “See something, say something” campaign, an effort to encourage the public to share information that might thwart terrorist attacks. The message seems to be: See something, say something — unless it highlights a security flaw at airports, unless it might actually help enhance aviation security and unless it proves embarrassing to the U.S. government. Julian Assange must surely be having a hearty laugh.

Letters policy

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Submissions

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Dodd, Obey close an era of congressional comity By Albert R. Hunt Bloomberg News

WASHINGTON — or a combined three-quarters of a century, David Obey and Christopher Dodd walked the halls of Congress; they are both retiring this year on a high. Obey, a 72-year-old Wisconsin representative, is chairman of the House Appropriations Committee. He guided through the fiscal stimulus package; though unpopular, most economic experts say it helped avoid a much deeper recession. Dodd, 66, is a five-term senator from Connecticut. With House Financial Services Committee Chairman Barney Frank, he authored the financial-regulatory bill that rewrote the rules for Wall Street after the crisis. He also played a major role in the passage of the health care overhaul. In separate interviews, Dodd and Obey reflected on rich experiences and contemporary concerns. Both are liberal Democrats — Obey more so — who care

F

deeply about Congress as an institution, have a track record of working with political opposites and lament that the legislative branch and much of the political system are dysfunctional these days. Neither disputes some of the negative views about Congress; they partially blame the news media, particularly the lack of coverage. “Newspapers have been taken over by chains, and if they cover members at all it’s as politicians, not legislators,” says Obey, who represents a sprawling northern Wisconsin district. As for 24-7 cable television news, “One minute they will be talking about an important piece of legislation, then they’ll go to a story on modeling underwear.” Dodd recalls there used to be a dozen Connecticut reporters who covered the delegation; today there is one. No longer, he says, do home-state reporters show up to cover a “dull hearing that isn’t going to be a news story, but the reporter learns about the subject matter as I learn about it.” The biggest difference, however, is the

erosion of comity and relationships. They both joined Congress — Obey in 1969 in a special election to take the seat of President Richard Nixon’s defense secretary, Melvin Laird, and Dodd as a House member five years later — during the divisive Vietnam War, with the memories of the bitter civil-rights struggles still fresh. Over the past two decades, Dodd says, there has been a “stripping of the socialization, which is always what made this place function.” He has a prodigious legislative record and says the 2010 health care bill marked the first time he ever passed a measure without a Republican sponsor. Obey recalls working cooperatively with conservative Republican lawmakers such as Bob Livingston of Louisiana, Mickey Edwards of Oklahoma and New York’s Jack Kemp, as well as House leaders of that party such as Gerald Ford of Michigan and Bob Michel of Illinois. Asked if there’s any Republican with whom he has a good relationship today, he responds, “If I cited them it would hurt them in their caucus.”

Dodd remembers how he got his master’s and Ph.D. in the Senate: through long hours in the members’ dining room, where he sat enthralled listening to the old bulls such as Louisiana Sen. Russell Long or Mississippi’s John Stennis, or the always thoughtful Daniel Patrick Moynihan of New York. “As a new member, you just sat there and absorbed it as they would rib each other and sometimes have a heated debate about a subject,” he says. “It was as good an education as you could get about the place.” Today, “there’s no one in that room.” Both recall fondly some of the legislative giants they’ve seen. They agree that Ted Kennedy was unsurpassed as an effective senator, and Dodd says Republicans Howard Baker and Bob Dole are among his all-stars. Obey’s mentor was the late Richard Bolling of Missouri, perhaps the most astute politician-scholar to serve in the House. The Badger State lawmaker has served with eight speakers and says Nancy Pelosi of California was the most

effective: “She’s tough and principled; we would not have health care without her determination.” On presidents, both warm at the mention of Ford, who was in office for less than two-and-a-half years. “In terms of healing the country, he did a hell of a job,” Obey says, “including the pardon of Richard Nixon, which I opposed at the time. I was wrong.” The Connecticut senator, who clashed frequently with the Reagan White House, fondly recalls the 40th president and his remarkable optimism. Obey and Dodd believe that President Barack Obama has enjoyed as auspicious a start as any of his predecessors. “As Pat Moynihan once said,” Dodd recalls, “a president only gets 20 months from inauguration to the first midterm election to do anything of real significance. That’s the window. Obama’s done it.” And where did Moynihan relate that? In the Senate Dining Room. Albert R. Hunt is the executive editor for Washington at Bloomberg News.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 1, 2011 C7

O D

N   Herschel Gideon Smith, of Prineville April 16, 1933 - Dec. 28, 2010 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 185 N.E. 4th Street, Prineville, OR 97754. 541-416-9733. Services: In accordance with Herschel's wishes, no service will be held. Contributions may be made to:

PMH Hospice, 1201 N.E. Elm Street, Prineville, OR 97754. 541-447-2510.

Ronald George Day, of Bend Sept. 6, 1941 - Dec. 26, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Private Service will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Josiah Ventures, Account #42180, PO Box 4317, Weaton, IL 60189.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Crook Continued from C1 Crook County School Board members ranked the three most important qualities they would like in their next superintendent. No. 1, they want someone who can improve academic performance. No. 2, they want someone with strong financial management skills. No. 3, they want someone who can engage with the community and serve as a bridge between staff, the school board and community. Cooper estimates the district is facing a possible $1 million to $1.5 million shortfall for the 2011-12 school year. The district spent $6,900 on the search for Hernandez. Officials plan to have a new superintendent hired by midMarch and he or she would start in July. Hernandez makes $122,000. “We’re out so early relative to other districts that are looking (for superintendents). … We think we’ll get some really good candidates,” Cooper said. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Find Your Dream Home In

Real Estate

Every Saturday

Ex-mayor who brought Rangers to Texas dies at 84 By Schuyler Dixon The Associated Press

DALLAS — Tom Vandergriff, the former Dallas-area mayor who lured the Texas Rangers out of Washington nearly 40 years ago, died Thursday. He was 84.

The former Arlington mayor’s son, Victor Vandergriff, said his father died of natural causes at a Fort Worth hospital. Tom Vandergriff had Alzheimer’s disease in recent years. Vandergriff brought the Rangers to the city halfway between Dallas and

Fort Worth in 1972. It took the Rangers almost 25 years to reach the playoffs. The younger Vandergriff said his father was in attendance when the Rangers beat the New York Yankees in October to win the AL pennant and advance to their first World Series.

Business Continued from C1 National retailer Kohl’s opened a department store in Bend in February. Bend kept its General Motors dealership, but lost the 94-year local-family ownership when Bob Thomas sold Honda of Bend and transferred Bob Thomas Chevrolet and Cadillac to Medford-based Lithia Motors in July. Hotel-room makeovers and spa, lobby and other improvements are planned for Eagle Crest and Brasada Ranch resorts, respectively, following their sale by Klamath Falls-based Jeld-Wen in November. A dozen small businesses, from software and solar energy to jewelers and a lumber company, have doubled — or plan to double — their staffing levels. State and regional experts say the economy continues to improve, but at a snail’s pace, and they predict only slight improvement in 2011. “My party hat’s out of the closet,” said Linda Navarro, president and CEO of the Oregon Bankers Association. “I’m hoping we have cause to celebrate. But I think we’re in for another difficult year — until Oregon families have jobs they can rely on.” Construction workers began building Facebook’s data center in January, and about seven months later, the social networking giant announced an expansion, which will bring its total floor space to about 314,000 square feet, when both phases are finished. While Facebook brought a big boost to the region’s outlook, its data center expects to permanently employ about 35 people, although it generates between 100 and 200 construction jobs on any given day. But one data center cannot come close to resurrecting the region’s construction industry, which lost more jobs, on a percentage basis, than any other. Those losses helped keep Central Oregon’s unemployment rates among the highest in the state. Jobless levels in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties hit their lows in February and trended upward through the rest of the year.

2 percent growth level The state Office of Economic Analysis expects job growth to stay below 2 percent until the fourth quarter of 2011, according to December’s Economic Revenue Forecast, and grow in 2012 and 2013. A 2 percent growth level translates into about 1,200 additional jobs in Deschutes County, said Eagan of the Employment Department, and about 100 jobs in Crook County and 110 in Jefferson County. A department survey released in December showed one-third of employers in the state planned to hire within six months, but most said they only expect to replace existing workers, not increase staff size. The lack of jobs meant many Central Oregon residents continued having difficulty paying their bills, including their mortgages. In Deschutes County, the number of default notices filed through November outpaced the number filed in 2009, which brought an 82 percent increase over 2008. A notice of default initiates foreclosure proceedings, but not all notices filed end up in foreclosure. The number of notices filed in November, however, fell compared with filings in October and in No-

Center Continued from C1 Natural gas and electricity to heat and operate the facility total roughly $12,000 per month, he said. During the planning phases of the pool, Jefferson County was expecting continued growth, in part driven by the anticipated

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin ile photo

The new Facebook building going up west of Prineville in late November.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin ile photo

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin ile photo

Carlson Sign Co. employees finish work on a sign installed at the Kohl’s at the Bend River Promenade. vember 2009, by about 28 percent and 14 percent, respectively. But continuing foreclosures kept a lid on housing prices in the region. Prices in the Bend Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Deschutes County, continued to plummet faster than any other MSA in the nation for the first six months of the year, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency.

Median house price

gradually see improvements,” she said. “I think we’re recognizing a new normal when it comes to home valuation.” The housing collapse has forced real estate professionals to write deals for bank-owned properties and short sales. Agents who initially said they would not handle short sales have changed their minds when buyers started asking about them, Ragsdale said. Interest in buying picked up in 2010, at least judging by those taking home-buying classes. NeighborImpact recorded more sign-ups in the first six months of 2010 than the total for any previous 12-month period. And one forecast released in August by Bloomberg Businessweek suggested housing prices in the Bend MSA would bottom out in the first quarter of 2011 and then see the nation’s secondstrongest housing rebound by 2014, behind Bremerton-Silverdale, Wash.

A worker closes the front door of the former Bob Thomas Chevrolet on Third Street in Bend, which was bought by Lithia Motors last summer. Oregon Division of Finance and Corporate Securities. While additional Oregon banks could fail in 2011, Tatman said, most have adjusted, and he sees improvement ahead. “I’m guardedly optimistic that things are turning around as we speak,” he said. Bank of the Cascades and Medford-based PremierWest Bank, which has branches in Bend and Redmond, continue to operate under federal and state regulatory orders. PremierWest announced Dec. 20 that its shareholders agreed to a reverse stock split. Idaho-based Home Federal Bank, which had no presence in Central Oregon before August 2009, took over both Community First Bank and LibertyBank, picking up a dozen branches in the region. “The good news looking forward is you still have a lot of banking options in Central Oregon,” said Navarro of the Oregon Bankers Association, referring to the state, Northwest and nationally based banks that remain. The federal government’s efforts to inject stimulus money into the economy continued in 2010, especially in the energy and job-training sectors.

Median single-family home sale prices in Bend, Crook and Jefferson counties hit their lowest levels in five years, according to the Bratton Report from Bendbased Bratton Appraisal Group. For seven out of 11 months last year, the median sales price in the Bend area remained below $200,000. In Crook County, it stayed below $100,000 through the third quarter, according to the Bratton Report, and in Jefferson County, which includes Crooked River Ranch, the median price fell below $80,000 in the second and third quarters. But sales of single-family homes in Bend were generally higher in October and November than in January and February, and the housing inventory fell to a four-month level in Bend, a drop of about a month’s worth from December 2009 and well below the 13-month level in December 2008, according to the Bratton Report. Kathy Ragsdale, CEO of the Central Oregon Association of Realtors, called the increase in sales a “ray of sunshine.” “I think that we’re going to

The real estate vortex sucked in two more regional banks this year. They joined Prinevillebased Community First Bank, which failed in 2009. But the condition of the region’s largest locally based bank, Bank of the Cascades, improved when investors agreed to buy $177 million in stock, allowing it to raise capital and meet requirements of federal and state regulatory orders to raise capital. Shareholders OK’d the sale Dec. 23. “By taking this significant step, we hope this will be a giant step forward,” said David C. Tatman, administrator of the

Funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funneled $1.64 billion into renewable energy programs nationwide, including $339.7 million for 43 renewable energy generation projects in Oregon. They included wind farms, solar energy and biomass projects,

opening of the Deer Ridge Correctional Institution. But while the minimum-security portion of the prison began filling up in late 2007, the opening of the larger, medium-security component has been delayed indefinitely due to the state’s budget difficulties. There also have been layoffs at the county’s largest employers. Altogether, the expected influx of new Jefferson County resi-

dents and larger tax base never happened. “There were some things when they built this facility that were put in place — they thought there were a lot more people moving, and a lot more jobs coming, a lot more housing developments going up,” DeRoest said. “Since they built this, most of that has stopped.” The Madras Aquatic Cen-

ter has tried to keep prices low, DeRoest said, with a one-time visit at $4, and a monthly pass at $18. While higher rates could help close the budget gap, he said visitor numbers are already sliding — possibly as a result of poor economic conditions — and higher fees are not currently under consideration. “We don’t want to make it harder for people to afford it,”

Two local banks gone

Stimulus funds

Tom Vandergriff, the former mayor who brought the Texas Rangers to Arlington, died Thursday. He was 84. The Associated Press ile photo

many in Eastern Oregon. Officials and developers discussed the potential for wind farms in Crook and Deschutes counties. Lake County granted permits to build what could become the state’s largest solar array. Developers also eyed Crook County as a potential array site. Sunlight Solar Energy installed Bend’s first electrical vehicle charging station, and Fort Collins, Colo.-based Advanced Energy Industries Inc. bought PV Powered, infusing Bend’s marquee solar-inverter maker with badly needed capital. Vulcan Power, a geothermal energy company that began drilling for its first power plant near Fernley, Nev., moved its headquarters from Bend, where it was founded in 1991, to Reno in August and changed its name to Gradient Resources. Near Newberry National Volcanic Monument, geothermal developers continue to seek federal approval to try enhanced testing methods that could potentially cause small earthquakes. But the idea has sparked concerns from some members of the public and environmental groups, and it’s not the only source of green power generating protests. The Oregon Public Health Division is studying potential health effects of wind-energy farms, after some Eastern Oregon residents expressed concerns about the noise and lights from wind turbines. Overall, however, the U.S. Energy Department predicts power generation from renewable resources will continue to grow, and the future also looks promising for startup software, technology, bioscience and green energy businesses.

Venture conference At the Bend Venture Conference in October, seven of the 13 companies — more than half — picked to make presentations to investors came from Bend, according to The Bulletin’s archives. In 2009, Bend companies represented about 21 percent, or three of 14 companies. The 2010 winner, Manzama Inc., which has created an Internet-based subscription service that provides information for the legal community, expects to employ 13 people by mid-2012. Bend-based GL Solutions, which develops software for government regulatory agencies, expects to double its staff to 82 by early this year. G5 Search Marketing, which helps companies with their online marketing, search and lead development, received a $15 million investment last year and has grown to 100 employees. Medical device maker Clear Catheter Systems received federal approval last year to market its PleuraFlow System in the U.S., the world’s largest medical device market. In its December newsletter, Economic Development for Central Oregon named several of those companies among a dozen that have or will double their staffing levels. “All this adds up to what EDCO considers strong evidence for the end of economic and employment contraction,” the newsletter said, “and the start of growth as we head into what will be a much better year ahead than we’ve seen in the past three.” Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

DeRoest said. “We do feel like we offer a very affordable rate — in comparison with other facilities, it’s probably less — but with the economy the way it is in our community here, we want to make sure it’s an affordable recreation for anybody and everybody.” Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.


WE

C8 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

AT HE R

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2011.

TODAY, JANUARY 1

SUNDAY

Today: Partly cloudy and unseasonably cool.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

31

11

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

24/13

22/10

28/16

24/15

33/18

27/8



Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

33/17

Mitchell

Madras

29/13

30/16

Camp Sherman 27/8 Redmond Prineville 31/11 Cascadia 28/12 30/12 Sisters 30/10 Bend Post 31/11

Oakridge Elk Lake 28/10

26/8

28/7

24/6

34/28

20/9

26/8

Seattle

Redding 45/33

Christmas Valley

Chemult

25/13

Partly cloudy skies with unseasonably cold temperatures today.



Crater Lake

Missoula 12/1

Helena Bend

27/19

8/4

Boise

31/11

24/13





Idaho Falls 10/-4

Elko



21/-3



21/10

Silver Lake

23/5

City

37/23

30/9

22/1

Reno

35/22

San Francisco

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:40 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:38 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:40 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:39 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 5:21 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 2:17 p.m.

Salt Lake City

54/44

22/7





Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases New

First

Full

Last

Jan. 4

Jan. 12

Jan. 19

Jan. 26

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

Astoria . . . . . . . . 37/27/0.00 . . . . . . 42/32/s. . . . . . 44/37/pc Baker City . . . . . . . 18/0/0.00 . . . . . . 20/8/pc. . . . . . 25/14/pc Brookings . . . . . .42/32/trace . . . . . . 52/38/c. . . . . . 52/39/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . .6/-25/0.00 . . . . . . 18/7/pc. . . . . . 25/13/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 37/28/0.00 . . . . . . 39/24/c. . . . . . 40/26/pc Klamath Falls . . . . 19/1/0.00 . . . . . . 29/15/c. . . . . . 31/17/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . .12/-9/0.00 . . . . . . 28/9/pc. . . . . . 32/15/pc La Pine . . . . . . . .23/-10/0.00 . . . . . . . 26/7/s. . . . . . 32/16/pc Medford . . . . . . . 34/21/0.00 . . . . . 44/27/sh. . . . . . 43/30/pc Newport . . . . . . . 41/30/0.00 . . . . . . 44/34/c. . . . . . 46/38/pc North Bend . . . . . 43/30/0.00 . . . . . 49/35/sh. . . . . . 49/37/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 22/11/0.00 . . . . . . 22/9/pc. . . . . . 23/14/pc Pendleton . . . . . . . 20/4/0.00 . . . . . 25/17/pc. . . . . . 28/21/pc Portland . . . . . . . 35/22/0.00 . . . . . . 37/25/s. . . . . . 39/29/pc Prineville . . . . . . . . 24/6/0.00 . . . . . . 28/12/s. . . . . . 33/19/pc Redmond. . . . . . . . 28/4/0.00 . . . . . . 29/7/pc. . . . . . 36/19/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 40/29/0.00 . . . . . 43/30/pc. . . . . . 44/34/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 33/27/0.00 . . . . . 38/23/pc. . . . . . . 40/26/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . . 23/7/0.00 . . . . . . 30/10/s. . . . . . 34/17/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 33/19/0.00 . . . . . 27/21/pc. . . . . . 31/25/pc

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . Chains or T.T. all vehicles Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . Chains or T.T. all vehicles Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . Chains > 10,000 lbs. Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25/1 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 in 1997 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.45” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . -15 in 1978 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 1.78” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.17” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . 11.73” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.95 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.97 in 2005 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:58 a.m. . . . . . .3:15 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .3:52 a.m. . . . . . .1:53 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:16 a.m. . . . . . .5:10 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .11:13 a.m. . . . . .10:59 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .12:38 a.m. . . . . .12:09 p.m. Uranus . . . . . .11:11 a.m. . . . . .11:01 p.m.

1

LOW

40 23

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy.

HIGH

37 17

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 22/16

Eugene Partly to mostly cloudy 39/24 skies with cold conditions Grants Pass today. 41/28 Eastern

Hampton Fort Rock

Vancouver

37/25

Burns

26/7

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 44° Seaside • -25° Burns

Partly cloudy and slightly warmer.

34 13

BEND ALMANAC

23/8

La Pine

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Portland

Brothers

LOW

35 13

NORTHWEST

Paulina

27/9

Sunriver

19/0

HIGH

WEDNESDAY

Partly cloudy and unseasonably cool.

Showers will be possible from southwest Oregon into northern California today.

Sunshine north with showers possible south today. Central

TUESDAY

Partly cloudy and unseasonably cool.

Tonight: Partly cloudy and cold.

HIGH

MONDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 . . . . . . 36-55 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . 48-79 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . 65-109 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 97-106 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . . 93 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 52-59 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . 107 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 30-32 Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 29-54 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 15 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

. . . . . . 35-38 . . . . 134-220 . . . . . . . . 90 . . . . . . . 140 . . . . . . 45-62 . . . . . . 35-47 . . . . . . 41-42

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 34/28

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

S

Calgary 22/16

S

Saskatoon 9/6

Seattle 37/23

Cheyenne 18/3

• -30° Grand Canyon, Ariz.

San Francisco 54/45

• 2.47” Jackson, Miss.

Las Vegas 41/27

Salt Lake City 22/7

Los Angeles 58/48 Phoenix 51/33

Honolulu 82/69

Denver 18/4

Kansas City 27/15

Houston 66/39

Chihuahua 64/31

Juneau 38/33

Mazatlan 72/50

Detroit 48/22

Little Rock 50/25

Buffalo

50/28

Columbus 52/24 Louisville 51/27

St. Louis 35/23

Dallas 50/26

La Paz 71/49

S

To ronto 43/27

Green Bay 20/8

Des Moines 16/7 Chicago 29/14 Omaha 16/4

Albuquerque Oklahoma City 37/12 29/10

Tijuana 56/38

Anchorage 32/29

S

Thunder Bay 13/-4

Rapid City 10/-2

Brownsville, Texas

S

S

S S

Quebec 41/34

St. Paul 11/-1

Boise 24/13

• 89°

S

Winnipeg 4/-5

Bismarck 6/-7

Billings 16/8

Portland 37/25

S

Halifax 39/32 Portland 46/33 Boston 52/38 New York 48/39 Philadelphia 49/40 Washington, D. C. 57/43

Charlotte 60/50

Nashville 55/27

Birmingham 65/37 New Orleans 65/43

Atlanta 62/46

Orlando 78/59 Miami 78/67

Monterrey 70/41

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HOURS: Mon - Sat 10 - 6 • Sun 12 - 5

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .60/44/0.00 . 48/23/pc . . 54/31/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .58/38/0.00 . . .52/25/t . . 32/18/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .43/27/0.00 . .49/34/sh . . .41/22/rs Albuquerque. . . .28/12/0.00 . 29/10/pc . . . 37/18/s Anchorage . . . . .39/27/0.13 . .32/29/sn . . 31/26/sn Atlanta . . . . . . . .67/44/0.00 . . .62/46/t . . 56/30/pc Atlantic City . . . .50/28/0.01 . 53/44/pc . . 49/28/sh Austin . . . . . . . . .70/53/0.00 . 63/25/pc . . 59/29/pc Baltimore . . . . . .50/24/0.00 . .53/41/sh . . 48/28/sh Billings. . . . . . . . . . 2/-1/0.09 . . .16/8/pc . . 25/10/pc Birmingham . . . .72/55/0.20 . . .65/37/t . . 52/27/pc Bismarck . . . . . . . .-2/-8/0.00 . . . 6/-7/pc . . . 15/6/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .24/14/0.00 . 24/13/pc . . 29/18/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .50/28/0.00 . 52/38/pc . . 46/26/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .44/29/0.00 . 44/36/pc . . 43/26/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . .50/41/0.02 . .50/28/sh . . 31/22/pc Burlington, VT. . .45/34/0.00 . .45/33/sh . . .36/24/rs Caribou, ME . . . .37/16/0.00 . . .34/33/c . . .37/24/rs Charleston, SC . .69/36/0.00 . 69/57/pc . . 70/44/sh Charlotte. . . . . . .58/28/0.00 . .60/50/sh . . 59/28/sh Chattanooga. . . .64/47/0.00 . . .61/38/t . . 48/23/pc Cheyenne . . . . . . . 2/-6/0.06 . . .18/3/pc . . . 28/9/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .53/45/0.67 . 29/14/pc . . 24/20/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .67/45/0.00 . . .53/23/r . . 35/20/pc Cleveland . . . . . .58/45/0.00 . . .50/25/t . . 30/21/pc Colorado Springs .10/1/0.00 . . 17/-1/pc . . . . 33/9/s Columbia, MO . .62/39/1.38 . 29/16/pc . . . 35/23/s Columbia, SC . . .67/30/0.00 . .68/56/sh . . 67/35/sh Columbus, GA. . .74/48/0.00 . . .67/51/t . . 61/30/pc Columbus, OH. . .62/45/0.00 . . .52/24/t . . 33/19/pc Concord, NH . . . .47/14/0.00 . . .49/36/c . . 45/21/sh Corpus Christi. . .80/66/0.00 . . .69/42/s . . 65/43/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .67/48/0.00 . 50/26/pc . . . 55/31/s Dayton . . . . . . . .62/46/0.00 . 53/22/pc . . 32/19/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . . .9/1/0.12 . . .18/4/pc . . . 39/10/s Des Moines. . . . .36/20/0.01 . . .16/7/pc . . 23/17/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .52/38/0.05 . 48/22/pc . . 27/21/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .36/10/0.12 . . 10/-2/sn . . .10/-4/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .36/32/0.00 . . .44/20/s . . 50/29/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . . .19/6/0.07 . . 10/-4/sn . . .20/10/sf Fargo. . . . . . . . . . . 2/-3/0.19 . . . 6/-13/c . . . . . 0/-7/c Flagstaff . . . . . . . .17/1/0.00 . . .27/2/pc . . 32/15/pc

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .54/45/0.59 . 39/20/pc . . 24/17/sn Green Bay. . . . . .43/35/0.04 . . .20/8/pc . . . 19/9/pc Greensboro. . . . .55/32/0.00 . .58/50/sh . . 54/29/sh Harrisburg. . . . . .45/23/0.00 . .49/38/sh . . 46/26/sh Hartford, CT . . . .47/22/0.00 . 46/36/pc . . 45/24/sh Helena. . . . . . . . . 2/-10/0.00 . . . .8/4/pc . . . 24/5/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .82/72/0.00 . .82/69/sh . . . .78/68/t Houston . . . . . . .76/66/0.00 . 66/39/pc . . . 60/41/s Huntsville . . . . . .69/51/0.00 . . .62/33/t . . . 47/23/s Indianapolis . . . .61/45/0.00 . 42/18/pc . . 30/20/pc Jackson, MS . . . .70/63/2.48 . . .61/32/r . . . 55/27/s Madison, WI . . . .47/36/0.04 . . .20/9/pc . . 21/14/pc Jacksonville. . . . .74/41/0.00 . 75/55/pc . . . 73/45/c Juneau. . . . . . . . .36/33/0.14 . .38/33/sh . . 40/34/sh Kansas City. . . . .36/21/0.20 . 27/15/pc . . . 37/22/s Lansing . . . . . . . .52/44/0.88 . 41/20/pc . . 25/18/sn Las Vegas . . . . . .38/30/0.00 . 41/27/pc . . 44/30/pc Lexington . . . . . .63/46/0.00 . . .55/26/t . . . 37/22/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .13/6/0.08 . . .19/2/pc . . . 26/14/s Little Rock. . . . . .73/56/0.03 . 50/25/pc . . . 46/24/s Los Angeles. . . . .57/39/0.00 . 58/48/pc . . 58/46/sh Louisville . . . . . . .68/53/0.00 . .51/27/sh . . . 39/23/s Memphis. . . . . . .70/61/0.14 . 54/27/pc . . . 45/26/s Miami . . . . . . . . .78/67/0.00 . 78/67/pc . . 79/64/pc Milwaukee . . . . .53/46/0.02 . 26/13/pc . . 25/17/pc Minneapolis . . . .25/13/0.03 . . 11/-1/pc . . . . 9/4/pc Nashville . . . . . . .68/53/0.00 . . .55/27/t . . . 44/23/s New Orleans. . . .74/66/0.21 . .65/43/sh . . . 60/37/s New York . . . . . .45/36/0.00 . 48/39/pc . . 46/29/sh Newark, NJ . . . . .44/29/0.00 . 47/39/pc . . . 47/27/c Norfolk, VA . . . . .51/24/0.00 . 58/55/pc . . 57/33/sh Oklahoma City . .57/32/0.03 . . .37/12/s . . . 46/23/s Omaha . . . . . . . . .19/9/0.10 . . .16/4/pc . . 23/14/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .77/51/0.00 . 78/59/pc . . . 78/58/c Palm Springs. . . .55/33/0.00 . 49/33/pc . . 50/39/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .56/48/1.89 . 28/13/pc . . . 27/19/s Philadelphia . . . .44/27/0.00 . . .49/40/c . . 47/26/sh Phoenix. . . . . . . .48/32/0.00 . 51/33/pc . . 57/40/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .59/33/0.00 . . .51/29/t . . 35/19/pc Portland, ME. . . .45/21/0.00 . 46/33/pc . . 45/28/sh Providence . . . . .51/22/0.00 . 51/38/pc . . 46/26/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .61/29/0.00 . . .61/54/c . . 56/30/sh

Yesterday Saturday Sunday Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . . .3/0/0.14 . . 10/-2/pc . . 24/13/pc Savannah . . . . . .72/40/0.00 . 70/58/pc . . 71/45/sh Reno . . . . . . . . . .28/12/0.00 . . .35/22/c . . . 36/19/c Seattle. . . . . . . . .37/21/0.00 . . .37/23/s . . 39/24/pc Richmond . . . . . .57/28/0.00 . . .55/52/c . . 54/30/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . . . 7/-4/0.20 . . 6/-10/sn . . . . 8/4/pc Rochester, NY . . .52/40/0.00 . .52/32/sh . . 33/23/pc Spokane . . . . . . . 14/-7/0.00 . . .18/8/pc . . . . 19/9/c Sacramento. . . . .49/28/0.00 . .48/38/sh . . 49/37/sh Springfield, MO. .60/36/0.10 . 33/15/pc . . . 36/22/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .64/55/0.53 . 35/23/pc . . . 36/26/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .79/58/0.00 . 76/61/pc . . . 75/57/c Salt Lake City . . .18/13/0.04 . . .22/7/pc . . 31/20/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .45/25/0.20 . . .49/27/s . . . 56/32/s San Antonio . . . .68/56/0.00 . . .65/32/s . . 62/33/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .65/34/0.38 . . .36/15/s . . . 42/23/s San Diego . . . . . .59/44/0.00 . 58/43/pc . . 60/48/sh Washington, DC .50/32/0.00 . .57/43/sh . . 50/28/sh San Francisco . . .48/38/0.00 . . .54/44/r . . 54/44/sh Wichita . . . . . . . .32/16/0.02 . . .30/10/s . . . 38/20/s San Jose . . . . . . .52/41/0.00 . . .56/43/r . . 57/41/sh Yakima . . . . . . . . .27/7/0.00 . 24/15/pc . . 25/19/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . . .20/8/0.00 . . 21/-4/pc . . . 32/12/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .55/33/0.00 . . .56/36/s . . 59/40/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .41/34/0.01 . . 35/26/sf . . 31/25/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .55/41/0.00 . . .54/46/c . . 55/46/sh Auckland. . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . . .76/59/s . . 81/64/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .57/50/0.00 . 58/41/pc . . 59/38/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . . .88/69/s . . 88/70/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .27/14/0.00 . . .31/14/s . . 32/15/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .64/55/3.18 . 62/52/pc . . 63/53/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .36/25/0.00 . . 32/24/sf . . 28/21/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .70/43/0.00 . .71/47/sh . . 69/46/sh Budapest. . . . . . .23/18/0.00 . 33/20/pc . . 30/18/pc Buenos Aires. . . .88/72/0.00 . . .87/66/s . . . .85/66/t Cabo San Lucas .73/54/0.00 . . .73/53/s . . . 77/56/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . . .65/50/s . . . 67/51/s Calgary . . . . . . . 16/-15/0.00 . 22/16/pc . . . 26/13/s Cancun . . . . . . . .81/73/0.00 . 83/68/pc . . 80/64/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .46/41/0.00 . 43/31/pc . . 39/30/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .45/34/0.00 . . .36/23/s . . . 33/26/c Geneva . . . . . . . .37/34/0.00 . 40/30/pc . . . 35/25/s Harare . . . . . . . . .81/63/0.19 . . .79/62/t . . . .80/61/t Hong Kong . . . . .66/55/0.00 . 67/52/pc . . 70/55/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .46/34/0.00 . . .45/31/s . . 46/34/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .55/47/0.47 . 58/43/pc . . 63/44/pc Johannesburg . . .77/59/0.00 . . .76/62/t . . . .76/61/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . .77/66/sh . . 76/65/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .63/55/0.00 . 59/51/pc . . 59/49/pc London . . . . . . . .45/41/0.00 . .42/31/sh . . 35/27/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .52/41/0.22 . . .52/37/c . . . 51/33/s Manila. . . . . . . . .84/75/0.62 . .84/74/sh . . 84/72/pc

Mecca . . . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . . .86/66/s . . . 86/65/s Mexico City. . . . .73/46/0.00 . 75/45/pc . . 73/42/pc Montreal. . . . . . .39/32/0.00 . .41/35/sh . . 35/19/pc Moscow . . . . . . . .16/9/0.06 . .21/12/sn . . 21/11/sn Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . .77/58/sh . . 79/59/sh Nassau . . . . . . . .77/64/0.00 . . .78/66/s . . . 77/65/s New Delhi. . . . . .50/48/0.00 . . .65/43/s . . . 67/44/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .39/32/0.00 . .44/35/sh . . 44/33/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .36/3/0.00 . 23/16/pc . . . . 19/7/c Ottawa . . . . . . . .45/27/0.02 . .41/35/sh . . 35/19/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .34/32/0.00 . 39/32/pc . . . 35/27/s Rio de Janeiro. . .86/75/0.00 . . .83/74/t . . . .85/75/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .50/41/0.00 . 54/39/pc . . 53/41/sh Santiago . . . . . . .82/54/0.00 . .80/58/sh . . 74/51/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . . .76/64/t . . . .75/65/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .34/34/0.00 . . 33/26/sf . . .30/20/sf Seoul . . . . . . . . . . .19/5/0.00 . 31/16/pc . . . 28/13/s Shanghai. . . . . . .36/27/0.00 . . .41/27/s . . . 44/35/c Singapore . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . .85/77/t . . . .84/76/t Stockholm. . . . . .27/16/0.00 . . 24/16/sf . . .22/13/sf Sydney. . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . 92/70/pc . . . .88/68/t Taipei. . . . . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . .59/48/sh . . 63/53/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .68/55/0.07 . .63/50/sh . . 65/51/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .50/37/0.00 . .48/37/sh . . 48/35/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .50/39/0.00 . .43/27/sh . . 27/18/pc Vancouver. . . . . .36/21/0.00 . . .34/28/s . . 36/27/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .32/21/0.00 . 36/26/pc . . 30/20/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .28/14/0.18 . . 27/18/sf . . .25/17/sf


S

College Football Inside Florida State hangs on for bowl game win over South Carolina, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 2011

INSIDE COLLEGE FOOTBALL Friday’s bowl games MEINEKE BOWL South Florida .............................. 31 Clemson ..................................... 26 SUN BOWL Notre Dame................................. 33 Miami ......................................... 17

2 0 1 0 : A look at the year in Central Oregon sports

Hard to beat During a history-making span of 12 months, Central Oregon athletes and teams set the bar high in the first year of a new decade. Local accomplishments featured

LIBERTY BOWL Central Florida............................ 10 Georgia ......................................... 6

Olympic appearances, world records, and state championships galore. Here’s a look at some of the top stories from the area for 2010:

CHICK-FIL-A BOWL No. 23 Florida State ................... 26 No. 19 South Carolina ................ 17

Roundup, see Page D3

Trio to Olympics

Today’s bowl games TICKETCITY BOWL Northwestern (7-5) ......................... Texas Tech (7-5) ............................. Time: 9 a.m. TV: ESPNU CAPITAL ONE BOWL No. 7 Michigan State (11-1) ........... No. 15 Alabama (9-3) ..................... Time: 10 a.m. TV: ESPN OUTBACK BOWL Florida (7-5) ................................... Penn State (7-5) ............................. Time: 10 a.m. TV: ABC GATOR BOWL Michigan (7-5) ............................... No. 21 Mississippi State (8-4) ....... Time: 10:30 a.m. TV: ESPN2 ROSE BOWL No. 3 TCU (12-0) ............................ No. 4 Wisconsin (11-1) ................... Time: 1:30 p.m. TV: ESPN FIESTA BOWL No. 25 Connecticut (8-4) ............... No. 9 Oklahoma (11-2) ................... Time: 5:30 p.m. TV: ESPN

INSIDE NBA Hornets ........83 Celtics .........81

Rockets ...... 114 Raptors ......105

Bulls.............90 Nets .............81

Thunder .....103 Hawks ..........94

Pacers..........95 Wizards........86

Suns ............92 Pistons.........75

Warriors.......96 Bobcats .......95

Lakers ........102 76ers ...........98

D

Brian W. Robb / For The Bulletin

Three Central Oregon athletes earned spots on the U.S. Olympic Team for the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver, British Columbia: alpine skier Tommy Ford (pictured here) and cross-country skier Torin Koos, both of Bend, and snowboarder Chris Klug, formerly of Bend and more recently a part-time Sisters resident. Ford, a first-time Olympian, placed 26th in the men’s giant slalom. Koos, competing in his third Olympics, raced in three different nordic ski events in Vancouver, where his best finish was ninth in the men’s team sprint. Klug, at 37 and in his third Olympics, advanced to the quarterfinals of the parallel giant slalom and finished in seventh place.

Accolades for Ashton From January, when he set a collegiate record in the seven-event heptathlon, to December, when he won the Bowerman Award — track and field’s equivalent of the Heisman Trophy — Bend’s Ashton Eaton made headlines throughout 2010. In addition to his college record, the Mountain View High School graduate and University of Oregon senior later set a world record in the heptathlon. In his specialty, the decathlon, Eaton extended his streak of Pac-10 and NCAA championships to three. Two weeks before claiming The Bowerman, Eaton received another prestigious honor: the Jim Thorpe All-Around Award for multisport excellence.

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Summit High golfer Cole Ortega

Story spotlight: Comeback kid Of all the sports stories we brought to Bulletin readers in 2010, none was more remarkable, or more inspiring, than the comeback of Cole Ortega. As a sophomore at Bend’s Summit High School, Ortega last spring qualified for the Class 5A state golf championships — and he did it less than two years after his left arm had been surgically reattached following a freak surfing accident on the Oregon Coast involving the propeller of a dory boat. A talented golfer in junior leagues before he got to high school, Ortega was an honorary member of the Summit golf team in his freshman year. As he continued to regain use of his left arm, Ortega continued to regain his golf game. By last spring, he was a fullfledged member of the Storm varsity team that won the Intermountain Conference title for the first time in seven years. At state, Ortega was the No. 4 scorer for Summit, which captured the 5A second-place trophy.

Inside Kevin Clark / The Register-Guard

Sweet 16

Durant’s threes lead Thunder over Hawks Kevin Durant scores 33 points to lead Oklahoma City to a 103-94 win over Atlanta, see Page D3

Matthew Aimonetti / For The Bulletin

In a year of unsurpassed success for Central Oregon preps, one athlete’s accomplishment topped them all. Summit High senior Kellie Schueler won four events at the Class 5A state track and field championships — which in itself was no surprise, as Schueler had won four events at state in each of the previous three years. Her victories at the 2010 state championships (in the 100-, 200- and 400-meter races for the fourth year in a row, and as anchor of Summit’s 1,600-meter relay team) made Schueler only the second Oregon athlete ever to win 16 state titles and the first to win 16 above the Class 2A level. Behind Schueler, Summit won the 5A girls state team championship for the fourth year in a row.

• Prep champions from 2010, Page D5 • More of the year’s top stories from Central Oregon, Page D5

Marshall Greene won his fifth straight Pole Pedal Paddle in 2010.

Inside • A look back at the world of sports in 2010, Page D4.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant, right, shoots over Atlanta Hawks guard Damien Wilkins in the fourth quarter of Friday’s game in Oklahoma City. Durant had 33 points as Oklahoma City won 103-94.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 College football .........................D3 NBA ...........................................D3 College basketball .................... D4

Oregon says goodbye to venerable Mac Court By Anne M. Peterson

supposed to be the first game at the new Matthew Knight AreEUGENE — The University na, but it was decided in August • A roundup of Oregon’s McArthur Court that it would be best to delay of Friday’s is proof that there’s a certain the gala opening because the men’s college students would still be on wincharm that comes with age. basketball, The venerable arena that ter break and Oregon’s football Page D4 opened in 1927 will host its team might be in a bowl game. final men’s basketball game As it turned out, the secondtonight when the Ducks play ranked football Ducks are playArizona State. ing in the BCS national championship “It’ll be a real emotional game for the game against No. 1 Auburn on Jan. 10 in fans,” first-year Oregon coach Dana Glendale, Ariz. Oregon basketball’s new Altman said. “Our guys, they under- home, named after the late son of promistood the significance of the weekend.” nent UO booster Phil Knight, hosts its The Ducks lost 76-57 to Arizona in first men’s game on Jan. 13 when the their Pac-10 Conference opener on Thurs- Ducks play Southern California. day night at McArthur Court. That was See Mac / D4 The Associated Press

Inside

Rick Bowmer / AP ile

The seating area surrounds the basketball court at McArthur Court in Eugene. Oregon will play its last game in McArthur Court tonight against Arizona State and will debut the new Matthew Knight Arena on Jan. 13 against Southern California.


D2 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

SOCCER

Tuesday Girls basketball: Mountain View at Redmond, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Burns, 6:30 p.m.; Summit at Sisters, 5:30 p.m.; Bend at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Culver at Central Linn, 6:30 p.m. Boys basketball: Redmond at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Burns at La Pine, 6:30 p.m.; Stayton at Sisters, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Bend, 7 p.m.; Culver at Central Linn, 8 p.m.

4:30 a.m. — English Premier League, West Bromwich Albion vs. Manchester United, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 8 a.m. — Men’s college, West Virginia at Marquette, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 9 a.m. — College, TicketCity Bowl, Northwestern vs. Texas Tech, ESPNU. 10 a.m. — College, Outback Bowl, Florida vs. Penn State, ABC. 10 a.m. — College, Capital One Bowl, Alabama vs. Michigan State, ESPN. 10:30 a.m. — College, Gator Bowl, Michigan vs. Mississippi State, ESPN2. 1:30 p.m. — College, Rose Bowl, Texas Christian vs. Wisconsin, ESPN. 5:30 p.m. — College, Fiesta Bowl, Connecticut vs. Oklahoma, ESPN.

GOLF 1 p.m. — Skills Challenge, day 1 (taped), NBC.

HOCKEY 5 p.m. — NHL, Winter Classic, Washington Capitals at Pittsburgh Penguins, NBC.

SUNDAY FOOTBALL 10 a.m. — NFL, Oakland Raiders at Kansas City Chiefs, CBS. 10 a.m. — NFL, Tampa Bay Buccaneers at New Orleans Saints, Fox. 1 p.m. — NFL, Tennessee Titans at Indianapolis Colts, CBS. 1 p.m. — NFL, Chicago Bears at Green Bay Packers, Fox. 5:15 p.m. — NFL, St. Louis Rams at Seattle Seahawks, NBC.

BASKETBALL 10 a.m. — Men’s college, Gonzaga at Wake Forest, FSNW. 12:30 p.m. — Women’s college, Stanford at California, FSNW. 4:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Miami at Duke, FSNW. 6 p.m. — NBA, Houston Rockets at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest. 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Arizona at Oregon State, FSNW.

GOLF 1 p.m. — Skills Challenge, day 2 (taped), NBC.

RADIO TODAY FOOTBALL 10 a.m. — College, Outback Bowl, Florida vs. Penn State, KICE-AM 940. 2 p.m. — College, Rose Bowl, Texas Christian vs. Wisconsin, KICE-AM 940. 5:30 p.m. — College, Fiesta Bowl, Connecticut vs. Oklahoma, KICE-AM 940.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Arizona State at Oregon, KBND-AM 1110.

SUNDAY FOOTBALL 5:15 p.m. — NFL, St. Louis Rams at Seattle Seahawks, KBNW-FM 96.5.

BASKETBALL 6 p.m. — NBA, Houston Rockets at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND-AM 1110. 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Arizona at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Football • Fox era in Carolina officially to end Sunday: The Carolina Panthers have formally announced coach John Fox won’t return next season, ending a nine-year run in which he led the franchise to its only Super Bowl. His departure has been no secret, and Fox said after his final full practice Friday that he’d been preparing for it for two years. Owner Jerry Richardson said in a statement that he told Fox that he appreciates everything he has done, but that “it is time for both sides to move in different directions.” Fox will coach his final game Sunday at Atlanta. • New Pitt coach jailed on domestic violence charge: New Pitt coach Mike Haywood was jailed on a domestic violence charge after a struggle at his South Bend home. Assistant St. Joseph County Police Chief Bill Redman says Haywood was arrested about 3 p.m. Friday after a custody issue developed with a woman with whom Haywood has a child. The unidentified woman told police that Haywood grabbed her by the arm and neck and pushed her as she tried to leave. Redman says the woman had marks on her neck, arms and back. Pittsburgh hired Haywood on Dec. 16 to replace Dave Wannstedt, who resigned under pressure. Haywood led Miami (Ohio) to a 9-4 record this season and the Mid-American Conference championship.

Winter sports • Speedskater Davis wins allround championship: Shani Davis posted the season’s fastest time in the 1,500 meters Friday, winning his third race in two days at the U.S. speedskating championships at the Utah Olympic Oval in Kearns, Utah. Davis posted a time of 1:42.95 to beat Trevor Marsicano’s 1:44.80, following up victories in the 500 and 5,000 on Thursday. He was second in the 10,000 behind Jonathon Kuck, who won in 13:21.49. Davis finished in 13:28.92, and Marsicano was third at 13:32.34. Davis and Petra Acker, a 16-year-old from Clifton Park, N.Y., are the U.S. allround champions. Acker won the women’s 5,000 in 7:47.26 and finished fourth in the 1,500 in 2:02.49. That race was won by Heather Richardson in 1:55.9.

Baseball • Orioles reach oral agreement with Derrek Lee: The Baltimore Orioles and free agent first baseman Derrek Lee have reached an oral agreement on a one-year contract pending a physical. Orioles president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail disclosed the deal Friday. He has been looking for a power-hitting first baseman since Ty Wigginton left as a free agent to sign with Colorado in mid-December. The 35-year-old Lee split time with the Chicago Cubs and Atlanta Braves last season, totaling 19 homers and 80 RBIs in 148 games. Lee has 312 career home runs, highlighted by the 46 he hit in 2005. He brings much-needed punch to the Orioles, who were led in home runs last year by Luke Scott (27). — From wire reports

W. Michigan 69, E. Illinois 60 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 87, Texas-Arlington 74 Texas 95, Coppin St. 75 Texas A&M 66, McNeese St. 57 Texas St. 80, Texas-Tyler 59 FAR WEST Boise St. 81, New Mexico St. 78 Gonzaga 73, Oklahoma St. 52 Idaho 79, Louisiana Tech 47 Idaho St. 68, Sacramento St. 63, OT Montana 75, Weber St. 56 Montana St. 86, N. Arizona 78 N. Colorado 75, E. Washington 73 Nevada 86, Hawaii 69 Portland 88, Utah 79 Saint Mary’s, Calif. 87, Hartford 63 San Diego St. 93, Occidental 50 Southern Cal 60, Washington St. 56 UC Santa Barbara 75, Fresno Pacific 67, OT Utah St. 80, San Jose St. 71 Washington 74, UCLA 63

IN THE BLEACHERS

Wednesday Wrestling: Summit at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Redmond at Mountain View, 6 p.m. Thursday Girls basketball: Madras at Crook County, 7 p.m. Boys basketball: Crook County at Madras, 7 p.m. Wrestling: Junction City and Sweet Home at La Pine, 5 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 5 p.m. Friday Girls basketball: Gilchrist at Hosanna, TBA, Crook County at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Molalla, 5:30 p.m.; Summit at Bend, 7 p.m.; Culver at Scio, 6:30 p.m. Boys basketball: La Pine at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Molalla, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Bend at Summit, 7 p.m.; Culver at Scio, 8 p.m.; Gilchrist at Hosanna, TBA Wrestling: Redmond at Rollie Lane in Boise, TBA; Culver at Jo-Hi Tournament in Joseph, 11 a.m. Saturday Girls basketball: Triad at Gilchrist, TBA; Lakeview at Culver; 2:30 p.m. Boys basketball: Lakeview at Culver, 4 p.m.; Triad at Gilchrist, TBA Wrestling: Summit, Madras, Mountain View, La Pine, Gilchrist at Bend High Invitational, 10 a.m.; Redmond at Rollie Lane Tournament in Boise, TBA; Crook County at Lebanon, 7 p.m.; Culver at Jo-Hi Tournament in Joseph, TBA Swimming: Redmond, Mountain View, Madras at Jay Rowan Invitational in Redmond, 9 a.m. Nordic skiing: OISRA skate and classic race at Diamond Lake, noon

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PST ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF y-New England 13 2 0 .867 480 x-N.Y. Jets 10 5 0 .667 329 Miami 7 8 0 .467 266 Buffalo 4 11 0 .267 276 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 9 6 0 .600 412 Jacksonville 8 7 0 .533 336 Tennessee 6 9 0 .400 336 Houston 5 10 0 .333 356 North W L T Pct PF x-Pittsburgh 11 4 0 .733 334 x-Baltimore 11 4 0 .733 344 Cleveland 5 10 0 .333 262 Cincinnati 4 11 0 .267 315 West W L T Pct PF y-Kansas City 10 5 0 .667 356 San Diego 8 7 0 .533 408 Oakland 7 8 0 .467 379 Denver 4 11 0 .267 316 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF y-Philadelphia 10 5 0 .667 426 N.Y. Giants 9 6 0 .600 377 Washington 6 9 0 .400 288 Dallas 5 10 0 .333 380 South W L T Pct PF x-Atlanta 12 3 0 .800 383 x-New Orleans 11 4 0 .733 371 Tampa Bay 9 6 0 .600 318 Carolina 2 13 0 .133 186 North W L T Pct PF y-Chicago 11 4 0 .733 331 Green Bay 9 6 0 .600 378 Minnesota 6 9 0 .400 268 Detroit 5 10 0 .333 342 West W L T Pct PF St. Louis 7 8 0 .467 283 Seattle 6 9 0 .400 294 San Francisco 5 10 0 .333 267 Arizona 5 10 0 .333 282 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Sunday’s Games Oakland at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 10 a.m. Miami at New England, 10 a.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 10 a.m. Carolina at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Baltimore, 10 a.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 1:15 p.m. San Diego at Denver, 1:15 p.m. Chicago at Green Bay, 1:15 p.m. Jacksonville at Houston, 1:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Washington, 1:15 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 1:15 p.m. Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1:15 p.m. St. Louis at Seattle, 5:20 p.m. ——— End of regular season

PA 306 297 295 387 PA 368 385 316 410 PA 223 263 291 382 PA 295 294 361 438 PA 363 333 360 423 PA 278 284 305 377 PA 276 237 328 356 PA 312 401 339 396

Texas Tech

College BOWLS Subject to Change All Times PST ——— Friday, Dec. 31 Meineke Bowl: South Florida 31, Clemson 26 Sun Bowl: Notre Dame 33, Miami 17 Liberty Bowl: UCF 10, Georgia 6 Chick-fil-A Bowl: Florida State 26, South Carolina 17

9.5 9.5 Northwestern Outback Bowl 7 7 Penn State Capital One Bowl 11 10 Michigan State Gator Bowl 5.5 4 Michigan Rose Bowl 2.5 3 Wisconsin Fiesta Bowl 17 16.5 Connecticut

Florida Alabama Miss. State Tcu Oklahoma

Stanford

January 3 Orange Bowl 3 3

Virginia Tech

Ohio State

January 4 Sugar Bowl 3.5 3.5

Arkansas

Miami (Ohio)

January 6 GMAC Bowl 1.5 1

Mid. Tenn. St.

Monday, Jan. 3 Orange Bowl: Stanford (11-1) vs. Virginia Tech (112), 5 p.m. (ESPN)

Lsu

January 7 Cotton Bowl PK 1

Texas A&M

Tuesday, Jan. 4 Sugar Bowl: Ohio State (11-1) vs. Arkansas (10-2), 5 p.m. (ESPN)

Pitt

January 8 BBVA Compass Bowl 2.5 3

Thursday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl: Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle Tennessee (6-6), 5 p.m. (ESPN)

Nevada

January 9 Fight Hunger Bowl 9 8 Boston College

Friday, Jan. 7 Cotton Bowl: Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2), 5 p.m. (Fox)

Auburn

January 10 BCS National Championship 2.5 2.5 Oregon

Today, Jan. 1 TicketCity Bowl: Northwestern (7-5) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 a.m. (ESPNU) Capital One Bowl: Michigan State (11-1) vs. Alabama (9-3), 10 a.m. (ESPN) Outback Bowl: Florida (7-5) vs. Penn State (7-5), 10 a.m. (ABC) Gator Bowl: Michigan (7-5) vs. Mississippi State (84), 10:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Rose Bowl: TCU (12-0) vs. Wisconsin (11-1), 1:30 p.m. (ESPN) Fiesta Bowl: Connecticut (8-4) vs. Oklahoma (11-2), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday, Jan. 8 BBVA Compass Bowl: Pittsburgh (7-5) vs. Kentucky (6-6), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Jan. 9 Fight Hunger Bowl: Boston College (7-5) vs. Nevada (12-1), 6 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 10 BCS National Championship: Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon (12-0), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Betting Line Favorite CHIEFS PATRIOTS COLTS TEXANS Steelers RAVENS LIONS Giants PACKERS EAGLES JETS FALCONS SAINTS Rams 49ERS Chargers

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Sunday 4 3.5 Raiders 5 4.5 Dolphins 9 9.5 Titans 2.5 (J) 3 Jaguars 6 6 BROWNS 10 10 Bengals 3.5 3 Vikings 3.5 4 REDSKINS 5 10 Bears 7 7 Cowboys 3 1.5 Bills 14.5 14 Panthers 8 7.5 Bucs 1.5 3 SEAHAWKS 6.5 6.5 Cardinals 3.5 3 BRONCOS College Today Dallas Ticket City Bowl

Kentucky

BASKETBALL Men’s college Friday’s Games ——— EAST Brown 84, Bryant 71 Connecticut 66, South Florida 61, OT Duquesne 91, Northwestern St. 64 Fairfield 68, Army 61 George Washington 58, Holy Cross 57 Harvard 84, MIT 58 Lehigh 62, Yale 57 Massachusetts 71, Boston U. 54 Saint Joseph’s 58, Siena 48 SOUTH Auburn 63, Grambling St. 45 Charleston Southern 77, High Point 69 Coastal Carolina 77, Radford 59 Coll. of Charleston 91, Tennessee 78 Georgia 64, E. Kentucky 57 Georgia Tech 87, Mercer 78 Kentucky 78, Louisville 63 Liberty 64, Gardner-Webb 62, OT Samford 55, E. Michigan 51 The Citadel 67, Chowan 53 VMI 83, UNC Asheville 72 Winthrop 53, Presbyterian 51 MIDWEST Ball St. 80, N. Carolina A&T 68 Cincinnati 70, Seton Hall 53 Florida 71, Xavier 67 James Madison 60, Kent St. 51 Kansas St. 100, North Florida 76 Michigan St. 71, Minnesota 62 N. Illinois 86, Utah Valley 76 Ohio St. 85, Indiana 67 Purdue 82, Northwestern 69

St. Louis Columbus Chicago Nashville

PAC-10 STANDINGS All Times PST ——— Conference All Games W L PCT W L PCT Washington 2 0 1.000 10 3 .769 Oregon St. 1 0 1.000 6 6 .500 Arizona 1 0 1.000 12 2 .857 Stanford 0 0 .000 7 4 .636 California 0 0 .000 7 5 .583 Southern Cal 1 1 .500 9 6 .600 UCLA 1 1 .500 9 5 .642 Oregon 0 1 .000 7 6 .538 Arizona St. 0 1 .000 7 5 .583 Washington St. 0 2 .000 10 4 .714 ——— Friday’s Games Washington 74, UCLA 63 Southern Cal 60, Washington State 56 Today’s Game Arizona State at Oregon, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Games California at Stanford, 5 p.m. Arizona at Oregon State, 7 p.m.

Women’s college Friday’s Games ——— EAST Cent. Connecticut St. 78, St. Peter’s 66 Providence 65, Boston U. 55 St. Francis, NY 57, Stony Brook 54 SOUTH Charleston Southern 86, Coll. of Charleston 74 IPFW 94, Centenary 65 Long Island U. 58, North Florida 40 Memphis 83, Jackson St. 64 North Carolina 83, Gardner-Webb 62 Princeton 71, Wake Forest 63 UNC-Greensboro 59, Davidson 58 W. Michigan 66, E. Kentucky 58 MIDWEST Creighton 58, Drake 51 Ill.-Chicago 65, Cleveland St. 59 Loyola of Chicago 70, Youngstown St. 53 Missouri St. 82, S. Illinois 50 Pittsburgh 94, Cent. Michigan 78 S. Dakota St. 81, UMKC 59 W. Illinois 51, IUPUI 50 Wis.-Green Bay 69, Detroit 62 Wright St. 77, Wis.-Milwaukee 73 SOUTHWEST Oral Roberts 96, Oakland, Mich. 74 FAR WEST Arizona 109, Oregon 94 Arizona State 49, Oregon State 46 CS Northridge 74, Pacific 68, OT Cal St.-Fullerton 58, UC Davis 56 Mount St. Mary’s, Md. 79, San Francisco 77, OT Southern Cal 72, Washington St. 57 UC Irvine 53, UC Riverside 46 UCLA 60, Washington 48 TOURNAMENT Hawk Holiday Classic Championship American U. 56, Brown 47 Third Place Monmouth, N.J. 60, Binghamton 51

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF Pittsburgh 39 25 11 3 53 126 Philadelphia 38 23 10 5 51 128 N.Y. Rangers 38 22 14 2 46 118 N.Y. Islanders 36 11 19 6 28 84 New Jersey 37 10 25 2 22 65 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF Boston 36 20 11 5 45 102 Montreal 39 21 16 2 44 97 Ottawa 39 16 18 5 37 89 Buffalo 37 15 18 4 34 98 Toronto 36 13 19 4 30 84 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF Tampa Bay 38 22 11 5 49 119 Washington 39 22 12 5 49 117 Atlanta 41 20 15 6 46 127 Carolina 36 17 15 4 38 102 Florida 35 16 17 2 34 95 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF Detroit 38 24 9 5 53 131

GA 91 102 98 118 116 GA 77 92 116 108 110 GA 121 105 122 108 92 GA 107

37 20 12 5 45 99 100 38 20 15 3 43 100 110 39 20 16 3 43 123 113 37 18 13 6 42 91 92 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 36 23 8 5 51 125 91 Colorado 38 20 13 5 45 131 123 Minnesota 37 17 15 5 39 92 107 Calgary 38 17 18 3 37 103 109 Edmonton 36 12 17 7 31 94 124 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 39 22 13 4 48 110 109 Los Angeles 37 22 14 1 45 113 91 San Jose 38 20 13 5 45 114 108 Anaheim 41 20 17 4 44 107 118 Phoenix 37 17 13 7 41 101 107 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday’s Games New Jersey 3, Atlanta 1 Montreal 3, Florida 2, OT Nashville 4, Minnesota 1 N.Y. Islanders 4, Detroit 3, OT Columbus 4, Ottawa 3, OT Anaheim 5, Philadelphia 2 Vancouver 4, Dallas 1 St. Louis 4, Phoenix 3 Calgary 3, Colorado 2 Today’s Games Boston at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Toronto at Ottawa, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Carolina, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Washington vs. Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh, PA, 5 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. Calgary at Edmonton, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Games Atlanta at Montreal, 10 a.m. N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 2 p.m. Philadelphia at Detroit, 2 p.m. Dallas at St. Louis, 3 p.m. Columbus at Nashville, 3 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 3 p.m. Vancouver at Colorado, 5 p.m. Chicago at Anaheim, 5 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Agreed to terms with 1B Derrek Lee on a one-year contract. CLEVELAND INDIANS — Announced RHP Justin Germano accepted outright assignment to Columbus (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with RHP Zach Miner on a minor league contract. American Association EL PASO DIABLOS — Signed RHP Shaun Ellis. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Fined Minnesota QB Joe Webb $5,000 for a “major” facemask penalty committed during a run in Tuesday’s game against Philadelphia. Reduced fines for Atlanta CB Dunta Robinson from $50,000 to $25,000 and New England S Brandon Meriweather from $50,000 to $40,000. Fined Tennessee OT David Stewart $20,000 for unnecessary roughness, Indianapolis LB Gary Brackett $15,000 for roughing the passer, Oakland DE Lamarr Houston $12,500 for poking his finger in a facemask near the eye, New England LB Jerod Mayo $10,000 for unnecessarily striking a defenseless receiver in the head and neck area, N.Y. Giants CB Terrell Thomas $5,000 for unnecessary roughness and San Francisco DE Ray McDonald $5,000 for hitting St. Louis QB Sam Bradford in the head. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed WR Shay Hodge from the practice squad. DALLAS COWBOYS — Placed WR Sam Hurd on injured reserve. Signed PK Kris Brown. DETROIT LIONS — Placed LB Landon Johnson on injured reserve. Signed CB Paul Pratt off the practice squad. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Placed LB Karlos Dansby on injured reserve. Signed WR Julius Pruitt from the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Traded D Brett Festerling and a 2012 fifth-round draft pick to Montreal for C Maxim Lapierre. BOSTON BRUINS — Reassigned D Cody Wild from Providence (AHL) to Reading (ECHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled LW Tomas Tatar from Grand Rapids (AHL). EDMONTON OILERS — Assigned LW Linus Omark to Oklahoma City (AHL). FLORIDA PANTHERS — Waived C Steve Reinprecht. MONTREAL CANADIENS — Recalled C David Desharnais from Hamilton (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Assigned D Mark Fraser to Albany (AHL) for conditioning. OTTAWA SENATORS — Recalled F Jim O’Brien from Binghamton (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES — Assigned RW Brett MacLean to San Antonio (AHL). VANCOUVER CANUCKS — Reassigned D Ryan Parent to Manitoba (AHL). American Hockey League BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERS — Returned F Mike Sellitto to Danbury (Federal). Signed F Chris Blight. LAKE ERIE MONSTERS — Recalled G Trevor Cann from Tulsa (CHL). PROVIDENCE BRUINS — Recalled D Ryan Donald from Reading (ECHL). ROCHESTER AMERICANS — Assigned F James Delory to Bossier-Shreveport (CHL). Central Hockey League TULSA OILERS — Signed G Brad Best. COLLEGE MIAMI (OHIO) — Named Don Treadwell football coach. NEW MEXICO HIGHLANDS — Named Eric Young football coach.

Canucks beat Stars in battle of division leaders The Associated Press DALLAS — Daniel and Henrik Sedin scored power-play goals, and backup goalie Cory Schneider took care of the rest for the streaking Vancouver Canucks. Schneider made 44 saves to bail out teammates who admitted they were outplayed for much of the game, and the Canucks went on to their fourth straight victory, 4-1 over the Dallas Stars on Friday night. “Dallas was probably the better team overall for 60 minutes, but sometimes all you need is a good power play and a good goalie,” Daniel Sedin said. Schneider was backed up by Roberto Luongo, who rejoined his teammates Friday. Luongo had been with his wife, Gina, who gave birth to a boy, the couple’s second child, on Wednesday in South Florida. Schneider, 6-0-2 this season, stopped all 18 shots he faced in the second period. Schneider also turned aside James Neal’s penalty shot in the second period. “Some nights you need your goaltender to steal you a win, and that’s what we got tonight, an outstanding performance from Schneids, who made the right saves at the right time,” Canucks coach Alain Vigneault said. “We needed him big tonight, and he came up big for us.” Daniel Sedin and Raffi Torres had goals in a 47-second span late in the first period, and Vancouver went on to improve to 13-1-2 in its last 16 games, 6-0-1 on the road during that stretch. Kevin Bieksa added a power-play goal for the Canucks, who went three for five with the man advantage. Stars coach Marc Crawford said some ill-advised penalties drained momentum from his team. “I think tonight we played a pretty strong game, but we had some adversity and it came in the form of penalties that were self-inflicted for the most part and we didn’t have any confidence

NHL ROUNDUP

in our penalty kill,” Crawford said. “I thought that maybe we were reading their press clippings about how good their power play is, and it seemed to me, we were back on our heels, and when we got aggressive on the penalty kill, I thought we killed much better.” Brenden Morrow had a power-play goal for the Stars, 0-3-1 in their last four at home. Dallas was coming off a 7-3 loss Wednesday night to Detroit when the Stars gave up six straight goals. The Sendins combined on the first period’s only power play to get their team rolling. In other games on Friday: Devils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Thrashers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 NEWARK, N.J. — Backup goalie Johan Hedberg made 28 saves and New Jersey beat Atlanta to snap a six-game losing streak and give Jacques Lemaire his first victory since replacing John MacLean behind the bench. Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 SUNRISE, Fla. — Montreal newcomer James Wisniewski scored his second goal of the game 3:41 into overtime to give the Canadiens a comeback victory over Florida. Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 ST. PAUL, Minn. — Pekka Rinne made 22 saves to help Nashville end its losing streak at five games. Islanders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Red Wings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 DETROIT — P.A. Parenteau scored on a power play at 3:57 of overtime to give the New York Islanders a victory over Western Conferenceleading Detroit. Blue Jackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Senators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 COLUMBUS, Ohio — Jake Voracek, a recent

NHL switches Winter Classic to 5 p.m. nighttime start PITTSBURGH — The NHL is moving the CapitalsPenguins Winter Classic to a nighttime start to avoid predicted daytime rain in Pittsburgh. The game, scheduled to start shortly after 10 a.m. PST today, has been moved to 5 p.m. It will be the first of the four Winter Classics to be played at night. The NHL announced the switch Friday so the 67,000 fans — about 20,000 from Washington — had time to adjust their plans. Forecasters are calling for nearly an inch of rain before it lets up late in the day. The game cannot be played in steady rain because it would significantly increase the risk of player injuries. — The Associated Press

healthy scratch for his lack of production, scored an unassisted goal off a quirky bounce off the back boards for Columbus. Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Flyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Jason Blake and defenseman Lubomir Visnovsky each scored two goals and Jonas Hiller made 35 saves for Anaheim. Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Coyotes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ST. LOUIS — Alex Steen had a goal and an assist, Jaroslav Halak stopped 30 shots and St. Louis won its fifth straight game, holding off Phoenix. Flames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Avalanche. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 CALGARY, Alberta — Tom Kostopoulos, Jarome Iginla and Tim Jackman scored in a 7:30 span in the second period and Calgary won its third straight game.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 1, 2011 D3

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Friday’s Games

Bulls 90, Nets 81 NEW JERSEY (81) Outlaw 6-17 3-7 16, Humphries 1-4 0-0 2, Lopez 4-11 11-11 19, Harris 5-13 0-0 10, Graham 7-12 2-2 16, Uzoh 0-1 0-0 0, Favors 2-3 2-3 6, Vujacic 3-10 0-0 8, Petro 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 30-77 18-23 81. CHICAGO (90) Deng 7-15 3-4 19, Boozer 8-14 4-7 20, Thomas 2-4 3-3 7, Rose 5-16 7-7 19, Bogans 0-3 2-2 2, Gibson 1-4 0-0 2, Brewer 3-10 3-4 10, Korver 3-8 2-2 9, Watson 1-2 0-0 2, Asik 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 30-76 24-29 90. New Jersey 21 23 19 18 — 81 Chicago 23 23 24 20 — 90 3-Point Goals—New Jersey 3-13 (Vujacic 2-6, Outlaw 1-6, Harris 0-1), Chicago 6-22 (Rose 2-6, Deng 2-6, Brewer 1-3, Korver 1-4, Watson 0-1, Bogans 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Jersey 53 (Lopez 8), Chicago 50 (Boozer 15). Assists—New Jersey 17 (Harris 9), Chicago 21 (Rose 9). Total Fouls—New Jersey 22, Chicago 17. Technicals—New Jersey defensive three second, Chicago defensive three second. A—21,792 (20,917).

Atlantic Division Boston New York Philadelphia Toronto New Jersey

W 24 18 13 11 9

Miami Orlando Atlanta Charlotte Washington

W 25 21 21 11 8

L 9 12 14 20 23

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland

W 21 14 12 11 8

L 10 17 18 22 24

Jae C. Hong / The Associated Press

Wisconsin quarterback Scott Tolzien throws a pass during NCAA college football practice in Carson, Calif., Monday.

Jae C. Hong / The Associated Press

TCU quarterback Andy Dalton looks to throw a pass during NCAA college football practice in Carson, Calif., Tuesday.

TCU hopes to make history vs. Wisconsin By Greg Beacham

Next up

520 points. TCU has racked up 491.5 yards per • Rose Bowl, PASADENA, Calif. — When the TCU game to Wisconsin’s 450.2, but the BadWisconsin Horned Frogs stepped off the team bus gers mercilessly have run up the score vs. TCU and got their first look at the Rose Bowl’s on several opponents in recent weeks. impeccably manicured grass, any lin- • W h en: The Frogs’ defense held seven oppogering thoughts of disrespect and disapnents to a touchdown or less, while the Today, 1:30 pointment evaporated. Badgers forced 14 more turnovers than p.m. No. 3 TCU might be the third wheel they made. in the BCS title dance, but the unbeaten • T V :ESPN “I do believe we’re the underdog, at Frogs know they’re still making foot- • Radio: KICEleast in some people’s eyes, and we ball history in today’s meeting with should be,” said Wisconsin coach Bret AM 940 Wisconsin. Bielema, who’s attempting to join former Although the Mountain West champiboss Barry Alvarez as the only Badgers ons just might be the most unlikely school to ap- coaches to win the Rose Bowl. “They’re an undepear in the Granddaddy of Them All since Wash- feated football team. They’ve done something we ington & Jefferson played a scoreless tie with haven’t. California in the 1922 game, nobody doubts these “I can’t really respond to what TCU’s motivaFrogs (12-0) deserve to stand in Arroyo Seco on tion is, but I know this: Our kids really believe the same beautiful field with the fourth-ranked that this is a culmination to something special. Badgers (11-1) in the 97th Rose Bowl. There is a difference in that ring if it says Rose “Most players in this sport will go their whole Bowl champions or just says a Rose Bowl that you lives and never know what it’s like to play in that played in. So that’s a big deal for our guys.” stadium for the chance to be Rose Bowl champiTCU also sees the game as a do-over of sorts, ons,” TCU coach Gary Patterson said. “We’ve got a chance to make up for last season’s 17-10 loss to a great opportunity.” Boise State in the Fiesta Bowl. Patterson adjusted The Horned Frogs have soaked up the excite- his team’s workout schedules and free-time allotment of bowl week in Los Angeles, but never ments — and he also made sure to take the playlost sight of a victory that would cement their ers to the Rose Bowl shortly after they arrived in program’s place among the nation’s elite. After town, hoping to minimize the “Ooooh” factor on last season’s loss to Boise State in the Fiesta Bowl, game day. TCU responded with another perfect regular seaIt’s tempting to distill the matchup into a clash son, but couldn’t get past fellow undefeated teams of Wisconsin’s size and strength against TCU’s Oregon and Auburn in the overall rankings. speed and tactics, but both teams have spent the “We’re not just representing ourselves,” said week downplaying that. TCU quarterback Andy Dalton, who will cap his Wisconsin’s Scott Tolzien has completed nearly college career by going for his 42nd victory in 75 percent of his passes in its sneakily effective 49 starts. “We’re representing all non-automatic passing game, while TCU’s 4-2-5 defense and qualifying schools. We’re here to show we can flexible offense sometimes mask its strong fundaall play at this level. We know they’re going to be mentals and pure athleticism. watching us and supporting us.” “They’ll give you a ton of formations, but only Although the first back-to-back BCS busters run a handful of plays out of those,” Wisconsin are a slight favorite on paper against the Big Ten defensive back Aaron Henry said. “They do have co-champion Badgers, the Frogs realize they’ll some guys that can fly, though. One to five, this is look like Davids against Wisconsin’s Goliath- probably going to be the fastest receiving corps sized offensive line, maybe the nation’s best. The we’ve faced all year.” Badgers are in their first Rose Bowl in 11 years, Both coaches have been careful to keep hiswielding a powerful rushing offense against a tory in mind throughout their week in southern TCU defense that was the nation’s best in several California. While Patterson says he doesn’t need important statistical categories. to remind his team about the stakes, Bielema was “We’re representing not only the Big Ten, but brought to tears at Friday’s final news conference every qualifying conference,” said Gabe Carimi, when he spoke about the importance of the game Wisconsin’s Outland Trophy-winning left tackle. to Wisconsin football tradition. “There’s no getting around that, and we accept it. Bielema and Patterson already have thought You can’t shy away from it.” about what they’ll say to their players before takAlthough the Rose Bowl crowd is likely to be ing the field. dominated by red-clad Wisconsin snowbirds and “In our own minds, we’re playing for the nasupporters, the matchup seems relatively even on tional title,” Patterson said. “Because if you win the field — particularly on the season scoreboard, the Rose Bowl and nobody else beat you all year, where Wisconsin and TCU both scored exactly that’s something special.” The Associated Press

South Carolina rally falls short as Florida State wins bowl game The Associated Press ATLANTA — EJ Manuel threw a fourth-quarter touchdown pass to stop a South Carolina rally and lead Florida State to a 26-17 victory over the turnover-plagued Gamecocks in the Chick-fil-A Bowl on Friday night. Chris Thompson ran for 147 yards and a touchdown and Dustin Hopkins kicked four field goals for the No. 23 Seminoles (10-4), who reached 10 wins for the first time since 2003. Hopkins tied his own school record for a bowl, and the four field goals also matched the Chick-fil-A Bowl record. Manuel took over for senior quarterback Christian Ponder, who left early in the second quarter with a concussion. No. 19 South Carolina lost running back Marcus Lattimore when he was hit hard on the Gamecocks’ first drive. “I hate it for Christian,” Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher said. “He got dinged on the back of his head. He came off and he

COLLEGE FOOTBALL ROUNDUP was kind of out of it a little bit. I hate that because of what he means to us but EJ, oh boy, I’m glad he’s on our team.” Manuel completed 11 of 15 passes for 84 yards and a touchdown and had seven carries for 46 yards. He was seven-for-seven passing on the fourth-quarter touchdown drive. “Man, I was so happy,” Manuel said. “We weren’t moving the ball like we wanted to. We weren’t getting touchdowns. We were getting field goals instead.” South Carolina (9-5), which was seeking its first 10-win season since 1984, committed five turnovers. Stephen Garcia threw three first-half interceptions and Lattimore and Alshon Jeffery lost fumbles to leave the Gamecocks trailing 16-3 in the third quarter. In other games on Friday: Notre Dame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Miami. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

EL PASO, Texas — Freshman Tommy Rees passed for 201 yards and two touchdowns to Michael Floyd as Notre Dame beat Miami in the Sun Bowl, making Brian Kelly the first Fighting Irish coach to win a bowl game in his first season. South Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Clemson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — B.J. Daniels threw two touchdown passes and ran for a third and South Florida finished coach Skip Holtz’s first season with a victory over Clemson in the Meineke Bowl. Central Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Georgia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Latavius Murray scored on a 10yard touchdown run with 9:01 left, and Central Florida held on to beat Georgia in the Liberty Bowl and cap the best season in school history with the program’s first postseason victory.

Pacers 95, Wizards 86 WASHINGTON (86) Lewis 5-10 3-4 15, Blatche 4-16 0-0 8, McGee 3-6 1-2 7, Wall 10-15 4-4 25, Young 2-11 2-2 8, Armstrong 0-1 0-0 0, Howard 0-5 4-6 4, Martin 1-7 2-2 4, Hudson 2-3 0-0 5, Thornton 4-4 2-2 10, Yi 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 31-80 18-22 86. INDIANA (95) Granger 8-12 2-3 18, McRoberts 1-3 0-0 2, Hibbert 6-13 5-6 17, Collison 8-14 0-0 18, Dunleavy 1-6 0-0 3, Hansbrough 0-1 0-0 0, Rush 4-9 2-3 11, George 5-8 3-3 13, S.Jones 0-2 1-2 1, Ford 4-6 1-1 9, Posey 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 38-78 14-18 95. Washington 22 12 28 24 — 86 Indiana 25 24 27 19 — 95 3-Point Goals—Washington 6-19 (Lewis 2-3, Young 2-6, Hudson 1-2, Wall 1-2, Blatche 0-1, Armstrong 0-1, Martin 0-1, Howard 0-3), Indiana 5-19 (Collison 2-3, Dunleavy 1-3, Posey 1-4, Rush 1-6, Granger 0-1, George 0-1, McRoberts 01). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Washington 48 (Blatche 12), Indiana 49 (Hibbert, McRoberts 8). Assists—Washington 12 (Lewis 5), Indiana 19 (Collison 6). Total Fouls—Washington 21, Indiana 23. A—13,043 (18,165).

Warriors 96, Bobcats 95 GOLDEN STATE (96) D.Wright 6-13 2-2 17, Radmanovic 3-5 0-0 6, Lee 3-8 2-4 8, Curry 10-17 0-0 24, Ellis 11-23 1-2 25, Law 2-3 0-0 4, Udoh 0-0 4-4 4, Carney 0-1 0-0 0, Amundson 1-3 0-2 2, Williams 2-4 1-2

Pct .774 .563 .394 .344 .273

GB — 6½ 12 13½ 16

L10 7-3 5-5 5-5 3-7 3-7

Str L-2 L-2 L-1 L-1 L-4

Home 13-2 8-7 8-6 7-9 6-9

Away 11-5 10-7 5-14 4-12 3-15

Conf 20-4 11-9 8-14 8-12 5-16

Away 12-5 9-7 9-9 3-12 0-16

Conf 16-4 16-6 16-8 7-13 5-17

Away 8-7 5-9 5-11 3-14 3-14

Conf 10-5 9-10 7-7 7-11 7-16

Southeast Division Pct .735 .636 .600 .355 .258

GB — 3½ 4½ 12½ 15½

L10 9-1 6-4 5-5 3-7 2-8

Str W-4 W-5 L-1 L-1 L-1

Home 13-4 12-5 12-5 8-8 8-7

Thunder 103, Hawks 94

Central Division Pct .677 .452 .400 .333 .250

GB — 7 8½ 11 13½

L10 8-2 3-7 5-5 4-6 1-9

Str W-3 W-1 L-2 L-1 L-5

Home 13-3 9-8 7-7 8-8 5-10

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division

Hornets 83, Celtics 81 NEW ORLEANS (83) Ariza 2-7 2-4 7, Da.West 8-17 3-5 19, Okafor 9-13 0-5 18, Paul 7-15 5-5 20, Belinelli 4-9 00 10, Thornton 1-5 0-0 2, Pondexter 0-0 0-0 0, Smith 1-3 0-0 2, Jack 0-2 0-0 0, Green 1-5 2-2 5, Mbenga 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 33-76 12-21 83. BOSTON (81) Pierce 5-10 2-2 12, Davis 4-14 0-0 8, S.O’Neal 4-5 2-3 10, Robinson 5-10 0-2 11, Allen 7-13 2-2 18, J.O’Neal 3-9 2-4 8, Daniels 4-6 2-2 10, Wafer 1-4 0-0 2, Harangody 1-5 0-0 2, Bradley 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 34-76 10-15 81. New Orleans 23 14 29 17 — 83 Boston 19 20 18 24 — 81 3-Point Goals—New Orleans 5-12 (Belinelli 2-3, Green 1-1, Paul 1-3, Ariza 1-4, Thornton 0-1), Boston 3-16 (Allen 2-4, Robinson 1-4, Harangody 0-1, Wafer 0-1, Davis 0-1, J.O’Neal 0-1, Pierce 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Orleans 48 (Okafor 13), Boston 51 (Pierce 7). Assists—New Orleans 21 (Paul 11), Boston 16 (Allen, Daniels 4). Total Fouls—New Orleans 17, Boston 17. Technicals—New Orleans defensive three second, Davis. A—18,624 (18,624).

L 7 14 20 21 24

San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Houston Memphis

W 28 24 19 16 14

L 4 7 14 16 18

Oklahoma City Utah Denver Portland Minnesota

W 23 22 18 17 8

L 11 11 13 16 25

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 23 14 13 10 6

L 10 17 19 23 23

Pct .875 .774 .576 .500 .438

GB — 3½ 9½ 12 14

L10 9-1 7-3 5-5 8-2 6-4

Str W-3 L-2 W-1 W-1 L-1

Home 18-2 13-6 13-4 10-5 9-6

Away 10-2 11-1 6-10 6-11 5-12

Conf 19-3 15-4 10-9 10-9 9-11

Away 10-5 11-5 5-10 6-13 2-17

Conf 12-7 11-10 12-7 11-11 3-18

GB — ½ 3½ 5½ 14½

L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 5-5 2-8

Str W-2 L-1 W-2 W-1 L-1

Home 13-6 11-6 13-3 11-3 6-8

Away 12-6 6-10 5-13 3-11 2-9

Conf 12-6 10-11 8-13 8-17 2-16

Paciic Division Pct .697 .452 .406 .303 .207

GB — 8 9½ 13 15

L10 Str 7-3 W-2 3-7 W-1 5-5 W-1 5-5 L-1 2-8 W-1 ——— Friday’s Games

Chicago 90, New Jersey 81 Golden State 96, Charlotte 95 Houston 114, Toronto 105 Phoenix 92, Detroit 75

Home 11-4 8-7 8-6 7-12 4-14

New Orleans 83, Boston 81 Indiana 95, Washington 86 Oklahoma City 103, Atlanta 94 L.A. Lakers 102, Philadelphia 98 Today’s Games

Cleveland at Chicago, 4 p.m. Golden State at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Memphis at Utah, 6 p.m.

New Orleans at Washington, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Sacramento at Denver, 6 p.m. Dallas at Milwaukee, 6 p.m. Sunday’s Games

Indiana at New York, 10 a.m. Boston at Toronto, 3 p.m. Houston at Portland, 6 p.m. Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 6:30 p.m.

Atlanta at L.A. Clippers, 12:30 p.m. Dallas at Cleveland, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Sacramento, 6 p.m. All Times PST

6. Totals 38-77 10-16 96. CHARLOTTE (95) Wallace 5-15 7-10 20, Diaw 5-9 0-0 10, Mohammed 3-8 0-0 6, Augustin 5-12 1-1 12, Jackson 7-22 7-9 22, McGuire 2-3 0-0 4, Livingston 1-3 5-6 7, Diop 0-1 0-2 0, D.Brown 0-1 0-0 0, Henderson 5-6 0-0 10, Carroll 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 35-83 20-28 95. Golden State 30 22 25 19 — 96 Charlotte 28 18 24 25 — 95 3-Point Goals—Golden State 10-24 (Curry 45, D.Wright 3-8, Ellis 2-5, Williams 1-3, Carney 0-1, Radmanovic 0-2), Charlotte 5-16 (Wallace 3-3, Augustin 1-6, Jackson 1-6, Carroll 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Golden State 45 (Amundson, Lee 8), Charlotte 56 (McGuire, Mohammed, Wallace 8). Assists—Golden State 16 (Ellis 5), Charlotte 19 (Augustin 6). Total Fouls—Golden State 21, Charlotte 16. Technicals—Golden State defensive three second.

ATLANTA (94) Smith 9-14 4-4 23, Horford 6-12 2-2 14, Collins 0-0 0-2 0, Bibby 2-4 0-0 5, Johnson 6-20 4-4 16, Evans 0-0 0-0 0, Ja.Crawford 8-15 7-9 26, Pachulia 2-6 4-4 8, Teague 0-1 0-0 0, Wilkins 0-1 2-4 2. Totals 33-73 23-29 94. OKLAHOMA CITY (103) Durant 11-22 6-6 33, Green 4-8 1-2 10, Krstic 3-6 0-0 6, Westbrook 9-22 5-5 23, Sefolosha 12 0-0 2, Ibaka 5-8 0-0 10, Harden 5-6 2-2 15, Maynor 1-4 1-2 4, Collison 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 39-81 15-17 103. Atlanta 24 29 26 15 — 94 Oklahoma City 33 27 23 20 — 103 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 5-18 (Ja.Crawford 37, Bibby 1-2, Smith 1-3, Johnson 0-6), Oklahoma City 10-18 (Durant 5-9, Harden 3-4, Maynor 1-2, Green 1-2, Westbrook 0-1). Fouled Out—Green. Rebounds—Atlanta 43 (Smith 9), Oklahoma City 47 (Westbrook, Ibaka 10). Assists—Atlanta 19 (Johnson 11), Oklahoma City 20 (Westbrook 10). Total Fouls—Atlanta 17, Oklahoma City 22. Technicals—Oklahoma City defensive three second. A—18,203 (18,203).

Suns 92, Pistons 75

Northwest Division Pct .676 .667 .581 .515 .242

3-4, Kleiza 1-8, DeRozan 0-1, Barbosa 0-2), Houston 5-17 (Budinger 3-5, Lee 1-1, Martin 1-2, Battier 0-1, Miller 0-2, Lowry 0-3, Brooks 0-3). Fouled Out—Kleiza. Rebounds—Toronto 59 (Kleiza 12), Houston 57 (Patterson 10). Assists—Toronto 20 (Calderon 11), Houston 25 (Brooks 7). Total Fouls—Toronto 24, Houston 15. Technicals—Toronto defensive three second, Houston defensive three second 2. A—18,121 (18,043).

A—16,249 (19,077).

Rockets 114, Raptors 105 TORONTO (105) Kleiza 7-21 2-2 17, Johnson 5-12 4-6 14, Dorsey 1-8 1-2 3, Calderon 4-10 0-1 11, DeRozan 12-21 13-14 37, Barbosa 8-13 1-2 17, Davis 1-6 0-0 2, Wright 2-5 0-0 4, Bayless 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 40-96 21-27 105. HOUSTON (114) Battier 1-2 0-0 2, Scola 5-11 3-5 13, Hill 410 0-0 8, Lowry 2-9 2-2 6, Martin 6-12 7-9 20, Miller 5-10 1-1 11, Brooks 2-10 1-1 5, Patterson 6-9 3-5 15, Lee 5-8 1-2 12, Budinger 8-10 3-3 22. Totals 44-91 21-28 114. Toronto 34 21 20 30 — 105 Houston 20 42 22 30 — 114 3-Point Goals—Toronto 4-15 (Calderon

DETROIT (75) Prince 6-10 0-1 12, Villanueva 5-11 0-0 10, Wallace 1-1 0-2 2, Gordon 8-19 2-3 19, McGrady 3-10 0-0 7, Wilcox 1-3 1-2 3, Hamilton 2-9 00 5, Daye 4-8 0-0 9, Bynum 0-0 3-4 3, Monroe 0-1 2-6 2, Summers 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 31-76 8-18 75. PHOENIX (92) Hill 5-6 2-3 12, Pietrus 4-12 1-2 11, Lopez 1-4 2-2 4, Nash 2-3 1-1 7, Carter 8-17 0-0 19, Gortat 2-3 0-2 4, Dudley 6-10 4-6 19, Dragic 3-9 0-0 8, Frye 3-7 2-2 8, Lawal 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 34-71 12-18 92. Detroit 14 18 26 17 — 75 Phoenix 24 26 18 24 — 92 3-Point Goals—Detroit 5-20 (Summers 1-2, McGrady 1-3, Hamilton 1-3, Daye 1-3, Gordon 1-5, Prince 0-1, Villanueva 0-3), Phoenix 1227 (Carter 3-6, Dudley 3-6, Nash 2-2, Dragic 2-4, Pietrus 2-6, Frye 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Detroit 50 (Daye 8), Phoenix 48 (Gortat, Carter 8). Assists—Detroit 18 (Gordon, Prince 3), Phoenix 21 (Dragic, Gortat 5). Total Fouls—Detroit 19, Phoenix 16. Technicals— Summers, Wallace, Hill, Phoenix defensive three second. A—17,637 (18,422).

Lakers 102, 76ers 98 PHILADELPHIA (98) Nocioni 4-6 3-5 13, Brand 4-8 0-0 8, Hawes 4-5 0-0 8, Holiday 7-16 3-4 19, Meeks 2-7 0-0 6, Turner 5-13 1-2 12, Battie 0-3 0-0 0, Young 5-10 4-4 14, Williams 8-15 0-1 18. Totals 3983 11-16 98. L.A. LAKERS (102) Artest 4-6 1-2 11, Gasol 9-12 2-2 20, Bynum 3-6 2-2 8, Fisher 0-7 1-2 1, Bryant 13-24 6-8 33, Odom 8-13 2-3 18, Barnes 1-2 0-0 2, Brown 2-6 0-0 4, Blake 2-6 0-0 5. Totals 42-82 1419 102. Philadelphia 19 25 29 25 — 98 L.A. Lakers 29 23 30 20 — 102 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 9-20 (Nocioni 2-3, Holiday 2-3, Meeks 2-5, Williams 2-7, Turner 1-2), L.A. Lakers 4-14 (Artest 2-4, Blake 1-3, Bryant 1-3, Fisher 0-1, Odom 0-1, Brown 0-1, Barnes 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 41 (Nocioni 8), L.A. Lakers 53 (Bynum 15). Assists—Philadelphia 26 (Holiday 11), L.A. Lakers 19 (Artest, Odom, Fisher 4). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 16, L.A. Lakers 15. A—18,997 (18,997).

NBA ROUNDUP

Durant, Westbrook lead Thunder to win over Hawks The Associated Press OKLAHOMA CITY — Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook and the Oklahoma City Thunder finished off a dazzling 2010 that featured a rise into the upper echelon of the NBA, then stirred up some bad blood with the Atlanta Hawks just in time for the new year. Durant hit a season-high five 3-pointers and scored 33 points, and Westbrook riled up the Hawks by topping off a triple-double with his 10th assist in the final seconds of the Thunder’s 103-94 victory on Friday night. Westbrook finished with 23 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists — the last coming when he rushed the ball up to Serge Ibaka for a dunk with 6.9 seconds left instead of running out the clock. “You don’t do that. The game is over with,” Atlanta coach Larry Drew said. “The game is over with. You’ve got the ball, you run the clock out. Just that plain and simple.” The final sequence brought an undesirable end to a brilliant performance by the Thunder at the finish of an unexpectedly successful 2010. Oklahoma City finished the calendar year at 5529 — more regular-season wins than every team but San Antonio, Dallas, Utah, Orlando and Miami — while completing its rise from league laughingstock into a contender. “When you’ve got the game won, you run the clock out,” Thunder coach Scott Brooks said. “Russell knows how I feel about situations like that, and it was a mistake, but I’m not going to let a mistake at the end of the game ruin what we’ve done tonight. I thought the game was as well as we’ve played both ends of the floor against one of the best teams in basketball.” Durant went three for three on 3s during a 16-6 run in the fourth quarter as the Thunder put the game away after Atlanta had pulled within two points. Jamal Crawford led Atlanta with 26 points and Josh Smith scored 23. Smith had to come out of the game for a while after he was cut on his head in the third quarter, and he only scored two points after returning in the fourth. Also on Friday: Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Monta Ellis scored 25 points and Golden State held off a late rally to beat Charlotte. Stephen Curry added 24 points and Dorell Wright 17 for the Warriors. Hornets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 BOSTON — Trevor Ariza made a tiebreaking 3-pointer with 1:34 to play and David West scored four of his 19 points in the final minute to help New Orleans beat injury-riddled Boston. Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Nets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 CHICAGO — Carlos Boozer scored 20 points and grabbed 15 rebounds, and Chicago won for the 12th time in 14 games.

Sue Ogrocki / The Associated Press

Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant shoots against the Atlanta Hawks in the first quarter of Friday’s game in Oklahoma City. Durant had 33 points as Oklahoma City won 103-94. Pacers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Wizards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 INDIANAPOLIS — Danny Granger and Darren Collison scored 18 points apiece and Indiana pulled away early. Granger shot eight of 12 from the field and scored 13 of his points in the first half in helping the Pacers snap a three-game losing streak. Rockets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 HOUSTON — Reserve guard Chase Budinger scored a season-high 22 points, Kevin Martin added 20 and Houston won for the eighth time in 10 games. Rookie Patrick Patterson set career highs in points (15) and rebounds (10) for the Rockets, who shook off a poor first quarter to shoot 48 percent (44 of 91) and win for the ninth time in 10 home games. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 LOS ANGELES — Kobe Bryant scored 33 points and hit a tiebreaking jumper with 1:15 to play, and the Los Angeles Lakers bounced back from consecutive home losses with a victory over pesky Philadelphia. Pau Gasol had 20 points and eight rebounds for the Lakers. Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 PHOENIX — Jared Dudley scored nine of his 19 points in the second quarter, and Phoenix’s reserves built a big lead that helped the Suns take control of the game en route to a win over Detroit.


D4 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Washington’s Venoy Overton (1) passes the ball over UCLA’s Jerime Anderson during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Los Angeles on Friday. Washington won the game, 74-63.

UConn looks ahead after streak ends By Doug Feinberg The Associated Press

Coach Geno Auriemma always preached that championships are what his Connecticut Huskies chase, not streaks. With UConn’s NCAA-record 90-game run over, Auriemma can get back to his primary goal — winning a third straight national title. “It’s where we go from here that will define this team more than the 90 wins,” Auriemma said. “How we play going forward will be this team’s defining moment. The 90 wins just belonged to a few of these guys. What happens for the rest of the season will belong to them. And I am excited about that.” Star Maya Moore, who has been the constant for UConn throughout the streak, looked ordinary for one of the rare times in her career. The school’s all-time scoring leader was held to just 14 points by Stanford’s suffocating defense in Thursday night’s 71-59 loss. She settled to shoot 3-pointers — taking 11 of them — even when Auriemma pleaded with her to take it to the basket. With her team trailing by six late in the game, Moore finally got to the free throw line for the first time and came up short — missing her only attempt. The normally poised senior was visibly upset after the game, losing for only the third time in her stellar career. No doubt she’ll use this as motivation, just as she did the last time her team was beaten — 998 days ago in the NCAA semifinals by Stanford. After a cross-country flight home, the Huskies will have six days to prepare for their next opponent — Villanova. The Wildcats will attempt to end two more UConn streaks on Jan. 5. The Huskies haven’t lost at home in 69 straight games and not lost consecutive games in nearly 17 years. Auriemma was disappointed by the loss, but hardly distraught, cracking jokes in the post game press conference. “This losing stuff is getting old, I hate it,” he said. “I just wish we could catch a break every once in a while so these kids can have some success.” He will have ample time to break down the Stanford game and point out to his players every error they made. “When we show the mistakes to them again, it will mean a lot more this time because now they’ll know what the result can be,” Auriemma said. “I’ve used this example before: You tell a kid don’t touch a hot stove and they don’t listen until they burn themselves. Now, they won’t touch it. You can tell kids all you want about problems, but if they never get beat. “But now they will feel different at practice. I’m happy they’ll get to experience that and they’ll get to show a different side.” The numbers during the unprecedented run were staggering. The Huskies won by nearly 34 points a game while allowing two teams to come within single digits. They beat ranked opponents 31 times.

Christine Cotter / The Associated Press

Huskies sweep L.A. Washington starts Pac-10 2-0 after beating UCLA The Associated Press LOS ANGELES — The Washington Huskies completed a weekend in Southern California like they haven’t enjoyed for quite a while. Matthew Bryan-Amaning scored 21 points and Washington used a 27-10 run over both halves to beat UCLA 74-63 Friday, giving the Huskies their first Pac-10 sweep in Los Angeles since 2006. Washington (10-3, 2-0) won at Pauley Pavilion for the first time in four years, also the last time the Huskies beat both of the LA schools and only their third sweep ever. They edged Southern California 73-67 in overtime on Wednesday. Washington’s win was a big hit among its large contingent of fans who traveled from San Diego after the Huskies’ victory over Nebraska in the Holiday Bowl on Thursday. They woofed their approval in the waning minutes. “Our fans were unbelievable tonight and against SC,” Washington coach Lorenzo Romar said. “We’ve never had that kind of support in LA.” Isaiah Thomas added 17 points and nine assists, and Bryan-Amaning had 10 rebounds. The win was especially sweet for seniors Bryan-Amaning, Justin Holiday and Venoy Overton, who had never won at Pauley. “I told the team the first person I’m going to call is Quincy Pondexter,” Bryan-Amaning said of the former Huskies star. “LA is going to be the hardest road trip for everyone in the conference.” The Huskies swept a league road series to start the season for the first time since 1976, when they won at California and Stanford. “Especially with the football team winning, we knew we had to win it for them,” Thomas said. In other games on Friday: No. 2 Ohio State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — William Buford scored 24 points, and Ohio State made 13 of 19 3-pointers, pulling away from Indiana. The Buckeyes (14-0, 1-0 Big Ten) have won eight straight road games — their longest such streak since winning nine in a row from 1970-72. No. 4 Connecticut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 South Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 HARTFORD, Conn. — Kemba Walker had 24 points and eight rebounds to lead Connecticut to an overtime victory over South Florida. The Huskies (11-1, 1-1 Big East), coming off their first loss of the season to No. 6 Pittsburgh, avoided losing two straight despite shooting 37.5 percent from the field and trailing throughout the game. South Florida shot 41.8 percent. No. 7 San Diego State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 Occidental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 SAN DIEGO — Chase Tapley scored a season-high 15 points while Kawhi Leonard had 14 points and 10 rebounds for San Diego State in a laugher over Division III Occidental. The Aztecs

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP improved to 15-0 for the first time in school history. Their 15-game winning streak is the longest in school history and is second nationally to No. 1 Duke’s 22-game run. No. 11 Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 No. 22 Louisville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Brandon Knight scored 25 points and Josh Harrellson added a career-high 23 points and 14 rebounds for Kentucky. The Wildcats (11-2) dominated the smaller Cardinals (11-2) in the lane behind Harrellson, who took advantage while Louisville focused on freshman Terrence Jones. No. 12 Purdue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 Northwestern. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — E’Twaun Moore tied his career high with 31 points, including a career-high seven 3-pointers, for Purdue. Moore matched his point total from a win over Southern Illinois on Nov. 26, and had seven rebounds. No. 13 Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 Coppin State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 AUSTIN, Texas — Jordan Hamilton hit five 3-pointers and scored 24 points to lead Texas. Tristan Thompson scored a career-high 22 points and pulled down nine rebounds for the Longhorns (11-2). No. 20 Michigan State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 No. 14 Minnesota. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 EAST LANSING, Mich. — Durrell Summers scored 14 of his 19 points in the second half for Michigan State in its Big Ten opener. Summers’ 3-pointer midway though the second half started an 8-0 run that gave the Spartans (9-4, 1-0) the lead for good. No. 17 Kansas State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 North Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 MANHATTAN, Kan. — Kansas State, playing without three starters, got huge games from Jamar Samuels and Wally Judge. Samuels had 26 points while Judge added 22, both season highs, for the Wildcats (11-3). No. 18 Texas A&M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 McNeese State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 COLLEGE STATION, Texas — Khris Middleton scored 13 points for Texas A&M, which overcame a double-digit deficit for its ninth consecutive victory. The Aggies (12-1) trailed 28-18 with 7:51 remaining in the first half, and 37-30 at halftime. Southern California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Washington State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 LOS ANGELES — Alex Stepheson finished with 14 points and 10 rebounds, and Southern California fended off a late rally to secure a victory over Washington State. Washington State scored 11 straight points to get within 58-56 on former Mountain View player Abe Lodwick’s 3pointer with 1:19 remaining. The Cougars had a chance to tie or go ahead on the ensuing possession, but Klay Thompson’s pass hit off the hands of Lodwick and bounced out of bounds.

Mac Continued from D1 Mac Court, as it is affectionately known, is the second-oldest on-campus arena in Division I, two years younger than Fordham’s Rose Hill Gym. McArthur Court was named after Clifton N. McArthur, the University of Oregon’s first student-body president, who went on to serve Oregon in the House of Representatives. It was paid for by a student fee of $15. The first men’s basketball game was played there on Jan. 14, 1927, when Oregon defeated Willamette 38-10. The building was later home to Oregon’s famed “Tall Firs” team, which beat Ohio State 46-33 to win the first NCAA basketball championship in 1939. The old gym has undergone several renovations over the years, and its capacity has fluctuated between 6,000 and 10,000. It’s current springy maple court came from the 1990 Goodwill Games in Seattle. It has hosted more than just sporting events: Presidential candidate Robert Kennedy campaigned for the 1968 Oregon primary there, shortly before he was

Rick Bowmer / AP ile

McArthur Court stands in Eugene last March. Oregon will play its last game in the arena today against Arizona State and will debut the new 12,541 seat Matthew Knight Arena on Jan. 13 against Southern California. assassinated in California. Bill Clinton appeared there in 1992 before he became president. Elvis Presley and the Grateful Dead performed there. When empty, Mac Court shows its age. Some of the seats high in the top tier do not offer a clear view of the court. Restrooms are scarce, and the hallways have the long-lingering scent of popcorn and hot dogs.

But when full, “The Pit” transforms into one of the more intimidating courts in the Pac-10. The student section, with its raucous Pit Crew, seems almost unfairly close to the action. The whole building shakes when the Pit Crew hops and stomps, and the backboards of the baskets have been known to shake when the student section leaps together.

Cheers can be heard on the street outside. After tonight’s game, Mac Court will not close forever. The UO women’s basketball team, which has played there since the late 1970s, plays its final two games there next week. The building will continue to host the volleyball team and various club sports. “We’d really love to win, not only for ourselves, but for the fans and the people that have been coming here through the years and all the memories they have of Mac Court,” Ducks forward Jeremy Jacob said of tonight’s final men’s game. “So we really don’t want to leave them with a loss. We really want to leave with a win.” Phil Knight, the co-founder of Nike and Oregon’s most famous benefactor, and his wife, Penny, donated $100 million to the athletic department’s Legacy Fund, which helped jump-start the arena project. Their son Matthew died in a 2004 scuba diving accident in El Salvador, where he was working for an orphanage. The new $227 million arena, which features a distinctive court designed to look as if it is shadowed by a forest, will seat 12,500.

Woods’ woes tops AP list of sports stories in 2010 By Rachel Cohen The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Tiger Woods’ humbling return to the public eye, from his televised confession to a winless season on the golf course, was voted the sports story of the year by members of The Associated Press. The fallout from Woods’ admission of infidelity edged a very different sort of story: The New Orleans Saints winning their first Super Bowl championship, giving an emotional boost to their hurricane-ravaged city. It was late 2009 when Woods’ pristine image unraveled after he crashed his SUV into a tree outside his home, unleashing salacious revelations of extramarital affairs. The story was a late addition to last year’s voting and wound up fifth. But the twists and turns weren’t over for Woods. Many more developments were still to unfold in 2010. There were 176 ballots submitted from U.S. news organizations that make up the AP’s membership. The voters were asked to rank the top 10 sports stories of the year, with the first-place story getting 10 points, the second-place story receiving nine points, and so on. The Woods saga received 1,316 points, with the Saints’ title getting 1,215 and the NBA free agency frenzy coming in third with 1,085. Major League Baseball’s ongoing travails with performance-enhancing drugs was the top story last year. Here are 2010’s top 10 stories: 1. Tiger Woods: Woods returned to public view with a 13½-minute statement in February, then came back to golf at the Masters in April with a fourth-place finish. That Tiger Woods would be one of his few highlights on the course — Woods went winless on the PGA Tour for the first time in his career and lost his No. 1 ranking for the first time in years. In August, he and Elin Nordegren divorced. 2. Saints win: New Orleans residents loved their Saints for not abandoning the city after Hurricane Katrina, but it was hard to imagine the team bringing much joy on the field after 42 mostly losing seasons. Then Drew Brees and Co. upset the mighty Indianapolis Colts in their first Super Bowl, to the delight of French Quarter revelers and fans nationwide who adopted the Saints. 3. Free agency frenzy: NBA fans were captivated by the mystery of where MVP LeBron James and other marquee free agents would land. Few would have guessed that three of them would sign with the same team: the Miami Heat, who became basketball’s Evil Empire by adding James from Cleveland and Chris Bosh from Toronto to Dwyane Wade. 4. World Cup: A World Cup

David J. Phillip / The Associated Press

San Francisco Giants’ Tim Lincecum carries the World Series trophy after winning baseball’s World Series against the Texas Rangers in Arlington, Texas, on Nov. 1. of firsts ended gloriously for Spain and for Africa. South Africa hosted the continent’s first World Cup without the pitfalls many predicted. And the Spaniards brought home the first World Cup title to the soccer-mad country with a 1-0 victory over the Netherlands in extra time. 5. Giants win: The Giants hadn’t won the World Series since they moved to San Francisco in 1958 — and since 1954 overall. This didn’t seem to be the year to end the drought when they barely squeaked into the playoffs. But with dominant pitching and clutch hitting, they beat the Texas Rangers in five games. 6. NFL Concussions: New posters distributed to teams before the season warned of concussions’ dangers in much harsher language than before. Another sign of how big the issue had become: increased reporting of concussions by players. Midseason, the NFL cracked down on helmet hits with huge fines and threatened suspensions. 7. Jimmie Johnson: The NASCAR driver extended his record with his fifth straight Sprint Cup title. Perhaps most impressively, he did it despite not being in top form all season. Johnson became the first driver in the Chase’s sevenyear history to overcome a points deficit in the finale. 8. Brett Favre: This comeback was nothing like last year’s magical run to the NFC title game for the 41-year-old quarterback. His Minnesota Vikings struggled badly, and the NFL launched an investigation into whether he sent lewd photos of himself to a Jets employee. After voting began, his record streak of 297 starts ended. 9. UConn wins: The Huskies’ women’s basketball team extended their record winning streak to 78 games with a second straight national championship in April, becoming the first team to post consecutive unbeaten seasons. And Connecticut is a powerhouse again this season. 10. Wooden dies: The Wizard of Westwood died June 4 at the age of 99. John Wooden coached UCLA’s men’s basketball team to 10 NCAA championships, including seven in a row from 1967-73 and an 88game winning streak.

AP ile

This March 31, 1975, file photo shows UCLA basketball coach John Wooden wearing a basketball net around his neck after his team won the NCAA basketball championship over Kentucky, 92-85, in San Diego, Calif.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 1, 2011 D5

2010: A look at the year in Central Oregon sports

Prep sports: State champions TEAMS Summit boys swimming Mountain View combined XC skiing Mountain View boys XC skiing Mountain View girls XC skiing Summit boys XC skiing Summit girls XC skiing Culver wrestling Summit girls golf Summit girls track Summit girls cross-country Crook County volleyball Summit girls soccer

Five in a row for Cowgirls The Oregon School Activities Association reworked the landscape of the state’s high school sports for the 2010-11 school year, including revamped postseason formats and a reclassification of schools that, among other changes, bumped Crook County from Class 5A to Class 4A because of declining enrollment at the Prineville school. The Crook County volleyball team had won the state championship in Class 5A each of the previous four years, which made the Cowgirls favorites to make it five in a row with the addition of a 4A title. They did not disappoint, and led by 4A player of the year Makayla Lindburg and 4A coach of the year Rosie Honl, the Cowgirls whipped Banks in the 4A final in November at Lane Community College in Eugene. Crook County became the first Oregon team ever to win five consecutive state volleyball championships.

INDIVIDUALS Cross-Country Skiing Ian Neubauer, Mountain View Kelly Hanson, Mountain View Mikhaila Thornton, Mountain View Chase Nachtmann, Mountain View Pat Madden, Summit Isabella Smith, Summit Alpine Skiing Christian Schuster, Summit Matthew Aimonetti / For The Bulletin

Big season for Bend Elks

Tradition bids farewell

In their 11th year as Central Oregon’s summer collegiate wood-bat baseball team, the Bend Elks fashioned a season that was a winner not only on the field (their overall record was 27-21) but at the gate as well. More than 50,000 fans — a franchise record — attended Elks games at Vince Genna Stadium in 2010, and the park was packed for two home games in the West Coast League playoffs. The Elks upset the Corvallis Knights in the first round of the league playoffs and advanced for the first time to the WCL Championship Series, where they fell to the Wenatchee AppleSox two games to one in the best-of-three series. Bend’s own Tommy Richards (pictured below) led the way for the Elks. The second baseman won the WCL batting crown with an average of .364 and in September was named the league’s MVP.

The Jeld-Wen Tradition, a major championship on professional golf’s Champions Tour (for players age 50 and older), ended its fouryear run in Central Oregon when Fred Funk (pictured below) won the 72-hole tournament at Crosswater Club in Sunriver. The Tradition had come to Central Oregon in 2007 with a commitment to four years at Crosswater. But any hope of that commitment being extended was shot down just days before the 2010 tournament teed off when Jeld-Wen Inc., a Klamath Falls-based window and door manufacturer, announced that it would not renew its contract with the PGA Tour to remain The Tradition’s title sponsor. The day after Funk won at Crosswater for the second time, the Champions Tour announced that The Tradition was moving to Birmingham, Ala., starting in 2011.

Bob Click / For The Bulletin

Fourth world title for Mote Owner of three world bareback titles and the reigning champion in the event, Bobby Mote was nevertheless something of a long shot to capture another crown at the 2010 National Finals Rodeo last month in Las Vegas. The 34-year-old Culver cowboy came into the NFR ranked fifth in the world standings and trailed leader Ryan Gray by nearly $70,000 in 2010 earnings. But a bad break for Gray — he suffered a second-round injury that ended his rodeo — turned into a good break for Mote. Himself plagued by injuries during the year, Mote was in championship form in Vegas, where he won one of the 10 rounds, tied for first place in another, and finished in the money (top six) in a total of seven rounds. When the dust had cleared at the Thomas & Mack Center, Mote was wearing a new worldchampionship belt buckle, having become one of only six bareback riders ever to win as many as four world titles. Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Wrestling Ryan Haney, Redmond McKennan Buckner, Crook County Ryan Brunner, Madras Jared Kasch, Culver Josue Gonzalez, Culver David Badillo, Culver Equestrian Courtney Thomas, Mountain View Maddie Hood, Mountain View Laurie MacWhorter, Mountain View MacKenzie Gellings, Sisters McKenzie Legg, Sisters Taryn Gates, Sisters Brittney Bounds, Sisters Lindsey Soliz, Sisters Brandice Durfee, Redmond Megen Hopper, Redmond Jordan Payne, Redmond Danielle Pilon, Redmond Nautique Simpson, Redmond Jessica Dillon, Redmond Hennessey Sloter, Redmond Tennis Hannah Shepard, Summit Jesse Drakulich, Summit Track & Field Megan Fristoe, Summit Annie Mutchler, Sisters Kellie Schueler, Summit Rachel Slater, Summit Veronica West, Summit Hillie Teller, Summit Catherine Theobold, Bend C.J. Easterling, Madras

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Cycling, cycling, cycling Central Oregon hosted a full schedule of national- and world-class cycling events in 2010, including the Elite, U23 and Junior Road National Championships in June and the ever-popular Cascade Cycling Classic road stage race in July. But off-road racing grabbed its share of the cycling spotlight too. Mountain bike races, such as the long-running Cascade Chainbreaker and the new Sisters Stampede, attracted competitors by the hundreds. And in December, Bend hosted the U.S. Cyclocross Nationals for the second year in a row, drawing droves of the country’s top cyclocross riders and entertaining thousands of spectators on a muddy, mucky race course in the Old Mill District. Local pro cyclists made headlines of their own, including Bend’s Chris Horner, who was a top-10 finisher on cycling’s biggest stage: the Tour de France.

Rodeo Austin Foss, Terrebonne Jessica Wood, Terrebonne Clint Johnson, Madras McKennan Buckner, Redmond Cully Stafford, Prineville Cheyenne Westwood, Prineville Cross-Country Megan Fristoe, Summit Cyclocross Colin Dunlap, Summit

PLAYERS OF THE YEAR Kassi Conditt, La Pine Class 4A girls basketball Turner Gill, Madras Class 5A baseball

Cycling controversy As Central Oregon continued to build its reputation as a bicycling mecca in 2010, Bend became a focal point of the cycling world in July when Floyd Landis rolled into town to take part in the Cascade Cycling Classic stage race. Earlier in the year, Landis, who won the Tour de France in 2006 but was stripped of his title after testing positive for synthetic testosterone, had ended four years of denial and admitted to doping during his pro career. He also had accused cycling icon Lance Armstrong of doping — an allegation that prompted a harsh backlash from the cycling community. In an interview with The Bulletin during the CCC, Landis stood by his accusations, saying, “It was about doing what was right.” While in Central Oregon, Landis was joined by American cycling legend Greg LeMond, who appeared at the CCC in support of Landis. Also while he was in Bend, Landis recorded an interview with ABC TV, during which he repeated both his admission of doping and his accusation of Armstrong.

Swimming Nic Morrell, Summit Mason Allen, Summit Paul Hartmeier, Summit Aidan Soles, Summit David Hopkins, Summit

Makayla Lindburg, Crook County Class 4A volleyball Hayley Estopare, Summit Class 5A girls soccer Dan Oliver / The Bulletin

Pole Pedal Paddle In a region that hosts an ever-lengthening list of endurance competitions, the multisport Pole Pedal Paddle remained by far the most popular of the bunch in 2010. A turnout of more than 3,000 — from world-class athletes to weekend warriors — set a participation record in the 34th running of the PPP. May’s annual six-stage race from Mount Bachelor to Bend (via alpine skiing, nordic skiing, cycling, running, paddling and sprinting) was won for the fifth time in a row by Bend’s Marshall Greene. In the elite women’s division, Bend’s Stephanie Howe won the PPP for the first time.

COACHES OF THE YEAR Todd Ervin, Bend Class 5A girls basketball Rosie Honl, Crook County Class 4A volleyball Grant Mattox, Mountain View Class 5A girls soccer


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Fuel and Wood

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Security Intercom system door entry video phone, new in box. $70. 503-933-0814 Bend

Farm Market

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

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The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

9mm, Ruger P95 S/S, like new, $425. Winchester 94 pre ‘64 30/30, $450. 541-647-8931

Travel/Tickets

Beretta AL 391 Urika Sporting Clays 12 gauge, 30 in. barrel and 6 Briley Spectrum choke tubes, 1000 rounds shot $1200 OBO, 541-771-0301

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Maytag, 541-385-5418

Disneyland (4) 6-day Park Hoppers. Regular $216 each; sell $195 each. 541-419-2753

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Glock 9mm semi-auto pistol, 3 clips, ammo, box, lilke new, $500 OBO. 541-647-8931 GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036. Juniper Rim Game Preserve - Brothers, OR Pheasants (both roosters/hens) & Chukars, all on special! 541-419-3923; 541-419-8963

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Ruger Blackhawk .357 Mag, 6½” $400. Verona SX401S 12 ga, NIB, $550. 541-771-5648

Antiques & Collectibles

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

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Exercise Equipment

Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Labrador pups AKC, chocolate, yellow, hips guaranteed, $150-$450. 1-541-954-1727

Queen size Pillowtop mattress, exc cond, stored in plastic. $200. 503-933-0814, Bend

ParaBody 400 universal style weight machine. Includes Lat bar, leg press, shoulder and bench press. Very good cond. $500. 541-317-8985

Malamute/lab mix puppy for sale, female, black with white markings, 12 weeks old, $100, to loving home 541-923-1180

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

Samsung 52” box big screen, 2006 excellent cond. Must sell, $400. 541-480-2652. WANTED: Reel to reel tape recorder, in excellent cond only, to $75. 541-318-5294

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

541-385-5809 NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP

CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

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WARM CLOTHING d Rain Gear, Boots

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Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

20 LOGS, 8”X20’ perfect for fence or accent, $1 per foot. 541-420-6235 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public . Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Dry Lodgepole For Sale $150 per cord rounds; $170 per cord split. 35 years’ service to Central Oregon. Call 541-480-5601

Snowboards

Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE FIFTH STREET (312-2069)

160 Burton Snowboard, good cond; size 10 boots + bindings. $125 all. 541-388-1533

Questions: Call Ken Boyer, 389-3296, or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

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Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Hay, Grain and Feed Barn stored Alfalfa $9 per bale. In Culver. 541-480-8185

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

341 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Prices Reduced: Quarterhorses, females $300, males & geldings $500, 541-382-7995

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

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Farmers Column

Lost and Found Found around December 20 at the Redmond Airport Terminal Secure Hold area, one Ipod in case and accessories, call to identify. Gail Bloom, Airport Office Assistant, Roberts Field, 541-504-3497. FOUND Diabetes Testing Kit, SE Bend 12/25. Call to identify, 541-390-7368. Found Jack Russell Terrier mix, female 5-8 yrs? Powell Butte Hwy, 12/26. 541-280-5823 HELP YOUR AD TO stand out from the rest! Have the top line in bold print for only $2.00 extra.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Fuel and Wood

Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers. Thank you.

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

Heating and Stoves

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Tractor, Allis Chalmers, diesel, 4X4, loader, rear blade, PTO new tires, $6500 OBO, 541-536-3889,541-420-6215

Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. Volume discounts; delivery available. 541-480-8648.

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Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

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Harman Stove Co. pellet stove model #PP38. Super charger setting & electric blower. Motor recently serviced. Glass front. 0.75-5.5 lbs/hr. Will heat 1500 sq ft. Approved for mobile homes; UL listed. $550. 541.383.8077 strideon@silverstriders.com

The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter:

d

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry pine, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2, Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

Tools

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TV, Stereo and Video

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Building Materials

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

541-322-7253

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

Ad must include price of item

• Receipts should include,

Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

541-389 - 6 6 5 5

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

Chainsaw: Husqvarna 18” like new, $200. 541-383-8528

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

T o a v o i d fr a u d , T h e Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 3 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised must equal $200 or Less • Limit one ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months 541-385-5809 • Fax 541-385-5802

BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

US & Foreign Coin & Currency collections, accum. Pre-1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling flatware. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection too large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

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"Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

Whirlpool washer & dryer, Heavy Duty Xtra lrg capacity, $150. 541-382-0932.

Telescope: Celestron 4½” with 10 and 25mm lens plus sun filter. $200. 541-383-8528

Misc. Items

Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our

Full size pillowtop mattress, exc cond, stored in plastic, $150. 503-933-0814, Bend

541-598-4643.

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Carry concealed in 33 states. Sun. Jan. 16th 8 a.m, Red mond Comfort Suites. Qualify For Your Concealed Hand gun Permit. Oregon & Utah permit classes, $50 for Or egon or Utah, $90 for both. www.PistolCraft.com. Call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS (4867) to Pre-Register.

Remington .22 long rifle, mdl 597 with scope - synthetic stock, brand new with box. Shot 1 set rounds. $200. 541-382-2593.

210 Kittens still available! Cat Res240 cue, Adoption & Foster Team Furniture & Appliances Crafts and Hobbies will be open Fri. 12/31 & Sun. 1/2 from 1-4 PM !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ (closed New Years). Lots of A-1 Washers & Dryers blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein nice cats & kittens, low $125 each. Full Warranty. $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989 adoption fee. Altered, shots, Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s ID chip, more. Visit @ 65480 dead or alive. 541-280-7355. 78th St, Bend, 541-389-8420, Look at: Bendhomes.com 541-598-5488. Also avail. @ Appliances, new & recondifor Complete Listings of foster home, 541-815-7278 tioned, guaranteed. Over- Area Real Estate for Sale See www.craftcats.org stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is grand sire. Deep pedigreed performance/titles, OFA hips & elbows. 541-771-2330 www.royalflushretrievers.com

1 time fired Weatherby brass .224, 60 @ $2.25 each. Call 541-728-1036

WANTED TO BUY

Welsh Corgi, 7 wks, very cute & playful, 1st shot, dewclaws, tail done $350. 541.350-3981

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Computers

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German Shepherd Pups, A K C , White, absolutely gorgeous, born October 1st. $400 OBO. 541-536-6167.

O r e g o n

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Coins & Stamps

German Shepherd pups, 6 wks $350-$450. 541-410-7388 www.megaquest.us

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing

http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

ROTTWEILLER PUPPIES 5 male, 1 female. $400. Won’t last long! 541-777-9392

A v e . ,

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Pug Mix Puppies (3), raised for personal companions, $150 ea. OBO, 541-389-0322 or 541-420-5228. Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537

Frenchie/Pug puppy. Last one. Adorable, smart, stout male. $700. 541-548-0747 or 541-279-3250.

German Shorthair Pointer A K C , champ lines, 2 females, $250. 541-550-9992.

C h a n d l e r

Furniture & Appliances

Dachshunds, AKC, mini’s, (4) females: 1 black & silver; 3 choc Pug Mix Adults (3), spayed/ neutered, for personal com& tan. $375. Pics available. panions only, small re-hom541-420-6044, 541-447-3060 ing fee, 541-389-0322.

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

1 7 7 7

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Meat & Animal Processing LOST 12/24/10 female Blue Heeler mix, 5th St. and Lava Drive LaPine, not wearing a collar but has microchip. name is Patches. 30# 3 years, white and brown spots. (541) 536-5621. (541) -728-4397,( 541) 536-3689. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

4 Black Angus Steers, 1000 lbs. left. Buy it by the 1/4, 1/2 or whole. 1 was butchered last week. 3 will be butchered this week. Fed alfalfa for over 2 mo. and grain for over 2 mo. Great shape. Great tasting meat. 541-382-6983

Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grain fed, no hormones $3.44/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included, please call 541-383-2523.


E2 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training Advertise in 30 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington & Utah. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 1-877-804-5293. (PNDC) Area VII Plumbers JATC MA 7005 will be accepting applications for the plumbing apprenticeship applicant pool list. Please submit request for an application packet to apprenticeshipservices@ gmail.com ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC)

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 30 daily newspaPhlebotomy classes begin Jan pers, six states. 25-word 3rd. Registration now open, classified $525 for a 3-day www.oregonmedicaltraining.com ad. Call (916) 288-6010; 541-343-3100 (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ TRUCK SCHOOL pndc.cfm for the Pacific www.IITR.net Northwest Daily Connection. Redmond Campus (PNDC) Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

Oregon Medical Training PCS

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476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Finance & Business

Maintenance Person Part-time

Production Director - Experienced Production Director needed for The Herald and News, in Klamath Falls, OR. A 16,000 circulation, 6-day community newspaper. For complete job description visit www.heraldandnews.com/cl assifieds Select "Help Wanted".

Sales - NOW HIRING! THR & Associates a multi-national company has hundreds of salaried positions, many that offer bonuses. Local and national positions. Looking for professional, friendly, self motivated individuals. Customer service oriented with sales experience. Many salaries starting at $45,000. To learn more & apply visit: www.thrassociates.com (PNDC)

500

Salary: $10.00 to $12.00/hr., DOE.

Aspen Ridge Retirement Community is seeking a part-time maintenance person to join our team in providing superior services and customer care to our senior population. 476 Must enjoy working with senior citizens, as well as exEmployment hibit proficiency in and rouOpportunities tinely performing a wide variety of building mainteCAREGIVERS NEEDED nance and mechanical work, In-home care agency presto include: minor carpentry, ently has openings for Careplumbing, small appliance givers in Redmond, and 24-hr and equipment repair and caregivers in Bend. Must have troubleshooting, with a maODL/Insurance, and pass jor emphasis on interior criminal background check. painting. Call Kim for more info, 541-923-4041, 9am-6pm, Must be able to pass a criminal Monday-Friday. history background check. Aspen Ridge is a drug-free CRUISE THROUGH Classiworkplace. Please apply in fied when you're in the person to: Aspen Ridge Remarket for a new or used tirement Community. 1010 car. NE Purcell Blvd. Bend, OR.

Delivery Driver/Warehouse Bedmart is currently looking for Delivery Drivers with a clean driving record and ap- Maintenance Supervisor. Salary DOE. Please send repearance. Must be available sume to: Precision Lumber weekends and holidays. Co., 3800 Crates Way, The Apply at 2220 NE Hwy 20, Dalles, OR 97058. in Bend.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Food Service: Quick Service Restaurant, Exp. Required, Independent worker, & capable in all positions including: Cook, counter, prepping. Wage DOE, Box 16303658, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Glazier -- Residential: Must have 5 years experience & clean driving record, Shower doors & mirrors a plus. Pay DOE. Call 541-382-2500.

Night Auditor

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

The Ranch is accepting applications for Night Auditors. Accounting background, computer skills, 10-key and basic math computation preferred. This dependable individual must be enthusiastic, customer service oriented, with a positive attitude . Duties include reconciling department ledgers and running daily reports. May be required to perform front desk duties including taking reservations and checking people in/out of the Ranch. Benefits include swimming, golf, food and merchandise discounts. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

CAUTION

Sales

ATTENTION WORK PART TIME HOURS, FULL TIME PAY

No Experience Necessary No Car, No Problem, Only 30 Hours Per Week PM Shifts & Weekends Available

The Bulletin

Call Right Now 541-306-6346

is your Employment Marketplace Call

Independent Contractor

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Big Country RV, Central Oregon’s largest RV dealer, seeks candidates for the following openings:

• RV Sales Now expanding our RV Sales team! Product & sales training provided. Progressive commission plan to 35%, bonus plan, vac pay & benefits. Unlimited earning potential.

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• RV Sales Manager Industry experience required. Full-time, weekends required. Exceptional pay and benefits. For consideration, please email your resume to bcrvinfo@yahoo.com Sales

NEED A JOB? If You Can Answer YES To These Questions, WE WANT YOU 1. Do you talk too much? 2. Do you like to have fun? 3. Do you want to make a lot of $$? 4. Are you available Wed.-Fri., 4pm-9pm & all day Sat. & Sun.?

Work part time with full time pay! DON'T LAG, CALL NOW! 541-306-6346 Independent Contractor

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com

Indoor Moving Sale 62701 Larkview Rd off Eagle & Oakview, Fri-Sat, 10:30-3. Furn, baby items, VHS, more!

MOVING SALE: leather couch, & chair set, ping-pong table brand new fridge, tables & chairs, drafting table, secretary. Low prices! Sun. Jan. 2, 9-4. 21476 Hyde Lane.

286

Sales Northeast Bend

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

Operate Your Own Business

541-385-5809 292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

&

Call Today &

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

SOFTWARE - Embedded Firmware & Windows Software Engineer: 2 full-time positions with local high-tech manufacturer of over 20 years. BS in Computer Science, Computer Engineering or Electrical Engineering; 5+ years experience. Programming in C for embedded processors, C++ and MFC for Windows applications. Competitive Salary + benefits. Resume to: jobs@DENTInstruments.com

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

System Administrator

H Supplement Your Income H

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

• RV F&I Manager

Independent Contractor

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend

507

Real Estate Contracts

2 years’ industry experience required. Full-time; Saturdays required. Exceptional pay and benefits.

Wanna Make Bank??? AND HAVE FUN?

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

541-385-5809

SALES / FINANCE

We are looking for a System Administrator to join our team of talented technicians. This is an ideal job for someone with strong technical aptitude and a degree of server experience who enjoys working in a team atmosphere. Who are we? We are a large family-owned newspaper chain with an established commitment to our customers and employees. Well placed in a beautiful town full of outdoor and recreational opportunities, we offer a work environment that is enjoyable and challenging. Responsibilities: Implement and maintain systems running on Linux/UNIX, Mac, and Windows workstations and servers, Experience in cloud hosting a plus. Manage web, file, storage, DNS, DB & version control servers. Will respond to helpdesk support requests from end users. Work on project-related tasks to deploy new systems or conduct maintenance. Handle day-to-day data backup and recovery practices. Support 802.11 networks including rollout, access control, security assessment, intrusion detention, packet capturing, and space planning. Continually investigate new technology for securing hosts on the network and monitoring activity. Participate in software development/design tasks. Participate in an on-call rotation after hours and weekends. Must be able to routinely lift 50 pounds or more. Non-Technical: We're a social bunch at Western Communications and like to keep work fun and lighthearted. The ideal applicant is a good communicator, enjoys a challenge and likes to laugh. Please send resume to resume@bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 1, 2011 E3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Boats & RV’s

865

870

880

882

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

800

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

860

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Motorcycles And Accessories CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161 541-788-3896

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

875

Watercraft

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

881

Travel Trailers

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $13,900 or take over payments, 541-390-2504

870

Boats & Accessories Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

The Bulletin Classiieds

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 541-322-7253

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Excavating

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling •Decks •Window/Door Re placement •Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

3 slides, washer and dryer, new A/C. Very nice & livable! $12,500. 541-923-7351.

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Canopies and Campers

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Classic Autos C-10

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Christmas Tree Delivery EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

933

DODGE RAM 1990 3500, excellent condition, 12,000 miles, $5600. 541-318-4835.

Dodge Ram 2001, short bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354. FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $17,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

Pickups ***

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4000. 541-706-1568

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8395 541-598-5111.

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $14,999 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Ford F250 1986, 4x4, X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686 Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

Now you can add a full-color photo to your Bulletin classified ad starting at only $15.00 per week, when you order your ad online. To place your Bulletin ad with a photo, visit www.bendbulletin.com, click on “Place an ad” and follow these easy steps: 1.

Pick a category (for example - pets or transportation) and choose your ad package.

2.

Write your ad and upload your digital photo.

3.

Create your account with any major credit card. All ads appear in both print and online.

Masonry

Please allow 24 hours for photo processing before your ad appears in print and online.

Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/410-6945

Snow Removal

541-390-1466

d SNOW REMOVAL! d

Same Day Response

d LARGE OR SMALL, d WE DO IT ALL! 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 d www.bblandscape.com d

Tile, Ceramic

Find It in

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3750 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Show Your Stuff.

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Multiple Options • Interior • Exterior • Landscape

call

Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 2000, full size, Reg cab w/ long bed, white, V6, 4.3L, 20 mpg, auto trans, ABS, AC, dual airbags, tow pkg, runs & drives excellent, maint’d extremely well; non-smoker. Recent brks, bearing, tune- up, tires, trans & coolant flush. 183K mi. $4700 obo. 541-633-6953

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Holiday Lighting

4-dr., complete, OBO, trades, please 541-420-5453.

Chevy Silverado 1500 1988, 4x4, step side, tow pkg., low mi. at 98K, A/C, great tries, brakes, new rear end, runs extra super, $3250 OBO, 541-548-7396

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

Snow Removal

Pickup

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

$15,000 VW Super Beetle 1974

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phe- (4) Studded Snows 215/45R17, nomenal condition. $17,500. like new, $375. (were $700 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins new). 503-747-9170 Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 932 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160 Antique and

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

1957,

14X6 UTILITY TRAILER $1200. Call Jimmy, 541-771-0789

4 Michelin Studless ice & snow, used 1 season, 225/60/R16, $175 cash. 541-318-8668

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof tops • De-icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

Wagon

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, Automotive Parts, original owner, V8, autoService and Accessories matic, great shape, $9000

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

nets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Chevy

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425.

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

Utility Trailers

931 Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabi-

925

885

DUTCHMAN 27’ 5th wheel 1998, slide-out, gen. & more. $7750. 541-504-9651. Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

882

Fifth Wheels

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $2950. 541-548-3628

clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

916

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

The Bulletin

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

MONTANA 2000 36’

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

S0305 5X10 kk

Adult Care

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $40,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

RENT-A-DAUGHTER Connecting caregivers with clients. Caregivers avail. 4 hours $45. Call office for scheduling. 541-350-7391.

900

Trucks and Heavy Equipment cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., reduced to $3000, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

933

Pickups

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

880

Motorhomes

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010, Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

Autos & Transportation

To place your photo ad, visit us online at www.bendbulletin.com or call with questions, 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com


E4 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

933

935

975

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

975

975

975

975

975

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Special Offer

Special Offer

Pontiac G6 2 Dr., Coupe 2006

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Pontiac Torrent SUV AWD 2008

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Mercedes AMG, Formula One V-12. Very Rare. Only 99k miles. Ultimate in safety, luxury & performance. Cost $135,000 to fully hand-build. Just $13,500. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

32K Miles! Vin #171092

Now Only $11,950

HYUNDAI

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl, 5-spd., 4x4, good cond, price reduced to $7950, 541-593-4437.

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Mercedes S 430 - 4Matic, 2003, All wheel drive, silver, loaded & pampered. Exc in snow! $15,400. 541-390-3596

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

37K Miles! Vin #110246

Now Only $15,988

366

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

PORSCHE CARRERA 4S 2003 - Wide body, 6

Smolich Auto Mall

speed, 63,000 miles, all wheel drive, no adverse history, new tires. Seal gray with light gray leather interior. $32,950. 503-351-3976

Special Offer

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

935

Sport Utility Vehicles CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Smolich Auto Mall

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Audi A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $9300. 541-420-9478

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Pontiac G6 4 Dr., 2006 86K Miles! Vin #110246

Now Only $7,999 (photo for illustration use only)

Special Offer

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com

541-322-7253

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Special Offer

Special Offer

541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Pontiac Grand Am 2004 FWD

31K Miles!! VIN #708432

$2,995

Now Only $18,577

Chevy HHR LT 2006

Super Nice! 71K Miles! VIN #008926

VIN #644129

Now Only $16,977

Now Only $9,999

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366 Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Smolich Auto Mall

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Special Offer

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica AWD, leather, video sys, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi, $13,950. 541-382-3666

Suzuki Grand Vitara 4X4 2010

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

Navigaion, alloys & more! 1K Miles! Vin #100784

Smolich Auto Mall

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 53K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $11,680. Please call 541-419-4018. Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Special Offer NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

Pontiac Grand Prix 2008 63K Miles! Vin #148687

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

Pontiac Firebird 1998, exc cond, no wrecks. T-top, V6, loaded, 22/29 mpg (reg gas). $4995. 541-475-3984

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Subaru Forrester 4X4 2006

3.4L V-6 4 door, all power, 158k hwy miles. Excellent condition. 541-923-8627

Audi TT Quattro 2005

Smolich Auto Mall

Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $13,995 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

Now Only $11,725

SUBARUS!!!

NISSAN

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Special Offer

Special Offer

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Preliminary Determination for Water Right Transfer T-10979 T-10979 filed by BILL ROATS, 61147 HAMILTON LANE, BEND OR 97702, proposes a change in points of appropriation, adThe Bulletin ditional points of appropriarecommends extra caution tion and a change in place of when purchasing products use under Certificates 86042 or services from out of the and 86043. Certificate 86042 area. Sending cash, checks, allows the use of 0.66 CUBIC or credit information may FOOT PER SECOND (CFS) be subjected to F R A U D. (priority date MARCH 23, 1961) from Well #1 in Sec. For more information about 17, T 18 S, R 12 E, W.M. (Dean advertiser, you may call schutes Basin) for GROUP the Oregon State Attorney DOMESTIC and SUPPLEMENGeneral’s Office Consumer TAL IRRIGATION in Sees. 7, Protection hotline at 8, 9, 17 and 18. Certificate 1-877-877-9392. 86043 allows the use of 0.56 CFS (priority date DECEMBER 22, 1965) from Well #2 in Sec. 17, T 18 S, R 12 E, W.M. (Deschutes Basin) for FIND IT! GROUP DOMESTIC and IRBUY IT! RIGATION in Sec. 7, 8, 9, 17 and 18. The applicant proSELL IT! poses to move the points of The Bulletin Classiieds appropriation to Well #10 and add 3 additional points of appropriation approxiSmolich mately 2.5 miles southwest in Sees. 7, 18 and 30, T 18 S, Auto Mall R 12 E, W.M. and to change Special Offer the place of use to Sees. 7, 8, 9, 16, 17 and 18. The Water Resources Department has concluded that the proposed transfer appears to be consistent with the requirements of ORS Chapter 540 and OAR 690-380-5000. Any person may file, jointly or Toyota Corolla severally, with the Department a protest or standing LE 2008 statement within 30 days 54K Miles! after the date of final publiVin #946661 cation of notice in the Now Only $9,999 Department's weekly notice or of this newspaper notice, whichever is later. A protest form and additional information on filing protests may be HYUNDAI obtained by calling (503) smolichmotors.com 986-0883. The last date of 541-749-4025 • DLR 366 newspaper publication is [DATE OF LAST PUBLICATION]. If no protests are filed, the Department will issue a final order consistent with the preliminary determination.

541-385-5809

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

Now Only $23,755

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

366

Pontiac G5 2009

Buick LeSabre 2004, Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $6000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

37K Miles! Vin #146443

Now Only $9,999

Smolich Auto Mall

smolichmotors.com

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

541-389-1178 • DLR

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

Special Offer

Ford Excursion AWD 2004 Eddie Bauer Trim, Loaded! Premium DVD, nav., & More! VIN #A37566

Now Only $22,988

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

FORD EXPLORER 1992 READY FOR SNOW! All Wheel Drive! 5 spd, loaded with all power equipment, sound system. All weather tires. Runs and drives good, Only $1800. 909-570-7067.

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

940

Vans 1998 Dodge Ram Wagon SE 2500, Mark III conversion, 100k miles, 4 captains chairs, rear fold-down bed, hitch, $4000 and worth it! Travel in luxury. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

Full power options & Alloys. 11K Miles! Vin #100350

Now Only $8,345

366

Now Only $17,988

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS Jane E. Meissner-Ford has been appointed Personal Representative of the Estate of Michael Vincent Ford, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, Deschutes County, under case number 10-PB-0144-SF. All persons having a claim against the estate must present the claim within four months of the first publication date of this notice to BRYANT, LOVLIEN & JARVIS, PC at 591 SW Mill View Way, Bend, OR 97702, Attn.: Melissa P. Lande, or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the administrator or the following-named attorney for the administrator. Date of first publication: December 25, 2010. MELISSA P. LANDE BRYANT, LOVLIEN & JARVIS, PC 591 SW MILL VIEW WAY BEND, OR 97702

Carrera Motors

H O LID AY C L E A R A NC E E V E NT

*** Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

97K Miles! Vin #160909

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

CHECK YOUR AD Toyota RAV 4 Ltd. 2007 80K miles, moonroof, tow pkg, great condition! $13,750. 541-848-7876

Suzuki Kizashi 4X4 2010

NISSAN

NISSAN

Ford Excursion 4x4 2000. Nice Red, like new, only 68k, seats 9. Just $16,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Pontiac Grand Prix GTP 2005

1000

Legal Notices

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

385-5809 Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

The Bulletin Classified ***

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Lexus IS250 2007 25K Miles! Vin #023074 CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Now Only $22,988

HYUNDAI

All 2010 Volkswagen Jetta Sedans, including TDi models, qualify for 0% financing up to 60 months on approved credit.

All new 2010 MY Volkswagen Vehicles will be sold at factory invoice price, plus tax, title and documentation fees.

(Diesel Jetta Sedans are eligible for a $650 federal tax credit if purchased by 12/31/2010. Please consult your tax professional for complete information)

(Please visit dealership for information on specific vehicles, or call a VW Specialist for further information)

All 2010 Volkswagen Routans qualify for 0% financing up to 72 months on approved credit.

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Honda Ridgeline 4X4 2008 29K Miles!! VIN #531969

Now Only $22,588 Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

541-385-5809

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

Infinity QX4 1998, luxury SUV 4WD, loaded, leather, 80K miles, $7500. CORRECTED PHONE # = 541-815-4052

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

M O T O R S Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

1 0 4 5 S E 3 r d S t . | B e n d | 5 4 1 - 3 8 2 - 1 7 11 | c a r r e r a m o t o r s . c o m


For homes online

THE BULLETIN

|

S AT U R D AY, J A N U A R Y 1, 2 0 11

|

www.bendhomes.com

A D V E R T IS IN G S E C T I O N F

Cascade View, RV Parking & 1/3 Acre

Hayden Homes Newest Community

A must-see! Located in SE Bend, this brand new, single level, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2086 sq. ft. custom home with designer inishes offers plenty of room with 1/3 acre, 3-car garage, workshop, RV parking and full RV hookup. Priced at $379,900, this move-in ready home has Craftsman features plus plenty of natural lighting and Cascade views. From Reed Mkt., south on 15th, left on Ferguson, right on Ladera, left on Sky Harbour and right on Sedonia. For more, call Mike Gregory, Broker, at (541) 749-0830.

RE/MAX KEY PROPERTIES (541) 728-0033 / www.remax.com

Welcome to Canyon Breeze, the newest community by Hayden Homes. Located in Southwest Bend, Canyon Breeze has a variety of well-appointed home plans available starting at only $209,990. Get your New Year off to a fantastic start in a new Hayden Home! For more information visit our model home in neighboring Aspen Rim or find us on the web at www.hayden-homes.com for more information. Directions: south on parkway, west on Powers Road, south on Brookswood Blvd., west on Montrose Pass.

CANYON BREEZE — SW BEND WWW.HAYDEN-HOMES. COM 541-306-3085

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REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT

by Ruben Garmyn, co-owner/broker, Prudential High Desert Realty In our current economic climate, everyone benefits from the infusion of investment dollars into the real estate market. Investors today are finding unbeatable deals on properties at a fraction of their previous price. But there’s more to investing than finding property at a low price. Today’s market conditions require in-depth understanding. Real estate agents who are Certified Investor Agent Specialists (CIAS) have been educated and have the experience to help you meet your real estate investment goals and help you avoid making the following common mistakes.

lating is that investing relies on research and number crunching. Speculation relies on gut feelings.

Over Leveraging While leverage is a highly valuable tool in real estate investment, not knowing the difference between positive leverage and negative leverage can mean making payments on an investment rather than getting paid by an investment. Calculating the debt service coverage ratio (DSCR) for an investment is an important method of determining whether or not an investment will earn money or cost money. A CIAS can help explain DSCR and what you need to be looking out for to avoid negative leverage

Following your gut and not your head

Thinking real estate is a way to get rich quick

Many investors fall into the trap of buying an investment property the same way they’d buy their home — using emotion instead of relying on numbers. It is important for investors to remember that every home is the right home for somebody, even if it isn’t for them. The difference between investing and specu-

From 2002 to 2006, the residential real estate market in Central Oregon experienced rapid appreciation which was subsequently lost in the years following. Real estate appreciation over time has been slow but steady and offers great rewards to the patient investor who does the research and works to ensure property ap-

preciation. In fact, real estate investment was greater than the S&P 500 in appreciation over the past 30 years — even factoring in the recent financial crisis. Wise real estate investors know there are no short cuts and are willing to put in the time and work to ensure good returns on properties. Get-rich-quick schemes are just that: schemes. CIAS-designated agents can help you set reasonable expectations through their knowledge and expertise, and can assist you in your wealth-building strategy.

Not understanding tax benefits and liabilities Among the key advantages of real estate as an investment are the tax benefits. Understanding how to deduct for depreciation and passive activity loss can greatly increase the cash flow (or money coming in) from a property. Opportunities exist to defer capital gains taxes which are unique to real estate such as the 1031 exchange. But benefits are only part of the story. Wise investors understand depreciation recapture and how to minimize taxes upon the sale of a property. Be sure to consult

a qualified accountant for tax advice regarding real estate investment.

Investing without a clear goal Simply buying a property because it’s a good deal can be dangerous. Shifts in market conditions, unexpected vacancy or extended holding costs can quickly turn a profitable property into a money pit. Investors should always have a clear goal for a property including an understanding of a specific cap rate, cash flow and expected return on investment. Having an exit strategy is also wise. Each CIAS understands strategies for different investment goals and can help guide you to what is best for your situation. In most cases, a real estate agent’s commission is covered by the property seller, so if you are considering purchasing an investment property, you can benefit from the specialized training and guidance of a CIAS-designated agent at no cost.

A Certified Investor Agent Specialist™ (CIAS) is a real estate professional specifically trained to find, create and close with residential real estate investors. Through comprehensive education and experience, a CIAS has gained the knowledge and tools to streamline the process of real estate investment and help increase returns for investor clients.

CIAS-designated Agents Help Real Estate Investors Navigate: • Investment Strategies • Self-directed IRAs • 1031 Exchange

• Leverage Options • Key Calculations • Return-on-Investment

• Capitalization Rate • Average Returns • Cash Flow

And much more! Subscribe to our investor list by sending a message to CustomerService@rgsold.com and receive your free report, e-mail tips and an invitation to our next FREE Investor Seminar.

Don’t wait! Contact us today, and start unlocking a world of real estate wealth! High Desert Realty

RUBEN GARMYN, CIAS, CDPE, CRS, ABR, GRI, e-PRO, Principal Broker, Owner

541-312-9449 101 NE Greenwood Ave Suite 100 | Bend, OR 97701 | www.CIAS.com/investors

REALTOR


F2 Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 632

636

642

648

650

656

671

Apt./Multiplex General

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

60171 Agate

Country Quiet, 6 mi. SE. of Bend, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, wood fireplace, large yard, no pets/ smoking, $550/mo.+dep., avail. now, 541-317-8744.

FIRST MONTH HALF-OFF! 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex. NEW CARPET & PAINT THROUGHOUT! W/D included. No smoking. No Pets. 1yr. lease. $795/mo. + $945 sec. 20076 Beth. 541-382-3813

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space 682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 630

Rentals

600

Rooms for Rent STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631 604

Storage Rentals

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

1042 NE Rambling Ln. #2 2 bdrm, all appliances +micro, w/d hook-up, gas heat/ fireplace, garage, landscaping included, small pet ok. $695 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

20940 Royal Oak Circl. Unit B 1 bdrm/ 1 bath attached apt. Furnished or unfurnished avail. kitchen, private ent. all utlts pd. no pets. $595+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

2508 NE Conners "C" 2 bdrm, 1½ bath, all appliances, utility rm., 1300 sq. ft., garage, w/s paid. $695 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

62045 NE Nates Place 3 bedroom 2.5 bath four-plex with garage, full laundry room with full size washer and dryer. Easy access to Greenwood and 27th. New carpet and paint. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

854 NE Hidden Valley #1 & #2 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, all appliances + W/D, gas heat, garage, w/s/g paid, small pet OK. $695. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

First Month’s Rent Free 130 NE 6th 1-2 bdrm/ 1 bath, W/S/G paid, onsite laundry, no pets, $450-$525+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 ** Pick your Special **

2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co. Secure 10x20 Storage, in 2 Bdrm townhouse, 2.5 bath, office, fenced yard w/deck, SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr garage. 1244 “B” NE Dawaccess, $95/month, Call son. $750 dep. $775/mo., $99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available Rob, 541-410-4255. W/S/G paid, pets possible. 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. 541-617-8643,541-598-4932 W/D hookups, patios or decks, 605

Roommate Wanted Share 3 Bdrm 2 bath Prineville home. $350/mo + ½ electricity; $200 dep. Everything else paid including satellite TV. Pets/smokers OK upon approval. 541-233-6615 Share House in DRW, $400/mo incl. utils, $200 dep., 541-420-5546.

627

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges

Steens Mountain Home Lodgings See Bend Craigslist for more info, 541-589-1982.

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily A Westside Condo at Fireside Lodge, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, $595/mo. Wood stove, W/S/G paid. W/D hookup 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755. Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Lovely 2 bdrm, private patio, small, quiet complex, W/S/G paid, no smoking, $525+ dep, 1000 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. Call 541-633-7533.

1544 NW Juniper Ave.

2960 SW 24th Ct.

$625 – 2 Bdrm ground floor apt with large rooms, fireplace, patio, off street parking. Full sized W/D, new carpet. Very near COCC. Easy access to Newport and downtown. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558

2 bdrm, 2 bath, all appl., gas heat, w/d hookup, fireplace, fenced yard, garage. $625. 541-382-7727

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt. Nice, quiet 2 bdrm, new windows, W/G/S & cable paid, laundry on-site, cat OK, $575/mo, $500 dep. Call 541-389-9867; 541-383-2430

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad TERREBONNE $995 4/2.5 Move in special! $500 off first month w/1 yr lease, views, fireplace, rv area, dbl garage 1425 Majestic Rock Dr. CROOKED RIVER RANCH $675 2/2, Views! 1 Acre, single garage w/ opener, w/d hookups, deck, fenced 8797 Sand Ridge Rd.

541-923-8222 www.MarrManagement.com

1 bdrm. apt. fully furnished in fine 50s style. 1546 NW 1st St., $780 + $680 dep. Nice pets welcomed. 541-382-0117

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

River & Mountain Views! 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188.

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Small studio close to downtown and Old Mill. $450 mo., dep. $425, all util. paid. no pets. 541-330-9769 or 541-480-7870. Westside Townhouse 2 bdrm, 1½ bath, water and garbage removal included. No pets. $575 mo. 541-480-2092.

Westside Village Apts. 1459 NW Albany d 1 bdrm $495 d d 3 bdrm $610 d Coin-op laundry. W/S/G paid, cat or small dog OK with dep. 541-382-7727 or 388-3113.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 330 SE 15th St. #9 Close to schools & shopping 1 bdrm, appliances, on-site coin-op laundry, carport, w/s/g paid. $465. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Country Terrace 61550 Brosterhous Rd. 1 Bdrm $425 • 2 Bdrm $495 All appliances, storage, on-site coin-op laundry BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-7727

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

STONE CREEK APARTMENTS 2 bdrm., 2 bath apartments W/D included, gas fireplaces 339 SE Reed Met. Rd., Bend Call about Move-In Specials 541-312-4222

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 1264 Silverlake Blvd. #200 Old Mill 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, all appliances + w/d, gas heat/fireplace, 1236 sq. ft., garage. W/S paid, cat ok. $795. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Enjoy living at 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $525 mo. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133;541-420-0133

1225 NW Stannium

642

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

2Bdrm 1bath, $540 mo. +$500 dep. W/D hkup, dishwasher, garage, W/S/G pd. Fenced yard, close to schools/shopping. 1-503-757-1949 2 bedroom, 2 bath next to park, Appliances avail. including big screen TV! 3 units available. $695-$750 month. 541-280-7781.

LIVE ON THE RIVER WALK DOWNTOWN

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, all appliances, w/d hookup, gas fireplace, w/s/g paid, garage, cat OK. $695. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

RIVER FALLS APARTMENTS

Happy holidays! Enjoy living at 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $525 mo. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133 541-420-0133

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When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1104 NW 7th St., #22 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $425 No credit checks. 1st & last only. Available now. Please call 541-788-3480.

1124 NE Ulysses

$595 2/2, single garage w/opener, w/d hookups, gas forced air heat, yard maint 1913 NW Elm Ave. $625 3/2 new paint! w/d hookup, gas stove, w/s/g paid, single garage 1222 SW 18th St. $675 2/2, single garage w/ opener, forced air, wsg pd, gas fireplace, fenced, yard maint. 1113 SW 29th St.

MOVE IN SPECIAL $200 off first month 3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appl., w/d hookup, fenced yard, extra storage, garage, pet considered. $795. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

1435 NE Boston 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, private yard, gas frplce, all kitchen appl incld small pet neg. $895+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

541-923-8222

1743 NE Diablo

www.MarrManagement.com ASK ABOUT OUR New Year Special! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

$900 – 3 bedroom 2 bath, newly remodeled, new carpet, linoleum & fresh paint; large yard and garage. Heaters and wood stove. Available soon! ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558

Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 managed by

GSL Properties DUPLEX SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 bath, garage w/opener. 1300 sq ft, w/d hkup, fenced yard, deck, w/s/g pd. $700 mo + dep. 541-604-0338

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Like New Duplex. Nice neighborhood. 2 Bdrm 2 bath, 1-car garage, fenced, central heat & AC. Fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825.

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

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Houses for Rent General BEND RENTALS • Starting at $450. Furnished also avail. For virtual tours & pics apm@riousa.com 541-385-0844

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage, bonus room, deck, fridge, gas stove, new paint, carpet & vinyl. $975/mo. Pets neg. Mike 541-408-8330. CLEAN 2 bdrm/1bath, new carpets, hardwood floors, gas heat & water, finished garage, storage shed, $775 mo. See at 1230 NE Viking. Clean 3 Bdrm 2 Bath, new paint/carpet, 1262 sq ft, $900/mo. Near hosp; must see! No pets/smoking. 3023 NE Byers Ct. 541-410-0794

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

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Houses for Rent NW Bend Country Home! 3 bdrm 3 bath 3500+ sq. ft. home, all appliances, family room, office, triple garage, 2 woodstoves, sunroom, lrg. utility room including w/d, pantry, landscaping incl, pet OK. $3000 mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

A Newly Remodeled 1+1, vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors, small yard, w/fruit trees, dog area/garden, $750 util. incl. 541-350-3110.

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Houses for Rent SE Bend 1/1 cottage, woodstove, garage, deck, yard w/trees, private end of cul-de-sac, Bear Creek/15th. Avail. now. $650 1st/last/dep. 541-330-0053

20371 Rocca Way 3 bdrm, 2½ bath, 1675 sq. ft. gas fireplace, fenced yard, pets ok! $950 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

21183 Copperfield Ave $995 - 3 Bdrm 2 bath single story home with large yard, 2-car garage, full size laundry, in great SE neighborhood. Easy access to 27th. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558

New 3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances + micro, utility rm., dbl. garage, deck, pet cons. $895. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

ROMAINE VILLAGE MOBILES 61004 Chuckanut. 1900 sq.ft. 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 1/2 acre, $850. Pet OK. Call Jim, 541-388-3209.

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Houses for Rent Redmond 1018 NW Birch Ave. 2 bdrm/ 1 bath, 720 sq ft. house,located on large lot, close to dwntwn. Pets neg. $550+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 1 Bdrm, 1 bath, 547 1/2 NW 7th, $550; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 626 1/2 SW 8th, $595; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 135 NW 10th St., $650, 541-815-1709, CopperDog PM. 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, Summerfield location, near 97, fresh interior paint, new Pergo, fully fenced. 1st & dep., $850. 503-997-7870. 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Adorable duplex in Canyon Rim Village, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. all appl., includes gardener. Reduced to $749/mo. 541-408-0877. Adorable duplex in Canyon Rim Village, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. all appl., includes gardener. Reduced to $749/mo. 541-408-0877.

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

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429 SE Roosevelt

Houses for Rent Sunriver

$795 – 3 Bdrm 2 Bath single story with yard, newer carpet. Cute little place, easy access to everything. Off street parking, full size W/D, lots of sunlight. Ready to go! ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

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Houses for Rent SW Bend $1000 Mo. Newer immaculate 3/2.5, 1560 sq.ft., dbl. garage 1st & last, pet neg. 19827 Powers Road. 503-363-9264,503-569-3518

19584 Manzanita ½ off first month 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1152 sq. ft., w/d hookup, carport, storage, 1 acre lot that backs up to canal. $575 mo. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

2/2+den, mfd. home, large lot, fenced yard, W/D hookup, shop/storage building, RV parking on site, forced air heat pump, no smoking, pet neg, 60918 Alpine Dr, $750 +$750 dep., 541-389-0209.

A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family room, new paint, private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $795. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803. VILLAGE PROPERTIES Sunriver, Three Rivers, La Pine. Great Selection. Prices range from $425 - $2000/mo. View our full inventory online at Village-Properties.com 1-866-931-1061

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Houses for Rent La Pine

On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

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Commercial for Rent/Lease 4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & warehouse. 15¢/sq ft for 1st 6 mos., + $300 cleaning dep. Avail Jan 15. 541-480-9041

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft 827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft 827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent 335 NE Greenwood Ave. Prime retail/office space, Greenwood frontage, 1147 sq. ft., ample parking, includes w/s. $1200 mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

347 NE Greenwood Ave. 400 sq. ft. office space, private entrance & restroom, 3 small 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1500 sq.ft. on offices + reception area, 1.1 acre, attached & detached ample parking, includes wagarage, huge dog run, heat ter/sewer/ electric. $500! pump, A/C, dishwasher, fridge, 541-382-7727 micro, W/D, secluded, quiet, BEND PROPERTY $900, refs, credit, background MANAGEMENT checks req., 541-815-9893. www.bendpropertymanagement.com

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Houses for Rent Furnished

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

RIVERFRONT: walls of windows with amazing 180 degree river view with dock, canoe, piano, bikes, covered BBQ, $1250. 541-593-1414

Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Real Estate For Sale

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Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

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Real Estate Wanted Cash For West Side Homes: Fast Closings Call Pat Kelley, Kelley Realty 541-382-3099

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Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale Opportunity Knocks! 3.12 acre RV Park and support improvements along the Crooked River Canyon Gorge, within the community of Crooked River Ranch. 350 sq. ft. wood-frame building includes office and (2) multifixture restrooms (includes shower). Amenities within the complex consist of a 18-hole golf course, RV park, clubhouse, swimming pool, community store & postal station, fire dept, ambulance, public safety, restaurants, salons and overnight stay accommodations. $200,000. (Possible owner terms.) MLS#201009635 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

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Multiplexes for Sale 13 Units (Duplexes & Triplexes) All units 3 Bdrm, 1.5 bath, townhouse style, living downstairs, bedrooms upstairs. Ad #92612. $799,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

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Homes for Sale $114,900 1728 sq. ft. 1.19 acres. Great private setting property. MLS#201003041 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $119,500. 3 bdrm, 2 bath MLS#201005642 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $124,740. 4 Bdrm, 1.75 bath on 1 acre. MLS#201009519 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 1, 2011 F3

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Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

$125,000. Brand new townhouse with fenced yard and to many amenities to list! MLS#2909950 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

$275,000 2 bdrm, on 14+ acres MLS#201004860 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

Custom 1682 Sq. Ft. Home! 1.52 acre lot boasts this beautiful 3 bed, 2 bath home, complete with den and sewing/craft room. Large living room with propane stove, solar hot water, heat pump, sunroom and lots of storage in the oversized garage and 16x25 shop, complete with compressor, hoist, overhead door & 220 power. $224,900. MLS#2712181 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Kings Forest. 4 Bedroom, 4 bath in 3660 sq. ft. on a 36,336 sq. ft. lot. Many wonderful features. Chef’s kitchen with maple cabinets, granite countertops, double ovens and much more. Slider off family room. Traditional dining room and formal living room, office, huge laundry, mud/work room, solid panel doors and maple hardwood flooring. Built-in desks, bookshelves, window seats in bedrooms. Large master bedroom and bathroom. Large weight & storage rooms. RV parking, kids play apparatus, tree house. Plenty of room for kids, pets and toys plus a triple garage. $425,000. MLS#2906169 or visit johnlscott.com/13379 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

$129,000 3 bdrm, 2 bath MLS#201009503 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

$275,000 4 bdrm, 2.5 bath MLS#201004754 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

$129,000 3 bdrm, 3 bath MLS#201004065 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $129,000 4 bdrm, 2.5 bath. MLS#201008443 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 13174 SW Chipmonk Rd., Crooked River Ranch. 1400 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 1 bath home on 5 acres. Property is completely fenced & gated. Hook-up. $140,000 MLS# 201009085 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 $149,000 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1+ acre. MLS#20100813 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $154,900 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath MLS#201004272 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $154,900 3 bdrm, 2 bath. MLS#201009021 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $159,900 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath MLS#201004271 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

$279,900 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2383 sq. ft. MLS#201007542 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $284,900 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath MLS#201007771 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $35,900 2 bdrm, 1 bath MLS#201002495 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $45,900 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. MLS#201008067 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $49,900 2 bdrm, 1 bath MLS#201009284 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

$164,900 2 bdrm, 2 bath MLS#201004056 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

$59,900 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. MLS#201008043 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

$179,900 4 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2+ acres. MLS#201009070 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

$69,000 3 bdrm, 1 bath MLS#201006639 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

$179,900. Incredible views and large home with new upgrades and located on 1.04 acres. MLS#2811654 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

7227 NW Rainbow Rd., Crooked River Ranch. 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, 1392 sq. ft. 2 story on 4.88 acres. New oak hardwood & tile floors. Large deck with hot tub. $219,900 MLS# 201008996 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

$217,305 3 bdrm, 2 bath MLS#201009468 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $225,000 3 bdrm, 3 bath, 2+ acres MLS#2910110 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

8264 SW Shad Rd., Crooked River Ranch. Park like setting, 1654 sq. ft. home on 2 lots totaling 2 acres. Attached 2-car garage plus a 24 x 36 shop. Wonderful mountain views. $184,000 MLS# 201010094 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

$25,000. Land with power, water already present. .58-acre. MLS#201000293 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

$89,900 3 bdrm, 2 bath. MLS#201008044 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Cascade mountain views. 1 Bdrm, 1 bath in 884 sq.ft. on 2.07 acres. Super country location with peace & quiet & small cottage that is so cute. Irrigated pasture has had loving care. A big barn, shop, office awaits you with a loft fun room for parties, pool, ping pong. Easy to show. $250,000 MLS#2909664 or visit johnlscott. com/56207 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Charming retreat located in Woodside Ranch. 2 Bdrm + den (potential 3rd bdrm), 2 bath in 1408 sq.ft. on .78 acre. Beautiful flag stone hearth in living room ready for wood or gas stove. Kitchen has tile floor, counters & back splash plus Whirlpool Estate appliances in silvertone. Garage has huge bank of cabinets. Home completely refurbished. Nestled in the trees w/easy care natural landscaping & a tree house too. Tall vaulted ceilings, beams, natural wood & stone accents. Leaded beveled glass in living room & foyer. Newer 30 yr roof & ext paint. $275,000. MLS#2711853 or visit johnlscott.com/66140 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

To place an ad, call 541-385-5809

Historic farm home. 3 Bedroom, 1 bath in 1119 sq. ft. on 32.5 acres with 23 acres of COI irrigation has seen loving family life inside its walls. Could be lived in while you build your dream home or could be a modest home for a small family as is. Close to town, yet has that country feel, including mature barnyard/homestead trees. $498,000. MLS#2809587 or visit johnlscott.com/87329 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Hunters Circle. 3 Bedroom, 1.5 bath on 1/4 acre lot with new trees, plants and fences2007-2009. New roof in 2009, shed in 2008, water heater, interior paint, and laminate in 2007, kitchen counters and backsplash in 2008, half bath in 2008, light fixtures in 2008, washing machine in 2009. Please visit this home. $127,500. MLS#201005148 or visit johnlscott. com/89946 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Ideal for large, foster or home school families. Room for Horses with Panoramic Mountain Views. 5 Bdrm + unfinished space for possible 6th bdrm, 4 bath in 3300 sq. ft. on 2.8 acre. Plenty of space for family togetherness & privacy too. Country setting adjacent to public lands. Great room-kitchen, dining & family room plus large bonus/recreational room! $340,000 MLS#2900223 or visit johnlscott. com/93222 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Kings Forest. 3 Bdrm, 1 bath, 1240 sq. ft. on 22.16 acres. Existing home is a charming old school house, extraordinary building site for for a replacement dwelling, with sweeping mountain and ranch views. Huge barn with full meat packing facility & refrigeration. Pond lined, beautiful 15 acre hay field weed-free. Impressive mature trees & the potential to raise goats, horses, cattle with numerous outbuildings. $484,500. MLS#201006994 or visit johnlscott.com/14483 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Get 4 lines, 1– 4 days for $20.

Looking for Unique? 5 Bedroom, 2 bath in 3262 sq.ft., on 3 acres. Large Kitchen with madrone floors, close to Shevlin Park. Interesting spaces for a multitude of family activities. Lots of natural light and incredible sunset views. Not just a house but a lifestyle, no close neighbors and no rules. It’s your property and home to enjoy your own way. Entertain young & old with ease in this home and on this property! $530,000. MLS# 201004851 or visit johnlscott. com/24593 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Majestic. 3 Bedroom, 2.5 bath in 1748 sq. ft. A gardener’s paradise (includes 20+ fruit trees), plenty of windows plenty of light. 3 bedrooms + a bonus room. Newer tile counters in kitchen & bathrooms. Main floor master, lily pond, and ceiling fans with lights. Handicap equipped w/grab bars throughout home & exterior. $179,000. MLS#201001304 or visit johnlscott. com/68701 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Opportunity knocks for your family. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath in 2116 sq. ft. on 4.54 acres. Beautiful mature trees, Russian Olive, Aspen, Ponderosa, Juniper, Poplar, Maple & Willow. Pond (Clayed) With dock & water feature, fenced and cross-fenced. Work in progress inside. Kitchen and hall bath completely remodeled. $235,000 MLS#201007475 or visit johnlscott.com/37531 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500


F4Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

www.bendhomes.com

SEARCH. Find acres of properties with slideshows offering up to 10 photographs per home to showcase unique features, home interiors and exteriors, quickly and easily.

FIND. Find homes in The Bulletin’s classified listings as well as standard MLS listings. Advanced search options allow you to locate homes based on architectural style, neighborhood amenities, views and more.

BUY. Use financial tools, such as the mortgage calculator, to estimate an approximate mortgage amount and provide insight into how much you can afford.

making Central Oregon real estate, real easy.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 1, 2011 F5

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Homes for Sale

Southwest Bend Homes

Redmond Homes

Homes with Acreage

Farms and Ranches

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Porter James Edition. Reverse living townhouse configuration duplex. Each unit is 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath in 1,466ý sq. ft. It sits on a 5,227ý sq. ft. lot. Great investment opportunity or live in one unit and rent the other (rent of $650). Walk-in master closet, easy-care landscaping, and close to the Old Mill District, Deschutes River, Parks & Schools. $170,000 MLS#201009602 or visit johnlscott. com/54838 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Deschutes River Woods. 3 Bdrm, 1.75 bath in 1329 sq. ft. custom home on DRW acre. Great room floor plan w/vaulted ceiling. All kitchen appli., are incl. Both recessed & under cabinet lighting in kitchen. Laundry room w/skylite & large pantry. New interior paint. Garage is heated & finished w/work bench. Super fenced yard w/mature Ponderosas, storage building, double canopy carport or storage structure. This home is move-in ready. $259,000. Call Bobbie at 541-480-1635 about MLS# 2802056 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Well Maintained!! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1580 sq.ft., corner lot, landscaped, fenced, super good cents home, RV parking. Ad #93632. $179,900 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

Best Horse Property Ever! 2400 sq. ft. frame-built, 3-stall barn, tack, auto watering system, game room & 2 car garage, in addition to a finished 3-car garage, both with overhead doors. 5 acres is fully fenced and cross-fenced, w/7’ fencing and gated entry, private well, raised beds & fruit trees. 2233 sq. ft. 3 bdrm home w/soap stone wood stove, hot tub and heat pump. Walls of windows to enjoy 360° view! $319,000. MLS#201002899 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

$1,295,000. Equestrian Estate. Beautiful main home, loaded with amenities. Also farm house, 116 x 204 sq.ft. barn, 80 x 204 sq.ft. indoor arena, has been used for shows, clinics, 17 indoor stalls, office w/bathroom. Apartment, spectator area, 150 x 300 sq. ft. outdoor arena, round pens, 60 x 62 sq.ft. foaling & breeding barn, 40 x 60 shop, 2 roll up doors vehicle lift & bathroom, 30 x 30 sq. ft. custom garage. Mtn. views galore on 19+ acres plus irrigation. 65950 93rd St. Heather Hockett, PC, Broker 541-420-9151 Century 21 Gold Country Realty

Cascade Views! One-acre sloped lot, with elevated building site, to take advantage of the outstanding Cascade views. Standard septic system is installed. Power and water available at lot line. Call listing agent for owner terms! Priced to sell! $69,900. MLS#201009226 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Stunning Cascade View Lot on Crooked River Ranch. This fabulous lot has power and community water available at the road and has previously obtained county approval for a standard septic installation. Come to Crooked River Ranch to golf, horseback ride, play tennis, fish or ski. It is a wonderful place to “hang your hat!” $54,900. MLS#201008827 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

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Endless opportunities at Evans Well. 2117 Deeded acres in 14 legal lots. Rated for 250 300 pair, this ranch operates with BLM and Forest Service leases covering approximately 60,000 acres. All parcels are surrounded by public lands. With views of the Paulina and Cascade Mountains as well as Horse Ridge and miles of open range, these parcels offer absolute privacy and seclusion, an easy, peaceful 30 minute drive to anywhere in Bend. Keep the property for yourself or use the established legal lots to create a compound for family and friends. $2,275,000 MLS#2709172 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Breathtaking Smith Rock Views! 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2005 sq.ft., 4.79 acres, 4.3 acres of irrigation, passive solar design, radiant floor heat. Ad #93622. $399,999 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

35 Acre irrigated, hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, 76 year old widower will sacrifice for $395,000, 541-410-3425

Custom Single Level in Bend! 5.7 acres, 3062 sq.ft. + 2 bdrm, guest house, gourmet kitchen w/fireplace, 4.3 acre COI, barns/shop, bunkhouse, tack room, pole fenced, pond. Ad #93502. $550,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

$139,000 2 acres MLS#201006299 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

Lots 4 & 5, Waterhole Pl., Crooked River Ranch. A portion of Crooked River Ranch’s historical watering hole is located on both well treed properties with views. Lot 4, 4.78 acres $70,000 MLS# 201009997. Lot 5, 3.2 acres $60,000 MLS# 201009996 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 Postcard Views! Where else can you watch a soaring eagle dive for his catch-of-the-day, or enjoy the picture-perfect postcard view of the evening sunset behind the snow-capped Cascade Mtn. Range. Not a rooftop in sight! and at night the only light is from the millions of stars. 2.1 acres w/septic & underground power installed. Water system connection at road. Enjoy fishing, hiking, golf, tennis & horseback riding! $145,000. MLS#201008528 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty Premier Crooked River Ranch rim property. Sit on the porch swing as you take-in awesome view from Smith Rock, down the Crooked River Canyon, in both directions, ending at a pictureperfect portrait of Mt. Hood and Mt. Jefferson. Across the canyon view miles of Culver Ag lands. This 1.69 acre property boasts a newer home of modest size with lots of room to add accessory bldgs. The perfect vacation home, comes fully furnished $199,900. MLS#201009485 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

541-322-7253

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes

Possibility! This 1782 sq. ft., 3 bdrm, 2 bath home is full of possibilities! Large living areas, including living, dining & kitchen with island/breakfast bar, pantry and china closet. Good bedroom separation with large master bath/walk-in closet. Metal roof, heat pump, skylights, a full length deck, handicap access and lots of room to build accessory bldgs add to the value of this home that is priced to sell at $65,000. MLS#2712929 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty Stunning Cascade Views from this beautiful 2000 sq. ft. home, on nearly 1.25 acre nicely sloped lot. Newer home with new roof, paved drive, concrete porch, oversized double garage, beautiful landscaping, fenced yard and garden, large rooms, breakfast bar, walk-in pantry, hickory cabinets, vaulted ceilings, fans and picture window. $224,900. MLS#201005829 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) Tillicum Village. 4 Bedrooms, 3 baths, 2608 sq. ft. on 1.46 acre. Your own park that’s adjacent to common ground. The grounds will astound you with their beauty. 2 ponds and 2 waterfalls plus spacious garden and gardening area. Remodel includes new cabinets, new birch floors and tile floors, new windows and doors, 2 gas furnaces, new hot tub, new lighting and ceiling fans. 2 water heaters, new Trex deck and paver patio. This home and its grounds are a must preview. $399,900 MLS#2803287 or visit johnlscott. com/17418 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS Under The Tuscan Sun You must see the interior of this gorgeous Tuscan-styled home, complete with beautiful frescos and arched doorways. Privately nestled among rock outcroppings, this 3,273 square foot home sits on 10 acres with unobstructed mountain views. 20635 Bowery Lane. MLS# 201006265. $899,000 Debbie Mantorano, Broker 541-480-2089 Steve Scott Realtors Village Wiestoria. 4 Bdrm, 2.75 bath in 2129 sq.ft. A super floor plan in award winning, Europeanstyle Village Wiestoria. Alley access to garage. Home overlooks the neighborhood park. Centrally located to schools, shopping, downtown, medical facilities & recreation. Downstairs is a great room floor plan. Upstairs has family room, 2 bdrm, 1 bathroom & could be a separate living area for a family member or friend. Home has had loving care! $240,000. MLS#2911387 or visit johnlscott.com/39616 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 www.dukewarner.com The Only Address to Remember for Central Oregon Real Estate

746

Northwest Bend Homes Awbrey Heights. 5 Bdrm, 3.5 bath on 0.32 ý acre. Perfect for family, developers or investors looking for a flexible floor plan. Masterfully landscaped for privacy. Located on 2+ RS lots just 1 block from the Deschutes River. Opportunity abounds w/the current redevelopment of the neighborhood. Double garage & covered carport too. Come preview this property – it’s not a drive by! $395,000. MLS# 2803755 or visit johnlscott.com/23648. Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Nice SW Bend Location! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1414 sq.ft., .32 acre lot, mature landscaping, sprinkler system, RV parking. Ad #93642. $129,200. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

748

Northeast Bend Homes Private Bend Setting! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1219 sq.ft., stainless appl., gas stove, Pergo flooring, mature trees. Ad #93652. $109,900 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

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Redmond Homes $149,000! Almost 1/2 acre in Terrebonne on Hwy 97. Two different tax lots. Older manufactured currently rented. Possible future investment property. 8540 9th St. Lana Carrell, Principal Broker 541-419-6810 Century 21 Gold Country Realty $440,000. 4-CAR GARAGE plus an exceptional 2974 sq. ft. home. Granite slab counters, knotty alder cabinets & trim, travertine floors, stainless steel appliances and slate entry. Huge bonus room w/built-in TV, bar & views, AC, central vac, fully landscaped, and extensive stamped concrete. Lana Carrell, Principal Broker 541-419-6810 Century 21 Gold Country Realty Bring all offers!! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1704 sq.ft., 1.2 acres, fenced pasture, mature landscaping, large garage w/ shop area. Ad #91962. $209,900. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Grand Smith Rock Estate! 4 Bdrm, 3.5 bath, 3500 sq.ft., 5 acres w/3 irrigation, guest apt., barn, shop, 2 triple garages, green house. Ad # 93392. $599,900. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

3 Bdrm, 2 bath, built in ‘03; (2) ½-acre lots, 1 buildable w/ well, south of Sunriver. Possible trade for Bend sgl. level of same value. 509-585-9050

756

Jefferson County Homes Prime Hwy 97 Commercial! Updated in 2006, 850 sq.ft., plenty of parking in rear, central air. Ad #93272. $154,900 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

757

Crook County Homes $139,900- 4 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, classic home. Wood floors, tile, gas fireplace. Tons of character. Air conditioning. On 3 full lots. Detached garage shop. Good location. Agent owned. Heather Hockett, PC, Broker 541-420-9151 Century 21 Gold Country Realty $159,900! Country living with acreage and nice 1920 sq.ft., 4 bedroom, 2 bath young home w/mountain views and small shed, fenced & more. $179,900. 5487 Sioux Lp. Heather Hockett, PC, Broker 541-420-9151 Century 21 Gold Country Realty

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Homes with Acreage 10226 SW Geneva View, Crooked River Ranch. Custom 1539 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 5.5 level acres completely fenced near public land. Unobstructed views of the mountains, $225,000 MLS# 201009408 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com 13930 SW Ridge Pl., Crooked River Ranch. Upgraded, 2208 sq. ft. home on 1.1 acres located on a quiet paved cul-de-sac. 3 bedrooms, den, 2.75 baths, 9’ ceilings and a 240 sq. ft. bonus room. 3-car garage. $259,000 MLS# 201008895 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

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15043 SW Peninsula, Crooked River Ranch. 1710 sq.ft., 3 bedroom, 2 bath on 1.83 acre rim lot with Crooked River Huge Upgraded Home! 3 Bdrm, Canyon & Smith Rock views. 2.5 bath, bonus room, 2416 1560 sq. ft. RV shop with 14' sq.ft., back yard, covered padoors on both ends to drive tio. AD #93302. $233,000. through. $238,900 MLS# Pam Lester, Principal Broker 201008425 Century 21 Gold Country Juniper Realty Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 541-504-5393 Located on Canyon Rim! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1520 sq.ft., 4. 63 Acres, Irrigated! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1188 sq.ft., detached .60 acre lot, RV parking gaoversized garage, setup for lore, vaulted family room, horses, Cascade Mtn views. Mtn views. Ad #93262. Ad #93212. $179,000. $169,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Nice SW Neighborhood! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1300 sq.ft., gas fireplace, central air, fenced, landscaped, sprinkler system. Ad #93572. $94,900. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 NW Redmond. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1393 sq.ft., den/office, master separation, gas fireplace, breakfast nook, RV parking, fenced. Ad #93612. $80,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

4 Bed Home, close to Crooked River Ranch entrance. 1620 sq. ft., with spacious family room, living room and great bedroom separation. Large kitchen w/breakfast bar and pantry. Ceiling fans, newer carpet and tile floors, heat pump and double attached garage. Backyard is fenced with additional storage buildings and beautiful views! 2.65 acres, well groomed and wired for hot tub! $178,000. MLS#2707953 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty 5.24 Acres w/Gorgeous Smith Rock Views! 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2367 sq.ft., 3 acres COI, fenced, barn, shop, end of road privacy. Ad #93472. $348,500. Pam Lester, Principal Broker, Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

NW Redmond Home. 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1942 sq.ft., gas fireplace, vaulted ceilings, kitchen island, tile countertops, landscaped, fenced. Ad #93562. $179,900. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

69177 Butcher Block, Sisters. Horse property! Custom 3436 sq. ft. home on 15.69 acres. 70' x 120' indoor riding arena, 30' x 80' pole building, 4-stall barn with heated tack room. $499,000 MLS# 201009686 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

Gardeners Delight on 9.9 Acres. 1612 sq.ft., house w/hot tub, 7.5 acres COI, huge pond, 2 greenhouses, one is 40 x 24, shop, fenced. Ad #93522. $395,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Horse Property! This 5 acre property is fully fenced with electric gate. 1782 sq. ft. home boasts a large kitchen, family room, living room and good bedroom separation, inclusive of heat pump for summer and winter comfort. 1200 sq. ft. accessory building is finished with heat and a 3/4 bath. Priced for a quick sale at $149,900. MLS#201008824 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty Lodge Style Home on Deschutes River! 5 acres, approx. 575 sq.ft., of river front, Cascade views, 5 Bdrm, 5 bath, 4649 sq.ft., 2 master suites. horses OK. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Near Walking Trails, Park & Public Land! 1704 sq. ft., 3 bdrm, 2 bath home on 1.11 acre parcel. Double attached garage, trellised front entry, fully fenced and beautifully landscaped backyard, complete with Pergola & generous sized patio. Well maintained framed home w/breakfast bar, family and living room, formal and informal dining. Not a distress sale. $164,900. MLS#201005643 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty Newly Remodeled, including kitchen cabinetry, and laminate flooring. This 3 bdrm, 2 bath home rests on 1.29 acre lot with Cascade views, landscaping, fencing, a wrap-around deck, 8x21 bonus sunroom, a turn-around driveway and a 20x20 shop. $109,000. MLS#2909620 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty NOT A SHORT SALE! $183,000! Beautiful setting on your own 2+ acres with rim rock views and a river view from the property. The nice 3+ bedroom home features sun porch, large stone hearth, open vaulted ceiling with great character beams and wood and western decor, office, very comfortable home. The property also has a small barn and a shop. The property has nice dog fenced front yard and mostly fenced for horses in the back. Great circular drive a real plus if you have a large truck or trailer. You can have this all for $183,000. 11987 Horny Hollow. Heather Hockett, PC, Broker 541-420-9151 Century 21 Gold Country Realty Sisters, turnkey horse setup, 4 acres, great barn, 3 pastures, updated house, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, pond,irrigation, RV pad w/hook ups, $575,000, 541-549-9945.

Turnkey Ranch w/Cascade Mtn Views. Built in 1993, 38+ acres w/ 26+ irrigation, barn, shop, hay shed, fenced. Ad #93352. $550,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

The Bulletin Classifieds

771

Lots

14297 SE Gatling Way, Prineville. Level 2 acre parcel with well, septic and power installed. Near Prineville Reservoir. $34,900 MLS# 201009032 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 16685 SW Chinook, Crooked River Ranch. Crooked River, Smith Rock & mountain views from this 6.9 acre lot. Septic is installed, the well is drilled. $225,000 MLS# 201008671 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 7965 River Road, Crooked River Ranch. Secluded & quiet. 2.79 acres short distance to the Deschutes River & Steelhead Falls. $85,000 MLS# 201009429 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 9148 sq.ft. Lot! Cul-de-sac, utilities stubbed in PUE, close to West Canyon Rim Park and access to the dry canyon trail. Ad #93422. $35,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Amazing River Views into the Crooked River Canyon, from this 10.65 acre rim lot. The property goes into the river, so you can build your own private access to river fishing! The setting is private, yet near amenities for horseback riding, hiking, fishing, boating and golfing. Adjoins a community track with golf course. A rare find, at a rare price, if you are looking for river view property. $175,000. MLS#2911260 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty A real find. A 5500 sq. ft. in-fill lot with large mature ponderosas that is flat and ready to build on. City services in the street. Close to shopping, Pilot Butte & the amenities of Juniper Park. $75,000. MLS#2801608 or visit johnlscott.com/77447 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 BIG DESCHUTES RIVER FRONTAGE - RIVER PARADISE ! Former Bend Elks recreation property in Haner Park. 7-8ý useable acres in 2 separate tax lots. 1.5ý miles downstream from Wickiup Reservoir with 1/4ý miles of river frontage on the Big Deschutes River. Large, flat grassy area for gatherings and a shelter with fireplace. A boat landing and dock. $575,000. MLS# 2910706 or visit johnlscott.com/59391. Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Buildable in Ochoco West. Two neighboring lots, each over 1/5 acre. Power and water in the street. Buy both and build your dream home or buy one for a great place to park your RV. Features include: over 1,200 acres of Recreation Land, swimming pool, tennis courts, fishing lakes stocked with trout and bass, horse stables, riding trails & Community Center. Beautiful view of the Prineville Valley. $15,000 MLS #2806023 & 2806025 or visit johnlscott.com/94130 & 94216 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

PALM SPRINGS GETAWAY SPECIAL Escape to one of our 2 hot springs resorts in the greater Palm Springs area at 50% off our standard rates!

$63 a night SKY VALLEY RESORTS www.SkyValleyResorts.com/specialoffer or call 888-894-7727 *Up To 1 Week. Vacation Home Tour Required. Terms and conditions apply.

Private & Gated! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1832 sq.ft., 5.3 acres, fully fenced, shop, near BLM, park like setting. Ad #93342. $275,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

Attention $ Millionaire Wanted $

REDUCED!! $139,000! Almost new 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2115 sq. ft. home located at end of cul-de-sac. Hickory cabinets, gas fireplace, large master suite, and bonus room upstairs. Fenced yard, storage building, and great mountain views. 2181 NW Kilnwood.. Lana Carrell, Principal Broker 541-419-6810 Century 21 Gold Country Realty

To Purchase Home With Million Dollar Views on 24 Private Acres ±

Spectacular Views! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1624 sq.ft., 2.24 acre rim lot, huge deck, fenced, landscaped, private setting. Ad #93582. $288,900. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

Open Sat. & Sun. January 1st & 2nd from 12:00 to 3:00 (weather permitting) MLS # 201006284 - Offered at $1,140,000

SUSAN AGLI SRES, ALHS, Broker susana@bendproperty.com

cell 541.408.3773 office 541.383.4338

www.esc2bend.com

Christmas Valley! Relaxing, tranquil, affordable getaway. Away from the hustle & bustle of city life. Located close to town, yet far enough to enjoy the starry skies. Enjoy 1 acre of 360° views in an area of great hunting, duck hunting, fishing, golfing, rock hounding, camping, bird watching or riding quads on the sand dunes. Great property for weekend RVing or build your getaway! $6,000. MLS#2902491 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty Crooked River Ranch lot. Level lot with beautiful trees CRR has: swimming pool, hiking trails, tennis courts, park & golf course as well as senior support group & other special interest groups. Men’s & Women’s golf with reduced green fees & cart rates plus a yearly golf package that is the best in Central Oregon & a course open for play when no other is during the winter. $41,500 MLS#201005890 or visit johnlscott.com/89314 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Deschutes River & Cascade View! Flat parcel with lots of trees for privacy and an unbelievable panoramic view. This 4.24 acre property adjoins public lands, with a rim-type view that will last a lifetime! Lot is approved for septic installation. This is a one-of-a-kind at $139,900. MLS#2906726 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Privacy Awaits on this lovely, well-treed, 5 acre lot. This flat corner lot offers many great building sites, surrounded by old-growth Juniper. Power is at end of the road. Seller financing available with approved credit, making this a great long-term investment. Call listing agent for details. $139.900. MLS#2910929 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty Rhody Road, Sumpter. The river runs through it! Well treed 5 acre parcel with the Powder River running through the property. On the edge of the town of Sumpter in Eastern Oregon. Snow mobile in the winter, fish in the summer. Seller is a licensed Real Estate Broker. $55,000 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

Horse Ridge East. Choose one of seven 10-acre parcels with mountain views. Your own piece of paradise where the deer, antelope and you can play. OWC for suitable buyer with 10% down. $25,000. Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 King-of-the-Mountain Views from these 2.7 acres overlooking the Cascade mountain range, from Hood to Bachelor. Already septic approved, with water and power at the road. Many beautiful home sites for your custom home. $99,900. MLS#201008526 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Six Acre Lot near the Crooked River Ranch entrance. Heavily treed, with mountain views through the trees. Many building sites to choose from. Two story home would provide “BIG” mountain views! $134,750. MLS#201007311 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Stunning Views beginning with Smith Rock, down the Crooked River Gorge, overlooking the original farm houses of Gates Ranch and on to Mt. Hood, in its blanket of snow. This 1.55 acre lot has a recent approval for septic installation and power and water at the lot line. Now is the time to purchase a lot for your future dream home. $115,500. MLS#201008531 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

OWN 20 Acres - Only $129/month. $13,900 near growing El Paso, Texas. (safest city in America!) Low down, no credit checks, owner financing. Free Map/ Pictures. 800-343-9444. (PNDC) FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Whispering Pines. Ready-to-Build 2.4 acres with easterly views on a paved road. Water & power to street and septic approval in place. $70,000 MLS#2802337 or go to johnlscott.com/83475 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Your new homesite. Ready for construction with great building site and all the utilities in the site. Great mature trees and fenced too. Romaine Village offers access to Clubhouse/ Rec room and a pool. A must preview. $49,900. MLS# 201007937 or visit johnlscott.com/8158 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

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Acreages $299,000 42.5 acres close to town. Nice private setting, well treed, and has canal running through property. Lots of possibilities, very secluded, and possible irrigation. 1130 SW 53rd St. Lana Carrell, Principal Broker 541-419-6810 Century 21 Gold Country Realty 4.38 Acre View Lot! Backs BLM, Cascade mtn & Smith Rock views, corner lot, approved for standard septic. Ad #92572. $199,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

The Highlands at Broker Top! 10 Acres, gated, private well, utilities at lot-line, approved for cap-fil septic. Ad #93132. $535,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

780

Mfd./Mobile Homes with Land 1.76 Acres! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1536 sq.ft., large rear deck, shop w/240v power, greenhouse, storage building. Ad #93402. $99,000 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Single Level on 1 Acre! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1716 sq.ft., master separation, office, fenced, flower garden, RV parking. Ad #93552. $150,000 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338


F 6Saturday, January 1, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Prineville: WHY WE LOVE

PRINEVILLE EMBRACES ITS HISTORY WHILE EMBRACING GROWTH AND INDUSTRY. REALTORS® know what makes Prineville, Oregon special, and they will help you find the home that’s perfect for you. Prineville has been home to growing businesses more than once. Les Schwab made Prineville the epicenter of his tire stores in 1952, and last year, Facebook announced that it had chosen Prineville to be the location of its newest data center. When the work day is done, residents enjoy a multitude of activities such as golf, horseback riding, water sports and camping to name just a few. Visit Prineville and you’ll see why so many love to call it home.

, y t n u o C k o o r Current C stics i t a t S l a i t n e Resid 4 .............27

.............. .. : s g in t is L e Activ

Pending/ ........... 67 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ct: .. Under Contra Homes Sold .............350 .. .. .. .. .. .. : ) s th (past 12 mon

2112 NE 4th St. Bend, Oregon 97701 541-382-6027 | E-mail: info@coar.com | www.coar.com WHAT ARE THESE SQUARES?

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Bulletin Daily Paper 01/01/11