Artbeat, August 2021

Page 1


So, you want to be an urban artist?

↖ Jessie Rawcliffe works on her mural supporting The Marriage of Figaro. The step into muralism can mean facing a raft of challenges, from the ability to work with briefs to the practicalities of accessing a wall

writer Reuben Woods In recent weeks I have been posed a recurring question: ‘How do I start painting murals?’ In one case this question was reframed from an initial: ‘How do I become a street artist?’ While the two incarnations of this question may seem quite different, they are also closely intertwined. While the first version is in many ways a practical enquiry, the potential responses to the latter are somehow both straight-forward and more layered. Ultimately, to become a street artist you need to take your art to the streets, driven by the motivation to reach an audience in the most direct manner possible, essentially by-passing institutional frameworks. Importantly, there are as many approaches

↑ Dr Suits art work on a mural in New Brighton. Stepping into muralism, and street art more generally, raises a range of questions

and styles and intentions as there are participants. While graffiti is a more coherent subculture where a network of histories, rules, and expectations (both stylistically and behaviourally) frame membership, post-graffiti street art is much more openended and to join the ranks the only requisite is a willingness to act. Whether you paint walls, paste posters, install sculptures, stitch yarn or apply any other technique, it is the act of doing so in the streets and as such subverting the expectations of that setting that becomes your entry point. The question of how to get into painting murals is also more interesting to reflect upon than it might seem at first. There are several practicalities to consider; from what

tools to use (although murals have predominantly been painted with brushes or spray cans, today artists produce work with fire extinguishers, by carving into walls (in the case of Portuguese artist Vhils) or by compiling refuse into colourful wall sculptures (the technique of another Portuguese artist, Bordalo II),to the process of working at a larger scale, both in terms of design and how to practically scale up work (ever operated a scissor lift?). Then there is the challenge of actually finding walls and commissions, itself an art of self-promotion that can be challenging for the more introverted and may require a thick skin. There are a number of additional issues that manifest, such as the challenging

NEWS &

EVENTS WORKSHOPS

← P O O L S I D E, a community choreographic project by Olivia Webb (composer and artist) in collaboration with Julia Harvie (contemporary dance choreographer). Photographer: Anastasiya Korzh. (funded through Christchurch Creative Communities Scheme) ←← Arina Terekhova, Blue Gum Fibres - handson natural dye and ink making, Margaret Stoddart Cottage in August ←←← Amelia Fauchelle, right hand, 2021, Sx-70 film, from the artist’s exhibition Somatic at Art Hole in August

02

question of how much to charge and whether to compromise on price to gain opportunities, or what stylistic and thematic concessions you might be willing to make when producing a legal work. In contrast to the freedom of hitting the streets, a commissioned mural will often require an understanding of what is deemed acceptable or appropriate, which may mean adopting a more fluid style. However, in a world where recognisable and original aesthetics are valued, this becomes a problematic proposition. This line of thought leads to another question that surrounds the transition to muralism; should you have a body of un-commissioned work before seeking larger opportunities? Are you somehow less authentic if you have not ‘put in work’? This is part of a broader discussion around the evolution of urban art and its participants. If graffiti and street art’s rebellious roots were once definitive, that has changed as these forms have become mainstream and have found increasingly supported platforms. Artists range from teenagers to parents (and in some instances grandparents), and span all walks of life, including doctors, scientists, teachers and, of course, professional artists. This diversity means people must come to terms with their motivations, their comfort levels and the potential implications of their actions. Night-time missions inside abandoned buildings won’t suit everyone, nor will more purely disruptive actions, and as such, it is important to think about what approach suits your constitution and situation. The advantage of contemporary urban art is that there are numerous niches to occupy within each branch. The answer to both questions that inspired this article is to understand what you want to accomplish and where you see your work fitting within that scope. Once you understand that, the rest will surely fall into place.

The Creative Communities Scheme (CCS): provides funding to local communities so New Zealanders can be involved in local arts activities. Applying for the Creative Communities Scheme: CCS supports a wide range of arts projects under the following art forms; craft/ object arts, dance, inter-arts, literature, Māori arts, multi-art form (including film), music, Pacific arts, theatre and visual arts. Your application will go to an assessment committee of people from the Christchurch area. They are appointed for their knowledge and experience of the arts and local communities. You will be notified of the outcome of your request within three months of the fund closing There are no exceptions to the closing dates. Only fully completed applications submitted before the closing date will be processed. Go to: https:// ccc.govt.nz/culture-and-community/community-funding/creative-communities-scheme For assistance please contact a Community Funding Adviser or email creativecommunities@ccc.govt.nz

The Creative Cottage August Workshops: The Stoddart Cottage is hosting a series of creative workshops at the historic property in Diamond Harbour. No previous experience required for any of the sessions, which are supported by Creative Communities funding. Exploring Eco-Dyes Workshop: Sunday 1 August, 1-5pm, $45+bf A hands-on natural dye and ink making with Blue Gum Fibre’s Arina Terekhova using plants foraged on the day. Participants will take home their own dyed fabric wrap and ribbons. Booking essential at: https://www.eventbrite.co.nz/e/exploringeco-dyes-workshop-tickets-159049428121 Clay Cup Workshop: Saturday 14th August,13pm, $25+bf Make a pottery cup using clay slab handbuilding technique with award-winning ceramic artist, Jane McCulla. The cup can be painted and includes firing. Booking essential at: https://www.eventbrite.co.nz/e/ craft-a-clay-cup-tickets-159579246823 Felting Flowers Workshop: Sunday 29th August, 1.30-3pm, $20+bf Acquire felting skills using wool from sheep and alpacas through felting a flower under the guidance of wool-craft tutor, Rowena MacGill. Booking essential at: https://www.eventbrite.co.nz/e/ felting-flowers-tickets-159580408297 Further details and how to book at https:// www.stoddartcottage.nz/events

Amelia Fauchelle and Women in Photography: Ameila Fauchelle’s exhibition, Somatic is a series of large scale photographic works exploring ideas around women's position within the realms of photography. Aiming to challenge ideas around the exploitation of the female figure while simultaneously drawing reference from the impact women photographers have made upon the medium and the tools at their disposal. Somatic explores ideas around concealing and revealing through abstractions, ephemerality and makeup of the body, expectations of immediacy, and the female voice. Details: Amelia Fauchelle, Somatic at Art Hole, 336 St Asaph Street Opening event: Tuesday 31st August, 5:30p, 10-2, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Sunday (Closed Saturday) CoCA - Artist Trustee Vacancy: Are you a practicing artist in Otautahi Christchurch who would like to contribute to the success of Toi Moroki, the Centre of Contemporary Art? We are seeking an artist Trustee who is well connected in the arts community and will bring fresh perspectives to the Board. CoCA is run by a dedicated team of staff and volunteers and you would be joining a Board of people from diverse backgrounds. Candidates without previous governance experience are encouraged to apply as Board induction will be provided. For more information: www.coca.org.nz/ opportunities If you’re interested, contact Board Chair, Anna Ryan: anna.ryan@laneneave.co.nz


AT THE

THE DEN: Building the Art Scene in Ōtautahi

↘ Andy Leleisi’uao, Umbilical Brown II (cropped image), 2021 acrylic on canvas ↘↘ Tim Cheeseborough, Sky High Scaffolders, 2021, photograph ↘↘↘ Clare Logan, Shallow Hollows, 2021, oil on board

writer Warren Feeney THE DEN is an artist-run space located on the ground floor of 181 High Street. Opening in December 2020 it was established by four graduates/ post-graduates from the Ilam School of Fine Arts: Sophie Ballantyne, Tessa McPhee, Jamie TeHeuheu and Rupert Travis. Its exhibition programme comprises the agendas of both an artist-run space and dealer gallery, characterised by an attitude about the bigger picture of how the visual arts function, encompassing emerging artists, curators and writers. Over the past three years artist-run spaces have gained in presence and significance in Aotearoa, with Auckland the initial centre for their revitalisation. THE DEN describes itself as ‘one of a network of small galleries helping to build the art scene within Ōtautahi Christchurch’, and fundamental to its presence is also the city’s ongoing regeneration, noting that High Street connects them to popular assumptions about the ‘innovation precinct’. Jamie TeHeuheu recalls that THE DEN is the outcome of them all needing somewhere to display their work. ‘Rupert knew the landlord and we were close to the end of our degrees. They gave us the space for three weeks. We moved in and as painters, we are interested in the commercial side of the art world and its accompanying challenges as a graduate. In many places where artists exhibit, commissions are high and rents are as well. Many young artists question what to display to cover this cost and not be out of pocket, and if the gallery is fulfilling its duties, doing it yourself can be rather empowering. With an artist-run space we can keep our overheads low. I strongly believe that all many young artist need is a sale, an opportunity to display or supportive feedback from outside their peer group to justify what they are doing’.

↘↘↘↘ Hamish Allan, Off the Deep End, 2021, acrylic on canvas

Sophie Ballantyne also notes the critical role of the city’s galleries in acknowledging career development. ‘The whole idea for THE DEN came around when we were at art school as very few people are picked up by galleries leaving art school. Sharing studio spaces at the School of Fine Arts and spending those years together with other students was central to THE DEN opening. All our meetings about the gallery were in our studio. We talked about it for a year and then it happened’. Rupert Travis sees THE DEN as an encouraging space for an artist’s work to be represented in. ‘Artists need to work out how they are going to enter this field and part of the idea is in allowing them to sell, and an artist’s installation can allow them do that as well. We allow artists to exhibit without charging them a fee, permitting them to put up their work without having to empty their pockets’. Travis also notes that although they are ‘still getting there’, their regular visitors are part of a community of supporters, and there is further room for projects like THE DEN in Ōtautahi. ‘What is amazing is going around and asking for spaces. There is a slump in retailing and a lot of opportunity for artists to give things a try’. TeHeuheu agrees, and further maintains that THE DEN and other artist-run spaces are essential, addressing wider concerns about ‘the need for systemic change in the arts community’.

THE DEN, 181 High Street Wednesday – Saturday, 10am to 4pm or by appointment https://thedenproject.com/contact enquiries@thedenproject.com

↑ THE DEN, inaugural exhibition, Collective, December 2020. From left; work by Sophie Ballantyne, Tessa McPhee, Jamie TeHeuheu and Rupert Travis. Photograph: James TeHeuheu

↓ Group exhibition, Daisy Chain, 15–26 June 2021. Participating artist: Alice Alva, Sophie Ballantyne, Saskia Bunce-Rath, Kara Burrowes, Jay Hutchinson, Lizzy Leckie, Hannah Phillips, Karen Rubado Christiane Shortal and Georgina May Young. Photograph: Sophie Ballantyne

↘↘↘↘↘ Tiffany Thornley, Frida, intaglio print ↘↘↘↘↘↘ Molly Halpine, In Motion, 2021, oil on canvas

Andy Leleisi’uao was born in New Zealand in 1969 and grew up in Mangere, South Auckland. He coined the term “Kamoan”, “Kiwi-Samoan”, to describe himself and other Samoan New Zealanders who exist in the Va (the space) between the two identities while not quite fully identifying with either. It is the questioning around this hybridity that fuels much of his imagery across a wide range of media. Andrew Paul Wood backgrounds Andy Leleisi’uao’s art. eyecontactmagazine.com/2017/09/ wallace-winner-in-christchurch Andy Leleisi'uao and Sefton Rani, PGgallery192, 192 Bealey Avenue, until 20 Aug. One of Christchurch’s oldest public buildings is at last getting its repairs, more than a decade after the earthquakes… Development company Box 112 is leasing the old municipal building, and under a partnership arrangement is also undertaking the restoration and strengthening…. Box 112 director Sam Rofe said they were “excited to get in there and start the restoration process”. Liz McDonald, ‘Ten years on from quakes, work starts on damaged Christchurch heritage building.’ The Press, 3 May 2021 Diamond Harbour Camera Club, Rebuild Refocused, Stoddart Cottage Gallery, 2 Waipapa Ave, Diamond Harbour, 6 to 29 Aug The idea of thinking in the margins is quite interesting to me. [Thomas] Ligotti believes that fiction can put us in touch with that sense of things unseen that can create an encounter with a state that combines terror and enchantment. And I think that – the enchantment, that heightened emotional state, I love that. Clare Logan discussing her work with Cameron Ralston, City Art Reader, Aug 2020 Clare Logan Lacuna, City Art Depot, 96 Disraeli Street, Sydenham, 3 to 23 Aug Off the Deep End is part of a series of 5 paintings, a reflection and interpretation of the recent two year period surveying and living in my local landscape - Ōtautahi and Te Whakaraupō. The dramatic landforms and the associated flora and fauna interacting in and on that space are worthy of quiet thought and careful rendition. Hamish Allan on his recent paintings. Hamish Allan, Angst at the Edge of the Pleasure Garden, Chambers Gallery, 80 Durham Street, Sydenham, 18 Aug to 4 Sep When I do the etching process things happen, but the plate gives a structure. With painting and drawing things happen too, but with the plate things happen that you can’t control. And although they say you should never overdraw, never overwork, I reckon you should. It’s much better for you if you overdraw, work it to the full…. If you stop you never know how far you could go, that’s the same in life, isn’t it?’ The artist on etching and life. Marian Evans, Bridie Lonnie and Tilly Lloyd, A Women’s Picture Book, Wellington: GP Books, 1988, p. 18 Tiffany Thornley , Jane Zusters and Robyn Webster, Dredging - a new history - three women printmaking, Eastside Gallery, 388 Worcester St, 9 to 28 Aug … to move, change and progress. Molly Halpine, has an interest in capturing figures in these moments. Barriers are stripped down to form a sense of vulnerability, highlighting human experience. Absolution on Molly Halpine’s In Motion Molly Halpine, In Motion, Absolution, Arts Centre Te Matatiki Toi Ora, 2 Worcester Blvd, 29 Jul to 30 Aug

Artbeat

Issue 31, August 2021

GALLERIES




W

1

X

2

6

7

P Y A

H 8 Q

Z 3

I B

AA 4

R J C

BB

9

CC

10

K S

D

L

E

T

DD

U

EE

M F

11 5

N FF V G

O GG

31 BEALEY AVE

32

P

H

A

E RP

R

E AV

SALISBURY ST

PETERBOROUGH ST

GG KILMORE ST

Z

E CHESTER ST

L

CHESTER ST WEST

O

D

COLOMBO ST

M

1

36 25

S

39

R

F

C A

B

Q

X

Y

EE

27

33

WORCESTER ST

16

HEREFORD ST

CASHEL ST

H ST

DURHAM ST

28

STANMORE RD

IG

BB

T H

LICHFIELD ST

FITZGERALD AVE

I

MADRAS ST

20

BARBADOES ST

COLOMBO ST

MONTREAL ST

J

TUAM ST

CC 43 ST ASAPH ST

K

5

41

FF

38 MOORHOUSE AVE

SR D

44 37

V WORCESTER ST

GLOUCESTER ST

40

12 14

SON

G

13

S

15

DD

MANCHESTER ST

10

GLOUCESTER U ST ROLLESTON AVE

AA

N ARMAGH ST

42

DISRAELI ST

W IL

H

W

BYRON ST

BUCHAN ST

29 17

WORDSWORTH ST

22

WALTHAM RD

19

45


12

22

36

29

17

23 30

37

13 24 31 18 38 25 32 19 14

39

26 20

33

15 40

21

27

34

41 35 28 16

12 June – 28 August

Mark Work

Kaiapoi’s premium artspace

Ruataniwha Kaiapoi Civic Centre 176 Williams Street, Kaiapoi

Follow us on Facebook: Artonthequay Email: kaiapoiartonthequay@gmail.com

Image: Warwick Freeman, drawing. Photograph: Samuel Hartnett.

Raukura Turei, Julian Hooper, Krystina Kaza, Areta Wilkinson, Warwick Freeman, Hannah Beehre

Art on the Quay

FIKSATE GALLERY Representing Local & International Urban Contemporary Artists 54 Hawdon St. Sydenham, Christchurch www.fiksate.com

EARTHQUAKE PROTECTION PROPRIETARY HARDWARE CUSTOMISED HANGING SYSTEMS

w w w.m catamn eyga lle ry .co . nz

NOW SHOWING

From the Red Tarns overlooking Mt Sefton

| AA DEANS

Hall Fence Firey Peak Four Peaks

40A Talbot St, Geraldine | Carolyn 027 305 3000 | carolyn@mcatamneygallery.co.nz

FLYING NUN

RECORDS

31 July – 24 August 2021

WANTED

HELLO@HANG.CO.NZ

430 Colombo Street, Christchurch

0273087849

Vashti Johnstone

Open 7 days

Mon–Fri 8am–5.30pm Sun–Sat 10am–5pm

PH: (03) 366 3278 Main Rd, Little River 03 325 1944 art@littlerivergallery.com


08




Valuations for insurance and estate purposes Research Catalogue essays Reviews Commentary and publishing Artist ’s CVs Dr. Warren Feeney — 022 176 9272 warrenfeeney@xtra.co.nz ar tcontent .co.nz artcontent.co.nz

Working Art Studio, Exhibition Space 126 Cashel Street, Guthrey Centre, Christchurch


18- 31 AUGUST

Clare Logan

Lacuna Opening 5.30pm, Tuesday, 3rd August Exhibition 3 – 23 August 2021 Image | Gaylene Barnes, Pig, video still, 2021.

GAYLENE BARNES DURATIONS 2 - 27 AUGUST 2021 Gallery Artist Stretchers 96 Disraeli St Gallery 96 Disraeli St cityart.co.nz Christchurch Framing Solander Boxes Framing Sydenham cityart.co.nz Installation Installation ArtChristchurch Transportation 0303 365 365 3811 3811

327 WEST STREET, ASHBURTON, 7700 ASHBURTONARTGALLERY.ORG.NZ T | 03 308 1133

PG gallery 192

RightSide gallery

Representing leading NZ artists 192 Bealey Avenue, Christchurch 03 366 8487

A celebration of Aotearoa New Zealand’s longest running photography studio Exhibition on now

featuring: Joel Hart Rachel Rush Sarah Albisser Odelle Morshuis Paula Petherick Kate McLeod Dr Suits Juliet Best Glen Jorna Charles Hannah Hamish Anderson Stef Gray Crispin Field Don Service

Art hanging and art technician services available

www.pggallery192.co.nz PG_ad_ArtBeat_May2020.indd 1

An exciting collective of New Zealand’s newest and established artists.

Viewing by appointment Mon-Fri, Open Saturdays 10-4 pm 380 St Asaph St 021 238 1501 instagram @rightside_art_gallery

21/04/20 12:24 PM

Donna-Marie Patterson & Hamish Allan Exhibition runs 18th Aug - 4th Sept Opening night 18th Aug 5.15-7pm 80 DURHAM ST SOUTH | CHRISTCHURCH 022 677 2810 | WWW.CHAMBERSART.CO.NZ Instagram: chambers_art | Facebook: chambers

163 MADRAS ST. CHRISTCHURCH

W W W. G O R D O N H A R R I S . C O . N Z