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TIME’S

is the Great Achive

www.time’s.com


About Our

Company The company sponsors a series of national and local awards designed to highlight the achievements of individuals and organizations in different realms. In 2007, it inaugurated its first Nonprofit Excellence Award, awarded to four organizations “for the excellence of their management practices”. Only nonprofits in New York City, Long Island, or Westchester were eligible.[17] Jointly with the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the American Library Association, The New York Times Company sponsors an award to honor librarians “for service to their communities.” The I Love My Librarian! award was given to ten recipients in December 2008, and presented by The New York Times Company president and CEO Janet L. Robinson, Carnegie Corporation president Vartan Gregorian, and Jim Rettig, president of the American Library Association.[18] In May 2009, the company launched The New York Times Outstanding Playwright Award to honor an American playwright who had recently had his or her professional debut in New York. The first winner was Tarell Alvin McCraney for his play “The Brothers Size”. In 2010, Dan LeFranc

won for his play “Sixty Miles to Silver Lake”. January 1, 2003 – The company completed its purchase of The Washington Post’s 50 percent interest in the International Herald Tribune (IHT) for US$65 million. The New York Times Company, which had owned 50% of the IHT, became the sole owner.[8] March 18, 2005 – The company acquired About.com, an online provider of consumer information for US$410 million. In 2005, the company reported revenues of US$3.4 billion to its investors. August 25, 2006 – The company acquired Baseline StudioSystems, an online database and research service on the film and television industries for US$35 million. In 2011, the Times sold the service back to its original owners.[9] September 12, 2006 – The company announced its decision to sell its Broadcast Media Group, consisting of “nine network-affiliated television stations, their related Web sites and the digital operating center” [10] January 4, 2007 – The New York Times reported that the company had reached an agreement to sell all nine local television stations to the private equity firm Oak Hill Capital Partners.[11][12] May 17, 2007 – The company announced that it had finalized the sale of its Broadcast Media Group on May 7, 2007, for “approximately $575 million.”[12] November 19, 2007 – The company staged a gala opening after relocating its


Content History......................................................................................................................... 1 Company holdings..................................................................................................... 3 Company stock profile............................................................................................... 5 Board of Directors...................................................................................................... 6 Community awards.................................................................................................. 10


History The company was founded by Henry Jarvis Raymond and George Jones in New York City. The first edition of the newspaper The New York Times, published on September 18, 1851, stated: “We publish today the first issue of the New-York Daily Times, and we intend to issue it every morning (Sundays excepted) for an indefinite number of years to come.”[5] ^ “Business Units”. The New York Times Company. Retrieved August 29, 2008. “The New York Times Company, a leading media company with 2007 revenues of $3.2 billion, includes The New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, The Boston Globe, 16 other daily newspapers, WQXR-FM, and more than 50 Web sites, including NYTimes.com, Boston.com, and About.com. The Company’s core purpose is to enhance society by creating, collecting, and distributing high-quality news, information, and entertainment.”

At the April 2005 board meeting, Class B shareholders elected nine of the fourteen directors of the company.


80%

OF PEOPLE All Over the World The company sponsors a series of national and local awards designed to highlight the achievements of individuals and organizations in different realms

Chronology January 1, 2003 – The company completed its purchase of The Washington Post’s 50 percent interest in the International Herald Tribune (IHT) for US$65 million. The New York Times Company, which had owned 50% of the IHT, became the sole owner.[8] March 18, 2005 – The company acquired About.com, an online provider of consumer information for US$410 million. In 2005, the company reported revenues of US$3.4 billion to its investors. August 25, 2006 – The company acquired Baseline StudioSystems, an online database and research service on the film and television industries for US$35 million. In 2011, the Times sold the service back to its original owners.[9]

Cristeena David CEO, Time’s

September 12, 2006 – The company announced its decision to sell its Broadcast Media Group, consisting of “nine network-affiliated television stations, their related Web sites and the digital operating center” [10]

the previous location at 229 West 43rd Street to The New York Times Building at 620 Eighth Avenue, on the west side of Times Square, between 40th and 41st streets across from the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey Bus Terminal.[13]

January 4, 2007 – The New York Times reported that the company had reached an agreement to sell all nine local television stations to the private equity firm Oak Hill Capital Partners.[11][12]

July 14, 2009 – The company announced that WQXR was to be sold to WNYC, which moved the station to 105.9 FM and began to operate the station as non-commercial on October 8, 2009. This US$45 million transaction, which involved Univision Radio’s WCAA moving to the 96.3 FM frequency from 105.9 FM, ended the Times’ 65-year-long ownership of the station.[14]

May 17, 2007 – The company announced that it had finalized the sale of its Broadcast Media Group on May 7, 2007, for “approximately $575 million.”[12] November 19, 2007 – The company staged a gala opening after relocating its headquarters from


Highly Developed

Business People


All Profit and Loss Manages with our Clints will Optional 1. a b c d e f “2010 Form 10-K, The New York Times Company”. United States Securities and Exchange Commission. 2. The New York Times (May 10, 2008). “Times Publisher and His Wife Separate”. The New York Times. Retrieved February 2, 2009. 3. “Arthur Sulzberger, Jr. Biography” 4. “Contact Us”. The New York Times Company. Retrieved August 28, 2009. 5. “Timeline”. The New York Times Company. Retrieved September 29, 2008. 6. “Business Units”. The New York Times Company. Retrieved August 29, 2008. “The New York Times Company, a leading media company with 2007 revenues of $3.2 billion, includes The New York Times, the

International Herald Tribune, The Boston Globe, 16 other daily newspapers, WQXRFM, and more than 50 Web sites, including NYTimes.com, Boston.com, and About. com. The Company’s core purpose is to enhance society by creating, collecting, and distributing high-quality news, information, and entertainment.” 7. “2005 Proxy Statement”. The New York Times Company. Retrieved August 23, 2008. 8. Kirkpatrick, David D. (January 2, 2003). “International Herald Tribune Now Run Solely by The Times”. The New York Times. Retrieved August 29, 2008. “The International Herald Tribune, descendant of an American paper first published in Paris in 1887, is appearing today for the first time under the

sole ownership and management of The New York Times Company. The takeover ends an anomalous 35-year partnership between The Times and its domestic competitor The Washington Post that produced a journalistic hybrid consisting mainly of articles and editorials from both papers compiled by editors in Paris. In October, The Times reached an agreement to buy The Post’s 50 percent stake in the venture for about $70 million -- in part, The Post said, by threatening to start a rival paper overseas.” 9. “NY Times Sells TV/Movie Database Baseline”. Deadline Hollywood Daily. October 7, 2011.


All Profit and Loss Manages with our Clints will Optional 10. “The New York Times Company Announces Plan to Sell Its Broadcast Media Group” (Press release). The New York Times Company. September 12, 2006. Retrieved July 23, 2008. 11. Story, Louise (January 4, 2007). “New York Times to Sell 9 Local TV Stations”. The New York Times. Retrieved August 23, 2008. 12. b “The New York Times Company Reports April Revenues” (Press release). The New York Times Company. May 17, 2007. Retrieved August 23, 2008. “On May 7, 2007, the Company sold the Broadcast Media Group, consisting of nine network-affiliated television stations, their related Web sites and the digital operating center, for approximately $575 million.”

13. “The New York Times Company Enters The 21st Century With A New Technologically Advanced And Environmentally Sensitive Headquarters”(Press release). The New York Times Company. November 19, 2007. Retrieved August 23, 2008. 14. Bensinger, Greg (July 14, 2009). “New York Times to Get $45 Million for Radio Station”. Bloomberg News. Retrieved July 18, 2009. 15. Staff/wire reports (December 27, 2011). “New York Times agrees to sell regional news group”. The Boston Globe. Retrieved December 30, 2011. 16. Sass, Erik (March 12, 2012). “’NYT’ Pay Wall Could Bring $100M Annually”. Media Daily News. Retrieved March 13, 2012.

17. “The New York Times Company Announces Four Winners of Its First Nonprofit Excellence Awards” (Press release). The New York Times Company. June 28, 2007. Retrieved December 10, 2008. 18. “Carnegie Corporation of New York/New York Times I Love My Librarian Award winners announced” (Press release). American Library Association. December 8, 2008. Retrieved February 3, 2009.

Small Group of Entity Limited Assurance


Since 1967, the company has been listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol NYT. Of the two categories of stock, Class A and Class B, the former is publicly traded and the latter is held privately largely (nearly 90%) by the descendants of Adolph Ochs, who purchased The New York Times newspaper in 1896. January 1, 2003 – The company completed its purchase of The Washington Post’s 50 percent interest in the International Herald Tribune (IHT) for US$65 million. The New York Times Company, which had owned 50% of the IHT, became the sole owner.


WORLD STATICS

Since 1967, the company has been listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol NYT. Of the two categories of stock, Class A and Class B, the former is publicly traded and the latter is held privately largely (nearly 90%) by the descendants of Adolph Ochs, who purchased The New York Times newspaper in 1896. January 1, 2003 – The company completed its purchase of The Washington Post’s 50 percent interest in the International Herald Tribune (IHT) for US$65 million. The New York Times Company, which had owned 50% of the IHT, became the sole owner.

78% 52% 63%

Making The Product Marketing Clients


Community

People

Women 50%

The Second Amendment of the United States

All Women Prestige Great Violation its

Men 80%

All Men Prestige Great Violation its

A people is a plurality of persons considered as a whole, as in an ethnic group or nation. Collectively, for example, Jews are known as “the Jewish people”, European Gypsies comprise the bulk of “the Romani people”, and Palestinian Arabs have started to be called “the Palestinian people” Various republics govern, or claim to govern, in the name of the people. Both the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire used the Latin term Senatus Populusque Romanus, (the Senate and People of Rome). This term was fixed to Roman legionary standards, and even after the Roman Emperors achieved a state of total personal autarchy, they continued to wield their power in the name of the Senate and People of Rome. Various republics govern, or claim to govern, in the name of the people. Both the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire used the Latin term Senatus Populusque Romanus, (the Senate and People of Rome). This term was fixed to Roman legionary standards, and even after the Roman Emperors achieved a state of total personal autarchy, they continued to wield their power in the name of the Senate and People of Rome.


“A well regulated Militia,being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.�


Company

Profits

95% 75%

2013 2012

50%

2011

85%

2010 2008 2006 2004 1992

In the United States, nonprofit organizations are formed by filing bylaws and/or articles of incorporation in the state in which they expect to operate. The act of incorporating creates a legal entity enabling the organization to be treated as a corporation by law and to enter into business dealings, form contracts, and own property as any other individual or for-profit corporation may do.

Jennyfer Jack Profit Manager

Designation as a nonprofit and an intent to make money are not related in the United States. This means nothing can be inferred by the declaration.

It is unclear whether or not this holds outside of the U.S. In the United States, such inference is the purpose of the Internal Revenue Code, Section

501(c). The extent to which an NPO can generate surplus revenues may be constrained or use of surplus revenues may be restricted.


20 % Clients 65 % Clients 75 % Clients 85 % Clients

100% of Clients

Some of the above must be, in most jurisdictions, expressed in the charter of establishment. Others may be provided by the supervising authority at each particular jurisdiction.

100%

TOTAL

While not-for-profit organizations are permitted to generate surplus revenues, they must be retained by the organization for its self-preservation, expansion, or plans.[3] NPOs have controlling members or boards. Many have paid staff including management, while others employ unpaid

volunteers and even executives who work with or without compensation (occasionally nominal). [4] Where there is a token fee, in general, it is used to meet legal requirements for establishing a contract between the executive and the organization. While not-for-profit organizations

50%

TOTAL

25%

TOTAL

are permitted to generate surplus revenues, they must be retained by the organization for its selfpreservation, expansion, or plans.[3] NPOs have controlling members or boards. Many have paid staff including management, while others employ unpaid volunteers and even executives.


25%

50%

75%

100%

While affiliations will not affect a legal status, they may be taken into consideration by legal proceedings as an indication of purpose

In many countries, nonprofits may apply for tax exempt status, so that the organization itself may be exempt from income tax and other taxes. In the United States, to be exempt from federal income taxes the organization must meet the requirements set forth by the Internal Revenue Service.

In the United States, nonprofit organizations are formed by filing bylaws and/or articles of incorporation in the state in which they expect to operate. The act of incorporating creates a legal entity enabling the organization to be treated as a corporation by law and to enter into business dealings, form contracts, and own property as any other individual or for-profit corporation may do. Nonprofits can have members but many do not. The nonprofit may also be a trust or association of members. The organization may be controlled by its members who elect the Board of Directors, Board of Governors or Board of Trustees. A nonprofit may have a delegate structure to allow for the representation of groups or corporations as members. Alternatively, it may be a non-membership organization and the board of directors may elect its own successors. The two major types of nonprofit organization are membership and board-only. A membership

organization elects the board and has regular meetings and power to amend the bylaws. A board-only organization typically has a selfselected board, and a membership whose powers are limited to those delegated to it by the board. A board-only organization’s bylaws may even state that the organization does not have any membership, although the organization’s literature may refer to its donors as “members”; examples of such organizations are Fairvote[6] [7] and the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws.[8] The Model Nonprofit Corporation Act imposes many complexities and requirements on membership decisionmaking.[citation needed] Accordingly, many organizations, such as Wikimedia,[9] have formed board-only structures. The National Association of Parliamentarians has generated concerns about the implications of this trend for the future of openness, accountability, and understanding of public concerns in nonprofit organizations


John Mathew

David Brown

General Manager

Marketing Manager

Catherin Joes

Customer Relation Manager

TIMES centered in the UK, operates in 86 countries and territories with 325.000 staff and provides services to more than 100 million customers worldwide.

TIMES centered in the UK, operates in 86 countries and territories with 325.000 staff and provides services to more than 100 million customers worldwide.

TIMES centered in the UK, operates in 86 countries and territories with 325.000 staff and provides services to more than 100 million customers worldwide.

As a customer focused, respected global financial institution, our aim is to be the “Best Place to Work” for our employees. We know that becoming the “Best Place to Bank” for our customers starts from creating the best work environment for our employees.

As a customer focused, respected global financial institution, our aim is to be the “Best Place to Work” for our employees. We know that becoming the “Best Place to Bank” for our customers starts from creating the best work environment for our employees.

As a customer focused, respected global financial institution, our aim is to be the “Best Place to Work” for our employees. We know that becoming the “Best Place to Bank” for our customers starts from creating the best work environment for our employees.

I invite all the talented and enthusiastic individuals who want to not only gain local but also international experience to join the HSBC team.

I invite all the talented and enthusiastic individuals who want to not only gain local but also international experience to join the HSBC team.

I invite all the talented and enthusiastic individuals who want to not only gain local but also international experience to join the HSBC team.

Kind Regards, John Mathew

Kind Regards, David Brown

Kind Regards, Catherin Joes


Be With You for Your Profit with High

TIME’S

TIME’S Great Avenue, 2nd Floor, Ranji Street, Meppukadu, Dhelhi 600 501 Ph : +91 0848 255265 +944 0121511 email : timesindia@gmail.com www.times.com

VipinVijay.V vipimoney@gmail.com


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