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PORTFOLIO: SEGMENT I Wendall Chin


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FALL 2006


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Lisa Pasquale


A-1 Foundation D E S I G N

SA101 - Foundation Design A-1 Studio Visual thinking is the act of advancing both verbal and visual skills and using them together to develop each assigned design project. Students will also understand the connection between the work of Foundation Design Studios and the Practice Component. Visual thinking skills, as evidenced by interconnected drawing, making, writing, and speaking are fundamental to meaningful participation in the practice of interior design, landscape architecture, and architecture.

There were many short assignments that were very challenging which got me to explore my imagination in abstract form. I thought of Architecture as a formal way of build for longevity. I designed many typical structures, but my instructor Lisa Pasquale insisted that I design abstractly. I thought to myself, “but theoretically, the structure will not hold if I don’t design to stand.� She told me not to worry but to let my imagination run free of design. I took her advice and it got me to explore. I lacked in computer drafting so I was looking forward to using AutoCAD, Sketch-Up, or Photoshop; but then we were not allowed to use any computer drafting programs. I felt I was behind other students in Architectural skill-sets. 5

Spring 2007


Explore Color Define the monochromatic, complementary and trichromatic colors. Understand how colors affect the human eye.

Lisa Pasquale


A-1 Foundation D E S I G N

This exercise showed me that there are many colors on the wheel chart that enhance each other by displaying from different angles, distance or mixture.

7

Spring 2007


a.

a. WINTER My love of snowboarding began during this time of year. I like how the mountains in winter contrasts with conditions of nature, so I wanted to capture that image. b. AUTUMN After a camping trip in Maine, rowing my canoe down Saco River, I saw the surrounding change in color of plant life. The image forces a perspective view point of monochromatic colors.

b.

c. LOVE Valentine’s Day was around the corner so I wanted to showcase the complimentary colors in a bed of roses. d. WAR These two colors are the same spectrum level as the reflective colors deny each other making the two stand out alone. This trichromatic displays the dominance of traditional color.

Lisa Pasquale


Foundation D E S I G N

A-1

c.

d.

9

Spring 2007


2D to 3D Transformation

“Hera� Francis Picabia 1929

Transform a two-dimensional painting into a three-dimensional version using my own personal interpretation or form and space.

Lisa Pasquale


A-1 Foundation D E S I G N

I began this assignment just by looking at the image and defining my interpretation of the painting. I was trying to figure what the painter was feeling and displaying; but I was not exactly sure what he wanted his viewers to acknowledge. I saw sadness, sexuality and loss. My instructor advised me to do some research on the painter. I found that my interpretation was similar yet a little different of the artist’s intention. This was the first time I had done research and found it very useful to combine my interpretation and the artists meaning of their work. 11

Spring 2007


a

a.

c.

Final Design

Height Ruling

Largest:

Smallest:

Object

Height

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1 7 2 6 3 5

Lisa Pasquale

Largest: Smallest:

Object 1 2 3 4

Height 1 4 2 3

Largest:

Smallest: 4

Object 1 2 3 4 5 6

Height 1 6 2 5 3 4

Largest:

Smallest:

Object 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

a. Sadness Faces are captured as the focal point of the painting, expression of neutral but yet undesirable complicated emotions. b. Sexual The sensual curves of a woman’s body are caressed by the gentle touch of a partner along with kisses all over the body. c. Lost The large scale plant life gives the first person viewer the image of looking through a tropical rain forest.

Height 1 7 2 6 3 5 4


A-1 Foundation D E S I G N

Francis Picabia was a womanizer. He loved the art of making love and wanted to paint the moment. The female body is what he found exotic, the faces are of the many women he has touched, and the symbol of the flower is the art of making love.

13

Spring 2007


Tri Book Display The study of using joints without adhesives to build a bookshelf. Choose three books of my preference and design a bookshelf for the sole purpose of highlighting the aesthetics of the books.

After being an auto-mechanic for over three years, I felt my car manual text books were important references for information such as torque specifications and how to step by step instructions on various types of motor vehicles; from American made to European cars and to Japanese Imports. I captured the geometric shapes of cars such as the wheel for ground base, the glass as the visual, and the body panels as support. I had to figure out how to avoid using any adhesive, mainly using various types of jointing methods. I figured the materiality of wood would work best because its stable, solid and easy to trim with the power tools.

Lisa Pasquale


A-1 Aerodynamic

Foundation D E S I G N

Force Load

Aerodynamic Comfort Base

Base

15

Spring 2007


DADO JOINT

Joint Studies These are various types of study joints. I studied what joints would hold firm, joints that are supported by gravity and joints that have mobility. DADO JOINT - it locks in place with the support of gravity. BALL JOINT - a ball swivels within the cylinder for mobility. SQUARE SPLICE JOINT - it locks in place in a horizontal or vertical position with the support of gravity. INSERTION PIPE JOINT - it locks in place in most positions due to the fact that it’s inserted at an angle with some support of gravity. BALL JOINT

Lisa Pasquale


A-1 Foundation D E S I G N

SQUARE SPLICE JOINT

INSERTION PIPE JOINT

17

Spring 2007


Final Design Following my design and using power tools such as a jigsaw to cutout each piece from a large sheet of 3/4” finished plywood, it was fairly easy to assemble within seconds. The scale of each book weighs roughly at about 5 pounds and is 12” in height, 9.5” in length and 3.5” in width. Considering the books combined are very heavy, the book display of the joints needs to be stable without any adhesives.

Lisa Pasquale


A-1 Foundation D E S I G N

BOOK 1 Chilton’s Car Manual: 1980 - 1987

BOOK 2 Chilton’s Car Manual: 1987 - 1991

BOOK 3 Chilton’s Car Manual: 1992 - 1996

The text book car manuals are displayed in chronological order, starting at the base of the bookshelf and spiraling upwards. The circular base is set on a wheel bearing so the book display could oscillate for easy access.

19

Spring 2007


Construct | Deconstruct a Cube Mesh Cube

To construct and deconstruct a cube within seven steps as it poetically defines the process.

Stack Step Cube CONCEPTUAL STUDY MODELS Tick-Tack-Toe Cube Skeleton Cube

Lisa Pasquale

Tetris Cube

Jail Cube

Transparent Cube


A-1 Foundation D E S I G N

PROCESS MODEL Concept A - Overflow

The idea of a tank overflow is that it explodes when the retaining walls cannot contain the pressure built inside anymore.

Concept B - Blooming Flower

A rose blooms steadily as it naturally forms its shape. It shows progress from the beginning to end not making step 4 noticeable at all.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

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Spring 2007


Final Product

STEP 1 The Seven Step Process of Constructing and Deconstructing a Cube 1. The rose is awaiting to bloom. (Shears from four opposing pivot points) 2. The rose is ready to bloom.

STEP 2

3. The rose has begun its blooming process. 4. The transition stage of pedals forming to full bloom. (Uses all eight corners as the pivot points) 5. The pedals begin to open. 6. The pedals begin to openly fold to full bloom. 7. The rose has blossomed.

STEP 3

STEP 4

Lisa Pasquale

STEP 5

STEP 6


5

4

3

2

1

Begin

Foundation D E S I G N

A-1

7

6

The conceptual blooming process was simple to follow breaking it down to seven steps. I felt this was not much of a challenge. I wanted to show that there are two points in getting to the formation of the cube and deforming after. I used the ideal shape of the cube’s corners as their pivot points. The lines are at rest at four opposing corners of the cubes shape. When the lines protrude to the next four corners, it transitions the bend folding outwards.

End

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

STEP 7 23

Spring 2007


Public Park Display of Sculpture Alexander Calder Spider 2 Sculpture We had to design a public outdoor exhibit space for a specific sculpture, defining the artist’s intention and purpose of the sculpture. I was assigned the Spider Sculpture by Alexander Calder. It represents the term “mobile” for the kinetic art form of balancing. The sculpture oscillates with each pivot point as the center of gravity as it rotates from applied natural forces such as wind.

I enjoyed this project a lot in designing conceptually without constraints. I learned to draw plans, elevations, perspectives and diagrams for viewers to understand my drawings using keys and legends. I followed my concept throughout the whole design in reminder of the key words: mobile, spider and the spider web.

Lisa Pasquale


25

Spring 2007

Foundation D E S I G N

A-1


Predesign Images of two kinds of webbing system. There’s the typical widely spread and flat web, and there’s the funnel style where the spider hides in its hole.

SECTIONAL SKETCH The spiral pathway ramp wraps around the Spider Sculpture. The pathway forces the people to walk the whole path making the viewers feel trapped within the spider’s layer. PLAN SKETCH Mimic the design of the funnel style webbing as it creates the central hole for the home of the Spider Sculpture.

ELEVATIONAL SKETCH Using the web system as the structural support underneath a hill sided landscape.

The design intention is focused on the spider’s legs as it curves, stretches and preforms itself vigorously for its mobility.

Lisa Pasquale


A-1 Circulation of people and water in nection the web nesting.

Foundation D E S I G N

Pathway

PERSPECTIVE at GROUND LEVEL

con-

Topography

The study of elevation in designing the structure to three stories in height.

The mountain is situated in a rustic desert setting. The peak of the mountain offers beautiful views over the valley. The concept of a rustic desert inflicts fear into the people as there is no body of water and feeling deserted from society.

27

Spring 2007


SKETCH MODEL

Predesign

The design intent of the park was to make the Spider Sculpture as the hierarchy of its surrounding, including the people. The site is supposed to make the viewer feel like the spiders pray. The starting point of walking across the bridges in enjoyment of the view is like an insect flying blindly. Then the hill leads you to the top of the structure as curiosity takes over. When traveling down the spiral ramp, you feel the entrapment of the spiders web, not allowing people to escape. At the bottom you come across the Spider Sculpture as it mesmerizes the viewers of its ability to oscillate, hence the symbolism of the spider feeding on its pray.

Lisa Pasquale

The sketch model was an interesting build. I focused on what materials to use so each element is identifiable. After laying out the topography and the cut out of the spiral ramp, I needed a structural support system. I improvised using steel wire diagonally bracing them for support while not disrupting the ideal pathways height of travel. I then pictured a mist flowing through the space with an ascent waterfall streaming through many creeks. Crossing the creeks, I placed bridges at three sections. The number of bridges at each section represents the starting point of the park as the concept of step 1 to step 2 to step 3 in referring to mobility.


After designing the layout of the park according to the concept of a spider and its layer, I was able to focus on each element such as the waterfall, the topography, the structure and bridges. Since it is a park, benches are needed for viewing and resting purposes.

A-1 The miniature sculptures displayed underneath the bench resemble the spiders nest as it lurks from below in a warring the people.

Inspirational Images

Foundation D E S I G N

PARK BENCH DESIGN

BENCH PLAN

BENCH SECTIONAL

BENCH ELEVATION

29

Spring 2007


SITE PLAN

Final Design

LEGEND = Walkway = Water = Land Topography = Bridge

I wanted to add color to the model making it realistic. I spray painted the model with a dirt brown color, placed shrubs around the site giving it a rustic design, and used sparkling blue glue for the waterfall and creeks. Sketch Model

Lisa Pasquale

Final Model


A-1 Foundation D E S I G N

The central image where the Spider Sculpture stands in the mist of the waterfall.

SECTIONAL

I felt this was one of my most successful projects in designing conceptually for the Spider Sculpture without restrictions and constraints. 31

Spring 2007


Scott Culley | Nathan Turner


All exercises will focus on understanding design’s relationship to the human body, and human experience. Students will think about the specifics of what is comfortable and uncomfortable, and will design sequences of spaces intended to express abstract ideas, and heighten the experience of an assigned ritual.

Foundation D E S I G N

A-2

SA202 - Foundation Design A-2 Studio

This studio involved learning about the human form and the curves in what supports the body and what does not, what pressure points keeps secure and what inflicts pain. Also how the human body reacts to movement such as muscle memory and understanding actions of the body and mind. I liked discovering the human body because it got me to explore how the jointing of body parts stay secure, and what relaxes the body and what is uncomfortable. Having to deal with my slightly dislocated shoulder and extreme tendonitis from playing various sports consistently without rest, I learned to rehabilitate myself. Using my understanding of the human body, my instructors challenged me even more after my first project because the studio was designed for eight students but my studio consisted of nine students; so my instructors randomly assigned me a more difficult task. I liked the idea of challenging myself, but I also disliked it due to the fact that I found myself asking for help more than designing. This made me reach out to my fellow students and instructors for advice. Once again, we are not allowed to use computer graphics through our projects. 33

Fall 2007


Cardboard Chair

To design a cardboard chair specifically for myself to the human scale. Understand how the body forms in supporting comfort. The challenge is to not use any adhesive.

The design intentions of my cardboard chair was simple yet conceptually strong. I began my thinking of animals that could form into many curvilinear shapes. I sketched many gestures of animal formation to support the backside of a human body. I identified the human pressure points in where the chair can be limited to design for comfort, making it seem effortless of holding up the human structure.

Scott Culley | Nathan Turner


35

Fall 2007

Foundation D E S I G N

A-2


Human Body Analysis

Exploring the elements of cardboard in defining the possibilities of supporting my body structure. I Adopted the idea of a rolled up newspaper as it creates a solid cylindrical tube. But then I wanted certain areas of the tube to bulge for supporting the pressure points on the body.

I used the paper mache technique when forming the cardboard around the curves of the body without the use of adhesive by dampening the cardboard with water and then let dry after sculpting to the desired form.

Scott Culley | Nathan Turner


STUDY of PRESSURE POINT SUPPORT SYSTEM

2.

3.

Foundation D E S I G N

A-2

1.

Thought about the luxury of dining on my cardboard chair and utilizing the headrest as the table. The chair is designed to sit upright or lay down with your feet up to relax the strenuous circulation of the foot.

4.

37

Fall 2007


Design Concept The numerous possibilities of a King Cobra snake that can form to the curves of a human body is a design concept. I thought of the snakes head as the wide back support and using the body to curve in supporting effortlessly.

Thought of the scrunchiness inside the layers of the cardboard for cushioning.

The gesture of a King Cobra as it anticipates the stand to attack on its pray.

Scott Culley | Nathan Turner

Detail side section of designing the chair with armrests. It’s supported by cardboard tubes. The cushioning will give comfort along with the various styles of tubes for support.

Elevation of the King Cobra cardboard chair final design.


Foundation D E S I G N

A-2

The King Cobra was a complicated idea that was a complex design. I explored many possibilities of the material but felt as if there are too many design qualities in making a simple gesture.

SKETCH MODEL OF JOINT Jointing method without the use of adhesives as there’s an intersecting male and female connector through each layer. 39

Fall 2007


Design Concept

ELEVATION STUDY DIAGRAM EAGLE STUDY MODEL

The study in calculating the cardboard cutouts of the rear end support, the back support, and the jointing methods in holding the structure together.

“U” Joint System

Option A: Front Elevation

Scott Culley | Nathan Turner

Option B: Front Elevation


Foundation D E S I G N

A-2

The simple gesture of an eagles wing span.

PLAN DIAGRAM The study of calculating the stacking of cardboard to form the desired width of support.

41

Fall 2007


Final Product

The final dimensions of the cutout within a 30”x42” piece of cardboard.

I purchased close to one hundred sheets of 30”x42” cardboard with each sheet retailing at roughly $2 dollars (not including tax). All together I spent a whopping $200 dollars for this design. There were some design flaws such as the constraint in sizing of the cardboard sheets. I actually wanted the design of the wing span to stretch out further in creating a point to support the neck and the entire leg. If I wanted larger sheets of cardboard, I probably would be spending an additional $200 dollars, so I improvised with what I was able to afford, however, I still think I have spent way more than budgeted. Overall, I’m very satisfied with the design and I have no regrets of the purchase.

Scott Culley | Nathan Turner


Purpose of Position

My Design Flaw Could have lengthened the cardboard for the head support to show a greater wing span in my design concept.

Foundation D E S I G N

A-2

Crossing my arms and legs is the conceptual design connection of an eagle at rest with its wings down by its side and claws in a narrow position.

43

Fall 2007


Fast Draw Ritual

The ritual project is to understand the body movement and posture in their reasoning of the ritual. Step by step procedure is critical in how rituals perform. We are to gather what is important and design a structure for the ritual. I chose the Fast Draw Ritual because it is fascinating how important capturing the body’s position within a second time frame puts a person in a threatening life or death situation.

Scott Culley | Nathan Turner


A-2 • • • •

6 shooter revolver gun Ammo for gun Holster for gun Timer with bell ring and/or light switch

Foundation D E S I G N

Materials:

Instructions: 1.

Distance between opponent is 50 feet apart. Each opponent stands on a 2 feet square podium box facing one another.

2.

Ruling is a combination of Traditional style stand off, and Open style shooting.

3.

Must leave gun in holster untouched until specified.

4.

Once the timer has sprung and/or flashes, duelers are allowed to draw their guns and deliver fire.

5.

Draw gun from holster, cock the hammer to prepare for fire, aim at target/opponent, and deliver fire.

6.

The fastest time of either dueler wins the stand off. 45

Fall 2007


Research & Analysis Fast Draw is the Old American Western style of gun dueling back in the 19th century. The role of a dueler was not to turn down a challenge or the opponent would be known as a coward. This was a risk of life and death. The guns that were used at the time were the revolvers such as the Colt .45 and Ruger. The design of the revolver was a single shot action and cocking back the hammer would rotate the revolver to set up for the next chamber to fire. The revolving chamber only allowed 6 shots. Automatic or semi-automatic guns were not used in this event. The tradition is that duelers are to keep a distance of fifty feet and using the clock tower as their timer in when to discharge. The clock tower rings its bells when striking the hourly time as the duelers will react to the chime of the tower. Each duelist is to keep stationed within a two feet square border at each end of the directed distance. Waiting for the timer is called the stand off. The stand off refrain the duelers from touching or holding their guns as they are to leave them rested in their holsters by their hip. The anxiety builds the anticipation as hands are millimeters away from drawing their revolvers. Once the timer has sprung, each dueler draws their gun out of their holster, cock back the hammer, aim at their target, and pull the trigger.

Scott Culley | Nathan Turner


A-2 Foundation D E S I G N

The Traditional style has many restrictions such as the casing of the holster and method of pulling the gun out of the holster. The holster has to be a snug fit for the gun, preventing the gun to rest loose in the holster. When pulling out the gun upon fire, the motion has to be in an up and down vertical position; cannot twist the gun to the side. They are to keep stance in a two feet square distance.

Traditional Style vs. Open Style The Open Style rules are opposing all the rules of Traditional style. Open style holsters can allow their guns to rest loosely; allowing duelers to draw their guns out of their holsters in a twisting action or however feels comfortable. The foot placement stance is not in affect. The result comparison of the Open style draw is a lot quicker than the Traditional style.

47

Fall 2007


A1

A2

A3

A4

Thumbing - the Traditional Style of gun slinging. It is the use of a single hand to deliver fire by pulling the gun with palm and use thumb to cock the hammer back. 3. Drawing revolver to aim. 1. The nerve-racking anticipation upon the alarm to sound for battle.

4. Pulling the trigger for discharge. 2. Cocking hammer in position.

Fanning - an Open Style form with the usage of both hands, as the importance of the second hand is to cock the hammer in position to fire.

B1

B2

Scott Culley | Nathan Turner

B3

B4


A-2 Foundation D E S I G N

There are various styles of gun slinging, but what determines the fast draw is the body posture and motion in positioning to fire as quick as possible. The revolver rests in its holster in an upright position; as the trigger hand reaches to pull out the firearm backward, the body thrusts forward to permit a quicker pull out of the holster allowing the mobility of the gun to fire. The diagram below indicates the body language for each of the four steps of fast drawing.

49

Fall 2007


Predesign

The purpose of a Right-Triangle is that it has a pointer, a handle and its solitary 90 degree defiance. It mimics the geometry of a hand gun as it sits nicely in the human hand.

Scott Culley | Nathan Turner


A-2 Foundation D E S I G N

The right-triangle’s 90 degree importance is that it is the backbone in the definition of a right-triangle. However, deforming the 90 degree angle of a right-triangle will cause its ferociousness to act as the hammer of a revolver waiting to explode.

51

Fall 2007


Final Design

Each design emulates one of the four steps involved in withdrawing the revolver. The hand’s four fingers and thumb grabs the revolver, cocks the hammer back and then fires a single shot pointing towards the target.

The curving of the structure resembles the rotating revolver as the Open Style of gun slinging.

The Traditional Style is an up and downward motion of drawing.

OPEN STYLE Front Sectional

TRADITIONAL Side Sectional

Scott Culley | Nathan Turner

OPEN STYLE Side Sectional

TRADITIONAL Front Sectional


ELEVATIONAL VIEW of FINAL MODEL

50’-0”

Foundation D E S I G N

2’-0” 2’-0”

A-2

PLAN VIEW of FINAL MODEL

I was satisfied with this project but it was difficult for me to break down the steps of the ritual. Struggling to find more of a meaningful purpose and information in between the process. Since it is conceptually a fast ritual, I wanted to create a simple design focusing on the movement of the revolver.

53

Fall 2007


Sol Camacho | Valeria Alonso


I enjoyed this studio with the transformation of a residential house and the infamous boat house along the Esplanade of the Charles River. Developing various ideas, traveling back and forth to determine what works and what does not work. It was a great learning tool of using diagrammatic sketches to indicate the purpose of the design. Once again, I wasnot able to use computer drafting for my renderings; but it did not phase me as much as I thought it would.

Foundation D E S I G N

Foundation Design B-1 introduces analysis as a basis for architectural design. Students begin by engaging in an intensive, six-week analysis of a seminal house or building, during which they are introduced to a variety of rigorous analytical methods. Through this project, students come to understand the nature and variety of drawings required to represent a work of architecture in its entirety producing a comprehensive set of “base drawings� (plans, sections, and elevations) from which to begin their analysis. Working through sketches, study models, and measured analytical drawings, students arrive at a fundamental understanding of the underlying concepts and principles that informed the design of their selected building. After completing the building analysis project, students undertake a three-week analysis of a site along the Charles River, in which they are given the opportunity to refine the analytical abilities developed during the first six weeks of the course. During this analysis, students are asked to cultivate and set forth a particular attitude about the site, which then serves as the basis for a complete design proposal for a public boathouse to be located on the site.

B-1

SB101 - Foundation Design B-1 Studio

55

Spring 2008


Residence Transformation Picture Window House 2003 Shizouka, Japan Shigeru Ban Architects The purpose is to transform a residence according to my understanding of the designers intentions.

This was a fun project having to work with an existing structure. I was intrigued by Shigeru Ban’s design as I did not want to transform much of it since it was designed specifically to match his conceptual intentions. I‘m greatly fascinated by his work, I waited to attend a seminar of his design process and concepts at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. I wasnot able to meet the guy who was present at the time, but it was a great learning experience and a way to network with so many up and coming designers.

Sol Camacho | Valeria Alonso


SITE PLAN

N

57

Spring 2008

Foundation D E S I G N

B-1


Site Analysis

SOUTH ELEVATION

N EAST SECTION

The 273-square-meter symmetrical structure consists of two floors spanning 20 meters utilizing the landscape for framing views, flow of space, and determining public and private living. Trusses span along the second floor facing south vaguely obstructs the view that overlooks the Pacific Ocean, as the corridor leans against the summit for privacy. The first floor is the “universal floor� meaning fluid continuity between inside and outside without boundaries. Layers of trees surround the rear surface like a fortified wall. The house is mostly covered by transparency material with sliding glass doors allowing the flow of light, air, and sound penetrating through the structure.

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

Sol Camacho | Valeria Alonso


Foundation D E S I G N

B-1

STUDY MODEL OF EXISTING SITE

I needed to ask myself questions as a reminder of his design aesthetic. I find it useful to continually challenge myself and ask questions, even if I am unable to find an answer. This has been useful when I research. 59

Spring 2008


DIAGRAM RELATIVE TO LANDSCAPE IN PLAN VIEW

Transformation

Keeping the public and private living similar, but enhancing the space for flow of light, air and sound travel throughout house. Leaving the first floor intact, transforming second floor and roof plan to geometrically match slope of landscape; determined from the site plan and the sloped pitch elevation from west to east. The roof slants from west to east as the south edge rises above north. Bedroom bay windows angle towards the ocean as it is slightly stretched in transforming the overhang platform to a balcony. The corridor wall stays the same height allowing the flow to the penetrating ceiling. The design becomes asymmetrical and relates to the landscape.

N

1.

The footprint of the residence along with the topography of the landscape directing slopes.

2.

The footprint relative to the transition points of the slopes defining the area of space.

3.

The boundaries symmetrical structure splitting it in half in creating sections of the spaces.

4.

Flipping the boundaries front facade in parallel to the upward slope of the landscape.

Sol Camacho | Valeria Alonso


SKETCH OF “FLOW” THROUGH SPACE

Foundation D E S I G N

B-1

“FLOW” DIAGRAM IN PLAN

The first floor is the “universal floor” meaning fluid continuity between indoor and outdoor space without boundaries. The arrows are the circulation of “flow” traveling through the space. But within the enclosed space bounces the “flow” back in reverse.

Flow of landscape relates to the public and private areas of the house. This sectional and perspective diagram captures Shigeru Ban’s idea of “flow” is of natural elements of light, air, sound and for viewing without boundaries. 61

Spring 2008


SECTIONAL OF FLOW DIAGRAM

Final Design

The diagramatical sketch defines the purpose in transformation in why it functions more productively than the existing structure.

SECTIONAL OF PUBLIC & PRIVATE AREAS

Legend =

Public & Private

= Private = Public

The sectional diagrams bewteen the existings and transformation indicates my understanding of “flow� through a larger space in the connecting the second floor. The axonometric image shows the rooftop form guiding the view towards the main entrance of the residence. That was one of my problem in design where his structure is very symmetrical to the point his main entrance is undefinable.

Sol Camacho | Valeria Alonso


SOUTH ELEVATION: TRANSFORMATION

I was satisfied with the simple transformation because I did not want to butcher Shigeru Ban’s design. It was already simple and conceptual as is, but I had to follow the assignment. I was so close to not transforming it due to my findings and research of his concept, but I needed the challenge making it as elegant as possible.

B-1

WEST SECTION: TRANSFORMATION

SOUTH ELEVATION: EXISTING

Foundation D E S I G N

WEST SECTION: EXISTING

63

Spring 2008


Site Analysis and Boat House Design at the Charles River Esplanade Concept Order and rhythm is the design creation within my analysis of the site and structure. The “ABC� streets aligned parallel with the Back Bay, illustrates order. Capturing the threshold between land and water as the structure mimics the monumental staircase; also creating the force perspective of manipulating views to appear further than reality demonstrates rhythm. The symmetry of the structure influenced by sunlight and artificial light along with the crossing beams appears extensive. Transparent canopies form tunnels in emphasizing the echoing waves creating the transitional stage of land and water. The dock imitates the structure directing the human eye of order and rhythm.

Sol Camacho | Valeria Alonso


B-1 Foundation D E S I G N

I enjoyed this Boat House design process so much that I wanted to cover all aspects of the design process. I investigated a thorough site analysis, concepts, concept diagrams, study models, interviewed with rowers at a boat house, sketches, final drawings and a final model. I have visited the site multiple times through rain and shine, sun down and sun up, and from the beginning to end of the Spring season. There was a lot of information to cover with utilizing the second half of the semester. All in all, it was a great transition process for me.

65

Spring 2008


Site Analysis

Old Boston 1630

North Cove Addition 1804-1829

West Cove Addition 1803-1863

HISTORY OF BOSTON’S LANDFILL Within the heart of Boston, more than half the land is landfill. Before the landfill project, there were three mountains known as the Trimountain over by Beacon Hill as it was excavated for the project landfill in filling the coves surrounding downtown, including Back Bay. There was a chronological order of when the project was complete as the Esplanade follows the concept of order and rhythm as defined by my historical site analysis.

Sol Camacho | Valeria Alonso


Back Bay Addition 1857-1894 Foundation D E S I G N

B-1

South Cove Addition 1806-1843

N

New Boston Landfill

New Boston with Landfill 67

Spring 2008


DIAGRAM OF LAGOON ISLAND VS. LAGOON

Site Analysis

Order and rhythm found within the Back Bay site of the ABC streets.

The additional body percentage of landfill in comparison to Old and new Boston. The Esplanade tells the story of the New Boston Project landfill by the sizes of each lagoon representing the time line in process of the project.

Sol Camacho | Valeria Alonso

View from the Massachusetts Avenue Bridge of the Lagoon

Arlington Street

Berkeley Street

Clarendon Street

Dartmouth Street

Exeter Street

Fairfield Street

Gloucester Street

Hereford Street

DIAGRAM OF LAND OLD BOSTON VS. NEW BOSTON


GRID LOCK DIAGRAM IN CAPTURING THE IMPORTANCE OF THE SITE

B-1

Prudential Tower John Hancock Building. Historical churches Charles River Esplanade Half shell Performance Center Access ramps Monuments Cambridge Massachusetts Avenue Bridge Longfellow Bridge The people

Foundation D E S I G N

• • • • • • • • • • • •

N

The Back Bay is a grid block of mixed use. From retail stores, to upscale residential, to commercial zones, with skyscrapers and community parks.

69

Spring 2008


A - Starting point of Esplanade B - Leads to an access ramp C - Captures a view to the Hancock Building D - The stone steps into the lagoon E - Leads to an access Ramp F - An access ramp in view of Prudential Tower G - Children’s playground. H - Empty site Mass. Ave - End of ABC streets.

Site Analysis

Legend = Boundaries = Views = Grid System = Location of Boat House e s. Av

Mas

H

G

F

E

D

C

B

SITE LOCATION DIAGRAM

A

N

Prudential Tower

John Hancock Building

Capturing views within the city. Each street from Arlington Street to Massachusetts Avenue have a significance to the Esplanade, except for Hereford Street. The Half Shell Center

Sol Camacho | Valeria Alonso


Foundation D E S I G N

Force perspective view of looking at the Prudential Tower . The residential buildings guide the view of importance within the city. Still the Prudential Tower is taller than any other building within its vicinity.

B-1

FORCED PERSPECTIVE OF HIERARCHY

71

Spring 2008


Threshold Study The threshold diagrams indicate the transition of elements and views. THRESHOLD DIAGRAM FROM LAND TO WATER

THRESHOLD OF STONE STEPS LEADING INTO THE WATER

THRESHOLD OF VIEWING INTO THE CITY

Sol Camacho | Valeria Alonso


Conceptual Sketch

Foundation D E S I G N

B-1

Site Diagram of Order

THRESHOLD STUDY MODEL Forcing the viewer to see an exaggerated appearance in larger or smaller form than its actual distance. The panels create an overcasting shadow in connecting the sides together. The shadows also guide the viewers attention towards the center. This creates order and rhythm.

73

Spring 2008


Each of the ABC crossing streets have a significant identity in defining the sections of the lagoon. Capturing the thresholds, perspective importance is the view from looking into the city. On the other hand, Hereford Street has no significant identity on the Esplanade, but an unpleasant view within the dark zone of the Charles River hidden under the Massachusetts Avenue Bridge. To enhance the distinction of Hereford Street as the last ABC street in the Back Bay, my designing purpose is to reverse the thresholds perspective looking from the city street instead of into the city.

Sol Camacho | Valeria Alonso

STUDY MODEL OF SITE SECTION


The curvilinear element of forced perspective of a roof deck

Plan view of a curvilinear roof deck.

B-1

Rhythm and order in forced perspective

Foundation D E S I G N

SKETCHES IN THE STUDY OF RHYTHM AND ORDER

Cross bracing of rods for structural support and canopy Roof plan of units in progressive growth

Movement of growth

Cross hatching of paddles rowing a boat 75

Spring 2008


Predesign

Gathering all the design concepts and site context, I designed according to my understanding of the site. I remind myself of order and rhythm because that was my analysis of the Esplanade as it refers to the landfill project of Old Boston and New Boston. I felt confident in my design so I felt I needed to define the programing of space. Making sure I met the area square footage requirements within each occupied space. How to design in making the spaces public or private, determine what views will be desirable for the people, what would be of easy access for entry. I focused on the functionality of the programatic spaces as I picture myself walking through and around the structure.

Sol Camacho | Valeria Alonso


• • •

The importance of the stone stairs leading to the main entrance of the building is the idea of reversing the threshold staircase of land to water. The open space in between the building act as the public space for people to enjoy when the building is unoccupied. The rods appear as if they cross through the structure in creating canopies as it resembles the rowing motion. The vertical rods stationed by the main entrance is for cyclist to lock their bicycles.

Foundation D E S I G N

B-1

Key Factors of Design

77

Spring 2008


Final Design

SOUTH SECTIONAL LOOKING FROM MASS. AVE BRIDGE

Sol Camacho | Valeria Alonso


WEST ELEVATION FROM CHARLES RIVER

BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN AT WATER LEVEL

Foundation D E S I G N

B-1

NORTH ELEVATION FROM LAGOON

FIRST FLOOR PLAN AT GROUND LEVEL Legend = = = = = =

Boat Storage (private space) Lounge (public space) Locker Rooms | Restrooms Repair Shop Office Trainers Room

N

79

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

Spring 2008


William Nolan


SB202 - Foundation Design B-2 Studio

Foundation D E S I G N

B-2

Students are expected to thoughtfully engage the varying site conditions through rigorous site analysis, but with additional consideration to issues such as historical and cultural contexts, programmatic organization, building structure & enclosure, and tectonic exploration.

This studio allowed me to explore thorough site analysis and envision ideas of how the site is interpreted. A very fast pace semester jumping from project to project in a short time frame . I finally got to experience computer drafting for this studio. I was excited to explore AutoCAD and Sketch-Up as well as redefining the images through Photoshop. The renderings came out clean, but it was difficult to display my ideas across the board. I kept trying methods to engage diagrams through computer drafting, but all inconclusive, it is not as legible as hand-drafting. Hand-drafting allows me to move freely and determine the hierarchy of line-weights and shadowing. Computer drafting restricted me from drawing certain ways of conveying my ideas. I regret not drafting by hand and that I should do it more often as oppose to computer programming.

81

Fall 2008


Project 0: Tectonic Strategy

Concept Statement:

Apparatus is the balance within the structure as the tectonics embrace within the materials. However, the functionality isn’t much within the tectonics or materials, but mainly focused on the positioning of the components and units. The geometric units are structural components in which they interlock with an angled force induction of vertical load bearing to one another as the foundation supports the spouted units. The cables are the recessive components relieving stress in which it supports the units at horizontal loads. The hierarchy component is the diagonal bracing of loads mostly defined by visualizing the angled position of the loads as a circular path; in equalizing that circular path with the help of a scale.

William Nolan


The Units are held together by force. They don’t bond to each other but are jointed by gravity as each component supports one another.

Foundation D E S I G N

B-2

Inspirational Tectonic Image

83

Fall 2008


1.

Design Influence 1. The stacking of round objects as the balance within the center of gravity.

Conceptual Images

2. The mystery still remains of Stonehenge’s form of construction. 3. An abstract linear painting that displays balance in stacking. 4. A drawing with the cables tension pulling from all directions. 5. A scale representing balance.

2.

6. The Bunker Hill Bridge showing the hierarchy of its structural support system. 7. The Milwaukee Art Museum designed by Santiago Calatrava as each element is a structural component as they brace one another for support. 6.

5.

3.

4.

William Nolan


Sketch Diagram a.

An equal balance of weight between the units.

b.

The tension holding the units as one is the foundation and the other is balanced by the tension of cables.

c.

An equal balance of weight between all the stack ing units of their geometric support within the tension of the cables.

d.

The tension supporting the stacking units above ground level as the other end acts as the foundation of the system.

a.

b.

7.

Foundation D E S I G N

B-2

c.

d.

85

Fall 2008


a.

d.

Schemes of Angular Position in Balance b.

e. c.

The balance depends on the angles from the structural beam as it mirrors the other side to even the load. If the angles different, they are to be balanced by an extension of close to double their distance. The circle represents the structural beams balance zone, as the loads are distributed equally within or outside of the balance zone.

William Nolan


Equalize Distribution Diagram

50 | 50

CONCEPT

Foundation D E S I G N

DRAWING

B-2

Stress Load Diagram

The stress load is pulling each other as the structural beam balances both sides. The beam penetrates into the ground as the source of foundation.

Hierarchy Stress Load Weight Distribution

= = =

MODEL 87

Fall 2008


Final Design

PLAN VIEW

ELEVATIONAL VIEW

FOUNDATION

The Structural beam act as the weight transferrer to balance the loads. FOUNDATION

William Nolan


TECTONIC STUDY MODEL

Foundation D E S I G N

The 3D rending tool I produced in Google SketchUp and transferred the image into an image editing program known as Creative Suite Photoshop, I captured the image seeming realistic. B2 Studio allowed me to practice my computer rendering ability and enhance images to appear real. I’ve been eager to draft with computer programing because that’s what I’ve lacked and needed to gain more experience for future involvement in design.

B-2

The loads combined force points the structures center point of gravity towards the foundation is accompanied by the tension pull of cables. The geometric shape with the force loads allow the units to interlock with one another.

89

Fall 2008


Project 1: Arnold Arboretum | Peters Hill Established 1872 Boston, Massachusetts Harvard University

Concept Statement: The design intent is to utilize my tectonic strategy from Project 0 in the design of an exhibit and classroom space at Peters Hill. Having to visit the site multiple times to analyze and conclude my interpretation was a great experience to understand Harvard University’s purpose. Their mission is to foster great understanding of Earth’s botanical diversity and its essential value to humankind by way of research, horticulture and education. The idea of balancing and connecting the units to uphold the structure is the concept strategy, but defining the purpose in transition is the key factor of Peters Hill.

William Nolan


N

91

Fall 2008

Foundation D E S I G N

B-2


The Transition Diagram

Site Topography Map of Peters Hill Arnold Arboretum

N

William Nolan

Plan View of Transition Diagram.


Perspective looking down from top of Peters Hill

Foundation D E S I G N

B-2

•

The transition between emptiness on one side and plant life on the other (grass is not included). The transparent wall symbolizes that the transition of balance between life and death. •

Conceptual Perspective

93

Fall 2008


BALANCE Conceptual Images Mental Map a. plant life grown off a rock

NEW

OLD

b. looking up Peters Hill

c. bird life

William Nolan

d. new plant life

e. old plant life

f. view from top of Peters Hill looking into Boston


Foundation D E S I G N

B-2

The rustic and organic elements create formation of nature fusing as they channel and feed from each other to increase their growth.

g. tombstone

Mental Map Conclusion - human nature of life and death 95

Fall 2008


1. Plan View Schemes

Conceptual Design

2. Front Elevation Schemes

3. Side Sectional Schemes

1.

William Nolan

Plan View Schemes show various balance within the units creating an overhanging slope above ground. The top and bottom blue marks represent the grounds level according to the units.

2. Front Elevation Schemes have units balanced with the landscape. There is the flat or sloped representations of the green landscape, and the units adjust with the angle to balance with the land.

3. Side Sectional Schemes variations in defining the concept and form in the design of the Arnold Arboretum.


Site Location Analysis

The transition between life and death, from rustic to earthy, the units are based upon materials in relation to Peters Hill landscape. The three units represent life, from adolescence to living to the lights of heaven. = Dramatic Slope of Land

B-2

= Congested Large Trees

Foundation D E S I G N

N

97

Fall 2008


Predesign STUDY MODEL

1.

5.

1. The constraints of area square footage within the units 2. Plan view of structural support system 3. Scheme 1 of structural support system 4. Scheme 2 of structural support system 5. Sketch model of structural support system

2.

3.

William Nolan

4.


STRUCTURAL PLAN - Steel Trusses - Steel Cables

UNITS AND FOUNDATION Unit 1

Basement Level (1,000 sq. ft.) - Small Classroom - Office Space First Floor Level (500 sq. ft.) - Lobby/Waiting Area - Reception Desk

Unit 2

(2,000 sq. ft.) - Large Classroom - Restrooms - Janitor Closet - Rooftop Patio/Garden

Unit 3

(1,000 sq. ft.) - Exhibit Space - Gathering Space - Lounge

Unit 3

Unit 1 Unit 2

B-2

MATERIALITY

Foundation D E S I G N

Foundation - Cement / Stone Unit 1 - Stone / Granite Unit 2 - Lumber Wood / Plant Life Unit 3 - Glass / Reflective Metal

Unit 3

Unit 1 Foundation

Unit 2

N

99

Fall 2008


NORTH INTERIOR ELEVATION • • •

Unit 3

Lobby and Basement in Unit 1 Rooftop garden patio above Unit 2 Exhibit space in Unit 3

Unit 2

Final Design These are the final images of how the structure is designed according to the form and function of programming. Unit 1

WEST INTERIOR SECTION OF UNIT 1 & UNIT 3 • • •

Unit 1 staircase between upper and lower level Unit 2 wood framing Unit 3 transparency

EAST ELEVATION HARD LINE

William Nolan

Unit 3 Unit 2

Unit 1


FINAL DESIGN I was grateful with this design process as I produced large amounts of diagrams, drawings, and followed a strong concept throughout the project. I defined the sites purpose, sketched a diagram of it and then was able to design my building according to the concept. Understanding materiality in determining the poetics of design was brilliant. I couldn’t have been happier with myself except the fact that I wasn’t able to build a final model due to the time constraints within the B2 Studio semester.

Unit 3 INTERIOR PROGRAMING OF SPACE • • •

Unit 1: lobby, classroom and storage Unit 2: large classroom, restrooms and janitor closet Unit 3: Exhibit Space

Unit 1

B-2

CONCEPT DIAGRAM

Foundation D E S I G N

SITE ANALYSIS

Unit 2

101

Fall 2008


Project 2: Chinatown Performance Center BCNC Cultural Center Boston, Massachusetts (Chinatown) The Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center group is growing sharing limited space with the Josiah Quincy School. They have after school programs, educational language labs for non-speaking English adults, and most importantly they like hosting special events for the community such as festivals and theatre. The festivals and auditorium space is what they lack. Applying for permits from the City of Boston to blockade a street is time consuming and their conflicting schedules for the auditorium space at the Josiah Quincy School. They like giving back to the community so what better way to do it but to design a cultural performance center. If they were to have their own space for these festivities, they would host more of these community events.

The information I was given was by the employers at BCNC. I was able to schedule an interview with their directors and it was good experience in gathering information. Even though they knew I was only a student, they shared a great deal of information of how their program is structured. I decided to design for the people.

William Nolan


103

Fall 2008

Foundation D E S I G N

B-2


Public Transportation

Vehicular Speed Transition

Water & Public Park

Site Analysis Site Location

= Silver Line = Red Line = Commuter Rail

= Orange Line = Green Line = Bus Route

The Red Zone from North is the starting point where traffic merges onto John Fitzgerald Road. The Black Zone is the entrapment of leading traffic towards the highway (Blue Zone) moving South of I-93 or West bound on the Massachusetts Turnpike (I-90).

Circulation Diagram This diagram lead me to the Node Diagram

William Nolan

= Body of Water

= Public Park


Boston District Zones

= Chinatown = Financial District = South End

Special Event Road Block

= Leather District = Theatre District = South Boston/Waterfront

BCNC’s primary location is South of Chinatown (red area) at the Josiah Quincy Elementary School. During special events such as Chinese New Year parade, August Moon Festival, or community events, the City of Boston authorize road blocks for the community events. The Orange path is the parade route.

Foundation D E S I G N

B-2

The given site location will inquire the Chinatown Gate Park in allowing BCNC to host their events without disrupting the heavy traffic circulating around the Downtown Area. The significance of the park is the unification of cultures surrounding the districts.

Node Diagram The site contains great diversity as the heart of transportation, communications and trades. Here is the transitional intersecting point as the nodes collide on this site.

105

Fall 2008


Reverse Order of Material from Project 1

Reverse Hierarchy

Project 1: Arnold Arboretum Material Diagram The three units are identified by its material order of construction from stone foundation to wood framing to large visual aesthetic elements as it follows the form of Peters Hill landscape. STONE - Foundation, serves as the public and private sector. This unit is the only way of circulating in and out of the structure. WOOD - Framing, private unit that blends with the densely populated trees. GLASS - Visual aesthetics, public transparent exhibition space.

William Nolan

The purpose in reversing the order of material identification of the units is to follow the form and function with the urbanized Chinatown site for BCNC. The design manipulates the intention of construction in making it seem conceptually infeasible with the foundation supported by the transparent structure.

GLASS

-

Open public space that allows circulation through ground level in connecting the Chinatown Gate Park to the building. As for BCNC’s purpose of the ground level transparency is to permit community events in relation to the park.

WOOD

-

Public and private sector for multiuse, mainly performing arts and entertainment space.

STONE

-

Private living area and studio space. The enclosed massive facade creates a sound barrier from the city.


Northeast Aerial View

View looking from above the State Street Corporate building.

Site Plan with Project 2 Building

• •

Open Space Ground Level Section (from East) • • • Ginza Restaurant

The icon of Chinatown’s existence Located in the heart of Boston from the main Interstates and districts

Foundation D E S I G N

N

State Street Building

B-2

Chinatown Gate

The open space connects the districts utilizing the park Allows open flow of circulation and pedestrians Meets similar height with existing structures Vent Stack

107

Fall 2008


PROJECT 2: TECTONIC DIAGRAM • The concept of balance from my tectonic strategy as each unit rests on one another • Finding a solution to elevate the units by force of tension • The steel cables support the hanging units

Programming

PROGRAMMING PROCESS SKETCH

3

2

1

Now that I designed a conceptual structure, I needed to program the spaces making it functionable according to the units purpose of public and private living. The units are elevated from the third unit’s foundation supported by structural steel cables as I adopt my tectonic strategy of balance from Project Zero and concept materials from Project One. The initial design of the Spiral Staircase leading up from ground level to the top floor mimics the idea from Project One’s purpose of walking through the units in order forcing the people to observe the transition of form following function.

William Nolan


SCHEME 1: East Elevation

3 2 1

SCHEME 2: East Elevation • • • • • •

Spiral staircase from 1st to 2nd floor only Larger floor space for programing Stairwell and elevator in foundation Skylight roofing Units 1 & 2 supported by cables from Unit 3 Six levels Basement: Level Unit 1: 1 Level Unit 2: 2 Levels Unit 3: 2 Levels

3 2

My decision between the two schemes is that I chose Scheme 2 the fact that I focused more on programing the spaces more than defining my conceptual design. I wanted to follow the program requirement of area square footage for each individual space because I felt it was of importance for the people at BCNC. During the process, I realized my design wasn’t as intriguing as my conceptual design. Considering the time frame within the semester for B2 Studio, my decision making was limited as I blindly followed my intentions at the time of design.

B-2

• • •

Spiral staircase throughout all floor Stronger flow in circulation Transparent elevator in center well of staircase Fire exit stair in foundation Skylight roofing Units 1 & 2 supported by cables from Unit 3 Six levels Basement: 1 Level Unit 1: 1 Level Unit 2: 2 Levels Unit 3: 2 Levels

Foundation D E S I G N

• • •

1 109

Fall 2008


Open Space with Spiral Staircase (person’s visual diagnostic)

Glass Structure

UNIT 1 Conceptual design in connecting the open space to the park

Reflection Pool Diagram

Glass Structure with Opaque Staircase

Glass Structure with Transparent Staircase

The purpose of the spiral staircase is forcing the viewers to oscillate the transition of space allowing maximum visibility.

William Nolan

The Reflection Pool enhances the concept of the units floating above ground level. In the connection with the Chinatown Gate Park, it ties the natural elements together at night.


UNIT 2

Light Through Transparent Facade

Conceptual design of the wood framing system, not so much as the structural purpose but for the aesthetics of the facade. The photo on the right displays a red structural system that theoretically supports the plants directional growth. The color red is the Chinese native color of representing good luck.

a.

c.

e. Light Through Structural Framing Diagram

d.

f.

Foundation D E S I G N

B-2

b.

Vent Stack Cultural Wall Mural Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure

a. b. c. d. e. f.

Simple vertical and horizontal style of framing Diagonal bracing framing style Abstract torqued vertical beams Curve-linear structural support system Wild structural support without order Unification of different elemental structural support without order (Figure f. suits the unificational purpose of diverse cultures with the surrounding districts)

•

The aesthetic purpose of public and private space in allowing some visibility and light.

111

Fall 2008


THIRD FLOOR PLAN

VENT STACK

The Second Floor is similar as the auditorium utilizes two levels within Unit 2. The units multipurpose use of gathering people such as performance space, cafeteria and teaching space.

FOURTH FLOOR PLAN

VENT STACK

The Fifth Floor is similar as it sections itself away from the units below for private living such as conference rooms, office cubicles and studio space. The rooftop patio from Unit 2 is the garden space for the 3rd Unit in isolation from the busy city.

William Nolan

GINZA RESTAURANT GINZA RESTAURANT

The transparent lobby is surrounded by a reflecting pool that connects the circulation of nodes through the Chinatown Gate Park. The exterior red brick flooring paves all across the park.

GINZA RESTAURANT

Final Design

VENT STACK

N

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


SOUTH SECTIONAL Elevator Shaft

Penthouse Level 4th Floor Level 3rd Floor Level 2nd Floor Level Ground Level Basement Level

EAST SECTIONAL

GINZA RESTAURANT

In terms of programming and space, I felt this was a successful project with design connections to the park. My knowledge and site analysis of the area was overwhelming with information and I tried to fuse them all into this single building. I should’ve focused on a single element such as the Spiral Staircase throughout all levels and that could’ve intrigued the design qualities. Once again, time was a factor during this strenuous B2 Studio.

B-2 Foundation D E S I G N

70’-0”

VENT STACK

113

Fall 2008


PRACTICE


Practice Work •

Goody Clancy & Associates

•

Boston Architectural College

PRACTICE

The purpose of practice work is gaining the knowledge and hands on experience of becoming an Architect. To understand proper protocols of procedure and process of phases in performing well. The way of networking with designers.

I wanted to showcase what I have accomplished in a project from the beginning to end in how I diagramed and drafted my thinking in design. From model making to computer drafting and design concepts, I felt my practice projects were a great success.

115


Richard Serra Sculpture: “Torque” for the MIT Brain and Cognitive Science Center Main Entrance

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Brain and Cognitive Science Center Boston, Massachusetts Goody Clancy & Associates and Charles Correa

To build a one inch scale model to accommodate Richard Serra’s Torque sculpture that is intended to be placed in the large alcove of the main entrance of the MIT Brain and Cognitive Science Center main entrance. The model should be transportable and able to assemble on site. I did not want the structural model as the focal point but designed for the Torque sculpture to display as a life size model in capturing the views in which the sculpture stands.

Goody Clancy & Associates


117

October 2007

G o o d y C l a n c y

PRACTICE


MIT Site Plan

MIT Puzzle Board

Ea 30”x42” board is secEach tioned tio off from the Brain and Cognitive Sciences BuildC iing site plan that acts like a large slider puzzle board. The vertical facade boards are jointed with one another standing balanced without connecting points on the site plan. The model stands 12’ long, 9’ wide, and 8’ tall.

N

Goody Clancy & Associates


MIT West Facade

MIT Main Facade

MIT East Facade

G o o d y C l a n c y

J - curtain wall on right side of MIT main facade 1 - main entrance, alcove 2 - edged corner curtain wall on left side of MIT main facade 3 - upper level patio 4 - flooring for upper level patio (lays horizontal on top of B1).

PRACTICE

The extra pieces are the pop-in boards such as the extruding curtain wall or upper level patios.

119

October 2007


Connection Diagram

Female Connector

Male Connector

The boards joint by male and female connectors as shown in the diagram above. The image in the diagram is the reverse side of the main entrance as it shows how the upper level patio joints with the East Facade.

Goody Clancy & Associates


G o o d y C l a n c y

PRACTICE

When Principal Roger Goldstein asked if I would like to take this challenge in building a large scale model that was transportable and easy to assemble on site, I was more than honored to accept this task. I knew this wasnot an easy build, and did not want to dissapoint Roger or myself. My instincts lingered on my auto mechanic days as to what jointing methods are substantial. After this model build was a success, MIT made a decision to no longer pursue the sculpture. But I‘m hoping one day the showcasing of my MIT model and Richard Serra’s of scale sculpture will be on display.

121

October 2007


Parcel 25 - New Development-Boston

Roxbury (Boston), MA Residential & Commercial Zone

During the general process of designing residential townhouses and rental units, there is an associated architect who designs the commercial building within the zone of Parcel 25. The housing complexes are to form around the north side of the commercial building away from the main street. Goody Clancy & Associates is to design both the housing units. The first residential building is rental housing mixed with retail stores because the location is at the corner of a busy intersection. The second residential building is a duplex town housing units that I was given the task of drafting various schemes. After finalizing a drawing of the duplex townhouse building, the Parcel 25 project was put on hold due to lack of funds.

N

Goody Clancy & Associates


G o o d y C l a n c y

I was given the task to draw the townhouses on Auto CAD in consulting with my project managers Jim Norris and Lisa Ferreira. This learning process I appreciated because it allowed me to gain new experience in my project support role. This felt like it was my time to showcase my computer drafting ability in a punctual time frame. I enjoyed designing in the confined spaces, making sure that the units were functionable of circulation and programing. Then making study models in Sketch-Up allowed me to pitch alternative options of space to the client.

PRACTICE

Functionality of Public and Private Stairs

123

December 2008


Duplex Town Housing

The Residential Townhouse The 40,000 sf duplex housing complex is designed of four floors with 16 duplex units and 8 single family units. Each unit consists of about 1,200 sf of space with 3 bedrooms and atleast 1.5 baths. The units each have a curtain wall alcove attracting natural light into the living space. The challenge I faced was understanding the circulation in designing the functionality of at least two entry ways to each unit.

1st & 3rd floor

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 575 sf

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 650 sf (fourth floor similar)

THIRD FLOOR PLAN 650 sf

N

Single Family Housing

only first floor upper level

WEST WING SINGLE FAMILY 1,300 sf

Goody Clancy & Associates

EAST WING SINGLE FAMILY 1,100 sf


Option A

After rendering a 3D massing model of Parcel 25 with the three buildings, we were asked for additional schemes for our client’s perspective in determining the extra square footage is aesthetically ideal in addition to the rental housing/retail building (Option A) or the commercial building (Option B).

PRACTICE

Option B

G o o d y C l a n c y

Residential Townhouse Complex • Single Family & Duplex Units • Circulation of Outdoor Parameter

125

December 2008


BAC Sketch Problem: Velux Skylight for Furniture Museum

The sponsorship of Velux Company, to design a museum space with the use of Velux Skylight products that will project a great deal of natural light on a single stage as well as preventing the natural light to shine upon display cases. My design intention is to have an art gallery with a sculpture as the centerpiece on a stage using indoor light fixtures as sun blockers to preserve the display casing.

This was my first Sketch Problem I attended at the Boston Architectural College. I was worried I did not bring enough modeling and drafting materials. I wasnot sure what to expect from this exercise especially when it is scheduled for an all day event from sunrise to sunset. I was informed that it was a charette and that I should focus on the concept in design rather than produce final images. Diagrams are key to following the idea in design. After handing in the work I produced during the Sketch Problem, I felt great about my accomplishment of design.

Boston Architectural College


e C h A t B

Sun Tunnel Skylight that is perfect for installations which require longer tunnel length or installations with a Southern exposure.

PRACTICE

VCE Electric Venting Skylight is the ideal day lighting solution for overhead applications. It brings in abundant natural light and natural ventilation with the touch of a button. And if you forget to close it, the VCE also closes automatically in case of rain.

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Skylights utilize natural light exposing the museum space. Intentions is to have the sculpture capture a great amount of sun light, but not for the display cases.

Final Design

Section

The Sectional Model guided my understanding of the design concept between light and shadow. The light fixtures cast shadows within the museum space to preserve the artwork along the interior wall.

The windows at floor level allow minimal natural light through the space but mainly serves as the ventilation in circulating air within the corners to prevent mold. Placement of windows are relative to the interior lighting and space of their form. Elevational View

Boston Architectural College

Plan View


Sectional of Velux Windows with Light Fixtures

= Velux Products

= Display Case = Interior Lighting

= Ventilation

t B

h A

= Non-Exposed Natural Light

e C

= Exposed Natural Light

The shadows formed with an above light fixture set at approximately noon time have less illumination upon the display cases across the interior walls.

PRACTICE

Exposed Sun Light & Ventilation with Light Fixtures

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Spring 2008


Wendall Chin 20 Newell Road, Brookline, MA 02446 (617) 953-5466 wendall.chin2@gmail.com


To obtain professional experiences in the practice of Architecture.

Education:

2006 – Present Boston Architectural College Bachelor of Architecture Program • Current classes include: Physics I, Civilization & Ideas I, and B2 Studio 2000 – 2001 Wentworth Institute of Technology Electrical Engineering Program • Classes taken: AutoCAD, C++, Circuit Theory 1996 – 2000 Brookline High School General Program • High School Diploma

Relevant Qualifications:

• • •

Work Experience:

Boston, MA Boston, MA Brookline, MA

Gained technical skill sets in AutoCAD (intermediate), Google Sketch-Up (advanced), Adobe Software such as Photoshop and In-Design (advanced), MS Powerpoint (advanced), MS Excel (advanced) and MS Word (advanced), through education and professional work experiences. Hands-on experiences with and auto mechanical power tools and carpentry power tools. Constructed many models for landscaping, residential and abstract designs using all sorts of materials such as foam board, wood, cardboard and plexiglas.

6/2007 – Present Goody Clancy & Associates Boston, MA Project Support • Construction Administrative duty throughout the design phases of site analysis, predesign, schematic design, design development, construction documents and post construction. • AutoCAD drafting or housing units for Parcel 25, graphic design imagery for Marketing Department, and model making for a site model of Parcel 24. • Research of information such as site analysis survey and area square footage takeoffs. • Maintain the construction documents in coordination with our consultants, clients, and contractors. 3/2003 – 5/2006 T3 Motorsports Boston, MA Auto Mechanic / Technician • Designed and customized body work for customer specifications and approval. • Installed aftermarket and factory parts; such as: engine parts, engine swapping, suspension, brakes, exhaust systems, wheels & tires, electronic gauges, electronic controllers, custom lighting, interior and exterior body panels. 9/1999 – 3/2003 RED OAK Day care/Camp Boston, MA Counselor • Directing children (ages 5-14) to succeed in their educational lives. • Maintain and record the child’s behavior while communicating with their parents/guardian. • Organized activities, events, and field trips.

R E S U M E

Objective:


Portfolio: Segment I