Issuu on Google+

CAKES I FLOWERS I STATIONERY I JEWELLERY I DRESSES I TABELSETTINGS

The Guide


CONTENTS Who’s who... who to invite Maid to order...who chooses the dress? The big picture...make sure you get the right shots Scentsability...flowers by season Event planner...timeline The grooms guide...responsibilities Tie the tie...we show you how Bar code...policies and packages Boy’s toys...gifts for the groomsmen Get set and glow...beauty tips for the bride Naming rights...what surname will you take? Well Suited...to tuxedo or not to tuxedo? We’re getting married...modern day etiquette The classiest stationery of all...off the shelf or bespoke Buck up...the bucks night Getting carried away...how to travel


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

E TIQUETTE

who’s who Be tough when naming the names on the guest list and end up with the people who really count at the wedding. A strong sense of obligation can mess up the day. It’s not essential to invite all cousins, aunties and uncles; invite only those who pass the truly up-close and meaningful test.

It’s a fact of life, so many people we all know and like…yet comparatively few guests can be invited, the imbalance is always the same no matter how big the wedding. Organising the final invitee list needs some planning techniques and a strong deter mination that only the truly deserving will end up dancing at your wedding. A process of elimination will lead to the right number and more importantly, the right people. First of all, check out all the contenders so that nobody is overlooked. Trawl through email and address books and compile the names of all those you would both like to share the big day. From that group the cull can begin. When doing the sums, consider inviting a similar number from each family, it’s good for balance and will avoid one side feeling badly done by. On average, about 15 percent of guests will not be able to make it; with that in mind, make an A list with all the must-haves and a B list as the back ups. As the R S V P s arrive, for each regret send an invitation from the B list. The most important people in the lives of the bride and groom will be at the top of the A list; these are the priority invitees who cannot be bumped. When it comes to sorting through friends, try the one-year rule. If there hasn’t been a meaningful conversation or a meal with a person within the past year, it is quite safe to draw a line through their name no matter how much fun they are at get togethers. Single friends without serious partners should not be asked to bring a guest. Large families can be an emotional trap. Compulsory invitations are a concept to be avoided. It’s not essential to invite all cousins, aunties and uncles; invite only those who pass the truly up-close and meaningful test. Don’t be conned into playing the tit for tat game. It’s easy to feel obliged to invite all the couples who have invited you to their weddings. Relationships change, invite those people who are important now and who you plan to keep in your life for years to come. Workmates with purely professional relationships could be placed low on the B list. These relationships are strong in the workplace but often don’t endure when people move on. Keep the list limited to personal friends. A child-free wedding should be clearly emphasised on the invitation by leaving the children’s names off the invitation should be a pretty clear hint. A phrase at the end of the reply card stating ‘ w e h o p e t h e t w o o f y o u w i l l b e a b l e t o j o i n u s ’ spells out how many guests are invited. Show the final lists to parents, their wise eyes might spot an important name that’s missing. They might even like a handful of invitations to send to their closest friends. The guest list represents the tone of the wedding on paper, audit the names to see that caring friends who really share the happiness of the event and will give a joyous mood to the day are all there. Rent-a-crowd acquaintances after a free drink will not give the same heartfelt, emotional buzz. Every name should be happily ticked off by the bride and groom so that there aren’t any people there who could ruin the day for either one.


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

F A S H ION

maid to order It seems as though everyone has an anecdote about a bridesmaids’ cat fight where even the nicest girls have turned into banshees during the frock talks. It’s not surprising, it’s only natural for any girl to fight for the dress that will make her look best in front of a crowd. An authoritative, opinionated bride can save potential hissy fits, dramas and even walk-outs. As a rule, the more freedom the bridal party is given, the more anxiety it will cause the bride. Unfortunately un-controlled bridesmaids have been known to upstage the bride. Can there be a worse nightmare? Never send the bridesmaids off shopping for their gowns unsupervised. The result could be an ego-tussle that will end in tears, the bride’s tears. The attendants will respect strength and confidence and will war m to the bride’s decisions in the end if they are true friends. Democracy is a winner in politics, but not essential in bridal party planning. The bride is numero uno and holds the casting vote in all her attendants’ dress and accessory decisions. It’s the golden rule. Her wedding, her day, her photos; the bride must have her way. There are many interesting ways to manage the bridesmaids’ look. The bride generally selects her dress style first, then moves onto the style and more importantly colour choice of her attendants’ wardrobe. If the bride has a colour theme in mind for the decorative aspects of the ceremony and reception, that is the clue to the maids’ colour direction. What they wear will impact on the overall look of the wedding. The bride should listen to the maids’ ideas and preferences; their gowns should be comfortable, have a flattering fit and suit the for mality of the venue. The larger the number of bridesmaids the more complex the matter as there are more tastes, hair colourways and figures. The options for the attendants’ style are many and varied. To cater for a variety of body shapes each maid can have the most suitable dress silhouette for her figure but the group is dressed in identical colours. Or, if figures are similar, the same style in a pre-selected palette of colours can cater for different hair colours. All the dresses can be in the same style and colour but in different shades so they can complement skin tones. If there are more than four bridesmaids, take the maid of honour on a store check-out to give her an idea of the styles that are suitable. The wedding party can then start shopping sooner rather than later, sensible if payment by lay-by is involved. The bridesmaids don’t have to wear the same shoes but they should be compatible styles especially if the dresses are short. Shoe comfort is important, weddings are hard on the feet. Colour can be used to advantage with shoes that are the same style but in different colours, or shoes that are in the same colours but different styles, they all work. Matching the bouquet and accessories with the shoe colour looks effective. The bride may picture her maids dressed in pure simplicity or extravagant opulence, the deciding factors will be style and the all important budget. Each attendant should be comfortable with the expense. It’s accepted that bridesmaids pay for their dresses, shoes and accessories so it’s important to discuss costs with the girls at the beginning. If however, the bride’s choices are extravagant, it’s not unusual for her to contribute to the costs. The bride might pay for the fabric and the bridesmaids cover the dressmaking. Or, the bridesmaids could pay for the dresses and the bride picks up the tab for the shoes and accessories. The bridesmaids are the bride’s best accessory; just a step down from her in glamour, but radiant, lovely and happy, enhancing the wedding in their highly prestigious role. i llu str ati on s by me la n i e t e r r ett

Think of their gowns as the cor porate unifor ms of the event projecting unity, friendship and a great look.


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

T H E G UIDE

the big picture the shots that can’t be missed… before the wedding

after ceremony

bride getting ready

bride

bride with family

groom

bride with bridesmaids

bride and groom

bride leaving for ceremony

bride with bridesmaids

groom getting ready

groom with groomsmen

groom with family

page boy and flower girl

groom with groomsmen

bride & groom with bridesmaids & groomsmen

groom leaving for ceremony

bride with bride’s family bride and groom with bride’s family groom with groom’s family bride and groom with groom’s families bride and groom with both families

ceremony photos ushers handing out programs

reception

program shot

venue

flowers

tablecentres

pew bows

favours

guests arriving

placecards

groom and groomsmen waiting

wedding cake

wedding cars arriving

guests enjoying pre-dinner drinks

flowergirls and pageboys walking down aisle

bride and groom arriving

bridesmaids walking down aisle

speeches

bride walking down the aisle

bride and groom’s first dance

the exchange of rings

band

the exchange of vows

guests dancing

bride and groom kissing

cutting of the cake

signing of the register

throwing the bouquet

bride and groom walking back

bride and groom leaving venue

guests throwing petals, bubbles etc guests congratulating bride and groom group shot of guests

THE GUIDE

SAY C HEESE , PLEASE


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

F LOWERS

scentsability a f low e r c h a rt f o r a l l s e a s o n s white/cream Flower Name

Months Available

Price Range

Anemone

August - September

*

Style Country, garden, Spring

Antherium

All year

***

Tropical

Blossom

August - September

*

Spring, pretty

Bouvardia

December

**

Pretty, spring, classic.

Camellia

June - August

**

Classic, garden

Carnation

All year

*

Classic, country, garden

Chrysanthemum - Daisy

All year

***

Country, garden

Cornflower

August - October

**

Spring, country

Dahlia

January - March

**

Country

Delphinium

All year

***

Elegant, country, garden

Frangapani

December - January

**

Beach, summer

Freesia

All year

****

Spring, timeless, elegant

Gardenia

Early December - March

*****

Timeless, effortless, classic

Gladioli

All year

**

Classic, elegant

Hyacinth

June - September

****

Spring, fresh

Hydrangea

December - February

**

Country, garden

Iris

All year

***

Elegant

Jasmine

December - February

**

Classic, elegant, garden

Jonquil

July - September

*

Spring, fresh, country

Lily - Arum

September - November

*

Contemporary, country, simple

Lily - Asiatic

All year

***

Contemporary

Lily - Calla

December - March

**

Classic, elegant

Lily - Oriental

All year

*****

Contemporary

Lily of the Valley

October

***

Classic, elegant

Lissianthus

October - May

***

Soft, romantic

Magnolia - Buddy

August - October

***

Sophisticated, elegant

Orchid - Cymbidium

June - September

***

Timeless, elegant, sophisticated

Orchid - Phalaenopsis

All year

*****

Timeless, elegant, sophisticated

Orchid - Singapore

All year

***

Contemporary

Peony

October - November

*****

Soft, romantic

Ranunculus

September - November

*

Country, garden, Spring

Rose - David Austin

October - May

***

Classic, country, garden

Rose - Field grown

October - May

***

Classic, country, garden

Rose - Glass house

All year

****

Timeless, elegant

Stephanotis

Late November

*****

Timeless, elegant, sophisticated

Sweet Pea

August - October

**

Spring, fresh

Tulip

May - October

****

Classic, elegant

Flower Name

Months Available

Price Range

Style

Anemone

August - September

*

Country, garden, Spring

Cornflower

August - October

**

Spring, country

Delphinium

All year

***

Elegant, country, garden

Hyacinth

June - September

****

Spring, fresh

Hydrangea

December - February

**

Country, garden

Iris

All year

***

Elegant

blue


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

F LOWERS

Flower Name

Months Available

Price Range

Style

Antherium

All year

***

Tropical

Carnation

All year

*

Classic, country, garden

Chrysanthemum - Daisy

All year

***

Country, garden

Gladioli

All year

**

Classic, elegant

Hydrangea

December - February

**

Country, garden

Lissianthus

October - May

***

Soft, romantic

Malaccabalm

All year

***

Fresh, contemporary, country

Orchid - Cymbidium

June - September

***

Timeless, elegant, sophisticated

Orchid - Phalaenopsis

All year

*****

Timeless, elegant, sophisticated

Orchid - Singapore

All year

***

Contemporary

Flower Name

Months Available

Price Range

Style

Anemone (red)

August - September

*

Country, garden, Spring

orange/red

Antherium

All year

***

Tropical

Camellia

June - August

**

Classic, garden

Carnation

All year

*

Classic, country, garden

Freesia

All year

****

Spring, timeless, elegant

Gladioli

All year

**

Classic, elegant

Lily - Asiatic

All year

***

Contemporary

Lily - Calla

December - March

**

Classic, elegant

Orchid - Singapore

All year

***

Contemporary

Poppy

June - September

*

Fun, simple

Ranunculus

September - November

*

Country, garden, Spring

Rose - David Austin

October - May

***

Classic, country, garden

Rose - Field grown

October - May

***

Classic, country, garden

Rose - Glass house

All year

****

Timeless, elegant

Tulip

May - October

****

Classic, elegant

Flower Name

Months Available

Price Range

Style

Carnation

All year

*

Classic, country, garden

Chrysanthemum - Daisy

All year

***

Country, garden

Dahlia

January - March

**

Country

Freesia

All year

****

Spring, timeless, elegant

Gladioli

All year

**

Classic, elegant

Hyacinth

June - September

****

Spring, fresh

yellow

Hydrangea

December - February

**

Country, garden

Jonquil

July - September

*

Spring, fresh, country

Lily - Asiatic

All year

***

Contemporary

Lily - Calla

December - March

**

Classic, elegant

Lily - Oriental

All year

*****

Contemporary

Orchid - Cymbidium

June - September

***

Timeless, elegant, sophisticated

Orchid - Singapore

All year

***

Contemporary

Poppy

June - September

*

Fun, simple

Ranunculus

September - November

*

Country, garden, Spring

Rose - David Austin

October - May

***

Classic, country, garden

Rose - Field grown

October - May

***

Classic, country, garden

Rose - Glass house

All year

****

Timeless, elegant

Sweet Pea

August - October

**

Spring, fresh

Tulip

May - October

****

Classic, elegant

THE GUIDE

green


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

F LOWERS purple/lavender Flower Name

Months Available

Price Range

Style

Anemone

August - September

*

Country, garden, Spring

Chrysanthemum - Daisy

All year

***

Country, garden

Dahlia

January - March

**

Country

Delphinium

All year

***

Elegant, country, garden

Freesias

All year

****

Spring, timeless, elegant

Gladioli

All year

**

Classic, elegant

Hyacinth

June - September

****

Spring, fresh

Hydrangea

December - February

**

Country, garden

Iris

All year

***

Elegant

Lavender

October - May

*

Country

Lilac

October

**

Country, garden

Lissianthus

October - May

***

Soft, romantic

Orchid - Cymbidium

June - September

***

Timeless, elegant, sophisticated

Orchid - Phalaenopsis

All year

*****

Timeless, elegant, sophisticated

Orchid - Singapore

All year

***

Contemporary

Rose - David Austin

October - May

***

Classic, country, garden

Rose - Field grown

October - May

***

Classic, country, garden

Rose - Glass house

All year

****

Timeless, elegant

Sweet Pea

August - October

**

Spring, fresh

Tulip

May - October

****

Classic, elegant

Flower Name

Months Available

Price Range

Style

Anemone

August - September

*

Country, garden, Spring

Antherium

All year

***

Tropical

Blossom

August - September

*

Spring, pretty

Bouvardia

December

**

Pretty, Spring, classic

Camellia

June - August

**

Classic, garden

Carnation

All year

*

Classic, country, garden

Chrysanthemum - Daisy

All year

***

Country, garden

Dahlia

January - March

**

Country

Freesia

All year

****

Spring, timeless, elegant

Gladioli

All year

**

Classic, elegant

Hyacinth

June - September

****

Spring, fresh

Hydrangea

December - February

**

Country, garden

Lily - Asiatic

All year

***

Contemporary

Lily - Calla

December - March

**

Classic, elegant

Lily - Oriental

All year

*****

Contemporary

Lissianthus

October - May

***

Soft, romantic

Orchid - Cymbidium

June - September

***

Timeless, elegant, sophisticated

Orchid - Phalaenopsis

All year

*****

Timeless, elegant, sophisticated

Orchid - Singapore

All year

***

Contemporary

Peony

October - November

*****

Soft, romantic

Ranunculus

September - November

*

Country, garden, Spring

Rose - David Austin

October - May

***

Classic, country, garden

Rose - Field grown

October - May

***

Classic, country, garden

Rose - Glass house

All year

****

Timeless, elegant

Sweet Pea

August - October

**

Spring, fresh

Tulip

May - October

****

Classic, elegant

*

Least expensive

*****

Most expensive

pink


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

T WELVE M ONTH P LA NNER

event planner

Congratulations–an engagement is an exciting time. Now the fun begins. The planning of a wedding can be a big deal, but there’s no need for sleepless nights or knotted stomachs. Relax knowing the day will be perfect. engaged

three months before

• A nnounce

• A sk

your engagement to family and friends

the people who you would like to speak at both ceremony and reception

Finalise the wedding date

Plan initial guest list

D iscuss and set budget with family members

• M ake

 hoose and purchase your engagement ring (if not C already presented)

• R eserve

 onsider and ask significant friends and family to be C members of the wedding party and other important roles (the sooner the better to avoid confusion amongst friends, and to help with organising and planning)

C onsider health, beauty and exercise routine

Research honeymoon options

• B ook

about the theme and style of your wedding

shopping for gown and bridal party dresses

• D ecide • Hire

wedding coordinators/stylists

out ‘ S a v e t h e a theme and date)

• Begin

D ress fittings for bride and bridesmaids

Order wedding bands (rings)

Buy shoes and accessories

Arrange groom’s and groomsmen’s outfits

• I nfor m

parents of colour scheme and flowers chosen, so they can coordinate their outfits

• F inalise

Dat e ’

cards (once you’ve set

a gym, and start regular skin treatments with your beauty therapist

Finalise gift registries and lists

• E nsure

all passports, visas, insurance and health checks are organised for overseas honeymoon travel

8 weeks before •

researching photographers

• J oin

 ile ‘ N o t i c e o f In t e nd e d M a rr i a g e ’ (needs to be F done at least one month and one day before wedding)

• P repare

necessary documents for changing your name if you intend to do so

• C ompile

six months before •

A rrange meeting with marriage officiant to discuss ceremony and legal requirements

and order stationery (extra for second-round

invites)

and confir m ceremony and reception location

• S end

accommodation for interstate guests

all arrangements and details with venue, coordinator and caterers

church, celebrant or religious officiant

• B egin

alter native arrangements for potential bad weather

• F inalise

the date is set • T hink

D ecide on ceremony vows, hymns and prayers

and have ‘ Ord e r

o f S e rv i c e ’

Dress fittings for bride and bridesmaids

Finalise guest list

booklets printed

• S end

out invitations (mail overseas invitations eight weeks before the wedding and interstate and local invitations six weeks beforehand)

S tart shopping for wedding bands (rings)

P ay a deposit on your gown or book a dressmaker

Record all

B ook catering and hire companies

Consider seating layout for reception venue

S tart dance lessons

Organise guest transport if necessary

V isit graphic designer or stationery supplier

F inalise flowers with florist

C hoose guest favours

• F inalise

B ook florist

B ook ceremony and reception music

• F inalise

B ook photographer and/or videographer

• Trial

E njoy cake tasting and book your cake

A dvise employers of leave required from work

B ook hair and make up for bride and bridal party

Book wedding night accommodation suite

B ook honeymoon, flights and accommodation

RSVPs

as they arrive

all music and specific music to be played (eg bridal waltz) plans with photographer and/or videographer

hairstyle and make-up with veil for bride

THE GUIDE

g e t o r g a n i s e d n ow !


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

T WELVE M ONTH P LA NNER

3 weeks before • M ake

sure officiant has all necessary details and papers

• E nsure

all speeches are prepared including toasts and speeches for rehearsal night

• C onfir m

duties of those responsible (ushers, spokespeople etc)

• S end ‘ T h a nk Y o u ’

notes as gifts arrive or compile a list of gifts received if sending cards after

the wedding •

Pick up rings

Have engagement ring cleaned

F inal dress fittings

P urchase underwear

Break in your wedding shoes at home

N otify caterer of guest count

• C onfir m

seating arrangements with reception venues

Have placecards organised for tables

Confir m transport details

Confir m flower order and time of delivery

• C onfir m

music and time that they arrive and begin playing

• C onfir m

photographer and/or videographer and check time of arrival

Organise cake knife

O rganise takeaway plans (boxes, bags, serviettes) for cake for guests

Trial spray tan

Men to have haircuts

Buy wedding party gifts

• O rganise

someone to look after your home and your pets while on honeymoon

• O rganise

credit cards and currency for honeymoon

Collect tickets for honeymoon

1 week before •

F ull rehearsal of ceremony at the ceremony destination

• H old •

rehearsal dinner and give presents to those necessary (attendants, parents, each other)

C ompile an ‘ Ord e r

of the Day’

schedule for all people involved

• P repare

payment envelopes for suppliers, officiants and vendors, and make arrangements for someone to distribute them on your behalf

P ick up all dresses for bride and bridesmaids

Arrange pick-up or delivery of hired wear

• A ll

bridal party to try on completed outfits to ensure it looks as planned and fits correctly

• C onfir m

all details and times with venue of ceremony and reception

• G roup

place cards in order of table seating for your coordinator or reception venue manager and print off alphabetically-ordered list for seating guests

• R econfir m • C onfir m

• M anicure • E nsure • P ack

timing of pick-up and drop-offs by your arranged transport

times for hair and make-up appointments on the wedding day and pedicure

you have early nights for beauty sleep

for honeymoon and wedding night

• C onfir m

accommodation for your wedding night

on the day •

Ensure you both eat a wholesome breakfast

Arrive at hair and makeup appointments on time

Allow enough time to dress without rushing

• Take •

time to appreciate this time with family and friends

R elax and enjoy yourselves!


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

G ROOM ’S G UIDE

RESPONSIBILITIES, RESPONSIBILITIES… groom’s responsibilities 1. Organise the honeymoon 2. Pay for engagement and wedding ring/s 3. Arrange wedding cars 4. Choose gifts for best man, groomsmen and ushers 5. Pay clergyman or make a church donation 6. Make a speech at the reception 7. Organise music and MC for the reception

best man’s responsibilities 1. Organise the buck’s night 2. Be responsible for the groom’s gift with the help of other groomsmen 3. Help dress the groom and get him to the church on time 4. Keep the wedding ring safe in the lead-up to the ceremony 5. Act as official witness if required 6. Make a speech at the reception

groomsmen’s responsibilities 1. Give the groom a buck’s night under the direction of best man 2. h and out order of service booklets and make sure hymn books are distributed at the ceremony

the groom’s parents’ responsibility Pay for the alcohol at the wedding However, the groom’s parents will often match the bride’s parents contribution.

tie the tie

the windsor knot The windsor knot looks special and dressy for traditional elegance 1. Cross the broad end over the thin end. 2. B ring the broad end up through the loop between the collar and tie and back down.

i llu str ati on by me l a n i e t e r re tt

3. P ull the broad end under neath the thin end and to the right, back through the loop and to the right again so that the broad end is inside out. 4. B ring the broad end across the front from right to left. 5. Pull the broad end up through the loop again. 6. B ring the broad end down through the knot in front. tighten the knot carefully and draw it up towards the collar.

THE GUIDE

groom’s guide


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

G ROOM ’S G UIDE

how much will we drink?

Look at the demographic of your guests. the mid to late 20s will drink different drinks to the older age group. Be sure to cater for all demographics. Stand up cocktail weddings will tend to need more bubbles and white wine whereas sit-down dinner weddings may require more reds. Keep the selection simple, too many wine, beers or cocktails will only confuse and make the waiters stressed out and on edge!

as a guide – for each 100 guests you will need… 10 cases of beer: 4 domestic, 3 imported, 3 light  cases of sparkling wine or champagne (it’s a celebratory drink, and even people who won’t 5 usually drink it will) 12 cases of wine (approx 1.5 bottles per person) 65% white, 35% red 7 cases of still spring water (more in summer) 7 cases of mineral water (more in summer) I f supplying spirits, 1 litre each of: Baileys, Grand Marnier, brandy, Frangelico, dry vermouth 5 litres of vodka 3 litres of gin 2 litres of rum 4 litres of scotch 3 litres of Kahlua 2 cases of dessert wine 1 case of port If the cocktail bar is going to be open, the mixers will have to be on hand to whip up guests’ favourite drinks. The shopping list should include: ice coolers cocktail glasses garnishes: lemons, limes, cherries, berries and olives ingredients: lime juice, Tabasco and Worcestershire sauces, milk, orange juice, cranberry juice, tomato juice, soda water, tonic water, cola, lemonade, lemon squash, ginger ale straws cocktail stirrers Discuss these quantities and beverages with your caterer to ensure that they are adequate and suitable, and that the service of them is realistic.

i l lu st rat io n by m e la n i e te r r ett

Two rules–keep it simple and at the end of the day it is better to have more than not enough– try not to be too conservative!

THE GUIDE

Determining the amount of beverage for a wedding is difficult but some important aspects need to be ascertained. The time of year will influence the decision – in winter more red wine will be consumed whereas in summer more water and beer will be requested. The time of the wedding will also change how many beverages will need to be supplied, as more will be needed in an evening wedding than a lunchtime wedding.


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

G ROOM ’S G UIDE

bar code It’s a good idea to check with potential venues on their drinks policies. Some venues may have deals with particular wine brands which might not be appealing.

Delicious drinks kick-start the celebrations after the ceremony and keep the fun firing. Somebody has to take responsibility for planning the bar stock. The groom is in the driver’s seat for this important job. The clinking of glasses as the happy couple is toasted again and again at the reception is nearly as much a part of the wedding tradition as saying the vows. Toasting with special drinks adds a celebratory mood and happiness and is a way to spoil guests from the very beginning and make them most welcome. What to pour into those empty glasses that will be lined up and waiting to be filled on the big day involves some thought by the groom. It’s his call to select the brands and styles of beer and wine to be served. It’s a good idea to check with potential venues on their drinks policies. Some venues may have deals with particular wine brands which might not be appealing. If the venue agrees to B YO , corkage per head is another point to clarify. Self-supplying the alcohol can be a money saver, however some venues charge exorbitant corkage to discourage the practice. It’s a point to watch very closely; do the sums. It’s best to choose the drinks after the menu has been signed off so that wines can be selected to complement each course.


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

G ROOM ’S G UIDE

boys’ toys It takes input from many people to organise a wedding. The groom’s support team has to be remembered when it comes to those that should get heart-felt recognition. The groomsmen have offered moral support and encouragement in the lead-up and on the wedding day, so a token of thanks is the time-honoured way of marking the event. The gift is a memento that will remind friends of the whole wedding scenario from suit fittings to the buck’s show, guest seating, and all the other important groomsmen’s duties.

To make the moment personal, take each groomsman aside and give the gift individually. There’s no need to make a public speech. This is a personal moment between friends.

If the gift is to be worn at the wedding, the gifts would be presented at the rehearsal dinner. These gifts might include cuff links or pocket watches. It’s also appropriate to make presentations on the wedding day while the guys are gathered all together in the dressing area, or later during the reception. To make the moment personal, take each groomsman aside and give the gift individually. There’s no need to make a public speech. This is a personal moment between friends. The gift doesn’t have to be ‘one size fits all’ gifts can be individual, personalised and unique for each person.

great groomsman gift ideas ENGRAVED DRINKING MUG MONOGRAMMED CUFF LINKS TO WEAR ON THE WEDDING DAY MONOGRAMMED MONEY OR TIE CLIP POKER SETS BOXED WINE ENGRAVED SWISS ARMY KNIFE TICKETS TO A SPORTING EVENT OR CONCERT PERSONALISED TOOL BOXES SILVER BUSINESS CARD HOLDERS PERSONALISED GOLF BALLS AND TOWELS POCKET WATCHES


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

NATURAL HEALTH

written by GREGORY DAMASKOS

get set and glow With all eyes on the bride, it's essential to be fit and healthy on the big day. An early focus on increasing fitness or beginning a path to

Late afternoon or evening, go for a walk or jog, attend a class

realistic and sustainable weight management can optimise

or visit a personal trainer before preparing a healthy dinner

health and develop a fit, healthy glow in time for the wedding.

with plenty of fresh vegetables. Dinner is a great chance to share achievements of the day with a friend or chronicle

Developing good fitness does not start or stop at the gym door,

them in a fitness journal.

it involves being more active in general - climbing stairs instead of taking the elevator, moving around instead of sitting

Looking great for the wedding day is the priority, but by

still, sitting up instead of lying down as well as showing some

this lifestyle may help to prevent:

enthusiasm instead of boredom.

OBESITY

The next step involves a personal health assessment with

MENTALILLNESS

a naturopath or doctor, then a visit with personal trainer for

BREAST

an exercise plan and goal-setting session. A personalised

INJURY

approach rather than a generic one is most likely to succeed. A lifestyle counsellor or life coach can also be of help with goal setting and positive reinforcement. People who think starvation diets are a way to control weight, need to think again. Dieting without exercise often ends in weight gain. Although weight may initially drop while 'dieting', such weight loss consists mostly of water and muscle. When the weight returns, it comes back as fat. The right way to avoid gaining weight over time is to increase meta b olism b y exer cising regular ly. W he n exercising, the body, especially during long low impact sustained activities such as walking, creates a fat-breaking enzyme called HORMONE SENSITIVE LIPASE which is released. Studies have revealed that this fat breaking activity is sustained for up to twelve hours from the moment it has been triggered. The same enzyme is also involv ed in cleaning all blood vessels of fatty plaques and deposits. So, no amount or type of dieting will produce positive results without exercise. Start a fitness and diet journal to keep track of food intake and exercise schedule. Do not skip meals - skipping meals lowers metabolism, decreasing energy, slowing weight loss and also decreasing the ability to use food to an advantage. Weight may even be gained by skipping meals. Regularity is the key here, the body likes rhythm. Make food fun and exciting; eat fresh, small regular meals. Breakfast on sensational ENERGY SMOOTHIES with fresh fruits or PORRIDGE. Allow half an hour break after breakfast then head to the gym or local park for a high energy or muscle focused workout, start the day with power! Lunch on salads, fruits or soups, eat cheese or nuts for protein, try to avoid breads and pastries, for beverages use water (the body is 75% water), fresh juices and supplementation. Seek support for this weight management journey, whenever needed use a team of professionals there's no need to 'go it alone'.

maintaining regular exercise there will be life long affects as

CANCER

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE COLON

CANCER

OSTEOPOROSIS EARLY DEATH

Daily group classes can fast track results - utilise a combination of aerobic, resistance and yoga exercise. Flexibility training (stretching) helps balance muscle groups that might be overused during exercise or physical activity or as a result of bad posture. Flexibility is a joint's ability to move through a full range of motion, include cardio-aerobic workouts, martial arts for increased coordination, power and stamina. Try resistance based exercise (weights) for toning and strengthening tired muscles-suitable for all levels of fitness and strength. A rest day each week will help the body to recover and power through the following days. The motto is flexibility, agility, strength and, balance. Fun and active outings and exercises like bike rides and walks at the beach, decrease boredom and time available for snacking or grazing during the day. At the completion of the pre- wedding program, the benefits from increased energy, skills and motivation will help to keep long term HEALTH & FITNESS GOALS

IT IS IMPORTANT TO CHECK WITH YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL BEFORE UNDERTAKING ANY CHANGES TO YOUR DIET OR LIFESTYLE.

Gregory Damaskos is a naturopath, analytical counsellor, public speaker, health educator When it comes to good health and weight and a writer for several national loss, exercise and diet are inter-related. and International publications. He More muscle equals more active has appeared on tv and radio metabolism. A higher metabolic rate programs on health matters and reduces the chance of weight gain. is the Director of Authenticity Spa Exercising without maintaining a balanced Resort. diet is no more beneficial than dieting AUTHENTICITY SPA RESORT offers avenues which will while remaining inactive. assist you to glow for the big day; including personal into the future.

health assessment and exercise, beautiful vegetarian foods, pampering at the day spa and accommodation in a peaceful serene environment in the heart of Port Elliot. PHONE 08 8554 2088 or visit AUTHENTICITY.COM.AU


WE DD I NG STYLE GU I DE

ETIQUETTE

naming rights Think out all the implications of the surname you will use after the wedding. The options are many but the consequences are not always right. Some women can’t wait to assume their husband’s name and be called Mrs; others prefer to spend their lives known by their maiden name and stay a Ms. Legally, you can call yourself anything you like. I have been married three times and have named myself three ways. Finally I have found the perfect fit, for me. After my first wedding, I took my husband’s name. I became M r s ‘ his fa m ily ’ and obviously had the name of his mother. I quite liked it – on one hand, it did feel very married, but I felt that I had left my own family behind, and as an only child, that made me a bit sad. I liked the name I was born with and wasn’t really happy about letting it go. I even graduated from university under my married name, something I now regret as my degree carries a name with which I now don’t feel any affinity. After my second marriage I thought I would right the emotional niggle and I reverted to my maiden name and obviously became Ms . That wasn’t really perfect either; I had lost my Mrs, it was a bit disturbing, people didn’t immediately classify me as married. Of course you can’t be M r s and use your maiden name; that’s your own mother. Socially my husband and I would be invited as M r and M r s ‘ his na m e ’ , but technically it wasn’t my name. I was forever re-introducing myself; I was in the no-man’s-land of names. Some knew me under my maiden name, others assumed I had my husband’s name. It just didn’t work. When it came to my third marriage, I decided to have it all, the best of both worlds for me; keep my maiden name and add my husband’s name. It has turned out to be just right. Luckily both our surnames have a good fit, my European name and his short English one. There are benefits, I am back to being M r s , I still have my own family’s identity and my last name matches my husband’s, something that is very handy when making airline bookings and checking into overseas hotels. A perfect balance. My two surnames aren’t hyphenated I didn’t want to do that because the names are two unique words and were not meant to be joined. It’s not a ‘family’ name that has come down through history, it’s my unique, married name. Things tend to go more smoothly in life when one name is used consistently, this is especially important for I D .

I learnt the I D lesson when at one point quite recently, we were opening a new business bank account and I had to come up with 100 I D points. I had a driver’s licence in my maiden name, a passport in the doublebarrel-third-wedding version, and a vast assortment of cards in either. For me it was nearly impossible to reach 100 points because of the name mess. Finally I scraped the score together, a humble Medicare card got me over the line. As you can imagine, I immediately changed all my I D to the name I now use, it was a big job. There can be awkward moments when you have two names on the go; you do forget under which name you have registered at doctors, dentists and pharmacies. Many times I was asked for my name and had to answer ‘I’m not sure’. It’s not a good look for a grown woman. But all the name confusion is behind me now; my life neat, I now know who I am when I’m asked and it all finally feels grown up. I admit my own search for the perfect married name is a bit extreme, but it does show that anything is possible, the choice has to feel right, be practical and consistent. Some women even keep their former married name; this choice could be comfortable if there are children from the previous marriage for family consistency. It does require a tolerant groom and name complications can arise if there are children from the new marriage. To make the full change to the groom’s family name or to add the married name to the maiden name, the time to do this is after the wedding. The driver’s licence and passport should be the first to correct so that the 100 ID points are in place. If the honeymoon involves overseas travel; there won’t be time to change the name on the passport, so the maiden name should be used on bookings and reservations. If the overseas travel is delayed, update the driver’s licence first as it will be required along with the marriage certificate, with the passport application. Ultimately, the name decision is emotional, it involves family conventions and attitudes and should meet both your and your husband’s needs, hopefully for a long, long time.

TH E GUIDE

by Z inta J u r jans H ea r d


WE DD I NG STYLE GU I DE

G ROOM ’ S G U I D E

well suited The English call it a dinner suit, the Americans a tuxedo and Europeans a ‘smoking’ jacket. Whatever the name, the tux is a traditional uniform with dress rules to follow.

men’s library the aim

“Walking into a room with good posture, a bright smile and a confident stride will go a long way towards cultivating (this) respect. Wearing the right clothes, however, will drive the point home.” G i s f o r G e n t l e m a n by Sam Martin published by Apple Press 2007

the must-know

“Dinner jackets should not be seen before 6pm; though if you are a guest at a daytime wedding and the invitation says black tie, then you have no choice but to grin and bear it. If you are being married in the day, and really want to follow conventional etiquette, you must wear morning dress.” “Personally I’m not too big on waistcoats which clutter the snow white shirt front. Matching sets of patterned waistcoats and bow ties are to be avoided; they make you look like a small town pharmacist trying to be original…and the bow tie, needless to say, must be real, that is to say, self-tied and not horrifyingly “made-up.” M e n ’ s S t y l e : T h e T h i n k i n g M a n ’ s G u i d e t o D r e s s by Russell Smith. published by St Martin’s Press 2007

the real reason

“The whole point of black tie, the whole reason all us men look like we do (identical) is in order to allow women to shine.”  M r J o n e s ’ R u l e s f o r t h e M o d e r n M a n by Dyl an Jones pub l ish ed by H o d d er & S to u gh to n Lt d 20 07

When buying the dinner suit, there are some important things to consider. H en r y B uc k s in Melbourne is one of the world’s great menswear stores. Ma r ga r et M c D o nnell , the marketing manager, says one of the most important things to consider is comfort. “The suit needs to stand up to the rigours of the ceremony and dancing so the fabric is very important. The best suits are made of lightweight wool. The lighter the suit, the more comfortable; heavier suits are more rigid making the wearer feel more rigid” she says. According to Margaret, the most popular style is the single breasted with a peak lapel. Black is most popular but H en r y B uc k s is seeing a slight move towards a white jacket. “Think James Bond and Cary Grant, he always wore a white jacket, very smart” she says. It’s especially important to have expert fitting and tailoring. The length of trousers is very important, they should be not too long and not too short. And surprise, surprise, most men choose their own suit without their partner; then groomsmen choose their suits to match or complement the groom’s. The price increases with the quality of tailoring, quality of cloth and detail in construction. The average cost is $1300.

accessories The dinner suit should be matched with beautiful accessories;

s h i r t The shirt should be pure cotton because it breathes. A classic M a r c e l l a (pique) or pintucked are most popular with a standard collar. Wing collars are definitely out of favour. Studs can be an expression of personal taste but they should always match the watch. Cufflinks should also be teamed with the watch and the studs. t i e A black tie is the most appropriate to wear with a classic dinner suit, but it is an opportunity to express individuality. If wearing a buttonhole, never team it with a handkerchief. It’s one or the other. s h o e s On the feet, black silk socks and black patent shoes are the formal look, preferably not lace-ups. d e t a i l s Belts are never worn with a dinner suit, the trousers should not have belt loops; suspenders are a quirky addition, but not very popular. A cummerbund is acceptable and traditional.


W E DDIN G S T Y L E G U I DE

E T IQU ET T E THE INS AND OUTS OF MODERN DAY ETIQUETTE

Yo u ’ve d e c i d ed to ti e th e knot, l i fe i s pu r e b l i s s, love i s i n th e ai r , th e r i n g i s a r ea l spar kl er ; but wh at n ext? C h ec k o ut th e an no u n c em ent e ti qu e t te a n d avoi d fr i e n d s an d r e l l i e s h avi ng u n exp ected h i s sy f its.

We’re Getting Married!

Y

ou might be walking on air, but an engagement and pending marriage affects a lot of people, they can get sensitive if they feel overlooked. So know the rules and get things right. In Vo gue ’ s B o o k o f Et iqu ette , Millicent Fenwick gives the advice that it’s bad form to let family or close friends receive their first news of the engagement through an announcement in the paper. She says letters should be sent by the engaged couple or by their mothers to all those who are close. Although this advice was written over 50 years ago and letterwriting is a dying art, it’s common sense that people should not hear sensitive news like this on the grapevine. However, these days the news might be broken personally by phone or email rather than by post. In the P e nguin B o o k o f Etiqu ette , author Marion von Adlerstein agrees that family should be informed before anyone else. Vera Wang in V e ra Wang on Weddings points out that relating the good news can be one of the most joyful parts of the wedding experience. The possibilities include a formal announcement, dinner with the family, a telephone call or email to close friends.

Where children are concerned, they should always be informed first and in private. When informing people in tiers, it’s appropriate to ask them to delay calling others until the bride has informed them herself. Sometimes the sequence in which friends and family are told can lead to resentment. Once close-ones have been personally apprised of your engagement, a notice in the newspaper is completely acceptable. The engagement can be as long or short as you like, there are no rules. And the bonding of the two families? Unless the in-laws truly get on like a house on fire, it’s not a good idea to force them to get along. It’s better to allow them to keep a polite distance than to put everybody through close encounters of an uncomfortable kind. Vogu e’s Book o f E t iqu e t t e

by Millicent

Fenwick, Simon & Schuster 1948. Ve r a Wa n g

on Weddings,

by Vera Wang, Harper Collins

2001. The Peng u in Bo o k o f E t iqu e t t e

by Marion von Adlerstein, Penguin Publishers 2002.


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

S TATIONERY

the classiest stationery of all When a graphic designer creates a stationery suite, it shows. Rather than cobble the stationery up on a laptop or buy readymade (just fill in the blanks) notepaper, commission a graphic designer. Here’s how it works.

T

he work of g raphic designer s includes creating brands, strong visual communication that has at-a-glance recognition. Beautiful wedding stationer y unites all the printed bits and pieces under the umbrella of the couple’s ‘brand’.

Finding a designer who will inter pret the desired look of the brand may require some legwork. Kee p an eye out for beautiful design work and follow the lead. A web search is convenient, samples of the designer’s work will be up and sites may include the costs, which can vary g reatly. Looking under g raphic designer s in the yellow pages will yield hundreds of names, people close-by are worth a call. Assess their suitability on the phone, ask them to email examples of their work. It all cuts time. Ever y professional designer will have a portfolio of work which has been created for clients’ specific requests. So, although the style may not be totally suitable it will give an idea of their creativity, use of typefaces, colours and paper. Ask the designer about budgets for the projects shown; anything is possible with an unlimited budget. An experienced designer will know ways to reduce production costs and deliver superior products to clients. Make sure the designer s have wedding stationery experience, they will be more under standing of all the detail required. It’s not necessary to pick the fir st designer who pops up with an appealing portfolio, a co-operative per sonality is also essential. The person must be happy to discuss options, make changes and add items to the suite. Commissioning a professional is going to be more expensive than DIY or asking a friend or relative to whip up a design. But a professional job is worth the price. Costs range from $30 per hour upwards, consultation rates are $100 per hour plus; the cost of printing the stationery is on top of the designwork. To ensure things go smoothly, get everything in writing. T his will eliminate mis-under standings on what is required of the designer and the costs. Include deadlines, contact addresses and any other important infor mation that may af fect the outcome of the deliver y. Email is a g reat way to keep track of the decisions made; if the designer doesn’t supply a copy of the commission in writing, send an email to confir m ag reements, just to make sure. Attend the meeting with a budget in mind. A good designer can work within any budget and advise how to achieve the best result for the money. Costs can blow out ver y easily so it’s important everyone knows their limit.


WEDDING STYLE GUIDE

Discuss the options with the designer, it may be more economical to have fewer, better quality items than many bits that end up looking disappointing. Fewer colour s can reduce printing costs, consider all the options suggested. A bit of research is necessar y before the first meeting with the designer; compile mag azine clippings that show the desired look; take along colour swatches, fabric samples of bride’s and bridesmaids’ dresses and images of favourite f lower s. T he season in which the wedding is to be held may also inf luence the design and colour palette. All these factor s will help the designer understand the style and type of event that is being planned. T hese inspiration pieces don’t have to be wedding related; a satin ribbon, a favourite book, a quote, a pebble collected during a romantic moment on the beach will all help to stir creativity. A list of key words that best describe the couple is helpful. Anything that speaks to the couple can be the starting point for a unique and innovative stationery suite and will help the designer deter mine colour s, paper s and typefaces. Dislikes are important for the designer to understand, too. If certain colours are a tur n-of f, they should be named at the start. Limit changes once work is underway, they add to costs. For design and printing, lead times should be generous. More detailed designs or more extensive stationery suites will take time to prepare; different printing methods take longer than others. Timing is very important says samantha fray from chapel press in Melbour ne. “Allo w lots of time, custom design and letterpress printing are labour intensiv e. We recommend clients visit four to six months prior to their wedding. If the y can suppl y us with a vision of their stationer y, it is perfect.” Invitations should be sent out six weeks before the wedding, even earlier for over seas guests or if a destination wedding is being planned, so it is imperative the designer knows the key dates. T his will allow the designer to pre pare a schedule that accommodates design, client changes and printing, all within the time frame. When deter mining the print run, remember that each guest won’t need an invitation as many guests will be one half of a couple or a member of a family. Work out how many invitations are required, this will affect the printing cost. T he number of items in the suite may vary from as few as an invitation and matching envelope to a full suite of stationery complete with bonbonniere swing tags and thank you cards. Whatever the extent of the suite, organise a priority list so expendable items can be deleted if the budget looks like blowing out. Be pre pared to listen to the designer’s advice. The designer has valuable experience in the design and production of stationery. T he wording for all elements of the suite won’t be required at the first meeting with the designer, but it’s worth considering if it will be traditional or contemporar y wording; this will be deter mined by the style of wedding. For mal wording would look incong ruous on a moder n design, likewise contemporar y wording doesn’t fit a for mal design. While it may cost more upfront to engage professional services, beautiful bespoke stationer y, on time and on budget is worth every penny.

THE GUIDE

S TATIONERY


W E DDIN G S T Y L E G U I DE

T HE G RO O M’S G U I D E

BUCK UP The tradition of men celebrating their friend’s departure from bachelorhood goes back to ancient Rome, it’s such a good night, the guys are hanging on to the two thousand year old tradition.

The contemporary buck’s night is intended to be a night of good clean fun, although some have been known to go over the top. However, with luck and a bit of good management, the groom should have a great night with his dignity intact. Setting up

the Speech

Traditionally, the best man delivers a buck’s night speech. The topic is likely to revolve around his friendship with the groom and will possibly touch on some disreputable episodes from the groom’s past.

The groom decides how he would like to spend the evening and the best man organises it, whether he follows instructions fully IS another story. A popular option is to book a private room at a restaurant or pub so the guests can enjoy an inexpensive meal and some drinks. It also allows some privacy so that other patrons won’t hear the speeches which are quite often designed to cause the groom embarrassment. Often entertainment is involved which might be better kept behind closed doors.

Safely Home

Invitations

It’s a boy thing

Generally the groom will give the best man a list of people to invite and the best man will see to it. Traditionally on the list are the groomsmen, ushers, brothers of the bride and groom, and the groom’s close friends. It is also considered a courtesy to invite the fathers of both the bride and groom. Money matters

Guests usually pay at least part of the cost. Sometimes the groom will pay for the meal, while the guests buy their own drinks. A generous idea is for the guests to combine resources and pay for the groom’s night out. The best man should make this decision and let guests know what monetary arrangements have been decided. He should also take charge of the money, to ensure there is enough and that no one forgets their share. setting a date

Traditionally, the buck’s night was held on the eve of the wedding. However, this has proved to be too close to the big day and didn’t allow enough time for a decent recovery. Be sensible, choose a night some days, even weeks, before the big day.

The best man is responsible for organising the after-party transport. Under no circumstances should any guest drive home. Pooling taxis works well and is quite economical. To avoid confusion, the best man can compile a list of partygoers with the address and phone number for each for the taxi drivers. The best man should ensure that the groom arrives home and is seen safely inside, tucked up in bed safe and sound. Alternatives to a buck’s night include:

High Adventure: Sky diving, white water rafting, go-kart racing, mountain biking, horseback trail riding, parasailing, water skiing, snow skiing, gun shooting, camping, deep sea fishing charter, kite surfing. Sports Mad: Play golf, a game of football,

cricket or frisbee at a local park, play backyard tennis. Russell Crowe hosted a cricket match between his family and friends versus Danielle Spencer’s family and friends for his buck’s show, and had shirts made up for the two teams.

The Rat Pack: Hire favourite dream cars,

Porsche, Lamborghini or Ferrari for the day; go for a cruise to a favourite destination; hire a casino to come to you (www.funcasino.com.au or www.pokerama.com.au) and enjoy martinis and cigars. Hire a bus and go wine tasting to favourite wineries.

Good Plain Fun: Paint ball, ten pin bowling, lawn bowls, bouncing boxing on a bouncy castle, hire a mechanical bull or surf board, hire sumo suits for sumo wrestling.


W E DDIN G S T Y L E G U I DE

T HE G RO O M’S G U I D E

Getting Carried Away W edding c a r s a r e m o r e th a n t r a nspo rtation , they a r e the fi r st hint of the style of the wedding th at is to unfold.

GET ME TO THE C H U RC H O N T I M E B Y …

h e l i copter b oat m otorbike h o r seback h o r s e a n d carriage l i m ousine a i rcraft s cooter h ot a i r balloon

W

hat style of wedding do you have in mind? A Buick or Chevrolet would suit a retro wedding, a Mercedes Benz or BMW would be just right for an urban sophisticate, a vintage Rolls Royce or Jaguar would be right for a traditional theme. Maybe a horse? Yes, horse. What could be more romantic than riding across the paddocks with the groom, veil blowing in the wind; perfect country style; but that’s another story. The wedding’s theme drives the choice of transport. Back to motor transport, by far the most popular choice; quotes will be determined by whether the wedding is in high season, the type of cars and how many hours you will need the transport. The number of people in the bridal party will affect the size of the fleet and the clock starts ticking from the pick-up and finishes at the reception.

Enquire about overtime rates if transport is required at end of night; the price quoted is firm and cannot be changed, that includes overtime. Allow extra time for photos with your wedding cars and be sure to state that requirement clearly in advance. Check out what will be included in the package, details like champagne, nibbles and red carpet. Enquire if the cars in the fleet are all matching and available on the day. Inspect the vehicles in the showrooms to make sure you know what you are getting and that the entire bridal party will fit in air- conditioned comfort. To ensure the cars you see on inspection are the cars you actually have on the day, write down registration numbers. If using an older vintage car, check the hinges of the doors for grease or oil. Also, look to see if there is a covering over the wheels at the back so as grease and dirt will not get onto dresses. Carry a small container of talcum powder to absorb the grease if the worst happens, then brush off before you disembark the car. Be sure that the operator is accredited. In most states, the Motor Transport Department issues an operator license to reputable companies and the cars themselves are licensed. The vehicle should be insured and the company must carry Public Liability Insurance. Enquire if there is back-up and another car available if there is a breakdown. Will you get an experienced driver who is keen to make your day special? Check him out. Provide him with sound direction and a map with collection points and exact times stated clearly. A running sheet will ensure your transport runs smoothly. If you would like refreshments provided in your car, and the company does not provide them, ask a member of the bridal party to organise refreshments and nibbles, especially if the travelling time is longer than half an hour. It is usually the groom’s responsibility to organise transport for guests if the wedding venue is out of the city. In most cases, a bus is the most appropriate option. Guests meet at a certain place and return to the same place after the wedding. This way guests can enjoy their night out to the full. Be sure to book a bus with air-conditioning if the weather is warm.



The Guide