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World Beat Festival 2010 Bhutan the last Shangri-La

Haldeman’s Oom-pah Boys

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Photo: Bill Lyons

Northwest Learning Academy Dragon Dancers

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Saturday • June 26 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Sunday • June 27 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Riverfront Park • Salem

Manooghi Hi Bombay Rock Band

• Named Best Performing Arts Festival by the Oregon Festivals and Events Association • More than 125 Performances, Demonstrations & Workshops • Dine, shop, and experience the cultural richness of the Northwest!

Global Sponsors

• American Family Insurance • Batteries Plus • City of Salem • Comcast • Drs. Bud & Selma Pierce • Fischer Hayes, CPAs • Food 4 Less • Fred Meyer • Jaquish Kenninger Foundation • Kaiser Permanente • KBZY • La Pantera, KWBY & KCKX • Newnam Family Trust • Statesman Journal • Willamette University

Feel the heartbeat of the world!

(503) 581-2004 • www.SalemMulticultural.org Poster design: Vision Graphix/ Patricia Young, www.visiongraphix.webs.com

Musekiwa Chingodza from Zimbabwe

Photo: Ron Cooper

Dragon Boat Races


Sixth Annual World Beat Dragon Boat Races Presented by American Family Insurance This year marks the sixth anniversary of one of World Beat’s most popular events — the World Beat Dragon Boat Races. Four dragon boats will arrive on Saturday for the Sunday races, which are a joint effort of the World Beat Dragon Boat Steering Team, Tacoma Dragon Boat Association, DragonSports USA, the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, and the Willamette Queen Sternwheeler. Based on ancient Chinese legend, dragon boating has been around for centuries and is now one of the fastest growing sports in the U.S. Dragon boating made its debut in Salem at World Beat 2005, and today local teams and paddlers can sign up to practice in Salem’s own teak dragon boat. Information about the race and club is available at the Guest Services booth near the Court Street entrance, or by visiting www.WorldBeatFestival.org.

Race Schedule

Sunday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (times subject to change)

8:30 a.m. Captain’s Meeting 8:45 a.m. Opening Ceremonies with the VoViNam Lion Dancers: The lion dance is a ritual tradition based on a Chinese mythological animal. According to legend, the lion dance was developed to combat supernatural forces and through the years has become a symbol of good luck used to chase away evil spirits. 9:00 a.m. Races Begin 4:00–6:00 p.m. Final Races & Awards Ceremony

Race Teams Women

Mixed

Golden Dragons Womens Gold Team (Portland)

BlewByU (Portland)

Mighty Women Paddling Club (Portland)

Blind Ambition (Portland)

Peace Dragon Warriors (Salem)

Chaos Water Babies (Salem)

Pink Phoenix (Portland)

Castaways (Portland)

Quetzalcoatl (Portland)

Golden Dragons Mixed Black (Portland)

Rip City Paddlers (Portland)

Lightning Boat (Salem)

Sirens Paddling Club (Portland)

TDBA Destiny (Tacoma)

Women on Water (Portland)

Owls Dragonflies (Portland) Paddles of Fury (Portland) Portland Firedragons (Portland) Portland State University (Portland) Queens Dragon Riders (Salem) Shibumi (Portland) Thunder Boat (Salem) Tide & Paddled (Portland) Wicked Kelekona (Portland)

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Welcome! 010

June, 2

Ted Kulongoski, Governor

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Behind the Scenes

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The World Beat Festival is organized by the Salem Multicultural Institute, a 501(c) 3 non-profit organization. The purpose of SMI and World Beat is to create an atmosphere of openness and appreciation for cultural diversity throughout Oregon. Volunteers work throughout the year on various events and projects that promote the capital city as a center for cultural exchange and enrichment. If you are interested in volunteering, making a financial contribution, or learning more, please contact us at PO Box 4611, Salem, OR 97302, (503) 581-2004 or visit us at www.WorldBeatFestival.org.

Exhibits: Jackie Pierce, Kathleen Fish, Marisa Newnam, Mona Roberto Hayes Entertainment: Marisa Newnam, Jody Beckwith, Cathy Gilbert-Yu, Josie Gray, Mako Hayashi-Mayfield, Elaine Kangas, Selaina Miller, Mark Murakami, Al Newnam, Jackie Pierce, Duncan Scotland, Jack Serna, Nancy Turner, MaryAnn Wright, Zach Wright Sponsorship & Event Revenue: Stewart Hayes & Bill Isabell, Warren Bednarz, Mark Murakami, Marisa Newnam, Terry Samuel Children’s Activities: Michelle Baldwin, Kim Baldwin, Denise Puentes, Karen Rothwell, Debbie Schmidt, Marianna Vaughn Volunteers: Sue Mackey, Dorothy Sergent Dragon Boat Racing & Club: Ayla Montgomery-Kraly, Donna Disch, Jules Halverson, Kat Bell, Richard Chesbrough, Nonie Felder, Bill Foote, Heidi Henry, Scott Mills, Roger Moles, Doug Schryver, Darlene Strozut, Dave Sweeney Hospitality: Marlene Kirkpatrick, Jesse Gamez, Vicki Gamez, Linda Weissner Gallery and Performance & Lecture Series: Rachel Freeburg, Leland Gilsen, Mako Hayashi-Mayfield, Rebecca Jaynes, Marisa Newnam, Mona Roberto Hayes Development: John Cuddy, Kathleen Fish, Chris McDonald, Denise Puentes Marketing: Mona Roberto Hayes, Randy Byrnes, Rebecca Maitland, Marisa Newnam, Carlee Wright, Patricia Young Strategic Planning: Mary Meyer, Gwen Carr, Mona Roberto Hayes, Terry Samuel Cultural Advisors: William Duncan, Mako Hayashi-Mayfield, Barry Ostrum, Elena Peña, LeRina Rangel, Duncan Scotland, Carlee Wright, Merlin White, Wei Zhang-Anderson

Board of Directors

John Cuddy, Chair, Jesse Gamez, Vice Chair, Rachel Freeburg, Secretary, Stewart Hayes, Treasurer, Jim Edmonds, Artonya Gemmil, Mako Hayashi-Mayfield, Mary T. Meyer, Ayla Montgomery-Kraly, Mark Murakami, Marisa Newnam, Denise Puentes, Mona Roberto Hayes, Terence D. Samuel

Advisory Council

Marie Bradford, Gayle Caldarazzo, Amadou Fofana, Gerry Frank, Judy Hillman, Alison Kelly, Mike McLaran, Lee Pelton, Dave Roth, George Russell, Jim Seymour, Elizabeth Underwood, Pam Vorachek, Jackie Winters, Roger Yost

Steering Teams & Sub-Committees

(Chairs indicated in bold) Festival: Marisa Newnam & Mona Roberto Hayes Operations: Richard Swyers, Jim Triplett, Ken Chambers, Mari Chambers, Simon Clowes, Billy Gates, Andy Katsetos, Davina Savage, Pam Vorachek

Staff

Graham Morris, Executive Director Erin Zysett, Program Coordinator

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Schedule of Events - Saturday, June 26 Amphitheater

10:00 10:15 10:30 10:45 11:00 11:15 11:30 11:45 12:00 12:15 12:30 12:45 1:00 1:15 1:30 1:45 2:00 2:15 2:30 2:45 3:00 3:15 3:30 3:45 4:00 4:15 4:30 4:45 5:00 5:15 5:30 5:45 6:00 6:15 6:30 6:45 7:00 7:15 7:30 7:45 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 9:45 10:00 10:45 11:00

Asia/Pacific

Martial Arts

Cultural Center

European Stage

Opening Children’s Parade led by the Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue Pipes and Drums

Opening Ceremony Bhutan Cultural Delegation Ballet Folklorico Tlanese

Bhutan Cultural Tent exhibits and demonstrations (festival hours)

Karate for Kids West Salem VoViNam

Chinese Chess Vietnamese Voice in Salem

Karate for Kids South Salem

Sussefusse International Dance Troupe

World Guitar Fusion

Musekiwa Chingodza and Kudana Marimba

Ikebana Art of Japanese Floral Arrangement

Zimbabwean Music Workshop

Chinese Chess

Iaido Japanese Martial Arts

Cherry City Cloggers Rose Garland English Country Dances

Okinawan Music and Dance

Kalabharathi School of Indian Dance Bhutan

Chinese Chess

Chinese Tai Chi Spices of Nepal

Kalabharathi School of Indian Dance Chinese Chess

Courthouse Flamenco

Molly Malone Irish Step Dancers

Australian Didgeridoo Okinawan Dancer

Chinese Lions, Dragons and Cultural Dances

Swedish Head Wreath Making

Freestyle Wrestling Hula Halau O Na Kaikuahine

Incendio

Decorate the Mahjstang

Japanese Martial Arts

Hawaiian Ghost Stories

Haldeman’s Oom-pah Boys

Dance of the Gael

Hmong Dancers

Looking Wolf Band

Bhutanese Dancers

Native American Flute/Rock

Black Hat Dance Lama Karma

Okinawan Karate

Dance Workshop: American Tribal and Cabaret Styles Understanding the Art of Standard Fencing

Paradise of Samoa

Classical Fencing

Manooghi Hi Bombay Rock

Procession

of

Fire

International Cultural Fire Dances Saturday Night at the Festival Ends

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Let’s Salsa

Blue Gardenia Latin Styled Jazz


Schedule of Events - Saturday, June 26 Middle East

10:00 10:15 10:30 10:45 11:00 11:15 11:30 11:45 12:00 12:15 12:30 12:45 1:00 1:15 1:30 1:45 2:00 2:15 2:30 2:45 3:00 3:15 3:30 3:45 4:00 4:15 4:30 4:45 5:00 5:15 5:30 5:45 6:00 6:15 6:30 6:45 7:00 7:15 7:30 7:45 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 9:45 10:00 10:45 11:00

Africa

Native America

Americas

Showcase Stage

Opening Children’s Parade led by the Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue Pipes and Drums

Africa Tent ongoing exhibits and demonstrations (festival hours) demonstrations hosted by the African community.

Ameyaltonal Azteca Dancers Native American Pow Wow Dancers

Mythobolus Mask Theater

Classical Flute: Sierra Schmeltzer German Accordion Music: Marlene Meissner

Piñata Party

Middle East Cultural Tent sets the stage for ongoing demonstrations, exhibits, music, dance, and conversation hosted by the Iranian Community and the Arab American Cultural Center of Oregon

Musekiwa Chingodza

Loveness Wesa and Kgotso

Tepees set the stage for sharing of Native American Culture with interactive displays crafts dance drums and storytelling hosted by Eastern Cherokee Warner Austin

Romance Latino Quartet

Piñata Party

Jan Michael Looking Wolf Native American Flute

Music 4 Stings

Bill Hughes Trio Jazz Standards 1920’s to 1960’s Philippines Airs: Ed Peteros and William Cabanilla

Piñata Party

Mythobolus Mask Theater

Golden Flute: Sherry Lanning

Folk Singer: David Lanning

Nzuko Ndi Igbo Nigerian Masquerade

Piñata Party

Native American Pow Wow Dancers

Denali & Faxxon

Ameyaltonal Azteca Dancers

Acoustic Soul and Rock

Sisters of the Desert Moon

Procession

of

Saturday Night at the Festival Ends

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Fire


Schedule of Events - Sunday, June 27 Amphitheater

8:45 10:15 10:30 10:45 11:00 11:15 11:30 11:45 12:00 12:15 12:30 12:45 1:00 1:15 1:30 1:45 2:00 2:15 2:30 2:45 3:00 3:15 3:30 3:45 4:00 4:15 4:30 4:45 5:00 5:15 5:30 5:45 6:00

Asia Pacific

Dragon Boat Races

Cultural Center

European Stage

Opening Ceremony for Dragon Races with VoViNam Lion Dancers

Hafla Parade

Bhutan Cultural Tent exhibits and demonstrations

Chinese Chess

Annual Dragon

(festival hours)

Hafla

INDUS Gandhi Symposium

Boat Races

Middle Eastern Dances

Paradise of Samoa

Celtic Footprints

return to the Bhutan

Salem World

Americanistan

Takohachi Japanese Taiko Drums

Japanese Folk Dance Express

Beat Festival

Hmong Dancers

welcoming

Cooking Demonstrations

for the sixth year

China

teams from

Kwan’s Original Cuisine

Oregon and Bhutanese Dancers

Negara Pan Mediterranean and Beyond !

Washington

Philippine Sinulog

Willamette Chinese School Dance Club

Kelly Thibodeaux and Etouffee

Soran Bushi

of

Horn of Africa

Irish Ceili Dancers

Nations Guam

Final races and awards ceremony

Classic Tap

Chamorro Cuisine Salem International Folk Dancers

Swamp Rock

nd: a B t h g Highli

Scottish Airs with Frank Blair

Ethiopia

Parade

Cherry City Rhythm Rockers

Festival Ends

Featured Bands Incendio

World Guitar Fusion Saturday 1:45 p.m.

Looking Wolf Band Native American Rock Saturday 6:00 p.m.

Negara

Manooghi Hi

Bombay Rock, Saturday 8:00 p.m.

Pan Mediterranean and Beyond! Sunday 2:45 p.m.

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Kelly Thibodeaux and the Etouffee Band

Swamp Rock — Sunday 4:45 p.m.


Schedule of Events - Sunday, June 27 Middle East

8:45 10:00 10:30 10:45 11:00 11:15 11:30 11:45 12:00 12:15 12:30 12:45 1:00 1:15 1:30 1:45 2:00 2:15 2:30 2:45 3:00 3:15 3:30 3:45 4:00 4:15 4:30 4:45 5:00 5:15 5:30 5:45 6:00

Africa

Native America

Americas

Showcase Stage

Opening Ceremony for Dragon Races with VoViNam Lion Dancers

 Middle East Cultural Tent sets the stage for ongoing demonstrations, exhibits, music, dance, and conversation hosted by the Iranian Community and the Arab American Cultural Center of Oregon

Visit Africa Tent for ongoing exhibits and demonstrations (festival hours)

Nigerian Fashions and Demonstrations

Okaidja Afrosa Dance and Drum Workshop

 Tepees set the stage for sharing of Native American Culture with interactive displays crafts dance drums and storytelling hosted by Eastern Cherokee Warner Austin

Native American Pow Wow Dancers Ameyaltonal Azteca Dancers Piñata Party

True West String Band

Piñata Party

Michoacan Dancers

Native American Pow Wow Dancers

Parade

of

Piñata Party Ameyaltonal Azteca Dancers

Festival Ends

Best-Bets for Kids • Children’s Parade — Saturday, 10:00 a.m. • Children’s crafts and games in the Villages Africa: African animal face painting. Make matching animal ear headbands to go with your painted face. Learn to play mancala.

Americas: Use animal totem icon stamps to decorate a pouch. Play the board game Coyote and Chicks. Europe: Learn about animals in European folktales through story boards, storytelling and puppet show. Make and take animal characters from the folktales.

Asia: Make a Bhutan dragon stick puppet. Put on the dragon masks and cloth capes and do your own

• Piñata Parties in the Americas • Visit the Tepee in the Americas

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True West String Band

Golden Flute: Sherry Lanning

Folk Singer: David Lanning

Americanistan

Songs of Samoa: Jamila

Nations

Fatima Al Wahid Women’s Dances of Africa

“dragon dance.” Try tangram puzzles.

Charlie Crawford

Bill Hughes Trio Jazz Standards 1920’s to 1960’s


World Beat Festival 2010 Amphitheater Saturday, June 26 10:00 Opening Children’s Parade: Children and families gather for this delightful parade to open the World Beat Festival weekend. Led by the Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue (TVF&R) Pipes and Drums, scouts, 4-H clubs and children in traditional costumes from all over the world parade through the festival grounds to the amphitheater. TVF&R: Formed in 2000, the Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Pipes and Drums was the first fire service pipe band in the Pacific Northwest. While its primary mission is to serve as a ceremonial asset for various firerelated functions and ceremonies, the band has twice traveled to Guadalajara, Mexico as part of sister city visitations, performed at the Chicago South Side and South Boston St. Patrick’s parades and for the President of Ireland at the 2008 dedication of Portland’s Irish Famine Memorial. 10:15 Opening Ceremony: Welcome to the Thirteenth World Beat Festival! Opening remarks and introduction of special guests and the Bhutanese Cultural Delegation. 10:30-11:15 Bhutan Cultural Delegation: The Bhutanese Cultural Tour presented by Lama Karma Namgyel and Drukpa Mila Center, in cooperation with Salem Multicultural Institute, is the World Beat Festival 2010 Focus. The tour is a cultural exchange, focusing on traditional cham sacred dances and folk dances, hand-loom weaving, singing, wood crafts and mask-making, sacred painting, and storytelling. Many years of study, training and apprenticeship are required to become a master of any one of these disciplines. This is a unique opportunity to experience the rich culture and diversity of Bhutan. (Visit the Bhutan Cultural Tent in Asia Pacific.) 11:15-12:00 Ballet Folklorico Tlanese: A non-profit group, Tlanese was established in 2004 to share Mexican culture through dance and to keep traditions alive in the hearts of youth. They specialize in traditional dances from different states of Mexico such as Oaxaca, Veracruz, Sinaloa and Jalisco. Viva Mexico! 12:15-1:15 Sussefusse International Folk Dancers: Portland based Sussefusse (“sweet feet” in German) brings young dancers in brilliant ethnic attire to the stage with an exciting international dance set choreographed by Heidi Vorst.

1:45-3:15 Incendio: Capture a raging firestorm – the music of INCENDIO! Over the last nine years, this Latin guitar world fusion group has committed a unique alchemy of composition, technique and performance to seven critically acclaimed international CD releases.  At the heart of every track is the bold, romantic Spanish guitar, its timeless sound recast in powerful modern arrangements.  Seductive melodies set next to explosive improvisatory journeys – this is INCENDIO live! 3:30-4:15 Chinese Dragons, Lions and Cultural Dances: Portland based Northwest Learning Academy performs traditional Chinese music on traditional instruments, cultural dances including the exciting and colorful dragon and lion dances. 4:30-5:30 Zimbabwean performer Musekiwa Chingodza: joins Kudana Marimba to bring you the authentic, heart-lifting, danceable music of Zimbabwe. These lively rhythms are important to the Zimbabwean people for celebrations, spirituality, and to carry them through hard times. 6:00-7:00 Jan Michael Looking Wolf Band: performs high-energy Native American rock.  Come journey with upbeat drums and flutes as the 2009 Native American Music Award Artist of the Year performs songs from his new CD Breakin’ Free.  With a mix of influences blended together, the message in their music is clear – One Heart for ALL PEOPLE regardless of our color, language, culture, or heritage – we are all related! 7:15 Special performance: Venerable Lama Karma Namgyel of Bhutan trained in the monastic tradition in the Drukpa Kagyu lineage of Tibetan Buddhism, performs the Black Hat Dance. 8:00-9:30 Manooghi Hi: This Seattle-based band blends rock, soul and funk with traditional Indian rhythms and instruments and its songs sample eight languages: English, Hindi, Persian, Sanskrit, Bengali, Urdu, Rajasthani and Mumbai slang. The music echoes the journey of lead singer, Mehnaz Hoosein, a Mumbai native and pop star (known for the hit song Banooghi Mein) now uprooted and living in the Pacific Northwest. Her dynamic voice, along with veteran Seattle artists Todd Fogelsonger on the guitar, Kent Halvorsen on keyboard, Jimmy Thomas on bass, John Hollis on percussion and drums, Jarrod Kaplan on percussion and vocalist Ava S Chakravarti, captivates and creates a fresh mix of “East meets West” both mesmerizing and compelling.

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World Beat Festival 2010 Amphitheater 10:00-10:45 World Beat Fire Dances: Experience the excitement of International Fire Dances!

Te Marama – Tahitian Fire Belts EarthDescenDance. – A dramatic mix of circus arts and street entertainment, inspired by ancient traditions and contemporary clowning, this group is sure to wow you with flaming torches, acts of daredevilry and their infamous box of bad ideas.

Sisters of the Desert Moon. - Shemadan (candelabra) dancing as part of the Egyptian zeffa (wedding procession) began in the early 20th century. Paradise of Samoa – Fire Knives

11:00 Saturday Night at the Festival ends.

Sunday, June 27 11:30-1:15 Hafla: Come join a Middle Eastern dance party! Exciting groups of Middle Eastern dancers bring us the Egyptian cane dance, shemadan, Turkish skirt dance, debke, American tribal and cabaret-style dances and others. The enjoyment of the participants is the focus of this noon-time event. Come and enjoy this shared experience! Americanistan: Wayne “Omar” and Dunyah, founders of Americanistan, perform music with influences of North Africa, Turkey, Egypt and from their own imaginations. They are talented percussionists and multi-instrumentalists. Ethnic instruments such as oud, kanun, harmonium and ney flute and dynamic vocals in several languages soar above the rhythms of the dumbek, tambourine and frame drum. 1:30-2:15 Takohachi Japanese Taiko: Takohachi is a dentogeino (traditional folk art) performing group, performing folk pieces and dances from Japan. The group was officially formed in May 2007 by Yumi Torimaru, the group leader. Takohachi performs traditional drumming pieces that originated in Japanese villages and festivals. Please enjoy the dentogeino of Japan! 4:15 Parade of Nations: The parade originates at the World Showcase and proceeds through the festival grounds to the Amphitheater, where represented countries and their flags are introduced. Wear the national dress of your birth, your forefathers’ land or your adopted country, and join us for this colorful and upbeat parade that embodies the spirit of the festival.

2:45-4:00 Negara Band: Pan-Mediterranean and beyond! Portland based Negara has influences ranging from Middle-Eastern, North and West African and Spanish, to rock, jazz and blues. The music allows inventive strings and horns to ride over tightly knit percussion that can range from delicate to intense, from mesmerizing to infectiously danceable. The music is rooted in ethnic tradition yet is thoroughly contemporary.

4:45-6:00 Kelly Thibodeaux and the Etouffee Band: Led by fiddler Kelly Thibodeaux of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Etouffee combines red hot fiddle, shufflin’ R&B, kickin’ southern rock, and Cajun to create an exciting sound known as SWAMP ROCK. This is music that will dance you down Bourbon Street or into the darkest swamps....Louisiana style. From Cajun two-steps to songs about alligators, swamps, and sugar cane....it’s all about dancing and feeling good. Laissez Le Bon Temps Rouler...Let the Good Times Roll! 6:00 World Beat Festival ’10 ends.

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Asia-Pacific Village Saturday, June 26 11:30 Chinese Chess Demonstration: Members of the Chinese Community demonstrate Xiangqi, a two-player Chinese board game in the same family as western chess, chaturanga, shogi, Indian chess and janggi. The present-day form of Xiangqi originated in China and is therefore commonly called Chinese chess in English. Visit them at their booth on the east side of the village. (Demonstration will be repeated at 2:00, 3:30 and 5:00.) 11:45-12:15 Vietnamese Voice in Salem: Members of the Salem Vietnamese community and guests from Portland share their culture through songs and colorful, traditional dances and share with us the history and variations of their national dress – Ao Dai. From simple to intricate, always elegant!

3:15-3:25 Okinawan Dance: Satoko Ragland performs dances from the Ryukyuan culture of Okinawa. (See description at Cultural Center, 3:00 pm) 4:15-5:00 Kalabharathi School of Indian Dance: Portland’s Kalabharathi School Founder and Director Sivagami Vanka and her talented students share their passion for the classical dance form of south India. Kalabharathi promotes the values of Indian culture, preserves an ancient art form, and forges links among Indian, US and other cultures.

1:15-2:00 Hula Halau O Na Kaikuahine: Sisters Leilani Beymer and Pearl Barido started the halau twelve years ago in Eugene and last year in Salem. Together they teach traditional kahiko and auana, training the students to perpetuate the Hawaiian culture through language, arts, songs and dances. Aloha! 2:30-3:15 Australian Didgeridoo: A professional “didje” player, Jack Duncan performs with multiple didgeridoos, some made traditionally by aboriginal peoples in Australia, and creates high-energy, rhythmic music. The didgeridoo is a wind instrument developed by the indigenous people of northern Australia at least 1,500 years ago and is still used today both in Australia and around the world. Sometimes described as a natural wooden trumpet or “drone pipe,” this instrument is traditionally made from Eucalyptus trees that have had their interiors hollowed out by termites or have died of other causes.

5:30-6:00 Hmong Dances: The Hmong American Community of Oregon in Portland shares their culture through their colorful folk dances. The term Hmong (pronounced “mong”) refers to an Asian ethnic group in the mountainous regions of southeast Asia. 6:00-6:30 Dances of Bhutan: Dancers of the Bhutan Cultural Delegation perform traditional cham sacred dances and folk dances. 7:15-8:00 Paradise of Samoa: Native Samoan dancers and entertainers offer a show with a tour of the Pacific Islands, including Samoan, Tongan, Fijian, Tahitian, Maori, and Hawaiian Dance with traditional costumes and narration, live music and fire dance.  The troupe is based in the Salem/Keizer area and performs throughout the Northwest.  Tasi Keener is choreographer and director.

Martial Arts Court - Saturday, June 26 10:45-11:15 Karate for Kids-West Salem: The academy is deeply rooted in the South Korean national sport, the martial art of Tae kwon do. Students are taught not only techniques but also valuable life skills such as respect, courtesy and discipline.

12:15-12:45 Karate For Kids–South Salem: Presents the Korean Art of Taekwondo. See how traditional martial arts teach children and young adults to have confidence, self-discipline and courtesy, communication skills, physical strength and courage through fun and positive encouragement.

11:15-11:45 VoViNam: Vietnamese Martial Arts in Salem is a place where everyone can go to sharpen their skills, talents and discipline for martial arts and an overall healthier life. That is what Master Phong wants to share to enrich our community. Although there are thousands of VoViNam groups in the world, VoViNam Salem is one of the first few to become a non-profit organization operated by our community.

12:45-1:15 Greco-Roman and Freestyle Wrestling: The Saxon Mat Club will have K-6 as well as cadet wrestlers, and junior wrestlers demonstrate takedowns, throws, and other techniques. Freestyle wrestling is a style of amateur wrestling that is practiced throughout the world. Along with GrecoRoman, it is one of the two styles of wrestling contested in the Olympic Games. With track and field, they are one of the oldest organized sports in history.

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Asia-Pacific Village Sunday, June 27 11:30 Chinese Chess Demonstration: see description in 11:30 am Saturday schedule. (Demonstration will be repeated at 2:15 and 5:00 pm.)

4:00 Parade of Nations: The parade originates at the World Showcase and proceeds through the festival grounds to the Amphitheater.

11:45-12:45 Paradise of Samoa: Polynesian dance troupe based in Salem, Oregon, is comprised of young men and women from age six through 48.  The troupe is open to all those interested in experiencing and performing the art of Polynesian dance.  Tasi Keener, Director. 12:45-1:30 Japanese Folk Dance Express: Japanese folk dances, which vary from region to region, are created to celebrate special events, depict stories and share life in Japan. Each year this group prepares for the celebration of Obon, A Gathering of Joy, where respect is paid to those who came before … our ancestors. Practices are lead by Sahomi Tachibana, who has been teaching since her debut in 1948 in the classical and Kabuki dance style.

4:15-5:00 Willamette Chinese School Dance Club: Performances encompass a wide variety of Chinese minority dances. The choreography is derived from traditional dance movements originating in areas of China such as Xin Jiang, Xi Zang, and Yun Nan provinces. With cultural costumes and authentic Chinese props, dancers strive to provide an experience unique to the rich Chinese culture.

1:30-2:15 Portland Hmong Dancers: (see description 5:30 Saturday) 2:15-3:00 Dances of Bhutan: Dancers of the Bhutan Cultural Delegation perform traditional cham sacred dances and folk dances.

5:00-5:15: Soran Bushi: Performed by TIUA (Tokyo International University of America) students, this traditional dance is from northern Japan. The dance moves depict fishermen dragging nets, pulling ropes and carrying luggage over their shoulders.

3:00-3:45 Sinulog: This Philippine tradition from the island province of Cebu commemorates the Christianization of the islands. Costumed groups join the procession and dance as they wind along the main streets of the city. The Cebuano Speaking Association Dancers from Oregon and SW Washington and friends all join in the fun!

6:00 World Beat Festival ’10 ends.

Martial Arts Court - Saturday, continued 2:00-2:30 Iaido, Japanese Martial Arts: Founded in the late 16th century, this traditional martial art teaches the use of the Japanese sword. Practice is done by performing kata (forms) solo or in pairs. Kubokan, a Salem-based group, demonstrates kata from the curriculum of Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu. 3:30-4:15 Tai Chi: Instructor Ling Havlin explains this Chinese martial art, primarily practiced for its health benefits and a way of dealing with tension and stress. With a 4,000year history, it has many styles. Chi is a form of energy. Chinese believe that chi or life energy flows throughout the body. A person becomes ill when the flow of the chi through the body is blocked. Chinese recognize several ways for freeing up the flow of chi, including acupuncture and tai chi. 5:00-5:30 Japanese Martial Arts: Tokyo International University of America (TIUA) students demonstrate different Japanese martial arts forms including Kendo, the Way of the Sword, the art of Japanese Samurai swordsmanship.

6:30-7:15 Okinawan Karate: The traditional Okinawan martial arts called Te and Chinese Kenpo were blended together and developed into karate, later developing in Okinawa, based on several factors including the policy of banning weapons in the 1500’s. World Beat welcomes shihan Jim Craig and Westside Martial Arts of Hillsboro. 8:00-8:45 Salem Classical Fencing: Fencing is the art and sport of swordplay and is one of only four sports that have been in every modern Olympiad since 1896, yet it remains one of the least understood sports in the United States. Fencing is excellent exercise for both body and mind.

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European Village/Stepping Stage Saturday: June 26, 2010 10:00-11:30 Decorate and Raise the Mahjstang: (pronounced mi-shtong) Come and help decorate the mahjstang (May pole) with beautiful, fragrant flowers. Stand back and watch as the floral handiwork of the Scandinavian community and World Beat guests takes up its post at the center of the European Village.

1:30-2:15 Molly Malone Irish Dancers of the Yeates Academy of Irish Dance: These Irish step dancers have been living out their love of the dance and bringing the joy of Irish step dancing to Salem since 1998. The dance troupe of award-winning young and adult dancers performs both soft and hard shoe dances to joyous Celtic music.

11:00-11:30 Courthouse Dance Academy: Students of flamenco, ages 5 – 15, share their love of dancing with selfdiscipline, technique, and performance skills through a dance that originated in Andalusia, Spain.

3:30-4:30 Haldeman’s Oom-pah Boys: This Oompah trio proudly wears their lederhosen and plays traditional German music. With their accordion, clarinet and tuba, they bring toe-tapping, thigh-slapping, hand-clapping entertainment to the European Village. Chicken dance anyone?

2:30-3:15 Kalabharathi School of Indian Dance: Portland’s Kalabharathi School Founder and Director Sivagami Vanka and her talented students share their passion of the classical dance form of south India. Kalabharathi promotes the values of Indian culture, preserves an ancient art form,and forges links among Indian, US and other cultures.

11:45-12:30 Cherry City Cloggers: Clogging is a type of American folk dance with roots in traditional European dancing, early African-American dance, and traditional Cherokee dance in which the dancer’s footwear is used musically by striking the heel, the toe, or both in unison against a floor or each other to create audible percussive rhythms. Clogging was a social dance in the Appalachian Mountains as early as the 1700s. Today we clog to all types of music including country, bluegrass, pop, gospel, etc. If it has a beat, we can clog to it!

4:45-5:30 Dance of the Gaels: This Portland-area group performs traditional dances from Ireland, Scotland and Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. The Gaels are an ethno-linguistic group that originated in Ireland and subsequently spread to Scotland and the Isle of Man. In the strictest sense of the word, Gaels are speakers of the Gaelic languages: Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Manx.

12:30-1:30 Wild Rose Garland Dancers: A World Beat tradition not to be missed! The Wild Rose Garland Dancers transform the European Village into an English countryside from another era. Colorful costumes, garlands and lively music bring a touch of merry olde England. Join in the Maypole Dance!

5:45-6:45 Let’s Salsa: Dance Instructors Roxanna and Elias Villegas bring the excitement of Latin Dances to the World Beat. Friends and students dance to the Salsa rhythms. Watch and learn a new step or two. 7:15-8:15 Blue Gardenia: Enjoy the smooth American and classy Latin-styled jazz that this seasoned group offers in both vocals and instrumentation. Stop by the European Stepping Stage for a taste of tango, chacha, rumba, samba, or bossa nova.

Best Bets for Teens and Twenty Somethings . Martial Arts demonstrations on Saturday

. Dragon Boat Races on Sunday . Drum and Dance Workshops in Africa . Henna Tattoos . Bands in the Amphitheater on Saturday and Sunday

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European Village/Stepping Stage Sunday, June 27 11:45-12:30 Celtic Foot Prints: Specializing in the historic traditions and dances of Scotland, this Salem-based group offers a rare presentation from early Caledonia to modern day. Today’s performance consists of researched dramas, dances and music collected from the highlands, islands and lowlands of Scotland, authentically presented with a view to entertain. 12:45-1:40 Cherry City Rhythm Rockers: A contemporary clog dancing group based in Salem and affiliated with the Cherry City Cloggers. They incorporate many types of music and styles from country to Irish, pop, Latin and even gospel – something for everyone! 2:00-3:00 Celtic Airs with Frank Blair: Frank plays traditional Irish and Scottish music, tunes (jigs, reels, etc) and songs on guitar and bouzouki, most with historical context. This performance will be predominantly Scottish. Fiddle player George Klepac joins in the fun! 3:15-4:00 Irish Céilí Dances: Members and friends of the Céilí of the Valley Society, led by caller Maldon Meehan, will perform a variety of traditional Irish céilí sets and sean nos dances that are sure to entertain.

4:00 Parade of Nations: The parade originates at the World Showcase and proceeds through the festival grounds to the Amphitheater, where represented countries and their flags are introduced. Wear the national dress of your birth, your forefathers’ land or your adopted country and join us for this colorful and upbeat parade that embodies the spirit of the festival. 4:15-4:00 Classic Tap: Enjoy a bit of Americana with this lively group of flashy tappers and their great routines. 5:15-6:00 Salem International Folk Dancers: Salem’s folk dancers will perform and teach international dances in a fun, interactive performance and workshop. Join in and learn a dance or two. 6:00 World Beat Festival ’10 ends.

Celebrate. Entertain. Educate. Inspire. Comcast is proud to support Salem World Beat Festival and their commitment to enriching our community. We power dreams in our communities 1-800-COMCAST www.comcast.com

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African Village Saturday, June 26, 2010 12:00-12:45 Mythobolus Mask Theater: This dance and mask performance group presents tales from around the world and has represented the Unites States at the International Dance Festival in Istanbul, Turkey. They will perform African legends. 2:00-3:00 Musekiwa Chingodza: Born into a family of great mbira players in Mwangara village, Murewa, Zimbabwe, Musekiwa began playing at the age of five. He currently teaches mbira at Prince Edward School in Harare. Enjoy the traditional mbira music of Zimbabwe as played by Musekwia accompanied by his friend and mbira partner, Bud Cohen. Known for his melodious, complex playing style and beautiful singing voice, Musekiwa brings the depth of Shona culture to every performance. 4:00-5:00 Loveness Wesa, Zimbabwean Dance Workshop: In 2001, Ms Wesa became her country’s first woman theatrical producer when her theater company brought the dance drama Brooms to the Amahkosi Township stage in Zimbabwe. Loveness founded the Kgotso African Dance Theater as a vehicle for bringing works by African women artists to Zimbabwe’s stage, promoting peace and understanding through music and dance.

6:00-6:45 Nzuko Ndi Igbo (NNI): The premier cultural organization of the Igbo people of Nigeria living in Oregon and SW Washington. The focus of the organization is to propagate the language and culture of the Igbos throughout the country. The rich culture of the Igbos is very evident in their food, clothing and music. The NNI Masquerade showcases the drumming, fluting and dancing abilities of the Igbo and features the famous Nyikiriputu and Apunanwu spirits, representing the father and mother of the Igbos. 8:00-9:15 Sisters of the Desert Moon: Salem’s awardwinning Middle Eastern dance troupe, with co-troupe Jewels of the Desert Moon, entertain you with Egyptian cabaret-style Middle Eastern dances. Come join the fun! Learn the dances! 9:45 Procession of Fire: Drummers lead the exciting performers of Samoan fire knives, Tahitian fire belts, Egyptian shemadan (candelabra) and show-stopping acts of Earth Descendance, as they light their way through the villages to the amphitheater for the finale of Saturday Evening at the Beat!

World Showcase Stage Saturday: June 26, 2010 10:45-11:15 Classical Flute: Sierra Schmeltzer, a freshman at South Salem High, has been playing flute for four years. She is the principal chair in the junior division of her city youth symphony and has performed in the Salem All City band for the past three years. Sierra is a national MTNA (Music Teachers’ National Association) junior woodwind finalist and winner of the Salem-Keizer district woodwind solo and ensemble competition for 2010. Her ambition is to play professionally in a large symphony. 11:30-12:15 German Accordion Music: Wearing her drindl and complete German attire, Marlene Meissner brings a bit of Bavaria to the festival with her selection of accordion music. A native of Mt. Angel, she has played at almost every Oktoberfest since 1966, either solo or part of a band. 12:30-2:15 Music 4 Strings: Bill Thompson and Salem ukulele enthusiasts showcase the “uke” with an international flavor. The ukulele originated in the 19th century as a Hawaiian interpretation of a small guitar-like instrument brought to Hawaii by Portuguese immigrants. It gained great popularity in the United States during the early 20th century, and from there spread internationally. 2:30-3:30 Bill Hughes Trio: Bill Hughes on guitar, Ray Rom on saxophone and Roger Webster on bass, play jazz standards and classics from the 1920s through the 1960s. 

3:45-4:30 Philippine Airs: Edgar Peteros and William Cabanilla entertain us with beautiful melodies from their homeland, the Philippine Islands. Present day Philippines and its music reflect diverse cultural influences including Chinese, Arabic, Spanish and American. Mabuhay! 4:45-5:30 The Golden Flute: Travel the world with the mystical sounds of Sherry Lanning and her golden flute. 5:45-6:30 Folk Singer David Lanning: With his 12-string guitar and heavily influenced by the music of John Denver, Jim Croce and Gordon Lightfoot, David brings back memories of the 70’s and 80’s. 7:00-8:00 Denali and Faxxon: Two young Northwest guitarists, Jesse Faxxon Mills & Denali Kennedy, musically meld hearts and minds into a uniquely pleasing soundscape. They combine acoustic soul and rock rhythms, with lyrics describing experiences shared by everyone growing up in the rainy, grey, but evergreen forest. Love of the land, beauty of women, heartbreak, sorrow, and even a song or two about food, Denali and Faxxon share through their songs a universal passion for the journey of life. 

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African Village Sunday, June 27 12:00-1:00 Fashions from Africa: Nigerian Mary Onyima and friends celebrate the Rites of Passage through traditional clothing. Members of the African community are welcome to “show-off” and model their traditional attire. Head wrapping and hair braiding demonstrations continue. 2:00-3:00 Okaidja Afrosa, Ghanaian Dance Workshop: A native of Ghana, Okaidja trained with Ghawafrica Dance Ensemble and danced for the prestigious Ghana Dance Ensemble at the University of Ghana’s Institute of African Studies. He was a principal dancer for the renowned group Okropong founded by the legendary Obo Addy. He has traveled to schools all over Oregon and Washington conducting workshops and residencies. Okaidja takes his audiences on a journey of cross-cultural understanding and shows the connection between West Africa and the rest of the world with music and dance.

4:00 Parade of Nations: The parade originates at the World Showcase and proceeds through the festival grounds to the Amphitheater. 4:15-5:00 Fatima Al Wahid, Dances of North Africa: Fatima was born in Sierra Leone, West Africa; her father was from the Sudan. She has always been fascinated by the culture and dance of the Middle East and Africa. Based in California, Fatima travels to Egypt several times a year, returning with the latest fashions for Fatima’s Bazaar as well as the latest on the dance scene. She is well versed in various folkloric styles. 6:00 World Beat Festival ‘10 ends!

World Showcase Stage Sunday, June 27 10:45-11:20 Charlie Crawford: Singer/Songwriter Charlie Crawford has been playing guitar and writing songs for over 40 years. His early influences were Bob Dylan, Tim Hardin and the Beatles. He will perform selections from his 24 CDs to date.

3:30-3:50 Jamila: Ms. Miller shares her Samoan heritage and entertains us with songs from her mother’s homeland. Talofa!

11:30-12:15 True West String Band: This group plays lively music of the frontier, from Appalachia into the West, with influences from the mountains to the blues. (Next performance in the Americas at 1:00 pm) 12:30-1:15 The Golden Flute: Travel the world with the mystical sounds of Sherry Lanning and her golden flute. 1:30-2:15 Folk Singer David Lanning: With his 12-string guitar and heavily influenced by the music of John Denver, Jim Croce and Gordon Lightfoot, David brings back memories of the 70’s and 80’s. 2:30-3:15 Americanistan: Wayne “Omar” and Dunyah perform music with influences of North Africa and Turkey, including zurna drum rhythms and miswiz. They are both talented percussionists and multi-instrumentalists performing together since 1990 at festivals, shows and events all over the Northwest and beyond.

4:00 Parade of Nations: The parade originates at the World Showcase and proceeds through the festival grounds to the Amphitheater, where represented countries and their flags are introduced. Wear the national dress of your birth, your forefathers’ land or your adopted country and join us for this exciting event! 4:15-5:30 Bill Hughes Trio: Salem’s own jazz trio entertains us with their inimitable style. Don’t miss this uniquely American brand of music standards and classics from the 1920s through the 1960s. 6:00 World Beat Festival ’10 ends!

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Cultural Center Saturday: June 26, 2010 10:45-11:45 Swedish Head Wreath Making: Barry and Diane Ostrum and members of the Tre Kronor Lodge of Salem, assisted by the 4-H Scandinavian Club, will show you how to weave traditional Swedish head wreaths using fresh flowers. Tre Kronor in Swedish means “three crowns,” representing the countries of Sweden, which once encompassed Finland, Norway, and Denmark. The beautiful head wreaths add much to the festive dancing around the majstång (may pole) which takes place at the European Village shortly after the workshop.

3:00-3:45 The Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan: Bhutan, Drukyul, Land of the Thunder Dragon, was voted one of the world’s top cultural heritage destinations. The Kingdom of Bhutan and the Bhutanese people identify themselves as a sovereign independent nation.  Members of the Bhutanese Cultural Delegation give us a unique opportunity to experience the rich culture and diversity of Bhutan. (Visit the Bhutan Cultural Tent in Asia Pacific.)

12:00-12:45 Ikebana, Japanese Floral Arrangement: Simplicity, asymmetry, and balance are basic principles in Japanese flower arrangement. The goal is creating a sense of harmony among the materials used, the container, and the setting. Ikebana makes use of “empty space,” while Western flower arrangement tends to use volume. Hiroko Newman taught the Sogetsu style of ikebana, as well as Western flower arrangement, for 10 years in Seoul, Korea. Come and see how to make lovely arrangements in both styles to enhance your home.

4:00-4:45 Spices of Nepal: Meet Shiba Bhattarai, whose mission is to introduce the traditional Eastern concept of ayurvedic healing through the use of foods and spices. Curry not only adds flavor to food, it brings multiple fringe benefits to your health. Studies have offered evidence that spices help protect from diseases such as cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, circulatory problems and many other ailments. Shiba recreates family recipes, using all natural ingredients and fresh ingredients from the Willamette Valley when available. 

1:00-1:45 Zimbabwean Music Workshop: Master Zimbabwean musician Musekiwa Chingodza will teach us to sing a traditional call and response song with clapping patterns. Experience the joy of this culture through participation! (Musekiwa performs at the African Village at 2:00 pm and joins Kudana Marimba at the amphitheater at 4:30 pm.) 2:00-2:45 Music and Dances of Okinawa: Satoko Ragland performs dances from the Ryukyuan culture of Okinawa. She has studied the Tamagusuku style of dance in Okinawa and Tokyo, and returns to Japan every year for further study. She will perform three dances which show both classical and traditional folk dancing in traditional Okinawan kimono. The final dance, Hatoma Bushi, from the island of Hatoma, combines Japanese Kappore dance with Okinawan karate movements, and the audience can join in. Okinawan Miwa Holman, her son Minato (13) and daughter Minami (11) play the Okinawan sanshin, a stringed instrument, which was introduced from China 600 years ago. The body is made of python skin and the neck is of lacquered ebony. The sound of the sanshin is described as the “true heart of Okinawan music.”

5:00-5:45 “Chicken Skin” Ghost Stories from Hawaii: Traditional story teller Alton Takiyama-Chung asks,”Afraid of the dark?” You will be after listening to ghostly tales from the islands. Stories range from benign, spooky tales for children, to those that make adults uncomfortable, to those that make even teenagers look over their shoulders into the shadows. Take a night in an abandoned graveyard, a faceless ghost, a strange hitchhiker, a dash of Hawaiian mythology, and blend well with other true stories of the bizarre and unexplainable, and you have the makings of perfectly frightful time. Life in paradise can be delightful.  But if you are disrespectful, your time there can be terrifying…and brief. 6:15-7:15 Dance Workshop - American Tribal and Cabaret Styles: These styles are greatly influenced by Middle Eastern dance and done with an American spin. Cira has been belly dancing for over 20 years and is the troupe director of Sister of the Desert Moon and Artemis Tribal Dancers. Learn new moves and have fun with Cira! 7:15-8:00 Understanding the Art of Standard Fencing: Fencing is only one of four sports that have been in every modern Olympiad since 1896, yet it remains one of the most poorly understood sports in the United States. Learn more about fencing, including how to watch and understand competitions.

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Cultural Center Sunday, June 27 11:00-12:00 Gandhi Symposium: “Mahatma Gandhi, M. L.  King Jr. and Nelson Mandela: three continents and three leaders. How would they deal with the fanaticism based on religion in today’s world?” Speakers: Peter Bergel, Director, Oregon Peace Works. Dr. Greg Felker, Department of Political Science, Willamette University.

COOKING DEMONSTRATIONS:  Learn to make! Have a taste! 

Hosted by INDUS, (India-US) Friendship Association. 12:15-1:15 The Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan: Venerable Lama Karma Namgyel is trained in the monastic tradition in the Drukpa Kagyu lineage of Tibetan Buddhism and will talk about Bhutan, “the last Shangri-La,” one of the newest democracies nestled in the Himalayas between Tibet and India. Bhutan is rich in culture and tradition, diverse landscape, arts and architecture, flora and fauna, monasteries and lama dancing, sports and trekking; home of Gross National Happiness.

1:45-2:45 Chinese Cooking: Kwan’s Original Cuisine has repeatedly been voted Salem’s “Best Asian” in local polls. Born in Macao, owner Master Chef Kam Sang Kwan came to Salem in the early 1970s to work as Gerry Frank’s cook. Many people remember his first restaurant in City Hall called Kwan’s Kitchen. He believes in using modern technology to achieve the healthiest Chinese cooking, but he uses traditional techniques to create his extensive menu. Mr. Kwan will show you how to prepare two Chinese dishes that you can easily duplicate at home: Beef Broccoli and Banana Fritters. 3:15-4:15 Ethiopian Cooking: Mohamed Yousaf’s Horn of Africa is a long-time favorite food booth in World Beat’s African Village. During a cooking demonstration last year, Mohamed provided a spongy Ethiopian flat bread to go with the dishes he prepared. Called injera in the north or bideena in his home state of Oromo, this flatbread is delicious and has a very distinctive flavor. By popular demand, he returns to demonstrate how to make and enjoy Ethiopian flatbread at home! 4:30-5:30 Chamorro Cooking: Ed Sablan grew up on Guam and moved to Portland in 1993 where he started his career in the food service industry. One of his goals is to develop a Portland establishment serving food from Guam. ”When you grow up on Guam, one of the first things you learn as a child is to cook.” Titiyas? Coconut milk flatbread! Kelaguen? Chopped grilled chicken mixed with grated coconut, lemon, onions, and peppers! Linechan gollai? Grilled vegetables with a spicy, citrusy coconut milk sauce! Learn to prepare and sample these tasty dishes! 6:00 World Beat Festival ’10 ends!

World Beat Focus: Bhutan, The last Shangri-La

Amphitheater: • Welcome ceremony • Music and dance by Cultural Delegation

Asia Pacific Village:

Cultural Center:

• Bhutan Cultural Tent • Mandala sand painting • • Cultural exhibits and demonstrations by weavers, painters, musicians, and carvers • Traditional cham (sacred dances), folk dances, and songs

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Lecture, presentation on Bhutanese culture


The Americas Saturday: June 26, 2010 11:00-11:30 Ameyaltonal: This traditional Aztec dance circle was established with the mission of continuing traditions, ceremonies, education and culture of their Mexican indigenous roots.

3:00-4:00 Jan Michael Looking Wolf: Native American Flute performance by 2009 Native American Music Awards Artist of the Year. Jan Michael is a member of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and has a mix of Native and Celtic heritage.  He is widely considered one of the modern day masters of the native flute and has recorded 16 CDs which earned over 35 national awards.   Come enjoy the magic of the world’s third most ancient instrument! Join Looking Wolf and his band at 6:00 pm in the Amphitheater for an unforgettable performance!

The ceremony starts with asking permission of the four directions of the Universe (East, West, North, South, center, above, below). The Azteca salute the four essential elements: Fire, Water, Wind, and Earth. This dynamic performance is shared by many tribes across the Americas. At the close of the ceremony, they close again to the four directions thanking them for their way of life and honoring their ancestors.

5:00-5:45 Mythobolus Mask Theater: The dance and mask performance group performs tales from around the world and has represented the Unites States at the International Dance Festival in Istanbul, Turkey. Mythobolus presents legends from North America, as well as legends from Mexico and Mayan cultures.

11:30-12:00 Native American Cultural Presentation: Eastern Cherokee Austin Warner, performing arts director of the Chemawa Indian School, hosts powwow-style drummers, dancers and singers. 12:30 Piñata Party: Come to an authentic Mexican piñata party. (Repeated at 2:30, 4:30 and 6:30 pm)

7:00-7:30 Native American Cultural Presentation: (See 11:30 description.)

1:00-2:00 Romance: Traditional Latino music revives the romantic and classical boleros from the past. Romance steals hearts with its traditional Latino music that rescues the essence of Latino romanticism. 

7:30-8:00 Ameyaltonal, Azteca Dancers: (See 11:00 am description.)

Sunday, June 27

11:00-11:30 Ameyaltonal, Azteca Dancers: (See description Saturday, 11:00am.)

the 31 states of Mexico. It is the sixteenth largest state with a population was of 3,966,073 in the 2005 census. Its capital city of Morelia (previously known as Valladolid) is located between Mexico City and Guadalajara.

11:30-12:00 Native American Powwow Dancers: (See description Saturday, 11:30 am.) 12:30 Piñata Party: Come to an authentic Mexican Piñata Party. (Repeated at 2:30 and 4:30) 1:00-2:00 True West String Band: True West plays lively music of the frontier, from Appalachia into the West, with influences from the mountains to the blues.  Truman Price on fiddle and vocal, Wes Messinger on banjo, guitar and vocal, and Paul Clements on fiddle, guitar, and vocal, have been playing together for years, with hundreds of performances in the Northwest.  3:00-3:30 Michoacán Dancers: Dancers representing the Mexican state of Michoacán share their colorful traditional dances. Formally known as Michoacán de Ocampo, it is one of

3:30-4:00 Native American Cultural Presentation: Eastern Cherokee Austin Warner, performing arts director of the Chemawa Indian School, hosts powwow-style drummers, dancers and singers. 4:00 Parade of Nations: The parade originates at the World Showcase and proceeds through the festival grounds to the Amphitheater. 5:00-5:30 Ameyaltonal: A traditional Aztec dance circle, with the mission of continuing traditions, ceremonies, education and culture related to Mexican indigenous roots. (see description, Saturday 11:00)  6:00 World Beat Festival ‘10 ends!

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Who We Are

Salem Multicultural Institute Providing places for our cultural communities to share their cultural heritages all year long

You know and enjoy the World Beat Festival every year, but did you know that we provide fun, educational cultural programs throughout the year? Visit the World Beat Gallery, on the 2nd Floor of the Reed Opera House in downtown Salem, where we feature three cultural exhibits a year and host a variety of cultural activities, each designed to highlight and honor diversity. Please join us for our 2010-11 season!

2010

2011

Currently on Display Many Choices: Weddings of India, created by India U.S. Friendship Association and Salem Multicultural Institute, the exhibit depicts the many wedding traditions of India. Aug. 4 - Oct. 13 Marriage Customs III: Russian Orthodox, Native American & Vietnamese, explores the similarities and differences of marriage customs around the world. Oct. 2 First Annual Multicultural Multicultural Ball, Ball, enjoy raise an money for of SMIculture, and enjoy an evening of cultural First evening live music and dancing, and costumes live entertainment! help launchand a signature fundraising event for SMI! Nov. 3 - Jan. 12, 2011 Global New Year’s Celebrations, we all have them! Come learn about the diverse ways people have found to ring in the New Year!

Jan. 17 - 22 Willamette University’s Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration, join us in honoring him during a two week long celebration at Wilamette University. Feb. 2 - May 11 Family History Project, local students research and display their family histories June 1 - Sept. 14 Faces of Salem, photographers share portraits and stories of local people June 25 & 26 14th Annual World Beat Festival, always the last weekend in June! Oct. 5, 2011 - Jan.18, 2012 Japanese Cultural Exhibit, take a trip to Japan without leaving Salem

2010 Blind Boys of Alabama Concert at Willamette University part of the 2010 MLK Event

Yo u a r e t h e c u lt u r a l E x p e r t ! The unique thing about our gallery is the exhibits are created by community members working with research and display experts. We welcome community members to assist with gallery exhibits. If you have cultural traditions, photos, and artifacts to share, let us tell your story at the World Beat Gallery.

Call us at (503) 581-2004 or visit SalemMulticultural.org 21


2010 World Beat Festival Exhibitors World Showcase: � � � � � � � � � � � �

Mid-Valley Women’s Crisis Service AFS Intercultural Program Mother/Baby Haiti Zonta WBF Volunteer Check in Indigo Wellness Center Puppet Pandemonium Japanese Cultural Society Statesman Journal Ambrusco’s Italian Ice Salem Stamp Society Karen Lamb Angora Spinning

Africa: � � � � � � � • � � � �

By the Fountain: � Dragon Boat Exhibit and WBF Guest Services � Oregon Chainsaw Sculptures � The Kettle Corn Company

Americas: � � � � � � � � � � • � � � � � �

Oregon Northwest Black Pioneers Mission Mill Museum Salem Doula Network Marion Co. Sheriff’s Department Salem Police Department Saxon Mat Club WBF Children’s Activities Ameyaltonal Azteca Jan Michael Looking Wolf Trading Post Native American Tepees Traveling Museum of Oregon Prehistory Michoacán Cultural Booth Marion-Polk Food Share Nosh Pit Adam’s Ribs Smokehouse Eva’s Fresh Fruit and Mexican Food

Horn of Africa Yatima Group Fund Fatima’s Egyptian Bazaar ADE Africana Andando Owerri Sister City Association Africa Cultural Tent Safro Scrubs Elizabeth Bowers Zambia Education Fund The Ray of Hope Foundation WBF Children’s Activities First Aid

Europe: � Authentic Polish Cuisine, Royal Cuisine Polish Cultural Booth � WBF Children’s Activities � Pasta Garden • Ice Cream Dreams � Mt. Angel Sausage Co � Ceili of the Valley � BelgiQue Sugar Waffles and Espresso � St. Andrew’s Society � Russian Orthodox ROBES � The World Flag � Artists in Action � Holland Cultural Booth � Taste of Holland-Poffertjes � Hatterdashery

Grand Boulevard: � � � � � � � �

Experience Cultural Cuisine!

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Rosegarden Turkish Food Rosegarden Turkish Cultural Booth Middle Eastern Cultural Tent Alter Ego Roving Horse Henna Karate for Kids Salem Classical Fencing World Beat Cultural Center


2010 World Beat Festival Exhibitors Amphitheater: � � � � � � � �

Asia Pacific East:

First Aid Crispin’s Import Gallery Ambrusco’s Italian Ice Cactus Jack La Jitana Gyro La Jitana Philly Rice Plate Sarika Thai

Asia Pacific West: � � � � � •

S

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Katmandu Café Paradise of Samoa Salem Samoa Club Polynesian Gifts Philippine American National Historical Society PACCO (Philippine American Chamber of Commerce or Oregon) Bhutan Cultural Tent Shahi Design India US Friendship Assoc (INDUS) Mertha WBF Children’s Activities Asian Fast Taste Maui Wowi Hawaiian Coffee and Smoothies

World Beat

� Back to Bali � Stone Age � Salem Chinese Cultural Assoc. and Language Academy � Vietnamese Voice in Salem � Hmong American Community of Oregon � Salem/Kawagoe Sister City � Jade Kingdom � Hmong Fashions � Oregon Falun Dafa Association • Snow Leopard Trust � Lhasa Handicrafts and Garments � Zambalha � Asian Art and Needle Craft � Chinese Art Studio • Comcast � Greater Salem Filipino American Assoc.

Save the date! Saturday, October 2, 2010 First Annual Multicultural Ball 6-11 p.m. – Trinity Ballroom, Reed Opera House • International Menu • Dancing • Silent Auction 23


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S M

Gracias India

Dhanyawad --

SALEM

KBZY 1490

Newnam Family Trust

Drs. Bud & Selma Pierce

Continental

• CCTV • Stewart & Mona Hayes • Hut Shuttle • Lancaster Mall • Marion County Sheriff’s Office • Marion, Polk, Yamhill Counties Central Labor Council • Oregon Arts Commission • Portland Rose Festival Association • Reed Opera House • Salem Electric • Salem Health • Target • Uwajimaya • Willamette Queen

Metropolitan • AC Gilbert’s • Allied Waste • Black United Fund • Randy Byrnes • Ken & Mari Chambers • John & Priscilla Cuddy • DragonSports USA • FastSigns • Tonk & Debbie Fischer • The Grand Hotel • Northern Lights Theater Pub • NW Natural • Performance Health Technology • Phil & Denise Puentes • Salem Area Chamber of Commerce • Salem’s Riverfront Carousel • Roth’s • Bruce Taylor • Vision Graphix

Spaseeba - Russia Salamat - Philippines Kamasahamnida - Korea Design and layout: Vision Graphix/Patricia Young, www.visiongraphix.webs.com

Merci~ France

Village • Bar Industries • Boise Packaging • Capitol Rental • Cascade Baking • Catholic Community Services • Country Financial • General Mills • Godsey Secure Storage • Great Harvest Bread • Heffernan Group • Bill Isabell AllState • Linn Benton Tractor Co. • Stan Mayfield & Mako Hayashi-Mayfield • John Newnam • Old Europe Inn • Olson Florist • Bill & Vona Pease • Promotions West • Shutterbug • Silverman Charitable Trust • Slater Communications

Arigato Gozaimasu – Japan

Acant - Kenya

d 2010 World Beat Sponsors! l r Woeat Global B

Italy

China

Mahalo - Hawaii

Grazie -

Xie Xie -

Thank you

Danke - Germany

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 I    


World Beat 2010 Program