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Newspaper of the WCED SEPTEMBER 2015 ISSUE 25

Milestone for eLearning in the Western Cape

The Western Cape Government has signed a five year Local Area Network (LAN) contract with an approved service provider, Sizwe Africa IT Group (Pty) (Ltd), for the provision of LAN equipment and services to schools in the Western Cape.

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he implementation of LAN in schools is part of the Western Cape Government’s wider eLearning vision for the province. ELearning will enhance quality education by increasing access to quality ICT in disadvantaged communities, providing support for struggling learners, contributing toward teachers’ training and professional development, and improving management and administration at schools. It will also provide learners with the skills to participate in our increasingly technology-based economy in the future. The eLearning project comprises the following: • Linking schools through a highspeed, real-time Wide Area Network (WAN). • Providing Local Area Networks (LANs) in schools. • Refreshing existing computer laboratories and providing new laboratories and technology rich classrooms (smart classrooms).

PREMIER HELEN ZILLE LAUNCHED THE WCED'S NEW ELEARNING PORTAL AS WE WERE GOING TO PRINT. SEE NEXT EDITION FOR SPECIAL REPORT.

• Developing and expanding online digital resources that are made available to all learners, parents and teachers. • Teacher training and development in ICT and the use of eLearning in schools. The implementation of the broadband (WAN) is already underway. The WCG has completed the broadband infrastructure build at 460 sites, of which 344 are schools. This means that either optic fibre or wireless infrastructure has been installed at the 460 sites to date. The WAN implementation will then enable the WCG to provide Local Area Networks (LANs) in schools. School sites will be fitted with a wireless distributed network (WiFi) for internet and inter-connectivity within a school. The tender for the implementation for the LAN closed at the beginning of February with the final contract with Sizwe Africa IT Group (Pty) (Ltd) being signed on 29 July 2015. In addition to the implementation of the WAN and the signing of the con-

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tract of the LAN, the following has been completed or is already underway: • Refreshing labs and smart classrooms – 123 subject labs and 126 computer labs have already been refreshed, as well as 3 350 smart classrooms installed. • Online digital resources - The WCED is sourcing and developing digital teaching and learning materials while also inviting developers of these materials to provide information on their products and services via an e-catalogue or portal on the WCED web site. The ePortal is scheduled to be launched this month. • Teacher Training and development - Teacher training in ICT has been a major focus area for the WCED in preparation for the roll-out of broadband to schools and the introduction of eLearning. It is critical that teachers and principals are orientated and trained in the integrated use of the new technology being introduced at their schools and incorporating it into the curriculum.

FEATURE

Build up to the New five year Mathematics matric exams and Language Strategy

See page 3

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Over the past couple of years more than 26 000 teachers in the Western Cape have had some training exposure to ICT. This year the WCED has presented a number of training sessions for principals, with specific training for teachers receiving smart classrooms, over and above on-going voluntary training for teachers. Training of educators began in January at the Cape Teaching and Leadership Institute and will continue to be a primary focus area of the WCED’s teacher training budget in this financial year. This year, training has included: • Basic Training for educators on how the smart classroom technology works. • Sessions with principals so as to provide them with tools to ensure that the technology is utilised and that it is sustained. • Content development courses focusing on developing skills to produce content for lessons for the teacher, by the teacher. • Courses for educators on basic ICT skills. From August 2015 onward, the WCED will be introducing a course which is aimed at providing teachers with a deep understanding on the nature of eLearning and e-Teaching and the role that technology can play. It will focus on teachers producing e-lessons, and will be applicable to all subjects. The WCED is also planning pilot projects to test effective ways of using the latest technology and will work with teachers who already provide examples of best practice to ensure that the province makes the most of this opportunity. The department will also continue to work with the private sector in order to expand this project even further and encourage them to invest in individual schools. They can invest in a range of areas, from the LAN, a “Smart Classroom” or “Lab Refresh” and devices at one or more of our schools. The MTN SA Foundation was the first private sector company to come on board to assist. They have already refreshed the labs of 10 Quintile 4 schools in some of our poorest areas. The MTN SA Foundation has also pledged to refresh an additional 5 computer labs in 2016.

FEATURE

SPORT

Rural schools demonstrate Manzomthombo Secondary best practice shines in National Netball Tournament. See page 10

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SEPTEMBER 2015

Brand new R54 million Khanya Primary School opens its doors

Multimillion-rand eLearning and Resource Centre Project opens in Wesbank The start of the third term signified a new beginning for learners of Khanya Primary when they moved into their brand new multimillion rand school building in Philippi.

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he learners have been temporarily accommodated at the former Buckingham Primary School building in Mitchell’s Plain since 2006, after vacating the Ottery Youth Centre buildings that had been utilised since 2004 when the school was established. The construction of the new school commenced in March 2014. The school accommodates learners who mainly reside in the Heinz Park, Samora Machel and Phillippi areas. The new school consists of 28 classrooms, two Grade R classrooms, two specialist rooms for art and music, an administration block and school sick bay, a kitchen, a computer room, school hall, library, and two specialist rooms as well as a sports field and two physical training and playing surfaces. The relocation of the school’s existing furniture to the new premises from the previous premises took place during the July school holiday period and the school also received top-up furniture. The WCED invests heavily in school infrastructure to improve the quality of teaching and learning spaces as well as to meet the demands for schooling in the province. As the implementing agent for the WCED, the Department of Transport and Public Works, for the 2015/2016 financial year, will spend R1.427 billion on the building and the refurbishing of school infrastructure across the province. Khanya Primary School is one of many schools earmarked for completion within this financial year. This year will see the completion of eleven new schools, while an extra fifteen are under construction. In addition, thirty-eight WCED and ASIDI funded replacement

schools are being either built or completed in this financial year. The Department of Transport and Public Works’ project team has done exceptionally well to deliver a state-of-the-art facility within the required time and budget, and ready for the start of the new school term. During a visit to the school, Western Cape Education Minister Debbie Schäfer and Minister of Transport and Public Works Donal Grant, said “we are pleased to have delivered a school that the community can be proud of, and

its learners can thrive in, which is in line with the Western Cape Government’s Provincial Strategic Goal 2, to improve education outcomes and opportunities for youth development”.

THIS YEAR WILL SEE THE COMPLETION OF ELEVEN NEW SCHOOLS, WHILE AN EXTRA FIFTEEN ARE UNDER CONSTRUCTION.

More than 5 000 learners are expected to benefit from the recently opened eLearning and Resource Centre in Wesbank near Delft. The Centre was funded by Afrisam and the Airports Company of South Africa (ACSA) in partnership with the Western Cape Education Department and various other stakeholders. The Centre is strategically located at Hoofweg Primary School to provide easy access to learners from neighbouring schools and the community. The Centre will offer eLearning, literacy, numeracy, IT literacy and library services. The handover of the first phase of the multi-million rand project was celebrated at a ceremony attended by the Minister of Mineral Resources, Ngoako Ramatlhodi, Western Cape Education Minister Debbie Schäfer, AfriSam and ACSA dignitaries, and community members from Wesbank and surrounding areas. The library facility will serve as the mainstream teaching resource for Grade 4 to 7 learners, with the school using their existing media centre room for the foundation phase learners. The Centre will be fully integrated into the Hoofweg Primary school programme in the mornings and open for surrounding schools and the community in the afternoons.

Corporate Social Responsibility Manager at AfriSam, Tsholo Diale said, “We hope this facility motivates and encourages the learners and community members to invest in their education, with the vision of a better future for themselves and their communities. Our role as AfriSam is to create possibilities and uphold our legacy of building communities by making it possible for our people to realise their dreams for the future benefit of our country.” Wayne Blauw of the WCED said the eLearning and resource centre could serve as a prototype for replication in primary schools in similar communities and has huge potential to impact literacy results, mainstreaming media and family literacy.

“WE HOPE THIS FACILITY MOTIVATES AND ENCOURAGES THE LEARNERS AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS TO INVEST IN THEIR EDUCATION...”


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SEPTEMBER 2015

Build up to T the matric exams

he Winter Schools included tutoring programmes and targeted and sustained interventions at schools where learners were struggling in specific high enrolment subjects. These subjects included Mathematics, Physical Science,

Geography, Life Sciences, Accounting and Economics. The Grade 12 Winter School programme at Excelsior Secondary School in Belhar was attended by more than 500 learners attending classes in Mathematics, Economics, English, History, Geography and Business Studies. The learners attending the classes come from 12 schools in the area. The Principal of Excelsior Secondary School, Kyrle Vraagom, said he was proud of the school’s 203 matric candidates and hoped that the school would achieve a pass rate of 92% in the 2015 NSC. In the 2014 NSC examinations, Excelsior High School achieved an 89.9% pass rate with 40.8% of the matrics achieving a bachelor’s pass. To improve the school’s results in the upcoming NSC, the school: • Designed a programme for each learner after considering their individual circumstances. A special programme was designed for ‘learners at risk’ • Engaged with the learners’ parents as he believed parental involvement was crucial in ensuring that the learners succeeded

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• Arranged extra classes after school daily throughout the year • Joined up with an NGO to assist learners to increase their results so that they are able to obtain bachelor passes During a visit to the school, Western Cape Education Minister Debbie Schäfer said she was impressed by Vraagom’s dedication and commitment to his Grade 12 learners and to the school as a whole. “It is true that great schools do not exist without great leaders. This is why Mr Vraagom is the first and only Western Cape Educator to win the Excellence in Secondary School Leadership award at the 2003 National Teaching Awards.” Schäfer wished all the Grade 12’s the very best of luck with their studies and for what was the most important examinations they will write in their school careers. “Primarily, the onus is now on you – the candidate. Nothing is ever achieved without hard work, and I have every confidence that you will make yourselves and the Western Cape proud.”

In order to assist learners in preparation for the National Senior Certificate (NSC), the Western Cape Education Department (WCED) organised a Grade 12 Winter School programme at 172 schools across the province.

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Holiday programme helps learners’ dreams take flight

Premier Helen Zille and Minister Debbie Schäfer visited the Safe Schools Holiday Programme at the Cape Academy for Maths, Science and Technology (CAMST). The holiday programme was designed for learners in Grades 10 and 11, covering exciting topics such as Robotics, Aviation and an Introduction to Pilot training. It was run in conjunction with the Sakhikamva Foundation and CAMST. In June, the foundation opened the Science, Technology, Robotics, Engi-

neering, Aerospace and Mathematics Laboratory (STREAM) in Tokai. It is set to create a culture of learning in these key subjects and will empower the youth and ultimately create leaders in the field of science and technology. Learners had the opportunity to ‘take flight’ in a Piper Tomahawk nicknamed Tommi. The aeroplane features an advanced flight simulator with movable control surfaces, creating a realistic flight experience for learners and visitors to the laboratory. Tommi is surrounded by six interac-

tive areas, including a twelve seater SPACE room which has a connection to the International Space Station and Hubble Telescope, an experimental laboratory, a briefing room, a simulation room and scientific display areas. Learners from schools in the Metro South Education District attended the programme. The schools include Aloe High School, Phakama High School, Tafelsig High School, Steenberg High School, Sibelius High School, Crestway High School, Wynberg High School, Bergvliet High School, Heathfield High School, Muizenberg High School and Livingstone High School. “It is wonderful to see so many young people actively interested in this holiday programme and what will be required for a career in aviation," said Premier Zille. “I was very pleased to see fun activities being enjoyed by learners which simultaneously teach them crucial concepts of maths and science which are vital to our economy," said Minister Schäfer. They added that as a developing country and a relatively young democracy, South Africa desperately needs skills to help our country compete internationally, grow economically and generally improve the lives of all citizens. “We need to educate our learners to enable them to be productive members of society, to take up positions where

there are jobs available and where there are critical needs.” The Western Cape Government is working hard to encourage learners to take mathematics and science, which are both gateway subjects for the economic development of the province and the country and of the personal career opportunities of learners. The WCG placed a lot of resources into these subject areas to prepare youth to be competitive citizens in the mathematical, scientific and technological world. Zille and Schäfer said the programme was an outstanding example of how partnerships between NGO’s and government can enable us to make things “Better Together” for the benefit of our learners and our country.

update is the official newspaper of the Western Cape Education Department. wcednews@pgwc.gov.za Tel: 021 467 2707 DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATION

Paddy Attwell EDITOR

Millicent Merton CONTRIBUTORS

Lance Abrahams Peter Beets Wayne Blauw Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport Chantal Fortuin (ACSA) Fazeela Haffejee Susan Hanekom Redewan Larney Marina Louw Andile Siyengo Jessica Shelver Sharon Swanepoel (SSGHS) Ismail Teladia Sonet van Rensburg John Volmink Peter Waker DESIGN

WCG Corporate Communication


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AWARDS

Western Cape learners top in English Olympiad Hannah Fagan, a Grade 12 learner at Camps Bay High, outclassed 8 000 learners from around the continent to claim first place in the 2015 De Be Beers English Olympiad.

The winners of this year’s provincial speech competition are, from left: Sandrine Mpazayabo of The Settlers High (first runner up - topic: The pursuit of happiness), Frances Van Rooyen of Vredendal High (winner – topic: Intelligence is not enough) and Azemahle Dyabeni (second runner up – topic: Ignorance is bliss). Fazeela Haffejee, Senior Curriculum Planner for English, said the quality of the speeches has improved tremendously over the years this competition has been in existence. “Speeches were well researched and the delivery was done with confidence. The second session “in conversation with our youth” was also very well presented. Congratulations to all our winners and participants. Thank you to all the district advisers, teachers and parents who assisted in preparing learners for this competition.”

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amsin Meterlerkamp of Rustenburg High School for Girls was third, Josie Burness of Fairmont High placed fourth while Manu Huyssen (Somerset College), Aimee Fuller (Bridge House) and Angus Thring (Bishops Diocesan) came in 6th, 11th and 15th place.

“It is really great that we had so many learners in the top 20 this year. We are extremely proud of them and look forward to having more of our schools participate in this worthwhile competition,” said Fazeela Haffejee, Senior Curriculum Planner for English. The English Olympiad is an annual competition that drew more than 8 000 Home Language and First Additional Language (FAL) entries from 400 schools throughout South Africa and from Namibia, Botswana and Mozambique. This prestigious competition was established in 1976. In March this year, entrants for the Olympiad from Grades 10 to 12 wrote the three-hour examination. The theme was “Stories and Language of Mzansi”. The anthology, entitled Revela-

tions and Transformations and compiled by SACEE, included 11 South African short stories by Gcina Mhlophe, Ahmed Essop, Michael Weeder, Herman Charles Bosman, Marita van der Vyver, Siphiwo Mahala, Diane Awerbuck, Zulfah Otto-Sallies, and Kaizer Nyatsumba and a Khoisan Oral Traditional story “The Girl who made Stars”, alongside Marguerite Poland’s “Wood-ash Stars”. Dr Diana Ayliff, Academic Coordinator, commented that the aim of the De Beers English Olympiad examination was to stretch candidates’ minds by introducing them to texts that they would not usually read at school. “The answers of the top candidates were insightful and showed flashes of vision and awareness that made them outstanding.” Entries for 2016 opened on 31 July 2015.

High school quiz whizzes

South Peninsula High School learners celebrate their victory in the Cape Argus Food Lovers Market High Schools Quiz. Photo credit:Tracey Adams, Cape Argus

South Peninsula High School secured their fourth win in the Western Cape’s biggest general knowledge quiz for high school learners. The Cape Argus Food Lovers Market High Schools Quiz is popular with many schools, some sending up to five teams to compete. This year 147 teams entered. Mondale High School came in second and Maitland High was third. Teams study the newspapers closely for at least a month; those getting to the knock-out rounds even longer. It is a good exercise for learners, many of whom seldom read the newspaper, to catch up with details of both local and international news as well as sport and entertainment, and have fun doing so! In short, they have to get to know the Cape Argus news backwards.

Each week, four teams compete against each other being quizzed on a week’s worth of news. It’s first finger on the buzzer, making for nail-biting contests and a tense and exciting atmosphere. Correct answers score a team five points, while an incorrect answer results in a minus three. No answer equals a zero score. After four weeks of competition the 64 teams with the highest scores qualify for the knockout rounds. Sans Souci Girls’ High entered just one team in this, their first year of participation in this competition. Sans Souci progressed through the two knock-out rounds and finished in 13th position.ion. position.


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Western Cape dominates Computer Olympiad Four of the six medal winners at the national finals of the Computer Applications Olympiad were from the Western Cape. Fayaz Kimmie from Islamia College and Matthew Symon from Herzlia both won silver, while Marc Domancie from Edgemead High and Roché Visser from President High both won bronze.

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he winners were recognised at an awards function attended by amongst others, Western Cape Education Minister Debbie Schäfer, Mokgadi Madiga from the Department of Science & Technology and Western Cape Education Head Penny Vinjevold. The Applications Olympiad challenges participants to use common computer applications such as word processors, spread-

sheets and databases to solve a set of problems. Of the 13 193 who entered the Olympiad, only 15 made it to the finals at Bergvliet High in Cape Town. Jade Caldicott of Curro Mossel Bay was the only female participant. Olympiad manager Peter Waker explained: “In the past the girls made up nearly half of all finalists, won many medals and in 2011 even won the competition outright; 2015 is just an unusual year.”

Entire SA team wins medals

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ll four members of the South African Team that took part in the 27th International Olympiad in Informatics in Kazakhstan returned with medals. The team that took part in the Olympiad consisted of Yaseen Mowzer from Fairbairn College, Thomas Orton from Bishops, Robin Visser from St George’s Grammar School and Ulrik de Muelenaere from Waterkloof High, Pretoria. All four won bronze medals. The Manager of the Olympiad, Peter Waker, was delighted with the medals. “In all 23 years of participation this is the fourth time we get medals for all four participants. The previous occasions

were 2010, 2000 and 1999.” South Africa was the top performer from Africa and ended 32nd out of 83 participating countries, just behind Germany and Hungary and just ahead of Sweden, Israel and Brazil. The process of selecting the team that will represent South Africa at the 28th International Olympiad in Informatics in Russia in 2016 started on Friday, 14 August when learners from all over South Africa took part in the first round of the Standard Bank/ IITPSA Programming Olympiad at their schools. “This year the contest is online and we expect a record number of entries,” explained Waker. “Teachers appreciate the fact that there is no marking and that detailed results will be sent to the school.”

Western Cape wins Minquiz 2015

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estern Cape Grade 12 learners were crowned Minquiz™ winners at the maths and science competition held at Mintek in Randburg. This marks the second victory in three years for the province after having won the competition in 2013 as well. They were awarded first position with 190 points. Kwazulu-Natal came second with 155 points, followed by

Gauteng (125 points) Southern Free State (124 points) and North West (90 points). The national winning team comprised of Jethro Fredericks (Cape Academy for Maths, Science and Technology), Riccardo Ladu (Brackenfell High School), Tae Jun (Rondebosch Boys’ High School) and Jeremy John Henry Wilkinson (Bishops). “Winning the competition is a big deal, we came with the

intention of winning, the fact that we have thrived has done our province well. We take pride in ourselves in maintaining this reputation,” said Fredericks. “We learned more about engineering, entrepreneurship through the exhibitions and presentations held. I am well developed for the future career choices when I leave school,” he added. Addressing learners at the competition, Mintek’s President

and CEO, Abiel Mngomezulu said “Minquiz paves the road for learners to be the best future scientist and engineers”. Delivering a keynote address , Don Haripersad, Director: FET/ ABET Curriculum Development and Support at Gauteng Department of education said that Mintek provides South Africa learners with opportunity to nurture and expose talent in Mathematics and Science.

“WINNING THE COMPETITION IS A BIG DEAL, WE CAME WITH THE INTENTION OF WINNING, THE FACT THAT WE HAVE THRIVED HAS DONE OUR PROVINCE WELL.”


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SEPTEMBER 2015

Western Cape launches new five year Mathematics and Language Strategy The Western Cape Education Department (WCED) has developed new strategies to enhance the quality of Mathematics and Language teaching and learning in all schools and improve results.

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hese strategies focus on four key success factors, namely, people development, productive pedagogies, resources, and ongoing evaluation. They will guide the WCED over the next five years as the department seeks to ensure quality teaching and quality learning.

“While we apply these strategies to support Mathematics and Language teaching and learning, we believe that we can use the same approach to improve education as a whole in the province. We will use this approach as we work on strategies with our schools to maximise teaching and learning opportunities for our learners,” said Dr Peter Beets, Chief Director: Curriculum

Development and Teacher Development. He added that a considerable body of research, which speaks to the realities of schooling provision in the Western Cape, has informed the strategies. There was general consensus that high-quality learning can be facilitated through “appropriate” teaching approaches. The strategies build on insights

from research on productive pedagogies, which highlight the kinds of teaching practices and organisational processes teachers use, and indicate that these make a difference to the academic and social learning of all learners. Research has also helped to identify attributes that have a marked and meaningful effect on learners’ learning - not just

a positive effect. This research has helped us to understand which teaching practices have made a significant difference, while also indicating who is mainly responsible for these practices. Beets said detail will be developed as the strategies unfold in the District Improvement Plans and the School Improvement Plans of the next five years.


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SEPTEMBER 2015

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Mathematical Literacy: Its Role and Purpose in the School Curriculum The choice between Mathematics and Mathematical Literacy should be based on purpose, career choice and guidance, according to Professor John Volmink. He writes that the two subjects serve different purposes and Mathematical Literacy should not be regarded as a form of watered-down Mathematics.

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he call for “mathematics for all” should be seen as reasonable and appropriate because we have to accept that everyone can learn mathematics and deserves the opportunity to do so. However a look at the history of mathematics in society will show that mathematics was seldom an activity that had enjoyed broad participation. By implication it shows only how mathematics had been used to define the elite by giving a great deal of power and privilege to very few people. In other words mathematics became the gatekeeper that decided who will go ahead and who will stay behind. But while all learners need mathematics, not all need the same kind of mathematics. What content is used must be inextricably tied to purpose. Mathematics for all must mean the same quality of mathematical experience for all. In order that we take the national policy of “mathematics for all” from strategic intent to operational reality required that we broaden what we traditionally regarded as mathematics. This traditional view is captured by

LANGUAGE Language is vital for communicating with others and is fundamental to learning in all subjects. In studying languages, learners develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing that they will need to participate successfully in society and employment. Through language, learners develop the skills to express themselves clearly and logically and to communicate with others confidently and effectively. The results of Western Cape learners in South African and international language tests suggest that the majority of learners in Western Cape schools are not reading and writing at appropriate levels. The Annual National Assessments (ANA) language tests, the WCED systemic tests, the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLs), the Southern and Eastern Africa Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality (SACMEQ) results and the Grade 12 National Senior Certificate (NSC) results all suggest under-performance in languages. This can be attributed to the fact that in many schools the home languages (HL) of learners may number anything

the NCS for Mathematics (Grades 10-12): “Mathematics is a discipline in its own right and pursues the establishment of knowledge without necessarily requiring applications in real life. Competence in mathematical process skills such as investigating, generalizing and proving is more important than the acquisition of content knowledge for its own sake.” Mathematics, seen in this way, is clearly important as a foundation for those with an interest to pursue work and further study in fields that require mathematics such as science, engineering and finance. Mathematics Literacy, on the other hand, has been introduced as part of the field of mathematics at the FET level for a very different purpose to that of Mathematics. It is about helping people to participate more fully in the choices that affect their lives and to take charge of their own experiences as self-managing individuals and critical citizens in a democracy. So, through Mathematical Literacy individuals will, for example, be able to

engage more meaningfully in discussions with employers over what constitutes fair wages and conditions of service, or even participate in national debates on issues such as health, crime etc. Mathematical Literacy may also help individuals to pursue academic fields where quantitative arguments and literacy are used and are required. The major challenge in moving towards a quality mathematical experience for all is to ensure that all learners are able to make progress in the field of mathematics without being over challenged or under challenged. At this point it is perhaps important to remind ourselves that if Mathematical Literacy will rise up to become the vital subject it was intended to be – crucial for nation-building and the strengthening of democracy - we have to prevent it from degenerating into a dead-end, low-level subject that differs from Mathematics in both level and status. Mathematics Literacy was never intended to be a form of watered-down Mathematics in the same way that SG Mathematics differed

from HG Mathematics. To this end it is of concern that Mathematical Lliteracy is seen by some as being of lesser cognitive demand than externally assessed subjects in the NSC examinations. This concern is understandable given its relative ranking in the examinations. The consequence of this perception has contributed to a migration from Mathematics to Mathematical Literacy as can be seen from the decline in enrollment in Mathematics from 301 987 who wrote in 2008 to 225 522 in 2014 while the number who wrote Mathematical Literacy increased from 268 022 to 312 103 during the same period. However this should not be a cause for alarm. Although the CAPS version of Mathematical Literacy did not introduce significant changes in the curriculum content or in the format and structure of the examination, there has been a strong shift towards exploring and understanding diverse authentic contexts through the use of mathematical concepts. This has significantly increased the cognitive demand of the Mathematical Literacy examination and has

undoubtedly had a downward effect on the performance of the candidates in the examination. It is my view that this balance in the demand of the two forms of mathematical experiences would help learners in future, to make choices not on the basis of perceived level of difficulty between these two subjects but rather based on purpose and career choice and guidance.

between one and eleven. Consequently a significant number of learners are schooled in a language that is not their home language. Furthermore, the rapid parlance of African languages, including Afrikaans, makes written communication, through textbooks, curriculum documents and ANA test papers, challenging. Over the last 20 years or more,

the Western Cape Education Department has launched a number of initiatives aimed at improving Language teaching and learner performance throughout the provincial schooling system. These took place amidst significant changes and revisions in the curriculum which resulted in new requirements in how teachers teach and assess as well as how schools function.

While there were gains in Language over this period, the learner performance in systemic and exit level assessment in the province is a major concern. The intention of the Language Strategy is therefore on the one hand to build on current educational support initiatives to strengthen Language teaching and learning, and on the other, to fuse these into a balanced approach which places equal emphasis on what happens inside language classrooms and is informed by what research indicates produces better educational outcomes for all learners.

aims to achieve the following: • Enhance the quality of Mathematics teaching in all schools • Improve mathematical learning for all learners • Improve the quality of passes in the subject • Increase the number of learners taking and passing Mathematics in Grades 10 to 12. The Western Cape Education Department has introduced a range of initiatives over the past 20 years to improve Mathematics education. These initiatives are work in progress and subject to ongoing review and revision. While we can point to some gains, systemic tests and our National Senior Certificate results show that we still have a long way to go before we can be satisfied with our results. We will continue to build on success, while learning from experience, the latest research and from international best practice. This strategy will guide us over the next five years as we seek to ensure quality teaching and quality learning.

MATHEMATICS

Dimensions and elements of the WCED Mathematics and Language Strategies (2015-2019)

Mathematics is a compulsory subject in South African schools up to Grade 9. All learners in the Grades 10 to 12 have to choose between Mathematics and Mathematical Literacy. Before 2006, many learners in these grades opted out of taking any form of Mathematics. Various international assessments have provided evidence of poor learner performance in Mathematics in South Africa. Against this background, the provincial mathematics strategy

Examples of the practical use of Mathematical Literacy: • • • •

draw up a budget understand bank costs calculate income tax interpret tables and graphs and compare data (eg. crime rate, population growth, exam results. etc.) • interpret building or town plans

• Prof. John Volmink is the chairperson of the Umalusi Council and he was a member of the ministerial task team on Mathematical Literacy.


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SEPTEMBER 2015

TRAINING

Teachers go back to class during school holidays Nearly 2 000 Western Cape teachers attended various training courses at the Cape Teaching and Leadership Institute (CTLI) during the winter school holidays.

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estern Cape Education Minister Debbie Schäfer visited the CTLI in Kuilsriver in the second week of the holidays where over 330 educators received additional training on how to teach maths effectively and to share best practice. The two-day conference entitled ‘Maths Solutions Conference’ involved a series of workshops and seminars by 22 presenters for educators from Grade R to Grade 9. The aim of the conference was to share ideas and best practice on how to improve the mathematics skills of learners, focusing on the different approaches adopted by educators when teaching math-

ematics in their schools. The WCED invests heavily in teacher development and training with a focus on ICT, inclusive education training, and improvement in Language and Mathematics teaching strategies. Many of these programmes took place during the school holiday period so as to not disrupt teaching and learning during the school term. The majority of these programmes took place at the CTLI which is an in-service Teacher Training Unit of the Western Cape Education Department (WCED). This winter holiday, a number of courses were on offer at the CTLI which included Mathematics and Language courses, a “Women in and into Leadership and Management Positions Leadership” course, as

well as a two day conference on Foundation Phase Curriculum Differentiation. The WCED also has a number of training initiatives on offer to support and assist existing and aspirant principals and management teams. Courses on offer through the CTLI included School Management and Team Training, Roles and Responsibilities Courses for Principals, Deputy Principals and HOD’s. The CTLI started the school holidays with an estimated 400 teachers registering for the various courses. The hostels were fully booked and this trend continued throughout the holidays. Schäfer said it was really promising to see that over 600 teachers registered for the Grade 8 and 9 Mathematics course during the last week of the holiday. “Attendance of most holiday courses was voluntary and this overwhelming participation of more than 1900 teachers during the school holiday period confirmed the commitment and dedication of the majority of the teachers in this province. “It is encouraging to see so many dedicated educators wanting to improve their skills in Maths, which is one of our main priority areas for improvement.”

Life Orientation Teachers complete Applied Teacher Counselling Course

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he first group of Life Orientation teachers completed the Applied Teacher Counselling Course through the South African College of Applied Psychology (SACAP). They were presented with their certificates at the SACAP campus in Claremont on Thursday 7th May. This programme was put together as a partnership between SACAP and the Metro South Education District (MSED) initiated by the Subject Advisor for Life Orientation, Ismail Teladia. This forms part of the education department’s focus on teacher development. Teladia saw the need for this course because of the tremendous social issues affecting learners across the province. The Life Orientation teachers become the first point of call to deal with learners and their social problems: from substance abuse, physical abuse, gangsterism, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, bullying, academic stress, amongst a host of other issues. Teachers had to apply to be part of the first group to do the course. Fourteen were identified and thirteen completed the course which was run over three consecu-

tive Saturdays. The course focussed on developing teachers to identify learners with issues. This would be both from a physical perception as well as verbal communication. Secondly, it prepared the teachers deal with the learner in the most appropriate way which could entail, dealing with the issue immediately; directing the learner to another authority at school or finding external assistance via the education department structures. Thirdly, the course looked at teachers looking after themselves so that they can be better prepared to deal with learners, colleagues and parents. The response of the teachers to the course was that it was very informative. Most felt more confident in going to school and being able to deal with issues when they arose. Some had already implemented skills learnt during the training. Teladia said the plan was to train more teachers during the course of this year and future years and to do other training courses with teachers so that they can improve on their delivery in the classroom.

Zurina Royepen (GM SACAP); Roger De Wet (Heathfield PS); Laura Fisher (lecturer SACAP); Lisa Smith (Zwaanswyk HS); Berenice Scholtz (Grassy Park HS); Leon Daniels (Ocean View HS); Bonnie (administrator SACAP); Alieyah Yagyah (Glendale HS); Shalmonah Manasse (Heathfield HS); Freda Dreyer (Plumstead HS); Thabo Mavuso & Mncedisi Mahanjana (both Phakama HS); Tracey Barnes (Norman Henshilwood HS); Ashley (Head Academics – SACAP); Faldela Dollie (Darul Arqam HS); Fatima Molte (Fairmount HS – obscured); Lameez Fortune (Grassy Park HS) and Ismail Teladia (MSED)

ONLINE DATABASE FOR CAPTURING NON-PROFIT ORGANISATION (NPO) INFORMATION The Western Cape Education Department (WCED) and Bridge, a non-profit organisation, have developed an online database for mapping the work of non-profit organisations (NPOs) in Western Cape schools. The database is available at http://educollaborate. westerncape.gov.za/ The tool makes it possible for the WCED and civil society to work together to use their resources as effectively and efficiently as possible where they are needed the most.

The system maps the participation of NPOs in schools across the province and the kinds of work they are engaged in using a geographic information system (GIS). The WCED will benefit by obtaining a better understanding of which organisations are working where and what issues they are addressing. NPOs will be able to use the database to find out where they could best provide their services and what kinds of services are most needed.

Bridge is managing the database on behalf of the partnership. This will include encouraging NPOs to capture their information and verify data. Districts and schools are requested to inform those NPOs that approach them to capture their information on the database. The database enables districts and schools to find out more about any NPO working at schools in the province.


update EDUCATION

WCED@work

9

SEPTEMBER 2015

2016 Planning Calendar for Sc

WCED receives a clean audit The Auditor General presented the Western Cape Education Department with a clean audit for the 2014/2015 financial year.

This schedule of date programmes, meet s for training ings, tests, examinations and important administrative deadlines is prov ided to aid schools’ plann ing for 2016.

Training workshops or meetings The WCED will offer meet specific need optional courses to s, for example, ICT proficiency, spec ial needs education and labour relati ons. advertise the traini District offices will ng, which will take place after 15:00 on school days . The Cape Teach ing and Leadershi p Institute (CTLI) will be offering a number of training prog rammes, seminars and conference s in 2016. Details of these 2-week curric ulum (content and methodology) courses for Foun dation Phase, Intermedi ate Phase and Senio Phase teachers and 2-week cours r es on roles and respo nsibilities of head of department, s deputy principals and principals, will be sent to all scho ols in September 2015 . This programm e will also be availa ble on the WCED webs ite at http://wced. westerncape .gov.za or www.wcedctli .co.za

Principals’ mee tings in circuits:

There will be one circu principals per term it meeting for , starting at 13:00 may be followed . This by a meeting of the district principals ’ forum.

hools

2016 School Term

First Second Third Fourth

Begins

Terms Ends

11 January (teac hers) 13 January (lear ners) 5 April

No. of No. of weeks school days

18 March

10

24 June

18 July

30 Septembe

10 October

7 December (learners) 9 December (teachers)

Safe School s Programmes Holiday

50 (teachers) 48 (learners)

12

55

11

53

9

45 (teachers) 43 (learners)

Protection of teaching tim e

Programmes for learners are offer ed by the Safe Scho ols Sub-directorat e during the scho ol holidays.

Safe School s Programme Holiday dates:

r

Schools must prote ct teaching time support learning and as follows: 1.

• 27 June 2016 – 8 July 2016 • 2 – 7 October 2016

Representa tive Council of Learners (RC Ls) calenda r The induc

tion of new RCLs is scheduled for February – Marc h 2016. All public scho ols with Grade 8 and higher must elect Teacher Liaiso n Officers (TLOs) during September 2016. Election of RCLs will take place in the last scho ol term of 2016

The dates for the 2016 Provincial Principals’ Foru m meetings are as follows: • 4 March 2016 • 20 May 2016 • 19 August 2016 • 18 November 2016

All learners must be in school and learning for the full 199 days (203 days for teachers), in accordance with the National Learner Attendance Polic y. 2. Teaching begin s on the first day of each Te term. sts an 3. On the last day d examin of the school termatio ns learn Annu ers al must at Natiobe scho ol for nal Asse at least (ANAthree ssm s) hours. Teach ers en arets expe cted The AN to be at school Senior As for for a Grades Certific minim pla ce inum 1 to 9 wil 5 hours. ate Exam Sepof • 3 May tem l tak be be confirm inations e r 2016 2016 4. ed Minim (to be con to 22 June 20 ), and sch (final date to tes teach ts intum 16 hour oo s firmed) ern . ing e l magrad shou More inf ls wilper pro ld beally rk vided obse the (thisatiexclu by the Derved orm Moderat Ed assem partment on wildes ucatioblies l be ion and Natio n (DBE) Scho Basic • Perfo ol AN in 2016. nal of Nutri As wil rmance tion Re l beProg ramm po sent to Asses e mealrtss).on the of Octob moderat paren er 2016. ed durin sment Tasks wil ts by the 5. Education second g the firs l be end al excursions must term t and Wbe • Grade linke CED d to and enhance Syste 12 oral mo mic Tests the (Gcurric August deration radesulum . Appl 3, 6 an 2016 ications for begins d 9) Theexcu • Grade 12 rsions should be WCED will con practical submitted for to du Au Grathe exa ct gu de 3,distri mination st 2016 6 andct9.direcSys tortem aticleast place Tests4 begins • Provin The in the week s in moadva cial rni nce oftests wil during l takded inten e Septem SBA moderation the perio ng on onethe date. sch ber 2016 : Schedule s to schoo with precise dat ls well in es advance. will be sent

ool day

T

he clean audit means the WCED’s 2014/2015 financial statements were free from material misstatements and there were no material findings on reporting on performance objectives or non-compliance with legislation. The achievement was recognised with a certificate and a trophy at an award ceremony at the offices of the Auditor General on Thursday, 30 July. Ivan Meyer, Western Cape Minister of Finance, announced that all 13 provincial departments received unqualified audit results, with 12 of the 13 receiving clean audits. “I want to in particular join the Auditor General of South Africa in congratulating the Western Cape Department of Education

for achieving a clean audit and becoming the first department of education in South Africa to do so.” “The clean audit outcome is the reflection of the leadership provided and the dedication of senior management and staff. “Over the years the WCED ensured adequate implementation of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) and continuous improvement of internal and financial control. There have been consistent improvements on the WCED’s audit outcomes over the years‚” said Head of Education, Penny Vinjevold. “We should all just take a message from it about service to our schools and just keep doing our best with the funds over which we are custodians,” added Anne

“THE CLEAN AUDIT OUTCOME IS THE REFLECTION OF THE LEADERSHIP PROVIDED AND THE DEDICATION OF SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND STAFF.”

Online su Term Pe bmission of rform

ance In 2016 schools wil to com plete the l be requested ir term per ind informati ividual learner. on Release Internal be requir Schools of the 20 Ex ed am to wil results: inations submit 15 NSC Perform 6 examinat the Term l anc (to be con January 2016 ion Grades by the fol e for learners 4–6 firmed) on CEMIS lowing • NSC Sch da tes: ools tha Award 12 Januar s: start the t offer Grade Ter m 1: Ter s 4 to 6 y 2016 ir examin m Perfo (to may no Grand Central 8 June for cap rmance t 2016 and ations before Towers, Low be confirmed) turing: opens 21 Novem • Suer 14 March Parliament Stre Term Pe pplem ber 2016. 2016 entary et, Cape Tow Gr rfo Priva teruaBag NS4, 5 Feb n ades 7 C exami Western Cap capturing rmance sign-o –9 ry to X911 nat e Tow e Education ff for : 8 April ions: n 8000Sch 24 MarchCap Department 2016 ools tha WCED Clien (to be confirm http 2016ced.scho ://w • http://wced. t t ed off ol.zastart the er • Serv school.za • Traininices Call )Centre: Term 2: ir examin Grades 7 to 9 g of inv WCED Clien 086 Ter 1 92 m 33 ma igilators Perform 226 June 20 t Serv ations be y not 29 Au for cap ices gust Call : ance op for 16 and turing: to 30 Cent re: 0861 92 33 ens 14 Novem e 20 June Septem • NSC Term Pe 22 ber 2016 ber 2016. practi 2016 rfo Grades 19 and 20 cal examination capturing rmance sign-o 10 – 12 ff for : 22 Jul Schools (to be con October 2016 s: y 2016 which off firmed) (where er Grade • 2016 Ter m ap s 10, 11 and 3: Term NSC examin plicable) may Perform 12 for cap 26 Octob examinations: ati no ance op turing: er 14 Novem ons before 30 t start their ens 26 Septe (to be con to 27 Novem Term Pe May 20 ber 2016. mber 20 ber 2016 16 and rfo firmed) 16 • Marki capturing rmance sign-o ng of ff All learne : 24 Oc tober 20 for rs are req examinat the 2016 NSC attend 16 uir ions: 5 ed by sch Decembe Term 4: (to be con or examin ool throughou law to Ter r 2016 firmed) m Pe t any tes rforman for cap t exceptio ation programm ce open turing: n of Gra 8 e, with s Decem Term Pe de the be entitle ber 2016 rfo d to 5 day 12 learners, wh capturing rmance sign-o start of o will s of stu ff for : 16 Decem the final examin dy before the ber 2016 School ations. d 11 to 25

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tober 20 Nationa 16. l Examina Senior Certific ate (NSC tions ) •

Schlebusch, Director: Business, Strategy & Stakeholder Management. Vinjevold said in 2013, the WCED established a new Internal Control Directorate, which, until April 2015, reported directly to the Head of Department. At its inception, the Internal Control Directorate was tasked with improving the application of internal controls which included payments processed by the department accompanied by the diligent execution of roles and responsibilities of staff members which contributed significantly to achieving a clean audit. The challenge now becomes to maintain the status in financial years ahead as internal controls are each and every individual’s responsibility and should be embedded in our culture. Provincial Education Minister Debbie Schäfer congratulated Vinjevold and Leon Ely, Chief Financial Officer, as well as their respective officials and teams and thanked them for their hard work.

Grade 12 examina September tri al tions

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PLANNING CALENDAR FOR SCHOOLS 2016 The Western Cape Education Department (WCED) has provided schools with a schedule of dates for training programmes, meetings, tests, examinations and important administrative deadlines to assist with schools’ planning for 2016. Provincial Education Minister Debbie Schäfer said planning for the school year requires a great deal of work and involves various structures within the department, including head office, the districts, principals, educators and school management teams. It also requires constant communication between the Department and schools about

important dates and deadlines. Schools received the planning calendar at the end of August to allow the institutions to plan effectively so that teaching and learning can take place from the first day of the academic year. Redewan Larney, Chief Education Specialist: Districts, said schools should take note of the new admissions timeframes for 2017. “We would also like feedback and input from schools on how to improve the planning calendar for 2017. Schools should collaborate with SGB associations and the Provincial Principals’ Forums.”

Timeframes: 2017 school admissions

T

he Western Cape Education Department has asked schools to help the department meet the demand for spaces in schools by following set timeframes for applications for admissions. Lance Abrahams, Senior Education Specialist in the Chief Directorate: Districts, said this alignment was important as it was evident that schools have varying periods for admission which stretched from February until January the following year. “This impacted negatively on planning for the provision of classrooms, staff establishments, procurement of

LTSM and all other systemic process required to be in place to ensure that schools were ready to start each year. “The different admission dates of schools also mean that parents wait for the outcome of applications which they receive at different times throughout the year and often block spaces in the process.” Abrahams said the WCED has raised the introduction of the alignment of administration dates for admission to public ordinary schools in the Western Cape with stakeholders such as the School Governing Body Association and the South African Principal’s Association at formal meetings

where they have endorsed the idea in principle. Applications for admissions for 2017 at all public ordinary schools were set to open on 1 February 2016 and close on 11 March 2016. Parents must be informed of the outcome by the end of the second term. Schools must capture their admission information for 2016 on the WCEDs School Admissions Management Information (SAMI). Abrahams emphasised the importance of capturing all applications on SAMI saying that in the case of an admissions appeal, dispute or a legal challenge, schools may be required to provide the details

of the application such as when and how the application was processed. The details will then be taken from the SAMI system as the official WCED admissions information database. The SAMI function generates a list of unplaced learners and indicates which schools still have available spaces as the applications are processed. It is therefore vital that schools capture and process the applications by the due dates to ensure that officials have access to accurate information which will be used to inform parents of available spaces. In cases where a learner has not secured a space at a school,

the relevant district officials charged with admission administration will be required to assist in resolving the placement of learners by liaising with schools in their respective districts and circuits.

“APPLICATIONS FOR ADMISSIONS FOR 2017 WERE SET TO OPEN ON 1 FEBRUARY 2016 AND CLOSE ON 11 MARCH 2016”


update EDUCATION

10

insight & opinion

SEPTEMBER 2015

Rural schools demonstrate best practice The Quality Assurance Directorate has identified schools that create an environment which contributes to academic success and emotional growth. Whole School Evaluation teams visited 33 schools in the rural districts in May and June 2015. A report, based on these visits, acknowledges and shares the excellent practices found while also shedding light on the difficulties and harsh realities of small schools in rural and remote areas. Karen Bydell, Director: Quality Assurance, said despite crime, neglect, violence and marginalisation as a result of geographical isolation, the evaluation teams found pockets of excellence and schools which are beacons of hope for learners to break free from the cycle of poverty.

Kommandantsdrift Primary

“T

he schools have been selected for noteworthy practices and not solely on overall WSE ratings. It is hoped that all schools will build on these examples of best practice and are given support to address the areas for development.” STRUCTURED CURRICULUM DELIVERY AND INTERVENTIONS Positive attitudes and belief in learners’ potential permeate throughout schools. L  utzville Primary has high expectations of learners and

Kleinrivier VGK Laerskool

Booysendal Primary

Lutzville Primary

uses incentives to encourage creative writing skills and higher achievement. There is effective curriculum delivery, interventions and monitoring. All activities are well planned and structured. The Khanya computer laboratory is fully functional. Updated software is purchased and installed by the school on a regular basis. There is accountability and effective use of ICT (computers and iPads) at all levels.  The school received the iPads from the Department of Rural Development.  An analysis of learner achieve-

ment indicates improvement in the Languages results in Grades 3 and 6. AFFIRMATION OF LEARNERS Besides focusing on the holistic development of learners, teachers are compassionate. This was obvious by the respectful manner in which they interacted with learners, the quality of curriculum delivery and the creation of warm and inviting physical environments. The staff of Lutzville Primary affirms learners by the following principle: ‘We believe it is not where you come from, but where you are going that is important. We do not hide under the cover of previously disadvantaged. If we want something, we work for it. To be poor does not mean we are stupid. Children are not promoted on age or years in a phase … they are taught different ways to pass on merit. Every child can learn … even the foetal alcohol syndrome children… we must find the correct method to teach them’. The acceptance and recognition of learners has resulted in enhanced self-esteem, improved learner achievement and enjoyment in classrooms.


update EDUCATION

insight & opinion

SEPTEMBER 2015

De Villiers Graaff Primary

The interventions at Kleinrivier Primary are successful because the needs of learners are identified and addressed, and performance is monitored to determine if the desired impact is being achieved.  An analysis of learner achievement indicates improvement in the Mathematics results in Grades 3 and 6.  The principal at Booysendal Primary affirms teachers by recording excellent and interesting lessons as part of teachers’ in-service training and induction for new teachers.  The staff development programme is based on the developmental needs recorded in their personal growth plans (PGPs). Some activities are facilitated by the school management team (SMT), while the others by district officials.  An analysis of learner achievement indicates improvement in the Languages and Mathematics results in Grade 3. At Kommandantsdrift Primary, teachers conduct accurate diagnostic analyses and implement effective interventions to address the needs of learners. Reading is promoted and encouraged. There is a wellequipped and utilised media centre (a computer laboratory and library).   As soon as the learners have completed tasks, they have free access to the media centre to read or research topics of interest. Astro turf was fitted to beautify the play and physical education areas to make it safe for the learners. NURTURING LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS CREATED BY TEACHERS Teachers play multiple roles to address the diverse needs of learners. The pastoral care and nurturing environments provided for learners are highly commendable. Despite the odds, teachers make every effort to develop learners holistically by addressing both academic and emotional needs. Teachers are committed, hardworking and show empathy towards learners. It was observed that the female principals and teachers at the visited schools were exceptional at fulfilling car-

ing and nurturing roles. In addition to taking their work seriously and being immersed in the lives of the learners, teachers are also interested in and concerned for them in their home environments. Home visits are conducted at Booysendal, Kommandantsdrift and Lutzville Primary Schools. At Trawal Primary, the learners are provided with a beautiful, stimulating and nurturing environment by the teachers, although the school does not have a general assistant or an administration clerk. The verandah area of the computer laboratory and multigrade 1 and 2 classes have been smartened with cushions, seats and plants where learners sit in the mornings to eat their breakfast. At Wysersdrift and Wakkerstroom-Oos Primary Schools, teacher assistants are paid by teachers or principals from their own pockets to provide interventions for learners with barriers to learning. FOSTERING STRONG COMMUNITY SPIRIT The positive ethos at De Villiers Graaff Primary and High Schools is based on the excellent collaboration and relationships amongst all stakeholders. The strong sense of community has developed from a shared sense of purpose and values, excellent communication and teamwork. The teachers are well organised, prepared for class activities and the standard of assessment tasks is good. The interventions are

11

De Villiers Graaff High

comprehensive. Lessons are interactive and the learners have the confidence and eloquence to engage with the teachers. Excellent learner achievement has led to raising the bar. The schools celebrate their history and achievement which continues the prevailing culture of excellence. The learners at the high school have a head start and are successful in the National Senior Certificate Examinations due to the sound foundation set at primary school. SUPPORTIVE EXTERNAL AGENCIES As most of the schools are situated on farm or church properties, the schools are dependent on assistance and support from landlords or other organisations. The farmer at Weltevreden Primary pays for the electricity of the school. The farmer at Voor-Groenberg Primary transports the parents for parent meetings. Farmers in the area ensure that Kommandantsdrift Primary is well fenced off and the school is in a good condition. The local pastor pays the salaries of the general assistant, the assistant in the kitchen and 2 class assistants.  Fifty percent of the learners are transported in the school bus, which is sponsored by a farmer, for school events. He also oversees the maintenance and running costs of the vehicle. The school always appeals to sponsors to enhance the teaching and learning environment.

Maraisdal Primary The farmer at Maraisdal Primary levelled the play area and an NGO has supplied the school with a container for Grade R learners. The school community at Spruitdrift Primary benefits financially from collaboration with an international agricultural company. RECOMMENDATION It is recommended that principals in underperforming schools in the urban areas learn lessons from these schools. A combination of the correct attitude, hard work and thorough planning will result in improved performance.

CONCLUSION There was evidence of concerted efforts to ensure that the quality of education (Quality of teaching and learning and educator development, Curriculum provisioning and Learner achievement) is prioritised. There is effective and consistent monitoring by principals and SGBs who are always seeking new means to keep the schools well resourced. But, even though there was evidence of principals’ and teachers’ diligence and having high expectations of learners, learner performance is limited by impoverished social environments.

“A COMBINATION OF THE CORRECT ATTITUDE, HARD WORK AND THOROUGH PLANNING WILL RESULT IN IMPROVED PERFORMANCE.” Trawal Primary


update EDUCATION

12

reviews

SEPTEMBER 2015

EDULIS

USING DATA TO IMPROVE TEACHING AND LEARNING You can borrow these and similar titles from your Education District Resource Centre or EDULIS Library.

BOOKS 1

2

3

4

1

2

HOW TEACHERS CAN TURN DATA INTO ACTION. Venables, D.R. 2014

7

8

9

THE DATA-DRIVEN DISTRICT

Schachter, Ron. District Administration. Oct 2013, p76-79. The article discusses the use and importance of data-driven decision making to enhance classroom instruction and to improve school district operations.

10

http://web.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=d3f099a5-ea0f-4af7-a692-c5c66d77d866%40sessionmg r111&vid=1&hid=128 3

4

STUDY UP ON HOW TO TEACH IN A DATA-DRIVEN CLASSROOM

11

Sitler, Helen Collins. Phi Kappa Phi Forum. Spring 2009, Vol. 89 Issue 1, p28-29. The article emphasizes the significance of data-driven teaching, that teachers who conduct research to provide better understandings for their students can make significant discoveries which could bring an impact on the teaching process and learning. Furthermore, the article explores the implications if teachers could develop their own data-gathering instruments and test context-based hypotheses for learning.

12

http://web.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?sid=9847c6d9-11d1-4ed7-9e39-1b225460b729%40sessionmgr113&vid= 0&hid=123&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=ehh&AN=37008329

13

CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP: THE EXPERIENCE OF A MIDDLE SCHOOL

Larocque, Michelle. Clearing House. Mar 2007, Vol. 80 Issue 4, p157-162. This article describes how leadership, community involvement, data-driven decision making, and the celebration of diversity reversed a negative trend in the achievement of students in one middle school.

hhttp://web.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=07c8d0ea-8315-4298-b0ba-20fcfeeb9f9d%40sessionm gr112&vid=1&hid=128 5

14

The article suggests that school districts and teachers can use student data to help make decisions about school policy and instruction. It describes the advantages of a data-driven school culture and how teachers can be data savvy.

http://web.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=e38d5706-71b4-4252-932d-57559171fd43%40sessionmg r111&vid=1&hid=128

HOW DO I BORROW THESE RESOURCES? Become a member by contacting your Education District Resource Centre / EDULIS Library or you can register electronically. Membership is FREE. Electronic registration GO TO http://tinyurl.com/registration-edulis (Please read terms and conditions).

OR go to our website: http://edulis.pgwc.gov.za Click on “EDULIS” on the Curriculum website Click on Register as member (read “Terms & conditions”) Click on “Library Membership Registration Form” Complete the form and submit

IMPROVING SCHOOLS THROUGH ACTION RESEARCH: A REFLECTIVE PRACTICE APPROACH. Hendricks, C. 2013 LEADING SCHOOLS IN A DATA-RICH WORLD: HARNESSING DATA FOR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT. Earl, L.M. 2006 THE LITERACY TEACHER’S PLAYBOOK: FOUR STEPS FOR TURNING ASSESSMENT DATA INTO GOAL-DIRECTED INSTRUCTION. GRADES K-2; 3-6 Serravallo, J. 2014 PYRAMID OF BEHAVIOUR INTERVENTIONS: SEVEN KEYS TO A POSITIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT. Hierck, T. 2011 REACHING AND TEACHING STUDENTS IN POVERTY: STRATEGIES FOR ERASING THE OPPORTUNITY GAP. Gorski, P. 2013 SUSTAINABLE SCHOOL TRANSFORMATION: AN INSIDE-OUT SCHOOL LED APPROACH. Crossley, D. 2013 TRANSFORMING SCHOOLS FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS: A COMPREHENSIVE FRAMEWORK FOR SCHOOL LEADERS. Zacarian, D. 2011 TRANSFORMING TEACHING AND LEARNING THROUGH DATADRIVEN DECISION MAKING. Mandinach, E.B. 2012

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UNDERSTANDING AND INTERPRETING EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH. Martella, R.C. 2013

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USING DATA TO FOCUS INSTRUCTIONAL IMPROVEMENT. James-Ward, C. 2013

CREATING DATA-DRIVEN SCHOOLS.

Noyce, Penny; Perda, David; Traver, Rob. Educational Leadership. Feb 2000, Vol. 57 Issue 5, p52-56.

THE DATA TOOLKIT: TEN TOOLS FOR SUPPORTING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT. Hess, R.T. 2012

6

Beattie, Helen; Rich, Martha; Evans, Peter. Educational Leadership. Summer 2015, Vol. 72 Issue 9, p66-70.

http://web.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=90c2b85d-c75d-4fb1-9c26-8c308005f028%40sessionm gr112&vid=1&hid=128

DATA ANALYSIS FOR CONTINUOUS SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT. Bernhardt, V.L. 2013

EXECUTIVE SKILLS FOR BUSY SCHOOL LEADERS. Hitch, C. 2010

THE CASE FOR THE MISSING R The article talks about the importance of a shared responsibility between students and teachers and the principles of rigor, relevance, and relationships. Topics include data-driven actions, and the benefits of learning partnerships.

CURRICULUM-BASED ASSESSMENT FOR INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN: USING DATA TO INDIVIDUALIZE INSTRUCTION. Burns, M.K. 2014

5

ELECTRONIC JOURNAL ARTICLES Please contact EDULIS Library 0219579618 to arrange access to these electronic journal articles

ACCESSIBLE ASSESSMENT: HOW 9 SENSIBLE TECHNIQUES CAN POWER DATA-DRIVEN READING INSTRUCTION. Opitz, M. 2011

17

USING DATA TO IMPROVE LEARNING: A PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR BUSY TEACHERS. Shaddock, A. 2014

YOUR NEAREST RESOURCE CENTRE EDULIS Library Tel: 021 957 9618 Fax: 021 948 0748 edulis@westerncape.gov.za 1st Floor Middestad Mall Charl Malan Street BELLVILLE

Overberg Timothy Cloete MT Ndzuzo Resource Centre Tel: 028 214 7353 Fax: 028 214 7400 timothy.cloete@westerncape.gov.za 15 College Street CALEDON

Metropole North Jenny Caroto Tel: 021 938 3197 Fax: 021 938 3183 jcaroto@westerncape.gov.za Timmerman Street PAROW


update EDUCATION

arts & culture

SEPTEMBER 2015

13

SCHOOLS CHORAL EISTEDDFOD ENDS ON A HIGH NOTE Two Western Cape Schools achieved first positions in the 2015 South African Schools Choral Eisteddfod (SASCE) in Randburg from 30 June to 2 July.

Mitchell’s Plain teen records demo album

M

ichaela Adonis, a learner at Cedar High School in Mitchell’s Plain, recently recorded her first demonstration album at the Red Bull Studios in Bree Street, Cape Town. She won the chance to record by ending in first place in the “Earth Moves” talent competition in June 2015. Earth Moves is a professional music, arts and drama production starring learners from the Western Cape Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport’s (DCAS) Mass

Participation; Opportunity and Access; Development and Growth Programme (MOD). The cast members were hand-picked from MOD after-school centres across the province. The production was presented at the Artscape Theatre in June, and it doubled up as a talent competition. Michaela initially participated in gymnastics at the school’s MOD Centre. Her coach encouraged her to attend auditions for Earth Moves. She impressed the judges with her performance and pro-

Michaela with her coach and mentor, Beaulla Kleinveldt, of the MOD Programme.

ceeded to sing in the semi-final and then went on to win the final. “I experienced an overwhelming feeling of joy to be a part of this,” she said, “especially knowing that our very own Premier came out to show support to our youth.” Michaela loves the feeling of being on stage and performing in front of a large audience. “I gained confidence in my vocal ability and was able to showcase my talent.” She is grateful to be able to use her gift to inspire others to follow their dreams too.

Bloemendal Primary performing at the SASCE National Championships

Internationally famous SA born violinist visits young musicians Young musicians from the Ifidyoli Strings Development Project at Beau Soleil Music Centre recently had the opportunity to work with international violinist David Juritz.

T

he Cape Town born musician is currently working in the UK, dividing his time between solo performances, directing, playing chamber music and frequently appearing as guest leader with fine orchestras. In 2007 he formed Musequality, a charity supporting music education projects for disadvantaged children in developing countries. He remains deeply committed to encouraging young musicians in the developing world. On a visit to Cape Town recently for a series of performances, David Juritz visited the Beau Soleil Music Centre in Kenilworth to work with the Ifidyoli Ensemble. The ensemble is made up of about 40 young musicians, many from Site B in Khayelitsha, playing mostly string instruments such as violin, viola, cello and double bass. The Ifidyoli Strings Development Project has enjoyed much success since its inception in 1999 under the expert tuition of Ms Kathleen Garrity and her team at Beau Soleil. Several students have been able to take Music as a matric subject and have gone on to make careers in music. Some of the past Ifidyoli members have returned and now teach in the Development Project at Beau Soleil. For more information about the Beau Soleil Music Centre call 0217611894 or email kathleengarrity. beausoleil@gmail.com.

The Elsies River High School Choir

The Elsies River High School Choir, under the direction of Benita Koopman, was the champions in the mixed choirs category while Bloemendal Primary School won in the category for rural schools. The primary schools participated in nine different categories, including a new category for Boys Choirs. The level of the competition was very high. The Department of Basic Education organised a three day camp and team building session for learners from farm schools to

help them prepare for the national championships by building their self-confidence. Learners re exposed to various activities including, amongst others, art, drama, poetry, rap, choir sessions, painting, as well as sporting activities. Jo-Ann Herman from Bloemendal Primary said she was grateful for the opportunity to attend the camp because she had a lot of fun. “It was great to learn to sing songs in a variety of South African languages.”

Renowned violinist David Juritz with members of the Ifidyoli Strings Project and their teachers at Beau Soleil.

MOD LEARNERS WOW AUDIENCE WITH EARTH MOVES AT ARTSCAPE Youth taking part in after-school programmes showcased their talents on stage with the production of “Earth Moves” at the Artscape Theatre. The after-school programmes are offered by the Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport’s (DCAS) Mass Participation, Opportunity, Access, Development and Growth (MOD) Programme. “Earth Moves” took the form of a talent competition, with different groups of children competing to be chosen as the winning group. The semi-finals were held in April 2015 at the Baxter theatre. DCAS Minister Anroux Marais said

she was extremely proud of the MOD Programme. “My department has worked hard to ensure that children have access to better after-school activities through the MOD Centres. It is important that we give our youth the chance to showcase and hone their various talents.” As part of Youth Month celebrations, the department hosted schools and teachers to come and watch the learners perform on Friday, 26 June 2015. The following night invited guests were hosted by Minister Marais and Premier Helen Zille to watch the performance.


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14

noticeboard

SEPTEMBER 2015

CIRCULARS

A quick guide to

CIRCULARS The Western Cape Education Department issued the following circulars and circular minutes during the period June 2015 to August 2015.

0028/2015

0038/2015

Amended policy for the management of learner transport schemes at ordinary public schools

Parking for visitors and officials in the Grand Central Towers and Golden Acre Shopping Centre

http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e28_15.html

http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e38_15.html

0029/2015

Amended final timetable for the October - November 2015 National Senior Certificate examinations that replaces Circular 0007/2015 dated 2 March 2015 http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e29_15.html 0030/2015

Officials’ duties and responsibilities when using GG vehicles http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e30_15.html 0031/2015

Online ordering facility on CEMIS for schools to order Grades 1-12 CAPS textbooks http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e31_15.html

0032/2015

Use of GG and leased vehicles for official purposes http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e32_15.html 0033/2015

Final timetable and arrangements for the November 2015 Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) Level 4 examinations http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e33_15.html

0039/2015

http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e39_15.html 0040/2015

Alignment of timeframes for applications for admission to the Western Cape Education Department (WCED) schools and the management of school admission information for 2016/17 http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e40_15.html 0041/2015

Use of raffles by schools as a fundraising method http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e41_15.html 0042 /2015

Provision of 2016 teaching staff establishments to ordinary public schools http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e42_15.html 0043/2015

Second amendment to the final timetable for the October - November 2015 National Senior Certificate Examinations http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e43_15.html

Delivery of WCED-supplied DBE workbooks for 2016

0035/2015

Online ordering of stationery and cleaning materials in the 2015/16 financial year for all non-section 21 schools http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e35_15.html 0036/2015

Regulations on the Issuing of Performance Indicators Binding on Public Schools in the Province\ http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e36_15.html 0037/2015

Revised guidelines on the issuing of official WCED circulars, minutes and notices http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e37_15.html

0003/2015

Release of Grade 9 Mathematics and Language exemplars for the WCED Systemic Tests http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ EPminutes/edrs3_15.html

Compliance with the requirements of the Competition Act

0034/2015

http://wced.school.za/circulars/circulars15/ e34_15.html

RESEARCH SERVICES

EDUCATION PLANNING MINUTES INSTITUTIONAL RESOURCE SUPPORT 0003/2015

Applications for new learner transport services for 2016 (new services and additional learners) http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ EPminutes/edir3_15.html

KNOWLEDGE AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 0003/2015

Details of WCED Head and District Office Registry Heads http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ EPminutes/edkm3_15.html

CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT MANAGEMENT MINUTES ASSESSMENT MANAGEMENT 0011/2015

Administration of a Common Assessment Task (CAT) for Grade 12 Life Orientation in 2015 http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/edam11_15.html 0012/2015

November 2015 National Senior Certificate examinations: Procedures and guidelines for the conduct of the final practical examination in Design and Visual Arts http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/edam12_15.html 0013/2015

Dissemination of the 2015 Grades 7 and 8 Annual National Assessments Exemplar Tests and Memoranda http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/edam13_15.html

CAPE TEACHING AND LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE 0004/2015

Roll-out of the Continuing Professional Teacher Development Management System for post level 1 educators http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/ectli4_15.html 0005/2015

2015 National Teaching Awards http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/ectli5_15.html 0006/2015

Annual Provincial Language Solutions Conference - 06 and 07 October 2015 http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/ectli6_15.html

CURRICULUM GET 0009/2015

2015 South African Mathematics Challenge for Grades 4 to 7 http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/edcg9_15.html

0010/2015

Africa Code Week pilot event - Grade 3 to 5 learners http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/edcg10_15.html 0011/2015

NATIONAL SCIENCE WEEK INCORPORATING MATHEMATICS: 1 – 8 AUGUST 2015 http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/edcg11_15.html

CURRICULUM FET 0009/2015

Distribution of FET English First Additional Language support CD

INSTITUTION DEVELOPMENT AND CO-ORDINATION 0002/2015

Online database for capturing NonProfit Organisation (NPO) information http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ IDCminutes/eidc2_15.html

INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND GOVERNANCE PLANNING 0005/2015

School terms and public holidays for 2016 (inland and coastal provinces) http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ IDCminutes/eimgp5_15.html

http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/edcf9_15.html 0010/2015

HSRC study regarding the prevalence of HIV/AIDS among teachers, administrative and support staff in selected schools in the Western Cape Education Department http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/edcf10_15.html

EXAMINATIONS ADMINISTRATION 0004/2015

Appointment of invigilators for the November 2015 National Senior Certificate (NSC), the March 2016 NSC Supplementary and the June – July 2016 Senior Certificate (SC) examinations http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/edea4_15.html 0005/2015

Verification of 2015 learner registration information on the Centralised Education Management Information System (CEMIS) for National Senior Certificate learners: Grades 10 to 12 http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/edea5_15.html 0006/2015

Procedure for requesting printing at Reprographic Services http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/edea6_15.html 0007/2015

Compulsory training for all principals, chief invigilators, senior invigilators and district officials involved in the conduct, administration and management of THE NSC, SC and AET Level 4 examinations in 2015/16 http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CMminutes/edea7_15.html

CORPORATE SERVICES MINUTES BUSINESS STRATEGY AND STAKEHOLDER MANAGEMENT 0004/2015

School Improvement Monitoring http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CSminutes/edbs4_15.html 0005/2015

Preparation of School Improvement Plan (SIP) for 2016 http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CSminutes/edbs5_15.html

RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION 0003/2015

Conversion of the temporary appointments of public service employees to permanent appointments at ordinary public schools http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CSminutes/ersc3_15.html

STRATEGIC PEOPLE MANAGEMENT 0003/2015

Sixty-six extraordinary 2016 rural-based funza lushaka bursaries for students in the Western Cape http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CSminutes/ehrm3_15.html 0004/2015

Part-time study bursary scheme for public service employees (2016 academic year) http://wced.school.za/circulars/minutes15/ CSminutes/ehrm4_15.html


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sport

SEPTEMBER 2015

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“IT IS ENCOURAGING TO SEE SO MANY YOUNG AND ENERGETIC LEARNERS FROM ACROSS THE PENINSULA TAKING PART IN THIS OUTSTANDING PROGRAMME.” SCHÄFER ADDED THAT IMPROVING EDUCATION OUTCOMES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT WAS ONE OF THE PROVINCE’S PRIORITIES. “THE LEGENDS CUP IS AN OUTSTANDING INITIATIVE AND I AM SO GRATEFUL TO ORGANISATIONS SUCH AS THE SA RUGBY LEGENDS ASSOCIATION (SARLA) FOR ASSISTING US, INVESTING IN THE LEADERS OF TOMORROW, AND HELPING US TO IDENTIFY SPORTING TALENT IN UNDERPRIVILEGED COMMUNITIES.” The victorious Athlone Lions team with Stefan Terblanche on the back left.

Highlanders and Lions triumph in Legends Cup final Tries by Thoubaan Gabriels and Thaakier Kamaar ensured a hard fought-win for the Athlone Lions against the Elsies River Cobras in the U15 final of the 2015 Legends Cup.

T

he finals at the UCT rugby fields on Saturday, 11 July, were the culmination to exciting weeks of school boy rugby at its best. The tournament consisted of 12 zonal teams from the Southern Suburbs, Mitchell’s Plain, Delft, Elsies River, Athlone, Khayelitsha, Atlantis, Langa, Manenberg. The round-robin matches started on Thursday 25 June at the Rocklands RFC fields in Mitchell’s Plain. The matches for the northern section were played at Florida Park. Western Cape Education Minister Debbie Schäfer attended the semi-finals at the UCT fields, to the excitement of the boys. She

was very happy with the programme and pleased to see the talent on display. The finals turned out to be an exciting morning of rugby. The first final (U15) between the Athlone Lions and the Elsies River Cobras was very tight with both sets of players giving it everything they had. The added incentive was that the match was also part of the WP Iqhawe team trials. The tactics of the Cobras were surprising in that they chose to run the ball at every opportunity even within their own 25 meter area on a number of occasions. The Athlone Lions won the match 10 – 3 which included

tries by Thoubaan Gabriels and Thaakier Kamaar. Gabriels was also deservedly given the Man of the Match award. The WP Iqhawe (U15) will be announced shortly and there were a number of candidates on display in this final. The U19 final was fiercely contested between the Atlantis Highlanders and the Elsies River Cobras. This was the second consecutive year that the team from Atlantis was in the final. They appeared better prepared as they lost last year’s final. They beat the Cobras by 25 – 10. The last ten minutes were played under wet conditions. Former Springbok wing and

SARLA CEO, Stefan Terblanche, handed over the trophies to the winning teams. SARLA’s VUKA programme, which was started by Dale Santon, former SA Rugby hooker and Ismail Teladia, Subject Advisor in the Metro South Education District, is in its seventh year. The programme, together with WPRFU, has placed coaches in the majority of the VUKA rugby schools. SARLA has further identified ex-Springboks and Bafana Bafana players who are unemployed, who are then trained by the Exercise Training Academy and work in 84 disadvantaged schools and other schools assisting with physical education.

Man of the Match: Thoubaan Gabriels and Ismail Teladia (Vuka Rugby).

GYMNASTS WOW AT 2015 NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS South Africa’s top junior and senior high performance and Olympic level gymnasts were challenging for South African Artistic Gymnastics titles at the 2015 Artistic Gymnastics National Championships in June at the Western Cape Sports School in Kuils River. The event was also qualifiers for the All-Africa Games and Artistic World Championships later in the year, with World Championships also being first qualifiers for Rio 2016 Olympic Games. The Western Cape Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport (DCAS), the South African Gymnastics Federation

(SAGF), the City of Cape Town and other partners hosted the Artistic Gymnastics National Championships. Approximately 200 of the top gymnasts from all nine provinces took part in this prestigious event. Participants included junior and senior high performance gymnasts who competed at the 2014 Commonwealth Games and at the 2014 Youth Olympic Games in China. They were hoping that their performances would qualify them to participate in the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. Jerry Masia, president of SAGF, said

that the gymnasts paid tribute to themselves and their coaches’ hard work and dedication. He thanked DCAS for supporting artistic gymnastics as a sport. “With this kind of support, we know that gymnastics can only grow to greater heights in the future,” he said. Adv. Lyndon Bouah, DCAS Chief Director of Sport and Recreation, said that DCAS wants to encourage a socially inclusive and active Western Cape. “By taking part in this event, and competing for places in upcoming events, you will be contributing to a winning nation,” he said.


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sport

SEPTEMBER 2015

NETBALL

Manzomthombo Secondary shines in National Schools Netball Tournament

M

anzomthombo Senior Secondary proved their reputation as one the best netball teams in the country by clinching silver and bronze at the National Netball Championships in Boksburg. The school’s under16, 17 and 19 teams took part in the championships. The under17 team won silver and the under19 team won bronze. The teams went through rigorous competition in the regional and district levels to represent the province alongside other high schools like Durbanville, Heideveld, Stellenbosch and De Kuilen. The schools represent different leagues within schools netball. Coach Frank Xaba said the teams prepared for the competition by playing with local schools and teams. Xaba said dedication and commitment were key in their school’s success on the netball court. “As a coach I am very dedicated and very passionate and that trickles down to the players and we have received amazing support from school staff and the parents.” One of the biggest challenges they faced was lack of funding but

WP takes top honours at U13 Coca-Cola Craven Week

D

HL Western Province took top honours at the Under-13 CocaCola Craven Week at Hoërskool Rob Ferreira in White River as they defeated neighbours Boland 34-14 to finish the tournament as the only unbeaten side. The team’s victory in the final match of the tournament followed on similar success in the 2013 and 2014 editions of the tournament in Bela-Bela and Durban respectively. The Cape Town side defeated the Valke, Border and SWD in their first three matches in White River to book their place in the grand finale of the Under-13 Coca-Cola Craven Week against their sister union. In the other big match-ups on the final day, TW Profile Services Valke defeated SWD 28-12, while KwaZulu-Natal beat the Leopards 24-3. Western Province delivered a fine all-round performance featuring strong forward and back play, which proved to be too much fire-

power for Boland. Boland scored the first points in the sixth minute compliments of a try by Corne Ethan Oliphant, but their Cape neighbours controlled proceedings soon after. Western Province’s form paid off as they scored two converted tries and penalty to take a 17-7 lead at the break. They picked up where they left off when play resumed and added two more converted tries to take their score to 34 points. Boland refused to give up and scored their second try on the stroke of full-time, but this merely served as a consolation as Western Province were far ahead on the scoreboard. Scorers: DHL Western Province – Tries: Duran Koevort, Ethan James, Armand Maritz, Rynardt Botha. Conversions: Jack Cloete (4). Penalties: Jack Cloete (2). Boland – Tries: Chadley Jermaine Josias, Corne Ethan Oliphant. Conversions: Nazero Cleophas, Curwin Gertse.

because of their great track record, corporate sponsors have availed funding for their activities. “We are very fortunate that through community leadership that we have Eskom as a sponsor who has made sure that we have a transport and accommodation for the competition, said school principal, John Matiso. He said that the target was to have at least two of the teams coming back as champions. He urged communities to encourage youth to participate in sports as

well as arts and culture activities as a deterrent to drug use.

JOHN MATISO URGED COMMUNITIES TO ENCOURAGE YOUTH TO PARTICIPATE IN SPORTS AS WELL AS ARTS AND CULTURE ACTIVITIES AS A DETERRENT TO DRUG USE.

SA SCHOOLS AND SA SCHOOLS A SQUADS ANNOUNCED DHL Western Province’s remarkable 95-0 victory against Eastern Province in the final match of the Under-18 Coca-Cola Craven Week saw 12 players from the Cape side selected in the SA Schools squad, while the remainder of the 26 man squad was made up of players from the Blue Bulls, Golden Lions, Eastern Province, SWD, the Valke and Griquas CD. The South African Rugby Union named the SA Schools and SA Schools A squads for the Under-18 International Series against England, France, Wales and Italy in August following the conclusion of the Under-18 Coca-Cola Craven Week in Stellenbosch. The SA Schools squad faced Wales on 7 August in Stellenbosch, France on 11 August at Outeniqua Park in George and England on 15 August at City Park

Stadium in Cape Town. The SA Schools A squad took on Italy in Stellenbosch, England in George and Wales in Cape Town in their clashes, which served as curtain-raisers to the SA Schools matches. Hein Kriek from Paul Roos Gymnasium was again appointed the SA Schools coach, while Lance Sendin from Hugenote Hoërskool in Wellington guided the SA Schools A team.

Willemse (Paul Roos), Jondre Williams (Boland Landbou) Forwards: Johan Visser (Paarl Gymnasium), Ruben De Villiers (Paarl Boys High), Salmaan Moerat (Paarl Boys High), Ernst Van Rhyn (Paarl Gymnasium), Ashwyn Adams (Rondebosch Boys High), Carlu Sadie (Bellville High), Johan Grobbelaar (Paarl Gymnasium)

WESTERN CAPE PLAYERS IN THE SA SCHOOLS SQUAD FOR THE UNDER-18 INTERNATIONAL SERIES:

Backs: Earll Douwrie (HTS Drostdy), Tyreeq February (Paarl Boys High), Ryan Muller (Bellville High), Mujaahid van der Hoven (Rylands) Forwards: Zain Davids (Rondebosch Boys High), Ngwekazi Khanya Ncusane (Paarl Boys High, PW Koegelenberg (Swartland HS)

Backs: Joshua Vermeulen (Paul Roos), Nico Leonard (Paul Roos), Manie Libbok (Outeniqua), Manuel Ras (Paarl Boys High), Damian

WESTERN CAPE PLAYERS IN THE SA SCHOOLS A SQUAD:


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