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E : matthieu.begoghina@gmail.com T : +61 466 158 330 W : http://bematthieu.com/

MATTHIEU BEGOGHINA PORTFOLIO


About Asia has always fascinated me ever since I was a kid and, as soon as I got my Master’s Degree in France, I decided to venture to this side of the world. In 2013, I got an opportunity to work in the Philippines in a young, local architecture firm. Working there was a challenging yet enlightening experience. I had to adapt to a different culture and learn another way of practicing architecture. What I’ve also learned is that even with all the constraints brought by physical and economic factors, Filipinos are resilient and innovative in their own way. That really brought meaning to my work. I drove myself and my team to produce a more humanistic architecture, from a mobile library that helps illiterate street children and promote the importance of public spaces, to a bridge that greatly improves the mobility in the congested capital region. I’ve also became part of the first architecture festival of the country to share this experience. My time in the Philippines was full of opportunities to improve the quality of life of the people and this is what truly matters to me. I moved to Australia early last year with my partner who is studying her Master in Urban Design, and I am currently tutoring architecture students in the same university. I am now on the look for a firm to continue to develop my knowledge and skills, bringing in with me my past five years of experience.


Journey by the Bay Project Type

Masterplan and Bridge proposal for Manila, Philippines Competition Entry, Finalist

Status

Book Cover of Blueprints for 2050, A Visioning exercise for the Philippines Featured in Archinect XXL

Position

Team Leader

Responsibilities Concept Masterplan Presentation Renders

Team Members

Christian Dinglasan Raymond Forcado

Finalist + Book Cover


This page: Journey by the Bay, bridge crossing Manila Bay [Role: final post-process; Render by: Christian Dinglasan]


Manila 2016 We all know Manila for different reasons, but the ones that majority shares are negative. Today, Manila is known for its lack of affordable housing and vast areas of informal settlements, inefficient public transportation system that leads to an average travel time of 80min per trip, vulnerability to natural disasters such as flooding and earthquake, and the most prevailing of it all, the legendary traffic congestion voted to be the worst on earth. Manila 2030 Nevertheless, with the help of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), the Metro Manila Dream Plan for 2030 is created to improve Metro Manila’s interlinked problems in transportation, land use and environment. In the bigger scale, the Dream Plan emphasizes the development of new economic centers North and South of Metro Manila, by moving the cargo-handling function of Manila’s port to Batangas and Subic and transferring NAIA to Cavite. On the other hand, at the scale of Metro Manila, the Dream Plan proposes to redevelop the road network in a “ladder form” and to complete the missing link between NLEX and SLEX. A North-South

Commuter Rail will be developed from Malolos to Calamba together with a Mega Manila Subway between San Jose Del Monte and Dasmariñas. However, considering the projected population of Metro Manila is expected to increase by 35% by 2030 and almost double by 2050, this Dream Plan doesn’t seem to be enough. Furthermore, looking at the historical urban growth of Metro Manila and its growth rate averaging 800% every 50 years, limiting the expansion along the North and the South inhibits the future development of the capital. As we take a look to San Francisco and its Bay, we can see an undeniable similarity in conditions with Manila. Yet, San Francisco developed itself around the Bay and is now famous for opposite reasons: its Victorian Housing, its Cable Car, Silicon Valley and the Golden Gate. Why not get inspired by the development of San Francisco and imagine how Metro Manila could evolve? Why not use our environment as an asset and develop West around Manila Bay? Manila 2050 To not make the same mistakes, the first step would be the creation of the backbone of transpor-


Opposite page: Presentation Slides [Role: Concept + Layout] This page: Journey by the Bay, bridge crossing Manila Bay [Role: final post-process; Render by: Christian Dinglasan]


tation around Manila Bay. This backbone would be composed of a Highway and a High Speed Train that would link the different cities. Manila, the new Airport, Naic, Corregidor, Balanga, Hermosa and Malolos would be closely connected with the loop around the Bay taking only one hour. By creating a direct link between Bataan and Cavite, the highway would be the perfect opportunity to create a bypass connecting North and South while avoiding Manila. The Backbone would accelerate the development of satellites cities and, at the same time, emphasizing the polycentric development encouraged by JICA. These cities would be able to host some functions of Manila, attracting BPOs, universities and even government offices. With its functions scattered in the nearby cities, Manila will be able to regenerate itself without compromising its development. In this setting, our project will focus on the link between Bataan and Cavite, on the bridge creating our Journey by the Bay. This link will connect the two sides of Manila Bay with a 22km long bridge, passing through the island of Corregidor. For the concept of the Bridge, we used its context as basis: the relation with the mountains, the skyline of Manila that the bridge is facing and the historical relationship with the sea which is particularly important in that area.

These elements relate to each other in matter of structure, direction and composition. While the perception of the boats keeps on evolving following the will of the sea, the mountains play with light and shadows to emphasize depth and the Skyline defines a new relationship, almost hierarchical, between the buildings. We developed the bridge with these considerations in mind. First, different structures were scattered along the span. Each of these structures develop their own variations like Galleons traveling along the bay. Then, the size of the structures is adjusted around Corregidor as we want the island to be the focal point in that area. To counterbalance that action and to emphasize its relationship with the surrounding mountains, we developed the part of the bridge next to Cavite to be more vertical. We added a tower, a revisited version of a lighthouse, emphasizing the historical relationship of the Filipinos to the sea while symbolizing guidance for the years to come. The refined version highlights this variation of towers, this collection of individualities, like a mirrored version of the skyline on the other side of the bay.


Opposite page: Your Journey by the Bay [Role: design + render] This page: Bridge over Manila Bay [Role: design + render]


The Outlets Project Type

Retail Outdoor Development in Lima, Batangas, Philippines. 32,000sqm Under Construction

Position

Team Leader

Responsibilities

Concept Masterplan Presentation Coordination Construction Drawings

Team Members

Christian Dinglasan Joanna Szadkowska Raymond John Tomas Richelle Estadilla Bryan Morelos Angeli Marzan Patricia Tobias

Under Construction


This image: Aerial View [Role: design + render]


The Playground Option 1

The Playground is the first of the two proposals for a retail development in Lima, Batangas. As asked by our client, a football field following the international standards of FIFA need to be included. This football field became the focal point of our proposals. In this first option centering the development on the retail experience, two possible locations stood out, which one with its own advantage and disadvantage. Instead of choosing one, we decided to propose a small field next to the main road that could also be used by the shops for demo, and one big field at the back for professionals, making the development entertaining for everyone. The location of these fields led to the creation of our main avenue that also frames the nearby Mt Makiling. The outlets spread on each side on this main spine, following an inner loop inside of the development. To contrast with the linearity of the project, the proposed design of the buildings brings a more active elevation by integrating a second level, matching the elevation of nearby structures. A forest of canopies grow on the open areas to provide shades and rain protection along the development.

Top: Street View [Render by: Christian Dinglasan] Middle: Section + Schemes [Role: concept + layout] This image: Aerial View [Role: design + render]


The Arena Option 2

In this second option, the football field itself became the central part of our proposal. The planning process was inverted, starting from a plain block and then subtracting instead of adding. The site is divided into an orthogonal grid of 3x3 clusters, emptying the middle one for the field. Each cluster is slightly reshaped to create a more interesting composition and to also provide a small field in the development. Some internal streets are added inside of the clusters, protected by a colored canopy. The color varies for each cluster, that would also represent the segregation of the shops inside of the development. To really give emphasis to the football field, the area was depressed, allowing the creation of bleachers on both side, while making it more visible from the circulation. We proposed to add an Arena, a second floor overlooking the field while giving an iconic feature to the project. This second floor would host some additional bleachers and the different restaurants of the development.

Top: Street View [Render by: Christian Dinglasan] Middle: Section + Schemes [Role: concept + layout] This image: Aerial View [Role: design + render]


The Outlets

Based on option 1 The final masterplan was based on the first option, creating a main avenue on the middle of the development that leads to the two football fields. A lower ground floor was developed on the left part, leading to some event areas surrounded by restaurants. The design of the buildings was redeveloped based on the comments of the client, with a play of wood and concrete, bringing a warmer feeling for the retail experience.

We spent a lot of time on the design and scale of the streets. We took inspiration from older streetscapes around the world to carefully dimension our street, allowing the creation of a peaceful human experience. The project was divided into 3 phases of construction, with the first one actually on-going. It is scheduled to fully open by end of 2019.


This image: Street View [Role: Design + Render]


This image: Master Development Plan [Role: design + grid layout + drafting]

This image: Block V Section Drawing [Role: design + internal layout + grid layout + drafting]


This image: Typical Ducting Detail [Role: drafting]

This image: Refrigerant Pipe Detail [Role: drafting]

This image: Block G Floor Plan [Role: design + grid layout + drafting]


Omni Gardens Project Type

High-End Residential Tower in Binondo, Manila, Philippines 32,000 sqm

Position

Team Leader

Responsibilities

Concept Renders Presentation Design Development Construction Drawings

Team Members

Ricardo Alina Isabella Pineda Rochelle Ong Christian Dinglasan Raymond Forcado


This page: Living Room [Role: design, Render: Christian Dinglasan]


Binondo is one of the oldest districts in Manila and is particularly known for being the world’s oldest Chinatown. Between Spanish, British and American invasions, Binondo was destroyed and rebuilt multiple times over the centuries, and only few traces of the history of the place are found within the district. Designing a building located along the main street of Binondo, Ongpin Street, is also making us think about the heavy history that took place in this location and how we could develop a building that embraces its root in the local culture and also helps strengthening the identity of the surrounding neighborhood. Binondo’s most successful time was during the 40s with many of the main entertainments of the

city taking place along Ongpin Street. We decided to pay homage to this era by creating a building that would, on its lower floors, redevelops a contemporary interpretation of this type of Art Deco buildings that were composing the street. The building itself is a 40-storey high-end residential tower with a really small street frontage of about 10m long. The whole site is really small and has an odd shape so the process was really intricate, going back and forth between the different engineers and us. It took many months to set up a base core and column location, that still had to evolve along the course of the project based on the existing conditions.


Opposite page: Amenities Floor Plan [Role: design + render] This image: Exterior View [Role: design + render]


This page: Cross Section [Role: drafting]


This page: Front Elevation [Role: drafting]


This page: Unit Floor Plan (38th Floor) [Role: drafting]


This drawing: Lobby Details [Role: drafting]

This drawing: Wall Section [Role: drafting]

This drawing: Stair Details [Role: drafting]


Urban Block Project Type

Mixed-Used proposal in Bonifacio Global City, Manila, Philippines 96,000 sqm Finalist of WAF 2015

Position

Team Leader

Responsibilities Concept Renders Presentation Video

Team Members William Ti Aileen See Royce Nicdao

Finalist WAF 2015


This page: Urban Block as a new common ground [Role: design + render]


What is mixed-use? We tend to define mixed-use as a building which is hosting multiple uses. Retail on the lower floors, offices in the middle, condominiums on top. But even with this kind of buildings, the uses are predefined. The mixed-use lost its flexibility. At the same time, retail is evolving. What were before small shops scattered around the city can now spread on multiple floors. Offices also are changing. Their scale is varying from small shared space for a startup to sizes that can compete with entire malls. How can we provide a space that can accommodate this difference in needs? More importantly, how can the space we provide stay relevant over time? From these questions, we started to look for a form that could accommodate such a flexibility. We looked around us and we saw that most of the building in the area are fighting for height. If we want our building to be successful as a mixed-use development, it needs to stand out from the crowd, to draw people to it. Then the answer came, almost too simple. Standing out by being simple. After a lot of iterations, we design our project as a simple cube. This simple shape would ensure its uniqueness in the area, it would be friendlier to surrounding buildings by minimizing its vertical footprint and the big floorplates would allow a high flexibility.

The whole project revolves around the idea that almost every floor could evolve. You could find an office spreading on 2 floors of building, one floor being half open spaces, one other floor being a mixed of small offices, retails and restaurants. Even the parking could host some games or events at night, when the space is less used. We expect that the mixed-use would be like a gradient inside of the building, with most retails on the lower floors and most of the offices on the top floors, but with more interesting intermediate levels. The building would almost act like a small city. To sustain such a big floorplate, the building develops a central atrium that runs from the roof deck to the parking floors. We envision this atrium not just a way to bring light, but as a lively space that also connect the different floors. It is a meeting spot where people could take a break in cafÊs, restaurants and recreational areas. The façade is composed of an inner layer of insulated glass and an outer layer of ETFE, that would allow the regulation of sunlight. Some parts of the façade are more open to provide additional open spaces inside of the building. The roof deck of the building is envisioned as a recreational area. Designing this roof as a park would not only provide people an alternative area to have a break, a picnic or a stroll, but it would also provide a extended garden for the people living in the surrounding buildings.


Opposite page: Aerial View [Role: design + render] This image: Atrium [By: Fernando Cunanan]


Ground floor

Second floor

Parking floor with Basketball court

Parking floor with commercial spaces


Typical floor option with only1 tenant

Typical floor option with open spaces

Typical floor option with inner circulation

Roof deck

This image: Street View [Role: design + render]


Courtyard City Project Type

Masterplan and Mixed use Development in Beijing, China Competition Entry, Shortlisted

Position

Team Leader

Responsibilities Concept Masterplan Presentation

Team Members

Audrey Lopez Fernando Cunanan Interns 2016

Conservation Area Hutongs within Unprotected Hutongs

Shortlisted

50%

OF THE HUTONGS

have an undetermined future


As we start retracing the story of Hutongs, we can find what a typical layout looked like.

China as one of the earliest civilization of the world, hosted an undeniably unique traditional architecture, a reflection of the country’s colorful history and culture. Notable as the world’s second biggest economy and the world’s most populous state, China despite its fast modernization has able to keep its intangible and built heritage and one of these are the Hutongs. The Hutongs are narrow alleys originally formed through the divisions among courtyard houses that surrounded the Forbidden City. Over the years, the Hutongs and Courtyard Houses have become the dwelling of Chinese culture. Even contemporary Chinatowns all over the world have a commonality recognized with replicating the idea of the hutongs and, to some extent, the courtyards. Beijingers have been saying: Today, the single family house has became a community; the courtyard house evolved into a courtyard building.

“If there are no more Hutongs, there will be no more Beijing.” The conservation of the Hutongs is essential to preserve the authentic Chinese culture and history but only half is under conservation area. To be able to truly keep the Hutongs relevant with contemporary times, we believe in regenerating and integrating new ideas to create a more interesting perspective on the Hutongs and the culture it gave birth to.

The idea is to bring back the courtyards and give them to the community; to open up and revive the now closed and crowded layout of the Hutong; and to create a network of public spaces that will give a new ground for the community.

It is crucial in developing such an idea that the essence of the Hutong is kept intact. It is also important that we are able to highlight the Hutongs as a contemporary space for Beijing today. The selected site is found within the second ring-road of Beijing at about 2 km from Tiananmen Square. The site has been irremediably altered due to the construction of new developments and infrastructures. Despite these alterations, some typical Siheyuans are still distinguishable against the newer developments. Historically, the Siheyuans were designed and built to house a single family. Over time, many Siheyuans were converted to house multiple families, leading to today’s overpopulation in residential courtyards. The single-family house has turned itself into its very own community; the courtyard house evolved into a courtyard building. Throughout this changing process, people have forgotten that Hutongs are actually a big part of the Chinese culture and history and that a courtyard can be a nice place to live in.


Proposed Masterplan [Role: layout + render]

Proposed Masterplan [Role: layout + render]

This leads us to the following questions about the future of the Hutongs beyond their established but diminishing influence. What if courtyards become part of neighbors’ everyday life? What if we could show a different point of view on the old Beijing? Our idea is to bring back the courtyards to the community. We plan to open the closed and crowded layout of the Hutong, to create a network of public spaces that will introduce a new common ground for the community and to re-envision the Hutong as a whole, as a Courtyard City.

In order to not make these interventions isolated and limited to specific areas, we decided to link each space. This way, the regeneration can radiate between public spaces, affecting more areas for revitalization. We decided to use these links as the new defining element of the area and to literally give a new perspective of the Hutongs. Instead of creating typical enclosed alleys, our idea is to create an elevated walkway as a way to emphasize the regeneration process. This way, the people can get a new experience of the Hutongs and literally broaden their perspectives.

To apply these concepts to our site, we first needed to examine the existing layout to identify the boundaries of the properties of the whole study area. Based on an aerial photograph, we were able to identify the Siheyuans from the other buildings and from there, we selected about fifteen courtyards spread out in the study area to be accessible as public space. The selected areas were based on each Siheyuan’s location, size and proximity to institutional and educational buildings.

These elevated walkways, dubbed as the “Silk Road” of the development, weaves as a continuous link. It will spread out along the entire network, allowing the people to appreciate the Hutongs on a higher ground level. By using the public courtyards as nodes of the pedestrian network, we ensure a high connectivity and visibility of the whole project along with opening the crowded layout of Hutongs.


Proposed Masterplan [Role: layout + render]

Proposed Masterplan [Role: layout + render]

Commercial Courtyards

Located near big axes or with high visibility

RETAIL

RESTAURANT

GARDEN AREA

WATER FEATURE

RESTAURANT

RETAIL

Educational Courtyards

Located next to institutions and public buildings

LIBRARY

COMPUTER LAB

OUTDOOR STUDY

PLAYROOMS

The commercial courtyard is part of the Visibility Projects, intended to be attractive from around Beijing.

STUDENT LOUNGE

The educational courtyard is part of the Awareness Projects, intended to inspire the younger generation.

Neighborhood Courtyards

Small and quiet, located on the inner parts of the Hutong

Residential Courtyards

Private and shared by the people living around

GREENHOUSE

CONFERENCE CENTER

RESIDENTIAL UNITS

RESIDENTIAL UNITS

PLAYGROUND

MARKET AREA

COMMUNAL KITCHEN

COMMUNAL TOILET

FITNESS GYM

COMMUNITY CENTER

RESIDENTIAL UNITS

RESIDENTIAL UNITS

The neighborhood courtyard is part of the Sociability Project, intended to promote unity among different generations in the community.

The residential courtyard is part of the Preservation Project, intended to uphold privacy among residents.


Supreme Court Project Type

New Supreme Court for Manila, Philippines 30,000 sqm Competition entry, Shortlisted

Position

Team Leader

Responsibilities Concept Masterplan Presentation Base Renders Video

Team Members

William Ti Fernando Cunanan Arnel Anonuevo Miguel Lim Christian Dinglasan Arianna Rodriguez Trishia Cruz Audrey Lopez

Shortlisted


SYMBOL

ORDER/ STRUCTURE

ACCESS/ CONNECTION

courtyard

king’s court

court

a court open to the sky, especially one enclosed on all four sides.

enclosed courtyards where disputes are adjudicated

a place where justice is administered

This image: Exterior View [By: Christian Dinglasan]


What makes a great building an icon? It’s not just the architecture. It’s the way it relates to its surroundings and interacts with the people, the memories it creates, and the ideas and actions that it inspires.

Domes have historically served as symbols of authority since Roman times. Authority, devoid of raw brute power, but empowered by humanist wisdom and rational thought. We have reconstructed the dome to be symbolic of our archipelagic nation by designing a series of connected domes that would create a truly striking and unforgettable structure. Each dome houses an atrium that serves a division of the Supreme Court. These domes are then linked by

a main court that serves as a connecting element, a separation barrier, and an organizing space. In planning the Supreme Court, we have traced the history of courthouses, to lords’ courts and to courtyards, and used this memory and identity of an open public square as the main organizing system for spaces.

Top: Scheme [Role: research + design] This image: Aerial View [By: Miguel Lim]


What makes a great building an icon?

These courts are defined by walls which are currently the strongest physical features of the site and its neighborhood. We have used this harsh and dividing element and reimagined it as a connecting feature instead of a barrier. The articulated walls come together to create the courtyards that connect the people inside the Supreme Court. They also form the Justices Path which connects the residential and commercial halves of Barangay Pinagsama and finally make it into a truly united community.

The Supreme Court Complex is not simply about architecture or even the court itself. It is a representation of justice and the law that defines who we are as a people, and how we are as a society – our values, passions, and goals. We have always been a compassionate and richly diverse people. We strive to express ourselves and connect with each other. The Supreme Court should uplift the community by healing the slashing barriers that divide it. This is an idea so simple, coherent, and inevasible, that one could hardly imagine any another rational alternative.

The Supreme Court has allowed all these ideas to come together to create a truly iconic landmark with an incredible silhouette. As these ideas expand to inspire the city and the nation in the very public endeavor of nation-building and active citizenry in the coming decades, that is something we can truly look forward to.

We have reimagined the Supreme Court as a uniquely Filipino icon. It is a structure that presents authority, a reflection of justice and the law tempered by wisdom and compassion. It is the gentle Filipino – an icon singular in its simplicity, enriched by its diversity, unbridled in its purpose, with which we seek to redefine the future.

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Sustainability is achieved within the site and the structures, through a holistic approach which integrates the ecology and landscape, water and energy systems, and building design and technology. This process aims to foster a mutually beneficial relationship between the site, its functions and the people it caters to, through a design that ties together the landscape, the site, the infrastructure, the architecture and the community.

ER

ME

A B L E PAVI

NG

WATER REDUCTION

LOW FLOW VS TRADITIONAL FIXTURES FAUCETS

TOILETS

URINALS

87 %

59 %

32 %

2L vs 15L/min

4.9L vs 12L/flush

1.5L vs 2.2L/flush

GREYWATER RECYCLING GREYWATER TANK

RAIN WATER TANK

This image: Schematic Section [Role: Concept]


507 sqm 31 employees 457 sqm 76 employees

PANTRY 5 STORAGE FOR LEGAL DOCUMENT 9 RECORDS ROOM 11

JUDICIAL RECORDS OFFICE

JUDICIAL RECORDS OFFICE

CALENDAR DIVISION

AGENDA STAFF

PANTRY

7

0

35

22

RECEIVING AREA RECORDS ROOM

0

00

SECURITY SECTION

CHAMBER OF THE ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

50

CR

00

50

33

587 sqm

507 SQM

Adjudication GAS STO Other

CAFE

0

139 sqm

90 sqm

1

COURTYARD

ACCESS

Visitors Employees Justices

50 SQM

767 SQM

480 sqm

57 SQM

[ OCA - FSQMO ] FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE

5

[ LIB ] LIBRARY SERVICES

289 sqm

977 SQM

AUDITORIUM 500 SEATER

855 SQM

2733

7

976 sqm

0 1700

1034

991 SQM

5

286 sqm

6

69

[ OCA ] LEGAL OFFICE

CR

[ HOJ ] OFFICE OF HALLS OF JUSTICE

[ OCA - OAS ] OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

232 sqm

66 SQM

96 SQM

4433

[ PHILJA ] ACADEMIC AFFAIRS OFFICE

WORKSHOP TRAINING ROOM

(DIVISION HEARING) 214 SQM

325 SQM

69 sqm

17000

2737

412 sqm

CR 38 sqm

32 SQM

231 SQM

FOODCOURT

CR

[ MDS ] MEDICAL AND DENTAL SERVICES

88 sqm

SOCIETY FOR JUDICIAL EXCELLENCE

INEGRITAS

(DIVISION HEARING)

SERVITATUM

CR

Adjudication GAS STO Other

0

[ PHILJA ] FINANCE OFFICE

[ PHILJA ] ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE

CR

53 SQM

175 SQM

VERUM

338 SQM

SPACES

1050

5

59 SQM

(DIVISION HEARING) 204 SQM

TRAINING CENTER 225 PAX

210 sqm

[ JBC ] JUDICIAL AND BAR COUNCIL

32

47

50 sqm

LEGEND

COURTYARD

0

42 sqm

1500

86

COURTYARD

ONE STOP [ PMO ] SHOP PROGRAM MANAGEMENT OFFICE 40 sqm

RECEIVING AND BANK INFORMATION AREA

87

18

CR 36 sqm

114 SQM

8500

SECURITY ROOM

00

60

0

Visitors Employees Justices

600 sqm

FUNCTION ROOM

5000

3

35

19

INTERNAL AUDIT SERVICE

00

23

ACCESS

[ FMBO ] FISCAL MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OFFICE

535 SQM

0

2050

18000

0

00

36

216 sqm

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

1550

118 sqm

50 SQM

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

5000

DAYCARE

[ PIO ] PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICE

COURTYARD

43 sqm

00

30

0

00

24

8500

6

93

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

512 SQM

0

0

3550

LEGEND SPACES

59 sqm

19

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

PRIVATE LOUNGE

50 sqm

1324 sqm

COURTYARD

54

CR

COURTYARD

[ OAS ] OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

2200

0

64

50 SQM

58 SQM

43 sqm

209 sqm

DIVISION COC FIRST DIVISION 299 sqm

COURTYARD

1700

PRIVATE LOUNGE

DIVISION COC SECOND DIVISION

00

30

0

00

0

00

[ COC ] CLERK OF COURT EN BANC

CR 58 sqm

5000

3000 DIVISION COC THIRD DIVISION 192 sqm

00

50 SQM

0

0

0

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

0

50 sqm

11

COURTYARD

512 SQM

COURTYARD

10

523 sqm 31 employees

1200

0

00

12

14 SQM

1200

457 sqm

00

21

523 SQM

5000

[ JRO ] JUDICIAL RECORDS OFFICE

CHAMBER OF THE ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORAL TRIBUNAL

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

8500

30 slots

CR

SECURITY SECTION

2

0

00

29

JUSTICES PARKING

00

90 00

50

PANTRY

RECEIVING AREA

8000 3188

CLERK OF COURT EN BANC

ADJUDICATION ROOM

ROLLO RECEIVING ROOM

00 80

PRESEDENTIAL ELECTORIAL TRIBUNAL

587 sqm 102 employees

3948

2

43

29

ROLLO RECEIVING ROOM

OFFICE FOR THE HEAD OF STAFF

PROMULGATION AND RELEASE DIVISION

00 80

RECORDS CONTROL & CASE MANAGEMENT DIVISION

OFFICE FOR THE HEAD OF STAFF RECORDS ROOM

CUBICLES FOR THE STAFF

MINUTES STAFF

DOCKET DIVISION

CUBICLES FOR THE STAFF

ADJUDICATION SECTION

N

ATTORNEYS POOL

01

29

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

STORAGE PANTRY

RECORDS ROOM CONFERENCE ROOM

CLERK OF COURT EN BANC

CONFERENCE ROOM

STENOGRAPHERS POOL

EN BANC RECORD DIVISION

[ OCA ] COURT MANAGEMENT OFFICE

[ DCA ] OFFICE OF THE JURIS CONSULT

770 sqm

[ SQMCLEO ] OFFICE OF THE EXECUTIVE OFFICER

309 SQM

226 SQM

1214

6

6

1214

21930

3000

49084

12146

21930

3000

21329

0

Ground Floor Plan

27755

5 10

20

12146

50m

First Floor Plan


OFFICE FOR THE HEAD OF STAFF

RESTROOM

770 sqm 31 employees

CUBICLES FOR THE STAFF

N

RECORDS ROOM SECURITY SECTION ROLLO RECEIVING

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

ADJUDICATION ROOM

OFFICE FOR THE HEAD OF STAFF

ROOM

N

RECEIVING AREA SECURITY SECTION

RECEIVING AREA

CHAMBER OF THE ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORAL TRIBUNAL CUBICLES FOR THE STAFF

3188

0

35

22

00

0 29

5000

5000

14 SQM

1200

COURTYARD

0

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

50 SQM

0

1200

50 SQM

OFFICE OF THE BAR CONFIDANT

523 SQM

50 COURTYARD

512 SQM

OFFICE OF THE BAR CONFIDANT (BAR)

243 sqm 41 employees

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

00

14 SQM

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

BAR EXAMINATION DIVISION

8000

00

50

2

2

50

512 SQM

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

50 SQM

CR

58 SQM

0

00

33

512 SQM

COURTYARD 50 SQM

CR

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 512 SQM

58 SQM

PRIVATE LOUNGE

43 sqm

COURTYARD 50 SQM

LEGEND

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 507 SQM

5500

[ OCAT ] OFFICE OF THE CHIEF ATTORNEY

SPACES

852 sqm

DIGNITARIES LOUNGE 120 sqm

[ PET ] PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORAL TRIBUNAL 379 sqm

CR

30 sqm

0

3050

Adjudication GAS STO Other

0

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

SPACES

270 sqm

3250

Adjudication GAS STO Other

[ PRN ] PRINTING SERVICES

3500

507 SQM

43 sqm

0

0

LEGEND

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

1600

1600

PRIVATE LOUNGE

6000

COURTYARD

6000

0

00

33

RECORDS ROOM

BAR RECORDS DIVISION

LEGAL RESEARCH STAFF

512 sqm 31 employees

523 SQM

STORAGE FOR LEGAL DOCUMENTS

CONFERENCE ROOM PANTRY

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

OFFICE OF ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

00

BAR RELATIONS STAFF

ADJUDICATION ROOM

8000

00

50

00

0 29

BAR COMPLAINTS DIVISION

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF ATTORNEY

SPECIAL STUDIES STAFF

3188

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORAL TRIBUNAL

RECORDS DIVISION

CONFERENCE ROOM

00 80

22

STORAGE FOR LEGAL DOCUMENTS

280 sqm 41 employees

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF ATTORNEY (OCAT) LEGISLATIVE RESEARCH STAFF

RECORDS ROOM PANTRY

00 80

0

35

ROLLO RECEIVING ROOM

PANTRY

CHAMBER OF THE ASSOCIATE JUSTICE

770 sqm

HOLDING FLOOR

ACCESS 6500

[ MISO ] MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS OFFICE

Visitors Employees Justices

343 sqm

[ COA ] COMMISSION ON AUDIT

720 sqm

ACCESS

[ OBC ] OFFICE OF THE REPORTER

Visitors Employees Justices

[ OBC ] OFFICE OF THE BAR CONFIDANT 243 sqm

202 sqm

[ OCA ] OFFICE OF COURT ADMINISTRATOR

CR

57 sqm

115 sqm

4433

0

1050

5

[ DCA ] OFFICE OF DEPUTY COURT ADMINISTRATOR

0

1200

845 sqm

AUDITORIUM 500 SEATER 991 sqm

[ ACA ] OFFICE OF ASSISTANT COURT OF ADMINISTRATOR 342 sqm

6

1214

21930

3000

21329

0

27755

5 10

20

12146

50m

Second Floor Plan

0

5 10

20

50m

Third Floor Plan

Top: Floor plans [Role: layout + render] This image: Main Court [By: Fernando Cunanan]


TAGAYTAY, PH 20°C

Cloudscape Tagaytay Project Type

Hotel and masterplan proposal in Tagaytay, Philippines 17,000sqm

Position

Team Leader

Responsibilities Concept Masterplan Presentation Renders

Team Members

Christian Dinglasan Beverly Locsin

Clouds

ENT


scape TAGAYTAY

TER


+ TAGAYTAY HIGHLANDS

+ SITE

SM WIND + + SUMMIT RIDGE TAAL VISTA + + SKY RANCH

Opposite page: Lake View [Role: render] This image: Location [Role: design + render] Bottom: Schemes [By: design + layout]

TAAL VOLCANO +

Welcome to Tagaytay. Tagaytay is a city well known in the Philippines for 2 main reasons. The first one is the climate, cooler than in the surrounding cities (including Manila), driving people there for a weekend getaway. The second is the incredible view the city has to offer on the Tall lake and volcano that transformed the city into a prime touristic destination, attracting tourists from all over the world. Sadly, the city itself exposes a dichotomy between what people came to see and what it offers. Most of the city is developed along one main road (that actually loops all around the Taal lake), bringing hotels and retails on the prime spots. All these buildings that developed there because of the view ironically end up hiding the view from the road. Being on the main street makes it hard to have even a glimpse of the Volcano.

We got the opportunity to design a hotel and residential complex in Tagaytay. We believe that developing a project in such a setting is about working with the roots of the city and its context. One aspect that drove our attention was the mist that often appears in the area. When he warm and humid air gets cooled, it creates this enchanting atmosphere that emphasizes the background by concealing the foreground. We used this idea to approach our design, giving the project a different relation with its surroundings. It would disappear instead of impose, merge with the background of Tagaytay and emphasize the experience of the place.


Opposite page: Location [Role: layout] This image: Aerial View [Role: design + render] Bottom: Schemes [By: design + layout]

1| The clubhouse as link between the sites providing an elevated view to the Taal Volcano

2| The hotel terraces integrated in the site providing a common public space

3| The residential area define an new topography leading to an uniformity in the development

The whole proposal is based on this idea of having the landscape as main feature, as it is the primary reason why people are going to Tagaytay. Nevertheless, we still wanted to provide an element that would be recognizable from the street, that would increase the hotel visibility even with our disappearing concept. The clubhouse, hosting events and meals offered by the hotel, was the perfect fit for this location. It is the best way to showcase the hotel and at the same time, the location offers a striking view by being the highest building of the development. The clubhouse was elevated to maintain a view from the street and still give an iconic feature to the project. From that, the hotel is directly integrated in the mountain, taking advantage of the slope to propose different levels of terraces, each one offering a direct view to the lake. A residential part is developed one the other side of the lot, this time defining its own contours to complement the surrounding topography.

4| Reinforcing the development as a landscape setting by scattering traditional houses on the hilly area


This project relies a lot on the landscape, leading to a minimalistic approach of the architecture. Each roof becomes a terrace, a place where people can take a stroll, enjoying the view and the cool weather. The amenities are scattered in different parts of the development to invite users to discover the hotel and the different views it is framing. The experience of the users is the main focus of this project. The lac Taal and the surrounding mountains becomes part of the architecture, allowing them to fully appreciate the wonders of Tagaytay. This project is a reflection about the link between architecture and the city. How do we want our

This image: Clubhouse [Role: design + render]

cities to grow? How do we propose not just independent buildings, but ecosystems that give back to their context? It doesn’t have to be just about sustainability or energy; architecture can complement the city in a lot of different ways. The buildings we design are affecting the life of everyone, not just users. In this case, the idea was simple. We just wanted to provide people what they were coming for: the view. Doing so would also enhance the city because instead of having a main road surrounded by enclosed development, you could have instead a city that opens itself to its surroundings.


Hsinta Power Plant Project Type

Power Plant proposal in Tainan, Taiwan 96,000 sqm

Position

Team Leader

Responsibilities Concept Renders Boards

Team Members

Audrey Lopez Isabella Pineda Rochelle Ong Christian Dinglasan Raymond Forcado


This page: The Power Plant as a landscape feature [Role: design + render]


Nowadays, power plants have been under a lot of scrutiny from the general public. With all the evidences of climate changes and with the numerous international accords about pollution reduction and eco-friendliness, building a power plant is not seen as an engineering problem anymore. Rightly, people and governments are looking towards a cleaner and healthier environment while also expecting a continuous energy supply that ceaselessly increases. While phasing out the Hsinta Coal Power Plant is a necessary move people will agree on, replacing it with a Gas Power Plant that is also a pollution emitter instead of a green energy facility might also be criticized. The goal of this project is not to build a power plant, it is to promote and emphasize the long-term vision of the country and the steps taken towards an eco-friendly future. To that end, we envisioned the Hsinta Power Plant to become an energy showroom, where some other modes of generating energy are exhibited. While a main power plant building would take care of the generation of electricity, we could take advantage of the size of the site to showcase some other methods envisaged by the company to produce sustainable energy. Some solar panels are already part of the site, so we are planning to extend this area to match our landscape. Some solar thermal

panels could also be added to help provide hot water in the premises and to show that solar energy can be used differently. We are also proposing to locate some Windmills, some Molten Salt Energy Storage and perhaps some tidal energy generators as well. The goal would really be to demonstrate different systems and how they could influence the future energy generation of the country. The project could also develop a research facility for energy generation on the current Hsinta Coal Power Plant once decommissioned. Planning a Gas Power Plant next to the sea is probably a good technical decision but creating such a huge facility in a horizontal and uninhabited area brings challenges on the urban scale. The traditional and efficient layout of such a power plant creates a discontinuity with the local environment mostly composed of salt field wetlands and 1 to 2 stories residential houses. The envisioned design of the project takes inspiration from the misty mountains around Tainan and the shape of the salt mounds common in the surroundings. The three power generation “mountains� become, at the same time a way to: produce energy, a protection for the other buildings and a symbol of nature and life. They use materials, colors and textures common in the region, allowing them to be anchored in their context.

ADMINISTRATION TURBINES UTILITIES

SWITCHYARD

POWER GENERATION AREA

MRO AREA

STAFF AREA


Opposite page: Aerial View + Diagram [Role: design + render] This image: Masterplan [Role: Layout, Render: Isabella Pineda]


PLANNING CONCEPT

ALIGN

Align the circular plan along the axis to create a visual corridor to the Historical architecture

RIPPLE

Create a series of concentric circles to base the landscape on

DIRECT

Link the landscape with the surroundings

APPLY

Create the Flood Retention area as a series of Basins around the facility


MASSING CONCEPT

Separate the power generation units to make the project less massive

Link the units on one side for easy management and engineering

Arrange the buildings in a circular layout for an efficient circulation on the site

Reshape the power generation units as reinterpretation of mountains

Opposite page, top: Planning Concept [Role: layout + drawing] This page, top: Massing Concept [Role: layout + drawing] This image: Street View [By: Christian Dinglasan]


Other Works


Collective Ensemble, Rotterdam, Netherlands


Collective Ensemble, Rotterdam, Netherlands


Atelier Bois, GAIA, France

Fragments, Venice Bienale 2014


Shelter 2Q2017, Manila, Philippines

The Book Stop, Manila, Philippines


Palo Hotel, Leyte, Philippines


Canopea, GAIA, France


East Sands, Panglao, Bohol, Philippines


E : matthieu.begoghina@gmail.com T : +61 466 158 330 W : http://bematthieu.com/

Profile for Matthieu Begoghina

Matthieu Bégoghina - Architecture Portfolio  

http://bematthieu.com/

Matthieu Bégoghina - Architecture Portfolio  

http://bematthieu.com/

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