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$88 million worth of relief in sight for Oregon homeowners Central Oregon among hard-hit areas targeted for federal foreclosure aid

Effluent may fuel geothermal project Piped-in La Pine wastewater would be injected into ground By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

A geothermal company is considering piping effluent from La Pine to a site west of Newberry National Volcanic Monument, where it would be injected into the ground and through fractures deep below the surface as part of a process to create power. For some conservationists, the idea

raises concerns that effluent could possibly leak out, contaminating aquifers or waters that feed into springs or lakes that are popular recreation sites in Newberry. But company officials say using treated wastewater would be a good way for communities like La Pine to get rid of effluent, which doesn’t involve spraying it on golf courses or having it seep into rivers.

Davenport Power and AltaRock are developing plans to try out new geothermal techniques outside of the volcanic monument and are slated to receive a $25 million stimulus grant for the work. Officials are planning to use leased groundwater as part of the demonstration project. Crews would use pressurized water to fracture the rock, creating a network of tiny cracks, and possibly creating tiny earthquakes in the process. They would

then inject more water, cycle it through the network of cracks, and pump the newly hot water or steam back out a second well. The goal is to see if enough hot water comes back to generate power. And if the geothermal method is feasible, the companies might propose building a power plant — which could use wastewater from south county sewage treatment facilities, said Doug Perry, president of Davenport Power. See Geothermal / A4

“We’re kind of hunkering down here.”

DONKEY BASKETBALL AT SUMMIT HIGH SCHOOL

By Keith Chu The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — Central Oregon’s high unemployment rates and run of foreclosures have made it a target for a new federal plan to help distressed homeowners. The White House announced on Monday that Oregon would receive $88 million to help slow the foreclosure crisis, with most of that money Related intended for • Tennessee, areas where Delaware unemploybig winners ment is above in race for 12 percent federal — like Crook, Deschutes education and Jefferson funding, counties. Page A5 It’s the latest in what seems to be an unending string of announcements tweaking the administration’s anti-foreclosure strategy, following several new proposals unveiled last week. States aren’t required to spend the money solely in counties with higher than 12 percent unemployment, said Diana Farrell, deputy director of the National Economic Council, but that’s where most of the money should be targeted. “Our expectation is the hardest-hit counties will get a disproportionate share of this,” Farrell said. Crook County had the highest unemployment rate in the state in February, at 19.2 percent, according to the Oregon Employment Department. Deschutes County had a 15.8 percent unemployment rate. Jefferson County’s unemployment rate was 16.1 percent. In all, 14 Oregon counties, mostly east of the Cascades, had unemployment rates above 12 percent. See Foreclosure / A5

— Timm Schimke, director, Department of Solid Waste

Deschutes officials see ‘grim’ future for budget By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

&

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Hooves hoops S

ummit Equestrian Team member Jesse Foster reaches for the ball during a donkey basketball game in the Summit High School gym on Monday eve-

ning. The game was part of a tournament sponsored by the Equestrian Team,

Deschutes County’s revenue outlook for the next two budget years is “grim,” due to the real estate market downturn and expected weak growth in tax revenues, the county administrator said Monday. The county is preparing to lay off two Department of Solid Waste employees and close the county landfill and Redmond transfer station one day a week. County officials also plan to eliminate or keep open several jobs that are currently vacant or will be soon due to retirement. The county has so far weathered the recession without cuts to staff or services in most of its departments, many of which built up savings accounts during better economic times. The Department of Solid Waste is on pace to end the current budget year in June more than $1 million short, because a sharp reduction in the amount of waste from the construction and tourism industries means less money for the county landfill, said County Administrator Dave Kanner. See Budget / A5

which was raising money for hosting meets and covering entry fees for events.

TOP NEWS INSIDE

The Equestrian Team lost the game to a group of players from the Summit Girls

ARRESTS: Christian militia members accused in violent plot, Page A3

INDEX Abby

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Basketball Team, with a final score of 10-4.

In Moscow, new fear of an old foe Subway attacks renew jitters about Caucasus war spilling over into city

E4-5

Sports

D1-4

By Ellen Barry

Community E1-8

Stocks

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New York Times News Service

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We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

MON-SAT

Vol. 107, No. 89, 40 pages, 7 sections

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Pavel Golovkin / The Associated Press

People pass a riot police officer while leaving Park Kultury subway station on Monday after two female suicide bombers blew themselves up in the subway system at rush hour, killing at least 38 and wounding dozens more.

MOSCOW — Investigators were still marching in and out of the Lubyanka subway station on Monday morning, but Nina Ivanovna, a 57-yearold retiree, was not waiting around to hear their conclusions. She stared coldly at the staircase where wounded and weeping passengers had streamed away from the chaos of the suicide bombing, and said, with a curl of her lip, who she thought was behind it. “It’s the Chechens, they will never let us live in peace,” she said. “We should build a Great Wall of China to keep them away from us. They should be walled away. They hate us, and they will always hate us.” See Moscow / A4

Inside • Specter of female suicide bombers has haunted Muscovites for a decade, Page A4 • Suspicion falls on militants — especially Chechens — from restive Caucasus, Page A4

New York Times News Service file photo

Climatologists like Heidi Cullen use very different methods than meteorologists.

Unlikely rivals emerging in climate debate By Leslie Kaufman New York Times News Service

The debate over global warming has created predictable adversaries, pitting environmentalists against industry and coalstate Democrats against coastal liberals. But it has also created tensions between two groups that might be expected to agree on the issue: climate scientists and meteorologists, especially those who serve as television weather forecasters. See Climate / A5


A2 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

8 25 32 34 41 44 Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $1.8 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

Debt-settlement fraud on the rise Lack of regulation can make it tough for consumers to tell good companies from bad

Two sides of debt negotiating WHEN IT DOESN’T WORK ... Consumer: Gloria Snowden, 65, of Baltimore Debt: $10,000 in credit card debt How it worked out: Snowden paid about $400 a month, but the company never contacted her creditors. She has not gotten her money back. “Debtsettlement companies are a scam, and I don’t wish that on anybody.”

By Ylan Q. Mui The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Gloria Snowden, of Baltimore, thought she had found a way out from under her $10,000 credit card bill when she signed up with a company that promised to negotiate with creditors to settle the debt for less than she owed. It was 2003 and the nascent debt-settlement industry was just taking off. Traditional credit counseling and consolidation organizations devise payment plans and arrange lower interest rates and fees, but debt-settlement companies bargain with banks and collection agencies to forgive part of the amount due. They typically require customers to pay a hefty fee up front and make monthly deposits into an independent account. Negotiations begin only after the balance reaches a level that they believe creditors will accept — a red flag for consumer advocates who say the firms are predatory, and in some cases, fraudulent. Snowden gave the firm she signed up with access to her savings account and deposited at least $400 each month toward her settlement. But when the collection calls kept coming, Snowden, 65, said she realized that the firm hadn’t contacted her creditors. For five years, she battled with the company to negotiate with those she owed, all the while putting money in her savings account. Snowden said she didn’t realize she had been swindled out of her deposits until the Maryland attorney general’s office called to tell her it had nailed the firm’s leaders, who received six months in jail and had to pay $2.5 million in restitution. She said she has not gotten her money back and had to file for bankruptcy. “I got a job. I work,” she said. “I just got caught up in this.”

‘A sign of the times’ Many debt-settlement firms offer legitimate financial services, but a lack of regulation has made it difficult for people such as Snowden to sort the good from the bad. The fast rise of firms has prompted lawsuits and pressed states to draft laws to protect

... AND WHEN IT DOES

Mark Gail / The Washington Post

Josh Sheintal, of Gaithersburg, Md., ran into credit problems when his construction business tanked and he put about $20,000 on his credit card to pay his suppliers. The fast rise of debt-settlement companies has sparked lawsuits and prompted states to draft laws to protect the financially vulnerable. their most financially vulnerable residents. “It’s a sign of the times. … People found themselves in deeper and deeper debt,” said Marceline White, executive director of the Maryland Consumer Rights Coalition. “As they were trying to dig out, these firms rose up.” Debt-settlement companies cater to those who got caught up in the era of easy credit only to find themselves overwhelmed. When changes in federal laws a few years ago made it more difficult to declare bankruptcy, a new class of consumers emerged with massive debt and no way out. When the Association of Settlement Companies, a trade group based in Madison, Wis., was established in 2005, there were about 300 firms in the sector, according to executive director David Leuthold. Now, he said, about 1,000 firms handle $18 billion in debt across the country. The average customer has $30,000 in credit card debt. “We’re the only alternative out there for them,” Leuthold said. “They know that they could get sued. They know that creditor calls could continue to come. They still want to get on the program and repay what they can.” Often, people who opt for debt settlement are in default, or at least 180 days late on payments, and their issuers have sold the loan to a third-party collection

agency. Many firms encourage a communications “blackout” — no payments and no response to calls or letters — until their customers are ready to cut a deal, which can wreak havoc on credit scores. Leuthold said his group’s members cannot require a blackout.

Advance-fee model under fire Advocacy groups say the industry’s advance-fee model has allowed unscrupulous firms to take advantage of desperate customers. Requiring upfront payment also makes it difficult for people to reach their savings goal and forces some to drop out — sometimes before any calls to creditors are made. Even the industry’s most optimistic estimates put the program completion rate at 34 percent. The Federal Trade Commission, which is the nation’s consumer protection agency, has brought seven cases against debt-settlement companies since 2001 and is considering banning advance fees. But a final decision is not expected anytime soon, an FTC spokesman said, leaving states largely responsible for policing the growing industry. Several states have banned the practice, including Arkansas, Hawaii, Kentucky, New Mexico and Wyoming. Even some debt-settlement

A little caution goes a long way toward preventing identity theft By Claudia Buck McClatchy-Tribune News Service

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Sitting at the computer to pay your bills, go shopping or do your banking is common. It’s quick, convenient and oh-so-green. But it’s not without risks. And while most transactions go through seamlessly, you can unwittingly fall victim to full-blown identity theft, or just a subtle trickle of money from an account. For Marika Rose, a Sacramento communications consultant, it happened so stealthily that it took years before she noticed. In January, she spotted a couple of puzzling charges on her debit card statement. The amounts were small — $24.95 — and she’d seen them before, but always assumed they were for purchases she or her husband had made. Curious, she started looking back through old statements and found dozens of similar charges. When she called the company listed on the statement, Rose was told the monthly charges — which had been quietly increasing since 2007 — were for a “shopping membership” that she unknowingly signed up for while making an online purchase. Digging deeper, she discovered her “membership” had sucked more than $1,100 out of her account in the past three years. “I was shocked that in little increments, a company could siphon off so much from my check-

Identity theft prevention tips from the FDIC • If you bank online, frequently check your accounts to spot errors or fraudulent transactions. The sooner you detect a problem, the easier it can be to fix. • Don’t respond to “urgent” requests. Never give out your Social Security, credit or debit card numbers or PIN in response to an unsolicited e-mail, text message or phone call. That “urgent” message purportedly from a bank, merchant or government agency (such as the IRS) could be a scam. • Watch out for bogus text messages. Cell phone texts claiming that your bank account has been “blocked” and that you must call to fix the problem can be a scam. If you make the call, you’ll likely be asked for your account and PIN, which can be used to create counterfeit debit cards. • Don’t open attachments or click on links in unsolicited e-mails. Your computer could become infected with spyware that changes your security settings and records your keystrokes. It lets online thieves silently steal your passwords, bank or credit-card numbers and obtain answers to security questions, like your mother’s maiden name. ing account,” Rose said. Ultimately, the company reversed all the charges and she canceled her debit card. In 2009, identity theft jumped 12 percent, hitting 11.1 million U.S. consumers, according to an annual survey released last month by Javelin Strategy & Research. “It doesn’t seem to be going away and it’s getting more sophisticated and more organized by criminal rings,” said Joanne McNabb, chief of California’s Office of Privacy Protection. On the heels of the Javelin findings, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. reminded consumers to take precautions. It even posted its own YouTube video, “Don’t Be an Online Victim.”

“Online fraud is an ongoing game of cat and mouse,” fraud specialist David Nelson said in the FDIC’s warning. “Crooks continuously hunt for security holes, banks and merchants plug those holes, and then the criminals find new ones to slink through.” Consumers can keep the bad guys at bay, he says, by taking precautions and remaining vigilant. McNabb warned that a lot of identity theft is “beyond the control of consumers to prevent,” things like data theft from businesses or hospitals. But in general, she said, consumers should keep their computer well protected with security software and avoid responding to any online “phishing” for personal financial information.

companies are seeking better ways for people to separate legitimate firms from the scofflaws. Mike Croxson, president of CareOne Services, a debt-relief firm based in Columbia, Md., supports licensing for debt-settlement companies. His firm charges customers 30 percent of their savings and a set-up fee of $50 to $400, depending on state laws. He said that people typically settle their first debt within six months and that his company carries an A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau. At a recent hearing in Annapolis on debt-settlement legislation, Croxson testified in favor of the bill but urged a higher cap. “I know that that model can work,” he said. “I believe that aligning the providers’ interest and the consumers’ interest is the smartest way to go.” But some companies say they can’t operate unless they collect fees up front. Leuthold said the firms make significant investments in acquiring customers and managing their accounts be-

Consumer: Josh Sheintal, 35, of Gaithersburg, Md. Debt: $20,000 in credit card debt How it worked out: After paying $1,500 a month for two months, the company he hired settled his debt for less than half of what he owed within seven months. Sheintal used what he learned to settle other debts on his own. “I knew what I was getting into.” fore they negotiate with creditors. If companies wait until the end to collect, he said, they might wind up as creditors themselves.

It’s not all bad Josh Sheintal, 35, of Gaithersburg, Md., said he dug himself into a credit hole when his construction business tanked along with the economy and he charged about $20,000 to pay his suppliers. He signed up with DebtShield and said he grew nervous when the company asked him to sock away $1,500 a month in a thirdparty account — and then took the first two months’ payments as service fees. But Sheintal stuck with the program, and he said the company eventually settled his debt for less than half of what he owed. The next time his credit card issuer contacted him, it was a letter of a different stripe. “Actually, they sent me another credit card,” he said. “But that’s a different story.”


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 30, 2010 A3

T S By Corey Williams and Devlin Barrett The Associated Press

DETROIT — Nine alleged members of a Christian militia group that was girding for battle with the Antichrist were charged Monday with plotting to kill a police officer and slaughter scores more by bombing the funeral — all in hopes of touching off an uprising against the U.S. government. Seven men and one woman believed to be part of the Michigan-based Hutaree were arrested over the weekend in raids in Michigan, Indiana and Ohio, and another was still being sought. FBI agents moved quickly against Hutaree because its members were planning an at-

tack sometime in April, prosecutors said. Authorities seized guns in the raids but would not say whether they found any explosives. The arrests have dealt “a severe blow to a dangerous organization that today stands accused of conspiring to levy war against the United States,” Attorney General Eric Holder said. Authorities said the arrests underscored the dangers of homegrown right-wing extremism of the sort seen in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing that killed 168 people. In an indictment unsealed Monday, prosecutors said the group began military-style training in the Michigan woods in 2008, learning how to shoot guns and make and set off bombs.

David Brian Stone, 44, of Clayton, Mich., and one of his sons was identified as the ringleaders of the group. Stone, who was known as “Captain Hutaree,” organized the group in paramilitary fashion and members were assigned secret names, prosecutors said. Ranks ranged from “radoks” to “gunners,” according to the group’s Web site. “It started out as a Christian thing,” Stone’s ex-wife, Donna Stone, told The Associated Press. “You go to church. You pray. You take care of your family. I think David started to take it a little too far.” Donna Stone said her ex-husband pulled her son into the movement. Another of Stone’s sons also was charged and still was being sought.

W  B

52 Iraqi candidates may be disqualified BAGHDAD — A government commission sought Monday to disqualify six people who had won seats in Iraq’s parliamentary election and 46 other candidates because of what it called their ties to the banned Baath Party. The disqualification effort, by Iraq’s Accountability and Justice Commission, could prove critical to the election’s outcome because the political alliance headed by Ayad Allawi, the country’s former interim prime minister, won only two seats more than Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s coalition in the March 7 contest. At a news conference on Monday, the commission’s director, Ali Faisal al-Lami, refused to disclose the names or political affiliations of the 52 candidates the commission is seeking to disqualify. Many were likely to be members of Allawi’s Iraqiya coalition.

Myanmar opposition boycotts election YANGON, Myanmar — Many residents of Myanmar’s largest city today greeted a decision by the party of democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi to boycott elections with rousing approval, but others blamed it for leaving them with little choice in the military-organized balloting. The National League for Democracy on Monday decidServing Central Oregon Since 1946

CREATIVE LIGHTING U.S. Marshall via The Associated Press

These photos provided by the U.S. Marshals Service show, top row, from left: David Brian Stone Sr., 44, of Clayton, Mich.; David Brian Stone Jr., 44, of Adrian, Mich,; Jacob Ward, 33, of Huron, Ohio; and Tina Mae Stone; bottom row, from left: Michael David Meeks, 40, of Manchester, Mich,; Kristopher T. Sickles, 27, of Sandusky, Ohio; Joshua John Clough, 28, of Blissfield, Mich.; and Thomas William Piatek, 46, of Whiting, Ind. Federal authorities say Stone’s other son, Joshua Matthew Stone, is a fugitive.

Swine flu in Southeast raises new pandemic concerns By Thomas Maugh II Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Continuing activity of pandemic H1N1 influenza in the Southeast, particularly in Georgia, is raising fears of a third wave of swine flu, federal officials said Monday. They urged people to continue getting vaccinated as a preventive measure in case a new outbreak occurs. Although swine flu activity is still low in most of the country, flu-related hospitalizations in Georgia have, since the beginning of February, been higher than they were last October at the height of the second wave of swine flu, said Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, in a telephone news conference. A CDC team was sent March 6 to assist state officials investigating the outbreak, but they have so far found nothing unusual related to the outbreak or the virus itself. “There is no evidence the virus has changed in Georgia,” she said. Alabama and South Carolina are also reporting regional activity of the virus, and some unusual activity has also been noted in Hawaii and New Mexico. The Southeast is where the second wave of the pandemic began last fall, but experts generally attributed that to the earlier start of school in the region. Swine flu has so far infected about 60 million Americans, with 265,000 hospitalized and about 12,000 dead.

What might the first year of health reform have in store for you? high-risk plans. On average, an enrollee won’t pay more than 35 More than a week after Presi- percent of covered benefits, and dent Barack Obama signed the annual out-of-pocket costs won’t sweeping new health care law, be more than $5,950 for individuwhich will eventually provide in- als and $11,900 for families. surance coverage for 32 million How many people can sign uninsured Americans, many of up for the new plan? us are still scratching our heads. Until national health offiWhat just happened? And how cials specify the premium and when will we start feeling its costs and exactly what will or will effect? not be covered, nobody knows In the long term, the legislation how many people can sign up. will require most AmerThe $5 billion set aside icans to obtain health by Congress must last insurance. It will also until 2014, when other offer federal subsidies options become availto lower premiums and able. By comparison, 35 significantly expand elistates already spend a HEALTH gibility for Medicaid. combined total of $2 bilCARE While the biggest lion annually on highchanges will not take efREFORM risk insurance pools that fect until 2014, some imcover 200,000 people. portant provisions will How is the new begin as early as June, federal pool difwhile others will kick in by the ferent from what is already ofend of the year. fered by state high-risk pools or Some of the specific details will Medicaid? be outlined in the coming weeks The federal plan is expectby the Department of Health and ed to offer more-affordHuman Services. However, here able coverage than the existing are answers to some commonly state plans and will not impose asked questions about the health the same income restrictions as care changes coming within the Medicaid. State plans also typinext year. cally impose high deductibles I don’t have health insur- and premiums (some charge as ance. How soon will the much as $1,200 a month), and up new law help me? to 12-month waiting periods beThe answer depends on fore covering pre-existing health your age and reasons for problems. not having insurance. If you How will the law affect haven’t had insurance for six children with pre-existing months, and you can’t afford or conditions? don’t qualify for insurance beBeginning in September, cause of a pre-existing medical the new law is expected to problem, you may be eligible for a stop insurance companies from new federal “high risk” pool to be rejecting children or excluding offered by the end of June. coverage because of pre-existing The cost of the monthly pre- medical problems. Since the law miums hasn’t been announced, passed, insurers have argued that but the rates are to be based on it uses vague language and does a “standard population,” sug- not require them to provide insurgesting they will be based on a ance to all children right away, healthier group than typically and they may take the battle to used to calculate premiums for court.

By Tara Parker-Pope

New York Times News Service

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ed to opt out of the country’s first election in two decades, following the lead of the detained Nobel Prize laureate who had earlier denounced the laws guiding the election as undemocratic. The decision, approved by an unanimous vote of the 113 executive members, spotlights the question of the polls’ credibility. The NLD won the most parliamentary seats in the last election in 1990, whose results the military refused to honor.

Rio Tinto employees found guilty in China SHANGHAI — Four employees of the British-Australian mining giant Rio Tinto, including an Australian citizen, were found guilty by a Chinese court on Monday of accepting millions of dollars in bribes and stealing commercial secrets. They were sentenced to seven to 14 years in prison and ordered to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in fines. Until the verdict, Rio Tinto — one of the world’s biggest producers of iron ore — had strongly defended its employees. But the company issued a statement Monday saying that it had decided to immediately fire the four employees, describing the evidence released during the trial that they had accepted about $13.5 million in bribes as “beyond doubt.”

‘Door to afterlife’ unearthed in Egypt CAIRO — Archaeologists have unearthed a 3,500-year-old “door to the afterlife” from the tomb of a high-ranking Egyptian official near Karnak temple in Luxor, the Egyptian antiquities authority said Monday. These recessed niches found in nearly all ancient Egyptian tombs were meant to take the spirits of the dead to and from the afterworld. The nearly 6-foot-tall slab of pink granite was covered with religious texts. The door came from the tomb of User, the chief minister of Queen Hatshepsut, a powerful, long ruling 15th century B.C. queen from the New Kingdom with a famous mortuary temple near Luxor in southern Egypt. — From wire reports

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A4 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Moscow haunted by history of female suicide bombers

Moscow Continued from A1 During the six years since the last suicide bomb attack on the Moscow subway, Muscovites came to think of themselves as comfortably insulated from the guerrilla warfare in the North Caucasus. They lost the jittery reflexes of a decade in which Russians refused to board airplanes beside a veiled woman, or waited for the last train car because they assumed suicide bombers would get on at the front. That fear reshaped the Russian state at the beginning of the decade. Vladimir Putin, then president, used the terrorist threat to justify a sweeping consolidation of power, and won enormous popularity for apparently bringing the years of violence to an end. But old anxieties rushed back to the surface on Monday, when commuters handed over wads of cash to taxis rather than descend into the subway. Many were asking the same question: Is it starting again? “Supposedly the war is over and people have been living well” in the Caucasus, said Lyudmila Margulis, 60, an edge of sarcasm in her voice, as she made her way through the Park Kultury subway station on Monday afternoon. The station was still dripping from a thorough washing after the attack, but on the white floor tiles you could still make out a faint trail of bloody boot prints. “You know, I don’t think it ever actually stopped,” said Aleksandr Zharkov, 22, a graduate student. He said he had started seeking out information about fighting in the Caucasus on Internet news sources, and had been surprised to discover much was still going on there, despite government claims that the insurgency had been brought to heel. “As long as it’s still going on there,” he said, “it can happen anywhere.” Monday morning’s attacks, which killed at least 38 people and injured dozens of others, almost seemed intended to puncture Moscow’s sense of calm. Statistics from the North Caucasus — including Chechnya, Ingushetia, Kabardino-Balkaria, North Ossetia and Dagestan — showed that clashes between militants and government forces jumped last year, nearly doubling the number of fatalities and quadrupling the number of suicide bombings. But those statistics are abstractions to Muscovites, said Sergei Markedonov, a Caucasus specialist at the Institute for Political and Military Analysis. “The Caucasus is far away, it’s way over there, ‘those dummies who keep blowing themselves up,’ that’s what Uncle John says — it doesn’t involve us,” he said. “An explosion in Moscow, that involves us directly.” On Monday, the city felt a punch to the gut. Outside Hospi-

By Andrew E. Kramer New York Times News Service

Misha Japaridze / The Associated Press

Special operations police officers keep an eye on a man laying flowers near one of the entrances to the Park Kultury subway station, background, after Moscow’s subway system was hit by two female suicide bombers on Monday. tal No. 33, a 70-year-old woman sobbed hysterically, saying her granddaughter had not answered her phone all day. Pyotr Novikov kept trying to explain that it was his usual train, that he would have been on it when it was bombed, except that on this morning, “I lay around, and here I am.” Yekaterina Solovyova, 36, stepped off at Lubyanka station, where shrapnel had broken tiles and carved golf-ball-size chunks out of the marble walls of the station. Glass littered the tracks, and red carnations had been laid near the spot where the bomb exploded. “This is simply monstrous,” she said. It was, for many, a reminder of the city Moscow was eight or 10 years ago, when terrorist attacks became, awfully, a routine part of life. Yelena Knizhnikova’s son was performing in the musical “Nord-Ost” in 2002, though he happened not to appear in it the night Chechen terrorists seized the theater, taking about 850 people hostage. On Monday, she had dropped off her daughter at school and taken the subway to work when she heard about the suicide bombings. She said she immediately reexperienced the sense of fear, followed by a panicky round of phone calls, then rage at the difficulty of finding information on who had died — it was “impossible to find anything, anywhere.” She could not help worrying that once again Muscovites would take out their anger on ethnic minorities. The randomness of it all struck her. “At some moment, you understand that — probably since we had gone through this before — you start to perceive things differently, that such is life,” she said.

Geothermal Israelis hold fast to position in E. Jerusalem New York Times News Service JERUSALEM — Senior Israeli ministers have publicly rejected American demands for curbs on building in Jewish areas of East Jerusalem and other concessions to the Palestinians, indicating no imminent end to the rift between Israel and the United States. Benny Begin, a member of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s inner Cabinet, said Monday on Israel Radio that the status of East Jerusalem should be resolved in direct negotiations with the Palestinians, not in advance. “It’s irritating and certainly a cause of concern,” Begin said of the American request. “This change will definitely bring about the opposite of the declared goal. It will bring about a hardening in the policy of the Arabs and of the Palestinian Authority.” Netanyahu, who met with President Barack Obama in the White House last week, has promised answers to the president’s requests regarding Jerusalem and other confidence-building measures aimed at starting indirect talks with the Palestinian Authority. Avigdor Lieberman, the foreign minister and another member of the inner group of seven ministers, said in a newspaper interview that the Obama demands included a building freeze in most of the Jewish neighborhoods of Jerusalem. He added: “I have not seen anyone among the seven who has consented to this.”

Continued from A1 “It is certainly something that’s been done elsewhere, and may make sense in Central Oregon as well,” Perry said. Other sources of liquid for a power plant could include additional purchased water rights or a new technology like liquefied carbon dioxide, Perry said. U.S. Department of Energy representatives in town last week identified wastewater as a potential source of the liquid, said Asante Riverwind, with the local chapter of the Sierra Club. The agency did not return a request for comment Monday. Riverwind is concerned about how much the wastewater will be treated before it enters the pipe or is injected into the ground, he said. Casings could line the well delivering the water down to the hot rocks, but casings can crack and leak, Riverwind said. And the geology of the springs that feed lakes like Paulina Lake and East Lake is still a bit of a mystery, he said, so it’s hard to say what might leak into them. “What about breaches in the casing, or what about fractures in the rock down below that might lead to contamination of the springs that feed the lakes?” Riverwind asked, adding he would hate to see the lakes and springs in the volcanic monument become unswimmable. He’s also concerned that all of the funding and preliminary work will lead to a power plant — without members of the public having a chance to weigh in on whether Newberry is the best place for a geothermal power plant, and take a closer

Militants from Chechnya, elsewhere in restive Caucasus are suspected in attack MOSCOW — The suicide bombs that roared through Moscow subway cars on Monday were almost certainly the latest salvo in a slow-moving war of attrition between the Russian government and militants in the restive, mostly Muslim republics of the Caucasus. Vladimir Putin has been trading blows with southern rebels ever since he rose to the presidency a decade ago. At times, violence has threatened to erode the social contract he’s struck with the Russian public: Forgo some of their democratic rights in exchange for, above all, stability. And yet, many analysts say Putin consolidated his power by waging a war in Chechnya — his strength was built by convincing people to unite with him against dangerous threats. The militants have menaced and fueled Putin’s leadership, they say. On Monday, two female suicide bombers climbed into packed subway cars in Moscow’s bustling downtown in the middle of rush hour and blew themselves up, killing at least 38 people and injuring dozens more. Women have been responsible for a number of past attacks by Chechen militants, but there was no immediate claim of responsibility for Monday’s bombings. Much of Putin’s time in power has been defined by the struggle with Islamic militants. He was elevated to national power by Boris Yeltsin,

“What about breaches in the casing, or what about fractures in the rock down below that might lead to contamination of the springs that feed the lakes?” — Asante Riverwind, local Sierra Club member, voicing concerns about using wastewater in a geothermal project

look at the environmental impact of these facilities. “From a conservation projects, we just haven’t had those questions answered to any level of sufficiency,” he said. Perry said that if the company decides that one or more power plants was feasible, there would be years of studies and permitting required to address concerns about possible leaks or other issues. “This is not something that’s eminent,” he said. The effluent would be treated, Perry said. And even if some organism did escape the treatment, he noted, pumping wastewater down to where the rocks are 500 degrees would kill them pretty quickly. And although nitrates might remain in the treated effluent, injecting them below the water table where people get their drinking water could be a good way to deal with the fluids, he said. “Otherwise that water with the nitrates either gets spread across the ground, on golf courses, or dumped in rivers

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who had fought a disastrous campaign in Chechnya. Putin brought Chechnya back under Moscow’s control in a second war. After the installation of proxy leadership to crack down on Chechen separatists and lingering, heavy-handed efforts to squash violence, bloodshed has surged again on the southern edge of Russia — and raised questions about the government’s ability to stabilize the country. Amid increased fighting and instability in Chechnya, as well as neighboring Ingushetia and Dagestan, Russia has stepped up abductions and assassinations of Islamist leaders. The Islamists, in turn, have vowed to visit bloodshed on cities in the heart of Russia. Now Russians are watching keenly to see how Moscow will respond. The public has largely ignored the rampant killings, disappearances and torture that plague its southern flank — until it spills suddenly into Moscow. — Los Angeles Times

like the Deschutes,” Perry said. Nitrates are a controversial issue in the La Pine area, where the Department of Environmental Quality is working on a solution for preventing the compound from seeping out of septic systems into groundwater, possibly contaminating drinking water wells. Parts of the city of La Pine are currently on a sewer system, however, which was designed to treat wastewater and pump it to lagoons, where material is broken down. The effluent is then treated again before its sprayed onto agricultural fields. Treated wastewater has been used at a geothermal facility in Northern California since 2003, where millions of gallons of effluent is pumped from a nearby city to the Geysers geothermal project. John Lund of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology said he’s never heard of any contamination problems with that project. Deschutes County Commissioner Alan Unger noted that a biomass company had mentioned the possibility of using treated effluent from the existing sewer system in La Pine at the city’s industrial park, and said that if the Department of Environmental Quality and other agencies said treated wastewater would be OK, it should be considered. “What I would be is supportive of looking into solutions to move forward with developing energy sources that are nonpolluting, so you weigh those development opportunities with the impacts,” Unger said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

MOSCOW — The two powerful explosions that tore through Moscow’s subway on Monday revived a peculiar fear in the Russian capital, one that goes beyond the usual terrorism worries of a metropolis: the female bomber. On Monday, the Russian authorities said that the bombings had been carried out by two women, and that they were searching for two suspected female accomplices, the Russian news media reported. Earlier this decade, Moscow’s fear of female suicide bombers was so strong it became a lurid obsession. Women, sometimes casually clad in jeans and blending in to the swirl of Moscow, committed at least 16 bombings, including two on board planes. The attacks came early — as when a widow killed herself and the Russian commander who had killed her husband in one of the first such attacks in the Chechen war — and sometimes in the most unlikely places, like mingling in line at a music festival, which only multiplied the horror. Women joined in some of the most well-known terrorist attacks in recent Russian history, at a theater in Moscow and a school in Beslan, Russia.

Black Widows and others The women, who came to be called the Black Widows, were not the first women to die this way. That dubious honor belongs to a 16-year-old Palestinian girl, who drove a truck into an Israeli army convoy in 1985. A former Indian prime minister, Rajiv Gandhi, was killed in 1991 by a member of the Birds of Paradise, a female group associated with the Tamil Tigers of Sri Lanka. Suicide bombing was a tactic that came late to Chechnya and was nearly unknown during the first war from 1994 to 1996. But once it arrived, in 2000, in an attack that killed 27 Russian special forces soldiers, it quickly became associated with women. The tactic expanded in subsequent years. Women adorned in billowy black robes and strapped with explosives made up 19 of the 41 captors in the October 2002 hostage taking

in the Moscow theater, which ended when Russian special services released a sleep-inducing gas into the building. When soldiers entered the auditorium they reportedly, as a first precaution, shot dead the Black Widows where they lay, lest they wake up and explode. In 2004, female suicide bombers detonated bombs on domestic flights; one bomber identified by the Russian authorities was in her early 40s, and two others were sisters in their 20s.

Why do they do it? While there is no single reason that women decide to give up their lives, experts said they have usually suffered a traumatic event that makes them burn with revenge or question whether they want to live. In the case of the attacks in Russia, this could be the death of a child, husband or other family member at the hands of Russian forces, or a rape. Russian authorities have said the women are sometimes drugged. In 2003, the Russian police captured a 22-year-old Chechen woman, Zarema Muzhakhoyeva, after she left a handbag bomb in a Moscow cafe. She was not a religious fanatic, her lawyer, Natalya Yevlapova, said in a telephone interview, but she had become emotionally distressed after her husband was murdered in what appeared to be a business dispute. “These girls are just pushed into a corner,” Yevlapova said. A rare window on the world of female suicide bombing appeared when Russian police captured Muzhakhoyeva. She later said she intentionally bungled the attack because she had lost the will to die. A Federal Security Service bomb squad member died defusing her explosive-laden bag. She was sentenced to 20 years in prison. In recent weeks, the Russian military conducted a series of raids that killed a prominent and charismatic recruiter for the rebels, a man who went by the name Said Buryatsky, along with dozens of other fighters. That had prompted a warning from a prominent rebel leader, who may or may not have made good his threat on Monday.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Climate Continued from A1 Climatologists, who study weather patterns over time, almost universally endorse the view that the Earth is warming and that humans have contributed to climate change. There is less of a consensus among meteorologists, who predict short-term weather patterns. Joe Bastardi, for example, a senior forecaster and meteorologist with AccuWeather, maintains that it is more likely that the planet is cooling, and he distrusts the data put forward by climate scientists as evidence for rising global temperatures. “There is a great deal of consternation among a lot of us over the readjustment of data that is going on and some of the portrayals that we are seeing,” Bastardi said in a video segment posted recently on AccuWeather’s Web site. Such skepticism appears to be widespread among TV forecasters, about half of whom have a degree in meteorology. A study released on Monday by researchers at George Mason University and the University of Texas at Austin found that only about half of the 571 television weathercasters surveyed believed that global warming was occurring and fewer than a third believed that climate change was “caused mostly by human activities.” More than a quarter of the weathercasters in the survey agreed with the statement “Global warming is a scam,” the researchers found.

A growing divide The split between climate scientists and meteorologists is gaining attention in political and academic circles because polls show that public skepticism about global warming is increasing, and weather forecasters — especially those on television — dominate communications channels to the public. A study released earlier this year by researchers at Yale and George Mason, for example, found that 56 percent of Americans trusted weathercasters to tell them about global warming far more than they trusted other news media or public figures like former Vice President Al Gore or Sarah Palin, the former vice-presidential candidate. The George Mason-Texas survey found that about half of the weathercasters said they had discussed global warming on their broadcasts during informal chats with anchors, and nearly 90 percent said they had talked about climate change at live appearances at Kiwanis Club-type events. Several well-known forecasters — including John Coleman in San Diego and Anthony Watts, a retired Chico, Calif., weatherman who now has a popular blog

Budget Continued from A1 He outlined the county’s budget issues in a March 2 memorandum to the County Commission and other budget committee members, obtained by The Bulletin on Monday through a public records request. In the past, public agencies in Oregon have been able to plan for property tax revenues increasing by at least 3 percent annually because of the way taxes are assessed in the state. Dramatic declines in property values mean tax revenues will only grow by 2.2 percent to 2.3 percent in the next budget year, and there could no increase or even a decline in tax revenue in the following budget year, Kanner said.

Departments face cuts County officials plan to lay off an equipment operator and an attendant at the landfill, in addition to the layoffs announced Friday of five employees who work with youth at the county’s juvenile detention center. Knott Landfill in east Bend is currently open seven days a week, and it will probably close on Sundays to save money. The Redmond waste transfer station will also close one day a week, said Timm Schimke, the director of the county Department of Solid Waste. “We’re kind of hunkering down here, making sure we do whatever we can do to cover our operating costs,” Schimke said. Schimke said he doesn’t know whether his department has hit the bottom of its fall in revenues, and he has had to stop saving money for future landfill expansions. Until now, the impacts of the recession have been limited to a couple of county departments, most notably the building fee-

“In a sense, the question is who owns the atmosphere: the people who predict it every day or the people who predict it for the next 50 years? And the level of tension has really spiked in recent months.” — Bob Henson, science writer for the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

— have been vociferous in their critiques of global warming. The dissent has been heightened by recent challenges to climate science, including the discovery of a handful of errors in the landmark 2007 report on global warming by the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the unauthorized release of hundreds of e-mail messages from a British climate research center last fall that skeptics say show that climate scientists had tried to suppress data. “In a sense, the question is who owns the atmosphere: the people who predict it every day or the people who predict it for the next 50 years?” said Bob Henson, a science writer for the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, who trained as a meteorologist and has closely followed the divide between the two groups. Henson added, “And the level of tension has really spiked in recent months.”

Different methods, different views The reasons behind the divergence in views are complex. The American Meteorological Society, which confers its coveted seal of approval on qualified weather forecasters, has affirmed the conclusion of the United Nations’ climate panel that warming is occurring and that human activities are very likely the cause. In a statement sent to Congress in 2009, the meteorological society warned that the buildup of heattrapping gases like carbon dioxide in the atmosphere would lead to “major negative consequences.” Yet, climate scientists use very different scientific methods from the meteorologists. Heidi Cullen, a climatologist who straddled the two worlds when she worked at the Weather Channel, noted that meteorologists used models that were intensely sensitive to small changes in the atmosphere but had little accuracy more than seven days out. As a result, Cullen said, meteo-

funded Community Development Department, which has cut staff from 77 employees to 41. The Development Department could face more cuts as of July 1, depending on whether its permit revenues do well in March and April. “I think if there are any more staff reductions, there will be a noticeable erosion in services,” Kanner said. These would likely include delays in getting building inspectors out to projects, delays in getting site plan reviews, longer waits at the Community Development Department’s public counters and reductions in hours at satellite offices in La Pine and Redmond. Employees at the Community Development Department had their paid work hours reduced by 10 percent starting in July 2008, but many are continuing to work more than 50 hours a week for 36-hour-a-week pay, Kanner wrote in his memorandum. Kanner said he would like to return the Community Development Department back to a 40-hour work week, but he is not sure that will be possible any time soon. The department plans to ask for a 15 percent increase in fees. At the juvenile detention center, the five planned layoffs will save approximately $300,000, said Community Justice Director Ken Hales. The department will also leave a position open at least six months when Bob LaCombe, administrator of the Juvenile Community Justice Division of the county Community Justice Department, retires in June. LaCombe’s salary and benefits add up to $154,054, Hales wrote in an e-mail.

A bright spot One county department with a positive budget outlook is the Health Department, which could add about seven jobs in the coming budget year because it has

rologists are often dubious about the predictions made by climate scientists, who use complex models to estimate the effects of climate trends decades in the future. But the cynicism, said Cullen, who now works for Climate Central, a nonprofit group that works to bring the science of climate change to the public, is in her opinion unwarranted. “They are not trying to predict the weather for 2050, just generally say that it will be hotter,” Cullen said of climatologists. “And just like I can predict August will be warmer than January, I can predict that.” Three years ago, Cullen found herself in a heated dispute with meteorologists after she posted a note on the Weather Channel’s Web site suggesting that meteorologists should perhaps not receive professional certification from the meteorological society if they “can’t speak to the fundamental science of climate change.” Resentment may also play a role in the divide. Climatologists are almost always affiliated with universities or research institutions where a doctoral degree is required. Most meteorologists, however, can get jobs as weather forecasters with a college degree. “There is a little bit of elitistversus-populist tensions,” Henson said. “There are meteorologists who feel, ‘Just because I have a bachelor’s degree doesn’t mean I don’t know what’s going on.’”

Closing the gap? Whatever the reasons, meteorologists are far more likely to question the underlying science of climate change. A study published in the January 2009 newsletter of the American Geophysical Union, the professional association of earth scientists, found that while nearly 90 percent of some 3,000 climatologists who responded agreed that there was evidence of human-driven climate change, 80 percent of all earth scientists and 64 percent of meteorologists agreed with the statement. Only economic geologists who specialized in industrial uses of materials like oil and coal were more skeptical. Seeing danger in the divide between climate scientists and meteorologists, a variety of groups concerned with educating the public on climate change — including the National Environmental Education Foundation, a federally financed nonprofit, and Yale — are working to close the gap by using research and educational forums to bring the two groups together. In 2008, for example, Yale began holding regular seminars with well-known weathercasters who are unsure about the climate issue and scientists who are leading experts in the field. The Columbia Journalism Review explored the reasons for the split in an article this year.

received a five-year, $3 million federal grant and more state money because of an expansion of the Oregon Health Plan to insure more people, Kanner said. The additional money will allow the county to add the equivalent of about seven fulltime employees, most of whom will be mental health workers, said Deschutes County Director of Health and Human Services Scott Johnson. The county will also probably use the money to increase nurses’ hours. Deschutes County will use the grant and money from approximately 1,000 more county residents covered by the Oregon Health Plan to expand school based health clinics, add new clinics at schools in Sisters and Redmond and provide family health and child abuse prevention, Johnson said.

One-time projects While the county’s tax revenues are lower than in the past, it expects a windfall this year from delinquent tax payments and Clerk’s Office recording fees, both of which are related to foreclosures. County officials have discussed using the money for one-time projects, such as to revitalize a business loan fund and purchase new case management software for the District Attorney’s Office. “We can’t plan on that money coming in year after year,” Kanner said. “Eventually, the foreclosures are going to stop and revenue streams are going to return to historical norms. If you have created new ongoing expenditures using one-time revenues, eventually those one-time revenues will stop, but those ongoing expenditures will still be there with no way to pay for them.” Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Foreclosure Continued from A1 The money will go to the Oregon Housing and Community Services Department, which now must create programs to slow the rate of foreclosures. The money can be used to give incentives to lenders and servicers to reduce payments or even cut the principal of mortgages, give temporary aid to unemployed homeowners, or steer borrowers toward short sales as an alternative to foreclosure, according to the Treasury Department.

In Central Oregon Central Oregon counties are well-positioned to receive a big slice of the federal award, said Lisa Joyce, spokeswoman for the state Housing and Community Services Department. “That I think probably bodes well for Central Oregon, those guidelines,” Joyce said. “I can’t say we’re going to put 100 percent in Central Oregon, because there is economic distress to spare.” It’s hard to say how many people will be helped by the program. Farrell estimated “hundreds of families” in Oregon would receive aid, but said the figure will vary depending on how the state designs its program. Any help for the unemployed in Central Oregon will be welcome, said Selef Spragg, a housing specialist at NeighborImpact. “At this point any additional help that we can get in this market that we are in right now would be great,” Spragg said. “Being that we have been hit so hard with loss of income and unemployment, it has been tremendously difficult to

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 30, 2010 A5 get homeowners modified into a mortgage that is truly affordable to them.” Deschutes County had the highest foreclosure rate in the state in February, with one for every 177 households, according to RealtyTrac, a company that monitors foreclosures.

Across the nation Federal efforts at helping homeowners haven’t made much difference to date, said University of Oregon economist Tim Duy. The most effective way to cut foreclosures is cutting the principal on loans where homeowners owe much more than their house is worth, he said. “We know one of the problems with helping homeowners is the fact these homes are so far underwater that interest reduction and principal forbearance simply isn’t enough to justify staying in the house and paying the mortgage on it,” Duy said. “It tends to take much more money to make a difference than we expect.” The administration decided to focus on states with the largest pockets of high unemployment, said Treasury Assistant Secretary Alan Krueger, because economic problems tend to snowball in when unemployment is concentrated. “It’s not just unemployment, but concentration of distress,” Krueger said. More specific guidelines for how states can use the funds are expected in two weeks. After that, states have four to six weeks to submit their plans for spending the money, Treasury officials said. The other states receiving the awards are Ohio, Rhode Island, North Carolina and South Carolina. Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

Two states are big winners in ‘Race to the Top’ WASHINGTON — In a high-stakes competition, Tennessee and Delaware were awarded $600 million Monday, the only states to win grants in the first phase of “Race to the Top,” the Obama administration’s $4.35 billion education initiative, said Education Secretary Arne Duncan. Duncan said both states showed that they had overwhelming support for their overhaul plans from all stakeholders — including teachers’ unions, parents, local and state school officials. Such support weighed heavily in the department’s decision. The two states committed to turn around troubled schools and create systems for teacher evaluation. Forty states and the District of Columbia had submitted applications in the lengthy and competitive grant awarding process. Tennessee, with 964,259 students in 1,731 schools, will receive $500 million. Delaware, with 122,574 students in 243 school, won $100 million. They were chosen from a list of 16 finalists. Oregon fell far short in its effort to win the education grants. The Oregonian newspaper reported the state’s application was graded 7th worst among the applicants. The good news for Oregon is that there is still $3.4 billion left for round II of the contest. — From wire reports


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MARKET REPORT

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2,404.36 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +9.23 +.39%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B2-3

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF U.S. to sell its stake in Citigroup this year Nearly 18 months after the federal government stepped in to bail out Citigroup, Washington announced plans on Monday to sell off its ownership stake. The Treasury said Monday that it planned to sell its 7.7 billion common shares in Citigroup over the course of 2010. It will gradually reduce its 27 percent ownership position through a series of stock sales to investors. The government would earn a profit of about $8 billion if it were to sell its entire stake today. That would be on top of $8.1 billion in interest payments and other fees it has already collected, making Citigroup one of the government’s most lucrative investments of the Troubled Asset Relief Program.

Judge: Cancer genes cannot be patented A federal judge on Monday struck down patents on two genes linked to breast and ovarian cancer. The decision, if upheld, could throw into doubt the patents covering thousands of human genes and reshape the law of intellectual property U.S. District Court Judge Robert Sweet issued the 152page decision, which invalidated seven patents related to genes whose mutations have been associated to breast cancer, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Myriad Genetics, the company that holds the patents with the University of Utah Research Foundation, asked the court to dismiss the case, claiming that the work of isolating the DNA from the body transforms it and makes it patentable. Such patents, it said, have been granted for decades. In fact, many in the patent field had predicted the courts would throw out the suit.

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CLOSE 10,895.86 DOW JONES CHANGE +45.50 +.42%

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$1,110.30 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$6.10

Tough year: ‘09 employment data By David Holley The Bulletin

Numbers released by the Oregon Employment Department earlier this month validate what most people already knew: 2009 was a tough year on jobs. Nearly one out of 10 jobs — 7,800 — that existed in 2008 in Central Oregon were lost during 2009, according to a study published by Carolyn Eagan, Central Oregon’s regional economist. That compares to 2008, when 4,000 jobs — or one in every 20 jobs — that existed in 2007 were lost. “If you thought it was hard, here’s the evidence,” Eagan

said about 2009. Crook County was hit hardest, losing about 15.3 percent of the more than 6,700 jobs the county had in 2008. Deschutes County lost 9.4 percent of its overall job count, while Jefferson County dropped by 6.8 percent from 2008 to 2009. All the numbers are annual averages of employment levels during each of the 12 months of the year. Employment Department data shows a lower percentage of job losses from February 2009 to February 2010, compared to the same month in 2008 and 2009. See Jobs / B3

Job losses in Central Oregon since 2006 Crook County

Deschutes County

Jefferson County

The bold-colored bars below represent percentage change of the average annual number of jobs for each county. To show how 2010 is shaping up, the year-over-year change since February 2009 is shown and is represented by the light-colored bars. 5% 0 -5

CHANGE, ’06-’07 .8% 2.4% 2.5%

-10

CHANGE, ’07-’08

CHANGE, ’08-’09

CHANGE, ’09-’10

6.8%

1.3% 3.4% 6.2% Year-over-year for February

5.6% 4.4% 4.3% 9.4%

-15

15.3%

Source: Oregon Employment Department Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

EXECUTIVE FILE

Beachwear galore (beach not included)

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Kelli Brooks, the owner of At the Beach, has been selling swimwear and beach accessories from her downtown Bend location for 14 years. The store originally opened in 1986 and sold hand-painted clothing and shoes.

Bend shop has found success for 24 years, despite the region’s land-locked location By Kimberly Bowker

Correction In a story headlined “IdaTech’s secret? hydrogen, oxygen and a membrane” that ran Monday, March 22, on Page C1, the company’s projected 2010 financial results were reported incorrectly. The company expects product sales in 2010 to be profitable, not the company as a whole. The Bulletin regrets the error.

The basics What: At the Beach Who: Kelli Brooks, owner Where: 850 N.W. Wall St., Bend Phone: 541389-2613 Employees: Two

Personal income

The Bulletin

I

n downtown Bend there is a store that always has a blue sky and a tropical feel. At the Beach, which has been in the same location for 24 years, offers swimwear and other beach accessories such as flip flops, bags and sunglasses. The ceiling is painted blue and the decor is reminiscent of Southern France. But a carpeted floor, used to keep bare feet warm, reminds customers that they are still in Central Oregon. The year-round swimwear

boutique has been owned by Kelli Brooks, 41, since 1996. Brooks is the third owner of the store, which opened as a hand-painted clothing and shoe store in the mid-’80s. The store now offers swimsuits ranging in sizes from skimpy bikinis to size 24. “What I hope we are known for is our customer service and getting people fitted in the right things,” said Brooks, a graduate of the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising in California. As a local boutique owner, Brooks credits customer service

for the store’s longevity and ability to compete with large department stores. At the Beach also carries different brands than stores such as Target and Kohl’s. Swimwear is available all year, which allows Brooks to concentrate on one market and not spread herself too thin. “It’s like any boutique,” she said. “You can’t be everything to everyone.” Brooks is honest with customers and can often guess what brand of suit they will purchase when they walk in the door. “I don’t want someone leaving the store, and it looks bad,” Brooks said. “A, they will bring it back and, B, I don’t want them coming in after vacation and saying they hate their suit.” See Beach / B3

Americans’ personal income: Seasonally adjusted Change from previous month Jan. 0.3% Feb. 0.0%

Sony pursues success to match its scale

$12.2

12.5

By Hiroko Tabuchi New York Times News Service

12.0

11.5 2009

’10

Source: Department of Commerce

AP

NAGOYA, Japan — The airy new Sony store in this central Japanese city has floor-to-ceiling windows, sleek white counters and friendly employees, called stylists, who offer advice and tailored counseling on Sony gadgets. “It’s just like the Apple store,”

TECH FOCUS laughed Yuka Hara, 23, a publishing company employee who was one of thousands of visitors on the store’s first day of business this month.

The store’s copycat design, although more hip and up-to-date than the company’s traditional Sony Style retail outlets, is emblematic of Sony’s struggle to regain its footing in recent years after a host of missteps: The company always seems to be playing catch-up instead of leaping ahead. See Sony / B3

$17.373 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.479

States’ budget tactics raising concern By Mary Williams Walsh New York Times News Service

-20

Consumers remain in a buying mood Consumers kept their wallets open for the fifth month in a row in February even though their incomes remained unchanged, according to government data released Monday. Spending on nondurable goods, such as clothing, jumped 0.9 percent last month, while spending on services rose 0.3 percent. Those increases were partially offset by a 0.2 percent decline in purchases of durable goods such as autos. Total consumer spending increased 0.3 percent. — From wire reports

s

New York Times News Service

California, New York and other states are showing many of the same signs of debt overload that recently took Greece to the brink — budgets that will not balance, accounting that masks debt, the use of derivatives to plug holes, and armies of retired public workers who are counting on benefits that are proving harder and harder to pay. And states are responding in sometimes desperate ways, raising concerns that they, too, could face a debt crisis. New Hampshire was recently ordered by its state supreme court to put back $110 million that it took from a medical malpractice insurance pool to balance its budget. Colorado tried, so far unsuccessfully, to grab a $500 million surplus from Pinnacol Assurance, a state workers’ compensation insurer that was privatized in 2002. It wanted the money for its university system and seems likely to get a lesser amount, perhaps $200 million. Connecticut has tried to issue its own accounting rules. Hawaii has inaugurated a four-day school week. California accelerated its corporate income tax this year, making companies pay 70 percent of their 2010 taxes by June 15. And many states have balanced their budgets with federal health care dollars that Congress has not yet appropriated. Some economists fear the states have a potentially bigger problem than their recessioninduced budget woes. If investors become reluctant to buy the states’ debt, the result could be a credit squeeze, not entirely different from the financial strains in Europe, where markets were reluctant to refinance billions in Greek debt. See States / B4

As end of tax credit looms, a spurt of homebuying By David Streitfeld New York Times News Service

DES MOINES — After several disastrous months for home sales across the country, when volume dropped by 23 percent, the pace appears to be picking up again. The number of Des Moines homes under contract in February rose by a third from the January level. The number of pending contracts jumped 10 percent in Naples, Fla., 14 percent in Houston and 21 percent in Portland. These deals will be reflected in the national sales reports when they become final, this month or next. There is no evidence that prices have begun to move in response to the higher volume. Indeed, so many homes are coming on the market that prices might well fall further. Real estate agents say buyers and sellers are hurrying to take advantage of the tax credit, which is worth up to $8,000 for homebuyers. But the last-minute rush is also prompting some foreboding about what will happen to the market on April 30 when the credit ends — and whether it is too risky to let it end at all. See Home sales / B3


B USI N ESS

B2 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd ADC Tel AEP Ind AES Corp AFLAC AGA Med n AGCO AK Steel AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL n AP Pharma ARCA bio ARYxTher ASML Hld AT&T Inc AT&T 2056 ATC Tech ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio Aarons Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AcadiaPh Accenture AccoBrds Accuray AcmePkt AcordaTh AcornIntl ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom Adaptec AdeonaPh AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agria Cp Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon AlexBld AlexREE Alexion AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch AllegiantT Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliedCap AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptM Allstate AlphaNRs AlphaPro AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AltairN h AlteraCp lf Altria Alumina AlumChina Alvarion AmBev Amazon AmbacF h Ambac3-03n AmcorFn h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AmCareSrc ADairy AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AIntGr pfA AIntlGp rs AIntGr62 AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Americdt Amrign Ameriprise AmeriBrg s Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Angiotch g AnglogldA ABInBev n Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Ansys AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys n Apache AptInv ApolloG g ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldEner h ApldMatl AMCC AquaAm Arbitron ArcelorMit ArchCoal ArchDan ArenaPhm ArenaRes AresCap ArgonSt AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArrwhdR h ArtTech ArtioGInv n ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfo AspenIns AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv Autoliv pfC AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoT n AvalonBay AvanirPhm

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Nm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJ Svcs BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BP Pru BPW Acq BPW Acq wt BPZ Res BRE BRF-Brasil BWAY Baidu Inc BakrHu Baldor BallCp Ballanty BallardPw BallyTech BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BkOzarks BankAtl A BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPNG BiPLive Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden BellMicro Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biocryst BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo h BioSante BioTime n Biovail Blkboard BlackRock BlkCrAll2 BlkDebtStr BlkGlbOp BlkrkHigh BlkIntlG&I BlkRlAsst BlkSenHgh Blackstone BlockHR Blockbstr BlckbstrB Blount BlueCoat BdwlkPpl BobEvn Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele Braskem BreitBurn BrdgptEd n BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brinker Brinks BrinksHSec BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BrdpntGlch BroadrdgF BrdwindE n BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BungeLt BurgerKing CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBS B CDC Cp A CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKE Rst CKX Inc CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNH Gbl CNOOC CNX Gas CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CACI Cadence CalDive Cal-Maine CalaStrTR Calgon CalifPizza Calix n CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs g CP Rwy g CdnSolar CdnSEn g CanoPet CapGold n CapOne CapitlSrce Caplease CapsteadM CpstnTrb CarboCer CardnlHlt s CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusn n Care Inv CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carmike Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet Cbeyond CedarF CedarSh CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf s CenovusE n

D 0.80 36.08 +.63 6.90 +.11 12.19 +.26 1.00 21.12 +.20 29.75 +1.38 0.88 33.96 +.71 0.84 31.40 +.50 0.60 32.20 -.05 1.74 29.65 +.29 30.55 +.60 0.32 6.07 -.29 1.66 80.77 +2.18 1.66 68.55 +1.82 0.20 20.87 +.29 36.67 +.05 37.98 -.37 3.36 56.89 +.20 7.98 97.59 +4.28 12.45 +1.31 1.79 +.40 7.24 +.14 1.50 36.04 -.76 0.26 51.81 +2.39 20.07 +2.72 603.50 +7.13 0.60 45.65 +.78 0.68 37.22 +.12 0.40 54.05 +.05 5.42 -.32 2.90 -.11 40.66 +1.28 0.39 13.93 +.03 0.76 17.92 +.48 0.87 13.57 +.11 0.20 11.94 +.18 0.88 21.08 +.21 0.04 18.04 +.14 2.05 25.61 +.11 9.66 +.04 3.71 +.15 6.60 -.84 2.80 60.47 +.32 0.36 30.96 +.06 1.96 50.03 +.41 0.56 34.75 +1.06 1.92 -.06 39.96 +.72 26.40 +.78 9.58 -.06 29.67 +.67 0.16 22.08 +.23 67.45 -.65 21.58 -.41 0.68 86.45 +.68 1.00 22.51 -.38 0.32 19.59 -.26 0.40 37.81 +.40 7.95 -.25 1.16 58.71 +.28 2.16 33.50 -.47 .45 +.02 19.31 +.11 4.73 -.07 0.10 9.43 -.02 0.72 63.69 -.31 1.48 79.00 +.49 43.90 -.10 0.20 26.92 +1.31 6.91 +1.53 6.63 +.23 0.92 29.26 +.02 20.92 -.05 0.24 26.19 +.29 81.75 +.45 0.30 28.23 +1.17 0.56 43.00 -.16 37.32 -.19 30.08 +.92 7.10 +.44 58.42 +.27 23.28 +.19 0.56 16.65 -.07 .44 +.02 1.87 +.01 7.70 +.28 0.36 16.86 +.56 42.06 -.37 4.00 220.05 +.78 0.90 10.14 -.07 0.37 4.23 +.01 2.28 19.60 -.36 0.17 2.01 +.01 1.82 11.50 +.11 1.09 13.10 +.22 0.30 4.12 -.09 1.20 14.27 -.26 0.60 17.78 +.10 .28 -.03 .21 -.03 10.34 -.07 31.42 2.00 29.43 +.33 0.72 31.42 +.60 1.68 74.11 +1.52 6.01 +.10 .58 +.01 2.36 +.06 1.93 -.13 37.07 +.04 0.04 7.20 -.06 2.00 76.25 +.56 7.19 +.18 0.22 11.25 +.01 9.86 -.25 0.60 12.88 +.08 0.97 19.62 +.94 14.68 +.27 14.66 +.25 24.31 -.49 0.44 20.36 +.20 16.15 +1.02 7.51 +.06 0.56 19.58 -.01 0.40 28.34 +.56 42.43 +.13 1.28 27.00 +.31 37.83 +.81 0.32 33.31 +.19 4.17 -.13 0.56 21.72 +.35 4.62 -.02 5.66 +.01 21.56 -.45 0.52 25.83 +.39 0.56 15.70 +.19 0.31 17.83 +.02 0.28 15.57 -.01 1.20 58.78 +1.49 14.66 -.04 0.05 16.25 +.17 0.80 36.92 +.03 0.10 69.80 +2.32 0.16 31.30 +.43 0.84 63.53 -.31 0.25 21.01 +.07 0.16 23.38 -.03 15.98 +1.03 0.80 13.94 +.05 0.20 14.14 +.21 3.05 +.02 0.40 92.93 -.24 1.00 56.09 +.53 0.04 36.35 +.45 38.98 -.02 0.24 11.00 +.02 6.05 +.09 0.90 26.56 +.33 4.60 315.64 -.06 0.60 15.55 +.02 26.82 -.12 32.64 +.79 5.16 166.48 +3.55 38.00 0.96 51.51 +.52 0.07 16.69 +.32 0.34 10.18 -.01 8.94 +.24 0.35 37.07 +.28 17.82 -.13 0.40 23.96 +.23 0.72 31.00 -.04 0.12 37.13 +.73 50.30 -.45 6.68 +.06 7.02 +.02 0.75 35.90 -1.36 0.63 9.15 17.01 -.23 16.96 +.09 13.25 -.37 0.04 8.76 -.22 5.57 +.07 11.99 +.39 1.80 42.30 +.11 0.28 27.36 +.65 42.21 +1.11 1.10 35.56 +.64 1.08 60.56 +.43 0.60 72.00 +1.99 0.99 55.50 +1.27 23.80 +1.77 .56 +.01 1.22 +.07 3.34 -.05 0.20 42.65 +.73 0.04 5.77 -.04 0.24 5.34 -.05 2.18 11.96 -.21 1.26 -.08 0.72 62.76 +1.70 0.70 36.07 +.65 .50 +.03 12.90 +1.06 25.80 +.35 0.68 8.90 -.02 32.43 +.47 0.64 38.46 +.16 25.78 +.77 14.22 -.64 0.40 38.98 +.18 0.72 36.53 +1.24 23.06 +.82 30.55 -.19 0.34 31.47 +.17 42.51 +.34 1.68 63.48 +1.04 0.04 11.57 -.07 24.53 +.03 13.17 +.19 11.61 -.09 0.36 7.87 -.08 .69 +.04 0.16 32.19 +.42 7.19 +.04 11.08 +.21 62.48 +.34 .60 -.04 6.22 +.07 0.40 10.33 +.28 0.98 16.82 +.29 0.80 25.12 +.69

Nm Centene CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CenGrdA lf CenPacF CentAl CntryTel Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp Changyou n ChRvLab ChrmSh ChkPoint Checkpnt Cheesecake ChelseaTh CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaCbl wt ChinaCbl rs ChiElMot n ChiGengM ChinaGreen ChinaGrnT ChinaInfo ChinIntE n ChinaLife ChinaLdg n ChinaMda ChinaMble ChNEPet n ChinaPet ChinaPhH n ChinaPStl ChinaRE n ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaTInfo ChinaUni ChiValve n ChinaYuch ChipMOS Chiquita ChoiceHtls Chordiant Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinedigm Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitiTdecs n CitizRep h CitrixSys CityBank CityTlcm Clarient h ClaudeR g ClayGSol CleanEngy Clearwire Clearw rt ClickSft CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CCHellenic CocaCl Coeur rs Cogent CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmclMtls CmclVehcl ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao CompssMn CompPrdS Comptn gh CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant Conns ConocPhil Conolog Conseco ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys ConvOrgn h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copel CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd CostPlus Costco Cott Cp Cntwd pfA CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp Crane Cray Inc CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs Crossh glf CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CurEuro CybrSrce Cyclacel CyprsBio CypSemi CytRx Cytec Cytori DARABio h DCT Indl DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE Daimler DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling DaVita DayStar h DeVry DealrTrk DeanFds DeckOut DeerCon s Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath dELIAs Dell Inc DeltaAir DltaPtr Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DeutBCT5 pf DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DeutTel DevelDiv DevonE Dex One n Diageo DiaOffs

D 24.12 +.60 0.78 14.47 +.28 1.56 14.97 +.58 35.19 +.30 29.01 -.56 0.01 13.94 +.15 9.51 +.14 1.66 14.59 +.19 2.90 35.52 +.12 72.62 +2.03 17.74 +.09 84.38 -1.92 2.81 -.06 29.89 -.19 39.47 +.27 6.70 -.05 34.65 -.05 22.81 +.11 27.30 -.03 3.80 -.05 1.70 15.90 +.22 0.30 23.28 +.91 2.72 75.23 +.80 23.55 +.20 0.16 14.23 +.17 45.38 +.56 0.54 3.98 +.05 27.74 +.38 8.65 +.06 23.80 +.81 2.49 +.15 .02 -.00 1.45 -.33 5.39 +.15 3.23 +.10 14.01 -.06 4.02 +.19 5.30 +.12 10.60 +.66 0.51 71.33 +1.09 14.75 +.83 13.85 +.36 1.81 48.56 +.52 8.99 -.03 1.46 81.86 -.48 3.11 -.21 2.15 9.98 +.35 7.76 +.07 4.12 +.20 7.06 0.29 11.52 +.39 13.29 -.22 0.35 18.01 +2.98 .78 +.06 16.26 -.35 0.74 34.94 +.14 5.06 1.48 52.47 +.24 1.42 19.41 +.39 0.56 67.26 +.77 15.26 -.18 0.32 58.67 +1.81 3.55 +.10 1.58 29.31 +.31 1.84 +.34 0.72 17.82 -.38 0.48 28.35 +.43 7.91 +.02 26.51 +.04 2.13 25.73 -.05 4.18 -.13 7.50 124.75 -3.71 1.08 +.04 47.98 -.11 1.17 0.49 15.87 +.21 2.72 +.04 1.13 +.10 8.55 +.15 21.85 +.59 7.20 +.07 .20 +.03 6.99 -.03 0.35 72.85 +1.59 2.00 64.99 +.43 16.41 +.31 0.30 39.98 -.33 13.65 +.15 0.36 28.09 +.49 2.60 26.99 -.23 1.76 54.77 +.12 14.65 +.10 10.16 -.07 51.14 +.05 0.96 14.88 +.09 0.37 7.24 -.10 32.90 -.05 6.94 -.05 2.12 84.98 +.54 22.00 -.24 0.60 13.04 -.24 1.09 1.24 -.01 0.38 18.50 +.16 0.38 17.62 +.08 0.20 37.88 +.32 0.48 15.40 +.26 7.45 +.22 28.74 +.47 37.73 20.90 -.33 0.47 65.60 +.50 1.56 79.88 +.59 11.63 +.63 .94 54.97 +.39 8.42 -.02 31.21 +1.26 32.10 +.12 0.40 35.47 +.29 0.80 25.03 +.39 20.73 +.24 49.70 +1.44 43.87 +.17 3.55 +.16 7.69 +.25 2.20 51.15 +.13 1.64 +.26 6.39 +.27 0.40 42.66 +.16 2.38 44.58 +.40 23.22 +.19 16.31 +.30 0.96 35.44 -.06 22.25 41.23 +3.69 3.80 -.18 12.69 +.12 .88 -.01 0.06 38.51 +.49 1.08 46.72 +.24 0.42 19.94 -.49 2.30 23.76 +.43 0.81 20.90 +.45 18.16 +.01 0.56 35.45 +.84 0.20 20.10 +.31 1.57 41.03 -.02 19.82 +.21 9.56 +.29 2.30 -.04 0.72 60.14 +.01 8.00 +.23 1.69 21.81 +.07 0.13 8.41 -.08 60.45 +.07 16.68 +.10 25.08 +.17 0.72 49.50 +.12 5.73 +.06 0.80 35.32 +.58 6.07 -.16 1.85 51.12 +.99 0.32 3.04 -.03 71.44 +1.31 8.34 .19 +.00 8.24 +.19 37.68 +.64 27.14 +.26 40.39 +.87 22.66 +.08 1.72 55.67 +.17 0.70 63.08 +.72 134.46 +.66 17.83 +.04 2.38 +.02 5.06 +.11 11.54 +.07 1.15 0.05 47.36 +1.00 4.67 +.08 .49 +.02 0.28 5.43 +.02 3.99 -.02 0.78 9.32 +.08 1.21 27.31 +.29 0.15 13.03 -.10 0.60 42.00 +.49 25.76 -.50 2.12 45.38 +.68 47.24 +.29 12.40 -.08 0.16 77.37 +.75 1.00 44.97 +.68 9.13 +.12 63.09 +.47 .30 -.03 0.20 66.12 -.14 17.38 +.20 15.80 +.13 138.17 +.44 12.33 +.46 1.12 61.35 +1.07 .46 +.04 0.20 14.52 +.27 7.62 +.36 1.65 +.01 14.96 -.03 14.65 +.15 1.46 +.04 1.00 19.60 -.12 6.83 +.05 16.25 +.65 37.34 +.47 1.43 +.04 3.95 +.17 0.20 34.48 +.31 3.63 +.14 0.70 78.63 +1.15 2.01 25.51 -.22 7.61 +.21 26.99 +.08 1.05 13.33 +.13 0.08 12.50 +.12 0.64 64.57 +1.37 26.59 +.17 2.36 66.43 -.04 0.50 85.82 +1.14

Nm

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0.03 10.08 +.26 14.63 +.39 26.56 -.09 1.08 31.79 +.26 .50 +.01 1.92 54.95 +.44 29.13 +.07 28.15 +.66 0.16 23.67 +.04 22.67 +.21 33.23 -.23 28.11 156.83 +.16 7.86 23.09 129.50 +7.38 44.39 -2.44 13.31 -.04 0.46 97.98 +.55 0.04 8.64 +.03 12.32 186.10 7.06 -.10 4.85 55.38 +.87 13.87 -.26 8.22 59.98 +1.00 10.55 -.61 5.18 38.26 +1.89 0.08 15.35 -.04 33.60 +.01 29.43 -.11 .54 +.00 2.00 20.48 +.02 0.35 35.16 -.15 59.31 +.12 12.37 +.28 25.35 +.36 33.75 -.15 59.65 -.06 1.83 41.18 +.58 13.78 -.01 64.86 +.94 0.48 45.88 -.05 1.04 21.50 +.26 0.40 15.41 -.06 1.04 46.64 +.57 0.60 29.52 -.39 0.60 35.64 -.16 9.55 -.28 39.34 -3.47 26.50 -.04 31.32 -1.32 0.42 4.34 +.01 60.47 +1.34 3.87 +.02 5.88 +.13 1.64 37.72 +.03 0.32 21.27 -.45 0.84 12.22 +.06 0.96 16.59 +.17 0.68 12.66 -.03 1.40 74.22 +.72 1.78 26.51 -.42 .24 +.02 2.75 +.15 3.39 +.07 9.00 +.09 1.34 1.27 +.05

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19.60 -.08 1.59 +.04 27.28 -.17 16.61 -.18 18.06 -.50 25.39 +.29 0.62 92.96 +3.37 0.88 41.21 +.92 6.56 +.09 15.94 5.30 +.19 0.40 26.60 +.84 0.56 8.45 +.09 0.04 17.99 -.10 1.76 63.99 +.62 6.00 +.03 2.30 +.09 2.00 76.09 +1.52 0.64 33.89 +.31 1.02 15.63 -.28 1.39 15.86 -.03 1.23 13.87 +.01 1.62 13.25 +.10 1.53 12.03 +.02 1.80 16.46 -.72 1.56 13.33 -.20 16.22 +.13 20.11 -.14 0.62 43.63 +.14 1.26 34.20 +.50 0.20 5.93 -.04 1.39 -.02 0.04 10.85 +.25 1.44 27.39 +.40 7.36 +.07 12.16 +.07 7.48 +.41 18.68 -.17 0.55 24.00 +.34 1.21 -.06 16.89 -.01 1.34 49.83 +.03 1.10 2.37 -.07 13.33 +.05 3.96 50.42 +1.09 0.80 30.34 +.87 1.36 +.03 3.28 +.01 23.73 +.34 1.00 36.77 +.32 4.81 +.13 29.91 +.01 0.52 47.00 +.18 63.42 +1.26 7.49 +.25 1.10 +.05 2.16 33.41 +.32 3.58 46.42 +.83 18.12 +.47 0.10 6.46 +.15 2.16 23.25 +.30 0.53 19.89 +.41 24.65 +.25 0.10 43.19 +.72 4.99 3.00 81.61 +1.33 1.50 24.75 +.01 .54 -.03 2.24 33.83 -.02 2.59 -.05 2.60 41.95 -.13 4.84 +.37 5.96 -.28 10.32 +.07 0.16 36.40 +.31 97.09 +.64 0.88 19.10 1.35 39.36 +.01 0.19 10.35 +.18 0.32 32.30 +.25 4.13 88.50 -.27 0.55 65.08 +1.16 50.29 +.60 18.83 +.05 0.60 30.65 -.74 1.92 80.86 +1.09 .21 +.00 1.12 10.63 +.03 1.11 -.10 6.09 +.22 0.12 18.15 +.33 6.02 +.01 2.10 43.92 +.73 6.22 -.17 5.76 +.19 0.28 24.35 +1.41 0.38 37.02 +.35 102.24 +1.62 3.90 +.12 24.31 +.50 0.23 13.03 +.03 2.99 +.05 1.68 67.30 +.76 19.70 +.47 21.22 +.30 62.62 +.06 4.73 -.17 27.97 +.06 0.50 60.45 +.28 62.96 +1.32 0.48 8.32 -.15 2.00 48.58 +.77 3.72 +.05 40.04 +1.14 26.99 -.01 0.80 72.98 +.58 0.08 25.50 -.27 10.66 +.10 0.62 36.88 -.05 1.06 1.39 -.06 1.33 -.07 0.80 48.43 +.15 0.44 92.23 +.88 0.20 10.78 -.20 2.64 73.60 +.17 0.96 26.23 -.09 6.01 +.12 8.88 +.25 21.96 +.64 0.60 14.78 -.03 0.20 23.57 -.09 1.20 11.51 -.12 0.04 13.31 +.12 15.39 -.06 0.16 16.12 -.86 0.88 33.55 -.15 2.17 +.04 22.01 +.60 0.12 6.74 -.13 0.80 14.07 +.02 8.29 +.10 0.11 16.69 +.14 3.05 +.11 0.04 13.54 -.11 0.56 14.30 +.03 0.80 15.09 +.39 119.37 +2.87 0.08 17.17 +.41 2.20 38.99 +.20 0.64 21.28 +.11 50.53 +.12 .60 +.03 9.60 +.87 7.95 +.09 0.70 25.17 -.10 1.16 110.51 +1.18 0.50 46.98 +.72 16.86 +.27 0.34 47.13 +.43 2.72 +1.33 0.60 15.14 +.08 6.08 +.14

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D 13.57 -.29 3.25 48.20 -.52 13.93 +.20 31.54 +.46 25.82 +.82 17.78 +.18 17.40 +.35 4.02 -.09 0.76 49.34 +.28 38.26 +.42 27.57 +.66 0.50 29.46 +.14 0.88 111.24 +.50 1.28 -.04 1.40 -.07 0.16 12.45 -.05 0.60 82.88 +3.71 6.75 115.27 +4.55 .15 -.03 5.18 +.16 1.00 7.40 +.05 2.23 -.10 13.47 +.12 0.90 30.65 +.90 30.99 +.49 2.88 -.02 0.27 23.41 +.36 0.12 10.49 +.24 11.24 -.43 1.12 29.00 -.24 0.20 5.97 +.02 3.22 +.15 8.26 +.01 27.66 -.22 5.43 +.06 27.05 -.99 0.72 13.82 +.12 0.44 5.15 +.07 1.68 17.54 +.14 0.09 13.85 -.29 1.28 24.95 +.18 21.77 -.23 8.42 +.13 0.16 16.72 +.18 0.40 23.23 -.19 0.20 44.42 +.71 1.50 39.14 -.80 22.70 +.02 .33 +.03 28.70 +.51 48.35 +.45 20.79 +1.20 5.59 +.28 14.42 -.33 27.56 +.28 5.83 +.04 1.68 78.48 +1.56 0.40 18.40 +.06 16.73 +.24 0.50 7.42 +.06 1.96 70.86 +.38 3.46 +.12 4.23 +.10 .55 -.01 30.92 +.31 33.99 +.14 0.18 16.53 +.86 0.44 20.02 -.08 28.90 +.26 1.64 42.06 +.18 2.81 -.09 17.60 +.07 52.98 -.02 7.55 -.09 18.68 +.30 7.66 +.25 0.16 15.84 +.90 5.83 +.04 3.19 +.01 26.50 +.33 45.88 +.54 0.52 15.29 -.03 1.94 38.12 +.10 0.40 5.20 -.12 8.18 -.09 6.28 +.13 0.08 45.87 +.27 2.29 -.15 1.33 -.04 11.01 -.05 0.40 12.46 +.36 0.17 12.31 +.16 0.18 37.51 +.42 3.83 +.13 1.40 174.05 +1.18 1.08 71.05 +.04 15.60 -.04 13.15 +.12 562.45 -.24 28.57 -.31 0.80 32.06 +.57 13.50 +.44 1.84 109.47 +.42 2.89 +.01 5.92 +.08 26.32 -.09 0.52 30.64 +.28 3.78 -.07 1.73 +.03 7.11 +.15 1.72 +.04 0.07 5.21 +.09 0.83 18.38 +.07 94.01 +.88 14.46 +.10 1.80 83.18 -1.89 12.99 -.03 32.86 -.87 2.20 1.19 20.93 +.35 0.64 47.19 -.25 26.84 +.29 10.64 -.01 0.05 1.19 -.07 52.85 -.70 0.54 27.87 -.21 1.86 33.13 -.24 0.60 138.13 +3.27 0.48 8.13 +.07 1.70 51.25 +.17 2.03 26.80 +.44 30.85 +.36 57.32 +.34 17.76 +.13 0.36 29.87 +.51 8.04 -.08 28.14 +.11 18.51 -.31 1.00 43.36 +.26 2.21 +.15 43.05 -.14 0.40 28.32 +.40 47.26 +.05 6.40 -.02 0.06 9.59 +.14 0.88 46.85 +.65 0.82 32.04 +.37 0.20 28.18 +.21 1.81 26.25 7.27 +.49 1.00 39.22 +.81 4.65 26.80 -.08 1.24 22.44 +.19 7.51 -.12 4.80 -.04 2.72 45.83 -.05 8.81 +.13 1.20 23.80 -.14 25.26 +.39 18.24 -.06 17.35 -.32 3.61 +.23 1.48 -.06 0.08 16.43 +.44 5.64 -.06 .77 -.01 5.42 +.09 1.68 45.64 +.07 .73 -.05 12.60 +.21 0.20 37.77 +1.27 .77 +.03 58.20 +.39 0.80 46.10 +1.48 4.22 +.18 0.80 10.76 +.22 0.20 4.90 -.11 1.28 42.87 +.38 9.91 -.10 0.40 61.08 +1.41 39.83 -.21 0.32 52.97 -.45 14.26 25.22 -.85 23.06 +1.25 25.86 -.18

Nm HghldsCrdt HighwdPrp HilltopH HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp HomeProp HomexDev Honda HonwllIntl Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HstnAEn HovnanE HudsCity HugotnR HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HuronCon HutchT Hyatt n Hyperdyn

D 0.63 7.84 +.11 1.70 32.52 +.36 11.77 +.29 0.60 28.04 +.23 11.20 +.01 18.41 +.15 0.95 32.60 -.15 2.32 47.12 +.34 28.34 +.92 35.39 +.15 1.21 44.87 +.27 0.84 42.44 +.49 18.48 -.06 12.11 +.18 56.86 +.35 1.80 23.32 -.02 0.04 14.62 +.03 6.44 +.06 0.02 18.55 +1.24 4.71 -.09 0.60 14.13 +.14 0.83 16.32 +.26 31.13 +.47 47.43 +.23 0.48 35.64 0.04 5.45 -.02 0.40 12.60 -.10 20.40 +.28 6.58 +.19 39.53 +.08 1.25

I-J-K-L IAC Inter 22.87 -.25 IAMGld g 0.06 13.56 +.13 ICICI Bk 0.46 42.92 +1.48 IdexxLabs 57.55 +1.67 IHS Inc 53.37 +.43 ING GRE 0.54 7.78 +.28 ING GlbDv 1.50 13.00 +.15 ING 10.01 +.14 INGPrRTr 0.30 6.19 +.02 ION Geoph 5.02 +.19 iPass 0.48 1.12 -.01 iShGSCI 30.94 +.67 iSAstla 0.66 24.22 +.39 iShBraz 2.72 72.34 +1.90 iSCan 0.33 27.82 +.34 iShEMU 1.05 35.98 +.29 iShGer 0.55 21.84 +.25 iSh HK 0.38 16.43 +.17 iShJapn 0.14 10.51 +.13 iSh Kor 0.32 49.68 +.94 iSMalas 0.24 11.57 +.22 iShMex 0.70 53.06 +.85 iShSing 0.33 11.64 +.20 iSPacxJpn 1.43 43.38 +.54 iShSoAfr 2.08 59.40 +.78 iSSpain 2.05 42.87 +.27 iSTaiwn 0.21 12.57 +.21 iSh UK 0.42 16.15 +.18 iShSilver 17.04 +.43 iShS&P100 1.04 53.77 +.24 iShDvsAlt 49.46 +.17 iShDJDv 1.65 46.16 +.32 iShBTips 4.12 103.36 -.13 iShChina25 0.55 41.62 +.79 iShDJTr 0.95 79.00 +.57 iSSP500 2.22 117.71 +.65 iShBAgB 3.96 104.10 -.12 iShEMkts 0.58 41.84 +.74 iShiBxB 5.64 105.66 -.09 iSSPGth 0.82 60.01 +.36 iShNatRes 0.36 34.15 +.73 iShSPLatA 0.75 47.75 +1.19 iSSPVal 1.20 56.71 +.31 iShB20 T 3.65 88.61 -.34 iShB7-10T 3.84 89.20 -.13 iShB1-3T 1.54 83.33 +.04 iS Eafe 1.44 55.98 +.47 iSRusMCV 0.72 40.51 +.37 iSRusMCG 0.39 48.87 +.45 iShRsMd 1.22 89.68 +.79 iSSPMid 0.93 79.16 +.69 iShiBxHYB 8.17 88.74 +.11 iShNsdqBio 91.93 +.63 iShC&SRl 1.93 57.91 -.01 iSR1KV 1.22 61.27 +.41 iSR1KG 0.69 52.12 +.28 iSRus1K 1.06 64.78 +.42 iSR2KV 1.00 64.17 +.32 iShBarIntC 4.81 103.96 +.02 iShBarc1-3 3.88 104.46 +.01 iSR2KG 0.42 73.68 +.40 iShR2K 0.75 68.18 +.37 iShBar3-7 3.01 110.94 iShBShtT 0.28 110.18 iShUSPfd 2.88 39.02 +.02 iSRus3K 1.12 69.08 +.34 iShDJTch 0.25 58.50 +.04 iShREst 1.86 50.33 +.22 iShFnSv 0.46 59.62 +.05 iShFnSc 0.68 57.33 +.13 iShUSEngy 0.48 32.99 +.59 iShSPSm 0.54 59.81 +.21 iShBasM 0.79 63.87 +.86 iShDJOG 0.24 53.91 +1.52 iSSCVal 0.84 64.53 +.23 iSMsciG 1.16 56.53 +.65 iStar 4.71 -.02 ITC Hold 1.28 55.27 +.56 ITT Corp 1.00 53.93 +1.19 ITT Ed 113.15 +.09 icad h 1.54 +.14 Icagen h .84 +.02 Icon PLC 26.81 -.37 IconixBr 15.69 -.30 Idacorp 1.20 34.68 +.33 IDEX 0.48 33.21 +.39 iGo Inc h 1.95 +.29 Ikanos 3.00 +.03 ITW 1.24 47.21 +.29 Illumina 39.20 +.03 Imax Corp 17.71 +.61 Immucor 22.06 +.37 ImunoGn 8.21 +.21 Imunmd 3.41 ImpaxLabs 17.99 +.28 Incyte 14.06 -.01 IndSvAm 16.90 +.25 Inergy 2.74 37.13 +.44 Infinera 8.40 +.06 infoGRP 7.89 +.01 InfoSpace 10.78 -.11 Informat 26.73 +.03 InfosysT 0.49 60.30 -.62 IngerRd 0.28 34.65 +.01 IngrmM 17.75 +.09 InlandRE 0.57 9.61 -.21 InovioBio 1.30 -.05 Insmed 1.14 +.03 Insulet 15.09 +.28 IntegLfSci 43.40 +.52 IntgDv 6.19 +.12 ISSI 10.21 +.54 IntegrysE 2.72 46.95 +.64 Intel 0.63 22.33 +.09 IntractDat 0.80 32.30 +.26 IntcntlEx 111.36 +.28 InterDig 27.54 -.19 Intrface 0.01 11.65 +.35 InterMune 46.00 -1.25 InterNAP 5.67 +.10 IBM 2.20 128.59 -.67 Intl Coal 4.74 +.19 IntFlav 1.00 47.96 +2.31 IntlGame 0.24 18.44 +.68 IntPap 0.10 25.15 +.16 IntlRectif 22.79 +.27 InterntCap 8.45 -.06 InetInfra 0.05 2.97 -.02 InterOil g 63.98 +1.97 Interpublic 8.49 +.16 Intersil 0.48 14.77 -.02 IntPotash 28.95 -.15 Intuit 34.32 +.08 IntSurg 347.79 +5.79 Invacare 0.05 26.92 -.53 inVentiv 22.25 +2.19 Invernss 39.56 -.25 Invesco 0.41 21.47 +.40 InvTech 17.09 -.12 InvRlEst 0.69 9.07 +.09 IronMtn 0.25 27.74 +.71 IsilonSys 8.55 +.20 Isis 10.31 -.05 ItauUnibH 0.49 21.28 +.70 Itron 74.95 +2.08 IvanhoeEn 3.36 +.09 IvanhM g 17.09 +.63 Ixia 9.33 -.24 JCrew 46.59 -.14 j2Global 23.37 +.28 JA Solar 5.48 +.47 JDASoft 28.38 -.05 JDS Uniph 11.96 +.18

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm JPMorgCh JPMAlerian JPMCh pfB Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesApp JonesLL JosphBnk JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KB Home KBR Inc KHDHumb KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA lf KaiserAlu KC Southn Kaydon KA MLP Kellogg Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KidBrands KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g KirbyCp Kirklands KnghtCap KnightTr Knoll Inc KodiakO g Kohls KongZhg Koppers KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LDK Solar LG Display LKQ Corp LSI Corp LTX-Cred LaZBoy Labophm g LabCp LaBrnch LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp n LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibAcq wt LbtyASE LibGlobA LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibStrzA n LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LigandPhm LihirGold Lihua Int n LillyEli Limited Lincare LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy LionsGt g LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM Loews Logitech LongtopFn Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol lululemn g LumberLiq Luminex

D 0.20 1.77 1.80 0.28 0.38

0.04 0.33 0.30

1.96 0.52 0.20 0.20 0.70 0.25 0.20 0.28 0.60 0.96 0.72 1.92 1.50 0.48 0.04 1.40 2.64 0.64 4.20 0.10

0.20 0.08

0.88 1.16 0.38

1.60

0.18 0.04 0.50

0.12 1.04 0.40 0.16 0.60

0.40 0.29

1.90

0.60 1.96 0.60 0.04 0.92 2.52

1.43 2.52 0.25 4.00 0.36 1.24

44.86 -.16 30.00 +.25 26.15 -.14 16.37 24.29 +.11 23.58 +.26 1.91 -.16 45.65 +.78 9.71 -.05 2.58 -.17 15.93 +.32 14.54 +.27 33.77 +.69 12.01 +.32 24.22 -.04 5.51 -.01 42.71 -.46 2.71 -.03 64.82 +.44 32.75 -.14 19.12 +.29 74.10 +2.43 51.92 -.17 58.08 +.99 30.65 +.16 16.96 -.14 22.24 +.15 14.95 8.38 +.21 30.61 +.20 20.94 2.20 +.09 38.62 +.44 36.43 +.23 37.08 +.39 26.46 -.02 53.86 +.10 28.44 +.32 2.86 +.05 9.40 +.07 7.72 -.14 8.00 +1.40 30.54 -.23 63.22 +.41 16.16 +.06 64.80 +.52 48.20 -.52 11.85 +.02 17.29 +.29 38.30 +.33 21.00 -.24 16.02 +.23 20.37 +.13 11.51 -.02 3.25 +.20 55.74 -.44 8.09 +.06 29.05 -.15 16.44 +.42 17.94 +.07 30.54 +.20 4.09 +.09 21.34 +.13 7.12 -.13 11.49 +1.16 9.33 +.10 93.59 +.33 7.05 +.04 17.39 +.67 20.03 +.41 6.39 +.03 2.91 -.01 12.99 -.14 1.52 +.06 75.81 +.23 5.10 -.15 37.19 +.69 34.63 +.16 41.61 +.21 21.86 -.03 23.29 +.15 3.75 +.10 6.70 +.06 36.38 +.71 16.25 -.20 6.94 +.43 81.20 -.65 29.30 -.20 21.53 -.08 38.97 +.52 18.24 -.06 44.59 -.05 25.00 -.16 1.59 -.01 1.54 +.07 6.75 -.15 35.50 -.08 .95 +.08 4.74 -.01 28.78 +.15 15.01 -.03 36.64 +.58 53.19 +.31 34.79 52.59 +.50 29.58 -.31 37.13 -.01 1.73 -.05 28.70 +.15 9.09 -.10 35.47 +.05 25.78 +.24 44.44 +.28 30.22 +.47 28.42 +.46 25.46 +.29 6.24 +.04 14.37 +.64 7.49 -.05 7.33 +.03 3.79 -.03 6.72 +.30 84.82 +.58 37.36 +.12 16.42 +.04 30.22 -1.00 74.88 -1.12 8.45 +.26 24.31 -.17 92.97 +1.45 41.22 +.65 26.50 +.08 17.02 -.63

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MAG Slv g MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDRNA MDS g MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGMMir MIPS Tech MSCI Inc MYR Grp Macerich MackCali Macys MagelnHl MagelMPtr MagelPt MagnaI g MagHRes MaguirePr MaidenH MaidenBrd MgHiYP ManhAssc Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MktV Steel MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MartMM MarvellT Masco MasseyEn

2.80 80.95 +.14 7.25 -.20 6.08 +.19 5.23 +.16 1.00 35.94 -.36 1.18 +.17 8.00 -.17 0.63 21.89 +.22 14.67 -.01 8.45 +.03 1.08 7.30 +.02 0.58 6.85 -.05 10.13 +.06 12.48 +.02 4.39 +.14 35.79 +.03 16.93 +.36 0.24 39.63 +.35 1.80 35.13 -.02 0.20 21.64 -.08 43.45 +.56 2.84 46.81 +.79 2.37 +.11 62.16 +.58 3.04 +.01 3.37 -.09 0.26 7.35 +.01 22.09 +.37 0.23 2.29 +.02 25.55 -.29 0.08 13.28 +.15 6.82 -.09 0.74 58.19 +.45 0.52 19.68 -.02 0.96 31.46 +.62 14.89 +.76 0.11 44.33 +.62 0.98 68.65 +2.06 0.08 34.17 +.92 25.90 +.40 0.42 45.42 +.56 0.45 45.42 +.72 0.31 37.92 +1.15 0.16 31.28 +.19 0.80 24.77 +.19 0.04 8.07 22.68 -.08 1.60 84.90 +1.53 20.46 +.43 0.30 15.32 +.13 0.24 54.27 +3.55

Nm MasterCrd Matrixx Mattel Mattson MaxCapital MaximIntg MaxLine n MaxwllT Maxygen McClatchy McCorm McC&Sch McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel MedCath MedcoHlth MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL Merck MeridBio MeridRs h MeritMed Meritage Metalico Metalline Methanx Methode MetLife MetroPCS MetroHlth MettlerT Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MidAApt MiddleBk h MdwGold g MillerHer Millicom Millipore MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel Modine ModusLink Mohawk Molex MolsCoorB Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MSEMDDbt Mosaic Motorola Move Inc MuellerWat MultimGm MurphO Mylan MyriadG NABI Bio NBTY NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NTTDoCo NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr Nanophs h NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NtWst pfC NatwHP Natuzzi NavigCons Navios Navistar NeenahP NektarTh Nelnet Ness Tech Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NtScout Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NexMed Nextwave h NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NoAmEn g NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NwtPipe lf NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax h Novell Novlus NovoNord NSTAR

D 0.60 248.01 +1.77 5.07 0.75 23.09 +.26 4.57 0.40 22.92 +.28 0.80 19.27 +.05 18.70 +.08 12.47 -.31 6.49 +.59 4.88 -.09 1.04 37.85 +.22 10.11 +.22 26.62 +.97 2.20 67.07 -.19 0.94 35.63 +.01 0.48 65.19 +1.57 14.80 +.28 39.97 -.20 0.90 52.35 +.52 0.12 8.00 -.11 0.92 25.99 +.63 28.75 +.93 10.77 -.25 64.68 -.34 0.80 10.96 +.01 7.89 +.03 0.24 25.61 +.84 24.11 +1.15 10.90 -.21 59.35 +1.90 0.82 45.07 +.58 4.81 -.06 23.52 +.75 0.36 24.04 -.33 8.14 -.06 47.89 +1.14 1.52 37.89 +.46 0.76 20.81 +.15 .27 +.01 15.35 +.35 21.30 -.46 6.18 +.20 1.02 +.17 0.62 25.44 +1.03 0.28 10.16 +.04 0.74 43.00 +.74 6.98 +.05 3.11 +.13 109.06 -.33 0.14 10.49 +.05 1.36 28.56 +.13 8.44 -.05 10.63 +.14 16.62 +.02 0.52 29.59 -.07 2.74 +.22 2.46 54.04 +.40 .32 .65 0.09 18.39 +.10 1.24 89.58 +3.16 105.54 +.08 0.20 36.90 -.27 7.89 +.01 9.45 +.04 11.22 -.04 5.37 +.21 4.07 +.02 53.91 +.06 11.84 +.07 8.57 -.11 54.99 +1.86 0.61 21.00 +.21 0.96 41.73 -.88 15.12 +.23 3.52 -.01 21.89 -.20 1.06 71.06 -.04 16.95 +.04 0.36 16.79 +.27 0.42 30.54 +.28 0.20 29.43 +.58 1.10 15.03 +.17 0.20 60.22 +.87 7.23 +.06 2.03 0.07 4.94 +.13 3.95 -.10 1.00 54.98 +1.55 22.87 +.49 1.75 24.90 -.23 5.63 -.13 48.47 +.14 11.53 +.14 13.83 +.01 26.00 -.16 0.60 15.83 +.07 41.25 +.42 3.92 +.23 4.87 +.15 20.60 +.35 0.54 15.27 +.02 0.44 12.33 +.13 1.20 29.65 +.50 19.53 +.58 0.14 24.32 +.67 9.15 +.51 1.19 +.20 21.16 +.11 0.31 4.30 +.05 14.25 +.27 1.34 51.27 +.88 0.40 40.60 +.68 0.04 7.14 +.10 1.50 23.11 +.02 0.32 14.54 +.04 1.94 21.02 +.02 1.76 35.70 -.24 4.53 -.23 12.21 -.03 0.24 6.27 +.05 44.37 +.65 0.40 16.32 -.85 15.33 +.13 0.28 18.80 +.32 6.47 -.07 18.03 -.20 0.01 12.96 +.42 29.77 -.54 32.54 -.19 36.74 +.47 13.29 -.18 73.90 -.40 3.74 -.03 14.52 +.20 2.70 25.19 -.21 17.37 -.44 3.04 +.04 .12 +.00 4.35 +.19 86.72 +1.71 1.00 16.67 +.32 11.19 +.08 0.28 12.69 +.04 3.00 +.01 0.20 15.31 +.05 49.86 +2.27 0.40 50.37 +.99 4.85 -.06 0.15 14.55 +.09 0.15 17.17 +.08 0.20 24.48 +.94 .46 +.03 .50 +.01 0.92 15.97 +.19 1.86 42.30 +.26 1.08 73.97 +.08 17.21 -.04 0.29 20.95 +.05 0.20 40.60 +1.01 0.72 71.29 +2.10 0.56 15.42 -.04 7.61 +.27 1.73 29.97 +.05 0.64 41.81 +.06 1.36 55.81 +.98 8.65 +.07 4.05 +.12 1.03 27.54 +.52 9.26 +.22 14.81 +.70 1.12 55.19 -.16 3.01 -.01 1.72 65.78 +.25 0.40 4.36 +.08 0.40 11.59 -.09 24.15 +.44 7.33 +.13 1.99 53.93 +.10 6.56 -.18 2.48 +.12 5.75 -.11 24.92 +.01 1.41 78.23 +.27 1.60 35.37 +.55

D

NuSkin 0.50 29.11 +.45 NuVasive 45.36 +1.09 NuanceCm 16.53 -.04 Nucor 1.44 46.04 +.73 NutriSyst 0.70 17.60 +.50 NvMSI&G2 0.75 8.27 +.06 Nvidia 17.56 +.22 NxStageMd 11.17 +.69 OGE Engy 1.45 38.77 +.75 OReillyA h 41.76 -.27 OSI Phrm 59.30 -.03 OSI Sys 28.19 -.97 ObagiMed 11.89 -.09 OcciPet 1.32 84.14 +2.41 Oceaneer 62.52 +1.96 OceanFrt h .76 -.02 Och-Ziff 0.72 14.97 +.02 Oclaro 2.76 -.05 OcwenFn 10.89 -.06 OdysseyHlt 18.67 -.19 OfficeDpt 8.16 -.05 OfficeMax 17.03 +.23 OilSvHT 1.78 119.97 +2.07 OilStates 45.70 +.95 Oilsands g .76 -.01 OldNBcp 0.28 11.97 +.01 OldRepub 0.69 12.44 +.03 Olin 0.80 19.31 +.03 OmegaHlt 1.28 19.89 -.49 Omncre 0.09 28.81 +.08 Omnicom 0.80 39.57 -.24 OmniVisn 16.07 -.28 Omnova 7.99 -.02 OnSmcnd 7.92 -.01 Oncothyr h 3.43 +.01 ONEOK 1.76 46.06 +.76 OnyxPh 31.00 +.21 OpenTxt 47.55 +.22 OpnwvSy 2.29 -.06 OptimerPh 12.53 -.05 Oracle 0.20 25.57 -.12 OrbitalSci 19.12 -.10 Orbitz 7.39 +.37 OrcktCm 3.96 -.85 Orexigen 6.10 OrientEH 13.49 +.18 OrienPap n 9.25 -.37 OrientFn 0.16 14.09 +.13 OriginAg 10.24 -.01 OrionEngy 4.75 -.16 OrmatTc 0.48 27.76 +.08 OshkoshCp 40.72 +.58 OvShip 1.75 39.85 +.54 OwensCorn 24.47 +.57 OwensIll 35.28 +.23 OxfordInds 0.36 23.51 +.02 Oxigene 1.01 -.03 OxygenBio 5.71 +1.07 PDL Bio 1.00 6.29 -.08 PECO pfA 3.80 74.31 -.99 PECO pfB 4.30 80.90 +1.98 PECO pfD 4.68 86.55 +3.97 PF Chng 43.78 -.53 PG&E Cp 1.82 42.81 +.30 PHH Corp 23.45 +.20 Pimc1-5Tip 0.41 51.54 -.01 PMC Sra 8.77 +.29 PMI Grp 4.57 +.05 PNC 0.40 59.47 -.10 PNM Res 0.50 12.60 +.19 POSCO 1.57 119.90 +3.16 PPG 2.16 65.76 -.31 PPL Corp 1.40 27.89 +.31 PSS Wrld 23.45 +.28 PacWstBc 0.04 22.70 -.30 Paccar 0.36 43.87 +.20 PacerIntl 6.11 +.18 PacCapB 1.72 +.04 PacEthan 1.17 -.82 PacSunwr 5.29 -.09 PackAmer 0.60 24.59 +.28 Pactiv 25.49 +.20 PaetecHld 4.59 Palatin .25 -.01 PallCorp 0.64 40.30 +.45 Palm Inc 3.90 +.01 PanASlv 0.05 22.90 +.46 Panasonic 0.13 15.47 +.26 PaneraBrd 76.91 ParPharm 24.90 +.20 ParagShip 0.20 4.62 +.14 ParamTch 17.95 +.22 ParaG&S 1.47 +.07 Parexel 22.29 -.89 ParkEl 0.40 28.68 +.17 ParkDrl 4.82 +.12 ParkerHan 1.00 65.24 +.63 PrtnrCm 3.89 22.26 +.32 PartnerRe 2.00 80.17 -.03 PatriotCoal 20.78 +1.02 Patterson 0.40 31.06 +.39 PattUTI 0.20 13.89 +.37 Paychex 1.24 31.19 -.02 PeabdyE 0.28 46.07 +1.48 PeetsCfeT 39.72 -1.94 Pengrth g 0.84 11.37 +.08 PnnNGm 27.37 -.48 PennVa 0.23 24.10 +.20 PennVaGP 1.52 18.33 +.08 PennWst g 1.80 21.03 +.13 Penney 0.80 32.91 -.18 PenRE 0.60 12.64 +.13 PennyM n 16.68 -.25 Penske 14.65 -.43 Pentair 0.76 34.98 +.34 PeopUtdF 0.61 15.75 +.07 PepBoy 0.12 10.30 -.31 PepcoHold 1.08 16.91 +.25 PepsiCo 1.92 66.55 -.04 PerfectWld 36.92 -.45 PerkElm 0.28 24.23 +.23 Prmian 0.91 17.57 +.32 Perrigo 0.25 58.22 +1.43 PetMed 0.40 22.00 +.10 PetChina 4.01 114.96 +2.50 Petrohawk 19.97 +.42 PetrbrsA 1.17 38.89 +.85 Petrobras 1.16 43.99 +.88 PtroqstE 5.10 +.02 PetsMart 0.40 31.74 +.46 Pfizer 0.72 17.28 +.14 PhmHTr 7.59 66.51 +.58 PharmPdt 0.60 22.93 +.10 Pharmacyc 6.49 +.30 PhaseFwd 12.85 -.15 PhilipMor 2.32 52.53 +.41 PhilipsEl 0.95 32.30 +.05 PhlVH 0.15 57.02 -.01 PhnxCos 2.48 +.03 PhotrIn 5.30 +.20 PiedNG 1.12 27.25 +.12 PiedmOfc n 1.26 20.20 +.34 Pier 1 6.42 -.08 PilgrmsP n 10.76 +.15 PimIncStr2 0.70 9.48 +.08 PimcoHiI 1.46 12.10 +.18 PinnclEnt 9.60 -.09 PinnaclFn 15.14 -.32 PinnGas h .32 -.00 PinWst 2.10 38.22 +.67 PionDrill 7.19 +.15 PionFltRt 0.90 12.22 -.05 PioNtrl 0.08 54.42 +1.62 PitnyBw 1.46 24.44 +.16 Pixelwrks 5.62 -.25 PlainsAA 3.71 56.00 +.45 PlainsEx 29.96 +1.22 Plantron 0.20 30.75 -.01 PlatGpMet 1.83 +.04 PlatUnd 0.32 37.03 +.19 PlatoLrn 5.55 +.03 PlugPwr h .65 -.09 PlumCrk 1.68 38.33 +.07 Polo RL 0.40 85.69 -.38 Polycom 30.17 -.55 PolyMet g 2.31 +.04 PolyOne 10.31 +.24 Polypore 17.35 +.29 Poniard h 1.17 +.01 Popular 2.79 +.07 PortGE 1.02 19.22 +.13 PostPrp 0.80 21.68 +.06 Potash 0.40 120.53 -.19 PwrInteg 0.20 40.49 -.87 Power-One 4.25 +.10 PSCrudeDS 61.25 -3.75 PwshDB 23.49 +.52 PwShCurH 23.58 +.26 PS Agri 24.45 +.41 PS BasMet 22.19 +.74 PS USDBull 23.84 -.12 PS USDBear 26.46 +.13 PwSClnEn 9.96 +.10 PSPrivEq 0.28 9.93 +.07 PSFinPf 1.37 17.39 +.02 PwShPfd 1.04 14.01 PShEMSov 1.64 26.12 PSIndia 0.13 22.88 +.39 PwShs QQQ 0.21 48.23 +.23 Powrwav 1.24 -.03 Pozen 9.38 +.46 Praxair 1.80 81.84 +.26 PrecCastpt 0.12 127.09 +3.27 PrecDril 7.63 +.38 PrmWBc h .50 +.01 PriceTR 1.08 55.36 +.28 priceline 255.67 +3.56 PrideIntl 29.18 +.63 PrinFncl 0.50 29.32 +.15 PrinFn pfB 1.63 23.31 +.06 PrivateB 0.04 13.88 -.29 ProShtS&P 49.38 -.28 PrUShS&P 30.83 -.34 ProUltDow 0.53 48.04 +.44 PrUlShDow 26.25 -.22 ProUltQQQ 65.58 +.58 PrUShQQQ 16.72 -.14 ProUltSP 0.41 42.21 +.44 ProUShL20 49.65 +.41 PrUShCh25 8.05 -.35 ProUltSEM 10.16 -.37 ProUShtRE 5.90 -.05 ProUShOG 12.39 -.48 ProUShtFn 19.06 -.06 ProUShtBM 6.99 -.22 ProUltSemi 0.19 34.76 +.34 ProUltRE 0.10 8.30 +.05 ProUltO&G 0.22 33.79 +1.13 ProUltFin 0.03 6.86 +.03 ProUBasM 0.15 36.03 +.87 ProUSR2K 20.39 -.22 ProUltR2K 0.04 33.74 +.43 ProSht20Tr 50.43 +.22 ProUSSP500 29.78 -.50 ProUltSP500 0.23 174.88 +2.95 ProUltCrude 12.81 +.69 ProUShCrude 12.50 -.78 ProSUSSilv 4.13 -.21 ProSUltSilv 57.14 +2.78 ProUShEuro 20.91 -.21 ProceraNt .42 +.00

Nm

D

ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgrsSoft ProgsvCp ProLogis ProlorBio ProspctCap ProspBcsh Protalix ProtLife ProvET g ProvidFS Prudentl PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal n PulteGrp PMMI PPrIT

1.76 63.73 +.04 2.48 39.51 +.20 31.76 -.14 0.16 19.26 -.01 0.60 13.71 -.23 4.22 +.24 1.64 12.48 -.27 0.62 40.62 -.01 6.88 -.02 0.48 20.78 +.22 0.72 7.52 +.01 0.44 11.92 0.70 59.91 +.70 30.09 -.02 1.37 29.49 +.38 2.60 92.64 +.50 8.67 -.28 11.62 -.10 0.53 7.19 +.04 0.68 6.51 +.03

Q-R-S-T QIAGEN QLT QiaoXing Qlogic Qualcom QualitySys QuanexBld QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag QuestSft Questar Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quidel Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RCN RF MicD RHI Ent h RPC RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM RXi Phrm Rackspace RadNet RadianGrp RadntSys RadientPh RadioShk Ralcorp Rambus Randgold RangeRs RaserT RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedRobin RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp RehabCG ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed ResrceCap ResConn RetailHT RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynldAm RigelPh RINO Int n RioTinto RitchieBr RiteAid Riverbed RobbMyer RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Roper RosettaG RosettaR RosettaSt n RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RBSct prM RBSct prN RBSc prP RBSct prQ RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Royce Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues Ruddick RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Rdx In2xSP Ryland S1 Corp SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLGrn pfC SLM Cp SMTC g SORL SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrSemi SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SPLeSTMun SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp SRA Intl STEC STMicro STR Hld n SVB FnGp SXC Hlth SABESP lf SafeBulk Safeway StJoe StJude StMaryLE Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SJuanB SanDisk SandRdge Sanmina rs Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h Satyam lf SauerDanf SavientPh Savvis SchiffNutr Schlmbrg Schnitzer Schulmn Schwab SchMau SciClone SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet ScrippsEW SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeagateT SealAir Sealy s SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SemiHTr SemiMfg SempraEn Semtech Senesco SenHous Senomyx Sensata n Sequenom ServiceCp Servidyne 7DaysGp n

23.11 -.08 5.26 1.99 -.01 20.07 -.09 0.76 41.76 -.07 1.20 60.99 -.10 0.12 16.72 +.48 19.46 +.05 2.72 +.01 .69 -.02 0.40 58.49 +.60 17.80 +.01 0.52 43.15 +.65 8.60 +.75 2.99 +.12 13.77 +.25 13.95 +.22 4.85 +.27 0.32 5.27 +.01 1.92 -.15 15.35 5.02 .19 -.11 0.16 10.89 -.02 0.82 21.29 +.18 3.82 +.11 7.88 +.41 32.49 +1.48 5.22 +.01 17.82 -.08 3.17 +.32 0.01 14.31 +.35 13.77 +.16 .23 -.01 0.25 22.98 -.67 68.06 +.49 22.34 -.32 0.17 74.61 +.53 0.16 46.95 +1.28 1.01 +.04 0.44 27.37 +.21 2.00 45.62 +.34 1.50 57.67 +.38 4.84 +.01 1.72 30.84 +.07 28.16 -.23 24.82 +.11 1.00 14.77 -.04 0.64 59.67 -.28 0.72 17.64 -.35 1.85 38.30 -.30 1.78 22.08 +.33 26.80 +.57 1.11 87.30 -.21 0.04 7.64 +.01 0.16 18.82 +.08 25.97 +.01 0.48 51.26 +.47 0.40 50.46 +2.30 1.00 57.04 +.69 5.76 +.15 23.57 +.13 1.01 -.02 .70 -.01 5.87 -.06 0.76 29.22 +.25 75.70 +.64 63.49 +.53 1.00 6.87 +.01 19.13 -.16 1.51 101.35 +.05 11.16 +.09 1.61 +.02 3.60 54.28 +.56 8.04 +.16 23.43 +.56 1.80 235.60 +4.49 0.40 21.58 -.22 1.74 +.06 28.54 +.02 0.17 23.88 +.25 0.52 31.15 +.24 0.60 45.95 +.17 1.16 55.55 +.12 0.96 63.40 +.42 26.13 +.39 1.28 33.91 +.39 0.38 56.96 +.09 2.31 +.33 22.99 +.10 24.57 -.46 0.64 53.48 -.13 37.28 -.04 27.63 +.60 2.00 58.25 +.03 13.43 -.18 1.60 12.77 -.17 1.59 12.68 -.12 1.56 12.72 +.01 1.69 13.35 33.47 +.48 3.36 55.14 +.13 3.36 57.59 +.21 0.36 46.23 +.36 11.85 +.08 3.82 -.02 19.49 -.39 10.75 -.15 0.48 31.79 5.28 +.03 27.19 1.00 38.86 +.30 0.52 42.68 +.34 49.87 -.49 0.12 23.07 -.76 5.90 +.02 18.91 -.35 0.67 48.00 +.92 35.63 +.80 1.90 38.02 +.35 0.18 21.57 +.02 8.25 +.04 17.58 +.18 0.40 56.12 +1.67 1.91 24.40 +.23 12.67 +.09 2.85 +.25 9.97 +.32 2.51 108.92 +.49 108.75 +.16 1.67 143.91 +1.26 2.21 117.32 +.74 1.67 49.30 +.32 0.13 17.01 +.05 0.25 25.89 -.12 0.46 40.98 +.32 0.36 48.15 +.31 1.79 54.34 +.09 4.98 39.77 +.12 0.52 23.99 +.02 0.03 45.84 -.02 0.36 26.21 -.12 0.50 41.59 -.03 0.25 41.75 +1.08 0.37 57.34 +1.61 1.00 66.90 +2.22 21.21 -.51 12.03 +.16 0.12 9.94 +.19 23.86 +2.19 46.51 +.07 68.20 +1.62 2.29 36.00 +1.90 0.60 7.51 +.41 0.40 24.84 +.40 33.53 +.33 40.84 -.08 0.10 34.44 +.86 8.65 -.21 74.77 -.18 35.67 +.21 8.93 -.02 .55 0.96 20.71 +.74 35.13 +.43 7.62 +.17 16.64 +.10 1.63 37.37 +.04 5.07 +.10 0.35 9.17 -.14 0.44 13.85 +.11 1.19 40.87 +1.58 2.64 +.28 5.22 -.07 13.28 +.02 14.47 +.35 16.60 -.13 0.50 8.35 -.33 0.84 63.07 +1.40 0.07 52.05 +1.24 0.60 25.68 -.32 0.24 18.73 -.03 0.60 47.16 +.23 3.80 -.05 14.07 -.11 0.50 46.17 +.16 0.30 44.07 +.22 8.78 24.46 +.18 1.79 -.04 18.90 -.03 0.48 21.28 -.03 3.64 109.74 +.73 0.40 10.21 +.14 11.74 +.08 7.90 +.77 0.50 27.95 +.15 6.06 +.13 1.56 50.44 +1.29 17.22 +.15 .41 +.02 1.44 22.03 +.14 3.31 +.08 18.12 +.12 6.16 -.09 0.16 9.24 +.16 0.04 4.47 +2.25 10.09 +.19

Nm ShandaG n Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderNac Siemens SigaTech h SigmaDsg SigmaAld SignetJwlrs SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilcnLab Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp Sina Sinclair Sinovac SiriusXM h SironaDent Skechers SkillSoft SkyWest SkywksSol SmartBal SmartM SmartHeat SmithWes SmithAO SmithIntl SmithMicro SmithfF Smucker SnapOn SocQ&M Sohu.cm Solarfun SolarWds n Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SncWall SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthFn h SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwstnEngy SovranSS SpectraEn SpectPh Spire h SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottGld n StageStrs SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StdPac StanBlkDk Staples StarBulk StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse SteinMrt StemCells Stereotaxis Stericycle Steris SterlngBcp SterlBcsh SterlCons StrlF WA h Sterlite SMadden StewEnt StifelFn StillwtrM StoneEngy Stratasys StratHotels Stryker SuccessF SulphCo SunCmts SunHlthGp SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisPh Sunoco SunPowerA SunPwr B SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SupEnrgy SuperWell Supvalu SusqBnc SwftEng Switch&Dt Sybase SykesEnt Symantec Symetra n Symmetry Synaptics Syniverse Synnex Synopsys Synovus Sysco TAM SA TCF Fncl TCW Strat TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TIM Partic TJX TNS Inc TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots TalismE g Tanger Target Taseko TASER TataMotors Taubmn TechData Technitrl Techwell TeckRes g Teekay TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TelcmNZ TelefEsp TelMexL Telestone Tellabs TelmxIntl TempleInld TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium Terra Terremk TerreStar TescoCp Tesoro TesseraT TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm Texas Inds TexInst TexRdhse Textron Theragen Theravnce ThermoFis ThmBet ThomCrk g Thor Inds Thoratec 3Com 3M Co 3Par TianyinPh TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany Timberlnd TW Cable TimeWrn rs Timken Titan Intl TitanMet TiVo Inc TollBros Trchmrk Toreador Toro Co TorDBk g Total SA TotalSys TowerGrp TowerSemi Toyota

D

1.44 1.20 0.34 1.12 2.41 0.64

0.28 0.08 2.40

0.16

0.78 0.48 1.40 1.20 1.30

1.08 0.27 0.20 1.75 0.76 0.60 0.02 1.80 1.00

0.20 0.52 0.53 0.73 0.41 1.00 0.20 0.59 0.31 1.26 1.32 0.36 0.20 0.40 0.20 0.04 1.02 0.30 0.16

0.44 0.36 0.06 0.07 0.12

0.60 2.52 1.44 0.40 0.60

0.04 0.35 0.04

0.04 1.00 0.09 0.20 0.33 0.80 0.28 0.47 0.60

0.46 0.23 1.53 0.68 0.13 1.66 0.10 1.27 1.40 1.17 0.76 4.20 0.67 0.02 0.25 0.44 0.50 0.86

0.40

0.64 0.30 0.48 0.08

0.28 2.10 0.10 1.00 0.80 1.60 0.85 0.36 0.02

0.60 0.72 2.44 3.23 0.28 0.28

Nm 7.37 +.05 44.59 +.38 35.73 +.38 67.01 +.17 18.23 +.31 66.47 -.33 8.10 -.06 23.46 -.85 40.00 +1.82 99.94 +2.02 6.64 -.15 11.45 -.14 53.76 +.59 32.07 +1.32 10.83 +.14 2.94 -.06 48.32 +.60 6.10 +.11 17.56 +.07 15.62 +.38 6.88 +.09 85.15 +.14 38.27 +.16 4.90 +.09 6.23 +.07 .84 -.02 38.15 +.68 36.83 -.57 10.18 -.10 14.45 -.19 15.78 -.18 6.41 +.05 8.03 -.11 12.04 +.73 3.91 +.03 52.00 +.60 42.58 +.96 9.15 +.62 20.77 +.10 60.06 +.19 43.06 +.26 37.19 +.30 54.28 +.57 7.58 +.62 21.37 +.23 16.39 +.31 8.83 -.26 11.49 -.60 11.16 8.92 -.01 30.60 +.10 2.65 -.02 38.43 +.21 31.84 +.13 23.25 -.05 .72 +.01 33.34 +.24 32.11 +1.21 25.32 +.25 13.18 +.13 40.73 +3.03 35.15 +.29 22.82 +.25 4.64 -.07 3.38 -.82 23.40 +.68 5.79 3.79 -.01 9.84 +.01 15.51 +.01 34.04 +.36 32.24 +.34 28.04 +.13 33.11 +.05 57.17 +1.09 16.02 +.02 31.37 +.28 23.07 +.07 29.81 +.36 4.75 -.10 58.34 -.27 23.75 -.02 2.96 +.01 2.79 +.12 24.61 +.02 46.20 -.01 46.27 +.11 23.13 +.56 17.70 +.45 6.54 +.09 9.15 -.16 1.15 -.02 5.08 +.04 55.04 +.54 34.18 +.16 9.40 +.37 5.44 +.07 16.05 +.14 .60 +.01 18.68 +.68 48.63 -.41 6.06 +.02 52.61 -1.22 13.16 +.54 17.48 +.59 24.83 -1.15 4.47 +.14 57.18 +.47 19.28 -.03 .32 -.03 24.88 +.28 9.84 +.20 32.58 +.57 31.29 +1.29 .90 +.02 28.75 +.15 18.82 +.60 16.94 +.62 5.34 +.03 11.16 +.08 14.41 +.28 26.34 -.16 20.07 +.55 13.57 +.21 16.31 +.09 9.65 +.26 30.58 +.48 17.81 +.16 46.23 +.23 23.47 +.05 16.95 +.11 13.15 -.05 9.55 +.28 26.31 +.91 19.53 +1.05 30.09 +.82 22.44 -.06 3.25 -.23 29.68 +.51 16.21 +.41 15.93 -.25 4.72 +.05 19.01 -.15 16.01 +.26 13.26 -.15 7.13 -.06 27.71 +.62 43.28 -.05 22.86 +.05 29.37 +.45 8.98 +.06 17.89 +.20 10.54 +.18 10.11 -.10 12.99 +1.51 16.88 +.47 43.29 +.01 53.96 -.41 5.10 +.02 6.06 +.06 17.73 -.02 41.26 +.10 42.65 +.72 5.13 +.07 18.42 +.01 42.32 +2.02 23.47 +.17 12.15 +.18 18.53 +.08 7.15 -.19 17.46 +.33 7.75 +.28 72.13 +.26 15.57 +.15 18.12 +.37 7.62 -.03 19.11 +.26 20.74 +.16 9.97 -.08 31.15 +.94 43.51 +.41 5.88 +.07 24.14 -.19 29.18 +.22 11.12 22.27 +.70 41.03 +1.84 46.03 +.07 7.37 +.35 1.22 +.06 11.17 -.18 13.70 +.06 20.04 -.26 22.85 -.10 12.40 +.48 63.77 -.01 35.71 +1.50 24.73 -.02 13.99 -.07 21.70 +.02 1.77 +.31 13.26 +.29 50.51 +.50 38.81 +.83 13.55 +.53 30.82 -.49 33.79 +.09 7.71 81.36 +.36 10.09 +.09 3.64 +.15 10.99 -.04 47.52 +.63 47.28 -.04 21.28 +.30 52.57 +1.39 31.56 +.06 30.14 +1.41 9.09 +.38 17.18 +.97 16.59 +.26 21.07 -.19 53.11 +.45 8.01 +.56 49.77 -.23 74.06 +.01 57.53 +.47 15.73 +.12 22.02 -.11 1.67 -.01 80.98 +.23

D

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0.80 52.57 +.26 3.52 -.13 7.65 53.45 +.89 82.98 +1.14 1.32 54.76 +.41 2.32 -.13 1.91 +.15 28.84 +.63 25.13 +1.63 0.32 20.47 +.10 7.14 +.09 0.16 70.80 -.13 15.83 +.08 30.05 +.43 0.60 14.84 +.04 .79 -.00 6.43 +.05 1.00 48.67 +.90 0.79 14.85 +.17 0.64 27.72 +.04 0.80 37.40 +.54 0.16 19.09 +.39

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UAL UBS AG UDR UFP Tch UGI Corp UQM Tech URS US Airwy US Cncrt h US Geoth US Gold USEC USG UTiWrldwd UTStrcm UltraPt g Uluru Umpqua UndrArmr UnilevNV Unilever UnionPac Unisys rs Unit UtdCBksGa UtdMicro UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp US NGsFd US OilFd USSteel UtdTech UtdThrp s UtdhlthGp UnvHlth s UnumGrp Uranerz UraniumEn UrbanOut VCA Ant VF Cp VaalcoE VailRsrt Valassis Vale SA Vale SA pf ValeantPh ValenceTc h ValeroE Validus VlyNBcp Valspar ValueClick VanKDyCr VKSrInc VanceInfo VandaPhm VangSTBd VangTotBd VangGrth VangSmCp VangTSM VangValu VangREIT VangDivAp VangAllW VangEmg VangEur VangEurPc U D M m D

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M R Ww m G m N mm m w w mG

0.10 0.72 0.80

0.06

0.20 0.67 0.67 1.08

0.40 1.88 0.20 0.20 1.70 0.03 0.20 0.33

2.40

0.52 0.52 0.20 0.88 0.76 0.64 1.03 0.30 2.10 3.09 0.61 0.65 1.15 1.25 1.85 0.93 0.86 0.55 1.91

7.33 -.01 19.99 +.08 16.17 +.70 17.93 -.12 10.30 +.13 26.49 +.41 3.67 +.02 49.89 +.38 7.32 +.02 .42 -.01 1.00 +.01 2.74 +.07 5.82 +.22 17.50 +.65 15.30 +.05 2.39 +.01 46.64 +2.46 .17 -.01 12.99 -.15 30.60 29.47 +.25 28.42 +.17 73.58 +.92 35.79 +.10 42.08 +.50 4.48 -.25 3.64 +.06 7.64 +.11 64.13 +.46 9.00 +.60 25.96 -.04 7.03 +.03 39.96 +1.13 64.90 +.94 74.00 +.38 56.41 +.64 32.84 +.21 36.07 +.44 24.87 +.22 1.87 +.09 3.22 -.09 37.51 -.47 27.34 +.30 80.41 -.10 4.78 +.13 40.75 +.03 28.23 -.03 32.00 +1.21 27.59 +.95 42.11 +1.16 .88 +.02 19.89 +.17 27.24 +.42 15.80 +.23 29.53 +.46 9.86 -.01 12.75 -.01 5.09 +.04 22.19 +.35 11.78 -.18 79.92 -.05 78.97 -.17 55.66 +.26 63.27 +.34 59.74 +.35 50.61 +.35 49.44 +.15 48.88 +.30 44.41 +.57 41.99 +.75 48.04 +.40


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Sony

will introduce a new online service that will eventually let users download music, television shows, movies and games from the company’s extensive library onto gadgets like computers, Blu-ray players, televisions, game consoles and digital cameras. The network, tentatively called the Sony Online Service, will be based on the company’s existing PlayStation Network, a game download site with more than 40 million accounts. Sony is working with Google and Intel on Google TV, a platform for a new generation of televisions and set-top boxes that will make it easier to browse the Web on TV screens. The first devices featuring the technology are expected to be on sale this summer. The company is also working on tablet computers similar to the coming iPad from Apple. “You’ll see many different products that you can probably compare with the iPad,” said a Sony engineer who asked for anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the news media.

Continued from B1 “Sony once hit home runs, but now it’s lost its touch,” said Akihiko Jojima, an analyst and author of the book “Sony’s Sickness.” “Sony still makes competent products but they’re all just boring ground balls.” It’s been a humbling fall for the company, which once shook up entire categories of electronics with its Walkman music player and PlayStation game console, and commanded premium prices for top-quality products. In the last few years, its position as a consumer electronics titan has been usurped by more nimble competitors. The iPod from Apple dominates the digital music player category. Among video game consoles, both the PlayStation 3 and its PlayStation Portable consoles from Sony trail the competing Wii and DS machines from Nintendo — and the DS is about to get a 3-D upgrade. Samsung Electronics leads in the global flat-panel TV market, a traditional stronghold of Sony, based in Tokyo. Sony’s pioneering e-book reader lost its early lead to the Kindle from Amazon.com. And in the fast-growing smart phone market, an important area for future growth, Sony’s hands have been tied. Under a 2001 deal that spun off its mobile phone operations into a joint venture with Ericsson, Sony has been prevented from offering cell phones that draw heavily on its own other technologies. All the while, Sony has failed to leverage the wealth of content at its music and cinema arms to the advantage of the wider company.

On the upswing Whatever the mode of attack, the next steps by Sony’s chief executive, Howard Stringer — who promised to make Sony “cool again” when he took the helm at the manufacturer in 2005 — will be critical. Sony’s finances, battered in the global financial crisis, are finally improving after aggressive cost-cutting and a revival in sales. In the final quarter of 2009, Sony surpassed analysts’ expectations with a sevenfold increase in profit, to 79 billion yen, or $853 million. And with Stringer’s favorite lieutenants finally in place after a management reshuffle last year, investors hope that he can finally focus on his oft-stated vision to link Sony’s hardware with its software. Sony’s stock price has doubled in the last year, outperforming the broader Japanese stock market. “If you add up all of Sony’s cell phones, digital cameras, music players, computers, you get a network that would dwarf Apple’s,” said Eiichi Katayama, a technology analyst at Nomura Securities in Tokyo. “And Sony also has content. They could become a force to contend with.”

On the offensive Sony, while acknowledging its past stumbles, says that its comeback has begun. “We will go on the offensive in 2010,” said Yoshihisa Ishida, a Sony senior vice president, at the unveiling of a new 3-D television in Tokyo this month. Sony will begin selling 3-D TVs in June, joining an industrywide push to bring the technology behind the hit movie “Avatar” from cinemas to living rooms. In the next few weeks, Sony

Beach

ribbean and European locales. Most of Brooks’ clientele are repeat customers. She has witnessed mothers bringing young children into the store for a swimsuit, and the children continue to shop there even 16 years later. Customers are excited when they come into the store because they are often traveling somewhere, but they also dread the process of finding a swimsuit. If customers allows the employees to help fit them, the process may not be as dreadful as customers expect. “Most people think this is such a chore and a horrible experience,” Brooks said. “But we have people thanking us at the end for making it a good experience.”

Continued from B1 Slow times for the store are September and October, while busier times are the summer months and January and February. Sales have slowed due to Central Oregonians taking fewer vacations and people not shopping as frequently, according to Brooks. “The minute I walked in I started making money and sales increased huge amounts up until 2007,” she said. Brooks has had to make cuts the last few years, including working more herself, slightly decreasing inventory and reducing hours. It is important for the store to be open Sundays, though, she said. “Sundays are an important day to be open because people work, parking is easier and it’s just an important day to be open,” she said. Sales have marginally increased over last year’s numbers, she said, because people are beginning to travel again this year. Common locations where customers travel are Hawaii and Mexico, according to Brooks, but they also purchase suits for Ca-

Q: A:

How does the store’s downtown location affect business and sales? I always think of the downtown location as an asset. Not only is my store located in a great space across from the Tower Theater — I have always appreciated that as a business owner — I can make my own hours and work in a great downtown atmosphere. If I were to ever open another store, I would look for a town or city with a similar downtown core.

Home sales

sures in hopes of bringing the market to life. California last week renewed a $10,000 credit that proved popular last year, allocating $200 million for it despite a state budget crisis. New Jersey legislators just introduced a bill that would give buyers a $15,000 credit spread over three years. South Carolina recently announced a $7,000 down payment assistance program for teachers, police officers and firefighters. On Monday, just three days after substantially expanding its anti-foreclosure programs, the Obama administration announced another $600 million to finance innovative measures to help defaulting families in five hard-hit states: North Carolina, Oregon, Ohio, Rhode Island and South Carolina. The first round of financing, announced last month, provided $1.5 billion to states including California and Florida.

Continued from B1 James Poterba, an economist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, calls this “the exit strategy problem.” “If you have a short-run program to stimulate demand, it’s always tricky to figure out how you gently remove it without going off a precipice,” he said. Arguments for extending the tax credit a second time are just beginning. Robert Shiller, a professor of economics at Yale and co-developer of the Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller housing price index, is an early advocate. He thinks the credit was a bad idea that nevertheless the market cannot do without. In some states, worries about the housing market are trumping fiscal considerations. They are adopting or extending tax credits or other supportive mea-

541-385-5950 www.educate.com

New Bend Location:

541-389-9252

2nd & Greenwood

Bend • 2150 NE Studio Rd. Redmond • 1332 SW Highland Ave.

www.extrafurniture.com

Q:

As an owner of a local boutique for 14 years, how have you changed business operations and what has remained the same? Although a lot changes in 14 years, I always say I’m not really a business person, I’m a person who really likes her business. I have a bookkeeper that keeps me in line. My passion for my business is more on the creative side. I prefer to buy the merchandise and work with customers.

A:

Q: A:

How often do you bring new merchandise into the

store? New merchandise arrives year-round. I focus on bringing most of the swim and resort wear in between October through April. These are the months most people travel to tropical locations. I also bring in men’s board shorts, but focus on it from February through May. Although flip flops are always in stock, the summer months are when we bring in even more.

Q:

You emphasize the importance of customer service. What services or concepts does that include? Great customer service starts with hiring people that are personable, sympathet-

A:

Jobs Continued from B1 Even so, Eagan said it’s unclear whether the annual average for 2010 has a sunnier outlook, adding that she needs at least three months of data, if not longer, to determine a trend. “I feel like I have indicators pointing in all different directions,” Eagan said. “I think it’s just keeping our eye out to see what happens.” The February numbers for 2010, although they still show job losses, appear to be better than 2009. The drop off of job losses was much smaller between February 2009 to February 2010, compared to the same differential between 2008 and 2009. About 70 jobs were lost from February 2009 to February 2010 in Jefferson County, compared to 650 lost jobs between

ic, empathetic and intelligent. I always try to have staff that treat my store as though it was their own. I want my employees to enjoy working here, and I think they do. In order to fit a swimsuit on a customer, we always ask for bra size and pant size. Each brand of swim is targeted to a specific type of person, so we try to direct the person to the correct style and brand. We are honest with people about what fits and looks the best. I don’t want someone to leave here with a bad fitting suit, because that makes both of us look bad...

Q: A:

What do customers usually expect when they walk through the door? I think people that walk in for the first time expect to be intimidated by not only swimwear, but by staff. I think they assume that selection will be small and that we won’t be able to fit them. Most are pleasantly surprised that our staff is extremely helpful and not intimidating. Returning customers expect a great selection, relaxing atmosphere, and great customer service. I think we deliver. Kimberly Bowker can be reached at 541-617-7815 or kbowker@bendbulletin.com.

February 2008 to February 2009. Deschutes County lost 2,100 jobs between February 2009 and February 2010, compared to three times the amount — nearly 6,500 — from 2008 to 2009 during the same period. In Crook County, the difference was 350 compared to more than 1,000, according to data from the Employment Department. “Mathematically, it’s very interesting,” Eagan said. Crook County’s 2009 annual average employment of 5,740 was at about that same level during the mid-1990s, according to Eagan. She wrote in mid-March that most of the impact on employment throughout Central Oregon stems from the weak housing market. David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 30, 2010 B3

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Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

... 1.00f .04 .32 1.68 ... .04 .72 .72 ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

14 13 ... ... 41 ... ... 27 23 ... 19 15 26 29 ... 11 ... ... 16 ... 16

41.14 -.19 +19.0 21.12 +.20 -2.2 18.04 +.14 +19.8 13.58 -.17 +10.5 74.11 +1.52 +36.9 .56 +.01 -17.6 35.08 +1.31 +27.6 53.68 +.26 +37.5 60.14 +.01 +1.6 2.54 +.07 +5.7 27.97 +.06 -14.5 52.97 -.45 +2.8 14.35 +.11 +7.8 22.33 +.09 +9.5 7.72 -.14 +39.1 21.34 +.13 +3.9 3.75 +.10 +38.9 8.45 +.26 +21.1 21.89 +.22 -7.2 8.14 -.06 -7.8 29.59 -.07 -2.9

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal

Price (troy oz.)

Pvs Day

NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

$1,110.00 $1,110.30 $17.373

$1,105.00 $1,104.20 $16.894

YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret AIM Investments A: ChartA p 15.67 +0.09 +4.3 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.56 +0.10 +6.9 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.77 +0.03 +3.6 GrowthI 23.11 +0.08 +4.9 Ultra 20.46 +0.10 +5.1 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.59 +0.10 +6.0 AMutlA p 23.81 +0.14 +3.5 BalA p 16.82 +0.05 +4.3 BondA p 11.94 +2.1 CapWA p 20.07 +0.07 +0.9 CapIBA p 47.99 +0.24 +1.1 CapWGA p 33.97 +0.23 +0.1 EupacA p 38.47 +0.34 +0.3 FdInvA p 34.00 +0.23 +4.3 GovtA p 14.03 +1.0 GwthA p 28.46 +0.19 +4.1 HI TrA p 10.97 +0.02 +5.0 IncoA p 15.79 +0.07 +3.0 IntBdA p 13.21 +1.2 ICAA p 26.76 +0.14 +3.6 NEcoA p 23.33 +0.14 +3.7 N PerA p 26.23 +0.14 +2.3 NwWrldA 48.60 +0.30 +3.0 SmCpA p 33.66 +0.19 +6.8 TxExA p 12.09 +1.4 WshA p 25.51 +0.15 +4.1 American Funds B: BalB p 16.76 +0.05 +4.1 CapIBB t 48.01 +0.23 +0.9 GrwthB t 27.57 +0.19 +4.0 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 28.65 +0.23 +1.5 IntlEqA 27.96 +0.24 +1.4 IntEqII I r 11.83 +0.10 +0.4 Artisan Funds: Intl 20.13 +0.15 -2.6 MidCap 27.27 +0.10 +6.7 MidCapVal 18.59 +0.19 +3.4 Baron Funds:

Growth 44.19 +0.31 +7.0 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.46 +2.7 DivMu 14.44 +1.0 TxMgdIntl 15.41 +0.17 +0.9 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.39 +0.13 +3.6 GlAlA r 18.17 +0.11 +1.6 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 16.97 +0.10 +1.4 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 18.25 +0.10 +1.6 CGM Funds: Focus 31.25 +0.40 +5.0 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 45.88 +0.27 +3.2 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 25.78 +0.20 +7.5 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 26.55 +0.20 +7.6 AcornIntZ 35.43 +0.23 +3.4 ValRestr 44.66 +0.55 +4.4 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.43 +0.11 +3.0 USCorEq2 9.90 +0.06 +8.5 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.22 +0.22 +4.0 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.56 +0.23 +4.1 NYVen C 31.13 +0.22 +3.8 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.45 +0.01 +2.8 Dimensional Fds: EmMktV 32.36 +0.50 +2.9 IntSmVa 15.83 +0.13 +4.9 USLgCo 34.60 +0.20 +5.7 USLgVa 18.73 +0.15 +10.1 US Micro 11.62 +0.05 +10.1 US SmVa 22.10 +0.15 +12.6 IntlSmCo 14.96 +0.13 +5.2 Fixd 10.33 +0.4 IntVa 17.38 +0.20 +2.0 Glb5FxInc 11.17 +1.6 2YGlFxd 10.19 +0.5 Dodge&Cox:

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.08 .64 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .40 .07 1.44f .80f .40 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

21 22 16 ... 90 ... 26 19 13 ... 18 11 47 55 ... 32 65 37 ... ...

73.97 +.08 +12.0 41.81 +.06 +11.3 47.10 +.68 +4.6 17.03 +.23 +34.2 43.87 +.20 +21.0 2.72 -.08 -3.2 38.33 +.07 +1.5 127.09 +3.27 +15.2 24.84 +.40 +16.7 52.05 +1.24 +9.1 67.01 +.17 +8.7 46.79 +.43 +16.9 24.61 +.02 +6.7 7.14 +.09 +19.0 12.99 -.15 -3.1 25.96 -.04 +15.3 20.27 +.03 +4.8 31.10 -.12 +15.2 2.58 -.05 +22.9 44.88 +.58 +4.0

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp FordM BkofAm S&P500ETF GenElec

8480792 1509989 1501254 1179370 815114

Last Chg 4.18 13.57 18.04 117.32 18.40

-.13 -.29 +.14 +.74 +.06

Gainers ($2 or more) Name KidBrands ChinaYuch BWAY Talbots W Holding

Last 8.00 18.01 20.07 12.99 9.90

Chg %Chg +1.40 +2.98 +2.72 +1.51 +1.15

+21.2 +19.8 +15.7 +13.2 +13.1

Losers ($2 or more) Name AldIrish Heckmn un BkIrelnd GlbShip un PSBMetDS

Last

Indexes

Chg %Chg

3.58 -.87 -19.6 6.50 -1.00 -13.3 6.60 -.84 -11.3 2.29 -.21 -8.4 15.44 -1.39 -8.3

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

AdeonaPh BPW Acq AlphaPro GoldStr g Taseko

Last Chg

54104 1.90 +.34 30443 12.45 +1.31 21238 2.73 -.46 21159 3.83 +.13 20957 5.10 +.02

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

IncOpR BPW Acq BPW Acq un SagaComm KodiakO g

Last

Diary

Last

Last

Servidyne BellMicro RosettaG AvanirPhm BioSphre

4.47 +2.25 +101.4 6.91 +1.53 +28.4 2.31 +.33 +16.7 2.51 +.35 +16.2 2.72 +.31 +12.9

2,133 953 114 3,200 208 7

Chg %Chg

2.73 -.46 -14.4 2.90 -.26 -8.2 3.21 -.24 -6.9 19.50 -1.44 -6.9 2.90 -.20 -6.5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

ARCA bio Spire h OrcktCm CmwlthBsh Gentium

5.70 -2.52 -30.7 3.38 -.82 -19.5 3.96 -.85 -17.7 3.88 -.69 -15.1 2.58 -.31 -10.7

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

48.23 +.23 6.91 +1.53 22.33 +.09 29.59 -.07 26.51 +.04

Name

Losers ($2 or more) AlphaPro AmDGEn n AmBiltrt HawkCorp FullHseR

Last Chg

529167 346113 337816 323993 299146

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

5.95 +.85 +16.6 12.45 +1.31 +11.8 13.50 +1.25 +10.2 22.67 +1.46 +6.9 3.25 +.20 +6.6

Name

Vol (00)

PwShs QQQ BellMicro Intel Microsoft Cisco

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

52-Week High Low Name

Chg %Chg

Diary 301 190 43 534 28 2

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,545 1,112 147 2,804 108 17

10,955.48 4,439.24 408.57 7,497.88 1,925.54 2,432.25 1,180.69 12,351.24 693.32

7,278.78 2,517.16 320.44 4,832.15 1,321.21 1,482.15 772.31 7,801.35 405.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,895.86 4,376.74 380.27 7,464.90 1,891.91 2,404.36 1,173.22 12,262.38 682.25

+45.50 +36.83 +3.91 +61.32 +15.76 +9.23 +6.63 +71.31 +3.28

YTD %Chg %Chg +.42 +.85 +1.04 +.83 +.84 +.39 +.57 +.58 +.48

52-wk %Chg

+4.49 +6.76 -4.46 +3.90 +3.67 +5.96 +5.21 +6.18 +9.09

+44.85 +64.94 +17.31 +52.37 +41.99 +60.10 +48.97 +53.24 +64.01

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

343.96 2,665.40 4,000.66 5,710.66 6,156.85 21,237.43 33,416.10 23,104.97 3,251.10 10,986.47 1,691.99 2,929.14 4,907.20 5,984.70

+.04 s +.32 s +.29 s +.13 s +.60 s +.88 s +.81 s +.18 s +.33 s -.09 t -.34 t +.79 s +.04 s +.17 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

.9159 1.4975 .9784 .001882 .1465 1.3463 .1288 .010806 .080238 .0339 .000881 .1376 .9400 .0314

Pvs Day .9019 1.4892 .9722 .001872 .1465 1.3401 .1288 .010806 .079694 .0338 .000876 .1377 .9372 .0313

Selected mutual funds Balanced 67.22 Income 13.08 IntlStk 32.93 Stock 102.30 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.68 NatlMunInc 9.65 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 17.73 Evergreen A: AstAll p 11.55 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 11.20 FPA Funds: NwInc 11.05 FPACres 25.81 Fairholme 34.12 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.91 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 17.81 StrInA 12.29 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 17.98 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.90 FF2015 10.75 FF2020 13.00 FF2025 10.79 FF2030 12.89 FF2035 10.68 FF2040 7.46 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.04 AMgr50 14.33 Balanc 17.05 BlueChGr 40.24 Canada 51.45 CapAp 23.40 CpInc r 8.92 Contra 60.27 DisEq 22.06 DivIntl 28.14 DivGth 25.29 EmrMk 23.04

+0.36 +0.01 +0.28 +0.71

+5.6 +2.2 +3.4 +6.8

+0.14 +5.9 +2.6 +0.14 +6.0 +0.05 +1.6 +0.05 +1.5 +0.01 +1.2 +0.13 +4.0 +0.11 +13.4 +0.03 +5.4 +0.09 +3.5 +0.01 +2.5 +0.09 +3.6 +0.06 +0.05 +0.07 +0.06 +0.08 +0.07 +0.05

+3.1 +3.2 +3.6 +3.8 +4.0 +4.1 +4.2

+0.09 +0.06 +0.08 +0.19 +0.65 +0.12 +0.02 +0.29 +0.17 +0.29 +0.25 +0.26

+5.3 +3.5 +4.2 +6.0 +6.1 +9.2 +5.0 +3.6 +5.0 +0.5 +6.8 +1.9

Eq Inc 41.73 EQII 17.35 Fidel 29.62 GNMA 11.51 GovtInc 10.45 GroCo 73.32 GroInc 17.03 HighInc r 8.67 Indepn 21.48 IntBd 10.28 IntmMu 10.18 IntlDisc 30.60 InvGrBd 11.42 InvGB 7.14 LgCapVal 11.91 LatAm 51.16 LevCoStk 24.74 LowP r 34.68 Magelln 67.62 MidCap 26.05 MuniInc 12.52 NwMkt r 15.46 OTC 48.48 100Index 8.33 Ovrsea 30.70 Puritn 16.80 StIntMu 10.63 STBF 8.36 SmllCpS r 17.34 StratInc 10.96 StrReRt r 8.65 TotalBd 10.63 USBI 11.14 Value 62.24 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 41.68 IntlInxInv 33.73 TotMktInv 33.62 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 41.68 TotMktAd r 33.62 First Eagle: GlblA 41.61 OverseasA 20.23

+0.28 +0.10 +0.15 +0.01

+6.6 +6.2 +4.5 +2.1 +1.2 +0.36 +6.3 +0.08 +6.0 +0.01 +4.2 +0.13 +7.8 +2.1 +1.1 +0.26 +0.8 -0.01 +2.0 +2.3 +0.09 +5.9 +1.10 -1.3 +0.26 +7.9 +0.18 +8.6 +0.57 +5.1 +0.25 +11.2 +1.5 +0.01 +4.3 +0.16 +6.0 +0.04 +5.0 +0.30 -0.7 +0.06 +4.6 -0.01 +0.5 +1.1 +0.13 +8.8 +0.01 +2.6 +0.04 +1.6 +2.4 +1.5 +0.56 +9.3

+0.24 +5.7 +0.30 +0.8 +0.20 +6.5 +0.24 +5.7 +0.20 +6.5 +0.20 +4.1 +0.10 +4.0

Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.79 FoundAl p 10.15 +0.05 HYTFA p 9.98 IncomA p 2.10 +0.01 USGovA p 6.70 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.09 +0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.12 +0.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.11 +0.11 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.53 +0.05 GlBd A p 13.30 +0.08 GrwthA p 17.01 +0.10 WorldA p 14.14 +0.08 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 17.02 +0.11 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.32 +0.08 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 38.75 +0.28 GMO Trust: ShDurColl rx 13.91 -0.82 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.71 +0.07 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.57 +0.16 Quality 19.71 +0.07 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.08 HYMuni 8.43 +0.01 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.42 CapApInst 33.95 +0.16 IntlInv t 54.51 +0.53 Intl r 55.04 +0.54 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.09 +0.13 Hartford Fds C: CapApC t 28.63 +0.12 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 32.03 +0.13

+1.3 +3.4 +2.4 +3.3 +1.9 +5.7 +3.3 +3.1 +5.5 -0.3 +5.6 +1.2 +1.2 +1.3 +5.5 +5.1 NE +1.4 +2.5 +1.4 +3.9 +4.2 +2.3 +3.0 +0.2 +0.3 +4.6 +4.4 +4.6

Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 38.74 +0.23 Div&Gr 18.44 +0.14 Advisers 18.29 +0.06 TotRetBd 10.84 HussmnStrGr 12.73 -0.05 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 21.81 +0.10 AssetStA p 22.36 +0.10 AssetStrI r 22.52 +0.10 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.21 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.21 HighYld 7.98 +0.01 IntmTFBd 10.89 -0.01 ShtDurBd 10.89 USLCCrPls 19.24 +0.13 Janus S Shrs: Forty 32.81 +0.17 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 27.12 +0.20 OvrseasT r 46.46 +0.32 PrkMCVal T 20.92 +0.13 Twenty T 64.20 +0.36 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 11.28 +0.08 LSBalanc 12.28 +0.06 LSGrwth 11.95 +0.07 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 21.37 +0.19 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.94 +0.17 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 19.21 +0.17 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.96 +0.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 25.63 +0.14 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.77 +0.03 StrInc C 14.33 +0.03 LSBondR 13.72 +0.03 StrIncA 14.25 +0.03 Loomis Sayles Inv:

+5.8 +5.1 +4.7 +2.5 -0.4 +0.1 +0.4 +0.4 +1.6 +1.7 +4.4 +0.6 +0.7 +5.8 +4.1 +3.3 +9.3 +5.7 +4.2 +4.7 +4.1 +4.4 +7.8 +5.2 +5.1 +2.1 +6.4 +4.8 +4.6 +4.7 +4.8

InvGrBdA p 12.01 +0.03 InvGrBdY 12.01 +0.02 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.95 +0.08 BdDebA p 7.51 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.57 +0.06 ValueA 21.70 +0.14 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.79 +0.13 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.76 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.30 +0.05 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 19.85 +0.12 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.14 TotRtBdI 10.14 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 13.22 +0.13 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.00 +0.09 GlbDiscZ 28.33 +0.09 QuestZ 17.93 +0.07 SharesZ 20.26 +0.10 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 39.88 +0.41 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 41.42 +0.43 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.72 +0.17 Intl I r 17.67 +0.09 Oakmark r 39.37 +0.15 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.37 +0.03 GlbSMdCap 13.37 +0.08 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 41.31 +0.25 DvMktA p 29.62 +0.31 GlobA p 56.12 +0.35 IntBdA p 6.41 +0.04 MnStFdA 29.67 +0.18 RisingDivA 14.49 +0.07 S&MdCpVl 28.32 +0.23

+3.7 +3.7 +7.1 +3.6 +3.8 +4.8 +4.8 +3.2 +2.2 +3.2 +3.6 +3.7 +1.5 +4.8 +4.8 +4.0 +5.6 +5.6 +5.5 +4.6 +4.9 +6.3 +4.2 +4.7 +3.5 +3.0 +5.9 +1.1 +5.5 +4.2 +6.5

StrInA p 4.04 +0.01 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.18 +0.07 S&MdCpVl 24.44 +0.20 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.13 +0.06 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.15 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.63 +0.01 ComodRR 7.78 +0.13 HiYld 9.06 InvGrCp 11.14 LowDu 10.43 +0.01 RealRet 10.86 -0.04 RealRtnI 10.81 -0.02 ShortT 9.87 TotRt 11.01 TR II 10.57 -0.01 TRIII 9.76 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 10.81 -0.02 TotRtA 11.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 39.71 +0.22 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 37.64 +0.21 Price Funds: BlChip 34.14 +0.19 CapApp 19.21 +0.09 EmMktS 30.91 +0.41 EqInc x 22.33 +0.06 EqIndex x 31.60 +0.06 Growth 28.63 +0.18 HlthSci 28.69 +0.24 HiYield 6.59 +0.01 IntlBond 9.67 +0.04

+3.9 +4.0 +6.4 +4.0 +3.0 +2.6 +2.1 -3.7 +5.1 +3.4 +1.8 -0.6 +0.7 +0.8 +2.7 +1.8 +2.9 +0.6 +2.6 +2.4 +2.6 +2.7 +2.7 +5.6 +4.2 +5.8 +2.7 +6.8 +5.6 +4.1 +9.6 +4.5 -1.4

IntlStk 13.02 MidCap 51.46 MCapVal 22.03 N Asia 16.66 New Era 44.05 N Horiz 28.04 N Inc 9.37 R2010 14.51 R2015 11.12 R2020 15.25 R2025 11.11 R2030 15.85 R2040 15.90 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 29.58 SmCapVal 31.85 SpecIn 12.02 Value 21.80 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.69 VoyA p 21.33 RiverSource A: DEI 9.24 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.11 PremierI r 17.47 TotRetI r 11.59 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 34.97 S&P Sel 18.33 Scout Funds: Intl 29.86 Selected Funds: AmShD 38.90 AmShS p 38.91 Sequoia 119.18 St FarmAssoc: Gwth 50.51 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 9.95 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 19.16 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 47.70 Thornburg Fds:

+0.11 +0.47 +0.18 +0.12 +0.87 +0.18 +0.07 +0.05 +0.08 +0.07 +0.10 +0.11 +0.20 +0.22 +0.01 +0.16

+3.3 +8.4 +6.3 +3.2 +1.0 +9.6 +2.0 +4.0 +4.2 +4.5 +4.7 +4.8 +5.0 +1.1 +9.8 +8.0 +2.8 +6.4

+0.08 +6.1 +0.16 +8.1 +0.04 +5.3 +0.06 +7.0 +0.13 +7.1 +0.06 +7.5 +0.21 +6.0 +0.10 +5.7 +0.23 +2.5 +0.29 +4.4 +0.29 +4.4 +0.80 +8.4 +0.30 +2.7 -0.01 +1.7 +0.14 -0.7 +0.29 +3.0

IntValA p 25.26 +0.18 IntValue I 25.80 +0.18 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.02 +0.01 VALIC : StkIdx 23.55 +0.14 Van Kamp Funds A: CmstA p 14.66 +0.07 EqIncA p 8.21 +0.04 GrInA p 18.46 +0.12 HYMuA p 9.24 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.88 CpOpAdl 73.14 +0.46 Energy 110.54 +2.07 500Adml x 108.07 +0.17 GNMA Ad e 10.73 -0.05 HlthCr 51.92 +0.33 HiYldCp 5.56 InfProAd x 24.46 -0.18 ITsryAdml e 11.10 -0.05 IntGrAdm 55.28 +0.57 ITAdml 13.47 -0.01 ITGrAdm e 9.76 -0.04 LtdTrAd 11.03 -0.01 LTGrAdml 8.86 -0.02 LT Adml 10.98 MuHYAdm 10.36 -0.01 PrmCap r 63.92 +0.33 STsyAdml e 10.71 -0.05 ShtTrAd 15.91 -0.01 STIGrAd 10.70 TtlBAdml 10.42 TStkAdm 29.08 +0.17 WellslAdm x 50.22 -0.37 WelltnAdm x 51.38 -0.09 Windsor 42.92 +0.35 WdsrIIAd 44.66 +0.25 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.44 +0.08 CapOpp 31.66 +0.20 DivdGro 13.62 +0.08 Energy 58.87 +1.10 EqInc x 19.01 -0.02

+1.8 +1.9 +3.9 +5.7 +6.5 +5.9 +7.3 +2.7 +1.4 +5.4 -1.4 +5.7 +2.0 +3.4 +3.6 -0.2 +1.3 +2.3 +0.9 +3.0 +0.5 +0.8 +1.1 +1.7 +3.7 +0.7 +0.3 +1.9 +1.6 +6.4 +2.7 +3.8 +6.8 +6.3 +4.2 +5.4 +3.4 -1.4 +4.9

Explr 62.39 GNMA e 10.73 GlobEq 16.41 GroInc 24.81 HYCorp 5.56 HlthCre 123.03 InflaPro x 12.46 IntlGr 17.37 IntlVal 31.00 ITIGrade e 9.76 LifeCon x 15.54 LifeGro 20.46 LifeMod 18.38 LTIGrade 8.86 Morg 16.09 MuInt 13.47 MuLtd 11.03 MuShrt 15.91 PrecMtls r 21.17 PrmcpCor 12.71 Prmcp r 61.60 SelValu r 17.27 STAR 18.19 STIGrade 10.70 StratEq 16.49 TgtRetInc x 10.78 TgRe2010 21.21 TgtRe2025 11.82 TgtRe2015 11.75 TgRe2020 20.79 TgRe2030 20.22 TgtRe2035 12.20 TgtRe2040 19.99 TgtRe2045 12.62 USGro 16.96 Wellsly x 20.73 Welltn x 29.75 Wndsr 12.72 WndsII 25.15 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 x 108.07 Balanced x 20.10 DevMkt 9.66 EMkt 26.41

+0.38 -0.05 +0.15 +0.17

+0.16 -0.04 +0.07 +0.06 +0.04 +0.09 +0.11 +0.07 +0.12 +0.08 +0.06 -0.15 -0.04 +0.10 +0.13

+8.9 +2.0 +4.7 +6.1 +3.5 +3.4 -0.2 +2.2 +1.3 +3.0 +3.3 +4.6 +3.9 +0.7 +5.4 +0.9 +0.5 +0.3 +3.6 +5.0 +3.6 +8.3 +3.7 +1.9 +7.9 +2.3 +3.4 +4.4 +3.9 +4.2 +4.7 +5.0 +4.9 +5.0 +3.0 +2.7 +3.8 +6.8 +6.2

+0.19 -0.04 +0.09 +0.37

+5.7 +4.4 +1.4 +2.0

+0.79 -0.08 +0.18 +0.33 -0.04 -0.04 +0.11 +0.07 -0.02 +0.09 -0.01 -0.01 -0.01 +0.33 +0.08 +0.32 +0.16 +0.07

Europe 25.57 +0.19 -1.4 Extend 35.72 +0.25 +9.3 Growth 28.66 +0.16 +5.1 ITBnd 10.81 +1.9 MidCap 17.83 +0.15 +9.0 Pacific 10.34 +0.13 +6.8 REIT r 16.41 +0.02 +11.4 SmCap 30.28 +0.18 +10.2 SmlCpGth 18.43 +0.11 +9.5 SmlCpVl 14.46 +0.08 +10.8 STBnd 10.47 +1.0 TotBnd 10.42 +1.6 TotlIntl 14.62 +0.15 +1.5 TotStk 29.08 +0.18 +6.3 Value 19.74 +0.13 +6.5 Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst 9.58 +0.09 NS ExtIn 35.74 +0.25 +9.4 GrwthIst 28.66 +0.15 +5.2 InfProInst x 9.96 -0.08 -0.2 InstIdx x 107.35 +0.17 +5.7 InsPl x 107.35 +0.16 +5.7 InsTStPlus x 26.28 +0.05 +6.4 MidCpIst 17.88 +0.16 +9.0 SCInst 30.30 +0.17 +10.2 TBIst 10.42 +1.6 TSInst 29.09 +0.18 +6.4 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl x 89.27 +0.14 +5.7 STBdIdx 10.47 +1.1 TotBdSgl 10.42 +1.6 TotStkSgl 28.07 +0.17 +6.3 Victory Funds: DvsStA 14.56 +0.08 +4.1 Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p 4.81 +0.3 Western Asset: CorePlus 10.44 +4.2


B USI N ESS

B4 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M  BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. WORKING WITH EXCEL SPREADSHEETS: Learn to understand Excel and spreadsheets. Familiarity with Windows operating system and MS Excel required. Preregistration required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055. “GROWING FARMS”: Teaches beginning specialty crop and livestock farmers about how to manage biological and financial risks of farming. Preregistration required; $200 or $350 per couple from the same farm; Tuesdays through May 4 from 5-9 p.m., and one farm tour on April 24; OSU Extension Service, 3893 S.W. Airport Way , Redmond; 541-548-6088, ext., 7957, dana.martin@oregonstate.edu or http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/ growing-farms-workshop-series. BNI NETWORKING EVENT: Network with business professionals looking to build business by referral. RSVP by March 26; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-526-0639 or sreynolds@ leamsc.com. FILM OREGON ALLIANCE QUARTERLY BUSINESS AND NETWORKING MEETING: Features updates and speakers from the local media production scene, a preview of projects and professional development opportunities; free; 6-8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-771-5440, stan@ filmoregon.org or www.filmoregon.org.

WEDNESDAY “INTERVIEWING — THE SECRETS”: Learn how to prepare for an interview. Arrive 20 minutes early for registration; free; 1:15-3:15 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. “SPANISH COMPUTER CLASS — CREATE A RESUME IN WORD”: Familiarity with Windows operating system and MS Office programs required. Taught in Spanish. Preregistration required; free; 3:30-5 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1066. “HOW TO START A BUSINESS”: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Preregistration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SIMPLE WILLS CLINIC: Presented by Hurley Re Attorneys at Law. Reservations requested; free; 6-7 p.m.; Hurley Re, 747 S.W. Mill View

Way, Bend; 541-317-5505 or jmlove@hurley-re.com. CENTRAL OREGON INTERNET TV REAL ESTATE SHOW: Jim Mazziotti, principal broker of Exit Realty Bend, will present the best of shows; free; 7 p.m.; mazz@propertiesinbend.com or www.exitrealtybend.com.

THURSDAY “WORKING WITH DIFFICULT PEOPLE”: Learn how to communicate with employees and co-workers. Registration required; $80; 8 a.m.noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. “HIGH DESERT DATA CONFERENCE — DON’T COUNT ON IT”: Learn about the American Community Survey. Features presenters Tim Duy with the University of Oregon, and Bill Carpenter and Natasha Detweiler with Oregon Housing & Community Services; $40 if registered by March 20, $50 after March 20; 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Inn at Cross Keys Station, 66 N.W. Cedar St., Madras; 541-504-1389. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking and support group for unemployed people to get out of the house and discuss various topics; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; bendetg@gmail.com.

FRIDAY REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Hosted by Combined Communications; free; 8:309:30 a.m.; Chloe at North Redmond Station, 1857 N.W. Sixth St.; 541-9235191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com. EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians who are eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-504-1389 or www.yourmoneyback.org.

SATURDAY SUNRIVER RESORT JOB FAIR: Sunriver Resort is planning to hire up to 250 seasonal employees; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sunriver Resort, Homestead Room, 57081 Meadow Road; 541-593-4600 or www.sunriverresortjobs.com.

MONDAY MICROSOFT EXCEL PARTS 1, 2 AND 3: Learn how to enter data, format, adjust columns and rows, problem-solve, apply colors and borders, and create formulas, charts and worksheets. Keyboarding and Microsoft Word experience required. First come, first served,

and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 9 a.m.-noon, and class continues April 6 and 7 from 9 a.m.-noon; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-3899661 or www.coic.org. EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians who are eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-5041389 or www.yourmoneyback.org. “RÉSUMÉS AND APPLICATIONS”: Learn to prepare applications, résumés and cover letters. Arrive 20 minutes early for registration; free; 24 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org.

TUESDAY April 6 “GETTING STARTED ON THE COMPUTER”: Covers mouse skills, scrolling and other basic tasks with Windows 2000 operating system. Preregistration required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or lesliw@dpls.us. INTERNET CLASS: Learn how to tour the Internet with emphasis on job searching and employment. Basic computer experience required. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 2-4:30 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-3899661 or www.coic.org.

WEDNESDAY April 7 “ROTH IRAS — RETIREMENT CAN BE LESS TAXING”: Learn about the differences between traditional and Roth IRAs and new tax law changes for conversion; free; noon-1 p.m.; Edward Jones financial adviser Mark Schang’s office, 1180 S.E. Third St., Bend; 541-617-8861 or www.edward jones.com. “INTERVIEWING — THE SECRETS”: Learn how to prepare for an interview. Arrive 20 minutes early for registration; free; 1:15-3:15 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. DEMOCRATIC GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATE FORUM: Candidates Bill Bradbury and John Kitzhaber will discuss how to support businesses, employment and economic growth. Live stream of the Portland event; $10 to stream; 4:30-5:45 p.m.; www.sao.org/event/dgp. CENTRAL OREGON INTERNET TV REAL ESTATE SHOW: Jim Mazziotti, principal broker of Exit Realty Bend, will present “Central Oregon’s Top 10 Best Home Buys”; free; 7 p.m.; mazz@propertiesinbend.com or www.exitrealtybend.com.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Kimberly Bowker at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com.

States Continued from B1 “If we ran into a situation where one state got into trouble, they’d be bailed out six ways from Tuesday,” said Kenneth Rogoff, an economics professor at Harvard and a former research director of the International Monetary Fund. “But if we have a situation where there’s slow growth, and a bunch of cities and states are on the edge, like in Europe, we will have trouble.” California’s stated debt — the value of all its bonds outstanding — looks manageable, at just 8 percent of its total economy. But California has big unstated debts, too. If the fair value of the shortfall in California’s big pension fund is counted, for instance, the state’s debt burden more than quadruples, to 37 percent of its economic output, according to one calculation. Unstated debts pose a bigger problem to states with smaller economies. If Rhode Island were a country, the fair value of its pension debt would push it outside the maximum permitted by the euro zone, which tries to limit government debt to 60 percent of gross domestic product, according to Andrew Biggs, an economist with the American Enterprise Institute who has been analyzing state debt. State officials say a Greecestyle financial crisis is a complete nonissue for them, and the bond markets so far seem to agree. All 50 states have investment-grade credit ratings, with California the lowest, and even California is still considered “average,” according to Moody’s Investors Service. The last state that defaulted on its bonds, Arkansas, did so during the Great Depression. Even though about $5 billion of municipal bonds are in default today, the vast majority were issued by small local authorities in boom-and-bust locations like Florida, said Matt Fabian, managing director of

Municipal Market Advisors, an independent consulting firm. The issuers raised money to pay for projects like sewer connections and new roads in subdivisions that collapsed in the subprime mortgage disaster. The states, he said, are different. They learned a lesson from New York City, which got into trouble in the 1970s by financing its operations with short-term debt that had to be rolled over again and again. When investors suddenly lost confidence, New York was left empty-handed. To keep that from happening again, Fabian said, most states now require short-term debt to be fully repaid the same year it is issued.

Some states have taken even more forceful measures to build creditor confidence. New York state has a trustee that intercepts tax revenues and makes some bond payments before the state can get to the money. California has a “continuous appropriation” for debt payments, so bondholders know they will get their interest even when the budget is hamstrung. One finding was that countries “can default on stunningly small amounts of debt,” he said, perhaps just one-fourth of what stopped Greece in its tracks. “The fact that the states’ debts aren’t as big as Greece’s doesn’t mean it can’t happen.”

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NEWS OF RECORD DEEDS Deschutes County

Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Gary and Jan Hooper, St. Clair Place Condominium, Units 102 and 302, $260,000 Edward P. Fitch, trustee to Paul Miller, David and Sheryl Whent, McCafferys First Add. to the Townsite of Sisters, Lots 1-2, Block 2, $176,000 Robert L. and Elizabeth A. Reed to Clark S. and Barbara A. Brody, Glaze Meadow Homesite Section of Black Butte Ranch, Lot 35, $790,000 IMB REO LLC to Scott E. Brennan, Kelly R. Johnson, Bonne Home Add., Lots 5-6, Block 20, $270,000 Doug Strain to Stephen K. Wagner, River Park Estates, Lot 9, $220,000 IMB REO LLC to Jon N. Jr. and Nicolette M. Swift, Awbrey Park Phase 3, Lot 101, $499,900 Loyal B. and Julie R. George to Alan A. and Michelle D. Skoglund, Golden Butte Phase 1, Lot 3, $352,000 Patrick K. and Kimberly A. McClain to Christopher and Elizabeth Clark, Shevlin Ridge Phase 6, Lot 86, $160,000 Bank of New York Mellon, trustee to Gail M. Slowikowski, T 15, R 11, Section 31, $179,800 James M. Murray Jr., trustee to Sean M. and Julie G. Reinhart, Awbrey Butte Homesites Phase 3, Lot 11, Block 4, $400,000 Cheryl L. Tanler to Scott R. Tate, Canyon Rim Village Phase 4, Lot 78, $240,000 Bill Wecks Construction Inc. to Bruce A. and Diane L. Caston, Silver Ridge Planned Unit Development, Lot 4, $259,900 Federal National Mortgage Association to Patricia Rinehart, Tollgate Third Add., Lot 144, $280,000 Jacob C. Taylor, Brian S. Dyson to Tiffany Stafford, Gardenside Planned Unit Development Phase 1, Lot 18, $153,600 Mario Riquelme to Gerardo T. Riquelme, River Park Estates, Lot 7, $800,000 BAC Home Loans Servicing LP to George and Lisa Corrigan, Broken Top Phase 3C, Lot 317, $501,125 Wells Fargo Bank NA to Shari

L. Morris, Wildwood Park, Lot 1, Block 2, $182,086 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Chase Home Finance LLC, Forrest Commons, Lot 4, $280,013.30 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., Hawk’s Ridge Phase 2, Lot 24, $345,000 Federal National Mortgage Association to Frank E. and E. Annette Smith, The Summit Phase 2, Lot 26, $154,900 Federal National Mortgage Association to Christopher S. Mease, Porcupine, Lot 10, $159,900 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corp., trustee to Harrison Street Property Group LLC, Parks at Broken Top, Lot 55, $277,500 U.S. Bank NA, trustee to Ephraim G. and Judith D. Starkey, Ponderosa Pines Third Add., Lot 11, Block 6, $201,000 Fidelity National Title Insurance Co., trustee to Deutsche Bank National Trust Co., trustee, T 17, R 12, Section 15, $486,281.53 Recontrust Co. NA, trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, Second Add. to Chaparral Estates, Lot 8, Block 2, $325,112.36 Recontrust Co. NA, trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, Eastbrook Estates Phase 3, Lot 61, $186,931.47 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corp., trustee to Vergent LLC, Majestic Ridge Phase 3, Lot 56, $318,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Mary E. Andrews, Eric M. Heinemann, Silver Sage Phase 2, Lot 27, $169,900 LSI Title Co. of Oregon LLC to Wells Fargo Bank NA, trustee, Janela Court, Lot 8, Block 1, $260,000 Recontrust Co. NA, trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, Hillman, Lots 2432, Block 174, $186,476.26 Matt J. Silver, Catherine C. Blue to Steven Denio, Heather Hogensen, Riverstone, Lot 5, $163,000 Kenneth L. and Annie L. Hascall to James and Tina Ryan, Fairway Crest Village Phase 2, Lot 25, Block 3, $305,000 Coughlin & Holloway LLC to Ridgeline LLC, McClellan Commons,

Lots 2-4 and 6-7, $180,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Jeffrey M. Kuhlman, Justin Glen Phase 3, Lot 57, $162,500 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Chase Home Finance LLC, Revised Tetherow Crossing, Lot 2, Block 2, $308,029.20 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Wells Fargo Bank NA, Crane Meadow, Lot 10, $315,215.96 Gregory S. and Jeanne M. Thompson to Jim Kreminski, Ridge at Eagle Crest 28, Lot 171, $355,000 Harry W. Lynch III to Cris Converse, Davidson Add. to Sisters, Lots 5-6, Block 18, $275,000 John L. Corso to Kevin E. and Karen Kimball, Skyliner Summit at Broken Top Phase 10, Lot 220, $354,000 Sterling Savings Bank to Long Term Bend Investors LLC, RiverRim Planned Unit Development Phase 10, Lots 371, 373-374, 398404, 416-420, 431-433, 442444 and 455-457, $768,000 West Coast Bank to Newberry Habitat for Humanity Inc., Terry Park, Lots 2-13, $217,800 David R. Ambrose, trustee to Independent Mortgage Co., Residence Club at Pronghorn Villas Condominiums, Unit 301, $800,000 Gary and Sami Dehm to Steven D. and Barbara M. Wascher, Arrowhead Phases 1-4, Lot 26, $175,500 Charles A. Hune to Brian W. and Elizabeth A. Allison, Bend Cascade View Estates Tract 2 Unit 1, Lot 49, $205,000 Colette H. Stewart to Donald H. Buckner, Beverly J. Hamilton, T 15, R 12, Section 12, $249,000 Patrick J. and Kimberly J. Ohara to Kaeleen C. Holmgren, Stevens Borough Phase 1, Lot 11, $175,000 D.R. Horton Inc. Portland to Dennis M. and Sandra A. Wallis, Summit Crest Phase 1, Lot 10, $176,027 First American Title Insurance Co., trustee to First Horizon Home Loans, T 18, R 13, Section 12, $432,506.48 Walter A., Vicki M. and Virginia E. Sands, Kari L. Fantz to Rio De Sol LLC, Deer Park 2, Lot 10, Block 15, $305,000

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OREGON Old love letters find their way back to woman’s family, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Actress June Havoc was sister of Gypsy Rose Lee, see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MARCH 30, 2010

Attention, photographers! Submit your own pictures of pets at www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot and we’ll pick the best for publication next week in this space. No doctored photos, please!

Picture-taking advice from The Bulletin’s professional photographers

Well, sh ot!

Installment 15:

Pets

laundering. More than a dozen investors have either received The Bend couple at the center judgments or filed lawsuits of more than a dozen lawsuits against the couple. Monday’s court hearand IRS and FBI investiing centers on investgations into their compaments made by Richard nies’ business practices Russell, who according got some good news to court records made Monday. A judge denied two loans to a Sawyer one investor’s motion to company, Starboard find the couple commitLLC, totaling more than ted fraud or are liable for $70,000 plus interest. their company’s debts. Deschutes County Monday’s hearing was Kevin Sawyer Circuit Court Judge the most recent attempt Stephen Forte denied a by an investor in compamotion by Russell’s atnies owned by Kevin and torney, Claud Ingram, Tami Sawyer to have the which would have held couple held responsible Tami Sawyer accountfor lost money. able for Starboard’s City officials have condebts and found the firmed that former Bend Sawyers committed Police Capt. Kevin Sawfraud. yer, his wife, Tami Saw- Tami Sawyer Forte said he declined yer, and their companies to hold Tami Sawyer acare under investigation by the FBI, and federal officials countable for Starboard’s debts have further confirmed Tami because it is unclear how money Sawyer is being investigated on transferred from Starboard’s acsuspicion of investment fraud, count was used. mail and wire fraud, and money See Sawyers / C6

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Photos by Pete Erickson

My dog, Kate, goofs around in the Mt. Bachelor parking lot. I always try to get to eye level with animals and hope to catch light in the eyes.

By Pete Erickson The Bulletin

For many people, me included, pets are like little humans living with us. A recent New York Times article said dogs were first domesticated about 15,000 years ago and their domestication “may have had a complex impact on the structure of human society.” Any animal lover knows pets have an impact on our lives, and we love taking photos of them. The goal is to share that intimate experience of human-like qualities in a photograph with the world. It’s not an easy task, especially with cats. The best way to make great pictures of our pets is to keep a camera at the ready for when they show

those special characteristics we love. When you keep the camera handy and photograph your pets, you can expect two results: The first is that the pet becomes oblivious to the camera; the second is that you get better pictures if you shoot tons of pictures. A pet not used to a black box covering your face and making strange noises will get nervous and run away. If you have a shy pet, give it a treat every time you take pictures. The next thing you know it will be begging to have its photo taken. The more photos you take of your pet, the better some of the pictures will look. This applies to all photography, so keep the camera handy and ready to use.

A pair of boxers check out the photographer at my old job in Iowa. Look for interesting compositions and be ready to get the shot.

A Pomeranian named Sophie fills one of my hiking boots in a studio-style photograph using a remote light and a softbox.

Treat cat pictures the same as wildlife photography. They won’t really ever get used to you taking pictures, but you can have fun playing like you’re on a safari hunting down the elusive creature. Use a long lens and have patience. The pictures will eventually present themselves. You can show pets in environments they love, fill the frame with an especially cute face, get action shots of them playing a game or anything you can imagine. I usually either try to be at eye level or even below the pet to show a favorite toy in the foreground. Any camera will work, but I use a camera with multiple lens choices and treat the pet the same as a human, which they are, in a way.

Sully the cat waits for someone to show up at the Humane Society of Central Oregon and make the adoption. Getting a cat to pose for a photo is almost impossible. You have to shoot a bunch of photos and hope for a winner.

Equipment corner FOR BEGINNERS AND INTERMEDIATES Eliminate the use of a flash as much as possible. Often you’ll catch pets with eyes half closed, or will capture red-eye or eyeshine (a result of the tapetum lucidum in animals, which is a layer of reflective material in the back of the eye that boosts night vision). Rely instead on strong

natural lighting, whether it be sunshine or indoor lights. Experiment with different types of light. You can often get interesting reflections from the surface of animals’ eyes. Heavy highlights and shadows can outline fur and whiskers, and light from different directions can bring out the color in animals’ irises or coats in interesting ways.

Here’s the lineup

FOR EXPERTS Experiment with props and locations. Often, the background of the frame can add that extra something to a photograph of a pet. Try green fields or interesting fabrics. Adding an article of “human” clothing or an unexpected accessory can turn an average photo into an instant smile-maker.

Each installment will feature tips from The Bulletin’s photographers, followed the next week by the best of readers’ submitted photos.

Jan. 5 Jan. 19 Feb. 2 Feb. 16 March 2 March 16 Today Landscapes Flowers Morning light On stage Architecture Close-ups Pets

Judge’s ruling aids Sawyers in fraud case

April 13 Family events

Warm Springs boy, 5, dies in gun accident By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

A 5-year-old boy on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation fatally shot himself using a family member’s .357 revolver, the Warm Springs police chief confirmed Monday. Corbin Tasyumpt’s parents were not at home when he started playing with the gun safe in the parents’ room on Thursday evening, police said. The boy was with his older brother, and the two apparently started pushing buttons until the safe opened. A teenage cousin was baby-sitting at the time. “This is traumatic for the baby sitter and devastating to the parents,” Police Chief Carmen Smith said. “It looks to us as an accident. It was something that happened, that nobody could expect.”

Correction In the “News of Record” that appeared Friday, March 26, on Page C2, the location for an authorized controlled burn on

Corbin pulled out the gun, Smith said, and put it to his head, pulling the trigger. Smith said it’s a good time to remind parents that guns should be in a safe, but other precautions can also be taken. “The guns should have a lock on them, that way if someone gets in the safe, they still can’t use it because it has a lock on it,” Smith said. The boy’s family has three other children. Corbin was the second to the youngest. His father works for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. Smith said the family is trying to mourn privately. Also last week, the body of a 56-year-old woman was found about 500 feet from Tenino Road, which runs through Warm Springs and past the administrative offices. See Shooting / C6

March 24 was wrong because of incorrect information provided to The Bulletin. The address should have been 19776 Buck Canyon Road. The Bulletin regrets the error.


C2 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A gun was reported stolen at 12:44 p.m. March 25, in the 2600 block of Northeast Forum Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:04 p.m. March 25, in the 20600 block of Brinson Boulevard. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 6:37 p.m. March 25, in the 300 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Theft — A guitar was reported stolen at 7:53 p.m. March 25, in the 1800 block of Northeast Third Street. DUII — Jerry Yukin Ng, 28, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:47 a.m. March 26, in the area of Northeast First Street and Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Redmond Police Department

DUII — Duane Peed, 38, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:52 p.m. March 26, in the 300 block of Northwest Seventh Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:13 p.m. March 26, in the 2000 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:52 p.m. March 26, in the 2500 block of Northwest 13th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:20 p.m. March 26, in the 2200 block of Southwest Xero Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:54 p.m. March 26, in the 300 block of Northwest Ninth Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:24 a.m. March 26, in the 1300 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A stereo was reported stolen from a vehicle at 7:30 a.m. March 26, in the 3300 block of Southwest Kalama Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:26 p.m. March 27, in the 2600 block of Northwest Eighth Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:28 p.m. March 27, in the 3000 block of Southwest Obsidian Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:03 p.m. March 27, in the 1800 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:59 p.m. March 27, in the 500 block of Northeast Larch Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported

at 1:28 p.m. March 27, in the 100 block of Northwest Antler Loop. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:37 a.m. March 27, in the 2200 block of Southwest Yew Avenue. DUII — Jesse James Simmons, 28, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:10 a.m. March 27, in the 1500 block of South U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Mark E. Chambers, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:51 a.m. March 28, in the 2100 block of South U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Timothy Martin Finley, 34, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:36 a.m. March 28, in the area of Southwest Canyon Drive and Southwest Cascade Avenue. DUII — Scott C. Hammers, 35, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:03 a.m. March 28, in the area of Southwest Canyon Drive and Southwest Obsidian Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:06 p.m. March 26, in the area of Northwest Ninth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:29 p.m. March 26, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:54 p.m. March 27, in the area of North Main Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:36 p.m. March 26, in the 64400 block of McGrath Road in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:05 a.m. March 26, in the area of South Century Drive and Spring River Road in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:01 a.m. March 26, in the area of state Highway 372 near milepost 12 in Bend. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen and an arrest made at 7:46 a.m. March 26, in the 8400 block of Forest Ridge Loop in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:44 p.m. March 27, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 126. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:29 a.m. March 27, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 148. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:40 p.m. March 27, in the 15700 block of Burgess Road in La Pine. Theft — A wallet and laptop computer were reported stolen from a vehicle at 1:30 p.m. March 27, in the 16700

block of Bitterbrush Lane in Sisters. DUII — Sheila Nancy Davis, 55, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:26 a.m. March 27, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and milepost 166 in La Pine. Burglary — Electronics and firearms were reported stolen at 11:41 p.m. March 28, in the 65200 block of 85th Place in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:12 p.m. March 28, in the 63300 block of U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:12 p.m. March 28, in the 7600 block of Northwest Grubstake Way in Redmond. Criminal mischief — A broken window was reported at 2:37 p.m. March 28, in the 5800 block of South U.S. Highway 97 in Redmond. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:43 p.m. March 28, in the 52400 block of Sunrise Boulevard in La Pine. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:37 a.m. March 28, in the 64700 block of Sylvan Loop in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:28 a.m. March 28, in the 61600 block of Gribbling Road in Bend. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A theft was reported March 16, in the 14300 block of Southwest Commercial Loop in Crooked River Ranch. Burglary — Jewelry was reported stolen March 16, in the 14900 block of Southwest Stallion Drive in Crooked River Ranch. Burglary — A burglary was reported March 16, in the 15900 block of Southwest Quail Road in Crooked River Ranch. Theft — A drill was reported stolen and an arrest made March 16, in the 2900 block of Southwest Eureka Lane in Culver. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:55 a.m. March 19, in the 2700 block of U.S. Highway 97 in Madras. Theft — A tire was reported stolen at 7:03 p.m. March 19, in the 500 block of Eighth Street in Metolius. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11 p.m. March 20, in the 200 block of Southwest Second Street in Culver. DUII — Robert Lee Lish, 54, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:56 p.m. March 20, in the 4800 block of Southwest U.S. Highway 97. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 12:59 a.m. March 21, in the 3700 block of Southwest Culver Highway in Metolius.

Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported and an arrest made at 9:34 a.m. March 22, in the area of Northeast Fifth and Northeast A streets in Madras. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 2:40 p.m. March 22, in the 2400 block of Southwest Culver Highway in Madras. Oregon State Police

DUII — Matthew James Mayhill, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:27 a.m. March 27, in the area of state Highway 126 near milepost 108.

BEND FIRE RUNS Friday 10:16 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 65385 North U.S. Highway 97. 15 — Medical aid calls. Saturday 2:01 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 1302 N.W. Knoxville Blvd. 7:58 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 60318 Zuni Circle. 8:25 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 22525 Nelson Place. 9:18 p.m. — Building fire, 18720 Bull Springs Road. 18 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 4:48 a.m. — Passenger vehicle fire, 70 N.W. Newport Ave. 10:06 a.m. — Grass fire, 61851 Dobbin Road. 11:53 a.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 64335 Old Bend Redmond Highway. 2:22 p.m. — Passenger vehicle fire, 20799 Renee Court. 10 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the Web site at www .humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541923-0882 — or refer to the Web site at www.redmondhumane .org. The Bend shelter’s Web site is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Domestic short-haired cat — Adult female, gray and white tabby; found near Northeast Eighth Street. Collie mix — Older male, white, tan and black; found near Southwest Canal Boulevard.

Michael Lloyd / The Oregonian

Phong “Sonny” Nguyen drives from his home in Springfield to fish for sturgeon on the weekends. For at least six decades, fishermen have been dipping their lines into the Willamette along “The Wall” in Oregon City but at the end of March, the tradition will abruptly cease, when new state regulations take effect.

Oregon City fishing tradition is banned By Dana Tims The Oregonian

OREGON CITY — Most Fridays for the past year, Sonny Nguyen has packed up his wife, kids and fishing gear, backed out of his driveway in Springfield and headed for the Willamette River angling mecca known simply as The Wall. From the gritty sidewalk 40 feet above the river, Nguyen joins, on any given day, anywhere from tens to hundreds of other bank-bound anglers — casts of thousands — all hoping that their next sling will land a sturgeon big enough to feed their families for three days or more. “I spend all day out here,” said Nguyen, who was born in Vietnam and fished since he was 7 years old. “I love it here.” At the end of this month, however, a tradition stretching back at least six decades will abruptly cease, when new state regulations take effect banning fishing from The Wall. A sturgeon “sanctuary,” stretching roughly from the I-205 bridge to Willamette Falls, takes effect April 1. State fisheries officials cite three factors in the decision: declining numbers of white sturgeon — capable of growing to 20 feet in length, living more than 100 years and

listed as the largest freshwater fish in North America; injuries sustained by undersized or oversized fish when they are heaved back into the waters below; and, the unexpected discovery last year that the cool, deep waters beneath the Arch Bridge linking Oregon City and West Linn are sturgeon-spawning grounds. Mark Loveland, 44, of Oregon City, a five-year veteran of Wall fishing, said he understands needing to protect a valued species. “But the truth is,” he said, “most of these guys can’t afford boats. It shuts a lot of people out. I have no idea what they are going to do now.”

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President Reagan is shot, injured in 1981 The Associated Press Today is Tuesday, March 30, the 89th day of 2010. There are 276 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On March 30, 1867, U.S. Secretary of State William Seward reached agreement with Russia to purchase the territory of Alaska for $7.2 million, a deal roundly ridiculed as “Seward’s Folly.” ON THIS DATE In 1822, Florida became a United States territory. In 1842, Dr. Crawford W. Long of Jefferson, Ga., first used ether as an anesthetic during a minor operation. In 1964, John Glenn withdrew from the Ohio race for the U.S. Senate because of injuries suffered in a fall. In 1970, the musical “Applause,” based on the movie “All About Eve,” opened on Broadway. In 1979, Airey Neave, a leading member of the British parliament, was killed in London by a bomb planted in his car by the Irish National Liberation Army. In 1981, President Ronald Reagan was shot and seriously injured outside a Washington, D.C., hotel by John Hinckley Jr. In 2002, Britain’s Queen Mother Elizabeth died in her sleep at Royal Lodge, Windsor, outside London; she was 101 years old. TEN YEARS AGO In the midst of the 2000 presidential campaign, Vice President Al Gore broke with the Clinton administration, saying he supported legislation to allow 6-year-old Elian Gonzalez to remain in the country while the courts resolved his custody case. FIVE YEARS AGO Under heavy protection, first lady Laura Bush visited the capital of Afghanistan, where she talked with Afghan women freed from Taliban repression and urged greater rights. The Supreme Court ruled that federal law allowed people 40 and over to file age bias claims over sal-

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y ary and hiring even if employers never intended any harm. Fred Korematsu, who’d challenged the World War II internment policy that sent Japanese-Americans to detention camps, died in Larkspur, Calif. at age 86. ONE YEAR AGO President Barack Obama asserted unprecedented government control over the auto industry, rejecting turnaround plans from General Motors and Chrysler and raising the prospect of controlled

bankruptcy for either ailing auto giant. Federal food safety officials warned consumers to stop eating all foods containing pistachios while they figured out the source of a possible salmonella contamination. (No illnesses have been confirmed as a result of contaminated pistachios.) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Game show host Peter Marshall is 84. Actor Richard Dysart is 81. Actor John Astin is 80. Actor-director Warren Beatty is

73. Rock musician Graeme Edge (The Moody Blues) is 69. Rock musician Eric Clapton is 65. Actor Robbie Coltrane is 60. Actor Paul Reiser is 53. Rap artist MC Hammer is 47. Singer Tracy Chapman is 46. Actor Ian Ziering is 46. Singer Celine Dion is 42. Actor Mark Consuelos is 39. Singer Norah Jones is 31. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Curiosity is free-wheeling intelligence.” — Alistair Cooke, British-born American journalist and broadcaster (born 1908, died on this date in 2004)

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 30, 2010 C3

O Englishman hailed for stopping Marchers in Portland Portland bank branch robbery protest police shootings By Michael Russell The Oregonian

The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Mark Rothwell doesn’t think of himself as a hero. But when a man pulled a gun on a bank teller next to the 44year-old Englishman at a Chase branch Thursday evening, he didn’t hesitate to play the part. “There are times to do nothing and there are times to act,” he said Friday from his Northeast Portland home. Rothwell, the owner of London Pride Renovation & Remodeling, doesn’t remember precisely how he managed to disarm and pin the robber, but he knows how the encounter began. He was one of two customers left in the branch inside the Hollywood Fred Meyer, 3030 N.E. Weidler St., about five minutes before its 7 p.m. closing. The former Londoner had tarried to ask about exchange rates in anticipation of a trip home. A man walked in, pulled out a gun — which turned out to be a fake — and demanded cash. “‘Kristen, give me all the cash in the till,’” Rothwell recalled the man saying. “He knew her name, and for a second I thought it was some kind of weird joke.” But Rothwell saw terror on the teller’s face. He jumped at the man, knocked the gun away and held him down. “It’s just one of those things,” he said, “someone points a gun at a girl just a couple of years older than my own daughter. It just rubbed me the wrong way.” Portland police responded and found a man pinned under another one. “At first they thought I was the suspect,” said Rothwell, who was wearing a hoodie. The suspect, later identified as Curt Michael Cooper, 35, of Portland, was arrested and faces

PORTLAND — A chanting crowd of protesters angry over recent police-involved shootings marched through downtown Portland on Monday evening. The Oregonian reports that about 150 people took part, many of them wearing masks. Among the demonstrators’ chants: “When cops attack,

O   B Michael Russell / The Oregonian

Mark Rothwell, 44, seen Friday in Portland, disarmed and pinned down a man attempting to rob a bank teller on Thursday. federal charges, said Beth Anne Steele, an FBI spokeswoman. Chase bank plans to thank Rothwell for his actions. But bank officials, like the FBI, cautioned that people shouldn’t put themselves in harm’s way. “We encourage our customers to exercise caution in these situations because it could be very dangerous,” said Darcy DonahoeWilmott, a Chase spokeswoman. Neighbor Becky Farmer, whose husband works at Rothwell’s 6-year-old construction company, says that’s just the type of person Rothwell is. “It’s nice to see people draw the line and say, ‘No, this isn’t going to happen,’” Farmer said. A former neighbor, Ann Robinson, said she wasn’t surprised when her husband told her what Rothwell had done. “He’s just the type to take charge and do that,” Robinson

said. “If somebody’s drowning, he’d jump in and save them.” Friday afternoon, Rothwell appeared nonplussed by the incident as he prepared for an evening game of indoor soccer and discussed the merits of English tea and his favorite English football team, Chelsea. He’s married and has a teenage son as well as a daughter. The fit general contractor, who bears a passing resemblance to Liam Neeson’s doting and deadly dad from the 2008 film “Taken,” said it wasn’t time spent in the military, police or a boxing gym that helped him to take the man down. “I grew up on the rough streets of (Greenwich) London,” said Rothwell, who now describes himself as a middle-aged softie. “Let’s just say it’s nice to be on the right side of the law this time.”

Vance Thompson holds some of the letters written by an American soldier stationed in Hawaii during World War II to his sweetheart. Thompson found the letters at a flea market in Eugene and tried to find relatives of the couple.

Old love letters posted online find way back to woman’s family The Register-Guard

EUGENE — Old photographs are Vance Thompson’s usual target when he scours tables at the local flea market. But a little over a year ago, something else caught his eye at the Picc-A-Dilly market at the Lane Events Center in Eugene. At first, Thompson took the ratty cardboard box to be stuffed with letters from various senders, something generally of interest to stamp collectors. Then he noticed that many of the letters — 60 in all — did not have stamps. Thompson, a 40year-old Symantec employee from Eugene, bought the letters for $10. He soon realized that every letter was from Thomas Edwards, a soldier stationed in Hawaii during World War II. The recipient of each letter (but one) was Sophia Pettrichka, a woman Edwards had met before being sent overseas. The letters span nearly three years. Over the course of their writing, Edwards and Pettrichka fell in love — through the mail. The first letter was dated Sept. 6, 1942. By April 1943, the two were engaged. Edwards had the presence of mind to send one letter, a Christmas card, to

Boom rocks southeast Portland PORTLAND — Police believe a large pipe bomb is what shook a number of homes in southeast Portland late Sunday. The Portland Police Bureau says investigators found evidence of the pipe bomb Monday in Powers Marine Park. They believe the sound was amplified because of the low cloud cover and its placement near a riverbank. The explosion caused no property damage and police have yet to discover anyone with injuries. The investigation remains active.

Baker air show returns in July BAKER CITY — Following a one-year hiatus prompted by the recession, the Wings Over Baker air show and Durkee Steak Feed will both return to Baker County in 2010. For the first time, the popular events will be combined. The steak feed is scheduled for Friday, July 23, at the Baker City Municipal Airport — the same weekend as the air show. Before it was canceled last year, residents in the small community southeast of Baker City had gathered for the annual dinner every summer since the mid-1940s. Mel Cross, president of the seven-member air show board, says he hopes the steak feed will become a permanent part of Wings Over Baker.

Crash kills Prospect man

Paul Carter The (Eugene) Register-Guard

By Serena Markstrom

stand up, fight back.” Police used bicycle officers and officers on horseback in an effort to keep the marchers on sidewalks as they followed a rectangular route past the federal courthouse, the justice center and the federal building. At one point, a window was broken in a Bank of America office.

Pettrichka’s parents in December 1943. The letters so impressed Thompson that he decided to post them online. The fact that they reveal only what Edwards wrote to Pettrichka, but not what she wrote in return, made the correspondence only that much more intriguing to Thompson. He was also struck by the fact that all of the letters had to pass at least one censor’s review. “On some occasions, words, phrases or whole sentences are either blacked out or removed,” Thompson noted on his Web posting. “To me, this made reading the letters even more interesting.” Over the past year, people from around the world have left comments on Thompson’s online posting of the letters. But it was only last week that Christine Welsch, of Winston near Roseburg, contacted Thompson and identified herself as Pettrichka’s niece. The letters will soon be reunited with Pettrichka’s family; with their blessing, Thompson’s Web site will stay up. Welsch said her son discovered the site while researching the Pettrichka side of the family tree. Given that her aunt lived in

California, Welsch said she doesn’t know how the letters ended up at a Eugene flea market, but she’s grateful Thompson took enough interest to post them. “It was really exciting to find the letters,” Welsch said. “It’s a part of our family, but also of history.” Welsch said her aunt, who died three years ago, never remarried after Tom Edwards died in the early ’60s. Thompson plans to send the letters to Pettrichka’s younger brother, Welsch’s father. “He was baffled that they were even on the Internet,” Welsch said of her father, who is in his 80s. “He had a hard time understanding.” Thompson scanned each letter onto the Web, and included an enlarged view where you can see addresses, names and other details. He also typed each one, indexed them by year and month, provided links for context, and, where relevant, wrote notes. Welsch said reading the letters is confirmation of a romance she witnessed as a youth. “They were very loving,” she said of her aunt and uncle. “It was always fun to go there. (Tom) was like a big kid...My dad remembers the letters coming.”

PROSPECT — State police say a 43-year-old man died Sunday when his pickup rolled over on Highway 62 in Southern Oregon. Police says Russell Schultz, of Prospect, was traveling eastbound when pickup drifted into the shoulder. Schultz overcorrected and the vehicle flipped multiple times. Schultz died at the scene. Officers say alcohol was a factor in the crash. Schultz was wearing a seat belt.

wick, Wash., is now in serious condition. Nicholson was one of three people hurt Friday when a boat exploded on the Columbia River shortly after fueling at a northeast Portland marina. Judy Chastain, of Heppner, remains in fair condition Monday. Rodger Chastain, of Heppner, was treated and released Friday night. — From wire reports

The protest is just the latest of several sparked by two recent police shootings. On Jan. 29, a police officer shot and killed an unarmed man, Aaron Campbell, in what began as a welfare check. On March 22, an officer fatally shot Jack Dale Collins, a homeless man who reportedly had advanced on the officer with a knife.

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Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Town Hall Meetings An opportunity for Deschutes County residents to learn about their Sheriff’s Office and the May 18th election. The agenda will include: Accomplishments • Budget • Jail Expansion Needs Question and Answer session to follow April 10, 10:00 am Sheriff’s Office 63333 W. Highway 20 Bend, OR

April 12, 6:00 pm Sisters Sheriff’s Substation 703 N. Larch Sisters, OR

April 15, 6:00 pm Terrebonne Sheriff’s Substation 8154 11th St., Suite 3 Terrebonne, OR

April 20, 6:00 pm La Pine Sheriff’s Substation 51340 Hwy 97 La Pine, OR

For more information call 541-388-6659


C4 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Jim Adkins for Jefferson County sheriff

J

im Adkins has functioned as Jefferson County’s sheriff since January, when Jack Jones stepped aside under pressure from the Oregon Department of Justice. Jones has

since resigned, and Adkins is asking voters to give him the job he’s been doing for more than two months. They should. Adkins has two opponents, neither of whom is nearly as qualified for the position as he is. Two-year Madras resident Paul Hames is a correctional officer at Deer Ridge state prison. Brad Halvorson, who moved to Jefferson County in 2005, has a long and varied career in law enforcement. He did short stints at the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, the Washington County Sheriff’s Office and Forest Grove Police Department before settling in with the Department of Corrections, where he specialized in investigations. He now works as an investigator for a law firm. Adkins, by contrast, has spent the last 20-plus years with the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office. During that time, he’s served as a corrections deputy, a road deputy, supervisor of the patrol division and, for approximately the last four years, as undersheriff. He’s even run for sheriff before, losing to Jones in 1998. Adkins stayed put despite the loss, and an effective demotion, because he says he’s not a quitter and because Jefferson county is his home. It speaks well of his perseverance that he eventually re-

bounded to become Jones’ second in command. Adkins argues convincingly that he can strengthen the office’s strained bond with its community, including the Warm Springs police department. He’s also determined to increase the efficiency of the county jail, especially when it comes to meals, which he believes have been too generous in recent years. He deserves a chance to do both. Some voters will be tempted to punish Adkins for Jones’ actions. They shouldn’t. Bringing in somebody from the outside — Hames or Halvorson — is certainly one way to change a department. But you can change a department by promoting from within, too, as long as you promote the right person. We believe Adkins is that person. By choosing him, moreover, voters will retain the expertise he’s gained during his 20-plus years with the department. He knows the Sheriff’s Office as well as anyone. He has deep roots in Central Oregon and the professional relationships that come with them. Of the three candidates on the May ballot, Adkins is far and away the best one for the job.

How to save millions T

ens of millions of dollars a year. That’s how much the Oregon University System could save if it was not required to purchase health care from the state. That eye-popping number was in Bulletin reporter Nick Budnick’s article on Monday about possibly turning Oregon’s state-funded universities into nonprofits. Whatever the merits are of reorganizing the state universities, we had to wonder why they could save so much on health care. Jay Kenton, the Oregon University System’s vice chancellor of finance and administration, explained it. Basically, the OUS’s 12,000 qualified employees have a very nice health care plan. There’s no employee co-pay. There is very little out-ofpocket expense. And it costs on average $1,150 per employee per month, which is $13,800 a year. We looked that up. That’s higher than the national average for premiums for family coverage for all workers and all plans. It’s also higher than the national average premiums for family plans for state and local government workers, according to a 2009 report by the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Health Research and

Education Trust. Kenton offered what might be a better source of comparison. The average health care costs for university employees in other states is $8,700 per year. That means OUS pays $5,100 more per year per employee. Of course, if Oregon turns its universities into nonprofits, it’s not like the university system would automatically save $60 million plus a year (12,000 employees multiplied by $5,100). The university system would have to negotiate a change in the health benefits with its various unions. Nobody expects those employees to be eager to surrender. And it’s also true, that while the OUS benefits package is on the higher side nationally, Oregon university salaries are in general lower than at its peer institutions. Overall, Kenton said the total compensation package is about 95 percent of what the market offers. Oregon’s universities have to be able to compete with other universities for the best faculty. Having a rich benefit package is one way to do that. In the long run, though, health care costs are growing much faster than the rate of inflation. It would be better for taxpayers to give university employees better salaries and negotiate a change in health benefits.

My Nickel’s Worth Why I tip Run that by me again: Someone wants to legislate that tips should be all put in one pot, distributed among all employees including cooks and busboys/girls and then be considered wages so that the employer can then deduct that amount from what he should be paying in wages so he doesn’t have to pay minimum wage? This would be like giving the employer my tip. I consider a tip a bonus for a job well done. Why should the employer get my tips? I am not tipping to make the employer’s life easier. I am tipping to help the person who serves me, so if this goes through, my tipping days are over and I hope others follow suit. Dorothy Bourgo Redmond

Tax gas The city of Bend might consider a three cent gas tax as a way of covering cash flow problems for police and fire. This would put the burden on everyone (even tourists) instead of just property owners. A lot of property owners are having difficulties and some are losing their homes. John Murphy Bend

Wyden helped I was surprised to see that one of our former employees, Shane Dinkel, has expressed an interest in running for the seat currently held by Sen. Ron

Wyden. Few would accuse me of being a Democrat, but in this case I’ll have no trouble supporting Sen. Wyden. Ironically, Sen. Wyden was instrumental in saving Shane’s and hundreds of other local jobs in the aviation industry. Three years ago, the FAA announced it was going to significantly change the regulation of so-called “kit” aircraft companies. My company would be affected even though it was creating innovations in aircraft design, creating new jobs and maintaining Central Oregon as a national center of aviation technology. While this was good for Oregon, let’s just say that the FAA did not appreciate our efforts and the benefits it would bestow to our region Sen. Wyden persuaded the FAA to take a more reasoned approach, which improved relations between our industry and the FAA. In doing so, Sen. Wyden was instrumental in saving hundreds of aviation related jobs in Central Oregon. While the economy has impacted many aviation related jobs in Central Oregon, those within our industry who still have jobs can thank Sen. Wyden for coming to our aid. Sen. Wyden has my support and thanks for all that he has done for aviation, business and, of course, Central Oregon. When aviation does make its resurgence, it will do so in principal because of the positive business and regulatory environment that the senator helped create. Joseph Bartels, CEO Lancair International Inc. Redmond

Listen to taxpayers The city of Redmond is not listening. We vote down the aquatics center, but the city then spends one million dollars to buy the land for its later building anyhow. We vote down the three cent gas tax, and Redmond Public Works then tells us that they will be $400,000 short in the road fund to maintain existing roads. The city of Redmond then tells us that they are spending over $300,000 to build a recreation center on the land purchased for the aquatics center and they will still have room to build the aquatics center. There is no mention of equipment or ongoing operating costs for the recreation center. The common reason we hear for one city department expanding while another city department needs to increase our taxes is that the city cannot transfer monies from one department fund to another department fund. Using that argument, I cannot take household money from our recreation fund to pay my house payment, car payment, gas to get to work, or all the expenses of running a household, including increased taxes. I’m sure the city, county, state and federal governments would accept this argument if I did not pay all my taxes. The Redmond City Council and city manager should listen to the voters and act more responsibly with discretionary expansion that increases our tax burden. Don O’Malley Redmond

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Celebrate Badlands Wilderness anniversary, protect more land By Brent Fenty Bulletin guest columnist

O

ne year after it was permanently protected as wilderness, life in the Badlands continues as it always has; the golden eagles and peregrine falcons still circle overhead; the desert wildflowers are starting to bloom; hikers, hunters, horseback riders and birdwatchers revel in the solitude of wilderness. But there is one crucial difference between today and a year ago: Now that this area is protected as wilderness, we know that whatever changes come our way, the Badlands will be there for our children and grandchildren to enjoy the silent arrival of spring in Oregon’s high desert. There are many people to thank on the one-year anniversary of the Badlands becoming a federally protected wilderness area. Countless volunteers, business owners, religious leaders and local elected officials banded together

to push for permanent protection of the Badlands, and this outpouring of local support is what moved Sen. Ron Wyden to introduce wilderness legislation to protect this treasured area. In particular, thanks are owed to Oregon’s entire congressional delegation, who voted unanimously to pass this historic legislation. As with the Badlands, wilderness offers us an opportunity to work towards a positive reflection of what our communities value and what makes them special. Even though Oregon has one of the most diverse and spectacular landscapes of any state, we lag far behind our western neighbors in the percentage of our great state (a mere 4 percent) that is currently protected as wilderness. A major part of the solution lies in Oregon’s high desert in Bend’s back yard. In this area, there are nearly three million acres of federally recognized wilderness study areas

IN MY VIEW whose protection remains in limbo; In order to put Oregon on par with other western states, these areas must be permanently protected as wilderness by Congress. We hope that Oregon’s congressional delegation will continue to pursue protections for these iconic landscapes such as the Owyhee Canyonlands, Sutton Mountain and Deschutes Canyon with the same passion and foresight they have shown in fighting for Badlands Wilderness. In just the past two congressional sessions, Sen. Wyden has asserted himself as a leader in protecting Oregon’s wilderness. Less than a year after passing the Omnibus Public Lands Management Act, which protected over 200,000 acres of wilderness in Oregon, Sen. Wyden partnered with Sen. Jeff Merkley to introduce legislation to

protect more than 16,000 acres of wilderness along the John Day River. The Cathedral Rock and Horse Heaven Wilderness Act is a model in collaboration; local landowners, religious groups, ranchers and conservationists have worked together to create a wilderness proposal that not only increases public access to the Wild and Scenic John Day River, but that also solves decades-old land management conflicts. We are grateful for Sen. Wyden’s leadership as he continues to encourage the development of more wilderness proposals like this one. While the Badlands Wilderness was permanently protected a year ago today, the Bureau of Land Management continues to work with landowners and other local stakeholders to complete land exchanges and develop a wilderness management plan. This process is vitally important and we urge you to stay involved in and work with the BLM to complete

this process by the second anniversary of the Badlands Wilderness. On the anniversary of such an exciting achievement for our community, it would be easy to sit back with our pints of Badlands Bitter and rest on our laurels, but there is still much work to be done. So, we raise our glasses in a toast to Badlands supporters — both in thanks for the work that they have already done to protect the Badlands and for the work that still lies ahead. Future generations deserve the opportunity to enjoy and explore Oregon’s wild places; let’s work together to ensure that they have that chance. But for today, let’s celebrate. Brent Fenty is the executive director of the Bend-based Oregon Natural Desert Association (www.onda.org). You can join Badlands supporters for the oneyear anniversary celebration today at Silver Moon Brewery from 3 to 6 p.m.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 30, 2010 C5

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N   J. Dean Weaver, of Redmond Sept. 28, 1924 - March 24, 2010 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219 www.redmondmemorial.com Services: Graveside at 11:00 am, Sat., April 3, 2010, at Redmond Memorial Cemetery with Memorial service to follow at Emmaus Lutheran Church on Salmon Ave., in Redmond. Contributions may be made to:

Emmaus Lutheran Church, 2175 SW Salmon Ave. Redmond, OR 97756.

Marsena M. Hopper, of Bend July 18, 1931 - March 25, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend. 541-318-0842 Services: Were held on Tuesday, March 30th, at 12:30 pm, at the First Missionary Baptist Church, 21129 Reed Market Rd., Bend, with Memorial service to follow at 2:00 pm at the church.

Maude C. Monical, of Bend Oct. 14, 1910 - March 27, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger - Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Pending

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Richard D. Haston Sept. 20, 1924 - March 22, 2010 Richard died in Powell Butte, OR, from causes related to his long battle with Parkinson Disease. He was born in White Salmon, WA, the youngest of six children. After graduating from Gresham High School, he entered the US Navy and was honorably discharged in 1945. He worked Richard Haston as a teamster in the Portland, OR, area. He and his wife, Dina, moved to Central Oregon after retirement. He was a member of the BPOE and the Oddfellows. His pleasant demeanor, willingness to help others, and smiling face will be long remembered by those who knew and loved him. He is survived by sons, Howard of Oceanside, CA, and Steven of Portland, OR, and a daughter, Barbara Hopson of Redmond, OR; ten grandchildren and twelve great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife, Dina, and son, Robert. Services will be held at a later date.

Daniel "Danny" T. Elsey Jan. 21, 1949 - March 24, 2010 Daniel Thomas Elsey, died Wednesday, March 24, 2010, at his home in Bend, Oregon. He was 61. A Memorial Service will be held at 1:00 pm, on Saturday, May 1, 2010, at Old Stone Church, located at 157 Northwest Franklin, in Bend. Martin Sagnameni, officiating. All friends and family are encouraged to wear their Aloha shirt. Mr. Elsey was born January 21, 1949, in Waialua, Hawaii, the son of John Francis Elsey and Doris Mary (Boyd) Elsey. Mr. Elsey was raised and educated in Hawaii. Danny served in the United States Navy as a Boiler Tender during the Vietnam era, and was honorably discharged. He lived in the Bay area before moving to Bend in 1979. He met Anita Suzanne Koenig in Bend and they were married in Hilo, Hawaii, on April 8, 1986. Mr. Elsey worked as a waiter, Sous Chef, caterer and served as the Tap Man at the base of the Summit at Mt. Bachelor. From 1994 - 1997, he owned and operated The Home Brewer, and was also a Goldsmith. Mr. Elsey became the first person in Oregon to be placed on the Heart Mate LVAD prior to undergoing a heart transplant in 1997. Mr. Elsey's many hobbies and interests included a love for chess and the game of Sudoku, and playing the ukulele; he had a special interest in Hawaiian Culture. He also enjoyed "cooking off the cuff", and was well-known for his beer-making: He won a Blue Ribbon for his IPA at the Deschutes County Fair. Survivors include his wife of 23 years, Anita Elsey; two sons, Micah Elsey (wife, Kim) and Jason Elsey (wife, Cheri); four grandchildren, Alaura, Zachary, Taylor and Rilea; one brother, Chris Elsey (wife, Linda); one sister, Jackie Tarallo, a "sister in spirit", Patty Tobin and his Godchild, Jenna Tobin. Mr. Elsey is preceded in death by his parents and one brother. The family suggests Memorial contributions to Donate Life NW, P.O. Box 532, Portland, Oregon 97207. Baird Funeral Home of Bend is in charge of arrangements (541)382-0903.

Marsena M. Hopper July 18, 1931 - March 25, 2010 Marsena M. Hopper was born in Shawnee, Oklahoma on July 18, 1931. She died in Bend, Oregon on March 25, 2010. She was 78 years old. She is survived by her husband, Leo M. Hopper; two children, Robert B. Barnett of Portland, Oregon and Rebecca (Morris) Gilmon of Kalama, Washington; two step daughters, Terri Miller and Rena Keffer, both of Bend; three granddaughters, Stephanie (Jeremy) Martin of Longview, Washington, Angela (Joseph) Mazza of Kalama, Washington, and Melissa Gilman of Kalama, Washington; two step grandchildren, Cory and Crystal Holcomb of Bend; four great-grandsons; and two sisters, Mary Francis Fritz of Hanford, California, and Naomi Frazier of Hermiston, Oregon. She was preceded in death by her first husband, Billie Burl Barnett. Marsena had been a life long member of Missionary Baptist Churches in the towns where she lived and for the past 8 1/2 years had been and currently was a member of the First Missionary Baptist Church of Bend. Refreshments will be served at the First Missionary Baptist Church, 21129 Reed Market Road, Bend, at 12:30 pm, on Tuesday, March 30th, with a memorial service following at the church at 2:00 pm.

Walter Eric Fauerso Chill (Achilles) Dec. 7, 1919 - March 20, 2010 Boyce Brown Walter E. Fauerso, beloved father, grandfather, and great-grandfather, passed away peacefully on March 20, 2010, at home in Bend, Oregon. He was born in The Dalles, Oregon, on Dec. 7, 1919, one of six children of County Engineer, Chris Fauerso and his wife, Johanna, who Walter Eric both immiFauerso grated from Denmark. Walt graduated with an MS in Mechanical engineering from Oregon State University in 1947. He served as Lieutenant in the Army Air Corps in the 20th Air Force and flew 21 missions in the Pacific with Col. James Roberts’ 39th Bombardment Group. He was a devoted husband to Esther Weibel for nearly 62 years, and the loving father of three children, Paul, Jane and Karen. He worked for Standard Oil (now Chevron) for 30 years at the Richmond Refinery, he had may positions including Chief Design Engineer. He was a community leader in the Contra Costa area, serving as a member of the Richmond School Board, Richmond Planning Commission, and the Neighborhood House. He helped start the Save the Plunge Organization which is renovation the Richmond Plunge Swimming Center and he was Treasurer of St. Luke’s Methodist Church. After retiring he founded the Chevron Retirees Tree Planting Program which planted over 100,00 trees in Northern California. Walt loved music and sang for many years in the St. Luke’s Choir. He was a member of the West contra Costa Civic Music Association and the San Francisco Symphony Foundation. He also loved camping with his family, fly fishing, swimming, hiking and playing golf. He was a philosopher, educator, and possessed a great sense of humor. He is survived by his three children and their spouses, Paul and Josie Fauerso of San Antonia, Texas, Janet Fauerso of Bend, Oregon, Karen and Mike Bagnariol of Modesto, California; his grandchildren and their spouses, Elizabeth and Chris Senn, Joey Fauerso and Riley Robinson of San Antonia, Texas and Neil and Melanie Fauerso of Seattle, Washington; and his great-grandson, Brendan Robinson. He is also survived by his brother and his spouse, Lee and Betty Fauerso and many nieces and nephews. A memorial celebration of Walt’s wonderful life will be held in Bend, Oregon in early June. Memorial gifts may be sent to Save the Plunge at www.richmondplunge.org or The Nature Conservancy at www.nature.org. Deschutes Memorial Chapel was in charge of the arrangements. Please leave condolences at www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

May 4, 1919 - May 26, 2010 Chill (Achilles) Boyce Brown was born on a beautiful day in the spring, May 4th, 1919. He was a handsome blue-eyed young fellow -- his proud parents were Achilles (Chill) and Myrtle Brown and were living at the time in the wild and wooly town Chill Brown of Hyattville, Wyoming. Chill lived near 91 years here on earth, as many would say, "the world was better for having him here." He and his wife Phoebe, (Kay) were blessed with four mighty fine children: Shawn, Connie, Terrie and Brad who all live here in Bend; ten grandchildren and six greatgrandchildren. Also surviving are two brothers, Chuck and Dale; and two sisters, Doris and Louise. The funeral will be held at 11:00 AM, April 1st at the L.D.S. Chapel, 1260 NE Thompson Drive, Bend. Arrangements by Deschutes Memorial Chapel with interment at Deschutes Memorial Gardens. Contributions to Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, 97701. Please leave condolences at www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com.

Forster, 97, fought antiSemitism with B’nai B’rith By Margalit Fox New York Times News Service

Arnold Forster, an American Jewish leader, lawyer and writer who was a longtime executive of the Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith, died March 7 in the Bronx. He was 97 and lived in New Rochelle, N.Y. His death, at the Hebrew Home for the Aged in Riverdale, was confirmed by his daughter, Janie Forster Berman. Associated with the AntiDefamation League for nearly six decades, Forster was its general counsel from 1946 to 2003. In that capacity he helped document, publicize and combat myriad forms of anti-Semitism in the United States and overseas. He was widely quoted in the news media over the years on a range of Jewish issues, including Zionism, a cause he defended ardently and about which he wrote frequently. His books, many of which began life as league reports, include “The Trouble-Makers” (Doubleday, 1952), “‘Some of My Best Friends ...’” (Farrar, Straus & Cudahy, 1962) and “The New AntiSemitism” (McGraw-Hill, 1974), all written with Benjamin R. Epstein.

Michael Rosenfeld, founding partner of top talent agency Los Angeles Times LOS ANGELES — Michael Rosenfeld, a talent agent and producer who was one of the founding partners of Creative Artists Agency, has died. He was 75. Rosenfeld died Thursday of respiratory failure at Santa Monica UCLA Medical Center after a long illness, the agency announced. In 1975, Rosenfeld and four other successful middle-management executives with the William Morris Agency left to

June Havoc, as Miss Hannigan, center, and the rest of the cast of the Broadway musical “Annie” celebrate after the final performance of the show on Jan. 2, 1983, in New York. Havoc, whose childhood in vaudeville as Baby June was immortalized in the musical “Gypsy,” died Sunday at her home in Stamford, Conn.

form Creative Artists Agency, which would become a talent agency powerhouse. Rosenfeld brought together the creative elements for the 1980 movie “Fame” and sold the landmark 1976 miniseries “Rich Man, Poor Man” to ABC. Among his clients were William Link and Richard Levinson, creators of TV’s “Murder, She Wrote,” and actresses Marlo Thomas, Joanne Woodward, Ann-Margret, Eva Marie Saint and Dyan Cannon.

The Associated Press file photo

June Havoc, 97, actress sister of Gypsy Rose Lee By Dennis McLellan Los Angeles Times

June Havoc, an actress and former child vaudeville star whose early life with her sister — legendary burlesque stripper Gypsy Rose Lee — and their ambitious stage mother was portrayed in the hit Broadway musical “Gypsy,” has died. She was 97. Havoc died Sunday of natural causes at her home in Stamford, Conn., said her caregiver, Tana Sibilio. “Gypsy,” the “musical fable” based on Lee’s memoir, opened on Broadway in 1959. It starred Ethel Merman as the overbearing stage mother, Mama Rose. Although Havoc acknowledged the greatness of “Gypsy” as a musical, she always complained that it painted a misleading picture of her mother and distorted her own story. “I cherish and am extremely proud of my childhood,” she told New York’s Newsday in 1995. “If you’d been a child — a phenomenon, really — someone who earned fifteen-hundred dollars a week on the Keith-Orpheum circuit, who was a headliner with all the applause and laughter and raised in that glorious vaudeville family, and then see yourself por-

trayed as a no-talent, whining nothing, well, it hurts terribly.” Some biographical sources say she was born in Seattle. But, according to Sibilio, “Miss Havoc always said she was born in Vancouver.” By 7, she was a vaudeville star performing on the same stages as Fanny Brice and Sophie Tucker. “Baby June Hovick, the most adorable little creature in captivity,” read the caption on one vintage photograph. “I loved being her,” Havoc told The New York Times in 1992. “I loved vaudeville.” But during the 1920s, she knew the days of vaudeville were nearing an end. As a teenager, Havoc married one of the boys in her act. During the Depression, she entered dance marathons to survive. As June’s fame as a performer dimmed, her sister’s fame as a burlesque stripper grew. Havoc used her 1930s experience in dance marathons to write and direct the 1963 Broadway play “Marathon ’33,” which starred Julie Harris. It received three Tony Award nominations. Havoc’s Broadway acting credits include taking over the role of Miss Hannigan in the musical “Annie” in 1982.

The Associated Press file photo

Actress and writer June Havoc, left, embraces actress Julie Harris on Dec. 22, 1963, after the premiere of “Marathon ’33” at ANTA Playhouse in New York City. Havoc, 97, died Sunday.

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W E AT H ER

C6 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, MARCH 30 Today: Mostly cloudy, breezy, cool, mixed showers.

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

48/31

45/28

52/29

33/26

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

46/29

39/19

Willowdale  Mitchell

Madras

46/24

44/27

Camp Sherman 38/19 Redmond Prineville 43/22 Cascadia 45/23 42/23 Sisters 41/21 Bend Post Oakridge Elk Lake 40/21

40/19

40/18

Burns

34/12 39/16

Seattle

50/37

Bend

48/34

Helena 48/32





48/28

Boise

43/22

Redding

Idaho Falls Elko

52/35

51/26

57/26

42/21

Silver Lake

Reno

39/20

Mostly cloudy with rain and higher-elevation snow.



29/16

50/30



Grants Pass

Christmas Valley

Crater Lake

Missoula

56/30

San Francisco



56/46

Salt Lake City 65/38

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases Last

April 6

New

First

Full

April 14 April 21 April 28

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

Astoria . . . . . . . . 53/42/0.75 . . . . . . 49/39/r. . . . . . 51/38/sh Baker City . . . . . . 63/47/0.02 . . . . . .43/24/rs. . . . . . 40/22/rs Brookings . . . . . . 52/48/0.78 . . . . . 49/41/sh. . . . . . 50/41/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 62/45/0.00 . . . . . .40/21/rs. . . . . . 40/20/sn Eugene . . . . . . . . 51/46/0.54 . . . . . . 50/37/r. . . . . . 52/37/sh Klamath Falls . . . 57/43/0.00 . . . . . .39/20/rs. . . . . . 40/20/sn Lakeview. . . . . . . 54/39/0.00 . . . . . 37/22/sn. . . . . . 38/21/sn La Pine . . . . . . . . 48/40/0.32 . . . . . .41/18/rs. . . . . . 45/22/rs Medford . . . . . . . 63/50/0.03 . . . . . . 49/34/r. . . . . . 50/33/sh Newport . . . . . . . 52/46/0.94 . . . . . . 49/41/r. . . . . . 50/44/sh North Bend . . . . . . 54/48/NA . . . . . . 49/39/r. . . . . . 49/37/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 72/49/0.02 . . . . . 48/33/sh. . . . . . . 50/29/r Pendleton . . . . . . 69/45/0.04 . . . . . 54/32/sh. . . . . . . 54/31/c Portland . . . . . . . 52/46/0.61 . . . . . . 50/41/r. . . . . . 54/41/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 55/41/0.14 . . . . . .45/23/rs. . . . . . 48/23/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 55/43/0.15 . . . . . .46/20/rs. . . . . . 44/16/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 55/48/0.54 . . . . . 48/35/sh. . . . . . 50/34/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 51/45/0.83 . . . . . . 50/39/r. . . . . . 53/38/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 48/42/0.37 . . . . . .41/21/rs. . . . . . . 46/22/c The Dalles . . . . . . 56/43/0.20 . . . . . 54/35/sh. . . . . . 54/35/pc

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50/43 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.18” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 in 1969 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.88” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 in 1977 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.87” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.97” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 3.76” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.48 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.42 in 1943 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:18 a.m. . . . . . .9:00 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:35 a.m. . . . . . .9:09 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .1:14 p.m. . . . . . .4:31 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .6:04 a.m. . . . . . .5:23 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .6:22 p.m. . . . . . .6:48 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .6:25 a.m. . . . . . .6:16 p.m.

1

LOW

51 27

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy.

HIGH

49 24

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

50/39

42/20

 Chemult

38/19

Fort Rock

Calgary 49/27

Eastern

Hampton

39/17

50/40

Eugene

41/20

41/18

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Vancouver

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:50 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:30 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:48 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:31 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 8:53 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 6:41 a.m.

SATURDAY Mostly cloudy, chance of showers.

47 26

BEND ALMANAC

50/41

Cloudy with rain and snow showers today.

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Portland

Brothers

LOW

44 18

NORTHWEST

41/19

La Pine

HIGH

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 72° Ontario • 37° Meacham

FRIDAY Partly cloudy.

An upper-level trough will generate areas of rain throughout the Northwest.

Paulina

41/20

Sunriver

31/10

Cloudy with rain likely today. Scattered showers tonight. Central

45/28

43/22

LOW

22

STATE

THURSDAY

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of showers.

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, chilly, isolated snow showers.

43

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

WEDNESDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 55-76 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 30-72 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 70-109 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . 99-108 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 7 . . . . 113-118 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 31-40 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 101-125 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 20-58 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

. . . . . . 54-60 . . . . 102-140 . . . . . . . . 76 . . . . . . . 120 . . . . . . 26-69 . . . . . . 87-99 . . . . . . . . 57

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

S

Vancouver 50/40

S

S

Calgary 49/27

Saskatoon 49/30

Seattle 50/39

S

Winnipeg 60/37

S

S

St. Paul 70/56

Boise 48/32

S

S

S

Green Bay 60/42

S S

Quebec 48/35

Thunder Bay 58/38

Bismarck 69/43

Billings 58/35

Portland 50/41

S

To ronto 49/35

Boston 55/45

Halifax 55/40 Portland 45/45

Buffalo

Detroit New York 45/36 56/38 54/42 Rapid City Des Moines Palm Springs, Calif. Cheyenne 76/45 Philadelphia Columbus 70/52 Chicago 69/44 57/38 52/40 61/47 • 9° Omaha San Francisco Washington, D. C. 73/50 Salt Lake 56/46 Angel Fire, N.M. 52/42 City Denver Louisville Kansas City • 5.07” 65/38 79/45 64/45 74/54 Las St. Louis Southport, N.C. Charlotte Vegas 71/53 68/39 Albuquerque Los Angeles 81/58 Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 78/45 64/54 80/56 66/44 75/51 Phoenix Atlanta 87/61 Honolulu 66/45 Birmingham 83/72 Dallas Tijuana 67/44 81/54 76/51 New Orleans 72/51 Orlando Houston 74/50 Chihuahua 78/54 84/49 Miami 75/56 Monterrey La Paz 84/58 86/58 Mazatlan Anchorage 87/61 40/27 Juneau 44/33

• 88°

FRONTS

RARE GRAY WHALE SIGHTING IN PUGET SOUND

Joshua Trujillo / Seattle Post Intelligencer

A gray whale surfaces near the mouth of the Duwamish River late Saturday in Seattle. The nearly 40-foot-long animal was watched by excited spectators as it hugged the shore around the West Seattle peninsula earlier in the day. Gray whales are not as common in Puget Sound as orca whales; gray whales are rarely seen in Elliott Bay near downtown Seattle. In this photo the whale surfaced near Jack Block Park and pier at the mouth of the Duwamish River. The large mammal was watched from the pier until about 1 a.m. Sunday. Maritime officials with the Port of Seattle were concerned the whale would attempt to travel up the Duwamish River, a major industrial area and Superfund site.

Shooting

Sawyers

Continued from C1 She was found about three miles out of town. Smith said Veronica Gale Wesley was visiting Warm Springs and is a Yakama tribal member. Wesley did not appear to have any injuries and had been drinking, according to Smith. Passers-by found her body Friday afternoon around 2 p.m. and called police. “It’s only suspicious because of where she was, but she was examined and there were no injuries,” he said. Wesley was found near the trees, with nobody around her. “We know who she was running around with, so we are trying to find out more information,” Smith said.

Continued from C1 “There are material issues of fact,” Forte said. “Whether that money was used personally … and whether it was used as an investment for Starboard.” In the motion, Ingram wrote of Bank of the Cascades account records showing the Starboard account was overdrawn in January 2008 and again in April when Russell made his first $20,000 loan to Starboard. Within the next week, funds had been transferred from the Starboard account to two other companies owned by the Sawyers. Meanwhile, Russell was told his investments would go to develop

Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

property in Indiana, although that property was transferred by Starboard to another Sawyer company in January 2008, months before he made his loan. “Defendants Sawyer did not disclose to Plaintiff that the funds he loaned Starboard would be used by their other business entities,” the motion states. Ingram had contended in his motion that Starboard’s assets were commingled with those of the Sawyers and their other companies, and as a result the corporate veil should be lifted. The case will now go to trial in July. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

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Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .79/41/0.00 . . .89/59/s . . . 90/59/s Akron . . . . . . . . .48/41/0.00 . 50/32/pc . . . 64/45/s Albany. . . . . . . . .54/42/0.17 . . .45/38/r . . 53/39/pc Albuquerque. . . .71/31/0.00 . 78/45/pc . . 75/45/pc Anchorage . . . . .42/32/0.00 . . 40/27/rs . . .37/27/rs Atlanta . . . . . . . 72/46/trace . . .66/45/s . . . 75/52/s Atlantic City . . . .55/52/2.55 . .52/40/sh . . 52/42/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .74/35/0.00 . . .83/46/s . . . 86/58/s Baltimore . . . . . .57/52/0.22 . .52/40/sh . . 64/42/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .67/44/0.00 . . .58/35/c . . .46/30/rs Birmingham . . . .65/48/0.00 . . .67/44/s . . . 78/49/s Bismarck . . . . . . .72/30/0.00 . . .69/43/c . . 54/36/sh Boise . . . . . . . . . .63/51/0.00 . .48/32/sh . . 47/28/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .54/45/1.64 . . .55/45/r . . 50/45/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .53/47/1.80 . . .52/43/r . . 55/43/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .45/39/0.03 . . .45/36/c . . 56/42/pc Burlington, VT. . .49/37/0.44 . . .45/40/r . . . 51/39/c Caribou, ME . . . .43/30/0.89 . . .41/39/r . . 45/35/sh Charleston, SC . .76/62/1.26 . . .70/47/s . . . 71/50/s Charlotte. . . . . . .66/53/0.34 . . .68/39/s . . . 75/42/s Chattanooga. . . .61/50/0.00 . . .66/42/s . . . 75/47/s Cheyenne . . . . . .60/43/0.00 . 69/44/pc . . 58/36/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .46/31/0.00 . . .61/47/s . . . 72/55/s Cincinnati . . . . . .49/43/0.07 . . .60/39/s . . . 72/48/s Cleveland . . . . . .46/39/0.02 . 46/36/pc . . . 62/44/s Colorado Springs 70/31/0.00 . 73/43/pc . . 72/40/pc Columbia, MO . .61/34/0.00 . . .71/51/s . . . 78/54/s Columbia, SC . . .72/57/0.53 . . .71/43/s . . . 77/45/s Columbus, GA. . .75/47/0.23 . . .70/44/s . . . 77/48/s Columbus, OH. . .49/43/0.01 . 57/38/pc . . . 70/48/s Concord, NH . . . .54/39/0.74 . . .45/40/r . . . 54/37/c Corpus Christi. . .77/45/0.00 . . .79/59/s . . . 81/62/s Dallas Ft Worth. .74/41/0.00 . . .81/54/s . . . 84/60/s Dayton . . . . . . . .46/40/0.00 . . .58/38/s . . . 70/48/s Denver. . . . . . . . .69/38/0.00 . . .79/45/s . . 71/37/pc Des Moines. . . . .64/31/0.00 . . .70/52/s . . . 74/54/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .50/35/0.00 . . .56/38/s . . 66/48/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .54/27/0.00 . 63/49/pc . . 61/42/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .75/35/0.00 . . .85/54/s . . . 83/55/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .41/11/0.00 . 40/18/pc . . 38/18/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .65/37/0.00 . 68/46/pc . . 63/38/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .62/20/0.00 . 61/37/pc . . .49/31/rs

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .48/30/0.00 . . .59/38/s . . . 71/47/s Green Bay. . . . . .47/25/0.00 . . .60/42/s . . 68/48/pc Greensboro. . . . .66/48/0.29 . 63/38/pc . . . 72/44/s Harrisburg. . . . . .62/48/0.01 . .47/38/sh . . 60/40/pc Hartford, CT . . . .55/48/1.61 . . .53/43/r . . 58/42/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .63/47/0.00 . . .48/28/c . . 41/21/sh Honolulu . . . . . . .79/73/0.00 . 83/72/pc . . 82/71/pc Houston . . . . . . .74/45/0.00 . . .78/54/s . . . 77/59/s Huntsville . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . . .66/40/s . . . 77/46/s Indianapolis . . . .55/35/0.00 . . .64/45/s . . . 71/50/s Jackson, MS . . . .66/44/0.00 . . .72/46/s . . . 77/49/s Madison, WI . . . .52/23/0.00 . . .64/45/s . . . 71/48/s Jacksonville. . . . .73/60/0.42 . . .71/46/s . . . 77/49/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .48/37/0.01 . .44/33/sh . . .44/32/rs Kansas City. . . . .66/34/0.00 . . .74/54/s . . . 80/59/s Lansing . . . . . . . .46/30/0.00 . . .59/37/s . . . 71/47/s Las Vegas . . . . . .77/53/0.00 . 81/58/pc . . . 66/46/c Lexington . . . . . .47/41/0.01 . . .62/42/s . . . 72/50/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .74/27/0.00 . . .75/48/s . . . 79/52/s Little Rock. . . . . .67/44/0.00 . . .75/51/s . . . 79/53/s Los Angeles. . . . .72/55/0.00 . 64/54/pc . . 60/49/sh Louisville . . . . . . .55/39/0.00 . . .64/45/s . . . 75/54/s Memphis. . . . . . .63/43/0.00 . . .72/53/s . . . 79/56/s Miami . . . . . . . . .80/66/0.33 . . .75/56/s . . . 78/61/s Milwaukee . . . . .40/32/0.00 . . .56/41/s . . . 64/50/s Minneapolis . . . .59/32/0.00 . . .70/56/s . . 71/48/pc Nashville . . . . . . .61/41/0.00 . . .66/44/s . . . 77/51/s New Orleans. . . .69/47/0.00 . . .72/51/s . . . 74/56/s New York . . . . . .54/48/1.32 . . .54/42/r . . 58/46/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .54/46/1.29 . . .53/42/r . . 60/45/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .62/51/3.00 . . .58/43/c . . 67/48/pc Oklahoma City . .72/34/0.00 . . .80/56/s . . . 85/58/s Omaha . . . . . . . .71/33/0.00 . . .73/50/s . . . 78/51/s Orlando. . . . . . . .73/60/1.19 . . .74/50/s . . . 78/52/s Palm Springs. . . .88/52/0.00 . 81/56/pc . . 66/45/sh Peoria . . . . . . . . .57/33/0.00 . . .65/46/s . . . 74/52/s Philadelphia . . . .57/52/1.16 . .52/40/sh . . 58/44/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .84/55/0.00 . . .87/61/s . . 79/57/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .51/44/0.00 . 49/35/pc . . 63/43/pc Portland, ME. . . .47/41/1.13 . . .45/45/r . . 48/43/sh Providence . . . . .52/46/2.97 . . .57/47/r . . . 57/45/c Raleigh . . . . . . . .67/55/1.55 . 65/39/pc . . . 73/44/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .74/38/0.00 . 76/45/pc . . 67/36/pc Savannah . . . . . .75/60/0.59 . . .70/45/s . . . 75/49/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .70/53/0.00 . . 56/30/rs . . .45/26/rs Seattle. . . . . . . . .50/40/0.68 . .50/39/sh . . 49/36/sh Richmond . . . . . .59/53/1.26 . . .59/41/c . . 71/45/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .70/35/0.00 . 73/48/pc . . 75/46/pc Rochester, NY . . .46/41/0.04 . .44/36/sh . . 53/40/pc Spokane . . . . . . .50/43/0.41 . . 45/28/rs . . 45/27/sh Sacramento. . . . .64/51/0.00 . .59/44/sh . . 57/41/sh Springfield, MO. .62/30/0.00 . . .71/51/s . . . 78/54/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .61/36/0.00 . . .71/53/s . . . 77/53/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .69/60/0.87 . . .72/53/s . . . 76/55/s Salt Lake City . . .66/44/0.00 . . .65/38/c . . .44/32/rs Tucson. . . . . . . . .86/46/0.00 . . .87/55/s . . 81/53/pc San Antonio . . . .75/43/0.00 . . .84/53/s . . . 86/61/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .71/34/0.00 . . .79/55/s . . . 81/58/s San Diego . . . . . .75/56/0.00 . 64/54/pc . . 61/50/sh Washington, DC .57/51/0.22 . .52/42/sh . . 65/43/pc San Francisco . . .63/55/0.00 . .56/46/sh . . 54/45/sh Wichita . . . . . . . .72/32/0.00 . . .77/54/s . . . 85/57/s San Jose . . . . . . .69/49/0.00 . .58/44/sh . . 57/41/sh Yakima . . . . . . . .55/40/0.02 . .55/31/sh . . 56/31/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .71/29/0.00 . 71/37/pc . . 69/38/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .87/52/0.00 . . .90/60/s . . 76/55/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .55/45/0.00 . .54/42/sh . . 44/32/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .66/58/0.00 . . .70/50/s . . 75/53/pc Auckland. . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . . .68/56/s . . . 70/58/s Baghdad . . . . . . .80/53/0.00 . . .74/56/c . . . 72/53/s Bangkok . . . . . . .97/81/0.00 . . .89/76/t . . . .90/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .54/36/0.00 . .60/40/sh . . 64/45/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . . .67/53/s . . . 69/54/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .50/37/0.00 . . .62/46/c . . .46/29/rs Bogota . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .71/52/t . . . .70/50/t Budapest. . . . . . .64/32/0.00 . 63/40/pc . . 52/37/sh Buenos Aires. . . .82/61/0.00 . 78/59/pc . . . 81/60/s Cabo San Lucas .88/57/0.00 . . .89/63/s . . . 88/62/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . . .76/55/s . . . 79/56/s Calgary . . . . . . . .57/25/0.00 . 49/27/pc . . . 49/26/s Cancun . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . 76/65/pc . . 80/68/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .50/39/0.57 . .44/34/sh . . .42/31/rs Edinburgh . . . . . .41/36/0.00 . .49/37/sh . . .42/30/rs Geneva . . . . . . . .64/45/0.00 . . .56/47/r . . 51/38/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . . .80/62/t . . . .80/64/t Hong Kong . . . . .70/64/0.00 . .75/65/sh . . 76/67/sh Istanbul. . . . . . . .48/46/0.48 . 61/38/pc . . 69/47/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .69/42/0.00 . . .67/43/s . . . 69/46/s Johannesburg . . .66/63/0.02 . . .76/59/t . . . .74/58/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . .80/70/sh . . 79/69/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . 55/43/pc . . 59/47/pc London . . . . . . . .54/46/0.26 . .52/41/sh . . 46/34/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .59/45/0.00 . 58/40/pc . . 63/45/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . 90/75/pc . . 90/76/pc

Mecca . . . . . . . . .95/68/0.00 . . .91/69/s . . . 92/70/s Mexico City. . . . .73/46/0.00 . 78/50/pc . . 77/48/pc Montreal. . . . . . .41/37/0.70 . .49/37/sh . . . 55/29/c Moscow . . . . . . .45/34/0.00 . 44/25/pc . . . 45/29/c Nairobi . . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . . .77/62/t . . . .80/63/t Nassau . . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . . .77/67/s . . . 80/68/s New Delhi. . . . .101/69/0.00 . .101/73/s . . 100/72/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .50/36/0.00 . . .52/33/s . . 57/44/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .39/30/0.03 . . 36/25/rs . . 45/33/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .43/36/0.55 . .48/37/sh . . 57/30/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .63/50/0.06 . .53/44/sh . . 45/32/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .91/79/0.00 . . .88/76/t . . . .88/77/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . . .67/48/c . . 62/42/pc Santiago . . . . . . .88/54/0.00 . . .88/56/s . . . 87/58/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . . .85/71/t . . 85/70/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .30/21/0.05 . . .33/24/s . . .38/30/rs Seoul . . . . . . . . . .52/28/0.00 . 50/29/pc . . 59/44/sh Shanghai. . . . . . .59/48/0.00 . .67/43/sh . . 68/48/sh Singapore . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .89/78/t . . . .88/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .45/34/0.00 . 35/24/pc . . 48/34/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . . .77/67/t . . 76/64/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . 70/60/pc . . 78/63/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .68/34/0.00 . . .71/56/s . . . 73/59/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .45/36/0.00 . . .50/36/s . . . 55/42/c Toronto . . . . . . . .46/39/0.34 . .49/35/sh . . 62/37/pc Vancouver. . . . . .48/41/0.37 . .50/40/sh . . 45/37/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . 64/46/pc . . . 47/30/c Warsaw. . . . . . . .57/36/0.00 . . .57/38/c . . . 55/34/c


S

NBA Inside Mavericks score big win over Nuggets, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MARCH 30, 2010

T R I AT H L O N Bend competitors do well at mountain bike triathlon SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Triathletes from Central Oregon finished 1-2 in the XTERRA REAL Mountain Bike Triathlon on Sunday. Matt Lieto won the race in 1 hour, 42 minutes, 16 seconds. David Cloninger finished second in 1:43:12. Lieto and Cloninger are both from Bend. Bruce Rogers, also of Bend, placed ninth with a time of 1:49:49. The triathlon included a half-mile swim in Folsom Lake, a 16-mile mountain bike ride and a 4-mile trail run. Matt Cloninger, David’s brother and also of Bend, placed 128th overall (2:35:51) and was seventh in his division. The event was part of the 2010 XTERRA America Tour, a series of off-road triathlons staged throughout the country. — Bulletin staff report

D

Road rash: A painful reality for cyclists HEATHER CLARK

I

n its many forms — from road to mountain bike to BMX — cycling and road rash go together like hiking and blisters. The former inevitably produces the latter. Because of their high speeds and close proximity, cyclists racing in a bunch are most susceptible to a tangle-up that results in a skin-burning slide across the road. This past weekend, however, at the

BMX Great Northwest Nationals in Redmond, medical staff from Desert Orthopedics in Bend treated some 50 riders for symptoms of what cyclists know as “road rash.” In BMX (bicycle motocross) or mountain biking, road rash is really a misnomer, as the skin abrasion can be the result of skidding across dirt or gravel as well as across pavement. In any case, road rash is a painful but common part of cycling — as Michael Ryan can attest. Ryan, a doctor with Desert Orthopedics, has provided medical support at Central Oregon’s Cascade Cycling Classic stage race for some 15 years. He says he and his staff have treated as many as 100 riders in a sin-

gle day for road rash during the CCC’s downtown criterium, where multiple circuit races are held over the course of one afternoon and evening. Despite the frequency, most road rash is typically mild. In fact, it is not uncommon to see riders crash one day and be back racing in the peloton the next, with bandages covering their hips, shoulders and/or elbows. “It’s pretty unusual for an abrasion to keep you off the bike,” says Mike Murray, an emergency-room doctor in Gresham who manages the Oregon Bicycle Racing Association’s first-aid program. Bend bike racer Spencer Newell, 30, recalls how he “catapulted” off his bike in a local roundabout last year, scrap-

ing his hip, knee and elbow on his left side. “I was close enough to my office,” he says. “I cleaned everything out, got back on my bike, went to Rite Aid (to purchase first-aid items), got bandaged up, and kept on riding for another hour.” Unfortunately, not all encounters with road rash are quite that benign. Five years before the roundabout incident, Newell was involved in a highspeed crash while racing during a stage of the Cascade Classic on the stretch of Century Drive that descends from the Mt. Bachelor parking area to the Sunriver cutoff road. See Road / D3

Distance runners Max King, 30, Jeff Browning, 38, and Dave Clark, 50, run in their Vibram FiveFingers barefoot running shoes at Shevlin Park Friday.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Izzo says he is happy at Michigan State EAST LANSING, Mich. — Michigan State coach Tom Izzo said Monday that he is happy where he is after a report that Oregon wants to make him the richest coach in the nation. KEZI-TV in Eugene, cited anonymous sources in Tom Izzo reporting that the school plans to offer Izzo college basketball’s largest contract with help from Nike Inc. cofounder Phil Knight. “I have not been contacted,” Izzo told The Associated Press on Monday. “I’m happy here and I’m focused on trying to win another national championship.” Izzo led the Spartans to a title a decade ago. He will take them to the college basketball’s showcase this weekend for the sixth time in 12 seasons. Izzo is earning more than $3 million per season at Michigan State and is under contract through 2016. — The Associated Press

The evolution of running Running free with minimal support, super teched-out shoes, now back to our roots — going for it barefoot

INSIDE GOLF

By Katie Brauns

Els wins at Bay Hill

in shoes. Which is why changing that pattern takes a long time. The topic of barefoot running evokes “To anyone who is interested in tranlots of different opinions: weird … dorky sitioning to barefoot or a minimalist … for hippies — OR: better for your body shoe, a warning: Be cautious,” says Jeff … easier on the joints … more natural Browning, 38, a Bend distance runner COMMUNITY who says he logs more than 80 miles a and how it should be. And some say it’s definitely not for everyone. week on his sturdy legs. Only a fraction SPORTS Barefoot running, or nearly barefoot of that distance is done without typical running, is considered by many avid running shoes using Vibram FiveFinrunners to be a key to avoiding injury. But, it can gers. The Vibram shoes are designed to allow feet also cause injury. Therefore, there is a delicate to move naturally. They are basically like gloves line between too much barefoot running and too for feet made from a 3-millimeter rubber sole and much support for the feet — the kind of support either a flexible polyamide fabric or kangaroo offered by typical running shoes. leather. Most Americans have spent most of their lives See Running / D3 The Bulletin

Golfer gets his second victory in a row on PGA Tour, see Page D2

Ernie Els The Vibram FiveFingers are designed to allow feet to move freely as if they are completely bare. They are used just to protect the feet from debris.

PREP GIRLS GOLF

Summit wins on a wet day Bulletin staff report

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 Women’s basketball...................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 Prep sports ................................D3 Community Sports ................... D4

Despite harsh winds and cold rain, Mountain View’s Kersey Wilcox shot a 10-over-par 46 over nine holes Monday to win medalist honors at the Bend Invitational girls golf event held at Bend Golf and Country Club. Although she was limited to only one practice session while away on spring break, Wilcox found her focus to log a win on what was a tough day for golf. “She’s serious about her game and wants to put the time in to improve,” said Mountain View coach Jim Coon. The cold, wet weather prompted the coaches to shorten the season-opening event to a ninehole tournament.

“It was miserable,” Coon said of the weather. In the team competition, Summit easily outshot its Intermountain Conference foes and won with a score of 200. Crook County followed in second place at 228, Madras was third with 232, Bend High shot 239, and La Pine finished in fifth place with 281. Kristen Parr and Rebecca Kerry led the Storm’s efforts, each carding a 47. Bend’s Kayla Good also scored a 47, just one stroke off the winning mark. Mountain View, with only three golfers, posted an incomplete team score. Coon said he hopes to have a full squad for the Cougars’ next contest on April 7, when they will face Summit at Broken Top Club.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Mountain View’s Kersey Wilcox watches her tee shot on hole No. 8 at Bend Golf and Country Club under rainfall Monday. The bad weather shortened the day from a planned 18 holes to just nine.


D2 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

BASEBALL

Today Baseball: Redmond at McKay (DH), 1 p.m.; Mazama at La Pine (DH), 2 p.m.; Salem Academy at Culver, 4:30 p.m. Softball: McKay at Redmond (DH), 1 p.m.; La Pine at Mazama (DH), 2 p.m.; Salem Academy at Culver, 4:30 p.m. Boys tennis: West Salem at Redmond, 3:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Crook County, 4 p.m.; The DallesWahtonka at Madras, 4 p.m.; Sisters at Cascade, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Redmond at West Salem, 3:30 p.m.; Madras at The Dalles-Wahtonka, 4 p.m.; Cascade at Sisters, 4 p.m.

10 a.m. — MLB preseason, Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay Rays, ESPN.

SOCCER 11:30 a.m. — UEFA Champions League, quarterfinal, Olympique Lyonnais vs. Girondins de Bordeaux, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Women’s college, NCAA Tournament, regional final, Connecticut vs. Florida State, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, NIT Tournament, semifinal, Dayton vs. Mississippi, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Women’s college, NCAA Tournament, regional final, Oklahoma vs. Kentucky, ESPN. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, NIT Tournament, semifinal, North Carolina vs. Rhode Island, ESPN2.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Chicago Blackhawks at St. Louis Blues, VS. network.

WEDNESDAY BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB, preseason, Minnesota Twins at New York Yankees, ESPN.

TENNIS 10 a.m. — Sony Ericsson Open, quarterfinal, FSNW. 6 p.m. — Sony Ericsson Open, quarterfinal, FSNW.

SOCCER 6 p.m. — Women’s, International match, USA vs. Mexico, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, New York Knicks at Portland Trail Blazers, Blazer network, Ch. 39. 7 p.m. — NBA, Golden State Warriors at Utah Jazz, ESPN.

RADIO TUESDAY BASEBALL 3 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Portland, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

WEDNESDAY BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, New York Knicks at Portland Trail Blazers, KRCO-AM 690, KBND-AM 1110. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations

S   B Baseball • Oregon State’s game at Portland Postponed: The Oregon State baseball team’s game with Portland today has been postponed due to unplayable conditions at Joe Etzel Field in Portland. No decision has been made regarding a possible makeup date. • Dodgers owner offers wife $150K in spousal support: Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt and his estranged wife squared off in court for the first time Monday in a bitter divorce case that featured the couple’s highflying spending habits after the team was purchased in 2004. The court hearing, only a mile from Dodger Stadium, centered on whether Jamie McCourt should be awarded nearly $1 million a month in temporary spousal support.

Auto racing • Hamlin surges to victory at Martinsville: Denny Hamlin surged to the front after a blunder and won the raindelayed NASCAR race at Martinsville Speedway in a wild finish. The victory was Hamlin’s second straight here on the shortest, oldest track in the Sprint Cup Series in Martinsville, Va. Hamlin gave up the lead with less than 10 laps left Monday when he headed to pit road for tires. He then rallied from ninth place to the lead in a span of just four laps. • Power goes 2-for-2, wins IRL’s Honda Grand Prix: Barely seven months after breaking his back in a scary crash, Will Power continued crafting a stirring comeback tale on Monday in St. Petersburg, Fla., by winning the rain-delayed Honda Grand Prix for his second victory in as many IndyCar events this year. Power went to the front after a restart on the 78th of 100 laps, then stayed there the rest of the way and held off Justin Wilson by nearly a full second. • Force powers to win at NHRA Four-Wide Nationals: John Force raced to victory in Funny Car on Monday at the rain-delayed finals of the inaugural NHRA Four-Wide Nationals at zMAX Dragway in Concord, N.C. Force’s second victory of the season came in the first four-lane — instead of the traditional two — event in NHRA history.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Wednesday Track: Mountain View at Redmond, 3:30 p.m.; Summit at Bend, 3:30 p.m.; Gilchrist at Bend JV, 3:30 p.m. Girls golf: Bend at Umpqua Golf Resort, 10 a.m. Boys golf: Redmond at CVC Tournament in Salem, noon. Softball: Sisters at Valley Catholic, 4 p.m. Thursday Baseball: The Dalles-Wahtonka at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Madras, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Hermiston, 4:30 p.m.; Scio at Culver (DH), 2:15 p.m. Softball: The Dalles-Wahtonka at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Madras, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Hermiston, 4:30 p.m.; Scio at Culver (DH), 2:15 p.m. Boys tennis: Mountain View at Bend, 4 p.m.; Madras at Crook County, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Mountain View at Summit, 4 p.m.; Crook County at Madras, 4 p.m. Friday Boys golf: Summit, Bend, Redmond at High Desert Challenge at Eagle Crest, 2 p.m. Baseball: West Salem at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; Pendleton at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Culver at Sherman County, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Redmond at West Salem, 4:30 p.m.; Pendleton at Summit, 4:30 p.m. Boys tennis: Redmond at McKay, 3:30 p.m. Girls tennis: McKay at Redmond, 3:30 p.m. Track: Bend at East County Classic in Gresham, 3 p.m. Saturday Baseball: Madras at Mountain View (DH), 11 a.m.; Pendleton at Summit (DH), 11 a.m.; Hermiston at Crook County (DH), 1 p.m. Softball: Bend at The Dalles-Wahtonka (DH), noon; Madras at Mountain View (DH), 11 a.m.; Pendleton at Summit (DH), 11 a.m.; Hermiston at Crook County (DH), 1 p.m. Track: Redmond, Summit, La Pine, Madras, Crook County, Gilchrist and Culver at Sisters Rotary, 9 a.m. Boys golf: Summit, Bend, Redmond at High Desert Challenge at Eagle Crest, 9 a.m. Boys tennis: Hermiston, Pendleton at Summit, 11 a.m.; Pendleton, Hermiston at Madras, 11 a.m. Girls tennis: Hermiston, Pendleton at Summit, 11 a.m.; Pendleton, Hermiston at Madras, 11 a.m.

BASKETBALL College MEN NCAA TOURNAMENT All Times PDT ——— FINAL FOUR At Lucas Oil Stadium Indianapolis National Semifinals Saturday, April 3 West Virginia (31-6) vs. Duke (33-5), 3:07 p.m. Michigan State (28-8) vs. Butler (32-4), 5:47 p.m. National Championship Monday, April 5 Semifinal winners NATIONAL INVITATION TOURNAMENT All Times PDT ——— Semifinals Today, March 30 At Madison Square Garden New York Mississippi (24-10) vs. Dayton (23-12), 4 p.m. North Carolina (19-16) vs. Rhode Island (26-9), 6:30 p.m. COLLEGE BASKETBALL INVITATIONAL All Times PDT ——— Championship Series (Best-of-3) Monday, March 29 Virginia Commonwealth 68, Saint Louis 56 (Virginia Commonwealth leads series 1-0) Wednesday, March 31 Virginia Commonwealth at Saint Louis, 5 p.m. Friday, April 2 Virginia Commonwealth at Saint Louis, 5 p.m., if necessary COLLEGE INSIDER.COM All Times PDT ——— Championship Today, March 30 Pacific (23-11) at Missouri State (23-12), 5:05 p.m. WOMEN NCAA WOMEN’S TOURNAMENT All Times PDT ——— DAYTON REGIONAL Regional Semifinals Sunday, March 28 At University of Dayton Arena Dayton, Ohio Connecticut 74, Iowa State 36 Florida State 74, Mississippi State 71 Regional Championship Today, March 30 Connecticut (36-0) vs. Florida State (29-5), 4 p.m. MEMPHIS REGIONAL Regional Semifinals Saturday, March 27 At FedExForum Memphis, Tenn. Baylor 77, Tennessee 62 Duke 66, San Diego State 58 Regional Championship Monday, March 29 Baylor 51, Duke 48 SACRAMENTO REGIONAL

Regional Semifinals Saturday, March 27 At ARCO Arena Sacramento, Calif. Stanford 73, Georgia 36 Xavier 74, Gonzaga 56 Regional Championship Monday, March 29 Stanford 55, Xavier 53

GP x-Chicago Nashville Detroit St. Louis Columbus

KANSAS CITY REGIONAL Regional Semifinals Sunday, March 28 At Sprint Center Kansas City, Mo. Oklahoma 77, Notre Dame 72, OT Kentucky 76, Nebraska 67 Regional Championship Today, March 30 Oklahoma (26-10) vs. Kentucky (28-7), 6 p.m.

BASEB A L L MLB Major League Baseball Preseason All Times PDT ——— Monday’s Games Washington , N.Y. Mets (ss) Pittsburgh 13, Houston 1 Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 4 Toronto 2, Detroit 2, tie St. Louis 5, Minnesota 2 N.Y. Mets (ss) 7, Florida 6 Texas 7, Colorado 6 San Francisco 8, Milwaukee 6 Seattle 3, Oakland 2 Chicago Cubs 8, Cincinnati 1 L.A. Angels (ss) 10, Kansas City 2 Tampa Bay 9, Boston 3 N.Y. Yankees 11, Baltimore 7 Chicago White Sox 7, L.A. Angels (ss) 7 L.A. Dodgers 11, Cleveland 2 San Diego 11, Arizona 3 Today’s Games Washington vs Florida at Jupiter, Fla., 10:05 a.m. N.Y. Yankees (ss) vs Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Boston vs Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Detroit vs Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Philadelphia vs Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Pittsburgh vs Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 10:05 a.m. St. Louis vs N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 10:10 a.m. Oakland vs Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Texas vs Arizona at Tucson, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. San Diego vs Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs Colorado at Tucson, Ariz., 1:10 p.m. Toronto vs N.Y. Yankees (ss) at Tampa, Fla., 4:05 p.m. Cleveland vs Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 6:05 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF x-Pittsburgh 76 44 25 7 95 237 x-New Jersey 75 44 26 5 93 203 Philadelphia 76 38 32 6 82 221 N.Y. Rangers 75 33 32 10 76 197 N.Y. Islanders 75 31 34 10 72 196 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF x-Buffalo 75 42 23 10 94 215 Ottawa 76 41 30 5 87 205 Montreal 76 37 31 8 82 204 Boston 75 34 29 12 80 190 Toronto 76 28 35 13 69 202 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF z-Washington 75 49 15 11 109 292 Atlanta 76 33 31 12 78 224 Carolina 76 32 35 9 73 210 Florida 75 30 33 12 72 195 Tampa Bay 75 30 33 12 72 197 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division

GA 217 183 210 203 232 GA 189 216 208 189 250 GA 214 240 236 220 237

W L OT Pts GF GA 74 46 21 7 99 241 191 77 44 27 6 94 214 212 75 39 23 13 91 207 197 75 36 30 9 81 203 205 76 31 32 13 75 205 244 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 75 45 26 4 94 244 195 Colorado 75 41 27 7 89 225 207 Calgary 76 38 29 9 85 194 193 Minnesota 76 37 33 6 80 208 226 Edmonton 75 24 44 7 55 190 255 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-San Jose 76 47 19 10 104 247 198 x-Phoenix 76 47 23 6 100 210 187 Los Angeles 75 42 27 6 90 218 202 Anaheim 75 36 31 8 80 211 227 Dallas 76 33 29 14 80 216 238 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot z-clinched conference Monday’s Games Buffalo 3, Boston 2 Carolina 4, Atlanta 1 Nashville 3, Florida 2, OT Minnesota 3, Los Angeles 2 Anaheim 3, Dallas 1 Today’s Games Atlanta at Toronto, 4 p.m. Boston at New Jersey, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Ottawa at Washington, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at Columbus, 4 p.m. Edmonton at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Los Angeles at Nashville, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Vancouver, 7 p.m.

TENNIS SONY ERICSSON OPEN Monday Key Biscayne, Fla. Singles Men Third Round Mardy Fish, United States, def. Feliciano Lopez (29), Spain, 7-5, 6-3. Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, def. Florent Serra, France, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (3). Tomas Berdych (16), Czech Republic, def. Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, 6-4, 7-5. Mikhail Youzhny (13), Russia, def. Stanislas Wawrinka (19), Switzerland, 1-6, 7-6 (5), 7-5. Marin Cilic (7), Croatia, def. Marcos Baghdatis (25), Cyprus, 6-3, 6-4. Fernando Verdasco (10), Spain, def. Jurgen Melzer (23), Austria, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 6-1. Robin Soderling (5), Sweden, def. Philipp Petzschner, Germany, 6-1, 6-2. Women Fourth Round Marion Bartoli (13), France, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova (1), Russia, 6-3, 6-0. Yanina Wickmayer (12), Belgium, def. Timea Bacsinszky, Switzerland, 6-0, 6-1. Agnieszka Radwanska (6), Poland, def. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 6-1, 6-4. Venus Williams (3), United States, def. Daniela Hantuchova (19), Slovakia, 1-6, 7-5, 6-4. Sam Stosur (9), Australia, def. Jelena Jankovic (7), Serbia, 6-1, 7-6 (9). Kim Clijsters (14), Belgium, def. Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, 6-4, 6-0.

GOLF PGA Tour ARNOLD PALMER INVITATIONAL Monday At Bay Hill Club & Lodge Orlando, Fla. Purse: $6 million Yardage: 7,353; Par 72 (36-36) Final FedExCup points in parentheses Ernie Els (500), $1,080,000 68-69-69-71—277 Edoardo Molinari (0), $528,000 70-70-70-69—279 Kevin Na (245), $528,000 68-70-72-69—279 Retief Goosen (123), $264,000 71-67-73-69—280 Chris Couch (123), $264,000 70-70-69-71—280 Ben Curtis (100), $216,000 70-67-70-74—281 J.P. Hayes (83), $180,750 70-72-70-70—282 D.J. Trahan (83), $180,750 69-68-75-70—282

Ryuji Imada (83), $180,750 Kevin Streelman (83), $180,750 Steve Marino (65), $138,000 Derek Lamely (65), $138,000 Jim Furyk (65), $138,000 Bo Van Pelt (56), $108,000 Robert Allenby (56), $108,000 Davis Love III (56), $108,000 D.A. Points (53), $87,000 Briny Baird (53), $87,000 K.J. Choi (53), $87,000 Bill Haas (53), $87,000 Charles Howell III (49), $67,200 Sean O’Hair (49), $67,200 J.B. Holmes (49), $67,200 Brian Davis (47), $57,600 John Senden (44), $46,800 Ben Crane (44), $46,800 Jason Day (44), $46,800 Hunter Mahan (44), $46,800 Boo Weekley (44), $46,800 Stephen Ames (37), $33,420 Erik Compton (0), $33,420 Scott Verplank (37), $33,420 Jerry Kelly (37), $33,420 Brandt Snedeker (37), $33,420 Phil Mickelson (37), $33,420 Stuart Appleby (37), $33,420 Rory Sabbatini (37), $33,420 Tim Petrovic (37), $33,420 Tim Clark (37), $33,420 Rod Pampling (27), $20,484 Marc Leishman (27), $20,484 Ryo Ishikawa (0), $20,484 Nathan Green (27), $20,484 Pat Perez (27), $20,484 Mike Weir (27), $20,484 George McNeill (27), $20,484 Ryan Moore (27), $20,484 Dustin Johnson (27), $20,484 Bryce Molder (27), $20,484 Rickie Fowler (21), $14,940 Sam Saunders (0), $14,940 Henrik Stenson (16), $13,851 Kris Blanks (16), $13,851 Charl Schwartzel (0), $13,851 Colin Montgomerie (0), $13,851 Matt Every (16), $13,851 Steve Stricker (16), $13,851 Tim Herron (16), $13,851 Stewart Cink (11), $13,200 Carl Pettersson (11), $13,200 Kevin Sutherland (11), $13,200 Chris DiMarco (9), $12,900 Joe Ogilvie (9), $12,900 Jonathan Byrd (7), $12,660 Nick Watney (7), $12,660 Jason Dufner (3), $12,240 Daniel Chopra (3), $12,240 Heath Slocum (3), $12,240 Paul Goydos (3), $12,240 Ricky Barnes (3), $12,240 Trevor Immelman (1), $11,820 Skip Kendall (1), $11,820 Garrett Willis (1), $11,640 Martin Laird (1), $11,520 Josh Teater (1), $11,400

73-70-69-70—282 68-75-68-71—282 70-70-72-72—284 71-70-70-73—284 71-74-66-73—284 72-70-73-70—285 68-73-72-72—285 66-71-74-74—285 73-72-72-69—286 72-72-70-72—286 71-69-73-73—286 72-71-70-73—286 72-72-71-72—287 70-73-71-73—287 66-74-77-70—287 74-71-73-70—288 71-74-70-74—289 69-74-73-73—289 71-70-73-75—289 71-73-75-70—289 70-73-68-78—289 73-71-71-75—290 72-71-73-74—290 75-70-70-75—290 71-74-72-73—290 72-72-70-76—290 71-67-75-77—290 70-74-70-76—290 75-70-74-71—290 74-68-71-77—290 74-70-75-71—290 74-70-71-76—291 70-73-72-76—291 74-70-71-76—291 69-73-72-77—291 69-74-74-74—291 67-73-77-74—291 69-71-73-78—291 72-72-74-73—291 71-70-72-78—291 74-70-75-72—291 73-72-74-73—292 73-70-77-72—292 67-78-71-77—293 74-69-73-77—293 74-71-72-76—293 72-71-71-79—293 74-70-70-79—293 69-71-79-74—293 73-72-76-72—293 73-72-71-78—294 71-73-73-77—294 70-73-76-75—294 69-73-75-78—295 76-66-79-74—295 71-73-73-79—296 74-71-73-78—296 69-72-73-83—297 74-71-70-82—297 69-72-76-80—297 70-72-82-73—297 72-71-82-72—297 71-74-76-77—298 73-71-77-77—298 72-73-80-74—299 74-71-78-77—300 72-71-79-80—302

AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup Goody’s Fast Pain Relief 500 Monday At Martinsville Speedway Ridgeway, Va. Lap length: .526 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (19) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 508 laps, 130.9 rating, 195 points, $179,225. 2. (17) Joey Logano, Toyota, 508, 100.7, 170, $148,765. 3. (11) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 508, 121.3, 170, $144,901. 4. (26) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 508, 97.3, 160, $131,604. 5. (20) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 508, 90.9, 155, $95,300. 6. (14) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 508, 86.6, 150, $118,848. 7. (12) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 508, 102.7, 146, $96,125. 8. (13) Carl Edwards, Ford, 508, 88.9, 142, $118,723. 9. (3) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 508, 105.1, 138, $130,053. 10. (4) Greg Biffle, Ford, 508, 71.9, 134, $95,100. 11. (31) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 508, 66.6, 130, $104,673. 12. (30) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 508, 72.7, 127, $104,785. 13. (33) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 508, 65.7, 124, $85,425. 14. (9) Paul Menard, Ford, 508, 74.1, 121, $85,875. 15. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 508, 91, 118, $84,750. 16. (27) David Ragan, Ford, 508, 70.6, 115, $85,050. 17. (23) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 508, 73.4, 112, $114,715. 18. (2) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 508, 84.3, 109, $118,951. 19. (35) David Gilliland, Ford, 508, 51.5, 111, $91,373. 20. (7) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 508, 118, 108, $111,215. 21. (16) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 507, 97.1, 105, $90,950. 22. (10) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 507, 91.6, 97, $118,781. 23. (6) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 506, 95, 99, $116,098. 24. (25) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 506, 54.5, 91, $82,475. 25. (39) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 506, 45.8, 88, $70,100. 26. (5) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 506, 67.7, 85, $110,273. 27. (34) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 506, 43.1, 87, $72,725. 28. (24) David Reutimann, Toyota, 503, 64.9, 79, $103,831. 29. (29) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 499, 50.4, 76, $72,250. 30. (15) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 498, 71.6, 73, $108,254. 31. (32) Kevin Conway, Ford, 498, 33.3, 70, $92,235. 32. (28) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 496, 41.1, 67, $76,825. 33. (18) Scott Speed, Toyota, 491, 37.4, 64, $83,173. 34. (38) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 480, 36.8, 61, $81,498. 35. (1) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 408, 97.5, 63, $105,776. 36. (22) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 400, 62.5, 55, $103,781. 37. (36) David Stremme, Ford, rear gear, 307, 40.9, 52, $76,300. 38. (21) AJ Allmendinger, Ford, accident, 173, 51.5, 49, $105,601. 39. (43) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, accident, 67, 32.2, 46, $68,200. 40. (40) Max Papis, Toyota, brakes, 52, 32.5, 43, $68,125. 41. (37) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet, brakes, 43, 33.5, 40, $68,075. 42. (42) Dave Blaney, Toyota, overheating, 24, 27.4, 37, $67,990. 43. (41) Michael McDowell, Toyota, brakes, 19, 29.3, 34, $67,536. ———

Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 73.180 mph. Time of Race: 3 hours, 39 minutes, 5 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.670 seconds. Caution Flags: 13 for 79 laps. Lead Changes: 24 among 8 drivers. Lap Leaders: K.Harvick 1-44; D.Gilliland 45; K.Harvick 46-58; J.Gordon 59-81; Ku.Busch 82; J.Gordon 83129; Ku.Busch 130; J.Gordon 131-139; Ku.Busch 140-148; J.Burton 149-164; M.Martin 165-180; Ku.Busch 181-188; M.Martin 189-197; J.Burton 198-229; D.Hamlin 230-236; T.Kvapil 237-238; D.Hamlin 239-249; J.Burton 250-275; D.Hamlin 276306; J.Burton 307-357; D.Hamlin 358-389; J.Burton 390-404; D.Hamlin 405-493; J.Gordon 494-506; D.Hamlin 507-508. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): D.Hamlin, 6 times for 172 laps; J.Burton, 5 times for 140 laps; J.Gordon, 4 times for 92 laps; K.Harvick, 2 times for 57 laps; M.Martin, 2 times for 25 laps; Ku.Busch, 4 times for 19 laps; T.Kvapil, 1 time for 2 laps; D.Gilliland, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 898; 2. G.Biffle, 884; 3. M.Kenseth, 882; 4. K.Harvick, 837; 5. J.Burton, 785; 6. Ku.Busch, 776; 7. J.Gordon, 773; 8. T.Stewart, 770; 9. C.Bowyer, 747; 10. D.Earnhardt Jr., 739; 11. P.Menard, 735; 12. B.Vickers, 734.

IRL HINDA GRAND PRIX Monday At Streets of St. Petersburg Circuit St. Petersburg, Fla. Lap length: 1.8 miles (Starting position in parentheses) 1. (1) Will Power, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 2. (4) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 3. (19) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 4. (5) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 5. (13) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 6. (8) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 7. (21) Danica Patrick, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 8. (23) Raphael Matos, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 9. (16) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 10. (2) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 11. (7) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 12. (6) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 13. (18) Mario Romancini, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 14. (12) Hideki Mutoh, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 15. (17) Vitor Meira, Dallara-Honda, 100, Running 16. (14) Simona de Silvestro, Dallara-Honda, 99, Running 17. (9) EJ Viso, Dallara-Honda, 97, Running 18. (3) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 73, Contact 19. (10) Mike Conway, Dallara-Honda, 64, Contact 20. (15) Dan Wheldon, Dallara-Honda, 46, Contact 21. (20) Mario Moraes, Dallara-Honda, 45, Contact 22. (11) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 24, Contact 23. (22) Alex Lloyd, Dallara-Honda, 14, Contact 24. (24) Milka Duno, Dallara-Honda, 7, Handling ——— Race Statistics Winners average speed: 84.975 Time of Race: 2:07:05.7968 Margin of Victory: .8244 of a second Cautions: 5 Cautions for 23 laps Lead Changes: 10 between right drivers Lap Leaders: Power 1-4, Andretti 5, Dixon 6-26, Meira 27-33, Matos 34-36, Franchitti 37-39, Briscoe 40-48, Power 49-66, Meira 67-71, Viso 72, Power 73-100. Point standings: Power 103, Wilson 59, Hunter-Reay 59, Franchitti 59, Matos 56, Castroneves 54, Briscoe 51, Meira 50, Wheldon 42, Patrick 41.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX—Optioned C Dusty Brown and INF Kevin Frandsen to Pawtucket (IL). Reassigned INF Jorge Jimenez and C Gustavo Molina to their minor league camp. National League FLORIDA MARLINS—Reassigned RHP Scott Strickland and INF Logan Morrison to the minor league camp. PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Claimed RHP Hayden Penn off waivers from Florida. Designated OF Brandon Moss for assignment. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Claimed C Chris Coste off waivers from the N.Y. Mets. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS—Re-signed WR Steve Breaston, C Lyle Sendlein, NT Gabe Watson to one-year qualifying offers, LB Monty Beisel to a one-year contract and CB Michael Adams to an exclusive rights contract. BUFFALO BILLS—Re-signed S George Wilson, LB Keith Ellison, LB Jon Corto, DB Cary Harris, DB Jonathan Stupar and WR Felton Huggins. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Re-signed LB Abdul Hodge, S Kyries Hebert, G Nate Livings, QB Jordan Palmer and OT Dennis Roland. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Signed WR Sean Morey to a multiyear contract. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Signed CB Phillip Buchanon. HOCKEY National Hockey League MINNESOTA WILD—Recalled G Anton Khudobin from Houston (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS—Recalled F Corey Locke from Hartford (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Signed F Bobby Butler to a two-year contract. Recalled D Brian Lee from Binghamton (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES—Re-signed F Paul Bissonnette to a two-year contract. SOCCER United Soccer League USL—Named Steven Short sales coordinator. Added Brian D’Amico to the Super Y-League/Super-20 League operations staff. COLLEGE CLEMSON—Named Itoro Umoh women’s basketball coach. COLORADO—Fired women’s basketball coach Kathy McConnell-Miller. DAVIDSON—Announced the resignation of women’s basketball coach Annette Watts. KANSAS—Announced junior C Cole Aldrich will enter the NBA draft. LOUISIANA-LAFAYETTE—Named Bob Marlin men’s basketball coach and announced he agreed to a five-year contract. MICHIGAN—Announced junior G Manny Harris will enter the NBA draft. MINNESOTA—Suspended S Kyle Theret indefinitely for an unspecified violation of team rules and policies. SETON HALL—Named Kevin Willard men’s basketball coach and Anne Donovan women’s basketball coach. SHEPHERD—Named B.J. Pumroy athletic director, effective June 30. UCF—Named Donnie Jones men’s basketball coach.

Basketball • Kentucky freshman teammates lead All-America team: Kentucky’s John Wall and DeMarcus Cousins were on the All-America team announced Monday. Joining them were Ohio State junior Evan Turner, who received all but one first-team vote, Syracuse junior Wes Johnson and Villanova senior Scottie Reynolds. • Kansas’ Cole Aldrich leaving early for NBA: Cole Aldrich, fighting back tears, said Monday he’ll skip his senior year at Kansas and head for the NBA. The 6-11 center, who averaged almost a double-double for the Big 12 champions, is projected by most experts as a high firstround pick. • Turkoglu to play but won’t start after benching: Toronto Raptors forward Hedo Turkoglu was back in the rotation on Monday night against Charlotte, but not as a starter a night after being benched. Turkoglu, who signed a five-year, $53 million free-agent deal with the Raptors last offseason, was a healthy scratch for the first time in over seven years in Sunday’s loss to Miami. That came after reports that he was seen out on the town hours after missing Friday’s loss to Denver with a stomach virus.

Golf • Els hangs on with clutch putts to win at Bay Hill: Ernie Els made two clutch par putts, escaped trouble from a buried lie in the bunker and wound up wearing a blue blazer Monday for winning the rain-delayed Arnold Palmer Invitational in Orlando, Fla. Suddenly, it’s easy to picture him in a different color jacket two weeks from now. Els overcame a few nervous moments with four solid pars to wrap up a 1-under 71 and win by two shots at Bay Hill, giving him back-to-back victories for the first time in seven years and setting himself up as a favorite at Augusta National. — From wire reports

NHL ROUNDUP

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Sabres hold off Bruins The Associated Press BOSTON — The way Ryan Miller and the Buffalo Sabres are closing out games could make them extremely tough to face a few weeks from now. Tyler Myers had a goal and set up Paul Gaustad’s score to lift the surging Sabres to their sixth win in seven games, 3-2 over the Boston Bruins on Monday night. Miller made 40 saves, including Marco Sturm’s penalty shot in the first period and Mark Recchi’s shot from the edge of the crease as the final horn sounded, in a matchup of last month’s USA Olympic goaltenders. Tim Kennedy also scored for Buffalo, which moved one point behind Pittsburgh for second overall in the Eastern Conference.

The Sabres improved to 27-0-0 when leading after two periods, but had to hold on after Dennis Seidenberg scored to make it 3-2 with 5:37 to play. “It was really big for us, especially with the spot they’re in and the desperation they have,” Myers. “It was a huge road win for us. As a team right now, we’re focused on moving forward.” David Krejci had Boston’s other goal. The Bruins, who remained in eighth place in the East after Carolina defeated Atlanta 4-1, lost for the third time in seven games. Also on Monday: Hurricanes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Thrashers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ATLANTA — Carolina goalie Cam Ward made a brilliant return after being out nearly two months, Erik

Cole scored a decisive goal with 4:11 left and the Hurricanes beat the Thrashers, dealing a blow to Atlanta’s playoff hopes. Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SUNRISE, Fla. — Francis Bouillon scored a minute into overtime to lift Nashville over Florida. Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Nick Bonino scored his first NHL goal with an assist from 600goal scorer Teemu Selanne, and Curtis McElhinney made 30 saves in Anaheim’s victory over Dallas. Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ST. PAUL, Minn. — Martin Havlat scored a power-play goal in the third period and Minnesota beat Los Angeles.

Buzzer beater lifts Stanford past Xavier The Associated Press SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Jeanette Pohlen made the biggest play yet to save Stanford’s spectacular season, on a night the Cardinal were a far cry from their dominant selves. Pohlen drove the length of the court for the game-winning layin as the final buzzer sounded, lifting top-seeded Stanford past third-seeded Xavier 55-53 in the Sacramento Regional final Monday night for a third straight trip to the Final Four. Xavier’s Dee Dee Jernigan missed two wideopen layins in the closing 12 seconds that likely would have sent the Musketeers to San Antonio for their first Final Four. In other NCAA Tournament games on Monday: No. 4 Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 No. 2 Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Celebrated freshman Brittney Griner caught a pass, spun around and hit a short jumper with 45 seconds left to propel Baylor to a win over Duke for its second trip ever to the Final Four.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 30, 2010 D3

Running Continued from D1 “If you are patient AND are willing to look at other things — like fixing muscle imbalances, footstrengthening exercises, wearing flat, flexible casual shoes in the workplace — you can find definite benefit in spending time unshod or in minimalist shoes.” (Minimalist shoes are designed to allow feet to move as if they were bare.) Browning recommends running barefoot on smooth, soft dirt trails, rather than pavement and he says the first time should last no more than 3 minutes. Some do run on pavement, but most barefoot runners in Central Oregon say they prefer grass, track or dirt trail. Perhaps the most poignant point about barefoot running — or as some call it, minimalist running — is, “It’s not about what you have on your feet, it’s about what you are doing with your feet,” notes Christopher McDougall, author of the bestselling book “Born to Run,” in a 2009 New York Times interview. Simply put, most shoes designed for running are built with a large heel and arch support and cause runners to strike the ground first with their heel, rather than with the ball of their foot. According to a Harvard University study on the biomechanics of foot strikes, a heel strike can be traumatic for the body, particularly for the legs and leg joints (www. barefootrunning.fas.harvard.edu). As noted in the study: “We show that most forefoot and some midfoot strikes (shod or barefoot) do not generate the sudden, large impact transients that occur when you heel strike (shod or barefoot). Consequently, runners who forefoot or midfoot strike do not need shoes with elevated cushioned heels to cope with these sudden, high transient forces that occur when you land on the ground. Therefore, barefoot runners can run easily on the hardest surfaces in the world without discomfort from landing.” Running has been a part of human existence since the era of the caveman. Running shoes have been around for barely a century. So goes the timeline of footwear technology: Shoes have become increasingly advanced with ever-greater support, which can lead to weakened muscles in the foot and lower leg due to lack of use. Shoes brace the foot, hence not allowing the foot to move as designed with all of its 26 bones, 33 joints, 20 muscles, and hundreds of tendons and

ligaments. But now, shoe designs are shifting. Even Nike has a line called Free with a minimal-support concept. “Biomechanically, most of us were meant to run without shoes,” says Bend’s Max King, 30, a worldclass runner and local running coach. “Shoes alter our stride mechanics, ground proprioception (unconscious perception of movement and spatial orientation arising from stimuli within the body), and muscles that activate during the running activity. It’s like putting a broken leg in a cast: After six weeks the bone is healed, you’ve been able to use the other joints in your leg aside from the one that’s immobilized, and your muscle connected to that joint is significantly atrophied compared to the other side.

NBA SCOREBOARD

NBA ROUNDUP

STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct y-Boston 47 26 .644 Toronto 36 37 .493 New York 26 47 .356 Philadelphia 26 47 .356 New Jersey 10 64 .135 Southeast Division W L Pct x-Orlando 52 22 .703 x-Atlanta 47 26 .644 Miami 40 34 .541 Charlotte 38 35 .521 Washington 21 51 .292 Central Division W L Pct y-Cleveland 58 16 .784 Milwaukee 40 32 .556 Chicago 35 38 .479 Indiana 27 47 .365 Detroit 23 50 .315 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct x-Dallas 49 25 .662 San Antonio 44 29 .603 Memphis 38 35 .521 Houston 36 36 .500 New Orleans 35 40 .467 Northwest Division W L Pct x-Utah 49 26 .653 x-Denver 48 27 .640 Oklahoma City 44 28 .611 Portland 45 29 .608 Minnesota 14 60 .189 Pacific Division W L Pct x-L.A. Lakers 54 20 .730 Phoenix 47 26 .644 L.A. Clippers 27 46 .370 Sacramento 24 50 .324 Golden State 21 52 .288 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ——— Monday’s Games Toronto 103, Charlotte 101 New Jersey 90, San Antonio 84 New Orleans 108, L.A. Lakers 100 Dallas 109, Denver 93 Utah 103, New York 98 Today’s Games Sacramento at Indiana, 4 p.m. Oklahoma City at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Chicago, 5 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Washington at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games L.A. Lakers at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Milwaukee at Cleveland, 4 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Toronto, 4 p.m. Oklahoma City at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Miami at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Phoenix at New Jersey, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at Memphis, 5 p.m. Sacramento at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Washington at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Houston at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. New York at Portland, 7 p.m. Golden State at Utah, 7 p.m.

GB — 11 21 21 37½ GB — 4½ 12 13½ 30 GB — 17 22½ 31 34½ GB — 4½ 10½ 12 14½ GB — 1 3½ 3½ 34½ GB — 6½ 26½ 30 32½

SUMMARIES Monday’s Games ——— SAN ANTONIO (84) Jefferson 5-11 6-7 16, Duncan 6-15 1-4 13, McDyess 0-2 0-0 0, Hill 8-19 2-2 19, Bogans 02 1-4 1, Mason 3-5 0-0 7, Bonner 4-11 0-1 10, Blair 5-9 1-2 11, Temple 1-4 0-0 3, Hairston 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 34-82 11-20 84. NEW JERSEY (90) Hayes 1-5 0-0 3, Yi 3-12 2-2 8, Lopez 7-14 8-9 22, Harris 6-16 4-6 17, Lee 7-13 3-3 19, Williams 4-13 4-4 13, Douglas-Roberts 0-1 0-0 0, Humphries 2-4 0-0 4, Boone 0-1 0-0 0, Dooling 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 32-85 21-24 90. San Antonio 33 13 20 18 — 84 New Jersey 27 16 19 28 — 90 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 5-15 (Bonner 27, Mason 1-1, Temple 1-1, Hill 1-3, Jefferson 0-1, Bogans 0-2), New Jersey 5-19 (Lee 2-3, Williams 1-3, Harris 1-4, Hayes 1-5, Yi 0-1, Dooling 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—San Antonio 66 (Duncan 12), New Jersey 47 (Lopez 12). Assists—San Antonio 23 (Jefferson 5), New Jersey 19 (Harris 9). Total Fouls—San Antonio 19, New Jersey 19. Technicals—San Antonio defensive three second 2. A—13,053 (18,974). ——— TORONTO (103) Wright 7-11 0-0 15, Bosh 10-19 2-3 22, Bargnani 6-14 1-2 16, Calderon 4-8 2-3 10, Weems 3-5 0-2 6, Johnson 1-2 0-0 2, Turkoglu 4-9 0-0 11, Evans 0-1 1-2 1, Jack 2-5 7-8 12, DeRozan 3-5 2-4 8. Totals 40-79 15-24 103. CHARLOTTE (101) Wallace 7-15 3-4 17, Diaw 5-12 0-0 11, Ratliff 0-1 3-4 3, Felton 7-12 0-0 18, Jackson 5-13 67 18, Chandler 1-1 6-8 8, Hughes 3-6 5-6 13, Augustin 3-6 0-0 9, Graham 1-3 2-2 4. Totals 32-69 25-31 101. Toronto 18 25 29 31 — 103 Charlotte 18 29 31 23 — 101 3-Point Goals—Toronto 8-18 (Bargnani 3-5,

Turkoglu 3-6, Jack 1-2, Wright 1-4, Calderon 0-1), Charlotte 12-24 (Felton 4-5, Augustin 3-3, Hughes 2-3, Jackson 2-5, Diaw 1-4, Graham 0-1, Wallace 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Toronto 48 (Bosh 11), Charlotte 43 (Wallace 8). Assists—Toronto 22 (Calderon 7), Charlotte 29 (Felton, Diaw 7). Total Fouls—Toronto 25, Charlotte 20. Technicals—Bargnani, Wright, Toronto defensive three second, Jackson. A—14,534 (19,077). ——— NEW YORK (98) Gallinari 2-10 4-4 9, Walker 3-5 0-0 9, Lee 7-9 2-2 16, McGrady 4-8 5-7 13, Douglas 2-7 1-2 5, Harrington 8-20 7-10 26, House 3-8 0-0 6, Rodriguez 6-10 0-0 14. Totals 35-77 19-25 98. UTAH (103) Miles 4-9 0-0 9, Boozer 11-16 4-5 26, Okur 6-10 0-0 13, Williams 8-16 2-3 23, Matthews 58 0-0 12, Millsap 5-8 4-8 14, Korver 1-9 2-2 4, Price 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 41-80 12-18 103. New York 30 30 27 11 — 98 Utah 44 20 23 16 — 103 3-Point Goals—New York 9-28 (Walker 3-5, Harrington 3-9, Rodriguez 2-3, Gallinari 1-6, House 0-1, McGrady 0-2, Douglas 0-2), Utah 9-16 (Williams 5-8, Matthews 2-3, Okur 1-1, Miles 1-2, Price 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New York 45 (Harrington 17), Utah 48 (Boozer 14). Assists—New York 16 (McGrady 6), Utah 24 (Williams 14). Total Fouls—New York 19, Utah 21. A—19,911 (19,911). ——— DENVER (93) Anthony 3-16 3-3 10, Nene 3-4 8-12 14, Petro 0-2 0-0 0, Billups 3-14 4-4 11, Afflalo 2-6 0-0 4, Allen 2-5 2-2 7, Smith 10-16 4-6 27, Andersen 00 0-0 0, Graham 4-5 2-3 10, Lawson 5-9 0-0 10, Carter 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 32-78 23-30 93. DALLAS (109) Marion 9-13 3-3 21, Nowitzki 7-17 16-17 34, Haywood 5-7 0-2 10, Kidd 2-6 2-2 8, Butler 411 0-0 10, Terry 6-10 0-0 15, Najera 0-2 0-0 0, Beaubois 2-7 0-0 5, Dampier 2-4 0-0 4, Carroll 1-2 0-0 2, Stevenson 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 38-81 21-24 109. Denver 23 23 23 24 — 93 Dallas 31 24 24 30 — 109 3-Point Goals—Denver 6-20 (Smith 3-6, Anthony 1-1, Allen 1-1, Billups 1-7, Carter 0-1, Graham 0-1, Afflalo 0-1, Lawson 0-2), Dallas 1222 (Nowitzki 4-5, Terry 3-5, Butler 2-2, Kidd 2-4, Beaubois 1-4, Carroll 0-1, Najera 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Denver 52 (Anthony 9), Dallas 47 (Nowitzki 10). Assists—Denver 12 (Billups 6), Dallas 27 (Kidd, Nowitzki 10). Total Fouls—Denver 20, Dallas 25. Technicals—Denver defensive three second, Terry. A—20,085 (19,200). ——— L.A. LAKERS (100) Artest 6-14 1-1 14, Odom 4-13 1-3 10, Gasol 11-21 4-4 26, Fisher 3-11 0-0 7, Bryant 10-18 9-11 31, Farmar 3-8 0-1 8, Brown 0-4 2-2 2, Powell 0-1 0-0 0, Mbenga 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 38-91 17-22 100. NEW ORLEANS (108) Peterson 1-5 2-4 5, West 7-15 6-8 20, Okafor 3-8 2-5 8, Paul 5-11 4-4 15, Thornton 5-13 5-6 18, Posey 3-5 4-4 13, Collison 6-9 3-3 17, Gray 1-1 0-0 2, Songaila 5-6 0-0 10. Totals 36-73 26-34 108. L.A. Lakers 22 20 21 37 — 100 New Orleans 27 23 27 31 — 108 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 7-29 (Farmar 2-4, Bryant 2-5, Odom 1-3, Fisher 1-7, Artest 1-8, Brown 0-2), New Orleans 10-23 (Posey 3-5, Thornton 3-9, Collison 2-2, Paul 1-2, Peterson 1-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Lakers 56 (Gasol 22), New Orleans 47 (Okafor 13). Assists—L.A. Lakers 18 (Bryant 6), New Orleans 22 (Paul 13). Total Fouls—L.A. Lakers 27, New Orleans 20. A—18,206 (17,188).

LEADERS Through Sunday SCORING G FG FT James, CLE 72 731 557 Durant, OKC 72 691 646 Anthony, DEN 61 620 469 Bryant, LAL 68 673 408 Wade, MIA 70 649 484 Ellis, GOL 61 603 280 Nowitzki, DAL 72 636 458 Granger, IND 54 424 308 Bosh, TOR 65 558 426 Stoudemire, PHX 73 616 442 Roy, POR 59 458 320 Johnson, ATL 71 593 211 Randolph, MEM 72 593 309 Jackson, CHA 72 543 306 Evans, SAC 64 473 318 Rose, CHI 69 584 213 Lee, NYK 71 595 237 Maggette, GOL 63 416 414 Gay, MEM 71 539 266 Billups, DEN 65 361 422

PTS 2147 2132 1760 1844 1850 1556 1766 1295 1550 1675 1306 1512 1508 1504 1296 1393 1427 1257 1407 1286

AVG 29.8 29.6 28.9 27.1 26.4 25.5 24.5 24.0 23.8 22.9 22.1 21.3 20.9 20.9 20.3 20.2 20.1 20.0 19.8 19.8

ASSISTS G Nash, PHX 72 Paul, NOR 41 Williams, UTA 68 Rondo, BOS 72 Kidd, DAL 71 James, CLE 72 Davis, LAC 71 Westbrook, OKC 72 Harris, NJN 55 Wade, MIA 70

AST 800 444 709 703 655 616 564 567 378 468

AVG 11.1 10.8 10.4 9.8 9.2 8.6 7.9 7.9 6.9 6.7

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Running with minimal support changes the way the foot strikes the ground in the barefoot shoe. Instead of the heel striking, the ball of the foot meets the ground first.

Want to learn more about barefoot running? “Why we Run: A Natural History” by Bernd Heinrich “Born to Run” by Christopher McDougall

Nowitzki has triple-double to lead Mavs The Associated Press DALLAS — Dirk Nowitzki’s scoring and rebounding are a given. The Dallas Mavericks’ All-Star forward also prides himself on his passing. Nowitzki had 34 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists for his second career triple-double, and the Mavericks maintained the No. 2 seed in the Western Conference with a 109-93 victory over the Denver Nuggets on Monday night. His first 16 double-doubles this season were for points and rebounds. But with the Nuggets throwing double-teams at him, Nowitzki passed to open teammates for easy baskets. “That’s when we’re at our best, sharing the ball,” Nowitzki said. Nowitzki reached double-digits in assists when he dished to Jason Terry for a 19-foot jumper that gave Dallas a 107-89 advantage with 2:15 left. “We ran that last play for me to get that last assist for ‘Jet’ and that was a great play design,” Nowitzki said. Nowitzki’s other triple-double came with 29 points, 10 rebounds and 12 assists against Milwaukee on Feb. 6, 2008. Nowitzki hit four of five from three-point range and went 16 for 17 from the free throw line as the Mavericks moved to 4-4 since snapping a season-best 13-game winning streak. “(Nowitzki) did everything,” said Dallas’ Jason Kidd, who had eight points and 10 assists. “He set the table, he accepted doubleteams, he moved the ball and hit shots.” Shawn Marion added 21 points and Terry contributed 15 for Dallas, which increased its conference lead over Denver to 1 1⁄2 games. Marion’s defense on Denver’s top scorer Carmelo Anthony was another factor in the victory. “The key to the game was the job that Shawn Marion did on Carmelo,” Dallas coach Rick Carlisle said. “He’s one of the toughest guys in the league to guard and (Marion) took the challenge.” Anthony, the league’s No. 3 scorer, went three for 16 from the floor and had a seasonlow 10 points, 18.9 below his average. In other games on Monday: Nets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Spurs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — New Jersey notched its 10th victory, avoiding any chance of tying for the worst record in NBA history by beating short-handed San Antonio. Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Chris Bosh had 22 points and 11 rebounds, Hedo Turkoglu hit the go-ahead three-pointer a day after getting benched, and Toronto beat Charlotte for a key victory in the Eastern Conference playoff race. Hornets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 NEW ORLEANS — Chris Paul had 15 points and 13 assists, his first double-double since returning from an ankle injury, and David West scored 20 points for New Orleans. Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Knicks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 SALT LAKE CITY — Carlos Boozer had 26 points and 14 rebounds, and Deron Williams added 23 points and 14 assists as Utah took over first place in the Northwest Division.

“Now tell me that a well-cushioned, stability shoe doesn’t immobilize any joints.” Some of the great runners of all time raced and trained barefoot. Like Kenyan runner Kip Keino, a two-time Olympic gold medalist in 1968 and 1972. Local advocates of barefoot running, along with numerous Web sites devoted to the awareness of barefoot running, tout the many benefits of running barefoot. A few of the benefits include reduced shock forces, support for healthy joints and spine, improved posture and the development of stronger muscles (see www.barefootmotion.com for more details). “I am a five-time marathon runner, and the knee pain I usually experience as a result (of distance running) is largely gone,” says Bend’s Matthew Bade, who says he has been barefoot running for two years. “My posture, running form, foot and ankle strength, and balance is far superior to what I knew running in shoes.” But with the benefits of barefoot running come some cautions. Because every body structure is different, the effect of changing to barefoot running can be positive or negative. “Depending upon the person and their biomechanics, their personal injury, athletic history and the way in which they transition to minimalist running, anything can happen,” notes Michael Tompkins, a physical therapist with Rebound Physical Therapy in Bend. “For some people, it could be a transition to stronger feet and lower extremities with improved gait mechanics, whereas with others it will likely end in injury. Currently, we have at least three patients who are injured and being treated … who attempted to transition to this type of running.” While barefoot running in America does not appear to be a passing fad, it is only currently reaching a subculture of runners. Teague Hatfield, owner of the FootZone running store in Bend, says: “We sell a few dozen (Vibram FiveFingers) a week. It’s definitely increased lately.” Whether or not this somewhat primitive style of running will catch on is yet to be determined. Anyone considering barefoot running should be sure to consult a running expert and be patient. “Remember, there is no magic pill, no single fix for everyone,” says Tompkins. “So even if you know someone or read about someone who made this switch and it helped them, it doesn’t mean it is the right thing for you to do.” Katie Brauns can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at kbrauns@bendbulletin.com.

Road Continued from D1 “We were going at least 50 miles per hour,” he recounts, “and some guy got the death wobbles (wheels wavering side to side uncontrollably) in the middle of the group. I got caught in it and went down, and slid on my right side for 150 feet. It felt like a Slip’N Slide. It was awful. I still can’t ride that hill without having an aversion to it.” The road rash extended from Newell’s right calf all the way up his right side to his arm. “I was on my back watching TV for five days after that,” he remembers. “It was three weeks for the bandages to come off, but I was on the bike in two.”

Know when to see a doc Riders fortunate enough — one could say — to sustain road rash during a sanctioned bicycle racing event should by all means take advantage of the medical support offered at the race. Most OBRA races are staffed by at least one medical provider, while an entire team of well-equipped medical professionals is typically on hand at high-profile Central Oregon events, such as the Cascade Cycling Classic, road nationals or cyclocross nationals. Even for a minor case of road rash, racers should take advantage of the supplies, ease of accessibility and know-how offered at no charge to racers who are injured while participating in these events. Those unlucky enough to be sent sliding across the pavement outside of a sanctioned race can, with the right supplies, treat most cases of road rash at home. That said, a trip to a medical clinic is recommended in some instances. Deep-tissue lacerations, bleeding that will not stop, or a wound contaminated with dirt and debris that cannot be sufficiently cleaned at home are all red flags that a doctor visit is necessary, Murray advises. Ryan recalls a pro rider who several years back sustained a deep abrasion when he was sent sprawling across hot pavement in a high-speed crash during the Cascade Cycling Classic. “High-speed road injuries are the ones we watch a little more carefully,” Ryan explains. “We give them a good scrub and like to see them back in 24 hours and repeat the process.”

Clean early and often A thorough cleaning of the abrasion is paramount. And the quicker, the better. “If you’ve got a wound that’s been sitting there for hours, it’s going to get a lot more sensitive,” says Murray. “Soap and water is the most important thing. We generally use a saline solution at

PREP BOYS GOLF

Cowboys take fifth at Pendleton golf tournament Bulletin staff report PENDLETON — Caleb Henry and Kurt Russell shared team scoring honors with 7-over-par rounds of 43 and led Crook County to a fifthplace finish in a nine-hole tournament held at the Wildhorse Resort and Casino. Madras’ Rabe Clements led the White Buffaloes with a 44. In a tournament originally scheduled for 18 holes but shortened because of foul weather, Crook County logged a team score of 176 and Madras finished with 184 strokes. Walla Walla (Wash.) won the event with 167 strokes. Complete team scores were unavailable. Both Crook County and Madras will be back in action next Monday in an Intermountain Conference tournament at The Dalles Country Club.

PREP SCOREBOARD GIRLS GOLF Monday’s Results ——— CLASS 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE At Bend Golf & Country Club Front nine holes only Team scores — Summit 200, Crook County 228, Madras 232, Bend 239, La Pine 281, Mountain View incomplete. Medalist — Kersey Wilcox, Mountain View, 46. SUMMIT (200) — Rebecca Kerry 47, Kristen Parr 47, Marlee Barton 52, Madi Marsberger 54, Stacey Patterson 62. CROOK COUNTY (228) — Kirsti Kelso 50, Jaci McKenzie 56, Corey Christensen 61, Korey Hehn 61. MADRAS (232) — Rachel Simmon 51, Savannah Patterson 54, Moriah Pugh 62, Lauren Simmons 65. BEND (239) — Kayla Good 47, Lili Bornio 59, Alex Jordan 64, Danae Walker 69.

bike races because it’s less painful, but there’s nothing wrong with water.” Leftover debris in the wound can lead to infection and scarring, says Ryan. “If you’re doing it on your own, use a washrag or scrub brush to get the material out of the wound,” he instructs. “Mostly that’s uncomfortable, but people can get through it. After that, it’s daily cleansing.”

Keep it moist Take care not to let the road rash dry out and scab over. Drying and scabbing, doctors say, will slow down the healing process and promote greater scarring. While several over-the-counter dressing options are available at the local pharmacy, Murray says home remedies can also work in a pinch. “It doesn’t have to be really high-tech,” Murray insists. “You can basically coat the wound with Vaseline, then put a piece of bedsheet over it and gauze to catch the goop, and that’ll work just fine.” While it is best to keep the wound moist, it is important that the bandage covering the road rash allows the abrasion to breathe. “Riders in the 70s used Saran Wrap (to cover road rash),” says Murray. “But sweat accumulates around the dressing and it gets white and the wound doesn’t heal.”

LA PINE (281) — Haley Clark 58, Ashley Ferns 63, Samantha McPherson 72, Taylor Tavares 88. Bridget McDonald 94. MOUNTAIN VIEW (inc.) — Kersey Wilcox, 46, Hailey Ostrom 57, Ashley Moon 63.

BOYS GOLF Monday’s Results ——— NONCONFERENCE At Wildhorse Resort and Casino in Pendleton nine holes only Team scores (incomplete) — Walla Walla 167, The Dalles-Wahtonka 168, Pendleton 170, Hermiston 170, Crook County 176, Madras 184. CROOK COUNTY (176) — Caleb Henry 43, Kurst Russell 43, Dillon Russell 44, Jared George 46, Ben McLane 53. MADRAS (184) — Rabe Clements 44, Nick Johnson 45, Adrian Phillips 46, Jasper Gerhardt 49.

Supplies to have on hand Riders with road rash should look for a breathable plastic dressing called Tagaderm, available at some local pharmacies. (Inquire with the pharmacist, as Tagaderm can be spendy — $9 to $13, depending on bandage size — and may be located behind the counter.) If Tagaderm is not available, look for a breathable, nonstick gauze, or any dressing that allows the wound to stay moist but not wet. The dressing should act like a Gore-Tex rain jacket, Ryan says. “The skin doesn’t weep underneath but allows the area to stay moist,” he says, describing how the dressing works. “Those (dressings) you can leave on for a week. That’s the ideal situation. (The road rash) will heal quicker and I definitely think the scarring is less.” Other products to look for include petroleum gauze (prepared thin sheet of gauze coated with petroleum jelly), which can be topped with regular gauze and strapped in place with medical tape. For more detailed instructions on caring for road rash, go to the Oregon Bicycle Racing Association Web site at www.obra.org and click on “Links” and then “Wound Care Tips.” Heather Clark can be reached at bulletinheather@gmail.com.

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D4 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

I B Equestrian • Horse show coming to Bend in June: The Central Oregon Summer Hunter Jumper equestrian contest is slated for June 18-20 at the J Bar J Boys Ranch in northeast Bend. The horse show, a benefit for Cascade Youth & Family Center, is sanctioned by the United States Equestrian Association and will be rated by the U.S. Equestrian Federation. Events will be open to equestrians of all skill levels. The Cascade Youth & Family Center, a program of J Bar J Youth Services, is a nonprofit organization serving at-risk youths. For more information about the horse show, call 530-220-3954.

Coaching • Sports talk to be held in Sisters: Motivational speaker Bruce Brown will be giving a free presentation in Sisters on Friday, April 16. The presentation will generally be about learning life lessons and leadership through sports and how parents can be supportive of their children. Brown is author of the book “Teaching Character Through Sport: Developing a Positive Coaching Legacy.â€? More information about Brown is available on his business Web site, www. proactivecoaching. The event will be held at the Sisters High School auditorium. Brown will speak to athletes during a daytime assembly. A talk for parents will be held at 6 p.m. in the auditorium, and a presentation for coaches is set for 7:30 p.m. All Central Oregon athletes, parents and coaches are welcome to attend. The event is being sponsored and hosted by Think Again Parents and Sisters Sports & Mentoring Alliance. For more information, contact Quay Richerson at quay@ bendbroadband.com or 541-3908834.

Running • Light of Hope race slated for April 18: The Light of Hope running race is scheduled for Sunday, April 18, in Bend. The event, which will take place at Riverbend Park, includes a USA Track & Field certified 5-kilometer run and a 1K run/ walk. Race start time is 9 a.m. The Light of Hope event is a benefit for Court Appointed Special Advocates of Central Oregon. General entry fee for the 5K is $30. Register online at www.casaofcentraloregon.org. Contact: 541-389-1618. • Smith Rock Race Group seeking charity to benefit: The deadline for applications to become an official charity for the Smith Rock Sunrise Summer Classic Half Marathon or the Cascade Lakes Relay is coming soon. Applicants must submit forms for the Smith Rock race by Wednesday, April 7, and for the Cascade Lakes Relay by Thursday, April 15. Online applications are available at www. smithrockrace.com and www. cascadelakesrelay.com. For more information contact rosemary@smithrockrace.com.

Rugby • Rugby team’s winning streak ends: The Bend Rugby Club’s four-game winning streak ended on Saturday, when the Roughriders fell to the Oregon Sports Union, 32-24, in a Pacific Northwest Rugby Union Division II league match in Portland. Bend’s tries were scored by Tom Quinn, John Stafford, Peter Liddell and Jody Williams. Mike Hunter scored on two conversion kicks. Quinn was voted most valuable player of the match. Bend’s season record dropped to 11-7 overall, 6-7 in league. The Roughriders next match will be against Snake River from Boise, Idaho, on Saturday, April 3, at Big Sky Park in Bend. Kickoff is at 2 p.m. Admission is free.

Football • Local semiprofessional football team falls again: The High Desert Lightning, a semiprofessional football team based in Central Oregon, lost in their second game of the season 19-3 against the Medford Rogue Warriors in Medford. The Lightning’s only score came on a late fourthquarter field goal of 19 yards by Zach Gist. The Warriors scored an early first-quarter touchdown and capped first half scoring with a 42-yard field goal for a 10-0 halftime lead. The Lightning defense held the Warriors to 93 rushing yards on 27 carries. The Lightning play their home opener at Redmond High School on Saturday, April 10, at 6 p.m. against the Oregon Outlaws. — Bulletin staff report

C OM M U N I T Y S P ORT S

C  S  C Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

BADMINTON BEND BADMINTON CLUB: Public play, Tuesdays and Sundays through winter; rackets, instruction available; cost is $7.50. Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.; Sundays, 4-6 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Mt. Bachelor Drive; 541-382-4994.

BASEBALL BEND SENIOR SOFTBALL REGISTRATION: For players age 50 and over; season runs mid-April through July; games on weekday evenings at Skyline Sports Complex; practices at Hal Puddy Field, noon to 2 p.m., Monday, Wednesday, Friday; $60 and free for ages 75 and older; new players contact Brian Crosby at 541-318-0426 or briancrosby@bendcable.com. SISTERS LITTLE LEAGUE FIELD CLEAN UP: Call to all players, parents, coaches and volunteers; bring a pair of work gloves and garden tools; raking, weeding, painting; meet at the Sisters Community Church fields at 10 a.m. on any Saturday: April 3 or 10; www.sisterslittleleague.org; Davina Luz 541-350-0907. BEND MASTERS SOFTBALL LEAGUE REGISTRATION: For ages 60 and over; deadline is March 31; season runs May 20-Aug. 26; $20; Rob Cohen at 541-382-5659; rob0405@bendbroadband.com. JUNIOR COUGAR BASEBALL FUNDRAISER: Play golf to raise money for youth baseball; fourperson scramble format is open to the public at The Club at Brasada Ranch on Saturday; tournament includes 18 holes with cart and range balls, contests, barbecue, silent auction and tournament prizes; $87.50 per player, $350 per team; Brandon Sunitsch at sunitsch@bendcable.com.

BASKETBALL YOUTH BASKETBALL SKILLS CLINIC: this Saturday at Summit High School in Bend; offered by the Summit girls basketball coaching staff; 9 a.m. to noon for kindergarten through fourth grade, and 1-4 p.m. for fifth through eighth grade; $35; www.highmountainhoops.com.

BIKING HIGH DESERT BMX RACES: Race registration and practice 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, races at 6:30 p.m.; helmet, longsleeved shirt and pants required; one-day free membership and gear available; at Big Sky Park, 21690 Neff Road; 541-8156208, www.highdesertbmx.org; renegade_sjane@hotmail.com. ROLLER RUMBLE — GOLD SPRINTS RACE SERIES: Sunday nights through May 9 at Silver Moon Brewing in Bend; registration at 6:30 p.m., races 7-10 p.m.; $5 racers; $3 spectators; 541610-7460; info@velosprints. com; www.velosprints.com. MBSEF’S SUMMER CYCLING PROGRAM MOUNTAIN AND ROAD BIKE SESSION I: Begins May 3, from 4:40-6 p.m.; 541388-0002; mbsef@mbsef. org; www.mbsef.org.

MISCELLANEOUS WEST POWELL BUTTE EQUESTRIAN: Western and English riding taught to all levels ages 7 and older; horses and tack provided; at Powell Butte estates from 10 a.m. to noon, Saturdays and Sundays, April 10 & 11, 24 & 25; $50 per session; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. BALL HOCKEY CLINIC: Ages 12-16; basic skills of indoor ball hockey; this Saturday, 1-4 p.m. at RAPRD Activity Center; $15; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. BEND TABLE TENNIS CLUB: Every Wednesday; 6-9 p.m.; every Sunday (No meeting on Easter Sunday, April 2), 2-5 p.m. (set-up half hour before) at 1355 N.W. Commerce (off Century Drive), Bend; drop-in fee, $5; Brett Yost 541-318-8997,

bendtabletennis@yahoo.com; www.bendtabletennis.com. BLUE DRAGONS MARTIAL ARTS: Ages 4-6; Kung Fu based, mixed martial arts program; Tuesdays and Thursdays, April 6-29, 4:305:15 p.m. at Redmond Activity Center; $30; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. Blue Dragons ACROVISION TAE KWON DO: Ages 6 and up; martial arts training; Tuesdays and Thursdays, April 1-27, 7-8 p.m. at RAPRD Activity Center; $69; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. STUDENT ATHLETE DEVELOPMENT CAMPS: Offered by Fitness Guide Service for middle and high schoolers; Camps run five days; Aug. 10-14 for middle schoolers; Aug. 3-7 for high schoolers; fundamentals of acceleration, decelerating, lateral speed, foot speed, core performance; $55 for middle schoolers, $110 for high schoolers; Matt Cox, matt@ fitnessguideservice.com, 541-3256583; www.fitnessguideservice.com. COED DODGEBALL LEAGUE: Through April 26; eight matches plus playoffs; at Morning Star Christian School, 19741 Baker Road in Bend, from 6-10 p.m.; $300 per team; registration still open; $2 drop-in; jared@ababend.com; 541-420-3081. WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTOR COURSE: American Red Cross WSI Course provides training to become a swim instructor; at the Athletic Club of Bend; April 3, 4, 10 and 11, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day; open to the public; must be age 16 or older; $135; Rob at 541-322-5856.

MULTISPORT POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Hosted by MBSEF; Saturday, May 15; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. KIDS’ MINI POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Hosted by MBSEF; Sunday, May 16; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

PADDLING PRIVATE AND GROUP KAYAK ROLL SESSIONS: Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; instruction by Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe staff, gear is provided; $45; 541-317-9407.

RUNNING WEEKLY TRACK AND HILL WORKOUTS: Thursdays, 6 p.m.; speed work at your own pace; intervals, pacing and more; $5; contact for location; joanne@inmotionbend.com. PLANTAR FASCIITIS CLINIC: Held Tuesday June 9, from 7 to 8 p.m. at FootZone in downtown Bend. Physical therapist Steve Leary from Hands On Physical Therapy will inform participants about Plantar Fasciitis, a common foot ailment and he will explain how to deal with it; Free; Contact: 541-3173568 or teague@footzonebend. com; www.footzonebend.com. GIRLS ON THE RUN REGISTRATION: For girls ages 8-11; sign-ups are limited to 15 girls per location; offered at Pine Ridge and High Lakes Elementary; starts March 29 and 30; $150; financial assistance is available; heidi@deschutescountygotr. org; 541-788-2499; www. deschutescountygotr.org. RUN LIKE A MOTHER BOOK SIGNING & 5K: Join Oregon author Sarah Bowen Shea at FootZone, Bend; Monday, April 5; 5K run at 9:30 a.m., and book signing at 7 p.m.; free; 541-3173568; teague@footzonebend. com; footzonebend.com. USA FIT BEND MARATHON TRAINING PROGRAM: Registration and information session for 26-week USA Fit Bend Marathon Training Program; April 17, 7:45 a.m. at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 800 N.E. Sixth St., Bend; $115 new members, $100 returning members; 541-610-1649; info@usafitbend. com; www.usafitbend.com. FOOTZONE LEARN TO RUN PROGRAM: Six-week program starts

Wednesday, April 21, 5:30-7 p.m. at the FootZone in downtown Bend; training beginners to run or walk 5K; get ready for the Heaven Can Wait 5K in June; cost is $55; 541-317-3568; www.footzonebend.com; Connie Austin at conzaustin@gmail.com. SHEPHERDS HOUSE SHUFFLE: 5K Run/ Walk starting at High Desert Middle School; April 11, 10 a.m.; proceeds benefit the Shepherd’s House Shelter in Bend; $10; register at Fleet Feet Sports Bend and the FootZone in Bend or on race day; jmail@bendbroadband.comz. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: 6:15 p.m. on Mondays; locations vary; group accommodates seven- to 11-minute mile pace; Jenny@footzonebend.com. BABY BOOTCAMP: Wednesdays at 10 a.m. at Fleet Feet Sports, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave; bridget. cook@babybootcamp.com.

SCUBA DIVING BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA DIVING CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing. Scuba certification available for adults and kids 12 and older; refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners, 541-312-2727 or 541-287-2727.

SKIING GROUP NORDIC SKIS: Ski at local snow parks; meet with Central Oregon Nordic Club on Sundays, 9 a.m. at DiLusso’s Coffee on Franklin Avenue in downtown Bend; all levels of skiers are welcome; if learning, get a free lesson through the Ski Buddy program; http:// conc.freehosting.net; 541-382-8023. NORDIC SKI WAXING CLINIC: Every Friday, 5 p.m. at WebSkis, Old Mill Marketplace, 550 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 20; www. WebSkis.com; 541-318-8809. FULL MOON X-COUNTRY SKI TRIPS: Meet at Pine Mountain Sports in Bend and carpool to the various snoparks for an evening ski; 6:30 p.m.; April 28; bring a headlamp; free ski rentals available, pick up rentals from 5:30-6 p.m.; free; 541-385-8080. ALPINE NORTHWEST CUP FINALS RACE: Hosted by MBSEF at Mount Bachelor, April 1–3; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. GREAT NORDEEN: This Saturday; the cross-country ski race will start at Mount Bachelor; distances of 15- and 30-kilometer offered along with a 15K recreational skijoring option; $50-$60; www. mbsef.org or 541-388-0002. ALPINE PNSA MASTERS CHAMPIONSHIPS: Hoste by MBSEF; April 8-11 at Mount Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@

mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MBSEF ANNUAL AWARDS BANQUET: April 23, 5:45 p.m. at W.E. Miller Elementary School; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef. org; www.mbsef.org. MAY DAY RACE: April 23-25 at Mount Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. THE BEND NORDIC COMPETITION TEAM: Through April 30, meets five to six days per week; designed for ages 14-22, cost varies; info@bendnordic.org; www. bendnordic.org; 541-678-3864.

SOCCER ADULT COED RECREATIONAL SOCCER REGISTRATION: Deadline is this Friday, April 2; Bend Park & Recreation District league starts Sunday, April 11; games played Sundays at Big Sky Sports Complex; $40-$54; www.bendparksandrec. org, 541-389-7275 and kevin@ bendparksandrec.org.

SOFTBALL CASCADE ALLIANCE-TRAVEL SOFTBALL TRYOUTS: 10U and 12U teams; this Saturday, at 2 p.m. at Bend Senior High softball field; Wade Kincade 541-948-3594. PRINEVILLE WOMEN’S SOFTBALL LEAGUE: Registration for the 2010 season through April 15; season runs June-August; must be 15 or older to play; $25; Kim at 541317-8787 or 541-460-1869.

SWIMMING KID’S NIGHT OUT AT JUNIPER: Saturdays, through May, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center in Bend; for ages 3-11; swimming, games, movies; the facility is closed to other patrons while the program is in session; registration required by noon each Saturday; $8-$10; https;//register.bendparksandrec. org; Jen Avery at 541-389-7665. COSMIC SWIM: For middle school students only; Saturdays, April 10 and 24, 8-10 p.m. Cascade Swim Center in Redmond. Must have student identification. Cost is $2.50. 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org. SPRINGBOARD DIVING: For all ages; must be able to swim one length of the pool; April 5-23; Mondays, Wednesday and Fridays, 7:15-8 p.m. at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond; $25; 541-548-7275, visit www.raprd.org. ADULT STROKE CLINIC: For ages 18 and older; must have some swimming experience; meets Mondays and Wednesdays, April 5-28, 5:45-6:15 at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $25; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. PRE-COMP KIDS: Grades 1-8;

MINI WORLD CUP 2010 SEASON OVERALL At Mount Bachelor Top five boys and girls by age by class (Place, name, season points) J-6 Boys: 7-8 year olds 1, Jack Smith, 380. 2, Jace Marshall, 360. 3, Luc Barnes, 206. 4, Tyler Lovejoy, 200. 5, Spencer Burgess, 189. J-6 Girls: 7-8 year olds 1, Alice Bouchard, 400. 2, Keely Buchanan, 320. 3, Maria Wold, 215. 4, Annelise Norkitis, 178. 5, Madi Sebulsky, 166. J-5 Boys: 9-10 year olds 1, Minam Cravens, 360. 2, Harrison “Laz� Glickman, 320. 3, Jonathan Wimberly, 265. 4, Wolfgang, Meckem, 230. 5, Walter Lafky, 185 J-5 Girls: 9-10 year olds 1, Erin Smith, 360. 2, Addison Beasley, 290. 3, Lili Bouchard, 270. 4, Maggi McElrath, 250. 5, Zoe Rischitelli, 200. J-4 Boys: 11-12 year olds 1, Thomas Wimberly, 380. 2, Peter Johnston, 276. 3, Andrew Bristow, 269. 4, Charlie Stuermer, 205. 5, Nick Rasmussen, 200. J-4 Girls: 11-12 year olds 1, Madison Archuleta, 400. 2, Shelby Cutter, 300. 3, Winter Vinecki, 260. 4, Taye Nakamura-Koyama, 225. 5, JoJo Bond, 185. J-3 Boys: 13-14 year olds 1, Eli Crane, 400. 2, Alexander Sarmiento, 80. J-3 Girls: 13-14 year olds 1, Kiersten Rowles, 200. 2, Hannah Fraser, 100. MBSEF MINI WORLD CUP Team Standings-2010 (1/10 GS (1), 1/30 GS (2), 1/31 SL (3), 2/28 SL (4), 3/27 GS (5), total pts 5 races) Team/Sponsor Norway/Bend Awards and Engraving 13 15 15 5 15 63 France/American Licorice 7 11 13 13 13 57 Austria/Pepsi 3 4 11 15 9 42 Canada/Desert Orthopedics 2 3 9 11 11 36 Switzerland/Contemporary Family

Dentistry Italy/Century Insurance Group USA/Carstickers.com Germany/Pappy’s Pizza Sweden/Pheonix Inn and Suites

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13 7 5 9 2

7 5 4 3 2

3 4 7 9 2

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TENNIS CARDIO TENNIS: For age 14 and older, all abilities are welcome. Held Tuesdays from 6 to 7:15 p.m., beginning June 16 at Sam Johnson Tennis Courts in Redmond. Cost is $10. Register by June 12. Contact: Redmond Area Park and Recreation District at 541548-7275 or visit www.raprd.org. LITTLE STARS TENNIS: For ages 3-5 years; helps build hand/eye coordination; Monday-Thursday, April 12-15, 2-2:30 p.m. at Redmond Activity Center; $15; parents must attend; 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org. WEST BEND TENNIS CENTER OPEN COURT: Three indoor tennis courts open to the public; 1355 W. Commerce (off NW Century Drive); reservations encouraged; $16-$20 per hour per court; 541-330-2112; http://reservemycourt.com.

C R E AT E D W I T H T H E H I G H D E S E R T H O M E O W N E R I N M I N D .

YOUR AWARD-WINNING HOME & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE: e:

e Insid Official Guid

CENTRAL OREGON

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ING SUPPLE

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD SKIING

advanced swim-lesson program; meets Tuesday and Thursdays, April 6-29, 5:45-6:30 p.m. at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $30; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. YOUTH SWIM LESSONS: For ages 12-17; learn to swim or improve ability; games and challenges; ; Fridays, April 9-May 14, 9:30-10:15 a.m. at Cascade Swim Center; $25; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. SWIM-A-THON: Fundraiser for the Cascade Aquatic Club; two-hour or 200-lap swim being conquered by CAC swimmers; Saturday, April 24, 9-11 a.m. at Cascade Swim Center; donations will be accept starting this Thursday at Cascade Swim Center; free for spectators; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER SWIM LESSONS: Variety of times and levels offered for age 6 months to adults; Juniper, 800 N.E. Sixth Street, Bend; www.juniperswimandfitness. com; 541-389-7665. AQUA KIDS: Swim lessons designed for age 3 to 5, and 6 and older. Held from 9:30 to 10 a.m., 10 to 10:30 a.m., 11 to 11:30 a.m. and 5:45 to 6:15 p.m., Monday-Friday, Aug. 17-28, at Cascade Swim Center, 465 S.W. Rimrock Drive, Redmond; $25 for 10 half-hour classes; 541-548-7275 or visit www.raprd.org WATERBABIES: Age 6 months to 3 years; basic water skills; parents are in the water with their children; April 6-29, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:45-6:15 p.m., at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $25; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. CONTINUOUS PROGRAM RAPRD FAMILY SWIM NIGHT: 7:05-8:20 p.m., Tuesdays, Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; adult must accompany anyone 18 and younger; $10 per family, $3 per adult, $2 per child; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org.

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NEW HOME

LIVING A locally written magazine devoted to the latest trends and techniques in interior design, home building, remodeling, and landscaping ... especially those that reflect the best of Central Oregon’s creative lifestyle.

BOWLING LEAGUE STANDINGS AND HIGH SCORES March 12-18 Lava Lanes Casino Fun — Sore Thumbs, Mikey Moldenhauer 269/600. Teresa Zitek 179/530. Win, Lose or Draw — Let’s Rum Bowl, Sonny Bruno 249/641. Christine Jacobe 226/543. His and Hers — Flippin 68’s, Travis Holmes 268/761. Carolyn Wirth 215/597. Jack and Jill — Blonde Baldies, Wynn Malikowski 299/790. Sarah Malikowski 248/624. Guys and Gals — Smokey and the Bandits. Jeremy Moyer 279/717. Paula Wilson 201/523. Early Risers — Bowlie Rollers, Edith Roebuck 204/532. Rejects — Three Queens and A King, Kenneth Fleming 259/634. Shirley King 180/490. Lava Lanes Classic — Pin Heads, Richie Carr 266/737. Janna Hiller 268/572. Wednesday Inc. — Red Hot Interiors, Allyn Hayes 276/743. Kerst Bosma 289/712. Tea Timers — The Bowling Stones, Kim Griffiths 233/580. Afternoon Delight — Clay Pigeons, Howie Phillips 237/662. Joy Reeves 248/585. Latecomers — No Threat, Jane Supnet 203/565. Progressive — Freight Lanes Intl., Tad Burzynski 246/664. Free Breathers — He’s and She, Art Glading 225/617. Sandy Weaver 192/542. T.G.I.F. — Grayakers, Rommel Sundita 237/679. Patti Sundita 225/628.

CENTRAL OREGON NEW HOME LIVING Publishes: May 1st

READ BY OVER 70,000 LOCAL READERS

ADVERTISE IN OUR NEXT EDITION FOR AS LITTLE AS $339 CALL 541-382-1811


FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT

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Inside

‘Little People,’ big ratings

COMMUNITY LIFE

TLC adds a few new reality shows, Page E2

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SPOTLIGHT Bend fiddler earns 1st in state championship

Help available to apply for Health Kids program Two local nonprofits, MountainStar Family Relief Nursery and Healthy Beginnings, are offering assistance to help local families enroll in the free Healthy Kids health coverage program. They will answer questions and help fill out the application forms. Both nonprofits received grants from Oregon’s Office of Healthy Kids to help in this effort. Currently, all Oregon children living in families at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level are eligible to receive free health coverage through the Healthy Kids program; and those in families up to 300 percent of poverty level are eligible to receive a subsidy for health coverage. Families seeking more information about the program and who want to apply can contact: MountainStar at 541-3226820 or Healthy Beginnings at 541-383-6357.

Dog adoption events at Bend Pet Express All For Dogs Rescue of Central Oregon will hold adoption events at the east-side location of Bend Pet Express (420 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive) on the first Saturday of each month through August. The adoption events are from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Contact: 541-312-5342 or info@ allfordogsrescue.com.

Yom HaShoah service set for April 10 in Bend Bend’s Reform Jewish congregation, Temple Beth Tikvah, is hosting a Yom HaShoah service on April 10 at the First United Methodist Church in Bend. Also known as a Holocaust Remembrance Day service, Yom HaShoah commemorates the deaths of 6 million Jews and millions of others during the Holocaust. Speakers include Rabbi Alan Berg, Pastor Tom Larson and Holocaust survivor Hans Biglajzer. The service begins at 7:30 p.m. at the church, located at 680 N.W. Bond St. Contact: 541-388-8826 or www.bethtikvahbend.org.

A Novel Idea schedule

Below is a roundup of A Novel Idea … Read Together’s events, which are free and open to the public. Details are subject to change. For more information, contact 541-312-1032 or visit www.dpls.lib.or.us/events/novelidea. BOOK DISCUSSION, ‘THE HELP’ A book based during the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi • April 1 at noon, Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane • April 5 at noon, Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St. Annemarie Hamlin, a • April 7 at 1:30 p.m., Bend Senior professor at Central Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road Oregon Community College, will discuss FILM SCREENING, “Cabins, Mocking‘GHOSTS OF MISSISSIPPI’ birds and Help: White • April 7 at 5:30 p.m., Bend Women Writing Black Public Library, Brooks Room Stories” April 18 in Sisters, April 20 in BOOK DISCUSSION, Bend and April 24 in ‘THE HELP” Sunriver. Novel Idea: Good Chair Great Book • April 8 at noon, Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.

Deschutes libraries to launch annual reading event April 1 By David Jasper • The Bulletin

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Novel Idea … Read Together, the Deschutes Public Library

A NOVEL IDEA KICKOFF AT SECOND SUNDAY Performances by Jason Graham and Central Oregon Gospel Choir • April 11 at 2 p.m., Bend Public Library, second floor BOOK DISCUSSION, ‘THE HELP’ • April 13 at noon, La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St. “AIN’T GOIN LET NOBODY TURN ME ROUND” Bend writer Marion Davidson recalls her year in Mississippi in 1964 • April 13 at 6:30 p.m., Bend Public Library, Brooks Room Kathryn Stockett tickets become available at Deschutes Public Library branches. Tickets to see “The Help” author Stockett are free but limited to two per patron • April 17 at 10 a.m. ‘CABINS, MOCKINGBIRDS AND HELP: WHITE WOMEN WRITING BLACK STORIES’ Discussion by COCC professor Annemarie Hamlin • April 18 at 2 p.m. Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St. • April 20 at 6:30 p.m., Bend Public Library, Brooks Room SCREENING OF ‘STANDING ON MY SISTERS’ SHOULDERS’ Documentary on the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi in the 1950s and ’60s • April 21 at 5:30 p.m., La Pine Public Library • April 21 at 6:30 p.m., Sisters Public Library LADIES WHO LUNCH: COOKING, COCKTAIL DEMO Chef Rose Makena and mixologist Columbine Quillen show how to prepare and serve delicacies and libations; 21 and older only; limited to 30

system’s annual community

reading event, launches this week. The book that has proven to be a popular choice: best-seller “The Help,” by first-

Chef Rose Makena will give cooking demonstrations during the Ladies Who Lunch: Cooking and Cocktail demo on April 21 at Bend Public Library and April 22 at Sisters Public Library.

time author Kathryn Stockett. In her attempt to find a literary agent to help land the book a publisher, Stockett sent queries to some 45 agents, according to The New York Times. Her persistence paid off: The book has been on the Times’ Best-Seller List for nearly a year — 51 weeks as of the March 26 list, where it was at No. 1 for hardcover fiction. The official kickoff for A Novel Idea is on April 11

Reiko Hillyer will talk about segregation in the Jim Crow South on May 1 at the Bend library and May 2 at the Redmond library.

during Second Sunday, the monthly reading event at Bend Public Library. Bend spoken word poet Jason Graham and the Central Oregon Gospel Choir will perform at the event, which starts at 2 p.m. Submitted photos

• April 21 at 6 p.m., Bend Public Library, Brooks Room ‘SOUTHERN COOKING DEMONSTRATION, TASTING Chef Rose Makena demonstrates classic southern dishes • April 22 at 1 p.m., Sisters Public Library ‘CABINS, MOCKINGBIRDS AND HELP: WHITE WOMEN WRITING BLACK STORIES’ Discussion by COCC professor Annemarie Hamlin • April 24 at 2 p.m., Sunriver Area Public Library

“The Help” author Kathryn Stockett will give readings May 7 in Bend and May 8 in Redmond.

However, events related to the book begin this week, with a discussion of “The Help” at noon Thursday at the Sunriver Area Public Library. Throughout April and into early May, the library

will hold book talks, lectures and other programming related to “The Help,” culminating with readings by Stockett herself, May 7 at the Tower Theatre in Bend, and May 8 at Redmond High School. (Tickets are free, limited to two per person, and will become available at all Deschutes County library branches at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 17.) See Novel Idea / E6

See Schedule / E7

Grants available for kids’ health care costs The UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation, a nonprofit arm of the health care company UnitedHealth Group, is accepting grant applications from families that need financial assistance to help pay for their children’s health conditions. Qualifying families are eligible for up to $5,000 to help pay for medical services and equipment not typically covered by insurance, including physical therapy, prescriptions, wheelchairs or eyeglasses. Children 16 years and younger are eligible; families must meet economic guidelines and have a commercial insurance plan. Parents and legal guardians can apply for the grants at www.uhccf.org. — From staff reports

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MARCH 30, 2010

Bend resident and fiddler Roland White, 62, placed first in the senior division (ages 60-69) at the 45th annual Oregon State Championship Old Time Fiddle Contest. The contest was held March 19-20 at the Chemeketa Community College in Salem. Also a member of the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Association, White has performed and taught in Central Oregon for more than 30 years. The Oregon Old Time Fiddlers host a free monthly jam, from 1 to 4 p.m. the first Sunday of the month at the Pine Mountain Grange Hall in Bend. Contact: 541-647-4789.

E

Innocent monkey business in a world of evil By Edward Rothstein New York Times News Service

The Jewish Museum, H.A. & Margret Rey Papers via The Associated Press

H.A. Rey’s illustration, “This is George. He lived in Africa,” published in “The Original Curious George” in 1940.

You don’t really think about Curious George saving the day, as the title of the new exhibition at the Jewish Museum puts it. A “good little monkey,” he is called in the classic series of picture books by Margret and H.A. Rey, but he was no savior. He was a mischief maker, an innocent, born in the jungle and lured into the strange world of humans. He imitates gestures, examines objects. He sees a hat, he puts it on his head; he sees a seagull and is determined to fly himself; he sees a telephone and dials, accidentally summoning the fire department; he sees house painters and decides to paint. His misadventures, particularly in the early books, are ignited by impulse

The Jewish Museum via The Associated Press

Margret Rey and her husband, H.A. Rey, created the “Curious George” character in 1939. and inquiry, the consequences of wanting to see and to know, and the books’ charm is that they don’t condemn this curiosity; they relish it. Reality’s hard

knocks — the chases, the falls, the breaking of limbs and objects — are ultimately taken care of by the nameless man in the yellow hat, who never seems to learn that you don’t leave such a childlike creature alone with a new bike, saying, “Keep close to the house while I am gone.” But as the exhibition points out, at least outside of the books’ frames, Curious George really did save the day, and more than once. In early September 1939, just after World War II began, the Reys — a husband-and-wife team of German Jews living in Paris — sought refuge at Chateau Feuga, an old castle owned by some friends in southern France. At such a time, Hans A. Rey wrote in a letter, “it feels ridiculous to be thinking about children’s books.” See Monkey / E8


T EL EV ISION

E2 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Car names suggest that you are what you drive Dear Abby: My husband and I had fun coming up with cars that fit with certain professions (Jan. 23). It made a long car ride seem short. Here’s what we came up with: The Greek epic poet Homer would have a Honda Odyssey, and a firefighter a Chevy Blazer. An entomologist would crawl through traffic in his Mitsubishi Spyder. A meteorologist would drive a Honda Element, an astronomer would have a Mitsubishi Eclipse and an optician a Ford Focus. Picasso would paint the town in his Nissan Cube, an ornithologist would use a Ford Falcon and his lawyer would drive a Honda Civic. — Megan T., Riding the Highways in Belvidere, N.J. Dear Megan: I’m pleased I was able to make your road trip more enjoyable. Readers, you amaze me! You put the pedal to the metal and came up with some ingenious responses. My staff and I had a great time reading them. Read on: Dear Abby: Stretching my imagination, I envisioned Jacques Cousteau with his Plymouth Barracuda, King Arthur in an Excalibur Phaeton and “Mini-Me” in a Mini Cooper. “Dog the Bounty Hunter” would choose a Mercury Tracer. And don’t you think Cadillac had Disney villainess “Cruella” in mind when it came out with the “DeVille”? — Winni at the Wheel in L.A. Dear Abby: I work at a correctional facility and had to laugh when I saw the warden drive up in his Ford Escape! — Jazzy in Waynesboro, Tenn. Dear Abby: Here’s my suggestion: Clint Eastwood driving a Dodge Magnum with a Magnum Force plate — no, wait, he can’t have that one because I already do! — Donna in Southern California Dear Abby: How about pairing these names and cars? Astrono-

DEAR ABBY mer Carl Sagan in a Mercury Comet, decathlon winner Bruce Jenner in his Javelin, Mr. T. in his very own Model T. And finally, Albert Einstein sporting around in — what else — a Smart Car. — Steven, Along for the Ride in L.A. Dear Abby: I have one: Michael Phelps in his Ford Freestyle. — Emilie in Albuquerque, N.M. Dear Abby: I submit the following: Keanu Reeves driving a Toyota Matrix, Courteney Cox cruising around in her Mercury Cougar, Dizzy Gillespie in a Dodge Coronet and Thomas Edison in a Chevy Volt. When Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger isn’t driving around in his Hummer, he’d be using his Ford Flex, and Ben Franklin would drive a Jeep Liberty. Abby, thanks for providing so many funny moments as well as insightful advice. — Greg in Gladewater, Texas Dear Abby: If some famous people were alive today, they’d have some interesting choices. Christopher Columbus might drive a Ford Explorer and Daniel Boone a Mercury Mountaineer. — Teri in Orrville, Ohio Dear Abby: We’re up to the challenge here in Oregon. A Navy captain driving his PT Cruiser, a housekeeper in her Plymouth Duster and, finally, the local weatherman in his Buick Tornado. — Debbie in Eugene Dear Abby: I have the perfect model for the 12 disciples. The Bible says they were all in one Accord. — Jane Rivera in Pennsylvania Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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Little people, giant ratings By Diane Werts Newsday

When reality TV first came calling, Bill Klein and fiancee Jen Arnold just said no. “The producers approached us to do a wedding show,” Klein said, after seeing energetic Dr. Jen featured on “Good Morning America” for her work as a Stony Brook University Medical Center neonatologist. “But we just didn’t have the time to dedicate to doing a television show while coordinating a wedding. We didn’t really feel like it was the right move for us. So we turned them down.” But “docu-soap” producers knew a telegenic modern couple when they saw one. Jen was moving to a new job at prestigious Houston Children’s Hospital. Bill would start working long-distance for his Emerge sales consulting firm. The two would be designing a new house and planning a family. So the producers came back with a different idea. “And after mulling around the potential,” Klein said, “we decided to move forward.” That’s how Bill and Jen became the next stars in cable TV’s latest unscripted trend — daily life ride-alongs with little people. Their hit series, “The Little Couple,” now shooting its third season for a June return, is just one of four shows with which TLC has been cornering the market on docu-soaps built around people 4 feet tall. Trendsetting fifth-season family smash “Little People, Big World” starts new episodes Monday. Other TLC projects spotlight the title Utah couple of “Little Chocolatiers” (premiering at 10 tonight) and Ohio parents raising an average-size baby in “Our Little Life” (which moves to Discovery Health tonight at 9).

The Roloff family of TLC’s “Little People, Big World” were the trendsetters of reality television shows featuring little people. New TLC additions include “Little Chocolatiers” and “The Little Couple.”

‘Little People, Big World’ When: 8 p.m. Mondays Where: TLC

‘The Little Couple’ When: 9 Tuesdays Where: TLC

‘Little Chocolatiers’ When: 10 Tuesdays Where: TLC

‘Pit Boss’

McClatchy-Tribune News Service file photo

When: 9 p.m. Mondays Where: Animal Planet

Animal Planet is also in the mix, having just renewed January arrival “Pit Boss” (Mondays 9-11 p.m.), about short-statured inner-city L.A. tough guy and pit bull rescuer Shorty Rogers. Even MTV seems interested. RealityWanted.com currently has a casting notice seeking “little people for stunts on MTV game show ‘Silent Library.’” Which is likely not the kind of portrayal that persuaded “Little People, Big World” star Amy Roloff to invite TLC cameras onto the family’s Oregon pumpkin farm, from which she, her husband, Matt, and their four kids have become global stars. Roloff says she wanted viewers to see “a regular family that faces challenges and that happens to have dwarfism and happens to be considered as having disabilities,” she said by phone. “We learn a lot about ourselves through this whole process, and we normalize dwarfism.” “Little People, Big World” took viewers outside Portland to the Roloffs’ pumpkin farm, which hosts fall-season outdoor activities. Initially seen as a financial

struggle to maintain, the farm grew into a tourist attraction as their TLC show became a hit. Viewers have followed the family through all kinds of ordinary activities — soccer games, house renovations, first dates, vacation travel. There also was Matt’s 2007 trial for drunken driving (the judge ruled him not guilty), and a serious accident with a pumpkin catapult, which resulted in hospital stays for son Jacob and adult family friend Mike Detjen. (His heart-related death two years later provided more drama.) But from the start, “Little People” revealed the challenges of the Roloffs’ dwarfism — reactions to their size in public, physical obstacles they encounter, the family’s visits to Little People of America gatherings and dwarf athletic competitions. TV hadn’t exactly portrayed dwarfs quite so naturally in the years leading up to the Roloffs’ debut. There was Jason Acuna as Wee-Man on MTV’s crude stunt show “Jackass,” and the Fox dating spectacle “The Littlest Groom,” which landed on

‘Our Little Life’ When: 9 Tuesdays Where: Discovery Health

Time magazine’s list of Top 10 Skanky Reality Shows. And it wasn’t as if scripted TV had done all that much better. “The only person of short stature popular when I was a kid,” said Klein, “was on ‘Fantasy Island’ (Herve Villechaize’s island helper Tattoo), and I don’t even know if there was a point to that character.” He has clear admiration for the Roloffs. “They’ve done a lot for us (little people) as individuals,” he said by phone. “Seeing them in mainstream society breaks down a barrier. You see they’re just average individuals, trying to make it in a world that isn’t easy, regardless of stature.”

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KATU News 3653 World News 276 News 56363 NBC News 11194 News 4491 News 2672 Judge Judy 6547 Inside Ed. 8498 Funniest Home Videos 3092 Jim 4585 Malcolm 3108 Electric 7479 Fetch! Ruff 130 News 2189 NBC News 7740 Reba ‘PG’ 98498 Reba ‘PG’ 17011 Christina 65160 Burt Wolf 24301 Travels 1011 Europe 7914

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å 16635 NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) 95176 News 9585 CBS News 8027 World News 8011 Millionaire 9363 Two Men 3721 Two Men 7301 Simpsons 3721 Simpsons 7301 This Old H’se 943 Business 295 News 4653 News 5905 King 14924 King 44996 Europe 21214 Travels 12566 Old House 7547 Business 1127

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Jeopardy! 2419 Wheel 653 Jeopardy! 76127 Wheel 85363 Access H. 4635 Scrubs ‘14’ 9721 Ent 9011 The Insider 5547 Simpsons 4721 Simpsons 3585 The Office 4721 The Office 3585 PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å 8059 Live at 7 (N) 5653 Inside Ed. 1189 ’70s Show 78634 ’70s Show 94160 Garden 85924 Workshop 44950 PBS NewsHour ’ Å 58740

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Dancing With the Stars ‘PG’ 4063 Lost The Package (N) ‘14’ 7549450 The Biggest Loser Eliminated contestants return. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 42018 NCIS Endgame ’ ‘14’ Å 65092 NCIS: Los Angeles ‘14’ Å 85856 Dancing With the Stars ‘PG’ 26016 Lost The Package (N) ‘14’ 3829740 American Idol Usher mentors the 10 finalists. ’ ‘PG’ Å 41450 PDX TV Prime News (N) 47634 Smarter 39127 Smarter 52653 NOVA Pluto Files ’ ‘G’ 4479 Voyages of Discovery ’ ‘PG’ 7943 The Biggest Loser Eliminated contestants return. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 61276 90210 Clark Raving Mad ‘14’ 65634 Melrose Place Santa Fe ‘14’ 85498 Woodsmith 94672 Moment 80479 Art Work 31189 Painting 61905 NOVA Pluto Files ’ ‘G’ 34160 Voyages of Discovery ‘PG’ 54924

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(10:02) V (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 9996 Parenthood The Situation ‘PG’ 80905 The Good Wife Infamy ‘PG’ 88943 (10:02) V (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 26127 News 29837 TMZ ‘PG’ 38585 Deal-Deal 29837 Deal No 38585 Frontline The Quake (N) ‘PG’ 9130 Parenthood The Situation ‘PG’ 73011 Married... 54127 Married... 30547 Mexico 38189 Julia 47837 Frontline The Quake (N) ‘PG’ 57011

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News 6969295 (11:35) Nightline News 1488498 Jay Leno News 9751450 Letterman Inside 90918108 (11:35) Nightline King of Hill 34672 Name Earl 15721 South Park 34672 South Park 15721 Independent Lens (N) ’ ‘PG’ 47063 News 9753818 Jay Leno Roseanne 52672 Roseanne 33721 Christina 36634 Burt Wolf 40011 Independent Lens (N) ’ ‘PG’ 47818

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The First 48 ‘14’ Å 968547 Criminal Minds ‘PG’ Å 174011 Criminal Minds The Fox ‘PG’ 190059 Criminal Minds L.D.S.K. ‘14’ 170295 CSI: Miami ’ ‘14’ Å 173382 CSI: Miami ’ ‘14’ Å 6227189 130 28 8 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Å 642837 ››› “Space Cowboys” (2000, Adventure) Clint Eastwood, Tommy Lee Jones, Donald Sutherland. NASA reunites four aging ››› “Troy” (2004, Adventure) Brad Pitt, Eric Bana, Orlando Bloom. Achilles leads Greek forces in the Trojan War. Å 816740 ›› “Volcano” (1997) 102 40 39 flyboys for an urgent mission. Å 637672 941092 Madman of the Sea (N) ‘14’ 4552740 Animals Behaving Badly ’ 7065672 Weird 1665498 Weird 1644905 Killer Aliens Invasive species in Florida. ’ ‘PG’ Å 7051479 Weird 8288943 Weird 6862030 68 50 12 38 The Most Extreme ’ ‘G’ 1648721 Kathy Griffin: D-List 543108 Kathy Griffin: D-List 441301 The Millionaire Matchmaker 138522 The Millionaire Matchmaker 833130 The Millionaire Matchmaker 738586 The Millionaire Matchmaker 588063 The Millionaire Matchmaker 237295 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home 5589112 Smarter 2685837 Smarter 5351450 Extreme Makeover: Home 8852547 Trading Spouses 8865011 Trading Spouses 8875498 Trading Spouses 1911450 190 32 42 53 World’s Strictest Parents 2684108 Biography on CNBC 984978 Swoosh! Inside Nike 266672 Mad Money 242092 “Welcome to Macintosh” (2008, Documentary) 528924 Put It on the Map Smoking 522740 Paid 134769 51 36 40 52 Buffett-Gates 734498 Larry King Live (N) Å 500547 Anderson Cooper 360 Examining the leadership of Scientology. (N) 316295 Larry King Live Å 710837 Anderson Cooper 360 Å 713924 Anderson Cooper 360 Å 312479 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) 628382 Married... 64856 Scrubs ’ 61769 Scrubs ’ 45721 Daily Show 32769 Colbert 41905 Tosh.0 ‘14’ 18189 Tosh.0 ‘14’ 20924 South Park 31127 South Park 54653 South Park 21837 South Park 30585 Daily Show 36672 Colbert 80566 135 53 135 47 Married... 12905 The Buzz 4943 Bend City Edition G Morning 1739 Outdoors 4059 Redmond City Council 61363 RSN 80837 RSN Movie Night 56127 G Morning 85382 Health 46566 11 Capital News Today 119059 Today in Washington 904498 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington 462653 Phineas 278382 Phineas 275295 Deck 266547 Wizards 546295 Montana 295059 “The Luck of the Irish” (2001) ’ ‘G’ Å 3049837 Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Montana 791818 Wizards 324160 Deck 518672 87 43 14 39 Phineas 566059 Bristol Bay Brawl ‘14’ Å 165363 Bristol Bay Brawl ‘14’ Å 185127 Mayday! Bering Sea ’ ‘PG’ 188214 Bristol Bay Brawl ‘14’ Å 761721 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab 638634 Cash Cab 364547 Cash Cab 354160 Cash Cab 378740 MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å 189943 Women’s College Basketball: NCAA Tournament 526450 SportsCenter (Live) Å 534479 NFL Live 893634 Scoreb’rd 349498 SportsCenter (Live) Å 540030 SportsCenter (Live) Å 132295 21 23 22 23 Women’s College Basketball 313491 College Basketball NIT Tournament -- North Carolina vs. Rhode Island (Live) Å 2972030 NBA 2671634 Baseball 3546011 SportsNation Å 9342818 NASCAR 7049856 NBA 3558856 Score 5846363 22 24 21 24 College Basketball 2695214 College Basketball: 1984 Big East Championship 9762721 Seats 9630160 Seats 9659295 American Gladiators ‘PG’ 9783214 College Basketball Played 2/27/95. 9599905 23 25 123 25 Boxing: Bruno vs. Lewis 9653011 ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 8 Rules 907301 8 Rules 998653 Funniest Home Videos 707498 Funniest Home Videos 783818 Funniest Home Videos 796382 Funniest Home Videos 706769 The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 969301 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å 277672 Hannity (N) 9339011 Greta Van Susteren 9855818 The O’Reilly Factor Å 9864566 Hannity 9877030 Greta Van Susteren 9854189 Glenn Beck 8921363 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) 1740905 Home 7827769 Cooking 7817382 30-Min. 7808634 Challenge Shrek Cakes 7067030 Cakes 1667856 Cakes 1646363 Unwrap 8285856 Best 4566943 Chopped Winging It 7066301 Good Eats ‘G’ Unwrap 6831160 177 62 46 44 Barefoot Cont Mariners 69301 Unscripted 50653 Baseball 30301 Game 365 56837 UEFA Champions League Soccer 975382 Final 12189 Game 365 18276 Final 95498 20 45 28* 26 March Madness Show 39672 ›› “Underworld: Evolution” (2006, Horror) Kate Beckinsale. 5417491 › “Armageddon” (1998) Bruce Willis, Billy Bob Thornton. A hero tries to save Earth from an asteroid. 1991769 Justified Fixer (N) ‘MA’ 9852721 Justified Fixer ‘MA’ 8936295 131 Buck 3380176 Holmes on Homes ‘G’ 8848382 House 1549382 House 2608405 First 1558030 First 1544837 Home Rules ‘G’ Å 2433653 House 9132450 House 9158498 First 5469818 Marriage 3065295 176 49 33 43 Income 1536818 Battles BC ‘PG’ Å 7966301 Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å 6964189 Decoding the Past ‘PG’ 6973837 The Real Face of Jesus? (N) ‘PG’ Å 6976924 Bible Code: Predicting 2528301 155 42 41 36 (4:00) First Apocalypse 1333189 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 162301 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 703672 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 789092 ›› “Down With Love” (2003) Renée Zellweger. Å 799479 Will 765130 Will 228566 138 39 20 31 Desperate Housewives ‘PG’ 257818 Rachel Maddow Show 67059059 Countdown-Olbermann 90194214 Maddow Show 90170634 Hardball Å 90190498 Countdown-Olbermann 90193585 Maddow Show 79610450 56 59 128 51 Countdown 93404479 Disaster 905943 Cribs 996295 16 and Pregnant ‘14’ Å 798740 16 and Pregnant Lori ’ ‘14’ 774160 16 and Pregnant ‘14’ Å 794924 16 and Pregnant Nicole ‘14’ 797011 16 and Pregnant Nicole ‘14’ 967943 192 22 38 57 True Life Digital habits. ’ 275214 Awards 362189 iCarly ‘G’ 385030 iCarly ‘G’ 376382 iCarly ‘G’ 649740 iCarly ‘G’ 372566 Malcolm 625160 Malcolm 644295 Chris 422160 Chris 976566 Lopez 252498 Lopez 238818 Nanny 434905 Nanny 911522 82 46 24 40 Sponge 636276 Ways Die 653059 Ways Die 637011 UFC: Best of 2009 ’ ‘14’ 192030 Blue Mountain Blue Mountain UFC Unleashed ‘PG’ Å 600127 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Invstgtn. 992450 V: The Final Battle (Part 2 of 3) ‘PG’ Å 4933030 V: The Final Battle (Part 3 of 3) ‘PG’ Å 4912547 WWE NXT ’ ‘PG’ Å 4924382 ››› “The Descent” Å 7441943 133 35 133 45 (4:00) V: The Final Battle 1149127 I Thirst 4358189 J. Meyer 4096856 Hagee 4093769 Hillsong 4077721 Jesus of Nazareth (Part 2 of 4) ‘PG’ Å 3886740 Passion 8370740 The Last Supper: Story of 13 Men 3184818 Changing-World Prophecies of the Passion 6632769 205 60 130 Friends 355924 Friends 352837 Office 343189 Seinfeld 623837 Seinfeld 365301 Office 632585 Office 611092 Office 119522 Office 509818 Office 861160 Office 887108 Lopez Tonight (N) 309905 16 27 11 28 King 636301 (10:45) ›››› “Ran” (1985, Drama) Tatsuya Nakadai, Mieko ›››› “Dersu Uzala” (1975, Adventure) Maxim Munzuk, Yuri Solomin, Vladimir Klemrna. Premiere. A Rus- ››› “Kagemusha” (1980, Drama) Tatsuya Nakadai, Tsutomu Yamazaki, Kenichi Hagiwara. A thief takes over a dead warlord’s 101 44 101 29 sian explorer and a Mongolian guide form a bond in Siberia. 2978214 army in medieval Japan. 39702769 Harada, Akira Terao. Premiere. 52830905 Say Yes 648127 Say Yes 639479 Ultimate Cake Off ‘PG’ Å 228739 Home 904295 Home 916030 19 Kids 365382 19 Kids 804856 Little 164740 Little 140160 Home 377127 Home 976672 178 34 32 34 What Not to Wear Kelly ‘PG’ 994818 Law & Order A blackout. ‘14’ 890653 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 332491 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 532699 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 932455 Southland (N) ’ ‘MA’ Å 782932 CSI: NY ’ ‘14’ Å 693837 17 26 15 27 Law & Order ’ ‘14’ 985160 Chowder 1532092 Chowder 7980130 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ 6TEEN 6435045 Stoked 1552856 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Flapjack 1538276 Flapjack 1540011 Flapjack 5460547 Flapjack 8856301 King-Hill 9145924 King-Hill 9154672 Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 High-Tech Monorails ‘PG’ 67059059 Extreme Restaurants ‘G’ 90194214 Extreme Fast Food ‘PG’ 90170634 Man-Carnivore Food 67021276 Food Wars ‘G’ Food Wars ‘G’ Food Wars ‘G’ Food Wars ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 Mega Structures 93404479 Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford 1654382 Sanford 7800092 Home Improve. Home Improve. Raymond Ray 4546189 Ray 7099450 Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ Law & Order: SVU 528943 Law & Order: SVU 709721 Law & Order: SVU 725769 Law & Order: SVU 705905 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 708092 Law & Order: SVU 43684059 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU 613450 Celebrity Fit Club ‘PG’ Å 264214 Beauty 719189 TRANS 721924 RuPaul’s Drag Race ’ ‘14’ 260498 Tool Academy ’ ‘14’ 263585 Sober House With Dr. Drew 846092 191 48 37 54 40 Most Slimmed-Down Celebs ’ ‘PG’ 319363 PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:00) ›››› “Rocky” 1751011 › “Bait” 2000, Action Jamie Foxx, David Morse. ’ ‘R’ Å 9861479 ›› “Miracle at St. Anna” 2008, War Derek Luke, Michael Ealy. ’ ‘R’ Å 44280059 (10:45) ›› “Pineapple Express” 2008 ‘R’ 44957130 ›› “Point Break” 1991, Action Patrick Swayze, Keanu Reeves. ‘R’ Å 9395059 ››› “Brubaker” 1980, Drama Robert Redford, Yaphet Kotto. ‘R’ Å 9376924 ›› “Point Break” 1991, Action Patrick Swayze. ‘R’ Å 2824276 Snow 5665740 Snowbrd 3635452 Daily 3477635 Prog. 9772027 Firsthand Å Update 7877491 Snow 5661924 Snowbrd 5680059 Daily 3388059 Ride Open Terjes 4953905 M80 4962653 Moto 3350276 On Surfari John Daly 654672 John Daly 380585 John Daly 387498 John Daly 361450 Haney 641108 Haney 367634 Golf 650856 PGA Tour 639363 John Daly 457856 John Daly 961634 Haney 247566 Haney 256214 Lessons 452301 PGA Tour 616950 Martha 1325160 Martha 1001301 7th Heaven ’ ‘G’ Å 7964943 7th Heaven ’ ‘G’ Å 6995059 7th Heaven ’ ‘G’ Å 6971479 “The Good Witch’s Garden” (2009) Catherine Bell. ‘PG’ Å 6974566 Golden 5587818 Golden 9336158 “Meet the Spartans” ›› “Australia” 2008, Adventure Nicole Kidman, Hugh Jackman, David Wenham. An Englishwoman and a cattleman struggle to ››› “Gran Torino” 2008, Drama Clint Eastwood, Christopher Carley, Bee Vang. A How to Make It in The Pacific Part Three Basilone is asked HBO 425 501 425 10 ’ 879214 America 687160 to return home. ‘MA’ 4935943 save her ranch. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 610905 veteran faces his longtime prejudices. ’ ‘R’ Å 934568 (4:25) › “Kiss of Fire” 58951672 Arrested 5371214 Arrested 5362566 Wrong 2685837 Modern 5351450 Whitest 2694585 Python 2673092 ››› “Evil Dead 2” 1987 Bruce Campbell. 3556498 Wrong 7041214 Wilfred 3550214 Jon Dore Show IFC 105 105 ››› “Wasted” 2006, Comedy-Drama Eddie Kaye Thomas, Kip (6:40) ››› “Taken” 2008, Action Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace, (8:15) ›› “Fighting” 2009, Drama Channing Tatum, Terrence Howard. A young man ›› “He’s Just Not That Into You” 2009 Ben Affleck. Men and women navigate through MAX 400 508 7 Pardue, Josh Cooke. ’ ‘R’ Å 5263547 Famke Janssen. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 73987634 becomes a champion street brawler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 87395473 complex relationships. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 9929721 America’s Wild Spaces ‘G’ 5653905 America’s Wild Spaces 3913943 Explorer ‘14’ 5256214 America’s Wild Spaces ‘G’ 5232634 America’s Wild Spaces 5252498 Explorer ‘14’ 5255585 Explorer ‘14’ 6807289 NGC 157 157 Avatar 5672030 Big Time Rush Mighty B 3277437 Mighty B 5277617 OddParents OddParents Avatar 5678214 Iron Man 5657721 Danny Phantom Phantom 3990092 Three 4960295 Three 4979943 Secret 3367566 Mikey 7583653 NTOON 89 115 189 Inside Outdoors Outdrs 7825301 Hunting 7822214 Hunting 7813566 Game Chasers Dream 7802450 Hunting 1632160 Nugent 1651295 Hunting 8250160 Hunting 4548547 Bone 7008108 Steve’s 7017856 Inside Outdoors Manage. 6846092 OUTD 37 307 43 Nurse Jackie ’ (5:05) “Retrograde” 2004, Action Dolph Lundgren, Silvia De Santis. iTV. A time trav- (6:55) “Contract Killers” 2008 Frida Farrell. Framed for murder, a (8:25) › “Saw V” 2008 Tobin Bell. iTV. A new disciple carries on Nurse Jackie ’ United States of United States of SHO 500 500 Tara ‘MA’ 885740 ‘MA’ 969289 Tara ‘MA’ 693856 beautiful assassin goes on the run. 9332295 eler must save humanity from a deadly bacteria. ’ ‘R’ 26597837 the Jigsaw legacy. ’ ‘R’ 16863011 ‘MA’ 876092 Race in 60 (N) 8381856 Monster Jam (N) 1635059 Dangerous Drives 4466721 Pass Tm 8368905 Hub 8370740 Race in 60 4462905 Monster Jam 4465092 Dangerous Drives 6632769 SPEED 35 303 125 Mummy Return (5:40) ›› “Quarantine” 2008 ’ ‘R’ Å 89417721 (7:15) ›› “Step Up 2 the Streets” 2008 Briana Evigan. ‘PG-13’ 73384363 ›› “Angels & Demons” 2009, Suspense Tom Hanks. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 71840740 Mummy Return STARZ 300 408 300 (4:30) ›› “Zoolander” 2001, Comedy Ben “Walker Payne” 2006, Drama Jason Patric, Guy Boyd. A man must make heartbreak- ›› “Rambo” 2008, Action Sylvester Stallone, Julie Benz, Mat- (9:35) ›› “Snoop Dogg’s Hood of Horror” 2006, Horror Snoop ››› “Being John Malkovich” 1999 John TMC 525 525 Stiller. ’ ‘PG-13’ 957672 thew Marsden. ’ ‘R’ 7128030 Dogg, Danny Trejo. ’ ‘R’ 63555498 Cusack. ’ ‘R’ 272653 ing choices to save his daughters. ’ ‘R’ Å 627769 NHL Hockey Chicago Blackhawks at St. Louis Blues (Live) 8408856 Hockey 7802450 Sports Soup Sports 1651295 World Extreme Cagefighting 7068769 Sports Soup Sports 6846092 VS. 27 58 30 Little Miss Perfect 8376924 Little Miss Perfect 1620127 Little Miss Perfect (N) 4468189 Little Miss Perfect 4477837 Little Miss Perfect 4480301 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 4450160 Little Miss Perfect 6627837 WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 30, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY OREGON BADLANDS WILDERNESS CELEBRATION: Celebrate the creation of the Badlands Wilderness Study Area, with live music, refreshments and more; free; 3-6 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331. “MAKING MIRACLES HAPPEN”: Learn how Bend’s Community BikeShed repairs old bikes and provides a transportation option for area homeless; free; 6-8 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-388-1793 or phil@tiedyed.us. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Rick Steber reads from his novel “Secrets of the Bull”; free; 7 p.m.; Between the Covers, 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766. KOGANE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT EXCHANGE CONCERT: The Tokyobased band from Kogane High School performs, with the Mountain View High School band, under the direction of Robert W. Smith; donations accepted; 7-9 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6360. “BOBBY GOULD IN HELL”: Volcanic Theatre and The Actors Realm present the play by David Mamet about a misogynistic narcissist interrogated by the devil; ages 21 and older; $7 plus service charges in advance, $10 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-215-0516, volcanictheatre@ bendbroadband.com or www.bendticket.com.

WEDNESDAY “ON THE ROAD IN ALASKA AND CANADA”: Carolyn Hammond presents a slide show and talk about her experiences with a group of RV travelers on the Cassiar Highway and the Alaska Highway; free; 2-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 800-824-2714 or ctrinfo@uoregon.edu. ALEXIS EBERT: The Oregonian singersongwriter performs; concert will be filmed; $10; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. NERSHI-LAW DUO: Rootsy jams from a founding member of The String Cheese Incident, with Elephant Revival; ages 21 and older; $13 plus service charges in advance, $15 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.randompresents.com.

THURSDAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett; bring a lunch; part of A Novel Idea ... Read Together; free; noon-1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541312-1080 or www.dpls.us/calendar. WALLOWA LLAMA SLIDE SHOW: Meet Nigel the llama and see a slide show about packing with llamas in Eastern Oregon; free; 6 p.m.; REI, 380 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541742-2961 or wallama@pinetel.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Diane Hammond reads from her book “Seeing Stars”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Between the Covers, 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766 or www.btcbooks.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Joann Green Byrd talks about her book “Calamity: The Heppner Flood of 1903”; free; 6:30 p.m.; A.R. Bowman Memorial Museum, 246 N. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-3715. “WEST SIDE STORY”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the Tony Award-winning musical about love blossoming in the face of a rivalry between two New York gangs; $15, $10 ages 8-18; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-4195558 or www.beatonline.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Rick Steber reads from his novel “Secrets of the Bull”; free; 7 p.m.; Dudley’s

Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. “COUPLE DATING”: Preview performance of the play by Cricket Daniel; directed by Susan Benson; adults only; $10; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626.

FRIDAY EASTER EGG HUNT: Bring a basket, hunt for eggs and win prizes; hunt areas will be separated by age group; ages 10 and younger; free; 2 p.m.; Cougar Springs Assisted Living Center, 1942 S.W. Canyon Drive, Redmond; 541-316-4400. TREE OF HOPE CEREMONY: KIDS Center kicks off the annual Blue Ribbon Campaign, which is held to acknowledge National Child Abuse Prevention month; event includes live music, speakers and refreshments; free; 4-5 p.m.; Troy Field, Bond Street and Louisiana Avenue, Bend; 541-383-5958 or www.kidscenter.org. TOUR DU CHOCOLAT: Taste chocolates prepared by local chefs; proceeds benefit The Tower Theatre Foundation; $5, includes five tastes and a beverage; 6-9 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Joann Green Byrd talks about her book “Calamity: The Heppner Flood of 1903”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “COUPLE DATING”: Opening night of the play by Cricket Daniel; directed by Susan Benson; with champagne and dessert reception; adults only; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 8 p.m., 7 p.m. reception; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626. “NAIL SCARRED HANDS”: The La Pine Community Arts Choir performs a concert to benefit the La Pine Community Kitchen; donations of nonperishable food or money accepted; 7 p.m.; La Pine Christian Center, 52565 Day Road; 541-536-2021. “WEST SIDE STORY”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the Tony Award-winning musical about love blossoming in the face of a rivalry between two New York gangs; $15, $10 ages 8-18; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-4195558 or www.beatonline.org. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 59 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend. TAARKA: The Coloradobased jazzy world-folk band performs; $10; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing.

SATURDAY FAMILY FUN FAIR: Featuring face painting, balloon building and more for children ages 1-5; proceeds benefit Together For Children; $5, $12 for three or more children; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Highland Magnet School, 701 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-389-9317. KIDS EASTER CELEBRATION: Featuring games, Easter egg hunts, refreshments, an illusionist and more; ages 2-10; free; 10 a.m.-noon; Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend; 541-382-5822. OLD MILL DISTRICT EASTER EGGSTRAVAGANZA: Hunt for eggs and do arts and crafts; hunting areas will be separated by age group; free; 10:30 a.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-312-0131,

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

marie@campbellconsulting.com or www.theoldmill.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Rick Steber reads from his novel “Secrets of the Bull”; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; noon and 3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. EASTER EGG HUNT: Bring a basket and hunt for eggs; followed by a lunch; for ages 12 and younger; free; noon; Grace First Lutheran Church, 2265 Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541-382-6862. SPRING FESTIVAL: Featuring Easter egg hunts for ages 12 and younger, a bounce house, games, a barbecue and more; free; noon; White School Park Building, 16405 First St., La Pine; 541-536-2223. “WEST SIDE STORY”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the Tony Award-winning musical about love blossoming in the face of a rivalry between two New York gangs; $15, $10 ages 8-18; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-4195558 or www.beatonline.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Shannon Riggs reads and discusses her children’s book “Not in Room 204”; part of the Child Abuse Awareness Month activities organized by KIDS Center; free; 3 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-5958, heatherm@dpls.us or www.kidscenter.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Diane Hammond speaks about her book “Seeing Stars”; reservations requested; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525. BECKER FAMILY BENEFIT: Featuring performances by The Dirty words, Jones Road, Tuck & Roll and more; proceeds benefit Joe and Mallory Becker, who lost their home to a fire; $10; 5 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www .myspace.com/beckerfamilybenefit. LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS BOUT: The Lava City Roller Dolls Smokin’ Ashes play the Dropkick Donnas; $10 in advance, $12 at the door, $6 seniors and ages 7-13; free ages 6 and younger; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center, 20795 High Desert Lane, Bend; www.lavacityrollerdolls.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Joann Green Byrd talks about her book “Calamity: The Heppner Flood of 1903”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. BLUEGRASS JAMBOREE: Prairie Rockets, Bend N’ Strings and Bitterbrush perform; with a silent auction and appetizers; proceeds benefit Bend’s Community Center’s Feed the Hungry program; $20, $35 per couple; 6:30-9 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541312-2069. “WEST SIDE STORY”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the Tony Award-winning musical about love blossoming in the face of a rivalry between two New York gangs; $15, $10 ages 8-18; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541419-5558 or www.beatonline.org. “COUPLE DATING”: Susan Benson directs the play by Cricket Daniel; adults only; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626. TAARKA: The Colorado-based jazzy world-folk band performs; $7; 8 p.m.; Three Creeks Brewing, 721 Desperado Court, Sisters; 541-549-1963 or www.threecreeksbrewing.com.

SUNDAY FORT ROCK GRANGE EASTER BREAKFAST: A meal of ham, eggs, pancakes, hash browns and coffee; $6, $3 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger; approximately 7:30 a.m.;

Fort Rock Grange, 64651 Fort Rock Road; 541-576-2289. “PAGAN SYMBOLS, CHRISTIAN MYTH”: Terri Daniel talks about the origins of Easter and current academic scholarship about the life of Jesus; free; 9-10 a.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-549-4004. EASTER EGG HUNT: Children can search for eggs while adults eat brunch; reservations required for brunch; $25, $12.50 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger; 9 a.m. and noon; Seventh Mountain Resort, 18575 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-693-9143. EASTER EGG HUNT: The Bend Elks Lodge presents an Easter egg hunt; free; 9 a.m.; Juniper Park, 741 N.E. Franklin Ave, Bend; 541-382-1371. EASTERN STAR GRANGE EGG HUNT: An Easter service followed by an egg hunt; free; 10 a.m.; Eastern Star Grange, 62855 Powell Butte Road, Bend; 541-388-1569. EASTER EGG HUNT: Children ages 2-12 hunt for eggs during an Easter service; free; 10:30 a.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-6472944 or http://journeyinbend.com. BLACK BUTTE RANCH EASTER EGG HUNT: Hunt for Easter eggs; Easter buffet available; reservations requested for the buffet; free; $29, $14.50 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger for the buffet; 11 a.m.; Lodge Restaurant at Black Butte Ranch, 12930 Hawks Beard, Sisters; 541-595-1260. “CHRIST AND THE CHRISTIANS — SOURCES OUTSIDE OF THE BIBLE”: Mike Caba talks about how Christ and Christians were viewed by historical figures and literary sources outside of the Bible; free; noon-1:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7089 or www.dpls.us/calendar. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-4 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-7395. CLIMBING SPEECH FUNDRAISER: Featuring a speech and slide show about climbing expeditions, and a raffle; proceeds benefit Homeboy Industries; donations accepted; 3-6 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-728-1405, carazco@ hotmail.com or www.homeboyindustries.org. BEND MASS CHOIR: A community gospel choir performs Easter music under the direction of Julie Eberhard; free; 5:01 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St.; 541-3902441 or www.freewebs .com/bendgospel. ROLLER RUMBLE RACE SERIES: Competitors race 500 meters on single-speed bikes attached to fork-mounted rollers; a portion of proceeds benefits Bend’s Community BikeShed; $5 to race, $3 spectators; 7 p.m., sign-ups at 6:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-610-7460 or www.myspace. com/silvermoonbrewing.

MONDAY ENVIRONMENTAL OPEN MIC: Come and speak about environmental issues; free; noon-3 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-508-9851, cwbaer@gmail.com or www. globalinternetgovernment.com. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett; part of A Novel Idea ... Read Together; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7040 or www.dpls.us/calendar. THE SPEAKEASY: Guy J. Jackson hosts an open mic storytelling event; stories must be no longer than eight minutes; April’s theme is potluck; $5; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677.

M T For Tuesday, March 30

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

CHLOE (R) 12:20, 3, 5:45, 8:20 CRAZY HEART (R) 12:25, 2:55, 5:35, 8:10 THE GHOST WRITER (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:30, 5:15, 8 GREENBERG (R) 12:10, 2:40, 5:30, 8:15 IT’S COMPLICATED (R) Noon, 2:45, 5:25, 7:55 SHERLOCK HOLMES (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:35, 5:20, 8:05

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 11:10 a.m., 1:40, 4:15, 6:55, 9:35 ALICE IN WONDERLAND 3-D (PG)

11:45 a.m., 2:20, 4:55, 7:50, 10:20 AVATAR (PG-13) 12:10, 3:35, 7, 10:25 THE BLACK EYED PEAS: THE E.N.D WORLD TOUR LIVE (no MPAA rating) 7:30 THE BOUNTY HUNTER (PG-13) 11 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:35, 2:05, 4:10, 4:40, 6:50, 7:20, 9:30, 10 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 11:55 a.m., 2:10, 4:45, 7:30, 9:50 GREEN ZONE (R) 12:15, 4:25, 7:25, 10:05 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 11:05 a.m., 12:05, 1:30, 2:30, 4:05, 5:05, 6:40, 7:40, 9:10, 10:10 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 3-D (PG) 11:35 a.m., 2, 4:35, 7:10, 9:40 HOT TUB TIME MACHINE (R) Noon, 2:25, 5:15, 8, 10:30 PERCY JACKSON & THE OLYMPIANS: THE LIGHTNING THIEF (PG) 12:20, 3:45, 6:30, 9:25 REMEMBER ME (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 3:55 REPO MEN (R) 11:15 a.m.,

1:50, 5:10, 7:55, 10:35 SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE (R) 11:20 a.m., 2:15, 5:20, 8:05, 10:35 SHUTTER ISLAND (R) 12:25, 3:40, 6:45, 9:55 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) THE BLIND SIDE (PG-13) 6 SHERLOCK HOLMES (PG-13) 9

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 4, 6:45, 9:15 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 3:30, 6, 8:45 GREEN ZONE (R) 4, 6:30, 9 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 5, 7:15, 9:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

THE BOUNTY HUNTER (PG-13) 6:45 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 7 THE GHOST WRITER (PG-13) 6:30 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville 541-416-1014

DEAR JOHN (PG-13) 7 FROM PARIS WITH LOVE (R) 4

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

Cyrus takes grown-up approach in ‘Last Song’ By Rob Lowman Los Angeles Daily News

LOS ANGELES — “I’m just double-checking,” said Miley Cyrus, leaning over to see if my digital recorder is running. “Not that I don’t trust you, but there have been some interviews that have not gotten recorded.” It’s pretty clear that the 17year-old pop idol is taking charge. After being known as Disney Channel’s kid star Hannah Montana, Cyrus is heading in a more grown-up direction in her new film, “The Last Song,” which opens this week. “I’ve gone these last five years … with everyone telling me what to do,” said Cyrus as she sits in a sunny Santa Monica, Calif., hotel room, with what seems like a ring on each finger. “Now it’s up to me and what I think is right in my career; so I’m just going in my own direction.” Her role in “The Last Song” was specifically written for her by Nicholas Sparks (“The Notebook”), and even the character, Veronica Miller — who goes by the name Ronnie, was named after her grandfather. One thing you notice about Cyrus is that she’s pretty up-tempo. “I’m from the South. They talk fast. Trust me,” explained the Tennessee native, adding that her mom “talks 10 times faster and no one can understand what she says because of her accent.” Her mother, Tish Cyrus, had a hand in producing “The Last Song,” directed by Britain’s Julie Anne Robinson. It also stars Australian actor Liam Hemsworth — Cyrus’ current boyfriend — as Ronnie’s love interest, Will. Cyrus plays a troubled 18-yearold who has been sent, along with her younger brother, to live with her composer father (Greg Kinnear), whom she resents for leaving her mother. A good girl but hardly Hannah Montana, Ronnie has some rough edges and, as a New Yorker, isn’t happy about living in a Southern beach town. She is, of course, musically talented, but as a pianist. You’ll only hear Cyrus’ vocals on two songs on the soundtrack and in the movie once, as she sings along to Maroon 5’s “She Will Be Loved” on the radio while riding in a car. “I think that it’s a song that everyone knows and it was one that went with the theme of the film, but one that everyone can sing along with,” said Cyrus, who chose the rest of the songs for the film. “If anyone knows the songs, it’s the person playing the character.”

A break from the industry She currently is finishing up an album that will be released in June, but those may be the last tunes you’ll hear from Cyrus for a while. “I kind of don’t want to do music right now,” she said, describing the record as sounding a little bit more pop and definitely a little edgier — “kind of like The Killers. That’s my favorite band.” The reason she’s taking a break, she says, is that she has

The Associated Press file photos

Miley Cyrus arrives at the American Music Awards in Los Angeles in 2007. Miley Cyrus, 17, enters into a more grown-up role with her new film “The Last Song.” “I kind of don’t want to do music right now,” Cyrus said.

Miley Cyrus is seen with her father, Billy Ray Cyrus, who is remembered for his hit “AchyBreaky Heart.” grown tired of all the politics in the record industry. “I remember when I lived in Nashville before all of this. I would call my radio station and say, ‘Can I hear Justin Timberlake’ and fans could call in. It was all about the fans. Now it’s all about what commercials can we play. What gossip can we hear about. Who do we owe so we can play their music. It’s not like it’s based on the fans anymore. And that’s the kind of industry I want to be in — one based on the fans and doing things for the people that support you.” Production, too, is under way now for the last season of “Hannah Montana.” The final episodes of Season 4 won’t air until next spring, but Disney Channel promises that the series’ 100 episodes will continue to air daily “for years to come.” So Cyrus may never escape the image of being Hannah Montana. Still, she thinks the show deserves “a respectful ending,” and although the “wig is out” as soon as she has done that last episode, she has mixed feelings about the end, calling it bittersweet. “It’s kind of a bummer because it’s like a security blanket for me. It’s easy to go back to. It’s like my comfort zone.” But then she’s quick to look at the flip side. “To go into things that aren’t necessarily as comfortable for me will be fun but more of a challenge. I’m ready for that.”


E4 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 30, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, March 30, 2010: This year, you’ll have many opportunities to deepen key relationships. Though the bonds could be warm, keeping finances separate might be a smart move. As you evaluate the pros and cons of different situations, decide which ones you want to walk away from. If you are single, check out someone you meet with care, as appealing as he or she might be. If you are attached, the two of you need to agree to disagree and respect each other’s differences. Let mutual respect become more predominant. LIBRA often plays devil’s advocate. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You might feel a bit awkward with an associate. You might know certain information about this person that is not commonly known. Emotions play into a conversation, perhaps causing a misunderstanding. Tonight: Catch up on someone’s news. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Pace yourself, especially after being unusually energized from a meeting or key conversation. Don’t over-think a situation or conversation. You could be making yourself more nervous or uptight than need be. Take a walk to clear your mind. Tonight: Choose a stress-buster. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Others hit brick walls. You are able to bypass a lot of the problems by lifting rigid thinking. Tap into your ingenuity and ability

to detach. Never lose sight of what you want. Friends play a big role in your decisions. Tonight: Lighten up. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH You cannot help that you are a homebody, but you are. Even at work, sometimes you are more focused on personal matters. Funnel your imagination into creating a more suitable, “homey” work situation. Brainstorm with an innovative person. Tonight: Order in. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Keep conversations moving. Avoid locking in on a problem. Given space and time, solutions will appear. You could be surprised by what someone offers. Financial options might appear to be a little too good to be true. Incorporate a walk or some other stress-buster. Tonight: Hang out with friends. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Your more possessive side emerges when dealing with others. You could be overwhelmed by all the offers that come up. People seek you out and want to pitch in. Don’t get territorial or touchy. If you are overwhelmed, don’t close down. Just ask for help. Tonight: Treat yourself on the way home. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Your smile draws many different people, evoking different reactions. Others seem only too willing to cooperate. You wonder how and why, but don’t think too long. Get a project off the ground. Others have different ideas; allow give-and-take. Tonight: As you like. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HH Take your time shoring up an idea. You might be overwhelmed by

the many different ways you could proceed. Study the different possible courses, and then make a decision. You could be worrying way too much. Consider taking up yoga or some other stress-buster. Tonight: Do your thing. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Others want to pitch in and help. If you can mobilize others’ energy, you could be on cruise control. You get a lot of feedback. Play with different ideas before making any decisions. Focus on an immediate issue, and you will hit a home run. Tonight: Where the action is. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Accept a challenge head-on. You are able to help guide others as you take the lead. Your words might convey enthusiasm, if not the precise idea. Juggle different concerns. A family member has a lot to share if you are willing to listen. Make time for this person. Tonight: Up late. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Keep reaching out for ideas and answers. You see situations differently from many. Help open others’ minds through a discussion. You will note that there is more rigidity in many people’s thinking than you thought. Use care with spending. You easily might go overboard. Tonight: Follow the music. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Relate directly to one individual at a time. You will accomplish far more if you do. Each person also will have a sense of your caring and concern. Ideas about money and spending could be very different. Coming to an agreement could be close to impossible, so don’t try! Tonight: Share over dinner. © 2009 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Novel Idea Continued from E1 Central Oregon Community College instructor Annemarie Hamlin will discuss “Cabins, Mockingbirds and Help: White Women Writing Black Stories” on April 18 in Sisters, April 20 in Bend and April 24 in Sunriver. Hamlin says she hopes to weave discussion, her favorite teaching mode, into the lecture, and the audience will not need to have read the book to participate in discussion. Despite the lecture’s title, Hamlin will also discuss books by black authors

such as Zora Neale Hurston, Maya Angelou, and Toni Morrison as she discusses Harper Lee, Margaret Mitchell and “The Help” author Stockett. (See “Novel Idea schedule,” Page E1.) Set in Mississippi during the 1960s, a time of much social and political upheaval in the South, “The Help” has three narrators: two black maids, Minny and Aibileen, and Skeeter, a 22-year-old who’s just returned to her hometown after graduating from college. As a veteran of the Civil Rights movement, Bend poet Marion Davidson says she found the character of Skeeter relatable. On April 13 in Bend and April 27 in Sunriver, Davidson will give the talk

C OV ER S T ORY about her year in Mississippi, starting with Freedom Summer in 1964. Davidson says that after she graduated from Smith College in 1964, she went to Ohio for training to participate in “Freedom Summer,” an effort to educate and register voters in Mississippi. Her senior year, she had collected books for the Freedom School Library, and once in Laurel, Miss., where she spent her year, was involved with the Freedom School set up to aid area blacks. “We were really rolling, and then, bam, we look up one morning and there was our office on TV, up in smoke. It was really sad. We had a good library,

and that was pretty much gone.” Altogether, being in Mississippi in 1964 was “an amazing experience,” Davidson says. “The leaders of the movement were such exceptional people, with such hope and decency,” she says. “A lot of the leaders of the Laurel black community that supported us were women.” Among them was Carrie Clayton, a black widow with whom Davidson lived for a year. “She housed some of the members of the Civil Rights group, including myself,” Davidson says. Even after gunshots were fired at a Fourth of July picnic, Davidson says, “there was never a time in her mind that she was going

F Easter The Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration Maundy Thursday, April 1: Noon Holy Eucharist 7:00 pm Holy Eucharist and Stripping of the Altar

Good Friday, April 2:

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 680 NW Bond • 382-1672 Come worship with us: Everyone always welcome, child care provided. Friday, April 2nd Good Friday Service - 7:00 pm

Easter Sunday, April 4th 8:30 am Contemporary Service with Praise Band 11:00 am Traditional Service with the Chancel Choir Coffee Fellowship between Services No Sunday School on Easter

Open Hearts. Open Minds. Open Doors. Concordia Lutheran Mission (LCMS)

Christ is Risen from the Dead – for us! Christ’s resurrection is the absolution of the sins of all men for all time (Romans 4:25) and their salvation through the Gospel (I Peter 3:21).

Maundy Thrusday Divine Service: 7:00 pm, 1 April 2010 Good Friday Divine Service: 7:00pm, 2 April 2010 The Rev. Willis C. Jenson, supply pastor, Office: 541-325-6773 8286 11th St. (Terrebonne Grange Hall)

to put us out because we put her in too much danger.” Clayton and other leaders “were just real clear about this: whatever the risk, it was time.” The title of Davidson’s talk. “Ain’t Goin Let Nobody Turn Me Round,” comes from a spiritual song that Clayton used to sing. “The old spirituals were sort of converted into freedom songs. Every meeting, we ended with ‘We Shall Overcome.’ It kept all of our eyes on the prize,” Davidson says. David Jasper can be reached at 541383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.

 G    ,       S,        ,    . J :

“The risen Christ is thine.” – Mary Baker Eddy Come learn more about the Christ at our church service, and bring your children to our Sunday school.

Sunday, 10:00 am All are welcome. Child care provided.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CHURCH 1551 NW 1st St., Bend (South of Portland Ave.) cschurchbend.org

Noon Good Friday Service 7:00 pm Good Friday Service and Stations of the Cross

Easter Sunday, April 4: 8:30 a.m. Ecumenical Worship 10:15 a.m. Holy Eucharist www.episcopalchurchsisters.org

68825 Brooks Camp Road Sisters • 549-7087 Fax: 549-7087

EPISCOPAL HOLY WEEK AND EASTER CELEBRATIONS SUNRIVER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP All services held in the Holy Trinity Church, 18143 Cottonwood Rd, Sunriver 541-593-1183 www.sunriverchristianfellowship.org Maundy Thursday – April 1, 6:00 PM Soup Supper 7 PM Service with Communion Good Friday – April 2, 7 PM Service and Music Program Easter Sunday Service – April 4, 10 AM Sunriver Bells, Choir, Communion

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 469 NW Wall St., Bend, 541-382-5542 April 1, Maundy Thursday 7:00 PM Holy Eucharist and Footwashing April 2, Good Friday 12:00 PM, Stations of the Cross 7:00 PM Liturgy of Good Friday April 3, Holy Saturday 7:00 PM The Great Vigil and Holy Baptism April 4, Easter Sunday 8:00 AM, 10:30 AM Holy Eucharist, music by the Trinity Choir 5:00 PM Holy Eucharist, music by the Trinity Jazz Band

The Rev. Christy Close Erskine, Pastor www.trinitybend.org

www.lutheransonline.com/concordialutheranmission

Join Us For “The Easter Question: Why Are You Weeping? Whom Do You Seek?”

Community Presbyterian Church, Redmond 529 NW 19th Street (3/4 mile north of Redmond High School)

(541) 548-3367 Rev. Rob Anderson, Pastor Rev. Heidi Bolt, Associate Pastor

Good Friday Service April 2nd, 7:00pm

Easter Sunday, April 4th 8:30 am - Contemporary Worship Service 11:00 am - Traditional Worship Service Fellowship following both services. www.redmondchurch.com

ST. ALBAN’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH 3277 NW 10th, Redmond 541-548-4212, www.saintalbansepis.org Holy Wednesday, March 31 12:00 PM, Informal Eucharist and Lenten Study Maundy Thursday, April 1 6:00 PM, Agapé and Footwashing Good Friday, April 2 12:00 PM, The Liturgy of Good Friday Easter Day, April 4 6:00 AM, Easter Vigil and Holy Eucharist 8:00 AM Breakfast 10:00 AM - Holy Eucharist The Rev. Charles Christopher, Pastor


C OV ER S T ORY

Schedule Continued from E1 ‘ICONS OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT’ University of Oregon professor Regina Sullivan highlights the iconic men and women of the Civil Rights Movement • April 24 at 3 p.m., Bend Public Library, Brooks Room SCREENING, ‘STANDING ON MY SISTERS’ SHOULDERS’ Documentary on the Civil Rights

Movement in Mississippi in the 1950s and ’60s • April 26 at 6 p.m., Redmond Public Library

libations; 21 and older only; limited to 30 • April 28 at 6 p.m., Redmond Public Library

‘AIN’T GOIN LET NOBODY TURN ME ROUND’ Bend writer Marion Davidson recalls her year in Mississippi in 1964 • April 27 at 1 p.m., Sunriver Area Public Library

BOOK DISCUSSION, ‘THE HELP’ • April 28 at 6:30 p.m., Sisters Public Library

LADIES WHO LUNCH: COOKING, COCKTAIL DEMO Chef Rose Makena and mixologist Columbine Quillen show how to prepare and serve delicacies and

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 30, 2010 E7 this time and place • May 3 at 6:30 p.m., Bend Public Library, Brooks Room • May 4 at noon, Sisters Public Library

‘MARKING OUR TERRITORY: SEGREGATION IN THE JIM CROW SOUTH’ Reiko Hillyer, assistant professor from Lewis & Clark College, explores how people exert power over each other by limiting access • May 1 at 3 p.m., Bend Public Library, Brooks Room • May 2 at 1:30 p.m., Redmond Public Library

SOUTHERN COOKING DEMONSTRATION, TASTING Chef Rose Makena demonstrates classic southern dishes • April 29 at 1 p.m., La Pine Public Library

SCREENING, ‘STANDING ON MY SISTERS’ SHOULDERS’ Documentary on the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi in the 1950s and ’60s • May 5 at noon, Sunriver Area Public Library

‘THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN MISSISSIPPI’ University of Oregon professor Melissa Stuckey discusses the people and history-making events that occurred in

• May 6 at 6:30 p.m., Bend Public Library, Brooks Room READING BY ‘THE HELP’ AUTHOR KATHRYN STOCKETT Free tickets required; available on April 17; see above • May 7 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6:30), Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend • May 8 at 1 p.m. (doors open at 12:30), Redmond High School Auditorium, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

R Orthodox Christian Church of Bend

Easter Worship Services Easter Sunday 8:00, 9:30 & 11:00 a.m.

HOLY SATURDAY

Child Care Provided

2 PM - Vesperal Liturgy 11:30 PM - Nocturnes

Life has a lot to offer

PASCHA (EASTER) Midnight - Paschal Matins & Liturgy, Blessing of Baskets

1900 N.E. Division St., Suite 109, Bend

541-317-9776

Grace First Lutheran Church ELCA

Maundy Thursday 7:00pm Good Friday 7:00pm Saturday Vigil of Easter Service at 7:00 pm

541-382-6862

Welcome to our new church home at 2265 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend www.gflcbend.org

Powell Butte Christian Church SUNRISE WORSHIP SERVICE: 6 am

here in Central Oregon. That’s why we live here. But there’s something you may be missing. Come see what we mean on Easter:

Holy Week Services

Christ Our Redeemer Evangelical Lutheran Church

• Maundy Thursday Service at 7:00 pm (Holy Communion Served) • Good Friday Worship Service at 7:00 pm • Easter Sunday Worship Services at 8:30 am and 11:00 am (Holy Communion Served) • Easter Brunch 10:00 - 11:00 am • Children’s Egg Hunt 10:00 am • Nursery Provided

Outdoors, West of Church - Under the 3 Crosses

WORSHIP SERVICES 8:30 am – Worship Center 10:00 am – Worship Center 11:00 am – Chapel Bldg.

Pastors: Chris Blair & Glenn Bartnik 13720 SW Highway 126, Powell Butte

541-548-3066 www.powellbuttechurch.com

Easter Sunday - April 4 Worship Service • 9:30 a.m. Coffee Time • 10:30 a.m. 2065 NE Highway 20, Bend (Two doors down from Cibelli’s East)

Zion Lutheran Church (ELCA) Call Dave Leistekow for information 541-389-6649 or 541-419-9194

Pilot Butte Thomas Sales

Christ Our Redeemer 2065 NE Highway 20

541-923-7466

Cibelli’s East

St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church of Bend Spiritual Growth

Join us Easter morning at 10:30, April 4th and learn what Christ’s resurrection brings to us all.

Catholic Center: 2450 NE 27th St. 541-382-3631

Rooted in Community

Easter Sunday Sunrise Service – 6:00 am Contemporary Service – 9:00 am Traditional Service – 10:45 am Youth Ministries Serving Breakfast (6:45 am to 10:45 am) Easter Egg Hunt All Children are Welcome – 10:15 am

EMMAUS LUTHERAN CHURCH (541) 548-1473

1113 SW Black Butte Blvd., Redmond

Highway 20 / Greenwood Avenue

“Death Where is your Victory?”

2175 SW Salmon Ave Redmond

Pastor Frank Brocker

A&W Restaurant

Breakfast 7 am to 11 am Fellowship Hall – Prepared by the Youth

Maundy Thursday Gathering

April 1, at 6:30 pm Light Supper Music and Meditation, Communion All are welcome at no charge.

Holy Thursday, April 1 7 PM, Evening Mass of the Lord’s Supper

Good Friday, April 2 Noon to 3 PM, Observance of the Three Hours 7 PM, Celebration of the Lord’s Passion

NATIVITY LUTHERAN CHURCH “corner of Knott and Brosterhous” www.nativityinbend.com

541-388-0765

Holy Saturday, April 3 Easter Vigil Mass 8:30 PM

Easter Sunday, April 4 Masses: 7:30 & 10:00 AM MISA En Espanol 1:00 PM No 5 PM Mass on Easter Sunday

Easter Celebration For Families

Saturday, April 3, 10:00 am to Noon

Ages 2 to 10 Egg Hunts, Games, Bounce House, Treats & Prizes!

Easter Weekend Services Contemporary Worship Services Saturday, April 3, 6:00 pm Sunday, April 4, 10:30 am Blended-Style Worship Service Sunday, April 4, 9:00 am

CITY CENTER CHURCH Easter Sunday, April 4th

8th St. City Center

Fred Meyer

541-548-7128 www.citycenterchurch.org

7th St. City Hall

Glacier

549 SW 8th Street, Redmond

6th St.

Forest

Neff Rd. 1/2 mile east of St. Charles Medical Center 541-382-5822 www.eastmontchurch.com

5th St.

Hwy. 126 (Highland Ave.) To Sisters

Service Times: 7:30, 9:00, and 10:45 am


E8 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Monk ey Continued from E1 But that is what they were doing, prolifically, including a book about a monkey named Fifi, who later became known as Curious George. When suspicious villagers reported the strange couple in the old castle to the authorities, gendarmes searched the place for expected bomb-making material, but the studio with pictures of the mischievous monkey convinced them of the Reys’ innocence. Apparently, Fifi/George served much the same function when, in more serious straits in June 1940, his creators fled Paris on bicycles Hans Rey built from parts. As Louise Borden described in her 2005 picture book, “The Journey That Saved Curious George,” they left two days before the Nazis entered Paris and rode 75 miles in three days. Their fourmonth journey on bicycle, train and boat led them to Lisbon, then to Rio de Janeiro and New York, the drawings offering proof of their occupations when they sought American visas. Surely Curious George could not have more deftly escaped the elevator operator, the firefighters, the farmers, the cook and the zookeepers who at one time or another pursued him through a series of seven books selling almost 30 million copies (thus saving the day for the Reys again). Yet there is something curious here, in the sense of peculiar: a meaning that, the exhibition tells us, prevented the Reys’ British publisher from following the American example in naming the monkey. The suggestion of “strange George” would have also seemed a tasteless allusion to George VI, then the British king (which is why the character became known as Zozo in Britain). At first, the peculiarity is not apparent. The material for this show was gathered by the museum’s curator Claudia J. Nahson, who combed through the extensive archives left by the Reys to the de Grummond Children’s Literature Collection at the University of Southern Mississippi. It is an enticing, appealing, intelligent show, for which Nahson has included personal memorabilia (including a wedding invitation sent out in 1935, soon after Hans Augusto Reyersbach shortened his last name to Rey, and Margarete Waldstein shortened her first name to Margret; Hans depicted himself as an artist’s palette, and Margret, a photographer, as a camera). There are letters (including some fascinating prewar correspondence with the French publisher Jacques Schiffrin, who tested out one of the Reys’ early books on his son, Andre) and watercolors of George at his best, along with little-known characters from other books (like Raffy the giraffe, on whose neck a George-like monkey rides to sunlit safety above the clouds). In all, there are about 80 drawings and watercolors, along with photographs Margret took of Paris in the 1930s. The exhibition is also true to its pictorial subject. It playfully expands some drawings into full-scale sets (you enter the first gallery through a portal resembling the entrance to a French hotel in one of the Reys’ prewar books), creates a children’s reading room (with pillows shaped like Georgian creatures) and features a gallery of the Reys’ later work, whose sets evoke the places they ultimately considered home: first Greenwich Village, then Cambridge, Mass. And the peculiarity of the Curious George books? Like the Babar tales (which also grew out of the milieu of 1930s Paris) they have an almost colonial-era vision of the uncultivated naif at large in the imperial world. But George is far more childish. One appeal of these volumes is their almost manic celebration of innocent desire. “Little monkeys sometimes forget,” we read of the warnings he regularly violates. Seeing something interesting, George, of course, “could not resist.” He lifts a lid on a pot of spaghetti, plays tricks on his bicycle, races down a fire escape, climbs a tree in a natural history museum. His curiosity is clever, but consequences are never foreseen: He seems to be a fearless 5-year-old. Yet his romps began at a place and time — Europe in 1939 — when consequences were all, when almost nothing about the world could be relied on, and when curiosity had to take second place to survival. One reason the Jewish Museum has created this exhibition (and why the new Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco will later show it) is that the Reys were not only Jewish, but they also had lives whose trajectory was a consequence of their identity.

But was their work also linked to that identity and their experience? Though the show points out the analogies we might make between the Reys’ adventures and Curious George’s, ultimately, of course, those suggestions are fairly trivial. There is simply nothing in these books that gives a clue of the dark times in which the first of them was conceived or the second one written, nor of the personal facts that led to the Reys’ escape. There is nothing in any of the documents here — and Nahson said there was nothing in any of the material she examined, either — that indicated the Reys gave much thought to their Jewish origins; nor is there much to suggest an awareness of the wider world in which they were moving.

C OV ER S T ORY There is a letter here from 1939, written by Hans Rey from the Chateau Feuga, where the couple had taken temporary shelter; he expresses concern about the war, but notes that “life goes on, the editors edit, the artists draw, even during wartime.” And yes, it does indeed go on, if you can find shelter, though generally, artists and editors have been deeply affected by their experiences. That letter to Schiffrin, in fact, went unanswered for months, since the editor had been drafted into the French Army; he later had to flee for his life as well. The duo must have been terrific together; Margret Rey explained how she would often act out George’s gestures as her husband drew. The man in the yellow hat,

the exhibition explains, was like Hans Rey, even smoking a pipe. Was George, then, a sort of joint cocoon for them, shaping a world secure enough to exist independent of the forces that gave them chase? The Reys never had any children themselves, though many young readers may have pledged familial allegiance. Later in life, we read, Margret Rey told of a little boy who came to meet them, thinking they were the parents of Curious George. With “disappointment written all over his face,” the boy said, “I thought you were monkeys too.” Not quite, of course — any more than the world in which George moved was the world the Reys knew, all too well.

This illustration by H.A. Rey, co-creator of the “Curious George” children’s books, shows George hanging on a giraffe in the book “Raffy and the 9 Monkeys.” The Jewish Museum via The Associated Press


H O M ES , GA RDE NS A ND FOOD IN C E NTR A L ORE GON

AH

F

Kitchen conundrums Granite tile countertops? Martha Stewart tells you what you need to keep in mind, Page F4

AT HOME

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MARCH 30, 2010

FOOD

Making a

GARDEN

Central Oregon’s rocky, sandy soil means getting a garden started can be challenging at best. Here’s how to get a head start with a raised garden bed, in which you can give your veggies the best mix of soil, compost and fertilizer.

RAISED GARDEN

4 feet

Rob Kerr The Bulletin

Packed with protein and an assortment of vitamins …

Soil, compost and starter fertilizer mix

It’s easier than you think!

The incredible lentil

… these popular legumes make for a healthy meal.

2-by-4 cedar stakes

By Leon Pantenburg For The Bulletin

10 feet 2-by-10 cedar

Tools you will need • Power or hand saw • Framing square • Shovel • Driver/drill • Hammer • Wheelbarrow

Newspaper people tend to research things, often for no particular reason. It’s part of the job, and for reporters like me, it’s one of the most enjoyable aspects of journalism. My only excuse for doing this random, unfocused research is that someday I might need the background for a story. Now, one of my research projects has finally shown some value. A few years back, I habitually ate lunch about 11 a.m., then went to the gym at noon to work out. Doing the same treadmill routine every day, I discovered that what I had for lunch directly impacted my energy and endurance. Naturally, I had to check it out. My research covered all of my favorite soups and sandwiches. The worst energy food turned out to be my beloved bacon-cheeseburger with fries. The champion, turbocharged, high-energy food proved to be lentil soup or stew mixed with brown rice. My superfood “discovery” would not be a surprise in many parts of the world. Among legumes, lentils have one of the highest levels of protein (26 percent of their calories are from protein). The small, flat bean is an important part of the diet in many parts of the world, especially India, which has large vegetarian populations. See Lentils / F2

Supplies you will need • Two 10-foot, 2-by-10 cedar boards • One 8-foot, 2-by-10 cedar board • Three 8-foot, 2-by-4 cedar boards • 3-inch exterior deck screws • Garden soil • Compost

3-inch deck screws

Note: DO NOT use pressure-treated boards for a vegetable garden, as they can contain toxic chemicals, including cyanide.

1

2

Cut and assemble the frame Using a saw and square, cut the 8-foot cedar 2-by-10 exactly in half. These will be the two ends of the box frame (4-by-10 feet). Using a driver/drill, sink three 3-inch deck screws through the face of the 10-foot board into the edge of the short board. Repeat on each corner.

Square and brace the corners

Square the corners with a framing square and tack a piece of scrap lumber across each corner to keep it aligned properly as you move it around.

IN BRIEF Spring garden seminar, market on the agenda

3

4

Mark the perimeter

Place the planter frame on the ground where you want it located. Using an edger or shovel, mark the entire perimeter of the frame in the sod or soil.

6

Prepare the soil

Remove the frame. Using a sod cutter or shovel, skim away the grass layer. Increase drainage for your garden by working up the soil with a pick, spade or hoe.

5

Level the frame

Place the frame over the tilled area and, using a level, check the positioning of the frame. Be sure to level lengthwise and widthwise. Add/subtract soil under the edges where needed.

7

Stake the frame Using a saw, cut 12 2-foot-long pieces of 2-by-4. Make a point on one end with two diagonal cuts on each one. Using a hammer, drive one of the stakes into the ground on the INSIDE of each corner. Then drive three, evenly spaced, along the outside (long side) of the frame, and one in the center of the end. Fasten all stakes to the side boards with 3-inch deck screws.

Fill the bed Remove the short board at the opposite end and, using a wheelbarrow, fill the bed with a mixture of soil and compost. Level as you go and fill until it is 2 to 3 inches from the top of the frame. Replace the end board when finished. Source: www.thisoldhouse.com Illustrations by Russ Morgan / The Bulletin

T O DAY ’ S RECIPES

• LENTIL SOUP, F2 • FAVORITE LENTIL PATTIES, F2 • CURRIED LENTIL RICE SALAD, F2 • FILE GUMBO, F2

• CREAM OF CARROT WITH GINGER SOUP, F2 • ROASTED ROOT VEGETABLES, F3 • THREE BEET CAVIAR WITH ENDIVE, GOAT CHEESE, F3

• SWEET POTATO AND COCONUT CUSTARD, F3 • OLIVE OIL MATZO, F3 • ROCKFISH AND CRAB CHOWDER, F6 • SHRIMP AND RICE SALAD WITH

The Central Oregon chapter of Oregon State University Master Gardeners will hold its annual Spring Gardening Seminar & Garden Market from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. April 24 at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond. The event features gardening classes on a variety of topics, including container gardening, genetically modified foods, raising chickens, Central Oregon perennials, insect and plant interactions and more. Many classes run concurrently, and some are approved for master gardener recertification. A garden market will also be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., with vendors selling garden products, tools, plants and more. Classes are $10 each, or $48 for a full day with a lunch, if you register in advance. Classes are $15 each the day of the event. Contact: 541-548-6088, ext. 7969, rocktonranch@msn.com or http://extension.oregonstate.edu /deschutes. — From staff reports

PARSLEY, F6 • PEA AND PARSLEY PESTO WITH LINGUINE, F6 • CRISP PITA SALAD, F6 • ZA’ATAR SPICE BLEND, F6


F2 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F

Next week Scones from “Grandma Skinner”

COVER STORY

Lentils Continued from F1 Lentils probably originated in western Asia and have been part of the human diet since Neolithic times. They may have been one of the first cultivated crops. Lentils were mentioned in the Bible, both as the item that Jacob traded to Esau for his birthright and as part of a bread that was made during the Babylonian captivity of the Jewish people. Today, lentils are popular in Bend, too. Newport Market carries 10 different varieties, ranging from $1.79 for the standard, 1-pound bag found in the aisle with the beans, to imported French Le puy brand green lentils that cost $10.99 per pound. You can also buy dehydrated, sprouted lentils, which have even higher nutritional value. Lentils come in a variety of colors, including orange, green, black, brown and tan. “Some of the lentils we carry could be considered a gourmet food,” says Glen Silvey, Newport Market cheese manager. “They’re real popular, and we sell a lot. It’s almost like lentils are part of a fad to eat more healthy food.” Red, white and yellow lentils in some cases are peeled before being sold, Silvey said. “The difference in the varieties has to do with the texture and

color, and how they could be used in different dishes,” Silvey said. “Some ethnic dishes require that you use a specific kind of lentil.” Regardless of color or texture, lentils, like all legumes, are high in fiber and a good source of B vitamins. They are an excellent source of protein, especially when combined with rice or whole grains. Lentils are also an important source of B vitamins, especially B3, which is essential for healthy nervous and digestive systems. Lentils are high in iron, zinc and calcium and can be a good replacement for red meat. Like meat, the iron in lentils is better absorbed when they are eaten with a good source of vitamin C, such as leafy green vegetables. My family eats lentils frequently because of the wonderful taste and ease of preparation. Lentils don’t need to be presoaked and can be prepared the day of serving. All you need to do is rinse, pick out any discolored beans and cook. To boil lentils, use 3 cups of liquid for each cup of lentils. I like to include chicken broth for more flavor. Bring to a boil, then turn down to a simmer. Depending on the variety, it will take 20 to 30 minutes to completely cook them. Cook until tender, but not mushy. Leon Pantenburg can be reached at lpantenburg@ bendbroadband.com.

½ C olive oil 1 ham hock or several cups of diced cooked ham ½ lb Polish sausage, cut into ½-inch slices

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

2 lg onions, chopped 1 clove garlic, chopped 2 C chopped celery with leaves 1 lb lentils, washed ½ tsp Tabasco 1½ tsp salt Black pepper to taste

In a large Dutch oven, heat oil. Sauté onions until golden brown. Add ham, sausage and garlic, cook five minutes. Add celery, lentils, Tabasco, salt and pepper and water to cover (about 2 quarts). Cover and simmer over low heat about two hours, or until beans are tender. Note: Add carrots, corn or puréed cauliflower and broccoli for an even better taste. Combine lentils with cooked rice, and you end up with a complete protein.

FAVORITE LENTIL PATTIES 2 C cooked lentils, well drained 2 TBS chopped onion 2 C mashed potatoes 2 TBS butter ½ tsp sage or sweet marjoram 1 C coarsely chopped nuts (English walnuts or pecans) Put onion, seasoning and butter into a small pan and let simmer a few minutes to soften the onion; do not brown. Add to lentils, cooked and drained. Shake together and mix with mashed potatoes. Add nuts. Form into small round patties and brown lightly in an oiled skillet. — Cooks.com

GIFT ITEMS

Bring water to a boil; add one teaspoon salt. Add lentils and rice, simmer, covered until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain, cool and reserve. Combine yogurt, lemon juice, curry powder, garlic and pepper, and the remaining salt. Combine with lentils, remaining ingredients and serve.

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1 qt water 2 tsp salt, divided 1 C lentils I C rice 1 C yogurt 2 TBS lemon juice 1 TBS curry powder 2 tsp finely chopped garlic ¼ tsp pepper 1 cucumber, peeled, cut in half lengthwise, seeded and sliced 1 C sliced red or bell pepper 1 C thinly sliced green onion

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Always a good time for soup By Joan Obra

LENTIL SOUP Makes 8 servings.

John Walker / Fresno Bee

Chopped fresh ginger gives this creamy carrot soup its zing. Cilantro makes an excellent garnish.

Even as sunnier days beckon, a steaming, savory bowl of liquid still satisfies, especially when it’s accompanied by crusty bread. Whether you crave a creamy carrot puree or something

heartier, soup satisfies nearly everyone. And if you’re feeling ambitious, try to put your own spin on an old family recipe, as I did with the gumbo of my husband’s grandmother. Recipes such as these — which don’t have exact measurements or

directions — beg to be tinkered with repeatedly. Consider them a jumping point instead of gospel. Want more inspiration? Flip through “The Best Soups in the World,” by Clifford A. Wright (John Wiley & Sons, $22.95). He offers recipes for classic

A NOVICE’S VERSION OF ERNA GASTON’S FILE GUMBO

soups, such as cream of carrot with ginger. But his adventures also take on several unexpected pairings: a Malaysian-Chinese soup of seaweed, egg and dried anchovies is part of the mix, as is zurek, a Polish soup with bacon and fermented rye juice.

CREAM OF CARROT WITH GINGER SOUP

Makes about 6 quarts Makes 6 servings FOR THE ROUX: 1 C vegetable oil 1¼ C flour FOR THE SHRIMP STOCK: 1 lb shrimp, with heads and shells 2 qts water ½ tsp crab boil seasonings FOR THE GUMBO: ½ lb Louisiana hot sausage ½ lb smoked sausage, such as Andouille 2 TBS vegetable oil

½ lb beef stew meat, cut into ½-inch pieces 4 chicken wings, separated into drumettes and wing tips 3 chicken necks 1 slice raw ham, cut into ½inch pieces (note) 4 chicken gizzards, chopped 2-3 qts water, divided 1 C chopped onion ¼ C chopped garlic

To make the roux: In a heavy-bottomed skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Once the oil is hot but not smoking, add flour all at once, turn the heat down to medium-low, and stir constantly with a wire whisk until roux is several shades darker than peanut butter. (Experiment here. If you prefer more intense flavor from very dark, expect to cook it for more than an hour.) If necessary, reduce the heat as you’re cooking to prevent the roux from burning. (If it burns, discard the entire mixture and start over.) Set aside to cool. To make the shrimp stock: Shell and de-vein the shrimp, reserving the heads and shells. Place the heads and shells in a pot with 2 quarts water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer. Let the stock simmer for 45 minutes; occasionally skim off the impurities. Strain the stock through cheesecloth into a clean bowl; discard the shrimp heads and shells. Add crab boil seasonings to shrimp stock and set aside. To make the gumbo: If the sausages aren’t fully cooked, poke them with a fork, then place them in a heavy-bottomed saute pan over medium heat. Cook thoroughly, turning them occasionally and adding a little water as necessary to prevent burning. Let cool and slice into ½-inch-thick pieces. Set aside. Pat dry the stew meat, chicken wings and

3 bay leaves ½ green bell pepper, chopped 3 green onions, chopped 3 crabs, cooked, cleaned and broken in quarters 1 dozen oysters, with liquid 3 tsp dried thyme ¼ C chopped parsley, or more, to your liking Kosher salt, to taste Ground pepper, to taste Gumbo file, to taste (note)

necks. Add oil to an 8-quart stockpot over high heat; once the oil is hot, add the stew meat, chicken wings and necks. Brown the beef and chicken, stirring occasionally to prevent them from scorching. Turn the heat down to medium-high and add raw ham, gizzards and sausage. Add 1 quart water. When the mixture starts to simmer, turn the heat to low. Let simmer 30 minutes. Add onion, garlic, bay leaves, green bell pepper and green onions. Stir in shrimp stock, 1 quart water and ½ to ¾ C of roux, depending on desired thickness. Let simmer 20 minutes, then add crabs, shrimp, oysters and their liquid, plus additional water (if the gumbo is too thick). Bring back to a simmer, then cook for 10 more minutes. During the last simmer, stir in thyme and parsley, then season to taste with salt and pepper. Stir in file powder. (Start with a little, then add more to desired thickness.) The gumbo should be thin or slightly thickened. Adjust the balance of water, roux and file powder to achieve the desired thickness. Taste again and adjust seasonings as necessary. Serve with white rice. (The gumbo tastes better after sitting overnight.) Notes: Raw ham is dry-cured ham that’s sold in thin slices, such as prosciutto. Gumbo file is powdered sassafras leaves. The file adds flavor and acts as a thickener.

2 TBS unsalted butter 2 med onions, chopped 1½ lbs young carrots, peeled and sliced 3 TBS chopped fresh ginger 6 C hot chicken broth 1 C whole milk 1½ C half-and-half 3 tsp salt or more to taste ½ tsp freshly ground pepper FOR THE GARNISHES: Croutons fried in olive oil (see note) Chopped cilantro leaves In a pot, melt the butter over low heat, then add the onions and cook, stirring, until slightly softened, about 15 minutes. Increase the heat to medium-low, then add the carrots and ginger and cook, stirring, until the carrots are softer, about 20 minutes. Add the chicken broth to the pot, bring to a boil over medium heat, then cook, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes. Remove the soup from the heat and add the milk. Transfer to a blender and blend, in batches if necessary, until it forms a puree. Return the soup to the pot, add the half-and-half, season with the salt and pepper, and cook until very hot without letting it come to a boil. Serve hot with garnishes. Note: Cover the bottom of a large skillet with 1/16 inch of olive oil. Heat the oil over medium heat for a few minutes, then add French bread cut into ¾-inch cubes. Cook, stirring frequently, until the cubes of bread are golden brown, 5-7 minutes.

For Greek yogurt, all you need’s a towel By Mark Bittman New York Times News Service

The so-called Greek yogurt that has become popular in recent years is neither a special kind of yogurt nor uniquely Greek. It’s simply yogurt from which much of the water has been removed, a concoction that in its thickest form can be called yogurt cheese. In addition to being thicker and richer when eaten straight, it makes superior spreads and dips. Producing yogurt cheese is quite simple. It takes a couple of hours, but your presence is required only for minutes. All you do is strain some of the water out of yogurt, until it reaches the thickness you want. For straining, I recommend a colander or coarse strainer lined with a clean cotton dish towel of fairly fine weave, what

used to be called flour sack. (Many recipes suggest the use of cheesecloth, but you’d have to use about 10 layers for the same results.) Dump a quart (or whatever quantity you like) of yogurt in there, set the colander over a bowl in the refrigerator, twist or tie the top of the towel, and wait. To speed the process, squeeze every now and then, or don’t bother. When the yogurt has reached the consistency of sour cream, twist and squeeze once more and scoop out the yogurt, which will have been reduced in volume by about half. (I suppose you could save and drink the yogurt-water, or cook with it, but I don’t.) Store the thickened yogurt in a covered container and use it within a week or so for best quality.

Evan Sung / New York Times News Service

Regular yogurt can get thick enough to be spreadable if the liquid is drained through a dish towel of relatively fine weave placed over a colander.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 30, 2010 F3

F Rooting around winter Olive oil adds snap to Sardinian flatbread remnants for new flavors By Mark Bittman

New York Times News Service

By Nara Schoenberg

There is a wonderful Sardinian flatbread known as carta musica — sheet music, because it is nearly impossibly thin — that I never thought of making. Something about its ethereal nature made me assume (idiotically, as it happens) that it would be too difficult. I had eaten the flatbread a few times in Genoa, Italy, where there is a large Sardinian community. When I encountered it not long ago at Grandaisy Bakery, which has a small operation in my Manhattan neighborhood, I asked if I could watch it being produced. It turns out to be a snap; the bread has such a high percentage of olive oil that rolling it super-thin is almost no work at all. But Grandaisy uses a touch of yeast in its carta musica, and using yeast takes time. Traditional or not, I was more

Chicago Tribune

Root tips Author Deborah Madison offers some tips for dealing with roots. • Cooking with leftovers is often easier than starting from scratch; if you’re baking sweet potatoes, make extra and refrigerate. • Thyme is a great herb for root vegetables; its earthy flavor grounds the roots’ sweetness. • When roasting, consider cutting your roots into bigger chunks. This allows for more caramelization (browning). • Winter turnips and rutabagas have tough skins. Peel off about 1 ⁄8 inch before cooking. • Know your roots: Parsnips roast more quickly than carrots so if you’re cooking them together, cut the parsnips into larger pieces.

Evan Sung / New York Times News Service

This unleavened, matzo-like bread gets a boost in flavor from the addition of olive oil. interested in producing an unleavened matzo-like bread, one that contained more flavor than matzo does — the olive oil takes care of that. (Whether it’s

OLIVE OIL MATZO Makes 12 servings 2 C flour 1 ⁄2 tsp salt 1 ⁄3 C olive oil

Photos by Bill Hogan / Chicago Tribune

Beets and rutabagas add some variety if you’ve been munching on potatoes all winter. In fact, rutabagas are lovely to cook with potatoes you are going to mash, lending a delicate yellow color and lovely flavor.

ROASTED ROOT VEGETABLES

1 ⁄2 C water Sea salt, optional

Heat the oven to 500 degrees. Put flour, salt and olive oil in a food processor. Once the machine is on, add water. Continue to run the machine until the dough forms a firm ball, rides around on the blade and is not at all sticky. (If you prefer, whisk together the water and oil and add this to the machine all at once.) Cut the dough into 12 small balls and flatten each into a 3- to 4inch patty. On a well-floured surface, use a rolling pin to roll each patty into a 6- to 8-inch circle. The dough should be so thin you can almost see through it. Put the dough on ungreased cookie sheets, sprinkle with sea salt if you like, and bake for about 2 to 3 minutes, keeping a very close eye on the breads — they can burn very quickly. Once they begin to puff up and brown, flip and cook for another minute or so. Repeat with all the dough and let cool completely.

legit for Passover is not a question I’m going to address; views on that would vary.) So I tinkered; really, it didn’t take much. I removed the yeast. The process became as simple as combining flour, olive oil, salt and water in a food processor, dividing the batch into 12 balls and rolling them out as thin possible. The dough is a joy to work with. It’s almost impossible to tear and, with a minimum of additional flour, is stick-free. Baking takes a bit of practice because the oven must be heated to reach a very high temperature before the dough is inserted. The last few breads will bake a bit faster than the first few because the baking sheet will be hot.

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Makes 2 servings 2 or 3 carrots, peeled, halved lengthwise, cut into large chunks 1 russet potato or several fingerlings, cut into chunks 1 onion, cut into thick wedges with root end intact 1 head garlic, cloves

separated 1 turnip, peeled, cut into wedges 1 large parsnip, peeled, cut into 2-inch rounds, halved 2 TBS olive oil ½ tsp sea salt Freshly ground pepper

Heat oven to 450 degrees. Place vegetables in a large, shallow baking dish or sheet pan in a single layer. Drizzle with oil; sprinkle with salt and pepper; toss to coat. Roast, turning every 15 minutes, until the vegetables are caramelized (golden brown) and tender when pierced with a knife, 4555 minutes. Nutrition information per serving: 357 calories, 34 percent of calories from fat, 14 g fat, 2 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 56 g carbohydrates, 7 g protein, 641 mg sodium, 9 g fiber.

THREE BEET CAVIAR WITH ENDIVE, GOAT CHEESE

CENTRAL OREGON BUILDERS ASSOCIATION

HOME EIGHTEENTH

ANNUAL

GARDEN

Makes 6 servings 6 beets, 2 golden, 2 Chioggia, 2 red, or all one color 1 sm red onion, finely diced 4 TBS white wine or rice wine vinegar 2 TBS chopped parsley or chervil

&

S H O W ½ tsp each: salt, sugar Freshly ground black pepper to taste 2 heads Belgian endive, sliced 4 oz fresh goat cheese 1 TBS olive oil, or as needed

Trim beet stems down to 1 inch; leave roots on. Place beets in a steamer over boiling water; cover. (Do each color of beet separately.) Steam until tender-firm when pierced with a knife, 25-45 minutes, depending on their size. Cool; slip off the skins. Cut beets into chunks. Place in food processor; pulse 6-8 times until finely chopped, but not pureed (or, dice them by hand). Meanwhile, mix the onion, vinegar, parsley, ¼ tsp of the salt, sugar and pepper to taste in a bowl. Toss each of the three types of beets with a third of the onion mixture in separate bowls. Chill. Arrange mounds of the beets, a mound of endive, and a smaller one of goat cheese on each plate. Drizzle a little olive oil over the endive and cheese. Toss everything together before eating. Nutrition information per serving: 133 calories, 53 percent of calories from fat, 8 g fat, 4 g saturated fat, 15 mg cholesterol, 10 g carbohydrates, 6 g protein, 357 mg sodium, 3 g fiber.

PRESENTED BY:

We’ve reached that time of year when winter’s star vegetables are wearing out their welcome. Parsnips? Been there. Turnips? Done that. Potatoes, mashed, hashed, roasted or fried? Check, check, check, yawn. In short, it’s time to start mixing it up a bit in the root vegetable department. “With root vegetables, they’re all basically kind of sweet, and they all have similar dense textures, so they’re very easily compatible with one another,” says Deborah Madison, author of the award-winning “Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone.” “Roasted root vegetables are great because they stay distinct. Rutabagas would be lovely cooked with potatoes that you’re going to mash because it would give (them) this delicate yellow color — and the flavor would be lovely, too.” Soups such as roasted Jerusalem artichoke bisque with a touch of potato and leek are a good starting point, Madison says. “You roast (turnips, carrots or Jerusalem artichokes) and their flavors concentrate so much and you get a little caramelization — and then go ahead and put them in a soup.” Looking to enliven the humble mash? Consider celery root. “Potatoes make a great base, but then when you add celery root, maybe a little bit of celery too — it gives it a freshness and a pale green color, and maybe stir in some minced celery leaves at the end,” says Madison. “Potatoes with any of these vegetables are really good. With parsnips. With turnips. Beets you’d want to be wary of because it would make a horrible color.” On the salad front, Madison advocates mixes ranging from the traditional to the unexpected. “Rutabagas have this lovely, buttery yellow, and turnips stay so white and then you have carrots, which are orange,” says Madison. “I cut all of those into a julienne, and I just blanch them and toss them with olive oil, lemon, just a little chopped parsley. Things you have around. And it looks like spring! You just look at it and it makes you happy.” As a general rule, vegetables that are in season together taste good together, and that certainly goes for the roots, Madison says. They also mix well with Brussels sprouts and cabbages.

APRIL 30 - MAY 1, 2, 2010

Reach more than 70,000 Central Oregon readers in the official Home & Garden Show guide. Official Show Guide Publishes: in The Bulletin Saturday, April 24 Advertising Deadline: Thursday, April 8

SWEET POTATO AND COCONUT CUSTARD WITH TOASTED COCONUT Makes 6 servings 1 C cooked, mashed sweet potato ¾ C light brown or muscovado sugar

3 eggs 1 can (15 oz) coconut milk plus milk to make 2 C 2 tsp vanilla

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Place sweet potato in medium bowl; mix in sugar. Beat in eggs. Beat in coconut milk mixture, vanilla and salt. Pour the pudding mixture into a 6-cup baking dish. Put the dish in a larger pan; pour boiling water to come halfway up the sides of the baking dish. Bake until set, 1 hour, 30 minutes. Cool. Put the coconut shavings on a baking sheet;

¼ tsp salt ½ C wide strips of coconut ½ C whipping cream 1 TBS rum, or to taste

toast until crisp and browned, about 2 minutes. Whip cream in medium bowl to soft peaks; add rum. Whip to stiff peaks. Serve pudding with whipped cream; garnish with toasted coconut. Nutrition information per serving: 461 calories, 57 percent of calories from fat, 30 g fat, 23 g saturated fat, 136 mg cholesterol, 43 g carbohydrates, 8 g protein, 208 mg sodium, 2 g fiber.

For show information visit: www.centraloregonshow.com

To Advertise, call your Bulletin Sales Representative at 541-382-1811


F4 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H What to do with your spring-cleaning leftovers By Mary Beth Breckenridge Akron Beacon Journal

You know what spring cleaning gets you? Stuff. Lots of stuff to get rid of. Sure, you can take the usual routes — hold a garage sale, cart it off to Goodwill, take out a classified ad. Or you can entertain yourself in the process of purging. We’ve cooked up a few fun ideas for lightening your load. You know what they say about all work and no play.

Host a swap party Swap parties are a great excuse for socializing in the name of recycling. And while you’re splurging on that third slab of brie, you can rationalize that you’re sacrificing your bikini body to save the environment. Swap parties work best if you choose a category — purses, home accessories, sporting goods, CDs, whatever. Everyone brings one or more gently used items in that category and gets a chance to take home an equal number of their friends’ things. You can make up your own rules, but one method is to give each guest a ticket or token for every item he or she brings. Put the guests’ names on their tickets. Allow everyone an hour or so after arriving to peruse the goods. Then when the swap begins, have them put their tickets next to the items they’d like to have. If more than one person desires an item, put the tickets into a hat and draw one. Real Simple magazine has swap party ideas on its Web site, http://www.realsimple. com. They’re in the “Holidays & Entertaining” section, under “Everyday Celebrations.” Or just Google “swap party.” You’ll find plenty of ideas.

Hold a charity auction This is a variation on the swap party theme, except you sell your unwanted things to your friends and donate the proceeds to charity. It adds an element of competitive excitement as you and your BFF go paddle-to-paddle over that coveted Gucci belt. In the interest of full disclosure, it should be reported that

MORROW’S SEWING & VACUUM CENTER

this idea was brazenly lifted from the letters section of Better Homes and Gardens magazine’s March issue. It was just too good not to share. We called the letter writer, Mary Howe of Jefferson, Ohio, for details. Howe said that at the auction her church group held, 10 or 12 women brought unwanted kitchen gadgets and sat around a table bidding on items. “Most of the bids started at, like, 25 cents,” she said. It was all very informal, Howe said. One person led the auction, someone else wrote down the winning bids, and everyone settled up when the auction was finished. At the end of the night, they’d raised more than $40 for a family in need.

Exchange it Who says gift exchanges are only for the holidays? A white elephant gift exchange is a fun way to swap your stuff with your friends or family members. And without the attendant stresses of the Christmas season, a nonholiday gathering would be that much more enjoyable. White elephant gift exchanges have become associated with joke gifts, but really, a white elephant is something of value that you no longer want or can’t afford to keep. Rules and procedures vary, but here’s one way to do it: Everyone brings one giftwrapped item, and all the gifts are piled together. Have the participants draw numbers to indicate the order in which they’ll choose gifts. When your number comes up, you either pick a gift from the pile, open it and show it to everyone, or you steal one that someone has already opened. If your gift is stolen, you get to either pick again or steal. To avoid a never-ending cycle of stealing, consider limiting the number of steals per turn or per person. And be sure to state the rules up front. Warning: This game works best with a group that has a healthy sense of humor and fair play. Good-natured wrangling and back stabbing are all part of the process, and if some participants don’t understand it’s all in good fun, things can get ugly.

Granite tile: A cheaper counter, with caveats By Martha Stewart Martha Stewart Living

Q:

My husband, a skilled tile installer, wants to save money on our kitchen counter by laying granite floor tiles (with a minimal grout line) instead of a custom slab. What do you think? The trouble with tile is you’re going to be washing that counter constantly. A friend had a ceramic-tile counter, and the wear and tear was too much. But granite tiles are significantly less expensive than a slab, so you might want to try it. You’ll have to use cutting boards on top for chopping and rolling, and pounding meat may pose a problem. A big slab of granite will take the pounding; tiles will loosen, even with a board on top. Here’s what you can do: Get a few resin cutting boards, like the ones used in butcher shops. They come in a range of colors and are fabulous. Put some rubber surface protectors underneath so that the boards are raised slightly. That way, the granite tiles won’t take all the pressure.

By Al Heavens The Philadelphia Inquirer

Q:

A:

Q: A:

How do I eradicate poison ivy from my yard once and for all? Foe to gardeners and campers alike, poison ivy has earned its notoriety. All parts of the plant — roots, stems, leaves, flowers and berries — contain urushiol, the oil responsible for an itchy, blistering rash. Spring and summer are particularly dangerous times because the urushiol content is high, but the plants pose a threat year-round. Banishing poison ivy is possible, but it may take several attempts over a few seasons. Our garden editors recommend targeting the plant without the use of chemicals. (Some herbicides are marketed as effective against poison ivy, but they are not completely reliable.) When dealing with the ivy, always wear long sleeves, goggles, and fabric gloves with plastic gloves or bags on top. After a good rain, rip out smaller vines, removing every leaf, stem and root to prevent resprouting. If the ivy is large and well-established, cut the stem near the ground, and let the rest wither. Once the plant is fully dry, dig out the roots before it can grow back. (At this point, getting a rash is less likely.) Then check regularly for new growth. Seal the ivy in garbage bags, and contact your sanitation de-

The cure might be worse than the bees Your recent column on a possible insect infestation of an antique wooden cabinet reminded me of the carpenter-bee problem I have every year. I have tried to get rid of them with sprays and plugging the holes, but they come back every year. I think some neighbors have them but I only see them near my garage. Is there any information or a place you could point me to to better fight them off? I am similarly plagued by carpenter bees each year, but in my mind there are more serious infestations — wasp nests under eaves, ant invasions of the downstairs bathroom sink, and relatives arriving unannounced. I’m also not all that keen on using pesticides — resorting to them only when every other option but prayer has been exhausted. Here’s what I know about carpenter bees, which are much less worrisome than carpenter ants. The stingerless males are pushy, but harmless. The females will sting if you bother them, but rarely attack, according to Mike Potter at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture. Painted or pressure-treated wood is much less susceptible to attack, Potter says, but I’ve watched them bore into both without hesitation. Painting the wood is more effective than applying preservatives or stains, some experts say, but that hasn’t been my experience — they are tenacious. Someone suggested trapping the bee inside the nest, filling the hole with silicone caulk, and painting over it will solve the problem. The consensus among the experts is to prevent infestations before they occur. They favor using treated wood or painting, and using the correct insecticide. Some of these pesticides are more dangerous than others, and require professional application. Be careful, and before you act, decide if the cure is going to be worse than the problem.

A:

David Meredith / Martha Stewart Living

Granite floor tiles for your kitchen counter are a lovely — and less costly — alternative to a full slab. To protect them — as well as your knives — from damage, place cutting boards on top of your counter for chopping and rolling. partment for disposal details. Burning or composting it is not an option. Airborne urushiol can cause serious lung irritation, and the poison ivy will return if put in compost.

Q:

I was given an antique brass bed, and it has a spotted patina. How can I restore and maintain its luster? First, find out if the bed has lacquer on it. Try brass polish; if it doesn’t work, the brass has been lacquered. To remove the spots, the bed has to be taken apart and then stripped, cleaned and polished. If you lacquer it again, the brass ultimately will lose some of the lacquer, and the spots will return. Instead, I have my brass beds stripped, cleaned, and polished, and then I let them be. I never lacquer. Ideally, if you could keep a bed freshly polished, that’s best. But that’s a hard thing to do.

A:

Q:

I installed cork flooring in my kitchen years ago. It has held up well but looks dull.

How can I get a shine? I don’t know what kind of cork you put down, but I have a cork floor in my guesthouse in Maine and had one in a kitchen in New York City one or two apartments ago. I love them and use a paste wax, such as Butcher’s, to wax them — just a thin layer to start. It might take a couple of applications and a lot of buffing, but the floors will look beautiful.

A:

Questions should be addressed to Ask Martha, c/o Letters Department, Martha Stewart Living, 601 W. 26th St., 9th floor, New York, NY 10001. Questions may also be sent by e-mail to: mslletters@ marthastewart.com Questions of general interest will be answered in this column; Martha Stewart regrets that unpublished letters cannot be answered individually. For more information on the topics covered in the Ask Martha column, visit www. marthastewart.com.

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Getting the range that’s right for you By Derek Donovan

Choose wisely

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Easter Brunch Extravaganza Join us for Bend’s Largest Easter Brunch Buffet overlooking the beautiful Deschutes River April 4th • 9:00am to 2:00pm Menu

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When you’re choosing a range for your dream kitchen, bigger — and more expensive — isn’t always better. If you’ve watched a renovation show on HGTV or flipped through design magazines at your local home improvement mega-mart over the past few years, you’ve seen endless reiterations of the same look. Dark granite countertops, clean lines of cabinetry and the ubiquitous six-burner “professional-style” gas range are all the rage. The heavy grates, chunky frontmounted knobs and stark stainless steel range exteriors evoke the no-nonsense, high-volume bustle of a restaurant kitchen. Or at least that’s the romance. In reality, the luxury appliances in retail showrooms are modeled on the looks of their siblings in commercial kitchens, but they have been modified for home use. Most offer insulated ovens, electronic controls and devices such as timers that are not found in the original models. These additions push the price up considerably, with 36-inch home models from manufacturers such as Viking, Wolf and Dacor starting around $6,000 or more. Ranges with double fullsize ovens and up to eight burners reach into five figures. According to some experts, these luxury appliances are far

Tammy Ljungblad / Kansas City Star

Brenda Knehans, of Shawnee, Mo., checks out the latest in a six-burner, 36-inch Bertazzoni range at Nebraska Furniture Mart. The commercial-style home appliance retails for $4,699, though a more standard size from the line can be found for around $2,000. from a necessity. And in many cases, they’re overkill. “We’ve tested a lot of those ranges,” said Celia Kuperszmid Lehrman, deputy home editor at Consumer Reports. “They really haven’t performed better than ranges that cost a fraction of the price.” Michael Robinson, director of communication at Factory Direct Appliance, says his company is selling more ranges that fit the standard 30-inch hole that has dominated the market for years. “A lot of people wanted the big ones strictly for show,” he said. “A lot of home cooks don’t use a

48- or 36-inch range when they can get by with a 30-inch range just fine. That high end has shriveled up quite a bit.” Some kitchen-design professionals think stainless appliances are already looking a bit passe. “You want to avoid things that will be dated in your remodeling, so you don’t want a range that screams ‘recession casualty,’” Kuperszmid Lehrman said. “Those pro-style ranges can be the Hummers of the kitchen.” “If you’re talking progressive design, the all-stainless look is already gone,” said Geri Higgins, of Portfolio Kitchen & Home.

• Spend smartly. You can get more now, said Celia Kuperszmid Lehrman of Consumer Reports. “In a 30-inch, you can get five burners instead of four. … It’s really a matter of finding the features you’re going to use.” • Stainless might look cool, but it can be difficult to keep clean. “If you’re a person who doesn’t mind a smudge or two but wants a very good showpiece and are willing to clean it up, then I think stainless is great,” said Steve Swayne of Whirlpool Corp. “If you have six kids and want a great look and don’t have the time to keep your kitchen clean, you might want to look at something different.” • Remember one size doesn’t fit all. Many kitchens can’t accommodate larger, commercial-style appliances without major alterations to existing cabinetry, countertops, exhaust, electrical and gas services. Some may even require extra bracing to floor joists. • Consider new technology. Consumer Reports is impressed with the new generation of induction cooktops, which work by magnetically heating the cooking vessel. They boil water quickly and hold temperatures precisely. However, they don’t work with all cookware and may demand electrical upgrades.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 30, 2010 F5

G

Next week Easy veggies for High Desert garden beginners.

Check out Cora Cascade for an explosion of color By Norman Winter McClatchy-Tribune News Service

L. Albee / Longwood Gardens via The Washington Post

Blue poppies are displayed at Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania. Difficult to impossible to grow outside their native terrain of the Himalayas, blue poppies generally only stand a chance in the U.S. in parts of New England, the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. These ones in Pennsylvania are a rare exception to that rule.

Blue poppies have some growers green with envy By Adrian Higgins The Washington Post

Blue is a special color in the garden. People want to turn their pink-flowering hydrangeas blue, not their blue ones pink. So when blue shows up in a flower that is supposed to be another color, the gardener is wired to go wild. Such is the case with a very special poppy: not the blood-red poppy of our late-spring gardens, but the blue poppy of the Himalayas. First seen by Westerners in the 19th century, the blue poppy was collected and championed by an intrepid British explorer in the early 20th century. To see the nodding, elongated flower buds open a glowing baby blue must have made all the hardships and travails of Frank Kingdon-Ward seem worth it. “The flowers flutter out from amongst the sea-green leaves like blue and gold butterflies,” he enthused in his diary. The gold is a reference to the anthers, themselves ornamental.

Finicky flower If this is so great a plant, you ask, why haven’t you seen it? There are mail-order nurseries that peddle this poppy, but dubiously and to the unknowing, because the only regions of the United States where this miraculous flower has a chance in the garden is in parts of New England, the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. It is a plant of the cold but sunny Himalayas, growing above 10,000 feet. Beyond its need for a certain

rarified terrain and climate, it has a stubborn streak that makes it not just hard to grow in the midAtlantic, but impossible. This, of course, adds to the allure. There is an exception to every rule. This exception is on display in the Main Conservatory at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pa., one of the few places in the United States to see blue poppies. Gathered in wall planters at the edge of the adjoining water-mirrored Exhibition Hall, the poppies are refreshed from a cache of 190 that come into fleeting bloom over a three-week period each March. The plants rise to about four feet. The soft leaves and stems are covered in golden hairs, topped with just three or four pendant blossoms. Visitors may not know the magnitude of this feat, but they do realize that seeing a blue poppy is magical, a bit like being transported into the color-skewed Land of Oz, itself entranced by the poppy. Suitably beguiled, visitors line up to take photos of the blue poppy. “It’s not a big display, but there’s something about it,” said Jim Harbarge, a leader in Longwood’s research and production division. “Maybe it’s that holy grail.”

Growing secrets I can imagine some growers I have encountered keeping the secrets of such cultivation to themselves, to add to the mystery and

value of the plant, but Harbarge is happy to talk about the methods used to trick this grudging prima donna onto Longwood’s stage. Harbarge and his colleagues became interested in raising the blue poppy, botanically the meconopsis, when a graduate student, Shannon Still, approached him about writing a thesis on the plant. They found a device that measures photosynthesis, the leaf’s process of turning sunlight into energy and food. As temperatures climbed into the 60s, it became clear that the plant couldn’t photosynthesize enough to keep up with its respiration. Still “could really see at what temperature the plant began to suffer,” said Harbarge. “At 70 degrees, roughly, they would burn themselves out.” In mid-October, Longwood’s blue poppy grower, Juergen Steininger, receives year-old plants by air freight from a nursery in Alaska. By that time, the plants are going into winter dormancy, when the leaves would naturally shrivel and the roots and crown hunker down for the season. The poppies are potted in a free-draining mix, placed in a darkened cooler and kept at 34 degrees until early January. This fools them into thinking they have gone through a winter. They are then potted up and brought into a cool greenhouse, where temperatures of 45 to 55 degrees coax fresh growth and, by early March, flower stalks.

Freeze-damaged drabness? Here are some restoration tips By Kathy Huber Houston Chronicle

Overheard recently at a nursery: “I’ve just got to have some color.” Don’t we all? The freeze-dried look has worn out its welcome. But as we remove dead plants and prune-damaged tops of oncetowering, root-hardy tropicals, the gaping holes are startling. We need some quick-fix sparkle as we wait for replacements or heavily pruned plants to grow.

Short-term options Cool-season annuals offer instant gratification. Nurseries are stocked, anticipating a feeding frenzy for colorful blooms for containers and prepared beds. There are geraniums in hot pink and brilliant red. Imagine them in pots as you march up the front steps. And spreading plants to provide volume. Trailing bacopa, for example, will give you at least a foot of white

or blue blooms. ‘Laura Bush’ petunias spread a 3-foot blanket of fragrant, violet flowers. Proven Winners’ ‘Pretty Much Picasso’ petunia also trails to 3 feet and has violet petals edged in lime green. Because it’s new, supplies are limited, but the Wave petunia series is available in white, pinks and purples. Remember grandmother with orange, red or yellow nasturiums. The parasollike foliage is irresistible. The first of the multi-colored coleuses is also making its way into nurseries. These leafy attractions will fill a container or bed corner in little time and last through summer.

Fast-growing aid Several perennials are a bridge between annuals and slow-growing foundation plants. Fast-growing ornamental grasses are wearing winter flattops now but will send up graceful fo-

liage with warm weather. These include bamboo muhly, which fills voids with clouds of ephemeral light-green foliage. Numerous true-bamboo options will quickly fill in garden gaps or screen air conditioners, ugly fences and the neighbor’s garage.

Long-term remedies Evergreens bring a sense of permanency year round. Boxwood and yaupon held their own with temperatures in the 20s. And ‘Sea Green’ junipers are looking pretty good now. The bright-green, finely textured vase-shaped evergreen is 4 to 6 feet tall and wide. Chinese mahonias, one of the best shade or part-sun evergreens, also pulled through the low temperatures unscathed. The toothed, fernlike foliage soon forms a dense shrub about 4 feet high and wide.

Cora vinca took the gardening world by storm when it made its debut a couple of years ago and now it is even better in 2010 with the addition of the five trailing selections called Cora Cascade. The colors available this spring are Polka Dot, Magenta, Cherry, Peach Blush and Lilac. There is also a very enticing mix that you may want to try. The vinca or Madagascar periwinkle was at the pinnacle of popularity in the 1980s but then a disease called aerial phytophthora showed up making gardeners go elsewhere for flower power. Cora’s disease resistance and absolute rugged summer performance changed this, putting the joy back into the periwinkle. Cora Cascade has that same dependable performance coupled with a habit that is sensational in the landscape reaching about 6 inches in height and spreading close to 3 feet. It is incredible in baskets, mixed containers or window boxes where a virtual carpet of flowers will gently tumble over the edge. Even though the Cora and Cora Cascade vincas are disease resistant, there is no use planting too early. Wait until the soil has warmed and the plant is able to expand out of its rootball with vigor. They are really easy to grow, sunlight and fertile well drained soil will give you the green thumb and make your neighbors think that you spent extensive hours in specialized gardening classes. Pay close attention to planting depth. Planting individual plants too deeply exposes the roots and stems to unfavorable growing conditions. Add a good layer of mulch after planting to stabilize soil temperatures and prevent rapid loss of moisture through evaporation. Mulch also will deter weeds from growing and competing for nutrients and water. Once established, the Cora Cascade vinca will tolerate droughts, so don’t overwater. While people may suffer from the heat and will want to go indoors later this summer, these troopers will en-

Norman Winter / McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Cora Cascade Polka Dot boast large flowers and striking semiglossy foliage adding sizzle to the landscape or containers.

Pay close attention to planting depth. Planting individual plants too deeply exposes the roots and stems to unfavorable growing conditions. sure beautiful beds. With the low growing habit and spread you’ll want to consider them as ground cover type flowers for the front of the border. Their colorful flowers, coupled with semi-glossy leaves, lets them work with ease in a tropical style garden. Use them in front of bananas or upright elephant ears. For a truly exceptional layered look plant in front of pentas with equally colorful flowers and let the bold tropical foliage serves as the backdrop. The truth is they will work in any setting from cottage gardens to modern landscapes. A bold drift of Cora Cascade Lilac or Cherry in front of New Gold lantana will give you a toughas-nails combination from early summer through frost. Their vigor, spread and flower

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F6 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Fish and crab chowder starts off right with bacon By Julie Rothman The Baltimore Sun

Peggy Everett of Salisbury, Md., was looking for a recipe that ran a few years ago in The Baltimore Sun for fish chowder made with a firm white fish and fresh crab meat. Faith Hermann of Relay, Md., thought she might have the recipe to which Everett was referring. She said the recipe for Rockfish and Crab Chowder that ran in the Sun in 2006 came from Brendan Keegan Jr., executive sous-chef at O’Leary’s Seafood restaurant in Annapolis. She said “it is delicious, of course, because it starts with bacon.” The recipe calls for homemade fish stock but notes that chicken stock can be used. I decided to test the recipe using chicken stock because it’s easier. Even with chicken stock, it

RECIPE FINDER

Fresh flavor on the cheap Especially in spring, look no farther than flat-leaf parsley

CRISP PITA SALAD Whole parsley leaves add brightness to this crunchy Mediterranean salad. If you like, boost the flavor even more with our version of Za’atar, a Middle Eastern spice blend. Makes 4 servings

Everyday Food was a stupendous soup chockfull of the tastes of the Chesapeake Bay. RECIPE REQUESTS Mary Cronkhite from Bend, Ore., is in search of a recipe for a bar cookie that is made using yellow cake mix. Her recollection is that the batter was very thick because the only liquid was honey. The cookies also contained chocolate chips.

If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request, write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278, or e-mail recipefinder@ baltsun.com.

ROCKFISH AND CRAB CHOWDER

Think of parsley as an ingredient, not just a garnish, and you’ll never wonder what to do with the rest of a bunch again. Parsley can be found yearround but is especially welcome in early spring, when it’s an affordable source of fresh flavor. Parsley is available in two common varieties: curly and flat-leaf (also known as Italian). Flat-leaf parsley works best in the following recipes because of its intense flavor and more appealing texture. Look for parsley that is vibrant green and free of wilting or yellowing leaves. At home, remove parsley from its plastic bag and wash well with cold water. Dry and store the bunch, loosely rolled in paper towels, in a resealable plastic bag for up to 1 week.

1 pita, split and torn into bitesize pieces 1 recipe Za’atar (optional, below) 1 ⁄4 C plus 1 TBS extra virgin olive oil 3 TBS fresh lemon juice 1 clove garlic, minced 1 head romaine lettuce, torn 1 English cucumber, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved 11⁄2 C fresh parsley leaves 1 ⁄3 C fresh mint leaves, torn 2 scallions, sliced

Makes 8 servings 6 slices of applewoodsmoked bacon, finely diced 4 TBS unsalted butter 1 C Spanish or yellow onion, diced 1 C celery, diced 2 cloves garlic, minced Salt and pepper to taste 4 TBS all-purpose flour 1 C dry white wine 3 C homemade fish stock

(or chicken stock) 1 bay leaf 1 C potato, diced 1½ lbs rockfish fillet, cut into ½ -inch cubes 1 lb jumbo lump crabmeat, picked clean 2 C half-and-half Tabasco sauce Parsley, finely chopped Smithfield ham, julienne

In a large sauce pot, over medium heat, render bacon until tender. Add butter and gently saute onions, celery and garlic until onions are translucent. Season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with flour and stir, making sure you cook the flour to remove that raw flour taste. Add white wine and reduce by half. Add fish (or chicken) stock and bay leaf. Bring to a boil. At this point, the chowder should begin to thicken. Add the potatoes and cook until tender, about 10 minutes. Then add the rockfish. Once the fish is cooked through, add the crabmeat and halfand-half. Stir in a couple dashes of Tabasco sauce. Check seasoning and remove bay leaf. Garnish with chopped parsley and ham. Nutrition information per serving: 392 calories, 18 grams fat, 9 grams saturated fat, 12 grams carbohydrates, 41 grams protein, 1 gram fiber, 148 milligrams cholesterol, 577 milligrams sodium.

SHRIMP AND RICE SALAD WITH PARSLEY

Con Poulos / Martha Stewart Living

Parsley brightens up the flavor of this shrimp and rice salad. Makes 4 servings 2 TBS extra virgin olive oil 1 clove garlic, minced 1/2 lb medium shrimp, peeled and deveined 1 C cooked long-grain white rice 1 C packed fresh parsley leaves, chopped 1 to 2 TBS fresh lemon juice In a medium skillet, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add garlic and shrimp and cook until shrimp are opaque throughout, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl and add rice, parsley and lemon juice. Season with coarse salt and ground pepper. Nutrition information per serving: 300 calories; 8.4 grams fat (1.3 grams saturated fat); 15.3 grams protein; 39.3 grams carbohydrates; 1.1 grams fiber.

FEATURED SPECIAL LEASE: Closed-end lease for 2010 Accord Sedan LX Automatic (Model CP2F3AEW) for $250.00 per month for 36 months with a no capitalized cost reduction available to customers who qualify for the AHFC Super Preferred credit tier. Other rates/tiers are available under this offer. $0 due at lease signing ($0 first month’s payment and no capitalized cost reduction with no security deposit; total net capitalized cost and base monthly payment does not include tax, license, title, registration, documentation fees, options, insurance and the like). Not all buyers may qualify. $0 due at lease signing offer requires dealer contribution, which could affect final negotiated transaction. *Subject to limited availability. From 3/2/2010 through 5/3/2010, to approved lessees by American Honda Finance Corp. Closed end lease for 2010 Accord Sedan LX Automatic vehicles (Model CP2F3AEW), for well qualified lessees. Not all lessees will qualify. Higher lease rates apply for lessees with lower credit ratings. MSRP $22,565.00 (includes destination) Net capitalized cost $20,961.42. Net capitalized cost includes $595 acquisition fee. Dealer contribution may vary and could affect actual lease payment. Taxes, license, title fees, options and insurance extra. Total monthly payments $8,750.00. Option to purchase at lease end $13,539.00. Lessee responsible for maintenance, excessive wear/tear and 15 cents/mi. over 12,000 miles/year for vehicles with MSRP less than $30,000, but for vehicles with MSRP of $30,000 or more, mileage cost is 20 cents/mi. over 12,000 miles/year. See dealer for complete details.

O N 3 R D S T R E E T J U S T N O RT H O F T H E U N D E R PA S S

PEA AND PARSLEY PESTO WITH LINGUINE Makes 4 servings 2 C frozen peas (from a 10ounce bag) 1 C packed fresh parsley leaves 1 ⁄2 C walnuts, toasted 2 ⁄3 C grated Parmesan, plus

more for serving 3 garlic cloves, smashed and peeled 1 ⁄3 C extra-virgin olive oil 12 oz linguine

Cook 1 cup peas according to package instructions. In a food processor, combine cooked peas, parsley, walnuts, Parmesan, garlic and 1 tablespoon water. Pulse until a paste forms. With machine running, slowly add oil, processing until blended; season with salt and pepper. In a large pot of boiling salted water, cook pasta according to package instructions, adding 1 cup peas 30 seconds before end of cooking. Reserve 1 cup pasta water; drain pasta and peas. Return pasta and peas to pot; toss with 3/4 cup pesto (reserve remainder for another use), adding enough pasta water to create a sauce that coats pasta. Serve pasta with more Parmesan. Nutrition information per serving: 546 calories; 18.8 grams fat (3.6 grams saturated fat); 19.8 grams protein; 76 grams carbohydrates; 6.7 grams fiber

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. On a rimmed baking sheet, toss pita with 11⁄2 TBS Za’atar (if using) and 1 TBS oil; season with salt and pepper. Bake until pita chips are golden, about 12 minutes to 15 minutes. In a large bowl, combine 1⁄4 C oil, lemon juice and garlic; season with salt and pepper. Add lettuce, cucumber, tomatoes, parsley, mint, scallions, pita chips and remaining Za’atar. Season salad with salt and pepper and toss to combine. Serve immediately. Nutrition information per serving: 285 calories; 20.5 grams fat (2.6 grams saturated fat); 6.5 grams protein; 21.6 grams carbohydrates; 6.6 grams fiber

ZA’ATAR SPICE BLEND 2 TBS toasted sesame seeds 1 tsp grated lemon zest 1 ⁄2 tsp each dried thyme 1 ⁄2 tsp dried oregano 1 ⁄4 tsp coarse salt 1 ⁄8 tsp ground pepper Combine ingredients in a small bowl.

FEATURED SPECIAL LEASE: Closed-end lease for 2010 Accord Crosstour 2WD EX Automatic (Model TF1H3AJW) for $390.00 per month for 36 months with a no capitalized cost reduction available to customers who qualify for the AHFC Super Preferred credit tier. Other rates/tiers are available under this offer. $0 due at lease signing ($0 first month’s payment and no capitalized cost reduction with no security deposit; total net capitalized cost and base monthly payment does not include tax, license, title, registration, documentation fees, options, insurance and the like). Not all buyers may qualify. $0 due at lease signing offer requires dealer contribution, which could affect final negotiated transaction. *Subject to limited availability. From 3/2/2010 through 5/3/2010, to approved lessees by American Honda Finance Corp. Closed end lease for 2010 Accord Crosstour 2WD EX Automatic Transmission vehicles (Model TF1H3AJW), for well qualified lessees. Not all lessees will qualify. Higher lease rates apply for lessees with lower credit ratings. MSRP $30,380.00 (includes destination). Net capitalized cost $30,891.84. Net capitalized cost includes $595 acquisition fee. Dealer contribution may vary and could affect actual lease payment. Taxes, license, title fees, options and insurance extra. Total monthly payments $13,650.00. Option to purchase at lease end $19,139.40. Lessee responsible for maintenance, excessive wear/tear and 15 cents/mi. over 12,000 miles/year for vehicles with MSRP less than $30,000, but for vehicles with MSRP of $30,000 or more, mileage cost is 20 cents/mi. over 12,000 miles/year. See dealer for complete details.

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Chihuahua/Poodle mix, 12 weeks, tiny female, $225, 541-536-5538.

Chihuahuas, 2 tiny, cute females, shots, 7 weeks, $240 cash. 541-678-7599.

Cockatiel Male w/powder coated cage & stand. Cinnamon pearl pied. $100. (541) 548-7947.

Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for Companion cats free to seniors! old vintage costume, scrap, Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. silver & gold Jewelry. Top 389-8420, www.craftcats.org dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES, AKC registered, champion lines. microchipped, ready to We Want Your Junk Car!! go, $2000. 541 416-0375 We'll buy any scrap metal, Free Chocolate Lab, Male, 18 batteries or catalytic conmos., neutered, outdoor dog, verters. 7 days a week call 541-390-6577/541-948-5277 to good home, 541-815-2647

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French Bulldog Pups, purebred, reg., dame and sire on site, born Valentines weekend, ready to go to new home April 10th, call to make appnt. to visit. 541-771-0981 ask for Rob.

Pets and Supplies Golden Retriever AKC female pups for sale $600 each. call for information 541-460-2411 Golden Retriever Pups exc. quality, parents OFA, good hips, $650. 541-318-3396.

Mini-Australian Shepherd male puppy, beautiful Blue Merle with blue eyes with full white collar, born 01/02/2010, $350. 541-433-2112. Mini Dachshund Pups, 2 girls $275 ea., 2 boys $250 ea. Prineville. 360-607-0604. MINI-GOLDENDOODLES, red, 15 lbs., mom on-site, family raised, hypo-allergenic, females $900, males $800, avail. in May, Gina, 541-390-1015.

Papillon-poodle mix pups. Will be under 10 lbs., low shed. Sweet and healthy $275. 541-350-1684. Pomeranian puppies, 2 male wolf sable, rare in color, fun personalities. $400. ea. 541-480-3160 Pomeranian Pups, (3), CKC reg., 2 reds, 1 black, $250 ea., call 541-923-3999.

Shihtzu male $450 12 weeks and Chihuahua male $350. 541-728-4367. Tzu/Maltese Cross pups and older dogs, males and females avail. 541-874-2901 charley2901@gmail.com

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S . W .

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

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Ski Equipment

Misc. Items

Fuel and Wood

Estate Sales

Hay, Grain and Feed

Desks, Office, some with credenza’s, all in one inkjet printers, bookcases, eraser boards, computer work desk, in Redmond, 541-420-0427

Helmet, Bern Brentwood Size Large black with black insert $50. 541-306-8115.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

Fridge, Top freezer Kenmore very nice, works great, white $200. 541-322-0983.

Helmet, Bern Brentwood Size Large Black w/Red Plaid Visor Insert $50. 541-306-8115

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Furniture

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Grandpa moved into care facility houseful of furniture and belongings, call for prices. 541-382-8399

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, discounted king sets, fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643. MODEL HOME FURNISHINGS Sofas, bedroom, dining, sectionals, fabrics, leather, home office, youth, accessories and more. MUST SELL! (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

212

Antiques & Collectibles Chairs, Antique, set of 6, $195, please call 541-389-8672 for more info.

22 cal. high power air rifle, 1200’ ps, new from box with var. scope, with ammo, $225. Call 541-280-5085. 338 Magnum, M-77, Serial# 79-60628, Pasco 7X32 Scope, $450, 541-389-6457 or 541-480-8521. A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

GUNS: Buy, Sell, Trade call for more information. 541-728-1036. HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte. Thur. April 8th, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422 Kahr Arms CW40 with box, shot very little. incl. Don Hume holster and 2 boxes of ammunition. Great for concealed carry $395 OBO. Call 541-815-7756

US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 549-1658

240

Crafts and Hobbies

unused, assembled for crib to king size quilts.541-419-1151

"Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

On Going Moving Sale, starting Sat., 10am-5pm. On Cottonwood Dr. Reclining couch, tools, electronics, etc.

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

Farm Market

Wine Barrel, authentic, used, European, great shape, $250. 541-279-8826

Couch, Hideabed, queen new cond. dark cinnamon, 78” long $400. 322-0983.

Down Hill Racing Poles, Scott 4 Series $60, please call 541-306-8115.

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Lawn/Garden sprayer, trailer mounted,w/boom, new 15 gal. Fimco, $190, 541-923-1363.

TC Contender 45 Colt, with accessories, $500, call 541-548-8478

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 548-3949.

WANTED:

Winchester Model 94 Saddle carbine, 25-35, will consider 30-30. 541-576-2352

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Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

257

Musical Instruments

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

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Misc. Items Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 549-1592

Binocular, SWAROVSKI, pocket, 10x25, black, $500, call 541-548-8478.

541-322-7253

242 BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. Crypt, Inside double companion, # 46604B in Deschutes Memorial Park, best offer. 541-207-3456 Corvallis

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

mags. in box, cash or possible trades $200 OBO. 541-647-8931

Sun Recumbent E-Z1, functional use, used 20 hrs., $500, 541-548-8478.

Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole cords for as low as $150. Bend Del. Cash, Check, Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Medical Equipment

270

Lost and Found

$300 REWARD, black/tan, female Chihuahua THERAPY-DOG. Recent pups No ID. Not used to strangers PLEASE CALL. 541-647-7467, 541- 678-0626 or 541-382-0439

Wheelchair carrier for a regular hospital chair only, unfolds & tilts $150. 322-0983

Found Cat, Black, brown, white, Green eyes w/black around, OB Riley Rd. 541-383-2124

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Found Cell Phone: 3/20 at 7th & Greenwood, call to identify, 541-771-1553.

Snow Removal Equipment Troy-Bilt 21 inch, 6 hp. snowthrower, model 42027. Two speed drive. $499. 541-322-0537

265

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

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Ski Equipment

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

TIMBER WANTED Warm Springs Forest Products Call Dean Rowley 503-260-5172

Heating and Stoves

243

• Receipts should include,

288

241

Pilates Performer, Model 55-4290, exc. cond., $200 OBO, call 541-318-1619.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

Sales Southeast Bend

Bicycles and Accessories

Exercise Equipment

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

Ad must include price of item

Sterling .22lr pistol semi-auto, stainless with 2

215 WANTED TO BUY

Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our

Pre 1964 Winchester Model 70 300 H&H Great Used hunting gun $1,250 With 3x9 scope 541-948-0321

Coins & Stamps

ARM CHAIRS, WICKER, 2 large, sturdy, plus round sidetable, $100; 541-923-6487.

BOXER, AKC dewclaw, tail dock, very playful, ready to go home $499 1-541-556-8224

A v e . ,

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Bichon Frise AKC, 2 females, 7 & 8 mo old., 1 male, 11 wks. Lab Puppies, yellows, AKC, www.lazycspuppies.com for good blood lines, $300 info and pics. males, $350 females, 541-447-1323. BOSTON TERRIER, AKC, puppy shots, dewormed $499 LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, 541-317-3938. OFA hips, dew claws, 1st BostonTerrier AKC puppy shots, wormed, parents on ready to go home $650 site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. please call 541-317-3938. www.kinnamanranch.com

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

C h a n d l e r

Furniture & Appliances

QUILTING FRAME, BERNINA $1500 OBO,

Pups, $150 ea.

541-280-1537 AKC BERNESE MOUNTAIN DOG puppies Socialized, healthy, happy, good markings, great personalities. $1500 e-mail trinityfarms@bendtel.net for infomation and application.

Labs, AKC, excellent pedigree, 4 males, 2 females 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com

POODLES, AKC Toy or mini. Joyfull tail waggers! Affordable. 541-475-3889.

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The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

1 7 7 7

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Found: Men’s light jacket 3/13, 27th St. (541) 419-2156 to identify jacket and contents.

300 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

John Deere Rider LX 277 all wheel steering, 48” cut , low hours, new $5200 now $2500. 541-280-7024.

MacDon 1991 Swather 14’ Cummins Diesel 920 header conditioner, exc. cond. heat, A/C, radio, everything works $16,500. 541-419-2713.

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

280

Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

Superb Sisters Grass H a y no weeds, no rain, small bales, barn stored Price reduced $160/ton. Free loading 541-549-2581 Top Quality Grass Alfalfa Mix Hay, 2 string bales, no rain, barn stored, $115 per ton, Burns, delivery avail., please call 541-589-1070.

Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Paint Mares, 3-14 year olds, broke to ride, from $750, 541-815-0966.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com Western Saddles (3): 14” Pot Longhorn, lots of silver, $450; 15” Hereford, $400; 12” Kids, $90, 541-480-6900.

Corriente Long Horn Cross Roping Steers 1 year old $300 each 541-420-4379 please leave a message.

Special Low 0% APR Financing New Kubota BX 2360 With Loader, 4X4, 23 HP Was $13,975

MIDSTATE POWER PRODUCTS 541-548-6744 Redmond

Estate Sales

HAY!

345

FOUND post box key near Old Mill, please call to identify, 541-318-5732.

Stolen: Red Honda CBR 600, w/white rims, from garage in SW Bend, if you have info call 541-350-5448, Reward.

HEY!

Alfalfa $115 a ton, Orchard Grass $115 a ton. Madras 541-390-2678.

Livestock & Equipment

Financing on approved credit.

SPOTTED Cat on Pilot Butte: Gray cat w/white spot on stomach. Call 541-728-0825.

Excellent grass hay, no rain, barn stored, $160/ton. FREE grapple loading, 2nd cutting avail. Delivery available. 541-382-5626,541-480-3059

Annual Reduction Sale. Performance bred APHA, AQHA, AHA, 541-325-3377.

FOUND: Pair of kid’s shoes at Big Sky Park, on 3/24, call to identify. 541-678-5615.

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Cheaper Than Feed Store! Premium Orchard Grass Hay, small, square, no rain, weedless, in barn, $8.50/bale. Buy 1 or a few/you pick up, we’ll store the rest until needed. By ton, 1st cut/$135, 2nd cut/$145. Near Alfalfa Store. 1-316-708-3656 or e-mail kerrydnewell@hotmail.com

Sale Price $11,975

325

Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Quality Grass Hay, barn stored, no rain , 2 string, $120, $140 & $150 a ton. 541-549-3831 Patterson Ranch Sisters 2nd Cutting Grass Hay, small bales, in barn, exc. quality, load any time, $150/ton. Lonepine, 541-480-8673 or 541-548-5747

Alfalfa hay, 2 string, very nice & green, clean, no rain, in barn, 1st & 3rd cuttings, bale or DON'T FORGET to take your ton, $115/ton & up, signs down after your ga541-408-5463, 541-475-6260 rage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility Barn Stored Bluegrass poles! Straw, clean & green, 3X3 www.bendbulletin.com mid-size bales, $22/bale, volume discounts available, Madras, call 541-480-8648.

Goats, 2 yearling Boer Cross Does due to kid in June, halter broke and friendly $145 each. 541-312-4752. Longhorn Bulls and Cows. Young solid color bulls available. Registered Texas Longhorns.www.kbarklonghornranch.com $300. Joel, 541-848-7357 Reg. Hampshire Ram, 2 yrs., $300 OBO, Reg. Hampshire Ram Lamb, 3 mos., $200, Club lambs, Suffolk/Hamp, 541-815-6539.

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Llamas/Exotic Animals Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

358

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Custom Farming: Roto-till, disc, fertilize, seed, ponds, irrigation, sprinkler systems, irripod irrigation systems, call 541-383-0969.


G2 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

CAUTION

421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

470

Domestic & In-Home Positions Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female part time, transportation & refs. 541-610-2799

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Alcohol & Drug Counselor: Adult/Juvenile. Seeking full time, state Certified, salary DOE, send resume to: Pfeifer & Associates, 23 NW Greenwood Ave. Bend, OR 97701 or fax to 541-383-4935.

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

476

476

476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Food Service

Hotel Front Desk Manager Ideal applicant will know how to lead their team to success, be friendly, outgoing and will not hesitate to go above and beyond for our guests. They will also have excellent organizational skills, basic computer, accounting knowledge and no schedule limitations. This position is full time and offers medical, dental, vision, 401K, paid holidays and vacations. Wages will be depending on experience. Please send resume and cover letter to Box 16147473, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Customer Service Rep., Spanish Bi-lingual, for Insurance Office. Apply in person at 711 SW 10th St., Redmond.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Driver CDL req. w/ dbl. endorsement, must have 1 yr. exp. driving. Parked in Madras, evening position. Call 541-475-4221.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Automatic Transmission Rebuilder wanted. General auto repair required. Experience required. Pay negotiable. Employee insurance paid. Vacation and holidays paid. ODL required. 541-388-3734 Cabinet Makers & Pre-Finish Taking applications for potential employment in the following departments, special build, door/drawer/milling, shipping & receiving. Successful pre-finish applicant must be experienced with all high quality finishes including distressed & crackled finishes. All applicants must have several years experience. Above all be quality conscious, self-motivated and a team player. Apply in person at International Architectural Millwork LLC also know as Pro Shop Millwork & Design 63085 NE 18th St. Suite 105 Caregivers VISITING ANGELS is looking for compassionate and reliable caregivers for all shifts incl. weekends. 1 year experience required. Must pass background check and drug test. Apply at Whispering Winds, 2920 NW Conners, Bend.

The Ranch has immediate openings for experienced food serve personnel to work at our Big Meadow Golf Course restaurant.. Must be gregarious, professionally motivated with good communication skills and willing to work weekends. These seasonal positions require valid food handlers and/ or OLCC cards. •Line Cooks •Servers •Bussers •Bartenders •Dishwashers These exciting job opportunities offer some benefits including golf privileges. Go on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com for application. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions.

Driver-On Call Whispering Winds Retirement is looking for an On-Call Driver. Will be mostly Sundays and 1-2 days per month. Fill in for regular driver. Must be able to drive 12 passenger bus and company car. Must enjoy senior citizens. Please respond in person to 2920 NE Conners Ave. Pre-employment drug test req. No phone calls please. DRIVER Tow Truck Operator Must have clean driving record. Part time, including weekends. Apply or send resume to: American Towing, 61532 American Lp. #3, Bend, OR 97702

The Bulletin Classifieds

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Part-Time Business News Assistant The Bulletin is looking for a resourceful, self-motivated person to work in the newsroom, assisting the business reporting staff. Duties will include data entry, proofreading for Bulletin & Associated Press style and other clerical work. This person should like working in a fast-paced environment and be able to meet tight deadlines. Excellent writing, understanding of grammar, good organization, flexibility and basic computer skills are essential. Attention to detail is necessary. Must enjoy working with the public and understand the importance of accuracy and thoroughness in all duties. College degree or previous related experience preferred. Submit a resume and letter of interest by Monday April 5th, to Marielle Gallagher at mgallagher@bendbulletin.com, or drop off or mail to The Bulletin, 1777 SW Chandler Ave., P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

&

C a ll T o d a y &

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTIONPROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER

WE

H S u n ri v e r

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

Hotel Lead Maintenance Ideal applicant will be a self starter and have excellent organizational skills; plumbing, carpeting, painting, electrical knowledge and basic computer experience. This is a fulltime position and must be willing to be on call with no schedule limitations. We offer medical, dental and vision benefits, 401k, paid holidays and vacation. Wages will depend on experience. Please send resume and cover letter to Box 16147500, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386 Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Sous Chef

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Hotel - Towne Place Suites and the Fairfield Inn & Suites: Now hiring for full time and part time Front Desk & night audit. Apply at 755 SW 13th Pl. No phone calls. Housekeepers Needed at Stoneridge Townhomes in Sunriver. To apply, please call 541-593-1502.

The Ranch is accepting applications for a seasonal Sous Chef. Need dedicated individual who possesses good supervisory and leadership skills that has an extensive knowledge of food preparation. Shifts will include weekends and holidays. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

Management Team of 2 for on-site storage facility, exc. computer skills and customer service req., Quickbooks a plus. Apt., util. + salary incl. Fax resume to 541-330-6288. Medical RCM Position RN with knowledge of MDS/RAPS, contact Kim, Ochoco Care, 541-447-7667. dns@ochococare.com

Apply in person at Sugarloaf Mountain Motel at 62980 N Hwy 97. Bend.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

500 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the C LA SSIFIED S

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Loans and Mortgages

541-385-5809 Trucking JOHN DAVIS TRUCKING in Battle Mountain, NV, is currently hiring for: Maintenance Mechanics and CDL Class A Drivers. MUST BE WILLING TO RELOCATE. For application, please call 866-635-2805 or email jdtlisa@battlemountain.net or website www.jdt3d.net

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin WILDLAND FIREFIGHTERS NEEDED-- we are looking for FFT2's, FFT1's, and ENGB's to work on engine crews. If interested please call 1-877-867-3868

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FINANCING

NEEDED

First Position Loans 2 Newer Bend Homes I Own Free & Clear 2 Points & 9% 3 Year Term Be The Bank Joel 949-584-8902

573

Business Opportunities LARGEST Auto/Home/Busi-

541-385-5809

Motel - Front Desk Night Auditor: Part-time position Sales

CAUTION

Finance & Business

SUBWAY MANAGER position. Salaried position with excellent benefits package. Call 541-389-0503 or fax resume to 541-389-9042.

Riverwoods Country Store 19745 Baker Rd., Bend.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

ness Glass Replacement Company in the Country, now searching for new franchise owners in the Bend market. No industry experience required. Full training, strong systems and excellent support. Call Justin Poston, at 254-745-2526. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Quality Control Earn up to $100 a day, evaluate retail stores, training provided, no exp. req. Sign up fee. 877-664-5362

AUTOMOTIVE Bob Thomas Car Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-2911 . . . . . . . . . . www.bobthomas.com Thomas Sales and Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-389-3031 . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.tsands.com

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

EMPLOYMENT Barrett Business Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-6946 . . . . . .www.barrettbusiness.com Flex Force Staffing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-749-7931 . . . . . . . . . . . .www.flex-force.com

MEDIA The Bulletin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-1811 . . . . . . . . . www.bendbulletin.com

For as low as $2.00 per day, your business, phone number, and Web address can be listed. Call 541-382-1811 to add your business and reach more than 80% of the market 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 30, 2010 G3

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 634

Rentals

600 605

Roommate Wanted 3/2 house in Redmond, no pets, $275/mo. +util. Call Jim, 541-280-4185. Rooms in Nice House, next to park/school, $300/1 room, both for $450, 541-408-7019

630

Rooms for Rent East Bend: Nice, large room, own bath & entrance, furnished, no smoking/pets, $350+dep. 541-389-0034. Quiet furnished room in Awbrey Heights, no smoking etc.$350+dep 541-388-2710

Duplex, beautiful 1100 sq. ft., 2 bdrm., 2 bath townhouse, cul-de-dac, newer, clean, vaulted, spacious, W/S paid, $635/mo. 541-815-1643

3/2, Newer 1 Story Duplex, w/big yard, vaults, garage w/opener, all appl., central gas heat, no smoking, pets neg., $725, 541-280-3152.

Studio, 1 bdrm, furnished, fenced backyard, all util. except phone +laundry facilities $500 mo+$250. dep. Pet? 541-508-6118.

HOSPITAL AREA Clean, quiet townhouse, 2 master bdrms, 2.5 bath, all kitchen appliances, w/d hook up, garage w/ opener, gas heat, a/c, w/s/g pd. $645/mo + deposit. 541-382-2033

A Large 1 bdrm. cottage. In quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hardwoods, W/D. Refs. Reduced to $550+utils. 541-420-7613

Houses for Rent General

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!!

Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ballfield, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr approval. Chaparral Apts. 244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms w/d hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. NEWER 3/2.5 duplex, fenced yard, gas fireplace, nice unit, garage 1108 NE Kayak Loop $750 mo., Vernon Property Management. 541-322-0183.

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent 1302 NW Knoxville, Westside 2 bdrm. condo, W/S/G paid, woodstove, W/D hookups, deck storage, $575 + $550 dep. Cat okay, 541-389-9595.

PILOT BUTTE TOWNHOME 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, garage, fireplace. Only $710 per month w/ one year lease. Call 541-815-2495

1 BDRM., 2 BATH, all util. paid, free cable/WiFi! Downtown condo, like new, near river, indoor pool, Bend Riverside, $700/mo. 541-385-8590 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755. Spacious Quiet Town home 2 Next to Pilot Butte Park Bdrm. 1.5 Bath, W/D. Pri1989 Zachary Ct. #4 vate Balcony and lower Patio, 1962 NE Sams Loop #4 storage W/S/G paid $650 2 master bdrms each w/ 2 full 2024 NE Neil. 541-815-6260 baths, fully appl. kitchen, gas fireplace, deck, garage with 636 opener. $675 mo., $337.50 1st mo., incl. w/s/yard care, Apt./Multiplex NW Bend no pets. Call Jim or Dolores, 1 Month Rent Free 541-389-3761 • 541-408-0260 1550 NW Milwaukee. 632 $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D incl. Apt./Multiplex General W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Visit us at www.sonberg.biz Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin 209 NW Portland: quiet one bedroom, w/s/g/cable paid, Classified Rep. to get the oak cabinets, appl., micronew rates and get your ad wave. Carport, laundry, no started ASAP! 541-385-5809 smoking, cat OK. $575/mo. $500 dep., 541-408-0067. 65155 97th St., newer 1/1 duplex on 2.5 acres w/ kitchen, 1 garage, mtn. views, $650 incls. util. No pets. 541-388-4277,541-419-3414 A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $550; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Close to COCC, spacious 2 bdrms., 950 sq. ft., starting at $550/mo. W/S/G paid, 2 on-site laundries, covered parking, 541-382-3108

$99 1st Month! 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, with garage. $675 mo. - $250 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

$100 Move In Special Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. Call 541-385-6928. #1 Good Deal, 3 Bdrm. Townhouse, 1.5 bath, W/D hookup, W/S/G paid, $675+dep., 2940 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615. 2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath, 992 sq.ft., near hospital, fenced back yard, large deck, gas heat, A/C, all appl., W/D, pets OK, $750+dep., 541-280-3570

Move In Special, Townhome, garage, gas heat, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, #3. 541-633-9199 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free 6 month lease! 2 bdrm, 1 bath, $550 mo. Close to schools, on-site laundry, non-smoking units, stg. units, carport, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

The Bulletin Classifieds

2/1.5 $545, Clean Units, Great Location, Move In Special, Hud OK, 2007 Timber Ave. The Rental Shop. 541-389-2260 www.rentmebend.com

55+ Hospital District, 2/2, 1 level, attached garage, A/C, gas heat, from $825-$925. Call Fran, 541-633-9199. www.cascadiamgmt.com

2553 SW 20th St.- 2/1 duplex, garage, yard, W/D hookup, on cul-de-sac, $600 + dep, incl. yard maint., No pets/smoking. 541-382-1015

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

631

642

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Ask Us About Our

March in Special!

AVAIL. NOW (2) nice duplexes, quiet neighborhood 2 bdrm., 2 bath, 1 car garage, fenced backyard, fully landscaped, more info call 541-545-1825.

648

Sunriver: Furnished 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 3 decks, 2 car garage, W/D incl., $875 mo. w/lease. 14 Timber, please call 541-345-7794,541-654-1127 The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, W/D hookups, dbl. garage, very spacious, new, W/S incl., no smoking, avail. now, $750/mo., call Rob, 541-410-4255

652

687

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Commercial for Rent/Lease

On 10 Acres between Sisters & 3000, 1500, & 2500 Sq.ft. Units, light industrial, 1 block Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ W of Hwy 97, 2 blocks N. of wood stove, all new carpet & Greenwood. Lets make a paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, deal! Call Tom 541-408-6823 fenced for horses, $1095, Light Industrial, various sizes, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803. North and South Bend locaCheck out the tions, office w/bath from classifieds online $400/mo. 541-317-8717 www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., & 1680 sq.ft. 654 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Houses for Rent Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. SE Bend Clean 3 bdrm., 1.75 bath, large fenced yard, quiet cul-de-sac, $995/mo. + deps. Pets okay. 20561 Dorchester East. 541-410-8273,541-389-6944 Sun Meadow, 1400 sq. ft., 3/2.5, W/D, appl., dbl. garage, yard maint. incl., pet ?, $995/mo, 61173 Daysprings Dr, call 541-388-4533.

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend

3 bdrm., 2 bath, large dbl. garage, large fenced yard, RV or toy parking, near schools, 541-385-1515

2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath 1084 sq.ft. newer carpet & paint, woodstove, garage fenced yard on .92 acre lot $795 A quiet 3 bdrm., 2.5 bath, 1751 (541)480-3393 or 610-7803. • 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. sq. ft., family room with pel• $200 security deposit on let stove, fenced yard, stor- 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, 900 sq.ft., w/ attached single garage, incl. 12-mo. lease. age shed, RV parking, $995. W/D, newly remodeled bath, • Screening fee waived 541-480-3393/541-610-7803 W/S incl., $725/mo. + dep., Studios, 1 & 2 bdrms from pet neg., 541-350-2248 $395. Lots of amenities. Pet NOTICE: friendly, w/s/g paid All real estate advertised THE BLUFFS APTS. here in is subject to the Fed340 Rimrock Way, Redmond eral Fair Housing Act, which 541-548-8735 makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or GSL Properties discrimination based on race, Move In Special $99 color, religion, sex, handicap, 2007 SW Timber. 2/1.5 familial status or national $545 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 origin, or intention to make THE RE.NTAL SHOP any such preferences, limitawww.rentmebend.com tions or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any Newer Duplex, 2/2 wood advertising for real estate floors, granite counters, back which is in violation of this deck, garage W/D hookup, law. All persons are hereby quiet st., 2023 NW Elm, informed that all dwellings $600. 541-815-0688. advertised are available on $850 - Newer, 3/2 full bath, 1300 sq. ft., dbl. garage, on an equal opportunity basis. dbl. cul-de-sac, fireplace, The Bulletin Classified avail. 4/1, 19833 Sprig Ct., 541-848-1482, 541-385-9391 Looking for your next employee? On the way to the Mt. Bachelor, Place a Bulletin help Fully subsidized near downtown Bend 3/2.5, wanted ad today and 2000 sq.ft. open floor plan, 1 and 2 bdrm Units reach over 60,000 dbl. garage 19424 SW Brookreaders each week. side Way. $1200. 408-0086 Equal Opportunity Your classified ad will Provider 658 also appear on Equal Housing bendbulletin.com which Houses for Rent currently receives over Opportunity Redmond 1.5 million page views every month at A newer Redmond 4 bdrm., 2 no extra cost. bath, 1600 sq. ft., family Bulletin Classifieds room, mostly fenced, nice Get Results! 2210 SW 19th St. yard, RV parking, $850. Call 385-5809 or place Redmond, OR 541-480-3393,541-389-3354 your ad on-line at (541) 548-7282 bendbulletin.com Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. $350 LATE WINTER MOVE-IN 503-829-7252, 679-4495 SPECIALS - Apts. & Multi-plexes Newly Renovated in SW at: COMPUTERIZED 1100 sq. ft, 2/1, hardwood PROPERTY MANAGEMENT floors large yard, pet? $600 541-382-0053 +dep. Near High School, Refs. req. 541-350-3321. •NOT THE TAJ MAHAL but livable. 1 bdrm, 1 bath with shared yard and extra storage. Only $395 mo. 659 • COZY 2 bdrm, 1 bath Apt. with small fenced back yard. Houses for Rent Just $425/mo inclusdes WST Sunriver • PRIVATE 2 BDRM/1 BATH upstairs Apt. w/ on site laundry and off-street parking. Cute balconies. $495 incl. WSG. 1/2 Off 1st mo., OWWII, .5 •DARLING 1 BDRM/1BATH HOUSE. - Fenced back yard acre, 55948 Snowgoose Rd., with room for a garden. Only $495 per month. short walk to river, commu•REDMOND APT. -2 bdrm, 1 bath lower unit, end of quiet nity boat ramp, $795,pets neg, dead-end st., A/C and Private patio. $510 includes WST. no smoking, 541-420-0208 • SPACIOUS APTS. 2 bdrm, 1 bath near Old Mill District. $525 mo. includes CABLE + WST - ONLY 1 left! 661 • NICE APTS. NEAR HOSPITAL - 1 Up/1 Down Houses for Rent 2 bdrm/1 bath. On-site laundry and Off-street parking. $540 Prineville mo., WST included. • FURNISHED Mt. Bachelor Condos - 1 bdrm/1 bath, $595, LARGE DBL. wide mfd. & small $645 mo. includes WST & Wireless. (1 @ $550 - only cabin, on 40 acres of horse partially furnished) property, 15 mi. E. of Prinev• NEAR DOWNTOWN - Spacious cottage, 3 bdrm/ 1 bath. ille, $900 - $1100mo. W/D hookups. Pet Considered. Just $595 includes WST. 907-315-0389 , 907-373-5524 •LARGE TOWNHOME - 3 bdrm, 1½ bath w/W/D hookups. 676 Totally private back deck. Covered parking. Extra storage. New paint. Just $595 mo. incl. WST. Mobile/Mfd. Space • BEST DEAL! SW TOWNHOME 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath with garage, & W/D included. Gas heat. Not far from Old Mill Dist. Mobile Home lot for rent $650/ mo. includes garbage. ½ Mo. FREE Rent! in Beautiful Prineville! No deposit. Will pay to move • PEACEFUL SERENITY Nice 3 bdrm, 2 bath mfd home your home! Call Bobbie on Huge Lot in DRW. Must see. $675 mo. at 541-447-4464. • NEAR TOWN & RIVER 3 bdrm, 1½ bath townhome w/W/D hookups and extra storage. $695 incl. WST. • HUGE FENCED YARD comes with this 2 bdrm, 1 bath house w/garage, washer/dryer hookups. Gas forced air heat. $700 mo. • CUTE NE TOWNHOME! 3 bdrm, 1½ bath w/sgl. garage & W/D incl. $750 mo. incl. W/S. ½ Mo. FREE Rent! •SPACIOUS CONDO w/ 2 MASTERS +½ bath + Washer/Dryer + Dbl. Garage + Space & storage galore + Corner fireplace + Pool +Tennis courts.. Only$775 mo. (excluded from Move In Special) ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website (REDMOND PROPERTIES, TOO!) www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com

Bringin’ In The Spring SPECIALS!

NOW RENTING!

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Concrete Construction

A & R Paintworks

Cascade Concrete

693

745

747

750

Homes for Sale

Southwest Bend Homes

Redmond Homes

Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

FSBO: $198,000 Golden Mantle Subdivision 1234 sq.ft., 3/2, 1/3rd acre treed lot, decking, fully fenced backyard. 541-312-2711.

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Quality & affordable, auto body & paint work. Rocky Fair, 541-389-2593 after 4 p.m.

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Cabinetry All Aspects of Construction Specializing in kitchens, entertainment centers & bath remodels, 20+ yrs. exp. ccb181765.. Don 385-4949

where square, plumb & level is not an extra, commercial, residential, 34+yrs. in Bend. No job too big or small, ccb16071 call for FREE estimates. 541-382-1834.

Debris Removal

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585

JUNK BE GONE

C-2 Utility Contractors

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Avail. for all of your Excavation Needs: Backhoe, Trench, Plow, Rock Saw, and Boring. 541-388-2933.

DMH & Co.

Three Phase Contracting Excavation, rock hammer, pond liners, grading, hauling, septics, utilities, Free Quotes CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Domestic Services Desert Rose Cleaning Now taking new clients in the Powell Butte, Redmond & Prineville areas. 20 Years Exp., Honest & Reliable. Call Gina, (541)788-0986 Home Is Where The Dirt Is 13 Yrs. Housekeeping Exp., Refs. Rates To Fit Your Needs. Call Angela Today! 390-5033 or 948-5413.

Kathys House Cleaning, experi enced, refs, reasonable rates. Call 541-389-8315.

Carpet & Vinyl

Drywall

Carpet & Vinyl Installation & Repairs, Carpet binding & area rugs, 30 yrs. exp. in OR, CCB#21841, 541-330-6632, or 541-350-8444.

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Handyman

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595 Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

Hauling Services

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds Ask us about

Landscaping, Yard Care Fire Fuels Reduction

J. L. SCOTT SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Weekly Maintenance

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years!

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service

Same Day Response

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

700 705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

745

Homes for Sale ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

382-3883

Single Story, 3/2.5, over $150,000 in upgrades, fenced, 1/3+ acre, RV Pad, w/hookups, $499,000, 503-812-0363 www.owners.com/jpm5553

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

748

Northeast Bend Homes Mountain View Park 1997 3/2, mfd., 1872 sq.ft., in gated community $179,000. Terry Storlie, Broker John L. Scott Realty. 541-788-7884

762

Homes with Acreage FAMILY GETAWAY! 9+ acres, will accommodate up to 12 ppl. Close to Sisters, private location. Only $485,000! Bachelor Realty, 389-5516

771

Lots WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $179,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

541-322-7253

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes Affordable Housing of Oregon *Mobile Home Communities*

Own your Home 4 Price of Rent! Starting at $100 per mo+space Central Or. 541-389-1847 Broker Single Wide, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, Pines Mobile Home Park, new roof, heat pump, A/C, new carpet, $10,000. 541-390-3382

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

DEALS ABOUND! LOOK IN OUR

SECTION!!! DON’T MISS OUT ON FINDING CHEAP DEALS! PRICE TO PLACE AD: 4 DAYS $20 • 70K READERS *Additional charges may apply.

Call 541-385-5809 to advertise and drive traffic to your garage sale today!!

FSBO: $249,000 Furnished 2/2 dbl wide/shop & farm equip. 40 acre lot fenced/gated. Pond, good well. 2 mi. E. of Mitchell, OR. Seller Finance Sharon 541-408-0337

(This special package is not available on our website)

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

BIG

RED’S LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Weekly Maintenance Clean Up’s. Free Estimates Call Shawn, 541-318-3445.

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

Moving and Hauling U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-279-8826

Remodeling, Carpentry Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

D Cox Construction Remodeling • Framing Painting, Wall Covering •• Finish Work • Flooring

SPRING

CLEAN-UP

Thatch, aerate, weekly maintenance, weeding, fertilizing, sprinkler activation. Free Estimates Commercial and Residential

“YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

The Bulletin Classifieds

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

Hauling Everything from pine needles to horse manure. Best prices in town. Little Whiskey Farm CCB #68496 • 541-408-2262

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Real Estate For Sale

Ridgemont Apartments

Excavating

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Office/Retail Space for Rent

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Automotive Service

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Contact Hal, Owner, 541-771-2880. hranstad@bendbroadband.com

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. RODRIGO CHAVEZ LAWN MAINTENANCE Full Service Maintenance 10 Years Experience, 7 Days A Week, 541-408-2688 Gregg’s Gardening & Lawn Maintenance. I Can Take Care Of All Of Your Yard Care Needs! Free estimates, 233-8498. Redmond area only.

Doug Laude Paint Contracting, Inc., In your neighborhood for 20 Years, interior/exterior, Repaints/new construction, Quality products/ Low VOC paint. Free estimates, CCB#79337,

541-480-8589 WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

•Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998.

Tile, Ceramic CLASSIC TILE BY RALPH Custom Remodels & Repairs Floors, Showers, Counter Tops Free Estimates • Since 1985 541-728-0551 • CCB#187171

Tree Services Three Phase Contracting Tree removal, clearing, brush chipping, stump removal & hauling. FREE QUOTES CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393


G4 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Boats & RV’s

800 805

Misc. Items 10’ Cargo Toy Hauler 2008 w/back door ramp, white, like new cond., Keeps your 4-wheeler dry and clean. $1,750. 541-350-3866.

850

Snowmobiles

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles 870

881

Boats & Accessories

Travel Trailers

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

932

933

935

975

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Helicopter 1968 Rotorway Scorpion 1, all orig., $2500, please call 541-389-8971 for more info.

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980 Water truck, Kenworth 1963, 4000 gal., CAT eng., runs great, $4000. 541-977-8988

Weekend Warrior 2008, 18’ toy hauler, 3000 watt gen., A/C, used 3 times, $18,500. 541-771-8920

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

925

Utility Trailers

Yamaha Mt. Max 600 1997, many extras, low mi., only $1450. Trailer also available. 541-548-3443

860

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

875

Watercraft

Motorcycles And Accessories Ads published in "Watercraft" HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

880

Motorhomes Harley Davidson 1200 XLC 2005, stage 2 kit, Vance & Hines Pipes, lots of chrome, $6500 OBO, 541-728-5506.

882 Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $8650. 1-907-355-5153.

Very livable, 23K miles, Diesel, 3-slides, loaded, incl. W/D, Warranty, $99,500, please call 541-815-9573.

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

865

ATVs

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919. Suzuki 250 2007, garage stored, extra set of new wheels & sand paddles, Polaris $2400; also Predator 90 2006, new paddles & wheels, low hours, $1400; both exc. cond., call 541-771-1972 or 541-410-3658.

870

Boats & Accessories 16’ FISHER 2005 modified V with center console, sled, 25 HP Merc 4-stroke, Pole holders, mini downriggers, depth finder, live well, trailer with spare, fold-away tongue. $8500 OBO. 541-383-8153. 17’ MARLIN 1993, 30 hours on motor. Only $3700! Call 541390-1609 or 541-390-1527. 18.5’ Reinell 2003, 4.3L/V6, 100 hrs., always garaged, beautiful boat, many extras to incl. stereo, depth finder, two tops, travel cover & matching bow canvas, $13,500 OBO. 541-504-7066

19’ 2002 Custom Weld, with 162 hrs. on

FLEETWOOD BOUNDER 38L 2006, 350 Cat, garaged, warranty. Price reduced! NOW $98,000. 541-389-7596

Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition,

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvass enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050.

GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

Ford F1 1951, older restoration. Flathead six 3 spd. stick. Everything is orig. & works. $10,000 OBO. 541-419-1966.

Ford F150 2005, XLT, 4x4, 62K, V8 4.6L, A/C, all pwr, tilt, CD, ABS, bedliner, tow pkg. $15,500. (541) 390-1755, 390-1600.

Ford F250 XLT 2004, Super Duty, Crew, 4x4, V10, short bed w/ liner, tow pkg., LOW MILES, 56K, great cond., well maint., below KBB, $17,500, 549-6709.

Ford Tudor 2 Door Sedan, All Steel, 327 Chevy, T-350 Trans., A/C, Tilt, Cruise, Disc. Brakes. Many Time Show Winner and Great Driver. Displayed at Professional Auto Body, South, 61210 S. Hwy. 97, Bend. $34,900. 541-306-5161, 209-993-6518

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, gen., fireplace, granite countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, take over payments or payoff of $43,500, 541-330-9149.

Camper Jacks, 1 Pair, universal, $40 OBO/Trade, please call 541-593-3329. Tires, (4) 245/70R16 & 5-hole wheels, take-off, new cond., fits newer Dakota, Durango & 1500 Dodge, $350, 541-382-1853.

Tires, Wintercat Radial SST, 16” snow groove, 225/70R16 103S $195. 760-715-9123

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Everest 2006 32' 5th wheel, 3/slides many add-on extras. exc. cond. Reduced to $37,500. 541-689-1351.

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

360 Sprint Car and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036 Chevrolet C-10 1969, nice truck newer paint, fresh 350 engine great wheels and tires, runs and looks great. $11,500, 541-504-0202. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

Wagon

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

933

Pickups

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

4WD, like new, 16K miles, 5.7 Hemi, goosneck hitch, $23,900, 541-416-0941.

Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, studded snow tires, all service records since new, great value, $18,444, Call Amber, 541-977-0102.

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$24,500, w/o winch $23,500, 541-325-2684 Lexus GX470 2004, all factory options, great cond., 56K, $21,500, 541-419-6967.

Mercury Mountaineer 1997, 4x4, 190K mi., good cond., $2750 OBO, 541-948-2126

Explorer Eddie Bauer 2002 loaded, heated leather, 5 disc, cruise, V8, immaculate, 46K, $10,200. 541-388-7309

GMC Yukon 2007, 4x4, SLT, 5.3L V8 FlexFuel, 63K, 100K extended warranty, loaded, $24,500, 541-549-4834

Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 330-5818.

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

Chevy Corsica 1996, 196K, well maint., runs great, all records $1650 541-317-9006

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

original miles, Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

Mercedes E320 2004, 4-matic, 4 door sedan, loaded, exc. cond. $10,900. 541-536-5774.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 53K mi., 4 cyl., exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9500 541-504-2878.

pendable $600 541-382-0476

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,800, please call 541-419-4018.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Vans

car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

Ford Mustang Cobra Oldsmobile Cutlass Sierra 2003, flawless, only 1700 1994, FWD 4 dr., 6 cyl. de-

940

Chevy 1/2-Ton 4X4 1992, V8, auto, A/C, PW, PDL, etc., runs & drives fantastic, $2950, 702-557-7034, Bend.

1957, Dodge Ram 3/4-Ton 2006,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Toyota Tundra 2006,

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, VW Super Beetle 1974, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. New: 1776 CC engine, dual cond., 78K, running boards. Dularto Carbs, trans, stud$13,600. 541-408-3583 ded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, Chevy Trailblazer 2005, in good condition, with extras, Astags & plates; has sheepskin sume loan. Call seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ 541-749-8339. subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

Dodge Ram 1500 1998, 4X4, Club cab, 148,500 miles, too many options to list, $6500, 541-617-5291.

Chevy

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, studded snow tires, all service records since new, great value, $17,444, Call Amber, 541-977-0102.

Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

VW Cabriolet 1981,

Jeep CJ7 1986, 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., no rust, exc cond. $8950 or consider trade. 541-593-4437

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, newer timing chain, water & oil pump, rebuilt tranny, 2 new Les Schwab tires $1500. 541-410-5631.

975

Automobiles

Honda Hybrid Civic 2006, A/C, great mpg, all pwr., exc. cond., 41K, navigation system, $15,200, 541-388-3108.

Lincoln Continental Mark IV 1979, 302, body straight, black, in good running cond., tires are good, $800 OBO. 541-536-3490

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

The Bulletin Lincoln Towncar 1992, top of the line Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, auto., front & side air bags, leather, 92K, $11,900. 541-350-1565 Audi Quattro 20V 1990, Manual Transmission, Pearl White, 4-Door, 218K, New Timing Belt and Water Pump, Good Tires, Selling this for $1800 O.B.O call Larry at 541-610-9614 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

model, immaculate condition, $2995, please call 541-389-6457 or 541-480-8521.

Mazda Protégé 5 2003, hatchback 4 dr., auto, cruise, multi disc CD, 107K mi., $6210. Call 541-350-7017.

VW Bug 1969, yellow, sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

VW Bug 2004, convertible w/Turbo 1.8L., auto, leather, 51K miles, immaculate cond. $10,950. 541-410-0818.

Mercedes 300SD 1981, never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

runs great, $5200, call 541-390-1833. Holiday Rambler Neptune 2003, 2 slides, 300hp. Diesel, 14K, loaded, garaged, no smoking, $77,000. 633-7633

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, mirco., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

Jamboree Sport 25G 2008, Class C, with slide, sleeps 6, low miles, perfect condition, $45,900, call 541-923-8333.

Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides, Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740

inboard Kodiak, Extreme Jet, with split bucket, Hummingbird 967C color gps - 3d sonar & maps, & more. $17,500, please call 541-977-7948. 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

931

Automotive Parts, 2 Service and Accessories

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Expedition 38’ 2005 Ideal for Snowbirds

Drastic Price Reduction!

2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112 Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Fifth Wheels Yamaha 700cc 2001 1 Mtn. Max $2500 OBO, 1 recarbed $2200 O B O low mi., trailer $600, $5000 FOR ALL, 541-536-2116.

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

916

21.9’ Malibu I-Ride 2005, perfect pass, loaded, Must sell $29,000. 541-280-4965 21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444 Sandpiper Toyhauler 39’ 2004, w/garage, like new, A/C, gen., many extras, $29,500 OBO. 541-536-1361.

885

Canopies and Campers Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $95,000, 541-848-9225.

881

Travel Trailers

Freeway 11’ Overhead Camper, self contained, A/C, reconditioned, $1900 OBO. 541-383-0449

Fleetwood Terry 2001, 34p slide-out, aw- Host 10.5DS Camper 2005, ning, self contained, less than 100 "on-the-road" miles. NICE! $13,000 OBO. 541-475-3869 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Tahoe, always stored indoors, loaded, clean, Reduced to $20,900, 541-330-0206.

Autos & Transportation

900 Jayco Jayflight 2006, 29’ BHS w/ custom value pkg., 20’ awning, gas grill, tow pkg., $14,500. 541-593-2227

Terry Dakota 30’ 2003, Ultra Lite, upgraded, 13’ slide, 18’ awning, rubber roof queen island bed, 2 swivel rockers $12,000 541-923-1524

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

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1000

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS Debra L. Bennett has been appointed as Personal Representative of the Estate of Daniella Cecile Garrett, deceased, by the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon, for the County of Deschutes, Probate No. 09-PB-0161-BH. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present their claims with proper vouchers, within four months from the date of first publication of this notice, as stated below, to the undersigned at the given address below, or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the Personal Representative, or the attorney for the Personal Representative. Dated and first published: March 16, 2009. Mikel R. Miller, OSB #91475 Attorney for Personal Representative Law Office of Mikel R. Miller, PC 26 NW Hawthorne Avenue Bend, OR 97701 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031390222 T.S. No.: 10-07735-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, HANNAH K. NAGEL as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on October 6, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-67323 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 195895 PARCEL 3, PARTITION PLAT NO. 2000-33, BEING A REPLAT OF PARCEL 1, PARTITION PLAT NO. 1998-02, CITY OF SISTERS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 576 S SPRUCE ST., SISTERS, OR 97759 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Pay-

ment $2,580.80 Monthly Late Charge $102.56 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $732,046.60 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.00000 % per annum from June 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on June 7, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes

any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 2, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Chris Bradford ASAP# 3472356 03/09/2010, 03/16/2010, 03/23/2010, 03/30/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-59352-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, KEAN L. DILLON, CINDY D. DILLON as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 08-17-2006, recorded 08-28-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 200658719 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 126968 LOT 49, BLOCK 3, LAZY RIVER SOUTH, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 16767 DONNER PLACE LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 11/01 2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $2,531.25 Monthly Late Charge $0.00 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $450,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per an-

num from 08-30-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 06-28-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors m interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: February 15, 2010 FIRST AMERI-

CAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORRE, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3461984 03/09/2010, 03/16/2010, 03/23/2010, 03/30/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No.: 1717040153 T.S. No.: 7100375 Reference is made to that certain deed made by Meli Markova, a Married Woman as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as Beneficiary, dated 4/30/2007, recorded 5/4/2007, in the official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-25649 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to wit: Lot Ten (10), Vista Ridge, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 63312 Carly Lane, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's failure to: Make the monthly payments of $1,759.52 each, commencing with the payment due on 12/1/2009 and continuing each month until this trust deed is reinstated or goes to trustee's sale; plus a late charge of $77.58 on each installment not paid within fifteen days following the payment due date; trustee's fees and other costs and expenses associated with this foreclosure and any further breach of any term or condition contained in subject note and deed of trust. By the reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The principal sum of $244,026.24 together with the interest thereon at the rate 6.250% per annum from 11/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and

any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on 7/13/2010 at the hour of 11:00 A.M., Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at the Front Entrance Entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured (and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee). Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes; has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. In construing this, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed; the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/5/2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee C/O Max Default Services Corporation 43180 Business Park Drive, Ste. A103 Temecula, CA 92590 (619)465-8200 DENNIS CANLAS ASAP# 3473166 03/23/2010, 03/30/2010, 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809


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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 30, 2010 G5

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LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7472524909 T.S. No.: OR-200384-C Loan No: 0713903775 T.S. No.: OR-225063-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, KEVIN T. SAWYER as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LISA ANN CUMMINS as Grantor to AMERITITLE, trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.), as BenNOMINEE FOR MIT LENDING, as Beneficiary, dated 11/30/2004, recorded 12/6/2004, in official eficiary, dated 2/22/2007, recorded 3/7/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-13793 (infee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2004-72576 (indicated which), covering the followdicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, ing described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 162930 A portion of to-wit: APN: 250897 LOT THIRTY-ONE (31), WESTBROOK VILLAGE, PHASE II, RECORDED JANUthe Southeast Quarter Southwest Quarter Southeast Quarter (SE1/4SW1/4SE1/4) of Section ARY 18, 2006, IN CABINET G, PAGE 1007, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: Twenty-six (26), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Me61648 GEMINI WAY BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the ridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been reSE1/4SW1/4SE1/4; thence North along the West line of said SE1/4SW1/4SE1/4, 660.65 feet to corded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the forethe Northwest corner of the SE1/4SW1/4SE1/4; thence East, 166.10 feet; thence due South to a closure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $280,638.20; plus accrued interest point which is 166.07 feet East of the Southwest corner of the SE1/4SW1/4SE1/4; thence West, plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2009 plus late charges, and all sub166.07 feet to the Point of Beginning. Commonly known as: 21456 NEFF ROAD BEND, Oregon sequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,842.84 Monthly Late Charge $80.39 By obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $304,751.37; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or $280,638.20 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.875% per annum from 3/1/2009 until advances which became due on 6/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that beadvanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is come payable. Monthly Payment $1,298.74 Monthly Late Charge $36.50 By this reason of said given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/14/2010 at default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statand payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $304,751.37 together with interues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Desest thereon at the rate of 6% per annum from 5/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges chutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursusaid described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the exant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY ecution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his succesOF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/14/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard sors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligaof Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the tions thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statpublic auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which utes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said princitogether with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the expal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and ecution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no deto the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is sefault occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default cured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective succescomplained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligasors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/1/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive tion or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" ASAP# 3433548 03/30/2010, 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010 and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/1/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario 1000 1000 1000 Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices ASAP# 3436313 03/30/2010, 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-92168 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MICHAEL A. BOWERS, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., DBA AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK OF OREGON, as beneficiary, dated 9/10/2004, recorded 9/14/2004, under Instrument No. 2004-551 77, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 7 OF NORTHPOINTE-PHASE I, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 20644 BEAUMONT DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 11, 2010 Delinquent Payments from December 01, 2009 4 payments at $ 1,075.33 each $ 4,301.32 (12-01-09 through 03-11-10) Late Charges: $ 161.64 Beneficiary Advances: $ 101.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 4,563.96 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $161,941.99, PLUS interest thereon at 6.250% per annum from 11/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 14, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/11/2010 Trustee By REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICE CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3483362 03/23/2010, 03/30/2010, 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0359442893 T.S. No.: OR-203203-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CLIFF LYLE SCOTT, ALSO KNOWN AS C. LYLE SCOTT as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. , as Beneficiary, dated 12/8/2006, recorded 12/15/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-81806 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 149858 Beginning at a point on the East right of way line of Sherwood Road, now known as SW 61st Street, from which the Southwest comer of Section 1, Township 16 South, Range 12 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, bears South 00º31'50" West 2009.74 feet; thence North 00º17'15" West along said right of way line 630.00 feet; thence North 89º55' East 195.00 feet; thence South 00º17'15" East, 630.00 feet; thence South 89º55' West 195.00 feet to the point of beginning. Commonly known as: 6392 SW 61ST STREET REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $487,210.23; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2009 plus late charges, nd all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,086.53 Monthly Late Charge $65.74 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $487,210.23 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.625% per annum from 3/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/11/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/28/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3431728 03/30/2010, 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010

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TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-91983

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-91510 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, LESLIE A. WALKER AND KENDRA M. WALKER, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to ORANGE COAST TITLE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR QUICKEN LOANS INC., as beneficiary, dated 3/15/2006, recorded 3/20/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-18735, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT SEVENTEEN, STONEHEDGE ON THE RIM, PHASE III, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1316 SOUTHWEST RIMROCK WAY REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 24, 2010 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 4 payments at. $ 1,929.13 each $ 7,716.52 (11-01-09 through 02-24-10) Late Charges: $ 351.12 Beneficiary Advances: $ 134.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 8,201.64 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $175,175.94, PLUS interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from 10/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 28, 2010, at the hour of 11:00AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2/24/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-91983 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, KENNETH E THOMAS AND KRISTIN L THOMAS, as grantor, to CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 2/1/2005, recorded 2/11/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-08281, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (N1/2SW1/4NW1/4SE1/4) OF SECTION TWENTY-SIX (26), TOWNSHIP SEVENTEEN (17) SOUTH, RANGE TWELVE (12), EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 62550 EAGLE ROAD BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 10, 2010 Delinquent Payments from October 01, 2009 6 payments at $ 1,616.64 each $ 9,699.84 (10-01-09 through 03-10-10) Late Charges: $ 569.06 Beneficiary Advances: $ 44.00 Suspense redit: $ -989.94 TOTAL: $ 9,322.96 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $277,138.06, PLUS interest thereon at 7.000% per annum from until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 13, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/10/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3481487 03/23/2010, 03/30/2010, 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010

ASAP# 3464091 03/09/2010, 03/16/2010, 03/23/2010, 03/30/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3175 T.S. No.: 1235897-09.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1464 T.S. No.: 1267131-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0835 T.S. No.: 1267173-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Richard L. Brannin and Heidi N. Brannin, as Grantor Reference is made to that certain deed made by Mario Riquelme, as Grantor to Deschutes County to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Hyperion Capital Group, Llc, as Beneficiary, Beneficiary, dated October 05, 2006, recorded October 16, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Reference is made to that certain deed made by Christopher Ellingson and Karen R. Ellingson, as dated April 14, 2006, recorded April 21, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-68922 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, ("mers") As Nominee For Group One Lending, A Division of Northwest Mortgage Group, Inc., as 2006-27514 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Beneficiary, dated November 27, 2006, recorded November 29, 2006, in official records of Desto-wit: Lot 15 in block 13 of woodside ranch phase v, Deschutes county, oregon. Commonly Lot 7 of River Park Estates, City of Bend, chutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reknown as: 60598 Ridge Heights Bend Or 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have Deschutes County, Oregon. ception No. 2006-78328 covering the following described real property situated in said County elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and noand State, to-wit: Lot 426 of riverrim pud phase 5, city of bend, Deschutes county, oregon. ComCommonly known as: tice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for 3530 NW Mesa Verde Ct. Bend OR 97701. monly known as: 19568 Sager Loop Bend Or 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due april 1, Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the oblielected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and no2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; totice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for gations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of gether with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due november said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,044.59 Monthly Late Charge $87.08. By this reason of said 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late pay the monthly payment due May 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent indefault the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due stallments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by bencharges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $327,836.95 together with intereficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $4,940.74 conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,403.24 Monthly Late Charge $70.16. By this est thereon at 6.375% per annum from March 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust Monthly Late Charge $175.49. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all oblithereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursugations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the followimmediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $217,184.34 toant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, gether with interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all acing, to-wit; The sum of $990,986.36 together with interest thereon at 4.250% per annum from Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 15, 2010 at the hour April 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure crued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby bond street entrance to deschutes county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of Bend, County of Desis given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 15, deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the chutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest undersigned trustee will on June 22, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as estab2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Reidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power lished by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes vised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to deschutes county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which o the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the exany interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and ecution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding disperson named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire missed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no deprior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender fault occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligain the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the perat any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the mastion or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing formance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes pluculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 02, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an ral, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other peryou are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who sons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 02, 2010. notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to 09, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to reagreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you tixed-tenn lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the quire you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale. If you have a tixed-tenn lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to ei60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the ther a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 15 2010, the name rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more inforevidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the mation about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and sale is May 23, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this sale is june 15, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may conthat you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the tact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Orincluded with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, egon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon Ca 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation SignaBoones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org ture/By: Tammy Laird R-299912 Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western ReconveyCorporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon Ca 92022-9004 Cal-Western Publication Dates: 03/30, 04/06, 04/13, 04/20 ance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-299911 R-294279 03/09/10, 03/16, 03/23, 03/30

Publication Dates: 03/30, 04/06, 04/13/, 04/20


G6 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7470991118 T.S. No.: OR-238030-C Loan No: 7429034796 T.S. No.: OR-158841-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BRAE D RUNNELS AND KATHI A RUNNELS, AS Reference is made to that certain deed made by, WILLIAM O. CHAPEL as Grantor to FIRST AMERITENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTCAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER HOMESOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC., as Beneficiary, dated COMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) A LIMITED LI6/5/2006, recorded 6/12/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in ABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 10/15/2006, recorded 10/17/2006, in official records book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-40219 (inof Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microdicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, file/reception No. 2006-69505 (indicated which), covering the following described real property to-wit: APN: 111524 LOT ELEVEN (11), BLOCK YY, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, RECORDED situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 247211 LOT ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE MARCH 22, 1962, IN PLAT BOOK 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 18891 (123), CANYON RIM VILLAGE, PHASE 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: CHOCTAW ROAD BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the 1619 NORTHWEST HEMLOCK AVENUE REDMOND, OREGON 97756 Both the beneficiary and the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been retrustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust corded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foredeed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the closure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $224,415.16; plus accrued interest default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 2/1/2009 plus late charges, and all sub$205,253.51; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on sequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and 10/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon paylate charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,585.43 Monthly Late Charge $68.96 By ments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of $1,474.09 Monthly Late Charge $62.00 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the $224,415.16 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.375% per annum from 1/1/2009 until following, to-wit: The sum of $205,253.51 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.25% per paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums annum from 9/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/14/2010 at trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the underthe hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statsigned trustee will on 6/18/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by ues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Dessection 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond chutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the exbidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had ecution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his succespower to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any insors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligaterest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust tions thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, intrustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statcluding a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Secutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by tion 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dispayment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said princimissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due pal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), toattorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering gether with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the mascuand the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest line gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is seincludes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, cured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" in interest, if any. Dated: 1/29/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/28/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 BurSale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory bank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3433131 03/30/2010, 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010 ASAP# 3431891 03/30/2010, 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8220 T.S. No.: 1266528-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4499 T.S. No.: 1265121-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Sara A Schwarz, as Grantor to Western Title & Es- Reference is made to that certain deed made by Kellie A. Rutherford and Brian P. Rutherford, As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Lawyers Title Insurance Corp., as Trustee, in favor of Mortcrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as gage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For E*trade Mortgage CorporaBeneficiary, dated May 24, 2007, recorded May 31, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon tion, as Beneficiary, dated August 15, 2005, recorded August 17, 2005, in official records of Dein book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. schutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, 2007-30882 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-54295 covering the following described real to-wit: Lot fourteen (14), block fourteen (14) of northwest townsite co's second addition to bend, property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 23 in block 2 of kiwa meadows, Deschutes recorded november 6, 1912 in cabinet a, page 19, Deschutes county, oregon. Commonly known county, Oregon. except the east 4.00 feet thereof. Commonly known as: 1463 SE Wilson Avenue as: 1424 Nw Milwaukee Ave Bend Or 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to Bend Or 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Secrecorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the tion 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due august 1, 2009 of grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal and interest and principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums adtogether with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions vanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payof said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,445.59 Monthly Late Charge $62.88. By this reason of ment $1,212.28 Monthly Late Charge $47.61. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immedideclared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums ately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $236,736.53 together being the following, to-wit; The sum of $153,814.55 together with interest thereon at 5.750% per with interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from July 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the benefifees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and condiciary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is tions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 15, 2010 Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 13, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to Statutes, At the bond street entrance to deschutes county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of Deschutes county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property ighest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired afinterest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust ter the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word euter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 02, 2010. interest, if any. Dated: February 26, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a tixed-tenn lease, the sale. If you have a tixed-tenn lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's re60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day quirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 13, 2010, the name of the sale is June 15, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid ProDirectory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance grams:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon Ca 92022-9004 Cal-Western Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-299897 Signature/By: Tammy Laird Publication Dates: 03/30, 04/06, 04/13, 04/20 R-299296 03/23/10, 03/30, 04/06, 04/13 Advertise your car! TURN THE PAGE FIND IT! Add A Picture! BUY IT! 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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-92073

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0487 T.S. No.: 1263867-09.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, KEITH BERGER AND JACKI BERGER, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as Trustee, in favor of INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., as beneficiary, dated 12/1/2006, recorded 12/14/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-81667, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by OneWest Bank, FSB Successor in Interest to IndyMac Federal Bank, FSB Successor in Interest to IndyMac Bank, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 8, BLOCK 17, DAVIDSON'S ADDITION TO SISTERS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 536 EAST JEFFERSON AVENUE FORMERLY KNOWN AS APNTM 151009 BA 04301 DAVIDSON ADDITION SISTER, OR 97759 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 5, 2010 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 5 payments at $3,362.06 each $16,810.30 (11-01-09 through 03-05-10) Late Charges: $616.80 Beneficiary Advances: $687.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $18,114.10 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $417,000.00, PLUS interest thereon at 8.875% per annum from 10/01/09 to 1/1/2010, 8.875% per annum from 1/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 8, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/5/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By MELISSA HJORTEN, ASST. VICE PRESIDENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Andrew D. Bumstead And Norma J. Bumstead Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated July 10, 2007, recorded July 16, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-39223 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lots one (1), two (2), and three (3), block four (4), hillman city of terrebonne, Deschutes county, oregon. Commonly known as: 1845 C Ave Terrebone Or 97760. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due february 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,461.46 Monthly Late Charge $60.70. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $182,036.08 together with interest thereon at 6.875% per annum from January 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 15, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to deschutes county courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the otice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 02, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a tixed-tenn lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 15, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon Ca 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-299882

ASAP# 3475892 03/16/2010, 03/23/2010, 03/30/2010, 04/06/2010

Publication Dates: 03/30, 04/06, 04/13, 04/20

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1913 T.S. No.: 1236599-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by John M. Simpson and Jolene M. Simpson, As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, dated November 07, 2005, recorded November 14, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-77859 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot twenty-seven (27), block HH, Deschutes River Woods, recorded march 22, 1962, in plat book 6, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 19483 Baker Road Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,735.62 Monthly Late Charge $68.83. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $202,974.80 together with interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from January 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 22, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 09, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 23, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-294444 03/09/10, 03/16, 03/23, 03/30

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-09-330426-SH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MICHAEL C HOUSE AND SARA D HOUSE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., DBA AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK OF OREGON, A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 1/23/2006, recorded 1/27/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xxx at page No. xxx fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No 2006Â06434, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 247807 LOT 63, VILLAGE POINTE, PHASES 2 & 3 DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2990 SW DESCHUTES AVE REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 9/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,112.44 Monthly Late Charge $55.62 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $168,493.30 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5000 per annum from 8/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 4/26/2010 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com 1 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the Trustee of the Deed of Trust written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the Trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is 3/27/2010 the name of the Trustee and the Trustee's mailing address is set forth on this Notice of Sale below. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your Landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included below with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included below with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 12/18/2009 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By Seth Ott, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3385696 03/09/2010, 03/16/2010, 03/23/2010, 03/30/2010


Bulletin Daily Paper 03/30/10