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#930 / AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013 VUEWEEKLY.COM

Patios 6 | Blues 32


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VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013


ISSUE: 930 AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

COVER ILLUSTRATION: JILL STANTON

LISTINGS

FILM / 19 ARTS / 30 MUSIC / 39 EVENTS / 41 CLASSIFIEDS / 42 ADULT / 44

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“The main thing is that I just want consistency.”

DISH

10

“I’m not sure what the connection is to Spock.”

FILM

15

“Memories waft, in league with the weightless substance of the title.”

ARTS

20

“A pair of foul-mouthed, gleefully offensive bouffon clowns.”

MUSIC

32

“Well, rock ‘n’ roll had a lotta babies too, so blues has some grandchildren.”

VUEWEEKLY #200, 11230 - 119 STREET, EDMONTON, AB T5G 2X3 | T: 780.426.1996 F: 780.426.2889 FOUNDING EDITOR / PUBLISHER .................................................................................. RON GARTH PRESIDENT ROBERT W DOULL .......................................................................................rwdoull@vueweekly.com PUBLISHER / SALES & MARKETING MANAGER ROB LIGHTFOOT.................................................................................................. rob@vueweekly.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER / MANAGING EDITOR EDEN MUNRO .................................................................................................... eden@vueweekly.com NEWS EDITOR REBECCA MEDEL ....................................................................................... rebecca@vueweekly.com ARTS & FILM EDITOR PAUL BLINOV .................................................................................................... paul@vueweekly.com

CONTRIBUTORS Jasmine Abbey, Bryan Birtles, Chelsea Boos, Lee Boyes, Josef Braun, Rob Brezsny, Ryan Bromsgrove, Saliha Chattoo, Ashley Dryburgh, Gwynne Dyer, Steve Edgerton, Jason Foster, Brian Gibson, Fish Griwkowsky, Mike Kendrick, Jordyn Marcellus, Agnieszka Matejko, Tom Murray, Stephen Notley, Mel Priestley, Dan Savage, Jill Stanton, Ryan Stephens, Mike Winters, Curtis Wright DISTRIBUTION Shane Bennett, Barrett DeLaBarre, Aaron Getz, Justin Shaw, Wally Yanish

MUSIC EDITOR EDEN MUNRO .................................................................................................. eden@vueweekly.com DISH EDITOR / STAFF WRITER MEAGHAN BAXTER ................................................................................. meaghan@vueweekly.com LISTINGS GLENYS SWITZER ....................................................................................... listings@vueweekly.com PRODUCTION MANAGER MARK HOWDEN .............................................................................................. mark@vueweekly.com PRODUCTION CHARLIE BIDDISCOMBE .............................................................................charlie@vueweekly.com SHAWNA IWANIUK ..................................................................................... shawna@vueweekly.com OFFICE MANAGER/ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE ANDY COOKSON ...................................................................................... acookson@vueweekly.com ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES JAMES JARVIS ................................................................................................... jjarvis@vueweekly.com AMANDA ZOTEK.............................................................................................azotek@vueweekly.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER MICHAEL GARTH ..........................................................................................michael@vueweekly.com

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VUEPOINT

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RYAN BROMSGROVE RYANB@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Senate reform Canada's Senate is broken and the recent cavalcade of senate scandals—including Mike Duffy's $90 000 spending spree—has made the noble sport of senate criticism amazingly easier. People have been calling for a fully elected body of senators or abolition of the senate completely. Here's another suggestion: how about senators are part elected and part randomly selected. Here's why: any fully elected system will, given time, become populated largely by people who figure out not how to represent the people, but how to work the system. If we make the senate fully elected, then these people and their parties will dominate as they do everywhere because every time an election rolls around and the parties pick their candidates, it's not always about who is best suited to represent a community. Often, it's about "who can win?" That's a huge difference. These elected senators do not represent a large, diverse body bringing forth ideas from constituents. There is no cordial debate leading to a solution that works for everyone. It's a party versus party food fight. On the other hand, a fully random level of government would likely be a disaster. There's something, reluctantly, to be said for politicians who enter government with an idea of what they're doing and how to do it. Rather than meeting the "sober second thought" approval of a body generally made up of property-owning friends of the prime minister, every piece of legislation introduced in the House of Commons would have to essentially gain approval from a random sample of Canadians, moderated and informed by those who had to win their seats via the popular vote. Just like that, the voice of average Canadians in government would increase. Women, aboriginal people, sexual minorities, lowerclass workers, people with disabilities, people with "radical" political beliefs and anyone traditionally considered "unelectable" would all have the same chance of having a say as anyone, free from the near-necessity of having to run for a party, free from holding back for fear of losing the next election, free to work together without fear of crossing a party line and displeasing Dear Leader, and free to actually contribute to the running of their society. Inexperience would be balanced by those elected, and by making the Senate an approval-only body—revoking its power to introduce legislation—we would prevent any bad ideas from getting through. Sure, it might be scary to imagine a group of random people in charge of anything. And the idea isn't perfect. But removing appointment and adding elections does nothing but put the status quo in a new dress. And abolition would entirely leave the House of Commons with a staggering and dangerous amount of power. This suggestion won't happen. Things that might upset the system tend not to, and any amount of senate reform would be a huge deal. But don't accept that you always have to choose something that's been used before, and don't accept that something hard isn't worth trying. Political thought should not stop at what Ottawa offers, and greater approximation of the will of the people should always be a prime goal of a would-be democratic society. V

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NEWS EDITOR : REBECCA MEDEL REBECCA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

NEWS // SIDEWALK PATIOS

Patio preference

Sidewalk patio guidelines cater more to sipping than shopping

// Mike Kendrick

E

dmonton's maturing patio culture is well-documented, with city officials finally streamlining the process to satisfy restaurant owners eager to increase capacity and customers craving to dine outdoors. However, as eateries line up to take advantage of this overdue change, many retail storefronts remain unadorned, the result of higher licensing fees that some store owners argue are impractical for independent businesses. Old Strathcona's adherence to promoting independent retail has created an atmosphere in which local store owners have access to a large population of shoppers, but its increasingly competitive nature means that owners often struggle to maintain consistent foot traffic or attract new customers. According to David LaLonde, owner of Artifacts Trading Company, pushing his unique wares onto the sidewalk and closer to dense foot traffic would provide easy advertising to curious shoppers. Such an opportunity had long been an attractive prospect for LaLonde, until the city's implementation of the new patio strategy—one that saw the process get much easier for restaurants—made him give up entirely. "What I want is fairness," LaLonde says. "Especially on Whyte Avenue, [it's all] alcohol. Now, they're encouraging more alcohol. If you're renting city property and if you sell alcohol, why is it so much cheaper than if you sell any other item?" Under the City's new Café Sidewalk Guidelines, restaurants pay a flat fee of $100 for a major patio and $25 for a minor patio of up to eight seats over a five-year term. The Department of Transportation Guidelines for Extended Lobbies states that the five-year licence fee to sell general goods on a sidewalk is "based on a market value appraisal of the neighbourhood." Also, whereas patio fees cover the

entire year, storefront retail licences are only valid from June 1 to September 30— unless owners wish to pay a monthly fee to go beyond the summer months. Harry Luke, a Senior Planner in the Office of Sustainable Development, says that the sidewalk café guidelines were updated so that restaurant owners will no longer have to go through two separate city departments. Sustainable Development serves as a catch-all for this process, leaving Transportation to focus more on other right-of-way issues relating to roads, sidewalks and boulevards. "The Department of Transportation runs the sidewalks," Luke says. "Where we come in is the function of its extension with regards to how it can operate year round." Sustainable Development guidelines address a variety of patio considerations, from the type of barriers used for separating patrons and pedestrians to enforcing uniformity between tables, chairs and umbrellas. As specific as the guidelines are, some restaurant owners feel the enforcement to be lacking. Tres Carnales Taqueria is one restaurant that has benefitted from the new licence process, finally installing a brand-new patio this summer and adding close to 50-percent capacity to their restaurant. After being rejected without clarification last year, co-owner Chris Sills wanted to ensure that his patio was built right, even if meant higher costs. "We wanted it to be safe," Sills says. "We wanted there to be a good barricade, so that you still feel that you're a part of the restaurant rather than just throwing some resin chairs and some tape and a couple of plants." Sills feel like this has long been a problem with Edmonton patios. Owners tend

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

to take advantage of the limited enforcement by installing minimal barriers and going beyond the approved area, leaving patrons open to potential dangers from passing pedestrians or vehicles. Such negligence, Sills says, is what has been holding other businesses back. "It's a chicken or egg thing," Sills argues. "Has transportation been leery about patios because people don't put the time and effort into a patio to make it safe?" LaLonde agrees that patio enforcement is lacking, wondering why the city is in such a rush to create meagre patios while retailers have been left behind. Ideally, LaLonde argues, the city will work to similarly refine the process for store owners, perhaps combining restaurants and stores under a unified set of guidelines. Such a future is possible, according to Luke, but ultimately he argues that each business comes with a separate set of considerations. "We try to tackle one issue at a time," he says. "The thing with sidewalk cafés is you're not just throwing out tables and chairs, you're going to have umbrellas, and perhaps heat warmers. There are more planning issues with spacing and esthetics, while ensuring that right of ways are maintained." LaLonde doesn't buy this distinction, arguing that every business, regardless of focus, is just trying to maximize their ability to sell. "The main thing is that I just want consistency," LaLonde says. "I don't care whether it's $100 for five years or $100 per month, but it should be the same. "If you're renting property from the City of Edmonton, what's the difference whether it's for a beer or a T-shirt?" RYAN STEPHENS

RYANS@VUEWEEKLY.COM


FRONT NEWS // HOMELESS DEATHS

Death on the streets What happens to the homeless when they die?

// Jasmine Abbey

A

n August Friday evening, the sun made no apologies. A little too hot, I waited for Jim Gurnett outside the Boyle McCauley Health Centre on 96 Street. The traffic is pleasantly low in this area of town, with just as many bikes going by as cars. There were plenty of people out, and a couple of churches nearby. Some of the people around me were homeless and could possibly die before too long as street life generally leads to a shorter life expectancy. Comparatively few people take notice when the homeless pass away. News organizations typically don't bother covering these deaths unless something unusual happened, and for most people it's a problem easier ignored than worried about. But when a homeless person does die, the body requires the same attention as anyone else's, and somebody has to ensure that things are taken care of. To clarify, not all people affected by homelessness live exclusively on the streets. Gurnett, from the Edmonton Coalition on Housing and Homelessness, splits the population into different groups. "The thing most people are familiar with are what I would call 'street homeless people,'" he says. "And that's people who are basically sleeping or resting wherever they can." Some will from time-to-time make use of emergency shelters. But many, whether because of the lack of comfort, no opportunity to sleep with an opposite-gender partner or any number of other reasons, may choose to live in park land or elsewhere, even year-round. "There are thousands more that we

call 'hidden homeless.' One of these folks might, for example, through their AISH worker or through the Housing First program, they might get an apartment or a suite somewhere, then let three, four, five friends or cousins sleep with them." But this is not stable housing and there are thousands more precariously housed, who could become homeless at any moment due to fleeing domestic

don't contact the family, that is in the hands of the police and the coroner's office. On occasion, family will actually contact us and they sometimes want to come down and visit Hope Mission and kind of get a sense of their loved ones." Hope Mission's chaplain, who may have known the deceased personally, is also available to family who want support, and their pastor will often arrange for memorial services.

We know from a lot of research that's been done in Canada that the life expectancy of homeless people is 10 or 12 years shorter than the average life expectancy of Canadians. assault or losing an insecure job—and then many more living beyond their means, for whom it may only be a matter of time before they're forced out of their homes. When someone dies on the streets or in a shelter, the questions of who reports it, who is notified and how the funeral is arranged are more apparent. Devin Komarniski from Edmonton's Hope Mission told me what happens when somebody passes at their shelter. "The first step is to call EMS so they can come and confirm whether the person is deceased," he begins. "Of course, our staff has first-aid training and they can assess it to a certain level. EMS comes on site, if they confirm that the person is deceased, they will contact the police as well as the coroner's office. The police come down and they conduct a report. "We share with them who this person is, because everyone's registered here at Hope Mission. At that point, we

Meanwhile, the body may end up at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner—a likely destination for those found on the street as well. Family and friends may be enlisted to identify the body, but they may also use dental records, physical characteristics such as scars or tattoos, as well as DNA. Occasionally, the public's help will be sought. Only rarely do all attempts fail. When they do, the OCME might release the body for burial or cremation, but will keep records for the sake of future identification. "We hold a yearly memorial service for anybody who's died that has been using our facilities," Komarniski says. "We do our utmost to honour our guests who pass, because they are like family. Strong bonds are made between guests and staff, and when someone dies it's devastating for us. It's the opposite of what we're trying to achieve." During the three-year span of 2010 to

2012, 185 deaths of people of no fixed address were investigated in Alberta— accounting for 1.6 percent of all investigations. While that appears a small percentage, according to Alberta's Housing First program, 11 000 Albertans are homeless—0.28 percent of the total population of 3.9 million. Not all deaths require notifying a medical examiner or an investigator, though the categories are broad. Unexplained, unexpected or violent deaths, as well as those due to poisoning (including drugs) and those of unidentified bodies, are a few conditions that would trigger notification. Not all of those notifications result in an investigation. If there is one, when the investigation is over Human Services Alberta will cover the cost of a funeral, should nobody else step forward. A basic coffin is a common final destination, but there is usually at least somebody willing to mark the occasion. "There's always a church or something that will have a service," Gurnett says. "I've been to many funerals with 10 or 12 people that knew and cared about the person in one of the churches along 96 Street. The basic cost is covered, but it's still a tragic event because often those people do have a lot of family who love them and care about them, but they're too far away to come and be at the funeral. And maybe they've lost touch with them. "It feels a little disappointing or sad to be at those kinds of funerals—but there's also people who die who have quite a good network of friends. I've also been at funerals where 50 or 60 family or friends of the people are there.

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

"It's like any funeral. If they are from more of an aboriginal background, they might have those elements there. If more of a Christian background, they might have that. I think usually there's at least some attempt to have dignity." While the funerals themselves may be no different to those of everyone else, there are differences in the causes of death. Of those 185 investigated, only 18.4 percent amongst the homeless were determined to be due to natural causes, compared to 48.5 percent of all other deaths investigated. "What's awful is the fact that they didn't have to die," Gurnett says. "We know from a lot of research that's been done in Canada that the life expectancy of homeless people is 10 or 12 years shorter than the average life expectancy of Canadians." When it comes to homicide, suicide and undetermined causes, the rate was slightly higher in the homeless compared to others, while accidental death was lower. And deaths determined to be directly related to acute or chronic ethanol and/or drug use were at 40 percent as compared to 13.2 percent in all other investigated deaths. While these numbers aren't exhaustive, they do indicate a strong trend of preventable deaths. "It's not so much what happens when they die," Gurnett says, "it's the absolute unnecessary fact that they lose those years of life because we're allowing people to live in poverty, we're allowing people to live in homelessness. "They should have been out living and enjoying a good life." RYAN BROMSGROVE

RYANB@VUEWEEKLY.COM

FRONT 7


FRONT QUEERMONTON

ASHLEY DRYBURGH // ASHLEY@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Bringing sexy back

There's a lot more to being a queer-friendly city than throwing a parade As we head into late summer and start the 10-week countdown until the snow arrives, I have one question for you, Edmonton: where are all the queer sex parties? Our window of warm weather is closing quickly and despite the plethora of festivals in this city, I have seen disappointingly few dildos and cockrings on brazen display. Now it's entirely possible that this city is swarming with sex parties and I just don't happen to get invited. Certainly there are some sexy events already happening in this city. For all the kinksters there's Lupercalia in February, the ancient Roman-inspired weekend of fetish and fun. While the "kink off" party and masquer-

DYERSTRAIGHT

ade ball sound like a blast, there are clear rules against sex at the event. There are two swingers clubs in town, but both are more social spaces where people in heterosexual partnerships can meet (although I imagine there are many bisexual folks in that group). There's always Steamworks or, if you are willing to travel, infamous parties like New York's Black Party, but these are primarily for gay cis-men. So what exactly do I mean by "sex party?" I don't necessarily mean an Eyes Wide Shut party where wealthy (male) patrons are served by nubile (female) servants. Nor do I mean a puddle of anonymous bodies heaving and thrusting in any

which way, although both of these might be fun. I mean a public party where we can explore and celebrate all of the dirty, transgressive elements of sex that make being queer so much fun. For example, I used to attend a queer anti-Valentine's Day party in my hometown. It was queer in the sense that not every person there identified as queer, but that we celebrated everything other than the white, skinny, twoperson, heteronormative, vanilla, missionary sex that is over-represented in the popular imagination. And it didn't always work—confidential to drag kings: misogyny is not hot—but there is something transformative about a room full of people of all different genders,

bodies and kinks coming together and doing sexy things. Currently, at least, there doesn't seem to be anything like it in Edmonton. I recognize that such an event will not interest everyone and that conversations about sex are loaded in our communities. There has been much effort to make queerness more palatable, to disconnect "queer" from "deviant sex practitioners." While no one can deny that the disappearing stereotype of gay men as pedophiles is a good thing, there is a strong anti-sex rhetoric that accompanies the mainstreaming of queer. One needs only look to this year's Pride parade, where nudity was banned due to the "fam-

ily friendly" nature of the events to see this rhetoric at work. If Pride's commitments to sex (and politics) are surrendered in lieu of family friendly entertainment, where else can we let our freak flags fly? This is why public queer sex parties are so important: any claims about the importance of LGBTQ experience lose their strength if we don't have an opportunity to have some experiences. This is not a suggestion to download the sexual elements of Pride into separate parties, but rather a call to shake up our communities' slide into so-called normalcy. Let's show Edmonton how much fun sex can be, and maybe we'll stop being so afraid to bring sexy back. V

GWYNNE DYER // GWYNNE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

All change on the Internet

American spying has raised new issues about mass communication privacy Edward Snowden is safe from American "justice" for the moment, and he will certainly go down as the most effective whistle-blower in history. His revelations are going to cause a wholesale restructuring of the world's most important communications system, the Internet. And that, rather than his whereabouts and fate, is now the real story. On August 8, Lavabit, a US-based email-service provider that promised to keep its clients' communications private, closed down. The US National Security Agency approached it about six weeks ago demanding the same access to its customers' emails that it has already extorted from big American Internet companies like Google, Facebook, Yahoo, Amazon and Microsoft. The company's owner, Ladar Levison, is under an NSA gag order, but he wrote to his clients: "I have been forced to make a difficult decision: to become complicit in crimes against the American people, or walk away from nearly 10 years of hard work by shutting down Lavabit. I would strongly recommend against anyone trusting their private data to a company with physical ties to the United States." Jon Callas, co-founder of Silent Cir-

cle, another encrypted email service that has just shut down because it cannot protect its clients' data, went even further. "Email (that uses standard Internet protocols) ... cannot be secure," he wrote. The mass surveillance being carried out by the NSA not only gives the US government access to everything Americans say to one another, it also destroys everybody else's privacy, because the standard Internet routing protocol sends messages not by the shortest route, but by whichever route is fastest and least congested. That means, in most cases, through the United States, and therefore straight into the hands of the NSA. Snowden's revelations so far have told us about two major NSA surveillance programs, both probably illegal even under American law. The first collects the mobile phone records of over 200-million Americans. Don't worry your pretty head about that, darling, said Senator Dianne Feinstein, chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee: "This is just metadata, there is no content involved." The NSA isn't actually listening to your calls. Well, OF COURSE it isn't listen-

ing to billions of calls. Machines can't listen to calls, and who has the manpower to do it with human beings? But machines can quickly use the call logs (metadata) to identify everybody you ever talked to, and everybody they ever talked to, and so on out to the fourth or fifth generation. If one of those thousands of people ever spoke to somebody abroad with a Muslim name (or somebody who works for Siemens, or Samsung, or some other industrial competitor of the United States), they may take an interest in you. If you're an American who has never had direct phone contact with anybody abroad, they may then apply to access the content of your calls and emails under the Prism program. The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court which reviews such applications has refused precisely 10 of them (out of 20 919) since 2001. Besides, the content of most Americans' messages can probably be examined without recourse to the judges under one of the blanket authorizations issued by FISC. And if you're not American, or an American resident who once spoke to somebody abroad by phone, then you're

in a free-fire zone. If you are American, you probably don't care about that, because you are mesmerized by the guff about a huge terrorist threat that the security barons use to justify the endless expansion of their empire (now almost a million employees). A recent opinion poll by the Pew Research Centre found that 62 percent of Americans think "fighting terrorism" is more important than worrying about personal privacy. But if you belong to the great majority of Internet users who are not American, are not in a perpetual sweaty panic about "terrorism," and have no protection whatever under American law from the NSA's spying, then you will want ways to avoid it. So the market, or other governments, will such create ways. What's needed is a big investment in Internet switching capacity in countries where the spies are not completely out of control. Then non-Americans can just join one of the many servers that will spring up to meet an exploding demand for secure Internet services. Finnish Internet servers are already emphasizing the security of their services. Germany, whose memo-

ries of the Gestapo and Stasi secret police make it particularly sensitive about the NSA's spying, may take the lead in building non-US Internet capacity, or it may be big countries like Brazil and India that are relatively invulnerable to US pressure. But this is a huge market opportunity, and it will get done. And the losers? The big US Internet providers, who will find that few of their customers want to store their data in American "cloud" services. "If businesses or governments think they might be spied on," said Neelie Kroes, vice-president of the European Commission, "they will have less reason to trust the cloud, and it will be (American) cloud providers who ultimately miss out." As Jennifer Granick, director of civil liberties at the Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, put it recently: "America invented the Internet, and our Internet companies are dominant around the world. But the US government, in its rush to spy on everybody, may end up killing our most productive industry." V Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.

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FRONT 9


DISH

DISH EDITOR : MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

DISH // ITALIAN

The Amore effect

Café Amore Bistro offers pasta of a delusion-destroying quality

// Meaghan Baxter

A

ll you cognitive bias fans out there are probably familiar with the Dunning-Kruger Effect, but for non-Biasheads (as such aficionados are known) I'll break it down for you. American psychologists Dunning and Kruger expounded on the twin-burden of a certain cognitive deficit, where one's incompetence in a particular field of endeavour

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not only prevents one from attaining success, but prevents one from perceiving how manifestly incompetent one is. These individuals are likely to overrate their abilities, while failing to recognize genuine talent in others. I think many of us have a touch of Dunning-Kruger—persons with anosognosia, as we prefer to be

called—when it comes to Italian forgo the rapini and the maplefood generally and pasta specifi- glazed sausage bruschetta in facally. How many times have you vour of the grilled calamari ($14) heard someone say that they and the tomato-bocconcini salad never order pasta in a restaurant ($11). We also haggled over wantbecause they can ing to order the make the same 10807 - 106 Ave same entrée— thing at home? 780.477.7896 the house special Unless you are cafeamorebistro.com seafood pasta— an Italian chef, with the strange my tendency result that we would be to respond, "No you both ended up ordering something can't." Maybe we can make pasta, else—my co-diner got a half-order but I have strong doubts that most of the vongole with penne ($10), of us could make pasta like they while I opted for the Pacific salmon make at Café Amore Bistro. fettucine ($19). Along with fancier Café Amore acquired almost leg- entrees featuring lamb, chicken and endary status at its original location striploin, Amore offers you the opin McCauley, where it was none too tion of building your own pasta out easy to secure a table at the wee, of a lengthy ingredient set, but that bustling bistro on short notice. was definitely way to much deliberNow installed at shiny new digs ation for the indecisive likes of us. behind Grant MacEwan, they're scarcely less busy, but there are at The salad and calamari arrived least a few more seats to accom- about as quickly as humanly posmodate their brisk trade. The brick- sible. The former was one of those lined interior balances middle-brow ideal salads, perfectly composed of elegance with homey touches like little more than the eponymous inpictures from the old country and gredients—ripe tomato chunks and chalk boards reiterating the vast unripened cheese chunks—with variety of the menu. For my part I some red onion, lettuce, parsley was relieved that the flatscreen di- and a simple vinaigrette utilizing a rectly across from me was showing very tasty olive oil, that was more a Fred MacMurray movie (Murder, than enough for two people. I've He Says, 1945) rather than two tat- long preferred grilled calamari to tooed homunculi beating the living the deep-fried variety, though I piss out of each other. sometimes forget we live far from Hidden as we were behind a post, octopus-bearing waters so praiit took a few moments to catch our rie calamari is inevitably frozen at server's attention, but once we had some point in its journey from the it the service was prompt and cour- sea. That aside, the twin skewers of teous, though our server couldn't calamari were nicely charbroiled, resist making a little joke about subtly flavoured, slightly chewy how we better order in case we and accompanied by a lemon didn't see her again. The struggle wedge and delicious tomato sauce over appetizers was monumental, for dipping. but my co-diner and I decided to The appetizer plates had barely

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VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

been cleared when our generous portions of pasta arrived, followed by our server with grated parmesan and hot chilies to taste. It was like a moment of clarity—all my immodest notions about my own pasta prowess were cleared away. My massive plate of fettucine, cooked to tender-firm perfection, was lavished with buttery, garlicky cream sauce well-supplied with toothsome baby shrimp and smoked salmon, the smokiness of which delightfully pervaded every bite. I don't often order pasta with cream sauce because I find the flavour and texture can get monotonous, but there was no such danger with this dish. I was delighted all over again upon reheating the leftover portion the next day, which allowed me to marvel anew at how my homemade pasta never tastes this good. My co-diner's penne with baby clams in white wine sauce was likewise ideally realized and even though her half-order didn't look much smaller than mine, she required no doggy bag. The half-litre of house red ($14) we shared was of reliable old-world extraction—it didn't burst across the palate, but grew on me over the course of the meal and didn't seem to mind being paired with cream sauce or seafood. Compared to the hourly rate of an accredited therapist, Café Amore's pasta is a great bargain as far as disabusing you of long-held delusions—plus you get a really nice meal. If you're interested in keeping your anosognosia in check, be sure to call ahead; a reservation is never a bad idea. SCOTT LINGLEY

SCOTT@VUEWEEKLY.COM


DISH PROVENANCE

MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

ABOUT BANANA SPLITS Procrastinating at work can be a good thing We can thank David Evans Strickler for the invention of the banana split. The 23-year-old apprentice pharmacist from Latrobe, Pennsylvania often invented new types of sundaes using the store’s soda fountain and created the first form of the banana split in 1904. It cost 10 cents at the time. Banana boat The long dish a banana split is traditionally served in is called a boat. Keeping tradition There’s a method to the dessert. Traditionally, ice cream flavours consist of strawberry, vanilla and chocolate, with toppings being piled on as follows: pineapple on top of the strawberry, chocolate sauce on top of the vanilla and strawberry sauce on top of the chocolate scoop. The whole thing is finished off with a generous dose of chopped nuts, whipped cream and a couple of cherries. Dessert legalities It’s no longer on the menu, but the 5 Spot in Seattle used to offer The Bulge, which was its own version of the banana split. It consisted of a ba-

nana that had been battered, rolled in sugar and deep fried, served with ice cream, whipped cream and macadamia nuts. Customers had to sign a waiver when they ordered it, releasing the 5 Spot from any liability of any weight gain resulting from consuming it. Split supremacy Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania is the ostensible champion of the banana split. The community set the world record for the longest banana split in 1982, measuring just over eight feet. The record was topped twice before Selinsgrove reclaimed its title in 1988 with a 4.55 mile-long banana split consisting of 2500 gallons of ice cream, 33 000 bananas, 600 lbs of chopped nuts and 450 gallons of toppings. The community planned to top its own record again on May 4, 2013—the 25th anniversary of the last victory—with a five-mile split, but allegedly couldn’t secure liability insurance for the event.

“wanna

grab a beer after?”

Combining two favourites The confection was kicked up a notch by 16-year-old Janet Winquest of Holdrege, Nebraska in 1952. Winquest entered the dessert into Pillsbury’s Grand National Recipe and Baking Contest and was awarded $3000. V

Caption // ©iStockphoto.com/rafalhyps

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

DISH 11


DISH TO THE PINT

JASON FOSTER // JASON@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Trekkie beer

Honouring Captain Spock with Irish Red Ale

MYDENNY’S REWARDS DennysCanada @DennysCanada MyDennys.ca

Gold Forest Grains:

Pancake mix, pasta/ pastry berries, pasta/ pastry flour, rye flour, whole wheat berries, whole wheat flour

Sundog Organic Farm:

Carrots, cabbage, baby kale, potatoes, cooking onions, fennel, parsnips, potatoes and shallots

Have you ever wondered what kind The beer is brewed to be an Irish of beer they drank on the Starship Red Ale, which is a moderately Enterprise? What would Spock's el- malty amber ale. I'm not sure what bow tip back if he decided to have the connection is to Spock in that a cold one? choice, but I am prepared to taste No one can answer those the beer at face value. specific questions, but It presents as a dark Trekkies can now quaff copper beer with red a Star Trek beer while edges. It has a thick, they ponder them. The tightly packed offworld's first official white head with good Star Trek beer was linger. The aroma gives released a few weeks off sweet sugary caraago, in Alberta of all mel, some brown sugar places, for reasons I and medium fruit. I also pick up a touch of will explain. earthiness and a I am speaking of Vulcan Ale Vulcan Ale. It is Pluto's Moon Beer Company/ hint of sharp malt. the first beer of- Harvest Moon Brewing, Belt, In the flavour I get a bready, toffee ficially licensed to Montana malt up front, carry a Star Trek $3.30 for 355 ml bottle with caramel, trademark. In other words, it is a beer designed for malt syrup and berry fruitiness to Trekkies. The large grey hand on accent. The middle sharpens a bit the label in the form of the Vulcan with a touch of grainy malt. The greeting is your first tip-off. finish is moderately sweet but with The creators of the beer, a trio a dry edge, not from the hops but of Trekkie Albertans (including more grainy. Vern Raincock, owner of one of Overall I find it to be a decent Alberta's largest liquor distribu- Irish Red Ale. It has all the charactors) were gathered at the an- ter needed in the style. It presents nual Spock convention in Vulcan, a bit fuller and sweeter than a clasAlberta last year when they con- sic example, but demonstrates it is cocted a plan to release a Star well brewed. Trek beer. After many months of In the final analysis I can't quite negotiation they convinced CBS figure out the connection between (owner of Star Trek's copyright) the beer and Star Trek, but maybe to allow them to produce an of- that is not the point. It pays homficial Star Trek beer. age to a classic Star Trek character They call it Vulcan Ale in part and the Alberta town that honours to honour Spock—one of the him. Maybe Trekkies will apprecishow's most appreciated char- ate the effort, and that is all that acters—but also to honour the will matter. V 100th anniversary of the town of Vulcan. They are releasing Jason Foster is the creator of onthe beer across the continent in beer.org, a website devoted to news the wake of the latest Star Trek and views on beer from the prairies and beyond. movie this summer.

Peas on Earth:

BOX

Spinach, lettuce, bok choy, rapini, onions, carrots, beets and kale

IC a N A G R O icbox.c

THE

ox.ca

nicb heorga www.t

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12 DISH

Mans Organic:

Onions, shallots, tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013


DISH MEAGHAN BAXTER // MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Dish Weekly Hope Mission Youth Shelter Fresh Corn and Produce Sale / Sat, August 17 (10 am – 4 pm) Riverbend Gardens has partnered with Hope Mission's Youth Shelter's SHIFT Program for a produce sale featuring locally grown items. The event marks the first social enterprise volunteer project for Hope Mission's youth. (Edmonton Valley Zoo, free admission; produce varies by item) Root Cellar Cookout / Sat, Aug 17 (5 pm – midnight) Barbecue, homemade beer and wine, plus live music from local artists Laura Swankey, Danielle Knibbe, Two Bears North and Delusions of Grandeur String Quartet. Tickets must be purchased in advance by calling 780.405.9858. (8719 - 64 Ave, $10) Chinatown Night Market / Sat, Aug 17 (6 pm – 10 pm) If you're not familiar with Chinatown, now's your chance to get acquainted. In addition to bike and foot walking tours, art and music, there will be more food than you'll know what to do with.

There will be plenty of Chinese fare to sample as well as local food trucks like Molly's Eats, S'wich and Lingnan Express. (105 Ave and 97 St) Edible Garden Tour / Sun, Aug 18 (9:30 am – 5 pm) Edible landscaping has quickly become a popular endeavour in our city. If you've got a green thumb or are a gardening newbie, it never hurts to see how others manage to make things grow. This tour allows participants to scope out the backyards of local urban gardeners and learn about unique growing projects in the city. Registration is required. Visit wildgreen.ca for more information. Summertime Vegan Pop-up Restaurant / Mon, Aug 19 (5 pm – 8 pm) You don't have to be a dedicated vegan to give this one a try. Mirepoix will take diners through five courses that support local growers as well as conscious and sustainable food. Reservations are required. (Noorish Cafe, $45 for five courses) V

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Since 1992 Dine in • Take out • Catering • Retail Since 1992 Homemade Pastas305-101 Granada Blvd., Sherwood Park Homemade Pastas and Sauces and Sauces 780.467.3777 • pastapantry.ca VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

DISH 13


PRESENTS...

Continuing Education Faculty of Fine Arts and Communications

Adult and youth classes in art, dance, music, digital media, photography, theatre, and more. www.MacEwan.ca/ArtsConEd 14 DISH

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013


REVUE // DRAMA

FILM

FILM EDITOR : PAUL BLINOV PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

The politics of art

Something in the Air among Olivier Assayas' best, most personal films

Revolutionary road

F

ollowing its young protago- and, at times, handmade explonist through tear gas-streaked sives. Assayas grew up in the street demonstrations and acts aftermath of '68, was forced to of politicized vandalism; through contend with its legacy, discover awkward trysts made more com- a meaningful identity in its wake. plicated, or perhaps less compli- But Something in the Air is no cated, or maybe nostalgia trip— just different- Fri, Aug 16 – Wed, Aug 21 there's nothcomplicated by Directed by Olivier Assayas ing sentimental then-current ar- Metro Cinema at the Garneau about the camguments against  era's gaze, no romantic posartificial grand sessiveness; single moment through struggles with an emerg- of awakening. In fact, one of the ing sense of artistic vocation and things I found most seductive a political self-actualization that about the film is its plot's lack of deemed artistic expression itself emphasis. Something in the Air as inherently petit bourgeois; maintains a steady middle-disthrough travels, happenings and tance, invested in every moment jobs, Something in the Air, Olivier and gesture, offering an immerAssayas' most fluid and explic- sive experience, yet it is resolutely itly personal film—and one of his non-partisan, kitsch-free, and imvery best—traces a busy youth- mune to fetishizing ephemera. A trajectory through a series of sort of belated sequel to Assayas' gorgeously composed sequences, equally autobiographical 1994 one following the next, without film Cold Water—and in many reimposing needless connective gards, a response to Robert Brestissue. Memories waft, in league son's 1977 masterpiece Le diable with the weightless substance probablement—it seems driven of the title. A defining cinematic by enduring questions about how testament to LP Hartley's famous to balance the personal and poline about the past being a foreign litical, questions especially applicountry, every moment of Some- cable to a still-forming essential thing in the Air feels vivid and self. tangible yet so specific and richly "If you were involved in the detailed as to be utterly trans- hopes and ideas of that time," Asporting. sayas explained as we discussed The film's original French title the film during last year's Toronto is Après mai, the May in question International Film Festival, "nothbeing that of 1968, when protests ing was acceptable if it did not and strikes shook Paris, where in- have a direct relationship with stead of a summer of love they the coming revolution. Which was got a summer of lobbing bricks not a question mark, it was not a

dream. It was a fact. The revolution was going to happen—so what are you going to do for it? You were not making art for the revolution. Art was about individualism, which was anathema to the varied Marxist politics of the time. I was 15 in 1970. It was extremely difficult to find your way, to harness the available ideas. Because you were living in the wake of events that you couldn't fully grasp." Gilles (Clément Métayer), Assayas' analogue, his shaggy hair obscuring a lean face that still bears a boyishness, is involved in a number of ostensibly revolutionary activities. But he is also, as was Assayas, a budding painter, clearly talented yet still finding a strategy or form or subject that he can make peace with. He has two lovers, one (Carole Combes) with a more drifting, druggy nature, the other (Lola Créton) more lucid and ultimately more influential on Gilles' long-term path—she joins a Marxist filmmaking collective. We first see Gilles doing figurative work, later we see him doing abstract work and then later still some combination of the two. A key moment in the film depicts a debate regarding whether or not radical content requires radical form. Assayas' own approach to cinematic form has been both promiscuous and precise, more radical in works like Irma Vep (1996) and Demonlover (2002), more outwardly con-

ventional in the likes of Summer Hours (2008) and Carlos (2010). "Practising an art is a drug," Assayas says. "And I had that addiction. Art dragged me into some imaginary world, and in some ways this world saved me from the dead ends of the '70s ideologies. I did not go all the way in terms of politics, or mysticism or drugs, because I wanted to go all the way in terms of my art, whatever it was, and it was extremely naïve at the time. Something in the Air is similar to Irma Vep in that I'm trying to show the conflicting theories of what art is about. It's a way to express how when you were taken into the turmoil of those years you defined yourself in terms of those options. Representing nature, representing mankind, representing the world as it is was not inherently petit bourgeois. Maybe these elements have something to do with the very nature of cinema. I ended up coming up with my own answers, but those were the questions. And they do stay with me. Whatever I'm doing I try to define it by answering all of those questions." Something in the Air closes in a milieu that has almost nothing to do with anything that precedes it. Gilles leaves France for employment at London's Shepperton Studios—as did Assayas—working on a ridiculous-looking movie involving Nazis and goofy monsters. After spending so much time watching Gilles move through

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

situations guided by convictions whose implications are meant to involve the entire world's poor and working-classes, ending the film with our hero working on something so comically insignificant feels audacious. But it is a way of lifting off, of imagining the future in the amusing banality of a new present. Whether or not we watch this sequence with the knowledge that the character is modeled after the film's author, we know that Gilles will likely move on to live an interesting life. "He works in this movie factory, making a film from another era," Assayas says with a laugh. "Which was my experience, actually. I worked similar jobs on similar films at the time. But Gilles also sells the free press in front of the consulates and he watches experimental films. He witnesses the resurrection of Laure in an experimental film. And all of a sudden he understands what art is about, what cinema is about. Cinema is about resurrection. Cinema is about dealing with your own ghosts and bringing them to life. Cinema can explore your subconscious and your memories, but mostly it allows what is lost to come back. This is really where the path starts for Gilles. Finally, he has arrived at the point where he understands why he wants to make films. And to me it's a way of making sense of his whole journey." JOSEF BRAUN

JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

FILM 15


FILM ASPECTRATIO

AND

JOSEF BRAUN // JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Face to face

Seconds takes self-reinvention to a sinister extreme WANT TO SEND YOU AND A FRIEND TO AN ADVANCE SCREENING OF

CLOSED CIRCUIT STARRING ERIC BANA AND REBECCA HALL

IN THEATRES AUGUST 28TH

AUGUST 26TH CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH EDMONTON

ENTER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN WWW.VUEWEEKLY.COM/CONTESTS/ CONTEST CLOSES AUGUST 21ST

Yeah, your new face didn't quite turn out as we'd hoped it would

Few films put us on edge so quickly. Arthur Hamilton (John Randolph) already seems on the verge of a nervous breakdown in the opening scenes of Seconds (1966), which follow the weary middle-aged bank executive on his train journey from Grand Central Station to his suburban Scarsdale home. He may be followed. The images seem taken from ankles or shoulders. Every space feels cavernous. The organ score seems lifted from a Vincent Price horror picture. The opening credits appear over images of gaping maws and distorted eyeballs, and if that first eyeball close-up makes you think of Marion's face on the bathroom floor in Psycho (1960), you won't be surprised to learn that this credit sequence was, like Psycho's, designed by Saul Bass. The director of Seconds was John Frankenheimer. The film is regarded as the cap on his "paranoia trilogy," following The Manchurian Candidate (1962) and Seven Days in May (1964). The Cold War was at the forefront of those pictures, which dealt explicitly with brainwashing and political assassination. In Seconds, that same claustrophobic atmosphere is bleeding out of the seemingly everyday. Based on David Ely's eponymous novel and scripted by Lewis John

16 FILM

Carlino, this story is exceedingly intimate, even if it, too, alludes to something akin to a vast conspiracy. Arthur's nervous because he's received a phone call from a friend he thought dead. The friend is trying to help Arthur change his life—by changing his face, his body, his voice, his name and occupation—by killing off Arthur. All it takes is money, which Arthur has, and a corpse, which the company whose services he will be obliged to solicit will take care of. This company seems to know what Arthur wants, even if he doesn't. Arthur is ushered to their headquarters after being led through a meat-packing plant, an all too apt analogue for the company's business of transfiguration. By the time they're done with Arthur he'll look like Rock Hudson. Which is to say they change Arthur Hamilton into a painter named Tony Wilson, played by Rock Hudson. It's the heartthrob movie star's most startling and impressive performance. (Another interesting parallel to Psycho: where that film had its star vanish 40 minutes in, the star of Seconds doesn't appear until 40 minutes in.) Our hero makes a go at this new life. He even finds himself a gorgeous younger lover (Salome Jens) to wipe out the memories of the wife he could barely kiss any-

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

more. But something about Tony doesn't quite take. Inside, he's still Arthur. And this makes the company uneasy. The collective desire for renewal at work in Seconds had been made into story before—there is some crossover between it and Ray Bradbury's "Marionettes Inc"—but Ely's exploration of this perhaps specifically American idea of total self-reinvention took this desire to a sinister extreme. The film perfectly synthesizes the novel's trajectory with the tools of cinema. Brilliantly employing wide-angle lenses, James Wong Howe's endlessly inventive cinematography makes the familiar eerie, and the casting of Hudson was a stroke of genius—thank god Frankenheimer didn't get his first choice of Laurence Olivier, whose performance would surely have felt studied and possessed none of the despair and, ultimately, harrowing hysteria on display here. Frankheimer's casting of numerous blacklisted actors contributes to a meta-reading that only increases a sense of condemnation of American falseness and fear-driven values. As Alec Baldwin describes it in one of the supplements on Criterion's new edition of Seconds, the film doesn't invite you in—"it takes you hostage." V


VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

FILM 17


FILM REVUE // WOODY ALLEN

Blue Jasmine

Dressed in red, feeling blue

A

series of vertiginous sea changes in class position have made Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) blue. Or is her rattled state symptomatic of something more fundamentally flawed in her psyche? Maybe it's just early dementia?

We see her nattering away to a fellow passenger in first-class; traumatized and narcissistic, she has a serious handicap when it comes to over-sharing. But Jasmine needs to share—the bad thoughts creep up when she's all

REVUE // BIOPIC

t some point in his career peo- From smug college dropout to smug ple would just start applaud- outlier at Atari to smug visionary ing Steve Jobs before he even told business founder to smug titan of inthem anything applause-worthy. dustry, Jobs sweeps us along the key Apparently he was just like that. steps in its protagonist's rise to glory. Maybe people were just eager to The bit where he and his cohorts seek be impressed. Maybe they were just their first investors has an enjoyable scared. According to Jobs, besides be- giddiness, but mostly this is a laundry ing a human applause-prompter, Jobs list over which haircuts and outfits was also a restless genius of bullying, gradually get more conservative and a deadbeat dad, an impatient ass- computers get more compact. The dihole incapable of empathizing with alogue is mostly exposition, the camothers (nervous investors included), era work fussy. Someone thought it a ruthless prick a good idea to hire and a quasi-hippie Opens Friday Ashton Kutcher. whose habits of Directed by He clearly threw going everywhere Joshua Michael Stern himself into the barefoot and ne-  role of Jobs, but glecting basic the role is roughly grooming died hard. The first scene 50-percent impersonation (of Golem of Jobs finds Jobs, to the sound of as much as Jobs) and 50-percent John Williams-style somber trium- hissy fit. Kutcher freaks out a lot. phalist scoring, introducing the first Sometime quietly, other times like an iPod, describing it as "a tool for the infant volcano. He shakes, sputters, heart." But did the Apple founder stares down, becoming only more even have one? remote as Jobs gets axed by his own company and later hired back. The How accurately the Jobs of Jobs rep- part where he makes amends with resents the real Jobs I couldn't tell the family he abandoned is elided. you. What matters for the purpose The film's chronology ends in 2001 of this review is that you're never go- and Kutcher's Jobs already seems ing to get to know anyone, famous exhausted. As are we, without the or not, through the graceless, imper- slightest feeling of having gained sonal bullet point/greatest hits ap- some new understanding of the man proach to the biopic employed here. behind half of the devices we're goThe kinks and nuances of persona are ing to turn back on after the movie. the first things to go. Jobs is crammed JOSEF BRAUN JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM with event and devoid of character.

18 FILM

old people during one of Blue Jasmine's many flashbacks. The line separating past and present in this film is diaphanous. For Jasmine, as her confusion burgeons, it occasionally dissolves altogether. At times the camera itself (Vicky Cristina Barcelona's Javier Aguirresarobe returns as Allen's cinematographer) seems to float, disembodied, in time with Jasmine's spells of dislocation. That these fugues finally work as well as they do are a testament to Blanchett's daringness, collaborative intuition and clarity of choices. Amazingly, Allen claims to have not seen her in Liv Ullman's 2009 production of A Streetcar Named Desire at the Brooklyn Academy of Music—amazing because Blanche DuBois is so obviously a template for Jasmine, whose mind keeps escaping to some idealized past. She too is always relying on the kindness of strangers, and is usually lying as a way of soliciting that kindness—a recipe for small, personal tragedies of the sort that Allen, however old-fashioned his sensibility may remain, is still very good at evoking. JOSEF BRAUN

JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

REVUE // ACTION

Jobs

A

alone—and it seems anyone will to deception—both of Chili and do. She was not so long ago filthy herself—to accelerate the new rich. By the rather devastating romance. The Ginger subplot may end of Blue Jasmine, she's mostly seem predictable, but it also feels alive, thanks in part to the nuance just filthy. and urgency This is the work brought to it of the serious Opens Friday by Hawkins Woody, which is Directed by Woody Allen and Cana good Woody in  navale, and by that seriousness can bring out a focus and discern- Andrew Dice Clay giving a shockment sometimes lacking in Allen's ingly strong performance, and recent comedies. Woody on the Louis CK, who's wonderful, not economy might sound like a dubi- emphatically funny but a welcome ous tag, but Blue Jasmine is pretty breath of fresh air at the film's smart, if cynical by default, about musty midpoint. He's one of those the pitfalls of privilege and the actors who should be working ways that desires for class ascen- with Allen as much as possible. sion corrupt everyone. As the film begins, Jasmine arrives in San Fran- As is Alec Baldwin, very funny cisco. She's hopeless, penniless in an incoherent role in To Rome and needs to crash at the modest With Love and very slimy here as home of her cashier sister Ginger Hal, Jasmine's ex, a Bernie Madoff(Sally Hawkins). Jasmine is self- type whose imprisonment for runabsorbed and snobby, and Ginger ning a Ponzi scheme leaves Jasseems set up as her salt-of-the- mine—who may or may not have earth, pure-hearted foil, but Allen been onto him—broke and humiliisn't one to sentimentalize any ated. "I sign everything," Jasmine class, so as the plot thickens Gin- claims. "I'm very trusting." Hal was ger will also spy an opportunity to a millionaire, a philanthropist and better herself, however slightly, serial philanderer—we see him in the arms of a much classier chatting up a nipply confection man than her current beau, Chili at what seems like an otherwise (Bobby Cannavale), and stoops deadly boring party full of rich

Elysium

Rage against the Matt-chine

I

t's the mid-22nd century and dis- the very robot cops that routinely ease and pollution have driven the beat the shit out of him. One day one percent—or, given the over- Max's asshole foreman tells him population, more likely the .001 to fix a glitch and winds up giving him radiation poipercent—into space, where they Now playing soning that'll kill him in five days. live on a pretty Directed by Neill Blomkamp spinning wheel  So Max finds his called Elysium, old Chicano gang, get plenty of artificial daylight and who run a coyote operation that receive medical attention from all- takes illegals to Elysium—this is, purpose healing beds that can erad- among other things, a border-crossicate a cancer or perform massive ing movie and a plea for universal reconstructive surgery in seconds. health care—and insists that he Meanwhile, somewhere in a sprawl- gets put on the next flight. The gang ing shantytown called Los Angeles, boss says Max can go so long as he a paroled ex-criminal named Max performs a wildly dangerous "data (Matt Damon) works the assem- heist," which means kidnapping a bly line in a factory that produces top-ranking Elysian and draining

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

his brain of all sorts of codes that can be used to start a revolution, or something. To prepare Max for his mission the gangsters provide him with an exoskeleton that turns him into a fleshier Robocop. If that strikes you as a lot of synopsis already, trust me, that ain't nothing. Part of the problem with Neill Blomkamp's follow-up to District 9 is that it's overloaded with plot. What Elysium does well are the big, broad concepts and the action bits; things like details or character development, not so much. Elysium spends a lot of time on secondary characters, yet all of them—Jodie Foster's evil, leaden secretary of defense most of all— remain boringly one-dimensional. Not that Max is all that nuanced. Damon has a knack for bringing an unlikely soulfulness to his action roles, but Max is humourless and the script's one stab at endowing him with psychological need is a shopworn trope that has Max longing to go to Elysium since childhood. We get this information not from anything Max says or does but rather from gauzy, corny flashbacks that, like much of the subplot material, are extraneous and make the film drag, right up to its nonsensically hopeful ending. JOSEF BRAUN

JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM


FILM

WEEKLY

Fri, AUG 16-Thu, Aug 22, 2013 CHABA THEATRE–JASPER 6094 Connaught Dr Jasper, 780.852.4749

WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A crude coarse language, sexual content) DAILY 1:30, 7:00, 9:05

2 GUNS (14A violence) DAILY 9:05 MONSTERS UNIVERSITY 3D (G) REAL D DAILY 1:30, 7:00 DUGGAN CINEMA–CAMROSE 6601-48 Ave Camrose, 780.608.2144

9:50; WED 4:00, 6:50, 9:50; Star & Strollers: WED 1:00

SUN 3:50, 6:50, 9:20; MON-THU 3:40, 6:40, 9:00

PLANES (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE 11:50, 2:00, 3:00,

LEE DANIELS' THE BUTLER (14A) Closed Captioned

5:20; MON 11:50, 2:00, 5:20; WED-THU 11:50, 2:00 3D: FRI-TUE 4:15, 6:40, 8:50; WED-THU 4:15, 6:40, 9:30

FRI-SAT 12:50, 3:50, 6:50, 9:50; SUN 12:40, 3:40, 6:45, 9:50; MON-THU 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00

SOME LIKE IT HOT (STC) MON 7:00 FRI-SUN, TUE-THU 12:45, 3:40, 6:45, 9:45; MON 12:45, 3:40,

THU 3:30, 7:35, 10:15; WED 3:30, 6:40, 10:15

THE SPIDERWICK CHRONICLES (PG frightening scenes)

ELYSIUM (14A gory violence) Closed Captioned, FRI-SUN, TUE

CINEPLEX ODEON SOUTH 1525-99 St 780.436.8585

KICK-ASS 2 (18A crude coarse language, gory brutal

THE SMURFS 2 (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 12:10; MON-

violence) DAILY 7:15PM 9:30; SAT-SUN, TUE, THU 2:15

THU 12:45; 3D: FRI-SUN 2:45, 5:20, 7:55, 10:30; MON-TUE, THU 3:45, 6:30, 9:25; WED 3:45, 6:30

scenes) No passes DAILY 7:00, 9:20; SAT-SUN, TUE, THU 2:00

PERCY JACKSON SEA OF MONSTERS (PG frightening

WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A crude coarse language, sexual

scenes) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 11:55; MON-THU 1:40; 3D: FRI-SUN 2:40, 5:15, 7:50, 10:25; MON-THU 4:15, 7:10, 9:55

ELYSIUM (14A gory violence) DAILY 6:45, 9:10; SAT-SUN, TUE, THU 1:45

CINEMA CITY MOVIES 12 5074-130 Ave 780.472.9779

THE CROODS (G) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:40 STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS (PG not rec for young children, violence) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:00; 3D: DAILY 3:50, 6:55, 9:40 IRON MAN 3 (PG not rec. for young children, violence,

RED 2 (PG violence, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 3:55, 9:35; MON 3:50, 9:35; TUE 4:00, 9:35

GROWN UPS 2 (PG crude content, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 1:10, 6:50; MON-TUE 1:15, 6:50

Grandin Mall Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert, 780.458.9822

PERCY JACKSON SEA OF MONSTERS (PG frightening

KICK-ASS 2 (18A crude coarse language, gory brutal) FRI-SUN,

THE SMURFS 2 (G) DAILY 2:55, 4:55, 7:00

4:10, 7:25, 10:10

THE WOLVERINE (14A violence) DAILY 9:05

GROWN UPS 2 (PG crude content, not rec for young

TUE 11:50, 2:55, 7:00, 10:00; MON, WED-THU 2:55, 7:00, 10:00

FRUITVALE STATION (14A coarse language) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:00, 3:00, 6:40, 9:40; MON, THU 3:00, 6:40, 9:40; WED

WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A crude coarse language, sexual

children) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video FRI-SAT, MON-WED 1:15, 3:50, 7:10, 9:50; SUN 12:00, 2:35, 9:50; THU

content) DAILY 12:45, 2:55, 5:05, 7:15, 9:25

1:15, 3:50, 9:50

PLANES (G) DAILY 1:20, 3:20, 5:10, 7:20, 9:20

THE WOLVERINE 3D (14A violence) Closed Captioned

3:00, 9:40

KICK-ASS 2 (18A crude coarse language, gory brutal) DAILY

PERCY JACKSON SEA OF MONSTERS (PG frightening scenes) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE 11:40, 3:20, 6:30, 9:30; MON 3:20, 6:30, 9:30

12:55, 3:00, 5:00, 7:05, 9:15

THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS CITY OF BONES (PG

THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS CITY OF BONES (STC) WED-THU 1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:05

METRO CINEMA AT THE GARNEAU

violence, frightening scene) WED-THU 2:45, 6:45, 9:50

JOBS (PG coarse language) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:20, 3:20, 7:10, 10:10; MON, WED-THU 3:20, 7:10, 10:10 THE WOLVERINE (14A violence) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:50; 3D: DAILY

Metro at the Garneau: 8712-109 St 780.425.9212

HAPPY WHACKIN' JIM MCCRACKIN (Live Fringe) FRI 7:00; SAT-THU 9:30; SUN 2:00

SOMETHING IN THE AIR (18A) Subtitled FRI, TUE 9:00; SAT

3:45, 6:50, 9:45

4:00; SUN, WED 7:00

WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A crude coarse language, sexual

FREAKS (STC) Metro Bizarro: FRI 11:00

content) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:30, 3:40, 7:30, 10:25; MON, WED-THU 3:40, 7:30, 10:25

EMPIRE CLAREVIEW 10 4211-139 Ave, 780.472.7600

BLACKFISH (14A disturbing content) SAT 2:00; MON 7:00 THE SEARCHERS (STC) Best Of The West: SAT, THU 7:00; SUN 4:00

FRANCES HA (14A coarse language) TUE 7:00

PLANES (G) FRI-SUN 11:50, 2:15; MON-THU 1:20; 3D: FRI-

Closed Captioned, Dolby Stereo Digital FRI-TUE 6:00, 8:45

THE WOLVERINE 3D (14A violence) Dolby Stereo Digital

OCTOPUSSY (STC) Turkey Shoot Comedy: WED 9:00 EMPIRE THEATRES–SPRUCE GROVE

TUE 2:45; SAT-SUN 12:20, 2:45; WED-THU 3:15

2 GUNS (14A violence) Dolby Stereo Digital DAILY 6:30, 9:15

KICK-ASS 2 (18A crude coarse language, gory brutal) Closed

scenes) Dolby Stereo Digital, Sr Dolby Digital FRI, MON-THU 6:25; SAT-SUN 12:25, 6:25; 3D: Digital 3d, Dolby Stereo Digital, Sr Dolby Digital DAILY 3:10, 9:10

THE SMURFS 2 (G) Digital FRI-SUN 12:10, 2:50, 5:50, 8:30;

WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A crude coarse language, sexual

scenes) Digital FRI-SUN 12:20, 6:10; MON, WED-THU 6:10; TUE 2:00, 6:10; 3D: Reald 3d FRI-MON, WED-THU 3:00, 8:50; TUE 8:50

WHITE HOUSE DOWN (14A violence) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:15, 4:05, 7:05, 9:50

THE INTERNSHIP (PG crude coarse language, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:45, 7:20

CHENNAI EXPRESS (PG violence) Hindi W/E.S.T. DAILY 1:10, 4:30, 7:50

NAUGHTY JATTS (PG) Punjabi W/E.S.T. DAILY 3:55, 6:45, 9:30 ONCE UPON A TIME IN MUMBAI DOBAARA (STC) Hindi W/E.S.T. DAILY 1:25, 4:45, 8:00

BAKIT HINDI KA CRUSH NG CRUSH MO? (PG coarse language) DAILY 1:30, 4:00, 6:40, 9:20 =

CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH 14231-137 Ave 780.732.2236

Captioned, No passes FRI-TUE 12:15, 2:50, 5:25, 8:00, 10:35; WED-THU 2:05, 5:00, 7:35, 10:10

YOU'RE NEXT (STC) THU 10:00 2 GUNS (14A violence) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 1:45, 4:25, 7:05, 9:45; MON 1:30, 4:10, 9:45; TUE-WED 1:45, 4:20, 7:05, 9:45; THU 1:45, 4:20, 7:05

WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A crude coarse language, sexual content) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 2:05, 4:45, 7:25, 10:10; MON-TUE 1:50, 4:35, 7:25, 10:10; WED 1:50, 4:35, 7:25, 10:15; THU 4:35, 7:25, 10:10; Star & Strollers Screening: THU 1:00

JOBS (PG coarse language) FRI-SUN 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30; MON-THU 12:55, 4:05, 7:30, 10:30

PLANES (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 12:05, 2:30; MON-THU 12:30, 2:50; 3D: FRI-SUN 4:50, 7:10, 9:30; MON-THU 5:10, 7:40, 10:05

WWE: SUMMERSLAM–2013 (Classification not available) SUN 6:00

LEE DANIELS' THE BUTLER (14A) Closed Captioned FRI, SUN 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15; SAT 1:20, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15; MON 1:00, 4:00, 6:45, 10:15; TUE, THU 1:10, 4:10, 7:15, 10:15; WED SERENITY (14A violence) WED 9:30

DESPICABLE ME 2 (G) Closed Captioned FRI, SUN-TUE 11:40,

SOME LIKE IT HOT (STC)

PACIFIC RIM (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned FRI-TUE 12:40; WED-THU 12:35 THE SMURFS 2 (G) Closed Captioned FRI, SUN-THU 1:10; SAT 11:00, 1:15; 3D:FRI-TUE 3:45, 6:30, 9:00; WED-THU 3:45,

6:20, 8:40

PERCY JACKSON SEA OF MONSTERS (PG frightening scenes) Closed Captioned FRI-TUE 11:45, 1:40; WED-THU 11:45, 1:50; 3D: FRI-SUN, WED-THU 4:20, 7:00, 10:10; MON-TUE 4:20, 7:00, 9:40 GROWN UPS 2 (PG crude content, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE 3:30, 10:20; MON 3:00, 10:20

PERCY JACKSON SEA OF MONSTERS (PG frightening

content) Dolby Stereo Digital, Sr Dolby Digital No passes FRI, MON-THU 3:25, 6:35, 9:25; SAT-SUN 12:35, 3:25, 6:35, 9:25

MON 7:00

THE SPIDERWICK CHRONICLES (PG frightening scenes) SAT 11:00

CINEPLEX ODEON WINDERMERE CINEMAS Cineplex Odeon Windermere, Vip Cinemas, 6151 Currents Dr, 780.822.4250

ELYSIUM (14A gory violence) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video FRI-SAT 1:00, 3:40, 7:00, 9:40; SUN 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10; MON-TUE 1:50, 4:30, 7:20, 10:10; WED-THU 1:50, 4:30, 7:20, 10:00; VIP 18+: FRI-SAT 12:00, 3:00, 6:30, 9:40; SUN 12:00, 2:50, 6:20, 9:20; MON-THU 2:50, 6:10, 9:10

THE SMURFS 2 3D (G) FRI-SAT 12:00, 2:30, 5:00; SUN 12:30, 3:10; MON-TUE 1:40, 4:20

PLANES (G) Dolby Stereo Digital, Reel Babies, Sr Dolby Digital No passes FRI, MON-THU 6:40; SAT-SUN 12:40, 6:40

content) Digital FRI-SUN 12:50, 3:30, 6:40, 9:20; MON-THU 3:30, 6:40, 9:20

THALAIVAA (14A brutal violence) Dolby Stereo Digital FRI,

PLANES 3D (G) Digital FRI-SUN 12:40, 6:30; MON-THU 6:30;

MON-WED 5:05, 8:40; SAT-SUN 1:30, 5:05, 8:40; THU 5:05

THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS CITY OF BONES (PG violence, frightening scene) Closed Captioned, Dolby Stereo Digital WED-THU 2:45, 6:00, 9:35

KICK-ASS 2 (18A crude coarse language, gory brutal) Closed Captioned, Dolby Stereo Digital FRI, MON-THU 3:00, 6:05, 9:00; SAT-SUN 12:05, 3:00, 6:05, 9:00 THU 10:00

PARANOIA (PG coarse language) Closed Captioned, Dolby Stereo Digital FRI, MON-THU 3:05, 6:15, 9:05; SAT-SUN 12:15, 3:05, 6:15, 9:05 THE WOLVERINE (14A violence) Closed Captioned, Dolby

Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE 5:40, 8:10, 10:45; MON 3:45, 10:45; WED-THU 3:25, 8:45, 10:50

KICK-ASS 2 (18A crude coarse language, gory brutal)Closed Captioned, No passes FRI-SUN 9:30; WED-THU 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:40; ULTRAAVX: FRI-TUE 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:40 YOU'RE NEXT (STC) THU 10:15 2 GUNS (14A violence) Closed Captioned FRI-TUE 2:20, 5:00, 7:45, 10:15; WED 2:40, 5:15, 7:45, 10:15; THU 2:40, 5:15, 7:45 WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A crude coarse language, sexual content) Closed Captioned DAILY 12:00, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30

JOBS (PG coarse language) FRI-TUE, THU 12:50, 4:00, 6:50,

2 GUNS (14A violence) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video

3D: Reald 3d DAILY 3:20, 9:10

PRINCESS 10337-82 Ave, 780.433.0728

THE WAY WAY BACK (PG coarse language) FRI 6:50, 9:00; SAT-SUN 2:00, 6:50, 9:00; MON-THU 6:50, 9:00

20 FEET FROM STARDOM (PG coarse language) FRI 7:10; SAT 1:00, 7:10; SUN 1:00, 7:10, 9:10; MON 7:10, 9:10; TUE-THU 7:10 s SCOTIABANK THEATRE WEM

WEM 8882-170 St 780.444.2400

ELYSIUM (14A gory violence) FRI-SUN 12:00, 2:40, 5:20, 8:00,

scenes) DAILY 2D: 12:55; DAILY 3D: 3:35, 6:55, 9:35; TUE 2D: 6:55; TUE 3D: 9:35

DESPICABLE ME 2 (G) DAILY 1:00, 3:25, 7:00 2 GUNS (14A violence) DAILY 9:25 WETASKIWIN CINEMAS Wetaskiwin 780.352.3922

WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A crude coarse language, sexual content) DAILY 1:00, 3:40, 7:00, 9:40

ELYSIUM (14A gory violence) DAILY 1:10, 3:35, 7:10, 9:35 PARANOIA (PG coarse language) DAILY 12:50, 3:25, 6:50, 9:25

THE SMURFS 2 (G) DAILY 2D: 1:05; DAILY 3D: 3:30, 7:05; TUE 2D: 7:05

R.I.P.D. 3D (PG frightening scenes, coarse language, not rec for young children) DAILY 9:30

10:45; MON-THU 2:20, 5:10, 8:00, 10:45

4:45, 7:30, 10:15; SAT 11:15, 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15; MON-THU 1:50, 4:30, 7:15, 10:05

DESPICABLE ME 2 (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 12:10, 2:45, 5:20, 7:50, 10:25; MON-THU 1:25, 4:00, 6:40, 9:10

THE SMURFS 2 (G) Closed Captioned FRI, SUN-THU 1:30; SAT 11:00, 1:30; 3D: DAILY 4:10, 6:50, 9:30

PERCY JACKSON SEA OF MONSTERS (PG frightening scenes) Closed Captioned FRI, SUN-THU 2:20; SAT 11:45, 2:20 GROWN UPS 2 (PG crude content, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned FRI-TUE 2:05, 7:20 12:45; MON-THU 1:15

THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS CITY OF BONES (PG violence, frightening scene) No passes WED-THU 1:00, 4:05, 7:10, 10:15; 3D: FRI-SUN 6:40, 9:45; MON-THU 7:00, 10:00 THE HEAT (14A crude coarse language) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 3:50; MON-THU 4:15

THE CONJURING (14A frightening scenes, disturbing

WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A crude coarse language, sexual

KICK-ASS 2 (18A crude coarse language, gory brutal) Closed Captioned, No passes FRI-SUN 12:00, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45, 10:20; MON-THU 2:15, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10

2:35; SUN 1:00; MON-THU 1:20; 3D: FRI-SAT 4:50, 7:20, 10:10;

WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A crude coarse language, sexual

ELYSIUM (14A gory violence) DAILY 12:45, 3:40, 6:45, 9:40

2020 Sherwood Dr Sherwood Park 780.416.0150

content) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 4:35, 10:00; MON-TUE 4:35, 9:50

PLANES (G) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video FRI-SAT 12:20,

4702-50 St Leduc, 780.986-2728

WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A crude coarse language,

ELYSIUM (14A gory violence) Closed Captioned FRI, SUN 2:00,

FRI-SAT 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30; SUN 12:50, 3:40, 6:20, 9:30; MON-THU 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30

content) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video FRI-SAT 2:10, 4:50, 7:40, 10:20; SUN 1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 10:10; MON-THU 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:10; VIP 18+: FRI-SAT 2:00, 5:20, 8:30; SUN 1:50, 5:00, 8:00; MON-THU 2:00, 5:00, 8:05

LEDUC CINEMAS

GALAXY–SHERWOOD PARK

THE WOLVERINE (14A violence) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN

THE CONJURING (14A frightening scenes, disturbing content)

passes WED-THU 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:45

Stereo Digital, SAT-SUN 12:00

THE WOLVERINE (14A violence) FRI-SAT 7:30, 10:30; SUN

No passes FRI-SAT 12:40, 3:40, 7:30, 10:40; SUN 12:40, 3:30, 7:10, 10:10; MON-THU 1:30, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10; ULTRAAVX: FRISAT 12:10, 2:45, 5:20, 8:00, 10:40; SUN 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:00; MON-TUE 2:00, 4:40, 7:10, 9:50; Closed Caption & Descriptive Video: WED 2:00, 4:40, 7:40, 10:10; THU 2:00, 4:40, 7:40, 10:15

THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS CITY OF BONES: The Imax Experience (PG violence, frightening scene) No

PERCY JACKSON SEA OF MONSTERS (PG frightening

9:30; MON-THU 3:40, 6:50, 9:30

PARANOIA (PG coarse language) Closed Captioned FRI, SUN-

FRI-TUE 12:20, 7:40

PERCY JACKSON SEA OF MONSTERS (PG frightening

Digital, No passes FRI, MON-THU 3:20, 6:10, 9:20; SAT-SUN 12:10, 3:20, 6:10, 9:20

3D: FRI-SUN 5:00, 7:40, 10:25; MON-THU 4:55, 7:35, 10:15

THE HEAT (14A crude coarse language) Closed Captioned

MON-THU 2:50, 5:50, 8:30

SERENITY (14A violence) WED 9:30

ELYSIUM (14A gory violence) Digital FRI-SUN 1:00, 3:40, 6:50,

THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS CITY OF BONES (PG violence, frightening scene) Ultraavx, No passes WED 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:20; Thu 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10

KICK-ASS 2 (18A crude coarse language, gory brutal)VIP 18+:

THE WOLVERINE (14A violence) Digital DAILY 8:40

FRI-TUE 1:40, 4:20, 7:15, 10:00

ELYSIUM (14A gory violence) Dolby Stereo Digital, Sr Dolby

THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS CITY OF BONES (PG violence, frightening scene) Closed Captioned, No passes WED-THU 11:40, 5:50; ULTRAAVX: WED-THU 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 10:40

6:15, 9:40; MON-TUE 6:50, 9:45

MON-THU 2:40, 6:00

sexual content) DAILY 1:05, 3:30, 7:05, 9:30

PERCY JACKSON SEA OF MONSTERS (PG frightening scenes) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video FRI-SUN 1:20; MONTHU 2:10; 3D: FRI-SAT 4:00, 6:40, 9:20; SUN 4:00, 6:40, 9:10; MON-TUE 4:50, 7:20, 9:55; WED-THU 4:40, 7:10, 9:40

TUE 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:05; SAT 11:40, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:05; WED-THU 2:15, 4:50, 7:30, 10:05

2 GUNS (14A violence) Digital FRI-SUN 12:00, 2:40, 6:00;

able) SUN 6:00

ELYSIUM: THE IMAX EXPERIENCE (14A gory violence)

KICK-ASS 2 (18A crude coarse language, gory brutal) Digital FRI-SUN 12:30, 3:10, 6:20, 9:00; MON-THU 3:10, 6:20, 9:00

1:00; 3D: FRI-SUN, WED-THU 4:10, 7:10, 10:40; MON-TUE 4:10, 7:10, 10:10

THE WOLVERINE (14A violence) Closed Captioned DAILY

130 Century Crossing, Spruce Grove 780.962.2332

SUN 4:40, 7:00, 9:20; MON-THU 3:45, 7:00, 9:20

WWE: SUMMERSLAM–2013 (Classification not avail-

Digital, No passes DAILY 3:30, 9:30

PLANES 3D (G) Digital 3d, Dolby Stereo Digital, Sr Dolby

YOU'RE NEXT (STC) Closed Captioned, Dolby Stereo Digital

12:35, 3:30, 6:30, 9:25

ELYSIUM (14A gory violence) DAILY 1:30, 4:30, 7:20, 10:00 1:20; SAT 11:10, 1:25; WED-THU 1:20; 3D: FRI-SUN, WED-THU 3:50, 6:15, 8:30; MON-TUE 3:50, 6:20, 8:40

DAILY 1:00, 4:00, 7:30, 10:30

THE CONJURING (14A frightening scenes, disturbing content)

1:35, 7:40; SUN 1:35, 4:00, 7:05; MON-THU 1:20, 7:20; 3D: FRISAT 4:35, 10:40; Sun 10:40; MON-THU 4:20, 10:20

content) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 1:25, 4:05, 7:00, 9:50; MON 1:10, 4:00, 9:50; TUE-WED 1:25, 4:10, 7:00, 9:50; THU 1:25, 4:10, 9:50

substance abuse) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:55, 4:35, 7:30, 10:05

2 GUNS (14A violence) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video

THE WOLVERINE (14A violence) Closed Captioned FRI-SAT

THE CONJURING (14A frightening scenes, disturbing

THIS IS THE END (18A gory violence, crude coarse language,

KICK-ASS 2 (18A crude coarse language, gory brutal) Ultraavx, No passes FRI-SUN 12:15, 2:50, 5:25, 8:00, 10:40; MON 2:10, 5:00, 8:00, 10:35; TUE-THU 2:10, 5:00, 7:50, 10:40

WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A crude coarse language, sexual content) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video DAILY 1:30, 4:30, 7:20, 10:15

FAST & FURIOUS 6 (14A violence) Closed Captioned DAILY

DAILY 1:30, 4:25, 7:15, 9:45

THE CONJURING (14A frightening scenes, disturbing content) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video FRI-SAT, MONTHU 2:00, 8:10, 10:45; SUN 2:00, 4:45, 8:10

COMPUTER CHESS (14A) MON 9:00

CARNIVAL OF SOULS (STC) Metro Bizarro: SUN 9:00

THE SMURFS 2 (G) Dolby Stereo Digital, No passes FRI, MON-

NOW YOU SEE ME (PG coarse language) Closed Captioned

FRI-SUN 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:55, 10:35; MON-TUE, THU 1:50, 4:50, 7:55, 10:35; WED 4:50, 7:55, 10:35; Star & Strollers: WED 1:00

FRI, MON-TUE 3:15; SAT-SUN 12:30, 3:15

FRI-SUN, TUE-THU 2:55, 7:00, 10:00; MON 2:55, 10:00

EPIC (G) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:05, 4:15, 6:50, 9:15

PARANOIA (PG coarse language) Closed Captioned

DESPICABLE ME 2 (G) Dolby Stereo Digital, Closed Captioned

12:00, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45, 10:20; MON-THU 2:15, 4:50, 7:50, 10:30

for young children) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:35; 3D: DAILY 4:40, 7:40

FRI-SUN, WED-THU 4:10, 7:10, 10:40; MON-TUE 4:10, 7:10, 10:10; Closed Caption & Descriptive Video: FRI-SUN 1:50; MON-THU 1:45; 3D: FRI-SUN 4:55, 7:50, 10:50; MON-THU 4:40, 7:40, 10:35

violence, frightening scene) Closed Captioned, No passes WED 1:35, 4:35, 7:40, 10:35; THU 12:40, 3:40, 6:50, 9:40

THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS CITY OF BONES (PG

PARANOIA (PG coarse language) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN

MAN OF STEEL (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec

THE SMURFS 2 (G) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video FRI-SUN 11:50; MON-THU 12:50; 3D: FRI-SUN 2:20, 4:50, 7:25, 9:55; MON-THU 3:40, 6:45, 9:25 scenes) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video FRI-SUN 12:10; MON-THU 1:10; 3D: FRI-SUN 2:40, 5:10, 7:45, 10:20; MON-THU

frightening scenes) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:20; 3D: DAILY 4:10, 7:00, 9:55 4:20, 10:00

MON-THU 4:45; SUN 10:45

PERCY JACKSON SEA OF MONSTERS (PG frightening

6:45, 9:50; MON 2:45, 6:45, 9:50; WED-THU 2:30, 6:30, 9:30

PACIFIC RIM (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for

young children) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video FRI-SAT,

GRANDIN THEATRE–ST ALBERT

DESPICABLE ME 2 (G) DAILY 12:50

MON-THU 12:50, 3:35, 6:35, 9:30; ULTRAAVX: FRI-SUN 12:00, 2:40, 5:20, 8:05, 10:45; MON-THU 1:55, 4:40, 7:35, 10:25 MON-THU 1:05; 3D: FRI-SUN 2:55, 5:35, 8:05, 10:35; MON 3:40, 6:40, 9:20; TUE-THU 3:50, 6:40, 9:20

PACIFIC RIM (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for

SAT 11:00

12:10, 3:10, 7:20, 10:20; MON, WED-THU 3:10, 7:20, 10:20

LEE DANIELS' THE BUTLER (14A) FRI-SUN, TUE 11:30, 2:45,

DESPICABLE ME 2 (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 12:20;

FRI-TUE, THU 12:30, 3:30, 6:50, 9:30; WED 12:30, 3:30, 6:50

THE SPIDERWICK CHRONICLES (PG frightening scenes)

scenes) DAILY 1:00, 3:10, 5:20, 7:30, 9:30

ELYSIUM (14A gory violence) FRI-SUN 2:00, 4:40, 7:20, 10:05;

PLANES (G) No passes DAILY 7:30; SAT-SUN, TUE, THU 2:30

content) DAILY 6:30, 9:00; SAT, SUN, TUE, THU 1:30

JASMINE (STC) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:40, 3:30, 7:35, 10:15; MON,

6:40, 9:45 SAT 11:00

DESPICABLE ME 2 (G) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video

4:50, 7:15, 9:40; MON-THU 4:45, 7:05, 9:40

10200-102 Ave, 780.421.7018

LEE DANIELS' THE BUTLER (14A) Closed Captioned

young children) FRI-SAT 1:00, 4:00, 6:55, 10:00; SUN 1:00, 10:00; MON-THU 1:00, 3:55, 6:55, 10:00

PERCY JACKSON SEA OF MONSTERS (PG frightening

CITY CENTRE 9

PLANES (G) FRI-SUN 12:00, 2:25; MON-THU 2:25; 3D: FRI-SUN

2 GUNS (14A violence) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 1:30, 4:15, 7:00, 9:50; MON-THU 1:20, 4:00, 6:45, 9:35 WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A crude coarse language, sexual content) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:40, 4:25, 7:10, 9:55

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

FILM 19


ARTS

ARTS EDITOR : PAUL BLINOV PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

COVER // FRINGE FESTIVAL

// Jill Stanton

E

dmonton’s Fringe Festival has had plenty of monikers since its beginnings in 1982. Some are classics, and some forgettable: names like “Frankenfringe” and “Home on the Fringe” stare out from threadbare T-shirts worn with pride by longtime Fringers, while it remains to be seen if this year’s 007-themed “From Fringe with Love”—which echoes 2007’s “Live and Let Fringe”—will join the pantheon of classics. Classic or not, there has perhaps been no more fitting a moniker than 2000’s “Cirque du Fringe” in the way it posits the Fringe as a travelling circus you can run away with. The parallels between the Fringe and a travelling circus are nearly endless: not only are there tents and gravity-defying feats, you’ve also got

junk food, bright lights and handbilling artists beckoning you into their shows like barkers outside a big top. Then there are the travelling performers themselves, the ones that hit the road, plying their trade from one side of Canada’s vast expanse to the other. Starting in Montréal in June, Fringe artists can move westward until they finish in Vancouver in mid-September. Adding a travelling dimension to a Fringe run makes it exponentially more difficult: thousands of people flock to the Fringe grounds each day to eat green onion cakes and walk away from street performers just before they pass the hat. Enticing people into venues is hard enough for a local whose friends and family are willing to help spread the word: for touring artists, it’s that much tougher.

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With no more than a few days to get posters up and handbills into hands, hustle is key. “In those first five days you’re on your feet talking to people, talking up your show, handbilling, trying to get people into your show—especially if you’re at an ‘away’ Fringe,” explains Christine Lesiak, co-artistic director of Edmonton’s Small Matters Productions who will tour a total of seven Fringe festivals this summer, bringing a new work to Edmonton called Ask Aggie—the Advice Diva. “Unless you’ve been there a lot of times, nobody knows you—you don’t have the home field advantage.”

of themselves, but for touring art- outweigh the challenges. ists you’ve got to go even smaller. As “I get to do what I love,” Horak sometime-Torontonian Bruce Horak, states unequivocally. “It’s an adventhe man behind Fringe hit This is Can- ture. My life is never boring.” cer, explains, his latest show Assassi“We love performing our work and nating Thomson— we want to perform our work,” which recounts the Thu, Aug 15 – Sun, Aug 25 Lesiak says. “It almysterious death Edmonton International lows us to do what of influential Cana- Fringe Festival we love and most dian painter Tom Various locations of the Fringes help Thomson while fringetheatre.ca bring you audience Horak paints the just by virtue of audience—is nearthe fact you’re part of this festival.” ly devoid of technical needs. Then there’s the camaraderie be“We develop the Fringe shows to be really versatile. We can pretty much tween artists, perhaps the Fringe take them into any venue and get touring circuit’s greatest benefit. With them up and running without having so many solo shows criss-crossing too much fuss or bother. This show the country, performers grow tightin particular there’s pretty much knit, meeting up in city after city and no tech: no sound cues, no lighting supporting each other from the highs cues—we kept it as simple as pos- of good reviews and packed houses sible,” he says. “If you can get it down through to the lows that go beyond to a performer with a very minimal a bad run. When Antony Hall of Edmonton’s set and technical elements it ultimately makes your Fringe experience Black Sheep Theatre was hit by a car and broke his leg at this year’s Ottawa that much easier.” “As an artist you have to be really Fringe, touring performers banded toadaptable to your space,” echoes Le- gether to fill the company’s slots with siak. “When we design a show, if we a variety show. All the proceeds went know we’re going to tour it, we know toward sending Hall home and helping to pay for the cost of his injury. it has to fit in a car.” “That stuff is heartwarming,” Lesiak That’s a lesson Edmonton’s Good Women Dance is learning as it tours says, “and I’ve seen it happen before.” “You don’t often find that in other for the first time. The company’s latest work, entitled Fracture requires fields where everybody’s in it for an elaborate set piece the foursome themselves,” Horak says. “But we support each other and look out for each has had to cart from city to city. “That’s actually been quite a pain,” other—it’s really a special thing.” That level of support would come as laughs company member Ainsley Hillyard. “We knew that we were taking no surprise to Hillyard, who has found [Fracture] on the road, but we didn’t her own Fringe “guardian angel” on the want to compromise the integrity of road—none other than spoken-word what we were producing just because artist and Fringe legend Jem Rolls. “I run into him everywhere I go— we knew that it had to travel.” It’s a decision she’d make again. “In a every 10 minutes. We’ve built this heartbeat,” she says. rapport and he always helps me “If the work was something we be- and always has advice for me,” she lieved in we’d bring three times the says. “Essentially we’re competing amount of set pieces we have right for the same audience, but he just now,” she says. “In the end you’re said, ‘I’ve been doing this for years touring your work and going outside and I’ve made some really stupid of Edmonton to show the world what mistakes so why should you have Edmonton is doing, so you don’t want to make them too?’ That’s a really beautiful sentiment. And everyto compromise on that at all.” one’s been like that. “That’s the sentiment between all While all that handbilling, postering and reimagining your show for dif- the Fringe artists—we’re not sharing ferent venues might seem like undue an audience, we’re sharing a festival.” hardships to undertake, for Fringe BRYAN BIRTLES performers the benefits of touring BRYAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

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ARTS 21


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DANTE ALIGHIERI SCHOOL OF ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE REGISTRATIONS FOR 2013 - 2014 SCHOOL YEAR

Registrations will be accepted on the following dates: Saturday, August 31th from 10:00 to 12:30 at Archbishop O’Leary High School (8760-132 Ave.) and Sunday, September 1st from 11:00 to 14:00 at Santa Maria Goretti Community Centre (9110-110 St). Registrations are accepted also on the first day of school (Saturday, September 7th) and 14th just before classes start. Our school offers Saturday morning classes (10:00-12:30), for pre-school children, K-12 and adults at Archbishop O’Leary High School. For further information visit our website: www.ladanteedmonton.org or call Aristide at 471-6656; via e-mail: aristidem@shaw.ca. or Elena at 474-1787. 22 ARTS

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BLUES FESTIVAL AUG 16 – AUG 18, 2013

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EDMONTON

BLUES FESTIVAL AUGUST 16 • 17 • 18

2013

SCHEDULE

FRIDAY 16

SATURDAY 17

GATE OPENS 4:30 • SHOW 4:30 - 10:00 PM

TIME

GATE OPENS 1:00 • SHOW

Arsen Shomakhov

5:30

John Primer and the Real Deal B

Terrance Simien

7:00

Big Pete with Matt Schofield

James Cotton with Roomful of Blues

8:30

Homemade Jamz Blues Band Cafe R&B Mannish Boys

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BLUES FESTIVAL AUG 16 – AUG 18, 2013


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Eden Brent

2:30

4:00

Monkeyjunk

4:00

5:30

Ana Popovic

5:30

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Golden State – Lone Star Revue

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Allen Toussaint February 22, 2014

Upcoming

Blues Shows

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November 29

Box Office: 780-449-3378 www.festivalplace.ab.ca

26

BLUES FESTIVAL AUG 16 – AUG 18, 2013


ARTS PREVUE // FRINGE

Earlybird fringe picks

Some pre-review entry points into the festival's spread of shows cer, Bruce Horak has established a fair bit of festival cred. The premise behind Assassinating Thomson sounds convoluted on paper but should be intriguing to watch on stage: Horak, who is legally blind, will be painting the audience whilst weaving together the story of Canadian painter Tom Thomson's unsolved murder with stories from Horak's own life, focusing on his series of 400 portraits that are meant to be viewed from a close distance, wearing strong prescriptive lenses, with one eye closed—similar to how Horak sees the world. If anyone is able to tackle the challenges of such an unusual premise, it would be this charismatic performer. MP

You Killed Hamlet

W

here do you even start? With more than 200 Fringe shows vying for your hard-earned ticket money, choosing what to see, especially early on, can be daunting. Of course, taking a risk on anything that intrigues you lends you a certain theatrical bravado, but we've got a couple suggestions, too. Aside from Vue's complete coverage of the festival—with reviews of every ticketed show being posted up on edmontonfringe.ca by Monday (save the lone Tuesday opening)—here are a couple of earybird picks from some of the members of our intrepid reviewing team. We can't guarantee anything, of course, but these are the shows that are intriguing us from the precipice of the festival. Earlybird picks by Paul Blinov (PB), Saliha Chattoo (SC) and Mel Priestley (MP). Nashville Hurricane (Venue 14: Strathcona Library) Chase Padgett is both a talented musician and skilled storyteller, and at last year's Fringe he found a way to exploit both talents to great effect with 6 Guitars—it was one of the best shows of the festival. This new effort looks to be very similar in format, with Padgett switching between an assortment of various guitar-wielding characters, though this time around the narrative framework appears to be more storybased. Sure, Nashville Hurricane may end up being a rehash of what Padgett has already done—but you know, had he decided to do a completely identical remounting of 6 Guitars I would have happily seen it again anyway. MP

and counterpart to A Wake's exploration of death: Held examines the moments before birth and the impact of inherited traits and family history. It will be fascinating to discover how the setting will inform and expand upon this year's narrative (and for those of us who saw last year's show, to compare the two). MP Assassinating Thomson (Venue 4: Academy at King Edward) As the creator and performer of the acclaimed past Fringe hit This is Can-

Grim and Fischer (Venue 41: La Cité Francophone) In 2011, Grim and Fischer made its Edmonton Fringe debut, and the Portland-based artists of Wonderheads Theatre quickly found themselves swimming in four- and five-star reviews. More than that, though, the show became an audience favourite, taking attendees on a deeply honest and poignant emotional journey. Three actors in full-face mask portray the characters, and the story—told

through actions instead of words— which follows an elderly widow avoiding Death's pursuit. We singled this show out as a Fringe favourite two years ago, so if you didn't catch it last time, this year is your second chance to see a true theatrical gem. SH Magical Mystery Detour (Venue 6: C103) Gemma Wilcox has been winning awards for her Fringe shows since 2003, and she's back this year with Magical Mystery Detour. Known for her one-woman multi-character productions, Wilcox will play more than 25 characters this time as she tells a tale of life on the road. Wilcox's past shows—most notably The Honeymoon Period is Officially Over and Dangerously Safe—have been praised for their tight storylines and the sheer force of Wilcox's acting abilities. If you're looking for a one-woman show with high entertainment value, Wilcox's Fringe record suggests this one is a solid bet. SH Or (Venue 8: Old Strathcona Performing Arts Centre) Trunk Theatre, the production com-

Why take Managment at Concordia?

Held (Venue 15: South Side Memorial Chapel) The South Side Memorial Chapel is quickly becoming one of my favourite venues, even though they only became a BYOV last year when they hosted Mindhive Collective's beautifully choreographed A Wake. On the surface it might seem gimmicky and/ or ghoulish but it's actually a lovely, intimate space, and Mindhive tactfully engaged with the charged emotions inherent in such a place. The Collective is back there again this year with a piece that stands as both complement

pany behind the Sterling-nominated Dying City is back this year with the 2009 off-Broadway show about Aphra Behn, the first professional female playwright. Or follows Behn through a particularly chaotic evening as she's racing to meet a deadline while balancing the attentions of her three lovers. The show is armed with a strong cast of Edmonton-based artists, and coupled with a Neo-Restoration comedy slant, it's likely that Or will transform the familiar premise of life's complicated mess of passions into something inspired. SH You Killed Hamlet, or Guilty Creatures Sitting At A Play (Venue 7: Yardbird Suite) A pair of foul-mouthed, gleefully offensive bouffon clowns riffing on one of the Bard's greatest tragedies? Yeah, You Killed Hamlet looks to be the extreme sort of show to polarize a Fringe—but there are enough glowing reviews and best-of-fest buzzes from previous festivals to suggest it's more than a costumed pissaround. Still, sounds like one for the bravest of audiences: don't expect the fourth wall to save you, or that the accusations stop with the show's title. PB

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7128 Ada Boulevard Edmonton, AB T: 780.479.9220 TF: 1.866.479.5200 VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

ARTS 27


NORTHERN LIGHT THEATRE 2013-14 SEASON 780.471.1586 | WWW.NORTHERNLIGHTTHEATRE.COM

28 ARTS

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013


ARTS REVUE // VISUAL ARTS

ARTIFACTS

Small Disasters

PAUL BLINOV // PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Success 5000 Tour Kick-off/ Sun, Aug 18 (9 pm) Success 5000, a musical comedy duo equally capable of singing the ballad of a breakfast wizard and doing a pretty bang-on Tragically Hip parody, are about to set off on their first comedy tour of the country. But before they see what kind of laughter the likes of, say, Manitoba is capable of, the duo’s cram-packing its tour kick-off with visual and aural treats: the pair will do a live set to herald the release of an EP of songs, plus screen The Axe-Wielding Knights of Rock N’ Roll Camelot, the no-budget medieval epic film they debuted at the Garneau a few months back. They also promise an official

drinking game to go along with said screening. (Wunderbar, Pay What You Can) Hamlet As Told on the Streets / Aug 16, 17, 18, 19, 23 and 24 (8:30 pm) So, this isn’t officially part of the Fringe, but it is a thing that just so happens to be happening concurrently to the Fringe, in the same approximate area, taking place in what could be interpreted as a secret BYOV. But anyways: Mostly Water Theatre mainstay Trent Wilkie’s paired with CJSR man-about-town Christian Zyp to perform Shel Silverstein’s Hamlet (As Told On The Streets). Just don’t call it a Fringe show. (Black Dog, Pay What You Can)

Noah's Ark, 47 x 75 inches, oil on canvas, 2013 // Andrea Kastner

O

nce a candy wrapper or an old It is all that. Back alleys, amidst paint can is out of my hands stuff hidden behind houses, and in the trash or basement cor- were Kastner's childhood playner it seems gone forever—it magi- grounds—places she found more cally disappears. Like most people, appealing than sterile frontal I have environmental concerns but yards. She recalls starting small don't think deeply about the story fires in her back alley where she of each item I leave behind—at roasted marshmallows on tiny least I didn't until Andrea Kastner's sticks. In the light of a fire, an show of paintings Small Disasters alley crammed with junk must have been a brought it to light. Kastner's Until Fri, Sep 6 wondrous site. art turns old Works by Andrea Kastner This gives Kastner's depicjunk into a fable: Harcourt House tion of garbage crumpled wrappers, stuff stashed behind garages something akin to affection. Yet, fill with character and a life story. the trash that fills the walls of this Take, for instance, "Noah's Ark": show pulls the curtain on our colthis painting features an ordinary lective closet—one crammed with Edmonton back alley. Amidst insatiable buying habits. The effect the parked cars stands a stor- is similar to the powerful YouTube age container—an object that is video "Story of Stuff" by Annie nearly invisible to casual passers Leonard. Leonard illustrates that a by. Kastner's "portrait" brings out linear system (rampant consumpits nearly Biblical character. This tion) can't be sustained by a finite intriguing object was carefully, one (one planet). In the last three almost lovingly, cobbled out of decades one-third of the planet's plywood into a boat shape. It's natural resources have been conpiled high with a lifetime worth sumed. We are simply using too of belongings. "I felt like they much stuff. were preparing for the end of the In both this show and Leonard's world," says Kastner with enthusi- video, the underlying message is asm, "it looks so protective." coated with spoonful of sugar and Another painting, "Storage Crisis," whimsical humour. Kastner likes forms a seven-foot-wide panorama. stuff. Her back alleys and baseIt's hardly the landscape vista typi- ments are at once children's playcal for the genre; it depicts a base- grounds and frightening depictions ment crammed with junk—stuff of our collective folly. The shiny most people store in the hope that new boxes I love to open soon cram it will one day be useful. Seeing it my basement and overflow closets. in a gallery painted and composed And that phase, so richly depicted into a grand nature morte poses in- in this show, is only mid-life. The teresting questions. saga continues; some plastics never biodegrade, others degrade into Do these artworks preach an envi- toxic chemicals that wash up onto ronmental message? Is it junk seen shorelines. It makes for an interestthrough the eyes of a child? Is there ing story, but, like many children's a note of humour in raising garbage stories, one with long and deep to the status of portraiture? Is this consequences. show a clandestine peek into pri- AGNIESZKA MATEJKO AGNIESZKA@VUEWEEKLY.COM vate spaces?

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

ARTS 29


ARTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

DANCE GOOD WOMEN • Westbury Theatre, 10330-84 Ave • Fracture • Aug 17, 4:30pm; Aug 19, 6:30pm; Aug 20, 10:45pm; Aug 21, 2:15pm; Aug 22, 10pm; Aug 25, 6:30pm

ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA (AGA) • 2 Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.422.6223 • youraga.ca • This Alberta Biennial showcases the work of several Alberta filmmakers and performance artists. Filmmakers with guest curator Nancy Tousley for an interactive Q&A session • THE PIANO: Video projections, performances and sculptural installations by contemporary artists; until Aug 18 • WATER INTO ART: British watercolours from the V&A, 1750-1950; until Nov 24 • New Acquisitions: VIEWS AND VISTAS: until Oct 6 • New Works Gallery: ADAM WALDON-BLAIN: DOES HIS BEST: The amateur musician is presented through performance, video and text, with all of their flaws and imperfections; until Aug 18 • 19TH CENTURY BRITISH PHOTOGRAPHS: From the collection of the National Gallery of Canada; until Oct 6 • BMO World of Creativity: CABINETS OF CURIOSITY: Lyndal Osborne's curious collection; until Jun 30, 2014 • All Day Sunday: Art activities for all ages 3rd Sun each month, Snap Shots:

CENTRE D’ARTS VISUELS DE L’ALBERTAS (CAVA) • 9103-95 Ave, 780.461.3427 • Artworks by Louise Piquette, Jacques Martel, Paulette Lefaîvre, Pauline Ulliac and Jody Swanson; Aug 16-Sep 3; opening: Aug 16

GALLERIE PAVA • 9524-87 St, 780.461.3427 • LE RÉVEIL DE LA MUSE: Works by Claudine AudetteRozon • Until Sep 11

CITY HALL • Main Fl, 1 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • THE ART OF ZHEN, SHAN, REN (Truth, Compassion, Tolerance): International exhibit • Aug 25-31 CROOKED POT GALLERY–Stony Plain • 4912-51 Ave, Stony Plain, 780.963.9573 • SUMMERTIME BLUES: Wheel and slab built, functional and decorative pottery by Bruce and Donna Wakeford; until Aug 31 DC3 ART PROJECTS • 10567-111 St • dc3artprojects.com • PLAY:TOYS+AGE=ART: Cindy Baker,

25TH

Field

FILM

CRIME WATCH SERIES • Metro Cinema at the Garneau Theatre • New monthly series featuring contemporary to classic films that offer a diverse and provocative glimpse into the cinematic criminal world. Curated by Laura O'Connor

HEAVEN: THE CHINESE WORLD IN MAPS, PICTURES, AND TEXTS FROM THE COLLECTION OF FLOYD SULLY: Works from Floyd Sully's collection • Until Aug 17

AUGUST

ZUMBA BASHFIERY FRIDAYS • Central Senior Lions Centre, 11113-113 St • Shake your body to the Latin beat, and freestyle dance to live DJ music. Featuring Tamico Russell, Ike Henry, DJ Rocko and Zumba instructors Dru D, Manuella F-St, Michelle M, Sabrina D. and Cuban Salsa instructor Leo Gonzales • 3rd Fri each month • Aug 16, 7pm• $20 (online)/$25 (door)

BAILEY THEATRE–Camrose • baileytheatre.com • Summer Movie Series present • Fantastic Mr Fox (G); Aug 19, 7pm • $7 (adult)/$5 (youth/senior)/$20 (family)

BUGERA MATHESON GALLERY • New Location: 10345-124 St, 780.482.2854 • bugeramathesongallery.com • New location

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to table

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EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY • Royal Alberta Museum Auditorium, 12845-102 Ave • Summer 2013 Series: Musicals for a Summer Night: until Aug 26 • The Shocking Miss Pilgrim; (1947, colour, PG); Aug 19, 8pm • $6/$5 (senior/student)/$30 (membership for the series, 8 films) FILM FORUM • Stanley A. Milner Library • A series of film screenings followed by facilitated discussions; running through the summer for 18+ • Drop-in; no registration • The Young Girls of Rochefort (STC); Aug 24, 1:30pm; Paul Matwychuk, Heather Noel, Erin Fraser will be in attendance to chat about the film.

Check out our home grown bench shows

ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY • 10186-106 St, 780.488.6611 • albertacraft.ab.ca • Discovery Gallery: FROM: CORRESPONDENCE TO: TXT: Collage artist Anita Narwrocki offers her perspective on the state of written communication; until Sep 7 • TAILS FROM A REJUVENATED FOREST: A narrative installation exploring the drive of nature to revive itself by ceramic artists Lisa McGrath and Mindy Andrews; until Sep 7 • THE OTHERS: Exhibit of mythical creatures by ceramic sculptor, Dale Lerner; until Sep 7 • STATIC BLOOM: Botanical polymer clay wall art by St Albert artist Kristin Anderson; until Sep 7 • Feature Gallery: HANGING BY A THREAD: Group exhibit using textiles to explore the relationship among multiple generations of women; until Sep 28 ALBERTA RAILWAY MUSEUM • 24215-34 St, 780.472.6229 • AlbertaRailwayMuseum.com • Open weekends during the summer ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL OF SPRUCE GROVE • Spruce Grove Art Gallery, Spruce Grove Library, 35-5 Ave, Spruce Grove, 780.962.0664 • alliedartscouncil. com • LIQUID LANDSCAPES–DIARY OF DREAMS: Works by Vanessa Kary; until Aug 17 • BEAUTY IN NATURE AND TAMED: Artworks by Fran Mansell; Aug 20-Sep 7; reception: Aug 24, 1-3pm THE ARTERY • 9535 Jasper Ave • CAPTURING TEASE: Photos of burlesque performances by Drew May. Performances by the Frolics and Los Calaveras, and Maila Mustang, Jade Janvier, Scarlett O'Handfull, Miss Sassy Sailor and others • Aug 17 • $15 (online)/$20 (door)

30 ARTS

HARRIS-WARKE GALLERY–RED DEER • 2nd Fl, Sunworks, 4924 Ross St, Red Deer • 403.597.9788 • ALCHEMY: Paintings by Liz Sullivan and Shirley Cordes Rogozinsky • Until Sep 14 • Reception: Sep 6, 6-8pm; part of First Friday JEFF ALLEN ART GALLERY (JAAG) • Strathcona Place Senior Centre, 10831 University Ave, 109 St, 78 Ave, 780.433.5807 • INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS: Come and view the works of the instructors and students of Strathcona Place Senior Centre • Until Aug 28 • Summer Hours: Mon-Fri, 9am-3pm

KIRSTEN ZUK'S STUDIO • 10421-85 Ave • THE MESSAGE IN CLAY: Annual open air exhibit of new sculptures by Kirsten Zuk • Aug 17, 2-10pm

LANDO GALLERY • 103, 10310-124 St, 780.990.1161 • SUMMER ON 124TH STREET: New works by gallery artists and secondary market works • Until Aug 22

Explore the Park as you learn harvest activities in the different eras!

Auditorium, 11455-87 Ave • Mosquers, an independent film competition created to dispel stereotypes about Muslims. Watch the 10 finalist short films and participate in judging the films. Featuring comedian, Maz Jobrani • Aug 24, 6-11pm • $20-$25 at W: mosquers.com

GALLERIES + MUSEUMS

HARCOURT HOUSE GALLERY • 3 Fl, 10215-112 St • Main Gallery: SMALL DISASTERS: Paintings by Andrea Kastner • Front Room Gallery: WALKING THE TEXT: Drawing installation, including prints and books by Mana Rouholamini; until Aug 16 • Front Room Gallery: LIGAMENTS AND LIGATURES: Katrina Bergmans’ soft sculpture installation; Aug 22-Sep 6 • Artist Talk: Bergmans, Aug 22, 7pm • Reception: Aug 22, 7-9pm

KIWANIS GALLERY–Red Deer Public Library • ALBERTA SKIES: Works by Judith Hall • Until Aug 25

MOSQUES 2013 FILM AWARDS SHOW • Jubilee

NFB FILM CLUB • Sprucewood Library • Monthly film series featuring animated and documentary films from the National Film Board of Canada • The CocaCola Case (STC); Aug 19 • Free

HAPPY HARBOR COMICS V1 • 10729-104 Ave • happyharborcomics.com • COMIC JAM: Improv comic art making every 1st and 3rd Thu each month, 7pm • OPEN DOOR: Collective of independent comic creators meet the 2nd & 4th Thu each month; 7pm

JURASSIC FOREST/LEARNING CENTRE • 15 mins N of Edmonton off Hwy 28A, Township Rd 564 • Education-rich entertainment facility for all ages

GRANDIN THEATRES–St Albert • 101-22 Sir

MOVIES AT THE CAPITOL–Fort Edmonton • fortedmontontickets.com • Northern Light; 4-D short film on Edmonton’s history from the ice age to the present, free for visitors to Fort Edmonton Park • Cinema Series: Singing in the Rain (PG); Aug 22, 8pm • $10/$8 (with same day general admission or admission receipt to the park); at the door/online

GALLERY AT MILNER • Stanley A. Milner Library Main Fl, Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.944.5383 • epl.ca/art-gallery • ARTICULATE: Sketchbooks by 31 art educators from Edmonton and St Albert schools • Until Aug 31

JUBILEE AUDITORIUM • THE ROAD TO......: Paintings by Mali Vargas, Sarah Bing, curated by Arlene WestenEvans • Until Aug 28

FROM BOOKS TO FILM • Stanley A. Milner Library Centennial Rm, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.496.7000 • epl.ca • 2010: The Year We Make Contact (1984, PG); Aug 16, 2pm • I, Robot (2004, PG-13); Aug 23, 2pm Winston Churchill Ave, Grandin Mall • Monty Python: the Holy Grail; audience participation movie night presented by St Albert Library. Come in costume; instructions and props will be provided • Aug 22, 7-8:30pm • Free; reserve in adv at 780.459.1682

GALLERY 7 • Bookstore on Perron, 7 Perron St, St Albert • Artworks by Karen Blanchet, Martha Grell, Father Douglas • Until Sep 3

LATITUDE 53 • 10242-106 St, 780.423.5353 • ProjEx Room: YORK: By Sydney Lancaster and Marian Switzer; until Aug 31 • Main Space: ART PARTY: Megan Morman; until Aug 31 • Patio: Thursday Night Patio Party

MCMULLEN GALLERY • U of A Hospital, 8440112 St, 780.407.7152 • PROCESSION WEST: A photographic Visual Journey from Plains to Coast by Rob Pohl and Robert Michiel • WHERE DRAGONFLIES DANCE: Watercolours and graphite botanical paintings by Elaine Funnel • Aug 17-Oct 20 MULTICULTURAL CENTRE PUBLIC ART GALLERY (MCPAG)–Stony Plain • 5411-51 St, Stony Plain, 780.963.9935 • multicentre.org • Tanya Harnett • Until Aug 28

Live music, games, and much more!

SEPTEMBER 1-2 STORYTELLING FESTIVAL LET OUR STORYTELLERS LEAD YOU INTO A LAND OF DELIGHT, ENCHANTMENT AND LEARNING! REGULAR ADMISSION APPLIES

WWW.FORTEDMONTONPARK.CA Aug 18, 12-4pm; free with admission

ART GALLERY OF ST ALBERT (AGSA) • 19 Perron St, St Albert, 780.460.4310 • artgalleryofstalbert.ca • ANIMAL SPIRIT: Works by Joane Cardinal-Schubert, Jason Carter, Erik Lee Christophersen, Terry McCue, and Aaron Paquette; from the AFA collection; until Sep 7 • DREAM WITHIN A DREAM: Photos by Tyler Enfield, collage by Julie Nauman-Mikulski; until Aug 31 • Dreamscape: Aug 15, 6:30-8pm; $12/$10 (Arts & Heritage member) ART BUS TOUR • The Art Bus Gets Crafty: Harcourt House Artist Run Centre, Alberta Craft Council, Gallery @ 501 • Gallery @ 501 host their first annual member's show • Aug 17, 12:30-5:30pm • $10 (member of galleries)/$15 (non member) • Info/RSVP: Stacey Cann at harcourtcomed@shaw.ca; 780.426.4180

Joe Becker, Jude Griebel, and more; artists who use childhood games and toys as elements within their work • Until Aug 17

DAFFODIL GALLERY • 10412-124 St, 780.760.1278 • BLOOMING • Until Aug 31 ENTERPRISE SQUARE GALLERIES • 10230 Jasper Ave • Open: Tue-Fri 12-6pm, Sat 12-4pm • WHEN THE SKY FALLS: Features more than a dozen meteorites from famous Western Canadian falls; presented by U of A Museums EXPRESSIONZ CAFÉ • 9938-70 Ave Olive Tree Project: Brian Zahorodniuk, Ginette D'Silva, Jane Chesebrough, Selena Phillips-Boyle, Lauri Ansell, Jose I. Marquez Lugo, Lesley Schatz Miciak FAB GALLERY/BRUCE PEEL SPECIAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARY • U of A Campus • ALL UNDER

MUSÉE HÉRITAGE MUSEUM–St Albert • 5 St Anne St, St Albert, 780.459.1528 • TRANSFORMING TRADITION: Contemporary Aboriginal Artists Re-envision Traditional Crafts: Traditional works by 1st Nation artists who bring their own interpretations to their work • Until Aug 25 MUTTART CONSERVATORY • 9262-96A St • GAIA: THE GREAT MOTHER OF ALL: Works by Sculptors’ Association of Alberta • Until Sep 3

Artists, 10123-121 St, 780.423.1492 • snapartists. com • Main Gallery: GENERATED LINE: Series of prints by Shawn Reynar • Community Gallery: SUPER SPY NARRATIVES: Paintings of drawings of prints by Jessie Thomas • Aug 15-Sep 21 • Drink and Draw: Drawzilla: rooted in the infamous Japanese Kaiju monster films; draw monsters rampaging through miniature cities in SNAP's printshop; Aug 24, 6-10pm

STRATHCONA COUNTY ART GALLERY @ 501 • 501 Festival Ave, Sherwood Park • Members show • Aug 16-Sep 8 • Opening: Aug 16, 7pm; artists in attendance STRATHCONA COUNTY MUSEUM ARCHIVES

• 913 Ash St, Sherwood Park • THE PAST SHOWS US THE WAY: Artworks by Aaron Paquette • Aug 22, 1-5pm • Opening celebration: bannock, tea and activities in an authentic tipi. Aboriginal drummers, dancers and musicians at 4pm

THE STUDIO • 11739-94 St • Works by Glen Ronald, Bliss Robinson, Debra Milne and guest artists • Until Dec 31, 12-5pm TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE • 11211-142 St • BODY WORLDS AND THE CYCLE OF LIFE: Revealing the Symphony Within; until Oct 14; $26.50 (adult)/$16.50 (child (3-12)/$23.50 (senior/youth/student) at door; prices incl general admission and admission for exhibit • Adult Night: Aug 22, 6-10pm • Your Spine Through the Cycle of Life: presented by chiropractors, Chad Kulak and Kelly Fleck; Aug 23, 7-8:30pm • How Do We Detect Cancer: Presentation by Sanjay Sharma; Aug 22, 7-8:30pm • The Importance of Sleep: Laurel Jackson will be focusing on the importance of sleep to the mind and body as well as sleep disorders and how to manage them; Aug 16, 7-8:30pm LADIES LEARNING CODE: INTRO TO JAVASCRIPT • Startup Edmonton, 10359-104 St • Aug 17, 10am5pm • $50 UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA MUSEUMS • Human Ecology Gallery: Main Fl, 116 St, 89 Ave: THE RE-

BIRTH OF VENUS: Fashion and the Venus Kallipygos: Explores the influence of art on fashion through the study of Venus Kallipygos, and its pervasive influence on dress • Until Mar 2, 2014

VAAA GALLERY • 3rd Fl, 10215-112 St, 780.421.1731 • STORYTELLERS (AGA travelling exhibition) Curated by Shane Golby from the collection of the Alberta Foundation for the Arts; until Aug 18 • Button Making Workshop: with Sharon Moore-Foster and Chris W. Carson Aug 17, 1-3pm VASA GALLERY • 25 Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert, 780.460.5990 • ABSTRACTS FROM 5 MILES: Artworks by Constable, Pat Wagensveld, Karin-Ann Bosma, Connie Osgood, Kristine McGuinty; through Aug

LITERARY ALBERTA MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION • Beaver Hills Park, 10404 Jasper Ave (inclement weather at Audrey's Books, 107 St, Jasper Ave) • Prose and poetry readings from Alberta's literary magazines, with EPL writer-in-residence Omar Mouallem, featuring Krista Ball, Sydney Budgeon, Lynn Coady, Mathew Fasullo, Alice Major, ky perraun, and Jay Smith • Aug 24, 1-2:30pm BOheMiA • 10217-97 St • Edmonton Story Slam

• Aug 21

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE • 9351-118 Ave • vzenari@gmail.com • Prose Creative Writing Group • Every Tue, 7-9pm ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St, 780.902.5900 • Spoken Word Tuesdays: Weekly spoken word night presented by the Breath In Poetry Collective (BIP); info: E: breathinpoetry@gmail.com T.A.L.E.S.–STRATHCONA • New Strathcona Library, 401 Festival Lane, Sherwood Park, 780.400.3547 • Monthly Tellaround: 4th Wed each month 7pm • Free

THEATRE

NAESS GALLERY • Paint Spot, 10032-81 Ave, 780.432.0240 • paintspot.ca • RECOLLECTIONS: Installation work by Amanda McKenzie; until Aug 15 • ARRAY: Abstract paintings; Aug 21-Sep 30 • Artisan Nook: BASALT DALIK: Mosaic paintings by Cathy Jackson; until Sep 15

BEST OF FRIENDS REUNION • Jubilations Dinner Theatre, 8882-180 St, WEM, 780.484.2424 • jubilations.ca • Friends, one of the most popular sitcoms of all time. Catch up with these lovable characters. Set to hits from the '90s, along with a few timeless classics • Aug 30-Oct 27

PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY • 12304 Jasper Ave, 780.455.7479 • probertsongallery.com • Summer Group Show: Painting, sculpture, photography, printmaking by gallery artists • Until Aug 31

FROM FRINGE WITH LOVE • Various locations through Old Strathcona and beyond • fringetheatre. ca • Edmonton's International Fringe Theatre Festival: Fringe Theatre Adventures brings danger, excitement, adventure and theatre to churches, bars and boudoirs • Aug 15-25 • $6-$12.50 (single tix) at Central Fringe Theatre box office, TIX on the Square • Programs available at Audreys Books

PRO'S ART GALLERY • 17971-106A Ave, 780.486.6661 • FIRST IMPRESSION: Paintings by Adrian Zorzut • Until Aug 30 PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA • 8555 Roper Rd • Photo exhibit showcasing the construction of the High Level Bridge and its historic profile • Until Sep 14; Tue-Sat 9am-4:30pm; Wed 9am-9pm; closed Sun and Mon • Free ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM • 12845-102 Ave, 780.453.9100 • royalalbertamuseum.ca • CHOP SUEY ON THE PRAIRIES: Until Apr 27, 2014 • THE ART OF SEATING: 200 YEARS OF AMERICAN DESIGN: until Oct 6 ROYAL ALEXANDRA HOSPITAL–Gallery Wall • 10240 Kingsway Ave • THROUGH MY EYE: Photos by photographers from Images Alberta Camera Club • Until Aug 19 • imagery@yahoo.ca SCOTT GALLERY • 10411-124 St • SUMMER TWO: Mix of contemporary and historic work • Through summer SNAP GALLERY • Society of Northern Alberta Print-

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

MARVELOUS PILGRIMS • teatroq.com • Teatro at the Fringe by Stewart Lemoine • Others swept up in this sumptuous adventure are Farren Timoteo, Jenny McKillop, Davina Stewart, and in her first Teatro appearance, newcomer Mackenzie Reurink. Aug 16-Sep 1 • $24 (adult)/$22 (adv student/senior); Holdover tickets at TIX on the Square JOHNNY B GOODE: A ROCK AND ROLL REUNION • Jubilations Dinner Theatre, 8882-180 St, WEM, 780.484.2424 • jubilations.ca • Back in high school, Johnny spent more time with his guitar then he did studying or socializing with other students. He was considered to be a "music nerd" and was teased by most of the other kids. In 1956, Johnny went on a school band trip to Ottawa, where he met another music student by the name of... Paul Anka. The two boys became friends and when Anka's career took off, he took Johnny with him • Until Aug 25


CONTRACT/ FREELANCE PHOTOGRAPHERS PostVue Publishing is looking for a confident, accomplished photographer for contract and freelance opportunities for current and future PostVue products. The selected individual will have their work featured alongside an extensive cache of locally produced tourism guides, playbills, programs and specialty publications. Responsibilities Include: - Working alongside the project manager, writer and production staff to help actualize their vision for the project. - Producing work within a specified timeframe - Creating high quality, eye catching photos to help make our products standout on newsstands across Edmonton. Preferred Qualifications: Excellent relationship and interpersonal skills - Exceptional Work Ethic - Attention to detail Please email 5-10 samples with resume to Rob Lightfoot at: rob@postvuepublishing.com

GOT THE NO-EDMONTON BLUES FESTIVAL TICKET.....BLUES?

41% OFF on tickets for Friday night, 42% OFF on tickets for Sunday night or 44% OFF for both Friday & Sunday!

Only just a few weeks left to entertain the kids for HALF THE PRICE at Fort Edmonton Park! Valid Monday - Thursday until the end of August. BUY IT NOW FOR $34.40!

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

ARTS 31


PREVUE // BLUES

MUSIC

MUSIC EDITOR : EDEN MUNRO EDEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

A blues education

How Eden Brent convinced a legend to mentor her we play. Those are some of my favourite times. Daddy will say "You got your guitar?' I'll go get it out of the car and we'll play to a few people." Has blues taken over your life, or are you still checking out new music? EB: Oh, yeah, I'm always aware. I respond to all folk music, even from other cultures. When I was in Egypt I ended up watching music on television and I completely responded to the songwriters over there. Yesterday I set a Brazilian poem translated to English to music. I'll be recording it soon. Music, and especially blues music, is communication. It's how we talk to each other, and it's simple to understand." VW:

The form is simple, sure, but isn't it also nuanced? EB: Well, I think that when people are emotional or passionate about their music they probably do that anyways. That's where the nuances come out. I would rather hear a song performed soulfully over one that's done technically proficient. Look at how BB King can play one note and make your heart sing or break. For me the uniform thing about blues music is that it truly informs just about all pop music through the world. That really does knock me out. VW:

Tell me if you’ve heard this one before ...

S

he might have graduated PBS documentary, Boogaloo & with a Bachelors Degree in Eden, Sustaining the Sound. Music from the University of Now out on her own Brent North Texas, but Eden Brent's continues Boogaloo's legacy, real education came sometime recording albums and winning after that. awards (2009 Acoustic Album Daughter of a big-band singer and Acoustic Performer of the mother and Year; 2010 Pimusic-enthusi- Sun, Aug 18 (2:30 pm) netop Perkins ast father, the Hawrelak Park Piano Player of Greenville, Mis- Part of Edmonton Blues the Year, from s i s s i p p i - r a i s e d Festival (Aug 16 – 18) the Blues FounBrent had been dation), known picking away at among her peers the piano since the age of three. as Little Boogaloo. By her own account she wasn't particularly distinguished in ei- VUE WEEKLY: How did you first ther studies or enthusiasm until meet Boogaloo? she managed to convince Abie EDEN BRENT: My parents knew "Boogaloo" Ames to tutor her. who he was, because Boogaloo Ames, who passed away in 2002, did all of the social events in was a life-long journeyman musi- the Delta: cocktail parties, rescian who made his way up from taurant gigs and lounges. I was Georgia to play on early Motown young and not very knowledgesessions before decamping back able about jazz. I had learned acto Mississippi in the late '60s. ademically, but it was Boogaloo An acknowledged master of the who put it in my hands. He made boogaloo piano style, Ames was it a real thing, not just some perlong sought after as a teacher functory task to get through. He to many budding blues and jazz taught me so that I was able to musicians, including Mulgrew express myself in a soulful way, Miller. as I had done when learning Brent did not expect Ames Joni Mitchell or James Taylor or would consent to teach her, but Jackson Browne—the music I liswhen he did the pair grew into tened to when I was growing up." a popular duo that eventually snagged a number of high-profile VW: It's interesting to think about concert-hall bookings and a 1999 you making the leap between

32 MUSIC

'70s singer-songwriters and deep blues. EB: Well, you know, my college audition tune was Rick Wakeman's "The Six Wives of Henry VIII." I think back on the "Three B's:" Bach, Beethoven and Brahms, and I'm pretty sure the audition panel hadn't heard the likes of that. In truth I wasn't so much following the score as going by the sounds. Boogaloo taught me the love of and joy in playing music. It worked well with college, because I don't think I would have gotten as much as I did without both of those things in my life. So university wasn't a complete write-off, then? EB: (Laughs) Daddy always said he could have saved on that outof–state tuition if he'd just sent me to Boogaloo earlier." VW:

VW: Was

music always on around your house? EB: Yeah, it was something that was just there. We lived out in the country and there really wasn't much else to do, so we entertained each other by playing after supper and on holidays. These days, when I get together with my daddy we sometimes meet at a bar uptown, maybe on a slow Monday night, and

And there you are, living in the very epicentre of it all. EB: I know! We have all of these slogans for Mississippi, like it's known as "The Magnolia State," and it's "The Hospitality State." Now we have a new slogan, "The Birthplace of America's Music." I think about the old phrase "Blues had a baby and they called it rock 'n' roll." Well, rock 'n' roll had a lotta babies too, so blues has some grandchildren, like metal and hip hop. I think even Appalachian music probably has some blues in there as well, otherwise it would have developed exactly on the lines of music from Ireland. VW:

You're definitely more of a performer than a recording artist. Is playing live something you find more enjoyable more than being in a studio? EB: Yeah, I just find that the studio is kind of dead to me. It's a different thing. In the studio you can't connect with anyone, it's like a monologue, and I prefer a conversation. I don't even use a set list when I play. I might have decided by the time I've gotten on stage what my first song would be, but I don't necessarily know what I'm going to end on. VW:

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

I leave it up in the air; someone might holler for a song, or I'll see someone with a smile on their face and think "Oh, if they like that then maybe I should play this song." You're at the opposite end of the spectrum from performers who script every second of a show, from songs, to jokes, to what they wear. EB: You know, my parents saw Dean Martin years and years ago in Vegas, and they had such a good time that they went back the very next time. It was exactly how you just described it, because they got the same show again. Every single thing was choreographed, every gesture and joke. It was all like a script. I don't think I would enjoy doing that; I mean, it sounds polished and very professional, but I don't think that as a performer I could deal with that much structure. I like improvisation." VW:

VW: That's your jazz background coming back at you. EB: I read an article recently, (assumes a mock professorial tone) perhaps in Psychology Today, about the jokes people tell. The study said that the greatest amounts of laughter, decibel wise, came from off-the-cuff stuff, people bouncing ideas back and forth rather than a planned joke. I get that; I kinda like being on the edge as a performer. Any second something could go wrong. I was doing a show in Asheville, North Carolina, and my cousin George was there. We were standing around talking and he said "Do you ever get nervous?'" I said "No, not really. What's the worse that could happen?" Sure enough I get onstage and I'm in the middle of a song called "Fried Chicken," and my mind wanders. All of a sudden I lose the key, I forget what I'm doing. I started laughing, and while finding my way back I explained to the audience what my cousin had said. Then I said "George, this is it, this is the worst thing that could happen." It wasn't so bad after all; I didn't mind it. VW: It's not as if your world ended or anything. EB: No, the world didn't end, and I still got through to people. Because that's what it's really about; sometimes you really move people. Someone might be going through a bad time and what you do provides catharsis. That's the reward for what I do, not the money. It's about so much more than the money. TOM MURRAY TOM@VUEWEEKLY.COM


MUSIC PREVUE // POST-HARDCORE

Pierce the Veil

DOWNTOWN

Pierce the Veil, unveiled // Adam Elmakias

'I

'm actually not even sure where nantly by its fans. "They like to spill their guts somewe're stopped here," laughs Pierce the Veil frontman Vic Fuentes. The times about the problems in their lives four-piece post-hardcore group from and how the music has helped them or San Diego is taking a break on its two- the songs have helped them or lyrics and certain things day drive from Otlike that," Fuentes tawa to the next gig Tue, Aug 20 (6:30 pm) on its first club tour explains. "They tell With A Day to Remember us these really of Canada. Shaw Conference Centre, "We've always heartfelt, deep sto$39.50 ries ... some of the played little one-off shows for Warped lyrics are really Tour or Taste of Chaos and it's finally about them and we like to tell them at a cool opportunity to have a real tour. the shows and I think it's a cool thing. We've been trying to do it for years," They tell us that music is helping them and at the same time they help us, too." Fuentes continues. Pierce the Veil is touring on the momentum of its latest album Collide A story in particular that's stuck with With the Sky, released last July. The Fuentes is one that came while Pierce songs have been around for some time the Veil was in the midst of recording, now, but continue to resonate with the via email from a group of teenagers in band, as they were inspired predomi- Australia. Their friend had committed

suicide and since she had been a steadfast fan, they thought the band should know. "She was pretty young, like a 16-yearold girl who was just severely depressed and bullied and just couldn't handle life anymore ... I even have a picture with this girl from a show," he says. "It was super shocking and really bummed me out and was kind of haunting almost, you know? I wrote a little about her and for her friends out of respect." The girl inspired the song title "Hold On Till May," as well as some of the lyrics in "Bulls in the Bronx," which Pierce the Veil shot a video for this past May. "I think as a band, it brought us even closer with our fans," Fuentes says, adding the album also reflects events in his own life, such as his ex-girlfriend overcoming breast cancer. "We do a lot of meet-and-greets and we get kids who had been self-harming and stuff like that telling us the music saved their life and helped them stop, so it's heavy for us, because we're not here to be in that position to give people advice on what to do. We just make our own music and it seems to be having that effect on people, so it sort of gives new meaning to what we do."

Aug 15 - Aug 17 JOANNE JANZEN Aug 20 - Aug 24 ROB TAYLOR

WEM

Aug 15 - Aug 17 MARK MCGARRIGLE Aug 20 - Aug 21 TRAVIS MARCOTTE Aug 22 - Aug 24 THE K-TELS SUNDAY NIGHT KARAOKE MONDAY NIGHT 'NAME THAT TUNE'

EDMONTONPUBS.COM

MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

PREVUE // BLUES ROCK

Hot Super Hot

Hot Super Hot potato, er, uh, band

W

THE RURAL ROUTES AUGUST 16 - AUGUST 17

for a while and I was going to move to Calgary and when I didn't do that I ended up staying in Hot Super Hot due to time constraints," says Bower, adding the whole show will have a definitive family vibe, both for its all-ages designation and the connection between the two bands. "The bass player from Longshadows is my roommate, Jeremy Tokarek, so there's a big family connection ... he's like my brother."

hen the Haven Social Club closed its doors at the end of July, it marked the end of one of the All venue issues aside, the show is city's best spots for original music— a CD release party—for Hot Super and left Hot Super Hot without a Hot with the release of Also and for Longshadows' latest self-titled disc. venue for its CD release show. "I got the news and it was this brief While the two acts have strong ties, moment of panic, but I was like, 'No, they present juxtaposing approachI think something es, with Hot Super Hot evoking is going to come Sat, Aug 17 (8 pm) what Brewer dealong that will With Longshadows scribes as a "lightsurprise me,'" says Royal Alberta Museum, $10 Hot Super Hot (advance), $15 (door) er, folkier side" while Longshadmember Aldon ows possesses a Brewer, recalling "crunchier, harder edge." fond memories of the space. Hot Super Hot's latest release That surprise turned out to be an opportunity to move the gig to the continues to blend poly-rhythms Royal Alberta Museum. The venue of traditional African music and swap has also presented the op- the band's Alberta roots, but with portunity to share a bill with local a definite reggae influence this time blues-rock group Longshadows, around. Brewer describes the disc which Brewer was a member of as a danceable one, complete with a cover of "Nothing but Flowers" by early in his career. "They went and did their own thing Talking Heads—a band that contin-

ues to be a strong influence on the group. "We put together a really quick album in the style of how they used to record with Bob Dylan and the Band," he explains of the disc, recorded with Scott Franchuk at Riverdale Recorders. "We went in with the intention of recording seven songs in two days, which is a little ambitious, but we came out with something that I'm really happy with." Ambitious, maybe, but the goal turned out to be doable with plenty of planning beforehand and Franchuk keeping the five-piece on track in the studio. Many of the tracks on the album are first takes from the studio, which Brewer feels suits the band's do-it-yourself ethos just fine. "There's something very satisfying about doing it yourself. It's a very organic approach," he says, adding that this includes artwork as well. "I joked when we first started that all of our artwork and all of our projects look like a Grade 4 class did them, and so far we've done well. I'm going to go postering later on today and the poster has that sort of a collage-art sort of look and I'd like to say a bunch of Grade 4 kids did it, but it was me."

STUART BENDALL / THE SALESMEN

AUGUST 23 - AUGUST 24 In Sutton Place Hotel #195, 10235 101 Street, EDMONTONPUBS.COM

AUGUST 16 -17 • AMIE WEYMES AUGUST 19 • JESSE D SUNDAY CELTIC MUSIC 5 - 8PM WEDNESDAY • OPEN STAGE W/ DUFF ROBINSON

MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

MUSIC 33


MUSIC PREVUE // ALT-COUNTRY

Mushy Callahan

Drag the River

Sun, Aug 18 (8 pm) Fandango’s Answered by: Noah McCann Hometown: Toronto, ON Genre: Neo-vintage rock Lastest album: Makings of a Man (To be released Sep 2013) Fun fact: The band members are all brothers, originally from Peace River, AB. First album Weird Al Yankovic on cassette, unfortunately. Joel bought it for me for Christmas, and we used to get to open one gift early. I chose that one—wasn't impressed. First concert I think I saw Finger Eleven play at the Calgary Stampede many many years ago—wasn't very memorable.

Last album Youth Lagoon, Wondrous Bughouse on vinyl.

Favourite album Grand Funk Railroad, Closer toHome—a childhood favourite.

Last concert Father John Misty, we all went together actually. He ended up throwing a bit of a hissy-fit at the end of the show right before his encore and we still aren't sure what about.

Favourite musical guilty pleasure Kings Of Leon. [I've] been a fan from early on—actually all the brothers were. It was one of the bands we could all agree on and I can still appreciate their live show. I don't have "Sex On Fire" on my iPod.  V

The Electric Revival

Thu, Aug 15 Bohemia The subgenres of rock music continue to grow, reflecting the stylistically varied influences of listeners. Local three-piece the Electric Revival has come up with its own take on the genre, evoking essences of Led Zeppelin and the Black Keys—with it all topped off by frontman Ian Dillon's custom-made theremin. The band recently released its second studio album, Pirate Radio, and before its upcoming show, Dillon shared his Soundtrack picks with Vue.

At home

On the road

Morning: My morning album is almost always Rome by Danger Mouse and Daniele Luppi. Noon: Any live Led Zeppelin, The BBC Sessions or How The West Was Won. Night: By the evening I’m ready to rock ‘n’ roll: Iggy & the Stooges, Raw Power

Morning: We’ll start the morning with some good driving music, The Rolling Stones, Sticky Fingers or Goats Head Soup Noon: Kadavar, Abra Kadavar Night: We always load our gear out with “Night Train” pounding on repeat from Guns N’ Roses, Appetite for Destruction.V

34 MUSIC

// Carrie Waite

'N

ot to try to, you know, make and they were just sitting around." you guys like me, but I loved The second seven-inch, released it there," Jon Snodgrass professes on Last Chance Records, showover the phone. cases two new studio songs acAdmittedly, Edmonton is not companied by live versions of the always an easy city to love, but same. One of the new songs, titled Snodgrass is "Here's to the making his sec- Tue, Aug 20 (9 pm) Losers," offers a ond trip here in With Fire Next Time, Worst sample of what's two months— Days Down, Old Wives to come on the the first of Wunderbar, $12 (advance), $15 group's upcomwhich was with ing full-length, (door) his other band, which Snodgrass Scorpios, in July. describes as beThis time he's back with Drag the ing more rock 'n' roll than previRiver, his alt-country group that ous Drag the River releases. evokes a decidedly different expe"It definitely sounds like a Drag rience than the indie-rock sound the River record, but there's of Scorpios. something else going on; I don't It's been three years since Drag quite know what it is," he adds. the River released an album, but "It's a little old, little new." the group's certainly made up for lost time with three new record- The album has been in the works ings in the span of three months. for more than a year now, but Two seven-inch discs were re- Snodgrass admits the band was in leased this month, the first on no rush to release it and wanted Hometown Caravan Records as to let it come together on its own an installment in a Burt Elmer's terms. fishing series, featuring two previ"However people do things ously unreleased songs and one is fine, but I've always sort of new track. thought it was crazy to book stu"'These songs were written and dio time a month or two months recorded on the spot for our bud- in advance and you know on Audies who were starting a fishing gust 15 I'm going to be ready to show. The show never happened, play some music. I don't know but they're still buddies, there's how I'm going to feel that day," he still fish and the songs are just explains. "You just kind of record OK,'" Snodgrass chuckles as he whenever you can and you feel reads the disclaimer printed on like it and you feel inspired. There the back of the disc. "It's a little doesn't need to be a deadline on self-deprecating, but it's true ... a record." they're cool songs but we record- MEAGHAN BAXTER ed them three or four years ago MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013


MUSIC PREVUE // ATMOSPHERIC POP

Ghost Cousin

Who you gonna call?

T

he etherial patchwork of tion started rolling. Sorry in adsounds that make up Ghost vance for any mix-ups, guys.) Cousin's debut, Scotland, feels So they set about looking for both familiar and otherworldly. The a room with the right feel, and set up is an ostensibly standard for four days last November, the band—Goodguitar-bass-keysing, Corey Pole voice-drums, but Wed, Aug 21 (8:30 pm) and broththere's an unusual With Jung People, My Side of ers David and air about how the Mountain Mathew Leterthose instruments Wunderbar, $8 sky—set about are being presentrecording in Mced, captured in atmosphere akin to an echo, but not Dougall United Church. The band in the obvious reverb-effect way. would arrange the gear, log a nineScotland's nine songs carry the hour day, then tear down again so fuzzy-periphery-feeling of a fleet- the choir could practise. They made ing memory as much about texture use of the church's Bösendorfer as about melody. grand piano, "one of the really large "There's something really wel- ones with the two black keys in coming about a sound that doesn't the low end." Mathew says. "It just come across as heavily manipulat- sounded phenomenal." ed—something that's got a little "We realized partway through the bit more of a room in it," Matt recording process that you record Gooding explains. "It seems more drums in a studio and you get a natural to listen to music that studio sound," Polo adds. "And that wasn't produced in a perfect envi- can be great, but a lot of the stuff ronment than it does to hear some- we were listening to had this atmothing close mic'd up in a studio." sphere to it. And it took us a while (At least I think it was Gooding; to figure out that that's what we the band's four members were all needed: just a big open room. The gathered around a speakerphone, church is so beautiful sounding. We which made it a little tricky to sort kinda lucked out with that." out who said what once conversa"The result, I think, is something

that's a little bit more spacious and a little bit more atmospheric maybe, then what you're used to," Matthew continues, noting a love of the likewise textured approaches of bands like Grizzly Bear, Midlake and Steely Dan. Still, four days wasn't quite enough time to finish recording the album there, so they had to prioritize what sounds got the church treatment: drums were all tracked in the first day or so, to ensure they received the effect. The rest was recorded in the basement of the place the band was renting, as well as some further experimentation with sounds. Mathew mixed the album too; he was in school at the time, which made it a bit of a long-time-coming from those church sessions to its now impending release. "There was a lot of trial and error and a lot of experimentation," Mathew explains. "We're not professionals by any means, I'm not a professional by any means. And we really had lofty goals for this one, and we didn't want to rush it." PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

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VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

MUSIC 35


MUSIC SLIDESHOW EDMONTON FOLK MUSIC FESTIVAL AUG 8 – 11 / GALLAGHER PARK

2

1

6

36 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013


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MUSIC 37


NEWSOUNDS

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CIVIL WARS S/T

Leeroy Stagger Truth be Sold (Gold Lake)

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Death Valley Driver Graveyard Dead (Diminished Fifth) 

There's an interesting swing to the music of Death Valley Driver: it's a heavy metal band with allegiances to the early '90s, with Panterasized riffs and Zakk Wylde tones. But vocalist Dan Hodgson doesn't seem to take it too seriously, his gravelly wretch coming across as though he were the smart-ass in a class of demons. A breath of fresh sulphur in a genre that tends to take itself way too seriously and get so bogged down in hell that it

Needles To Vinyl The Silk Hat (Independent) 

Needles To Vinyl singer and lyricist Nick Martin admitted to aiming at making radio-friendly rock in a February 8, 2012 GigCity interview, and that desire shows on The Silk Hat. There's nothing wrong with making mass-market

forgets Satanism sits comfortably with hedonism. There are moments of thrash and grind, but none of it is heavy handed, and the elements come together in such a way as to avoid repetition despite clear influences. Most of the songs are based around a single riff, which again seems odd in today's world of speedy metal filled with as many changes as possible. Hunched-over stomper "Black Vein" hasn't done its job if you don't at least punch the air, and the already anvil-sized "Ice Serpent" seems to get even heavier after a smoky blues break down. The album's title track has so much low-end that you'd think Satan himself donated his dental floss to string the bass. This is by no means a classic album, but if you're looking to fuck shit up, Graveyard Dead might come in handy. LEE BOYES

// LEE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

music, but The Silk Hat only succeeds at being boring. Give Martin credit for heartfelt and genuine lyrics that are also extremely cheesy, like the chorus to "Couldn't Say" where Martin croons "I remember, most everything / Device to be used and abused once again / I consider, but I will not sing / Of past pain, love no more." The Silk Hat is full of songs perfect for mid-'90s alt-rock radio, with "Sight Unseen" and "Stumbling With Strangers" being emblematic of Needle To Vinyl's sound: overwrought choruses, bland instrumentation and uninspiring hooks that have been done to death by other bands like Pearl Jam and the Red Hot Chili Peppers. JORDYN MARCELLUS

// JORDYN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

FOUR IN 140



Stagger seems like a perfect word to describe the music here, because Leeroy Stagger certainly has trouble walking a straight line. We go from calm, sweet, back-country jams to blacked-out rockers with the grace of a two-stepper who's had one too many. "Memo" is a rain-soaked eulogy, while the dirty bass of "Cities on Fire" will rattle bones and "Goodnight Berlin" sounds like Steve Earle with a ripping Neil Young solo. Truth be Sold, both in title and in presentation elicits a brooding sense of noir, as though it's full of good people doing bad things and vice versa, dotted with checkered pasts and second chances. When you hear the fuzzy chainsaw guitar on "Have a Heart" matched with Stagger's cured-tobacco voice, it's enough to give you razor burn. This record digs in and buries you in a depth of style and songcraft that no one should lament. LEE BOYES

// LEE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUECARES

DON’T LEAVE YOUR RECORDS IN THE SUN. @CURTISTWRIGHT

Explosions in the Sky & David Wingo, Prince Avalanche (Temporary Residence) @VueWeekly: A band built to score blockbusters, built something short, almost-sweet & quite fleeting. You very well could love this.

Pond, Hobo Rocket (Modular) @VueWeekly: Requires massive patience to get through this mind-warp, sound rainbow. Unsurprisingly from part of the Tame Impala team.

Crocodiles, Crimes of Passion (Frenchkiss) @VueWeekly: Gloomy summer pop, wrapped in echoes upon echoes. A pretty nice 4th release.

Jel, Late Pass (Anticon) @VueWeekly: Unique beats & an odd spectacle of samples. Years of production & odd rapping will alienate some, embrace others. 38 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013


MUSIC

WEEKLY

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STUDIO MUSIC

JAZZ AT THE LAKE–

FOUNDATION Tommy

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STUDIO MUSIC FOUNDATION Last Horizon

tshe Rhubarbs

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Fridays

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

‘n’ roll open mic every Fri; 8:30pm; no cover

DRUID DJ every Thu at 9pm

Open Jam Nights; no cover

Y AFTERHOURS Foundation

LIZARD LOUNGE Rock

Festival B.Y.O.V. presents An Elvis Odyssey, 6:30pm; Late show: GRiZ (pretty lights music), 9pm;

EARLY STAGE–Stony Plain

UNION HALL Ladies Night

every Fri

9:30pm-2am

LUCKY 13 Industry Night ON THE ROCKS Salsaholic:

Tyco and Ernest Ledi; no line no cover for ladies all night long

Derina Harvey Band (CD release party)

Thu: Country, Rock Anthems and Top 40 Classics with Mourning Wood

every Fri

TREASURY In Style Fri: DJ

EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT IN TEMPLE STARTING AUG 2

STEP’D UP SATURDAYS E V E R Y S AT U R D AY AUG/16 MAJICAL CLOUDZ AUG/17 METALFEST 2013 W/ GUARDIANS OF POWER, TERRORFIST AND MANY MORE!

AUG/20 THE ARCHAICS RUBY TUESDAYS PRESENTS W/ RILEY QUILAN

ONE LIFE ANIMAL AUG/24 MATCHBREAKER AUG/23

W/ GUESTS

W/ BRAEDEN MARSHALL BAND

AUG/27 THE DRRTY SHOW AUG/31 WINTERCOAST RUBY TUESDAYS PRESENTS W/ VANESSA DOMINGUES

W/ MONDRIAN SHIFT

Swing Dance Party: Sugar Swing Dance Club every Sat, 8-12; no experience or partner needed, beginner lesson followed by social dance; sugarswing.com

EVERY EATS

SUITE 69 Stella Saturday: retro, old school, top 40 beats with DJ Lazy, guests

EVERY THE ULTIMATE OPEN STAGE

TEMPLE Step’d Up Saturdays

with Lolcatz, Yaznil, Badman Crooks, Ootz

UNION HALL Celebrity

Saturdays: every Sat hosted by DJ Johnny Infamous Y AFTERHOURS Release

AND BEATS

WEDNESDAY EVERY WEDNESDAY, $0.35 WINGS

THURSDAY EVERY THURSDAY, OPEN TURNTABLES, OPEN STAGE

NOW HIRING SERVERS, BUSSERS, SECURITY STAFF AND BARTENDERS

Saturdays

SUN AUG 18 ARTERY Spearsical the Musical: Raw Meet Productions; $12 (adv)

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

MUSIC 39


BLACKJACK’S ROADHOUSE–Nisku Open

mic every Sun hosted by Tim Lovett

FRI AUG 16

MICHALE GRAVES

FORMERLY OF THE MISFITS LIVE ACOUSTIC SHOW W/ ATTACK ADDICT & CHAKOBSA

SAT AUG 17

TROLLBAND

CD RELEASE OF ‘SAMSARA’ W/ KORPERLOSE, MORADIN & 88 MILE TRIP THU AUG 22

AN EVENING OF AUDIO/VIDEO SYNTHESIS WITH EGYPTRIXX & BORYS W/ SPECIAL GUESTS WIND ROSE/ SHAWN PINCHBECK/SKRUNTSKRUNT/ PIGEON BREEDERS & DJ NIK 7

FRI AUG 23

HIGHER&HIGHER TOUR KICK OFF W/

DANIEL AND THE IMPENDING DOOM, MOST OF AUGUST & HEARSAY

FRI AUG 24

BACK TO THE 90’S PARTY... DRESS UP IN YOUR BEST 90’S FASHION & DANCE YOUR WAY BACK TO THE 90’S.. DOORS 9PM - $5 AT THE DOOR - WITH DJ SALVIA PLATH & EDDIE LUNCHPAIL

FRI AUG 30 THE PREYING SAINTS CD RELEASE

W/ THE GET DOWN, UNWED MOTHERS, & THE ARCHAICS

THU SEPT 5

THE REASON W/ DANIEL & THE IMPENDING DOOM & GUEST

WED SEPT 11

THE CREEPSHOW

W/ HELLBOUND HEPCATS & FIRE NEXT TIME FOR TICKETS- PLEASE VISIT WWW.YEGLIVE.CA

WEDNESDAY PINT NIGHT’S

$2.75 DOMESTIC PINTS

SAT AUG 17 FREE SHOW 4PM

LABRADOODLE W/ COLD CRUISER

40 MUSIC

DJs

Productions; $12 (adv)

DJs

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

BLUES ON WHYTE Cece

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Teneal

and Tamara Peterson

BLUES ON WHYTE Lucky

Main Floor: Soul Sundays: A fantastic voyage through ‘60s and ‘70s funk, soul and R&B with DJ Zyppy

BLUES FEST Eden Brent,

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Stylus

Tuesday! With Abra King, Russ Urquhart, Salt Water Windows, & Clay Swanson!

MON AUG 19

BRITTANY’S Velvet Hour: Live music in the afternoons hosted by Rob Taylor and Bill Bourne; Mon-Fri; 4:30-8pm; no cover

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

BRIXX Ruby Tuesdays with

Monkeyjunk, Ana Popovic, Lone Star Revue, Anson Funderburgh, Little Charlie Baty, Mark Hummel, the North Mississippi All Stars; 1pm (gate), 2:30-10pm (show); $50 (Sun pass) at TicketMaster, Permanent Records, Chateau Louis Hotel

CASINO EDMONTON

Industry Sundays: Invinceable, Tnt, Rocky, Rocko, Akademic, weekly guest DJs; 9pm-3am

Sleeman Mon: live music monthly; no cover

BLUES ON WHYTE Cece

Doucette (classic rock); 9pm

Teneal

CHA ISLAND TEA CO

BOHEMIA Vitriolage, Cryptic

Live on the Island: Rhea March hosts open mic and Songwriter’s stage; starts with a jam session; every Sun, 7pm DEVANEY’S IRISH PUB

Celtic Music with Devaney’s House Band; 5-8pm FANDANGO’S Mushy

Callahan

JAZZ AT THE LAKE–Sylvan Lake Meadowlands Golf Club:

Farewell Jam Session: Big Rocks, 7pm, $40; Lions Legacy Park Gazebo (rainout: Lions Hall): Jazz Bands Outdoor Concert: Jazz Explosion, Flat Iron Jazz, 2-4pm; Meadowlands Golf Club, Main St, Hwy. 11: Farewell Jam Session Dinner/Dance: Big Rocks (11-piece orchestra), 7pm, $40 (incl buffet dinner); JAZZ PUB CRAWL: Bayview Café: C-Note/Audrey Graham

Jazz Duo, 11:30am-2:30pm; Bravo Gastro Lounge: Caravana Gypsy Jazz, 12:30-3:30pm; Royal Canadian Legion:

Cornerpocket Tri, 1-4pm; Chef Francisco Pub: Dean Theissen Quartet, 1-4pm; Pete’s at the Beach: Alex Goodman Trio, 1:30-4:30pm; Chief’s Pub: Morgan McKee Trio, 2-4pm; Cities Gastro Pub: Egor Ukoloff Trio, 2:30-5:30pm; Fireside Restaurant: Jessica Stuart Few; 3-6pm NEWCASTLE PUB Sun Soul

Service (acoustic jam): Willy James and Crawdad Cantera; 3-6:30pm

O’BYRNE’S Open mic every

Sun; 9:30pm-1am

RICHARD’S PUB Sun Jam

hosted by Andrew White and the Joint Chiefs; 4-8pm

THE RIG Every Sun Jam

hosted by Better Us than Strangers; 5-9pm

SMOKEHOUSE BBQ Hair

of the Dog acoustic Sun Jam with Bonedog and Bearcat; every Sun; 2-6pm

STARLITE ROOM Fringe Festival B.Y.O.V: Capital City Burlesque’s An Elvis Odyssey; 4pm

Murmurs, Rubber Nurse

BRITTANY’S Velvet Hour:

Live music in the afternoons hosted by Rob Taylor and Bill Bourne; Mon-Fri; 4:30-8pm; no cover

CAFÉ HAVEN Mandy Ebel,

Julia Bentley

DEVANEY’S IRISH PUB

BOHEMIA Acoustic

host Mark Feduk; $5 after 8pm; this week guests: the Archaics, Riley Quilan

DRUID Jamhouse Tues hosted by Chris Wynters, guest J+H PUB Acoustic open mic night every Tue hosted by Lorin Lynne; Everyone will have 10-15 minutes to play L.B.’S Tue Blues Jam with

Darrell Barr; 7:30pm11:30pm LEAF BAR Tuesday

Main Floor: Alternative retro and not-so-retro, electronic and Euro with Eddie Lunchpail; Wooftop: The Night with No Name featuring DJs Rootbeard, Raebot, Wijit and guests playing tasteful, eclectic selections

CROWN Underground at the

Crown Tuesday: Trueskool and live hip-hop with residents Jae Maze, Xaolin, Frank Brown; monthly appearances by guests Shawn Langley, Locution Revolution, and Northside Clan DV8 Creepy Tombsday:

Psychobilly, Hallowe’en horrorpunk, deathrock with Abigail Asphixia and Mr Cadaver; every Tue

WED AUG 21 ALBERTA BEACH HOTEL

Jesse D

Tue; with Shannon Johnson and friends; 9:30pm

NEW WEST HOTEL COUNTRY BANDS C.C.,

OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK The Campfire Hero’s

Highrider

OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK Monday Open Stage PAWN SHOP The

Underground Rebels, Aaron Vincent

PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL

Acoustic instrumental old time fiddle jam every Mon; hosted by the Wild Rose Old Tyme Fiddlers Society; 7pm; contact Vi Kallio 780.456.8510 ROUGE Open Mic Night with

Darrek Anderson from the Guaranteed; every Mon; 9pm

ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM THEATRE Hot Super Hot,

Longshadows; 7pm; $10 (adv)/$15 (door) at Blackbyrd, Permanent Records

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: Blue Jay’s Messy

Nest: mod, brit pop, new wave, British rock with DJ Blue Jay

(acoustic rock, country, top 40); 9pm-2am every Tue; no cover

SHAW Right Back At

It Again Tour–A Day To Remember: Pierce the Veil, the Ghost Inside; 6:30pm; $39.50 atb unionevents. com, Ticketfly.com, Blackbyrd

SHERLOCK HOLMES– Downtown Rob Taylor SHERLOCK HOLMES– WEM Travis Marcotte STARLITE ROOM

Wintersun, Fleshgod Apocalypse, Arsis, Starkill; 8pm WUNDERBAR Drag the

PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL

Acoustic Bluegrass jam presented by the Northern Bluegrass Circle Music Society; every Wed, 6:3011pm; $2 (member)/$4 (non-member)

Open stage Wed with Trace Jordan; 8pm-12 ARTERY Spearsical

the Musical: Raw Meet Productions; $12 (adv)

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Main Floor: Glitter Gulch: live music once a month; On the Patio: Funk and Soul with Doktor Erick every Wed; 9pm

BLUES ON WHYTE Cece

Teneal

BRITTANY’S Velvet Hour:

Live music in the afternoons hosted by Rob Taylor and Bill Bourne; Mon-Fri; 4:30-8pm; no cover

CROWN PUB The Dan Jam:

SHERLOCK HOLMES– Downtown Rob Taylor SHERLOCK HOLMES– WEM Travis Marcotte WUNDERBAR Ghost Cousin,

Jung People, My Side of the Mountain

ZEN LOUNGE Jazz

Wednesdays: Kori Wray and Jeff Hendrick; every Wed; 7:30-10pm; no cover

Classical ST FAITH’S ANGLICAN CHURCH C’mon (Chamber

music old new) Festival “Good Bad Ugly”: host Tammy Sluzar, Aaron Au (violin), Andrea House, Eric Wigston, Chris Smith, group of Edmonton’s leading symphony and freelance musicians, the C’mon Ensemble, Lucas Waldin (conductor); 7:30pm; $12.50 at fringetheatre.ca, door

musical styles from around the globe with Miguel and friends; musicians are invited to bring their personal touch to the mix every Wed

DJs

DEVANEY’S Wed open mic with host Duff Robison

Main Floor: RetroActive Radio:

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Classical

FANDANGO’S Wed open stage hosted by Michael Gress and Cody Noula; Original artist showcase at 9pm

BRIXX Really Good... Eats and Beats: every Wed with DJ Degree and Friends

ST FAITH’S ANGLICAN

J AND R 4003-106 St, 780.436.4403 JAVA XPRESS 110, 4300 South Park Dr, Stony Plain, 780.968.1860 JAZZATTHELAKE: ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION–Sylvan Lake: Royal Canadian Legion 4916-50 Ave; Lions Hall, 50A Ave, 51A St; Alliance Community Church, 4404-47 Ave; Lions Legacy Park Gazebo 50 St, 48 Ave; Meadowlands Golf Club, Main St, Hwy 11; JAZZ PUB CRAWL: Bayview Café, Bay 9, 5100 Lakeshore Dr (Chateau Suites); Bravo Gastro Lounge, 4613 Lakeshore Dr; Royal Canadian Legion, 491650 Ave; Chef Francisco Pub, 4609 Lakeshore Dr; Pete’s at the Beach, 4711 Lakeshore Dr; Chief’s Pub, 4707 Lakeshore Dr; Cities Gastro Pub, 330, 3715-47 Ave (Ryders Sq); Fireside Restaurant, 4907 Lakeshore Dr JEFFREY’S CAFÉ 9640 142 St, 780.451.8890 L.B.’S 23 Akins Dr, St Albert, 780.460.9100 LEAF BAR 9016-132 Ave, 780.757.2121 LEGENDS SPORTS BAR AND TAP HOUSE 9221-34 Ave, 780.988.2599 LEVEL 2 LOUNGE 11607 Jasper Ave, 2nd Fl, 780.447.4495 LIT ITALIAN WINE BAR 10132104 St LIZARD LOUNGE 13160-118

ARTERY Spearsical

rock, country, Top 40); 9pm2am every Wed; no cover

Alternative ‘80s and ‘90s, post punk, new wave, garage, Brit, mod, rock and roll with LL Cool Joe

Ave, 780.757.2482 COMMON 9910-109 St CROWN PUB 10709-109 St, 780.428.5618 DEVANEY’S IRISH PUB 901388 Ave, 780.465.4834 DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave, 780.454.9928 DUSTER’S PUB 6402-118 Ave, 780.474.5554 DV8 8130 Gateway Blvd EARLY STAGE SALOON– Stony Plain 4911-52 Ave, Stony Plain ELECTRIC RODEO–Spruce Grove 121-1 Ave, Spruce Grove, 780.962.1411 ELEPHANT AND CASTLE–Whyte Ave 10314 Whyte Ave ENCORE–WEM 2687, 8882170 St FANDANGO'S 12912-50 St, fandangoslive.com FESTIVAL PLACE 100 Festival Way, Sherwood Park, 780.449.3378 FIDDLER’S ROOST 8906-99 St FILTHY MCNASTY’S 10511-82 Ave, 780.916.1557 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 10031-109 St FLUID LOUNGE 10888 Jasper Ave, 780.429.0700 HILLTOP PUB 8220 106 Ave HOGS DEN PUB Yellow Head Tr, 142 St HOOLIGANZ 10704-124 St, 780.995.7110, 780.452.1168 IRISH SPORTS SOCIETY 12546-126 St, 780.453.2249 J+H PUB 1919-105 St

TUE AUG 20

OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK Jason Greeley (acoustic

ELEPHANT AND CASTLE– Whyte Ave Open mic every

the Musical: Raw Meet

with DJ Phoenix and MJ with Sleepless DJ, DJ Breeze and more every Mon; 9pm-2am

classic country dance lessons every Wed, 7-9pm; Highrider

River (country rock), Fire Next Time, Worst Days Down, Liam harvey Oswald; 9pm; $12 (adv)/$15 (door)

CHURCH C’mon (Chamber music old new) Festival “Good Bad Ugly”: host Tammy Sluzar, Aaron Au (violin), Andrea House, Eric Wigston, Chris Smith, group of Edmonton’s leading symphony and freelance musicians, the C’mon Ensemble, Lucas Waldin (conductor); 7:30pm; $12.50 at fringetheatre.ca, door

CROWN PUB A Sexy Night

NEW WEST HOTEL Free

THE RIG Open jam every Wed hosted by Will Cole; 8pm -12am

Mash up and Electro with DJ Tyco, DJ Omes with weekly guest DJs

NEW WEST HOTEL C.C., O’BYRNE’S Celtic jam every

with guitarist, Gord Matthews; every Wed, 8pm

SUITE 69 Rockstar Tuesdays:

DV8 A Ghost In Drag, Lesser

DEVANEY’S IRISH PUB

LEAF BAR Wed variety night:

RED PIANO Wed Night Live: hosted by dueling piano players; 8pm-1am; $5

rock, hip hop, electro with DJ Hot Philly; every Tue

Moosehead/Barsnbands open stage hosted by Mark Ammar; every Tue; 7:3011:30pm

Highrider

J+H PUB Acoustic open mic night hosted by Lorin Lynne

RED STAR Experimental Indie

Singer/songwriter open stage every Mon; 8pm; host changes weekly Man, Preschool Shooting, Busted Femur; 9pm

every Wed with host Michael Gress; 9pm

Wed (unless there’s an Oilers game); no cover

FESTIVAL PLACE Qualico

Patio Series: 6 Minute Warning (pop/rock), Paul Ledding (singer-songwriter); 7:30pm; $8 FIDDLER’S ROOST Little Flower Open Stage every Wed with Brian Gregg; 8pm-12 HOOLIGANZ Open stage

COMMON The Wed

Experience: Classics on Vinyl with Dane

NIKKI DIAMONDS Punk and

‘80s metal every Wed

RED STAR Guest DJs every

Wed

TEMPLE Wild Style Wed: Hip

hop open mic hosted by Kaz and Orv; $5

VENUEGUIDE ACCENT EUROPEAN LOUNGE 8223-104 St, 780.431.0179 ALE YARD TAP 13310-137 Ave ARTERY 9535 Jasper Ave AVENUE THEATRE 9030-118 Ave, 780.477.2149 BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 10425-82 Ave, 780.439.1082 BLACKJACK'S ROADHOUSE– Nisku 2110 Sparrow Drive, Nisku, 780.986.8522 BLUES FEST Heritage Ampitheatre, Hawrelak Park, bluesinternationalltd.com BLUES ON WHYTE 10329-82 Ave, 780.439.3981 BOHEMIA 10217-97 St THE BOWER 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.423.425; info@thebower.ca BRITTANY'S LOUNGE 10225-97 St, 780.497.0011 BRIXX BAR 10030-102 St (downstairs), 780.428.1099 BUDDY’S 11725B Jasper Ave, 780.488.6636 CAFÉ HAVEN 9 Sioux Rd, Sherwood Park, 780.417.5523, cafehaven.ca CAFÉ TIRAMISU 10750-124 St CARROT COFFEEHOUSE 9351118 Ave, 780.471.1580 CASINO EDMONTON 7055 Argylll Rd, 780.463.9467 CASINO YELLOWHEAD 12464153 St, 780.424 9467 CENTRAL SENIOR LIONS CENTRE 11113-113 St CENTURY CASINO 13103 Fort Rd, 780.643.4000 CHA ISLAND TEA CO 10332-81

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

Ave NAKED CYBERCAFÉ 10303-108 St, 780.425.9730 NEWCASTLE PUB 6108-90 Ave, 780.490.1999 NOORISH CAFÉ 8440-109 St NORTH GLENORA HALL 13535109A Ave O’BYRNE’S 10616-82 Ave, 780.414.6766 ON THE ROCKS 11730 Jasper Ave, 780.482.4767 O2 JOES–North 13509-127 St, 780.451.7799 O2'S–West 11066-156 St, 780.448.2255 OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK 100 Granada Blvd, Sherwood Park, 790.570.5588 PAWN SHOP 10551-82 Ave, Upstairs, 780.432.0814 PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL 10860-57 Ave PUB 1824 12402-118 Ave, 587.521.1824 RED PIANO BAR 1638 Bourbon St, WEM, 8882-170 St, 780.486.7722 RED STAR 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.428.0825 RENDEZVOUS 10108-149 St RICHARD'S PUB 12150-161 Ave, 780.457.3118 RIC’S GRILL 24 Perron Street, St Albert, 780.460.6602 THE RIG 15203 Stony Plain Rd, 780.756.0869 ROSEBOWL/ROUGE LOUNGE 10111-117 St, 780.482.5253 ROSE AND CROWN 10235-

101 St ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM THEATRE 12845-102 Ave ST FAITH'S ANGLICAN CHURCH 11725-93 St SERVUS PLACE–St Albert 400 Campbell Rd SET NIGHTCLUB Next to Bourban St, 8882-170 St, WEM, Ph III, setnightclub.ca SMOKEHOUSE BBQ 10810-124 St, 587.521.6328 SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE 12923-97 St, 780.758.5924 SPORTSMAN'S LOUNGE 8170-50 St STARLITE ROOM 10030-102 St, 780.428.1099 SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM 10545-81 Ave SUITE 69 2 Fl, 8232 Gateway Blvd, 780.439.6969 TREASURY 10004 Jasper Ave, 7870.990.1255, thetreasurey.ca VEE LOUNGE, APEX CASINO–St Albert 24 Boudreau Rd, St Albert, 780.460.8092, 780.590.1128 WINSPEAR CENTRE 4 Sir Winston Churchill Square; 780.28.1414 WUNDERBAR 8120-101 St, 780.436.2286 Y AFTERHOURS 10028-102 St, 780.994.3256, yafterhours. com YESTERDAYS PUB 112, 205 Carnegie Dr, St Albert, 780.459.0295 ZEN LOUNGE 12923-97 St


EVENTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

COMEDY

AVENUE THEATRE Doug Stanhope • Aug 28, 7pm • $30 (adv) at Blackbyrd

THE BEAR’S DEN/CONNIE'S COMEDY Fort Saskatchewan • Mike Harrison, Bill Gee, and Alex

Shirjang • Sun, Aug 18, 7pm • no cover BRIXX Comedy and Music once a month as a part of Ruby Tuesdays CENTURY CASINO • 13103 Fort Rd • 780.481.9857 • Open Mic Night: Every Thu; 7:30-9pm COMEDY FACTORY • Gateway Entertainment Centre, 34 Ave, Calgary Tr • Paul Sveen; Aug 16-17 • Ken Valgardson; Aug 23-24 COMIC STRIP • Bourbon St, WEM • 780.483.5999 • Wed-Fri, Sun 8pm; Fri-Sat 10:30pm • Hit or Miss Mondays: Amateurs and Professionals every Mon, 7:30pm • Battle to the Funny Bone; last Tue each month, 7:30pm • Brian Scolaro; until Aug 18 • Simon King; Aug 21-25 DRUID • 11606 Jasper Ave • 780.710.2119 • Comedy night open stage hosted by Lars Callieou • Every Sun, 9pm FILTHY MCNASTY'S • 10511-82 Ave • 780.996.1778 • Stand Up Sundays: Stand-up comedy night every Sun with a different headliner every week; 9-11pm; no cover KRUSH ULTRALOUNGE/CONNIE'S COMEDY • 16648-109 Ave • Open Mic following Singles Mixer starting at 9:15pm • Aug 15 • Call 780.914.8966 to get on roster OVERTIME PUB • 4211-106 St • Open mic comedy anchored by a professional MC, new headliner each week • Every Tue • Free RIVER CREE–the Venue • Rob Schneider • Aug 24, 6pm (door), 8pm (show) • $29.50 ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St • Sterling Scott every Wed, 9pm RUMORS ULTRA LOUNGE • 8230 Gateway Blvd • Every Thu Neon Lights and Laughter with host Sterling Scott and five comedians and live DJ TNT; 8:30pm VAULT PUB • 8214-175 St • Comedy with Liam Creswick and Steve Schulte • Every Thu, at 9:30pm X-WRECKS LOUNGE/CONNIE’S COMEDY • 9303-50 St • Travelling open mic • Aug 23, 7pm • T: 780.914.8966 to get on roster ZEN LOUNGE • 12923-97 St • The Ca$h Prize comedy contest hosted by Matt Alaeddine and Andrew Iwanyk • Every Tue, 8pm • No cover

GROUPS/CLUBS/MEETINGS

AIKIKAI AIKIDO CLUB • 10139-87 Ave, Old

Strathcona Community League • Japanese Martial Art of Aikido • Every Tue 7:30-9:30pm; Thu 6-8pm

ARGENTINE TANGO DANCE AT FOOT NOTES

STUDIO • Foot Notes Dance Studio (South side), 9708-45 Ave • 780.438.3207 • virenzi@shaw.ca • Join Vincenzo and Ida Renzi every Friday at Foot Notes Dance Studio for an evening of authentic Argentine tango • Every Fri, 8pm-midnight • $15 (per person) BERG LAKE • lionsbreath.ca; click on adventure • Depart from studio 301,10534-124 St • 780.990.6247 • Back Country Tent and Hike • Aug 30-Sep 2 • $199 +GST BRAIN TUMOUR PEER SUPPORT GROUP • Mount Zion Lutheran Church, 11533-135 St NW • braintumour.ca • 1.800.265.5106 ext 234 • Support group for brain tumour survivors and their families and caregivers. Must be 18 or over • 3rd Mon every month; 7-8:45pm • Free

CANADIAN INJURED WORKERS ASSOCIATION OF ALBERTA (CIWAA) • Augustana Lutheran

Church, 107 St, 99 Ave • canadianinjuredworkers. com • Meeting every 3rd Sat, 1-4pm • Injured Workers in Pursuit of Justice denied by WCB DISCOVER DOWNTOWN • edmontondowntown. com • Tours start at the park next to Evoolution, 104 St, 101 Ave • Discover Downtown's history, architecture and public art: 90 min guided walk • Mon-Wed, Fri at 1pm; Thu, 2:30pm (arrive 10 mins early) • Until Aug 23 EDMONTON GHOST TOURS • Meet infront of the Rescuer statue next to the Walterdale Playhouse, 10322-83 Ave • A Ghostly Walk Through Old Strathcona. Tours are outside and walking;

dress for the weather and wear walking shoes • Summer: Wed-Thu, 9pm; meet (15 mins early) until Sep 12 • $10/$30 (2 adults and 2 kids) EDMONTON NEEDLECRAFT GUILD • Avonmore United Church Basement, 82 Ave, 79 St • edmNeedlecraftGuild.org • Classes/workshops, exhibitions, guest speakers, stitching groups for those interested in textile arts • Meet the 2nd Tue each month, 7:30pm EDMONTON UKULELE CIRCLE • Bogani Café, 2023-111 St • 780.440.3528 • 3rd Sun each month; 2:30-4pm • $5

FABULOUS FACILITATORS TOASTMASTERS CLUB • 2nd Fl, Canada Place, 9700 Jasper Ave •

780.467.6013, l.witzke@shaw.ca • fabulousfacilitators.toastmastersclubs.org • Can you think of a career that does not require communication • Every Tue, 12:05-1pm FOOD ADDICTS • St Luke's Anglican Church, 8424-95 Ave • 780.465.2019, 780.634.5526 • Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA), free 12-Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, under-eating, and bulimia • Meetings every Thu, 7pm HISTORIC WALKING TOURS–St Albert • Little White School, 2 Madonna Dr • A walking tour of St Albert’s past • Aug 15, 6:30pm • Info: Roy Toomey at 780.459.4404 or royt@artsheritage.ca

HOME–Energizing Spiritual Community for Passionate Living • Garneau/Ashbourne

Assisted Living Place, 11148-84 Ave • Home: Blends music, drama, creativity and reflection on sacred texts to energize you for passionate living • Every Sun, 3-5pm

INTRODUCTION TO TIBETAN BUDDHIST MAHAMUDRA MEDITATION • Karma Tashi Ling

Society Centre, 10502-70 Ave • Calm Abiding and Insight: Meditation background helpful. Contact Andrew for info/registration at amgmitch@gmail. com; T: 780.437.3688 • Thu 7-8:15pm; Sep 5-Oct 24 • $40 (suggested donation) LOTUS QIGONG • 780.477.0683 • Downtown • Practice group meets every Thu MADELEINE SANAM FOUNDATION • Faculté St Jean, Rm 3-18 • 780.490.7332 • madeleinesanam.org/en • Program for HIV-AID’S prevention, treatment and harm reduction in French, English and other African languages • 3rd and 4th Sat, 9am-5pm each month • Free (member)/$10 (membership); pre-register NSAI SONGWRITERS GROUP • The Carrot, 9351-118 Ave • 780.973.5311 • nashvillesongwriters.com • NSAI (Nashville Songwriters Association International) meet the 2nd Mon each month, 7-9pm

NORTHERN ALBERTA WOOD CARVERS ASSOCIATION • Duggan Community Hall, 3728-106

St • 780.435.0845 • nawca.ca • Meet every Wed, 6:30pm

ORGANIZATION FOR BIPOLAR AFFECTIVE DISORDER (OBAD) • Grey Nuns Hospital, Rm

0651, 780.451.1755; Group meets every Thu, 7-9pm • Free RIVER VALLEY VIXEN BOOT CAMP • Summer long drop-in, all girls boot camp • Various days and times throughout the week; info E: rivervalleyvixen@gmail.com • $20 • facebook.com/#!/ rvvbootcamp SAWA 12-STEP SUPPORT GROUP • Braeside Presbyterian Church bsmt, N. door, 6 Bernard Dr, St Albert • For adult children of alcoholic and dysfunctional families • Every Mon, 7:30pm SEVENTIES FOREVER CLUB • Call 587.520.3833 for location • deepsoul.ca • Combining music, garage sales, nature, common sense, and kindred karma to revitalize the inward persona • Every Wed, 7-8:30pm SHERWOOD PARK WALKING GROUP + 50 • Meet inside Millennium Place, Sherwood Place • Weekly outdoor walking group; starts with a 10min discussion, followed by a 30 to 40-min walk through Centennial Park, a cool down and stretch • Every Tue, 8:30am • $2/session (goes to the Alzheimer’s Society of Alberta) SOCIETY OF EDMONTON ATHEISTS • Stanley A. Milner Library, Centennial Rm (bsmt); edmontonatheists.ca; E: info@edmontonatheists.ca; Monthly roundtable 1st Tue each month SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM • 10545-81 Ave • 780.604.7572 • Swing Dance at Sugar Foot Stomp: beginner lesson followed by dance every Sat, 8pm (door) VALLEY OF THE 5 LAKES • lionsbreath.ca; click on adventure • Depart from studio 301, 10534124 St • 780.990.6247 • Jasper Bike Adventure • Aug 23-25 • $199 +GST WASKAHEGAN TRAIL HIKE • waskahegantrail. ca • Meet: NW corner Superstore parking lot, 51 St, Calgary Tr (carpool to trail) • waskahegantrail. ca • Travel south of the city to hike the Chickadee Trail with hike leader Oscar 780.435.1197; Aug 18, 8:45am-3pm • Enjoy the views in the Coal Lake part of our trail with hike leader Bev, 780.469.7948 • Aug 25, 8:45am-3pm • $5 (carpool); $20 (annual

membership)

WOMEN IN BLACK • In Front of the Old Strathcona

Farmers' Market • Silent vigil the 1st and 3rd Sat, 10-11am, each month, stand in silence for a world without violence Y TOASTMASTERS CLUB • Queen Alexandra Community League, 10425 University Ave (north door, stairs to the left) • Meet every Tue, 7-9pm except last Tue each month. Help develop confidence in public speaking and leadership • Contact: Antonio Balce, 780.463.5331

LECTURES/PRESENTATIONS

GREAT EXPEDITIONS • St Luke’s AnglicanChurch, 8424-95 Ave • 780.469.3270 • 1st Mon every month, 7:30pm • Suggested donation of $3

QUEER

AFFIRM SUNNYBROOK–Red Deer • Sunnybrook

United Church, Red Deer • 403.347.6073 • Affirm welcome LGBTQ people and their friends, family, and allies meet the 2nd Tue, 7pm, each month BEERS FOR QUEERS • Empress Ale House, 9912 Whyte Ave • Meet the last Thu each month BISEXUAL WOMEN'S COFFEE GROUP • A social group for bi-curious and bisexual women every 2nd Tue each month, 8pm • groups.yahoo.com/group/ bwedmonton BUDDYS NITE CLUB • 11725B Jasper Ave • 780.488.6636 • Tue with DJ Arrow Chaser, free pool all night; 9pm (door); no cover • Wed with DJ Dust’n Time; 9pm (door); no cover • Thu: Men’s Wet Underwear Contest, win prizes, hosted by Drag Queen DJ Phon3 Hom3; 9pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Fri Dance Party with DJ Arrow Chaser; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Sat: Feel the rhythm with DJ Phon3 Hom3; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm

EPLC FELLOWSHIP PAGAN STUDY GROUP

• Pride Centre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • eplc.webs.com • Free year long course; Family circle 3rd Sat each month • Everyone welcome FLASH NIGHT CLUB • 10018-105 St • 780.969.9965 • Thu Goth + Industrial Night: Indust:real Assembly with DJ Nanuck; 10pm (door); no cover • Triple Threat Fridays: DJ Thunder, Femcee DJ Eden Lixx • DJ Suco beats every Sat • E: vip@flashnightclub.com G.L.B.T. SPORTS AND RECREATION • teamedmonton.ca • Day Hike–Jasper: Sat, Aug 24; Meeting at Beer Revolution in Oliver Sq, 11736-104 Ave; 7am departure; info/sign-up: E: dayhikes@teamedmonton.ca • Cycling: Louise McKinney Park, terrace above River Valley Adventure Co; Thu, 6:30-8pm; For more info: cycling@teamedmonton.ca • Dragon Boat–Flaming Dragons: Edmonton Dragon Boat Festival at Louise McKinney Park; Aug 16-18 • Summer Volleyball: Kinsmen Park; Every Sun to end of Aug, 3-5pm • Blazin' Bootcamp: Every Mon and Thu, 7pm; $30/$15 (low income/student); E: bootcamp@ teamedmonton.ca • Running: Every Sun, 10am, at Kinsmen • Yoga: Gay/Lesbian yoga every Wed, 7:30-9pm, at Lion's Breath Yoga, 206, 10350-124 St; Instructor: Jason Morris; $10 (drop-in) • Indoor Cycling: Terwillegar Recreation Centre; drop-in; E: 311@edmonton.ca • Swimming–Making Waves: Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) pool, 11762-106 St; E: swimming@teamedmonton.c; makingwavesswimclub.ca • Martial Arts–Kung Fu and Kick Boxing: Every Tue and Thu, 6-7pm; GLBTQ inclusive adult classes at Sil-Lum Kung Fu; kungfu@ teamedmonton.ca, kickboxing@teamedmonton. ca, sillum.ca G.L.B.T.Q SENIORS GROUP • S.A.G.E Bldg, Craftroom, 15 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.474.8240 • Meeting for gay seniors, and for any seniors who have gay family members and would like some guidance • Every Thu, 1-4pm • Info: E: tuff @ shaw.ca ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB • Pride Centre, 10608105 Ave • 780.387.3343 • edmontonillusions.ca • Crossdressers meet 2nd Fri each month, 7:30-9pm INSIDE/OUT • U of A Campus • Campus-based organization for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transidentified and queer (LGBTQ) faculty, graduate student, academic, straight allies and support staff • 3rd Thu each month (fall/winter terms): Speakers Series. E: kwells@ualberta.ca LIVING POSITIVE • 404, 10408-124 St • edmlivingpositive.ca • 1.877.975.9448/780.488.5768 • Confidential peer support to people living with HIV • Tue, 7-9pm: Support group • Daily drop-in, peer counselling MAKING WAVES SWIMMING CLUB • geocities. com/makingwaves_edm • Recreational/competitive swimming. Socializing after practices • Every Tue/Thu PRIDE CENTRE OF EDMONTON • Pride Centre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • A safe, welcoming, and non-judgemental drop-in space, support programs and resources offered for members of the GLBTQ community, their families and friends • Daily: Community drop-in; support and resources. Queer library: borrowing privileges: Tue-Fri 12-9pm, Sat 2-6:30pm, closed Sun-Mon;

Queer HangOUT (a.k.a. QH) youth drop-in: Tue-Fri 3-8pm, Sat 2-6:30pm, youth@pridecentreofedmonton.org • Counselling: Free, short-term by registered counsellors every Wed, 5:30-8:30pm, info/bookings: 780.488.3234 • Knotty Knitters: Knit and socialize in safe, accepting environment, all skill levels welcome; every Wed 6-8pm • QH Game Night: Meet people through board game fun; every Thu 6-8pm • QH Craft Night: every Wed, 6-8pm • QH Anime Night: Watch anime; every Fri, 6-8pm • Movie Night: Open to everyone; 2nd and 4th Fri each month, 6-9pm • Women’s Social Circle: Social support group for female-identified persons +18 years in the GLBT community; new members welcome; 2nd and 4th Thu, 7-9pm each month; andrea@pridecentreofedmonton.org • Men Talking with Pride: Support and social group for gay and bisexual men to discuss current issues; every Sun 7-9pm; robwells780@hotmail.com • TTIQ: a support and information group for all those who fall under the transgender umbrella and their family/supporters; 3rd Mon, 7-9pm, each month • HIV Support Group: Support and discussion group for gay men; 2nd Mon, 7-9pm, each month; huges@shaw.ca PRIMETIMERS/SAGE GAMES • Unitarian Church, 10804-119 St • 780.474.8240 • Every 2nd and last Fri each Month, 7-10:30pm ST PAUL'S UNITED CHURCH • 11526-76 Ave • 780.436.1555 • People of all sexual orientations are welcome • Every Sun (10am worship) WOMONSPACE • 780.482.1794 • womonspace. ca, womonspace@gmail.com • A Non-profit lesbian social organization for Edmonton and surrounding area. Monthly activities, newsletter, reduced rates included with membership. Confidentiality assured WOODYS VIDEO BAR • 11723 Jasper Ave • 780.488.6557 • Mon: Amateur Strip Contest; prizes with Shawana • Tue: Kitchen 3-11pm • Wed: Karaoke with Tizzy 7pm-1am; Kitchen 3-11pm • Thu: Free pool all night; kitchen 3-11pm • Fri: Mocho Nacho Fri: 3pm (door), kitchen open 3-11pm

SPECIAL EVENTS

97TH STREET NIGHT MARKET • 105 Ave, 97 St (parking lot at South end of Pacific Rim Mall) • (Re) discover Chinatown! Featuring food trucks, vendors, Chinatown tours, art, and music • Aug 17, 6-10pm CANADIAN NATIONAL RETURN TOP CHAMPIONSHIP • WEM, HMV Stage • Family-friendly

event featuring yo-yoers from all over Canada to compete • Aug 17, 10am-5pm • Free CORN SALE–HOPE MISSION • Edmonton Valley Zoo, 13315 Buena Vista Rd • Aug 17, 24, 31, 10am-4pm • Proceeds from sale go to Hope Mission Youth Shelter and Edmt and Area Land Trust DATE NIGHT • Devonian Botanic Garden • Stroll the Garden till dusk, enjoy a dinner special at the Birch Patio, and take in a different amusement every week • Every Thu Night • Jun-Aug • Alt Country Night: A two-step/line dance night at the Wedding Patio/Pine Pavilion with a steak dinner special; dinner special menu $25; Aug 15 • Instruction from the U of A Dance Club; 7:30pm; start with dinner at the Birch Patio, call to reserve dinner at 780.987.3054 ext 2243; Aug 22 • $11 (adult)/$6 (student)/$8 (senior)/$8 (friends of the Garden)/$8 (Garden season pass holder); incl admission to the Garden and entertainment; reserve dinner at 780.987.3054, ext 2243 DAUGHTERS DAY CELEBRATION • City Hall • Celebration of the importance of daughters in all our lives program, info fair, commitment walk • Aug 24, 1-3pm DEEPSOUL.CA • 587.520.3833; text to: 780.530.1283 for location • Classic Covers Shindig Fundraiser • Every Sun: Sunday Jams with no Stan (CCR to Metallica), GarageGigs Tour; all ages • Fundraising for local Canadian Disaster Relief, the hungry (world-wide through the Canadian Food Grains Bank) DRAGON BOAT FESTIVAL• edmontondragonboatfestival.com • Aug 16-18 • Fri: showcase the cultural opening ceremonies with the Taiko Drums, the Chinese Lion Dance, National Anthem sung by Gateway Chorus Sweet Adelines; Fri, Aug 16, evening, followed by competitive challenge races, Get the dragon spirit fired up, and the final races through to Sunday EDMONTON LATIN FESTIVAL • Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.993.9799 • edmontonlatinfestival.com • Edmonton Hispanic Cultural Society present live Latin orchestras, international Latin singers and dancers. Brazilian Sambistas (fr Rio de Janiero), beer gardens, authentic Latin food pavilions, arts and crafts and kids corner • Aug 17-18 • Free family event • Opening ceremony: Shake it for the Cure: Zumbathon for Alberta Cancer foundation Breast Cancer–shake your Bon Bon for a great cause; Sat, 10:30am • Sunday opening ceremony: Piñata smashing FALL OUTDOOR DAYS • Cabela's, 6150 Currents Dr • cabelas.ca/find-a-store/edmonton/2 • Cabela's Free Family Events: Aug 15-25 • Aug 17-18: SuperSplash 2013: Canine Dock Diving Competition; Family Virtual Fishing Experience;

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

Meet Your Conservation Leaders; Ultimate Outfitter Camp with Maximus Outdoor TV Hosts Kris and Lana Cheater; Alberta Wildlife Carving Association; Interactive Fly-Tying Station for Little Fingers with Superfly Pro Team; Animal Identification for Kids; Alberta Conservation Association: Report a Poacher Program • Free Seminars: Sat: Live and Artificial Bait Techniques for Fall Fishing with Mel Barr, Cabela’s Pro Staff, 10am; Candid Capture: Tips & Tricks for Outdoor Videography with Maximus Outdoor TV Hosts Kris and Lana Cheater, 11am; Tracking that Trophy: Big Horn Sheep Basics with Savanna Koebisch, Cabela's Pro Staff, 1pm; White-tailed Deer Research and Big Game Management in Alberta with Wildlife Ecologist Larry Roy and ESRD Biologist Grant Chapman, 2pm; Hit Your Mark: Cutting-Edge Archery Strategies for Whitetails with Gord Nuttall, Cabela's Pro Staff, 3pm; Targeting Trophy Lake Trout with Shimano Field Staff and Pro Tournament Angler, Corey Nault, 4pm • Free Seminars: Sun: Calls of the Wild: Big-Game Calling Tactics and Strategies with Maximus Outdoor TV Hosts, Kris and Lana Cheater, 11pm; Waterfowl University: Pro Tips for Improving Your Waterfowl Hunt with Claudio Ongaro, Cabela’s Pro Staff, 1pm; After the Shot: Field to Freezer Game Care with Gord Nuttall, Cabela's Pro Staff, 2pm; Blinds of all Kinds: Be Invisible with Savanna Koebisch, Cabela's Pro Staff, 3pm; Targeting Big Pike with Jason Henderson, Rapala Pro Staff, 4pm

FIELD TO TABLE: A HORTICULTURAL EXTRAVAGANZA • Fort Edmonton • Come get your hands dirty and celebrate this horticultural extravaganza. Formerly known as the Harvest Festival • Aug 25

FRIENDS UKRAINIAN MUSIC FEST •

Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Village, 8820-112 St • 780.662.3640 • ukrainianvillage.ca • Concert, hosted by Steven Chwok (CFCW’s Zabava Program) • Sun, Aug 25 • Ticket: admission on gate HAIR CUT-A-THON • Cloverdale Community Hall, Gallagher Park, 9411-97 Ave • Fundraiser, in support of trade skill and business education for women in Tanzania; sponsored by Nafasi Opportunity Society. Get your hair washed, cut and styled by some of Edmonton's top hair stylists. Entertainment, food, and silent auction • Aug 25, 10am-4pm

HARVEST OF THE PAST & HARVEST FOOD FESTIVAL • Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Village,

8820-112 St • 780.662.3640 • ukrainianvillage. ca • Begins with a pancake breakfast; historical activities include flower and herb drying, feather stripping, making kapusta (sour cabbage), grinding wheat, quilting, and canning of produce from the museum’s heritage gardens • Sun, Sep 8 • Ticket: admission on gate

HIGHLEVEL BRIDGE PROFESSIONAL DOWNHILL SKATEBOARDING RACE • Kinsmen Field

House, Under the Highlevel Bridge • Edmonton’s River Valley will be taken over by longboarders on the weekend of Aug 17-18 • Sat, Aug 17 (registration 9am, Main Race 12pm-4pm) • Sun, Aug 18: Start at Hermitage Park; Finish at Government House Park; Registration ends at 9am, Race starts at 10am • Registration for both events/info at roguerace.com JLS NIGHT MARKET • 102 Ave, 106 St • nightmarketedmonton@gmail.com • 780.901.8480 • Every Sat, 7-11pm; until Sep 28 • Email:nightmarketedmonton@gmail.com • facebook.com/#!/events/398830093565798/?co ntext=create MIN BID–SILENT/LIVE ART AUCTION • Vacancy Hall, 10359-104 St • Social Experiment WORK: An electric night of art, design, and music • Aug 16, 8-11pm (auction), 8pm-2am POP UP ARTISAN MARKET • Carrot Community Arts Coffeehouse, 9351-118 Ave • Aug 17, 10am-4pm SHAKE IT FOR THE CURE! • Churchill Square • Zumba charity event in support of the Alberta Cancer foundation Breast Cancer initiatives. Zumba enthusiasts will be wiggling their hips for this cause. Pledge forms info at W: shakeitforthecure. com; T: 780.993.9799 • Aug 17, 10:30am • $10 in pledges required to participate; free for kids under 14

STRATHCONA COUNTY LIBRARY BOOK SALE

• Agora, Strathcona County Community Centre • Annual book, DVD and CD sale • Proceeds to support the purchase of new materials for the library; T: 780.410.8601, E: info@sclibrary.ab.ca for info • Fri, Aug 16, 9:30am-8:30pm; Sat, Aug 17, 9:30am4:30pm; Sun, Aug 18, 1-4:30pm

TABULA RASA–SOCIAL ARTS EXPERIENCE

• Carrot Community Arts Coffeehouse, 9351-118 Ave • Buy a canvas and paint with encouragement from the 118 Ave artists • Fundraiser for the Carrot Community Arts Coffeehouse • Aug 23, 7-10pm • $118 at the Carrot, info: carrotassist@gmail.com YEG FASHION SHOW • Stanley Milner Library Edmonton Rm (lower level), 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • Social awareness fundraiser in support of ALS. Featuring on-site makeovers, mini photo shoots, silent auction, accessory workshop, fashion show • Aug 18, 1:30-4:30pm • $15

MUSIC 41


FREEWILLASTROLOGY

ARIES (Mar 21 – Apr 19): Normally, International CAPS LOCK DAY happens only once a year, on June 28. But in alignment with your current astrological omens, you have been granted the right to observe the next seven days as your own personal International CAPS LOCK DAYS. That means you will probably be forgiven and tolerated if you use OVERHEATED ORATORY and leap to THUNDEROUS CONCLUSIONS and engage in MELODRAMATIC GESTURES. You may even be thanked—although it's important to note that the gratitude you receive may only come later, AFTER THE DUST HAS SETTLED. TAURUS (Apr 20 – May 20): William Turner was a 19th-century English landscape painter born under the sign of Taurus. His aim was not to capture scenes in realistic detail but rather to convey the emotional impact they made on him. He testified that on one occasion he had himself tied to the mast of a ship during a snowstorm so that he could experience its full effects firsthand. The result was "Snow Storm - Steam-Boat Off a Harbour's Mouth," a painting composed mostly of tempestuous swirls. What would be the equivalent for you, Taurus? I'm trying to think of a way you could be perfectly safe as you treated yourself to an up-close encounter with elemental energies. GEMINI (May 21 – Jun 20): Some years back, the Greek government launched a huge antismoking campaign. In response, cigarette sales spiked dramatically. When my daughter was sixyears-old, I initiated a crusade to ban Barbie dolls from our home forever. Soon she was ripping out pictures of the accursed anti-feminist icon from toy catalogues and leaving them on my desk. With these events in mind, I'm feeling cautious about trying to talk you into formulating a five-year master plan. Maybe instead I should encourage you to think small and obsess on transitory wishes. CANCER (Jun 21 – Jul 22): "Wings are a constraint that makes it possible to fly," the Canadian poet Robert Bringhurst reminds us. That will be a good principle for you to keep in mind during your own adventures during the coming weeks. I suspect that any liberation you are able to achieve will come as the result of intense discipline. To the degree that you cultivate the very finest limitations, you will earn the right and the power to transcend inhibitions that have been holding you down. LEO (Jul 23 – Aug 22): "The secret of change is to focus all of your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new." When I came across that quote while surfing the web, I felt that it jibed perfectly with the astrological omens that are currently in

42 BACK

ROB BREZSNY FREEWILL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

play for you. Every website I consulted agreed that the speaker of this wisdom was Socrates, but I thought the language sounded too contemporary to have been uttered by a Greek philosopher who died 2400 years ago. After a bit of research, I found the real source: a character named Socrates in Way of the Peaceful Warrior, a New Age self-help book by Dan Millman. I hope this doesn't dilute the impact of the quote for you, Leo. For now, it is crucial that you not get bogged down in quarrelling and brawling. You need to devote all your energy to creating the future.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 – Dec 21): "All my life, my heart has yearned for a thing I cannot name." So said French writer André Breton. I suspect that many of us feel the same way, which is kind of depressing. But the good news for you, Sagittarius, is that there will be times in the coming months when you will get as close to naming that mysterious thing as you have ever gotten. On more than a few occasions, you may be able to get a clear glimpse of its true nature. Now and then you might even be fully united with it. One of those moments could come soon.

VIRGO (Aug 23 – Sep 22): Do you know that you are a host for more than 10 000 different species of microorganisms? Many of them are bacteria that perform functions essential to your health. So the stunning fact of the matter is that a large number of life forms share your body and constantly help you in ways about which you have no conscious awareness. Might there be other examples of you collecting benefits from unknown sources? Well, do you know who is responsible for providing you with the water and electricity you use? Who sewed your clothes and made your medicine? Who built the roads and buildings you use? This is an excellent time to take inventory of all the assistance, much of it anonymous, that you are so fortunate to receive.

CAPRICORN (Dec 22 – Jan 19): The Paris Review did a story on novelist William Gass. The interviewer asked him why he wrote his books. That was "a very dumb question," he sneered. Nevertheless, he answered it, saying, "I write because I hate. A lot. Hard." In other words, his primary motivations for expressing himself creatively were loathing, malice and hostility. I beg you not to use him as your role model, Capricorn. Not now. Not ever. But especially now. It is essential to your long-term health and wealth that you not be driven by hate in the coming weeks. Just the opposite, in fact: the more you are driven by love and generosity, the better chance you will have of launching a lucky streak that will last quite a while.

LIBRA (Sep 23 – Oct 22): More often than not, your fine mind does a competent job of defining the problems that need solving. It comes up with concise questions that lead you in the right direction to find useful clues. It gathers evidence crisply and it makes smart adjustments as the situation evolves. But after studying the astrological factors currently at work, I'm a little concerned that your usually fine mind might temporarily be prone to suffering from the dreaded malady known as paralysis through over-analysis. To steer yourself away from that possibility, keep checking in with your body and your feelings to see what alternate truths they may have to tell you. SCORPIO (Oct 23 – Nov 21): By the standards of people who don't know you well, the triumph you achieve in the coming days might seem modest. But I think it will actually be pretty dramatic. Here's my only concern: there's a slight danger you will get grandiose or even a bit arrogant in the aftermath of your victory. You could also get peeved at those who don't see it for the major achievement it is. Now that I've given you this warning, though, I'm hoping you will avoid that fate. Instead you will celebrate your win with humble grace, feeling gratitude for all the help you got long the way.

AQUARIUS (Jan 20 – Feb 18): "Until we have seen someone's darkness, we don't really know who they are," said author Marianne Williamson. "Until we have forgiven someone's darkness, we don't really know what love is." Your assignment, Aquarius, is to seek out the deepest possible understanding of these truths. To do that, you will have to identify the unripe, shadowy qualities of the people who are most important to you. And then you will have to find it in your smart heart to love them for their unripe, shadowy qualities almost as much as you do for their shiny, beautiful qualities. PISCES (Feb 19 – Mar 20): Aldous Huxley was the renowned 20th-century intellectual who wrote the book Brave New World, a dystopian vision of the future. Later in his life he came to regret one thing: how "preposterously serious" he had been when he was younger. "There are quicksands all about you, sucking at your feet," he ruminated, "trying to suck you down into fear and self-pity and despair. That's why you must walk so lightly. Lightly, my darling ... Learn to do everything lightly. Yes, feel lightly even though you're feeling deeply." I would love for you to put this counsel at the top of your priority list for the next 10 months, darling Pisces. Maybe even write it out on a piece of paper and tape it to your bathroom mirror. V

CLASSIFIEDS 130.

Coming Events

OIL CITY DERBY GIRLS All tickets are $10.00 in advance and $15.00 at the door, Kids under 10 are free! Next up: All Stars VS Pile O Bones Sept 21 @ Oil City Grindhouse 14420 112 street Doors at 6pm Visit www.oilcityderbygirls.ca for more information

1005.

Help Wanted

Prairie Dog Film + Television, a dramatic television production company, is looking to fill the position of Office Production Assistant. Vehicle required. Contact: Carmen@prairiedog.ca

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Are you an animal lover? WHARF Rescue is looking for volunteers We are a nonprofit animal rescue that provides shelter to homeless,neglected animals Please check www.wharfrescue.ca for more information As a non-profit, SATS can serve more elders over 65 years who need help with volunteer led transportation, if we can find more volunteer drivers! Please think of giving Volunteer managed Rides to elders. You are needed 8:00 to 8:00 pm seven days a week for three hours at your convenience. Two to three days of notice, in advance of a volunteer given ride, is given. The elders always will be very appreciative of your time and your gas. For more details on gas re-imbursements call SATS at 780 732-1221 Habitat For Humanity is building a pool of volunteers to help us with renovations at our newest ReStore. Flexible hours, no experience necessary If interested, please contact Evan at ehammer@hfh.org or call (780) 451-3416 Help someone in crisis take those first steps towards a solution. The Support Network`s Crisis Support Centre is looking for volunteers for Edmonton`s 24-Hour Distress Line. Interested or want to learn more? Contact Lindsay at 780-732-6648 or visit our website: www.TheSupportNetwork.com

Blush Lane Organic Market is dedicated to providing our customers with certified organic and sustainable farmed produce, grown with care on our family orchard, local family farms and in the worldwide organic community.

Our Edmonton location is looking for a

FULL-TIME DELI MANAGER Reporting to the Store Manager, you will  supervise purchasing, receiving, merchandising, rotation and stocking of deli products for optimum sales and profitability. Build and lead team of Deli Sales staff. Ensure staff is competent; sales-oriented; focused on customer service; and confident and content in their work.

send your resume to

hiring@blushlane.com We appreciate the interest of all applicants however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Become a Victim Services Volunteer Advocate! Work in conjunction with the RCMP to provide immediate assistance, support, information and agency referral to victims of crime and trauma in Strathcona County and provide support to victims through the criminal justice system. Please contact Stacey at 780-410-4331 or by email at Stacey.grilo@strathcona.ca for more information!

Help the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation create a future without breast cancer through volunteerism. Contact 1-866-302-2223 or ivolunteer@cbcf.org for current volunteer opportunities

EIFF - Sept 26 to Oct 5 Play with us. Volunteer! Thank-you to the many volunteers who donate their time and energies to create EIFF -- your smiling faces and genuine sincerity rank us among a handful of film festivals deemed to have the nicest people. Whether you’re a returning volunteer or brand new to the whole film fest scene, we welcome your help! If you’re interested in volunteering please fill out the application at edmontonfilmfest.com

Walk for HER, Walk for HOPE, Walk for LIFE.

Habitat for Humanity invites all women to build with us during Women Build Week: August 20-24 Are you a woman who has always wanted to volunteer on a Habitat for Humanity build site,but were unsure if you had the necessary skills? You may be surprised how many women -- with no construction experience -- build homes with Habitat for Humanity. If you are a woman who wants to help families in our community, there is an important role for you on our build sites, whether you have no construction experience or a tool belt of skills Contact for more info about the event: Louise Fairley 780-451-3416 lfairley@hfh.org Habitat for Humanity requires Landscaping Volunteers! Flexible hours, no experience necessary If interested, please contact Evan at ehammer@hfh.org or call (780) 451-3416 Habitat for Humanity’s Volunteer Orientation and Basic Tool Training Session Have you often considered volunteering with Habitat for Humanity, but just need information about our program and some training on tools? We are hosting a tool training and information session for new volunteers - or not-new volunteers - who would like to gain some basic knowledge of tools and learn more about how our organization works! Contact for more info about the event: Louise Fairley 780-451-3416 lfairley@hfh.org

Universiade ’83 Foundation Grant Program, Edmonton: Due Sept 6 This is a great chance for Edmontonians running programs for sports, the arts, and culture to help fund themselves for the upcoming year. The applications for this opportunity are due September 6th, so start getting those submissions ready. You could get up to a maximum of $10,000 for your program and projects. Check out the City of Edmonton website for more information: http://edmonton.ca/for_resident s/universiade-83foundation.aspx

Ovarian Cancer Canada Walk of Hope - WE NEED YOU Join us on September 8, 2013 at Laurier Park, Edmonton.

We are looking for enthusiastic and dedicated volunteers to help out in various roles for the Ovarian Cancer Canada Walk of Hope. There is something for everyone: event set-up, cheering on participants, assisting with registration are only few examples. Volunteers are vital in ensuring that everything runs according to plan on the Walk day. Please contact Shauna shauna.occ@gmail.com for more information

Support local farmers and your community. SouthWest Edmonton Farmers Market is seeking volunteers to help with set up, market activities and take down each Wednesday. This is fun, vibrant and community-oriented place and you get to be outside! For more information please contact Melissa at 780-868-9210

Volunteering - Habitat for Humanity requires Landscaping Volunteers! New houses with bare yards need love and our energetic volunteers will be beautifying yards for our families by planting trees, laying sod, building fences and decks and putting the finishing touches on our completed homes. This is an active opportunity open to volunteers of all skill levels. Previous volunteers really enjoyed strengthening friendships and building new ones and knowing they had put in a good day of work. Individual and group volunteers welcome. Contact: Evan Hammer ehammer@hfh.org 780.451.3416 www.hfh.org

Volunteers needed for the Open Minds Walk & Run event September 21. Contact Natasha at 780-452-4661 ext 2

Volunteering - Improve the Lives of Children in the Developing World Room to Read is changing the lives of children in Asia and Africa through literacy programs and gender equality. Join our Edmonton team and help us plan events to support our programs, and spread the word about the fantastic results we are achieving. Skills in event planning, PR, marketing, graphic design are needed, but not essential. We welcome all volunteers. If this sounds interesting, email us at Edmonton@roomtoread.org Contact: Kerri Tulloch Edmonton@roomtoread.org Phone: 780.425.4043 roomtoread.org/Edmonton


To place an ad PHONE: 780.426.1996 / FAX: 780.426.2889 EMAIL: classifieds@vueweekly.com 1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Wanted: Volunteer Board Members We are a non-profit charitable organization in search of volunteer board members. Sundance Canine Rescue Society which has been in operation since September 2009 has recently received charitable status which requires a working board. We are looking for board members with a range of expertise and are willing to be active in their governance roles. For a complete information package, please email

president@sundancecanine rescue.com Please email resume to

president@sundancecanine rescue.com by August 7, 2013

2003.

Artists Wanted

Call for Proposals: Jackson Power Gallery, Edmonton Deadline: Ongoing The Jackson Power Gallery in Edmonton is seeking submissions for future exhibitions. For further information, including photographs, gallery plan and submission requirements please contact: Paddy Lamb paddylamb@mac.com 780 499 7635 Call for Artists: The 2nd annual Strathearn Art Walk is seeking artists to display and sell their work on 95 ave. in Strathearn on Sat. Sept. 14, 11-3. All styles of work are considered and there is no fee to the artist for participation. After a successful event last year popular demand called for an expansion in the number of display opportunities for artists. Including the returnees from last year,organizers are looking to double the number of participating artists. Please contact Andrew Struthers ajstruthers@gmail.com – for more information or to book your space before they fill up. This event is sponsored by the Strathearn Community League. Deadline is Sat. Sept. 7th. The Allied Arts Council of Spruce Grove is hosting its annual Open Art Competition in the Spruce Grove Art Gallery. Please note that the deadline for entries is August 24, 2013. Delivery of Art: Sept 7, 2013 at 10am, Reception and Awards: Sept 13 2013 – 7:00pm, Pickup of Art: Sept 28, 2013 – 10:00am. For a copy of the rules & application form go to www.alliedartscouncil.com Or phone 780-962-0664 or email the Allied Arts Council at alliedac@telus.net

2005.

Artist to Artist

Call for Artists/Artisans Carrot Coffeehouse Pop Up Market August 17th, 2013 10am - 4pm Contact Heather to reserve a spot carrotassist@gmail.com / 780-471-1580

2005.

Artist to Artist

Call for submissions: Equinox Vigil at Union Cemetery, Calgary In a nod to remembrance and reflection of the departed, Equinox Vigil invites artists to create work to be installed at Union Cemetery for the night of September 22nd. Deadline for submissions is midnight, August 23rd. http://www.calgaryartsdevelop ment.com/content/callsubmissions-equinox-vigilunion-cemetery

Call to Artists: Art from the Unknown, Edmonton It’s that time of year again! MLA Rachel Notley is seeking artists for Art from the Unknown, 2013. Deadline for Applications is Sunday, September 8th, 2013 This free event provides a nocost gallery space to new and emerging artists in our community. A new and emerging artist is defined as any artist, regardless of skill level, whose primary income does not come from selling their work. Low-income artists are especially encouraged to apply. For more information: contact Heather Fernhout at 780-414-0702 or email

Edmonton.strathcona@assembly.ab .ca

Edmonton Arts Council Information Session : Edmonton Arts Council Information Session John Mahon Arts Administrators’ Sabbatical Fund (October 2013 deadline) Thursday September 5, 2013 6:30pm – 8pm Kerr Room Prince of Wales Armouries 2nd Floor, 10440 108 Avenue free event, but space is limited so registrations are requested Please register by email to Jana O’Connor joconnor@edmontonarts.ca

Transitory Public Art Program 2014 The Edmonton Arts Council, on behalf of the City of Edmonton, is seeking local applications from a Lead Artist(s) and/or Curator interested in participating in the Transitory Public Art Program 2014. Budget: $30,000.00 maximum per proposal Deadline for Submissions: 4:30 PM on Friday October 25, 2013 Installation: Project Complete by December 2014 For more information, contact the Edmonton Arts Council Dawn Saunders Dahl, Public Art Program Officer phone:(780) 424–2787 ext 229 email:publicart@edmontonarts .ca dsaundersdahl@edmontonarts.ca

SPECIAL CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: The Artisan Nook, Located at The Paint Spot, Edmonton, AB Looking for submissions of Holiday-themed craft/ artisan work for display/ sale Nov/Dec 2013. Artists who craft small, artistic objects are invited to submit exhibition proposals SUBMISSION DEADLINE: September 30, 2013. For further information, contact Michelle at 780 432 0240 accounts@paintspot.ca www.paintspot.ca/galleries

2010.

ALBERTA-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS

Musicians Available

Experienced bass player looking to play with established band. Between the ages of 35 and 55. No heavy metal or punk but willing play 80’s power metal Call Tony 780-484-6806.

AUCTIONS MEIER GUN AUCTION. Saturday, August 31, 11 a.m., 6016 - 72A Ave., Edmonton. Over 150 guns - Handguns, rifles, shotguns, wildlife mounts, hunting and fishing equipment. To consign 780-440-1860.

3010. Old shuffle blues drummer available for gigs. Influences: B.B. King, Freddy King, etc. 780-462-6291

2020.

Musicians Wanted

Bass guitar player looking for Top 40 Band Call Matt 780-484-6806

Auctions

Auction Wed & Fri 6pm 14912-128 ave 780-453-6964 Selling: Tools & Misc * Storage* Estate Items * Coins * Jewellery* etc *Last Friday of Month Large Grocery Auction* *Consignments taken*

3100. Appliances/Furniture Guitarists, bassists, vocalists, pianists and drummers needed for good paying teaching jobs. Please call 780-901-7677

Singer /songwriter looking for mature musicians to collaborate with in songwriting and performing. Influences- Jazz, pop, country and blues. Please e-mail me at: cdguen@telus.net.

2020.

Music Equipment

Fender Vintage Stratocaster sunburst hardshell case wah wah pedal, cords $675.00 780-719-7268

2100.

08 Kenmore Estate Super Duty Capacity, 4 cycle, 2 speed Combination washing machine top load, white, excellent condition 780-719-7268 Leave message

Musicians Wanted

August 2013 - Call for Submissions/Entries to 3rd Annual Memphis Bound Blues Challenge. Entry deadline will be early September 2013. Watch for more details. Edmonton Blues Society conducts their search for two Northern Alberta blues acts, one Solo/Duo act and one Band, to represent EBS and Alberta at the 30th International Blues Challenge in Memphis, Tennessee early 2014. Acts must reside in Alberta from Red Deer, north between BC and Saskatchewan borders. or more info email: ibc@EdmontonBluesSociety.n et Rules and past winners at www.EdmontonBluesSociety.n et

2035.

08 Kenmore Estate 3 speed Combination 220 dryer top load, white, excellent condition $175 780-719-7268 Leave message

Auditions

Mother Goose presented by St. George of England Society. Auditions being held on August 18. Performances in January. For more information, contact: Andrea Friesen at tezronal@shaw.ca or Tom Hill at 439-1631

Two ONE-WAY Tickets To Broadway Productions is holding auditions for the longrunning Off-Broadway hit musical revue. Audition by appointment. Audition dates: Aug 29-30. BOOK: http://www.signupgenius.com/g o/9040845A8AC22A02forbidden SHOW DATES & LOCATION November 8-16, 2013 at La Cite (Theatre), 8627 91 Street, Edmonton

GE Medallion Frost free fridge, white, good working condition $100 780-719-7268 Leave message

3185.

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CCM Rebellion 21 Spd Mtn Bike. LN, Blue & White $150 o.b.o. 780-719-7268 Leave message

Mens Giant 21 spd MT Bike Rockshox, Large frame, blue & silver chrome alloy LN Paid $1200 Asking $450 $200+ worth of extras. 780-719-7268 Leave Message

3190.

Musical Instruments

Goya Antique mandolin new strings, hardshell case excellent tone $450.00 780-719-7268 Leave Message

Hammond L111 dual keyboard, electronic organ All stops; bass pedals mahogany, $750.00 Excellent condition 780-719-7268 Leave message

Kimball Dual keyboard electronic organ, some synchronization, fall keyboard 3 bass pedals, built in drum $450.00 780-719-7268 Leave message

6100.

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‘87 Mercedes Benz 300E Sunroof, tan interior 4DR Maroon, 200 km New Pirellis, runs good, am/fm Needs some TLC $1600.00 780-719-7268 Leave Message

‘92 Ranger 2.3 5 Speed Extend cab; Good Rubber 4x4 150 km silver minor fender damage $1200.00 obo. 780-719-7268 Leave Message

NEED TO ADVERTISE? Province wide classifieds. Reach over 1 million readers weekly. Only $269. + GST (based on 25 words or less). Call this newspaper NOW for details or call 1-800-282-6903 ext. 228. COLLECTOR CAR AUCTION. 6TH Annual Red Deer Fall Finale. September 20 - 21, Westerner Park. Last year sold 77%. Only 100 spaces available. Consign today. 403-3960304. Toll free 1-888-296-0528 ext. 102; www.egauctions.com. 2-DAY ANTIQUE AUCTION. August 24 & 25, 11 a.m. Over 3000 items, furniture, tools, and collectibles. Meier Auctions at 6016 - 72A Ave., Edmonton. To consign 780-440-1860. ESTATE AUCTION. August 17 & 18 - Saturday/Sunday. Collection of oriental & Victorian antiques, art works, & guns! Athabasca, Alberta. Viewing: Fri. 4 - 6; Sat. 9 - 10 a.m. Auction: 10 a.m. both days. Detailed pictures: www.all-riteauctions.com. 780-374-3864; allriteauctions@ syban.net. Licence #194638. KELSEY’S RESTAURANT & Lounge Equipment & Leasehold Dispersal Auction. 1935 Gaetz Ave., Red Deer, Alberta. Tuesday, August 20, 2013 at 11 a.m. See www.montgomeryauctions. com or call 1-800-371-6963.

CAREER TRAINING EQUINE THERAPY CLINICS. Weekends or year long programs. Learn: massage, nutrition, chiropractics, saddle fit, acupressure, herbs, essential oils and more. Contact: www. laodas-way.com. 780-897-7711.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

OUTSIDE SALES PERSON for NAPA Store in Three Hills, Alberta. Automotive parts/service knowledge required and sales experience is valuable. Resume to: dfox@napacanada.com. BLAIRMORE SOBEYS fulltime Baker, full-time Grocery Manager. Wages negotiable. Benefits available. Fax resume to Ken 403-562-8985. ENVIROEX OILFIELD Rentals & Sales Ltd. is looking for a Class 1 Driver to join our team. Oilfield experience is required as well as valid safety tickets. We offer a great benefit package as well as a small company atmosphere. Please fax your resume and a current driver’s abstract 403-501-0397. FREIGHTLAND CARRIERS, a tri-axle air ride flatdeck carrier is looking for Owner/Operators to run Alberta only or 4 Western Provinces. Average gross $18 20,000/month. 1-800-917-9021. AN ALBERTA OILFIELD construction company is hiring dozer and excavator operators. Lodging and meals provided. Drug testing required. Call 780723-5051, Edson, Alberta. NOW LOCATED in Drayton Valley. BREKKAAS Vacuum & Tank Ltd. Wanted Class 1 & 3 Drivers, Super Heater Operators with all valid tickets. Top wages, excellent benefits. Please forward resume to: Email: dv@ brekkaas.com. Phone 780621-3953. Fax 780-621-3959. OPENINGS in Alberta areas for Highway Maintenance Class 1 or 3 Operators. Full-time and part-time positions available. Fax resume to Carillion Canada at 780-449-0574 or email: mcroft@carillionalberta.ca. Positions to start Oct. 15, 2013. Please state what position you are interested in.

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

Marine Engineering Officers are required for various civilian positions with the Department of National Defence in Victoria and Nanoose Bay BC. Online applications only through the Public Service Commission of Canada website, Reference# DND13J-008697-000069, Selection Process# 13-DNDEA-ESQ-375697, Canadian Forces Auxiliary Fleet (CFAV). Applicants must meet all essential qualifications listed and complete the application within the prescribed timelines. **http://jobs-emplois.gc.ca/ index-eng.htm Le ministère de la Défense nationale cherche des Officiers du génie des systèmes de marine pour remplir divers postes de civils à Victoria et Nanoose Bay en Colombie-Britannique. Les candidates et candidats peuvent postuler en ligne seulement, au site Internet de la Commission de la fonction publique du Canada, numéro de référence DND13J-008697-000069, numéro du processus de sélection 13-DND-EA-ESQ-375697, Vaisseaux auxiliaires des forces armées canadiennes. Les postulants doivent posséder toutes les compétences requises énumérées et soumettre leur demande selon l’échéance prescrit. ** http://jobsemplois.gc.ca/index-fra.htm VAC & STEAM Truck Operator. Valid Class 1 or 3, Safety Tickets, Top Wage, Benefits, Camp Work, Experience an Asset. Email/Fax Resume: 780458-8701, bryksent@telus.net. JOURNALISTS, Graphic Artists, Marketing and more. Alberta’s weekly newspapers are looking for people like you. Post your resume online. Free. Visit: www. awna.com/resumes_add.php.

FOR SALE METAL ROOFING & SIDING. Very competitive prices! Largest colour selection in Western Canada. Available at over 25 Alberta Distribution Locations. 40 Year Warranty. Call 1-888-263-8254. STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100, sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-457-2206; www.crownsteelbuildings.ca. STEEL BUILDING - Sizzling Summer Savings Event! 20x22 $4,188. 25x24 $4,598. 30x36 $6,876. 32x44 $8,700. 40x52 $12,990. 47x70 $17,100. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422; www. pioneersteel.ca. BUILDINGS FOR SALE. Two unclaimed buildings. Must be sold. One is 40x80x16. Great savings! Hurry, these won’t last! Go direct/save. Rocket Steel Canada. 1-877-218-2661. RESTLESS LEG SYNDROME & leg cramps? Fast relief in one hour. Sleep at night. Proven for over 32 years; www.allcalm.com. Mon-Fri, 8-4 EST. 1-800-765-8660.

MANUFACTURED HOMES 70 HOMES BUILT and ready for delivery. 20 different 1520 square foot models, packed with options. Priced from $129,900, delivered. Toll free 1-855-463-0084; www.jandelhomes.com. CROSS COUNTRY HOMES. Check out our show homes that are ready for fall possession. Or custom build in only 8 weeks to match your own inspiration! Visit us in Acheson. 780-4708000; www.crosscountryhomes. com.

FACTORY DIRECT Wholesale CSA certified modular homes. Manufactured/mobile homes and park model homes. We ship throughout western Canada. Visit us online at www.hbmodular.com or 1-877-976-3737. LAST ONE! SRI 2012. 4 bedroom/2 bath. Tons of options. 20’ X 76’. New stock arriving - must go! Was $127,900. Delivered, blocked (100 miles). Blow out $117,900. 4 stainless appliances, etc. Call now! 1-877-3414422; www.dynamicmodular.ca. GRANDVIEW MODULAR HOMES now open in Red Deer & Airdrie! Showcasing high-end homes from Grandeur Housing and Palm Harbor Homes. Inquire about opening specials; www.grandviewmodular.com; 1-855-347-0417; 7925B - 50 Ave., Red Deer. HOMES, COTTAGES & More. RTMI - Ready to Move in. Call 1-888-733-1411; rtmihomes. com. Red Tag Sale on now!

PERSONALS TRUE PSYCHICS! For Answers call now 24/7 Toll Free 1-877342-3036; Mobile: # 4486; http://www.truepsychics.ca. DATING SERVICE. Long-term/ short-term relationships. Free to try! 1-877-297-9883. Live intimate conversation, Call #7878 or 1-888-534-6984. Live adult 1on1 Call 1-866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet local single ladies. 1-877-804-5381. (18+).

PETS PET SUPPLIES ONLINE! 1000’S of products to choose from. Take 15% off your order with coupon code: SALE15. Sale runs till the end of August; www. petland.ca. 1-855-839-0555.

REAL ESTATE ELINOR LAKE RESORT. 2.5 hours NE of Edmonton. Fully serviced lake lots for sale. Suitable for cabin/house, RV, or investment. Unserviced lots available for lease. 1-877-623-3990; www.elinorlakeresort.com.

SERVICES DO YOU NEED to borrow money - Now? If you own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits will lend you money - It’s that simple. 1-877-486-2161. CRIMINAL RECORD? Think: Canadian pardon. U.S. travel waiver. (24 hour record check). Divorce? Simple. Fast. Inexpensive. Debt recovery? Alberta collection to $25,000. Calgary 403-228-1300/1-800-347-2540; www.accesslegalresearch.com. DROWNING IN DEBT? Cut debts more than 50% & debt free in half the time! Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation; www.mydebtsolution. com or toll free 1-877556-3500. BBB rated A+. FAST AND EASY loans! Bad credit accepted! Get up to $25,000 on your vehicle, mobile home, land or equipment. 1st and 2nd mortgages; www.bhmcash.com. 1-877-787-1682. MONEYPROVIDER.COM. $500 loan and +. No credit refused. Fast, easy, 100% secure. 1-877-776-1660. BANK SAID NO? Bank on us! Equity Mortgages for purchases, debt consolidation, foreclosures, renovations. Bruised credit, self-employed, unemployed ok. Dave Fitzpatrick: www.albertalending. ca. 587-437-8437, Belmor Mortgage.

BACK 43


ADULTCLASSIFIEDS

0195.

Personals

Sexy feminine transvestite healthy , mature avail for appreciative white or native man Over 40 Daytime is best 780-604-7440. No Texts

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44 BACK

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VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

BACK 45


JONESIN' CROSSWORD

DAN SAVAGE SAVAGELOVE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

MATT JONES JONESINCROSSWORDS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

“A Clean Start”--things are starting to bubble up. Dear readers: two excellent writers stepped in to answer the Savage Love Letter of the Day while I was on vacation, and I wanted to share two of their responses in the column this week. (The SLLOTD appears daily—cough, cough—on Slog, The Stranger's blog, and is blasted out to folks who have the Savage Love app.) First up is Daniel Bergner. He's the award-winning author of four books of nonfiction. His newest book is What Do Women Want? Adventures in the Science of Female Desire, which Salon said "should be read by every woman on earth."

INTRUDER FANTASY

Across

1 “You couldn’t have made it more obvious?” 5 Driveway sealer 8 Football coach Amos Alonzo ___ 13 Impressive spread 15 Focus of 1999 protests in Seattle 16 Baby who was renamed Clark Kent 17 With 25-across, “Fantasia” role for Mickey Mouse 19 Olympic skater Slutskaya 20 Auberjonois’s “Deep Space Nine” role 21 Iraq neighbor 22 Bridge abstention 23 Square figure? 25 See 17-across 27 Sabermetrician’s stats 29 Creeping growth 30 “See ya” in Sevilla 33 I-5, for one 34 Oscar winner Winslet 38 Photo-ops for one 42 Edible seaweed 43 Hot cider server 44 Greek letters 45 Genre for Fall Out Boy 46 Worn threads 48 Fruits that flavor Puckertinis 53 American Lit., e.g. 57 ___ Tages (someday, in German) 58 Proprietor 60 Tony-winning role for Robert Morse 61 Eastwood of westerns 62 2007-08 Boston-based reality show setting up dates during MLB games 64 “Cosi fan ___” (Mozart opera) 65 Poet’s palindromic preposition 66 Ravine 67 Stone Age weapon 68 Music game with a floor pad, for short 69 Supply hidden in the first two letters of the long answers’ words

Down

1 Actor Bateman 2 Wear away 3 “File not found,” e.g. 4 Actor Efron of “High School Musical” 5 Pipsqueaks 6 Take ___ down memory lane

46 BACK

7 Refried beans brand 8 Made with skim milk, at a coffee shop 9 Fortune teller’s deck 10 Story 11 Photo finish? 12 Forest clearing 14 Verbal nod 18 “Million Second Quiz” host Seacrest 24 Go limp 26 Have You ___? (game like Truth or Dare) 28 Letters on an Olympic jersey 30 “Try me!” 31 Female rabbit or deer 32 Unwell 33 TV chihuahua 34 Etch A Sketch controls 35 Perform in plays 36 Bagged leaves 37 Road twist 39 Shoe type 40 Popped the question 41 Oxygen source 45 Holiday with fake grass 46 Boomer’s kid 47 On the waves 48 Bands of believers 49 Get ready for a bodybuilding competition 50 Come together 51 Fashion designer Oscar de la ___ 52 With “The,” groundbreaking Showtime TV series 54 “In ___” (Nirvana) 55 Brazilian actress Sonia ___ 56 Kentucky Derby drink 59 Dungeons & Dragons, e.g. 63 Neg.’s counterpart ©2013 Jonesin' Crosswords

I came out as gay during my marriage five years ago. (I'm a woman who doesn't like the word "lesbian.") I want to be in relationships with women, get married, etc, but I haven't dated since my divorce. But I'm ready to start. I started on Craigslist in the w4w section and then moved to the m4w section, looking to fulfill a pegging fantasy. In working up the courage to respond to one guy's ad—and then emailing/texting a total stranger that I was masturbating—I thought of asking for my own fantasy: intruder sex with a stranger. I asked if we could first "meet" without meeting: go to a coffee shop, sit across the room from each other and flirt via text. If that went well, I wanted him to follow me to my place (stalk me), break in, rough me up a little, fuck me and leave. That was too intense for him. Which is fine. There are other guys. I don't consider this a rape fantasy. I am NOT turned on by rape. I've been raped, and it was the worst experience of my life. This is consensual sex. I don't want to meet directly because I want him to remain a stranger. I want to be safe. I'll have a safe word. I would also like to discuss this with my therapist, who I've been seeing for years, because I was sexually abused by my father, my cousin and my mom's boyfriend. I feel so hung up all the time by the fear of being raped that it has restricted my ability to enjoy anything. Maybe by doing this I can face that fear and no longer be controlled by it. I'm also completely turned on by it. My questions: can I do this safely? Is this healthy? Am I still a gay girl if I fulfil some kinky fantasies with men? Not Wanting Rape So you haven't talked to your therapist about this but you're reaching out for advice online, you're declaring yourself a gay woman but you're starting your post-divorce erotic life hunting for sex with men, you'd like that sex to commence with a "meeting" that is a nonmeeting, and you

want to be stalked, roughed up a bit and fucked by an intruder in a way that bears only a minimal (and constructive) relationship to your having been raped and, before that, sexually abused by an assault squad of family members. Since your letter is full of paradox, can I tell you something paradoxical? Your fantasies are utterly hot and are absolutely nothing to be ashamed of, but they scream out, "Slow down and seek serious counsel!" Do you see the pattern, NWR? Everything you want, everything you lust for, is at the same time somehow avoided or semi-denied? And it's not that you're unwise about yourself. You do draw connections. Father, cousin, mom's boyfriend performed some work on the core of your psyche, where eros lives, and probably laid down some of the wiring for your current yearnings. This does not mean your fantasies are weird (rape fantasies—I'm going to call them that—are among the most common sexual scenarios women imagine while masturbating or having sex), but it does mean you've got some deeper thinking to do before you take real risks. Because what I'm sensing is searing heat, a swirl of confusion and a deluded hope that you can reliably control the forces you're about to unleash. "I have a safe word." Not necessarily, NWR. Words aren't always going to be heeded by total strangers you've only glimpsed and texted and asked to get rough with you. I am sounding like a prude and a killjoy. I'm not. I'm pretty sure you can pull off some version of what you wish—with a measure of safety—when you're thinking a little more clearly. I'm all for seizing ecstasy in the present while exorcising the horrors of your past. I'm just saying, know thyself a tad better. When you're thinking more clearly, you'll be a better judge of the right not-rapist, one who will respect your script. As for your last question—"Am I still a gay girl?"—let go of categories. Our human complexity outdoes the divides. If you're turned on by both genders—and almost every bit of research I've encountered over the last eight years of writing about desire suggests that women often are—count yourself lucky. Your options are enviably wide. —Daniel Bergner

THIS ISN'T LOVE

I am a 21-year-old straight male. I am in love but miserable. My girlfriend has a bad temper and is extremely needy. She is rude to my seven-year-old brother and gets angry when I spend time with him. She won't allow me to see family or other friends because I have to spend all of my free time with her. Some-

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

times she hits me when she's angry. She reads all my texts, but when I ask to read hers, she won't let me. The problem is, I love her. She says she can't live without me, and I'm worried that if I break up with her, she'll do something drastic. What can I do? Please help! Manipulated Man Let's take a look at a few of the descriptors you used for this hideous person you say you're in love with: bad temper, needy, rude, angry, violent. Based on your description, I'd throw in manipulative and controlling, too. Where are all the positive words people in love normally use? In other words, why do you love her? Because the person you have described is decidedly unlovable. Here in Michigan, the rightwingers that have taken over our state have demonized our teachers and made "union member" into a slanderous phrase. They've worked overtime to take away women's reproductive rights and raised taxes on the poor and the elderly. They've been complete assholes to everyone but their business pals. But every now and then they do something nice. When they do, people fall all over themselves to thank them. Then these assholes turn around and do the same stuff all over again. That's the position you're in. You have a choice to make— continue to be treated like a doormat by this abusive woman, or recognize that you're being abused and kick her to the curb. You'll soon find out that she can live just fine without having you to wipe her feet on. You're fortunate, MM: you can do this now. In Michigan, we have to wait until Election Day 2014. —Chris Savage Chris Savage is Michigan's most widely read progressive political blogger. Rachel Maddow calls Chris's blog—Eclectablog. com—"the indispensable Michigan politics source." In addition to his writing, he is an organizer for the Michigan Democratic Party, where work is already under way to return control of Michigan's state government to Democrats in 2014. You can (and should) follow Chris on Twitter @Eclectablog. A big thank you to Daniel Bergner and Chris Savage for filling in for me over the last two weeks. To read all of their SLLOTD responses, go slog.thestranger. com/slog/archives/savage-love. On the Savage Lovecast: Brazilian waxes for men, from the waxer's perspective, at savagelovecast.com. V @fakedansavage on Twitter


VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013

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48 BACK BACON BONANZA

VUEWEEKLY AUG 15 – AUG 21, 2013


930: Fringe to Fringe