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Job No.: 037597

School Name: Rock Bridge High School

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O One Act Festival

Mizzouthon

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Student Activism Orchestra Speech & Debate Showcase

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Band Concert

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CoMo Cow

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Show Choir Benefit

Capers

Percussion Concert

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O Art Show

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Flashback Assembly Prom

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Mud Volleyball Theatrical Showcase

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Bruin Cup

Zombie Defense League

Senior Picnic

Baccalureate

Graduation

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april–may

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To

whom concern, it may

TAKE 2, PLEASE Unhappy with his reply, Audrey Mueller (10, right) stands up furious, thinking that Michael Bledsoe (10), was looking to pick her up. Throughout this one act, there were constant “dings” signifying like a rewind button and the characters would go back on their dialogue and change their responses.

CALL ME ON MY TELEPHONE Ignoring the situation at hand, Angel Montie (11, middle left) calls the desk clerk for the hotel about getting ice water. In the photo, Montie pointed out that she was holding the phone incorrectly and that she did it as an inside joke between her cast mates. They’re supposed to talk into the base part and put the wired part up to their ear.

LAUGH IT UP After eating pizza with the festival cast, Lucille Beattie (11, middle right) and Isabel Thoroughman (11) goof off while they wait for their turn to perform on stage. The show they were a part of, The Philadelphia, was the third act to be performed that night after Sure Thing. While cast members waited to go on-stage, they continued to play some of their favorite team building games.

“WE DON’T HAVE THAT SIR” During the most climatic scene, Ashley Livingston (11, bottom) witnesses Lucille Beattie (11) attempt to give her order to Isabel Thoroughman (11) while living under the influence of a “Philadelphia.” Living in a “Philadelphia” meant that everything you asked for meant the opposite to the person you’re conversing with. As a result, Beattie successfully ordered her meal.

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WHICH LINE DID YOU OWN?

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Rosalind Eggener, 12

Tamara Holliday, 12

“I promise to draw constellations up your arms every night until you know that you’re made of stars. And when you feel self conscious about your freckles, I will say ‘Darling, that’s just Cassiopeia across your nose.’”

“I think the shortness of this letter represents your effort to be a good or even present father throughout my life.”

Rebecca Simmons, 12

“Today she climbed a tree claiming that it was soft as a blanket, but I cut myself just by touching it. There is something not right in her head. Help me!”

Students cancel act due to lack of memorization

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he end of Peter Pan was sad for the advanced actors as they not only had to say goodbye to their swords and glitter, but also to friends they met through the production. Though they left lots behind, it only meant they had something new to start. The advanced acting class, with eight out of the ten students from Peter Pan, they came to class immediately with a new show to have memorized, The Insanity of Mary Girard. Though they agreed to be memorized the Monday after the shows were finished, things didn’t go according to plan. When the actors got on stage that Monday, they looked at each other in panic, as they realized they weren’t going to be ready on time and would have to face their director, Ms. Holly Kerns. “It was a mix of the actors being overwhelmed and procrastinating,” senior Rebecca Simmons said. “We didn’t want to be working on something new right after finishing the previous show.” As the actors stood on the stage and waited for commentary from Ms. Kerns, she was forced to feed actors their lines. This embarrassing defeat made students once again appreciate their duties to the class and the performance. “She was annoyed with us since she had made us aware of the date and expected us to honor it,” Simmons said. “When an actor is given a role, they are expected to learn the character so that they can portray them correctly and learn the lines so that they will be ready to perform. They are expected to have both done before a performance.” It wasn’t common for the entire cast to not be memorized for a show, though there were situations that came up every now and then that would conflict with performing it. It was tolerable when only one person wasn’t memorized, meaning only one problem was needed to be fixed,

but as for the entire cast, that kind of problem was difficult to fix in a short amount of time. Obviously, the cast didn’t think it would get bad, and in the beginning wanted to get through with the show as all of them were intrigued by the horror aspect of it. “I thought the play was cool and speaking in chorus was fun to do,” junior Ashley Livingston said. “The story line was also really interesting since it was basically based on true things.” Though it seemed like they weren’t going to perform the show for an audience, they realized that it was much better to perform the show then to ditch it completely after the hard work. They chose to set a date and memorize the lines, eventually performing March 22. “We tried to do it three times. Two times it did not work out because we weren’t really prepared,” freshman Lane Luebbering said. “The first showing was at the beginning of March, one was a week after that, and one was two weeks after that.” Though it took a lot longer than they anticipated, they agreed to continue putting their effort into the show, despite some annoyed with the rough journey, and not going through with the performance. “It was really cool to do a play with the [older actors], but there were a few times where I regretted my decision to keep going,” Luebbering said. “The chorus lines were awful and there were times where we all just didn’t feel it anymore and that’s where I wanted to quit. [We didn’t want to quit] because we already gotten that far and memorized our lines, and I guess my own reason was it was my first show with Advanced Acting [students], I know it sounds cheesy, but it’s important to me.” j. heimsoth, story / j. heimsoth, design / j. hemisoth, photos

THE STRESS IS REAL While the hotel was burning down, Miles Cone (11) goes through all the clothes he brought to the hotel and admires them before he leaves them behind. The act they performed was called Still Alarm, which was a dry humor play about two business men (Ed and Bob) who were currently in a hotel that was burning from the bottom, up. Though they’re aware of the situation, all they seemed to care about was Bob’s blue prints for a future house he plans to build.

HELLO THERE, BACKSTAGE After the end of the act Sure Thing, Audrey Mueller (10) and Michael Bledsoe (10) strike the ending pose as they both look out to find a waiter in their coffee shop. On opening night, their director, Ms. Holly Kerns, decided to run the show once before the actual performance. They weren’t required to be in costume, but they were required to put their best effort into it, as they acted like it was the actual show and pizza was their reward afterwards.

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JUST DANCE!

rock bridge and mizzou students unite to raise money for the kids

s students walked through the halls of the Mizzou Recreation Center April 7, the chant, “MIZ! FTK!” and the pounding beat of music, could be heard from all over the building, signifying the 10th annual MizzouThon was in session. MizzouThon was an annual University of Missouri tradition, stemming from the idea of a dance marathon originally founded at Indiana University in 1991 for Ryan White, a 13-year-old boy who suffered from HIV/ AIDS. Since then, dance marathons had grown into a movement of more than 150 high schools and colleges and 600,000 students across the country, raising money for children that were fighting all kinds of diseases. Mizzou got involved in the marathon in 2008 and had since been dancing to raise money for Missouri Women and Children’s Hospitals. Senior Rochita Ghosh had a personal connection to the event and its cause. “At first I got involved because half my friends were doing it, but the summer before senior year I was almost hospitalized. I had been seeing doctors for two years, but it really put things into perspective for me,” Ghosh said. “ While I never actually had to be in the hospital, I’m extremely grateful for it and will happily do whatever I can to support the children who need the hospital like I almost did.” MizzouThon was composed of two parts. The first event, Mini-MizzouThon, was a 7.5 hour branch off of MizzouThon, specifically for high school, middle school and elementary school children held in February. The main event, held in April, was 13.1 hours, the equivalent of a half marathon. In order to qualify

for the main event, Mini-MizzouThon participants had to raise at least $100. The danceathon consisted of DJs, various performances from groups around campus, games, food and chances to bond with the families and kids that participants were raising money for. “My favorite part of the experience was getting the opportunity to raise money for the kids and to see them at the event,” sophomore Madelyn Orr said. “It allowed me to see how my donations and all the work I put into raising money are making a difference and making miracles.” At the end of the 13.1 hours, the dance leaders revealed the total amount of money raised throughout the year: $307,543.80. This was a specifically important milestone for participants because in 2014, MizzouThon signed a pledge to raise one million dollars in five years to fund the renovation of the largest Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in mid-Missouri. Thanks to the money raised in 2018, MizzouThon met their goal in only four years. Senior Connor Squellati, a two-year MizzouThon volunteer and leader, was ecstatic to hear that the goal had been met, especially a year earlier than planned. “I participate in MizzouThon because I believe it’s important for a community to provide both financial and emotional support to children with lifelong, debilitating conditions, as well as their families,” Squellati said. “Donating my time and energy to the Children’s Miracle Network means that I can help protect a child’s right to live, laugh and just be a kid, no matter what their medical afflictions.” l. godon, story / l. godon, design

EVERYBODY’S HANDS GO UP...

Decorated in face paint, Kaelyn Kovarik (12) fist bumps into the air to the beat of the music. To show their MizzouThon spirit, participants got decked out in all kinds of crazy clothing or accessories. “I really believe in the cause, and I want that day to be one that the kids could just be kids,” Kovarik said. “Making a fun and crazy environment helps everyone to stay lighthearted and bring smiles to their faces.”

WHAT’S THE MOVE?

Puzzled about the dance they were learning, Carolyn Redlinger (12) and Alyssa Maggine (12) look to the stage and try to follow along with the leaders teaching them how to do the Cupid Shuffle. “Most of the dancs were pretty easy,” Maggine said. “But there was one part where we had to learn sign language, and that was kind of hard to remember with music.”

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l. godon

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FOR THE KIDS At 1 a.m. Sunday morning, dance leaders held up the total amount of money raised, signifying the end of the 2018 MizzouThon. The amount was a result of donations from the Mini and Main Events and was presented to the Mizzou Women and Children’s hospital later that week. c. squellati, photo credit

HOW DID YOU NEVER SIT DOWN? 1- Danielle Schnider (12), Holly Hughes (12), Lucy Kegley (12), Marlon Guzman (12). 2- Morgan Banker (12), Priyanka Patel (12). 3- Marlon Guzman (12), Marine Caron (12), Giada Batticani (12). 4- Piper Osman (11), Marine Caron (12), Jadyn Lisenby (10), Madelyn Orr (10).

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Lucy Kegley (12)

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“It was definitely hard to stand for that long. But the MizzouThon leaders did a great job keeping us busy and motivated through the day. Every hour or so they would bring out a family affected by childhood illness, and they would share their testimony and how the Women’s and Childrens Hospital helped them. Hearing the stories and hardships that these families had to endure made sore feet seem like nothing, and that really reminded me what we were there for.”

Morgan Banker (12)

l. godon

p. patel

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“It was really hard [to stay standing for 13.1 hours, especially around hours 6/7. I managed to stay standing by trying not to think about how badly my feet hurt and also by recognizing that the whole idea of staying standing for that long is to make that sacrifice of temporary pain because the miracle children go through so much more than that in their everyday lives, so the least we can do for them is stay standing and dancing.”

Piper Osman (11)

3 3

m. caron

l. godon

l. godon

FRONT AND CENTER

After getting pulled on stage by emcee Kerry Gibson, Danielle Schneider (12) claps to the beat of the music and hypes up the crowd. “The emcees were going around picking people to go up on stage to get people involved and having fun,” Schneider said. “At first I really did not want to go up there, but the energy was so high, and I realized no one really cared about how good or bad people could dance. It was all about having fun.”

IT TAKES TWO TO TANGO

l. godon

Laughing, Marlon Guzman (12) spins Holly Hughes (12) during Shut Up and Dance by Walk The Moon. The 13.1 hours of almost non-stop music consisted of current hits, widely loved throwbacks and even Disney music. “I think the throwback Disney music like the Jonas Brothers and High School Musical songs got everyone moving the most,” Hughes said. “They definitely got me pumped up.”

“I pretty much just tried to stay with my friends so we could hype each other up. Over time we realized the college students didn’t know we were in high school and started dancing with us, which made it way more fun. They had short Zumba and yoga breaks and those really helped. Overall it was really just fun to interact with other people and the miracle families, and dance our hearts out all day long.

NOW WATCH ME WHIP

l. godon

Following the performers onstage, seniors Connor Squellati, Priyanka Patel and Alex Geyer try to learn a part of the Morale Dance. Broken up into 13 stages, the Morale Dance was a compilation of songs with specfic dances created by the MizzouThon leaders who went on stage every hour and taught a new section of it. This provided a scheduled event to get volunteers through the day.

MizzouThon

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THE GATHERING STORM Huddling against the cold low of 35 degrees March 24, Meredith Farmer (10), Madeline Marrero (10), Anushka Jalisatgi (10), Kris Cho (12), Samikshya Pokharel (10), Savannah Wittman (11), Sarvika Mahto (10), Rachael Erikson (10) and Kanchan Hans (10) share a moment of wonder with friends.

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speakers 25 student activists

BAND BRETHEREN

32 days to 2 hours and 15 minutes prepare

MARCH24

around

1,500 marchers

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r. erikson, statistics

Ashleigh McKinley (12) and Amanda Andrews (12) hold a paper with the name of a band member from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida March 24. “I held it very carefully because it was almost like holding someone’s name who didn’t exist anymore,” Andrews said.

ELEPHANT’S MEMORY During the March 14 Walk Out, Olivia Nevels (11) holds a sign with the names of survivors with the headline “Never Again, Never Forget.”

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A NEW GENERATION TO

RALLY BEHIND

Gen Z revives activism

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he morning of March 14, sophomore Amanda Kurukulasuriya watched the clock as the time grew closer to a walkout that would stick in her memory forever. Kurukulasuriya and her friends hurriedly finished their posters and walked out of the library toward the front of the building to begin the rally. Stepping through the main doors of the school, Kurukulasuriya was hit with a wave of pride as she saw how many other students had taken a stand and protested with her. A month to the day after the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, thousands of students in schools across the United States walked out of class to raise awareness of gun violence and honor the victims of the shooting. Along with some 300 of her peers, Kurukulasuriya joined the commotion of the March 14 walkout with a sense of awe. “We were standing there waiting at around 10, and then students started to walk out. It was a lot more students than we were anticipating. [They] came out in a huge horde, and it was really shocking to see so many people there supporting each other and what they believed in,” Kurukulasuriya said. “It started out kind of slow; we had a couple of people who were really instrumental in the planning and implementation of the walkout speak,” Kurukulasuriya said. “After they spoke, we were kind of surprised to see how many other people felt strongly enough about it to talk about it in front of other people.” Although many students had decided to join the walkout not too soon before it began, some student activists put much planning and effort into making events run as smoothly as possible. One such student, sophomore Anushka Jalisatgi, also recognised the March 24 rally as an outlet for student activists. “For the weeks coming up to the march, we met every week. We would go through the logistics of the march, and if we needed permits we would go talk to specific people, reach out to the press, make posters to spread the word and just kind of organize everything so that the actual event could run smoothly,” Jalisatgi said. “Mostly just organizational stuff, talking to the right people and getting the right permits and information so that we could actually do it [was important].”

As one of many students involved in getting events like the March For Our Lives up and running, Jalisatgi noted the importance of teamwork in such a large undertaking. Pointing to her collaborators as the reason behind the success, Jalisatgi appreciated the ease with which the group shared ideas, work and a positive attitude. “[My peers] were all passionate people who really cared about this issue and wanted to do something about it,” Jalisatgi said. “Everyone was really driven and motivated, and it was really easy and fun working with them because everyone held up their end on what they had to do.” Many students had different reasons behind their involvement in activism. Kurukulasuriya found inspiration in her peers and her generation and their dedication to the future. “I think because I have always said that I want to change the world– not just said that– I want to change the world. A lot of times it feels hard to do, especially because we’re here in basically the middle of nowhere. This little nobody-cares-about-it town. A lot of times it feels like I can’t do anything that matters because I’m just a kid in a small town, like what can I possibly do?” Kurukulasuriya said. “But this feels like it’s part of something bigger and part of something that, one, needs to be changed, and, two, it seems like something that’s actually feasible.” “Right now we have the steam behind it to actually make it happen,” Kurukulasuriya said. “Just because we’re kids doesn’t mean we can’t do anything about it. Changing the world is something we have the power to do, and there isn’t any reason we shouldn’t do it.” While action was prompted by hope for the future for some, junior Harper Dailey’s catalyst lay in the past. “I got involved because my neighbor Rickie Dunn­– in 2014– was shot and killed behind the McDonalds on business loop. He was with his daughter picking her up from a party. He was the sweetest person. He was like an uncle to me; he was the closest thing I had to an uncle, actually. He always treated me like family,” Dailey said. “He died at 40 years old. I’m doing it for Rickie because he means so much to me and I feel like I wouldn’t be doing him right if I weren’t doing this.” g. kirk, story / g. kirk, design / m. bell, photos

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WATERWORKS AT THE COURTHOUSE

FACE THE FACTS During the walkout, George Frey (11, above) and Meredith Farmer (10) hold up peer-made signs. “Sometimes when we have these mass shootings, we tend to focus on them as statistics. I think we tend to forget that these were people with families who were loved,” Frey said.

MARCH FOR OUR LIVES Kristine Cho (12, dominant) and Harper Dailey (10) protest March 24. The group organized police enforcement and street barricades to ensure the safety of all marchers. As legality was an issue, leaders also met with city, campus and county officials.

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Kristine Cho, 12

Sarvika Mahto, 10

“It was really special to see so many of my peers show up to make a difference. There’s something about marching together that made it so emotional. I was so proud to stand with everyone else that day.”

“There was a moment where we had gathered at the columns before the march. I turned around and saw [everyone], and it was awe inspiring, and we just couldn’t believe that a bunch of teenagers who didn’t have much experience were able to do this.”

Rachael Erikson, 10

“It was really powerful to see so many people show up. Most of the time, you see this issue pushed aside, so to know that so many people in my hometown think what we are doing is important was really empowering.”

Student Activism

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THE BROCCOLI REVOLUTION Presenting her speech entitled “The Broccoli Revolution” Sarah Emerson (12) uses a poster with velcro pieces to attach various photos and illustrations to as she progresses through her speech. Emerson discussed various battles she’s been through during her childhood, from refusing to eat broccoli to not conforming to gender norms.

CHOPPED Anna Xu (10) exclaims “Go ladies!” as she mentions studies have found that men’s IQ points drop five points more than women’s while trying to multi-task. Xu’s act focused on analyzing how detrimental “multi-tasking” was to productivity as well as our health.

DEAR WHITE AMERICA Sadia Moumita (10) presents a chilling topic regarding privilege and growing up as a person of color (POC) in America. She spoke about the atrocities that happen daily to POCs in the United States because of the color of their skin. “Because there are no amber alerts for amber skinned girls.”

Debaters host annual showcase

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IN THE TEAM’S OWN WORDS

“Are you ever afraid of the future?”

“When multitasking, one’s IQ drops significantly.”

“If they wish to do what is right, then they should listen to the recommendations of Robert Mueller.”

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­—Anna Xu (10)

“We’re starfish... I mean what’s our purpose. All we do is lay here, ya know?” —Quinn Tyler (9)

­—Amira McKee (9)

—Kanchan Hans (10)

—Kiren Macleod (11)

“I examine the mess of the people before me and build the best space station the world has ever seen.”

he house lights of the theater dimmed. The light chatter throughout the audience quickly faded. High heels were heard clacking against the wooden stage as seniors and co-captains Sonya Hu and Joshua Vincent stepped up to the podium. It was the fourth annual Speech and Debate showcase held by the team, which decided to begin holding these showcases to raise money to send students to state and nationals. “The majority ends up going towards nationals, as we have to pay for transportation, the hotel, registration fees and buying out of judging rounds,” Hu said. “This showcase helped quite a bit, but students will probably each still have to pay upwards of $500.” The event was not only a great way to raise money for the team, but also an opportunity for the students to showcase speeches they had been working on all year. The night included a diverse range of topics with speeches ranging from Russian involvement in U.S. politics to a conversation between starfish. Freshman Amira McKee dedicated her speech to addressing how raising kids with gender specific toys can limit and discourage girls from choosing Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields. She included personal anecdotes from her life as a child when she had her regular LEGOS taken from her and was forced to use giant pink LEGOS. “I examined the so-called ‘girl LEGOS’,” McKee said. “They were bigger. They were less complicated, but most importantly they were bright pink. I couldn’t understand how LEGOS supposedly designed for me could be so underwhelming.” Mckee, as well as the other students, presented their speeches to a small crowd made up of friends, family and teachers supporting the event gathered at the front of the PAC . “The showcase went well and we had a higher turnout this year compared to years past,” Vincent said. “In past years we’ve had less than 20 people show up, but this year we had around 40. Granted, that’s still not a lot of people, but it is better than nothing.” y. el-jayyousi, story / y. el-jayyousi, design / y. el-jayyousi, photo

“We explore what it means to be American...in terror.” —Sadia Moumita (10)

y. el-jayyousi, typography

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(Star) for

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LIGHT UP THE STAGE

just

COWING around

COMO COW WAS A LIP SYNCING COMPETITION IN WHICH STUDENTS AND TEACHERS FROM ALL THREE CPS HIGH SCHOOLS PARTICIPATED IN.

Battling against the Hickman teachers with his best moves April 9, World Studies teacher Mr. Alex Worman lip syncs to “Ice Ice Baby”. Their performance had many difficult dances and lots of unique skills making it more complex to memorize. The RBHS staff swept away their opponents and took home first place in the teacher category.

AMERICAN PRIDE Liam Stanley (12), Dalton Nunamaker (12), Carter Abernathy (12), Eli Darrough (11), and Evan Abernathy (12) stand together before their finale. Most of the members that were part of Milkmen Next Generation were seniors and participating in their last CoMo Cow. “It was an amazing experience to be able to have fun dancing with my friends,” Evan Abernathy said. ”The fact that it was all for such a good cause makes it even better.”

WINNER, WINNER, BEEF DINNER Preparing to award the winning team with the first place trophy, student council sponsor Mrs. Kelly Wittenborn steps on stage. She was one of the procedures of the show, and helped introduce acts between performances. She also performed in the RBHS teacher dance themed Snow Day.

ALL ABOUT THE ATTITUDE Reaching outside of his usual comfort zone, Liam Stanley (12) dances to the song “Santa Baby”. Stanley was part of the group Milkmen Next Generation and helped add quirkiness to his team’s performance. “It’s a good summary of who I am. It’s a little out of the box and many people wouldn’t have been able to do it with such a care free attitude as well as in front of a lot of people,” Stanley said.

A WORK IN PROGRESS Showcasing the soon to be winning performance, twins Olivia and Audrey Guess (10) dance alongside teammate Anya Kumar (10). The girls spent countless hours working to perfect their routine and to make the dance their own. They added a variety of moves that showcased their personality. “I think personally, the performance reflects my passion for dancing because the choreography is all my own and it really showcases my personality,” Kumar said. “The police are more fierce and serious while the robbers were definitely more sassy and outgoing.”

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CoMo cow raises money for charity Although this event has turned into a tradition and a fun way for all the high schools to get together, it was also a fund raiser that did not benefit the schools. In order to watch the routines, the entrance fee was $5. The money went to First Chance, a charity that helped with early childhood development. “It was an amazing experience to be able to have fun dancing with my friends in front of all three schools,” said senior Evan Abernathy who was part of ‘Milkmen Next Generation’. “The fact that it was all for such a good cause makes it even better. I love how we were able to have fun while promoting such a good cause.” Although the contest’s original concept was a fund raiser, most participants were not aware of the greater cause behind the lip sync battle until after they had already entered the competition. By the end, the three CPS high schools raised around $2,000 to help benefit First Chance foundation, all while having an excitement filled night full of many laughs and amazing performances. “I found out once I joined the group because I joined in a little later, but I thought it was awesome that it made me even happier to be participating,” said junior Lauren Clayton, who was part of ‘Bed, Bath and Beyonce’.

Seth Covert (12) “I owned it on stage because I had confidence in my fellow Milk Men. Even though we messed around a lot during our practices we all knew the roles we had to execute.”

Mr. Neal Blackburn

“On stage I get to be a different person than I normally am; so the somewhat more reserved side of me gets a break, and the fun, hyper side of me that my family sees about every night, gets a chance to be under the lights on display in front of others.”

Grace Dorsey (12) “We owned the stage by using all our combined talents and dedication to present the best routine we could. There were practices after school, on the weekend and even during our lunch.”

HOW DID YOU OWN IT ON STAGE?

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s the bright stage lights hit the faces of students from around the district, only few would place in the top three of the competition. Before Battle’s involvement, this event was known as Golden Cow. It was a lip syncing competition between Hickman and Rock Bridge. Now which students and teachers from all three CPS high schools participated. Teams made up routines displaying a dance that went along with a song of their choice, the best performance won a trophy for their school. The Bruins brought home first and second place. Also the RBHS faculty won first over Hickman teachers. These performances let students’ talents and personalities shine through because of the creative freedoms that were allowed in the showcase. Participants were unique with their dance moves all while enjoying the experience with fellow students. “My favorite part was probably getting the chance to hang out with my friends and watch the other performances go,” said sophomore David Gysbers, who was part of the group ‘Live it Up’. “Some teams really stole the show, like Milkmen Next Generation and Cops and Robbers.”

g. hervey, story/ g. hervey, design/ g. hervey, photos

STEALING FIRST Sarah Kuhlmann (10), Anna Xu (10) and Rachael Erickson (10) receive the first place award for their group ‘Cops and Robbers’. By the end of the night after so many great performances, any team had a chance to win. “To be honest I was surprised when we won, especially when all the groups were very good and entertaining,” Xu said. “It was incredible to win this time after all the late nights practicing in the PAC.”

WHAT IN COW-NATION? Getting the crowd excited April 9, Sayde Hindelang (12) surprises the audience with a cow costume that she had worn from the previous year’s spring assembly. “I just absolutely love the fact that not only do we get to collaborate with the other school governments, but learn [from] each other and use each school’s creativity and unique qualities to make the event happen.” Hindelang said.

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ROCK ON Side to side, show choir member Wolfgang Schaefer (11, right) and show choir member Hanna Weber (10) perform the solo for ACDC’s “Thunderstruck”. “It was super cool to be able to be up there, especially since I’ve played guitar for so long.” Weber said. “Being able to be the center of the opener was a really cool feeling.”

LIKE THE WIND Performing before the auction in the main gymnasium, Madeleine James (12, bottom left) sings “Don’t Rain on my Parade” by Barbra Streisand. “I grew up listening to this song and have always wanted to sing it,” James said. “I was able to perform directly to my family and friends.”

A SONG FOR THE PEOPLE Performing during the auction, show choir member Rosalind Eggener (12, right) sings “Soak Up The Sun” by Sheryl Crow. “Performing in a gym is a lot different than performing in a performance space,” Eggener said. “I got to sit in a comfy dress on the edge of the stage. It was a chill atmosphere.”

A PLAYLIST OF THE TIMES “Into the Fire”

ACDC

The Scarlert Pimpernel“Thunderstruck”

johnny

nash

“I Can See Clearly Now”

Ole Borud rihanna “Keep Moving”

“What Now?”

IN THE SPOTLIGHT Front and center, Anna Inslee (12) confidently performs her solo. “I’ve performed solos a lot during theatre performances so I don’t really get extremely nervous about it anymore,” Inslee said. “Being in the spotlight is really fun, especially since the benefit concert is mostly friends and family jamming out with me.”

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ORGANIZED CHAOS Announcing the first of the performers, parents Anne Merrifield and Nollie Jackson speak on the main gymnasium stage. Providing an apt introduction for the students was crucial, as there were more than 100 parents watching, and the event was being recorded. Without the lively spirit of Jackson and Merrifield, things might have not been as smooth as they did.

TIME TO SHINE Performing during the auction time of the benefit, Andrea Baker (12) sings “What a Wonderful World” by Louis Armstrong. “It was pretty nerve wracking because there were a lot of people in the audience but not a lot of people on stage,” Baker said. “We hadn’t rehearsed as much as we wanted to. But it was also really fun because we got to watch the people’s reactions and interact with the audience more than we would in a normal show.”

A HELPING HAND

D

An expedition of a lifetime

ecorating the room, tables with large trays of appetizers filled the gymnasium. In addition to the sweets, there was something special, and some could’ve said it was a vacation of a lifetime. An all-inclusive, seven day stay for six guests in Hawaii was being auctioned off. The mysterious trip’s donor was unknown, as all donations were anonymous. This left no room to reward the gracious person. That’s what made the donation so special. And since all of the donations went toward future show choir payments, such as busses, hotels and competitions, the beneficial value of this act was great. “All of our auction activities and items to bid on were donated,” sophomore Show choir member Caroline Costa said. “It brings people together who might not know each other without it.” The auction wasn’t the only event that was on the schedule, however. On the same night was the last performance for seniors in show choir. While some were uneasy, others were eager and proud to have the opportunity to put on their best performance. “I think that our performance was one of our best,” sophomore show choir member Jack Buckley said. “I believe this was personally my best performance because it was our last performance of the year, and I really gave it my all. I think it was was a great way to get money for the program as we had less people in show choir so we couldn’t raise as much.” The auction was a great way for show choir to earn extra money, as some items brought in as much as $1,800. Because there were fewer people in show choir, the 2017-2018 team did not have access to as much money as they would’ve liked. Without having these events to raise money, the show choir department wouldn’t have been able to survive. “Aside from raising a lot of money for the show choir from the parents and peers of the members of city lights, the auction helps bring a lot of new faces and potential members to our show,” sophomore show choir performer Grace Dablemont said. “There’s a real message behind our show. This year’s theme is tragedy to triumph, and we’ve really tried to share a message of perseverance and hope throughout our show. Also, it’s just a ton of fun for us to perform, and we really hope it’s just as fun to watch.” b. yelton, story / b. yelton, design / b. yelton, photos

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New friends, great music

“A

ngels in Architecture” was a unique piece performed where the percussion section played a vital role. It required the musicians to use instruments they did not usually play, such as the corrugaphone or the wine glasses. The group performed the song at different locations such as Battle High School and at Mexico High School, where they received a number one rating from the judges. “I really enjoyed the piece. It had so many different cool moments that culminated in the grandiose finale, which was quite beautiful,” freshmen Arren Mallott said. “The unique percussion effects, like the tuned wine glasses and tubes, and the singing made the song feel special since very few pieces use them.” The musicians were excited about the song and embraced the opportunity to play a different instrument than what they were used to. Even though it was a challenge getting to the different places on the floor to change instruments, the students performed the song with their peers smoothly. “I played pedal bass, tam-tam, slapstick and snare in the ‘Angles in Architecture’ piece. It was different, I usually play cymbals or triangle. It was a lot of fun, I got to run around the floor. It was a lot all at once, but I find it fun to be all over the place. It makes it more of a challenge,” sophomore Anna Bess said. “We got first at state, which is the best you can get, and our section did a percussion ensemble and also got first. Percussionists are like family. I met my best friend, Lulu [Louisa Frey, sophomore], through percussion, and the other percussionists are really good friends with me, too.” Many students met their friends from their involvement in percussion and then became close because of the amount of time they spent together to make the music great. “I have made so many friendships through percussion. I have been able to become friends with people from all grades of high school,” junior Savannah Wittman said. When performing different songs, switching instruments was common because of the simplicity of the instruments. When the group performed the popular piece ‘Angels in Architecture,’ the whole auditorium was quiet and all eyes were glued to the musicians. “I absolutely loved the ‘Angels in Architecture’ piece. I played the wine glasses, which I have never played them before, but it was easy,” Wittman said. “Percussion is a great way to relieve stress because you are basically hitting things to make music. It is super enjoyable, and it allows me to express myself and lets me be musically creative.” r. eagle, story

IN RHYTHM With four mallets, Moy Zhong (11) plays the vibraphone. “I like it because I have been playing it since freshman year,” Zhong said. “It was the first instrument I played on. I think playing instruments is a good skill to have. My favorite piece I played was probably the last one ‘Be Country’ because we had been working on it for a while.”

/ r. eagle, design / r. eagle photos

small

movements

BIG sounds

20

ALL WITH A LITTLE SMILE

CONCENTRATION IS KEY

At the percussion only concert Grace Aumiller (10) plays the xylophone. “I usually play the xylophone because I like being able to get into the music with other people in the ensemble. I feel like we are all on the same wave length,” she said. “I really enjoyed the song ‘Paradise’ by Coldplay from the concert because I have a lot of fun playing songs I am familiar with.”

“I play percussion because it always seemed like a fun choice to me. It wasn’t the same wind instrument as everyone else. It was something completely unique and me being a self-centered person I couldn’t pass up a chance to always be playing a solo. I like the variety you get with percussion most,” Brent Brightwell (9) said. “There’s so many different instruments you can choose from that you can never get bored, and there’s always new things to do.”

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STAYING ON BEAT “To stay on beat there’s a lot of counting in my head, and I’m usually bouncing my knee in time with whatever piece we are playing. Whenever I do get off beat. I’ll listen to the rest of the band to figure out where we are in the piece, then look to the director to get back on the beat. It doesn’t happen often in concerts but it has definitely happened in rehearsal.” alexander drury, 11

IN ALEXANDER’S OWN WORDS

KEEPING FOCUSED

HELPING OUT A FRIEND

Arren Mallott (9) plays the Timpani, which is a large kettledrum that has to be played with mallets. “I really enjoyed playing ‘Big Country.’ It’s a well written percussion adaptation of the song. It gets stuck in my head really easily,” Mallott said. “My solo, Farfenmarch, is my favorite. It’s fun to play because I worked on it for months and have gotten really well acquainted with the piece.”

Instructing a peer to get the music stand, Meredith Farmer (10) stands behind her keyboard. “I enjoy playing piano because I’m able to play anything I want. I can create different sounds and play with other people easily,” she said. “I liked how the concert was percussion only because it’s so different from normal band to have just percussion.”

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Art show shines light on aspiring artists

T

he art department’s show called “Depth” displayed student’s art that they worked on all year. This year’s theme was the depth of sky. Transformed to look like a sky, the hall was covered with clouds, kites and even a projected thunderstorm. In the main hallway on Sunday, April 22 art hung along the walls. This included art including photography, paintings, ceramics, chalk pastels and more. To pull this all off in one weekend required help from art club members. Students spent extra hours making props, hanging work and getting the final touches ready for the community to see. Senior Sydney Muskopf participated in the show all four years of high school and looked forward to going each time. She loved how the art filled the halls, giving the old walls a new, creative vibe. “It is always cool to see the main hallway turned into an art gallery. It is almost unrecognizable,” Muskopf said. “It is always awesome to see the payoff of the hard work all of the art students did throughout the year.” The show first started five years ago when the art department wanted to display their student’s work. This became a tradition and something that they, along with the community, looked forward to. “I’ve participated in the art show for three years. I love seeing all the Rock Bridge artists’ hard work and hanging up my own pieces in the main hallway,” junior Maya Bell said. “The best part of the show is always the installation.This year, the part of the hall near the north commons was decorated with clouds and kites as a part of the sky theme.” For the seniors in art classes, the show was their last chance to display how far they had come during their high school experience. The show gave them a time, not only to present their own work, but also to look at all the pieces other students had made throughout the year. Senior Shay Wagner had a section of the hallway to display her concentration called “Through the Decades.” She portrayed her mom 10-year chunks of time. “The pressure of having to do so many pieces this year really pushed technique and work ethic further, which has brought me to the point where I am not,” Wagner said. “The art show really exemplifies that.” m. stober story / m. stober, design / m. stober, photos

m. stober

SHOW AND TELL Browsing through the main hallway, teachers Mr. Travis Gabel, physics, and Mrs. Megan Gabel, track coach, attend the art show with their child, Penny Gabel. The show attracted Rock Bridge teachers who were interested in viewing their student’s orginal work. The art department allowed students to have full creative freedom, so there was art work varying from self-portraits to ceramics to outspoken paintings.

Looking

art students get

a closer look into the art they made

over the years

Deeper

april 22

22

seniors

3

5

art shows

days of 4 teachers setting up 10

art classes

2 hours long

300 ART PIECES

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FINISHING TOUCHES

FRAMING THE MASTERPIECE

m. stober

EYE CATCHING Studying the art work along the main hallway on the east side of the building, Jacy Highbarger (12) views the annual art show. She said she came to support her friends, along with the other artists at Rock Bridge. “In general the lil’ art community of RB feels underhyped, which made it even more important for me and my friends to go to the show and see how hard all the artists at RB work,” Highbarger said.

Matting art work, teacher Carrie Stephenson finishes the final adjustments to the show. Stephenson offered to help students who were required to have properly matted art pieces in order to have a professional looking show.

OLD WALLS, NEW THINGS Making sure it is straight, Haiming Guo (10) hangs an art piece along the walls of the main hallway. Students and teachers spent hours perfecting and preparing for the community to see the show.

PROJECTING A THEME Art teacher Abigial Gorsage and Maura Hull (11) look for the perfect video of a thunderstorm on Saturday morning before the art show. In order to portray the theme, the sky, this video was projected onto the entrance display, consisting of clouds and kites.

AT FIRST GLANCE After entering the art show, Malik Ibdah (11) and Amy Blevins, a Rock Bridge graduate, inspect paintings. Ibhad took advantage of the show as he not only displayed his own art, but also viewed his classmates and the work of his brothers, Khalid Ibdah (11) and Zain Ibdah (11) . Ibhad was in 3-Dimensional Art, working mostly with ceramics. m. stober, photo

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AN ASSEMBLY THAT LOOKED BACK AT THE 2018 SCHOOL YEAR

F

rom the 8 a.m alarms to the final closing bell of 4:05 p.m., weeks went by faster than expected; 180-something odd school days, a few undeserving ‘snow’ days and a handful of skipped classes later, students found themselves at the end of yet another school year that flew right by. Spring came, school wound down and the weather got warmer. Students struggled to find motivation to get through finals while emotions were full-fledged. Time was a sneaky secret everyone seemed to forget. Before students knew it, the year was coming to an end. Lauren Hofmann’s senior year went by particularly fast for her. “I had every other day off school because I was enrolled in two online courses,” Hofmann said. “Everyone says senior year goes fast, so I knew to expect that, but I honestly could not believe how quickly this year has gone by. I feel like two weeks ago I was comparing my schedule with friends, hoping we would have some classes together.” Looking back at her senior year, Hofmann said three emotions sum it up: “Nostalgic, stressful and whatever the emotion is for when you don’t want to miss a thing.” For seniors such as Hofmann, the end meant goodbye to family, friends and the school community they had spent their past four years learning and growing in. As Rock Bridge’s way of celebrating the seniors and look-

ing back on the past academic year, an event commemorated community achievements—the Flashback assembly. Tasks from writing the script to emceeing were arranged by Student Counci. From singers Andrea Baker, Caroline Kaiser, Yoo-Jin Jeong of the national anthem to closing remarks from Student Council president Dalton Nunamaker, the soon-to-be graduates organized the day. “The Flashback assembly is a time for us to honor our students who are graduating and leaving us,” Ms. Hannah Casey, activities’ secretary, said. “It’s a look back on the year.” The assembly recognized outstanding teachers and students, alike. As students, staff and faculty found themselves leaving the double doors behind for the summer, and some even for the last time, the individuals and events recognized in the assembly were a way to remember and keep in mind the people along the way that have helped and have possibly shaped lives forever. “Senior year came so much faster than anticipated,” senior Grace Olson said. “Looking back I’m so thankful for Mr. [Neal] Blackburn who watched and helped me grow since junior high. Seeing me and all of my friends grow together has been amazing.” t. huang, story / t. huang, design, / t. huang, photos

TEACHER OF THE YEAR GOES TO... Language arts specialist and AVID teacher Mrs. Daryl Moss receives the Teacher of the Year award as fellow teacher, friend, and last year’s recipient, Mrs. Martha Clowe hands her the plaque and boquet.

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ONE LAST GO AROUND Senior Student Council members Caroline Stevens, Addie Logsdon, Sonya Hu, Ashwath Elangovan, Deven Buckley, Dalton Nunamaker, Macy Knorr, Sayde Hindelang, and David Brummett speak at their very last Rock Bridge assembly.

BRUINS OF OUR MR. MALCOM SMITH Nominated by senior AP Physics students Audrey Milyo, Kevin Kiehne, Dilan Kurukulasuriya, Taylor Lewis, Kelsey Morgret and Ayooluwa Odemuyiwa. “His class has absolutely ruined our sleep schedules,” his students wrote. “But even so, he might just be the best teacher we’ve ever had. From freshman year to senior year, [Mr. Smith] has been there. His classroom isn’t just a classroom anymore—his room is a safe place for everybody, mostly because he’s in it.”

BRIAN JIANG, 12 Nominated by Mia Hale (12). “I don’t know this student very well, but every time I see him, he’s smiling and saying something encouraging to someone,” Hale wrote. “He somehow knows when everyone’s birthday is and makes sure he tells them happy birthday and makes them feel special. I think that he should be nominated because it’s time that he be recognized for the amazing person he is.”

A student committee selected four individuals to honor. These individuals represent teachers, administrators, staff, family and friends who have supported and guided us through the years. THESE ARE THE BRUINS OF OUR LIVES.

MRS. KELLY WITTENBORN

MEGAN FLOYD, 12

Nominated by Sayde Hindelang (12). “[We] go way back to the first day of freshman year,” Hindelang wrote. “[For our first assignment], I wrote about how I felt alone. [A week later, Mrs. Witt] handed back my writing with a lengthy response on the back. She reassured me that I belonged and that I would do great things within the walls of this school. She has been one of my biggest inspirations. She has so much love for Rock Bridge and dedicates so much time and effort into making high school the best.”

Nominated by Paige Hensley (10). “Trying out for soccer wasn’t the easiest, especially when you don’t know anyone on the team,” Hensley wrote. “Every day in the hallway if she saw me, [Megan] would smile and say hi. That meant a lot knowing someone on varsity noticed me as a little freshman.”

OWNING RETIREMENT ‘A teacher affects eternity; they can never tell where their influence stops.” — Henry James MRS. NITA CUMMINGS Special Needs Educator Time at Rock Bridge: 10 years Retirement Plans: Kick back & relax

MRS. CANDACE JORGENSON Physical Education Educator Time at Rock Bridge: 8 years Retirement Plans: Move to KY for family

MR. BRIAN GAUB Assistant Principal / Building Facilitator Time at Rock Bridge: 5 years Retirement Plans: Spend family time

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For the

of PROM BREAKDOWN OF TOP PROM QUESTIONS c. james, module

1

Flashback surveyed 200 of the students who went to prom about their top Google searches before the dance.

WHAT WILL THE WEATHER BE LIKE ON PROM NIGHT?

2

How do I pass a breathalyzer test?

3

4

26 Student Life

What are the best ways to ask someone to prom?

5

what is the best Where is the place best place to get hair to buy a prom dress? and makeup

done?

m. bell

m. bell

BUST A MOVE

UNDER COVER

Laughing with friends, Don Hammers (12) dances alongside his date, Ellie Peery (10). “I think prom was a really exciting atmosphere, and if you went to prom, you came in with the attitude that you were going to dance,” Peery said. “I was honored to go to prom with my boyfriend, and I am really excited to be able to go again in two years when I’m a senior.”

Showing off their unique style, Cotter Clinkingbeard (12), Chad Voney (12) and Jackson Winn (12) arrive to prom in their own fashion. While most students wearing tuxedos picked the classic black suit and matching tie, these three boys decided to add their own flare and represent their country background by wearing camoflauge vests, hats and boots.

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LIGHT UP THE DANCE FLOOR

Surrounded by pink and blue strobe lights, Lydea Lowe (12) and her date Plais Dow break out their best dance moves to the beat of the music. Couples such as Dow and Lowe weren’t the typical RB prom couple, as Dow was already out of high school .

m. bell

c. polo

c. polo

BOUGHT AND PAID FOR

PROM TIP OFF

Conquering the large line, Carson Czaicki (12) and Grace Bailey (11) show the attendants their tickets then went through the breathalyzers. Students celebrated the arrival to prom with a tunnel of welcoming teachers and “photographers.”

Waiting in a line that snaked out the door and around the building, Evan Ratermann (12) messes with his breathalyzer tip that was handed out. Administrators gave the students the breathalyzer test as they entered, whether it was in the beginning, middle or end of the scheduled evening.

REFLECTING ON PROM

m. bell

Sweeping her intricate hair-do from her face, Sarah Bagley (12) joins friends in the bathroom to make sure they are maintaining the hair and makeup they had prepped so long for. Many students went to nail salons and hair salons, such as, The Strand and Pro Nail Salon, as well as friends’ houses to get ready together.

Prom-goers forced to ‘take a breath’

B

reathe...1, 2, 3….8, 9, 10…13, 14, 15…senior Meredith Robben could not keep her breath any longer. She had done as they said; she had used her rubber, disposable mouthpiece that connected to the breathalyzer that administrators used as a mandatory entrance to the event. But she could only hold her breath for so long, and so, again and again, she tried to breathe, until she was finally able to move on to the night that she had been waiting for. As she walked into prom, she couldn’t help her feeling of frustration at seeing so many other people around her having a rough time with the breathalyzers, just as she had. “I honestly don’t really care about it,” Robben said, “but I would just have it where if you look or act drunk, you should be breathalyzed and not have everyone that enters be breathalyzed. I think it helped a little though because people definitely drink before the dances.” After administrators found students intoxicated at homecoming, Dr. Jennifer Rukstad, principal, approached Dr. Peter Steepleman, superintendent of schools, to ask if breathalyzers could be used at prom in order to regulate the drinking. Though many students found it hard to succeed with the breathalyzers the first time and were not thrilled to be taking the test, it became an undeniable fact, according to Rock Bridge students, that the rate of those

drinking decreased drastically at the May 28 prom. But not all students going to prom felt neutral about the implementation of breathalyzers; in fact, many felt it was a violation of privacy and were trying to find ways to combat the idea. Senior Zachary Peters explained that there were some students who decided to boycott prom altogether, though most only criticized the idea within their friend group. “I’d say the school breathalyzing every person at prom is pretty crazy because we are seniors. It’s our last dance, and, as long as people aren’t reckless, I don’t see what’s wrong,” Peters said. “As far as people not going, I think that is their choice, but I guess the school kind of figured no one would want to pay like $30 to go to their senior prom just to be breathalyzed.” Many students, though, understood where the school was coming from. “I know that the reason for the decision that was made by our school was in the best interest of the student body and to keep the upperclassmen from making bad decisions at prom,” sophomore Student Council representative Madelyn Orr said. “I think a lot of people understand where we were coming from and that it was only for the safety. Yes, there was some pushback originally, but I think prom was still just as fun as it’s been in the past, even with the new addition.” c. james, story / c. james, designer

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IS THERE SOMETHING ON MY FACE? Looking at Faith Elsbury (12), Ilinca Popescu (12) laughs about their recent play during the game. Kelsey Morgret (12) had elbowed Popescu in the face after they both went for the ball. “Our team name was Sugar and Spikes, and we did horrible, lost two out of two games, but it was still fun,” Popescu said.

s.blecha

GOT MUD? After falling in the mud, Lynn Freesemann (9) laughs while being pushed back by Sophia Hutchinson (9) Their team was named The Beaches. “Just going out and having fun without it getting too competitive.” Braden Hopkins (11) said, was the best part of the experience.

s s..blecha blecha

GET UP HIGH

THERE’S NO CRYING IN MUD VOLLEYBALL

Carter Abernathy (12) jumps up during the championship game to score his team a point. Abernathy’s team, the Velvet Johnsons, ended the game with a win.

A LITTLE DIRT NEVER HURT After falling in the mud multiple times, Claire Swindle (9), laughs with Olivia Hake (9) while being helped up. “Mud and gravity were not helping us out,” Hake said.

Looking over at his teammates, Lucas Whitworth (9) talks to Aaron Vandyke (9) during the game. Every team that played picked its own names, made and designed shirts to wear during the games.

It’s a

HIT

YOUR OWN TEAM NAME

WE HAVE AN AP TEST TOMORROW

VOLLEY LLAMAS

“Well, we have an AP test tomorrow and so none of us are studying. Were playing mud volleyball,” Matthew Burns said (11).

“It was like three years ago. We were watching Caddy Shack,” Mrs. Kelly Wittenborn civics teacher said.

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YOU CAN’T BLOCK ME Aiming to go over the net, Nolan Stichter (11) spikes a ball that was unblockable by teacher Mr. Scott Wittenborn. The final game decided who would play the winner in the final match. Stichters’ team, Bhaddies and Daddies, ended with a win over the teachers’ team, VolleyLlamas. Each game the team that scored to 15 first won and moved onto the next round.

M SERVICE WITH A SIDE OF MUD

s.blecha

To start the game, Savannah Schnabel (11) served the ball to begin the tournament, Schnabel’s team was the first to play. Before the players could enter the mud volleyball area, the participants duct taped their shoes, so they wouldn’t fall off in the mud.

Fundraiser turned tradition

ud volleyball marked the transition from the colder months into spring weather and the beginning of the end of the school year.This was the last all-school event seniors had before they headed readied themselves to put on their cap and gowns and say goodbye. Mud volleyball started in the spring of 1993 as a way for juniors to raise money activities their senior year. “Every year each class did it’s own fundraiser to bank money for senior activities, such as prom, [senior] picnic and after graduation all-night party,” Student Council sponsor Mrs. Kelly Wittenborn said. “Out of all of the stuff that we do that is comparable to this, such as Powderpuff or CoMo Cow, mud volleyball always seems to fill up the fastest and have the most diverse and widespread interest throughout the school. It is fun, lively and entertaining, and it always seems to set the tone for a cheerful and happy shift into the end of the school year.” Some looked forward to getting down and dirty as they prepared for their games by duct taping shoes to keep their shoes on while they played and clothing to prevent mud from getting everywhere. “My friends wanted to do it because it looked like fun, and we, honestly, think that we have a decent shot at winning,”

sophomore Jasper Ross said, “We thought that being mostly tall and all athletes would give us an advantage over other teams.” StuCo juniors started work early in the week. With the help of teachers, they spray down the field behind the Career Center to ensure maximum filth. On the day of the event the, were excused to set up the nets and make the brackets, get the cones, the hoses and the supplies. “My job is to basically get as many people to sign up as possible and help those teams organize as best as I can, so May 3, every single person at Mud volleyball can have a blast,” junior Kamran Farid said. “Things we have to do is prepare the field [and] make posters so people are aware about mud volleyball.” When the games finally started, the audience could hear the sound of shoes squishing in the mud mixed with laughter from the students playing. For some, the event offered a few final high school memories to take with them. “I think that activites like this really bring the student body together,” senior Brayden Hawkins said. “It is one thing you have to do in high school. We look forward to it. It’s a pretty big event. It is pretty special because it’s one of the last times we’ll all be together as a group.” s. blecha, story / s.blecha, design / s. blecha, photos

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all night

ATTACK Club members express their passion for club lock-ins

H

iding in corners, choosing a weapon and setting up Nerf guns on base were all apart of Zombie Defense League lock-ins. Most students would not want to catch themselves in a zombie apocalypse, but those in the club prepared to defend the human race. Lock-ins gave students the opportunity to use the whole school building as a playing field. The late night fun switched among schools, and the last lock-in of occurred at Hickman High School. Members came prepared for the night with Nerf guns. “I am passionate about Zombie Defense League because it gives me and the rest of us the chance to run around and nerd out at the same time,” said president senior Mason Maddos. “Lock-ins are definitely the best part of the club because we get a much larger turnout with students from all of CPS high schools, and we get to use nearly all of the school building we decide to go to.” Members were thrilled with the three different lock-ins that were hosted because of the variety of people that attended. Senior Alexys Sovanski was a member of Zombie Defense

WAIT FOR ‘EM

League for all four years and was passionate about the club’s lock-ins. The lock-ins gave people who didn’t normally enjoy the other clubs the chance to meet and have a common connection through a unique hobby. “I personally think lock-ins are the best part because you meet others that you aren’t always able to go to the meetings. Also you can meet others at different schools because we do lock-ins with them. Sometimes we invite other clubs to the lockins,” Sovanski said. “They are a great way to meet other people.” One student was drawn to the club simply because of the lock-ins. Sophomore Toan Vu attended the last all-night event even though he had never gone to a meeting before. “I honestly do not plan to attend the club’s meetings in the future, but it was a fun one-time opportunity. I enjoyed running around the school with friends. It was definitely a unique experience,” Vu said. “I think the club would be something anyone would enjoy if they did it with a friend. It was cool to goof off and just have fun in the school building.” d. ninichuck, story / d. ninichuck, design / d. ninichuck, photos

APOCALYPSE STARTS NOW

Oliver Matteson (11) sets up his Nerf guns in position and waits for the opposing team to approach his teams base. “I have made several friends and I find them very fun,” Matteson said. “My favorite gun is my Modded Retaliator, and in this photo I was using a Nerf pistol.”

59%

Find Friends/Family

23.5%

Find Weapons

14.5%

Find a Safe House

3%

Find Food

Flashback interviewed 200 students asking, “IF A ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE BROKE OUT, WHAT WOULD YOU DO FIRST?” infographic by d. ninichuck

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NERF GUN FUN Alexys Sovanski (12) uses tools to repair one of the weapons. “The guns get used and dropped a lot,” Sovanski said. “Because they get used and dropped, they have to get worked on pretty frequently.”

AIM FOR THE GAME Ariela Pickering (10) aims her Nerf gun during a game of capture the flag. “I have a lot of fun playing with people.” Pickering said. “My favorite nerf gun to use are the Rival guns, but I was using my shotgun in this photo.”

NOT THE USUAL Toan Vu (10) jokes around with friends while running around Hickman High School. “The lock-in was definitely something new to me.” Vu said. “Although it was new to me the people were super nice and it was fun time overall.”

HIDE AND WAIT Reece Batisch (9) hides under the stairs and points his gun. “My favorite Nerf gun to use would most likely be the small pistols that we bring in our duffle bags,” Batisch said. “They don’t jam as easily as the big guns. Also, I like how much further someof the smaller guns can actually shoot than some of the bigger guns.”

Zombie Defense League

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TCID:PP

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Flashback Spring Supplement 2018  

This is an extension of the Rock Bridge 2018 Yearbook OWN IT and is available to be printed as an addition to your yearbook.

Flashback Spring Supplement 2018  

This is an extension of the Rock Bridge 2018 Yearbook OWN IT and is available to be printed as an addition to your yearbook.

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