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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON

OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP FEBRUARY 19-21, 2012 | ESTES PARK, COLORADO


2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

Current WEA Board of Trustees President Mike McGowan ml-mcgowan@wiu.edu Current Term: 2010-2013

Special Events Committee Kim Collins kacollin@indiana.edu Current Term: 2009-2012

Vice President Chris Pelchat cpelchat@ithaca.edu Current Term: 2011-2014

Promotions Committee Tim Street tstreet@indiana.edu Current Term: 2011-2012

Treasurer Jerel Cowan jcowan2@uco.edu Current Term: 2011-2014

Secretary J.D. Tanner tannerj@sanjuancollege.edu Current Term: 2011-2014

Affiliate Representative Hugh Gibson hughgibson@missouristate.edu Current Term: 2010-2013

Curriculum Committee Kelli McMahan kelli_mcmahon@baylor.edu Current Term: 2010-2013

Research Committee Rachel Collins rachel.collins@utah.edu Current Term: 2009-2012

Executive Director Mary Stuessy nationaloffice@weainfo.org

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

The YMCA of the Rockies: What You Need to Know LODGING & MEETING ROOMS: All rooms reserved in the conference room block are in Longs Peak along with all of the meeting rooms for the conference. Diamond West, Diamond East, Chasm Lake, and Keyhole Meeting Rooms are located on the ground level of Longs Peak Lodge.

ASSEMBLY HALL: Assembly Hall is located directly south of Longs Peak (Out the back door and down the stairs) . Please visit with conference Exhibitors throughout the conference; they are an excellent resource for attendees and are essential to the support of the conference. The WEA store and Registration table will be located in Assembly Hall as well as the Welcome Social – Trivia Night, WEA Awards, Keynote Address, and Auction and Raffle

DINING AREA: We will use the Spruce Dining Area for all meals during the Conference. The Spruce Dining Area is located directly below Assembly Hall. Please enter and exit the Dining Area through Assembly Hall, via the stairs near the stage.

MEALS: If you are staying as a guest at the YMCA of the Rockies all meals are provided with your lodging fees. If you are an off-site guest

but would like to eat meals at the conference, you can purchase meals individually at the Spruce Dining Area. Meal Cost: (Breakfast $6, Lunch $9, Dinner $12). Meal times are listed on the daily workshop grids as well as on the schedule on the back of the program.

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES: The YMCA of the Rockies does not sell or serve alcoholic beverages. Alcohol is not allowed in common/public ar-

eas. You may provide your own libations for consumption in private lodge rooms and during evening events in meeting rooms reserved for the International Conference on Outdoor Leadership (in Longs Peak meeting rooms and Assembly Hall). Please be mindful and do not transport open bottles and containers in open areas of the YMCA that may be frequented by the public and other guests. Please consume alcoholic beverages responsibly.

CONFERENCE EVALUATIONS: We look forward to hearing your feedback on the conference so we can continue to improve our events in future years. You will receive an email after the conference with a link to an online evaluation.

WORKSHOP EVALUATIONS: Please take the time to complete workshop evaluations in each of the workshops you attend. These are compiled and reviewed by the Conference Committee as well as passed along to Presenters – your feedback is valuable!

CEU TRACKING: For individuals needing to document CEU’s for Outdoor Leadership Certification or Instructor status maintenance in the

IROL, please be sure to complete the CEU form on page 31 for each workshop you attend, sign in with the service crew attendee at each workshop and obtain the signature of the presenter for the workshop. Enjoy your time here at the YMCA of the Rockies!

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ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP 2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

Welcome to the 2012 International Conference on Outdoor Leadership

ESTES PARK, COLORADO FEBRUARY 18-21, 2012

Welcome to the 2012 International Conference on Outdoor Leadership! This is our third year in a row at the YMCA of the Rockies and we are happy to be back in the mountains with old and new friends alike. Each person in attendance is an important part of the WEA community. I know it takes resources, both time and money to be here, and I thank you for making this event a priority and for supporting the WEA by being here. The International Conference on Outdoor Leadership provides us each an opportunity to learn and share from others in the outdoor leadership profession. The occasion offers much needed time to collaborate with people who understand and appreciate the challenges and rewards that go hand in hand with the profession. I encourage you to spend your time during the conference with intention. Spend time getting to know new people and learning about other programs not only during sessions but during meals and evening social events. It is through relationships developed at the conference that momentum is gained. Whether you are a professional with years of experience or a student eager to get started on your career, take advantage of the time we all have together and make the most of it.

2012

INTERNATIONAL

CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR

LEADERSHIP

I must personally thank the Board of Trustees for their dedication to the WEA as individuals and as a group. They volunteer their time, and offer their year round dedication, vision, and leadership to ensure that the WEA association is able to pursue its mission. Take a few moments during the conference to seek out your board members and say “Thank You”. In addition to the Board of Trustees I must also say thank you to several people specifically for their efforts in planning and executing the conference.

v v v v v v v v

Kevin Sutton – Service Crew Co-Coordinator Eryn Pope – Service Crew Co-Coordinator Rose Gochenaur – Welcome Social & Outdoor Leadership Program Symposium Gina White – Welcome Social Shelly Otis – Workshop Coordination Bruce Martin – Outdoor Leadership Program Symposium Ryan Butler – Student Presentation Coordination Scott Jordan & ‘Team OSU’ – Auction item donation request wizardry

Enjoy the conference!

Mary Stuessy WEA Executive Director

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ESTES PARK, COLORADO FEBRUARY 18-21, 2012


2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

2011 Board of Trustees Year in Review This has been momentous year marked by significant positive changes and transitions as well as significant challenges. Challenges include working to reinstate 501c3 status, managing impacts to capital investments caused by the recession, and communicating the benefits of accreditation to organizational members. It has also been a very exciting year marked by formation of the accreditation council and fully implementing the accreditation process. A highlight of actions of the board this year include: v Opening International Registry Outdoor Leadership to individuals who are not associated with an accredited institution to become IROL/WEA members and maintain a portfolio within the IROL system. This action by the board creates access to everyone in the field of outdoor leadership to the certification process. v Charging the Vice President of the Board of Trustees to recruit, organize and advise an accreditation council. Chris Pelchat has done a magnificent job both organizing the council and shepherding the several programs that have sought and achieved accreditation. v Appointments to fill board vacancies: Jerel Cowan (2.5 years) and Tim Street (one year) were appointed to fill vacancies last spring. Tim will be running for a full three-year seat in the up coming election. v Adjusting roles on the board of trustees to address new and emerging needs of the Association. A promotions committee was developed to work in conjunction with the National Office to design and execute essential promotions for the association and the International Conference improve national visibility and attract membership. The committee is chaired by Tim Street. v Continuing work to expand endorsements to outdoor leadership certification v Moving the national office from Indiana to Vermont. v Continuing support of outdoor leadership research through financial commitment to the Journal Outdoor Recreation Education Leadership for the next three years. v Refining the current Strategic plan. v Maintaining the LNT Master Educator Courses and the LNT/WEA/Affiliate relationship It has been a big year for WEA and I am excited for the coming year’s developments as the association continues to move through transition and address the needs of its members. As more programs are accredited and momentum builds the growth of professional certification of outdoor leaders will transform our field and our association. It has been an honor to serve with the dedicated professionals who make up the board of trustees for this association. I look forward to continuing to serve the membership in the coming year.

Mike McGowan President of the Wilderness Education Association

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

3rd Annual Outdoor Leadership Research Symposium SUNDAY 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM: KEYHOLE SESSION 1: DEVELOPING SELVES & COMMUNITY THROUGH ADVENTURE EXPERIENCE DISCUSSANT: KELLI MCMAHAN, BAYLOR UNIVERSITY v

v

v

IN DEFENSE OF THE MORAL WORTH OF WILDERNESS EDUCATION PAUL STONEHOUSE, SIMPSON UNIVERSITY LIVING ADVENTURE: AN OUTDOOR GUIDE NARRATIVE PATRICK LEWIS, OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY EXPLORING THE LONG-TERM EFFECTS FOR YOUNG WOMEN INVOLVED IN AN OUTDOOR EDUCATION PROGRAM SANDY ALLEN-CRAIG & CLAIRE HARTLEY, AUSTRALIAN CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY

SESSION 2: MECHANISMS THAT INFLUENCE PARTICIPANT GROWTH AND THE QUALITY OF EXPERIENCE IN ADVENTURE PROGRAMMING BRAD DANIEL, MONTREAT COLLEGE v

v

v

CLIENT EXPERIENCES IN MOUNTAINEERING TOURISM AND IMPLICATIONS FOR OUTDOOR LEADERS SUSAN HOUGE MACKENZIE, UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO; JOHN H. KERR, UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA THE IMPORTANCE OF THE UNPLANNED AND UNCERTAINTY IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF OUTDOOR LEADERS WHITNEY WARD, UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS, CARBONDALE THE NATURE OF FEEDBACK IN ADVENTURE-BASED EDUCATION SCOTT SCHUMANN, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH; NATHANIAL MILES MILLARD, UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY

OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM CHAIR - BRUCE MARTIN, PH. D.

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

Outdoor Leadership Program Symposium SUNDAY 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM: CHASM LAKE 1:30 PM - 1:40 PM

OPENING REMARKS

1:40 PM - 2:05 PM

STUDENT CENTERED PORTFOLIOS – IT’S POWERFUL SCOTT ROBERTSHAW & CHRISTINE ROCHESTER (CSU-PUEBLO, OUTDOOR PURSUITS)

Imagine a panel review with your student that is lead by the student. Students are the driving force for what we do. They work very hard to design a portfolio that demonstrates their level of competency as an aspiring Outdoor Leader. At CSU-Pueblo we are striving to develop a process that enrolls the learner. Through practice, evaluation and feedback, students learn the core competencies and devote their passion towards creating evidence of what the know, what they can do and who they are. Join us as we share our process and help us learn from your experiences and ideas.

2:05 PM - 2:30 PM

IRON CHEF WILDERNESS: A CULMINATING EXPERIENCE FOR FRESHMAN ORIENTATION TRIPS

KIM COLLINS (INDIANA UNIVERSITY OUTDOOR ADVENTURES)

This presentation will cover an introduction into IU Outdoor Adventures “IU Beginnings” trips. It also includes a historical look at trips and University partners and the trip process, a brief history of Iron Chef Wilderness as well as setup, rules, secret ingredients, etc. We will present programming benefits, testimonials and a brief “how to” on Freshmen Orientation trips.

2:30 PM - 2:55 PM

THE PATH TO EXTENSIVE FIELD TIME IN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS: THE HURDLES AT ITHACA COLLEGE CHRIS PELCHAT & MICHELLE OTIS (ITHACA COLLEGE)

The mission of the Outdoor Adventure Leadership (OAL) major at Ithaca College is to develop visionary leaders who change lives through effective leadership, whether in a wilderness context or a context where these transferable skills are implemented. The OAL has been on campus for 7 years and each of those years has presented hurdles to providing the experience students need and desire in order to be marketable. These hurdles include degree validity, risk management, faculty course load, proposal development, and a multitude of various other complexities of faculty life.

2:55 PM - 3:05 PM

INTERMISSION

3:05 PM - 3:30 PM

FROM MARKETING TO DEBRIEFS: CREATING A CULTURE OF RISK MANAGEMENT JESSIE CRUICKSHANK & JIM DOENGES (SOLID ROCK OUTDOOR MINISTRIES)

SROM has one of the lowest incident rates in the industry per the Wilderness Risk Management Reporting Project. From the pictures your use and the words used in your marketing, to how you inform students about risk, to debriefing, risk management is a culture, not a form or diagram. This presentation will discuss how to conceptualize your program and all its parts in a manner that creates a culture of risk management and reduces issues and incidents. We will talk about the parts of programming where risk management is usually considered and raise awareness where it is not. The goal is that participants will leave with a larger view of risk management that will hopefully improve programs.

3:30 PM - 3:55 PM

USING INTENTIONAL CURRICULUM TO ENHANCE WILDERNESS ORIENTATION PROGRAMS MARK MULLERT & KELLI MCMAHAN (BAYLOR UNIVERSITY OUTDOOR ADVENTURE)

College & University outdoor programs have used Freshmen Wilderness Orientation Programs (FWOP) for years to help with the transition to college. We want to take a closer look at the curriculum used in Baylor University’s Line Camp program to discuss how intentional curriculum helps to meet program objectives. We believe that students that take part in these shared experiences transition into college life easier with a pre-established group of friends; have increased student involvement; and are more likely to graduate. We have been tracking our numbers for the last 6 years and will discuss some of the history as we go through our findings.

3:55 PM - 4:20 PM

OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP TRAINING: PREPARING INSTRUCTORS FOR MULTI-CURRICULUM TEACHING AND LEADING TIM STREET (BRADFORD WOODS/INDIANA UNIVERSITY)

At Bradford Woods, Professional Outdoor Instructors (POIs) have to be prepared to teach on a multitude of different topics to a variety of populations. Instructors play a vital role in Environmental Education programs, summer camps, Adventure Education activities, teambuilding programs, and facilitation of adapted activities for youth with chronic illness and disability. This presentation will cover how our month-long training prepares instructors to be effective leaders in these various disciplines.

4:20 PM - 4:30 PM

CLOSING REMARKS

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Journal of Outdoor Recreation, Education, and Leadership Access the journal online at www.ejorel.com

About JOREL The Journal of Outdoor Recreation, Education, and Leadership’s mission is to improve outdoor recreation, education, and leadership through the publication and dissemination of peerreviewed manuscripts centered on professional practice, research, and theoretical discussions. Relevant topic areas for the journal include, but are not limited to: outdoor recreation, adventure recreation, outdoor education, outdoor leadership, pedagogy, administration, programming, risk management, wilderness medicine, certification, participant behavior, trends, diversity, training, and outcomes.

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

WEA Student Presentations SUNDAY 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM: DIAMOND EAST & WEST 1:30 PM - 1:40 PM

[Diamond East]

1:40 PM - 2:10 PM

WOMEN’S OUTDOOR PROGRAMMING AT SIUC: STUDENTS TAKING THE LEAD KAIA PIRAZZINI AND CAMI SOCKOW (SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY - CARBONDALE)

[Diamond East] Students are a powerful force, and when their energy and passion are harnessed amazing things can happen. The goal of this session is to help participants understand the importance and impact that outdoor recreation programming can have for women, how students created women’s programming at their university, and lastly encourage students to take the lead to make similar programs a reality at their school or program.

PARTICIPANT-DIRECTED PROGRAMMING JARED MCDANIEL AND MARY MCDANIEL (SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY - CARBONDALE)

OPENING REMARKS - RYAN BUTLER, ITHACA COLLEGE

[Diamond West] This presentation will explore a model of wilderness education that is participant directed. This model is used by a faith-based organization in Mears, Michigan and may produce deeper learning outcomes than more traditional formats. Using the presenters’ experience as a guide we will unpack the benefits and setbacks of this model and discuss how it may be implemented in other programs.

2:10 PM - 2:20 PM BREAK 2:20 PM - 2:50 PM

GRRRLS GONE WILD LAURA KATHREIN AND KELSEY MCCABE (ITHACA COLLEGE)

[Diamond East] As two aspiring outdoor leaders, we have noticed that the field of outdoor education is highly dominated by men. At Ithaca College, in the Outdoor Adventure Leadership Major, we look around us and see something different: lots of women. In this presentation we plan to (1) hold a guided discussion about the presence of women in undergraduate outdoor programs around the country, (2) discuss how schools can begin to reach a more diverse population for enrollment, and (3) discuss what the future holds for student’s chosen career paths. We will do this by taking a look at popular texts used in the field and the classroom for commons themes and trends relating to women in the outdoor field.

DEVELOPING A SENSE OF PLACE: GEOGRAPHIC CONNECTION AND ITS APPLICATION TO PARTICIPANT EXPERIENCE ALEX LANCASTER & JANIE WELSH (INDIANA UNIVERSITY OUTDOOR ADVENTURES)

[Diamond West] When teaching others how to lead, educators often focus on basic principles such as risk management, logistics, food planning, etc. These principles are fundamental and necessary for planning a successful trip. However, once a leader has learned how to adeptly cover these bases, other trip aspects can be considered so that the trip has a maximum positive impact on the participants involved. The concept of “sense of place” is one of these additional aspects that demands less attention in the planning process than something like risk management but can add substantial value to a trip. In this presentation we plan to define “sense of place” and discuss why establishing it is valuable. We will then explore how this concept can be applied to the trip planning process and the trip itself.

2:50 PM - 3:00 PM

BREAK

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

3:00 PM - 3:30 PM

IMMERSION: A SEMESTER IN THE WILD” FILM SHOWING AND DISCUSSION PETE ISKYAN (ITHACA COLLEGE)

[Diamond East] In this presentation, an Ithaca College student thesis film entitled “Immersion: A semester in the Wild” will be shown. This documentary chronicles the four month Immersion Semester Program offered through Ithaca College. Eight students and three instructors spend four months living in American Northwest wilderness areas, including the San Juan Islands and the North Cascade Mountains. Opposite to normal college living, the group is pushed to its limits physically and socially.

CATCHING THE WAVE OF CHANGE: A CASE STUDY INTO TRYING TO CHANGE THE DEFINITION OF “NATURE” THROUGH OUTDOOR EDUCATION WITH URBAN CHILE RORY COOPER (ITHACA COLLEGE)

[Diamond West] My immersion semester consisted of a month long research period where I studied and worked with a local NGO called Valpo Surf Project. Valpo Surf offers English, swimming, and surf lessons to at risk youth living in Valparaiso free of charge. Through a process of interviews and participant/active observation I worked to relate and see if Louv’s theory of “Nature Deficit Disorder” could be applied the same in Chile as it is in the United States.

3:30 PM - 3:40 PM

BREAK

3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

WHEN GEAR FAILS SAM REIBMAN (ITHACA COLLEGE)

4;10 PM - 4:30 PM

[Diamond East] We put a lot of our trust in our gear when we enter the backcountry. Because of so many technical advances we have in equipment, we have grown to rely on our gear to the point that very few of us would survive comfortably in the backcountry without them. Survival skills are being publicized more and more but utilized less and less. To live comfortably in the backcountry would require much more education than this presentation, but this should give you the skills to stay warm and dry. Because of regional differences we will only discuss the most basic of skills. In this presentation we will learn how to build a shelter and will work with friction kits to make coals.

WRAP-UP AND FINAL THOUGHTS: RYAN BUTLER, ITHACA COLLEGE

[Diamond East]

THANK YOU TO OUR PRODUCT DONORS:

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

Keynote Speaker: Andrew Buerger MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 By day, Andrew Alter Buerger is the CEO of Alter Communications, Inc., a Baltimore-based regional diversified media company. Some of its magazines include the Baltimore Jewish Times and Baltimore Style. Andrew is the fourth generation publisher of the Baltimore Jewish Times, a paper that his greatgrandfather, David Alter, founded in 1919. Among his responsibilities is writing a semi-monthly column that tackles the issues facing the Jewish world, particularly how to make Judaism relevant to today’s younger generation. It was Andrew’s column, titled “An Open Letter to Prince Abdullah,” which gained him national recognition. But his favorite jobs were being a ski instructor and white water rafting guide in Aspen, CO. By night Andrew is the founder of Jodi’s Climb for Hope which has gotten over 125 climbers safely to summits on four continents, including Mt. Cotopaxi, the world’s highest active volcano at 19,400 feet and Mt. Kilimanjaro. Other expeditions have included Mt. Adams and several active Icelandic volcanos. More importantly, the organization in four years has raised over $500,000 to funding promising research on breast cancer and MS at Baltimore’s prestigious John’s Hopkins University. He holds a Masters of Business Administration degree from the University of Colorado and a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Vermont. Buerger currently serves on the boards of The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, and Baltimore Outward Bound. The Maryland Daily Record selected him as one of the 50 Most Influential Marylanders in 2007. He had been chosen three times by several local magazines as one of Baltimore’s 40 up & coming leaders under 40. However, sadly he has long since become ineligible for that award. He lives in Baltimore with his wife Jennifer, 18 month old twins they adopted from Ethiopia and 130 pound Bullmastiff, Mt. Shasta.

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

Paul Petzoldt Leadership Award “… now a promise made is a debt unpaid, and the trail has its own stern code. In the days to come, though my lips were numb, in my heart how I cursed that load…” (Robert Service; The Cremation of Sam McGee). Paul Petzoldt recited this passage to emphasize that outdoor leaders must make a deep commitment to the groups they lead. From his first climb of the Grand Teton in 1924 he developed a desire to teach people, as well as guide them through the mountains. Paul Petzoldt played an integral role in the development of outdoor leadership in the United States (Ringholz, 1997). Petzoldt held the position of chief instructor for the first Outward Bound School. He left behind one of the most successful outdoor leadership schools in the world, the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS). After NOLS, helped launch the Wilderness Education Association (WEA) and in his last few years he formed the Paul Petzoldt Leadership School for youth. Paul Petzoldt lived until 1999 and for most of his life he sought to develop, define and teach outdoor leadership skills (Ringholz, 1997) and passionately recorded his ideas on outdoor leadership in such texts as The Wilderness Handbook. The Paul K Petzoldt Leadership Award is granted each year to an individual who has made significant contributions to the field of Outdoor Leadership. We are pleased to award Greg Lais with this esteemed award in 2012 in recognition of his outstanding influence within the profession.

THE 2012 WINNER: GREG LAIS Greg Lais recipient of the 2012 Paul Petzoldt Leadership Award is the Executive Director of Wilderness Inquiry Inc., a not for profit organization that utilizes wilderness experiences to facilitate social change. The chief architect of Wilderness Inquiry’s mission and programs, Greg has personally instructed over 150 wilderness adventures integrating people of all abilities including persons with physical, cognitive, and emotional disabilities since he founded the organization in 1978. Greg’s vision of wilderness open to all regardless of disability and creation of Wilderness Inquiry paved the way for inclusive wilderness travel programs long before the advent of the Americans with Disabilities Act. It is likely you have encountered a Wilderness Inquiry expedition. It could have been in the Everglades, the Apostle Islands, BWCA, the San Juans, Prince William Sound, the Olympics, on a 14er in Colorado, in the Grand Canyon, on Isle Royale or the North Country Trail. It could just as easily have been in Africa, the Yukon, New Zealand, Australia, Mexico, Belize or Costa Rica because Wilderness Inquiry expeditions, canoe, sea kayak, white water, dogsled, horse pack, and backpack all over the planet. Greg’s has been a 30-year commitment to connecting people with each other and to the land; to help people escape stereotypes and do things no one thought possible. He has authored and co-authored seminal works on inclusive wilderness programming as well as reports to Congress and the Forest Service. He guest lectures in university classes across the Midwest and presents at national and international conferences. He has received numerous awards and has been honored at the White House for his personal service to people with disabilities. His vision of wilderness exploration as an inclusive human endeavor has enabled over a quarter of a million Wilderness Inquiry participants to develop appreciation and love, both for wilderness and for their companions on the journey. They are the testament to his vision of a world where exploring, cherishing and protecting wilderness is a human birthright for every one.

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

Past WEA Award Recipients

PAUL K. PETZOLDT LEADERSHIP AWARD

FRANK LUPTON SERVICE AWARD

1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

Tap Tapley No award given Bjorn Kjellstrom Sandy Braun Josh Miner Chris Cashel No National Conference in 1991, No awards given Raye Ringholz Kent Clement & Duane Gould Glen Exum Mark Wagstaff Yvon Chouinard Dare Bible Jim Fowler Bruce Bonney Vance Martin Cheryl Teeters Dave Foreman Rene Koessler Betty van der Smissen Paul Harbison Frank Lupton Paul Petzoldt & Mike Carlton John Netherton Scoob Dooben David Brower & Kenneth Brower No award given Buck Tilton Steve Gustafson Bill McKibben Jack Drury Bob Christie Dave Calvin William “Doc” Forgey, M.D. Dene Berman Christine Cashel Maurice Phipps Oklahoma State U. Mark Wagstaff Phil Powers Steve Spencer Indiana U. Jack Drury Richard Louv Jim Lustig Coal. for Christian Outreach Francisco Detrell Joel Meier, Ph.D. Ivan Bartha Western Illinois U. Paul Harbison John Gookin Tom Stuessy Western Kentucky U. Mathew Erpelding Leo McAvoy Bob Christie CSU-Pueblo Jeff Tindall

AFFILIATE AWARD

INSTRUCTOR AWARD

STUDENT LEADER

Aya Hayashi Whitney Ward Aiko Yoshino Lauren Barnes Nathaniel Millard Pat Lewis

ABOUT WEA AWARDS WEA SERVICE AWARD (FRANK LUPTON) – NOMINATED BY THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES v v

Member has been active with WEA for a minimum of ten years. Member has contributed significantly to the success of the WEA in a minimum of three specific ways.

WEA INSTRUCTOR AWARD – NOMINATED BY COMMITTEE CHAIRS v v v

Instructor has been an active member of WEA for a minimum of five years. Instructor has made positive contributions to WEA curriculum, standards, operations, conferences, etc. Instructor does an outstanding job representing WEA.

WEA AFFILIATE AWARD – NOMINATED BY THE NATIONAL OFFICE AND THE AFFILIATE REPRESENTATIVE v v v

Affiliate has been active with WEA for a minimum of five years Affiliate Representative has made positive contributions to WEA affiliates committee, curriculum, conferences, standards, operations, etc. Affiliate does an outstanding job representing WEA.

WEA STUDENT LEADER AWARD – NOMINATED BY THE MEMBERSHIP, REVIEWED AND SELECTED BY THE SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE v v v

Student Leader is actively enrolled in the International Registry of Outdoor Leaders. Student Leader has contributed significantly to the success of the outdoor leadership within her or his Affiliate. Student Leader has benefited the WEA through volunteer service (conference, journal, committees, etc.)

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

WEA Curriculum & Workshop Tracks Conference workshops are delineated into six separate tracks that align with the professional competencies applied by Wilderness Education Association’s accredited programs. Individuals who hold Outdoor Leader, Apprentice or Instructor status in the International Registry of Outdoor Leaders (IROL) must obtain Continuing Education Units In each of the core competencies to maintain their status in the IROL.

PROFESSIONAL CORE COMPETENCIES

Ou

Pl

Ri

OUTDOOR LIVING

The specific outdoor skills that is essential to individual / group sustainability in the backcountry. 9.1.1 Understanding and demonstration of proper campfire use, camp establishment, and basic kitchen management. 9.1.2 Understanding and demonstration of proper selection, repair, and storage of equipment and clothing for self and others. 9.1.3 Understanding and demonstration of proper health and sanitation techniques. 9.1.4 Understanding and demonstration of planning for the safety, comfort, and organization of a group in a backcountry environment. Understanding and demonstration of getting from one place to another and how it is done efficiently and safely in a backcountry environment. 9.1.5 Understanding and demonstration of basic weather forecasting and the implications of the effects of weather on the comfort and safety of the group.

PLANNING & LOGISTICS

The knowledge, skills and abilities to design, implement, and prepare outdoor expedition trips a minimum of 7 days long. 9.2.1 Understanding of and ability to prepare an effective plan for group outings of seven or more days in a back country environment. 9.2.2 Demonstration of ability to design and manage proper travel progressions. 9.2.3 Understanding of and ability to adequately plan and package rations for a group of 5 or more for an outing of seven or more days in a backcountry environment.

RISK MANAGEMENT

A structured approach to manage actual risk, emotional risk and perceived risk through: risk assessment, utilization of management and instructional resources, and development and execution of emergency protocols. 9.3.1 Understanding and demonstration of the knowledge, skills and abilities needed to engage the process of identifying and implementing plans that control risk in outdoor activities. 9.3.2 Demonstrate ability to design, implement and evaluate an effective risk management plan. 9.3.3 Demonstrate proper balance between the potential of risk with the educational benefits of adventure. 9.3.4 Demonstrate ability to manage group travel by moving a group in a safe manner. 9.3.5 Demonstrate the ability to organize and implement search/evacuation procedures to locate group members in need of assistance.

CEU TRACKING – FILL OUT YOUR FORM! In order to validate attendance at workshops and receive appropriate CEU authorization please be sure to fill out the CEU Tracking Form at the end of the conference program and get the presenter’s signature at the end of each workshop.

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

Le

En

Ed

LEADERSHIP

The ability to accurately self-assess as well as those essential skills concerning or involving relationships between people; the ability to effectively implement a decision. 9.4.1 Understanding and demonstration of ability to control ones own emotions and behaviors and adapt to stressful or dynamic situations. 9.4.2 Understanding and demonstration of ability to maximize the potential of others and motivate them to attain shared goals to improve expedition behavior. 9.4.3 Understanding and demonstration of task-specific knowledge to guide a group to attaining its goals. 9.4.4 Understanding and demonstration of creativity while taking initiative and calculated risks. 9.4.5 Understanding and demonstration of integrity and honesty putting the best interest of a group before individual desires.

ENVIRONMENTAL INTEGRATION

The concepts that embody ecological and cultural literacy along with the cooperative planning and management skills needed to ensure preservation of resources, through personal connections, for past, present and future generations. 9.5.1 Understanding and demonstration of concepts that embody ecological and cultural literacy along with the cooperative planning and management skills needed to ensure preservation of resources. 9.5.2 Demonstrates the capacity to perceive and interpret the basic health of environmental systems and take ap propriate action to maintain, restore, or improve the health of those systems. 9.5.3 Demonstrates the understanding of the theoretical foundations of environmental education. 9.5.4 Understanding and demonstration of the civic responsibly to educate land users to reduce their impact in backcountry as well as in their day to day lives.

EDUCATION

The ability to know and implement theories and practices of teaching, processing and transference. 9.6.1 Demonstrates understanding of education theory and foundations. 9.6.2 Demonstrates a variety of effective teaching and learning strategies in both traditional and outdoor environments. 9.6.3 Demonstrates knowledge of teaching and learning skills to plan educational strategies and progressions. 9.6.4 Demonstrates problem solving and critical thinking skills to understand instruction and learner achievement. 9.6.5 Demonstrates understanding of appropriate educational assessment practices and procedures.

THANK YOU TO OUR PRODUCT DONORS:

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11. Life is one long slackline: Experience and implicationtion Guan-Jang Wu

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10. Critical Action Research Used to Develop Assessment Tools Chris Pelchat

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4.“Learn From My Mistakes: A Dialectical Approach to Training Outdoor Educators” Brad Daniel

KEYHOLE

Pl PLANNING & LOGISTICS

BREAK 10. Games for the Backcountry Evan Scrutchins, Joe Ready, Shea Pletcher

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En ENVIRONMENTAL INTEGRATION

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LUNCH

WEA State of the Association - Assembly Hall

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DINNER

Committee Meetings

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3. Shared Reflection: A Dozen Ways to Debrief the Experience Thayer Raines

BREAK 8. Leave No trace Research: Past, Present, 9. The Interactive/Reflective Judgment and Future Process Ben Lawhon Jeff Tindall

2. Nitty Gritty Leave No Trace- Get all of your questions answered! Ben Lawhon

7. Nautical Charts, Tides, & Finding Your Way on the Water Tim Street

CHASM LAKE BREAKFAST

1. Risk - It’s Not Just a Game You Play Kaia Pirazzini and Whitney Ward

DIAMOND EAST

5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

3:00 PM - 3:30 PM 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

1:30PM-1:45 PM

NOON - 1:30 PM

10:30 AM - 11:00 AM 11:00 AM - NOON

9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

DIAMOND WEST

Monday, February 20 – Workshop Schedule


2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

MONDAY 9:00AM-10:30AM Ri

1. RISK – IT IS NOT JUST A GAME YOU PLAY / Kaia Pirazzini, Dr. Whitney Ward

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2. NITTY GRITTY LEAVE NO TRACE- GET ALL OF YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED! / Ben Lawhon

[Diamond West] “Lead your troops. Take a risk. Rule the world!” You may not be conquering the world, but you do take risks everyday as you lead groups in the wilderness, and just like the game in order to be successful it is essential to take risks. Risk is a necessary part of learning…but does no good if you lose. The key is learning how to identify and balance risk’s costs and benefits. Come take a few risks yourself while you learn first-hand how growth is coupled with taking risks. During this session we will discuss risk identification, the necessity of risk, and how to assess and manage risk in various learning environments. You will walk away having taken risks, with some experience in identifying the risks involved with activities you lead, and how to justify risk’s importance. [Diamond East] So you’re a Leave No Trace Trainer or Master Educator and you’ve read all the Leave No Trace information you can get your hands on, but you still can’t find the answers you’re looking for. This session will delve into the more esoteric aspects of Leave No Trace from issues such as proper human waste disposal techniques for southeast Alaska to proper storage of used WAG bags in bear country to women’s-specific Leave No Trace practices to the use of climbing chalk. Come to this session with your list of Leave No Trace questions and be ready to explore and learn new skills and techniques for your next outing.

SHARED REFLECTION: A DOZEN WAYS TO DEBRIEF THE EXPERIENCE / Thayer Raines Le 3.[Chasm Lake]

Are you challenged by coming up with creative ways to get your group talking during a debrief? Through slides, hands-on activities, and discussion, this workshop wil provide you with at least 12 different ways to get your groups to reflect upon their shared experience. Even group members who are shy, nervous or just don’t like to talk will get engaged.

4. “LEARN FROM MY MISTAKES: A DIALECTICAL APPROACH TO TRAINING OUTDOOR EDUCATORS” / Brad Daniel Ed [Keyhole]

This presentation offers a fun, effective method for training outdoor educators. The workshop begins with a 10-15-minute lesson/skit demonstrating a wide variety of mistakes made when teaching in the outdoors. The idea is to caricature these mis takes in such a way that they stand out. These mistakes are usually somewhat inappropriate for the setting or the season and generally fall into one or more of several categories, including group position, delivery, content, pace, and professionalism. Afterward, these mistakes will be discussed using a multi-staged sequential debriefing exercise. Solutions to each mistake will be presented and discussed.

THANK YOU TO OUR PRODUCT DONORS:

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

MONDAY 11:00AM-12:00PM NAUTICAL CHARTS, TIDES, & FINDING YOUR WAY ON THE WATER / Tim Street Ou 5.[Diamond West] If you ever plan on coastal kayaking, or especially if you plan on leading a group on coastal waters, then it’s vital to have a good understanding of nautical charts, tides, and the inherent risks and hazards of navigating along a coast. In this session, you will learn about common navigational markers, including buoys, beacons, and daymarkers. You will also get an understanding of how tides work, how to read a tidal chart, and how they can make your coastal kayaking trip either wonderful, or miserable.

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6. LEAVE NO TRACE RESEARCH: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE / Ben Lawhon

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7. THE INTERACTIVE/REFLECTIVE JUDGMENT PROCESS / Jeff Tindall

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8. CRITICAL ACTION RESEARCH USED TO DEVELOP ASSESSMENT TOOLS / Chris Pelchat

[Diamond East] Efficacy is defined as the ability to produce a desired or intended result. Since the creation of the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics, interest in the efficacy of the Leave No Trace program has been significant. While many studies have examined the positive effect of education to influence visitor behavior, far fewer studies directly address the efficacy of the Leave No Trace program. Due to Leave No Trace’s broad scope, numerous measures of program efficacy potentially exist. This session will examine current and proposed Leave No Trace-related research, and will explore opportunities for future research efforts. [Chasm Lake] Paul Petzoldt, when asked for an interview on a New York news broadcast, told them that “with all his experience” he wouldn’t know what he would do in a situation, thereby passing up a flight to New York, the shows, and some extra cash. Why wouldn’t Paul know what to do? In “The Man and the Mountains” he claims that “with all his experience, he needs to make the judgment decision.” What goes in to making a judgment decision beyond experience? How do the other elements of assessment, technical knowledge, and perception fit with experience within the judging process? [Keyhole] In order to achieve Instructor status in the IROL or through accreditation a program or individual must demonstrate the ability to create authentic assessment tools. Action research strategies provide an intuitive bridge between experiential education and assessment. This workshop will expose you to different action research strategies that can be used in a field setting to increase student learning.

MONDAY 3:30PM-5:00PM 9. COMMITTEE MEETINGS

[Diamond West & Diamond West]

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10. GAMES FOR THE BACKCOUNTRY / Evan Scrutchins, Joe Ready, Shea Pletcher

[Chasm Lake] Games for the Backcountry will demonstrate activities that can be used to create cohesion and camaraderie within a group.

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11. LIFE IS ONE LONG SLACKLINE: EXPERIENCE AND IMPLICATION / Guan-Jang Wu

[Keyhole] Come learn how to slackline using Gibbon slacklines. Many people enjoy the activity of slacklining for a vairiety of reasons: relaxation, increasing balance, mental focus, making real social network, or just having fun! This workshop will teach you slackline setup, teaching considerations and share current research findings about slackline. In addition, we will discuss how slackline can be integrated into experiential education.

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5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

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25. A Ukulele in Your Backpack or Dry-bag Michael McGowan

19. The Loss of Leadership in the Outdoor Industry Whitney Ward

Pl PLANNING & LOGISTICS

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BREAK 22. What Every Trip Leader Should Know: 23. Guarding Safety versus Compromising 24. Experiential education in the age of Six Essentials for Conflict Resolution Learning: A Look at the Value of neuroscience: A new theory Thayer Raines Unaccompanied Components Jessie Cruickshank Brad Daniel

21. IROL Info Session – In Pursuit of Outdor Leader Certification Mary Stuessy

BREAK

LUNCH

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3:00 PM - 3:30 PM 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

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20. IROL Info Session for Professionals and Instructors Chris Pelchat

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16. Weekend Meal Planning: Preparing for specific food needs and allergies Kim Collins

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14. Making connections in Outdoor Leader- 15. The Nature of Language ship through concept mapping Nathaniel Millard Scott Jordan & Emily McKenzie

BREAKFAST

CHASM LAKE

BREAK 17. School in the Woods: Practicing Im18. How many is too many? A big group mersion Theory through Environmental explores the woods. Integration Will Hobbs & Lucas Newton Daniel Sequioia Bowan

13. How to Avoid OMG Decision-Making Jeff Tindall & Michael McGowan

12. Introduction of Taiwan and aboriginal culture and knitting ball Ya-Fan Yu & Hsing-Yi Lu

DIAMOND EAST

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

1:30PM-1:45 PM

NOON - 1:30 PM

10:30 AM - 11:00 AM 11:00 AM - NOON

9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

7:30 AM - 9:00 PM

DIAMOND WEST

Tuesday, February 21 – Workshop Schedule


2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

TUESDAY 9:00AM-10:30PM Ou

12. INTRODUCTION OF TAIWAN AND ABORIGINAL CULTURE AND KNITTING BALL / Ya-Fan Yu & Hsing-Yi Lu

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13. HOW TO AVOID OMG DECISION-MAKING / Jeff Tindall, Michael McGowan

[Diamond West] To introduce Taiwan aboriginal tribes, and to expand on traditional customs as well as individual characteristics of each ethnic group, such as the Amis Harvest Festival, the Bunun Ear-shooting Festival, and the Yami (Tao) flying fish Festival, giving an extra dimension to Taiwan’s culture. We introduce not only the aboriginal cultural in Taiwan but also teach WEA participants how to make aboriginal crafts of knitting ball. After completing the knitting ball, we will arrange participants into groups and help them use knitting ball to design an activity. Through the interactive learning process we hope to share ideas and learn from each other. [Diamond East] Without a foundation for the decision-making process, decisions are likely to be ineffective and detrimental. This session seeks to determine what are essential factors and building blocks (a checklist of sorts) of decision-making and applying them to the d-m model.

MAKING CONNECTIONS IN OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP THROUGH CONCEPT MAPPING / Scott Jordan, Emily McKenzie Ed 14. [Chasm Lake] Concept maps are a graphical tool for organizing and representing knowledge. Concepts on the maps are conveyed with boxes and arrows while connections between concepts are noted by lines. The end product is a flow of ideas, theories and actions graphically displayed for individual assessment. The use of concept maps is most notable in the field of Nursing Education. Student in this field are asked to draw concept maps relating their patients presenting problems to the care that they feel is needed. There has been some evidence stating this tool as a positive teach and learning device as well as a mechanism leading to critical thinking. Outdoor leaders are presented with issue much like the nursing students are mapping out. Concept maps can be used as useful administrative tools in program planning and risk management, to the field instructor as a tool for facilitations and for the student as a tool for reflection. This work shop will discuss the process of developing concept maps and how they can enhance the field of Outdoor Education.

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15. THE NATURE OF LANGUAGE / Nathaniel Millard

[Keyhole] This presentation will look at the history of language. I will ask a few key questions: As we lose the knowledge about the ecosystems in which live, what language is also lost? What role does language have in developing what Aldo Leopold called a “land ethic? What happens to our ethics when language entropy, the idea that a generalized language loses the preciseness or the ability to work, continues to cross larger geographic boundaries? What role does connotative meaning in words have with physical experiences with objects? How does connotative meaning connect people to place? Does a richer language of nature equate to a higher land ethic? If emotive connections to nature stem from meanings, and language alongside societal experience fosters meaning, does direct work with language lead towards a stronger land ethic? Is there a shared experience in nature within a specific bioregion throughout time? Does nature communicate to us, and what is lost when we stop listening? These questions will lead us through conversations about evolution, bi-pedal-ism, theories of prospect and refuge, Bloom’s Taxonomy of knowledge, language entropy, environmental ethics, community and communication, and sense of place. I hope to open up the end of this presentation to talk about what this means for outdoor leaders and environmental integration. How do we build a language of nature in our students?

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

TUESDAY 11:00AM-12:00PM Ou

16. WEEKEND MEAL PLANNING: PREPARING FOR SPECIFIC FOOD NEEDS AND ALLERGIES / KIM COLLINS

[Diamond West] Planning and budgeting for weekend trip meals can seem like a repetitive headache for outdoor programs. During this workshop, I’ll share meal planning and budgeting techniques used in IU Outdoor Adventure’s training courses, so easy that student staff will be able to use it successfully. Each participant will leave the workshop with a meal budgeting and planning worksheet, complete with preplanned menus and shopping lists, available to take home and apply to your outdoor program.

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17. SCHOOL IN THE WOODS: PRACTICING IMMERSION THEORY THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL INTEGRATION / DANIEL SEQUIOIA BOWAN

[Diamond East] The workshop will provide an overview of The School in the Woods, an innovative, place-based immersion program for fourth graders in southern Colorado. The session will engage instructors, administrators, and academic professionals as it showcases how the natural environment and 640 acres of forest can be used as a cornerstone of learning. Each year, 52 fourth grade students, randomly chosen from a pool of applicants, spend an entire school year immersed in the natural world. Through problem-based and constructivist learning models, the surrounding environment is integrated into the reading, writing, math, and social studies curriculum. This conference proceeding will present preliminary dissertation research which finds evidence that environmental integration can be shown to improve academic achievement in a public school setting. Utilizing an experimental design, independent sample t-tests find a statistically significant difference in academic achievement between students accepted into the program and those not accepted.

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18. HOW MANY IS TOO MANY? A BIG GROUP EXPLORES THE WOODS / WILL HOBBS, LUCAS NEWTON

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19. THE LOSS OF LEADERSHIP IN THE OUTDOOR INDUSTRY / DR. WHITNEY WARD

[Chasm Lake] Instructor:participant ratios aren’t new, but are there reasons beyond risk management and minimum impact? Are there any extended field program settings where a large group could be successful? If we have the staff, and we can manage the group’s travel, why not take a bunch? We had such an adventure this past fall and found the results to be pretty interesting. This session will review some of industry’s beliefs about group size and examine those beliefs in the context of our modern programming reality. Attendees will participate in small and large group discussion, share perspectives on group size implications, and develop a keen sense of this foundational concept. [Keyhole] What is a leader and how do leaders come to be? Today outdoor leaders are expected to be many things to many people. Some argue that because of these expectations and a change in client characteristics overtime, there is a loss of leadership in the outdoor industry. However, “leadership and learning are indispensable to each other” (John F. Kennedy), and learning may be the key to restoring leadership. Come and join the discussion on how learning what makes an effective leader helps you to be one.

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

TUESDAY 1:30PM-3:00PM 20. IROL INFO SESSION-FOR PROFESSIONALS AND INSTRUCTORS / Chris Pelchat

[Diamond West & Diamond East] This session is designed specifically for those working professionally in the outdoor leadership industry. This includes, guides, educators, professors, those who achieved Outdoor Leadership Certification or WEA Instructor status prior to 2010 as well as those professionals not currently certified that would like to challenge the IROL. Topics covered include: Brief Introduction to the IROL; How to Challenge the IROL for Outdoor Leader Certification or Instructor Status; Submitting Portfolios for Review; Submitting Validation Forms; Continuing Education Units – collection and submission; Assessment and Evaluation (10.0 Apprentice Series); Creating Presentation Portfolios.

21. IROL INFO SESSION- IN PURSUIT OF OUTDOOR LEADER CERTIFICATION / Mary Stuessy

[Chasm Lake & Keyhole] This session is designed specifically for students. Whether or not you are attached to an accredited institution, if you are interested in learning about the IROL and Outdoor Leadership Certification, this info session is not to be missed! Topics covered include: What is the IROL; Tour of IROL; Developing your Student Experience Inventory; Submitting your Portfolio for Certification; Creating Presentation Portfolios; Sharing Your Portfolio; After your OL Certification (Continuing Education Units).

TUESDAY 3:30PM-5:00PM Le

22. WHAT EVERY TRIP LEADER SHOULD KNOW: SIX ESSENTIALS FOR CONFLICT RESOLUTION / Thayer Raines

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23. GUARDING SAFETY VERSUS COMPROMISING LEARNING: A LOOK AT THE VALUE OF UNACCOMPANIED COMPONENTS / Brad Daniel

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24. EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION IN THE AGE OF NEUROSCIENCE: A NEW THEORY / Jessie Cruickshank

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25. A UKULELE IN YOUR BACKPACK OR DRY-BAG / MICHAEL MCGOWAN

[Diamond West] Participants will learn the six essentials for effective conflict resolution including behavior contracting, benefits of conflict, active listening, collaborative speaking, brainstorming, and win-win consensus. This is an interactive workshop; participants will have the opportunity to resolve simulated conflict scenarios using the ABCDEF model. [Diamond East] Should wilderness program instructors always accompany their groups? This workshop will present three positions in response to this question - yes, no, and yes but in a modified role. Though discussion and debate we will explore whether learning can be maximized during unaccompanied expedition components while anticipating and minimizing risk. [Chasm Lake] Co-constructed Developmental Teaching Theory (CDTT) combines robust findings from cognitive neuroscience and education philosophy with effective experiential education practices into a dynamic, self-adjusting cycle. It integrates constructivist theory and Flow theory with explicit learning goals, which harness recognition, affect, and strategy networks. CDTT combines the strengths of current pedagogy focused on student engagement with those of experiential education’s focus on reflection, social-emotional learning, and processing to build understanding. In this five-staged model, CDTT recognizes the learner as a whole person with profound uniqueness. The role of the facilitator, then, is to provide an environment conducive to the learning experience. The learner, teacher/facilitator, environment, and content interact in dynamic feedback loops. These feedback loops create a self-adjusting, fractal-like model using appraisal and assessment, which connects processes at different scales facilitating change and improvement in the student, lesson, course, or even school/program. [Keyhole] The ukulele is compact, portable, and versatile making it the perfect instrument for outdoor leaders and programs. Easy to learn for people with no formal musical training it becomes a festive and enjoyable point of contact for groups to develop, socialize, unwind and manage stress. In this session you will learn how to tune, chord, strum and play several songs. Designed for folks with no experience or talent the session is limited to ten participants. Ukuleles are provided. You must sign up in advance for this session at central conference registration.

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

Presenter Bios DANIEL SEQUOIA BOWAN

Daniel Sequoia Bowan is a doctoral student in the College of Education at The University of Colorado – Colorado Springs. He recently completed his coursework and is currently working on his dissertation. His research interests include outdoor, environmental, and place-based education. In addition to his scholarly pursuits, he is also a seasoned outdoor professional and serves as the Manager of Outdoor Recreation at The University of Colorado – Colorado Springs. Daniel received his master’s degree in Recreation Administration from The University of Tennessee and his bachelor’s degree in Environmental Resources from The Pennsylvania State University.

KIM COLLINS

Kim has worked with IUOA for 6 years and been a part of serving over 24,000 people in the Bloomington, Indiana area. Her passion lies in training outdoor leaders and whitewater paddlers, as well as planning custom experiences. In her free time, she loves to ride bikes, go kayaking, listen to music, cook, and work in her garden.

JESSIE CRUICKSHANK

Jessie Cruickshank is the Administrative Director at SROM (Solid Rock Outdoor Ministries) where she has served since 2000. Her previous roles include being a field guide and the Program Director. SROM has operated in the Rocky Mountains region since 1983 and is accredited by the Association of Experiential Education. In 2011, Jessie earned her Master’s from Harvard’s Graduate School of Education in Mind, Brain, and Education. She oversees SROM curriculum development and spends over 21 field days a year training SROM staff. Jessie is also a human resources and staff training consultant with KNOWA Inc. She has been a member of high altitude expeditions in 5 countries including Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, and the Yukon. Jessie currently lives in Laramie, WY with her husband Bob.

BRAD DANIEL

Brad Daniel is Professor of Outdoor Education and Environmental Studies at Montreat College where he currently serves as co-chair of the Outdoor Education Department. Brad is a North Carolina state certified environmental educator and coauthored one of the two required course modules for the North Carolina Environmental Education certification program. He has been the recipient of several awards for teaching excellence. He holds Masters Degrees in Biology and Outdoor/Environmental Teacher Education and a Ph.D. in Environmental Studies. He has led multiple, extended wilderness expeditions since 1986. His research interests include outdoor experiences as significant life events and the impact of wilderness course components on personal growth. In his free time, he enjoys hiking, backpacking, and photography.

WILL HOBBS

Will teaches field leadership and education at Georgia College in the undergrad and graduate outdoor education programs as well as a new professional certificate program. He has been with the WEA since 2000 and master educator with Leave No Trace since 2007. He spends most of his field time in the humid Southeast, occasionally venturing as far north as the Big South Fork, Kentucky for walking and paddling adventures with students and family. His next big adventure is the WEA accreditation process for the Georgia College program.

SCOTT JORDAN

Scott Jordan has been the Coordinator of OSU’s Outdoor Adventure program for the past 10 years. He has been a WEA Certification Instructor since 2003 and has trained many Outdoor Leadership certification programs for WEA. As a member of the WEA, Scott Has served on the Board of Trustees and as the President of the BOT in 2007. Scott also teaches for the Wilderness Medicine Training Center and is working on a PhD at OSU. Besides working in Outdoor Recreation since 1981 he spent nine years of his life providing family therapy services for Oklahoma Youth Services. Scott has a laid back presentation style that is informative as well as fun.

BEN LAWHON

Ben Lawhon, a Natural Resources Management graduate of the University of Tennessee, joined the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics staff in 2001, where he serves as the Education Director. His responsibilities include curriculum development, management of national education and training programs, oversight of Leave No Trace-related research and coordinating general outreach efforts. Ben is currently pursuing a M.S. Degree at Colorado State University in Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Management, focusing on the efficacy of the Leave No Trace program. Ben is an avid outdoor enthusiast, enjoying whitewater paddling, telemark skiing, fly fishing and backpacking.

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

HSING-YI LU

Hsing-Yi Lu, Erica, is from Kaohsiung of Taiwan and is 23 years old. She is a master student studying at the National Taiwan Sport University (NTSU). She is a first year graduate student, majoring in sport management and an energetic and outgoing person. She likes sports and enjoys jogging and swimming at leisure time. She believes nothing is more precious than health, so she exercises frequently to keep a healthy lifestyle.

MICHAEL MCGOWAN

Mike McGowan, WEA member since 1987 and WEA instructor since 1989, has served several times as the WEA affiliate representative for WIU, served on the standards committee for eight years and was the affiliate sponsor for the WEA Colloquium in 2002. His experience includes: instructor Wisconsin Division of Juvenile Corrections S.P.R.I.T.E. adventure based intervention program, Program Coordinator of the Challenge Education program at Bradford Woods Center for Camping and Recreation at Indiana University and Coordinator of the ECOEE semester travel study program at Western Illinois University. He teaches leadership, programming, outdoor adventure recreation education and therapeutic recreation classes, instructs field based skills courses in backpacking, sea kayaking, and canoeing, and chairs the outdoor curriculum team for the Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Administration at Western Illinois University. An area of intense interest for Mike is the role of wilderness experience in spiritual development in which he has published several articles on this topic. In 1999 while visiting scholar at Strathsclyde University Glasgow, Scotland he facilitated the conference on “Spiritual Development through Adventure Programmes” at Brathay Hall in Ambelside, Cumbria, England. In 2000 in cooperation with the local community unit school district he developed and directed the Freshman Leadership Expedition, a violence prevention program for high school freshmen. In 2003 he was named the Meyer Visiting Professor to Indiana University.

EMILY MCKENZIE

Emily McKenzie is the local programming specailest for Oklahoma State University’s Outdoor Adventure program. She recently became a Master of Science in Leisure Studies. currently Emily is taking classes in preparation for a PhD program and teaching classes for OSU. She loves working with people in the outdoors and especially enjoys using the outdoor environment as a way to reach students. Emily has worked on the Outdoor Adventure challenge course for four years and for the trips program for two years. She currently helps in training students for both programs as well as serves as and Adjunct Professor for OSU’s HHP program. In her spare time, she dabbles in video editing for Outdoor Adventure and academic projects, enjoying the medium of videos to convey messages and capture moments in time.

NATHANIEL MILLARD

Nathaniel Miles Millard is a PhD candidate at Utah State University in the College of Natural Resources in the Department of Environment and Society. His research looks at how sense of place is connected to moral and ethical decision making with a special interest in the language of place. He most recently was running a surf hotel in a remote coastal village in Guatemala and is currently living in a van, driving around the US, and writing.

LUCAS NEWTON

Lucas Newton is a Graduate Assistant Instructor at Georgia College.

CHRIS PELCHAT

Dr. Chris Pelchat obtained a B.A. double major in Outdoor Recreation and Recreation Management from Eastern Washington University in 1999 and continued at EWU to work on his graduate work. He finished his M.Ed. in Adult Education with a certificate in College Instruction in 2000. Dr. Pelchat finished his Ph.D. in Education at the University of Idaho in 2010. He has fourteen years of experience in wilderness education. Currently, Dr. Pelchat is a professor at Ithaca College instructing courses within the Outdoor Adventure Leadership B.S. program and serves as the Accreditation Council Chair for the Wilderness Education Association.

KAIA PIRAZZINI

Kaia Pirazzini is a second year graduate student at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois; she plans to graduate in May of 2012. At SIUC, Kaia has developed a women’s-only outdoor recreation program through her position at the student recreation center. She also teaches outdoor leadership and recreation courses, which has only fueled her fire of passion for wilderness education. Kaia is originally from Wisconsin, and grew up spending extensive time with her family in the wilderness, specifically the Boundary Waters of Northern Minnesota. She is excited to explore more of the country following her graduation.

SHEA PLETCHER

Shea Pletcher is a student at the University of Central Oklahoma.

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

THAYER RAINES

Dr. Thayer Raines is a professor in the Recreation & Outdoor Studies Program at Green Mountain College in Poultney, VT; a WEA affiliate school. He is the Director of the BS in Youth Development & Camp Management degree and an NSP Instructor and LNT Master Educator Instructor. He holds certification at the Instuctor/Instructor Trainer rank in the PSIA, ACA, NSP, ARC, and PA. Thayer is a graduate of Indiana University (ReD), Penn State (MS), and West Chester U (BS). He is the co-owner & director of Roaring Brook Camp for Boys in Bradford, VT.

JOE READY

Joe Ready is a student at the University of Central Oklahoma.

EVAN SCRUTCHINS

Evan Scrutchins is a student at University of Central Oklahoma.

TIM STREET

Tim Street is an adjunct instructor with Indiana University Outdoor Adventures and is also the Retreats Director at Bradford Woods. Tim enjoys teaching on a variety of topics, including backpacking, coastal kayaking, and map and compass. Tim is also an avid outdoor photographer, and enjoys lugging way too much camera equipment on his trips.

JEFF TINDALL

Jeff has been instructing in the outdoors since 1973. He became a certified outdoor leader in 1980 and an instructor in 1984. He has worked for a variety of programs in a number of positions. He became the ECOEE Coordinator for Western Illinois University in 1999. He still hasn’t arrived because there is still a time on course when he has to scratch his head and say, “I didn’t see that one coming!”

DR. WHITNEY WARD

Whitney Ward is currently an assistant professor of outdoor recreation in the Department of Health Education and Recreation at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. He coordinators the Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Management courses and curriculum for the department. He has been pursuing wilderness recreation/education for many years, with interests that include just about anything outside – but his true love are the deserts and mountains (and desserts in the mountains and mountains of dessert).

GUAN-JANG WU

A native of Taiwan, Guan-Jang Wu is an assistant professor at National Taiwan Sport University. His research and professional interests include outdoor leadership, adventure programming, wilderness orientation, and adventure tourism. In his spare time, he enjoys slacklining, canyoneering and drinking coffee. His professional experiences include NOLS & OB-Wilderness instructor, and WEA certified leader.

YA-FAN YU

Yu Ya-Fan is now a graduate student at National Taiwan Sport University in Taiwan, whose major is master of business administration. He has a 3-year work experience in Taipei Visitor Information Center and is conversant with the tourism information in Taiwan. With the experience working in the Visitor Information Center, he is hoping all the conferees will have a brand new idea of Taiwan after this workshop.

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

Student Presenter Bios RORY COOPER

Rory is a Senior at Ithaca College studying Culture and Communication and Outdoor Pursuits. His jounrneys have take him on Ithaca College’s Immersion Program with former WEA President Chris Pelchat in the Spring of 2010 and he just returned from a semester in Chile this Fall where he worked with the NGO Valpo Surf Project while studying through the School Of International Training.

PETE ISKYAN

Graduate of Ithaca College Cinema and Photography Program and Outdoor Adventure Leadership Program. Participant in 2010 Immersion Semester Program, of which was documentarian. Currently employed by Vail Resorts Video Production team.

LAURA KATHREIN

Laura Kathrein is an Outdoor Adventure Leadership major and Women’s Studies minor at Ithaca College. She aspires to see every inch of the world as well as doing everything within her power to conserve it. When she’s not kayaking or playing her uke at her cabin in Northern Michigan you can find her with a tank on her back exploring the deep blue seas of the Caribbean.

ALEX LANCASTER

Alex is a junior, hoping to go to medical school upon graduation and integrate medicine with her outdoor pursuits. She works at IU Outdoor Adventures as a trip leader. In the last year she’s been able to travel to 9 states and 2 countries and is excited to continue exploring more in the future.

KELSEY MCCABE

Kelsey McCabe is a senior Outdoor Adventure Leadership major at Ithaca College. She loves to Scuba dive, sail, rollerblade, read books about zombies, and hike. While Kelsey is always ready to jump to action at the threat of the zombie apocalypse, you can also find her snorkeling with sea turtles and dolphins in the Leeward islands.

JARED MCDANIEL

Jared McDaniel is a Graduate Student at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois. He has a Bachelor of Science in Recreation Leadership and Management from Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Michigan. Jared and his wife live in Illinois and enjoy backpacking, rock climbing, and just being outside.

MARY MCDANIEL

Mary McDaniel is a Graduate Student at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois, studying Therapeutic Recreation. She has a Bachelor of Science in Youth Ministry from Kuyper College in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Mary and her husband enjoy backpacking, rock climbing, and anything else outdoors.

KAIA PIRAZZINI

of 2012. Kaia grew up spending extensive time with her family in the wilderness, specifically the Boundary Waters of Northern Minnesota. Through studying outdoor recreation education at the graduate level, her enthusiasm and passion for wilderness education has grown immensely. Kaia has developed a women’s-only outdoor recreation program through her position at the student recreation center, which includes women-only climbing trips, climbing wall nights, and backpacking trips. She has also had the opportunity to teach several outdoor leadership expedition courses for college students, which has only fueled her fire of passion for wilderness education. Kaia is originally from Wisconsin, and currently lives in Southern Illinois. She is excited to explore more of the country following her graduation.

SAM REIBMAN

I am a sophomore at Ithaca college studying Outdoor Adventure Leadership. I am an eagle scout and a backpacker, rock climber, and an explorer. I am interning at Primitive Pursuits, an organization that teaches survival skills, ecology, edible plants, and awareness training experientially.

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

CAMI SOCKOW

Hello! My name is Cami Sockow and I am an undergraduate student at SIUC studying Leisure Services Management with an emphasis in outdoor recreation. I am scheduled to graduate in August after I complete a professional internship. i have always had a love for the outdoors and a passion for leading other people. I have come to realize how beneficial adventure education can be for people whether it be within the classroom or in the backcountry. Within my opportunity to work at Base Camp at SIUC i have been able to facilitate as well as lead different kinds of trips we have to offer. I am hoping in the future to be able to pursue a masters degree to continue the studying of adventure-based learning as well as more about Outdoor Recreation as a career. I am excited about the upcoming years following my graduation, hoping to explore the Northwestern region of the country.

JANIE WELSH

Janie is from Michigan City, Indiana. She is a junior, studying anthropology and underwater science at Indiana University. She is a trip leader for I.U. Outdoor Adventures, and her favorite trip lead through IUOA was a week-long canoeing trip in Quetico Provincial Park, Canada. She is also an avid Beanie Baby collector.

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

Join the Wilderness Education Association! Your annual membership dues not only support the WEA financially, our members support the WEA mission and vision by actively engaging as members and delegates of our committees, Board of Trustees, and beyond. The WEA is comprised of over 500 individual members, and every voice makes a difference. The WEA strives to serve its membership by working towards the ultimate goal of professionalizing the field of outdoor leadership.

MEMBERSHIP LEVELS FOR INDIVIDUALS:

v Introductory – At only $15 this membership level is an affordable way to support the WEA and gain access to a slew of great membership benefits. v Premium – At $35 it offers the same great membership benefits as the Introduc tory Membership and includes a one-year membership to Leave No Trace.

IROL

The IROL (International Registry of Outdoor Leaders) is for individuals who wish to develop an outdoor leadership portfolio and/or maintain their Outdoor Leadership Certification or Instructor status with the WEA. All IROL memberships receive the same benefits as the Premium Membership and include 12 months of access to your personal online portfolio. v First time IROL members $100 v Renewing memberships and those ‘gradfathered’ in (OLC/Instructor status prior to 2010) $85

MEMBERSHIP LEVELS FOR ORGANIZATIONS: v

Organizational – For $250 your organization will be listed on the WEA website with a link directly to your organization or to a fully editable page on the WEA site. Your organization will receive discounted exhibitor space at the annual conference and one complimentary Premium Membership for an individual at the institution. Eligible Organizational Members have the opportunity to work within the WEA’s Master Educator Provider status with the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics to offer Master Educator Courses throughout the year.

MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS IN A NUTSHELL v v v v v v v v v

Significant discounts to the International Conference on Outdoor Leadership & Pre-conference workshops Discounted Subscription Rates to Outside Magazine and the Journal of Outdoor Recreation, Education, and Leadership Access to the WEA team on Promotive.com (discounts on outdoor equipment and clothing) Voting in the annual BOT Elections Opportunities to participate on WEA Committees Monthly Member Access Emails from the WEA National Office Access to the Members Only section of the WEA website One year membership to Leave No Trace+* Current Status of your Outdoor Leader Certification or Instructor status in the International Registry of Outdoor leaders *

+ Available for Premium Membership Holders *Available to IROL Membership Holders

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

Please Support our 2012 ICOL Exhibitors: Visit their Booths in Assembly Hall!

OUTDOOR ADVENTURE CENTER

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2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

Continuing Education Credits Tracking Form 1. Complete a new CEU section of this form for each presentation you attend. 2. Sign in with the Service Crew representative to confirm your attendance at the workshop. 3. Collect the signature of the presenter immediately following the workshop**. 4. Scan this form and submit it as the CEU attachment in the Professional Development portion of your IROL Portfolio. **Please do not approach presenters later in the conference asking for a signature, this places them in an awkward position since they may not know for sure if you were in their presentation.

YOUR NAME:

ORGANIZATION:

SESSION TITLE: PRESENTER NAME: PRESENTER SIGNATURE:

SESSION TITLE: PRESENTER NAME: PRESENTER SIGNATURE:

SESSION TITLE: PRESENTER NAME: PRESENTER SIGNATURE:

SESSION TITLE: PRESENTER NAME: PRESENTER SIGNATURE:

SESSION TITLE: PRESENTER NAME: PRESENTER SIGNATURE:

SESSION TITLE: PRESENTER NAME: PRESENTER SIGNATURE:

30

SESSION LENGTH:

1 hour

1.5 hours

COMPETENCY/SESSION TRACK (PLEASE CHECK ONLY ONE): Outdoor Living Risk Management Leadership Planning and Logistics Education Environmental Integration SESSION LENGTH:

1 hour

1.5 hours

COMPETENCY/SESSION TRACK (PLEASE CHECK ONLY ONE): Outdoor Living Risk Management Leadership Planning and Logistics Education Environmental Integration SESSION LENGTH:

1 hour

1.5 hours

COMPETENCY/SESSION TRACK (PLEASE CHECK ONLY ONE): Outdoor Living Risk Management Leadership Planning and Logistics Education Environmental Integration SESSION LENGTH:

1 hour

1.5 hours

COMPETENCY/SESSION TRACK (PLEASE CHECK ONLY ONE): Outdoor Living Risk Management Leadership Planning and Logistics Education Environmental Integration SESSION LENGTH:

1 hour

1.5 hours

COMPETENCY/SESSION TRACK (PLEASE CHECK ONLY ONE): Outdoor Living Risk Management Leadership Planning and Logistics Education Environmental Integration SESSION LENGTH:

1 hour

1.5 hours

COMPETENCY/SESSION TRACK (PLEASE CHECK ONLY ONE): Outdoor Living Risk Management Leadership Planning and Logistics Education Environmental Integration


ESTES PARK, COLORADO FEBRUARY 18-21, 2012

2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP

Important Notes & Contacts

2012

INTERNATIONAL

CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR

LEADERSHIP ESTES PARK, COLORADO FEBRUARY 18-21, 2012

31


2012 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE SCHEDULE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19

7:30am – 9:00am 9:00am – 12:00pm Noon – 1:30pm 1:30pm – 4:30pm 5:00pm – 6:30pm 7:00pm – 9:00pm

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20

7:30am – 9:00am 9:00am – 10:30am 11:00am – 12:00pm Noon – 1:30pm 1:30pm – 2:30pm 3:00pm – 4:00pm 4:15pm – 5:15pm 5:00pm – 6:30pm 7:30pm – 9:00pm

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21

7:30am – 9:00am 8:00am – 9:00am 9:00am – 10:30am 11:00am – 12:00pm 12:00pm – 1:30pm 1:45pm – 3:15pm 3:45pm – 4:45pm 5:00pm – 6:30pm 7:30pm – 9:30pm

Breakfast Conference Registration and Exhibitor Open House – Assembly Hall Lunch Outdoor Leadership Research Symposium – Keyhole Outdoor Leadership Program Symposium – Chasm Lake Student Presentations – Diamond West & Diamond East Dinner Welcome Social – Trivia Night! – Assembly Hall

Breakfast Registration Table Open – Assembly Hall CEU Workshops – Longs Peak CEU Workshops – Longs Peak Lunch State of the Organization – Assembly Hall Committee Meetings IROL Info session for professionals – Diamond West IROL Info session for students – Diamond East Dinner WEA Awards Presentation & Keynote Address –Assembly Hall

2012

INTERNATIONAL

CONFERENCE ON OUTDOOR

LEADERSHIP ESTES PARK, COLORADO FEBRUARY 18-21, 2012

Breakfast Registration Table Open – Assembly Hall CEU Workshops - Longs Peak CEU Workshops - Longs Peak Lunch CEU Workshops –Longs Peak CEU Workshops–Longs Peak Dinner Evening Remarks and Outdoor Gear Auction to benefit the Kitty Drury Scholarship Fund

BE SURE TO TURN IN YOUR CEU TRACKING FORM TO GET CREDIT FOR ATTENDING WORKSHOPS!

2012 International Conference on Outdoor Leadership Program  

Schedule, Workshop Descriptions, and more!

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