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Veerashaiva Samaja of North America

Arivu Embracing the essence of knowledge 32nd VSNA CONVENTION Chicago, Illinois

Acharave Swarga CjªÀÅ

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July 3, 2009 TABLE OF CONTENTS

«µÀAiÀÄ ¸ÀÆa President, Chicago Chapter of VSNA……………………

Channu Kambalyal………………………

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President, Central VSNA …………………………………………

Sundaresh Siddaiah……………………

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Convention Chairperson………………………………………….

Bhavani Moodbagil………………………

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Editorial…………………………………………………………………….

Shivakumar…………………………………

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Greetings from the Mayor of Chicago …………………….

Richard M. Daley ………………………

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Greetings from the Governor of Illinois ……………………. Patrick Quinn …………………………..

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Achara Makes This World a Heaven…………………………

Dr. Siddheswar Swamiji……………………

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Thoughts On Veerashaivism…………………………………….

Dr. Shivaratri Desikendra Swamiji……

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Sivadvaita’s Sivayoga……………………………………………….

Lingaraju……………………………………

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The Journey of VSNA…………………………………………………… Guruswamy Ayya………………………

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Watch What You Eat…………………………………………………… Naga Manohar……………………………

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Basava Consciousness………………………………………………… Ramjan Darga……………………………

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Dasoha: A Glorious Veerashaiva Tradition…………………… Kishore Channabasavaiah…………

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Convention Committee Members List……………………….. …………………………………………………

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Path to the Covention in Pictures………………………………………………………………………………………

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Sharana Movement and the Other Half……………………

Vimala Puranik ……………………………

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Compassion, the Very Root of Religion…………………….

Basavaraja Puranik………………………

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Sri Basaveswara…………………………………………………………

Danashree………………………………………… 39

Why Should We be Proud of Veerashaivism?.............

Ravi Amblee………………………………………… 42

Basavanna –A Man Truly Ahead if His Time………………

Basu Hullur………………………………………… 45

Kayaka – The Message of Basavanna……………………….

Prabhashankar Premi……………………….

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Glory of Linga……………………………………………………………… Guru Bale…………………………………………… 49 Bike and Build……………………………………………………………… Swaroop Gonchikar…………………………… 53 VSNA Chicago -360 Degree Survey…………………………….

Channu Kambalyal…………………………….. 55

DZÁgÀ –ªÀævÀ-¤µÉÖAiÉÄà ¥ÁætªÁzÀ CPÀ̪ÀÄä………………………………

Leeladevi Prasad……………………………….

¥ÀæPÀÈwAiÉÄà UÀÄgÀÄ UÀUÀ£À°AUÀªÀÅ (poem) ……………………………….

Dr. G.S. Shivarudrappa……………………… 63

Dedicated to your Service (poem) ………………………….

Jeevan Topgi….………………………………….. 63

±ÀÆ£Àå ¸ÀA¥ÁzÀ£É………………………………………………………………

Tara Murthy……………………………………… 64

§¸ÀªÀAiÀÄÄUÀzÀ°è ¹ÛçÃAiÀÄgÀ ¥ÁvÀæ………………………………………

Anusuya Shivakumar………………………… 69

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PÀªÀ£ÀUÀ¼ÀÄ……………………………………………………………………..

Neetha Dhananjaya………………………….. 71

“CjªÀÅ” ¥ÀzÀgÀAUÀ ……………………..……………………………..

Annapur Shivakumar……………………….

£ÀÄrzÀAvÉ £ÀqÉAiÀÄ¢zÀðqÉ……………………..……………………..

Prabhashankar Premi……………………….. 75

ªÁAiÀÄÄ«ºÁgÀ ªÀÄvÀÄÛ «ZÁgÀ«ºÁgÀ………………………………………

Dr. Shivamurthy Shivacharya……………

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Holistic Health for All……………………..…………………………

L. Sannellappanavar……………………..

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Continuing Medical Education Program…………………….. P.S. Shankar………………………………….

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Yoga in Kannada Literature………………………………………..

S. Sannellappanavar……………………..

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Staying Afloat……………………..……………………………………..

Chaitra Kishore……………………..…………… 91

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Global Warming (a poem) ……………………..…………………… Shreya Dhananjaya…………………………… 92 Vachanas……………………..……………………..…………………….. Akshay Indushekar……………………………

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Basavanna’s Ideals Reflected in Rama’s Actions……….

Mallikarjun Virupannavar…………………

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One’s Actions – A Symbol of Good Conduct……..…………… Chiranth Kishore……………………………….

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Purity of Mind and Good Conduct……………………………..

Eshwar Kishore…………………………………

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Ayya……………………..……………………..…………………………….

Jeevan Topgi……………………..……………… 99

Allama Prabhu……………………..……………………..…………….

Nikhil Shiva……………………..………………… 106

Akkamahadevi……………………..……………………..……………

Sachin Shiva……………………..………………… 106

Our VSNA Graduates [Pictures & Bio] …………………….

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Donors, Sponsors, Advertisers {Table}

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C£ÀĨsÁªÀ ……………………..…………………………….

Veeranna Gowda Rajura…………………

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ARIVU EDITORIAL COMMITTEE Managing Editor H.S. Jayaswamy Edotor-in-Chief Dr. Annapur Shivakumar Editors Basavarajappa Indusekar Ravindra Topgi Vanitha Satish Youth Editors Chaitra Kishore Akshay Indusekar Manisha Virupannavar

*Cover Page Design by Chaitra Kishore*

Editorial Committee greatly acknowledges the assistance rendered by the VSNA Members

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Welcome Message President, VSNA Chicago Chapter

On behalf of the VSNA Chicago Chapter, it gives me great pleasure to welcome you all Veerashaivas from around the world, to the 32nd VSNA Annual Convention in this beautiful city of Chicago. It is indeed a great honor for giving our chapter the opportunity to host the convention after 10 years. Every member of the VSNA Chicago Chapter, along with the strong support and encouragement from the Central VSNA Office-bearers and your chapter presidents, has worked very hard for months to make this event a memorable one for all of you. Our elder members have taken extra effort to guide us in organizing this event to be a fault-proof one. Our leadership team has been meticulous in going over details of the programs over the last few weeks. Our youth members have ‘as usual’ come up with innovative ideas and items, and will showcase their talent and spiritual understanding of our religion and culture that we in the Chicago Chapter cherish. Many of our spiritual leaders, professionals, and entrepreneurs from all over the world will share their rich experiences with you. Dear Veerashaivas, we once again welcome you all to this windy city of Chicago to enjoy the hospitality of the VSNA Chicago Chapter and experience the time of your lives. Channu Kambalyal President, VSNA Chicago Chapter

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Welcome Message President Veerashaiva Samaja of North America Non Profit tax exempt Religious Organization

Dear Fellow Veerashaivas, VSNA Conventions have built a reputation for bringing together scholars of high understanding with stimulating depth about tenets of Veerashaivism. To meet the expectations of the conference, our aim is to get the most suited individuals for the occasion. Organizing a VSNA convention requires lots of dedication and commitment from the families of the hosting chapter. On behalf of Executive Committee and all Veerashaivas of North America, I would like to thank the host chapter of Chicago for making this event happen and I deeply appreciate the commitment of its members in bringing out the commemorative book titled “ARIVU” on the occasion of the VSNA Convention 2009. The VSNA Convention Organizing committee have shown great dedication and enthusiasm in bringing together the spiritual experience in connecting all the members of veerashaivas across the globe selecting the theme for the VSNA Annual Convention 2009 in Chicago as “Acharave Swarga” . We thank all the contributors of the articles and sponsors for their generous contribution and support for the publication of book and it’s release within a short period of time during the convention. With this milestone release of the book the legacy of our culture and religion carries forward with VSNA as its platform. On behalf of the VSNA Executive Committee we wish the very best and looking forward to taking our beloved organization to the next level. With Best Wishes

On behalf of VSNA Executive Committee Sundaresh Siddiah President of VSNA

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Welcome Message Chairperson ANNUAL VSNA CONVENTION

July 3, 2009 Dear Veerashaiva Members: On behalf of the Chicago chapter members, I welcome you to 32nd Annual Convention with vigor and excitement. We invite you with great pleasure to join the fellow Veerashaivas from across the country, Canada and around the world to participate. VSNA-Chicago Chapter is honored to host this year’s Veerashiava convention in this exciting town of Chicago, hometown of our new US president! Our theme of the convention – Aacharave Swarga – “good character can attain heavenly abode” truly proven in bringing this convention to you. Committee members have worked very hard to give you the most memorable convention ever in Chicago. We have put together 2 days of activities for all generations to savor. Seniors, adults, youth, men, women and children all have something to appreciate and take back as the event of the year in various activities, including this commemorative souvenir Arivu! We are blessed indeed to have three prominent swamijis to give us their support and guidance for our way of life – JSS Suttur Mutt Swamiji of Mysore, Sri Siddeshwara Swamiji of Bijapur and Sri Shivamurthy Swamiji of Sirigere. We are very pleased to have our prominent key note speakers who have graciously travelled from India on this occasion – Sri Basavaraj Puranik and Mrs. Ningamma Pathange. Though Sri Ramjan Darga is unable to join us, we are delighted to have his video message for our convention. We want to thank all our sponsors who have generously helped us to bring this successful convention to you and your family. We invite you to enjoy the two days of learning, mingling, making new friends and greeting old friends and families. What comes tomorrow, let it come today, As William Shakespeare said, “join your hands, with your hands, your hearts” and let’s all together make this a great VSNA 2009 convention for all of us! Thank you.

What comes today, Let it come right now, Do not say now or later. Chenna Mallikarjuna Akka Mahadevi

Sincerely,

Bhavani Moodabagil Convention Chair

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EDITORIAL “The covers of this book are too far apart”, was the response by Ambrose Bierce, a famous American Journalist from the yester-years. It may be true with this volume in your hands, but we certainly hope that the journey between these covers would be pleasant and certainly be worthwhile. Veerashaiva literature flourished in Karnataka many centuries ago and formed the basis for growth of much of the Kannada literary world. It encompasses our philosophy and is built upon day to day personal experiences or “anubhava” and comes out as the essence of knowledge which we embrace fondly. This is what “ARIVU”, the title of this volume is meant to reflect. The title was voted upon after much discussion with our local Veershaiva populace. The other two finalists for the title were “Bilva” and “Garike”. The compilation of this volume was made easy by an overwhelming response by writers from far and near. We have taken a welcome departure from the traditional release of the Souvenir Issue which used to happen days and months after the convention. We are glad and thankful to our Executive Committee who listened to our proposal that we should release it during the convention and that it should provide a platform for our writers to reflect their literary talents. The pre-convention activities are presented in this issue and the convention proceedings including the speeches by our dignitaries and pontiffs will be covered in a supplemental issue to be mailed out after the convention. Leading proponents of our Veerashaiva philosophy have penned their thoughts and many of our young writers have jumped in with their views. Our philosophy and dharma – what it meant, what it was, what actually it is today, and where it is headed – are aptly discussed with different perspectives. It is a reflection of the thought processes and a springboard for healthy discussions. It is meant to be a “Keepsake” volume and not a namesake one. We will be pleased if you find that to be true after journeying between the covers. We welcome your comments and feedbacks. The support, both moral and financial, for this issue has come from many quarters. We thank the sponsors, advertisers, and the printers. My sincere personal thanks go my partner-in-life, Anusuya Shivakumar, who helped me with her deft fingers on the keyboard and allowing me to take time off from my usual chores and concentrate on this publication. Our editorial committee members have been great and our chapter members have pitched in several ways and placed their trust on me. I am thankful for their support. The Souvenir Editorial Committee hopes that you will be able to bring back happy memories of your time here at the convention in our world famous city of Chicago. We hope that you enjoy reading the articles on Veerashaivism. If they help you to awaken, switch on your awareness and motivate you to delve into that deep pile of “Veerashaiva Bhandara”, we will feel a sense of accomplishment. Sharanu Sharanaarthi. Annapur Shivakumar Editor-in-Chief On behalf of the Souvenir Editorial Committee: H. S. Jayaswamy {Managing Editor}, Indusekar, Ravi Topgi, Vanitha Satish, Akshay Indusekar, Manisha Virupannavar, and Chaitra Kishore.

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Achara Makes This World a Heaven Sri. Siddeshwar Swamiji Jnanayogasharam Bijapur, Karnataka, India

Heaven is not somewhere in the sky; it is here on the earth - the world of mortal beings. This earth is a wonderful planet, unique and beautiful. It has hills and high mountains; rivers and vast oceans; myriad kinds of trees and plants; and varieties of animals, small as well as big. Whatever is needed to live comfortably and joyfully, it is there. Flowers of varied colors, fruits of manifold tastes, murmuring brooks of cool water, raining clouds and singing birds. Just imagine anything excellent (marvelous) it is here on the Earth. What else could there be in the wonder world of God things? However, to enjoy this terrestrial heaven a clean and spiritually cultured heart is needed. A hateful, envious and greedy heart cannot delight in the natural beauty; the ego infested self cannot feel the hidden presence of the Divine being in both living and non– living objects of this world. For people with such unclean hearts, this world appears to be ‘Martya’ – mortal, sorrowful, worry causing and hellish. It is these men and women who conceive that the heaven (the abode of bliss) is beyond the visible province and this earth is no better than a hell. When the human mind is purified of all such malignant feelings (hatred, greed, envy and ego) the man begins to see the Divine nature of the world; to him, this Earthly world itself becomes a heaven – a place of Divine beauty and happiness. But, how to purify and strengthen the mind? Here comes into sight the Achar; Sri Basaweshwar a great thinker and mystic of all times, says that Achar is capable of cleaning the mind and enabling it to see the terrestrial world as not different from heaven. Now, the problem is what is this Achara? Literally it means activity, behavior, and performance. And technically it means a spiritual discipline, a training of mind and character (to produce self control as well as appeasement). This unique spiritual discipline (Achar) prescribed by Sharanas (Saints who lived in Karnataka nine hundred years before) is seven fold; is of seven divisions, Viz., Kriyavichaar, Jnanachaar,

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Bhavachaar, Sattyachaar, Nittyachaar, Dharmachaar & Sarvachaar. 1. The cultivation of physical activities: Doing good works sincerely for one’s good, and for the good of others. By this our body becomes purified. 2. The discipline of the intellect: Using one’s cognitive organs and the intellect to know the world as it is. And to see deeper into it to find out its real nature. By this our senses and intellect become purified. 3. The discipline of emotion: Cultivating love for one’s neighbors, and all people in general; showing love towards birds, beasts and plants. Feeding the poor, serving the suffering, teaching the unschooled and consoling the distressed. This purges our mind of all its ugly and unhealthy emotions. 4. The discipline of the speech and thought: It is the Truth that prevails, and not the untruth. It is the Truth that enriches the life, and not the untruth. On quick sands the temple of happiness cannot be built. The spiritual seeker has to learn to love the truth, live it and convey it through his speech. This removes our attachment to the sense objects. 5. The discipline of (our) attitude: We usually look upon this world as simply a material expansion. It is full of objects, which we perceive through our senses and try to get pleasure from them. This sensory pleasure binds us to this material world. Consequently, we suffer from worries and cares. Hence, to get freed from this pain– causing bondage the seeker of peace and freedom has to change his attitude towards the world. He has to look at it as a manifestation of the divine principle. If he does so, everything that he experiences becomes ‘Prasad’ God’s favor, God’s blessing. This makes him ever cheerful. Worries no more trouble him. His life on this earth becomes a sacred experience. Page 11


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July 3, 2009 seeing the heavenly face of this world. Akka Mahadevi, a great lady saint of 12th century of Karnataka says “O, God You are all these forests and trees; you are all these animals and birds. This whole world is filled with you. This is not just the earth of mortals; it is marvelous abode of thee, the immortal Reality ″

6. The discipline of the mind: It is to make our mind absorbed in the thought of the Divine existence. It is a little deep meditation on the meaning of mystical formulae such as ‘Om Namah Shivaya ’. ‘Om’ is a sound symbol of ‘Infinite Reality’, while the other part of mantra means ‘I offer myself unto the Divine Being Shiva ’. This meditation, if done regularly, bestills the mind. 7. The discipline, Final: Lastly, the sense of ‘I’ is to go; it is to be Offered into the cosmic consciousness into the endless and boundless presence of God. Thus, this sevenfold discipline cleans our mind, gives a new vision to us; in consequence we begin

To make a summary of it: Achara is a spiritual discipline; Swarga is heaven, a place of God, a paradise of spiritual joy, When we discipline all our activities, internal external, we begin to feel the Divine presence in all things; we feel we live in the kingdom of God. Being freed from hatredness and attachment, greed and ego, we enjoy our life on this earth. This joy is not just material; it is a spiritual joy. ****

Best Wishes To VEERASHAIVA SAMAJA OF NORTH AMERICA 32nd ANNUAL CONVENTION

Priya, Shreya, Neetha & Nandish Dhananjaya

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THOUGHTS ON VEERASAIVISM Jagadguru Sri Shivaratri Deshikendra Mahaswamiji Sri Suttur Math Mysore District, Karnataka In an age when religions and religious values have come under scrutiny it is necessary that they need to be reoriented to meet the needs and aspirations of modern day life. World religions all along their history have continued to inspire man's moral and spiritual ethos thereby his social, economic and cultural expressions continue to remain a part of the zeitgeist. Virasaivism continues to pursue this goal in letter and spirit in the light of its tenets as propounded by its founders. A religion of inclusive dynamics, its ability to pin down and indentify human priorities is really astonishing. Its philosophical and epistemological foundation is firmly rooted in the soil of the earth giving, comparatively speaking, more importance to man's worldly existence. It is a religion that mainly appropriates to itself the responsibility of guiding man as an integral component of society always keeping in view his religious, social, economic and spiritual needs. The vital impulse of the religion is aptly summed up in the words of Basaveswara:

The Virasaiva religion is founded by theo-centric liberals whose chief objective was to make individuals live here on earth meaningfully and not to circumscribe them in any manner including in the name of God. It expects every individual to experience its ethereal side practically and feel its theological and spiritual impact while living through ones righteous words and deeds. The course of action-oriented life it insists on everybody to adopt promises, metaphysically speaking, ever new sense and direction to human Arivu

The Shiva Sharanas of the 12th century did in fact rewrite the cosmic laws in their religious context by way of reasoning and experiencing that a single divine law rules over the entire cosmos. The Vachana literature is replete with instances showing that God is one and there is no second. Though each one of them has used in their vachanas an identifiable insignia only to distinguish them and their exclusivity, all of them believed in the existence of a single divine entity. In one of his vachanas Basaveshwara observes: Whichever way I look Thou only art, O Lord! The form of all the circumambient space Thou only art, O Lord ! Thou art the universal eye, O Lord, and Thou the universal force! Thou art the arms of All, O Lord, And thou the feet O Kudala Sangama Lord!

What you call world of gods, What you call mortal world, Are they some other place? Why, in this very world Are infinite worlds besides! Where godlike works are done There is the Siva World; The place where the devout is That is the world of gods; The devout's courtyard is A Varanasi; and his body is Kailasa! This is a fact, O Lord Kudala Sangama!

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life and its purpose. It views birth, existence and death as something fearlessly that deserves to be lived and experienced. Living spiritually is a passion with Virasaivism. The Sharanas, devotees of Siva, lived it and demonstrated to the world that the Virasaiva path way to self-realization is marked with experience-divine spread across the whole length of one’s existential life on earth.

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Therefore, the religion of the Shiva Sharanas was exclusively based on monotheistic concepts of the divine manifestation. To earn God's grace and to be one with Him ultimately the Sharanas have unequivocally stressed the importance of the path of devotion and complete surrender to Him. To help facilitate the ultimate realization the Virasaiva religion holds that every individual is a cosmic person. He or she has the necessary potential to feel and understand the presence of the divine element in him or her that however needs to be awakened. This divine element or the impersonal personality as has the Absolute been described by the Sharanas present in every individual is well within the grasp of a true Page 13


CjªÀÅ Arivu devotee. It is the thin veil of ignorance that separates the mortal and the divine. If this veil can be shorn of, the mortal will certainly be at the doors of the divine. Siddhalinga Yathi says, The body of Siva itself is Devotee, The body of Devotee itself is Siva; The spirit of Siva itself is Devotee And spirit of Devotee itself is Siva; The Devotee's mind and will And senses are themselves the Devotee; Therefore Siva is devotee, The Devotee is Siva O Mahalingaguru Sivasiddheswara Lord.

Probably the most important preoccupation of the 12th Century Sharanas was the emancipation of the individual who was till then caught in the web of religious anachronism, superstitions and beliefs that divided society on the lines of social hierarchy. For the Sharanas believed that all are equal by birth. They never discriminated between man and woman. To progress spiritually and realize oneself, the integral association of God and the human soul, was well within the reach of both man and woman, they declared. The reforms that the Sharanas envisaged and initiated created an environment that men and women belonging to the lower strata of society exhibited an unprecedented hunger for spiritual justice. As against the deeply entrenched religious orthodoxy men and women in countless numbers sought redemption individually and collectively aiming at the creation of an egalitarian society based on the principles of equality and fraternal brotherhood. To illustrate this, the example of a woman saint who remaining anonymous barring her husband's name, Masanayya, can be cited. Her intense search for self realization is found earnestly expressed in the following vachana: Why you don't help me know myself? help me Know myself : help not to know you. He who is ignorant of himself is ignorant of you also. Not helping me to know myself if you help me know you You aren't my preceptor nor am I your disciple. If helped to know myself you are my guru I'm your sishya, Gajesvara, the beloved of Masanayya

The Vachana is a wonderful colloquy reflecting on thoughts about her attempts at self-realization. Such instances abound in the Vachana literature,

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July 3, 2009 considered one of the best literary achievements of mankind. The two most enduring values that the Shiva Sharanas gave to the world are Kayaka and Dasoha which are of everlasting significance to mankind. The Sharanas not only propounded these values theoretically but practiced them in their everyday life, each one of them setting a personal example to demonstrate that here is a path that in itself is a means and an end to divinity. Kayaka means righteous work aimed at earning righteously. Wealth earned righteously is fit for divine dispensation. In doing so the Sharanas rendered every kind of work or labour, divine or sacred, thereby abolishing the notion that some professions are high and others low. Similarly they earmarked that any kind of superfluous wealth should go to meet the needs of the deserving in society. They were opposed to the idea of hoarding which they knew would stunt economic growth. They knew that social, economic and religious equality would usher in innovative trends in one's cultural growth. From this point of view the founders of Virasaivism were certainly great social scientists who treating individuals as significant components of society promoted higher and nobler interests of mankind such as spirituality for the realization of the ultimate. Lastly, a word on istalinga that a Virasaiva or a Lingayat is enjoined to worship. Istalinga is not a deity commonly worshipped in temples. It is a symbol of the formless, of the Absolute worn on the body of a devotee. It is also described as the microcosmic light inherent in every devotee symbolizing the macrocosmic soul, a synthesis of suprapersonal and teleological aspects of the Supreme Reality. In Virasaiva parlance Sagunasiva or the formless form of Siva is called istalinga and a devotee as anga or body. The merging of the one with the other and the resultant bliss is termed as the integral association or merging of God and the human soul. That anybody or everybody can receive istalinga from a competent guru and get initiated to the Virasaiva path of divine consciousness, lingangasamarasya.. This is the summum bonum of the teachings of Virasaivism as visualized by the Sharanas through its long history ***

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SIVADVAITAS’ SIVAYOGA Dr. Linga Raju, Plainview, NY Veerasaivas (VS) believe that the Individual Self and the Universal Self are one and the same. The Universal Self is referred to as Sunya, Linga, Mahalinga, Siva, Parasiva, and in Upanishadic terms Brahman, Parabrahman and Paramatman. The Individual Self is referred to as Linga, Atmalinga, Atman and Jeevatman. The literal meaning of Sunya is void or emptiness. Sunya is permanent, eternal and real. The universe and worldly existence are also real and evolved in an orderly process. God being real, and everything else being real and within God, is the Absolute Reality of the VS. Advaita Vedanta of Sankaracharya followers (advaitas) agree with the VS in believing in oneness (non-duality) and that God is real, but they fundamentally disagree and say everything else is an illusion. They maintain that God is tranquil – static not dynamic. They consider that all consciousness is activity and therefore not consistent with the Absolute. But the Absolute to Sivadvaitas is at once static and dynamic and that existence without selfconsciousness would be null. The VS’ belief that the Absolute is not only self-luminous but also selfconscious distinguishes the sivadvaitas from the advaitas. Buddhists also use the term Sunya for the Absolute and Ultimate Principle. They disagree with both the VS and advaitas in believing that Sunya is impermanent. But they agree with the advaitas and assert that this universe is unreal, imaginary and false; that existence itself is an illusion; and that the Soul is not real. Dvaita is a person who believes in duality – the individual and God are two separate entities. Although some Hindus appear to be dvaitas, the ultimate goal of all Hindus is to become one with God. The concept of duality appears to be followed by Jews, Christians and Muslims. Please note that any comparison to others is to better understand the Veerasaiva Philosophy, and not in any way to state which belief

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is superior. Also note that most of what is written in this article is taken, in parts word for word, from SUNYASAMPADANE volumes I through V, published by Karnatak University, Dharwar, India. In the beginning the Absolute Divine ‘Sunya’ existed in a state of complete void. It is an eternal state where there is no linear time line. Sunya is said to be beyond comprehension and description, and said to be – only one, eternal, permanent, beyond the pairs of opposites, always a witness of all actions, infinite, indivisible, perfect and complete in all respects. In this state Sunya is Siva (male component) and His conscious force Sakti (female component). Siva’s consciousness is known as the power indicated by the syllable OM of three letters a, ou, ma (hence OM NAMAH SIVAYA). In the beginning Siva was alone and without support, but wished to be the Many. Then arose a commotion in the Conscious Force that produced a reverberating nada (sound, vibration), a seed of creation bindu (point, a ray of light, drop, subtle matter), and amplification and radiance of the above two kala (art in evolving objects) - the three corresponding to a, ou and ma. Earth, water, wind/air, fire/light, and ether/cosmos (rest of the universe) evolved, so also the sun, the moon and Atman. Infinity of macrocosms and myriads of microcosms were created within Siva’s Self. The scientific minded may refer to this as the Big Bang and evolution. The aim of the VS is the attainment (sampadane) of this Supreme State (Sunya). It is not a monopoly of a chosen few; it is within reach of anyone whether it is a man or a woman, or of any caste or creed. The VS have formulated a practical way for doing so - Siva yoga. Yoga is control/harmony of mind, breath and body, that results in the union of the Individual Self and the Universal Self. Sivayoga is similar to Patalanjali’s Page 15


CjªÀÅ Arivu astanga (eight limbs) yoga consisting of yama, niyama, asana, pranayama, pratyahara, dharana, dhyana and samadhi. Asanas (physical practices of sustained postures/exercises) are not stressed in sivayoga. Padmasana (lotus position) is mainly used during meditation. By recognizing a wide diversity among individuals – love and affection predominating in some, action and will in some, and logic and reason in some others – VS have given equal importance to devotion, action and knowledge. To attain Sunya, first, in the preparatory steps, the person has to realize the Divine presence within self by freeing self from all evil desires and inclinations, and by attaining serenity of mind so as to be a fit vehicle for the Divine. Then, in six stages (satsthala), the Soul must ascend from the initial but dim awareness of God to the final and complete identification with Sunya. It is to be noted that the Divine experience is not liberation to be had after death, but to be attained during life. Initial step: The phenomenal world comprising of multitude of souls was inherent in the Divine consciousness before its manifestation. When an individual soul assumes the body, it plunges into Maya (illusive glamour), and identifies with the body. As the round of life in this world begins, it errs into the belief that the passage from birth to death is all there is to life and existence. It is driven by a compelling passion for worldly pleasures. This thirst is not satisfied by enjoyment. The more one tries to appease the sense organs and senses (nose/smell, mouth/taste, eye/vision, ear/hearing, and skin/touch) the more disillusioned one becomes. This causes distress and misery. Such an individual, fond of the body, is not in a position to realize the Absolute. One has to understand that the body and soul are not identical. One has to get rid of the six evil desires and inclinations – lust, anger, greed, infatuation, ego and jealousy. There is no room for hatred, enmity or violence of any kind. Money itself is neither holy nor unholy. It depends upon how it is earned. Money earned by kayaka (dedicated labor) is taken as something holy. That earned with avarice is unholy. In the path of

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July 3, 2009 spirituality, it is sheer ignorance and arrogance to require commendation for performance; it is ego. One who has purged all passions and pleasures, attained contentment, and realized the difference between body and soul, advances further in one’s path toward God. Next step is for the soul to realize its identity with God. The earthbound soul identifies itself with the phenomenal world which is constituted of three Gunas (Qualities): Sattva being stainless and luminous binds the embodied one by creating attachment to happiness and knowledge; this corresponds to the waking state of consciousness and it is said that Brahma is the presiding deity. Rajas being of the nature of motion or passion, binds by attachment to action; this corresponds to the dream state of consciousness presided over by the deity Vishnu. And Tamas of the nature of inertia or lethargy born of ignorance, binds by attachment to indolence and sleep; this corresponds to deep sleep consciousness presided over by the deity Rudra. As a consequence the soul forgets the sense of unity and begins to feed on multiplicity. The embodied one has to transcend the three Gunas. The real Self-consciousness transcends these three states of consciousness and abides in its native glory. It is suggested that one acquire knowledge and practice meditation. As one frees from self imposed ignorance and acquires the right knowledge, and realizes that the phenomenal world itself is nothing but the manifestation of Self, the phenomenal play ceases and the sense of duality is obliterated. Next step is to control the restlessness of the mind which is a great hindrance in the way of discipline. Life, mind and intellect remain impure and agitated if the stillness of the soul is not realized. In order to attain calm the seeker should continue to acquire knowledge and meditate. It is not through force but through persuasion that the restless activities of the mind are brought to a standstill. Undesirable impulses and primordial instincts are the raw material of thought. Not by suppression but by directing the expression of these toward more socially or culturally acceptable way is Page 16


CjªÀÅ Arivu how to acquire richness of the mind. Spirit and matter, Self and non-self, which are two extremes of life, are concepts that originate in consciousness. They act and react upon each other and enrich the mind. When one detaches from the persistent siege of phenomenal association, the restlessness of the mind disappears and mind itself merges into Self. After discarding the glamour of the phenomenal world and freeing from the sinister influence of Maya, the seeker is qualified to break the fetters of bondage for which one may need the grace and guidance of a Guru. Guru is a master of spiritual knowledge who has realized the state of identity with Linga. Guru instills spiritual knowledge into the disciple. This initiation process can be achieved by a physical process – besmearing the body with sacred ashes, placing the palm on the disciple’s head, whispering the mantra into one’s ear, and investing Istalinga on the seeker’s palm. The physical process holds well in the case of an aspirant who is on the lower plane of consciousness. For one who is on the higher plane, the initiation can be effected through mere will. Guru’s grace helps to purge the triple malas (taints/impurities) that obscure the native divinity: Anavamala (anu means atom) is the impurity known as the primordial dirt that subsists in the soul and keeps it separated from God; Mayamala (taint of illusive glamour) is associated with subtle matter subtler than the cosmic matter, and it is not considered an illusion; Karmamala (taint of bad deeds) is the result of actions performed and is associated with the individual soul which suffers or enjoys according to one’s deeds. Wiping out these malas, results in the liberation of the soul. Thus one achieves purity of the body, clarity of the mind, and perfection of the will. This results in Divine descent into mind, life and matter. Love, knowledge, power, bliss and peace are the radiant expressions of the Divine. This mere sight of God is not enough to be united with God. The seeker must now ascend in six stages (satsthala) to attain Sunya. Bhaktasthala: Bhakta is one who is characterized by a state of enlightened faith. Bhakta’s daily life includes CjªÀÅ

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July 3, 2009 worshiping usually in the morning, performing dedicated work (kayaka), and treating everyone with respect and humility. Humility is the crowning characteristic of this stage. Bhakta recognizes that the Absolute has manifested Itself in Guru and Jangama, and equates them with the Linga. Worship of Linga, unconditional service to Guru, and dasoham (self-dedication) to Jangama form the principle features of this stage. Jangama is one who has renounced all earthly attachments and travels to impart spiritual knowledge into people. One should offer things obtained through dedicated work to Jangama. It is said that the real worship of Linga is not with material things but with pure devotion and knowledge – perfect blend of love and knowledge dawns divine consciousness. The concept of discipline or practice (sadhana) is important. One has to incorporate love, knowledge, power, bliss and peace – the radiant expressions of the Divine in one’s inner and outer being, and have these functioning through one’s body, life and mind. There has to be a harmony of what one is thinking, saying and doing. In Maheswarasthala one has to consolidate that faith into unshaken certitude (steadfastness in that faith). Maheswara understands that one who wavers, and lacks faith in one God, is neither brave nor resolute; worships only Linga which is the embodiment of the Absolute. As the devotion becomes intense, external rites and rituals are dispensed with, and only internal concentration is developed. The silent contemplation of the Divine remains the only yearning. Prasadisthala is characterized by vigilance in that steadfastness and undivided attention. The seeker surrenders the body, mind and spirit to Guru, Linga and Jangama. If the dedication is tinged with ego, it ceases to be holy. Everything is offered as Prasada. One who offers it is a Prasadi. One should offer everything with a sense of self-surrender, and it must be free from taint arising out of the attachment of the body and mind. If any attachment or craving persists, the transformation to Prasada can not be effected. When offered properly, the fire

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CjªÀÅ Arivu of knowledge burns the illusion of desire into an illumination of joy. Self-experience is the main characteristic of Pranalingisthala. The body is a temple that enshrines God. Breath control and meditation performed by the seeker activates the vital force that permeates the whole body. The seeker recognizes the Divine presence in every part of the body, and experiences vivid impressions of light, sound and taste. When breath-force begins to move through the nervous system, a peerless peace wells out, and the external world is kept in abeyance. Pranalingi sees his Self permeating the whole universe. Saranasthala is characterized by pure delight derived from continued contemplation of the Divine. The seeker continues to perform deep and intense meditations. This results in a serene mood where remembrance of work-a-day-world is gone, illusion of will is burnt, awareness of the body is forgotten, and all external phenomena have crumbled. In that mood there is no motion of any kind; the momentary flashes of Pranalingisthala have been replaced by the steady light of knowledge. When the two states of mind – mind that acts with motive and the mind that acts without motive – are stilled, and when the individual consciousness is overcome, the Divine light appears like a resplendent blaze, and ecstasy dwells. Sharana, in whom the empirical knowledge has resolved into supra-mental knowledge, and in whom the sense of duality has been replaced by knowledge of significance of the Union, experiences pure delight.

July 3, 2009 Aikyasthala is characterized by a state of identity with Sunya. A state of unitive consciousness is reached where there is no volition, no motion or sound, no word or speech, and where all consciousness of space and time is suspended. In this super-consciousness state the seeker has reached true Reality which is indescribable where the great white light is everywhere. The six characteristics of an Aikya the transcendent person are said to be: – one who having known Reality, is past care – great one who has conquered mortality (of consciousness not body) – glorious one who is the embodiment of the Most High – highest one who has attained the blissful state – perfect one who inhabits Void – and the spontaneous one with supernal consciousness who has attained perfect Poise. A realized soul being harmonized by yoga sees ones own Self in all beings; sees all beings in one’s own Self; and sees the same in all and makes no distinction whatsoever. The very purpose of a Sivayogi’s life is to uplift the people. After Aikyasthala there is final consummation. This state, where one revitalizes the society, is referred to as Jangamasthala. A Jangama moves for the redemption of mankind, and seeks not for ordinary alms but unreserved surrender to God. As indicated above, the Veerasaivas believe that oneness is achieved during one’s life, not after death. Sunyasampadane, the attainment of Sunya, is the essence of Veerasaivism, and is within the reach of anyone and everyone.

ªÉÄïÁUÀ¯ÉƯÉè£ÀÄ QüÁUÀ®®èzÉ, QýAUÀ®èzÉ ºÀAiÀÄ£ÀÄ PÀgɪÀÅzÉ? ªÉÄïÁV £ÀgÀPÀzÀ¯ÉÆïÁqÀ¯ÁgÉ£ÀÄ. ¤ªÀÄä ±ÀgÀtgÀ ¥ÁzÀPÉÌ QüÁVj¸ÀÄ, ªÀĺÁzÁ¤ PÀÆqÀ®¸ÀAUÀªÀÄzÉêÁ. ..§¸ÀªÀtÚ

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The Journey of VSNA Guruswamy Ayya, Reston, Virginia We are all fellow travelers in a journey to learn and practice veerashaivism.

Nevertheless, all of us, as a community, are striving to learn and practice religion.

It has taken nearly a quarter of a century to establish about 20 chapters all over North America. By now, we have learned to arrange get-togethers but we do not have an agenda that provides us incremental self development. This is because we do not have a commonality in our understanding of religion and its practice.

It is important that we eliminate “us” and “them” attitude within our community. We are all udergoing self growth in spirituality. Some may be ahead and some may be behind. We as a community, who have the living experience in the new land, need to develop a commonality in the practice of religion appropriate to our environment. We need to accomplish this goal through meaningful dialogue among ourselves to develop needed social mechanisms.

Veerashaivism, in its simplest form, consists of : linga puje, vachana study, and practicing kayaka and dasoha. Linga puje leads us to meditation and shiva yoga. Vachana study provides us an ethical frame work for life and spirituality. Kayaka and dasoha are spiritual actions for earning and sharing. This, we can say, is the essence of veerashaivism further leading to aspects of metaphysics. Given this premise, we are facing several self created impediments for moving forward. We, as individuals, are all at various stages of spiritual development. Some of us are strict adherents of core values. Some of us participate in spiritual activities out side our community. Some of us have certain personal preferences in food. Some of us are loyal to other religious institutions. Some of us expect a “messiah’ from out side to come and help us, thereby rejecting inhibiting community resources. Thus, some of our actions may not be in tune with our commitment as a community.

We need to keep the core values of religion in focus and not be distracted by out moded customs and rituals. As we evolve in the new land, we need to be America centric in our out look. Some times we tend to be Karnataka centric and loose objectivity. It is well to realize that it is not appropriate for us to blindly “transplant” solutions from our native land. In Karnataka, of late, religion is framed by socio- political dynamics which is not relevant to us. Journey of VSNA is journey of adventure where we learn to apply the core values of veerashaivism to effectively live in the new land which is full of opportunities and distractions. As we move forward in the journey, we evolve as a community where we live full modern life and also keeping the core values of religion.

EªÀ£ÁgÀªÀ, EªÀ£ÁgÀªÀ, EªÀ£ÁgÀªÀ£ÉAzɤ¸À¢gÀAiÀiÁå EªÀ £ÀªÀÄäªÀ, EªÀ £ÀªÀÄäªÀ EªÀ £ÀªÀÄäªÀ£ÉAzɤ¸ÀAiÀiÁå PÀÆqÀ® ¸ÀAUÀªÀÄzÉêÁ ¤ªÀÄä ªÀÄ£ÉAiÀÄ ªÀÄUÀ£ÉAzɤ¸ÀAiÀiÁå||

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Watch what you eat Naga Manohar Our Sharanas of the twelfth century, Basaveshwara, Allama Prabhu, Akkamahadevi, Chennabasava and others have provided an immense wisdom in the form of Vachanas that apply to our day to day life. This knowledge has been acquired by them not only from their understanding of the Veda Shastras but experiencing and understanding human life. Akkamahadevi, a great Sharane has given us this simple gem of a vachana that embodies answers to many of today’s health problems. Let us study this vachana and see what we can conclude from this –

DºÁgÀªÀ QjzÀÄ ªÀiÁrgÀuÁÚ, DºÁgÀªÀ QjzÀÄ ªÀiÁr

PÉr¸ÀzÉ G½¹PÉƽîgÀAiÀiÁå.

– CPÀ̪ÀĺÁzÉë

Transliteration Aaharava kiridu maadirannaa, aaharava kiridu maadi Aaharadinda vyaadhi habbi balivudayyaa Aaharadhim nidhre, nidhreim thamasa, ajnana, maimarahu Ajnanadim kaamavikaara hecchi Kaayavikaara, manovikaara, indriyavikaara Bhaavavikaara, vaayuvikaaravanuntumaadi Shrushtige tahudaada kaarana kaayada atiposhana beda

DºÁgÀ¢AzÀ ªÁå¢ü ºÀ©â §°AiÀÄĪÀÅzÀAiÀÄå DºÁgÀ¢A ¤zÉæ, ¤zÉæ¬ÄA vÁªÀĸÀ, CeÁÕ£À, ªÉÄʪÀÄgÀºÀÄ,

Atiposhane mrutyuvendudu

CeÁÕ£À¢A PÁªÀÄ«PÁgÀ ºÉaÑ

Japa tapa dhyana dhaarana poojege sookshmadim thanumaatraviddare saalade?

PÁAiÀÄ«PÁgÀ, ªÀÄ£ÉÆëPÁgÀ, EA¢æAiÀÄ «PÁgÀ,

Tanuva poshisuva aase yatitvakke vighnavendudu,

¨sÁªÀ«PÁgÀ, ªÁAiÀÄÄ«PÁgÀªÀ£ÀÄAlÄ ªÀiÁr

Tanu poshaneyinda taamasa hecchi, ajgnanadim virakti haani,

¸ÀȶÖUÉ vÀºÀÄzÁzÀ PÁgÀt PÁAiÀÄzÀ Cw¥ÉÇõÀt ¨ÉÃqÀ,

Arivu nashta, paravu doora, nirake nilavillada kaarana,

Cw¥ÉÇõÀuÉ ªÀÄÈvÀÄåªÉAzÀÄzÀÄ.

Chennamallikarjunanolisa banda kaayava

D¥À vÀ¥À zsÁå£À zsÁgÀt ¥ÀÇeÉUÉ ¸ÀÆPÀë÷ä¢A

Kedisade ulisikollirayyaa. Akkamahadevi

vÀ£ÀĪÀiÁvÀæ«zÀÝgÉ ¸Á®zÉ?

-

vÀ£ÀĪÀ ¥ÉÇö¸ÀĪÀ D¸É AiÀÄwvÀéPÉÌ «WÀߪÉAzÀÄzÀÄ,

Brothers, please reduce your food intake

vÀ£ÀÄ ¥ÉÇõÀuɬÄAzÀ vÁªÀĸÀ ºÉaÑ, CeÁÕ£À¢A «gÀQÛ ºÁ¤,

Please reduce your food intake

From food, diseases spread and feed on it

CjªÀÅ £ÀµÀÖ, ¥ÀgÀªÀÅ zÀÆgÀ, ¤gÀPÉ ¤®«®èzÀ PÁgÀt,

From food, comes sleepiness, slothfulness and lethargy

ZÉ£ÀߪÀÄ°èPÁdÄð£À£ÉÆ°¸À §AzÀ PÁAiÀĪÀ CjªÀÅ

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Slothfulness leads to ignorance resulting in abnormalities of five faculties – body; mind; feelings; organs; respiration

Akka also warns that if one tries to excessively build the body unnecessarily without a purpose it will lead to severe problems even leading to death.

These abnormalities are being serious, excessive nourishment of the body will lead to death

To lead a spiritual life one needs only a sensitive body, it does not need excessive nourishment

Excessive nourishment of the body leads to slothfulness which leads to ignorance resulting in loss of spirituality in addition to having the abnormalities

Once you have determined the level of food intake for your body, how would you put that into action? This is a problem for most of us. We have programmed our minds to eat three meals a day, a couple of snacks on top of that, on and on. If you are someone that lives to eat, also has a spouse or a mother with great culinary talents this plan has no merit.

Here is a simple plan to follow. The first thing to do is to make up your mind with a strong determination. Some people may call this will power. Start to work on changing the program on your mind about the eating habits. Sooner the program is changed; with a firm order the results can be seen. You are the boss. Your mind, or your tongue, or your stomach is not the boss. Once that is determined this programming becomes easy. I had accepted an overweight condition as a given, due to the medications I was required to take. After I studied Akka’s message I have been able to apply this technique and achieve the desirable results in the past six months.

This body is designed to get blessings from the Lord Mallikarjuna, please make sure that you do not spoil it.

Akka’s message is very clear. She emphasizes that the purpose you want to use your body needs to be clarified. If you are a priest or a spiritual person who does not exert physically your food intake shall be minimal. Alternatively, if you are a factory worker or a laborer(of any kind) you expend a lot more energy and as such your food intake should reflect that. In simple words, one needs to balance input and output.

Sharanu Sharanarthi Naga Manohar

²ªÀ, UÀÄgÀĪÉAzÀÄ §¯ÁèvÀ£Éà UÀÄgÀÄ. ²ªÀ, °AUÀªÉAzÀÄ §¯ÁèvÀ£Éà UÀÄgÀÄ. ²ªÀ, dAUÀªÀĪÉAzÀÄ §¯ÁèvÀ£Éà UÀÄgÀÄ. ²ªÀ, ¥Àæ¸ÁzÀªÉAzÀÄ §¯ÁèvÀ£Éà UÀÄgÀÄ. ²ªÀ, DZÁgÀªÉAzÀÄ §¯ÁèvÀ£Éà UÀÄgÀÄ. EAwà ¥ÀAZÀ«zsÀªÉà ¥ÀAZÀ§æºÀäªÉAzÀÄ CjzÀ, ªÀĺÁªÀÄ»ªÀÄ ¸ÀAUÀ£À §¸ÀªÀtÚ£ÀÄ, J£ÀUÉAiÀÄÆ UÀÄgÀÄ, ¤£ÀUÉAiÀÄÆ UÀÄgÀÄ dUÀªÉ®èPÉÌAiÀÄÆ UÀÄgÀÄ PÁuÁ, UÀĺÉñÀégÀ --C®èªÀÄ¥Àæ¨sÀÄ

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CzÉéöÊvÀªÀ £ÀÄrzÀÄ CºÀAPÁjAiÀiÁzÉ£ÀAiÀiÁå §æºÀäªÀ £ÀÄrzÀÄ ¨sÀæ«ÄvÀ£ÁzÉ£ÀAiÀiÁå ±ÀÆ£ÀåªÀ £ÀÄrzÀÄ ¸ÀÄRzÀÄBRPÉÌ UÀÄjAiÀiÁzÉ£ÀAiÀiÁå UÀĺÉñÀégÀ, ¤ªÀÄä ±ÀgÀt ¸ÀAUÀ£À§¸ÀªÀtÚ£À ¸Á¤ßzsÀå¢AzÁ£ÀÄ ¸ÀzÀâ÷Ì÷Û£ÁzÉ£ÀAiÀiÁå --C®èªÀÄ¥Àæ¨sÀÄ

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Basava Consciousness Ramjan Darga

Basava was born into a wealthy, high caste family. He got the best education. He enjoyed political power, as finance minister and later prime minister, he made King Bijjala’s empire thrive. But fame, money and worldly success mattered little to him. He took up the cause of the poor and the humiliated, and led a movement that has no parallel in history. In the 12th century, Basavanna led a social movement that drew inspiration from spirituality. He lives in the hearts of millions to this day. Without doubt, the world will be better place and will thrive in all respects if more people become aware of Basava and his ideals. Basava Consciousness means giving up the idea of Karma, which states that everything is predetermined, and making Kayaka or work, the center of our existence. It means making our vocation not an extension of our selves but our very life-breath. It means understanding the principle of equality. Basava Consciousness means we wish good for all living creatures. It means we accept that there is one God for the entire universe, and forget all distinctions of caste, creed and gender. Basava prompts us to give up any science that is anti-life, and to destroy our arrogance. He shows us the way to a society without exploitation. His is a democratic ideology that respects plurality of culture.

Arivu

Before Basavanna was born, the Buddha, Mahaveera and thinkers of the Lokayata School had spoken out against philosophies that pushed people into the hellhole of karma. They had denounced that idea that superiority comes from birth, and proposed an equal society. Basavanna went a step ahead and showed us the way to achieve equality. He realized that minority not engaged in production was subjugating a majority of productive and hardworking women, shudras and untouchables. He showed that caste, knowledge and power were sources of exploitation, and traced the roots of sorrow to them. Basavanna thought deeply about changing old ways. He wanted to build a new society with new values. He shifted the focus of education from blindly memorizing texts to living by one’s spirit. He questioned everything that came in the way of this new way of life. Conscious is Basavanna’s God. He refused to accept any other God. When he talked about ishtalinga (personal deity), he stressed that it represented inner voice.

Basava awareness teaches us to live a spiritual life and physical life at the same time. It gives us the strength to fight exploitation and become truthful. It makes us speak the truth when we are silent lest we offend someone. It tells us to bare our mistakes and to stand fearless.How did Basavanna lead people to a life of simplicity and freedom? How did he proclaim the dignity of labor?

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The hellhole of Karma

It’s enough if you experience God within, heaven and hell are futile concepts, he said. Basavanna strove tirelessly to tell the world about his vision of God. When God resides within us, we become heaven ourselves.

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Arivu Can there be religion without compassion, Basavanna asks. For him compassion is the basis of all spirituality. This led him to oppose the Vedic ideas of heaven and hell, and the unequal laws of Manu that govern much of Indian society.

July 3, 2009

CjªÀÅ

Impediment to vitality Thinking of heaven and hell is an impediment to human vitality, Basavanna said. He urged his followers to clear up such ideas with broomstick of proper awareness. The physical ishtalinga that the devout carry is but a symbol of God. It is one thing to just look at the physical symbol, and quite another to see what it symbolizes. Without this knowledge, says Basavanna, all worship is hollow. He says in a vachana that outward worship, without any compassionate social action, is meaningless. In Kannada mythology, we hear of the bherunda, a bird with two heads. For Basavanna, society and God are two heads of bherunda. You can’t give milk to one and poison to the other and still expect the bird to live in good health, he says. Dangers of fatalism Does God have a form? Or is He / She formless? Basavanna knew the dangers of fatalistic idol worship. In a vachana, he tries to grasp the formless nature of divinity, but is troubled by the difficulty of doing so. Thus is born his idea of the ishtalinga, a personal deity. Even before Basavanna’s time, people carried personal Gods in a small case. They worshipped these substitute Gods – the original one remained at home – when they traveled. But Basavanna’s ishtalinga became a symbol of the true practitioner of his ideals. The ishtalinga thus caters to sensitive spiritual needs without turning the individual away from society. It is a confluence of the micro and macro planes at which conscious works. It CjªÀÅ

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ensures the internal and external purity of individuals, and ensures that the two planes work as one. The works of disciples who carry the ishtalinga are not mere words, they are promises. In rote culture, people who don’t work rule. In Basavanna’s vachana culture, people who don’t work have no importance. The shudras and other working classes become central to his world. In rote culture, they existed only to work, but not to enjoy the fruits of their work! “The ishtalinga could be a badge given to Basavanna’s followers. Commitment to the Linga implies a commitment to the community and to the followers” Says P. S. Patil the well-known Marxist thinker of Bijapur, in his book ‘Basava chaluvaliaya Bhoutikavadi Adhyayana (A Materialist Study of the Basava Movement). The ideal Society Basavanna’s view of the ideal society is unique. He lived in Kalyana, a city whose name incidentally means welfare, and constantly contemplated the idea of a welfare society. In a vachana, he says his happiness depends on the happiness of the entire community that lives around him. But without social, cultural, economic and gender equality, an ideal society cannot be built. Equality means freedom from caste, class and gender distinctions. Basavanna gave his all to achieve such equality. He questioned all aspects of society that were inhuman. He was deeply disturbed the practice of untouchability. He stripped himself of high caste attitudes to be able to understand such practices. Untouchability is not just an unequal social system; it hides a production system that favors the upper castes. It hides a system of exploitation, violence and humiliation. It hides hunger, helplessness and labor without fruit. In the last 5000 years of Indian history, great men like Buddha and Gandhiji have fought in favor of

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CjªÀÅ Arivu the weak and the Dalits, but we can’t find another who lowered himself in caste like Basavanna. In a vachana he questions the idea of caste, and says all devout people are casteless. The lowcaste Chennayya is far greater than God himself, Basavanna proclaims in this poem. The last man in the hierarchy of Manu can become, by the strength of his uprightness and hard work, the highest man in Basavanna’s society. “I reject the texts, I am a son of Channayya the untouchable,” he says. It was because Basavanna understood shudra power that he was able to dream of a society that could create good people. A mere knowledge of astrology, arithmetic, logic and grammar is nothing. “A true devotee finds no meaning in them,” he says “Our lord will not accept people without true devotion.” The karma philosophy, which is the basis of Manu’s laws, drives people to fatalism and fills them with guilt. It justifies exploitation by describing it as the fruit of one’s previous birth’s misdeeds. It favors the exploiters. Darkness and light What use is a light if it doesn’t drive away darkness? What use is an ishtalinga if you wear and still believe in karma? These are questions Basavanna asks. Even a violent man can become good and devout, he says in a vachana. But he is skeptical about mainstream deities with their hierarchy. Basavanna’s God is straightforward; he goes to the houses of untouchables, and eats with them. When Kudalasangama, Basavanna’s God, eats at the house of Chennayya, orthodox society is scandalized. Basavanna understood the

July 3, 2009 cruelty of caste society by interacting with the most oppressed, and thus gained the authority to question it. In one vachana, denounces Linga worshippers who continue to neglect or ill treat untouchables. Such is his moral strength; Basavanna stands in support of children born out of wedlock. He describes himself as a son born to the lowliest of the low – imaginary servants of the untouchable Channayya and Kakkayya who made love in the fields. Manu’s laws are against mixing of castes. Basava is in favor of mixing of castes. For him, caste is hollow when it comes face to face with moral uprightness. The lamp of revolution he lit continues to burn to this day. Basavanna’s contemporaries praise him from the heart. Allama Prabhu, the great philosopher-poet who was also a prominent leader of Basava’s Bhakti movement, says the lamp of Basavanna’s thoughts should illumine the ideal society. Akka Mahadevi, who wrote vachanas of rebellious brilliance, says Basavanna is greater than all the Gods of the three worlds. Here moral strength comes from interacting with great minds like Basava and Allama Prabhu. Aydakki Marayya, a lesser know poet of Basavanna’s time, says the world will brighten up only when it is lit by Basavanna’s Compassion.

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Dasoha – A Glorious Veerashaiva Tradition Kishore Channabasavaiah Palatine, Illinois, USA Dasoha, the glorious tradition of sharing one’s wealth with the needy, was one of the rich contributions of our Veerashaiva ancestors and is an integral part of the philosophies and practices of Veerashaivism. Adopting Dasoha as an integral conduct in one’s life is a way to realize “acharave swarga,” one of the foundational principles of Veerashaivism set forth by our ancestors as a means to reach the “aikya sthala,” the ultimate state of realizing or being one with God, the almighty.

Dasohi , or one who serves, is the source of the word Dasoha. Basavanna , who strongly believed that one should contribute their services to the society, was the inspiration and creator of the notion of Dasoha. In addition, he also strongly promoted Dasoha as a means of selfless sharing for the overall up-liftment of the society. His view was not restricted to just sharing wealth, but also included knowledge and services in all forms. Dasoha was all about improving the overall well being of our fellow beings and society as a whole. To emphasize the need for giving as human beings, Basavanna has said,

Dasoha, over the centuries, has been adopted and practiced by the members of the Veerashaiva community in a number of different ways. Selfless service was the goal that drove our ancestors to embrace Dasoha in their lives and their conduct was something that we would all want to emulate as a means of building a strong character. Dasoha is a simple and straightforward way of life which is easy to adopt and practice as a virtuous conduct in our daily lives. Like any other philosophy or practice, Dasoha also has been misrepresented and misconstrued by people with different interests or sometimes by those who are purely misinformed. These vested interests have tried to influence and provide a self-fulfilling and self promoting explanation to Dasoha. These misrepresentations seem to have cropped into main-stream society predominantly during the last century which has had its undue share of materialistic influences.

కರెయದె తన బళగవను

Amongst the many virtues prescribed by the 12 century social reformer Basavanna, Dasoha, the act of selfless sharing, stands out as one of his greatest contributions not only to the Veerashaiva philosophy but to mankind in itself. th

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ಕాಗెందగుళ కండರె ಕెూౕందు కుటక కండರె కూకರెయದె తన కులవನెలవ? వభకನా భ!పక#$ల%ద&ರె ಕాಗె ಕెూౕ'ంద కరకష* కూడలసంగమದెౕవ Here Basavanna takes the example of crows and hen who ensure that they share what they find with the rest of their community and asks us all if we want to be worse than these creatures by not following a simple path of selfless sharing. Soon this act of Dasoha was embraced by the other Veerashaiva mystics of the 12th century who accepted and promoted this virtue of selfless service to the society by adopting this in their daily lives. In addition, Basavanna and the other Veerashaivas educated the society about the adoption and value of Dasoha through various means, including Vachanas, which by themselves were a significant and unique contribution to the society and Kannada literature.

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Arivu The Veerashaiva community and others who have embraced the philosophies of Veerashaivism have continued to nurture Dasoha over the centuries by following the principles set forth in the 12th century by Basavanna and other Veerashaiva mystics and Vachnakaras – creators of Vachanas. The ardent followers of the Veerashaiva philosophy have made it a personal agenda to adopt Dasoha in their daily lives by sharing their wealth, knowledge, and services to the society at large and have kept this rich tradition alive over the years. They have done so by their own selfless contributions and have never believed in doing so as means to promote selfish causes in the society. Over the centuries, they have established organizations which support the down trodden in the society by providing them basic necessities of life like food, shelter, and clothing. In addition, they have further immersed themselves in Dasoha by establishing educational institutions and organizations whose sole mission was and has been to share knowledge and provide education for one and all in the society. This contribution of Veerashaivas over the centuries is unmatched and has a played a significant role in raising the social standing of people in all walks of life. CjªÀÅ

July 3, 2009 but a very simple one. He said charity was donations giving to the needy by the well-to-do and done more as a self-fulfilling act. Dasoha, on the other hand, he explained was to share one’s wealth or knowledge while treating everyone as equals and is practiced with an overall intent of improving the socio-economic structure of the society as a whole. Charity and the notion of donation in itself separate the donee or the receiver and donor or the giver by an artificial boundary and make the receiver feel obligated and humiliated at times. The receiver of charity always is treated as inferior and the donor artificially feels superior for making the donation.

There are many individuals, institutions, and organizations that have been following the righteous path of Dasoha over the centuries and also in recent years. Some of them have focused on making available the basic essentials of life like food, shelter, and clothing while others have immersed themselves in sharing knowledge and providing for education, a key necessity for the maturity of the society and civilization as a whole. Siddaganga Math in Tumkur, Karnataka is one such esteemed organization which has been at the forefront of practicing Dasoha in its true form and contributing to society in innumerable ways.

Dasoha ,on the other hand, does not make a distinction between the provider and the receiver. The overall intention of Dasoha is to realize equality in the society by making available the required resources to those who do not have access to them by those who do possess such resources. The philosophy of Dasoha does not encourage any distinction between the provider and the receiver and by no means creates any socio-economic boundaries in the society. Practice of Dasoha is not meant to demean the receiver as inferior but is more to bring about equality among all beings and in fact to remove the barriers between the well to do and those that need support and encouragement. A simple example of Dasoha would be to share a meal with someone in need instead of handing left-overs to get rid of excess or with the guilt of accumulating more than what is needed. Charity, in many instances, seems to be undertaken in guilt and in other instances as a means to self-promote oneself or to gain a feeling of superiority in the society. Practice of Dasoha on the other hand is a simple act of selfless service to fellow beings and does by no means encourage the glorification of the act itself.

During one of his recent visits, His Holiness Tumkur Swamiji Dr. Shivananda Shivacharya was asked if there was any difference between Dasoha and Charity or if they were one and the same. His explanation was an eye opener

Dasoha, a simple act of selfless service, is often misrepresented and misconstrued by many including Veerashaivas for a variety of reasons including self-promotion, ignorance, or in many cases as a means to feel elevated and superior in

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CjªÀÅ Arivu social circles. These acts deserve no encouragement as they cultivate bad behavior in the communities we are all part of. Dasoha was all about sharing a part of one’s own earnings with an intent to improve the overall social fabric and was not about distributing wealth collected from others especially with an intent of self-promotion. A number of such instances are rampant and are very prevalent in today’s society and in some instances has become an occupation for some. In many instances Veerashaivas and others have indulged in demeaning and making insulting comments on their fellow beings for not donating or following their foot steps in their version of charity and donations. These actions seem to be antithesis to what Dasoha is all about. In addition, good conduct and character, which are the foundational principles of Veerashaivism, seem to be put aside by such actions. Basavanna in one of his vachanas appropriately says ಮా. ಮా. ಕెట*రు మన$లದె /ౕ. /ౕ. ಕెట*రు /జ$లದె

Dasoha, the glorious tradition of selfless service, promoted by the 12th century social reformer Lord Basaveshwara has been considered as one of the core principles of Veerashaivism over the centuries. Though structured as a simple act but is one that has continued to have a profound impact on the social fabric of all times, Dasoha is a practice that all Veerashaivas can and need to adopt in their daily lives. This glorious philosophy has also been practiced by others at different times elsewhere in the world as the thought behind Dasoha is one of selfless service to man kind at large. Andrew Carnegie (18351919), whose contributions to America and mankind as a whole are innumerable, has said “One of the serious obstacles to the improvement of our race is indiscriminate charity”

ಮాడువరు /ౕడువరు /జగుణ ఉళ3వర కూ.ಕెూంబ కూడలసంగమದెౕవ

Here Basavanna says assistance or donations when offered without a wholehearted commitment are indeed not true. Only such acts when undertaken without the expectation of anything in return are pleasant to Lord Kudalasangama. In one of her vachanas, Sharane Ayadakki Lakkama says, భకరు ಕాయకವెందు ದాయಗా5ಕెయ6 తందు ದాಸెూౕహవ ಮాడబహుದె ఒమ:నవ తందు ఒమ:నద6; ಮా.

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July 3, 2009 Here she talks about the need to not cultivate ego when performing Dasoha. She emphasizes that both the person indulging in performing Dasoha and the person receiving such services should never feel obligated in any manner whatsoever.

These thought provoking words were indeed similar to the ones glorified by our 12th century Vachanakaras and are relevant for all times. Though the idea of Dasoha has been misrepresented and misconstrued by manymisinformed people at various times, the practice continues to thrive and influence the lives of all followers of Veerashaivism and others who have taken an ardent interest in these beliefs and practices. It is for all of us to continue to nurture this path of virtuous conduct by adopting this in our daily lives and make a difference to the society we are all part of. ****

మునವె

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Veerashaiva Samaja of North America (VSNA) 32nd Annual Convention, July 3rd – 5th 2009 Hosted by: VSNA – Chicago Chapter Venue: The Westin Chicago Northwest. 400 Park Blvd. Itasca, IL Advisory: S. Chandramouli H. S. Jayaswamy Sadanand Manoli Manju Moodabagil Bangalore Murthy Mallikarjun Nalawadi

Communications/PR Chair: Ravi Babu Co-Chair: Kishore Channabasaviah Vaishak Babu Nandish Dhananjaya Shrishail Hadimani Jay Jayadev Chaitra Kishore (Y) JP Reddy

Entertainment /Cultural Chair: Kusuma Indusekar Co-Chair: Neetha Dhananjaya Ambika Babu Sangeetha Basavaraju Rajini Chandramouli Roopa Jayadev Anita Kishore Indira Reddy Anusuya Shivakumar Shailaja Topgi All Youth Program Chair: B. Indusekar Co-Chair: Deepak Patil Arun Bommannavar S. Chandramouli H.S. Jayaswamy Mallikarjun Nalawadi Veena Prabhu Indira Reddy

Finance /Fund Raising Chair: Bangalore Murthy Co-Chair: Manju Moodabagil Rajeshwari Bommannavar S. Chandramouli Sujata Desai Basavaraj Hullur Channu Kambalyal Uma Murthy Mallikarjun Nalawadi JP Reddy Shrishail Virupannanavar Photography & Video Chair: Murugesh Patil Co-Chair: Akash Shirol

Stage and A/V Chair: K Suresh Co-Chair: Nataraj Hoskote Raj Betkerur Basavaraj Nanjundappa Sachin Suresh

Yoga & Shiva Pooja Chair: Shrishail Hadimani Co-Chair: Murugesh Patil H.S. Jayaswamy Channu Kambalyal K Suresh

Competitions Chair: Kishore Channabasaviah Co-Chair: Neelu Kumar Jayashree Basanth Vidu Betkerur Sujata Desai Shilpa Hadimani Veena Hullur Kusuma Indusekar Roopa Jayadev Deepa Patil Indira Reddy Food Chair: Rajini Chandramouli Co-Chair: Anita Kishore Satish Bangalore Rajeshwari Bommanavar Uma Jayaswamy Tanuja Kambalyal Nataraj Hoskote Dhanashree Suresh

Decoration Chair: S. Chandramouli Co-Chair: Anusuya Shivakumar Jayashree Basanth Vidu Betkerur Anita Kishore Neelu Kumar Kiran Kumar Shilpa Hadimani Deepa Patil Jyothi Patil

Registration Chair: Nandish Dhananjaya Co-Chair: Vidu Betkerur Satish Bangalore Keerthi Kumar Neelu Kumar Veena Hullur Tanuja Kambalyal Meenakshi Virupannanavar Shrishail Virupannanavar Young Adults Meet Chair: Shruthi Chandramouli Co-Chair: Vidu Betkerur Raj Betkerur Sunil Desai Sujata Desai Shantesh Nalawadi (Y)

Souvenir Managing Editor: H.S. Jayaswamy Editor-in-Chief: A. Shivakumar B. Indusekar Akshay Indusekar (Y) Chaitra Kishore (Y) Vanitha Satish Ravi Topgi Manisha Virupannanavar (Y)

Matrimony: Uma Jayaswamy Business Chair: Manju Moodabagil Co-Chair: Akash Shirol Satish Bangalore Kishore Channabasaviah Sunil Desai Channu Kambalyal Prabhu Shiva

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WORKSHOPS CME/Health Chair: Ambika Babu Co-Chair:: Sunil Desai Co-Chair: Rajeev Kumar Neetha Dhananjaya Vijay Doshetty Bangalore Murthy Jyothi Patil Veena Prabhu Prabhu Shiva

Religious Chair: Indira Reddy Co-Chair: Shrishail Hadimani Ravi Babu Arun Bommannavar B. Indushekar H.S. Jayaswamy

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Hospitality Chair: Raj Betkerur Co-Chair: Basanth Goud Sangeetha Basavaraj Tanuja Kambalyal Keerthi Kumar Uma Jayaswamy Uma Murthy Ratna Nalawadi Vanita Satish Dhanashree Suresh

Youth (Listed – above 13) Vaishak Babu Maya Hoskote Amogh Kambalyal Chaitra Kishore Akshay Indusekar Suma Hiremath Vinay Hiremath Meghana Moodabagil Danya Moodabagil Sahana Moodabagil Eshwar Murthy Shilpa Murthy Abhinav Reddy Sachin Suresh Satish Suresh Malik Virupannanavar Manisha Virupannanavar All Youth

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PATH TO THE CONVENTION Committees OUR YOUTH

L to R Top: Dhanya Moodabagil, Manisha Virupannanavar, Meghana Moodabagil, Abhinav Reddy, Vaishak Babu L to R Bottom : Natasha, Sahana Moodabagil, Chaitra Kishore, Akshay Indusekar, Sachin Suresh, Amogh Kambalyal, Mallikarjun Virupannanavar. NOT HERE! : Vinay Hiremath, Maya Hoskote, Eshwar Murthy, Shantesh Nalawadi, Satish Suresh

Food Committee

Our Advisors From Left to Right : Manju Moodabagil , Mallikarjun Nalawadi , H. S. Jayaswamy, S. Chandramouli Bangalore Murthy. NOT HERE!: Sadanand Manoli

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From Left to Right: Danashree Suresh, Anita Kishore (CoChair), Rajeshwari Bommanavar, Rajini Chandramouli (Chair), Uma Jayaswamy,Satish Bangalore NOT HERE:

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Nataraj Hoskote ,Tanuja Kambalyal

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Communications/PR

Decoration Committee From Left to Right : Anita Kishore ,Neelu Kumar , Vidu Betkerur ,

From Left to Right : Ravi Amblee (Chair), Amith

S. Chandramouli (Chair), Suresh, Anusuya Shivakumar (Co-

Nagarajappa, Sachin Suresh, Vaishak Babu, Kishore Channabasaviah (Co-Chair), JP Reddy, Chaitra Kishore NOT HERE: Nandish Dhananjaya, Shrishail Hadimani

Chair). NOT HERE: Jayashree Basanth, Kiran Kumar , Shilpa Hadimani , Nataraj Parwar, Deepa Patil, Jyothi Patil, Deepa Shirol

Finance /Fund Raising

Registration

From Left to Right [Top]: Manju Moodbagil (Co-Chair), S.

From Left to Right ; Shrishail Virupannanavar, Meenakshi

Chandramouli, Mallikarjun Nalawadi, JP Reddy, Kishore

Virupannanavar , Veena Hullur, Vidu Betkerur(Co-Chair), Neelu Kumar, Keerthi Kumar , Nandish Dhananjaya (Chair) NOT HERE: Satish Bangalore, Tanuja Kambalyal,

Channabasaviah [Bottom] Channu Kambalyal , Rajeshwari Bommannavar, Sujata Desai, Uma Murthy, Bangalore Murthy (Chair) NOT HERE: Basavaraj Hullur, Shrishail Virupannanavar

Medical/Health

Business From Left to Right: Satish Bangalore, Channu Kambalyal, Sunil Desai, Manju Moodabagil (Chair)

From Left to Right : Sunil Desai (Co-Chair) Ambika Babu (Chair ), Bangalore Murthy

NOT HERE: Kishore Channabasaviah , Prabhu Shiva, Akash Shirol (Co-Chair)

NOT HERE: Neetha Dhananjaya , Vijay Doshetty , Jyothi Patil,

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, S Chandramouli,

Veena Prabhu, Prabhu Shiva, Rajeev Kumar (Co-Chair)

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Religious

Souvenir From Left to Right: B. Indusekar , H.S.Jayaswamy (Managing

From Left to Right: Ravi Amblee [Babu] ,Indira Reddy(Chair), ,

Editor), A. Shivakumar (Editor-in-Chief) , Ravi Topgi

B. Indushekar , H.S. Jayaswamy

NOT HERE: Akshay Indusekar (Y),Chaitra Kishore (Y) ,Vanitha

NOT HERE: Shrishail Hadimani(Co-Chair)

, Arun Bommannavar

Satish, Manisha Virupannanavar (Y)

Stage and A/V

Hospitality Nagarajappa, Uma Murthy, Raj Betkerur (Chair), Keerthi Kumar

From Left to Right: K Suresh (Chair), Amith Nagarajappa, Basavaraj Nanjundappa, Raj Betkerur, Sachin Suresh, Manju Moodabagil

NOT HERE: Ratna Nalawadi (Co-Chair), Sangeetha Basavaraj,

NOT HERE: Nataraj Hoskote (Co-Chair)

From Left to Right: Basanth Goud, Uma Jayaswamy, Amith

Pavitra Chigateri, Tanuja Kambalyal, Deepak Patil, Vanita Satish, Danashree Suresh

Entertainment /Cultural

Program Committee

From Left to Right Bhavani Moodabagil, Neetha Dhananjaya (Co-Chair), Kusuma Indusekar (Chair), Anusuya Shivakumar, Shilaja Topgi, Ambika Babu , Sangeetha Basavaraju NOT HERE: Rajini Chandramouli, Roopa Jayadev, Anita Kishore, Indira Reddy

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From Left to Right Bhavani Moodbagil, Indusekar (Chair), Chandramouli, Jayaswamy, Arun Bommnnavar, Veena Prabhu, Nandish Dhananjaya NOT HERE: Indira Reddy, Deepak Patil (Co-Chair)

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Committees @work! Matrimony Uma Jayaswamy

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Yoga & Shiva Pooja Chair: Shrishail Hadimani Co-Chair: Murugesh Patil H.S. Jayaswamy, Channu Kambalyal,K Suresh

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GAMES SHOW & COMPETITIONS COMMITTEES @ WORK

NAVIKA Navika greets the attendees of Veerashiva Samaja of North America assembled in Chicago during July 2-4, 2009. North America Vishwa Kannada Association (NAVIKA) was inaugurated on the auspicious day of Virodhi Nama Samvatsara Ugadi, March 27, 2009. Several Kannada Kootas and Kannada organizations have expressed support for NAVIKA. Prominent Kannadigas of North America have taken keen interest to nurture this organization as a true and democratic voice of Amerikannadigas and be a beacon for Vishwa Kannadigas. NAVIKA intends to promote and propagate the language and culture of Kannada amongst the generations of Kannadigas settled in North America and rest of the world. It will provide a forum for networking of Amerikannadigas and vishwakannadigas on issues of social, cultural, linguistic, educational, business and charitable needs. NAVIKA plans to hold meaningful conferences at local, regional, national and international levels to achieve this purpose. Special emphasis will be placed in teaching and learning Kannada amongst the second and third generations of Vishwa kannadigas. Youth activities and networking will be prominent. Navika will also involve actively to address social issues concerning Amerikannadigas and Vishwa Kannadigas. Navika wishes VSNA annual conference all success We once again welcome all VSNA attendees and members to be part of NAVIKA

For more information, visit www.navika.org

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Sharana Movement and The Other Half Dr.Vimala Puranik, Bangalore Email : v.bpuranik@gmail.com

The Stratum of Society suddenly came alive in the 12th century Karnataka. It was the Sharana Movement at Kalyana, the capital of Kalachuri Kingdom. It was a unique socioreligious movement launched by Basava, who was a minister in the court of Kalachuri King Bijjala. Basava intensely felt the agony of the lower classes and articulated in language and action their agony. He infused in them an enthusiasm to assert themselves. The movement was a revolt against decadent bred many evils- social, political, religious and literary. The Sharana Movement denounced the traditionalistic, caste-ridden system of the time and criticized polytheism and priest craft. Above all, the movement made no distinctions between men and women in regard to the soul or consciousness. Gender equality and the creation sacred for and by women was the cardinal feature of Sharana ideology. Women devotees of the movement came forth from diverse socio-economic backgrounds but they found equal importance in the movement, irrespective of their earlier background or marital status. The movement is distinctive in that it was open to common women like Sule Sankavve( Sankavve, the prostitute), Sooji Kayakad Remmavve (Remmavve, who was a tailor), Kottanada Somavve(Somavve, who’s profession was to pound the grain). There were widows like Akkanagamma, a co-wife like Neelalochane, housewives like Ayadakki Lakkamma, Moligeya Mahadevi and Mukthayakka and the rebels like Akkamahadevi who denounced the institution of marriage altogether. They freely pursued their spiritual, literary and intellectual aspirations. The movement was an advent of Vachanakaaras; and the striking feature is that, among the 300 Vachanakaaras known so far, 30 are women. CjªÀÅ

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Throughout the vast treasure of the Vachanas of the Sharanas one finds many instances, where the theme of the gender equality if articulated with fervor. Men and women were regarded as equal, possessing identical substance in metaphysical terms. Devara Dasimayya, a senior member of the movement, has strongly expressed his views on gender equality: Cutting a straight cane into two, Making the lower piece a woman, And the upper one a man, Thus rubbed together! The fire that is born, Do you call it male or female, O Ramanatha? If breasts and braid of hair appear, They call her woman so, If beard and moustache appear, They call him man so. The soul that exists in either, Look, it is neither man nor woman O Ramanatha! Devara Dasimayya recognizes the difference between a man and a woman as only biological and asserts that the soul is neither male nor female. Goggavve’s Vachana gives the fine example of sexual transcendence: When one gets breasts and braid, She is called woman. When one gets moustache and beard, He is called man. But this knowledge of duality, Is it male or female Nasthinatha? Some leading sharanas tried to rectify or reinterpret a few of patriarchal concepts of demeaning to woman. Traditionally, women were put on par with gold and landed property and each

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CjªÀÅ Arivu one of them was viewed as a Maya or an “illusion”; as such they were dangerous impediments on the path to God realization; so a Sadhaka was instructed to shun these illusions to attain spiritual heights. Allama Prabhu, the peerless gem of Sharana Movement, refuses this notion:

The devotion of husband-wife to love blissful Is pleasing to Shiva! Love hostile between the two Is like an alliance between the nectar and poison Ramanatha! Women not only got equal status with men socially and religiously, they also got an equal opportunity to pursue their own Kayaka (work), to participate in spiritual discussion and discourse, to express their views fearlessly, to marry or not to marry according to their sweet will and to correct their husbands whenever necessary, as is seen in the episodes of Aydakki Marayya and Lakkamma and Molige Marayya and Mahadevi and Basava and his wife Neelalochane.

Siddharama’s Vachana is hall-mark of Sharana’s attitude towards women: The Woman He Himself had made Mounted upon His head; The Woman He Himself had made Climbed His lap; The Woman Brahma had made Perched on his tongue; The Woman Narayana had made Got upon his chest. Therefore, A Woman is no woman, nor demon she; Woman is Verily, look you, Kapilasiddha Mallikarjuna Himself.

Neelambike, the wife of Basava calls herself, the Vichar-Patni, the “intellectual life partner” of Basava. This speaks of the freedom a woman enjoyed to assert her conviction.

There are seven Vachanas, where Basava makes reference to how woman is to be looked upon. The point, which Basava drives home to his followers, is that to desire another man’s woman is sin: If my mind’s a truant And inconstant be, A Vow, so be it, In Thy name I say“As Goddess to Cherish My neighbour’s wife”My Lord Kudalasangama.

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When a couple stand with their hearts made one As in sub-vision the twin-eyed look, There is dedication to Guheshwaralinga. Devara Dasimayya states his views on the institution of marriage:

Gold, they say is Maya; Gold is not Maya. Woman, they say is Maya; Woman is not Maya. Land, they say is Maya. Land is not Maya. Maya is desire In front of the mind, See, Guheshwara.

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Saint Satyakka delivers the final verdict on this issue: a verdict which present day feminists and male chauvinists alike may accept if they ponder over it dispassionately; It can’t be certified that What has breasts and tresses is woman. It can’t be certified that What has loincloth; whiskers and draggers is a man. Whatever the fruit, It is judged by its sweetness. Even a flower without its loveliness, Is liked for its fragrance. It is known to thee Shambu Jakkeswara.

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COMPASSION, the Very Root of Religion Basavaraj Puranik Bangalore, India Email : bpuranik@gmail.com

Dharma, we often call it religion, is righteous living, right action. Dharma formed from the root dhr, to hold, means that which holds a thing and maintains it in being. Every form of life, every group of men has its Dharma, which is the law of its being. Dharma or righteousness or virtue is conformity with the truth of things. Religion is not a museum of beliefs or a medley of rites. Religion is not correct belief but righteous living. After all, what counts is not creed but conduct. By their fruits you shall know them and not by their beliefs.” Wherever justice and charity have the force of law and ordinance there is God’s Kingdom” said Spinoza. Basava, the great seer, mystic and social reformer of the 12th century Karnataka in India, stressed the importance of conduct. He rightly said compassion is the very root of religion. Can there be religion bereft of compassion? Compassion is the way of relating to people, places and things. It is a key to transforming ourselves and others. It is a foundation for sharing our aliveness and building a more human world. All the great religions of the world provide us with the images that help put this spiritual practice in focus. A brief study of this aspect is both illuminating and instructive. The Buddha of compassion represented in Tibetan iconography as having “ a thousand eyes that see the pain in all corners of the universe and a thousand arms to reach out to all corners of the universe to extend his help”.

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The Christian mystic Mechtild of Magdeburg describes the Holy Spirit “as a compassionate outpouring of the Creator and the Son”. Of course, one of the best known parables of Jesus focuses on the compassion demonstrated by the Good Samaritan who helps the injured man on the road to Jericho. Protestant Jim Wallis, the founding editor of Sojourners magazine, writes “At times I think the truest image of God today is a black inner-city grandmother in the U.S. or a mother of the disappeared in Argentina or the women who wake up early to make up tortillas in refugee camps. They all weep for their children and in their compassionate tears arises the political action that changes the world. The Mothers show us that it is the experience of touching the pain of others that is the key to the change”. “Oh, that my monk’s robes were wide enough to gather up all the people in this floating world”. This is the image of compassion of Ryokan, the Zen monk. Teacher of mythology Joseph Campbell notes: “Compassion for me is just what the word says; it is suffering with”. It is an immediate participation in the sufferings of another to such a degree that you forget yourself and your own safety and spontaneously do what is necessary”. This means reaching out with care to others. It means identifying with the homeless person on the street, with the depressed teenagers who is about to commit suicide, with the helpless trees in the Amazon rain forest, with the frightened animals in a laboratory, and with the tortured Page 37


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July 3, 2009 numbness and the daze which keeps us closed off from the messes and miseries of the world.

feelings of anger and hate that we harbor in our own psyches. Buddhist teacher Jack Cornfield calls compassion “the quivering of the pure heart when we have allowed ourselves to be touched by the pain of life”. Under this rubric, even the idea of the enemy vanishes and is replaced by the notion of someone who needs our understanding and love. Through compassion we conquer the

“Compassion is the sometimes fatal capacity for feeling what is like inside somebody else’s skin. It is the knowledge that there can never really be any peace and joy for me until there is peace and joy finally for you too”. Thus sums up Protestant minister and writer Fredrick Buechner.

AKKAMAHADEVI CAVE –SHRISHAILA, Andhra Pradesh

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Sri Basavesvara A Social Reformer, the Universal Man and a Mystic Dhanashree, IL Sri Basavesvara as a Social Reformer Basavesvara was born in Karnataka in the 12th Century A.D. The prevailing degeneration of society deeply moved him and he saw clearly that only a religion that could bring about the integration of thought and action could preserve the mankind. Since that was the age in which our sense of history was not as vigilant as it is now, we do not get clear details about his life, and sometimes what we do get is not completely genuine. The 12th century witnessed an unprecedented revolution in the social life of Karnataka, and it was Basavesvara who was the dynamic centre of this great revolution which brought a new awakening in the life of the common people. Before the advent of Basavesvara the life of common people was nothing but misery. Religion was the monopoly of a class. The common people groaned under the dark shadow of religious fear created by that class. It was Basavesvara who strongly revolted against the unjust and evil deeds done in the name of religion, and who vowed to bestow on the common people the right to knowledge. Basavesvara, assisted by a number of fellow idealists, started a gigantic social upheaval. The men of vision were there to lead a social revolution. What sort of religion can it be without Compassion? Compassion needs to be towards all living things: Compassion is the root of all religious faith: Lord Kudala Sangama does not care, for what is not like this. Sri Basavesvara condemned all forms of violence to life and held the eating of flesh to be a CjªÀÅ

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most sinful act. He preached kindness to all living creatures and said that no religion would be worth the name without it. Society was a victim of lifeless tradition before the time of Sri Basavesvara and plunged in deep darkness, it was unable to shape its own future. Fraud, injustice and Exploitation ruled society in the name of religion and under the mask of Karma. Sri Basavesvara boldly declared that happiness here and hereafter could come only through the practice of Sarana Dharma, with its profound social orientation. Immoral practices in the name of religion are detrimental to the well-being of the individual as well as of the society. No one knew this better than Sri Basavesvara who spoke constantly on the necessity of each individual adhering to the path of the good. He said Words are not enough; they must be translated into action. Basavesvara built many institutions to propagate his ideas and to keep them alive in society. The Anubhava Mantapa that he established occupies a most important place in the religious history of Karnataka. Social ethics condemns ill conduct, evil habits and immoral dealings. A major function of religion is to secure the well being of society, to make the individual realize that the happiness of others is as important as that of his own. Basavesvara said “The selfish know not the interests of others” and declared “righteousness here is righteousness hereafter”. It is through proper behavior and good actions that the purity of man’s mind and body is preserved. Sri Basavesvara taught these seven stepsThou shall not steel nor kill Let no falsehood foul thy tongue; nor anger burn thy brow.

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Stand not high in thy own esteem. So shall thy ways both of heart and demeanor proclaim thy purity? And shall favor find, Of Lord Kudala Sangama. Basavesvara upheld Truth and rejected Untruth. Truth was God for him: Behold! Between the worlds of mortals and Gods There is no difference! world of Gods;

To speak the truth is

To speak untruth, is the mortal world. works is Heaven,

Good

Bad works is Hell-- And you can witness it, O Lord Kudala Sangama! Basavesvara impressed upon the people the value of the great teachings of the Upanishads—‘Speak Truth and act righteously’. The Sarana dharma which he preached is firmly founded on righteousness in word and deed has the dimensions of a universal religion. Even though Basavesvara’s essential basis was spiritual; he labored hard for the emancipation and progress of society. He uplifted the society which had got stuck in the sands of bigotry of various creeds in the name of religion, inspired its sprit with pure spiritualism, uprooted the Varnasrama system and eradicated the chaos created by castes, and , thus became the great power of regeneration of the universal religion of the Vedanta. Sri Basavesvara is a Universal Man He is the one who is with the universe. He is a person whose heart is as large as the universe, whose mind is so vast that he can take in the whole of creation at a glance, the rhythm of whose daily life is in tune with the Infinite in every vibration and whose body is at home in all climates and under every sky. Truth to tell, Universal Man is the harbinger of a new race, the prophet of a new humanity. He has a

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comprehensive soul. As Universal man that he was cultivated and enriched a literary form that had a universality of appeal the vachana or brief prose lyric. If Allama Prabhu was the God –Man of his time Basavesvara was the Universal Man. Their Companionship and collaboration was as significant as that of Krishna and Arjuna. It was the prides of Karnataka that she produced early in the 12th century a universal man whose vision was unclouded and who sought to realize in the life of the individual as well as the collectivity this supreme universality of vision. There was a period of glory when this great conjunction shone dazzlingly in the sky and illumined life all over the Kannada land and beyond. Basavesvara lived his life divinely, fearing none and hating none. To a society petrified into castes and creeds, he came as the great deliverer, preaching oneness and equality, equating the pariah with the Brahmin and the bearer with the prince. All were equals in the eyes of God and comparative greatness was one of proximity to God. Greatness did not depend on the accident of birth or caste. There has hardly been a more glorious academy of souls than the Academy of Experience that Basavesvara established in Kalyana. The Universal Man had absorbed the universe within himself formulated a creed to a casteless society and attracted to himself seers and men of vision who realized its tremendous social significance. But there was fanaticism on either side and the hour was not yet. And so he returned to the confluence from which he came, his fulfilling itself though the quest had to go on. He Left behind him a veritable treasure of poignant prose lyrics and these have kept the vision of Universal Man alive through the centuries and will continue to do so till the dream is realized. “Why are you bent on correcting the world”, he asked: “Correct yourself. Attend to your own body. Attend to your mind”. His last prayer was: “I did your bidding. Take me into your bosom now, O Kudala Page 40


CjªÀÅ Arivu Sangama!” And that is the prayer of the great of all times, who descended into the flesh.

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Sri Basavesvara: A Mystic He was a great mystic, religious reformer and responsible for the development of the virasaiva faith which believes in the worship of the omnipotent Siva as the only God. He possessed great spiritual powers gained from the practice of mysticism. This is clear from the many deeds of wonder which are attributed to him. Hr showed Bijjala the exact place where a valuable treasure was hidden. When a devotee of Siva called Sivalenkamancarasa approached Basava with a request for pearls, the latter gave him a measure of corn which later turned into brilliant gems. On a different occasion and to the great amazement of people around him, Basavesvara seems to have commanded even the Sun God to stop from moving for a period of eleven days! Many other extraordinary acts attributed to Basavesvara clearly indicate that he was gifted with supernatural powers commonly associated with mystics. The reason why Basavesvara chose the path of mysticism was unique. He found religious minded men of his times advocating dogma, tradition and scriptural study for the realization of God. When he appeared on the religious scene, he found in the Karnataka in a weakened state. The cult of sacrifice was widely practiced and society was hopelessly divided into castes and communities. Basavesvara enkindled and deepened Hinduism on its religious side and made the path of devotion highly popular. He gave a worthy expression to the emotional factor in religion. He threw wide open the gateway of devotion and invited all to enter the palace of divinity. He was not only an unequalled devotee of Siva but also a staunch advocate of the path of devotion. He was impatient with those who argued for the performance of religious rites to realize god. “How can devotion to Siva and adherence to CjªÀÅ

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rites agree?” he exclaimed often; and he discarded the ‘sacred thread’ which was the symbol of one who was devoted to the observance of rituals. He described very vividly the signs of ecstasy that can be noticed in a devotee while experiencing a mystic vision of God: “His (the devotee’s) mind melts, he experienced thrills of rapture, his eyes shed tears of joy and his speech becomes choked with feelings of pleasure.” And Basavesvara longed to experience such signs of devotion in his person. Practice of intense devotion led Basavesvara to experience the mystic joy of seeing the vision of Lord Shiva and of feeling one with Him. He dreaded the moment when he thought that Siva’s vision was disappearing from his mind. “Do not run away”, he exclaimed once, addressing the deity of his choice, “I dislike asking for favors. Only I beg to have a full view of Thee, Oh! Lord, and experience the joy resulting there from. He shed tears of joy, he was overcome by feelings of spiritual bliss and he engaged himself continuously in the worship of his chosen deity. The gift of experiencing such mystic delight could come only to a person who led a moral life. He had only the absorbing mystic experience of merging into the Great “omnipresent mass” and of being one with the “omniscient light”—the indivisible Supreme. The mystic way of life also depended on the control of the mind and Basava was not less insistent on the practice of this essential quality. Basava in his sweet and profound sayings emphasized this point and called upon the people upon all the people belonging to the Virasaiva faith to become morally pure. Men of Sri Basavesvara ‘s stature truly set a model for other human beings; and by following the footsteps of such religious masters, devoted men of God are bound to realize the delights of spiritual experience. Ref: Sri Basavesvara, A Commemorative Volume, 1967

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Why Should We be Proud of “Veerashaivism”? Ravi Amblee, Email: raviamblee@hotmail.com

strived hard to reach the same goal - to find ways to establish a civilized society, both for survival in the present and to evolve into the future.

Many times we hear anti-religious statements like: 1. Religion is the cause of the world's problems. 2. Religion has become obsolete. 3. Religion is for the poor and ignorant. These misconceptions stem from either our own ignorance of what religion is, or the way religions are interpreted. This article is written in an effort to show our youth how to perceive religion, Veerashaivism in particular, from a logical perspective, so that they will understand and appreciate the religion of which they are a part of. Before we embark on this discussion, let us look at some of the other world religions. There are many global religions like Hinduism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and so on. Surprisingly enough, if we go down to the tribal level, every tribe has its own beliefs and its own rituals. The point is, wherever there is a human society, we will find a religion there, however primitive it might be. Why can't humans live without a religion? If we understand why religions came into existence, we will find the answer to this question. Religion is a concept that humans devised to make them more civilized. It becomes obvious that, the creation of a religion itself is inevitable for the survival of any civilization. Though the founders of many of these religions lived in different parts of the world, spoke different languages, and lived in different times, they all CjªÀÅ

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All our modern day progress has been made possible by the success of these religions in taming our primitive nature, and allowing us to organize into a civilized, orderly society. We should be grateful and thankful to our ancestors and religious leaders who established and maintained these religions all along. Even though the goal of all religions is the same, their approaches are different. Many religions follow Bhakti Marga, or devotion to a personal deity, as the path to salvation. There is nothing wrong in this concept as long as it motivates people to follow a moral and civilized way of life. However, religions that follow Bhakti Marga use the “lure and scare” strategy to convince people to follow their religion. “One will go to heaven if one worships god with devotion” simultaneously endorsing “One will go to hell, if they do not worship god with devotion.” Though this approach in itself does not look harmful, it has a blatant loophole. Anyone can worship God with devotion, and believe that he or she will go to heaven no matter what. They may have committed many sins, but in their mind, if they pray with devotion and ask for forgiveness, they will still reach salvation. Though the goal of Bhakti-marga is to instill honesty, trustworthiness and other morals, people will always misinterpret religious concepts to their advantage. As God is always merciful,

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ To make one’s 'Consciousness' stronger, their sins are forgiven and doors of opportunity Basaveswara introduced the concept of "Ista-linga are always open to reach salvation. puja". "Ista-linga puja" is not a ritualistic process Bhakti Marga’s lure/scare strategy gives of holding istalinga in hand and praying. It is a no weight to honest hard work. And this is exactly process of invoking our 'Consciousness' to what Basaveshwara corrected in Veerashaivism. suppress the bad qualities. Every puja should 'Kayakave kailasa' indisputably became the carve out a moralistic individual out of us. This foundation of Veerashaivism. sculpturing of moral self would be the focus in every puja. Day after day and year after year, an Many people mistranslate this concept individual should inch towards becoming a moral into 'work is worship'. But Veerashaivism does asset to the society rather than dreaming of not bring 'worship' in between our hard work and reaching that non-existent heaven. eventual salvation. In Veerashaivism hard work in itself is salvation. There is no intermediate stage “Ista-linga puja” would make our of worship or other God-pleasing rituals necessary consciousness stronger and be able to decide in order to reach salvation. which is good for the society and which is bad. It Basaweshwara's saying of “Acharave Swarga” gives the highest importance to one’s conduct to create a harmonious society. In Veerashaivism, society comes first and every action of ours should be closely evaluated to see its impact on our society. If a person is involved in felony, mere acceptance of responsibility is not enough or praying to God for forgiveness is not the end, instead an effort to reverse the damages inflicted on society is what is emphasized. Basaweshwara's saying of 'Ayya endare swarga...', emphasizes the fact that we can make our own society a 'heaven' or a 'hell' depending on how civilized we would become without the need to dream of nonexistent heavenly lives. Basaveswara accentuated 'reliance on Consciousness' rather than reliance on God. Our 'Consciousness' can suppress the evil and expose our humane face to the world. In his saying 'kalabeda kolabeda... .’ he has brought in the concept of 'Consciousness' as the best guide that a person can rely on to lead a successful life. 'Consciousness’ is an awareness of a moral or ethical aspect to one's conduct together with the urge to prefer right over wrong. CjªÀÅ

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is a continuous learning process rather than just mere ritual. Further, to continue the process of making one’s 'Consciousness' stronger and wiser, Veerashaivas follow the concept of ‘Anubhaava [arivu] shatstala Marga' where once Anubhaava in real life would be the guide to lead a successful life. It is a continuous process of receiving moral information from various sources including parents, teachers and religious gurus. All these sources are equally good and offer same opportunity to become better citizens. All the moral characters that we see around and perceive should be evaluated and absorbed to help make our 'Consciousness' stronger. Building a strong 'Consciousness' or awareness is a continuous act of wisdom. Anubhaava [arivu] marga and linga puja go together making a person not only civilized but an intellect of service In Basweshwara's 'kayaka marga' the concept of "Kayaka" is not mere hard work but it should be "shuddha-kayaka" which is a hard work for the good of the society. It is the Anubhaava that would help us decide which is good kayaka and which is not.

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ from logical perspective to build a harmonious There are many examples of greedy society. Though Veerashaivism is an equally good individuals who have deceived the society in spiritual tool to meet one’s own spiritual needs, its business world, time and again. Although they main focus has always been a moral society. In would have employed thousands of people in their fact this is the approach of every religion, even businesses and all have worked hard, may be though some are masked by superstitious beliefs. 12hrs or 14hrs a day, such kind of work is not categorized as shuddha-kayaka. ‘Kayaka’ always Basaveswara taught Veerashaivism the articulates hard work for the good of the society. way a religion should be taught. When we strip all After all, in Veerashaivism society is heaven. superstitious beliefs from a religion what is left out is the bare truth. That is what embodies We cannot build a society by deceiving Veerashaivism, the religion of the future. others. A religion prevents crime from happening in the first place and "law and order" comes after Let us take our religion to a much higher the crime is committed. This is the most logical level in the future that answers all complex reason for the existence of multitude of religions questions and make our future generations be in the world. proud of their ancestors for establishing a futuristic religion that would remain essential and Religions are there to avoid humanity eternal for all generations to come. from going backwards or perishing all together. It is the responsibility of every intellect to ***** understand their role in their religions and to preach them logically to the best of their ability, rather than some superstitious believes. Intellectuals of modern day world should analyze and understand the religious concepts

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Basavanna – A Man Truly Ahead of His Time Basu Hullur, Bloomingdale, Illinois hullur@hotmail.com

History is full of saints, teachers and leaders that have tried to guide the people towards a tolerant, benevolent society where dignity of hard work is appreciated and differences in opinions/views are respected. History is also full of fascists and tyrants that cared more about themselves than their people. There are many cases of radical groups such as Al Qaida, Taliban, LTTE, LeT etc. which exploit the illiterate, poor people and brainwash them to commit horrible deeds promising them either separate homeland or many fortunes at heaven (I wonder if they ever make it to heaven after committing such heinous crimes!). If everyone has little more compassion and respect for fellow human beings and show willingness to compromise and understand the value of win-win deal making, world would be a far better place devoid of any type of conflicts. The role of teachers, religious and political leaders in affirming these ideals and making the common people see the benefits is crucial. This is where our “Vishwa Guru“ Basavanna excelled beyond anyone’s imagination. Basavanna and his peers not only communicated their ideals in simple understandable vachanas but also practiced what they preached and had rigorous discourse at Anubhava Manatapa. His thoughts on equality, dignity of work, acceptance of all and dasoha did not go well with many at his time nor will they go well with many people in this age as greed, control, and status drive the daily activities of people. His ideas are truly the load bearing pillars of a true democracy. At this juncture, democracy is under attack by various terrorist organizations who want to prove that their beliefs are more important than others and there is no place for people who have different set of beliefs, rituals and culture. Our Basavanna confronted this issue long CjªÀÅ

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ago by accepting the fact that people have different beliefs and religions, but every pious human being is God’s favorite and any religious person must have compassion as illustrated by following Vachanas: What is the use of religion which has no compassion? Be compassionate to all living beings in the world compassion is indeed the root of all religions Lord Kudala Sangama does not like it otherwise! Let me not ponder who is this, who is this? Let me believe they are ours; surely they are mine! O God! Let me feel that everyone in this creation is indeed your favorite person By using their favorite name for the God at the end of their Vachanas, our sharanas illustrated the fact that you can call the same God by many names, but the path to salvation is determined by how useful you have been to the society. The hard work of any person should improve the quality of life and dasoha takes care of people who have run into trouble and need a helping hand to regain their confidence. Ideally, democracy and capitalism should improve the quality of life, but the recent financial troubles show that uncontrolled greed and lobbyist influenced deregulation can ruin many a lives. Probably Basavanna envisioned dasoha not only to control one’s greed, but use the excess wealth one has to serve the needy sections of the society. After all, there is an end to everyone’s life and future generations will reward those souls who made a difference to uplift the people. Basavanna, Abraham Lincoln, Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Page 45


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ follow. By following his lead and installing his Luther King Jr., Mother Theresa, Nelson Mandela ideals in our children, we can make this world a make this bracket of great souls. We also know of better place for generations to come. fascists and tyrants such as Hitler, Saddam Hussein, V. Prabhakaran who tried to impose their One hundred years from now it will not matter will and killed many in the process and their what kind of car I drove, what kind of house I lived pathetic place in history. In this information age, in, how much money I had, nor what kind of there is so much data available at the finger tips of clothes I wore. But the world may be a better place many well-to-do people but the knowledge to because I was important in the life of a child. -choose the right path in life seems to be lacking. Kathy Davis Our Basavanna and his peers have made it easy for us by explaining the way of life a Lingayat should

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KAYAKA – THE MESSAGE OF BASAVANNA Dr.T.G. Prabhashankar Premi, Bangalore

Basavanna the great personality of the world, though took birth in 12th century, through his deeds he became immortal. He lived like us and experienced the agony of the people around him. Basavanna was not only a preacher, but he practised too. Among his experiments to uplift the downtrodden, the most important one is ‘Kayaka’. As A.K.Ramanujan puts it, veerashiva slogan like ‘kayakave kailasa’ (Basavanna) ‘work is heaven’, ‘to work is to be in the lords kingdom’, Kayaka could also mean the work of ritual or other worship; here I think it means labour, work.1 Basavanna says physical labour is a must even to Guru. Nuliya chandayya (a rope maker) says though you are Guru, only through work you save yourself while still alive (Guruvadaru kayak divdale jeevanmukti).2 Aaydakki Marayya (a gatherer of rice grains scattered on the ground) gives prime importance to kayaka and states since work (kayaka) is as good as heaven (kailas) Amareswarlinga himself must do it (kayakave kailasa vada karana Amareswara lingavayittadaru kayakadolagu).3 Here it is to be noted that though Basavanna introduced the concept of kayaka, but Aayadakki Marayya used the term ‘kayakave kailas’ in one of his vachanas as mentioned above. Basavanna opines that every man or woman should pursue his or her material and spiritual progress through kayaka, so beggary and idleness have no place in society. So he declares that ‘Beduvatha Bhaktanalla’ (one who begs is not a devotee (Bhakta).4 Hence the concept of kayaka is so comprehensive that it is capable of universal application. Even to this day this concept of kayaka is relevant.

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For Mahatma Gandhiji this kayaka is ‘bread labour’. According to him, nature has intended us to earn our bread by the sweat of our brow.5 Basavanna revolted against ‘karma theory’ which dictated that each man’s occupation was predeterminated by birth. He condemned any kind of discrimination on the basis of birth, sex or occupation. Basavanna at the same time made the keynote of kayaka that no occupation was superior or inferior to another and that it was honesty and sincerity which decided the merit of the means of livelihood.6 Equality of all professions leads to the next important aspect of kayaka. So kayaka at once is the dignity as well as the divinity of labour. In 12th century Basavanna encouraged the sharanas to follow different occupations. So we could see hundreds of sharanas in different occupations. In’Anubhav mantap’, a socio religious academy founded by Basavanna under the presidentship of Allama Prabhu, there were more than 300 sharanas and 33 sharaneyaru (women saints). Among them mentionable are Madivala Machayya, a Washerman, Nuliga chandayya, a rope maker, Ambigara Chowdayya, a Boatswain, Medara Ketayya, a basket-maker, Hadapada Appanna, a barber, Turugahi Ramanna, a cowherd, Sunkada Benakanna, a toll keeper, Madara Dhulayya, a pariah, Vaidya Sanganna, a physician, Kottanada Remavve, a paddy pounder and so on. These were used to assemble in ‘Anubhav mantap’ and participating in its deliberations. Sharanas were against hoarding. The main principle of kayaka is to-day’s earning for to-day’s bread only, not for tomorrow. As said earlier, the main aim of kayaka is upliftment of downtrodden through an honest bodily labour for Page 47


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ 4. ‘Basavannanavara Vachana Samputa’ Ed: livelihood. To-day when the world is facing economic crisis, the ‘kayaka’ the message of Dr.M.M.Kalburgi Dept. of Kannada and Basavanna is so relevant that it pave the way to culture, Karnataka Govt, Bangalore. Page solve the problems of the suffering mass. 107. 5. ‘Basaveswara’ – by H.Thipperudra Swamy, Sahitya Academy, New Delhi. Page 34.

References: 1. ‘Speaking of Shiva’ A.K.Ramanujan, penguin books, New York. Page 35.

6.

Ibid. Page 35.

2. ‘Sunya Sampadane’ Vol. IV. Ed: Dr.Nandimutt, Prof.Menezes and Dr.R.C.Hiremutt, Karnatak University. Page 169. 3. Ibid. Vol.IV. Page 15.

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Best Wishes to VSNA 32nd Annual Convention “J£ÀVAvÀ QjAiÀÄj®è ²ªÀ¨sÀPÀÛjVAvÀ »jAiÀÄj®”è FROM PREETI THRUPTI DEEPTI & NAYAN ANNAPUR & ANUSUYA SHIVAKUMAR Libertyville, Illinois

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Liṁga Praśaṁsa sthala (Glory of Liṁga) Guru S. Bale The glory of Liṁga that came through the blessing of guru is explained. Gurumahātmya yōgēna nijajnānātirēkataḥ| Liṁgasyāpi ĉa māhātmyaṁ sarvōtkruṣṭaṁ vibhāvyatē

1 Translation: Gurumahātmya = from glory of guru, yōgēna = association, ĉa = also, nija jñāna = true knowledge, atirēkataḥ= overflowed, sarvōtkruṣṭaṁ = sacred, Liṁgasyā= śivaliṁga, māhātmyaṁ api = superior, vibhāvyatē= known.

Explanation: With guru’s blessing devotion takes root in devotee. This knowledge is ĉilliṁga that is peaceful. It is the form of Śiva. Brahma, Viṣṇu and Rudra responsible for creation, existence and absorption because of ĉilliṁga. It is the reason for all reasons. Guru is essential to learn the glory of liṁga. Paraṁ pavitramamalaṁ liṁgaṁ brahma sanātanam| Śivābhidhānaṁ ĉinmātraṁ sadānaṁdaṁ niraṁkuśam

3 Kāraṇaṁ sarvalōkānaṁ vēdānāmapi kāraṇam|

Explanation: There are three types of prasādas namely, śudda, sidda, and prasidda. Śudda prasāda is of guru, sidda prasāda is of liṁga and prasidda prasāda is of jaṁgama. These are the lifelines for a devotee. Prasidda prasāda provides true happiness. The first śudda is very dear and the second sidda is mōda (pleasure). The later is for amusement and the third prasidda is for happiness respectively. Śudda prasāda is grasped through the sense organs, sidda prasāda is sensed by the mind and internal sense organs, and the last prasidda prasāda is sensed through feelings of equality with Paraśiva. Guru brings together the three prasādas. With these three prasādas the body becomes pure, mind become stedfast, and feelings are mirth. This leads to extreme devotion to Śiva. Śivasya bōdhaliṁgaṁ yadgurubōdhitaĉētasā| Tadēva liṁgaṁ vijnēyaṁ śāṁkaraṁ sarvakāraṇam

2 Translation: yat = which, Śivasya bōdhaliṁgaṁ = the form of Śiva as liṁga, Tadēva = that, sarvakāraṇam śāṁkaraṁ liṁgaṁ= Liṁga basis for the world, gurubōdhita ĉētasā = from the heart of guru, vijnēyaṁ = know as such. CjªÀÅ

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Pūraṇaṁ sarvatattāvanāṁ tāraṇaṁ janmavāridhēḥ 4 Jyōtirmayamanirdēśyaṁ yōgināmātmani sthitam| Kathaṁ vijnāyatē lōkē mahāgurudayāṁ vinā 5

Translation: Paraṁ = superior, pavitram= pure, amalaṁ = without any impurities, brahma sanātanam = ancient, Śivābhidhānaṁ = having the name of Śiva, ĉinmātraṁ= having different forms, sadānaṁdaṁ = happy always, niraṁkuśam = independent, sarvalōkānaṁ = for all worlds, kāraṇam = reason, vēdānāmapi = to all Vēdas, Kāraṇaṁ = reason, sarvatattāvanāṁ = for all philosophies, Pūraṇaṁ = basis, anmavāridhēḥ = problems of body, tāraṇaṁ = against, Jyōtirmaya = self illuminated, anirdēśyaṁ = having proof, yōginām = sages, ātmani sthitam = living in the center of body, iṁgaṁ = Paraśiva, lōkē = in this world, mahāgurudayāṁ vinā = with the grace of guru,Kathaṁ vijnāyatē= how is possible. Explanation: The greatness of Liṁga is explained with 17 charecteristics. They are: 1 Para Page 49


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ everywhere and at the end everything is absorbed (relation): Liṁga is above paṁĉabūtas, sense in Liṁga. Uriliṁgapeddipriya Viśvēśvara says organs, mind, knowledge. 2 Pavitra (Pure): Liṁga that the learned is the one who understands this. is pure because it is free from birth. 3 Amala (Impurities): Free from all types of impurities. 4 Liṁga is beyond the scope of mind. To learn about Liṁga guru’s help is essential. Liṁga: It has no birth, existence or death. 5 Brahma: Liṁga is independent of time and place. Bahunātra kimuktēna liṁgaṁ brahma sanātanam| 6 Sanātana (from ancient times): It has no beginning or end. Free from four types of feelings, Yōginō yatra līyaṁte muktapāśanibaṁdhanāḥ 7 namely, prāgabhāva (Before), pradhvaṁsabhāva Translation: muktapāśa nibaṁdhanāḥ= to free (erase), anyōnyābhāva (affectionate), and from ignorance and others, Yōginō = yōgis, yatra atyaṁtābhāva (much). 7 Śiva: liṁga is auspicious. liṁgaṁ = in what liṁga, līyaṁte = absorbed or 8 Ĉinmātra: is with knowledge 9 Sadānaṁda: ends that, sanātanam Bahuna = śivaliṁga the Always happy. 10 Niraṁkuśa: It is independent of ancient, brahma uktēna atra kim= what good in time, place, karma, and illusions. 11 Sarvakāraṇa: describing? Liṁga is the reason for the 14 worlds. 12 Vēdakāraṇa: Liṁga is the reason for all Vēdas 13 Pūraṇa: It is the basis for the earth and for bindu. 14 Tāraka: Life is subject to birth and death. Liṁga provides freedom from them. 15 Jyotirmaya: Self-lluminated and is brighter than many thousand suns. 16 Anirdēśa: Liṁga cannot be addressed as ‘it’ because mind cannot comprehend. 17 Atma: Liṁga is omnipresent. It shines more in the hearts of Śiva devotees. The truth about liṁga can only be obtained through the grace of guru

With purity in heart and mind Śiva devotees unite in Liṁga. With unity they are Liṁga. With unity sage Sanaka and other yōgis became immortals.

Brahmaṇā viṣṇunā pūrvaṁyalliṁgaṁ jyōtirātmakam| Apariĉĉhēdyamabhavyatēna vā pariĉōdyatē 6

Translation: pūrvaṁ = before, jyōtirātmakam = glowing, yat liṁgaṁ = which liṁga, Brahmaṇā = from Brahma, viṣṇunā = from Viṣṇu, Apariĉĉhēdya= not visible, abhavyat = becomes, ēna vā = From others, pariĉōdyatē= becomes visible? Explanation: Men cannot experience Paraśiva without the help of a guru. But what is the necessity of a guru to the divines like Brahma, Viṣṇu and Rudra? Without the help of a guru they also cannot learn the truth about Paraśiva. ‘Liṁgaveṁbudu haribrahmara naḍuve negaḷda jyōtirmayaliṁga’ ‘Alayaṁ sarvabhūtānāṁ liṁgamuĉĉatē’ is the secret of liṁga. Liṁga is CjªÀÅ

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Explanation: It is not possible to tell the complete glory of Liṁga. The whole world is Liṁga and all jīva’s are Liṁga. Liṁga is the result of the union between Śakti and Śiva. Liṁga is the greatest and spreads the entire universe and things that are in the universe. Liṁga is not bound by place or time. It took the form of five sādākyas, namely; Śiva, Amūrty, Mūrthy, Kartru, and Karma Sādākyas. Later, Liṁga took many other forms.

VSNA

Pīṭhikā paramāśaktirliṁgaṁ sākṣātparaśśivaḥ| Śīvaśakti samāyōgaṁ viśvaṁ liṁgaṁ taduĉyatē 8

Translation: Pīṭhikā paramāśaktir= pitike or base is śakti, sākṣāt paraśśivaḥ = truly Paraśiva, liṁgaṁ = liṁga, Śīva śakti samāyōgaṁ = union of Śia and śakti, viśvaṁ= world, tat liṁgaṁ = that liṁga, uĉyatē= said. Explanation: Śivaliṁga has two parts; the base and the top. The base is called pīṭike and the top is Paraśiva the Liṁga. The world is the expression of the union of Śakti and Śiva. So the world is the Page 50


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ Bhāratīṁ prāptavānāśussapūjyassarvaĉētasaiḥ|| form of Liṁga. Even the divines Brahma, Viṣṇu and Rudra are also the forms of Liṁga. ‘Liṁgamadyē jagat sarvaṁ’ means that the world is in the center of Liṁga. It is the complete form. Brahmā dayassurāssarvē munayaśśainakādayaḥ| Śivaliṁgārĉanādēva svaṁ svaṁ padamavāpnuyuḥ 9

Translation: sarvē= everything, Brahmā dayas surās= Brahma and other divines, śainakādayaḥ munaya = śavnaka and other sages, Śivaliṁgārĉanādēva = worshiping śivaliṁga, svaṁ svaṁ= their own, padam= status, avāpnuyuḥ= aquired. Explanation: This world came from Liṁga and also ends in Līmga. Liṁga is like an ocean. All the waves are created in the ocean and also end in the ocean. But ocean stays. Similarly Liṁga remains for all times. Liṁga shines in all jīva’s with pure mind and heart. By worshiping Liṁga there is no doubt that the worshiper experiences Liṁga as one. Worship of Liṁga by divines gave their status for creation, existence and absorption. The following verse from Skāṁda purāṇa says; Brahma viṣṇvādayō brahmarṣayastathā|

dēvāḥ

sarvē

Śivaliṁgējyayā samyak svasvarūpamavāpnuyuḥ||

The above verse from Parā purāṇa says that Brahma worshiped Liṁga to acquire both Saraswati and his position as the creator. That Liṁga is worthy of worship by all jivas. Brahmaṇaḥ viṣṭōrdānavamardanaṁ| Svargādhipatyamiṁdrasya phalam||

śivapūjāvidhēḥ

The above verse from Padma purāṇa says that the creative power of Brahma, the power to destroy the demons of Viṣṇu and to become the king of divines for Indra are all the results of Liṁga worship. Viśvādhipatyamīśasya liṁgamūrtēssvabhāvajam| Ananyadēvasādruśyaṁ śrutirāha sanātanī 10

Translation: Ananyadēva = with different gods, sādruśyaṁ = sādruśya, an = not having, Viśvādhipatyam = world creation, liṁgamūrtē=to the liṁga, īśasya= to Paraśiva, svabhāvajam = ordinarily, sanātanī= from beginning, śrutir= śruti, āha= says. Explanation: The Allamaprabhu says;

Brahma, Viṣṇu and other divines and all sages obtained their status through the worship of liṁga.

sruṣṭikartrutvaṁ

following

vaĉana

of

Before the births of these five divines

Ravdraṁ tadabhyarĉya hi liṁgamādav

Brahma, Viṣṇu, Rudra, Īśvara, and Sadāśiva

Śilāmayaṁ ĉāru haristu bhaktyā| Sudurlabhaṁ vaiṣṇavamādimagrya

Was in the form of Sūnya.

Mavāptavānēṣa paraṁ padaṁ yat||

It is imposible to explain the greatness. The above verse is from Brahma Kaivarta purāṇa. It says that Viṣṇu worshiped the stone Liṁga of Rudra with great devotion and acquired rare, and precious status.

Arivu

Idol that cannot be joined Wide, incomparable, our Guheśvara

Brahmā sarvajagatyartā yasya liṁgārĉanēna tu|

CjªÀÅ

Light that cannot be seen,

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ Śvētāśvatarōpaniṣat 3/4,7 The origin of the brighness of liṁga Liṁga associates know

Na tatsamaśĉāpyadhikaśĉa druśyatē Śvētāśvatarōpaniṣat 6-8

How can others know! Brahma, Viṣṇu, Rudra, Īśvara, and Sadāśiva the five divines worshiped Liṁga and obtained their status. No one else could provide the same.

Yō dēvānāṁ prabhavaśĉōdbavaśĉa Viśvādhipō rudrō maharṣiḥ|

Rudra responsible for the creation of Iṁdra and other divines, for their advancements, and for the creation of all movable and immovable objects of the world. He is the master for all things. He is knowledgeable. He blesses us with good things. He is in all animals hidden and not seen. He is the only one. He is Paraśiva. Know him and seek salvation in him. Liṁga is the form of Paraśiva. There is nothing equal to Liṁga. Devotee that receives prasāda from that Liṁga is truly blessed.

Hiraṇyagarbhaṁ janayāmāsa pūrvaṁ Sa ṇō buddhyā śubhayā saṁyunaktu||

(Translation is based on Siddāṁta ŚikhāmaṇI by Sri Siddēśvara śvāmigaḷu, Jagadguru śri Śivarātrīśvara graṁtamāle, Mysore, 1999)

Tataḥ paraṁ brahma paraṁ bruhaṁtaṁ Yathā nikāyaṁ sarvabhūtēṣu gūḍaṁ

From unpublished book Siddāṁta ŚikhāmaṇI by Guru S. Bale

Viśvasyaikaṁ parivēṣṭhitāramīśaṁ Taṁ jnātvā(s)mrutā bhavaṁti|

With Best Compliments on this occasion of VSNA Convention 2009 From Chaitra Kishore

* Eshwar Kishore * Chiranth Kishore

“Acharave Swarga” Taking Our Conduct Sky High CjªÀÅ

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

Bike and Build Swaroop Gonchikar In the summer of 2008, I had the privilege of taking part in an unforgettable experience that will always be important and relevant to me throughout my life. From May 23rd to July 24th, I went on a cross-country bicycling trip with twenty-nine other riders raising money and awareness for affordable housing efforts in the United States. The organization through which I completed this trip is called Bike & Build. It is an incredible organization with the guiding principle that, “We are young, and we could change the world”. With this idea in mind and a desire to be challenged I set off from Nags Head, North Carolina in the Outer Banks and made my way to San Diego, California. Backtracking several months before ever setting off from the Outer Banks, I find myself in a conversation with a friend about what to do during the summer after graduating from college. She mentioned how exciting it would be to take part in a bicycle trip across the country through an organization she had heard of. Looking into it, we decided it would be a great way to spend our summer and ended up applying for places on the roster. It was an ideal trip for me for a number of reasons. First of all, it presented a chance to help others in a more direct way than I could have ever imagined. Secondly, I had played sports throughout my life and as a result, have always had a great appreciation for what could be accomplished by the strength of one’s body and will. This trip provided me with the opportunity to do something physically active that I found to be challenging but at the same time exciting. Lastly, it gave me the chance to see the country in a very unique manner, from the seat of a bicycle. Prior to joining the others on the coast of North Carolina to begin the trip, I had to raise CjªÀÅ

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$4,000 for the affordable housing cause. Half of that amount went to furthering the efforts of the Bike & Build organization. The other half went directly to a number of other affordable housing organizations that we worked with over the course of the trip. We primarily worked with Habitat for Humanity but also made joint efforts with several lesser known organizations across the country. Raising $4,000 was a tall task but I felt confident that I could achieve my goal with a large base of support from family and friends who were in a position to help others. I sent out letters describing my plans as well as details about the organization to a number of family and friends. Many of these friends were members of VSNY and VSNA, without whose help I would have never gotten the chance to take this amazing journey. Their donations were directly aiding those in need providing them with a step in the right direction. Perhaps the most important part of the many affordable housing organizations we worked with is that they considered the lives of those they helped as a whole. These groups made sure that those receiving help were in a position to properly use it to improve their lives and someday, return the favor to others in need. For example, most people know that Habitat for Humanity provides affordable housing to those in need of it. But what most people do not know are the efforts taken to ensure that each candidate can maintain that home and support themselves without help in the future. The organization provides education on a number of financial topics meant to improve the decisionmaking of those being helped so that they can avoid finding themselves in the same kind of money trouble. Riding for affordable housing, I got the chance to truly immerse myself in the cause and learn a great deal about progressive efforts in this area. During the course of the trip, ten build days were spread out across the country when we would take part in the actual construction of a number of Page 53


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ flat tires, we all packed extra tire tubes, a hand houses. Our build days were in Chapel Hill and pump, and a multi-tool to fix them on the side of the Asheville in North Carolina, Maryville, Tennessee, road. While eating breakfast, we were each given a Little Rock, Arkansas, Colorado Springs and cue sheet with the directions to get to that day’s Durango in Colorado, and Prescott, Arizona. It was destination. After stretching and getting loose, we incredible how much work could be done by thirty set off from our host site. During the course of the energetic young adults with an ideal in mind and a trip, we stayed overnight in various places free of hammer in hand. On a few occasions, we had the any charge. Often, we found ourselves sleeping on wonderful opportunity to meet the future owners of the floors in churches, school gyms, and the houses we were constructing. These encounters occasionally, we even had to camp outside when we were always dear to me and reaffirmed my resolve could not get a host site. On average, we rode 75 to help those who are not as fortunate as I am. miles a day but some days but some days more and Our trip across the country took us from some less. It all depended on where we could get North Carolina to Tennessee to Arkansas to places to sleep overnight. Our longest day had us Oklahoma to Kansas to Colorado to Arizona and riding 125 miles into Colorado Springs. But day finally to California. after day, we found ourselves closer and closer to Our most difficult our final destination, the Pacific Ocean. riding was done in the For trips like this, the journey was far more Appalachian important than the destination. Throughout this Mountains of North journey, I found myself growing closer to my Carolina and fellow riders and looking forward to meeting new Tennessee, the Ozarks people and seeing new places. All of this, while of Arkansas, the windy plains of Oklahoma and gaining knowledge and a feeling of fulfillment Kansas, the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, and the through my work with affordable housing. I have Santa Ana Mountains of California. The most hundreds of photos from the trip but pictures do not rewarding rides for me were on the Blue Ridge do the places I got the opportunity to see or the Parkway in the Appalachians, the mountain passes memories I made any through the Rockies, and the road alongside the justice. Once again, I Grand Canyon. The scenery from these rides were would like to thank the breathtaking and the emotions they evoked members of VSNY and unforgettable. Having traveled a limited amount VSNA for their support previously, I was excited to venture west of Texas and encouragement in for the first time in my life. making this trip possible. Specifically, I would like The summer was characterized by a similar to extend my gratitude to Jyothi Shivakumar, routine that had to be performed in very different Sundaresh Siddaiah of the VSNY chapter for their places. On riding days, we often woke up on our help organizing my fundraising efforts. Being a air mats at five or six o’ clock in the morning. We part of this trip was a great experience that I would changed into our bicycling clothes and brought our recommend to anyone who is interested. The packed bags out to the support van to be put in. organization’s website www.bikeandbuild.org has a The support van was driven by one of four leaders lot of useful information about the routes, riders, and contained our bags and lunch materials. After and how to sign up. In addition, my email address packing our bags up, we filled our water bottles and is sgonchikar@gmail.com and I would be happy to hydrations packs while checking to make sure we answer any questions about the trip for anyone had all the necessary tools for dealing with bicycle interested. Thank you again and keep on pedaling! issues during the ride. Often finding ourselves with CjªÀÅ

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

VSNA Chicago - 360 Degree Survey Channu Kambalyal, Round Lake, Illinois

Veerashaiva Samaja of North America (VSNA) is a non-profit charitable organization with its mission to preserve and foster Veerashaivism in North America. In an effort to improve the organization functioning and membership experience, a 360 degree feedback survey was conducted by the Chicago Chapter. The objective of the survey was to assess the current membership experience and to obtain feedback from the VSNA members so that the data could be utilized to better organize the VSNA functions. The survey was carried-out online and distributed to 82 members via emails. The survey consisted of nineteen simple questions covering various aspects of the functions such as types of programs, discussion themes, location, food, membership fees, day and time preferences. The questions were single and multiple choices, with an option to provide comments. The VSNA members exhibited an enormous amount of passion and responded positively with feedback and suggestions. The members were in fact happy that a professional survey has been conducted. Out of 82 members who were requested to participate 46 members (56%) participated.

dissatisfied are willing to coordinate Anubhava Ghosti. Parents want to give their children more opportunities to participate and at the same time youth members would like to actively participate. The majority would like to have Ugadi function. Most would like to keep the location of the functions in both community halls and residences of members. Many would like to use English and Kannada as the language for communication. However, people are open to other Indian languages provided there was translation. There was a clear choice about the day and time of the function. Most would like to have the function on Saturday evening. Members would like combination of home and restaurant food. The majority of the members are willing to contribute $60 or more towards annual membership fees. Members have expressed many valuable comments. Few important feedback received were to start “Dasoha” i.e., volunteer social work and food drive, and to keep VSNA open to all members of the society.

Based on the feedback obtained from the participants, this year we are working towards adhering to the timings of the programs, making Most members expressed a strong desire budget transparent, better structuring “Anubhava for Anubhava Ghosti, a religious discussion forum. Ghosti”, involving volunteers for web While most are satisfied with Anubhava Ghosti, development, starting discussion forums such as few who consider Anubhava Ghosti very important youth development, health & wellness, and are very dissatisfied. The members who are “Dasoha”. A sampling of graphical representations of the feedback from VSNA-Chicago chapter members are presented below.

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

Location Preferences Combination of Residence Community Hall only & Community Hall 39% 36%

Important

Total 76%

Neutral

15%

2%

17%

Unimportant

5%

2%

7%

Total

59%

41%

100%

Pivot Table showing percentage distribution of location preferences and Importance Levels

Day & Time Preferences Saturday Noon

Saturday Evening

Sunday Noon

Other

Total

Important

8.7%

78.3%

2.2%

4.4%

93.5%

Neutral

0%

6.5%

0%

0%

6.5%

Total

8.7%

84.8%

2.2%

4.3%

100%

Percentage Distribution for Day and Time, and Importance Level

Anubhava Ghosti Very unimportant

0%

unimportant

7%

Nuetral

24%

Important

43%

Very important

26% 0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%

40%

45%

50%

Percentage Distribution for Importance of Anubhava Ghosti

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ Very dissatisfied

0%

Dissatisfied

15%

Nuetral

28%

Satisfactory

48%

Very Satisfactory

9% 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

Percentage Distribution for Satisfaction Level for Anubhava Ghosti Satisfied

Neutral

Dissatisfied

Total

Important

54.35%

10.87%

4.35%

69.57%

Neutral

2.17%

15.22%

6.52%

23.91%

unimportant

0.00%

2.17%

4.35%

6.52%

Total

56,52%

28.26%

15.22%

100.00%

Pivot Table showing Importance & satisfaction levels

Discussion Themes Other

4%

Memories from Land of Origin

48% 72%

Youth Development 46%

Health & Wellness Financial Management

33%

Career Discussions

35% 80%

Cultural Discussions

83%

Religious Discussions 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

Percentage Distribution for Discussion Theme Preferences

Membership Fee Other ($30 to $100)

16%

$80

9%

$75

9%

$60

36%

$50

31% 0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%

40%

Percentage Distribution for Membership Fees CjªÀÅ

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

Cultural & Entertainment Programs 17%

Other

52%

Classical Dances Hindi Movie Dances

30% 41%

Kannada Movie Dances India Culture

76% 72%

American-Veerashaiva Culture Andhra-Veerashaiva Culture

33%

Maratha-Veerashaiva Culture

33%

Karnataka-Veerashaiva Culture

87% 0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

Percentage Distribution for Cultural & Entertainment Program Preferences Children Participation Other

13%

Experiences from visit to Land of Origin

54% 70%

Instrumental Music

65%

Skit & Drama Dance Item

70%

Movie Item

13% 63%

Religious Discussions

74%

Vachana Recitation 0%

10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80%

Percentage Distribution for Children Participation

Food Preferences Other

11%

Home Food only

24%

Combine Restaurant & Home Food

50%

Restaurant Food for Alternate Functions

11%

Restaurant Food

4% 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

Percentage Distribution for Food Preferences

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

DzÀgÉ CPÀëgÀ eÁÕ£À«®èzÉ ¨sÁµÉ0iÀÄ£ÀÄß PÀ°0iÀÄĪÀÅzÀÄ ºÉÃUÉ? eÁÕ£ÀªÀ£ÀÄß ¸ÀA¥Á¢¸ÀĪÀÅzÀÄ ºÉÃUÉ? CAzÀgÉ ¨sÁµÉ0iÀÄ£ÀÄß PÀ°0iÀÄĪÀÅzÉà eÁÕ£ÀªÀ®è. ºÁUÉ0iÉÄà 0iÀiÁAwæPÀªÁV PÉêÀ® ºÉÆgÀUÉ vÉÆÃgÀĪÀ DqÀA§gÀzÀ ªÀævÀ ¤0iÀĪÀÄUÀ¼À DZÀgÀuÉUÀÆ ¥ÀæªÀÄÄRªÁUÀ¨ÁgÀzÀÄ. ªÀævÀ ¤0iÀĪÀÄUÀ¼ÀÄ ¥Àæw0iÉƧ⠪ÀiÁ£ÀªÀ¤UÉ CªÀgÀ DvÀä¥Àj±ÀÄzÀÞvÉUÉ PÉʢåÀUÀ¼ÁUÀ¨ÉÃPÀÄ. EzÉà ±ÀgÀtgÀÄ ªÀævÀ, ¤0iÀĪÀÄUÀ¼À£ÀÄß PÀÄjvÀÄ vÁ½zÀ ¤®ÄªÀÅ. CPÀ̪ÀÄä ±ÀgÀtgÀÄ DZÀj¹zÀ 52 £ÉêÀÄUÀ¼À£ÀÄß 64 ²Ã®UÀ¼À£ÀÄß ¥Àj¥Á°¸À¨ÉÃPÉAzÀÄ vÀ£Àß C£ÉÃPÀ ªÀZÀ£ÀUÀ¼À°è ºÉýzÀgÀÆ, CªÀÅ PÉêÀ® 0iÀiÁAwæPÀªÁV CxÀð»Ã£ÀªÁUÀ¨ÁgÀzÉAzÀÄ JZÀÑj¹, ¤dªÁzÀ ªÀævÀ DZÀgÀuÉ ºÉÃVgÀ¨ÉÃPÉA§ÄzÀ£ÀÄß J®ègÀ UÀªÀÄ£ÀPÉÌ vÀA¢gÀĪÀ¼ÀÄ. EzÀPÉÌ CªÀ¼À MAzÀÄ ªÀZÀ£ÀªÉà ¸ÁQë0iÀiÁVzÉ. “ UÀÄgÀĪÁzÀgÀÆ DZÁgÀ ¨sÀæµÀÖ£ÁzÀgÉ C£ÀĸÀj¸À¯ÁUÀzÀÄ °AUÀªÁzÀgÀÆ DZÁgÀ zÉÆúÀ¼ÀªÁzÀ°è ¥ÀÇf¸À¯ÁUÀzÀÄ dAUÀªÀĪÁzÀgÀÆ DZÁgÀ C£ÀĸÀgÀuÉ0iÀiÁzÀ°è PÀÆqÀ¯ÁUÀzÀÄ DZÁgÀªÉà ªÀ¸ÀÄÛ. ªÀævÀªÉà ¥Áæt, Qæ0iÉÄ0iÉÄà eÁÕ£À eÁÕ£ÀªÉà DZÁgÀ, DZÁgÀªÉà ¥ÁætªÁzÀ gÁªÉÄñÀégÀ°AUÀªÀÅ vÁ£É” F ªÀZÀ£ÀzÀ°è «ÃgÀ±ÉʪÀ ¹zÁÞAvÀzÀ “UÀÄgÀÄ °AUÀ, dAUÀªÀÄ” EªÀÅUÀ½UÉ MvÀÄÛ PÉÆlÄÖ CªÀÅUÀ¼ÀÄ PÀÆqÀ ¥Àj±ÀÄzÀÞªÁVgÀ¨ÉÃPÉA§ ¥Àj±ÀÄzÀÞ PÀ®à£É0iÀÄ ¹zÁÞAvÀ CqÀPÀªÁVªÉ, UÀÄgÀÄ 0iÀiÁgÀÄ? ¥Àæw0iÉƧâ fë0iÀÄ fêÀ£ÀzÀ «PÁ¸ÀPÉÌ M§â UÀÄgÀÄ ¨ÉÃPÀÄ. D UÀÄgÀÄ 0iÀiÁgÀÄ? ºÉÃVgÀ¨ÉÃPÀÄ? CªÀ£À DZÁgÀ «ZÁgÀUÀ¼ÀÄ ºÉÃVgÀ¨ÉÃPÀÄ? UÀÄgÀÄ«£À ªÀĺÀvÀéªÉãÀÄ? 0iÀiÁgÀ£ÀÄß UÀÄgÀĪÁV UÀÄgÀÄw¸À¨ÉÃPÀÄ? £ÁªÀÅ D0iÉÄÌ ªÀÄrPÉÆAqÀ UÀÄgÀÄ ¨sÀæµÀÖ£ÁzÀ°è CªÀ£À£ÀÄß C£ÀĸÀj¸À¨ÁgÀzÉA§ ¸ÀàµÀÖ ¤®ÄªÀÅ E°è PÀAqÀħgÀĪÀÅzÀÄ. CAvÉ0iÉÄà ±ÀgÀtgÀ ªÀZÀ£ÀUÀ¼À°è “vÀ£ÀßvÁ£ÀjzÉÆqÉ vÀ£ÀßjªÉ UÀÄgÀÄ” JAzÀÄ ºÉüÀ¯ÁVzÉ “CjªÉà ªÀåQÛ0iÀÄ DvÀä «PÁ¸ÀzÀ UÀÄgÀÄ” vÀ£Àß ªÀåQÛvÀézÀ°è0iÉÄà ¤dªÁzÀ UÀÄgÀĪÀ£ÀÄß ºÀÄqÀÄQPÉÆAqÀÄ vÀ£Àß Cj«£À ¨ÁV®£ÀÄß vÉgÉzÀÄ ªÀÄÄ£ÀßqÉ0iÀÄ®Ä ¥ÀæwfëAiÀÄÆ ±Àæ«Ä¸À¨ÉÃPÀÄ. E£ÀÄß “°AUÀ” JA§ ±À§ÝPÉÌ §ºÀÄzÉÆqÀØ ªÁå¥ÀPÀvÉ EzÉ, §ºÀÄ zÉÆqÀØ ªÁåSÁå£À«zÉ, CªÉÆÃWÀªÁzÀ ±ÀQÛ EzÉ ªÀÄvÀÄÛ ¤gÁPÁgÀzÀ ¸ÀAPÉÃvÀ«zÉ, CzÀPÉÌ §¸ÀªÀtÚ£ÀªÀgÀÄ °AUÀªÀ£ÀÄß PÀÄjvÀÄ CjªÀÅ

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

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“DZÁgÀ vÀ¦àzÀ°è ±ÉæõÀ×£ÀÄ £Á£ÉAzÀÄ DZÁgÀªÀ£ÀÄ C£ÀĸÀgÀuÉ0iÀÄ ªÀiÁqÀ§ºÀÄzÉà DZÁgÀPÀÆÌ C£ÁZÁgÀPÀÆÌ ¥ÀPÀë¥ÁvÀ GAmÉ ? QvÀÛ PÀtÂÚ UÀAn¤QÌzÀ ªÀÄvÉÛ C¼ÀvÀPÀÄÌAmÉà ? ¸ÀvÀå vÀ¦à £ÀqÉzÀ ªÀÄvÉÛ ¨sÀQÛ0iÀÄÄAmÉà ? PÉlÄÖ £ÀqÉzÀ CAUÀ£É0iÀÄ°è zÀȵÀÖªÀ PÀAqÀ ªÀÄvÉÛ zÀȵÀÖ ¢§å GAmÉ? CzÀÄ ¨Á0iÀħUÀzÀ¼ÀzÀAvÉ E£ÁßjUÉ ºÉüÀĪÉ? DZÁgÀªÉà ¥ÁætªÁzÀ gÁªÉÄñÀégÀ°AUÀªÀ®èzÀ £ÉêÀÄ” DZÁgÀªÀAvÀ£ÁUÀ¢zÀÝgÉ ªÀiÁ£ÀªÀ ±ÉæõÀ× ºÉÃUÉ DUÀ§®è? DZÁgÀªÀÅ C£ÁZÁgÀªÁUÀ¨ÁgÀzÀÄ. CPÀ̪ÀÄä£À E£ÉÆßAzÀÄ ªÀZÀ£À EAwzÉ “J¯Áè ªÀævÀPÀÆÌ dAUÀªÀÄzÀ ¥Àæ¸ÁzÀªÉ ¥Áæt J¯Áè £ÉêÀÄPÀÆÌ dAUÀªÀÄ zÀgÀıÀ£ÀªÉ £ÉêÀÄ J¯Áè ²Ã®PÀÆÌ dAUÀªÀÄ ªÀiÁlªÉ ²Ã® PÀlÄÖªÀiÁrzÉ£ÁzÀqÉ J£ÀUÀzÉ zÉÆæúÀ D dAUÀªÀÄzÀ zÀ±Àð£À¢AzÀ ¸ÀPÀ®zÀæªÀå ¥À«vÀæ D dAUÀªÀÄzÀ ¥ÁzÀwÃxÀð¢AzÀ WÀ£À°AUÀPÉÌ fêÀPÀ¼É Page 62


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

D dAUÀªÀÄzÀ ¥Àæ¸ÁzÀ¢AzÀ WÀ£À°AUÀPÉÌ vÀÈ¦Û EµÀÖ£ÀjvÀ°è dAUÀªÀÄ °AUÀPÉÌ ¸ÀAzÉúÀ ªÀiÁrzÀqÉ J£ÀUÉ PÀÄA©ü¥ÁvÀPÀzÀ°è £Á0iÀÄPÀ£ÀgÀPÀ vÀ¥ÀàzÀÄ, DZÁgÀªÉà ¥ÁætªÁzÀ gÁªÉÄñÀégÀ°AUÀ ¸À»vÁV ªÀÄļÀÄUÀĪɣÀÄ” CPÀ̪ÀÄä£À ªÀZÀ£ÀUÀ¼ÀÄ £ÉÃgÀ £ÀÄr £ÉÃgÀ £ÀqÉ0iÀÄ£ÀÄß eÁÕ¥ÀPÀPÉÌ vÀgÀÄvÀÛªÉ. ±ÀgÀtgÀÄ CAvÀgÀAUÀ §»gÀAUÀUÀ½UÉ ºÉÃUÉ ªÀĺÀvÀéªÀ£ÀÄß PÉÆlÖgÀÆ D G¨sÀ0iÀÄ aAvÀ£ÉUÀ¼À£ÀÄß ‘ºÉÆgÀUÀt ªÀiÁl- M¼ÀUÀt PÀÆl’0iÉÄA§ ºÉƸÀ £ÀÄr0iÀÄ£ÀÄß ¸Àȶ׹PÉÆnÖzÁÝgÉ. F G¨sÀ0iÀÄzÀ ±ÀÄ¢Þ0iÀÄ£ÀÄß ¥Àæw ¨sÀPÀÛ£ÀÄ fêÀ£ÀzÀ°è DZÀj¸À¨ÉÃPÉA§ÄzÉà CªÀ¼À G¥ÀzÉñÀ. ¨sÀPÀÛ£ÀÄ ¸ÁwéPÀ DºÁgÀªÀ£ÀÄß ¸Éë¸ÀĪÀ CUÀvÀåvÉ,

¥ÀæPÀÈw0iÉÄà UÀÄgÀÄ UÀUÀ£À °AUÀªÀÅ - f. J¸ï. ²ªÀgÀÄzÀæ¥Àà

¥ÀÇeÁ ¥ÀjPÀgÀAUÀ¼À D0iÉÄÌ, ¥Àæ¸ÁzÀPÉÌ D0iÉÄÌ ªÀiÁrPÉƼÀÄîªÀ DºÁgÀ EªÀÅUÀ¼À£ÀÄß J¼É J¼É0iÀiÁV ºÉýzÀAwzÉ. CPÀ̪ÀÄä vÀ£Àß E£ÉÆßAzÀÄ ªÀZÀ£ÀzÀ°è DZÁgÀPÉÌ Cj«£À CUÀvÀåvÉ0iÀÄ£ÀÄß ¸ÁjzÁݼÉ. “ §vÀÛ¯É EzÀݪÀgÉ®è PÀvÉÛ0iÀÄ ªÀÄPÀ̼ÀÄ, vÀ¯É ¨ÉÆüÁzÀªÀgÉ®è ªÀÄÄAqÉ0iÀÄ ªÀÄPÀ̼ÀÄ, vÀ¯É dqÉUÀnÖzÀݪÀgÉ®è ºÉƯÉ0iÀÄgÀ ¸ÀAvÁ£À, DªÀ ¥ÀæPÁgÀªÁzÀqÉãÀÄ ? CjªÉ ªÀÄÄRåªÀ0iÀiÁå DZÁgÀªÉ ¥ÁætªÁzÀ gÁªÉÄñÀégÀ°AUÀzÀ°è “ F ªÀZÀ£À CªÀ¼À £ÉÃgÀ ¢lÖ £ÀÄrUÉ ¸ÁQë0iÀiÁVzÉ.

Dedicated to Your Service - Jeevan Topgi

¥ÀæPÀÈw0iÉÄà UÀÄgÀÄ UÀUÀ£À °AUÀªÀÅ dUÀªÉà PÀÆqÀ®¸ÀAUÀªÀiÁ

In the name of religion, fight is everywhere

ºÀÄr0iÉÄà ¨sÀ¸ÀäªÀÅ ºÀįÉè ¥ÀvÉæ0iÀÄÄ dqÀ«zÉ®èªÉÇà dAUÀªÀÄ

Between the nations quarrel is terrible

PÀÄrªÀ ¤ÃgÉà wÃxÀð w£ÀÄߪÀ

Desire for women, wealth, and land is surmounting

gÉÆnÖ ²ªÀ£À ¥Àæ¸ÁzÀªÀÇ ±ÀæªÀÄzÀ ¨ÉªÀgÉà ¸ÁߣÀ

Without water farmers’ life is dreading

zÀÄrvÀzÀ ºÁqÉà ªÀÄAvÀæ ¤£ÁzÀªÀÇ

Old age life is nothing but struggling

J®èªÀÇ ²ªÀ£ÀA±ÀªÉ£ÀÄߪÀ zsÀªÀÄðªÉÇAzÉà zsÀªÀÄðªÀÅ Oh! Kalabhiaravane

C£ÀågÀ£ÀÄ C¼ÀQ¸ÀzÀ »vÀPÀgÁ PÀªÀÄðªÉÇAzÉà PÀªÀÄðªÀÇ

Fill my heart always with Bhakti

Gt¹ GtÄÚªÀ ¨sÁªÀ ¨sÀQÛ0iÀÄÆ §¯Éè£É£É¸ÀÄ «gÀQÛ0iÀÄÆ

Let my thinking be always for compassion

PÀÆr PÀ°0iÀÄ®Ä

Preserve my doing all for your service!

PÀÆr £À°0iÀÄ®Ä PÀÆr ¨É¼É0iÀÄ®Ä ªÀÄÄQÛ0iÀÄÆ CjªÀÅ

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

±ÀÆ£Àå ¸ÀA¥ÁzÀ£É ²æêÀÄw vÁgÁ ªÀÄÆwð, ¨ÉAUÀ¼ÀÆgÀÄ “±ÀÆ£Àå ¸ÀA¥ÁzÀ£É” JA§ ¥ÀzÀ C£ÀĨsÁªÀ (Mysticism) ¸Á»vÀåPÉÌ PÀ£ÀßqÀzÀ «ÃgÀ±ÉʪÀ vÀvÀéeÁÕ¤UÀ¼À «±ÉõÀ PÉÆqÀÄUÉ. EzÀÄ «ÃgÀ±ÉʪÀ ¹zÁÞAvÀªÀ£ÀÄß ¸ÀªÀÄ¥ÀðPÀªÁV ºÉüÀĪÀ GvÀÛªÀÄ ¥Áj¨sÁ¶PÀ ¥ÀzÀ. ªÀiÁwUÉ «ÄÃjzÀ, PÉêÀ® C£ÀĨsÀªÀPÉÌ §gÀĪÀ ªÀÄ£À¹ÜwAiÀÄ£ÀÄß ¸ÀÆa¸ÀĪÀ F ¥ÀzÀ AiÉÆÃa¹zÀµÀÆÖ «¸ÁÛgÀªÁUÀÄvÀÛ, UÀºÀ£ÀªÁUÀÄvÀÛ ºÉÆÃUÀĪÀ zsÀ餥ÀÇtð ¥ÀzÀ. ¸ÁªÀiÁ£Àå CxÀðzÀ¯ÁèzÀgÉ £ÀªÀÄä°è E®è¢gÀĪÀÅzÀ£ÀÄß UÀ½¸ÀĪÀÅzÉà ¸ÀA¥ÁzÀ£É. zsÀ£À ¸ÀA¥ÁzÀ£É±ÀQÛ-¸ÁªÀÄxÀåð ¸ÀA¥ÁzÀ£É, DgÉÆÃUÀå ¸ÀA¥ÁzÀ£É, QÃwð ¸ÀA¥ÁzÀ£É EvÁå¢. EªÀ£ÀÄß ±ÀæªÀÄ¥ÀlÄÖ ¸ÀA¥Á¢¸ÀĪɪÀÅ. EªÀ£ÀÄß EvÀgÀjUÉ vÉÆÃj¸À®Æ ¸ÁzsÀå. ±ÀÆ£ÀåªÀ£ÀÄß ¸ÀA¥Á¢¸ÀĪÀÅzÉAzÀgÉ? ‘EgÀÄ«PÉ’ E®èzÀ ¸ÉÆ£ÉßAiÀÄ£ÀÄß ¸ÀA¥Á¢¸ÀĪÀÅzÁzÀgÀÆ ºÉÃUÉ? KPÉ? ¸ÉÆ£Éß ¸ÀA¥Á¢¸À®Ä ±ÀæªÀĪÁzÀgÀÆ KPÉ ¨ÉÃPÀÄ? ¸ÁégÀ¸ÀåPÀgÀ ¸ÀAUÀwAiÉÄAzÀgÉ ¯ÉÆÃPÀzÀ J®è zsÀªÀÄðUÀ¼À EAVvÀ-ªÀÄÆ® GzÉÝñÀ-CAwªÀÄ UÀÄj F ±ÀÆ£Àå ¸ÀA¥ÁzÀ£ÉAiÉÄÃ! ¥ÀæwªÀiÁ£ÀªÀ£À MAzÉÆAzÀÆ AiÀÄvÀßzÀ ªÀÄÆ®¨sÀÆvÀ GzÉÝñÀªÉà ±ÀÆ£Àå ¸ÀA¥ÁzÀ£É. Cj«zÉÆÝà E®èzÉAiÉÆà J®è fëUÀ¼À ºÀÄqÀÄPÁl F ‘±ÀÆ£Àå’ ¹ÜwAiÀÄ°è ¹UÀĪÀ ªÀÄ£À±ÁêAwUÁV – D£ÀAzÀPÁÌV. ªÀiÁ£ÀªÀ d£ÀäzÀ ¸ÁxÀðPÀå EgÀĪÀÅzÉà F ‘±ÀÆ£Àå ¸ÀA¥ÁzÀ£É’AiÀÄ°è. «ÃgÀ±ÉʪÀgÀ zsÁ«ÄðPÀ ¸Á»vÀåzÀ°è ‘±ÀÆ£Àå’ªÉAzÀgÉ C£ÀĨsÁªÀ(DzsÁåwäPÀ)ªÀiÁUÀðzÀ°è ¸ÁUÀĪÀ ¸ÁzsÀPÀ vÀ£Àß ¸ÁzsÀ£ÉAiÀÄ CAvÀåzÀ°è ¥ÀqÉAiÀÄĪÀ ¨sÀUÀªÀvï¸ÁPÁëvÁÌgÀ – DvÀä¸ÁPÁëvÁÌgÀzÀ C£ÀĨsÀªÀ JAzÀxÀð. ¸ÀȶÖUÀÆ ªÉÆzÀ°£À ¥ÀgÀªÀ¸ÀÄÛ(§æºÀä)«UÀÆ ‘±ÀÆ£Àå’ªÉAzÀÄ ºÉüÀĪÀgÀÄ. ‘±ÀÆ£Àå’PÉÌ ¥ÀAiÀiÁðAiÀĪÁV CZÀÑ PÀ£ÀßqÀzÀ ‘§AiÀĮĒ ªÀZÀ£ÀPÁgÀjvÀÛ ªÀÄvÉÆÛAzÀÄ ¥Áj¨sÁ¶PÀ ¥ÀzÀ. F ¤nÖ£À°è ‘±ÀÆ£ÀåªÁUÀÄ §AiÀįÁUÀÄ’ J£ÀÄߪÀÅzÀgÀ CxÀ𠲪À-fêÀgÀ LPÀåvÉAiÀÄ C£ÀĨsÀªÀ JAzÁUÀĪÀÅzÀÄ, C®èzÉ, ¸ÀA¸ÀÌöÈvÀzÀ°è ‘¸ÀA¥ÁzÀ£À’zÀ CxÀð UÀ½¸ÀĪÀÅzÀÄ, ¥ÀqÉAiÀÄĪÀÅzÀÄ JAzÀµÉÖà C®èzÉ ²æêÀÄAvÀ£ÁUÀÄ, GvÀÛªÀĪÁUÀÄ, ¥ÀÇtðªÁUÀÄ JAzÀÆ GAlÄ. ±ÀÆ£Àå¸ÀA¥ÁzÀ£É JAzÀgÉ ¥ÀÇtðªÁUÀÄ JA§xÀðªÀÇ §gÀĪÀÅzÀÄ.

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

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PÀ¼À¨ÉÃqÀ, PÉÆ®¨ÉÃqÀ, ºÀĹ0iÀÄ £ÀÄr0iÀÄ®Ä ¨ÉÃqÀ ªÀÄĤ0iÀĨÉÃqÀ, C£ÀåjUÉ C¸ÀºÀå¥ÀqÀ¨ÉÃqÀ vÀ£Àß §tÂÚ¸À¨ÉÃqÀ, E¢gÀ ºÀ½0iÀÄ®Ä ¨ÉÃqÀ EzÉà CAvÀgÀAUÀ ±ÀÄ¢Ý, EzÉà §»gÀAUÀ ±ÀÄ¢Ý EzÉà £ÀªÀÄä PÀÆqÀ® ¸ÀAUÀªÀÄzÉêÀgÀ£ÉÆ°¸ÀĪÀ ¥Àj. 4

§¸ÀªÀtÚ£ÀªÀgÀÄ £ÀÄr0iÀÄ ¸ÉÆUÀ¸À£ÀÄß ºÉüÀÄvÀÛ -

0iÀiÁªÀÅzÀ£ÀÄß ‘M¯Éè£ÀÄ’ J£ÀߨÉÃPÀÄ MAzÀÄ ¸ÀAPÀ®àzÀ ¨sÁµÉ PÉý.

£ÀÄrzÀgÉ ªÀÄÄwÛ£À ºÁgÀzÀAwgÀ¨ÉÃPÀÄ. £ÀÄrzÀgÉ °AUÀ ªÉÄaÑ CºÀÄzÀºÀÄzÉ£ÀÄߪÀAwgÀ¨ÉÃPÀÄ JAzÀÄ ªÀÄÄAzÀĪÀjzÀÄ £ÀÄr0iÉƼÀUÁV £ÀqÉ0iÀÄ¢zÀÝqÉ PÀÆqÀ®¸ÀAUÀªÀÄzÉêÀ£ÉAvÉÆ°ªÀ£À0iÀÄå? 2

bÀ®¨ÉÃPÀÄ ±ÀgÀtAUÉ ¥ÀgÀ¸Àw0iÀÄ£ÉƯÉè£ÉA§ bÀ®¨ÉÃPÀÄ ±ÀgÀtAUÉ ¥ÀgÀzsÀ£ÀªÀ£ÉƯÉè£ÉA§, bÀ®¨ÉÃPÀÄ ±ÀgÀtAUÉ ¥ÀgÀzÉʪÀªÀ £ÉƯÉè£ÉA§, bÀ®¨ÉÃPÀÄ ±ÀgÀtAUÉ °AUÀdAUÀªÀĪÀ£ÉÆAzÉA§, bÀ®¨ÉÃPÀÄ ±ÀgÀtAUÉ ¥Àæ¸ÁzÀ ¢lªÉA§ bÀ®«®èzÀªÀgÀ ªÉÄZÀÑ PÀÆqÀ® ¸ÀAUÀªÀÄzÉêÀ. 5

-JAzÀÄ £ÀqÉ0iÀÄ ªÀĺÀvÀéªÀ£ÀÄß ¸ÁgÀÄvÀÛ MAzÀÄ JZÀÑjPÉ0iÀÄ ªÀiÁvÀ£ÀÆß ºÉýzÁÝgÉ.

ªÀ¸ÀÄÛªÀ£ÀÄß JwÛPÉƼÀÄîªÀAvÀºÀzÀÄ ªÀiÁqÀ¨ÁgÀzÀÄ’ JA§ ªÀiÁvÀ£ÀÄß vÀ£Àß ªÀZÀ£ÀzÀ°è »ÃUÉà ºÉýzÁݼÉ-

£ÀÄr0iÀÄ°è JaÑvÀÄÛ, £ÀqÉ0iÀÄ°è vÀ¦àzÀqÉ »qÀ¢zÀð °AUÀªÀÇ WÀl¸À¥Àð£À0iÀÄå. 3 -CAzÀgÉ £ÀÄrzÀAvÉ £ÀqÉ0iÀÄ¢zÀÝgÉ, ²ªÀ£À ¥ÀæwÃPÀªÉAzÀÄ PÀgÀ¸ÀÜ®zÀ°è »rzÀÄPÉÆArgÀĪÀ °AUÀªÉà WÀl¸À¥ÀðªÁV PÀZÀÄÑvÀÛzÉ J£ÀÄߪÀ°è PÉêÀ® ¨Á¬ÄªÉÃzÁAvÀ¢AzÀ CjªÀÅ

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ªÀævÀ¤µÀ×¼ÁzÀ ±ÀgÀuÉ ¸ÀvÀåPÀÌ ‘®AZÀPÉÌ’ PÉÊ0iÉÆÃqÀبÁgÀzÀÄ, ©zÀÝ

VSNA

®AZÀªÀAZÀ£ÉUÉ PÉÊ0iÀiÁ£ÀzÀ ¨sÁµÉ. §mÉÖ0iÀÄ°è ºÉÆ£ÀÄß ªÀ¸ÀÛç ©¢ÝzÀÝqÉ JwÛzÉ£ÁzÀgÉ C0iÀiÁå ¤ªÀiÁäuÉ. 6

Page 75


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

ªÉÆýUÉ ªÀĺÁzÉêÀªÀÄä ‘£ÀqÉ£ÀÄr ±ÀÄzÀÝ«gÀ¨ÉÃPÀÄ’ JA§ÄzÀgÀ §UÉÎ §ºÀ¼À ªÀiÁ«ÄðPÀgÁV £ÀÄr¢zÁݼÉ,

CONGRATULATIONS TO

£ÀqÉ£ÀÄr ±ÀÄzÀݪÀżÀîªÀgÀÄ ¥ÀÅgÁvÀ£ÀgÀ ªÀZÀ£ÀªÀ N¢zÀqÉ C£ÀĨsÁªÀªÀ ªÀiÁrzÀqÉ ªÉÄZÀÄѪÀgÀ®èzÉ £ÀqÉ£ÀÄr ±ÀÄzÀÝ«®èzÀªÀgÀÄ ¥ÀÅgÁvÀ£ÀgÀ ªÀZÀ£ÀªÀN¢zÀqÉ C£ÀĨsÁªÀªÀ ªÀiÁrzÀqÉ ªÉÄZÀÄѪÀgÉ? 7

VSNA ON THEIR 32nd Annual Convention

DzÀÝjAzÀ PÉêÀ® ¥ÀÅgÁvÀ£ÀgÀ (§¸ÀªÀ ¥ÀǪÀðzÀ ±ÀgÀtgÀ) ªÀZÀ£À N¢zÀgÉ ¸Á®zÀÄ, ºÁUÉ NzÀĪÀªÀgÀ £ÀqÉ£ÀÄr ±ÀÄzÀÞ«gÀ¨ÉÃPÀÄ. »ÃUÉà §¸ÀªÁ¢ ±ÀgÀtgÀÄ £ÀqÉ £ÀÄrUÉ DzÀåvÉ PÉÆlÄÖ £ÀqÉ E®èzÀ £ÀÄr ¥Àæ0iÉÆÃd£À«®èzÀÄÝ JA§ÄzÀ£ÀÄß ¸ÁgÀĪÀÅzÀgÀ ªÀÄÆ®PÀ ¨sÀQÛ JAzÀgÉ PÉêÀ® ¥ÀÇeÉ ªÀævÀ £ÉêÀĪÀ®è CªÀÅUÀ¼À »AzÉ ZÁjvÀæ÷å ±ÀÄ¢Þ EgÀ¨ÉÃPÀÄ. PÁ0iÀÄPÀ zÁ¸ÉÆúÀ ªÀÄvÀÄÛ ¸ÀªÀÄvÁ¨sÁªÀªÀ£ÀÄß ªÉÄÊUÀÆr¹PÉÆArgÀ¨ÉÃPÀÄ. DUÀ¯Éà ¨sÀPÀÛ ¨sÀUÀªÀAvÀ¤UÉ ºÀwÛgÀªÁUÀĪÀÅzÀÄ, CAUÀ¢AzÀ °AUÀªÁUÀĪÀ ªÀiÁUÀð EzÉãÉ.

1) ªÀZÀ£ÀUÀ¼ÀÄ ¸ÀA.qÁA.J¸ï.«zÁå±ÀAPÀgÀ, PÀ£ÁðlPÀ ¸Á»vÀå CPÁqÀ«Ä, ¨ÉAUÀ¼ÀÆgÀÄ ªÀZÀ£À 307 ¥ÀÅ.60. 2) §¸ÀªÀtÚ£ÀªÀgÀ ªÀZÀ£À ¸ÀA¥ÀÅl ¸ÀA.qÁ.JA.JA. PÀ®§ÄVð, PÀ£ÀßqÀ ªÀÄvÀÄÛ ¸ÀA¸ÀÌöÈw E¯ÁSÉ, ¨ÉAUÀ¼ÀÆgÀÄ, ªÀZÀ£À 803, ¥ÀÅl 206. 3) §¸ÀªÀtÚ£ÀªÀgÀ ªÀZÀ£À ¸ÀA¥ÀÅl ¸ÀA.qÁ.JA.JA. PÀ®§ÄVð, PÀ£ÀßqÀ ªÀÄvÀÄÛ ¸ÀA¸ÀÌöÈw E¯ÁSÉ, ¨ÉAUÀ¼ÀÆgÀÄ, ªÀZÀ£À 646, ¥ÀÅ. 162 4) §¸ÀªÀtÚ£ÀªÀgÀ ªÀZÀ£À ¸ÀA¥ÀÅl ¸ÀA.qÁ.JA.JA. PÀ®§ÄVð, PÀ£ÀßqÀ ªÀÄvÀÄÛ ¸ÀA¸ÀÌöÈw E¯ÁSÉ, ¨ÉAUÀ¼ÀÆgÀÄ, ªÀZÀ£À 235, ¥ÀÅ. 59. 5) §¸ÀªÀtÚ£ÀªÀgÀ ªÀZÀ£À ¸ÀA¥ÀÅl ¸ÀA.qÁ.JA.JA. PÀ®§ÄVð, PÀ£ÀßqÀ ªÀÄvÀÄÛ ¸ÀA¸ÀÌöÈw E¯ÁSÉ, ¨ÉAUÀ¼ÀÆgÀÄ, ªÀZÀ£À 677 ¥ÀÅ. 169. 6) ªÀZÀ£ÀUÀ¼ÀÄ, ¸ÀA.qÁA.J¸ï.«zÁå±ÀAPÀgÀ, PÀ£ÁðlPÀ ¸Á»vÀå CPÁqÀ«Ä, ¨ÉAUÀ¼ÀÆgÀÄ, ªÀZÀ£À 708, ¥ÀÅ.157. 7) ²ªÀ±ÀgÀuÉ0iÀÄgÀ ªÀZÀ£À ¸ÀA¥ÀÅl ¸ÀA.qÁ.«ÃgÀtÚgÁdÆgÀ, PÀ£ÀßqÀ ªÀÄvÀÄÛ ¸ÀA¸ÀÌöÈw E¯ÁSÉ, ¨ÉAUÀ¼ÀÆgÀÄ, ªÀZÀ£À 899, ¥ÀÅ. 286.

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PÁ®§rªÀÅzÀ®èzÉ, ¨ÉÃgÉ UÀwAiÀÄÄAmÉ? ²ªÀ ²ªÀ! ºÉÆÃzÉºÉ ºÉÆÃzɺɣÀAiÀiÁå. ¤ªÀÄä ªÀÄ£ÀzÉvÀۯɣÀß vÉUÉAiÀÄAiÀiÁå ¥À±ÀĪÁ£ÀÄ, ¥À±ÀÄ¥Àw ¤Ã£ÀÄ! vÀÄqÀÄUÀtÂAiÉÄAzÀÄ J£Àß »rzÀÄ §rAiÀÄzÀ ªÀÄÄ£Àß

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MqÉAiÀÄ ¤ªÀÄä §AiÀÄåzÀAvÉ ªÀiÁqÀÄ PÀÆqÀ®¸ÀAUÀªÀÄzÉêÁ.

From Drs. Sadanand Manoli & Rajyasri Manoli & Drs. Dayanand & Devanand Manoli

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

ªÁAiÀÄÄ«ºÁgÀ ªÀÄvÀÄÛ «ZÁgÀ«ºÁgÀ qÁ. ²ªÀªÀÄÆw𠲪ÁZÁAiÀÄð ¸Áé«ÄÃf ¹jUÉgÉ ¹jUÉgÉAiÀÄ°èzÁÝUÀ¯É¯Áè £ÀªÀÄä ªÀÄoÀzÀ ±ÁAwªÀ£ÀzÉƼÀUÉ ªÀÄÄAeÁªÀzÀ°è £Á¯ÁÌgÀÄ Q.«ÄÃ. ªÁAiÀÄÄ«ºÁgÀ ºÉÆÃUÀĪÀÅzÀÄ £ÁªÀÅ gÀÆrü¹PÉÆAqÀÄ §AzÀ ¢£ÀZÀj. ªÀÄÆqÀtzÀ°è CgÀÄuÉÆÃzÀAiÀÄzÀ £À¸ÀÄUÉA¥ÀÅ, DUÀ¸ÀzÀ°è ZÀ°¸ÀĪÀ §AUÁgÀzÀ UÀnÖUÀ¼ÀAwgÀĪÀ ªÉÆÃqÀUÀ¼ÀÄ, ¸ÀéZÀÒAzÀªÁV ºÁgÀĪÀ ºÀQÌUÀ¼À PÀ®gÀªÀ, ¨Á£ÀAUÀ¼À£ÀÄß wæªÀtðUÀ½AzÀ gÀAUÉÃj¸ÀĪÀ AiÀÄÄzÀÞ «ªÀiÁ£ÀUÀ¼À Airshow £ÀAvÉ CPÀÌ¥ÀPÀÌzÀ°è ¸Á®Ä¸Á¯ÁV ¸ÁUÀĪÀ ¨É¼ÀîQÌUÀ¼À »AqÀÄ, PÁUÉUÀ¼À PÀPÀð±À zÀ¤¬ÄAzÀ ¨ÉøÀvÀÛ Q«UÀ½UÉ EA¥ÁV ¸ÀégÀUÉʪÀ PÉÆÃV¯ÉUÀ¼ÀÄ, ªÉÄÊUÉ »vÀPÀgÀªÁV ©Ã¸ÀĪÀ vÀAUÁ½, 'ªÀÄAzÀA ªÀÄAzÀA £ÀÄzÀw ¥ÀªÀ£ÀB' JA§ PÁ½zÁ¸À£À ªÉÄÃWÀzÀÆvÀzÀ ¸Á®ÄUÀ¼À £É£À¥ÀÅ, ªÀÄoÀ¢AzÀ¯Éà MAzÀÄ PÉÆÃnUÀÆ ºÉZÀÄÑ RZÀÄðªÀiÁr ¤«Äð¹zÀ aPÀÌ CuÉPÀlÄÖ, F ªÀµÀð ªÀÄÄAUÁgÀÄ ªÀļɬÄAzÀ DUÀ¯Éà JgÀqÀÄ ¨Áj vÀÄA© ºÀjzÀ ±ÁAw¸ÀgÉÆêÀgÀ, CzÀgÀ°è DUÀ¸À¢AzÀ §A¢½zÀÄ WÀ£ÀUÀA©ÃgÀªÁV FdÄvÁÛ ªÀÄļÀÄUÉüÀÄvÁÛ ªÀĺÁªÀÄdÓ£ÀªÀ ªÀiÁr ªÀÄvÉÛ UÀjUÉzÀj ¨Á£ÉqÉUÉ ºÁgÀĪÀ ¤ÃUÉÆÃð½UÀ¼ÀÄ, ªÀ£ÀzÉêÀvÉUÉ ZÁªÀÄgÀ ©Ã¸ÀÄwÛªÉAiÉÆà J£ÀÄߪÀAvÉ UÀj©aÑ £Àwð¸ÀĪÀ £ÀÆgÁgÀÄ £À«®ÄUÀ¼ÀÄ - ¤vÀåªÀÇ £ÁªÀÅ PÁtĪÀ ªÀÄ£ÀªÉÆúÀPÀ zÀȱÀåUÀ¼ÀÄ! ºÀwÛgÀzÀ ºÀ½îUÀ¼À zÉêÁ®AiÀÄUÀ¼À ªÉÄðgÀĪÀ zsÀ餪ÀzsÀðPÀUÀ½AzÀ PÉý§gÀĪÀ ‘K¼ÀAiÀiÁå ¨É¼ÀUÁ¬ÄvÀÄ' J£ÀÄߪÀ ‘¸ÀÄ¥Àæ¨sÁvÀ'! CzÀÄ £ÀªÀÄä Q«UÀ½UÉ D¥ÁåAiÀĪÀiÁ£ÀUÁVzÀÝgÀÆ ¨É¼ÀV£À eÁªÀ UÁqsÀ¤zÉæAiÀÄ°ègÀĪÀ '¸ÀÆAiÀÄðªÀA²'UÀ½UÉ PÀtðPÀoÉÆÃgÀ! ¨É¼ÀV£À ¸À«¤zÉæ PÉlÄÖºÉÆìÄvÉAzÀÄ ‘ºÁ¼ÀÄ ¸ÀÄ¥Àæ¨sÁvÀ' gÉPÁqïð ºÁQzÀªÀ¤UÀÆ CªÀ£À zÉêÀjUÀÆ D PÀÄA¨sÀPÀtðgÀÄ ‘±Á¥À' ºÁPÀzÉ ©qÀĪÀÅ¢®è. F ¸ÀÄ¥Àæ¨sÁvÀªÀÅ zÉêÀgÀ ¸ÀÄÛwAiÉÆà CxÀªÁ ¨ÉÃUÀ£É K¼ÀzÀ ªÀÄPÀ̼À£ÀÄß vÀAzÉvÁ¬ÄUÀ¼ÀÄ ¨ÉÊAiÀÄÄåªÀAvÉ HgɯÁè PÉüÀĪÀ ºÁUÉ ªÀiÁqÀĪÀ zÉêÀgÀ£ÀÄß PÀÄjvÀÄ ¸ÀĸÀA¸ÀÌöÈvÀ ¨ÉÊUÀļÀªÉÇà (¤AzÁ¸ÀÄÛw)? ‘¤ªÀÄä zÉêÀgÀÄ ªÀÄ£ÀĵÀå£ÀAvÉ ¸ÉÆêÀiÁjAiÉÄÃ, zÀjzÀæUÉÃrAiÉÄÃ, ¨ÉÃUÀ£É K¼ÀĪÀÅ¢®èªÉÃ?' JAzÀÄ AiÀiÁgÁzÀgÀÆ ¥Àæ±Éß ªÀiÁrzÀgÉ ¤ªÀÄä GvÀÛgÀªÉãÀÄ? zÉêÀjUÉ DAiÀiÁ¸ÀªÁUÀÄvÀÛzÉAiÉÄÃ, ¤¢æ¸ÀÄvÁÛ£ÉAiÉÄÃ? CªÀ£ÀÄ ¤zÉæ ªÀiÁqÀvÉÆqÀVzÀgÉ dUÀwÛ£À ªÁå¥ÁgÀ £ÀqÉAiÀÄĪÀÅzÀÄ ºÉÃUÉ? CªÀ£ÀÄ F dUÀwÛ£À ¤AiÀÄAvÀætªÀ£ÀÄß «ªÀiÁ£ÀzÀ°ègÀĪÀAvÉ autopilot UÉ ºÁQ «±Àæ«Ä¹PÉƼÀÄîvÁÛ£ÉAiÉÄÃ? »ÃUÉ ¸ÁUÀÄvÀÛzÉ £ÀªÀÄä ¸ÀA¨sÁµÀuÉ ¤vÀåªÀÇ £ÀªÉÆäqÀ£É ªÁAiÀÄÄ«ºÁgÀzÀ°è ¥Á¯ÉÆμÀÄîªÀ CjªÀÅ

Arivu

VSNA

¹jUÉgÉAiÀÄ JA. §¸ÀªÀAiÀÄå PÁ¯ÉÃf£À ¤ªÀÈvÀÛ ¦ü¯Á¸À¦ü ¥ÉÇæ¥sɸÀgï DzÀ r.JA.J£ï CªÀgÉÆA¢UÉ. ªÁQAUï ªÀiÁqÀĪÁUÀ ªÀiÁvÀ£ÁqÀ¨ÁgÀzÀÄ JAzÀÄ DgÉÆÃUÀå±Á¸ÀÛçdÕgÀÄ ºÉüÀÄvÁÛgÉ. E£ÀÄß PÉ®ªÀgÀÄ eÉÆÃgÁV £ÀUÀ¨ÉÃPÀÄ J£ÀÄßvÁÛgÉ. ¨ÉAUÀ¼ÀÆj£À ¯Á¯ï ¨ÁUï, PÀ§â£ï ¥ÁPïð EvÁå¢ GzÁå£ÀªÀ£ÀUÀ¼À°è ªÁAiÀÄÄ«ºÁgÀ ºÉÆÃUÀĪÀ Laughing Club ¸ÀzÀ¸ÀågÀÄ MAzÉqÉ ¤AvÀÄ £ÀUÀÄwÛgÀĪÀ zÀȱÀåUÀ¼ÀÄ ¥ÀwæPÉUÀ¼À°è ¥ÀæPÀlUÉÆArgÀĪÀÅzÀ£ÀÄß ¤ÃªÀÅ £ÉÆÃrgÀ§ºÀzÀÄ. £ÀUÀÄ DgÉÆÃUÀåPÉÌ M¼ÉîAiÀÄzÀÄ ¤d. ‘£ÀUÀĪÀÅzÀÄ ¸ÀºÀd zsÀªÀÄð, £ÀV¸ÀĪÀÅzÀÄ ¥ÀgÀzsÀªÀÄð’. ¥ÁætÂUÀ¼ÀÄ C¼ÀÄvÀÛªÉ, RĶ¥ÀqÀÄvÀÛªÉ, ¹mÁÖUÀÄvÀÛªÉ DzÀgÉ £ÀUÀĪÀAvÉ vÉÆÃgÀĪÀÅ¢®è. zÉêÀgÀÄ ªÀÄ£ÀĵÀå¤UÉ PÉÆlÖ «²µÀÖ PÉÆqÀÄUÉ £ÀUÀÄ. DzÀgÉ K£ÀÆ PÁgÀt«®èzÉ £ÀPÀÌgÉ CªÀgÀ£ÀÄß ºÀÄZÀÑgÀÄ J£ÀÄßvÁÛgÉ! CªÀgÀÄ £ÀPÀÌgÉAzÀÄ EªÀgÀÄ £ÀUÀĪÀ, EªÀgÀÄ £ÀPÀÌgÉAzÀÄ CªÀgÀÄ £ÀUÀĪÀ PÀÈwåªÀÄ £ÀUÀÄ«¤AzÀ ±ÀjÃgÀzÀ ¸ÁßAiÀÄÄUÀ¼ÀÄ ¸Àr®UÉƼÀÄîªÀÅ¢®è. ¸ÀºÀd £ÀUÀÄ«¤AzÀ GAmÁUÀĪÀ DºÁèzÀPÀgÀ C£ÀĨsÀªÀ CzÀgÀ°ègÀĪÀÅ¢®è. PÀÈwæªÀÄ £ÀUɬÄAzÀ ±ÀjÃgÀ ¥ÀżÀPÀUÉƼÀÄîªÀÅ¢®è. CzÀÄ PÁUÀzÀzÀ ºÀÆ«zÀÝAvÉ. £ÉÆÃqÀ®Ä ZÉAzÀ, DzÀgÉ ¸ÀÄUÀAzsÀ«gÀĪÀÅ¢®è. £ÀªÀÄä ªÁAiÀÄÄ«ºÁgÀ PÉêÀ® ªÁAiÀÄÄ«ºÁgÀªÁUÀzÉ ¨Ë¢ÝPÀ «ZÁgÀUÀ¼À «ºÁgÀªÀÇ DVgÀÄvÀÛzÉ. dªÀÄð¤AiÀÄ ¥ÀæªÀÄÄR £ÀUÀgÀUÀ¼À°è ºÉÊqÀ¯ï§Uïð (Heidelberg) MAzÀÄ. «AiÉÄ£ÁßzÀ°è NzÀÄwÛzÁÝUÀ C°èUÉ ºÉÆÃVzÀÝ £É£À¥ÀÅUÀ¼ÀÄ E£ÀÄß ºÀZÀѺÀ¹gÁVzÉ. MAzÀÄ PÁ®zÀ°è PÀ£ÀßqÀ ªÀÄvÀÄÛ vÀ«Ä¼ÀÄ ¨sÁµÉUÀ¼À CzsÀåAiÀÄ£À C°èAiÀÄ «±Àé«zÁ央AiÀÄzÀ°è £ÀqÉAiÀÄÄwÛzÀÄÝ, EwÛÃZÉUÉ PÀ£ÀßqÀzÀ CzsÀåAiÀÄ£À ¤AvÀĺÉÆÃVzÉ. vÀ«Ä¼ÀÄ ªÀiÁvÀæ E£ÀÄß EzÉ. £ÀªÀÄä £Ár£ÀªÀgÀ ‘R£ÀßqÁ©üªÀiÁ£À'PÉÌ EzÉÆAzÀÄ dé®AvÀ ¸ÁQë! F £ÀUÀgÀzÀ ¨ÉlÖzÀ vÀ¥Àà°£À°è ¦ü¯Á¸À¥sÀ¸ïðªÉÃUï (Philosophersweg) JA§ ºÉ¸Àj£À QjzÁzÀ gÀ¸ÉÛ EzÉ. dªÀÄð£ï ¨sÁµÉAiÀÄ°è berg JAzÀgÉ ¨ÉlÖ, weg JAzÀgÉ zÁj. F ¨ÉlÖzÀ zÁjAiÀÄ°è dªÀÄð¤AiÀÄ D£ÉÃPÀ ¥Àæ¹zÀÝ vÀvÀéeÁÕ¤UÀ¼ÀÄ ªÁAiÀÄÄ«ºÁgÀ ªÀiÁqÀÄvÁÛ UÀA©üÃgÀªÁzÀ aAvÀ£É £ÀqɸÀÄwÛzÀÝ PÁgÀt EzÀPÉÌ (Philosophersweg) JA§ ºÉ¸ÀgÀÄ §A¢zÉ. dUÀwÛ£À AiÀiÁªÀ JgÀqÀÄ UÀrAiÀiÁgÀUÀ¼ÀÆ MAzÉà ¸ÀªÀÄAiÀĪÀ£ÀÄß vÉÆÃj¸ÀĪÀÅ¢®è JA§AvÉ dUÀwÛ£À AiÀiÁªÀ E§âgÀÄ vÀvÀéeÁÕ¤UÀ¼À «ZÁgÀzsÁgÉAiÀÄÆ MAzÉà vÉgÀ£ÁVgÀĪÀÅ¢®è. Page 77


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

‘ªÀÄÄAqÉà ªÀÄÄAqÉà ªÀÄw©üð£Áß' JAzÀÄ ºÉüÀĪÀÅzÀÄ EzÀPÁÌVAiÉÄÃ. ‘vÀ¯ÉUÉ MAzÉÆAzÀÄ ªÀiÁvÀÄ' JA§ PÀ£ÀßqÀzÀ UÁzÉ ªÀiÁvÀÄ F ¸ÀÆQÛAiÀÄ ºÀwÛgÀPÉÌ §gÀÄvÀÛzÉ. ¸ÀA¸ÀÌöÈvÀzÀ°è 'ªÀÄÄAqÀ' JAzÀgÉ ¨ÉÆý¹zÀ vÀ¯É JAzÀxÀð. »A¢£À PÁ®zÀ°è ¸ÀA¥ÀæzÁAiÀĸÀÜ ªÀÄ»¼ÉAiÀÄgÀÄ UÀAqÀ ¸ÀvÀÄÛºÉÆÃzÀ ªÉÄÃ¯É vÀ¯É ¨ÉÆý¸ÀÄwÛzÀÝ PÁgÀt «zsÀªÉUÉ PÀ£ÀßqÀzÀ°è ‘ªÀÄÄAqÉ' JAzÀÄ §A¢gÀ§ºÀÄzÀÄ. CzÉãÉà EgÀ°, £ÀªÀÄä ªÀiÁvÀÄUÀ¼À£ÀÄß ªÀiË£ÀªÁV D°¸ÀÄvÁÛ K£ÉÆAzÀÆ ¥ÀæwQæ¬Ä¸ÀzÀ £ÀªÀÄä ¥ÉǪÉÄÃjAiÀÄ£ï ¸ÁPÀÄ£Á¬ÄªÀÄj 'ªÀÄĤß' £ÀªÀÄä£ÀÄß ªÀÄÄAzÉ ªÀÄÄAzÉ J¼ÉzÉÆAiÀÄÄåwÛgÀÄvÀÛzÉ. ¢£À¤vÀåzÀ ªÁAiÀÄÄ«ºÁgÀ ªÀÄÄVzÀgÀÆ «ZÁgÀUÀ¼À «ºÁgÀ ªÀÄÄV¢gÀĪÀÅ¢®è! ±ÁjÃjPÀªÁV zÀtªÁzÀgÀÆ «ZÁgÀUÀ¼À «¤ªÀÄAiÀÄzÀ°è §Ä¢Ý E£ÀÆß ªÀÄÄAzÉ ªÀÄÄAzÉ NqÀÄwÛgÀÄvÀÛzÉ! “Early bird catches worms" J£ÀÄߪÀAvÉ ¨É¼ÀV£À ªÁAiÀÄÄ«ºÁgÀ C£ÉÃPÀ «ZÁgÀUÀ¼À aAvÀ£ÉUÉ zÁjªÀiÁrPÉÆqÀÄvÀÛzÉ. ªÉÆ£Éß £ÀqÉzÀ CAvÀºÀ ¸ÀA¨sÁµÀuÉAiÀÄ°è ZÀZÉðUÉ UÁæ¸ÀªÁzÀzÀÄÝ ‘AiÀiÁgÀÄ M¼ÉîAiÀĪÀgÀÄ, AiÀiÁgÀÄ PÉlÖªÀgÀÄ?' JA§ «µÀAiÀÄ. ªÀiÁw£À ¥Àæ¸ÀAUÀzÀ°è DwäÃAiÀÄ ¸ÉßûvÀgÀÄ ¤ªÀÄUÉ ‘CªÀ£ÀÄ M¼ÉîAiÀĪÀ£À®è, §ºÀ¼À ºÀĵÁgÁVgÀÄ' JAzÀÄ JZÀÑj¸ÀÄvÁÛgÉ. §¸ÀªÀtÚ£ÀªÀgÀÆ ¸ÀºÀ »ÃUÉ ºÉüÀÄvÁÛgÉ: ¸ÁgÀ, ¸ÀdÓ£ÀgÀ ¸ÀAUÀªÀ ªÀiÁqÀĪÀÅzÀÄ zÀÆgÀ zÀÄdð£ÀgÀ ¸ÀAUÀ ¨ÉÃqÀªÀAiÀiÁå DªÀ ºÁªÁzÀqÉãÀÄ, «µÀªÉÇAzÉà CAxÀªÀgÀ ¸ÀAUÀ ¨ÉÃqÀªÀAiÀiÁå! CAvÀgÀAUÀ ±ÀÄzÀÞ«®èzÀªÀgÀ ¸ÀAUÀ ¹AV, PÁ¼ÀPÀÆl «µÀªÉÇà CAiÀiÁå PÀÆqÀ®¸ÀAUÀªÀÄzÉêÁ ºÁUÁzÀgÉ AiÀiÁgÀÄ M¼ÉîAiÀĪÀgÀÄ, AiÀiÁgÀÄ PÉlÖªÀgÀÄ? EªÀgÀÄ M¼ÉîAiÀĪÀgÀÄ, CªÀgÀÄ M¼ÉîAiÀĪÀgÀ®è JAzÀÄ w½zÀÄPÉƼÀî®Ä EgÀĪÀ ªÀiÁ£ÀzÀAqÀªÁzÀgÀÆ K£ÀÄ? AiÀiÁªÀ ªÀåQÛAiÀÄÆ ¸ÀA¥ÀÇtð M¼ÉîAiÀĪÀ£ÀÄ, ¸ÀA¥ÀÇtð PÉlÖªÀ£ÀÄ DVgÀĪÀÅ¢®è. ¸ÀzÀÄÎt ªÀÄvÀÄÛ zÀÄUÀÄðtUÀ¼ÀÄ ¥ÀæwAiÉƧ⠪ÀÄ£ÀĵÀå£À®Æè EgÀÄvÀÛzÉ. CªÀÅUÀ¼À ¥ÀæªÀiÁt ªÀiÁvÀæ CªÀgÀªÀgÀ ¸ÀA¸ÁÌgÀPÀÌ£ÀÄUÀÄtªÁV ¨ÉÃgɨÉÃgÉAiÀiÁVgÀÄvÀÛzÉ. ªÀiÁ£ÀªÀ£À EwºÁ¸ÀzÀÄzÀÄÝPÀÆÌ M¼ÉîAiÀÄ ªÀÄvÀÄÛ PÉlÖ ªÀåQÛUÀ¼À ªÀÄzsÉå ¤gÀAvÀgÀªÁV ¸ÀAWÀµïð £ÀqÉAiÀÄÄvÁÛ §AzÀAvÉ ¥ÀæwAiÉƧ⠪ÀåQÛAiÀÄ ªÀÄ£À¹ì£ÉƼÀUÉ ¸ÀzÀÄÎtzÀÄUÀÄðtUÀ¼À vÀĪÀÄÄ® £ÀqÉAiÀÄÄwÛgÀÄvÀÛzÉ. D vÀĪÀÄÄ®zÀ°è DAiÀiÁAiÀÄ ªÀåQÛAiÀÄ ¸ÀA¸ÁÌgÀ ªÀÄvÀÄÛ ¥Àj¸ÀgÀPÀÌ£ÀÄUÀÄtªÁV CªÀÅUÀ¼À°è ¥À槮ªÁzÀÄzÀÄ ¥ÀæPÀlUÉÆAqÀÄ M¼ÉîAiÀĪÀ£ÀÄ CxÀªÁ PÉlÖªÀ£ÀÄ JAzÀÄ PÀgɹPÉƼÀÄîvÁÛ£É. £ÀªÀÄä C£ÀĨsÀªÀzÀ°è CjªÀÅ

Arivu

VSNA

G¥ÀPÁgÀ ¥ÀqÉzÀ ªÀåQÛ PÀÈvÀdÕ£ÁUÀĪÀÅ¢gÀ°, ¸ÁéxÀð¸ÁzsÀ£ÉUÁV C¥ÀPÁgÀ ªÀiÁqÀ®Æ ºÉøÀĪÀÅ¢®è.

±ÉæÃAiÀıÀÑ ¥ÉæÃAiÀıÀÑ ªÀÄ£ÀĵÀåªÉÄÃvÀB vË ¸ÀA¥ÀjÃvÀå ««£ÀQÛ ¢üÃgÀB ±ÉæÃAiÉÆà » ¢ÃgÉÆà C©ü¥ÉæÃAiÀĸÉÆà ªÀÈtÂÃvÉà ¥ÉæÃAiÉÆà ªÀÄAzÉÆà AiÉÆÃUÀPÉëêÀiÁzï ªÀÈtÂÃvÉà (PÀoÉÆÃ¥À¤µÀvï1.2.2 ) PÀoÉÆÃ¥À¤µÀwÛ£À ¥ÀæPÁgÀ ±ÉæÃAiÀĸÀÄì ªÀÄvÀÄÛ ¥ÉæÃAiÀĸÀÄì JgÀqÀÆ MmÉÆÖnÖUÉà ªÀÄ£ÀĵÀå£À ºÀwÛgÀ §gÀÄvÀÛªÉ. «ÃªÉÃQAiÀÄÄ ¸ÁPÀµÀÄÖ D¯ÉÆÃa¹ vÀ£ÀUÉ ±Á±ÀévÀ ¸ÀÄRªÀ£ÀÄß ¤ÃqÀĪÀ ±ÉæÃAiÀĸÀÌgÀªÁzÀÄzÀ£ÀÄß DAiÉÄ̪ÀiÁrPÉƼÀÄîvÁÛ£É. C«ªÉÃQAiÀÄÄ ¨ÁºÀå DPÀµÀuÉðUÉ M¼ÀUÁV vÀ£ÀUÉ vÁvÁÌ°PÀ ¸ÀÄRªÀ£ÀÄß ¤ÃqÀĪÀ ¦æAiÀĪÁzÀÄzÀ£ÀÄß DAiÉÄ̪ÀiÁrPÉƼÀÄîvÁÛ£É. MAzÀÄ ¥ÁgÀªÀiÁyPÀð DzÀ±Àð ªÀÄvÉÆÛAzÀÄ ¯ËQPÀ D¸ÀQÛ. fêÀ£ÁzÀ±À£ÀðzÀ F »vÉÆÃQÛUÀ¼ÀÄ ¥ÉèÃmÉÆãÀ j¥À©èPï £À°è §gÀĪÀ ªÀÄÄA¢£À ¸Á®ÄUÀ¼À£ÀÄß £É£À¦UÉ vÀgÀÄvÀÛªÉ: "In every one of us, there are two ruling and directing principles, whose guidance we follow wherever they may lead; the one being an innate device of pleasure, the other an acquired judgement which aspires after excellence."

¸ÁPÀænøÀ£À ¥ÀæPÁgÀ ªÀÄ£ÀĵÀå JµÉÖà M¼ÉîAiÀĪÀ£ÁVzÀÝgÀÆ CªÀPÁ±ÀªÀAavÀ£ÁzÀ PÁgÀt CªÀ£ÀÄ M¼ÉîAiÀĪÀ£ÁVgÀÄvÁÛ£ÉAiÉÄà ºÉÆgÀvÀÄ ªÀÄÄPÀÛ CªÀPÁ±À ¹PÀÌ°è M¼ÉîAiÀĪÀ£É¤¹PÉÆAqÀªÀ£ÀÆ ¸ÀºÀ M¼ÉîAiÀÄ zÁjAiÀÄ°è PÀæ«Ä¸ÀzÉ PÉlÖzÁjAiÀÄ£ÀÄß »rAiÀÄÄvÁÛ£É. ¸ÁPÀænøÀ£À F «ZÁgÀzsÁgÉ ‘ªÀÄoÀzÉƼÀUÀt ¨ÉPÀÄÌ E°AiÀÄ PÀAqÀÄ ¥ÀÅl £ÉUÉzÀAvÁ¬ÄvÀÄÛ' JA§ zÉêÀgÀzÁ¹ªÀÄAiÀÄå£À ªÀZÀ£ÀªÀ£ÀÄß ºÉÆîÄvÀÛzÉAiÉÄAzÀÄ ªÉÄïÉÆßÃlPÉÌ PÀAqÀħAzÀgÀÆ ‘J¤¸É¤¸ÉAzÉÆqÉ £Á zsÀÈwUÉqÉ£ÀAiÀiÁå' JA§ UÀnÖ¤®ÄªÀżÀî DzÀ±Àð ªÀåQÛUÀ¼ÀÄ EgÀĪÀÅzÀ£ÀÄß ±ÀgÀtgÀÄ C®èUÀ¼ÉAiÀÄĪÀÅ¢®è. EzÀPÉÌ ¥ÀÇgÀPÀªÁV "«PÁgÀºÉÃvË ¸Àw «QæAiÀÄAvÉà AiÉÄõÁA £À ZÉÃvÁA¹ vÀ KªÀ ¢üÃgÁB" CAzÀgÉ ‘ªÀÄ£À¸Àì£ÀÄß «PÀÈvÀUÉƽ¸ÀĪÀ ªÀ¸ÀÄÛ JzÀÄjVzÀÝgÀÆ «PÁgÀUÉƼÀîzÀªÀgÉà ¢üÃgÀgÀÄ' JA§ ªÀiÁvÀÄ PÁ½zÁ¸À£À PÀĪÀiÁgÀ¸ÀA¨sÀªÀzÀ°è (1.59) §gÀÄvÀÛzÉ. F ªÀiÁwUÉ vÀ¢égÀÄzÀÞªÁzÀ ¤®ÄªÀ£ÀÄß ¸ÁPÀænøÀ£À°è PÁt§ºÀÄzÁVzÉ. M¼ÉîAiÀÄ ªÀÄ£ÀĵÀå ªÀÄvÀÄÛ PÉlÖ ªÀÄ£ÀĵÀå JAzÀÄ AiÀiÁgÀ£ÀÄß w½zÀÄPÉÆArzÉÝêÉÇà CªÀj§âjUÀÆ ªÀÄ£À¹ìUÉ §AzÀAvÉ £ÀqÉAiÀÄĪÀ ¸ÁévÀAvÀæ÷å«zÀÝ°è M¼ÉîAiÀÄ ªÀÄ£ÀĵÀå£ÀÆ ¸ÀºÀ PÉlÖ ªÀÄ£ÀĵÀå£ÀAvÉ £ÀqÉAiÀÄÄvÁÛ£É JA§ÄzÀÄ ¸ÁPÀænøÀ£À ¹zÁÝAvÀ. CzÀPÉÌ CªÀ£ÀÄ PÉÆqÀĪÀ zÀȵÁÖAvÀ »ÃVzÉ: °rAiÀÄ (Lydia) JA§ zÉñÀzÀ°è M§â zÉÆgɬÄzÀÝ. Page 78


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

CªÀ£À D±ÀæAiÀÄzÀ°è UÉÊUÀ¸ï (Gyges) JA§ ºÉ¸Àj£À M§â PÀÄgÀħ¤zÀÝ. CªÀ£ÀÄ MAzÀÄ ¢£À PÁr£À°è PÀÄjUÀ¼À£ÀÄß ªÉÄìĸÀÄwÛgÀĪÁUÀ ¨sÁjà ©gÀÄUÁ½ JzÀÄÝ eÉÆvÉUÉ ©üÃPÀgÀ ¨sÀÆPÀA¥À GAmÁV ¨sÀÆ«ÄAiÀÄ°è zÉÆqÀØ ©gÀÄPÀÄ GAmÁ¬ÄvÀÄ. UÉÊUÀ¸ï D ©gÀÄPÀ£ÀÄß §VÎ £ÉÆÃqÀ¯ÁV C°è C£ÉÃPÀ D±ÀÑAiÀÄðPÀgÀ ªÀ¸ÀÄÛUÀ¼ÀÄ EgÀĪÀÅzÀÄ PÁt¹vÀÄ. CªÀ£ÀÄ PÀÄvÀƺÀ®¢AzÀ PɼÀUÉ E½zÀÄ ºÉÆÃzÀ. C°è CªÀ¤UÉ MAzÀÄ PÀAa£À PÀÄzÀÄgÉ PÁt¹vÀÄ. CzÀgÀ ºÉÆmÉÖ mÉƼÁîVvÀÄÛ. EtÄQ £ÉÆÃrzÁUÀ CzÀgÉƼÀUÉ M§â£À ±ÀªÀ«vÀÄÛ. D ±ÀªÀzÀ PÉÊAiÀÄ°è MAzÀÄ §AUÁgÀzÀ GAUÀÄgÀ«vÀÄÛ. UÉÊUÀ¸ï D GAUÀÄgÀªÀ£ÀÄß vÉUÉzÀÄPÉÆAqÀÄ vÀ£Àß PÉʨÉgÀ½UÉ vÉÆr¹PÉÆAqÀ. ªÉÄÃ¯É §AzÀÄ JA¢£ÀAvÉ PÀÄjUÀ¼À£ÀÄß ºÉÆqÉzÀÄPÉÆAqÀÄ ªÀÄ£ÉUÉ §AzÀ. PÉʨÉgÀ½£À°èzÀÝ D GAUÀÄgÀªÀ£ÀÄß £ÉÆÃr RĶ¥ÀqÀÄwÛzÀÝ. wAUÀ½UÉƪÉÄä gÁd¤UÉ PÀÄjUÀ¼À §UÉÎ ªÀgÀ¢PÉÆqÀ®Ä J®è PÀÄgÀħgÀÆ MAzÉqÉ ¸ÉÃjzÀÝgÀÄ. UÉÊUÀ¸ï D GAUÀÄgÀªÀ£ÀÄß zsÀj¹PÉÆAqÉà ºÉÆÃzÀ. DPÀ¹äPÀªÁV D GAUÀÄgÀzÀ ªÉÄðgÀĪÀ PÉA¥ÀźÀgÀ¼À£ÀÄß vÀ£ÉßqÉUÉ ¸Àj¹PÉÆAqÀ. D±ÀÑAiÀÄðzÀ ¸ÀAUÀwAiÉÄAzÀgÉ CªÀ£ÀÄ EzÀÝQÌzÀÝAvÉAiÉÄà AiÀiÁjUÀÆ PÁt¸ÀzÀAvÉ CzÀȱÀå£ÁzÀ. £ÀAvÀgÀ UÉÊUÀ¸ï J°è J°è JAzÀÄ CªÀ£À ¸ÉßûvÀgÀÄ PÉüÀÄwÛzÀÝAvÉAiÉÄà ªÉÆzÀ°zÀÝAvÉ wgÀÄV¹zÁUÀ J®èjUÀÆ PÁt¹PÉÆAqÀ. £ÀAvÀgÀ JgÀqÀÄ ªÀÄÆgÀÄ ¨Áj »ÃUÉ ¥ÀæAiÉÆÃUÀ ªÀiÁrzÁUÀ CªÀ¤UÉ CzÀgÀ gÀºÀ¸Àå w½¬ÄvÀÄ. GAUÀÄgÀzÀ PÉA¥ÀźÀgÀ¼À£ÀÄß M¼ÀªÀÄÄRªÁV wgÀÄV¹zÁUÀ CzÀȱÀå£ÁUÀĪÀ, ºÉÆgÀªÀÄÄRªÁV wgÀÄV¹zÁUÀ ªÀiÁvÀæ J®èjUÀÆ PÁt¸ÀĪÀ ªÀiÁAwæPÀ ±ÀQÛ D GAUÀÄgÀPÉÌ EzÉAiÉÄAzÀÄ ªÀÄ£ÀUÀAqÀ. ªÀiÁgÀ£ÉAiÀÄ ¢£ÀªÉà UÉÊUÀ¸ï vÀ£Àß ¸ÉßûvÀgÉÆA¢UÉ gÁd£À£ÀÄß PÁt®Ä CgÀªÀÄ£ÉUÉ ºÉÆÃzÀ. EvÀgÀ ¸ÉßûvÀgÀÄ ªÀgÀ¢AiÀÄ£ÀÄß gÁd¤UÉ M¦à¸ÀÄwÛzÀÝAvÉAiÉÄà UÉÊUÀ¸ï vÁ£ÀÄ zsÀj¹zÀÝ GAUÀÄgÀªÀ£ÀÄß M¼ÀªÀÄÄRªÁV wgÀÄV¹ ¹ÃzÁ gÁtÂAiÀÄ CAvÀB¥ÀÅgÀPÉÌ ºÉÆÃzÀ. CªÀ¼ÉÆA¢UÉ ZÀPÀÌAzÀªÁr CªÀ¼À zÉúÀ ¸ÀÄRªÀ£ÀÄß ¥ÀqÉzÀ. CªÀ¼À£ÀÄß vÀ£Àß PÉʪÀ±ÀªÀiÁrPÉÆAqÀÄ CªÀ¼À ¸ÀºÁAiÀĪÀ£ÀÄß ¥ÀqÉzÀÄ gÁd£À£ÀÄß PÉÆAzÀÄ ºÁQ vÁ£Éà zÉÆgÉAiÉÄAzÀÄ WÉÆö¹PÉÆAqÀÄ ¹AºÁ¸À£ÀªÀ£ÉßÃjzÀ!

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Holistic Health for All Prof. Laxmankumar V. Sannellappanavar Man is the unity of Jeeva/ Prana (the life force), Deha (the body), Manas (the mind), Buddhi (the intellect) and the Atman (the soul/the essence of an individual being). Holistic Health means the health of all these units of a man. The health of any one or some of these units is partial health. There are different practices suitable for different age groups - starting from those for children of 3 years to those for senior citizens. One can practice them until the last breath of his life as long as he is in a state of consciousness. The experienced teacher (the trainer) can use his wisdom for the selection of the practices suitable to different age groups considering the condition of the individual health, needs of the body, the nature of the work, the availability of the time etc. The Holistic Health Program consists of the following features: 1. Breath is Life: A man is living as long as he is breathing. Once the breathing is stopped, it is the end of the life. This shows that there is a very close relation between breathing and Jeeva/ Prana. We can say that breath is the evident part of Jeeva/Prana and Jeeva/Prana is the subtle part of breath. Thus, we can say that breathing plays a crucial role. Ancient Yogis of India after the long practice of Yoga, have arrived at the conclusion that Longer the breathing, longer the span of life; Shorter the breathing, shorter the span of life. This means that longer breathing leads to a longer, healthier and more comfortable span of life whereas, shorter breathing leads to an unhealthy and shorter span of life. We learnt that many Yogis of India lived for 100s of years. This was due to their regular practice of longer breathing. This statement can be believed by the observation of the CjªÀÅ

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following table, which shows the rate or frequency of breathing of different living beings and the span of their life.

Sl No

Name of the living being

Approximate frequency of breathing

Approximate span of life

1.

Human being

15 times/min

70 years

2.

Horse

20 times/ min

50 years

3.

Dog

30 times/min

10-12 years

4.

Pigeon

34 times/ min

3-5 years

5.

Tortoise

5 times/ min

150 years

This table clearly proves that the aforementioned statement about the span of life is true. Span of life of living being is inversely proportional to the frequency of breathing i.e., More the frequency of breathing, less the span of life; Less the frequency of breathing, more the span of life. Jeeva/Prana (the life force) is most valuable. Once if it is lost, it is the end of life for that being. Because of this reason, every living being in the Universe either in the air or on the Earth or in the water, tries to protect the life by sacrificing even the most precious belongings. Especially, the human being who is supposed to be the most superior one on the Earth, due to his high intelligence and consciousness, takes utmost care to protect his Jeeva/Prana and health. For this, one can simply utilize the gift of the Almighty God i.e., free air available in the nature to nurture human Page 80


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ life. Our duty is just to breathe properly and deeply than any weapon on the Earth. Because of this reason, sometimes it is said that one who can to protect Jeeva/Prana and to attain excellent health control the mind can control anything and and heavenly happiness. Nothing is to be paid for it everything in the Universe. except our attention, as a result of which, we would be free from the misery and sorrow of Any work done by the mind or the unhealthy living and early death. The process of body consumes some required amount of energy long, deep breathing is as follows: and strength from the body itself especially the a. Assuming any comfortable, sitting posture like Sukhasana (the Comfortable posture), Swastikasana, Ardha Padmasana (the half Lotus pose), Padmasana (the Lotus pose), Ardha Vajrasana (the half Diamond pose), Vajrasana (the Diamond pose). These may be performed either on the floor or in the chair or any sitting platform. b. Keeping the eyes closed to cut off the worldly activities of our most active sensory organs and the mind, which in turn slow down the activities of the other sensory organs. c. Reduction of tension of the body - Relaxing the whole body thoroughly, starting from toes to the top, by following the process of attending each and every part of the body mentally and relaxing physically. d. After thorough relaxation of the body, forgetting it, and observing the natural flow of breathing until it is regularized. Slowly increasing the length of all the 4 phases of breathing, namely, inhalation, pause after inhalation, exhalation and pause after exhalation within one’s own physiological limit, without any sort of force/ pressure during any of these 4 phases. This process of long, deep breathing can be continued for sometime without any sort of discomfort or exertion. It helps us to improve health and lead a happy life and increase the span of life. Reduced bodily tension and rhythmic deep breathing help to bring stability to the mind. 2. Health of the Mind: Mind is one of the units of the human being. It is very difficult to define. It is invisible. It has neither shape, size, color nor smell. It is mysterious, most powerful and active too. It is more active than mercury and has higher speed than light. It is not an exaggeration if we say that, it is more powerful CjªÀÅ

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mental work done by an individual is said to consume more energy than physical work. Due to this reason, the people who are engaged in mental work are prone to high Blood pressure, hyper acidity etc than others who are engaged in physical work or manual labor. The very nature of Mind is to wander. Because of its wandering, it loses its energy and strength and becomes very weak, so it will not be in a position to do any work properly. If the same mind is made stable, one can do anything and everything with excellence. There will be perfection in one’s deeds. This steady (stable) condition of the mind is the healthy mind. In brief, we can say that, wandering mind is a weak mind and stable mind is a strong mind. Our aim is to make every unit of the human being strong. Then, the question arises – “How to make this invisible and mysterious mind, stable??” The wandering of the mind is dependent on different factors: a. Mobility of the body: Mobility/wandering/fluctuation of the mind is directly proportional to the mobility of the body. If the mobility of the body is increased, then naturally, mobility or fluctuation of the mind is also increased. In the final stage of the Asanas, especially the meditative postures, the body becomes stable/still, like a statue. This condition helps the mind to become stable. b. Rate of breathing: Wandering of the mind is directly proportional to rate or frequency of breathing. More the frequency of breathing, more the wandering of the mind and less the frequency of breathing, less the wandering of the mind. The frequency of breathing is reduced in all the final stage of Asanas, so naturally wandering of the mind is also reduced.

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ c. Rate of muscular movements: In turn, the ii. Relax thoroughly by attending to each and every part of the body mentally and frequency or rate of breathing is directly loosening it physically. proportional to the muscular movements. More the muscular movements, more the frequency of iii. Forget the body and observe the natural flow breathing and less the muscular movements, less of breathing until it is regularized the frequency of breathing. In the final stage of the (stabilized). Asanas, especially in the meditative postures, all iv. Inhale deeply, slowly and comfortably the bodily (muscular) movements are stopped. The through both the nostrils. (The process of body comes to a stable position. So naturally, the deep breathing has been explained earlier) rate of breathing also is brought to some stability. v. Keep the mouth slightly opened and throat So, this condition naturally helps the mind to completely relaxed. Then, recite Omkara melodiously, smoothly in a low pitch along become stable. with exhalation. Even this melodious sound d. Influence of sound: Any sound produced in of Omkara should go on becoming lower and the Universe, has its influence on all the living lower in pitch and reduce to whispering at beings around it. Even the atmosphere is the end of exhalation. influenced by the sound. If the sound produced is vi. Then close the mouth, inhale slowly, deeply melodious, then all the living beings become happy and comfortably as earlier. because of its soothing effect. This effect is also vii. Continue this process of recitation of there on the surrounding atmosphere. If the sound Omkara. This practice helps us in achieving is harsh (noise), naturally all the living beings are the stability of the mind, which enhances its disturbed, and run away or fly from that place. health. Even the whole atmosphere in the vicinity of the sound produced, is disturbed. 3. Health of the Body: By hearing melodious sound, our mind gets Movement is life i.e., smooth and natural movements signify comfortable living. Joints, soothing effect and becomes calm, quiet and muscles, ligaments etc are all responsible for our stable. By hearing harsh sound (disturbing noise), movements. Health of the body depends on the our heartbeat, pulse rate etc are increased and our health of the different systems of the body. Human mind becomes very much disturbed. When we body consists of many systems namely, respiratory hear the melodious sound of music from an system, skeletal system, muscular system, digestive system, circulatory system, glandular instrument like Sitar or flute or someone singing, system consisting of duct glands and ductless we usually close our eyes and nod our heads with glands, central nervous system etc. Some of these the tune of the music. This is because of the are described below: soothing effect of the sound on our mind. We a. Respiratory System: Rhythmic and deep know that even the ferocious cobra (serpent) too breathing maintained during the practice of the raises its hood and moves sideways by listening to physical-cultural exercises and Yoga help in the sound of a particular instrument played by the i. improving the lung capacity snake charmer. It is learnt from experimentation ii. digestion that melodious sound of music influences better iii. circulation iv. secretion of the duct and ductless glands growth in the crops. v. improving the health and the efficiency of the central nervous system too. Our mind can be made calm, quiet and steady by Thus, the health of the whole body is improved by reciting Omkara. The technique of reciting the practice of physical-cultural exercises, Surya Omkara is as follows: Namaskara, different Asanas, Bandhas, Mudras, Kriyas, and Pranayamas. All these practices i. One should assume and establish in one of the meditative postures. together can be called as Holistic Health

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ Practices. These practices help us to improve These acts help to improve the tone of the muscle spindles (the fundamental unit of the muscle), overall health of the body. which in turn improves the tone of the muscles and ligaments. b. Health of the skeletal system: Skeletal system e. Effect on the joints: Youth of an individual consists of 207 bones of different shape and size. depends on the mobility of the joints. i. Bones add personality to the individual and i. In the performance of the postures like also give proper shape and size to the body. Sukhasana, Ardha Padmasana, Padmasana, ii. Bones protect different vital organs like the Ardha Vajrasana, Vajrasana, Ardha brain, the lungs, the heart etc. Kurmasana, Kurmasana, Mandukasana, Skeletal system also consists of joints. Health of Bhadrasana etc, toes, ankle joints, knee joints, the joints means their ability for natural hip joints etc get different movements. So movements. We can say that mobility of the joints naturally, the mobility of these joints is means everlasting youth and the lack of improved. mobility means the sign of old age. The joints of ii. Effects on Frozen shoulder: Lack of natural the body have got 4 possible movements namely – movements and the advancement of the age cause lack of mobility in the joints. Shoulder i. flexion (the forward bending) joints are not an exception for this condition. ii. extension (the backward bending) This lack of mobility in the shoulder joints is iii. lateral bending (sideways bending) and known as Frozen Shoulder. This can be iv. twisting or rotation. definitely prevented if an individual practices All the major muscles and the ligaments of the different physical cultural exercises, Surya body too take active part in all of these 4 types of Namaskara and some Asanas like Bhujangasana, Dhanurasana, Akarna movements. Dhanurasana, Gomukhasana, Parshva Chakrasana, Trikonasana etc. Otherwise, the c. The height of an individual: It depends on the movements of the shoulder joints become length of the long bones of the legs, thighs, and the restricted and sometime may be intolerably height of the neck. The difference of the height of painful too. This disturbs the pleasure and the body (the portion from the trunk to the neck) mental peace of an individual. will not change much considerably from the f. Effects on the Vertebral column: It is said, “A childhood to adolescence but, whereas, the length man is as old as his vertebral column is”. of the long bones of the legs and the thighs will i. The postures like Bhujangasana, Shalabhasana, change considerably. Dhanurasana, Ushtrasana, Chakrasana etc give i. The isometric contractions and the stretching effective extension within limit to the of the muscles and the ligaments bring pull on backbone. They also help to prevent, control both the ends of the long bones of the legs and and improve certain defects of the cervical the thighs in the final stage of postures like region. Dhanurasana and helps to increase these bones ii. Postures like Yoga Mudra, Paschimottanasana, especially when they are cartilages, in turn, Kurmasana, Halasana etc give good flexion to increase the height of the individual. the vertebral column. ii. Similar stretching occurs in the neck muscles iii. Postures like Parshva Chakrasana, Trikonasana in Bhujangasana, Dhanurasana, Ushtrasana, and their variations give lateral movements to Chakrasana etc., which help to increase the the vertebral column. height of the neck of the sadhaka iv. Postures like Vakrasana, Ardha (practitioner), which in turn, helps to increase Mastyendrasana, Matsyendrasana, the height of the individual. Gomukhasana, Akarna Dhanurasana give d. Effect of Asanas on the muscles and effective rotation or twisting to the ligaments: In the final stage of different Asanas, vertebral/spinal column. some group of muscles and the ligaments, get Thus, a group of these postures give all the isometric contractions, whereas, the antagonistic (opposite) group of muscles and ligaments get necessary movements to the vertebral column. So isometric stretching (relaxation) and twisting too. naturally, the mobility of the vertebral column is CjªÀÅ

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ control and reduce constipation, gastric problems improved. This makes the practitioner youthful and energetic. and problems like pistula, piles etc. g. Effect on the circulation of the Blood: The above-mentioned isometric contractions, stretching and twisting of the muscle spindles, muscles and ligaments also influence the arteries, veins and capillaries too. This helps to improve the blood circulation. Secondly, the positive and negative pressures created in the abdominal viscera occurring during certain practices also influence the blood circulation to some extent. h. Effects on the Digestion and Excretion: i. In the postures like Bhujangasana and its variations, the lower abdominal viscera is kept in contact with the floor. ii. In the postures like Shalabhasana and its variations, the upper portion of the abdominal viscera is kept in contact with the floor. iii. In the postures like Dhanurasana and its variations, the middle portion of the abdominal viscera is kept in contact with the floor. iv. In the postures like Vakrasana, Ardha Matsyendrasana, Matsyendrasana etc, both the left and the right sides of the abdominal viscera get a sort of pressure. v. In the postures like Yoga Mudra, Paschimottanasana, Halasana too bring pressure on the whole abdominal viscera. Thus, in all these postures, during inhalation, the pressure is increased in the portion of the abdominal viscera, which is in contact with the floor. During exhalation, the pressure is decreased. Due to this increase (positive) and decrease (negative) pressures occurred, a scientific massage is given to the abdominal viscera, bringing the following influence: - The small and large intestines are influenced, stimulated and activated. So, excretion is improved and becomes regularized. Thus it helps to prevent,

- Digestive secretions are increased and help to improve digestion. - The scientific massage occurring in the abdominal viscera helps to prevent, reduce the unwanted fat and sluggishness from the abdominal viscera. Thus, due to these effects, the abdominal viscera remains clean, which in turn, keeps the mind calm and quiet and makes one happy. Health of the body means the healthy/harmonious functioning of all the above-mentioned systems of the body. Ill health of any system makes an individual unhealthy.

4. Health of the Intellect and the Soul: Yamas and Niyamas, which are like the 10 commandments, help to purify the Buddhi (the intellect) leading to meditation. The meditation leads to purify the Atman (the individual soul) and then leads to the Realization (Moksha)/ Liberation/ Samadhi, which is the ultimate aim of life of each individual. The pure individual soul easily gets the union with the Universal soul (the Paramatman). Thus the Holistic Health Practices help an individual to gain integral health and keeps him hale and hearty in all respects. This is the process of the Holistic Health Program for all. Under the guidance and supervision of an expert and experienced Guru, select the activities suitable to your needs, necessities, constitution, abilities etc.

**** "Forgiveness is a funny thing. It warms the heart and cools the sting." - William Arthur Ward One needs to expend an awful lot of energy to hold onto anger and resentment. And at the end of the day, who is it hurting? Certainly not the people to whom you are directing your bitterness and hostility. Those negative feelings are swirling through your own psyche and body. So let them go and enjoy a path toward feeling lighter, freer, and happier. In the end, you could consider forgiveness the best kind of selfish act, as it benefits you as much as anyone else.

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CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM P.S. SHANKAR, MD, FRCP (Lond), FAMS, DSc(Gul), DSc(NTR) Emeritus Professor and Director M.R. Medical College, Gulbarga, India When we look at the growth and development of the Medical Science, human mind cannot but wonder at the enormity of its accomplishments. The things which seem routine today would have taxed the imagination of even the most futuristic person just a few years ago. With scientific achievement human structure and function has reached a level of comprehension which was unknown. Furthermore it has revolutionized our concepts and today not only we are talking in terms of medicine at molecular level but gene therapy. The sea of change in the concept and knowledge of medicine has come about due to major advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. The medical man enters the profession with a vast store of knowledge about various diseases and their manifestations, diagnosis, management and prevention. In this era to keep abreast and updated in knowledge, they must not be satisfied with their current level of proficiency and must take earnest attempts to enhance and expand their competence. It is done by improving the knowledge and by keeping abreast with the latest developments in the field. This, in essence, is a continuing medical education (CME) throughout one’s career. ‘Medical Education’ according to William Welsh, a well-known US bacteriologist, ‘is not completed at the medical school. It is only begun. Hence it is not only the quantity of knowledge which the student takes with him from schools which will help him in his future works; it is also the quality of mind, the disciplined habit of correct reasoning, the methods of work, the way of looking at medical-problems, and the estimate of

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the value of evidence’. Education moves us from darkness to light. During the medical course we try to learn too much and the teacher also tries to teach too much. This will not have the desired response. Education being a lifelong learning process, the knowledge and experience we gain after graduation forms the most important part of education. Sir William Osler, the renowned physician of the twentieth century, in his ‘Aequanimitas’ has stated that, ‘the system under which we work asks too much of the student in a limited time. To cover the vast field of medicine in three years is an impossible task. We can only instill the principles, put the student in the right path, give him methods, teach him how to study and early to discern between essentials and nonessentials’. When we have taken up the profession we have to keep abreast of the developments and advances in the diagnosis and management of a variety of disorders. We have to keep an open mind to recognize changes in the natural history of a disease and try to know more about it. It is possible to gain the knowledge from the books. Thomas Carlyle has said, ‘the greatest University of all is a collection of books’. We have to kindle the curiosity and try to enrich the knowledge which we have gained already. Albert Einstein, has told, ‘it is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education’. After our formal education in the Medical College, our mind is mature and it seeks to follow through the things. Major advances in diagnosis and therapeutic modalities have brought a sea of changes in the concept and knowledge of Medicine. This has necessitated the medical men to Page 85


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ ‘goodness’ with up to date medical knowledge and enhance and to expand their professional clinical skill, strong ethical standards and a bedside competence to find a solution to real-time manner that is empathetic, courteous and kind. situations. Skills are attained over a period of time These qualities forms the fundamental attributes of by following examples, and by experience gained doctor’s professionalism. by trial and error. There is need for life-long learning and involvement in a periodic self The qualities of a professional man, in the assessment. words of Thomas Russell, Executive Director of American College of Surgeons, are multiCompetence is a professional habit and it dimensional. They consist of competency and is an interaction of the task and clinical abilities. It dedication to improve the skills, becoming a rollinvolves a judicious use of communication, model for future generations of medical men and knowledge, technical skills, clinical reasoning, placement of welfare of the patients above emotions, values, and reflection in daily practice everything else. The ultimate aim of the physician for the benefit of the individual and the is patient care and to that end all their efforts must community. The competence develops on the be directed (2). scientific knowledge and basic clinical skills attained. The teaching also includes the Today, the medical profession is conversations that take place in the ward rounds, confronted by an explosion of technology, and in the passageway and narration of interesting changing market forces, problems in health care cases, stories and anecdotes and experiences. delivery, bioterrorism and globalization. It has resulted in increasing difficulty to meet the The Medical Professionalism project responsibilities to patients and society. In these jointly sponsored by the American Board of circumstances reaffirming the fundamental and Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation, American universal principles and values of medical College of Physicians (ACP) and European professionalism, which remains ideal to be pursued Federation of Internal Medicine began in by all physicians become all the more important. November 1999 as a collaborative effort designed to raise the concept of professionalism within the Epstein and Hundert have defined consciousness of Internal Medicine both in US and professional competence as ‘ the habitual and Europe. It brought out a charter in 2002, on judicious use of communication, knowledge, medical professionalism detailing the fundamental technical skills, clinical reasoning, emotions, principles and professional responsibilities to both values, and reflection in daily practice for the patients and society to be followed by the benefit of the individual and the community being physicians. Among 10 Professional served’ (3). responsibilities, the commitment to professional competence and commitment to scientific Physician has to maintain his professional knowledge have found the prime place (1). competence by updating his knowledge of The Charter of 21st century highlights the ideals enunciated by Charaka long ago. The physician who is the chief in the medical practice must be knowledgeable and resourceful, honest and pure in his purpose and conduct, and competent. It will go a long way in improving the quality of care provided to the patients. He must uphold scientific standards and promote research which is of benefit to the patients. Patients equate CjªÀÅ

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medicine. The technological advances have given the facilities to do his best which was not possible earlier. He must be committed to lifelong learning. This he acquires by studying the books, reading the journal and attending the continuing medical education programs, and discussing with the experts. This will update his knowledge and enable him to be in the forefront of the profession. His mature mind will follow through. We have to Page 86


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ disorders. As there is no formal course of study maintain a sense of curiosity to learn, which after emerging from the medical institution, the Smiley Blanton has considered ‘ nature’s original physician has to maintain his or her professional school of education’. competence. Maintenance of professional A competent physician results from good competence is an exercise of lifelong learning as it training and/or from keeping abreast with the forms an essential requirement for evidence-based current developments in the medical field. The task medical practice (5). There are various methods to force appointed by the assembly of the American update their knowledge that include reading books Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) has and journals, surfing internet, attending the identified the following six primary components as continuing medical education programs and a measure of general competence: 1) adequate attending the hands-on-workshop. They will medical knowledge, 2) competent patient care, 3) a update their skill and provide new knowledge. life-long commitment to evidence-based and The physicians attend the CME programs practice-based learning, 4) interpersonal to update their knowledge, and for many such communication skills, 5) professionalism, and 6) programs remain the main source. The organizers system-based practice(4). There is no examination of the CME programs have to plan to provide after a person has graduated. There is no system of appropriate curriculum so as to make it an effective recertification in our country. Though the and beneficial endeavour. The planning involves a physicians are encouraged to attend the continuing process of the assessment of the needs of medical education programmes held periodically physicians and the training program must include throughout the country to update their knowledge, such topics so as to improve their competence. there is no yardstick to assess their knowledge. There is no procedure of self-assessment. Any physician who plans to attend a CME program must assess his learning needs and decide The ABMS assembly later adapted the about the topics for the learning (6). This will following 4 basic components as an evidence of make then make it learner-centric. The persons assessment of continuing competence. They are; 1) participating in the program are already continuous high professional standing, 2) experienced and would be interested in trying to continuous commitment to life-long learning and find solutions to the problems encountered in their involvement in a periodic self-assessment process, practice. There is greater flexibility in designing 3) cognitive evidence, and 4) evaluation of the curriculum. Thus the learning becomes performance in practice. There is no agency or problem-centered rather than subject-centered. The mechanism in our country that can conduct an latter is a teacher-centered learning process with a examination to assess cognitive knowledge of the rigidly designed curriculum. These two learning physician during life time after obtaining the experiences have been referred by Knowles as degree and licence to practice. It is a welcome andragogy and pedagogy respectively (7). Active thing that there is a greater awareness in the recent participation of the learner and discussion they years about the process of life-long learning by hold with the faculty plays a leading role in attending the continuing medical education retaining the information taught. They will get programmes relevant to their specialties. information on the newer diagnostic methods, and As Oliver Wendell Holmes has said, ‘it is therapeutic modalities, on new techniques and the province of knowledge to speak and it is the equipments, and recent advances in the knowledge privilege of wisdom to listen’. In this background, of the subject and the program will enable to learn Medical man often finds the subject taught during new skills. his or her training either obsolete or altered with the availability of newer evidence on different CjªÀÅ

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ Accreditation Council for Continuing activities that update their existing skills and lead Medical Education (ACCME) in USA has stated to continuous professional development (8). that CME should provide physicians with learning References 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. Medical Professionalism in the new millennium: a physician charter. Lancet 2002: 359; 520-2 Russell TR. From my perspectives Bull Amer Coll Surgeons 2000: 85; 4-5 Epstein RM, Hundert EM. Defining and assessing professional competence J A M A 2002: 287; 226-33 Ritchie WP. The measurement of competence. Bull Amer Coll Surgeons 2001: 86; 10-15

6. 7.

8.

Mazmanian PE. Role of continuing medical education in the United States. J Contin Edu Health Prof 2005: 25: 13233 Kaufman DM. Applying education theory in practice. B M J 2003: 326; 213-16 Knowles MS. Introduction: the art and science of helping adult learn. Andragogy in action: applying modern principles of adult learning. San Francisco, Calif, Jossey Bass 1984 Regnier K, Kopelow M, Lane D, Alden E. Accreditation for learning and change quality and improvement as the outcome. J Contin Edu Health Prof 2005: 25; 174-82

YOGA IN KANNADA LITERATURE Dr. Shantadevi L. Sannellappanavar The Kannada language is the State language of Karnataka state and it is one of the constitutional languages of India. From the point of view of antiquity and richness of literature, Kannada stands third, the first two being Sanskrit and Tamil respectively. Linguistically, Kannada belongs to the languages of Dravidian family. It dates back from the 5th century A.D and possesses several indigenous forms.1 Yoga is one of the main features of the ancient Indian culture. It has one of the splendid traditions in the philosophical history of India. It is praise worthy that all religious disciplines have accepted yoga whole-heartedly in one form or the other. In the same way, Indians are following the path of Yoga either knowingly or unknowingly in their daily routine. Yoga has not only being recognized in Indian religion and life but in its literature too. Yoga is depicted in certain contexts in the religious scripts of the Kannada language to the principles of various religions in attaining liberation. The principles of yoga are being researched not only from ancient period but also in

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Jain Literature2: There is the identification of Jainyoga in the following scripts ‘Vaddaradhane’, ‘Adipurana’, ‘Shantinatha purana’, ‘Ajita purana’ (These are the works of 10th century). Similar identification is found in the later purans – i.e, in mythologies and in Ratnakaravarni’s, ‘Bharatesh vaibhava, Shantarasa’s, ‘Yoga ratnakara’ etc. Veershaiva Literature: Twelfth century is not only the ‘golden age’ because of the precious Kannada literature but also due to the description of yoga in them. The late Veershaiva Saranas of this period have written thousands of vachanas, where yoga principles and practices are good in number. Prominent among them are Allamprabhudeva, Basavanna, Chennabasavanna, Siddharam Shivayogi, Mahadeviakka, etc., have written vachanas which profound us. Moreover, one can find ample gist ‘Yoganagabhusana’, ‘Shivayogastaka’ in some songs and vachanas. Like this, we mark yogic aspects in the works of Tontada Siddalinga Shivayogi, Swatanta Siddalingayogi, Nijaguna Shivayogi, Shanmukha Shivayogi, Sarpabhusana 2

Structure of Kannada – Dr. R.C. Hiremath

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the works literature of the modern times. Here, few instances could be mentioned in such works.

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Kannada literature has its origins in Jain literature

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ concentration of mind. The aspects of yoga are Shivayogi, Chennabasava Shivayogi, Balallela found when the contributions of these persons are Mahanta Shivayogi and Saravajna, etc. gone through in the work of 10th century Vaidika Literature: ‘Vaddaradhane’, which contains the epics of 19 great persons who attained the Moksa through their There is also yoga philosophy in incessant toiling and moiling. A person in the works of Ranganatha’s, ‘Anubhavamruta’, liberation when in penance comes across Jagannath’s ‘Harikathamrutasara’, Rudrabhatta’s innumerable obstacles. In order to face these ‘Jagannatha vijaya’, Laxmisha’s ‘Jaiminibharata’, menaces, one’s mind and body needs to be in great Chidavandavadhuta’s ‘Jnyansiadhu’ and peace. The status of mind of the leading characters ‘Navachakrakularekha laksana’, besides the in ‘Vaddaradhane’ when in attainment goes to keertanas of Purandaradas, Kanakadas and others. recollect 33rd Sutra, (Sanskrit), of first chapter of ‘Patanjali Yogasutra’ viz., namely: Folk Literature (Tattvapada Sahitya): In this, the yoga literature of the illiterate mystics of villages is explicated. The mystic experience of the saints of the remote villages depicted in their poetries are highly spiritual in nature. Amongst such saints, Shishunala Sharifa Shivayogi, Kadakola Madivalappa, Chalavadi Chandappa, Koodalara Basavalinga Sarana etc., are prominent. Modern Literature: It is natural that the mind and the thinking of the literates changes according to the passage of time and age. The principles of Yoga of some of the present writers are influenced by the present age yogis such as Shri Ramakrishna Paramahansa and Maharshi Arvinda. Prominent among these present writers are Madhurachenna, D.V.G. Pu. Ti. Narashimhacharya, Shrinivas, Bendre, Kuvempu, etc. We find in their works, not only the early stages of Jain, Veershaiva, Vaidika and folk principles of yoga but also the philosophy embraced by these two eminent yogis. This is the brief account of yoga literature available in kannada literature. Now let us have a glance at the few works on Jain and veershaiva forms of kannada literature. On scrutiny of Jain literature, we note that one has undergone abnormal torture of the body in order to attain the status of Teerathankara or Salvation. The torture of the body of these persons is to achieve CjªÀÅ

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“Maitrikarundamduitopeksanam Sukhadukha Punya Punyavisayanam bhavanactuschitta prasadanam” The tapasvis such as Kartika, Abhayaghosa, etc., possessed great virtues of kindness, forgiveness even though their enemies tortured them with their arms and weapons. This aspect too heralds the success of yoga. Now, one Kannada stanza from ‘Adipurana’: “3 Karigal Kesarigalge puskaradharata swachhambvam neede bhee kara Shardulakulam kuranga kkuladol talpoydu vandade ke sarinesstanyavanyagajapotaneeka mundade shan tarasam pompulivoduda munipanim tatkantakantaradol” The above stanza is regarding first Teerthankara ‘Adinatha’ amongst twenty-four Teerthankaras in Jain literature. Here, one can see how an atmosphere of thick forest transpires on account of the influence of the penance by Aaditeerthankara. There, non-violence surfaced in the violence of wild animals. There, the inborn enemies – elephant, lion, tiger, deer, etc began to live amicably. There, trunks gave water for the lions to drink, lions breast fed the young ones of elephants. Such abnormal events brings to mind,

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It is hardly possible to translate the poetries written in the old Kannada language so they are given as they are in the original Kannada language (in English script). Their summaries are written in English.

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ Chennasangayyanalli Saiyoga the 35th sutra (Sanskrit), second chapter of ali nindode sulidu soosuva ‘Patanjala Yogasutra,’ viz., namely: gali niluvudu, gali nile mana mele niluvudu, manavu nindode bindu nindihudu “Ahimsa pratisthayam tatsannidhou leeleyinda bindu nindode vairatyagah” kalakarmva geddu mayeya hela hesarillenisabahudai Basava Kelenda” The above stanza is a unique example where enemity vanishes in the presence of a Here, the ratio of inhalation and exhalation is prominent non-violent yogi. explained scientifically. There is a reference to how breathing differs proportionally during Likewise, similar narration could be be different activities such as sitting, standing, seen in Shantarasa’s ‘Yogarathnakara,’ whatever is sleeping, walking, talking, etc. In order to gain expressed in “Patanjala Yogasutra’ and spiritual knowledge, different stages of acquiring Swatmarama’s ‘Hathapradeepike’ as well. spiritual energy is stated. This begins with the Yogi’s eligibility, attainment status, yamastability of the eyeballs leading to the reduction of niyamas, asanas, narrations etc., as written in frequency of breathing thorough which steadiness Sanskrit yoga works, could be also traced in Jain of the mind is established, is recognized. Another literature. Stanza goes as follows: Second Veerashaiva literature – Veershaiva’s Shivayoga concept is recent contribution to the yoga field. Shivayoga is the sum and substance of all other yogas viz-namely Bhaktiyoga, Karmayoga, Jnyanayoga, Dhayayoga, etc. Technically ‘Shivayoga’ is called as ‘Linganagasmarasya. The principle ‘Satsthala’ of Veershaiva religion is nothing but blossom of ‘Astangayoga.’ It is an outstanding feature that the aspects of ‘Patanjalayoga’ is taken as a supplementary to Shivayoga. In parallel to this, different faces of yoga could be seen in context of denouncing malafided yogis. The vachanas on yoga stated in Veershaiva literature are testimony of modern science. To quote an example the following one or two stanzas may be taken into account: “Kulitalli yeradu, nindalli nalku nadenudiyalli yenta, araniddeyalli hadinaru ratisangadalli movatteradu angula rechaka; tadrdha pooraka horagu valagadade, Koodala

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“Yamaniyamadikastavidhayogadoluttarabhaga poorvabha gamananumana drasta vimala shrutadindaridaslli poorvabha gamanuliduttarardha shivayoga samahita bhakti satkriya shrama paramarthaman pidida vartisavar sharanar shivadhava” The above verse from ‘Shivadhava Sataka’ of Meggeya Mayideva throws light on the divisions of ‘Astangayoga’ of Patanjali into two separate groups as earlier part and latter part. Veerashaivas have named the first five parts of ‘Astangayoga’ as ‘Poorva yoga’ and remaining three parts as ‘Uttara yoga.’ They made use of ‘Uttara yoga’ for the perfection in ‘Shivayoga’ and ‘Poorva yoga’ as a means of ‘Shivayoga.’ The ancient literature of various Indian languages aids the higher studies in Yoga. With this view, the study of the works of ancient kannada literature also plays an important role. This paper of mine is a little effort-put-together, in this direction. In this way, many research studies can be undertaken in Yoga in Kannada literature. Here, I put a stop to my paper, with a hope that, interested people will come forward to join their hands in this work.

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Staying Afloat Chaitra Kishore, Palatine, Illinois Sometimes, when you believe in something so deeply, you get so lost in the ocean of its fervor, that you focus all your energy in spreading this fervor. Eventually, the waves crash down upon you and you are left standing on dry sand, without a drop of that fervent water still clinging to you. Sometimes, if you preach too much, you lose a sense of the practice itself. Once upon a time, a group of fishes lived in one ocean and all believed in the same thing. They were raised on the same principles, read the same literature, and celebrated the same holidays. Yet, while one can feed every fish the same food, one cannot prevent the scales of every individual fish from being different. Individuality and background shapes the perspective in which the same principles are viewed and practiced. Self-interest does as well. So, each fish practiced the same philosophy slightly differently, and twisted it to fit its own needs. For a while, each fish became totally absorbed in its own ocean of its own altered belief. As time passed, however, eyes opened and each fish became aware of the slight differences in the oceans of its neighbors. Every fish was appalled. “How could you deviate from the principles we have learned?” each fish asked another. Each fish began preaching to the other the original principles of the philosophy they had all learned, completely forgetting that they themselves had altered the philosophy within their own oceans. As they kept preaching the “true” philosophy, they continued to practice their own version. What is the sense of knowing the truth, if you only use it to show up others and not to improve your own conduct?

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As a few fish pointed out, there really is no sense in it. Some even said, “Why should I follow tradition when you yourself are not?” This caused many oceans to merge together, creating a variety of torrents. However, the original ocean that supported the original principles was no where to be found. Too much preaching to each other resulted in the true practice itself being lost amid the torrents. For the little fish, this caused torrents of confusion in their own personal oceans. What should they believe in now? The true philosophy that they too had been raised on barely lingered to the coral reefs around them. Was it still correct to follow it? Following tradition became an almost unheard of idea if the older fish before them were not. Yet, what should they follow now that there were so many altered beliefs in the mix? The world around the group of fish they were part of was growing and changing in directions that drastically deviated from tradition. The little fish were unsure as to whether to follow this world or stick to the beliefs of their group. And again, the question came up, which belief in their own group? They still believed in the true principles of their group. Everyone in it did. But, practicing it? That was a different story. The story of myself and some of the other VSNA youth is similar to that of these little fish lost in stormy waters. We are stuck in the middle of several oceans of thought and do not know which one to swim in. We are part of a group called VSNA, which embraces the philosophy of Veerashaivism. The principles set forth by this philosophy are engrained in our heads. We grew up listening to our parents and other elders at home and in our Veerashaiva community speaking about these beliefs and reciting Vachanas which further explained this philosophy to us. We have Page 91


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ balance of the two. However, doing that is not participated in many VSNA events, enacting small always easy, especially since those around us are dramas and reading paragraphs about the confused as well. Tradition. Culture. Principle. fundamental principles of Veerashaivism. Yet, Practices. These are words with meanings to us when we look around us, we don’t always see these little fish. Yet, they bring with them storms of principles being followed. confusion as to how to mix them together in the Sometimes our community resembles the right amounts and practice our philosophy the right group of fish those little ones are a part of. Some way. We become swept away by these currents and people’s personalities and goals interfere with their sway from one ocean to another, without ever really perspective of Veerashaivism and thus, they follow finding one ocean to belong to. it slightly differently than the actual philosophy. However, there might be a way to Yet, the traditional Veerashaivism principles are overcome these torrents of confusion. You might continued to be promoted and preached. believe in something deeply. But, you must also Us little fish, or youth, are then faced with believe in it strongly. That way, you can stay true to conflict. If what is preached is not always practiced, your own ocean and not let the waves of others as students, must we? What makes things even crash upon you. Stay true to your own belief and more confusing is that the world around us has stay firmly rooted in your own ocean. That way you become more modern. We are living in North won’t get swept away. You will stay afloat. America, a place far removed from the ancestral [ Profile : Chaitra Kishore is a 17 year old who just graduated home of Veerashaivism. Here, the culture is quite from William Fremd High School. She is an active youth different and doesn’t always mix well with member of the VSNA Chicago Chapter and has been Veerashaiva culture. We can’t entirely choose one contributing to both literary and cultural activities over the culture over the other, because we are part of both years.] worlds, or both oceans. We have to find the perfect *****

GLOBAL WARMING -Shreya Dhananjaya Oh Global warming Electricity we are using Places are getting warmer Animals are getting extinct Earth is getting hotter Seas and oceans are getting drier Oh, please… save Planet Earth Sunshine is bright, if we use it right Planet earth is going to be better… Wow

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Shreya Dhananjaya 9 Years Old

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Vachanas Akshay Indusekar Without rope and tools Can you get water from a deep well? Possible with steps! With Vachanās Our elders built steps To reach the heavens! To clean man's taints Sharanās gave us the Vachanās Illuminated with knowledge Kudala Chennasangaiah! -Chennabasavanna The 12th century was a renaissance period in Karnataka history. During this time not only a social revolution occurred but also a literary revolution called Vachana Sāhitya started. Sharanas wrote a new form of literature called Vachanās in Kannada, the language of the common people. Jédara Dāsimaiah has been credited as the first Vachanakāra or the first writer of Vachanās. Prior to this revolution, only privileged people wrote literary work and that too in a language not understood by the common people. Sharanās encouraged and promoted writings in the local language Kannada and even the underprivileged people could participate in the literary work. From the available Vachanas, about 300 writers have been identified. During a span of 20 years, more than a million Vachanās were recorded about the discussions at Anubhavamantapa (meaning experience is the stage). However, most of the vachanas were either lost or burned during the revolution. Vachanās were obscure for nearly 800 years. So far, about 25,000 Vachanās have been identified and have been printed. Vachanakārās ended their Vachanās uniquely by referring either to their Guru, or with the name of the God that they worshipped. This uniqueness of vachana endings has assisted in the recognition of the writers.

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Vachanās are intelligible prose, which are easy to understand. Vachanās are the basis of Veerashaiva philosophy. Veerashaiva Vachanās have also influenced contemporary society by its’ content. Veerashaiva Vachanās utilize several devices such as symbols, analogies, metaphors, and similes in order to convey its’ message regarding universal truth. Vachanās also have a captivating quality which draws the reader into the true meaning of the Vachana. Additionally, Vachanās convey several viewpoints and incorporate intense emotions. This is different than contemporary poems which usually have only one viewpoint combined with the technique of imagery; however, Veerashaiva Vachanās and contemporary poems both express messages regarding universal truth. Vachanās are the Bouquet of Voices. There are many different types of Vachanas. Each Vachana uses a different type of voice. The Voice of Mystical Paradox: This voice expresses impossibilities becoming possible and incompatibilities becoming compatible. e.g., He created the fire-throne for the camphor-doll but the fire melted away and the camphor survived. -Muktayakka The Voice of Devotion: Devotion for God is expressed in this type of Vachana. e.g., That is why Channamallikarjuna is my lord. Grab all these mortal, decaying men O mother & throw them into fire! - Akka Mahadevi The Voice of Existential Despair: This type of Vachana expresses views on human conflict and overall suffering. e.g., Page 93


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ If the sky becomes naked Saw lightning wondrous What can it be clothed with? Like a woven vines. If the Veerashaivas turn worldly, - Allama Prabhu Where will I find an analogy O’ Guheshawara? The Voice of God Realization: This type of - Allama Prabhu Vachana describes the connection with God and the The Voice of Trials and Tribulations: This type celebration for attaining this aspiration. e.g., of Vachana expresses stages and events that one Breaching the banks must pass in order to connect with God. e.g., The waters of ecstasy flowed over If embers rain turn into water How can I describe the ecstasy If there is a flood turn into wind Of touching Kudalasanagamadeva If there is a big deluge, turn into sky And vanishing in him? If a world-wide deluge engulfs all - Basavanna Shed all yourself and leap in to Guheshawara? -Allama Prabhu The Voice of Wisdom: This style of Vachana allows wisdom to be shared with others. e.g., The Voice of Protest: This type of Vachana ¸ÁܪÀgÀPÀ̽ªÀÅAlÄ dAUÀªÀÄPÀ̽«®è protests religious naïveté and promotes the belief in one supreme God, nonviolence, and gender and caste equality. e.g., Cleave the bamboo into two Call the upper portion “man” And the lower one “woman” Rub them together and produce fire Now tell me was the flame man Or woman, O’ Ramanatha? - Jedara Dasimaiah

Ultimately, Vachanas use a combination of these styles in order to convey a deep message regarding universal truth. These ideas become the foundation of society and promote the general wellbeing of all people.

The Voice of Cosmic Grandeur: This type of Vachana describes the actions of God and the creation of the universe. e.g., I came out to see your glory Like that of a billion suns!

¸ÀwAiÀÄ UÀÄtªÀ ¥Àw £ÉÆÃqÀ¨ÉÃPÀ®èzÉ ¥ÀwAiÀÄ UÀÄtªÀ ¸Àw £ÉÆÃqÀ§ºÀÄzÉ JA§gÀÄ ¸Àw¬ÄAzÀ §AzÀ ¸ÉÆÃAPÀÄ ¥ÀwUÉ PÉÃqÀ®èªÉ? ¥Àw¬ÄAzÀ §AzÀ ¸ÉÆÃAPÀÄ ¸ÀwAiÀÄ PÉÃqÀ®èªÉ? MAzÀAUÀzÀ PÀtÄÚ G¨sÀAiÀÄzÀ°è, MAzÀÄ »AUÀ°PÉÌ ¨sÀAUÀªÁjUÉA§ÄzÀ w½zÀ°èAiÉÄ PÁ¯ÁAvÀgÀ ©üêÉÄñÀégÀ°AUÀPÉÌ ¸À¯É ¸ÀA¢vÀÄ. ---qÀPÉÌAiÀÄ ¨ÉƪÀÄätÚ CjªÀÅ

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The fall of the static is certain Only the dynamic is eternal! -Basavanna

References: 1.

“Virasaiva Vachanas” by Pradip Khandwalla Basava Journal Vol. 32 Issue 4 Jan-March 2007 published by Basava Samithi, Bangalore, India

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Basavanna’s Ideals Reflected in Lord Rama’s Actions Mallikarjun Virupannavar

This past winter-break, I had the exceptional privilege of being able to watch the television series Ramayana. I thought being able to watch the series was a great privilege because it does not air anymore, and the DVDs are hard to find. However, my moms friend happened to have them, so my family and myself began to watch the series. Although the shows are at times boring, the cultural significance of it is huge, and it is far more entertaining then reading the books. When watching the series, I would at times connect Basavanna to Rama. Although many people would think that these two would be very different, I would see glimpses of Basavanna in Lord Rama’s actions. The biggest example of the two being similar is when Rama and Lakshmana go to a lower caste woman’s ashram even though there were hundreds of other yogis waiting for Rama. However, Rama chose to go to the woman’s ashram because she was so devoted, even though the lady kept repeating that she did not think she was worthy of being in his company. In one instance, Lakshmana tells Rama not to eat the berries the women gave because they were taste-tested by the lower caste lady. However, after eating the berry, Rama said he has never tasted a sweeter berry, a berry offered with so much devotion. Overall, the instance with Rama and the lady largely connects to Basavanna because he also would have done the same thing as Rama and ignored the caste system. Overall, the biggest connection between Basavanna and Rama is that both did not give much consideration to the caste system that existed in their respective societies. Not only do Basavanna and Rama agree on the disapproval of the caste system, Rama also follows many of the commandments that Basavanna had. CjªÀÅ

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These seven commandments I am speaking of include do not steal, do not kill without purpose, do not tell untruth, do not get angry, do not show disgust toward others, do not boast about yourself, and do not rebuke others. In Ramayana, Rama obviously never steals anything because quite frankly, there is not anything for him to steal. However, Rama does kill Ravan, but he does it with purpose. Rama chooses to kill Ravan because of the great stress he caused Rama, Sita, Lakshmana, and all of Ayodhya. However, even after killing Ravan, Rama gives Ravan’s dead body to Vibhishana, Ravan’s brother, and tells him to perform a proper burial, showing exceptional respect even though the man he just killed abducted his wife. Rama also never lied throughout Ramayana, therefore he did not break the commandment of not telling the untruth. Rama also never became angry, even though it is hard to see him not become so because of the difficulties of some of his situations. For example, when Kaikeyi (“step-mother” of Rama, mother of Bharata) uses the two boons that Dasaratha had granted her long ago to demand that Rama be exiled into the forest for fourteen years and Bharatha receive the crown. When Dasaratha explains this situation to Rama, Rama has no argument and believes it is his duty as a son to leave for fourteen years. Even when leaving the house, he asks for Kaikeyi’s blessings even though he knows that she is primarily the one that exiled him. Rama also never shows disgust toward others, primarily shown through his actions toward the lower caste lady and Kaikeyi. Throughout Ramayana, the main character never boasts about himself even though he is the seventh incarnation of Vishnu, and a popular prince and soon to be king. In matter of fact, after being exiled Rama chooses to wear an orange cloth instead of the glamorous Page 95


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ Therefore, my experience watching Ramayana was clothes that princes are accustomed to wearing, great as I got to experience the great epic visually. showing that Rama does not wish to be separate Although the series was not exactly technologically himself from his followers. The commandment not advanced, I still thought it was very intriguing, and to rebuke others, I think, repeats itself as it closely I learned so much from it. Therefore, if anyone has relates to the ideas of not showing disgust toward any doubts about watching the series, thinking it is others and not boasting about yourself. Overall, in too long, I would highly recommend watching it. Ramayana, Rama not only despises the caste system, but also follows Basavanna’s seven commandments to show how close of a resemblance he has with Basavanna.

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CONGRATULATIONS TO 32nd Annual VSNA Convention ***BASU, VEENA HULLUR & FAMILY***

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One’s Actions – A Symbol of Good Conduct Chiranth Kishore, Palatine IL Good conduct is the way to realize God. That is the definition of “Acharave Swarga”. Good conduct can be practiced in many different and unique ways. The practice of good conduct has always been taught by my parents and elders ever since I can remember. The same has been taught at school by my teachers, or “gurus”. At school, this is refered to as the “Cougar Character” program, which emphasizes good conduct as a means to develop strong character. As a member, regular attendee, and active participant of the Chicago VSNA Chapter, I was exposed to Vachanas, a number of which talked about good conduct. I and a number of others of my age group were given the opportunity to recite several of the great Vachanas that describe Veerashaiva philosophy and especially good conduct as a means to realizing God. Initially these were just words that we repeated with a very little understanding of what was being said. Later on, we were asked to recite these Vachanas and explain their meanings. A number of these always talked about practicing good conduct including speaking the truth and being compassionate to other living beings. Lord Basavann, in one of his most well known Vachana “Kala Beda Kola Beda,” says that the ways to please Lord Kudala Sangama is by following a virtuous path of good conduct by not stealing from others, not killing or hurting others, being truthful, and not disrespecting others. Elsewhere Lord Basavanna has explained that it is not proper to point out others’ mistakes in a rude

fashion. Lord Basavanna, in one other Vachana, talks about selfless service and kindness along with a whole-hearted dedication to undertake ones tasks in a virtuous manner. Akka Mahadevi in one of her Vachanas explains that beauty without good and noble character is of no value at all. She compares such beauty to a large tree that gives no shade. It is wrong to pretend to be good and great when indeed your actions are bad and dishonest as explained by Lord Basavanna in one more of his great Vachanas. Speech is an important expression of character. What you speak should be of value and should be done in such a way that is does not hurt or insult others. This was expressed by Lord Basavanna in another Vachana where he compares good speech to a string of pearls and also says that all speech should be such that it gains appreciation from Lord Kudala Sangama Deva at all times. Learning these Vachanas by listening and reciting them on various occasions and events like Basava Jayanthi and Maha Shivaratri celebrations gave me and my friends the opportunity to learn and know about the influence of ones action on good conduct. The knowledge that I received on good conduct was invaluable to me. Simple things we had learnt at home and school like being honest, truthful and helping others were all part of what “Acharave Swarga” is all about. [Profile ~ Chiranth Kishore is eleven years old and will be in sixth grade this coming fall at Pleasant Hill Elementary School. He is a member of the VSNA Chicago Chapter and has been actively participating in all events along with his family.]

Reflect upon your present blessings, of which every man has plenty; not on your past misfortunes of which all men have some. ---Charles Dickens

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Purity of Mind and Good Conduct Eshwar Kishore, Palatine, Illinois

Vachanas of Basavanna and other Veerashaiva Vachanakaras or authors of Vachanas have in a number of instances referred to purity of mind as an essential characteristic of good conduct. They have also preached that purity of mind is a way to reach heaven, or acharave swarga. In one instance, Basavanna talks about purity of mind being not about cultivating anger. In another, Basavana talks about anger as a destructive emotion that leads to violence, and clouds one’s thoughts. Basavanna talks about penance being useless with a dishonest mind. He further says that such penance will never make Lord Kudala Sangama happy. He also says that worship without sincerity is only an act, not progress towards realization of God. He compares this act of worthless worship to enjoying sugarcane in a picture. Other Veerashaiva Vachanakaras have said that keeping good company is a necessity that shapes character. Bad company can indeed corrupt a pure mind. They have also said that we should face our challenges with a pure mind and soul just when the challenge occurs. Saving it for later does not provide any value for overcoming the challenge. Another thing they have said is that the mind should not be allowed to be distracted by worldly distractions, for it is a hurdle towards the realization of God. A pure mind without any distractions is the only way to please God. Lord Basavanna speaks about how if someone speaks good things, and pretends to be a good person, but really has evil and bad intentions, then God shall

not bless that person. It is essential to have a pure and honest mind accompanying all our actions. In another Vachana, Basavanna says that if your speech and actions differ from one another, then you don’t have a clear conscience. It should be that our speech should be a reflection of our mind rather than trying to say something different while having dishonest thoughts. Basavanna was a social reformer, who taught “Acharave Swarga”, the realization of which requires purity of mind. These ideas are simple enough to understand and follow. These Vachanas gave me a feeling for the need to have a pure mind to build good and strong character. My parents and elders have been always telling us that we should be honest and speak the truth. They have also been telling us not to cultivate anger or disrespect for others. These ideas were the same as what we were exposed to in the Vachanas. Purity of mind seems to be a simple idea, but we do find that people get angry, and at times are disrespectful of others. Following the ideas and thoughts highlighted in the Vachanas definitely will help us all to develop a pure mind and thereby developing good conduct. This in turn is one of the ways to realize ‘Acharave Swarga” [Profile: I am an eleven year old eager participant in Veerashaiva activities. I have been participating since I was three years old in different activities. From coloring to reciting Vachanas, to dancing on stage to a well known Kanada-hit songs, I have been an active participant most of my life.]

There are as many nights as days, and the one is just as long as the other in the year's course. Even a happy life cannot be without a measure of darkness, and the word "happy" would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness. ---Carl Jung When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us. ---Helen Keller

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AYYA Jeevan Topgi, Palatine “If we do not obey God’s moral law, we will go to hell. If we do obey the moral code, we will go to heaven.” This is what I was told and like any other kid, I believed it. But which are God’s moral laws? This was one of the reasons why I took great interest in understanding Veerashaiva principles and rituals. Shri Basavanna’s statement, “Ayya endued Swarga, yelawo endade Naraka”1 lessened my worries. However, I wanted to know what exactly the meaning of his vachana:2 Behold! Between the worlds of mortals and of Gods There is no difference! To speak the truth is world of gods; to speak untruth, the mortal world Good work is heaven, bad work is hell And you can witness it, Oh Lord Kudala Sangama! I enquired the meaning of this vachana, as did my grandparents, parents, and sisters. My grandmother gave her interpretation as, ”here is no separate swarga or naraka. Both are on this earth only. If you do good, you will get good results and that is swarga. If you do bad you will get bad results and that is naraka. If you do bad god will punish you in this world only.” I was content with her interpretation. However, I kept on searching the Veerashaiva literature. In the book “Lingayat Dharma”, Dr. Somashekar Munavalli wrote the following details on the concept of heaven and hell: 3 “Lingayat religion neither subscribes to nor believes in the concept and notion of the existence of Heaven and Hell. It is, in fact, the ONLY religion in the world that has not fostered and pronounced the popular concept of the Heaven and Hell. For the Veerashaivas the world we live in is where heaven and hell exist. They have no CjªÀÅ

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separate existence. Doing a good deed is like being in heaven. One feels good and pleased about oneself for having been a Good Samaritan. Deliberately, knowingly and intentionally hurting a living being is like living in a hell.” Religion plays a powerful role in defining and cultivating the characteristics of its followers. Religion is a science that can be practiced to achieve spiritual self-realization. Each soul is potentially divine. The divinity in the body remains latent in us as long as we identify ourselves with our body-mind and the sensory system. The goal of life is to manifest this hidden divinity. Refinement of the soul is the solemn duty of each living individual in this universe. And the only tool available at our disposal for achieving this is our action. Each and every one of our actions is important here. Each thought and each movement is vital. The sight of an object, the thinking of a thought, the performance of an act, even though very transitory, leave a complex trace in the subconscious mind.4 The mind, the seat of will power, discriminates between real and unreal, what is right and what is wrong, what is to be done and what is to be avoided. Mind also does the imagination and formulation of concepts. How a person behaves, feels, thinks, and how he conducts himself in a given set of circumstances is largely determined by the state of his mind. Mind stores the impressions of our thoughts and actions: good and bad. The sum total of these impressions determines our character.4 Repeated habits alone can reform character. The struggle of the mind to cultivate new habits makes us civilized by manifesting our divinity and thereby our hidden perfection.4 Page 99


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ five codes of conduct: Shivachara, Lingachara, The purified mind has all the powers of wish, Sadachara, Brihyachara, and Ganachara. These are knowledge, and action. It can be achieved through intended to enrich Veerashaivas with devotion, Vichara or enquiry and control of the fluctuations sanctimony, brotherhood, religious cooperation, of the mind. We need to develop an independent, honest life, and non-injury to other living logical, and reasonable mind. creatures.5, 6 Character guides every behavior. If a man with According to Channabasava, the faithful practice character is ambitious, his ambition will be shown of these five principles transforms individual’s in everything he does. Mind acts according to fixed achar and vichar:6 habits and preferences. Character is what a person truly is. The man of character is the hope, solace, Lingachara purifies the body well-being, peace, and inspiration of mankind. Sadachara purifies the mind The essence of character building lies in Shivachara purifies the soul strengthening of our will-power. Bhrityachara purifies the speech and What the society demands as manners develops into genuine behavior in the individual. Behavior comes from the vital emotions, whereas character comes from the mind. The uniqueness of the person based on self-reliance, self-awareness, and self-respect is expressed by his achara and vichar. These manifest in his self-restraint, soft speech, and humble considerate behavior towards all. Every belief creates certain attitudes. Those attitudes govern all of our actions. Man's actions can thus be traced to his inmost beliefs about himself and about the world around him. If those beliefs are erroneous, his actions will not be in tune with the achara that would create Swarga. Therefore, there should be a perfect coordination between achar and vichar. The knowledge without action is stagnation, while action without knowledge is catastrophe. In order to create swarga, one needs to reduce six fold enemies: desire of the world, anger, avarice, infestation, pride, and hatred by following Veerashaiva principles and rituals, and the learning from the life of Shivasharanas. Shivasharans have written their life experiences and wisdom in vachanas. Veerashaiva philosophy highly emphasizes the practice of Panchacharas to realize the meaning of “Acharave Swarga” in our life. The practice of Panchachara in daily life is necessary to be a virtuous Veerashaiva. Panchacharas encompass CjªÀÅ

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Ganachara purifies the behavior Shivachara: It teaches social equality. What you make yourself in life is more important than who you are in life. This practice leads to personal spiritual growth. Sadachara: In daily life one must behave righteously and live by good morals and ethics. All ethics, all human actions, and all human thought hang upon unselfishness.7 The following life experience of Devara Dasimayya is impressive example of unselfishness:8 “Once Dasimayya wove a beautiful piece of cloth using all his talents and skills. He took it to the market place to sell it at the highest price he could get. But a jangama liked it and Dasimayya gave it free to him, for he considered the jangamas as representative of God. However, jangama tore it to pieces and threw the pieces away. Dasimayya kept his cool and did not even utter an unhappy word. He was feeling happy that he had given that piece of cloth to a godly person. The next day that jangama went to Dasimayya’s house and narrated the incident to Dasimayya wife Duggale to see how she would react. To his utter surprise, she too kept her cool and said what her husband had done was a right thing to do. All she could say was, ‘Our objective was fulfilled. Thank God for accepting our gift.’ The jangama was mystified by the unity of their ennobling purpose of life and sublime thought.” Page 100


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ with the feeling that all things belong to you? All Love, truth and unselfishness are our highest 4 those are the Prasada of Shiva himself. You can ideals. Love is life. All selfishness is death. only satisfy Allama Prabhu, when you show your Sadachara includes practicing good conduct in Bhakti. Your belongings, your body, your avoidance of violence, anger, lust, greed, emotions, and your life have to be served to him arrogance, and envy. We find sadachara in with Bhakti, not with pride.” showing respect to the Guru, teachers, parents, and The material greed is the passion for the possession all others. Sadachara also includes honest work for 9 of and the rejoicing with worldly objects.10 living and compassion for all creatures. Basavanna outlines the basics of sadachara in the following vachana:2

Greed is a fierce fire

Thou shalt not steal, nor kill, nor speak a lie Be angry with no one, nor scorn another man Nor glory in thyself, nor others hold to blame This is your inward purity, this is your outward purity This is the way to win our Lord Kudala Sangama

It fools the wise

Ahamkara, which is the source of all troubles, has its seat in the mind. It need not necessarily be taken to mean pride, but it is the feeling of selfawareness. The good achar requires pacifying the ego through common-sense and understanding. The following example serves as an example of ahamkara:9 After Allam Prabhu performed his Maha-Linga Puje, Basaveshwar washed Allama Prabhu’s feet and requested feast first. Basaveshwara and Nagalambike set the dinner and started serving the dinner. Allama Prabhu kept on praising the food and asked for more and more till all the sweets in the kitchen were consumed. Surprised, Basaveshwara started serving rice and curry. Allama Prabhu kept on eating and asking more and more till there was no more left for anyone else. Basaveshwara was shocked to realize that all the food prepared at his house for 200 people had been consumed by Allama Prabhu. Basaveshwara thought that with all his riches he could satisfy the hunger of Allama Prabhu, but he was bewildered. Realizing the dilemma, Channabasava came to the rescue and explained, “How can you satisfy Shiva, who has come here in the form of Allama Prabhu, by serving food, wealth, belonging and service CjªÀÅ

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It destroys judgment

It hides in the mind Excess wealth should be distributed to the less fortunate and the disabled. Dasoha means free distribution of food, wealth, knowledge, and care for underprivileged persons. The donation of wealth and other belongings should have been earned through the righteous work. Uneven accumulation of wealth in few hands would lead to an economically imbalanced society. In order to achieve equal distribution of wealth and serve the needs of under privileged, shivasharanas launched the noble idea of Dasoha.11 The hallmark of Veerashiava philosophy lies in giving equal opportunities for males and females. Considering “lokave nanna mane and manava kulave nanna kutumb,” one can easily swim through this ocean of life. All beings are entitled to the same treatment of happiness and kindness in life. One should be compassionate to all living beings including animals. Do not think of killing, stealing, lying, praising oneself, scolding, or humiliating others. Speech is an important aspect of our daily life. Knowing its importance, Kannada folk wisdom expresses it as: “Matu adidare hoyitu; muttu odedare hoyitu.” 1 The essence of sadachara is well captured by Vimala Channabasappa in the following vachana:12 With knowledge there should be humility Page 101


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ With wealth there should be generosity and commitment. The importance of Kayaka goes With strength there should be compassion beyond divinity.13 With justice there should be mercy With beauty there should be virtue “Kayak niratanadode Lingada Hangu hariyabeku, With the grace of Lord Vimalesha Guru bandaroo mareyabeku” Channabasavesha One’s heart should always be full of love! While doing your duty you should be so deeply Ganachara: It involves illustrating your faith in involved that even the highest revered Linga, Veerashaivism and educating others about it. It is Guru, and Jangama should be forgotten. The story an ethical principle to fight against injustice and of Nuliya Chendayya beautifully exemplifies this immortality with courage and conviction. The concept:9 following vachana depicts the concept of “One day Nuliya Chendayya was making a rope Ganachara:2 sitting by the side of a pond. While he was Does not a crow on seeing a crumb, call to its performing his work, Linga around his neck fell flock? into the water. He continued his work. For him Does not a hen, on finding a morsel, call clacking his Linga was alive as he was, and it was his to her brood? companion all the time. It was also his belief that If, being a bhakta, a man lacks loyalty to his own companions don’t separate from each other. He faith He is worse that hen or crow, O Kudala Sangama was so close to his Istha Linga, but it had left him Deva! – he was not sure, either by accident or intent. He wanted to know if his Istha Linga was as much Brithyachara: It is the service with humility. This attached to him as he was to it. If his Istha Linga code of conduct concentrates on humility of our didn’t want him, he would leave it alone, since his actions and thoughts. In the following vachana guru and many jangamas were mobile Lingas. Basaveshwara gave the expected qualities of speech:2 It was time for him to go to the market to sell his rope and buy food to prepare for the jangamas. As If you should speak, your words should be pearls his Linga had not come out of the water to him, he that are strung upon a thread was grief stricken and angry. How could his Linga that he had worshiped for so long leave him? If you should speak, your words should be like luster by the ruby shed If you should speak, your words should be a crystal’s flash that cleaves the blue If you should speak, great God must say, ha ha, that’s very true! But if your deed betrays your word, can Kudala Sangama care for you? Every able-bodied person must engage in work, earn in a righteous way, and it must be beneficial to the welfare of the community. “Work is Worship – Kayakave Kailasa” was the motto of Sharanas. While doing it, do it with all devotion

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When Chendayya started walking to go to market, he heard a shouting, “Chendayya don’t leave me! Come and get me.” Chendayya’s heart filled with happiness, but he replied, “since you left me, you are the one who should come to me.’ The Istha Linga changed into a small by and started running to Chendayya.” Faith is the vehicle for building achar and vichar. The following event in the life of Dasimayya serves as an example:8 “Two gentlemen, after having acidously argued about a problem and failing to come to a mutually acceptable conclusion, came to Dasimayya’s abode to consult him about that problem. It was Page 102


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ In the life of Veerashaivas, Guru plays an midday. Dasimayya was at his kayaka and important role. He teaches us knowledge that Duggale was assisting her husband. The visitors would help us to practice good achar and achieve explained their problem to Dasimayya and asked self-realization. Similarly, yoga enables us to him which of the two – the family life of married perform meditation, discipline, and worship. couple or the life of a sanyasin – was better. Practicing Shivayoga also leads to the spiritual Dasimayya kept quiet. After a while, he ordered self-realization: his wife to bring the lamp so that he could see where the thread was in the hand-loom. She did With the help of all these Veerashaiva that without grumbling about the necessity of a philosophical concepts, life experiences, and lamp in the midday or telling him to bend a little vachanas, each one of us is able to realize the forward so that he could see the thread for himself. concept, “Acharave Swarga.” She quietly went away to fetch the lamp. More time passed. Yet Dasimayya had not answered the References and Further Reading: youth’s question. The youths thought that 1. V. Channabasappa, “Speak no evil”, VSNA Dasimayya was a hard task master and that he Convention Souvenir, New Jersey (2003) treated his wife harshly by ordering her to do 2. Sri Panditaradya Shivacharya Swamiji, unnecessary things. They pitied Duggale thinking “Basavannanavar Nurondu Vachanagalu”, Sanehally that Dasimayya was cruel to her and unnecessarily (1996) bossing and bothering her. Duggale, on the other 3. S. Munavalli, “Lingayat Dharma”, VSNA, (2007) hand, was thinking that her husband had something up his sleeves. 4. Swami Vivekananda, “Personality Development”, Kolkata (2002)

Since it was getting time for lunch, Dasimayya asked his wife to prepare the prasada for the guests as well. After some time she announced that the food was ready. She served the food to her husband and the two guests with due courtesy and respect. After the meal, the guests felt pleased and happy. But they thought that their problem had not been addressed by Dasimayya. One of the youths asked Dasimayya with all his humility to answer their question. Dasimayya courteously said that he had not only answered the question but also had given them an illustration to prove his point of view. Both of them said simultaneously, “Sir, you have not even uttered a single word to answer our question.” Dasimayya thought they needed an explanation. So he said, “If you are blessed, like I am, in having a life-partner such as my wife, then you can marry and lead a family life and you do not have to take sanyasa.” If you are not, then give up the idea of marrying and better take asceticism.”

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5.

S. Ullagaddi, “In Search of Shiva”, VSNA (1995)

6.

S. Munavalli, “A Brief Introduction to the Veerashaiva Religion”, VSNA Annual Convention, Georgia (2004)

7.

Swami Vivekananda, “Universal Ethics and Moral Conduct”, Kolkata (2001)

8.

S. Munavalli (Editor), “Life, Legacy and Lyrics of Devara Dasimayya”, VSNA (1998)

9.

Basava Raj, Dimension Leap”

10. “Hinduism: Desire Under the Kalpataru” http://www.boloji.com/hinduism/076.htm 11. S. V. Patil, “Basava’s New Message for New Age”, VSNA Annual Convention, Pittsburgh (1996) 12. V. Channabasappa, “My Vachanas”, VSNA Annual Convention, Columbus (2002) 13. Sri Shivamurthy Murugharajendra Swamiji, “The Universal Truth by Basavanna”, Sri Murugharajendra Matha, Chitradurga.

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BEST WISHES TO Veerashaiva Samaja of North America 32nd Annual Convention 2009 ** Mrs. Uma Lingaraju & Dr. Lingaraju ** Plainview, New York, NY

PÀ£ÀßqÀªÉà £À£ï vÀªÀgÀÄ ²æêÀÄw «ªÀįÁ ZÉ£Àߧ¸À¥Àà ¨sÁgÀvÀ ©lÄÖ ¨ÉAUÀ¼ÀÆgï ©lÄÖ §AzÀzÁÝAiÀÄÄÛ E°è zÉÆqï zÉñÀzÁUÉ zÀÄqï £ÀAeÉÆÌAqÀÄ ªÀÄ£À¸ÉÆÃUÉÛöÊvÉ C°è| PÉ®¸À ¹UÀÄÝ zÀÄrدÁèAvÀ K£ÉÆà §AzÀÄé E°è PÉ®¸À zÀÄqÀÄØ JgÀqÀÆ EzÀÆæ £ÀªÉÆäÃj¯Áè E°è! C°èzÀݪïgÉÎ E¯ïÎ §¨ÉÃðPÀÆAvÀ K£ÉÆà ¨sÁjà ºÀÄZÀÄÑ E°èzÀÆæ£É C°èzï £É£É¸ÉÆÃzï K¤zï £À£ÉÎ ¥ÉZÀÄÑ! L¹ÌçÃA PÉÃPÀÄ ZÁPÀ¯ÉÃmï ¨ÉÃPÀÄ ªÉÄʸÀÆgï ªÀÄPÀ̽ÃUï C°è Erè zÉÆÃ¸É ¨ÉÆÃAqÁ £É£ï¹ ¨ÁAiÀÄ¯ï ¤ÃgÀÄ E°è! ªÉÄʸÀÆgï ªÀÄ°èUÉ gÉõÉä ¹ÃgÉ E°èzï £À£ÉÎ PÀ£ÀÄì ªÉÄʸÀÆgÀ߯Éèà EgÉÆà ºÀÄrÎUÉ ¥ÁåAlÄ ¸ÀÌnð£À ¢¸ÀÄð! ªÀÄPÀ̽ÃUï PÀ£ÀßqÀ PÀ°¸ï¨ÉÃPÀÆAvÀ £À«ÄUÉÆzÁÝl E°è ºÀÄmÉÆÖÃPï ªÉÆzÀ¯Éà PÁ£ÉéAnUï ºÁQ EAVèµï PÀ¯ÉÆìÃzï C°è! C°è E°è J¯Éèà DVè £ÀªÀiï vÁAiÀiï ¨sÁµÉ £À«gÀÄ PÉüÉÆÃPï D¸É NzÉÆÃPï D¸É PÀ£ÀßqÀªÉà £À£ï vÀªÀgÀÄ

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In Loving Memory of

LATE SRI D.M.RUDRAIAH " DHEEMANTA" Advocate, Chitradurga, Karnataka from Smt D.M. Girijamma Rudraiah; Dr. D.M.Shivakumar, & family members

Best Wishes to All the VSNA Members On the Occasion of 32nd Annual Veerashaiva Convention 2009

Lokesh Hebbani, Samhita Lokesh, Shreyas Lokesh & Vibhav Lokesh

Alpharetta, Georgia

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ALLAMA PRABHU Nikhil Shiva

I am a thirteen year old, 8th grade student of Clarendon Hills Middle School. Since an early age I have been active in the cultural activities of VSNA, Chicago.I have given performances in dance and music and recited vachanas. I am playing Basavanna's role in a play in the upcoming Convention. I play Piano and Saxophone also. - Nikhil

Clarendon Hills, Illinois

Allama Prabhu, 12th century Veerashaiva saint was a contemporary of Basavanna and Akka Mahadevi in the Shiva Bhakti movement of the kannada-speaking regions of Southern India. He was a temple drummer of Shimoga district of Karnataka. He belonged to a family of temple performers and an expert in playing a particular type of drum called maddale, his father was a dance teacher. Allama fell in love with a beautiful dancer called Kamalathe whom he married and lived a happy married life only for a short period as fate took her away due to illness. Due to the loss of his beloved wife Allama was grief stricken and wandered aimlessly until he came upon the saint Animisha (one without eyelids or the open eyed one) in a cave temple. The saint gave him a linga, the universal symbol of Hindu god Shiva and instantly Allama was enlightened and transformed into a seeker of spirituality. Allama’s pen name Guheshwara (Lord of caves) which he used in most of his poems is said to be a celebration of his experience in the cave temple. Allama Prabhu’s poetic style has been described as mystic and cryptic, rich in paradoxes and inversions staunchly against any form of symbolism, occult powers, and all his poems are non-sectarian and use straight forward language.

Allama died in Kadali town and it is said he became one with the linga. Look here, the legs are the two wheels; The body is a wagon Full of things Five men drive The wagon And one man is not like another Unless you ride it in full knowledge of its ways The axle will break O Lord of Caves

Akka Mahadevi Sachin Shiva

I am going to 4th grade at Prospect School in Clarendon Hills and I am 10 years old. I have performed on the stage in different programs of VSNA Chicago, like dance, vachana recital and drama. Basavanna has impressed me a lot and I am glad I get to enact his role in the upcoming Convention. I am also interested in music and play the Violin. - SACHIN

Hinsdale, Illinois Akka Mahadevi was the most prominent woman poet of 12th century, a saint and one of the “Trinity of Veerashaivinism”, the other two being Basavanna and Allama Prabhu. She lived between 1150-1175 AD and was born at Udutadi near Banavasi, Shikaripur taluk, Shimoga district. Her parents, Nirmalshetti and Sumati were great devotees of Lord Shiva. She was very beautiful CjªÀÅ

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and a great poet. At a very young age her immense faith in God was exhibited. A turning point occurred in the life of Mahadevi when she went to see the procession of king Kaushika. The king was taken away by her beauty and expressed his desire to her parents to marry her. For the sake of her parents she enters into a conditional marriage. When the king broke the condition she quits the palace. Suddenly a psychic Page 106


CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ conversion occurs in her. She leaves Udutadi, her mystic husband. Akka as she is dearly called parents and even the clothes she was wearing only spends her last days in Srishaila, Andhra Pradesh to be covered by long tufts of hair she possessed. and dies at the early age of twenty- five years by entering final divine union with Lord Mallikarjuna She heads towards Kalyana and reaches this far in a banana grove with a off place overcoming innumerable difficulties on the way. flash of light. At Kalyana she meets Basavanna and Allama Prabhu. Allama Prabhu puts many difficult and tricky questions to confirm her faith in God which beTTada mElondu maneya mADi she answers singularly intelligently and in a mrugagaLiganjidoDentayya charming manner and finally he will be convinced samudrada taDiyalli maneya mADi nore and he accepts Akka Mahadevi into Anubhava teregaLiganjidoDentayya Mantapa. santeya naDuve maneya mADi shabdakke Akka Mahadevi a born poet wrote about 430 nAchidoDentayya vachanas. She accepts Chenna Mallikarjuna as her chenna mallikArjuna dEva kELayya

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

WITH BEST COMPLIMENTS FOR 32nd Annual VSNA Conference From Drs. Krupa & Sharanabasava Rajur, Vinay & Naveen Andover, MA

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OUR VSNA GRADUATES Vaishak Amblee

Whitney M. Young Magnet High School Vaishak is a graduate of Whitney M. Young Magnet High School in Chicago. At Whitney Young, Vaishak was a member of National Honor Society, a co-head in Asian American Club, a division leader for the Mentors program, a Rush Hospital volunteer, and senior member of the Habitat for Humanity club. Vaishak was also a participant in the University of Chicago’s Collegiate Scholars Program, a highly selective three-year enrichment program for Chicago high school students that offers college classes, cultural and community service events, and internships at the University of Chicago. This fall, he will be attending the University of Illinois at Chicago,GPPA (Guaranteed Professional Programs Admissions) Program for Medicine. Chandramouli, Shruthi 2009 University of Chicago A Chicago-native, Shruthi will be graduating with an MBA from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, with concentrations in Strategy and Marketing. She will be moving to the city of brotherly love, Philadelphia, PA, where she will strategize the future of shelf-stable soups as an Associate Brand Manager. Shruthi is excited to move back east and explore a new city, although she will miss her Chitown. Prior to business school, Shruthi graduated from Northwestern University in 2004 with a BA in Economics and Psychology. After Northwestern, she moved to Washington D.C. where she worked for CRA International, an economic litigation consulting firm. In her spare time, Shruthi enjoys playing basketball, mentoring and tutoring, stepping, and bubble tea. Khajuri Amogh Gateway Senior High School I am a 2008 graduate from Gateway Senior High School in Monroeville, PA. I am currently enrolled in the Business School at Duquesne University. I completed my freshman year at college and I'm currently doing an internship at Bombardier Transportation in Pittsburgh, PA. I have been working there for the past couple years during the summer in the Health, Safety, & Environment Department. Throughout my high school, in addition to my academics, I participated in the Beta & Key Club, both of which involve volunteering activities. In addition, I played tennis, representing my high school team for all four years. Aside from this, I was involved in local community activities for the Indian youth organization at the S.V. Temple in Pittsburgh. My family and I have attended many VSNA conventions where I have participated and won several trophies. I also attend & participate in various activities for our local VSNA Pittsburgh Chapter. Murthy, Priya 2009

St. Christopher Medical College Luton, UK

Priya Graduated with an M.D. from St. Christopher Medical College, Luton, UK in May 2009. Priya is the daughter of Dr. G.S. Murthy, Chester VA. She also has an M.P.H. from George Washington University from Washington, D.C. Priya currently lives in Chicago, IL.

Nimbekai, Rekha 2009 Jacobi Medical Center, New York Post graduation in Pediatric Dentistry from Jacobi Medical Center, New York

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ Kishore, Chaitra 2009

William Fremd High School Chaitra Kishore is graduating from William Fremd High School. She is a National Merit Scholar, an AP Scholar with Distinction, and an Illinois State Scholar. Throughout high school, she was an editor of her school's yearbook, a member of the National Honors Society, and a member of the Quill and Scroll Journalism Society. Chaitra has been learning piano and classical Indian dance including Bhartanatyam, Mohini Attam, and Kuchipudi. She has performed and choreographed a variety of dances from classical to Bollywood styles at various school, community, and cultural events. In addition, she has actively volunteered at local hospitals and in her cultural community. Chaitra will be the attending the Honors College at the University of Illinois at Chicago on a pre-med track and will be majoring in Bioengineering. Shivakumar, Preeti 2009 DDS- Ohio State University Preeti graduated from the Ohio State University College of Dentistry on June 7, 2009 and ready to venture into the working world as a general Dentist. During the past 4 years she has been involved with different outreach programs. As a participant of Ohio Project, she went out to different under-served community clinics in Ohio to provide the much needed dental care. She has also participated in numerous “Give Kids a Smile” projects which go out to surrounding grade schools to do free dental screens, apply fluoride varnish, and teach children basic dental education to take care of themselves. In her free time, she volunteers for “Make A Wish program” as a wish grantor being the liaison between the family and the program. Prior to Dental School, Preeti did her undergraduate studies at the University of Illinois- Urbana/Champaign after graduating from Libertyville High School in Libertyville. Suresh, Sachin 2008 Waubonsie Valley High School Sachin Bangalore Suresh graduated from Waubonsie Valley High School with the class of 2008. He was honored with being both a 204 District and Illinois State Scholar. He was also part of the Spanish Honors Society and Tri-M Honors Society (Modern Music Masters). Sachin was co-chair of the AKKA youth committee as well as an active member of the VSNA youth committees during his high school years. He also volunteered his time at Rush Copley Hospital and at the BMW Championship for the PGA Tour. Sachin is currently attending the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for engineering and is planning on majoring in Computer Science. Anupama Topgi 2009 Chicago Medical School

Anupama Topgi of Palatine, Illinois, Graduated from Chicago Medical School with an M.D. She is venturing into the field with Residency in Pediatrics at Loyola University Medical Center Chicago.

Maya Niles North High School Maya is a graduate of Niles North High School,located in Skokie,IL. She has worked very hard through out the 4 years. She has been part of clubs and activities. She has been part of VSNA since she was a child and Kannada Kuta. She will be attending Oakton Community College in the fall for 2 years and will be planning to go to UIC or U of I after that. She is planning to major in Pyschology. CjªÀÅ

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________ We like to recognize the following families who have generously donated towards the success of 2009 convention!

Sunil, Sujatha, Naveen and Sonal Desai

Sandesh, Shruthi, Chandramouli, Ashwin, & Rajini

ªÀÄqÀPÉAiÀÄ ªÀiÁqÀĪÀqÉ ªÀÄuÉÚà ªÉÆzÀ®Ä; vÉÆqÀUÉAiÀÄ ªÀiÁqÀĪÀqÉ ºÉÆ£Éßà ªÉÆzÀ®Ä; ²ªÀ¥ÀxÀªÀ£ÀjªÀqÉ UÀÄgÀÄ¥ÀxÀªÉà ªÉÆzÀ®Ä; PÀÆqÀ®¸ÀAUÀzÉêÀgÀ£ÀjªÀqÉ ±ÀgÀtgÀ ¸ÀAUÀªÉà ªÉÆzÀ®Ä. -§¸ÀªÀtÚ Drs. Chandra Kumbar & Family Shreya ,Priya, Netha & Nandish Dhananjaya

Eshwar, Shilpa, Uma & Sachidananda Murthy

Bhavani, Danya, Sahana, Meghana and Manju Moodabagil

Does Meru look for virtue in a crow? Does the alchemic stone look for virtue in iron? And does the saint seek virtue in the worthless man? Does a sandal-tree look for virtue in Trees? And why should you, Kudala Sangama, all-Virtuous Linga, Look so for sin in me? Basavanna’s vachana as translated by Sri Shivamurthy Swamiji, Sirigere Drs. Arun & Veena Haleyur Family Ravi, Ambika, & Vaishak Amblee

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Raju, Vidu & Roshan Betkerur

Rhea, Rohan, Kiran & Rajeev Kumar

²ªÀaAvÉ ²ªÀeÁÕ£À«®èzÀ ªÀÄ£ÀÄdgÀÄ ¸ÀUÀtPÉÌ ¸Á¹gÀ ºÀļÀÄ ºÀÄlÖªÉ, zÉêÁ? PÁqÀ ªÀÄÈUÀªÉÇAzÁVgÀ¯ÁUÀzÉ, zÉêÁ? HgÀ ªÀÄÈUÀªÉÇAzÁVgÀ¯ÁUÀzÉ, ºÀgÀ£É? £ÀªÀÄä PÀÆqÀ® ¸ÀAUÀ£À ±ÀgÀtj®èzÀ HgÀÄ, zÉñÀ ªÀ£ÀªÁ¸À, £ÀgÀ«AzsÀå, PÁtÂgÀtÚ! §¸ÀªÀtÚ Dr. Nagabhushan Malakkala & Family

Mallikarjun & Rathna Nalawadi & Family

Go, and make friends with the righteous ones! But shun the company of the worthless ones! Whatever the snake may be, The poison is same; Avoid the fellowship of such as these. The friendship of those Who are not pure of heart Is hemlock, deadly bane, O Lord Kudala Sangama! Basavanna’s Vachana as translated by Sri Shivamurthy Swamiji, Sirigere

Mr. Virupax & Sarveshwari Reddy Arun & Rajeshwari Bommannavar

M¼ÀUÉ PÀÄn®, ºÉÆgÀUÉ «£ÀAiÀĪÁV ¨sÀPÀÛgɤ¹PÉÆA§ªÀgÀ §®è£ÉÆ®è£ÀAiÀiÁå °AUÀªÀÅ, CªÀgÀÄ ¸ÀvÀàxÀPÉÌ ¸À®ègÀÄ, ¸À®ègÀAiÀiÁå! M¼ÀºÉÆgÀUÉÆAzÁUÀzÀªÀjUÉ C½AiÀiÁ¸ÉzÉÆÃj ©Ã¸ÁqÀĪÀ£ÀªÀgÀ dUÀ¢Ã±À PÀÆqÀ®¸ÀAUÀªÀÄzÉêÁ. -§¸ÀªÀtÚ Mrs. Sharada Hulbanni

Kishore Anitha, Chaitra Eshwar and Chiranth

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CjªÀÅ Arivu July 3, 2009 _______________________________________________________________________________________

¸ÁAiÀÄ° ©ÃdªÉAzÀÄ ªÀÄtÚ°è ºÀƽzÀgÀÄ G¹gÀÄUÀlÖ° JAzÀÄ ªÉÄÃ¯É ¤ÃgÀÄ ©lÖgÀÄ £À®ÄV¹ ©qÀĪɣÉAzÀÄ ©¹®Ä ©¢ÝvÀÄ ªÀÄ®V¹ ©qÀĪɣÉAzÀÄ UÁ½ ¸ÀĽ¬ÄvÀÄ DZÉ FZÉ wgÀÄUÀzÀAvÉ £É®ªÉà PÁ®£ÀÄ PÀnÖºÁQvÀÄ K£ÉA¨É£ÀZÀÑjAiÀÄ? ©Ãd ¨É¼É¬ÄvÀÄ, ªÉƼÀPÉAiÉÆqɬÄvÀÄ ‘¨sÀÆd'ªÁVAiÉÄ ¤AwvÀÄ, vÀ£ÀUÁzÀ C¼À® vÉÆÃrPÉƼÀîzÉ ¯ÉÆÃPÀPÉÌ £É¼À® ¤ÃrvÀÄ, ±ÁgÀzÀ¸ÀR F±Á ¤Ã£É ¸ÁQë ¨É¼ÉªÀªÀjUÉ®è vÁ£Éà CzÀ±ÀðªÁ¬ÄvÀÄ. ..ElV FgÀtÚ

Channu & Tanuja Kambalyal & Family

B. & Kusuma Indusekar & Family

Nishita, Neelu, Keerthi & Natasha Kumar Meghana, Kavitha, Vijaya and Neel Kotrappa

He is a devotee who greets with folded hands Each devotee he meets: Your gentle speech is worth all counting of beads; Your gentle speech is worth all penances; True modesty is worth Sadashiva’s grace. Lord Kudala Sanga spurns those Who are not like this. Basavanna’s Vachana as translated by Sri Shivamurthy Swamiji, Sirigere

Drs. Sadanand & Rajeshwari Manoli Arjun Bangalore, Latha & Kruthika Mallikarjun

PÀ¯ÁåtªÉA§ ¥ÀætvÉAiÀÄ°è ¨sÀQÛgÀ¸ÀªÉA§ vÉ宪À£ÉgÉzÀÄ DZÁgÀªÉA§ §wÛAiÀÄ°è §¸ÀªÀtÚ£ÉA§ eÉÆåÃwAiÀÄ ªÀÄÄnÖ¸À®Ä, vÉƼÀV ¨É¼ÀUÀÄwÛzÀÄðzÀAiÀÄå ²ªÀ£À ¥ÀæPÁ±À| D ¨É¼ÀV£ÀƼÀUÉÆ¥ÀÅöàwzÀÄðzÀAiÀÄå C¸ÀASÁåvÀ ¨sÀPÀÛ ªÀĺÁUÀtAUÀ¼ÀÄ| ²ªÀ¨sÀPÀÛjzÀð PÉëÃvÀæ C«ªÀÄÄPÀÛ PÉëÃvÀæªÉA§ÄzÀÄ ºÀĹAiÉÄÃ? ²ªÀ¨sÀPÀÛjzÀð zÉñÀªÀÅ ¥ÁªÀ£ÀªÉA§ÄzÀÄ ºÀĹAiÉÄÃ? UÀĺÉñÀégÀ °AUÀzÀ°è J£Àß ¥ÀgÀªÀiÁgÁzsÀå ¸ÀAUÀ£À §¸ÀªÀtÚ£À PÀAqÀÄ §zÀÄQzÉ PÁuÁ, UÀĺÉñÀégÀ

Sachin, Nikhil, Veena & Prabhu Shiva

Jayaprakash and Indira Reddy CjªÀÅ

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EªÀ£ÁgÀªÀ, EªÀ£ÁgÀªÀ, EªÀ£ÁgÀªÀ£ÉAzɤ¸À¢gÀAiÀÄå, EªÀ £ÀªÀÄäªÀ, EªÀ £ÀªÀÄäªÀ, EªÀ £ÀªÀÄäªÀ£ÉAzɤ¸ÀAiÀiÁå. PÀÆqÀ® ¸ÀAUÀªÀÄzÉêÁ, ¤ªÀÄä ªÀÄ£ÉAiÀÄ ªÀÄUÀ£É¤¸ÀAiÀiÁå §¸ÀªÀtÚ

¯ÉÆÃPÀzÀ qÉÆAPÀ ¤ÃªÉÃPÉ wzÀÄÝ«j? ¤ªÀÄä ¤ªÀÄä vÀ£ÀĪÀ ¸ÀAvÉå¹PÉƽî; ¤ªÀÄä ¤ªÀÄä ªÀÄ£ÀªÀ ¸ÀAvÉå¹PÉƽî. £ÉgÀªÀÄ£ÉAiÀÄ zÀÄBRPÉÌ C¼ÀĪÀªÀgÀ ªÉÄZÀÑ PÀÆqÀ® ¸ÀAUÀªÀÄzÉêÀ!

Sundaresh & Sabitha Siddaiah

Mrs. Shailaja Uppin

§¸ÀªÀtÚ

Is the master of the house gone out, or is he in? Upon the threshold grasses sprout; The house is just a bowl of dust. Is the master of the house gone out, or is he in? When falsehood does infect your flesh and your heart is a sensuous mesh, The master of the house cannot be in, cannot be in, Oh, Lord Kudala Sangama Deva Basavanna’s Vachana as translated by Sri Shivamurthy Swamiji, Sirigere

Vijay & Latha Doshetty H.S. Jayaswamy, Eshaan and Uma Jayaswamy

J£Àß PÁAiÀĪÀ zÀArUÉAiÀÄ ªÀiÁqÀAiÀÄå; J£Àß ¹gÀªÀ ¸ÉÆÃgÉAiÀÄ ªÀiÁqÀAiÀÄå; J£Àß £ÀgÀªÀ vÀAwAiÀÄ ªÀiÁqÀAiÀÄå; J£Àß ¨ÉgÀ¼À PÀrØAiÀÄ ªÀiÁqÀAiÀÄå; §wÛøÀ gÁUÀªÀ ºÁqÀAiÀÄå; GgÀzÀ¯ÉÆwÛ¨Áj¸ÀÄ, PÀÆqÀ® ¸ÀAUÀªÀÄzÉêÁ §¸ÀªÀtÚ Chandrashekar & Shashikala Nimbal Family

Venkatesh Nagareddy & Family

The Sharana must have the constancy to say, I will not have another’s wealth; The Sharana must have the constancy to say, I will not have another’s wife; The Sharana must have the constancy to say, I will not have another god; The Sharana must have the constancy to say, Linga and Jangama are one; The Sharana must have the constancy to say, Prasada is the Truth; Lord Kudala Sangama disdains, such men as have no constancy Basavanna’s vachana as translated by Sri Shivamurthy Swamiji , Sirigere

If you should speak, your words should be pearls that are strung upon a thread. If you should speak, your words should be like lustre by the ruby shed. If you should speak, your words should be a crystal’s flash that cleaves the blue. If you should speak, great god must say ya, ya, that’s very true! But if your deed betrays your word, can Kudala Sangama care for you? Basavanna’s vachana as translated by Sri Shivamurthy Swamiji, Sirigere

Girish & Rekha Nimbekai Family

Drs. Suri Sharoff & Family CjªÀÅ

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Thanks to each one of our donors, where the measure of a convention depended on the esteemed sponsors who made VSNA 2009 Convention possible!

Sponsors Business Workshop

Chief Guest

Dr. Sunil & Sujata Desai [IL] Drs. Chandra & Deepa Kumbar [IN]

Dr. Sacchi & Uma Murthy[IL] Mr. Manjunatha & Bhavani Moodabagil [IL]

Banquet Dinner

Health Workshop

Mr. Nandish & Dr. Neetha Dhananjaya [IL]

Mr. Nandish & Dr. Neetha Dhananjaya [IL] Drs. Arun & Veena Haleyur [IL] Drs. Rajeev and Kiran Kumar [IL]

Key Note Speaker

Religious Workshop

Drs. Arun & Veena Haleyur [IL] Basava Abhimani (indirect sponsor) Basava Abhimani (indirect sponsor) Mr. Mallikarjun & Ratna Nalawadi [IL]

Mr. Ravi & Dr. Ambika Amblee [IL] Dr. Chandra & Rajini Mouli[IL]

Souvenir Bag

Souvenir Bag Inserts

Dr. Chandra & Rajini Mouli [IL]

Mr. Nandish & Dr. Neetha Dhananjaya [IL] Mr. Basavarajappa & Kusuma Indusekar [IL]

Dr. Chandra & Rajini Mouli [IL]

VSNA Game Show

Youth Competitions

Mr. Kishore Channabasaviah & Anita Kishore [IL]

Mr. Ravi & Dr. Ambika Amblee [IL] Mr. Channu & Tanuja Kambalyal [IL] Mr. Keerthi & Neelu Kumar [IL]

Yoga Workshop

Youth Retreat

Drs. Sadanand & Rajashri Manoli [WI]

Dr. Chandra & Rajini Mouli [IL] Mr. Raj & Vidu Betkerur [IL]

General Convention

Cultural Programs

Mr. Vijay & Latha Doshetty [IL] Mr. H.S. & Uma Jayaswamy [IL] Drs. Suri & Aruna Sharoff [OH]

Mr. Basavarajappa & Kusuma Indusekar [IL]

Donors of unpublished sponsorship category Dr. Guru & Rathna Bale [NJ] Dr. Arun & Rajeshwari Bommannavar [IL] Mr. Basavaraj & Kalpana Hiremath [NY] Mr. Vijay & Dr. Kavitha Kotrappa [S CA] Mr. Rudramuni & Hemalatha Majjigi [OH] Dr. Nagabushana Malakkla & Family [N CA] Mr. Arjun Bangalore & Latha Mallikarjuna [PA] Mr. Venktesh Nagareddy [TX] Mr. & Mrs. Chandra & Shashikala Nimbal (N CA) Mr. Anil & Bharathi Patil [NY] Drs. Prabhu Shivalingappa & Veena Prabhu [IL] Drs. G & Renuka Ramappa (FL)

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Mr. J P & Indira Reddy [IL] Mr. Virupaksha & Sarveswari Reddy [IL] Mr. Prashanth & Shobha Shekar [IL] Mr. B. M & Swarna Sundara [MI] Mr. Sundaresh & Sabitha Siddaiah [NJ] Members of Basava Samiti [Virginia Chapter] Members of Maryland Chapter Members of New York Chapter Members of Michigan Chapter Members of N California Chapter Members of Atlanta Chapter Members of Texas Chapter

VSNA

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VSNA Convention Trust Fund

Mr. Vijay & Dr. Kavitha Kotrappa [N CA] Mr. Sundaresh & Sabitha Siddaiah [NJ]

Souvenir Advertisements: Commemorative & Supplement Dr. C. B & Purnima Lokesh [GA] - Quarter page b/w Midwest Clinical Imaging [IL] - Full page color Xavier University [NY] - Full page color U Win Investments [IL] - Quarter page b/w Contract Health Services [IL] - Full page b/w Drs. Sharanbasava & Krupa Rajur [MA] - Full page b/w Dr. D.M. Shivakumar & Family, [KY] - Half page b/w Suburban Pulmonary & Sleep Associates, [IL] - Full page b/w Mr. Kishore Channabasaviah & Anita Kishore, [IL] - Half Page b/w Dr. Ravi & Shailaja Topgi, [IL] - Half page color Mr. Basavaraj & Veena Hullur, [IL] - Half page b/w Mr. Naga D. & Lokeshwari Manohar, [MI] - Half page color Drs. Sadanand & Rajashri Manoli [WI] – Quarter page b/w Mr. Lokesh & Samhita Hebbani, [GA] - Half page b/w; Atlanta Chapter – Half page b/w Mr. Nandish & Neetha Dhananjaya [IL] – Half page color Dr. Annapur & Anasuya Shivakumar – Half page color Dr. Lingaraju & Uma Lingaraju – [NY] - Half page color Virupannavar and Ramachandra Families [IL] – Full page color Navika – North America Vishwa Kannada Association – Quarter page b/w Ashyana Banquets (IL) – Full page b/w; Toronto Chapter – Half page color Chicago Home Healthcare (IL) – Full page b/w Ultimate Home Healthcare (IL) – Quarter page b/w Shiva Maganahalli (N CA) – Full page b/w; Fifth Avenue Events - Half page color

Sponsorship Levels Business Workshop Chief Guest Banquet Dinner Saturday Feast Health Workshop Key Note Speaker Souvenir Bag Sunday Boxed Breakfast Youth Retreat

$3000 $2500 $2000 $2000 $1000 $1000 $1000 $1000 $1000

Cultural Programs Religious Workshop Souvenir Bag Inserts VSNA Game Show Yoga Workshop Youth Competitions General Convention Friendly Patrons Well Wishers

$500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $300 $100 $50

eÁ®UÁgÀ£ÉƧâ d®ªÀ ºÉÆPÀÄÌ ±ÉÆâü¹ ºÀÄ®Ä ¥ÁætÂAiÀÄ PÉÆAzÀÄ £À°£À°zÁqÀĪÀ, vÀ£Àß ªÀÄ£ÉAiÀįÉÆAzÀÄ ²±ÀÄ ¸ÀvÀÛqÉ CzÀPÉ ªÀÄgÀÄUÀĪÀAvÉ CªÀ£ÉÃPÉ ªÀÄgÀÄUÀ£ÀÄ? D®UÁgÀ£À zÀÄBR dUÀPÉÌ®è £ÀUÉUÉqÉ, EzÀÄ PÁgÀt ZÉ£ÀߪÀÄ°èPÁdÄð£À£À ¨sÀPÀÛ£ÁVzÀÄÝ, fêÀ»A¸ÉAiÀÄ ªÀiÁqÀĪÀ ªÀiÁ¢UÀgÀ£ÉãÉA¨É£ÀAiÀiÁå? CjªÀÅ

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BEST COMPLIMENTS To 32nd VSNA Annual Convention FROM CONTRACT HEALTH SERVICE CORPORATION

22727 S. 80th Ave. Frankfort, IL 60423 773-350-3579

PRESIDENT: BANGALORE SACHIDANANDA MURTHY VICE PRESIDENT: UMA S. MURTHY

Rush Nursing Agency Student Placement Service Vice President: Shilpa Murthy Vice President: Eshwar Murthy

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Best Compliments To nd 32 Annual VSNA Conference ¯Éøɤ¹PÉÆAqÀÄ LzÀÄ ¢£À §zÀÄQzÀgÉãÀÄ? ¯Éøɤ¹PÉÆAqÀÄ £Á®ÄÌ ¢£À §zÀÄQzÀgÉãÀÄ? ¯Éøɤ¹PÉÆAqÀÄ ªÀÄÆgÀÄ ¢£À §zÀÄQzÀgÉãÀÄ? ¯Éøɤ¹PÉÆAqÀÄ JgÀqÀÄ ¢£À §zÀÄQzÀgÉãÀÄ? PÀÆqÀ® ¸ÀAUÀ£À ±ÀgÀtgÀ ªÀZÀ£ÀzÀ°è ¯Éøɤ¹PÉÆAqÀÄ MAzÀÄ ¢£À §zÀÄQzÀgÉ ¸ÁPÀÄ

ªÀiÁr ªÀiÁr PÉlÖgÀÄ, ªÀÄ£À«®èzÉ ¤Ãr ¤Ãr PÉlÖgÀÄ, ¤d«®èzÉ ªÀiÁqÀĪÀ ¤ÃqÀĪÀ ¤dUÀÄtªÀżÀîqÉ PÀÆrPÉÆA§ £ÀªÀÄä PÀÆqÀ® ¸ÀAUÀªÀÄzÉêÀ ¸ÀAUÀªÀÄzÉêÀ ! From

DR.NAGABHUSHANA MALAKKLA AND FAMILY CjªÀÅ

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Congratulations to VSNA on the Celebration of It’s 32nd Anniversary Shrishail, Meenakshi, Mallik & Manisha Virupannavar FOR ALL OF YOUR REAL ESTATE AND MORTGAGE SERVICE (RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, INVESTMENT PROPERTIES AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT)

CONTACT MR. SHRISHAIL VIRUPANNAVAR ( FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONAL SERVING ALL CHICAGOLAND AREA AND RELOCATION SPECIALIST) RAAVSTAR INC. (A REAL ESTATE CORP.)

847-208-7318 [Cell] 630630-527527-1271 [Home Office, Naperville, IL]

E-Mail : shrivirup@yahoo.com

vÀªÀĸÉÆà ªÀiÁ eÉÆåÃwUÀðªÀÄAiÀiÁ, ªÀÄÈvÉÆåÃgï ªÀiÁ CªÀÄÈvÀA UÀªÀÄAiÀiÁ, NA ±ÁAwB ±ÁAwB ±ÁAwB Best Wishes to VSNA on the Occasion of it’s 32nd Annual Convention KAJEKAR RAMACHANDRA & MARISOL & ANJALI Lake Zurich, Illinois

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ARIVU  

2009 VSNA Convention Souvenir.