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Hunter recounts 4 days of peril in Ochoco By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

On Thanksgiving Day, Alan Hewitt set out on his horse, Vegas, to hunt for elk from the high ridges in the Ochoco National Forest. He grabbed an extra pair of gloves but left most of his survival kit, like the fire starting equipment,

at his camp. It was too bulky, and he was only planning to be away from his camp during the day. But it would be three nights and four days before Hewitt made it back to shelter. He was rescued Sunday afternoon. He was scheduled to leave the hospital last night.

Hewitt got to the forest on Monday, Nov. 22. At his camp he had a horse trailer for the two horses he had with him. There was also a camper, his truck, feed for the animals and food for him. He planned to spend a week at the camp hunting elk during the day. His wife wasn’t expecting him

Hunter Alan Hewitt, of Prineville, recovers at St. Charles Bend after being stranded for four days in the Ochoco National Forest.

home until Sunday. On Thursday afternoon, Hewitt’s horse lost her footing and slipped on a log. A branch smacked into the back of Hewitt’s neck. The horse eventually crashed to the ground, pinning Hewitt underneath her. See Rescue / A5

Dean Guernsey The Bulletin

Fans ready for Civil War

WINTER

Storms expected to pass over region Central Oregon residents should expect a reasonably clear and dry day today, as recent storms should be passing through the region and heading east. Rob Brooks, forecaster with the National Weather Service office in Pendleton, said it will be a brief break, before the region settles into about a week’s worth of stable weather. Temperatures should be fairly consistent over the next week, he said, with daytime highs in most of Central Oregon in the midto upper 30s and nighttime lows in the mid-20s. Brooks said it’s unlikely lower elevations will see significant accumulations of snow in the near future, though a few flurries should linger in the mountains and on mountain passes. Saturday evening through Monday, travelers driving toward The Dalles and the rest of the Columbia Basin should be on the lookout for freezing precipitation and slick roads. Friday night should be the coldest night in the near-term forecast, Brooks said, with low temperatures in Bend between 16 and 21 degrees. — Scott Hammers, The Bulletin

Cannabis clubs and clinics opening in Bend to provide treatment to the qualified By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Medical marijuana seems to be a burgeoning business in Bend. A new cannabis club is expected to open up next week on North East Division Street, and a second, similar establishment, has already secured a business license to do the same. Both places — the first of their kind in the city and about two blocks from one another — want to provide state-licensed cardholders a place where they can safely access medical marijuana. Inside One of the clubs and three new • Locations clinics will be places where phyof clubs sicians will provide medical evaland clinics, uations to prospective patients to Page A4 see if their ailments qualify them for alternative treatment. Some of these locations will even provide classes for patients who want to learn how to medicate themselves.

Businesses filling a niche Many of the operators of these places say the reason for the recent boom is that they feel like they’re filling a niche that has been left largely vacant in Central Oregon. Some have also said that last month’s failure of Measure 74, which would have allowed state-regulated medical marijuana dispensaries in Oregon and lost 791,186 to 627,016, has also brought the issue to the forefront. See Marijuana / A4

TOP NEWS INSIDE NUTRITION: House passes bill to improve school lunches, Page A3

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Calendar

E3

Classified Comics

Local Movies

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

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Obituaries

C5

F1-6

Science

A2

E4-5

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D1-6

Crossword E5, F2

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B4-5

Editorial

Sudoku

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C4 E1-6

Horoscope

E5

E5

TV listings

E2

Weather

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ABOVE: Bend High School culinary teacher Louise Markland, left, compliments Summer Johnson, 15, on her University of Oregon outfit Thursday. Markland made it clear she is an Oregon State University fan by decorating her hallway entrance with a flag and an inflatable beaver. BELOW: Looking for a friendly way to show your allegiance in the Ducks/Beavers rivalry? Beginning at noon today, pumpkins will be shot at cars, one representing the Ducks and the other the Beavers. The pumpkin shooting will take place at the Pumpkin Company at 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., in Terrebonne. Call 541-771-8886 for more information.

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We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

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Medicinal marijuana business sees boom

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Microbe discovery raises possibility of new types of life By Eryn Brown and Thomas H. Maugh II Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — After days of rampant speculation that NASA was on the cusp of revealing it had detected extraterrestrial life, the reality was slightly more down to Earth. A team of scientists revealed Thursday that they had found a remarkable quality in a bacterium growing quietly in California’s Mono Lake — it is the only known life form able to subsist on the otherwise deadly element arsenic. The organism even uses arsenic to build the backbone of its DNA. To researchers searching for life elsewhere in the universe, the discovery still qualified as a heavensent event. “I find this result delightful,” said Pamela Conrad, an astrobiologist at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., who wasn’t involved in the research. “It makes me expand my notion of what” life in the universe would need to sustain itself. See Arsenic / A2


A2 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Simple but difficult Sometimes the simplest mechanisms are the most difficult to reproduce, said Janna Nawroth, a graduate student in the lab of Caltech engineering professor John Dabiri, who won a 2010 MacArthur fellowship for his research on jellyfish. If engineers could fully understand the way the creatures propel themselves, they could eventually use it medically, say for putting pumps inside the body, perhaps creating a better artificial heart, Nawroth said. The technology also could be used to make blade-free, bird-safe ways to collect wind energy, she added. For all the field’s promise, Spedding said that scientists need to avoid just trying to imitate nature regardless of whether they can learn from it. “Just because it exists in nature doesn’t mean it’s an optimum. ... The designs that come through evolution are just good enough to survive, that’s all,” he said. Nature, he noted, has yet to come up with a decent wheel.

167 395

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LOS ANGELES — The physicists, biologists and engineers were huddled around every available bar-height table in the Long Beach Convention Center, covering their tiny surfaces with laptops and notebooks. Posters in long, military rows showcased their efforts: An analysis of the movement of milk in English tea, a report on the stripes of gas across Jupiter. In a hotel next door, Aryesh Mukherjee, a physics graduate student at Harvard University, was explaining how he built, with the help of rubber glovelike material, a synthetic voice box that could imitate a range of birdsongs. Like Mukherjee, many of the scientists gathered last week at a fluid-dynamics conference to show how insights from the world of animals and plants might guide tomorrow’s technology, a burgeoning field known as bio-inspired engineering. Some scientists reported on the aerodynamic antics of Chrysopelea paradisi, the paradise flying snake of Asia, suggesting it might — who knows? — aid in the creation of more sinuous search-andrescue robots. Others are analyzing the movement of jellyfish, which they say could eventually lead to better designs for medical pumps and wind turbines. Aerospace engineer Amy Lang of the University of Alabama showed how the scales of a speedy mako shark allow it to zip through the water so fast. And USC engineer Geoffrey Spedding gave a talk proposing that airplanes be designed more like birds. These scientists from far-flung fields share a common conviction: that future engineering has a great deal to learn from the natural world. “The number of people who are developing, encouraging, thinking about biologically inspired designs is vastly more than it was five years ago, two years ago even,” Spedding said. Even 15 years ago, he said, “nobody took you seriously.” But now, said researcher David Lentink of Wageningen University in the Netherlands, “biologists and engineers are starting to talk with each other, and engineers are getting interested in what questions biologists would like to answer.”

signs could be put to good engineering use. Mark Murray, engineer at the U.S. Naval Academy, found that the sawtooth-like bumps (called tubercles) running up the edge of a humpback whale’s fin make the creatures perform better in low-flow water. This, in turn, implies that lining the blades of underwater turbines with similar bumps could make them much better at capturing energy from ocean tides. And B.J. Balakumar from Los Alamos National Laboratory and colleagues built a robotic hummingbird wing to understand how one of the world’s best (and in relative terms heaviest) hovering creatures manages to stay aloft. Learning how it hovers in gusty winds could help scientists develop quieter craft that could maneuver reliably even in bad weather.

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Researchers at Mono Lake have discovered the first known bacteria able to grow and reproduce using arsenic, which is toxic to most forms of life.

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Arsenic supports life

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From snakes to jellyfish, nature inspires technology

Continued from A1 The organism’s existence suggests life on Earth has an unappreciated flexibility, experts said, and could have evolved from a wider array of building blocks than previously thought — not only here, but elsewhere in the universe. Perhaps no one was more surprised by the revelation than Felisa Wolfe-Simon, the biochemist who identified the creature. “The mere fact that an organism can grow with this much arsenic, that’s outrageous,” said Wolfe-Simon, a NASA research fellow based at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, Calif. All life on Earth relies on six principal elements — carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur and phosphorus. Phosphorus is a key ingredient in the ladder of DNA, as well as many key components of cellular machinery. Wolfe-Simon had theorized that arsenic might be able to stand in for phosphorus because it is located directly below phosphorus on the periodic table of elements and behaves similarly. In fact, arsenic’s likeness to phosphorus is what makes it toxic to most life: It fools cells into thinking they have the phosphorus they need to survive. To look for a creature that might bear out her hypothesis, Wolfe-Simon led an expedition to Mono Lake, an arsenic-rich body of water near Yosemite National Park. The team collected mud from the lake last year and introduced it into an artificial broth designed to mimic the qualities of the natural lake water. But there was one major difference: In the broth, high levels of arsenic were added in lieu of phosphorus. The scientists let the mud sit in the broth for several days, then introduced a small portion of it into a fresh batch of the arseniclaced broth. They repeated the process seven times over a threemonth period, and checked to see if anything grew. They isolated a microbe that survived in what should have been a toxic stew. “That wasn’t supposed to work,” Wolfe-Simon said. Wolfe-Simon said the organism, known as GFAJ-1, is in many respects “unexciting.” It breathes oxygen and is a genetic “distant cousin” to the gut bacterium E. coli. What was remarkable, she said, was its apparent ability to use arsenic to grow. Through laboratory analysis, the team confirmed that both arsenic and phosphorus were present in the cultured organism, but that there wasn’t enough phosphorus to sustain the organism on its own. They also demonstrated that arsenic existed “everywhere” in the cells and that the arsenic appeared to be filling the role of

Map area

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541-385-5804

Arsenic

INNOVATION

5 miles

Lake geology The discovery

Cell

Phosphorus — essential element for all living cells Arsenic — chemically similar to phosphorus; poisonous for most life on Earth

• Saltwater lake, 1 to 3 million years old; lake basin formed by volcanic activity

Ecology • Algae, brine shrimp, alkali flies • More than 80 species of birds, including snowy plovers and California gulls

Microbes from the lake are able to substitute phosphorus with arsenic and grow new cells Source: ESRI, NASA, USGS Graphic: Lee Hulteng

© 2010 MCT McClatchy-Tribune News Media Service

Henry Bortman / via New York Times News Service

Felisa Wolfe-Simon, a NASA research fellow, takes samples from a sediment core she pulled up from the shore of Mono Lake in California. phosphorus, Wolfe-Simon said. Researchers said the finding, published online Thursday in the journal Science, has forced them to reconsider what they ought to be looking for as they hunt for signs of life beyond Earth. “This opens our eyes that more things are possible — that life can do more things than we thought,” said Bruce Runnegar, a professor of Earth and space sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a former director of NASA’s Astrobiology Institute who wasn’t involved in the study. That was the point NASA wanted to make when it an-

nounced Monday that it would hold a press conference later in the week about “an astrobiology finding that will impact the search for evidence of extraterrestrial life.” Those words were enough to fuel rumors that the space agency was preparing to make an announcement of cosmic proportions. By Thursday morning, BookMaker.com was offering odds on what NASA had found, including such possibilities as discovery of a life form on Mars, an image of an alien spacecraft and a confession that Area 51 was indeed used for alien studies.

Convergence Scientists are approaching that point of convergence from different directions. Spedding’s colleague Joachim Huyssen at the North-West University in South Africa designed an airplane on aerodynamic first principles — what kind of plane would, in theory, fly best. Spedding and Huyssen then tested the model in a wind tunnel. The best shape, the pair found, would have a bulletlike body rather than the elongated tube seen in commercial planes. The wings would be bent, the tail stubby. The end result looked remarkably like a bird. The research also has some inadvertent implications for understanding birds, Spedding added. Most planes have tails for stability, and biologists thought birds used theirs for the same reason. But because the research model’s stubby, birdlike tail exists only to reduce drag, it may mean biologists need to rethink what those tail feathers really do for birds. In a similar vein, Mukherjee’s rubber bird voice box suggested that birds might be using a yetundiscovered muscle to produce sound. “It might not be true,” Mukherjee said. “We’re saying, ‘This is what we’re doing ... and now, biologists, go see if this makes sense or not.’ ” Some scientists in the field of bio-inspired engineering look directly to nature to see what de-

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, December 3, 2010 A3

T S Nutrition bill clears Congress

Rangel censured by House By Richard Simon Los Angeles Times

WASHINGTON — After high political drama and an emotional debate, the House of Representatives censured Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y., Thursday for ethical misconduct, meting out its first such punishment in nearly 30 years. As the often raucous body came to a standstill, the 80year-old former chairman of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee stood in the well of the chamber, Rep. Charles hands clasped Rangel, D-N.Y. in front of him, while Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., somberly read the censure resolution: “Resolved, that Rep. Charles B. Rangel of New York be censured; Rep. Charles B. Rangel forthwith present himself in the well of the House for the pronouncement of censure ... and pay restitution to the appropriate taxing authorities or the U.S. Treasury ... and provide proof of payment to the (ethics) committee.” “Even though it is painful to accept this vote ... I know in my heart I’m going to be judged not by this Congress but by my life, my activities, my contributions to society,” said Rangel. He said it had never entered his mind “to enrich myself or to do violence to the honesty that’s expected of all of us in this House.”

Legislation will use funds from food stamps to pay for better school meals By Robert Pear New York Times News Service

Rebecca Blackwell / The Associated Press

Supporters of opposition leader Alassane Ouattara run through the streets in celebration after the electoral commission head announced his victory in last Sunday’s presidential run-off, in the Abobo neighborhood of Abidjan, Ivory Coast, on Thursday.

Winner announced and disputed in Ivory Coast presidential election By Adam Nossiter New York Times News Service

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — A historic presidential election intended to unify this long-divided nation slipped further into uncertainty Thursday, as a heated tug-of-war emerged over who had the power to proclaim a winner. The candidate, Alassane Ouattara, 68, a former prime minister, banker and top International Monetary Fund official, received more than 54 percent of the vote, the election commission said, defeating President Laurent Gbagbo, who gained 45 percent. Gbagbo has remained in office

five years beyond his legal mandate, through perpetual maneuvering and election postponements. Ear-splitting cheers and chanting erupted as the results were announced in a heavily guarded lagoon-side hotel that serves as a headquarters for the Ouattara camp. But their joy could be short-lived. Gbagbo’s spokesman has already rejected as fraudulent the results from a vast northern area of the country that is Ouattara’s stronghold. Then on Thursday evening, the head of the country’s constitutional council said the electoral commis-

WIKILEAKS

Cables lay bare the corruption battle in Afghan government By Greg Miller The Washington Post

Tens of millions of dollars are carried out of Afghanistan each month, with no telling how much is illicit. The country’s dominant money exchange caters to “narco-traffickers, insurgents, and criminals.” All the while, U.S. officials walk a “thin tightrope” in efforts to root out corruption, working with Afghan officials who are awash in graft. Those grim assessments run like a steady current through secret diplomatic cables sent from the U.S. Embassy in Kabul during the past two years. Released to several news organization by WikiLeaks, the cables highlight a problem that the U.S. government has sought to keep under wraps. The disclosures provide new details showing how corruption has undermined progress in a country that is in many ways a nine-year-old project in nationbuilding for the United States. Even apparent breakthroughs in the fight against corruption are portrayed in the cables as

cynical attempts engineered by President Hamid Karzai’s administration to preserve the status quo. In a Jan. 5, 2010, document labeled “A Tale of Two Mayors,” U.S. officials describe the ouster of former Kabul Mayor Abdul Ahad Sahebi over corruption charges as an apparent case of “kangaroo court justice.”

‘Corrupt’ mayor ousted When Sahebi was driven from office after Karzai’s re-election, it was seen as the start of a promised crackdown against dishonest politicians. Sahebi had been convicted of “mismanagement of authority” in late 2009, in a case that was described as involving massive embezzlement. But behind the scenes, U.S. officials were saying in State Department memos that they had not seen evidence to support the conviction, and speculated that Sahebi had been sacrificed by Karzai for political reasons. In meetings with U.S. officials, Sahebi said he was being pun-

ished not for taking money, but for renewing a lease on a parcel of city land for $16,000 less than another applicant was willing to pay. Other documents point to corruption across Afghan society and assess the magnitude of the problem. During a three-month stretch last year, one cable said, more than $190 million was carried out of the country in suitcases and other containers brought through the Kabul airport. How much of it was being diverted illegally “is impossible to know,” the Oct. 19, 2009, cable said. “Drug traffickers, corrupt officials and to a large extent licit business owners do not benefit from keeping millions of dollars in Afghanistan.” The document cites a report from officials in the United Arab Emirates — a destination for much of the cash — that Afghan Vice President Ahmad Zia Masoon had entered the emirate with $52 million earlier that year, an amount he was allowed to keep “without revealing the money’s origin or destination.”

Amazon cites terms of use in service cancellation By Charlie Savage New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Amazon on Thursday defended its decision to expel WikiLeaks from its website hosting service this week after an aide to Sen. Joseph Lieberman, I-Conn., called the company and asked about the relationship. In a statement, Amazon — which rents server space to companies in addition to its better-known business of selling books, music and other products online — said it had canceled its relationship with WikiLeaks not because of “a government inquiry,” but because it decided the organization was violating the terms of service for the

program. “When companies or people go about securing and storing large quantities of data that isn’t rightfully theirs, and publishing this data without ensuring it won’t injure others, it’s a violation of our terms of service, and folks need to go operate elsewhere,” the company said. WikiLeaks, which began making public the first of a cache of more than 250,000 secret State Department cables this week, apparently moved its website to Amazon’s servers in recent weeks after “denial of service” attacks had sought to shut it down. On Tuesday, after reading about the move in media reports,

a staff member on the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, which Lieberman heads, called Amazon and asked several pointed questions, including, “‘If you are aware of this, do you have plans to take it down?’” according to Leslie Phillips, a spokeswoman for the committee. On Wednesday morning, Phillips said, an official at Amazon called back and said the company had “terminated the relationship because it was a violation of terms of use,” but offered no further details. She said Lieberman found out about his aide’s inquiry only afterward, but strongly approved of it — and of Amazon’s decision.

sion was “not capable” of declaring the outcome because it had missed its Wednesday deadline. He said it was up to his institution to do so, in the days to come. The long-awaited vote has been a significant international concern, prompting the United Nations Security Council to warn officials here not to “obstruct the electoral process” and say it was ready to take “appropriate measures.” The government here, however, has been relatively impervious to international pressure, brushing off repeated calls to hold elections over the years.

WASHINGTON — Congress gave final approval on Thursday to a child nutrition bill that expands the school lunch program and sets new standards to improve the quality of school meals, with more fruits and vegetables. Michelle Obama lobbied for the bill as a way to combat obesity and hunger. About half of the $4.5 billion cost is financed by a cut in food stamps starting in several years. Obama said she was thrilled by passage of “a groundbreaking piece of legislation.” By a vote of 264 to 157, the House on Thursday passed the bill, which was approved in the Senate by unanimous consent in August. It goes now to President Barack Obama, who intends to sign it. On the final roll call, 247 Democrats and 17 Republicans voted for the bill. Four Democrats and 153 Republicans voted no. The bill gives the secretary of agriculture authority to establish nutrition standards for foods sold in schools during the school day, including items in vending machines. The standards would require schools to serve more fruits and vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy products. And for the first time in more than three decades, the bill would increase federal reimbursement for school lunches beyond inflation — to help cover the cost of higher-quality meals. It would also allow more than 100,000 children on Medicaid to qualify automatically for free school meals. One of the most contentious provisions of the bill regulates prices for lunches served to children with family incomes over 185 percent of the poverty level (more than $40,793 a year for a family of four). “This provision would require some schools to raise their lunch prices,” the Congressional Budget Office said.


A4 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Marijuana Continued from A1 “I think it’s a cavalcade of likeminded people,” said Chris Smith, manager of Central Oregon Alternative Therapy Club LLC, which plans to open on Division Street next week. “There are a lot of people in need, and we’re going to get this to them.” The Herb Center, which has not opened yet, also has plans to be a collective, similar to Central Oregon Alternative Therapy, as well as a place for other medicinal herbs. The Herb Center’s executive director, Brent Goodman, did not want to comment, but said he has attorneys examining all the legal issues before deciding on a date to open. According to Smith, his cannabis club will join at least six others in the state to provide what he calls a safe place for cardholders to get medical marijuana. Though it is still illegal to sell marijuana, Smith said the club is set up as a collective of patients and their caregivers who cultivate the plant as a place where they can exchange their medicine. Those individuals, who will have to pay for a monthly membership, will also be able to get marijuana from the club’s “budtenders” in exchange for a donation. “It’s basically just allowing the patient-to-patient interface,” he said. “It’s a safe access place for patients to get their medicine.” At least four of the five new facilities will have physicians to help people get medical marijuana evaluations. Three of the facilities — High Desert Alternative Medicine, Central Alternative Medicine and The Herb Center — are brand-new to Bend. The fourth, Mothers Against Misuse and Abuse (MAMA) has been around Bend for awhile but is moving into a permanent location off Revere Avenue. The fifth facility, Central Oregon Alternative Therapy, will be a club only, and does not plan to have a physician. It is also new to Bend. Lt. John Gautney, the team task force commander for Central Oregon Drug Enforcement, said he’s heard about the new medical marijuana establishments opening up in Bend, but hasn’t had a chance to meet with any of the proprietors yet — something he said he intends to do once they open. He said he’s particularly interested in how the clubs intend to operate, and has been in contact with law enforcement in Portland, where similar collectives exist. He also said enforcement is a “very gray area.” For instance, there are provisions in the law that allow for patients to reimburse medicine providers for the costs of electricity and fertilizer for the cultivation. But Gautney also said there’s a distinct line between providing medical marijuana under the auspices of the law and crossing over to drug sales. “It’s not going to be like a dispensary — that’s what we voted down in the last election,” Gautney said. “You can call it what you want, but if they’re exchanging money for marijuana, then that’s a sale and that’s illegal.” Dave Hibbard, the president of Central Alternative Medicine, said that while his business doesn’t supply marijuana, he wouldn’t be surprised to see more clubs sprouting up in Central Oregon over the next couple years. The reason for that, he said, is that the area so far has been an untapped market for medical marijuana, and he thinks that whoever gets in on the ground floor will likely have a better

Medical marijuana Locations of Bend’s medical marijuana clubs and clinics Butle r

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et Rd .

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20

4 Hawthorne Ave.

Franklin Ave.

Central Oregon Alternative Therapy The Herb Center High Desert Alternative Medicine Central Alternative Medicine Mothers Against Misuse & Abuse (MAMA) Greg Cross / The Bulletin

chance to get certified by the state should a similar ballot initiative to Measure 74 go to voters. “The people that get involved in Oregon first will have the best opportunity to become a dispensary,” Hibbard said. “If somebody can get there first and get established they have a better chance. ... It’s going to be a golden ticket.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

C OV ER S T ORY

Top brass and McCain square off over ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ New York Times News Service WASHINGTON — Sen. John McCain, the Arizona Republican and Vietnam-era war hero, took on the nation’s top defense and military officials Thursday when he challenged the Pentagon’s position that gays should be allowed to serve openly. In a hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Mc-

Cain argued with senior military leadership, saying they should not push for the repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell,” the 17-year-old law that requires gay men and women in the military to keep their sexual orientation secret or face discharge. Citing the results of a recent Pentagon survey of 115,000 active-duty and reserve service

members, McCain said 58 percent of Marines in combat units and 48 percent of Army combat troops thought repealing the law would have a negative impact on the ability of their units to work together. “I remain concerned,” McCain said, “as I have in the past, and as demonstrated in this study, that the closer we get to service mem-

bers in combat, the more we encounter concerns about whether ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ should be repealed.” The officials responded by pointing out the larger conclusions of the survey, which found that 70 percent of service members asked believed the impact on their units would be positive, mixed or of no consequence at all.


C OV ER S T ORY

Rescue Continued from A1 “I got her up in an upright position and freed myself of her,” Hewitt said. The horse’s leg was injured, and Hewitt couldn’t backtrack up the steep cliff and get back to his camp without abandoning her. Leaving the animal, Hewitt said, wasn’t an option. Hewitt had a dislocated shoulder and was sore, but he was able to hike. The animal could walk, but

Hewitt said she wouldn’t make it up the cliff on her bum leg. “I couldn’t leave her there helpless,” he said of Vegas. Darrell Hover “If we were going, we were both going down. We went up there together, we were coming down together.” Hewitt used a tree to help him force his dislocated shoulder

back into place. He had water, but it was already frozen. His pack of beef jerky was too hard to eat. He was wearing several layers of clothing, two pairs of long johns, jeans and pants over those. On top, he was also dressed in layers; underneath it all was a black T-shirt that read, “Grandpa rocks.” The 48-year-old retired Marine had one goal: reach the main forest service road. There, he figured, other hunters would be leaving the forest before the season ended and they would

spot him. After his horse slipped, the howling wind picked up and his map blew away. He’d been trained in mountaineering survival techniques in the Marines, even winning the award of “most likely to survive,” he said, and he had a mental map. “Sunday night was my deadline,” he said. “After that, every hunter would be off the mountain.” During the day, he would walk as much as he could. It was slow going. He would wet his mouth with snow periodically. He would

THE BULLETIN • Friday, December 3, 2010 A5 give himself little goals — make it to this point and take a break. He would reach the point, rest his head against his horse and then set another goal. At night, he didn’t sleep. “The nights were long, and it was cold,” he said. “Every muscle in my body would shake.” He would go through rhymes in his head, “wiggle your nose, wiggle your toes” and he would keep moving, making small movements. He would shadow box through the night and force himself to breathe slowly. Then

he would do it again, repeating it over and over. The first night was bad. Temperatures dropped to about 20 degrees overnight in Prineville while Hewitt was in the forest, according to information from the National Weather Service in Pendleton. It would have been colder in the mountains. He found a large tree and logs and fashioned a shelter. He stayed close to Vegas for heat and would brush the snow and ice off the animal throughout the night. Hewitt didn’t think about dying. He did not factor it in. He thought about his wife, his five children and two grandchildren. “Being able to see them again is where I drew my strength,” he said. Finally, on the fourth day, he could ride his horse for a short while. He was able to cover more territory. Earlier, he’d been slowly wading through knee-deep snow. He was getting closer. He said his horse also seemed to know the direction. But when the duo hit a creek, the animal could not be persuaded to cross. Hewitt had to leave her. He made it to the road that afternoon and spotted fresh-looking tire tracks. His brain was scrambled, and he could barely speak. That’s when Darrell Hover, of Bend, saw what he thought was a red backpack in the snow. Hover had been out hunting with his father on back roads and was driving back to Prineville. Hover said he’d had to make a lot of choices on his trek: Should I go left or right, should I take the main road or go back on the forest service road? He said he almost went another way. But when he saw that speck of red, which turned out to be Hewitt’s hat, he got out of his pickup and walked toward the man about 40 yards away. Hewitt could barely speak, but eventually he got out, “I need help.” Hover walked him back to his truck and stripped him of his wet clothes, cranked up the heat, gave him coffee and drove to the hospital in Prineville. Hewitt, who is 5 feet 10 inches tall and usually weighs 150 pounds, was down to about 108 pounds when he checked into the hospital. Hover said Hewitt was about eight miles from his camp. He hadn’t had anything to eat or drink for four days. He still can’t feel the fingers of his left hand. But on Thursday afternoon, he was hoping to go home from St. Charles Bend, where he’d been transferred. “I’m very thankful,” he said. Next winter, if he draws a hunting tag, the experienced hunter will go out again. This time, he will leave a detailed plan with his wife and let her know when he plans to check in. That way, if she doesn’t hear from him, she will know he’s in trouble. But, he said, he would tell other people not to do what he did. “You don’t want to be a lone hunter,” he said. “This has turned out fortunately because I had the knowledge and training. ... Follow the general rule: Have a partner.” The Crook County Search and Rescue team rescued both of Hewitt’s horses. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Obama seeks aid for jobless in return for deal on taxes New York Times News Service

BEND

RIVER

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WASHINGTON — The Obama administration said Thursday that it wanted an extension of unemployment assistance and a variety of tax breaks for low-wage and middle-income workers as part of a deal with congressional Republicans to extend all the Bush-era tax cuts. In a symbolic nod to President Barack Obama’s pledge to let the tax cuts on upper-income brackets expire on Dec. 31, as scheduled by law, the House Thursday approved a bill to continue the lower tax rates enacted during the Bush administration for Americans they described as “middle class.” The vote was 234-188, with three Republicans joining 231 Democrats in favor; 20 Democrats and 168 Republicans were opposed. The bill, however, has no chance of passage in the Senate, where even some Democrats say the tax cuts should be extended for everyone, at least temporarily, given the continued weakness in the economy.


N A T ION / WOR L D

A6 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

KYRGYZSTAN

FIRES RAGE IN NORTHERN ISRAEL

Do-not-track proposal worries some lawmakers

Clinton: U.S. presence vital — for now By Robert Burns The Associated Press

BISHKEK, Kyrgyzstan — The United States will reconsider its military presence in the Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan once it winds down its combat mission in Afghanistan in 2014, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Thursday. She offered no indication whether the Obama administration hopes to maintain a presence at the Manas air base, which plays a central role in moving troops and supplies Hillary Clinton to support the war effort in Afghanistan. Russia has objected to having the U.S. military set up so close to its borders. Speaking to students and civic leaders in a Kyrgyz TV interview, Clinton noted that the U.S. and its NATO partners agreed last month in Lisbon, Portugal, to begin turning over control to local Afghan authorities in 2011, with a goal of completing that transition by the end of 2014. “Then we will look to see if there is any continuing mission” for U.S. troops at Manas, she said. Later, in a pep talk to American troops at Manas, Clinton said, “You’re not going to be here indefinitely.” The U.S. has used Manas as a major transit point since the Afghan war began in 2001. The base has been a sore subject with regional giant Russia. It has also been the source of tension in U.S.-Kyrgyz relations, in part because of Kyrgyz suspicion of corruption in contracts for supplying the air base with fuel. Clinton said Thursday that the U.S. has agreed to include a Kyrgyz firm in the contracting for fuel supplied to Manas.

FTC suggestion of online service, similar to do-not-call list, seen as potential threat to Internet trade By Jim Puzzanghera Los Angeles Times

Dan Balilty / The Associated Press

Firefighters try to prevent a wildfire from reaching the town of Tirat Hacarmel, northern Israel, on Thursday. A massive forest fire that scorched part of northern Israel killed scores of people Thursday, officials said. Fire officials said the blaze, which torched some 800 acres, remained out of control as nightfall arrived. “This is an unprecedented disaster,” Prime Minis-

ter Benjamin Netanyahu said in a televised address before inspecting the scene of what many observers termed the worst forest fire in Israeli history. Netanyahu vowed to use all the government’s means to combat the fire and asked the international community, including European nations and Russia, to dispatch firefighting airplanes to help douse the flames. Greece and Cyprus said they would send planes.

ARIZONA

Budget cuts push many off of transplant lists By Marc Lacey New York Times News Service

PHOENIX — Even physicians with decades of experience telling patients that their lives are nearing an end are having difficulty discussing a potentially fatal condition that has arisen in Arizona: death by budget cut. Effective at the beginning of October, Arizona stopped financing certain transplant operations under the state’s version of Medicaid. Many doctors say the decision amounts to a death sentence for some low-income patients, who have little chance of survival without transplants and lack the hundreds of thousands of dollars needed to pay for them.

“The most difficult discussions are those that involve patients who had been on the donor list for a year or more and now we have to tell them they’re not on the list anymore,” said Dr. Rainer Gruessner, a transplant specialist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. “The frustration is tremendous. It’s more than frustration.” Organ transplants are already the subject of a web of regulations, which do not guarantee that everyone in need of a life-saving organ will receive one. But Arizona’s transplant specialists are alarmed that patients who were in line to receive transplants one day were, after the state’s

budget cuts to its Medicaid program, ruled ineligible the next. State Medicare officials said they recommended discontinuing some transplants only after assessing the success rates for previous patients. Among the discontinued procedures are lung transplants, liver transplants for hepatitis C patients and some bone marrow and pancreas transplants, which altogether would save the state about $4.5 million a year. “As an agency, we understand there have been difficult cuts and there will have to be more difficult cuts looking forward,” said Jennifer Carusetta, chief legislative liaison at the state Medicare agency.

WASHINGTON — Requiring a do-not-track mechanism to protect consumers from companies tracking their digital footprints on the Web is worrying some lawmakers, who warned Thursday that such a move could damage the Internet economy. “What will happen to advertising-supported Internet content?” said Rep. Ed Whitfield, R-Ky., who could chair a key subcommittee dealing with online privacy when Republicans take control of the House in January. “We need to be mindful not to enact legislation that would hurt a recovering economy.” He and other lawmakers at a House hearing were trying to determine whether Congress should enact legislation requiring a do-not-track function in Web browsers to allow consumers to opt out of the extensive data collection by Internet companies. Momentum has been growing for such an option, which would build off the success of the do-not-call registry that lets consumers block unwanted calls from telemarketers. On Wednesday, the Federal Trade Commission endorsed the idea of a do-nottrack function, though for now, it is calling for the industry to adopt it voluntarily. The Obama administration endorsed the idea of voluntary industry compliance with stronger consumer privacy protections, but has not backed the call for a broad do-not-track function, said Daniel Weitzner, an official at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration. Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., chairman of the House Subcommittee on Commerce, Trade and Consumer Protection, plans to introduce online privacy legislation next year and is considering including a donot-track requirement. He appeared to be still undecided but noted there were benefits to such a tool. “Through such a mechanism, consumers could advise would-be trackers unambiguously and persistently that they do not wish to be followed by digital snoopers and spies across websites and their various fixed and mobile computing devices,” Rush said. Internet companies are trying to blunt the call for a do-not-track function by launching an industrywide initiative offering more narrow privacy protection by allowing people to opt out of receiving targeted ads based on tracking data.


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Auto News Eulogy for long-beloved Mercury, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010 2,579.35 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +29.92 +1.17%

For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

1,221.53 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +15.46 +1.28%

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Ten-year CLOSE 3.00 treasury CHANGE +1.35%

City, Bend Indoor Markets at odds over whether use is industrial or retail

Franklin Ave.

BEND Colorado Ave. Arizona Ave. Industrial Ave.

By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

The people in charge of Bend Indoor Markets, where locals peddle and sometimes make products on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, do not plan to cooperate with the city in solving a zoning problem at the 2month-old market. The building, at 50 S.E. Scott St., is in an area zoned light industrial, which prohibits uses that are primarily retail. The city contends the property is being used primarily for retail and would like the property owners to seek permission for that

Prices from the AAA Fuel Price Finder at www .aaaorid.com. Price per gallon for regular unleaded gasoline and diesel, as posted online Thursday.

GASOLINE Station, address Per gallon • Conoco, 62980 Highway 97, Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.99 • Chevron, 1210 S.W. Highway 97, Madras . . . . .$3.00 • Chevron, 1745 N.E. Third St., Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.00 • Chevron, 1095 S.E. Division St., Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.04 • Chevron, 3405 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend . . . . . . .$3.04 • Texaco, 539 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.06 • Texaco, 2409 Butler Market Road, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.06 • Gordy’s Truck Stop, 17045 Whitney Road, La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.06 • Chevron, 1501 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond . . . . . . . . . .$3.08

DIESEL • Chevron, 1210 S.W. Highway 97, Madras . . . . .$3.30 Collene Funk / The Bulletin

BUS 97

97

Bend Indoor Markets

Shoppers look around the Bend Indoor Markets on Oct. 17. use. What’s more, the market has created parking and traffic problems, according to the city and neighboring businesses. But the property owners see the issue differently.

“This does not look like retail,” said Stephan White, who, along with his wife, Jennifer, has owned the building for more than a decade. The Whites are partners with

$28.542 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.154

Consumer spending revitalizes The Washington Post

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin ile photo

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Central Oregon fuel prices

$1388.50 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$1.20

Market hits zoning snag

Cindy Palmer in the Bend Indoor Markets, which is located in a former auto showroom. The Whites say they’re giving small-business owners a venue to sell their products, offering a venue that otherwise might not be available and creating income opportunities for vendors. See Market / B5

After two years on the sidelines, American consumers are spending again and raising hopes that they are ready to shoulder the burden of the nation’s economic recovery. Consumers’ growing strength was evident in data released in recent days across a wide array of sectors: Pending home sales shot up a surprising 10 percent, according to an industry group, a record increase. Sales at the Big Three automakers have increased by double-digit percentages. And many of the nation’s largest retailers reported better-than-expected sales from door-buster deals and midnight openings last month, with Cyber Monday alone raking in a historic $1 billion. See Consumers / B5

For unemployed, a growing fear of becoming

UNEMPLOYABLE Tim Smyth is a television producer who has been unable to find work since 2008. Benjamin Norman New York Times News Service

“I am so worried somebody will look at me and say, ‘Oh, he’s probably lost his edge.’ ”

Mortgage rates rise Fixed-rate mortgage rates rose again this week for the third straight week, according to the results of Freddie Mac’s weekly mortgage market survey. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 4.46 percent with an average 0.8 point for the week ending Thursday, up from last week, when it averaged 4.4 percent. Last year at this time, the 30-year rate averaged 4.71 percent. — From staff and wire reports

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North Carolina’s Department of Health and Human Services has awarded Bendbased GL Solutions a $9 million five-year contract that’s expected to double the size of the software company’s work force. “It’s the largest contract we’ve received to date,” Bill Moseley, GL Solutions CEO, said Thursday evening. The company, founded in 1997, has developed software called GL Suite that’s used by government regulatory agencies. GL Suite is called configurable off-the-shelf software, Moseley said; employees tailor it to meet customers’ requirements. Currently, 45 agencies in 18 states use GL Solutions software. For North Carolina, Moseley said, GL Solutions will customize its system to track certification of health care providers and medical facilities, such as hospitals and nursing homes. Located on Southwest Disk Drive, GL Solutions has 40 employees, Moseley said, and he expects to increase that number to 82 by March. The company also is in negotiations on a location for new offices in Bend, he said. GL Solutions will be hiring for a variety of roles, Moseley said, including business analysts, quality assurance, sales and software. The company will soon be posting information describing the openings and instructions for applying on its website, www.glsolutions.com. The company would prefer those interested to communicate by e-mail and not by phone, he said.

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—Tim Smyth

By Catherine Rampell New York Times News Service

he longer people stay out of work, the more trouble they have finding new work. That is a fact of life that much of Europe, with its underclass of permanently idle workers, knows all too well. But it is a lesson that the United States seems to be just learning. This country has some of the highest levels of long-term unemployment — out

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of work longer than six months — it has ever recorded. Meanwhile, job growth has been, and looks to remain, disappointingly slow, indicating that those out of work for a while are likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. Even if the government report today shows the expected improvement in hiring by business, it will not be enough to make a real dent in those totals. So the legions of long-term unemployed will probably be idle for signifi-

cantly longer than their counterparts in past recessions, reducing their chances of eventually finding a job even when the economy becomes more robust. “I am so worried somebody will look at me and say, ‘Oh, he’s probably lost his edge,’ ” said Tim Smyth, 51, a New York television producer who has been unable to find work since 2008, despite having two decades of experience at places like Nickelodeon and the Food Network. See Unemployed / B2

Cross section of America’s rich financed Fed program By Sewell Chan and Ben Protess New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — One investor, Kenneth Dahlberg, is a World War II flying ace who, as a volunteer in President Richard Nixon’s re-election campaign, was a minor figure in the Watergate scandal. Another investor, Magalen Bryant, runs a horse farm in Virginia and is active in steeplechase racing circles. A third, Ward Woods, is the chairman of the nonprofit organization that runs the Bronx Zoo. They were among hundreds of wealthy but lesser-known investors in an emergency lending program the Federal Reserve set up in November 2008, three weeks after President Barack Obama’s election, to support the market for student, auto, credit card and small-business loans. The investors, whose identities were disclosed as part of a trove of 21,000 records released on Wednesday at the direction of Congress, are a cross-section of America’s wealthy — investors who, in the midst of the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression, heard about an opportunity and weighed the risk. See Lending / B5 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Tablets are the next big thing, but what exactly do they do? By Roy Furchgott New York Times News Service

To be any kind of enthusiast, techies included, requires a modicum of snobbery. So if you are pondering a gift for your gadget lover, it had better be the Next Big Thing, otherwise you risk (at best) tepid thanks before your costly gizmo goes to the back of a drawer. Here’s a tip: Netbooks are passe. A computer? Paugh! Smart phones are so two years ago. The device of the moment is the tablet. What is a tablet? The category is so new that there is no agreed-upon definition, but tablets are generally lightweight computers that lack a physical keyboard and connect wirelessly to the Internet. Some liken them to giant smart phones, or netbooks you don’t unfold.

Here’s how hot the category is: Right now there is exactly one tablet that anyone has heard of, the iPad. More come out this month, and 35 are expected to be introduced at the Consumer Electronics Show in January. Here is a sampling of some new tablets, who might want them, and why.

ViewSonic’s ViewPad 7 New York Times News Service

For the bibliophile Technically, e-readers are tablets, albeit with a single purpose — reading. But e-readers are adding features that take them into tablet computing territory. The groundbreaker was the Amazon Kindle. The two newest versions, introduced in August, retain the 6-inch screen of earlier models, but are lighter, smaller and have higher contrast. The $140 Kindle connects to the Web by Wi-Fi alone, while the $190 Kindle can connect using either Wi-Fi or a 3G cellular network. No wireless subscription is required. Amazon says 750,000 recent books are available and 1.8 million free books out of copyright. The Kindle will hold 3,500 books. See Tablets / B2

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COV ER S T OR I ES

B2 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Unemployed Continued from B1 “I mean, I know it’s not true, but I’m afraid I might say the same thing if I were interviewing someone I didn’t know very well who’s been out of work this long.”

A downward spiral Smyth’s anxieties are not unfounded. New data from the Labor Department, provided to The New York Times, show that people out of work fewer than five weeks are more than three times as likely to find a job in the coming month than people who have been out of work for over a year, with a re-employment rate of 30.7 percent versus 8.7 percent, respectively. Likewise, previous economic studies, many based on Europe’s job market struggles, have shown that people who become disconnected from the work force have more trouble getting

Tablets Continued from B1 If you turn off the wireless connection, Amazon says, a single charge will last a month. That’s because screens using the E Ink technology common to readers don’t use battery-draining backlighting. But that also means you need as much light to read an ebook as a real book. The Kindles can load MP3 files, or audio books, for listening as you read, and can post passages from books you are reading, and your comments on them, to Facebook and Twitter. A qwerty keyboard also lets you search books for words or passages. A new feature lets readers see what passages other readers most commonly highlight in the text they are reading. The Borders Kobo e-reader is new and pared down to the basics. Since it lacks a keyboard, navigating the 6-inch E Ink screen is done through menus and a four-way toggle button. Borders estimates its $140 reader will hold about 1,000 books on its built-in 1-gigabyte memory, which can be expanded to 3 gigabytes with an SD memory card. Borders offers about 250,000 titles in addition to 1.8 million free books. Borders said the Kobo could hold a charge for about two weeks with the Wi-Fi turned off. The reader is “open source,” meaning it will support most forms of e-publications, so you aren’t locked into reading only Borders purchases on the Kobo. Barnes & Noble has updated its e-reader, the Nook, with a backlit color touch screen, and the ability to play music, video, and to send messages to friends through Facebook and Twitter and by e-mail. That also means the Nook Color can drink its battery dry in eight hours. It is a bit larger than other ereaders, closer in size and function to a tablet proper, with a 7inch screen and a weight just shy of a pound. The reader has access to more than 2 million titles, says Barnes & Noble, including magazines, newspapers, children’s books and free books.

For the classicist The iPad is now too familiar to turn heads, but as the device that

hired, probably because of some combination of stigma, discouragement and deterioration of their skills. This is one of the biggest challenges facing policymakers in the United States as they seek to address unemployment. Its underlying tenet — that time exacerbates the problem — means that the longer Congress squabbles about how to increase job growth, the more intractable the situation becomes. This, in turn, means Washington would need to pursue more aggressive (and, perversely, more politically difficult) job-creating policies in order to succeed. Even reaching an agreement over whether to extend benefits yet again has proved contentious. Several factors lead to this downward spiral of the unemployed. In some cases, the long-term unemployed were poor performers in their previous positions and among the first to be terminated when the recession began. These people are weak job can-

brought the tablet market to life, it is an instant classic. The iPad set the standard with a roughly 9.5-inch touch screen, a nearly miraculous 10 hours of battery life, wrapped in a halfinch-thick, 1.5-pound package. It connects to the Web by Wi-Fi, and some iPads can use the 3G mobile network, as well. It also connects with Bluetooth devices like headphones or your computer. The iPad may not be an all-out computer — some people will miss having a physical keyboard — but you can compensate somewhat with an app like Dragon Dictate, which converts what you say out loud into type. Apple’s 300,000 apps let you book travel, check weather, find an apartment, get fit, shop, read books and magazines and more. But not all of the apps you love on your iPhone work perfectly for iPad, and there are many fewer apps specifically for the iPad. You will want those apps because the iPad (and iPhone) can’t read the parts of websites made with Adobe Flash. According to comScore, a Web tracking firm, 70 percent of all video viewed on the Web in January used Flash. Most online video games use Flash, as well as shopping sites like Macy’s, Bloomingdale’s, Burton Snowboards and F.A.O. Schwarz. The way around that is to use apps that put a site’s content into a format that the iPad can process. The iPad lacks a camera, and its memory can’t be augmented with a card, as other tablets’ can. There are two tiers of iPads, those that require Wi-Fi to go online and those that can also use the 3G phone network. The Wi-Fi-only iPads are priced from $500 with a 16-gigabyte memory to $700 with 64 gigabytes of memory. The 3G models are priced from $630 with a 16-gigabyte memory to $830 for 64 gigabytes. The 3G models also require a phone contract and are available only from AT&T.

For the media mad At about half the iPad’s size and weight, you might think of the Galaxy Tab as the device you use on the way to the coffee shop, in contrast to the iPad, which you would use while sitting there. The Tab uses the Android 2.2

didates with less impressive résumés and references. In other instances, those who lost jobs may have been good workers but were laid off from occupations or industries that are in permanent decline, like manufacturing. But economists have tried to control for these selection issues, and studies comparing the fates of similar workers have also shown that the experience of unemployment itself damages job prospects. If jobless workers had been in sales, for instance, their customers might have moved on. Or perhaps the list of contacts they could turn to for leads is obsolete. Smyth, for example, says that so many of his former co-workers have been displaced that he is no longer sure whom to call on about openings. In particularly dynamic industries, like software engineering, unemployed workers might also miss out on new developments and fail to develop the skills required.

DEAL OF

Many unemployed workers fret about how to explain the yawning gaps on their résumés. Some are calling themselves independent “consultants” or “entrepreneurs.” Smyth has been working on his own documentary film and trying to develop ideas for new TV shows with a friend. But with financing for such projects scarce, he says he is still looking for a full-time job.

KOBO E-READER Borders’ e-reader keeps things simple with a pared-down design.

SAMSUNG GALAXY TAB This “media hub” supports Adobe Flash and features a camera.

DELL STREAK Dell offers the only tablet that will fit in your pocket. It also features optional phone service.

New York Times News Service photos

operating system, which will be instantly recognizable to anyone with an Android phone. In fact, the Tab shares the same snappy 1-gigahertz processor with the Galaxy S phones. And like the Galaxy phones, the Tab is available at all four major carriers as well as U.S. Cellular. While Androids don’t have nearly as many apps as the iPhone, they do have most of the popular ones. Android doesn’t have an online store, but you can check sites like android. appstorehq.com to see what is available. Samsung calls the Tab a “media hub,” a credible claim considering that it does some things the iPad can’t. Foremost, it can see all kinds of Web animation, including those coded in Adobe Flash. It also has a camera on the back with an LCD flash, and front-facing camera for video chat using third-party apps. It’s easier not to miss details when photographing from a screen that is nearly the size of a 5-by-7 print.

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Explaining the gap

Which tablet is right for you?

HOLIDAY DOUBLE N IN W WIIG G!! I B B VE E AV !! S SA G G I B BI

Still, this explanation probably applies to only a small slice of the country’s 6.2 million longterm unemployed. “I can’t imagine very many occupations and industries are of the type that if you’re out for nine months, the world passes you by,” said Heidi Shierholz, an economist at the Economic Policy Institute, a liberal research organization. “I think this erosion-of-skills idea is way overplayed. It’s probably much more about marketability.”

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A slot for a Micro SD memory card adds 32 gigabytes of storage to the built-in 16 gigabytes. While the screen is bright and clear, it is not the AMOLED screen on the Galaxy phones, so don’t expect the same startling detail.

For the Android purist Most carriers overlay the Android operating system with a “skin” to give it a certain look and load it with hard-to-remove proprietary apps that critics call “bloatware.” Not Viewsonic, whose ViewPad 7 offers a pure Android experience. Viewsonic argues that, by

Employers are reluctant to acknowledge any bias against the jobless, and many say they try to take broader economic circumstances into consideration. It does not help when job seekers are repeatedly rejected — or worse, ignored. Constant rejection not only discourages workers from job-hunting as intensively, but also makes people less confident when they do land interviews. A Pew Social Trends report found that the long-term unemployed were significantly more likely to say they had lost some of their self-respect than their counterparts with shorter spells of joblessness. “People don’t have money to keep up appearances important for job hunting,” said Katherine Newman, a sociology professor at Princeton. “They can’t go to the dentist. They can’t get new clothes. They gain weight and look out of shape, since unemployment is such a stressful experience. All that is held against them when there is such an enormous range of workers to

choose from.”

leaving Android untouched, apps work without freezes, crashes or hangs. The pad is less than a halfinch thick, weighs 0.83 pounds, and comes with 512 megabytes of internal memory, which can be expanded with a Micro SD card up to 32 gigabytes. The squarish aluminum edges, which make it look like an oversize iPhone 4, house speakers, a microphone, connection ports and volume controls. The ViewPad has a 3-megapixel camera on the back and a 0.3-megapixel front-facing camera for live chats. The spec sheet shows that the resolution of the Viewsonic screen is considerably lower, at 800-by480, than competing products. The reason, said Viewsonic, is that Android software specifies that apps be built to show at that resolution, so the tablet doesn’t have to scale graphics up. That requires less processing power, which is a good thing, because the ViewPad 7, with a 600-megahertz processor, doesn’t have quite the punch of other pads’ gigahertz processors. The ViewPad won’t be offered through a carrier, so the price of the pad won’t be folded into a contract, leaving you to pay the full $460 freight (a $30 discount promotion is planned for this month). You then need an AT&T or T-Mobile SIM card and contract to connect to the Web on 3G.

comes with a 64-gigabyte flash solid-state memory, a slot for a SD memory card and a USB port that can be connected to an external drive. The $800 tablet is Wi-Fi only, but because it has a USB slot, you can get an accessory that will let you to connect to a 3G or 4G network. Run that hardware, however, and the tablet won’t get near its maximum five-hour battery life. The idea is that people with businesses running on Windows can work remotely. Need to check inventory? Just check the pad. However, anyone who wants full Windows functionality can use the Slate. It does come equipped with a 3-megapixel camera on the back and a 0.3megapixel camera on the front, and will handle iTunes, so it’s not all work no play. But it won’t be under tree in time for Christmas; there is a six-week back-order.

For the entrepreneur The HP Slate 500 Tablet PC is such a hard-core business machine that you can buy it only through Hewlett-Packard’s business website. The Slate is the most computerlike of the current tablets, running the same version of Windows 7 that a desktop computer uses through its 1.86 gigahertz processor. Similar in size to the iPad, it has an 8.9-inch touch screen, is a little more than a half-inch thick and weighs 1.5 pounds. The pad

A new normal? Though economists generally agree that getting the longterm unemployed back to work quickly is necessary to keep people from becoming unemployable, the mechanism to do so is unclear. The real threat, economists say, is that America, like some of its Old World peers, may simply become accustomed to a large class of idled workers. “After a while, a lot of European countries just got used to having 8 or 9 percent unemployment, where they just said, ‘Hey, that’s about good enough,’ ” said Gary Burtless, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. “If the unemployment rates here stay high but remain relatively stable, people may not worry so much that that’ll be their fate this month or next year. And all these unemployed people will fall from the front of their mind, and that’s it for them.”

For the light traveler The one tablet that can really be called “pocketable,” the Dell Streak, with a 5-inch screen, is partway between a phone and a tablet. With a weight of 7.7 ounces and size of 6-by-3.1-by0.4 inches, the Streak will fit into the back pocket of a pair of jeans. It is also the only tablet right now to offer phone service as a standard service, not an add-on. With Android 2.2, it is a capable device for Web browsing, games and watching video. It comes with a 5-megapixel camera on the back and a 0.3megapixel camera on the front. The Streak can also act as a WiFi hot spot to connect up to eight devices to the Web. The company isn’t publishing a battery-life claim (never a good sign). Eight configurations of the Streak are priced from $250 at Best Buy with a two-year AT&T contract and a 16 gigabytes of memory to $680 for an unlocked phone, sold direct by Dell, with 32 gigabytes of memory.


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Friday, December 3, 2010 B3

A N Gas price forecast for holiday road trips By Steven Cole Smith The Orlando Sentinel

ORLANDO, Fla. — Planning a road trip for the holidays? There’s good news and bad news regarding gas prices and supply. Here’s a look at what to expect:

Q: A:

Good news first, please?

Gas prices are stable, and there are no major factors in sight that would dramatically shift prices up or down before the end of the year. Once again, we dodged the hurricane season, and the BP spill doesn’t seem to have had much of an effect.

Q: A:

And the bad news?

Gas prices are up compared with last year. The national average is $2.89 a gallon, compared with $2.64 a year ago. Most of the increase is attributed to a slight rally in the U.S. economy that increased demand, to a small rise in crude oil prices, and increased global demand in emerging markets such as China.

Q: A:

Is heating oil affecting gasoline prices? “So far, not so much this year,” said Jessica Brady, public relations manager for AAA South in Tampa, Fla. We are seeing, Brady said, a slight dip in oil reserves, and some of that is attributed to heating oil. But so far, a relatively mild weather up north hasn’t upset prices. The federal U.S. Energy Information Administration in Washington, an information clearinghouse for the Department of Energy, projects average household expenditures for heating fuels will total $965 this winter, about the same as last year.

Q: A:

So will we see $3-a-gallon gas this holiday season? According to the most recent forecast from the EIA, expect a national average for regular gasoline of $2.84 per gallon this winter, 19 cents per gallon higher than last winter. Diesel fuel prices are expected to average $3.09 per gallon this winter, an increase of 29 cents per gallon over last winter.

Q: A:

What’s the long-term forecast? Here are the numbers from the EIA projections for 2011, and some historical perspective, to give you an idea of the trend: A gallon of regular gas averaged $3.26 in 2008, $2.35 in 2009, and EIA predicts an average of $2.77 for 2010. For 2011, the organization expects an average of $2.97 — still under $3 a gallon, but not by much. EIA forecaster Neil Gamson said the projected increase includes slightly higher crude oil prices, the potential for an uptick in the economy that could raise demand, and a more active “driving season.”

Eulogy for long-beloved Mercury By Jim Koscs

Top collectible Mercurys

New York Times News Service

October marked the end of the line for yet another U.S. automotive brand. Assembly plants produced the final vehicles to carry the Mercury nameplate, an unceremonious end for a marque that had been introduced in 1939 as an upscale companion for basic Fords — but more recently allowed to atrophy to little more than a selection of lightly modified Ford sedans and SUVs. Still, Mercury leaves behind a history peppered with compelling and even innovative cars that at once conveyed a clear message: based on Fords, but better. Depending on the year and the car, better could have meant any combination of bigger, more stylish, more powerful or more luxurious. Pairing Mercury with the Lincoln franchise after World War II underscored the theme of what is today called entry-level luxury. Ford’s name for its new division was an allusion to the speedy messenger to the gods from ancient mythology, for many years depicted in the company’s logo with a winged helmet. It also represented business or financial success; for many, buying a Mercury flaunted upward mobility. John Baumann of Holland, Mich., grew up with the brand. “My father sold Mercurys, so we always had them around,” said Baumann, who was a teenager when the first Mercury Cougar came out in 1967. Since then, he’s had eyes only for early Cougars, especially the 1969-70 convertibles. He owns five. One of the most acclaimed Mercury designs, the first Cougar was based on Ford’s Mustang but offered a striking look of its own — a roomier, more luxurious interior and, its fans say, a smoother driving feel. But it was a success the company let go fallow. “My sons drove Capris in the ’80s,” Baumann said. “But there’s nothing there today for the next generation — my grandsons — sporty enough to drive in high school.”

Brand evolution The 1949-51 models, the brand’s first postwar redesign, were quickly successful — and their popularity proved durable. James Dean drove a ’49 coupe in the 1955 film “Rebel Without a Cause,” scoring a lifetime of coolness points for Mercury. In fact, those models were already an established canvas for customizers. The cars were called “lead sleds” for the copious amounts of lead used to fill

Jesse Newman / New York Times News Service

Eight of the cars in Bob McMinn’s 20-vehicle collection in Massapequa, N.Y., are Mercurys, from a ’46 woody wagon to a ’94 Capri. seams and smooth body cuts. From the mid-1960s, full-size Mercurys adopted Lincoln-influenced designs and ran with Ford’s top engines. On TV, the top cop of the original “Hawaii Five-O” series, Steve McGarrett, cracked crimes in a black ’68 Park Lane. Even with its parent Ford deeply involved in racing, Mercury filled its own trophy case. In NASCAR, Mercury had a strong presence in the late 1960s and early 1970s, with David Pearson, Cale Yarborough, Bobby Allison and A.J. Foyt racking up wins. In Mercury showrooms, the Cyclone and Cougar Eliminator muscle models stoked the performance image. As the Cougar began to grow into a model with luxury aspirations, Mercury turned to Ford’s German branch to lure younger buyers with the hot-selling Capri sports coupe in the 1970s. Mercury tried to keep a sporty streak going: The Capri name bounced to a Mustang-based modeland then to a small Australian-built, Mazdapowered convertible in the early ’90s; the Cougar badge later made a brief reprise on a small, front-wheel-drive sports coupe. In 2003, Mercury revived the Marauder moniker for a performance-tuned Grand Marquis, but sold just 11,000 over two years. By then, the boundary between Ford and Mercury vehicles had all but vanished.

Minn credits his father with lighting the Mercury fire for him. “He had a ’55, and later a ’64 Comet,” said McMinn, an accountant who advertises his affection for the brand with a neon Mercury sign in the front window of his house. Eight of his 20 vehicles are Mercurys, from a ’46 woody wagon to a ’94 Capri. The ’46 woody wagon is among the most valuable Mercury models today, with the best examples selling for more than $100,000. He bought his 20 years ago for $375, replacing its seized V-8 with a rebuilt engine from Ford. McMinn bought his first Mercury in 1959, a ’54 two-door sedan. Today, he has a ’54, a ’56 and a ’57 in that same style, a cheaper alternative to the more popular pillarless hardtop models. What’s needed, he said, is more time to drive his cars —

one thing he hopes to get when he retires. Baumann, the Cougar enthusiast from Michigan, said his father remained loyal to Mercury and drove a Grand Marquis. “I’m old enough to drive that car now, but I don’t like it,” he said. More his style, he added, would have been something like the Mercury Messenger design study that made its debut at the Detroit auto show in 2003. With classic Cougar design cues and a Mustang V-8 under its long hood, the Messenger hinted at a sporty Mercury revival that never came.

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Where to find cheap gas You probably know where to find the cheapest gas in your own neighborhood, but what about when you’re 100, or 1,000, miles from home? Here’s some help. • GasBuddy.com has 204 separate sites that allow you to check gas prices by city, state or ZIP code in the U.S. and Canada. I punched in my ZIP code, which is in a very rural area, and got back three local stations with prices immediately on regular, midgrade, premium and diesel fuel. Click on the station you choose, and you’ll get a map showing where it is. GasPriceWatch.com has similar information. • Often the cheapest gas is offered at wholesale clubs like Sam’s Club, B.J.’s and Costco. • Get away from the exit: Real estate is typically the highest at exits for expressways and toll roads on property closest to the highway, so a station a mile down the road may be cheaper.

Though the Mercury brand is a tiny sliver of the overall car collecting scene, said John Kraman of Mecum Auctions, it has some advantages. “It’s a little bit off the beaten path, but at the same time, a higher-line car like a Mercury can offer more enjoyment than the higher-priced collectible Chevys and Fords, because it was a bit more car,” he said. Kraman suggested a top-five list of collectible Mercurys (listed values, from CPI and Cars That Matter price guides, are the top of the range for rare cars in excellent condition): • 1946 Sportsman convertible, $238,000. • 1946-51 woody wagons, $118,000. • 1949-51 coupes and convertibles, $85,000. • All other 1950s convertibles, $63,000 (for a ‘56 Montclair). • Late ’60s and early ’70s performance models like the Cyclone, $30,000, and the ’6970 Cougar Eliminator, $70,000. “The ’49-’51 has a cultlike appeal, and many who are attracted to it were not even alive when those cars were new,” said Kraman. “It’s a car that jumps generations.”

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B USI N ESS

B4 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFC Ent AFLAC AGCO AGIC Cv AGIC Cv2 AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL n APACC ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abraxas AcadiaRlt Accenture AccretvH n AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom ADAM AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Advntrx rs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp AirMedia Aircastle Airgas AirTran AkamaiT AkeenaS h Akorn Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliHlthC AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlnylamP AlphaOm n AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria AlumChina AmBev Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AmIntlGrp AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmStsWtr AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Ancestry Andrsons Angiotc gh AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Approach Apricus rs AquaAm ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArchD pfA ArchLearn ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmstrWld Arris ArrowEl ArrwhdRsh ArtTech ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AspenBio h AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlPwr gn AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AudCodes Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium

4.97 +.23 25.60 +.41 0.48 20.12 +.39 0.54 23.51 +.19 1.30 59.84 +.36 12.74 11.27 +.35 13.61 -.37 1.20 54.28 +1.28 45.96 +1.41 1.08 9.85 -.04 1.02 9.20 -.05 1.76 37.74 +.54 0.20 13.84 +.28 15.60 +.04 1.12 30.49 +.85 5.46 -.13 8.45 -.18 24.57 +.07 5.97 -.02 0.27 34.88 +.44 1.68 28.55 +.27 15.04 +.39 10.12 +.04 1.81 -.03 8.51 -.11 0.05 20.57 +.22 2.65 +.17 1.76 47.61 +.60 0.70 56.02 +5.58 0.42 6.88 -.05 4.34 -.03 0.72 18.59 +.19 0.90 44.31 +.31 14.38 +.15 52.43 -.58 26.19 -.28 2.29 +.12 0.15 12.08 +.11 0.04 25.41 +.96 0.52 56.56 +.10 18.34 +.44 6.59 +.24 29.10 +.73 0.36 32.89 +.81 0.25 5.00 +.12 0.24 67.54 +1.39 3.85 +.06 12.23 +.34 7.54 +.03 0.06 5.31 +.03 6.66 -.02 1.99 +.06 27.20 +.69 0.04 8.94 +.13 5.96 +.08 13.32 +.23 23.04 -3.76 1.46 +.05 0.04 30.50 +.56 93.44 +3.03 6.16 -.57 4.28 +.03 2.40 +.03 36.72 +.60 0.18 82.98 +.92 0.11 83.38 +.32 1.96 88.63 +2.24 7.82 +.19 7.30 -.10 0.40 10.20 +.22 1.00 63.71 +1.77 7.46 52.45 -.91 .37 +.01 5.22 -.02 0.56 55.00 -.37 0.34 37.34 +.06 2.84 +.05 0.12 14.09 +.52 3.95 161.17 +.63 33.41 +1.15 1.80 68.77 +.89 8.15 +.46 76.15 -.09 17.50 -.47 10.54 -.07 0.60 23.28 +.27 0.72 54.49 +1.44 0.20 68.28 +1.82 67.14 +.98 3.61 -.16 3.95 1.20 14.46 -.14 0.48 8.10 +.02 1.51 23.67 +.50 1.58 37.00 +.06 0.80 77.91 +1.19 .95 +.03 28.21 +.07 0.80 61.17 +.77 6.09 -.21 4.00 -.05 17.94 +.04 0.80 30.31 +.36 4.56 +.06 9.45 +.06 13.28 +1.52 53.02 +2.33 2.22 +.04 0.40 7.23 +.06 0.66 5.80 +.05 0.25 15.86 +.01 0.24 37.33 +.40 0.48 21.19 +.47 1.52 23.80 -.37 23.36 +.59 4.95 139.49 +2.52 5.49 +.01 176.53 -.02 27.14 +.67 28.49 -.27 1.54 29.22 +.03 44.16 +.62 1.29 57.76 +.33 1.45 +.02 11.00 +.34 1.35 31.49 5.60 29.43 7.66 +.22 0.44 15.88 -.96 1.84 36.08 -.32 0.10 11.38 +.13 0.72 44.98 +.68 0.65 31.83 +.53 42.88 +.60 18.83 +.39 10.16 +.16 2.31 +.06 1.04 34.07 -3.19 33.46 -.22 51.81 +.78 0.88 25.00 +.22 0.72 53.71 +.73 0.40 31.88 +.33 0.36 60.89 -.91 53.84 +.32 7.23 +.20 0.06 52.82 +1.11 23.26 +1.71 12.97 +.03 0.36 69.88 +2.60 6.96 +.01 1.11 +.02 0.88 37.26 +.60 29.57 +.08 0.36 34.84 +1.20 .23 +.01 0.18 48.44 +1.12 0.49 57.80 +1.16 3.25 57.84 +1.66 26.90 -.33 2.60 18.28 +.07 1.37 +.06 51.09 +.30 0.92 7.03 +.07 0.60 42.26 +.95 8.45 +.49 0.60 114.38 +3.12 0.40 25.06 +.65 35.35 +.90 1.12 11.16 +.27 318.15 +1.75 0.68 30.70 +.20 0.28 12.91 +.14 9.93 +.27 21.00 +2.05 3.54 +.02 0.62 21.59 -.24 .31 +.01 0.75 34.20 +.98 91.61 +.91 0.40 31.28 +1.06 0.60 30.12 +.63 3.13 38.60 +.45 8.66 +.09 1.39 +.01 1.40 16.90 +.16 4.17 -.03 21.61 +.90 0.12 27.56 +2.31 0.12 19.07 +.01 13.74 51.07 +.96 10.48 +.17 33.34 +1.26 .92 -.02 5.98 23.00 +.09 18.96 +.20 16.75 +.61 3.37 +.15 10.15 +.22 0.60 52.96 +.91 17.51 +.70 0.60 29.35 +.30 12.97 -.06 .56 -.04 0.04 13.77 +.56 0.68 15.15 +.22 0.64 36.57 +.60 0.18 17.60 +.36 0.52 12.81 +.41 2.41 47.99 +.40 42.70 -.39 34.00 +.16 1.09 14.17 +.23 43.23 +.22 1.40 24.78 +.54 11.47 +.72 1.36 31.38 +.80 36.93 +.73 5.45 +.65 7.07 +.13 26.91 +.42 37.64 +1.07 1.40 78.35 +2.51 1.44 46.69 +.58 263.20 +2.64 19.36 +.29

Nm AvagoTch AvalonBay AvanirPhm AVEO Ph n AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallyTech BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkAML pfN BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil B iPInvVIX Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioScrip BiostarPh Bitauto n BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso BlackRock BlkBldA n BlkCpHY V BlkCpHY VI BlkIntlG&I BlkLtdD Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BlueNile BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt BonTon BoozAllen n Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BttmlnT BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BldrFstSrc BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBS B CEVA Inc CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNinsure CRH CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CACI CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalmsAst CalaStrTR Calgon Calix n CallGolf Calpine CAMAC En CamdnP Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CampCC n CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar Canon CapGold n CapOne CapitlSrce CapFedF CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer Cardero g CardnlHlth CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd CarMax Carnival Carrizo Carters Caseys CashAm Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE n CenterFncl CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CenPacF CentAl

D 28.41 +1.55 3.57 113.41 +1.71 4.08 -.10 14.30 -.66 0.80 39.68 +1.09 4.35 +.09 14.50 +.75 1.00 21.73 -.03 32.39 +.64 0.88 29.19 -.17 2.46 -.10 0.84 36.75 +.49 0.68 12.98 +.08 0.60 24.71 +.96 1.83 35.25 +.60 37.32 +.83 0.48 7.98 +.04 1.74 87.43 +1.92 1.74 76.12 +1.81 38.10 +.76 47.54 +.32 45.76 +.23 41.32 +.70 4.42 1.50 43.67 +.46 0.10 16.01 +.71 3.97 -.30 24.65 -.28 106.37 -.44 0.60 54.49 +.67 0.68 63.30 +.07 0.40 69.06 +1.12 41.70 +.62 0.57 10.55 +.42 0.52 20.90 +.24 0.80 11.02 +.65 0.33 13.80 +.14 0.88 13.60 +.35 0.04 11.68 +.39 2.05 24.92 +.02 6.77 +.27 2.43 +.15 2.16 25.18 1.67 22.80 -.29 1.80 44.88 +.75 1.04 1.73 -.02 2.80 60.65 +.41 0.36 27.84 +.47 1.96 53.79 +.52 .85 +.14 0.04 1.71 +.06 45.88 +.32 24.79 +.39 31.92 +.68 0.28 17.18 +.30 43.31 -3.64 70.13 -2.44 0.72 86.33 +.37 1.00 13.06 -.40 0.32 20.00 +.35 0.48 53.29 +.85 15.68 +.86 1.24 49.66 +.32 2.16 43.41 +.26 .23 -.00 17.74 +.26 4.67 +.22 0.10 6.16 +.02 0.76 58.37 +2.04 1.64 80.76 +.94 45.69 +1.09 6.29 +.16 0.92 32.58 +.46 16.47 +.07 0.28 27.05 +.06 81.42 +.74 0.30 40.00 +.79 0.60 43.56 +1.12 31.09 +.08 39.49 +.47 1.77 +.06 1.48 -.17 67.08 +1.71 27.11 -.04 0.68 17.80 +.08 4.54 +.05 2.81 -.02 11.95 -.12 1.44 29.91 -1.13 1.28 11.72 +.20 4.00 171.85 +4.23 0.12 18.49 +.14 0.99 11.52 -.10 0.99 11.38 -.10 1.36 10.77 -.01 1.05 16.67 -.16 0.40 14.07 +.92 0.60 13.37 +.68 27.30 +.28 50.46 -1.10 2.06 30.99 +.16 1.68 66.59 +.87 0.40 7.60 +.03 .66 +.01 13.98 -.01 19.14 -.26 1.08 +.01 65.27 +2.01 0.04 5.46 -.05 2.00 86.12 +1.21 6.67 +.15 19.50 -.40 9.20 +.03 0.60 11.25 -.05 21.73 +.42 0.44 18.99 +.96 26.91 +.54 8.54 +.05 1.72 +.04 0.56 21.56 +.41 0.40 26.23 +.62 1.28 25.84 +.28 0.32 46.55 +.52 0.60 21.72 +.53 24.70 +.57 1.97 -.05 5.10 +.07 20.06 +.49 0.52 30.66 +.73 0.56 16.88 +.24 0.34 10.28 +.20 7.93 +.39 0.32 23.80 +.32 0.28 14.26 +.17 1.28 69.12 +2.32 16.31 +.33 0.05 17.16 +.25 0.16 20.26 +.06 0.80 38.30 +2.17 0.10 89.04 -.06 0.46 51.30 +.64 46.25 -.89 1.60 +.10 0.92 62.54 +.56 0.16 23.99 +.30 19.38 +.30 6.25 +.15 0.80 17.32 +.40 0.20 17.29 +.12 22.39 -.34 0.40 123.75 -.29 1.00 75.81 +.75 0.04 38.26 +.26 41.69 +1.94 4.60 312.50+12.46 0.84 18.45 +.24 44.57 +1.38 6.18 +.15 0.26 18.40 -3.75 0.83 19.76 +1.69 1.04 64.03 +1.09 0.52 23.77 +.90 0.34 8.03 +.03 12.43 +.32 0.35 31.98 +.11 22.50 -.16 0.50 31.87 -.30 0.72 37.24 +.45 0.12 36.94 +.94 52.38 +.72 7.57 +.07 8.17 +.22 5.67 +.10 0.30 12.20 +.22 0.63 9.16 +.15 14.60 +.37 14.39 +.66 0.04 7.83 +.05 12.46 +.18 2.95 +.07 1.80 52.42 +1.35 0.28 37.69 +.33 23.00 -1.68 50.89 +.97 1.16 34.06 -.17 12.81 +.11 3.48 79.14 -.72 1.08 66.71 +1.25 0.30 41.69 +1.12 1.08 66.02 +1.05 13.38 +.36 48.95 +1.03 4.63 +.03 0.20 38.95 +.82 0.04 6.65 +.06 2.00 23.50 -.07 1.66 11.98 +.11 .77 -.01 0.80 99.85 -.87 1.54 -.02 0.78 37.36 +.74 .45 -.01 17.03 -.03 22.75 -.82 18.31 +.27 33.64 +.09 0.40 43.22 +.65 30.78 +.43 32.16 +.19 0.54 40.40 +.49 0.14 37.03 -.24 1.76 88.62 +1.17 0.04 14.59 +.59 39.28 +.97 .75 +.01 0.20 38.81 +.38 5.80 +.14 9.24 +.22 60.46 +.05 .37 -.00 0.43 9.58 +.38 0.86 17.29 +.07 0.80 30.83 +1.14 6.50 +.01 0.78 15.84 +.08 1.56 13.76 +.11 27.44 +2.97 20.03 +.84 0.01 19.57 +.08 1.47 +.06 14.96 +.77

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D 2.90 43.98 +.07 5.65 +.25 65.51 +1.25 21.32 +.51 11.67 +.62 92.03 +.45 2.40 -.01 30.59 +1.46 33.59 +.40 3.54 -.25 34.25 +1.64 34.50 +.12 44.49 +.42 19.67 +.92 32.70 +.51 14.67 +.22 5.98 +.04 0.30 21.63 +.22 2.88 84.50 +1.80 30.43 +.44 0.16 12.29 -.19 51.72 -.25 0.69 4.07 +.01 .49 -.06 1.70 -.05 7.75 +.05 2.00 8.49 +.13 3.44 +.41 8.17 -.05 7.10 -.19 1.54 65.62 +.04 5.03 -.13 15.87 -.15 11.56 -.04 1.85 50.63 +.14 0.28 3.56 -.09 11.88 +.12 6.18 -.09 2.79 96.00 +1.48 1.50 -.01 5.16 +.04 2.45 -.05 0.23 13.82 +.20 9.61 -.19 10.60 -.27 0.25 27.02 +1.00 250.96 -7.86 11.70 +.48 0.24 5.51 +.21 1.48 58.43 +.45 1.27 24.51 +.21 0.68 66.06 +.33 15.72 +.37 0.32 85.83 +2.09 2.50 1.60 31.04 +.23 0.84 18.29 +.39 0.49 28.38 +.50 15.52 +.11 19.22 -.10 1.97 26.40 -.01 4.42 +.12 1.78 24.55 +.11 .63 +.07 69.62 +.72 0.40 56.21 +.94 4.99 -.01 1.56 -.02 13.86 +.37 5.90 -.92 0.56 72.21 +1.75 2.20 62.67 +.36 21.45 +.97 0.60 56.85 +.37 11.48 -.07 0.48 25.37 +.59 1.76 64.90 +.20 25.08 +.31 0.40 5.86 +.14 69.32 +2.43 0.96 16.51 +.16 0.72 8.85 +.12 64.27 +.91 3.44 +.03 2.12 77.76 +.53 20.38 +2.79 0.60 18.49 +.27 1.38 +.04 0.38 20.72 -.11 0.38 19.64 0.40 39.09 +1.74 0.94 37.68 +1.16 0.48 16.62 +.65 2.00 25.43 +.19 31.82 +.18 32.03 +.23 29.73 +.14 0.36 41.94 +.29 1.56 86.74 +3.10 27.02 +.84 31.16 +1.60 0.60 46.76 +.30 10.72 +.09 25.76 +.81 1.00 30.70 +.66 6.86 -.26 0.40 36.04 +1.40 0.92 22.08 +.13 85.33 +1.88 52.63 +.09 1.43 +.03 4.46 +1.23 2.20 63.70 +1.25 0.40 44.43 +.74 2.38 48.83 +.08 26.79 +.39 21.31 +.23 0.96 28.92 +.20 55.71 +.72 13.17 +.18 .32 -.02 0.06 53.79 -.57 1.08 55.32 -.75 0.42 21.88 +.65 2.30 29.82 -.02 33.12 -.69 0.72 25.66 +.48 4.20 +.08 0.24 87.63 +.82 18.82 +.47 13.16 +.16 4.24 +.15 0.56 44.88 +.49 0.20 18.72 +.68 1.65 35.20 +.85 25.14 +.58 13.44 +.34 8.33 +.47 11.98 +.33 0.82 69.01 +.70 8.38 +.04 0.12 7.67 +.23 46.76 +.66 1.50 16.14 +.30 26.53 +.37 0.80 43.04 +.10 0.92 39.52 +.83 1.70 124.02 +1.92 1.85 39.04 +1.06 0.32 2.97 +.01 67.87 +1.09 17.75 -.13 .36 -.03 42.68 +.70 32.27 +.52 .32 +.02 44.01 +1.28 21.20 +.22 1.80 55.82 +1.19 1.05 103.97 +3.45 0.01 131.77 +.90 0.90 9.91 +.29 3.20 -.09 1.75 -.07 40.57 +1.04 17.20 +.67 2.40 13.85 +.05 1.05 0.05 51.05 +1.00 2.44 35.20 +.30 0.28 5.02 +.08 0.40 10.57 -.24 26.60 +.70 0.40 4.31 -.09 0.78 9.92 -.03 1.21 25.65 -.05 0.15 10.92 +.39 0.60 44.21 +.77 40.17 +.72 2.24 45.53 +.13 15.91 +.24 0.08 44.50 +.38 1.28 50.02 +.70 12.51 +.37 74.11 +.07 0.24 43.68 +.93 7.29 -.03 77.80 -2.14 1.40 78.30 +2.16 0.36 18.77 +.01 9.94 +.01 13.65 +.24 13.51 -.37 .74 -.02 1.00 22.02 -.18 10.12 -.09 19.40 +.56 37.82 +.26 3.36 -.03 3.70 -.01 0.20 32.19 +.42 5.41 +.03 0.93 51.35 +1.50 11.96 -.11 15.55 +.04 40.85 -.13 8.42 +.02 0.08 13.23 +.15 0.64 73.43 +1.42 4.79 +.08 11.75 -.16 2.38 72.08 +.27 0.50 66.75 +.84 0.03 10.83 -.11 13.41 -.12 35.88 +.48 1.08 31.93 -.21 2.12 53.79 +.56 36.37 -1.68 0.16 34.52 +2.46 40.91 -.32 6.26 42.60 +1.63 5.68 38.58 +2.03 25.65 -1.01 18.02 -.58 0.20 19.64 -.84 26.09 -1.15 21.92 -1.35 11.01 -.84 24.25 +1.63 7.35 42.40 +.40

Nm

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3.41 53.29 +2.14 9.14 -.57 4.77 63.59 +1.91 9.67 -.38 8.06 65.14 +2.45 5.06 50.98 +2.16 0.08 18.94 +.08 42.12 +.78 36.76 +.80 .20 18.65 +.16 0.40 37.34 +.22 0.24 40.27 +.94 65.30 -.49 9.46 -.05 27.26 +.51 31.93 -.38 47.12 +.52 56.09 +.17 1.83 42.10 +.05 14.87 +.07 1.00 80.61 +1.86 0.52 55.90 +.34 1.04 16.73 +.27 1.43 -.03 0.40 16.87 +.05 1.10 57.78 +.98 0.60 33.24 +.82 1.00 37.79 +.73 8.02 +.28 31.40 +.23 25.11 +.43 40.38 +1.08 0.52 4.57 +.02 80.25 -.15 1.74 5.23 -.02 1.64 48.63 +.28 0.48 22.89 +.02 0.98 17.76 -.02 0.68 11.55 +.13 1.40 77.61 +.89 2.86 +.10 3.00 -.09 13.66 +.19 5.26 +.11

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0.25 14.38 +.25 0.77 29.43 -.02 15.64 +.36 29.91 +.65 22.68 +.34 15.45 -.36 22.02 +.12 28.02 +.31 2.51 41.94 +.86 0.62 93.86 +2.23 0.88 42.51 +1.12 5.85 +.40 76.23 +2.93 5.11 0.40 26.74 +.94 0.10 8.13 -.01 0.64 9.11 +.02 0.04 18.15 +.45 1.88 80.97 -.24 4.74 +.04 2.32 99.75 +.86 0.72 30.72 +.62 1.39 16.18 -.08 1.80 13.35 -.03 1.62 11.55 +.10 1.53 10.74 +.04 1.56 12.96 +.07 21.86 +.95 20.48 +.32 0.70 47.96 +.08 0.97 42.38 +1.59 13.90 +.74 1.26 37.79 +.22 0.20 7.55 +.09 67.52 -.06 2.75 -.05 0.04 13.93 +.13 1.64 33.27 +.33 5.18 +.10 0.05 18.32 +.33 15.08 +.03 0.38 29.69 +.37 1.37 +.10 1.38 56.86 +.88 .53 -.03 1.28 21.67 -.09 10.71 +.17 11.65 +.02 4.11 60.77 +.17 1.96 57.08 +.32 0.80 28.37 +.30 2.00 20.49 +.21 6.46 +.06 36.83 +.13 4.21 26.79 +.89 0.52 45.89 +1.57 72.37 +.96 4.64 +.11 3.65 +.28 2.16 39.62 -.30 3.58 50.80 +.08 25.95 +.74 5.47 +.18 2.16 30.33 +.87 0.61 23.93 -.13 1.40 49.21 +1.38 7.08 +.19 3.32 72.35 +.50 2.33 41.25 +.20 2.60 47.21 +.51 9.79 +.36 11.26 +.08 9.88 +.17 0.64 35.79 +.55 81.52 +1.92 0.88 17.75 +.17 1.35 51.66 +.99 0.28 10.62 +.05 4.13 114.22 +1.01 0.75 78.04 +.89 28.48 +.11 11.84 -.02 1.92 84.19 +.16 .78 -.00 5.85 -.20 5.69 +.04 0.16 18.54 +.11 5.91 -.06 2.10 39.55 +.11 5.94 +.39 8.50 +.31 0.28 26.96 +.17 0.40 55.55 +.60 16.16 +.39 54.08 -.30 2.16 -.14 23.08 +.09 0.33 16.59 +.23 2.87 -.02 1.76 71.48 +.15 27.93 +2.65 27.27 +1.01 137.15 -1.81 24.83 +.76 28.36 +.67 0.50 80.16 -.35 88.74 +1.59 0.48 9.24 +.21 4.04 +.18 36.84 +.77 14.85 14.92 +.59 0.62 50.61 +.30 0.84 56.92 +1.98 0.48 95.21 +1.22 2.68 78.31 +.22 0.96 24.84 +.75 6.43 +.29 14.68 +.13 16.35 +.36 0.72 13.78 +.10 0.20 28.15 +.39 1.26 11.22 -.43 0.04 13.05 +.79 23.06 +3.29 0.16 18.33 -.31 0.24 15.00 +.08 .27 +.02 0.04 6.57 +.09 0.40 17.72 +.32 0.72 10.19 +.30 7.96 +.31 0.04 9.66 +.17 0.60 12.99 +.51 0.80 16.57 +.56 131.47 +4.73 0.03 25.63 +.40 0.06 21.16 +.18 34.17 +.23 0.06 19.46 +.24 0.11 14.21 +.26 0.25 23.15 +.33 19.34 +.39 2.20 35.66 +.46 0.64 18.44 +.41 57.65 +.79 6.60 -.06 1.25 +.02 7.47 +.10 4.28 +.53 3.48 +.10 0.80 26.41 +.44 1.16 109.34 +1.36 0.50 60.74 +.98 23.69 +.42 0.64 57.38 +.09 0.60 19.29 +.09 5.23 -.02 16.78 +.32 8.15 +.28 3.25 52.13 +.29 15.75 +.04 32.24 -.14 35.61 +.40 9.64 -.01 32.44 +.24 4.94 +.31 0.76 61.47 +1.32 72.78 +4.53 30.32 +1.08 1.77 21.10 +.34 0.88 119.97 +2.34 2.00 107.64 +2.15 .04 -.00 38.20 +.80 10.37 +.31 0.75 9.39 +.08 16.33 +.44 1.90 25.88 -.28 1.19 +.02 0.12 9.17 +.25 6.21 +.09

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D 7.31 +.33 9.23 +.30 0.20 4.90 +.17 4.56 24.46 +.48 7.87 +.18 27.60 -.25 0.84 14.88 +.11 0.68 5.63 +.12 1.68 18.15 +.20 0.14 14.67 +.01 1.28 28.87 +.12 21.15 +.88 7.15 +.33 0.16 14.11 +.50 0.40 21.67 +.11 0.20 67.99 +.61 1.50 30.58 +.68 33.54 +.52 .34 5.14 +.24 35.68 +.18 14.81 +.11 5.14 +.05 34.67 +.69 1.68 67.80 +.18 0.48 16.68 +.38 15.80 -.15 0.04 3.73 -.11 1.12 35.66 +.02 5.45 34.68 -.10 2.38 51.45 +.17 2.48 -.02 49.06 +.21 1.55 24.44 +.29 0.18 14.59 +.09 0.44 22.83 +.62 22.47 -.88 1.64 49.60 +1.09 .45 -.02 12.48 +.46 70.97 -.17 21.71 +.18 0.32 12.64 +.55 5.92 -.04 .40 -.12 0.18 7.10 +.02 1.52 +.07 0.30 29.01 -1.87 37.70 +.50 0.52 13.46 -.04 2.00 38.94 +.28 2.54 +.04 0.40 8.70 +.24 2.45 +.04 6.32 +.05 0.08 42.36 +.06 5.11 +.11 14.68 +.22 20.04 +.09 25.31 +.47 15.04 +.17 0.15 16.58 +.04 2.07 -.13 0.40 16.81 +.09 0.68 13.99 -.10 0.16 17.37 +.59 0.36 46.58 +.43 4.37 +.08 1.53 23.94 +.17 1.40 162.50 +4.05 1.16 86.64 +.74 15.04 +1.61 9.85 -.03 571.82 +7.47 16.39 +2.78 34.70 +.53 0.80 38.30 +1.34 20.75 +.24 2.16 131.16 +3.89 2.27 +.23 7.72 +.18 19.00 -.15 0.52 27.22 +.38 4.01 +.11 3.26 +.05 2.83 -.05 0.07 7.45 -.04 0.83 19.02 +.02 35.80 -.40 10.93 -.07 30.60 +.26 0.40 39.03 +.11 16.54 +.53 0.52 24.38 +.33 0.80 48.39 +.45 7.24 +.20 10.43 +.40 19.54 +.05 0.58 28.59 +.06 1.86 33.71 +.80 0.86 29.23 +.78 1.70 52.02 +.52 2.00 27.24 +.23 28.63 +.01 0.36 40.61 +1.42 7.20 +.11 27.62 -.11 .96 +.01 1.41 -.04 52.94 +.43 16.50 +.32 0.40 33.05 +.79 46.70 +.50 6.74 -.06 0.07 11.52 +.11 1.00 44.95 -.23 14.03 +.93 0.82 25.34 +.75 0.20 24.02 +.76 1.81 24.27 +.63 13.44 -.05 1.00 49.04 +1.28 4.60 31.20 -.04 1.24 22.16 -.01 8.10 +.06 4.17 +.15 2.76 46.07 +.47 0.62 16.11 +.02 9.13 +.09 1.20 20.64 +.20 27.60 +.52 18.61 +.64 28.23 +.39 9.96 +.21 0.08 16.15 +.40 4.17 +.17 9.75 +.03 0.52 23.29 +2.03 1.80 48.76 +.09 13.81 -.18 0.24 48.33 +1.47 59.55 +.82 1.00 70.91 +1.68 2.70 +.09 0.80 10.07 -.07 0.20 6.37 +.11 1.28 47.31 +.08 12.96 +.32 0.40 74.29 +1.15 0.32 43.11 +.54 17.74 +.32 25.59 +.33 34.87 +.21 1.70 30.98 +.26 0.41 41.00 +.08 0.75 19.61 +.30 0.25 2.13 +.06 60.63 +1.69 0.60 36.67 -.12 13.85 +.14 17.44 +.22 0.95 33.36 +1.75 47.29 +.06 2.32 55.12 +.55 34.37 +.22 37.67 +.40 1.21 51.19 +.31 .67 +.02 0.20 4.18 +.15 1.02 49.77 -.09 23.09 +.01 12.04 +.29 56.54 +.39 1.80 22.70 +.26 0.04 16.89 +.24 0.28 6.15 +.02 4.02 +.22 43.15 +1.20 34.69 +1.35 1.44 59.77 +1.08 0.60 11.77 +.21 4.12 +.07 24.99 +.31 57.47 +.38

Nm HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn Hyatt Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 0.48 38.53 +.95 0.04 6.25 +.22 0.40 15.64 +.28 43.72 +.77 7.92 +.25 3.08 +.08

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D 2.58 +.11 48.47 +.49 15.01 +.09 0.76 36.57 +.24 1.92 28.81 +.17 1.62 49.53 +.09 14.07 -.05 0.48 36.47 +1.24 4.92 -.31 11.07 +.43 0.04 8.12 +.35 15.59 +.23 1.40 34.15 +.03 2.64 61.68 -.78 0.72 17.25 +.41 4.44 70.50 +.27 4.44 64.00 +.21 16.64 +.01 40.25 -.29 14.21 +.03 4.67 +.48 0.10 18.19 +.38 45.03 +.15 12.00 13.79 +.28 0.24 19.62 +.52 1.70 22.89 -.53 0.24 16.12 +.54 5.15 +.04 55.03 -.99 12.49 +.11 1.16 30.43 -.20 28.20 -.41 7.44 +1.28 0.42 21.63 -2.23 8.01 +2.01 7.14 +.14 11.48 +.83 11.83 -.02 1.60 73.64 +1.60 10.40 +.24 17.98 +.44 3.86 +.26 21.97 +.03 34.70 -.31 2.81 +.17 5.92 +.11 8.42 +.24 8.27 +.29 .97 +.02 83.91 -1.57 3.09 +.03 1.24 +.01 48.15 +.63 48.55 +.85 39.03 +.55 0.20 38.46 +1.31 49.17 -2.17 0.44 24.47 -.11 5.00 +.09 9.05 +.09 0.50 37.56 +.91 10.71 -.47 5.68 -.11 92.76 +2.99 0.24 35.24 +1.50 1.08 21.51 +.28 0.40 31.13 +.87 0.16 16.88 +1.13 0.60 46.29 +.17 27.41 +.57 .97 +.00 1.34 -.04 0.46 8.09 +.22 38.36 +1.09 0.29 4.81 +.08 35.79 +.04 34.06 +.35 15.91 +.19 58.13 -.53 1.90 31.60 +.13 52.49 +1.03 40.55 +.16 35.05 +.58 1.96 34.25 -.01 6.67 -.08 0.60 34.90 +.26 0.80 26.15 +.15 0.20 25.12 +.60 0.92 33.94 +.52 1.69 +.02 2.64 36.48 -.37 0.20 12.92 -.05 11.27 +.37 7.72 +.29 1.45 4.14 +.14 5.06 +1.10 3.00 69.80 +.40 3.61 +.41 0.25 38.22 +.31 20.50 +.57 39.49 -.10 2.79 +.19 4.50 81.74 -.47 8.99 +.58 0.44 24.92 +1.17 1.44 108.80 +1.61 2.53 +.14 53.37 -.83 24.78 +.59 30.49 +.61 30.41 +.54

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MAG Slv g MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MER Tel rs MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSCI Inc Macatawa Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MSG n MagelnHl MagelMPtr MagicSft Magma MagnaI gs MagHRes Majesco h MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MktVGold MkVStrMet MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktV Indo MktV Viet MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg MaxLine n McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn

2.80 80.64 +2.14 11.54 +.05 9.97 +.18 0.37 7.11 +.12 1.00 26.96 +.97 0.65 20.90 +.12 3.25 -.15 12.15 +.24 3.08 +1.02 8.09 +.16 0.90 8.22 -.01 0.58 6.79 -.02 9.28 +.62 12.85 +.47 14.30 21.41 -.07 2.33 -.02 36.37 +1.16 2.82 +.12 2.00 47.80 +1.13 1.80 32.00 +.12 0.20 25.54 -.26 .91 +.11 23.71 +.78 49.55 +.24 2.98 55.98 -.24 0.50 6.16 +.15 4.43 +.01 0.72 51.55 +1.62 6.10 -.32 .81 +.03 0.24 2.26 -.02 0.08 11.87 +.50 6.26 +.02 0.74 58.80 +1.53 0.52 14.81 +.46 1.00 35.04 +.89 0.11 61.18 +.90 20.86 +.26 0.08 36.29 +.97 41.87 +.60 0.42 51.11 +.49 0.45 60.75 +.71 0.18 90.32 +2.27 0.04 26.75 -.16 0.31 44.83 +.62 2.56 41.89 0.35 40.52 +.30 0.84 26.39 +.62 0.04 5.48 +.60 22.77 +.39 4.60 -.07 1.60 90.15 +1.76 20.46 +.26 0.30 12.01 +.33 2.75 32.48 -.12 0.24 50.25 +.65 14.45 -.11 0.60 249.19 +1.00 0.83 25.57 -.05 2.92 +.02 0.84 23.95 +.11 10.99 +.10 3.37 +.20 1.12 45.89 +1.49 19.27 +.27 2.44 79.38 +.09 0.94 35.65 +.62 0.72 66.83 +1.16 15.56 +.71 46.89 -.08 0.90 61.41 +1.26

Nm MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MecoxL n MedAssets MedcoHlth MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck MercGn Meredith MeridBio MeritMed Meritage Mesab Metabolix Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetroPCS Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MidAApt MdwGold g MillerHer Millicom MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g MinesMgt Mirant MitelNet gn MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolexA MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan Mosaic Motorola Motricity n Movado Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NETgear NGAS Rs h NICESys NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NXP Sem n NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NatInstru NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatResPtrs NaviosAcq Navios Navistar NektarTh NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netflix Netlist NetSpend n NetSuite Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NGenBiof h NwGold g NJ Rscs NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NoahHld n NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura Noranda n NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NoAmEn g NA Pall g NoWestCp NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NwstNG NovaMeas NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NuPathe n NutriSyst NvIMO NuvMuVal NvMSI&G2 NuvPI2 NuvQInc NuvQPf2 Nvidia OGE Engy OReillyA h OSI Sys OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFr rs

D 1.00 26.61 +1.00 26.10 +1.63 8.11 +.21 7.61 +.96 19.33 63.69 +1.14 0.80 10.58 +.23 13.37 -.20 0.24 26.88 -.21 26.35 +.89 64.21 +.72 0.90 33.86 -.05 6.05 -.09 0.36 28.58 +.03 11.69 +.12 68.67 +1.99 7.20 +.16 1.52 35.22 +.16 2.40 44.25 +.87 0.92 34.30 -.16 0.76 22.45 15.03 -.14 21.13 +1.42 2.39 48.30 +1.49 11.19 +.78 4.60 -.04 .96 -.04 0.62 30.60 +.52 0.74 40.47 +1.17 12.37 -.03 1.38 35.44 +.94 7.30 -.07 7.91 +.52 44.90 +.10 23.25 +.26 0.64 26.89 +.85 1.44 +.04 2.46 62.71 +.98 .77 +.01 0.09 23.47 +.93 7.24 89.77 -.41 2.11 +.23 0.20 26.00 -.16 6.39 +.01 9.78 +.09 2.83 -.29 10.01 +.20 6.40 +.35 4.82 +.05 3.25 +.04 21.61 +.52 14.94 +.50 56.57 +2.22 0.70 22.10 +.45 0.70 18.39 +.39 1.12 48.56 +.10 28.45 -1.55 15.65 +.23 2.59 +.04 17.01 +.50 1.12 62.35 +.62 23.24 +.27 0.40 19.90 +.10 0.42 27.17 +.23 0.20 25.61 +.69 0.20 66.96 -1.53 7.97 -.04 26.89 +.28 14.97 +2.51 2.67 +.04 0.07 3.74 +.20 1.10 70.75 +1.43 19.74 -.04 21.59 +.18 11.44 +.74 14.59 -.17 32.61 +.37 .49 +.01 30.70 -.06 40.72 +.68 2.32 +.09 6.28 +.05 19.19 +.03 0.48 13.94 +.05 13.98 +.72 1.20 28.91 +.73 23.13 +.29 0.14 30.79 +.77 12.37 +.53 23.25 +.68 0.29 1.85 -.04 12.61 +.18 1.38 66.38 +1.44 7.04 44.05 +.46 0.52 35.48 +.58 0.44 62.34 +.35 0.04 7.15 +.20 1.52 27.27 +.98 0.40 14.11 +.49 1.88 35.80 +.29 2.16 31.83 +.58 0.20 4.14 -.09 0.24 5.30 +.06 56.57 +2.08 13.00 -.19 32.63 +.39 53.84 +1.65 38.80 -.16 193.42 -6.72 2.45 +.08 14.47 +.87 26.28 +1.01 8.02 +.39 26.33 +.46 14.71 -.09 6.20 +.23 .08 -.01 9.69 +.16 1.44 42.93 -.35 1.00 17.14 +.27 9.07 -.03 0.28 13.92 +.50 5.80 -.24 0.20 17.60 +.23 69.72 +1.27 0.60 60.51 +.86 6.06 +.01 15.86 +.25 0.15 14.32 +.25 0.15 16.04 +.36 0.20 21.89 +.60 2.00 51.23 +.30 0.92 17.07 +.04 1.86 46.63 +3.11 1.24 87.83 +.50 15.91 +.01 22.81 +.07 19.39 +1.94 0.90 34.25 -.43 0.72 84.98 +1.44 0.56 9.77 +.17 5.95 +.17 11.50 -.01 1.70 25.72 -.24 0.80 42.14 -1.29 1.44 62.49 +.97 9.84 +.16 6.22 +.47 1.36 29.13 -.28 1.03 31.80 +.21 9.90 +.30 23.72 +.32 1.12 52.99 +1.47 3.07 +.10 1.88 64.03 +.68 0.40 4.26 0.40 10.78 +.36 1.74 47.54 -1.73 7.42 +.02 14.48 -.10 1.99 54.61 +.50 8.86 +.13 2.23 -.03 5.96 31.73 +.65 1.70 42.02 +.06 0.50 32.10 +.01 23.44 +.22 17.91 +.01 1.44 40.26 +1.04 6.34 -.07 0.70 19.72 -.66 0.86 13.52 -.18 0.47 9.35 -.11 0.75 8.89 +.02 0.89 13.62 -.06 0.95 13.59 -.36 0.66 8.08 -.03 14.38 +.17 1.50 44.70 -.29 61.75 +1.04 33.23 -1.15 26.68 -.18 1.52 90.74 +.49 73.24 +.19 .98 +.01

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Och-Ziff 0.88 14.50 +.50 Oclaro rs 11.07 +.91 OcwenFn 8.91 +.05 OfficeDpt 4.68 +.10 OfficeMax 18.57 +.67 OilSvHT 2.54 136.18 +2.07 OilStates 60.95 +.45 Oilsands g .42 -.01 OldDomF s 30.10 +.58 OldNBcp 0.28 10.84 -.02 OldRepub 0.69 12.96 +.22 Olin 0.80 19.14 +.02 OlympStl 0.08 23.21 +1.64 OmegaHlt 1.48 21.93 +.70 Omncre 0.13 23.22 +1.00 Omnic pfB 2.00 37.41 -.17 Omnicom 0.80 46.94 +.47 OmniVisn 30.85 -.17 OnSmcnd 9.09 +.40 ONEOK 1.92 52.51 +1.07 OnyxPh 30.01 -.17 OpenTxt 44.00 +.75 OpenTable 73.25 +.76 OpnwvSy 2.34 -.07 Opnext 1.44 +.04 OptimerPh 9.74 +.18 optXprs 4.50 18.53 +1.04 Oracle 0.20 28.10 +.45 OraSure 5.29 OrbitalSci 16.94 +.12 Orbitz 5.55 +.13 Orbotch 11.57 +.38 Orexigen 5.47 +.58 OrientEH 11.51 +.17 OrienPap n 6.86 -.40 OrientFn 0.20 11.80 +.05 OriginAg 8.86 +.03 Oritani s 0.40 11.48 +.04 Orthovta 1.86 -.09 OshkoshCp 30.50 +1.40 OvShip 1.75 34.27 -.52 OwensM s 0.71 29.03 +.19 OwensCorn 27.86 +.16 OwensIll 28.02 +.20 Oxigene h .21 +.00 PDL Bio 1.00 5.88 +.03 PF Chng 0.63 51.56 +1.09 PG&E Cp 1.82 47.83 +.13 PHH Corp 21.42 +.01 PMC Sra 7.95 +.44 PMI Grp 3.40 +.20 PNC 0.40 56.57 +1.40 PNM Res 0.50 12.09 -.08 POSCO 1.43 103.29 +2.67 PPG 2.20 80.19 +.33 PPL Corp 1.40 25.76 +.18 PSS Wrld 21.20 +.21 Paccar 0.48 56.21 +.33 PacerIntl 5.66 -.09 PacBiosci n 12.81 -.29 PacCapB h .30 +.05 PacEth h .70 +.04 PacSunwr 6.80 +.16 PackAmer 0.60 26.90 +.72 PaetecHld 3.87 +.08 PainTher 2.00 7.78 -.13 PallCorp 0.64 47.18 +.96 PalmHHm .15 +.03 PampaEng 0.08 18.09 +.38 PanASlv 0.10 39.15 +.60 Panasonic 0.11 14.49 +.02 PaneraBrd 104.47 +2.57 ParagShip 0.20 3.47 +.02 ParamTch 22.47 +.31 ParaG&S 1.77 +.01 Parexel 18.24 +.75 ParkDrl 4.16 +.14 ParkerHan 1.16 83.99 +.80 PartnerRe 2.20 78.51 +.51 PatriotCoal 17.54 +.74 Patterson 0.40 30.40 +.15 PattUTI 0.20 21.38 +.92 Paychex 1.24 29.60 +.29 PeabdyE 0.34 62.72 +1.84 Pengrth g 0.84 13.19 +.13 PnnNGm 35.48 PennVa 0.23 17.23 +.82 PennVaGP 1.56 26.18 +1.00 PennVaRs 1.88 27.88 +.54 PennWst g 1.08 22.39 +.35 Penney 0.80 34.47 +.77 PenRE 0.60 13.66 +.21 Penske 15.86 +.46 Pentair 0.76 33.98 +.47 PeopUtdF 0.62 12.91 +.36 PepBoy 0.12 12.65 +.09 PepcoHold 1.08 18.64 +.09 PepsiCo 1.92 65.20 -.43 PeregrineP 1.61 +.02 PerfectWld 23.57 -.07 PerkElm 0.28 24.37 +.44 Perrigo 0.28 62.85 +1.72 PetChina 3.97 130.30 +2.92 Petrohawk 18.98 +.60 PetrbrsA 1.12 30.58 +.52 Petrobras 1.12 33.78 +.46 PtroqstE 7.33 +.12 PetsMart 0.50 39.18 +.67 Pfizer 0.72 16.69 -.01 PhrmAth 3.67 -.11 PhmHTr 2.36 64.13 +.39 PharmPdt 0.60 25.73 +.59 Pharmacyc 5.48 +.19 PhilipMor 2.56 57.93 +.23 PhilipsEl 0.95 29.50 +1.35 PhlVH 0.15 71.23 +1.21 PhnxCos 2.27 +.01 PhotrIn 6.74 +.19 PiedNG 1.12 29.03 -.97 PiedmOfc n 1.26 19.90 +.04 Pier 1 10.00 -.14 PilgrmsP n 6.76 -.07 PimcoCpI 1.28 15.51 -.39 PimCpOp 1.38 17.04 -.21 PimcoHiI 1.46 13.13 -.05 PimcoMu2 0.78 10.38 -.10 PinnclEnt 13.74 +.11 PinnaclFn 10.74 +.63 PinWst 2.10 41.12 +.09 PionDrill 7.20 +.13 PioMuAdv 1.08 12.86 -.33 PioNtrl 0.08 83.92 -.35 PitnyBw 1.46 22.76 +.42 PlainsAA 3.80 61.63 +.27 PlainsEx 29.78 +.78 Plantron 0.20 36.23 +.27 PlatGpMet 2.24 +.12 Plexus 27.83 -.16 PlugPwr h .41 PlumCrk 1.68 37.34 +.35 Polaris 1.60 75.43 +1.42 Polo RL 0.40 113.05 +2.46 Polycom 38.00 +.37 PolyMet g 2.09 -.01 PolyOne 13.00 +.02 Polypore 35.12 +2.67 Pool Corp 0.52 21.60 +.12 Popular 3.01 +.11 PortGE 1.04 21.69 +.14 PostPrp 0.80 34.52 +.40 Potash 0.40 143.54 -1.39 Potlatch 2.04 32.60 +.06 PwrInteg 0.20 42.00 +1.19 Power-One 10.40 +.79 PSCrudeDS 57.78 -2.02 PwshDB 26.03 +.22 PwShCurH 23.52 +.07 PS Agri 29.82 +.10 PS Oil 26.77 +.26 PS BasMet 22.51 +.24 PS USDBull 23.16 -.14 PwSClnEn 9.95 +.14 PwSWtr 0.11 18.31 +.20 PSTechLdr 0.02 23.27 +.21 PSFinPf 1.31 17.74 -.01 PSETecLd 0.11 18.54 +.43 PSBldABd 1.36 25.16 -.15 PwShPfd 1.01 14.23 -.06 PShEMSov 1.60 27.24 +.13 PSIndia 0.12 24.69 +.26 PwShs QQQ 0.33 53.73 +.54 Powrwav 2.17 +.04 Praxair 1.80 94.43 +.92 PrecCastpt 0.12 142.31 +1.53 PrecDrill 8.94 +.10 PremGlbSv 7.10 PrmWBc h .40 +.01 Prestige 12.09 +.02 PriceTR 1.08 61.47 +2.01 priceline 402.99 -.11 PrideIntl 32.08 +.32 PrinctnR 1.01 +.09 PrinFncl 0.55 29.42 +1.26 PrisaA wi 7.72 -.13 PrivateB 0.04 12.55 +.14 ProShtDow 45.29 -.44 ProShtQQQ 35.25 -.40 ProShtS&P 45.27 -.61 PrUShS&P 25.36 -.66 ProUltDow 0.40 52.35 +.96 PrUlShDow 21.63 -.43 ProUltQQQ 79.02 +1.63 PrUShQQQ 12.03 -.25 ProUltSP 0.43 45.16 +1.15 ProUShL20 36.49 +.25 ProUSL7-10T 40.94 +.22 ProShtEafe 51.84 -1.02 PrUSCh25 rs 28.04 -.81 ProUSEM rs 33.32 -1.37 ProUSRE rs 19.14 -.52 ProUSOG rs 40.99 -1.20 ProUSBM rs 21.57 -.71 ProUltRE rs 0.41 48.33 +1.31 ProUShtFn 17.47 -.92 ProUFin rs 0.09 59.97 +2.76 PrUPShQQQ 32.81 -1.14 ProUltO&G 0.23 42.05 +1.13 ProUBasM 0.10 45.45 +1.39 ProUShEur 15.33 -.80 ProShtR2K 33.73 -.36 ProUltPQQQ 141.15 +4.16 ProUSR2K 13.80 -.31 ProUltR2K 0.01 39.11 +.78 ProUSSP500 21.36 -.85 ProUltSP500 0.48 186.78 +7.00 ProUltCrude 11.65 +.35 ProUSSlv rs 11.79 -.13 ProUShCrude 10.99 -.35 ProSUltSilv 137.97 +1.13 ProUltShYen 16.77 -.10 ProUShEuro 20.80 -.30 ProceraNt .55 +.03 ProctGam 1.93 62.36 +.21 ProgrssEn 2.48 43.81 -.20 ProgsvCp 1.16 20.90 +.34 ProLogis 0.45 13.69 +.66 ProspctCap 1.21 9.91 +.03 ProtLife 0.56 25.01 +.88 ProvET g 0.72 7.78 +.18 ProvidFS 0.44 14.17 +.13 Prudentl 1.15 53.92 +1.97

Nm PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal PulteGrp PMMI PMIIT PPrIT

D 1.37 31.49 +.03 3.20 99.29 +1.08 16.47 +1.09 6.75 +.21 0.53 7.00 -.13 0.52 5.96 +.02 0.71 6.50 -.07

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n 0.08 36.91 +.46 QIAGEN 18.61 +.01 QiaoXing 1.81 QlikTech n 23.35 -.11 Qlogic 17.95 -.05 Qualcom 0.76 48.49 +.60 QuanexBld 0.16 17.00 +.10 QuantaSvc 18.32 +.52 QntmDSS 3.91 +.01 QuantFu h .50 -.02 QstDiag 0.40 50.57 +.20 QuestSft 26.83 +.57 Questar s 0.56 17.46 +.71 Questcor 13.99 -.33 QuickLog 6.16 +.12 QksilvRes 14.72 +.28 Quiksilvr 4.44 +.07 QuinStrt n 20.61 +.51 QwestCm 0.32 7.08 +.03 RAIT Fin 1.81 +.11 RBS pfG 1.52 14.13 +.12 RF MicD 7.28 +.12 RIT Tech 12.94 +1.06 RLI Cp 1.16 59.26 -.89 RPC 0.28 31.40 +1.17 RPM 0.84 20.47 -.51 RRI Engy 3.53 +.06 RSC Hldgs 8.21 +.20 RTI IntlM 29.33 -.28 Rackspace 29.61 -.39 RadianGrp 0.01 7.63 +.29 RadientPh .42 +.01 RadOneD 1.00 -.06 RadioShk 0.25 19.01 +.49 Ralcorp 63.10 +1.02 Rambus 20.40 +.24 RamcoG 0.65 11.75 +.20 Randgold 0.17 94.25 +.20 RangeRs 0.16 43.99 +1.16 RareEle g 9.90 -.20 RJamesFn 0.52 30.86 +1.37 Rayonier 2.16 52.35 +.86 Raytheon 1.50 48.33 +1.08 RealNwk 3.66 +.06 RltyInco 1.73 34.10 +.10 RedHat 46.93 +.70 RedRobin 19.49 +.89 Rdiff.cm 4.65 +.77 RedwdTr 1.00 14.41 +.37 RegalBel 0.68 61.84 -.25 RegalEnt 0.72 14.45 +.69 RgcyCtrs 1.85 41.75 +.70 RegncyEn 1.78 26.25 +.25 Regenrn 29.48 -.01 RegBkHT 0.59 78.95 +2.47 RegionsFn 0.04 6.06 +.39 Regis Cp 0.16 18.04 +.05 ReinsGrp 0.48 51.63 +.61 RelStlAl 0.40 48.21 +1.61 RenaisRe 1.00 61.40 +.66 ReneSola 8.64 +.33 RentACt 0.24 28.44 +.29 Rentech 1.26 +.03 Repsol 1.15 25.97 +.62 RepubAir 7.82 +.20 RepubSvc 0.80 29.33 +.70 RschMotn 62.69 +.87 ResMed s 33.44 +.56 ResrceCap 1.00 6.73 +.03 RetailHT 1.79 105.56 +.99 RexEnergy 12.39 +.09 RexahnPh 1.13 +.15 ReynAm s 1.96 31.90 +.03 RightNow 24.95 +.21 RioTinto s 0.90 68.94 +2.41 RitchieBr 0.42 20.38 +.12 RiteAid .96 +.03 Riverbed s 34.44 +.17 RoadrnTr n 12.97 +.03 RobbMyer 0.17 32.53 +.66 RobtHalf 0.52 29.84 +1.02 RockwlAut 1.40 68.45 +.84 RockColl 0.96 58.34 +.97 RockwdH 39.14 +.65 RogCm gs 1.28 35.96 +.32 Rollins 0.36 27.87 -.10 Roper 0.38 74.81 +1.06 RosettaR 37.85 +.89 RossStrs 0.64 65.60 +.01 Rovi Corp 54.47 -.48 Rowan 32.03 +.97 RoyalBk g 2.00 55.57 +.21 RBScotlnd 13.09 +.56 RylCarb 42.21 +.66 RoyDShllB 3.36 63.29 +1.13 RoyDShllA 3.36 63.27 +.98 RoyGld 0.44 51.78 -.33 Rubicon g 5.73 -.09 RubiconTc 23.49 +.48 RubyTues 13.68 +.64 Ruddick 0.52 37.63 -.21 rue21 29.51 -1.46 RuthsHosp 5.15 -.05 Ryanair 2.29 31.51 +.60 Ryder 1.08 45.20 +.76 RdxSPEW 0.62 45.90 +.66 Ryland 0.12 15.81 +.76 SAIC 16.01 +.20 SAP AG 0.67 47.96 +.37 SBA Com 40.18 +.21 SCANA 1.90 41.22 +.27 SEI Inv 0.20 23.72 +.67 SFN Grp 9.37 +.37 SK Tlcm 18.80 +.09 SLGreen 0.40 66.43 +.35 SLM Cp 12.17 +.18 SM Energy 0.10 52.85 +1.17 SMTC g 3.59 -.11 SpdrDJIA 2.57 113.74 +1.07 SpdrGold 135.20 -.18 SpdrEMSmC 0.87 57.78 +.93 SpdrIntRE 1.31 39.77 +.84 SpdrIntlSC 0.42 29.29 +.53 SP Mid 1.54 160.28 +2.03 S&P500ETF 2.31 122.56 +1.55 Spdr Div 1.68 51.48 +.01 SpdrHome 0.12 16.65 +.45 SpdrKbwBk 0.11 23.65 +.89 SpdrKbwCM 0.26 37.35 +1.24 SpdrKbwIns 0.43 40.91 +.91 SpdrLehHY 4.13 39.84 SpdrNuBST 0.43 24.03 -.02 SP IntTip 0.33 57.10 +.18 SpdrLe1-3bll 45.85 SpdrKbw RB 0.30 23.75 +.47 SpdrRetl 0.57 47.85 +.17 SpdrPhrm 0.34 44.87 +.04 SpdrOGEx 0.20 50.45 +1.05 SpdrOGEq 0.12 35.95 +.46 SpdrMetM 0.35 64.45 +1.40 SPX Cp 1.00 68.63 +1.57 STEC 16.98 -.04 STMicro 0.28 9.27 +.12 STR Hldgs 19.01 +.63 SVB FnGp 49.05 +1.66 SXC Hlth s 43.62 +4.52 SABESP 0.84 48.36 +.65 Safeway 0.48 22.29 -1.04 StJoe 18.64 +.84 StJude 40.09 +.34 Saks 11.47 +.18 Salesforce 143.02 -1.02 SalixPhm 44.35 -.65 SallyBty n 13.69 -.14 SamsO&G 1.18 SanderFm 0.60 41.38 -.48 SanDisk 48.00 +1.10 SandRdge 5.43 +.25 SangBio 5.33 +.39 Sanmina 11.17 +.17 Sanofi 1.63 31.68 +.22 Sapient 0.35 12.77 -.11 SaraLee 0.46 15.16 -.16 Satcon h 3.74 +.17 SavientPh 11.91 -.17 Savvis 25.93 +.17 Schlmbrg 0.84 80.74 -.11 Schulmn 0.62 21.86 +.65 SchwUSMkt 0.38 29.54 +.38 SchwUSLgC 0.38 29.17 +.37 Schwab 0.24 16.16 +.47 SciGames 7.93 +.07 Scotts 1.00 51.36 +.36 ScrippsNet 0.30 51.72 +.38 ScrippsEW 9.56 -.02 SeaCube n 0.20 12.79 +.72 SeabGld g 28.60 -.67 SeacorHld 15.00 111.89 +1.64 SeadrillLtd 2.31 32.84 +.10 SeagateT 14.53 +.61 SeahawkDr 7.55 -.40 SealAir 0.52 23.98 +.36 Sealy 3.06 +.06 SearsHldgs 67.39 -.19 Seaspan 0.50 12.64 -.04 SeattGen 15.88 +.66 SelCmfrt 9.09 +.13 SelMedHld 6.39 +.20 SemiHTr 0.55 32.44 +.57 SempraEn 1.56 51.01 +.46 Semtech 23.33 -.70 SenecaA 24.84 +.96 SenHous 1.48 22.45 +.10 Sensata n 27.66 -.01 Sequenom 6.75 -.06 ServiceCp 0.16 8.16 -.01 ShandaGm 5.74 -.15 ShawGrp 33.52 +.94 Sherwin 1.44 76.21 +.22 ShipFin 1.44 22.72 +.40 Shire 0.34 70.94 +1.04 ShoreTel 7.57 +.39 Shutterfly 34.27 +.29 SiderNac s 0.58 16.25 +.30 Siemens 3.72 119.52 +3.90 SifyTech 2.08 +.01 SigmaDsg 12.45 +.33 SigmaAld 0.64 65.38 +.51 SignetJwlrs 40.52 +.52 SilganH s 0.42 35.20 +.13 SilicGrIn 7.91 +.12 SilicnImg 7.60 -.07 SilcnLab 44.63 +.89 Slcnware 0.41 5.39 +.09 SilvStd g 27.64 +.89 SilvWhtn g 38.29 +.39 SilvrcpM g 0.08 13.17 +.47 SimonProp 2.40 101.93 +2.09 SimpsnM 0.40 27.36 +.73 Sina 67.99 +1.06 Sinclair 0.43 7.92 -.01 SinoCkg n 8.98 +.61

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D

0.75 0.56 1.60 1.28 0.73 2.40

0.10 1.12 0.28 0.20 1.82 1.68 0.60 0.02 1.00 1.00 1.76

0.30 1.05 0.58 0.77 0.43 1.00 0.16 0.60 0.31 1.27 1.36 0.36 0.20 0.52 0.30 0.04 1.02 0.30 0.16 0.50

0.36 0.06 0.08 0.12

0.60

1.44 0.40 0.60

0.04 0.35 0.04

0.20 1.13 0.04 0.24 1.04 0.92 0.20 0.20 0.82 0.96 0.71 0.60

0.47

0.25 2.15 1.00 0.32 1.66 0.60 1.27 1.28 1.65 0.90 0.77 0.68 1.36 5.25 1.35 0.08 0.44 0.54 0.68

0.50

0.75 0.52 0.08

1.16 0.40 2.10 1.00 1.00

1.60 0.85 0.72 0.02

0.64 0.20 2.44 3.13 0.28 1.05 0.28 1.60 0.84

1.44

0.32

0.92 0.60

Nm 5.51 +.31 1.39 22.79 -.28 6.10 -.10 26.99 +.51 5.84 +.03 10.36 +.22 4.31 -.25 46.72 +.31 3.97 +.01 40.42 +.67 14.92 -.18 17.96 +.18 65.15 +.80 24.77 +.52 55.61 +1.07 52.54 +1.08 30.95 -.89 69.53 -.31 24.04 -.13 8.65 +.13 18.47 -.17 22.57 +.49 2.82 +.12 13.09 +.33 9.58 +.03 10.70 +.27 33.50 +.18 2.75 -.02 36.56 +.09 41.89 +1.29 27.77 -.09 38.08 -.15 43.78 +.64 24.19 +.20 13.28 -.14 35.55 +.02 37.72 +.84 20.51 +.61 24.76 +.32 32.52 -1.40 .56 -.05 20.06 +.33 16.55 +.13 3.86 +.09 12.08 +.18 12.19 -.02 15.74 +.17 36.70 +.55 31.09 +.24 28.80 +.02 37.40 +.48 65.53 +.96 15.13 +.38 33.97 +.52 24.75 +.29 31.21 +.09 3.92 +.22 62.41 +1.97 .04 -.02 22.88 +.59 2.94 1.81 -.03 32.76 +1.06 58.75 +.33 45.62 +.82 21.08 +.51 16.50 +.14 9.72 9.72 -.31 1.10 -.02 3.58 +.03 77.25 +1.71 9.82 +.10 6.48 +.24 15.00 +.35 45.81 -.52 5.82 +.02 57.06 +3.21 21.40 +.60 21.70 +.22 14.84 +.46 4.89 +.14 51.40 +.45 30.42 -.26 .18 -.00 6.25 +.07 9.75 +.09 28.72 +1.00 35.51 +.72 .38 -.00 41.20 +.49 12.47 +.41 12.18 +.31 4.17 +.23 10.07 +.36 7.90 +.56 25.38 +1.38 34.58 +.15 5.65 +.83 8.66 -.23 6.87 8.32 +.17 10.60 +.19 6.27 +.13 9.77 +.06 8.68 +.10 39.65 +.83 25.10 -.15 17.25 +.11 12.22 +.04 29.25 +.08 56.16 +.13 30.73 +.03 25.85 -.66 2.24 +.14 48.12 +.42 1.86 29.31 -.09 25.33 +.25 14.27 +.34 18.22 +.84 16.94 8.34 +.28 5.40 -.03 10.79 +.36 33.90 +.35 44.53 -1.06 27.35 -.54 50.06 +.88 14.13 +.09 16.77 -.06 11.54 +.43 11.47 +.10 11.43 -.12 21.64 +.28 20.05 +.52 6.63 +.10 30.26 +.34 59.65 +1.63 4.61 +.12 31.30 +.30 49.77 +.78 45.45 +.17 53.79 +2.29 32.75 +.32 12.02 12.44 +.07 4.76 -.02 14.63 +.21 24.75 -.04 8.37 +.19 13.18 +.28 50.73 +.46 68.57 +1.29 17.05 +.41 11.10 +.50 20.38 +.69 6.57 +.07 22.20 +.74 10.70 +.09 36.60 +.81 45.51 +1.25 4.25 +.15 .51 +.04 38.53 +.49 41.27 -.47 12.43 +.16 26.52 +1.15 36.75 +1.15 12.27 +.04 32.35 -2.00 17.28 +.47 19.93 -.15 24.06 +.38 11.31 +.03 49.77 -.22 20.39 +.70 32.85 +.27 17.71 +.41 23.40 +.42 26.06 +.78 52.50 +.95 48.64 +1.93 12.98 +.11 37.60 +.73 30.32 +.47 25.58 -.45 86.51 +.46 20.19 +.08 50.13 +.14 63.20 +.45 2.48 +.28 25.26 -.14 1.14 -.04 64.79 +.79 30.44 +.23 46.40 +.36 16.65 +.65 20.87 +.85 18.37 +.30 8.62 +.14 18.87 +.41 60.28 +1.39 62.96 +1.98 72.94 -1.13 50.38 +.81 15.43 +.15 1.40 -.02 79.02 -.56 45.44 +1.65 6.39 -.09 36.90 +.66 51.85 +.77 3.19 69.66 +.48 17.99 +.93 2.31 -.15 70.93 +3.19 55.11 +.22 .50 -.01 1.86 +.02 20.81 +.57 38.84 +.86 22.70 +.31 24.23 +.38 12.53 +.15 18.10 +.37 21.86 -.68 22.65 +.41 10.05 +.01

D

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1.20 0.66 1.00 1.34 0.64 0.85 0.16

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Market

to choose their course of action. Mel Oberst, community development director, said the city was being generous in the deadline date. “If we were using a heavyhanded tactic, we would’ve been in court months ago, but I think we’ve been very, very lenient,” Oberst said. If Jan. 15 comes and goes without a $12,000 payment, Oberst said, the city would tell the Whites the market’s illegal in the current location and would give them a time period, probably 30 days, to stop the use. If the Whites do not do so, the city would cite them and ask them to appear before Bend Municipal Court Judge Brian Hemphill.

Continued from B1 But the city would like industrial sites to be used for actual industrial business. The city would prefer to protect its inventory of industrial properties because it sees manufacturing and other activities that could occur in such places as the way out of the region’s financial woes. City staffers, who began investigating the building’s use after the city received a formal complaint, maintained that the market amounts to a lot of retail use in an industrially zoned area. The city has presented the Whites with three choices, according to Community Development Director Mel Oberst: • Pay $12,000 to the city to finance public hearings with the Planning Commission and City Council on a text amendment to the city’s Development Code that would allow them to have retail markets on weekends and holidays in Bend. • Pay $12,000 to the city to seek a change in zoning from industrial to retail. • Request no change, pay nothing and face any consequences of a code violation. The Whites have until Jan. 15

Zoning interpretations White, 72, said he has his mind made up. “I’m not gonna pay it ($12,000), not 10 cents,” he said at the market on Wednesday. “We’re a legal usage.” He said later, “I’ll go to jail first” before paying the fee to the city. By keeping the market open, he said, he feels he is protecting crafters and other vendors — who he said sell their wares for prices lower than those at big-

Lending

from the Fed. Through the program, known as the Term AssetBacked Securities Loan Facility, or TALF, the investors helped keep markets for consumer loans from seizing up by steadily buying securities. About $71 billion was lent by the Fed out of the $200 billion available. The program ended June 30; two-thirds of the loans have been repaid early. The remaining borrowings come due as late as 2015. The Fed has said it does not expect to lose any money in the program. The investors put up their own money in return for Fed financing that was then plowed into the markets for securitized loans — bundles of credit card or auto dealership debt and student loans. The investors shouldered the risk that the loan packages could lose value and be worth less than the amount they had borrowed from the Fed. Nearly all of some two dozen TALF investors contacted on

Continued from B1 The list, not surprisingly, includes famous Wall Street financiers like J. Christopher Flowers, John Paulson and Julian Robertson, demonstrating the extent to which the Fed relied on fast-moving hedge funds to keep credit flowing through the markets. There were also institutional investors like the Ford Foundation and the pension plan for Major League Baseball. And there were wealthy businessmen like the computer executive Michael Dell and the home builder Bruce Toll. Investors like Dell are identified in the Fed’s data because they owned — or were part of a group that owned — a “material” stake in a company or a fund that received funding from the Fed. They may not have been involved in the decision to borrow

box stores — from having no business at all during the coldweather months. Some vendors, he suggested, could wind up homeless if this business opportunity ceases. A memo Oberst submitted to the city Nov. 16, one day before the council discussed the matter, explores the financial backdrop of this issue as it applies to the property owners. “The reason to locate a retail commercial use in an industrial district without seeking permits from the city is most probably financial,” Oberst wrote. “Retail commercial space generally leases for $1 per square foot while industrial space leases for 20 to 30 cents per square foot. The recession has been hard on all retail businesses, and moving into lease space with a rate of 20 cents per square foot is tempting.” Oberst said the city does not provide permits for special zoning uses; rather, it looks into a potential zoning issue after a complaint is filed.

What neighbors think Jessica Keating, manager of Sparrow Bakery, a few steps from the market, said “it’s definitely pretty chaotic in our parking lot” when the market

Thursday declined to comment or did not respond to messages. One who did agree to talk was Dov Schlein, a former president of the Republic Bank of New York, who estimated he made a healthy profit, but not a killing. “Realistically, if you were an early investor you could net 10 percent,” he said. “If you came in much later, when the program looked to be successful, then the return dropped to 8, 7, 6, 5 percent.” Schlein said he told fellow investors they should be prepared for their names to become public at some point. “I told anyone who invested it in at the time that if you’re not prepared for that information to be disclosed, you should not invest,” he said. Schlein said he was by no means certain of making money; if unemployment had skyrocketed to 12 percent, for example, he would have expected to lose

THE BULLETIN • Friday, December 3, 2010 B5

is open, which is from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and from noon to 4 p.m. on Sundays. The market has brought a bit more business to the bakery, she said, but it can force bakery customers to park farther away than they ordinarily would. To visit the market or the bakery, she said, some people have been parking in the bicycle lane on Scott Street or on Aune Road, which intersects Scott. Trucks frequent Aune Road, though, and cars parked on it can make truck drivers struggle to turn onto it, she said. Market neighbor Stuart Breidenstein, owner of Stuart’s of Bend, which manufactures and repairs jewelry, said the people who go to the market do not tend to be his customers, so he hasn’t lost or gained business. Jean Fisher, office manager at Cement Elegance, said the concrete-surfaces business is not open on weekends and has not been affected by the market’s customer traffic. And John Kinder, co-manager of nearby Cindercone Clay Center, said, “The extra foot traffic doesn’t bother us.” Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@ bendbulletin.com.

from huge defaults. Many of the financiers, the records show, teamed up, like Jay Twery, Walt Weissman and M. Blair Wellensiek, who work at Tradelink Holdings, a Chicago trading firm. Some financiers show up in the Fed data because of their ownership in companies that sought funds from the Fed. In one instance, Paulson and Flowers, the financiers, formed OneWest Bank, the successor to the collapsed lender IndyMac, which borrowed from the Fed. Dell’s investment firm, MSD Capital, is an investor in the bank as well. Records show that Bryant, the steeplechase enthusiast, was an investor in Belstar Credit Fund, which obtained 22 loans in amounts ranging from $2.5 million to $75.2 million. Belstar used the loans to purchase securities backed by credit card and auto loans, mortgages and smallbusiness loans.

Consumers Continued from B5 “The American consumer is off the mat,” said Craig Johnson, president of consulting firm Customer Growth Partners. “This is not a one-time flash in the pan. All the signals are all moving in the correct direction.” There is still a long march to return to prerecession conditions, however. The stagnant job market remains one of the principal drags on the economy. The monthly unemployment rate is slated for release Friday, and economists expect it to be unchanged at 9.6 percent. During the Great Recession, a wave of job losses combined with sinking home prices and a volatile stock market battered consumers, the driving force of the nation’s economic growth. Spending on everything from fast food to designer clothes slumped. Since then, consumers have trodden warily, slowing the pace of recovery. But signs of a turnaround are emerging. The spike in pending home sales in October offered hope that the housing market is on the mend, even if those sales are at a significantly lower level overall from the boom years. The National Association of Realtors said Thursday that its index of pending home sales, which reflects the number of signed contracts to buy existing houses, rose 10.4 percent in October to 89.3. The index peaked in May 2006 at 112.6. Meanwhile, stock markets have largely recouped their losses from the financial crisis and are up more than 60 percent from their lows in the spring of 2009. The wave of positive economic news has helped boost consumer sentiment. A monthly survey by Reuters and the University of Michigan came in more cheerful than expected, rising to the highest level since June. Improvement in consumer

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sentiment typically translates into gains in actual spending. Almost all of the roughly 30 retail chains that reported monthly sales at established stores Thursday experienced a solid boost in November. The council said last month’s results were so encouraging that it is considering raising its annual forecast of holiday sales as much as a percentage point. Michael McNamara, vice president of research and analysis for MasterCard Advisors SpendingPulse, which tracks consumer spending, said he was also encouraged by the types of retail that have seen improvement. Sales of women’s clothing, hit particularly hard during the recession, rose 3.9 percent in November, according to his data. That suggests women feel confident enough in the future to spend on themselves again, McNamara said. In addition, he said, shoppers previously split their dollars between buying new goods and purchasing services, such as hotel rooms and airline tickets. But now both sectors are reporting stronger sales instead of seesawing. Auto sales have led the way in consumer spending, demonstrating that Americans are more willing to open their wallets and borrow money to buy big-ticket items. General Motors, Chrysler and Ford enjoyed double-digit-percentage gains in sales last month, on top of a strong October. Economists cautioned, however, that Americans should not expect to rewind to 2007. But speculation of a double-dip recession — widespread just a few months ago — has largely died down amid the stream of positive data. “You put it all together and I think it tells a story of an economy that is shaking off the doldrums,” said Stuart Hoffman, chief economist for PNC Financial Services. “It’s broad-based enough and the trends are there to suggest that this isn’t a false start.”

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Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .36f 1.68 ... .40f .80a .82 ... ... .32 .22 .72f .04 .42f ... ... .65f ... .64f

10 14 17 25 14 ... ... 26 24 47 19 11 ... 12 ... ... 12 ... 16 ... 7

55.32 -.14 +60.1 21.73 -.03 +.6 11.68 +.39 -22.4 15.86 +.48 +29.0 66.59 +.87 +23.0 6.59 -.67 -3.2 39.49 +1.40 +43.7 56.67 -.04 +45.2 69.01 +.70 +16.6 6.57 +.10 +173.8 28.36 +.67 -13.4 43.11 +.54 -16.3 11.63 +.13 -12.6 21.70 +.22 +6.4 8.12 +.35 +46.3 21.63 -2.23 +5.4 5.00 +.09 +85.2 8.99 +.58 +28.8 20.90 +.12 -11.4 11.69 +.12 +32.4 26.89 +.85 -11.8

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1390.00 $1388.50 $28.542

Pvs Day $1388.00 $1387.30 $28.388

Div

PE

1.24f .80 1.74f ... .48f ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .86f .52 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20a

22 17 17 25 61 ... 35 21 ... 25 18 10 26 12 ... 16 15 11 ... ...

Market recap 87.83 42.14 47.54 18.57 56.21 2.18 37.34 142.31 22.29 59.42 76.21 43.74 32.76 12.53 11.05 24.76 15.32 28.78 2.70 17.54

+.50 -1.29 -1.73 +.67 +.33 +.12 +.35 +1.53 -1.04 -.10 +.22 +.78 +1.06 +.15 +.03 +.55 +.35 +1.25 +.06 +.49

+32.9 +12.1 +5.6 +46.3 +55.0 -22.4 -1.1 +29.0 +4.7 +24.6 +23.6 +9.3 +42.1 +108.8 -17.6 +10.0 -20.8 +6.6 +28.6 +10.7

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp BkofAm S&P500ETF SPDR Fncl LVSands

5037074 2069825 1610425 1081253 936849

4.42 +.12 11.68 +.39 122.56 +1.55 15.13 +.38 49.17 -2.17

Gainers ($2 or more) Name WimmBD KrispKrm Movado CollctvBrd FtBcp pfB

Last 31.34 7.44 14.97 20.38 12.74

Chg %Chg +6.84 +1.28 +2.51 +2.79 +1.68

+27.9 +20.8 +20.1 +15.9 +15.2

Losers ($2 or more) Name GerovaF rs Aeropostl s CSVS2xVxS C-TrCVOL Kroger

Last

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) Name NA Pall g NthgtM g NovaGld g DenisnM g NwGold g

Last Chg

86325 6.22 +.47 46242 3.07 +.10 43338 14.48 -.10 37444 3.36 -.03 33798 9.69 +.16

Gainers ($2 or more)

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Cisco Microsoft MicronT PwShs QQQ Intel

1008369 741163 469753 414611 353594

19.22 26.89 7.91 53.73 21.70

-.10 +.85 +.52 +.54 +.22

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

MincoG g NTS Rlty Lannett NA Pall g OrionEngy

2.11 4.10 6.26 6.22 3.43

+.23 +12.2 +.44 +12.0 +.55 +9.6 +.47 +8.2 +.24 +7.5

Conns Ku6Media CaroBkHld Gordman n Rdiff.cm

Last

Chg %Chg

4.46 +1.23 +38.1 8.01 +2.01 +33.5 3.35 +.67 +25.0 16.39 +2.78 +20.4 4.65 +.77 +19.8

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

-14.2 -14.0 -14.0 -12.0 -9.3

CagleA MinesMgt Express-1 Talbots wt Vicon

9.82 -1.18 -10.7 2.83 -.29 -9.3 2.16 -.14 -6.1 2.00 -.13 -6.1 4.17 -.25 -5.7

2,144 887 88 3,119 279 10

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

21.86 -3.63 23.04 -3.76 86.59 -14.10 87.00 -11.85 21.63 -2.23

Nasdaq

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

CNinsure Clearwire IBC Cap pf ChinaHGS WSB Hldgs

Diary

Chg %Chg

18.40 -3.75 -16.9 5.90 -.92 -13.5 12.52 -1.87 -13.0 3.13 -.36 -10.3 2.65 -.26 -8.9

Diary 250 227 38 515 19 6

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,691 955 145 2,791 222 32

11,451.53 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,000.46 3,742.01 Dow Jones Transportation 413.75 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,817.25 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,177.58 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,592.94 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,227.08 1,010.91 S&P 500 12,970.39 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 745.95 567.98 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,362.41 5,037.57 397.67 7,712.25 2,091.51 2,579.35 1,221.53 12,956.26 751.20

+106.63 +66.00 +1.44 +108.52 +10.40 +29.92 +15.46 +154.62 +8.06

YTD %Chg %Chg +.95 +1.33 +.36 +1.43 +.50 +1.17 +1.28 +1.21 +1.08

52-wk %Chg

+8.96 +22.88 -.09 +7.34 +14.61 +13.67 +9.54 +12.19 +20.12

+9.61 +25.48 +1.46 +7.76 +17.02 +18.69 +11.06 +14.93 +27.59

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday.

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

341.45 2,617.20 3,747.04 5,767.56 6,957.61 23,448.78 37,399.47 20,054.09 3,285.49 10,168.52 1,950.26 3,197.96 4,761.80 5,812.27

+1.68 s +2.00 s +2.12 s +2.22 s +1.33 s +.86 s +.33 s +2.49 s +.62 s +1.81 s +1.09 s +.50 s +1.82 s +1.21 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9762 1.5584 .9966 .002065 .1500 1.3210 .1288 .011918 .080991 .0320 .000872 .1447 1.0064 .0329

.9683 1.5618 .9844 .002060 .1500 1.3132 .1287 .011877 .080808 .0319 .000868 .1433 .9965 .0329

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 18.08 +0.26 +10.1 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.07 +0.07 +10.1 GrowthI 25.33 +0.25 +14.9 Ultra 22.23 +0.20 +14.2 American Funds A: AmcpA p 18.37 +0.26 +11.2 AMutlA p 24.90 +0.28 +9.6 BalA p 17.62 +0.17 +10.5 BondA p 12.26 -0.01 +7.6 CapIBA p 49.58 +0.36 +6.5 CapWGA p 35.13 +0.53 +5.3 CapWA p 20.56 +0.06 +5.3 EupacA p 41.03 +0.68 +7.0 FdInvA p 35.72 +0.52 +10.4 GovtA p 14.51 -0.01 +6.2 GwthA p 29.87 +0.40 +9.3 HI TrA p 11.22 +0.02 +13.3 IncoA p 16.47 +0.14 +9.7 IntBdA p 13.51 -0.02 +5.2 ICAA p 27.49 +0.36 +7.6 NEcoA p 25.03 +0.32 +11.3 N PerA p 28.10 +0.43 +9.6 NwWrldA 54.62 +0.71 +15.7 SmCpA p 38.26 +0.49 +21.3 TxExA p 12.06 -0.01 +3.8 WshA p 26.67 +0.33 +10.2 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.32 +0.56 +7.4 IntlEqA 29.53 +0.54 +7.1 IntEqII I r 12.56 +0.23 +6.6 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.73 +0.37 +5.2 MidCap 33.03 +0.39 +29.2 MidCapVal 20.29 +0.22 +12.8 Baron Funds: Growth 48.67 +0.47 +17.8 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.94 -0.02 +9.1 DivMu 14.49 -0.02 +3.5 TxMgdIntl 15.57 +0.28 +1.9 BlackRock A:

EqtyDiv 17.08 +0.20 +9.5 GlAlA r 19.15 +0.18 +7.4 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.84 +0.16 +6.6 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.12 +0.21 +9.9 GlbAlloc r 19.25 +0.18 +7.7 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 51.94 +0.60 +16.8 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.00 +0.39 +21.0 DivEqInc 9.75 +0.14 +11.8 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 29.92 +0.41 +21.4 AcornIntZ 39.89 +0.60 +18.6 ValRestr 48.30 +0.76 +14.1 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.86 +0.22 +9.1 USCorEq2 10.60 +0.15 +17.1 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 33.29 +0.47 +8.7 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 33.62 +0.47 +8.9 NYVen C 32.21 +0.44 +7.9 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.59 +7.5 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.61 +0.29 +20.0 EmMktV 36.70 +0.52 +17.9 IntSmVa 16.46 +0.37 +10.2 LargeCo 9.67 +0.12 +11.6 USLgVa 19.24 +0.33 +14.3 US Small 20.53 +0.23 +25.1 US SmVa 24.34 +0.34 +24.2 IntlSmCo 16.38 +0.32 +16.6 Fixd 10.36 +1.1 IntVa 17.84 +0.38 +6.7 Glb5FxInc 11.51 -0.02 +6.1 2YGlFxd 10.22 +1.6 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 68.45 +0.62 +8.9 Income 13.35 +6.8 IntlStk 35.25 +0.72 +10.7 Stock 103.93 +1.26 +9.2 Eaton Vance A:

LgCpVal 17.62 NatlMunInc 9.32 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.30 LgCapVal 17.67 FMI Funds: LgCap p 15.19 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.98 FPACres 26.70 Fairholme 35.04 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.37 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.79 StrInA 12.72 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.01 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.62 FF2015 11.36 FF2020 13.76 FF2020K 13.14 FF2025 11.46 FF2030 13.67 FF2035 11.34 FF2040 7.92 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.88 AMgr50 15.19 Balanc 17.94 BlueChGr 44.63 Canada 57.52 CapAp 25.04 CpInc r 9.39 Contra 67.40 ContraK 67.45 DisEq 22.28 DivIntl 29.89 DivrsIntK r 29.92 DivGth 27.34 EmrMk 26.29 Eq Inc 42.59 EQII 17.54 Fidel 31.16

+0.26 +6.1 -0.02 +2.8 -0.01 +4.6 +0.26 +6.4 +0.16 +8.2 +3.2 +0.27 +9.2 +0.45 +16.5 +0.05 +15.2 +0.21 +15.0 +0.03 +8.9 +0.21 +15.3 +0.11 +9.6 +0.10 +9.7 +0.13 +10.4 +0.12 +10.5 +0.13 +11.0 +0.16 +11.1 +0.14 +11.2 +0.10 +11.3 +0.19 +12.6 +0.13 +11.2 +0.16 +11.4 +0.51 +17.6 +1.03 +18.6 +0.25 +16.8 +0.05 +14.9 +0.72 +15.8 +0.72 +16.0 +0.37 +6.0 +0.59 +6.8 +0.59 +6.9 +0.47 +16.1 +0.35 +16.3 +0.75 +10.2 +0.32 +8.6 +0.55 +10.5

FltRateHi r 9.77 GNMA 11.63 GovtInc 10.62 GroCo 81.92 GroInc 17.77 GrowthCoK 82.00 HighInc r 8.94 Indepn 24.12 IntBd 10.63 IntmMu 10.20 IntlDisc 32.79 InvGrBd 11.55 InvGB 7.41 LgCapVal 12.03 LatAm 57.90 LevCoStk 26.99 LowP r 37.21 LowPriK r 37.21 Magelln 70.41 MidCap 27.63 MuniInc 12.52 NwMkt r 15.96 OTC 53.16 100Index 8.61 Ovrsea 32.04 Puritn 17.63 SCmdtyStrt 11.83 SrsIntGrw 11.05 SrsIntVal 9.80 StIntMu 10.69 STBF 8.47 SmllCpS r 18.89 StratInc 11.35 StrReRt r 9.42 TotalBd 10.87 USBI 11.42 Value 67.17 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 56.97 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 37.20 500IdxInv 43.40 IntlInxInv 34.86 TotMktInv 35.76

+6.8 +7.5 +5.8 +0.70 +18.8 +0.26 +11.1 +0.71 +18.9 +0.02 +12.3 +0.24 +21.1 -0.01 +8.1 -0.01 +3.6 +0.68 +8.0 +7.7 -0.01 +8.5 +0.20 +7.0 +0.65 +13.3 +0.45 +17.9 +0.48 +16.7 +0.49 +16.9 +1.13 +9.6 +0.44 +18.3 -0.02 +4.3 +0.06 +11.5 +0.57 +16.3 +0.10 +8.6 +0.70 +3.6 +0.18 +11.7 +0.09 +8.5 +0.23 +13.3 +0.20 +0.9 +2.6 +3.7 +0.34 +18.5 +0.03 +9.3 +0.04 +11.2 +8.6 -0.01 +6.7 +1.17 +18.0 +0.87 +34.2 +0.42 +23.6 +0.55 +11.6 +0.66 +4.3 +0.44 +13.7

Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 43.40 +0.55 +11.6 TotMktAd r 35.77 +0.44 +13.7 First Eagle: GlblA 45.75 +0.63 +14.4 OverseasA 22.38 +0.30 +15.0 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.63 -0.01 +3.2 FoundAl p 10.35 +0.11 +7.2 HYTFA p 9.91 -0.02 +5.2 IncomA p 2.13 +0.02 +10.3 USGovA p 6.77 +6.2 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +11.4 IncmeAd 2.11 +0.01 +10.0 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.14 +0.01 +9.2 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.36 +0.21 +7.8 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.82 +0.14 +4.1 GlBd A p 13.58 +0.03 +11.1 GrwthA p 17.45 +0.31 +3.8 WorldA p 14.51 +0.24 +3.9 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.61 +0.04 +10.8 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 39.69 +0.55 +7.7 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.71 +0.16 +2.9 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 21.47 +0.38 +4.7 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.37 +0.20 +17.3 Quality 19.71 +0.15 +3.0 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.23 +0.02 +11.9 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.91 -0.01 +8.0 CapApInst 36.56 +0.37 +10.9 IntlInv t 58.59 +1.17 +7.7 Intl r 59.30 +1.18 +8.1 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 33.66 +0.42 +9.7 Hartford Fds Y:

CapAppI 33.66 +0.42 +10.0 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.27 +0.56 +12.9 Div&Gr 19.12 +0.27 +9.1 Advisers 19.15 +0.14 +9.7 TotRetBd 11.29 -0.01 +7.2 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.76 -0.14 -0.2 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.76 +0.15 +4.9 CmstkA 15.23 +0.23 +11.5 EqIncA 8.40 +0.09 +9.4 GrIncA p 18.59 +0.29 +8.7 HYMuA 9.22 -0.02 +6.6 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.73 +0.19 +9.0 AssetStA p 24.45 +0.19 +9.7 AssetStrI r 24.66 +0.19 +9.9 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.56 -0.01 +7.6 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.55 -0.01 +7.7 HighYld 8.10 +0.02 +12.8 IntmTFBd 10.90 -0.01 +3.0 ShtDurBd 11.00 -0.01 +3.1 USLCCrPls 20.03 +0.27 +10.2 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 50.06 +0.75 +17.8 PrkMCVal T 22.09 +0.26 +11.6 Twenty T 64.37 +0.86 +4.5 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.94 +0.11 +11.5 LSGrwth 12.88 +0.15 +12.5 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.44 +0.27 +19.5 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.77 +0.28 +19.1 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.53 -0.03 +2.5 Longleaf Partners: Partners 27.45 +0.28 +13.9 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.22 +0.07 +12.4 StrInc C 14.80 +0.07 +11.5 LSBondR 14.16 +0.06 +12.1

StrIncA 14.72 +0.06 +12.3 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.38 +0.04 +10.9 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.11 +0.19 +9.4 BdDebA p 7.75 +0.02 +11.5 ShDurIncA p 4.63 +6.1 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.66 +5.3 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.85 +0.10 +7.8 ValueA 22.10 +0.27 +7.5 MFS Funds I: ValueI 22.20 +0.26 +7.7 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.61 +0.18 +6.7 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv 18.26 +0.08 +17.2 PacTgrInv 23.30 +0.21 +21.2 MergerFd 16.05 +0.02 +3.3 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.59 -0.01 +11.6 TotRtBdI 10.59 +11.8 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 36.79 +0.41 +30.6 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.04 +0.34 +8.7 GlbDiscZ 29.45 +0.35 +9.0 QuestZ 18.44 +0.18 +7.0 SharesZ 20.56 +0.21 +8.2 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 44.10 +0.48 +16.8 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 45.72 +0.50 +16.5 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.26 +0.02 +12.3 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.21 +0.26 +6.5 Intl I r 18.84 +0.42 +11.9 Oakmark r 40.85 +0.57 +10.3 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.03 +0.04 +13.6 GlbSMdCap 15.32 +0.24 +20.0 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 42.60 +0.51 +6.7

DvMktA p 35.18 +0.51 +22.3 GlobA p 59.86 +1.02 +12.9 GblStrIncA 4.26 +0.01 +14.5 Gold p 54.49 +0.87 +51.7 IntBdA p 6.54 +0.03 +6.1 MnStFdA x 31.49 +0.35 +12.6 RisingDivA 15.19 +0.21 +10.3 S&MdCpVl 30.88 +0.45 +16.2 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.77 +0.18 +9.4 S&MdCpVl 26.51 +0.39 +15.4 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.73 +0.19 +9.5 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.89 -0.04 +4.5 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.88 +0.50 +22.7 IntlBdY 6.54 +0.04 +6.4 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.42 +0.01 +8.5 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.99 +0.01 +10.2 AllAsset 12.51 +0.05 +12.6 ComodRR 8.89 +0.06 +16.3 HiYld 9.24 +0.03 +12.8 InvGrCp 11.58 +11.4 LowDu 10.58 +0.01 +4.7 RealRtnI 11.48 +8.6 ShortT 9.92 +1.9 TotRt 11.42 +0.01 +8.8 TR II 11.03 +7.9 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.58 +0.01 +4.4 RealRtA p 11.48 +8.1 TotRtA 11.42 +0.01 +8.4 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.42 +0.01 +7.6 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.42 +0.01 +8.5 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.42 +0.01 +8.7 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 45.05 +0.26 +16.5 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 39.78 +0.56 +12.1

Price Funds: BlChip 37.82 CapApp 20.09 EmMktS 35.13 EqInc 22.80 EqIndex 33.02 Growth 31.84 HlthSci 29.08 HiYield 6.75 IntlBond 9.94 IntlStk 14.05 MidCap 59.27 MCapVal 23.19 N Asia 19.34 New Era 50.43 N Horiz 33.00 N Inc 9.60 R2010 15.43 R2015 11.89 R2020 16.36 R2025 11.94 R2030 17.09 R2040 17.17 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 34.22 SmCapVal 35.39 SpecIn 12.32 Value 22.70 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.02 VoyA p 23.20 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.30 PremierI r 19.77 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 37.13 S&P Sel 19.34 Scout Funds: Intl 31.74 Selected Funds: AmShD 40.13 AmShS p 40.17 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 19.87 Third Avenue Fds:

+0.43 +15.4 +0.18 +10.6 +0.55 +16.7 +0.33 +10.3 +0.42 +11.3 +0.36 +15.7 +0.29 +11.1 +0.02 +12.7 +0.07 +3.1 +0.22 +11.5 +0.74 +24.8 +0.30 +11.9 +0.23 +19.8 +0.87 +15.6 +0.38 +29.0 +7.2 +0.13 +10.6 +0.12 +11.4 +0.17 +12.1 +0.14 +12.5 +0.21 +13.0 +0.23 +13.3 +3.1 +0.39 +27.0 +0.35 +20.0 +0.05 +8.5 +0.36 +10.8 +0.20 +9.3 +0.43 +17.6 +0.15 +19.6 +0.31 +21.2 +0.46 +12.6 +0.24 +11.5 +0.54 +9.9 +0.57 +9.4 +0.57 +9.1 +0.39 +3.2

ValueInst 51.36 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 27.40 IntValue I 28.01 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.41 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.90 CpOpAdl 75.41 EMAdmr r 39.42 Energy 120.81 500Adml 112.87 GNMA Ad 11.00 HlthCr 52.19 HiYldCp 5.68 InfProAd 26.07 ITBdAdml 11.44 ITsryAdml 11.71 IntGrAdm 61.08 ITAdml 13.49 ITGrAdm 10.19 LtdTrAd 11.07 LTGrAdml 9.30 LT Adml 10.92 MCpAdml 90.47 MuHYAdm 10.32 PrmCap r 67.38 STsyAdml 10.86 ShtTrAd 15.90 STIGrAd 10.80 TtlBAdml 10.71 TStkAdm 30.73 WellslAdm 52.58 WelltnAdm 52.84 Windsor 44.03 WdsrIIAd 44.38 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 24.14 CapOpp 32.63 DivdGro 14.14 Energy 64.31 EqInc 19.90 Explr 70.58 GNMA 11.00

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+0.26 +13.0 +0.01 +11.3 +0.92 +3.9 +7.0 +0.37 +12.9 +0.55 +4.3 -0.01 +11.0 +0.09 +9.8 +0.24 +12.0 +0.16 +11.1 -0.01 +9.7 +0.21 +16.0 -0.02 +3.5 +2.4 +0.83 +31.3 +0.13 +11.6 +0.71 +9.2 +0.25 +15.8 +0.17 +9.5 +5.2 +0.24 +18.5 +0.04 +8.6 +0.14 +9.8 +0.09 +10.4 +0.19 +10.8 +0.12 +11.1 +0.23 +11.4 +0.15 +11.8 +0.25 +11.8 +0.16 +11.9 +0.25 +9.3 +0.06 +9.5 +0.29 +8.3 +0.18 +10.3 +0.31 +6.7 +1.43 +11.5 +0.15 +11.0 +0.43 +15.6 +0.46 +22.5 +0.35 +14.5 -0.02 +10.7 +0.29 +21.8 +0.26 +25.5

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30.72 +0.38 +13.4

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

9.93 +0.18

NS

EmMkInst

30.02 +0.43 +15.8

ExtIn

40.10 +0.46 +22.7

FTAllWldI r

92.79 +1.61 +8.3

GrwthIst

31.04 +0.35 +14.7

InfProInst

10.62

+7.1

InstIdx

112.13 +1.42 +11.6

InsPl

112.14 +1.42 +11.6

InsTStPlus

27.78 +0.35 +13.6

MidCpIst

20.00 +0.29 +22.0

SCInst

33.75 +0.40 +22.7

TBIst

10.71 -0.01 +6.9

TSInst

30.74 +0.39 +13.5

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

93.24 +1.18 +11.6

STBdIdx

10.63 -0.01 +4.2

TotBdSgl

10.71 -0.01 +6.9

TotStkSgl

29.66 +0.37 +13.5

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.84

NA


BUSI N ESS

B6 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M  D I SPATC H E S The RE/MAX Pacific Northwest region has announced the opening of R E /M A X Key Properties at 431 N.W. Franklin Ave., in Bend. Recruited by the RE/MAX network to bring RE/MAX back to Bend after the company closed its office in 2008, new broker/owners Bill Duffey and Pat Huber opened for business on Wednesday. Duffey and Huber most recently operated Taft Dire Real Estate Resources in Bend. Independently owned and operated, RE/MAX Key Properties will service Deschutes and Crook counties. For more information, go to remax.com or contact Colleen McNally, marketing broker, at 541728-0033 or cmcnally@remax.net. Allstate Insurance Co. has announced the opening of a new Allstate Financial Services office in Sisters. Owned and operated by Paul Seglund, the office is located at 750 Buckaroo Trail, Suite 204. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information, contact Seglund at 541-647-8157. Oregon CrossFit has moved from its former location to 555 N.W. Arizona Ave., next to Strictly Organic Coffee Co. A grand opening of the new facility will be held from 9 a.m. to noon on Dec. 11 and will feature products from Lululemon, Foot Zone and Emerald Smoothie. The Artists’ Gallery Sunriver Village recently opened with an exhibition showcasing Central Oregon artists. The gallery is open Saturdays only, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., until it begins holiday hours on Dec. 17. From Dec. 17 through Jan. 1, it will be open every day except Christmas from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. A formal grand opening will be held Dec. 10 with an artists’ reception from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. RSVP to tammygoen@ chamberscable.com. After Jan. 1, gallery hours will return to Saturdays only from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., with extended hours planned during the winter holiday periods. The gallery is located in the Sunriver Village at 57100 Beaver Drive, Suite 120, Building 23. Kathy Schnepf, of Bend, has opened a custom sewing and home decor business called Bellissima featuring made-to-order slipcovers, throw pillows, curtains and comforters. For information about events where her work will be featured, contact Schnepf at 251-786-1637 or custom_slipcovers@yahoo.com. Newport Avenue Market, an IGA Plus grocery store in Bend, has been named a “Top 50 Retailer” by The Gourmet Retailer, a trade publication for specialty food and kitchenware retailers. Some recipients of the award were selected for their superior sales representatives, others nominated the stores they own or where they work, and some were handpicked by The Gourmet Retailer. Newport Avenue Market and the other selected retailers will be honored at the Fancy Food Show in San Francisco on Jan. 16. Oregon Business magazine recently ranked Compass Commercial Real Estate Services, of Bend, as one of the top 10 commercial real estate firms in Oregon. According to Oregon Business’ 2011 Power Book, Compass Commercial is Oregon’s largest commercial real estate firm outside the PortlandVancouver metropolitan area.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave. , Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Hosted by Polar Bear Gas and Wash; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-5393. CREATING A NOT-SO-BIG GREEN HOME: Learn to optimize home sustainability through space planning, proper selection of materials and fixtures, and green building techniques. Architect Michael Klement will showcase exceptional projects; $12.50; 9 a.m.-noon; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, Community Room, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-389-7275 or www.earthadvantage.org/ education-events. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY PORTFOLIO REVIEW AND CURRENT MARKET UPDATE: Hosted by Matthew Leeden, financial adviser; free; 2-6 p.m.; Paulson Investment Co. Inc., 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 7, Bend; 541-385-0444. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 48:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

HOME ENERGY I.Q. WORKSHOP: Hosted by Energy Trust of Oregon and Cascade Natural Gas, the workshop covers practical ideas that homeowners and renters can try right away along with bigger energy-savings strategies. Admission is open to all area Cascade Natural Gas customers. Registration required by visiting www.regonline.com/energyiq or calling 866-368-7878; free; 6-8:30 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend.

WEDNESDAY PRIVATE PESTICIDE APPLICATOR WORKSHOP: Oregon State University Extension will conduct a pesticide prelicense workshop to assist pesticide users in preparing for the private applicator exam; $20 for the workshop, manuals available for $22.50; 8:30 a.m.noon; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-475-7107 or http://oregonstate.edu/dept/coarc. TWO-DAY LEADERSHIP SUMMIT : Human resource professionals may learn to lead successfully and accomplish more in less time. Program is facilitated by Dana Barz and designed for those with an interest in leadership development. Registration required at info@danamics.net or 541-550-0272; $365; 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 N.W. Wall St., Suite 300, Bend. LIVE REAL ESTATE TV SHOW: “Make it your home with a 203(k) Renovation Loan,” hosted by Jim Mazziotti of Exit Realty. Learn to use this loan product to purchase a home and perform repairs. Live at www.ExitRealtyBend.com, follow the show icons; free; 7-8 p.m.

THURSDAY TWO-DAY LEADERSHIP SUMMIT: Human resource professionals may learn to lead successfully and accomplish more in less time. Program is facilitated by Dana Barz and designed for those with an interest in leadership development. Registration required at info@danamics.net or

541-550-0272; $365; 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 N.W. Wall St., Suite 300, Bend. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Learn to research investments, place online trade orders for stocks, bonds and mutual funds, and manage your finances with account features. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior, CFP, CFS. Registration required by Dec. 7; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. 7TH ANNUAL BUSINESS HOP: Hosted by the Redmond Chamber of Commerce & CVB, chamber businesses will display their products and services. Open to the public; free; 5-7 p.m.; Historic Redmond Church, 641 S.W. Cascade Ave.; 541923-5191 or www.visitredmond oregon.com. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

FRIDAY Dec. 10 FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Sponsored by All About You, a Division of Central Oregon Engraving; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Fire and Rescue, 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-9231525. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861.

MONDAY Dec. 13 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY Dec. 14 PORTFOLIO REVIEW AND CURRENT MARKET UPDATE: Hosted by Matthew Leeden, financial adviser; free; 2-6 p.m.; Paulson Investment Co. Inc., 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 7, Bend; 541-385-0444. REDMOND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Heating & Cooling, 2516 S.W. Glacier Place; 541-233-6336.

WEDNESDAY Dec. 15 INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP TO ASSIST SMALL BUSINESSES : The city of Redmond, partnering with the Oregon MicroEnterprise Network, will provide free market research services to Redmond small businesses through a program called MarketLink. Learn how qualifying business owners can apply to receive free and confidential customized research through the MarketLink program; free; 8-9 a.m.; Redmond Fire & Rescue, 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-923-7761.

THURSDAY

www.happyhourtraining.com. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

FRIDAY Dec. 17 FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave. , Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861.

SATURDAY Dec. 18 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY Dec. 20 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

Dec. 16 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $20 “Discount Day”; 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or

TUESDAY Dec. 21 PORTFOLIO REVIEW AND CURRENT MARKET UPDATE: Hosted by Matthew Leeden, financial adviser; free; 2-6 p.m.; Paulson Investment Co. Inc., 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 7, Bend; 541-385-0444.


L

Inside

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OREGON Financial hardship comes to widow, mother of 3, see Page C6. Flood-ravaged Vernonia getting new school, civic center, see Page C6. State to remain in control of Umatilla DA’s office, see Page C6.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

Deschutes facing its own IOU Sch ool district County searching for ways to repay $4.5M REDMOND

officials prep staff for next round of cuts

Informal class warns employees about looming $5 million shortfall By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

REDMOND — The Redmond School District’s dire budget outlook projects 2011-12 budget shortfall of around $5 million, an estimate that will almost certainly require more rounds of cuts at the district. With a shortfall that large — the total budget this year was about $55 million — the district decided to starts its budget process several months early, and a key component of that is an informal budget class at every district building. The class, for teachers and staff, is designed to describe the fiscal reality of the schools. The hope is that once the district considers specific cuts — and everything is now on the table — staff members will be less surprised by the harsh reality. Director of Operations Mike McIntosh and Jon Bullock, the director of strategic planning, expect to have held budget sessions at all of the district’s buildings by the end of next week. District officials often discuss the idea of transparency, and staff have said the class is a step in that direction. Dru Carpenter, president of local chapter of the Oregon School Employees Association, said this step will help smooth out the district’s budget process. “Hopefully as we go through the process of building the budget and negotiating these (possible cuts), it’s much easier or straightforward,” Carpenter said. “There’s not the feeling of hidden resources or anything, and everybody feels on the same page.” Though the budget news now is bad, the district has to share the information, Bullock said. Running the budget classes, though just at the schools, will help inform the entire district, he said. According to Bullock, most residents receive information about schools from people who work in them, and so informing teachers and staff about the budget will help inform parents. See Budget / C3

Charges against former Redmond policeman dropped

it borrowed from landfill’s savings account By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Two years after Deschutes County officials borrowed nearly $4.5 million from Knott Landfill, it’s unclear when they’ll be able to repay it. The county took money from the landfill savings account to help keep the Redmond Humane Society running and pay for some preliminary work for a county jail expansion. But the Humane Society has only paid back $600,000 out of nearly $1.4 million loaned. And the $3.1 million for the jail was going to be paid by selling real estate. However, this is not a good time to sell. “I’ve been assured that when the

time comes, when I need the funds, the dollars will be there in the reserve fund,” the director of the county Department of Solid Waste, Timm Schimke, said Thursday. The money the county borrowed came from fees that residents and garbage haulers pay to bring waste into Knott Landfill. A portion of that money usually goes into a savings account to pay for future landfill expansions and closures. The loans came at a bad time for the Department of Solid Waste: In 2008, the department stopped saving for expansion projects because it was making less money at the landfill during the recession. Land-

“The county’s on very sound financial footing, and one way or another, that money will be paid back.” — Dennis Luke, Deschutes County commissioner

fill fees have increased, and services have been cut. County officials said Thursday they are confident the loans will be repaid by the time the Department of Solid Waste needs the money for projects. If not, the county can borrow the money from another fund or issue bonds. In 2008, the county loaned the

Redmond Humane Society nearly $1.4 million to pay off mortgages and other bills. The County Commission voted to extend a $100,000 line of credit to the Humane Society on Wednesday. County Administrator Dave Kanner said officials have not yet decided where they will get that money, although the Department of Solid Waste is a candidate. The Humane Society is repaying the loans as it raises money from a variety of sources. Beginning in 2008, the county also loaned the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office approximately $2.3 million for architectural, engineering and other services related to a planned expansion of the county jail, Property and Facilities Department Director Susan Ross wrote in an e-mail. See Landfill / C3

Cheery night lights

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Christmas light decorations adorn the property, trees and house at 61620 S.W. Summer Shade Drive in Bend on Thursday night.

By Erin Golden The Bulletin

Prosecutors have dropped the charges filed against a former Redmond police lieutenant accused of assaulting his 18-year-old adopted son and harassing the teen’s mother. Wayne Shortreed, 60, was scheduled to face a trial in January on one count of felony assault and one count of misdemeanor harassment, but the case was dropped because of issues related to his health. The charges stemmed from a domestic dispute that allegedly took place at his home in Terrebonne in 2008. Shortreed, who served with the Redmond Police Department for 23 years, was not on duty at the time. Documents filed by prosecutors indicated that the incident took place in front of a child. The teen’s biological mother, Tonya Marie Johnson, told The Bulletin that the incident left her son with a black eye and a split lip. See Charges / C3

Bend Christmas Parade route The full length of the parade route will be closed to traffic starting at around 11 a.m. Saturday. Streets will be reopened as the parade passes, and all streets should be open to traffic by around 2 p.m. The parade should cross the Newport Avenue bridge at noon.

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Proud of your own light display? Get out your tripod and upload a photo at www.bendbulletin.com/lights

BLM charts map to help sage grouse Illustrating habitat is called a key step in keeping bird off endangered species list By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

A new map illustrating key sage grouse breeding habitat across the West is designed to help land managers make decisions about where to allow developments like wind power facilities or transmission lines, and where to focus conservation efforts. “The goal now is to lend some consistency to the whole program, so that we can benefit the sage grouse and its habitat,” said Melodie Lloyd, spokeswoman with the Bureau of Land Management, which drafted the map. Last spring the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that, although sage grouse populations are in enough trouble to warrant protection under the federal Endangered Species Act, there are other species that are a higher priority and so the chicken-like birds would not be listed for now. At the same time, the BLM announced new policies on how it planned to help protect the bird’s sagebrush habitat, Lloyd said. The policies also aim to help prevent sage grouse from being added to the endangered species list, according to the BLM. If the grouse are listed, it could result in stringent rules for energy proj-

ects, grazing, development and other activities in the High Desert and other sage grouse habitat. Those policies include rerouting planned electric transmission lines around priority sage grouse habitat, and warning developers looking to build wind facilities in or near priority habitat that their applications could be denied or come with restrictions. Developing the breeding habitat map is one step in identifying that priority habitat, Lloyd said. “Just like with driving, you need to know where you’re going,” she said. “And a map — or GIS, these days — is important in providing knowledge and understanding of where you’re at and where you need to get to.”

Sage grouse in the West The Bureau of Land Management has adopted a map illustrating the highest concentration of sage grouse breeding grounds, which can be used to guide the placement of energy sites and other developments across the West. Areas in red represent the highest density of breeding sites, followed by areas in orange, yellow and blue. CANADA

Spokane WASHINGTON MON TA N A

Butte OREGON

Bend

Breeding grounds plotted The map itself identifies areas where the highest density of breeding grounds, or leks, are located — including in areas east of Bend and in Southern Oregon. Future maps will identify where important habitats are for the birds in different seasons and where they migrate to, she said. “That’s now a starting point for going out and getting additional data,” she said. The maps are a tool local land managers and decision-makers can use to determine whether human activities are appropriate for that site, she said. See Grouse / C2

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300 Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin


C2 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 10:06 a.m. Dec. 1, in the 63400 block of Hunnell Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and purse stolen at 10:19 a.m. Dec. 1, in the 400 block of Southeast Miller Avenue. Redmond Police Department

DUII — Jim Lee Sannes, 58, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:55 p.m. Dec. 1, in the area of South U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Odem Medo Road. Theft — A theft was reported at

10:24 p.m. Dec. 1, in the 100 block of Southwest Canyon Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:33 p.m. Dec. 1, in the 2800 block of Southwest Cascade Vista Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:06 p.m. Dec. 1, in the 600 block of Northeast Larch Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:03 p.m. Dec. 1, in the 3100 block of Northwest Canal Boulevard. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 3:28 p.m. Dec. 1, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:14 p.m. Dec. 1, in the 1600 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:39 p.m. Dec. 1, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 2:10 p.m. Dec. 1, in the 300 block of

Police probe cause of 4 teens’ illness

L B  

Northwest Quince Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:35 a.m. Dec. 1, in the 1300 block of Northwest Eighth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:05 a.m. Dec. 1, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 9:18 a.m. Dec. 1, in the 500 block of Southwest Sixth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:55 a.m. Dec. 1, in the 2700 block of Southwest Salmon Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and bicycle stolen at 8:12 a.m. Dec. 1, in the 2100 block of Southwest Salmon Avenue. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 8:02 a.m. Dec. 1, in the 3200 block of Southwest 36th Street.

1, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97 in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:48 a.m. Dec. 1, in the 4300 block of South U.S. Highway 97 in Redmond. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:14 a.m. Dec. 1, in the 51400 block of Telegraph Road in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:32 a.m. Dec. 1, in the 1100 block of B Avenue in Terrebonne. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:50 a.m. Dec. 1, in the area of Camp Polk Road and State Highway 126 in Sisters. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:29 p.m. Dec. 1, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 174.

BEND FIRE RUNS

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Wednesday 20 — Medical aid calls.

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 1 p.m. Dec.

SEE YA LATER, FESTIVE ALLIGATOR

Bend Fire Department Santa Express starting The Bend Fire Department will be visiting local neighborhoods starting Monday to collect nonperishable food, clothing and toys to benefit local charities, according to a news release. On Monday, members and volunteers of the department and the Salvation Army will visit the Morning Star, Canal View, Wishing well and Phoenix Park neighborhoods. On Tuesday, they will visit Larkspur, Foxborough and Sun Meadow neighborhoods. Members and volunteers will visit the Providence neighborhood and areas north and south of Neff Road on Wednesday. The drive will finish up Thursday in the NorthWest Crossing and Skyliner Summit neighborhoods. Donations can also be dropped off at Bend Fire Department fire station locations, Bend Memorial Clinic locations and The Salvation Army, among other locations.

Shop with a Cop seeking donations

The Associated Press HILLSBORO — Police in Hillsboro are trying to determine why four 17-year-old high school students who know each other fell ill. Lt. Mike Rouches says police suspect the four male Liberty High School students may have taken some type of drug. The spokesman says one student did say he took brown pills but the teens are not commenting beyond that. Police and medics responded Wednesday afternoon after school officials reported that one of the students had stumbled in the halls and was slightly incoherent. Rouches says school officials then found a second student slightly incoherent. Those two teens were sent to a hospital. Two other students were checked by medics on scene.

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

The Shop with a Cop program held by the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is seeking donations from community members, according to a news release. The program, which is a joint effort by local law enforcement agencies and Walmart stores, pairs needy children with officers to shop for holiday gifts. Students selected through the Family Access Network for the program get to shop at Walmart one-on-one with an officer and receive a free meal. Donations to the program can be dropped off at the main Sheriff’s Office in Bend or at any of the Sheriff’s Office’s substations in La Pine, Sisters or Terrebonne.

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y

The Associated Press

ON THIS DATE In 1810, British forces captured Mauritius from the French, who had renamed the island nation off southeast Africa “Ile de France.� In 1818, Illinois was admitted as the 21st state. In 1828, Andrew Jackson was elected president of the United States by the Electoral College. In 1833, Oberlin College in Ohio — the first truly co-educational school of higher learning in the United States — began holding classes. In 1910, Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of Christian Science, died in Chestnut Hill, Mass., at age 89. In 1925, George Gershwin’s Concerto in F had its world premiere at New York’s Carnegie Hall, with Gershwin at the piano. In 1960, the Lerner and Loewe musical “Camelot,� starring Julie Andrews as Guenevere, Richard Burton as King Arthur and Robert Goulet as Lancelot, opened on Broadway.

In 1967, surgeons in Cape Town, South Africa, led by Dr. Christiaan Barnard performed the first human heart transplant on Louis Washkansky, who lived 18 days with the new heart. The 20th Century Limited, the famed luxury train, completed its final run from New York to Chicago. In 1979, 11 people were killed in a crush of fans at Cincinnati’s Riverfront Coliseum, where the British rock group The Who was performing. In 1980, Bernadine Dohrn, a former leader of the radical Weather Underground, surrendered to authorities in Chicago after more than a decade as a fugitive. TEN YEARS AGO Space shuttle Endeavour’s astronauts attached the world’s largest, most powerful set of solar panels to the international space station. Sandra Baldwin was elected the first female president of the U.S. Olympic Committee. (Baldwin resigned in May 2002 after she admitted lying about her academic credentials.) Poet Gwendolyn Brooks, the first African-American to win a Pulitzer Prize, died in Chicago at age 83.

19 Iraqi soldiers in a coordinated ambush northeast of Baghdad. Retired Navy vice admiral Frederick L. “Dick� Ashworth, the weaponeer aboard the B-29 that dropped the atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan, died in Phoenix at age 93. ONE YEAR AGO President Barack Obama hosted a White House-sponsored jobs forum, where he said he’d heard many “exciting ideas� and proposals and expressed hope some could be put into action quickly. Pope Benedict XVI and visiting Russian President Dmitri Medvedev agreed to upgrade Vatican-Kremlin ties to full diplomatic relations. Comcast and GE announced joint venture plans, with Comcast owning a 51 percent controlling stake in NBC Universal. British actor Richard Todd died in Little Humby, Lincolnshire, England, at age 90.

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A workshop on scientific irrigation will be held for landowners Dec. 14, according to a news release. The free workshop will be held at the Jefferson County Fair Complex in Madras from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., and will help educate landowners in Jefferson County. The workshop will be hosted by the The Wy’East Resource Conservation & Development Council, the North Unit Irrigation District, and Central Electric Coop. Those interested in attending the event should register online at http://nuid.wufoo .com/forms/dec-14th-workshop -registration.

Low-interest home loans offered to vets Qualified veterans can now get low loan interest rates through the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs’ ORVET Home Loan Program, according to a news release. Veterans who qualify can get a 15-year fixed-rate mortgage for 3.25 percent or a 3.75 percent fixed rate for a 30-year term through the State of Oregon veteran benefit. According to the news release, even veterans who have purchased homes using the separate VA Home Loan program may be eligible for an ORVET home loan. For more ORVET Home Loan information, contact ODVA’s Home Loan Department at 888-673-8387, or visit w w w . o r e g o n g o v / O DVA / HOMELOANS.

Chandelle Cotter / Six Flags Discovery Kingdom via The Associated Press

First human heart transplant achieved in ’67 TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Dec. 3, 1984, thousands of people died after a cloud of methyl isocyanate gas escaped from a pesticide plant operated by a Union Carbide subsidiary in Bhopal, India.

Landowners seminar slated in Madras

Ally Oop, a 3-year-old female North American alligator, wears a Santa hat at Six Flags Discovery Kingdom in Vallejo, Calif., earlier this week.

Grouse

Today is Friday, Dec. 3, the 337th day of 2010. There are 28 days left in the year.

Checks made out to Walmart can also be mailed to the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Attn: Shop with a Cop program, 63333 West Highway 20, Bend, OR 97701.

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Continued from C1 That could include uses like grazing or building new trails. “It’s strengthening the guidance that we have,� she said. “It’s finding a balance in conserving the sage grouse while still allowing for public uses.� The mapping efforts have been collaborative with state and other federal agencies, Lloyd said, and the hope is that other agencies will use the resulting information as well. The Oregon section of the BLM map comes from Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife information, said Christian Hagen, sage grouse coordinator for the state wildlife agency. And the BLM adopting the map gets the federal agency and the state on the same general page, he said. The state Fish and Wildlife Commission will be considering a revised Oregon plan for sage grouse at its meeting today in Portland, Hagen said. The state could have a plan in the next four to six months that

would outline its recommendations for conserving sage grouse and the sagebrush ecosystems, he said. The ODFW and BLM maps are based on solid science and give a good picture of where sage grouse live, said Matt Little, conservation director with the Bend-based Oregon Natural Desert Association. “The big question is what the agencies are going to do with the maps,� he said. And the maps should also identify areas to protect that would allow sage grouse to move between breeding sites, Little said. The next step is for the BLM to determine things like how it will restrict development in and around sage grouse habitat as well as what kind of a buffer is necessary around key habitat. “Now we know the places where they live and where they breed,� Little said. “What we’re waiting to see is what the agencies say is going to be allowed in those areas.� Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Budget

Landfill

Continued from C1 “If people understand how things occurred when they get the information, they have a filter to process it,” Bullock said. “I may not like it, but I understand how it came to be.” In their presentation, Bullock and McIntosh, both former principals in the district, describe how state money flows to each district. Those funding levels are basically based on how many students a district has and how much money the state provides for the education of each student. Bullock and McIntosh also discuss the Redmond district’s specific situation, emphasizing that the numbers could change throughout the year. This will be the third straight year of budget cuts, which have included the district adopting a four-day school week for the 2009-10 year and freezing scheduled cost-of-living raises. For this year, teachers and staff also agreed to cut six nonclass days from the calendar. The district did give step increases — based on years of experience and training — at a cost of about $500,000 for the current year. The issues for Redmond schools include scheduled raises, the impact of existing cuts and increasing payments into the public employee retirement fund, or PERS. The PERS increase is no surprise, and the district has set aside about $1.6 million to defray the cost. Starting next year, though, the district expects its annual PERS costs to increase by about $1.8 million. The district could spend all of its savings in one year, or try to spread that over several years — a decision that will come during the budget process later in the winter, according to McIntosh. As of now, the district is also scheduled to pay employees a 1.8 percent cost-of-living increase starting the next school year. The district will also have to decide whether or not to add back the six days cut from the school year, a move that would cost about $1.2 million, according to McIntosh. The budget classes have helped district staff better understand those kind of issues, McIntosh said. In previous years, the district, he said, has had a reputation of keeping information locked away in a “black box.” “People would say, ‘How’d you come up with that number?’ ” McIntosh said. “Now, there’s no mystery.” The information about the shortfall that McIntosh and Bullock deliver is grim news, but staff appreciate knowing now rather than finding out after the crisis hits, according to Brent Walsh, the district’s athletic director and an assistant principal at Redmond High School. Walsh said that bad fiscal news had sometimes shocked people, as if a bomb had gone off. “Now, they’ve said, ‘It’s going to go off,’ ” Walsh said. “They’ve been very proactive. It’s been very clear what’s out there and what we’re looking at.”

Continued from C1 Another $805,000 paid for the relocation of an irrigation canal, rerouting a sewer line, fees and permits, and other work to prepare for the jail expansion, according to Ross. The jail expansion has stalled, after voters in May rejected a $44 million bond that would have paid for it. The county has identified some properties it owns which

Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Charges Continued from C1 Johnson also said the alleged assault was witnessed by her 9year-old son, who had also been adopted by Shortreed. After he was cited in connection with the incident, Shortreed was put on paid administrative leave. He later retired from the department. Shortreed said Thursday that he’s pleased the case was dropped, but said he would have liked the chance to try to clear his name. “I would have liked to have had the opportunity to present my case in court,” he said. “I believe if I could present this whole case, I would be acquitted.” Officials from the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office could not be reached for comment. Shortreed said he believes his health problems were brought on by the case. “They were initiated by the stress of the past two and a half years and the disruption to my family,” he said. “I ended a 25year honorable career because of this, and I’m just glad it’s over.” Shortreed declined to elaborate on his health problems. His attorney, Dick Forcum, confirmed the dismissal was related to a health issue Shortreed has been dealing with for about three weeks. He also declined to be more specific. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

could be sold to repay the loan to the Sheriff’s Office, Ross said, “but right now is just not a good time to sell property.”

Market rebound? County Commissioner Dennis Luke said he expects the real estate market to rebound. “The county’s on very sound financial footing, and one way or another, that money will be paid back,” Luke said. Commissioner Tammy Baney

wrote in an e-mail Thursday that she is committed to finding a way to repay the loans. In 2009, the County Commission approved a landfill fee increase of $5 per ton in an attempt to offset falling revenues and start saving money for landfill closures again, according to the county budget document. That hasn’t happened. This year, the department laid off two employees and closed the landfill on Sundays to balance its budget, Schimke said. Schimke expects it will be

THE BULLETIN • Friday, December 3, 2010 C3 eight years until another section of the landfill must be closed and a new area opened. It cost approximately $6 million to close part of the landfill and open a new area this fall, Schimke said. Currently, the landfill has roughly $1 million in the savings fund. In the worst-case scenario, the county could issue bonds and pay them off gradually, like a mortgage. The cost of doing that would depend mostly on interest rates at the time, said County

Finance Director and Treasurer Marty Wynne. After several years of bad financial news for the landfill, however, Schimke said there might be a bright spot: Monthly waste amounts have stopped their dramatic decline. If the trend continues, the Department of Solid Waste might be able to start saving again, Schimke said. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.


C4 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Gov. Kulongoski plays the heavy

D

uring this fall’s campaign, Gov.-elect John Kitzhaber liked to talk about his close relationships with Oregon’s public employee unions. Thanks to this collegiality, he

argued, he’d be in a relatively good position to engineer some of the tough concessions needed to balance the state budget. If this assessment is correct — as we hope it is — then Kitzhaber owes a great debt to Gov. Ted Kulongoski, who has accepted the role of Big Labor lightning rod in the waning days of his tenure. Through the work of his Reset Cabinet, which released a new report this week, the governor has dragged into public view the budgetbusting truth about public employee compensation in Oregon. Because he has, Kitzhaber won’t have to, and that’s a good thing. His job — correcting the flaws his predecessor has identified — will be hard enough. This week’s report refines some of the recommendations the Reset Cabinet made in its full report, which hit the streets in June. The cabinet’s task, in brief, is to recommend ways for government to endure today’s — and tomorrow’s — straitened circumstances. Oregon faces an estimated $3.5 billion shortfall during the coming biennium, and revenue is expected to grow only modestly for many years after that. Thus, the cabinet focused intensely on spending, which, of course, includes lavish public sector benefits. The unions haven’t appreciated the scrutiny, and Kulongoski, a former labor lawyer, surely hasn’t enjoyed the process either. In releasing the Reset Cabinet’s latest report this week, the governor said, “I do not want the citizens to believe that this budget situation is because of the public employees, whether they’re school district or state employees. I don’t think that has created this problem.” What the governor did not say, however, is that the unions representing many public employees have shown little interest in fixing that problem. But to his credit, he stands behind a panel that says just that — and says it very pointedly — in this week’s report, “Best Steps Forward” Consider the following jab. Since the release of its June report, the Reset Cabinet notes, “the Governor continued in effect the freeze on salaries for management and unrepresented employees and asked employee organizations to modify their contracts to follow suit. None agreed to do so. As a result of these actions and the ongoing effect of unpaid furloughs throughout the state workforce, the average pay of represented employees will increase approximately two percent in this biennium, while the average pay of management and unrepresented employees will decline by almost three percent.” In other words, Oregon’s public employee unions haven’t been team players during the state’s hour of need. And if they won’t do what’s necessary voluntarily, the report suggests, they’ll have to be forced. The

recommendations that have received — and deserve — the most attention from both the public and employee unions involve retirement and health benefits. The state maintains two retirement programs, according to the report. One is the fixed-benefit PERS program, to which lawmakers can’t make meaningful changes without getting themselves sued. The other is the 401(k)-like Individual Account Program (IAP), into which most public employers contribute an amount equivalent to 6 percent of salary. Noting that “the state can no longer afford to maintain two retirement programs” (you don’t say), the report urges lawmakers to kill the IAP and 6 percent pickup outright. To that end, the governor has prepared a bill that will be introduced to the 2011 Legislature. There’s no mention of softening this blow by giving up something in return, a fact that wasn’t lost on Ken Allen, executive director of AFSCME Council 75. “If they want to talk about substituting something for the 6-percent pickup … we will listen to them. But we will fight tooth and nail before we take a 6 percent reduction in total compensation.” Never mind the fact that the 6 percent pickup is something government can’t afford and shouldn’t have offered to begin with. And then there’s health care, to which most state employees contribute nothing. Having framed the discussion by noting the refusal of employee unions to share in the sacrifice imposed upon unrepresented employees and management, the report asks taxpayers and lawmakers to consider the following shocking fact: “Oregon is one of two states that pay the full cost of health benefits for employees and their dependents (the other is Alaska) and is the only state to do so in plans with no deductibles.” To address the problem, the panel urges the Public Employees Benefit Board to adopt a lower-cost plan. Lawmakers and taxpayers will be watching. AFSCME’s Allen dismissed the Reset Cabinet’s latest work by arguing that it’s not “particularly responsible for him (Kulongoski) to issue that kind of report when he’s not going to be around to work on it.” Just the opposite is true. By helping to highlight the unsustainable nature of public employee benefits in Oregon, Kulongoski has done nothing more than unmask an uncomfortable truth that can no longer be ignored. Because he’s played the heavy, Kitzhaber can devote his political capital to solving the problems. If he succeeds, as we hope he does, his predecessor will deserve half the credit.

My Nickel’s Worth Stop war

Pitfalls of a new state

Some say airport pat-downs to check for weapons are too invasive and cause a lack of freedom and dignity. But their purpose is security. The U.S. has used shock and awe, drones, civilian deaths and night raids in Iraq even though none of the 9/11 terrorists were Iraqi. In the name of our security, people have been subjected to night raids of homes, held at gunpoint, kicked and killed while women and children screamed in fear. We were checking for weapons. Talk about invasive. Those “pat-downs” were done to ensure security, right? Our bombings, occupations, assassinations and lawless imprisonments to “keep us safe” may have increased our enemies. How much death and destruction would you take from an occupying force? Afghan and Iraqi civilians have experienced horror under our occupation. The raids and airstrikes have made recruiting easy for the Taliban. Do they want revenge, security? How would you be in their situation? If you have deep humanitarian instincts that tell you our actions are wrong, call the president, 202-4561111. Say, “War is not the answer. What we’ve been doing for nine years has not been working, but has caused more hatred and death, as well as pain and suffering for our military and families.” Security is better achieved by peaceful actions such as diplomacy, development and global cooperation, instead of violence. Think of Greg Mortenson, whose Central Asia Institute promotes education and literacy. Call Sens. Merkley and Wyden and Rep. Walden (switchboard: 202-2243121) to ask tough questions about wars. Meg Brookover Bend

Nov. 20, Randy Avery agrees with Tom Finley about a new state east of the Cascade Mountains. I, too, with many others, agree, but one should think of the big can of worms we are opening. Where would the capital be? Bend, of course. Why? Because this is where the most voters are located, more than any other city east of the mountains. There you go again. Voters count. All state employees and state records would be moved west to the Valley. Now look at produce and goods from the Valley state. Its leaders could say we do not deliver east of the mountains or put a tax on all deliveries. These ideas have been thought of for more years than you are old. Like about 70 years. Also, there could be backlash on your idea of charging an out-of-state hunting and fishing fee. Lots of people like to fish and camp on the coast. What goes around will come around, but Randy does have a good idea. Mel Coffin La Pine

Cut government Anne Philiben wrote an interesting letter about the rich and jobs. She blamed the Bush tax cuts for losing 4.5 million manufacturing jobs. The jobs and the economy were doing quite well during the Bush administration until Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi took over Congress in 2007. By the end of that year, we were in a recession and started hemorrhaging jobs. Now, even after two years of the Obama administration, we still have high unemployment. Philiben then uses Obama’s definition of rich as $250,000 per year, but fails to say that is per couple. This number, of course, will never get indexed for inflation. It includes a huge marriage

penalty, because unmarried, the same person is not considered rich until making $200,000. I have never heard Obama explain the marriage penalty, or why he would want to discourage marriage. What we need to see is efficiency in government. We need to see government worker salaries in line with the private sector. We need to see government pension plans converted to Social Security. We need to see a reduction in the size of government and an end to government borrowing. Most of all, we need to end special interests using the government for their own purposes. Wayne Peterson Redmond

Water barons Who owns the Deschutes River? The Bulletin’s front-page article and picture (Nov. 24) give the answer. The water barons own the river. “Low Water: Officials use river to fill reservoir.” Whether it’s 22 or 30 cubic feet per second, what happens to the brown trout that spawn below Wickiup Reservoir? What happens to their eggs in the frozen gravel? What happens to the other animals that live in the river when the river is not there anymore? What happens to the erodible banks of the river below Wickiup when the water barons release the spring floods? Just look at the acres of mud in Drake Park. What happens to the historically abundant trout population in the Deschutes in summer when the water barons divert 99 percent of the flow into irrigation canals? The handful of fish that survive the low water find that water too warm to live in. It’s about time for the water barons to share some of the water for other cultural, natural and recreational uses. Jack Remington Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

U.S., allies should consider undermining North Korea MICHAEL I GERSON

WASHINGTON — t is a dirty secret — in a world increasingly without secrets — that most nations have been quietly content with the status quo on the Korean peninsula. According to a WikiLeaked State Department cable recounting a conversation in May 2009, Singapore’s Lee Kuan Yew believes that “Beijing sees a North Korea with nuclear weapons as less bad for China than a North Korea that has collapsed.” South Korea itself, in recent decades, has preferred to accommodate, even appease, Pyongyang rather than risk a confrontation that would threaten South Korean economic achievements. America has been the least comfortable with an unstable gangster regime possessing nuclear weapons, but neither negotiations nor sanctions have shifted North Korean behavior. This stalemate has been comfortable for just about everyone — except the North Korean people, living in a nation whose borders define a prison camp. But the comfortable stalemate seems to be ending, at North Korean insistence.

The North Korean regime is fully capable of provocative madness — as when, in 1976, North Korean soldiers hacked Capt. Arthur Bonifas to death with axes in the DMZ — but recent North Korean actions are not irrational. Since the Korean War armistice in 1953, Pyongyang has been contained by the military alliance between South Korea and America, and by American nuclear deterrence. North Korean provocations are designed to prove the alliance is toothless, and to gain recognition as a nuclear power. So, in the course of a week, the regime showed off a new “industrial-scale” uranium enrichment plant and shelled South Korean soldiers and civilians, in what is normally known as an act of war, but which, in this case, brought few consequences. “This isn’t the end,” says Nicholas Eberstadt of the American Enterprise Institute. “They are stepping up a game that escalates each time. And each time the North Korean side meets with less than devastating penalties, it moves to the stage beyond.” Eberstadt believes a third North Korean nuclear test is likely

soon, along with missile tests to solve technical problems in the delivery of nuclear warheads. The outcomes of this dangerous game are limited in number. First, it is possible that Kim Jong Ill’s regime could continue its provocations and finally miscalculate. South Korea could be backed into a nationalistic corner and be forced to escalate. In the past — as in the sinking of the Cheonan — North Korea has often implausibly denied its culpability, allowing much of the South Korean public to close its eyes and pretend. When shells fall on civilians in broad daylight, convenient illusions are dispelled. South Koreans had a visceral response to the deaths and evacuations, forcing President Lee Myung-bak to apologize for his initially

supine response and to promise greater (though unspecified) vigor in the future. It is not inconceivable that North Korea might push past some invisible tripwire of South Korean pride, drawing the United States into the resumption of a shooting war. A second outcome seems more likely. North Korea could find that its strategic calculations are correct — that none of its studied provocations will be enough to cause serious consequences. That South Koreans simply want to enjoy their well-earned prosperity instead of engaging in a heroic struggle that could destroy much of Seoul. That China still wants a buffer state on its border, no matter how dangerous and poorly run. That America, despite its past commitments, has no intention of renewing its part in Harry Truman’s unended war. But at some point this campaign of North Korean escalation becomes unsustainable for America. “The North Korean side,” says Eberstadt, “may eventually manufacture a crisis with a conventional attack on a U.S. base or target. Then the American president will

have a choice: meeting American security responsibilities, which may involve a generalized war, or a continuation of no response, no penalty — undermining the credibility of the U.S. alliance with South Korea. The U.S. might be seen as a missile magnet by South Koreans, causing an upswell that compels our exit.” There is, however, a third possible outcome that has not been considered seriously enough — an option other than possible war or strategic humiliation. South Korea, America and Japan, employing their technology and vast wealth, could attempt to undermine the North Korean regime from within. An aggressive, sustained campaign to break the North Korean information embargo, expose the barbarity and corruption of the regime to its own people, promote the work of dissidents and defectors, and encourage disloyalty among North Korean elites may or may not work. But the alternatives are increasingly unattractive. Michael Gerson is a member of The Washington Post Writers Group.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, December 3, 2010 C5

O Ivan Austin Burton

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N   Hoil Olen Sharp, of Prineville Sept. 21, 1920 - Nov. 30, 2010 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 185 N.E. 4th Street, Prineville, OR, 541-416-9733. Services: A funeral service will be held 1:00 P.M. Friday, December 3, 2010 at the Prineville Missionary Baptist Church, 1870 N.W. Riverland Loop, Prineville, OR. Interment will follow the service at Juniper Haven Cemetery, 1555 N. Main Street, Prineville, OR. Contributions may be made to:

Prineville Missionary Baptist Church, P.O. Box 691, Prineville, OR 97754. 541-447-4689.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Sam R. Henry Feb. 8, 1936 - Nov. 28, 2010 Sammie ‘Sam’ Ray Henry lived in Central Oregon most of his life. He loved to train and ride horses and do some roping (especially the grandchildren). He was always living the life of a cowboy. His favorite pastime was trading horses and cars. He passed way Sunday, November 28, 2010, quietly, in his home at Crooked River Ranch. Sam had found that perfect horse, the perfect trail that lead him to his final resting place. He will be missed by everyone. Thank you for all the great memories. Sam requested that there be no service. Donations may be made to the Redmond and Sisters Hospice. Sam is survived by his sons, Dan R. Henry and Rod L. Henry; daughter, Samantha Henry-Simmons; seven grandchildren and six great- grandchildren.

Ray Dillard

Jan. 2, 1931 - Nov. 27, 2010 Long-time Central Point, Oregon resident, Ivan A. Burton, 79, went to be with his Saviour and Lord Jesus Christ, on Saturday, November 27, 2010, after a long and valiant fight with a number of severe health issues. He was born on January 2, 1931, in Bend, Oregon to Ivan W. and Reba Burton. Ivan graduated from Bend High School in 1949, and after two years of college, he enlisted in the Coast Guard in January 1951, serving the Korean War. Ivan met Bobi Gilbert in 1947, and they married in Bend, Oregon, on May 15, 1951, shortly after Ivan completed boot camp. Together, they had three children. Ivan graduated with a degree in pharmacy from then Oregon State College in 1959, where he was honored as the outstanding pharmacy student. He and his family relocated to Central Point, Oregon, where he managed several area pharmacies prior to purchasing Central Point Pharmacy in 1969, ultimately renamed Burton’s Central Point Pharmacy. Ivan viewed his business as more than a way to make a living, it was a way to serve his community and his customers, whom he called his friends. Health issues forced Ivan to retire in 1993. In addition to being active in the lives of his family, business and the ministries at Medford Friends Church, Ivan was committed to making his community a better place for everyone. This led him to serve as mayor of Central Point from 1969 to 1971, as well as on the city planning commission. He also served on the boards of Jackson County Bible History and Campus Life/Youth for Christ. Ivan is survived by his wife, Bobi; children, Debi (Courd) Samples of Albany, OR, Mark (Patsy) Burton of Medford, OR, and Ron (Judi) Burton of Jacksonville, OR; older brother, Dean of Los Gatos, CA; younger brother, Stephen of Houston, Texas; as well as grandchildren, Bend (Nicole) Samples, Marcos (Katrina) Samples, Erica (Phil) Chan, Michael Burton, Kyle and Kelli Crow, and Rachael Burton. A memorial service is scheduled for Saturday, December 4, 2010 at 1 p.m. at Medford Friends Church, 525 DeBarr Ave., Medford, OR, with Pastor Mark Burton, officiating. The family expresses a special thank you to Providence Home Health Care, Providence Hospice, and Providence Central Point Medical Group for their kind care. Contributions may be made to Medford Friends Church, 525 DeBarr Ave., Medford, OR 97501. Arrangements by Conger-Morris, Central Point Chapel, 541-664-3361.

Scientist, Gold Medal sailor Britton Chance dies

Oct. 18, 1935 - Nov. 24, 2010 Ray Dillard, 75, of Crooked River Ranch, passed away at home, after a short illness, with his family by his side. Born in Arkansas, Ray moved to California as a young man; married and had six kids. As a retired plumber, he moved to Oregon nine years ago. He loved fishing, baseball and Ray Dillard poker. He is preceded in death by Shirley, his wife of 54 years. He leaves three sons, Ray, Travis and Dallas Dillard of Oregon; three daughters, Shirley Morgan and Lillie Benson of Oregon, Della Dillard of California; 18 grandkids and numerous great-grandkids. Private services will be held at a later date.

The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA — Britton Chance, a scientist whose work in biomedical optics helped develop spectroscopy as a noninvasive way to diagnose medical problems, has died. He was 97. Chance died of heart failure at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia on Nov. 16, Marc Kaplan, a spokesman for Penn’s School of Medicine said Tuesday. In 2003, Chance worked to further the science of polygraphs — lie detectors — by developing an imaging machine that could detect bloodflow changes in brain areas stimulated by deceit. The following year, he began testing a device that women could use at home for detecting breast cancer in its earliest stages. Chance was also an avid sailor who won a Gold Medal on the U.S. sailing team at the 1952 Helsinki Olympics.

Raymond Gary Rothbard

Wilma Pauline Williams-Todd

January 17, 1945 - Nov. 10, 2010

April 11, 1936 - Nov. 28, 2010

Raymond Gary Rothbard peacefully left this earth on November 10, 2010, of natural causes. Ray will be remembered as a loving and devoted father, a compassionate and generous friend, and a benevolent companion to many animals. He loved all things related to cars, and had a distinct Ray Rothbard knack and passion for transforming the neglected and unwanted into newly desirable conditions. This skill of Ray's resurfaced in many aspects of his life. His gentle and patient demeanor enabled him to transform feral cats into couch-snoozing companions, and he even charmed an orphaned deer into his home on a regular basis. Old friends fondly recall Ray's ability to beckon herds of wild rabbits to his porch, just by standing at his door and calling out "raaaaabits!". Born on January 17, 1945, Ray grew up in upstate New York. He attended Horace Greeley High School and served in the Army from 1963 through 1969. The eternal lover of cars, he enjoyed being the driver for his Battalion's Colonel. Following his honorable discharge, Ray graduated from UC Northridge in 1971 and worked in various corporate positions. Searching for more autonomy and independence, he opened a stereo store in New York City called "Sounds 'N' Stuff". His unquenchable yearning for freedom eventually triumphed though, and he left all that in the exhaust of a newly purchased VW van taking only his Old English Sheepdog named Daphne, and love for the open road with him. Ray eventually settled in Central Oregon with his adoring companion, Linda, where their daughter, Jaime was born in 1976. One of Ray's proudest accomplishments has been the time he volunteered as a La Pine Little League coach, and the following four years of service as President. He has written that "Our instinct feels a need to take care and love life in its many forms, sort of a celebration of life and as you watch things start flowing to you, you want to pass them on to where they are needed". This was Ray. Those wishing to attend his memorial should contact Jaime at 202-415-9317.

A true country woman, Western as they come, danced through life to the beat of her own drum. No one else like her that's for certain, lived life to the fullest until the final curtain. Gave everyone hugs, kisses and goodbyes, then went to be with Jesus and her mansion in the sky. Family and friends all there to greet her, showing her around, saying how much they'd missed her. She dwells Wilma Todd now in peace and eternal happiness, (we'll miss you, Wilma) knowing her… we've all been blessed! Wilma Pauline WilliamsTodd of Prineville, OR, daughter of Ransom and Ellen Williams of Terrebonne, OR, spent her final days under the care of her loving daughter, Gayle Boan at her home in Pahrump, NV, where she passed away quietly and comfortably surrounded by her loving family. She was born in Redmond, OR, and lived all her life a Central Oregonian with a few travels around the country including OK and TX. But, she loved Central Oregon and chose to reside there, close to all of her friends and family still living there. She is survived by her children, Gayle Boan, Pahrump, NV, Tedd Allen Anderson, Prineville, OR, Todd Anderson, Covington, WA, Tim Anderson, Boulder City, NV, Terry Anderson, Redding, CA, and T.J. Todd, of Bend, OR. She had 18 grandchildren and 19 great grandchildren, as well as her brothers, Glenn, Ray and Hammy Williams of Terrebonne, OR, and a sister, Doris Drew of Springfield, OR, as well as numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by two sons, Bobby and Tracy. In addition to her love for her family, she LOVED yard sales, The PBR and Chinese Food. It has been said that when she, her mother and sister would meet at the Pearly Gates, she would ask, "Where's the best/biggest yard sale in Heaven"? A special Celebration of Life will be held on the weekend of her 75th birthday on April 9, 2011, at Smith Rock State Park in Terrebonne, OR. A reminder will be sent or posted in The Bend Bulletin.

Sri Daya Mata, 96, leader of Self-Realization Fellowship By Elaine Woo Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Sri Daya Mata, a Mormon from Utah who became enchanted by a Hindu mystic as a teenager and went on to lead the Los Angeles-based Self-Realization Fellowship for 55 years, has died. She was 96. The religious leader died Tuesday of natural causes at one of the fellowship’s nuns’ retreats in Los Angeles, where she had been living in seclusion, said spokeswoman Lauren Landress. Daya Mata, whose name in Sanskrit means Mother of Compassion, was the third president of the Self-Realization Fellowship, a worldwide organization founded in 1920 by Indian yoga master Paramahansa Yogananda. Dedicated to the harmony of all religions, the fellowship has more than 600 temples and meditation centers around the world, including its sprawling headquarters northeast of downtown LA. Daya Mata was known as a faithful interpreter of Yogananda’s teachings. “She was trying to promote the image of her teacher, and she did a rather good job,” said J. Gordon

Melton, author of the Encyclopedia of American Religions. “She chose to spend her time projecting her teacher rather than herself.” Melton, who met Daya Mata years ago, said she was one of the first female Hindu leaders and enjoyed unusual longevity in her position as spiritual and administrative head of the sect, which emphasizes yoga and meditation as paths to God. Yogananda preached the unity of Christianity and the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, an ancient school of philosophy that emphasizes nonviolence, self-discipline, physical exercise and meditation. His teachings attracted a number of celebrity followers over the years. One of Daya Mata’s most famous students was singer Elvis Presley, who met her in the 1960s. Presley read her book “Only Love” and kept it in his library, according to Fred Worth and Steve Tamerius in their book “Elvis: His Life from A to Z.” Born Faye Wright in Salt Lake City on Jan. 31, 1914, she was descended from a prominent Mormon family; her grandfather, Abraham Reister Wright Jr., helped design the historic Mormon Tabernacle in Utah.


W E AT H ER

C6 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, DECEMBER 3

SATURDAY

Today: Mostly cloudy and cool.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

HIGH

LOW

38

18

STATE



Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

37/22

35/20

41/26

28/18

Marion Forks 34/15

Willowdale Warm  40/24 Springs Mitchell 41/25 Madras

Camp Sherman 36/15 Redmond Prineville 38/18 Cascadia 36/19 37/19 Sisters 39/17 Bend Post  38/18

Oakridge Elk Lake 35/17

26/6

Morning clouds, then partly cloudy today. Partly cloudy skies tonight. Central

36/20

40/23

35/15

35/14

33/16

Hampton

32/13

Fort Rock

40/29

23/2

Seattle

Chemult



34/12

Missoula 29/6

33/15

43/28

Grants Pass

Bend

35/26

43/32

Idaho Falls Redding

34/17

Partly to mostly cloudy skies today. Partly to mostly cloudy tonight.

Crater Lake 31/15

35/18

40/23



33/22

Elko

55/38

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

26/5

Boise

38/18

Reno

49/31

San Francisco



Salt Lake City 35/26

58/48



S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

Vancouver 40/29

S

S

Calgary 23/2

S

Saskatoon 13/2

Seattle 43/33

Dec. 5

First

Full

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Last

Dec. 13 Dec. 21 Dec. 27

Friday Hi/Lo/W

S Winnipeg 15/6

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 38/29 Thunder Bay 19/5

Halifax 49/40 P ortland Billings To ronto P ortland (in the 48 42/35 34/16 34/26 45/33 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): Boston 22/20 28/24 Boise 43/32 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 35/26 36/27 34/17 New York • 82° 34/23 43/31 Des Moines Rialto, Calif. Philadelphia Salt Lake Cheyenne Omaha 34/27 Chicago Columbus 52/21 City 42/29 41/22 33/26 • -17° San Francisco 35/23 35/26 Washington, D. C. Denver Minot A.F.B., N.D. 58/50 60/29 Kansas City 43/29 48/30 Louisville Las • 1.08” 42/32 Vegas St. Louis Orleans, Calif. Charlotte 41/32 63/45 53/30 Los Angeles Albuquerque Oklahoma City NashvilleAtlanta 65/54 65/36 51/35 62/33 57/39 Phoenix Little Rock 75/48 Honolulu 60/43 84/70 Tijuana Birmingham 70/51 Dallas 59/40 New Orleans 71/50 66/51 Orlando Houston 65/40 Chihuahua 74/60 79/41 Miami 73/55 Monterrey La Paz 76/50 85/56 Mazatlan Anchorage 88/62 29/23 Juneau 26/23 Bismarck 22/7

FRONTS

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .70/45/0.00 . . .76/43/s . . . 59/29/s Akron . . . . . . . . .29/23/0.00 . 32/22/pc . . 34/23/sn Albany. . . . . . . . .40/29/0.00 . 40/25/pc . . 39/25/pc Albuquerque. . . .58/29/0.00 . . .62/33/s . . . 57/33/s Anchorage . . . . . .15/1/0.00 . .29/23/sn . . 23/21/sn Atlanta . . . . . . . .50/28/0.00 . . .57/39/s . . 58/34/pc Atlantic City . . . .44/29/0.01 . 44/30/pc . . 45/32/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .72/27/0.00 . 74/52/pc . . 70/34/pc Baltimore . . . . . .41/26/0.00 . 42/28/pc . . 41/29/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .36/24/0.00 . . .34/16/c . . . 25/9/pc Birmingham . . . .54/28/0.00 . . .59/40/s . . 64/32/sh Bismarck . . . . . . .22/13/0.00 . . .22/7/sn . . .15/-5/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .36/30/0.11 . .35/26/sn . . 36/25/sn Boston. . . . . . . . .45/37/0.00 . . .43/32/c . . 43/31/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .44/35/0.00 . 45/31/pc . . 44/30/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .32/27/0.11 . .36/27/sn . . . 35/24/c Burlington, VT. . .42/34/0.00 . . .36/28/c . . 37/28/sn Caribou, ME . . . .41/35/0.73 . .36/32/sh . . . .42/31/r Charleston, SC . .54/28/0.00 . . .57/40/s . . 62/44/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .49/23/0.00 . . .53/30/s . . . 51/34/c Chattanooga. . . .48/29/0.00 . 53/33/pc . . 54/35/sh Cheyenne . . . . . .51/30/0.00 . . .52/21/c . . . 37/23/c Chicago. . . . . . . .33/21/0.00 . 33/26/pc . . 32/23/sn Cincinnati . . . . . .37/28/0.00 . 38/26/pc . . 35/26/sn Cleveland . . . . . .29/26/0.00 . .33/25/sn . . 35/25/sn Colorado Springs 50/28/0.00 . 57/29/pc . . 41/25/pc Columbia, MO . .52/26/0.00 . 44/31/pc . . . 38/24/c Columbia, SC . . .53/27/0.00 . . .58/30/s . . 57/37/pc Columbus, GA. . .56/30/0.00 . . .60/37/s . . 63/38/pc Columbus, OH. . .35/26/0.00 . 35/23/pc . . 33/25/sn Concord, NH . . . .44/30/0.00 . . .42/31/c . . . 41/24/c Corpus Christi. . .77/42/0.00 . 78/61/pc . . 82/48/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .67/39/0.00 . 71/50/pc . . . 60/33/s Dayton . . . . . . . .35/25/0.00 . 35/23/pc . . 33/24/sn Denver. . . . . . . . .59/25/0.00 . 60/29/pc . . . 45/29/c Des Moines. . . . .42/25/0.00 . .34/27/sn . . 30/16/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .29/25/0.00 . 34/23/pc . . . 34/25/c Duluth . . . . . . . . . .13/7/0.00 . . .18/16/c . . . 21/1/sn El Paso. . . . . . . . .65/28/0.00 . . .71/35/s . . . 71/37/s Fairbanks. . . . . -16/-24/0.00 . . -1/-7/pc . .10/-10/sn Fargo. . . . . . . . . . 12/-6/0.00 . . .19/9/sn . . . . 17/0/c Flagstaff . . . . . . .55/21/0.00 . . .58/22/s . . 56/24/pc

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . 32-40 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . 52-56 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . 59 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . 36-44 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . . 75 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 28-45

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . Chains or T.T. all vehicles Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . .1-0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

. . . . . . . . 25 . . . . . . 50-96 . . . . . . . . 26 . . . . . . . . 73 . . . . . . 18-24 . . . . . . 12-15 . . . . . . 20-26

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .30/28/0.04 . . 32/23/sf . . 32/22/sn Rapid City . . . . . .43/19/0.00 . .34/17/sn . . . . 25/9/c Savannah . . . . . .54/26/0.00 . . .60/37/s . . 64/42/pc Green Bay. . . . . .25/22/0.00 . 28/24/pc . . 32/19/sn Reno . . . . . . . . . .59/27/0.00 . .49/31/sh . . 44/34/sh Seattle. . . . . . . . .42/36/0.00 . 43/33/pc . . 42/34/pc Greensboro. . . . .45/27/0.00 . . .50/28/s . . .45/31/rs Richmond . . . . . .47/27/0.00 . 46/27/pc . . 45/29/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .30/13/0.00 . .28/14/sn . . . . 20/5/c Harrisburg. . . . . .37/32/0.00 . 41/24/pc . . 42/27/pc Rochester, NY . . .32/27/0.00 . .37/27/sn . . . 37/25/c Spokane . . . . . . .33/30/0.19 . 30/19/pc . . . 25/16/c Hartford, CT . . . .44/36/0.00 . 43/27/pc . . 44/26/pc Sacramento. . . . .52/36/0.00 . .59/44/sh . . 57/44/sh Springfield, MO. .55/23/0.00 . 54/34/pc . . 41/22/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .34/21/0.00 . . . .26/5/c . . . 25/6/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .45/26/0.00 . 41/32/pc . . .40/28/sf Tampa . . . . . . . . .62/42/0.00 . . .65/43/s . . . 69/52/s Honolulu . . . . . . .83/73/0.00 . 84/70/pc . . . 83/69/s Salt Lake City . . .36/16/0.00 . .35/26/sn . . .38/27/rs Tucson. . . . . . . . .81/40/0.00 . . .78/42/s . . . 78/43/s Houston . . . . . . .71/37/0.00 . 74/60/pc . . 78/48/pc San Antonio . . . .71/37/0.00 . 74/54/pc . . 79/38/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .63/28/0.00 . 64/37/pc . . 49/24/pc Huntsville . . . . . .52/28/0.00 . 52/37/pc . . 59/33/sh San Diego . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . 65/50/pc . . 63/52/pc Washington, DC .43/32/0.00 . 43/29/pc . . 42/30/pc Indianapolis . . . .36/23/0.00 . 36/28/pc . . 31/25/sn San Francisco . . .53/44/0.00 . . .58/48/c . . 58/49/sh Wichita . . . . . . . .60/24/0.00 . 59/30/pc . . 42/24/pc Jackson, MS . . . .63/30/0.00 . . .67/46/s . . 70/36/pc San Jose . . . . . . .60/39/0.00 . . .62/46/c . . 62/48/sh Yakima . . . . . . . .35/32/0.00 . 30/19/pc . . . 31/20/c Madison, WI . . . .30/16/0.00 . 29/23/pc . . 30/14/sn Santa Fe . . . . . . .58/24/0.00 . 58/27/pc . . 53/24/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .73/44/0.00 . . .75/48/s . . 76/49/pc Jacksonville. . . . .56/27/0.00 . . .62/36/s . . 66/46/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .26/21/0.02 . 26/23/pc . . 32/31/sn Kansas City. . . . .53/25/0.00 . 48/30/pc . . 36/23/pc Amsterdam. . . . .21/19/0.06 . . 28/23/sf . . .29/24/sf Mecca . . . . . . . . .99/70/0.00 . . .93/70/s . . . 93/71/s Lansing . . . . . . . .28/26/0.01 . . 32/21/sf . . 32/20/sn Athens. . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . 73/61/pc . . 70/60/sh Mexico City. . . . .72/43/0.00 . . .76/42/s . . . 78/43/s Las Vegas . . . . . .61/38/0.00 . 63/45/pc . . 62/44/pc Auckland. . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . . .72/55/s . . . 71/54/s Montreal. . . . . . .37/34/0.68 . 35/26/pc . . 34/29/sn Lexington . . . . . .34/22/0.01 . 40/29/pc . . .39/27/rs Baghdad . . . . . . .77/43/0.00 . . .84/50/s . . . 84/49/s Moscow . . . . . . . . 7/-9/0.00 . .16/14/sn . . .32/17/rs Lincoln. . . . . . . . .46/24/0.00 . . .47/23/c . . 32/16/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . 89/76/pc . . 90/77/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . .80/60/sh . . . 81/59/s Little Rock. . . . . .63/30/0.00 . 60/43/pc . . 61/32/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .46/27/0.00 . . .45/26/s . . . 56/35/s Nassau . . . . . . . .77/72/0.54 . 76/65/pc . . . 76/66/s Los Angeles. . . . .71/47/0.00 . 65/54/pc . . 67/53/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . . .81/65/s . . . 82/64/s New Delhi. . . . . .55/52/0.00 . . .73/50/s . . . 74/50/s Louisville . . . . . . .37/27/0.00 . 42/32/pc . . .41/29/rs Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .18/5/0.00 . 17/13/pc . . 21/15/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .70/39/0.00 . .54/38/sh . . . 58/43/s Memphis. . . . . . .61/31/0.00 . 57/49/pc . . 63/31/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .64/54/0.51 . .66/50/sh . . 65/49/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .10/0/0.00 . . . .16/5/c . . . 18/9/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .74/55/0.00 . . .73/55/s . . . 75/58/s Budapest. . . . . . .34/28/0.12 . . .40/36/r . . . 37/25/c Ottawa . . . . . . . .34/32/0.35 . 35/25/pc . . 35/28/sn Milwaukee . . . . .32/19/0.00 . 31/28/pc . . 34/21/sn Buenos Aires. . . .82/66/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . . 87/60/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .30/27/0.00 . 31/23/pc . . .38/33/rs Minneapolis . . . .20/13/0.00 . .22/20/sn . . . . 25/6/c Cabo San Lucas .82/59/0.00 . . .85/61/s . . . 86/63/s Rio de Janeiro. . .91/77/0.00 . . .88/76/t . . . .90/76/t Nashville . . . . . . .45/24/0.00 . 51/35/pc . . 52/30/sh Cairo . . . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . .82/61/s . . . 82/60/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .59/52/0.00 . 58/48/pc . . 54/44/sh New Orleans. . . .64/38/0.00 . . .66/51/s . . 71/48/pc Calgary . . . . . . . .28/10/0.00 . . . 23/2/sf . . . . 21/5/s Santiago . . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . 73/43/pc . . . 76/45/s New York . . . . . .42/34/0.00 . 43/31/pc . . 44/29/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .75/63/0.00 . . .78/62/s . . . 79/63/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . .84/69/t . . . .81/68/t Newark, NJ . . . . .44/33/0.00 . 44/30/pc . . . 45/29/s Dublin . . . . . . . . .32/21/0.40 . . 35/30/rs . . .35/29/rs Sapporo. . . . . . . .54/31/0.03 . . .49/44/r . . 44/35/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .46/37/0.00 . 46/31/pc . . 45/32/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .32/12/0.00 . . 33/26/rs . . .34/26/rs Seoul . . . . . . . . . .61/36/0.00 . . .39/20/s . . . 45/25/s Oklahoma City . .64/30/0.00 . 65/36/pc . . 48/23/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .32/19/0.00 . .30/24/sn . . . 34/27/c Shanghai. . . . . . .68/55/0.01 . . .60/44/s . . . 68/52/s Omaha . . . . . . . .42/24/0.00 . . .41/22/c . . 29/14/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .82/64/0.62 . . .81/64/t . . . .85/65/t Singapore . . . . . .90/73/3.34 . . .87/77/t . . . .90/77/t Orlando. . . . . . . .62/43/0.00 . . .65/40/s . . . 67/51/s Hong Kong . . . . .77/64/0.00 . . .75/66/s . . . 78/68/s Stockholm. . . . . . .21/3/0.00 . . . 18/5/sf . . . . 19/8/sf Palm Springs. . . .73/42/0.00 . 76/48/pc . . 73/49/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . . .72/57/s . . 67/58/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . . .73/66/t . . 70/65/sh Peoria . . . . . . . . .31/22/0.00 . 34/28/pc . . 33/20/sn Jerusalem . . . . . .77/37/0.00 . . .80/53/s . . . 81/52/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . . .74/63/s . . . 76/65/s Philadelphia . . . .42/32/0.00 . 42/29/pc . . 43/29/pc Johannesburg . . .82/64/0.00 . . .70/58/t . . . .80/60/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . . .83/56/s . . . 82/55/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .76/45/0.00 . . .75/48/s . . 75/50/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . .68/60/sh . . 67/59/sh Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .64/52/sh . . . 58/47/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .29/27/0.01 . .33/23/sn . . . 33/24/c Lisbon . . . . . . . . .55/45/0.00 . . .53/40/s . . 59/48/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .34/30/0.00 . . .34/26/c . . 34/24/pc Portland, ME. . . .50/34/0.11 . . .42/35/c . . . .41/26/r London . . . . . . . .32/28/0.00 . 31/26/pc . . 40/34/sh Vancouver. . . . . .43/36/0.00 . 40/29/pc . . . 41/29/s Providence . . . . .45/33/0.00 . . .44/29/c . . 43/29/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .45/34/0.00 . 42/27/pc . . . 49/29/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .32/23/0.07 . .29/25/sn . . .26/21/sf Raleigh . . . . . . . .49/26/0.00 . . .50/29/s . . . 47/32/c Manila. . . . . . . . .88/79/0.03 . . .87/76/t . . . .88/77/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .23/10/0.16 . 23/18/pc . . 20/11/pc

INTERNATIONAL

Charlene Hooper, who cares for three children on a Social Security income, says she worries about having to apply for more financial help if everyday items and bills get any more costly.

By Ryan Pfeil (Klamath Falls) Herald and News

Annah Backstrom (Klamath Falls) Herald and News

“I’ve always taken care of myself. To go in and admit I was scared and in need, it was very humbling for me to be on the other side of the fence.” — Charlene Hooper, widow and mother of three

four surviving on $22,050 a year is considered in poverty by federal standards. During the past few years, the number of people who qualified for food stamps in Klamath and Lake counties under the state’s Supple-

ment Nutrition Assistance Program has increased. In October 2010, 7,145 households — about 15,375 individuals — were on food stamps. In October 2009, 6,293 households — 13,797 individuals — qualified for benefits. “We’re seeing people that never thought they’d be in this position before,” said Department of Human Services food stamp manager Nancy Baker. And like Hooper, many are embarrassed to be asking for help. Embarrassment is a common reason people delay applying for food stamps or other state assistance. “We do see people who are proud and not coming in until they absolutely have to,” Baker said. Hooper receives Social Security benefits of $2,600 a month, which are adequate to help with bills, food, gas

and amenities for Hooper’s daughters. “I did everything I could to get down to very little spending,” Hooper said. “That just became kind of the mission.” Over time, her financial situation got worse. She had to evict the tenant at the rental property she owned after a series of nonpayments. She moved her family into the rental property and decided to rent out their old home instead. But the rent doesn’t cover the mortgage payment. Hooper has sought to control how much money she spends. She keeps her eye out for sales, shops in bulk and freezes foods to preserve them longer. Her parents were products of the Great Depression, she said, and they taught her to be frugal. “I’m very careful,” Hooper said.

State to keep running Umatilla County DA Office during probe PENDLETON — The Oregon Department of Justice will remain in charge of the Umatilla County District Attorney’s Office during an investigation into alleged misconduct by its district attorney. Gov. Ted Kulongoski has sent a letter to Attorney General John Kroger

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

1

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39/34 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.10” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 in 1972 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.10” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . -2 in 1985 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.10” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.82” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . 10.05” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.97 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.33 in 1980 *Melted liquid equivalent

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 48/33/0.06 . . . . . 47/33/pc. . . . . . 44/34/pc Baker City . . . . . . 32/28/0.12 . . . . . 31/14/pc. . . . . . 33/14/pc Brookings . . . . . . 47/45/0.18 . . . . . . 53/34/c. . . . . . . 58/38/c Burns. . . . . . . . . . 33/28/0.36 . . . . . . 30/17/c. . . . . . 33/15/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 47/44/0.02 . . . . . 43/28/pc. . . . . . . 43/34/c Klamath Falls . . . 35/31/0.64 . . . . . 32/28/pc. . . . . . . 39/30/c Lakeview. . . . . . . 36/32/0.42 . . . . . 32/23/sn. . . . . . . 36/19/c La Pine . . . . . . . . 36/33/0.02 . . . . . . 34/14/c. . . . . . 32/19/sn Medford . . . . . . . 45/40/0.70 . . . . . 43/35/pc. . . . . . . 47/36/c Newport . . . . . . . 48/37/0.23 . . . . . 49/35/pc. . . . . . 46/39/pc North Bend . . . . . 50/45/0.00 . . . . . 52/38/pc. . . . . . . 50/41/c Ontario . . . . . . . . 33/29/0.26 . . . . . . 33/26/c. . . . . . 35/23/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 33/31/0.35 . . . . . 34/21/pc. . . . . . . 34/25/c Portland . . . . . . . 46/40/0.01 . . . . . 45/33/pc. . . . . . 41/29/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 38/35/0.18 . . . . . . 36/19/c. . . . . . . 36/23/c Redmond. . . . . . . 40/34/0.11 . . . . . 36/16/pc. . . . . . . 37/24/c Roseburg. . . . . . . 49/44/0.31 . . . . . . 44/35/c. . . . . . . 47/36/c Salem . . . . . . . . . 47/40/0.01 . . . . . 45/30/pc. . . . . . 42/33/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 40/33/0.01 . . . . . 39/17/sn. . . . . . 36/21/sn The Dalles . . . . . . 40/37/0.03 . . . . . 36/28/pc. . . . . . . 37/30/c

After husband’s suicide, mother of 3 found herself scared, standing in line for food stamps

The Associated Press

42 28

TEMPERATURE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .9:12 a.m. . . . . . .5:42 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .3:53 a.m. . . . . . .2:35 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:40 a.m. . . . . . .5:21 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .1:02 p.m. . . . . .12:42 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .2:22 a.m. . . . . . .1:58 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .1:05 p.m. . . . . .12:57 a.m.

More families encounter new struggles KLAMATH FALLS — Charlene Hooper sat in the lobby of the state Department of Human Services, feeling out of place while she waited for her number to be called. She was there to apply for food stamps, something she never thought she would have to do. “It was pretty devastating for me to have to do that,” said Hooper, 56, of Klamath Falls. “I’ve always taken care of myself. To go in and admit I was scared and in need, it was very humbling for me to be on the other side of the fence.” Her family was struggling financially. Following her husband’s suicide, the situation worsened, leading her to the food stamps line. Hooper ended up not using her food stamp benefit, making it instead on the Social Security checks she received after her husband’s death. Hooper was left alone to raise her three daughters, then 9, 11 and 13, forcing her to quit her job at a child care center. The previous twoincome household went to one fixed income. “I immediately went into the shock of ‘How am I going to take care of these kids?’ ” Hooper said. It’s a question more Klamath County residents have faced the past few years as a nationwide recession and its aftermath have taken jobs and forced pay cuts. Many families that were struggling before crept closer to the federal poverty line. A family of

HIGH

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

Moon phases New

LOW

41 27

Mostly cloudy, showers developing late eveLOW ning.

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS S



Helena



Eugene

37/16

29/8

City

43/33

Portland

Partly cloudy skies today. Partly cloudy again overnight. Eastern

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:22 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:28 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:23 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:27 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 5:16 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 2:48 p.m.

HIGH

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

45/33

Burns

La Pine Crescent

Vancouver



34/14

Crescent Lake

BEND ALMANAC

TUESDAY Mostly cloudy and cool.

37 20

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 50° North Bend • 28° Burns

MONDAY

Mostly cloudy, cool, slight chance of isolated LOW showers.

HIGH

37 22

NORTHWEST

30/15

Brothers

Sunriver

HIGH

Mostly cloudy, cool, slight chance of isolated LOW showers.

Other than some snow over the Cascades of Washington, dry weather is expected.

Paulina

34/16

Tonight: Mostly cloudy and chilly.

SUNDAY

confirming the Justice Department will keep managing the Umatilla office until criminal charges against Dean Gushwa “are adjudicated or otherwise fully resolved,” the East Oregonian in Pendleton reported. Gushwa told the newspaper he was not sure what authority the governor was using to make that decision.

“I’ve researched the statutes and the Constitution, and I’m not aware of a mechanism under which this can occur,” Gushwa said. The state attorney general’s office has accused Gushwa of intimidating and threatening two women he supervised into having sexual relations with him.

Gushwa has pleaded not guilty to five misdemeanor counts of official misconduct claiming he used his office to obtain sex and tried to cover it up. Gushwa has been on leave since Aug. 26, when he requested the Department of Justice appoint someone to serve in his place during the investigation.

VERNONIA

Flood-struck town getting new school, civic center By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

SALEM — Three years after flooding sent sewage into classrooms and ravaged the foothill town of Vernonia, Gov. Ted Kulongoski led a groundbreaking ceremony Thursday for a new school and community center. Students have been attending class in partially damaged buildings and portable classrooms since 2007, when up to a foot of rain caused floodwaters from two streams to rise in a matter of hours, damaging 340 homes, temporarily closing businesses and cutting off roads with damage and debris. The new school will house kindergartners through high school seniors, the latest step toward rebuilding a Coast Range foothills community repeatedly ravaged by floods. It will be built northeast of the existing schools at an elevation 50 feet higher, but “hopefully we will never need all 50 feet,” city administrator Bill Haack told The Associated Press.

500-year flood Vernonia is an old timber town that has been struck by devastating floods in 11 years. The first, in 1996, was called a 500-year flood. Once the new school is finished, likely in 2013, the old buildings will be demolished. Plans call for the land to be raised and used for permanent open space in the town located 45 miles northwest of Portland. About 600 of the town’s 2,370 residents are students, so the school is an especially important part of Vernonia, Haack said. “Everything social happens at the school,” he said. The school will include a center to study sustainability in rural areas, including renewable biomass energy. A quality school is key to keeping residents in town and encouraging newcomers to make the move, said Tony Hyde, a Columbia County commissioner who lives in Vernonia. “It makes the difference between Vernonia living or dying,” Hyde said. The $38 million school is being funded through a $13.6 million bond, private fundraising and a likely payout from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Kulongoski also announced the state will pay $3.8 million to improve a highway and two other streets near the new school. “The citizens of Oregon have never left the residents of Vernonia behind,” Kulongoski said. “Today’s investment is the next step in helping rebuild this community.”


S

D

Golf Inside Tiger leads at Chevron World Challenge, see Page D5.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

SOCCER

C O L L E G E F O OT BA L L C O M M E N TA RY

Local fans gearing up for Civil War ‘Beaver believers’ are hoping for upset By Zack Hall The Bulletin

T Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani, Emir of Qatar, holds the World Cup trophy after the announcement of Qatar hosting the 2022 soccer World Cup.

Russia will host World Cup in 2018, Qatar in 2022 ZURICH — Picture soccer fans partying where tanks and missiles paraded on Red Square in the Cold War’s darkest days. Imagine hightech air-conditioned stadiums chilled so players and spectators don’t keel over in the sweltering desert heat of the Middle East. For all the allegations of corruption and rigged voting that have been leveled lately against FIFA, the governing body of world soccer, the much-maligned group certainly has a taste for adventure. In taking the World Cup to the uncharted lands of Russia in 2018 and tiny but oilwealthy Qatar in 2022, FIFA — like the International Olympic Committee — is leading the charge for the argument that sports can reshape history and influence the destinies and the way people and nations are seen by the rest of the world. FIFA could have played it safe by going to the readybuilt stadiums of the United States or to the sport’s motherland of England. Both promised minimal worry and lots of cash. But the desire of FIFA’s all-powerful, 74-yearold president, Sepp Blatter, to carry soccer and its considerable influence to promising and largely untapped markets won the day. “We go to new lands,” said Blatter, who next June will seek another four-year presidential term. — The Associated Press

INSIDE NBA

he last two Civil Wars have been tough on Beaver football fans. In both 2008 and 2009, Oregon State had a chance to get to the Rose Bowl with a win over Oregon. And both times those Beaver fans went home disappointed. Some Central Oregon OSU fans would like a little payback when Oregon State hosts undefeated Oregon this Saturday at Reser Stadium in Corvallis. At stake for the Ducks is no less than a trip to the BCS National

Championship Game next month in Glendale, Ariz. And only the rival Beavers stand in their way. “There has been so much attention around Oregon, and they knocked us off the last two chances we’ve had to go to the Rose Bowl, that it would be a nice little victory if we upset them,” says Kyle Danilson, a 30-year-old Bend resident and OSU graduate. “They’ve been getting so much attention, I would love to just knock them off.” Beaver fans, it seems, are still believers. But their collective confidence has waned. See Beavers / D5

Duck supporters look for perfect finish By Mark Morical The Bulletin

T Next up • Oregon at Oregon State • When: Saturday, 12:30 p.m. • TV: ABC

hey are daring to talk about the national championship, but only in “hushed whispers.” For University of Oregon football fans, nothing would be better than their team securing a berth this weekend in the Bowl Championship Series national title game. But perhaps nothing would be worse than having that dream crushed at the hands of bitter instate rival Oregon State. That’s the dilemma Duck fans have been facing this week. They

talk of not wanting to “jinx anything” and of “keeping their fingers crossed” as Saturday’s 114th Civil War at Corvallis’ Reser Stadium draws near. On paper, Oregon’s hyperspeed spread offense should decimate Oregon State’s inconsistent defense. But anything can happen in the Civil War — and Duck fans are all too aware of that. The undefeated Ducks (11-0, No. 2 BCS) might have the advantage in talent and speed, but the unranked Beavers (5-6) might make up for that with sheer motivation. See Ducks / D5

ADVENTURE SPORTS

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

A snowboarder makes a heelside turn, navigating around snowy trees Wednesday afternoon at Mt. Bachelor in stormy conditions. Buried treetops poke through the surface in many places.

In-depth coverage Snow is piling up fast at Central Oregon resorts, but skiers and snowboarders should still ride with caution early in the season

N

ormally at this time of year, snowriders need to worry about rocks or branches — objects that can poke up out of the snow and can damage their skis or snowboards, and ruin a day on the slopes. While snowriders still should be cautious in the early season, recent winter storms have given snow-sports enthusiasts at Central Oregon resorts a chance to shred the snow with relative peace of mind, at least on the groomed runs. “For this early in the season, the (ground) cov-

Miami Heat forward LeBron James smiles as Cleveland Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert, right, watches.

LeBron has a happy homecoming Heat blast Cavs as James returns to Cleveland, see Page D3

Scoreboard ................................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 College basketball .....................D3 Prep sports ............................... D4 NHL .......................................... D4 NFL ........................................... D4 Golf ............................................D5 Adventure Sports.............. D5, D6

erage is really good,” says Tom Lomax, mountain manager at Mt. Bachelor ski area. The new season at Bachelor started last week

N AT I O N A L F I N A L S R O D E O

Culver’s Mote takes second on opening night in Vegas finish in the money, placing LAS VEGAS — Culver’s Inside 14th with a ride of 76.5 points. Bobby Mote got off to a good • NFR results, Mote is still in fifth place in start in his bid to win a fourth the world standings after one Page D2 world title in bareback riding. round of the 10-round NFR. The three-time champ took But he closed the gap on Gray second place in the first go-round of and trails him by about $56,000. the National Finals Rodeo on ThursThe Central Oregon team of Charly day night at the Thomas & Mack Cen- Crawford and Russell Cardoza finter. His score of 86.5 points on Show ished second in team roping. Crawford, Boat trailed only go-round winner Joe of Prineville, and Cardoza, of TerreGunderson, who posted an 88. bonne, roped their calf in 4.6 seconds, Mote earned a check of $13,840.14 behind only the team of Colby Lovell and made up some ground on current and Kory Koontz (4.1). world leader Ryan Gray, who didn’t See Rodeo / D4

Bulletin staff report

INDEX

MARK MORICAL

with three feet of fresh powder. One ski patroller said it was the best opening day he had seen in 32 years. As of Thursday, the snow depth at Bachelor was 52 inches, and 21 inches had fallen in the previous three days. And this could be just the beginning. A La Niña weather pattern — which brings cooler temperatures and more precipitation to the Northwest — is expected to last throughout the upcoming winter, according to state climatologists. See Snow / D6

Bobby Mote, of Culver, scores 86.5 points on a horse called Show Boat to place second in the first go-round of the bareback riding competition at the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas. Bob Click / For The Bulletin


D2 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 6:30 a.m. — Sunshine Tour, Nedbank Golf Challenge, second round, Golf Channel. 10:30 a.m. — LPGA Tour, LPGA Tour Championship, second round, Golf Channel. 1 p.m. — PGA Tour, Chevron World Challenge, second round, Golf Channel.

SOCCER 1 p.m. — Women’s NCAA Cup, semifinal, Ohio State vs. Notre Dame, ESPN2. 3:30 p.m. — Women’s NCAA Cup, semifinal, Boston College vs. Stanford, ESPNU.

FOOTBALL 4 p.m. — College, MAC Championship, Northern Illinois vs. Miami (Ohio), ESPN2. 4 p.m. — High School, Washington Class 3A final, Bellevue vs. Kamiakin, FSNW. 7:15 p.m. — College, Illinois at Fresno State, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Washington Wizards, Comcast SportsNet Northwest. 5 p.m. — NBA, Chicago Bulls at Boston Celtics, ESPN. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Dallas Mavericks at Utah Jazz, ESPN. 8 p.m. — Men’s college, Kansas State at Washington State, FSNW.

RODEO 7 p.m. — National Finals Rodeo, round 2, ESPN Classic. 10:30 p.m. — National Finals Rodeo, round 2, ESPN2 (same-day tape).

SATURDAY GOLF 6:30 a.m. — Sunshine Tour, Nedbank Golf Challenge, third round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Chevron World Challenge, third round, NBC. 4:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, LPGA Tour Championship, third round, Golf Channel.

SOCCER 6:55 a.m. — English Premier League, Chelsea vs. Everton, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 9 a.m. — College, Rutgers at West Virginia, ABC 9 a.m. — College, Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati, ESPN. 9 a.m. — College, Conference USA Championship Game, SMU vs. Central Florida, ESPN2. 11 a.m. — College, Troy at Florida Atlantic, ESPNU. 12:30 p.m. — College, Oregon at Oregon State, ABC. 1 p.m. — College, SEC Championship Game, South Carolina vs. Auburn, CBS. 4 p.m. — High school, Washington Class 4A final, Skyline vs. Ferris, FSNW. 4 p.m. — College, Washington at Washington State, VS. network. 4:45 p.m. — College, ACC Championship Game, Florida State vs. Virginia Tech, ESPN. 5 p.m. — College, Big 12 Championship Game, Nebraska vs. Oklahoma, ABC. 5 p.m. — College, Connecticut vs. South Florida, ESPN2. 7:30 p.m. — College, USC at UCLA, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 9 a.m. — Women’s college, Cal at Texas A&M, FSNW. 9:30 a.m. — Men’s college, Kentucky at North Carolina, CBS. 11 a.m. — Men’s college, Cal at Iowa State, FSNW. 12:15 p.m. — Men’s college, Butler at Duke, ESPN. 12:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Alabama at Purdue, ESPN2. 1 p.m. — Men’s college, Texas Tech at Washington, FSNW. 2:15 p.m. — Men’s college, Illinois at Gonzaga, ESPN. 2:30 p.m. — Men’s college, North Carolina State at Syracuse, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State at Colorado, ESPNU.

SKIING 2 p.m. — Aspen Winternational, women’s slalom, Vs. network (taped).

RODEO 6 p.m. — National Finals Rodeo, round 3, ESPN Classic. 10:30 p.m. — National Finals Rodeo, round 3, ESPN2 (same-day tape).

SUNDAY GOLF 6:30 a.m. — Sunshine Tour, Nedbank Golf Challenge, final round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Chevron World Challenge, final round, NBC. 4:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, LPGA Tour Championship, final round, Golf Channel.

SOCCER 9 a.m. — Women’s NCAA Cup, final, teams TBD, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 10 a.m. — NFL, Denver Broncos at Kansas City Chiefs, CBS. 10 a.m. — NFL, San Francisco 49ers at Kansas City Chiefs, Fox. 1 p.m. — NFL, Carolina Panthers at Seattle Seahawks, Fox. 5 p.m. — NFL, Pittsburgh Steelers at Baltimore Ravens, NBC.

SKIING 11 a.m. — Birds of Prey, men’s alpine, NBC (taped).

BASKETBALL 11 a.m. — Women’s college, Purdue at Notre Dame, ESPN2. 1 p.m. — Men’s college, Oklahoma at Arizona, FSNW. 3 p.m. — Men’s college, Virginia at Virginia Tech, FSNW. 3 p.m. — Men’s college, Portland State at Oregon, Comcast SportsNet Northwest. 5 p.m. — Men’s college, Maryland vs. Temple, FSNW. 6 p.m. — NBA, Los Angeles Clippers at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

RODEO 6 p.m. — National Finals Rodeo, round 4, ESPN2.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Washington Wizards, KBND-AM 1110.

SATURDAY FOOTBALL 12:30 p.m. — College, Oregon at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940, KBNDAM 1110, KRCO-AM 690.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State at Colorado, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

ON DECK

Hartford 58, Brown 46 Mount St. Mary’s, Md. 66, Sacred Heart 52 Rider 88, Manhattan 59 Robert Morris 70, Long Island U. 69 St. Francis, NY 57, St. Francis, Pa. 44 St. Peter’s 55, Loyola, Md. 52

IN THE BLEACHERS

Today Girls basketball: Grants Pass at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Burns at La Pine in La Pine tournament, 6:30 p.m., Crook County at Madras, 7 p.m.; Summit vs. Reynolds at Aloha tournament, 3 p.m.; Eagle Point at Bend, 7 p.m.; Culver vs. South Wasco at Sherman tournament, 3 p.m. Boys basketball: Mountain View at Grants Pass, 7 p.m.; Burns at La Pine in La Pine tournament, 8:15 p.m.; Madras at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Summit vs. Reynolds at Aloha tournament, 4:45 p.m.; Bend at Eagle Point, 7 p.m.; Culver vs. South Wasco at Sherman tournament, 4:30 p.m. Wrestling: Bend, Mountain View, Madras at Redmond Duals, 2:30 p.m.; Crook County at Sweet Home, 7 p.m.; Culver at Ranger Classic in Estacada, TBA; Gilchrist at North Lake, TBA; Sisters at Burns, noon

Thursday’s summary

No. 9 Missouri 83, Oregon 80 MISSOURI (6-1) Bowers 3-7 1-2 7, English 5-11 1-2 12, Ratliffe 56 1-1 11, Dixon 1-4 9-10 11, Denmon 5-7 6-7 19, P. Pressey 1-2 0-0 2, Kreklow 1-2 0-0 3, M. Pressey 4-6 1-2 10, Safford 2-6 0-0 4, Moore 2-2 0-0 4. Totals 29-53 19-24 83. OREGON (4-3) Sim 0-5 2-2 2, Singler 7-12 2-2 19, Catron 4-9 7-11 15, Armstead 3-11 2-2 9, Strowbridge 4-9 4-4 15, Losli 0-0 0-0 0, Loyd 5-10 2-2 15, Seiferth 0-0 0-0 0, Nared 2-3 1-2 5. Totals 25-59 20-25 80. Halftime—Missouri 44-24. 3-Point Goals—Missouri 6-16 (Denmon 3-4, Kreklow 1-2, M. Pressey 1-3, English 1-4, P. Pressey 0-1, Dixon 0-2), Oregon 10-24 (Singler 34, Strowbridge 3-5, Loyd 3-8, Armstead 1-3, Catron 0-1, Sim 0-3). Fouled Out—Strowbridge. Rebounds—Missouri 30 (Denmon 8), Oregon 31 (Singler 9). Assists— Missouri 19 (Dixon 4), Oregon 13 (Armstead, Loyd 3). Total Fouls—Missouri 24, Oregon 21. A—6,843.

Saturday Girls basketball: Eagle Point at Mountain View, 12:45 p.m.; La Pine tournament, 3 p.m.; Summit at Aloha tournament, TBA; North Medford at Redmond, 4 p.m.; Grants Pass at Bend, 12:45 p.m.; Culver at Sherman tournament, TBA Boys basketball: Mountain View at Eagle Point, 12:45 p.m.; La Pine tournament, noon; Summit at Aloha tournament, TBA; Redmond at North Medford, 4 p.m.; Bend at Grants Pass, 12:45 p.m.; Culver at Sherman tournament, TBA Wrestling: Summit at Springfield, 10 a.m.; La Pine at Grant Union, 10 a.m. Swimming: Mountain View, Sisters at Madras Relays, noon

Women’s college

RODEO NFR NATIONAL FINALS RODEO Thursday At Thomas & Mack Center Las Vegas First go-round Bareback riding 1. Joe Gunderson, Agar, S.D., 88 points on Brookman Rodeo’s Good Times, $17,512. 2. Bobby Mote, Culver, Ore., 86.5, $13,840. 3. (tie) Wes Stevenson, Lubbock, Texas, and Kaycee Feild, Payson, Utah, 84.5, $8,897 each. 5. (tie) Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb., and Will Lowe, Canyon, Texas, 82, $3,672 each. 7. Jason Havens, Prineville, Ore., 81. 8. (tie) Kelly Timberman, Mills, Wyo., and Justin McDaniel, Porum, Okla., 80.5. 10. Clint Cannon, Waller, Texas, 79.5. 11. Dusty LaValley, Bezanson, Alberta, 79. 12. D.V. Fennell, Neosho, Mo., 77.5. 13. Ryan Gray, Cheney, Wash., 76.5. 14. Steven Peebles, Redmond, Ore., 74.5. 15. Matt Bright, Azle, Texas, NS. Steer wrestling 1. Billy Bugenig, Ferndale, Calif., 3.4 seconds, $17,512. 2. Trevor Knowles, Mount Vernon, Ore., 3.6, $13,840. 3. (tie) Dean Gorsuch, Gering, Neb., and Kyle Hughes, Olney Springs, Colo., 4.1, $8,897 each. 5. Jule Hazen, Ashland, Kan., 4.2, $4,519. 6. Ethen Thouvenell, Napa, Calif., 4.3, $2,825. 7. (tie) Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif., and Wade Sumpter, Fowler, Colo., 4.5. 9. Cody Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta, 4.6. 10. (tie) Todd Suhn, Hermosa, S.D.. Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas, and Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis., 4.9. 13. Dane Hanna, Berthold, N.D., 6.0. 14. (tie) Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta, and Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo., NT. Team roping 1. Colby Lovell, Madisonville, Texas/Kory Koontz, Sudan, Texas, 4.1 seconds, $17,512 each. 2. Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore./Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore., 4.6, $13,840. 3. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas/Patrick Smith, Midland, Texas, 4.8, $10,451. 4. Turtle Powell, Stephenville, Texas/Broc Cresta, Santa Rosa, Calif., 5.0, $7,344. 5. Derrick Begay, Seba Dalkai, Ariz./Cesar de la Cruz, Tucson, Ariz., 5.2, $4,519. 6. Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont./Travis Graves, Jay, Okla., 5.3, $2,825. 7. Brady Tryan, Huntley, Mont./Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan., 9.1. 8. Luke Brown, Rock Hill, S.C./Martin Lucero, Stephenville, Texas, 9.3. 9. JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas/Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz., 9.4. 10. Keven Daniel, Franklin, Tenn./Caleb Twisselman, Santa Margarita, Calif., 9.6. 11. Chad Masters, Clarksville, Tenn./Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev., 9.8. 12. Britt Williams, Hammond, Mont./Bobby Harris, Gillette, Wyo., 10.3. 13. Ty Blasingame, Ramah, Colo./Cody Hintz, Spring Creek, Nev., 14.7. 14. (tie) Travis Tryan, Billings, Mont./Rich Skelton, Llano, Texas, and Nick Sartain, Yukon, Okla./Kollin VonAhn, Durant, Okla., NT. Saddle bronc riding 1. Jesse Kruse, Great Falls, Mont., 87 points on D&H Cattle’s Lipstick & Whiskey, $17,512. 2. Wade Sundell, Boxholm, Iowa, 86.5, $13,840. 3. Shaun Stroh, Dickinson, N.D., 86, $10,451. 4. Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M., 84.5, $7,344. 5. (tie) Cody Wright, Milford, Utah, and Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La., 81.5, $3,672 each. 7. (tie) Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb., and Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La., 81. 9. (tie) Jeff Willert, Belvidere, S.D.. Dustin Flundra, Pincher Creek, Alberta, and Sam Spreadborough, Snyder, Texas, 79. 12. J.J. Elshere, Quinn, S.D., 76. 13. Bradley Harter, Weatherford, Texas, 75. 14. Scott Miller, Boise, Idaho, 74. 15. (tie) Rod Hay, Wildwood, Alberta, and Jesse Wright, Millford, Utah, NS. Tie-down roping 1. Clif Cooper, Decatur, Texas, 7.9 seconds, $17,512. 2. Trent Creager, Stillwater, Okla., 8.9, $13,840. 3. Fred Whitfield, Hockley, Texas, 9.1, $10,451. 4. Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas, 9.5, $7,344. 5. Ryan Jarrett, Summerville, Ga., 9.8, $4,519. 6. Jerome Schneeberger, Ponca City, Okla., 10.0, $2,825. 7. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas, 10.1. 8. Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La., 10.7. 9. Tyson Durfey, Colbert, Wash., 11.6. 10. Scott Kormos, Teague, Texas, 15.6. 11. Clint Cooper, Decatur, Texas, 17.8. 12. Cody Ohl, Hico, Texas, 18.0. 13. Joseph Parsons, Marana, Ariz., 18.2. 14. Stran Smith, Childress, Texas, 19.8. 15. Jerrad Hofstetter, Portales, N.M., NT. Barrel racing 1. Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D., 13.84 seconds, $17,512. 2.Nellie Williams, Cottonwood, Calif., 13.92, $13,840. 3. Sydni Blanchard, Albuquerque, N.M., 14.00, $10,451. 4. Jill Moody, Letcher, S.D., 14.03, $7,344. 5. Tana Poppino, Big Cabin, Okla., 14.05, $4,519. 6. Brenda Mays, Terrebonne, Ore., 14.09, $2,825. 7. Brittany Pozzi, Victoria, Texas, 14.21. 8. Christina Richman, Glendora, Calif., 14.23. 9. Benette Barrington, Lubbock, Texas, 14.25. 10. Sherry Cervi, Marana, Ariz., 14.30. 11. Angie Meadors, Blanchard, Okla., 18.86. 12. Lindsay Sears, Nanton, Alberta, 18.89. 13. SherryLynn Johnson, Henryetta, Okla., 19.22. 14. Kelli Tolbert, Hooper, Utah, 23.94. 15. Jeanne Anderson, White City, Kan., 24.19. Bull riding 1. D.J. Domangue, Houma, La., 88.5 points on Andrews Rodeo’s Black Cat, $17,512. 2. (tie) Chad Denton, Berry Creek, Calif., and J.W. Harris, Mullin, Texas, 87.5, $12,145 each. 4. Steve Woolsey, Payson, Utah, 86, $7,344. 5. (tie) Clayton Williams, Carthage, Texas, and Corey Navarre, Weatherford, Okla., 85.5, $3,672 each. 7. Kanin Asay, Powell, Wyo., 81.5. 8. Tyler Smith, Fruita, Colo., 80.5. 9. Ardie Maier, Timber Lake, S.D., 80. 10. Dustin Elliott, North Platte, Neb., 73. 11. Cody Whitney, Asher, Okla., 68.5. 12. (tie) Wesley Silcox, Santaquin, Utah. Shawn Hogg, Odessa, Texas, Seth Glause, Rock Springs, Wyo., and Bobby Welsh, Gillette, Wyo., NS.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PST ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF New England 9 2 0 .818 334 N.Y. Jets 9 2 0 .818 264 Miami 6 5 0 .545 205 Buffalo 2 9 0 .182 229 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 6 5 0 .545 282 Jacksonville 6 5 0 .545 240 Tennessee 5 6 0 .455 257 Houston 5 7 0 .417 288 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 8 3 0 .727 250 Pittsburgh 8 3 0 .727 254 Cleveland 4 7 0 .364 216 Cincinnati 2 9 0 .182 225 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 7 4 0 .636 285 San Diego 6 5 0 .545 310 Oakland 5 6 0 .455 255 Denver 3 8 0 .273 250 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 8 4 0 .667 344 N.Y. Giants 7 4 0 .636 277 Washington 5 6 0 .455 215 Dallas 3 8 0 .273 256 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 9 2 0 .818 276 New Orleans 8 3 0 .727 265 Tampa Bay 7 4 0 .636 219 Carolina 1 10 0 .091 140 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 8 3 0 .727 222 Green Bay 7 4 0 .636 269 Minnesota 4 7 0 .364 189

PA 266 187 225 295 PA 252 294 218 321 PA 188 181 229 288 PA 231 225 256 323 PA 281 240 262 301 PA 209 197 223 276 PA 172 166 239

Detroit

2

258 282

W 5 5 4 3

9 0 .182 West L T Pct Seattle 6 0 .455 St. Louis 6 0 .455 San Francisco 7 0 .364 Arizona 8 0 .273 ——— Thursday’s Game Philadelphia 34, Houston 24 Sunday’s Games San Francisco at Green Bay, 10 a.m. Denver at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Miami, 10 a.m. Chicago at Detroit, 10 a.m. Washington at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Oakland at San Diego, 1:05 p.m. Carolina at Seattle, 1:15 p.m. St. Louis at Arizona, 1:15 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1:15 p.m. Dallas at Indianapolis, 1:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Game N.Y. Jets at New England, 5:30 p.m.

PF 209 213 187 194

PA 275 231 225 319

23. West Virginia 8-3 147 — 24. N. Illinois 10-2 130 — 25. Hawaii 9-3 43 — Others receiving votes: Arizona 34, Maryland 29, Tulsa 28, Connecticut 16, Navy 14, UCF 12, San Diego St. 5, Air Force 2, N.C. State 2. PAC-10 CONFERENCE Standings All Times PST Conf. W L Oregon 8 0 Stanford 8 1 Oregon State 4 4 USC 4 4 Washington 4 4 Arizona 4 5 Arizona State 4 5 California 3 5 UCLA 2 6 Washington State 1 7 Thursday’s Game Arizona St. 30, Arizona 29, 2OT Saturday’s Games Oregon at Oregon State, 12:30 p.m. Washington at Washington State, 4 p.m. USC at UCLA, 7:30 p.m.

Ov’ll W L 11 0 11 1 5 6 7 5 5 6 7 5 6 6 5 6 4 7 2 9

Thursday’s summary

Eagles 34, Texans 24 Houston Philadelphia

3 7 14 0 — 24 7 13 0 14 — 34 First Quarter Phi—McCoy 1 pass from Vick (Akers kick), 7:56. Hou—FG Rackers 48, 4:55. Second Quarter Phi—McCoy 4 run (Akers kick), 14:30. Phi—FG Akers 36, 9:35. Hou—Jones 8 pass from Schaub (Rackers kick), 5:38. Phi—FG Akers 22, :21. Third Quarter Hou—Foster 13 pass from Schaub (Rackers kick), 8:49. Hou—Foster 3 run (Rackers kick), :50. Fourth Quarter Phi—Vick 2 run (Akers kick), 13:04. Phi—Schmitt 5 pass from Vick (Akers kick), 4:18. A—69,144. ——— Hou Phi First downs 27 22 Total Net Yards 431 416 Rushes-yards 26-108 29-115 Passing 323 301 Punt Returns 1-(-3) 0-0 Kickoff Returns 6-101 5-111 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 1-13 Comp-Att-Int 22-36-1 22-33-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-14 1-1 Punts 2-36.0 3-35.7 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-0 Penalties-Yards 4-25 11-85 Time of Possession 28:11 31:49 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Houston: Foster 22-83, Ward 2-15, Johnson 2-10. Philadelphia: Vick 10-48, McCoy 1244, Harrison 3-20, Hall 3-3, D.Jackson 1-0. PASSING—Houston: Schaub 22-36-1-337. Philadelphia: Vick 22-33-1-302. RECEIVING—Houston: Johnson 6-149, Dreessen 5-63, Walter 4-33, Foster 2-26, Jones 2-20, Leach 1-21, D.Anderson 1-17, Casey 1-8. Philadelphia: McCoy 886, Maclin 5-68, Celek 4-55, D.Jackson 3-84, Schmitt 1-5, Avant 1-4. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

College Schedule All Times PST (Subject to change) ——— Thursday’s Game FAR WEST Arizona St. 30, Arizona 29, 2OT ——— Today’s Games MIDWEST MAC Championship, N. Illinois vs. Miami (Ohio), at Detroit, 4 p.m. FAR WEST Illinois at Fresno St., 7:15 p.m. ——— Saturday’s Games EAST Rutgers at West Virginia, 9 a.m. SOUTH CUSA Championship, SMU at UCF, 9 a.m. Troy at Florida Atlantic, 11 a.m. Nevada at Louisiana Tech, noon SEC Championship, Auburn vs. South Carolina, at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Middle Tennessee at Fla. International, 3 p.m. ACC Championship, Virginia Tech vs. Florida St., at Charlotte, N.C., 4:45 p.m. Connecticut at South Florida, 5 p.m. MIDWEST Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 9 a.m. SOUTHWEST Big 12 Championship, Nebraska vs. Oklahoma, at Arlington, Texas, 5 p.m. FAR WEST Utah St. at Boise St., noon Oregon at Oregon St., 12:30 p.m. San Jose St. at Idaho, 2 p.m. Washington at Washington St., 4 p.m. UNLV at Hawaii, 7:30 p.m. Southern Cal at UCLA, 7:30 p.m. THE AP TOP 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 27, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Oregon (36) 11-0 1,475 1 2. Auburn (23) 12-0 1,456 2 3. TCU (1) 12-0 1,383 4 4. Wisconsin 11-1 1,289 5 5. Stanford 11-1 1,283 7 6. Ohio St. 11-1 1,184 8 7. Michigan St. 11-1 1,098 11 8. Arkansas 10-2 1,094 12 9. Boise St. 10-1 908 3 10. Oklahoma 10-2 886 14 11. LSU 10-2 856 6 12. Virginia Tech 10-2 761 13 13. Nebraska 10-2 740 16 14. Nevada 11-1 736 19 15. Missouri 10-2 691 15 16. Oklahoma St. 10-2 599 10 17. Alabama 9-3 597 9 18. South Carolina 9-3 591 18 19. Texas A&M 9-3 582 17 20. Florida St. 9-3 356 22 21. Utah 10-2 249 23 22. Mississippi St. 8-4 224 25

Betting Line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Sunday VIKINGS 7 6 Bills DOLPHINS 4.5 4 Browns TITANS 2 2 Jaguars CHIEFS 7 8 Broncos GIANTS 7.5 7 Redskins Bears 3 4 LIONS PACKERS 10 9.5 49ers Saints 7 7 BENGALS Falcons 3 3 BUCCANEERS CHARGERS 13 13 Raiders SEAHAWKS 6 6 Panthers COLTS 6 6 Cowboys Rams 3 3.5 CARDINALS RAVENS 3 3 Steelers Monday PATRIOTS 3.5 3.5 Jets Favorite

COLLEGE Today Illinois 6 5.5 FRESNO ST MAC Championship N. Illinois 15 17.5 Miami (Ohio) Saturday CINCINNATI PK 2 Pittsburgh W. VIRGINIA 20 20 Rutgers S. FLORIDA 1.5 1.5 Connecticut BOISE ST 40 39 Utah St Nevada 12.5 9.5 LA TECH Usc 7 6.5 UCLA Washington 7 6 WASHINGTON ST Oregon 16 16 OREGON ST IDAHO 14 14 San Jose St HAWAII 34.5 35 Unlv Troy 4.5 4.5 FLA ATLANTIC FLORIDA INT’L 6.5 4.5 Mid Tenn St Conference USA Championship C. FLORIDA 9.5 9.5 Smu SEC Championship Auburn 5 6 S. Carolina ACC Championship Virginia Tech 4.5 4 Florida St Big 12 Championship Oklahoma 4.5 5 Nebraska

SOCCER Women’s college NCAA Division I All Times PST ——— Semifinals Today, Dec. 3 At Cary, N.C. Ohio State vs. Notre Dame, 1 p.m. Stanford vs. Boston College, 3:30 p.m.

Men’s college NCAA Division I All Times PST ——— Quarterfinals Today, Dec. 3 SMU at North Carolina, 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 4 Michigan at Maryland, 10 a.m. California at Akron, 1 p.m. UCLA at Louisville, 4 p.m.

BASKETBALL Men’s college Thursday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Air Force 72, CS Northridge 63 Long Beach St. 90, BYU-Hawaii 83 Missouri 83, Oregon 80 UC Riverside 82, UTSA 75 SOUTHWEST Baylor 68, Arizona St. 54 North Texas 89, Grambling St. 78 Texas A&M 62, Stephen F.Austin 53 MIDWEST Austin Peay 78, SE Missouri 60 Cleveland St. 83, Wis.-Green Bay 75 DePaul 86, N. Illinois 84 E. Illinois 68, Tennessee St. 67 IPFW 76, UMKC 72, OT IUPUI 77, Centenary 69 Kansas 77, UCLA 76 Kent St. 69, Louisiana-Monroe 53 Oakland, Mich. 81, S. Utah 65 Oral Roberts 71, W. Illinois 58 Valparaiso 68, Ill.-Chicago 66, OT Wis.-Milwaukee 76, Youngstown St. 67 SOUTH Belmont 89, Mercer 67 Chattanooga 81, Appalachian St. 69 Coll. of Charleston 82, Davidson 73 Fairfield 41, Savannah St. 39 High Point 66, Gardner-Webb 64 Jacksonville 70, Stetson 61 Liberty 70, Presbyterian 61 Morehead St. 70, Tenn.-Martin 49 Murray St. 74, E. Kentucky 72 North Florida 81, Florida Gulf Coast 74 Northwestern St. 78, Central Baptist 56 Samford 63, W. Carolina 58 The Citadel 65, Georgia Southern 52 UNC Asheville 70, Radford 50 Winthrop 88, VMI 82, OT Wofford 92, UNC Greensboro 70 EAST Fairleigh Dickinson 78, Bryant 68

Thursday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Colorado St. 73, N. Colorado 66 Montana 50, Denver 45 Nevada 79, Arizona 75 Portland St. 77, Hawaii 66 San Diego 84, BYU-Hawaii 71 SOUTHWEST Oklahoma St. 55, Ark.-Little Rock 52 TCU 69, Houston 57 MIDWEST Austin Peay 65, SE Missouri 57 Creighton 79, South Dakota 70 Dayton 70, Cincinnati 59 Duke 59, Wisconsin 51 E. Illinois 77, Tennessee St. 58 Maryland 56, Purdue 55 Minnesota 63, Virginia Tech 58 N. Illinois 71, N. Iowa 64 Oakland, Mich. 68, S. Utah 39 Ohio St. 74, Virginia 46 Oral Roberts 68, W. Illinois 66 Saint Louis 66, S. Illinois 39 Wichita St. 64, Santa Clara 49 Xavier 69, Southern Cal 66 SOUTH Appalachian St. 99, UNC Asheville 71 Auburn 75, South Alabama 70 Charlotte 66, UNC Wilmington 50 Connecticut 80, South Florida 54 E. Kentucky 83, Murray St. 73 East Carolina 77, Va. Commonwealth 72 Florida Gulf Coast 73, North Florida 51 Gardner-Webb 59, Kennesaw St. 48 Indiana 65, Clemson 51 Jacksonville 76, Stetson 61 James Madison 66, Longwood 41 Louisville 96, MVSU 37 Marshall 64, George Washington 61, 2OT McNeese St. 65, Louisiana-Lafayette 52 Mercer 69, Belmont 56 Morehead St. 103, Tenn.-Martin 82 North Carolina 79, Iowa 67 S.C.-Upstate 78, Presbyterian 73, OT UAB 50, Georgia St. 41 Winthrop 62, N.C. Central 60 EAST American U. 46, George Mason 43 Boston College 113, Penn St. 104, OT Drexel 64, Tulsa 47 Robert Morris 72, St. Francis, NY 36 Stony Brook 68, Fairleigh Dickinson 51 Villanova 30, Fairfield 29 Wagner 69, Columbia 50 West Virginia 90, Elon 51

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 27 17 8 2 36 82 64 Philadelphia 26 15 7 4 34 87 64 N.Y. Rangers 27 15 11 1 31 80 74 New Jersey 25 8 15 2 18 46 74 N.Y. Islanders 23 5 13 5 15 51 78 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 26 16 8 2 34 68 52 Boston 24 14 8 2 30 70 47 Ottawa 26 11 14 1 23 58 79 Buffalo 25 9 13 3 21 62 73 Toronto 24 8 12 4 20 51 70 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 27 18 7 2 38 91 71 Tampa Bay 26 14 9 3 31 78 89 Atlanta 26 13 10 3 29 82 77 Carolina 24 10 11 3 23 71 78 Florida 24 10 14 0 20 62 65 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 22 16 4 2 34 78 59 Chicago 27 14 11 2 30 86 79 Columbus 23 14 8 1 29 65 57 St. Louis 24 12 9 3 27 63 68 Nashville 24 11 8 5 27 58 63 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 23 13 7 3 29 75 61 Colorado 24 13 9 2 28 85 74 Minnesota 24 11 11 2 24 58 69 Calgary 25 10 13 2 22 69 76 Edmonton 25 9 12 4 22 68 92 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 24 15 8 1 31 70 63 Phoenix 24 12 7 5 29 70 70 Anaheim 27 13 11 3 29 71 80 Los Angeles 24 14 10 0 28 66 59 San Jose 24 12 8 4 28 72 68 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Thursday’s Games Boston 8, Tampa Bay 1 Edmonton 5, Toronto 0 Montreal 5, New Jersey 1 N.Y. Rangers 6, N.Y. Islanders 5 Pittsburgh 3, Atlanta 2 San Jose 4, Ottawa 0 Dallas 2, Washington 1 Los Angeles 3, Florida 2 Today’s Games N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Colorado at Carolina, 4 p.m. Columbus at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. Calgary at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Vancouver at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Detroit at Anaheim, 7 p.m.

GOLF PGA Tour CHEVRON WORLD CHALLENGE Thursday At Sherwood Country Club Thousand Oaks, Calif. Yardage: 7,052 yards; Par: 72 Purse: $5 million First Round Tiger Woods 32-33—65 Rory McIlroy 33-33—66 Graeme McDowell 32-34—66 Dustin Johnson 33-36—69 Stewart Cink 35-34—69 Luke Donald 38-32—70 Camilo Villegas 35-35—70 Ian Poulter 38-34—72 Hunter Mahan 36-36—72 Sean O’Hair 38-34—72 Jim Furyk 38-34—72 Steve Stricker 37-35—72 Nick Watney 37-35—72 Paul Casey 34-39—73 Matt Kuchar 38-37—75 Zach Johnson 38-37—75 Bubba Watson 39-37—76 Anthony Kim 39-40—79

LPGA Tour LPGA TOUR CHAMPIONSHIP Thursday At Grand Cypress Golf Club, North and South Courses Orlando, Fla. Purse: $1.5 million

Yardage: 6,518; Par 72 (36-36) Partial First Round Play was suspended due to darkness; 28 players did not finish the round Amy Yang 34-33—67 Seon Hwa Lee 34-33—67 Julieta Granada 35-34—69 Tania Elosegui 36-34—70 Leta Lindley 36-34—70 Laura Davies 36-34—70 Cristie Kerr 38-33—71 Song-Hee Kim 35-36—71 Eun-Hee Ji 34-37—71 Maria Hjorth 35-37—72 Katherine Hull 37-35—72 Juli Inkster 35-37—72 Stacy Prammanasudh 36-36—72 Chella Choi 36-37—73 Heather Bowie Young 36-37—73 Mariajo Uribe 35-38—73 Kyeong Bae 35-38—73 Morgan Pressel 37-36—73 Angela Stanford 39-34—73 In-Kyung Kim 37-36—73 Suzann Pettersen 36-37—73 Na Yeon Choi 34-39—73 Amy Hung 37-37—74 Samantha Richdale 38-36—74 Jessica Shepley 39-35—74 Jin Young Pak 36-38—74 Beatriz Recari 40-34—74 Laura Diaz 38-36—74 Jimin Kang 33-41—74 Candie Kung 38-36—74 Se Ri Pak 33-41—74 Gwladys Nocera 39-35—74 Louise Friberg 37-37—74 Wendy Ward 36-38—74 Natalie Gulbis 36-38—74 Giulia Sergas 37-38—75 Moira Dunn 38-37—75 Jane Park 39-36—75 Karin Sjodin 39-36—75 Lisa Meldrum 38-37—75 Azahara Munoz 38-37—75 Christina Kim 35-40—75 Yani Tseng 37-38—75 Sophie Gustafson 36-39—75 Brittany Lincicome 37-38—75 Paula Creamer 39-36—75 Ji Young Oh 38-37—75 Mi Hyun Kim 36-39—75 Kristy McPherson 41-34—75 Sarah Jane Smith 35-40—75 Amanda Blumenherst 37-39—76 Mindy Kim 39-37—76 Paige Mackenzie 38-38—76 Pernilla Lindberg 39-37—76 Kris Tamulis 38-38—76 Haeji Kang 38-38—76 Silvia Cavalleri 40-36—76 Katie Futcher 40-36—76 Sun Young Yoo 40-36—76 Helen Alfredsson 38-38—76 Michele Redman 38-38—76 Na On Min 35-41—76 Momoko Ueda 40-37—77 Jiyai Shin 35-42—77 Brittany Lang 39-38—77 Aree Song 39-38—77 Alison Walshe 41-37—78 Nicole Hage 40-38—78 Jean Reynolds 36-42—78 Allison Hanna 39-39—78 Eunjung Yi 37-41—78 Lorie Kane 37-41—78 Vicky Hurst 40-38—78 Stacy Lewis 38-40—78 Karine Icher 37-41—78 Allison Fouch 41-37—78 Jill McGill 37-42—79 Mhairi McKay 42-37—79 M.J. Hur 39-40—79 Pat Hurst 40-39—79 Mika Miyazato 38-41—79 Karen Stupples 38-42—80 Meaghan Francella 39-41—80 Nicole Jeray 40-40—80 Sarah Lee 36-44—80 Ai Miyazato 39-41—80 Anna Nordqvist 36-45—81 Beth Bader 38-44—82 Cindy Lacrosse 38-44—82 Michelle Ellis 42-40—82 Misun Cho 42-40—82 Diana D’Alessio 39-43—82 Jimin Jeong 41-42—83

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Declined to tender a contract to RHP Matt Albers. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Exercised their 2011 option on the contract of SS Alexei Ramirez. Declined to tender contracts to RHP Bobby Jenks and LHP Erick Threets. CLEVELAND INDIANS—Agreed to terms with RHP Joe Smith on a one year contract. DETROIT TIGERS — Declined to tender a contract to RHP Zach Miner. LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Agreed to terms with LHP Hisanori Takahashi on a two-year contract. MINNESOTA TWINS—Agreed to terms with OF Jason Repko and RHP Pat Neshek on one-year contracts. NEW YORK YANKEES—Agreed to terms with RHP Sergio Mitre on a one-year contract. Declined to tender contracts to RHP Alfredo Aceves and RHP Dustin Moseley. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Declined to tender a contract to DH Jack Cust, OF Travis Buck and 3B Edwin Encarnacion. SEATTLE MARINERS—Agreed to terms with LHP Erik Bedard on a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Agreed to terms with INF Russ Canzler, INF J.J. Furmaniak, RHP Richard De Los Santos, RHP Cory Wade and LHP R.J. Swindle on minor league contracts. Promoted Mark Vinson to assistant trainer. TEXAS RANGERS—Declined to tender a contract to RHP Dustin Nippert. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Agreed to terms with RHP Dustin McGowan on a one-year contract. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Declined to tender a contract to OF Matt Diaz. Agreed to terms with INF/OF Eric Hinske on a one-year contract. CHICAGO CUBS — Agreed to terms with INF Jeff Baker on a one-year contract. FLORIDA MARLINS — Agreed to terms with RHP Javier Vazquez and RHP Burke Badenhop on one-year contracts. HOUSTON ASTROS — Declined to tender a contract to RHP Sammy Gervacio. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Released RHP Dinesh Patel, RHP Sheng-Cin Hong and 1B Chih-Wei Hsu. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Declined to tender a contract to OF Scott Hairston, OF Tony Gwynn, INF Matt Antonelli and RHP Luis Perdomo. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Signed SS Miguel Tejada to a one-year contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MILWAUKEE BUCKS — Waived G Darington Hobson. Signed C Brian Skinner. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS — Placed DE Dwan Edwards on injured reserve. Signed TE Mike Caussin. CAROLINA PANTHERS — Signed RB Josh Vaughan to the practice squad. Released RB Jeremiah Johnson from the practice squad. DETROIT LIONS — Placed PK Jason Hanson on injured reserve. Signed CB Tye Hill. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Placed G Stephen Neal on injured reserve. Claimed RB Thomas Clayton off waivers from the Cleveland Browns. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Placed QB Bruce Gradkowski on injured reserve. Signed QB J.T. O’Sullvan. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Signed RB Shawnbrey McNeal and WR Maurice Price to the practice squad. Released RB Kestahn Moore from the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Reassigned F Josh Brittain from Syracuse (AHL) to Elmira (ECHL). ST. LOUIS BLUES — Assigned D Nikita Nikitin to Peoria (AHL). VANCOUVER CANUCKS — Assigned F Alexandre Bolduc to Manitoba (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Signed D Brett Flemming to a three-year contract. SOCCER Major League Soccer D.C. UNITED — Announced they will not exercise options on D Barry Rice, D Juan Manuel Pena, M Brandon Barklage and M Carlos Varela. COLLEGE SOUTHLAND CONFERENCE — Fined Texas State and Texas-San Antonio $250,000 for not giving sufficient notice of their withdrawals from the league. ARKANSAS STATE—Named Hugh Freeze football coach. NEW MEXICO — Announced football coach Mike Locksley will return next season. NORTHWESTERN — Announced sophomore RB Arby Fields plans to transfer.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, December 3, 2010 D3

NBA ROUNDUP

S  B

NBA SCOREBOARD EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

Football • Steelers say Roethlisberger’s right foot not broken: The Pittsburgh Steelers say quarterback Ben Roethlisberger doesn’t have a broken right foot but instead is healing from an aggravation of a previous injury where scar tissue is present. The Steelers issued a statement Thursday night refuting a Pittsburgh Post-Gazette report that Roethlisberger broke a metatarsal bone in his foot. He has worn a protective boot all week, and has been fitted with a protective game shoe. Previously, the Steelers said Roethlisberger had a sprained right foot. • Ohio State president to be silent on BCS in future: Ohio State president Gordon Gee plans to stick to academics from now on, leaving football to his athletic director and Buckeyes coach Jim Tressel. Gee has been criticized for telling The Associated Press last week that teams from the Big Ten and SEC deserve to play in BCS bowl games more than schools such as TCU, because they play a “murderer’s row” of opponents and “we do not play the Little Sisters of the Poor.” Gee told the Columbus Dispatch on Wednesday that he should not have gotten involved and “what I should do is go over to the surgical suites and get my foot extricated from my mouth.” • Colorado has new coach?: University of Colorado athletic director Mike Bohn said Thursday he hopes to hire a football coach in the next few days and denied he had already offered the job to Washington Redskins assistant Jon Embree. Former Buffaloes coach Bill McCartney told the Denver Post that Colorado was awaiting an answer from Embree, the Redskins tight ends coach who played for the Buffs in the late 1980s before a brief career as an NFL tight end with the then-Los Angeles Rams. Bohn quickly issued a statement denying the job had been offered to anybody yet. He said the search committee still hasn’t completed its work.

Baseball • Rivera, Yanks close to deal: Mariano Rivera and the New York Yankees are close to an agreement on a two-year contract for about $30 million, a person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press. The person spoke early Friday on condition of anonymity because no announcement was made. The person said negotiations were not quite complete. While talks with Derek Jeter have gone slowly, negotiations with Rivera, who turned 41 this week, had proceeded smoothy. Earlier Thursday, the Yankees increased their contract offer to Jeter. The team informed Jeter’s side of the new offer during a telephone conversation early Thursday, a person familiar with the negotiations said. • Giants, LF Burrell agree to 1-year deal: Pat Burrell and the World Series champion San Francisco Giants have agreed to terms on a one-year contract, giving the club another returning face for what it hopes will be another deep run in 2011. The 34-year-old Burrell came to the Giants on a minor league deal May 29 after his release by Tampa Bay and spent a short stint with Triple-A Fresno before joining the Giants on June 4. He batted .266 with 18 home runs and 51 RBIs in 96 games for San Francisco, becoming the everyday left fielder. • Red Sox, Varitek reach agreement: The Red Sox are keeping captain Jason Varitek. A person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press that the catcher has reached a preliminary agreement with Boston on a $2 million, one-year contract. The 38-year-old Varitek has spent his entire major league career with the Red Sox after making his debut in 1997. He batted .232 with seven homers and 16 RBIs in a substitute role last season, when injuries helped limit him to 39 games. • Ex-Yankee Leyritz gets probation, fine: Former New York Yankees World Series hero Jim Leyritz was sentenced Thursday to one year’s probation and fined $500 for a drunk driving conviction, a far lesser penalty than he had faced before a jury decided he wasn’t responsible for a woman’s death in a 2007 traffic crash. Circuit Judge Marc Gold imposed the sentence for the misdemeanor on the 47-year-old former ballplayer, who was acquitted last month of DUI manslaughter in the death of 30year-old Fredia Ann Veitch. Leyritz could have gotten up to 15 years if convicted of manslaughter • Dunn, White Sox ink $56M, 4-yr deal: Slugging first baseman Adam Dunn has agreed to join the Chicago White Sox for a four-year, $56 million contract, a person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press on Thursday. Dunn hit 38 home runs with 103 RBIs for Washington last season. He hit .260 and is the big, left-handed bat the White Sox were seeking. Even after adding Dunn, the White Sox are still hoping to re-sign Paul Konerko, who is a free agent after turning down Chicago’s arbitration offer.

Golf •Harrington leads: Padraig Harrington led the Nedbank Golf Challenge by one stroke after picking up five birdies on the back nine to shoot a 6-under 66 Thursday in the opening round. The Irishman’s first birdie came on No. 8, and he made seven in his last 11 holes to overtake Ross Fisher of England at the Gary Player Country Club in Sun City, South Africa. Fisher led at 7 under before a double bogey at No. 17, just before play was suspended for nearly two hours because of rain and lightning. Top-ranked Lee Westwood shot a 68 after overcoming a slow start.

Soccer • Upstarts face powers in Women’s College Cup semis: Both semifinal games of the NCAA Women’s College Cup feature an upstart against a traditional power. The question is whether Stanford and Notre Dame will benefit from their experience in past national semifinals. No. 4 seed Notre Dame (19-2-2) plays No. 3 seed Ohio State (17-4-2) in today’s first semifinal, followed by No. 2 seed Boston College (17-6-1) against No. 1 seed Stanford (22-02). The winners meet Sunday for the title.

Swimming • Lochte wins 200 IM: Ryan Lochte has won the 200-yard individually medley and finished eighth in the 50 freestyle at the U.S. Short Course National Championships in Columbus, Ohio. The two-time gold medalist at the 2008 Beijing Olympics came from behind in the 200 IM to defeat Austrian Olympian Markus Rogan on Thursday. — From wire reports

Boston New York Toronto New Jersey Philadelphia

W 14 10 7 6 5

L 4 9 11 13 13

Orlando Atlanta Miami Charlotte Washington

W 14 12 12 6 5

L 4 7 8 12 12

Chicago Indiana Cleveland Milwaukee Detroit

W 9 9 7 6 6

L 7 8 11 12 13

Pct .778 .526 .389 .316 .278

GB — 4½ 7 8½ 9

L10 8-2 7-3 6-4 3-7 3-7

Str W-5 W-2 W-1 L-2 W-2

Home 8-1 3-5 5-4 4-5 4-4

Away 6-3 7-4 2-7 2-8 1-9

Conf 11-2 7-4 6-6 3-9 4-10

Away 5-2 7-2 3-5 3-7 0-9

Conf 11-2 8-4 10-4 3-8 3-12

Away 4-5 5-3 3-5 2-8 2-9

Conf 2-3 5-4 6-8 5-4 3-7

Southeast Division Pct .778 .632 .600 .333 .294

GB — 2½ 3 8 8½

L10 9-1 6-4 6-4 4-6 3-7

Str W-5 W-4 W-3 L-2 L-4

Home 9-2 5-5 9-3 3-5 5-3

Central Division Pct .563 .529 .389 .333 .316

GB — ½ 3 4 4½

L10 6-4 6-4 3-7 3-7 3-7

Str L-1 L-1 L-2 L-2 L-3

Home 5-2 4-5 4-6 4-4 4-4

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division Tony Dejak / The Associated Press

A Cleveland Cavaliers fan yells at Miami Heat forward LeBron James (6) during the first quarter of Thursday’s game in Cleveland.

James scores 38 as Heat rout Cavs

San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Memphis Houston

W 15 14 13 8 6

L 3 4 5 11 12

Utah Oklahoma City Denver Portland Minnesota

W 15 13 11 8 4

L 5 6 6 10 14

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State Sacramento L.A. Clippers

W 13 9 8 4 4

L 6 9 11 12 15

Pct .833 .778 .722 .421 .333

GB — 1 2 7½ 9

L10 8-2 8-2 5-5 4-6 4-6

Str L-1 W-7 W-1 L-1 W-1

Home 7-2 8-3 8-1 6-4 4-4

Away 8-1 6-1 5-4 2-7 2-8

Conf 9-3 8-3 8-5 6-5 4-8

Away 7-2 7-2 3-5 4-7 1-9

Conf 7-5 6-5 7-4 4-6 2-9

Away 5-4 5-6 3-7 2-4 0-8

Conf 9-5 8-5 5-7 1-7 4-11

Northwest Division Pct .750 .684 .647 .444 .222

GB — 1½ 2½ 6 10

L10 8-2 8-2 7-3 3-7 3-7

Str W-7 W-2 W-5 L-5 L-5

Home 8-3 6-4 8-1 4-3 3-5

Paciic Division Pct .684 .500 .421 .250 .211

GB — 3½ 5 7½ 9

L10 Str 5-5 L-4 5-5 W-1 2-8 L-2 1-9 L-5 3-7 W-1 ——— Thursday’s Games

Miami 118, Cleveland 90

Home 8-2 4-3 5-4 2-8 4-7

Phoenix 107, Golden State 101 Today’s Games

The Associated Press CLEVELAND — LeBron James insisted it wasn’t personal, even if it was for 20,000 or so fans. “It’s a basketball game,” James said after scoring 38 points to silence an angry crowd and lead the Miami Heat to a 118-90 victory over the Cleveland Cavaliers on Thursday night. It was James’ first game back in the city where he played for seven years before leaving via free agency, angering disbelieving fans who considered him one of their own. “I don’t hold any grudges,” said the player once heralded as “King James” by most of those same irate fans. “They came out to support their team.” Before the game, fans peppered him with obscene chants and booed every time he appeared on the giant monitors over midcourt. They held up signs that read, “Quitness” and “Play Like It’s Game Five” — a reference to his Nike marketing campaign and also last season’s pivotal game in the playoff series with Boston, when many felt James had quit on the Cavaliers. There were five guys wearing a single letter each on their white T-shirts that spelled out: LeBum. He said he tried to smile and shrug off the insults. “I just tried to keep a clear head,” he said. “It’s nothing personal from myself to these fans. It won’t be. Ever.” Dwyane Wade added 22 points, James Jones 18 and Chris Bosh 15 for the Heat, a star-studded team which has seldom played like one in going 12-8 so far. “It was a great collective effort,” said coach Erik Spoelstra. “This is the first time I have seen this connection all year long.” Daniel Gibson scored 21 for the Cavaliers, who have lost six of eight and now play seven of their next eight on the road. James had 10 more points than Cleveland’s

starting lineup. He had half the points in a 16-0 first-quarter run that immediately knocked the Cavaliers back on their heels. Ahead by 19 at the half, the Heat poured it on by shooting 73 percent from the field in the third quarter, with James scoring 24 points while going 10 of 12 and Wade hitting all four of his attempts. The lead stretched to 30 points and beyond. “I thought he played great,” Cleveland coach Byron Scott said of James. “Simple as that. I thought he played great.” James sat on the bench for all of the fourth quarter, with dozens of security guards and police lining the team’s entrance to the court and guarding against objects thrown at him. After the final seconds sifted away, he left without incident. The Heat were happy that things turned out so well for their star swingman. “One thing we preach a lot about in Miami is family,” Wade said. “This is our brother.” Throughout the game, James frequently bantered with his former coaches with the Cavaliers and even talked to fans at courtside. The native of nearby Akron smiled while shooting free throws, in spite of what seemed like the entire arena chanting, “Akron hates you!” The early spurt left a crowd of 20,562 with nothing left to cheer except James’ occasional missed shot. He didn’t miss many, finishing 15 of 25 from the field, to go with eight assists and five rebounds. Also on Thursday: Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 OAKLAND, Calif. — Jason Richardson scored 25 points against his former team and Grant Hill added 24 to lead Phoenix over Golden State. Steve Nash added 13 points and matched his season high with 16 assists for the Suns.

New Jersey at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Portland at Washington, 4 p.m. Orlando at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. New York at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Minnesota at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Indiana at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Dallas at Utah, 7:30 p.m.

Oklahoma City at Toronto, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Houston at Memphis, 5 p.m. Chicago at Boston, 5 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Denver, 6 p.m. Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games

Atlanta at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Houston at Chicago, 5 p.m. Orlando at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m.

Charlotte at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Cleveland at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Dallas at Sacramento, 7 p.m. All Times PST

SUMMARIES Thursday’s Games

Heat 118, Cavaliers 90 MIAMI (118) James 15-25 6-9 38, Bosh 6-11 3-5 15, Ilgauskas 0-0 0-0 0, Arroyo 3-9 0-0 6, Wade 1016 2-3 22, Anthony 1-1 2-2 4, Chalmers 3-5 0-0 9, Howard 3-6 0-0 6, Jones 6-8 1-2 18, House 0-1 0-0 0, Dampier 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 47-83 14-21 118. CLEVELAND (90) Graham 2-5 0-0 4, Hickson 3-9 0-0 6, Varejao 1-4 2-2 4, M.Williams 2-8 6-8 11, Parker 1-4 0-0 3, Jamison 4-10 2-2 11, Hollins 0-2 4-6 4, Gibson 6-14 5-7 21, Moon 1-3 0-0 2, Sessions 2-5 7-8 11, J.Williams 3-8 0-0 6, Powe 2-4 3-4 7. Totals 27-76 29-37 90. Miami 31 28 36 23 — 118 Cleveland 23 17 25 25 — 90 3-Point Goals—Miami 10-24 (Jones 5-7, Chalmers 3-4, James 2-7, House 0-1, Wade 0-1, Bosh 0-1, Arroyo 0-3), Cleveland 7-19 (Gibson 4-6, Parker 1-2, M.Williams 1-2, Jamison 1-3, Hickson 0-1, Graham 0-1, J.Williams 0-2, Moon 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Miami 49 (Wade 9), Cleveland 51 (Varejao 8). Assists— Miami 30 (Wade 9), Cleveland 21 (Sessions 7). Total Fouls—Miami 28, Cleveland 19. Technicals—House, Gibson. A—20,562 (20,562).

Suns 107, Warriors 101 PHOENIX (107) Hill 9-11 6-6 24, Barron 1-4 0-0 2, Frye 3-8 3-4 10, Nash 4-9 5-5 13, Richardson 10-15 2-2 25, Turkoglu 4-9 0-0 9, Warrick 2-4 2-2 6, Dragic 3-5 0-0 7, Dudley 2-4 3-3 7, Childress 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 40-73 21-22 107. GOLDEN STATE (101) D.Wright 4-13 0-0 10, Lee 10-17 5-6 25, Biedrins 2-5 0-0 4, Curry 4-10 0-0 9, Ellis 16-27

3-7 38, Williams 3-4 0-0 8, Carney 1-3 1-2 4, Adrien 1-1 1-2 3, Bell 0-1 0-0 0, Lin 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 41-82 10-17 101. Phoenix 31 21 23 32 — 107 Golden State 20 29 23 29 — 101 3-Point Goals—Phoenix 6-18 (Richardson 3-4, Turkoglu 1-3, Frye 1-3, Dragic 1-3, Childress 0-1, Dudley 0-2, Nash 0-2), Golden State 9-18 (Ellis 3-5, Williams 2-2, D.Wright 2-7, Carney 1-1, Curry 1-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Phoenix 41 (Frye 10), Golden State 41 (D.Wright 10). Assists—Phoenix 25 (Nash 16), Golden State 27 (D.Wright, Ellis, Curry 7). Total Fouls—Phoenix 16, Golden State 21. Technicals—Golden State defensive three second. A—18,328 (19,596).

LEADERS Through DEC. 2 SCORING G FG FT Durant, OKC 16 142 130 Bryant, LAL 19 171 138 Rose, CHI 15 149 69 Ellis, GOL 19 183 81 Nowitzki, DAL 18 169 96 Westbrook, OKC 19 152 157 James, MIA 20 160 143 Gordon, LAC 17 134 120 Stoudemire, NYK 19 164 124 Anthony, DEN 17 139 103 Martin, HOU 18 115 139 Granger, IND 17 133 67 Williams, UTA 20 147 116 Ginobili, SAN 18 122 94 Howard, ORL 18 134 116 Wade, MIA 19 138 117 REBOUNDS G OFF DEF Love, MIN 18 85 184 Noah, CHI 16 66 132 Evans, TOR 15 65 117 Howard, ORL 18 51 166 Gasol, LAL 19 68 158 Griffin, LAC 19 71 150

PTS 437 507 387 474 447 467 483 409 457 394 407 377 441 387 384 405

AVG 27.3 26.7 25.8 24.9 24.8 24.6 24.2 24.1 24.1 23.2 22.6 22.2 22.1 21.5 21.3 21.3

TOT 269 198 182 217 226 221

AVG 14.9 12.4 12.1 12.1 11.9 11.6

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

No. 9 Missouri holds off Last-second free throw lifts No. 4 Oregon’s late rally, 83-80 Kansas past UCLA The Associated Press

EUGENE — Marcus Denmon scored 19 points and No. 9 Missouri held on to beat Oregon 83-80 on Thursday night in a Big 12/Pac-10 Hardwood Series game. Kim English had 12 points for the Tigers (6-1), who nearly blew all of their 20-point halftime lead. Ricardo Ratliffe and Michael Dixon added 11 points each for Missouri and Matt Pressey had 10 points. E.J. Singler scored a career-high 19 points for the Ducks (4-3), who trailed 44-24 at halftime but shot 62.1 percent from the field and made eight of 15 3-pointers in the second half. Freshman Johnathan Loyd made two 3s in the final 14 seconds, the second of which cut the Tigers’ lead to 82-80 with 8 seconds to play. But Dixon made one of two free throws with 5.3 seconds left, and the Ducks missed on a last-ditch effort to tie the game as time ran out. Loyd, Jay-R Strowbridge and Joevan Catron all had 15 points for the Ducks. Missouri was coming off its first loss of the season — 111-102 in overtime to No. 16 Georgetown on Tuesday — but the Tigers played sharp in the first half, leading by as many as 22 points and shooting 64.3 percent from the field. Denmon, who had a career-high 27 points against the Hoyas, scored 13 in the first half. He finished the game five of seven from the field, three of four from 3-point range and six for seven from the free throw line. He had a team-best eight rebounds. Oregon, which was turned down by Missouri’s Mike Anderson during its coaching search last spring before hiring Dana Altman from Creighton, was without two starters who were late scratches. Teondre Williams sat because of a concussion and Jeremy Jacob was held out after experiencing discomfort in his surgically repaired right knee. Still, the Ducks kept their deficit under 10 points until a 3-pointer by Pressey sparked an 11-2 run that made it 31-13 with 6:22 to play in the first half.

The Associated Press

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Missouri’s Ricky Kreklow, left, battles for a loose ball with Oregon’s Johnathan Loyd, center, and Malcolm Armstead in the first half of Thursday’s game in Eugene. Missouri’s length and athleticism kept the Ducks from having an inside presence early. Oregon finished the first half with just 10 points in the paint and was blocked five times, including three times by Ratliffe, who finished with four blocks. Oregon scored 14 of its 24 points in the first half on two 3-pointers and eight free throws and shot just 23.3 percent. But Singler capped a 10-0 run early in the second half with the first of his three 3-pointers as the Ducks cut their deficit to 49-41 with 13:25 to play.

LAWRENCE, Kan. — After almost 40 minutes of bruising, banging, and shouting, everything came down to a little bump and one soft toss. The bump was by UCLA guard Malcolm Lee, the toss was by Kansas’ Mario Little. His first free throw with seven-tenths of a second remaining dropped and lifted No. 4 Kansas to a pulsating 7776 victory over UCLA on Thursday night. Tyler Honeycutt, capping a 33-point game, hit a 3-pointer with 5 seconds to go that tied the score between two of basketball’s most storied programs at 76-76. Then Lee fouled Little as he got set to try to avoid overtime. After conferring at the scorer’s table, officials said to put .7 seconds back on the clock and Little walked to the line as a roaring crowd of 16,300 implored him to keep the Jayhawks’ home court winning streak alive. “I think he just bumped me,” said Little, who was in coach Bill Self’s doghouse earlier for taking some poor shots. “When I first knew I was fouled and they called it, free throws is what I do. I just stepped up and knocked it down. I knew I had two chances. Sink the first one and then let them deal with it.” After making the first foul shot, Little missed the second. The Bruins (3-3) rebounded and Honeycutt made a desperation hurl across the court, missing for one of the few times all game, and Kansas (7-0) saw its school-record homecourt winning streak reach 64. Also on Thursday: No. 11 Baylor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Arizona State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 WACO, Texas — LaceDarius Dunn had six 3pointers and finished with 24 points as Baylor (60) stretched its home winning streak to 11 games. Rihards Kuksiks hit consecutive 3-pointers for Arizona State (3-3) in the opening minute of the second half to tie the game at 33. Dunn responded with a 3-pointer, the first of his two in a quick 7-2 run that gave Baylor the lead for good.


D4 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

NFL

NHL ROUNDUP

Vick rallies Eagles past Texans Crosby gets hat trick, By Rob Maaddi The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Michael Vick limped to the huddle and walked gingerly to the line of scrimmage. He may have been bruised. He may have been battered. But nothing could slow him down once he took the snap. Vick threw for 302 yards and accounted for three touchdowns, rallying the Philadelphia Eagles to a 34-24 victory over the Houston Texans on Thursday night. Vick was hurried and harassed throughout the game. But he kept getting up. He kept making big plays despite a slew of jarring hits. He scored the go-ahead touchdown on a 2-yard run, and the Eagles held serve in the race for the NFC East title. “I’m used to taking hits. It’s not that bad,” Vick said. “If I take one and I lay down, then I took a good one. But I’m a pretty tough guy. I bounce back when I can. There’s no science to getting hit, or protecting yourself.” It was the first time Vick led the Eagles (8-4) back from a fourthquarter deficit. They led 14-3 in the first half before falling behind

Miles Kennedy / The Associated Press

Philadelphia Eagles’ Quintin Mikell (27) pressures Houston Texans’ quarterback Matt Schaub (8) in the first half of Thursday’s game in Philadelphia. Schaub’s pass was incomplete. 24-20. Matt Schaub had 337 yards passing and two scores for the Texans (5-7). Andre Johnson had 149 yards receiving — four days after his hockey-like fight with

Tennessee’s Cortland Finnegan. The NFC East-leading Eagles were coming off their first loss in a game that Vick started and finished. He was 5-0 before a 31-26 loss at Chicago.

Vick continued his remarkable comeback story. He completed 22 of 33 passes for two touchdowns, and had his third 300-yard game. Vick, a three-time Pro Bowl pick in six seasons with Atlanta, only had two 300-yard games coming into this year. He also ran for 48 yards and a score. “This young man is playing as good as anybody I’ve seen play in the NFL and I’ve been doing it for a while,” Texans coach Gary Kubiak said of Vick. “He’s special and we just tried to contain him, but obviously he still had a big night. He’s been doing it against a lot of people so. ... We had a couple of chances for turnovers. He gave us a couple of opportunities that we just didn’t take advantage of.” After the Texans took their first lead in the third quarter, the Eagles quickly answered. Vick sneaked in from the 2 to put Philadelphia ahead 27-24 early in the fourth. Vick’s 33-yard pass to DeSean Jackson to the Texans 11 set up the score. Vick drove the Eagles 87 yards on their next possession, and tossed a 5-yard touchdown pass to Owen Schmitt to extend the lead to 34-24.

ASU blocks its way to win over Arizona By John Marshall The Associated Press

TUCSON, Ariz. — Arizona State blocked extra point attempts at the end of regulation and the second overtime, giving life to its bowl chances with an improbable 30-29 win over rival Arizona on Thursday night. Arizona State (6-6, 4-5 Pac-10) rallied from an 11-point deficit in the fourth quarter and broke through for a blocked extra point with 27 seconds left in regulation to keep the score tied at 20-all. Cameron Marshall scored on a 2-yard run in the second overtime

COLLEGE FOOTBALL and David Douglas of Arizona (7-5, 4-5) answered with a 9-yard touchdown run, but James Brooks leaped to block Alex Zendejas’ extra point to send Arizona to its fourth straight defeat. Thomas Weber kicked five field goals for Arizona State, which now must wait to see if the NCAA clears its bowl waiver after one of the wildest finishes in this heated rivalry. Weber provided the only points, hitting from 52 and 36 yards to put

the Sun Devils up 6-0. Arizona, after 88 yards and eight punts in the first half, finally came to life in the second. Back in rhythm after a 49-yard first half, Nick Foles hit Terrence Miller on a pump-faking 38yard pass down the middle, then hooked up with Juron Criner on the next play, pinpointing a pass in the corner of the end zone for a 28-yard touchdown. Criner made it 14-6 late in the third quarter on a 52-yard touchdown.

The Sun Devils decided to fight back after that. Weber hit a 38-yard field goal to open the fourth quarter, then Brock Osweiler led Arizona State back down the field for a 3-yard touchdown pass to Mike Willie, adding a 2-point conversion that put the Sun Devils up 17-14. Arizona State’s defense held on a fourth down near Arizona’s 30 on the next drive and Weber nailed a 40-yard field goal to make it 20-14 with 3 minutes left. Foles answered by hitting Douglas on a 5-yard touchdown, but Arizona State blocked the PAT.

Pens edge Thrashers The Associated Press

PITTSBURGH — Sidney Crosby scored all three Pittsburgh goals for the first natural hat trick of his six-season career and the Penguins won a matchup of teams on long winning streaks, beating the Atlanta Thrashers 3-2 on Thursday night. With Crosby becoming the first Penguins player in nearly 10 years to score three goals in successive home games, Pittsburgh ran its winning streak to eight games. Atlanta’s franchise record-tying streak ended at six. The Penguins, 10-0-1 in their last 11, are on their longest winning streak since they also won eight in a row from Dec. 23, 2007-Jan. 10, 2008. They have won their last eight at home against Atlanta, which had outscored opponents 22-5 during its winning streak. Marc-Andre Fleury allowed Nik Antropov’s goal that made it 3-2 late in the second period, but made 20 saves while improving to 9-0-1 in his last 10 starts. Crosby, the NHL’s leading scorer with 21 goals and 23 assists for 44 points in 27 games, tied Tampa Bay’s Steven Stamkos for the goal-scoring lead. They tied for the goals title last season with 51 apiece. Bryan Little also scored for Atlanta. Also on Thursday: Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Capitals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DALLAS — Backup Andrew Raycroft made 37 saves, Brandon Segal scored the go-ahead goal midway through the third period, and Dallas survived a late scare to win its fifth

straight. Bruins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 BOSTON — David Krejci had two goals and an assist and Marc Savard returned to the Boston lineup, helping the Bruins rout Tampa Bay. Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Islanders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Marian Gaborik had three goals and an assist in his first game with Sean Avery as a linemate, and Henrik Lundqvist made nine saves in relief of backup Martin Biron to lift New York Rangers. Oilers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Maple Leafs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 TORONTO — Nikolai Khabibulin made 33 saves and Taylor Hall scored twice to help Edmonton beat Toronto, giving the Oilers their third road victory four nights. Sharks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Senators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 OTTAWA — Logan Couture scored twice, Dany Heatley had an assist in his return to Ottawa, and Antti Niemi made 28 saves for his first shutout of the season — and San Jose’s first, too. Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Devils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 NEWARK, N.J. — Brian Gionta and Lars Eller scored in the first 1:38, Tom Pyatt, Scott Gomez and Benoit Pouliot added goals and Carey Price made 27 saves for Montreal. Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 LOS ANGELES — Anze Kopitar scored the tiebreaking goal on a rebound with 2:43 to play, and Los Angeles beat Florida to snap a four-game losing streak.

PREP ROUNDUP

Crook County starts season with victory in hoops Bulletin staff report PRINEVILLE — Crook County won its first girls basketball game of the season under new coach David Johnson on Thursday, defeating Sweet Home 57-27. “We shot the ball extremely well,” Johnson said about the Cowgirls’ 24-point outburst in the game’s opening quarter. Danni Severance posted a double-double for the home team, scoring 13 points and grabbing 11 rebounds. She also blocked four shots. Chanelle Fulton added nine points and eight defensive rebounds in the victory for Crook County. The Cowgirls (1-0) travel to Madras tonight. In other prep events Thursday:

GIRLS BASKETBALL Gilchrist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Culver JV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 GILCHRIST — The Grizzlies got their season off to a winning start with a victory over the junior varsity squad from Culver, holding the Bulldogs to just nine points in the first three quarters of play. Sophomore Ashley James outscored Culver by herself, totaling 23 points on 10-of-18 shooting, which included two threepointers. Gilchrist overcame a poor night at the free throw line, in which the Grizzlies converted just nine of 25 attempts from the floor. Lori Sandy and Anna Badillo led the Culver JV squad with seven points each. Gilchrist plays Bend High’s junior varsity squad tonight in Bend.

BOYS BASKETBALL Sweet Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 SWEET HOME — Travis Bartels scored 15 points to lead the Cowboys, who almost posted their first win since 2008. Sweet Home’s Gavin Kauffmann, who scored a game-high 21 points, made a layup with under five seconds left in the game to hoist the Huskies to victory. The Cowboys (0-1) struggled at the free throw line, connecting on just six of 17 attempts. Sweet Home (1-0) was perfect from the charity stripe, hitting all 16 of their free throws. Gilchrist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 La Pine freshman . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 GILCHRIST — Tyler Shuey recorded 23 points and 10 rebounds to help Gilchrist win its season

opener. The Grizzlies square off against the same La Pine freshman team today at La Pine. WRESTLING Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 MADRAS — The Storm and the White Buffaloes tied in the nonconference dual match, which served as each teams’ season-opening contest. Eric Nazario (103 pounds), Brian Pechan (119), Eric Thompson (140) and Conner Rueth (152) all posted pins for Summit. Miguel Vasquez (135), Tanner Norwest (145), Brok Fuller (160) and Travis Williams all record falls for Madras. The Storm is back on the mat Saturday at Springfield High while the Buffs are at the Redmond Duals today.

PREP SCOREBOARD BASKETBALL Girls CLASS 4A NONCONFERENCE ——— CROOK COUNTY (57) — Crofchek 2, Brooke Buswell 8, Fulton 9, Walker 3, Morgan 18, Paige Buswell 1, Severance 13, McKenzie 3, Martin, Pope, Apperson, Ovens. Totals 18 12-19 57. SWEET HOME (27) — Cole 4, Wyatt 2, Anderson 2, Davis 5, Bell 1, Whitfield 13, R. Muir, C. Muir, Robidoux, Weld, Graville. Totals 8 11-18 27. Crook County 24 11 11 11 — 57 Sweet Home 10 4 7 6 — 27 Three-point goals — Crook County: Fulton 2, Morgan 3. ——— GILCHRIST (49) — Denise Gordon 6, Brenna Gravitt 7, Markel Heater 2, Ashley James 23, Paige Kooker 3, Leanna McGregor 1, Jenny Scevers 7. Totals 19 9-25 49.

CULVER JV (18) — Jahnie Cleveland 2, Lori Sandy 7, Anna Badillo 7, Lauren Fedance 2. Gilchrist 13 20 5 11 — 49 Culver JV 5 4 0 9 — 18 Three-point goals — Gilchrist: James 2.

Boys CLASS 4A NONCONFERENCE ——— CROOK COUNTY (52) —Seaquist 8, Travis Bartels 15, Henry 6, Gomes 8, Morales 4, Simpson 4, Washecht, Reeher 7, Dees. Totals 20 6-17 52. SWEET HOME (54) — Rice, Morgan 4, White 4, Robidoux 8, Gavin Kauffmann 21, Webb, Mauch 2, Winslow, Fekins 13. Totals 17 16-16 54 Crook County 8 18 10 16 — 52 Sweet Home 12 11 18 10 — 54 Three-point goals —Crook County: Bartels 3, Reeher.

——— LA PINE FRESHMAN (44) — Sam Wieber 16, Smith 8, Stinson 6, Ramierez 5, Leandowski 4, Serns, Haddad, Fogel, Milee, James. Totals 15 12-19 44. GILCHRIST (50) — Tyler Shuey 23, Boone 8, Taran Koch 6, Trinton Koch 4, Link 4, Cox 3, Martinez 2, Hanna, Getchell, Stein, Blacketer. Totals 23 4-10 50. La Pine 4 11 14 15 — 44 Gilchrist 15 14 12 9 — 50 Three-point goals — none.

WRESTLING NONCONFERENCE

SUMMIT 39, MADRAS 39 ——— At Madras High 103 — Madras wins by forfeit . 112 —Eric Nazario, S, pins. Andrew Fine, M, third period. 119 — Brian Pechan, S, pins Rob Azuna, M, second period. 125 — Summit wins by forfeit. 130 —Madras wins by forfeit. 135 — Miguel Vasquez, M, pins Brandon Katter, S, first period. 140 — Eric Thompson, S, pins, Triston Boise, M, first period. 145 —Tanner Norwest, M, pins Tom O’Shea, S, first period. 152 — Conner Rueth, S, pins, Neal Morningowl, M, first period. 160 — Brok Fuller, M, pins Alex Larsson, S, first period. 171 — Summit wins by forfeit. 189 — Forfeit. 215 — Travis Williams, M, pins Victor Reyes, S, second period. 285 — Adrian Phillips, M, def. James Zacha, S, 6-4.

Juniper Golf Course

A Magazine Highlighting The Variety Of Organizations That Connect Your Community.

Publishing Monday, December 20, 2010 in The Bulletin Central Oregon communities continue to grow due to a nationallyrecognized appreciation for the region’s quality of life. From providing the most basic needs of food, shelter and security, to creating and maintaining positive social, educational, recreational and professional environments, Central Oregon’s nonprofit community is a foundation for our area’s success and sustainability. Hundreds of organizations and thousands of volunteers make up this nonprofit network. Through the publication of Connections, The Bulletin will both define and profile the organizations that make up this network. Connections will provide readers with a thorough look at nonprofit organizations in Deschutes, Jefferson, and Crook Counties.

Advertising space reservation deadline is Monday, December 6, 2010 CALL 541.382.1811 TO RESERVE YOUR SPACE TODAY.

Holiday Membership Drive

Rodeo Continued from D1 Both cowboys earned $13,840.14 for the night. The two Central Oregon cowboys have an outside shot at winning world titles. Crawford is in fourth place in the world standings for headers, about $47,000 behind Clay Tryan. Cardoza is in fourth for heelers, also about $47,000 behind the leader, Travis Graves. Terrebonne’s Brenda Mays also earned a check on Thursday night, finishing sixth in barrel racing with a time of 14.09 seconds. Lisa Lockhart won the go-round in 13.84 sec-

onds. Mays earned a paycheck of $2,824.52. Prineville’s Jason Havens finished just out of the money in bareback (seventh place, 81 points), while Redmond’s Steven Peebles was 15th (74.5). From around the state, Mount Vernon cowboy Trevor Knowles, a graduate of Grant Union High School in John Day, recorded a runner-up finish in steer wrestling. Knowles posted a time of 3.6 seconds and earned a check worth $13,840. Billy Bugenig, of Ferndale, Calif., was the only bulldogger to best Knowles on Thursday, as he turned in a time of 3.4 seconds. The NFR continues tonight with the second go-round.

This holiday season is the time to set up your 2011 golf season with a membership at Juniper Golf Course, one of Central Oregon’s Premier Golf Courses. Here’s the deal: For the reduced joining fee of $200, you will become a member of our course at what Golf Digest says is Oregon’s Best Municipal golf course. To sweeten the deal, we will throw in a $100 gift card to our pro shop or restaurant for your Christmas present AND delay your dues until February of 2011. Call for details or check our website. Become part of the Juniper family!

ATTENTION CENTRAL OREGON NONPROFIT GROUPS The Bulletin is in the process of verifying and compiling a comprehensive list of nonprofit entities in Central Oregon. Please fill out this form to verify information in order to be considered for publication in Connections. Mail back to: The Bulletin, Attn: Nicole Werner, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. E-mail information to nwerner@bendbulletin.com or call 541-382-1811 ext. 871

Name of Nonprofit Group ____________________________________________ Contact Person ____________________________________________________ Phone________________________E-mail ______________________________

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Nonprofit Mission Statement/Purpose________________________________________

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, December 3, 2010 D5

GOLF ROUNDUP

Tiger fires 65, leads tourney The Associated Press THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. — Those streaks of good play from Tiger Woods keep getting a little longer. In one of his most complete rounds of the year, Woods missed only two greens and putted for eagle four times Thursday on his way to a 7-under 65 for a one-shot lead over U.S. Open champion Graeme McDowell and Rory McIlroy in the Chevron World Challenge. Woods made it all the way until the 18th hole before an old flaw crept into his new swing. He popped up his tee shot, forcing him to pitch out from behind a tree and two-putt from 50 feet to escape with bogey. Even so, he matched his best score of the year, and was atop the leaderboard for only the second time in his troublesome season. About the only club that didn’t cooperate was his new putter, although that’s nothing new. If anything has held Woods back from at least having a few chances at contending, it’s not making many putts. Great iron play made up for that at Sherwood Country Club. “It’s not too often you can say I shot 65 and only made one putt, but that’s kind of what I did today,” Woods said. “I only made one putt and it was on 9. The rest were either two-putts or kickins. It was a good ball-striking day.” The putt on the par-4 ninth was from about 15 feet with significant break. Equally impressive were some of his shots into the par 5s, particularly the 3-iron into No. 2. Woods hit it so clean that he twirled the club, a sure sign of a good shot. He hasn’t done much twirling this year. “I have not,” Woods said. “Usually, it’s point which way the ball is going to go — incoming somewhere.”

Beavers Continued from D1 A season that includes a 31-14 loss to Pac-10 bottom-dwelling Washington State and last week’s 38-0 blasting at the hands of Stanford had a lot to do with that. “My state of mind for the Civil War as a Beaver fan? Concerned!” says Jon Walker, a 39-year-old Bend resident and Beaver football season-ticket holder. “We have been so up and down this year. Will the real Beaver team please stand up? My biggest concern would be the lack of defensive speed we have to contain Oregon’s offense. Top that with now our offense can’t seem to score, and things don’t look good.” The Beavers, at 5-6 for the season, are playing this week for a much more modest goal than the Ducks. A win would mean a trip to a bowl game for Oregon State. A loss means an end to what has turned out to be a disappointing season. But after what so far has been a

Ducks Continued from D1 Oregon denied them a Rose Bowl berth with Civil War victories each of the last two years. The stakes have been high before in the Civil War, but never this high for the Ducks: Win, and they play for the national championship. Lose, and they go to the Rose Bowl — which is a wonderful consolation prize, but one the Ducks would prefer to forgo. It is quite simply the most important Civil War in UO football history. ESPN’s College GameDay will be in Corvallis for the game, but not to see if the Beavers become bowl eligible. The show will be there to highlight Oregon’s possible final step to the Jan. 10 title game at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Ariz. Duck fans who have already made travel arrangements and hotel reservations for Arizona will watch the Civil War with bated breath. “I’ll admit, I made plane reservations about three or four weeks ago,” said Bend’s Chris Otto, president of the Oregon Club of Central Oregon. “I didn’t want to tell anybody that.” Most airline tickets are nonrefundable, but they can be typically changed for a fee of $75 to $150 for up to a year. “I’ll be able to use that ticket (no matter what),” said Otto, 44, who plans to watch the Civil War at a party at Bend’s Tower Theatre. Otto — who did not attend UO but lived in Eugene from 1993 to 2006 and has been a Duck football season-ticket holder since 1993 — does not plan on having to change his airline ticket. But if Oregon State pulls off perhaps the most resounding upset of the year in college football, Otto said he

Gus Ruelas / The Associated Press

Tiger Woods waves to the gallery after putting on the 18th hole during the first round of the Chevron World Challenge in Thousand Oaks, Calif., Thursday. McDowell and McIlroy, the Northern Ireland duo who lost only one match at the Ryder Cup, would have been tough to beat in fourballs at Sherwood. They were paired together had would have had a best-ball score of 61. On their own, each settled for a 66. “A lot of birdies out there between us,” McDowell said, and that includes a pair of eagles on the par-5 11th. Dustin Johnson faltered on the back nine and shot a 69, along with Stewart Cink, who is trying out a new putter and a new putting grip with an eye toward 2011. Luke Donald and Camilo Villegas each had a 70, and no one else

broke par. With warm temperatures and a clear sky, the greens were quicker than usual. Sherwood has its share of trouble that is not hard to find, and that accounts for a few high scores. Anthony Kim is bringing up the rear at 79. This is Woods’ last chance to win a tournament in 2010, but it looks more like he is geared toward next season. It was his second straight 65, having closed with that score in the Australian Masters a few weeks ago. Woods missed a few shots along the way, making one amazing par on the 12th from behind the green with a flop shot that lipped out. But whenever his swing got loose, he fixed the problem during the round, not on the range the next day. “It’s like what I told you guys earlier in the week, it’s a process,” he said. “I was putting together streaks of holes earlier — two, three, four, five holes of this — and then I’d lose it for a little bit. Eventually, I needed to get to a full round and then eventually, a full tournament. And today was a full round, so that’s a good start.” Q-School into second round ORLANDO, Fla. — Chris Baryla has taken a big step toward getting a PGA Tour card. He leads by one stroke after two rounds of the PGA Tour qualifying tournament after shooting an 11-under 61. Baryla tied for 65th after the first round. After Thursday’s round at the Crooked Cat course at Orange County National he is at 10-under 133. He is a shot ahead of Ben Martin, who had a 68. Brett Waldman bogeyed two of his last three holes for a 72, leaving him seven shots behind. Waldman is the caddie for Camilo Villegas who had to go through pre-qualifying and two other stages to reach the Q-school finals. The top 25 after six rounds earn PGA Tour cards for 2011.

schizophrenic Oregon State season, which has also included narrow losses to Washington and UCLA, a win over the Ducks would be the perfect prescription for suffering Beaver fans. “I think it would take some of the sting out of (the season),” says Brian Connolly, a 47-year-old Prineville resident who says he has traveled to every OSU home game for the last 12 seasons with his wife, Carol. “You are going to get to a bowl, which is obviously going to be a smaller bowl game. But the benefit is, your younger kids get more practice time. “And honestly, anytime you beat the Ducks it helps your season. It’ll help, but I think you are always going to look back and think of those three games: Washington, UCLA, and Washington State.” Though the Civil War is receiving more national attention than ever, including the ESPN College GameDay crew’s first-ever trip to Corvallis, much of that attention has rightfully focused on the Ducks. OSU fans certainly understand what is at stake for UO, which is trying to

will make the trip to Pasadena for the second straight year to watch the Ducks play in the Rose Bowl. He doesn’t think losing to the Beavers would be the worst thing ever. “I think what we’re seeing the (Oregon) program do has created amazing notoriety for the state,” he said. “Just the fact that we’ve been down this road is positive. The fact that the Civil War is deciding the national championship is a great thing.” Bend’s James McFarlane, 45, also purchased an airline ticket to Arizona about three weeks ago. A UO graduate from the class of 1989 and a season-ticket holder, McFarlane is hoping to meet up with some old fraternity brothers in Glendale for the title game. But he knows the Beavers have been spoilers before — in 2000 they beat the Joey Harrington-led Ducks to keep Oregon out of the Rose Bowl. “I’m not talking a lot of smack,” McFarlane said. “I just want them (the Ducks) to get it done one more time.” Bend’s Amanda Gow, 29, is a board member of the Oregon Club of Central Oregon and a lifelong Duck fan. She said losing to Oregon State on Saturday would be “heartbreaking.” “I’m so looking forward to Saturday, but dreading it at the same time,” Gow said. “That’s going to be a really long four hours.” Oregon’s last four victories have been close games in the first half, as the Duck offense has tended to wear down opponents in the second half. That has made many Oregon fans nervous. Last week, the Ducks trailed 19-14 at halftime against Arizona but dominated the second half en route to a 48-29 victory at Autzen Stadium. “I don’t think I can take that again,” Gow said.

complete an undefeated regular season and make its first-ever trip to the BCS title game. But don’t think Beaver fans are happy for their archrival’s success. “I’ve got too many friends that are arrogant Duck fans,” says Andy West, a 45-year-old Bend resident and OSU alum. “And they have spoiled any chance of me wishing the Ducks well, honestly. And it is probably the other way, too, for some Duck fans if Beaver fans are too arrogant. “My favorite team is any team that plays the Ducks.” Danilson has special circumstances. His wife, Meredith, is a UO graduate. And he can’t help but be a little happy for her team’s success, he says. But this week, that goes out the window. “Anything can happen in the Civil War,” says Danilson, who says he has tickets to the game but may opt to watch it on TV at home if the travel conditions in the mountain passes look nasty. “We’ve seen it in years past where the Beavers are definitely not the stronger

Gow plans to host a Civil War party in Bend, and her friends and UO classmates (class of 2003) from as far away as Los Angeles will be in attendance. “I have a bottle of champagne ready and waiting,” Gow said. She added that she has a close friend who lives in Glendale, a suburb of Phoenix, and hopes to make the trip to Arizona “no matter what.” “If it just so happens we’re in the national championship, I’ll go,” she said. “I’m just trying not to jinx it. I think that’s what we’re all thinking. We just hope they can make it happen with this week’s game.” Gow said she has heard other Oregon fans talking about the national championship in a “hushed whisper.” And some don’t even like to utter the words. They will ask others if they are planning to go to Arizona, leaving “national championship” out of the conversation altogether. But if Oregon takes care of business on Saturday, Duck fans will be free to put aside all the superstitions and celebrate with gusto. “There will be some dancing in the streets,” McFarlane said. Yet they fully expect the Beavers to be ready. “The Civil War is always such a tough game, no matter what the rankings are,” Gow said. “They (the Beavers) get to play the No. 1 team in the country, and it just happens to be their biggest rival.” The stage is set for Oregon’s most significant Civil War victory in the 116 years of the rivalry — or, for its most crushing defeat. “There’s been some huge Civil Wars,” Otto said, “but this is the biggest of all time.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

Koreans on top at LPGA Tour Championship ORLANDO, Fla. — Two South Koreans atop the leaderboard at the LPGA Tour Championship came as no surprise. They just weren’t the two everybody expected. Stealing the spotlight from two others vying for a historic player of the year honor, Amy Yang and Seon Hwa Lee each shot a 5-under 67 on Thursday to share the clubhouse lead when the opening round was called for darkness. The bigger challenge falls on their two more acclaimed countrywomen. Jiyai Shin and Na Yeon Choi are in contention to become the first South Korean to take home the LPGA’s player of the year award, a huge honor in a golf-crazed country that sent swarms of media to cover them this week. But Shin (77) and Choi (73) each got off to a disappointing start, leaving them well off the pace. Julieta Granada finished two shots off the lead on a chilly day at Grand Cypress Golf Club that had many players wearing earmuffs and winter hats with temperatures dipping into the low 40s just before dawn. There were four players three shots off the pace. This year’s season-ending event doesn’t have the usual script. For the first time in a decade, Lorena Ochoa and Annika Sorenstam won’t win player of the year now that they’re retired. That leaves five in the field with an opportunity to take home the tour’s top honor and perhaps the No. 1 world ranking. So far, none of them has seized the moment. American Cristie Kerr (71), Yani Tseng (75) of Taiwan and Ai Miyazato (80) of Japan — the only others who could win the player of the year award — all struggled in the conditions. — The Associated Press

of the two teams but managed to pull it out. I would love it more than anything. My wife is a Duck and a lot of my friends are Ducks, and I would LOVE to have that victory.” Can the Beavers pull off what would be the most significant upset of the college football season. Well, at least some Beaver fans believe it’s possible. “I’m very hopeful that the Beavers are going to come out on top,” West says. “I don’t know about a good shot, but I think we have a shot at it. But those Duckies, I’ll tell you what, they are pretty tough.” And if the upset doesn’t happen? “It is good for the state,” says Connolly of the Ducks’ success. “It is good for the Northwest, especially with next year and the division of the (Pac-10 Conference into two divisions in the new Pac12) that they get this kind of attention in the Pacific Northwest. “I just wish it was a different school, but that’s OK.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-6177868 or at zhall@bendbulletin.com.

A S 

 B  Bend men compete in Mexico’s Baja 1000 Three Bend men competed in the 43rd running of the Baja 1000, Nov. 17-20. The Baja 1000 is an off-road auto race that takes place on Mexico’s Baja California peninsula every late November. Bend’s Aaron Beatty, Brad Cockman and Pat Hemperley were part of Team Snortn’ Boar, a seven-man motorcycle team that competed in the 30-and-over Pro Category. Team Snortn’ Boar raced an off-road Honda motorcycle over the 1,061-mile course from Ensenada to La Paz, Mexico, and placed fourth in its category with a time of 32 hours, 33 minutes, 46 seconds. The Baja 1000 has classes for many types of vehicles, including ATVs, buggies and military vehicles. The overall winner of the race was Gus Vildosola, of Mexicali, Mexico, who raced a Ford F-150 trophy truck in a time of about 19 hours.

Bend’s Watts selected for U.S. halfpipe team For the second straight season, Bend’s Ben Watts was named to U.S. Snowboarding’s halfpipe rookie team. At 17 years old, Watts is the secondyoungest snowboarder on the ninerider rookie team. Highlighting the 17 riders named to the pro and rookie-team rosters are five Olympians, including two-time Olympic medalist Kelly Clark (Mount Snow, Vt.), Olympic silver medalist Gretchen Bleiler (Aspen, Colo.) and two-time Grand Prix champion Louie Vito (Sandy, Utah). The teams will compete in many events, including the U.S. Snowboarding Grand Prix, which features halfpipe stops in Copper Mountain, Colo. (Dec. 10), and Mammoth Mountain, Calif. Other major events on the schedule include the Dew Tour, X Games and U.S. Open. The rookie team will also compete in some World Cup and Revolution Tour stops.

Bend’s Semick named ultra runner of year Bend’s Kami Semick, 44, was recently awarded the Ruth Anderson USATF Ultra Runner of the Year. Semick won the award for the second straight year. Her major victories in 2010 included the USA 50-Kilometer Trail Championships, the Miwok 100K Trail Race, the Vermont 100 Miler, and the Portland Marathon. Semick — an active member of USATF’s Mountain Ultra Trail Running Council — was fourth overall and the top American at the Comrades Marathon (89K) in South Africa. —From staff reports


A DVEN TUR E S PORTS

D6 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Two snowboarders traverse below trees, some buried to the tops, Wednesday afternoon at Mt. Bachelor in stormy conditions.

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

ALPINE SKIING

S n o w Continued from D1 Lomax says that the light, dry snow that fell last week has solidified and formed a solid base at Bachelor. While the wetter snow that has pounded the mountain this week may not be as fun to ride, it should serve to firm up the base as snow continues to fall, Lomax explains. Lighter snow can get swept away quickly by wind. For now the snow is deep, but snowriders should never get complacent in early December. Rocks and trees can create hazards — and nobody wants to hear that terrible scraping sound of a rock on freshly waxed and tuned skis or snowboards. “You still want to be really careful, especially on ridges,” Lomax warns. “Ridges tend to be more distinct rock structure up here (at Bachelor), and the wind will tend to take the snow off the ridges (thus exposing rocks).” As snow deepens, voids can be created at the bases of trees. And once filled with light snow, those voids can lead to danger for unwary snowriders, Lomax explains. Downed trees can also present problems, as their branches can jut up through the snow and be difficult to see. This is especially true in the trees located between groomed runs, where snowriders often venture to find fresh powder. “People are skiing all over, but you need to look around first before you pick a line,” Lomax says. False coverage is another potential hazard for skiers and snowboarders. A rock or tree branch that

was exposed the day before might get covered with several inches of snow. Snowriders could easily plow through that snow onto the object and tear up their equipment or crash. But as the snow continues to pile up, those hazardous rocks and branches will eventually become sufficiently covered. “All in all, coverage is really good,” Lomax says. “Groomed runs are shaping up excellent — pretty darn good skiing. With conditions this week, coverage all the way across is really good. … It usually takes longer.” This week, Bachelor has been operating three chairlifts: Pine Marten Express, Skyliner Express and Sunshine Accelerator. This weekend, Lomax says, the resort might add Sunrise Express and Rainbow Chair to that lineup. At Hoodoo Mountain Resort near Sisters, the snow depth was up to 41 inches as of Thursday and the resort received 10 inches in the previous two days. Hoodoo opened last Friday, which was one of the earliest openings at the resort in the last several years, according to Hoodoo general manager Matthew McFarland. He says snow coverage is good on the groomed runs, but he adds that snowriders should take extra caution when skiing off-piste. “In the trees there will always be sticks and rocks, things to look out for,” McFarland says. “This time of year, make sure you’re very careful with where you’re going. It’s a judgment call. Just be smart about what you’re doing, and have fun.”

During the summer Hoodoo employees do much grooming among the trees, according to McFarland, removing sticks and rocks to provide for better skiing in the trees come winter. Still, he says, snowriders should be cautious of false coverage, particularly on new-snow days and windy days. “Snow blows any direction,” McFarland notes. “The way it (windblown snow) lies is different every time. Just watching the drifts over the course of the day, it’s amazing how much the run will change.” Hoodoo is scheduled to be open through Sunday this week, and then closed Monday through Wednesday of next week. The resort plans to remain open from Dec. 9 until the end of the season, but it is closed most Wednesdays. Chairlifts currently operating at Hoodoo include Green, Ed, Manzanita and Easy Rider. Willamette Pass off state Highway 58, currently open Thursdays through Sundays, reported a 30-inch snow depth on its website Thursday and four lifts operating. No matter which Central Oregon resort they choose, or if they choose the backcountry, snowriders should always be prepared with the right gear and not over-exert themselves on their first time out of the season, according to Lomax. “Check equipment and take it easy your first day,” Lomax says, “and be ready for a long season of La Niña.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

MT. BACHELOR NATIONAL SKI PATROL: Ski evaluation on Dec. 11, at 9 a.m., for those interested in joining the organization; meet at the Mt. Bachelor tent in the West Village parking lot; the ski patrol is recruiting for all disciplines: alpine patrol, nordic patrol, and auxiliary patrol (indoor clinical work); alpine patrol is open to all downhill techniques including alpine skiing, snowboarding, and AT/telemark skiing; Contact Rob Weiss at mt.bnsp.training@gmail.com. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE FALL DRYLAND TRAINING: For ages 13 and older; through November; 541-3880002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

BIKING BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLOCROSS: Programs for 2010 include five-day or three-day options for ages 10-23. Riders will be grouped based on age and ability; through Dec. 12, times vary; www.BendEnduranceAcademy.org; 541-335-1346. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain, road, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Dec. 12, Tuesdays-Sundays from 3:45-5:45 p.m.; www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org; 541-678-3865. DIRT RIDERS NIGHT RIDES: Casual mountain bike rides on Tuesday nights; cnightingale@deschutesbrewery.com.

MISCELLANEOUS THE URBAN GPS ECO-CHALLENGE: Trips on paths and trails along Deschutes River through Old Mill District shops and Farewell Bend Park daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; like a scavenger hunt with clues and checkpoints; $65, includes guide, GPS and instruction, water, materials; 541-389-8359, 800-962-2862; www.wanderlusttours.com.

NORDIC SKIING BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC MASTERS: Technique group and training group options; for adults ages 20 and older with intermediate to advanced nordic skiing abilities; weekday and weekend options from Dec. 6 to Feb. 23; portion of proceeds will go to Meissner Nordic Community Ski Trails; enrollments vary; www. bendenduranceacademy.org; 541-678-3864. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION NORDIC WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC SKIING: Programs conducted at Virginia Meissner Sno-park on Century Drive west of Bend;

transportation provided from Bend; Development Team for ages 11-18 began Nov. 17; Youth Club for ages 7-11 starts Dec. 4; times vary; www. bendenduranceacademy.org; 541-678-3865.

PADDLING PRIVATE AND GROUP KAYAK ROLL SESSIONS: Thursdays, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; instruction by Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe staff, gear is provided; $45; 541-317-9407.

ROLLER DERBY RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY: Practice with the Renegades Sundays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Bend’s Midtown Ballroom; drop-in fee of $7; loaner gear available; contact nmonroe94@gmail.com. PRACTICE WITH THE LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS ALL-FEMALE ROLLER DERBY LEAGUE: 3 to 5 p.m. on Sundays and 8-10 p.m. on Tuesdays; at Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center; $6 per session, $40 per month; deemoralizer@ lavacityrollerdolls.com or 541-306-7364.

RUNNING REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays for a 4- to 8-mile run; contact Dan Edwards at dedwards@ bendbroadband.com or 541-419-0889. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. TEAM XTREME’S RUNNING CLUB IN REDMOND: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Xtreme Fitness Center, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 2- to 5-mile run; free; 541-923-6662. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park for 6-18 miles; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: Distances and locations vary; paces between 7- and 11-minute miles can be accommodated; Sundays at 9 a.m.; locations vary, Bend; free; 541-317-3568 or jenny@footzonebend.com.

SCUBA DIVING BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA DIVING CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing; certification for anyone 12 and older; vacation refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners at 541-312-2727 or 541-287-2727.

SNOWBOARDING FOURTH ANNUAL DIRKSEN DERBY RALLY RACE: Set for Dec. 11-12 at Mt. Bachelor; cost is $25 per category plus $25 lift ticket; register online at www.mtbachelor.com; Saturday’s categories include women, groms, olderand-wiser, ski-ski, and splitboard; Sunday’s categories include men and derby elites. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION FREERIDE SKI AND SNOWBOARD WINTER PROGRAMS: Enrollment for ages 8 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

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F

Inside

FAMILY I NS I DE

K I D C U LT U R E

Find magic between pages of these tales

Family Calendar Listing of family-friendly events, see Page E3

F A M I LY IN BRIEF PlayOutdoors offers free events for kids PlayOutdoors, a children’s outdoor store, will host several free events and activities aimed at kids in the next few weeks. All of the events are open to the public and will take place at 701 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend. Amy James with DevelopMusic will lead a session about music at 4:30 p.m. Thursday. An instructor from Groove yoga will teach a 30-minute class at 10:30 a.m. Dec. 11. A local children’s librarian will lead and outdoor-themed story and song session at 4:30 p.m. Dec. 16. Preschoolers and toddlers are invited to a yoga class at 10:30 a.m. Dec. 18. Local children’s musician Janellybean will perform at 10:30 a.m. Dec. 20. Also that day, the Reptile Zone will bring several reptiles for kids to check out at 3 p.m. Dec. 20. Contact: 541-678-5398.

Kid Culture features fun and educational books and toys for kids. ’Tis the season for wishes to come true and miracles of the heart. You’ll find a touch of magic in these books for listeners and readers ages 3-11.

‘April and Esme: Tooth Fairies’

Children most likely to have food allergies Anat Even Or / New York Times News Service

Mean girls start sooner Female bullying on the rise in elementary schools

B E ST B E T S FOR FAMILY FUN

By Pamela Paul New York Times News Service

Details, Page E3

S

Festival of Trees Families can visit this holiday wonderland of decorated Christmas trees and wreaths for free Saturday. The event, which takes place at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, will include music, refreshments and visits from Santa.

carlett made for a good target. The daughter of an artist, she wore funky clothing to her school, had a mild learning disability and was generally timid and insecure. Lila, the resident “mean girl” in Scarlett’s kindergarten class, started in immediately.

Scarlett, she sneered, couldn’t read. Her Payless and Gap shoes weren’t good enough. She wasn’t “allowed” to play with certain girls. Lila was forming a band, and Scarlett couldn’t be a part. One girl threatened to hurt her. During recess, Lila would loom over Scarlett, arms crossed, and say, “I’m watching you.” “I was in middle school before things got as awful as they did for Scarlett,” said Scarlett’s mother, Annelizabeth, who asked that her last name not be used to protect her daughter. “I understand that children are maturing much faster, but

Bend Christmas Parade Kids will love cheering at this festive parade slated to meander through downtown Bend at noon Saturday. This year’s theme is Christmas Carols on Parade.

• Television • Comics • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope www.bendbulletin.com/family

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

About 4.2 percent of children ages 5 or younger tested positive for a food allergy, compared with 2.5 percent of the general population, in a recent study from Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and the National Institutes of Health. About 3.8 percent of kids ages 6-19 tested positively for a food allergy. The survey involved 8,200 patients who were given a blood test to check for allergies. Peanuts were the most common food allergy, followed by shrimp, eggs and milk. Black individuals were about three times as likely as white individuals to have a food allergy. Men were about twice as likely as women to have a food allergy. Food allergies were also found to be common among those with asthma. — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

E

HELPING CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES THRIVE

to see such hostility at this young age, wow. It was really shocking.” Mean-girl behavior, typically referred to by professionals as relational or social aggression and by terrified parents as bullying, has existed for as long as there have been ponytails to pull and notes to pass (today’s insults are texted instead). But while the calculated round of cliquishness and exclusion used to set in over fifth-grade sleepover parties, warfare increasingly permeates the early elementary school years. See Mean / E6

Coming Sunday What do local administrators, kids think of bullying and prevention programs?

By Bob Graham April and Esme are sisters. They live with their parents in a wee cottage — and I do mean wee — about the size of a bird house. The book begins when the 6- and 7-year- old siblings are given their first assignment, via Submitted photos cell phone. They are told to collect the front tooth of Daniel Dangerfield. The last words their mother says to them before they begin their adventure are, “Send me a text if you need to.” This is a modern fairy tale with delightful characters who want to prove they can do everything just right. But there’s a rule that they mustn’t be seen, and then Daniel wakes up, and. … Readers young and old will be enchanted by the sincerity of these fairy sisters, and the humor of this charming tale that is filled with courage and love, ending with complete satisfaction when “Mom and Dad hugged them till their wings crackled.”

‘The Night Fairy’ By Laura Amy Schlitz For the reader who wants a chapter book, but still needs short pages and a few illustrations, “The Night Fairy” by Newbery Medal winner Laura Amy Schlitz will be just right. Angela Barrett’s artwork lavishly enhances the story of a fairy whose wings are “pale green with amber moons on them.” But they are ripped off during an unfortunate encounter with a bat. Now Flory lives in a garden that belongs to a giantess (aka human), using her wits, magic and the ability to sting. She survives encounters with a raccoon and a spider, and is determined to ride on the back of a hummingbird in order to see the world. But it is the frightening bat who brings her the world she seeks. Schlitz’s choice of words is always perfect, and this small story is a gem to savor. See Books / E3

Make a plan for shy children and holiday hellos

‘The Nutcracker’

By Heidi Stevens

Two local ballet companies — The Redmond School of Dance and the Central Oregon School of Ballet — will put on this classic holiday tale this weekend.

Q:

Chicago Tribune

Your kindergartner is extremely shy around strangers. How do you get her to warm up to relatives she only sees over the holidays? Parent advice: If the child has an innately introverted personality, trying to coerce sociability in a way that reflects well on the parents is a kind of tor-

ture. Coaching the child to the most basic “Hello, Uncle Murray” should be good enough. If the relative really wants to develop a relationship with the child, parents might offer suggestions ahead of time, such as a favorite book, game or toy to quietly share. — Mariannell Bassett-Dilley Purchase sheets of large, selfadhesive name tags and give her

PA R E N T H O O D a pen. Her job as “hostess” is to see that everyone has a name tag. This puts her in charge of initiating contact and being in control. Since she will need to know how to spell the names, this gives her verbal and personal contact with each newcomer. — Susan Carrico

I showed my sons photos of whom we were going to visit and told them about each one: “Great-Grandma and GreatGrandpa volunteer at a hospital. They have a dog, Suzie. They live in Florida where it’s warm at Christmastime and we can go to the beach.” That way, my sons felt a little more comfortable about seeing them and couldn’t wait to take

the dog to the beach! — Lisa Renninger Expert advice: Few topics are more complicated than family at the holidays, which is why Betsy Brown Braun, author of “You’re Not the Boss of Me: Brat-Proofing Your Four- to Twelve-Year-Old Child” (Harper Paperbacks, $15.99), suggests this approach: See Parenthood / E6


T EL EV ISION

E2 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Father’s oddball behavior cries out for treatment Dear Abby: My boyfriend’s father is very odd socially. If there is a line, he will unknowingly cross it. He has no sense of what is appropriate when it comes to personal space, and his only friends are teenagers. His wife and two grown children are constantly upset with his bizarre behavior, but dare not bring it up with him for fear of hurting his feelings. As a health care worker, I suspect he has Asperger’s syndrome, for which behavioral treatment is available. Must I “just ignore” this man’s odd conduct as well? Or should I speak with my boyfriend about my suspicions in order to get his father help? — New Doctor In New England Dear New Doctor: Of course you should discuss this with your boyfriend. To do so would be a kindness. Whether his father is open to therapy is not assured — but if he’s intelligent, he must be aware that he doesn’t fit in with his contemporaries, and he may accept help if it is offered. Dear Abby: As we head toward Christmas, would you remind people to please treat others as they, themselves, would want to be treated? I work in retail, and it’s amazing how many customers are rude. They don’t acknowledge us, they’ll talk on their cell phone throughout transactions and become angry at us if something beyond our control goes wrong. If we were to treat them this way, they would surely file a complaint against us. Abby, can you remind folks to remember what the reason for the season is, and to act toward others with kindness, patience and respect — no matter what? — Mindful In Fairbanks Dear Mindful: There is something about Christmas that can

CBS’ ‘The Talk’ focuses on family matters By Alessandra Stanley New York Times News Service

DEAR ABBY turn the most angelic individuals into gremlins. And that “something” is the pressure to buy, buy, buy — accumulating debt that can’t be repaid for months or even longer. Add to that, no place to park and long lines in understaffed malls, and the “joy” of the season can curdle into frustration. But readers, please hang onto your tempers even if those around you are losing theirs. The folks behind the counters are people, too, and they feel as pressured — if not more so — than you. Dear Abby: My wife and I have been married 40 years. Five years ago, she told me she didn’t want me in our bedroom and that she is “off limits.” She said she is not interested in me “that way” anymore. Other than that, we have a great marriage and we’re best friends, but I can’t go on like this. I have suggested counseling, but she refuses to go. What do you think I should do? — Missing The Kissing Dear Missing: I think you should talk to a counselor without her. You have some important decisions to make about how you will spend the rest of your life, and it’s a shame your wife does not want to be a part of the discussion and, possibly, reach a compromise. But unless both of you are happy being roommates, the current situation is unfair to you. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

It feels like cheating. The mistress is a little younger than the wife, a bit prettier perhaps and certainly a lot less argumentative and opinionated. The mistress would never storm off the set to protest a provocative remark by the Fox host Bill O’Reilly. She’s a people pleaser; most likely she would ignore the comment, lean in and ask him about his parenting skills. “The Talk,” a new daytime show that had its premiere on CBS last month, is the other woman of daytime television, a fresher model jostling “The View” in its 14th year on ABC. At first glance the two talk shows don’t look so very different. Julie Chen, the moderator of “The Talk,” and her cohosts are not so much younger than the women of “The View,” and they are often just as feisty and lewd. But their focus is narrower. The show’s organizing themes and chief preoccupations are motherhood and child-rearing. Guests, male and female, are introduced by how many children they have; the hosts talk at great length, and tearfully, about their own experiences. As Chen said: “We celebrate motherhood. We celebrate children.” Or to put it another way, it’s not unheard of for someone on “The View” to make a reference to Stalin. On “The Talk,” he would be introduced as “Stalin, father of two.” When she created “The View” in 1997, Barbara Walters said she wanted it to be a cross between Virginia Graham’s 1960s show, “Girl Talk,” and “This Week With David Brinkley.” The CBS version, which puts Sharon Osbourne (“America’s Got Talent”), Leah Remini (“The King of Queens”), Sara Gilbert (“Roseanne”) and Holly

‘The Talk’ Wh e n : 1 p.m. weekdays Where: CBS Robinson Peete (“21 Jump Street”) around a table and Marissa Jaret Winokur (“Hairspray”) as “mom on the street,” is a throwback to the Virginia Graham model. The girl talk is more risque than censors would have allowed in 1963, but political views are mostly left out of the mix. “The Talk” is a live show, but the panelists don’t get sidetracked by issues like abortion, North Korea or Bristol Palin’s performance on “Dancing With the Stars.” At fraught times, tempers and words fly on “The View,” particularly between Joy Behar, an outspoken liberal, and Elisabeth Hasselbeck, a Sarah Palin-loving conservative. Even the milder-mannered Whoopi Goldberg and Sherri Shepherd have been known to disagree vehemently. Ideological differences are harder to detect on “The Talk.” The co-hosts mainly seem divided on dietary issues: Gilbert is a vegan, while Remini likes red meat. And, accordingly, it’s easy to look at the two shows as a clash between two stages of feminism. Walters, who started as a secretary and battled her way into the industry as the token “girl” writer on morning shows, made history in 1976 when ABC hired her to become the first female

Twitter posts of blogger moms. The co-hosts can be entertaining, but seem most intent on sharing. That was all too evident after the engagement of Prince William and Kate Middleton was announced this month. On “The View” there were waggish reminiscences about Prince Charles and Diana’s wedding in 1981, including the expectation that royal brides be virgins, which Goldberg and Walters said dates back as far as Henry VIII. Behar disagreed, insisting that those merry wives of Tudor were famous for sleeping around. Walters set her straight. “Joy,” she said. “I was there.” The women of “The Talk,” true to their cult of motherhood, focused on how sad it is that Diana will not be there for her son’s wedding. Chen introduced the engagement news by stating that their discussion would demonstrate “how a mother’s love is irreplaceable and influential during life’s most momentous occasions.” But the conversation quickly turned from Buckingham Palace to the hosts’ own mothers and weddings. Several, including Chen, misted up at the memories. “My mom would do anything for me,” Remini said, as the camera panned to her mother in the studio audience. “I mean, I don’t know what I would do without my mom.” “The View” showcases women of different generations with conflicting opinions. “The Talk” makes a generational statement by leaving conflict out.

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evening news co-anchor — alongside a visibly disgruntled Harry Reasoner. More than any other figure in television news, Walters stands out as a pioneer of the women’s movement. Julie Chen, a co-anchor of “The Early Show” on CBS and the host of the CBS reality show “Big Brother,” is more a symbol of the postfeminist era. Her husband, Leslie Moonves, is the chief executive of CBS, and that doesn’t seem to inhibit Chen. In a segment in which the panelists divulged which celebrities they find most attractive, Chen chose Moonves. “I find confidence is so sexy,” she said, “and my husband, in my opinion, is the sexiest man alive and probably one of the most confident guys alive.” Chen doesn’t really need to butter up the boss on national television. (He’s confident, remember?) She’s well-suited to the job, good-humored and levelheaded, skilled at leading her gabby, spirited co-hosts through short, brisk segments. More than changing mores, however, the two shows reflect different talk show eras. “The View” adds a fillip of political sparring to a talk-show model that dates to the heyday of Merv Griffin and Mike Douglas: The tone is light, and entertainment is paramount. “The Talk” is a descendant of the confessional talk-show genre created by Phil Donahue, Oprah Winfrey and Dr. Phil, and is buoyed by the self-obsession of social networks, especially the

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BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

FRIDAY PRIME TIME 12/3/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Rachel’s-Food Rudy Maxa Steves’ Europe

6:00

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KATU News at 6 Pregame Spec NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ Equitrekking ‘G’ Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves Europe Rudy Maxa Equitrekking ‘G’ Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Home This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

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Supernanny Young Family (N) ‘PG’ Primetime: What Would You Do? (N) 20/20 (N) ’ Å “A Walk in My Shoes” (2010, Drama) Nancy Travis. Premiere. ’ ‘G’ Å Dateline NBC (N) ’ Å Medium Blood on the Tracks (N) ‘14’ CSI: NY Shop Till You Drop (N) ‘14’ Blue Bloods After Hours (N) ’ ‘14’ Supernanny Young Family (N) ‘PG’ Primetime: What Would You Do? (N) 20/20 (N) ’ Å House A Pox on Our House ‘14’ The Good Guys Cop Killer (N) ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Monk ’ ‘PG’ Å Monk ’ ‘PG’ Å Washington W’k BBC Newsnight Cirque du Soleil -- Flowers in the Desert ’ ‘PG’ Å “A Walk in My Shoes” (2010, Drama) Nancy Travis. Premiere. ’ ‘G’ Å Dateline NBC (N) ’ Å Smallville Luthor (N) ’ Å Supernatural Caged Heat (N) Å Married... With Married... With Moment-Luxury Paint Paper Sew With Nancy 1 Stroke Paint Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Washington W’k BBC Newsnight Cirque du Soleil -- Flowers in the Desert ’ ‘PG’ Å

11:00

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KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ Back Care Basics: Yoga News Jay Leno King of Queens King of Queens Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Rachel’s-Food Back Care Basics: Yoga

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Criminal Minds Brothers in Arms ‘14’ Criminal Minds Public Enemy ’ ‘14’ Criminal Minds Hopeless ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds The Eyes Have It ‘14’ Criminal Minds A Shade of Gray ‘14’ Criminal Minds A Higher Power ‘14’ 130 28 8 32 American Justice The Perfect Victim (4:30) ›› “Constantine” (2005, Fantasy) Keanu Reeves, Rachel Weisz. A man who ››› “Independence Day” (1996, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Bill Pullman, Jeff Goldblum. Earthlings vs. evil aliens in 15-mile-wide The Walking Dead Wildfire Rick leads the ››› “Predator” (1987, Science Fiction) 102 40 39 sees demons helps a policewoman probe her sister’s death. Å ships. group to the CDC. ‘14’ Arnold Schwarzenegger. Å Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å The Haunted Dead in the Water ‘PG’ The Haunted (N) ’ ‘PG’ Fatal Attractions My Pet Python ‘PG’ The Haunted ’ ‘PG’ 68 50 12 38 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ Å Real Housewives/Beverly The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ ››› “Donnie Brasco” (1997, Crime Drama) Al Pacino, Johnny Depp. Premiere. ››› “Donnie Brasco” (1997) Al Pacino. 137 44 CMT Artists of the Year 2010 (N) ’ ‘PG’ CMT Artists of the Year 2010 ’ ‘PG’ ›››› “Dances With Wolves” ’ 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ›››› “Dances With Wolves” (1990, Western) Kevin Costner. A Union officer befriends the Lakota. ’ Biography on CNBC Harley-Davidson American Greed Madoff Behind Bars Mad Money The Apprentice ’ ‘PG’ Å Biography on CNBC Harley-Davidson Paid Program Youtholgy 51 36 40 52 The Apprentice ’ ‘PG’ Å Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ Å Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ Å 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Com.-Presents Comedy Central Ron White: Behavioral Problems ‘14’ Comedy Central Comedy Central Daniel Tosh: Completely Serious 135 53 135 47 Shaun-Dead Outdoorsman Joy of Fishing PM Edition Visions of NW The Buzz Epic Conditions Outside Film Festival Outside Presents Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ The Element 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 (3:30) Tonight From Washington Hannah Montana ’ ‘G’ Å Sonny-Chance Shake it Up! ‘Y’ Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Phineas and Ferb (9:15) Fish Hooks Pair of Kings ‘Y7’ Shake it Up! ‘Y’ Sonny-Chance Hannah Montana ’ ‘G’ Å 87 43 14 39 Suite/Deck Cash Cab: Dark Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Swamp Loggers Truck Wars ’ ‘PG’ Swamp Loggers Put to the Test ‘PG’ Swamp Loggers Wake Up Call ‘PG’ Gold Rush: Alaska (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Swamp Loggers Put to the Test ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ NBA Basketball Dallas Mavericks at Utah Jazz From EnergySolutions Arena in Salt Lake City. SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Boston Celtics From TD Garden in Boston. (Live) (7:15) College Football Illinois at Fresno State (Live) College Football Rodeo Wrangler National Finals, Second Round Å 22 24 21 24 College Football: Marathon MAC Championship The Battle The Battle (N) One on One Rodeo Wrangler National Finals, Second Round From Las Vegas. (Live) Å Boxing Boxing: Dawson vs. Ruiz Boxing Å 23 25 123 25 The Battle SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter (Live) Å Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 ››› “The Polar Express” (2004, Fantasy) Voices of Tom Hanks, Michael Jeter. Å ››› “The Polar Express” (2004, Fantasy) Voices of Tom Hanks, Michael Jeter. Å The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls Keg! Max! ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Good Eats Unwrapped Chopped Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Outrageous Food Best Thing Ate Unwrapped Unwrapped 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Huskies Cougars Access College Basketball Kansas State at Washington State (Live) Seahawks High School Football 20 45 28* 26 (4:00) High School Football Washington Class 3A Final: Teams TBA (Live) In Her Shoes Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men › “The Marine” (2006) John Cena. Thugs kidnap the wife of a soldier. ›› “XXX: State of the Union” (2005, Action) Ice Cube, Willem Dafoe. Sons of Anarchy 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ Income Property Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Home-Holiday Gangland Most Notorious ‘14’ Å Gangland A Killer’s Revenge ‘14’ Brad Meltzer’s Decoded ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Built to Last ‘PG’ Top Gear Blind Drift ‘PG’ Å Gangland Public Enemy No. 1 ‘14’ 155 42 41 36 Gangland Hell House ‘14’ Å Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup: Raw The Three R’s Lockup: Raw Time to Kill Lockup: Raw Hardcore Lockup: Raw Dues and Don’ts Lockup: New Mexico 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Silent Library ’ Silent Library ’ Bully Beatdown Bully Beatdown Pranked ’ ‘14’ Pranked ’ ‘14’ ›› “Adam Sandler’s Eight Crazy Nights” (2002), Jackie Titone ’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly iPie ’ ‘G’ Victorious Freak the Freak Out ‘G’ Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ Glenn Martin The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘PG’ Ways to Die Ways to Die (8:13) 1,000 Ways to Die ’ ‘14’ Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die (10:39) Entourage Talk Show ‘MA’ (11:16) Entourage 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ “Monsterwolf” (2010, Horror) Leonor Varela, Robert Picardo. ‘14’ Å WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ Å Sanctuary For King & Country (N) ’ Stargate Universe Resurgence Å 133 35 133 45 (4:00) “Fire From Below” (2009) Å Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Frederick Price Praise the Lord Å Life Focus ’ ‘G’ Joseph Prince Kim Clement Changing-World Barra MacNeils’ Celtic Christmas ‘G’ 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ ›› “The House Bunny” (2008) Anna Faris, Colin Hanks. Premiere. Å The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ›› “It Happened on 5th Avenue” (1947, Musical Comedy) Don DeFore, Ann Harding. ›› “Susan Slept Here” (1954, Comedy) Dick Powell, Debbie Reynolds, Anne Francis. “The Beyond” (1981, Horror) Katherine ››› “Fitzwilly” (1967, Comedy) Dick Van Dyke, Barbara Feldon, Edith Evans. Old 101 44 101 29 woman’s butler leads servants in larceny in her behalf. A hobo shares a mansion with a GI and others in winter. A Hollywood scriptwriter gets custody of a teen vagrant. Å MacColl, David Warbeck. Wedding Day Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ What Not to Wear Debbie ‘PG’ Å What Not to Wear Nudist. ‘PG’ Å What Not to Wear Linda (N) ’ ‘PG’ Homemade Millionaire Fashion ‘PG’ What Not to Wear Linda ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order I.D. ‘14’ Å (DVS) Bones ’ ‘14’ Å ›› “The Forbidden Kingdom” (2008) Jackie Chan, Jet Li. Premiere. Å ›› “The Forbidden Kingdom” (2008, Action) Jackie Chan, Jet Li. Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Merger ’ ‘14’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Total Drama Star Wars: Clone Batman: Brave Ben 10 Ult. Sym-Bionic Titan Generator Rex Star Wars: Clone Sym-Bionic Titan King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man-Carnivore Man-Carnivore Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures Old Fort Erie ‘PG’ Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures Old Fort Erie ‘PG’ 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford and Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ (11:31) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Family ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Ex-File ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “Sex and the City” (2008) Sarah Jessica Parker. Time brings many changes for Carrie and her gal pals. ››› “Enchanted” (2007) Å 15 30 23 30 House A Pox on Our House ’ ‘14’ (6:45) Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å (7:45) Jersey Shore What Happens in the AC ‘14’ Å (8:50) Jersey Shore One Shot ‘14’ (9:55) Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å London Live ‘PG’ My Big-Wedding 191 48 37 54 Jersey Shore ‘14’ (5:45) Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:20) ›› “Sex Drive” 2008 ’ ‘R’ (6:15) ›› “Groundhog Day” 1993 Bill Murray, Chris Elliott. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “The Proposal” 2009 Sandra Bullock. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (9:50) › “Obsessed” 2009 Idris Elba. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (11:40) Sex Drive (5:14) ››› “The Crucible” 1996, Drama Daniel Day-Lewis. ‘PG-13’ Å Fox Legacy (7:44) ››› “The Crucible” 1996, Drama Daniel Day-Lewis. ‘PG-13’ Å Fox Legacy (10:14) ››› “The Crucible” 1996, Drama Daniel Day-Lewis. ‘PG-13’ Å Rampage-Evo Red Bull: Rampage Retrospective The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ Crusty’s Dirt Demons ’ ‘14’ The Daily Habit Cubed (N) Å The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ Crusty’s Dirt Demons ’ ‘14’ The Daily Habit Golf Chevron World Challenge, Second Round From Sherwood Country Club in Thousand Oaks, Calif. 12 Nights Golf Central Golf Chevron World Challenge, Second Round From Sherwood Country Club in Thousand Oaks, Calif. (4:00) “Fallen Angel” (2003) ‘PG’ “Debbie Macomber’s Mrs. Miracle” (2009) James Van Der Beek. ‘PG’ Å “Debbie Macomber’s Call Me Mrs. Miracle” (2010) Doris Roberts. ‘PG’ “Santa Jr” (2002, Romance-Comedy) Lauren Holly, Judd Nelson. ‘G’ Å (4:30) › “The Whole Ten Yards” 2004 (6:15) ››› “Drag Me to Hell” 2009, Horror Alison Lohman. A young woman must REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel ’ ››› “Avatar” 2009, Science Fiction Sam Worthington, Voice of Zoe Saldana, Sigourney Weaver. A former “Transformers: HBO 425 501 425 10 Bruce Willis. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å shatter a powerful curse placed upon her. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ‘PG’ Å Marine falls in love with a native of a lush alien world. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Revenge” Monty Python (5:25) ››› “Monty Python’s Life of Brian” 1979 ‘R’ Todd Margaret Arrested Dev. Undeclared ‘14’ Undeclared ‘PG’ ›› “Gothic” 1986, Drama Gabriel Byrne. ‘R’ ››› “Monty Python’s Life of Brian” 1979 ‘R’ IFC 105 105 ››› “The Hangover” 2009 Bradley Cooper. Three pals must (11:45) Lingerie (N) (4:30) ›› “The Time Traveler’s Wife” 2009, Romance Rachel (6:20) › “Rollerball” 2002 Chris Klein. Players uncover a plan to ›› “Enough” 2002, Suspense Jennifer Lopez, Billy Campbell. A woman takes her MAX 400 508 7 McAdams, Eric Bana. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ’ ‘MA’ Å increase their sport’s violence. ‘PG-13’ Å daughter and flees her abusive husband. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å find a missing groom after a wild bash. ’ ‘R’ Dog Whisperer (N) ‘G’ Border Wars Last Defense ‘PG’ Border Wars Gang Task Force ‘PG’ Dog Whisperer ‘G’ Border Wars Last Defense ‘PG’ Border Wars Gang Task Force ‘PG’ Crocodile King ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 “Bionicle: The Legend Reborn” (2009) ’ Å Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air “Bionicle: The Legend Reborn” (2009) ’ Å Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Reel, Outdoors Match Fish. Spanish Fly Bill Dance Salt. Wanna Fish Outdoor’s 10 Match Fish. Savage Wild Hunting, Country On Your Own Profess. Gold Tips 4CE Deer City USA American Hunter OUTD 37 307 43 Inside the NFL (iTV) ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “We Were Soldiers” 2002, War Mel Gibson, Madeleine Stowe, Greg Kinnear. iTV. Outnumbered U.S. ››› “Inglourious Basterds” 2009, War Brad Pitt, Mélanie Laurent, Christoph Waltz. iTV. Jewish-American (11:05) Boxing Lateef Kayode vs. Ed SHO 500 500 Perry (iTV) troops battle the North Vietnamese. ’ ‘R’ soldiers seek Nazi scalps in German-occupied France. ’ ‘R’ (4:00) NASCAR Awards Ceremony NASCAR Awards Ceremony (Live) NASCAR Awards Ceremony SPEED 35 303 125 (5:10) › “Pandorum” 2009, Science Fiction Dennis Quaid. ’ ‘R’ Å (7:05) ›› “2 Fast 2 Furious” 2003, Action Paul Walker. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Dear John” 2010, Romance Channing Tatum. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å “Did You Hear-Morgans?” STARZ 300 408 300 (4:45) “The Consultants” 2009, Comedy (6:15) ›› “Soul Men” 2008, Comedy Samuel L. Jackson, Bernie Mac, Sharon Leal. › “Next Day Air” 2009 Donald Faison. A delivery man gives a Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jump-Off Women exploit them- (11:05) “Far Cry” 2008, Action Til SchweiTMC 525 525 Paul Hughes. Premiere. ‘NR’ Estranged singers reunite for a tribute concert. ’ ‘R’ package of drugs to the wrong people. ‘R’ Å selves to achieve stardom in hip-hop. ‘MA’ Å ger. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Å Buck Stops Bucks Gun It w/Spies Elk Fever Tred Barta Whitetail Rev. Buck Stops Here Bucks Gun It w/Spies Elk Fever Tred Barta Whitetail Rev. Dangerous Game Dangerous Game VS. 27 58 30 ›› “Miss Congeniality” 2000, Comedy Sandra Bullock, Michael Caine. ‘PG-13’ Å Ghost Whisperer The Collector ‘PG’ The Locator ‘G’ The Locator ‘G’ ›› “Miss Congeniality” 2000, Comedy Sandra Bullock, Michael Caine. ‘PG-13’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Friday, December 3, 2010 E3

FAMILY CALENDAR

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon

P  ’ G  M 

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351. The Family Movie Guide should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Only films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment value or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

Full events calendar and movie times are in today’s GO! Magazine. FRIDAY

Driver, played by Dwayne Johnson, seeks vengeance against his brother’s killers in “Faster.�

Dec. 3

The Associated Press

I’LL BE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS HOME TOUR: See a home decorated in holiday style, with more than 40 decorated Christmas trees, wall hangings and more, then visit a second nearby home; proceeds benefit the Children’s Vision Foundation, Deschutes Historical Center and Williams Syndrome Association; $5 in advance, $6 at the door; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; tour home, 21163 Clairaway Ave., Bend; 541-330-3907. HAT AND SCARF SEW-A-THON: Cut and sew hats and scarves for children attending the Wonderland Express holiday party; free; 1-4 p.m.; Cynthia’s Sewing Center, 20225 Badger Road, Bend; 541-383-1999. CHRISTMAS KAYAKERS FLOAT: Kayaks and canoes decorated with lights paddle a loop beginning at the bridge at Galveston Avenue; free; 4:15 p.m. gathering, 5 p.m. float; Mirror Pond, Deschutes River at Drake Park, Bend; 541-330-9586. “LIGHT UP A LIFE�: Light a candle in honor of loved ones; followed by a reception; donations accepted; 6-8 p.m.; Mountain View Hospital, 470 N.E. A St., Madras; 541-460-4030. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION�: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or http://bendpac.org. “STORYBOOK CHRISTMAS�: Bend Theatre for Young People presents Santa’s elves rewriting classic fairy tales with contemporary twists; $8, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-419-1395, bendtheatre4youngpeople@gmail. com or www.bendtheatre.org. “ELF�: A screening of the PG-rated holiday movie starring Will Ferrell; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351.

SATURDAY Dec. 4 VFW BREAKFAST: Community champagne breakfast with fruit, coffee and more; $7.50; 8-10 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-3890775. CROOKED RIVER RANCH OLDE FASHIONED CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION: Includes visits with Santa, a parade, an illumination of the ranch Christmas tree and more; free; 10 a.m., 2 p.m. parade, 4:15 p.m. tree lighting; Crooked River Ranch Administration Building, 5195 S.W. Clubhouse Drive; 541-548-8939. I’LL BE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS HOME TOUR: See a home decorated in holiday style, with more than 40 decorated Christmas trees, wall hangings and more, then visit a second nearby home; proceeds benefit the Children’s Vision Foundation, Deschutes Historical Center and Williams Syndrome Association; $5 in advance, $6 at the door; 10 a.m.-

By Roger Moore The Orlando Sentinel

‘Burlesque’

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin ile photo

Gabby Fortin smiles as she rides a float down Wall Street in downtown Bend during the Bend Christmas Parade in 2006. This year’s parade will take place Saturday. 4 p.m.; tour home, 21163 Clairaway Ave., Bend; 541-330-3907. FESTIVAL OF TREES: The 27th annual event showcases decorated Christmas trees, wreaths and more; with music, refreshments and visits with Santa; proceeds benefit Redmond-Sisters Hospice; free daytime family festivities, $40 evening event; 11 a.m.- 2 p.m. family festivities, 5 p.m. evening gala, 7:30 p.m. tree auction; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-7483. PET PHOTOS WITH SANTA: Take a photo of Santa Claus with your pet; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; free with donation to the Humane Society; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond Thrift & Gifts, 1776 S. Highway 97; 541-923-8558. JINGLE BELL RUN/WALK FOR ARTHRITIS : Runners and walkers don festive holiday costumes for this yearly 5K run and walk; proceeds benefit the Arthritis Foundation; $20, $10 children 12 and younger; 9:30 a.m. registration, 11:30-11:45 a.m. races begin; downtown Bend; 503-2455695, klowry@arthritis.org or http://bendjinglebellrun.kintera.org. BEND CHRISTMAS PARADE: Parade theme is “Christmas Carols on Parade�; free; noon; downtown Bend; 541-388-3879. HAT AND SCARF SEW-A-THON: Cut and sew hats and scarves for children attending the Wonderland Express holiday party; free; 1-4 p.m.; Cynthia’s Sewing Center, 20225 Badger Road, Bend; 541383-1999. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION�: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger, $25 families; 2 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or http://bendpac.org. “STORYBOOK CHRISTMAS�: Bend Theatre for Young People presents Santa’s elves rewriting classic fairy tales with contemporary twists; $8, $3 ages 12 and younger; 2 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E.

Ninth St., Bend; 541-419-1395, bendtheatre4youngpeople@gmail. com or www.bendtheatre.org. BELLUS VOCIS CHOIR FALL CONCERT: The choir performs under the direction of James Knox; $6, $5 students and seniors; 2 p.m., doors open 1:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. “THE NUTCRACKER�: The Central Oregon School of Ballet performs the classic dance; $17 in advance, $20 at the door; $6 ages 12 and younger in advance, $7 at the door; 3 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-390-7549 or www. centraloregonschoolofballet.com. ART FOR INDIA: Fourth annual event features canvas art, an auction, slide show, live music and more; benefits underprivileged children in India; $10 with buffet, $5 concert only, free ages 9 and younger; 5 p.m., 8 p.m. concert; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; art@riseupinternational.com or www.riseupinternational.com. ST. FRANCIS CHRISTMAS FAIRE: A spaghetti dinner with a silent auction, raffle and food sale; proceeds benefit St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church; free admission, $4-$22 for dinner; 5 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3631. LA PINE HOLIDAY LIGHTS PARADE: Conveyances of all types are decorated with lights; free; 6 p.m.; downtown La Pine; 541536-9771 or director@lapine.org. “HIGH DESERT NUTCRACKER�: Redmond School of Dance presents a Central Oregon version of the classic ballet; $5; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-548-6957. “THE NUTCRACKER�: The Central Oregon School of Ballet performs the classic dance; $17 in advance, $20 at the door; $6 ages 12 and younger in advance, $7 at the door; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-390-7549 or www. centraloregonschoolofballet.com.

SUNDAY Dec. 5 PHOTOS WITH FRONTIER SANTA: Take pictures with a Victorian-era Father Christmas and listen to live music by the Thorn Hollow String Band; proceeds benefit the museum’s educational programs; $10 plus museum admission, $5 for museum members; 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-5451. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION�: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger, $25 families; 2 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or http://bendpac.org. “HIGH DESERT NUTCRACKER�: Redmond School of Dance presents the classic holiday ballet, in a style inspired by Central Oregon people and culture; $5; 2 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-548-6957 or http:// redmondschoolofdance.com. BELLUS VOCIS CHOIR FALL CONCERT: The choir performs under the direction of James Knox; $6, $5 students and seniors; 2 p.m., doors open 1:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837510. CASCADE WINDS SYMPHONIC BAND: The band performs music by Leroy Anderson, Malcolm Arnold, and Percy Grainger under the direction of Dan Judd; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541593-1635 or www.cascadewinds.org. “THE NUTCRACKER�: The Central Oregon School of Ballet performs the classic dance; $17 in advance, $20 at the door; $6 ages 12 and younger in advance, $7 at the door; 3 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-390-7549 or www. centraloregonschoolofballet.com.

F DVD  W

Rekindle magic with ‘Shrek Forever After’

who hunt down ogres. Fiona is the leader of the ogre resistance movement. But there’s an escape clause: to get his life back, Shrek has to make Fiona fall in love with him — all over again. Contains slapsticky action and bathroom humor.

Books Continued from E1

‘Come Fall’

Submitted photo

‘Faster’ Rating: R for strong violence, some drug use and language. What it’s about: Guy gets out of prison and sets out to kill the fellows who murdered his brother. The kid attractor factor: Kids have grown up on Dwayne Johnson, the wrestler formerly known as The Rock. Good lessons/bad lessons: To murder is human, to forgive murderers divine. Violence: Well, yeah. Language: Coarse and profane. Sex: None. Drugs: Yes, needles and booze, the works. Parents’ advisory: This is not the “Game Plan�/�Tooth Fairy�/ �Race to Witch Mountain� version of Dwayne Johnson. As action films go, it’s pretty sordid and not for anybody younger than 14.

‘Tangled’ Rating: PG for brief mild violence. What it’s about: Rapunzel slips out of her tower to experience a little of the big, wide world, in the company of a charming rogue. The kid attractor factor: Disney animation, a “Disney Princess,� songs and a very funny horse.

‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1’ Rating: PG-13 for some sequences of intense action violence, frightening images and brief sensuality. What it’s about: The wizards and witch are a long way from Hogwarts, on the run as they try to foil You Know Who’s plans. The kid attractor factor: The Harry Potter epic winds down with an “Empire Strikes Back� dose of gloom and doom. Good lessons/bad lessons: Education builds the character we need to make it through life’s trials. Violence: Bloody, in a couple of instances. Language: The occasional mild oath. Sex: Near nudity in one scene of “brief sensuality.� Drugs: None Parents’ advisory: The PG-13 is for blood and violence and one slightly racy hallucination. Suitable for 10 and older.

‘Unstoppable’ Rating: PG-13 for sequences of action and peril, and some language. What it’s about: Two railroad workers try to catch and stop a runaway train. The kid attractor factor: A runaway train! Good lessons/bad lessons: Companies lay off their most experienced “heroes� every day. Violence: Injuries, an off-camera death. Language: Some profanity, understandable, considering the circumstances. Sex: Hooters Girls are ogled. Drugs: None Parents’ advisory: A very positive, family-friendly action picture, OK for 8 and older.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

The Washington Post “Shrek Forever After� (PG, 98 minutes): The Shrek we meet at the start of this film is a shell of an ogre: mean and green on the outside, but all mellow yellow inside. In an attempt to get back some of his mojo, Shrek (voice of Mike Myers) makes a deal with Rumpelstiltskin (Walt Dohrn) for 24 hours in his old life. In return, Rumpelstiltskin gets to take a day from Shrek’s life. Rumpelstiltskin picks the day Shrek was born, which places Shrek in a world in which all the good he’s done has had no effect. He didn’t rescue his wife, Fiona (Cameron Diaz). Rumpelstiltskin is now king and the kingdom a police state run by witches

Rating: PG-13 for sexual content including several suggestive dance routines, partial nudity, language and some thematic material. What it’s about: A country girl who has just gotta sing, gotta dance makes her way to an L.A. burlesque club where she might become a star. The kid attractor factor: Christina Aguilera, belting tunes and shaking her moneymaker. Good lessons/bad lessons: “Life is about the choices we make.� To bump. Or to grind. Apparently. Violence: None. Language: Some profanity but not as much as you would expect. Sex: Nothing graphic, though what happens on a burlesque stage can be pretty risque. Drugs: Drinking. Parents’ advisory: Surprisingly tame for a movie about scantily clad dancers bumping and grinding, still not for anybody younger than 13.

Good lessons/bad lessons: Good parents protect their kids from the worst of the world, bad parents don’t let them experience the world at all. Violence: A frying pan, a noggin, you do the math. Language: Disney clean. Sex: Rogue meets princess, sparks fly. Eventually. Drugs: Flagons of ale are consumed. Parents’ advisory: This adheres to that Disney animation credo, “suitable for all ages.�

By A.C.E. Bauer This is an unusual tale of three middle school misfits who are brought together through magic and a mutual search for friendship. Lu is a quiet girl, unhappy about having lost her best friend and not able to find her niche. She is assigned to be the d.b.

DVD extras: Deleted scenes; featurettes and “From Swamp to Stage: The Making of Shrek the Musical.� Also on Dec. 7: “The Bob Hope Collection�; “Cronos: Criterion Collection� and “A Dog Year,� starring Jeff Bridges.

(designated buddy) for Salman, a boy who has been bounced from one foster home to another, and yet has somehow retained the ability to find goodness in unusual places. His best friend is a crow. Blos requires order, and Asperger’s makes him “see the world as it is and not as humans would have it be.� And then there’s Puck, a fairy from Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer’s Night’s Dream,� caught in the middle of a battle between the king and queen of the Otherworld, and sent to meddle in the

lives of the three children. But they are wiser than expected, able to overcome the heartlessness of classmates, adults and even mischievous fairies. We’re never too old to think that if we just turned around fast enough, we might see a flash of tiny wings and a sprinkle of fairy dust. Believe! — Recommendations from Heather McNeil, community services youth manager, Deschutes Public Library


E4 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Friday, December 3, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQ U ELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Dec. 3, 2010: This year, much that comes to fruition stems from reflection and an innate thoughtfulness. Treasure your time alone, as it will give birth to many great ideas. You will remain more centered than in the past. Your domestic life proves to be a source of continual happiness. Many of you will move in new directions, buy new homes, add to your family or even live with someone for the first time. If you are single, romance blooms spring 2011. Know that this is a special period in which you could attract someone quite unique. If you are attached, the two of you renew your vows in spirit in 2011. SCORPIO understands you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Move through a problem decisively and firmly. Deal directly with the person who might be involved. Keep reaching out for others. Your sixth sense homes in on the bottom line once others share. Tonight: Choose a special restaurant or place. Be with a favorite person. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Defer to others quickly. Sometimes it is better that others take on more responsibility. A meeting or get-together proves to be a joyous occasion. The unexpected hits with someone who is angry and demanding. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Work with someone directly

and understand what is going on. A must appearance could add pressure to a partnership. You might want to venture out without this person. A little nurturing could reverse this issue. Tonight: Don’t push beyond your limits. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Keep reaching out for those at a distance. Your ability to get past what others think are necessary steps might not always help. Streamline issues, and root out the real problem behind the scenes. Tonight: Switch modes. Time to play. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Express your feelings directly. Your creativity will start to flourish if you are coming from your authentic self. Those who relate on a one-on-one level with you respond positively to your resourceful ideas and conversations. Tonight: Not far from home. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Your style can be efficient or critical. If someone flees the scene when you are speaking about details, perhaps your efficiency has evolved to pickiness. Bring this issue up for discussion, and you’ll gain the confidence of others. Tonight: Hang at a favorite haunt. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Center yourself and press forward. Though at first you might be uncertain about a situation, you’ll come up with great results. Yes, you have stamina and energy, but how much can you really take on? Remember, you also need to relax. Tonight: Do for yourself first. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Simply follow what

seems to be the best course. Your judgment is fine-tuned. The results you get from this type of centering might blow you away. Touch base with a child or loved one. If you are artistic, just let it happen. Tonight: You deserve your reputation as a wild thing. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Understand that not everything is meant to be shared or discussed. In fact, sometimes it is easier to let others tell you what they know or think. Helping them process could be more important. Tonight: Keep it private. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Conversations lead you in a new direction. At first you could be jolted by information that heads your way. Rethink a situation, and zero in on what feels right. A conversation opens up a friendship or association. Tonight: TGIF. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Your stand and ability to handle a lot of responsibilities and understand an excess of information puts you in a position where you might not be comfortable. Use your instincts and good sense with a money offer. Tonight: Could be a late one. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Allow your imagination to soar. The more ideas that are substantiated by information that comes forward, the greater the choices. This statement might refer to something as simple as your weekend plans. Tonight: Take off if you can. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Mean Continued from E1 “Girls absolutely exclude one another in kindergarten,” said Michelle Anthony, a psychologist and co-author of the new book “Little Girls Can Be Mean.” When her own daughter was manipulated by a “friend” into racing down a slide booby-trapped with mud, making it appear to a group of boys as though she’d soiled her pants, Anthony was taken aback. “You don’t expect to run into that level of meanness in a 7-year-old.” But at a time when teenage cyber-bullying is making headlines, parents fear that the onset of bullying behavior is trickling down. According to a new Harris survey of 1,144 parents nationwide, 67 percent of parents of 3- to 7-year-olds worry that their children will be bullied; parents of preschoolers and gradeschool-age children are significantly more likely to worry than parents of teenagers. Such fears may be justified. One recent survey of 273 third-graders in Massachusetts found that 47 percent have been bullied at least once; 52 percent reported being called mean names, being made fun of or teased in a hurtful way; and 51 percent reported being left out of things on purpose, excluded from their group of friends or completely ignored at least once in the past couple of months. In Washington, at a “Bullying Prevention Summit” in August, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced stepped-up efforts in elementary schools, noting, “Bullying starts young — and we need to reach students when they are young with the message that bullying is not OK.”

Girl bullying ‘under the radar’ Capt. Stephanie Bryn, a military officer overseeing the government’s “Stop Bullying Now!” program, is initiating a campaign geared toward 5- to 8-year-old children this fall. “Girl relational bullying has been under the radar,” she said. But when the campaign surveyed its 80 partner organizations, they unequivocally said children were aging up, making bullying pervasive in the early elementary years. “We realized we need to address this in kindergarten.” In the case of a little girl named Caroline Port, the torment didn’t begin until first grade. Within months of starting at a private elementary school in suburban St. Louis, Caroline, now 9, was waking up with night terrors, sleepwalking and crying excessively. When her mother, Karen Port, met with Caroline’s teacher, she learned that her daughter was being ostracized. “I was very upset,” she said. “Why hadn’t anyone told me?”

“To be honest with you, the parents not only enabled it, they engaged in it. The parents of mean girls often think, ‘Great, our daughter is so popular!’ ” — Eileen O’Connor, a lawyer and mother of five girls in Washington, D.C. Five birthday parties passed, without any invitations. No one would play with Caroline. She even had to sit with the boys at lunchtime. “I hate myself,” she would tell her mother when she came home. She was 7 years old. Port sought help from a school counselor, which improved matters briefly, but scorn and ridicule persisted. One day, Caroline came home from school carrying a little blue rock that her counselor had given her, a treasure she had presented to her class. “They asked if it had Caroline Disease,” she told her mother. “It’s starting again.” Is there really a fresh spate of mean little girls? Social scientists who study relational aggression point to a dearth of longitudinal data. It could just be heightened awareness among hyper-parents, ever attuned to their children’s most minuscule slight. It could be a side effect of early-onset puberty, with hormones raging through otherwise immature 8year-olds. Or it may be that an increase has yet to be captured; relational aggression wasn’t a focus of academic research until the mid-1990s, making longitudinal study a bit premature. Most studies still leapfrog from preschoolers to early adolescents.

‘Monkey see, monkey do’ Nicole Werner, a psychologist who studies bullying at Washington State University, said that she hasn’t seen research “to indicate that these forms of hurtful behavior are increasing in younger kids.” “However,” she continued, “I have to expect that the amount and type of media kids are consuming at younger ages is having an effect.” Other experts agreed. “The research literature on aggression is very clear that with relational aggression, it’s monkey see, money do,” said Tracy Vaillancourt, who specializes in children’s mental health and violence prevention at the University of Ottawa. “Kids mirror the larger culture, from reality TV to materialism.” We no longer live in the pigtailed world of Cindy Brady where a handful of channels import variations on sugar and spice, with prompt repercussions for the latter. “So much of what passes for entertainment is about being rude, nasty and crass,” said Meline Kevorkian, who studies bullying at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale-Davie, Fla. “What we see as comedy is actually making fun of other people.”

Nicole Martins, a professor of telecommunications at Indiana University, has conducted a study linking aggressive behavior to shows with stars she deemed socially aggressive, like “Hannah Montana” and “The Simple Life.” “There was no effect on aggression on boys, but in girls, there was an increase among those who watched socially aggressive female models on TV,” Martins said. Then there is the tendency of children to grow older younger (a trend with its own acronym: GOY, bandied about by parents and educators). Six-year-olds go to see Erin Munroe, a school guidance counselor in Boston, complaining that So-and-So won’t play with them because they like the Jonas Brothers and the “It girls” like Miley Cyrus. She sees firstgraders pulling their hair out, throwing up before school and complaining of constant stomachaches. “It’s not cool to not have a cell phone anymore or to not wear exactly the right thing,” Munroe said. “The poor girls who have Strawberry Shortcake shirts on, forget it.”

Parents often complicit Nobody wants her daughter’s penguin kicked out of the igloo on Club Penguin. But too many parents are too quick to take their daughter’s side, without fully exploring her role in the fracas, said Rosalind Wiseman, the author of the anti-mean-girl bible, “Queen Bees and Wannabes.” Sometimes, she points out, the victim may turn out to have been the initial provocateur. While peer influence is no doubt a factor, veteran teachers and school counselors say parents are often complicit. “Parents think it’s really cute when their 2and 3-year-olds are doing ‘Single Ladies’ or singing the Alicia Keys/Jay-Z song,” Wiseman said. “But it’s not so funny at age 8, when they’re singing along to Lady Gaga and demanding a cell phone.” A kindergarten teacher at one of New York City’s top private all-girls schools observed, “The mean girls are often from mean moms.” She was thrown back by the “venom” among 5-year-olds. They’ll say, “You only read ‘Biscuit,’ and we’re all reading chapter books.” Or, “Why don’t you brush your hair? You don’t look nice today.” And they’re not afraid of getting into trouble with a teacher. “Perhaps they can act that way at home without repercussions,” she said. “It’s untypical of this age group because they’re usually adult-pleasers.” In certain cases, the parents themselves seem to be pleased. When her

daughter Julia was in first grade last year, said Lea Pfau, a mother of two in the Sherman Oaks section of Los Angeles, one girl threatened that, unless Julia did as she ordered, “I’m going to tell my mommy, and she’ll set up a meeting with your mommy, and you’ll get in trouble.” The girl then orchestrated a series of exclusive clubs in which girls could be kicked out for various infractions. “I was surprised by the fierceness,” Pfau said. “But I was more surprised at the other parents. Rather than nip it in the bud, they encouraged it.” Eileen O’Connor, a lawyer and mother of five girls in the Georgetown section of Washington, D.C., has also witnessed trickle-down meanness in her daughters’ classrooms. “To be honest with you, the parents not only enabled it, they engaged in it,” she said. “The parents of mean girls often think, ‘Great, our daughter is so popular!’”

Working out issues Across town, in southeast Washington, Rosalyn Rice, the associate principal of a public elementary school until last year, continually held mediations among young grade-school girls. “They were reporting deeply held grudges from the first grade,” she recalled. One first-grader was shunned because she didn’t have the “in” classroom supplies — sparkly glue and a Powerpuff Girls carrying case. She stopped going to school because her parents couldn’t afford them. “The other girls kept accusing her of stealing theirs, which wasn’t true,” Rice said. Children who didn’t have their uniforms regularly laundered or had to borrow one from the school office were mocked mercilessly. Even at the lower end of the socioeconomic spectrum, “Girls were judging how much people cared about them based on what they owned.” Several experts point to a shift in childhood play, with a focus on controlled environments, techno-goodies and material objects. Instead of working out issues themselves during free play outside, children are micromanaged by parents who step in to resolve conflicts for them. Debbie Rosenman, a teacher in her 31st year at a suburban Detroit school, said that helicopter parents simultaneously fail to provide adequate authority or appropriate forms of supervision. “The girls who are the victims tend to be raised by parents who encourage them to be more age appropriate,” Rosenman said. “The mean girls are 8 but want to be 14, and their parents play along. They all want to be top dog.” And so the nastiness begins.

Parenthood Continued from E1 Change your language. “I never use the ‘s’ word,” Braun says. “Kids end up using that as an excuse: ‘I’m shy.’ Rather than giving them an excuse, we want to help them feel comfortable with who they are and help them move to a place that’s more socially acceptable. I prefer ‘slow to warm up’ because it’s a defined trait of temperament. Once you keep in mind ... that your child needs time, you can help him.” Prep your child. “Let him know, ‘Uncle Henry and Aunt Gert are coming over. Here are some pictures of what they look like. They live in Iowa. They have a farm. You haven’t seen them in a while and it might take you a little time before you feel like being with them. Just remember when people say hi, it’s nice to, in some way, say hi back.’ Give him permission to find another way to greet them. ‘One of the things we do when we see people is we greet them. You could wave. You could smile. You could do a pinky wave.’ ” Prep your relatives. “You can fertilize the ground by warning, ‘Just a heads up that Steven is a little slow to warm up. Just come in and greet him and then let him come to you.’ ” She also endorses a “side door” approach. “Walking in and announcing, ‘Give Grandma a kiss!’ is the surest way to sabotage things. ‘Anybody in this room wearing tennis shoes that light up?’ is better. He’ll know you’re connecting with him, but in a more subtle way.” Ease up. “Don’t say, ‘I want you to look them in the eye and shake hands and say, “It’s nice to see you, Uncle Ed.” ’ That just sets him up for failure. You want to set him up to be successful,” says Braun. “Remember that your child has to be your priority, not what your family thinks of you. Forcing it will sabotage the whole lesson and that just makes you the cooked goose on Christmas Day.”

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Chesapeake Pups AKC, shots, dew claws, great disposition, $500-$600 ea. 541-259-4739 CHIHUAHUA, 10 weeks, 2 females. $250 each. 541-678-8760.

Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, $250, 541-977-4686. Chihuahua, Applehead, male, last one! $200, 541-593-0223.

Chihuahua Puppies, unique colors, great with kids, $300. 541-977-4817 Email jesse1215@gmail.com

Aussies - Toys & Minis, will hold for Christmas, prices start $500, 541-548-6672 or www.cattlecalltoyaussies.com

Aussie Toy Sheltie mix small male pup. 15 weeks, very cute. $125. 541-390-8875.

S . W .

Free Mini Australian Shepherd to loving home. Good companion, good with kids. Needs space to run. Call 541-504-8247 German Shepherd Puppy (1) 9 wk female, black, parents on site, $250. 541-536-5538 German Shepherd Pups, 3 white, 1 dark mahogany, 1 white donated to Sisters Wrestling team, $500 ea., 541-610-5785.

German Shorthair Puppies, AKC 9 wks old, 6 males, shots/ wormed. 5 dogs in the GSP Hall of Fame in their pedigree; excellent hunt/show or family dogs. Well socialized, $500. Also 1 4-yr male, $800; and 1 4-month female, $800. 541-923-8377; 541-419-6638 German Wirehaired Pointer, male pup. $300 or trade for guns. 541-548-3408 Great Pyrenees purebred pups ready week of Christmas. 3 F 3M, $500-$600. Ranch raised, parents on site. 541-576-2564 Griffin Wirehaired Pointer, male pup, 6 mo., both parents AKC, good hunters, great hunting potential & good natured, $500, loreencooper@centurytel.net 541-934-2423.

LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is grand sire. Deep pedigreed performance/titles, OFA hips & elbows. 541-771-2330 www.royalflush retrievers.com Labradoodles $499; Goldendoodle Puppies view at http://doodlesrfun.tripod.com 541-938-8765 Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Labrador pups AKC, chocolate, yellow, hips guaranteed, $250 to $450. 541-954-1727

Beagle Puppies - 8 weeks, 1st/2nd shots. Great with kids. $250 (541)419-4960.

Chinchilla for sale. Handled, friendly. Cage included. Needs friendly home. $125. Gray, 3 yrs. 541-593-2960

Black Lab/Walker Hound Pups. Super Healthy. 1st shots & dewormed. $100 382-7567

Chinese Crested Pups (2), & 1 Crest Doxie, 3 mo., $275 ea., 541-433-2747 or 420-7088.

Boston Terrier, AKC 12-wk male, family raised, 1st/2nd shots, $400. 541-610-8525

Chi-Pom puppies, 1 boy, 1 girl, 1st shots. $175 each. Call Brooke, 541-771-2606

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Furniture & Appliances

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Misc. Items

Snow Removal Equipment

Lost and Found

Malamute/Lab puppies for sale! 8wks old, ready now. Need loving homes! 5 males 1 female $100 each, 541-923-1180 call between the hours of 4pm and 8pm Min-Pin pups, Adorable pure bred, 8 weeks old, Black & Tan, 4 males $400/ea and 1 female $500. up-to-date, on shots. Pics available. 541-633-6148 (leave msg)

Papillon pups just in time for St Nick to put under tree. $300. Taking deposits. Call 541-504-9958 POODLES AKC Toy. Also Pom-a-Poos. Home raised. 541-475-3889 541-325-6212

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Scottish Terriers, AKC, 1 male, 1 fem., brindle, shots, dewclaws & dewormed. $400 ea. Will deliver! 541-447-1304 S H I H - T Z U, 8 mo., male. $350. 541-678-8760.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

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Children’s Items Fold-up Booster seats (2) with trays, fits on dining chairs, $10 both. 541-330-5467

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Antiques & Collectibles Antique Dressmaker’s Dummy, great for clothing display? Excellent condition, $350. 541-317-4985; 541-280-0112

Shih Tzu/Poodle mix, 14-week male, $250. Great Christmas present! 541-233-8202

COWGIRL

RESALE

Gently Used Western Wear Turquoise, Old Pawn Squash Blossoms, Cuffs 541-549-6950 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website. Shih Tzu puppies, 3 girls, 2 boys, 1 very small female, $450-$750. 541-788-0090 Toy Poodle Puppies for sale at an affordable price. Call Cindy at 541 771-0522.

Yorkie Mix pups, very tiny & cute, 10 weeks old, $180 cash. 541-678-7599 Yorkie Pups, ready for good homes, parents on-site, 1st shots, $450, 541-536-3108

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Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959 !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

Custom Remington Model 1903-A3, 375 H&H, heavy barrel, $850 OBO. Uberti 1848 3rd gen dragoon black powder pistol, MSRP $409, & holster $70; asking $400 both, OBO. 541-390-1010

BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

Building Materials

HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte Wed.Dec. 8th, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422 Juniper Rim Game Preserve - Brothers, OR Pheasants (both roosters/hens) & Chukars, all on special! 541-419-3923; 541-419-8963

Chainsaws, like new! Run excellent! Stihl MS-460, $695! MS-390, $395! 026 20” $269! Husqavarna 395XP, $595! 281XP, $595! 372XP, $595! 55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, $295! 541-280-5006

Heating and Stoves

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

JOTUL Gas stove GF600DV Firelight, like new, black in color. $1000. 541-504-4666

Lyman 54 Cal muzzle loader with everything to start shooting $225 call 541-923-4196

Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our

PARKER TROJAN 12 gauge, 50% plus. $1300 OBO. 541-728-1036 Ruger 10/22 with carbon fiber stock. Comes with extra Hogue stock, another target barrel, plastic case, spotting scope. $300 541-678-0509 Ruger #1 22-250 varmitter $699. Taurus .44 mag SS, 8” barrel $369. 541-419-5830 Ruger 338 M-77 S/S, synthetic stock, Nikon 4.5-14 scope, $675 OBO. 541-420-9063

S&W 44 Mag Model 629 $665. Colt Mark V .357 Mag $495. Dan 541-410- 5444.

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Coins & Stamps Gold Coin: 1876, 1 oz., George T Morgan, $100 Gold Union, struck in 2005, Ultra Cameo, NGC Certified, $2200, 541-410-4447

WANTED TO BUY

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 Winchester Model 70 XTR 7 mm Magnum with 3x9 Tasco Pronghorn Scope $450 Call 541-923-4196

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Sporting Goods - Misc.

US & Foreign Coin & Currency collections, accum. Pre-1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, Lifetime free-standing Basketsterling flatware. Gold coins, ball Hoop, good condition, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental $25. 541-382-0890 gold. Diamonds, Rolex & 253 vintage watches. No collection too large or small. BedTV, Stereo and Video rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 TV/VCR Combo, 19” Pana241 sonic, works great. $20. Bicycles and 541-330-5467

Accessories

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In time for Christmas! Men’s Computers Hard Rock Mountain Bike, exc cond, $50. 541-382-0890 THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those Schwinn 7 speed girl’s bike, selling multiple systems/ 24” wheel, good condition, software, to disclose the $50. 541-383-4231. name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Schwinn High Timber, alum. Private party advertisers are mtn. bike, front shocks, Shidefined as those who sell one mano equipped, $140. computer. 541-480-5950.

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Appliances, new & recondiTravel/Tickets Ski Equipment tioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Alpina women’s x-country Civil War tickets, 2 seats w/ backs on 49-yd line $550 inc shoes, black, size 8, like Maytag, 541-385-5418 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

new! $20. 541-598-7397

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Misc. Items

10 ga Ithaca semi auto shotgun w/26” bbl; $150 ammo incl. All $575. 541-419-5565

Pro-grade stainless refer, range, micro, dishwasher; Washer & dryer. 10 mos use. Storage cabs. $2400. 541-678-1963

9mm Desert Eagle Baby Israeli Military, holster, box and ammo. $725. 541-647-8931

Recliner, Brown, microfiber, good shape, $75; Loveseat recliner, tan microfiber, w/ console, exc. shape, $200, 541-548-0324.

Sun. Dec. 12 at 10am 121 Deady Crossing – Sutherlin Equipment, Trucks, Trailers, Pickups, Cars, ATVs, Firearms, Tools & More.

541-598-4643. Sofa & Loveseat, clean, attractive, contemporary style, pic. avail. $200, 541-389-8697

AUCTION

www.I-5auctions.com (541) 643-0552

"Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. Like new cash register; very nice Open & Close sign & remote control; hydraulic styling chair in very good cond; nice built-in hairdrying chair, all $500. 541-325-9476 NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

Nintendo DSi Video Game, almost new, $100. Call 541-325-6349 The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 3 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised must equal $200 or Less • Limit one ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months 541-385-5809 • Fax 541-385-5802 Viking #1 Plus Sewing machine, good condition. $800. Please call 541-382-7790 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

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Tools Construction tools, over $450 worth, sell for $175, or trade for .22 Rifle, 541-410-4596

parking pass. 541-410-8921

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Glider Rocker with matching stool, light green, like new, $45. 541-548-0291

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call Labrador pups, quality purebred English, beautiful yellow & rare fox-red yellow, home raised, happy, $550-$600 ea 541-461-1133; 541-510-0495

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English Bulldog puppies, AKC, Grand sire by Champion Cherokee Legend Rock, #1 Bulldog in USA ‘06, ‘07 and ‘08, ready to go! $1300/ea. 541-306-0372 English Mastiff puppies, registered. 8 months, 1 female, 1 male, Brindle. $600 ea including Spay/Neuter. Willow Farms Mastiff 541-279-1437.

C h a n d l e r

Pets and Supplies

English Bulldog AKC male, “Cooper” is 8 mo. old, all shots, $1200. 541-325-3376.

WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-7959. Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top Boxer Puppies, AKC, 7 wks, 2 dollar paid, Estate incl. Honmales @$400 ea; 6 females est Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 @$500 ea. 541-408-5230 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel puppies, Blenheim & tri541-280-7959. color, 8 wks old. AKC reg., 205 champion lines. Parents heart/eye certified annually. Items for Free 541-410-1066; 541-480-4426 www.djcavalierkennels.com Coffee Table, Needs stain & polish, in good cond., you Chesapeake Pups AKC, shots, haul, call 541-325-3005. dews, health guaranteed. $500-$600. 541-259-4739 Horse Manure, large loads, perfect for gardening, will load, FREE. 541-390-6570. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

1 7 7 7

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food

200

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

(3) 9-ft. sections of Christmas greenery garland. Was expensive; $45. 541-322-9483

Found Key: 11/29, On Greenwood between 5th & 6th, call to ID, 541-480-5851.

$3,000. 541-385-4790.

265 Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

266

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves. SPACE HEATER Black & Decker, like new, $15. 541-330-5467

The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter: d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

d

WARM CLOTHING d Rain Gear, Boots

Boots, Cabela’s,size 14, 15” high, insulated, waterproof, unused, paid $149, $75, 541-389-7472

Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE FIFTH STREET (312-2069)

Browning Gold Hunter 12 ga. semi-automatic, shoots 3½”, $500. Scott, 541-508-6327

Questions: Call Ken Boyer, 389-3296, or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Found Ring, Indian Ave near Ray’s last summer. Call to identify. 541-548-4861 LOST a black wallet at Shopko parking lot around 7 a.m., 11/26. If found, please return contents to Disabled Senior who needs medical cards, 541-480-3431. LOST Black/White Shih Tzu female “Bailey” Thanksgiving morning, Eagle Crest. Needs meds. Reward. 360-518-2126 Lost: Grey & White large Cat, male,12 yrs, Cauliflower ears, N. Redmond, 541-548-7624. Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. Identify 541-382-8893. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Farm Market

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2, Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484 CASH price: Rounds $119; 2 cords/more $115 ea. Split, $149; 2 cords/more, $145 ea. (Visa/MC: $129 or Split $159 ea) Deliv avail. 541-771-8534

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

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Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds 65 lb. bales, $160/ton; 5+ tons, $150/ton. Patterson Ranch in Sisters, 541-549-3831 Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. Volume discounts; delivery available. 541-480-8648. Premium Orchard grass, & Premium Oat grass mix. 3x3 midsize bales, no rain, no weeds. Orchard @$65/bale; Oat @$50/bale 541-419-2713 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

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Horses and Equipment Dry Lodgepole: $150/cord rounds, $175/cord split, Free Delivery, please call 541-610-6713. Dry Lodgepole For Sale $170per cord rounds; $190 per cord split. 35 years’ service to Central Oregon. Call 541-480-5601

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

269 BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can.

Found keys for Dodge + house keys? NW 19th & Ivy, Redmond, 11/30. 541-526-7246

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com


F2 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 341

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Horses and Equipment

Farmers Column

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Advertise in 30 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington & Utah. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

PRINCIPAL, Powell Butte Char ter School. Position closes 12/3/10. Info at www.pow ellbuttecharterschool.org or 541-548-1166.

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 ASPC Shetland Ponies: Palomino Gelding, gentle and ready to start, $150; Palomino Stallion halter champion $300. Hold until Christmas. 541-548-2887/788-1649 HORSES FOR SALE! Looking for good homes for TB, Clydes, Arab, QH. Call and come see. 541-420-3186. NELSON back-to-back wallmounted automatic waterers including plumbing kit & insulation, Model 760-10W $850 541-948-3170

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com Retiring, young quarterhorses for sale, 2 1-ton flatbed pickups, 1 Dodge 1/2-ton, & 1 Toyota Diesel pickup, 2 rubber tired backhoes, 2 Crawler tractors & 2 semi trucks with trailers, evenings 541-382-7995.

Employment

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LOCAL GROWN BEEF - Natural pasture raised, no hormones 421 /antibiotics, USDA inspected, Schools and Training ¼, ½ or whole. $2/lb hanging weight + C & W. Excel- Advertise and Reach over 3 lent gift idea! 541-548-1219 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 30 daily newspaOrchard Grass, $165/ton, pers, six states. 25-word Alfalfa, $150/ton, Mix Hay, classified $525 for a 3-day $160/ton, Feeder Hay, ad. Call (916) 288-6010; $100/ton, cheap delivery (916) 288-6019 or visit avail., 541-891-4087. www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. Looking for your next (PNDC) employee? Place a Bulletin help ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE wanted ad today and from Home. *Medical, *Busireach over 60,000 ness, *Paralegal, *Accountreaders each week. ing, *Criminal Justice. Job Your classified ad will placement assistance. Comalso appear on puter available. Financial Aid bendbulletin.com which if qualified. Call currently receives over 866-688-7078 www.Cen1.5 million page views turaOnline.com (PNDC) every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Find It in Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place The Bulletin Classifieds! your ad on-line at 541-385-5809 bendbulletin.com

383

Produce and Food Wild Alaskan Salmon Fresh-Frozen Coho and Sockeye Sockeye $13.50/lb Coho $12.00/lb available for delivery From the fisherman to you! Kelvin Vaughan 907.209.2055

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

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Sales Redmond Area

Huge Garage Sale. Lots of Christmas Decorations, giftables, and horse tack. 3105 NE OB Riley Rd, Bend. Sale located upstairs above the indoor pool at the Shilo hotel. Fri. & Sat. 8 am-4pm. Look What I Found!

You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardware, classified is always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if you're planning your own garage or yard sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains!

Call Classifieds: 385-5809 or Fax 385-5802 286

Sales Northeast Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Estate Sale Lots of nice antiques and more! Fri-Sat 9-4 numbers Fri. 8am Go north on Main St. to 141 NE Owens Rd. Prineville For more info go to atticestatesandappraisals.com Attic Estates & Appraisals 541-504-1827

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Sales Other Areas CHRISTMAS VILLAGE SALE! Sat-Sun, 9-4 indoors. 16715 Bitterbrush Lane, Sisters off Hwy 126, turn on Bradley. DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

CAREGIVERS NEEDED In home care agency presently has openings for Caregivers, FT/PT, in La Pine. Must have ODL/Insurance & pass criminal background check. Call Kim for more info, 541-923-4041, 9am6pm, Monday.-Friday. Chemical System Operators Suterra is currently seeking Chemical Systems Operators, to operate a series of chemical reaction and purification units and associated equipment. All work is done according to defined standard procedures to meet production goals in a 24 hrs x 7 days per week operation. Candidates must have some previous industrial or manufacturing experience. Fax resume to 310-966-8310 or go to http://www.suterra.com

Looking for Employment Caregiver w/20+yrs exp seeks job; all ages/aspects of care. Pets, too! Great rates, ref’s, bkgrnd check. 541-419-7085

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

Estate Sales

Caregiver: Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female, Part-time transportation & refs., req. 541-610-2799.

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

DENTAL ASSISTANT Our busy practice is looking for a dental assistant who is a team player with a great attitude. Xray certification and some experience preferred. Great staff and benefits. Call 541-504-0880 between 10 am and 4pm. or evenings before 8pm - 541-548-9997. Dental -Front Office 4 Days a week, dental assistant preferred. Drop off resume at 2078 NE Professional Ct., Bend. 541-382-2281. Jack Miller, DMD Branden Ferguson, DDS Driver needed for local run. Home every day. Must be willing to work swing shift & have Class A CDL w/doubles endorsement. 541-419-1125 or 541-546-6489.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

General - NOW HIRING! THR & Associates a multi-national company has hundreds of salaried positions, many that offer bonuses. Local and national positions. Looking for professional, friendly, self motivated individuals. Customer service oriented with sales experience. Many salaries starting at $45,000. To learn more & apply visit: www.thrassociates.com

NEWSPAPER

Full-time News Assistant The Bulletin is looking for a resourceful, self-motivated person to work in the newsroom writing briefs, editing letters to the editor and managing the archive. Duties also include editing for Bulletin and AP style, assisting the public with archive searches and other clerical duties. This person should enjoy working in a fast-paced environment and be able to meet tight deadlines. Requirements include excellent grammar and organizational skills, flexibility of schedule, and proficiency with computers. Must enjoy working with the public and understand the importance of accuracy and thoroughness in all duties. Submit a resume and cover letter by Monday, Dec. 6 to Marielle Gallagher at mgallagher@bendbulletin .c om or mail to The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97702; or drop off at The Bulletin, 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Owner/Operators needed. Local haul. Home daily. Contact 541-419-1125 or 541-546-6489.

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

GeneralSell Sunday editions of the Newspaper in popular street corners in Bend. You work Sundays ONLY from 9am till 3pm-4pm. You get paid cash that same day at the end of the shift. We are looking for motivated and charismatic individuals. Call 541-306-6346 for a phone interview.

Where buyers meet sellers.

Easily. The Classified Section is easy to use. Every item is categorized and every category is indexed on the section’s front page.

Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 385-5809

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

Sales

NEED A JOB? If You Can Answer YES To These Questions, WE WANT YOU 1. Do you talk too much? 2. Do you like to have fun? 3. Do you want to make a lot of $$? 4. Are you available Wed.-Fri., 4pm-9pm & all day Sat. & Sun.?

Work part time with full time pay! DON'T LAG, CALL NOW! 541-306-6346

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

ATTENTION

-Independent ContractorRemember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

SALES - Part-time position. Seeking salesperson who is self-motivated, familiar with computers and physically able to lift 50-100 lbs. Must be able to fill a flexible schedule. Knowledge of firearms, tools, electronics or jewelry is a plus. Please fax resume to 541-318-0808. Teacher for Youth Challenge program located 9 miles east of Bend. Must be able to teach multiple subjects. Oregon certification needed. Must be creative and work well in a team setting. For application packet & info call Cascade Educational Services, 541-771-5616.

Sales WORK PART TIME HOURS, FULL TIME PAY

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF 541-617-7825

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Independent Contractor

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

Maintenance: Full-time position at The Pines at Sunriver. Valid driver’s license req. Apply in person at 17655 Pinnacle Ln., Sunriver, OR

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Wanna Make Bank??? AND HAVE FUN? No Experience Necessary No Car, No Problem, Only 30 Hours Per Week PM Shifts & Weekends Available

Call Right Now 541-306-6346 Independent Contractor

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Part-Time News Assistant The Bulletin is looking for a resourceful, self-motivated person to work in the newsroom, assisting the reporting staff. Duties will include data entry, proofreading for Bulletin & Associated Press style and other clerical work. This person should like working in a fast-paced environment and be able to meet tight deadlines.

H Bend, Prineville & Madras H

Excellent writing, understanding of grammar, good organization, flexibility and basic computer skills are essential. Attention to detail is necessary.

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Must enjoy working with the public and understand the importance of accuracy and thoroughness in all duties. College degree or previous related experience preferred.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours

Submit a resume and cover letter by Monday, Dec. 6, 2010, to Marielle Gallagher at mgallagher@bendbulletin.com, or drop off or mail to The Bulletin, 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC) RETIRING Dust Control Road Treatment Business. Business base commercial & rural home & farm owners. $450,000 Call Butch 541-567-3203 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

Rentals

600

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

605

Roommate Wanted Seeking responsible roommate, no smoking/drugs. $300/mo + $200 deposit and ½ utilities. Call 541-279-0779 Share 2bdrm 2½ bath home near Broken Top, fully furn. $550+ ½ util. 949-940-6748 Share House in DRW, $400/mo incl. utils, $200 dep., 541-420-5546.

616

Want To Rent Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917.

627

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges BEND 6 Bedroom Luxury vacation rental, centrally located, available Thanksgiving/ Christmas. 541-944-3063 or see www.bluskylodge.com

Steens Mountain Home Lodgings See Bend Craigslist for more info, 541-589-1982.

630

1085 NE Purcell - Pilot Butte Village 55+ Community 2 bdrm $799, in hospital district. 541-388-1239 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com 1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

** Pick your Special **

2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

HOSPITAL AREA Clean quiet AWESOME townhouse. 2 Master Bdrms, 2.5 bath, all kitchen appli., W/D hookup, garage w/opener, gas heat & A/C. $645/mo. + dep. S/W/G pd. No Dogs. 541-382-2033 Newer Duplex 2/2, close to Hospital & Costco, garage, yard maint., fireplace, W/D, W/S, pet? 1025 Rambling Ln. #1 $725. 541-420-0208

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Rooms for Rent STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Avail now, unfurnished 1 Bdrm condo at Mt. Bachelor Village. W/S/G/elec, amenities, lower level, no smoking/pets $650+dep. 541-389-1741

1 Bdrm. $420+dep. Studio $385+dep. No pets/smoking, W/S/G paid. Apply at 38 NW Irving #2, near downtown Bend. 541-389-4902. 1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D included! $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

632

Apt./Multiplex General

Fully furnished loft apt.

3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex. NEW CARPET & PAINT throughout. W/D incl. no smoking. No pets. Sewer/ Lawncare paid. 1 yr. lease. $795 mo. + $945 sec. 20076 Beth Ave. in Bend. 541-382-3813 The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Happy holidays! Enjoy living at 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $525 mo. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 4-plex SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 bath, all appls, W/D hkup, garage, fenced, w/s/g pd. Half off 1st mo! $650 mo + dep; pet neg. 541-480-7806 ASK ABOUT OUR HOLIDAY SPECIAL! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 managed by

GSL Properties

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz Clean 2 Bdrm, 1.5 Bath duplex Absolutely beautiful, 1 Bdrm. 2 bath, fully furnished Condo, $695, $400 dep, near downtown & college, completely renovated, 2 Verandas, no pets/smoking, avail. now, all amenities and W/S/G/elec./A/C/Cable incl., 541-279-0590 or cheritowery@yahoo.com

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

640

on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt.

for rent. Fenced backyard, single car garage, Small pet ok upon approval. $660 per month plus deposit. 1620 SW Rimrock Way #A. 541-480-7783 for showings. DUPLEX SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 bath, garage w/opener. 1300 sq. ft., w/d hookup, fenced yard, deck, w/s/g pd. $700 dep. 541-604-0338

648

Houses for Rent General

Quiet 2 bdrm, new windows, W/G/S/Cable paid, laundry on-site, cat OK, $575/mo, $500 dep., 541-383-2430 or 541-389-9867.

THE BULLETIN • Friday, December 3, 2010 F3 650

687

865

870

880

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Commercial for Rent/Lease

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

3/2 House, large kitchen, great room 1500 sq.ft., large yard with sprinklers. Pets neg. 21336 Pelican Dr. $950 + deposit. Call 541-322-0708

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage, bonus room, deck, fridge, gas stove, new paint, carpet & vinyl. $1000/mo. Pets neg. Mike 541-408-8330.

Beautifully furnished 6 Bdrm, 3 Bath, granite kitchen, fenced yard. Skyliner Summit. $2500 includes water/garbage; min 6-mo lease. 541-944-3063

NE Bend

personals

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Whatever happened to Jim Zerbo’s screenplays: “The Fighting Nurses” & “Aviation Story”? Both due at the box office. 541-318-7260.

2 Bdrm. in 4-Plex, 1 bath, new carpet/paint, W/D hookups, storage, deck, W/S paid, $525 + $600 dep. 541-480-4824 1-Month Free Option!

1800 sq.ft., 3 bdrm., 1 bath, family room, clean, close to hospital & shopping, elect./nat. gas heat, poss. small pet. 1150 NE 6th St. $950/mo, $800 dep., no smoking, 541-389-4985.

Arctic Cat Mountain 800 2004, injected, battery-free ignition, electric start, lefty throttle, high-output new battery, 151”x2” track, ice scrapers, cover, belts, storage wheels, etc. Ready! $3900 OBO. 541-536-5456

700

654

705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

Houses for Rent SE Bend $1385/mo 2456 sq.ft., 3/2.5 Super clean home in Sunmeadow Hot tub, Pool, walk to park & Jewell school. 3 car gar Avail 12/10 $1400 deposit pets ok w/deposit Keith 771-0475

4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

Terrebonne 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath in private, treed setting. Has deck, detached garage and storage, $725/month. Call 541-419-8370; 541-548-4727

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295, 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

687

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919. YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161, 541-788-3896.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Yamaha 2008 Nitro 1049cc, 4 stroke, bought new Feb 2010, still under warranty, 550 miles, too much power for wife! $6000. Call 541-430-5444

875 Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024 Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

870

Boats & Accessories

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010, Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

745

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, GREAT WINTER PROJECT. $400 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $25,000. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

880

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabi-

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

10th Fairway Eagle Crest behind the gates 3 Bdrm + den, 3.5 bath, 2400 sq ft, O/S garage, W/D, deck, views quiet low maint. Year round pool, tennis golf. No smkg, pet w/dep. $1400 + sec. Possible lease option, owner will carry w/down, $349,000. 541-923-0908

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

773

Acreages 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

OWN 20AC. LAND! $99/month! $0-Down, $12,900, great deal! Near El Paso, Texas. Owner Financing, No Credit Checks. Money Back Guarantee. Free Map/Pictures. 800-343-9444.

Drywall

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Experienced Male Caregiver offering assistance with medical & non-medical tasks & activities. Refs. avail. upon request, 541-548-3660.

Barns

Excavating

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Snow Removal

Handyman

Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof tops • De-icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

I DO THAT!

Holiday Lighting

Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. Help w/pre-holiday projects. CCB#151573 Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling •Decks •Window/Door Replacement •Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Multiple Options • Interior • Exterior • Landscape

Christmas Tree Delivery EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Same Day Response

Fall Cleanup and Snow removal

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

•Flower bed clean up •Irrigation repair •Senior Discounts •Landscape Maintenance

541-390-1466

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

“WANTED” RV Consignments All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold! We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

881

Travel Trailers

750

Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs No Job Too Small. Free Exact Quotes. 541-408-6169 CCB# 177336

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

nets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

Redmond Homes

Adult Care

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

Motorhomes

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Wet-Jet personal water craft, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights, 2 for $2400. Bill 541-480-7930.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Homes for Sale

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Watercraft

Yamaha 350 Big Bear

PUBLISHER'S Harley Davidson Heritage Soft NOTICE Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras All real estate advertising in incl. pipes, lowering kit, this newspaper is subject to chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. the Fair Housing Act which 541-944-9753 makes it illegal to advertise 3 Bdrm, 1 bath, single car at"any preference, limitation or tached garage, dishwasher, discrimination based on race, range and fridge, located at color, religion, sex, handicap, end of cul-de-sac, no smokfamilial status, marital status ing, no pets. $700/mo. 948 Harley Davidson Police Bike or national origin, or an inSE Polaris Ct. Available im2001, low mi., custom bike tention to make any such mediately. 541-389-6793. very nice.Stage 1, new tires preference, limitation or dis& brakes, too much to list! crimination." Familial status 656 A Must See Bike $10,500 includes children under the Houses for Rent OBO. 541-383-1782 age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant SW Bend women, and people securing Harley Davidson custody of children under 18. Elkhorn, Avail. now, 1200 This newspaper will not sq.ft, 3 bdrm., 2.5 bath, dbl. Screamin’ Eagle knowingly accept any advergarage, fenced, forced air, Electric-Glide 2005, tising for real estate which is gas fireplace, all appl., $850, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy in violation of the law. Our 541-389-1416. teal, 18,000 miles, exc. readers are hereby informed cond. $19,999 OBO, please that all dwellings advertised 658 call 541-480-8080. in this newspaper are availHouses for Rent able on an equal opportunity Redmond basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free 10th Fairway Eagle Crest at 1-800-877-0246. The toll behind the gates 3 Bdrm + free telephone number for Harley Davidson Ultra den, 3.5 bath, 2400 sq ft, the hearing impaired is Classic 2008, clean, lots O/S garage, W/D, deck, 1-800-927-9275. of upgrades, custom exhaust, views quiet low maint. Year dual control heated gloves & Lease option, round pool, tennis golf. No Sunriver vest, luggage access. 15K, Cozy 2+2, dbl. garage, w/ smkg, pet w/dep. $1400 + $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975. decks, lots of windows, wood sec. Possible lease option, stove & gas heat, near Lodge owner will carry w/down, $230,000. 541-617-5787 $349,000. 541-923-0908

The Bulletin is now offering a Commercial for LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rent/Lease Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Light Industrial, various sizes, Classified Rep. to get the North and South Bend locaRiver & Mtn. Views, 930 NW new rates and get your ad tions, office w/bath from started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, $400/mo. 541-317-8717 W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, 650 $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188. Houses for Rent

638

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

Houses for Rent NW Bend 2 Bdrm 2 bath, Lower West Hills, with great view & deck. W/D & garage, $895/mo; gas, water, & elec. is $100 flat rate. 541-420-7357.

850

Snowmobiles

Real Estate For Sale

652

800

693

900 sq ft 1 Bdrm 1 bath, single car garage, all utils incl, W/D hkup, in country, very quiet. An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from No smkg/pets. $675/mo. 1st $250 per month, including + $300 dep. 541-480-9041 utilities. 541-317-8717 A newer 3 bdrm., 2 bath, mfd. Downtown Redmond home,1755 sq.ft.,living room, family room, on private .5 Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 secuacre lot near Sunriver, $895 rity deposit. 425 SW Sixth 541-480-3395 or 610-7803. St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848 When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad

Boats & RV’s

Fall Maintenance! Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Painting, Wall Covering MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Remodeling, Carpentry Repair & Remodeling: Kitchens & Baths Structural Repair, We move walls. Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 Tenant Improvement Structural remodel - 23 yrs exp Quality • Dependable • Honest Armstrong Gen’l Contractor CCB#152609 • 541-280-5677

To advertise, call 541-385-5809

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.


F4 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent 881

882

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $13,900 or take over payments, 541-390-2504

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

931

932

933

933

933

935

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Pickups

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

S m o li c h A u t o M a ll

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $18,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

(4) 205-65/R15 Goodyear all season tires, 60% tread left. $75. 541-923-8627 4 Michelin studless snow tires on Toyota rims, 175-70x13, exlnt! $195. 541-312-9725 Michelin X-Treme weather/ All season studless. 225/60-R16 4 for $150. 541-617-8850. Tires, 4 Studded, 215/70R16, on 16” Toyota 5-lug alloy wheels, good tread, $475, 541-388-8841.

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425. MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

932

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

882

Fifth Wheels

MONTANA 2000 36’ 3 slides, washer and dryer, new A/C. Very nice & livable! $12,500. 541-923-7351.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. 2 hangars at Roberts Field, Redmond, OR. Spots for 5 planes. $536 annual lease. Reduced to $125,000 or make offer! 541-815-6085. Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Montana 37’ 2005, very good condition, just serviced, $23,000 OBO. 541-604-1808

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Chevy Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

Redmond Airport hangar, heated, 55’ x 75’ x 18’, 12’ x 24’ office, bath with shower, $229,500. 20-year lease. Call 503-803-2051

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

916

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500/OBO. (541) 610-4472 • 1-541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

VW Super Beetle 1974 New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

VW Super Beetle 1974 New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

933

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford F-250 XLT 1986, X-Cab, 4x4, everything works, runs good, $1250 OBO, please call 541-815-5618.

Special Offer

Dodge RAM 2500 2006 4x4

7.3 diesel, X-Cab, 92,000 miles, matching canopy, excellent condition.

CUMMINS DIESEL, VERY CLEAN and Road Ready. 84k miles VIN #200992

$14,999. 541-923-8627.

Lance 1010 10’1” 1999.Micro, A/C, gen, awnings, TV, stereo, elec jacks, reduced to $7950. 541-410-8617

s m o li c h m o t o r s . c o m 541-389-1177 • DLR#366 Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Ford Excursion 4x4 2000. Nice Red, like new, only 68k, seats 9. Just $16,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Ford Expedition 2000, 4WD, 131K mi., exc. cond., new traction tires, 3rd seat, $4995. 541-480-3286

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer - below wholesale pricing

Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

***

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4000. 541-706-1568

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow

Pickups CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

smolichmotors.com

package, Good condition, $1200 OBO, 541-815-9939.

Chrysler Aspen 2008 SUV AWD LIMITED EDITION. 41k miles. Vin #132288

Now Only $19,998 FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Dodge Ram 3500 dually 2003 Cummins Diesel 24V, 113K, new tires, TorkLift hitch, exc cond, $25,900. 541-420-3250

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl, 5-spd., 4x4, good cond, price reduced to $7950, 541-593-4437.

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

YOUR STANDARD SUBARU CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED COVERAGE 6 Year/100,000* Miles Powertrain Added Security with Roadside Assistance

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8925. 541-598-5111. Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 2000, full size, Reg cab w/ long bed, white, V6, 4.3L, 20 mpg, auto trans, ABS, AC, dual airbags, tow pkg, runs & drives excellent, maint’d extremely well; non-smoker. Recent brks, bearing, tune- up, tires, trans & coolant flush. 183K mi. $4700 obo. 541-633-6953

Dodge 2500 Laramie 2008 4x4 6.7 Diesel automatic, 23K mi, 6.5’ Proline flatbed. Below Bluebk $35,500 541-447-3393

All Subaru Certified Pre-Owned Vehicles receive: CARFAX vehicle history report • Roadside Assistance Rigorous 152-point safety inspection • Rental and towing benefits on all plans Mechanical breakdown coverage on all plans All vehicles must be 5 years old or newer and have less than 80,000 miles registered on the odometer. ’08 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5

Auto

$

17,999

’10 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5 BASE

’08 SUBARU OUTBACK LIMITED

Manual, 1,600 Miles

Moonroof, Leather, Auto

$

VIN: 304770

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

VIN #642750

Starting @ Only $12,999

NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE Deductible amount is $0

2003 Lance 1030 Camper, satellite dish, 3600 gen, pullout Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, pantry, remote elec jacks, Qn original owner, V8, autobed, all weather pkg, solar, matic, great shape, $9000 AC, $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 OBO. 530-515-8199 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, sway bar, airbags, Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes canopy, bedliner, gooseneck, bucket and forks, 540 hrs., 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as $18,500. 541-410-5454 unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160 Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & Grader - All wheel drive, low hard tops, new paint, carpet, hours on engine - $10,500. upholstery, rechromed, nice! 1986 Autocar cement truck $32,000. 541-912-1833 Cat engine, 10 yd mixer Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999, Mercedes 380SL 1983, $10,000. Call 541-771-4980 extended overhead cab, stereo, Convertible, blue color, new self-contained,outdoor shower, 925 tires, cloth top & fuel pump, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non call for details 541-536-3962 Utility Trailers smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

Example:

Dodge NITRO 4WD 2007

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

FORD F250 XLT 2000 4X4

885

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Honda Ridgeline 2006 AWD 48K miles, local, 1 owner, loaded w/options. $21,999. 541-593-2651 541-815-5539

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $15,999 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Dodge Ram 2001, short

Canopies and Campers International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps. $7950, 541-350-3866

Special Offer - 2 pre-owned in stock

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

366

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, 1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

NEW PRICE $16,777

541-749-4025 • DLR

Antique and Classic Autos

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

It’s a HEMI, 39k miles Vin #106043

smolichmotors.com

541-322-7253 KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Dodge RAM 1500 4x4 2004

HYUNDAI

Wheels, Milanni 20’s,fit Mustang, Veutus SportK104,245/402R20 95Y, $1250, 541-408-7972 Winter Master mud and snow studded tires, (2) like new $90. 541-480-5950

Special Offer

S m o li c h A u t o M a ll

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $3350. 541-548-3628

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

’08 SUBARU OUTBACK LIMITED 2.5 XT TURBO

Manual, Leather, Moonroof

Show Your Stuff.

$

22,688

20,988 VIN: 783956

Moonroof, Auto, Low Miles, All Weather

$

22,988

22,988

VIN: 317617

Moonroof, Auto, Low Miles, All Weather

$

VIN: 72472

’10 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5 PREM ’10 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5 PREM

$

22,388

’10 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5 PREM ’10 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5 PREM

VIN: 301669

Moonroof, Auto, Low Miles, All Weather

$

Moonroof, Auto, Low Miles, All Weather

$

22,988

22,988 VIN: 721838

’08 SUBARU OUTBACK LIMITED

Low Low Miles, Auto, Moonroof

$

24,988

VIN: 744272

VIN: 714447

VIN: 359069

’10 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5 PREM

’10 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5 PREM

’10 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5 PREM

All Weather, Auto, Low Miles

All Weather, Auto, Low Miles

All Weather, Auto, Low Miles

Now you can add a full-color photo to your Bulletin classified ad starting at only $15.00 per week, when you order your ad online. To place your Bulletin ad with a photo, visit www.bendbulletin.com, click on “Place an ad” and follow these easy steps:

1. Pick a category (for example - pets or transportation) and choose your

$

25,488 VIN: 357313

’09 SUBARU FORESTER LIMITED 2.5 XT TURBO

ad package.

$

25,488

$

25,488

VIN: 337014

APR

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25,988 VIN: 710761

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Loaded, Leather, Auto, Low Low Miles

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S0305 5X6 kk

Please allow 24 hours for photo processing before your ad appears in print and online.

To place your photo ad, visit us online at www.bendbulletin.com or call with questions, 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through December 5, 2010.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Friday, December 3, 2010 F5

935

940

975

975

975

975

975

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Special Offer - below wholesale pricing

Special Offer

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Smolich Auto Mall

PRICE REDUCED TO $800 Cash! Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

25K Miles! VIN #617085

Now Only $9,999

Like NEW but Priced much BETTER! 14k miles. VIN #250097

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Now Only $10,325

975

Automobiles

Mazda MIATA 1999 It fits under the Christmas tree! 39k miles Vin #128198

Now Only $7750

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Smolich Auto Mall

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Smolich Auto Mall

Special Offer

Special Offer

541-385-5809 What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Smolich Auto Mall

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. Subaru Forester 2007 AWD, man. trans, immac cond, 55K cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new auto chk, reduced to $15,750 tires, soft & hard top, 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212 $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Hyundai V6 SONATA 2009

Special Offer

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Loaded and hard to find V6. 30k miles. VIN #407550

541-385-5809

NISSAN

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

smolichmotors.com

Now Only $18,895

366

VW Passat Wagon 2004 4 Motion AWD! 94,188k miles Vin #302694

Now Only $9,999

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Nissan Murano AWD 2003 V6, family SUV, loaded with leather & more. 66K Miles! Vin #217483

Now Only $14,999

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

Audi A4 Nearly New 2009 Only 8,000 miles & many premium options on this A4 sedan including heated leather seats, Bluetooth, iPod dock & sunroof. The Quattro all-wheel drive system performs amazingly well in all weather conditions. Asking $2500 below Kelley Blue Book! $28,995. 541-350-3502

Chrysler Sebring 2007 Super Nice, 37k miles Vin #590806

NOW ONLY $10,888

smolichmotors.com

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

smolichmotors.com 366

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Smolich Auto Mall

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316

LOADED, Roof Rack, 7 Passenger, 39K Miles! Vin #106479

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

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custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $5950; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

Ford Focus SES 2009 4 door, loaded. Leather, Moonroof, Alloys & more. 32k miles. Vin #243146

Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $14,750 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

smolichmotors.com 366

Toyota FJ Cruiser 2007 4x4 Yellow 6 spd, never off-road, Sat-Nav/DVD/Sirius, 96k all hwy, $18,250. 541-549-8036

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

940

Vans 1998 Dodge Ram Wagon SE 2500, Mark III conversion, 100k miles, 4 captains chairs, rear fold-down bed, hitch, $4000 and worth it! Travel in luxury. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Chrysler 1999 AWD Town & Country LXI, 109k; 1998 Town & Country 7 passenger, leather, used but not abused. I’ll keep the one that doesn’t sell. Takes $3500 and up to buy. Bob, as you can see, likes mini vans. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

The Bulletin Classified ***

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

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366

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Stk. 90102A, VIN M504921.

Stk. 3421, VIN 071339.

Kelley Blue Book $12,565

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15,495

2007 Beetle Convertible

2009 VW Beetle

VW Certified, One Owner.

VW Certified, Low miles.

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Stk. 3519, VIN M505864.

Kelley Blue Book $15,260

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16,945

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2003 Mercedes C320 4-Matic

2008 VW Beetle

2009 VW Routan

2007 Mini Cooper S

All Wheel Drive, Low Miles.

WW Certified, Only 9k Miles.

VW Certifed Mini Van.

Low Miles, Full Options

Stk. 3520, VIN F410694.

Stk. 90162A, VIN C366044.

Stk. 3514, VIN R501073.

Stk. 3414, VIN L84656

Kelley Blue Book $16,500

Kelley Blue Book $17,035

Kelley Blue Book $18,475

Kelley Blue Book $20,730

NOW

19,995

$

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19,995

$

$

NOW

21,495

$

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2006 BMW Z4

2001 Porsche Boxter

2009 VW Jetta TDI

Top Down Fun to Drive!!

Low Miles, Well Equipped.

Stk. N1030, VIN LW91534.

Stk. 3371B, VIN P1710675.

Only 16k Miles, Nav., Moonroof.

Kelley Blue Book $22,775

Kelley Blue Book $21,125

NOW

21,495

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

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2005 Volvo XC90 AWD, Loaded, 3rd Row.

Available on every vehicle.

22,995

2007 Audi A4 Quattro Audi Certified, Low Miles.

Stk. 71031K, VIN 51200237.

Stk. 3465, VIN 125841.

Kelley Blue Book $22,750

Kelley Blue Book $24,785

CarreraAutoOutlet cars you can get into Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires/rims, no htr; dashbrd heater instead. Runs great! $999. 541-388-4167

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

GREAT VALUES ON RECENT TRADE-INS! $

NOW

WAS $11,995

7,495

11,495

$

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

NOW

12,995

$

WAS $17,995

WAS $17,995

15,995

14,995

$

$

2002 Isuzu Trooper 4x4

2008 Smart Fortwo

2002 Ford F-150 Super Cab

2005 Acura MDX

2004 GMC Yukon

Stk. 3371J VIN P1710672.

Stk. 3534 VIN K178943.

Stk. 99110B VIN CA79670.

Stk. A31036A, VIN H526917.

Stk. 71023A, VIN J295729.

Passion Model, Low Miles.

Kelley Blue Book $7,755

Kelley Blue Book $12,285

WAS $17,995

WAS $18,995

15,995

17,495

$

$

2005 GMC Yukon

Incredible Condition & Value.

4x4, Canopy, Low Miles.

Kelley Blue Book $13,195 WAS $19,995

19,495

$

2004 Jeep 2006 Ford F-150 XLT Super Cab, Grand Cherokee

Navigation, One Owner, Low Low Miles.

Kelley Blue Book $19,895

Stk. A31040A, VIN C366044.

Kelley Blue Book $19,960

Low Miles. Stk. 90131B, VIN FA78172

Kelley Blue Book $22,655

Porsche | Audi Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Immaculate, Hard to Find. Stk. A30149A, VIN N081500.

NOW

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

2005 Audi A6 Quattro

Stk. AA30167J, VIN 134876.

21,995

Stk. 71056B, VIN J174687.

HYUNDAI

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Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

42K Miles! Vin #209196

NISSAN

Ford Focus SE Wagon 2007 4-dr, 8800 mi, 30+ mpg, brand new cond, $12,500 obo cash. 541-475-1165 aft 6

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

Now Only $11,379

Loaded like you want it. 40K miles! Vin #613716

VW Certified. Great Buy.

Low Miles, Affordable!

Chevy Impala Luxury 2009

Dodge Caravan Stow-N-Go 2009

2007 VW Jetta

2007 VW Beetle

Smolich Auto Mall

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14,995

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Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

14,995

13,895

Buick Regal Grand

***

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

WAS $15,295 NOW

NOW

$

$

NISSAN

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Sport 1995, excellent cond. moonroof, 4 dr., leather interior, low milage, $5000. (541) 549-1014

Toyota RAV 4 Ltd. 2007 80k miles, tow pkg. $14,000. 541-848-7876

WAS $13,995 NOW

12,395

$

Now Only $17,789

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Kelley Blue Book Prices as of 12/01/2010 NOW

Case No. 10PB0124ST NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS Notice is hereby given that the undersigned has been appointed and has qualified as the personal representative of the estate. All persons having claims against the estate are hereby required to present the same, with property vouchers, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice as stated below, to the personal representative at 64390 Bend Redmond Hwy., Bend, Oregon 97701 or they may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings in this estate may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative or the attorney for the personal representative. Date first published: December 3, 2010

Name, Address and Telephone Number of Personal Representative: Paul F. Imwalle 64390 Bend Redmond Hwy. Bend, OR 97701 Ph. (541) 382-5570

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

VW Certified.

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366

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES

Paul F. Imwalle, Personal Representative

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Buick LeSabre 2004,

Suzuki XL7 2008 Premium

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BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

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Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

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Mercedes AMG, Formula One V-12. Very Rare. Only 99k miles. Ultimate in safety, luxury & performance. Cost $135,000 to fully hand-build. Just $13,500. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

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Deceased. VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 smolichmotors.com

1000

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In the Matter of the Estate of: ELEANOR C. IMWALLE,

Pontiac Firebird T-Top 1998 mint, 125K,custom wheels/tires HO V6, 4 spd auto, 29 mpg reg. $5700 OBO. 541-475-3984

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Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Hyundai Elantra GLS 2007

Chrysler PT Cruiser 2007 Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Toyota Avalon 2000 Orig. Owner. $7300 Auto, Leather Interior, Moon Roof, 103,300 miles Great condition. Call Bob at 541-588-6615 Sisters

NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

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2007 Nissan Pathfinder

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2006 Ford F250 Super Cab

One Owner, Like New.

Diesel, 4x4, Canopy, Low Miles.

Kelley Blue Book $25,265

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Name, Address, and Telephone Number of Attorney for Personal Representative: Kristen S. Edwards, OSB #093397 Edwards Law Offices PC 225 NW Franklin Ave., Suite 2 Bend, OR 97701 541-318-0061 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND ELECTION TO SELL AND OF SALE WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT AND DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to a certain trust deed ("Trust Deed") made, as follows: Tamara S. Harty, as to an undivided 33 percent interest, and John McClean, as to an undivided 66 percent interest, and John V. Johnson and Marcella G. Johnson, as to an undivided 1 percent interest, Grantor; Western Title & Escrow Company, Trustee; and South Valley Bank & Trust, Beneficiary, recorded in Official/Microfilm Records, Volume 2007, Page 55516, Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following-described real property in Deschutes County, Oregon, commonly known as 4477 NW Glenn Meadow Loop, Redmond, OR 97756 ("Property"): Lot Two (2), GLENN MEADOW, PHASE 1, recorded September 26, 2007, in Cabinet H. Page 510, Deschutes County, Oregon The defaults for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Failed to pay the payment due April 1, 2010 and monthly payments thereafter until October 1, 2010 when the entire balance was due and payable; failed to pay 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 Deschutes County real property taxes in the amounts of $864.17 and $984.96 respectively, plus interest. By reason of said defaults, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligations secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $116,677.41 principal plus interest thereon at the rate of 8.5 percent per annum from March 1, 2010; 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 Deschutes County real property taxes in the total amount of $1,849.13, plus interest, plus trustee's fees, attorney's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said trust deed. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will, on February 16, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 o'clock a.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the above-described Property, which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dis-

missed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sum or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes each and every grantor, any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deeds of Trust, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 23, 2010. TRUSTEE /s/ Andrew C. Brandsness, Successor Trustee 411 Pine Street Klamath Falls, OR 97601 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND ELECTION TO SELL AND OF SALE WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT AND DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to a certain trust deed ("Trust Deed") made, as follows: Tamara S. Harty, as to an undivided 33 percent interest, and John McClean, as to an undivided 66 percent interest, and John V. Johnson and Marcella G. Johnson, as to an undivided 1 percent interest, Grantor; Western Title & Escrow Company, Trustee; and South Valley Bank & Trust, Beneficiary, recorded in Official/Microfilm Records, Volume 2007, Page 55514, Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following-described real property in Deschutes County, Oregon, commonly known as 4437 NW Glenn Meadow Loop, Redmond, OR 97756 ("Property"): Lot Three (3), GLENN MEADOW, PHASE 1, recorded September 26, 2007, in Cabinet H. Page 510, Deschutes County, Oregon The defaults for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Failed to pay the payment due April 1, 2010 and monthly payments thereafter until October 1, 2010 when the entire balance was due and payable; failed to pay 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 Deschutes County real property taxes in the amounts of $864.17 and $984.96 respectively, plus interest. By reason of said defaults, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligations secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $116,677.41 principal plus interest thereon at the rate of 8.5 percent per annum from March 1, 2010; 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 Deschutes County real property taxes in the total amount of $1,849.13, plus interest, plus trustee's fees, attorney's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said trust deed. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will, on February 16, 2011, at the hour of 10:15 o'clock a.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the above-described Property, which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sum or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and


F6 Friday, December 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes each and every grantor, any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deeds of Trust, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 23, 2010. TRUSTEE /s/ Andrew C. Brandsness, Successor Trustee 411 Pine Street Klamath Falls, OR 97601 LEGAL NOTICE OREGON AUCTION AD Wall Street Storage, LLC at 1315 NW Wall St., Bend, OR 97701 will be accepting sealed bids on 12/27/2010 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for the following units: Michael Turner - M-6 Joseph Schmaus - U-12 Adam Taylor Kondoleon - E-18 LEGAL NOTICE The Pines Mobile Home Park gives notice that personal property (the "Property") described below is abandoned. The Property will be sold by private bidding. Sealed bids will not be accepted. The Property is described as a 1975 Concord manufactured home Plate 56063 Serial # 349014. The Property is located at 61000 Brosterhous Road, Space 595, Bend Or 97702. The tenant that occupied the home was Austin and Marianne Clinton. To inspect the property, contact Harvey Berlant, 61000 Brosterhous, Bend, OR 97701, Phone # 541-382-8558 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: KATHLEEN J. WARREN. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), PLEASANT RIDGE, recorded July 29, 1993 in Cabinet D page 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: August 29, 2007. Recording No. 2007-47388 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,683.93 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of February 2010 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $362,348.07; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from January 15, 2010; plus late charges of $502.48; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE

OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 3, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30316). DATED: September 22, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: JAMES L. HANZELY AND ANGELA R. HANZELY. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot One Hundred Four (104), RED HAWK UNIT ONE, City of Redmond, recorded March 18, 1993, in Cabinet C, Page 754, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: November 29, 2005. Recording No.: 2005-81752 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,102.75 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of April 2009 through August 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $191,618.03; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from March 15, 2009; plus late charges of $199.70; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default

and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 3, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30443). DATED: September 17, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: A. TRUST DEED ONE: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: BARRY BERGMAN AND JOAN BERGMAN. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), COPPER CANYON PHASE 1, recorded March 11, 2005, in Cabinet G, Page 625, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: June 7, 2006. Recording No. 2006-39525 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,965.58 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of September 2008 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $330,330.25; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from August 15, 2008; plus late charges of $2,079.43; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. B. TRUST DEED TWO: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: BARRY BERGMAN AND JOAN BERGMAN. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROP-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Pamela Reeves, as Grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Bill Sonnabend, as Beneficiary, dated July 24, 2008, recorded July 25, 2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-31397 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: LOT ELEVEN (11), BLOCK ONE HUNDRED EIGHT (108), DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES UNIT 8 PART II, RECORDED JULY 5, 1967, IN CABINET A, PAGE 137, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 15750 Sparks Dr., La Pine, Oregon 97739. Both the beneficiary and the successor trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 28, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $466.34 Monthly Late Charge $27.98. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $72,468.27 together with interest thereon at 7% per annum from December 2, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any stuns advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, George B. Heilig the undersigned successor trustee or his designee will on March 9, 2011 at the hour of 10:00 am, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at the 1164 NW Bond Street, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by her of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required Under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is March 9, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260. Dated: 11/12/2010 By: George B. Heilig, Successor Trustee, HEILIG MISFELDT & ARMSTRONG, LLP, 310 NW 7"' Street, Suite 100, Corvallis, Oregon 97330, (541) 754-7477, www.hmalaw.net.

ERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), COPPER CANYON PHASE 1, recorded March 11, 2005, in Cabinet G, Page 625, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: June 7, 2006. Recording No. 2006-39526 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $502.22 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of September 2008 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $64,923.00; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from August 15, 2008; plus late charges of $569.34; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 3, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time

that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30546). DATED: September 15, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: A.TRUST DEED ONE: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: KARL F. ALDINGER. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot One Hundred Sixty-two (162), AWBREY VILLAGE, PHASE 3, recorded June 19,2001, in Cabinet E, Page 642, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: October 2, 2006. Recording No. 2006-66613 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Biweekly payments in the amount of $1,221.21 each, due biweekly each month, for the months of December 2008 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $451,056.91; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from December 15, 2008; plus late

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust (hereafter referred to as the Trust Deed) made by: Kristi Rae Rucker, as the Grantor, and CitiBank, N.A., as the Beneficiary, dated February 9th, 2007, and recorded February 23rd, 2007, as Doc No. 2007-11119 in the Mortgage Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 84, BLOCK 6, LAZY RIVER SOUTH, IN THE CITY OF LA PINE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, for the real property described above is purported to be: 52854 Timber Lane Loop, La Pine, Oregon 97739. The Tax Assessor's Parcel Number (Property Tax ID) for the Real Property is/are purported to be: 127019 and/or 245176. Both the beneficiary and the trustee, Sia Rezvani, have elected to foreclose the above referenced Trust Deed and sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed and a Notice of Default and Election to Sell has been recorded pursuant to ORS 86.735(3). All right, title, and interest in the said described property which the grantors had, or had power to convey, at the time of execution of the Trust Deed, together with any interest the grantors or their successors in interest acquired after execution of the Trust Deed shall be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed and the expenses of sale, including the compensation of the trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of trustee's attorneys. The default(s) for which foreclosure is made is (1) the grantor's failure to make regular payments to the beneficiary, such default beginning May 3rd, 2010, and continuing through the date of this Notice, and (2) failure to carry, and/or provide evidence of, extended coverage hazard insurance, in violation of the Trust Deed, and (3) any defaults or breaches occurring after the date of this document is executed. The current balance of payments now due, together with late charges, attorney and trustee fees, costs, title expenses, and other allowed charges is $4,035.05 together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due, periodic adjustments to the payment amount, any further sums advanced by the beneficiary to protect the property or its interest therein, additional costs and attorney fees as provided by law, and prepayment penalties/premiums, if any, together with defaulted amounts owed to senior lienholders. The amount required to cure the default in payments to date is calculated as follows: From: 5/03/10; No. Payments: 4; Amount per: $466.44= Total of past-due payments: $1,865.76 Total Late charges: $93.29 Trustee's/Attys Fees and Costs: $2,076.00 Total necessary to cure default in payments to date: $4,035.05 + proof of insurance + proof taxes are current + proof seniors are current or tender of sufficient funds to cure any/all senior defaults. Please note this amount is subject to confirmation and review and is likely to change during the next 30 days. Please contact Rezvani Law Office to obtain a "reinstatement" and/or "payoff" quote prior to remitting funds. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed due and payable. The amount required to discharge this lien in its entirety to date is: $203,596.20. Said sale shall be held at the hour of 11:10 a.m. on January 4th, 2011, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, and pursuant to ORS 86.745(7) shall occur at the following designated place: INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, IN THE CITY OF BEND, OREGON. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation(s) of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. The mailing address of the trustee is: Rezvani Law Office, LLC, P.O. Box 865, Gresham, Oregon 97030, the telephone number for the trustee is 503-666-3407. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" and/or "grantors" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Actual payoff and/or reinstatement amounts may change on a daily basis and therefore any payoff/reinstatement is subject to the Trustee's final review and confirmation. Dated this 25th day of August, 2010. By: /s/ Sia Rezvani, Successor Trustee (203655 11/19/10, 11/26/10, 12/03/10, 12/10/10)

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8007 T.S. No.: 1303408-09.

charges of $964.87; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. B. TRUST DEED TWO: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: KARL F. ALDINGER. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot One Hundred Sixty-two (162), AWBREY VILLAGE, PHASE 3, recorded June 19,2001, in Cabinet E, Page 642, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: October 2, 2006. Recording No. 2006-66614 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $606.08 each, due the fifteenth each month, for the months of January 2009 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $80,973.29; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from De-

cember 15, 2008; plus late charges of $341.57; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 3, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal as-

sistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30775). DATED: September 23, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc26264-5 Loan No.: 0146797048 Title No.: 4503788 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Thomas J. Bennett, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR., as Trustee, in favor of SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated 07/24/2007, recorded on 07/31/2007 as Instrument No. 2007-42230 and Loan Modification Recorded on 03/13/2009 as Instrument No. 2009-10403, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 8 IN BLOCK JJ OF DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. TOGETHER WITH THAT PORTION DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A PORTION OF LOT 41 OF BLOCK JJ, PLAT OF DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 41, BEING A 5/8 INCH IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 34° 11' 17" EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT 41 A DISTANCE OF 104.47 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 38° 59' 00" WEST ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 41 A DISTANCE OF 15.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST LINE OF SAID LOT SOUTH 26° 40' 17" WEST 109.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Account No.: 107315 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 60475 Umatilla Circle, Bend, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $2,897.90 beginning 03/01/2010, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $377,415.26 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.125% per annum from 02/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 01/06/2011, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 8-26-10 First American Title Insurance Company, Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage Inc. c/o Mortgage Lender Services Inc., 4401 Hazel Avenue #225, Fair Oaks, CA 95628 (916) 962-3453 MORTGAGE LENDER SERVICES, INC. MAY BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. (RSVP# 203305, 11/12/10, 11/19/10, 11/26/10, 12/03/10 )

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9165 T.S. No.: 1305178-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Byron K. Ames and Lisa A. Ames Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Western Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated October 18, 2007, recorded October 24, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-56560 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 9, block 7, Lazy River South, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 16677 Sprague Loop La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due July 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,789.06 Monthly Late Charge $78.52. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $252,819.78 together with interest thereon at 5.980% per annum from June 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on February 15, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is January 16, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert L. Seavey, as Grantor to Western Title and Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For American Brokers Conduit, as Beneficiary, dated November 07, 2005, recorded November 10, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-77660 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 15, block 8, C.L. & D. Ranch Tract, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 15997 Fir Road La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $931.37 Monthly Late Charge $40.21. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $117,001.95 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from July 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company the undersigned trustee will on March 08, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 29, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is February 06, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org First American Title Insurance Company C/o Cal-western Reconveyance Corporation P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 First American Title Insurance Company Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-351208 11/12, 11/19, 11/26, 12/03

R-355428 12/03, 12/10, 12/17, 12/24


EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN DECEMBER 3, 2010

M U S I C : Béla Fleck & The Flecktones celebrate the holidays, PAGE 3

G A M I N G : ‘Donkey Kong’ returns, PAGE 24


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR Julie Johnson, 541-383-0308 jjohnson@bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

inside

REPORTERS

Cover photo by R y an Brennecke / The Bulletin

Anna Johnson and Don Delach star in “Moon Over Buffalo.”

• Art and cycling mix at event • First Friday is tonight • “The Nutcracker” hits the stage • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

Jenny Harada, 541-383-0350 jharada@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

• Oregon Zoo opens holiday lights display • A guide to out of town events

Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

GAMING • 24

SUBMIT AN EVENT

MUSIC • 3

GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. E-mail to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

• Béla Fleck plays Christmas show to support KPOV • Feedback sees Lucero • Century Center hosts shows • Grant Sabin brings the blues • Noodle-dance to Yamn

541-382-1811

• This week’s bazaars

OUT OF TOWN • 21

DESIGNER

ADVERTISING

HOLIDAY BAZAARS • 20

AREA 97 CLUBS • 8 • Guide to area clubs

• Review of “Donkey Kong Country Returns” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

MOVIES • 25

OUTDOORS • 15 • Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

CALENDAR • 16 • A week full of Central Oregon events

MUSIC RELEASES • 9 • Take a look at recent releases

RESTAURANTS • 10 • A review of Letzer’s Deli

FINE ARTS • 12 • COVER STORY: CTC opens “Moon Over Buffalo” • Cascade Winds play concert

PLANNING AHEAD • 18 • Make your plans for later on

• “The Warrior’s Way” opens in Central Oregon • “Knight and Day,” “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice,” “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse,” “Going the Distance” and “Vampires Suck” are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon

TALKS, CLASSES, MUSEUMS & LIBRARIES • 19 • Learn something new

1 3 2 4 designer fashions for both Men & Women. Onsite sewing/alterations & waxing studio

5

738 NW Columbia St • 541-647-2510 THE shop for affordable nearly new kids clothing. Maternity and moms too! Handmade hula hoops $15.

Old Mill Shopping District

6

Ladies and Juniors upscale consignment. The ultimate in resale shopping, where only the trendy fashion will do.

1465 SW Knoll Ave #102 541-728-0666 Young Men’s and women’s resale clothing. Your favorites recycled.

550 SW Industrial Way, Ste 105 541-317-9113 Boutique style clothing & accessories. Locally crafted gifts.

930 SE 3rd St. • 541-382-7202 Bend’s largest upscale resale women’s clothing store. Also featuring jewelry, home décor, small furnishings and men’s clothing. Come in today and get your RESALE THERAPY!


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 3

music

A

break norm

Béla Fleck & The Flecktones will play selections from their 2008 holiday album “Jingle All The Way” on Wednesday night in Bend.

from the

Béla Fleck brings non-traditional Christmas tunes to Bend By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

A

h, the songs and sounds of the holidays. They’re fun … for a while. One day you’re having a holly, jolly time dreaming of a white Christmas, and a few days later — a few elbowsharpening trips to the mall, a few times stuck dining in a restaurant blaring these tunes — you’re ready to roast Rudolph on a spit and shove

Frosty button-nose first into a blazing Yule log. Fa la la la la, ha ha ha! Prepare to meet your puddle, Frosty! Ahem … where was I? Oh right, Christmas songs. They’re fun … for a while. But here’s a little secret: You can extend their welcome by digging deeper than the usual suspects. Of course you must hear the classics by Ives, Crosby, Sinatra and the like, but be sure to break those up with non-traditional

takes on Christmas songs, like those all over “Jingle All The Way,” the 2008 album by Béla Fleck & The Flecktones. Fleck should need no introduction, but just in case: He’s a virtuoso banjo player and perhaps the singular figure in newgrass over the past couple of decades, thanks to his masterful splicing of bluegrass with other genres, especially jazz. Continued Page 5

Submitted photo

If you go What: A benefit holiday concert for KPOV with Béla Fleck & The Flecktones and Alash When: 7 p.m. Wednesday, doors open 6 p.m. Where: Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend Cost: Tickets range from $33 to $47, plus fees, available at www.kpov.org or from 1-5 p.m., Mondays through Fridays at KPOV, 501 N.W. Bond St., Bend Contact: 541-322-0863 or www.kpov.org


PAGE 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

music

Rock solid Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Memphis, Tenn.’s Lucero played the Domino Room on Tuesday night. From left are guitarist Brian Venable, frontman Ben Nichols and bassist John Stubblefield.

Lucero’s fiery sound warms up a cold night at the Domino Room

I

love it when a terrific concert sneaks up on me. I mean, it’s fun to go see a great band play a great show that you figured would be great when you walked in the door. But there’s something special about going in with low or no expectations, only to find yourself grinning ear to ear halfway through a set, wowed by a band you didn’t think could wow you. Tuesday night’s Lucero show at the Domino Room was like that for me. Don’t get me wrong, I think the Memphis, Tenn., roots-rock band has had a fine career filled with fine songs on

fine albums. But I’d never truly connected with any of it. I’m not sure why. Maybe I hadn’t given them enough of a chance because I burned out on alt-country years ago, or maybe you have to see ’em live to get it. Or, it could very well be that frontman Ben Nichols’ very-coarse-grit sandpaper voice was a hurdle I just couldn’t clear. (I like my vocals only so scruffy, I think.) Whatever the case, the fact is that Lucero is a band that I didn’t think could wow me. But on Tuesday night, they did. It wasn’t their wild antics or

Feedback BY BEN SALMON hilarious banter or jaw-dropping technical abilities that did it, either. None of those things happened. This was more about a super-tight band skillfully playing compelling, catchy songs. Who knew such a thing could work? (Insert winking emoticon here.) First things first: A three-band bill shrunk when Portland’s I Can Lick Any SOB in the House (understandably) decided not to brave the mountain passes. So

the night started with a long, solid set from Jon Snodgrass and Chad Price of Colorado’s Drag the River, whose downcast tunes and wonderful harmonies nicely warmed up the Domino Room, and a crowd that was small, but slowly growing in size. (Shout-out to whoever requested “Rangement.” Inspired choice.) The duo played in front of a giant red Tennessee state flag, with an outline of the Volunteer State and Lucero’s logo plunked right in the center. It was a constant reminder that the big name of the night was still to come. I didn’t realize just how big, however. As Lucero appeared, it was like clowns out of a Volkswagen; no fewer than eight guys crowded onto the Domino’s cozy stage: two on horns, one each on guitar, bass, drums, pedal steel

and organ, plus the only guy with a microphone, Nichols. The band kicked off with a slow-burning song that I didn’t recognize, plus a cover of “Kiss the Bottle” by the old pop-punk band Jawbreaker, and it took almost no time to realize just how much the horn section — Jim Spake on sax, Nahshon Benford on trumpet — added to the overall sound. In fact, I wish they’d been louder in the mix. All night, those horns and Rick Steff’s keyboard work complemented Nichols’ bluecollar twang-punk with a welcome, heavy dose of Memphis soul. They added texture and color to the sound, and provided a bright, bouncy counterbalance to the gritty weight of Lucero’s songs. Continued next page


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 5

music

Fresh Cut Noble Christmas Trees

COMING DEC. 17

GO! MAGAZINE’S ANNUAL LOOK BACK AT THE YEAR IN MUSIC FOR 2010! PLUS: THE RETURN OF “NEAR/FAR,” OUR FREE, LEGAL, DOWNLOADABLE COMPILATION OF THE YEAR’S BEST SONGS!

• Storybook Lane

DD Ranch

• Christmas Decor, Wreaths and Garland • U-build Wreaths Call Diann

Celebrates the 11th Country Christmas

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin ile photo

Béla Fleck From Page 3 Fleck has won 11 Grammys — in country, pop, instrumental, jazz, classical and world music categories (seriously) — and has been nominated for dozens more. The 52-year-old New York native has worked with big names ranging from Dave Matthews to Chick Corea and Edgar Meyer to Alash, the Tuvan throat-singing troupe that will open the Flecktones’ show Wednesday at Mountain View High School in Bend (see “If you go,” Page 3). So it’s no surprise that “Jingle All The Way” is a set of ultra-familiar songs performed in a mishmash of unexpected styles. “Silent Night” starts off with a funky bass line and unfolds into a banjodriven jazz number. “Sleigh Ride” gets a classic bluegrass breakdown treatment. “Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas” sounds like jazz giant Charlie Parker jamming with a string band on

Feedback From previous page As a whole, the band was fun to watch: heavily tattooed, bushy beards, looking like they hadn’t seen a laundromat since Dallas. Guitarist Brian Venable wore an ominous T-shirt bearing the name of sludge-metal band Kylesa and some psychedelic skull thing. Bassist John Stubblefield’s shirt had a zebra with angel wings on it. But the star of the show was the seemingly humble and self-deprecating Nichols, who thanked a half-full Domino Room and said

More uncommon Christmas music • Whimsical indie: Sufjan Stevens, “Songs for Christmas” • Gloomy slowcore: Low, “Christmas” • Old-school hip-hop: Various artists, “Christmas Rap” • Hipster lounge-pop: 11 Acorn Lane, “Happy Holy Days” • Acoustic wizardry: John Fahey, “The New Possibility: John Fahey’s Guitar Soli Christmas Album” • Pure perfection: Vince Guaraldi Trio, “A Charlie Brown Christmas” the “Seinfeld” theme song. Even Bach’s Christmas Oratorio takes on a fluttery, poppy feel in the hands of the Flecktones. And “The Twelve Days Of Christmas” is a labyrinthine beast, zigging and zagging all across the style galaxy. “Jingle All The Way” won a

he didn’t expect half that big a crowd on the band’s first trip to Bend. The guy just writes great songs. And they are twangy and punky, true. But at their heart, they’re simply great pop tunes that you can’t help but sway or tap along to. “Sixes and Sevens” showcased the band’s serious Stax Records swagger, thanks in large part to a killer horn riff. The lost-love lament of “Goodbye Again” featured some perfectly mournful pedal-steel swoons. The highlight of the night, though, were a couple of fistpumpers near the end of the set;

Grammy for Best Pop Instrumental Album, but taken as a whole, even its 16 tracks can make you long for Dec. 26. Interspersed among more traditional holiday songs on your iPod, however, these songs are both palatecleansers and a fun challenge to your ears’ holiday expectations. Which is exactly what Fleck wanted. Just last week, he called “Jingle” an “antidote to Christmas albums” in an interview with the Montreal Gazette. “If you can’t stand all that sweet smarmy stuff, well, our record never goes in that direction in the slightest,” he said. That doesn’t mean the songs won’t warm that chilly, seasonally curious part of your heart, however. “No matter what we do … you’ll know what songs we’re doing within a few bars,” Fleck said, “because we all know these melodies.” Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.

the power-pop chug of “Johnny Davis” and the radio-ready, roller-coaster chorus of “Sweet Little Thing” … well, remember that thing I said earlier about grinning from ear to ear? For me, those two songs were that moment on this night. Like I said, I love it when a terrific concert sneaks up on me. And on Tuesday, Lucero snuck up on me, Tennessee ninja-style, and clubbed me over the head with one of the best shows I’ve seen in Bend this year. Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.

• Hay Rides & Pony Rides • Hay Maze • Petting Zoo & Kids Korral • Central Oregon Christian School Bazaar on Weekends • Visits with Santa on Weekends • Café open Weekends

fied Beef USDA Certi orders for ng ki & Pork. Ta dinner. your holiday

Dec. 4 – Dec. 23 Open Daily 9am-5pm

541-548-1432

“A Country Christmas for the Whole Family”

3 miles East of Terrebonne Visit our website for more information. on Smith Rock Way www.ddranch.net

BEND’S Intimate, Affordable, Local

THEATRE DECEMBER 17-20 A CHRISTMAS CAROL Enjoy pre-show special at Pizza Mondo

JANUARY 14 THE ORIGINAL WAILERS From Bob Marley to Bend

Dec. 12 ................................. Acrovision Holiday Show Dec. 24 ............... Community Christmas Eve Services Jan. 8 ..............................................“The Big Lebowski” Jan. 10 .................................. BCS Championship Party Jan. 15 ......................................................... “Hairspray” Jan. 22 ................................................... “Wizard of Oz”

Tickets & Info: TowerTheatre.org Ticket Mill | 541.317.0700


PAGE 6 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

music

Larry and His Flask

Holiday SHOW

...ONLY AT THE DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR & EXPO CENTER South Sisters Building ajoining Redmond Sisters Festival of Trees

FRIDAY, DECEMBER. 3rd 1pm-8pm SATURDAY, DECEMBER. 4th 9am-6pm

Come take your picture with santa SUGGESTED DONATION - $1.00 PROCEEDS TO BE DONATED TO THE REDMOND HUMANE SOCIETY

ALL LOCAL ARTISANS & CRAFTMASTERS

ALWAYS FUN TO SHOP • ALWAYS FUN TO BROWSE

SPECIAL

CENTRALOREGONSATURDAYMARKET.COM

CENTRALOREGONSATURDAYMARKET.COM

Courtesy Joseph Eastburn

Good times,

good cause

Century Center buzzes with benefit shows for Rise Up

O

ne venue. Two nights. A bunch of good bands and artists. All to benefit one good cause. It’s a big weekend at the new Century Center music venue on Bend’s west side, as music lovers have a couple of opportunities to check out some of our town’s finest acts and also raise money for local humanitarian organization Rise Up International. Tonight brings the triumphant return of Redmond’s Larry and His Flask, the six-man rootspunk band that will wrap its highly successful 2010 with its final local show of the year. The Flask’s year included touring as an opener for Dropkick Murphys (ending with a sold-out St. Pat’s Day show in Boston), recording and releasing a terrific 7-inch record, drawing rave reviews from new fans across the country, and, as usual, traveling thousands of miles playing music anywhere and everywhere. The momentum doesn’t stop there. The band is heading to California soon to record a fulllength album, and it’ll spend February and March on the road opening for Streetlight Manifesto. Plus, if you’re so inclined, you can vote for the boys as 2010’s best new band at www.bestnew-

ON THE WEB Read about Century Center owner Dave Hill’s plan for his event center — including what it means for the music scene — at WWW.BENDBULLETIN .COM/FREQUENCY

bands.com, where they’re nominated alongside big names like Mumford & Sons, Gogol Bordello, Aqualung and Blakroc. You can keep up with LAHF’s exploits at www.larryandhisflask.com. Tonight’s bill will also feature the California band Lakes, plus Oregon’s own Aeon Now! and Science Heroes. On Saturday night, it’s time for the fourth annual Art for India event, which gathers art by more than 20 local artists, tasty food and excellent bands in an effort to raise funds to provide education for children in India. The headliner is Empty Space Orchestra, the local buzz-band that expects to do as well in 2011 as the Flask did in 2010. These five folks plays loud, instrumental space-rock that incorporates

both jazz and metal influences. After spending more than a year building a following with its awesome live show, ESO recently recorded its upcoming album at a studio in Sacramento, Calif. That album is due out next year, but you can get a sneak preview by visiting The Bulletin’s music blog, Frequency, at www.bendbulletin.com/frequency. Just scroll down a bit. Find more info on the band at www.myspace.com/esorchestra. Also on Saturday’s bill: Local violinist Julie Southwell and friends, those ubiquitous Lakes, and former Bendites The Autonomics, who recently moved to Portland and have just begun gigging in the big city. L a rry and His Flask, with Lakes, Aeon Now! and Science Heroes; 8 tonight; $7. Art for India with Empty Space Orchestra, The Autonomics, Lakes and Julie Southwell; 5 p.m. Saturday, music starts at 8 p.m.; $10 (with buffet), $5 (concert only), 9 and younger free. Advance tickets available at www .bendticket.com. Both events at Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; art@riseupinternational.com or www.riseupinternational.com. — Ben Salmon


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

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music Upcoming Concerts Dec. 12 — Bro ther Ali and The Grouch (hip-hop), Domino Room, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Dec. 16 — Dick Dale (guitar hero), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Dec. 17 — Sweatshop Union (hip-hop), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Dec. 18 — Crown Point (poprock), JC’s, 541-383-3000. Dec. 18 — The Quick & Easy Boys (funk-rock), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Dec. 29 — Reverend Horton Heat (psychobilly), Midtown Ballroom, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Jan. 8 — Jon Wayne and The Pain (funk-rock), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Jan. 10 — The Steep Canyon Rangers (bluegrass), Sisters High School, 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. Jan. 14 — The Wailers (reggae), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. Jan. 22 — LJ Booth (folk), Harmony House concerts, Sisters, 541-548-2209. Jan. 22 — Cicada Omega (trance blues), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

Grant Sabin plays blues at Silver Moon Bend seems to keep the flame burning for gritty, throwback blues heavy with slide guitars and stomping boots. David Jacobs-Strain, Hillstomp, Cicada Omega, Blackflowers Blacksun — all these folks are passionate cogs in the current revival of muddy, oldschool blues, and all keep coming back to town over and over. They’re not doing it for their health. There must be folks who show up, again and again, to dig the sound. So perhaps young Grant Sabin, the slide/harmonica player from Colorado, will find fertile ground here this week, when he plays two shows in Bend. First up is a date opening for Larry and His Flask at Century Center tonight. See Page 6 for more on that gig. On Saturday, Sabin will fill Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom with his fiery sound, which combines the traditional blues of legends like Son House with the modern urgency of punk rock. His voice is a scratchy, froggy thing that’s perfect for the genre. Hear more of him at www .myspace.com/grantsabinmusic. Grant Sabin, with The Dela Project; 9 p.m. Saturday; $5; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave.,

Yamn Submitted photo

Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

McMenamins hosts Colorado’s Yamn In its official bio, Denver, Colo.’s Yamn calls itself a “high-energy, smooth sonic explosion.” A spin through the songs on their MySpace proves they know what they’re talking about. The band is energetic; “high-energy” may be generous — this is a band that employs a pretty laid-back groove — but there’s energy here. “Smooth sonic explosion,” on the other hand, is a

perfect way to describe Yamn’s sound, as the band blends its jam-band tendencies with bubbly pop music and a little bit of danceable electro-rock. Most importantly, they bring those styles together in a way that’s slick, seamless, and as tight as a hippie’s head wrap during a windy day on the playa. Yamn is a polished, totally pro outfit, and it shows.

But let’s be honest: You just want to noodle-dance. And you can noodle-dance to Yamn. Hot damn! Find more at www.yamnit .com. Yamn; 7 p.m. Wednesday; free; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St.; 541382-5174 or www.mcmenamins .com. — Ben Salmon


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

area clubs BEND

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Get listed At least 10 days prior to publication, e-mail events@bendbulletin.com. Please include date, venue, time and cost.

SUNDAY

MONDAY

MUSIC TYPE: b c

Blues Country

dj f

a

DJ Folk

TUESDAY

h j

Hip-hop Jazz

m p

WEDNESDAY

821 N.W. Wall St., 541-323-2328 147 N.W. Minnesota Ave., 541-388-0116

Bo Restobar 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-617-8880

Century Center 70 S.W. Century Drive

Crossings Lounge 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, 541-389-8810

Domino Room 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-1106

Blacksmith After Dark, 9 pm dj A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm Larry & His Flask, Aeon Now! and more, 8 pm, $7 a (P. 6) The Reputations, 9 pm r/p Slipmat Science presents Roboliquidpop, 8 pm, $2 r/p

Grover’s Pub 939 S.E. Second St., 541-382-5119

JC’s 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-383-3000

Kayo’s 415 N.E. Third St., 541-323-2520

The Autonomics, 9 pm r/p Sagebrush Rock, 8:30 pm r/p

Madhappy Lounge 850 N.W. Brooks St., 541-388-6868

Blacksmith After Dark, 9 pm dj A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm Art for India: ESO, The Autonomics and more, 5 pm, $5-10 r/p (P. 6) The Reputations, 9 pm r/p

Josh Hart, 7 pm r/p

Ladies night with DJ Harlo, 9 pm dj Yamn, 7 pm r/p (P. 7)

Badlands Boogie Band, 9 pm r/p

635 N.W. 14th St., 541-617-9600 25 S.W. Century Drive, 541-389-2558

Open mic, 8 pm

Ladies night w/ Sarah Spice, 10 pm dj Franchot Tone, 7 pm r/p

2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, 541-385-1777 19570 Amber Meadow Drive, 541-728-0095

Jazz Sundays, 2 and 5 pm j

The Out of Hand Band, 9 pm r/p

portello winecafe River Rim Coffeehouse

Badlands Boogie Band, 9 pm r/p JoAnna Lee, 7 pm r/p

Parrilla Grill Players Bar & Grill

James Nicol+Edmond Wadeson, 6:30 pm r/p Karaoke, 8 pm

Sidelines Sports Bar & Grill 1020 N.W. Wall St., 541-385-8898

Grant Sabin, 9 pm, $5 b (P. 7)

Silver Moon Brewing Co. 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-8331

The Summit Saloon & Stage 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., 541-749-2440

Taj Palace 917 N.W. Wall St., 541-330-0774

Tart Bistro 920 N.W. Bond St., 541-385-0828

Tumalo Feed Co. 64619 U.S. Highway 20, 541-382-2202

Lindy Gravelle, 6-9 pm c

Kleverkill, Shovelbelt, 9 pm m Mark Ransom, 9 pm r/p Sagebrush Rock, 8:30 pm r/p Shade 13, 9 pm r/p

700 N.W. Bond St., 541-382-5174 62860 Boyd Acres Road, 541-383-0889

THURSDAY

The Reputations, 8 pm r/p

McMenamins Old St. Francis Northside Pub

w

Americana Rock/Pop World

Glitched Out w/ Sicilian & more, 9 pm dj

Astro Lounge

211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-318-0588

r/p

Bill Keale, 6 pm r/p

5 Fusion & Sushi Bar

The Blacksmith Restaurant

Metal Punk

DJ Steele, 9 pm dj Bellydancing with Rasha, 7 pm Night Under the Covers: Santa Slam, 5 pm Pat Thomas, 9 pm c

Open mic with Tall Adam, 8 pm

DJ Steele, 9 pm dj

VeloSprints championships, 6 pm

John Beland, 9 pm, $7 r/p

Open mic, 8 pm

Josh Hart Project, 7 pm r/p Pat Thomas, 9 pm c Josh Hart Project, 7 pm r/p

Typhoon 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-322-8889

REDMOND Brassie’s Bar Eagle Crest Resort, 541-548-4220

Millennium Cafe 445 S.W. Sixth St., 541-350-0441

Lindy Gravelle, 7-10 pm c

Lindy Gravelle, 7-10 pm c

Live Texas Hold ’em or Omaha, 5 pm

Live Texas Hold ’em or Omaha, 5 pm

Live Texas Hold ’em or Omaha, 12 pm

Live Texas Hold ’em or Omaha, 5 pm

Live Texas Hold ’em or Omaha, 5 pm

SISTERS Cork Cellars Wine Bar 161 Elm St., 541-549-2675

Jeremy Storton, 6-8 pm r/p The Quons, 7 pm r/p

Three Creeks Brewing Co. 721 Desperado Court, 541-549-1963

Live jazz, 6-8 pm j

Thyme at FivePine 1011 Desperado Trail, 541-588-6151

SUNRIVER Owl’s Nest 1 Center Drive, 541-593-3730

The River Pigs, 9 pm r/p

The River Pigs, 9 pm r/p

POWELL BUTTE High Desert Comm. Grange 62855 Powell Butte Highway, 541-420-2204

Barn dance with Frenchy & friends

r/p


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

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PAGE 9

music releases Brian Eno SMALL CRAFT ON A MILK SEA Warp Records Though better known as a sound sculptor and collaborator with U2, Coldplay, and David Byrne within the last 20 years, Brian Eno’s solo work has been no less evocative. Abstract, yes, ambient, yes, but certainly daring. Eno’s new electronic project with fellow improvisational musicians Jon Hopkins and Leo Abrahams is more aggressive and playful (to say nothing of darker) than recent outings. With several of its alien mo-

Jethro Tull STAND UP: 40TH ANNIVERSARY COLLECTOR’S EDITION Chrysalis Records “Stand Up,” Jethro Tull’s 1969 breakout, stands up. If “Thick as a Brick” or “Aqualung” annoys, this deserved, celebratory 40th (really, 41st)anniversary box reminds that Tull was once a hungry, jamming four-piece ensemble, with Ian Anderson pouring out brilliant originals. Disc 1 is “Stand Up” remastered: Tull investigates classical, Celtic, jazz, folk, from “New Day Yesterday,” a clever blues-riffer, to “Bouree,” the Bach takeoff that made the band famous, to “Reasons for Waiting,” proof Anderson can write pretty ballads. “Living in the Past” is here, too, in stereo

ments based on unused tracks from Eno’s soundtrack to “The Lovely Bones,” there is a sad and sinister waft throughout this “Milk Sea.”

Bookended by sonorously placid cuts such as the Roedelius-like “Emerald and Lime,” there are potent mellow-harshing episodes between Eno’s sugary spoonfuls — the rolling, Krautrocking “2 Forms of Anger,” the frantically break-beaten “Horse,” the sizzling “Flint March,” and the lushly exotic yet menacing likes of “Bone Jump” and “Complex Heaven.” Rather than chilling on Eno’s laurels as an innovator or producer, “Small Craft” seems like a wrenching warning of greater restlessness to come. — A.D. Amorosi, The Philadelphia Inquirer

and glorious mono. It might be Tull’s best-written collection. Martin Barre had just joined as guitarist, which he’s been ever since. He transformed the band’s sound and arrangements, and original drummer Clive Bunker and bass man Glenn Cornick were madly propulsive. Extra tunes are here, plus a four-set BBC fling, complete with tape hiss and inyour-living-room vibe. Discs 2 and 3 offer a wild, thrashing, November 1970 concert at Carnegie Hall (by which time pianist John Evan had joined), with eight tracks not released before. Skip the MP3 of Disc 2, get headphones, and listen to the DVD/DTS of Disc 3 — far superior sound. Too bad there’s no video; half the fun of Tull was/is the stage show.

A 45-minute chat with Anderson is informative and piquant. This box, redolent with 1969-1970, gives a long, vivid look at Ian A. and mates in leaping-gnome troubadour white heat. Best of all, it’s got that cool cutout that stands up when you open the front flap! — John Timpane, The Philadelphia Inquirer

discards (“Jimmie Standing in the Rain”), abandoned love (“I Lost You”), romantic paranoia (“Dr. Watson, I Presume”) and myriad other topics in what feels like a sequel song cycle to 2009’s “Secret, Profane & Sugarcane.” This one delves even deeper into

the art-song style, sometimes at the expense of the rootsy Americana fun that characterized its predecessor. Costello and his accomplices cover the gamut — including the Brit pub-rock thump of “National Ransom,” the stunning jazzy pop of “Slow Drag With Josephine” and the dark cabaret lament of “You Hung the Moon.” But anyone who loves the English language should marvel at his poking into its nooks and crannies with phrases such as “ravening maw,” “colliery town,” “fumbled skein” and “vile vaudevillians.” In Costello’s infinitely gifted hands, pop music circa 2010 is anything but “only rock ’n’ roll.” — Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times

Elvis Costello NATIONAL RANSOM Hear Music As a singer, songwriter and observer of human foibles, Elvis Costello is little short of dazzling on his latest outing. It certifies him as both the modern-day Cole Porter for the effortless way he marries sophisticated lyrics with elegant music, and contemporary counterpart to BrechtWeill for his unrelenting skill at creating and inhabiting unforgettable characters and their dark situations. Collaborating once again with T Bone Burnett and his crew of musical magicians, Costello fearlessly takes on rampant greed (the title track), society’s

Buddy Guy LIVING PROOF Jive Records “Living Proof” is as properly complicated as Buddy Guy is and ought to be, and it triggers a couple of different listening responses. One is institutional respect and commercial familiarity. Here’s a great older blues musician still strong of voice and hands, an American improvising maestro, given a bright and contemporary deep-sonics treatment — neither the art-brut roadhouse scuff of his 2001 album “Sweet Tea” nor Sharon Jones-esque analog old-schoolness — with celebrity walk-ons to bolster his case. (There’s B.B. King on “Stay Around a Little Longer.” There’s Carlos Santana on “Where the Blues Begins.”) Some of the songs address aging, in cute lyrics — “74 Years Young,” “Everybody’s Got to Go,” “Stay Around a Little Longer.” You know this category of record: the I’m-Still-Here record. John Lee Hooker has made this record before. B.B. King has made this record. Guy himself, a professional up and down, has made this record several times. But the other response is, oh my, that guitar playing is messy and loud and rude. On the first track, “74 Years Young,” after the sleepwalking verses about how Guy has been around the world and seen it all, his solo claws out of the gate, screaming and scrabbling, suddenly boosted in the

mix. You hear flecks of probably unintended dissonance, and they sound like gifts; you hear his gestural ideas arriving a little too late for the bar line. It’s committed playing, the real thing, and it floods your hearing. On Track 2, “Thank Me Someday,” it happens all over again. Track 3, “On the Road,” again. And then either the in-yourfaceness of the record abates a little, or your ears have just gotten used to it. Anyway, the point is made. You can really hear Guy’s own guitar tone, and it isn’t deep-fried in distortion. He’s been very loud in recent live shows too, and it doesn’t always work. Sometimes it can seem unnatural, unnecessary, a soundboard mistake. What’s wrong with the record is plain. The lyrics’ first-person mythmaking gets trite. The guest appearances sound fainthearted, tailored to the ears of Grammy voters. But the heart of the record is deeply, honorably misbehaved. — Ben Ratliff, The New York Times

Saturday, December 4, 2010 at 3 P.M. & 7 P.M. Sunday, December 5, 2010 at 3 P.M. Bend Senior High School Auditorium Adults: $17 • Children (12 & Under): $6 At the Door - Adults: $20 • Children (12 & Under): $7

TO PURCHASE TICKETS: Box Office: (541) 390-7549

www.centraloregonschoolofballet.com


PAGE 10 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

restaurants

DELI DELIGHTS The Letzer family brings an authentic Jewish deli to Bend By John Gottberg Anderson For T he B ulletin

F

or a decade in the 1950s and ’60s, a sign in the small town of Lancaster, Calif. — on the edge of the Mojave Desert — announced to all who ventured that direction: “Letzer’s Deli … the ultimate sandwich.” The owner of that authentic Jewish delicatessen was Marty Letzer. He subsequently moved to Los Angeles, where he managed such famous delis as Jerry’s, Brent’s and Vroman’s. His employees included his then-young son, Sheridan. Marty passed on, and Sheridan moved with his family many years ago to Oregon. He retired last year after 15 years with Home Depot — the last nine of them in Bend — and a few months later, on July 6, established his own delicatessen. Of course, he named it Letzer’s Deli. His father’s original sign hangs over the front entrance. And he is ably assisted by his son, Gabriel, and nephew, Aidan. Located in the former Big O Bagels shop in Scandia Square on South Division Street near the Jackalope Grill, Letzer’s lives up to its considerable pedigree.

Holiday specials

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Letzer’s Deli in Bend serves this generous portion of pastrami, corned beef and Swiss on rye.

Letzer’s Deli Location: 1155 S.W. Division St. (Scandia Square), Bend Hours: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday Price range: Sandwiches $4.75 to $9.75, other dishes $3 to $6.50

Credit cards: American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa Kids’ menu: Yes Vegetarian menu: Salads, pickles and cheesecake Alcoholic beverages: No Outdoor seating: Limited

We are presently in the week of Hanukkah, the annual eight-day Jewish “festival of lights.” In Central Oregon as elsewhere around the world, families celebrate by lighting the candles of the menorah, spinning the dreidel, and eating copious quantities of latkes (potato pancakes) and other traditional foods. As Bend’s only dedicated Jewish delicatessen, Letzer’s finds itself in particular demand at this time of year, especially in terms of catering. “We’re getting great support from the local Jewish community,” Sheridan Letzer said. “And we’re doing some things with one of the temples in town.” Especially popular for the holiday are kosher meats and such foods as knishes, potato-and-chicken dumplings that are traditional snack fare. Continued next page

Reservations: No Contact: 541-306-4696 or www.letzersdeli.com

Scorecard OVERALL: AFood: A-. Outstanding sandwiches and other foods; only the cabbage dishes are weak.

Service: A. Orders are quickly and courteously taken, then delivered to waiting patrons. Atmosphere: C. Clean and spacious, but otherwise lacking in traditional ambience. Value: A. Quantity and quality prevail in huge sandwiches and time-honored Jewish dishes.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

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restaurants From previous page Meats, including beef tongue, liver and smoked whitefish, are always available by the pound. Knishes appear on the original deli menu at just $3 a pop, but they will likely be removed at the next revision and offered only on special occasions. “People just weren’t ordering them,” said Gabriel Letzer. That’s odd, because they certainly are ordering everything else. “Nobody else in Bend has this unique product, in terms of quality or quantity,” trumpets Sheridan Letzer. “We offer the right product at the right price. ‘The ultimate sandwich’ was our tagline all the way from Lancaster, and it’s still true today.” Sheridan might be forgiven for his promotional pitch. In my years in Bend, I have never been served a larger sandwich than I have at Letzer’s.

Giant sandwiches To be honest, I was stunned at the size of my first Letzer’s sandwich: corned beef, pastrami and Swiss cheese on crusty but untoasted rye bread, dressed with minced tomatoes and Thousand Island dressing. Even though the sandwich was cut diagonally in half, there was no way that I could put my mouth around the whole thing for even a single bite. My companion gauged its thickness at 6 inches with a small tape measure. I was forced to disassemble it. This was not a travesty. It was awkward only because the two meats were separated by a third slice of rye — made, incidentally, by Dave Cohen of Rockin’ Daves Bagel Bistro — and I had to use the cheese as a substitute cover for half of my sandwich. The meal turned into two lunches in successive days, thanks to a take-home box. And I loved this sandwich not just for its layer after layer of thinly sliced meats: perhaps a dozen layers folded one on top of the next. It was lean, tasty meat, the kind that told me the Letzers are very careful in purchasing, as Sheridan said, a top-quality product. The meal was accompanied by a large dill pickle (sliced lengthwise) and a pickled wedge of green tomato. It also came with a choice of potato salad or coleslaw. I was glad to have chosen the former, which had just the right amount of mustard and mayonnaise to keep the salad dry, but not too dry. I sampled my friend’s slaw, and we both agreed that it had a strong vinegar flavor and was

N extw eek:T haiO Visit www. bendbulletin.com /restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants.

not as moist as we prefer.

Jewish perspective My companion, who is herself of Jewish heritage and who has eaten at many of the well-known delis in Los Angeles, had some distinct opinions about Letzer’s food on two separate visits. Her chopped liver-and-egg salad sandwich, she said, was “almost as good as Mom’s.” She appreciated that the liver had been mixed with chicken fat, and that the flavor was appropriately rich but not overly salty. Although I liked the matzo ball soup, my friend was somewhat disappointed, as one often can be when comparing a recipe to Mom’s. The unleavened dumpling, she said, lacked seasoning. But I found the chicken broth delicious, made with lots of dark chicken meat and bits of onion, celery and carrot. We both found the knockwurst delicious. But neither of us cared much for the generous portion of sauerkraut that accompanied it. Like the coleslaw, it was dry and heavily flavored with vinegar. I like kraut when it is sweeter and more peppery. A sandwich of pastrami, turkey and Swiss on challah bread was as large and as good as the others. This one was of interest to us because it was served in braided challah, an egg-rich bread that is ideally light and honey-sweetened. We found it heavy and not as sweet as we like. It’s hard to go wrong, however, with lox (sliced, smoked salmon) and cream cheese on a toasted bagel. Served with slices of tomato and onion, it was very good. And the New York-style cheesecake, dubbed “Laurie’s luscious cheesecake,” was superb. Marvelously creamy, made with sour cream and wrapped in a Graham-cracker crust, it was the sort of dessert that every pastry chef should have as a part of his or her repertoire.

Lacking ambience Other than the cabbage dishes, my only complaints about Letzer’s are focused on its ambience — or lack thereof.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Gabriel Letzer, left, works with his father, Sheridan Letzer, right, at the family deli in Bend. Letzer’s Deli uses kosher meats on its sandwiches. The atmosphere is strictly functional. Six tables seat about 20 people, and there are another few seats at bars facing outward toward the parking lot. Little attention has been given to putting anything on the walls, with the exception of a few framed photos of patriarch Marty Letzer at his original California deli. There’s a cooler with soft drinks and a soda machine, but no cups for water, which patrons must request when they order at the counter. There’s a large glass case where deli meats might be displayed, but on both of my visits, it was empty. But Letzer’s doesn’t need adornment to draw attention away from what it does best. Orders are quickly and courteously taken — by Gabriel, on both of my visits — and prepared in the kitchen by Sheridan, who keeps an eye on proceedings through an open window. Grandpa Marty would have been proud.

Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center on Bend’s north side. Breakfast and lunch are priced in the $6 to $10 range. Cheerleaders previously was located on Third Street near Greenwood Avenue, in a site now occupied by Taylor’s Sausage. Open 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. every day. 3081 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-330-0631.

2405); 3098 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend (541-382-0674); 1565 Odem Medo Road, Redmond (541-9230400; www.sharis.com. Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker (B+): A good option for enjoying a light meal while watching the big game, Rivals is succeeding in a venue where other restaurants have failed. Reasonably priced burgers, prompt service and a laid-back ambience extend to a large poker room in the rear. Open 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m. Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 2 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771, www.rivalsbend.com. Anthony’s at the Old Mill (B): Despite a highly professional wait staff, Anthony’s falls short of its considerable promise. Grilled fish and chowder are good but the recipes are unimaginative, the menu overpriced and the ambience lacking in intimacy. Open 11:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday, 11:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 9:30 p.m. Sunday. 475 S.W. Powerhouse Drive (in the Old Mill District), Bend; 541389-8998; www.anthonys.com/ restaurants/info/bend.html.

RECENT REVIEWS Shari’s Restaurants (B+): These family-friendly restaurants, part of an Oregon-based chain, are known for their distinctive, six-sided design. Casual and well-lit, they feature solid comfort food at reasonable prices with homespun service, and are open 24 hours daily. 61135 S. Highway 97, Bend (541-389-

Correction A story headlined “Worth the gamble,” which appeared Friday, Nov. 19 on Page 10 of GO! Magazine, contained incorrect information about outdoor dining at Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker. The restaurant does have an outdoor dining area. The Bulletin regrets the error.

What Are You Doing for the Holidays?

John Gottberg Anderson can be reached at janderson@ bendbulletin.com.

SMALL BITES Spork, the mobile kitchen that most often parks its Airstream trailer on 14th Street near Commerce Avenue, has closed for the winter and will not reopen until March. In the interim, executive chef Jeff Hunt, previously of Marz, and his partners, former Grove Cantina owners Chris Lohrey and Erica Reilly, will be available to work holiday parties and other special events. 541-390-0946, www.sporkbend .com. Cheerleaders Grill and Sports Pub is now firmly established in its new location beside the

• Dec. 11th - Chanterelle Signature Dinner

• Dec. 31st - New Year’s Eve Party and Overnight Accommodations!

Dec. 24th - Christmas Eve Dinner

Pronghornclub.com ~ 541-693-5300 ~ reservations@pronghornclub.com ~


PAGE 12 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

fine arts

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Don Delach, playing George, and Anna Johnson, playing Charlotte, rehearse a scene in “Moon Over Buffalo.”

Barrel A of laughs

Wit, emotions collide in funny ‘Moon Over Buffalo’ at CTC

By David Jasper • The Bulletin mid the quick pace, physical comedy and witty dialogue in Cascades Theatrical Company’s production of the Ken Ludwig comedy “Moon Over Buffalo,” there’s a subtle theme that asks

something like this: Where does theater fit in a world where people can stay home to get their entertainment fix? The play, which debuted on Broadway in 1995, opens tonight at Greenwood Playhouse in Bend (see “If you go”). It’s set in 1953, when television was beginning to transmit its spell over American households. Protagonists George and Charlotte Hay are aging stage and film actors whose star wattage and livelihoods are threatened by TV, even as they look down their noses at it. Director Kimberli Colbourne suggests this theme has plenty of relevance today. “It’s interesting. We find ourselves on an-

other cusp, in a way, with digital media and 3-D televisions and all this crazy stuff,” she said. “Again, we have to ask ourselves, is there value in live performance, and what is it that live performance does for us? What relationship can we have with a live performance that we can’t have with movies or television?” Of course, if you’ve seen this play before, you know that the other threat to the Hays’ way of life is George’s misbehavior. Continued next page


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

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PAGE 13

fine arts From previous page The action takes place primarily in a Buffalo theater’s green room, that backstage area of mismatched furniture and ghosts of productions past where actors wait when not on stage. It is there that we first see George (played by Don Delach) and Charlotte (Anna Johnson) unmasked. Though they’ve also starred in films, what goes up must come down, and the two are at the moment doing repertory theater in Buffalo, alternating between performances of “Private Lives” and “Cyrano De Bergerac.” Among the troubles they face — including being unable to make payroll and a cast member who abandoned ship — is the fact that George strayed one night in Ohio and got Eileen, a young member of the company, in trouble (in the euphemism-forpregnant sense). Meanwhile, George and Charlotte’s daughter, Roz (Jenn

Cascade Winds band concert set for Sunday Cascade Winds Symphonic Band will perform its first concert of the season at 2 p.m. Sunday at Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend. Directed by Dan Judd, the band will perform music by Leroy Anderson, Malcolm Arnold, Percy Grainger, Robert Russell Bennett, Sam Hazo, Henry Fillmore and others. The concert is free, but donations are accepted. Contact: 541-593-1635 or www .cascadewinds.org.

Cyclocross event mixes art and bikes The three-day “Cross Culture: Bike + Art Love Festival” launches Thursday, part of the USA Cycling Cyclo-Cross National Championships. “This is the second year we’ve partnered with Cross Culture to showcase Bend’s vibrant arts community to visitors from across the country,” a press release quotes Visit Bend CEO Doug La Placa as saying. “There’s so much amazing creativity associated with bike culture, and we’re honored to be

If you go What: Cascades Theatrical Company presents “Moon Over Buffalo” by Ken Ludwig When: Opens at 7:30 tonight and runs through Dec. 19; performances at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sundays Where: Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost: $20 for adults, $15 for seniors, $12 for students Contact: 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org

Copsey), who left the company in hot pursuit of a stable, normal life, comes to town with her likable fiance, Howard (Justin Mason). Howard is clearly out of his weatherman element, although he happens to be a big fan of the Hays. Charming in his goofy way, he’ll find a rival for Roz’s affection in her former flame, Paul (Ed Victor), the company’s stage manager. Just as George’s theater life threatens to implode, he learns that Frank Capra, in need of an actor, is on his way to Buf-

falo to catch George in performance. Before that can happen, however, Charlotte makes a drastic change of life plan, and George’s ensuing bender threatens his shot at entertainment redemption. Will Charlotte come to her senses in time for the matinee? Will George sober up in time for Capra’s visit? You’ll have to leave home to find out. Ludwig’s plays are just “funny, funny shows,” said director Colbourne, a professional actor who

part of sharing it.” Things begin with a free storytelling event called SpokeN-Word at 8:30 p.m. Thursday at portello winecafe, 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend. The event continues Dec. 10 with an art walk featuring photography, painting, handmade bikes, zines, film and live music. Contact: 541-747-2233 or www .bendlovesbikes.com.

Gallery (834 N.W. Brooks St.), the featured artist for December and January is Carol Jacquet, whose landscape oil paintings show in “Travels with Carol.” • Watercolorist Keith Sluder is showing his work at Perspectives Fine Art Gallery, 130 Minnesota Ave., and will be on hand at the gallery during First Friday.

First Friday Gallery Walk kicks off tonight The first Friday of the month — tonight — means art, wine and hors d’oeuvres at galleries around Bend from roughly 5 to 9 p.m. Here are a few of the offerings: • Opening tonight and showing through December, Tumalo Art Co. (450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407) will feature “Small Treasures,” a show of art in miniature by gallery artists. • Bend artist Barbara Largent will open Largent Studios, located at 711 N.W. Broadway, from 5 to 10 p.m., offering the public a glimpse of her oil, acrylic, pastel, watercolor and mixed-media works, as well as a line of cards and prints based on her work. • At Sage Custom Framing and

Correction A brief with the headline “‘Teeny Tiny Art Show’ makes a big splash,” which appeared on Page 13 of the Nov. 26 issue of GO! Magazine, gave an incor-

Ballet school presents ‘The Nutcracker’ Central Oregon School of Ballet is celebrating its 25th anniversary production of “The Nutcracker” this weekend at Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St. The famed ballet, with a score by Tchaikovsky and libretto adapted from E.T.A. Hoffman’s “The Nutcracker and the Mouse King,” will be performed at 3 and 7 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Advance tickets are $17 for adults, $6 for children at www .centraloregonschoolofballet.com. Online ticket sales end one hour before each performance. Door price is $20 for adults, $7 for children. Contact: 541-390-7549 or www .centraloregonschoolofballet.com. — David Jasper

rect address and phone number for High Desert Gallery in Bend. The correct address is 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend. The correct phone number is 541-388-8964. The Bulletin regrets the errors.

also lends her talents to community theater companies. While she hasn’t starred in this particular Ludwig play before, Colbourne has acted in the contemporary playwright’s “Lend Me a Tenor,” deemed “one of the two great farces by a living writer” by The New York Times. “They’re just madcap and wacky … they’re a real gas to work on. They’re always fun as an actor to do,” she said of Ludwig’s plays. “Moon Over Buffalo,” which starred Carol Burnett in a Tony-nominated turn on Broadway, is pretty fun for the audience, too. “I hope that everybody will come and have a hearty laugh

“I hope that everybody will come and have a hearty laugh in the midst of all of their holiday madness.” — Kimberli Colbourne, director

in the midst of all of their holiday madness,” Colbourne added. “There’s nothing particularly Christmasy about the show, but it’s just a barrel of laughs.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@ bendbulletin.com.


PAGE 14 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

fine arts ART EXHIBITS AMBIANCE ART CO-OP: Featuring works by Mitch and Michelle Deaderick; through December; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. AREA HOME FURNISHINGS & DESIGN: Featuring works by local artists and students from the Redmond School District; 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Saturday; 418 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-389-3739. ART BY KNIGHT: Featuring oil paintings by Laurel Knight and bronze sculpture by Steven L. Knight; 236 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-6337488 or www.ArtbyKnight.com. ARTISTS’ GALLERY SUNRIVER VILLAGE: Featuring photography by Tammy Goen and chain-saw works by Ray Anguiano; through Sunday; 57100 Beaver Drive, Suite 120, Building 23, Sunriver; 541-788-2486. ARTS CENTRAL: Featuring works and a fundraising sale from Art Potters for Education; through December; 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-317-9324. ATELIER 6000: Featuring “Just Desserts,” sweet prints and food landscapes in a variety of media; through Jan. 28, reception from 5:308:30 tonight; 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-3308759 or www.atelier6000.com. AZURA STUDIO: Featuring acrylic paintings by Charles H. Chamberlain; through Feb. 1; 856 N.W. Bond St., Unit 3, Bend; 541-385-1846. BEND FURNITURE AND DESIGN: Featuring pottery by Annie Dyer; 2797 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Suite 500, Bend; 541-633-7250. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Art of Photography”; through January; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1037. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of

Submitted photo

“Winter Creek,” by Bart Walker, will be on display through December at Mockingbird Gallery. View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright, and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www.canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. DOUGLAS FINE JEWELRY DESIGN: Featuring works by Steven Douglas; 920 N.W. Bond St., Suite 106, Bend; 541-389-2901.

FEATURING Landscape Oil Paintings by

CAROL JACQUET “Travels with Carol” NOW THROUGH JANUARY VISIT US ON FIRST FRIDAY

BAR & GRILL

JUDIE WELCOMES YOU TO THE

D & D BAR & GRILL WE HAVE THE

NFL TICKET! WITH 7 TV’S!

BREAKFAST SPECIAL DAILY DECEMBER 4TH Prime Rib Dinner Special

CUSTOM PICTURE FRAMING

$11.95 927 NW Bond St. 541-382-4592

834 NW Brooks Street Bend, Oregon 97701 Behind the Tower Theatre

541.382.5884

BAR & GRILL

EASTLAKE FRAMING: Featuring photography by Christian Heeb; through December, reception from 5-8 tonight; 1335 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; 541-389-3770. FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “Art in the Atrium,” photography by Vern Bartley and works by gallery artists; through Jan. 3, reception from 5-8 tonight; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. FURNISH.: Featuring works by Marjorie Wood Hamlin; 761 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-617-8911. THE GALLERY AT THE PINCKNEY CENTER: Featuring “Retrospective: A Passionate Journey with Paint,” works by Judy Hoiness; through Dec. 10; Pinckney Center for the Arts, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-5498683 or www.art-lorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HIGH DESERT FRAMEWORKS!: Featuring greeting cards and prints by several artists; through January; 61 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-549-6250 or www. highdesertframeworks.com. HIGH DESERT GALLERY OF BEND: Featuring “Conversations,” works by Karin Richardson; through Dec. 15; also featuring “Teeny Tiny Art Show”; through Jan. 4, reception from 5-9 tonight; 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-8964. HIGH DESERT GALLERY OF SISTERS: Featuring works by Grace Bishko, Paul Alan Bennett and Kathy Deggendorfer; through January; 281 W. Cascade

Ave., Sisters; 541-549-6250 or www.highdesertgallery.com. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring “James B. Thompson: The Vanishing Landscape,” paintings and prints of the American West; through Jan. 3; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. THE HUB HEALING ARTS CENTER: Featuring mixed-media collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; Dawson Station, 219 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-6575. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www.jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jill Haney-Neal; 20512 Nels Anderson Place, Building 3, Bend; 541-6176078 or www.jillnealgallery.com. KAREN BANDY STUDIO: Featuring “An Evolution of Fine Art Jewelry and Paintings”; through December, reception from 6-8 tonight; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; 541-388-0155. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson, Katherine Taylor, Donna Young and more; 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-388-4404 or www.lahainagalleries.com. LARGENT STUDIOS: Featuring works by Barbara Largent; 5-10 tonight; 711 N.W. Broadway St., Bend; 541-5500907 or barblargent@hotmail.com. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com.

MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “Western Visions,” works by Bart Walker and Kent R. Wallis; through December, reception from 5-9 tonight; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www. mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixedmedia collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-6694. PEACE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: Featuring works by Brianna Murphy; reception from 5:30-9 tonight; 816 N.W. Hill St., Bend; 541-325-3174 or www.pcoco.org. PERSPECTIVES FINE ART GALLERY: Featuring works by Keith Sluder; reception from 5 to 9 tonight; 130 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541388-7858 or www.keithsluder.com. POETHOUSE ART: Featuring resident artists; 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-728-0756. RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring “All That Glitters …,” works by the gallery membership; through December; 103 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-3176. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring “Travels with Carol,” landscape oil paintings by Carol Jacquet; through Jan. 29, reception from 5-9 tonight; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS ART WORKS: Featuring “Ice Gazing,” photography by Lynn Woodward; through December; 204 W. Adams St., Sisters; 541-420-9695. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SODA CREEK GALLERY: Featuring originals and prints of Western, wildlife and landscape paintings; 183 E. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0600. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring works by Cameron Kaseberg and Chandra vanEijnsbergen; through January; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Mike Smith, Joyce Clark and Helen Brown; through Jan. 18; 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-382-9398. TBD LOFT: Featuring “Community Portrait: Who Are We?,” an evolving exhibit by various artists; through December; 856 N.W. Bond St., Suite 2, Bend; 541-388-7558. TETHEROW AT THE FRANKLIN CROSSING BUILDING: Featuring paintings of the High Desert by local artist David Wachs; corner of Franklin Avenue and Bond Street, Bend; www.wordsideas.blogspot.com. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring “Small Treasures,” works in miniature by gallery artists; through December, reception from 5-9 tonight; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-385-9144 or www.tumaloartco.com.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

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PAGE 15

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Sutton Mountain

Scout Camp Trail

I

f you can bear the boring approach, Sutton Moun-

tain’s basalt cliffs offer a fun scramble at the top and picturesque views from the summit. It’s a place to cling to fall before winter snows arrive or to revel in wildflowers next spring.

If you go Getting there: From Prineville, drive east 47 miles to Mitchell, then turn left (north) on state Road 207. Note mile marker 16, and proceed one mile to a turnout on the right side of the road. (Milepost 15 may be missing.) The trailhead is on the opposite side of the road. Cost: Free Difficulty: Moderate Contact: Bureau of Land Management, Prineville District, 541-416-6700

— Bulletin staff 207

Be tsy Cliff / The Bulletin ile photo

The Scout Camp Trail offers access to the Deschutes River canyon near Crooked River Ranch.

have been developed by the

in

su

la

Cr oo ke d Dr .

Geneva View Loop Rd.

Ri ve r

Deschutes River

Meadow Dr. Trailhead

Scout Camp Trail

Quail Rd.

er Riv tes hu sc De

chutes and Crooked rivers. The trail has sharp descents and

in the Deschutes River canyon. — Bulletin staff

If you go Getting there: Traveling north from Redmond on U.S. Highway 97, turn left (west) on Lower Bridge Road (toward Crooked River Ranch) just north of Terrebonne. After two miles, turn right on 43rd Street, go 1.7 miles. Turn left on Chinook Drive and go 2.3 miles. Turn left on Mustang Road and go 1.1 miles. Turn right on Shad Road and go 1.4

Quail Rd.

with solace and dramatic scenery

To Madras

Sutton Mountain

O R E G O N

97

MILES 0

0.5

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Rainbow Rd.

served for agile hikers who, if they

Mitchell

Bend

CROOKED RIVER RANCH

rocky areas that may be best reventure here, will be rewarded

Mitchell

Meadow Dr.

CROOKED RIVER RANCH

Rim Rd.

give people safe routes to the Des-

207

207

. Dr

over the past couple of years to

26

Scout Camp Trail

la su nin

Bureau of Land Management

Geneva View Loopp Rd. Rd P en

Area of detail

Pe

T

his is among the trails that

John Day Fossil Beds Painted Hills Unit

Lower Bridge Rd.

97

Terrebonne To Redmond Greg Cross / The Bulletin

miles. Turn right on Peninsula Drive and go 3.2 miles. Turn left on Meadow Road and go 0.5 miles. Turn right on Scout Camp Trail, go 0.2 miles and park at the end of the road. Cost: Free Difficulty: Moderate to difficult Contact: Bureau of Land Management, Prineville District, 541-416-6700


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER THE BULLETIN 3, 2010 • FRID

this w CHRISTMAS KAYAKERS FLOAT

BEND CHRISTMAS

TODAY

SATURDAY

What: Parade theme is “Christmas Carol Parade.” Children watch entries from last parade file past. When: Noon

I’LL BE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS HOME TOUR

TODAY & SATURDAY What: Kayaks and canoes decorated with lights paddle a loop beginning at the bridge at Galveston Avenue. Stuart Baronti, dressed as Santa Claus, paddles down the Deschutes River prior to the 2007 float.

TODAY CERAMICS SALE: COCC art students, faculty and volunteers present uniquely handcrafted ceramics for sale in Pence Hall; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. I’LL BE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS HOME TOUR: See a home decorated in holiday style, with more than 40 decorated Christmas trees, wall hangings and more, then visit a second nearby home; proceeds benefit the Children’s Vision Foundation, Deschutes Historical Center and Williams Syndrome Association; $5 in advance, $6 at the door; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; tour home, 21163 Clairaway Ave., Bend; 541-330-3907. HAT AND SCARF SEW-A-THON: Cut and sew hats and scarves for children attending the Wonderland Express holiday party; free; 1-4 p.m.; Cynthia’s Sewing Center, 20225 Badger Road, Bend; 541-383-1999. CHRISTMAS KAYAKERS FLOAT: Kayaks and canoes decorated with lights paddle a loop beginning at the bridge at Galveston Avenue; free; 4:15 p.m. gathering, 5 p.m. float; Mirror Pond, Deschutes River at Drake Park, Bend; 541-330-9586. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5-9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend. (Story, Page 13) STARLITE GALA: Featuring live entertainment, gourmet dinner, live and silent auctions and dancing; proceeds benefit St. Thomas Academy of Redmond; $60; 5:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls

When: 4:15 p.m. gathering, 5 p.m. float Where: Mirror Pond, Deschutes River at Drake Park, Bend Cost: Free Contact: 541-330-9586

Road, Redmond; 541-923-3390. “LIGHT UP A LIFE”: Light a candle in honor of loved ones; followed by a reception; donations accepted; 6-8 p.m.; Mountain View Hospital, 470 N.E. A St., Madras; 541-460-4030. “THE MAFIOSO MURDERS”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. CHRISTMAS PLAY: A festive evening featuring the play, “Mary, Did You Know?”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Real Life Christian Church, 2880 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-312-8844. “STORYBOOK CHRISTMAS”: Bend Theatre for Young People presents Santa’s elves rewriting classic fairy tales with contemporary twists; $8, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-419-1395, bendtheatre4youngpeople@gmail. com or www.bendtheatre.org. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-5046721 or http://bendpac.org. “ELF”: A screening of the PG-rated holiday movie starring Will Ferrell; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; with champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.;

What: See a home decorated in holiday style, with more than 40 decorated Christmas trees, wall hangings and more, then visit a second nearby home; proceeds benefit the Children’s Vision Foundation, Deschutes Historical Center and Williams Syndrome Association.

AREA 97 CLUBS See what’s playing at local night spots on Page 8. Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical. org. (Story, Page 12) JUICE NEWTON: The California-based country musician performs; ages 21 and older; $20-$30; 8 p.m.; KahNee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541553-1112 or http://kahneeta.com. RISE UP BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring Larry and His Flask, Lakes, Science Heroes and Aeon Now!; $7; 8 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; art@riseupinternational. com or www.riseupinternational. com. (Story, Page 6) CONCRETE COWBOYS: Portlandbased country band performs; $3; 8:30 p.m.; Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-553-1112.

SATURDAY Dec. 4 VFW BREAKFAST: Community champagne breakfast with fruit, coffee and more; $7.50; 8-10 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. CROOKED RIVER RANCH OLDE FASHIONED CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION: Includes visits with Santa, a parade, an illumination of the ranch Christmas tree and more; free; 10 a.m., 2 p.m. parade, 4:15 p.m. tree lighting; Crooked River Ranch Administration Building, 5195 S.W. Clubhouse Drive; 541-548-8939.

Decorations fill the home of Susan Jorgensen during the 2008 tour. When: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Where: Tour home, 21163 Clairaway Ave., Bend Cost: $5 in advance, $6 at the door Contact: 541-330-3907

I’LL BE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS HOME TOUR: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the tour home; see Today’s listing for details. TEMPLE GRANDIN: The Oregon Cattlemen’s Association’s Annual Convention presents world-renowned cattle care advocate Temple Grandin; $10; 10:30 a.m.; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-389-3111. FESTIVAL OF TREES: The 27th annual event showcases decorated Christmas trees, wreaths and more; with music, refreshments and visits with Santa; proceeds benefit RedmondSisters Hospice; free daytime family festivities, $40 evening event; 11 a.m.2 p.m. family festivities, 5 p.m. evening gala, 7:30 p.m. tree auction; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-7483. PET PHOTOS WITH SANTA: Take a photo of Santa Claus with your pet; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; free with donation to the Humane Society; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond Thrift & Gifts, 1776 S. Highway 97; 541-923-8558. CIVIL WAR FOOTBALL GAME FUNDRAISER: Crook County Foundation hosts the civil war clash between the Ducks and the Beavers on Pine Theater’s big screen; games and tailgate party food included; $25; 11:30 a.m.; Pine Theater, 214 N. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6909. JINGLE BELL RUN/WALK FOR ARTHRITIS: Runners and walkers don festive holiday costumes for this yearly 5K run and walk; proceeds benefit the Arthritis Foundation; $20, $10 children 12 and younger; 9:30 a.m. registration, 11:30-11:45 a.m. races begin; downtown Bend; 503245-5695, klowry@arthritis.org or http://bendjinglebellrun.kintera.org.

BEND CHRISTMAS PARADE: Parade theme is “Christmas Carols on Parade”; free; noon; downtown Bend; 541-388-3879. CIVIL WAR FUNDRAISER: Watch the Ducks and the Beavers clash on a big screen; proceeds benefit Ephesians Vision Ministries; $20; noon; Ephesians Vision Ministries, 711 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 541-323-2882. CIVIL WAR FUNDRAISER: Watch the civil war game between the University of Oregon and Oregon State University, with food, drinks and an auction; proceeds benefit New Generations Childhood Development Center; $40, $20 ages 17 and younger; noon; Mavericks at Sunriver, 18135 Cottonwood Road; 541-593-6135. HAT AND SCARF SEW-A-THON: Cut and sew hats and scarves for children attending the Wonderland Express holiday party; free; 1-4 p.m.; Cynthia’s Sewing Center, 20225 Badger Road, Bend; 541-383-1999. “STORYBOOK CHRISTMAS”: 2 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church; see Today’s listing for details. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger, $25 families; 2 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-5046721 or http://bendpac.org. BELLUS VOCIS CHOIR FALL CONCERT: The choir performs under the direction of James Knox; $6, $5 students and seniors; 2 p.m., doors open 1:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. “THE NUTCRACKER”: The Central Oregon School of Ballet performs the classic dance; $17 in advance,


AY, DECEMBER THE BULLETIN 3, 2010• FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

week

PAGE 17

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

PARADE

‘THE NUTCRACKER’

Y

SATURDAY & SUNDAY

s on year’s

Where: Downtown Bend Cost: Free Contact: 541-388-3879

TEMPLE GRANDIN

SATURDAY What: The Oregon Cattlemen’s Association’s Annual Convention presents worldrenowned cattle care advocate Temple Grandin. When: 10:30 a.m.

$20 at the door; $6 ages 12 and younger in advance, $7 at the door; 3 and 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-390-7549 or www.centraloregonschoolofballet .com. (Story, Page 13) ART FOR INDIA: Fourth annual event features canvas art, an auction, slide show, live music and more; benefits underprivileged children in India; $10 with buffet, $5 concert only, free ages 9 and younger; 5 p.m. dinner, 8 p.m. concert; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; art@ riseupinternational.com or www. riseupinternational.com. (Story, Page 6) ST. FRANCIS CHRISTMAS FAIRE: A spaghetti dinner, with a silent auction, raffle and food sale; proceeds benefit St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church; free admission, $4-$22 for dinner; 5 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3631. LA PINE HOLIDAY LIGHTS PARADE: Conveyances of all types are decorated with lights; free; 6 p.m.; downtown La Pine; 541-5369771 or director@lapine.org. “THE MAFIOSO MURDERS”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “HIGH DESERT NUTCRACKER”: Redmond School of Dance presents a Central Oregon version of the classic ballet; $5; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-548-6957. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: 7:30 p.m. at Greenwood Playhouse; see Today’s listing for details. CONCRETE COWBOYS: Portlandbased country band performs; $3;

8:30 p.m.; Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-553-1112. GRANT SABIN: The Colorado-based blues and indie folk act performs, with The Dela Project; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. (Story, Page 7)

SUNDAY Dec. 5 PHOTOS WITH FRONTIER SANTA: Take pictures with a Victorian-era Father Christmas and listen to live music by the Thorn Hollow String Band; proceeds benefit the museum’s educational programs; $10 plus museum admission, $5 for museum members; 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-5451. “HIGH DESERT NUTCRACKER”: Redmond School of Dance presents the classic holiday ballet, in a style inspired by Central Oregon people and culture; $5; 2 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-548-6957 or http://redmondschoolofdance.com. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: 2 p.m. at Greenwood Playhouse; see Today’s listing for details. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: 2 p.m. at Bend Performing Arts Center; see Saturday’s listing for details. BELLUS VOCIS CHOIR FALL CONCERT: The choir performs under the direction of James Knox; $6, $5 students and seniors; 2 p.m., doors open 1:30

Where: The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend Cost: $10 Contact: 541-389-3111

p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. BUNCO PARTY: Featuring games, prizes and refreshments; proceeds benefit Prineville Habitat for Humanity; $5; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. CASCADE WINDS SYMPHONIC BAND: The band performs music by Leroy Anderson, Malcolm Arnold, and Percy Grainger under the direction of Dan Judd; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-593-1635 or www. cascadewinds.org. (Story, Page 13) AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Heyoka Merrifield talks about his works, with live music and a screening of “Sundancing with the Muse”; $7; 2:305:30 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-323-1885. “THE NUTCRACKER”: 3 p.m. at Bend High School; see Saturday’s listing for details. “THE MAFIOSO MURDERS”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 3:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com.

MONDAY Dec. 6 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Year-end book party; bring a favorite book or two to share with the group; free; noon-1 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7040 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. HUMANE GOOSE MANAGEMENT: Screening of a film and discussion

What: The Central Oregon School of Ballet performs the classic dance. Dancers perform the ballet last year. When: 3 p.m. both days, and 7 p.m. Saturday Where: Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.

HOLIDAY BAZAARS ’Tis the season, Page 20. of nonlethal goose management practices; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-280-0802.

TUESDAY Dec. 7 TOTALLY AWESOME ’80S HOLIDAY PARTY: Dress up in ’80s fashions, with music, dancing, food, a costume contest and more; registration recommended; proceeds benefit the Serendipity West Foundation; $30; 6-9 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; 541-350-8201. GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “Blue Gold: World Water Wars,” an award-winning film about the world water crisis and the privatization of water; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY Dec. 8 MOVIE NIGHT AND POTLUCK: A screening of “Food Fight,” with a dessert potluck; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; Grandview Hall, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-504-4040 or slowfoodhighdesert@gmail.com. BÉLA FLECK THE FLECKTONES: The bluegrass-jazz fusion act performs a holiday concert, with Alash; proceeds

Cost: $17 in advance, $20 at the door; $6 ages 12 and younger in advance, $7 at the door Contact: 541-390-7549 or www .centraloregonschoolofballet.com Courtesy Chandler Photography

benefit KPOV; $33-$47, with fees in advance; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-322-0863 or www.kpov.org. (Story, Page 3) SURGERY AND RECOVERY PRESENTATION: Hear about Adam Craig’s ACL surgery and rehabilitation, with Q&A with elite cycling racers; proceeds benefit NeighborImpact; $5 or three cans of food; 7 p.m.; Rebound Physical Therapy, 155 S.W. Century Drive , Bend; 541-585-2540. YAMN: The trance-fusion band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. (Story, Page 7) “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: 7:30 p.m. at Greenwood Playhouse; see Today’s listing for details.

THURSDAY Dec. 9 RUBBISH RENEWED ECO FASHION SHOW: Sustainable fashion show fusing environmental responsibility and funky fashion; proceeds benefit REALMS Charter School’s arts program; $10; 5 p.m. doors, 6 p.m. all ages, 8 p.m. ages 21 and older; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.realmschool.org. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: 7 p.m. at Bend Performing Arts Center; see Saturday’s listing for details. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: 7:30 p.m. at Greenwood Playhouse; see Today’s listing for details. SPOKE-N-WORD: Storytelling forum as part of the Cross Culture arts festival celebrating bikes and art in Bend; free; 8:30 p.m.; portello winecafe, 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-647-2233. (Story, Page 13)


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planning ahead Right Around the Corner DEC. 10-12 — “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; SOLD OUT Dec. 10, $10, $5 ages 12 and younger, $25 families Dec. 11-12; 7 p.m. Dec. 10, 2 p.m. Dec. 11-12; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www.bendpac.org. DEC. 10 & 12 — HOLIDAY MAGIC CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Cascade Chorale performs under the direction of James Knox with soloist Lindy Gravelle; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Resources for Independent Living; $15, 7 p.m. Dec. 10, 3 p.m. Dec. 12; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-771-6184 or www.coril.org. DEC. 10 & 12 — HIGH DESERT CHORALE HOLIDAY CONCERT: Concert featuring the choir perform traditional, classical and gospel selections; free; 7:30 p.m. Dec. 10, 2:30 p.m. Dec. 12; Sisters Community Church, 1300 W. McKenzie Highway; 541-5491037 or www.sisterschorale.com. DEC. 10-12, 15-16 — “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m. Dec. 10-11 and Dec. 15-16, 2 p.m. Dec. 12; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. DEC. 10 — BICYCLE ART WALK: An art walk featuring businesses displaying bike-themed art; 5-9 p.m.; downtown Bend; www.visitbend.com. DEC. 10 — GOSPEL CHOIR OF THE CASCADES: The community choir performs a Christmas concert, with The Granneys; $5-$10 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-3902441 or www.bendgospel.webs.com. DEC. 10 — HOLIDAY ORGAN CONCERT: Musicians Mark Oglesby, Mary O’Malley Carlos and Nick Wavers play a holiday concert and Christmas carol singalong; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3631. DEC. 10 — “TETRO”: A screening of the 2009 R-rated movie directed by Francis Ford Coppola; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351. DEC. 11 — “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: DON CARLO”: Starring Roberto Alagna, Marina Poplavskaya, Anna Smirnova, Simon Keenlyside and Ferruccio Furlanetto in a presentation of Verdi’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 9:30 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. DEC. 11 — PET PHOTOS WITH SANTA: Take a photo of Santa Claus with your pet; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; free with

P ete Erickson / The Bulletin ile photo

The Cascade Chorale, members of which are pictured here, will perform at the Holiday Magic Concert on Dec. 10 and 12. donation; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond Thrift & Gifts, 1776 S. Highway 97; 541-923-8558. DEC. 11 — MOTORCYCLISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON TOY RUN: Toy drive featuring kid games, arm wrestling competition, raffles, and a holiday motorcycle ride through Bend; proceeds to benefit Bend Elks and Central Oregon charities; donations of money and toys accepted; noon-4 p.m.; Cascade Harley-Davidson of Bend, 63028 Sherman Road; 541-280-0478. DEC. 11 — RING NOEL: Ring in the season with handbell choir the Bells of Sunriver, as they play familiar holiday tunes; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. DEC. 11 — RING NOEL: Ring in the season with handbell choir the Bells of Sunriver, as they play familiar holiday tunes; free; 3 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. DEC. 11 — WEBCYCLERY MOVIE NIGHT: “Where Are You Go” showcases the Tour d’Afrique, the world’s longest bicycle race; proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance; $10; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-318-6188. DEC. 11 — CROSS NATS BLOWOUT BASH: Celebration benefits Bend’s Community BikeShed; $5; 8 p.m.-1 a.m.; Deschutes Brewery’s lower warehouse, 399 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-385-8606 or www.deschutesbrewery.com. DEC. 12 — SECOND SUNDAY: Alan

Contreras discusses his lifetime of birding and reads a selection from his book; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034. DEC. 12 — “LIGHT UP A LIFE”: Light a candle in honor of loved ones; followed by a reception; free; 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Redmond-Sisters Hospice, 732 S.W. 23rd St.; 541-548-7483 or brvhospice@bendbroadband.com. DEC. 12 — HOW THE GROUCH STOLE CHRISTMAS TOUR: Hip-hop show featuring Brother Ali with DJ Snuggles, The Grouch with DJ Fresh, Eligh and Los Rakas; $20 plus fees in advance, $23 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com. DEC. 15 — THE NORTHSTAR SESSION: The California-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. DEC. 16 — “LIGHT UP A LIFE”: Light a candle in honor of loved ones; followed by a reception; free; 5-6 p.m.; Sisters Art Works, 204 W. Adams St.; 541-548-7483 or brvhospice@bendbroadband.com. DEC. 16 — HOLIDAY ORGAN CONCERT: Musician Mark Oglesby plays a holiday concert and Christmas carol singalong; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-548-3367. DEC. 16 — DICK DALE: The “king of

the surf guitar” performs; ages 21 and older; $20 plus fees in advance, $23 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com.

Farther Down the Road DEC. 17-20 — “A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents an adaptation of Charles Dickens’ classic holiday tale, performed by a youth and adult cast; $19 or $25, $15 ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. DEC. 17-19 — “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m. Dec. 17-18, 2 p.m. Dec. 19; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. DEC. 17 — HOLIDAY BLUEGRASS JAMBOREE: Featuring music from The Bond Street Bluegrass Allstars, Blackstrap, Wild Rye and Greg Botsford; $5, plus donations of canned food; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331. DEC. 17 — SWEATSHOP UNION: The Vancouver, British Columbia-based hip-hop act performs, with Top Shelf, Logy B and Young G; $10 plus fees in

advance, $13 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com. DEC. 18 — THE QUICK AND EASY BOYS: The Portland-based funk band performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. DEC. 19 — SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL CHRISTMAS CONCERT: An evening of classical and Christmas music, with maestro Lawrence Leighton Smith; $30, $40 reserved, $25 ages 65 and older, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Resort Great Hall, 17728 Abbot Drive; 541593-9310, tickets@sunrivermusic. org or www.sunrivermusic.org. DEC. 20 — THE REPTILE ZONE: Jeff from The Reptile Zone will show lizards, pythons, and a tortoise; all ages welcome; free; 3 p.m.; Play Outdoors, 840 S.E. Woodland Blvd., Suite 110, Bend; 866-608-2423. DEC. 21 — “SHARING OUR FAVORITE GENEALOGY STORIES”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program followed by a holiday potluck; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-3178978,541-317-9553 or www. orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. DEC. 22 — LIVE READ: Sit in comfy chairs and listen to short fiction read aloud by library staff; free; 6:30-7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080.


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talks, classes, museums & libraries KINKER ART STUDIO: 541-306-6341. PAINT ITALY, BEND OR SEATTLE WITH CINDY BRIGGS: 541-420-9463, www.cindybriggs.com or www .MakeEveryDayAPainting.com. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: http://sagebrushersartofbend. com or 541-617-0900.

Education WINTER SOLSTICE CEREMONY: Terri Daniel talks about the origins of Christmas rituals based in winter solstice practices; followed by a ceremony; free; 9-10 a.m. Sunday ; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-549-4004. THE PERFECT HOLIDAY COCKTAIL PARTY: Prepare unique dishes and make innovative cocktails; $50; 6 p.m. Tuesday ; Bendistillery tasting room, 19330 Pinehurst Road, Bend; 541-312-0097 or http://shop.welltraveledfork.com. WHAT’S BREWING: Toby Van Altvorst talks about jobs with Oregon Connect and the Prineville railroad; free; 7-8 a.m. Wednesday ; Meadow Lakes Restaurant, 300 Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-4476909 or kristi.CCF@msn.com. LIVING IN LUXURY: Anita Tracy teaches you how to make spa products; registration required; free; 6 p.m. Wednesday ; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. MUSICAL MOVEMENT ADVENTURE: Hear mountain-inspired tales with musical movement; free; 4:30-5 p.m. Thursday ; Play Outdoors Store, 701 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-678-5398. AARP DRIVER SAFETY PROGRAM: 541-317-0610. AEROSPACE CADET EDUCATION: 541-598-7479. CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE COMMUNITY CLASSES: www.cocc.edu or 541-383-7270. COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION: www.katyelliottmft.com or 541-633-5704. COMPUTER CLASSES: 541383-7270 or www.cocc.edu; Deschutes Public Library System, www.dpls.us or 541-312-1020. KINDERMUSIK: www.kidsmovewith music.com or 541-325-6995. KINDERMUSIK: www.developmusic .com or 541-389-6690. LATINO COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION: 541-382-4366 or www.latca.org. METAPHYSICAL STUDY GROUP: 541-549-4004. MOTORCYCLE SAFETY: http://teamoregon.orst.edu. NEIL KELLY CO. REMODELING SEMINARS: 541-382-7580. PARTNERS IN CARE PRESENTATIONS: loriew@partnersbend.org or 541-382-5882. PEACE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: Compassionate communication, Enneagram, yoga and more; www.pcoco.org or 541-325-3174. SPIRITUAL AWARENESS COMMUNITY OF THE CASCADES: www.spiritual awarenesscommunity.com or 541-388-3179. THE STOREFRONT PROJECT: Creative writing workshops for middle- and high-school students; 541-330-4381 or www.thenatureofwords.org.

Performing Arts

Submitted photo

Terri Daniel, pictured, will present a talk on winter solstice and Christmas practices. See the Education section for details. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER CLASSES: www.wrcco. org or 541-385-0750. WRITERS GUILD: 541-923-0896.

Parks & Recreation BEND PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT: www.bendparksandrec.org or 541-389-7275. BEND SENIOR CENTER: 541-388-1133. CAMP TUMALO: www.camptumalo. com or 541-389-5151. REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: www.raprd.org or 541-548-7275. SISTERS ORGANIZATION FOR ACTIVITIES AND RECREATION: www.sistersrecreation.com or 541-549-2091.

Outdoor Recreation DESCHUTES LAND TRUST: www.deschuteslandtrust.org or 541-330-0017. THE ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER: www .envirocenter.org or 541-322-4856. OREGON PALEO LANDS INSTITUTE OUTDOOR EXCURSIONS: www .paleolands.org or 541-763-4480. OUTDOORS SKILLS WORKSHOPS: 800-720-6339, ext. 76018. PINE MOUNTAIN OBSERVATORY: pmo-sun.uoregon.edu. REI: www.rei.com/stores/96 or 541-385-0594. SILVER STRIDERS: strideon@silver

striders.com or 541-383-8077. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY: www.sunrivernature center.org or 541-593-4442. TRADITIONAL MOUNTAINEERING MAP, COMPASS AND GPS SKILLS: Offering outdoor and indoor classes; 541-385-0445. WANDERLUST TOURS: www.wanderlusttours. com or 541-389-8359.

Arts & Crafts WREATH DECORATING: Create a beautiful holiday wreath with Anita Tracy; bring your own wreath; free; 11 a.m. Wednesday; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1034. ABRACADABRA ARTS & CRAFTS: www.abracadabracrafts.com. ART IN THE MOUNTAINS: www.artinthemountains. com or 541-923-2648. ART STATION: Art camps, classes and workshops; www.artscentraloregon. org or 541-617-1317. ATELIER 6000: Printmaking, book arts and more; www.atelier6000. com or 541-330-8759. CREATIVITY RESOURCE FOUNDATION: 541-549-2091. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY ART ACADEMY: 541-549-7200. KEN ROTH STUDIO: Painting workshops; www.kenrothstudio. com or 541-317-1727.

ACADEMIE DE BALLET CLASSIQUE: 541-382-4055. ACTOR’S REALM: 541-4107894 or volcanictheatre@ bendbroadband.com. ADULT MODERN DANCE: Taught by Fish Hawk Wing Modern Dance troupe; 541-788-0725. AN DAIRE ACADEMY OF IRISH DANCE: 541-678-1379. BARBERSHOP HARMONY: www. showcasechorus.org or 541447-4756 or 541-526-5006. BEND EXPERIMENTAL ART THEATRE: www.beatonline.org or 541-419-5558. CASCADE COMMUNITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC: www.ccschoolofmusic. org or 541-382-6866. CENTRAL OREGON DANCE COMPANY: www.centraloregondance.com or 541-419-8998 or 541-388-9884. CENTRAL OREGON SCHOOL OF BALLET: www. centraloregonschoolofballet. com or 541-389-9306. CHILDREN’S MUSIC THEATRE GROUP: www.cmtg.org or 541-385-6718. THE CLOG HOUSE: 541-548-2062. CUBAN STYLE DRUMMING CLASSES: 541-550-8381. GOTTA DANCE STUDIO: 541-322-0807. GYPSY FIRE BELLYDANCE: 541-420-5416. HAND DRUMMING: 541-350-9572. INDONESIAN ORCHESTRA: 541-408-1249. JAZZ DANCE COLLECTIVE: www.jazzdancecollective. org or 541-408-7522. LINE DANCE CLASSES: 562-508-1337 or danceforhealth@ymail.com. MODERN SQUARE DANCE CLASSES: 541-385-8074. REDMOND SCHOOL OF DANCE: 541-548-6957 or www. redmondschoolofdance.com. SCENE STUDY WORKSHOP: 541-9775677 or brad@innovationtw.org. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING: 541-549-7311. SQUARE DANCING: 541-548-5743. TANGO DANCE: 541-330-4071. TERPSICHOREAN DANCE STUDIO: 541-389-5351. WEST AFRICAN DRUM: 541-760-3204.

Museums A.R. BOWMAN MEMORIAL MUSEUM: Exhibits about Crook County, the City of Prineville Railroad and the local timber industry; free; 246 N. Main St., Prineville; www.bowmanmuseum.

org or 541-447-3715. DES CHUTES HISTORICAL MUSEUM: Explores the history, culture and heritage of Deschutes County; $5 adults, $2 ages 13-17, children ages 12 and younger free with adult; 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; www.deschuteshistory. org or 541-389-1813. FORT ROCK HOMESTEAD VILLAGE MUSEUM: A collection of original buildings from the early 1900s homestead era; open Memorial Day through Labor Day; $4; Fort Rock; www.fortrockoregon. com or 541-576-2251. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring the “Year of the Forest: Human Connections” exhibit, through Dec. 12; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger and members; (closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s days); 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www.highdesertmuseum. org or 541-382-4754. THE MUSEUM AT WARM SPRINGS: Cultural, traditional and artistic heritage of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs $7 adults, $6 seniors, $3.50 ages 5-12, $4.50 students; 2189 U.S. Highway 26, Warm Springs; www.museumatwarmsprings. org or 541-553-3331. REDMOND MUSEUM: Featuring displays highlighting 100 years of Redmond history; $2; 529 S.W. Seventh St.; 541-504-3038. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY: Featuring live birds of prey, hands-on exhibits, nature trail, telescopes, night sky viewing and more; $3 adults, $2 ages 12 and younger; 57245 River Road, Sunriver; www.sunrivernaturecenter. org or 541-593-4394.

Libraries BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY LIBRARY: Williamson Hall at Rock Arbor Villa (behind Jake’s Diner), 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb. org/deschutes/bend-gs. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7040. CROOK COUNTY LIBRARY: 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978. FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY: 1260 N.E. Thompson Drive, Bend; 541-382-9947. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: 1642 51st St., La Pine; 541-312-1091. JEFFERSON COUNTY LIBRARY: 241 S.E. 7th St., Madras; 541-475-3351. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050. ROBERT L. BARBER LIBRARY: 2600 N.W. College Way (COCC), Bend; 541-383-7560. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY: 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080.


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holiday bazaars T

he following is a list of holiday bazaars for the upcoming week.

it to The Bulletin, Holiday Bazaars, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

A new list of upcoming bazaars will publish every Friday in

The deadline is the Monday before each Friday’s publication. Con-

GO! Magazine. To submit a bazaar that has not already appeared,

tact: 541-383-0351.

send your information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or mail

ONGOING CHRISTMAS AT COLLAGE: Gift items, decor, candles, cards, frames, clothes, jewelry and more; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Saturday through Dec. 23; 339 S.W. Sixth St., Suite B, Redmond; 541-617-1259 or www.christmasatcollage.com. COUNTRY CHRISTMAS: Decorations, gifts, produce and more; with Santa visits and a petting zoo; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday through Dec. 23; DD Ranch, 3836 N.E. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne; 541-548-1432.

HOLIDAY BOUTIQUE: Holiday decorations, novelties, clothing and more; 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays; Humane Society of Redmond Thrift & Gifts, 1776 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-923-8558. SALVATION ARMY HOLIDAY FAIRE: New and used Christmas items; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday, through Dec. 17; Bend Factory Stores, 61334 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-389-8888.

TODAY HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Clothes, purses, necklaces, mirrors, jewelry, decor, food

Admission to bazaars is free unless otherwise noted.

and more; 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; 2632 N.W. Ordway Ave., Bend; 541-598-4617. METOLIUS TRAIN DEPOT HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Handcrafted items and gifts; 9 a.m.; Metolius Train Depot, 599 Washington Ave., Metolius; 541-546-3801. ART OF CHRISTMAS SALE AND SHOW: Handmade arts and crafts from local artisans; 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Urban on 6th, 432 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4692. BEND CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP BAZAAR: Earrings, birdhouses, artwork, handcrafts and more; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Bend Christian Fellowship, 19831 Rocking Horse Road; 541-408-1067. CHRISTMAS VALLEY CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Wreaths, food, handcrafted gifts and more; cafe will serve breakfast and lunch; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Christmas Valley Community Hall, 87345 Holly Lane, Christmas Valley; 541-576-2166. COUNTRY CHRISTMAS BOUTIQUE: Holiday decorations, gifts, glassware, quilts, jams and more; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 15520 S.W. Culver Highway, Culver; 541-546-6529. LA PINE CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Handcrafted items, artwork, candies, jewelry and more; 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-8398 or 541-536-9771. SATURDAY MARKET HOLIDAY SHOW: Handcrafted items, ornaments, toy trains, wreaths, candy and more; $1 suggested donation, benefits the Redmond Humane Society; 1 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, South Sister building, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-420-9015.

DEC. 4 VFW CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Homemade items, ornaments, jewelry and more; cafe will serve breakfast; 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. ANGELS AMONG US: Homemade

Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents an adaptation of Charles Dickens’ classic holiday tale, performed by a youth and adult cast.



Friday-Monday, December 17-21 7:30 p.m. Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

crafts and baked goods; cafe will serve food; 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Madras United Methodist Church, 49 N.E. 12th St.; 541-475-2150. BEST LITTLE CHRISTMAS BAZAAR IN MADRAS: Handcrafted personal, pet, home decor and baked items; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 686 S.E. Tumbleweed Lane, Madras; 541-475-6746. CHRISTMAS FOOD FAIR: Handcrafted fair trade items and Scandinavian breads and desserts; 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 695 N.W. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-1545. HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Clothes, purses, necklaces, mirrors, jewelry, decor, food and more; 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; 2632 N.W. Ordway Ave., Bend; 541-598-4617. JIREH PROJECT CHRISTMAS BOUTIQUE: Crafts, food, home decor, children’s gifts and more; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; The Jireh Project, 2330 N.E. Division St., Suite 1, Bend; 541-678-5669. METOLIUS TRAIN DEPOT HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Handcrafted items and gifts; 9 a.m.; Metolius Train Depot, 599 Washington Ave., Metolius; 541-546-3801. PRINEVILLE HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Food, jewelry, gifts and toys; cafe will serve lunch; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Crook County Christian School, 839 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-416-0114. SATURDAY MARKET: Produce, wood products, quilted goods and more; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Old Fire Hall, 6730 S.W. Shad Road, Crooked River Ranch; 541-420-2149. TOPS COMMUNITY BAZAAR: Handcrafted and gift items; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; City Hall, 200 First Ave., Culver; 541-546-4502. ART OF CHRISTMAS SALE AND SHOW: Handmade arts and crafts from local artisans; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Urban on 6th, 432 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4692. BEND CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP BAZAAR: Earrings, birdhouses, artwork, handcrafts and more; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Bend Christian Fellowship, 19831 Rocking Horse Road; 541-408-1067. CHRISTMAS ON MIMOSA: Jewelry, wine-bottle wraps, ornaments, knitwear and cookies; 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 62959 Mimosa Drive, Bend; 541-815-5188. CHRISTMAS VALLEY CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Wreaths, food, handcrafted gifts and more; cafe will serve breakfast and lunch; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Christmas Valley Community Hall, 87345 Holly Lane, Christmas Valley; 541-576-2166. CHURCH OF CHRIST ANNUAL PARADE WAY CRAFT SALE: Food, textile

items, doll clothes, plants and more; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Newport Avenue Church of Christ, 554 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-382-6983. COUNTRY CHRISTMAS BOUTIQUE: Holiday decorations, gifts, glassware, quilts, jams and more; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 15520 S.W. Culver Highway, Culver; 541-546-6529. HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE: Handmade crafts, ornaments and gifts; Santa pet photos benefit Sisters Furry Friends Food Drive; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sisters Art Works, 204 West Adams Ave.; 541-420-9695 or www.sistersartworks.com. LAVA RIDGE HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Arts and crafts, ornaments, jewelry, bird feeders and more; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Lava Ridge Elementary School, 20805 Cooley Road, Bend; 541-383-9037. OLDE FASHIONED CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION: Photos with Santa, handcrafted items and more; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Crooked River Ranch Administration Building, 5195 S.W. Clubhouse Drive, Crooked River Ranch; 541-548-8939 or 541-923-2679. SATURDAY MARKET HOLIDAY SHOW: Handcrafted items, ornaments, toy trains, wreaths, candy and more; $1 suggested donation, benefits the Redmond Humane Society; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, South Sister building, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-420-9015. LA PINE CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Handcrafted items, artwork, candies, jewelry and more; donations of food and toys to benefit SCOOTR and the La Pine Christmas Basket Association accepted; 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-8398 or 541-536-9771.

DEC. 5 ART OF CHRISTMAS SALE AND SHOW: Handmade arts and crafts from local artisans; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Urban on 6th, 432 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4692.

DEC. 8 HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE: Handmade ornaments and crafts; 4 to 7 p.m.; Redmond Learning Center, 720 S.W. 23rd St.; 541-923-4854.

DEC. 9 TREASURED GIFTS BAZAAR: Jewelry and crafts; 3 to 7 p.m.; 1567 N.W. Elgin Ave., Bend; 541-948-9249. CROOKED RIVER HOLIDAY BAZAAR: With pictures with Santa; 5 to 7 p.m.; Crooked River Elementary School, 640-641 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-420-2920.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 21

out of town

Courtesy Michael Durham / Oregon Zoo

The “Oregon” steam locomotive is adorned with lights as part of ZooLights. The Oregon Zoo’s popular holiday light display is currently on exhibit through Jan. 2 in Portland.

ALL ABOARD

for ZooLights Oregon Zoo’s popular display returns for the holidays By Jenny Harada The Bulletin

A

fter a stellar year, the Oregon Zoo has a lot to be thankful for this holiday season. During 2010, the zoo announced recordbreaking attendance, hired Kim Smith as its new director, opened the Red Ape Reserve, received reaccreditation by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and was recently awarded the prestigious AZA exhibit award for the “Predators of the Serengeti” exhibit. To spread the holiday cheer, the zoo will present its winter wonderland, ZooLights, in Portland. The popular light displays are currently on exhibit through Jan. 2. Using more than 1 million light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, the light show features lifesize animal silhouettes and moving light sculptures, according to a news release. New additions for this year include an interactive barnyard display, an animated cat,

a 3-D secretary bird and silhouettes of “Alice in Wonderland” characters. The festivities also feature a scavenger hunt with prizes, a model train exhibit and performances by more than 100 schools, churches, professional groups and local dance troupes, according to the news release. ZooLights runs 5 to 8 p.m. Sundays through Thursdays and 5 to 8:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, although it will be closed on Dec. 24-25. ZooLights package tickets (includes admission and a train ride) are $10.75 for adults, $9.25 for seniors (ages 65 and older) and $7.75 for children (ages 3 to 11). Admission-only tickets are $9 for adults, $7.50 for seniors and $6 for children. For more information, contact 503-2261561 or visit www.oregonzoo.org. Jenny Harada can be reached at 541-3830350 or jharada@bendbulletin.com.

The f ollowing is a list of other events “Out of Town.”

Dec. 31 — Pink Martini, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM*

Concerts

Lectures & Comedy

Dec. 3 — Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541-884-5483 or www.rrtheater.org. Dec. 3 — The Black Crowes, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Dec. 3 — The Books, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 3 — Cherry Poppin’ Daddies, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-6872746 or www.wowhall.org. Dec. 3 — An Evening with The Black Crowes, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Dec. 3 — The Gracious Few, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Dec. 4 — HellYeah, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Dec. 4-5 — Christmas with the Trail Band: Featuring Linda Hornbuckle; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541779-3000 or www.craterian.org. Dec. 5 — Hellyeah, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Dec. 5 — Misty River Band, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 6 — Oak Ridge Boys, Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Dec. 7 — Béla Fleck & The Flecktones, Hult Center, Eugene; 541-6825000 or www.hultcenter.com. Dec. 7 — John McLaughlin & The Fourth Dimension, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 8 — Leonard Cohen, Theater of the Clouds, Portland; 877-7897673 or www.rosequarter.com. Dec. 8 — The Posies/Brendan Benson/Aqueduct, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 9-12 — Holidays with Trail Band, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 10 — The Doobie Brothers/ Michael Franti & Spearhead/ Leon Russell, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Dec. 12 — The Dandy Warhols, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Dec. 12 — Jewel, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Dec. 17 — Ty Curtis Band/Insomniacs, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Dec. 21 — Tomaseen Foley’s A Celtic Christmas, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541779-3000 or www.craterian.org. Dec. 29 — Jim Brickman, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Dec. 30 — Reverend Horton Heat, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Dec. 31 — Andre Nickatina, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Dec. 31 — Brandi Carlile, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 31 — Gift of Gab/Marv Ellis, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW*

Jan. 8 — Joan Rivers: Also featuring the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800228-7343 or www.orsymphony.org. Jan. 21 — Jim Jefferies, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Jan. 25 — Elizabeth Strout: Part of the Portland Arts & Lectures series; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 503-227-2583 or www.literary-arts.org.

Symphony & Opera Dec. 5 — Yo-Yo Ma: Featuring music by Adams, Copland, Shostakovich and Rimsky-Korsakov; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; SOLD OUT; 800-228-7343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 6 — Béla Fleck & The Flecktones: Performing with the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 10-12 — “Gospel Christmas”: Featuring the Northwest Community Gospel Choir; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 11 — The Esquire Jazz Orchestra, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541-884-5483 or www.rrtheater.org. Dec. 11-12 — Yuletide Celebration: Featuring holiday songs, Broadway style acts, an orchestra and tap-dancing Santas; presented by the Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Dec. 18-19 — “Handel’s Messiah”: Featuring the Portland Symphonic Chamber Choir; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 23 — “Comfort & Joy”: Holiday concert featuring the Pacific Youth Concert; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 30-31, Jan. 2 — “La Boheme”: Opera by Puccini; presented by the Eugene Opera; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Jan. 8 — “Coming to America”: Featuring music by Barber, Gershwin, Ross and Copland; presented by the Oregon Mozart Players; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-6825000 or www.hultcenter.org.

Theater & Dance Through Dec. 4 — Jason Samuels Smith: Featuring tap dancer Jason Samuels Smith, winner of the 2009 Dance Magazine Award;

Continued next page


PAGE 22 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

out of town From previous page presented by White Bird Dance; Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM* Through Dec. 18 — “The Santaland Diaries”: Based on the true chronicles of David Sedaris’ experience as Crumpet the Elf in

Macy’s Santaland display; adapted for the stage by Joe Mantello; presented by the Lord Leebrick Theatre Company; Eugene; 541-4651506 or www.lordleebrick.com. Through Dec. 19 — “Irving Berlin’s White Christmas”: A musical adaption

of the 1954 film starring Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney and Vera Ellen; The Shedd Institute, Eugene; 541-4347000 or www.theshedd.org. Through Dec. 19 — “Mars on Life — LIVE!”: Late-night talk show

starring Susannah Mars; presented by Artists Repertory Theatre; Alder Stage, Portland; 503-2411278 or www.artistsrep.org. Through Dec. 24 — “Ebenezer Ever After”: Musical by Don Flowers and Fred Walton; presented by Stumptown Stages; Theatre! Theatre!, Portland; 503-381-8686 or www.stumptownstages.com. Through Dec. 26 — “A Christmas Story”: Based on the classic motion picture; presented by Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; 503-445-3700 or www.pcs.org. Through Jan. 2 — “The Santaland Diaries”: Based on the true chronicles of David Sedaris’ experience as Crumpet the Elf in Macy’s Santaland display; adapted for the stage by Joe Mantello; presented by Portland Center Stage; Ellyn Bye Studio, Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; 503-445-3700 or www.pcs.org. Dec. 9-23 — “A Tuna Christmas”: A sequel to the hit comedy, “Greater Tuna”; presented by the Oregon Repertory Theatre; Winningstad Theatre, Portland; TM* Dec. 11-12, 17-18— “A Holiday Revue”: Featuring several Christmas standards; created in collaboration with Susannah Mars and Richard Bower; presented by the Oregon Ballet Theatre; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Dec. 11-24 — “George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker”: Presented by the Oregon Ballet Theatre; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Dec. 12 — Posado Milagro: Celebration featuring Latin American traditions; Miracle Theatre Group, Portland; 503236-7253 or www.milagro.org. Dec. 17-18 — “A Musical Christmas”: Holiday revue presented by the Teen Musical Theater of Oregon; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541-7793000 or www.craterian.com. Dec. 17-19 — “The Nutcracker”: Presented by the Eugene Ballet Company; Hult Center, Eugene; 541682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Dec. 23 — Radio City Christmas Spectacular: Featuring the Radio City Rockettes; Rose Garden, Portland; 877-789-7673 or www.rosequarter.com. Dec. 28 — “Hair”: 2009 Tony Award winner for Musical Revival; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Jan. 4-Feb. 6 — “Superior Donuts”: Comedy-drama by Tracy Letts; presented by Artists Repertory Theatre; Morrison Stage, Portland; 503-241-1278 or www.artistsrep.org. Jan. 13-15 — “Doug Elkins & Friends’ Fräulein Maria”: Featuring choreography by Doug Elkins; set to the score of the film “The Sound of Music”; part of the White Bird Dance Series; Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM* Jan. 20-22 — Oslund + Co/Dance: Featuring choreography by Mary Oslund; part of the White Bird Uncaged series; Lincoln Hall, Portland State University, Portland; 503-725-3307 or www.whitebird.org.

*Tickets • TM — Ticketmaster, 800745-3000, www.ticketmaster.com • TW — TicketsWest, 800992-8499, www.ticketswest.com Jan. 22 — Ailey II: A showcase for rising young dancers and choreographers; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541779-3000 or www.craterian.com. Jan. 25 — “‘S Wonderful — The New Gershwin Musical”: Musical revue featuring music and lyrics by George and Ira Gershwin; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541779-3000 or www.craterian.com. Jan. 25 — “Spring Awakening”: The musical is a fusion of morality, sexuality and rock & roll; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Jan. 29-30 — “Bossa Brasil”: Presented by Ballet Fantastique; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-6825000 or www.hultcenter.org. Feb. 2 — “Monty Python’s Spamalot”: A tuneful spoof of the King Arthur legend, based on the cult classic film, “Monty Python and the Holy Grail”; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541-7793000 or www.craterian.com. Feb. 4 — “Legally Blonde the Musical”: Based on the hit movie of the same name starring Reese Witherspoon; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541779-3000 or www.craterian.com.

Exhibits Through Dec. 5— Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Christophe Goodstein: Inferno” (through Dec. 5), “Giuseppe Vasi’s Rome: Lasting Impressions from the Age of the Grand Tour” (through Jan. 2) and “Excessive Obsession” (through July 31, 2011); University of Oregon, Eugene; 541-3463027 or jsma.uoregon.edu. Through Dec. 19 — Museum of Natural and Cultural History: The following exhibits are currently on display: “PaleoLab — Oregon’s Past Revealed: Horses and Grasslands” (through Dec. 19), “Yellowstone to Yukon” (through Dec. 19) and “We are Still Here — Stephanie Wood on Baskets and Biography” (through June 2011); University of Oregon, Eugene; 541-346-3024 or natural-history.uoregon.edu. Through Dec. 23 — Hallie Ford Museum of Art: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Sandow Birk: Dante’s Inferno” (through Dec. 23) and “Francis Celentano: Form and Color” (through Jan. 16); Willamette University, Salem; 503370-6855 or www.willamette.edu. Through Dec. 24 — Carl Morris and William Givler, The Laura Russo Gallery, Portland; 503-2262754 or www.laurarusso.com. Through Dec. 31 — “Jews@Work:


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

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PAGE 23

out of town Law and Medicine”: The exhibition focuses on the challenges Jews faced in their career choices as well as on the contributions they were able to make; Oregon Jewish Museum, Portland; 503226-3600 or www.ojm.org. Through Dec. 31 — Korey Gulbrandson and Jeff Butler, Laurence Gallery Salishan, Gleneden Beach; 541-764-2318 or www.lawrencegallery.net. Through Dec. 31 — Nancy Tipton and Neal Philpott, Lawrence Gallery Sheridan, Sheridan; 503-843-3633 or www.lawrencegallery.net. Through Jan. 2 — Portland Art Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States” (through Jan. 2), “Lee Kelly” (through Jan. 9), “Thomas Moran at Shoshone Falls” (through Jan. 16) and “Catherine Opie” (through Feb. 6), ; Portland; 503-226-2811 or www.portlandartmuseum.org. Through Jan. 2 — ZooLights: Holiday light show features animal silhouettes and moving light sculptures; Oregon Zoo, Portland; 503-226-1561 or www.oregonzoo.org. Through Jan. 8 — Museum of Contemporary Craft: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Collateral Matters: Selections by Kate Bingaman-Burt and Clifton Burt” (through Jan. 8) and “Object Focus: The Book” (through Feb. 26); Portland; 503-223-2654 or www. museumofcontemporarycraft.org. Through Jan. 10 — Pacific Northwest College of Art: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Jungjin Lee: Wind” (through Jan. 10) and “Web of Trails” (through Jan. 10); Portland; 503-226-4391 or www.pnca.edu. Through Jan. 20 — “Outreach to Space”: Traveling exhibit exploring space and space travel; built by San Francisco’s Exploratorium; Science Factory, Eugene; 541-6827888 or www.sciencefactory.org. Through Jan. 23 — “Tinkertoy: Build Your Imagination”: Featuring giant replicas of the classic Tinkertoy construction set; Portland Children’s Museum, Portland; 503-2236500 or www.portlandcm.org. Through Feb. 6 — Oregon Museum of Science and Industry: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Identity: An Exhibition of You” (through Feb. 6) and “Design Zone: Behind the Scenes” (through May 30); Portland; 503797-4000 or www.omsi.edu. Jan. 27-June 4 — “Era Messages: Selections by Garth Johnson”: Featuring works from the 1960s to 1980s that exemplify particular moments in the history of craft; Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland; 503-223-2654 or www. museumofcontemporarycraft.org. Jan. 28-29 — “Stitches in Bloom Quilt Show,” The Oregon Garden, Silverton; 503-874-8100 or www.oregongarden.org. Jan. 29-30 — Sagebrush Rendezvous: Featuring an art exhibit and wine tasting; Running Y Ranch

Convention Center, Klamath Falls; 541-891-8618 or www.klamath. org/events/sagebrushart.

Miscellany Through Dec. 12 — “Japanese

Currents: The Samurai Tradition”: Featuring the evolution of the samurai film genre; Northwest Film Center, Portland; 503-2211156 or www.nwfilm.org. Through Dec. 23 — Polar Express Train Ride: Featuring hot

chocolate, cookies, a reading of “Polar Express” and photos with Santa; Hood River; 800-8724661 or www.mthoodrr.com. Dec. 4-7 — Rogue Winterfest, Evergreen Federal Bank’s Bear Hotel, Grants Pass; www.

roguewinterfest.com. Dec. 7-9 — Small Wind and Community Wind Conference & Exhibition, Oregon Convention Center, Portland; 202-383-2512 or www. smallandcommunitywindexpo.org.

Over 175 unique, locally owned businesses. Support your community. Holiday customers can PARK for FOUR hours for FREE in the downtown garage. More info at www.DowntownBend.org

Holiday Celebration Friday, Dec. 3 • 5-9 pm Champagne, Jewelry, Fine Art, and live music by Little Fish

SALE RACK up to 50% off!

25 NW Minnesota Ave. #5 Downtown Bend

541-388-0155

Ladies, come in to Bella Moda and select our holiday wish list items today! Then ask your Santa to attend our Wednesday Night Secret Shopper event December 15th until 7pm Free gift wrapping! Mon - Sat 10am - 6pm • Sunday Noon - 4pm 1001 NW Wall Street, Bend, Oregon • 541.550.7001

Est. 1980

Audio • Video • Home Theater • Custom Design • Installation 1008 NW Bond Street • (541) 382-9062 • www.stereoplanet.com Celebrating 30 Years!

NEW 2ND LOCATION IN REDMOND!

DESIGNER RESALE • DESIGNER SAMPLES • SELECT RETAIL


PAGE 24 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

gaming This makeover is a success ‘Donkey Kong’ revival totally eclipses original

TOP 10 ON THE WII The editors of Game Informer Magazine rank the top 10 Wii games for November: 1. “Donkey Kong Country Returns,” Nintendo 2. “Kirby’s Epic Yarn,” Nintendo 3. “Rock Band 3,” MTV Games 4. “DJ Hero 2,” Activsion 5. “NBA Jam,” EA Sports 6. “Epic Mickey,” Disney Interactive Studios

By Dan Ryckert Game Informer Magazine

T

he “Donkey Kong Country” series on SNES is remembered more for its graphical achievements than anything else. “Donkey Kong” may have featured the most attractive character models of the 16-bit era, but “Mario” always held the gameplay crown. Flash forward three console generations, and “DK” and “Mario” have both received 2-D returns to form. “New Super Mario Bros. Wii” was fantastic, but “Donkey Kong Country Returns” manages to push the simian above his plumber rival in virtually every category. A wave of nostalgia swept over me when I booted up “Donkey Kong Country Returns.” You’ll hear familiar tunes as you bust out of your jungle hut, and before long you’re collecting bananas, snagging red balloons, and teaming up with your pal Diddy. Many will buy this game for the nostalgia value alone, but as I progressed, I realized that the merits of gameplay carry the adventure more than anything else. This could have been stripped of recognizable characters and renamed “Steve the Gorilla’s BananaQuest” and I would have enjoyed it just as much. It’s not all fan service. You won’t see the Kremlings, the only animal you’ll be riding is Rambi the rhino, and appearances from DK’s family members are kept to a bare minimum. Rather than bombard fans with familiar faces and gameplay elements, Retro focuses

7. “Batman: The Brave and the Bold,” Warner Bros. Interactive 8. “NHL Slapshot,” EA Sports 9. “Spider-Man: Shattered Dimensions,” Activision 10. “Guilty Party,” Disney Interactive Studios McClatchy-Tribune News Service

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“Donkey Kong Country Returns” gives the series an impressive makeover with eight worlds to traverse. on presenting new and dramatic scenarios. Mine cart levels were a staple from the original trilogy, but now they are far more exciting than ever. In one “don’t you dare blink” moment, your cart bashes through a giant egg and causes it to roll down the track. As the egg spins through the level, you remain in your cart, avoiding rocks that break through the shell (and the holes they leave) as you loop around inside. For this entire segment, you have to be aware of the environment outside of the egg while simultaneously making sure you jump its cracks as they approach you. These mine cart levels left me breathless, but they’re not the only stages that cause that effect. You’ll outrun a wall of insects as they attempt to eat you, scale the insides of a volcano as lava rapidly rises, and pilot a barrel rocket through a cave as a giant bat shoots sonar at you. As you prog-

E RE V I

W

New game releases The following titles were scheduled for release the week of Nov. 29. • “Rush” (PC) • “Unbound Saga” (X360) • “Who’s That Flying?! One More Go!” (X360) • “Super Meat Boy” (PC, Mac)

‘DONKEY KONG COUNTRY RETURNS’ 9.5 (out of 10) Wii Nintendo, Retro Studios ESRB rating: E for Everyone ress, you’ll breathe a heavy sigh of relief every time you arrive at a checkpoint. “Donkey Kong Country” games have never been a walk in the park, but “Returns” is easily the hardest in the series’ history. Many of the later stages had me burning through 15-plus lives before I reached the end, but never due to cheapness. You just need to hone your platforming skills, be patient, and pay attention. After beating them once, I found I could usually go through the toughest levels without dying thanks to all the time I had spent practicing the various maneuvers needed to

• “EVE Online: Incursion” (PC) • “Mystery P.I. New York” (PC) • “WinX Club: Rockstars” (DS) • “Funky Lab Rat” (PS3) • “Disney Epic Mickey” (Wii) • “Dead Nation” (PS3) • “nail’d” (X360, PS3, PC)

avoid traps and enemies. My journey through the eight worlds wasn’t without a few minor issues. Shaking the Wii remote to roll isn’t as responsive as the classic method, and can send you off a cliff if the Wii detects an unintentional shake. Having a second player join in as Diddy Kong can be fun, but it is also frustrating in more difficult levels. Considering the amount of speed and precise jumping required late in the game, two players is one too many. Beating the game is already a substantial challenge, but getting 100 percent requires impeccable platforming skills. I’ve been looking forward to this game for months, but the final product blew me away. Its gorgeous visuals, awesome boss battles, varied stages, and cleverly hidden secrets guarantee gamers will have a great time revisiting this classic franchise. It’s not only the best “Donkey Kong Country,” it’s also one of the best platformers I’ve ever played.

• “Dungeon Defenders” (PC) • “SpellForce 2: Faith in Destiny” (PC) • “Sniper Elite” (Wii) • “Deadliest Catch: Sea of Chaos” (Wii, X360, PS3) • “Golden Sun: Dark Dawn” (DS) — Gamespot.com

Weekly downlaod ‘PAC-MAN CHAMPIONSHIP EDITION DX’ For: PlayStation 3 via PlayStation Network and Xbox 360 via Xbox Live Arcade From: Namco Bandai ESRB Rating: E for Everyone Price: $10 After 27 years of playing it safe with spinoffs, retreads and cameos, Namco blew the doors off the barn with a true sequel, “Pac-Man Championship Edition,” that rewrote the “Pac-Man” script without changing the tenets that made it the most popular video game ever made. “Pac-Man Championship Edition DX” takes that blueprint, refines it, and douses it with sprinkles. The base game has changed: Mazes now crawl with dozens of ghosts instead of four, but all but a few rogue ghosts will follow Pac-Man in formation, making their movements easy to predict. “DX” counters the crowded mazes by giving Pac-Man a limited-use bomb to briefly clear his path, and it sends the action into a very brief fit of slow motion whenever Pac heads toward peril. Such lifesavers sound like game-breakers on paper, but they quickly become indispensable. The only downside: The achievements/ trophies are entirely too easy to unlock this time, and while every mode of every maze gets its own leaderboard, there’s no at-a-glance way to see how you stack up against your friends. — Billy O’Keefe, McClatchy-Tribune News Service


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

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movies

The Associated Press

Annika Hallin, left, and Noomi Rapace star in “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest.” The film is the final installment of the Stieg Larsson trilogy.

This film is mesmerizing Heroine in ‘Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest’ has strength, pride

L

isbeth Salander makes a transfixing heroine precisely because she has nothing but scorn for such a role. Embodied here for the third time by Noomi Rapace, she’s battered, angry and hostile, even toward those who would be her friends. Some of the suspense in the final courtroom showdown of “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest” comes from the excellent question of whether she would rather be found guilty than provide anyone with the satisfaction of hearing her tes-

tify in her own defense. By the time she comes to what is essentially a sanity hearing, she has returned to the ranks of punk fashionistas, with the black leather pants and jacket, the boots, the studs and buckles, the spikes, the body piercings, the eyeliner that looks like protective armor, and the stark black crest of her hair. She sits sullen and silent in the courtroom, as if saying, “I care nothing for you, although I have spent hours working on my look in front of the mirror.”

ROGER EBERT

“The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest” 148 minutes R, for strong violence, some sexual material and brief language This film opened Nov. 19. She is formidably smart and deeply wounded from childhood, as we know from the earli-

er two films in the Stieg Larsson trilogy. Worse, she can’t leave her pain behind in childhood. Again in her life are her freakish, gigantic half-brother Niedermann (Mikael Spreitz) and the psychologist who fabricated her incarceration in an asylum. And the murderous members of “the Section,” a rogue killing unit within the Swedish national police, are determined to eliminate her once and for all. The outlines of her dilemma will be clear to those who’ve seen “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” and “The Girl Who Played With Fire,” but this film has enough quick flashbacks to orient the first-timer. It begins literally when the second one ended, after the bloody confron-

tation in the barn with her father and half-brother. She’s taken to the hospital with a bullet in her brain, and spends much of the film’s first half in intensive care and refusing to speak. That frees the director, Daniel Alfredson, to focus more time on Mikael Blomkvist (Michael Nyqvist), the investigative journalist who collaborated with her in the first film and has become her fierce defender — and perhaps more, a man who loves her. Their mutual affection was an intriguing subtext in the first film but has been on hold ever since, while Mikael continues his relaxed intimacy with his editor, Erika Berger (Lena Endre). Continued next page


PAGE 26 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

movies

Courtesy Relativity Media

Jang Dong-Gun stars in Relativity Media’s “The Warrior’s Way.”

ON LOCAL SCREENS Here’s what’s showing on Central Oregon movie screens. For showtimes, see listings on Page 30.

HEADS UP “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” — Critics saw 20 minutes of this third installment in the “Chronicles of Narnia” series, and while it seems seriously overplotted, it also appears to be a visual tour de force. The first two “Narnia” titles earned a combined $445 million

From previous page There are said to be two more Larsson novels in various stages of completion, but even if they’re not publishable, Lisbeth Salander is too good a character to suspend after three films, and my guess is there must be sequels. The sequels need not fret overmuch about plot. These films are really about personality, dialogue and the possibility that the state has placed itself outside the law. That leads to an oppressive, doomy atmosphere that the characters move through with apprehension. We understand the basics of the Section conspiracy, we recognize most of the faces, but few of us could pass a test on exactly who is who. No problem; neither could Lisbeth nor Mikael. The tension — and there is a

domestically, suggesting there remains a big audience for the series. Catch a late night preview Thursday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 in Bend. 112 minutes. (PG)

— Robert W. Butler, The Kansas City Star “Glenn Beck Live: Broke” — Radio and television host Glenn Beck returns to the silver screen. Broadcast live from Pittsburgh, Penn., the stage show will feature thoughts and ideas at the core of Beck’s new book, “Broke.” An encore screening of the event will run at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 in Bend. Cost is $18. 120 minutes. (no MPAA rating)

“The Tourist” — A mild-mannered tourist in Italy (Johnny Depp) falls for an intriguing and dangerous woman (Angelina Jolie) in this dramatic thriller. Depp and Jolie offer plenty of box office potency; directing and co-writing is Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, whose German film “The Lives of Others” took home the Oscar for foreign language film. Contributing to the screenplay are Christopher McQuarrie (“The Usual Suspects”) and Julien Fellowes (“Gosford Park,” “Young Victoria”). Catch a late night preview Thursday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 in Bend. 103 minutes. (PG-13)

— Robert W. Butler, The Kansas City Star

— Synopsis from National CineMedia

Continued next page

lot of it — grows from the danger that Lisbeth brings upon herself by refusing to act sensibly for her own welfare. She has such a burned-in distrust of authority that even a friend like Mikael gets closed out, and Rapace takes a simple friendly “see you” and invests it with the effort it costs Lisbeth to utter. Her battle with herself is more suspenseful than her battle against her enemies, because enemies can be fought with and that provides release, but we spend much of “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest” straining against Lisbeth’s fear, and sending her urgent telepathic messages about what she should do. These are all very well-made films. Like most European films, they have adults who are grown-ups, not arrested adolescents. Mikael and Erika, his

boss and lover, have earned the lines in their faces and don’t act like reckless action heroes. They make their danger feel so real to us that we realize the heroes of many action movies don’t really believe they’re in any danger at all. Lisbeth is in grave danger, but in great part because of her damaged obstinacy, and that scares us more than any number of 6-foot-4 Nordic blond homicidal half-brothers. So what has happened is, this uptight, ferocious little gamin Lisbeth has won our hearts, and we care about these stories and think there had better be more. The funny thing is, I’ve seen the “real” Noomi Rapace on TV, and she has a warm smile and a sweet face. What a disappointment. Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

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movies NEW DVD & B L U - R AY RELEASES The following movies were released Nov. 30.

“Knight and Day” — Tom Cruise and Cameron Diaz in a stupendously goofy action-comedy-romance. I like the goofiness and the charm they bring to it, but the film miscalculates on the proportion of romcom to action, and has so much special effects violence it throws the balance off. Moves from one country to another as if it’s teleporting. DVD and Blu-ray Extras: Featurette, music video and viral videos. Rating: Three stars. 109 minutes. (PG-13) “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice” — Nicolas Cage plays the good magician Balthazar, who for 1,300 years has held the evil magicians Morgana (Alice Krige) and Horvath (Alfred Molina) captive. In modern New York, he discovers at last the Prime Merlinian, the master magician who can vanquish the captive villains once and for all. This is young Dave (Jay Baruchel), who would rather smooch with cute Becky (Teresa Palmer) than learn his sorcering lessons. Lots of special effects in a typical twoweekend special. Not bad, far from

From previous page

WHAT’S NEW “The Warrior’s Way” — An Asian warrior assassin is forced to hide in a small town in the American Badlands. With Jang Dong-Gun, Kate Bosworth, Danny Huston and Geoffrey Rush. Written and directed by Sngmoo Lee. This film was not screened in advance for critics. 100 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from Los Angeles Times

STILL SHOWING “Burlesque” — Christina Aguilera plays the proverbial small-town girl from Iowa who gets on a bus and travels to Los Angeles hoping for stardom. She finds it in the Burlesque Lounge, a Sunset Strip club run by Cher. With a cornball story to showcase their musical numbers, it’s a cheesy entertainment of interest primarily because of the embedded music videos. Rating: Two stars. 116 minutes. (PG-13) “Due Date” — Robert Downey Jr. and Zach Galifianakis star as a mismatched odd couple who find themselves sharing a rental car on a drive from Atlanta to Los Angeles. In a comedy that’s as near as makes no difference to a down-market retread of “Planes, Trains and Automobiles,” they create big laughs and have some funny stops along the way, but the Galifianakis character is so obnoxious in such a passiveaggressive way that we don’t much want to see the journey continue.

good. DVD Extras: Featurette and deleted scene; Blu-ray Extras: Nine additional featurettes and additional deleted scenes. Rating: Two and a half stars. 108 minutes. (PG) “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” — Much better than “Twilight: New Moon,” not as good as the original “Twilight.” Bella (Kristen Stewart) continues to fascinate Edward the vampire (Robert Pattinson) and Jacob the werewolf (Taylor Lautner), as they join forces to protect her from the vengeful Victoria (Bryce Dallas Howard) and her Newbie army of freshly made undead who are ravenous for blood and will do her bidding. As exciting as this sounds, the movie is mostly soppy romantic conversations. Just what turns on “Twilight” fans, I guess. The DVD is in stores on Saturday. DVD and Blu-ray Extras: Audio commentary, featurettes, deleted and extended scenes, photo gallery and music videos. Rating: Two stars. 134 minutes. (PG-13) ALSO OUT THIS WEEK: “Going the Distance” and “Vampires Suck.” COMING UP: Movies scheduled for national release Dec. 7 include “Inception.” Check with local video stores for availability.

— Roger Ebert, The Chicago SunTimes (“DVD and Blu-ray Extras” from wire and online sources)

Passable entertainment, but a missed opportunity. Directed by Todd (“The Hangover”) Phillips. Rating: Two and a half stars. 95 minutes. (R) “Fair Game” — Sean Penn and Naomi Watts star as Joe Wilson and Valerie Plame, a couple embroiled in controversy in the early days of the Iraq War. Wilson, sent to Niger to find evidence of uranium sales to Saddam, found none, and said so in a New York Times op-ed bombshell. Plame was then outed as a CIA agent, apparently by an aide of Dick Cheney. The situation placed great pressure on their marriage, which is largely the focus of the film. The movie may work better the more you walk in agreeing with it. Rating: Three stars. 105 minutes. (PG-13) “Faster” — A pure thriller, all blood, no frills, in which a lot of people get shot, mostly in the head. Dwayne Johnson stars as Driver, a justreleased prisoner working his way down a hit list of those who betrayed him and killed his brother. Billy Bob Thornton is the heroin-addicted cop, close to retirement, on his trail, along with a detective played by Carla Gugino. Oliver Jackson-Cohen is the Brit hit man also on Driver’s trail. Efficiently delivers action for an audience that likes one-course meals, but that’s about it. Rating: Two and a half stars. 98 minutes. (R) “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest” — Lisbeth Salander spends the first half of the film recovering from what happened at the end of the previous one. That’s all right, because a wounded silence is her medium.

Continued next page

The Associated Press

Cameron Diaz, left, and Tom Cruise join forces in “Knight and Day.”


PAGE 28 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010

movies From previous page Now members of the “Section” want to silence her once and for all, and her demented blond giant half-brother is after her, and Mikael is fighting to defend her against insanity charges,

and this uptight, ferocious little gamin Lisbeth has won our hearts. Rating: Three stars. 148 minutes. (R) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1” — Harry, Hermione and Ron have grown up and the horrors they

met at Hogwarts are but nostalgic memories. They are cast out now into the vastness of the world, on their own, and Voldemort and his Death Eaters draw ever closer. Also drawing near is an equally

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“Love and Other Drugs” — Jake Gyllenhaal plays a gung-ho pharmaceutical salesman in the 1990s, not above flirting with doctors’ receptionists if it gets him through the door. Anne Hathaway plays the beautiful patient of one doctor. They meet under shady circumstances, but nonetheless fall in love, and she reveals she’s in the early stages of Parkinson’s. This fact changes the course of a comedy into something much more serious, and the comic elements become an awkward fit. With Oliver Platt, Hank Azaria, Josh Gad and Gabriel Macht. Directed by Edward Zwick. Rating: Two and a half stars. 112 minutes. (R) “Megamind” — Bright and amusing 3-D animation as two aliens (voiced by Will Ferrell and Brad Pitt) battle for control of Metro City. Tina Fey voices a local TV reporter, David Cross is a piranha-like sidekick for Megamind, and Jonah Hill is a put-upon TV cameraman who finds himself transformed into a third super being. The 3-D isn’t really necessary, but is well-handled. Rating: Three stars. 95 minutes. (PG) “Morning Glory” — Rachel McAdams transforms a conventional plot into a bubbling comedy with her lovable

high energy. She plays an ambitious young producer on a last-place network morning news show, who forces a reluctant TV veteran (Harrison Ford) to do the kind of TV he despises. A lot of laughs, including Diane Keaton as Ford’s veteran co-anchor, Matt Malloy as a goofy weatherman and Jeff Goldblum as the boss who considers the show dead in the water. Rating: Three and a half stars. 110 minutes. (PG-13) “The Next Three Days” — Russell Crowe stars as an English teacher whose wife (Elizabeth Banks) is charged and convicted for murder. Despite compelling evidence for her guilt, he believes she couldn’t have done it. As appeals fail, he determines to break her out of jail, and in the process his character must somehow transform into a man capable of taking such action. Not a bad movie if you want a competent thriller. Not the level of achievement we expect from Crowe and writer-director Paul Haggis (“Crash”). Rating: Two and a half stars. 133 minutes. (PG-13) “RED” — Bruce Willis is a retired CIA assassin, but now is a target. So he reassembles his old team: Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren and Brian Cox. And a telephone operator played by Mary-Louise Parker. Comic thriller, neither good nor bad, featuring actors we like doing things we wish were more interesting. Rating: Two stars. 110 minutes. (PG-13) “Secretariat” — A great film about greatness, the story of the horse and the no less brave woman who had faith in him. Diane Lane stars as Penny Chenery, who fell in love with Secretariat when he was born, and battled the all-male racing fraternity and her own family to back her faith in the champion. A lovingly crafted film, knowledgeable about racing, with great uplift. Also with John Malkovich, Scott Glenn, James Cromwell, Nelsan Ellis, Dylan Walsh. One of the year’s best. Rating: Four stars. 122 minutes. (PG)

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unsettling phenomenon, sexual maturity. A handsome and sometimes harrowing film that will be completely unintelligible for anyone coming to the series for the first time. Rating: Three stars. 146 minutes. (PG-13) “Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole” — Zack Snyder’s film “Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole” is a gorgeous and occasionally exciting movie that loses some of its heart and forward momentum in clutter, laborious title included. Still, this variation on a theme by Tolkien is pretty daring, more demanding than your typical film for kids. In an age of “let’s all get along” pabulum, there’s much to like in a cartoon not afraid to show