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ISSUE 7

BUY ME 8.50 EURO

MADE FOR MADE BY

BEHIND THE SCENES Textile & Fashion Department 1

ROYAL ACADEMY OF ART, DEN HAAG


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ISSUE 7

BUY ME 8.50 EURO

MADE FOR MADE BY

BEHIND THE SCENES

Uncovering the textile and fashion department.

ROYAL ACADEMY OF ART, DEN HAAG


INDEX

INTRO

BEHIND THE SCENES

READ OUR

READ OUR

BY JURGI PERSOONS

6

INSPIRING GUESTS

INSPIRING GUESTS

7

JAN-JAN VAN ESSCHE

5

8—9

ON TEXTURE AND

BEHIND THE SCENES

READ OUR

SEARCHING SHAPE,

COLOUR

17

INSPIRING GUESTS

FORM, PROPORTION

WALI MOHAMMED BARRECH

20 — 23

10 — 15

19 • PORTRAITS BY

BEHIND THE SCENES

GRADUATES 2014

EVELIEN

CHRISTA VAN DER MEER

29

30 — 49

BLENCKERS

32 — 33

24 — 27

ANNA MALÁ

STEPHANY

GINO ANTHONISSE

GRADUATES

34 — 35

VAN LEEUWEN

38 — 39

SELECTION

36 — 37

40 — 41

SONNY ROFFEL

JOSINE NELL

NATHALIE VAN DER

BASTIAN VISCH

42 — 43

44 — 45

VEEN

48 — 49

46 — 47

BEHIND THE SCENES

READ OUR

BEHIND THE SCENES

FROM TOILE TO FINISHED

51

INSPIRING GUESTS

55

DESIGN

EUGÉNE VAN VELDHOVEN

56 — 63

52 — 53

BEHIND THE SCENES

STILL LIVES OF A

BEHIND THE SCENES

MEET OUR EIGHT

65

PROCESS

73

GRADUATES

66 — 71

74 — 77

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INTRODUCTION

Nathalie, Anna, Stephany, Josine, Sonny, Evelien, Bastian and Gino, it was our pleasure to coach and guide you during these 4 amazing years. Our department is very proud of you and your achievements. We wish you all the best and lots of success in the future. Of course, the end of your training at the Textile and Fashion department in The Hague is obviously the beginning of a new and exciting chapter for you! And we can’t wait to see you making that next move! You all worked hard during those past 4 years, in fact we expected nothing else. I guess, you might have thought sometimes that we were too severe, not reasonable, so difficult to satisfy or setting the bar too high…? Maybe you have a point but we are very serious about the quality and significance of our students’ design. We expected a solid research as a fundamental basis for strong creative statements, a relevant sense of innovation and a very professional attitude towards your work, style and message. We asked you to make decisions in design, to be aware of style, message and content, to consider consequences but most of all, to discover and use the accompanying challenges! It is so essential to develop your own personal style in a positive, constructive and open way. Keep on pushing boundaries in your future careers, be loyal to your authentic mind, always looking for brilliant innovation or an alternative proposal. Always search further than evidence and don’t be afraid for possible controversy. Communication is an essential component, find your own unique language. Be critical but always open-minded towards the world and society we live in and all diverse developments, including all opportunities. Dare to follow your dreams and have an open heart. Always curious, hungry for inspiration, confident, bold and ready for creative action! We are an ambitious academy and we want to pass this aspiration on to our students. During the past years, our team worked hard and consistently. Changing an educational structure is a delicate exercise, a project that needs a clever structure and a process that needs time, including plenty of objective and smart evaluation. At the end of 2013, the examination commission rewarded our department with the grade “excellent”. Both an award for our perseverance, as well as a motivation to continue our project with refreshed and plenty of positive energy. Stagnation is no option, we stay focused on the never-ending process of improving, on necessary developments and on progression. Not only the fact that we offer a textile program as well as a fashion course, but most of all their mutual combination effect makes our academy truly unique! The 2 departments have their own typical program, course and projects but their reciprocal influence is so remarkable and such an enrichment for the creative approach and vision of our students. My dear graduates, be conscious of this great advantage and keep this modern sensibility in shape, material, style and content in your future projects. It will most certainly differentiate your work and give it this unique and typical “touch of The Hague”! Finally, I would like to thank everybody who is involved in this amazing project : first of all our amazing team of faculty and collaborators! You are all famous for your never-ending energy, patience and passion! Students of the first, second and third year: this is also a celebration for you and your beautiful work! Enjoy this mindfully and let it be a source of inspiration! Yours,

Jurgi Persoons Head Textile & Fashion

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PHOTOGRAPHY: DAAN LIU

FASHION ON DISPLAY 4th year student from Sweden, 100% woolfelt, Fashion drawing on recycled paper, PC.002

BEHIND THE SCENES


READ OUR INSPIRING GUESTS

INTERVIEWS

JAN–JAN VAN ESSCHE (B) Fashion designer and design teacher in the fourth year

8

WALI MOHAMMED BARRECH (DK)

EUGÈNE VAN VELDHOVEN (NL)

Fashion designer

Textile designer

19

52

READ OUR INSPIRING GUESTS

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8

INTERVIEW

READ OUR INSPIRING GUESTS

JAN–JAN VAN ESSCHE Fashion designer and design teacher in the fourth year

How do you look back on you graduation period? I remember it as a very fun time. I was working a lot first and fun time came towards the end of the year. Afterwards it was the best summer ever, partly because it was 25-30 degrees. It is difficult to remember the darker days before. It was really hard work, but I really enjoyed it. I always look back on it with very good memories. It was a very energetic time, without many obstructions because you could really do what you wanted to do. The graduation show was a really good experience as well. All the models were totally involved in the collection and they all understood why they were chosen. They really became a gang of friends that made the show together. In how far did your graduation collection affect the start of your career? Actually, I’m still doing the same thing, my subject hasn’t changed much, although the clothes I make did evolve quite a lot. And of course I was only 23 when I graduated, which means that the way I think about it has evolved (hopefully).  But to a certain degree, I still do the same thing. I’m still on the same track, but my influences have changed. Did you attract a lot of attention with your graduation collection? I did get a lot of attention, to my surprise. I didn’t see that coming so I was quite positively shocked. I won some prizes and I got some attention. After finding my way professionally, it became more of a struggle actually, but that was mostly due to my own character and who I was then. It wasn’t like the golden ticket, but such a thing doesn’t exist if you ask me. You still have to do it yourself. The fact that what I did had a place and an audience gave me some confidence but all in all, it took me some years to find my way. What made you decide to start your own label and what did the first period look like? Actually, it still is the first period. It still feels like

starting up and it still seems risky every day. I didn’t decide to start my own label at a certain point. I already knew that this was what I wanted but I thought that I didn’t have the guts, experience and right timing to start for myself. Then, suddenly I realized that I was turning 30 the year after, which made me say: “Do it now.” There still remain questions every day and sometimes, I still feel that I’m not experienced enough. But at some point, you deal with those doubts, stop the bullshit and go for it. How did your label evolve and is having your own label as you expected it to be? I didn’t really have fixed expectations, in the sense of “I want this and this to happen like that and that”. This way of thinking isn’t me and will only lead to disappointment. But until now, I’m really proud of what we have achieved, because I’m not alone. I’m really happy with the place I claimed for myself and although it’s a really small one, I really feel comfortable with how it’s evolving. How would you describe the source of your work and how did it develop through time? I guess, the origin for all of that is in my whole life. It’s not just one moment or one inspiration; it’s about all the aspects of all things that have inspired me until this moment. I tried to do things in the same way I like to live, which means that I like to have the same morality in life as in my work. But it’s difficult, as it is not always a clear line. Added to that are all the things that I went through and so on. It is about openness, timelessness and space for individual input. But still, I’m designing it! What is the most essential moment for you during the process of making a collection? I don’t have a new idea every season. It flows from one idea to another and of course, there are always new aspects. For example, there are three or four pattern details I try to play with each season. Other things are colors that you stick to or fabrics that you use to make the collection a whole.

DR AWING IS S OMETHING I REALLY, REALLY ENJOY. IT ’S PLAYING AROUND. BUT THE THING THAT SATISFIES ME THE MOST IS THE MOMENT WHEN IT ALL COMES TO GETHER.


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But I’m not the storyteller, saying “This season is about this or this”. It’s somewhat the same story for all my collections. Which aspects of your work satisfy or annoy you the most? Drawing is something I really, really enjoy. It’s playing around. But the thing that satisfies me the most is the moment at the end off a season when it all comes together. Last season there was a particular day in the showroom which is a nice example. It was the last day after a week in Paris and people got together. There were a lot of clients and other people, whom I met through doing what I do now, who stopped by. They just came to get a coffee or to say hi as they knew it was the last day and they all started mingling. Everybody found somebody to have a chat or good conversation with and I saw them exchanging phone numbers. For me, that moment, bringing people together through my work, is what you’re working for. Other people can take something out of it and do their own thing with it. Even if it’s just a word. Those are moments in which you think: “Okay, this is really worth it”. You were already telling us about the fact that you are aiming to be the same person in work as well as in your private life. Could you tell us more about the relationship between your personal and professional life? As I stated in the previous question, bringing people together through work is a beautiful thing. It’s all about connections. You get inspired by other people, by other things or by other people’s work. Life gets interesting when you talk to people, not if you are just on your own. If my work can bring that kind of feeling to other people, I’m happy with that and wouldn’t want it any other way. There are, for example, super interesting works and collections that are totally ego-centered, but it’s never going to be me who is making those. So it’s a bit about those things. For instance, if you’re a vegetarian, why would you make leather? It’s that kind of logic, you know. If you know how you like to wear clothes or how you like to treat garments, you would also like to make things that can be treated or worn in a corresponding way. For me it’s about that.

Can you give us an insight into your average working day? My working day normally starts at 10 but if there are already people working in the studio, we all try to have breakfast together. Half an hour later or so, we slowly start the day. Most of the time I’m in my studio but as my studio is also my house, it all fits together. The photos are also taken there which makes it one big thing. It’s just working, working and again, working. If I have time, I try to cook something in the evening and then I continue working. There are days on which I don’t even leave the apartment! That happens quite a lot actually and sometimes I only realize that after five days or so. So suddenly I think, “Hmm, maybe I should go to the bakery today because I need some bread”. Those days happen the most I guess. So when you are staying inside for five days, what are you doing during that time? Making patterns, making prototypes and so on. I make all my own patterns and prototypes in the studio and put it together as one package. I bring it to the factory myself and I brief it myself. There are a lot of days which are just about production: you’re just making sure that the small, the large and the medium sizes are all correct or if they have enough buttons. Often it’s a lot of problem solving. Finally, do you have any advice that you could give us for now and the future? One? Do your work in a way that you can enjoy it. Do it in a way that gets you inspired time and time again and gives you energy. Carry out your job in a satisfying way, even if it doesn’t have your name on it or even if it’s not totally your cup of tea. With all these limits and aspects that currently exist, do it in a way so that you can defend it a thousand percent. And that is very intense so it better be very fun as well! And it’s not always going to be fun and entertaining. There are aspects that take a lot of time and a lot of drag but they are all part of it.


1ST YEAR

UNFASHIONED YET FASHIONABLE

ON TEXTURE AND COLOUR

Raw materials reflect the start of a design process

UNFASHIONED YET FASHIONABLE 10 — 15

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11


1ST YEAR

UNFASHIONED YET FASHIONABLE Raw materials reflect the start of a design process

12

ON TEXTURE AND COLOUR


13


1ST YEAR

UNFASHIONED YET FASHIONABLE Raw materials reflect the start of a design process

14

ON TEXTURE AND COLOUR


15


17

BEHIND THE SCENES

FASHION ON DISPLAY 100ml Colle Universelle glue, 60% Merino wool 40% Acryl, 73 Hobby pins, PC.002

PHOTOGRAPHY: DAAN LIU


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READ

INTERVIEW

OUR INSPIRING GUESTS WALI MOHAMMED BARRECH Fashion designer

How do you look back on your graduation period? Face-planted postgrad depression served with a swirl of inferiority issues and a juicy reality check.   Did you attract a lot of attention with your graduation collection? I got a fair amount of exposure. This, coupled with my school’s reputation, gave me more time to convince the interviewers during job applications. As it turns out, I wasn’t the master graduate, willing to work for free 24/7, while living in the tiniest apartment in the outskirts of Paris.   What made you decide to start your own label and can you tell us something about your first period after graduation? I started studying fashion, knowing that I wanted to start my own brand. However, not directly after my graduation. But as I said, due to the harsh reality of the working conditions of interns, or should I say slaves, I decided to not give up my youth for so called “experience” on my CV.  I don’t want to generalize and  I’m sure there are Maisons that offer better conditions. However, my experiences didn’t sit well with me, which made me decide to start with my own label right away. At least I would invest in myself and get to keep the body of work I produce, I thought to myself. There are various reasons why this choice made sense to me. It has been the best decision of my life, after choosing to study in Antwerp. How did your label evolve and is having your own label as you expected It to be?

I was willing to take the risk of total public humiliation and I set up goals that had to be reached in order for my first collection to be “successful”. I knew that there was no pulling out. It was all or nothing, no compromise and I didn’t want to please anyone with it. In school, one is exposed to so many influences, personalities and tastes that it becomes hard to purify one’s own vision. I often felt untrue to myself. This made me decide to exclude all those opinions from my first work. It also gave me the luxury of working completely alone, channeling my thoughts and vision. I love how it all came together naturally and effortlessly. In my studio, I try to give my interns a complete experience, involving them in every step of the process of making a collection. They need to feel responsible and part of something in order for their time to be worthwhile. I’m not an established brand yet and I don’t make millions. Therefore, I can’t offer a real salary but what I can do is show them how tough it is to start something on your own. What it means to be organized and how important it is to have a good team around you. Without giving them responsibilities, there wouldn’t be a collection.   Tell us about the origin of your work and the development over time? I was born and raised in Pakistan, my mom is Croatian, my dad is Afghan and I have a German passport. I felt as if I never belonged to anything 100%. This excluded feeling made me analyze societal behavior meti-culously, such as differences between Eastern and

Western culture. I find fashion to be one of the most powerful languages of our time. It gets to live in the “real world” and interact everywhere but of course, I incorporate other media as well in order to amplify the message.   Describe the most essential moment for you during the process of making a collection? Seeing the world, the person, the feeling, the sound, the look and everything  come together in my head, starting to move and making a full circle. That’s when I know, I’m heading into the right direction.  Can you explain the relationship between your personal life and your work? My work is inherently connected to my personal life. All my experiences, all the people, their life, society’s effect on me, news, Facebook and politics create a form of collective societal anxiety. I try to talk about that and digest it through my work.   Do you have any advice for us, graduates?  Don’t simply believe in yourself, be realistic. You know it if you have what it takes. If not, take a bird’s view and figure out what skills you need to adhere and do whatever it takes to get them. I strongly believe that you can learn anything. But the most important thing is that everyone should be good to each other. Be helpful, open and honest and take your time figuring out where you want to go with your work.

I WAS WILLING TO TAKE THE  RISK OF TOTAL PUBLIC HUMILIATION


2ND YEAR

INFINITE OUTLINES

SEARCHING

The development of growing aesthetics

SHAPE, FORM, PROPORTION

INFINITE OUTLINES 20 — 23

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PORTRAITS BY ALUMNUS CHRISTA VAN DER MEER “The portraits I drew are of those random people who come up at your Google image search results when you are looking for the teachers of the textile and fashion department.”

jacket by Sonny Roffel right page: sweater by Bastian Visch

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PORTRAITS BY ALUMNUS CHRISTA VAN DER MEER

clothing by Bastian Visch and Sonny Roffel left page: jacket by Gino Anthonisse

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BEHIND THE SCENES

FASHION ON DISPLAY 450ml Red dye, 100% cotton, Royal Colorlab

PHOTOGRAPHY: DAAN LIU


GRADUATES

4TH YEAR

ABOUT PHOTOSHOOT

Evelien Blenckers LONGING 32

Anna Malรก

Stephany van Leeuwen

FOLD BACK, FOLD OUT

NO WORDS

34

36

Gino Anthonisse LOST WONDER 38

โ€ข

Sonny Roffel BEHOLD 42

Josine Nell

Nathalie van der Veen

GRIP

HUMAN ABSENCE

44

46

Bastian Visch LIGHT STUDIES 48

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4TH YEAR

GRADUATES

ABOUT PHOTOSHOOT

EIGHT GRADUATES PRESENT THEIR COLLECTION 30 — 49

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LONGING photography: Liv Ylva make-up: Anne de Bruin models: Liede Lambriex  and right page:  Monique Huls

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GRADUATES PRESENT THEIR COLLECTION

Evelien Blenckers


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FOLD BACK, FOLD OUT photography & styling: Gerrit van Dam make-up: Tajemstvi Tvoji Mamki model: Kirsten van Antwerpen

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GRADUATES PRESENT THEIR COLLECTION

Anna Malรก


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NO WORDS photography: Iris van der Zee hair and make-up : Elke de Jong model: Veleda Duchemin

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GRADUATES PRESENT THEIR COLLECTION

Stephany van Leeuwen


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LOST WONDER photography: Lisandro Suriel make-up & styling: Lydiëne Thomas model: Jip Loots

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GRADUATES PRESENT THEIR COLLECTION

Gino Anthonisse


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Evelien Blenckers Stephany van Leeuwen

Anna Malรก Gino Anthonisse


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Sonny Roffel Nathalie van der Veen

Josine Nell Bastian Visch


BEHOLD

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GRADUATES PRESENT THEIR COLLECTION

photography: Duarte Nobrega model: Edgar Jacobson

Sonny Roffel


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GRIP photography:  Renate van der Togt hair and make-up: Anne de Bruin model: Marloes Bakker

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GRADUATES PRESENT THEIR COLLECTION

Josine Nell


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HUMAN ABSENCE

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GRADUATES PRESENT THEIR COLLECTION

photography:  Daan Liu

Nathalie van der Veen


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LIGHT STUDIES photography:  bastian Visch model: Daniel K @ Tony Jones Model Management

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GRADUATES PRESENT THEIR COLLECTION

Bastian Visch


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BEHIND THE SCENES

FASHION ON DISPLAY Sample Bag, 12 Push pins, Stitch F Stitch Length 1.6, Pink plexiglas, PC.002

PHOTOGRAPHY: DAAN LIU


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INTERVIEW

READ OUR INSPIRING GUESTS

EUGÈNE VAN VELDHOVEN Textile designer

How do you look back on your graduation period? Now, I only do textile and wallpapers for interiors. I studied fashion part-time in Rotterdam. I was very insecure about stylistic things and had a teacher who paid special attention to those aspects such as the length of sleeves, music, shoes and so on. I found those things so difficult that they even gave me nightmares. Decision-making was really hard for me since I was a real doubter at that time. I was and still am someone who puts an emphasis on ideas and a good construction, or something graphical. A turning point certainly was my participation in the Smirnoff Fashion Award, using a male outfit from my graduation collection. That was kind of special and although I didn’t win, it was a lot of fun. I’ve always been an easy talker. I love giving presentations because they give me strength in return. I used to make quite a show of every presentation and wasn’t nervous at all. My graduation was a tough period, with little sleep and long working hours. I must admit that at the same time, I became quite arrogant after my internships. I had two internships abroad at two famous brands, Dries van Noten and Marithé & François Girbaud. At that time, I had quite an ambiguous feeling because I questioned the judgement of my teachers about my final collection, while feeling very insecure at the same time. In how far did your graduation collection affect the start of your career? In Rotterdam, graduating consisted of three parts; writing your thesis, making a couple of trend-books and your clothes collection. The first part of the year was for working on your trend-books and during the second part of the year, you worked on your collection. After graduating, I started to present my work at, for instance, Vivienne Westwood and Bikkembergs. They all told me: “why don’t you do something with your fabrics and continue working on those?”. People kept on telling me this so I always took my trend-books to various companies. The designers at Girbaud told me that there already were so many fashion designers and not a

lot of textile designers. When you are a starter, you want to prove you can do anything. But I soon found out that companies are looking for designers with a specialization. Because I didn’t like reading theoretical books for my thesis, I decided to interview people. So I thought of the 15 most important people from the world of fashion in the Netherlands. A couple of trend-people, someone from the fashion-institute and so on. The interviews with these people formed my thesis and at the same time, gave me a lot of new contacts and even my first job. So my trend-books and thesis started it all, not so much my collection or grades. Lidewij Edelkoort liked the work I was doing and gave me my first job, which was creating textiles for two of her trend-books. What made you decide to start your own brand and what did the first period look like? You have to think about and decide whether you want to start for yourself or want to get a job. For the first year, I received welfare but after earning money, this stopped. After that, I worked in the catering industry and as a freelance designer. It all started because people from within my network approached me and started supplying me with a couple of jobs. Two years after my graduation, I took a master class at the department of textile of the Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam. For a whole week, I was surrounded by textile designers, giving me the right directions towards textile. Can you tell us an aspect that is typical for your work as a textile designer? Throughout the year, I work on new textile designs to put in my portfolio. My portfolio consists of a suitcase filled with printed designs, which I take to the client, looking at his demands and the sales of certain fabrics. I make designs and after that, I think of a technique that would go well with that particular design. There really is a connection between design, material and technique which makes it very concrete for the client.

IN ELEMENTARY S CHO OL , I WANTED TO BECOME A FARMER.


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When a client is interested, I supply them with a sample, a digital file and all technical information, meaning: who can make it industrially and what are the raw materials and the techniques used. The above process, I would say, is the typical me. Tell us a bit more about the source of your work and how did this develop through time? The coating technique really was what I started with, although there was a time where I didn’t use it at all. Nowadays, I use it in a different manner. I also still use designs from my graduation period. Lidewij Edelkoort had a great influence on me because she is really good at formulating and communicates very clearly. For clients, I also make things that are not really my taste, although I try to broaden my style as much as possible. In the beginning, I never used flowers in a new design but nowadays, it’s a trend and there is a demand for flower designs. That’s why I started taking more photo’s of flowers, enhancing them on the computer and using them for a new design. Digital printing is the easiest and fastest way for me to develop a new textile sample for a client. To stay with the flowers; they have even become an important part of my portfolio. I now have several different series per technique, partly because my clients in the higher segment expect a steady flow of new materials and techniques. What satisfies or annoys you the most in your work? Well, there is a thing that makes me insecure, rather than annoying me. I already told you that my suitcase is my portfolio. But this suitcase is also my only medium that I can use when presenting my work on trade fairs for example, because it consists of many different ideas, techniques, materials and styles, whereas other people use graphics and so on to present their work. The risk of only using my suitcase is losing it somewhere. If that would be the case, I would have to start all over again.

Is there a connection between your personal life and your work and if so, how would you describe it? That’s a good one. I have thought about it on occasion. Something that comes to my mind is the fact that I’ve never had a long-lasting relationship, have never lived together with someone or have never connected myself with other companies or brands. They can pick something from my suitcase, which is fine because that’s what they want and that’s how I make money. I’m not connected to a company in any way, although there are clients that keep coming back each year. I guess that these things indicate a non-committal mindset, sometimes even fear of committing myself to something or someone. Additionally, I can only work closely with someone whom I trust. Rather a friend than a business contact. I like that because I get more feedback. If you look back on your career, what kind of advice would you give us for now and the future? When I started, I learned an important lesson: Always take care of your PR. For example, when you send an e-mail, be sure to always send an accompanying image. Make sure to impress the client. Another important aspect of PR is to maintain your contacts and networks. Another nice tip that was given to me by Milou Ket: “Keep your business small but keep your work on a high level.” This is something that I’ve always remembered and great advice for you as well. If you would have to choose another medium then textile, what would you be doing? In elementary school, I wanted to become a farmer. My girlfriend would become a farmer as well. After that, I wanted to work for the roadside rescue service. Those were all manly jobs so I wasn’t designing wedding dresses like some others. Then, I wanted to become an archeologist. Finally, before entering the academy, I did a social major but I still think I would have become a garden architect. Gardening makes me very happy.


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BEHIND THE SCENES

FASHION ON DISPLAY Electroknit Brother KH-9654

PHOTOGRAPHY: DAAN LIU


3RD YEAR

GARMENT REVEALED

FROM TOILE

About the moment it all comes together

TO FINISHED DESIGN

GARMENT REVEALED 56 — 63

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Whole In One

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3RD YEAR

GARMENT REVEALED

FROM TOILE

About the moment it all comes together

TO FINISHED DESIGN

Silkscreen Print – Fabian Bredt

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3RD YEAR

GARMENT REVEALED

FROM TOILE

About the moment it all comes together

TO FINISHED DESIGN

Floral Shirt - Olivier Jehee

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Printed Jacket and Plaid Pantalon - Olivier Jehee, Striped Silkscreen Print - Fabian Bredt, Remake Necklace Samburu Tribe, Kenya - Anne Oomen, Replicacostume Long Horn Miao, China - Ruby De Bruijn


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BEHIND THE SCENES

FASHION ON DISPLAY Personal Lockers, Headgear, PC.002

PHOTOGRAPHY: DAAN LIU


4TH YEAR

WORK IN PROGRESS

STILL LIVES OF A PROCESS

PROCESS SELECTION 66 — 71

Josine Nell

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67


Stephany van Leeuwen

68


69


4TH YEAR

WORK IN PROGRESS

STILL LIVES OF A PROCESS

Evelien Blenckers

Bastian Visch

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BEHIND THE SCENES

FASHION ON DISPLAY Pattern paper, Chalkboard, 2 Rulers, 1st year student from Berlin, PC.002

PHOTOGRAPHY: DAAN LIU


MEET THE CLASS OF 2014

GRADUATES

Sonny Roffel

Bastian Visch BEHOLD

LIGHT STUDIES

Of all the many things that we see, only a small part really draws our attention: the part that makes it worthwhile to look at for a second time. In my collection, this urge will be specially provoked, by using different methods in order to give this collection two faces. A game of optical elements in shape and material makes sure that the collection cannot be looked at with one view and therefore invites you to take a second look.

 In my work I strive for an objective essence of aesthetics. For my graduation collection I drew inspiration from studying clothing and other objects in different light settings. Instead of using an aesthetic defined by hand I searched for a way to let nature define the impression. I managed to capture the different ways of sunlight shining on the clothing, and make it permanent with a photographic process.

www.sonnyroffel.com info@sonnyroffel.com

www.bastianvisch.com info@bastianvisch.com

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GRADUATES

Stephany van Leeuwen

MEET THE CLASS OF 2014

Josine Nell NO WORDS

GRIP

The body is able to express what we know but can’t articulate, that’s why I like to let it do the talking. The body whilst undressing forms the base for this collection, by using the shapes and motion created by this process as a tool I aim to define and redefine the identity of a garment. It shows a movement to-wards and from reality.

My collection is a about a certain control that we want to have over our lives. I think this is due to the striving for an ideal image. But nature has the upper hand and is forcing us to give up control. I am searching for the interaction between the natural and unnatural. Bycreating and manipulating.

www.stephanyvanleeuwen.com info@stephanyvanleeuwen.com

www.josinenell.com  info@josinenell.com

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MEET THE CLASS OF 2014

GRADUATES

Gino Anthonisse

Nathalie van der Veen LOST WONDER

HUMAN ABSENCE

The endless search of man for explanations has given us structure, but has also numbed us. Because everything has already been ‘explored’ or ‘discovered’, wondering has become a rare phenomenon. With my designs, I’m searching for that bit of lost wonder in our society. By using classical pieces and ethnical elements, unknown materials, techniques and accessories, I aim to create a wondering image.

Because of my background as an interior architect, I think it is important that textile has a space-related function. During my design-process, I am always working with light, space, textile and photography. My present textile collection consists of different products, which are all designed for the interior. It is about the sensible absence of a person and the awareness of time passing by.

www.ginoanthonisse.com g.anthonisse@gmail.com

www.nathalievanderveen.nl info@nathalievanderveen.nl

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GRADUATES

Anna Malá

MEET THE CLASS OF 2014

Evelien Blenckers FOLD BACK, FOLD OUT

LONGING 

 My graduation collection is based on a futuristic vision, in which clothing is an equal opponent to the body. The designs itself are then a result of an interaction between the two, playing with a tension between hard and rigid as opposed to soft and sensual.  Experimental in form and use of innovative materials, such as silicone or plexiglas, the collection is exploring new ways of interpreting classical shapes. 

 Where does the oppression within me and within the young adult in present society come from and how do this target group and I cope with this? Is there any form of resistance against ourselves and the present society and is this the reason why we find ourselves in a new punk-era? Based on oppression and resistance, I aim for a positive approach and a liberating collection and research.

www.annamala.com annagrosse@gmail.com

www.evelienblenckers.com info@evelienblenckers.com 

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COLOPHON

EDITORS — GRADUATES 2014

PRINT — Veenman+

Nathalie van der Veen, www.nathalievanderveen.nl Gino Anthonisse, www.ginoanthonisse.com Evelien Blenckers, www.evelienblenckers.com Stephany van Leeuwen, www.stephanyvanleeuwen.com Anna Mala, www.annamala.com Josine Nell, www.josinenell.com Sonny Roffel, www.sonnyroffel.com Bastian Visch, www.bastianvisch.com

PAPER — Arctic Papers Munken Lynx FONTS —New Paris Skyline, New Paris Text by Swiss

Typefaces.com PUBLISHER

Royal Academy of Art, the Hague Prinsessegracht 4 2514 AN The Hague www.kabk.nl

CONCEPT & DESIGN — FutureNetherlandsFund.com PHOTOGRAPHY — Gerrit van Dam, Willemieke Kars, Nico

Special thanks to the community of the Hague for their support

Laan, Daan Liu, Duarte Nobrega, Lisandro Suriel, Renate van der Togt, Liv Ylva, Iris van der Zee

COPYRIGHT

TEXT EDITOR — Jan Hunger

Made for #7 is a publication of the Royal Academy of Arts the Hague. Nothing from this publication may be reproduced and/or redistributed through means of print, photography, film or any other means without written permission from the authors, photographers, the KABK or the designers. 2014

FINAL EDITING — Gerdi Esch

ISSN 2214-0557

MODELS — HAIR & MAKE-UP —

PRICE 8,50 EURO COORDINATION — Graduates 2014, Gerdi Esch,

Gerrit Uittenbogaard ADVERTISEMENTS AND DISTRIBUTION — Graduates 2014,

FutureNetherlandsFund.com SPECIAL THANKS TO — Marieke Schoenmakers, director

KABK HEAD TEXTILE AND FASHION — Jurgi Persoons COORDINATOR DEPARTMENT AND INTERNSHIPS

Gerrit Uittenbogaard ADMINISTRATION — Sanne Jansen TEACHERS — Zara Atelj ,Els de Baan, Hil Driessen, Gerdi

Esch, Jan-Jan van Essche, Hilde Frunt, Eric Hirdes, Mirjam Ingram, Nico Laan, Harald Ligtvoet, Natasja Martens, Jurgi Persoons, Joost Post, Wim Ros, Laut Rosenbaum, Asha Salaris, Neeltje Schoenmaker, Gerrit Uittenbogaard, Martijn Verhoeven, Roy Verschuren, Robert Volmer, Ellen Vos WORKSHOP — Beleke den Hartog, Elsbeth van Heyningen,

Tardia Page

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MADE FOR MADE BY

#7

ROYAL ACADEMY OF ART, DEN HAAG


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