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Canadian Fine Art THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2020


Canadian Fine Art Auction THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2020 AT 7 PM


AUCTION DATE

CANADIAN FINE ART

FRONT COVER

Thursday, September 17, 2020 at 7:00 pm

416-504-5100 canadianart@waddingtons.ca

Lot 6

LOCATION OF PREVIEW & AUCTION

Waddington’s 275 King Street East, 2nd Floor Toronto, Ontario M5A 1K2

DIRECTOR OF FINE ART

Yvonne Monestier MANAGER OF CANADIAN FINE ART

Ellie Muir

WILLIAM KURELEK RELAXATION, 1973 INSIDE COVER Lot 8 WILLIAM PEREHUDOFF NANAI, NO. 4, 1969 (DETAIL)

CONSIGNMENT COORDINATOR ON VIEW

By appointment.

Nicole Schembre

INSIDE BACK COVER Lot 22 JEAN PAUL RIOPELLE COMPOSITION, c.1955 (DETAIL)

All lots including additional images, essays, and reports can be viewed online at waddingtons.ca

BACK COVER Lot 40 TOM THOMSON A QUIET SUMMER EVENING, c.1913

OPPOSITE Lot 54 KENNETH CAMPBELL LOCHHEAD BROWN BELOW, 1964 PICTURED WITH LOT 90 FROM OUR INUIT ART AUCTION

This auction is subject to the Conditions of Sale printed in the back of this catalogue.

This catalogue and its contents © 2020 Waddington McLean and Company Ltd. All rights reserved.

Photography and design by Waddington’s. 


1 SOREL ETROG, R.C.A. ASTARTE, 1964 bronze signed and numbered 3/10 on the base 19 ins x 3.2 ins x 3.2 ins; 48.3 cms x 8.1 cms x 8.1 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Toronto $10,000–15,000

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CORNELIUS KRIEGHOFF

The title of this piece is Going to the Village, but it appears to be more of a race than an idle jaunt into town. The driver on the left is tensed with the anticipation of catching the other sled, his face caught in a grimace of determination. Though he is behind, he has the advantage of the inside track. The driver on the right urges his horse on, while his fellow riders look back eagerly. The three of them are anxious not to relinquish the lead. There is room on the road for the two sleds to ride abreast, and the ultimate winner has not yet been determined. Cornelius Krieghoff has a wonderful way with light: we can see the sun setting on a short winter day, the shadows just beginning to creep in. The frosty twilight on snowy fields and the looming distant hills provide a vivid backdrop for the dramatic scene. We can feel the chill, the exhilaration. Our racers charge on, eager to be the first to the village.

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2 CORNELIUS KRIEGHOFF MOCCASIN SELLER oil on canvas signed 11 ins x 9 ins; 27.9 cms x 22.9 cms PROVENANCE:

Watson Art Galleries, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto $15,000–20,000

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3 CORNELIUS KRIEGHOFF GOING TO THE VILLAGE oil on canvas signed and inscribed “Quebec”, framed as an oval sight 12 ins x 17 ins; 30.5 cms x 43.2 cms PROVENANCE:

Watson Art Galleries, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto

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$40,000–60,000

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2020

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4 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. GREY MORNING, POINTE-AU-BARIL, 1967 oil on board signed; also signed, titled, and dated on the reverse 12 ins x 14.75 ins; 30.5 cms x 37.5 cms PROVENANCE:

Roberts Gallery Limited, Toronto By descent to Private Collection, Florida $18,000–24,000

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ARTHUR LISMER

The painting appears to have been created alla prima—from the Italian “at once”—meaning that it was made in a single session, without allowing the oil paint to dry between layers. Often, alla prima works are made in front of the subject itself, which suggests that this might be a panel made during one of Arthur Lismer’s exploratory painting trips into the Canadian landscape rather than in his studio. Lismer laid his brushstrokes down on top of a burnt sienna ground; the underpainted layer peeks through in several places, notably the sky. There is a wonderfully vivacious quality to this section, as if Lismer was so caught up in the moment that he had to dash it down before it eluded him. One imagines the painter rapturously gazing upwards as the clouds scud across the sky, trying to capture a precise moment in time. This painting was created in 1925, the midpoint of the Group of Seven’s formal partnership. Several other depictions of the Quebec countryside were completed in the same year, five of which are held in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa. Lismer had gone on an expedition with A.Y. Jackson and ethnologist Marius Barbeau, travelling to several Quebec villages around the St. Lawrence River in August of that same year. It was on this trip that Lismer found inspiration for his iconic Quebec Village (Saint-Hilarion), which was shown at the Art Gallery of Toronto in 1926 and featured on a postage stamp in 2020 to celebrate the centenary of the inaugural Group of Seven exhibition. Indeed there are resemblances between these two paintings: both share a similar palette with an emphasis on vivid blue skies, rolling hills and fence posts that eagerly pull the eye towards the heart of the

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5 ARTHUR LISMER, O.S.A., R.C.A. QUEBEC UPLANDS, 1925 oil on panel signed and dated ‘25; signed and titled on the reverse 13 ins x 16 ins; 33 cms x 40.6 cms PROVENANCE:

Atlas Construction Co. Ltd. Collection Galerie Claude Lafitte, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto EXHIBITED:

Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 11 Artists in Montreal: 1860-1960 $25,000–35,000

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WILLIAM KURELEK It is a rare thing when a painting is accompanied by an explanation written by the artist. It is rarer still when the explanation is candid, stripped of any pretense or self-aggrandizement. William Kurelek spent two periods felling trees in the woods of Northern Ontario and Quebec, the first during the summer at the age of 19 and the second for nearly a year at age 24. This painting is illustrated in Kurelek’s book Lumberjack, a visual and written account of his time spent in the bush. The suite of paintings in Lumberjack are a documentation of a bygone way of life, as well as a paean to the dignity of hard work. Reading Kurelek’s images and texts is to learn about the many backbreaking travails of these bush warriors, from what they ate to the frustrations of stacking poplar logs. No detail is too obscure for Kurelek, who echoes the particulars in word and image. In the accompanying text, we learn about Tony, possibly the figure in purple - a Polish lumberjack who shares his bunkhouse.1 We are told that the washy gray images tacked up to the wooden wall next to his bed are pinups, and that Tony was known to share bawdy tales of his exploits outside of the camp, which embarrassed the young Kurelek. The paintings in the Lumberjack series are honest and unapologetically humble, a fusion of art and chronicle. Life was hard for these men, but amidst the toil were moments of respite, of joy and connection. Relaxation is one of those rare pauses. The viewer sees the men at cards, stretched out on their beds, swapping stories to the sound of a harmonica - and feels present inside the cabin, an effect heightened by the artist’s painted wooden frame. Kurelek’s image enchants, opening a window into a fragment of our nation’s history. 1

William Kurelek, “Lumberjack”, np.

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composition.

6 WILLIAM KURELEK, R.C.A. RELAXATION, 1973 oil on board initialed and dated ‘73; in artist’s frame 19 ins x 22 ins; 48.3 cms x 55.9 cms PROVENANCE:

Marlborough-Godard Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Vancouver LITERATURE:

William Kurelek, Lumberjack, Tundra Books of Montreal, Montreal, 1974, p. 20, reproduced. $80,000–100,000

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Kurelek as a lumberjack from his personal scrapbook of his life inder the heading “The Artist as a Young Man”. Patricia Morley, Kurelek: A Biography, MacMillan of Canada: Toronto, 1986, pg. 53.


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PHILIP HENRY HOWARD SURREY Of Philip Surrey’s work, Robert Ayre wrote in 1940 that it evoked “the loneliness and secrecy of the night, created by still, poised compositions, by sombre colours, by mysterious shadows and, here and there, an eerie light…There is a story in most of Surrey’s paintings: not an anecdote made obvious but a story implied for your own imagination to complete.” Indeed, a painting that appears simple at first glance slowly reveals itself to be the intersection of three vignettes: the couple on promenade, a boater on the river, and a car looping around the bend on the road, visible only by its lights. Surrey guides the viewer through the scene masterfully, coaxing the eye around the canvas using the curves of the low-slung telephone wire, the mirrored sweep of the road and the backhand arc of the trees. The effect is cinematic, simultaneously serene and unsettling, in the way of a David Lynch film. The composition functions as a painterly chooseyour-own-adventure story, with the viewer left to contemplate the anterior and posterior of this moment in time. The pivotal moment takes place almost offstage, in the form of the approaching vehicle. Surrey frequently returned to the car as a subject; Gilles Daigneault wrote of Surrey that “...there is one thing that occupies a special place in the artist’s imagination and which he often uses to express what he resents most: the automobile.” Indeed, in this painting it is the car that will interrupt and perhaps even threaten the couple’s bucolic stroll. The painting takes its title from a street of the same name, the longest on the Island of Montreal. Gouin wraps around the north side of the island, bordering the Riviere des Prairies.

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7 PHILIP HENRY HOWARD SURREY, R.C.A. BOULEVARD GOUIN oil on masonite signed 20 ins x 30 ins; 50.8 cms x 76.2 cms PROVENANCE:

Gauvreau Gallery, Montreal Private Collection, Ontario $15,000–20,000

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WILLIAM PEREHUDOFF

Following an early career that encompassed landscape painting, muralism, and abstract expressionism, William Perehudoff established his reputation with his turn to pure, non-figurative abstraction during the 1960s. The summer artists’ workshops held in Saskatchewan at Emma Lake at this time had a significant impact on Perehudoff, and the paintings he produced during and after this period can be seen as a direct result of the relationships he made there. Introductions to Clement Greenberg and Kenneth Noland were particularly influential, and developed into enduring friendships. This work, made the year following the 1968 workshop hosted by Donald Judd, could have been inspired by that artist’s structural minimalism. The remainder of Perehudoff’s career would focus on stripping painting down to the essentials of colour, form, and surface. Using a vocabulary of geometric abstraction on flat ground, Nanai No. 4 is an accomplished example of his work from this formative time. Rendered at massive scale, sweeping blocks tilt across the neutral field. Looming warm tones dominate, bracketed at the corners by cooler blues and greens. Confidently executed and pulsing with bold hues, this is an exceptional example of Perehudoff at a pivotal moment in his development as a colourist.

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8 WILLIAM PEREHUDOFF, R.C.A. NANAI, NO. 4, 1969 acrylic on canvas signed, titled, and dated on the reverse 50 ins x 55 ins; 127 cms x 139.7 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Alberta $12,000–16,000

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9 WILLIAM PEREHUDOFF, R.C.A. AC-00-5, 2000 acrylic on canvas signed, titled, and dated on the reverse 31.5 ins x 31.5 ins; 80 cms x 80 cms PROVENANCE:

Newzones Gallery of Contemporary Art, Calgary Private Collection, Alberta $6,000–8,000

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William Perehudoff’s late career saw a return to the hardedged modernism he practiced in the late 1950s and 1960s (see lot 8), while integrating the lessons learned from his later experimentations with more complex, organic colours. Bold, hard-edged bars and jutting rectangular forms floated on ethereal, monochrome backgrounds, recalling the sustained influence of Kenneth Noland on the artist while also harkening to early modernist painting, in particular Russian Constructivism. This can be readily seen in this work. Rendered in clear and lively colour, piled up on each other and fanning out from the seams, blocks and strips are set in a dense and dynamic composition. The background of stained taupe recalls the washed-out backgrounds found in his work of the 1970s, and creates a spacious ground for the quietly frenetic foreground arrangement. AC-00-5 is a synthesis of Perehudoff’s career, the result of decades of practice and a continued dedication to Colour Field painting.


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10 DOROTHY KNOWLES, R.C.A. THE FAR CLIFFS, 1965 oil on canvas signed and dated ‘65; signed, titled and inscribed “Green Fields Series” in pencil on the reverse 56 ins x 56 ins; 142.2 cms x 142.2 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Alberta $10,000–15,000

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DAVID MILNE

David Brown Milne took inspiration from many sources, painting subjects that included the streets of New York, the battlefields of wartorn Europe, portraits, and parliament buildings. However, he kept returning to a subject he considered central to an artist’s identity: childhood. He described his own upbringing in rural Ontario as such: “A nice place to be born in, at least to grow in, thrilling, mysterious, exciting place. On the back [of the farm], along the edge of Black’s bush, there was a hill and from the top of a stump on that hill we could see mostly everything, our own fields and barn and part of the house, Finnie’s pasture and berry patch, another farm, and then the valley through which the Saugeen River flowed, Brown’s farm [where his father worked] very small and faint, and beyond it sand hills and a long, straight streak of blue, sometimes with a white moving speck on it, Lake Huron. From that stump for the first time, I was brought face to face with Infinity where anything might be and anything might happen.”1 Originally in the collection of Milne’s principal patron, the Right Honourable Vincent Massey, this painting is an embodiment of the above statement. Streaks of lilac against tree stumps and flecks of white, with a central void that seems to hint at the infinite possibilities that lay beyond. Silcox, David P., Milne, David. Painting place: the life and work of David B. Milne. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996. 1

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11 DAVID BROWN MILNE SUGAR MAPLE, 1935 oil on canvas, laid down on board signed; titled and inscribed “44” in pencil on the reverse PROVENANCE:

Collection of the Hon. Vincent Massey Laing Galleries, Toronto Private Collection, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Private Collection, Alberta LITERATURE:

David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings, Volume 2: 1929-1953, University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division, Toronto, 1998, p. 599, reproduced, no. 304.12 $25,000–35,000

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DAPHNE ODJIG

As a child, Daphne Odjig learned about her Ojibway ancestry largely through her grandparents. Odjig’s grandfather carved tombstones for a living and was known to take his granddaughter on sketching trips throughout Manitoulin Island. On these occasions, he also shared oral histories of the Ojibway people, which included sacred stories and legends. These early teachings would come to influence much of her artistic career. Though she maintained a preoccupation with painting and drawing, Odjig did not exhibit her work professionally until the 1960s. This period saw her explore Modernist abstraction in ways similar to her friend, the Dine artist Alex Janvier. It also saw a return to her childhood, of sorts, through the production of a number of representational pen-and-ink drawings of contemporary Indigenous life, both on and off-reserve. During the end of the 1960s, she was influenced by the Woodland School of Art and its emphasis on thick black line, flat planes of colour, and use of spiritual subject matter. Arguably, it was not until the early 1970s that Odjig’s luminous colour schemes and use of curvilinear design, which she was taught by her grandfather, became a signature of her style. In this painting, Return to the Earth, Odjig communicates her fondness for Modernist abstraction, particularly that of the Cubists and Surrealists, as anthropomorphic figures appear (and reappear) before descending into the earth. The painting appears to articulate the traditional Anishinaabay Medicine Wheel, a worldview that both exemplifies Anishinaabay spiritual knowledge and the connectivity between all things. According to the Medicine Wheel, its third quadrant contains the Fall season and is often associated with the closure of life. In this stage, one’s knowledge can be passed on to others and they can ruminate on their experiences, age, and the impact of their existence in the physical realm. From this perspective, Odjig’s painting might represent a profound meditation on the cycle of death and rebirth. We thank Matthew Ryan Smith, Ph.D., Curator and Head of Collections at Glenhyrst Art Gallery in Brantford, Ontario, for contributing this essay.

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12 DAPHNE ODJIG, R.C.A. RETURN TO THE EARTH, 1976 acrylic on canvas signed and dated /76; titled to the stretcher 27 ins x 23.75 ins; 68.6 cms x 60.3 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Alberta $10,000–15,000 40

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ALEX JANVIER

At the age of eight, Alex Janvier was sent to Blue Quills Indian Residential School in St. Paul, Alberta. Members of its staff recognized his artistic potential and encouraged him to pursue formal art training at the Provincial Institute of Technology and Art in Calgary (now the Alberta College of Art and Design). He was one of the first artists of Indigenous ancestry from Canada to receive professional arts training. Following graduation, he also became one of the first to be hired for a faculty position in studio art. Janvier’s early work was influenced by European Modernism; in particular, by Expressionist and Surrealist painters including Wassily Kandinsky, Joan Miró, and Paul Klee. He combined these influences with a deep affection for Dene quill and beadwork and would come to identify himself at this time as the “First Indian Modernist.” Janvier’s work of this period is characterized by heavy use of line, muted colour palette, and fractured forms. Power Struggle is a tempest of movement and pigment where several figures and objects emerge from the canvas. This, coupled with its evocative title, may reference Canada’s treatment towards Indigenous peoples and Janvier’s own experiences living on-reserve and surviving Residential School. To this end, the painting is not only signed using his surname but also with “287,” the number associated with his band treaty. This signage represents Janvier’s commitment to resisting government interference to his identity and that of all Indigenous peoples in Canada. A year after the painting’s completion, Janvier helped organize the Indians of Canada Pavilion for Expo ’67 in Montreal. In time, the composition of his paintings would loosen considerably, growing intense with colour and ebbing linework. During the 1970s, he joined the Professional Native Indian Arts Inc. (PNIAI), an Indigenous artist collective that included members Norval Morrisseau, Daphne Odjig, Carl Ray, Joseph Sanchez, Eddy Cobiness, and Jackson Beardy. The collective attempted to break cultural and political stereotypes by demanding recognition as professional artists of Indigenous descent. We thank Matthew Ryan Smith, Ph.D., Curator and Head of Collections at Glenhyrst Art Gallery in Brantford, Ontario, for contributing this essay.

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13 ALEX JANVIER POWER STRUGGLE, 1966 oil on canvas board signed and inscribed “287”; also signed, titled, and dated “March 5/66” on the reverse 24 ins x 30 ins; 61 cms x 76.2 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Ottawa $7,000–9,000

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EMILY CARR

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14 M. EMILY CARR DOGFISH POT painted ceramic signed “Klee Wyck” 2.25 ins x 3.5 ins x 3.5 ins; 5.7 cms x 8.3 cms x 8.3 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Ontario LITERATURE:

Emily Carr, The Complete Writings of Emily Carr, Douglas & McIntyre, Vancouver/Toronto, 1993, page 439. Gerta Moray, Unsettling Encounters: First Nations Imagery in the Art of Emily Carr, UBC Press, Vancouver/Toronto, 2006, pages 277-280. $10,000–15,000 Lack of money was a chronic condition for Emily Carr. Gerta Moray writes that “the comforts of material affluence” were never something that the artist enjoyed, explaining that beginning in 1924, “in her search for ways to eke out a living, Carr turned to craft production, taking up rug making and pottery as media through which her interest in native imagery could find a market.” Carr signed her pottery “Klee Wyck” which meant Laughing One, a nickname bestowed upon her by the First Nations people of Ucluelet. Carr writes about her experience as a potter extensively in her autobiography Growing Pains. She herself foraged for the clay, loading it into a pram to take home. There she would build up her objects by hand, losing many during the firings. She describes every moment of the firing as “agony, suspense and sweat.” Carr recalled “The small kiln room grew stifling. My bones shook, anticipating a visit from police, fire chief, or insurance man. The roof caught fire. The floor caught fire. I kept the hose attached to the garden tap and the roof of the kiln shed soaked.” Carr aimed to produce pottery in quantity, as the venture was a commercial one. However, given how difficult it was for her to make them and how few survived the firings, it is not surprising that so few of these objects remain available to present day collectors. The dogfish is a small variety of shark that inhabits the waters of Haida Gwaii. “Dogfish Woman” is a crest belonging to many of the Haida clans, and is related to a story of a female ancestor who could transform herself into a dogfish. This serves as a fitting design for pottery, a craft which requires so much earth and water to create. 46

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KENNETH CAMPBELL LOCHHEAD A gathering of people keep vigil around a coffin in an otherwise bare prairie landscape. The clothespeg-like figures and geometric shapes that surround them exemplify the modernism that Kenneth Lochhead, as a member of The Regina Five, is known for developing. Lochhead painted a number of other communal rituals of daily life on the prairies in this style, including The Bonspiel, 1954 (The Saskatchewan Arts Board Permanent Collection), The Review, 1953 (Private Collection), and The Dignitary, 1953 (National Gallery of Canada). The artist studied Italian masters from Piero della Francesca to surrealist Giorgio de Chirico while studying at the Barnes Foundation as well as during his travels to Europe as a student. The fixed vanishing point shadows and the gathering of people within an architectural composition is a nod to these artists. This is a seminal painting for Lochhead, embodying a key moment of modernism and surrealism in Canada. It was included in his first major retrospective in 2005, titled “Kenneth Lochhead: Garden of Light.” Curator Ted Fraser wrote of the painting in the exhibition’s catalogue, “The Burial communicates how Saskatchewan is born of the travail of nineteenth-century homesteaders who built sod huts, towns, and province on community goodwill.” 1 Fraser, Ted. Kenneth Lochhead: Garden of Light [1948 to 2002]. Regina: MacKenzie Art Gallery, 2005. unpaginated. 1

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15 KENNETH CAMPBELL LOCHHEAD, R.C.A. THE BURIAL, 1953 oil on canvas signed and dated “feb/53” to stretcher; also titled to exhibition label on the reverse 16 ins x 24 ins; 61 cms x 61 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Alberta EXHIBITED:

Saskatchewan Arts Board Fifth Annual Saskatchewan Art Exhibition - The Saskatchewan Arts Board, Norman MacKenzie Art Gallery, 1 March 1954. Kenneth Lochhead: Garden of Light, The MacKenzie Art Gallery, Regina, Saskatchewan, January 29-May 23, 2005. LITERATURE:

Ted Fraser, Kenneth Lochhead: Garden of Light [1948 to 2002]. Regina: MacKenzie Art Gallery, 2005, unpaginated $3,000–4,000

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GORDON MCKINLEY WEBBER With a diverse set of influences, including Arthur Lismer (who he studied under at the Ontario College of Art), the Mexican Muralists, and Lรกszlรณ Moholy-Nagy, Gordon Webber excelled in creating evocative scenes that bristle with energy. His landscapes in particular are characterized by expressive palettes and textures, and as with this painting, frequently suggest his later turn to abstraction. Looming hills are rendered as huge, scale-like facets, like full sails bowing against the wind. The deep purple cloud cover is almost fluid as it wafts across the top of the canvas, seeming to curl and surge out of the landscape. The monumentality of the scene is anchored in the foreground by a lone tree with two stark sprays of leaves that echo the distant turbulence.

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Portrait of the artist. Photo supplied by the family of the artist.

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Gordon Webber (standing right) and Arthur Lismer teaching a children’s art class at The Grange, Toronto. Courtesy, Private Collection, Toronto.


16 GORDON MCKINLEY WEBBER SUN SHAFTS IN A FOREST oil on canvas signed 19.5 ins x 19.5 ins; 49.5 cms x 49.5 cms PROVENANCE:

Family of the Artist, Kitchener $9,000–12,000

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MARC-AURÈLE FORTIN Marc-Aurèle Fortin’s brushstrokes are loose, dancing around the canvas, as the painter guides the viewer around the scene. His control of colour is masterful, effortlessly conveying the feeling of cool leaves shadowing the house from warm sun. We can almost hear the wind rustling as Fortin enfolds the viewer in a swirl of green, transporting us into a verdant landscape. A blue sky, punctuated with fleecy clouds, peeks out from behind the foliage. A strongly defined crevice of negative space between our red house and the swaying trees leads the eye to another red building sitting on the crest of a hill. Fortin shows us what might otherwise have been missed, this charming house tucked away in the countryside. The plywood support on which the artist has painted this rural scene adds further rustic charm.

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17 MARC-AURÈLE FORTIN, R.C.A. THE RED HOUSE oil on plywood panel signed; with catalogue raisonné number H-0096 39 ins x 29.5 ins; 99.1 cms x 74.9 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Montreal Sotheby’s, Toronto, November 1996, lot 247 Private Collection, Montreal Sotheby’s, Toronto, 24 May 2000, lot 153 Private Collection, Toronto $40,000–60,000

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RITA LETENDRE Rita Letendre established a vital presence in the languages of postwar abstraction. Her paintings of the 1950s and early 1960s were characterized by gestural impasto, an affinity for and association with Paul-Émile Bourduas and the Automatistes. After a 1965 sojourn in California – and her first major public mural, Sunforces at California State University, Long Beach – Letendre’s work became more precise or “hard edged,” and initially near black and white monochromatic. One source suggests a shift due to her first silkscreens, but it also coincided with a period of hard-edge works internationally, as seen in the 1965 MoMA exhibition The Responsive Eye. But unlike much of the optical and constructive tendencies of the time, Letendre’s compositional space expressed a dynamic quality and structure, akin to the c.1911-1913 Futurist “Rayonism” of Mikhael Larianov and Natalia Goncherova. Nights, 1972 (lot 18) has a dramatic vanishing-point ray with dominant dark and cool graphic colours, whereas in Onled, 1978 (lot 19), a discrete ‘zip’ emerges from the bottom with a counterpoint of softer radiating lines in ochre. Both are classic examples of her studio practice, and used for striking impact in large-scale indoor and outdoor Toronto public commissions in the 1970s. Nights, for Berkshire House, 1971; Onled relates to Irowakan for the Royal Bank Plaza and the painted skylight Joy for the TTC Glencairn Station, both 1977. 1 Letendre continued this compositional space into the late 1980s. She has stated that her cues for painting are internally generated–a “zen-state” –a way of being, knowing the world, and expressing the life forces of the universe. We thank Ihor Holubizky, cultural essayist and art historian, for contributing this essay. Mr. Holubizky received his PhD in art history from the University of Queensland. Joy is the only remaining commissioned work but reinterpreted in 2014. Irowakan is now in the collection of Musée d’art de Joliette. All are illustrated in Rita Letendre: Fire & Light, Art Gallery of Ontario, 2017. Onled also shares strong affinities with the three-metre wide Ononada, 1976. Illustrated pp.40-41. 1

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18 RITA LETENDRE, R.C.A. NIGHTS, 1972 acrylic on canvas signed and dated; also signed, titled, and dated on the reverse 30 ins x 40 ins; 76.2 cms x 101.6 cms PROVENANCE:

Gallery Moos, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $5,000–7,000 Rita Letendre established a vital presence in the languages of postwar abstraction. Her paintings

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19 RITA LETENDRE, R.C.A. ONLED, 1978 acrylic on canvas signed, titled and dated ‘78 on the reverse 78 ins x 53.25 ins; 198.1 cms x 135.3 cms PROVENANCE:

Gifted by Kosso Eloul to Private Collection, Toronto By descent to Private Collection, Toronto $7,000–9,000

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Irowakan, Royal Bank Plaza, Toronto, 1977


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MICHAEL FORSTER Michael Forster’s painting career was perhaps defined by the artist’s restlessness. Born in Calcutta (Kolkata) in 1907, he spent his childhood in northern colonial India. After the death of his parents he was schooled in England, where he attended London’s Central School of Arts and Crafts, and by 1928 he had moved to Toronto, where he worked as a commercial painter. After working as an official war painter during the Second World War, stationed with the Royal Canadian Navy, he moved to Montreal in 1949. Here, he wrote articles supporting the Automatistes, and honed his surrealist practice inspired by the writings of André Breton: painting through free, unconscious gesture. Forster claimed that his paintings were never planned in advance but rather created through the demands of his subconscious, maintaining that, “the way it is with painting, you don’t know what you’re looking at until you find it.” 1 It was at this time that he also began to experiment with media, experimenting with painting textiles, using dyed 35mm film to create light-based works, and the use of industrial paints (this can be seen in Lot 21 of this auction, where striated lines of Duco paint are applied to gloss newsprint.) Forster settled in Mexico for an extended period from 1952-1963. Undergoing an ongoing cultural renewal led by the Muralists, Mexico provided a lively and inspiring environment for many Canadian artists at this time, including R. York Wilson, Leonard Brooks, and Jack Nichols. Here, Forster would continue to experiment with his practice, largely moving away from his earlier figurative work towards a focus on abstraction and colour. It was the prevailing quality and depth of light that would most impact Forster, and it was the intensity of the country’s vibrancy that he would come to emulate in his painting. This can be readily seen in Sun Comma Moon, produced shortly after his return to Canada and while he had begun painting with acrylics. Shifted colour and tilted light refract in a thin, opalescent surface. Lyrical and poetic, a soft flurry of atmospheric emotion that recalls slow afternoon sunbeams through tinted glass, or vast nebulaic dust motes. We can see Forster’s surrealist heritage, as forms rise and dissolve through the diluted surface. Here, light emerges from the sun as well as the moon, both partially concealed - existing not in opposition but concurrently, as two parts of the same phrase. The work breathes with an underlying urgency, heaves and sighs with delicate ripples of colour. This lot is an exceptional example of an audacious voice in Canadian mid-century art. Forster returned to England in 1975, settling with his sister in Cornwall, where he remained for the rest of his life. 1

Jansma, Linda. Michael Forster. Order Out of Chaos: Sixty Years of a Canadian Artist. Oshawa: Robert McLaughlin Gallery, 1997. p.13.

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20 MICHAEL FORSTER SUN COMMA MOON, 1966 acrylic on canvas signed and dated to the flap and titled to the label 42 ins x 50 ins; 106.7 cms x 127 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Ontario LITERATURE:

Jansma, Linda. Michael Forster. Order Out of Chaos: Sixty Years of a Canadian Artist, Oshawa: Robert McLaughlin Gallery, 1997. p.13 $3,000–5,000 68

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21 MICHAEL FORSTER CAGE, 1949 enamel (Duco) on newsprint dated; titled to the label on the reverse 12 ins x 17 ins; 30.5 cms x 43.2 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Ontario $800–1,200

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JEAN PAUL RIOPELLE Painted during a restless flurry of experimentation while immersed in the Paris cultural scene through the 1950s, Composition is an early example of the artist’s signature techniques. The work is hurried, full to the brim with darts and ridges of colour quickly laid down with a palette knife in heavy impasto. The canvas is dominated by a strong diagonal composition, with predominantly white centre separating strokes of heavier colour on the left from an area of bright colour in the upper right. Deep blues, briny seagreens, and blistered-red blacks disintegrate into pinkish streaks and tinted greys. The dense tessellations are a jostle of pigment as colours curl and fold in on each other, stitching together a mosaic of paint with smooth stains and scalloped drips. The resulting mesh is cohesive, dynamic, and forceful. This is the first time this painting has been brought to market in over 60 years, and is an excellent example of Jean Paul Riopelle at a pivotal moment in his career. This work will be included as an addendum in Jean Paul Riopelle: Catalogue RaisonnÊ by Yseult Riopelle.

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22 JEAN PAUL RIOPELLE, R.C.A. COMPOSITION, C.1955 oil on canvas signed; also signed on the reverse, titled and dated 1954 to gallery label 15 ins x 18 ins; 38.1 cms x 45.7 cms PROVENANCE:

Galerie Dresdnere, Montreal By descent to Private Collection, Toronto $150,000–250,000

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JEAN ALBERT MCEWEN Never formally trained as a painter, Jean McEwen’s practice was formed through influential relationships with Paul-Émile Borduas, Jean-Paul Riopelle, and Sam Francis, while taking inspiration from Colour Field painters such as Mark Rothko. This work, produced while he was painting full-time and at the height of his career, is an exceptional demonstration of his mature practice, with characteristic emphasis on the vibrant play of colour and the structural potential of pigment and medium. Translucent tissuepaper slides of colour are built up in stratified layers on an uneasy, recessed ground. The result is a work structured through depths of colour, as opacity and luminosity work in tension with each other: the work reveals and conceals itself, creating a mesmerizing, forceful play of effervescent colour. The canvas is dominated by a pair of hazy, roiling off-white forms, bisecting the work like the wings of a gateway, and partially concealing the mottled black mass anchored at the centre of the piece. Luminescent reds and ochres seething in the background, and whispy white drifts floating across the upper corners defy attempts to bound the work. “The artist comprehends space solely through colour”, says Naubert-Riser. “He succeeds in establishing a tension between all the stratified planes by leaving their boundaries only partially defined.” 1 Les Jardins d’Aube M9 is a vivid example of the artist’s energetic and radiant use of colour as the central force of painting. Naubert-Riser, Constance. Jean McEwen: Colour in Depth: Paintings and Works on Paper, 1951-1987. Montréal: Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, 1987, p. 167. 1

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23 JEAN ALBERT MCEWEN, R.C.A. LES JARDINS D’AUBE M9, 1976 oil on canvas signed, titled and dated ‘76 to the overflap 50 ins x 50 ins; 127 cms x 127 cms PROVENANCE:

Marlborough-Godard, Toronto and Montreal Private Collection, Montreal LITERATURE:

Naubert-Riser, Constance. Jean McEwen: Colour in Depth: Paintings and Works on Paper, 1951-1987. Montréal: Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, 1987, p. 167. $40,000–50,000

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GERSHON ISKOWITZ Gershon Iskowitz’s art was forever changed after a 1967 Canada Council grant allowed him to charter an aircraft to fly over the sub-Arctic landscape and the coast of Hudson Bay. His most iconic paintings have roots in this episode, and channel both the literal vision and ephemeral sensation of catching fleeting glimpses of the ground through gaps in the cloudscape. In 1975, Iskowitz explained “People say, oh, Gershon Iskowitz is an abstract artist…But it’s a whole realistic world…the experience, out in the field, of looking up in the trees or in the sky, of looking down from the height of a helicopter. So what you do is try to make a composition of all those things, make some kind of reality: like the trees should belong to the sky, and the ground should belong to the trees, and the ground should belong to the sky. Everything has to be united.” In a year when we are all so strongly tethered to the terrestrial realm, unable to board flights, the impression of broad skies and uninhibited flight feels especially poignant, and beckons strongly. Imagine Iskowitz, given the gift of zooming up and above his surroundings, of seeing the familiar made new and almost alien. Many of us cannot remember our first trip in an airplane, and take for granted that startling moment when we slip the surly bonds of earth and gain the perspective of birds, of the heavens themselves. Iskowitz’s paintings remind us of the marvel of the skies, and how sublime that experience of the infinite can be. To read further about the work of Iskowitz and the Gershon Iskowitz Foundation, see our blog Proceeds from the sale of this lot to benefit the Gershon Iskowitz Foundation.

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24 GERSHON ISKOWITZ, R.C.A. BLUE RED-C, 1980 oil on canvas signed, titled, and dated on the reverse 45 ins x 40 ins; 114.3 cms x 101.6 cms PROVENANCE:

Artist’s Studio, Gershon Iskowitz Foundation $10,000–15,000

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25 JEAN ALBERT MCEWEN, R.C.A. MIROIR SANS IMAGE, VERT - NUMBER 5, C.1971 oil on canvas signed and titled to the overflap 40 ins x 40 ins; 101.6 cms x 101.6 cms PROVENANCE:

Galerie Agnès Lefort, Montreal Private Collection, Montreal $40,000–60,000 In 1971, Jean McEwen returned to painting in oil after a period spent using acrylics with a series called Miroir Sans Image (Imageless Mirror). The clear representation of a “frame” with golden corners surrounds the central layers of paint. This lot, Vert - Number 5, showcases small hints of bright turquoise that peek out from darker layers of varnished forest green. The subtle variation of greens from subdued on the frame portion, to verdant across the central square - creates the impression of a painting that is alive, breathing, and swelling outward from the centre. 86

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RENÉ MARCIL

René Marcil’s career began as a fashion illustrator, first for Morgan’s and Eaton’s department stores in Montreal, then Lord and Taylor in New York. In the early 1950s Marcil moved to France, where he began supplementing his figure drawing practice with abstracted compositions. The paintings produced during this time demonstrate a continuation of the dynamism and elegance that characterised his fashion illustrations, and marked a significant turning point towards the use of bold, brilliant colour that would be further explored in his late-career portrait pieces. This work, completed in the early days of what would be an extended period living in Europe, exemplifies Marcil’s willingness to experiment with his practice. Here he adopts the established visual language of Fauvism, Cubism, and automatic Surrealism. Blues dominate the canvas, illuminated by flashing facets of orange, green, and pink. Bold, heavy black strokes provide an architectural structure to the scene: this could be an interior, or a pure abstract exploration of colour. Expressionistic and lyrical, Marcil’s long career was characterised by confident draftsmanship and a unique evolved style.

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26 RENÉ MARCIL UNTITLED, 1956-58 signed and dated ‘56; also signed, dated ‘58 and inscribed ‘retouché’ verso 39.25 x 24 in — 99.7 x 61 cm PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Toronto $3,000—5,000 LOT HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN AND WILL BE OFFERED IN WADDINGTON’S CANADIAN ART SELECT ONLINE AUCTION THIS DECEMBER.

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SOREL ETROG

27 SOREL ETROG, R.C.A. HAIELET STUDY, 1959 bronze signed and numbered 3/5 to the base 14.75 ins x 4 ins x 4 ins; 37.5 cms x 10.2 cms x 10.2 cms PROVENANCE:

The Helen and Walter Zwig Foundation Collection, Toronto LITERATURE:

Pierre Restany, Sorel Etrog, Prestal: Munich, 2001, illus. p. 13. $10,000–15,000

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28 CORNELIUS KRIEGHOFF INDIAN TRAPPERS, 1849 oil on canvas signed; also signed and dated on the reverse 13.75 ins x 18 ins; 34.9 cms x 45.7 cms PROVENANCE:

Ex. Collection Officer of the Quebec Garrison By descent to Private Collection, Edinburgh  William Watson Gallery, Montreal  Fraser Bros. Ltd., Montreal, 1966, Lot 851 Private Collection, Montreal  By descent to Private Collection, Calgary $50,000–70,000

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A rare opportunity, this beautifully preserved painting has not been seen publicly since 1966, when it was bought at auction in Montreal. After Cornelius Krieghoff completed the piece, it was brought to England by members of the Québec Garrison, where it made its way to Scotland. Against the backdrop of Krieghoff’s signature candy-floss clouds, we see a fur cache built into the side of a hillock. From behind a door flap made from a Hudson’s Bay blanket, a figure emerges, curious to see the two figures conversing outside the shelter. In the background, a trapper strains to pull a well-loaded toboggan through the snow, returning from a hard day’s work. A similar painting is held in the permanent collection of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Indian Hunter and His Family, completed in 1856. Indian Hunter and His Family, completed in 1856.


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KENT MONKMAN Paul Kane painted Fort Edmonton, the Hudson Bay Company outpost that overlooked the North Saskatchewan River, between 1849 and 1856. Set against a sublime pastoral landscape, Kane’s outpost rests atop a sun-struck hilltop while a grouping of teepees stand below. Kane’s physical placement of the HBC outpost high above the Indigenous community should not be easily dismissed. It suggests a racial hierarchy of European civilization over others and is reflective of their paternalistic treatment toward Indigenous populations. Moreover, Kane’s romanticization of a Christian cross and the flag of empire are further evidence that Fort Edmonton is steeped in colonial ideology. Nearly 150 years after its completion, Kent Monkman revisits Kane’s painting with his own version of Fort Edmonton. However, in Monkman’s hands, the colonial matrix that drove Kane to produce his work is delegitimized. Though it is also set against the backdrop of Fort Edmonton, Monkman’s painting features a triplicate of queer sex and desire among stallions, glimpsed on a petroglyph, and engaged between a frontier soldier and woodland warrior. Here the viewer doubles as voyeur, peering into a panorama of sex, pornography, and BDSM play. For Monkman, the dominant and submissive relationship extends well beyond the realm of BDSM and into the subjugation of Indigenous peoples in North America. Fort Edmonton’s kink both encapsulates and redresses centuries of sexual oppression and colonial authority. It also challenges existing archetypes of colonialism by recovering agency over how one’s self, one’s family, and one’s people are represented to others. We thank Matthew Ryan Smith, Ph.D., Curator and Head of Collections at Glenhyrst Art Gallery in Brantford, Ontario, for contributing this essay.

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29 KENT MONKMAN FORT EDMONTON, 2003 acrylic on canvas 24 ins x 36 ins; 61 cms x 91.4 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Ontario EXHIBITED:

Kent Monkman: The Triumph of Mischief, Art Gallery of Hamilton, June 7 - August 26, 2007; exhibition travelled to Toronto (MOCA), Halifax (SMU Art Gallery), Calgary (Glenbow Museum); Victoria (Art Gallery of Greater Victoria). $30,000–50,000

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Installation shot of Kent Monkman: TheTriumph of Mischief, Museum of Contemporary Art, Toronto. This lot shown lower right. Photo by Walter Willems” and “MOCA Toronto”.


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FRANK HANS JOHNSTON

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1924 was a watershed year for art depicting the Canadian Rockies. Lawren Harris, A.Y. Jackson, Arthur Lismer, and J.E.H. MacDonald were all painting in various places between Banff and Jasper, at various times. In July of that year, the Canadian Pacific Railway sent Frank H. Johnston west from Winnipeg, where he was living at the time, on a sketching trip to create advertising material for their promotional brochures. We also know that he visited Jasper, which was of interest to the CPR and had been opened up by their regional competitor the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway in 1911. But Jasper National Park is huge, and the mountains of its southern regions, which this fine work depicts, were a much more challenging venture to reach. Previously described as “View from Banff” and “Lake O’Hara,” this work in fact depicts Mount Athabasca, the centerpiece of the Columbia Icefields. Mount Andromeda shows to the right of Athabasca, both seen from a location high up along Wilcox Pass. Wilcox Pass is an historic route and at the time, was the main trail linking Banff and Jasper towns. There was no road or train line that would have given Johnston access to this pass until The Glacier Trail (now the Icefields Parkway) was completed in 1940. Johnston having accessed this remote area, either on his 1924 trip or later in 1930, is indeed remarkable. The CPR headed west at Field, some 146 kilometers south of the Icefields, and the Grand Trunk Pacific line in Jasper - which was by then known as the Canadian National Railway, was 106 kilometres north west. Travelling the Wilcox Pass route would have required a guide and pack train, and would have taken several days. It’s possible and perhaps more likely that the work was executed from photographs provided by others, and the large format of the work certainly suggests its use as illustrative material, perhaps as a banner or masthead on a brochure or poster. It is simply too large to have been a practical field study. While there are posters for both the CPR and the CNR in Johnson’s exhibition records in 1925, there are no additional titles of work that can be located in the vicinity of Wilcox Pass. The work’s support, however, suggests a more durable intention than illustration art, which was often discarded after use, thus inexpensive papers and boards were used. The work’s support of pressed board and execution in oil begs the question of its intention. Regardless of its source or use, it is a sundrenched, fresh, and uniquely appealing work depicting a spectacular high-alpine location in the Rockies of Jasper National Park. One that brings a new set of questions about the extent of Johnston’s travels in the Rockies to the fore. We thank Lisa Christensen for contributing this essay. Ms. Christenten is the past Director of Heffel Fine Art Auction House’s Calgary office, Curator of Mountain Culture at the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies, and a freelance writer and guide. She is the author of four award-winning books on the mountainscape art history of Canada. 100 Canadian Fine Art Auction


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30 FRANK HANS JOHNSTON, O.S.A., R.C.A. MOUNT ATHABASCA AND ANDROMEDA oil on board signed; inscribed “From Franz Johnston, Balm Beach - Georgian Bay, Ont.” on the reverse 20 ins x 42.25 ins; 50.8 cms x 107.3 cms PROVENANCE:

Joyner Fine Art, November 1993, lot 93 as “View From Banff” Private Collection, Toronto $15,000–20,000 Photo by Mike Mitchell, Giant’s Gate

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31 FREDERICK SIMPSON COBURN, R.C.A. HAULING LOGS, 1945 oil on canvas signed and dated ‘45 20 ins x 25.5 ins; 50.8 cms x 64.8 cms PROVENANCE:

Continental Galleries of Fine Art, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto $8,000–12,000

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32 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. SEPTEMBER MORNING MIST AT TALISMAN RESORT, 1976 oil on board signed; also signed, titled and dated “Talisman/76” on the reverse 9.25 ins x 11.25 ins; 23.5 cms x 28.6 cms PROVENANCE:

Gift from the Artist By descent to Private Collection, Ontario $12,000–16,000

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The Talisman Resort was a popular destination in the seventies, primarily for skiing. Here A.J. Casson has recorded the quiet ski hills on a September day before the snow flies. The distinctive ridgeline will be familiar to those who have visited the resort. The distinctive Swissstyle chalet building of the main lodge would be out of frame to the left of the composition.


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33 JOSEPH YVON FAFARD, R.C.A NOT-PHOTO-BASED-COW, 2007 patinated bronze signed, dated and numbered 3/9 8 ins x 13 ins x 5 ins; 20.3 cms x 33 cms x 12.7 cms PROVENANCE:

Estate of Richard LaPrairie, Toronto NOTE:

Proceeds from the sale will be generously donated by the Estate to Camp Ooch & Camp Trillium to benefit children living with cancer. $4,000–6,000

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JACK HAMILTON BUSH Throughout his fine art career, amid international acclaim, Jack Bush remained a painter dedicated to Toronto. During his early landscape painting days, Toronto provided a variety of subject matters for inspiration. In 1948, Bush was raising a family of three boys with his wife Mabel. They lived on Eastview Crescent, which lies between Yonge Boulevard and York Mills Road, just west of Yonge Street. To the east, the view was Hoggs Hollow – a largely rural stretch of rolling hills and farms back then, but accessible by an electric railway that traveled along Yonge Street, which bordered this once bucolic place. Valley in Winter is a painting that captures a fascinating moment in Toronto’s history – a transition, or pivot point, between rural and urban. The rolling hills and tufts of forest are carved through with a scatter of houses, a long and winding road and, most prominently, tall utility poles. The utility poles bear an uncanny resemblance to crucifixes in the landscape. Bush was an Anglican but 1948 marked a time of emotional and spiritual struggle for the artist. Evidence of this pivotal time in his life came through boldly and bravely in a solo exhibition of “New Paintings” held at the Gavin Henderson Galleries at 759 Yonge Street in the fall of 1949. The gallery billed the paintings as “provocative” and Valley in Winter was included among other paintings, such as Floating Spirit and Struggling Spirit, both of which are now in the collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario. These two paintings also date to 1948 and are notably abstract, with no discernible human features or objects. Between landscapes and forays into abstraction, 1948 represents a critical moment in the career of Jack Bush where his worlds were colliding. As Pearl McCarthy noted when she reviewed his 1949 show, the work represented a “period of intensive, personal work,” resulting in his paintings reaching a higher level than anything he had produced previously. 1 Another critic, Rose MacDonald, praised the paintings for their “powerfully impactive character.”2 We thank Sarah Stanners, art historian, curator, and Director of the Jack Bush Catalogue Raisonné for contributing this essay. Pearl McCarthy, “Pictures by Jack Bush Typify Deeper Trends,” The Globe and Mail (15 October 1949), p. 9. 2 Rose MacDonald, “Donges Landscapes at Little Gallery,” Toronto Telegra (15 October 1949). 1.

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34 JACK HAMILTON BUSH, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. VALLEY IN WINTER (HOGG’S HOLLOW), 1948 gouache on board signed 18.5 ins x 25 ins; 47 cms x 63.5 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Ontario EXHIBITED:

New Paintings By Jack Bush, Gavin Henderson Galleries, Toronto, 17-29 October 1949, no. 29. $8,000–12,000 Cover of exhibition catalogue

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35 ROBERT WAKEHAM PILOT, P.R.C.A. HOTEL DIEU, 1916 oil on panel signed and dated ‘16; titled on the reverse 5.5 ins x 7 ins; 14 cms x 17.8 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Ontario $4,000–6,000

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ALEXANDER YOUNG JACKSON With a keen eye and light touch, A.Y. Jackson captures the unique signatures of a Dutch landscape. A tiny windmill is just visible on the horizon, as are four hayricks near the centre of the painting, rendered in subtle progression so as to present a strong impression of perspectival depth. The Montreal-born Jackson travelled to Europe on three separate occasions between 1905 and 1913, where he became influenced by the Impressionist movement. This painting was created during Jackson’s second trip, from 1907 to 1909. He had travelled to Paris to study at the AcadÊmie Julian, but deferred his studies after only one semester in order to travel across France, Italy, Belgium and the Netherlands. The Impressionistic objective to capture the elusive effects of light and shadow can be seen in this painting. Jackson masterfully renders a break in the clouds by layering a few strokes of bright white over moody yellows and taupes. A dike snakes its way through the middle of the scene, echoed by an unpaved path, guiding the eye to a patch of countryside bathed in sunlight, a swath of brightness on an overcast day.

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36 ALEXANDER YOUNG JACKSON, O.S.A., R.C.A. DUTCH LANDSCAPE WITH STREAM, 1909 oil on panel mounted to board signed and dated 7.2 ins x 9.5 ins; 17.8 cms x 22.9 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Ontario $10,000–15,000

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37 ALEXANDER YOUNG JACKSON, O.S.A., R.C.A. A SOUVENIR OF A JUNE DAY oil on panel signed and indistinctly dated; inscribed “To Walter Stewart from Alex Jackson; A souvenir of a June day” with “S. Walter Stewart” stamp on the reverse 8.5 ins x 10.5 ins; 21.6 cms x 26.7 cms PROVENANCE:

The Morris Gallery, Toronto By descent to Private Collection, Florida $20,000–25,000

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A.J. CASSON In 1976 Casson produced a series of paintings in this area. Elephant Lake, Baptiste Lake and our titular subject, Diamond Lake, surround the Haliburton Forest which was a favourite source of inspiration for the artist. Here, a typical Haliburton hill looms hazy and bluish in the background. The trees and bushes in the foreground are carefully differentiated in their end-of-summer tones of green and gold, while a shadow cools the ancient rose-coloured granite that is unique to this area of Ontario.

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38 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. DIAMOND LAKE, 1976 oil on board signed; also signed, dated, and titled on the reverse 9.5 ins x 11 ins; 24.1 cms x 27.9 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Toronto $20,000–30,000

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39 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. OCTOBER NEAR BUCK HILL, BIRD’S CREEK, C.1968 oil on board signed; also signed and titled on the reverse 12 ins x 15 ins; 30.5 cms x 38.1 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Toronto $20,000–30,000

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TOM THOMSON

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Tom Thomson’s early paintings around 1912 and 1913 are often marked by a dark tonality and sensitive handling. He had not yet heard the clarion call of Impressionism. A Quiet Summer Evening and Late Spring reveal the direction of his course. He was invigorated and inspired by the northern landscape, a subject he discovered, it seems, by chance. In 1912, after a visit Thomson had made to Algonquin Park, he and a colleague, William Broadhead, went on a two- or threemonth expedition up the Spanish River and into Mississagi Forest Reserve (today Mississagi Provincial Park). It was on this trip, as A.Y. Jackson wrote later, that Thomson started to paint. The course of the trip was recorded by Thomson himself. In a letter to a friend, M.J. McRuer, Thomson wrote: “We started in at Bisco and took a long trip on the lakes around there going up the Spanish River and over into the Mississauga [Mississagi] water we got a great many good snapshots of game—mostly moose and some sketches, but we had a dump in the forty-mile rapids which is near the end of our trip and lost most of our stuff—we only saved 2 rolls of film out of about 14 dozen. Outside of that we had a peach of a time as the Mississauga is considered the finest canoe trip in the world.” 1 Thomson’s local newspaper, The Owen Sound Sun, added to this enthusiastic account that it rained most of the time and the two men capsized twice. However, the adventure they were on added to the thrill of discovering the grand scenery of the Park as well as other places on their route. When they made it home to Toronto, Thomson joined the commercial art firm of Rous & Mann, and met future members of the Group of Seven such as F. H. Varley, and Dr. J.M. MacCallum, co-founder of the Studio Building with Lawren Harris, who became his friend and patron. Thomson showed these friends the sketches he had made on the trip and was showered with praise. Everyone agreed that he had caught the real northern character.

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Late Spring has the sombre, dark tonality of sketches related to this trip. In this work, he does not get bogged down in minute details but delicately and sensitively handled the bare branches of the trees and sets the land masses and trees securely in their spaces. He indicated the structure of the land by small flecks of paint and the sky above and its layer of cloud by uneven horizontal bands of blue-grey and off-white. As in another work of 1912, Thomson used the trees on either side as a framing device, here, for a distant bridge or culvert and a stretch of blue water. In these lyrical early conceptions, Thomson discovered the kind of thinking about art that he often would use later. Late Spring is in embryo one of the sources for paintings such as Thomson’s majestic Woodland Waterfall (McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Kleinburg). Canadian Fine Art Auction


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40 TOM THOMSON A QUIET SUMMER EVENING, C.1913 oil on board 6.9 ins x 9.9 ins; 17.5 cms x 25.1 cms PROVENANCE:

The artist, by gift, to his sister Margaret Thomson Tweedale Private Collection, Vancouver Kenneth G. Heffel Fine Art Ltd., Vancouver Hazel Hett, Vancouver Galerie Claude Lafitte, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto LITERATURE:

Murray, Joan, Tom Thomson Catalogue Raisonné (tomthomsoncatalogue.org) (1913.21) $250,000–350,000

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One more word about Late Spring: it is not likely to have been painted in 1913 when Thomson went north again since Jackson wrote of the sketches done that year that there were no “wood interiors” in the group that he saw that autumn.2 Yet Late Spring provides striking evidence of Thomson’s increased skill in composition when compared with a sketch such as Mississagi (1912.29) which he painted on his trip. Perhaps Thomson essayed some sketches when he came home from memory or when visiting his family in Leith. The path Thomson took in art involved digesting painting lessons learned from teachers such as J.E.H. MacDonald, his ‘boss’ in the commercial art firm of Grip Ltd., and Harris whom he had met at MacDonald`s show at the Arts & Letters Club in Toronto in 1911 and of course, from his training in design. These sources offered something of a guide too. With remarkable speed, Thomson’s handling of paint strengthened, his composition grew more powerful and he gained more confidence. A Quiet Summer Evening, created in the summer of 1913, is a night-time scene but even so, Thomson used a lighter palette in it than in Late Spring. The handling of the sky and water is more modulated, the branches of trees and foliage crisper. As in Late Spring, Thomson introduced a lyrical element, here the moon which glamorously lights the sky, water and trees. Though of approximately the same size as Late Spring, this sketch is so well designed that it seems larger, at least in reproduction. Thomson was in his own way a determined modern artist. He did not want his work to be viewed as part of a tradition unless that tradition was of something new, and he was working intelligently and ambitiously towards that new form of expression. These works are proof that he found much that was exciting and challenging in the northern landscape that he wanted to convey and applied it to his work. Perhaps that is why his art still proves so compelling to viewers today. We thank Joan Murray, art historian, author of the Tom Thomson Catalogue Raisonné and many books on Tom Thomson, for contributing this essay. Letter to Dr. M. J. (John) McRuer, 17 October 1912, Joan Murray, “Thomson`s Letters”, in Reid, Dennis (ed.). Tom Thomson. Toronto/Ottawa: Art Gallery of Ontario/National Gallery of Canada, p. 297 2 See Hill, Charles (2002). “Tom Thomson, Painter”. In Reid, Dennis (ed.). Tom Thomson, p.21. 1

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41 TOM THOMSON LATE SPRING, 1912 oil on canvas board 6.8 ins x 9.8 ins; 17.2 cms x 24.8 cms PROVENANCE:

Galerie Claude Lafitte, Montreal Roberts Gallery, Toronto Sotheby’s Toronto, 31 May 1990, lot 26 Joyner Fine Art, Toronto, 23 November 1993, lot 85 Sotheby’s Toronto, 15 November 1995, lot 79 Private Collection, Toronto EXHIBITED:

1987 Nancy Poole’s Studio, Toronto, [unknown title], November, 1987. LITERATURE:

Murray, Joan, Tom Thomson Catalogue Raisonné (tomthomsoncatalogue.org) (1912.10) $200,000–300,000

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LAWREN STEWART HARRIS

This early work depicts a stand of trees near the Harris family cottage on Lake Simcoe. During this time in the artist’s practice, ideas of how to depict “our Canada” as a unique and original subject seen through truly Canadian eyes was at the forefront of Lawren Harris’s mind, mirrored by Canada’s emergence as a nation apart from colonial Britain because of the valiant participation of our troops in World War One. In 1916, when this painting was made, Harris was spending much of his time training soldiers at Camp Borden, not far from Lake Simcoe. Harris would experience a heartbreaking loss when his younger brother Howard was killed in battle just two years later. The bright sunny scene is alive with colour - a golden field, cool green evergreens and vibrant ombre turquoise blue sky almost make the viewer feel like they are standing right in that warm summer sun - a respite from the difficult reality of a world at war. This painting has been owned by the same family since its acquisition in the 1930s, likely when the Studio Building contents were dispersed, and has been passed down through three generations.

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42 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS PINE TREES, KEMPENFELT BAY, C.1916 oil on board signed and titled “Kempenfeldt Bay” on the reverse 14 ins x 10.5 ins; 35.6 cms x 26.7 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Toronto $60,000–80,000

Lawren Harris in military uniform c. 1916. Image courtesy of Estate of Lawren S. Harris.

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43 JAMES EDWARD HERVEY MACDONALD, O.S.A., R.C.A. LIMESTONE HILLSIDE oil on board initialled; titled and inscribed “Certified T. MacDonald” in pencil on the reverse 8.5 ins x 10.5 ins; 21.6 cms x 26.7 cms PROVENANCE:

Joyner Fine Art, 26 May 1995, lot 50H Private Collection, Ontario $20,000–30,000

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44 ANDRÉ CHARLES BIÉLER, O.S.A., R.C.A. CAP TOURMENTE, C.1928 oil on panel signed 8.5 ins x 10.5 ins; 21.6 cms x 26.7 cms PROVENANCE:

C. Gulenberg Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Ontario NOTE:

This is a study for the fully realised canvas in the collection of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. $3,000–5,000 Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Queen’s University, Kingston. Gift of Queen’s Art Circuit, 1964 (07-008).

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Image Courtesy of Fafard Sculpture Inc. showing an edition of Lil outdoors


45 JOSEPH YVON FAFARD, R.C.A LIL, 1987 patinated bronze signed, dated, and numbered 2/7 44 ins x 27 ins x 13 ins; 111.8 cms x 68.6 cms x 33 cms PROVENANCE:

Galerie de Bellefeuille, Montreal Estate of Richard LaPrairie, Toronto NOTE:

Proceeds from the sale will be generously donated by the Estate to Camp Ooch & Camp Trillium to benefit children living with cancer. $10,000–15,000

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LAURA ADELINE MUNTZ LYALL In 1897, Laura Muntz was in France during her second trip to the country. She was finding success in her work, landing the position of massière (studio head) at the esteemed Académie Collarossi, while also showing her paintings at salon exhibitions, where they were well received. At the age of 37, she was also in love for the first time with a French gentleman. Perhaps this painting exemplified her positive mood during this moment in time due to her blossoming success professionally. She was honing in on her own style during this later period of Impressionism, and experiencing romantic love for what would prove to be the only time in her life. Best-known for her tender portraits of children who look directly at the viewer, this work is markedly different. The subject is turned away, the angle of her body and gaze leading the eye down a sunny garden path. There is a serenity and stillness about her, with the only sense of motion coming from the dappled shadows that dance across her shoulder and hat. Shortly after this painting was completed, Muntz would discover that the Frenchman she was in love with was married and had been misleading her. She fled to Canada, where her life would take an entirely new path - away from that of a successful Impressionist artist living in France and into a more conventional role for a woman of that era. “..Muntz’s reaction to her betrayal was typical of the reticence and reserve she displayed throughout her life. Although she knew it was a mistake to return to Canada as far as her career was concerned, she felt compelled to withdraw from the scene of her greatest happiness and success. In her confusion and grief over this man, the only one she ever thought of marrying for love, she came home in early November, 1898.” 1 While she continued to paint -portraits specifically- in Canada, she purposely toned down her Impressionist style as it was not sought after by Canadian patrons. Muntz also took up teaching positions in Ontario and Quebec. In 1915, after the death of her sister, Muntz married her sister’s widower and took on the monumental task of raising their eleven children. Her practice was much reduced after her marriage, but despite these difficulties, was still able to leave behind a legacy as one of the finest Impressionist-style Canadian painters. Joan Murray, Laura Muntz Lyall; Impressions of Women and Childhood, Boardwalk Ventures Inc. by McGill-Queen’s University Press, Montreal & Kingston, London, Ithaca, p.26. 1

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46 LAURA ADELINE MUNTZ LYALL, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. WOMAN IN A WIDE-BRIMMED HAT, C.1897 oil on canvas, laid down on board 17.7 ins x 21 ins; 45 cms x 53.4 cms PROVENANCE:

Gift from the great niece of the Artist Private Collection, Brampton Sotheby’s Toronto/Ritchie’s: 18 November 2003, Lot 2 Peter Ohler Fine Arts Ltd., Vancouver Private Collection, British Columbia LITERATURE:

Joan Murray, Laura Muntz Lyall: Impressions of Women and Childhood, McGill-Queen’s University Press, Montreal and Kingston, 2012, p. 71 (plate 14), reproduced. $10,000–15,000 146

Canadian Fine Art Auction


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HELEN GALLOWAY MCNICOLL A gift from the artist to Mrs. Trenholme, a close friend of the McNicoll family, this painting depicts the orchard and barns of the Elmhurst Dairy Farm. Mrs. Trenholme’s husband, Thomas Anderson, was the founder of this Montreal-area dairy, located in what is now the city’s Notre-Dame-de-Grâce neighbourhood. Thomas Trenholme took great care and pride with his herd—the business stayed within the Trenholme family for just shy of 100 years, and was known for producing high-quality milk as well as for an iconic neighbourhood ice cream parlour. Elmhurst Dairy was sold to Parmalat in 1970. Like the dairy farm itself, the painting stayed in the Trenholme family for generations. Along with this excellent provenance, the painting was included in a 1925 memorial exhibition for Helen McNicoll organized by the Art Association of Montreal and is included in the corresponding literature. Another charming touch is an accompanying beachside photo of the McNicoll and Trenholme families. Art historian Paul Duval called McNicoll “possibly [Canada’s] best Impressionist painter.” 1 Indeed, railway pioneer William Van Horne acquired one of McNicoll’s works in 1909, positioning it next to paintings by Auguste Renoir, Mary Cassatt and other European Impressionists in his collection. McNicoll’s work was well received in her lifetime—despite Impressionism never gaining much traction in Canada—but faded from view after her death. Samantha Burton suggests that this was perhaps due to the dominance of the Group of Seven and the quest for a more “Canadian” school of painting, rather than a style that was seen as imported and foreign.2 A major exhibition of her work in 1999 at the Art Gallery of Ontario helped introduce McNicoll to wider audiences and reposition her as one of Canada’s foremost artists. True to the roots of Impressionism, McNicoll was fascinated by the transient nature of light and colour, well evidenced in this painting. While McNicoll’s brushstrokes conjure up a strong sense of movement—the grass in particular seems positively effervescent—the overall composition is restful and calm. Her use of darker tones to evoke the lengthening shadows on the field is particularly poignant, transporting the viewer to a fleeting summer’s day in a friend’s orchard. https://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/art-and-architecture/article-influential-art-writer-paul-duvalchampioned-lawren-harris/ 2 https://aci-iac.ca/art-books/helen-mcnicoll/significance-and-critical-issues/#a-legacy-forgotten 1

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47 HELEN GALLOWAY MCNICOLL, R.C.A. THE ORCHARD AT ELMHURST DAIRY, MONTREAL, C.1910 oil on canvas inscribed “Painting by Miss Helen G. McNicoll, 1879 - 1915” to frame, and stamped with the artist’s studio stamp #32 on the canvas and stretcher 20 ins x 24.25 ins; 50.8 cms x 61.6 cms PROVENANCE:

A gift from the Artist to Mrs. T.A. Trenholme By descent to Private Collection, Quebec

EXHIBITED:

Art Association of Montreal, Memorial Exhibition of Paintings by the Late Helen G. McNicoll, RBA, ARCA, November 7 - December 6, 1925, catalogue #32 LITERATURE:

Memorial Exhibition of Paintings by the Late Helen G. McNicoll, RBA, ARCA, Art Association of Montreal, 1925, listed p. 5 Paul Duval, Canadian Impressionism, 1990, p. 92 Natalie Luckyj, Helen McNicoll: A Canadian Impressionist, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1999, for a similar circa 1908 oil entitled A Wayside Farm, p. 35. $60,000–90,000

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48 JOAN WILLSHER-MARTEL TREESCAPE, 1968-97 oil on linen signed with initials; titled, dated, and inscribed “Revised - 1997” on the reverse 72 ins x 72 ins; 182.9 cms x 182.9 cms PROVENANCE:

Estate of the Artist Private Collection, Toronto $4,000–6,000 152

Canadian Fine Art Auction


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ULYSSE COMTOIS Emblematic of the magnified pointillism found in his later painting, Couleurs d’Automne showcases Ulysse Comtois at his most expansive and iridescent. Juxtaposing strokes of bold colour come together in glinting flashes and rushed, hurried flows of energetic movement. A central cruciform radiates across the canvas, creating a turbulent lurch between heated oranges and reds and cooler shades of blue, black, and turquoise. The impression is that of blustered flurries of fallen leaves in the chill autumn breeze and the last searing heat of a dying summer sun. The vast field of colour is a singular example of Comtois’ buzzing expressionism.

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49 ULYSSE COMTOIS COULEURS D’AUTOMNE, 1988 acrylic on canvas signed; also signed, dated, and titled on the reverse 60 ins x 72 ins; 152.4 cms x 182.9 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Quebec $20,000–30,000

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JOYCE WIELAND

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This lot is accompanied by a note from the artist on personal stationary, “Jim Loves The Slide | This is our best one so far | Best Wishes, Joyce”. Joyce Wieland produced at least two Expo Pavillion [sic] drawings in 1984, both of which are reproduced as scans from Wieland’s personal slide archive on the Centre for Contemporary Canadian Art website.1 One of these is the consigned coloured pencil drawing of two lovers amidst a wash of idyllic Canadian wilderness. In the note accompanying the consigned drawing, Wieland comments that the slide reproduction – which she likely submitted to an organizing committee for Expo ’87 – “is our best one so far.” No published writing on Wieland currently acknowledges this drawing (ostensibly one of a series). The 1986 World Exposition on Transportation and Communication, or Expo ’86, was the second exposition to be held in Canada after Expo ’67, and celebrated Vancouver’s centennial. Wieland’s inclusion in plans for the Canadian Pavilion would have been likely, given her reputation for witty and perceptive celebrations of the nation since her rise to fame in 1967. She was the first female artist to be given a solo retrospective at the National Gallery of Canada (True Patriot Love, 1971) and the Art Gallery of Ontario (1987). During the first half of the 1980s Wieland’s career as a visual artist (as opposed to an experimental filmmaker) was relaunched. Bloom of Matter Spring, her 1981 solo exhibition at the Isaacs Gallery in Toronto, featured delicate yet rhapsodic coloured-pencil drawings variously described as “sex poetry,” teeming “with interior mythological and allegorical life,” and rejoicing in an “apotheosis of the erotic.”2 Wieland had begun creating intimate ovoid and circular drawings in which she celebrates her love of nature through female sexuality in 1979. The consigned Expo Pavillion drawing is rectangular, but the curve of the earth is captured along the top with an ocean view recalling Wieland’s beloved memories of Newfoundland, where she and her husband, Michael Snow, spent many summers. Familiar characters appear: the ecstatic woman (possibly Wieland herself), her aesthetic lover, the stag (with which she associated the painter, Tom Thomson) seen atop the seaside cliff, and a Canada Goose honking a national cheer. “World in Motion – World in Touch,” as Expo ’86 was themed, intended “to expose avant-garde artists to large audiences” in the flagship Canadian pavilion, located in Vancouver’s busy harbour.3 But many plans fell short when Christopher Wootten, the original Expo programming director was fired and approximately “$7 million “was trimmed from the budget for the entertainment program.” The cuts meant the cancellation of an art gallery and an exposition “embarrassingly short of visual art…”. Wootten and his visual arts consultant, Luke Rombout (the former director of the Vancouver Art Gallery), had planned a fine arts pavilion which was subsequently reserved for cabaret performances. In the end, Rombout succeeded in arranging only two exhibitions: Ramses II and His Times from the Cairo Museum and The Spectral Image, featuring holographic work by Wieland’s then ex-husband, Michael Snow. We thank Professor Anna Hudson, Graduate Program Director of Art History & Visual Culture in the School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design at York University, for contributing this essay. http://ccca.concordia.ca/ See: Jay Scott, “Full Circle, True, patriot womanhood: the 30-year passage of Joyce Wieland,” Canadian Art (Spring 1987), pp. 56-63: https://canadianart.ca/; and Jan Allen Joyce Wieland: Twilit Record of Romantic Love(Kingston: The Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Queen’s University, 1994): http://ccca.concordia.ca 3 See: Ann “Special Report / EXPO 86 – A World of Performance,” Maclean’s (March 17, 1986), https://archive.macleans.ca/ Canadian FineWalmsley, Art Auction 1

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50 JOYCE WIELAND, R.C.A. EXPO PAVILION DRAWING pencil crayon on card sheet 9.2 ins x 11.5 ins; 23.4 cms x 29.2 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Ontario $2,000–3,000

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A note from the artist accompanies this lot


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WANDA KOOP Wanda Koop is one of Canada’s foremost landscape painters. Her signature canvases are composed of minimal forms and densely layered colours, seemingly simple compositions that reveal the complexities of a world that is part science fiction imaginary and part too-true reality. Deeply aware of the damage humans are imposing on the biosphere, Koop constructs landscapes that feel both timeless and urgent, considering nature, atmosphere, technology and industry in tandem. Untitled (Blue Satellite City) is one of her renowned “Satellite City” paintings. In this series, she removes the horizon almost entirely and instead uses subtle gradations of colour to define the shift in atmosphere between air and land or sky and sea, as appears to be the case here. This wonderfully delicate quality and soft palette recall an island archipelago suspended in either luminous clouds or a fog-filled, glassy sea. And the familiar topography of roadways emanating from a central urban hub could as easily be interpreted as transportation circuits or airplane contrails. As in much of Koop’s work, the imagery remains urgent as her compositions are interpreted anew. In our current moment, one can’t help but read the isolated but connected urban spaces as some kind of portent for a future where communication is infrastructural rather than social. Everyone is connected, at a distance. What might subsequent generations see in such icily minimal depictions of space? We thank Jayne Wilkinson, a Toronto-based writer, editor and independent curator, for contributing this essay. She is currently editor-in-chief at Canadian Art.

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51 WANDA KOOP UNTITLED (BLUE SATELLITE CITY), 2002 acrylic and gouache on canvas signed; titled and dated to gallery label on the reverse 49 ins x 84 ins; 124.5 cms x 213.4 cms PROVENANCE:

Leo Kamen Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, New York $25,000–30,000

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52 RONALD LANGLEY BLOORE BYZANTINE LIGHTS SERIES #5, 1975-76 oil on masonite signed, titled, dated “Dec 24- Feb1 1975-1976”, and inscribed “Foipermanent pigments underpainting white; Homage a Merton Sequence” on the reverse 24 ins x 34 ins; 61 cms x 86.4 cms PROVENANCE:

The Morris Gallery, Toronto, purchased 1976 By descent to Private Collection, Toronto $7,000–9,000

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53 THOMAS SHERLOCK HODGSON R.C.A. UNTITLED, 1963 oil on canvas signed and dated ‘63; also signed to the stretcher 49 ins x 49 ins; 124.5 cms x 124.5 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, London, Ontario $15,000–20,000

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54 KENNETH CAMPBELL LOCHHEAD, R.C.A. BROWN BELOW, 1964 oil on canvas signed, titled, and dated on the reverse 35 ins x 33 ins; 88.9 cms x 83.8 cms PROVENANCE:

Mira Godard Gallery, Toronto Joyner Fine Art, 7 December 1999, lot 161 Private Collection, Toronto $12,000–16,000

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55 MARC-AURÈLE FORTIN, R.C.A. BATEAU POUR L’ILE STE HELENE, C.1925 oil on board signed; titled to gallery label, with catalogue raisonné number H-0156 13.75 ins x 16.25 ins; 34.9 cms x 40.6 cms PROVENANCE:

Galerie Marcel Favreau, Quebec Private Collection, Montreal $15,000–20,000

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Big puffs of smoke billow from the row of boats jostling on their way to Île Ste Hélène. The scene is lively, full of motion both in subject and style. Set against the skyline of Montreal, we can see the landmarks of that early century: the Cathédrale Marie-Reine-du-Monde, the grain elevators, the bustling Vieux-Port. Marc-Aurèle Fortin expertly layers contrasting yellow and blues in both sky and water, to dynamic effect. The bright red boat in the center anchors the composition, creating a lovely congruence of primary colours.


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56 PHILIP HENRY HOWARD SURREY, R.C.A. MARCH WIND, 1965 mixed media on paper signed; titled and dated to gallery label on the reverse 12 ins x 21 ins; 30.5 cms x 53.3 cms PROVENANCE:

Kastel Gallery Inc., Montreal Galerie Valentin, Montreal Private Collection, Montreal $3,000–4,000

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Anyone who has experienced March weather of the Canadian variety will simultaneously wince and chuckle at this familiar scene. The wind nearly topples the pedestrians as they hurl their bodies, twirling and pitching, hands on caps and skirts, into the gusts that threaten to bowl them over. One man walks determinedly against the wind, against the flow of the crowd, barely catching purchase on the sloped ground. Philip Surrey goes so far as to angle the majority of his pencil and brushstrokes as if they too are being subjugated by invisible winds, heightening the effect. The artist was a lifelong pedestrian, walking to and from work, and often used the simple act as a basis for many compositions. While the artist’s skill is such that the cool air seems to blast out from the page, there is a sympathetic lightness to the scene, as the viewer watches the small figures dance and joust with the March wind.


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57 MARC-AURÈLE FORTIN, R.C.A. VIEUX PONT, 1948 casein on plywood panel signed; dated 1948 to certificate from Jean-Pierre Bonneville on the reverse 30.25 ins x 41 ins; 76.8 cms x 104.1 cms PROVENANCE:

Dominion Corinth Galleries Ltd., Ottawa Atelier 85 Galerie d’Art, Sainte-Adèle, Quebec Private Collection, Quebec $50,000–70,000

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Hubert Robert’s The Ponte Salario (1775), currently held in the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC, is the inspiration for this painting by Marc-Aurèle Fortin. Robert was so influenced by the Romantic ruins of 18th century artist Giambattista Piranesi that he soon became known as “Robert of the Ruins,” and would use the motif of artfully decaying structures throughout his career. Robert’s painting is modelled after an ancient road bridge that was situated three kilometers outside of Rome and straddled the Aniene, a tributary to the Tiber river. Fortin borrows quite liberally from Robert’s original, in both the overall composition and the tiny anecdotal details. Both painters show a pair of washerwomen hanging a large sheet to dry under the bridge while two of their colleagues kneel at the water’s edge. Fortin dispenses with the softness of the original, instead viewing the subject through a bold and modern lens. It is, in a way, an homage to an homage: Robert eulogizes the grandeur of Rome while Fortin eulogizes Romanticism.


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58 JOHN LITTLE, R.C.A EGLISE ST. JEAN BAPTISTE, RUE ST. JEAN ET CLAIRE FONTAINE, QUEBEC oil on canvas board signed; also signed and titled on the reverse 12 ins x 16 ins; 30.5 cms x 40.6 cms PROVENANCE:

Walter Klinkhoff Gallery, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto $10,000–15,000

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59 DAVID BROWN MILNE ST. MICHAEL’S CATHEDRAL, 1943 colour drypoint on Whatman wove paper signed and numbered “40/53”; inscribed “2 Plate, 3 Colour, Drypoint etching, State VII E-291” to gallery label on the reverse image 7 ins x 8 ins; 17.8 cms x 20.3 cms PROVENANCE:

The Isaacs Gallery, Toronto By descent to Private Collection, Toronto $15,000–20,000

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60 ALEXANDER YOUNG JACKSON, O.S.A., R.C.A. WAKEFIELD, QUEBEC oil on panel signed; titled to gallery label with “NJG 1580” on the reverse 8.5 ins x 10.5 ins; 21.6 cms x 26.7 cms PROVENANCE:

Galerie Claude Lafitte, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto $25,000–35,000

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The village of Wakefield sits on the banks of the Gatineau river north of Ottawa. This was well travelled terrain for A.Y. Jackson in the late forties, fifties and sixties during which he produced many colourful portraits of little clusters of farms and their out buildings, and are the subjects of some of Jackson’s most loved paintings. He would most often sketch in these areas in late winter and early spring. Here we are presented with a charming group of utilitarian dwellings and barns, gilded in the afternoon sun. It’s a pleasing composition which could be why Jackson chose this vantage point to set down his stool. The buildings draw the eye from one to the next, finally up to the horizon where the azure blue sky is cloudless and serene. The mastery of technique is evident in this snapshot of rural life in a Canadian riverside village.


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61 ANNE DOUGLAS SAVAGE DRYING FISH NETS, C. 1940 oil on board dated and titled to gallery label on the reverse 12 ins x 14 ins; 30.5 cms x 35.6 cms PROVENANCE:

Kastel Gallery, Montreal Galerie Valentin, Montreal Private Collection, Montreal $6,000–8,000

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62 MARCELLA MALTAIS UNTITLED, 1957 oil on canvas signed and dated /57 30 ins x 21 ins; 76.2 cms x 53.3 cms PROVENANCE:

The John Morris Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, London, Ontario $8,000–10,000

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63 KATHLEEN MARGARET HOWITT GRAHAM, R.C.A. HARD THEN SOFT, 1970 acrylic on canvas signed and dated /70 on the reverse, also signed, titled, and dated /70 to the stretcher 69 ins x 13 ins; 175.3 cms x 33 cms PROVENANCE:

Estate of Richard LaPrairie, Toronto $2,000–3,000 NOTE:

Proceeds from the sale will be generously donated by the Estate to Camp Ooch & Camp Trillium to benefit children living with cancer.

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64 MARCELLA MALTAIS SCANDINAVE SCANDÉ, 1958 oil on canvas signed and dated /58; also signed to the stretcher 30 ins x 36 ins; 76.2 cms x 91.4 cms PROVENANCE:

Galerie Denyse Delrue, Montreal Private Collection, London, Ontario EXHIBITED:

Salon de la Jeune Peinture, Montreal $9,000–12,000

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65 JEAN ALBERT MCEWEN, R.C.A. COMPAGNON DE SILENCE #1, 1973 oil on canvas signed, titled, and dated to the flap 72 ins x 72 ins; 182.9 cms x 182.9 cms PROVENANCE:

Marlborough-Godard, Toronto/Montreal The Helen and Walter Zwig Foundation Collection, Toronto $70,000–90,000

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Compagnon de Silence #1was produced the same year that Jean McEwen began to dedicate himself solely to painting, and is a potent demonstration of his expressive mastery of the medium. Using glossy, translucent layers of thick paint, McEwen creates a subtle and absorbing play of colour and emotion. The central space is dominated by warm, roiling browns that emerge from painted layers of steamy white fogs. Green bars at the edges of the canvas radiate with the vivid patina of weathered copper, bounding and structuring the piece with a burnished glow. Half-buried furrows of verdigris emerge from the deep-hued expanse. The larger-thanlife field seems to flex and push outwards against the squared-off canvas, resisting a neat geometric structure. The overall effect is a visual encounter that is both dynamic and contemplative, perhaps even meditative.


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66 FRANKLIN CARMICHAEL, O.S.A., R.C.A TREE ROOT, CRANBERRY LAKE, 1937 watercolour with estate stamp 11 ins x 13 ins; 27.9 cms x 33 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Toronto $30,000–50,000

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Throughout his career, Franklin Carmichael frequently painted around the La Cloche Mountains, on the northern shore of Lake Huron near Manitoulin Island. He was so fond of the area that he built a family cottage on Cranberry Lake in 1935. Nearly every autumn, a small group of Carmichael’s artist friends used the cottage as their sketching headquarters. The area is fondly referred to even today as ‘Carmichael country.’


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67 DAVID BROWN MILNE BUSH AND PASTURE, 1949 watercolour on paper dated “Aug 27 ‘49; inscribed “Bush and Pasture”, “Uxbridge” by Kathleen Milne in 1953; inscribed “W-622 Aug 27 ‘49” by Duncan on the reverse 10.5 ins x 14.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 36.8 cms PROVENANCE:

Duncan Picture Loan Society, 1955 Private Collection, Ottawa The Isaacs Gallery, Toronto By descent to Private Collection, Toronto LITERATURE:

David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings, Volume 2: 1929-1953, 1998, p. 945, reproduced, no. 502.15. NOTE:

See the catalogue raisonne, p. 945 for the sketch for this watercolour done on Baptiste Lake. $12,000–16,000 196

Canadian Fine Art Auction


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68 TOM HOPKINS THE WATER (NAVIGATOR), 2006 oil on linen signed; also signed, titled, and dated on the reverse 36 ins x 30 ins; 91.4 cms x 76.2 cms PROVENANCE:

Galerie de Bellefeuille, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto $5,000–7,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction


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69 DAVID A. THAUBERGER, R.C.A. WINTER BLUE, 2007 oil on canvas signed twice, titled and dated “July 2007” to the flap 43 ins x 56 ins; 109.2 cms x 142.2 cms PROVENANCE:

Loch Gallery, Toronto/Calgary/Winnipeg Estate of Richard LaPrairie, Toronto NOTE:

Proceeds from this sale will be generously donated by the Estate to Camp Ooch & Camp Trillium to benefit children living with cancer. $4,000–6,000

200 Canadian Fine Art Auction


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70 HAROLD BARLING TOWN, R.C.A. PARK #21, 1972 oil and Lucite on canvas signed and dated ‘72; also signed, titled, and dated on the reverse 28 ins x 16 ins; 71.1 cms x 40.6 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Ontario $5,000–7,000

202 Canadian Fine Art Auction


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71 JACK HAMILTON BUSH, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. JETÉ EN L’AIR, 1976 silkscreen signed, titled, dated, and numbered “I/X A.P.” in pencil to the margin sheet 29.5 ins x 40 ins; 74.9 cms x 101.6 cms PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Toronto $1,000–1,500

204 Canadian Fine Art Auction


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72 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. EDGE OF THE WOODS, HALFWAY LAKE, 1958 oil on board signed; also signed and titled on the reverse 12 ins x 15 ins; 30.5 cms x 38.1 cms PROVENANCE:

Roberts Gallery Limited, Toronto Art Rental Service of the Art Gallery of Toronto Dominion Corinth Galleries Ltd., Ottawa Imperial Oil Art Collection Joyner Waddington’s Canadian Fine Art, 6-7 December 2005, lot 8 Private Collection, Toronto $20,000–30,000

206 Canadian Fine Art Auction

The year this painting was created was the first year of A.J. Casson’s retirement. Halfway Lake, near Barry’s Bay, Ontario, was a place he returned to many times to paint the dramatic hills and colourful autumn forests. It is easy to imagine the chill in the air, beautifully suggested by the taller trees already stripped of their leaves. Wisps of cloud dance above the scene- harbingers of the approaching rain.


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73 JACK HAMILTON BUSH, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. THE PAINTER (H. JAMES), 1944 oil on board signed; also signed, titled, dated, and inscribed “Haliburton” on the reverse 8.5 ins x 11 ins; 21.6 cms x 27.9 cms PROVENANCE:

Estate of the artist Harold James By descent to Private Collection, Ontario $5,000–7,000 The subject is Harold William James, a painter and member of The Arts and Letters Club.  He was a good friend and painted with Bush around Haliburton and Belfountain. There are portraits of Mr. James by Bush in the collections of the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Art Gallery of Algoma. This work will be included in the forthcoming Jack Bush Paintings: A Catalogue Raisonné by art historian, curator, and Director of the Jack Bush Catalogue Raisonné, Dr. Sarah Stanners. 208 Canadian Fine Art Auction

Jack Bush (Canadian, 1909-1977) Harold W. James – Artist, 1946 Oil on Canvas 76.96 cm x 60.96 cm Collection of the Art Gallery of Algoma; Gift of Terry Bush, Jack Bush Jr. and Robert Bush.


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Index B

BIÉLER, ANDRÉ CHARLES (1896-1989)(44) BLOORE, RONALD LANGLEY (1925-2009) (52) BUSH, JACK HAMILTON (1909-1977)(34, 71, 73)

C

CARMICHAEL, FRANKLIN (1890-1945) (66) CARR, M. EMILY (1871-1945) (14) CASSON, ALFRED JOSEPH (1898-1992) (4, 32, 38, 39, 72) COBURN, FREDERICK SIMPSON (1871-1960) (31) COMTOIS, ULYSSE (1931-1999) (49)

LETENDRE, RITA (b. 1928) (18, 19) LISMER, ARTHUR (1885-1969) (5) LITTLE, JOHN (b. 1928) (58) LOCHHEAD, KENNETH CAMPBELL(1926-2006) (15, 54) LYALL, LAURA ADELINE MUNTZ (1860-1930) (46)

M

ETROG, SOREL (1933-2014) (1, 27)

MACDONALD, JAMES EDWARD HERVEY (1921-1932) (43) MALTAIS, MARCELLA (1933-2018) (62, 64) MCEWEN, JEAN ALBERT (1923-1999) (23, 25, 65) MCNICOLL, HELEN GALLOWAY (1879-1915) (47) MILNE, DAVID BROWN (1882-1953) (11,59, 67) MONKMAN, KENT (b. 1965) (29)

F

O

E

FAFARD, JOSEPH YVON (1942-2019) (33, 45) FORSTER, MICHAEL (1943-2002) (20, 21) FORTIN, MARC-AURÈLE (1888-1970) (17, 55, 57)

G

GRAHAM, KATHLEEN MARGARET HOWITT (1913-2008) (63)

H

ODJIG, DAPHNE (1919-2016) (12)

P

PEREHUDOFF, WILLIAM (1919-2013) (8, 9) PILOT, ROBERT WAKEHAM (1898-1967) (35)

P

RIOPELLE, JEAN PAUL (1923-2002) (22)

HARRIS, LAWREN STEWART (1885-1970) (42) HODGSON, THOMAS SHERLOCK (1924-2006) (53) HOPKINS, TOM (1944-2011) (68)

S

I

T

ISKOWITZ, GERSHON (1921-1988) (24)

J

JACKSON, ALEXANDER YOUNG (1882-1974) (36, 37, 60) JANVIER, ALEX (b. 1935) (13) JOHNSTON, FRANK HANS (1888-1949) (30)

K

KNOWLES, DOROTHY (b. 1927) (10) KOOP, WANDA (b. 1951) (51) KRIEGHOFF, CORNELIUS (1815-1872) (2, 3, 28) KURELEK, WILLIAM (1927-1977) (6)

210

L

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SAVAGE, ANNE DOUGLAS (1896-1971) (61) SURREY, PHILIP HENRY HOWARD (1910-1990) (7, 56) THAUBERGER, DAVID A. (b. 1948) (69) THOMSON, TOM (1877-1917) (40, 41) TOWN, HAROLD BARLING (1924-1991) (70)

W

WEBBER, GORDON MCKINLEY (1909-1965) (16) WIELAND, JOYCE (1931-1998) (50) WILLSHER-MARTEL, JOAN (1925-2017) (48)


Buying at Waddington’s All lots will be offered and sold subject to the Conditions of Sale which appear in this catalogue as well as any Glossary and posted or oral announcement. By bidding at auction, bidders are bound by those Conditions and Glossary, as amended by any oral announcement or posted notices, which together form the contract of sale between the successful bidder (buyer), Waddington’s™ and the consignor (seller) of the lot. Descriptions or photographs of lots are not warranties and each lot is sold “as is” in accordance with the Conditions of Sale.

CONDITION OF LOTS

All of the items are to be considered, unless otherwise noted in the description, in good condition. The definition of “good” when used in reference to condition, describes an object as having had no major damage or repair but as with the nature of the material, may show minor surface wear, discolouration etc., which indicates the acceptable wear that the piece may acquire with age. If you are particular about minor flaws, you should examine the pieces in person or have our staff answer any questions before bidding. Sizes are approximate. It is the sole responsibility of the bidder to inquire as to the condition of a lot before bidding. Condition reports are available upon request by phone, fax, email or in person. You are advised to make any requests well in advance of the sale. Frames on artwork are not included as part of purchase or condition.

BUYER’S PREMIUM

A premium of 20% of the successful bid price of each lot. A charge of 13% HST (Harmonized Sales Tax) is applicable on the hammer price and buyer’s premium, except for purchases exported from Canada. In the case where purchases are shipped out of the province of Ontario, the HST or GST is charged based on the tax status of that province.

PAYMENT

Payment for purchases must be by cash, INTERAC direct debit (Cdn clients in person only), certified cheque (U.S. & Overseas not applicable), travelers cheque, bank draft, electronic transfer (fee applies), VISA or Mastercard (up to $25,000). ALL PRICES IN CANADIAN FUNDS

REMOVAL OF PURCHASES

Purchases must be paid for within 48 hours of the date of the sale, and removed from premises within 10 days of the date of sale (see Conditions of Sale, conditions 8 to 15). Clients are advised that packing and/or handling of purchased lots by our employees or agents is undertaken solely as a courtesy for the convenience of clients.

Selling at Waddington’s BIDDING

To bid in person at the auction, you must register for a bidding number by showing identification acceptable to the Auctioneer upon entering the salesroom. Your number will identify you if you are the successful bidder. You will be responsible for all lots purchased on your bidding number. Banking information may be requested by Waddington’s™. You may submit an Absentee Bid Form if you are unable to attend the sale. Bidding by telephone, in limited circumstances, can be arranged prior to the sale. While we are pleased to offer absentee and telephone bidding as a service to our clients, and take great care in their commission, the Auctioneer will not be responsible for technical difficulties, errors or failure to execute bids. The Auctioneer may also execute bids on behalf of the consignor to protect the reserve. The reserve is the confidential minimum price the seller is willing to accept for his or her property, below which it will not be sold. SHIPPING The Auctioneers will not undertake packing or shipping. The purchaser must designate and arrange for the services of an independent shipper and be responsible for all shipping, insurance expenses and any necessary export permits that may apply. The Auctioneers will, upon request, provide names of professional packers and shippers but will not be held responsible for the service or have any liability for providing this information. Reliable preauction estimates of shipping costs of lots offered in this sale may be obtained from: PakShip 905-470-6874 / 905-470-6875 / 416-293-8225 taurus@pakship.ca / www.pakship.ca Safer Shipping Inc. 416-299-3367 / 416-299-9750 perry@safershipping.ca/www.safershipping.ca Fero Transport 514-453-1462 / www.ferotransport.ca

CITES

Restrictions exist regarding the import and export of species protected under CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species).This includes but is not limited to items made of or containing bone (whalebone etc.), ivory, tortoise shell, seal skin, rhinoceros horn and any other animal part and is strictly controlled or forbidden by most countries. Please review your country’s laws before bidding on pieces made of or containing these restricted items. It is the sole responsibility of the buyer to inquire about and obtain the proper permits for artwork purchased that may contain restricted materials, if such permit can be obtained

WADDINGTON’S COMMISSION RATES Items selling for $7,501 or more - 10% Items selling for $2,501 to $7,500 - 15% Items selling for $251 to $2,500 - 20% Items selling for $250 or less - 25% *There is a minimum handling charge of $20 per item

CANADIAN ART DEPARTMENT COMMISSION RATES Items selling for $7,501 or more 10% Items selling for $2,501 to $7,500 15% Items selling for $2,500 or less 20% *There is a minimum handling charge of $20 per item

INSURANCE A 1% insurance charge, based on the hammer price of the property, will be applied to all accounts. AUCTION ADVICE

For auction advice on paintings, drawings, prints, jewellery, and various forms of decorative arts and other collectibles, please feel free to contact us via email or telephone. We are pleased to review emails containing photographs and information on your pieces in order to provide auction estimates for you to consider. For collections with a variety of objects, please contact our Appraisals and Consignments department (consignments@ waddingtons.ca). For department-specific inquiries, please contact the specialist and/or department directly. All contact information can be found at www.waddingtons.ca. Our offices are located in Toronto and Vancouver, but our specialists occasionally travel to major Canadian cities to meet with prospective consignors. To receive more information on Valuation Days across Canada or to arrange an appointment, please contact our Toronto office (416-504-9100). Please note that property typically arrives at Waddington’s at least three months before the sale in order to allow our specialists time to research, catalogue, photograph and promote the items. Consignors will receive a contract to sign, setting forth terms and fees for our services.


Conditions of Sale 1. All lots are sold “AS IS”. Any description issued by the auctioneer of an article to be sold is subject to variation to be posted or announced verbally in the auction room prior to the time of sale. While the auctioneer has endeavoured not to mislead in the description issued, and the utmost care is taken to ensure the correct cataloguing of each item, such descriptions are purely statements of opinion and are not intended to constitute a representation to the prospective purchasers and no warranty of the correctness of such description is made. An opportunity for inspection of each article is offered prior to the time of sale. No sale will be set aside on account of lack of correspondence of the article with its description or its reproduction, if any, whether colour or black & white. Some lots are of an age and/or nature which preclude their being in pristine condition and some catalogue descriptions make reference to damage and/or restoration. The lack of such a reference does not imply that a lot is free from defects nor does any reference to certain defects imply the absence of others. Frames on artwork are not included as part of purchase or condition. It is the responsibility of prospective purchasers to inspect or have inspected each lot upon which they wish to bid, relying upon their own advisers, and to bid accordingly. 2. Each lot sold is subject to a 20% buyers premium as part of the purchase price. 3. Unless exempted by law, the buyer is required to pay Harmonized Sales Tax on the total purchase price including the buyer’s premium. For international buyers, taxes are not applicable when purchases are shipped out of country. Items shipped out of Ontario, the buyer is required to pay taxes as per the tax status of that province, whether it HST or GST (Goods and Services Tax). 4. The auctioneer reserves the right to withdraw any lot from sale at any time, to divide any lot or to combine any two or more lots at his sole discretion, all without notice. 5. The auctioneer has the right to refuse any bid and to advance the bidding at his absolute discretion. The auctioneer reserves the right not to accept and not to reject any bid. Without limitation, any bid which is not commensurate with the value of the article offered, or which is merely a nominal or fractional advance over the previous bid may not be recognized.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction

6. Each lot may be subject to an unpublished reserve which may be changed at any time by agreement between the auctioneer and the consignor. The auctioneer may bid, or direct an employee to bid, on behalf of the consignor as agreed between them. In addition, the auctioneer may accept and submit absentee and telephone bids, to be executed by an employee of the auctioneer, pursuant to the instructions of prospective purchasers not in attendance at the sale. 7. The highest bidder accepted by the auctioneer for any lot shall be the buyer and such buyer shall forthwith assume full risk and responsibility for the lot and must comply with such other Conditions of Sale as may be applicable. If any dispute should arise between bidders the auctioneer shall have the absolute discretion to designate the buyer or, at his option, to withdraw any disputed lot from the sale, or to re-offer it at the same or a subsequent sale. The auctioneer’s decision in all cases shall be final. 8. Immediately after the purchase of a lot, the buyer shall pay or undertake to the satisfaction of the auctioneer with respect to payment of the whole or any part of the purchase price requested by the auctioneer, failing which the auctioneer in his sole discretion may cancel the sale, with or without re-offering the item for sale. 9. The buyer shall pay for all lots within 48 hours from the date of the sale, after which a late charge of 2% per month on the total invoice may be incurred or the auctioneer, in his sole discretion, may cancel the sale. The buyer shall not become the owner of the lot until paid for in full. Items must be removed within 10 days from the date of sale, after which storage charges may be incurred. 10. Each lot purchased, unless the sale is cancelled as above, shall be held by the auctioneer at his premises or at a public warehouse at the sole risk of the buyer until fully paid for and taken away. 11. Notwithstanding condition no. 1, if the buyer, prior to removal of a lot, makes arrangements satisfactory to the auctioneer for the inspection of such lot by a fully qualified person acceptable to the auctioneer to determine the genuineness or authenticity of the lot, to be carried out promptly following the sale of the lot, and if, but only if, within a period of 14 days following the sale a written opinion of such person is presented to the auctioneer to the effect that the lot is not genuine or authentic, accompanied by a written request by the buyer for rescission of the sale, then the sale of the lot will be rescinded and the sale price refunded to the buyer.

12. Payment for purchases must be by cash, INTERAC direct debit (Cdn clients in person only), certified cheque (U.S. & Overseas not applicable), travelers cheque, bank draft, electronic transfer (fee applies), and VISA or Mastercard (up to $25,000). 13. In the event of failure to pay for or remove articles within the aforementioned time limit, the auctioneer, without limitation of the rights of the consignor and the auctioneer against the buyer, may resell any of the articles affected, and in such case the original buyer shall be responsible to the auctioneer and the consignor for: (a) any deficiency in price between the resale amount and the amount to have been paid by the original buyer; (b) any reasonable charge by the auctioneer for the storage of such articles until payment and removal by the subsequent buyer; and (c) the amount of commission which the auctioneer would have earned had payment been made in full by the original buyer. 14. It is the responsibility of the buyer to make all arrangements for insuring, packing and removing the property purchased and any assistance by the auctioneer or his servants, agents or contractors, in packing or removal shall be rendered as a courtesy and without any liability to them. 15. The auctioneer acts solely as agent for the consignor and makes no representation as to any attribute of, title to, or restriction affecting the articles consigned for sale. Without limitation, the buyer understands that any item bought may be affected by the provisions of the Cultural Property Export Act (Canada). 16. The auctioneer reserves the right to refuse admission to the sale or to refuse to recognize any or all bids from any particular person or persons at any auction.


Inuit Art Auction WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16

inuitart@waddingtons.ca


KAT I LV I K

Katilvik: A Gathering Place Waddington’s created Katilvik in 2006 as a virtual resource centre for those who were passionate about Inuit Art. We are proud to launch an even better Katilvik, now encompassing Canadian Indigenous Art. Katilvik: a place to discover, learn and research unique works of art and the dynamic artists who create them.

www.katilvik.com


Canadian Fine Art waddingtons.ca

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275 King Street East, Second Floor Toronto, Ontario Canada M5A 1K2

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Canadian Fine Art Auction | September 17, 2020  

Canadian Fine Art Auction | September 17, 2020  

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