Page 1

JUNE 2012 | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


VEUX Magazine - Issue 6 - Fluidity STAFF Ada Adams Editor-In-Chief/Content Director/Public Relations ada@veuxmag.com

Vivien Hoang Editor/Advisor/Layout Design vivien@veuxmag.com

Wales Wong Editor/Literary Editor/Photographer wales@veuxmag.com

Yawen Chan Web Producer

CONTRIBUTORS: Richard Ahnert, Eleanor Leonne Bennett, Jason Bekolay, Tracy Blouin, Anouk Desloges, Ayobola Ejiwunmi, ViVien Hoang, Pete Kasprzak, Tara Krebs, Nick Lee, Kelly Liu, Ferial Rahbari, David White, Wales Wong

PUBLISHER AVW Publishing Inc. CONTACT www.veuxmag.com General Information: info@veuxmag.com Editor-In-Chief: editor@veuxmag.com Editorial Submissions: editorial@veuxmag.com Writing Submissions: write@veuxmag.com Advertising Inquiries: advertise@veuxmag.com Subscribe: subscribe@veuxmag.com FOLLOW www.facebook.com/veuxmag www.twitter.com/VeuxMag

COVER PHOTO Photography: Brendan Zhang Make-Up, Hair, & Nails: Andrea Claire Photography Assistants: Joy, Gabe Chen Model: Indiamara D (Ave Management) BACK PHOTO Photography: Alessandro Babini Make-Up & Hair: Sam Vega Model: Brianna (Streamline Model Mgmt)


IN THIS ISSUE ISSUE SIX | FLUIDITY

“Merv” Tara Krebs

FEATURES

5 Beauty: Water on Skin 10 Luxury from the Land: Goat’s Milk Soap 16 A Stroke of Creativity 44 Tohoku Charity Event - IRO Fundraiser

ARTS

12 Anouk Desloges 14 Kelly Liu 24 Ferial Rahbari 40 Tara Krebs 52 Eleanor Leonne Bennett 64 Pete Kasprzak 74 Richard Ahnert 90 David White

EDITORIAL

18 Ice Princess 30 The Fluidity of Gender 46 Dreams in Technicolour 58 Bask 68 Plastik Wrap 78 Decorated with Medals of Honour 84 Aquamarina 94 Fields and Ivy 100 The Screen Siren

IN EVERY ISSUE

4 Letter from the Editors 36 Travel: Santorini 56 Lifestyle: A Date with Toronto


Letter from the Editor As I write this, downtown Toronto, Canada is flooded from the pouring spring rains. Surely, that is one literal interpretation of “Fluidity”: water as a force of nature to be reckoned with. People are still recovering from the tragedy of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan, but they have a helping hand. Nick Lee and Wales Wong’s article on page 44 document how people are coming together for relief efforts. However, water is also a life-giving marvel and it can cleanse both our bodies (perhaps with the assistance of hand-made goat’s milk soap from Tracy Blouin’s farm - page 10) and baptise our souls. Our seemingly solid bodies are made up of water and we would perish from thirst faster than starvation. We are blessed in Canada to have an abundance of clean water in which to drink and play (Ayobola Ejiwunmi’s has suggestions on page 56 for places to go in the Toronto Canada region), and so I have to often remind myself of how lucky I am. The devastation of drought and the toll of not having clean drinking water affect the lives of millions daily. There is fluidity in who we are. Much like how water can change its form but always maintains its identity, we can all play different roles as is required in our life. I recently celebrated a milestone birthday - 30! - and spent the better part of the month reflecting on who I was. Was I the business professional, stomping around in stilettos and pencil skirts, or the tomboy in jeans and sneakers? Can I be both? There can even be fluidity in our gender (as explored by Farzam HD’s editorial on page 30). Fluidity should not be mistaken for confusion. Like the model who plays a different role on every shoot, he or she is flexible and adaptable - and ultimately, he or she is creative. What is creativity - other than the ability to break out of set and rigid molds - and the power to let those creative juices flow? VH on behalf of the Editors, with assistance from Ayobola Ejiwunmi

Dress by Jasper Garvida Shoes by Linda Francesca Ciriotto

4 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY

Photography: Alessio Migliardi Make-up & Hair: Silvia Sadecka Fashion Design: Sergei Grinko, Jasper Garvida, Manuele Scapin, Linda Francesca Ciriotto Wardrobe Styling: Manuela Mezzetti Assistant: Annika Gallo Model: Olya (Freelance Fashion)


Water on Skin FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 5


EDITORIAL

6 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 7


BEAUTY

I to the world am like a drop of water

8 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


BEAUTY

That in the ocean seeks another drop...

SCOTLAND Photography: Oliver Schneider (www.oliverschneider.co.uk) Make-Up: Louise Ballantine (www.the-eyecon.com) Assistant: Elaine Stables Model: Lauren Elizabeth Andrew

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 9


Luxury from the Land: Goat’s Milk Soap

Tracy Blouin is a former Toronto make-up artist who now owns and operates her own farm in Northern Ontario, Canada. All Text and Photography by Tracy Blouin I live on 240 forested acres on the West Arm of Lake Nipissing, Ontario, Canada where I raise chickens, rabbits, pigs, and a small herd of dairy goats. I didn’t always live here; in fact I spent many years in downtown Toronto working in the cosmetics industry. With a growing interest in self-sufficiency and a more down to earth lifestyle, I embarked on a six month organic farming internship to see if this former makeup artist had what it took to walk in a farmer’s rubber boots. After spending my days in the earth, tending to livestock, and looking down at a plate of food which was all home grown and raised, there was no way I was returning to the city. I packed up my belongings including a darling little goat I called Sara Lou, two spotted piglets, and four hens. I moved north to begin my life here on my little forest farm. I hand milk four goats which provide me with more than enough milk to meet my dairy needs. I make cheeses, yogurt, kefir and best of all, soap. I make the soap from scratch by mixing animal or vegetable fats and oils with sodium hydroxide - commonly known as lye. Although the final product doesn’t actually contain lye, it is the chemical reaction between lye and the fats and oils that creates soap. This process is called saponification and the end product is soap and glycerin.

Of all the things I do here on my farm, it is soapmaking that allows me to fully express my creative roots.

100% natural goat’s milk soap

10 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


I work with the Cold Process method which involves mixing fats and oils with a lye solution at relatively low temperatures. Naturally, oils don’t readily mix well with other liquids so a culinary stick blender saves the home soaper a lot of elbow grease and quickly forces the lye and oils to come together and undergo the saponification process. The point at which this begins to happen is called trace. The batch will look homogenous and a quick stir with a spoon will reveal a trace line.

Trace is the cue for the artist to take the stage. This is when all the scenting, colouring, and fancy ingredients are added.

Finally, the raw soap is poured into molds where it will complete the saponification process and begin to harden. After twenty four hours it’s ready to be un-molded and set aside to cure for up to six weeks. Curing makes for milder soap and excess water time to evaporate out of the bar. My soap reflects my lifestyle: one surrounded by natural beauty. The ingredients I use are natural and sourced locally when available. I find beauty in the texture of the soap, the tool marks left behind as I hand cut each bar, and my knife catching hold of a particle of oatmeal or poppy seed which drives grooves through the surface of the soft uncured soap. I leave those perfect imperfections in each bar and delight when they happen. Though I use many types of skin-loving butters and oils and each batch is formulated for a specific skin type, I always add goat’s milk. Beyond all the claims and hype over individual ingredients, goat’s milk adds a creaminess to soap which speaks for itself. It is simply luxurious. Typically, if I am formulating a facial bar, I will make a batch of soap and then hand mill it all down and melt it over a double boiler to rebatch it which gives me the opportunity to add even more goat’s milk. This milk is not subject to the lye solution and the resulting soap is worth the extra effort. It may be the closest I will come to Cleopatra’s milk bath here on my little forest farm. journeytocasimir.blogspot.ca/

100% hand made soap

Nubian goat

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 11


ART

12 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


ART

Anouk Desloges

“Labyrinth, he told me not to trust anyone who looks at you with their left eye.” Textile embroidery on plexiglass, bronze leaf, oil | 60” X 27”

ABOUT THE ARTIST: Anouk Desloges is a contemporary embroiderer and sculptor living in Quebec city. Her works present symbolic allegories and literary allusions according to preexisting concepts that she is interested in deconstructing and investigating. Her pieces are focused on her obsession regarding the theme of intimacy. www.anoukdesloges.com

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 13


14 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


ART

Kelly Liu

“Sombre�

ABOUT THE ARTIST: Kelly Liu will be graduating from high school this month.She arrived in Toronto, Canada last year from China and will be continuing her passion at an art school in London, England. She has an interest in finding new artwork which fuses different cultures together.

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 15


A Stroke of Creativity By Wales Wong

With music playing in the background and the light scent of cupcakes wafting in the air, a group of adults gather together to create some magic. This magic that I speak of is art. Often, many are intimidated by the notion of creating a piece of work that exhibits their inner feelings and thoughts. However at Paint Lounge, everyone is encouraged to just have fun and enjoy the whimsical inspirations around them while experimenting with the variety of techniques found in the art form. Samantha Chan, owner and artist, envisioned a place for people of all ages to be able to gather and express themselves through paint – she had a belief that anyone can pick up a paintbrush. Having only been open for a year and a half in Markham, Ontario, Canada, they have quickly struck up a close rapport with regulars who come in at least once a month while also welcoming newcomers every week. An idea is a result of many experiences and events. Samantha loved art from a very young age. She was born in Hong Kong and then immigrated to Toronto, Canada, at the tender age of four. She had taken art classes till the end of high school. Her academics were always a priority and with a hardworking and persistent attitude, she graduated from University of Toronto with a background in Engineering and Business. She pursued a career in engineering and then investment banking which led her

Photographs courtesy of Michelle Chiu and Wales Wong

16 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY

back to Hong Kong for three years. She always had a goal of opening a business that would be art-related. It was in Asia that the idea of building a business out of creativity was spawned.

For the past few years, art jams have been a popular outing for the young and hip crowd in Hong Kong. Having a venue where painting can be paired with a chance for friends to get together was a well-received concept due to the lack of space at home since many lived in cramped apartments in the city. What Samantha decided to do was make it more sociable and offer other features such as a cafĂŠ with food and specialty drinks in Toronto. Clients come in and select a canvas from a range of sizes. They can spend the whole afternoon there. Usually, it takes most people about four hours to complete a painting. However, as we all know, perfection cannot be rushed. If you need more time, you can come in on another day and at a small additional cost, have another afternoon of finishing off the final touches to your canvas. There are materials galore from a large selection of acrylic paints to different brush sizes. The lovely people of Paint Lounge are always on hand to assist and give you different ideas on making each piece truly unique. During one of my visits, my friend even turned her painting into a clock. Also, with the incorporation of mix media, the possibilities of creating a piece to truly represent who you are,


are endless. The social aspect quickly evolved into workshops such as “Abstract Floral Art” and “Cherry Blossoms”, which are usually taught by local guest artists. Another successful event where I truly understood how different mediums of art can influence each other to inspire creativity is their monthly Espressions event. Live music plays while people of different artistic backgrounds wax poetic on what art means to them while painting their pieces. For Samantha, the most memorable moments from her time with this business are the events. “Every time I do a new event and it works out really well, even after an hour after the event ended, people would email me saying, ‘That was amazing! Thanks for this event!’” Recently, Samantha organized I Heart Art, a singles mixer which takes a spin on speed-dating. Easels with predrawn artwork, are given to each female. The males then rotate and take turns to help out each female with their painting. This was a success and some of these ideas such as Espressions and I Heart Art are the result of customers’ suggestions. It’s also the same clients who have helped Samantha spread the word on the concept of art socializing. With so much support from her family, friends, and customers, she has learned that it’s a matter of trial and error when owning a business.

She expressed her confidence in the concept from the knowledge that “Toronto is an art-loving community.” One key supporter has been John Ryerson, the Art Director of Markham. She contacted the Markham Arts Council and Ryerson came to their grand opening. He wanted to do a Christmas event at Markville Mall which was, again, supported by those in the council. As a result, Paint Lounge was able to make their presence known amongst the community very early on. The success of this business extends beyond Torontonians who are looking for a new activity to try out. Corporations have also come to Paint Lounge to create team building exercises. The heads of every department for the Town of Markham mingled and painted a painting together in an environment that fostered creativity - a change from the everyday routine of working in an office with minimal chances to socialize. Samantha sees the positive effect it has on businesses that come to them for a corporate event. “In the future, when they come together, they know each other and understand each other more.” So what are the future plans for Samantha Chan? Opening a second location in the heart of Downtown Toronto is at the top of her list. Judging by the recommendations and reviews about Paint Lounge in the past year, more of us in the city will get a chance to enjoy the endless possibilities that brushes and acrylics can create on canvas. www.paintlounge.ca

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 17


ICE PRINCESS 18 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


ART

UNITED STATES Photography: Alessandro Babini (www.sabastudio.com) Make-Up & Hair: Sam Vega Model: Brianna (Streamline Model Mgmt)

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 19


20 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


This Page and Facing Page: White Lace Shirt by Sheila Frank

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 21


EDITORIAL

White Lace Shirt by Sheila Frank

22 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


EDITORIAL

Jewelry available exclusively from Landau Jewelry

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 23


“Birch #1” | Mixed media on wood panel , 2010 | 36” x 48” 24 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


ART

Ferial Rahbari

“Birch #2” | Mixed media on wood panel , 2010 | 36” x 48” ABOUT THE ARTIST: Ferial Rahbari is a designer and an artist. Influenced by contemporary artists and her interest in the emotional range and form of the human body, this drives her to continuously evolve her craft in pursuit of capturing the essence of human expression. www.wix.com/ferialrahbari/gallery

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 25


“Birch #3” | Mixed media on wood panel , 2011 | 36” x 12”

26 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 27


“Birch #4” | Mixed media on wood panel , 2011 | 36” x 12”

28 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 29


Jacket by Burberry Prorsum Shirt by Hugo Boss Pants by Flippa K Fedora by Embassy Hats Pocket Square by Thomas Sabo

30 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


EDITORIAL

The Fluidity Of Gender

Jacket by Sand Shirt by Jones New York Pants by Flippa K Bowtie by Etro FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 31


EDITORIAL

Sweater by Elizabeth and James Shirt by Jones New York Pants by Calvin Klein Ascot by Hilmond

32 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


Jacket and Tie by Hugo Boss Vest by Armani Collezioni Shirt by Ermenegildo Zegna Pants by Flippa K Pocket Square by Banana Republic Pocket Watch by Thomas Sabo

EDITORIAL

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 33


EDITORIAL

Jacket by Banana Republic Shirt by Hugo Boss Pants by Flippa K Tie by Gucci Pocket Square by Hilmond Fedora by Paul Smith

34 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


EDITORIAL

CANADA Photography: Farzam HD (www.farzamhd.com) Make-Up & Hair: Erin Heather (Yaby Cosmetics) Wardrobe Styling: Hilmond Hui Model: Olivia Dawn (Elite Toronto)

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 35


TRAVEL

Santorini:

A Gem in th e Aegean Text by Vi Vien Hoang Photography by Jason Bekolay & Vi Vien Hoang

Catholic Cathedral in Fira, Santorini

There is a series of tiny islands in the southern Aegean Sea which has captured the hearts and imaginations of tourists for decades, while also fueling the historians and archaeologists in their quests to find Atlantis. The Greek archipelago of Santorini (officially known as Thira) comprises of the eastern curved island of Santorini/Thira, the smaller island of Thirasia in the west, the private island of Aspronisi, and the central volcanic islands of Nea Kameni and Palea Kameni - all fragments of a larger island destroyed after a massive volcanic explosion in 1500 or 1600 BCE, leaving behind the caldera. Santorini is one of the more popular tourist destinations in Greece, and the sleepy population of 12,000 surges with nearly half a million visitors every tourist season. We join the flock as we fly from Athens to Thira on Aegean Airlines, which is a pleasant short flight. It’s late when we arrive, and after a harrowing, white-knuckled cab ride - we arrive at our little family-run hotel. The white-walled Melina Hotel is located outside of the touristy neighbourhoods of Fira - so it is quiet and inexpensive without sacrificing too much convenience. A few tour buses have stops around the block from the hotel, and from our balcony, we can still wake up to a view of the sea. It is a basic, clean hotel, with simple amenities including a pool and free breakfasts, and hosts who help us with our plans. The location of the hotel also gives us the opportunity (and the excuse)

36 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY

to wander some of the local streets and is a 10 minute walk to the tourist districts. The towns and villages in Santorini are located either at the top of the sheer cliffs, or at the bottom. Winding roads - formerly for donkeys and carts - still serve as the main roads for the massive tour buses, transport trucks and other vehicles that must navigate down to the docks and up again. With tourism being the largest economic contributor to the islands, it’s no wonder that our tour guides are prompt, professional, and efficient. We are led onto the appropriate tour boats and begin our journey into the Aegean seas. Our first stop is Nea Kameni. The ground here is harsh and barren, a reminder of the island’s lava and ash origins. The volcano itself is still active, with vents scattered throughout the island, spewing out sulphur. The last eruption was in 1950. Nea Kameni also reminds us that Santorini is a desert with little rainfall and no rivers. The sun beats down on us mercilessly as we make the slow and meandering climb up the volcanic crater. Sunscreen, hats, and water aren’t luxuries - they are a necessity. The view from the top is worth the trek - and it impresses upon you the land mass that was lost after the eruption. Maybe this is the location of the mythical Atlantis after all! The island had a thriving Bronze age civilization by 3000 BCE and Plato may have drawn his inspiration from a real-life sunken island!


Port at Oia

Nea Kameni

Fira, Santorini

The next stop on our tour is the hot springs at Palea Kameni. Our boat stops about 100 m from shore and the captain points to an area where the waters go from turquoise green to rusty brown. That is the location of the hot springs, and he warns us that we’ll probably return with stained bathing suits and skin. I’ve never let a little discolouration ruin my adventure so I jump from the deck of the ship into the sea and begin my swim to the springs. The water slowly warms to a lovely 35 degrees Celsius, but we only stay at the springs for about 45 minutes before it’s time to move to our next destination. Therasia or Thirasia is where we stop for a late lunch. The small island is home to fewer than 200 people, and compared to Santorini, is relatively untouched by tourism. Next to the port are several open air restaurants, on piers, all overlooking the water. The pace is leisurely and the food is authentic Greek: freshly caught from the sea as well as homegrown and homemade. I doubt I will ever have a lobster souvlaki as succulent and delicious as on Thirasia. The few tourist shops sell us kitschy magnets and we walk along the shore. To call it a beach might be a stretch for those accustomed to seeing sugar-fine white sand: it’s all pebbles and rocks. Donkeys graze amicably along the cliffs; they are surprisingly surefooted though nowhere near as agile as the wild goats that can be seen bounding along the rockface of the various islands. Our ship then takes us to the town of Oia, located on the northwestern part of Santorini, for dinner. Many of the restaurants sell whatever is caught that day and it is sold by either the whole fish or the pound. The eateries are crowded next to each other along the docks and waterfront, with tables placed precariously next to the edge of the boardwalk and open water (no railings!). FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 37


View from the Sunset Fish Tavern, Oia, Santorini

We stop in at the Sunset Fish Tavern and I have a swordfish steak. It is grilled to perfection, and the fresh lemon and herbs give it a fresh, light flavour. The white wine that accompanies dinner is among the best I have ever tasted. The people of Santorini have been making wines since they mastered agriculture on the island, but many of their lovely vintages have been kept and sold for local consumption and North American distribution is practically nil. To guarantee that we have our fill, we polish off a bottle, then move onto their house reds. It would be easy to linger here all night but something very special to Oia beckons us. The sunset. Every tour guide and brochure about Santorini will rave about the sunset views from Oia. Unlike the wines, this is not a secret waiting for an enterprising tourist to discover. As the sun dips towards the horizons, the streets slowly fill with people all seeking the perfect vantage point. We climb the hundreds of stairs to get to the top of the cliffs and jockey for room on a ledge. The sky turns every shade of soft pastels as the golden orb sinks towards the waters, the last light reflecting off the famous white walls and blue domed buildings of Santorini . There is a hush among the observers - save for the frantic clicking of cameras - and then the sun tucks itself away for the night. Fira is the capital of Santorini. It’s easy to get lost as you wander the narrow, cobblestone streets - most of 38 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY

the buildings are painted the Cycladic white. Still - no matter where you go, there is shopping and food to be found. Like all tourist destinations, you can find stores to sell you T-shirts, bags and trinkets. But I’m looking for a different souvenir of my Santorini adventure: a donkey ride! To get from the port to the top of the cliffs where many villages are located, donkeys were used by locals before the invention of the car; in some areas, these beasts of burden are still very much a mainstay in the economy. For tourists, the benefits of riding the donkeys (a one way trip costs about 5 euros) is twofold: firstly, the donkeys can get you to the top of the cliffs in about 10 minutes whereas on our measly two feet, it would take the better part of 30 minutes of huffing and puffing up hill in the scorching Mediterranea sun. Secondly, it would save your shoes from shuffling through generations of donkey droppings! Luckily in Fira, for those who are not so keen on a journey with some floppy-eared friends, there are cable cars to take tourists and their luggage up from the harbour for about 4 euros per person. Santorini is a gem in the Aegean sea, a little pocket where a tourist can experience the trademark Greek hospitality, culture, and beauty. My biggest regret is not having more time to explore, eat, and relax in the beautiful atmosphere - but this just means I’ll have to return one day, doesn’t it?


Sunset View from Oia, Santorini

Donkeys at FIra, Santorini

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 39


Tara

Krebs

“The Hitchhiker” ABOUT THE ARTIST: Tara Krebs is a Toronto-based artist. She earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Ontario College of Art and Design. She is primarily inspired by her love of animals and the natural world. www.tarakrebs.com

40 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


“Here Fishy Fishy Fishy”

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 41


“Even the Crickets Grew Silent” 42 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 43


Tohoku Charity Event – IRO Fundraiser By Nick Lee & Wales Wong When we first arrived at The Great Hall in Toronto, Canada, on a mild evening in March, there was a buzz in the air. Women in kimonos were shuffling across the stage. There were high-pitched squeals and low-bass rumblings emanating from the speakers while the host did a last minute microphone check as artists and jewelry designers finished setting up their booths for the pieces that they would sell to raise funds for Japan Aid. “Iro translates into colour in Japanese and it’s meant to convey a positive feeling with high energy, passion, positivity and hope,” explained Shuntaro Kurakake, Director of Japan Aid. A very fitting title for an evening of live performances that got the crowd cheering for more and waving their hands to the melodies from acts such as After Hours, J. Quarm, O-Mocha, HANA, and DJs ELETO and Arnab. We could feel the music reverberating off of The Great Hall’s walls. Japan Aid, a non-profit organization, was created back in November 2011 as a way to help and assist the many citizens of Japan affected by the northeastern earthquake and tsunami. On the afternoon of March 11, 2011, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake shook the Tohoku region. In effect, a tsunami followed. A few buildings managed to withstand the powerful quake only to be destroyed by the water and powerful waves of the tsunami. By the next day, the Japanese National Police Agency confirmed that there were about 15,000 deaths while around 3,000 people were still missing. Jun Honda, the presenter for IRO, can attest to the reality of what had happened in that area. He had come to Toronto to learn English. Then, tragically, on March 11, 2011, his family home’s roof collapsed and the entire town of Tohoku was submerged in water. Luckily his family was safe and sound after the earthquake. Hearing people’s personal stories of how the natural disaster has affected them was another reason why the event was needed and to foster a continued awareness of those stricken by the unfortunate events.

Shuntaro Kurakake

Kurakake reminded us, “It’s been over one year, but the effects are still there.” Living in Toronto and being half-way around the world, made those in the Japanese community feel helpless while their family and friends struggled to get their lives back together. So when the idea came to organizing a fundraiser, he knew that it would be about the community coming together and contributing their efforts in Canada to making a difference for those in Tohoku. What started as a grassroots effort by a few compassionate Japanese newcomers to Canada, quickly blossomed into a group of 65 dedicated volunteers whose hope and goal is for the reconstruction of Tohoku, Japan. Kurakake originally came from Tokyo to Toronto because of its ethnic diversity and its acceptance of multiculturalism. Support for the IRO event came quickly and freely. Thus, in a few short months the fundraiser event quickly became a sold-out full-capacity event with over 600 people showing support for this important cause for humanity. They were definitely not short on help. There was a fashion show with six designers, a silent auction, live music followed by a DJ and an after-party.

Masayo Taniguchi

Jun Honda

44 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


The addition of a fashion show emphasized the cultural influence of Japan in Toronto. Masayo Taniguchi, the fashion show organizer, was overjoyed to see the wide range of styles that walked along the runway. “The designers are free to present however they want. The design principles include Proportion, Balance, Harmony, and with the theme of iro, it speaks to the creative and vibrant feeling on the runway.” The following labels made an appearance that night: Creep by Hiroshi Awai, UPPER UPPER by MUNEY/UG, atelier Susumu by Kazuya Sase, ANCY by Shihoko Anzai, YUJI OKADA by Yuki Okada, and Makato Unagami meets adidas by Makato Unagami. The styles ranged from minimalist cuttings to the juxtaposition of bright colors and vintage prints. Each designer had a unique vision to unveil to the audience as each model showcased their work. Kurakake’s current plans are to return to Japan in the Fall of 2012, but he’s not worried about the future of Japan Aid. Another member of the association will be chosen as the leader. The funds raised from the evening have already been sent to Habitat for Humanity Japan for the Tohoku reconstruction. While his time with the organization has been short, he is leaving behind a strong and determined group of people who will continue what he started. www.japanaidtoronto.com

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 45


DREAMS IN

TECHNICOLOUR 46 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 47


EDITORIAL

48 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 49


50 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


EDITORIAL

ITALY Photography: Antonio Guzzardo Make-Up & Hair: Valentina Pintus Fashion Design & Wardrobe Styling: Okiana Mikeli Jewelry: Anja Oro Artwork: Marco De Matteo Assistant: Giovanni Merone Model: Ambra Giombini

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 51


Eleanor Leonne Bennett

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER: Eleanor Leonne Bennett is an award-winning teenage photographer from the United Kingdom. eleanorleonnebennett.zenfolio.com

52 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


“Starfish” FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 53


PHOTOGRAPHY

“Battling Winds”

54 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


PHOTOGRAPHY

“Happy in March”

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 55


LIFESTYLE

A Date with Toronto – Water By Ayobola Ejiwunmi

Photography by Wales Wong

It was Samuel Taylor Coleridge who wrote in his long poem, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” the following lines:

“Water, water, every where, Nor any drop to drink...” Those famous words mean that even though you have tons of water everywhere, it doesn’t mean you can always drink it. It’s like a rich man having abundance all around him, but not being able to use it. All the wealth in the world does not necessarily guarantee contentment. It also relates the modern human predicament of having heaps of people out there - but no one to be with. However, modern society is more open. There are greater opportunities for human interaction. Still, many are left in a lonely existence. Even though one is surrounded by numerous, likeable potential partners, too many people still have no one to go out on a date with. Why so? In general, water is associated with pleasure and Toronto is blessed with it. All around us is easy access to water. It’s so omnipresent that most of the citizens of Toronto take it for granted. I’ll let you in to a few of the many water-related pleasures within reach for you and your date. The experience of romance by the water – be that by a pond, on a riverbank, on a lake shore or by the ocean can be stimulating to the soul. Many Toronto couples now get married in the distant temples that are Caribbean or Pacific beaches. Who can argue with the logic of a nuptial ceremony among just a handful of really close friends and family at one’s favourite Jamaican resort with flip-flops on and sand between one’s toes?

And hey, the sunshine is guaranteed to boot! Vacationing on cruise ships has become another pleasurable trend on the uptake. While you relax and await landfall, you drift in this expanse of water, all your needs for sustenance taken care of by someone else.

56 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


LIFESTYLE

For those who want to enjoy their waters locally, here are a few delights to share in our own Toronto environs and backyards. Looking down on the great expanse of Lake Ontario from the top of the Bluffs can be exquisite. I once took a friend visiting from abroad out there to the sculpture garden in Guildwood Park.

“It’s like an ocean!” they wowed. Another suitable vantage point for enjoying the lake view is on the south side of the R.C. Harris Water Filtration Plant. On any sunny weekday, take a blanket, rustle up some sandwiches and make a picnic of it by just hanging out on the grassy slopes. Much romance can be found by being in each other’s arms while enjoying the up-draft from the lake and the eternity of water. You would be lost in time, without regrets. Similarly the Humber Bay Park is a scenic collection of peninsulas that jut into the lake. The location is accessible by car, but ideal for biking, dog walking, picnicking and even skating together. It’s a wonderful spot, whether it is summer or winter. In various seasons the trails along the Don River offer interesting, contemplative tracks for a lovers’ walk, as one follows the sluggish meanderings of an old river trying to recover from its polluted history. Around the 5 kilometre mark on the way up from the Lakeshore Road, one can exit before Pottery Road to make a detour to the Evergreen Brickworks site for some healthy and wholesome refreshments at Cafe Belong. Mid-town offers a leisurely spot in the Etienne Brule Park located in the Old Mill neighbourhood, where the shallow waters of the Humber River gurgle under an old-worldly stone bridge. Watch anglers wade in mid-stream cast their hopeful lines. When tired of that, a few steps over is the Old Mill Inn & Spa which has been rated one of Toronto’s top 5 hotels/inns. Drop in for a nice martini, afternoon tea or stay late for some fine dining and the best visiting jazz shows. Also mid-town is High Park. During the spring, this is one of Toronto’s hidden secret date locations. Make it a mid-week, mid-day date, usually during the first few weeks of April. On a weekend, it simply is a zoo. Looking up from the east bank of the Grenadier Pond, watch the iridescent feathered mother duck leading her ducklings to a safe shelter in the rushes. All around the wind is scattering white and pale pink cherry blossom petals like confetti at a wedding; competing with the mauve richness of an expansive magnolia tree and the brilliant canary yellows of a few forsythia bushes. Lay yourselves on the meadow and watch the cherry blossom trees swaying against the background of the lake in the distance.

Try telling me that isn’t heaven. Out west, take a leisurely walk together along the Port Credit Breakwater Park trail, where the Credit River estuary opens into the lake. Adding to the fun in the late summer is watching the myriad boats of all sizes and shapes heading in and out during the tagged salmon hunt competition. Further up north off of Hwy 10, you and your sweetheart can spend a spiritual weekend on an off-road trek up into the Forks of the River Credit in Caledon. As people rediscover the joys of parks and waterways in Toronto, let us hope that this is part of a greater reconnection to nature in our concrete urban setting. Canadians are the world’s second biggest consumers of water, in per capita terms.

The question is, are we finding any pleasure in this?

Here’s to enjoining for the respectful use of our water resources. And while we are at it, never to forget that water is and should always be a universal civil right. Water is crucial to our existence; a glorious day spent passively by the waters will surely do any relationship a wonderful service and remind us of our interconnectivity.

Bola is a world citizen whose world view has been stamped by the fact that he was born in Africa, was educated in Europe, has lived and worked in many countries on different continents and immigrated to Canada some 33 years ago. He’s now retired, but has a keen interest in giving back to society. Writing and books in general have always been an area of consummate passion. Compassion, an eye for the not-so-overtly observed and adventure in general on the road less travelled could be considered his strong points.

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 57


Bask

UNITED STATES Photography: T LaNiece (tlaniece.com) Make-Up: Marion Vijar Wardrobe Styling: T LaNiece Model: Marion Vijar

58 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


Net Dress by Maria Lepe 2 Piece Gold Shimmer Swimsuit by Victoria’s Secret

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 59


EDITORIAL

Gold Jacket by Eva Danielle 2 Piece Gold Shimmer Swimsuit by Victoria’s Secret

60 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


Pink Teardrop Dress by Eva Danielle

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 61


62 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


Gold Jacket by Eva Danielle 2 Piece Gold Shimmer Swimsuit by Victoria’s Secret

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 63


PHOTOGRAPHY

Pete Kasprzak

“Blackout - Sunlinda”

64 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


PHOTOGRAPHY

“Blackout - Vegas” ABOUT THE ARTIST: Inspired by the fast life of the city, Pete Kasprzak is known for the innovative techniques he uses to create his art. Born and raised in Toronto, Canada, Pete developed a passion for the city’s nightlife and urban scenery, which fused with his innate creativity to generate some of the city’s most striking and uniquely modern artwork. His art is currently on display at the Art Gallery in Hamilton, Canada, and two pieces were recently selected for inclusion in the Norman Felix Gallery in Toronto. Pete recently visited the beautiful state of California, where he found inspiration for his newest Blackout series, which are photographs in Glossy Black on Matte Black finish. His “Blackout - Vegas” piece won the People’s Choice for the Energy Competition at the Artist Project Toronto 2012. www.seewhatinspires.me

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 65


“Blackout - Sassy”

66 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 67


PLASTIK WRAP

UNITED STATES Photography: David Nguyen (DavidNStudio.com) Make-Up: Cathy Koo Fashion Design: Adriana Fulop (www.plastikwrap.com) Styling: Julia Perry Producer: Chanel Ryan Model: Chanel Ryan (www.chanelryan.com)

68 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


D3L3T3 Dress by Plastik Wrap FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 69


D3L3T3 Dress by Plastik Wrap

70 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


D3L3T3 Dress by Plastik Wrap FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 71


S.O.S Skirt by Plastik Wrap Transform Top by Plastik Wrap

72 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


EDITORIAL

Electronica Jacket by Plastik Wrap Oxide Pants by Plastik Wrap

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 73


Richard Ahnert

“The Hangover”

74 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


ART

“The Drop-Off”

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 75


ART

“Rendezvous”

76 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


ART

“Nate’s Last Stand” ABOUT THE ARTIST: Richard is an emerging Canadian artist and describes his work as ‘anthropomorphic musings in oil’. Only a couple of years on the art scene, Richard has exhibited in Toronto and New York while earning awards and a dedicated following. Maintaining a belief that there is always room for humor in art, he continues to reinvent and refine his work with each exhibit. You can learn more about Richard and see his work at www.mycanvas.ca

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 77


DECORATED WITH

MEDALS

OF

HONOUR 78 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 79


EDITORIAL

80 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 81


EDITORIAL

All Dresses Provided By Sitenne Vintage Shop - Rome

82 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


EDITORIAL

ITALY Photography: Margherita Angeli Make-Up & Hair: Margherita Iaconeta Wardrobe Styling: Margherita Iaconeta Assistant: Marco Parisi Digital Artwork: Tiziana Di Dino Model: Noemi Ercolani (Zoe Models)

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 83


Aquamarina ITALY Photography: Alessio Migliardi (www.alessiomigliardi.com) Make-up & Hair: Silvia Sadecka (www.silviasadecka.com) Fashion Design: Sergei Grinko, Jasper Garvida, Manuele Scapin, Linda Francesca Ciriotto Wardrobe Styling: Manuela Mezzetti (www.manuelamezzetti.com) Assistant: Annika Gallo (www.freelancefashion.com) Model: Olya (Freelance Fashion)

Necklace by Sergei Grinko 84 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 85


Dress by Jasper Garvida

86 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


Dress by Jasper Garvida FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 87


Dress by Manuele Scapin Shoes by Linda Francesca Ciriotto 88 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


EDITORIAL

Dress by Manuele Scapin Shoes by Linda Francesca Ciriotto


“Feel the City” | 28.5cm x 38.5cm 90 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


DAVID WHITE

“The Flag” | 28.5cm x 38.5cm

ABOUT THE ARTIST: 6 years of studying aspects of printmaking, graphics and fine art helped develop David’s style and techniques as well as his creative thought process. Several more years working within the world of media have had a strong impact on David’s work. The artwork itself is a true representation of today’s ever changing chaotic culture, with hidden meanings overlapped with humour and iconic imagery. www.endlesstheartist.com

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 91


92 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 93


Knit Jacket by Vintage Versace Contrast Piping 60’s Tunic by Tenspeed and Brownshoes Printed Scarf by Hello Friend Boutique Floral Boxing Short by Hello Friend Boutique Platform Cork Heels by Wittner

AUSTRALIA Photography: Bekha & Jess Lafrankie (Ivy Nine Designs - www.ivynine.com.au) Make-Up: Amelia Jane Hair: Amelia Espley Fashion Styling: Savannah Young Styling Assistant: Sam Van Grinsven Model: Madeleine Russell (Vivien’s Model Management)

Fields and Ivy 94 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


‘Colorado’ Cougar Print Tee by Tenspeed and Brownshoes High Waisted Trousers by Chicabooti Beige Lace-Up Shoes by Tony Bianco Printed Scarf: Stylist’s Own Orange Ankle Socks: Stylist’s Own

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 95


EDITORIAL Printed Sweater by Target The Clash-Long Sleeve Smock Dress by Cubic Collective Platform Creepers by Wittner White Socks: Stylist’s Own

96 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


EDITORIAL

Floral Kimono by Hello Friend Boutique Afterlife Necklace by Hello Friend Boutique Stained Heart/Thin Strap Dress by Cubic Collective Platform Cork Heels by Wittner

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 97


Carla Zampatti Jacket by Hello Friend Boutique Hitch Ring Neck Piece by Bond Hardware

98 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


Brown Leather Coat by Country Road Paisley Print Shirt Dress by Hello Friend Boutique Printed Scarf by Hello Friend Boutique ‘Lana’ Platform Boot-Olive Canvas by Jeffrey Campbell Vintage Fur Hat: Stylist’s own

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 99


The Screen Siren Make Up For Ever Aquacolour in Turquoise Yaby Cosmetics in Tropical Ocean MINXLusion Gradient Seam 100 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 101


Benefit Creaseless Cream Shadow in RSVP Kryolan Supracolor #288 Yaby Cosmetics Pearl Paint Eyeshadow in Kamkuat, Persimmon, and Gold Bar

102 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


Shu Uemura Cream Shadow in Red Yaby Cosmetics in Coppy Ruby

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 103


L’Oreal Paris Color Infallible in Flashback Silver MAC Cosmetics Eyeshadow in Shroom MINXLusion Gradient Seam

104 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY


EDITORIAL

SINGAPORE Photography: Brendan Zhang Make-Up, Hair, & Nails: Andrea Claire Photography Assistants: Joy, Gabe Chen Model: Indiamara D (Ave Management)

On All Images Skin FACEatelier #3 MAC Cosmetics Mineralize SkinFinish Soft and Gentle Glycerin Mascara L’Oreal Paris Voluminous in Black

On Cover Kryolan Supracolor #GR. 42 Yaby Cosmetics Pearl Paint Eyeshadow in Emerald Dragon MINXLusion Gradient Seam

FLUIDITY |ISSUE 6 | VEUX | 105


www.veuxmag.com AVW Publishing Inc.

ISSUE SIX | FLUIDITY  

Issue 6 explores the theme of fluidity - water, identity, life, and disaster - through arts, fashion, and writing. Check out www.veuxmag.co...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you