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MUSIC & ARTS • MARCH 2016 WARPMAGAZINE.COM.AU | FACEBOOK.COM/WARP.MAG

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Daniel Champagne Wednesday 16 Mar

Saskwatch Saturday 2 April

Bondi Cigars Friday 18 March

ASTA Friday 8 April

March 2016 Saturday 5th 2.30pm Soul Sessions: Funk Nukl Presents Funky Tunes In The Beer Garden 10pm Mumbo Gumbo Sunday 6th 3pm Zuma Play Neil Young Monday 7th 8.30pm G.B. Balding (Finger Pickin' Blues) Tuesday 8th 8.30pm Helen Crowther Wednesday 9th 8.30pm Keith Hall Thursday 10th 8.30pm Sugarcane Collins Friday 11th 5.30pm After Work Acousitc Sessions in the Beer Garden with Tony Mac+ Free Sausage Sizzle Friday 11th 10pm Australia Made (Aussie Pub Rock) $5 Saturday 12th 2.30pm Ange Boxall Sunday 13th 3pm The Calhouns 8pm Dan Stonehouse + MT Blues Music + Kate Alexander Monday 14th Closed - Eight Hour Day Tuesday 15th 8.15pm Quiz Night Wednesday 16th 9pm Daniel Champagne $15 Thursday 17th 8pm The Comedy Clubhouse with Tommy Dassalo (Upstairs) $20pre/$25door 8.30pm KashKin Friday 18th 5pm After Work Acousitc Sessions in the Beer Garden with Bianca & Hutch + Free Sausage Sizzle

Friday 18th 10pm Bondi Cigars $20pre/$25door Saturday 19th 2.30pm Soul Sessions:Funk Nukl Presents Funky Tunes In The Beer Garden 10pm Chase City + Tropical Zombie $10 Sunday 20th 2.30pm Beer Garden Party With A Free Indonesian Feast: Inc Beef Rendang, NasiGoreng Fried Rice & Indonesian Salad with Tony Mac Playing Live 8.30pm Hui &The Muse Monday 21st 8.30pm Tarik Stoneman & Sam Forsyth Tuesday 22nd 8.30pm Billy Whitton Wednesday 23rd 8.30pm Lisette Lowe Thursday 24th 5pm After Work Acousitc Sessions in the Beer Garden with Dan Vandermeer + Free Sausage Sizzle Thursday 24th 9pm Yesterday's Gentlemen + Billy Whitton Friday 25th 10pm Good Good Friday - Local Original Acts $5 Saturday 26th 10pm Tasmanian Metal' DVD Launch with Intense Hammer Rage + Mephistopheles +Gape + Atra Vetosus + Create The Crayon $7 Sunday 27th 8.30pm Tim & Scott Monday 28th Closed Easter Monday Tuesday 29th 8.15pm Quiz Night Wednesday 30th 8.30pm Johnny McIntyre Thursday 31st 8.30pm 4 Letter Fish


screening the best of australian & international shorts

annexe theatre launceston wed 9 mar peacock theatre hobart thu 10 - fri 11 mar Town Hall cygnet fri 11 mar

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

FLickerfest.com.au/Tour

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News

News in Brief Champagne Music

Craptastic!

The Australian born, Nashville based singer/songwriter and one of a kind guitar virtuoso Daniel Champagne announces a new live-in-studio album, The Heartland Hurricanes, and a world tour that will take him to Australia, New Zealand, The United Kingdom, Belgium, Ireland, The USA and Canada in the first half of 2016. Throughout March Daniel Champagne will be performing in Tasmania at the Republic Bar and Café on Wednesday March 16, Gioconda Coffee in Devonport on Thursday March 17, Mountain Mumma in Sheffield on Friday March 19, The Royal Oak Hotel on Saturday March 19 (in the boatshed), and the Marakoopa Café in Mayberry on Sunday March 20. Check him out if you get the chance!

After a ridiculously mega party in Hobart in November and a run of stupidly fun gigs all over Australia and Europe, Tomas Ford brings his ridiculous Crap Music Rave Party back to Hobart on Friday March 18. The rules are simple: request any song you want, so long as it’s crap. I guess Tomas determines what is good or crap. He is the all-knowing king of crapness. So if you want to hear some crap music, be crap, or just crap on a bit, go to a crap music rave! Tomas will drop your crappy request like a, umm.. Crap. There’ll be a lot of happy hardcore, Eurovision nightmares, Justin Beiber, White-Boy Reggae, Hair Metal, Skate Park Dubstep, Mouldy New Jack Swing Records, and more. Yep, that sounds pretty crap to me. Wakey Wakey

Up in Smoke

A Sneaky Uni Bar Gig

Victorian acts Sal Kimber and John Flanagan will hit the road together this Autumn as part of their double album launch tour in what will be a big event in the Australian alt-country/folk music calendar. Following on from a rollicking, full band tour of Victorian country halls, Sal and John will perform stripped-back sets across the country with a focus on sharing their powerful songs with intimate audiences. These two songwriters will share stories of hope, yearning, the landscape and it’s characters at house concerts and music venues. They will be joined by Tully Sumner, who will add his soaring vocal harmonies and guitar textures to the shows. They’ll be appearing twice on Tasmanian soil, firstly on Thursday April 7 at Mountain Mama in Sheffied, and again on Saturday April 9 at The Grand Poohbar in Hobart.

So funkadelic bass music extraordinaire Opiuo is about to hit the road for a nationwide Australian tour, stopping in at more cities and tour stops than ever before. On this tour, he’ll be promoting his new single ‘Sneakers’, from the forthcoming album Omniversal. ‘Sneakers’ is a party starter, combining heavy bass with lashings of house, disco and a seriously addictive vocal hook. It’s playful, it’s cheeky, it’s funky, and it’s in your face. Opiuo will be making one seriously huge stop in Tasmania, playing at the Uni Bar in Hobart on Saturday April 16. Keep an eye on your social networks for information regarding tickets and supports. It’s guaranteed to be a banger! Proclaim!

Get LOW

When the Bondi Cigars were first gigging around Sydney, late 1989, they moved in a blues/R&B circuit which, while robust enough since the 60s, had then been sparked into new life by the ‘blues revival’ of the mid-80’s, spearheaded by Robert Cray, Joe Louis Walker, Stevie Ray Vaughan and similar crusaders. And while many of the Sydney bands from that era have vanished, become historical footnotes, or undergone major changes, the Cigars - true survivors - have battled on, without ever compromising their distinctive no nonsense style, to become a leading force in Australian R&B. Tasmania gets a chance to see the no nonsense survivors in the flesh, not only at the Forth Valley Blues Festival, but also at the Republic Bar & Café on Friday March 18.

Warp Tasmania MARCH 2016

Bombastic South Sydney Pop Punks The Great Awake are driven by relentless positivity, and they’re psyched to release their super sweet debut album Reasons For Leaving (out now). Having directed their love of travel to touring the nation and honing their live show, The Great Awake are no strangers to long nights and longer drives. The band has deservedly shared stages with punk hallmarks the likes of Good Riddance, Hawthorne Heights, Kisschasy, Luca Brasi and more. The Great Awake is a name found on the lips of those savvy on top notch local melodic punk rock. Sounds like a pretty good wrap, huh. You can check them out at the Brisbane Hotel in Hobart on Friday April 8, or Fresh Café in Launceston on Saturday April 9.

Get intimate with the slow core intensity of Minnesota’s LOW at MONA. Formed in 1993, the three-piece consisting of Alan Sparhawk, Mimi Parker and Steve Garrington, are back after a six-year absence. LOW are finally returning to Australia for a series of special performances and they’re bringing along their good friend Mike Noga (exDrones). Head along and check out the Eros/Thanatos rooms for the downbeat minimalism for which LOW have become renowned. Tickets are available now from shop.mona.net.au, and will run you $40 for an adult ticket, or $30 concession.

HAHA YES THE PROCLAIMERS ARE COMING TO HOBART!!!! Holy crap, remember those guys? Of course you don’t, you’re like 5 years old or something. They had a couple of massive hits with their quirky, novelty style, “I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles)” and “I’m On My Way” were huge. I still have the cassingles. Maybe I’ll go along to the gig and get them autographed. You should do the same. To do that, you’d probably need the gig info huh? It’s on at the Wrest Point Entertainment Centre on Tuesday April 19. Doors open at 7:15pm, gig starts at 8pm. Tickets are available from tixtas.com.au and will cost you $79. Go on, grab a couple tickets. You know you want to.

Editor Nic Orme

Writers SHANE CRIXUS LISA DIB RACHEL EDWARDS STEPH ESLAKE LUCY HAWTHORNE NIC ORME

ALL SUBMISSIONS REMAIN THE PROPERTY OF WARP MAGAZINE. ALL CONTENT IS COPYRIGHT TO WARP MAGAZINE AND CANNOT BE REPRODUCED IN WHOLE OR PART WITHOUT WRITTEN AUTHORISATION OF THE PUBLISHERS. WARP MAGAZINE makes no guarantees, warranties or representations of any kind, whether express or implied, as to the accuracy, reliability, or completeness of the information provided. WARP MAGAZINE will not be liable for incorrect use of the information and will assume no responsibility for consequences that may result from the use of the information. WARP MAGAZINE is not responsible of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance on such information. The opinions expressed in Warp Magazine and Warp online do not necessarily reflect those of the editors or publishers.

nic@warpmagazine.com.au

ART Andrew Harper andrewlikesfish@gmail.com

................................. www.warpmagazine.com.au www.facebook.com/warp.mag ................................. INTERESTED IN WRITING FOR WARP? contact ed@warpmagazine.com.au .................................

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News

The Middle(ton) Finger

Darren Middleton is back again. For the fifty millionth time. Apparently Powderfinger wasn’t the end of him. He’s still going. He’s the energizer bunny of Australian music. Apparently. He released a highly regarded solo album in late 2015 titled Splinters, and in 2016, Middleton has emerged with his latest single, Favours, featuring vocals from Australia’s song writing sweetheart, Missy Higgins. Yep, that sounds like a song name. Anyway, Mister Middleton will be performing at the Republic Bar & Café in Hobart on Saturday April 23. Keep an eye on your social media websites for more information. Little May, in May

Tell ‘em They’re Dreamin’

After the massive worldwide success of the debut album Heartbound in 2011, Dream On Dreamer have released their much anticipated sophomore record, Loveless to rave reviews. Only took ‘em 5 years. Slackers. Loveless was produced and mixed by guitarist Callan Orr, while vocalist Marcel Gadacz designed the artwork and imagery for the record. “This DIY mentality is a rarity for such a young band within the metal core genre” (that‘s what their press release says, personally I’ve found the complete opposite to be true, but hey, a bands press release wouldn‘t exaggerate the truth, would it?). You can catch them playing at The Republic Bar & Café in Hobart on Saturday May 14. Have a word to them about their PR people.

several festivals, most notably, Spain’s Azkena Rock Festival and Belgium’s Sjock Festival. The impact of their sell out one-off London show was such that they have been invited back to London with Manchester and Leeds added on to the itinerary with several other UK shows also being slated. The good news for local fans is that prior to their return to Europe, the band will play a limited number of shows over the first two weekends of June. Currently, these are expected to be the band’s only Australian shows for 2016. Radio Birdman will be performing at the Brisbane Hotel in Hobart on Friday June 10. Tickets are available now via oztix. com.au, and will cost you $52.05 a piece. Bye Bye Mr American Pie

Don McLean was scheduled to tour Australia this month. Well, that won’t be happening for a while now (it’s been scheduled for the same time next year (2017)). It’s been revealed that McLean is facing additional charges relating the alleged assault of his wife. Patrisha (McLean’s wife) alleges she has suffered three decades of abuse. The protection order taken out against McLean, by Patrisha, has since been thrown out (at her request). She recently wrote to McLean’s fans, stating the following: “Don has a big heart. He and I had many happy times in the 30 years of our marriage and what has recently transpired is unfortunate for all of us.” If you had tickets for the Hobart gig, get in touch with the ticketing agency to organise a return of funds.

Aaarrghaarrrghghhgh! 0

Following the release of Little May’s For The Company, the debut that landed triple j feature album, Fbi’s Album of the Week, and an international world tour to support their Aaron Brooking Dressner (The National) produced record, the pioneering indie outfit are back on home soil to undertake their biggest Australian tour to date. Kicking off this May, these shows follow on from their City & Colour national support slot. Little May will be dropping in to The Waratah Hotel in Hobart on Saturday May 14 for a very special one-night-only performance. Tickets are available via oztix, and will cost you $25.50. Doors open at 9pm! 28 Days in a Leap Year? Odd. 28 Days, remember them? I do, but I’m a lot older than you. They probably retired when you were 3 months old, whipper snapper. They put out a string of hits a while back, the likes of Rip It Up, What’s The Deal? and Sucker were absolutely everywhere for a hot minute there. Then they disappeared, but now they’re back. Capiche? The Melbourne punk rockers are back with their latest offering Amber Afternoons, and they’re setting off on a national tour to promote it. Check the song out on the internet, then head along to the Republic Bar & Café on Friday May 13 to catch them in the flesh. It’s guaranteed to be a good ol’ banger of a gig, so don’t miss it!

Presents

Massachusetts natives A Wilhelm Scream return to Australian shores this May for a full Australian tour. Known for their energetic and exhausting live show, the band are an overwhelming assault on the senses and never fail to disappoint. AWS, as they are affectionately known, have been described as “… still one of the most creatively engaging and thoroughly fun and exciting bands in punk”, and it’s pretty damn hard to argue with that. Not a band to do things by halves, AWS will visit eight cities across both coasts, including one gig in Taswegia. To catch them in Tasmania, you’ll need to be at The Brisbane Hotel in Hobart on Saturday May 28. Tickets are available now via oztix.com.au, and will cost you $37.75 each. Birdy Man Man

Friday Evening Acoustic Sessions From 5pm Every Friday In The Beer Garden

Live music to finish off the working week with a free BBQ

MARCH’S LINE UP -

4TH TIM & SCOTT 11TH TONY MAK 18TH BIANCA & HUTCH 24TH DAN VENDERMEER* *(THURSDAY NIGHT DUE TO EASTER)

FREE EVENTS Radio Birdman’s 2015 European tour made enough successful noise for them to gain spots this coming June on

REPUBLIC BAR & CAFÉ

299 Elizabeth St. North Hobart | Ph 6234.6954 | www.republicbar.com

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Music

ALPHA AND OMEGA “I AM ACTUALLY PLAYING GUITAR. I’M PLAYING SONGS OFF EXILE [EXILE IN OBLIVION, 2004], WE’RE PLAYING THAT ALBUM IN ITS ENTIRETY BEFORE WE COME TO AUSTRALIA. I’M ALSO EATING ALMOND BUTTER, SO THAT’S GREAT.”

Well, Chris Aiken is just having a whale of a time. The bassist for punk rockers Strung Out is working and treating himself, something I quickly learn is part of his method: work hard, and be nice to yourself, which includes not worrying too much about reviews and YouTube comments. “Just keep writing, just keep putting out music. You can’t help it, you do get some sort of pressure: “this is gotta be good”, you can’t help but get entangled with that” Aiken explains. “Be what you are right now, without a care. If [people] like it: awesome, if not: awesome! You have to be able to take punches. There’s no way in hell you’re gonna be perfect. I don’t think perfect exists. If you’re getting into this sort of business, you have to be able to take criticism with a grain of salt. It’s like getting caught up in YouTube comments, that’s the nastiest shit ever that people are writing. People have so much time on their hands to talk shit, it’s like, who gives a shit?” “You can be negative on yourself, you can be your own critic, you can focus on it and hurt yourself, but you’re investing all that time in negativity from a stranger that doesn’t know anything about you. You should be investing your time in making your art. It’s all about moving forward.” Aiken gushes at his own openness (“I feel like a motivational speaker right now!”) but it’s heartening to see such positivity and upbeatness.

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It’s been six years since the band’s last album, Agents of the Underground. Six years may not seem that long in the grander sense of your entire life, but in the fast-paced entertainment world and with the ever-changing face of music, six years is ages. But the band took their time on their new album, Transmission.Alpha.Delta, which many fans and critics alike see as a strong return to form, and a solid, punk/thrash/hardcore gem. “That was our thing, a new album every few years and we were putting stuff out to tide people over, but as far as an album, we had other stuff going on. It didn’t mean to take that long, but it did. Life happens. We’re all in different points of our lives, we just let life catch up on us. We’re all super proud of the record, everyone’s performances, and especially the fans’ reception. We’re so glad the fans like ‘cause we like it. We’re always about what’s next though, the album came out last month and I’m already like, “I don’t care anymore, what’s the next album!?” (laughs) it’s just so nice playing a bunch of new songs live.” The band have been going strong for some twenty years, forming in 1991 and releasing their first album in 1994 (Another Day in Paradise); since then, they’ve put out eleven more records, including their 2016 effort, live albums and compilations. They’ve been going strong for a long time, but show no signs of putting on the brakes.

“We never rest on our laurels” he says strongly. “We never wanna make the same album twice, never wanna repeat ourselves. You always wanna put out something new. We’re always looking for new music, finding new bands- life inspires you, it makes you creative and we’re just trying to put out what we’re going through in our lives, and people really like it. We’re always really grateful that we get to put out music and that we’re still relevant after twenty years.” In other press, the band’s singer Jason Cruz said he didn’t wanna be a “nostalgia punk band”, an idea that Aiken can fully get behind, in an almost spiritual way. “It’s all about being present in the now. We’ve been relevant for twenty years, we still push it and put out good records, we always come out giving our all: that’s all I wanna do, come out and give one-hundred percent. We’re still here and still going. It’s a gift to be able to do what you doing with your life, your trade. When you find what you’re meant to be doing in your life, that’s a good thing. Not getting caught up in bullshit or driven by the wrong thing, like quick fame. I just wanna write good songs and good stories that people can sit down and relate to. I wanna move people.” LISA DIB Strung Out will play on Thursday March 24 at the Brisbane Hotel in Hobart and Friday March 25 at Club 54 in Launceston. Transmission.Alpha.Delta is out on March 24 on Fat Wreck Chords.


Music

SPOKEN WORDS OF SCOTT CARRIER SCOTT CARRIER DROPPED SOME ACID IN NEW YORK AND ACCIDENTALLY FOUND HIMSELF IN A CHURCH WHERE A KID ROCK CONCERT WAS DOUBLING AS A FUNDRAISER FOR THE REPUBLICAN PARTY. TEN YEARS LATER HE TOLD THIS STORY FOR HOME OF THE BRAVE, HIS NEW PODCAST. CARRIER, WHO HAS ALSO PRODUCED FOR THE FAMOUS THIS AMERICAN LIFE IS COMING TO TASMANIA THIS MARCH TO APPEAR AT A FESTIVAL CALLED PANAMA.

A Festival Called Panama will happen deep in the forest of North East Tasmania on the March long weekend. It is a site that has formerly held the Circus Festival and it contains perfectly situated campsites and natural amphitheatres in glorious bush surrounds. The site has hosted some powerful acts in the past and this festival will reveal more. Carrier, when I spoke to him for this article, was unsure of what he would be doing on stage. He is new to live performance but he was eager to visit Tasmania, having not ventured to the Antipodes before. “I am learning my stage act, it is coming along. I am basically going to tell stories, some talking, some playing radio stories.” Carrier believes in the power of human connection, the power of story. This crystallized when he saw a fleeting moment, a human moment, caught on film by a documentary maker who remained present, filming persistently. The film was Primary, and he was an undergrad student of anthropology. Then he realised that people were less self conscious with a microphone and not a camera. “It goes into the back of their heads somewhere because they know they have to organise their thoughts and sound sane. In that process they forget that they are being recorded.” Carrier brings this attention, an awareness of the quiet moments, to his podcasts, which generally include both narrative and interviews. It is deep observation, deep attention that he brings to the surface in his podcasts. Podcasting changes the manner in which we consume media, again. Radio used to simply broadcast once; a single, fleeting show. For Carrier, “people would never hear my programs, really, it has changed to people hearing them and writing in.” Home of the Brave is supported entirely from listener donations so “basically that’s the way I survive and it is the way I get feedback from stories.” The freedom allowed him by creating his own podcasts is new. “There are no limitations, there is no censor or packaging, you get to do whatever you want.” Discussing the comparatively new medium of podcasting he talks energetically about how we are still “figuring out what the language is for that medium.” “It’s the oldest medium, it’s talking and listening, we’ve been doing it since we started to talk as human beings. “I think that is why it is the most emotional sense. We’re primarily visual animals but our sense of hearing is the most emotional. There is something to be said for just listening to a story on the radio versus seeing it at the movies in the same way that reading a book is often better than seeing a movie.” Podcasts also are a way of hearing stories that do not involve a screen, it happens in the mind. And what is more powerful than having a story told to you, to truly hearing another’s story? A Festival Called Panama offers a rare opportunity to sit down and listen to Carrier’s glorious radio tones, to settle and slow amidst a weekend of festivalling. RACHEL EDWARDS

Scott Carrier will be appearing at Panama Festival, which runs March 11 – 13. Further details from www.panamafestival.com.au.

Ruffcut Records

222 ARGYLE ST HOBART Hiring: Band Backline, DJ gear, Projectors, PA gear, Party & Event Lighting. Phone: (03) 6234 8600

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Music

SOLDIER ON THE PAST COUPLE OF YEARS HAVE SEEN A BIG PUSH IN 90S NOSTALGIA, BUT THE 80S IS NEVER REALLY FORGOTTEN. WE ALWAYS SEEM TO HAVE SPACE IN OUR COLLECTIVE HEART FOR THAT PARTICULAR ERA. WAS IT THE NEON, THE BIG HAIR, THE DUMB CARS, THE SHAMELESS POP? I RECKON SO. SUCH IS THE INSPIRATION BEHIND THE TOTALLY 80S TOUR, WHICH WILL SEE ICONS OF THE DECADE TOURING AUSTRALIA, PEDDLING THEIR RETRO WARES FOR A NOSTALGIC CROWD. THE TOUR WILL FEATURE, AMONG OTHERS: MEN WITHOUT HATS, WA WA NEE, BERLIN, KATRINA (KATRINA AND THE WAVES) AND, MY INTERVIEW FOR TODAY, MARTIKA.

You might know Martika best for her massive singles More Than You Know, a reimagining of I Feel The Earth Move and, of course, Toy Soldiers. Martika’s career survived the 80s-90s changeover period, and she released two solo albums. She has also released two albums with side project Oppera, a band featuring Martika and her husband Michael Mozart. “I have to pick shoes, shop for wardrobe...I bobbed my hair for the first time in a while” says Miss Martika, wondering how best to re-introduce herself to the tour crowds. “I want people to recognise me and feel the familiarity. It’s all about bringing that era back to life, I want to keep a consistency, to how people remember but I definitely wanna give it a modern touch.” “It had a happy vibe, we wanna revisit the soundtrack to our lives!” she explains, when I ask what exactly made the 80s so fun and memorable. “It’s nostalgia for all of

us, remembering a time when we didn’t have as much responsibility. It’s happy and uplifting. I think maybe it was a bit of escapism, I would hope that music would uplift, a lot of music would express anger and angst, there was definitely a goofball aspect, now we’re used to someone like Kanye: “I will never be photographed smiling” [laughs] that’s a harder-edged era. I was trying to have fun, I was a teenager, going to clubs with friends, having a good time with the girls. That first album [Martika, 1988] captured that aspect.” Martika hasn’t hit Australian shores since 1991. How has she changed since then? “That was so many lifetimes ago! It’s a great paradox, I’m still the same girl but completely different at the same time. When I came to Australia, I was...not even 21. I was such a child. I hadn’t even been that far from home. I was kind of at that point where kids go to college and leave the nest, maybe go to another city, feeling out what it’s like to be a grown person, but that was the era where I was hitting my career hard. I felt like I was growing up in front of people. [But] I don’t like to have regrets. You never know if you had gone a different way, how things would turn out. I can’t have regrets because I had so many amazing experiences. One of the cool things about having been in the public eye is the fact that people have connected over music.” LISA DIB

The Totally 80s Tour will hit Wrest Point on Friday July 22. Tickets available from www.tixtas.com.au.

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SkyFields 2016

Saturday March 19th 2.00pm Gates Open 2.00pm Campers allowed into Camping/Car Park 2.00pm VIP Plus Parking open on site 3.30pm Welcome To Country 3.40pm till 4.00pm Leah Woodbury 4.10pm till 4.40pm Halfway To Forth 4.50pm till 5.35pm Jesse Tienaki 5.45pm till 6.35pm Dan Sultan 6.45pm till 7.55pm Paul Dempsey 8.15pm till 10.30pm Missy Higgins and the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra with the Crescendo Choir Aftershow Party - 2nd Stage 11.00pm till Finish Pete Cornelius and The Devilles

SUNDAY March 20th 7.00am Barbecue Breakfast and Coffee Van for Campers Begins 12.00pm Barbecue Breakfast for Campers Ends

MAP

1.00pm All Patrons off Venue

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Music

CARNIVAL OF THE ANIMALS IN FIVE FUN FACTS FROM TORTOISES TO KANGAROOS, ROOSTERS TO WILD ASSES, CAMILLE SAINT-SAENS DEPICTS IT ALL IN HIS MUCH LOVED CARNIVAL OF THE ANIMALS. THE WORK WAS WRITTEN IN 1886 AND FEATURES 14 MOVEMENTS IN ALL, EACH REMINDING US OF FEATHERS AND FUR. WE BRING IT TO YOU HERE IN FIVE FUN FACTS, AHEAD OF THE TASMANIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA’S PERFORMANCE THIS MONTH.

1. IT WAS ACTUALLY JUST A JOKE Saint-Saens wrote his famous Carnival of the Animals as a joke. It was all a bit of “fun” for the composer, who preferred to be known for his more serious symphonic works. For this reason, he made sure the work was published only after his death – and indeed, it received its first public performance by Concerts Colonne in 1922, the year following his passing. 2. BUT THE SWAN WAS AN EXCEPTION Perhaps the most famous of all Saint-Saens’ animals, The Swan was the only movement he allowed to be published while he was alive and in 1887 it was arranged for cello and solo piano. Almost 20 years later, the beautifully sentimental melody was choreographed for Anna Pavlova, the renowned ballerina who is said to have taken the work to the stage 4000 times.

3. PLENTY OF MUSICAL REFERENCES In his 11th movement Pianistes, Saint-Saens reminds us of a pianist practicing scales, while the following Fossiles references his own work Danse macabre. It also draws from a few more nursery rhymes and songs, from Twinkle Twinkle Little Star to Au Clair de la Lune and The Barber of Seville. Flip the coin and you’ll find Saint-Saens’ work referenced across other music, from Ennio Morricone’s Academy Award-nominated score for Days of Heaven, to a surf-rock version used as the theme song for a Disneyland rollercoaster in the ‘90s.

5. THERE’S A RHYME TO GO WITH You’ll occasionally hear about a set of rhymes that accompanies the Carnival of the Animals, written by Ogden Nash (yes, real name) in 1949. In his poetic introduction to the musical work, Nash perceptively remarks: “Camille Saint-Saens was wracked with pains, when people addressed him as Saint-Saens. He held the human race to blame, because it could not pronounce his name. So, he turned with metronome and fife, to glorify other kinds of life.” This month’s Hobart performance features new poems by Tassie writer Bradley Trevor Greive. STEPHANIE ESLAKE

4. WEIRD AL TOTALLY DUG IT In the late ‘80s, Weird Al Yankovic teamed up with Wendy Carlos in a Grammy nominated album Peter and the Wolf: Carnival of the Animals – part II. Honouring the creatures Saint-Saens abandoned, the track listing features the iguana, vulture, aardvark, amoeba, cockroach and unicorn – among others.

Beer Garden Party

See the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra perform Camille SaintSaens’ Carnival of the Animals in the Federation Concert Hall. Starts 6pm, March 23. Concert narrated by ABC’s Richard Morecroft. Tickets available from www.tso.com.au.

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Indonesian Feast

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Sunday 20th March 2.30pm

THURSDAY 24 MARCH brisbane hotel hobart FRIDAY 25 MARCH club 54 launceston facebook.com/strungout instagram@strungout twitter@strungout strungout.com

Featuring:

Beef Rendang (Curry) Nasi Goreng Fried Rice Indonesian Salad

Live Music By

Tony Mac

REPUBLIC BAR & CAFÉ

299 Elizabeth St. North Hobart Ph 6234.6954 www.republicbar.com

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Arts THEATRE

THEY SAW A THYLACINE IT’S BEEN 80 YEARS SINCE THE LAST KNOWN TASSIE TIGER DIED IN CAPTIVITY AT THE OLD BEAUMARIS ZOO. BUT THE SPIRIT OF THE THYLACINE LIVES ON THROUGH OUR CULTURE AND HISTORY. PLAYWRIGHTS JUSTINE CAMPBELL AND SARAH HAMILTON CELEBRATE THE CREATURE IN THEIR LATEST PRODUCTION THEY SAW A THYLACINE, SHOWING AT THE THEATRE ROYAL THIS MONTH.

Until recently, New Zealand-born Justine Campbell had never even heard of a thylacine. Sarah Hamilton was doing free-writing one morning and began to write about the extinct Tasmanian animal, calling Justine to tell her about an idea for a new work. “I said, ‘What’s a thylacine?’,” Justine recalls.

Sarah, on the other hand, plays a fictional character called Beatie McCullough – a tracker during a time when there was a substantial reward for the animal (living or dead). “Sarah’s story is taken from an amalgamation of research, and it’s fictional but it’s based on anecdotal stories and also from some of her family stories,” Justine said.

“As soon as she said it was the Tassie tiger, I thought it was absolutely fascinating. It’s become part of Australia’s mythology. It was wonderful because it took me on a journey of research.”

Born in Tasmania, Sarah’s own grandfather is said to have encountered the creature in his youth. At the beach, he “thought he saw a monster that had drowned or beached itself on the sand”.

Justine visited Tasmania last year to meet a man called Wes Cram, who used to look after the last thylacine living in Hobart’s old Beaumaris Zoo. “He’s in his 90s and from when he was about eight he used to go once a week every Sunday and feed the thylacine,” Justine says.

“He ran back home and told his father, who came down. It was a thylacine that had washed up. And that’s an interesting image that comes into the play as well.”

The actress plays the role of the real life Alison Reid (who Wes used to meet at the zoo), a woman who “struggled with bureaucracy” to try to save the thylacine and other animals on the site.

She wasn’t raised in the state like Sarah, but Justine still feels a strong connection to the Tassie Tiger. “Coming from New Zealand, we’ve got animals that became extinct such as the moa, so extinction is also something that’s been a part of our recent heritage as well.” But why are we so obsessed with the mystery of the thylacine? Justine reckons it’s because we still have video footage of the creature. “It’s so in the here-and-now because it’s happened only in the last 100 years. We’ve still got this documentation of photos and videos. I think it moves us incredibly deeply because it’s something we can see, it’s so recent in the grand scheme of time.”

Photo Credit: Pia Johnson

Justine hopes the play will inspire an interest in the thylacine for years to come. “Hopefully people in the future will look back and see the fascination we have now as the springboard of an enlightenment towards how we treat the earth and how we treat other creatures.” STEPHANIE ESLAKE

They Saw a Thylacine is on at the Theatre Royal on March 31 and April 1, 7.30pm. Adults from $40, available from www. theatreroyal.com.au.

LITERARY

TAMAR VALLEY WRITER’S FESTIVAL THE TAMAR VALLEY WRITERS’ FESTIVAL RETURNS THIS MARCH IN THE GLORIOUS SURROUNDS OF BEACONSFIELD IN WEST TAMAR, VERY CLOSE TO THE FINE CITY OF LAUNCESTON. THE FESTIVAL, WHICH MADE ITS DEBUT UNDER THE BANNER ‘GOLDEN WORDS’ A FEW YEARS AGO INCLUDES A DIVERSE PROGRAM OF PANELS, DISCUSSIONS, READINGS, WORKSHOPS AND LAUNCHES AND IT ALSO HAS A DEDICATED CHILDREN’S AND YOUNG ADULT (YA) COMPONENT.

The program contains many of Tasmania’s best known writers as well as a platoon of prominent visitors to the state, including Radio National’s Michael Cathcart and Philip Adams. Julian Burnside, the brave and compassionate lawyer and refugee advocate will be speaking on panels about national identity and social justice and I’m feeling privileged to be hosting a discussion with the erudite Don Watson, wise watchdog of language and Paul Keating’s former speech writer, about his new book The Bush. Some of the Tasmanian voices include Rohan Wilson, whose dark historical novels The Roving Party and To Name Those Lost have been compared in style to Cormac McCarthy, Favel Parrett, who may no longer identify as ‘Tasmanian’ per se, but her books confirm a deep fascination with the deepest, darkest south of the continent, and Lindsay Tuffin, raconteur and fearless editor of Tasmania’s only alternative news outlet, Tasmaniantimes.com. So many more of us too! One the young people front, some highlights include Alice Pung, discussing her YA novel Laurinda and children’s author Anne Morgan and illustrator Lois Bury will be launching a new book The Moonlight Bird and the Grolken on Friday 18 in Marquee one. The festival will also feature both sides of Angelica Banks and the Tuesday McGillycuddy books, Jaclyn Moriarty and Justin D’Ath.

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Launceston is the definitely the hub for performance poetry in Tasmania (with sweet southern offerings in the form of Silver Words) and Luke Wren Reid is hosting Tamarduggery (riffing off the regular Slamduggery events now hosted by Angus King) on the Saturday evening of the festival. There are some sessions dedicated to the little explored art of publishing, as well as self publishing and while I could go on about the wonderful range of sessions I’d actually suggest that you get yourself a program, pool yourselves in a car and come along to hear some of these fantastic people speak, celebrate reading and writing and check out the beautiful Tamar Valley. And, many of these events are free. No excuses, see you there. PS The festival is also offering workshops on subjects including starting off as a freelance illustrator and manga illustration, a glorious inclusion. PPS Richard Fidler, who is a serious contestant in Australia’s Best Interviewer Awards (TM pending) will also be there. RACHEL EDWARDS The festival runs from March 18-20 and more information can be found at www.tamarvalleywritersfestival.com.au.


Arts

FILM

SLINGSHOT COURTSHIP, INFIDELITY, AND ROMANCE. IT MAY SOUND LIKE A TYPICAL LOVE STORY, BUT AUSSIE SHORT FILM MAKER DAVID HANSEN TELLS THE TALE THROUGH THE EYES OF A 10-YEAR-OLD. SLINGSHOT TOOK OUT BEST SHORT AT THIS YEAR’S FLICKERFEST, AND ITS DIRECTOR SHARES HIS ODD INSPIRATIONS AND THE EXPERIENCE OF WORKING WITH YOUNG ACTORS. So what’s Slingshot all about? It’s an analogy on modern love told through the eyes of one of its latest victim. It contains all the elements of a modern day romance from the quick courtship to the romantic period, then a minor infidelity, a breakup, and a splitting of assets – all told within seven minutes. All those things happen between two 10-year-olds. It’s innocent, playful, and fun – no lawyers involved. This is your first rom-com, so to speak. How’d the idea come to you? I was sitting in a bar in Salamanca, which is just west of Madrid, and an English couple who were in their mid to late 50s took a place at the bar. They started getting it on like they were teenagers, just pashing and groping each other. It’s not something you see every day. I thought that was a bit odd. I usually carry a pen and pad with me and Slingshot just came out in one hit then and there. I’m not too sure what it was about that couple getting it on in a bar – perhaps I had a cynical lens on but it all came out in one hit. That was 2011 and I was there on a holiday. You’ve said the story is about love told through the eye of its victim. Do you think that we are all sufferers of love, and is this something that should be learnt at an early age? It’s not a guide for a 10-year-old in their early romance periods. In love, especially perhaps young love, one can be blinded by that love and you lose your objectiveness. Frankie, the boy, falls a victim to those feelings and that romance. It’s his first romance, a special moment. He’s a guarded young man at the start of the film – he has his defences up and he’s not really into it. But the girl, Tayla, manages to break through his guarded nature. He does fall for her and can’t quite get his objectivity back.

schoolyard. You tell someone you like them and then they tell the whole school and you get embarrassed. I remember that awkward phase. I also do a lot of filmmaking workshops. When I graduated in 2005 from film school at the Victorian College of the Arts, I headed straight to the outback and worked with indigenous people and part of that process was teaching people how to make films. The most common group I worked with were youth groups from 10-15 years of age. I’ve maintained that work up until now with kids in cities and rural areas too, so because we’re collaborating on film projects I constantly have their perspectives in mind. Having that so fresh is another way to access that mentality when writing. There’s an old saying among filmmakers – never work with children or animals. How was the experience? There’s an animal in it, too! You need to be on the ball when working with children. You have to work a little bit differently because they don’t have the training or process a more established actor has. Mind you, young actors can certainly get to the emotional areas you need to get them to, but you need to think outside the box in terms of getting them there as a performer on the day of the shoot. It’s more tricky, more time consuming. I rehearsed quite thoroughly with these actors and left as little as possible to chance on the day. You were awarded the Flickerfest 2016 Virgin Australia Award for Best Australian Short Film. Why do you think yours was so successful? There’s a throwback to an era in our lives when things were a little bit more simple and less complicated, while touching on universal themes. Most of us have been love-struck and fallen for someone, most of us remember our first kiss. And I think people are able to connect with the youth, innocence, first love aspect of the film. But because it also touches on some larger universal themes, covering that whole journey of a relationship, it rings some bells in people’s minds and pulls some emotional strings. As a credit to my actors, they did a fantastic job. STEPHANIE ESLAKE

How do you, as a 37-year-old, go about understanding the way a child feels about love? As a writer, you’re constantly putting yourself in other people’s shoes. But I had very vivid memories from that period in my life – I can pinpoint conversations and moments I felt emotions for other people in the

Flickerfest is on across the state from March 9-11. Full details available at www. flickerfest.com.au/tour.

VISUAL ART

THE SKETCHBOOK PROJECT LAST YEAR, DEVONPORT REGIONAL GALLERY’S YOUNG MEMBERSHIP GROUP - THE DROOGS - INITIATED THE SKETCHBOOK PROJECT, WHICH INVOLVED THE DISTRIBUTION OF OVER 400 SKETCHBOOKS TO THE LOCAL DEVONPORT COMMUNITY. This year, young people can once again participate in the project, cumulating in an exhibition at Reclaim the Lane festival as part of National Youth Week. Entry is free, and sketchbooks can be collected from Devonport Regional Gallery or Devonport LINC. For inspiration, participants might want to visit the website of the unaffiliated Sketchbook Project, based at the Brooklyn Art Library in New York (see www.sketchbookproject. com). The library includes over 35,000 sketchbooks from artists based in more than 135 countries. While nothing beats the tactility of a physical sketchbook, about half the collection can be viewed in their digital library. Reclaim the Lane is on Friday April 20, 3–5 pm. Rooke Lane, Devonport. More information can be found at Reclaim the Lane: www.facebook.com/ ReclaimTheLane.

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Arts Interview with

Julia Drouhin YOU MIGHT HAVE ALREADY HEARD OF JULIA DROUHIN’S SWEET SWEET TRIBOLOGY PROJECT. LAST YEAR, A SUCCESSFUL CROWDFUNDING CAMPAIGN ALLOWED HER TO COMMISSION AND INSCRIBE THE MUSIC OF FORTY FEMALE ARTISTS ONTO CHOCOLATE RECORDS. WARP TALKED TO THE FRENCHBORN ARTIST ABOUT LAST MONTH’S PERFORMANCE AT THE MONA MARKETS, HER UPCOMING INVOLVEMENT IN THE WORLDWIDE EVENT, SOUNDCAMP, AS WELL AS HER UPCOMING COLLABORATIVE PROJECTS WITH FELLOW HOBART-BASED ARTIST, PIP STAFFORD.

of a former orphanage. It was creepy. Everything was still in there, and everything was big. The pots were big, the spoons were big. People still came with eskies and snacks though.

[women] have to wax [their] legs. But in Tasmania you don’t. When I came to Tasmania I was surprised that people had hair growing. In France it’s not done.

How did you come up with the distinctive name?

Tell me more about the fashion parade that followed Tribology at Mona last week.

‘Tribology’ comes from the science of friction. Examples can be found on my website [such as the friction between wax and chocolate, archive and art, past and present, original and copy]. But then I thought Tribology sounded a bit scary, so I added ‘sweet’ to the name. It can refer to the chocolate, but it also has links to women – people say ‘she’s so sweet’. It’s a bit disgusting, you know. What about the element of humour in your work, such as absurdity of casting chocolate records, and the title I Married a Dead Icecream?

How did Sweet Sweet Tribology come about? In 2014, an art space in Spain, Spectrum, commissioned me to curate a radio event. The performance was called I Married a Dead Icecream, and that’s where I started to mix food and sound. I created a radio picnic, broadcasting sound from a mobile ice cream machine in the Plaza Instituto in Gijon, Spain. But then I was looking for something harder. [The Dunedin sound artist] Sally Ann Macintyre, who runs a radio station called Radio Cegeste, visited Tassie and introduced me to the Sound Preservation Association of Tasmania. They have thousands of wax cylinders [an early medium for recording and reproducing sound]. I recorded one minute each of 70 cylinders, and would think of a particular female artist with each one – you know when you associate a sound with someone? I then asked them if they’d like to reply to that wax minute in an audio or visual way, and curated the responses into a series of records. The first Sweet Sweet Tribology picnic was in Spain last year. It was originally planned for a garden, but when it rained, it was moved to a giant kitchen

I guess it’s just me. I don’t prepare it. If I have to write a proposal it’s very serious, but it’s not deliberate… maybe it’s because I’m scared of being serious. Everything is possible when it’s funny. But then it’s also accessible, isn’t it? Yes. Kids love [the chocolate records]. It’s very visual, but then you can play the music on the records. You can eat the music, hear the colours. You can actually eat those invisible frequencies. You can touch it, it is melting, it is very ephemeral. Why did you only select female participants? Well, being in Tasmania revealed to me that I was working with lots of men. I was running a festival in Paris, and I was always trying to include women. It was a challenge. Sweet Sweet Tribology is the first project that I’ve done that is women only. I was a bit against it at first. Nothing is equal, and I didn’t want the 50-50 thing, but now that I’ve done this project, I’ve been rethinking my position. But it was still difficult. I sent out seventy invitations, and only thirty nine replied. Also, the project started with the wax cylinders, and it got me thinking about waxing - as in

Kirsha Kaechele wanted a runway renegade catwalk at the Mona markets. There was a rule: we had to go to Rosny college and use costumes from there. I had an egg man, a happy couple, a lizard mother, and I was the Milky Way. There was a rapper dressed up Mad Max style. I called it the Pink Noise Parade, because I like the idea of dressing up as sound. There’s such a thing as pink noise? Pink noise is the sound when you change radio stations. I didn’t want to call it white noise because it has associations with virginity. What are your future plans for the project? My next performance will be at the Sound Preservation Association of Tasmania, probably in July, and then another performance in Germany in October. The format of the record allows a variety of visuals and sound, and I like the way that it’s a portable exhibition. Everything is in a box. In the future, I want to involve the audience more, and play with the audience. You’re also involved in Soundcamp from the 30 April – 1 May. What’s that? It’s a project that broadcasts 24 hours of sounds of sunrise. People from all around the world are connected online to share that moment of the dawn chorus. Anyone can listen to it online. I hope to simultaneously broadcast our dawn on a local radio station, maybe Huonville. Tell me about your upcoming Melbourne projects with your frequent collaborator, Pip Stafford. Our performance is called Super Occult Cosmophon as part of Dinner and a Show. It’s a similar work to the one performed at [the new Hobart Artist Run Initiative] Visual Bulk recently, where we attached antennae to our backs, the sound of the radio changing as we moved. We are radio queens, channelling the dead frequencies of the radio. LUCY HAWTHORNE

Dinner and a Show, curated by Shani Mohini-Holmes, will be held at Collingwood Masonic Centre, Melbourne on the 18 March 2016. You can also see Drouhin and Stafford’s project, Sisters Akousmatica, at Melbourne’s 2016 Next Wave Festival in May. For more information on the above projects: Sweet Sweet Tribology: sweet-sweet-tribology.hotglue. me/?home Soundcamp: soundtent.org I Married a Dead Icecream: i-married-a-dead-icecream. hotglue.me Next Wave: nextwave.org.au Image info: Julia Drouhin, Sweet Sweet Tribology in the Moorilla Winery, Mona Markets, February 2016 Julia Drouhin, Pink Noise Parade, Mona Markets, February 2016. Photographer: Amy Brown Courtesy Amy Brown and the artist.

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PAIGE TURNER

THIS HERE WOMAN ACKNOWLEDGES THAT SHE IS ON A SLIPPERY SLOPE. A SLIPPERY SLOPE OF READING GRAPHIC NOVELS. IT STARTED LATE LAST YEAR WITH THE PUBLICATION OF JW CLENNETT’S EXQUISITELY CRAFTED, WRITTEN AND DRAWN FICTIONAL HISTORY OF TASMANIA THE DIEMENOIS (HUNTER PUBLISHING), WHICH HAS BEEN NOMINATED IN THE BEST GRAPHIC NOVEL/ILLUSTRATED WORK SECTION OF THE 2015 AUREALIS AWARDS. IT ALSO GOT THE THUMBS-UP FROM THE AGE: “...A TRIUMPH OF THE GRAPHIC NOVEL, STRANGE, DARK AND VERY AUSTRALIAN. FANS OF ITS FORM WILL FIND IT; BUT OTHERS WITH AN INTEREST IN THOSE BYWAYS OFF THE BEATEN LITERARY TRACK WILL ALSO HAVE MUCH TO ENJOY.”

From Clennett, I moved to Marjane Satrapi, starting with Persepolis, the first in a series of graphic novels about growing up in Iran and then, a life in exile. Satrapi’s delivery is light and sharp, but her subject matter is often heavy; a woman’s lot under an oppressive regime and how a rich culture that values literature and learning has been degraded. Tasmania’s connection to Iran and their vibrant and enduring literary culture is about to be deepened with the launch of The Third Script. This book includes new short stories from Iran, Tasmania and the UK – and it is a diverse range of short stories too. I say that with the conviction that comes from being an editor of the collection, alongside Shirinkdokht Nourmanesh (Iran) and Sean Preston (UK). The stories are introduced by Amanda Lohrey, who quotes Shirindokht in her introduction “Shirin reminds us that Iran has a rich centuries-old culture, now stifled by persecution. With dark irony, she writes: ‘I live in Iran, the land of myths, legends and romance, of words and allegories, of flowers and nightingales, the den of lions, heaven of poets and gazelles, ancient culture and civilization sprinkled in rose water, painted in spattered blood. In this colourful paradise, I am much respected and loved. As the great novelist Esmail Fassih reminds us: “in the splendour land of Iran, a good writer is a dead writer”.’ The book, gorgeously designed by Kelly Eidjenberg of Poco People will be launched by Melanie Tait, reader extraordinaire and host of Statewide Evenings on ABC Radio on March 22, 5.30pm at Fullers in Hobart. See you there. Tamar Valley Literary Festival runs between March 18-20. For some of my top picks to get you in the (largely free) festival mood, check out the accompanying article and at the festival’s website: www. tamarvalleywritersfestival.com.au. The 144th edition of Island will be out on 3 March, the first under the new editors.  The cover story is by Tasmanian, Father Julian Punch AM and there are also pieces from James Boyce, Delia Nicholls, Greg Barns, Adam Ouston and Bronwyn Lea. There is also artwork from Plimsoll Gallery and photography by Matthew Newton.   The Tasmanian Writers’ Centre is offering their exchange with Prince Edward Island in Canada again, more information is available here - www. taswriters.org/changing-places-writers-exchange. Slamduggery, which was started a few years ago by the irrepressible Lucinda Shannon, one of the invited writers for The Third Script, is hosting World Poetry Slam Champion, Harry Baker from the UK. This is happening at Fresh in Launceston on March 15, 7.30pm. Tickets are approximately $10 on the door. I love how Launceston is leading Tasmania’s live poetry charge – and wish I could travel North for more of this art form. If you have some word related news, I’d love to hear from you. Racheledwards488@gmail.com. RACHEL EDWARDS

WARP RECOMMENDS

Image credit: Lucy Hawthorne

Radio Therapy: Brain Massage Elissa Ritson and Bridget Hickey have a proposal for you: a five-minute head massage in exchange for an audio recording of some of your life experiences. It’s an alluring service, promising to ‘bring you peace of mind through talk and touch. Let your worries float away on invisible waves.’ The participatory performance is part of the Moonah Art Centre’s annual exhibition, The Glenorchy Open, which features the work of artists who live and/or work in the municipality. The small massage booth is set up in a sunny section of the gallery’s foyer, decorated with pink mesh, fresh flowers, and soft brain-like objects, which I’m invited to comfortingly fondle during my brain massage. Ritson plays masseuse, polite to the extreme. I’m coaxed into retelling a recent (and slightly guilt-inducing) ‘life experience’ - AKA the raucous party I attended last night. It’s an entirely welcome and healing procedure, and if you’re not scared of sharing, I highly recommend giving it a go.

Radio Therapy: Brain Massage is performed at Moonah Arts Centre 1-3pm every Saturday until the 12th March.

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Arts

FILM

FLICKERFEST FLICKERFEST IS YOUR GATEWAY TO THE BEST SHORT FILMS IN THE WORLD. THE FESTIVAL HITS TASMANIA THIS MONTH AS PART OF ITS NATIONAL TOUR, WITH SCREENINGS ACROSS HOBART, CYGNET AND LAUNCESTON. FESTIVAL DIRECTOR BRONWYN KIDD TALKS US THROUGH THE EVENT.

It’s Bronwyn Kidd’s 19th year with the festival, which celebrates its own 25th birthday as the top Academy accredited and BAFTA-recognised short film fest in the nation. “It gives audiences the opportunity to see the most creative innovative and fresh new short films from the leading emerging filmmakers,” Bronwyn explains. There were more than 2300 entries in this year’s Flickerfest. So how do you pick a selection of short films to ensure the success of such a long running festival? “What we’re looking for is creativity. We’re looking for telling stories. We’re looking for filmmaking that is culturally diverse; that we’re representing a range of voices and not just the same free-to-air TV that we see across Australia.” Part of the diversity includes a big representation of female directors, while Bronwyn says Flickerfest also brings a more “multicultural view of Australian culture” than you’d find in other festivals. Among the Tassie screenings are Ernie Biscuit from Oscar winner Adam Elliot, Academy Award nominated Ave Maria and Shok, and Balcony – winner of the Flickerfest Award for Best International Short Film. “It’s about a great script, a film taking you on a journey that is giving you new insights into life or a particular situation that is going on in the world and doing that in a non-Hollywood, formulaic way.” But what’s wrong with Hollywood? While it’s produced some of the most well-known films in cinema history, Bronwyn says its success is due to its position as a big-budget industry. “Short films are truly independent – they’re not operating with huge amounts of money and studios behind them to give them commercial 18

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success. They’re coming from an independent place. It’s important for a commercial industry not to dictate cinema, which is a creative pursuit.” Bronwyn reckons we should be proud of our differences, not aim to be the same as Hollywood. “Australia’s films are never going to have the same amount of huge profile that Hollywood blockbusters are,” she says. “It’s about looking at how we support the Australian industry, which is an independent industry that comes about through being able to tell our own stories through our own culture and not having a culture imposed upon us from outside, which is Hollywood.”

Theatre

Duck Lake ART MEETS ACTIVISM IN A PERFORMANCE AT MOULTING LAGOON THIS MONTH. DUCK LAKE, AS THE TITLE SUGGESTS, IS PERFORMED TO THE SOUNDTRACK OF THE FAMOUS BALLET, SWAN LAKE. BUT THAT’S WHERE THE TRADITION ENDS.

According to Bronwyn, it can take up to seven years to raise funds for a feature film. As a result, short films offer their makers an outlet to explore hot contemporary issues without having them go out of date. “That’s one of the things that really sets a short film apart – the immediateness. It’s really fresh, and often made by younger filmmakers about the things that are relevant to them in their lives. That’s another reason shorts are so compelling and interesting.” Think you’ve got what it takes to make your own short film? Bronwyn shares her take on the most important elements of a production: 1.

Original idea. Tell a story that you’re passionate about. That’s what makes all good films.

2. Location. You need to go and find it – where its filmed should make sense when considering what the film is about. 3.

Solid performances. Go to acting schools and find people who are training as actors. But often, it’s worth paying the actors because you can end up with a better product. STEPHANIE ESLAKE

On the dawn of the opening of Tasmania’s duck hunting season, the dancers appear in hot pink tutus, pink camo-patterned leggings and pink high-vis vests, accompanied by a flotilla of decoy kayakers - all designed to scare the lagoon’s ducks from the nearby hunters. Described as “Priscilla Queen of the Desert meets Werner Herzog’s Fitzcarraldo,” the performance is an unusual method of protest - a mix of humorous entertainment, parody, and an ultimately macabre purpose. The novel concept, however, has attracted a great deal of interest and support from the local community. The event’s organiser - artist, activist and academic, Yvette Watt – raised over $10,000 for the ambitious project, with sixty artists donating artworks towards the fundraising effort. LUCY HAWTHORNE Duck Lake, 5th March 2016, Moulting Lagoon, Freycinet Peninsula. Free entry.

Flickerfest runs from March 9-11 across Launceston, Cygnet and Hobart. Full details and tickets www. flickerfest.com.au/tour.

Disclaimer: I am a financial supporter of this project.


Arts

Gallery

performing arts

Guide

Guide

South 146 Artspace Feb 4 - Mar 10 CONSTANCE presents: Somewhere, Away Mar 17 - April 21 A Shared Exhibition with Promised Denial by Shireen Taweel and Anteroom by Sam Johnstone Bett Gallery Feb 26 - Mar 14 Lucienne Rickard Mar 18 - April 4 Amber Koroluk-Stephenson Contemporary Art Tasmania Feb 20 - Mar 20 The Address Mar 11 The Uncomtemporary Mar 19 The Ghosts of Nothing Mar 23 Conversations on Practice Mar 25 Eloise Kirk Colville Gallery Mar 9 Fine Art Auction Mar 18 Katy Woodroffe Handmark Gallery Feb 19 - Mar 14 Blair Waterfield & Emma Bugg Mar 18 - April 11 Furniture Exhibition - Various Artists MONA Until Mar 28 Gilbert & George Until July 11 Mathieu Briand: Et In Libertalia Ego. Vol II Until Mar 28 Katthy Cavaliere: Loved Rosny Barn Schoolhouse Gallery Mar 4 - Mar 24 Drawing Breath Mar 18 - April 17 Hunt Nature Birth: Tara Badcock

SOUTH Salamanca Arts Centre Studio Gallery Mar 1 - Mar 28 Tasmanian Landscapes: A Different Perspective Sidespace Gallery Mar 1 - Mar 6 Deconstruct / Reconstruct Mar 11 - Mar 21 Shadows from the Island Lightbox Mar 1 - Mar 31 The Art of Design AT The Maker TMAG Until May 22 Pattern Play Until May 1 Where Science Meets Art: The Botanical Illustrations of Rod Seppelt Mar 18 - May 22 Snapshot Photography and Migrant Women: A Tasmanian Experience

NORTH QVMAG Nov 20 - April 3 Richard Wastell and Matthew Newton on Albatross Island Handmark Evandale Feb 14 - Mar 9 John Lendis “Indigo” Mar 13 - April 6 Landscape Exhibition Handmark Artists Burnie Regional Gallery Until Mar 4 People Like Us Until Mar 4 Limited Edition Until Mar 4 Eight Years On - The Tradition Continues Mar 12 - May 22 Michelangelo: The Exhibition Devonport Regional Gallery Mar 19 - May 8 Katherine Hattam: Desire First Mar 19 - April 16 TRANSform Gallery Pejean Mar 3 - April 2 Still Life Revisited

CIRCUS

THEATRE

Theatre Royal Mar 19 - 22 Flying Fruit Fly Circus presents Circus Under My Bed

Peacock Theatre Mar 17 - Mar 26 The Hatpin

COMEDY

Theatre Royal Mar 10 - Mar 19 Pedalling Back Mar 31 - April 1 0They Saw a Thylacine

Derwent Entertainment Centre April 1 Em Rusciano

NORTH

The Republic Bar Mar 17 The Clubhouse with Tommy Dassalo

COMEDY

Wrest Point Mar 30 Ross Noble The Polish Club Mar 2 Alice Fraser Mar 9 Peter Berner Mar 16 Sue-Ann Post Mar 23 Anthony Morgan Mar 30 Simon Palomares

FILM Cinemona Until Mar 28 The Secret Files of Gilbert and George Until Mar 28 With Gilbert and George Cygnet Town Hall (Cygnet) Mar 11 Flickerfest: 2016 Tour - Best of Australian Shorts Peacock Theatre Mar 10 Flickerfest: 2016 Tour - Best of International Mar 11 Flickerfest: 2016 Tour - Best of Australian Shorts

Fresh on Charles Mar 18 Fresh Comedy - Tommy Little

CABARET Burnie Arts Centre Mar 5 The Paris Underground Cabaret Mar 18 Claire Dawson - A Woman on the Edge Theatre North Mar 18 Claire Dawson - A Woman on the Edge

FILM Annexe Theatre (Inveresk) Mar 9 Flickerfest: 2016 Tour - Best of Australian Shorts

THEATRE Theatre North Mar 10 - 12 Mudlark’s One Day Project

They Saw a Thylacine BY HUMAN ANIMAL EXCHANGE

31 March & 1 April

Melbourne International Comedy Festival Roadshow Sun 1 May

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Event Guide

Hobart Date

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

BACK - Greenthief (VIC) + Diego The Butcher + Dog Dreams

Date

March Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

20

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

Karaoke

Republic Bar & Café

Sugarcane Collins 8:30pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Dan Vandermeer 7pm Unlocked (accoustic night) 6pm

Brisbane Hotel

FRONT - Morton Stone + Woe + Starmaker

The Waratah Hotel

Brisbane Hotel

Late Night Krackieoke

Waterfront Hotel

Billy Whitton 7pm

Claremont Hotel

Karaoke - DJ Dazz 7pm

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Grand Poobah

Edge Radio Party with Filty Little Star, Those Bloody Ingalls & Violet Swells & DJs 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

Late Night Krackieoke

Brisbane Hotel

Kashkin

Grand Poobah Kissing Room

The Midways, Pine & Staircase plus DJ Astral Files 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

Brett Collidge (Happy Hour)

Onyx

Jerome Hillier 9pm

Fluke and Bruce Hotel

A Night at the Round Table 7pm

Republic Bar & Café

After Work Acoustic Sessions in the Beer Garden with Tim & Scott + Free Sausage Sizzle 5pm

Grand Poobah

Ultra Martian & Straddlepuss 9pm

Republic Bar & Café

The Racoons & The Revtones 10pm

Onyx

Girl Friday 9pm

Republic Bar & Café

After Work Acoustic Sessions in the Beer Garden with Tony Mac + Free Sausage Sizzle 5:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

Australia Made (Aussie Pub Rock) 10pm

Telegraph Hotel

Matt & Abby / Big Swifty

The Apple Shed

Nick Osborn 6pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Tori and Sean 7pm

The Yard

Yard House DJ 7:30pm

Waterfront Hotel

Blue Monday 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Tim & Scott 8:30pm

Brisbane Hotel

Zoe Zac + Sarah Lacy Ann

Grand Poobah

Mayhem & Me Music Video Debut + Wolf Arrow Rain + The Sign 8:30pm

Onyx

Blue Monday 9pm

Pier One

Les Coqs 6pm

Republic Bar & Café

Ange Boxhall 2:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

Sugartrain 10pm Micheal Clennett / Dr Fink

Telegraph Hotel

Micheal Clennett / Dr Fink

The Apple Shed

Liz Stringer 6pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Dan Vandermeer 7pm

The Yard

DJ Mad 7:30pm

Waterfront Hotel

Lisa Pilkington Duo 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

The Roobs + Powernap + The Know Nothings + Smutty Sam & The Soda Creamers + Crypt Vapour + Ruins Alone (Jpn) + Bu$ Money + Ironhawk + DJ’s Eazy Eadz + Crème Brulee

Grand Poobah

Annual Pisces Power Prom with DJ Philistine 9pm

Grand Poobah

Payin Homage with Dunn D, SkurgeOne, Burd Brain, Draz, Swishbank & Stray 9pm

Onyx

Sambo & Patto 9pm

Pier One

Billy & Tilly 6pm

Republic Bar & Café

Soul Sessions: Funk Nukl Presents Funky Tunes in the Beer Garden 2:30pm

Friday

Saturday

11

12

Republic Bar & Café

Mumbo Gumbo 10pm

Telegraph Hotel

Telegraph Hotel

Tim Davies / Entropy

The Brunswick Hotel

Cam Stuart 8pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Tom Coulsen 8pm

The Yard

DJ Mad 8pm

The Yard

Yard House DJ 8pm

Waterfront Hotel

Ebeneza Good 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Tim & Scott 8:30pm

Sunday

13

Waterfront Hotel

Merkin Brothers 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Sambo 8:30pm

Brisbane Hotel

Bingo w/ The Ramblin Vocal Sniper

Brisbane Hotel

The All Seeing Hand (NZ) + AXE GIANT + Those Bloody Ingalls

Claremont Hotel

Jerome Hillier 2pm

Bingo w/ The Ramblin Rapturous Rhinoceros of Recreation

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

Jed Appleton

Brisbane Hotel

Republic Bar & Café

The Calhouns 3pm

Claremont Hotel

Tony Voglino 2pm

Republic Bar & Café

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

Grim Fawkner (vic) & Friends

Dan Stonehouse + MT Blues Music + Kate Alexander 8pm

The Homestead

Figure It In - Sketch Club

Republic Bar & Café

Zuma Play Neil Young 3pm

The Waratah Hotel

Republic Bar & Café

Blue Flies 8:30pm

Sunday Sessions at the Tah with Junior Brando + DJ Mad 3pm

The Apple Shed

Chupacabra 1pm

Waterfront Hotel

Outdoor Holiday Event

The Waratah Hotel

Sunday Sessions at the Tah with Junior Brando + DJ Mad 3pm

Monday

14

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8:30pm

Tuesday

15

Birdcage Bar

Sambo 8:30pm

Waterfront Hotel

Jerome Hillier 12:30pm Lisa Pilkington 4pm

Brisbane Hotel

Quiz-A-Saurus

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8:30pm

Songwriter Sessions w/ Zac Henderson

Republic Bar & Café

G.B. Balding (Finger Pickin’ Blues) 8:30pm

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

Birdcage Bar

Tony Voglino 8:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

Quiz Night 8:15pm

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

Songwriter Sessions w/ Zac Henderson

Birdcage Bar

Black Coffee 8:30pm Emily & Ryan + Elouise. + guests

Republic Bar & Café

Helen Crowther 8:30pm

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

Birdcage Bar

Sabine Bester 8:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

Daniel Champagne 9pm

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

Surreal Estate Agents + Staircase + Colin Kucera

Telegraph Hotel

DJ B-Rex / Micheal Clennett

The Brunswick Hotel

Two Peas 7pm

Republic Bar & Café

Keith Hall 8:30pm

The Waratah Hotel

Quiz Night 7pm

Telegraph Hotel

DJ B-Rex / Tony Mac

Birdcage Bar

James Maddock Swing 4 8:30pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Karly Fisher 7pm Quiz Night 7pm

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

Karaoke

The Waratah Hotel Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 8:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

Brisbane Hotel

The Midways + Pine

The Comedy Clubhouse with Tommy Little (Upstairs) 8pm

Grand Poobah

Burlesque Idol with Laydee Bombay, Monya Lisa, Lazuli Lizzie, Derby Dollface, Groovy Lushious, Ophelia 7pm

Republic Bar & Café

KashKin 8:30pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Alex Hutchins 7pm

The Waratah Hotel

Unlocked (accoustic night) 6pm

warpmagazine.com.au

Wednesday

Thursday

16

17


Event Guide

Date Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Waterfront Hotel Birdcage Bar Brisbane Hotel

BACK - Parents (NZ) + Uncle Geezer + NowyourefuckeD + Weeper

Date

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Sambo 7pm

The Waratah Hotel

Unlocked (accoustic night) 6pm

Glen Challice 9pm

Waterfront Hotel

Tim & Scott 7pm

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

BACK - Recrucify The Bastard w/ Goatblood (VIC) + Vrag + Supremacy (NSW) + Arddhu + Lightless + Dissonant Winds

Brisbane Hotel

FRONT - MC Sha Boo Boo & The Krackalacken Krackieoke Band

Fluke and Bruce Hotel

A Night at the Round Table 7pm

Grand Poobah

Swishbank & Friends in the Swamp 9pm

Grand Poobah

DJ Bluesabelle 10pm

Friday

25

Brisbane Hotel

FRONT - Tim Hampshire + Lucas Walker + Gerard Rush

Brisbane Hotel

FRONT (Late) - Miles Brown (vic) + Crypt Vapor + Java Fonda

Fluke and Bruce Hotel

A Night at the Round Table 7pm

Grand Poobah

Tomas Fords Crap Rave Party 8pm

Grand Poobah

Senator Scott Ludlums Cryptoparty with DJ’s Puffy Pank and Saffire 8pm

Onyx

The Darlings 9pm

Onyx

Ebeneza Good 9pm

Republic Bar & Café

After Work Acoustic Sessions in the Beer Garden with Bianca & Hutch + Free Sausage Sizzle 5pm

Republic Bar & Café

Good Good Friday - Local Original Acts 10pm

Republic Bar & Café

Bondi Cigars 10pm

Telegraph Hotel

Tim Davies / Entropy

Telegraph Hotel

Micheal Clennett / Dr Fink

The Apple Shed

Ali Patmore Trio 6pm

The Apple Shed

Isacc Shaw 6pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Alex and Bianca 7pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Tom Coulsen 7pm

The Yard

Yard House DJ 7:30pm

The Yard

DJ Mad 7:30pm

Waterfront Hotel

Girl Friday 8:30pm

Waterfront Hotel

Ebeneza Good 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Tony Voglino 9pm

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

Work Ethic + Tantric Sax + Nervous Breakdown

Brisbane Hotel

All Fires + Filthy Little Star + Spiral Kites + Tantric Sax

Grand Poobah

Menzs Hip Hop Mix Tape Launch 9pm

Grand Poobah

Ruben Reeves, Nick Machin, Menz, Chunk-E, Nibs, Reflekt & AO & Dispraze 9pm

Onyx

The Robinsons 9pm

Pier One

Billy & Tilly 6pm

Republic Bar & Café

Tasmanian Metal DVD Launch with Intense Hammer Rage + Mephistopheles + Gape + Atra Vetosus + Create The Crayon 10pm

Telegraph Hotel

Micheal Clennett / Dr Fink

The Brunswick Hotel

Everburn 8pm

The Yard

DJ Mad 8pm

Waterfront Hotel

Merkin Brothers 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Fiona Whitla 8:30pm

Brisbane Hotel

Cosmic Psychos (Vic) + Bu$ Money

Brisbane Hotel

Bingo w/ The Ramblin AGB

Claremont Hotel

The National Average 2pm

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

Jed Appleton

Republic Bar & Café

Tim & Scott 8:30pm

The Apple Shed

Philip Henry & Hannah Martin (UK) 1pm

The Waratah Hotel

Sunday Sessions at the Tah with Junior Brando + DJ Mad 3pm

Waterfront Hotel

Jerome Hillier 12:30pm Tim & Scott 4pm

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8:30pm

Brisbane Hotel

The Bennies (Vic) + Off With Their Heads (USA) + Hightime (SA)

Birdcage Bar

Sambo 8:30pm

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

Songwriter Sessions w/ Zac Henderson

Republic Bar & Café

Quiz Night 8:15pm

Birdcage Bar

Aly Rae Patmore Trio 8:30pm

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

James Parry + Three Little Pigz

Republic Bar & Café

Johnny McIntyre 8:30pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Alex and Hayley 7pm

The Waratah Hotel

Quiz Night 7pm

Birdcage Bar

Fiona Whitla 8:30pm

Brisbane Hotel

The Comedy Forge

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

Karaoke

Republic Bar & Café

4 Letter Fish 8:30pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Cam Stuart 7pm

The Waratah Hotel

Unlocked (accoustic night) 6pm

Waterfront Hotel

Jerome Hillier 7pm

Onyx

Ebeneza Good 9pm

Pier One

Aly Rae Patmore Trio 6pm

Republic Bar & Café

Soul Sessions: Funk Nukl Presents Funky Tunes in the Beer Garden 2:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

Chase City + Tropical Zombie 10pm

Telegraph Hotel

Jeremy Matcham / Atomic Playboys

The Brunswick Hotel

Cam Stuart 8pm

The Yard

Yard House DJ 8pm

Waterfront Hotel

Tony Voglino 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Fiona Whitla 8:30pm

Claremont Hotel

Tony Voglino 2pm

Marakoopa Café

Daniel Champagne 2pm

Republic Bar & Café

Beer Garden Party with a Free Indonesian Feast: Inc. Beef Rendang Nasi Goreng Fried Rice & Indonesian Salad with Tony Mac Playing Live

Republic Bar & Café

Hui & The Muse 8:30pm

The Waratah Hotel

Sunday Sessions at the Tah with Junior Brando + DJ Mad 3pm

Waterfront Hotel

Billy Whitton 12:30pm Manhatten 4pm

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8:30pm

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

Jed Apl

Republic Bar & Café

Tarik Stoneman & Sam Forsyth 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Tony Voglino 8:30pm

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

Songwriter Sessions w/ Zac Henderson

Republic Bar & Café

Billy Whitton 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Dance in a Shoebox 8:30pm

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

The Habits, LASCA

Republic Bar & Café

Lisette Lowe 8:30pm

Telegraph Hotel

DJ B-Rex / Matt & Abby

The Brunswick Hotel

Dan Vandermeer 7pm

The Waratah Hotel

Quiz Night 7pm

Birdcage Bar

Les Coqs 8:30pm

Brisbane Hotel

Strung Out (USA) + Pears (USA) + Knife Hands

Irish Murphy’s Greenhouse

Karaoke

Republic Bar & Café

After Work Acoustic Sessions in the Beer Garden with Dan Vandermeer + Free Sausage Sizzle 5pm

Republic Bar & Café

Yesterday’s Gentlemen + Billy Whitton 9pm

Telegraph Hotel

Tony Mac

The Brunswick Hotel

Matt and Abby 7pm

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

26

27

28

29

30

31

www.facebook.com/warp.mag 21


Event Guide

Launceston Date

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Club 54

The Animation Sensation Party

Royal Oak Hotel

L.B.C. Presents Keith Hall & Pat Dow Band (Tamar Boat Shed) 9pm

Tonic CCT

Nic & Carmel 8pm

Watergarden

Bradley Von Rock 7pm

Royal Oak Hotel

Open Folk Session (Public Bar) 5pm

Watergarden

Brendon Siemsen Duo 3pm

Club 54

The Local @ Club 54: Radio Silence + The Hour of Power DJs + Thomas Fowkes + Angus Austin

MARCH Saturday

Sunday Wednesday

Thursday

Saturday

6 9

Royal Oak Hotel

Nick Chugg (Public Bar) 9pm

Watergarden

Rino Morea 6:30pm

10 Bakers Lane

11 Club 54

12 Club 54

11

Latrobe

Mackeys Royal Hotel

Mandi’s Glitter Tatoo’s 5:30pm

Saturday

12

Latrobe

Mackeys Royal Hotel

The Unit 9pm

Devonport

Molly Malones

J. Arthur Band 9:30pm

17

Devonport

Molly Malones

St Patricks Day

The Brew: Cardinels (Acoustic) + Seth Henderson + Trent Buchanan

Friday

18

Latrobe

Mackeys Royal Hotel

Magician 5:30pm

Ange Boxhall & Sleeping Willow (Tamar Boat Shed) 9pm

Saturday

19

Forth

Forth Valley Blues Festival

Claude Hay 12pm

The Long Weekender Max Hillman Showband (Public Bar) 9pm

Tonic CCT

Nelle and the Jets 8pm

13 Club 54

16 Club 54

Open Folk Session (Public Bar) 5pm Nic Parker Duo 3pm The Local @ Club 54: Jack McLaine + The Hour of Power DJs + The Art of Surviving + Trent Buchanan Matthw Dames (Public Bar) 9pm

Watergarden

Hank Koiopman 6:30pm

17 Bakers Lane

18 Club 54

19 Club 54

The Brew: Tim Hampshire + Pat Broxton + Brodygreg Ratfunk (St. Patricks Day) (Public Bar) 9pm Chase City + Supports Brad Gillies (Public Bar) 9pm Sambo 7pm The Disney Party

Royal Oak Hotel

Daniel Champagne (Tamar Boat Shed) 9pm

Tonic CCT

Nelle and the Jets 8pm

20 Royal Oak Hotel

23 Club 54

Rino Morea 7pm Blues Jam (Tamar Boat Shed) Open Folk Session (Public Bar) 5pm The Hat & the Horn 3pm The Local @ Club 54: PIG + The Hour of Power DJs + Nick Bennett + Sara Wright

Royal Oak Hotel

Andy Collins (Public Bar) 9pm

Watergarden

Jerome Hillier 6:30pm

24 Bakers Lane

25 Club 54

The Brew: George Edmondson + Denni Sulzberger + Josh Durno Mick Attard (Public Bar) 9pm Strung Out + Pears + Bennylava

Royal Oak Hotel

Good Friday

Watergarden

Jerome Hillier 7pm

26 Club 54

Mixtape: The 90s

Royal Oak Hotel

Luke Parry & Maddie Who (Public Bar) 9pm

Tonic CCT

Jason & Steph 8pm

27 Club 54

Tassie Tenor 7pm The Bennies + Off With Their Heads + Hightime + The Sleepyheads

Launceston Jazz Club (Tamar Boat Shed) 6pm

Wednesday

30 Club 54

The Local @ Club 54: Pop Noi’Sop + Evening Andro + Pat Broxton + Lilyana Sanoe

Royal Oak Hotel

Open Mic Night (Public Bar) 9pm

Watergarden

Tony Voglino 6:30pm

warpmagazine.com.au

Devonport

Molly Malones

Jerome Hillier 8:30pm

Friday

25

Latrobe

Mackeys Royal Hotel

Mandi’s Face Painting 5:30pm

Saturday

26

Latrobe

Mackeys Royal Hotel

Rino Morea 9pm

Devonport

Molly Malones

Blue Monday 9:30pm

Wednesday

30

Ulverstone

The Wharf

Jon Hunt 7:30pm

Thursday

31

Devonport

Molly Malones

The Firebirds - Duo 8:30pm

Wed 3rd Matthew Dames ~ Folk Originals Public Bar 9pm - Free entry Thu 4th Ratfunk ~ Electic Covers Public Bar 9pm - Free entry Fri 5th When She Believes’ ~ Showcase Public Bar 8.30 pm - Free Entry Sat 6th Brad Gillies ~ Blues Originals Public Bar 9pm - Free entry Sun 7th Open Folk Seisiún ~ All Welcome Public Bar 5pm - Free entry Wed 10th Nick Chugg ~ mix Covers/Originals Public Bar 9pm - Free entry Thu 11th The Hat & The Horn ~ (Carl Bulow) Public Bar 9pm - Free entry Fri 12th S+M+H trio ~ Festivale Public Bar 9pm - Free entry Sat 13th Luke Triffit ~ Solo Originals/Covers Public Bar 9pm - Free entry Sun 14th Open Folk Seisiún ~ All Welcome Public Bar 9pm - Free entry Wed 17th Julio Mathew - Subtle Covers Public Bar 9pm - Free entry Thu 18th Jericho Jack ~ (Mary Shannon) Solo Public Bar 9pm - Free entry Fri 19th Liam Gerner ~ Touring Originals Public Bar 9pm - Free entry Sat 20th A Paper Soul ~ Delicious Originals Public Bar 9pm - Free entry Sun 21st Open Folk Seisiún ~ All Welcome Public Bar 9pm - Free entry Wed 24th Open Mic Night ~ Emerging Artists Public Bar 9pm - Free entry Thu 25th The Beards “Farewell Tour” ~ Beardiness! Boat Shed Doors 8.30 - $35 Fri 26th Cleveland Blues ~ Touring Blues Boat Shed Doors 8.30 - $8 Sat 27th Zeolite+Sharkpuncher+Gravemind+Majula Boat Shed Doors 9pm - $5 Sun 28th Blues Jam / Open Folk Seisiún ~ Free BS / PB 1-4pm / 5-8.30pm

Jason & Steph 3pm

29 Royal Oak Hotel

Royal Oak Hotel

24

February

Open Folk Session (Public Bar) 5pm

Tuesday

31 Bakers Lane

Thursday

Bradley Von Rock 7pm The Long Weekender

Royal Oak Hotel

Watergarden

22

Friday

Thursday

Royal Oak Hotel

Royal Oak Hotel

Thursday

Trevor Weaver 8:30pm

The Collection 9:30pm

Watergarden Sunday

Molly Malones

Molly Malones

Royal Oak Hotel

Saturday

Cool Train 9:30pm

Devonport

Devonport

Watergarden

Friday

Molly Malones

10

Clinton Hutton 7pm

Royal Oak Hotel

Thursday

Devonport Thursday

Watergarden

Watergarden

Wednesday

Matt & Abby 9pm

Sambo 9pm

Watergarden

Sunday

Mackeys Royal Hotel

5

Mackeys Royal Hotel

Royal Oak Hotel Saturday

Latrobe

Saturday

Latrobe

Royal Oak Hotel Friday

Acts / Start Time

Sugar Cane Collins (Tamar Boat Shed) 9pm

Watergarden

Thursday

Venue

The Long Weekender

Royal Oak Hotel Wednesday

CITY

Royal Oak Hotel

Watergarden Sunday

Date MARCH

5

Royal Oak Hotel Friday

NORTHWEST

The Brew: Alice Headlam + Lilyana Sanoe + Sara Wright Live Music (Public Bar) 9pm

~ Live Music ~ ~ Great Food ~ ~ Open 7 Days ~ ~ Open Mic Night the Last Wednesday of the Month ~

14 Brisbane St Launceston 7250 (03) 6331 5346


TASMANIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

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Profile for Warp Magazine

Warp Magazine March 2016  

Warp Magazine is Tasmania's only street magazine

Warp Magazine March 2016  

Warp Magazine is Tasmania's only street magazine

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